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Sample records for forebrain unexpected abundance

  1. Unexpected increases in rotifer resting egg abundances during the period of contamination of Lake Orta

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    Roberta Piscia

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite their ecological importance and rapid response to environmental changes, rotifers are rarely included in palaeolimnological studies. Here, we describe changes in abundance (ABD and morphotype (MTs diversity of rotifer resting eggs in the sediments of deep subalpine Lake Orta, Italy, covering a period prior to (pre- 1926, during long-term ammonia and metal pollution from a rayon factory, and subsequent recovery of water quality. Following the pollution and bacterial oxidation of the ammonia, Lake Orta became the largest and deepest acid lake in Europe. Recovery of water quality followed both a ban on the discharge of industrial wastes, and a liming intervention in 1989 and 1990. We sectioned a sediment core collected from the deepest part of the lake (ORTA 07/2A to provide a high  time resolution, given the ca. 3-4 y cm-1 of sediment accumulation. Rotifer resting egg (RRE abundance and morphotypes were examined from the sediments and compared to limnological variables indicating the pollution. Rotifer resting egg abundance significantly increased with lake contamination (r=0.609 and -0.624 for copper and pH, respectively; P<0.001; n=27. A lake-water copper concentration threshold of ca. 40 µg L-1discriminated among pre-, during-, and post- pollution compositions of the rotifer morphotype assemblages. Diversity and morphotype richness increased during the recovery from copper pollution and with complete restoration from acidity, while abundance increased during pollution. The persistence of presumably viable Brachionus resting eggs and of hatched egg cases during the heavy pollution phase suggests that, unlike most other organisms, which were extirpated by the pollution of the lake, rotifers survived producing resting eggs, which secured future generations.

  2. Unexpected nondenitrifier nitrous oxide reductase gene diversity and abundance in soils.

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    Sanford, Robert A; Wagner, Darlene D; Wu, Qingzhong; Chee-Sanford, Joanne C; Thomas, Sara H; Cruz-García, Claribel; Rodríguez, Gina; Massol-Deyá, Arturo; Krishnani, Kishore K; Ritalahti, Kirsti M; Nissen, Silke; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T; Löffler, Frank E

    2012-11-27

    Agricultural and industrial practices more than doubled the intrinsic rate of terrestrial N fixation over the past century with drastic consequences, including increased atmospheric nitrous oxide (N(2)O) concentrations. N(2)O is a potent greenhouse gas and contributor to ozone layer destruction, and its release from fixed N is almost entirely controlled by microbial activities. Mitigation of N(2)O emissions to the atmosphere has been attributed exclusively to denitrifiers possessing NosZ, the enzyme system catalyzing N(2)O to N(2) reduction. We demonstrate that diverse microbial taxa possess divergent nos clusters with genes that are related yet evolutionarily distinct from the typical nos genes of denitirifers. nos clusters with atypical nosZ occur in Bacteria and Archaea that denitrify (44% of genomes), do not possess other denitrification genes (56%), or perform dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA; (31%). Experiments with the DNRA soil bacterium Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans demonstrated that the atypical NosZ is an effective N(2)O reductase, and PCR-based surveys suggested that atypical nosZ are abundant in terrestrial environments. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that atypical nos clusters possess distinctive regulatory and functional components (e.g., Sec vs. Tat secretion pathway in typical nos), and that previous nosZ-targeted PCR primers do not capture the atypical nosZ diversity. Collectively, our results suggest that nondenitrifying populations with a broad range of metabolisms and habitats are potentially significant contributors to N(2)O consumption. Apparently, a large, previously unrecognized group of environmental nosZ has not been accounted for, and characterizing their contributions to N(2)O consumption will advance understanding of the ecological controls on N(2)O emissions and lead to refined greenhouse gas flux models.

  3. Dryland biological soil crust cyanobacteria show unexpected decreases in abundance under long-term elevated CO2

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    Steven, Blaire; Gallegos-Graves, La Verne; Yeager, Chris M.; Belnap, Jayne; Evans, R. David; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2012-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (biocrusts) cover soil surfaces in many drylands globally. The impacts of 10 years of elevated atmospheric CO2 on the cyanobacteria in biocrusts of an arid shrubland were examined at a large manipulated experiment in Nevada, USA. Cyanobacteria-specific quantitative PCR surveys of cyanobacteria small-subunit (SSU) rRNA genes suggested a reduction in biocrust cyanobacterial biomass in the elevated CO2 treatment relative to the ambient controls. Additionally, SSU rRNA gene libraries and shotgun metagenomes showed reduced representation of cyanobacteria in the total microbial community. Taxonomic composition of the cyanobacteria was similar under ambient and elevated CO2 conditions, indicating the decline was manifest across multiple cyanobacterial lineages. Recruitment of cyanobacteria sequences from replicate shotgun metagenomes to cyanobacterial genomes representing major biocrust orders also suggested decreased abundance of cyanobacteria sequences across the majority of genomes tested. Functional assignment of cyanobacteria-related shotgun metagenome sequences indicated that four subsystem categories, three related to oxidative stress, were differentially abundant in relation to the elevated CO2 treatment. Taken together, these results suggest that elevated CO2 affected a generalized decrease in cyanobacteria in the biocrusts and may have favoured cyanobacteria with altered gene inventories for coping with oxidative stress.

  4. Unexpected abundance and long-term relative stability of the brown alga Cystoseira amentacea, hitherto regarded as a threatened species, in the north-western Mediterranean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibaut, Thierry; Blanfuné, Aurélie; Markovic, Laurent; Verlaque, Marc; Boudouresque, Charles F; Perret-Boudouresque, Michèle; Maćic, Vesna; Bottin, Lorraine

    2014-12-15

    Cystoseira amentacea is a Mediterranean endemic alga thriving on very shallow rocky substrates. It has been considered as a threatened species, having experienced a steady decline and is therefore protected by international conventions. The historical distribution of the species has been assessed along the French Mediterranean coast, on the basis of 467 articles and herbarium vouchers. We have produced an accurate map of its current distribution and abundance along 1832 km of coastline, through in situ surveys. C. amentacea was observed along 1125 km of shoreline, including 33% of almost continuous or continuous belt. In most of its range, there is no evidence of loss, except in 4 areas of Provence, French Riviera and Corsica. A significant relation was found between the absence or low abundance of C. amentacea and the vicinity of ports and large sewage outfalls. The status of conservation of the species should therefore be reassessed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Population Genomic Analysis of 1,777 Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates, Houston, Texas: Unexpected Abundance of Clonal Group 307.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, S Wesley; Olsen, Randall J; Eagar, Todd N; Beres, Stephen B; Zhao, Picheng; Davis, James J; Brettin, Thomas; Xia, Fangfang; Musser, James M

    2017-05-16

    treat because many strains are resistant to multiple antibiotics. Clonal group 258 (CG258) organisms have caused outbreaks in health care settings worldwide. Using a comprehensive population-based sample of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing K. pneumoniae strains, we show that a relatively uncommon clonal type, CG307, caused the plurality of ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae infections in our patients. We discovered that CG307 strains have been abundant in Houston for many years. As assessed by experimental mouse infection, CG307 strains were as virulent as pandemic CG258 strains. Our results may portend the emergence of an especially successful clonal group of antibiotic-resistant K. pneumoniae . Copyright © 2017 Long et al.

  6. Sensitivity of depression-like behavior to glucocorticoids and antidepressants is independent of forebrain glucocorticoid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Melanie Y; Hussain, Rifat J; Zampi, Michael E; Sheeran, Katherine; Solomon, Matia B; Herman, James P; Khan, Anum; Jacobson, Lauren

    2013-08-07

    The location of glucocorticoid receptors (GR) implicated in depression symptoms and antidepressant action remains unclear. Forebrain glucocorticoid receptor deletion on a C57B/6×129×CBA background (FBGRKO-T50) reportedly produces increased depression-like behavior and elevated glucocorticoids. We further hypothesized that forebrain GR deletion would reduce behavioral sensitivity to glucocorticoids and to antidepressants. We have tested this hypothesis in mice with calcium calmodulin kinase IIα-Cre-mediated forebrain GR deletion derived from a new founder on a pure C57BL/6 background (FBGRKO-T29-1). We measured immobility in forced swim or tail suspension tests after manipulating glucocorticoids or after dose response experiments with tricyclic or monoamine oxidase inhibitor antidepressants. Despite forebrain GR deletion that was at least as rapid and more extensive than reported in the mixed-strain FBGRKO-T50 mice (Boyle et al. 2005), and possibly because of their different founder, our FBGRKO-T29-1 mice did not exhibit increases in depression-like behavior or adrenocortical axis hormones. Nevertheless, FBGRKO-T29-1 mice were at least as sensitive as floxed GR controls to the depressive effects of glucocorticoids and the effects of two different classes of antidepressants. FBGRKO-T29-1 mice also unexpectedly exhibited increased mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) gene expression. Our results reinforce prior evidence that antidepressant action does not require forebrain GR, and suggest a correlation between the absence of depression-like phenotype and combined MR up-regulation and central amygdala GR deficiency. Our findings demonstrate that GR outside the areas targeted in FBGRKO-T29-1 mice are involved in the depressive effects of glucocorticoids, and leave open the possibility that these GR populations also contribute to antidepressant action. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Microglia Modulate Wiring of the Embryonic Forebrain

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    Paola Squarzoni

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Dysfunction of microglia, the tissue macrophages of the brain, has been associated with the etiology of several neuropsychiatric disorders. Consistently, microglia have been shown to regulate neurogenesis and synaptic maturation at perinatal and postnatal stages. However, microglia invade the brain during mid-embryogenesis and thus could play an earlier prenatal role. Here, we show that embryonic microglia, which display a transiently uneven distribution, regulate the wiring of forebrain circuits. Using multiple mouse models, including cell-depletion approaches and cx3cr1−/−, CR3−/−, and DAP12−/− mutants, we find that perturbing microglial activity affects the outgrowth of dopaminergic axons in the forebrain and the laminar positioning of subsets of neocortical interneurons. Since defects in both dopamine innervation and cortical networks have been linked to neuropsychiatric diseases, our study provides insights into how microglial dysfunction can impact forebrain connectivity and reveals roles for immune cells during normal assembly of brain circuits.

  8. Genetic evidence that Celsr3 and Celsr2, together with Fzd3, regulate forebrain wiring in a Vangl-independent manner.

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    Qu, Yibo; Huang, Yuhua; Feng, Jia; Alvarez-Bolado, Gonzalo; Grove, Elizabeth A; Yang, Yingzi; Tissir, Fadel; Zhou, Libing; Goffinet, Andre M

    2014-07-22

    Celsr3 and Fzd3, members of "core planar cell polarity" (PCP) genes, were shown previously to control forebrain axon guidance and wiring by acting in axons and/or guidepost cells. Here, we show that Celsr2 acts redundantly with Celsr3, and that their combined mutation mimics that of Fzd3. The phenotypes generated upon inactivation of Fzd3 in different forebrain compartments are similar to those in conditional Celsr2-3 mutants, indicating that Fzd3 and Celsr2-3 act in the same population of cells. Inactivation of Celsr2-3 or Fzd3 in thalamus does not affect forebrain wiring, and joint inactivation in cortex and thalamus adds little to cortical inactivation alone in terms of thalamocortical projections. On the other hand, joint inactivation perturbs strongly the formation of the barrel field, which is unaffected upon single cortical or thalamic inactivation, indicating a role for interactions between thalamic axons and cortical neurons in cortical arealization. Unexpectedly, forebrain wiring is normal in mice defective in Vangl1 and Vangl2, showing that, contrary to epithelial PCP, axon guidance can be Vangl independent in some contexts. Our results suggest that Celsr2-3 and Fzd3 regulate axonal navigation in the forebrain by using mechanisms different from classical epithelial PCP, and require interacting partners other than Vangl1-2 that remain to be identified.

  9. Unexpected abundance of self-splicing introns in the genome of bacteriophage Twort: Introns in multiple genes, a single gene with three introns, and exon skipping by group I ribozymes

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    Landthaler, Markus; Shub, David A.

    1999-01-01

    Analysis of RNA that can be labeled with GTP indicates the existence of group I introns in genes of at least three transcriptional classes in the genome of Staphylococcus aureus bacteriophage Twort. A single ORF of 142 amino acids (Orf142) is interrupted by three self-splicing group I introns, providing the first example of a phage gene with multiple intron insertions. Twort Orf142 is encoded in a message that is abundant 15–20 min after infection and is highly similar to a late gene product ...

  10. Unexpected magnetism in nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Ranber

    2013-01-01

    Conventional magnetic order in a material requires the partially filled d or f bands. The exchange interactions between the electrons in these partially filled bands give rise to a magnetic order. However, the discovery of unexpected magnetism observed in some nanomaterials, which have the d and f shells either completely empty or full, has challenged our understanding of magnetism in conventional materials. The magnetism in nanomaterials shows the effects of reduced dimensions, reduced coordination of atoms at the surface and some quantum effects which dominate at low dimensions. In this review paper we give a brief review and discuss the unexpected magnetism experimentally observed and/or theoretically predicted in nanomaterials of conventional magnetic and nonmagnetic bulk materials. - Highlights: • A brief review of unexpected magnetism in nanomaterials. • Conventional magnetic and nonmagnetic materials of transition metal elements. • Semiconducting sp-bonded materials. • Carbon nanostructures. • Single molecule nanomagnets

  11. Basal forebrain cholinergic system: a functional analysis.

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    Olton, D; Markowska, A; Voytko, M L; Givens, B; Gorman, L; Wenk, G

    1991-01-01

    This chapter has been organized empirically, focusing on the types of approaches that have been taken to understand BFCS function. This approach reflects the state of our knowledge about the behavioral and psychological functions of the BFCS. Considerable information has been gathered in the very short time that the BFCS has been the object of intense investigation. The results from the neurotoxic lesions and from the HACU studies provide some points of consistency and some puzzling differences. Both approaches to the study of basal forebrain function suggest that the MSA is involved in tasks that require spatial working memory; MSA lesions impaired choice accuracy, and HACU in the HIP was increased after performance. The pattern of results in simpler tasks is more difficult to interpret. In a left-right reference memory discrimination in a T-maze, MSA lesions did not impair acquisition or performance, whereas HACU in the HIP was activated during performance. This pattern of results suggests that although the MSA is engaged during this type of task, its activity is not necessary for normal performance. These, and other comparisons indicate the need for a systematic analysis of task demand (Olton, 1989b). Parametric manipulations of different task demands in a systematic fashion can indicate the extent to which the BFCS is involved in the function associated with each parametric manipulation. Ultimately, of course, the organization of this material should focus on particular psychological functions, rather than the techniques and procedures used to gather the information. Achieving this goal is going to require careful attention to the design of behavioral experiments so that definitive conclusions can be made about the extent to which the BFCS is involved in a given psychological function. A systematic application of task analysis can achieve this goal (Olton, 1986, 1989a, 1989b). For example, BFCS lesions in rats impair choice accuracy in spatial working memory

  12. File list: ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Forebrain [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Forebrain mm9 All antigens Neural Forebrain SRX093315,SRX377672,SR...SRX377673,SRX377671,SRX317036 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Forebrain.bed ...

  13. File list: InP.Neu.20.AllAg.Forebrain [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Neu.20.AllAg.Forebrain mm9 Input control Neural Forebrain SRX377677,SRX377675,S...RX377679,SRX377673,SRX669236,SRX377671 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Neu.20.AllAg.Forebrain.bed ...

  14. File list: InP.Neu.10.AllAg.Forebrain [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Neu.10.AllAg.Forebrain mm9 Input control Neural Forebrain SRX377679,SRX669236,S...RX377677,SRX377675,SRX377673,SRX377671 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Neu.10.AllAg.Forebrain.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Neu.50.AllAg.Forebrain [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.50.AllAg.Forebrain mm9 Histone Neural Forebrain SRX093315,SRX377672,SRX3776...70,SRX377678,SRX377676,SRX093314,SRX377674 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.50.AllAg.Forebrain.bed ...

  16. File list: InP.Neu.50.AllAg.Forebrain [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Neu.50.AllAg.Forebrain mm9 Input control Neural Forebrain SRX377679,SRX377675,S...RX377677,SRX377673,SRX669236,SRX377671 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Neu.50.AllAg.Forebrain.bed ...

  17. File list: ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Forebrain [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Forebrain mm9 All antigens Neural Forebrain SRX093315,SRX377672,SR...SRX377674,SRX317036,SRX377671 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Forebrain.bed ...

  18. File list: ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Forebrain [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Forebrain mm9 All antigens Neural Forebrain SRX093315,SRX377672,SR...SRX377671,SRX377674,SRX669235 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Forebrain.bed ...

  19. File list: His.Neu.20.AllAg.Forebrain [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.20.AllAg.Forebrain mm9 Histone Neural Forebrain SRX093315,SRX377672,SRX3776...70,SRX377678,SRX377676,SRX093314,SRX377674 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.20.AllAg.Forebrain.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Neu.10.AllAg.Forebrain [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.10.AllAg.Forebrain mm9 Histone Neural Forebrain SRX093315,SRX377672,SRX3776...70,SRX377678,SRX377676,SRX093314,SRX377674 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.10.AllAg.Forebrain.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Neu.05.AllAg.Forebrain [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.05.AllAg.Forebrain mm9 Histone Neural Forebrain SRX093315,SRX377678,SRX3776...72,SRX377670,SRX377676,SRX377674,SRX093314 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.05.AllAg.Forebrain.bed ...

  2. File list: ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Forebrain [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Forebrain mm9 All antigens Neural Forebrain SRX002660,SRX093315,SR...SRX377673,SRX669235,SRX377671 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Forebrain.bed ...

  3. Morphometric Studies Of The Cerebellum And Forebrain Of The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Morphometric studies were undertaken using the brains of six African giant rats. The mean of weights and lengths (tip of the olfactory bulb to the caudal border of the cerebellum) were observed tobe 4.88 0.183g and 4.40 0.193g, respectively. Similarly, the mean weight and length of the cerebellum and the forebrain ...

  4. Adult forebrain NMDA receptors gate social motivation and social memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Stephanie; Tsien, Joe Z

    2017-02-01

    Motivation to engage in social interaction is critical to ensure normal social behaviors, whereas dysregulation in social motivation can contribute to psychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia, autism, social anxiety disorders and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). While dopamine is well known to regulate motivation, its downstream targets are poorly understood. Given the fact that the dopamine 1 (D1) receptors are often physically coupled with the NMDA receptors, we hypothesize that the NMDA receptor activity in the adult forebrain principal neurons are crucial not only for learning and memory, but also for the proper gating of social motivation. Here, we tested this hypothesis by examining sociability and social memory in inducible forebrain-specific NR1 knockout mice. These mice are ideal for exploring the role of the NR1 subunit in social behavior because the NR1 subunit can be selectively knocked out after the critical developmental period, in which NR1 is required for normal development. We found that the inducible deletion of the NMDA receptors prior to behavioral assays impaired, not only object and social recognition memory tests, but also resulted in profound deficits in social motivation. Mice with ablated NR1 subunits in the forebrain demonstrated significant decreases in sociability compared to their wild type counterparts. These results suggest that in addition to its crucial role in learning and memory, the NMDA receptors in the adult forebrain principal neurons gate social motivation, independent of neuronal development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Forebrain Mechanisms of Nociception and Pain: Analysis through Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Kenneth L.

    1999-07-01

    Pain is a unified experience composed of interacting discriminative, affective-motivational, and cognitive components, each of which is mediated and modulated through forebrain mechanisms acting at spinal, brainstem, and cerebral levels. The size of the human forebrain in relation to the spinal cord gives anatomical emphasis to forebrain control over nociceptive processing. Human forebrain pathology can cause pain without the activation of nociceptors. Functional imaging of the normal human brain with positron emission tomography (PET) shows synaptically induced increases in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in several regions specifically during pain. We have examined the variables of gender, type of noxious stimulus, and the origin of nociceptive input as potential determinants of the pattern and intensity of rCBF responses. The structures most consistently activated across genders and during contact heat pain, cold pain, cutaneous laser pain or intramuscular pain were the contralateral insula and anterior cingulate cortex, the bilateral thalamus and premotor cortex, and the cerebellar vermis. These regions are commonly activated in PET studies of pain conducted by other investigators, and the intensity of the brain rCBF response correlates parametrically with perceived pain intensity. To complement the human studies, we developed an animal model for investigating stimulus-induced rCBF responses in the rat. In accord with behavioral measures and the results of human PET, there is a progressive and selective activation of somatosensory and limbic system structures in the brain and brainstem following the subcutaneous injection of formalin. The animal model and human PET studies should be mutually reinforcing and thus facilitate progress in understanding forebrain mechanisms of normal and pathological pain.

  6. A forebrain atlas of the lizard Gekko gecko.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, W J; Hoogland, P V; Lohman, A H

    1986-12-01

    An atlas of the forebrain of the lizard Gekko gecko has been provided, which will serve as the basis for subsequent experimental tracing and immunohistochemical studies. Apart from a strongly developed medial cortex and septal area, the Tokay gecko shows all the main features of the forebrain of the lacertid-type lizards. When its convenience as an experimental animal is also taken into account, this species seems to be very suitable for studying the limbic system in reptiles. The atlas comprises topographical reconstructions of the telencephalon and diencephalon and a series of transverse sections of which the levels have been indicated in the reconstructions. The results obtained in the Gekko are briefly compared with those found in other lizards studied.

  7. Basal forebrain thermoregulatory mechanism modulates auto-regulated sleep

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    Hruda N Mallick

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of body temperature and sleep are two physiological mechanisms that are vital for our survival. Interestingly neural structures implicated in both these functions are common. These areas include the medial preoptic area, the lateral preoptic area, the ventrolateral preoptic area, the median preoptic nucleus and the medial septum, which form part of the basal forebrain.When given a choice, rats prefer to stay at an ambient temperature of 270C, though the maximum sleep was observed when they were placed at 300C. Ambient temperature around 270C should be considered as the thermoneutral temperature for rats in all sleep studies. At this temperature the diurnal oscillations of sleep and body temperature are properly expressed. The warm sensitive neurons of the preoptic area mediate the increase in sleep at 300C. Promotion of sleep during the rise in ambient temperature from 270C to 300C, serve a thermoregulatory function. Autonomous thermoregulatory changes in core body temperature and skin temperature could act as an input signal to modulate neuronal activity in sleep-promoting brain areas. The studies presented here show that the neurons of the basal forebrain play a key role in regulating sleep. Basal forebrain thermoregulatory system is a part of the global homeostatic sleep regulatory mechanism, which is auto-regulated.

  8. A ketogenic diet accelerates neurodegeneration in mice with induced mitochondrial DNA toxicity in the forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauritzen, Knut H; Hasan-Olive, Md Mahdi; Regnell, Christine E; Kleppa, Liv; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Gjedde, Albert; Klungland, Arne; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Storm-Mathisen, Jon; Bergersen, Linda H

    2016-12-01

    Mitochondrial genome maintenance plays a central role in preserving brain health. We previously demonstrated accumulation of mitochondrial DNA damage and severe neurodegeneration in transgenic mice inducibly expressing a mutated mitochondrial DNA repair enzyme (mutUNG1) selectively in forebrain neurons. Here, we examine whether severe neurodegeneration in mutUNG1-expressing mice could be rescued by feeding the mice a ketogenic diet, which is known to have beneficial effects in several neurological disorders. The diet increased the levels of superoxide dismutase 2, and mitochondrial mass, enzymes, and regulators such as SIRT1 and FIS1, and appeared to downregulate N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor subunits NR2A/B and upregulate γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABA A ) receptor subunits α 1 . However, unexpectedly, the ketogenic diet aggravated neurodegeneration and mitochondrial deterioration. Electron microscopy showed structurally impaired mitochondria accumulating in neuronal perikarya. We propose that aggravation is caused by increased mitochondrial biogenesis of generally dysfunctional mitochondria. This study thereby questions the dogma that a ketogenic diet is unambiguously beneficial in mitochondrial disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Using gene expression databases for classical trait QTL candidate gene discovery in the BXD recombinant inbred genetic reference population: Mouse forebrain weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jianhua

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Successful strategies for QTL gene identification benefit from combined experimental and bioinformatic approaches. Unique design aspects of the BXD recombinant inbred line mapping panel allow use of archived gene microarray expression data to filter likely from unlikely candidates. This prompted us to propose a simple five-filter protocol for candidate nomination. To filter more likely from less likely candidates, we required candidate genes near to the QTL to have mRNA abundance that correlated with the phenotype among the BXD lines as well as differed between the parental lines C57BL/6J and DBA/2J. We also required verification of mRNA abundance by an independent method, and finally we required either differences in protein levels or confirmed DNA sequence differences. Results QTL mapping of mouse forebrain weight in 34 BXD RI lines found significant association on chromosomes 1 and 11, with each C57BL/6J allele increasing weight by more than half a standard deviation. The intersection of gene lists that were within ± 10 Mb of the strongest associated location, that had forebrain mRNA abundance correlated with forebrain weight among the BXD, and that had forebrain mRNA abundance differing between C57BL/6J and DBA/2J, produced two candidates, Tnni1 (troponin 1 and Asb3 (ankyrin repeat and SOCS box-containing protein 3. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the direction of an increased expression in C57BL/6J genotype over the DBA/2J genotype for both genes, a difference that translated to a 2-fold difference in Asb3 protein. Although Tnni1 protein differences could not be confirmed, a 273 bp indel polymorphism was discovered 1 Kb upstream of the transcription start site. Conclusion Delivery of well supported candidate genes following a single quantitative trait locus mapping experiment is difficult. However, by combining available gene expression data with QTL mapping, we illustrated a five-filter protocol that nominated Asb3 and

  10. Visualization of the medial forebrain bundle using diffusion tensor imaging

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    Ardian eHana

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion tensor imaging is a technique that enables physicians the portrayal of white matter tracts in vivo. We used this technique in order to depict the medial forebrain bundle in 15 consecutive patients between 2012 and 2015. Men and women of all ages were included. There were 6 women and 9 men. The mean age was 58,6 years (39-77. Nine patients were candidates for an eventual deep brain stimulation. Eight of them suffered from Parkinson`s disease and one had multiple sclerosis. The remaining 6 patients suffered from different lesions which were situated in the frontal lobe. These were 2 metastasis, 2 meningiomas, 1 cerebral bleeding and 1 glioblastoma. We used a 3DT1-sequence for the navigation. Furthermore T2- and DTI- sequences were performed. The FOV was 200 x 200 mm², slice thickness 2 mm, and an acquisition matrix of 96 x 96 yielding nearly isotropic voxels of 2 x 2 x 2 mm. 3-Tesla-MRI was carried out strictly axial using 32 gradient directions and one b0-image. We used Echo-Planar-Imaging (EPI and ASSET parallel imaging with an acceleration factor of 2. b-value was 800 s/mm². The maximal angle was 50°. Additional scanning time was less than 9 minutes. We were able to visualize the medial forebrain bundle in 12 of our patients bilaterally and in the remaining 3 patients we depicted the medial forebrain bundle on one side. It was the contralateral side of the lesion. These were 2 meningiomas and one metastasis. Portrayal of the medial forebrain bundle is possible for everyday routine for neurosurgical interventions. As part of the reward circuitry it might be of substantial importance for neurosurgeons during deep brain stimulation in patients with psychiatric disorders. Furthermore it might explain at a certain extent character changes in patients with lesions in the frontal lobe. Surgery in this part of the brain should always take the preservation of this white matter tract into account.

  11. Patterns of cell death in the perinatal mouse forebrain

    OpenAIRE

    Mosley, Morgan; Shah, Charisma; Morse, Kiriana A.; Miloro, Stephen A.; Holmes, Melissa M.; Ahern, Todd H.; Forger, Nancy G.

    2016-01-01

    The importance of cell death in brain development has long been appreciated, but many basic questions remain, such as what initiates or terminates the cell death period. One obstacle has been the lack of quantitative data defining exactly when cell death occurs. We recently created a “cell death atlas,” using the detection of activated caspase-3 (AC3) to quantify apoptosis in the postnatal mouse ventral forebrain and hypothalamus, and found that the highest rates of cell death were seen at th...

  12. Forebrain pathways and their behavioural interactions with neuroendocrine and cardiovascular function in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohus, B; Koolhaas, JM; Korte, SM; Roozendaal, B; Wiersma, A

    1. The forebrain is a major organizer of the complex behavioural, physiological and neuroendocrine responses to environmental challenges of a stressful nature. 2. Combined physiological and neuroanatomical studies suggest that a specific forebrain-brain stem network, composed of connections between

  13. Dcc regulates asymmetric outgrowth of forebrain neurons in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxia Gao

    Full Text Available The guidance receptor DCC (deleted in colorectal cancer ortholog UNC-40 regulates neuronal asymmetry development in Caenorhabditis elegans, but it is not known whether DCC plays a role in the specification of neuronal polarity in vertebrates. To examine the roles of DCC in neuronal asymmetry regulation in vertebrates, we studied zebrafish anterior dorsal telencephalon (ADt neuronal axons. We generated transgenic zebrafish animals expressing the photo-convertible fluorescent protein Kaede in ADt neurons and then photo-converted Kaede to label specifically the ADt neuron axons. We found that ADt axons normally project ventrally. Knock down of Dcc function by injecting antisense morpholino oligonucleotides caused the ADt neurons to project axons dorsally. To examine the axon projection pattern of individual ADt neurons, we labeled single ADt neurons using a forebrain-specific promoter to drive fluorescent protein expression. We found that individual ADt neurons projected axons dorsally or formed multiple processes after morpholino knock down of Dcc function. We further found that knock down of the Dcc ligand, Netrin1, also caused ADt neurons to project axons dorsally. Knockdown of Neogenin1, a guidance receptor closely related to Dcc, enhanced the formation of aberrant dorsal axons in embryos injected with Dcc morpholino. These experiments provide the first evidence that Dcc regulates polarized axon initiation and asymmetric outgrowth of forebrain neurons in vertebrates.

  14. Efficient in vivo electroporation of the postnatal rodent forebrain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Boutin

    Full Text Available Functional gene analysis in vivo represents still a major challenge in biomedical research. Here we present a new method for the efficient introduction of nucleic acids into the postnatal mouse forebrain. We show that intraventricular injection of DNA followed by electroporation induces strong expression of transgenes in radial glia, neuronal precursors and neurons of the olfactory system. We present two proof-of-principle experiments to validate our approach. First, we show that expression of a human isoform of the neural cell adhesion molecule (hNCAM-140 in radial glia cells induces their differentiation into cells showing a neural precursor phenotype. Second, we demonstrate that p21 acts as a cell cycle inhibitor for postnatal neural stem cells. This approach will represent an important tool for future studies of postnatal neurogenesis and of neural development in general.

  15. Patterns of cell death in the perinatal mouse forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosley, Morgan; Shah, Charisma; Morse, Kiriana A; Miloro, Stephen A; Holmes, Melissa M; Ahern, Todd H; Forger, Nancy G

    2017-01-01

    The importance of cell death in brain development has long been appreciated, but many basic questions remain, such as what initiates or terminates the cell death period. One obstacle has been the lack of quantitative data defining exactly when cell death occurs. We recently created a "cell death atlas," using the detection of activated caspase-3 (AC3) to quantify apoptosis in the postnatal mouse ventral forebrain and hypothalamus, and found that the highest rates of cell death were seen at the earliest postnatal ages in most regions. Here we have extended these analyses to prenatal ages and additional brain regions. We quantified cell death in 16 forebrain regions across nine perinatal ages from embryonic day (E) 17 to postnatal day (P) 11 and found that cell death peaks just after birth in most regions. We found greater cell death in several regions in offspring delivered vaginally on the day of parturition compared with those of the same postconception age but still in utero at the time of collection. We also found massive cell death in the oriens layer of the hippocampus on P1 and in regions surrounding the anterior crossing of the corpus callosum on E18 as well as the persistence of large numbers of cells in those regions in adult mice lacking the pro-death Bax gene. Together these findings suggest that birth may be an important trigger of neuronal cell death and identify transient cell groups that may undergo wholesale elimination perinatally. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:47-64, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Midbrain and forebrain patterning delivers immunocytochemically and functionally similar populations of neuropeptide Y containing GABAergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaira, S K; Nefzger, C M; Beh, S J; Pouton, C W; Haynes, J M

    2011-09-01

    Neurons differentiated in vitro from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have the potential to serve both as models of disease states and in drug discovery programs. In this study, we use sonic hedgehog (SHH) and fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF-8) to enrich for forebrain and midbrain phenotypes from mouse ESCs. We then investigate, using Ca(2+) imaging and [(3)H]-GABA release studies, whether the GABAergic neurons produced exhibit distinct functional phenotypes. At day 24 of differentiation, reverse transcriptase-PCR showed the presence of both forebrain (Bf-1, Hesx1, Pgc-1α, Six3) and midbrain (GATA2, GATA3) selective mRNA markers in developing forebrain-enriched cultures. All markers were present in midbrain cultures except for Bf-1 and Pgc-1α. Irrespective of culture conditions all GABA immunoreactive neurons were also immunoreactive to neuropeptide Y (NPY) antibodies. Forebrain and midbrain GABAergic neurons responded to ATP (1 mM), L-glutamate (30 μM), noradrenaline (30 μM), acetylcholine (30 μM) and dopamine (30 μM), with similar elevations of intracellular Ca(2+)([Ca(2+)](i)). The presence of GABA(A) and GABA(B) antagonists, bicuculline (30 μM) and CGP55845 (1 μM), increased the elevation of [Ca(2+)](i) in response to dopamine (30 μM) in midbrain, but not forebrain GABAergic neurons. All agonists, except dopamine, elicited similar [(3)H]-GABA release from forebrain and midbrain cultures. Dopamine (30 μM) did not stimulate significant [(3)H]-GABA release in midbrain cultures, although it was effective in forebrain cultures. This study shows that differentiating neurons toward a midbrain fate restricts the expression of forebrain markers. Forebrain differentiation results in the expression of forebrain and midbrain markers. All GABA(+) neurons contain NPY, and show similar agonist-induced elevations of [Ca(2+)](i) and [(3)H]-GABA release. This study indicates that the pharmacological phenotype of these particular neurons may be independent of the addition of

  17. Training to handle unexpected events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamlin, K.W.

    1987-01-01

    The importance of conducting hands-on training to deal with complex situations is well recognized. Since most utilities now own or have ordered their own control room simulators, access to simulator training facilities has improved greatly. Most utilities now have a control room shift rotation that includes a dedicated training shift. The opportunities for practicing operational control over unexpected and off-normal events are just beginning to be recognized. Areas that are being enhanced include teamwork training, diagnostics training, expanded simulator training programs, improvements in simulator instructor training, emergency procedures training, and training on the use of probabilistic risk assessment studies. All these efforts are aimed at the goal of improving the plant staff's ability to cope with unexpected and off-normal events

  18. From pluripotency to forebrain patterning: an in vitro journey astride embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, Giuseppe; Bertacchi, Michele; Carucci, Nicoletta; Augusti-Tocco, Gabriella; Biagioni, Stefano; Cremisi, Federico

    2014-08-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have been used extensively as in vitro models of neural development and disease, with special efforts towards their conversion into forebrain progenitors and neurons. The forebrain is the most complex brain region, giving rise to several fundamental structures, such as the cerebral cortex, the hypothalamus, and the retina. Due to the multiplicity of signaling pathways playing different roles at distinct times of embryonic development, the specification and patterning of forebrain has been difficult to study in vivo. Research performed on ESCs in vitro has provided a large body of evidence to complement work in model organisms, but these studies have often been focused more on cell type production than on cell fate regulation. In this review, we systematically reassess the current literature in the field of forebrain development in mouse and human ESCs with a focus on the molecular mechanisms of early cell fate decisions, taking into consideration the specific culture conditions, exogenous and endogenous molecular cues as described in the original studies. The resulting model of early forebrain induction and patterning provides a useful framework for further studies aimed at reconstructing forebrain development in vitro for basic research or therapy.

  19. Dopamine receptor gene expression by enkephalin neurons in rat forebrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Moine, C.; Normand, E.; Guitteny, A.F.; Fouque, B.; Teoule, R.; Bloch, B. (Universite de Bordeaux II (France))

    1990-01-01

    In situ hybridization experiments were performed with brain sections from normal, control and haloperidol-treated rats to identify and map the cells expressing the D2 dopamine receptor gene. D2 receptor mRNA was detected with radioactive or biotinylated oligonucleotide probes. D2 receptor mRNA was present in glandular cells of the pituitary intermediate lobe and in neurons of the substantia nigra, ventral tegmental area, and forebrain, especially in caudate putamen, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercle, and piriform cortex. Hybridization with D2 and preproenkephalin A probes in adjacent sections, as well as combined hybridization with the two probes in the same sections, demonstrated that all detectable enkephalin neurons in the striatum contained the D2 receptor mRNA. Large neurons in caudate putamen, which were unlabeled with the preproenkephalin A probe and which may have been cholinergic, also expressed the D2 receptor gene. Haloperidol treatment (14 or 21 days) provoked an increase in mRNA content for D2 receptor and preproenkephalin A in the striatum. This suggests that the increase in D2 receptor number observed after haloperidol treatment is due to increased activity of the D2 gene. These results indicate that in the striatum, the enkephalin neurons are direct targets for dopamine liberated from mesostriatal neurons.

  20. Subregional Basal Forebrain Atrophy in Alzheimer's Disease: A Multicenter Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilimann, Ingo; Grothe, Michel; Heinsen, Helmut; Alho, Eduardo Joaquim Lopez; Grinberg, Lea; Amaro, Edson; dos Santos, Gláucia Aparecida Bento; da Silva, Rafael Emídio; Mitchell, Alex J.; Frisoni, Giovanni B.; Bokde, Arun L.W.; Fellgiebel, Andreas; Filippi, Massimo; Hampel, Harald; Klöppel, Stefan; Teipel, Stefan J.

    2014-01-01

    Histopathological studies in Alzheimer's disease (AD) suggest severe and region-specific neurodegeneration of the basal forebrain cholinergic system (BFCS). Here, we studied the between-center reliability and diagnostic accuracy of MRI-based BFCS volumetry in a large multicenter data set, including participants with prodromal (n = 41) or clinically manifest AD (n = 134) and 148 cognitively healthy controls. Atrophy was determined using voxel-based and region-of-interest based analyses of high-dimensionally normalized MRI scans using a newly created map of the BFCS based on postmortem in cranio MRI and histology. The AD group showed significant volume reductions of all subregions of the BFCS, which were most pronounced in the posterior nucleus basalis Meynert (NbM). The mild cognitive impairment-AD group showed pronounced volume reductions in the posterior NbM, but preserved volumes of anterior-medial regions. Diagnostic accuracy of posterior NbM volume was superior to hippocampus volume in both groups, despite higher multicenter variability of the BFCS measurements. The data of our study suggest that BFCS morphometry may provide an emerging biomarker in AD. PMID:24503619

  1. Cytoskeletal Regulation Dominates Temperature-Sensitive Proteomic Changes of Hibernation in Forebrain of 13-Lined Ground Squirrels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, Allyson G.; Martin, Sandra L.

    2013-01-01

    13-lined ground squirrels, Ictidomys tridecemlineatus, are obligate hibernators that transition annually between summer homeothermy and winter heterothermy – wherein they exploit episodic torpor bouts. Despite cerebral ischemia during torpor and rapid reperfusion during arousal, hibernator brains resist damage and the animals emerge neurologically intact each spring. We hypothesized that protein changes in the brain underlie winter neuroprotection. To identify candidate proteins, we applied a sensitive 2D gel electrophoresis method to quantify protein differences among forebrain extracts prepared from ground squirrels in two summer, four winter and fall transition states. Proteins that differed among groups were identified using LC-MS/MS. Only 84 protein spots varied significantly among the defined states of hibernation. Protein changes in the forebrain proteome fell largely into two reciprocal patterns with a strong body temperature dependence. The importance of body temperature was tested in animals from the fall; these fall animals use torpor sporadically with body temperatures mirroring ambient temperatures between 4 and 21°C as they navigate the transition between summer homeothermy and winter heterothermy. Unlike cold-torpid fall ground squirrels, warm-torpid individuals strongly resembled the homeotherms, indicating that the changes observed in torpid hibernators are defined by body temperature, not torpor per se. Metabolic enzymes were largely unchanged despite varied metabolic activity across annual and torpor-arousal cycles. Instead, the majority of the observed changes were cytoskeletal proteins and their regulators. While cytoskeletal structural proteins tended to differ seasonally, i.e., between summer homeothermy and winter heterothermy, their regulatory proteins were more strongly affected by body temperature. Changes in the abundance of various isoforms of the microtubule assembly and disassembly regulatory proteins dihydropyrimidinase

  2. Cytoskeletal regulation dominates temperature-sensitive proteomic changes of hibernation in forebrain of 13-lined ground squirrels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allyson G Hindle

    Full Text Available 13-lined ground squirrels, Ictidomys tridecemlineatus, are obligate hibernators that transition annually between summer homeothermy and winter heterothermy - wherein they exploit episodic torpor bouts. Despite cerebral ischemia during torpor and rapid reperfusion during arousal, hibernator brains resist damage and the animals emerge neurologically intact each spring. We hypothesized that protein changes in the brain underlie winter neuroprotection. To identify candidate proteins, we applied a sensitive 2D gel electrophoresis method to quantify protein differences among forebrain extracts prepared from ground squirrels in two summer, four winter and fall transition states. Proteins that differed among groups were identified using LC-MS/MS. Only 84 protein spots varied significantly among the defined states of hibernation. Protein changes in the forebrain proteome fell largely into two reciprocal patterns with a strong body temperature dependence. The importance of body temperature was tested in animals from the fall; these fall animals use torpor sporadically with body temperatures mirroring ambient temperatures between 4 and 21°C as they navigate the transition between summer homeothermy and winter heterothermy. Unlike cold-torpid fall ground squirrels, warm-torpid individuals strongly resembled the homeotherms, indicating that the changes observed in torpid hibernators are defined by body temperature, not torpor per se. Metabolic enzymes were largely unchanged despite varied metabolic activity across annual and torpor-arousal cycles. Instead, the majority of the observed changes were cytoskeletal proteins and their regulators. While cytoskeletal structural proteins tended to differ seasonally, i.e., between summer homeothermy and winter heterothermy, their regulatory proteins were more strongly affected by body temperature. Changes in the abundance of various isoforms of the microtubule assembly and disassembly regulatory proteins

  3. Cardiac angiosarcoma: an unexpected diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Roberto Furst Crenitte

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac angiosarcoma is a rare entity. The incidence through autopsy findings ranges between 0.001% and 0.03%. The disease usually presents with non-specific symptoms, although asymptomatic cases are frequent; therefore, diagnosis is unexpected and consequently delayed. The authors report the case of a middle-aged man with a recent onset cough and dyspnea. He sought medical care several times without receiving a definite diagnosis until a plain chest radiography was taken showing a mediastinal enlargement, which was the reason why he was hospitalized for clinical investigation. During the diagnostic workup, an echodopplercardiogram and a thoracic computed tomography were performed, showing a heterogeneous soft-tissue mass infiltrating the pericardium and the anterior atrial wall. Multiple and scattered pulmonary nodules were also present. A pulmonary nodule was biopsied, which revealed an angiosarcoma. The clinical features added to the radiological and histological findings permitted the diagnosis of right atrial angiosarcoma. The authors highlight the unexpected pattern in the presentation of cardiac tumors.

  4. Basal forebrain projections to the lateral habenula modulate aggression reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Sam A; Heshmati, Mitra; Flanigan, Meghan; Christoffel, Daniel J; Guise, Kevin; Pfau, Madeline L; Aleyasin, Hossein; Menard, Caroline; Zhang, Hongxing; Hodes, Georgia E; Bregman, Dana; Khibnik, Lena; Tai, Jonathan; Rebusi, Nicole; Krawitz, Brian; Chaudhury, Dipesh; Walsh, Jessica J; Han, Ming-Hu; Shapiro, Matt L; Russo, Scott J

    2016-06-30

    Maladaptive aggressive behaviour is associated with a number of neuropsychiatric disorders and is thought to result partly from the inappropriate activation of brain reward systems in response to aggressive or violent social stimuli. Nuclei within the ventromedial hypothalamus, extended amygdala and limbic circuits are known to encode initiation of aggression; however, little is known about the neural mechanisms that directly modulate the motivational component of aggressive behaviour. Here we established a mouse model to measure the valence of aggressive inter-male social interaction with a smaller subordinate intruder as reinforcement for the development of conditioned place preference (CPP). Aggressors develop a CPP, whereas non-aggressors develop a conditioned place aversion to the intruder-paired context. Furthermore, we identify a functional GABAergic projection from the basal forebrain (BF) to the lateral habenula (lHb) that bi-directionally controls the valence of aggressive interactions. Circuit-specific silencing of GABAergic BF-lHb terminals of aggressors with halorhodopsin (NpHR3.0) increases lHb neuronal firing and abolishes CPP to the intruder-paired context. Activation of GABAergic BF-lHb terminals of non-aggressors with channelrhodopsin (ChR2) decreases lHb neuronal firing and promotes CPP to the intruder-paired context. Finally, we show that altering inhibitory transmission at BF-lHb terminals does not control the initiation of aggressive behaviour. These results demonstrate that the BF-lHb circuit has a critical role in regulating the valence of inter-male aggressive behaviour and provide novel mechanistic insight into the neural circuits modulating aggression reward processing.

  5. Orexin A-induced enhancement of attentional processing in rats: role of basal forebrain neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajo, Kristin N; Fadel, Jim R; Burk, Joshua A

    2016-02-01

    Orexins are neuropeptides released in multiple brain regions from neurons that originate within the lateral hypothalamus and contiguous perfornical area. The basal forebrain, a structure implicated in attentional processing, receives orexinergic inputs. Our previous work demonstrated that administration of an orexin-1 receptor antagonist, SB-334867, systemically or via infusion directly into the basal forebrain, can disrupt performance in a task that places explicit demands on attentional processing. Given that the orexin-1 receptor binds orexin A with high affinity, we tested whether orexin A could enhance attention in rats. Attentional performance was assessed using a task that required discrimination of variable duration visual signals from trials when no signal was presented. We also tested whether infusions of orexin A into the lateral ventricle could attenuate deficits following lesions of medial prefrontal cortical cholinergic projections that arise from the basal forebrain. Infusions of orexin A into the basal forebrain attenuated distracter-induced decreases in attentional performance. Orexin A attenuated deficits in lesioned animals when a visual distracter was presented. The present results support the view that orexin A can enhance attentional performance via actions in the basal forebrain and may be beneficial for some conditions characterized by attentional dysfunction due to disruption of cortical cholinergic inputs.

  6. Fournier gangrene and unexpected death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bury, Danielle; Byard, Roger W

    2012-11-01

    Fournier gangrene represents a rare but progressive perineal infection that may result in rapid death. A 70-year-old man with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus and alcohol abuse is reported who was found unexpectedly dead. He had last been contacted the night before his death. At autopsy, the most striking finding was deep necrotic ulceration of the scrotum with exposure of underlying deep muscles and testicles, with blood cultures positive for Escherichia coli. Death was, therefore, attributed to necrotic ulceration/gangrene of the perineum (Fournier gangrene) that was due to E. coli sepsis with underlying contributing factors of diabetes mellitus and alcoholism. In addition there was morbid obesity (body mass index 46.9), cirrhosis of the liver, and marked focal coronary artery atherosclerosis with significant cardiomegaly. Fournier gangrene may be an extremely aggressive condition that can result in rapid death, as was demonstrated by the rapid progression in the reported case. © 2012 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  7. Cognitive Readiness: Preparing for the Unexpected

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fletcher, J. D

    2004-01-01

    .... Anticipated operational requirements can be decomposed into specific tasks, conditions, and standards, but how should individuals, teams, and units prepare for the unexpected, which, by definition...

  8. Serotonin 5-HT4 receptors and forebrain cholinergic system: receptor expression in identified cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñas-Cazorla, Raúl; Vilaró, M Teresa

    2015-11-01

    Activation of serotonin 5-HT4 receptors has pro-cognitive effects on memory performance. The proposed underlying neurochemical mechanism is the enhancement of acetylcholine release in frontal cortex and hippocampus elicited by 5-HT4 agonists. Although 5-HT4 receptors are present in brain areas related to cognition, e.g., hippocampus and cortex, the cellular localization of the receptors that might modulate acetylcholine release is unknown at present. We have analyzed, using dual label in situ hybridization, the cellular localization of 5-HT4 receptor mRNA in identified neuronal populations of the rat basal forebrain, which is the source of the cholinergic innervation to cortex and hippocampus. 5-HT4 receptor mRNA was visualized with isotopically labeled oligonucleotide probes, whereas cholinergic, glutamatergic, GABAergic and parvalbumin-synthesizing neurons were identified with digoxigenin-labeled oligonucleotide probes. 5-HT4 receptor mRNA was not detected in the basal forebrain cholinergic cell population. In contrast, basal forebrain GABAergic, parvalbumin synthesizing, and glutamatergic cells contained 5-HT4 receptor mRNA. Hippocampal and cortical glutamatergic neurons also express this receptor. These results indicate that 5-HT4 receptors are not synthesized by cholinergic cells, and thus would be absent from cholinergic terminals. In contrast, several non-cholinergic cell populations within the basal forebrain and its target hippocampal and cortical areas express these receptors and are thus likely to mediate the enhancement of acetylcholine release elicited by 5-HT4 agonists.

  9. TASK Channels on Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Neurons Modulate Electrocortical Signatures of Arousal by Histamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Michael T.; Du, Guizhi; Bayliss, Douglas A.

    2015-01-01

    Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons are the main source of cortical acetylcholine, and their activation by histamine elicits cortical arousal. TWIK-like acid-sensitive K+ (TASK) channels modulate neuronal excitability and are expressed on basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, but the role of TASK channels in the histamine-basal forebrain cholinergic arousal circuit is unknown. We first expressed TASK channel subunits and histamine Type 1 receptors in HEK cells. Application of histamine in vitro inhibited the acid-sensitive K+ current, indicating a functionally coupled signaling mechanism. We then studied the role of TASK channels in modulating electrocortical activity in vivo using freely behaving wild-type (n = 12) and ChAT-Cre:TASKf/f mice (n = 12), the latter lacking TASK-1/3 channels on cholinergic neurons. TASK channel deletion on cholinergic neurons significantly altered endogenous electroencephalogram oscillations in multiple frequency bands. We then identified the effect of TASK channel deletion during microperfusion of histamine into the basal forebrain. In non-rapid eye movement sleep, TASK channel deletion on cholinergic neurons significantly attenuated the histamine-induced increase in 30–50 Hz activity, consistent with TASK channels contributing to histamine action on basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. In contrast, during active wakefulness, histamine significantly increased 30–50 Hz activity in ChAT-Cre:TASKf/f mice but not wild-type mice, showing that the histamine response depended upon the prevailing cortical arousal state. In summary, we identify TASK channel modulation in response to histamine receptor activation in vitro, as well as a role of TASK channels on cholinergic neurons in modulating endogenous oscillations in the electroencephalogram and the electrocortical response to histamine at the basal forebrain in vivo. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Attentive states and cognitive function are associated with the generation of γ EEG activity

  10. TASK Channels on Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Neurons Modulate Electrocortical Signatures of Arousal by Histamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Michael T; Du, Guizhi; Bayliss, Douglas A; Horner, Richard L

    2015-10-07

    Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons are the main source of cortical acetylcholine, and their activation by histamine elicits cortical arousal. TWIK-like acid-sensitive K(+) (TASK) channels modulate neuronal excitability and are expressed on basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, but the role of TASK channels in the histamine-basal forebrain cholinergic arousal circuit is unknown. We first expressed TASK channel subunits and histamine Type 1 receptors in HEK cells. Application of histamine in vitro inhibited the acid-sensitive K(+) current, indicating a functionally coupled signaling mechanism. We then studied the role of TASK channels in modulating electrocortical activity in vivo using freely behaving wild-type (n = 12) and ChAT-Cre:TASK(f/f) mice (n = 12), the latter lacking TASK-1/3 channels on cholinergic neurons. TASK channel deletion on cholinergic neurons significantly altered endogenous electroencephalogram oscillations in multiple frequency bands. We then identified the effect of TASK channel deletion during microperfusion of histamine into the basal forebrain. In non-rapid eye movement sleep, TASK channel deletion on cholinergic neurons significantly attenuated the histamine-induced increase in 30-50 Hz activity, consistent with TASK channels contributing to histamine action on basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. In contrast, during active wakefulness, histamine significantly increased 30-50 Hz activity in ChAT-Cre:TASK(f/f) mice but not wild-type mice, showing that the histamine response depended upon the prevailing cortical arousal state. In summary, we identify TASK channel modulation in response to histamine receptor activation in vitro, as well as a role of TASK channels on cholinergic neurons in modulating endogenous oscillations in the electroencephalogram and the electrocortical response to histamine at the basal forebrain in vivo. Attentive states and cognitive function are associated with the generation of γ EEG activity. Basal forebrain

  11. TDP-43 pathology in the basal forebrain and hypothalamus of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cykowski, Matthew D; Takei, Hidehiro; Schulz, Paul E; Appel, Stanley H; Powell, Suzanne Z

    2014-12-24

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a neurodegenerative disease characterized clinically by motor symptoms including limb weakness, dysarthria, dysphagia, and respiratory compromise, and pathologically by inclusions of transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 kDa (TDP-43). Patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis also may demonstrate non-motor symptoms and signs of autonomic and energy dysfunction as hypermetabolism and weight loss that suggest the possibility of pathology in the forebrain, including hypothalamus. However, this region has received little investigation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In this study, the frequency, topography, and clinical associations of TDP-43 inclusion pathology in the basal forebrain and hypothalamus were examined in 33 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: 25 men and 8 women; mean age at death of 62.7 years, median disease duration of 3.1 years (range of 1.3 to 9.8 years). TDP-43 pathology was present in 11 patients (33.3%), including components in both basal forebrain (n=10) and hypothalamus (n=7). This pathology was associated with non-motor system TDP-43 pathology (Χ2=17.5, p=0.00003) and bulbar symptoms at onset (Χ2=4.04, p=0.044), but not age or disease duration. Furthermore, TDP-43 pathology in the lateral hypothalamic area was associated with reduced body mass index (W=11, p=0.023). This is the first systematic demonstration of pathologic involvement of the basal forebrain and hypothalamus in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Furthermore, the findings suggest that involvement of the basal forebrain and hypothalamus has significant phenotypic associations in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, including site of symptom onset, as well as deficits in energy metabolism with loss of body mass index.

  12. Forebrain CRF1 Modulates Early-Life Stress-Programmed Cognitive Deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Dong; Rammes, Gerhard; Kraev, Igor; Wolf, Miriam; Liebl, Claudia; Scharf, Sebastian H.; Rice, Courtney J.; Wurst, Wolfgang; Holsboer, Florian; Deussing, Jan M.; Baram, Tallie Z.; Stewart, Michael G.; Müller, Marianne B.; Schmidt, Mathias V.

    2012-01-01

    Childhood traumatic events hamper the development of the hippocampus and impair declarative memory in susceptible individuals. Persistent elevations of hippocampal corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), acting through CRF receptor 1 (CRF1), in experimental models of early-life stress have suggested a role for this endogenous stress hormone in the resulting structural modifications and cognitive dysfunction. However, direct testing of this possibility has been difficult. In the current study, we subjected conditional forebrain CRF1 knock-out (CRF1-CKO) mice to an impoverished postnatal environment and examined the role of forebrain CRF1 in the long-lasting effects of early-life stress on learning and memory. Early-life stress impaired spatial learning and memory in wild-type mice, and postnatal forebrain CRF overexpression reproduced these deleterious effects. Cognitive deficits in stressed wild-type mice were associated with disrupted long-term potentiation (LTP) and a reduced number of dendritic spines in area CA3 but not in CA1. Forebrain CRF1 deficiency restored cognitive function, LTP and spine density in area CA3, and augmented CA1 LTP and spine density in stressed mice. In addition, early-life stress differentially regulated the amount of hippocampal excitatory and inhibitory synapses in wild-type and CRF1-CKO mice, accompanied by alterations in the neurexin-neuroligin complex. These data suggest that the functional, structural and molecular changes evoked by early-life stress are at least partly dependent on persistent forebrain CRF1 signaling, providing a molecular target for the prevention of cognitive deficits in adults with a history of early-life adversity. PMID:21940453

  13. Coping with Unexpected Events: Depression and Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DBSAlliance.org. Read more... Coping With Unexpected Events: Depression and Trauma Responding to Traumatic Events When we ... immediately. back to top How to Cope with Depression After Trauma The healing process after a traumatic ...

  14. Development of glucocorticoid receptor regulation in the rat forebrain: Implications for adverse effects of glucocorticoids in preterm infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glucocorticoids are the consensus treatment to avoid respiratory distress in preterm infants but there is accumulating evidence that these agents evoke long-term neurobehavioral deficits. Earlier, we showed that the developing rat forebrain is far more sensitive to glucocorticoi...

  15. NF-kappaB activity decreases in basal forebrain of young and aged rats after hyperoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toliver-Kinsky, Tracy; Rassin, David; Perez-Polo, J Regino

    2002-01-01

    Hyperoxia is an oxidative stressor that triggers signaling cascades via changes in promoter activation by transcription factors. The transcription factor NF-kappaB has been shown to regulate transcription of many genes that play a role in inflammation and recovery from acute or chronic trauma. Here we describe the effects of hyperoxia on basal levels of NF-kappaB activity in young and aged rat forebrain. The results would suggest that chronic stress may have different effects on NF-kappaB basal activity levels as compared to the effects of an acute stress such as hyperoxia and that there is a diminished response to hyperoxia in the aged basal forebrain. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Inc.

  16. Receptors for GRP/bombesin-like peptides in the rat forebrain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, S.S.; Moody, T.W.

    1985-01-01

    Binding sites in the rat forebrain were characterized using ( 125 I-Tyr4)bombesin as a receptor probe. Pharmacology experiments indicate that gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) and the GRP fragments GRP as well as Ac-GRP inhibited radiolabeled (Tyr4)bombesin binding with high affinity. Biochemistry experiments indicated that heat, N-ethyl maleimide or trypsin greatly reduced radiolabeled (Tyr4)bombesin binding. Also, autoradiographic studies indicated that highest grain densities were present in the stria terminalis, periventricular and suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, dorsomedial and rhomboid thalamus, dentate gyrus, hippocampus and medial amygdaloid nucleus. The data suggest that CNS protein receptors, which are discretely distributed in the rat forebrain, may mediate the action of endogenous GRP/bombesin-like peptides

  17. Forebrain-Specific Loss of BMPRII in Mice Reduces Anxiety and Increases Object Exploration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofeyah L McBrayer

    Full Text Available To investigate the role of Bone Morphogenic Protein Receptor Type II (BMPRII in learning, memory, and exploratory behavior in mice, a tissue-specific knockout of BMPRII in the post-natal hippocampus and forebrain was generated. We found that BMPRII mutant mice had normal spatial learning and memory in the Morris water maze, but showed significantly reduced swimming speeds with increased floating behavior. Further analysis using the Porsolt Swim Test to investigate behavioral despair did not reveal any differences in immobility between mutants and controls. In the Elevated Plus Maze, BMPRII mutants and Smad4 mutants showed reduced anxiety, while in exploratory tests, BMPRII mutants showed more interest in object exploration. These results suggest that loss of BMPRII in the mouse hippocampus and forebrain does not disrupt spatial learning and memory encoding, but instead impacts exploratory and anxiety-related behaviors.

  18. Variability of Forebrain Commissures in Callosal Agenesis: A Prenatal MR Imaging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaretti, C; Nanni, M; Ghi, T; Parazzini, C; Conte, G; Contro, E; Grisolia, G; Righini, A

    2016-03-01

    Agenesis of the corpus callosum, even when isolated, may be characterized by anatomic variability. The aim of this study was to describe the types of other forebrain commissures in a large cohort of randomly enrolled fetuses with apparently isolated agenesis of the corpus callosum at prenatal MR imaging. All fetuses with apparent isolated agenesis of the corpus callosum undergoing prenatal MR imaging from 2004 to 2014, were evaluated for the presence of the anterior or a vestigial hippocampal commissure assessed in consensus by 2 pediatric neuroradiologists. Overall, 62 cases of agenesis of the corpus callosum were retrieved from our data base. In 3/62 fetuses (4.8%), no forebrain commissure was visible at prenatal MR imaging, 23/62 fetuses (37.1%) presented with only the anterior commissure, and 20/62 fetuses (32.3%) showed both the anterior commissure and a residual vestigial hippocampal commissure, whereas in the remaining 16/62 fetuses (25.8%), a hybrid structure merging a residual vestigial hippocampal commissure and a rudiment of the corpus callosum body was detectable. Postnatal MR imaging, when available, confirmed prenatal forebrain commissure findings. Most fetuses with apparent isolated agenesis of the corpus callosum showed at least 1 forebrain commissure at prenatal MR imaging, and approximately half of fetuses also had a second commissure: a vestigial hippocampal commissure or a hybrid made of a hippocampal commissure and a rudimentary corpus callosum body. Whether such variability is the result of different genotypes and whether it may have any impact on the long-term neurodevelopmental outcome remains to be assessed. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  19. Control of vocal and respiratory patterns in birdsong: dissection of forebrain and brainstem mechanisms using temperature.

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    Aaron S Andalman

    Full Text Available Learned motor behaviors require descending forebrain control to be coordinated with midbrain and brainstem motor systems. In songbirds, such as the zebra finch, regular breathing is controlled by brainstem centers, but when the adult songbird begins to sing, its breathing becomes tightly coordinated with forebrain-controlled vocalizations. The periods of silence (gaps between song syllables are typically filled with brief breaths, allowing the bird to sing uninterrupted for many seconds. While substantial progress has been made in identifying the brain areas and pathways involved in vocal and respiratory control, it is not understood how respiratory and vocal control is coordinated by forebrain motor circuits. Here we combine a recently developed technique for localized brain cooling, together with recordings of thoracic air sac pressure, to examine the role of cortical premotor nucleus HVC (proper name in respiratory-vocal coordination. We found that HVC cooling, in addition to slowing all song timescales as previously reported, also increased the duration of expiratory pulses (EPs and inspiratory pulses (IPs. Expiratory pulses, like song syllables, were stretched uniformly by HVC cooling, but most inspiratory pulses exhibited non-uniform stretch of pressure waveform such that the majority of stretch occurred late in the IP. Indeed, some IPs appeared to change duration by the earlier or later truncation of an underlying inspiratory event. These findings are consistent with the idea that during singing the temporal structure of EPs is under the direct control of forebrain circuits, whereas that of IPs can be strongly influenced by circuits downstream of HVC, likely in the brainstem. An analysis of the temporal jitter of respiratory and vocal structure suggests that IPs may be initiated by HVC at the end of each syllable and terminated by HVC immediately before the onset of the next syllable.

  20. Activation of the Basal Forebrain by the Orexin/Hypocretin Neurons: Orexin International Symposium

    OpenAIRE

    Arrigoni, Elda; Mochizuki, Takatoshi; Scammell, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    The orexin neurons play an essential role in driving arousal and in maintaining normal wakefulness. Lack of orexin neurotransmission produces a chronic state of hypoarousal characterized by excessive sleepiness, frequent transitions between wake and sleep, and episodes of cataplexy. A growing body of research now suggests that the basal forebrain (BF) may be a key site through which the orexin-producing neurons promote arousal. Here we review anatomical, pharmacological and electrophysiologic...

  1. Ablation of ferroptosis regulator glutathione peroxidase 4 in forebrain neurons promotes cognitive impairment and neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Sealy Hambright

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic loss and neuron death are the underlying cause of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD; however, the modalities of cell death in those diseases remain unclear. Ferroptosis, a newly identified oxidative cell death mechanism triggered by massive lipid peroxidation, is implicated in the degeneration of neurons populations such as spinal motor neurons and midbrain neurons. Here, we investigated whether neurons in forebrain regions (cerebral cortex and hippocampus that are severely afflicted in AD patients might be vulnerable to ferroptosis. To this end, we generated Gpx4BIKO mouse, a mouse model with conditional deletion in forebrain neurons of glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4, a key regulator of ferroptosis, and showed that treatment with tamoxifen led to deletion of Gpx4 primarily in forebrain neurons of adult Gpx4BIKO mice. Starting at 12 weeks after tamoxifen treatment, Gpx4BIKO mice exhibited significant deficits in spatial learning and memory function versus Control mice as determined by the Morris water maze task. Further examinations revealed that the cognitively impaired Gpx4BIKO mice exhibited hippocampal neurodegeneration. Notably, markers associated with ferroptosis, such as elevated lipid peroxidation, ERK activation and augmented neuroinflammation, were observed in Gpx4BIKO mice. We also showed that Gpx4BIKO mice fed a diet deficient in vitamin E, a lipid soluble antioxidant with anti-ferroptosis activity, had an expedited rate of hippocampal neurodegeneration and behavior dysfunction, and that treatment with a small-molecule ferroptosis inhibitor ameliorated neurodegeneration in those mice. Taken together, our results indicate that forebrain neurons are susceptible to ferroptosis, suggesting that ferroptosis may be an important neurodegenerative mechanism in diseases such as AD. Keywords: Ferroptosis, Neurodegeneration, Cognitive impairment, Alzheimer's disease, Glutathione peroxidase 4, Transgenic mice

  2. Topographic Organization of Cholinergic Innervation From the Basal Forebrain to the Visual Cortex in the Rat

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    Frédéric Huppé-Gourgues

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine is an important neurotransmitter for the regulation of visual attention, plasticity, and perceptual learning. It is released in the visual cortex predominantly by cholinergic projections from the basal forebrain, where stimulation may produce potentiation of visual processes. However, little is known about the fine organization of these corticopetal projections, such as whether basal forebrain neurons projecting to the primary and secondary visual cortical areas (V1 and V2, respectively are organized retinotopically. The aim of this study was to map these basal forebrain-V1/V2 projections. Microinjections of the fluorescent retrograde tracer cholera toxin b fragment in different sites within V1 and V2 in Long–Evans rats were performed. Retrogradely labeled cell bodies in the horizontal and vertical limbs of the diagonal band of Broca (HDB and VDB, respectively, nucleus basalis magnocellularis, and substantia innominata (SI, were mapped ex vivo with a computer-assisted microscope stage controlled by stereological software. Choline acetyltranferase immunohistochemistry was used to identify cholinergic cells. Our results showed a predominance of cholinergic projections coming from the HDB. These projections were not retinotopically organized but projections to V1 arised from neurons located in the anterior HDB/SI whereas projections to V2 arised from neurons located throughout the whole extent of HDB/SI. The absence of a clear topography of these projections suggests that BF activation can stimulate visual cortices broadly.

