WorldWideScience

Sample records for forced water flow

  1. Ice flow dynamics forced by rapid water pressure variations in subglacial granular beds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Anders; Egholm, David Lundbek; Beem, Lucas H.;

    2016-01-01

    mechanical processes driving transitions from stability to slip. We performed computational experiments that show how rearrangements of load-bearing force chains within the granular sediments drive the mechanical transitions. Cyclic variations in pore water pressure give rise to rate-dependent creeping......Glaciers and ice streams can move by deforming underlying water-saturated sediments, and the nonlinear mechanics of these materials are often invoked as the main reason for initiation, persistence, and shutdown of fast-flowing ice streams. Existing models have failed to fully explain the internal...

  2. Hydrogeology, simulated ground-water flow, and ground-water quality, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumouchelle, D.H.; Schalk, C.W.; Rowe, G.L.; De Roche, J.T.

    1993-01-01

    Ground water is the primary source of water in the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base area. The aquifer consists of glacial sands and gravels that fill a buried bedrock-valley system. Consolidated rocks in the area consist of poorly permeable Ordovician shale of the Richmondian stage, in the upland areas, the Brassfield Limestone of Silurian age. The valleys are filled with glacial sediments of Wisconsinan age consisting of clay-rich tills and coarse-grained outwash deposits. Estimates of hydraulic conductivity of the shales based on results of displacement/recovery tests range from 0.0016 to 12 feet per day; estimates for the glacial sediments range from less than 1 foot per day to more than 1,000 feet per day. Ground water flow from the uplands towards the valleys and the major rivers in the region, the Great Miami and the Mad Rivers. Hydraulic-head data indicate that ground water flows between the bedrock and unconsolidated deposits. Data from a gain/loss study of the Mad River System and hydrographs from nearby wells reveal that the reach of the river next to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base is a ground-water discharge area. A steady-state, three-dimensional ground-water-flow model was developed to simulate ground-water flow in the region. The model contains three layers and encompasses about 100 square miles centered on Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. Ground water enters the modeled area primarily by river leakage and underflow at the model boundary. Ground water exits the modeled area primarily by flow through the valleys at the model boundaries and through production wells. A model sensitivity analysis involving systematic changes in values of hydrologic parameters in the model indicates that the model is most sensitive to decreases in riverbed conductance and vertical conductance between the upper two layers. The analysis also indicates that the contribution of water to the buried-valley aquifer from the bedrock that forms the valley walls is about 2 to 4

  3. Numerical Study of Laminar Flow Forced Convection of Water-Al2O3 Nanofluids under Constant Wall Temperature Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsien-Hung Ting

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This numerical study is aimed at investigating the forced convection heat transfer and flow characteristics of water-based Al2O3 nanofluids inside a horizontal circular tube in the laminar flow regime under the constant wall temperature boundary condition. Five volume concentrations of nanoparticle, 0.1, 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 vol.%, are used and diameter of nanoparticle is 40 nm. Characteristics of heat transfer coefficient, Nusselt number, and pressure drop are reported. The results show that heat transfer coefficient of nanofluids increases with increasing Reynolds number or particle volume concentration. The heat transfer coefficient of the water-based nanofluid with 2 vol.% Al2O3 nanoparticles is enhanced by 32% compared with that of pure water. Increasing particle volume concentration causes an increase in pressure drop. At 2 vol.% of particle concentration, the pressure drop reaches a maximum that is nearly 5.7 times compared with that of pure water. It is important to note that the numerical results are in good agreement with published experimental data.

  4. Lorentz Force on Sodium and Chlorine Ions in a Salt Water Solution Flow under a Transverse Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, R.

    2009-01-01

    It is shown that, by applying elementary concepts in electromagnetism and electrochemistry to a system consisting of salt water flowing in a thin rectangular pipe at an average velocity v[subscript A] under the influence of a transverse magnetic field B[subscript 0], an electromotive force generator can be conceived. In fact, the Lorentz force…

  5. Transverse structure of tidal flow, residual flow and sediment concentration in estuaries: sensitivity to tidal forcing and water depth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijts, K.M.H.; de Swart, H.E.; Schramkowski, G.P.; Schuttelaars, H.M.

    2011-01-01

    An analytical and a numerical model are used to understand the response of velocity and sediment distributions over Gaussian-shaped estuarine cross-sections to changes in tidal forcing and water depth. The estuaries considered here are characterized by strong mixing and a relatively weak

  6. Hydrogeology and simulation of ground-water flow at Arnold Air Force Base, Coffee and Franklin counties, Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugh, C.J.; Mahoney, E.N.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Air Force at Arnold Air Force Base (AAFB), in Coffee and Franklin Counties, Tennessee, is investigating ground-water contamination in selected areas of the base. This report documents the results of a comprehensive investigation of the regional hydrogeology of the AAFB area. Three aquifers within the Highland Rim aquifer system, the shallow aquifer, the Manchester aquifer, and the Fort Payne aquifer, have been identified in the study area. Of these, the Manchester aquifer is the primary source of water for domestic use. Drilling and water- quality data indicate that the Chattanooga Shale is an effective confining unit, isolating the Highland Rim aquifer system from the deeper, upper Central Basin aquifer system. A regional ground-water divide, approximately coinciding with the Duck River-Elk River drainage divide, underlies AAFB and runs from southwest to northeast. The general direction of most ground-water flow is to the north- west or to the northwest or to the southeast from the divide towards tributary streams that drain the area. Recharge estimates range from 4 to 11 inches per year. Digital computer modeling was used to simulate and provide a better understanding of the ground-water flow system. The model indicates that most of the ground-water flow occurs in the shallow and Manchester aquifers. The model was most sensitive to increases in hydraulic conductivity and changes in recharge rates. Particle-tracking analysis from selected sites of ground-water contamination indicates a potential for contami- nants to be transported beyond the boundary of AAFB.

  7. Experimental and numerical modelling of surface water-groundwater flow and pollution interactions under tidal forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanoudaki, Katerina; Bockelmann-Evans, Bettina; Schaefer, Florian; Kampanis, Nikolaos; Nanou-Giannarou, Aikaterini; Stamou, Anastasios; Falconer, Roger

    2015-04-01

    Surface water and groundwater are integral components of the hydrologic continuum and the interaction between them affects both their quantity and quality. However, surface water and groundwater are often considered as two separate systems and are analysed independently. This separation is partly due to the different time scales, which apply in surface water and groundwater flows and partly due to the difficulties in measuring and modelling their interactions (Winter et al., 1998). Coastal areas in particular are a difficult hydrologic environment to represent with a mathematical model due to the large number of contributing hydrologic processes. Accurate prediction of interactions between coastal waters, groundwater and neighbouring wetlands, for example, requires the use of integrated surface water-groundwater models. In the past few decades a large number of mathematical models and field methods have been developed in order to quantify the interaction between groundwater and hydraulically connected surface water bodies. Field studies may provide the best data (Hughes, 1995) but are usually expensive and involve too many parameters. In addition, the interpretation of field measurements and linking with modelling tools often proves to be difficult. In contrast, experimental studies are less expensive and provide controlled data. However, experimental studies of surface water-groundwater interaction are less frequently encountered in the literature than filed studies (e.g. Ebrahimi et al., 2007; Kuan et al., 2012; Sparks et al., 2013). To this end, an experimental model has been constructed at the Hyder Hydraulics Laboratory at Cardiff University to enable measurements to be made of groundwater transport through a sand embankment between a tidal water body such as an estuary and a non-tidal water body such as a wetland. The transport behaviour of a conservative tracer was studied for a constant water level on the wetland side of the embankment, while running a

  8. Simulation of MHD CuO–water nanofluid flow and convective heat transfer considering Lorentz forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheikholeslami, Mohsen; Bandpy, Mofid Gorji [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Babol University of Technology, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ellahi, R., E-mail: rellahi@engr.ucr.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California Riverside (United States); Department of Mathematics and Statistics, FBAS, IIUI, H-10 Sector, Islamabad (Pakistan); Zeeshan, A. [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, FBAS, IIUI, H-10 Sector, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2014-11-15

    Magnetic field effect on CuO–water nanofluid flow and heat transfer in an enclosure which is heated from below is investigated. Lattice Boltzmann method is applied to solve the governing equations. The effective thermal conductivity and viscosity of nanofluid are calculated by KKL (Koo–Kleinstreuer–Li) correlation. In this model effect of Brownian motion on the effective thermal conductivity is considered. Effect of active parameter such as: Hartmann number, heat source length, nanoparticle volume fraction and Rayleigh numbers on the flow and heat transfer characteristics have been examined. The results reveal that the enhancement in heat transfer increases as Hartmann number and heat source length increase but it decreases with increase of Rayleigh number. Also it can be found that effect of Hartmann number and heat source length is more pronounced at high Rayleigh number. - Highlights: • This paper analyses the magnetic effect on CuO–water nanofluid. • Koo–Kleinstreuer–Li correlation and Lattice Boltzmann method are used. • Effects of pertinent parameters are presented through tables and graphs.

  9. Boxfish swimming paradox resolved: forces by the flow of water around the body promote manoeuvrability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wassenbergh, S; van Manen, K; Marcroft, T A; Alfaro, M E; Stamhuis, E J

    2015-02-06

    The shape of the carapace protecting the body of boxfishes has been attributed an important hydrodynamic role in drag reduction and in providing automatic, flow-direction realignment and is therefore used in bioinspired design of cars. However, tight swimming-course stabilization is paradoxical given the frequent, high-performance manoeuvring that boxfishes display in their spatially complex, coral reef territories. Here, by performing flow-tank measurements of hydrodynamic drag and yaw moments together with computational fluid dynamics simulations, we reverse several assumptions about the hydrodynamic role of the boxfish carapace. Firstly, despite serving as a model system in aerodynamic design, drag-reduction performance was relatively low compared with more generalized fish morphologies. Secondly, the current theory of course stabilization owing to flow over the boxfish carapace was rejected, as destabilizing moments were found consistently. This solves the boxfish swimming paradox: destabilizing moments enhance manoeuvrability, which is in accordance with the ecological demands for efficient turning and tilting.

  10. Effect of Inertial Force on Thermal Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication of Oil Film Bearing in Rolling Mill Lubricated by the Oil-water Two-phase Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Wang, You-Qiang; Wang, Jian; Fan, Xiao-Meng

    2016-05-01

    The oil film bearing in rolling mill as the research object in this paper is established oilwater two-phase flow of thermal elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) model with the inertia force and thermal effect of the Reynolds equation. The oil film bearing in rolling mill in oil-water two-phase flow is analyzed the effect on the pyrolysis with considering inertia force, and the lubricant film pressure, film thickness with the changes in the relationship between water content, rolling force and spindle speed. The results showed that the lubricant film thickness is increased and carrying capacity is also increased with considering inertial force. With the increase of water content, lubricant film thickness is increased and the carrying capacity is decreased.

  11. Boxfish swimming paradox resolved : forces by the flow of water around the body promote manoeuvrability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Wassenbergh, S.; van Manen, K.; Marcroft, T. A.; Alfaro, M. E.; Stamhuis, E. J.

    2015-01-01

    The shape of the carapace protecting the body of boxfishes has been attributed an important hydrodynamic role in drag reduction and in providing automatic, flow-direction realignment and is therefore used in bioinspired design of cars. However, tight swimming-course stabilization is paradoxical give

  12. Microphotonic Forces From Superfluid Flow

    CERN Document Server

    McAuslan, D L; Baker, C; Sachkou, Y; He, X; Sheridan, E; Bowen, W P

    2015-01-01

    In cavity optomechanics, radiation pressure and photothermal forces are widely utilized to cool and control micromechanical motion, with applications ranging from precision sensing and quantum information to fundamental science. Here, we realize an alternative approach to optical forcing based on superfluid flow and evaporation in response to optical heating. We demonstrate optical forcing of the motion of a cryogenic microtoroidal resonator at a level of 1.46 nN, roughly one order of magnitude larger than the radiation pressure force. We use this force to feedback cool the motion of a microtoroid mechanical mode to 137 mK. The photoconvective forces demonstrated here provide a new tool for high bandwidth control of mechanical motion in cryogenic conditions, and have the potential to allow efficient transfer of electromagnetic energy to motional kinetic energy.

  13. Quasi-two-layer finite-volume scheme for modeling shallow water flows with the presence of external forces

    CERN Document Server

    Karelsky, K V; Slavin, A G

    2011-01-01

    The numerical method for study of hydrodynamic flows over an arbitrary bed profile in the presence of external force is proposed in this paper. This method takes into account the external force effect, it uses the quasi-two-layer model of hydrodynamic flows over a stepwise boundary with consideration of features of the flow near the step. A distinctive feature of the proposed method is the consideration of the properties of the process of the waterfall, namely the fluid flow on the step in which the fluid does not wet part of the vertical wall of the step. The presence of dry zones in the vertical part of the step indicates violation of the conditions of hydrostatic flow. The quasi-two-layer approach allows to determine the size of the dry zone of the vertical component of the step. Consequently it gives an opportunity to figure out the amount of kinetic energy dissipation. There are performed the numerical simulations based on the proposed algorithm of various physical phenomena, such as a breakdown of the r...

  14. Forced hyperbolic mean curvature flow

    CERN Document Server

    Mao, Jing

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate two hyperbolic flows obtained by adding forcing terms in direction of the position vector to the hyperbolic mean curvature flows in \\cite{klw,hdl}. For the first hyperbolic flow, as in \\cite{klw}, by using support function, we reduce it to a hyperbolic Monge-Amp$\\grave{\\rm{e}}$re equation successfully, leading to the short-time existence of the flow by the standard theory of hyperbolic partial differential equation. If the initial velocity is non-negative and the coefficient function of the forcing term is non-positive, we also show that there exists a class of initial velocities such that the solution of the flow exists only on a finite time interval $[0,T_{max})$, and the solution converges to a point or shocks and other propagating discontinuities are generated when $t\\rightarrow{T_{max}}$. These generalize the corresponding results in \\cite{klw}. For the second hyperbolic flow, as in \\cite{hdl}, we can prove the system of partial differential equations related to the flow is ...

  15. Steady and transient forced convection heat transfer for water flowing in small tubes with exponentially increasing heat inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibahara, M.; Fukuda, K.; Liu, Q. S.; Hata, K.

    2017-03-01

    Steady and transient heat transfer coefficients for water flowing in small tubes with exponentially increasing heat inputs were measured. Platinum tubes with inner diameters of 1.0 and 2.0 mm were used as test tubes, which were mounted vertically in the experimental water loop. In the experiment, the upward flow velocity ranged from 2 to 16 m/s, and the corresponding Reynolds numbers ranged from 4.77 × 103 to 9.16 × 104 at the inlet liquid temperatures ranged from 298 to 343 K. The heat generation rate exponentially increased with the function. The period of the heat generation rate ranged from 24 ms to 17.5 s. Experimental results indicate that steady heat transfer coefficients decreased with the increase in the inner diameter of the small tube. Moreover, the ratio of bulk viscosity to near-wall viscosity of water increased with the rise in surface temperature of the vertical tube. From the experimental data, correlations of steady-state heat transfer for inner diameters of 1.0 and 2.0 mm were obtained. The heat transfer coefficient increased with decreasing the period of the heat generation rate as the flow velocity decreased. Moreover, the Nusselt number under the transient condition was affected by the Fourier number and the Reynolds number.

  16. Steady and transient forced convection heat transfer for water flowing in small tubes with exponentially increasing heat inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibahara, M.; Fukuda, K.; Liu, Q. S.; Hata, K.

    2016-06-01

    Steady and transient heat transfer coefficients for water flowing in small tubes with exponentially increasing heat inputs were measured. Platinum tubes with inner diameters of 1.0 and 2.0 mm were used as test tubes, which were mounted vertically in the experimental water loop. In the experiment, the upward flow velocity ranged from 2 to 16 m/s, and the corresponding Reynolds numbers ranged from 4.77 × 103 to 9.16 × 104 at the inlet liquid temperatures ranged from 298 to 343 K. The heat generation rate exponentially increased with the function. The period of the heat generation rate ranged from 24 ms to 17.5 s. Experimental results indicate that steady heat transfer coefficients decreased with the increase in the inner diameter of the small tube. Moreover, the ratio of bulk viscosity to near-wall viscosity of water increased with the rise in surface temperature of the vertical tube. From the experimental data, correlations of steady-state heat transfer for inner diameters of 1.0 and 2.0 mm were obtained. The heat transfer coefficient increased with decreasing the period of the heat generation rate as the flow velocity decreased. Moreover, the Nusselt number under the transient condition was affected by the Fourier number and the Reynolds number.

  17. Developing the laminar MHD forced convection flow of water/FMWNT carbon nanotubes in a microchannel imposed the uniform heat flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karimipour, Arash; Taghipour, Abdolmajid [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Najafabad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Najafabad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Malvandi, Amir, E-mail: amirmalvandi@aut.ac.ir [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Neyshabur Branch, Islamic Azad University, Neyshabur (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-12-01

    This paper aims to investigate magnetic field and slip effects on developing laminar forced convection of nanofluids in the microchannels. A novel mixture of water and FMWNT carbon nanotubes is used as the working fluid. To do this, fluid flow and heat transfer through a microchannel is simulated by a computer code in FORTRAN language. The mixture of FMWNT carbon nanotubes suspended in water is considered as the nanofluid. Slip velocity is supposed as the hydrodynamic boundary condition while the microchannel's lower wall is insulated and the top wall is under the effect of a constant heat flux. Moreover, the flow field is subjected to a magnetic field with a constant strength. The results are presented as the velocity, temperature and Nusselt number profiles. It is observed that nanofluid composed of water and carbon nanotubes (FMWNT) can work well to increase the heat transfer rate along the microchannel walls. Furthermore, it is indicated that imposing the magnetic field is very effective at the thermally developing region. In contrast, the magnetic field effect at fully developed region is insignificant, especially at low values of Reynolds number. - Highlights: • Simulation of water/FMWNT carbon nanotubes flow in a microchannel. • The effects of magnetic field strength on nanofluid's slip velocity. • The effects of Ha, Re, ϕ and slip coefficient on averaged Nusselt number. • Magnetic field effect at developing flow region is significant.

  18. Vorticity from irrotationally forced flow

    CERN Document Server

    Del Sordo, Fabio

    2010-01-01

    In the interstellar medium the turbulence is believed to be forced mostly through supernova explosions. In a first approximation these flows can be written as a gradient of a potential being thus devoid of vorticity. There are several mechanisms that could lead to vorticity generation, like viscosity and baroclinic terms, rotation, shear and magnetic fields, but it is not clear how effective they are, neither is it clear whether the vorticity is essential in determining the turbulent diffusion acting in the ISM. Here we present a study of the role of rotation, shear and baroclinicity in the generation of vorticity in the ISM.

  19. Developing the laminar MHD forced convection flow of water/FMWNT carbon nanotubes in a microchannel imposed the uniform heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimipour, Arash; Taghipour, Abdolmajid; Malvandi, Amir

    2016-12-01

    This paper aims to investigate magnetic field and slip effects on developing laminar forced convection of nanofluids in the microchannels. A novel mixture of water and FMWNT carbon nanotubes is used as the working fluid. To do this, fluid flow and heat transfer through a microchannel is simulated by a computer code in FORTRAN language. The mixture of FMWNT carbon nanotubes suspended in water is considered as the nanofluid. Slip velocity is supposed as the hydrodynamic boundary condition while the microchannel's lower wall is insulated and the top wall is under the effect of a constant heat flux. Moreover, the flow field is subjected to a magnetic field with a constant strength. The results are presented as the velocity, temperature and Nusselt number profiles. It is observed that nanofluid composed of water and carbon nanotubes (FMWNT) can work well to increase the heat transfer rate along the microchannel walls. Furthermore, it is indicated that imposing the magnetic field is very effective at the thermally developing region. In contrast, the magnetic field effect at fully developed region is insignificant, especially at low values of Reynolds number.

  20. Field measurement of basal forces generated by erosive debris flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, S.W.; Tucker, G.E.; Kean, J.W.; Coe, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    It has been proposed that debris flows cut bedrock valleys in steeplands worldwide, but field measurements needed to constrain mechanistic models of this process remain sparse due to the difficulty of instrumenting natural flows. Here we present and analyze measurements made using an automated sensor network, erosion bolts, and a 15.24 cm by 15.24 cm force plate installed in the bedrock channel floor of a steep catchment. These measurements allow us to quantify the distribution of basal forces from natural debris‒flow events that incised bedrock. Over the 4 year monitoring period, 11 debris‒flow events scoured the bedrock channel floor. No clear water flows were observed. Measurements of erosion bolts at the beginning and end of the study indicated that the bedrock channel floor was lowered by 36 to 64 mm. The basal force during these erosive debris‒flow events had a large‒magnitude (up to 21 kN, which was approximately 50 times larger than the concurrent time‒averaged mean force), high‒frequency (greater than 1 Hz) fluctuating component. We interpret these fluctuations as flow particles impacting the bed. The resulting variability in force magnitude increased linearly with the time‒averaged mean basal force. Probability density functions of basal normal forces were consistent with a generalized Pareto distribution, rather than the exponential distribution that is commonly found in experimental and simulated monodispersed granular flows and which has a lower probability of large forces. When the bed sediment thickness covering the force plate was greater than ~ 20 times the median bed sediment grain size, no significant fluctuations about the time‒averaged mean force were measured, indicating that a thin layer of sediment (~ 5 cm in the monitored cases) can effectively shield the subjacent bed from erosive impacts. Coarse‒grained granular surges and water‒rich, intersurge flow had very similar basal force distributions despite

  1. The practice of chemical treatment of the water/steam circuits in plants with forced flow once-through boilers. Praxis der chemischen Konditionierung von Wasser-Dampfkreislaeufen in Anlagen mit Zwangdurchlaufkesseln

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bursik, A. (Grosskraftwerk Mannheim AG (Germany)); Kittel, H. (VGB-Geschaeftsstelle, Essen (Germany))

    1992-02-01

    In 1990, a statistical survey was undertaken into the status of chemical treatment of water/steam circuits in plants with once-through forced-flow boilers. The results were reported at the VGB Conference on 'Chemistry in the Power Station 1990'. This paper imparts to the operators of plants with once-through forced-flow boilers additional information about the practice of chemical treatment. It contains guidelines concerning the chemicals used and also instructions about dosing points for individual materials and the type of dosing to be used in continuous operation. (orig.).

  2. Fluid Flows driven by Oscillating Body Force

    CERN Document Server

    Vladimirov, V A

    2016-01-01

    In this note we consider general formulation of Euler's equations for an inviscid incompressible homogeneous fluid with an oscillating body force. Our aim is to derive the averaged equations for these flows with the help of two-timing method. Our main result is the general and simple form of the equation describing the averaged flows, which are derived without making any additional assumptions. The presented results can have many interesting applications.

  3. Numerical prediction of impact force in cavitating flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, B [Department of Thermal Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Hydroscience and Engineering, Tsinghua Univeersity, Beijing, 100084 (China); Wang, H, E-mail: bszhu@mail.tsinghua.edu.c [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China)

    2010-08-15

    An analytical method including a macroscopic cavitation model based on the homogeneous flow theory and a microscopic cavitation model based on the bubble dynamic was proposed for the prediction of the impact force caused by cavitation bubbles collapse in cavitating flows. A Large Eddy Simulation (LES) solver incorporated the macroscopic cavitation model was applied to simulate the unsteady cavitating flows. Based on the simulated flow field, the evolution of the cavitation bubbles was determined by a microscopic cavitation model from the resolution of a Rayleigh-Plesset equation including of the effects of the surface tension, the viscosity and compressibility of fluid, thermal conduction and radiation, the phase transition of water vapor at interface and chemical reactions. The cavitation flow around a hydrofoil was simulated to validate the macroscopic cavitation model. A good quantitative agreement was obtained between the prediction and the experiment. The proposed analytical method was applied to predict the impact force at cavitation bubbles collapse on a KT section in cavitating flows. It was found that the shock pressure caused by cavitation bubble collapse is very high. The impact force was predicted accurately comparing with the experimental data.

  4. Irreversible energy flow in forced Vlasov dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Plunk, Gabriel G.

    2014-10-01

    © EDP Sciences, Società Italiana di Fisica, Springer-Verlag. The recent paper of Plunk [G.G. Plunk, Phys. Plasmas 20, 032304 (2013)] considered the forced linear Vlasov equation as a model for the quasi-steady state of a single stable plasma wavenumber interacting with a bath of turbulent fluctuations. This approach gives some insight into possible energy flows without solving for nonlinear dynamics. The central result of the present work is that the forced linear Vlasov equation exhibits asymptotically zero (irreversible) dissipation to all orders under a detuning of the forcing frequency and the characteristic frequency associated with particle streaming. We first prove this by direct calculation, tracking energy flow in terms of certain exact conservation laws of the linear (collisionless) Vlasov equation. Then we analyze the steady-state solutions in detail using a weakly collisional Hermite-moment formulation, and compare with numerical solution. This leads to a detailed description of the Hermite energy spectrum, and a proof of no dissipation at all orders, complementing the collisionless Vlasov result.