  3. Functional Connectome Analysis of Dopamine Neuron Glutamatergic Connections in Forebrain Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingote, Susana; Chuhma, Nao; Kusnoor, Sheila V; Field, Bianca; Deutch, Ariel Y; Rayport, Stephen

    2015-12-09

    In the ventral tegmental area (VTA), a subpopulation of dopamine neurons express vesicular glutamate transporter 2 and make glutamatergic connections to nucleus accumbens (NAc) and olfactory tubercle (OT) neurons. However, their glutamatergic connections across the forebrain have not been explored systematically. To visualize dopamine neuron forebrain projections and to enable photostimulation of their axons independent of transmitter status, we virally transfected VTA neurons with channelrhodopsin-2 fused to enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (ChR2-EYFP) and used DAT(IREScre) mice to restrict expression to dopamine neurons. ChR2-EYFP-expressing neurons almost invariably stained for tyrosine hydroxylase, identifying them as dopaminergic. Dopamine neuron axons visualized by ChR2-EYFP fluorescence projected most densely to the striatum, moderately to the amygdala and entorhinal cortex (ERC), sparsely to prefrontal and cingulate cortices, and rarely to the hippocampus. Guided by ChR2-EYFP fluorescence, we recorded systematically from putative principal neurons in target areas and determined the incidence and strength of glutamatergic connections by activating all dopamine neuron terminals impinging on recorded neurons with wide-field photostimulation. This revealed strong glutamatergic connections in the NAc, OT, and ERC; moderate strength connections in the central amygdala; and weak connections in the cingulate cortex. No glutamatergic connections were found in the dorsal striatum, hippocampus, basolateral amygdala, or prefrontal cortex. These results indicate that VTA dopamine neurons elicit widespread, but regionally distinct, glutamatergic signals in the forebrain and begin to define the dopamine neuron excitatory functional connectome. Dopamine neurons are important for the control of motivated behavior and are involved in the pathophysiology of several major neuropsychiatric disorders. Recent studies have shown that some ventral midbrain dopamine neurons are

  4. Grief, poetry, and the sweet unexpected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Richard; Jordan, Elizabeth

    2018-01-01

    This paper explains the healing benefits, the "sweet unexpected" of the title, which results from using poetry to engage trauma, including traumatic grief. The benefits of poetry are presented alongside a discussion of a 22-year-old nonprofit called The Pongo Poetry Project. The sweet unexpected includes the ease with which trauma survivors engage their trauma narrative, the critical insights that emerge in poetry, the beneficial social context of sharing poetry, and the healing benefits of poetry for writers, care providers, and readers alike. The paper concludes by providing resources that can help people use poetry in their own work.

  5. Stepwise, non-adherent differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells to generate basal forebrain cholinergic neurons via hedgehog signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crompton, Lucy A; Byrne, Meg L; Taylor, Hannah; Kerrigan, Talitha L; Bru-Mercier, Gilles; Badger, Jennifer L; Barbuti, Peter A; Jo, Jihoon; Tyler, Sue J; Allen, Shelley J; Kunath, Tilo; Cho, Kwangwook; Caldwell, Maeve A

    2013-11-01

    Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (bfCNs) which provide innervation to the hippocampus and cortex, are required for memory and learning, and are primarily affected in Alzheimer's Disease (AD), resulting in related cognitive decline. Therefore generation of a source of bfCNs from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) is crucial for in vitro disease modeling and development of novel AD therapies. In addition, for the advancement of regenerative approaches there is a requirement for an accurate developmental model to study the neurogenesis and survival of this population. Here we demonstrate the efficient production of bfCNs, using a novel embryoid body (EB) based non-adherent differentiation (NAdD) protocol. We establish a specific basal forebrain neural stem cell (NSC) phenotype via expression of the basal forebrain transcription factors NKX2.1 and LHX8, as well as the general forebrain marker FOXG1. We present evidence that this lineage is achieved via recapitulation of embryonic events, with induction of intrinsic hedgehog signaling, through the use of a 3D non-adherent differentiation system. This is the first example of hPSC-derived basal forebrain-like NSCs, which are scalable via self-renewal in prolonged culture. Furthermore upon terminal differentiation these basal forebrain-like NSCs generate high numbers of cholinergic neurons expressing the specific markers ChAT, VACht and ISL1. These hPSC-derived bfCNs possess characteristics that are crucial in a model to study AD related cholinergic neuronal loss in the basal forebrain. Examples are expression of the therapeutic target p75(NTR), the release of acetylcholine, and demonstration of a mature, and functional electrophysiological profile. In conclusion, this work provides a renewable source of human functional bfCNs applicable for studying AD specifically in the cholinergic system, and also provides a model of the key embryonic events in human bfCN development. © 2013.

  6. Modulation of learning and memory by the targeted deletion of the circadian clock gene Bmal1 in forebrain circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, Kaitlin H; Dziema, Heather; Aten, Sydney; Loeser, Jacob; Norona, Frances E; Hoyt, Kari; Obrietan, Karl

    2016-07-15

    A large body of literature has shown that the disruption of circadian clock timing has profound effects on mood, memory and complex thinking. Central to this time keeping process is the master circadian pacemaker located within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Of note, within the central nervous system, clock timing is not exclusive to the SCN, but rather, ancillary oscillatory capacity has been detected in a wide range of cell types and brain regions, including forebrain circuits that underlie complex cognitive processes. These observations raise questions about the hierarchical and functional relationship between the SCN and forebrain oscillators, and, relatedly, about the underlying clock-gated synaptic circuitry that modulates cognition. Here, we utilized a clock knockout strategy in which the essential circadian timing gene Bmal1 was selectively deleted from excitatory forebrain neurons, whilst the SCN clock remained intact, to test the role of forebrain clock timing in learning, memory, anxiety, and behavioral despair. With this model system, we observed numerous effects on hippocampus-dependent measures of cognition. Mice lacking forebrain Bmal1 exhibited deficits in both acquisition and recall on the Barnes maze. Notably, loss of forebrain Bmal1 abrogated time-of-day dependent novel object location memory. However, the loss of Bmal1 did not alter performance on the elevated plus maze, open field assay, and tail suspension test, indicating that this phenotype specifically impairs cognition but not affect. Together, these data suggest that forebrain clock timing plays a critical role in shaping the efficiency of learning and memory retrieval over the circadian day. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Unexpected difficult airway with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism

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    Yaman F

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Ferda Yaman,1 Bengi Arslan,2 Ercan Yuvanç,3 Ünase Büyükkoçak1 1Anesthesiology and Reanimation Department, 2Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery Department, 3Urology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Kirikkale University, Kirikkale, Turkey Background: A critical aspect of safe general anesthesia is providing adequate ventilation and oxygenation. Failed endotracheal intubation and inadequate ventilation with insufficient oxygenation may lead to serious complications, even death. Anesthesiologists rarely encounter unexpected difficult airway problems in daily routine. Management of an unexpectedly difficult airway consists of laryngeal mask ventilation, gum-elastic bougie and video laryngoscopy-assisted intubation. Gum-elastic bougie is the easiest and cheapest tool used in case of an unexpected difficult intubation occurring in the operating room. Case: A 53-year-old male patient with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism presented as an unexpected difficult intubation after the induction of anesthesia. No pathological finding or predictor of difficult intubation was present. In addition, bag-mask ventilation was poor and inadequate. The patient was finally successfully intubated with a gum-elastic bougie. Conclusion: A difficult airway has been described in patients with a variety of endocrine disorders, including pituitary diseases, but not with hypogonadism. There may be an unrevealed relationship between hypogonadism and difficult airway. Gum-elastic bougie is still the most attainable and effective tool in the operation room in this situation. Keywords: airway management, intubation, hypogonadism

  8. An Unexpected Influence on a Quadratic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jon D.

    2013-01-01

    Using technology to explore the coefficients of a quadratic equation can lead to an unexpected result. This article describes an investigation that involves sliders and dynamically linked representations. It guides students to notice the effect that the parameter "a" has on the graphical representation of a quadratic function in the form…

  9. Spectrometric mixture analysis: An unexpected wrinkle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Dedicated to the memory of the late Professor S K Rangarajan. Spectrometric mixture analysis: An unexpected wrinkle. †. ROBERT DE LEVIE. Chemistry Department ..... For a quick visual check of the mixture spectra, we plotted the absorbances of those solutions that have a constant value of c + t, such as (0, 180), (90,.

  10. Association Between Smoking and Cholinergic Basal Forebrain Volume in Healthy Aging and Prodromal and Dementia Stages of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teipel, Stefan; Grothe, Michel J

    2016-04-12

    Smoking has been found associated with decreased cerebral volumes in healthy adults and in various neuropsychiatric disorders. We aimed to determine whether chronic nicotine exposure through smoking is associated with reduced volume of cortically projecting cholinergic basal forebrain nuclei in healthy aging, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and dementia stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We retrieved cross-sectional data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database including 179 cognitively normal elderly subjects, 270 subjects with early stage MCI, 136 subjects in later, more advanced, stage of MCI, and 86 subjects in dementia stages of AD. We determined the association between past or current smoking versus lifetime non-smoker status on the volumes of the basal forebrain determined from volumetric MRI scans. Hippocampus volume was used as a control region. Significant effects were controlled for mediating or moderating effects of respiratory and cardiovascular morbidity. In cognitively healthy individuals and early MCI, past or current smoking was significantly associated with smaller basal forebrain volume. This effect was independent from age, sex, or cardiovascular or respiratory morbidity. Hippocampus volume was not associated with smoking. In late MCI and AD dementia, smoking was not associated with basal forebrain or hippocampus volumes. Our findings suggest that chronic nicotine exposure through smoking may lead to atrophy of cholinergic input areas of the basal forebrain. This effect may account for an increased risk of AD dementia onset with smoking by exhausting the cholinergic system reserve capacity.

  11. Forebrain development in fetal MRI: evaluation of anatomical landmarks before gestational week 27

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmook, Maria T.; Weber, Michael; Kasprian, Gregor; Nemec, Stefan; Prayer, Daniela [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology/Division of Neuro- and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Brugger, Peter C. [Medical University of Vienna, Integrative Morphology Group, Center for Anatomy and Cell Biology, Vienna (Austria); Krampl-Bettelheim, Elisabeth [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology / Division of Obstetrics and Feto-maternal Medicine, Vienna (Austria)

    2010-06-15

    Forebrain malformations include some of the most severe developmental anomalies and require early diagnosis. The proof of normal or abnormal prosencephalic development may have an influence on further management in the event of a suspected fetal malformation. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the detectability of anatomical landmarks of forebrain development using in vivo fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before gestational week (gw) 27. MRI studies of 83 singleton fetuses (gw 16-26, average {+-}sd: gw 22 {+-} 2) performed at 1.5 Tesla were assessed. T2-weighted (w) fast spin echo, T1w gradient-echo and diffusion-weighted sequences were screened for the detectability of anatomical landmarks as listed below. The interhemispheric fissure, ocular bulbs, corpus callosum, infundibulum, chiasm, septum pellucidum (SP), profile, and palate were detectable in 95%, 95%, 89%, 87%, 82%, 81%, 78%, 78% of cases. Olfactory tracts were more easily delineated than bulbs and sulci (37% versus 18% and 8%), with significantly higher detection rates in the coronal plane. The pituitary gland could be detected on T1w images in 60% with an increasing diameter with gestational age (p=0.041). The delineation of olfactory tracts (coronal plane), chiasm, SP and pituitary gland were significantly increased after week 21 (p<0.05). Pathologies were found in 28% of cases. This study provides detection rates for anatomical landmarks of forebrain development with fetal MRI before gw 27. Several anatomical structures are readily detectable with routine fetal MRI sequences; thus, if these landmarks are not delineable, it should raise the suspicion of a pathology. Recommendations regarding favorable sequences/planes are provided. (orig.)

  12. Newly identified patterns of Pax2 expression in the developing mouse forebrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mason John O

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The availability of specific markers expressed in different regions of the developing nervous system provides a useful tool for the study of mouse mutants. One such marker, the transcription factor Pax2, is expressed at the midbrain-hindbrain boundary and in the cerebellum, spinal cord, retina, optic stalk, and optic chiasm. We recently described a group of diencephalic cells that express Pax2 as early as embryonic day (E 10.5, and become part of the eminentia thalami by E11.5. The discovery of this previously undescribed cell population prompted us to examine Pax2 protein expression in the developing mouse forebrain in more detail. Results We determined the expression pattern of Pax2 in the forebrain of wild type mouse embryos between E10.5 and postnatal day (P 15. Pax2 expression was detected in the septum of the basal forebrain, hypothalamus, eminentia thalami and in the subfornical organ. To evaluate Pax2 as a marker for septal cells, we examined Pax2 expression in Pax6Sey/Sey mutants, which have an enlarged septum. We found that Pax2 clearly marks a population of septal cells equivalent to that seen in wild types, indicating its utility as a marker of septal identity. These cells did not express the GABAergic marker calbindin nor the cholinergic marker choline acetyltransferase and were not detectable after P15. Conclusion Pax2 is expressed in populations of cells within the developing septum, hypothalamus, and eminentia thalami. It seems especially useful as a marker of the telencephalic septum, because of its early, strong and characteristic expression in this structure. Further, its expression is maintained in the enlarged septum of Pax6Sey/Sey mutants.

  13. GABA-to-ACh ratio in basal forebrain and cerebral cortex varies significantly during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanini, Giancarlo; Lydic, Ralph; Baghdoyan, Helen A

    2012-10-01

    GABAergic and cholinergic transmission within the basal forebrain and cerebral cortex contribute to the regulation of sleep and wakefulness. In contrast to levels of acetylcholine (ACh), levels of endogenous GABA in basal forebrain and cortex during sleep and wakefulness have not previously been quantified. This study (1) tested the hypothesis that there are differential, state-specific changes in GABA levels within the substantia innominata (SI) region of the basal forebrain and somatosensory cortex; and (2) quantified the ratio of GABAergic to cholinergic transmission in the SI, cortex, and pontine reticular formation during rapid eye movement sleep (REM), non-REM sleep (NREM), and wakefulness. Within/between subjects. University of Michigan. Adult, male, purpose bred cats (n = 5). In vivo microdialysis, high performance liquid chromatography, electrophysiological recordings. In the SI, GABA levels were significantly greater during NREM (17%) than during REM. In the cortex, GABA levels were significantly greater during NREM than during wakefulness (39%) and REM (63%). During prolonged wakefulness, there was a linear increase in cortical GABA levels, and the amount of time spent awake accounted for 87% of the variance in GABA. The GABA-to-ACh ratio was largest during NREM for all brain regions. REM was characterized by a 68% decrease in the GABA-to-ACh ratio across brain regions, always due to a decrease in GABA levels. Three of the brain regions that comprise the anatomically distributed, sleep-generating network have in common a GABA-mediated, sleep-dependent decrease in the GABA-to-ACh ratio.

  14. Song exposure regulates known and novel microRNAs in the zebra finch auditory forebrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Jong H

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In an important model for neuroscience, songbirds learn to discriminate songs they hear during tape-recorded playbacks, as demonstrated by song-specific habituation of both behavioral and neurogenomic responses in the auditory forebrain. We hypothesized that microRNAs (miRNAs or miRs may participate in the changing pattern of gene expression induced by song exposure. To test this, we used massively parallel Illumina sequencing to analyse small RNAs from auditory forebrain of adult zebra finches exposed to tape-recorded birdsong or silence. Results In the auditory forebrain, we identified 121 known miRNAs conserved in other vertebrates. We also identified 34 novel miRNAs that do not align to human or chicken genomes. Five conserved miRNAs showed significant and consistent changes in copy number after song exposure across three biological replications of the song-silence comparison, with two increasing (tgu-miR-25, tgu-miR-192 and three decreasing (tgu-miR-92, tgu-miR-124, tgu-miR-129-5p. We also detected a locus on the Z sex chromosome that produces three different novel miRNAs, with supporting evidence from Northern blot and TaqMan qPCR assays for differential expression in males and females and in response to song playbacks. One of these, tgu-miR-2954-3p, is predicted (by TargetScan to regulate eight song-responsive mRNAs that all have functions in cellular proliferation and neuronal differentiation. Conclusions The experience of hearing another bird singing alters the profile of miRNAs in the auditory forebrain of zebra finches. The response involves both known conserved miRNAs and novel miRNAs described so far only in the zebra finch, including a novel sex-linked, song-responsive miRNA. These results indicate that miRNAs are likely to contribute to the unique behavioural biology of learned song communication in songbirds.

  15. Cortical cholinergic hypofunction and behaviorial impairment produced by basal forebrain lesions in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerer, B.E.; Friedman, E.; Gamzu, E.

    1986-01-01

    The authors confirm the cortical ChAT and passive avoidance deficits resulting from bilateral KA lesions of the magnocellular nuclei of the basal forebrain (MNBF). Because of reported passive avoidance deficits, the authors were interested in whether bilateral MNBF lesions would interfere with learning in an active avoidance paradigm. Samples of rat cortex were stored at -80 C until assayed. ChAT was assayed by a modification method under saturating conditions; 20 mM choline and 2 mM C 14-acetylcoenzyme. The behavioral deficits assumed to be indicative of learning and memory problems were accompanied by a 20% decrease in cortical ChAT

  16. Genetic ablation of Dicer in adult forebrain neurons results in abnormal tau hyperphosphorylation and neurodegeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hébert, Sébastien S; Papadopoulou, Aikaterini S; Smith, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    , particularly in the adult brain, remain poorly defined. Here we show that the absence of Dicer in the adult forebrain is accompanied by a mixed neurodegenerative phenotype. Although neuronal loss is observed in the hippocampus, cellular shrinkage is predominant in the cortex. Interestingly, neuronal...... degeneration coincides with the hyperphosphorylation of endogenous tau at several epitopes previously associated with neurofibrillary pathology. Transcriptome analysis of enzymes involved in tau phosphorylation identified ERK1 as one of the candidate kinases responsible for this event in vivo. We further...

  17. Cannibalistic-morph Tiger Salamanders in unexpected ecological contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Kyle I.; Stockwell, Craig A.; Mushet, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Barred tiger salamanders [Ambystoma mavortium (Baird, 1850)] exhibit two trophic morphologies; a typical and a cannibalistic morph. Cannibalistic morphs, distinguished by enlarged vomerine teeth, wide heads, slender bodies, and cannibalistic tendencies, are often found where conspecifics occur at high density. During 2012 and 2013, 162 North Dakota wetlands and lakes were sampled for salamanders. Fifty-one contained A. mavortium populations; four of these contained cannibalistic morph individuals. Two populations with cannibalistic morphs occurred at sites with high abundances of conspecifics. However, the other two populations occurred at sites with unexpectedly low conspecific but high fathead minnow [Pimephales promelas (Rafinesque, 1820)] abundances. Further, no typical morphs were observed in either of these later two populations, contrasting with earlier research suggesting cannibalistic morphs only occur at low frequencies in salamander populations. Another anomaly of all four populations was the occurrence of cannibalistic morphs in permanent water sites, suggesting their presence was due to factors other than faster growth allowing them to occupy ephemeral habitats. Therefore, our findings suggest environmental factors inducing the cannibalistic morphism may be more complex than previously thought.

  18. Unexpected abundance of HLA class II presented peptides in primary renal cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengjel, Jörn; Nastke, Maria-Dorothea; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Gitsioudis, Gitsios; Schoor, Oliver; Altenberend, Florian; Müller, Margret; Krämer, Björn; Missiou, Anna; Sauter, Martina; Hennenlotter, Jörg; Wernet, Dorothee; Stenzl, Arnulf; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Klingel, Karin; Stevanović, Stefan

    2006-07-15

    To elicit a long-lasting antitumor immune response, CD8+ and CD4+ T cells should be activated. We attempted to isolate HLA-DR-presented peptides directly from dissected solid tumors, in particular from renal cell carcinoma, to identify MHC class II ligands from tumor-associated antigens (TAA) for their use in peptide-based immunotherapy. Tumor specimens were analyzed by immunohistochemical staining for their HLA class II expression. HLA class II peptides were subsequently isolated and identified by mass spectrometry. Gene expression analysis was done to detect genes overexpressed in tumor tissue. Peptides from identified TAAs were used to induce peptide-specific CD4+ T-cell responses in healthy donors and in tumor patients. In the absence of inflammation, expression of MHC class II molecules is mainly restricted to cells of the immune system. To our surprise, we were able to isolate and characterize hundreds of class II peptides directly from primary dissected solid tumors, especially from renal cell carcinomas, and from colorectal carcinomas and transitional cell carcinomas. Infiltrating leukocytes expressed MHC class II molecules and tumor cells, very likely under the influence of IFNgamma. Our list of identified peptides contains ligands from several TAAs, including insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 and matrix metalloproteinase 7. The latter bound promiscuously to HLA-DR molecules and were able to elicit CD4+ T-cell responses. Thus, our direct approach will rapidly expand the limited number of T-helper epitopes from TAAs for their use in clinical vaccination protocols.

  19. Unexpected secoiridoid glucosides from Manulea corymbosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gousiadou, Chrysoula; Kokubun, Tetsuo; Gotfredsen, Charlotte H; Jensen, Søren R

    2014-03-28

    From an extract of Manulea corymbosa were isolated four known secoiridoid glucosides (1-4), 10 new monoterpenoid esters of secologanol, namely, manuleosides A-I (5-11, 13, and 14) and dimethyl rhodanthoside A (12), and four new phenylpropanoid esters of carbocyclic iridoid glucosides, manucorymbosides I-IV (15-18). Also, the caffeoyl phenylethanoid glycoside verbascoside was isolated. The presence of secoiridoids apparently derived from loganic acid in the family Scrophulariaceae is unprecedented and greatly unexpected.

  20. Unexpected Secoiridoid Glucosides from Manulea corymbosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gousiadou, Chrysoula; Kokubun, Tetsuo; Gotfredsen, Charlotte Held

    2014-01-01

    From an extract of Manulea corymbosa were isolated four known secoiridoid glucosides (1–4), 10 new monoterpenoid esters of secologanol, namely, manuleosides A–I (5–11, 13, and 14) and dimethyl rhodanthoside A (12), and four new phenylpropanoid esters of carbocyclic iridoid glucosides, manucorymbo......, manucorymbosides I–IV (15–18). Also, the caffeoyl phenylethanoid glycoside verbascoside was isolated. The presence of secoiridoids apparently derived from loganic acid in the family Scrophulariaceae is unprecedented and greatly unexpected....

  1. The effects of incubation temperature on the development of the cortical forebrain in a lizard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiel, Joshua J; Bao, Shisan; Shine, Richard

    2017-01-01

    The embryos of egg-laying species are exposed to variable thermal regimes, which can influence not only the resultant hatchling's morphology (e.g., size, sex) and performance (e.g., locomotor speed), but also its cognitive performance (learning ability). To clarify the proximate basis for this latter effect, we incubated eggs of the scincid lizard Bassiana duperreyi under simulated 'hot' and 'cold' natural nest temperatures to examine the effect of incubation temperature on the structure of the telencephalon region of the forebrain. Hatchlings from low-temperature incubation had larger telencephalons (both in absolute terms and relative to body size) and larger neurons in their medial cortices, whereas the medial cortices of hatchlings from high-temperature incubation had fewer neurons overall, but greater neuronal density, and more neurons in certain areas. These temperature-induced differences in B. duperreyi forebrain development are consistent with (and may explain) the disparities in learning ability between hatchlings from our two incubation treatments. The phenotypic plasticity of lizard telencephalon anatomy in response to incubation temperature presents exciting opportunities for studies on the evolutionary and developmental determinants of intelligence in vertebrates, but also offers a cautionary tale. Global climate changes, wrought by anthropogenic activities, may directly modify brain structure in reptiles.

  2. Hierarchical prediction errors in midbrain and basal forebrain during sensory learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, Sandra; Mathys, Christoph; Brodersen, Kay H; Kasper, Lars; Piccirelli, Marco; den Ouden, Hanneke E M; Stephan, Klaas E

    2013-10-16

    In Bayesian brain theories, hierarchically related prediction errors (PEs) play a central role for predicting sensory inputs and inferring their underlying causes, e.g., the probabilistic structure of the environment and its volatility. Notably, PEs at different hierarchical levels may be encoded by different neuromodulatory transmitters. Here, we tested this possibility in computational fMRI studies of audio-visual learning. Using a hierarchical Bayesian model, we found that low-level PEs about visual stimulus outcome were reflected by widespread activity in visual and supramodal areas but also in the midbrain. In contrast, high-level PEs about stimulus probabilities were encoded by the basal forebrain. These findings were replicated in two groups of healthy volunteers. While our fMRI measures do not reveal the exact neuron types activated in midbrain and basal forebrain, they suggest a dichotomy between neuromodulatory systems, linking dopamine to low-level PEs about stimulus outcome and acetylcholine to more abstract PEs about stimulus probabilities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Sudden unexpected death associated with lymphocytic thyroiditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Vibeke; Drostrup, Dorthe Høj; Thomsen, Jørgen L

    2007-01-01

    , especially, is easily overlooked at autopsy as there are no macroscopic changes and often no prior symptoms or history of thyroid disease pointing towards this condition. Analyses of thyroid hormones are unreliable in predicting endocrine status in life. Routine microscopy of the thyroid gland is therefore...... of their alcohol abuse, (iii) cases of fatal poisoning other than opiate addicts, (iv) unknown cause of death and (v) controls without prior disease. Tissue samples from the thyroid gland were cut and stained with haematoxylin and eosin and van Gieson. Histology examinations were subsequently performed blind...... advocated in cases of sudden unexpected death in order to diagnose thyroid disease, in particular silent (painless) thyroiditis....

  4. Age-related changes in rostral basal forebrain cholinergic and GABAergic projection neurons: relationship with spatial impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañuelos, Cristina; LaSarge, Candi L; McQuail, Joseph A; Hartman, John J; Gilbert, Ryan J; Ormerod, Brandi K; Bizon, Jennifer L

    2013-03-01

    Both cholinergic and GABAergic projections from the rostral basal forebrain contribute to hippocampal function and mnemonic abilities. While dysfunction of cholinergic neurons has been heavily implicated in age-related memory decline, significantly less is known regarding how age-related changes in codistributed GABAergic projection neurons contribute to a decline in hippocampal-dependent spatial learning. In the current study, confocal stereology was used to quantify cholinergic (choline acetyltransferase [ChAT] immunopositive) neurons, GABAergic projection (glutamic decarboxylase 67 [GAD67] immunopositive) neurons, and total (neuronal nuclei [NeuN] immunopositive) neurons in the rostral basal forebrain of young and aged rats that were first characterized on a spatial learning task. ChAT immunopositive neurons were significantly but modestly reduced in aged rats. Although ChAT immunopositive neuron number was strongly correlated with spatial learning abilities among young rats, the reduction of ChAT immunopositive neurons was not associated with impaired spatial learning in aged rats. In contrast, the number of GAD67 immunopositive neurons was robustly and selectively elevated in aged rats that exhibited impaired spatial learning. Interestingly, the total number of rostral basal forebrain neurons was comparable in young and aged rats, regardless of their cognitive status. These data demonstrate differential effects of age on phenotypically distinct rostral basal forebrain projection neurons, and implicate dysregulated cholinergic and GABAergic septohippocampal circuitry in age-related mnemonic decline. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Deficits Reduce Glucose Metabolism and Function of Cholinergic and GABAergic Systems in the Cingulate Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Da Un; Oh, Jin Hwan; Lee, Ji Eun; Lee, Jihyeon; Cho, Zang Hee; Chang, Jin Woo; Chang, Won Seok

    2016-01-01

    Reduced brain glucose metabolism and basal forebrain cholinergic neuron degeneration are common features of Alzheimer's disease and have been correlated with memory function. Although regions representing glucose hypometabolism in patients with Alzheimer's disease are targets of cholinergic basal forebrain neurons, the interaction between cholinergic denervation and glucose hypometabolism is still unclear. The aim of the present study was to evaluate glucose metabolism changes caused by cholinergic deficits. We lesioned basal forebrain cholinergic neurons in rats using 192 immunoglobulin G-saporin. After 3 weeks, lesioned animals underwent water maze testing or were analyzed by ¹⁸F-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography. During water maze probe testing, performance of the lesioned group decreased with respect to time spent in the target quadrant and platform zone. Cingulate cortex glucose metabolism in the lesioned group decreased, compared with the normal group. Additionally, acetylcholinesterase activity and glutamate decarboxylase 65/67 expression declined in the cingulate cortex. Our results reveal that spatial memory impairment in animals with selective basal forebrain cholinergic neuron damage is associated with a functional decline in the GABAergic and cholinergic system associated with cingulate cortex glucose hypometabolism.

  6. Local tissue interactions across the dorsal midline of the forebrain establish CNS laterality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concha, Miguel L; Russell, Claire; Regan, Jennifer C; Tawk, Marcel; Sidi, Samuel; Gilmour, Darren T; Kapsimali, Marika; Sumoy, Lauro; Goldstone, Kim; Amaya, Enrique; Kimelman, David; Nicolson, Teresa; Gründer, Stefan; Gomperts, Miranda; Clarke, Jonathan D W; Wilson, Stephen W

    2003-07-31

    The mechanisms that establish behavioral, cognitive, and neuroanatomical asymmetries are poorly understood. In this study, we analyze the events that regulate development of asymmetric nuclei in the dorsal forebrain. The unilateral parapineal organ has a bilateral origin, and some parapineal precursors migrate across the midline to form this left-sided nucleus. The parapineal subsequently innervates the left habenula, which derives from ventral epithalamic cells adjacent to the parapineal precursors. Ablation of cells in the left ventral epithalamus can reverse laterality in wild-type embryos and impose the direction of CNS asymmetry in embryos in which laterality is usually randomized. Unilateral modulation of Nodal activity by Lefty1 can also impose the direction of CNS laterality in embryos with bilateral expression of Nodal pathway genes. From these data, we propose that laterality is determined by a competitive interaction between the left and right epithalamus and that Nodal signaling biases the outcome of this competition.

  7. Calcium imaging of basal forebrain activity during innate and learned behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Clarke Harrison

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The basal forebrain (BF plays crucial roles in arousal, attention, and memory, and its impairment is associated with a variety of cognitive deficits. The BF consists of cholinergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic neurons. Electrical or optogenetic stimulation of BF cholinergic neurons enhances cortical processing and behavioral performance, but the natural activity of these cells during behavior is only beginning to be characterized. Even less is known about GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons. Here, we performed microendoscopic calcium imaging of BF neurons as mice engaged in spontaneous behaviors in their home cages (innate or performed a go/no-go auditory discrimination task (learned. Cholinergic neurons were consistently excited during movement, including running and licking, but GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons exhibited diverse responses. All cell types were activated by overt punishment, either inside or outside of the discrimination task. These findings reveal functional similarities and distinctions between BF cell types during both spontaneous and task-related behaviors.

  8. Somatostatin Neurons in the Basal Forebrain Promote High-Calorie Food Intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Zhu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Obesity has become a global issue, and the overconsumption of food is thought to be a major contributor. However, the regulatory neural circuits that regulate palatable food consumption remain unclear. Here, we report that somatostatin (SOM neurons and GABAergic (VGAT neurons in the basal forebrain (BF play specific roles in regulating feeding. Optogenetic stimulation of BF SOM neurons increased fat and sucrose intake within minutes and promoted anxiety-like behaviors. Furthermore, optogenetic stimulation of projections from BF SOM neurons to the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA selectively resulted in fat intake. In addition, activation of BF VGAT neurons rapidly induced general food intake and gnawing behaviors. Whole-brain mapping of inputs and outputs showed that BF SOM neurons form bidirectional connections with several brain areas important in feeding and regulation of emotion. Collectively, these results suggest that BF SOM neurons play a selective role in hedonic feeding.

  9. Hippocampal Sclerosis but Not Normal Aging or Alzheimer Disease Is Associated With TDP-43 Pathology in the Basal Forebrain of Aged Persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cykowski, Matthew D; Takei, Hidehiro; Van Eldik, Linda J; Schmitt, Frederick A; Jicha, Gregory A; Powell, Suzanne Z; Nelson, Peter T

    2016-05-01

    Transactivating responsive sequence (TAR) DNA-binding protein 43-kDa (TDP-43) pathology has been described in various brain diseases, but the full anatomical distribution and clinical and biological implications of that pathology are incompletely characterized. Here, we describe TDP-43 neuropathology in the basal forebrain, hypothalamus, and adjacent nuclei in 98 individuals (mean age, 86 years; median final mini-mental state examination score, 27). On examination blinded to clinical and pathologic diagnoses, we identified TDP-43 pathology that most frequently involved the ventromedial basal forebrain in 19 individuals (19.4%). As expected, many of these brains had comorbid pathologies including those of Alzheimer disease (AD), Lewy body disease (LBD), and/or hippocampal sclerosis of aging (HS-Aging). The basal forebrain TDP-43 pathology was strongly associated with comorbid HS-Aging (odds ratio = 6.8, p = 0.001), whereas there was no significant association between basal forebrain TDP-43 pathology and either AD or LBD neuropathology. In this sample, there were some cases with apparent preclinical TDP-43 pathology in the basal forebrain that may indicate that this is an early affected area in HS-Aging. We conclude that TDP-43 pathology in the basal forebrain is strongly associated with HS-Aging. These results raise questions about a specific pathogenetic relationship between basal forebrain TDP-43 and non-HS-Aging comorbid diseases (AD and LBD). © 2016 American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Hippocampal Sclerosis but Not Normal Aging or Alzheimer Disease Is Associated With TDP-43 Pathology in the Basal Forebrain of Aged Persons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Hidehiro; Van Eldik, Linda J.; Schmitt, Frederick A.; Jicha, Gregory A.; Powell, Suzanne Z.; Nelson, Peter T.

    2016-01-01

    Transactivating responsive sequence (TAR) DNA-binding protein 43-kDa (TDP-43) pathology has been described in various brain diseases, but the full anatomical distribution and clinical and biological implications of that pathology are incompletely characterized. Here, we describe TDP-43 neuropathology in the basal forebrain, hypothalamus, and adjacent nuclei in 98 individuals (mean age, 86 years; median final mini-mental state examination score, 27). On examination blinded to clinical and pathologic diagnoses, we identified TDP-43 pathology that most frequently involved the ventromedial basal forebrain in 19 individuals (19.4%). As expected, many of these brains had comorbid pathologies including those of Alzheimer disease (AD), Lewy body disease (LBD), and/or hippocampal sclerosis of aging (HS-Aging). The basal forebrain TDP-43 pathology was strongly associated with comorbid HS-Aging (odds ratio = 6.8, p = 0.001), whereas there was no significant association between basal forebrain TDP-43 pathology and either AD or LBD neuropathology. In this sample, there were some cases with apparent preclinical TDP-43 pathology in the basal forebrain that may indicate that this is an early affected area in HS-Aging. We conclude that TDP-43 pathology in the basal forebrain is strongly associated with HS-Aging. These results raise questions about a specific pathogenetic relationship between basal forebrain TDP-43 and non-HS-Aging comorbid diseases (AD and LBD). PMID:26971127

  11. New perspective on the regionalization of the anterior forebrain in Osteichthyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kei; Bloch, Solal; Vernier, Philippe

    2017-05-01

    In the current model, the most anterior part of the forebrain (secondary prosencephalon) is subdivided into the telencephalon dorsally and the hypothalamus ventrally. Our recent study identified a new morphogenetic unit named the optic recess region (ORR) between the telencephalon and the hypothalamus. This modification of the forebrain regionalization based on the ventricular organization resolved some previously unexplained inconsistency about regional identification in different vertebrate groups. The ventricular-based comparison also revealed a large diversity within the subregions (notably in the hypothalamus and telencephalon) among different vertebrate groups. In tetrapods there is only one hypothalamic recess, while in teleosts there are two recesses. Most notably, the mammalian and teleost hypothalami are two extreme cases: the former has lost the cerebrospinal fluid-contacting (CSF-c) neurons, while the latter has increased them. Thus, one to one homology of hypothalamic subregions in mammals and teleosts requires careful verification. In the telencephalon, different developmental processes between Sarcopterygii (lobe-finned fish) and Actinopterygii (ray-finned fish) have already been described: the evagination and the eversion. Although pallial homology has been long discussed based on the assumption that the medial-lateral organization of the pallium in Actinopterygii is inverted from that in Sarcopterygii, recent developmental data contradict this assumption. Current models of the brain organization are largely based on a mammalian-centric point of view, but our comparative analyses shed new light on the brain organization of Osteichthyes. © 2017 The Authors. Development, Growth & Differentiation published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  12. How unexpected are unexpected findings in prenatal cytogenetic diagnosis? A literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zwieten, Myra C. B.; Willems, Dick L.; Litjens, Liesbeth L.; Schuring-Blom, Heleen G.; Leschot, Nico

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this review was to gain understanding about unexpected findings in prenatal cytogenetic diagnosis. This category of results might be excluded from prenatal testing when new molecular tests such as I-FISH and QF-PCR will be applied in a future scenario of targeted testing. The

  13. OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN CEPHEIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luck, R. E.; Andrievsky, S. M. [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106-7215 (United States); Korotin, S. N.; Kovtyukh, V. V., E-mail: luck@fafnir.astr.cwru.edu, E-mail: serkor@skyline.od.ua, E-mail: val@deneb1.odessa.ua, E-mail: scan@deneb1.odessa.ua [Department of Astronomy and Astronomical Observatory, Odessa National University, Isaac Newton Institute of Chile, Odessa Branch, Shevchenko Park, 65014 Odessa (Ukraine)

    2013-07-01

    Oxygen abundances in later-type stars, and intermediate-mass stars in particular, are usually determined from the [O I] line at 630.0 nm, and to a lesser extent, from the O I triplet at 615.7 nm. The near-IR triplets at 777.4 nm and 844.6 nm are strong in these stars and generally do not suffer from severe blending with other species. However, these latter two triplets suffer from strong non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) effects and thus see limited use in abundance analyses. In this paper, we derive oxygen abundances in a large sample of Cepheids using the near-IR triplets from an NLTE analysis, and compare those abundances to values derived from a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis of the [O I] 630.0 nm line and the O I 615.7 nm triplet as well as LTE abundances for the 777.4 nm triplet. All of these lines suffer from line strength problems making them sensitive to either measurement complications (weak lines) or to line saturation difficulties (strong lines). Upon this realization, the LTE results for the [O I] lines and the O I 615.7 nm triplet are in adequate agreement with the abundance from the NLTE analysis of the near-IR triplets.

  14. Sudden unexpected death in infancy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkel, Bo Gregers; Holst, Anders Gaarsdal; Theilade, Juliane

    2011-01-01

    of the ICD-10 code for SIDS (R95) in the Danish Cause of Death registry. Design. A retrospective analysis of all infant deaths (reports were read. Results. We identified 192 SUDI cases (10% of total deaths, 0.42 per 1000 births......Abstract Background. Incidence of sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) differs among studies and non-autopsied cases are difficult to assess. Objectives. To investigate causes of sudden death in infancy in a nationwide setting. Validate the use......) with autopsy performed in 87% of cases. In total, 49% of autopsied SUDI cases were defined as SIDS (5% of all deaths, 0.22 per 1000 births); Cardiac cause of death was denoted in 24% of cases. The Danish Cause of Death Registry misclassified 30% of SIDS cases. Conclusions. A large proportion of infant deaths...

  15. Unpredictable Root Canal Morphology: Expect the Unexpected

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohez J Makani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A maxillary first molar with more than four canals is an interesting example of anatomic variations, especially when two of these canals are detected, with separate apical foramen in the distal root. The inability to locate the unexpected canals of various anatomical configuration and subsequently treat them , may lead to therapeutic failures. Endodontic retreatment is usually the modality of choice in such cases. This report describes a case of a maxillary first molar with five canals (two mesial canals in mesial root, two distal canals in two distal roots and a palatal canal in palatal root. Additionally it shows a rare anatomic configuration and emphasizes the importance of identifying additional canals.

  16. Unexpected flood loss correlations across Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Naomi; Boyd, Jessica

    2017-04-01

    Floods don't observe country borders, as highlighted by major events across Europe that resulted in heavy economic and insured losses in 1999, 2002, 2009 and 2013. Flood loss correlations between some countries occur along multi-country river systems or between neighbouring nations affected by the same weather systems. However, correlations are not so obvious and whilst flooding in multiple locations across Europe may appear independent, for a re/insurer providing cover across the continent, these unexpected correlations can lead to high loss accumulations. A consistent, continental-scale method that allows quantification and comparison of losses, and identifies correlations in loss between European countries is therefore essential. A probabilistic model for European river flooding was developed that allows estimation of potential losses to pan-European property portfolios. By combining flood hazard and exposure information in a catastrophe modelling platform, we can consider correlations between river basins across Europe rather than being restricted to country boundaries. A key feature of the model is its statistical event set based on extreme value theory. Using historical river flow data, the event set captures spatial and temporal patterns of flooding across Europe and simulates thousands of events representing a full range of possible scenarios. Some known correlations were identified, such as between neighbouring Belgium and Luxembourg where 28% of events that affect either country produce a loss in both. However, our model identified some unexpected correlations including between Austria and Poland, and Poland and France, which are geographically distant. These correlations in flood loss may be missed by traditional methods and are key for re/insurers with risks in multiple countries. The model also identified that 46% of European river flood events affect more than one country. For more extreme events with a return period higher than 200 years, all events

  17. Changes in androgen receptor mRNA expression in the forebrain and oviduct during the reproductive cycle of female leopard geckos, Eublepharis macularius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhen, Turk; Sakata, Jon T; Woolley, Sarah; Porter, Raymond; Crews, David

    2003-06-01

    Successful reproduction requires the coordination of reproductive physiology with behavior. The neural correlates of reproductive behavior have been elucidated in a variety of amphibians, mammals, and birds but relatively few studies have examined reptiles. Here we investigate differences in androgen receptor (AR) mRNA expression in the forebrain and oviduct between previtellogenic and late vitellogenic female leopard geckos, Eublepharis macularius. Plasma concentrations of testosterone (T) are low when females are previtellogenic and sexually unreceptive but increase dramatically during late vitellogenesis when females are receptive. In addition, receptivity can be induced by treatment with exogenous T. The relative abundance of AR-mRNA across various nuclei was greater in late vitellogenic than in previtellogenic females. This general pattern was observed in the medial preoptic area, anterior hypothalamus, external nucleus of the amygdala, dorsolateral aspect of the ventromedial hypothalamus, lateral septum, and periventricular hypothalamus. There were also clear differences in AR-mRNA expression among these nuclei. The pattern of gene expression observed in the brain was reversed within stromal cells of the oviduct where expression of AR-mRNA decreased from the previtellogenic stage to the late vitellogenic stage. Overall, these data demonstrate that T concentration in the plasma, abundance of AR-mRNA in the brain and oviduct, and sexual behavior change coordinately during the reproductive cycle of female leopard geckos. Although the function of AR in the female leopard gecko is not yet clear, our results are in accord with growing evidence that androgens regulate numerous aspects of female physiology and behavior in vertebrates.

  18. Influence of oxygen tension on dopaminergic differentiation of human fetal stem cells of midbrain and forebrain origin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Krabbe

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells (NSCs constitute a promising source of cells for transplantation in Parkinson's disease (PD, but protocols for controlled dopaminergic differentiation are not yet available. Here we investigated the influence of oxygen on dopaminergic differentiation of human fetal NSCs derived from the midbrain and forebrain. Cells were differentiated for 10 days in vitro at low, physiological (3% versus high, atmospheric (20% oxygen tension. Low oxygen resulted in upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor and increased the proportion of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (TH-ir cells in both types of cultures (midbrain: 9.1 ± 0.5 and 17.1 ± 0.4 (P<0.001; forebrain: 1.9 ± 0.4 and 3.9 ± 0.6 (P<0.01 percent of total cells. Regardless of oxygen levels, the content of TH-ir cells with mature neuronal morphologies was higher for midbrain as compared to forebrain cultures. Proliferative Ki67-ir cells were found in both types of cultures, but the relative proportion of these cells was significantly higher for forebrain NSCs cultured at low, as compared to high, oxygen tension. No such difference was detected for midbrain-derived cells. Western blot analysis revealed that low oxygen enhanced β-tubulin III and GFAP expression in both cultures. Up-regulation of β-tubulin III was most pronounced for midbrain cells, whereas GFAP expression was higher in forebrain as compared to midbrain cells. NSCs from both brain regions displayed less cell death when cultured at low oxygen tension. Following mictrotransplantation into mouse striatal slice cultures predifferentiated midbrain NSCs were found to proliferate and differentiate into substantial numbers of TH-ir neurons with mature neuronal morphologies, particularly at low oxygen. In contrast, predifferentiated forebrain NSCs microtransplanted using identical conditions displayed little proliferation and contained few TH-ir cells, all of which had an immature appearance. Our data may reflect

  19. Theory of mind for processing unexpected events across contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dungan, James A; Stepanovic, Michael; Young, Liane

    2016-08-01

    Theory of mind, or mental state reasoning, may be particularly useful for making sense of unexpected events. Here, we investigated unexpected behavior across both social and non-social contexts in order to characterize the precise role of theory of mind in processing unexpected events. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine how people respond to unexpected outcomes when initial expectations were based on (i) an object's prior behavior, (ii) an agent's prior behavior and (iii) an agent's mental states. Consistent with prior work, brain regions for theory of mind were preferentially recruited when people first formed expectations about social agents vs non-social objects. Critically, unexpected vs expected outcomes elicited greater activity in dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, which also discriminated in its spatial pattern of activity between unexpected and expected outcomes for social events. In contrast, social vs non-social events elicited greater activity in precuneus across both expected and unexpected outcomes. Finally, given prior information about an agent's behavior, unexpected vs expected outcomes elicited an especially robust response in right temporoparietal junction, and the magnitude of this difference across participants correlated negatively with autistic-like traits. Together, these findings illuminate the distinct contributions of brain regions for theory of mind for processing unexpected events across contexts. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Ombud's Corner: unexpected turn in the conversation?

    CERN Multimedia

    Sudeshna Datta-Cockerill

    2014-01-01

    Regular informal conversations with colleagues play a very important part in weaving the fabric of team spirit. They allow us to build the working relationships that are vital to the success of our projects and to create an environment of good will that is instrumental in averting potential conflict or crises. However, sometimes they can come with unexpected surprises…   Eric and his colleagues always meet on Monday mornings to have coffee together, before starting the working week. This is a very privileged moment for the team when there are no formal barriers or professional concerns: Mary may talk about a film that she saw at the weekend, Eric often goes hiking in the Jura with his friend Stefan, Hans has always got a story about his son’s prowess on the school football team and occasionally there is a bit of special news such as Louisa’s recent marriage, Pierre’s baby’s christening or Claude’s daughter’s graduation&...

  1. A trans-Regulatory Code for the Forebrain Expression of Six3.2 in the Medaka Fish*

    OpenAIRE

    Beccari, Leonardo; Marco-Ferreres, Raquel; Tabanera, Noemi; Manfredi, Anna; Souren, Marcel; Wittbrodt, Beate; Conte, Ivan; Wittbrodt, Jochen; Bovolenta, Paola

    2015-01-01

    A well integrated and hierarchically organized gene regulatory network is responsible for the progressive specification of the forebrain. The transcription factor Six3 is one of the central components of this network. As such, Six3 regulates several components of the network, but its upstream regulators are still poorly characterized. Here we have systematically identified such regulators, taking advantage of the detailed functional characterization of the regulatory region of the medaka f...

  2. Neonatal and adult forebrain norepinephrine depletion and the behavioral and cortical thickening effects of enriched/impoverished environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtha, S; Pappas, B A; Raman, S

    1990-08-20

    Two experiments examined the effects of neonatal or adult intracerebral injections of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) on the effects of enriched (ENR) vs. impoverished (IMP) housing conditions. In Expt. 1, neonatal rats received intraventricular injections of 6-OHDA after pretreatment with buproprion to destroy norepinephrine (NE) terminals while lessening damage to dopamine (DA) terminals. The rats were subsequently raised in either enriched or impoverished environments and then tested for their spatial problem-solving ability in an automated Hebb-Williams maze. Littermates did not undergo this testing but were instead assessed for cortical thickness. Despite the substantial depletion of NE in the forebrains of the 6-OHDA-treated rats, they responded to enriched rearing as did the control rats, i.e., they solved the Hebb-Williams problems more efficiently than their impoverished reared counterparts and they showed thicker cortices. In Expt. 2, adult rats received 6-OHDA lesions of the dorsal noradrenergic bundle and were then relegated to enriched or impoverished housing for 42 days. Subsequently, the enriched-housed rats solved the Hebb-Williams mazes more efficiently than their impoverished-housed counterparts and this effect of housing was not altered by the dorsal bundle lesion which severely depleted forebrain NE. These two experiments do not support a role for forebrain NE in the alteration of the rat cortex and behavior by environmental enrichment. It was concluded that the cognitive effects of enriched rearing do not require intact forebrain NE but that they may be influenced by the peripheral sympathectomy that is one consequence of neonatal systemic 6-OHDA injections.

  3. The effect of aniracetam on cerebral glucose metabolism in rats after lesioning of the basal forebrain measured by PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchi, Y; Kakiuchi, T; Okada, H; Nishiyama, S; Tsukada, H

    1999-03-15

    To evaluate the effect of aniracetam, a potent modulator of the glutamatergic and cholinergic systems, on the altered cerebral glucose metabolism after lesioning of the basal forebrain, we measured the cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRGlc) with positron emission tomography and the choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) activity in the frontal cortex of the lesioned rats after treating them with aniracetam. Continuous administration of aniracetam for 7 days after the surgery prevented CMRGlc reduction in the frontal cortex ipsilateral to the lesion while the lesioned rats without aniracetam showed significant CMRGlc reduction in the frontal cortex. The level of CMRGlc in the lesion-side basal forebrain was lower in all rats regardless of the aniracetam treatment. Biochemical studies showed that aniracetam did not alter the reduction in the frontal ChAT activity. These results showed that aniracetam prevents glucose metabolic reduction in the cholinergically denervated frontal cortex with little effect on the cortical cholinergic system. The present study suggested that a neurotransmitter system other than the cholinergic system, e.g. the glutamatergic system, plays a central role in the cortical metabolic recovery after lesioning of the basal forebrain.

  4. Unexpected allergic reactions to food, a prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michelsen-Huisman, A.D.; Os-Medendorp, H. van; Versluis, A.; Kruizinga, A.G.; Castenmiller, J.J.M.; Noteborn, H.P.J.M.; Houben, G.F.; Knulst, A.C.

    2013-01-01

    Unexpected reactions occur in patients with food allergy, but frequency data are scare. This prospective study investigates the frequency, severity and causes of unexpected allergic reactions to food in adults with a doctor's diagnosed food allergy. Participants complete an online questionnaire

  5. 77 FR 21389 - Unexpected Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-10

    ... April 3, 2012 Unexpected Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs Memorandum for the Secretary of State By the... 2(c)(1) of the Migration and Refugee Assistance Act of 1962 (the ``Act''), as amended, (22 U.S.C... United States Emergency Refugee and Migration Assistance Fund, for the purpose of meeting unexpected and...

  6. Interaction of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons with the glucocorticoid system in stress regulation and cognitive impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saswati ePaul

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A substantial number of studies on basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (BFCN have provided compelling evidence for their role in the etiology of stress, cognitive aging, Alzheimer’s disease (AD, and other neurodegenerative diseases. BFCN project to a broad range of cortical sites and limbic structures, including the hippocampus, and are involved in stress and cognition. In particular, the hippocampus, the primary target tissue of the glucocorticoid stress hormones, is associated with cognitive function in tandem with hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis modulation. The present review summarizes glucocorticoid and HPA axis research to date in an effort to establish the manner in which stress affects the release of acetylcholine, glucocorticoids, and their receptor in the context of cognitive processes. We attempt to provide the molecular interactive link between the glucocorticoids and cholinergic system that contributes to BFCN degeneration in stress-induced acceleration of cognitive decline in aging and AD. We also discuss the importance of animal models in facilitating such studies for pharmacological use, which could help decipher disease states and propose leads for pharmacological intervention.

  7. Whole-Brain Monosynaptic Afferent Inputs to Basal Forebrain Cholinergic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongfeng Hu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The basal forebrain cholinergic system (BFCS robustly modulates many important behaviors, such as arousal, attention, learning and memory, through heavy projections to cortex and hippocampus. However, the presynaptic partners governing BFCS activity still remain poorly understood. Here, we utilized a recently developed rabies virus-based cell-type-specific retrograde tracing system to map the whole-brain afferent inputs of the BFCS. We found that the BFCS receives inputs from multiple cortical areas, such as orbital frontal cortex, motor cortex, and insular cortex, and that the BFCS also receives dense inputs from several subcortical nuclei related to motivation and stress, including lateral septum (LS, central amygdala (CeA, paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus (PVH, dorsal raphe (DRN and parabrachial nucleus (PBN. Interestingly, we found that the BFCS receives inputs from the olfactory areas and the entorhinal-hippocampal system. These results greatly expand our knowledge about the connectivity of the mouse BFCS and provided important preliminary indications for future exploration of circuit function.

  8. Regulation of GABA and benzodiazepine receptors following neurotoxin-induced striatal and medial forebrain bundle lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, H.S.I.

    1985-01-01

    GABA, a major inhibitory transmitter, is used by many projection neurons of the striatum. To investigate the role of GABA in striatal function, the GABA receptor complex was studied after lesions of the striatum or the nigrostriatal neurons. Quantitative receptor autoradiography using thaw-mounted tissue slices was developed for the study of GABA and benzodiazepine (BDZ) receptors. With the technique established, binding to GABA and BDZ receptors after unilateral striatal kainate lesions was examined. Subsequently, changes in GABA and BDZ receptors were studied following the destruction of dopaminergic nigrostriatal cells by unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion of the medial forebrain bundle. In summary, quantitative receptor autoradiography allowed the detection of GABA and BDZ receptor changes in multiple small areas in each lesioned brain. This technique made it feasible to carry out kinetic saturation, and competition studies using less than 1 mg of tissue. The data suggest that dopamine is functionally inhibitory on striatopallidal neurons but is functionally excitatory on striatoentopeduncular and striatonigral cells which in turn inhibit the thalamus. This quantitative autoradiographic technique can be generalized to study other transmitter receptors and can be combined with 2-deoxyglucose uptake studies

  9. Large-Scale Network Organisation in the Avian Forebrain: A Connectivity Matrix and Theoretical Analysis

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    Murray eShanahan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Many species of birds, including pigeons, possess demonstrable cognitive capacities, and some are capable of cognitive feats matching those of apes. Since mammalian cortex is laminar while the avian telencephalon is nucleated, it is natural to ask whether the brains of these two cognitively capable taxa, despite their apparent anatomical dissimilarities, might exhibit common principles of organisation on some level. Complementing recent investigations of macro-scale brain connectivity in mammals, including humans and macaques, we here present the first large-scale wiring diagram for the forebrain of a bird. Using graph theory, we show that the pigeon telencephalon is organised along similar lines to that of a mammal. Both are modular, small-world networks with a connective core of hub nodes that includes prefrontal-like and hippocampal structures. These hub nodes are, topologically speaking, the most central regions of the pigeon's brain, as well as being the most richly connected, implying a crucial role in information flow. Overall, our analysis suggests that indeed, despite the absence of cortical layers and close to 300 million years of separate evolution, the connectivity of the avian brain conforms to the same organisational principles as the mammalian brain.

  10. Blocking estradiol synthesis affects memory for songs in auditory forebrain of male zebra finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Kathleen M; Lu, Kai; Vicario, David S

    2012-11-14

    Estradiol (E2) has recently been shown to modulate sensory processing in an auditory area of the songbird forebrain, the caudomedial nidopallium (NCM). When a bird hears conspecific song, E2 increases locally in NCM, where neurons express both the aromatase enzyme that synthesizes E2 from precursors and estrogen receptors. Auditory responses in NCM show a form of neuronal memory: repeated playback of the unique learned vocalizations of conspecific individuals induces long-lasting stimulus-specific adaptation of neural responses to each vocalization. To test the role of E2 in this auditory memory, we treated adult male zebra finches (n=16) with either the aromatase inhibitor fadrozole (FAD) or saline for 8 days. We then exposed them to 'training' songs and, 6 h later, recorded multiunit auditory responses with an array of 16 microelectrodes in NCM. Adaptation rates (a measure of stimulus-specific adaptation) to playbacks of training and novel songs were computed, using established methods, to provide a measure of neuronal memory. Recordings from the FAD-treated birds showed a significantly reduced memory for the training songs compared with saline-treated controls, whereas auditory processing for novel songs did not differ between treatment groups. In addition, FAD did not change the response bias in favor of conspecific over heterospecific song stimuli. Our results show that E2 depletion affects the neuronal memory for vocalizations in songbird NCM, and suggest that E2 plays a necessary role in auditory processing and memory for communication signals.

  11. Basal forebrain motivational salience signal enhances cortical processing and decision speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvina M Raver

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The basal forebrain (BF contains major projections to the cerebral cortex, and plays a well-documented role in arousal, attention, decision-making, and in modulating cortical activity. BF neuronal degeneration is an early event in Alzheimer’s disease and dementias, and occurs in normal cognitive aging. While the BF is best known for its population of cortically projecting cholinergic neurons, the region is anatomically and neurochemically diverse, and also contains prominent populations of non-cholinergic projection neurons. In recent years, increasing attention has been dedicated to these non-cholinergic BF neurons in order to better understand how non-cholinergic BF circuits control cortical processing and behavioral performance. In this review, we focus on a unique population of putative non-cholinergic BF neurons that encodes the motivational salience of stimuli with a robust ensemble bursting response. We review recent studies that describe the specific physiological and functional characteristics of these BF salience-encoding neurons in behaving animals. These studies support the unifying hypothesis whereby BF salience-encoding neurons act as a gain modulation mechanism of the decision-making process to enhance cortical processing of behaviorally relevant stimuli, and thereby facilitate faster and more precise behavioral responses. This function of BF salience-encoding neurons represents a critical component in determining which incoming stimuli warrant an animal’s attention, and is therefore a fundamental and early requirement of behavioral flexibility.

  12. Propagated but Topologically Distributed Forebrain Neurons Expressing Alpha-Synuclein in Aged Macaques.

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    Katsuo Kimura

    Full Text Available In neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease (PD, alpha-synuclein (α-syn accumulates to induce cell death and/or form a cytoplasmic inclusion called Lewy body (LB. This α-syn-related pathology is termed synucleinopathy. It remains unclear how α-syn accumulation expands during the progress of synucleinopathy in the human brain. In our study, we investigated the patterns of distribution and propagation of forebrain neurons expressing α-syn in aged macaques. It was found that the occurrence of α-syn-positive neurons proceeded topologically based on the midbrain dopamine pathways arising from the substantia nigra and the ventral tegmental area where they were primarily observed. In the nigrostriatal or mesolimbic dopamine pathway, the age-dependent increase in α-syn-positive neurons was evident in the striatum or the nucleus accumbens, respectively. Concerning the nigrostriatal pathway, a mediolateral or rostrocaudal gradient was seen in the substantia nigra or the striatum, respectively, and a compensatory increase in dopamine transporter occurred in the striatum regardless of the decreased dopamine level. In the mesocortical dopamine pathway, α-syn-positive neurons appeared in the prefrontal and then motor areas of the frontal lobe. Given that neither LB formation nor clinical phenotype manifestation was detected in any of the monkeys examined in the present study, aged macaques may be useful as a potential presymptomatic model for PD and LB-related neuropsychiatric disorders.

  13. Stimulation of the Pontine Parabrachial Nucleus Promotes Wakefulness via Extra-thalamic Forebrain Circuit Nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Mei Hong; Chen, Michael C; Fuller, Patrick M; Lu, Jun

    2016-09-12

    Human and animal studies have identified an especially critical role for the brainstem parabrachial (PB) complex in regulating electrocortical (electroencephalogram [EEG]) and behavioral arousal: lesions of the PB complex produce a monotonous high-voltage, slow-wave EEG and eliminate spontaneous behaviors. We report here that targeted chemogenetic activation of the PB complex produces sustained EEG and behavioral arousal in the rat. We further establish, using viral-mediated retrograde activation, that PB projections to the preoptic-basal forebrain and lateral hypothalamus, but not to the thalamus, mediate PB-driven wakefulness. We exploited this novel and noninvasive model of induced wakefulness to explore the EEG and metabolic consequences of extended wakefulness. Repeated (daily) chemogenetic activation of the PB was highly effective in extending wakefulness over 4 days, although subsequent PB activation produced progressively lesser wake amounts. Curiously, no EEG or behavioral sleep rebound was observed, even after 4 days of induced wakefulness. Following the last of the four daily induced wake bouts, we examined the brains and observed a chimeric pattern of c-Fos expression, with c-Fos expressed in subsets of both arousal- and sleep-promoting nuclei. From a metabolic standpoint, induced extended wakefulness significantly reduced body weight and leptin but was without significant effect on cholesterol, triglyceride, or insulin levels, suggesting that high sleep pressure or sleep debt per se does not, as previously implicated, result in a deleterious metabolic phenotype. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Statistical learning of recurring sound patterns encodes auditory objects in songbird forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Kai; Vicario, David S

    2014-10-07

    Auditory neurophysiology has demonstrated how basic acoustic features are mapped in the brain, but it is still not clear how multiple sound components are integrated over time and recognized as an object. We investigated the role of statistical learning in encoding the sequential features of complex sounds by recording neuronal responses bilaterally in the auditory forebrain of awake songbirds that were passively exposed to long sound streams. These streams contained sequential regularities, and were similar to streams used in human infants to demonstrate statistical learning for speech sounds. For stimulus patterns with contiguous transitions and with nonadjacent elements, single and multiunit responses reflected neuronal discrimination of the familiar patterns from novel patterns. In addition, discrimination of nonadjacent patterns was stronger in the right hemisphere than in the left, and may reflect an effect of top-down modulation that is lateralized. Responses to recurring patterns showed stimulus-specific adaptation, a sparsening of neural activity that may contribute to encoding invariants in the sound stream and that appears to increase coding efficiency for the familiar stimuli across the population of neurons recorded. As auditory information about the world must be received serially over time, recognition of complex auditory objects may depend on this type of mnemonic process to create and differentiate representations of recently heard sounds.

  15. NKCC1 controls GABAergic signaling and neuroblast migration in the postnatal forebrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray Kerren

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract From an early postnatal period and throughout life there is a continuous production of olfactory bulb (OB interneurons originating from neuronal precursors in the subventricular zone. To reach the OB circuits, immature neuroblasts migrate along the rostral migratory stream (RMS. In the present study, we employed cultured postnatal mouse forebrain slices and used lentiviral vectors to label neuronal precursors with GFP and to manipulate the expression levels of the Na-K-2Cl cotransporter NKCC1. We investigated the role of this Cl- transporter in different stages of postnatal neurogenesis, including neuroblast migration and integration in the OB networks once they have reached the granule cell layer (GCL. We report that NKCC1 activity is necessary for maintaining normal migratory speed. Both pharmacological and genetic manipulations revealed that NKCC1 maintains high [Cl-]i and regulates the resting membrane potential of migratory neuroblasts whilst its functional expression is strongly reduced at the time cells reach the GCL. As in other developing systems, NKCC1 shapes GABAA-dependent signaling in the RMS neuroblasts. Also, we show that NKCC1 controls the migration of neuroblasts in the RMS. The present study indeed indicates that the latter effect results from a novel action of NKCC1 on the resting membrane potential, which is independent of GABAA-dependent signaling. All in all, our findings show that early stages of the postnatal recruitment of OB interneurons rely on precise, orchestrated mechanisms that depend on multiple actions of NKCC1.

  16. Bilateral Pathways from the Basal Forebrain to Sensory Cortices May Contribute to Synchronous Sensory Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Chaves-Coira

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensory processing in the cortex should integrate inputs arriving from receptive fields located on both sides of the body. This role could be played by the corpus callosum through precise projections between both hemispheres. However, different studies suggest that cholinergic projections from the basal forebrain (BF could also contribute to the synchronization and integration of cortical activities. Using tracer injections and optogenetic techniques in transgenic mice, we investigated whether the BF cells project bilaterally to sensory cortical areas, and have provided anatomical evidence to support a modulatory role for the cholinergic projections in sensory integration. Application of the retrograde tracer Fluor-Gold or Fast Blue in both hemispheres of the primary somatosensory (S1, auditory or visual cortical areas showed labeled neurons in the ipsi- and contralateral areas of the diagonal band of Broca and substantia innominata. The nucleus basalis magnocellularis only showed ipsilateral projections to the cortex. Optogenetic stimulation of the horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca facilitated whisker responses in the S1 cortex of both hemispheres through activation of muscarinic cholinergic receptors and this effect was diminished by atropine injection. In conclusion, our findings have revealed that specific areas of the BF project bilaterally to sensory cortices and may contribute to the coordination of neuronal activity on both hemispheres.

  17. Ammonia abundances in comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyckoff, S.; Tegler, S.; Engel, L.

    The emission band strengths of the NH2 bands of Comets Halley, Hartley-Good, Thiele, and Borrelly were measured to determine the NH2 column densities for the comets. Production rates obtained using the Haser and vectorial models are in agreement within the observational errors, suggesting that a simple two-step decay model may be used to approximate the NH2 distribution in a comet's coma. Ammonia-to-water abundance ratios from 0.01 to 0.4 percent were found for the four comets. The ratio in Comet Halley is found to be Q(NH3)/Q(H2O) = 0.002 + or - 0.001. No significant difference in the ammonia abundance was found before or after perihelion in Comet Halley.

  18. Distribution, Abundance and Assemblages

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    E-mail: luis.silva@cd.ieo.es. Cephalopod Species in Mozambican Waters Caught in the. “Mozambique 0307” Survey: Distribution, Abundance and. Assemblages. Luis Silva1, Eduardo Balguerías2, Paula Santana Afonso3, Ignacio Sobrino1, Juan Gil1 and. Candelaria Burgos1. 1Instituto Español de Oceanografía Unidad de ...

  19. Adenosine Inhibits the Excitatory Synaptic Inputs to Basal Forebrain Cholinergic, GABAergic and Parvalbumin Neurons in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun eYang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Coffee and tea contain the stimulants caffeine and theophylline. These compounds act as antagonists of adenosine receptors. Adenosine promotes sleep and its extracellular concentration rises in association with prolonged wakefulness, particularly in the basal forebrain (BF region involved in activating the cerebral cortex. However, the effect of adenosine on identified BF neurons, especially non-cholinergic neurons, is incompletely understood. Here we used whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in mouse brain slices prepared from two validated transgenic mouse lines with fluorescent proteins expressed in GABAergic or parvalbumin (PV neurons to determine the effect of adenosine. Whole-cell recordings were made BF cholinergic neurons and from BF GABAergic & PV neurons with the size (>20 µm and intrinsic membrane properties (prominent H-currents corresponding to cortically projecting neurons. A brief (2 min bath application of adenosine (100 μM decreased the frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents in all groups of BF cholinergic, GABAergic and PV neurons we recorded. In addition, adenosine decreased the frequency of miniature EPSCs in BF cholinergic neurons. Adenosine had no effect on the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in cholinergic neurons or GABAergic neurons with large H-currents but reduced them in a group of GABAergic neurons with smaller H-currents. All effects of adenosine were blocked by a selective, adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, cyclopentyltheophylline (CPT, 1 μM. Adenosine had no postsynaptic effects. Taken together, our work suggests that adenosine promotes sleep by an A1-receptor mediated inhibition of glutamatergic inputs to cortically-projecting cholinergic and GABA/PV neurons. Conversely, caffeine and theophylline promote attentive wakefulness by inhibiting these A1 receptors in BF thereby promoting the high-frequency oscillations in the cortex required for

  20. A SHH-responsive signaling center in the forebrain regulates craniofacial morphogenesis via the facial ectoderm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Diane; Marcucio, Ralph S.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Interactions among the forebrain, neural crest and facial ectoderm regulate development of the upper jaw. To examine these interactions, we activated the Sonic hedgehog (SHH) pathway in the brain. Beginning 72 hours after activation of the SHH pathway, growth within the avian frontonasal process (FNP) was exaggerated in lateral regions and impaired in medial regions. This growth pattern is similar to that in mice and superimposed a mammalian-like morphology on the upper jaw. Jaw growth is controlled by signals from the frontonasal ectodermal zone (FEZ), and the divergent morphologies that characterize birds and mammals are accompanied by changes in the FEZ. In chicks there is a single FEZ spanning the FNP, but in mice both median nasal processes have a FEZ. In treated chicks, the FEZ was split into right and left domains that resembled the pattern present in mice. Additionally, we observed that, in the brain, fibroblast growth factor 8 (Fgf8) was downregulated, and signals in or near the nasal pit were altered. Raldh2 expression was expanded, whereas Fgf8, Wnt4, Wnt6 and Zfhx1b were downregulated. However, Wnt9b, and activation of the canonical WNT pathway, were unaltered in treated embryos. At later time points the upper beak was shortened owing to hypoplasia of the skeleton, and this phenotype was reproduced when we blocked the FGF pathway. Thus, the brain establishes multiple signaling centers within the developing upper jaw. Changes in organization of the brain that occur during evolution or as a result of disease can alter these centers and thereby generate morphological variation. PMID:19036802

  1. Arginine Vasotocin Preprohormone Is Expressed in Surprising Regions of the Teleost Forebrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Rodriguez-Santiago

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Nonapeptides play a fundamental role in the regulation of social behavior, among numerous other functions. In particular, arginine vasopressin and its non-mammalian homolog, arginine vasotocin (AVT, have been implicated in regulating affiliative, reproductive, and aggressive behavior in many vertebrate species. Where these nonapeptides are synthesized in the brain has been studied extensively in most vertebrate lineages. While several hypothalamic and forebrain populations of vasopressinergic neurons have been described in amniotes, the consensus suggests that the expression of AVT in the brain of teleost fish is limited to the hypothalamus, specifically the preoptic area (POA and the anterior tuberal nucleus (putative homolog of the mammalian ventromedial hypothalamus. However, as most studies in teleosts have focused on the POA, there may be an ascertainment bias. Here, we revisit the distribution of AVT preprohormone mRNA across the dorsal and ventral telencephalon of a highly social African cichlid fish. We first use in situ hybridization to map the distribution of AVT preprohormone mRNA across the telencephalon. We then use quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction to assay AVT expression in the dorsomedial telencephalon, the putative homolog of the mammalian basolateral amygdala. We find evidence for AVT preprohormone mRNA in regions previously not associated with the expression of this nonapeptide, including the putative homologs of the mammalian extended amygdala, hippocampus, striatum, and septum. In addition, AVT preprohormone mRNA expression within the basolateral amygdala homolog differs across social contexts, suggesting a possible role in behavioral regulation. We conclude that the surprising presence of AVT preprohormone mRNA within dorsal and medial telencephalic regions warrants a closer examination of possible AVT synthesis locations in teleost fish, and that these may be more similar to what is observed in mammals and

  2. Atrophy and structural covariance of the cholinergic basal forebrain in primary progressive aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teipel, Stefan; Raiser, Theresa; Riedl, Lina; Riederer, Isabelle; Schroeter, Matthias L; Bisenius, Sandrine; Schneider, Anja; Kornhuber, Johannes; Fliessbach, Klaus; Spottke, Annika; Grothe, Michel J; Prudlo, Johannes; Kassubek, Jan; Ludolph, Albert; Landwehrmeyer, Bernhard; Straub, Sarah; Otto, Markus; Danek, Adrian

    2016-10-01

    Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is characterized by profound destruction of cortical language areas. Anatomical studies suggest an involvement of cholinergic basal forebrain (BF) in PPA syndromes, particularly in the area of the nucleus subputaminalis (NSP). Here we aimed to determine the pattern of atrophy and structural covariance as a proxy of structural connectivity of BF nuclei in PPA variants. We studied 62 prospectively recruited cases with the clinical diagnosis of PPA and 31 healthy older control participants from the cohort study of the German consortium for frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). We determined cortical and BF atrophy based on high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Patterns of structural covariance of BF with cortical regions were determined using voxel-based partial least square analysis. We found significant atrophy of total BF and BF subregions in PPA patients compared with controls [F(1, 82) = 20.2, p Atrophy was most pronounced in the NSP and the posterior BF, and most severe in the semantic variant and the nonfluent variant of PPA. Structural covariance analysis in healthy controls revealed associations of the BF nuclei, particularly the NSP, with left hemispheric predominant prefrontal, lateral temporal, and parietal cortical areas, including Broca's speech area (p < .001, permutation test). In contrast, the PPA patients showed preserved structural covariance of the BF nuclei mostly with right but not with left hemispheric cortical areas (p < .001, permutation test). Our findings agree with the neuroanatomically proposed involvement of the cholinergic BF, particularly the NSP, in PPA syndromes. We found a shift from a structural covariance of the BF with left hemispheric cortical areas in healthy aging towards right hemispheric cortical areas in PPA, possibly reflecting a consequence of the profound and early destruction of cortical language areas in PPA. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by

  3. Cell proliferation in the forebrain and midbrain of the adult bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Andrea Megela; Horowitz, Seth S; Brown, Rebecca A

    2008-01-01

    The distribution of proliferating cells in the midbrain, thalamus, and telencephalon of adult bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana) was examined using immunohistochemistry for the thymidine analog 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and DNA dot-blotting. At all time points examined (2 to 28 days post-injection), BrdU-labeled cells were located in ventricular zones at all levels of the neuraxis, but with relatively more label around the telencephalic ventricles. Labeled cells, some showing profiles indicative of dividing and migrating cells, were present in brain parenchyma from 7 to 28 days post-injection. These labeled cells were particularly numerous in the dorsal and ventral hypothalamus, preoptic area, optic tectum, and laminar and principal nuclei of the torus semicircularis, with label also present, but at qualitatively reduced levels, in thalamic and telencephalic nuclei. Double-label immunohistochemistry using glial and early neural markers indicated that gliogenesis and neurogenesis both occurred, with new neurons observed particularly in the hypothalamus, optic tectum, and torus semicircularis. In all brain areas, many cells not labeled with BrdU were nonetheless labeled with the early neural marker TOAD-64, indicating that these cells were postmitotic. Incorporation of DNA measured by dot-blotting confirms the presence of DNA synthesis in the forebrain and brainstem at all time points measured. The pattern of BrdU label confirms previous experiments based on labeling with (3)H-thymidine and proliferating cell nuclear antigen showing cell proliferation in the adult ranid brain, particularly in hypothalamic nuclei. The consistent appearance of new cells in the hypothalamus of adult frogs suggests that proliferative activity may be important in mediating reproductive behaviors in these animals. (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Distinct Temporal Coordination of Spontaneous Population Activity between Basal Forebrain and Auditory Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josue G. Yague

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The basal forebrain (BF has long been implicated in attention, learning and memory, and recent studies have established a causal relationship between artificial BF activation and arousal. However, neural ensemble dynamics in the BF still remains unclear. Here, recording neural population activity in the BF and comparing it with simultaneously recorded cortical population under both anesthetized and unanesthetized conditions, we investigate the difference in the structure of spontaneous population activity between the BF and the auditory cortex (AC in mice. The AC neuronal population show a skewed spike rate distribution, a higher proportion of short (≤80 ms inter-spike intervals (ISIs and a rich repertoire of rhythmic firing across frequencies. Although the distribution of spontaneous firing rate in the BF is also skewed, a proportion of short ISIs can be explained by a Poisson model at short time scales (≤20 ms and spike count correlations are lower compared to AC cells, with optogenetically identified cholinergic cell pairs showing exceptionally higher correlations. Furthermore, a smaller fraction of BF neurons shows spike-field entrainment across frequencies: a subset of BF neurons fire rhythmically at slow (≤6 Hz frequencies, with varied phase preferences to ongoing field potentials, in contrast to a consistent phase preference of AC populations. Firing of these slow rhythmic BF cells is correlated to a greater degree than other rhythmic BF cell pairs. Overall, the fundamental difference in the structure of population activity between the AC and BF is their temporal coordination, in particular their operational timescales. These results suggest that BF neurons slowly modulate downstream populations whereas cortical circuits transmit signals on multiple timescales. Thus, the characterization of the neural ensemble dynamics in the BF provides further insight into the neural mechanisms, by which brain states are regulated.

  5. Temperature manipulation of neuronal dynamics in a forebrain motor control nucleus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matías A Goldin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Different neuronal types within brain motor areas contribute to the generation of complex motor behaviors. A widely studied songbird forebrain nucleus (HVC has been recognized as fundamental in shaping the precise timing characteristics of birdsong. This is based, among other evidence, on the stretching and the "breaking" of song structure when HVC is cooled. However, little is known about the temperature effects that take place in its neurons. To address this, we investigated the dynamics of HVC both experimentally and computationally. We developed a technique where simultaneous electrophysiological recordings were performed during temperature manipulation of HVC. We recorded spontaneous activity and found three effects: widening of the spike shape, decrease of the firing rate and change in the interspike interval distribution. All these effects could be explained with a detailed conductance based model of all the neurons present in HVC. Temperature dependence of the ionic channel time constants explained the first effect, while the second was based in the changes of the maximal conductance using single synaptic excitatory inputs. The last phenomenon, only emerged after introducing a more realistic synaptic input to the inhibitory interneurons. Two timescales were present in the interspike distributions. The behavior of one timescale was reproduced with different input balances received form the excitatory neurons, whereas the other, which disappears with cooling, could not be found assuming poissonian synaptic inputs. Furthermore, the computational model shows that the bursting of the excitatory neurons arises naturally at normal brain temperature and that they have an intrinsic delay at low temperatures. The same effect occurs at single synapses, which may explain song stretching. These findings shed light on the temperature dependence of neuronal dynamics and present a comprehensive framework to study neuronal connectivity. This study, which

  6. Higher sensitivity to cadmium induced cell death of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons: A cholinesterase dependent mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Pino, Javier; Zeballos, Garbriela; Anadon, María José; Capo, Miguel Andrés; Díaz, María Jesús; García, Jimena; Frejo, María Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium is an environmental pollutant, which is a cause of concern because it can be greatly concentrated in the organism causing severe damage to a variety of organs including the nervous system which is one of the most affected. Cadmium has been reported to produce learning and memory dysfunctions and Alzheimer like symptoms, though the mechanism is unknown. On the other hand, cholinergic system in central nervous system (CNS) is implicated on learning and memory regulation, and it has been reported that cadmium can affect cholinergic transmission and it can also induce selective toxicity on cholinergic system at peripheral level, producing cholinergic neurons loss, which may explain cadmium effects on learning and memory processes if produced on central level. The present study is aimed at researching the selective neurotoxicity induced by cadmium on cholinergic system in CNS. For this purpose we evaluated, in basal forebrain region, the cadmium toxic effects on neuronal viability and the cholinergic mechanisms related to it on NS56 cholinergic mourine septal cell line. This study proves that cadmium induces a more pronounced, but not selective, cell death on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) on cholinergic neurons. Moreover, MTT and LDH assays showed a dose dependent decrease of cell viability in NS56 cells. The ACh treatment of SN56 cells did not revert cell viability reduction induced by cadmium, but siRNA transfection against AChE partially reduced it. Our present results provide new understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the harmful effects of cadmium on the function and viability of neurons, and the possible relevance of cadmium in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases

  7. Hypocretin/orexin antagonism enhances sleep-related adenosine and GABA neurotransmission in rat basal forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-DeRose, Jacqueline; Schwartz, Michael D; Nguyen, Alexander T; Warrier, Deepti R; Gulati, Srishti; Mathew, Thomas K; Neylan, Thomas C; Kilduff, Thomas S

    2016-03-01

    Hypocretin/orexin (HCRT) neurons provide excitatory input to wake-promoting brain regions including the basal forebrain (BF). The dual HCRT receptor antagonist almorexant (ALM) decreases waking and increases sleep. We hypothesized that HCRT antagonists induce sleep, in part, through disfacilitation of BF neurons; consequently, ALM should have reduced efficacy in BF-lesioned (BFx) animals. To test this hypothesis, rats were given bilateral IgG-192-saporin injections, which predominantly targets cholinergic BF neurons. BFx and intact rats were then given oral ALM, the benzodiazepine agonist zolpidem (ZOL) or vehicle (VEH) at lights-out. ALM was less effective than ZOL at inducing sleep in BFx rats compared to controls. BF adenosine (ADO), γ-amino-butyric acid (GABA), and glutamate levels were then determined via microdialysis from intact, freely behaving rats following oral ALM, ZOL or VEH. ALM increased BF ADO and GABA levels during waking and mixed vigilance states, and preserved sleep-associated increases in GABA under low and high sleep pressure conditions. ALM infusion into the BF also enhanced cortical ADO release, demonstrating that HCRT input is critical for ADO signaling in the BF. In contrast, oral ZOL and BF-infused ZOL had no effect on ADO levels in either BF or cortex. ALM increased BF ADO (an endogenous sleep-promoting substance) and GABA (which is increased during normal sleep), and required an intact BF for maximal efficacy, whereas ZOL blocked sleep-associated BF GABA release, and required no functional contribution from the BF to induce sleep. ALM thus induces sleep by facilitating the neural mechanisms underlying the normal transition to sleep.

  8. Activation of the Basal Forebrain by the Orexin/Hypocretin Neurons: Orexin International Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrigoni, Elda; Mochizuki, Takatoshi; Scammell, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    The orexin neurons play an essential role in driving arousal and in maintaining normal wakefulness. Lack of orexin neurotransmission produces a chronic state of hypoarousal characterized by excessive sleepiness, frequent transitions between wake and sleep, and episodes of cataplexy. A growing body of research now suggests that the basal forebrain (BF) may be a key site through which the orexin-producing neurons promote arousal. Here we review anatomical, pharmacological and electrophysiological studies on how the orexin neurons may promote arousal by exciting cortically-projecting neurons of the BF. Orexin fibers synapse on BF cholinergic neurons and orexin-A is released in the BF during waking. Local application of orexins excites BF cholinergic neurons, induces cortical release of acetylcholine, and promotes wakefulness. The orexin neurons also contain and probably co-release the inhibitory neuropeptide dynorphin. We found that orexin-A and dynorphin have specific effects on different classes of BF neurons that project to the cortex. Cholinergic neurons were directly excited by orexin-A, but did not respond to dynorphin. Non-cholinergic BF neurons that project to the cortex seem to comprise at least two populations with some directly excited by orexin that may represent wake-active, GABAergic neurons, whereas others did not respond to orexin but were inhibited by dynorphin and may be sleep-active, GABAergic neurons. This evidence suggests that the BF is a key site through which orexins activate the cortex and promotes behavioral arousal. In addition, orexins and dynorphin may act synergistically in the BF to promote arousal and improve cognitive performance. PMID:19723027

  9. Lichens: Unexpected anti-prion agents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Cynthia M.; Bennett, James P.; Johnson, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    The prion diseases sheep scrapie and cervid chronic wasting disease are transmitted, in part, via an environmental reservoir of infectivity; prions released from infected animals persist in the environment and can cause disease years later. Central to controlling disease transmission is the identification of methods capable of inactivating these agents on the landscape. We have found that certain lichens, common, ubiquitous, symbiotic organisms, possess a serine protease capable of degrading prion protein (PrP) from prion-infected animals. The protease functions against a range of prion strains from various hosts and reduces levels of abnormal PrP by at least two logs. We have now tested more than 20 lichen species from several geographical locations and from various taxa and found that approximately half of these species degrade PrP. Critical next steps include examining the effect of lichens on prion infectivity and cloning the protease responsible for PrP degradation. The impact of lichens on prions in the environment remains unknown. We speculate that lichens could have the potential to degrade prions when they are shed from infected animals onto lichens or into environments where lichens are abundant. In addition, lichens are frequently consumed by cervids and many other animals and the effect of dietary lichens on prion disease transmission should also be considered.

  10. Staged Venture Capital Investment considering Unexpected Major Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yindong Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a dynamic model of capital financing, taking into consideration unexpected major events occurring within continuous time model. We are considering a special jump-diffusion model first described by Samuelson (1973 while using traditional geometric Brownian motion. This paper seeks to accurately show the innovative project valuation when unexpected major events occur and get the analytical results of the project option value. Furthermore, we analyzed the impact of multistaged financing; results indicated that both sources of uncertainty positively impact the project option value; particularly, the option price when considering unexpected major events occurrence is larger than the option price without unexpected major events. Based on a comparative-static analysis, new propositions for optimal amount of investment and optimal level of project are derived from simulations.

  11. Unexpected Expectations The Curiosities of a Mathematical Crystal Ball

    CERN Document Server

    Wapner, Leonard M

    2012-01-01

    Unexpected Expectations: The Curiosities of a Mathematical Crystal Ball explores how paradoxical challenges involving mathematical expectation often necessitate a reexamination of basic premises. The author takes you through mathematical paradoxes associated with seemingly straightforward applications of mathematical expectation and shows how these unexpected contradictions may push you to reconsider the legitimacy of the applications. The book requires only an understanding of basic algebraic operations and includes supplemental mathematical background in chapter appendices. After a history o

  12. Evaluating impacts of unexpected earning on precision of profit estimation

    OpenAIRE

    Hossein Kazemi; Atefeh Khoshnodi

    2013-01-01

    Precision in earning report has always been a concern among investors, and when there are some negative adjustments on earning, investor may find it challenging to decide whether they should hold or sell their shares. This paper studies the impact of earning precision and unexpected earning adjustments on firms whose share are listed on Tehran Stock Exchange. The proposed study of this paper considers three hypotheses including whether earning precision has negative relationship with unexpect...

  13. Transgenic up-regulation of alpha-CaMKII in forebrain leads to increased anxiety-like behaviors and aggression

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    Hasegawa Shunsuke

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have demonstrated essential roles for alpha-calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (alpha-CaMKII in learning, memory and long-term potentiation (LTP. However, previous studies have also shown that alpha-CaMKII (+/- heterozygous knockout mice display a dramatic decrease in anxiety-like and fearful behaviors, and an increase in defensive aggression. These findings indicated that alpha-CaMKII is important not only for learning and memory but also for emotional behaviors. In this study, to understand the roles of alpha-CaMKII in emotional behavior, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing alpha-CaMKII in the forebrain and analyzed their behavioral phenotypes. Results We generated transgenic mice overexpressing alpha-CaMKII in the forebrain under the control of the alpha-CaMKII promoter. In contrast to alpha-CaMKII (+/- heterozygous knockout mice, alpha-CaMKII overexpressing mice display an increase in anxiety-like behaviors in open field, elevated zero maze, light-dark transition and social interaction tests, and a decrease in locomotor activity in their home cages and novel environments; these phenotypes were the opposite to those observed in alpha-CaMKII (+/- heterozygous knockout mice. In addition, similarly with alpha-CaMKII (+/- heterozygous knockout mice, alpha-CaMKII overexpressing mice display an increase in aggression. However, in contrast to the increase in defensive aggression observed in alpha-CaMKII (+/- heterozygous knockout mice, alpha-CaMKII overexpressing mice display an increase in offensive aggression. Conclusion Up-regulation of alpha-CaMKII expression in the forebrain leads to an increase in anxiety-like behaviors and offensive aggression. From the comparisons with previous findings, we suggest that the expression levels of alpha-CaMKII are associated with the state of emotion; the expression level of alpha-CaMKII positively correlates with the anxiety state and strongly affects

  14. Long-lasting novelty-induced neuronal reverberation during slow-wave sleep in multiple forebrain areas.

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    Sidarta Ribeiro

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of experience-dependent brain reactivation during both slow-wave (SW and rapid eye-movement (REM sleep led to the notion that the consolidation of recently acquired memory traces requires neural replay during sleep. To date, however, several observations continue to undermine this hypothesis. To address some of these objections, we investigated the effects of a transient novel experience on the long-term evolution of ongoing neuronal activity in the rat forebrain. We observed that spatiotemporal patterns of neuronal ensemble activity originally produced by the tactile exploration of novel objects recurred for up to 48 h in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, putamen, and thalamus. This novelty-induced recurrence was characterized by low but significant correlations values. Nearly identical results were found for neuronal activity sampled when animals were moving between objects without touching them. In contrast, negligible recurrence was observed for neuronal patterns obtained when animals explored a familiar environment. While the reverberation of past patterns of neuronal activity was strongest during SW sleep, waking was correlated with a decrease of neuronal reverberation. REM sleep showed more variable results across animals. In contrast with data from hippocampal place cells, we found no evidence of time compression or expansion of neuronal reverberation in any of the sampled forebrain areas. Our results indicate that persistent experience-dependent neuronal reverberation is a general property of multiple forebrain structures. It does not consist of an exact replay of previous activity, but instead it defines a mild and consistent bias towards salient neural ensemble firing patterns. These results are compatible with a slow and progressive process of memory consolidation, reflecting novelty-related neuronal ensemble relationships that seem to be context- rather than stimulus-specific. Based on our current and previous results

  15. EDC IMPACT: Molecular effects of developmental FM 550 exposure in Wistar rat placenta and fetal forebrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kylie D Rock

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Firemaster 550 (FM 550 is a flame retardant (FR mixture that has become one of the most commonly used FRs in foam-based furniture and baby products. Human exposure to this commercial mixture, composed of brominated and organophosphate components, is widespread. We have repeatedly shown that developmental exposure can lead to sex-specific behavioral effects in rats. Accruing evidence of endocrine disruption and potential neurotoxicity has raised concerns regarding the neurodevelopmental effects of FM 550 exposure, but the specific mechanisms of action remains unclear. Additionally, we observed significant, and in some cases sex-specific, accumulation of FM 550 in placental tissue following gestational exposure. Because the placenta is an important source of hormones and neurotransmitters for the developing brain, it may be a critical target of toxicity to consider in the context of developmental neurotoxicity. Using a mixture of targeted and exploratory approaches, the goal of the present study was to identify possible mechanisms of action in the developing forebrain and placenta. Wistar rat dams were orally exposed to FM 550 (0, 300 or 1000 μg/day for 10 days during gestation and placenta and fetal forebrain tissue collected for analysis. In placenta, evidence of endocrine, inflammatory and neurotransmitter signaling pathway disruption was identified. Notably, 5-HT turnover was reduced in placental tissue and fetal forebrains indicating that 5-HT signaling between the placenta and the embryonic brain may be disrupted. These findings demonstrate that environmental contaminants, like FM 550, have the potential to impact the developing brain by disrupting normal placental functions.

  16. Visceral hyperalgesia induced by forebrain-specific suppression of native Kv7/KCNQ/M-current in mice

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    Bian Xiling

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dysfunction of brain-gut interaction is thought to underlie visceral hypersensitivity which causes unexplained abdominal pain syndromes. However, the mechanism by which alteration of brain function in the brain-gut axis influences the perception of visceral pain remains largely elusive. In this study we investigated whether altered brain activity can generate visceral hyperalgesia. Results Using a forebrain specific αCaMKII promoter, we established a line of transgenic (Tg mice expressing a dominant-negative pore mutant of the Kv7.2/KCNQ2 channel which suppresses native KCNQ/M-current and enhances forebrain neuronal excitability. Brain slice recording of hippocampal pyramidal neurons from these Tg mice confirmed the presence of hyperexcitable properties with increased firing. Behavioral evaluation of Tg mice exhibited increased sensitivity to visceral pain induced by intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of either acetic acid or magnesium sulfate, and intracolon capsaicin stimulation, but not cutaneous sensation for thermal or inflammatory pain. Immunohistological staining showed increased c-Fos expression in the somatosensory SII cortex and insular cortex of Tg mice that were injected intraperitoneally with acetic acid. To mimic the effect of cortical hyperexcitability on visceral hyperalgesia, we injected KCNQ/M channel blocker XE991 into the lateral ventricle of wild type (WT mice. Intracerebroventricular injection of XE991 resulted in increased writhes of WT mice induced by acetic acid, and this effect was reversed by co-injection of the channel opener retigabine. Conclusions Our findings provide evidence that forebrain hyperexcitability confers visceral hyperalgesia, and suppression of central hyperexcitability by activation of KCNQ/M-channel function may provide a therapeutic potential for treatment of abdominal pain syndromes.

  17. EVIDENCE OF CELL-NONAUTONOMOUS CHANGES IN DENDRITE AND DENDRITIC SPINE MORPHOLOGY IN THE MET-SIGNALING DEFICIENT MOUSE FOREBRAIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judson, Matthew C.; Eagleson, Kathie L.; Wang, Lily; Levitt, Pat

    2010-01-01

    Human genetic findings and murine neuroanatomical expression mapping have intersected to implicate Met receptor tyrosine kinase signaling in the development of forebrain circuits controlling social and emotional behaviors that are atypical in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). To clarify roles for Met signaling during forebrain circuit development in vivo, we generated mutant mice (Emx1Cre/Metfx/fx) with an Emx1-Cre-driven deletion of signaling-competent Met in dorsal pallially-derived forebrain neurons. Morphometric analyses of Lucifer Yellow-injected pyramidal neurons in postnatal day 40 anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) revealed no statistically significant changes in total dendritic length, but a selective reduction in apical arbor length distal to the soma in Emx1Cre/Metfx/fx neurons relative to wild type, consistent with a decrease in the total tissue volume sampled by individual arbors in the cortex. The effects on dendritic structure appear to be circuit-selective, as basal arbor length was increased in Emx1Cre/Metfx/fx layer 2/3 neurons. Spine number was not altered on Emx1Cre/Metfx/fx pyramidal cell populations studied, but spine head volume was significantly increased (~20%). Cell-nonautonomous, circuit-level influences of Met signaling on dendritic development were confirmed by studies of medium spiny neurons (MSN), which do not express Met, but receive Met-expressing corticostriatal afferents during development. Emx1Cre/Metfx/fx MSN exhibited robust increases in total arbor length (~20%). Like in the neocortex, average spine head volume was also increased (~12%). These data demonstrate that a developmental loss of presynaptic Met receptor signaling can affect postsynaptic morphogenesis and suggest a mechanism whereby attenuated Met signaling could disrupt both local and long-range connectivity within circuits relevant to ASD. PMID:20853516

  18. Orexin-A facilitates emergence of the rat from isoflurane anesthesia via mediation of the basal forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-Na; Yang, Cen; Ouyang, Peng-Rong; Zhang, Zhi-Chao; Ran, Ming-Zi; Tong, Li; Dong, Hai-Long; Liu, Yong

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that orexinergic neurons involve in promoting emergence from anesthesia of propofol, an intravenous anesthetics, while whether both of orexin-A and orexin-B have promotive action on emergence via mediation of basal forebrain (BF) in isoflurane anesthesia has not been elucidated. In this study, we observed c-Fos expressions in orexinergic neurons following isoflurane inhalation (for 0, 30, 60, and 120min) and at the time when the righting reflex returned after the cessation of anesthesia. The plasma concentrations of orexin-A and -B in anesthesia-arousal process were measured by radioimmunoassay. Orexin-A and -B (30 or 100pmol) or the orexin receptor-1 and -2 antagonist SB-334867A and TCS-OX2-29 (5 or 20μg) were microinjected into the basal forebrain respectively. The effects of them on the induction (loss of the righting reflex) and the emergence time (return of the righting reflex) under isoflurane anesthesia were observed. The results showed that the numbers of c-Fos-immunoreactive orexinergic neurons in the hypothalamus decreased over time with continued isoflurane inhalation, but restored at emergence. Similar alterations were observed in changes of plasma orexin-A concentrations but not in orexin-B during emergence. Administration of orexins had no effect on the induction time, but orexin-A facilitated the emergence of rats from isoflurane anesthesia while orexin-B didn't. Conversely, microinjection of the orexin receptor-1 antagonist SB-334867A delayed emergence from isoflurane anesthesia. The results indicate that orexin-A plays a promotive role in the emergence of isoflurane anesthesia and this effect is mediated by the basal forebrain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mu Opioid Receptors in Gamma-Aminobutyric Acidergic Forebrain Neurons Moderate Motivation for Heroin and Palatable Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbogne, Pauline; Gardon, Olivier; Martín-García, Elena; Keyworth, Helen L; Matsui, Aya; Mechling, Anna E; Bienert, Thomas; Nasseef, Taufiq; Robé, Anne; Moquin, Luc; Darcq, Emmanuel; Ben Hamida, Sami; Robledo, Patricia; Matifas, Audrey; Befort, Katia; Gavériaux-Ruff, Claire; Harsan, Laura-Adela; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Hennig, Jurgen; Gratton, Alain; Kitchen, Ian; Bailey, Alexis; Alvarez, Veronica A; Maldonado, Rafael; Kieffer, Brigitte L

    2017-05-01

    Mu opioid receptors (MORs) are central to pain control, drug reward, and addictive behaviors, but underlying circuit mechanisms have been poorly explored by genetic approaches. Here we investigate the contribution of MORs expressed in gamma-aminobutyric acidergic forebrain neurons to major biological effects of opiates, and also challenge the canonical disinhibition model of opiate reward. We used Dlx5/6-mediated recombination to create conditional Oprm1 mice in gamma-aminobutyric acidergic forebrain neurons. We characterized the genetic deletion by histology, electrophysiology, and microdialysis; probed neuronal activation by c-Fos immunohistochemistry and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging; and investigated main behavioral responses to opiates, including motivation to obtain heroin and palatable food. Mutant mice showed MOR transcript deletion mainly in the striatum. In the ventral tegmental area, local MOR activity was intact, and reduced activity was only observed at the level of striatonigral afferents. Heroin-induced neuronal activation was modified at both sites, and whole-brain functional networks were altered in live animals. Morphine analgesia was not altered, and neither was physical dependence to chronic morphine. In contrast, locomotor effects of heroin were abolished, and heroin-induced catalepsy was increased. Place preference to heroin was not modified, but remarkably, motivation to obtain heroin and palatable food was enhanced in operant self-administration procedures. Our study reveals dissociable MOR functions across mesocorticolimbic networks. Thus, beyond a well-established role in reward processing, operating at the level of local ventral tegmental area neurons, MORs also moderate motivation for appetitive stimuli within forebrain circuits that drive motivated behaviors. Copyright © 2017 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Conditional Deletion of PDK1 in the Forebrain Causes Neuron Loss and Increased Apoptosis during Cortical Development

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    Congyu Xu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Decreased expression but increased activity of PDK1 has been observed in neurodegenerative disease. To study in vivo function of PDK1 in neuron survival during cortical development, we generate forebrain-specific PDK1 conditional knockout (cKO mice. We demonstrate that PDK1 cKO mice display striking neuron loss and increased apoptosis. We report that PDK1 cKO mice exhibit deficits on several behavioral tasks. Moreover, PDK1 cKO mice show decreased activities for Akt and mTOR. These results highlight an essential role of endogenous PDK1 in the maintenance of neuronal survival during cortical development.

  1. Unexpected reductions in regional cerebral perfusion during prolonged hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawley, Justin S; Macdonald, Jamie H; Oliver, Samuel J; Mullins, Paul G

    2017-02-01

    Cognitive performance is impaired by hypoxia despite global cerebral oxygen delivery and metabolism being maintained. Using arterial spin labelled (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging, this is the first study to show regional reductions in cerebral blood flow (CBF) in response to decreased oxygen supply (hypoxia) at 2 h that increased in area and became more pronounced at 10 h. Reductions in CBF were seen in brain regions typically associated with the 'default mode' or 'task negative' network. Regional reductions in CBF, and associated vasoconstriction, within the default mode network in hypoxia is supported by increased vasodilatation in these regions to a subsequent hypercapnic (5% CO 2 ) challenge. These results suggest an anatomical mechanism through which hypoxia may cause previously reported deficits in cognitive performance. Hypoxia causes an increase in global cerebral blood flow, which maintains global cerebral oxygen delivery and metabolism. However, neurological deficits are abundant under hypoxic conditions. We investigated regional cerebral microvascular responses to acute (2 h) and prolonged (10 h) poikilocapnic normobaric hypoxia. We found that 2 h of hypoxia caused an expected increase in frontal cortical grey matter perfusion but unexpected perfusion decreases in regions of the brain normally associated with the 'default mode' or 'task negative' network. After 10 h in hypoxia, decreased blood flow to the major nodes of the default mode network became more pronounced and widespread. The use of a hypercapnic challenge (5% CO 2 ) confirmed that these reductions in cerebral blood flow from hypoxia were related to vasoconstriction. Our findings demonstrate steady-state deactivation of the default network under acute hypoxia, which become more pronounced over time. Moreover, these data provide a unique insight into the nuanced localized cerebrovascular response to hypoxia that is not attainable through traditional methods. The observation of reduced

  2. The hallucinogen d-lysergic acid diethylamide (d-LSD) induces the immediate-early gene c-Fos in rat forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Paul S; Cunningham, Kathryn A

    2002-12-27

    The hallucinogen d-lysergic acid diethylamide (d-LSD) evokes dramatic somatic and psychological effects. In order to analyze the neural activation induced by this unique psychoactive drug, we tested the hypothesis that expression of the immediate-early gene product c-Fos is induced in specific regions of the rat forebrain by a relatively low, behaviorally active, dose of d-LSD (0.16 mg/kg, i.p.); c-Fos protein expression was assessed at 30 min, and 1, 2 and 4 h following d-LSD injection. A time- and region-dependent expression of c-Fos was observed with a significant increase (PLSD administration. These data demonstrate a unique pattern of c-Fos expression in the rat forebrain following a relatively low dose of d-LSD and suggest that activation of these forebrain regions contributes to the unique behavioral effects of d-LSD. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  3. The Unexpected Past of a Dwarf Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-08-01

    New Light on Cannibalism in the Local Group of Galaxies The Local Group of Galaxies consists of a few large spiral galaxies - for instance the Milky Way galaxy in which we live, and the Andromeda galaxy that is visible to the unaided eye in the northern constellation of the same name - as well as two dozen much smaller galaxies of mostly irregular shape. Whereas the larger galaxies have extended halos of very old stars, no such halos have ever been seen around the smaller ones. Now, however, Dante Minniti and Albert Zijlstra [1], working at the ESO 3.5-metre New Technology Telescope (NTT), have found a large halo of old and metal-poor stars around one of the dwarf galaxies in the Local Group. This finding is quite unexpected. It revises our understanding of star formation in these galaxies and provides important information about the past evolution of galaxies [2]. Galaxy halos The Milky Way galaxy is surrounded by a large, roughly spherical halo of old stars. The diameter is about 100,000 light years and the stars therein, known as Population II stars, are among the oldest known, with ages of 10 billion years or even more. They also differ from the younger stars nearer to the main plane of the Milky Way (in which our 4.7 billion year old Sun is located) by being very metal-poor. Many of the halo stars consist almost solely of hydrogen and helium, reflecting the composition of matter in the young Universe. This halo is important for our understanding of the processes that led to the formation of the Milky Way galaxy. It is believed that many of the halo stars and those of the same type found in globular clusters existed already before the Milky Way had fully formed. Galaxy cannibalism Many astronomers suspect that galaxies evolve and gradually grow larger and heavier by practising cannibalism on their own kind. In this picture, when two galaxies collide in space, the stars and nebulae in the smaller one will disperse and soon be taken over by the larger one, which

  4. Marine debris in central California: quantifying type and abundance of beach litter in Monterey Bay, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosevelt, C; Los Huertos, M; Garza, C; Nevins, H M

    2013-06-15

    Monitoring beach litter is essential for reducing ecological threats towards humans and wildlife. In Monterey Bay, CA information on seasonal and spatial patterns is understudied. Central California's coastal managers require reliable information on debris abundance, distribution, and type, to support policy aimed at reducing litter. We developed a survey method that allowed for trained citizen scientists to quantify the types and abundance of beach litter. Sampling occurred from July 2009-June 2010. Litter abundance ranged from 0.03 to 17.1 items m(-2). Using a mixed model approach, we found season and location have the greatest effect on litter abundance. Styrofoam, the most numerically abundant item, made up 41% of the total amount of litter. Unexpected items included fertilizer pellets. The results of this study provide a baseline on the types and abundance of litter on the central coast and have directly supported policy banning Styrofoam take out containers from local municipalities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Foxp1 in Forebrain Pyramidal Neurons Controls Gene Expression Required for Spatial Learning and Synaptic Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Daniel J; Toriumi, Kazuya; Escamilla, Christine O; Kulkarni, Ashwinikumar; Anderson, Ashley G; Harper, Matthew; Usui, Noriyoshi; Ellegood, Jacob; Lerch, Jason P; Birnbaum, Shari G; Tucker, Haley O; Powell, Craig M; Konopka, Genevieve

    2017-11-08

    Genetic perturbations of the transcription factor Forkhead Box P1 ( FOXP1 ) are causative for severe forms of autism spectrum disorder that are often comorbid with intellectual disability. Recent work has begun to reveal an important role for FoxP1 in brain development, but the brain-region-specific contributions of Foxp1 to autism and intellectual disability phenotypes have yet to be determined fully. Here, we describe Foxp1 conditional knock-out ( Foxp1 cKO ) male and female mice with loss of Foxp1 in the pyramidal neurons of the neocortex and the CA1/CA2 subfields of the hippocampus. Foxp1 cKO mice exhibit behavioral phenotypes that are of potential relevance to autism spectrum disorder, including hyperactivity, increased anxiety, communication impairments, and decreased sociability. In addition, Foxp1 cKO mice have gross deficits in learning and memory tasks of relevance to intellectual disability. Using a genome-wide approach, we identified differentially expressed genes in the hippocampus of Foxp1 cKO mice associated with synaptic function and development. Furthermore, using magnetic resonance imaging, we uncovered a significant reduction in the volumes of both the entire hippocampus as well as individual hippocampal subfields of Foxp1 cKO mice. Finally, we observed reduced maintenance of LTP in area CA1 of the hippocampus in these mutant mice. Together, these data suggest that proper expression of Foxp1 in the pyramidal neurons of the forebrain is important for regulating gene expression pathways that contribute to specific behaviors reminiscent of those seen in autism and intellectual disability. In particular, Foxp1 regulation of gene expression appears to be crucial for normal hippocampal development, CA1 plasticity, and spatial learning. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Loss-of-function mutations in the transcription factor Forkhead Box P1 ( FOXP1 ) lead to autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability. Understanding the potential brain

  6. Principles of auditory processing differ between sensory and premotor structures of the songbird forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyman, Efe; Vicario, David S

    2017-03-01

    Sensory and motor brain structures work in collaboration during perception. To evaluate their respective contributions, the present study recorded neural responses to auditory stimulation at multiple sites simultaneously in both the higher-order auditory area NCM and the premotor area HVC of the songbird brain in awake zebra finches ( Taeniopygia guttata ). Bird's own song (BOS) and various conspecific songs (CON) were presented in both blocked and shuffled sequences. Neural responses showed plasticity in the form of stimulus-specific adaptation, with markedly different dynamics between the two structures. In NCM, the response decrease with repetition of each stimulus was gradual and long-lasting and did not differ between the stimuli or the stimulus presentation sequences. In contrast, HVC responses to CON stimuli decreased much more rapidly in the blocked than in the shuffled sequence. Furthermore, this decrease was more transient in HVC than in NCM, as shown by differential dynamics in the shuffled sequence. Responses to BOS in HVC decreased more gradually than to CON stimuli. The quality of neural representations, computed as the mutual information between stimuli and neural activity, was higher in NCM than in HVC. Conversely, internal functional correlations, estimated as the coherence between recording sites, were greater in HVC than in NCM. The cross-coherence between the two structures was weak and limited to low frequencies. These findings suggest that auditory communication signals are processed according to very different but complementary principles in NCM and HVC, a contrast that may inform study of the auditory and motor pathways for human speech processing. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Neural responses to auditory stimulation in sensory area NCM and premotor area HVC of the songbird forebrain show plasticity in the form of stimulus-specific adaptation with markedly different dynamics. These two structures also differ in stimulus representations and internal

  7. Cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids on primary neuronal cells of the forebrain: the involvement of cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptors and apoptotic cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomiyama, Ken-ichi; Funada, Masahiko, E-mail: mfunada@ncnp.go.jp

    2014-01-01

    The abuse of herbal products containing synthetic cannabinoids has become an issue of public concern. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the acute cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids on mouse brain neuronal cells. Cytotoxicity induced by synthetic cannabinoid (CP-55,940, CP-47,497, CP-47,497-C8, HU-210, JWH-018, JWH-210, AM-2201, and MAM-2201) was examined using forebrain neuronal cultures. These synthetic cannabinoids induced cytotoxicity in the forebrain cultures in a concentration-dependent manner. The cytotoxicity was suppressed by preincubation with the selective CB{sub 1} receptor antagonist AM251, but not with the selective CB{sub 2} receptor antagonist AM630. Furthermore, annexin-V-positive cells were found among the treated forebrain cells. Synthetic cannabinoid treatment induced the activation of caspase-3, and preincubation with a caspase-3 inhibitor significantly suppressed the cytotoxicity. These synthetic cannabinoids induced apoptosis through a caspase-3-dependent mechanism in the forebrain cultures. Our results indicate that the cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids towards primary neuronal cells is mediated by the CB{sub 1} receptor, but not by the CB{sub 2} receptor, and further suggest that caspase cascades may play an important role in the apoptosis induced by these synthetic cannabinoids. In conclusion, excessive synthetic cannabinoid abuse may present a serious acute health concern due to neuronal damage or deficits in the brain. - Highlights: • Synthetic cannabinoids (classical cannabinoids, non-classical cannabinoids, and aminoalkylindole derivatives) induce cytotoxicity in mouse forebrain cultures. • Synthetic cannabinoid-induced cytotoxicity towards forebrain cultures is mediated by the CB{sub 1} receptor, but not by the CB{sub 2} receptor, and involves caspase-dependent apoptosis. • A high concentration of synthetic cannabinoids may be toxic to neuronal cells that express CB{sub 1} receptors.

  8. Cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids on primary neuronal cells of the forebrain: the involvement of cannabinoid CB1 receptors and apoptotic cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomiyama, Ken-ichi; Funada, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    The abuse of herbal products containing synthetic cannabinoids has become an issue of public concern. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the acute cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids on mouse brain neuronal cells. Cytotoxicity induced by synthetic cannabinoid (CP-55,940, CP-47,497, CP-47,497-C8, HU-210, JWH-018, JWH-210, AM-2201, and MAM-2201) was examined using forebrain neuronal cultures. These synthetic cannabinoids induced cytotoxicity in the forebrain cultures in a concentration-dependent manner. The cytotoxicity was suppressed by preincubation with the selective CB 1 receptor antagonist AM251, but not with the selective CB 2 receptor antagonist AM630. Furthermore, annexin-V-positive cells were found among the treated forebrain cells. Synthetic cannabinoid treatment induced the activation of caspase-3, and preincubation with a caspase-3 inhibitor significantly suppressed the cytotoxicity. These synthetic cannabinoids induced apoptosis through a caspase-3-dependent mechanism in the forebrain cultures. Our results indicate that the cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids towards primary neuronal cells is mediated by the CB 1 receptor, but not by the CB 2 receptor, and further suggest that caspase cascades may play an important role in the apoptosis induced by these synthetic cannabinoids. In conclusion, excessive synthetic cannabinoid abuse may present a serious acute health concern due to neuronal damage or deficits in the brain. - Highlights: • Synthetic cannabinoids (classical cannabinoids, non-classical cannabinoids, and aminoalkylindole derivatives) induce cytotoxicity in mouse forebrain cultures. • Synthetic cannabinoid-induced cytotoxicity towards forebrain cultures is mediated by the CB 1 receptor, but not by the CB 2 receptor, and involves caspase-dependent apoptosis. • A high concentration of synthetic cannabinoids may be toxic to neuronal cells that express CB 1 receptors

  9. Complexity of cis-regulatory organization of six3a during forebrain and eye development in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Horng-Dar

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Six3a belongs to the SIX family of homeodomain proteins and is expressed in the most anterior neural plate at the beginning of neurogenesis in various species. Though the function of Six3a as a crucial regulator of eye and forebrain development has been thoroughly investigated, the transcriptional regulation of six3a is not well understood. Results To elucidate the transcriptional regulation of six3a, we performed an in vivo reporter assay. Alignment of the 21-kb region surrounding the zebrafish six3a gene with the analogous region from different species identified several conserved non-coding modules. Transgenesis in zebrafish identified two enhancer elements and one suppressor. The D module drives the GFP reporter in the forebrain and eyes at an early stage, while the A module is responsible for the later expression. The A module also works as a repressor suppressing ectopic expression from the D module. Mutational analysis further minimized the A module to four highly conserved elements and the D module to three elements. Using electrophoresis mobility shift assays, we also provided evidence for the presence of DNA-binding proteins in embryonic nuclear extracts. The transcription factors that may occupy those highly conserved elements were also predicted. Conclusion This study provides a comprehensive view of six3a transcription regulation during brain and eye development and offers an opportunity to establish the gene regulatory networks underlying neurogenesis in zebrafish.

  10. Defects in GPI biosynthesis perturb Cripto signaling during forebrain development in two new mouse models of holoprosencephaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. McKean

    2012-07-01

    Holoprosencephaly is the most common forebrain defect in humans. We describe two novel mouse mutants that display a holoprosencephaly-like phenotype. Both mutations disrupt genes in the glycerophosphatidyl inositol (GPI biosynthesis pathway: gonzo disrupts Pign and beaker disrupts Pgap1. GPI anchors normally target and anchor a diverse group of proteins to lipid raft domains. Mechanistically we show that GPI anchored proteins are mislocalized in GPI biosynthesis mutants. Disruption of the GPI-anchored protein Cripto (mouse and TDGF1 (human ortholog have been shown to result in holoprosencephaly, leading to our hypothesis that Cripto is the key GPI anchored protein whose altered function results in an HPE-like phenotype. Cripto is an obligate Nodal co-factor involved in TGFβ signaling, and we show that TGFβ signaling is reduced both in vitro and in vivo. This work demonstrates the importance of the GPI anchor in normal forebrain development and suggests that GPI biosynthesis genes should be screened for association with human holoprosencephaly.

  11. Relationship between the anterior forebrain mesocircuit and the default mode network in the structural bases of disorders of consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lant, Nicholas D; Gonzalez-Lara, Laura E; Owen, Adrian M; Fernández-Espejo, Davinia

    2016-01-01

    The specific neural bases of disorders of consciousness (DOC) are still not well understood. Some studies have suggested that functional and structural impairments in the default mode network may play a role in explaining these disorders. In contrast, others have proposed that dysfunctions in the anterior forebrain mesocircuit involving striatum, globus pallidus, and thalamus may be the main underlying mechanism. Here, we provide the first report of structural integrity of fiber tracts connecting the nodes of the mesocircuit and the default mode network in 8 patients with DOC. We found evidence of significant damage to subcortico-cortical and cortico-cortical fibers, which were more severe in vegetative state patients and correlated with clinical severity as determined by Coma Recovery Scale-Revised (CRS-R) scores. In contrast, fiber tracts interconnecting subcortical nodes were not significantly impaired. Lastly, we found significant damage in all fiber tracts connecting the precuneus with cortical and subcortical areas. Our results suggest a strong relationship between the default mode network - and most importantly the precuneus - and the anterior forebrain mesocircuit in the neural basis of the DOC.

  12. Genome-wide analysis of epigenomic alterations in fetal mouse forebrain after exposure to low doses of bisphenol A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaoi, Takeshi; Itoh, Kyoko; Nakamura, Keiko; Ogi, Hiroshi; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Fushiki, Shinji

    2008-11-21

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is one of endocrine disrupting chemicals, being distributed widely in the environment. We have been studying the low dose effects of BPA on murine forebrain development. Here, we have investigated the genome-wide effect of maternal exposure to BPA on the epigenome in mouse forebrain at E12.5 and at E14.5. We scanned CpG methylation status in 2500 NotI loci, representing 48 (de)methylated unique loci. Methylation status in most of them was primarily developmental stage-dependent. Each of almost all cloned NotI loci was located in a CpG island (CGI) adjacent to 5' end of the transcriptional unit. The mRNA expression of two functionally related genes changed with development as well as the exposure to BPA. In both genes, changes at the transcriptional level correlated well with the changes in NotI methylation status. Taken together, epigenetic alterations in promoter-associated CGIs after exposure to BPA may underlie some effects on brain development.

  13. ANABOLIC ANDROGENIC STEROID ABUSE: MULTIPLE MECHANISMS OF REGULATION OF GABAERGIC SYNAPSES IN NEUROENDOCRINE CONTROL REGIONS OF THE RODENT FOREBRAIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberlander, Joseph G.; Porter, Donna M.; Penatti, Carlos A. A.; Henderson, Leslie P.

    2011-01-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are synthetic derivatives of testosterone originally developed for clinical purposes, but now predominantly taken at suprapharmacological levels as drugs of abuse. To date, nearly 100 different AAS compounds that vary in metabolic fate and physiological effects have been designed and synthesised. While administered for their ability to enhance muscle mass and performance, untoward side effects of AAS use include changes in reproductive and sexual behaviours. Specifically, AAS, depending on the type of compound administered, can delay or advance pubertal onset, lead to irregular oestrous cyclicity, diminished male and female sexual behaviours, and accelerate reproductive senescence. Numerous brains regions and neurotransmitter signalling systems are involved in the generation of these behaviours, and are potential targets for both chronic and acute actions of the AAS. However critical to all of these behaviours is neurotransmission mediated by GABAA receptors within a nexus of interconnected forebrain regions that includes the medial preoptic area (mPOA), the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) and the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. Here we review how exposure to AAS alters GABAergic transmission and neural activity within these forebrain regions, taking advantage of in vitro systems and both wild-type and genetically altered mouse strains, in order to better understand how these synthetic steroids affect the neural systems that underlie the regulation of reproduction and the expression of sexual behaviours. PMID:21554430

  14. Effect of Estradiol on Neurotrophin Receptors in Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Neurons: Relevance for Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Kwakowsky

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The basal forebrain is home to the largest population of cholinergic neurons in the brain. These neurons are involved in a number of cognitive functions including attention, learning and memory. Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (BFCNs are particularly vulnerable in a number of neurological diseases with the most notable being Alzheimer’s disease, with evidence for a link between decreasing cholinergic markers and the degree of cognitive impairment. The neurotrophin growth factor system is present on these BFCNs and has been shown to promote survival and differentiation on these neurons. Clinical and animal model studies have demonstrated the neuroprotective effects of 17β-estradiol (E2 on neurodegeneration in BFCNs. It is believed that E2 interacts with neurotrophin signaling on cholinergic neurons to mediate these beneficial effects. Evidence presented in our recent study confirms that altering the levels of circulating E2 levels via ovariectomy and E2 replacement significantly affects the expression of the neurotrophin receptors on BFCN. However, we also showed that E2 differentially regulates neurotrophin receptor expression on BFCNs with effects depending on neurotrophin receptor type and neuroanatomical location. In this review, we aim to survey the current literature to understand the influence of E2 on the neurotrophin system, and the receptors and signaling pathways it mediates on BFCN. In addition, we summarize the physiological and pathophysiological significance of E2 actions on the neurotrophin system in BFCN, especially focusing on changes related to Alzheimer’s disease.

  15. Comprehensive mapping of regional expression of the clock protein PERIOD2 in rat forebrain across the 24-h day.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie L Harbour

    Full Text Available In mammals, a light-entrainable clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN regulates circadian rhythms by synchronizing oscillators throughout the brain and body. Notably, the nature of the relation between the SCN clock and subordinate oscillators in the rest of the brain is not well defined. We performed a high temporal resolution analysis of the expression of the circadian clock protein PERIOD2 (PER2 in the rat forebrain to characterize the distribution, amplitude and phase of PER2 rhythms across different regions. Eighty-four LEW/Crl male rats were entrained to a 12-h: 12-h light/dark cycle, and subsequently perfused every 30 min across the 24-h day for a total of 48 time-points. PER2 expression was assessed with immunohistochemistry and analyzed using automated cell counts. We report the presence of PER2 expression in 20 forebrain areas important for a wide range of motivated and appetitive behaviors including the SCN, bed nucleus, and several regions of the amygdala, hippocampus, striatum, and cortex. Eighteen areas displayed significant PER2 rhythms, which peaked at different times of day. Our data demonstrate a previously uncharacterized regional distribution of rhythms of a clock protein expression in the brain that provides a sound basis for future studies of circadian clock function in animal models of disease.

  16. An Evolutionarily Conserved Network Mediates Development of the zona limitans intrathalamica, a Sonic Hedgehog-Secreting Caudal Forebrain Signaling Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Sena

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies revealed new insights into the development of a unique caudal forebrain-signaling center: the zona limitans intrathalamica (zli. The zli is the last brain signaling center to form and the first forebrain compartment to be established. It is the only part of the dorsal neural tube expressing the morphogen Sonic Hedgehog (Shh whose activity participates in the survival, growth and patterning of neuronal progenitor subpopulations within the thalamic complex. Here, we review the gene regulatory network of transcription factors and cis-regulatory elements that underlies formation of a shh-expressing delimitated domain in the anterior brain. We discuss evidence that this network predates the origin of chordates. We highlight the contribution of Shh, Wnt and Notch signaling to zli development and discuss implications for the fact that the morphogen Shh relies on primary cilia for signal transduction. The network that underlies zli development also contributes to thalamus induction, and to its patterning once the zli has been set up. We present an overview of the brain malformations possibly associated with developmental defects in this gene regulatory network (GRN.

  17. Characterisation Of Forebrain Neurons Derived From Late-Onset Huntington’s Disease Human Embryonic Stem Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Christos Niclis

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Huntington's Disease (HD is an incurable neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in exon 1 of the Huntingtin gene. Recently, induced pluripotent stem cell lines carrying atypical and aggressive (CAG60+ HD variants have been generated, and perplexingly exhibit disparate molecular pathologies. Here we investigate two human embryonic stem cell (hESC lines carrying CAG37 and CAG51 repeats to assess whether typical late-onset expansions exhibit HD pathologies. HD hESC properties were assessed in comparison to wildtype control lines at undifferentiated states and throughout forebrain neuronal differentiation. Pluripotent HD lines demonstrate growth, viability, pluripotent gene expression, mitochondrial activity and forebrain specification that is indistinguishable from control lines. Expression profiles of crucial genes known to be dysregulated in HD remain unperturbed in the presence of mutant protein and throughout differentiation; however, elevated glutamate responses were observed in HD CAG51 neurons. These findings suggest typical late-onset HD mutations do not alter pluripotent parameters or differentiation mechanics but that neuronal progeny may possess the capacity to recapitulate neuropathologies seen in human patients. Such HD models will help further our understanding of the cascade of pathological events leading to disease onset and progression, while simultaneously facilitating the identification of candidate HD therapeutics.

  18. Relationship between the anterior forebrain mesocircuit and the default mode network in the structural bases of disorders of consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas D. Lant

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The specific neural bases of disorders of consciousness (DOC are still not well understood. Some studies have suggested that functional and structural impairments in the default mode network may play a role in explaining these disorders. In contrast, others have proposed that dysfunctions in the anterior forebrain mesocircuit involving striatum, globus pallidus, and thalamus may be the main underlying mechanism. Here, we provide the first report of structural integrity of fiber tracts connecting the nodes of the mesocircuit and the default mode network in 8 patients with DOC. We found evidence of significant damage to subcortico-cortical and cortico-cortical fibers, which were more severe in vegetative state patients and correlated with clinical severity as determined by Coma Recovery Scale—Revised (CRS-R scores. In contrast, fiber tracts interconnecting subcortical nodes were not significantly impaired. Lastly, we found significant damage in all fiber tracts connecting the precuneus with cortical and subcortical areas. Our results suggest a strong relationship between the default mode network – and most importantly the precuneus – and the anterior forebrain mesocircuit in the neural basis of the DOC.

  19. Cholinergic Basal Forebrain Structure Influences the Reconfiguration of White Matter Connections to Support Residual Memory in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Nicola J.; Metzler-Baddeley, Claudia; Khondoker, Mizanur R.; Grothe, Michel J.; Teipel, Stefan; Wright, Paul; Heinsen, Helmut; Jones, Derek K.; Aggleton, John P.

    2015-01-01

    The fornix and hippocampus are critical to recollection in the healthy human brain. Fornix degeneration is a feature of aging and Alzheimer's disease. In the presence of fornix damage in mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a recognized prodrome of Alzheimer's disease, recall shows greater dependence on other tracts, notably the parahippocampal cingulum (PHC). The current aims were to determine whether this shift is adaptive and to probe its relationship to cholinergic signaling, which is also compromised in Alzheimer's disease. Twenty-five human participants with MCI and 20 matched healthy volunteers underwent diffusion MRI, behavioral assessment, and volumetric measurement of the basal forebrain. In a regression model for recall, there was a significant group × fornix interaction, indicating that the association between recall and fornix structure was weaker in patients. The opposite trend was present for the left PHC. To further investigate this pattern, two regression models were generated to account for recall performance: one based on fornix microstructure and the other on both fornix and left PHC. The realignment to PHC was positively correlated with free recall but not non-memory measures, implying a reconfiguration that is beneficial to residual memory. There was a positive relationship between realignment to PHC and basal forebrain gray matter volume despite this region demonstrating atrophy at a group level, i.e., the cognitive realignment to left PHC was most apparent when cholinergic areas were relatively spared. Therefore, cholinergic systems appear to enable adaptation to injury even as they degenerate, which has implications for functional restoration. PMID:25589767

  20. Evaluating impacts of unexpected earning on precision of profit estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Kazemi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Precision in earning report has always been a concern among investors, and when there are some negative adjustments on earning, investor may find it challenging to decide whether they should hold or sell their shares. This paper studies the impact of earning precision and unexpected earning adjustments on firms whose share are listed on Tehran Stock Exchange. The proposed study of this paper considers three hypotheses including whether earning precision has negative relationship with unexpected profit, whether it has a negative with unexpected decline in profit and finally, whether, in prediction on negative news compared with positive news, there is a negative relationship between stronger earnings forecast and precision of earning forecast. The study gathers the necessary data from official news released for some firms whose shares were active over the period 2003-2012. The study uses two regression models and the results of regression analysis have confirmed all hypotheses of this survey.

  1. Structural imaging biomarkers of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandschneider, Britta; Koepp, Matthias; Scott, Catherine; Micallef, Caroline; Balestrini, Simona; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Thom, Maria; Harper, Ronald M; Sander, Josemir W; Vos, Sjoerd B; Duncan, John S; Lhatoo, Samden; Diehl, Beate

    2015-10-01

    Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy is a major cause of premature death in people with epilepsy. We aimed to assess whether structural changes potentially attributable to sudden death pathogenesis were present on magnetic resonance imaging in people who subsequently died of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy. In a retrospective, voxel-based analysis of T1 volume scans, we compared grey matter volumes in 12 cases of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (two definite, 10 probable; eight males), acquired 2 years [median, interquartile range (IQR) 2.8] before death [median (IQR) age at scanning 33.5 (22) years], with 34 people at high risk [age 30.5 (12); 19 males], 19 at low risk [age 30 (7.5); 12 males] of sudden death, and 15 healthy controls [age 37 (16); seven males]. At-risk subjects were defined based on risk factors of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy identified in a recent combined risk factor analysis. We identified increased grey matter volume in the right anterior hippocampus/amygdala and parahippocampus in sudden death cases and people at high risk, when compared to those at low risk and controls. Compared to controls, posterior thalamic grey matter volume, an area mediating oxygen regulation, was reduced in cases of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy and subjects at high risk. The extent of reduction correlated with disease duration in all subjects with epilepsy. Increased amygdalo-hippocampal grey matter volume with right-sided changes is consistent with histo-pathological findings reported in sudden infant death syndrome. We speculate that the right-sided predominance reflects asymmetric central influences on autonomic outflow, contributing to cardiac arrhythmia. Pulvinar damage may impair hypoxia regulation. The imaging findings in sudden unexpected death in epilepsy and people at high risk may be useful as a biomarker for risk-stratification in future studies. The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of

  2. Unexpected Coexisting Myocardial Infarction Detected by Delayed Enhancement MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edouard Gerbaud

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of an unexpected coexisting anterior myocardial infarction detected by delayed enhancement MRI in a 41-year-old man following a presentation with a first episode of chest pain during inferior acute myocardial infarction. This second necrotic area was not initially suspected because there were no ECG changes in the anterior leads and the left descending coronary artery did not present any significant stenoses on emergency coronary angiography. Unrecognised myocardial infarction may carry important prognostic implications. CMR is currently the best imaging technique to detect unexpected infarcts.

  3. Development of body, head and brain features in the Australian fat-tailed dunnart (Sminthopsis crassicaudata; Marsupialia: Dasyuridae); A postnatal model of forebrain formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, Rodrigo; Paolino, Annalisa; Kozulin, Peter; Fenlon, Laura R; Morcom, Laura R; Englebright, Robert; O'Hara, Patricia J; Murray, Peter J; Richards, Linda J

    2017-01-01

    Most of our understanding of forebrain development comes from research of eutherian mammals, such as rodents, primates, and carnivores. However, as the cerebral cortex forms largely prenatally, observation and manipulation of its development has required invasive and/or ex vivo procedures. Marsupials, on the other hand, are born at comparatively earlier stages of development and most events of forebrain formation occur once attached to the teat, thereby permitting continuous and non-invasive experimental access. Here, we take advantage of this aspect of marsupial biology to establish and characterise a resourceful laboratory model of forebrain development: the fat-tailed dunnart (Sminthopsis crassicaudata), a mouse-sized carnivorous Australian marsupial. We present an anatomical description of the postnatal development of the body, head and brain in dunnarts, and provide a staging system compatible with human and mouse developmental stages. As compared to eutherians, the orofacial region develops earlier in dunnarts, while forebrain development is largely protracted, extending for more than 40 days versus ca. 15 days in mice. We discuss the benefits of fat-tailed dunnarts as laboratory animals in studies of developmental biology, with an emphasis on how their accessibility in the pouch can help address new experimental questions, especially regarding mechanisms of brain development and evolution.

  4. Dose-related gene expression changes in forebrain following acute, low-level chlorpyrifos exposure in neonatal rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, Anamika; Liu Jing; Ayoubi, Patricia; Pope, Carey

    2010-01-01

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is a widely used organophosphorus insecticide (OP) and putative developmental neurotoxicant in humans. The acute toxicity of CPF is elicited by acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition. We characterized dose-related (0.1, 0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg) gene expression profiles and changes in cell signaling pathways 24 h following acute CPF exposure in 7-day-old rats. Microarray experiments indicated that approximately 9% of the 44,000 genes were differentially expressed following either one of the four CPF dosages studied (546, 505, 522, and 3,066 genes with 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg CPF). Genes were grouped according to dose-related expression patterns using K-means clustering while gene networks and canonical pathways were evaluated using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (registered) . Twenty clusters were identified and differential expression of selected genes was verified by RT-PCR. The four largest clusters (each containing from 276 to 905 genes) constituted over 50% of all differentially expressed genes and exhibited up-regulation following exposure to the highest dosage (2 mg/kg CPF). The total number of gene networks affected by CPF also rose sharply with the highest dosage of CPF (18, 16, 18 and 50 with 0.1, 0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg CPF). Forebrain cholinesterase (ChE) activity was significantly reduced (26%) only in the highest dosage group. Based on magnitude of dose-related changes in differentially expressed genes, relative numbers of gene clusters and signaling networks affected, and forebrain ChE inhibition only at 2 mg/kg CPF, we focused subsequent analyses on this treatment group. Six canonical pathways were identified that were significantly affected by 2 mg/kg CPF (MAPK, oxidative stress, NFΚB, mitochondrial dysfunction, arylhydrocarbon receptor and adrenergic receptor signaling). Evaluation of different cellular functions of the differentially expressed genes suggested changes related to olfactory receptors, cell adhesion/migration, synapse

  5. Abundances in the Galactic bulge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbuy, B; Alves-Brito, A [Universidade de Sao Paulo, IAG, Rua do Matao 1226, Sao Paulo 05508-900 (Brazil); Ortolani, S; Zoccali, M [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita di Padova, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 2, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Hill, V; Gomez, A [Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, 92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Melendez, J [Centro de AstrofIsica da Universidade de Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Asplund, M [Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Postfach 1317, 85741 Garching (Germany); Bica, E [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, CP 15051, Porto Alegre 91501-970 (Brazil); Renzini, A [Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Minniti, D [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Universidad Catolica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile)], E-mail: barbuy@astro.iag.usp.br

    2008-12-15

    The metallicity distribution and abundance ratios of the Galactic bulge are reviewed. Issues raised by recent work of different groups, in particular the high metallicity end, the overabundance of {alpha}-elements in the bulge relative to the thick disc and the measurement of giants versus dwarfs, are discussed. Abundances in the old moderately metal-poor bulge globular clusters are described.

  6. Energy abundance and economic progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schurr, S.H.

    1983-01-01

    A discussion is presented on the benefits of energy abundance and on the links between energy supply, economic growth and human welfare in the United States. It is argued that the restoration of energy abundance with dependable sources of supply should be a major national objective. (U.K.)

  7. Thallium-201 accumulation in cerebral candidiasis: Unexpected finding on SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonami, N.; Matsuda, H.; Ooba, H.; Yokoyama, K.; Hisada, K.; Ikeda, K.; Yamashita, J.

    1990-01-01

    The authors present an unexpected finding of Tl-201 uptake in the intracerebral lesions due to candidiasis. SPECT demonstrated the extent of the lesions and a high target-to-background ratio. The regions where abnormal Tl-201 accumulation was seen were nearly consistent with CT scans of those enhanced by a contrast agent. After treatment, most of the abnormal Tl-201 accumulation disappeared

  8. Thallium-201 accumulation in cerebral candidiasis: Unexpected finding on SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonami, N.; Matsuda, H.; Ooba, H.; Yokoyama, K.; Hisada, K.; Ikeda, K.; Yamashita, J. (Kanazawa Univ. (Japan))

    1990-06-01

    The authors present an unexpected finding of Tl-201 uptake in the intracerebral lesions due to candidiasis. SPECT demonstrated the extent of the lesions and a high target-to-background ratio. The regions where abnormal Tl-201 accumulation was seen were nearly consistent with CT scans of those enhanced by a contrast agent. After treatment, most of the abnormal Tl-201 accumulation disappeared.

  9. Unexpected intra-operative diagnosis of a large cystic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    draining directly into the inferior vena cava. The patient became. Unexpected intra-operative diagnosis of a large cystic phaeochromocytoma and secondary nifedipine pharmacobezoar. D N Ginther, MD, BSc. Division of General Surgery, Royal University Hospital, Saskatoon, SK, Canada. S Kriegler, MD, MB ChB, MMed, ...

  10. Unexpected regiospecific formation and DNA binding of new 3 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    New 3-(acridin-9-yl)methyl-2-substituted imino-1,3-thiazolidin-4-ones were regiospecifically synthesized from unstable (acridin-9-yl)methyl thioureas and methyl bromoacetate (MBA) or bromoacetyl bromide (BAB). Unexpected formation of only one thiazolidinone regioisomer with both the reagents was due to a new ...

  11. Sudden and unexpected childhood deaths investigated at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Sudden and unexpected death is well known to occur in infants, and although sudden deaths are less frequent after the first birthday, they still account for a significant proportion of childhood deaths. In 2009, 1.9% of the total deaths in the USA were childhood deaths. In South Africa (SA) this proportion was ...

  12. An unexpected death during oxygen-ozone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, D; La Monaca, G

    2000-06-01

    An unexpected death is described that was caused by gas embolism that occurred during oxygen-ozone (O2/O3) therapy administered by autohemotransfusion for psoriasis. This unusual complication suggests the necessity of investigating benefits and adverse effects of medical ozone application.

  13. 77 FR 42947 - Unexpected Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-20

    ... July 12, 2012 Unexpected Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs Memorandum for the Secretary of State By..., including section 2(c)(1) of the Migration and Refugee Assistance Act of 1962 (the ``Act''), as amended, (22... from the United States Emergency Refugee and Migration Assistance Fund, for the purpose of meeting...

  14. Inventory of observed unexpected environmental effects of genetically modified crops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, van den L.; Bus, C.B.; Franke, A.C.; Groten, J.A.M.; Lotz, L.A.P.; Timmer, R.D.; Wiel, van de C.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    In general, it can be concluded that very few clearly unexpected effects were observed during the large scale post-release growing of herbicide-tolerant crops and Bt crops. Of course, one has to keep in mind Applied Plant Research (Praktijkonderzoek Plant & Omgeving ) 14 that there will always

  15. Unexpected sneezing after a peribulbar injection in a patient for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... anaesthetic in awake patients. We present a case report of an awake elderly male who experienced unexpected continuous sneezing immediately after the removal of the needle used for the peribulbar block, which was subsequently relieved with pheniramine maleate. Keywords: peribulbar block, pheniramine maleate, ...