  5. Evidence for water structuring forces between surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanley, Christopher B [ORNL; Rau, Dr. Donald [National Institutes of Health

    2011-01-01

    Structured water on apposing surfaces can generate significant energies due to reorganization and displacement as the surfaces encounter each other. Force measurements on a multitude of biological structures using the osmotic stress technique have elucidated commonalities that point toward an underlying hydration force. In this review, the forces of two contrasting systems are considered in detail: highly charged DNA and nonpolar, uncharged hydroxypropyl cellulose. Conditions for both net repulsion and attraction, along with the measured exclusion of chemically different solutes from these macromolecular surfaces, are explored and demonstrate features consistent with a hydration force origin. Specifically, the observed interaction forces can be reduced to the effects of perturbing structured surface water.

  6. Drag Force Anemometer Used in Supersonic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fralick, Gustave C.

    1998-01-01

    To measure the drag on a flat cantilever beam exposed transversely to a flow field, the drag force anemometer (beam probe) uses strain gauges attached on opposite sides of the base of the beam. This is in contrast to the hot wire anemometer, which depends for its operation on the variation of the convective heat transfer coefficient with velocity. The beam probe retains the high-frequency response (up to 100 kHz) of the hot wire anemometer, but it is more rugged, uses simpler electronics, is relatively easy to calibrate, is inherently temperature compensated, and can be used in supersonic flow. The output of the probe is proportional to the velocity head of the flow, 1/2 rho u(exp 2) (where rho is the fluid density and u is the fluid velocity). By adding a static pressure tap and a thermocouple to measure total temperature, one can determine the Mach number, static temperature, density, and velocity of the flow.

  7. 3d Forced multiphase flow on the pore scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, Hagen; Singh, Kamaljit; Scheel, Mario; Dimichiel, Marco; Herminghaus, Stephan; Seemann, Ralf

    2013-11-01

    Using ultra fast x-ray tomography the forced imbibition of an aqueous phase into an initially oil filled matrix is studied. The water is volume controlled flushed into cylindrical columns filled with oil saturated spherical bead packs. The oil displacement is imaged in real time having a spacial resolution of 11 microns and a temporal resolution of about 1 second. To clearly distinguish the aqueous from the oily phase a contrast agent was added to the aqueous phase. The influence of wettability, oil viscosity, gravity and flow velocity was explored and analyzed in terms of temporal development of oil saturation and front shape. It turned out that capillary forces are the key to understand the forced multiphase behavior in the explored parameter range. Funding was provided by the BP-ExploRe project.

  8. Forces on stationary particles in near-bed turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeeckle, M.W.; Nelson, J.M.; Shreve, R.L.

    2007-01-01

    In natural flows, bed sediment particles are entrained and moved by the fluctuating forces, such as lift and drag, exerted by the overlying flow on the particles. To develop a better understanding of these forces and the relation of the forces to the local flow, the downstream and vertical components of force on near-bed fixed particles and of fluid velocity above or in front of them were measured synchronously at turbulence-resolving frequencies (200 or 500 Hz) in a laboratory flume. Measurements were made for a spherical test particle fixed at various heights above a smooth bed, above a smooth bed downstream of a downstream-facing step, and in a gravel bed of similarly sized particles as well as for a cubical test particle and 7 natural particles above a smooth bed. Horizontal force was well correlated with downstream velocity and not correlated with vertical velocity or vertical momentum flux. The standard drag formula worked well to predict the horizontal force, but the required value of the drag coefficient was significantly higher than generally used to model bed load motion. For the spheres, cubes, and natural particles, average drag coefficients were found to be 0.76, 1.36, and 0.91, respectively. For comparison, the drag coefficient for a sphere settling in still water at similar particle Reynolds numbers is only about 0.4. The variability of the horizontal force relative to its mean was strongly increased by the presence of the step and the gravel bed. Peak deviations were about 30% of the mean force for the sphere over the smooth bed, about twice the mean with the step, and 4 times it for the sphere protruding roughly half its diameter above the gravel bed. Vertical force correlated poorly with downstream velocity, vertical velocity, and vertical momentum flux whether measured over or ahead of the test particle. Typical formulas for shear-induced lift based on Bernoulli's principle poorly predict the vertical forces on near-bed particles. The

  9. Computational Studies of Lobed Forced Mixer Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.Hu; S.C.M.Yu; 等

    1998-01-01

    Full Navier-Stokes Analyses have been conducted for the flows behind the trailing edge of a lobed forced mixer,The governing equations are derived from the time-dependent compressible Navier-Stokes equations and discretized in the finite-difference form.A simple two-layer eddy viscosity model has also been used to account for the turbulence.Computed results are compared with some of the velocity measurements using a laser-Doppler anemomter(Yu and Yip (1997),In General,good agreement can be obtained in the streamwise mean velocity distribution but the decay of the streamwise circulation is underpredicted.Some suggestions to the discrepancy are proposed.

  10. Air-water flow in subsurface systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, A.; Mishra, P.

    2013-12-01

    Groundwater traces its roots to tackle challenges of safe and reliable drinking water and food production. When the groundwater level rises, air pressure in the unsaturated Vadose zone increases, forcing air to escape from the ground surface. Abnormally high and low subsurface air pressure can be generated when the groundwater system, rainfall, and sea level fluctuation are favorably combined [Jiao and Li, 2004]. Through this process, contamination in the form of volatile gases may diffuse from the ground surface into residential areas, or possibly move into groundwater from industrial waste sites. It is therefore crucial to understand the combined effects of air-water flow in groundwater system. Here we investigate theoretically and experimentally the effects of air and water flow in groundwater system.

  11. Water flow through temperate glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountain, A.G.; Walder, J.S.

    1998-01-01

    Understanding water movement through a glacier is fundamental to several critical issues in glaciology, including glacier dynamics, glacier-induced floods, and the prediction of runoff from glacierized drainage basins. to this end we have synthesized a conceptual model os water movement through a temperate glacier from the surface to the outlet stream. Processes that regulate the rate and distribution of water input at the glacier surface and that regulate water movement from the surface to the bed play important but commonly neglected roles in glacier hydrology. Where a glacier is covered by a layer of porous, permeable firn (the accumulation zone), the flux of water to the glacier interior varies slowly because the firn temporarily stores water and thereby smooths out variations in the supply rate. In the firn-free ablation zone, in contrast, the flux of water into the glacier depends directly on the rate of surface melt or rainfall and therefore varies greatly in time. Water moves from the surface to the bed through an upward branching arborescent network consisting of both steeply inclined conduits, formed by the enlargement of intergranular veins, and gently inclined conduits, sprqwned by water flow along the bottoms of near-surface fractures (crevasses). Englacial drainage conduits deliver water to the glacier bed at a linited number of points, probably a long distance downglacier of where water enters the glacier. Englacial conduits supplied from the accumulation zone are quasi steady state features that convey the slowly varying water flux delivered via the firn. their size adjusts so that they are usually full of water and flow is pressurized. In contrast, water flow in englacial conduits supplied from the ablation area is pressurized only near times of peak daily flow or during rainstorms; flow is otherwise in an open-channel configuration. The subglacial drainage system typically consists of several elements that are distinct both morpphologically and

  12. A modelling study of the influence of anomalous wind forcing over the Barents Sea on the Atlantic water flow to the Arctic Ocean in the period 1979-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciniak, Jakub; Schlichtholz, Pawel; Maslowski, Wieslaw

    2016-04-01

    Arctic climate system is influenced by oceanic heat transport with the Atlantic water (AW) streaming towards the Arctic Ocean in two branches, through the deep Fram Strait and the shallow Barents Sea. In Fram Strait, the AW submerges below the Polar surface water and then flows cyclonically along the margin of the Arctic Ocean as a subsurface water mass in the Arctic Slope Current. In contrast to the Fram Strait branch, which is the major source of heat for the Arctic Ocean, most of the heat influx to the Barents Sea through the Barents Sea opening (BSO) is passed to the atmosphere. Only cold remnants of AW outflow to the Arctic Ocean through the northeastern gate of the Barents Sea. Some AW entering the Barents Sea recirculates westward, contributing to an outflow from the Barents Sea through the BSO along the shelf slope south of Bear Island, in the Bear Island Slope Current. Even though the two-branched AW flow toward the Arctic Ocean has been known for more than a century, little is known about co-variability of heat fluxes in the two branches, its mechanisms and climatic implications. Recent studies indicate that the Bear Island Slope Current may play a role in this co-variability. Here, co-variability of the flow through the BSO and Fram Strait is investigated using a pan-Arctic coupled ice-ocean hindcast model run for the period 1979-2004 and forced with daily atmospheric data from the ECMWF. Significant wintertime co-variability between the volume transport in the Bear Island and Arctic slope currents and its link to wind forcing over the Barents Sea is confirmed. It is found that the volume transports in these currents are, however, not correlated in the annual mean and that the wintertime co-variability of these currents has no immediate effect on either the net heat flux through the BSO or the net heat flux divergence in the Barents Sea. It is shown that the main climatic effect of wind forcing over the northern Barents Sea shelf is to induce temperature

  13. The impact of fluid flow on force chains in granular media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabadi, Nariman; Jang, Jaewon

    2017-01-01

    Fluid flow through granular media is an important process found in nature and various engineering applications. The effect of fluid flow on the evolution of force chains in the granular media is explored using the photoelasticity theory. A transparent cell is designed to contain several photoelastic disks of different sizes and to allow fluid flow through the particle packing. Water is injected into the cell while the particle packing is under confining stress. Several images are taken for the conditions of different confining stresses and fluid injection rates. An algorithm of an image processing technique is developed to detect the orientation and magnitude of contact forces. The results show that forces in parallel and transverse to the flow direction increase with increasing water velocity, while parallel force shows a higher increasing rate.

  14. Surface Forces on a Deforming Ellipsoid in Shear Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Kightley, E P; Evans, J A; Bortz, D M

    2016-01-01

    We present a model for computing the surface force density on a fluid ellipsoid in simple shear flow, which we derive by coupling existing models for the shape of a fluid droplet and the surface force density on a solid ellipsoid. The primary contribution of this coupling is to develop a method to compute the force acting against a plane intersecting the ellipsoid, which we call the fragmentation force. The model can be used to simulate the motion, shape, surface force density, and breakage of fluid droplets and colloidal aggregates in shear flow.

  15. Water Resources Investigations at Edwards Air Force Base since 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneed, Michelle; Nishikawa, Tracy; Martin, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) in southern California (fig. 1) has relied on ground water to meet its water-supply needs. The extraction of ground water has led to two major problems that can directly affect the mission of EAFB: declining water levels (more than 120 ft since the 1920s) and land subsidence, a gradual downward movement of the land surface (more than 4 ft since the late 1920s). As water levels decline, this valuable resource becomes depleted, thus requiring mitigating measures. Land subsidence has caused cracked (fissured) runways and accelerated erosion on Rogers lakebed. In 1988, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Air Force, began investigations of the effects of declining water levels and land subsidence at EAFB and possible mitigation measures, such as the injection of imported surface water into the ground-water system. The cooperative investigations included data collection and analyses, numerical simulations of ground-water flow and land subsidence, and development of a preliminary simulation-optimization model. The results of these investigations indicate that the injection of imported water may help to control land subsidence; however, the potential ground-water-quality impacts are unknown.

  16. Impact of climate forcing uncertainty and human water use on global and continental water balance components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller Schmied, Hannes; Adam, Linda; Eisner, Stephanie; Fink, Gabriel; Flörke, Martina; Kim, Hyungjun; Oki, Taikan; Portmann, Felix Theodor; Reinecke, Robert; Riedel, Claudia; Song, Qi; Zhang, Jing; Döll, Petra

    2016-10-01

    The assessment of water balance components using global hydrological models is subject to climate forcing uncertainty as well as to an increasing intensity of human water use within the 20th century. The uncertainty of five state-of-the-art climate forcings and the resulting range of cell runoff that is simulated by the global hydrological model WaterGAP is presented. On the global land surface, about 62 % of precipitation evapotranspires, whereas 38 % discharges into oceans and inland sinks. During 1971-2000, evapotranspiration due to human water use amounted to almost 1 % of precipitation, while this anthropogenic water flow increased by a factor of approximately 5 between 1901 and 2010. Deviation of estimated global discharge from the ensemble mean due to climate forcing uncertainty is approximately 4 %. Precipitation uncertainty is the most important reason for the uncertainty of discharge and evapotranspiration, followed by shortwave downward radiation. At continental levels, deviations of water balance components due to uncertain climate forcing are higher, with the highest discharge deviations occurring for river discharge in Africa (-6 to 11 % from the ensemble mean). Uncertain climate forcings also affect the estimation of irrigation water use and thus the estimated human impact of river discharge. The uncertainty range of global irrigation water consumption amounts to approximately 50 % of the global sum of water consumption in the other water use sector.