  16. The rho GTPase Rac1 is required for proliferation and survival of progenitors in the developing forebrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leone, Dino P; Srinivasan, Karpagam; Brakebusch, Cord

    2010-01-01

    family member, Cdc42, affects the polarity and proliferation of radial glial cells in the VZ. Here, we show that another family member, Rac1, is required for the normal proliferation and differentiation of SVZ progenitors and for survival of both VZ and SVZ progenitors. A forebrain-specific loss of Rac1...... leads to an SVZ-specific reduction in proliferation, a concomitant increase in cell cycle exit, and premature differentiation. In Rac1 mutants, the SVZ and VZ can no longer be delineated, but rather fuse to become a single compact zone of intermingled cells. Cyclin D2 expression, which is normally...... expressed by both VZ and SVZ progenitors, is reduced in Rac1 mutants, suggesting that the mutant cells differentiate precociously. Rac1-deficient mice can still generate SVZ-derived upper layer neurons, indicating that Rac1 is not required for the acquisition of upper layer neuronal fates, but instead...

  17. Sudden unexpected death in children with congenital heart defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jortveit, Jarle; Eskedal, Leif; Hirth, Asle; Fomina, Tatiana; Døhlen, Gaute; Hagemo, Petter; Tell, Grethe S; Birkeland, Sigurd; Øyen, Nina; Holmstrøm, Henrik

    2016-02-14

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are the most common birth defects and are an important cause of death in children. The fear of sudden unexpected death has led to restrictions of physical activity and competitive sports. The aim of the present study was to investigate the rate of sudden unexpected deaths unrelated to surgery in children 2-18 years old with CHDs and, secondarily, to determine whether these deaths were related to cardiac disease, comorbidity, or physical activity. To identify children with CHDs and to determine the number of deaths, data concerning all 9 43 871 live births in Norway in 1994-2009 were retrieved from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway, the Cardiovascular Disease in Norway project, the Oslo University Hospital's Clinical Registry for Congenital Heart Defects and the Norwegian Cause of Death Registry. Survivors were followed through 2012, and information for the deceased children was retrieved from medical records at Norwegian hospitals. Among 11 272 children with CHDs, we identified 19 (0.2%) children 2-18 years old who experienced sudden unexpected deaths unrelated to cardiac surgery. A cardiac cause of death was identified in seven of these cases. None of the children died during physical activity, whereas two children survived cardiac arrest during sports. Sudden unexpected death was infrequent among children with CHDs who survived 2 years of age. Comorbidity was common among the children who died. This study indicates that sudden unexpected death in children with CHDs rarely occurs during physical activity. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Sleep-wake sensitive mechanisms of adenosine release in the basal forebrain of rodents: an in vitro study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Edward Sims

    Full Text Available Adenosine acting in the basal forebrain is a key mediator of sleep homeostasis. Extracellular adenosine concentrations increase during wakefulness, especially during prolonged wakefulness and lead to increased sleep pressure and subsequent rebound sleep. The release of endogenous adenosine during the sleep-wake cycle has mainly been studied in vivo with microdialysis techniques. The biochemical changes that accompany sleep-wake status may be preserved in vitro. We have therefore used adenosine-sensitive biosensors in slices of the basal forebrain (BFB to study both depolarization-evoked adenosine release and the steady state adenosine tone in rats, mice and hamsters. Adenosine release was evoked by high K(+, AMPA, NMDA and mGlu receptor agonists, but not by other transmitters associated with wakefulness such as orexin, histamine or neurotensin. Evoked and basal adenosine release in the BFB in vitro exhibited three key features: the magnitude of each varied systematically with the diurnal time at which the animal was sacrificed; sleep deprivation prior to sacrifice greatly increased both evoked adenosine release and the basal tone; and the enhancement of evoked adenosine release and basal tone resulting from sleep deprivation was reversed by the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS inhibitor, 1400 W. These data indicate that characteristics of adenosine release recorded in the BFB in vitro reflect those that have been linked in vivo to the homeostatic control of sleep. Our results provide methodologically independent support for a key role for induction of iNOS as a trigger for enhanced adenosine release following sleep deprivation and suggest that this induction may constitute a biochemical memory of this state.

  19. Transcriptional Profiling of Cholinergic Neurons From Basal Forebrain Identifies Changes in Expression of Genes Between Sleep and Wake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikonova, Elena V; Gilliland, Jason DA; Tanis, Keith Q; Podtelezhnikov, Alexei A; Rigby, Alison M; Galante, Raymond J; Finney, Eva M; Stone, David J; Renger, John J; Pack, Allan I; Winrow, Christopher J

    2017-06-01

    To assess differences in gene expression in cholinergic basal forebrain cells between sleeping and sleep-deprived mice sacrificed at the same time of day. Tg(ChAT-eGFP)86Gsat mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) under control of the choline acetyltransferase (Chat) promoter were utilized to guide laser capture of cholinergic cells in basal forebrain. Messenger RNA expression levels in these cells were profiled using microarrays. Gene expression in eGFP(+) neurons was compared (1) to that in eGFP(-) neurons and to adjacent white matter, (2) between 7:00 am (lights on) and 7:00 pm (lights off), (3) between sleep-deprived and sleeping animals at 0, 3, 6, and 9 hours from lights on. There was a marked enrichment of ChAT and other markers of cholinergic neurons in eGFP(+) cells. Comparison of gene expression in these eGFP(+) neurons between 7:00 am and 7:00 pm revealed expected differences in the expression of clock genes (Arntl2, Per1, Per2, Dbp, Nr1d1) as well as mGluR3. Comparison of expression between spontaneous sleep and sleep-deprived groups sacrificed at the same time of day revealed a number of transcripts (n = 55) that had higher expression in sleep deprivation compared to sleep. Genes upregulated in sleep deprivation predominantly were from the protein folding pathway (25 transcripts, including chaperones). Among 42 transcripts upregulated in sleep was the cold-inducible RNA-binding protein. Cholinergic cell signatures were characterized. Whether the identified genes are changing as a consequence of differences in behavioral state or as part of the molecular regulatory mechanism remains to be determined. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. The anterior medial amygdala transmits sexual odor information to the posterior medial amygdala and related forebrain nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maras, Pamela M; Petrulis, Aras

    2010-08-01

    In Syrian hamsters, reproductive behavior relies on the perception of chemical signals released from conspecifics. The medial amygdala (MEA) processes sexual odors through functionally distinct, but interconnected, sub-regions; the anterior MEA (MEAa) appears to function as a chemosensory filter to distinguish between opposite-sex and same-sex odors, whereas the posterodorsal MEA (MEApd) is critical for generating attraction specifically to opposite-sex odors. To identify how these sub-regions interact during odor processing, we measured odor-induced Fos expression, an indirect marker of neuronal activation, in the absence of either MEAa or MEApd processing. In Experiment 1, electrolytic lesions of the MEAa decreased Fos expression throughout the posterior MEA in male hamsters exposed to either female or male odors, whereas MEApd lesions had no effect on Fos expression within the MEAa. These results indicate that the MEAa normally enhances processing of sexual odors within the MEApd and that this interaction is primarily unidirectional. Furthermore, lesions of the MEAa, but not the MEApd, decreased Fos expression within several connected forebrain nuclei, suggesting that the MEAa provides the primary excitatory output of the MEA during sexual odor processing. In Experiment 2, we observed a similar pattern of decreased Fos expression, using fiber-sparing, NMDA lesions of the MEAa, suggesting that the decreases in Fos expression were not attributable exclusively to damage to passing fibers. Taken together, these results provide the first direct test of how the different sub-regions within the MEA interact during odor processing, and highlight the role of the MEAa in transmitting sexual odor information to the posterior MEA, as well as to related forebrain nuclei.

  1. Determining Boundaries between Abundance Biozones Using Minimal Equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brent Wilson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The areal extent of a biological community is usually determined using statistical techniques that only give reliable results where samples contain similar and high numbers of specimens. This paper presents a simple, inexpensive method for determining the geographical limits of biological communities applicable where adjacent samples contain widely differing numbers of specimens. The method is a development of SHE Analysis, which discerns boundaries between adjacent abundance biozones (ABs, an AB being an area with a distinct community structure. As originally conceived, SHEbi (SHE Analysis for the identification of Biozones commences with species' absolute abundances and works best with large samples of equal sizes. If the variance in (per sample is high, SHEbi may place AB boundaries in unexpected locations. A modification, based on proportional abundances, is developed here using species' proportional abundances (=/ for each sample where is the number of specimens in the ith species in the sample. For intertidal foraminifera from the Caroni Swamp, Trinidad, where , the number of specimens, fluctuates widely between samples, the modification (SHEbip gives ecologically more sensible results than does traditional SHEbi.

  2. Understanding relationships among abundance, extirpation, and climate at ecoregional scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beever, Erik A; Dobrowski, S Z; Long, J; Mynsberge, A R; Piekielek, N B

    2013-07-01

    Recent research on mountain-dwelling species has illustrated changes in species distributional patterns in response to climate change. Abundance of a species will likely provide an earlier warning indicator of change than will occupancy, yet relationships between abundance and climatic factors have received less attention. We tested whether predictors of counts of American pikas (Ochotona princeps) during surveys from the Great Basin region in 1994-1999 and 2003-2008 differed between the two periods. Additionally, we tested whether various modeled aspects of ecohydrology better predicted relative density than did average annual precipitation, and whether risk of site-wide extirpation predicted subsequent population counts of pikas. We observed several patterns of change in pika abundance at range edges that likely constitute early warnings of distributional shifts. Predictors of pika abundance differed strongly between the survey periods, as did pika extirpation patterns previously reported from this region. Additionally, maximum snowpack and growing-season precipitation resulted in better-supported models than those using average annual precipitation, and constituted two of the top three predictors of pika density in the 2000s surveys (affecting pikas perhaps via vegetation). Unexpectedly, we found that extirpation risk positively predicted subsequent population size. Our results emphasize the need to clarify mechanisms underlying biotic responses to recent climate change at organism-relevant scales, to inform management and conservation strategies for species of concern.

  3. Unexpected changes in community size structure in a natural warming experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, Eoin J.; Zhao, Lei; Pichler, Doris E.; Adams, Georgina; Friberg, Nikolai; Rall, Björn C.; Seeney, Alex; Zhang, Huayong; Reuman, Daniel C.; Woodward, Guy

    2017-09-01

    Natural ecosystems typically consist of many small and few large organisms. The scaling of this negative relationship between body mass and abundance has important implications for resource partitioning and energy usage. Global warming over the next century is predicted to favour smaller organisms, producing steeper mass-abundance scaling and a less efficient transfer of biomass through the food web. Here, we show that the opposite effect occurs in a natural warming experiment involving 13 whole-stream ecosystems within the same catchment, which span a temperature gradient of 5-25 °C. We introduce a mechanistic model that shows how the temperature dependence of basal resource carrying capacity can account for these previously unexpected results. If nutrient supply increases with temperature to offset the rising metabolic demand of primary producers, there will be sufficient resources to sustain larger consumers at higher trophic levels. These new data and the model that explains them highlight important exceptions to some commonly assumed `rules' about responses to warming in natural ecosystems.

  4. Fuzzy Concepts in the Detection of Unexpected Situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bíla

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper establishes three essential classes of unexpected situations (UX1, UX2, UX3, and concentrates attention on UX3 detection. Theconcepts of a special Model of System of Situations (MSS and a Model of a System of Faults (MSF are introduced. An original method isproposed for detecting unexpected situations indicating a violation of a proper invariant of MSS (MSF. The presented approach offers apromising application for starting and ending phases of complex processes, for knowledge discoveries on data and knowledge basesdeveloped with incomplete experience, and for modeling communication processes with unknown (disguised communication subjects. Thepaper also presents a way to utilize ill-separable situations for UX3 detection. The paper deals with the conceptual background for detectingUX3 situations, recapitulates recent results in this field and opens the ways for further research.

  5. Unexpected marked seizure improvement in paediatric epilepsy surgery candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoei-Hansen, Christina E; Mathiasen, René; Uldall, Peter

    2017-01-01

    of children withdrawn from an epilepsy surgery programme due to unexpected seizure improvement. METHODS: We retrospectively studied 173 children under 18 years with medical refractory epilepsy referred for epilepsy surgery between 1996 and 2010. Medical records were reviewed in 2012 and 2015. RESULTS...... for these patients was heterotopia (n=1), focal cortical dysplasia (n=3), infarction (n=1) and unknown, with normal MRI (n=1). They all had an IQ in the normal range. Two of the remaining 7 children were operated later. CONCLUSION: Unexpected seizure control may occur during epilepsy surgery evaluation.......PURPOSE: Epilepsy surgery is performed based on the assumption that medical refractory epilepsy will continue. Rarely seizure freedom occurs before surgery is performed, while the patient is being evaluated as an epilepsy surgery candidate. The aim of this study was to describe the number...

  6. Unexpected brain finding in pre-autopsy postmortem CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzaraki, Vasiliki; Bolliger, Stephan A; Thali, Michael J; Eggert, Sebastian; Ruder, Thomas D

    2017-09-01

    A case is presented in which pre-autopsy postmortem computed tomography (PMCT) revealed an unexpected brain abscess with a related frontal sinusitis and an erosion of the posterior wall of the frontal sinus. PMCT findings enabled the forensic pathologists to adapt protective measures during autopsy and protect their health from infection. Pre-autopsy PMCT has been also useful in the early differential diagnosis procedure. The complementary use of postmortem imaging and autopsy can improve the quality of forensic death investigations.

  7. Encountering unexpected difficult airway: relationship with the intubation difficulty scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Wonuk; Kim, Hajung; Kim, Kyongsun; Ro, Young-Jin; Yang, Hong-Seuk

    2016-06-01

    An unexpected difficult intubation can be very challenging and if it is not managed properly, it may expose the encountered patient to significant risks. The intubation difficulty scale (IDS) has been used as a validated method to evaluate a global degree of intubation difficulty. The aims of this study were to evaluate the prevalence and characteristics of unexpected difficult intubation using the IDS. We retrospectively reviewed 951 patients undergoing elective surgery in a single medical center. Patients expected to have a difficult intubation or who had history of difficult intubation were excluded. Each patient was assessed by the IDS scoring system with seven variables. Total prevalence of difficult intubation and the contributing individual factors were further analyzed. For the 951 patients, the difficult intubation cases presenting IDS > 5 was 5.8% of total cases (n = 55). The prevalence of Cormack-Lehane Grade 3 or 4 was 16.2% (n = 154). Most of the difficult intubation cases were managed by simple additional maneuvers and techniques such as stylet application, additional lifting force and laryngeal pressure. Unexpected difficult airway was present in 5.8% of patients and most was managed effectively. Among the components of IDS, the Cormack-Lehane grade was most sensitive for predicting difficult intubation.

  8. Sudden Unexpected Death in Fetal Life Through Early Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Richard D; Kinney, Hannah C; Willinger, Marian

    2016-06-01

    In March 2015, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development held a workshop entitled "Sudden Unexpected Death in Fetal Life Through Early Childhood: New Opportunities." Its objective was to advance efforts to understand and ultimately prevent sudden deaths in early life, by considering their pathogenesis as a potential continuum with some commonalities in biological origins or pathways. A second objective of this meeting was to highlight current issues surrounding the classification of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), and the implications of variations in the use of the term "SIDS" in forensic practice, and pediatric care and research. The proceedings reflected the most current knowledge and understanding of the origins and biology of vulnerability to sudden unexpected death, and its environmental triggers. Participants were encouraged to consider the application of new technologies and "omics" approaches to accelerate research. The major advances in delineating the intrinsic vulnerabilities to sudden death in early life have come from epidemiologic, neural, cardiac, metabolic, genetic, and physiologic research, with some commonalities among cases of unexplained stillbirth, SIDS, and sudden unexplained death in childhood observed. It was emphasized that investigations of sudden unexpected death are inconsistent, varying by jurisdiction, as are the education, certification practices, and experience of death certifiers. In addition, there is no practical consensus on the use of "SIDS" as a determination in cause of death. Major clinical, forensic, and scientific areas are identified for future research. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  9. Cerebrovascular endothelin-1 hyper-reactivity is associated with transient receptor potential canonical channels 1 and 6 activation and delayed cerebral hypoperfusion after forebrain ischaemia in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, S E; Andersen, X E D R; Hansen, R H

    2015-01-01

    . METHODS: Experimental forebrain ischaemia was induced in Wistar male rats by a two-vessel occlusion model, and the cerebral blood flow was measured by magnetic resonance imaging two days after reperfusion. In vitro vasoreactivity studies, immunofluorescence and quantitative PCR were performed on cerebral...... in the vascular smooth muscle cells was enhanced and correlated with decreased cerebral blood flow two days after forebrain ischaemia. Furthermore, under conditions when voltage-dependent calcium channels were inhibited, endothelin-1-induced cerebrovascular contraction was enhanced and this enhancement...... was presumably mediated by Ca(2+) influx via upregulated transient receptor potential canonical channels 1 and 6. CONCLUSIONS: Our data demonstrates that endothelin-1-mediated influx of extracellular Ca(2+) activates transient receptor potential canonical channels 1 and 6 in cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells...

  10. Solar and stellar photospheric abundances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Allende Prieto

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The determination of photospheric abundances in late-type stars from spectroscopic observations is a well-established field, built on solid theoretical foundations. Improving those foundations to refine the accuracy of the inferred abundances has proven challenging, but progress has been made. In parallel, developments on instrumentation, chiefly regarding multi-object spectroscopy, have been spectacular, and a number of projects are collecting large numbers of observations for stars across the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, promising important advances in our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. After providing a brief description of the basic physics and input data involved in the analysis of stellar spectra, a review is made of the analysis steps, and the available tools to cope with large observational efforts. The paper closes with a quick overview of relevant ongoing and planned spectroscopic surveys, and highlights of recent research on photospheric abundances.

  11. CHLORINE ABUNDANCES IN COOL STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maas, Z. G.; Pilachowski, C. A. [Indiana University Bloomington, Astronomy Department, Swain West 319, 727 East Third Street, Bloomington, IN 47405-7105 (United States); Hinkle, K., E-mail: zmaas@indiana.edu, E-mail: cpilacho@indiana.edu, E-mail: hinkle@noao.edu [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 26732, Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Chlorine abundances are reported in 15 evolved giants and 1 M dwarf in the solar neighborhood. The Cl abundance was measured using the vibration-rotation 1-0 P8 line of H{sup 35}Cl at 3.69851 μ m. The high-resolution L -band spectra were observed using the Phoenix infrared spectrometer on the Kitt Peak Mayall 4 m telescope. The average [{sup 35}Cl/Fe] abundance in stars with −0.72 < [Fe/H] < 0.20 is [{sup 35}Cl/Fe] = (−0.10 ± 0.15) dex. The mean difference between the [{sup 35}Cl/Fe] ratios measured in our stars and chemical evolution model values is (0.16 ± 0.15) dex. The [{sup 35}Cl/Ca] ratio has an offset of ∼0.35 dex above model predictions, suggesting that chemical evolution models are underproducing Cl at the high metallicity range. Abundances of C, N, O, Si, and Ca were also measured in our spectral region and are consistent with F and G dwarfs. The Cl versus O abundances from our sample match Cl abundances measured in planetary nebula and H ii regions. In one star where both H{sup 35}Cl and H{sup 37}Cl could be measured, a {sup 35}Cl/{sup 37}Cl isotope ratio of 2.2 ± 0.4 was found, consistent with values found in the Galactic ISM and predicted chemical evolution models.

  12. Anthropogenic noise changes arthropod abundances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunkley, Jessie P; McClure, Christopher J W; Kawahara, Akito Y; Francis, Clinton D; Barber, Jesse R

    2017-05-01

    Anthropogenic noise is a widespread and growing form of sensory pollution associated with the expansion of human infrastructure. One specific source of constant and intense noise is that produced by compressors used for the extraction and transportation of natural gas. Terrestrial arthropods play a central role in many ecosystems, and given that numerous species rely upon airborne sounds and substrate-borne vibrations in their life histories, we predicted that increased background sound levels or the presence of compressor noise would influence their distributions. In the second largest natural gas field in the United States (San Juan Basin, New Mexico, USA), we assessed differences in the abundances of terrestrial arthropod families and community structure as a function of compressor noise and background sound level. Using pitfall traps, we simultaneously sampled five sites adjacent to well pads that possessed operating compressors, and five alternate, quieter well pad sites that lacked compressors, but were otherwise similar. We found a negative association between sites with compressor noise or higher levels of background sound and the abundance of five arthropod families and one genus, a positive relationship between loud sites and the abundance of one family, and no relationship between noise level or compressor presence and abundance for six families and two genera. Despite these changes, we found no evidence of community turnover as a function of background sound level or site type (compressor and noncompressor). Our results indicate that anthropogenic noise differentially affects the abundances of some arthropod families. These preliminary findings point to a need to determine the direct and indirect mechanisms driving these observed responses. Given the diverse and important ecological functions provided by arthropods, changes in abundances could have ecological implications. Therefore, we recommend the consideration of arthropods in the environmental

  13. The bliss (not the problem) of motor abundance (not redundancy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latash, Mark L

    2012-03-01

    Motor control is an area of natural science exploring how the nervous system interacts with other body parts and the environment to produce purposeful, coordinated actions. A central problem of motor control-the problem of motor redundancy-was formulated by Nikolai Bernstein as the problem of elimination of redundant degrees-of-freedom. Traditionally, this problem has been addressed using optimization methods based on a variety of cost functions. This review draws attention to a body of recent findings suggesting that the problem has been formulated incorrectly. An alternative view has been suggested as the principle of abundance, which considers the apparently redundant degrees-of-freedom as useful and even vital for many aspects of motor behavior. Over the past 10 years, dozens of publications have provided support for this view based on the ideas of synergic control, computational apparatus of the uncontrolled manifold hypothesis, and the equilibrium-point (referent configuration) hypothesis. In particular, large amounts of "good variance"-variance in the space of elements that has no effect on the overall performance-have been documented across a variety of natural actions. "Good variance" helps an abundant system to deal with secondary tasks and unexpected perturbations; its amount shows adaptive modulation across a variety of conditions. These data support the view that there is no problem of motor redundancy; there is bliss of motor abundance.

  14. Age-related intraneuronal elevation of αII-spectrin breakdown product SBDP120 in rodent forebrain accelerates in 3×Tg-AD mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Cai

    Full Text Available Spectrins line the intracellular surface of plasmalemma and play a critical role in supporting cytoskeletal stability and flexibility. Spectrins can be proteolytically degraded by calpains and caspases, yielding breakdown products (SBDPs of various molecular sizes, with SBDP120 being largely derived from caspase-3 cleavage. SBDPs are putative biomarkers for traumatic brain injury. The levels of SBDPs also elevate in the brain during aging and perhaps in Alzheimer's disease (AD, although the cellular basis for this change is currently unclear. Here we examined age-related SBDP120 alteration in forebrain neurons in rats and in the triple transgenic model of AD (3×Tg-AD relative to non-transgenic controls. SBDP120 immunoreactivity (IR was found in cortical neuronal somata in aged rats, and was prominent in the proximal dendrites of the olfactory bulb mitral cells. Western blot and densitometric analyses in wild-type mice revealed an age-related elevation of intraneuronal SBDP120 in the forebrain which was more robust in their 3×Tg-AD counterparts. The intraneuronal SBDP120 occurrence was not spatiotemporally correlated with transgenic amyloid precursor protein (APP expression, β-amyloid plaque development, or phosphorylated tau expression over various forebrain regions or lamina. No microscopically detectable in situ activated caspase-3 was found in the nuclei of SBDP120-containing neurons. The present study demonstrates the age-dependent intraneuronal presence of an αII-spectrin cleavage fragment in mammalian forebrain which is exacerbated in a transgenic model of AD. This novel neuronal alteration indicates that impairments in membrane protein metabolism, possibly due to neuronal calcium mishandling and/or enhancement of calcium sensitive proteolysis, occur during aging and in transgenic AD mice.

  15. Tesofensine induces appetite suppression and weight loss with reversal of low forebrain dopamine levels in the diet-induced obese rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik H; Jensen, Majbrit M; Overgaard, Agnete

    2013-01-01

    is not clarified. Tesofensine effectively induces appetite suppression in the diet-induced obese (DIO) rat partially being ascribed to an indirect stimulation of central dopamine receptor function subsequent to blocked dopamine transporter activity. This is interesting, as obese patients have reduced central......, tesofensine produces weight loss together with reversal of lowered forebrain dopamine levels in DIO rats, suggesting that tesofensine's anti-obesity effects, at least in part, are associated with positive modulation of central dopaminergic activity....

  16. Down-regulation of the axonal PSA-NCAM expression coincides with the onset of myelination in the human fetal forebrain

    OpenAIRE

    Jakovcevski, Igor; Mo, Zhicheng; Zecevic, Nada

    2007-01-01

    The polysialic acid (PSA) modification of neural cell adhesion molecule, which reduces NCAM-mediated cell adhesion, is involved in several developmental processes, such as cell migration, axonal growth, pathfinding, and synaptic plasticity. It has been suggested that PSA-NCAM expression may inhibit myelination. To clarify the relationship between myelination and the expression of PSA-NCAM we systematically investigated its expression in the human forebrain from embryonic stage to midgestation...

  17. Coho Abundance - Linear Features [ds183

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  18. Chinook Abundance - Point Features [ds180

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  19. Coho Abundance - Point Features [ds182

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  20. Steelhead Abundance - Linear Features [ds185

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  1. Steelhead Abundance - Point Features [ds184

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  2. Chinook Abundance - Point Features [ds180

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  3. Coho Abundance - Linear Features [ds183

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  4. Coho Abundance - Point Features [ds182

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  5. Steelhead Abundance - Linear Features [ds185

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  6. Steelhead Abundance - Point Features [ds184

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  7. Cloning and characterization of GRIPE, a novel interacting partner of the transcription factor E12 in developing mouse forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Julian Ik Tsen; Tan, Seong-Seng

    2002-11-08

    The helix-loop-helix (HLH) family of transcription factors are key contributors to a wide array of developmental processes, including neurogenesis and hematopoiesis. These factors are thought to exert their regulatory influences by binding to cognate promoter-DNA sequences as dimers. Although studies in mice have convincingly demonstrated that neurogenic HLH proteins such as NeuroD are intimately involved in neuronal fate determination, the role of the ubiquitously expressed HLH protein, E12, in mammalian neurogenesis remains ambiguous. To address this, a yeast two-hybrid interaction screen was employed to identify dimerization partners to E12. Screening of an embryonic day 11.5 forebrain library resulted in the cloning of GRIPE, a novel GAP-related interacting protein to E12. GRIPE binds to the HLH region of E12 and may require E12 for nuclear import. Furthermore, GRIPE may negatively regulate E12-dependent target gene transcription. High levels of GRIPE and E12 mRNA were coincidentally detected during embryogenesis, but only GRIPE mRNA levels remained high in adult brain, particularly in neurons of the cortex and hippocampus. These observations were recapitulated through an in vitro model of neurogenesis. Taken together, these results indicate that GRIPE is a novel protein dimerization of which with E12 has important consequences for cells undergoing neuronal differentiation.

  8. The selective alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist A-582941 activates immediate early genes in limbic regions of the forebrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, M S; Mikkelsen, J D; Timmermann, D B

    2008-01-01

    and adult rat forebrain using two markers, activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) and c-Fos, to map neuronal activity. Acute administration of A-582941 (1, 3, 10 mg/kg) induced a dose-dependent increase in Arc mRNA expression in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the ventral....../lateral orbitofrontal (VO/LO) cortex of juvenile, but not adult rats. This effect was mitigated by the alpha7 nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine. A-582941 also increased c-Fos mRNA expression in the mPFC of juvenile, but not adult rats. Furthermore, A-582941 increased the number of Arc and c-Fos immunopositive cells...... in the mPFC, VO/LO, and shell of the nucleus accumbens, in both juvenile and adult rats. The A-582941-induced c-Fos protein expression was significantly greater in the mPFC and VO/LO of juvenile compared with adult rats. These data indicate that A-582941-induced alpha7 nAChR stimulation activates brain...

  9. Loss of BAF (mSWI/SNF Complexes Causes Global Transcriptional and Chromatin State Changes in Forebrain Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanathan Narayanan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BAF (Brg/Brm-associated factors complexes play important roles in development and are linked to chromatin plasticity at selected genomic loci. Nevertheless, a full understanding of their role in development and chromatin remodeling has been hindered by the absence of mutants completely lacking BAF complexes. Here, we report that the loss of BAF155/BAF170 in double-conditional knockout (dcKO mice eliminates all known BAF subunits, resulting in an overall reduction in active chromatin marks (H3K9Ac, a global increase in repressive marks (H3K27me2/3, and downregulation of gene expression. We demonstrate that BAF complexes interact with H3K27 demethylases (JMJD3 and UTX and potentiate their activity. Importantly, BAF complexes are indispensable for forebrain development, including proliferation, differentiation, and cell survival of neural progenitor cells. Our findings reveal a molecular mechanism mediated by BAF complexes that controls the global transcriptional program and chromatin state in development.

  10. Increased dopamine receptor expression and anti-depressant response following deep brain stimulation of the medial forebrain bundle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandekar, Manoj P; Luse, Dustin; Hoffmann, Carson; Cotton, Patrick; Peery, Travis; Ruiz, Christian; Hussey, Caroline; Giridharan, Vijayasree V; Soares, Jair C; Quevedo, Joao; Fenoy, Albert J

    2017-08-01

    Among several potential neuroanatomical targets pursued for deep brain stimulation (DBS) for treating those with treatment-resistant depression (TRD), the superolateral-branch of the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) is emerging as a privileged location. We investigated the antidepressant-like phenotypic and chemical changes associated with reward-processing dopaminergic systems in rat brains after MFB-DBS. Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: sham-operated, DBS-Off, and DBS-On. For DBS, a concentric bipolar electrode was stereotactically implanted into the right MFB. Exploratory activity and depression-like behavior were evaluated using the open-field and forced-swimming test (FST), respectively. MFB-DBS effects on the dopaminergic system were evaluated using immunoblotting for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine transporter (DAT), and dopamine receptors (D1-D5), and high-performance liquid chromatography for quantifying dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), and homovanillic acid (HVA) in brain homogenates of prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus, amygdala, and nucleus accumbens (NAc). Animals receiving MFB-DBS showed a significant increase in swimming time without alterations in locomotor activity, relative to the DBS-Off (pbrain regions distant from the target area of stimulation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Marrow Stromal Cells Migrate Throughout Forebrain and Cerebellum, and They Differentiate into Astrocytes after Injection into Neonatal Mouse Brains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopen, Gene C.; Prockop, Darwin J.; Phinney, Donald G.

    1999-09-01

    Stem cells are a valuable resource for treating disease, but limited access to stem cells from tissues such as brain restricts their utility. Here, we injected marrow stromal cells (MSCs) into the lateral ventricle of neonatal mice and asked whether these multipotential mesenchymal progenitors from bone marrow can adopt neural cell fates when exposed to the brain microenvironment. By 12 days postinjection, MSCs migrated throughout the forebrain and cerebellum without disruption to the host brain architecture. Some MSCs within the striatum and the molecular layer of the hippocampus expressed glial fibrillary acidic protein and, therefore, differentiated into mature astrocytes. MSCs also populated neuron rich regions including the Islands of Calleja, the olfactory bulb, and the internal granular layer of the cerebellum. A large number of MSCs also were found within the external granular layer of the cerebellum. In addition, neurofilament positive donor cells were found within the reticular formation of the brain stem, suggesting that MSCs also may have differentiated into neurons. Therefore, MSCs are capable of producing differentiated progeny of a different dermal origin after implantation into neonatal mouse brains. These results suggest that MSCs are potentially useful as vectors for treating a variety of central nervous system disorders.

  12. Identification of genomic regions regulating Pax6 expression in embryonic forebrain using YAC reporter transgenic mouse lines.

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    Da Mi

    Full Text Available The transcription factor Pax6 is a crucial regulator of eye and central nervous system development. Both the spatiotemporal patterns and the precise levels of Pax6 expression are subject to tight control, mediated by an extensive set of cis-regulatory elements. Previous studies have shown that a YAC reporter transgene containing 420 Kb of genomic DNA spanning the human PAX6 locus drives expression of a tau-tagged GFP reporter in mice in a pattern that closely resembles that of endogenous Pax6. Here we have closely compared the pattern of tau-GFP reporter expression at the cellular level in the forebrains and eyes of transgenic mice carrying either complete or truncated versions of the YAC reporter transgene with endogenous Pax6 expression and found several areas where expression of tau-GFP and Pax6 diverge. Some discrepancies are due to differences between the intracellular localization or perdurance of tau-GFP and Pax6 proteins, while others are likely to be a consequence of transcriptional differences. We show that cis-regulatory elements that lie outside the 420 kb fragment of PAX6 are required for correct expression around the pallial-subpallial boundary, in the amygdala and the prethalamus. Further, we found that the YAC reporter transgene effectively labels cells that contribute to the lateral cortical stream, including cells that arise from the pallium and subpallium, and therefore represents a useful tool for studying lateral cortical stream migration.

  13. Pyramidal cells and cytochrome P450 epoxygenase products in the neurovascular coupling response to basal forebrain cholinergic input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecrux, Clotilde; Kocharyan, Ara; Sandoe, Claire H; Tong, Xin-Kang; Hamel, Edith

    2012-05-01

    Activation of the basal forebrain (BF), the primary source of acetylcholine (ACh) in the cortex, broadly increases cortical cerebral blood flow (CBF), a response downstream to ACh release. Although endothelial nitric oxide and cholinoceptive GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) interneurons have been implicated, little is known about the role of pyramidal cells in this response and their possible interaction with astrocytes. Using c-Fos immunohistochemistry as a marker of neuronal activation and laser-Doppler flowmetry, we measured changes in CBF evoked by BF stimulation following pharmacological blockade of c-Fos-identified excitatory pathways, astroglial metabolism, or vasoactive mediators. Pyramidal cells including those that express cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) displayed c-Fos upregulation. Glutamate acting via NMDA, AMPA, and mGlu receptors was involved in the evoked CBF response, NMDA receptors having the highest contribution (~33%). In contrast, nonselective and selective COX-2 inhibition did not affect the evoked CBF response (+0.4% to 6.9%, ns). The metabolic gliotoxins fluorocitrate and fluoroacetate, the cytochrome P450 epoxygenase inhibitor MS-PPOH and the selective epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) antagonist 14,15-epoxyeicosa-5(Z)-enoic acid (14,15-EEZE) all blocked the evoked CBF response by ~50%. Together, the data demonstrate that the hyperemic response to BF stimulation is largely mediated by glutamate released from activated pyramidal cells and by vasoactive EETs, likely originating from activated astrocytes.

  14. Biochemical evidence for glutamate as a transmitter in hippocampal efferents to the basal forebrain and hypothalamus in the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walaas, I.; Fonnum, F.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of bilateral transection of the fornix bundle on the high affinity uptake of glutamate and on the amino acid content in several nuclei of rat forebrain and hypothalamus were studied in order to investigate the possible role of glutamate as a transmitter of these fibres. This lesion decreased the high affinity uptake of L-glutamate by 60 to 70% in the mammillary body and lateral septum, and by 40 to 50% in the anterior diagonal band nucleus, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the mediobasal hypothalamus and the nucleus accumbens. The content of endogenous glutamate in samples dissected from freeze-dried tissue also decreased significantly in these regions. Endogenous aspartate was slightly decreased in the anterior diagonal band nucleus and the mammillary body, but unchanged in the other regions. No significant changes were seen in the levels of serine, ..gamma..-aminobutyric acid, glutamine and taurine, except for an increase in glutamine and taurine in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. The high affinity uptake of ..gamma..-aminobutyric acid, tested in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the mediobasal hypothalamus and the mammillary body, was unchanged after the lesion. The results indicate that allocortical efferents innervating subcortial nuclei through the fornix might use glutamate as a transmitter. The study further supports the concept that glutamate plays an important role as transmitter of several different corticofugal fibre systems in mammalian brain.

  15. Cutaneous anthrax on an unexpected area of body

    OpenAIRE

    Ertuğrul Güçlü; Nazan Tuna; Oğuz Karabay

    2012-01-01

    Anthrax is a zoonotic disease caused by Bacillus anthracis. Cutaneous anthrax is the most commonly seen form of anthrax.Skin lesions usually occur on the most exposed areas of the body, such as the face, neck, hand or upper extremity.The aim of this paper is to report a case of cutaneous anthrax form which was occurred on an unexpected area of thebody of a slaughter-house worker. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2012;2(4): 163-164Key words: Anthrax, Bacillus anthracis, cutaneous

  16. Unexpected rules using a conceptual distance based on fuzzy ontology

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    Mohamed Said Hamani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the major drawbacks of data mining methods is that they generate a notably large number of rules that are often obvious or useless or, occasionally, out of the user’s interest. To address such drawbacks, we propose in this paper an approach that detects a set of unexpected rules in a discovered association rule set. Generally speaking, the proposed approach investigates the discovered association rules using the user’s domain knowledge, which is represented by a fuzzy domain ontology. Next, we rank the discovered rules according to the conceptual distances of the rules.

  17. Unexpected death holograms: Animitas urban appeal in Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lautaro Ojeda Ledesma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at performing an integral analysis of the relation between popular religiousness and urban space in Chilean animitas [little shrines] practices. In order to do this, we propose a multipurpose analysis scheme, holding the concept of "unexpected death hologram". This scheme puts forward three supplementary classifications: animita as a holographic subject, as a holographic object and as a holographic place. Finally, these three classifications supplemented by interviews and topologic analyses show almost all the sociospatial factors present in this practice, accounting for the urban importance that this type of popular practice has

  18. Alopecia associated with unexpected leakage from electron cone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, B.C.; Pennington, E.C.; Hussey, D.H.; Jani, S.K.

    1989-06-01

    Excessive irradiation due to unexpected leakage was found on a patient receiving electron beam therapy. The cause of this leakage was analyzed and the amount of leakage was measured for different electron beam energies. The highest leakage occurred with a 6 x 6 cm cone using a 12 MeV electron beam. The leakage dose measured along the side of the cone could be as great as 40%. Until the cones are modified or redesigned, it is advised that all patient setups be carefully reviewed to assure that no significant patient areas are in the side scatter region.

  19. Alopecia associated with unexpected leakage from electron cone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, B.C.; Pennington, E.C.; Hussey, D.H.; Jani, S.K.

    1989-01-01

    Excessive irradiation due to unexpected leakage was found on a patient receiving electron beam therapy. The cause of this leakage was analyzed and the amount of leakage was measured for different electron beam energies. The highest leakage occurred with a 6 x 6 cm cone using a 12 MeV electron beam. The leakage dose measured along the side of the cone could be as great as 40%. Until the cones are modified or redesigned, it is advised that all patient setups be carefully reviewed to assure that no significant patient areas are in the side scatter region

  20. Abundance estimation and conservation biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, J.D.; MacKenzie, D.I.

    2004-01-01

    Abundance is the state variable of interest in most population–level ecological research and in most programs involving management and conservation of animal populations. Abundance is the single parameter of interest in capture–recapture models for closed populations (e.g., Darroch, 1958; Otis et al., 1978; Chao, 2001). The initial capture–recapture models developed for partially (Darroch, 1959) and completely (Jolly, 1965; Seber, 1965) open populations represented efforts to relax the restrictive assumption of population closure for the purpose of estimating abundance. Subsequent emphases in capture–recapture work were on survival rate estimation in the 1970’s and 1980’s (e.g., Burnham et al., 1987; Lebreton et al.,1992), and on movement estimation in the 1990’s (Brownie et al., 1993; Schwarz et al., 1993). However, from the mid–1990’s until the present time, capture–recapture investigators have expressed a renewed interest in abundance and related parameters (Pradel, 1996; Schwarz & Arnason, 1996; Schwarz, 2001). The focus of this session was abundance, and presentations covered topics ranging from estimation of abundance and rate of change in abundance, to inferences about the demographic processes underlying changes in abundance, to occupancy as a surrogate of abundance. The plenary paper by Link & Barker (2004) is provocative and very interesting, and it contains a number of important messages and suggestions. Link & Barker (2004) emphasize that the increasing complexity of capture–recapture models has resulted in large numbers of parameters and that a challenge to ecologists is to extract ecological signals from this complexity. They offer hierarchical models as a natural approach to inference in which traditional parameters are viewed as realizations of stochastic processes. These processes are governed by hyperparameters, and the inferential approach focuses on these hyperparameters. Link & Barker (2004) also suggest that our attention

  1. Abundance estimation and Conservation Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nichols, J. D.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abundance is the state variable of interest in most population–level ecological research and in most programs involving management and conservation of animal populations. Abundance is the single parameter of interest in capture–recapture models for closed populations (e.g., Darroch, 1958; Otis et al., 1978; Chao, 2001. The initial capture–recapture models developed for partially (Darroch, 1959 and completely (Jolly, 1965; Seber, 1965 open populations represented efforts to relax the restrictive assumption of population closure for the purpose of estimating abundance. Subsequent emphases in capture–recapture work were on survival rate estimation in the 1970’s and 1980’s (e.g., Burnham et al., 1987; Lebreton et al.,1992, and on movement estimation in the 1990’s (Brownie et al., 1993; Schwarz et al., 1993. However, from the mid–1990’s until the present time, capture–recapture investigators have expressed a renewed interest in abundance and related parameters (Pradel, 1996; Schwarz & Arnason, 1996; Schwarz, 2001. The focus of this session was abundance, and presentations covered topics ranging from estimation of abundance and rate of change in abundance, to inferences about the demographic processes underlying changes in abundance, to occupancy as a surrogate of abundance. The plenary paper by Link & Barker (2004 is provocative and very interesting, and it contains a number of important messages and suggestions. Link & Barker (2004 emphasize that the increasing complexity of capture–recapture models has resulted in large numbers of parameters and that a challenge to ecologists is to extract ecological signals from this complexity. They offer hierarchical models as a natural approach to inference in which traditional parameters are viewed as realizations of stochastic processes. These processes are governed by hyperparameters, and the inferential approach focuses on these hyperparameters. Link & Barker (2004 also suggest that

  2. When an Object Appears Unexpectedly: Object Circumvention in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmut, Kate; Du, Wenchong; Barnett, Anna L

    2017-01-01

    Obstacles often appear unexpectedly in our pathway and these require us to make immediate adjustments. Despite how regularly we encounter such situations only few studies have considered how we adjust to unexpected obstacles in the pathway that require us to walk around them. The authors considered how adults adjust to the possibility of an obstacle appearing and then also how foot placement is adjusted to circumvent an obstacle. Fifteen healthy adults walked down an 11-m walkway, initially they were told this was a clear pathway and nothing in the environment would change (no gate), they then performed a series of trials in which a gate may (gate close) or may not (gate open) partially obstruct their pathway. The authors found that mediolateral trunk velocity and acceleration was significantly increased when there was the possibility of an obstacle but before the obstacle appeared. This demonstrates an adaptive walking strategy that seems to enable healthy young adults to successfully circumvent obstacles. The authors also categorized foot placement adjustments and found that adults favored making shorter and wider steps away from the obstacle. They suggest this combination of adjustments allows participants to maintain stability while successfully circumventing the obstacle.

  3. Process improvement methodologies uncover unexpected gaps in stroke care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuner, Anthony D; Schemmel, Andrew J; Pooler, B Dustin; Yu, John-Paul J

    2018-01-01

    Background The diagnosis and treatment of acute stroke requires timed and coordinated effort across multiple clinical teams. Purpose To analyze the frequency and temporal distribution of emergent stroke evaluations (ESEs) to identify potential contributory workflow factors that may delay the initiation and subsequent evaluation of emergency department stroke patients. Material and Methods A total of 719 sentinel ESEs with concurrent neuroimaging were identified over a 22-month retrospective time period. Frequency data were tabulated and odds ratios calculated. Results Of all ESEs, 5% occur between 01:00 and 07:00. ESEs were most frequent during the late morning and early afternoon hours (10:00-14:00). Unexpectedly, there was a statistically significant decline in the frequency of ESEs that occur at the 14:00 time point. Conclusion Temporal analysis of ESEs in the emergency department allowed us to identify an unexpected decrease in ESEs and through process improvement methodologies (Lean and Six Sigma) and identify potential workflow elements contributing to this observation.

  4. Unexpected arousal modulates the influence of sensory noise on confidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Micah; Frank, Darya; Schwarzkopf, D Samuel; Fardo, Francesca; Winston, Joel S; Hauser, Tobias U; Rees, Geraint

    2016-01-01

    Human perception is invariably accompanied by a graded feeling of confidence that guides metacognitive awareness and decision-making. It is often assumed that this arises solely from the feed-forward encoding of the strength or precision of sensory inputs. In contrast, interoceptive inference models suggest that confidence reflects a weighted integration of sensory precision and expectations about internal states, such as arousal. Here we test this hypothesis using a novel psychophysical paradigm, in which unseen disgust-cues induced unexpected, unconscious arousal just before participants discriminated motion signals of variable precision. Across measures of perceptual bias, uncertainty, and physiological arousal we found that arousing disgust cues modulated the encoding of sensory noise. Furthermore, the degree to which trial-by-trial pupil fluctuations encoded this nonlinear interaction correlated with trial level confidence. Our results suggest that unexpected arousal regulates perceptual precision, such that subjective confidence reflects the integration of both external sensory and internal, embodied states. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18103.001 PMID:27776633

  5. Abundances in stars with exoplanets

    OpenAIRE

    Israelian, Garik

    2003-01-01

    Extensive spectroscopic studies of stars with and without planets have concluded that stars hosting planets are significantly more metal-rich than those without planets. More subtle trends of different chemical elements begin to appear as the number of detected extrasolar planetary systems continues to grow. I review our current knowledge concerning the observed abundance trends of various chemical elements in stars with exoplanets and their possible implications.

  6. Unexpected differences in butterfly diversity between two peat bogs in the same area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klimczuk Przemysław

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Peat bogs are listed among the most threatened habitats in central Europe, a situation that is reflected by, for example, the conservational status of stenotopic butterflies. Even so, this group remains relatively little studied and most of the available data are limited to qualitative records. The present study enabled us to gain insight into the butterfly fauna of the two largest peat bogs in the Knyszyn Forest (NE Poland, i.e. Bagno Moskal and the one in the Jesionowe Góry nature reserve. The sites, only ca 10 km apart, are characterized by similar vegetation (mainly the Ledo-Sphagnetum association. The study was carried out in 2013-2015 using the transect method, i.e. regular counts along fixed routes. A total of 37 species, including three tyrphobionts (Colias palaeno, Plebejus optilete and Boloria eunomia and two tyrphophiles (Callophrys rubi and Boloria euphrosyne, were recorded. The greatest and unexpected differences between the sites were related to the complete absence of P. optilete at Bagno Moskal, the significantly higher abundance of B. eunomia at Jesionowe Góry and the greater abundance of B. euphrosyne at Bagno Moskal. In addition, C. palaeno was observed sporadically and only at Bagno Moskal. There was some heterogeneity in the distribution and density of particular species, however. Ledum palustre was found to be the most important nectar plant, its flowers also being frequently visited by tyrphoneutrals. The present study shows that isolated island-like habitats (e.g. peat bogs may possess specific features and be subject to specific independent changes. The results provide a good basis for further research into the habitat preferences of tyrphophilous and tyrphobiontic butterflies, which is important in the context of their conservation.

  7. Global analysis of p53-regulated transcription identifies its direct targets and unexpected regulatory mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Mary Ann; Andrysik, Zdenek; Dengler, Veronica L; Mellert, Hestia S; Guarnieri, Anna; Freeman, Justin A; Sullivan, Kelly D; Galbraith, Matthew D; Luo, Xin; Kraus, W Lee; Dowell, Robin D; Espinosa, Joaquin M

    2014-05-27

    The p53 transcription factor is a potent suppressor of tumor growth. We report here an analysis of its direct transcriptional program using Global Run-On sequencing (GRO-seq). Shortly after MDM2 inhibition by Nutlin-3, low levels of p53 rapidly activate ∼200 genes, most of them not previously established as direct targets. This immediate response involves all canonical p53 effector pathways, including apoptosis. Comparative global analysis of RNA synthesis vs steady state levels revealed that microarray profiling fails to identify low abundance transcripts directly activated by p53. Interestingly, p53 represses a subset of its activation targets before MDM2 inhibition. GRO-seq uncovered a plethora of gene-specific regulatory features affecting key survival and apoptotic genes within the p53 network. p53 regulates hundreds of enhancer-derived RNAs. Strikingly, direct p53 targets harbor pre-activated enhancers highly transcribed in p53 null cells. Altogether, these results enable the study of many uncharacterized p53 target genes and unexpected regulatory mechanisms.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02200.001. Copyright © 2014, Allen et al.

  8. Unexpected fungal communities in the Rehai thermal springs of Tengchong influenced by abiotic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai-Hui; Ding, Xiao-Wei; Salam, Nimaichand; Zhang, Bo; Tang, Xiao-Fei; Deng, Baiwan; Li, Wen-Jun

    2018-05-01

    Fungal communities represent an indispensable part of the geothermal spring ecosystem; however, studies on fungal community within hot springs are still scant. Here, we used Illumina HiSeq 2500 sequencing to detect fungal community diversity in extremely acidic hot springs (pH springs (pH > 6) of Tengchong-indicated by the presence of over 0.75 million valid reads. These sequences were phylogenetically assigned to 5 fungal phyla, 67 order, and 375 genera, indicating unexpected fungal diversity in the hot springs. The genera such as Penicillium, Entyloma, and Cladosporium dominated the fungal community in the acidic geothermal springs, while the groups such as Penicillium, Engyodontium, and Schizophyllum controlled the fungal assemblages in the alkaline hot springs. The alpha-diversity indices and the abundant fungal taxa were significantly correlated with physicochemical factors of the hot springs particularly pH, temperature, and concentrations of Fe 2+ , NH 4 + , NO 2 -, and S 2- , suggesting that the diversity and distribution of fungal assemblages can be influenced by the complex environmental factors of hot springs.

  9. The Abundance of Interstellar Fluorine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauroesch, James T.

    2005-01-01

    The primary objective of this program was to obtain FUSE observations of the interstellar absorption lines of F I at 951 and 954 Angstroms to derive the abundance of fluorine toward the star HD 164816. The nucleosynthetic source(s) of fluorine are still a matter of debate - the present day abundance of fluorine can potentially constrain models for pulsationally driven dredge-up in asymptotic giant branch stars. An accurate measure for the depletion behavior of fluorine will determine whether it may be detectable in QSO absorption line systems - an unambiguous detection of fluorine at suitably high redshifts would provide the best evidence to date for the neutrino process in massive stars. Furthermore, due to its extreme reactivity, measurement of the gas-phase interstellar fluorine abundance is important for models of grain chemistry. Despite the importance of measuring the interstellar fluorine abundance, at the time of our proposal only one previous detection has been made due to the low relative abundance of fluorine, the lack of lines outside the far-UV, and the blending of the available F I transitions with lines of Hz. The star HD 164816 is associated with the Lagoon nebula (M8), and at a distance of approximately 1.5 kpc probes both distant and local gas. Beginning April 8th, 2004 FUSE FP-Split observations of the star HD 164816 were obtained for this program. This data became available in the FUSE data archive May 21, 2004, and these observations were then downloaded and we began our analysis. Our analysis procedure has involved (1) fitting stellar models to the FUSE spectra, (2) using the multiple lines of Hz and N I at other wavelengths in the FUSE bandpass to derive column densities for the lines of H2 and N I which are blended with the F I features at 951 and 954 angstroms (3) the measurement of the column densities of F I and the species O I and C1 I which are important species for the dis-entangling of dust and nucleosynthetic effects. As discussed in

  10. Slow age-dependent decline of doublecortin expression and BrdU labeling in the forebrain from lesser hedgehog tenrecs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpár, Alán; Künzle, Heinz; Gärtner, Ulrich; Popkova, Yulia; Bauer, Ute; Grosche, Jens; Reichenbach, Andreas; Härtig, Wolfgang

    2010-05-12

    In addition to synaptic remodeling, formation of new neurons is increasingly acknowledged as an important cue for plastic changes in the central nervous system. Whereas all vertebrates retain a moderate neuroproliferative capacity, phylogenetically younger mammals become dramatically impaired in this potential during aging. The present study shows that the lesser hedgehog tenrec, an insectivore with a low encephalization index, preserves its neurogenic potential surprisingly well during aging. This was shown by quantitative analysis of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) immunolabeling in the olfactory bulb, paleo-, archi-, and neocortices from 2- to 7-year-old animals. In addition to these newly born cells, a large number of previously formed immature neurons are present throughout adulthood as shown by doublecortin (DCX) immunostaining in various forebrain regions including archicortex, paleocortex, nucleus accumbens, and amygdala. Several ventricle-associated cells in olfactory bulb and hippocampus were double-labeled by BrdU and DCX immunoreactivity. However, most DCX cells in the paleocortex can be considered as persisting immature neurons that obviously do not enter a differentiation program since double fluorescence labeling does not reveal their co-occurrence with numerous neuronal markers, whereas only a small portion coexpresses the pan-neuronal marker HuC/D. Finally, the present study reveals tenrecs as suitable laboratory animals to study age-dependent brain alterations (e.g., of neurogenesis) or slow degenerative processes, particularly due to the at least doubled longevity of tenrecs in comparison to mice and rats. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Distribution of Fos-immunoreactive cells in rat forebrain and midbrain following social defeat stress and diazepam treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lkhagvasuren, B; Oka, T; Nakamura, Y; Hayashi, H; Sudo, N; Nakamura, K

    2014-07-11

    The anxiolytic diazepam selectively inhibits psychological stress-induced autonomic and behavioral responses without causing noticeable suppression of other central performances. This pharmacological property of diazepam led us to the idea that neurons that exhibit diazepam-sensitive, psychological stress-induced activation are potentially those recruited for stress responses. To obtain neuroanatomical clues for the central stress circuitries, we examined the effects of diazepam on psychological stress-induced neuronal activation in broad brain regions. Rats were exposed to a social defeat stress, which caused an abrupt increase in body temperature by up to 2°C. Pretreatment with diazepam (4mg/kg, i.p.) attenuated the stress-induced hyperthermia, confirming an inhibitory physiological effect of diazepam on the autonomic stress response. Subsequently, the distribution of cells expressing Fos, a marker of neuronal activation, was examined in 113 forebrain and midbrain regions of these rats after the stress exposure and diazepam treatment. The stress following vehicle treatment markedly increased Fos-immunoreactive (IR) cells in most regions of the cerebral cortex, limbic system, thalamus, hypothalamus and midbrain, which included parts of the autonomic, neuroendocrine, emotional and arousal systems. The diazepam treatment significantly reduced the stress-induced Fos expression in many brain regions including the prefrontal, sensory and motor cortices, septum, medial amygdaloid nucleus, medial and lateral preoptic areas, parvicellular paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus, dorsomedial hypothalamus, perifornical nucleus, tuberomammillary nucleus, association, midline and intralaminar thalami, and median and dorsal raphe nuclei. In contrast, diazepam increased Fos-IR cells in the central amygdaloid nucleus, medial habenular nucleus, ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus and magnocellular lateral hypothalamus. These results provide important information for elucidating the

  12. Magnesium chloride alone or in combination with diazepam fails to prevent hippocampal damage following transient forebrain ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Milani

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available In the central nervous system, magnesium ion (Mg2+ acts as an endogenous modulator of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA-coupled calcium channels, and may play a major role in the pathomechanisms of ischemic brain damage. In the present study, we investigated the effects of magnesium chloride (MgCl2, 2.5, 5.0 or 7.5 mmol/kg, either alone or in combination with diazepam (DZ, on ischemia-induced hippocampal cell death. Male Wistar rats (250-300 g were subjected to transient forebrain ischemia for 15 min using the 4-vessel occlusion model. MgCl2 was applied systemically (sc in single (1x, 2 h post-ischemia or multiple doses (4x, 1, 2, 24 and 48 h post-ischemia. DZ was always given twice, at 1 and 2 h post-ischemia. Thus, ischemia-subjected rats were assigned to one of the following treatments: vehicle (0.1 ml/kg, N = 34, DZ (10 mg/kg, N = 24, MgCl2 (2.5 mmol/kg, N = 10, MgCl2 (5.0 mmol/kg, N = 17, MgCl2 (7.5 mmol/kg, N = 9 or MgCl2 (5 mmol/kg + DZ (10 mg/kg, N = 14. Seven days after ischemia the brains were analyzed histologically. Fifteen minutes of ischemia caused massive pyramidal cell loss in the subiculum (90.3% and CA1 (88.4% sectors of the hippocampus (P0.05. Both DZ alone and DZ + MgCl2 reduced rectal temperature significantly (P<0.05. No animal death was observed after drug treatment. These data indicate that exogenous magnesium, when administered systemically post-ischemia even in different multiple dose schedules, alone or with diazepam, is not useful against the histopathological effects of transient global cerebral ischemia in rats.

  13. Distinct brainstem and forebrain circuits receiving tracheal sensory neuron inputs revealed using a novel conditional anterograde transsynaptic viral tracing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, Alice E; Driessen, Alexandria K; Simmons, David G; Powell, Joseph; Davis-Poynter, Nicholas; Farrell, Michael J; Mazzone, Stuart B

    2015-05-06

    Sensory nerves innervating the mucosa of the airways monitor the local environment for the presence of irritant stimuli and, when activated, provide input to the nucleus of the solitary tract (Sol) and paratrigeminal nucleus (Pa5) in the medulla to drive a variety of protective behaviors. Accompanying these behaviors are perceivable sensations that, particularly for stimuli in the proximal end of the airways, can be discrete and localizable. Airway sensations likely reflect the ascending airway sensory circuitry relayed via the Sol and Pa5, which terminates broadly throughout the CNS. However, the relative contribution of the Sol and Pa5 to these ascending pathways is not known. In the present study, we developed and characterized a novel conditional anterograde transneuronal viral tracing system based on the H129 strain of herpes simplex virus 1 and used this system in rats along with conventional neuroanatomical tracing with cholera toxin B to identify subcircuits in the brainstem and forebrain that are in receipt of relayed airway sensory inputs via the Sol and Pa5. We show that both the Pa5 and proximal airways disproportionately receive afferent terminals arising from the jugular (rather than nodose) vagal ganglia and the output of the Pa5 is predominately directed toward the ventrobasal thalamus. We propose the existence of a somatosensory-like pathway from the proximal airways involving jugular ganglia afferents, the Pa5, and the somatosensory thalamus and suggest that this pathway forms the anatomical framework for sensations arising from the proximal airway mucosa. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/357041-15$15.00/0.

  14. Dysfunction of the RAR/RXR signaling pathway in the forebrain impairs hippocampal memory and synaptic plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nomoto Masanori

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retinoid signaling pathways mediated by retinoic acid receptor (RAR/retinoid × receptor (RXR-mediated transcription play critical roles in hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Furthermore, recent studies have shown that treatment with retinoic acid alleviates age-related deficits in hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP and memory performance and, furthermore, memory deficits in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. However, the roles of the RAR/RXR signaling pathway in learning and memory at the behavioral level have still not been well characterized in the adult brain. We here show essential roles for RAR/RXR in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. In the current study, we generated transgenic mice in which the expression of dominant-negative RAR (dnRAR could be induced in the mature brain using a tetracycline-dependent transcription factor and examined the effects of RAR/RXR loss. Results The expression of dnRAR in the forebrain down-regulated the expression of RARβ, a target gene of RAR/RXR, indicating that dnRAR mice exhibit dysfunction of the RAR/RXR signaling pathway. Similar with previous findings, dnRAR mice displayed impaired LTP and AMPA-mediated synaptic transmission in the hippocampus. More importantly, these mutant mice displayed impaired hippocampus-dependent social recognition and spatial memory. However, these deficits of LTP and memory performance were rescued by stronger conditioning stimulation and spaced training, respectively. Finally, we found that pharmacological blockade of RARα in the hippocampus impairs social recognition memory. Conclusions From these observations, we concluded that the RAR/RXR signaling pathway greatly contributes to learning and memory, and LTP in the hippocampus in the adult brain.

  15. Initiation and developmental dynamics of Wfs1 expression in the context of neural differentiation and ER stress in mouse forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekko, Triin; Lilleväli, Kersti; Luuk, Hendrik; Sütt, Silva; Truu, Laura; Örd, Tiit; Möls, Märt; Vasar, Eero

    2014-06-01

    Wolframin (Wfs1) is a membrane glycoprotein that resides in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and regulates cellular Ca(2+) homeostasis. In pancreas Wfs1 attenuates unfolded protein response (UPR) and protects cells from apoptosis. Loss of Wfs1 function results in Wolfram syndrome (OMIM 222300) characterized by early-onset diabetes mellitus, progressive optic atrophy, diabetes insipidus, deafness, and psychiatric disorders. Similarly, Wfs1-/- mice exhibit diabetes and increased basal anxiety. In the adult central nervous system Wfs1 is prominent in central extended amygdala, striatum and hippocampus, brain structures largely involved in behavioral adaptation of the organism. Here, we describe the initiation pattern of Wfs1 expression in mouse forebrain using mRNA in situ hybridization and compare it with Synaptophysin (Syp1), a gene encoding synaptic vesicle protein widely used as neuronal differentiation marker. We show that the expression of Wfs1 starts during late embryonic development in the dorsal striatum and amygdala, then expands broadly at birth, possessing several transitory regions during maturation. Syp1 expression precedes Wfs1 and it is remarkably upregulated during the period of Wfs1 expression initiation and maturation, suggesting relationship between neural activation and Wfs1 expression. Using in situ hybridization and quantitative real-time PCR we show that UPR-related genes (Grp78, Grp94, and Chop) display dynamic expression in the perinatal brain when Wfs1 is initiated and their expression pattern is not altered in the brain lacking functional Wfs1. Copyright © 2014 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Song competition affects monoamine levels in sensory and motor forebrain regions of male Lincoln's sparrows (Melospiza lincolnii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendra B Sewall

    Full Text Available Male animals often change their behavior in response to the level of competition for mates. Male Lincoln's sparrows (Melospiza lincolnii modulate their competitive singing over the period of a week as a function of the level of challenge associated with competitors' songs. Differences in song challenge and associated shifts in competitive state should be accompanied by neural changes, potentially in regions that regulate perception and song production. The monoamines mediate neural plasticity in response to environmental cues to achieve shifts in behavioral state. Therefore, using high pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection, we compared levels of monoamines and their metabolites from male Lincoln's sparrows exposed to songs categorized as more or less challenging. We compared levels of norepinephrine and its principal metabolite in two perceptual regions of the auditory telencephalon, the caudomedial nidopallium and the caudomedial mesopallium (CMM, because this chemical is implicated in modulating auditory sensitivity to song. We also measured the levels of dopamine and its principal metabolite in two song control nuclei, area X and the robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA, because dopamine is implicated in regulating song output. We measured the levels of serotonin and its principal metabolite in all four brain regions because this monoamine is implicated in perception and behavioral output and is found throughout the avian forebrain. After controlling for recent singing, we found that males exposed to more challenging song had higher levels of norepinephrine metabolite in the CMM and lower levels of serotonin in the RA. Collectively, these findings are consistent with norepinephrine in perceptual brain regions and serotonin in song control regions contributing to neuroplasticity that underlies socially-induced changes in behavioral state.

  17. Antidepressant-like Effects of Medial Forebrain Bundle Deep Brain Stimulation in Rats are not Associated With Accumbens Dopamine Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregman, Tatiana; Reznikov, Roman; Diwan, Mustansir; Raymond, Roger; Butson, Christopher R; Nobrega, José N; Hamani, Clement

    2015-01-01

    Medial forebrain bundle (MFB) deep brain stimulation (DBS) is currently being investigated in patients with treatment-resistant depression. Striking features of this therapy are the large number of patients who respond to treatment and the rapid nature of the antidepressant response. To study antidepressant-like behavioral responses, changes in regional brain activity, and monoamine release in rats receiving MFB DBS. Antidepressant-like effects of MFB stimulation at 100 μA, 90 μs and either 130 Hz or 20 Hz were characterized in the forced swim test (FST). Changes in the expression of the immediate early gene (IEG) zif268 were measured with in situ hybridization and used as an index of regional brain activity. Microdialysis was used to measure DBS-induced dopamine and serotonin release in the nucleus accumbens. Stimulation at parameters that approximated those used in clinical practice, but not at lower frequencies, induced a significant antidepressant-like response in the FST. In animals receiving MFB DBS at high frequency, increases in zif268 expression were observed in the piriform cortex, prelimbic cortex, nucleus accumbens shell, anterior regions of the caudate/putamen and the ventral tegmental area. These structures are involved in the neurocircuitry of reward and are also connected to other brain areas via the MFB. At settings used during behavioral tests, stimulation did not induce either dopamine or serotonin release in the nucleus accumbens. These results suggest that MFB DBS induces an antidepressant-like effect in rats and recruits structures involved in the neurocircuitry of reward without affecting dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Unexpected decoupling of stretching and bending modes in protein gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibaud, Thomas; Zaccone, Alessio; Del Gado, Emanuela; Trappe, Véronique; Schurtenberger, Peter

    2013-02-01

    We show that gels formed by arrested spinodal decomposition of protein solutions exhibit elastic properties in two distinct frequency domains, both elastic moduli exhibiting a remarkably strong dependence on volume fraction. Considering the large difference between the protein size and the characteristic length of the network we model the gels as porous media and show that the high and low frequency elastic moduli can be respectively attributed to stretching and bending modes. The unexpected decoupling of the two modes in the frequency domain is attributed to the length scale involved: while stretching mainly relates to the relative displacement of two particles, bending involves the deformation of a strand with a thickness of the order of a thousand particle diameters.

  19. Unexpected properties of Radim-type radon monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plch, J.; Burian, I.; Jilek, K.; Vosahlik, J.

    2004-01-01

    The results of numerous experiments carried out using Radim-type monitors are summarized. The monitor, which is based on collection of ions on the surface of a semiconductor detector in an electric field, exhibits enormous efficiency in collecting ions, which attains a value of 70% in the optimum case. The collection efficiency exhibits low dependence on the humidity: the efficiency decreases by 7.4% when the humidity changes from 50 to 90%. The dependence on the humidity is linear to 10% - in contradiction with the published results. The work gives the experimentally determined decreases in the presence of smoke and VOCs, which are acceptable even when the smoke and VOC concentrations are enormous. The results are analyzed and an attempt was made to theoretically explain these unexpected results. (author)

  20. Unexpected response of high Alpine Lake waters to climate warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thies, Hansjörg; Nickus, Ulrike; Mair, Volkmar; Tessadri, Richard; Tait, Danilo; Thaler, Bertha; Psenner, Roland

    2007-11-01

    Over the past two decades, we have observed a substantial rise in solute concentration at two remote high mountain lakes in catchments of metamorphic rocks in the European Alps. At Rasass See, the electrical conductivity increased 18-fold. Unexpectedly high nickel concentrations at Rasass See, which exceeded the limit in drinking water by more than 1 order of magnitude, cannot be related to catchment geology. We attribute these changes in lake water quality to solute release from the ice of an active rock glacier in the catchment as a response to climate warming. Similar processes occurred at the higher elevation lake Schwarzsee ob Sölden, where electrical conductivity has risen 3-fold during the past two decades.