  17. Numerical Modeling of Debris Flow Force Caused by Climate Change and Its application to Check Dam

    Science.gov (United States)

    KIM, S. D.; Jun, K.; JUN, B. H.; Lee, H. J.; TAK, W. J.

    2016-12-01

    Due to global warming, climate change cause a super hurricane and heavy rainfall frequently. Heavy rainfall cause by debris flow in mountainous terrains, and disasters by debris flow force have continuously increased. The purpose of this study is to analyze the characteristics of debris flow force acting on the check dam. The numerical approach to the debris flow force was performed by the Finite Difference Method (FDM) based on the erosion-deposition combination model including the equation of continuity, mass conservation, and momentum conservation. In order to investigate behavior of the debris flow force according to the variance of supplying water discharge and channel slope angle, a rectangular straight channel and one closed type check dam was set up for conducting numerical simulations. As the supply water discharges increase, the curve of the impact force by debris flow becomes unstable and fluctuation with high impact force occurred as time passes. And the peak impact force showed a steeper slope and appeared more quickly, the high impact force undergoes a fluctuation with high speed, and acting on the check dam. At the mountainous upstream, strong rainfall energy provoke a repeat erosion and deposition which results in debris flow force causing much damage along the check dam at the mountainous place. The analyses of the present study help provide information to predict future debris flow force and how to design for the check dam. This research was supported by a grant [MPSS-NH-2014-74] through the Disaster and Safety Management Institute funded by Ministry of Public Safety and Security of Korean government

  18. Flow-Force Compensation in a Hydraulic Valve

    CERN Document Server

    Lugowski, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Flow-reaction forces acting in hydraulic valves have been studied for many decades. Despite this, they are difficult to account for due to the complexities of the jet flow. This paper focuses only on the reduction, also referred to as compensation, of the flow force as applied to a valve spool featuring a profile of a turbine bucket. Fluid power textbooks explain the compensation taking place on such a profile by applying Newton laws of motion to the profile and deliver an equation for the magnitude and the direction of the flow force. This paper shows that both the magnitude and the direction of the compensating flow force are incorrect if calculated from the textbook equation. A corrected analysis of the dynamic forces is presented that are in agreement with earlier experiments by this author. It follows that the compensating flow force should be calculated from the static-pressure imbalance on the spool profile. That is, not Newton but Pascal law should be applied to calculate the compensating flow force.

  19. Steady vortex force theory and slender-wing flow diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.T.Yang; R.K.Zhang; Y.R.An; J.Z.Wu

    2007-01-01

    The concept vortex force in aerodynamics is sys-tematically examined based on a new steady vortex-force theory (Wu et al., Vorticity and vortex dynamics, Springer, 2006) which expresses the aerodynamic force (and moment) by the volume and boundary integrals of the Lamb vector.In this paper, the underlying physics of this theory is explo-red, including the general role of the Lamb vector in non-linear aerodynamics, its initial formation, and its relevance to the total-pressure non-uniformity. As a typical example, the theory is applied to the flow over a slender delta wing at a large angle of attack. The highly localized flow structures with high Lamb-vector peaks are identified in terms of their net contribution to various constituents of the total aerody-namic force. This vortex-force diagnosis sheds new light on the flow control and configuration optimization.

  20. Impulsive force of debris flow on a curved dam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chjeng-Lun SHIEH; Chia-Hsien TING; Hung-Wen PAN

    2008-01-01

    Although Sabo dams are an efficient method for river and basin management,traditional Sabo dams have a great impact on ecology and landscape.Moreover,such dams are hit and often damaged by great impulsive force when they block the debris flow.Therefore,alternative shapes for Sabo dam deserve thorough investigation.In this investigation,a curved dam was designed by changing the upstream-dam-surface geometric shape to reduce the impulsive force of the debris flow,with enhanced stability and reduced concrete mass being the anticipated outcomes.In this study,the flume and laboratory facilities simulated the impulsive force of the debris flow to the Sabo dams.Three geometric forms,including vertical,slanted and curved Sabo dams,were used to determine the impulsive force.Impulsive force theories of the debris flow were derived from the momentum equation and the Bernoulli equation.In these,the impulsive force was balanced by the friction force of the Sabo dam and the opposite force of the load cell behind the dam as it was hit by the debris flow.Positive correlations were found when comparing the experimental data with the theoretical results.These findings suggest that our impulsive force theory has predictive validity with regard to the experimental data.The results from both theory and experimental data clearly show that curved dams were sustained less force than the other dams under the same debris flow.This comparison demonstrates the importance of curved geometry for a well-designed Sabo dam.

  1. Unsteady hydrodynamic forces acting on a robotic hand and its flow field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Hideki; Nakashima, Motomu; Ozaki, Takashi; Matsuuchi, Kazuo

    2013-07-26

    This study aims to clarify the mechanism of generating unsteady hydrodynamic forces acting on a hand during swimming in order to directly measure the forces, pressure distribution, and flow field around the hand by using a robotic arm and particle image velocimetry (PIV). The robotic arm consisted of the trunk, shoulder, upper arm, forearm, and hand, and it was independently computer controllable in five degrees of freedom. The elbow-joint angle of the robotic arm was fixed at 90°, and the arm was moved in semicircles around the shoulder joint in a plane perpendicular to the water surface. Two-component PIV was used for flow visualization around the hand. The data of the forces and pressure acting on the hand were sampled at 200Hz and stored on a PC. When the maximum resultant force acting on the hand was observed, a pair of counter-rotating vortices appeared on the dorsal surface of the hand. A vortex attached to the hand increased the flow velocity, which led to decreased surface pressure, increasing the hydrodynamic forces. This phenomenon is known as the unsteady mechanism of force generation. We found that the drag force was 72% greater and the lift force was 4.8 times greater than the values estimated under steady flow conditions. Therefore, it is presumable that swimmers receive the benefits of this unsteady hydrodynamic force.

  2. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF SUCCINONITRITE DENDRITIC GROWTH IN A FORCED FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Numerical simulation based on phase field method is performed to describe solidifica-tion process of pure material in a free or forced flow. The evolution of the interface is showed, and the effects of mesh grid and flow velocity on succinonitrite shape are studied. These results indicate that crystal grows into an equiaxial dendrite in a free flow and into an asymmetrical dendritic in a forced flow. With increasing flow velo-city, the upstream dendritic arm tip grows faster and the downstream arm grows slower. However, the evolution of the perpendicular tip has no significant change. In addition, mesh grid has no influence on dendritic growth shape when mesh grid is above 300×300.

  3. Erosion and basal forces in granular flow experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanvitale, Nicoletta; Bowman, Elisabeth

    2016-04-01

    Extreme mass wasting avalanche events such as rock, snow and ice avalanches, debris flows, and pyroclastic flows are among the most hazardous geological phenomena. These events driven by gravity, can travel for long distance and high speed, increasing their volumes as they can entertain material along their path. The erosion of material and its entrainment can greatly affect the overall dynamics of transportation, either enhancing or impeding the avalanche mobility depending on flow dynamics and characteristics of the substrate. However, the mechanisms and processes acting at the base as they travel over deformable or erodible substrates are still poor understood. Experiments, simulations and field measurements indicate that large fluctuations can occur in basal forces and stresses, which may be the result of non-uniform load transfer within the mass, and rolling, bouncing and sliding of the particles along the bed. In dense granular materials, force distributions can propagate through filamentary chain structures that carry a large fraction of the forces within the system. Photoelastic experiments on two-dimensional, monodisperse, gravity-driven flows have shown that force chains can transmit high localized forces to the boundary of dense granular flows. Here we describe the preliminary setup and results of 2D experiments on polydisperse granular flows of photoelastic disks down a small flume designed to acquire the forces exerted at the boundaries of the flow and to analyze their effects on an erodible bed. The intended outcome of this research is to provide better information on the complex mechanism of erosion and its effects on avalanche behaviour.

  4. Control system for hot water preparing on flow rate principle. Force PT C pressure- and thermostat control system; Regler fuer die Warmwasserbereitung nach dem Durchflussprinzip. Force PT C Druck- und Thermostatregler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, M. [Redan A/S, Risskov (Denmark)

    2003-08-01

    Water heating is getting more important as the heat demand of buildings decreases while customers demand higher comfort. The heating method employed influences the cooling of district heating water, energy consumption and the energy efficiency of the district heating system in general, especially in district heating systems with low temperature and pressure ratios. [German] Aufgrund des immer geringer werdenden Heizwaermebedarfs von Gebaeuden und der gestiegenen Komfortanprueche der Kunden gewinnt die Warmwasserbereitung immer mehr an Bedeutung. Das eingesetzte Verfahren fuer die Erzeugung von Warmwasser hat dabei grossen Einfluss auf die Abkuehlung des Fernwaermewassers, den Energieverbrauch und die Energieeffizienz im gesamten Fernwaermesystem. Dies gilt sowohl fuer Nahwaermesystems mit geringeren Temperatur- und Druckverhaeltnissen. (orig.)

  5. Detailed flow and force measurements in a rotated triangular tube bundle subjected to two-phase cross-flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, M. J.; Zhang, C.; Mureithi, N. W.; Pamfil, D.

    2005-05-01

    Two-phase cross-flow exists in many shell-and-tube heat exchangers. A detailed knowledge of the characteristics of two-phase cross-flow in tube bundles is required to understand and formulate flow-induced vibration parameters such as damping, fluidelastic instability, and random excitation due to turbulence. An experimental program was undertaken with a rotated-triangular array of cylinders subjected to air/water flow to simulate two-phase mixtures. The array is made of relatively large diameter cylinders (38 mm) to allow for detailed two-phase flow measurements between cylinders. Fiber-optic probes were developed to measure local void fraction. Local flow velocities and bubble diameters or characteristic lengths of the two-phase mixture are obtained by using double probes. Both the dynamic lift and drag forces were measured with a strain gauge instrumented cylinder.

  6. Forces on bends and T-joints due to multiphase flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belfroid, S.P.C.; Cargnelutti, M.F.; Schiferli, W.; Osch, M.M.E. van

    2010-01-01

    To be able to assess the mechanical integrity of piping structures for loading to multiphase flow conditions, air-water experiments were carried out in a horizontal 1" pipe system. Forces and accelerations were measured on a number of bends and T-joint configurations for a wide range of operating co

  7. Forces on bends and T-joints due to multiphase flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belfroid, S.P.C.; Cargnelutti, M.F.; Schiferli, W.; Osch, M.M.E. van

    2010-01-01

    To be able to assess the mechanical integrity of piping structures for loading to multiphase flow conditions, air-water experiments were carried out in a horizontal 1" pipe system. Forces and accelerations were measured on a number of bends and T-joint configurations for a wide range of operating

  8. Hidden force resolving water ice densities

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Chang Q

    2013-01-01

    Inter-electron-pair Coulomb repulsion and the thermodynamic-disparity of the master-slave-segmented H bond are shown to originate the density anomalies of water ice. In the liquid and solid phases, the softer non-bond (of lower specific heat) serves as the master that contracts largely and meanwhile forces the stiffer real-bond as slave into Coulomb-repulsion-driven slight elongation, leading to the O-H:O cooling contraction and the seemingly normal cooling densification; at the transition phase, the master-slave swap roles, resulting in the O:-H-O freezing elongation and volume expansion. The O:H-O of ice is longer than that of water, and therefore, ice floats. In addition, angle relaxation also contributes to the volume change during the process of relaxation.

  9. Pulsatile blood flow, shear force, energy dissipation and Murray's Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bengtsson Hans-Uno

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Murray's Law states that, when a parent blood vessel branches into daughter vessels, the cube of the radius of the parent vessel is equal to the sum of the cubes of the radii of daughter blood vessels. Murray derived this law by defining a cost function that is the sum of the energy cost of the blood in a vessel and the energy cost of pumping blood through the vessel. The cost is minimized when vessel radii are consistent with Murray's Law. This law has also been derived from the hypothesis that the shear force of moving blood on the inner walls of vessels is constant throughout the vascular system. However, this derivation, like Murray's earlier derivation, is based on the assumption of constant blood flow. Methods To determine the implications of the constant shear force hypothesis and to extend Murray's energy cost minimization to the pulsatile arterial system, a model of pulsatile flow in an elastic tube is analyzed. A new and exact solution for flow velocity, blood flow rate and shear force is derived. Results For medium and small arteries with pulsatile flow, Murray's energy minimization leads to Murray's Law. Furthermore, the hypothesis that the maximum shear force during the cycle of pulsatile flow is constant throughout the arterial system implies that Murray's Law is approximately true. The approximation is good for all but the largest vessels (aorta and its major branches of the arterial system. Conclusion A cellular mechanism that senses shear force at the inner wall of a blood vessel and triggers remodeling that increases the circumference of the wall when a shear force threshold is exceeded would result in the observed scaling of vessel radii described by Murray's Law.