  1. Unexpected pulmonary hypertensive crisis after surgery for ocular malignant melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kaori; Saji, Tsutomu; Kaneko, Taku; Takahashi, Kei; Sugi, Kaoru

    2014-11-24

    To report a case of unexpected pulmonary hypertensive crisis caused by endothelin release from melanoma cells after surgery for choroidal melanoma. A 56-year-old man suddenly developed dyspnea after resection of choroidal melanoma. Worsening hypoxia required intensive treatment, including percutaneous cardiopulmonary support, after which a series of tests were immediately performed. The tentative diagnosis was idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. Previous studies noted a significant association between melanoma and endothelin (ET)-1. We hypothesized that a substantial amount of ET-1 had been released from malignant melanoma cells during resection, thus triggering the pulmonary hypertensive crisis in our patient. The patient fully recovered after intensive treatment and administration of the endothelin receptor antagonist bosentan. The success of bosentan treatment, along with the extremely high level of ET-1 on pathologic analysis, confirmed our hypothesis regarding the increase in plasma ET-1 level. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The Unexpected Awakening of Chaitén Volcano, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carn, Simon A.; Zogorski, John S.; Lara, Luis; Ewert, John W.; Watt, Sebastian; Prata, Alfred J.; Thomas, Ronald J.; Villarosa, Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    On 2 May 2008, a large eruption began unexpectedly at the inconspicuous Chaitén volcano in Chile's southern volcanic zone. Ash columns abruptly jetted from the volcano into the stratosphere, followed by lava dome effusion and continuous low-altitude ash plumes [Lara, 2009]. Apocalyptic photographs of eruption plumes suffused with lightning were circulated globally. Effects of the eruption were extensive. Floods and lahars inundated the town of Chaitén, and its 4625 residents were evacuated. Widespread ashfall and drifting ash clouds closed regional airports and cancelled hundreds of domestic flights in Argentina and Chile and numerous international flights [Guffanti et al., 2008]. Ash heavily affected the aquaculture industry in the nearby Gulf of Corcovado, curtailed ecotourism, and closed regional nature preserves. To better prepare for future eruptions, the Chilean government has boosted support for monitoring and hazard mitigation at Chaitén and at 42 other highly hazardous, active volcanoes in Chile.

  3. Unexpected fold in the circumsporozoite protein target of malaria vaccines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doud, Michael B.; Koksal, Adem C.; Mi, Li-Zhi; Song, Gaojie; Lu, Chafen; Springer, Timothy A. (Harvard-Med)

    2012-10-09

    Circumsporozoite (CS) protein is the major surface component of Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites and is essential for host cell invasion. A vaccine containing tandem repeats, region III, and thrombospondin type-I repeat (TSR) of CS is efficacious in phase III trials but gives only a 35% reduction in severe malaria in the first year postimmunization. We solved crystal structures showing that region III and TSR fold into a single unit, an '{alpha}TSR' domain. The {alpha}TSR domain possesses a hydrophobic pocket and core, missing in TSR domains. CS binds heparin, but {alpha}TSR does not. Interestingly, polymorphic T-cell epitopes map to specialized {alpha}TSR regions. The N and C termini are unexpectedly close, providing clues for sporozoite sheath organization. Elucidation of a unique structure of a domain within CS enables rational design of next-generation subunit vaccines and functional and medicinal chemical investigation of the conserved hydrophobic pocket.

  4. [Analysis of how elderly internet users react to unexpected situations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haesner, Marten; Steinert, Anika; O'Sullivan, Julie Lorraine; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth

    2015-12-01

    Although internet usage among older adults is steadily increasing, there is still a digital divide between generations. Younger internet users seem to be more open towards new media. Recent studies showed the negative influence of computer anxiety on internet usage. It is not known how older adults deal with computer and internet issues in their home environment and which problem-solving strategies they apply. The behavior of elderly people in unexpected situations when using an internet portal was analyzed to establish whether older users can solve the problems without assistance and what individual reactions (e.g. facial expressions and gesticulations) they show during the interaction. In a clinical trial with 50 older adults aged 60 years and older various typical problems which may occur while using web platforms were simulated and user behavior was analyzed using logging data, videography and with questionnaires to measure the subjective opinion of the study participants. The study participants had severe problems in solving the tasks on their own and many of them could not find a suitable solution at all. Overall, the videography data indicated an increased concentration of the participants during the whole session, which is in contrast to the low levels of perceived mental workload reported by the participants. Regarding task completion, no differences were found between seniors with and without cognitive impairment. The results showed the serious difficulties of older adults when dealing with unexpected events while using a web platform. For developers of internet platforms for inexperienced seniors, it seems to be crucial to incorporate a simple integration of all available features within the platform, without including features requiring high multi-tasking skills.

  5. Radical abundance how a revolution in nanotechnology will change civilization

    CERN Document Server

    Drexler, K Eric

    2013-01-01

    K. Eric Drexler is the founding father of nanotechnology--the science of engineering on a molecular level. In Radical Abundance, he shows how rapid scientific progress is about to change our world. Thanks to atomically precise manufacturing, we will soon have the power to produce radically more of what people want, and at a lower cost. The result will shake the very foundations of our economy and environment. Already, scientists have constructed prototypes for circuit boards built of millions of precisely arranged atoms. The advent of this kind of atomic precision promises to change the way we make things--cleanly, inexpensively, and on a global scale. It allows us to imagine a world where solar arrays cost no more than cardboard and aluminum foil, and laptops cost about the same. A provocative tour of cutting edge science and its implications by the field's founder and master, Radical Abundance offers a mind-expanding vision of a world hurtling toward an unexpected future.

  6. Lead abundance in the uranium star CS 31082-001

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plez, B.; Hill, V.; Cayrel, R.

    2004-01-01

    stars:abundances- physical data and processes: nuclear reactions, nucleosynthesis, abundances- atomic data......stars:abundances- physical data and processes: nuclear reactions, nucleosynthesis, abundances- atomic data...

  7. The mRNA expression and histological integrity in rat forebrain motor and sensory regions are minimally affected by acrylamide exposure through drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowyer, John F.; Latendresse, John R.; Delongchamp, Robert R.; Warbritton, Alan R.; Thomas, Monzy; Divine, Becky; Doerge, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine whether alterations in the gene expression or overt histological signs of neurotoxicity in selected regions of the forebrain might occur from acrylamide exposure via drinking water. Gene expression at the mRNA level was evaluated by cDNA array and/or RT-PCR analysis in the striatum, substantia nigra and parietal cortex of rat after a 2-week acrylamide exposure. The highest dose tested (maximally tolerated) of approximately 44 mg/kg/day resulted in a significant decreased body weight, sluggishness, and locomotor activity reduction. These physiological effects were not accompanied by prominent changes in gene expression in the forebrain. All the expression changes seen in the 1200 genes that were evaluated in the three brain regions were ≤ 1.5-fold, and most not significant. Very few, if any, statistically significant changes were seen in mRNA levels of the more than 50 genes directly related to the cholinergic, noradrenergic, GABAergic or glutamatergic neurotransmitter systems in the striatum, substantia nigra or parietal cortex. All the expression changes observed in genes related to dopaminergic function were less than 1.5-fold and not statistically significant and the 5HT1b receptor was the only serotonin-related gene affected. Therefore, gene expression changes were few and modest in basal ganglia and sensory cortex at a time when the behavioral manifestations of acrylamide toxicity had become prominent. No histological evidence of axonal, dendritic or neuronal cell body damage was found in the forebrain due to the acrylamide exposure. As well, microglial activation was not present. These findings are consistent with the absence of expression changes in genes related to changes in neuroinflammation or neurotoxicity. Over all, these data suggest that oral ingestion of acrylamide in drinking water or food, even at maximally tolerable levels, induced neither marked changes in gene expression nor neurotoxicity in the motor and

  8. Ablation of Ca(V2.1 voltage-gated Ca²⁺ channels in mouse forebrain generates multiple cognitive impairments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Theodor Mallmann

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated Ca(V2.1 (P/Q-type Ca²⁺ channels located at the presynaptic membrane are known to control a multitude of Ca²⁺-dependent cellular processes such as neurotransmitter release and synaptic plasticity. Our knowledge about their contributions to complex cognitive functions, however, is restricted by the limited adequacy of existing transgenic Ca(V2.1 mouse models. Global Ca(V2.1 knock-out mice lacking the α1 subunit Cacna1a gene product exhibit early postnatal lethality which makes them unsuitable to analyse the relevance of Ca(V2.1 Ca²⁺ channels for complex behaviour in adult mice. Consequently we established a forebrain specific Ca(V2.1 knock-out model by crossing mice with a floxed Cacna1a gene with mice expressing Cre-recombinase under the control of the NEX promoter. This novel mouse model enabled us to investigate the contribution of Ca(V2.1 to complex cognitive functions, particularly learning and memory. Electrophysiological analysis allowed us to test the specificity of our conditional knock-out model and revealed an impaired synaptic transmission at hippocampal glutamatergic synapses. At the behavioural level, the forebrain-specific Ca(V2.1 knock-out resulted in deficits in spatial learning and reference memory, reduced recognition memory, increased exploratory behaviour and a strong attenuation of circadian rhythmicity. In summary, we present a novel conditional Ca(V2.1 knock-out model that is most suitable for analysing the in vivo functions of Ca(V2.1 in the adult murine forebrain.

  9. Differentiation of Forebrain and Hippocampal Dopamine 1-Class Receptors, D1R and D5R, in Spatial Learning and Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sariñana, Joshua; Tonegawa, Susumu

    2017-01-01

    Activation of prefrontal cortical (PFC), striatal, and hippocampal dopamine 1-class receptors (D1R and D5R) is necessary for normal spatial information processing. Yet the precise role of the D1R versus the D5R in the aforementioned structures, and their specific contribution to the water-maze spatial learning task remains unknown. D1R- and D5R- specific in situ hybridization probes showed that forebrain restricted D1R and D5R KO mice (F-D1R/D5R KO) displayed D1R mRNA deletion in the medial (m)PFC, dorsal and ventral striatum, and the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus. D5R mRNA deletion was limited to the mPFC, the CA1 and DG hippocampal subregions. F-D1R/D5R KO mice were given water-maze training and displayed subtle spatial latency differences between genotypes and spatial memory deficits during both regular and reversal training. To differentiate forebrain D1R from D5R activation, forebrain restricted D1R KO (F-D1R KO) and D5R KO (F-D5R KO) mice were trained on the water-maze task. F-D1R KO animals exhibited escape latency deficits throughout regular and reversal training as well as spatial memory deficits during reversal training. F-D1R KO mice also showed perseverative behavior during the reversal spatial memory probe test. In contrast, F-D5R KO animals did not present observable deficits on the water-maze task. Because F-D1R KO mice showed water-maze deficits we tested the necessity of hippocampal D1R activation for spatial learning and memory. We trained DG restricted D1R KO (DG-D1R KO) mice on the water-maze task. DG-D1R KO mice did not present detectable spatial memory deficit, but did show subtle deficits during specific days of training. Our data provides evidence that forebrain D5R activation plays a unique role in spatial learning and memory in conjunction with D1R activation. Moreover, these data suggest that mPFC and striatal, but not DG D1R activation are essential for spatial learning and memory. PMID:26174222

  10. Meiofaunal abundances and faunal similarity on the continental rise off the coast of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohal, Melissa; Thistle, David; Easton, Erin E.

    2014-11-01

    Metazoan meiofauna (e.g., nematodes, benthic copepods) play important roles in deep-sea sediment communities, but information as basic as standing stocks is not known for much of the world ocean. We therefore sampled six stations: one near the 2700-m isobath and one near the 3700-m isobath off northern, central, and southern California. We counted benthic copepods, both Desmoscolecidae and nondesmoscolecid nematodes, kinorhynchs, nauplii, and ostracods from multiple-corer samples. Nematodes from our 2700-m and 3700-m stations, and ostracods and nauplii from our 3700-m stations, were unusually abundant compared to those from other stations from comparable depths in the Pacific. Off California, the abundances of benthic copepods, kinorhynchs, and nondesmoscolecids at the 2700-m stations were significantly greater than those at the 3700-m stations. Abundance of benthic copepods was correlated with the percentage of medium sand in the sediment, so sediment texture could be important to them. That of kinorhynchs was correlated with the concentration of chloroplastic-pigment equivalents and percentage nitrogen, so consumable material from the euphotic zone could be important to them. In contrast to the usual pattern of decreasing abundance with depth, Desmoscolecidae abundance in the central region was greater at the 3700-m than at the 2700-m station. The three regions differed significantly in both kinorhynch and ostracod abundances, independently of depth. In the food-poor deep sea, animals are expected to be more abundant where food is plentiful. Unexpectedly, ostracod abundance was negatively correlated with all food variables. A possible explanation is that the natural enemies of ostracods are abundant where food is abundant. Multivariate faunal similarity at 2700 m differed significantly from that at 3700 m, independently of regions. Benthic copepods were most responsible for the difference. Regions also differed in multivariate faunal similarity independently of

  11. Unexpected Molecular Sieving Properties of Zeolitic Imidazolate Framework-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chen; Lively, Ryan P; Zhang, Ke; Johnson, Justin R; Karvan, Oguz; Koros, William J

    2012-08-16

    We studied molecular sieving properties of zeolitic imidazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8) by estimating the thermodynamically corrected diffusivities of probe molecules at 35 °C. From helium (2.6 Å) to iso-C4H10 (5.0 Å), the corrected diffusivity drops 14 orders of magnitude. Our results further suggest that the effective aperture size of ZIF-8 for molecular sieving is in the range of 4.0 to 4.2 Å, which is significantly larger than the XRD-derived value (3.4 Å) and between the well-known aperture size of zeolite 4A (3.8 Å) and 5A (4.3 Å). Interestingly, because of aperture flexibility, the studied C4 hydrocarbon molecules that are larger than this effective aperture size still adsorb in the micropores of ZIF-8 with kinetic selectivities for iso-C4H8/iso-C4H10 of 180 and n-C4H10/iso-C4H10 of 2.5 × 10(6). These unexpected molecular sieving properties open up new opportunities for ZIF materials for separations that cannot be economically achieved by traditional microporous adsorbents such as synthetic zeolites.

  12. Unexpected arsenic compounds in low-rank coals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slejkovec, Zdenka; Kanduc, Tjasa

    2005-05-15

    Nine low-rank coal samples from three different coal basins (Velenje and Trbovlje basins, Slovenia, and Sokolov basin, Czech Republic) were analyzed for their elemental composition and the presence of arsenic compounds. Total arsenic concentrations in the samples were 1.59-5.77 microg g(-1) with one exception, 142 microg g(-1) for a sample from the Sokolov basin. A methanol/water mixture (1:1) extracted 15.1 - 38.7% of the total arsenic from Velenje basin samples but only 2.2-7.1% from Sokolov and Trbovlje basin samples. Extracts from the Velenje basin samples contained mainly the tetramethylarsonium ion (0.14 - 0.92 microg g(-1)) with considerable amounts of arsenate (0.15 - 0.85 microg g(-1)) and monomethyl arsonic acid 0.04 - 0.27 microg g(-1)). In methanol/water extracts from samples from the Sokolov and Trbovlje basins inorganic arsenic (arsenate) prevailed (0.26 - 37.1 microg g(-1)), but at least trace amounts of organic arsenic compounds were found as well. It is likely that biogeochemical degradation of organic material is related to the unexpected organoarsenic compounds found in low-rank coals. However, it should also not be ruled out that abiogenic synthesis could have taken place in the carbon-rich environment under the harsh conditions present (elevated temperature and pressure).

  13. Unexpected Far-Ultraviolet Photometric Characteristics On Mimas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, E. M.; Hendrix, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    While infrared and visible are the most common wavelength domains used to investigate planetary surfaces, ultraviolet (UV) data are significant and useful. Here, we present the first far-UV phase curves of Mimas, thus displaying another piece of the Saturnian System puzzle. Our preliminary results shows that, one more time, Mimas surface properties are far from what we was expected. Namely, we observe a leading hemisphere brighter than the trailing hemisphere at some far-UV wavelengths. We used the far-UV channel of the Cassini/UVIS instrument, ranging from 118 to 190 nm. Disk-integrated phase curves for the leading hemisphere and the trailing hemisphere, at 180nm, have been produced. Data points span from 0.5 to 163.5 degrees in phase angle. Mimas displays a leading hemisphere brighter than its trailing hemisphere, when theory and previous Voyager observations at longer wavelengths attest of a brighter trailing hemisphere due to the impact of the E-ring grains on this face of the satellite. Surprisingly, UVIS data show a very bright opposition effect on Mimas leading hemisphere, greater than what is observed on Tethys or Dione leading hemisphere at the same wavelength of 180 nm. Preliminary results of photometric properties modeling seem to indicate an important contribution of the coherent-backscattering process in the opposition surge. Exogenic processes such as bombardment by energetic electrons and/or E-ring grains are discussed to explain this unexpected surface property of Mimas.

  14. Unexpected levels and movement of radon in a large warehouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gammage, R.B.; Espinosa, G.

    2004-01-01

    Alpha-track detectors, used in screening for radon, identified a large warehouse with levels of radon as high as 20 p Ci/l. This circumstance was unexpected because large bay doors were left open for much of the day to admit 1 8-wheeler trucks, and exhaust fans in the roof produced good ventilation. More detailed temporal and spatial investigations of radon and air-flow patterns were made with electret chambers, Lucas-cell flow chambers, tracer gas, smoke pencils and pressure sensing micrometers. An oval-dome shaped zone of radon (>4 p Ci/L) persisted in the central region of each of four separate bays composing the warehouse. Detailed studies of air movement in the bay with the highest levels of radon showed clockwise rotation of air near the outer walls with a central dead zone. Sub slab, radon-laden air ingresses the building through expansion joints between the floor slabs to produce the measured radon. The likely source of radon is air within porous, karst bedrock that underlies much of north-central Tennessee where the warehouse is situated

  15. Unexpectedly large charge radii of neutron-rich calcium isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia Ruiz, R F; Blaum, K; Ekström, A; Frömmgen, N; Hagen, G; Hammen, M; Hebeler, K; Holt, J D; Jansen, G R; Kowalska, M; Kreim, K; Nazarewicz, W; Neugart, R; Neyens, G; Nörtershäuser, W; Papenbrock, T; Papuga, J; Schwenk, A; Simonis, J; Wendt, K A; Yordanov, D T

    2016-01-01

    Despite being a complex many-body system, the atomic nucleus exhibits simple structures for certain ‘magic’ numbers of protons and neutrons. The calcium chain in particular is both unique and puzzling: evidence of doubly magic features are known in 40,48Ca, and recently suggested in two radioactive isotopes, 52,54Ca. Although many properties of experimentally known calcium isotopes have been successfully described by nuclear theory, it is still a challenge to predict the evolution of their charge radii. Here we present the first measurements of the charge radii of 49,51,52Ca, obtained from laser spectroscopy experiments at ISOLDE, CERN. The experimental results are complemented by state-of-the-art theoretical calculations. The large and unexpected increase of the size of the neutron-rich calcium isotopes beyond N = 28 challenges the doubly magic nature of 52Ca and opens new intriguing questions on the evolution of nuclear sizes away from stability, which are of importance for our understanding of neutron-...

  16. A "present" for the future: the unexpected value of rediscovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting; Kim, Tami; Brooks, Alison Wood; Gino, Francesca; Norton, Michael I

    2014-10-01

    Although documenting everyday activities may seem trivial, four studies reveal that creating records of the present generates unexpected benefits by allowing future rediscoveries. In Study 1, we used a time-capsule paradigm to show that individuals underestimate the extent to which rediscovering experiences from the past will be curiosity provoking and interesting in the future. In Studies 2 and 3, we found that people are particularly likely to underestimate the pleasure of rediscovering ordinary, mundane experiences, as opposed to extraordinary experiences. Finally, Study 4 demonstrates that underestimating the pleasure of rediscovery leads to time-inconsistent choices: Individuals forgo opportunities to document the present but then prefer rediscovering those moments in the future to engaging in an alternative fun activity. Underestimating the value of rediscovery is linked to people's erroneous faith in their memory of everyday events. By documenting the present, people provide themselves with the opportunity to rediscover mundane moments that may otherwise have been forgotten. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Identifying unexpected therapeutic targets via chemical-protein interactome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lun Yang

    Full Text Available Drug medications inevitably affect not only their intended protein targets but also other proteins as well. In this study we examined the hypothesis that drugs that share the same therapeutic effect also share a common therapeutic mechanism by targeting not only known drug targets, but also by interacting unexpectedly on the same cryptic targets. By constructing and mining an Alzheimer's disease (AD drug-oriented chemical-protein interactome (CPI using a matrix of 10 drug molecules known to treat AD towards 401 human protein pockets, we found that such cryptic targets exist. We recovered from CPI the only validated therapeutic target of AD, acetylcholinesterase (ACHE, and highlighted several other putative targets. For example, we discovered that estrogen receptor (ER and histone deacetylase (HDAC, which have recently been identified as two new therapeutic targets of AD, might already have been targeted by the marketed AD drugs. We further established that the CPI profile of a drug can reflect its interacting character towards multi-protein sets, and that drugs with the same therapeutic attribute will share a similar interacting profile. These findings indicate that the CPI could represent the landscape of chemical-protein interactions and uncover "behind-the-scenes" aspects of the therapeutic mechanisms of existing drugs, providing testable hypotheses of the key nodes for network pharmacology or brand new drug targets for one-target pharmacology paradigm.

  18. Finding the unexpected: pathological examination of surgically resected femoral heads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fornasier, V.L. [St. Michael' s Hospital, University of Toronto, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Battaglia, D.M. [St. Michael' s Hospital, University of Toronto, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); St. Michael' s Hospital, University of Toronto, Division of Pathology, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2005-06-01

    To study the clinically diagnosed disease process but also identify additional, clinically undetected pathologies in femoral heads resected for replacement arthroplasty. A retrospective review was carried out of the pathological findings in 460 surgically resected femoral heads. Serial sections were submitted to low-energy fine-detail radiography, then decalcified sections stained by the WHO method were examined. The preoperative clinical and imaging diagnoses were compared with the pathological findings and special interest was placed on assessing the clinical significance of any unexpected, clinically undetected findings. The most common findings included the presence of bone islands (solitary osteomas) and areas of avascular necrosis in addition to the primary joint disease for which the patient underwent surgery. The preoperative symptomatology did not distinguish between the known primary disease and the additional pathological findings. Some of the clinically unidentified lesions were of a size that fell below the ability of current clinical investigations to detect. However, the finding of lesions by tissue fine-detail radiography indicates that current, more sensitive clinical imaging techniques may identify them. Careful examination of surgically resected femoral heads is important to ensure that all pathologies are identified and assessed for clinical relevance. (orig.)

  19. Unexpected high-energy γ emission from decaying exotic nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gottardo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The N=52 Ga83 β decay was studied at ALTO. The radioactive 83Ga beam was produced through the ISOL photofission technique and collected on a movable tape for the measurement of γ-ray emission following β decay. While β-delayed neutron emission has been measured to be 56–85% of the decay path, in this experiment an unexpected high-energy 5–9 MeV γ-ray yield of 16(4% was observed, coming from states several MeVs above the neutron separation threshold. This result is compared with cutting-edge QRPA calculations, which show that when neutrons deeply bound in the core of the nucleus decay into protons via a Gamow–Teller transition, they give rise to a dipolar oscillation of nuclear matter in the nucleus. This leads to large electromagnetic transition probabilities which can compete with neutron emission, thus affecting the β-decay path. This process is enhanced by an excess of neutrons on the nuclear surface and may thus be a common feature for very neutron-rich isotopes, challenging the present understanding of decay properties of exotic nuclei.

  20. Targeting IL-2: an unexpected effect in treating immunological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Congxiu; Brand, David; Zheng, Song G

    2018-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) play a crucial role in maintaining immune homeostasis since Treg dysfunction in both animals and humans is associated with multi-organ autoimmune and inflammatory disease. While IL-2 is generally considered to promote T-cell proliferation and enhance effector T-cell function, recent studies have demonstrated that treatments that utilize low-dose IL-2 unexpectedly induce immune tolerance and promote Treg development resulting in the suppression of unwanted immune responses and eventually leading to treatment of some autoimmune disorders. In the present review, we discuss the biology of IL-2 and its signaling to help define the key role played by IL-2 in the development and function of Treg cells. We also summarize proof-of-concept clinical trials which have shown that low-dose IL-2 can control autoimmune diseases safely and effectively by specifically expanding and activating Treg. However, future studies will be needed to validate a better and safer dosing strategy for low-dose IL-2 treatments utilizing well-controlled clinical trials. More studies will also be needed to validate the appropriate dose of IL-2/anti-cytokine or IL-2/anti-IL-2 complex in the experimental animal models before moving to the clinic.

  1. Electrocardiographic features of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chyou, Janice Y; Friedman, Daniel; Cerrone, Marina; Slater, William; Guo, Yu; Taupin, Daniel; O'Rourke, Sean; Priori, Silvia G; Devinsky, Orrin

    2016-07-01

    Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is the most common cause of epilepsy-related mortality. We hypothesized that electrocardiography (ECG) features may distinguish SUDEP cases from living subjects with epilepsy. Using a matched case-control design, we compared ECG studies of 12 consecutive cases of SUDEP over 10 years and 22 epilepsy controls matched for age, sex, epilepsy type (focal, generalized, or unknown/mixed type), concomitant antiepileptic, and psychotropic drug classes. Conduction intervals and prevalence of abnormal ventricular conduction diagnosis (QRS ≥110 msec), abnormal ventricular conduction pattern (QRS <110 msec, morphology of incomplete right or left bundle branch block or intraventricular conduction delay), early repolarization, and features of inherited cardiac channelopathies were assessed. Abnormal ventricular conduction diagnosis and pattern distinguished SUDEP cases from matched controls. Abnormal ventricular conduction diagnosis was present in two cases and no controls. Abnormal ventricular conduction pattern was more common in cases than controls (58% vs. 18%, p = 0.04). Early repolarization was similarly prevalent in cases and controls, but the overall prevalence exceeded that of published community-based cohorts. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  2. Unexpected Molecular Sieving Properties of Zeolitic Imidazolate Framework-8

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Chen

    2012-08-16

    We studied molecular sieving properties of zeolitic imidazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8) by estimating the thermodynamically corrected diffusivities of probe molecules at 35 °C. From helium (2.6 Å) to iso-C 4H 10 (5.0 Å), the corrected diffusivity drops 14 orders of magnitude. Our results further suggest that the effective aperture size of ZIF-8 for molecular sieving is in the range of 4.0 to 4.2 Å, which is significantly larger than the XRD-derived value (3.4 Å) and between the well-known aperture size of zeolite 4A (3.8 Å) and 5A (4.3 Å). Interestingly, because of aperture flexibility, the studied C 4 hydrocarbon molecules that are larger than this effective aperture size still adsorb in the micropores of ZIF-8 with kinetic selectivities for iso-C 4H 8/iso-C 4H 10 of 180 and n-C 4H 10/iso-C 4H 10 of 2.5 × 10 6. These unexpected molecular sieving properties open up new opportunities for ZIF materials for separations that cannot be economically achieved by traditional microporous adsorbents such as synthetic zeolites. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  3. An Unexpected Near Term Pregnancy in a Rudimentary Uterine Horn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabete Gonçalves

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Unicornuate uterus occurs due to a complete or partial nondevelopment of one Mullerian duct; sometimes it is associated with a rudimentary horn, which can communicate or not with uterine cavity or contain functional endometrium. Pregnancy in a rudimentary horn is rare and the outcome almost always unfavorable, usually ending in rupture during the first or second trimester with significant morbidity and mortality. Despite the availability and advances on imagiologic procedures, recognition of this ectopic pregnancy is frequently made at laparotomy after abdominal pain and collapse. The authors describe a case of a primigravida with 34 weeks of gestation admitted with a preeclampsia with severity criteria. A cesarean for fetal malpresentation was done and, unexpectedly, a rudimentary horn pregnancy was found with a live newborn. In the literature, few reports of a horn pregnancy reaching the viability with a live newborn are described, enhancing the clinical importance of this case. A review of literature concerning the epidemics, clinical presentation, and appropriate management of uterine horn pregnancies is made.

  4. Preferences of Patients for Discussing Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sūna Normunds

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available People with epilepsy have increased mortality rates, which is partially attributed to sudden unexpected death in epilepsy syndrome (SUDEP. Poor seizure control appears to be the strongest SUDEP risk factor. Management of epilepsy and adherence to therapy is critical to seizure control. The belief by caregivers of negative influence caused by being informed about the syndrome is the main reason SUDEP is not disclosed. There are no clear recommendations when to disclose the risk of SUDEP and how much information should be provided. We addressed the preferences of Latvian epilepsy patients for discussing SUDEP as well as awareness of the syndrome. Our study involved 55 epilepsy patients. We found that, as in other studies, our patients were relatively well informed about SUDEP. We found that a considerable proportion of patients preferred to receive information about SUDEP from a general practitioner. We note the belief of patients that the disclosure of SUDEP would either improve or have no effect on the quality of life. We were able to identify groups of patients with a self-reported belief of more frequent expected anxiety and poor adherence to medical treatment. Our data improves the understanding of preferences of patient for discussing the negative aspects of epilepsy.

  5. Overexpression of the NR2A subunit in the forebrain impairs long-term social recognition and non-social olfactory memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, S A; Tsien, J Z

    2014-04-01

    Animals must recognize and remember conspecifics and potential mates, and distinguish these animals from potential heterospecific competitors and predators. Despite its necessity, aged animals are known to exhibit impaired social recognition memory. As the brain ages, the ratio of NR2A:NR2B in the brain increases over time and has been postulated to underlie the cognitive decline observed during the aging process. Here, we test the hypothesis that an increased NR2A:NR2B subunit ratio underlies long-term social recognition memory. Using transgenic overexpression of NR2A in the forebrain regions, we investigated the ability of these mice to learn and remember male and female conspecifics, mice of another strain and animals of another rodent species, the rat. Furthermore, due to the importance of olfaction in social recognition, we tested the olfactory memory in the NR2A transgenic mice. Our series of behavioral experiments revealed significant impairments in the NR2A transgenic mice in long-term social memory of both male and female conspecifics. Additionally, the NR2A transgenic mice are unable to recognize mice of another strain or rats. The NR2A transgenic mice also exhibited long-term memory impairments in the olfactory recognition task. Taken together, our results provide evidence that an increased NR2A:NR2B ratio in the forebrain leads to reduced long-term memory function, including the ethologically important memories such as social recognition and olfactory memory.

  6. Substitution of natural sensory input by artificial neurostimulation of an amputated trigeminal nerve does not prevent the degeneration of basal forebrain cholinergic circuits projecting to the somatosensory cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Rincon, Celia; Panetsos, Fivos

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral deafferentation downregulates acetylcholine (ACh) synthesis in sensory cortices. However, the responsible neural circuits and processes are not known. We irreversibly transected the rat infraorbital nerve and implanted neuroprosthetic microdevices for proximal stump stimulation, and assessed cytochrome-oxidase and choline- acetyl-transferase (ChAT) in somatosensory, auditory and visual cortices; estimated the number and density of ACh-neurons in the magnocellular basal nucleus (MBN); and localized down-regulated ACh-neurons in basal forebrain using retrograde labeling from deafferented cortices. Here we show that nerve transection, causes down regulation of MBN cholinergic neurons. Stimulation of the cut nerve reverses the metabolic decline but does not affect the decrease in cholinergic fibers in cortex or cholinergic neurons in basal forebrain. Artifical stimulation of the nerve also has no affect of ACh-innervation of other cortices. Cortical ChAT depletion is due to loss of corticopetal MBN ChAT-expressing neurons. MBN ChAT downregulation is not due to a decrease of afferent activity or to a failure of trophic support. Basalocortical ACh circuits are sensory specific, ACh is provided to each sensory cortex “on demand” by dedicated circuits. Our data support the existence of a modality-specific cortex-MBN-cortex circuit for cognitive information processing. PMID:25452715

  7. How microelectrode array-based chick forebrain neuron biosensors respond to glutamate NMDA receptor antagonist AP5 and GABAA receptor antagonist musimol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Y. Kuang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We have established a long-term, stable primary chick forebrain neuron (FBN culture on a microelectrode array platform as a biosensor system for neurotoxicant screening and for neuroelectrophysiological studies for multiple purposes. This paper reports some of our results, which characterize the biosensor pharmacologically. Dose-response experiments were conducted using NMDA receptor antagonist AP5 and GABAA receptor agonist musimol (MUS. The chick FBN biosensor (C-FBN-biosensor responds to the two agents in a pattern similar to that of rodent counterparts; the estimated EC50s (the effective concentration that causes 50% inhibition of the maximal effect are 2.3 μM and 0.25 μM, respectively. Intercultural and intracultural reproducibility and long-term reusability of the C-FBN-biosensor are addressed and discussed. A phenomenon of sensitization of the biosensor that accompanies intracultural reproducibility in paired dose-response experiments for the same agent (AP5 or MUS is reported. The potential application of the C-FBN-biosensor as an alternative to rodent biosensors in shared sensing domains (NMDA receptor and GABAA receptor is suggested. Keywords: Biosensor, Microelectrode array, Neurotoxicity, Chick forebrain neuron, AP5, Musimol

  8. Mapping the co-localization of the circadian proteins PER2 and BMAL1 with enkephalin and substance P throughout the rodent forebrain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariana Frederick

    Full Text Available Despite rhythmic expression of clock genes being found throughout the central nervous system, very little is known about their function outside of the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Determining the pattern of clock gene expression across neuronal subpopulations is a key step in understanding their regulation and how they may influence the functions of various brain structures. Using immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, we quantified the co-expression of the clock proteins BMAL1 and PER2 with two neuropeptides, Substance P (SubP and Enkephalin (Enk, expressed in distinct neuronal populations throughout the forebrain. Regions examined included the limbic forebrain (dorsal striatum, nucleus accumbens, amygdala, stria terminalis, thalamus medial habenula of the thalamus, paraventricular nucleus and arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus and the olfactory bulb. In most regions examined, BMAL1 was homogeneously expressed in nearly all neurons (~90%, and PER2 was expressed in a slightly lower proportion of cells. There was no specific correlation to SubP- or Enk- expressing subpopulations. The olfactory bulb was unique in that PER2 and BMAL1 were expressed in a much smaller percentage of cells, and Enk was rarely found in the same cells that expressed the clock proteins (SubP was undetectable. These results indicate that clock genes are not unique to specific cell types, and further studies will be required to determine the factors that contribute to the regulation of clock gene expression throughout the brain.

  9. A comparison of the effects of male pheromone priming and optogenetic inhibition of accessory olfactory bulb forebrain inputs on the sexual behavior of estrous female mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, E.A.; Kunkhyen, T.; Korzan, W.J.; Naik, A.; Maqsudlu, A.; Cherry, J.A.

    2017-01-01

    Previous research has shown that repeated testing with a stimulus male is required for ovariectomized, hormone-primed female mice to become sexually receptive (show maximal lordosis quotients; LQs) and that drug-induced, epigenetic enhancement of estradiol receptor function accelerated the improvement in LQs otherwise shown by estrous females with repeated testing. We asked whether pre-exposure to male pheromones (‘pheromone priming’) would also accelerate the improvement in LQs with repeated tests and whether optogenetic inhibition of accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) projection neurons could inhibit lordosis in sexually experienced estrous female mice. In Experiment 1, repeated priming with soiled male bedding failed to accelerate the progressive improvement in LQs shown by estrous female mice across 5 tests, although the duration of each lordosis response and females’ investigation of male body parts during the first test was augmented by such priming. In Experiment 2, acute optogenetic inhibition of AOB inputs to the forebrain during freely moving behavioral tests significantly reduced LQs, suggesting that continued AOB signaling to the forebrain during mating is required for maximal lordotic responsiveness even in sexually experienced females. Our results also suggest that pheromonal stimulation, by itself, cannot substitute for the full complement of sensory stimulation received by estrous females from mounting males that normally leads to the progressive improvement in their LQs with repeated testing. PMID:28065711

  10. Communication of Unexpected and Significant Findings on Chest Radiographs With an Automated PACS Alert System.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hayes, Sara A

    2014-08-01

    An integral part of realizing the enormous potential of imaging in patient care is close communication between radiologists and referring physicians. One key element of this process is the communication of unexpected significant findings. The authors examined the performance of a PACS-based alert system in the appropriate communication of reports containing unexpected significant findings to referring physicians.

  11. Unexpected Hospitalisations at a 23-Hour Observation Unit in a Paediatric Emergency Department of Northern India

    OpenAIRE

    Mahajan, Vidushi; Arora, Sumant; Kaur, Tarundeep; Gupta, Sorab; Guglani, Vishal

    2013-01-01

    Background: The 23-hour Observation Unit (OU) is a novel and an effective means for tackling overcrowding in busy Paediatric Emergency Departments (PED) worldwide. However, unexpected hospitalisations in the OU involve transfer of care and they reduce the efficiency of the OU. Hence, we aimed to study the presenting diagnoses which were responsible for the unexpected hospitalisations in a 23-hour OU.

  12. 3 CFR - Unexpected Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs Related to the Continuing Conflict in Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Unexpected Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs... Presidential Determination No. 2009-16 of March 11, 2009 Unexpected Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs Related... Migration and Refugee Assistance Act of 1962 (the “Act”), as amended (22 U.S.C. 2601), I hereby determine...

  13. 3 CFR - Unexpected Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs Related to Gaza

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Unexpected Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs... of January 27, 2009 Unexpected Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs Related to Gaza Memorandum for the..., including section 2(c)(1) of the Migration and Refugee Assistance Act of 1962 (the “Act”), as amended (22 U...

  14. 76 FR 53295 - Unexpected Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs Related to the Horn of Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-25

    ...-12 of August 8, 2011--Unexpected Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs Related to the Horn of Africa...) of the Migration and Refugee Assistance Act of 1962 (the ``Act''), as amended, (22 U.S.C. 2601(c)(1... Emergency Refugee and Migration Assistance Fund, for the purpose of meeting unexpected and urgent refugee...

  15. Palila abundance estimates and trend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Richad; Banko, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    The Palila (Loxioides bailleui) is an endangered, seed-eating, finch-billed honeycreeper found only on Hawai`i Island. Once occurring on the islands of Kaua`i and O`ahu and Mauna Loa and Hualālai volcanoes of Hawai`i, Palila are now found only in subalpine, dry-forest habitats on Mauna Kea (Banko et al. 2002). Previous analyses showed that Palila numbers fluctuated throughout the 1980s and 1990s but declined rapidly and steadily since 2003 (Jacobi et al. 1996, Leonard et al. 2008, Banko et al. 2009, Gorresen et al. 2009, Banko et al. in press). The aim of this report is to update abundance estimates for the Palila based on the 2012 surveys. We assess Palila trends over two periods: 1) the long-term trend during 1998–2012 and 2) the short-term trajectory between 2003 and 2012. The first period evaluates the population trend for the entire time series since additional transects were established (Johnson et al. 2006). These additional transects were established to produce a more precise population estimate and provide more complete coverage of the Palila range. The initial year for short-term trajectory was chosen subjectively to coincide with the recent decline in the Palila population. Additionally, stations in the core Palila habitat were surveyed on two occasions in 2012, thus allowing us to address the question of how repeat samples improve estimate precision.

  16. Unexpected Functional Divergence of Bat Influenza Virus NS1 Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkington, Hannah L; Juozapaitis, Mindaugas; Tsolakos, Nikos; Corrales-Aguilar, Eugenia; Schwemmle, Martin; Hale, Benjamin G

    2018-03-01

    Recently, two influenza A virus (FLUAV) genomes were identified in Central and South American bats. These sequences exhibit notable divergence from classical FLUAV counterparts, and functionally, bat FLUAV glycoproteins lack canonical receptor binding and destroying activity. Nevertheless, other features that distinguish these viruses from classical FLUAVs have yet to be explored. Here, we studied the viral nonstructural protein NS1, a virulence factor that modulates host signaling to promote efficient propagation. Like all FLUAV NS1 proteins, bat FLUAV NS1s bind double-stranded RNA and act as interferon antagonists. Unexpectedly, we found that bat FLUAV NS1s are unique in being unable to bind host p85β, a regulatory subunit of the cellular metabolism-regulating enzyme, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K). Furthermore, neither bat FLUAV NS1 alone nor infection with a chimeric bat FLUAV efficiently activates Akt, a PI3K effector. Structure-guided mutagenesis revealed that the bat FLUAV NS1-p85β interaction can be reengineered (in a strain-specific manner) by changing two to four NS1 residues (96L, 99M, 100I, and 145T), thereby creating a hydrophobic patch. Notably, ameliorated p85β-binding is insufficient for bat FLUAV NS1 to activate PI3K, and a chimeric bat FLUAV expressing NS1 with engineered hydrophobic patch mutations exhibits cell-type-dependent, but species-independent, propagation phenotypes. We hypothesize that bat FLUAV hijacking of PI3K in the natural bat host has been selected against, perhaps because genes in this metabolic pathway were differentially shaped by evolution to suit the unique energy use strategies of this flying mammal. These data expand our understanding of the enigmatic functional divergence between bat FLUAVs and classical mammalian and avian FLUAVs. IMPORTANCE The potential for novel influenza A viruses to establish infections in humans from animals is a source of continuous concern due to possible severe outbreaks or pandemics. The

  17. Unexpected arsenic compounds in low-rank coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zdenka Slejkovec; Tjas Kanduc [Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2005-05-15

    Nine low-rank coal samples from three different coal basins (Velenje and Trbovlje basins, Slovenia, and Sokolov basin, Czech Republic) were analyzed for their elemental composition and the presence of arsenic compounds. Total arsenic concentrations in the samples were 1.59-5.77 {mu}g g{sup -1} with one exception, 142 {mu}g g{sup -1} for a sample from the Sokolov basin. A methanol/water mixture (1:1) extracted 15.1-38.7% of the total arsenic from Velenje basin samples but only 2.2-7.1% from Sokolov and Trbovlje basin samples. Extracts from the Velenje basin samples contained mainly the tetramethylarsonium ion (0.14-0.92 {mu}g g{sup -1}) with considerable amounts of arsenate (0.15-0.85 {mu}g g{sup -1}) and monomethyl arsonic acid 0.04-0.27 {mu}g g{sup -1}). In methanol/water extracts from samples from the Sokolov and Trbovlje basins inorganic arsenic (arsenate) prevailed (0.26-37.1 {mu}g g{sup -1}), but at least trace amounts of organic arsenic compounds were found as well. It is likely that biogeochemical degradation of organic material is related to the unexpected organoarsenic compounds found in low-rank coals. However, it should also not be ruled out that abiogenic synthesis could have taken place in the carbon-rich environment under the harsh conditions present (elevated temperature and pressure). 39 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Copper imbalances in ruminants and humans: unexpected common ground.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttle, Neville F

    2012-09-01

    Ruminants are more vulnerable to copper deficiency than humans because rumen sulfide generation lowers copper availability from forage, increasing the risk of conditions such as swayback in lambs. Molybdenum-rich pastures promote thiomolybdate (TM) synthesis and formation of unabsorbable Cu-TM complexes, turning risk to clinical reality (hypocuprosis). Selection pressures created ruminant species with tolerance of deficiency but vulnerability to copper toxicity in alien environments, such as specific pathogen-free units. By contrast, cases of copper imbalance in humans seemed confined to rare genetic aberrations of copper metabolism. Recent descriptions of human swayback and the exploratory use of TM for the treatment of Wilson's disease, tumor growth, inflammatory diseases, and Alzheimer's disease have created unexpected common ground. The incidence of pre-hemolytic copper poisoning in specific pathogen-free lambs was reduced by an infection with Mycobacterium avium that left them more responsive to treatment with TM but vulnerable to long-term copper depletion. Copper requirements in ruminants and humans may need an extra allowance for the "copper cost" of immunity to infection. Residual cuproenzyme inhibition in TM-treated lambs and anomalies in plasma copper composition that appeared to depend on liver copper status raise this question "can chelating capacity be harnessed without inducing copper-deficiency in ruminants or humans?" A model of equilibria between exogenous (TM) and endogenous chelators (e.g., albumin, metallothionein) is used to predict risk of exposure and hypocuprosis; although risk of natural exposure in humans is remote, vulnerability to TM-induced copper deficiency may be high. Biomarkers of TM impact are needed, and copper chaperones for inhibited cuproenzymes are prime candidates.

  19. Unexpectedly high burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis in very young infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reilly Megan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The highest incidence of rotavirus gastroenteritis has generally been reported in children 6-24 months of age. Young infants are thought to be partially protected by maternal antibodies acquired transplacentally or via breast milk. The purpose of our study was to assess the age distribution of children with confirmed community-acquired rotavirus gastroenteritis presenting to an urban referral hospital. Methods Children presenting to The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia with acute gastroenteritis have been monitored for the presence of rotavirus antigen in the stool by ELISA (followed by genotyping if ELISA-positive since the 1994-95 epidemic season. Results Over the last 12 rotavirus seasons prior to the introduction of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine in 2006, stool specimens from 1646 patients tested positive for community-acquired rotavirus infection. Gender or age was not recorded in 6 and 5 cases, respectively. Overall, 58% of the cases occurred in boys. G1 was the predominant VP7 serotype, accounting for 72% of cases. The median (IQR age was 11 (5-21 months. A total of 790 (48% cases occurred in children outside the commonly quoted peak age range, with 27% in infants 24 months of age. A total of 220 (13% cases occurred during the first 3 months of life, and the highest number of episodes per month of age [97 (6%] was observed during the second month of life. Conclusions The incidence of community-acquired rotavirus gastroenteritis monitored over 12 seasons in the prevaccine era at a major university hospital was nearly constant for each month of age during the first year of life, revealing an unexpectedly high incidence of symptomatic rotavirus disease in infants

  20. Copper Imbalances in Ruminants and Humans: Unexpected Common Ground1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttle, Neville F.

    2012-01-01

    Ruminants are more vulnerable to copper deficiency than humans because rumen sulfide generation lowers copper availability from forage, increasing the risk of conditions such as swayback in lambs. Molybdenum-rich pastures promote thiomolybdate (TM) synthesis and formation of unabsorbable Cu-TM complexes, turning risk to clinical reality (hypocuprosis). Selection pressures created ruminant species with tolerance of deficiency but vulnerability to copper toxicity in alien environments, such as specific pathogen–free units. By contrast, cases of copper imbalance in humans seemed confined to rare genetic aberrations of copper metabolism. Recent descriptions of human swayback and the exploratory use of TM for the treatment of Wilson’s disease, tumor growth, inflammatory diseases, and Alzheimer’s disease have created unexpected common ground. The incidence of pre–hemolytic copper poisoning in specific pathogen–free lambs was reduced by an infection with Mycobacterium avium that left them more responsive to treatment with TM but vulnerable to long-term copper depletion. Copper requirements in ruminants and humans may need an extra allowance for the “copper cost” of immunity to infection. Residual cuproenzyme inhibition in TM-treated lambs and anomalies in plasma copper composition that appeared to depend on liver copper status raise this question “can chelating capacity be harnessed without inducing copper-deficiency in ruminants or humans?” A model of equilibria between exogenous (TM) and endogenous chelators (e.g., albumin, metallothionein) is used to predict risk of exposure and hypocuprosis; although risk of natural exposure in humans is remote, vulnerability to TM-induced copper deficiency may be high. Biomarkers of TM impact are needed, and copper chaperones for inhibited cuproenzymes are prime candidates. PMID:22983845

  1. Hydrocarbon Reserves: Abundance or Scarcity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    IFP and the OAPEC jointly organize a regular international seminar dealing with world oil-related problems appearing in the news. For the first time, this seminar has been opened to oil and gas company specialists, service companies, research centers and independents. This year's theme concerns oil and gas reserves: are they abundant or are we headed towards the shortages announced by some experts? This theme is especially topical in that: oil and gas currently meet two thirds of world energy needs and almost completely dominate the transport sector; the reserves declared by the OAPEC countries account for nearly half of world reserves; the price of a barrel of oil went through the roof in 2004; world energy demand is growing fast and alternative sources of energy are far from ready to take over from oil and gas in the next few decades. Since the reserves correspond to the volume it is technically and economically viable to produce, the seminar has, of course, dealt with the technical and economic questions that arise in connection with exploration and production, but it has also considered changes in the geopolitical context. Presentations by the leading companies of the OAPEC countries and by the IFP group were completed by presentation from the International Energy Agency (IEA), the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the IHS Energy Group, Total and Gaz de France. This document gathers the transparencies of the following presentations: Hydrocarbon reserves in OAPEC members countries: current and future (M. Al-Lababidi); Non OAPEC liquid reserves and production forecasts (Y. Mathieu); World oil and gas resources and production outlook (K. Chew); Global investments in the upstream (F. Birol); Total's policy in the oil and gas sector (C. de Margerie); Gaz de France's policy in the oil and gas sector (J. Abiteboul); NOC/IOC's opportunities in OPEC countries (I. Sandrea); Relationships between companies, countries and investors: How they may impact on the growth

  2. Hydrocarbon Reserves: Abundance or Scarcity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    IFP and the OAPEC jointly organize a regular international seminar dealing with world oil-related problems appearing in the news. For the first time, this seminar has been opened to oil and gas company specialists, service companies, research centers and independents. This year's theme concerns oil and gas reserves: are they abundant or are we headed towards the shortages announced by some experts? This theme is especially topical in that: oil and gas currently meet two thirds of world energy needs and almost completely dominate the transport sector; the reserves declared by the OAPEC countries account for nearly half of world reserves; the price of a barrel of oil went through the roof in 2004; world energy demand is growing fast and alternative sources of energy are far from ready to take over from oil and gas in the next few decades. Since the reserves correspond to the volume it is technically and economically viable to produce, the seminar has, of course, dealt with the technical and economic questions that arise in connection with exploration and production, but it has also considered changes in the geopolitical context. Presentations by the leading companies of the OAPEC countries and by the IFP group were completed by presentation from the International Energy Agency (IEA), the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the IHS Energy Group, Total and Gaz de France. This document gathers the transparencies of the following presentations: Hydrocarbon reserves in OAPEC members countries: current and future (M. Al-Lababidi); Non OAPEC liquid reserves and production forecasts (Y. Mathieu); World oil and gas resources and production outlook (K. Chew); Global investments in the upstream (F. Birol); Total's policy in the oil and gas sector (C. de Margerie); Gaz de France's policy in the oil and gas sector (J. Abiteboul); NOC/IOC's opportunities in OPEC countries (I. Sandrea); Relationships between companies, countries and investors: How they may

  3. Chamomile reveals to be a potent galactogogue: the unexpected effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Fernando V; Dias, Francisca; Costa, Gustavo; Campos, Maria da Graça

    2018-01-01

    Good habits of breastfeeding have been associated with many long-term health benefits. Nowadays, improvement is seen in the health of children and mothers who practice exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life. The search of new potent stimulants for milk production is important to promote lactation, mainly in cases where breastfeeding is a difficult task. This report presents a case of a woman who accidentally realized an abundant amount of milk and had high breast tension, a few hours after consuming chamomile. Although usual consumption of chamomile during pregnancy and lactation are documented for several purposes, the galactogogue effect was never reported. In this case report, we document for the first time the influence of chamomile in a lactating woman by increasing lactogenesis. This article also highlights the need of more research in this field to assure the safety of the intake, by women, of herbal product without the risk for them or the newborns.

  4. Unexpected drought resistance strategies in seedlings of four Brachychiton species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Victoria A; Anderegg, Leander D L; Loy, Xingwen; HilleRisLambers, Janneke; Mayfield, Margaret M

    2017-11-28

    Functional traits associated with drought resistance can be useful for predicting tree responses to a drying climate. Yet drought resistance is likely achieved through a complex combination of constitutive traits (traits expressed even in benign environments) and plastic traits (traits expressed only in response to drought). Because few studies measure multiple traits for multiple species under both well-watered and drought conditions, we often struggle to identify suites of constitutive and plastic traits indicative of drought resistance strategies. Using a greenhouse experiment, we examined nine drought resistance traits (six morphological/allocation traits plus assimilation, stomatal conductance and water-use efficiency) in well-watered and water-stressed seedlings of four Brachychiton (Malvaceae Juss.) species with ranges spanning a strong aridity gradient in east-central Australia. In benign conditions, constitutive biomass allocation was consistent with expectations, with xeric species investing more heavily in roots and stem tissue and less in leaf tissue than mesic species (P = 0.004). Under drought conditions, xeric species decreased relative biomass allocation below-ground while mesic species increased relative below-ground allocation (treatment × species interaction P = 0.0015). Relative water content of the stems was slightly higher in xeric species (P = 0.055), and remained stable during drought while decreasing in mesic species (treatment × species P = 0.001). Specific leaf area (SLA) and leaf dry matter content (LDMC) did not fit with expectations under either benign or water-limited conditions. Moreover, stomatal conductance and carbon assimilation were unexpectedly highest and intrinsic water-use efficiency (WUEi) lowest in the xeric species in benign conditions. Only under drought did the xeric species manifest higher WUEi than the mesic species (treatment × species P resistance traits. Notably, traits commonly used as proxies for drought

  5. Entering into the Unexpected: Managing Resilience in Extreme Situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarnieri, F.; Travadel, S.

    2016-01-01

    The popularity of the concept of safety culture has provided useful support for deterministic approaches to safety. The inclusion of ‘beyond design’ cases in severe accident management guidelines opened up the debate on the precautionary principle. However, a reflexive and vibrant safety culture should not stop there: even the most precautionary measures can prove to be lacking. Our discussion therefore focuses on the management of radical disruption caused by the collapse of pre-established frameworks for action. It goes beyond any objectivist consideration of the necessary conditions for rational decision-making in the event of an accident. Here, we are interested in ‘extreme situations’. Specifically, a management situation faced by operators who, should they lose control of their production facility, must take action despite the hazards and the lack of critical resources. They must respond to a social emergency that, if not satisfactorily resolved, will lead to damage on a scale never before seen. The Fukushima Daiichi accident is a useful case study of such a scenario. The short period from 11 to 15 March 2011 contains all of the ingredients of an extreme situation that was the result of an unexpected event. From the perspective of the management of engineering organizations, the question of entry into resilience arises. Prior to any normative prescription, this concerns the poorly understood mechanisms through which collective action develops in response to hazards and social pressure. In particular we study the sense making process through which actors regain control of the situation, and create an informal and ephemeral organizational kernel. The issue is addressed in terms of the human being as a whole, a subject whose actions are consistent with a defined purpose and affects and who is endowed with a representational capacity. Our epistemic perspective is constructivist and relies on the latest theoretical developments related to sensemaking. In

  6. Unexpected Impacts of Global warming on Extreme Warm Spells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardeshmukh, P. D.; Compo, G. P.; McColl, C.; Penland, C.

    2017-12-01

    It is generally presumed that the likelihood of extreme warm spells around the globe has increased, and will continue to increase, due to global warming. However, we find that this is generally not true in three very different types of global observational datasets and uncoupled atmospheric model simulations of the 1959 to 2012 period with prescribed observed global SSTs, sea ice, and radiative forcing changes. While extreme warm spells indeed became more common in many regions, in many other regions their likelihood remained almost the same or even decreased from the first half to the second half of this period. Such regions of unexpected changes covered nearly 40 percent of the globe in both winter and summer. The basic reason for this was a decrease of temperature variability in such regions that offset or even negated the effect of the mean temperature shift on extreme warm spell probabilities. The possibility of such an impact on extreme value probabilities was highlighted in a recent paper by Sardeshmukh, Compo, and Penland (Journal of Climate 2015). The consistency of the changes in extreme warm spell probabilities among the different observational datasets and model simulations examined suggests that they are robust regional aspects of global warming associated with atmospheric circulation changes. This highlights the need for climate models to represent not just the mean regional temperature signals but also the changes in subseasonal temperature variability associated with global warming. However, current climate models (both CMIP3 and CMIP5) generally underestimate the magnitude of the changes in the atmospheric circulation and associated temperature variability. A likely major cause of this is their continuing underestimation of the magnitude of the spatial variation of tropical SST trends. By generating an overly spatially bland tropical SST warming in response to changes in radiative forcing, the models spuriously mute tropically

  7. [Bioterrorism: notes for an agenda in case of the unexpected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce de León-Rosales, S; Lazcano-Ponce, E; Rangel-Frausto, M S; Sosa-Lozano, L A; Huerta-Jiménez, M A

    2001-01-01

    The vulnerability of human populations to chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear terrorism has been widely discussed but insufficiently studied. Current public health policies are not guided by solid and relevant information to design cost-effective programs for preventing or controlling this kind of incidents in the future. Governmental budgets are insufficient to respond to bioterrorist attacks. To face these threats, developing countries like Mexico should frame strategies and devise specific preventive actions that consider the transmission dynamics of potential infectious agents likely to be used in a bioterrorist attack. The international reaction to a biological attack must be supported by international agreements that ban the use of biological agents for warfare and/or defense purposes, as well as on academic and technological exchange for the prevention of bioterrorist attacks. At the national level, the recommendations in the event of a biological attack are: a) establishing a legal defense strategy against bioterrorism; b) implementing education programs as a key strategy for defense against bioterrorism; c) devising a national program of interinstitutional anti-bioterrorist coordination that includes medical emergency assistance and collection of medical forensic evidence; d) including a biological weapon registry in epidemiological surveillance systems; e) implementing a laboratory for biological material analysis related to terrorist incidents; f) devising public health information campaigns, g) assuring the supply of diagnostic testing, special protection, and emergency treatment materials; h) decentralizing alert systems for the timely detection of bioterrorist attacks; i) responding to bioterrorist actions addressed against animals and plants, and j) organizing Ethics Committees in case of urgent events derived from a biological attack. The proper response to sudden and unexpected events of emergent or unusual infectious diseases involved

  8. Adeno-associated viral vector serotypes 1 and 5 targeted to the neonatal rat and pig striatum induce widespread transgene expression in the forebrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornum, Birgitte R; Stott, Simon R W; Mattsson, Bengt

    2010-01-01

    Viral vector-mediated gene transfer has emerged as a powerful means to target transgene expression in the central nervous system. Here we characterized the efficacy of serotypes 1 and 5 recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) after stereotaxic....... Our results show that striatal delivery of rAAV5 vectors in the neonatal brain represents a useful tool to express genes of interest both in the basal ganglia and the neocortex. Furthermore, we apply, for the first time, viral vector-mediated gene transfer to the pig brain providing the opportunity...... delivery to the neonatal rat and minipig striatum. The efficiency of GFP expression and the phenotype of GFP-positive cells were assessed within the forebrain at different time points up to 12 months after surgery. Both rAAV1-GFP and rAAV5-GFP delivery resulted in transduction of the striatum as well...

  9. Brain leukocyte infiltration initiated by peripheral inflammation or experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis occurs through pathways connected to the CSF-filled compartments of the forebrain and midbrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Charlotte; Strazielle, Nathalie; Ghersi-Egea, Jean-François

    2012-08-07

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been considered as a preferential pathway of circulation for immune cells during neuroimmune surveillance. In order to evaluate the involvement of CSF-filled spaces in the pathogenesis of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model of multiple sclerosis, we performed a time-course analysis of immune cell association with the CSF-containing ventricles, velae, and cisterns in two active models of this disease. Guinea-pig spinal cord homogenate-induced EAE in rat and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-induced EAE in mouse were used. Leukocyte distribution and phenotypes were investigated by immunohistochemistry in serial sections of brain areas of interest, as well as in CSF withdrawn from rat. Immune cells associated with the choroid plexuses were quantified. Freund's adjuvant-induced peripheral inflammation in the absence of brain antigen led to a subtle but definite increase in the number of myeloid cells in the extraventricular CSF spaces. In both rats and mice, EAE was characterized by a sustained and initial infiltration of lymphocytes and monocytes within forebrain/midbrain fluid-filled compartments such as the velum interpositum and ambient cisterns, and certain basal cisterns. Leukocytes further infiltrated periventricular and pericisternal parenchymal areas, along perivascular spaces or following a downward CSF-to-tissue gradient. Cells quantified in CSF sampled from rats included lymphocytes and neutrophils. The distinctive pattern of cell distribution suggests that both the choroid plexus and the vessels lying in the velae and cisterns are gates for early leukocyte entry in the central nervous system. B-cell infiltration observed in the mouse model was restricted to CSF-filled extraventricular compartments. These results identified distinctive velae and cisterns of the forebrain and midbrain as preferential sites of immune cell homing following peripheral and early central inflammation and point to a role of CSF

  10. Brain leukocyte infiltration initiated by peripheral inflammation or experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis occurs through pathways connected to the CSF-filled compartments of the forebrain and midbrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmitt Charlotte

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF has been considered as a preferential pathway of circulation for immune cells during neuroimmune surveillance. In order to evaluate the involvement of CSF-filled spaces in the pathogenesis of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, a model of multiple sclerosis, we performed a time-course analysis of immune cell association with the CSF-containing ventricles, velae, and cisterns in two active models of this disease. Methods Guinea-pig spinal cord homogenate-induced EAE in rat and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-induced EAE in mouse were used. Leukocyte distribution and phenotypes were investigated by immunohistochemistry in serial sections of brain areas of interest, as well as in CSF withdrawn from rat. Immune cells associated with the choroid plexuses were quantified. Results Freund’s adjuvant-induced peripheral inflammation in the absence of brain antigen led to a subtle but definite increase in the number of myeloid cells in the extraventricular CSF spaces. In both rats and mice, EAE was characterized by a sustained and initial infiltration of lymphocytes and monocytes within forebrain/midbrain fluid-filled compartments such as the velum interpositum and ambient cisterns, and certain basal cisterns. Leukocytes further infiltrated periventricular and pericisternal parenchymal areas, along perivascular spaces or following a downward CSF-to-tissue gradient. Cells quantified in CSF sampled from rats included lymphocytes and neutrophils. The distinctive pattern of cell distribution suggests that both the choroid plexus and the vessels lying in the velae and cisterns are gates for early leukocyte entry in the central nervous system. B-cell infiltration observed in the mouse model was restricted to CSF-filled extraventricular compartments. Conclusion These results identified distinctive velae and cisterns of the forebrain and midbrain as preferential sites of immune cell homing following

  11. Inducible forebrain-specific ablation of the transcription factor Creb during adulthood induces anxiety but no spatial/contextual learning deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Annika Vogt

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The cyclic AMP (cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB is an activity-dependent transcription factor playing a role in synaptic plasticity, learning and memory, and emotional behavior. However, the impact of Creb ablation on rodent behavior is vague as e.g. memory performance of different Creb mutant mice depends on the specific type of mutation per se but additionally on the background and learning protocol differences. Here we present the first targeted ablation of CREB induced during adulthood selectively in principal forebrain neurons in a pure background strain of C57BL/6 mice. All hippocampal principal neurons exhibited lack of CREB expression. Mutant mice showed a severe anxiety phenotype in the openfield and novel object exploration test as well as in the Dark-Light Box Test, but unaltered hippocampus-dependent long-term memory in the Morris water maze and in context dependent fear conditioning. On the molecular level, CREB ablation led to CREM up regulation in the hippocampus and frontal cortex which may at least in part compensate for the loss of CREB. BDNF, a postulated CREB target gene, was down regulated in the frontal lobe but not in the hippocampus; neurogenesis remained unaltered. Our data indicate that in the adult mouse forebrain the late onset of CREB ablation can, in case of memory functionality, be compensated for and is not essential for memory consolidation and retrieval during adulthood. In contrast, the presence of CREB protein during adulthood seems to be pivotal for the regulation of emotional behavior.

  12. Determinants of distribution, abundance and reproductive success ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... while local vegetation structure determines the abundance of locally established populations. The abundance of trees affects nest site availability and breeding success, based on observations at two oases. Blackbird nests were usually situated on pomegranate trees and olive trees. The Common Blackbird is a successful ...

  13. Resource Abundance and Resource Dependence in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ji, K.; Magnus, J.R.; Wang, W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reconsiders the ‘curse of resources’ hypothesis for the case of China, and distinguishes between resource abundance, resource rents, and resource dependence. Resource abundance and resource rents are shown to be approximately equivalent, and their association with resource dependence

  14. Seasonal variation in fish abundance and physicochemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is a positive correlation between fish abundance and biomass for wet and dry seasons (r = 0.60 and 0.76 respectively). There was no significant difference between fish abundance in the two seasons. Variations occurred between physico-chemical parameters of water samples. Analysis of the lagoon waters showed ...

  15. Axion: Mass -- Dark Matter Abundance Relation

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The axion is a hypothetical particle which would explain why QCD is approximately T-conserving, and is also an excellent Cold Dark Matter candidate. It should be possible to make a clean theoretical prediction relating the dark matter density in axions and the axion mass (under reasonable assumptions about inflation). But the axion's early-Universe dynamics, which establish its density as dark matter, are unexpectedly rich in a way which is only starting to yield to quantitative numerical study.

  16. The accrual anomaly - focus on changes in specific unexpected accruals results in new evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schøler, Finn

    it is demonstrated that different specific components of earnings have significantly different earnings persistence characteristics and that these differences are not fully reflected in share prices. In the analysis presented here the earnings persistence effect of two particular unexpected accrual components...... and unexpected accruals, estimated by the extended Jones model like in both some US-analyses and some international studies of the accrual anomaly phenomenon. It is found that the persistence of earnings is decreasing in the magnitude of the unexpected accrual components of earnings and that the persistence...... of current earnings performance is particularly decreasing in the magnitude of unexpected changes in inventory. The special accrual parts are related to the perceptions of earnings persistence implicit in the market prices, and it is found that the differences in earnings persistence are not rationally...

  17. Dealing with unexpected events : efficient and safe solutions to emergent repair on NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liekens Massazza, I.

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear Facilities are constantly challenged with unexpected events occurring on Primary Circuit components. A solution must be deployed quickly to minimize impact on the scheduled outage duration while guaranteeing safety, quality and ALARA standards. AREVA NP has demonstrated worldwide recognized capabilities and expertise through efficient management of various unexpected forced events through the time. Turnkey packaged solutions which are proposed are based on proven technics which can be quickly adapted and qualified to the specific problem, resulting in customers’ full satisfaction. (Author)

  18. New product trial, use of edibles, and unexpected highs among marijuana and hashish users in Colorado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jane A; Davis, Kevin C; Duke, Jennifer C; Nonnemaker, James M; Bradfield, Brian R; Farrelly, Matthew C

    2017-07-01

    This study examines the relationships between trial of new marijuana or hashish products and unexpected highs, and use of edible products and unexpected highs. We conducted an online survey of 634 adult, past-year marijuana users in Colorado. We used logistic regression models to examine the relationship between new product trial or edible use and unexpected highs. In the first year that recreational marijuana was legal in Colorado, 71.4% of respondents tried a new marijuana or hashish product, and 53.6% used an edible product. Trial of new products was associated with greater odds of experiencing an unexpected high after controlling for age, gender, education, mental health status, current marijuana or hashish use, and mean amount of marijuana or hashish consumed in the past month (OR=2.13, pmarijuana or hashish products, or use edible marijuana or hashish products, are at greater risk for an unexpected high. It is possible that some negative outcomes associated with marijuana use and unexpected highs may be averted through a better understanding of how to use product packaging to communicate with consumers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Interstellar Abundances Toward X Per, Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencic, Lynne A.; Smith, Randall K.

    2014-01-01

    The nearby X-ray binary X Per (HD 24534) provides a useful beacon with which to measure elemental abundances in the local ISM. We examine absorption features of 0, Mg, and Si along this line of sight using spectra from the Chandra Observatory's LETG/ ACIS-S and XMM-Newton's RGS instruments. In general, we find that the abundances and their ratios are similar to those of young F and G stars and the most recent solar values. We compare our results with abundances required by dust grain models.

  20. Do predators control prey species abundance? An experimental test with brown treesnakes on Guam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Earl W.; Yackel Adams, Amy A.; Converse, Sarah J.; Fritts, Thomas H.; Rodda, Gordon H.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of predators on the abundance of prey species is a topic of ongoing debate in ecology; the effect of snake predators on their prey has been less debated, as there exists a general consensus that snakes do not negatively influence the abundance of their prey. However, this viewpoint has not been adequately tested. We quantified the effect of brown treesnake (Boiga irregularis) predation on the abundance and size of lizards on Guam by contrasting lizards in two 1-ha treatment plots of secondary forest from which snakes had been removed and excluded vs. two 1-ha control plots in which snakes were monitored but not removed or excluded. We removed resident snakes from the treatment plots with snake traps and hand capture, and snake immigration into these plots was precluded by electrified snake barriers. Lizards were sampled in all plots quarterly for a year following snake elimination in the treatment plots. Following the completion of this experiment, we used total removal sampling to census lizards on a 100-m2 subsample of each plot. Results of systematic lizard population monitoring before and after snake removal suggest that the abundance of the skink, Carlia ailanpalai, increased substantially and the abundance of two species of gekkonids, Lepidodactylus lugubris and Hemidactylus frenatus, also increased on snake-free plots. No treatment effect was observed for the skink Emoia caeruleocauda. Mean snout–vent length of all lizard species only increased following snake removal in the treatment plots. The general increase in prey density and mean size was unexpected in light of the literature consensus that snakes do not control the abundance of their prey species. Our findings show that, at least where alternate predators are lacking, snakes may indeed affect prey populations.