  10. Ultrasonic Imaging of Hemodynamic Force in Carotid Blood Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, N.; Homma, K.

    Hemodynamic forces including blood pressure and shear stress affect vulnerable plaque rupture in arteriosclerosis and biochemical activation of endothelium such as NO production. In this study, a method for estimating and imaging shear stress and pressure gradient distributions in blood vessel as the hemodynamic force based on viscosity estimation is presented. Feasibility of this method was investigated by applying to human carotid blood flow. Estimated results of shear stress and pressure gradient distributions coincide with the ideal distributions obtained by numerical simulation and flow-phantom experiment.

  11. Fluid dynamics: Water flows out of touch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hof, Björn

    2017-01-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces reduce the frictional drag between water and solid materials, but this effect is often temporary. The realization of sustained drag reduction has applications for water vehicles and pipeline flows.

  12. Estimated Water Flows in 2005: United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C A; Belles, R D; Simon, A J

    2011-03-16

    Flow charts depicting water use in the United States have been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of water use patterns. Approximately 410,500 million gallons per day of water are managed throughout the United States for use in farming, power production, residential, commercial, and industrial applications. Water is obtained from four major resource classes: fresh surface-water, saline (ocean) surface-water, fresh groundwater and saline (brackish) groundwater. Water that is not consumed or evaporated during its use is returned to surface bodies of water. The flow patterns are represented in a compact 'visual atlas' of 52 state-level (all 50 states in addition to Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands) and one national water flow chart representing a comprehensive systems view of national water resources, use, and disposition.

  13. Ground-water flow related to streamflow and water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Voast, W. A.; Novitzki, R.P.

    1968-01-01

    A ground-water flow system in southwestern Minnesota illustrates water movement between geologic units and between the land surface and the subsurface. The flow patterns indicate numerous zones of ground-water recharge and discharge controlled by topography, varying thicknesses of geologic units, variation in permeabilities, and the configuration of the basement rock surface. Variations in streamflow along a reach of the Yellow Medicine River agree with the subsurface flow system. Increases and decreases in runoff per square mile correspond, apparently, to ground-water discharge and recharge zones. Ground-water quality variations between calcium sulfate waters typical of the Quaternary drift and sodium chloride waters typical of the Cretaceous rocks are caused by mixing of the two water types. The zones of mixing are in agreement with ground-water flow patterns along the hydrologic section.

  14. Single phase channel flow forced convection heat transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartnett, J.P.

    1999-04-01

    A review of the current knowledge of single phase forced convection channel flow of liquids (Pr > 5) is presented. Two basic channel geometries are considered, the circular tube and the rectangular duct. Both laminar flow and turbulent flow are covered. The review begins with a brief overview of the heat transfer behavior of Newtonian fluids followed by a more detailed presentation of the behavior of purely viscous and viscoelastic Non-Newtonian fluids. Recent developments dealing with aqueous solutions of high molecular weight polymers and aqueous solutions of surfactants are discussed. The review concludes by citing a number of challenging research opportunities.

  15. Morphometric methods for simulation of water flow.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booltink, H.W.G.

    1993-01-01

    Water flow in structured soils is strongly governed by the occurence of macropores. In this study emphasis was given to combined research of morphology of water- conducting macropores and soil physical measurements on bypass flow. Main research objectives were to: (i) develop and improve soil physic

  16. Ground Water Flow No Longer A Mystery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehr, Jay H.; Pettyjohn, Wayne A.

    1976-01-01

    Examined are the physical characteristics of ground water movement. Some potential pollution problems are identified. Models are used to explain mathematical and hydraulic principles of flow toward a pumping well and an effluent stream, flow around and through lenticular beds, and effects of pumping on the water table. (Author/MR)

  17. Protecting environmental flows through enhanced water licensing and water markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Erfani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available To enable economically efficient future adaptation to water scarcity some countries are revising water management institutions such as water rights or licensing systems to more effectively protect ecosystems and their services. Allocating more flow to the environment though can mean less abstraction for economic production, or the inability to accommodate new entrants (diverters. Modern licensing arrangements should simultaneously enhance environmental flows and protect water abstractors who depend on water. Making new licensing regimes compatible with tradable water rights is an important component of water allocation reform. Regulated water markets can help decrease the societal cost of water scarcity whilst enforcing environmental and/or social protections. In this article we simulate water markets under a regime of fixed volumetric water abstraction licenses with fixed minimum flows or under a scalable water license regime (using water "shares" with dynamic environmental minimum flows. Shares allow adapting allocations to available water and dynamic environmental minimum flows can vary as a function of ecological requirements. We investigate how a short-term spot market manifests within each licensing regime. We use a river-basin-scale hydro-economic agent model that represents individual abstractors and can simulate a spot market under both licensing regimes. We apply this model to the Great Ouse river basin in Eastern England with public water supply, agricultural, energy and industrial water using agents. Results show the proposed shares with dynamic environmental flow licensing system protects river flows more effectively than the current static minimum flow requirements during a dry historical year, but that the total opportunity cost to water abstractors of the environmental gains is a 10 to 15% loss in economic benefits.

  18. Traction Forces of Endothelial Cells under Slow Shear Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrault, Cecile M.; Brugues, Agusti; Bazellieres, Elsa; Ricco, Pierre; Lacroix, Damien; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells are constantly exposed to fluid shear stresses that regulate vascular morphogenesis, homeostasis, and disease. The mechanical responses of endothelial cells to relatively high shear flow such as that characteristic of arterial circulation has been extensively studied. Much less is known about the responses of endothelial cells to slow shear flow such as that characteristic of venous circulation, early angiogenesis, atherosclerosis, intracranial aneurysm, or interstitial flow. Here we used a novel, to our knowledge, microfluidic technique to measure traction forces exerted by confluent vascular endothelial cell monolayers under slow shear flow. We found that cells respond to flow with rapid and pronounced increases in traction forces and cell-cell stresses. These responses are reversible in time and do not involve reorientation of the cell body. Traction maps reveal that local cell responses to slow shear flow are highly heterogeneous in magnitude and sign. Our findings unveil a low-flow regime in which endothelial cell mechanics is acutely responsive to shear stress. PMID:26488643

  19. Sustaining processes from recurrent flows in body-forced turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Lucas, Dan

    2016-01-01

    By extracting unstable invariant solutions directly from body-forced three-dimensional turbulence, we study the dynamical processes at play when the forcing is large scale and either unidirectional in the momentum or the vorticity equations. In the former case, the dynamical processes familiar from recent work on linearly-stable shear flows - variously called the Self-Sustaining Process (Waleffe 1997) or Vortex-Wave Interaction (Hall & Smith 1991; Hall & Sherwin 2010) - are important even when the base flow is linearly unstable. In the latter case, where the forcing drives Taylor-Green vortices, a number of mechanisms are observed from the various types of periodic orbits isolated. In particular, two different transient growth mechanisms are discussed to explain the more complex states found.

  20. Surface waves propagation on a turbulent flow forced electromagnetically

    CERN Document Server

    Gutiérrez, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    We study the propagation of monochromatic surface waves on a turbulent flow. The flow is generated in a layer of liquid metal by an electromagnetic forcing. This forcing creates a quasi two-dimensional (2D) turbulence with strong vertical vorticity. The turbulent flow contains much more energy than the surface waves. In order to focus on the surface wave, the deformations induced by the turbulent flow are removed. This is done by performing a coherent phase averaging. For wavelengths smaller than the forcing lengthscale, we observe a significant increase of the wavelength of the propagating wave that has not been reported before. We suggest that it can be explained by the random deflection of the wave induced by the velocity gradient of the turbulent flow. Under this assumption, the wavelength shift is an estimate of the fluctuations of deflection angle. The local measurements of the wave frequency far from the wavemaker do not reveal such systematic behavior, although a small shift is measured. Finally we qu...

  1. Thermal and hydrodynamic characteristics of forced and mixed convection flow through vertical rectangular channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanafi Abdalla S.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental and numerical studies for the case of turbulent forced and mixed convection flow of water through narrow vertical rectangular channel. The channel is composed of two parallel plates which are heated at a uniform heat flux, whereas, the other two sides of the channel are thermally insulated. The plates are of 64 mm in width, 800 mm in height, and separated from each other at a narrow gap of 2.7 mm. The Nusselt number distribution along the flow direction normalized by the Nusselt number for the case of turbulent forced convection flow is obtained experimentally with a comparison with the numerical results obtained from a commercial computer code. The quantitative determination of the nor- malized Nusselt number with respect to the dimension-less number Z = (Gr/Re21/8Pr0.5 is presented with a comparison with previous experimental results. Qualitative results are presented for the normalized temperature and velocity profiles in the transverse direction with a comparison between the forced and mixed convection flow for both the cases of upward and downward flow directions. The effect of the axial locations and the parameter Gr/Re on the variation of the normalized temperature profiles in the transverse direction for both the regions of forced and mixed convection and for both of the upward and downward flow directions are obtained. The normalized velocity profiles in the transverse directions are also determined at different inlet velocity and heat fluxes for the previous cases. It is found that the normalized Nusselt number is greater than one in the mixed convection region for both the cases of upward and downward flow and correlated well with the dimension-less parameter Z for both of the forced and mixed convection regions. The temperature profiles increase with increasing the axial location along the flow direction or the parameter Gr/Re for both of the forced and mixed convection regions, but this increase is

  2. Evolution of forced shear flows in polytropic atmospheres: A comparison of forcing methods and energetics

    CERN Document Server

    Witzke, V; Favier, B

    2016-01-01

    Shear flows are ubiquitous in astrophysical objects including planetary and stellar interiors, where their dynamics can have significant impact on thermo-chemical processes. Investigating the complex dynamics of shear flows requires numerical calculations that provide a long time evolution of the system. To achieve a sufficiently long lifetime in a local numerical model the system has to be forced externally. However, at present, there exist several different forcing methods to sustain large-scale shear flows in local models. In this paper we examine and compare various methods used in the literature in order to resolve their respective applicability and limitations. These techniques are compared during the exponential growth phase of a shear flow instability, such as the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability, and some are examined during the subsequent non-linear evolution. A linear stability analysis provides reference for the growth rate of the most unstable modes in the system and a detailed analysis of the e...

  3. Drag Reduction in Oil-water Flows

    OpenAIRE

    Edomwonyi-Otu, L. C.

    2015-01-01

    Liquid-liquid flows occur in many chemical and process industries including the petroleum industry where crude oil and its derivatives are transported over long distances often in mixtures with water. Depending on flow conditions and pipe geometry different flow patterns can appear ranging from fully separated to dispersed ones. The addition of small amounts of some polymeric materials to one of the phases has been found to change the flow patterns and their boundaries and reduce the friction...

  4. Flow improvers for water injection based on surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oskarsson, H.; Uneback, I.; Hellsten, M.

    2006-03-15

    In many cases it is desirable to increase the flow of injection water when an oil well deteriorates. It is very costly in offshore operation to lay down an additional water pipe to the injection site. Flow improvers for the injection water will thus be the most cost-effective way to increase the flow rate. During the last years water-soluble polymers have also been applied for this purpose. These drag-reducing polymers are however only slowly biodegraded which has been an incentive for the development of readily biodegradable surfactants as flow improvers for injection water. A combination of a zwitterionic and an anionic surfactant has been tested in a 5.5 inch, 700 m long flow loop containing sulphate brine with salinity similar to sea water. A drag reduction between 75 and 80% was achieved with 119 ppm in solution of the surfactant blend at an average velocity of 1.9 m/s and between 50 and 55% at 2.9 m/s. The surfactants in this formulation were also found to be readily biodegradable in sea water and low bio accumulating which means they have an improved environmental profile compared to the polymers used today. Due to the self-healing properties of the drag-reducing structures formed by surfactants, these may be added before the pump section - contrary to polymers which are permanently destroyed by high shear forces. (Author)

  5. Some Exact Solutions of Boundary Layer Flows along a Vertical Plate with Buoyancy Forces Combined with Lorentz Forces under Uniform Suction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asterios Pantokratoras

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Exact analytical solutions of boundary layer flows along a vertical porous plate with uniform suction are derived and presented in this paper. The solutions concern the Blasius, Sakiadis, and Blasius-Sakiadis flows with buoyancy forces combined with either MHD Lorentz or EMHD Lorentz forces. In addition, some exact solutions are presented specifically for water in the temperature range of 0∘C≤≤8∘C, where water density is nearly parabolic. Except for their use as benchmarking means for testing the numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equations, the presented exact solutions with EMHD forces have use in flow separation control in aeronautics and hydronautics, whereas the MHD results have applications in process metallurgy and fusion technology. These analytical solutions are valid for flows with strong suction.

  6. Simulation of Effects of the Saffman Force and the Magnus Force on Sand Saltation in Turbulent Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Zhongquan C.; Zou, Xueyong; Yang, Xiaofan; Cheng, Hong

    2011-12-11

    The effects of both the Saffman force and Magnus force on sand saltation are investigated. Turbulent flows in a channel and over a barchans dune are considered with sand particles injected into the flow. The results show that both of the forces increase the height and skipping distance of sand saltation, with the Magnus force giving more significant effect on the height. These forces can also increase the sand settling at the lee side of the barchans dune.

  7. Forced expiratory flows' contribution to lung function interpretation in schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, Bernard; Koskas, Marc; Guillo, Houda; Maingot, Lucia; La Rocca, Marie-Claude; Boulé, Michèle; Just, Jocelyne; Momas, Isabelle; Corinne, Alberti; Beydon, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Forced expiratory flow (FEF) at low lung volumes are supposed to be better at detecting lung-function impairment in asthmatic children than a forced volume. The aim of this study was to examine whether FEF results could modify the interpretation of baseline and post-bronchodilator spirometry in asthmatic schoolchildren in whom forced expiratory volumes are within the normal range. Spirometry, with post-bronchodilator vital capacity within 10% of that of baseline in healthy and asthmatic children, was recorded prospectively. We defined abnormal baseline values expressed as z-scores 12%, FEF reversibility as an increase larger than the 2.5th percentile of post-bronchodilator changes in healthy children. Among 66 healthy and 50 asthmatic schoolchildren, only two (1.7%) children with normal vital capacity and no airways obstruction had abnormal baseline forced expiratory flow at 25-75% of forced vital capacity (FEF25-75%). After bronchodilation, among the 45 asthmatic children without FEV1 reversibility, 5 (11.1%) had an FEF25-75% increase that exceeded the reference interval. Isolated abnormal baseline values or significant post-bronchodilator changes in FEF are rare situations in asthmatic schoolchildren with good spirometry quality.

  8. Three Principles of Water Flow in Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, L.; Lin, H.

    2016-12-01

    Knowledge of water flow in soils is crucial to understanding terrestrial hydrological cycle, surface energy balance, biogeochemical dynamics, ecosystem services, contaminant transport, and many other Critical Zone processes. However, due to the complex and dynamic nature of non-uniform flow, reconstruction and prediction of water flow in natural soils remain challenging. This study synthesizes three principles of water flow in soils that can improve modeling water flow in soils of various complexity. The first principle, known as the Darcy's law, came to light in the 19th century and suggested a linear relationship between water flux density and hydraulic gradient, which was modified by Buckingham for unsaturated soils. Combining mass balance and the Buckingham-Darcy's law, L.A. Richards quantitatively described soil water change with space and time, i.e., Richards equation. The second principle was proposed by L.A. Richards in the 20th century, which described the minimum pressure potential needed to overcome surface tension of fluid and initiate water flow through soil-air interface. This study extends this principle to encompass soil hydrologic phenomena related to varied interfaces and microscopic features and provides a more cohesive explanation of hysteresis, hydrophobicity, and threshold behavior when water moves through layered soils. The third principle is emerging in the 21st century, which highlights the complex and evolving flow networks embedded in heterogeneous soils. This principle is summarized as: Water moves non-uniformly in natural soils with a dual-flow regime, i.e., it follows the least-resistant or preferred paths when "pushed" (e.g., by storms) or "attracted" (e.g., by plants) or "restricted" (e.g., by bedrock), but moves diffusively into the matrix when "relaxed" (e.g., at rest) or "touched" (e.g., adsorption). The first principle is a macroscopic view of steady-state water flow, the second principle is a microscopic view of interface

  9. Evolution of forced shear flows in polytropic atmospheres: a comparison of forcing methods and energetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzke, V.; Silvers, L. J.; Favier, B.

    2016-11-01

    Shear flows are ubiquitous in astrophysical objects including planetary and stellar interiors, where their dynamics can have significant impact on thermochemical processes. Investigating the complex dynamics of shear flows requires numerical calculations that provide a long-time evolution of the system. To achieve a sufficiently long lifetime in a local numerical model, the system has to be forced externally. However, at present, there exist several different forcing methods to sustain large-scale shear flows in local models. In this paper, we examine and compare various methods used in the literature in order to resolve their respective applicability and limitations. These techniques are compared during the exponential growth phase of a shear flow instability, such as the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability, and some are examined during the subsequent non-linear evolution. A linear stability analysis provides reference for the growth rate of the most unstable modes in the system and a detailed analysis of the energetics provides a comprehensive understanding of the energy exchange during the system's evolution. Finally, we discuss the pros and cons of each forcing method and their relation with natural mechanisms generating shear flows.

  10. The role of hand calculations in ground water flow modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haitjema, Henk

    2006-01-01

    Most ground water modeling courses focus on the use of computer models and pay little or no attention to traditional analytic solutions to ground water flow problems. This shift in education seems logical. Why waste time to learn about the method of images, or why study analytic solutions to one-dimensional or radial flow problems? Computer models solve much more realistic problems and offer sophisticated graphical output, such as contour plots of potentiometric levels and ground water path lines. However, analytic solutions to elementary ground water flow problems do have something to offer over computer models: insight. For instance, an analytic one-dimensional or radial flow solution, in terms of a mathematical expression, may reveal which parameters affect the success of calibrating a computer model and what to expect when changing parameter values. Similarly, solutions for periodic forcing of one-dimensional or radial flow systems have resulted in a simple decision criterion to assess whether or not transient flow modeling is needed. Basic water balance calculations may offer a useful check on computer-generated capture zones for wellhead protection or aquifer remediation. An easily calculated "characteristic leakage length" provides critical insight into surface water and ground water interactions and flow in multi-aquifer systems. The list goes on. Familiarity with elementary analytic solutions and the capability of performing some simple hand calculations can promote appropriate (computer) modeling techniques, avoids unnecessary complexity, improves reliability, and is likely to save time and money. Training in basic hand calculations should be an important part of the curriculum of ground water modeling courses.

  11. A new framework for simulating forced homogeneous buoyant turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Phares L.; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2015-06-01

    This work proposes a new simulation methodology to study variable density turbulent buoyant flows. The mathematical framework, referred to as homogeneous buoyant turbulence, relies on a triply periodic domain and incorporates numerical forcing methods commonly used in simulation studies of homogeneous, isotropic flows. In order to separate the effects due to buoyancy from those due to large-scale gradients, the linear scalar forcing technique is used to maintain the scalar variance at a constant value. Two sources of kinetic energy production are considered in the momentum equation, namely shear via an isotropic forcing term and buoyancy via the gravity term. The simulation framework is designed such that the four dimensionless parameters of importance in buoyant mixing, namely the Reynolds, Richardson, Atwood, and Schmidt numbers, can be independently varied and controlled. The framework is used to interrogate fully non-buoyant, fully buoyant, and partially buoyant turbulent flows. The results show that the statistics of the scalar fields (mixture fraction and density) are not influenced by the energy production mechanism (shear vs. buoyancy). On the other hand, the velocity field exhibits anisotropy, namely a larger variance in the direction of gravity which is associated with a statistical dependence of the velocity component on the local fluid density.

  12. Photospheric Flows, Lorentz Forces, and Solar-Eruption Initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, George; Kazachenko, Maria

    Eruptive Flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are almost certainly magnetically driven. We discuss the role that the Lorentz force must play in driving an eruption, and how both the radial and horizontal components of this force can be related to changes that occur in observations of the vector magnetic field observed at the photosphere. We then review recent observational work on observed flows in the solar atmosphere, and how these flows might be related to changes in the Lorentz force observed during flares. Flows in magnetized regions of the photosphere also generate electric fields, which can affect the flux of magnetic energy transported across the photosphere and into the chromosphere and corona, and result in changes to the magnetic field there as well. We will discuss how such electric fields are incorporated into models of active-regions, to study the buildup of electric currents and the ejection of plasma in the context of our recently funded project, the ``Coronal Global Evolutionary Model (CGEM)'', a collaboration between UC Berkeley, Stanford University, and the Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory.

  13. Control algorithm for multiscale flow simulations of water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotsalis, E. M.; Walther, Jens Honore; Kaxiras, E.

    2009-01-01

    . The use of a mass conserving specular wall results in turn to spurious oscillations in the density profile of the atomistic description of water. These oscillations can be eliminated by using an external boundary force that effectively accounts for the virial component of the pressure. In this Rapid......We present a multiscale algorithm to couple atomistic water models with continuum incompressible flow simulations via a Schwarz domain decomposition approach. The coupling introduces an inhomogeneity in the description of the atomistic domain and prevents the use of periodic boundary conditions...... Communication, we extend a control algorithm, previously introduced for monatomic molecules, to the case of atomistic water and demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach. The proposed computational method is validated for the cases of equilibrium and Couette flow of water....

  14. Control algorithm for multiscale flow simulations of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsalis, Evangelos M.; Walther, Jens H.; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2009-04-01

    We present a multiscale algorithm to couple atomistic water models with continuum incompressible flow simulations via a Schwarz domain decomposition approach. The coupling introduces an inhomogeneity in the description of the atomistic domain and prevents the use of periodic boundary conditions. The use of a mass conserving specular wall results in turn to spurious oscillations in the density profile of the atomistic description of water. These oscillations can be eliminated by using an external boundary force that effectively accounts for the virial component of the pressure. In this Rapid Communication, we extend a control algorithm, previously introduced for monatomic molecules, to the case of atomistic water and demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach. The proposed computational method is validated for the cases of equilibrium and Couette flow of water.

  15. Arbitrary axisymmetric steady streaming: Flow, force and propulsion

    CERN Document Server

    Spelman, Tamsin A

    2015-01-01

    A well-developed method to induce mixing on microscopic scales is to exploit flows generated by steady streaming. Steady streaming is a classical fluid dynamics phenomenon whereby a time-periodic forcing in the bulk or along a boundary is enhanced by inertia to induce a non-zero net flow. Building on classical work for simple geometrical forcing and motivated by the complex shape oscillations of elastic capsules and bubbles, we develop the mathematical framework to quantify the steady streaming of a spherical body with arbitrary axisymmetric time-periodic boundary conditions. We compute the flow asymptotically for small-amplitude oscillations of the boundary in the limit where the viscous penetration length scale is much smaller than the body. In that case, the flow has a boundary layer structure and the fluid motion is solved by asymptotic matching. Our results, presented in the case of no-slip boundary conditions and extended to include the motion of vibrating free surfaces, recovers classical work as parti...

  16. Schlieren High Speed Imaging on Fluid Flow in Liquid Induced by Plasma-driven Interfacial Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Janis; Foster, John

    2016-10-01

    Effective plasma-based water purification depends heavily on the transport of plasma-derived reactive species from the plasma into the liquid. Plasma interactions at the liquid-gas boundary are known to drive circulation in the bulk liquid. This forced circulation is not well understood. A 2-D plasma- in-liquid water apparatus is currently being investigated as a means to study the plasma-liquid interface to understand not only reactive species flows but to also understand plasma- driven fluid dynamic effects in the bulk fluid. Using Schlieren high speed imaging, plasma-induced density gradients near the interfacial region and into the bulk solution are measured to investigate the nature of these interfacial forces. Plasma-induced flow was also measured using particle imaging velocimetry. NSF CBET 1336375 and DOE DE-SC0001939.

  17. Analysis of flow instabilities in forced-convection steam generator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Because of the practical importance of two-phase instabilities, substantial efforts have been made to date to understand the physical phenomena governing such instabilities and to develop computational tools to model the dynamics. The purpose of this study is to present a numerical model for the analysis of flow-induced instabilities in forced-convection steam generator. The model is based on the assumption of homogeneous two-phase flow and thermodynamic equilibrium of the phases. The thermal capacity of the heater wall has been included in the analysis. The model is used to analyze the flow instabilities in the steam generator and to study the effects of system pressure, mass flux, inlet temperature and inlet/outlet restriction, gap size, the ratio of do /di, and the ratio of qi/qo on the system behavior.