  1. Testing Relationships between Energy and Vertebrate Abundance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbone, C.; Pettorelli, N.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding what drives variation in the abundance of organisms is fundamental to evolutionary ecology and wildlife management. Yet despite its importance, there is still great uncertainty about the main factors influencing variation in vertebrate abundance across taxa. We believe valuable knowledge and increased predictive power could be gained by taking into account both the intrinsic factors of species and the extrinsic factors related to environmental surroundings in the commonly cited RQ model, which provides a simple conceptual framework valid at both the interspecific and the intraspecific scales. Approaches comparing studies undertaken at different spatial and taxonomic scales could be key to our ability to better predict abundance, and thanks to the increased availability of population size data, global geographic datasets, and improved comparative methods, there might be unprecedented opportunities to (1) gain a greater understanding of vertebrate abundance patterns and (2) test existing theories on free-ranging animals.

  2. Chinook Abundance - Linear Features [ds181

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The dataset 'ds181_Chinook_ln' is a product of the CalFish Adult Salmonid Abundance Database. Data in this shapefile are collected from stream sections or reaches...

  3. Stochastic species abundance models involving special copulas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huillet, Thierry E.

    2018-01-01

    Copulas offer a very general tool to describe the dependence structure of random variables supported by the hypercube. Inspired by problems of species abundances in Biology, we study three distinct toy models where copulas play a key role. In a first one, a Marshall-Olkin copula arises in a species extinction model with catastrophe. In a second one, a quasi-copula problem arises in a flagged species abundance model. In a third model, we study completely random species abundance models in the hypercube as those, not of product type, with uniform margins and singular. These can be understood from a singular copula supported by an inflated simplex. An exchangeable singular Dirichlet copula is also introduced, together with its induced completely random species abundance vector.

  4. SWFSC/MMTD: Vaquita Abundance Survey 1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 1997, the Southwest Fisheries Science Center (SWFSC) conducted a survey designed to estimate the abundance of vaquita, the Gulf of California harbor porpoise...

  5. Abundance Analysis of Red Horizontal Branch Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarzadeh, S.; Lagerholm, C.; Mikolaitis, Š.

    2008-12-01

    During the Observational Stellar Astrophysics research course in Lithuania, we analyzed the spectra of four red horizontal branch stars obtained on the Nordic Optical Telescope and FIES spectrograph. For the analysis we used the program SIU running under IDL. Overall, the metallicity for these stars seems to be higher than what is listed in the literature. We have determined the main atmospheric parameters and abundances of C, N, O and Mg chemical elements. We were only able to get the [O/Fe] abundance for one star because of telluric lines. The abundances were compared with stellar evolutionary models, both for finding the stellar mass and to investigate how well these stars follow theoretical predictions of evolutionary abundance alterations.

  6. Abundance estimation of spectrally similar minerals

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Debba, Pravesh

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates a spectral unmixing method for estimating the partial abundance of spectrally similar minerals in complex mixtures. The method requires formulation of a linear function of individual spectra of individual minerals. The first...

  7. Chinook Abundance - Linear Features [ds181

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The dataset 'ds181_Chinook_ln' is a product of the CalFish Adult Salmonid Abundance Database. Data in this shapefile are collected from stream sections or reaches...

  8. Electron Density and Temperature Measurements, and Abundance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Using spectra obtained from the SUMER (Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation) spectrograph on the spacecraft SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory), we investigate the height dependence of electron density, temperature and abundance anomalies in the solar atmosphere.

  9. Good abundances from bad spectra - I. Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J. Bryn; Gilmore, Gerard; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1996-01-01

    Stellar spectra derived from multiple-object fibre-fed spectroscopic radial-velocity surveys, of the type feasible with, among other examples, AUTOFIB, 2dF, HYDRA, NESSIE, and the Sloan survey, differ significantly from those traditionally used for determination of stellar abundances. The spectra tend to be of moderate resolution (around 1A) and signal-to-noise ratio (around 10-20 per resolution element), and cannot usually have reliable continuum shapes determined over wavelength ranges in excess of a few tens of Angstroms. None the less, with care and a calibration of stellar effective temperature from photometry, independent of the spectroscopy, reliable iron abundances can be derived. We have developed techniques to extract true iron abundances and surface gravities from low-signal-to-noise ratio, intermediate-resolution spectra of G-type stars in the 4000-5000A wavelength region. Spectroscopic indices sensitive to iron abundance and gravity are defined from a set of narrow (few-several A wide) wavelength intervals. The indices are calibrated theoretically using synthetic spectra. Given adequate data and a photometrically determined effective temperature, one can derive estimates of the stellar iron abundance and surface gravity. We have also defined a single abundance indicator for the analysis of very low-signal-to-noise ratio spectra; with the further assumption of a value for the stellar surface gravity, this is able to provide useful iron abundance information from spectra having signal-to-noise ratios as low as 10 (1-A elements). The theoretical basis and calibration using synthetic spectra are described in this paper. The empirical calibration of these techniques by application to observational data is described in a separate paper (Jones, Wyse & Gilmore). The technique provides precise iron abundances, with zero-point correct to ~0.1 dex, and is reliable, with typical uncertainties being <~0.2 dex. A derivation of the in situ thick disc metallicity

  10. Composition and abundance of tree regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd F. Hutchinson; Elaine Kennedy Sutherland; Charles T. Scott

    2003-01-01

    The composition and abundance of tree seedlings and saplings in the four study areas in southern Ohio were related to soil moisture via a GIS-derived integrated moisture index and to soil texture and fertility. For seedlings, the total abundance of small stems (less than 30 cm tall) was significantly greater on xeric plots (81,987/ha) than on intermediate (54,531/ha)...

  11. Long bone histology of sauropterygia from the lower Muschelkalk of the Germanic basin provides unexpected implications for phylogeny.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Klein

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sauropterygia is an abundant and successful group of Triassic marine reptiles. Phylogenetic relationships of Triassic Sauropterygia have always been unstable and recently questioned. Although specimens occur in high numbers, the main problems are rareness of diagnostic material from the Germanic Basin and uniformity of postcranial morphology of eosauropterygians. In the current paper, morphotypes of humeri along with their corresponding bone histologies for Lower to Middle Muschelkalk sauropterygians are described and interpreted for the first time in a phylogenetic context. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Nothosaurus shows a typical plesiomorphic lamellar-zonal bone type, but varying growth patterns and the occurrence of a new humerus morphotype point to a higher taxonomic diversity than was known. In contrast to the enormous morphological variability of eosauropterygian humeri not assigned to Nothosaurus, their long bone histology is relatively uniform and can be divided into two histotypes. Unexpectedly, both of these histotypes reveal abundant fibrolamellar bone throughout the cortex. This pushes the origin of fibrolamellar bone in Sauropterygia back from the Cretaceous to the early Middle Triassic (early Anisian. Histotype A is assigned to Cymatosaurus, a basal member of the Pistosauroidea, which includes the plesiosaurs as derived members. Histotype B is related to the pachypleurosaur Anarosaurus. Contrary to these new finds, the stratigraphically younger pachypleurosaur Neusticosaurus shows the plesiomorphic lamellar-zonal bone type and an incomplete endochondral ossification, like Nothosaurus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Histological results hypothetically discussed in a phylogenetical context have a large impact on the current phylogenetic hypothesis of Sauropterygia, leaving the pachypleurosaurs polyphyletic. On the basis of histological data, Neusticosaurus would be related to Nothosaurus, whereas Anarosaurus would follow

  12. Population Genomic Analysis of 1,777 Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates, Houston, Texas: Unexpected Abundance of Clonal Group 307

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, S. Wesley; Olsen, Randall J.; Eagar, Todd N.; Beres, Stephen B.; Zhao, Picheng; Davis, James J.; Brettin, Thomas; Xia, Fangfang

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Klebsiella pneumoniae is a major human pathogen responsible for high morbidity and mortality rates. The emergence and spread of strains resistant to multiple antimicrobial agents and documented large nosocomial outbreaks are especially concerning. To develop new therapeutic strategies for K. pneumoniae, it is imperative to understand the population genomic structure of strains causing human infections. To address this knowledge gap, we sequenced the genomes of 1,777 extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing K. pneumoniae strains cultured from patients in the 2,000-bed Houston Methodist Hospital system between September 2011 and May 2015, representing a comprehensive, population-based strain sample. Strains of largely uncharacterized clonal group 307 (CG307) caused more infections than those of well-studied epidemic CG258. Strains varied markedly in gene content and had an extensive array of small and very large plasmids, often containing antimicrobial resistance genes. Some patients with multiple strains cultured over time were infected with genetically distinct clones. We identified 15 strains expressing the New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase 1 (NDM-1) enzyme that confers broad resistance to nearly all beta-lactam antibiotics. Transcriptome sequencing analysis of 10 phylogenetically diverse strains showed that the global transcriptome of each strain was unique and highly variable. Experimental mouse infection provided new information about immunological parameters of host-pathogen interaction. We exploited the large data set to develop whole-genome sequence-based classifiers that accurately predict clinical antimicrobial resistance for 12 of the 16 antibiotics tested. We conclude that analysis of large, comprehensive, population-based strain samples can assist understanding of the molecular diversity of these organisms and contribute to enhanced translational research. PMID:28512093

  13. Frequency, severity and causes of unexpected allergic reactions to food: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versluis, A; Knulst, A C; Kruizinga, A G; Michelsen, A; Houben, G F; Baumert, J L; van Os-Medendorp, H

    2015-02-01

    Food allergic patients have to deal with an avoidance diet. Confusing labelling terms or precautionary labels can result in misinterpretation and risk-taking behaviour. Even those patients that strictly adhere to their diet experience (sometimes severe) unexpected allergic reactions to food. The frequency, severity and causes of such reactions are unknown. The objective of this review was to describe the frequency, severity and causes of unexpected allergic reactions to food in food allergic patients aged > 12 years, in order to develop improved strategies to deal with their allergy. A systematic review was carried out by two researchers, in six electronic databases (CINAHL, Cochrane, EMBASE, Medline, Psychinfo and Scopus). The search was performed with keywords relating to the frequency, severity and causes of unexpected allergic reactions to food. This resulted in 24 studies which met the inclusion criteria; 18 observational and six qualitative studies. This review shows that knowledge about the frequency of unexpected reactions is limited. Peanut, nuts, egg, fruit/vegetables and milk are the main causal foods. Severe reactions and even fatalities occur. Most reactions take place at home, but a significant number also take place when eating at friends' houses or in restaurants. Labelling issues, but also attitude and risky behaviour of patients can attribute to unexpected reactions. We conclude that prospective studies are needed to get more insight in the frequency, severity, quantity of unintended allergen ingested and causes of unexpected allergic reactions to food, to be able to optimize strategies to support patients in dealing with their food allergy. Although the exact frequency is not known, unexpected reactions to food occur in a significant number of patients and can be severe. For clinical practice, this means that patient education and dietary instructions are necessary. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. TEA: A CODE CALCULATING THERMOCHEMICAL EQUILIBRIUM ABUNDANCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blecic, Jasmina; Harrington, Joseph; Bowman, M. Oliver, E-mail: jasmina@physics.ucf.edu [Planetary Sciences Group, Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816-2385 (United States)

    2016-07-01

    We present an open-source Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances (TEA) code that calculates the abundances of gaseous molecular species. The code is based on the methodology of White et al. and Eriksson. It applies Gibbs free-energy minimization using an iterative, Lagrangian optimization scheme. Given elemental abundances, TEA calculates molecular abundances for a particular temperature and pressure or a list of temperature–pressure pairs. We tested the code against the method of Burrows and Sharp, the free thermochemical equilibrium code Chemical Equilibrium with Applications (CEA), and the example given by Burrows and Sharp. Using their thermodynamic data, TEA reproduces their final abundances, but with higher precision. We also applied the TEA abundance calculations to models of several hot-Jupiter exoplanets, producing expected results. TEA is written in Python in a modular format. There is a start guide, a user manual, and a code document in addition to this theory paper. TEA is available under a reproducible-research, open-source license via https://github.com/dzesmin/TEA.

  15. TEA: A CODE CALCULATING THERMOCHEMICAL EQUILIBRIUM ABUNDANCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blecic, Jasmina; Harrington, Joseph; Bowman, M. Oliver

    2016-01-01

    We present an open-source Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances (TEA) code that calculates the abundances of gaseous molecular species. The code is based on the methodology of White et al. and Eriksson. It applies Gibbs free-energy minimization using an iterative, Lagrangian optimization scheme. Given elemental abundances, TEA calculates molecular abundances for a particular temperature and pressure or a list of temperature–pressure pairs. We tested the code against the method of Burrows and Sharp, the free thermochemical equilibrium code Chemical Equilibrium with Applications (CEA), and the example given by Burrows and Sharp. Using their thermodynamic data, TEA reproduces their final abundances, but with higher precision. We also applied the TEA abundance calculations to models of several hot-Jupiter exoplanets, producing expected results. TEA is written in Python in a modular format. There is a start guide, a user manual, and a code document in addition to this theory paper. TEA is available under a reproducible-research, open-source license via https://github.com/dzesmin/TEA.

  16. Post-genomic analyses of fungal lignocellulosic biomass degradation reveal the unexpected potential of the plant pathogen Ustilago maydis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Couturier Marie

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Filamentous fungi are potent biomass degraders due to their ability to thrive in ligno(hemicellulose-rich environments. During the last decade, fungal genome sequencing initiatives have yielded abundant information on the genes that are putatively involved in lignocellulose degradation. At present, additional experimental studies are essential to provide insights into the fungal secreted enzymatic pools involved in lignocellulose degradation. Results In this study, we performed a wide analysis of 20 filamentous fungi for which genomic data are available to investigate their biomass-hydrolysis potential. A comparison of fungal genomes and secretomes using enzyme activity profiling revealed discrepancies in carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes sets dedicated to plant cell wall. Investigation of the contribution made by each secretome to the saccharification of wheat straw demonstrated that most of them individually supplemented the industrial Trichoderma reesei CL847 enzymatic cocktail. Unexpectedly, the most striking effect was obtained with the phytopathogen Ustilago maydis that improved the release of total sugars by 57% and of glucose by 22%. Proteomic analyses of the best-performing secretomes indicated a specific enzymatic mechanism of U. maydis that is likely to involve oxido-reductases and hemicellulases. Conclusion This study provides insight into the lignocellulose-degradation mechanisms by filamentous fungi and allows for the identification of a number of enzymes that are potentially useful to further improve the industrial lignocellulose bioconversion process.

  17. High-throughput sequencing-based analysis of endogenetic fungal communities inhabiting the Chinese Cordyceps reveals unexpectedly high fungal diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Fei; Chen, Xin; Guo, Meng-Yuan; Bai, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Yan; Shen, Guang-Rong; Li, Yu-Ling; Lin, Juan; Zhou, Xuan-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Chinese Cordyceps, known in Chinese as “DongChong XiaCao”, is a parasitic complex of a fungus (Ophiocordyceps sinensis) and a caterpillar. The current study explored the endogenetic fungal communities inhabiting Chinese Cordyceps. Samples were collected from five different geographical regions of Qinghai and Tibet, and the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer-1 sequences from each sample were obtained using Illumina high-throughput sequencing. The results showed that Ascomycota was the dominant fungal phylum in Chinese Cordyceps and its soil microhabitat from different sampling regions. Among the Ascomycota, 65 genera were identified, and the abundant operational taxonomic units showed the strongest sequence similarity to Ophiocordyceps, Verticillium, Pseudallescheria, Candida and Ilyonectria Not surprisingly, the genus Ophiocordyceps was the largest among the fungal communities identified in the fruiting bodies and external mycelial cortices of Chinese Cordyceps. In addition, fungal communities in the soil microhabitats were clustered separately from the external mycelial cortices and fruiting bodies of Chinese Cordyceps from different sampling regions. There was no significant structural difference in the fungal communities between the fruiting bodies and external mycelial cortices of Chinese Cordyceps. This study revealed an unexpectedly high diversity of fungal communities inhabiting the Chinese Cordyceps and its microhabitats. PMID:27625176

  18. The unexpected killer: effects of stimulus threat and negative affectivity on inattentional blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beanland, Vanessa; Tan, Choo Hong; Christensen, Bruce K

    2017-10-25

    Inattentional blindness (IB) occurs when observers fail to detect unexpected objects or events. Despite the adaptive importance of detecting unexpected threats, relatively little research has examined how stimulus threat influences IB. The current study was designed to explore the effects of stimulus threat on IB. Past research has also demonstrated that individuals with elevated negative affectivity have an attentional bias towards threat-related stimuli; therefore, the current study also examined whether state and trait levels of negative affectivity predicted IB for threat-related stimuli. One hundred and eleven participants (87 female, aged 17-40 years) completed an IB task that included both threat-related and neutral unexpected stimuli, while their eye movements were tracked. Participants were significantly more likely to detect the threatening stimulus (19%) than the neutral stimulus (11%) p  =  .035, odds ratio (OR)  =  4.0, 95% confidence interval OR [1.13, 14.17]. Neither state nor trait levels of negative affectivity were significantly associated with IB. These results suggest observers are more likely to detect threat-related unexpected objects, consistent with the threat superiority effect observed in other paradigms. However, most observers were blind to both unexpected stimuli, highlighting the profound influence of expectations and task demands on our ability to perceive even potentially urgent and life-threatening information.

  19. The detection of faked identity using unexpected questions and mouse dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merylin Monaro

    Full Text Available The detection of faked identities is a major problem in security. Current memory-detection techniques cannot be used as they require prior knowledge of the respondent's true identity. Here, we report a novel technique for detecting faked identities based on the use of unexpected questions that may be used to check the respondent identity without any prior autobiographical information. While truth-tellers respond automatically to unexpected questions, liars have to "build" and verify their responses. This lack of automaticity is reflected in the mouse movements used to record the responses as well as in the number of errors. Responses to unexpected questions are compared to responses to expected and control questions (i.e., questions to which a liar also must respond truthfully. Parameters that encode mouse movement were analyzed using machine learning classifiers and the results indicate that the mouse trajectories and errors on unexpected questions efficiently distinguish liars from truth-tellers. Furthermore, we showed that liars may be identified also when they are responding truthfully. Unexpected questions combined with the analysis of mouse movement may efficiently spot participants with faked identities without the need for any prior information on the examinee.

  20. Transient Down-Regulation of Phytochrome mRNA Abundance in Etiolated Cucumber Cotyledons in Response to Continuous White Light 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirimanne, T. Shamala; Colbert, James T.

    1991-01-01

    Phytochrome mRNA abundance decreased to 20% of the initial level in etiolated cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) cotyledons exposed to continuous white light. Unexpectedly, by 12 hours of continuous white light, phytochrome mRNA had reaccumulated to 60% of the control level. High stringency RNA blot analyses suggest that it is the mRNA encoding type I phytochrome that reaccumulates. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3 PMID:16668588

  1. Clustering in the stellar abundance space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesso, R.; Rocha-Pinto, H. J.

    2018-03-01

    We have studied the chemical enrichment history of the interstellar medium through an analysis of the n-dimensional stellar abundance space. This work is a non-parametric analysis of the stellar chemical abundance space. The main goal is to study the stars from their organization within this abundance space. Within this space, we seek to find clusters (in a statistical sense), that is, stars likely to share similar chemo-evolutionary history, using two methods: the hierarchical clustering and the principal component analysis. We analysed some selected abundance surveys available in the literature. For each sample, we labelled the group of stars according to its average abundance curve. In all samples, we identify the existence of a main enrichment pattern of the stars, which we call chemical enrichment flow. This flow is set by the structured and well-defined mean rate at which the abundances of the interstellar medium increase, resulting from the mixture of the material ejected from the stars and stellar mass-loss and interstellar medium gas. One of the main results of our analysis is the identification of subgroups of stars with peculiar chemistry. These stars are situated in regions outside of the enrichment flow in the abundance space. These peculiar stars show a mismatch in the enrichment rate of a few elements, such as Mg, Si, Sc and V, when compared to the mean enrichment rate of the other elements of the same stars. We believe that the existence of these groups of stars with peculiar chemistry may be related to the accretion of planetary material on to stellar surfaces or may be due to production of the same chemical element by different nucleosynthetic sites.

  2. Attentive, Affective, and Adaptive Behavior in the Cat: Sensory deprivation of the forebrain by lesions in the brain stem results in striking behavioral abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague, J M; Chambers, W W; Stellar, E

    1961-01-20

    . It is our belief, from these studies, that the symptoms produced by interruption of the lemnisci, characterized by a high degree of somatotopic and modality localization, are due to a loss of patterned sensory input to the forebrain, particularly to the neocortex and to the rostral midbrain. Without a patterned afferent input to the forebrain via the lemnisci, the remaining portions of the central nervous system, which include a virtually intact reticular formation, seem incapable of elaborating a large part of the animal's repertoire of adaptive behavior (45).

  3. Spontaneous sleep-wake cycle and sleep deprivation differently induce Bdnf1, Bdnf4 and Bdnf9a DNA methylation and transcripts levels in the basal forebrain and frontal cortex in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventskovska, Olena; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Karpova, Nina N

    2015-04-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) regulates neuronal plasticity, slow wave activity and sleep homeostasis. Environmental stimuli control Bdnf expression through epigenetic mechanisms, but there are no data on epigenetic regulation of Bdnf by sleep or sleep deprivation. Here we investigated whether 5-methylcytosine (5mC) DNA modification at Bdnf promoters p1, p4 and p9 influences Bdnf1, Bdnf4 and Bdnf9a expression during the normal inactive phase or after sleep deprivation (SD) (3, 6 and 12 h, end-times being ZT3, ZT6 and ZT12) in rats in two brain areas involved in sleep regulation, the basal forebrain and cortex. We found a daytime variation in cortical Bdnf expression: Bdnf1 expression was highest at ZT6 and Bdnf4 lowest at ZT12. Such variation was not observed in the basal forebrain. Also Bdnf p1 and p9 methylation levels differed only in the cortex, while Bdnf p4 methylation did not vary in either area. Factorial analysis revealed that sleep deprivation significantly induced Bdnf1 and Bdnf4 with the similar pattern for Bdnf9a in both basal forebrain and cortex; 12 h of sleep deprivation decreased 5mC levels at the cortical Bdnf p4 and p9. Regression analysis between the 5mC promoter levels and the corresponding Bdnf transcript expression revealed significant negative correlations for the basal forebrain Bdnf1 and cortical Bdnf9a transcripts in only non-deprived rats, while these correlations were lost after sleep deprivation. Our results suggest that Bdnf transcription during the light phase of undisturbed sleep-wake cycle but not after SD is regulated at least partially by brain site-specific DNA methylation. © 2014 European Sleep Research Society.

  4. Proteomic analysis of protein composition of rat forebrain cortex exposed to morphine for 10 days; comparison with animals exposed to morphine and subsequently nurtured for 20 days in the absence of this drug

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ujčíková, Hana; Vošahlíková, Miroslava; Roubalová, Lenka; Svoboda, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 145, Aug 11 (2016), s. 11-23 ISSN 1874-3919 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/12/0919 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : morphine * long-term exposure * rat forebrain cortex * post-nuclear supernatant * MALDI-TOF MS/MS * MaxLFQ Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.914, year: 2016

  5. REVIEW: Can habitat selection predict abundance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Mark S; Johnson, Chris J; Merrill, Evelyn H; Nielsen, Scott E; Solberg, Erling J; van Moorter, Bram

    2016-01-01

    Habitats have substantial influence on the distribution and abundance of animals. Animals' selective movement yields their habitat use. Animals generally are more abundant in habitats that are selected most strongly. Models of habitat selection can be used to distribute animals on the landscape or their distribution can be modelled based on data of habitat use, occupancy, intensity of use or counts of animals. When the population is at carrying capacity or in an ideal-free distribution, habitat selection and related metrics of habitat use can be used to estimate abundance. If the population is not at equilibrium, models have the flexibility to incorporate density into models of habitat selection; but abundance might be influenced by factors influencing fitness that are not directly related to habitat thereby compromising the use of habitat-based models for predicting population size. Scale and domain of the sampling frame, both in time and space, are crucial considerations limiting application of these models. Ultimately, identifying reliable models for predicting abundance from habitat data requires an understanding of the mechanisms underlying population regulation and limitation. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Ecological Society.

  6. Abundances in Eight M31 Planetary Nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Kerry G.; Kwitter, Karen B.; Corradi, Romano; Galera-Rosillo, R.; Balick, Bruce; Henry, Richard B. C.

    2014-06-01

    As part of a continuing project using planetary nebulae (PNe) to study the chemical evolution and formation history of M31 (see accompanying poster by Balick et al.), we obtained spectra of eight PNe in the fall of 2013 with the OSIRIS spectrograph on the GTC. All of these PNe are located outside M31’s inner disk and bulge. Spectral coverage extended from 3700-7800Å with a resolution of ~6 Å. Especially important in abundance determinations is the detection of the weak, temperature-sensitive auroral line of [O III], at 4363Å, which is often contaminated by Hg I 4358Å from streetlights; the remoteness of the GTC eliminated this difficulty. We reduced and measured the spectra using IRAF, and derived nebular diagnostics and abundances with ELSA, our in-house five-level-atom program. Here we report the chemical abundances determined from these spectra. The bottom line is that the oxygen abundances in these PNe are all within a factor of 2-3 of the solar value, (as are all the other M31 PNe our team has previously measured) despite the significant range of galactocentric distance. Future work will use these abundances to constrain models of the central star to estimate progenitor masses and ages. In particular we will use the results to investigate the hypothesis that these PNe might represent a population related to the encounter between M31 and M33 ~3 Gy ago. We gratefully acknowledge support from Williams College.

  7. RELATIVE ABUNDANCE MEASUREMENTS IN PLUMES AND INTERPLUMES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guennou, C.; Hahn, M.; Savin, D. W.

    2015-01-01

    We present measurements of relative elemental abundances in plumes and interplumes. Plumes are bright, narrow structures in coronal holes that extend along open magnetic field lines far out into the corona. Previous work has found that in some coronal structures the abundances of elements with a low first ionization potential (FIP) <10 eV are enhanced relative to their photospheric abundances. This coronal-to-photospheric abundance ratio, commonly called the FIP bias, is typically 1 for elements with a high-FIP (>10 eV). We have used Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer observations made on 2007 March 13 and 14 over a ≈24 hr period to characterize abundance variations in plumes and interplumes. To assess their elemental composition, we used a differential emission measure analysis, which accounts for the thermal structure of the observed plasma. We used lines from ions of iron, silicon, and sulfur. From these we estimated the ratio of the iron and silicon FIP bias relative to that for sulfur. From the results, we have created FIP-bias-ratio maps. We find that the FIP-bias ratio is sometimes higher in plumes than in interplumes and that this enhancement can be time dependent. These results may help to identify whether plumes or interplumes contribute to the fast solar wind observed in situ and may also provide constraints on the formation and heating mechanisms of plumes

  8. Bracken: estimating species abundance in metagenomics data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Lu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Metagenomic experiments attempt to characterize microbial communities using high-throughput DNA sequencing. Identification of the microorganisms in a sample provides information about the genetic profile, population structure, and role of microorganisms within an environment. Until recently, most metagenomics studies focused on high-level characterization at the level of phyla, or alternatively sequenced the 16S ribosomal RNA gene that is present in bacterial species. As the cost of sequencing has fallen, though, metagenomics experiments have increasingly used unbiased shotgun sequencing to capture all the organisms in a sample. This approach requires a method for estimating abundance directly from the raw read data. Here we describe a fast, accurate new method that computes the abundance at the species level using the reads collected in a metagenomics experiment. Bracken (Bayesian Reestimation of Abundance after Classification with KrakEN uses the taxonomic assignments made by Kraken, a very fast read-level classifier, along with information about the genomes themselves to estimate abundance at the species level, the genus level, or above. We demonstrate that Bracken can produce accurate species- and genus-level abundance estimates even when a sample contains multiple near-identical species.

  9. Deuterium abundance, from ultraviolet to visible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebrard, Guillaume

    2000-01-01

    In the frame of the standard Big Bang model, the primordial abundance of deuterium is the most sensitive to the baryonic density of the Universe. It was synthesized only during the primordial nucleosynthesis few minutes after the Big Bang and no other standard mechanism is able to produce any further significant amount. On the contrary, since deuterium is burned up within stars, its abundance D/H decreases along cosmic evolution. Thus, D/H measurements constrain Big Bang and galactic chemical evolution models. There are three samples of deuterium abundances: primordial, proto-solar and interstellar. Each of them is representative of a given epoch, respectively about 15 Gyrs past, 4.5 Gyrs past and present epoch. Although the evolution of the deuterium abundance seems to be qualitatively understood, the measurements show some dispersion. Present thesis works are linked to deuterium interstellar abundance measurements. Such measurements are classically obtained from spectroscopic observations of the hydrogen and deuterium Lyman series in absorption in the ultraviolet spectral range, using space observatories. Results presented here were obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope and FUSE, which has recently been launched. Simultaneously, a new way to observe deuterium has been proposed, in the visible spectral range from ground-based telescopes. This has led to the first detections and the identification of the deuterium Balmer series, in emission in HII regions, using CFHT and VLT telescopes. (author) [fr

  10. [Unexpected focal bowel 18-FDG uptake sites: should they be systematically investigated?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessonnier, Laetitia; Gonfrier, Sebastien; Carrier, Patricia; Valerio, Laure; Mouroux, Jérôme; Benisvy, Danielle; Viau, Philippe; Girma, Astrid; Bussière, Françoise; Darcourt, Jacques

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate the nature and significance of unexpected focal 18-FDG uptake localized by PET/CT within the intestinal tract. Methods. The data of 4,033 PET/CT were retrospectively reviewed. One hundred and eighty PET/CT showed unexpected focal uptakes (patients with known intestinal neoplasia were excluded). Among them, 42 patients corresponding to 47 focal uptake sites were investigated by endoscopy or surgery. Results. Height endoscopy results were negative (17%). We found 25 adenomatous polyps (53.2%), 10 neoplasms (21.3%) and 4 inflammatory lesions (8.5%). 18-FDG uptake values were not statistically different between the 4 groups. Conclusion. Eighty-three percent of unexpected intestinal foci of hypermetabolism are either inflammatory, malignant or premalignant lesions. These results justify systematic investigation of these lesions.

  11. Genetics of single-cell protein abundance variation in large yeast populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Frank W.; Treusch, Sebastian; Shockley, Arthur H.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Kruglyak, Leonid

    2014-02-01

    Variation among individuals arises in part from differences in DNA sequences, but the genetic basis for variation in most traits, including common diseases, remains only partly understood. Many DNA variants influence phenotypes by altering the expression level of one or several genes. The effects of such variants can be detected as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL). Traditional eQTL mapping requires large-scale genotype and gene expression data for each individual in the study sample, which limits sample sizes to hundreds of individuals in both humans and model organisms and reduces statistical power. Consequently, many eQTL are probably missed, especially those with smaller effects. Furthermore, most studies use messenger RNA rather than protein abundance as the measure of gene expression. Studies that have used mass-spectrometry proteomics reported unexpected differences between eQTL and protein QTL (pQTL) for the same genes, but these studies have been even more limited in scope. Here we introduce a powerful method for identifying genetic loci that influence protein expression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We measure single-cell protein abundance through the use of green fluorescent protein tags in very large populations of genetically variable cells, and use pooled sequencing to compare allele frequencies across the genome in thousands of individuals with high versus low protein abundance. We applied this method to 160 genes and detected many more loci per gene than previous studies. We also observed closer correspondence between loci that influence protein abundance and loci that influence mRNA abundance of a given gene. Most loci that we detected were clustered in `hotspots' that influence multiple proteins, and some hotspots were found to influence more than half of the proteins that we examined. The variants that underlie these hotspots have profound effects on the gene regulatory network and provide insights into genetic variation in cell

  12. Estimating the relationship between abundance and distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindorf, Anna; Lewy, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies investigate the relationship between abundance and distribution using indices reflecting one of the three aspects of distribution: proportion of area occupied, aggregation, and geographical range. Using simulations and analytical derivations, we examine whether these indices...... based on Euclidean distance to the centre of gravity of the spatial distribution. Only the proportion of structurally empty areas, Lloyds index, and indices of the distance to the centre of gravity of the spatial distribution are unbiased at all levels of abundance. The remaining indices generate...... relationships between abundance and distribution even in cases where no underlying relationships exists, although the problem decreases for measures derived from Lorenz curves when samples contain more than four individuals on average. To illustrate the problem, the indices are applied to juvenile North Sea cod...

  13. INTERSTELLAR ABUNDANCES TOWARD X Per, REVISITED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valencic, Lynne A.; Smith, Randall K.

    2013-01-01

    The nearby X-ray binary X Per (HD 24534) provides a useful beacon with which to examine dust grain types and measure elemental abundances in the local interstellar medium (ISM). The absorption features of O, Fe, Mg, and Si along this line of sight were measured using spectra from the Chandra X-Ray Observatory's LETG/ACIS-S and XMM-Newton's RGS instruments, and the Spex software package. The spectra were fit with dust analogs measured in the laboratory. The O, Mg, and Si abundances were compared to those from standard references, and the O abundance was compared to that along lines of sight toward other X-ray binaries. The results are as follows. First, it was found that a combination of MgSiO 3 (enstatite) and Mg 1.6 Fe 0.4 SiO 4 (olivine) provided the best fit to the O K edge, with N(MgSiO 3 )/N(Mg 1.6 Fe 0.4 SiO 4 ) = 3.4. Second, the Fe L edge could be fit with models that included metallic iron, but it was not well described by the laboratory spectra currently available. Third, the total abundances of O, Mg, and Si were in very good agreement with that of recently re-analyzed B stars, suggesting that they are good indicators of abundances in the local ISM, and the depletions were also in agreement with expected values for the diffuse ISM. Finally, the O abundances found from X-ray binary absorption spectra show a similar correlation with Galactocentric distances as seen in other objects.

  14. Adaptation to sudden unexpected loading of the low back - the effects of repeated trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skotte, J.H.; Fallentin, N.; Pedersen, Mogens Theisen

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate short-term changes in reactions to sudden unexpected loading of the low back. The study utilized a set-up where a horizontal force of 58 N pointing forward suddenly was applied to the upper part of the subject's trunk. EMG activity from the erector...... was lower for the first trial. This study showed that some subjects adapted to sudden unexpected loadings of the low back through a reduction in stopping time and a progression in EMG response during the first few trials. This possible adaptation to repeated trials have been overlooked in previous studies....

  15. Many unexpected abdominal findings on staging computed tomography in patients with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmsted, Kim; Nørring, Keld; Laustrup, Lene Collatz

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was proven to be superior to preoperative abdominal ultrasound in the preoperative setting for detection of hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer (CRC). The higher sensitivity of CT has resulted in a number of unexpected abdominal findings of varying importance......; an issue that was previously studied in relation to CT colonography, but not in relation to staging CT with intravenous contrast in CRC patients. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the number and significance of such unexpected findings on staging CTs in CRC patients....

  16. Many unexpected abdominal findings on staging computed tomography in patients with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmsted, Kim; Nørring, Keld; Laustrup, Lene Collatz

    2011-01-01

    ; an issue that was previously studied in relation to CT colonography, but not in relation to staging CT with intravenous contrast in CRC patients. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the number and significance of such unexpected findings on staging CTs in CRC patients.......Computed tomography (CT) was proven to be superior to preoperative abdominal ultrasound in the preoperative setting for detection of hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer (CRC). The higher sensitivity of CT has resulted in a number of unexpected abdominal findings of varying importance...

  17. Blocking miRNA Biogenesis in Adult Forebrain Neurons Enhances Seizure Susceptibility, Fear Memory, and Food Intake by Increasing Neuronal Responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorenza, Anna; Lopez-Atalaya, Jose P; Rovira, Victor; Scandaglia, Marilyn; Geijo-Barrientos, Emilio; Barco, Angel

    2016-04-01

    The RNase Dicer is essential for the maturation of most microRNAs, a molecular system that plays an essential role in fine-tuning gene expression. To gain molecular insight into the role of Dicer and the microRNA system in brain function, we conducted 2 complementary RNA-seq screens in the hippocampus of inducible forebrain-restricted Dicer1 mutants aimed at identifying the microRNAs primarily affected by Dicer loss and their targets, respectively. Functional genomics analyses predicted the main biological processes and phenotypes associated with impaired microRNA maturation, including categories related to microRNA biology, signal transduction, seizures, and synaptic transmission and plasticity. Consistent with these predictions, we found that, soon after recombination, Dicer-deficient mice exhibited an exaggerated seizure response, enhanced induction of immediate early genes in response to different stimuli, stronger and more stable fear memory, hyperphagia, and increased excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons. In the long term, we also observed slow and progressive excitotoxic neurodegeneration. Overall, our results indicate that interfering with microRNA biogenesis causes an increase in neuronal responsiveness and disrupts homeostatic mechanisms that protect the neuron against overactivation, which may explain both the initial and late phenotypes associated with the loss of Dicer in excitatory neurons. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Effect of MDMA-Induced Axotomy on the Dorsal Raphe Forebrain Tract in Rats: An In Vivo Manganese-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuang-Hsin Chiu

    Full Text Available 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, also known as "Ecstasy", is a common recreational drug of abuse. Several previous studies have attributed the central serotonergic neurotoxicity of MDMA to distal axotomy, since only fine serotonergic axons ascending from the raphe nucleus are lost without apparent damage to their cell bodies. However, this axotomy has never been visualized directly in vivo. The present study examined the axonal integrity of the efferent projections from the midbrain raphe nucleus after MDMA exposure using in vivo manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI. Rats were injected subcutaneously six times with MDMA (5 mg/kg or saline once daily. Eight days after the last injection, manganese ions (Mn2+ were injected stereotactically into the raphe nucleus, and a series of MEMRI images was acquired over a period of 38 h to monitor the evolution of Mn2+-induced signal enhancement across the ventral tegmental area, the medial forebrain bundle (MFB, and the striatum. The MDMA-induced loss of serotonin transporters was clearly evidenced by immunohistological staining consistent with the Mn2+-induced signal enhancement observed across the MFB and striatum. MEMRI successfully revealed the disruption of the serotonergic raphe-striatal projections and the variable effect of MDMA on the kinetics of Mn2+ accumulation in the MFB and striatum.

  19. The autism-associated MET receptor tyrosine kinase engages early neuronal growth mechanism and controls glutamatergic circuits development in the forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Y; Lu, Z; Li, G; Piechowicz, M; Anderson, M; Uddin, Y; Wu, J; Qiu, S

    2016-07-01

    The human MET gene imparts a replicated risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and is implicated in the structural and functional integrity of brain. MET encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase, MET, which has a pleiotropic role in embryogenesis and modifies a large number of neurodevelopmental events. Very little is known, however, on how MET signaling engages distinct cellular events to collectively affect brain development in ASD-relevant disease domains. Here, we show that MET protein expression is dynamically regulated and compartmentalized in developing neurons. MET is heavily expressed in neuronal growth cones at early developmental stages and its activation engages small GTPase Cdc42 to promote neuronal growth, dendritic arborization and spine formation. Genetic ablation of MET signaling in mouse dorsal pallium leads to altered neuronal morphology indicative of early functional maturation. In contrast, prolonged activation of MET represses the formation and functional maturation of glutamatergic synapses. Moreover, manipulating MET signaling levels in vivo in the developing prefrontal projection neurons disrupts the local circuit connectivity made onto these neurons. Therefore, normal time-delimited MET signaling is critical in regulating the timing of neuronal growth, glutamatergic synapse maturation and cortical circuit function. Dysregulated MET signaling may lead to pathological changes in forebrain maturation and connectivity, and thus contribute to the emergence of neurological symptoms associated with ASD.

  20. Leptin acts in the forebrain to differentially influence baroreflex control of lumbar, renal and splanchnic sympathetic nerve activity and heart rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baoxin; Shi, Zhigang; Cassaglia, Priscila A.; Brooks, Virginia L.

    2013-01-01

    While leptin is known to increase sympathetic nerve activity (SNA), we tested the hypothesis that leptin also enhances baroreflex control of SNA and HR. Using α-chloralose anesthetized male rats, mean arterial pressure (MAP), HR, lumbar SNA (LSNA), splanchnic SNA (SSNA), and renal SNA (RSNA) were recorded before and for 2 hr after lateral cerebroventricular (LV) leptin or aCSF administration. Baroreflex function was assessed using a four parameter sigmoidal fit of HR and SNA responses to slow ramp (3-5 min) changes in MAP, induced by iv infusion of nitroprusside and phenylephrine. Leptin (3 μg) increased (Pbaroreflex maxima. Leptin also increased gain of baroreflex control of LSNA and RSNA, but not of SSNA or HR. The elevations in HR were eliminated by pretreatment with methscopalamine, to block parasympathetic nerve activity; however, after cardiac sympathetic blockade with atenolol, leptin still increased basal HR and MAP and the HR baroreflex maximum and minimum. Leptin (1.5 μg) also increased LSNA and enhanced LSNA baroreflex gain and maximum, but did not alter MAP, HR, or the HR baroreflex. LV aCSF had no effects. Finally, to test if leptin acts in the brainstem, leptin (3 μg) was infused into the 4th ventricle; however, no significant changes were observed. In conclusion, leptin acts in the forebrain to differentially influence baroreflex control of LSNA, RSNA, SSNA and HR, with the latter action mediated via suppression of parasympathetic nerve activity. PMID:23424232

  1. Lower incidence of unexpected in-hospital death after interprofessional implementation of a bedside track-and-trigger system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunkenborg, Gitte; Samuelson, Karin Samuelsonkarin; Poulsen, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    In-hospital patients may suffer unexpected death because of suboptimal monitoring. Early recognition of deviating physiological parameters may enable staff to prevent unexpected in-hospital death. The aim of this study was to evaluate short- and long-term effects of systematic interprofessional u...... of early warning scoring, structured observation charts, and clinical algorithms for bedside action.......In-hospital patients may suffer unexpected death because of suboptimal monitoring. Early recognition of deviating physiological parameters may enable staff to prevent unexpected in-hospital death. The aim of this study was to evaluate short- and long-term effects of systematic interprofessional use...

  2. A biogeographical perspective on species abundance distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthews, Thomas J.; Borges, Paulo A. V.; de Azevedo, Eduardo Brito

    2017-01-01

    It has become increasingly recognized that multiple processes can generate similar shapes of species abundance distributions (SADs), with the result that the fit of a given SAD model cannot unambiguously provide evidence in support of a given theory or model. An alternative approach to comparing...

  3. Catch Composition, Abundance and Length- Weight Relationships ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    loading Salter digital balance for small fish (<2.0 kg) or on a hanging Salter ... white- spotted grouper,. Epinephelus caeruleopunctatus, was numerically the most abundant (15.6%) in the catch followed by Cephalopholis boenak. (13%) and E. fasciatus ... Vanga, the commonly landed species were the white-spotted grouper,.

  4. species composition, relative abundance and distribution

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    However, wet season had an effect on the avian abundance in eucalyptus plantation. (t=2.952, P <0.05). Eucalyptus plantation, soil ... distribution of bird species in the country is quite complex (Urban, 1980). Most of the the birds that .... size, shape, colour, songs and calls were considered as important parameters (Afework.

  5. Correlation between some environmental variables and abundance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Correlation between some environmental variables and abundance of Almophrya mediovacuolata (Ciliophora: Anoplophryidae) endocommensal ciliate of an ... The survey primarily involved soil samples collection from the same spots of EW collection and preparation for physico-chemical analysis; evaluation in situ of the ...

  6. Securing abundance : The politics of energy security

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kester, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Energy Security is a concept that is known in the literature for its ‘slippery’ nature and subsequent wide range of definitions. Instead of another attempt at grasping the essence of this concept, Securing Abundance reformulates the problem and moves away from a definitional problem to a theoretical

  7. In Abundance: Networked Participatory Practices as Scholarship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Bonnie E.

    2015-01-01

    In an era of knowledge abundance, scholars have the capacity to distribute and share ideas and artifacts via digital networks, yet networked scholarship often remains unrecognized within institutional spheres of influence. Using ethnographic methods including participant observation, interviews, and document analysis, this study investigates…

  8. Abundance, composition and distribution of simple sequence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    δ∗(W-29, W-70) = 1.25; δ∗(W-93, W-70 = 0.75)) even though they originate from different geographical regions. We can, therefore, infer that the WSSV sequences are closely related by ancestry. Table 3. Dinucleotide relative abundance in the ...

  9. The Abundance of Large Arcs From CLASH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bingxiao; Postman, Marc; Meneghetti, Massimo; Coe, Dan A.; Clash Team

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an automated arc-finding algorithm to perform a rigorous comparison of the observed and simulated abundance of large lensed background galaxies (a.k.a arcs). We use images from the CLASH program to derive our observed arc abundance. Simulated CLASH images are created by performing ray tracing through mock clusters generated by the N-body simulation calibrated tool -- MOKA, and N-body/hydrodynamic simulations -- MUSIC, over the same mass and redshift range as the CLASH X-ray selected sample. We derive a lensing efficiency of 15 ± 3 arcs per cluster for the X-ray selected CLASH sample and 4 ± 2 arcs per cluster for the simulated sample. The marginally significant difference (3.0 σ) between the results for the observations and the simulations can be explained by the systematically smaller area with magnification larger than 3 (by a factor of ˜4) in both MOKA and MUSIC mass models relative to those derived from the CLASH data. Accounting for this difference brings the observed and simulated arc statistics into full agreement. We find that the source redshift distribution does not have big impact on the arc abundance but the arc abundance is very sensitive to the concentration of the dark matter halos. Our results suggest that the solution to the "arc statistics problem" lies primarily in matching the cluster dark matter distribution.

  10. Abundance Ratios in Dwarf Elliptical Galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sen, Seyda; Peletier, Reynier F.; Toloba, Elisa; Mentz, Jaco J.

    The aim of this study is to determine abundance ratios and star formation histories (SFH) of dwarf ellipticals in the nearby Virgo cluster. We perform a stellar population analysis of 39 dEs and study them using index-index and scaling relations. We find an unusual behaviour where [Na/Fe] is

  11. Abundances and morphology in planetary nebulae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pottasch, [No Value; Kastner, JH; Soker, N; Rappaport, SA

    2000-01-01

    The abundances of 16 well studied have been determined. New ISO measurements have been combined with optical and ultraviolet data from the literature, in an attempt to obtain accurate values. Only He, O, C, N, Ne, Ar, and S are considered. High values of N/O are sometimes, but not always, found in

  12. Cosmological evolution of the Nitrogen abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangioni, Elisabeth; Dvorkin, Irina; Olive, Keith A.; Dubois, Yohan; Molaro, Paolo; Petitjean, Patrick; Silk, Joe; Kimm, Taysun

    2018-03-01

    The abundance of nitrogen in the interstellar medium is a powerful probe of star formation processes over cosmological timescales. Since nitrogen can be produced both in massive and intermediate-mass stars with metallicity-dependent yields, its evolution is challenging to model, as evidenced by the differences between theoretical predictions and observations. In this work we attempt to identify the sources of these discrepancies using a cosmic evolution model. To further complicate matters, there is considerable dispersion in the abundances from observations of damped Lyα absorbers (DLAs) at z ˜ 2 - 3. We study the evolution of nitrogen with a detailed cosmic chemical evolution model and find good agreement with these observations, including the relative abundances of (N/O) and (N/Si). We find that the principal contribution of nitrogen comes from intermediate mass stars, with the exception of systems with the lowest N/H, where nitrogen production might possibly be dominated by massive stars. This last result could be strengthened if stellar rotation which is important at low metallicity can produce significant amounts of nitrogen. Moreover, these systems likely reside in host galaxies with stellar masses below 108.5M⊙. We also study the origin of the observed dispersion in nitrogen abundances using the cosmological hydrodynamical simulations Horizon-AGN. We conclude that this dispersion can originate from two effects: difference in the masses of the DLA host galaxies, and difference in the their position inside the galaxy.

  13. On the primoridal abundance of argon-40

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begemann, F.; Weber, H.W.; Hintenberger, H.

    1976-01-01

    Argon trapped in graphite-diamond-kamacite inclusions from the Havero ureilite has a 40 Ar/ 36 Ar ratio of (1.4 +- 0.6) x 10 -3 , which is close to the estimated primordial abundance ratio of 2 x 10 -4 . Some implications are discussed

  14. Will Abundant Natural Gas Solve Climate Change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McJeon, H. C.; Edmonds, J.; Bauer, N.; Leon, C.; Fisher, B.; Flannery, B.; Hilaire, J.; Krey, V.; Marangoni, G.; Mi, R.; Riahi, K.; Rogner, H.; Tavoni, M.

    2015-12-01

    The rapid deployment of hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling technologies enabled the production of previously uneconomic shale gas resources in North America. Global deployment of these advanced gas production technologies could bring large influx of economically competitive unconventional gas resources to the energy system. It has been hoped that abundant natural gas substituting for coal could reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, which in turn could reduce climate forcing. Other researchers countered that the non-CO2 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with shale gas production make its lifecycle emissions higher than those of coal. In this study, we employ five state-of-the-art integrated assessment models (IAMs) of energy-economy-climate systems to assess the full impact of abundant gas on climate change. The models show large additional natural gas consumption up to +170% by 2050. The impact on CO2 emissions, however, is found to be much smaller (from -2% to +11%), and a majority of the models reported a small increase in climate forcing (from -0.3% to +7%) associated with the increased use of abundant gas. Our results show that while globally abundant gas may substantially change the future energy market equilibrium, it will not significantly mitigate climate change on its own in the absence of climate policies.

  15. Abundance and guild structure of grasshoppers (Orthoptera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to determine how savanna grass sward modifications caused by heavy grazing pressure influenced the abundance and guild structure of grasshoppers. Heavily grazed communal land was compared with a lightly grazed area and a mowed airstrip, in adjacent protected land, in the Mpumalanga ...

  16. spatial patterns of zooplankton distribution and abundance

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    nb

    production of fish species, invertebrates and availability of phytoplankton. Weekly monitoring for zooplankton abundance was conducted in .... chlorophyll-a pigment was extracted according to procedures recommended by ..... production of high density of bacteria and detrital matter which were effectively consumed by the ...

  17. Topology in QCD and the axion abundance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitano, Ryuichiro; Yamada, Norikazu [KEK Theory Center,Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Department of Particle and Nuclear Physics,The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (Sokendai),Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan)

    2015-10-21

    The temperature dependence of the topological susceptibility in QCD, χ{sub t}, essentially determines the abundance of the QCD axion in the Universe, and is commonly estimated, based on the instanton picture, to be a certain negative power of temperature. While lattice QCD should be able to check this behavior in principle, the temperature range where lattice QCD works is rather limited in practice, because the topological charge is apt to freezes at high temperatures. In this work, two exploratory studies are presented. In the first part, we try to specify the temperature range in the quenched approximation. Since our purpose here is to estimate the range expected in unquenched QCD through quenched simulations, hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC) algorithm is employed instead of heatbath algorithm. We obtain an indication that unquenched calculations of χ{sub t} encounter the serious problem of autocorrelation already at T∼2 T{sub c} or even below with the plain HMC. In the second part, we revisit the axion abundance. The absolute value and the temperature dependence of χ{sub t} in real QCD can be significantly different from that in the quenched approximation, and is not well established above the critical temperature. Motivated by this fact and precedent arguments which disagree with the conventional instanton picture, we estimate the axion abundance in an extreme case where χ{sub t} decreases much faster than the conventional power-like behavior. We find a significant enhancement of the axion abundance in such a case.

  18. Benthic macrofauna community composition, abundance and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The communities of the shallow, intermediate and deep environments were composed mainly of molluscs, worms and insects. Gastropods (52.68%) and bivalves (40.18%) constituted the major part of the benthic community. Bellamya unicolor, Melanoides tuberculata and Coelatura spp. were the most abundant molluscs.

  19. Occurrence, abundance and distribution of benthic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Occurrence, abundance and distribution of benthic macroinvertebrates in the Nyando River catchment, Kenya. ... measures are required to safeguard the environment and ecosystems of Lake Victoria. Keywords: biodiversity index, environmental monitoring, Lake Victoria Basin, species distribution, water quality, Winam Gulf ...

  20. Palaeoceanographic implications of abundance and mean ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Temporal variation in abundance and mean proloculus diameter of the benthic foraminiferal species Epistominella exigua has been reconstructed over the last ∼ 50,000 yr BP,from a core collected from the distal Bay of Bengal fan,to assess its potential application in palaeoceanographic reconstruction studies.

  1. Short communication: Abundance, distribution and population ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus) is an iconic or keystone species in many aquatic ecosystems. In order to understand the abundance, distribution, and population trends of Nile crocodiles in Gonarezhou National Park (GNP), southeastern Zimbabwe, we carried out 4 annual aerial surveys, using a Super Cub aircraft ...

  2. Toward reliable estimates of abundance: comparing index methods to assess the abundance of a Mammalian predator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güthlin, Denise; Storch, Ilse; Küchenhoff, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Due to time and financial constraints indices are often used to obtain landscape-scale estimates of relative species abundance. Using two different field methods and comparing the results can help to detect possible bias or a non monotonic relationship between the index and the true abundance, providing more reliable results. We used data obtained from camera traps and feces counts to independently estimate relative abundance of red foxes in the Black Forest, a forested landscape in southern Germany. Applying negative binomial regression models, we identified landscape parameters that influence red fox abundance, which we then used to predict relative red fox abundance. We compared the estimated regression coefficients of the landscape parameters and the predicted abundance of the two methods. Further, we compared the costs and the precision of the two field methods. The predicted relative abundances were similar between the two methods, suggesting that the two indices were closely related to the true abundance of red foxes. For both methods, landscape diversity and edge density best described differences in the indices and had positive estimated effects on the relative fox abundance. In our study the costs of each method were of similar magnitude, but the sample size obtained from the feces counts (262 transects) was larger than the camera trap sample size (88 camera locations). The precision of the camera traps was lower than the precision of the feces counts. The approach we applied can be used as a framework to compare and combine the results of two or more different field methods to estimate abundance and by this enhance the reliability of the result.

  3. Non-Salmonid Abundance - Line Features [ds186

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. The "Other Fish" category contains data collected...

  4. Sudden unexpected death in children with a previously diagnosed cardiovascular disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polderman, Florens N.; Cohen, Joeri; Blom, Nico A.; Delhaas, Tammo; Helbing, Wim A.; Lam, Jan; Sobotka-Plojhar, Marta A.; Temmerman, Arno M.; Sreeram, Narayanswani

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is known that children with previously diagnosed heart defects die suddenly. The causes of death are often unknown. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to identify all infants and children within the Netherlands with previously diagnosed heart disease who had a sudden unexpected death

  5. Sudden unexpected death in children with a previously diagnosed cardiovascular disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polderman, F.N.; Cohen, Joeri; Blom, N.A.; Delhaas, T.; Helbing, W.A.; Lam, J.; Sobotka-Plojhar, M.A.; Temmerman, Arno M.; Sreeram, N.

    2004-01-01

    Background: It is known that children with previously diagnosed heart defects die suddenly. The causes of death are often unknown. Objective: The aim of the study was to identify all infants and children within the Netherlands with previously diagnosed heart disease who had a sudden unexpected death

  6. Challenging Ideals of Reciprocity in Undergraduate Teaching: The Unexpected Benefits of Unpredictable Cross-Cultural Fieldwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammersley, Laura A.; Bilous, Rebecca H.; James, Sarah W.; Trau, Adam M.; Suchet-Pearson, Sandie

    2014-01-01

    Geographers are increasingly grappling with the theoretical and practical implications of integrating an ethics of reciprocity into undergraduate learning and teaching. This paper draws on the unexpected experiences of a third-year human geography research methods fieldtrip to examine the process of balancing undergraduate student learning and…

  7. Working memory representations persist in the face of unexpected task alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Garrett; Wyble, Brad; Chen, Hui

    2017-07-01

    It is well known that information can be held in memory while performing other tasks concurrently, such as remembering a color or number during a separate visual search task. However, it is not clear what happens to stored information in the face of unexpected tasks, such as the surprise questions that are often used in experiments related to inattentional and change blindness. Does the unpredicted shift in task context cause memory representations to be cleared in anticipation of new information? To answer this question, we ran two experiments where the task unexpectedly switched partway through the experiment with a surprise question. Half of the participants were asked to report the same attribute (Exp. 1 = Identity, Exp. 2 = Color) of a target stimulus in both presurprise and postsurprise trials, while for the other half, the reported attribute switched from identity to color (Exp. 1) or vice versa (Exp. 2). Importantly, all participants had to read an unexpected set of instructions and respond differently on the surprise trial. Accuracy on the surprise trial was higher for the same-attribute groups than the different-attribute groups. Furthermore, there was no difference in reaction time on the surprise trial between the two groups. These results suggest that information participants expected to report can survive an encounter with an unexpected task. The implication is that failures to report information on a surprise trial in many experiments reflect genuine differences in memory encoding, rather than forgetting or overwriting induced by the surprise question.

  8. Frequency, severity and causes of unexpected allergic reactions to food: A systematic literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versluis, A.; Knulst, A.C.; Kruizinga, A.G.; Michelsen, A.; Houben, G.F.; Baumert, J.L.; Os-Medendorp, H. van

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Food allergic patients have to deal with an avoidance diet. Confusing labelling terms or precautionary labels can result in misinterpretation and risk-taking behaviour. Even those patients that strictly adhere to their diet experience (sometimes severe) unexpected allergic reactions to

  9. Frequency, severity and causes of unexpected allergic reactions to food : A systematic literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versluis, A.; Knulst, A. C.; Kruizinga, A. G.; Michelsen, A.; Houben, G. F.; Baumert, J. L.; van Os-Medendorp, H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Food allergic patients have to deal with an avoidance diet. Confusing labelling terms or precautionary labels can result in misinterpretation and risk-taking behaviour. Even those patients that strictly adhere to their diet experience (sometimes severe) unexpected allergic reactions to

  10. Unexpected poor performance of presumed high-quality power line filter, and how it improved

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moonen, Dominicus Johannes Guilielmus; Buesink, Frederik Johannes Karel; Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes

    2015-01-01

    A 20 A, 440 V three p hase power line filter for a radar transmitter, designed using the best components available and following the correct rules for filter design, showed unexpected poor common mode attenuation levels at frequencies above, already, a few megahertz. Component self-parasitic, as

  11. An unexpected patron: A social-scientific and realistic reading of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An unexpected patron: A social-scientific and realistic reading of the parable of the Vineyard Labourers (Mt 20:1–15). Ernest van Eck, John S. Kloppenborg. Abstract. Many readings of the Parable of the Labourers in the vineyard want to treat the owner as representing God. Knowledge of actual agricultural practices relating ...

  12. Investigation of Unexpected Reaction Intermediates in the Alkaline Hydrolysis of Methyl 3,5-Dinitrobenzoate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Clesia C.; Silva, Ricardo O.; Navarro, Daniela M. A. F.; Navarro, Marcelo

    2009-01-01

    An experimental project aimed at identifying stable reaction intermediates is described. Initially, the studied reaction appears to involve the simple hydrolysis, by aqueous sodium hydroxide, of methyl 3,5-dinitrobenzoate dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide. On mixing the substrates, however, the reaction mixture unexpectedly turns an intense red in…

  13. The creative use of unexpected responses in the hypnotherapy of patients with conversion disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moene, F.C.; Hoogduin, C.A.L.

    1999-01-01

    In a previously completed empirical study examining the use of hypnosis in a comprehensive treatment program with 85 patients who suffered motor conversion symptoms, 16 patients were reported by their therapists to have had unusual and unexpected responses during hypnosis. This article summarizes

  14. Shift costs of predictable and unexpected set shifting in young and older adults.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Asselen, M.; Ridderinkhof, K.R.

    2000-01-01

    Examined the extent to which predictable, unexpected, and mixed costs associated with task shifts are subject to the effects of aging. 17 university students (aged 18-25 yrs) and 17 community residents (aged 66-81 yrs) completed a series of pure and mixed tasks. Results show that the costs of an

  15. Unexpected MRI findings in clinically suspected Legg-Calve-Perthes disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobert, Philip F.; Dillman, Jonathan R.; Strouse, Peter J.; Hernandez, Ramiro J. [University of Michigan Health System, Department of Radiology, Section of Pediatric Radiology, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital/F3503, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2011-03-15

    In the setting of clinically suspected Legg-Calve-Perthes (LCP) disease and negative/equivocal radiographs, contrast-enhanced MRI can be performed to confirm the diagnosis. To determine the frequency of unexpected causes of hip pain as identified by MRI in children with clinically suspected LCP disease and negative/equivocal radiographs. All pediatric contrast-enhanced MRI examinations of the pelvis and hips performed between January 2000 and February 2009 to evaluate for possible LCP disease in the setting of negative/equivocal radiographs were identified. MRI examinations performed to evaluate for secondary avascular necrosis were excluded. Imaging reports were retrospectively reviewed for unexpected clinically important causes of hip pain. Thirty-six pediatric patients underwent contrast-enhanced MRI examinations for clinically suspected LCP disease in the setting of negative/equivocal radiographs. Twenty-two (61%) imaging studies were normal, while four (11%) imaging studies demonstrated findings consistent with LCP disease. Ten (28%) imaging studies revealed unexpected clinically important causes of hip pain, including nonspecific unilateral joint effusion and synovitis (n = 7, juvenile chronic arthritis was eventually diagnosed in 3 patients), sacral fracture (n = 1), apophyseal injury (n = 1), and femoral head subluxation (n = 1). MRI frequently reveals unexpected clinically important causes of hip pain in children with suspected LCP disease and negative/equivocal radiographs. (orig.)

  16. Tourism Stocks in Times of Crises: An Econometric Investigation of Unexpected Non-macroeconomic Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Zopiatis (Anastasios); C.S. Savva (Christos); N. Lambertides (Neophytos); M.J. McAleer (Michael)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractFollowing the recent terrorist attacks in Paris, the European media emphatically pronounced that billions of Euros were wiped from tourism related stocks. The theoretical relationship of the industry with such unexpected non-macro incidents received moderate academic coverage.

  17. 75 FR 67015 - Unexpected Urgent Refugee And Migration Needs Resulting From Flooding InPakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    ... September 3, 2010 Unexpected Urgent Refugee And Migration Needs Resulting From Flooding InPakistan... laws of the United States, including section 2(c)(1) of the Migration and Refugee Assistance Act of... amount not to exceed $33 million from the United States Emergency Refugee and Migration Assistance Fund...

  18. 76 FR 14271 - Unexpected Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs Related to Libya

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    ... March 7, 2011 Unexpected Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs Related to Libya Memorandum for the... States, including section 2(c)(1) of the Migration and Refugee Assistance Act of 1962 (the ``Act''), as... million from the United States Emergency Refugee and Migration Assistance Fund, for the purpose of meeting...

  19. 75 FR 67013 - Unexpected Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs Resulting from Violence in Kyrgyzstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    ... August 26, 2010 Unexpected Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs Resulting from Violence in Kyrgyzstan... laws of the United States, including section 2(c)(1) of the Migration and Refugee Assistance Act of... amount not to exceed $9.5 million from the United States Emergency Refugee and Migration Assistance Fund...

  20. 78 FR 9569 - Unexpected Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs Relating to Syria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-08

    ...-04 of January 29, 2013--Unexpected Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs Relating to Syria Memorandum of... Urgent Refugee and Migration Needs Relating to Syria Memorandum for the Secretary of State By the... 2(c)(1) of the Migration and Refugee Assistance Act of 1962 (the ``Act''), as amended (22 U.S.C...

  1. Manganese-Catalyzed C−H Functionalizations: Hydroarylations and Alkenylations Involving an Unexpected Heteroaryl Shift

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Chengming

    2017-06-24

    A manganese-catalyzed regio- and stereoselective hydroarylation of allenes is reported. The C−H functionalization method provides access to various alkenylated indoles in excellent yields. Moreover, a hydroarylation/cyclization cascade involving an unexpected C−N bond cleavage and aryl shift has been developed, which provides a new synthetic approach to substituted pyrroloindolones.

  2. Doctors′ experience and response to unexpected patient death in a Nigerian Teaching Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y O Oshodi

    2013-01-01

    medication and 42% had appetite problems after the loss. There were no statistically significant differences between surgical and non-surgical specialties. Conclusion: There are mental health and emotional effects following unexpected patient death among doctors. Routes for support and institutional guidelines are encouraged in tertiary institutions of care. Such guidelines should be made available for doctors and other members of the health team.

  3. Critical Neural Substrates for Correcting Unexpected Trajectory Errors and Learning from Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutha, Pratik K.; Sainburg, Robert L.; Haaland, Kathleen Y.

    2011-01-01

    Our proficiency at any skill is critically dependent on the ability to monitor our performance, correct errors and adapt subsequent movements so that errors are avoided in the future. In this study, we aimed to dissociate the neural substrates critical for correcting unexpected trajectory errors and learning to adapt future movements based on…

  4. Does UV instrumentation effectively measure ozone abundance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Bernhard Lee

    1992-01-01

    Measurements of O3 on Mars provide significant information about the chemistry and composition of the atmosphere, including long-term changes. The most extensive and accurate data were inferred from the Mariner 9 UV spectrometer experiment. Mars O3 shows strong seasonal and latitudinal variation, with column abundances ranging from 0.2 microns at equatorial latitudes to 60 microns over the northern winter polar latitudes (1 micron-atm is a column abundance of 2.689 x 10(exp 15) molecules cm(exp-2)). The Mariner 9 UV spectrometer scanned from 2100 to 3500 Angstroms in one of its two spectral channels every 3 seconds with a spectral resolution of 15 Angstroms and an effective field-of-view of approximately 300 km(exp 2). Measurements were made for almost half a Martian year, with winter and spring in the Northern Hemisphere and summer and fall in the Southern Hemisphere. The detectability limit of the spectrometer was approximately 3 microns of ozone. The UV spectrometer on Mariner 9 was incapable of penetrating the dust during dust storms; the single-scattering albedo and phase function of airborne dust and cloud ice are not known to the degree required to extract the small UV signal reflected up from near the surface. The reflectance spectroscopy technique would also have difficulty detecting the total column abundance of O3 in cases where large dust abundances exist together with the polar hood, especially at high latitudes where large solar zenith angles magnify those optical depths; yet these cases would contain the maximum O3, based on theoretical results. It is quite possible that the maximum O3 column abundance observed by Mariner 9 of 60 microns is common. In fact, larger quantities may exist in some of the colder areas with optically thick clouds and dust. As the Viking period often had more atmospheric dust loading than did that of Mariner 9, the reflectance spectroscopy technique may even have been incapable of detecting the entire O3 column abundance

  5. Big-Bang nucleosynthesis and lithium abundance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Vinay; Lahiri, Joydev; Bhowmick, Debasis; Basu, D.N.

    2017-01-01

    The predictions of the standard big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) theory depend on the astrophysical nuclear reaction rates and on additional three parameters, the number of flavours of light neutrinos, the neutron lifetime and the baryon-to-photon ratio in the uni- verse. The effect of the modification of thirty-five reaction rates on light element abundance yields in BBN was investigated earlier by us. In the present work we have replaced the neutron lifetime, baryon-to-photon ratio by the most recent values and further modified 3 He( 4 He,γ) 7 Be reaction rate which is used directly for estimating the formation of 7 Li as a result of β + decay by the most recent equation. We find that these modifications reduce the calculated abundance of 7 Li by ∼ 12%

  6. Chemical element abundance in K giant atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarov, N.S.; Shcherbak, A.N.

    1980-01-01

    With the help of modified method of differential curves of growth studied are physical parameters of atmospheres of giant stars of KO111 spectral class of the NGC 752, M25 and UMa cluster. Observations have been made on reflector of Crimea astrophysical observatory of Academy of Sciences of the USSR in the period from February to May, 1978. Spectograms are obtained for the wave length range from 5000-5500 A. It is shown that the change of chemical content in the wide range in heavy element composition does not influence the star atmosphere structUre. It follows from the results of the investigation that the abundance of chemical elements in stars of various scattered clusters, is the same in the range of errors of measurements and is similar to the abundance of chemical elements in the Sun atmosphere

  7. Abundances in the diffuse interstellar medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, A.W.

    1988-04-01

    The wealth of interstellar absorption line data obtained with the Copernicus and IUE satellites has opened up a new era in studies of the interstellar gas. It is now well established that certain elements, generally those with high condensation temperatures, are substantially under-abundant in the gas-phase relative to total solar or cosmic abundances. This depletion of elements is due to the existence of solid material in the form of dust grains in the interstellar medium. Surprisingly, however, recent surveys indicate that even volatile elements such as Zn and S are significantly depleted in many sight lines. Developments in this field which have been made possible by the large base of UV interstellar absorption line data built up over recent years are reviewed and the implications of the results for our understanding of the physical processes governing depletion are discussed. (author)

  8. Attenuation of species abundance distributions by sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimadzu, Hideyasu; Darnell, Ross

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying biodiversity aspects such as species presence/ absence, richness and abundance is an important challenge to answer scientific and resource management questions. In practice, biodiversity can only be assessed from biological material taken by surveys, a difficult task given limited time and resources. A type of random sampling, or often called sub-sampling, is a commonly used technique to reduce the amount of time and effort for investigating large quantities of biological samples. However, it is not immediately clear how (sub-)sampling affects the estimate of biodiversity aspects from a quantitative perspective. This paper specifies the effect of (sub-)sampling as attenuation of the species abundance distribution (SAD), and articulates how the sampling bias is induced to the SAD by random sampling. The framework presented also reveals some confusion in previous theoretical studies. PMID:26064626

  9. Integral Field Spectroscopy Surveys: Oxygen Abundance Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, S. F.; Sánchez-Menguiano, L.

    2017-07-01

    We present here the recent results on our understanding of oxygen abundance gradients derived using Integral Field Spectroscopic surveys. In particular we analyzed more than 2124 datacubes corresponding to individual objects observed by the CALIFA (˜ 734 objects) and the public data by MaNGA (˜ 1390 objects), deriving the oxygen abundance gradient for each galaxy. We confirm previous results that indicate that the shape of this gradient is very similar for all galaxies with masses above 109.5M⊙, presenting in average a very similar slope of ˜ -0.04 dex within 0.5-2.0 re, with a possible drop in the inner regions (r109.5M⊙) the gradient seems to be flatter than for more massive ones. All these results agree with an inside-out growth of massive galaxies and indicate that low mass ones may still be growing in an outside in phase.

  10. A global database of ant species abundances

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gibb, H.; Dunn, R. R.; Sanders, N. J.; Grossman, B. F.; Photakis, M.; Abril, S.; Agosti, D.; Andersen, A. N.; Angulo, E.; Armbrecht, I.; Arnan, X.; Baccaro, F. B.; Bishop, T. R.; Boulay, R.; Brühl, C.; Castracani, C.; Cerdá, X.; Del Toro, I.; Delsinne, T.; Diaz, M.; Donoso, D. A.; Ellison, A. M.; Enríquez, M. L.; Fayle, Tom Maurice; Feener, D. H.; Fisher, B. L.; Fisher, R. N.; Fitzpatrick, M. C.; Gómez, C.; Gotelli, N. J.; Gove, A.; Grasso, D. A.; Groc, S.; Guenard, B.; Gunawardene, N.; Heterick, B.; Hoffmann, B.; Janda, Milan; Jenkins, C.; Kaspari, M.; Klimeš, Petr; Lach, L.; Laeger, T.; Lattke, J.; Leponce, M.; Lessard, J.-P.; Longino, J.; Lucky, A.; Luke, S. H.; Majer, J.; McGlynn, T. P.; Menke, S.; Mezger, D.; Mori, A.; Moses, Jimmy; Munyai, T. C.; Pacheco, R.; Paknia, O.; Pearce-Duvet, J.; Pfeiffer, M.; Philpott, S. M.; Resasco, J.; Retana, J.; Silva, R. R.; Sorger, M. D.; Souza, J.; Suarez, A.; Tista, M.; Vasconcelos, H. L.; Vonshak, M.; Weisser, M. D.; Yates, M.; Parr, C. L.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 98, č. 3 (2017), s. 883-884 ISSN 0012-9658 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36098G; GA ČR GAP505/12/2467; GA ČR GPP505/12/P875 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : abundance * ants * database Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Ecology Impact factor: 4.809, year: 2016 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ecy.1682/abstract

  11. Uranium abundance in some sudanese phosphate ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, A.A.; Eltayeb, M.A.H.

    2009-01-01

    This work was carried out mainly to analysis of some Sudanese phosphate ores, for their uranium abundance and total phosphorus content measured as P 2 O 5 %. For this purpose, 30 samples of two types of phosphate ore from Eastern Nuba Mountains, in Sudan namely, Kurun and Uro areas were examined. In addition, the relationship between uranium and major, and trace elements were obtained, also, the natural radioactivity of the phosphate samples was measured, in order to characterize and differentiate between the two types of phosphate ores. The uranium abundance in Uro phosphate with 20.3% P 2 O 5 is five time higher than in Kurun phosphate with 26.7% P 2 O 5 . The average of uranium content was found to be 56.6 and 310 mg/kg for Kurun and Uro phosphate ore, respectively. The main elements in Kurun and Uro phosphate ore are silicon, aluminum, and phosphorus, while the most abundant trace elements in these two ores are titanium, strontium and barium. Pearson correlation coefficient revealed that uranium in Kurun phosphate shows strong positive correlation with P 2 O 5 , and its distribution is essentially controlled by the variations of P2O5 concentration, whereas uranium in Uro phosphate shows strong positive correlation with strontium, and its distribution is controlled by the variations of Sr concentration. Uranium behaves in different ways in Kurun phosphate and in Uro phosphate. Uro phosphate shows higher concentrations of all the estimated radionuclides than Kurun phosphate. According to the obtained results, it can be concluded that Uro phosphate is consider as secondary uranium source, and is more suitable for uranium recovery, because it has high uranium abundance and low P 2 O 5 %, than Kurun phosphate. (authors) [es

  12. Nitrous Oxide Production by Abundant Benthic Macrofauna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stief, Peter; Schramm, Andreas

    screened more than 20 macrofauna species for nitrous oxide production and identified filter-feeders and deposit-feeders that occur ubiquitously and at high abundance (e.g., chironomids, ephemeropterans, snails, and mussels) as the most important emitters of nitrous oxide. In contrast, predatory species...... and temperature. Given the increasing nitrate pollution of freshwater ecosystems, the collective gut of benthic macrofauna might constitute an increasingly important yet hitherto overlooked link in the global nitrous oxide budget....

  13. Modulation of Specific Sensory Cortical Areas by Segregated Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Neurons Demonstrated by Neuronal Tracing and Optogenetic Stimulation in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves-Coira, Irene; Barros-Zulaica, Natali; Rodrigo-Angulo, Margarita; Núñez, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    Neocortical cholinergic activity plays a fundamental role in sensory processing and cognitive functions. Previous results have suggested a refined anatomical and functional topographical organization of basal forebrain (BF) projections that may control cortical sensory processing in a specific manner. We have used retrograde anatomical procedures to demonstrate the existence of specific neuronal groups in the BF involved in the control of specific sensory cortices. Fluoro-Gold (FlGo) and Fast Blue (FB) fluorescent retrograde tracers were deposited into the primary somatosensory (S1) and primary auditory (A1) cortices in mice. Our results revealed that the BF is a heterogeneous area in which neurons projecting to different cortical areas are segregated into different neuronal groups. Most of the neurons located in the horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca (HDB) projected to the S1 cortex, indicating that this area is specialized in the sensory processing of tactile stimuli. However, the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (B) nucleus shows a similar number of cells projecting to the S1 as to the A1 cortices. In addition, we analyzed the cholinergic effects on the S1 and A1 cortical sensory responses by optogenetic stimulation of the BF neurons in urethane-anesthetized transgenic mice. We used transgenic mice expressing the light-activated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2, tagged with a fluorescent protein (ChR2-YFP) under the control of the choline-acetyl transferase promoter (ChAT). Cortical evoked potentials were induced by whisker deflections or by auditory clicks. According to the anatomical results, optogenetic HDB stimulation induced more extensive facilitation of tactile evoked potentials in S1 than auditory evoked potentials in A1, while optogenetic stimulation of the B nucleus facilitated either tactile or auditory evoked potentials equally. Consequently, our results suggest that cholinergic projections to the cortex are organized into segregated

  14. Kv2.2: a novel molecular target to study the role of basal forebrain GABAergic neurons in the sleep-wake cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermanstyne, Tracey O; Subedi, Kalpana; Le, Wei Wei; Hoffman, Gloria E; Meredith, Andrea L; Mong, Jessica A; Misonou, Hiroaki

    2013-12-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) has been implicated as an important brain region that regulates the sleep-wake cycle of animals. Gamma-aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) neurons are the most predominant neuronal population within this region. However, due to the lack of specific molecular tools, the roles of the BF GABAergic neurons have not been fully elucidated. Previously, we have found high expression levels of the Kv2.2 voltage-gated potassium channel on approximately 60% of GABAergic neurons in the magnocellular preoptic area and horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca of the BF and therefore proposed it as a potential molecular target to study this neuronal population. In this study, we sought to determine the functional roles of the Kv2.2-expressing neurons in the regulation of the sleep-wake cycle. Sleep analysis between two genotypes and within each genotype before and after sleep deprivation. Animal sleep research laboratory. Adult mice. Wild-type and Kv2.2 knockout mice with C57/BL6 background. EEG/EMG recordings from the basal state and after sleep-deprivation which was induced by mild agitation for 6 h. Immunostaining of a marker of neuronal activity indicates that these Kv2.2-expressing neurons appear to be preferentially active during the wake state. Therefore, we tested whether Kv2.2-expressing neurons in the BF are involved in arousal using Kv2.2-deficient mice. BF GABAergic neurons exhibited augmented expression of c-Fos. These knockout mice exhibited longer consolidated wake bouts than wild-type littermates, and that phenotype was further exacerbated by sleep deprivation. Moreover, in-depth analyses of their cortical electroencephalogram revealed a significant decrease in the delta-frequency activity during the nonrapid eye movement sleep state. These results revealed the significance of Kv2.2-expressing neurons in the regulation of the sleep-wake cycle.

  15. Long-term basal forebrain cholinergic-rich grafts derived from trisomy 16 mice do not develop beta-amyloid pathology and neurodegeneration but demonstrate neuroinflammatory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, T; Goldammer, A; Luschekina, E; Beck, M; Schliebs, R; Bigl, V

    1998-01-01

    Patients with Down syndrome (human trisomy 21) develop neuropathological and cholinergic functional defects characteristic of Alzheimer's disease, which has been attributed to the location of the Alzheimer beta-amyloid precursor protein on chromosome 21. Due to the partial genetic homology between mouse chromosome 16 and human chromosome 21, murine trisomy 16 was used as a model to study functional links between increased expression of the amyloid precursor protein, neurodegeneration and neuroinflammatory responses. Basal forebrain cholinergic-rich tissue derived from trisomy 16 mice at embryonic age of day 16 was transplanted into the lateral ventricle of adult normal mice. At 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after transplantation, the grafts were characterized by immunocytochemistry, molecular biological analysis, and stereological methods. Grafts survived up to one year and still demonstrated immunoreactivity for cholinergic, GABAergic and astroglial cells. Though a 1.5-fold neuronal over-expression of amyloid precursor protein was detected in brains from trisomy 16 embryos by Northern analysis, beta-amyloid deposits were found neither in control nor trisomic grafts. Detailed stereological analysis of trisomic grafts did not reveal any neurodegeneration or morphological changes of cholinergic and GABAergic neurons during the course of graft maturation up to one year, as compared to grafts derived from euploid tissue. However, both euploid and trisomic grafts demonstrated a strong infiltration with T- and B-lymphocytes and a significant micro- and astroglial activation (hypertrophic astrocytes) within and around the grafts. These observations further suggest that the trisomy 16-induced neurodegeneration is seemingly due to a lack of neuron supporting factors which are provided by either the metabolic interaction of trisomic graft with surrounding healthy host tissue or by cells of the immune system infiltrating the graft.

  16. Dysfunctional Sensory Modalities, Locus Coeruleus, and Basal Forebrain: Early Determinants that Promote Neuropathogenesis of Cognitive and Memory Decline and Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daulatzai, Mak Adam

    2016-10-01

    Sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder. It is essential to unravel its etiology and pathogenesis. This should enable us to study the presymptomatic stages of the disease and to analyze and reverse the antemortem behavioral, memory, and cognitive dysfunction. Prima facie, an ongoing chronic vulnerability involving neural insult may lead normal elderly to mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and then to AD. Development of effective preventive and therapeutic strategies to thwart the disease pathology obviously requires a thorough delineation of underlying disruptive neuropathological processes. Our sensory capacity for touch, smell, taste, hearing, and vision declines with advancing age. Declines in different sensory attributes are considered here to be the primary "first-tier pathologies." Olfactory loss is among the first clinical signs of neurodegenerative diseases including AD and Parkinson's disease (PD). Sensory dysfunction in the aged promotes pathological disturbances in the locus coeruleus, basal forebrain, entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, and several key areas of neocortex and brainstem. Hence, sensory dysfunction is the pivotal factor that may upregulate cognitive and memory dysfunction. The age-related constellation of comorbid pathological factors may include apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype, obesity, diabetes, hypertension, alcohol abuse, head trauma, and obstructive sleep apnea. The concepts and trajectories delineated here are the dynamic pillars of the current hypothesis presented-it postulates that the sensory decline, in conjunction with the above pathologies, is crucial in triggering neurodegeneration and promoting cognitive/memory dysfunction in aging and AD. The application of this thesis can be important in formulating new multifactorial preventive and treatment strategies (suggested here) in order to attenuate cognitive and memory decline and ameliorate pathological dysfunction in aging, MCI, and AD.

  17. Detergent-dependent separation of postsynaptic density, membrane rafts and other subsynaptic structures from the synaptic plasma membrane of rat forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, LiYing; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Tatsuo

    2014-10-01

    We systematically investigated the purification process of post-synaptic density (PSD) and post-synaptic membrane rafts (PSRs) from the rat forebrain synaptic plasma membranes by examining the components and the structures of the materials obtained after the treatment of synaptic plasma membranes with TX-100, n-octyl β-d-glucoside (OG) or 3-([3-cholamidopropyl]dimethylammonio)-2-hydroxy-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPSO). These three detergents exhibited distinct separation profiles for the synaptic subdomains. Type I and type II PSD proteins displayed mutually exclusive distribution. After TX-100 treatment, type I PSD was recovered in two fractions: a pellet and an insoluble fraction 8, which contained partially broken PSD-PSR complexes. Conventional PSD was suggested to be a mixture of these two PSD pools and did not contain type II PSD. An association of type I PSD with PSRs was identified in the TX-100 treatment, and those with type II PSD in the OG and CHAPSO treatments. An association of GABA receptors with gephyrin was easily dissociated. OG at a high concentration solubilized the type I PSD proteins. CHAPSO treatment resulted in a variety of distinct fractions, which contained certain novel structures. Two different pools of GluA, either PSD or possibly raft-associated, were identified in the OG and CHAPSO treatments. These results are useful in advancing our understanding of the structural organization of synapses at the molecular level. We systematically investigated the purification process of post-synaptic density (PSD) and synaptic membrane rafts by examining the structures obtained after treatment of the SPMs with TX-100, n-octyl β-d-glucoside or CHAPSO. Differential distribution of type I and type II PSD, synaptic membrane rafts, and other novel subdomains in the SPM give clues to understand the structural organization of synapses at the molecular level. © 2014 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  18. Overexpression of Mineralocorticoid Receptors in the Mouse Forebrain Partly Alleviates the Effects of Chronic Early Life Stress on Spatial Memory, Neurogenesis and Synaptic Function in the Dentate Gyrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Kanatsou

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Evidence from human studies suggests that high expression of brain mineralocorticoid receptors (MR may promote resilience against negative consequences of stress exposure, including childhood trauma. We examined, in mice, whether brain MR overexpression can alleviate the effects of chronic early life stress (ELS on contextual memory formation under low and high stress conditions, and neurogenesis and synaptic function of dentate gyrus granular cells. Male mice were exposed to ELS by housing the dam with limited nesting and bedding material from postnatal day (PND 2 to 9. We investigated the moderating role of MRs by using forebrain-specific transgenic MR overexpression (MR-tg mice. Low-stress contextual (i.e., object relocation memory formation was hampered by ELS in wildtype but not MR-tg mice. Anxiety like behavior and high-stress contextual (i.e., fear memory formation were unaffected by ELS and/or MR expression level. At the cellular level, an interaction effect was observed between ELS and MR overexpression on the number of doublecortin-positive cells, with a significant difference between the wildtype ELS and MR-tg ELS groups. No interaction was found regarding Ki-67 and BrdU staining. A significant interaction between ELS and MR expression was further observed with regard to mEPSCs and mIPSC frequency. The ratio of evoked EPSC/IPSC or NMDA/AMPA responses was unaffected. Overall, these results suggest that ELS affects contextual memory formation under low stress conditions as well as neurogenesis and synaptic transmission in dentate granule cells, an effect that can be alleviated by MR-overexpression.

  19. Modulation of specific sensory cortical areas by segregated basal forebrain cholinergic neurons demonstrated by neuronal tracing and optogenetic stimulation in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene eChaves-Coira

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Neocortical cholinergic activity plays a fundamental role in sensory processing and cognitive functions. Previous results have suggested a refined anatomical and functional topographical organization of basal forebrain (BF projections that may control cortical sensory processing in a specific manner. We have used retrograde anatomical procedures to demonstrate the existence of specific neuronal groups in the BF involved in the control of specific sensory cortices. Fluoro-gold and Fast Blue fluorescent retrograde tracers were deposited into the primary somatosensory (S1 and primary auditory (A1 cortices in mice. Our results revealed that the BF is a heterogeneous area in which neurons projecting to different cortical areas are segregated into different neuronal groups. Most of the neurons located in the horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca (HDB projected to the S1 cortex, indicating that this area is specialized in the sensory processing of tactile stimuli. However, the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (B nucleus shows a similar number of cells projecting to the S1 as to the A1 cortices. In addition, we analyzed the cholinergic effects on the S1 and A1 cortical sensory responses by optogenetic stimulation of the BF neurons in urethane-anesthetized transgenic mice. We used transgenic mice expressing the light-activated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2, tagged with a fluorescent protein (ChR2-YFP under the control of the choline-acetyl transferase promoter (ChAT. Cortical evoked potentials were induced by whisker deflections or by auditory clicks. According to the anatomical results, optogenetic HDB stimulation induced more extensive facilitation of tactile evoked potentials in S1 than auditory evoked potentials in A1, while optogenetic stimulation of the B nucleus facilitated either tactile or auditory evoked potentials equally. Consequently, our results suggest that cholinergic projections to the cortex are organized into segregated

  20. Prostaglandins compromise basal forebrain cholinergic neuron differentiation and survival: action at EP1/3 receptors results in AIF-induced death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonakait, G Miller; Ni, Li

    2009-08-18

    Activated microglia produce a factor or cocktail of factors that promotes cholinergic neuronal differentiation of undifferentiated precursors in the embryonic basal forebrain (BF) in vitro. To determine whether microglial prostaglandins mediate this action, microglia were stimulated in the presence of the cyclooxygenase inhibitor ibuprofen, and microglial conditioned medium (CM) was used to culture rat BF precursors at embryonic day 15. Choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) activity served as a measure of cholinergic differentiation. While inhibition of prostaglandin biosynthesis did not affect the ability of microglial CM to promote ChAT activity, treatment of microglia with prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) inhibited it. Agonists of E prostanoid receptors EP2 (butaprost) and EP1/3 (sulprostone) mimicked PGE2, while misoprostol (E1-4) actually enhanced the action of CM. PGE2 added directly to BF cultures together with microglial CM also inhibited ChAT activity. While BF cultures expressed all four prostanoid receptors, direct addition of sulprostone but not butaprost mimicked PGE2, suggesting that PGE2 engaged EP1/3 receptors in the BF. Neither PKA inhibition by H89 nor cAMP induction by forskolin or dibutyrl-cAMP altered the action of sulprostone. Sulprostone severely compromised ChAT activity, dendrite number, axonal length and axonal branching, but caspase inhibition did not restore these. However, sulprostone resulted in increased staining intensity and nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) suggesting caspase-independent cell death. We have found that PGE2 action at microglial EP2 receptors inhibits the microglial production of the cholinergic differentiating cocktail, while action at neuronal EP3 receptors has a deleterious effect on cholinergic neurons causing neurite retraction and cell death.

  1. [REACTIVE CHANGES IN THE ASTROCYTES OF FOREBRAIN NUCLEUS ACCUMBENS AFTER RESTRICTION OF BLOOD FLOW IN THE BASIN OF BOTH COMMON CAROTID ARTERIES IN RATS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumov, N G

    2016-01-01

    Reactive changes of astrocytes were studied in forebrain nucleus accumbens in rats (n = 12) after global cerebral ischemia induced by bilateral occlusion of both common carotid arteries, which is a frequently used model to assess the effectiveness of pharmacological agents that have anti-ischemic and neuroprotective properties. Under these conditions, the nucleus accumbens was in the area of partial ischemia. Morphometric study of nucleus accumbens was performed in three groups of rats (4 animals in each group) after ligation of both common carotid arteries, after a sham operation and in healthy animals. Astrocytes were demonstrated in serial sections using the reaction to glial fibrillary acidic protein counterstained with hematoxylin. 7 days after the surgery, in each animal the number of astrocytes was counted in the sections in 7 successiive squares of 0.01 mm2 each, the distance between their bodies and the capillary wall was measured within the circle of 20 μm radius, the cell body area and the length of their main processes were determined. It is found that astrocytes in the nucleus accumbens in the model of bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries for 7 days experienced a partial state of ischemia. Their reactive changes were manifested by the signs of the cytotoxic edema, damaging intermediate filament proteins in their bodies, processes and in the perivascular glial membranes. The concentration of the astrocyte cell bodies near blood capillaries is the adaptation mechanism and is a condition for the survival of cells under the restriction of blood flow in the brain.

  2. Frequentie en oorzaak van onverwachte allergische reacties op voedsel [Frequency and cause of unexpected allergic reactions to food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michelsen-Huisman, A.D.; Os-Medendorp, H. van; Versluis, A.; Kruizinga, A.G.; Castenmiller, J.J.M.; Noteborn, H.P.J.M.; Houben, G.F.; Knulst, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    Unexpected reactions occur in patients with food allergy, but frequency data are scare. This prospective study investigates the frequency, severity and causes of unexpected allergic reactions to food in adults with a doctor's diagnosed food allergy. Participants complete an online questionnaire

  3. The primordial helium abundance from updated emissivities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aver, Erik; Olive, Keith A.; Skillman, Evan D.; Porter, R.L.

    2013-01-01

    Observations of metal-poor extragalactic H II regions allow the determination of the primordial helium abundance, Y p . The He I emissivities are the foundation of the model of the H II region's emission. Porter, Ferland, Storey, and Detisch (2012) have recently published updated He I emissivities based on improved photoionization cross-sections. We incorporate these new atomic data and update our recent Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis of the dataset published by Izotov, Thuan, and Stasi'nska (2007). As before, cuts are made to promote quality and reliability, and only solutions which fit the data within 95% confidence level are used to determine the primordial He abundance. The previously qualifying dataset is almost entirely retained and with strong concordance between the physical parameters. Overall, an upward bias from the new emissivities leads to a decrease in Y p . In addition, we find a general trend to larger uncertainties in individual objects (due to changes in the emissivities) and an increased variance (due to additional objects included). From a regression to zero metallicity, we determine Y p = 0.2465 ± 0.0097, in good agreement with the BBN result, Y p = 0.2485 ± 0.0002, based on the Planck determination of the baryon density. In the future, a better understanding of why a large fraction of spectra are not well fit by the model will be crucial to achieving an increase in the precision of the primordial helium abundance determination

  4. Abundance ratios in dwarf elliptical galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şen, Ş.; Peletier, R. F.; Boselli, A.; den Brok, M.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Hensler, G.; Janz, J.; Laurikainen, E.; Lisker, T.; Mentz, J. J.; Paudel, S.; Salo, H.; Sybilska, A.; Toloba, E.; van de Ven, G.; Vazdekis, A.; Yesilyaprak, C.

    2018-04-01

    We determine abundance ratios of 37 dwarf ellipticals (dEs) in the nearby Virgo cluster. This sample is representative of the early-type population of galaxies in the absolute magnitude range -19.0 index-index diagrams and scaling relations and use the stellar population models to interpret them. We present ages, metallicities, and abundance ratios obtained from these dEs within an aperture size of Re/8. We calculate [Na/Fe] from NaD, [Ca/Fe] from Ca4227, and [Mg/Fe] from Mgb. We find that [Na/Fe] is underabundant with respect to solar, whereas [Mg/Fe] is around solar. This is exactly opposite to what is found for giant ellipticals, but follows the trend with metallicity found previously for the Fornax dwarf NGC 1396. We discuss possible formation scenarios that can result in such elemental abundance patterns, and we speculate that dEs have disc-like star formation history (SFH) favouring them to originate from late-type dwarfs or small spirals. Na-yields appear to be very metal-dependent, in agreement with studies of giant ellipticals, probably due to the large dependence on the neutron-excess in stars. We conclude that dEs have undergone a considerable amount of chemical evolution, they are therefore not uniformly old, but have extended SFH, similar to many of the Local Group galaxies.

  5. 2015-2016 Palila abundance estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Richard J.; Brinck, Kevin W.; Banko, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    The palila (Loxioides bailleui) population was surveyed annually during 1998−2016 on Mauna Kea Volcano to determine abundance, population trend, and spatial distribution. In the latest surveys, the 2015 population was estimated at 852−1,406 birds (point estimate: 1,116) and the 2016 population was estimated at 1,494−2,385 (point estimate: 1,934). Similar numbers of palila were detected during the first and subsequent counts within each year during 2012−2016; the proportion of the total annual detections in each count ranged from 46% to 56%; and there was no difference in the detection probability due to count sequence. Furthermore, conducting repeat counts improved the abundance estimates by reducing the width of the confidence intervals between 9% and 32% annually. This suggests that multiple counts do not affect bird or observer behavior and can be continued in the future to improve the precision of abundance estimates. Five palila were detected on supplemental survey stations in the Ka‘ohe restoration area, outside the core survey area but still within Palila Critical Habitat (one in 2015 and four in 2016), suggesting that palila are present in habitat that is recovering from cattle grazing on the southwest slope. The average rate of decline during 1998−2016 was 150 birds per year. Over the 18-year monitoring period, the estimated rate of change equated to a 58% decline in the population.

  6. BOND: Bayesian Oxygen and Nitrogen abundance Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale Asari, N.; Stasinska, G.; Morisset, C.; Cid Fernandes, R.

    2018-01-01

    BOND determines oxygen and nitrogen abundances in giant H II regions by comparison with a large grid of photoionization models. The grid spans a wide range in O/H, N/O and ionization parameter U, and covers different starburst ages and nebular geometries. Unlike other statistical methods, BOND relies on the [Ar III]/[Ne III] emission line ratio to break the oxygen abundance bimodality. By doing so, it can measure oxygen and nitrogen abundances without assuming any a priori relation between N/O and O/H. BOND takes into account changes in the hardness of the ionizing radiation field, which can come about due to the ageing of H II regions or the stochastically sampling of the IMF. The emission line ratio He I/Hβ, in addition to commonly used strong lines, constrains the hardness of the ionizing radiation field. BOND relies on the emission line ratios [O III]/Hβ, [O II]/Hβ and [N II]/Hβ, [Ar III]/Hβ, [Ne III]/Hβ, He I/Hβ as its input parameters, while its output values are the measurements and uncertainties for O/H and N/O.

  7. Abundance of boron in Vega and Sirius

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Praderie, F.; Boesgaard, A.M.; Milliard, B.; Pitois, M.L.

    1977-01-01

    High-resolution (0.05 A) observations of the region of the B II resonance line (1362 A) have been made of Vega (AO V) and Sirius (Al V) with the Copernicus satellite. A strong B II feature is present in Vega, but only a weak line, due primarily to V III, is present is Sirius. An upper limit of B/H -12 is derived for Sirius from line-profile fitting. A local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) synthesis of the B II blend in Vega results in an abundance ratio B/H=1 x 10 -10 . Calculations of the effects of non--LTE on the line profile show that the LTE abundance would not be increased by more than 50% (B.H=1.5 x 10 -10 ) to account for departures from LTE. The B content of Vega probably represents the cosmic B abundance. The B deficiency in Sirius could result from interaction with the white-dwarf companion at an earlier stage in its evolution or from diffusion processes in the Sirius atmosphere.Difficult observations at 0.10 A resolution of subordinate lines from multiplet (3) of B II at 1624 A show that those lines are not present in Sirius; but the identification of B in Vega appears to be confirmed by the presence of weak lines at 1624 A in this star

  8. A global database of ant species abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibb, Heloise; Dunn, Rob R.; Sanders, Nathan J.; Grossman, Blair F.; Photakis, Manoli; Abril, Silvia; Agosti, Donat; Andersen, Alan N.; Angulo, Elena; Armbrecht, Ingre; Arnan, Xavier; Baccaro, Fabricio B.; Bishop, Tom R.; Boulay, Raphael; Bruhl, Carsten; Castracani, Cristina; Cerda, Xim; Del Toro, Israel; Delsinne, Thibaut; Diaz, Mireia; Donoso, David A.; Ellison, Aaron M.; Enriquez, Martha L.; Fayle, Tom M.; Feener Jr., Donald H.; Fisher, Brian L.; Fisher, Robert N.; Fitpatrick, Matthew C.; Gomez, Cristanto; Gotelli, Nicholas J.; Gove, Aaron; Grasso, Donato A.; Groc, Sarah; Guenard, Benoit; Gunawardene, Nihara; Heterick, Brian; Hoffmann, Benjamin; Janda, Milan; Jenkins, Clinton; Kaspari, Michael; Klimes, Petr; Lach, Lori; Laeger, Thomas; Lattke, John; Leponce, Maurice; Lessard, Jean-Philippe; Longino, John; Lucky, Andrea; Luke, Sarah H.; Majer, Jonathan; McGlynn, Terrence P.; Menke, Sean; Mezger, Dirk; Mori, Alessandra; Moses, Jimmy; Munyai, Thinandavha Caswell; Pacheco, Renata; Paknia, Omid; Pearce-Duvet, Jessica; Pfeiffer, Martin; Philpott, Stacy M.; Resasco, Julian; Retana, Javier; Silva, Rogerio R.; Sorger, Magdalena D.; Souza, Jorge; Suarez, Andrew V.; Tista, Melanie; Vasconcelos, Heraldo L.; Vonshak, Merav; Weiser, Michael D.; Yates, Michelle; Parr, Catherine L.

    2017-01-01

    What forces structure ecological assemblages? A key limitation to general insights about assemblage structure is the availability of data that are collected at a small spatial grain (local assemblages) and a large spatial extent (global coverage). Here, we present published and unpublished data from 51,388 ant abundance and occurrence records of more than 2693 species and 7953 morphospecies from local assemblages collected at 4212 locations around the world. Ants were selected because they are diverse and abundant globally, comprise a large fraction of animal biomass in most terrestrial communities, and are key contributors to a range of ecosystem functions. Data were collected between 1949 and 2014, and include, for each geo-referenced sampling site, both the identity of the ants collected and details of sampling design, habitat type and degree of disturbance. The aim of compiling this dataset was to provide comprehensive species abundance data in order to test relationships between assemblage structure and environmental and biogeographic factors. Data were collected using a variety of standardised methods, such as pitfall and Winkler traps, and will be valuable for studies investigating large-scale forces structuring local assemblages. Understanding such relationships is particularly critical under current rates of global change. We encourage authors holding additional data on systematically collected ant assemblages, especially those in dry and cold, and remote areas, to contact us and contribute their data to this growing dataset.

  9. Elemental abundances of solar sibling candidates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramírez, I.; Lambert, D. L.; Endl, M.; Cochran, W. D.; MacQueen, P. J. [McDonald Observatory and Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, Texas 78712-1205 (United States); Bajkova, A. T.; Bobylev, V. V. [Central (Pulkovo) Astronomical Observatory of RAS, 65/1, Pulkovskoye Chaussee, St. Petersburg 196140 (Russian Federation); Roederer, I. U. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Wittenmyer, R. A. [School of Physics, UNSW Australia, Sydney 2052 (Australia)

    2014-06-01

    Dynamical information along with survey data on metallicity and in some cases age have been used recently by some authors to search for candidates of stars that were born in the cluster where the Sun formed. We have acquired high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectra for 30 of these objects to determine, using detailed elemental abundance analysis, if they could be true solar siblings. Only two of the candidates are found to have solar chemical composition. Updated modeling of the stars' past orbits in a realistic Galactic potential reveals that one of them, HD 162826, satisfies both chemical and dynamical conditions for being a sibling of the Sun. Measurements of rare-element abundances for this star further confirm its solar composition, with the only possible exception of Sm. Analysis of long-term high-precision radial velocity data rules out the presence of hot Jupiters and confirms that this star is not in a binary system. We find that chemical tagging does not necessarily benefit from studying as many elements as possible but instead from identifying and carefully measuring the abundances of those elements that show large star-to-star scatter at a given metallicity. Future searches employing data products from ongoing massive astrometric and spectroscopic surveys can be optimized by acknowledging this fact.

  10. The primordial helium abundance from updated emissivities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aver, Erik; Olive, Keith A.; Porter, R. L.; Skillman, Evan D.

    2013-11-01

    Observations of metal-poor extragalactic H II regions allow the determination of the primordial helium abundance, Yp. The He I emissivities are the foundation of the model of the H II region's emission. Porter, Ferland, Storey, & Detisch (2012) have recently published updated He I emissivities based on improved photoionization cross-sections. We incorporate these new atomic data and update our recent Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis of the dataset published by Izotov, Thuan, & Stasi'nska (2007). As before, cuts are made to promote quality and reliability, and only solutions which fit the data within 95% confidence level are used to determine the primordial He abundance. The previously qualifying dataset is almost entirely retained and with strong concordance between the physical parameters. Overall, an upward bias from the new emissivities leads to a decrease in Yp. In addition, we find a general trend to larger uncertainties in individual objects (due to changes in the emissivities) and an increased variance (due to additional objects included). From a regression to zero metallicity, we determine Yp = 0.2465 ± 0.0097, in good agreement with the BBN result, Yp = 0.2485 ± 0.0002, based on the Planck determination of the baryon density. In the future, a better understanding of why a large fraction of spectra are not well fit by the model will be crucial to achieving an increase in the precision of the primordial helium abundance determination.

  11. Abundant Solar Nebula Solids in Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Nguyen, A. N.; Clemett, S.

    2016-01-01

    Comets have been proposed to consist of unprocessed interstellar materials together with a variable amount of thermally annealed interstellar grains. Recent studies of cometary solids in the laboratory have shown that comets instead consist of a wide range of materials from across the protoplanetary disk, in addition to a minor complement of interstellar materials. These advances were made possible by the return of direct samples of comet 81P/Wild 2 coma dust by the NASA Stardust mission and recent advances in microscale analytical techniques. Isotopic studies of 'cometary' chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) and comet 81P/Wild 2 Stardust samples show that preserved interstellar materials are more abundant in comets than in any class of meteorite. Identified interstellar materials include sub-micron-sized presolar silicates, oxides, and SiC dust grains and some fraction of the organic material that binds the samples together. Presolar grain abundances reach 1 weight percentage in the most stardust-rich CP-IDPs, 50 times greater than in meteorites. Yet, order of magnitude variations in presolar grain abundances among CP-IDPs suggest cometary solids experienced significant variations in the degree of processing in the solar nebula. Comets contain a surprisingly high abundance of nebular solids formed or altered at high temperatures. Comet 81P/Wild 2 samples include 10-40 micron-sized, refractory Ca- Al-rich inclusion (CAI)-, chondrule-, and ameboid olivine aggregate (AOA)-like materials. The O isotopic compositions of these refractory materials are remarkably similar to their meteoritic counterparts, ranging from 5 percent enrichments in (sup 16) O to near-terrestrial values. Comet 81P/Wild 2 and CP-IDPs also contain abundant Mg-Fe crystalline and amorphous silicates whose O isotopic compositions are also consistent with Solar System origins. Unlike meteorites, that are dominated by locally-produced materials, comets appear to be composed of

  12. Incidentally found and unexpected tumors discovered by MRI examination for temporomandibular joint arthrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagi, Yoshinobu; Asaumi, Jun-ichi; Maki, Yuu; Murakami, Jun; Hisatomi, Miki; Matsuzaki, Hidenobu; Konouchi, Hironobu; Honda, Yosutoshi; Kishi, Kanji

    2003-01-01

    We examined the frequency of incidentally found or unexpected tumors discovered at the time of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) region for patients with suspicion of TMJ arthrosis. Five MR images (T1-weighted transverse scout image and proton density and T2-weighted oblique sagittal images at the open and closed mouth) were acquired. In 2776 MRI examinations of TMJ arthrosis, two tumors were discovered. They consisted of an adenoid cystic carcinoma in the deep portion of the parotid gland, and a malignant tumor extending from the infratemporal fossa to the parapharyngeal space. The rate of incidentally founded or unexpected tumors in TMJ examinations was low (0.072%), but the two tumors found were malignant tumors, and therefore, scout image should be carefully examined, not only used for positing the slice

  13. Incidentally found and unexpected tumors discovered by MRI examination for temporomandibular joint arthrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagi, Yoshinobu; Asaumi, Jun-ichi E-mail: asaumi@md.okayama-u.ac.jp; Maki, Yuu; Murakami, Jun; Hisatomi, Miki; Matsuzaki, Hidenobu; Konouchi, Hironobu; Honda, Yosutoshi; Kishi, Kanji

    2003-07-01

    We examined the frequency of incidentally found or unexpected tumors discovered at the time of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) region for patients with suspicion of TMJ arthrosis. Five MR images (T1-weighted transverse scout image and proton density and T2-weighted oblique sagittal images at the open and closed mouth) were acquired. In 2776 MRI examinations of TMJ arthrosis, two tumors were discovered. They consisted of an adenoid cystic carcinoma in the deep portion of the parotid gland, and a malignant tumor extending from the infratemporal fossa to the parapharyngeal space. The rate of incidentally founded or unexpected tumors in TMJ examinations was low (0.072%), but the two tumors found were malignant tumors, and therefore, scout image should be carefully examined, not only used for positing the slice.

  14. Openness to the unexpected: Our Pathways to Careers in a Federal Research Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Kurt R.; Bunnell, David B.; Hondorp, Darryl W.; Taylor, William W.; Lynch, Abigail J.; Léonard, Nancy J.

    2014-01-01

    Many fisheries professionals may not be in the job they originally envisioned for themselves when they began their undergraduate studies. Rather, their current positions could be the result of unexpected, opportunistic, or perhaps even “lucky” open doors that led them down an unexpected path. In many cases, a mentor helped facilitate the unforeseen trajectory. We offer three unique stories about joining a federal fisheries research laboratory, from the perspective of a scientist, a joint manager-scientist, and a manager. We also use our various experiences to form recommendations that should help the next generation of fisheries professionals succeed in any stop along their journey, including being open to opportunities, setting high expectations, and finding a strong and supportive team environment to work in.

  15. Stress-induced changes in the expression of the clock protein PERIOD1 in the rat limbic forebrain and hypothalamus: role of stress type, time of day, and predictability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherin Al-Safadi

    Full Text Available Stressful events can disrupt circadian rhythms in mammals but mechanisms underlying this disruption remain largely unknown. One hypothesis is that stress alters circadian protein expression in the forebrain, leading to functional dysregulation of the brain circadian network and consequent disruption of circadian physiological and behavioral rhythms. Here we characterized the effects of several different stressors on the expression of the core clock protein, PER1 and the activity marker, FOS in select forebrain and hypothalamic nuclei in rats. We found that acute exposure to processive stressors, restraint and forced swim, elevated PER1 and FOS expression in the paraventricular and dorsomedial hypothalamic nuclei and piriform cortex but suppressed PER1 and FOS levels exclusively in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CEAl and oval nucleus of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNSTov. Conversely, systemic stressors, interleukin-1β and 2-Deoxy-D-glucose, increased PER1 and FOS levels in all regions studied, including the CEAl and BNSTov. PER1 levels in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN, the master pacemaker, were unaffected by any of the stress manipulations. The effect of stress on PER1 and FOS was modulated by time of day and, in the case of daily restraint, by predictability. These results demonstrate that the expression of PER1 in the forebrain is modulated by stress, consistent with the hypothesis that PER1 serves as a link between stress and the brain circadian network. Furthermore, the results show that the mechanisms that control PER1 and FOS expression in CEAl and BNSTov are uniquely sensitive to differences in the type of stressor. Finally, the finding that the effect of stress on PER1 parallels its effect on FOS supports the idea that Per1 functions as an immediate-early gene. Our observations point to a novel role for PER1 as a key player in the interface between stress and circadian rhythms.

  16. Spatial and temporal variability in coccolithophore abundance and distribution in the NW Iberian coastal upwelling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausín, Blanca; Zúñiga, Diana; Flores, Jose A.; Cavaleiro, Catarina; Froján, María; Villacieros-Robineau, Nicolás; Alonso-Pérez, Fernando; Arbones, Belén; Santos, Celia; de la Granda, Francisco; Castro, Carmen G.; Abrantes, Fátima; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Salgueiro, Emilia

    2018-01-01

    A systematic investigation of the spatial and temporal variability in coccolithophore abundance and distribution through the water column of the NW Iberian coastal upwelling system was performed. From July 2011 to June 2012, monthly sampling at various water depths was conducted at two parallel stations located at 42° N. Total coccosphere abundance was higher at the outer-shelf station, where warmer, nutrient-depleted waters favoured coccolithophore rather than phytoplanktonic diatom blooms, which are known to dominate the inner-shelf location. In seasonal terms, higher coccosphere and coccolith abundances were registered at both stations during upwelling seasons, coinciding with high irradiance levels. This was typically in conjunction with stratified, nutrient-poor conditions (i.e. relaxing upwelling conditions). However, it also occurred during some upwelling events of colder, nutrient-rich subsurface waters onto the continental shelf. Minimum abundances were generally found during downwelling periods, with unexpectedly high coccolith abundance registered in subsurface waters at the inner-shelf station. This finding can only be explained if strong storms during these downwelling periods favoured resuspension processes, thus remobilizing deposited coccoliths from surface sediments, and hence hampering the identification of autochthonous coccolithophore community structure. At both locations, the major coccolithophore assemblages were dominated by Emiliania huxleyi, small Gephyrocapsa group, Gephyrocapsa oceanica, Florisphaera profunda, Syracosphaera spp., Coronosphaera mediterranea, and Calcidiscus leptoporus. Ecological preferences of the different taxa were assessed by exploring the relationships between environmental conditions and temporal and vertical variability in coccosphere abundance. These findings provide relevant information for the use of fossil coccolith assemblages in marine sediment records, in order to infer past environmental conditions, of

  17. Spatial and temporal variability in coccolithophore abundance and distribution in the NW Iberian coastal upwelling system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ausín

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A systematic investigation of the spatial and temporal variability in coccolithophore abundance and distribution through the water column of the NW Iberian coastal upwelling system was performed. From July 2011 to June 2012, monthly sampling at various water depths was conducted at two parallel stations located at 42° N. Total coccosphere abundance was higher at the outer-shelf station, where warmer, nutrient-depleted waters favoured coccolithophore rather than phytoplanktonic diatom blooms, which are known to dominate the inner-shelf location. In seasonal terms, higher coccosphere and coccolith abundances were registered at both stations during upwelling seasons, coinciding with high irradiance levels. This was typically in conjunction with stratified, nutrient-poor conditions (i.e. relaxing upwelling conditions. However, it also occurred during some upwelling events of colder, nutrient-rich subsurface waters onto the continental shelf. Minimum abundances were generally found during downwelling periods, with unexpectedly high coccolith abundance registered in subsurface waters at the inner-shelf station. This finding can only be explained if strong storms during these downwelling periods favoured resuspension processes, thus remobilizing deposited coccoliths from surface sediments, and hence hampering the identification of autochthonous coccolithophore community structure. At both locations, the major coccolithophore assemblages were dominated by Emiliania huxleyi, small Gephyrocapsa group, Gephyrocapsa oceanica, Florisphaera profunda, Syracosphaera spp., Coronosphaera mediterranea, and Calcidiscus leptoporus. Ecological preferences of the different taxa were assessed by exploring the relationships between environmental conditions and temporal and vertical variability in coccosphere abundance. These findings provide relevant information for the use of fossil coccolith assemblages in marine sediment records, in order to infer past

  18. Unexpected island effects at an extreme: reduced Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA diversity in Nias

    OpenAIRE

    Oven, Mannis; Hämmerle, Johannes; Schoor, Marja; Kushnick, Geoff; Pennekamp, Petra; Zega, Idaman; Lao Grueso, Oscar; Brown, Lea; Kennerknecht, Ingo; Kayser, Manfred

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe amount of genetic diversity in a population is determined by demographic and selection events in its history. Human populations which exhibit greatly reduced overall genetic diversity, presumably resulting from severe bottlenecks or founder events, are particularly interesting, not least because of their potential to serve as valuable resources for health studies. Here, we present an unexpected case, the human population of Nias Island in Indonesia, that exhibits severely redu...

  19. Dynamic Asset Allocation Strategies Based on Volatility, Unexpected Volatility and Financial Turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Grimsrud, David Borkner

    2015-01-01

    Masteroppgave økonomi og administrasjon- Universitetet i Agder, 2015 This master thesis looks at unexpected volatility- and financial turbulence’s predictive ability, and exploit these measures of financial risk, together with volatility, to create three dynamic asset allocation strategies, and test if they can outperform a passive and naively diversified buy-and-hold strategy. The idea with the dynamic strategies is to increase the portfolio return by keeping the portfolio risk at a low a...

  20. An unexpected cause of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage in a kidney transplant patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlageter, Manuel; Jahn, Kathleen D; Tzankov, Alexandar; Wiese, Mark; Bubendorf, Lukas; Tamm, Michael; Savic, Spasenija

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a life-threatening condition requiring urgent treatment. There are many different treatment-relevant causes of DAH, making the diagnostic approach to these patients complex and necessitating a multidisciplinary team. We report the case of a kidney transplant recipient in whom all diagnostic efforts did not reveal the cause of DAH, and only autopsy was able to establish an unexpected diagnosis. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. On the unexpected oscillation of the total cross section for excitation in He2+ + H collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, D.R.; Reinhold, C.O.; Krstic, P.S.

    1996-01-01

    Recent calculations and measurements have revealed unexpected oscillations of the total cross section for excitation in low- to intermediate-energy He 2+ + H collisions. A physical explanation of this behavior is given here stemming from analysis of classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulations, molecular orbital close coupling calculations, and solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation on a numerical lattice. These results indicate that the observed behavior should be characteristic of a wide range of reactions in ion-atom collisions

  2. Cobalt-catalyzed hydrogenation of esters to alcohols: unexpected reactivity trend indicates ester enolate intermediacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srimani, Dipankar; Mukherjee, Arup; Goldberg, Alexander F G; Leitus, Gregory; Diskin-Posner, Yael; Shimon, Linda J W; Ben David, Yehoshoa; Milstein, David

    2015-10-12

    The atom-efficient and environmentally benign catalytic hydrogenation of carboxylic acid esters to alcohols has been accomplished in recent years mainly with precious-metal-based catalysts, with few exceptions. Presented here is the first cobalt-catalyzed hydrogenation of esters to the corresponding alcohols. Unexpectedly, the evidence indicates the unprecedented involvement of ester enolate intermediates. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Effects of unexpected chords and of performer's expression on brain responses and electrodermal activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Koelsch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is lack of neuroscientific studies investigating music processing with naturalistic stimuli, and brain responses to real music are, thus, largely unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study investigates event-related brain potentials (ERPs, skin conductance responses (SCRs and heart rate (HR elicited by unexpected chords of piano sonatas as they were originally arranged by composers, and as they were played by professional pianists. From the musical excerpts played by the pianists (with emotional expression, we also created versions without variations in tempo and loudness (without musical expression to investigate effects of musical expression on ERPs and SCRs. Compared to expected chords, unexpected chords elicited an early right anterior negativity (ERAN, reflecting music-syntactic processing and an N5 (reflecting processing of meaning information in the ERPs, as well as clear changes in the SCRs (reflecting that unexpected chords also elicited emotional responses. The ERAN was not influenced by emotional expression, whereas N5 potentials elicited by chords in general (regardless of their chord function differed between the expressive and the non-expressive condition. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results show that the neural mechanisms of music-syntactic processing operate independently of the emotional qualities of a stimulus, justifying the use of stimuli without emotional expression to investigate the cognitive processing of musical structure. Moreover, the data indicate that musical expression affects the neural mechanisms underlying the processing of musical meaning. Our data are the first to reveal influences of musical performance on ERPs and SCRs, and to show physiological responses to unexpected chords in naturalistic music.

  4. Unexpected massive hemorrhage following the removal of a pleural drainage tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Minako; Yoda, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    We herein describe a case in which a massive hemorrhage unexpectedly occurred after the removal of a pleural drainage tube which had been in place for five days. One possible explanation for that event was the damage of the intercostal artery during tube insertion into the thoracic cavity. This is an extremely rare but severe complication. Therefore, the present report provides useful information for physicians who treat patients with respiratory diseases.

  5. Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation of Tomato Elicits Unexpected Flower Phenotypes with Similar Gene Expression Profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yi-Hong; Campbell, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genetic transformation mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens is known to cause unexpected phenotypes. Mutations of a specific set of homeotic genes can result in altered floral structure. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Previously we identified two genes (LeTGA1 and SOLly GLB1) induced by nutrient availability in tomato. To further elucidate their function, we sought to knock out the genes using antisense RNAi. When antisense constructs for the two different tomato genes were each...

  6. Clustering dark energy and halo abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Ronaldo C.; Marra, Valerio

    2017-11-01

    Within the standard paradigm, dark energy is taken as a homogeneous fluid that drives the accelerated expansion of the universe and does not contribute to the mass of collapsed objects such as galaxies and galaxy clusters. The abundance of galaxy clusters—measured through a variety of channels—has been extensively used to constrain the normalization of the power spectrum: it is an important probe as it allows us to test if the standard ΛCDM model can indeed accurately describe the evolution of structures across billions of years. It is then quite significant that the Planck satellite has detected, via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, less clusters than expected according to the primary CMB anisotropies. One of the simplest generalizations that could reconcile these observations is to consider models in which dark energy is allowed to cluster, i.e., allowing its sound speed to vary. In this case, however, the standard methods to compute the abundance of galaxy clusters need to be adapted to account for the contributions of dark energy. In particular, we examine the case of clustering dark energy—a dark energy fluid with negligible sound speed—with a redshift-dependent equation of state. We carefully study how the halo mass function is modified in this scenario, highlighting corrections that have not been considered before in the literature. We address modifications in the growth function, collapse threshold, virialization densities and also changes in the comoving scale of collapse and mass function normalization. Our results show that clustering dark energy can impact halo abundances at the level of 10%-30%, depending on the halo mass, and that cluster counts are modified by about 30% at a redshift of unity.

  7. Experimental muscle pain challenges the postural stability during quiet stance and unexpected posture perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Rogério Pessoto; Ervilha, Ulysses Fernandes; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2011-08-01

    Musculoskeletal pain impairs postural control and stability. Nine subjects stood as quietly as possible on a moveable force platform before, during, and after experimental pain in the right leg muscles. A moveable force platform was used to measure the center of pressure and provided unexpected perturbations. Lower limb muscle activity, joint angles, and foot pressure distributions were measured. Hypertonic saline was used to induce pain in the vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, or biceps femoris muscle of the right leg. Compared to baseline and control sessions, pain in the knee extensor muscles during quiet standing evoked: 1) larger sway area, greater medial-lateral center of pressure displacement and higher speed (P Pain provoked longer time to return to an equilibrium posture after forward EMG activity for, and pain in vastus medialis muscle decreased the time for the maximum hip flexion during this perturbation (P pain impairs postural stability during quiet standing and after unexpected perturbation, which suggest that people suffering from leg muscle pain are more vulnerable to falls. This article presents the acute responses to leg muscle pain on the postural control. This measure could potentially help clinicians who seek to assess how pain responses may contribute to patient's postural control and stability during quiet standing and after recovering from unexpected perturbations. Copyright © 2011 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Audit of radiology communication systems for critical, urgent, and unexpected significant findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, K A; Drinkwater, K J; Dugar, N; Howlett, D C

    2016-03-01

    To determine the compliance of UK radiology departments and trusts/healthcare organisations with National Patient Safety Agency and Royal College of Radiologist's published guidance on the communication of critical, urgent, and unexpected significant radiological findings. A questionnaire was sent to all UK radiology department audit leads asking for details of their current departmental policy regarding the issuing of alerts; use of automated electronic alert systems; methods of notification of clinicians of critical, urgent, and unexpected significant radiological findings; monitoring of results receipt; and examples of the more common types of serious pathologies for which alerts were issued. One hundred and fifty-four of 229 departments (67%) responded. Eighty-eight percent indicated that they had a policy in place for the communication of critical, urgent, and unexpected significant radiological findings. Only 34% had an automated electronic alert system in place and only 17% had a facility for service-wide electronic tracking of radiology reports. In only 11 departments with an electronic acknowledgement system was someone regularly monitoring the read rate. There is wide variation in practice across the UK with regard to the communication and monitoring of reports with many departments/trusts not fully compliant with published UK guidance. Despite the widespread use of electronic systems, only a minority of departments/trusts have and use electronic tracking to ensure reports have been read and acted upon. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Four unexpected lanthanide coordination polymers involving in situ reaction of solvent N, N-Dimethylformamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Jun-Cheng; Tong, Wen-Quan; Fu, Ai-Yun; Xie, Cheng-Gen; Chang, Wen-Gui; Wu, Ju; Xu, Guang-Nian; Zhang, Ya-Nan; Li, Jun; Li, Yong; Yang, Peng-Qi

    2015-01-01

    Four unexpected 2D lanthanide coordination polymers have been synthesized through in situ reactions of DMF solvent under solvothermal conditions. The isostructural complexes 1–3 contain four types of 2 1 helical chains. While the Nd(III) ions are bridged through μ 2 -HIDC 2− and oxalate to form a 2D sheet along the bc plane without helical character in 4. Therefore, complex 1 exhibits bright red solid-state phosphorescence upon exposure to UV radiation at room temperature. - Graphical abstract: Four unexpected 2D lanthanide coordination polymers have been synthesized through in situ reactions of solvent DMF to formate acid or oxalic acid under solvothermal conditions. The isostructural complexes 1–3 contain four types of different 2 1 helical chains in the 2D layer and 1 exhibits bright red solid-state phosphorescence upon UV radiation. - Highlights: • Four unexpected 2D lanthanide coordination compounds have been synthesized through in situ reactions under solvothermal conditions. • The complexes 1–3 contain four types of 2 1 helical chains in the layer. • Complex 1 exhibits bright red solid-state phosphorescence upon exposure to UV radiation at room temperature

  10. Detecting significant changes in protein abundance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Kammers

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We review and demonstrate how an empirical Bayes method, shrinking a protein's sample variance towards a pooled estimate, leads to far more powerful and stable inference to detect significant changes in protein abundance compared to ordinary t-tests. Using examples from isobaric mass labelled proteomic experiments we show how to analyze data from multiple experiments simultaneously, and discuss the effects of missing data on the inference. We also present easy to use open source software for normalization of mass spectrometry data and inference based on moderated test statistics.

  11. The Galaxy Clustering Crisis in Abundance Matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Duncan; van den Bosch, Frank C.; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Mao, Yao-Yuan; Zentner, Andrew R.; Lange, Johannes U.; Jiang, Fangzhou; Villarreal, Antonio

    2018-02-01

    Galaxy clustering on small scales is significantly under-predicted by sub-halo abundance matching (SHAM) models that populate (sub-)haloes with galaxies based on peak halo mass, Mpeak. SHAM models based on the peak maximum circular velocity, Vpeak, have had much better success. The primary reason Mpeak based models fail is the relatively low abundance of satellite galaxies produced in these models compared to those based on Vpeak. Despite success in predicting clustering, a simple Vpeak based SHAM model results in predictions for galaxy growth that are at odds with observations. We evaluate three possible remedies that could "save" mass-based SHAM: (1) SHAM models require a significant population of "orphan" galaxies as a result of artificial disruption/merging of sub-haloes in modern high resolution dark matter simulations; (2) satellites must grow significantly after their accretion; and (3) stellar mass is significantly affected by halo assembly history. No solution is entirely satisfactory. However, regardless of the particulars, we show that popular SHAM models based on Mpeak cannot be complete physical models as presented. Either Vpeak truly is a better predictor of stellar mass at z ˜ 0 and it remains to be seen how the correlation between stellar mass and Vpeak comes about, or SHAM models are missing vital component(s) that significantly affect galaxy clustering.

  12. The effects of stimulation of substantia innominata and sensory receiving areas of the forebrain upon the activity of neurons within the amygdala of the anesthetized cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Femano, P A; Edinger, H M; Siegel, A

    1983-06-13

    The present study investigated the response characteristics of individual neurons in the amygdala following stimulation of the substantia innominata (SI), and compared these responses with those elicited by stimulation of insular and temporal polar cortices and the lateral olfactory tract (LOT). Recordings were made from single units within the medial, central, basal, and lateral amygdaloid nuclei of anesthetized, male cats. Stimulating electrodes were located in the SI, LOT, and sylvian cortex (SG). Unit responses were classified as either excitation or inhibition. Excitatory responses were further divided into fixed latency excitation (FLE) and variable latency excitation (VLE) based on the variability of the onset latency of the response. The majority of responses to SI stimulation were of the FLE type, implying a direct orthodromic, monosynaptic activation of amygdaloid units. Proportionally more FLE responses were recorded laterally, especially in the magnocellular basal nucleus, compared to VLE responses which were more common in the medial and central nuclei. SI stimulation consistently affected the activity of many more units than did SG or LOT stimulation. The onset latencies of the population of cells exhibiting excitatory responses elicited by SI stimulation were distributed bimodally, and this may reflect a dual projection pathway of amygdaloid afferents from this basal forebrain region. This correlates with anatomical descriptions indicating that SI projections to amygdala pass via the ventral amygdalofugal pathway as well as in the stria terminalis. Excitatory onset latencies of responses to SI stimulation were the shortest in the lateral and magnocellular basal nuclei and the longest in the parvocellular basal nucleus. Amygdaloid units exhibited convergent input from the stimulus sites. A clear topographical distribution of units was not demonstrated. The data suggests that units receiving a convergent input were rarely driven monosynaptically by

  13. Hippocampal N-methyl-d-aspartate and kainate binding in response to entorhinal cortex aspiration or 192 IgG-saporin lesions of the basal forebrain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallagher, M.; Gill, T.M.; Shivers, A.; Nicolle, M.M.

    1997-01-01

    Lesion models in the rat were used to examine the effects of removing innervation of the hippocampal formation on glutamate receptor binding in that system. Bilateral aspiration of the entorhinal cortex was used to remove the cortical innervation of the hippocampal formation and the dentate gyrus. The subcortical input to the hippocampus from cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain was lesioned by microinjection of the immunotoxin 192 IgG-saporin into the medial septum and vertical limb of diagonal band. After a 30-day postlesion survival, the effects of these lesions on N-methyl-d-aspartate-displaceable [ 3 H]glutamate and [ 3 H]kainate binding in the hippocampus were quantified using in vitro autoradiography. The bilateral entorhinal lesion induced a sprouting response in the dentate gyrus, measured by an increase in the width of [ 3 H]kainate binding. It also induced an increase in the density of [ 3 H]kainate binding in CA3 stratum lucidum and an increase in N-methyl-d-aspartate binding throughout the hippocampus proper and the dentate gyrus. The selective lesion of cholinergic septal input did not have any effect on hippocampal [ 3 H]kainate binding and induced only a moderate decrease in N-methyl-d-aspartate binding that was not statistically reliable.The entorhinal and cholinergic lesions were used as in vivo models of the degeneration of hippocampal input that occurs in normal aging and Alzheimer's disease. The results from the present lesion study suggest that some, but not all, of the effects on hippocampal [ 3 H]kainate and N-methyl-d-aspartate binding induced by the lesions are consistent with the status of binding to these receptors in aging and Alzheimer's disease. Consistent with the effects of aging and Alzheimer's disease is an altered topography of [ 3 H]kainate binding after entorhinal cortex lesion and a modest decline in N-methyl-d-aspartate binding after lesions of the cholinergic septal input to the hippocampus. (Copyright (c) 1997

  14. DAWN GRAND MAP VESTA HYDROGEN ABUNDANCE V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A global map of the abundance of hydrogen in micrograms/g within the regolith of asteroid 4 Vesta is provided for two-degree equal-angle pixels. Hydrogen abundances...

  15. Is the geographic pattern in the abundance of south African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two general, alternative hypotheses can explain the abundance pattern: either pre-recruitment factors, those affecting the abundance of larvae, settlers and juveniles (5 mm in basal diameter), are significantly different ...

  16. Abundance determinations in HII regions and planetary nebulae

    OpenAIRE

    Stasinska, Grazyna

    2002-01-01

    The methods of abundance determinations in HII regions and planetary nebulae are described, with emphasis on the underlying assumptions and inherent problems. Recent results on abundances in Galactic HII regions and in Galactic and extragalactic Planetary Nebulae are reviewed.

  17. Recombinant human NGF-loaded microspheres promote survival of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons and improve memory impairments of spatial learning in the rat model of Alzheimer's disease with fimbria-fornix lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Haigang; Long, Dahong; Song, Cunxian; Li, Xiaobin

    2009-04-10

    Neurotrophic factors are used for the experimental treatment of neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease. However, delivery of the neurotrophic factors into the brain remains a big challenge. Recombinant human nerve growth factor (NGF)-loaded microspheres were fabricated and characterized in vitro and in vivo in our previous study. The present study was to assess the therapeutic benefit of rhNGF-loaded microspheres in treating the rat model of Alzheimer's disease with fimbria-fornix lesion. Recombinant human NGF-loaded microspheres were implanted into the basal forebrain of the rats with fimbria-fornix lesion. Four weeks after implantation in the basal forebrain, immunohistochemical analysis showed that rhNGF-loaded microspheres had a significant effect on the survival of axotomized cholinergic neurons in the medial septum (MS) and vertical diagonal branch (VDB) (pimprove the ability of spatial learning and memory of the rats with fimbria-fornix lesion (p<0.05). These results indicate that rhNGF-loaded microspheres are an effective means for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Cosmological implications of light element abundances: theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, D N

    1993-06-01

    Primordial nucleosynthesis provides (with the microwave background radiation) one of the two quantitative experimental tests of the hot Big Bang cosmological model (versus alternative explanations for the observed Hubble expansion). The standard homogeneous-isotropic calculation fits the light element abundances ranging from 1H at 76% and 4He at 24% by mass through 2H and 3He at parts in 105 down to 7Li at parts in 1010. It is also noted how the recent Large Electron Positron Collider (and Stanford Linear Collider) results on the number of neutrinos (Nnu) are a positive laboratory test of this standard Big Bang scenario. The possible alternate scenario of quark-hadron-induced inhomogeneities is also discussed. It is shown that when this alternative scenario is made to fit the observed abundances accurately, the resulting conclusions on the baryonic density relative to the critical density (Omegab) remain approximately the same as in the standard homogeneous case, thus adding to the robustness of the standard model and the conclusion that Omegab approximately 0.06. This latter point is the driving force behind the need for nonbaryonic dark matter (assuming total density Omegatotal = 1) and the need for dark baryonic matter, since the density of visible matter Omegavisible < Omegab. The recent Population II B and Be observations are also discussed and shown to be a consequence of cosmic ray spallation processes rather than primordial nucleosynthesis. The light elements and Nnu successfully probe the cosmological model at times as early as 1 sec and a temperature (T) of approximately 10(10) K (approximately 1 MeV). Thus, they provided the first quantitative arguments that led to the connections of cosmology to nuclear and particle physics.

  19. Abundant thorium as an alternative nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker Schaffer, Marvin

    2013-01-01

    It has long been known that thorium-232 is a fertile radioactive material that can produce energy in nuclear reactors for conversion to electricity. Thorium-232 is well suited to a variety of reactor types including molten fluoride salt designs, heavy water CANDU configurations, and helium-cooled TRISO-fueled systems. Among contentious commercial nuclear power issues are the questions of what to do with long-lived radioactive waste and how to minimize weapon proliferation dangers. The substitution of thorium for uranium as fuel in nuclear reactors has significant potential for minimizing both problems. Thorium is three times more abundant in nature than uranium. Whereas uranium has to be imported, there is enough thorium in the United States alone to provide adequate grid power for many centuries. A well-designed thorium reactor could produce electricity less expensively than a next-generation coal-fired plant or a current-generation uranium-fueled nuclear reactor. Importantly, thorium reactors produce substantially less long-lived radioactive waste than uranium reactors. Thorium-fueled reactors with molten salt configurations and very high temperature thorium-based TRISO-fueled reactors are both recommended for priority Generation IV funding in the 2030 time frame. - Highlights: • Thorium is an abundant nuclear fuel that is well suited to three advanced reactor configurations. • Important thorium reactor configurations include molten salt, CANDU, and TRISO systems. • Thorium has important nuclear waste disposal advantages relative to pressurized water reactors. • Thorium as a nuclear fuel has important advantages relative to weapon non-proliferation

  20. VLT/UVES abundances in four nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies. I. Nucleosynthesis and abundance ratios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shetrone, M; Venn, KA; Tolstoy, E; Primas, F; Hill, [No Value; Kaufer, A

    We have used the Ultraviolet Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) on Kueyen (UT2) of the Very Large Telescope to take spectra of 15 individual red giants in the Sculptor, Fornax, Carina, and Leo I dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSph's). We measure the abundances of alpha-, iron peak, first s-process, second

  1. Distribution and Abundance of Candacia Dana , 1846 and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    They are more abundant during the southeast monsoon period and less so during the northeast monsoon. Abundance decreases with increasing depth, from a maximum of 880 ind.100/m3 at the surface to a minimum of 10 ind.100/m3 in the deep layers. The Candaciidae are least abundant at the depths ranging of 400 to ...

  2. Composition, Abundance and Distribution of Brachyuran Larvae in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Ocypodidae, Grapsidae and Xanthidae. Abundance of brachyuran larvae was significantly positively correlated with total zooplankton abundance (r2 = 0.8) and salinity (r2 = 0.71). Keywords: Brachyuran larvae, abundance, composition, Mida creek, Kenya West Indian Ocean Journal of Marine Science Vol. 3 (2) 2004: pp.