  18. FLOW PATTERNS AND FORCE CHARACTERISTICS OF LAMINAR FLOW PAST FOUR CYLINDERS IN DIAMOND ARRANGEMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Lin; LIN Yu-feng; LU Hong

    2011-01-01

    A three-dimensional numerical investigation of cross-flow past four circular cylinders in a diamond arrangement at Reynolds number of 200 is carried out. With the spacing ratios ( L/D ) ranging from 1.2 to 5.0, the flow patterns can be classified into three basic regimes. The critical spacing ratio for the transition from narrow gap flow pattern to vortex impingement flow pattern around the cylinders is found to be L/D = 3.0, while a single bluff-body flow pattern is observed at L/D = 1.2. The relationship between the three-dimensional flow patterns and force characteristics around the four cylinders shows that the variation of forces and Strouhal numbers against L/D are generally governed by these three kinds of flow patterns. It is concluded that the spacing ratio has important effects on the development of the free shear layers about the cylinders and hence has significant effects on the force and pressure characteristics of the four cylinders with different spacing ratios.

  19. Water flow at all scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sand-Jensen, K.

    2006-01-01

    Continuous water fl ow is a unique feature of streams and distinguishes them from all other ecosystems. The main fl ow is always downstream but it varies in time and space and can be diffi cult to measure and describe. The interest of hydrologists, geologists, biologists and farmers in water fl ow......, and its physical impact, depends on whether the main focus is on the entire stream system, the adjacent fi elds, the individual reaches or the habitats of different species. It is important to learn how to manage fl ow at all scales, in order to understand the ecology of streams and the biology...

  20. Water Ingestion Into Axial Flow Compressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-08-01

    AFAPL-TR-76-77 WATER INGESTION INTO AXIAL FLOW COMPRESSORS PURDUE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF AERONAUTICS AND ASTRONA UTICS S WEST LAFAYETTE, INDIANA 47907...CIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER TITL _07" 0 EREO Final i-7 0 Water Ingestion Into Axial Flow Compressorse 1 Auq 75 -: 31 Au0 a6 114o’ H-WPAFB-T-76-l:P ."CO TACT...necessary and Idenify by block number) Water ingestion , turbomachinery, and jet engines. 20 ABSTRACT (Contlinue on tov.ras side Hi necessary and Identify

  1. Lagrangian statistics and flow topology in forced 2-D turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadoch, B. [Universite d' Aix-Marseille; Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego B [ORNL; Bos, W.J.T. [CNRS, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon; Schneider, Kai [Universite d' Aix-Marseille

    2011-01-01

    A study of the relationship between Lagrangian statistics and flow topology in fluid turbulence is presented. The topology is characterized using the Weiss criterion, which provides a conceptually simple tool to partition the flow into topologically different regions: elliptic (vortex dominated), hyperbolic (deformation dominated), and intermediate (turbulent background). The flow corresponds to forced two-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence in doubly periodic and circular bounded domains, the latter with no-slip boundary conditions. In the double periodic domain, the probability density function (pdf) of the Weiss field exhibits a negative skewness consistent with the fact that in periodic domains the flow is dominated by coherent vortex structures. On the other hand, in the circular domain, the elliptic and hyperbolic regions seem to be statistically similar. We follow a Lagrangian approach and obtain the statistics by tracking large ensembles of passively advected tracers. The pdfs of residence time in the topologically different regions are computed introducing the Lagrangian Weiss field, i.e., the Weiss field computed along the particles' trajectories. In elliptic and hyperbolic regions, the pdfs of the residence time have self-similar algebraic decaying tails. In contrast, in the intermediate regions the pdf has exponential decaying tails. The conditional pdfs (with respect to the flow topology) of the Lagrangian velocity exhibit Gaussian-like behavior in the periodic and in the bounded domains. In contrast to the freely decaying turbulence case, the conditional pdfs of the Lagrangian acceleration in forced turbulence show a comparable level of intermittency in both the periodic and the bounded domains. The conditional pdfs of the Lagrangian curvature are characterized, in all cases, by self-similar power-law behavior with a decay exponent of order - 2.

  2. On the forced flow around a flapping foil

    CERN Document Server

    Mandujano, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    The two dimensional incompressible viscous flow past a flapping foil immersed in a uniform stream is studied numerically. Numerical simulations were performed using a Lattice-Boltzmann model for moderate Reynolds numbers. The computation of the hydrodynamic force on the foil is related to the the wake structure. In particular, when the foil's centre of mass is fixed in space, numerical results suggest a relation between drag coefficient behaviour and the flapping frequency which determines the transition from the von K\\'arm\\'an (vKm) to the inverted von K\\'arm\\'an wake. Beyond the inverted vKm transition the foil was released. Upstream swimming was observed at high enough flapping frequencies. Computed hydrodynamic forces suggest the propulsion mechanism for the swimming foil.

  3. Does the choice of the forcing term affect flow statistics in DNS of turbulent channel flow?

    CERN Document Server

    Quadrio, Maurizio; Hasegawa, Yosuke

    2015-01-01

    We seek possible statistical consequences of the way a forcing term is added to the Navier--Stokes equations in the Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of incompressible channel flow. Simulations driven by constant flow rate, constant pressure gradient and constant power input are used to build large databases, and in particular to store the complete temporal trace of the wall-shear stress for later analysis. As these approaches correspond to different dynamical systems, it can in principle be envisaged that these differences are reflect by certain statistics of the turbulent flow field. The instantaneous realizations of the flow in the various simulations are obviously different, but, as expected, the usual one-point, one-time statistics do not show any appreciable difference. However, the PDF for the fluctuations of the streamwise component of wall friction reveals that the simulation with constant flow rate presents lower probabilities for extreme events of large positive friction. The low probability value ...

  4. FORCE REDUCTION OF FLOW AROUND A SINUSOIDAL WAVY CYLINDER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Lin; LIN Yu-feng

    2009-01-01

    A large eddy simulation of cross-flow around a sinusoidal wavy cylinder at Re=3000 was performed and the load cell measurement was introduced for the validation test. The mean flow field and the near wake flow structures were presented and compared with those for a circular cylinder at the same Reynolds number. The mean drag coefficient for the wavy cylinder is smaller than that for a corresponding circular cylinder due to the formation of a longer wake vortex generated by the wavy cylinder. The fluctuating lift coefficient of the wavy cylinder is also greatly reduced. This kind of wavy surface leads to the formation of 3-D free shear layers which are more stable than purely 2-D free shear layers. Such free shear layers only roll up into mature vortices at further downstream position and significantly modify the near wake structures and the pressure distributions around the wavy cylinder. Moreover, the simulations in laminar flow condition were also performed to investigate the effect of Reynolds number on force reduction control.

  5. Nanedi Vallis: Sustained Water FLow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This picture of a canyon on the Martian surface was obtained a few minutes after 10 PM PST, January 8, 1998 by the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC), during the 87th orbit around Mars of the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft. It shows the canyon of Nanedi Vallis, one of the Martian valley systems cutting through cratered plains in the Xanthe Terra region of Mars. The picture covers an area 9.8 km by 18.5 km (6.1 mi by 11.5 mi), and features as small as 12 m (39 ft) can be seen. The canyon is about 2.5 km (1.6 mi) wide. Rocky outcrops are found along the upper canyon walls; weathered debris is found on the lower canyon slopes and along the canyon floor. The origin of this canyon is enigmatic: some features, such as terraces within the canyon (as seen near the top of the frame) and the small 200 m (660 ft) wide channel (also seen near the top of the frame) suggest continual fluid flow and downcutting. Other features, such as the lack of a contributing pattern of smaller channels on the surface surrounding the canyon, box-headed tributaries, and the size and tightness of the apparent meanders (as seen, for example, in the Viking image 897A32, left), suggest formation by collapse. It is likely that both continual flow and collapse have been responsible for the canyon as it now appears. Further observations, especially in areas west of the present image, will be used to help separate the relative effects of these and other potential formation and modification processes.Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  6. Water slip flow in superhydrophobic microtubes within laminar flow region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhijia Yu; Xinghua Liu; Guozhu Kuang

    2015-01-01

    The fabrication of superhydrophobic surfaces and the studies on water flow characteristics therein are of great significance to many industrial areas as wel as to science and technology development. Experiments were car-ried out to investigate slip characteristics of water flowing in circular superhydrophobic microtubes within lam-inar flow region. The superhydrophobic microtubes of stainless steel were fabricated with chemical etching–fluorination treatment. An experimental setup was designed to measure the pressure drop as function of water flow rate. For comparison, superhydrophilic tubes were also tested. Poiseuille number Po was found to be smaller for the superhydrophobic microtubes than that for superhydrophilic ones. The pressure drop reduc-tion ranges from 8%to 31%. It decreases with increasing Reynolds number when Re b 900, owing to the transition from Cassie state to Wenzel state. However, it is almost unchanged with further increasing Re after Re N 900. The slip length in superhydrophobic microtubes also exhibits a Reynolds number dependence similarly to the pressure drop reduction. The relation between slip length and Darcy friction factor is theoretically analyzed with consideration of surface roughness effect, which was testified with the experimental results.

  7. Cell exclusion in couette flow: evaluation through flow visualization and mechanical forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Laura J; Marshall, Lindsay J; Devitt, Andrew; Hilton, Andrew; Tansley, Geoff D

    2013-03-01

    Cell exclusion is the phenomenon whereby the hematocrit and viscosity of blood decrease in areas of high stress. While this is well known in naturally occurring Poiseuille flow in the human body, it has never previously been shown in Couette flow, which occurs in implantable devices including blood pumps. The high-shear stresses that occur in the gap between the boundaries in Couette flow are known to cause hemolysis in erythrocytes. We propose to mitigate this damage by initiating cell exclusion through the use of a spiral-groove bearing (SGB) that will provide escape routes by which the cells may separate themselves from the plasma and the high stresses in the gap. The force between two bearings (one being the SGB) in Couette flow was measured. Stained erythrocytes, along with silver spheres of similar diameter to erythrocytes, were visualized across a transparent SGB at various gap heights. A reduction in the force across the bearing for human blood, compared with fluids of comparable viscosity, was found. This indicates a reduction in the viscosity of the fluid across the bearing due to a lowered hematocrit because of cell exclusion. The corresponding images clearly show both cells and spheres being excluded from the gap by entering the grooves. This is the first time the phenomenon of cell exclusion has been shown in Couette flow. It not only furthers our understanding of how blood responds to different flows but could also lead to improvements in the future design of medical devices.

  8. Effect of electromagnetic force and anode gas on electrolyte flow in aluminum electrolysis cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Nai-jun; XIA Xiao-xia; BAO Sheng-zhong

    2006-01-01

    Based on the commercial computational fluid dynamics software CFX-4.3, electrolyte flow fields in a 156 kA pre-baked anode aluminum electrolysis cell were investigated in three different cases where the electrolyte melt was driven by different kinds of force, i.e. electromagnetic force only, the anode gas drag force only and both of the former two forces. The results show that when electromagnetic force was introduced only, most of the electrolyte moves horizontally; when anode gas drag force was introduced only, the electrolyte flows mainly around each anode with small circulation; when electromagnetic force and anode gas drag force were both introduced together, the structure of the electrolyte flow fields and the velocity of electrolyte are similar to that of the case where only anode gas drag force is used. The electrolyte flow fields are mainly determined by the anode gas drag force.

  9. Water-in-Water Droplets by Passive Microfluidic Flow Focusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Byeong-Ui; Abbasi, Niki; Jones, Steven G; Hwang, Dae Kun; Tsai, Scott S H

    2016-04-05

    We present a simple microfluidic system that generates water-in-water, aqueous two phase system (ATPS) droplets, by passive flow focusing. ATPS droplet formation is achieved by applying weak hydrostatic pressures, with liquid-filled pipette tips as fluid columns at the inlets, to introduce low speed flows to the flow focusing junction. To control the size of the droplets, we systematically vary the interfacial tension and viscosity of the ATPS fluids and adjust the fluid column height at the fluid inlets. The size of the droplets scales with a power law of the ratio of viscous stresses in the two ATPS phases. Overall, we find a drop size coefficient of variation (CV; i.e., polydispersity) of about 10%. We also find that when drops form very close to the flow focusing junction, the drops have a CV of less than 1%. Our droplet generation method is easily scalable: we demonstrate a parallel system that generates droplets simultaneously and improves the droplet production rate by up to one order of magnitude. Finally, we show the potential application of our system for encapsulating cells in water-in-water emulsions by encapsulating microparticles and cells. To the best of our knowledge, our microfluidic technique is the first that forms low interfacial tension ATPS droplets without applying external perturbations. We anticipate that this simple approach will find utility in drug and cell delivery applications because of the all-biocompatible nature of the water-in-water ATPS environment.