  3. Effects of a lifting belt on spine moments and muscle recruitments after unexpected sudden loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavender, S A; Shakeel, K; Andersson, G B; Thomas, J S

    2000-06-15

    Ten men and eight women participated in a repeated-measures experiment in which sudden loads were applied unexpectedly to a container held in the hands. Three independent variables were investigated: lifting belt use, preload, and load symmetry. To determine whether a lifting belt would help protect the spine in sudden symmetric and asymmetric loading situations. Unexpected loading events have long been associated with the onset of back pain. Based on work showing that lifting belts restrict motion of the torso, the hypothesis was that a lifting belt would stiffen the spine, thereby protecting its supporting tissues. A weight, equal to 7.5% of the subjects' trunk extension force, was allowed to fall 1 m before the bottom of a box held by blindfolded subjects was pulled. Kinetic and kinematic data, obtained from two force plates and a magnetic motion measurement system, were used in a three-dimensional, dynamic, linked-segment biomechanical model to calculate spine moments. Electromyogram data were simultaneously obtained from eight trunk muscles. The belt reduced the forward bending of the spine during the symmetric loadings. In the men, the belt also reduced the forward flexion moment acting on the spine. The belt restricted lateral bending in the women and men, when the box was preloaded. The peak electromyogram amplitudes from posterior contralateral erector spinae and latissimus dorsi muscles increased during the asymmetric loadings, whereas three ipsilateral muscles were less active. The conflicting moment and electromyographic results, combined with the influence of load symmetry, preload, and gender make the benefits of the lifting belt difficult to delineate. Although the data support the hypothesis that the belt stiffens the torso's response to sudden loading, the effects are small, and considerable individual differences exist. The findings show that during unexpected sudden loading, a belt may reduce the net external moment loading. At the same time the

  4. Unexpected Survivors: Children With Life-Limiting Conditions of Uncertain Prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nageswaran, Savithri; Hurst, Anna; Radulovic, Andrea

    2018-04-01

    Prognostication of survival is difficult in children with life-limiting illnesses because of the rarity of these conditions and technological advances improving survival. The objective of this article is to describe the characteristics of children with life-limiting illnesses who survived longer than the expectations of health-care providers. This is a retrospective cohort study conducted in a tertiary-care children's hospital in North Carolina. "Unexpected survivors," defined as children who survived despite a prognosis of imminent death or significantly longer than prognosticated by health-care providers, were identified from among 349 children enrolled in a pediatric palliative care program between March 2008 and October 2012. Children's clinical courses were followed until September 2015 or their death. Eighteen (5%) children were identified as unexpected survivors; 17 (10 girls and 7 boys) were included. Congenital anomalies were the most common diagnoses. Neonatal intensive care unit was the most frequent setting of prognostication. Thirteen children used some form of medical technology at the time of prognostication. Eleven children received hospice services. Eight died during the observation period but survived significantly longer than expected (median survival time 1.5 years), and 9 survived beyond the observation period (median survival time 5.9 years). Unexpected survivors are a small group of children with life-limiting conditions. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of prognostic inaccuracy, able to communicate prognostic uncertainty to parents, and engage supportive services when prognosticating poor survival. Prospective studies are needed to understand outcomes of children with life-limiting illnesses of uncertain prognosis.

  5. Unexpected hospitalisations at a 23-hour observation unit in a paediatric emergency department of northern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Vidushi; Arora, Sumant; Kaur, Tarundeep; Gupta, Sorab; Guglani, Vishal

    2013-07-01

    The 23-hour Observation Unit (OU) is a novel and an effective means for tackling overcrowding in busy Paediatric Emergency Departments (PED) worldwide. However, unexpected hospitalisations in the OU involve transfer of care and they reduce the efficiency of the OU. Hence, we aimed to study the presenting diagnoses which were responsible for the unexpected hospitalisations in a 23-hour OU. A prospective cohort study Setting: The PED at a tertiary care teaching hospital. 15th Feb-15th March 2011. Consecutive children were triaged at presentation to the PED, according to the WHO paediatric emergency triage algorithm. Those who were transferred to the 23-hour OU, were further followed up for duration of the stay, the hospital course, and the outcome (discharge/hospitalisation). Three hundred (228 males, 72 females) consecutive children who attended the PED over one month were enrolled. All the children, at presentation, were triaged by the medical intern/s who was/were posted in the PED, and they were crosschecked by a PED consultant. A majority (55%, n=165) of the children were triaged as non-urgent, 32% (n=97) as priority and 13% (n=38) as emergent. Out of the 300 children, 173(58%) were transferred to the 23-hour OU. Of these, 16 (9.1%) required unexpected hospitalisations. The children who required hospitalisations had the following diagnoses: bronchiolitis (4), bronchopneumonia (4), seizure (2), viral hepatitis (2), high fever (1), bronchial asthma (1), severe anaemia (1), and urticaria (1). The mean duration of the stay in the OU was 19 hours for those who needed hospitalisation, as against 13 hours for those who were discharged from the OU. The children with respiratory complaints (bronchiolitis and bronchopneumonia) need frequent monitoring in the 23-hour OU, as they have high hospitalisation rates in the OU.

  6. Precision grip responses to unexpected rotational perturbations scale with axis of rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gregorio, Michael; Santos, Veronica J

    2013-04-05

    It has been established that rapid, pulse-like increases in precision grip forces ("catch-up responses") are elicited by unexpected translational perturbations and that response latency and strength scale according to the direction of linear slip relative to the hand as well as gravity. To determine if catch-up responses are elicited by unexpected rotational perturbations and are strength-, axis-, and/or direction-dependent, we imposed step torque loads about each of two axes which were defined relative to the subject's hand: the distal-proximal axis away from and towards the subject's palm, and the grip axis which connects the two fingertips. Precision grip responses were dominated initially by passive mechanics and then by active, unimodal catch-up responses. First dorsal interosseous activity, marking the start of the catch-up response, began 71-89 ms after the onset of perturbation. The onset latency, shape, and duration (217-231 ms) of the catch-up response were not affected by the axis, direction, or magnitude of the rotational perturbation, while strength was scaled by axis of rotation and slip conditions. Rotations about the grip axis that tilted the object away from the palm and induced rotational slip elicited stronger catch-up responses than rotations about the distal-proximal axis that twisted the object between the digits. To our knowledge, this study is the first to investigate grip responses to unexpected torque loads and to show characteristic, yet axis-dependent, catch-up responses for conditions other than pure linear slip. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Unexpected structure in the E2 quasicontinuum spectrum of 154Dy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzmann, R.; Khoo, T.L.; Ma, W.C.

    1988-01-01

    The evolution of the γ quasicontinuum spectrum with neutron number has been investigated in the sequence of dysprosium isotopes /sup 152,154,156/Dy. The three nuclei display a pronounced collective E2 component. In 154 Dy this component shows an unexpected splitting into two distinct parts, signifying a structural change along the γ cascade. The E2 and statistical components can be reproduced in simple γ cascade calculations; in 152 Dy and 156 Dy only rotational bands were included, whereas in 154 Dy additional vibration-like transitions were required to reproduce the two E2 peaks. 11 refs., 2 figs

  8. Unexpected Retroaldol-Aldol Reaction during O-Alkylation of Hydroxylated Vince Lactam Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, Christoffer; Wetzel, Alexander; Bergman, Joakim; Brånalt, Jonas

    2016-01-15

    The unexpected retroaldol-aldol reaction during O-alkylation of a β-hydroxy lactam was found to be highly dependent on the temperature and shows a remarkable solvent effect. In DMF, O-alkylation is faster than retroaldol-aldol rearrangement giving exclusively products with retention of configuration. In THF, O-alkylation is slower than rearrangement, giving selectively products with inversion of stereochemistry. In DMSO, a retroaldol reaction followed by fast intramolecular proton transfer occurs to give the ring-opened aldehyde.

  9. Environmental conditions and intraspecific interference: unexpected effects of turbidity on pike (Esox lucius) foraging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, P.A.; Jacobsen, Lene; Berg, Søren

    2009-01-01

    Interference among predators decreases per capita foraging rates and has implications for both community dynamics and top-down trophic processes. Interference originates from behavioural interactions among foragers, and these behaviours could be affected by environmental conditions. In experiments......, indicating no effect of interference. As high turbidity enhances prey consumption for pike individuals foraging alone, but does not have this effect for pike in groups, high turbidity induces the relative interference effect. We suggest that future evaluations of the stabilizing effects of interference...... on community dynamics and its reduction of predation impact on top-down trophic cascades should consider potential unexpected effects of environmental conditions....

  10. The unexpected stability of multiwall nanotubes under high pressure and shear deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pashkin, E. Y.; Pankov, A. M.; Kulnitskiy, B. A.; Mordkovich, V. Z. [Technological Institute for Superhard and Novel Carbon Materials, 7a Centralnaya Street, Troitsk, Moscow 142190 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, 9 Institutsky Lane, Dolgoprudny 141700 (Russian Federation); Perezhogin, I. A. [Technological Institute for Superhard and Novel Carbon Materials, 7a Centralnaya Street, Troitsk, Moscow 142190 (Russian Federation); Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Karaeva, A. R. [Technological Institute for Superhard and Novel Carbon Materials, 7a Centralnaya Street, Troitsk, Moscow 142190 (Russian Federation); Popov, M. Y.; Sorokin, P. B.; Blank, V. D. [Technological Institute for Superhard and Novel Carbon Materials, 7a Centralnaya Street, Troitsk, Moscow 142190 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, 9 Institutsky Lane, Dolgoprudny 141700 (Russian Federation); National University of Science and Technology MISiS, 4 Leninskiy Prospekt, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-22

    The behavior of multiwall carbon nanotubes under a high pressure (up to 55 GPa) combined with shear deformation was studied by experimental and theoretical methods. The unexpectedly high stability of the nanotubes' structure under high stresses was observed. After the pressure was released, we observed that the nanotubes had restored their shapes. Atomistic simulations show that the hydrostatic and shear stresses affect the nanotubes' structure in a different way. It was found that the shear stress load in the multiwall nanotubes' outer walls can induce their connection and formation of an amorphized sp{sup 3}-hybridized region but internal core keeps the tubular structure.

  11. Unexpected synthesis of cinnamaldehyde-dimedone adduct using samarium (III) chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahyana, A. H.; Nadila, A.; Ardiansah, B.

    2017-07-01

    In the present work, 1,8-dioxooctahydroxanthene cannot be obtained from the reaction between cinnamaldehyde and dimedone (ratio 1:2) using samarium(III) chloride as a Lewis acid catalyst. The unexpected product formed is 5,5-dimethyl-2-(3-phenylallylidene)cyclohexane-1,3-dione as a result of 1:1 adduct. The product is obtained in a low to good yield and the optimum protocol can be achieved by running the reaction using 10% mol SmCl3 in water at room temperature for 2 h. This product is preliminary screened for its radical scavenging test with moderate activity.

  12. Second generation sequencing and morphological faecal analysis reveal unexpected foraging behaviour by Myotis nattereri (Chiroptera, Vespertilionidae) in winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Temperate winters produce extreme energetic challenges for small insectivorous mammals. Some bat species inhabiting locations with mild temperate winters forage during brief inter-torpor normothermic periods of activity. However, the winter diet of bats in mild temperate locations is studied infrequently. Although microscopic analyses of faeces have traditionally been used to characterise bat diet, recently the coupling of PCR with second generation sequencing has offered the potential to further advance our understanding of animal dietary composition and foraging behaviour by allowing identification of a much greater proportion of prey items often with increased taxonomic resolution. We used morphological analysis and Illumina-based second generation sequencing to study the winter diet of Natterer’s bat (Myotis nattereri) and compared the results obtained from these two approaches. For the first time, we demonstrate the applicability of the Illumina MiSeq platform as a data generation source for bat dietary analyses. Results Faecal pellets collected from a hibernation site in southern England during two winters (December-March 2009–10 and 2010–11), indicated that M. nattereri forages throughout winter at least in a location with a mild winter climate. Through morphological analysis, arthropod fragments from seven taxonomic orders were identified. A high proportion of these was non-volant (67.9% of faecal pellets) and unexpectedly included many lepidopteran larvae. Molecular analysis identified 43 prey species from six taxonomic orders and confirmed the frequent presence of lepidopteran species that overwinter as larvae. Conclusions The winter diet of M. nattereri is substantially different from other times of the year confirming that this species has a wide and adaptable dietary niche. Comparison of DNA derived from the prey to an extensive reference dataset of potential prey barcode sequences permitted fine scale taxonomic resolution of prey

  13. Protein abundance profiling of the Escherichia coli cytosol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ishihama, Y.; Schmidt, T.; Rappsilber, J.

    2008-01-01

    sample. Using a combination of LC-MS/MS approaches with protein and peptide fractionation steps we identified 1103 proteins from the cytosolic fraction of the Escherichia coli strain MC4100. A measure of abundance is presented for each of the identified proteins, based on the recently developed em...... protein and mRNA abundance in E. coli cells. Conclusion: Abundance measurements for more than 1000 E. coli proteins presented in this work represent the most complete study of protein abundance in a bacterial cell so far. We show significant associations between the abundance of a protein and its...

  14. Manganese abundances in Galactic bulge red giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbuy, B.; Hill, V.; Zoccali, M.; Minniti, D.; Renzini, A.; Ortolani, S.; Gómez, A.; Trevisan, M.; Dutra, N.

    2013-11-01

    Context. Manganese is mainly produced in type II SNe during explosive silicon burning, in incomplete Si-burning regions, and depends on several nucleosynthesis environment conditions, such as mass cut between the matter ejected and falling back onto the remnant, electron and neutron excesses, mixing fallback, and explosion energy. Manganese is also produced in type Ia SNe. Aims: The aim of this work is the study of abundances of the iron-peak element Mn in 56 bulge giants, among which 13 are red clump stars. Four bulge fields along the minor axis are inspected. The study of abundances of Mn-over-Fe as a function of metallicity in the Galactic bulge may shed light on its production mechanisms. Methods: High-resolution spectra were obtained using the FLAMES+UVES spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope. The spectra were obtained within a program to observe 800 stars using the GIRAFFE spectrograph, together with the present UVES spectra. Results: We aim at identifying the chemical evolution of manganese, as a function of metallicity, in the Galactic bulge. We find [Mn/Fe] ~ -0.7 at [Fe/H] ~ -1.3, increasing to a solar value at metallicities close to solar, and showing a spread around - 0.7 ≲ [Fe/H] ≲ -0.2, in good agreement with other work on Mn in bulge stars. There is also good agreement with chemical evolution models. We find no clear difference in the behaviour of the four bulge fields. Whereas [Mn/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] could be identified with the behaviour of the thick disc stars, [Mn/O] vs. [O/H] has a behaviour running parallel, at higher metallicities, compared to thick disc stars, indicating that the bulge enrichment might have proceeded differently from that of the thick disc. Observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO programmes 71.B-0617A, 73.B0074A, and GTO 71.B-0196).Tables 1-6 and Figs. 1-6 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  15. Challenges of transferring models of fish abundance between coral reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequeira, Ana M M; Mellin, Camille; Lozano-Montes, Hector M; Meeuwig, Jessica J; Vanderklift, Mathew A; Haywood, Michael D E; Babcock, Russell C; Caley, M Julian

    2018-01-01

    Reliable abundance estimates for species are fundamental in ecology, fisheries, and conservation. Consequently, predictive models able to provide reliable estimates for un- or poorly-surveyed locations would prove a valuable tool for management. Based on commonly used environmental and physical predictors, we developed predictive models of total fish abundance and of abundance by fish family for ten representative taxonomic families for the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) using multiple temporal scenarios. We then tested if models developed for the GBR (reference system) could predict fish abundances at Ningaloo Reef (NR; target system), i.e., if these GBR models could be successfully transferred to NR. Models of abundance by fish family resulted in improved performance (e.g., 44.1% fish abundance (9% fish species richness from the GBR to NR, transferability for these fish abundance models was poor. When compared with observations of fish abundance collected in NR, our transferability results had low validation scores ( R 2   0.05). High spatio-temporal variability of patterns in fish abundance at the family and population levels in both reef systems likely affected the transferability of these models. Inclusion of additional predictors with potential direct effects on abundance, such as local fishing effort or topographic complexity, may improve transferability of fish abundance models. However, observations of these local-scale predictors are often not available, and might thereby hinder studies on model transferability and its usefulness for conservation planning and management.

  16. Chemical Abundance Analysis of Three α-poor, Metal-poor Stars in the Ultrafaint Dwarf Galaxy Horologium I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, D. Q.; Marshall, J. L.; Li, T. S.; Hansen, T. T.; Simon, J. D.; Bernstein, R. A.; Balbinot, E.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Pace, A. B.; Strigari, L. E.; Pellegrino, C. M.; DePoy, D. L.; Suntzeff, N. B.; Bechtol, K.; Walker, A. R.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Cunha, C. E.; D’Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Davis, C.; Desai, S.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; García-Bellido, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gschwend, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Hartley, W. G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Jeltema, T.; Krause, E.; Kuehn, K.; Kuhlmann, S.; Kuropatkin, N.; March, M.; Miquel, R.; Nord, B.; Roodman, A.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, M.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Tucker, D. L.; Wechsler, R. H.; Wolf, R. C.; Yanny, B.

    2018-01-01

    We present chemical abundance measurements of three stars in the ultrafaint dwarf galaxy Horologium I, a Milky Way satellite discovered by the Dark Energy Survey. Using high-resolution spectroscopic observations, we measure the metallicity of the three stars, as well as abundance ratios of several α-elements, iron-peak elements, and neutron-capture elements. The abundance pattern is relatively consistent among all three stars, which have a low average metallicity of [Fe/H] ∼ ‑2.6 and are not α-enhanced ([α/Fe] ∼ 0.0). This result is unexpected when compared to other low-metallicity stars in the Galactic halo and other ultrafaint dwarfs and suggests the possibility of a different mechanism for the enrichment of Hor I compared to other satellites. We discuss possible scenarios that could lead to this observed nucleosynthetic signature, including extended star formation, enrichment by a Population III supernova, and or an association with the Large Magellanic Cloud. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. This paper also includes data based on observations made with the ESO Very Large Telescope at Paranal Observatory, Chile (ID 096.D-0967(B); PI: E. Balbinot).

  17. Nicotine increases anterior insula activation to expected and unexpected outcomes among nonsmokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addicott, Merideth A; Oliver, Jason A; Joseph McClernon, F

    2017-04-01

    Tobacco has a higher rate of dependence than other drugs of abuse. However, the psychopharmacological effects of nicotine are incongruent with the tenacity of tobacco addiction since nicotine does not produce robust euphoria in humans or self-administration in rodents. A potential explanation is that nicotine amplifies the salience of other stimuli that have some incentive value, which could influence the initiation and persistence of smoking. However, the neural mechanisms of this process are unknown. One way that nicotine may amplify the salience of other stimuli is by enhancing reward prediction errors. We hypothesized that nicotine would enhance the neural response to unexpected (relative to expected) rewards compared to placebo. Twenty-three nonsmokers underwent two fMRI scans, following nicotine (1 mg) or placebo administration, while performing an outcome expectation task. In the task, a pair of cues was associated with either a subsequent reward (the image of a $100 bill) or a nonreward (the image of a blurry rectangle). On 20% of trials, the cue was followed by an unexpected outcome. Although nicotine did not affect the magnitude of prediction errors relative to placebo, nicotine did increase BOLD activation in the anterior insula/inferior frontal gyrus and decrease activation in the caudate across all outcome types (including both rewards and nonrewards). The insula and caudate could play a role in the initial effects of nicotine in nonsmokers, and these changes in baseline may be the mechanism that underlies how nicotine amplifies the salience of nondrug stimuli.

  18. Unexpected findings at imaging: Predicting frequency in various types of studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lumbreras, Blanca; Gonzalez-Alvarez, Isabel; Lorente, Ma Fernanda; Calbo, Jorge; Aranaz, Jesus; Hernandez-Aguado, Ildefonso

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to evaluate the prevalence and associated variables of unsuspected findings from imaging tests in clinical practice. Material and Methods: Cross-sectional study of patients referred for an imaging test in 2006. Two independent radiologists classified the imaging tests according to the presence or absence of an unexpected finding in relation with the causes that prompted the test (kappa = 0.95). A thorough chart review of these patients was carried out as a quality control. Results: Out of 3259 patients in the study, 488 revealed unsuspected findings (15.0%). The prevalence of abnormal findings varied according to age: from 20.4% (150/734) in the over 74-group to 9.0% (76/847) in the under 43-group. The largest prevalence was in the category of infectious diseases (14/49, 28.6%) and in CT (260/901, 28.9%) and ultrasound (138/668, 20.7%). Studies showing moderate clinical information on the referral form were less likely to show unexpected findings than those with null or minor information (OR 0.51; 95% CI 0.36-0.73). Conclusion: Clinicians should expect the frequency of diseases detectable by imaging to increase in the future. Further research with follow-up of these findings is needed to estimate the effect of imaging technologies on final health outcomes.

  19. A brittle star-like robot capable of immediately adapting to unexpected physical damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Takeshi; Sato, Eiki; Ono, Tatsuya; Aonuma, Hitoshi; Matsuzaka, Yoshiya; Ishiguro, Akio

    2017-12-01

    A major challenge in robotic design is enabling robots to immediately adapt to unexpected physical damage. However, conventional robots require considerable time (more than several tens of seconds) for adaptation because the process entails high computational costs. To overcome this problem, we focus on a brittle star-a primitive creature with expendable body parts. Brittle stars, most of which have five flexible arms, occasionally lose some of them and promptly coordinate the remaining arms to escape from predators. We adopted a synthetic approach to elucidate the essential mechanism underlying this resilient locomotion. Specifically, based on behavioural experiments involving brittle stars whose arms were amputated in various ways, we inferred the decentralized control mechanism that self-coordinates the arm motions by constructing a simple mathematical model. We implemented this mechanism in a brittle star-like robot and demonstrated that it adapts to unexpected physical damage within a few seconds by automatically coordinating its undamaged arms similar to brittle stars. Through the above-mentioned process, we found that physical interaction between arms plays an essential role for the resilient inter-arm coordination of brittle stars. This finding will help develop resilient robots that can work in inhospitable environments. Further, it provides insights into the essential mechanism of resilient coordinated motions characteristic of animal locomotion.

  20. Unexpected findings at imaging: Predicting frequency in various types of studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumbreras, Blanca [Public Health Department, Miguel Hernandez University (Spain); CIBER en Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (Spain)], E-mail: blumbreras@umh.es; Gonzalez-Alvarez, Isabel [Radiodiagnostic Department, San Juan Hospital, 03550 Alicante (Spain)], E-mail: gonzalez_isa@gva.es; Lorente, Ma Fernanda [Radiodiagnostic Department, San Juan Hospital, 03550 Alicante (Spain)], E-mail: MARFERLORENTE@telefonica.net; Calbo, Jorge [Radiodiagnostic Department, San Juan Hospital, 03550 Alicante (Spain)], E-mail: jocalma@hotmail.com; Aranaz, Jesus [Preventive Medicine Department, San Juan Hospital, 03550 Alicante (Spain)], E-mail: aranaz_jes@gva.es; Hernandez-Aguado, Ildefonso [Public Health Department, Miguel Hernandez University (Spain); CIBER en Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (Spain)], E-mail: ihernandez@umh.es

    2010-04-15

    Objective: The objective was to evaluate the prevalence and associated variables of unsuspected findings from imaging tests in clinical practice. Material and Methods: Cross-sectional study of patients referred for an imaging test in 2006. Two independent radiologists classified the imaging tests according to the presence or absence of an unexpected finding in relation with the causes that prompted the test (kappa = 0.95). A thorough chart review of these patients was carried out as a quality control. Results: Out of 3259 patients in the study, 488 revealed unsuspected findings (15.0%). The prevalence of abnormal findings varied according to age: from 20.4% (150/734) in the over 74-group to 9.0% (76/847) in the under 43-group. The largest prevalence was in the category of infectious diseases (14/49, 28.6%) and in CT (260/901, 28.9%) and ultrasound (138/668, 20.7%). Studies showing moderate clinical information on the referral form were less likely to show unexpected findings than those with null or minor information (OR 0.51; 95% CI 0.36-0.73). Conclusion: Clinicians should expect the frequency of diseases detectable by imaging to increase in the future. Further research with follow-up of these findings is needed to estimate the effect of imaging technologies on final health outcomes.

  1. Sudden Unexpected Death During Sleep in Familial Dysautonomia: A Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Jose-Alberto; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Perez, Miguel A; Spalink, Christy L; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2017-08-01

    Sudden unexpected death during sleep (SUDS) is the most common cause of death in patients with familial dysautonomia (FD), an autosomal recessive disease characterized by sensory and autonomic dysfunction. It remains unknown what causes SUDS in these patients and who is at highest risk. We tested the hypothesis that SUDS in FD is linked to sleep-disordered breathing. We retrospectively identified patients with FD who died suddenly and unexpectedly during sleep and had undergone polysomnography within the 18-month period before death. For each case, we sampled one age-matched surviving subject with FD that had also undergone polysomnography within the 18-month period before study. Data on polysomnography, EKG, ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, arterial blood gases, blood count, and metabolic panel were analyzed. Thirty-two deceased cases and 31 surviving controls were included. Autopsy was available in six cases. Compared with controls, participants with SUDS were more likely to be receiving treatment with fludrocortisone (odds ratio [OR]; 95% confidence interval) (OR 29.7; 4.1-213.4), have untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OR 17.4; 1.5-193), and plasma potassium levels Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. ERP correlates of unexpected word forms in a picture–word study of infants and adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duta, M.D.; Styles, S.J.; Plunkett, K.

    2012-01-01

    We tested 14-month-olds and adults in an event-related potentials (ERPs) study in which pictures of familiar objects generated expectations about upcoming word forms. Expected word forms labelled the picture (word condition), while unexpected word forms mismatched by either a small deviation in word medial vowel height (mispronunciation condition) or a large deviation from the onset of the first speech segment (pseudoword condition). Both infants and adults showed sensitivity to both types of unexpected word form. Adults showed a chain of discrete effects: positivity over the N1 wave, negativity over the P2 wave (PMN effect) and negativity over the N2 wave (N400 effect). Infants showed a similar pattern, including a robust effect similar to the adult P2 effect. These observations were underpinned by a novel visualisation method which shows the dynamics of the ERP within bands of the scalp over time. The results demonstrate shared processing mechanisms across development, as even subtle deviations from expected word forms were indexed in both age groups by a reduction in the amplitude of characteristic waves in the early auditory evoked potential. PMID:22483072

  3. Rural families' interpretations of experiencing unexpected transition in the wake of a natural disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Gisele Cristina Manfrini; Boehs, Astrid Eggert; Denham, Sharon A; Nitschke, Rosane Gonçalves; Martini, Jussara Gue

    2017-02-13

    Natural disasters affect populations in various parts of the world. The impacts of disasters can cause many problems to the health of people and disruption to family life, potentially leading to an unexpected transition. The objective of this paper is to present the unexpected transitional experiences of rural families following a natural disaster. A multiple case study of six families was conducted with children and adolescents in a rural area affected by a 2008 disaster in southern Brazil. For data collection, we used participant observation, narrative interviews, genograms, ecomaps and an instrument called calendar routine. The analysis of the data resulted in different family interpretations about the changes resulting from the storm and compared life before and after the disaster. The loss of homes and loved ones, migration, unemployment, and losses from the farm were the main changes associated with new development tasks. The experiences of family transition after the disaster revealed that losses influenced social lives, daily routines and the preservation of cultural values.

  4. Rural families' interpretations of experiencing unexpected transition in the wake of a natural disaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Cristina Manfrini Fernandes

    Full Text Available Abstract: Natural disasters affect populations in various parts of the world. The impacts of disasters can cause many problems to the health of people and disruption to family life, potentially leading to an unexpected transition. The objective of this paper is to present the unexpected transitional experiences of rural families following a natural disaster. A multiple case study of six families was conducted with children and adolescents in a rural area affected by a 2008 disaster in southern Brazil. For data collection, we used participant observation, narrative interviews, genograms, ecomaps and an instrument called calendar routine. The analysis of the data resulted in different family interpretations about the changes resulting from the storm and compared life before and after the disaster. The loss of homes and loved ones, migration, unemployment, and losses from the farm were the main changes associated with new development tasks. The experiences of family transition after the disaster revealed that losses influenced social lives, daily routines and the preservation of cultural values.

  5. Unexpected Maternal Convulsion: An Idiopathic Case of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome after Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jila Agah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is associated with various clinical manifestations such as headache, blurred vision, confusion and tonic-clonic convulsion. Some of the predisposing factors for PRES include hypertensive encephalopathy, preeclampsia and eclampsia, lupus erythematosus, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and long-term use of immunosuppressive drugs. This condition rarely occurs after normotensive and uneventful pregnancies. Several theories have been proposed on the etiology of PRES. For instance, endothelial injury and brain edema have been reported as possible causes of PRES. Although PRES is a temporary condition, proper and timely management of the disorder in the acute phase is critical for the prevention of permanent neurological complications. During pregnancy, PRES is normally accompanied with hypertension. In this paper, we present a rare case of PRES in a normotensive pregnancy in a 25-year-old parturient woman (Gravida 2, Ab 1. The patient unexpectedly manifested symptoms of tonic-clonic convulsion one hour after an uneventful vaginal delivery, which were successfully managed. According to our observations, PRES has various clinical manifestations with unexpected occurrence in some cases. Therefore, it is recommended that maternity centers be well-equipped with resuscitation tools, emergency drugs and expert staff so as to manage unforeseen PRES efficiently and prevent permanent maternal neurological complications and mortality.

  6. Microsurgical approach for unusual and unexpected malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the forearm: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Orazi, Valerio; Panunzi, Andrea; Paoloni, Marco; Ortensi, Alice; Anichini, Silvia; Cialini, Michela; Nardoni, Stefano; Urciuoli, Paolo; Pasta, Vittorio; Ortensi, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas are rare tumors with a dismal prognosis. Among the most common histological types of sarcomas of the extremities, malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) is the one with the highest incidence. Surgery is considered to be the first choice of treatment for MFH. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report in the literature of a patient with MFH within the abductor pollicis longus (APL) muscle. This unusual location was also unexpected by the treating surgeons, as the preoperative magnetic resonance imaging localized the tumor inside a different muscle. A 79-year-old Caucasian man presented with a swelling in the middle third of the dorsal aspect of the left forearm. MFH was diagnosed following biopsy and instrumental diagnostic examinations. Surgical excision and simultaneous reconstruction was performed by the same microsurgical team, achieving an excellent functional outcome. The present case highlights the significance of microsurgical approach for improving strategic planning in oncologic surgery. Accurate surgical dissection, performed by a team of microsurgeons, allowed for the identification of the unusual and unexpected tumor localization within the APL muscle. For this reason, a change of surgical strategy allowed for preservation of the extensor digitorum communis muscle, which would otherwise have to be resected, with tendon transfer and successful restoration of the thumb abduction function.

  7. Beryllium abundances in Hg-Mn stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boesgaard, A.M.; Heacox, W.D.; Wolff, S.C.; Borsenberger, J.; Praderie, F.

    1982-01-01

    The Hg-Mn stars show anomalous line strengths of many chemical elements including Be. We have observed the Be ii resonance doublet at lambdalambda 3130, 3131 at 6.7 A mm -1 in 43 Hg-Mn stars and 10 normal stars in the same temperature range with the coude spectrograph of the 2.24 m University of Hawaii telescope at Mauna Kea. Measured equivalent widths of the two lines and/or the blend of the doublet have been compared with predictions from (1) LTE model atmospheres and (2) non-LTE line formation on non-LTE model atmospheres. (For strong Be ii lines, the LTE calculations result in more Be by factors of 2 to 4 than do the non-LTE calculations.) Overabundances of factors of 20--2 x 10 4 relative to solar have been found for 75% of the Hg-Mn stars. The 25% with little or no Be are typically among the cooler Hg-Mn stars, but for the stars with Be excesses, there is only marginal evidence for a correlationi of the size of the overabundance and temperature. It is suggested that diffusion driven by radiation pressure is responsible for the observed Be abundance anomalies

  8. Chloroflexi bacteria are more diverse, abundant, and similar in high than in low microbial abundance sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Susanne; Deines, Peter; Behnam, Faris; Wagner, Michael; Taylor, Michael W

    2011-12-01

    Some marine sponges harbor dense and phylogenetically complex microbial communities [high microbial abundance (HMA) sponges] whereas others contain only few and less diverse microorganisms [low microbial abundance (LMA) sponges]. We focused on the phylum Chloroflexi that frequently occurs in sponges to investigate the different associations with three HMA and three LMA sponges from New Zealand. By applying a range of microscopical and molecular techniques a clear dichotomy between HMA and LMA sponges was observed: Chloroflexi bacteria were more abundant and diverse in HMA than in LMA sponges. Moreover, different HMA sponges contain similar Chloroflexi communities whereas LMA sponges harbor different and more variable communities which partly resemble Chloroflexi seawater communities. A comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of our own and publicly available sponge-derived Chloroflexi 16S rRNA gene sequences (> 780 sequences) revealed the enormous diversity of this phylum within sponges including 29 sponge-specific and sponge-coral clusters (SSC/SCC) as well as a 'supercluster' consisting of > 250 sponge-derived and a single nonsponge-derived 16S rRNA gene sequence. Interestingly, the majority of sequences obtained from HMA sponges, but only a few from LMA sponges, fell into SSC/SCC clusters. This indicates a much more specific association of Chloroflexi bacteria with HMA sponges and suggests an ecologically important role for these prominent bacteria. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The relative importance of kinetic mechanisms and variable enzyme abundances for the regulation of hepatic glucose metabolism--insights from mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulik, Sascha; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg; Berndt, Nikolaus

    2016-03-02

    Adaptation of the cellular metabolism to varying external conditions is brought about by regulated changes in the activity of enzymes and transporters. Hormone-dependent reversible enzyme phosphorylation and concentration changes of reactants and allosteric effectors are the major types of rapid kinetic enzyme regulation, whereas on longer time scales changes in protein abundance may also become operative. Here, we used a comprehensive mathematical model of the hepatic glucose metabolism of rat hepatocytes to decipher the relative importance of different regulatory modes and their mutual interdependencies in the hepatic control of plasma glucose homeostasis. Model simulations reveal significant differences in the capability of liver metabolism to counteract variations of plasma glucose in different physiological settings (starvation, ad libitum nutrient supply, diabetes). Changes in enzyme abundances adjust the metabolic output to the anticipated physiological demand but may turn into a regulatory disadvantage if sudden unexpected changes of the external conditions occur. Allosteric and hormonal control of enzyme activities allow the liver to assume a broad range of metabolic states and may even fully reverse flux changes resulting from changes of enzyme abundances alone. Metabolic control analysis reveals that control of the hepatic glucose metabolism is mainly exerted by enzymes alone, which are differently controlled by alterations in enzyme abundance, reversible phosphorylation, and allosteric effects. In hepatic glucose metabolism, regulation of enzyme activities by changes of reactants, allosteric effects, and reversible phosphorylation is equally important as changes in protein abundance of key regulatory enzymes.

  10. Patterns of unexpected in-hospital deaths: a root cause analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Respiratory alarm monitoring and rapid response team alerts on hospital general floors are based on detection of simple numeric threshold breaches. Although some uncontrolled observation trials in select patient populations have been encouraging, randomized controlled trials suggest that this simplistic approach may not reduce the unexpected death rate in this complex environment. The purpose of this review is to examine the history and scientific basis for threshold alarms and to compare thresholds with the actual pathophysiologic patterns of evolving death which must be timely detected. Methods The Pubmed database was searched for articles relating to methods for triggering rapid response teams and respiratory alarms and these were contrasted with the fundamental timed pathophysiologic patterns of death which evolve due to sepsis, congestive heart failure, pulmonary embolism, hypoventilation, narcotic overdose, and sleep apnea. Results In contrast to the simplicity of the numeric threshold breach method of generating alerts, the actual patterns of evolving death are complex and do not share common features until near death. On hospital general floors, unexpected clinical instability leading to death often progresses along three distinct patterns which can be designated as Types I, II and III. Type I is a pattern comprised of hyperventilation compensated respiratory failure typical of congestive heart failure and sepsis. Here, early hyperventilation and respiratory alkalosis can conceal the onset of instability. Type II is the pattern of classic CO2 narcosis. Type III occurs only during sleep and is a pattern of ventilation and SPO2 cycling caused by instability of ventilation and/or upper airway control followed by precipitous and fatal oxygen desaturation if arousal failure is induced by narcotics and/or sedation. Conclusion The traditional threshold breach method of detecting instability on hospital wards was not scientifically derived; explaining

  11. Patterns of unexpected in-hospital deaths: a root cause analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curry J Paul

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory alarm monitoring and rapid response team alerts on hospital general floors are based on detection of simple numeric threshold breaches. Although some uncontrolled observation trials in select patient populations have been encouraging, randomized controlled trials suggest that this simplistic approach may not reduce the unexpected death rate in this complex environment. The purpose of this review is to examine the history and scientific basis for threshold alarms and to compare thresholds with the actual pathophysiologic patterns of evolving death which must be timely detected. Methods The Pubmed database was searched for articles relating to methods for triggering rapid response teams and respiratory alarms and these were contrasted with the fundamental timed pathophysiologic patterns of death which evolve due to sepsis, congestive heart failure, pulmonary embolism, hypoventilation, narcotic overdose, and sleep apnea. Results In contrast to the simplicity of the numeric threshold breach method of generating alerts, the actual patterns of evolving death are complex and do not share common features until near death. On hospital general floors, unexpected clinical instability leading to death often progresses along three distinct patterns which can be designated as Types I, II and III. Type I is a pattern comprised of hyperventilation compensated respiratory failure typical of congestive heart failure and sepsis. Here, early hyperventilation and respiratory alkalosis can conceal the onset of instability. Type II is the pattern of classic CO2 narcosis. Type III occurs only during sleep and is a pattern of ventilation and SPO2 cycling caused by instability of ventilation and/or upper airway control followed by precipitous and fatal oxygen desaturation if arousal failure is induced by narcotics and/or sedation. Conclusion The traditional threshold breach method of detecting instability on hospital wards was not

  12. Willingness and ability to pay for unexpected dental expenses by Finnish adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widström Eeva

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since 2002, adults have been able to choose oral health care services in the public sector or in the private sector in Finland. Though various subsidies for care exist in both sectors, the Public Dental Service (PDS is a cheaper option for the patient but, on the other hand, there are no waiting lists for private care. The aim of this study was to assess middle-aged adults' use of dental services, willingness to pay (WTP and ability to pay (ATP for unexpected, urgent dental treatment. Methods Postal questionnaires on use of dental services were sent to a random sample of 1500 47-59 year old adults living in three large municipalities in the Helsinki region. The initial response rate was 65.8%. Two hypothetical scenarios were presented: "What would be the highest price you would be prepared to pay to have a lost filling replaced immediately, or, at the latest, the day after losing the filling?" and " How much could you pay for unexpected dental expenses at two weeks notice, if you suddenly needed more comprehensive treatment?" Logistic regression analysis was used to analyse factors related to WTP and ATP. Results Most respondents (89.6% had visited a dentist recently and a majority (76.1% had used private services. For immediate replacement of a lost filling, almost all respondents (93.2% were willing to pay the lower price charged in the PDS and 46.2% were willing to pay the private fee. High income and no subjective need for dental treatment were positively associated with the probability of paying a higher price. Most respondents (93.0% were able to pay a low fee, EUR 50 and almost half (41.6% at least EUR 300 for unexpected treatment at short notice. High income and male sex were associated with high ATP. Conclusion There was a strong and statistically significant relationship between income and WTP and ATP for urgent dental care, indicating that access to publicly provided services improved equity for persons with low

  13. Bacterial community profiles in low microbial abundance sponges

    OpenAIRE

    Giles, Emily C.; Kamke, Janine; Moitinho-Silva, Lucas; Taylor, Michael W.; Hentschel, Ute; Ravasi, Timothy; Schmitt, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    It has long been recognized that sponges differ in the abundance of associated microorganisms, and they are therefore termed either 'low microbial abundance' (LMA) or 'high microbial abundance' (HMA) sponges. Many previous studies concentrated on the dense microbial communities in HMA sponges, whereas little is known about microorganisms in LMA sponges. Here, two LMA sponges from the Red Sea, two from the Caribbean and one from the South Pacific were investigated. With up to only five bacteri...

  14. History and current understanding of the Suess abundance curve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marti, K.; Zeh, H.D.; Heidelberg Universitaet, West Germany)

    1985-01-01

    By means of a gamma ray sum spectrometer currently under development, many neutron capture cross sections will be determined with high accuracy, thereby facilitating the inferrence of the abundance ratios of neighboring elements with the same accuracy. Attention is presently given to this and other prospects emerging in the study of nuclide abundances and the data base for theories of element synthesis. Poorly understood structures in the abundance curve are discussed in view of recent models on nuclear structure and stability. 43 references

  15. Chemical Abundance Analysis of Three α -poor, Metal-poor Stars in the Ultrafaint Dwarf Galaxy Horologium I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagasawa, D. Q.; Marshall, J. L.; Li, T. S.; Hansen, T. T.; Simon, J. D.; Bernstein, R. A.; Balbinot, E.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Pace, A. B.; Strigari, L. E.; Pellegrino, C. M.; DePoy, D. L.; Suntzeff, N. B.; Bechtol, K.; Walker, A. R.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Cunha, C. E.; D’Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Davis, C.; Desai, S.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; García-Bellido, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gschwend, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Hartley, W. G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Jeltema, T.; Krause, E.; Kuehn, K.; Kuhlmann, S.; Kuropatkin, N.; March, M.; Miquel, R.; Nord, B.; Roodman, A.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, M.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Tucker, D. L.; Wechsler, R. H.; Wolf, R. C.; Yanny, B.

    2018-01-10

    We present chemical abundance measurements of three stars in the ultra-faintdwarf galaxy Horologium I, a Milky Way satellite discovered by the Dark EnergySurvey. Using high resolution spectroscopic observations we measure themetallicity of the three stars as well as abundance ratios of several$\\alpha$-elements, iron-peak elements, and neutron-capture elements. Theabundance pattern is relatively consistent among all three stars, which have alow average metallicity of [Fe/H] $\\sim -2.6$ and are not $\\alpha$-enhanced([$\\alpha$/Fe] $\\sim 0.0$). This result is unexpected when compared to otherlow-metallicity stars in the Galactic halo and other ultra-faint dwarfs andhints at an entirely different mechanism for the enrichment of Hor I comparedto other satellites. We discuss possible scenarios that could lead to thisobserved nucleosynthetic signature including extended star formation, aPopulation III supernova, and a possible association with the Large MagellanicCloud.

  16. Unexpected Reading Dissociation in a Brazilian “nisei” with Crossed Aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Caramelli

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available There is an increased interest in reading impairments in the Japanese language, due to its particular writing system which includes two different scripts, Kanji (logograms and Kana (phonograms. Reading dissociations between Kanji and Kana have been described, showing that each system is processed differently by the cerebral hemispheres. We describe the case of a 68 year old Brazilian “nisei” (i.e. born from Japanese parents who had knowledge of both Japanese and Portuguese. He presented an ischemic stroke affecting the right hemisphere and subsequently developed a Broca's aphasia and an unexpected reading dissociation, with an impairment in Kana reading comprehension and a good performance in Kanji and in Portuguese. These findings suggest that the patient's right and left hemispheres have assumed opposite roles not only for oral but also for written language decodification.

  17. Left-Insular Damage, Autonomic Instability and Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacuey, Nuria; Zonjy, Bilal; Theerannaew, Wanchat; Loparo, Kenneth A.; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Sahadevan, Jayakumar; Lhatoo, Samden D.

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed the only two sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) cases from 320 prospectively recruited patients in the three-year Prevention and Risk Identification of SUDEP Mortality (PRISM) Project. Both patients had surgically refractory epilepsy, evidence of left insular damage following previous temporal/temporo-insular resections, and progressive changes in Heart Rate Variability (HRV) in monitored evaluations prior to death. Insular damage is known to cause autonomic dysfunction and increased mortality in acute stroke. This report suggests a possible role for the insula in the pathogenesis of SUDEP. The presence of intrinsic insular lesions or acquired insular damage in refractory epilepsy patients may be an additional risk factor for SUDEP. PMID:26797084

  18. Detection of gunshot primer residue on bone in an experimental setting-an unexpected finding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Hugh E; Kutyla, Alicja K; Russell Davis, J

    2010-03-01

    Pork ribs with intact muscle tissue were used in an experimental attempt to identify bullet wipe on bone at distances from 1 to 6 feet with 0.45 caliber, full metal jacket ammunition. This resulted in the unexpected finding of primer-derived gunshot residue (GSR) deep within the wound tract. Of significance is the fact that the GSR was deposited on the bone, under the periosteum, after the bullet passed through a Ziploc bag and c. 1 inch of muscle tissue. It is also important to note that the GSR persisted on the bone after the periosteum was forcibly removed. The presence of primer-derived GSR on bone provides the potential to differentiate gunshot trauma from blunt trauma when the bone presents an atypical gunshot wound. In this study, the presence of gunshot primer residue at a distance of 6 feet demonstrates the potential for establishing maximum gun-to-target distance for remote shootings.

  19. Heart diseases play a vital role in sudden unexpected death in epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze-ning SHI

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP indicates sudden death without a definite cause in epileptics, especially during seizures or interictal phase. The risk of sudden death in epileptic patients is over 20 times higher than that in individuals without epilepsy. The explicit pathogenesis of SUDEP is not clear, while the heart disease is likely to play an important role in SUDEP. Cardiac dysfunction, which is caused by ion channel diseases, autonomic dysfunction, antiepileptic drugs (AEDs, is associated with SUDEP. Understanding of the mechanisms about cardiac factors is required to provide effective strategy for future control of SUDEP. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.11.006

  20. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP): don't ask, don't tell?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, B; Richardson, A; Duncan, S

    2006-02-01

    The National Institute for Clinical Excellence in the UK has issued guidelines stating all individuals with epilepsy be given information about sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). We conducted a survey of current practice among UK neurologists, using a questionnaire sent to all practising neurologists in the UK listed on the Association of British Neurologists database, asking under what circumstances they told patients about SUDEP. Of the validated respondents, 5% discussed SUDEP with all patients, 26% with a majority, 61% with a few, and 7.5% with none. The commonest reasons for SUDEP to be discussed were the patient asking about it and the neurologist counselling people with known risk factors for SUDEP. The variation we found, although not necessarily in tune with the guidelines, reflects the variation in patients' need for knowledge about their condition.

  1. The Galeta Oil Spill. II. Unexpected Persistence of Oil Trapped in Mangrove Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, K. A.; Garrity, S. D.; Jorissen, D.; MacPherson, J.; Stoelting, M.; Tierney, J.; Yelle-Simmons, L.

    1994-04-01

    Sediment chemistry studies, undertaken as part of the long-term assessment of the Bahía las Minas (Panamá) oil spill, showed the unexpected persistence of the full range of aromatic hydrocarbon residues of the spilled crude oil in anoxic muds of coastal mangroves. Mangrove muds served as long-term reservoirs for chronic contamination of contiguous coastal communities for over 5 years. One result of the repeated history of oil pollution incidents along this coast was an increased proportion of dead mangrove ( Rhizophora mangle) roots in sediment cores which was related to contaminant loading and was detectable for at least 20 years after major oil spills. We suggest that this is the minimum time-scale that is to be expected for the loss of toxicity of oil trapped in muddy coastal habitats impacted by catastrophic oil spills.

  2. The Galeta oil spill: Pt. 2; Unexpected persistence of oil trapped in mangrove sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, K.A.; Jorissen, D.; MacPherson, J.; Stoelting, M.; Tierney, J.; Yelle-Simmons, L. (Bermuda Biological Station, Ferry Reach (Bermuda)); Garrity, S.D. (Coastal Zone Analysis, Sopchoppy, FL (United States))

    1994-04-01

    Sediment chemistry studies, undertaken as part of the long-term assessment of the Bahia las Minas (Panama) oil spill, showed the unexpected persistence of the full range of aromatic hydrocarbon residues of the spilled crude oil in anoxic muds of coastal mangroves. Mangrove muds served as long-term reservoirs for chronic contamination of contiguous coastal communities for over 5 years. One result of the repeated history of oil pollution incidents along this coast was an increased proportion of dead mangrove (Rhizophora mangle) roots in sediment cores which was related to contaminant loading and was detectable for at least 20 years after major oil spills. We suggest that this is the minimum time-scale that is to be expected for the loss of toxicity of oil trapped in muddy coastal habitats impacted by catastrophic oil spills. (author)

  3. Benefits and unexpected artifacts of biplanar digital slot-scanning imaging in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumer, Steven L; Dinan, David; Grissom, Leslie E

    2014-07-01

    Biplanar digital slot-scanning allows for relatively low-dose orthopedic imaging, an advantage in imaging children given the growing concerns regarding radiosensitivity. We have used this system for approximately 1 year for orthopedic imaging of the spine and lower extremities. We have noted advantages of using the digital slot-scanning system when compared with computed radiographic and standard digital radiographic imaging systems, but we also found unexpected but common imaging artifacts that are the direct result of the imaging method and that have not been reported. This pictorial essay serves to familiarize radiologists with the advantages of the digital slot-scanning system as well as imaging artifacts common with this new technology.

  4. Comprehensive study of unexpected microscope condensers formed in sample arrangements commonly used in optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Darshan B; Aldawsari, Mabkhoot Mudith S; Alharbi, Bandar Mohammed H; Sen, Sanchari; Grave de Peralta, Luis

    2015-09-01

    We show that various setups for optical microscopy which are commonly used in biomedical laboratories behave like efficient microscope condensers that are responsible for observed subwavelength resolution. We present a series of experiments and simulations that reveal how inclined illumination from such unexpected condensers occurs when the sample is perpendicularly illuminated by a microscope's built-in white-light source. In addition, we demonstrate an inexpensive add-on optical module that serves as an efficient and lightweight microscope condenser. Using such add-on optical module in combination with a low-numerical-aperture objective lens and Fourier plane imaging microscopy technique, we demonstrate detection of photonic crystals with a period nearly eight times smaller than the Rayleigh resolution limit.

  5. Unexpected Type of Failure of Thermal Battery Resulting in a Near Miss to a Serious Injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, Daena Kei [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-10-01

    On 6/26/2015 at 1445 in 894/136, a thermal battery (approximately the size of a commercial size C cell) experienced an unexpected failure following a routine test where the battery is activated. The failure occurred while a test operator was transferring the battery from the testing primary containment box to another containment box within the same room; initial indications are that the battery package ruptured after it went into thermal runaway which led to the operator receiving bruising to the palm of the hand from the pressure of the expulsion. The operator was wearing the prescribed PPE, which was safety glasses and a high temperature glove on the hand that was holding the battery.

  6. Review on Recent Results from RHIC Polarized Collider; Unexpected Forward Neutron Asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Itaru

    The polarized proton-proton collider at RHIC provides an unique opportunity to study the spin structure of the proton. The latest highlights from both transverse and longitudinal RHIC spin program are introduced in this document. For the transverse program, two asymmetry measurements are discussed here which are distinguished by the production mechanism either soft (diffractive) or hard perturbative QCD natures depending on the rapidity region of the hadron production. The former is the very forwardneutron asymmetry measurements which showed unexpectedly drastic dependence on the atomic mass. The latter is the forward pion production whose origin of the large asymmetry has been under debate for theoretical understanding over two decades. For longitudinal program, the latest highlights from the measurements on the gluon and the sea quark spin components of the proton spin are discussed.

  7. Heart rate variability regression and risk of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Alessio; Lombardi, Federico

    2017-02-01

    The exact mechanisms of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy remain elusive, despite there is consensus that SUDEP is associated with severe derangements in the autonomic control to vital functions as breathing and heart rate regulation. Heart rate variability (HRV) has been advocated as biomarker of autonomic control to the heart. Cardiac dysautonomia has been found in diseases where other branches of the autonomous nervous system are damaged, as Parkinson disease and multiple system atrophy. In this perspective, an impaired HRV not only is a risk factor for sudden cardiac death mediated by arrhythmias, but also a potential biomarker for monitoring a progressive decline of the autonomous nervous system. This slope may lead to an acute imbalance of the regulatory pathways of vital functions after seizure and then to SUDEP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Carbodicarbenes: Unexpected π-Accepting Ability during Reactivity with Small Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Ching; Shih, Wei-Chih; Jurca, Titel; Zhao, Lili; Andrada, Diego M; Peng, Chun-Jung; Chang, Chun-Chi; Liu, Shu-Kai; Wang, Yi-Ping; Wen, Yuh-Sheng; Yap, Glenn P A; Hsu, Chao-Ping; Frenking, Gernot; Ong, Tiow-Gan

    2017-09-13

    An investigation of carbodicarbenes, the less explored member of the carbenic complex/ligand family has yielded unexpected electronic features and concomitant reactivity. Observed 1,2-addition of E-H bonds (E = B, C, Si) across the carbone central carbon and that of the flanking N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) fragment, combined with single-crystal X-ray studies of a model Pd complex strongly suggests a significant level of π-accepting ability at the central carbon of the NHC moiety. This feature is atypical of classic NHCs, which are strong σ-donors, with only nominal π-accepting ability. The unanticipated π-acidity is critical for engendering carbodicarbenes with reactivity more commonly observed with frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs) rather than the more closely related NHCs and cyclic (alkyl)(amino)carbenes (CAACs).

  9. Critical properties of unlimited gliding: Unexpected flocking behavior driven by the exchange of information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigus-Kwiatkowska, Marta; Fronczak, Agata; Fronczak, Piotr

    2018-03-01

    Inspired by albatrosses that use thermal lifts to fly across oceans we develop a simple model of gliders that serves us to study theoretical limitations of unlimited exploration of the Earth. Our studies, grounded in physical theory of continuous percolation and biased random walks, allow us to identify a variety of percolation transitions, which are understood as providing potentially unlimited movement through a space in a specified direction. We discover an unexpected phenomenon of self-organization of gliders in clusters, which resembles the flock organization of birds. This self-organization is intriguing, as it occurs thanks to exchange of information only and without any particular rules that could favor the clustering of the gliders (in contrast to the causes well known in literature, like, for example, attractive forces used in the Vicsek-type models or fitness functions used in evolutionary computation).

  10. Comparative Analysis of Four Calypogeia Species Revealed Unexpected Change in Evolutionarily-Stable Liverwort Mitogenomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Ślipiko

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Liverwort mitogenomes are considered to be evolutionarily stable. A comparative analysis of four Calypogeia species revealed differences compared to previously sequenced liverwort mitogenomes. Such differences involve unexpected structural changes in the two genes, cox1 and atp1, which have lost three and two introns, respectively. The group I introns in the cox1 gene are proposed to have been lost by two-step localized retroprocessing, whereas one-step retroprocessing could be responsible for the disappearance of the group II introns in the atp1 gene. These cases represent the first identified losses of introns in mitogenomes of leafy liverworts (Jungermanniopsida contrasting the stability of mitochondrial gene order with certain changes in the gene content and intron set in liverworts.

  11. Neonatal Screening for Medium-Chain Acyl-CoA Deficiency—Insights and Unexpected Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther M. Maier

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available With the implementation of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS, neonatal screening for medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCADD has been introduced in many screening programs worldwide. Together with phenylketonuria, MCADD is the disorder most frequently diagnosed. Despite undeniable beneficial effects on morbidity and mortality, neonatal screening for MCADD effectively exemplifies the unexpected challenges of increased diagnosis by screening programs. MS/MS-based screening revealed an at least 2-fold higher incidence than expected with a considerable share of individuals showing mild biochemical alterations and/or novel mutations with unknown clinical significance. Whether these individuals are at lower risk to experience metabolic decompensations is a matter of ongoing debate. Defining patients, stratifying them according to their clinical risk, and adopting treatment protocols is an as yet unmet challenge in neonatal screening for MCADD.

  12. Modelling tick abundance using machine learning techniques and satellite imagery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Lene Jung; Korslund, L.; Kjelland, V.

    satellite images to run Boosted Regression Tree machine learning algorithms to predict overall distribution (presence/absence of ticks) and relative tick abundance of nymphs and larvae in southern Scandinavia. For nymphs, the predicted abundance had a positive correlation with observed abundance...... the predicted distribution of larvae was mostly even throughout Denmark, it was primarily around the coastlines in Norway and Sweden. Abundance was fairly low overall except in some fragmented patches corresponding to forested habitats in the region. Machine learning techniques allow us to predict for larger...... the collected ticks for pathogens and using the same machine learning techniques to develop prevalence maps of the ScandTick region....

  13. Unexpected Decrease in Milk Production after Fenbendazole Treatment of Dairy Cows during Early Grazing Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravinet, Nadine; Chartier, Christophe; Bareille, Nathalie; Lehebel, Anne; Ponnau, Adeline; Brisseau, Nadine; Chauvin, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) infection can impair milk production (MP) in dairy cows. To investigate whether MP would be optimized by spring targeted-selective anthelmintic treatment in grazing cows, we assessed (1) the effect on MP of an anthelmintic treatment applied 1.5 to 2 months after turn-out, and (2) herd and individual indicators associated with the post-treatment MP response. A randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted in 13 dairy farms (578 cows) in western France in spring 2012. In each herd, lactating cows of the treatment group received fenbendazole orally, control cows remained untreated. Daily cow MP was recorded from 2 weeks before until 15 weeks after treatment. Individual serum pepsinogen and anti-Ostertagia antibody levels (expressed as ODR), faecal egg count and bulk tank milk (BTM) Ostertagia ODR were measured at treatment time. Anthelmintic treatment applied during the previous housing period was recorded for each cow. In each herd, information regarding heifers’ grazing and anthelmintic treatment history was collected to assess the Time of Effective Contact (TEC, in months) with GIN infective larvae before the first calving. The effect of treatment on weekly MP averages and its relationships with herd and individual indicators were studied using linear mixed models with two nested random effects (cow within herd). Unexpectedly, spring treatment had a significant detrimental effect on MP (-0.92 kg/cow/day on average). This negative MP response was particularly marked in high producing cows, in cows not treated during the previous housing period or with high pepsinogen levels, and in cows from herds with a high TEC or a high BTM ODR. This post-treatment decrease in MP may be associated with immuno-inflammatory mechanisms. Until further studies can assess whether this unexpected result can be generalized, non-persistent treatment of immunized adult dairy cows against GIN should not be recommended in early grazing season. PMID

  14. Spontaneous abortion and unexpected death: a critical discussion of Marquis on abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Mary Clayton

    2013-02-01

    In his classic paper, 'Why abortion is immoral', Don Marquis argues that what makes killing an adult seriously immoral is that it deprives the victim of the valuable future he/she would have otherwise had. Moreover, Marquis contends, because abortion deprives a fetus of the very same thing, aborting a fetus is just as seriously wrong as killing an adult. Marquis' argument has received a great deal of critical attention in the two decades since its publication. Nonetheless, there is a potential challenge to it that seems to have gone unnoticed. A significant percentage of fetuses are lost to spontaneous abortion. Once we bring this fact to our attention, it becomes less clear whether Marquis can use his account of the wrongness of killing to show that abortion is the moral equivalent of murder. In this paper, I explore the relevance of the rate of spontaneous abortion to Marquis' classic anti-abortion argument. I introduce a case I call Unexpected Death in which someone is about to commit murder, but, just as the would-be murderer is about to strike, his would-be victim dies unexpectedly. I then ask: what does Marquis' account of killing imply about the moral status of what the would-be murderer was about to do? I consider four responses Marquis could give to this question, and I examine what implications these responses have for Marquis' strategy of using his account of the wrongness of killing an adult to show that abortion is in the same moral category.

  15. The neural coding of expected and unexpected monetary performance outcomes: dissociations between active and observational learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellebaum, C; Jokisch, D; Gizewski, E R; Forsting, M; Daum, I

    2012-02-01

    Successful adaptation to the environment requires the learning of stimulus-response-outcome associations. Such associations can be learned actively by trial and error or by observing the behaviour and accompanying outcomes in other persons. The present study investigated similarities and differences in the neural mechanisms of active and observational learning from monetary feedback using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Two groups of 15 subjects each - active and observational learners - participated in the experiment. On every trial, active learners chose between two stimuli and received monetary feedback. Each observational learner observed the choices and outcomes of one active learner. Learning performance as assessed via active test trials without feedback was comparable between groups. Different activation patterns were observed for the processing of unexpected vs. expected monetary feedback in active and observational learners, particularly for positive outcomes. Activity for unexpected vs. expected reward was stronger in the right striatum in active learning, while activity in the hippocampus was bilaterally enhanced in observational and reduced in active learning. Modulation of activity by prediction error (PE) magnitude was observed in the right putamen in both types of learning, whereas PE related activations in the right anterior caudate nucleus and in the medial orbitofrontal cortex were stronger for active learning. The striatum and orbitofrontal cortex thus appear to link reward stimuli to own behavioural reactions and are less strongly involved when the behavioural outcome refers to another person's action. Alternative explanations such as differences in reward value between active and observational learning are also discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Stability of vertical posture explored with unexpected mechanical perturbations: synergy indices and motor equivalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagata, Momoko; Falaki, Ali; Latash, Mark L

    2018-03-21

    We explored the relations between indices of mechanical stability of vertical posture and synergy indices under unexpected perturbations. The main hypotheses predicted higher posture-stabilizing synergy indices and higher mechanical indices of center of pressure stability during perturbations perceived by subjects as less challenging. Healthy subjects stood on a force platform and held in fully extended arms a bar attached to two loads acting downward and upward. One of the loads was unexpectedly released by the experimenter causing a postural perturbations. In different series, subjects either knew or did not know which of the two loads would be released. Forward perturbations were perceived as more challenging and accompanied by co-activation patterns among the main agonist-antagonist pairs. Backward perturbation led to reciprocal muscle activation patterns and was accompanied by indices of mechanical stability and of posture-stabilizing synergy which indicated higher stability. Changes in synergy indices were observed as early as 50-100 ms following the perturbation reflecting involuntary mechanisms. In contrast, predictability of perturbation direction had weak or no effect on mechanical and synergy indices of stability. These observations are interpreted within a hierarchical scheme of synergic control of motor tasks and a hypothesis on the control of movements with shifts of referent coordinates. The findings show direct correspondence between stability indices based on mechanics and on the analysis of multi-muscle synergies. They suggest that involuntary posture-stabilizing mechanisms show synergic organization. They also show that predictability of perturbation direction has strong effects on anticipatory postural adjustment but not corrective adjustments. We offer an interpretation of co-activation patterns that questions their contribution to postural stability.

  17. Proteomic analysis of protein composition of rat forebrain cortex exposed to morphine for 10days; comparison with animals exposed to morphine and subsequently nurtured for 20days in the absence of this drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujcikova, Hana; Vosahlikova, Miroslava; Roubalova, Lenka; Svoboda, Petr

    2016-08-11

    Proteomic analysis was performed in post-nuclear supernatant fraction (PNS) prepared from forebrain cortex of rats exposed to increasing doses of morphine (10-50mg/kg) for 10days and sacrificed 24h (group +M10) or 20days (group +M10/-M20) after the last dose of morphine. PNS fraction was resolved by 2D-ELFO and stained by CBB. Analysis of the difference between (+M10) and (-M10) samples of PNS by PDQuest accompanied by MALDI-TOF MS/MS indicated the significant change of 28 proteins. Importantly, the number of altered proteins was decreased to 14 after 20days of nurturing animals in the absence of morphine. This new and important finding indicating the ability of mammalian organism to return to physiological norm after removal of the drug was verified by an independent methodology - gel-free & label-free quantification and normalization procedure denominated as MaxLFQ. The 113 proteins were identified as altered by morphine in (+M10) samples when compared with (-M10) samples of PNS and this number was decreased to 19 after 20days of nurturing the animals in the absence of this drug. Forebrain cortex of rats exposed to morphine for 10days is severely altered as far as the overall protein composition is involved. Depending on the method used for protein detection and quantification, 28 (MALDI-TOF MS/MS) or 113 (MaxLFQ) altered proteins were identified. Importantly, in rats sacrificed 20days after the last dose of morphine, the number of altered proteins was decreased to 14 (MALDI-TOF MS/MS) and 19 (MaxLFQ), respectively. Our data indicate the high ability of living organism to oppose the drastic, morphine-induced change of the target tissue protein composition with the aim to return to the physiological norm after complete removal of the drug. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Diversity and abundance of bacteria in an underground oil-storage cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kazuya; Kodama, Yumiko; Kaku, Nobuo

    2002-08-28

    Microorganisms inhabiting subterranean oil fields have recently attracted much attention. Since intact groundwater can easily be obtained from the bottom of underground oil-storage cavities without contamination by surface water, studies on such oil-storage cavities are expected to provide valuable information to understand microbial ecology of subterranean oil fields. DNA was extracted from the groundwater obtained from an oil-storage cavity situated at Kuji in Iwate, Japan, and 16S rRNA gene (16S rDNA) fragments were amplified by PCR using combinations of universal and Bacteria-specific primers. The sequence analysis of 154 clones produced 31 different bacterial sequence types (a unique clone or group of clones with sequence similarity of > 98). Major sequence types were related to Desulfotomaculum, Acetobacterium, Desulfovibrio, Desulfobacula, Zoogloea and Thiomicrospira denitrificans. The abundance in the groundwater of bacterial populations represented by these major sequence types was assessed by quantitative competitive PCR using specific primers, showing that five rDNA types except for that related to Desulfobacula shared significant proportions (more than 1%) of the total bacterial rDNA. Bacteria inhabiting the oil-storage cavity were unexpectedly diverse. A phylogenetic affiliation of cloned 16S rDNA sequences suggests that bacteria exhibiting different types of energy metabolism coexist in the cavity.

  19. Preserved scleral patch graft for unexpected extreme scleral thinning found at the scleral buckling procedure: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spela Stunf

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pre-existing scleral pathology is an important risk factor for globe rupture during scleral buckling procedures. We report here, the surgical management of an unexpected scleral pathology found at the scleral buckling procedure in a retinal detachment patient. A 77-year-old white female with retinal detachment underwent a scleral buckling procedure. The surgery was converted into a scleral graft procedure, as extreme scleral thinning was found intraoperatively. An alcohol-preserved donor sclera graft was used. The second surgery for definitive retinal alignment was performed two weeks later. The presented case of an unexpected scleral pathology in a retinal detachment patient was managed with a combination of scleral grafting and pars plana vitrectomy, without any major complications. The anatomical outcome was excellent and the scleral rupture was prevented; the visual outcome was satisfactory. A conversion of the scleral buckling procedure into a scleral graft procedure has proved to be safe and effective for unexpected scleral pathology.

  20. Diversity and abundance of the bacterial community of the red Macroalga Porphyra umbilicalis: did bacterial farmers produce macroalgae?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilibeth N Miranda

    Full Text Available Macroalgae harbor microbial communities whose bacterial biodiversity remains largely uncharacterized. The goals of this study were 1 to examine the composition of the bacterial community associated with Porphyra umbilicalis Kützing from Schoodic Point, ME, 2 determine whether there are seasonal trends in species diversity but a core group of bacteria that are always present, and 3 to determine how the microbial community associated with a laboratory strain (P.um.1 established in the presence of antibiotics has changed. P. umbilicalis blades (n = 5, fall 2010; n = 5, winter 2011; n = 2, clonal P.um.1 were analyzed by pyrosequencing over two variable regions of the 16 S rDNA (V5-V6 and V8; 147,880 total reads. The bacterial taxa present were classified at an 80% confidence threshold into eight phyla (Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Planctomycetes, Chloroflexi, Actinobacteria, Deinococcus-Thermus, Firmicutes, and the candidate division TM7. The Bacteroidetes comprised the majority of bacterial sequences on both field and lab blades, but the Proteobacteria (Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria were also abundant. Sphingobacteria (Bacteroidetes and Flavobacteria (Bacteroidetes had inverse abundances on natural versus P.um.1 blades. Bacterial communities were richer and more diverse on blades sampled in fall compared to winter. Significant differences were observed between microbial communities among all three groups of blades examined. Only two OTUs were found on all 12 blades, and only one of these, belonging to the Saprospiraceae (Bacteroidetes, was abundant. Lewinella (as 66 OTUs was found on all field blades and was the most abundant genus. Bacteria from the Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria and Planctomycetes that are known to digest the galactan sulfates of red algal cell walls were well-represented. Some of these taxa likely provide essential morphogenetic and beneficial nutritive factors to P. umbilicalis and may have had