  10. A phenomenological continuum model for force-driven nano-channel liquid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbanian, Jafar; Celebi, Alper T.; Beskok, Ali

    2016-11-01

    A phenomenological continuum model is developed using systematic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of force-driven liquid argon flows confined in gold nano-channels at a fixed thermodynamic state. Well known density layering near the walls leads to the definition of an effective channel height and a density deficit parameter. While the former defines the slip-plane, the latter parameter relates channel averaged density with the desired thermodynamic state value. Definitions of these new parameters require a single MD simulation performed for a specific liquid-solid pair at the desired thermodynamic state and used for calibration of model parameters. Combined with our observations of constant slip-length and kinematic viscosity, the model accurately predicts the velocity distribution and volumetric and mass flow rates for force-driven liquid flows in different height nano-channels. Model is verified for liquid argon flow at distinct thermodynamic states and using various argon-gold interaction strengths. Further verification is performed for water flow in silica and gold nano-channels, exhibiting slip lengths of 1.2 nm and 15.5 nm, respectively. Excellent agreements between the model and the MD simulations are reported for channel heights as small as 3 nm for various liquid-solid pairs.

  11. Responses of prawn to water flow rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vascotto, G.L.; Nilas, P.U.

    1987-05-28

    An aquarium study to determine the responses of postlarval macrobrachium rosenbergii to varying water changes was carried out. Six week old postlarvae were raised in glass aquaria receiving 0, 1.15, 7.2 and 14.4 water changes per day over a 12 week period. The treatments had significant influences on survival, biomass, and average size of the animals. Maximum survival and highest biomass were found in the 1.15 water turnover treatment; however, this treatment also produced the smallest average size animals. Early high mortalities were attributed to poor growing conditions in the high and low flow treatments, while later mortality appeared to be biomass dependent.

  12. CFD Analysis of nanofluid forced convection heat transport in laminar flow through a compact pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kitae; Park, Cheol; Kim, Sedon; Song, Heegun; Jeong, Hyomin

    2017-08-01

    In the present paper, developing laminar forced convection flows were numerically investigated by using water-Al2O3 nano-fluid through a circular compact pipe which has 4.5mm diameter. Each model has a steady state and uniform heat flux (UHF) at the wall. The whole numerical experiments were processed under the Re = 1050 and the nano-fluid models were made by the Alumina volume fraction. A single-phase fluid models were defined through nano-fluid physical and thermal properties calculations, Two-phase model(mixture granular model) were processed in 100nm diameter. The results show that Nusselt number and heat transfer rate are improved as the Al2O3 volume fraction increased. All of the numerical flow simulations are processed by the FLUENT. The results show the increment of thermal transfer from the volume fraction concentration.

  13. Joint forces and torques when walking in shallow water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orselli, Maria Isabel Veras; Duarte, Marcos

    2011-04-01

    This study reports for the first time an estimation of the internal net joint forces and torques on adults' lower limbs and pelvis when walking in shallow water, taking into account the drag forces generated by the movement of their bodies in the water and the equivalent data when they walk on land. A force plate and a video camera were used to perform a two-dimensional gait analysis at the sagittal plane of 10 healthy young adults walking at comfortable speeds on land and in water at a chest-high level. We estimated the drag force on each body segment and the joint forces and torques at the ankle, knee, and hip of the right side of their bodies using inverse dynamics. The observed subjects' apparent weight in water was about 35% of their weight on land and they were about 2.7 times slower when walking in water. When the subjects walked in water compared with walking on land, there were no differences in the angular displacements but there was a significant reduction in the joint torques which was related to the water's depth. The greatest reduction was observed for the ankle and then the knee and no reduction was observed for the hip. All joint powers were significantly reduced in water. The compressive and shear joint forces were on average about three times lower during walking in water than on land. These quantitative results substantiate the use of water as a safe environment for practicing low-impact exercises, particularly walking.

  14. A modified force-balance model for prediction of bubble departure diameter in subcooled flow boiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugrue, R., E-mail: rsugrue@mit.edu; Buongiorno, J.

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Existing bubble departure models were tested against various experimental databases. • General experimental trends were captured correctly but give large average errors. • A modified bubble departure model is proposed and tested against these databases. - Abstract: Experimental data by Sugrue et al., Klausner et al., Zeng et al., Prodanovic et al., and Situ et al. for bubble departure diameter in subcooled flow boiling in a wide range of orientation angle, subcooling, heat flux, mass flux, and pressure conditions were used to assess the predictive accuracy of the mechanistic force-balance models of Klausner et al. and Yun et al. The results suggested that both models capture the experimental trends correctly, but exhibit large average errors and standard deviations, i.e. 85.5% (σ = 49.7%) and 43.9% (σ = 23.1%) for Klausner’s and Yun’s models, respectively. Since the cube of the bubble departure diameter is used in subcooled flow boiling heat transfer models, such errors are unacceptable, and underscore the need for greater accuracy in predictions. Therefore, the databases were used to (i) identify the dominant forces determining bubble departure at various operating conditions, and (ii) optimize the empirical coefficients describing those forces in Klausner’s model. The modified model considerably lowers prediction error to 22.4% (σ = 19.9%) for all data considered. Application of the modified model is demonstrated for the subcooled flow boiling conditions present in the hot channel of a typical Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR).

  15. Case study on ground water flow (8)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-02-01

    The report comprises research activities made in fiscal year 1997 under the contract of Japan Nuclear Fuel Cycle Development Center and the main items are: (1) Evaluation of water permeability through discontinuous hard bedrock in deep strata in relevant with underground disposal of radioactive wastes, (2) Three dimensional analysis of permeated water in bedrock, including flow analysis in T ono district using neuro-network and modification of Evaporation Logging System, (3) Development of hydraulic tests and necessary equipment applicable to measurements of complex dielectric constants of contaminated soils using FUDR-V method, this giving information on soil component materials, (4) Investigation methods and modeling of hydraulics in deep strata, (5) Geological study of ground water using environmental isotopes such as {sup 14}C, {sup 36}Cl and {sup 4}He, particularly measurement of ages of ground water using an accelerator-mass spectrometer, and (6) Re-submerging phenomena affecting the long-term geological stability. (S. Ohno)

  16. Case study on ground water flow (8)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-02-01

    The report comprises research activities made in fiscal year 1997 under the contract of Japan Nuclear Fuel Cycle Development Center and the main items are: (1) Evaluation of water permeability through discontinuous hard bedrock in deep strata in relevant with underground disposal of radioactive wastes, (2) Three dimensional analysis of permeated water in bedrock, including flow analysis in T ono district using neuro-network and modification of Evaporation Logging System, (3) Development of hydraulic tests and necessary equipment applicable to measurements of complex dielectric constants of contaminated soils using FUDR-V method, this giving information on soil component materials, (4) Investigation methods and modeling of hydraulics in deep strata, (5) Geological study of ground water using environmental isotopes such as {sup 14}C, {sup 36}Cl and {sup 4}He, particularly measurement of ages of ground water using an accelerator-mass spectrometer, and (6) Re-submerging phenomena affecting the long-term geological stability. (S. Ohno)

  17. Stability of people exposed to water flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Martínez-Gomariz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Our cities are formed by several elements which are exposed to floods of a magnitude according to the importance of the rainfall event and the design of the urban drainage system. The most important components in the cities are the pedestrians who develop various activities during rain events. Focusing on pedestrians, the research on their stability when they are exposed to water flows provides the necessary knowledge to understand and manage the associated hazard for them. In this research, several experiments with humans were carried out in order to determine the stability limits to pedestrians crossing through a water flow in a real scale platform. The results obtained and by comparing those with human stability criteria proposed by other authors and guidelines provide a more restrictive criterion.

  18. Spatial development of the wind-driven water surface flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemin, Rémi; Caulliez, Guillemette

    2015-04-01

    The water velocity field induced by wind and waves beneath an air-water interface is investigated experimentally versus fetch in the large Marseille-Luminy wind wave tank. Measurements of the vertical velocity profiles inside the subsurface shear layer were performed by a three-component Nortek acoustic Doppler velocimeter. The surface drift current was also derived from visualizations of small floating drifters recorded by a video camera looking vertically from above the water surface. Surface wave height and slopes were determined simultaneously by means of capacitance gauges and a single-point laser slope system located in the immediate vicinity of the profiler. Observations were made at steady low to moderate wind speeds and various fetches ranging between 1 and 15 meters. This study first corroborates that the thin subsurface water boundary layer forced by wind at the leading edge of the water sheet is laminar. The surface drift current velocity indeed increases gradually with fetch, following a 1/3 power law characteristic of an accelerated flat-plate laminar boundary layer. The laminar-turbulent transition manifests itself by a sudden decrease in the water surface flow velocity and a rapid deepening of the boundary layer due to the development of large-scale longitudinal vortices. Further downstream, when characteristic capillary-gravity wind waves develop at the surface, the water flow velocity increases again rapidly within a sublayer of typically 4 mm depth. This phenomenon is explained by the occurrence of an intense momentum flux from waves to the mean flow due to the dissipation of parasitic capillaries generated ahead of the dominant wave crests. This phenomenon also sustains significant small-scale turbulent motions within the whole boundary layer. However, when gravity-capillary waves of length longer than 10 cm then grow at the water surface, the mean flow velocity field decreases drastically over the whole boundary layer thickness. At the same

  19. Tsunami-induced force and surface pressure on multiple rectangular buildings in an unsteady free-surface channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahmanpour, Alireza; Eames, Ian

    2016-11-01

    We study the flow around multiple rectangular obstacles in an unsteady free-surface channel flow using a combination of mathematical models, computations and experiments. The unsteady flow is triggered by a dam-break. The total drag force and surface pressure distribution on the obstacles are examined. The height and length of the building are fixed; the influence of initial water height and blocking ratio b / w is studied. The force scalings are confirmed from the computational analysis and found to be consistent with the experimental results. The effects of the additional buildings on the total drag force are noted and compared against the case of a single building. Increasing the number of buildings as well as the blocking ratio results in the water to inundate further onshore. The pressure distribution on the individual surfaces are analyzed and shown to vary linearly with height from the building base and dominated by the hydrostatic component. We summarize the results in terms of a new Fr - b / w regime diagram and explain how the force on buildings subject to an unsteady flow can be estimated from the upstream velocity and water height. We would like to thank HR Wallingford for their continued support in funding the project.

  20. Investigation of Multiscale Non-equilibrium Flow Dynamics Under External Force Field

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Tianbai

    2016-01-01

    The multiple scale non-equilibrium gaseous flow behavior under external force field is investigated. Both theoretical analysis based on the kinetic model equation and numerical study are presented to demonstrate the dynamic effect of external force on the flow evolution, especially on the non-equilibrium heat flux. The current numerical experiment is based on the well-balanced unified gas-kinetic scheme (UGKS), which presents accurate solutions in the whole flow regime from the continuum Navier-Stokes solution to the transition and free molecular ones. The heat conduction in the non-equilibrium regime due to the external forcing term is quantitatively investigated. In the lid-driven cavity flow study, due to the external force field the density distribution inside cavity gets stratified and a multiscale non-equilibrium flow transport appears in a single gas dynamic system. With the increment of external forcing term, the flow topological structure changes dramatically, and the temperature gradient, shearing s...

  1. Flow pattern and lift evolution of hydrofoil with control of electro-magnetic forces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The initial responses and evolutions of the flow pattern and lift coefficient of a hydrofoil under the action of electro-magnetic (Lorentz) force have been studied experimentally and numerically, and trace particle methods are employed for them. With the introduction of BVF (boundary vortex flux), the quantitative relation among Lorentz forces, BVF and lifts is deduced. The influences of flow patterns on the hydrofoil lift coefficient have been discussed based on the BVF distribution, and the flow control mechanism of Lorentz force for a hydrofoil has been elucidated. Our results show that the flow pattern and lift of the hydrofoil vary periodically without any force. However, with the action of streamwise Lorentz forces, the separation point on the hydrofoil surface moves backward with a certain velocity, which makes the flow field steady finally. The streamwise Lorentz force raises the foil lift due to the increase of BVF intensity. On the other hand, Lorentz force also increases the hydrofoil surface pressure, which makes the lift decrease. However, the factor leading to the lift enhancement is determinant, therefore, the Lorentz force on the suction side can increase the lift, and the stronger the Lorentz force, the larger the lift enhancement. Our results also show that the localized Lorentz force can also both suppress the flow separation and increase the hydrofoil lift coefficient, furthermore, the Lorentz force located on the tail acts better than that located on the front.

  2. Unfolding Ubiquitin by force: water mediated H-bond destabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán Pabón

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Using the “pull and wait” (PNW simulation protocol at 300 K, we studied the unfolding by force of an ubiquitin molecule. PNW was implemented in the CHARMM program using an integration time step of 1 fs and a uniform dielectric constant of 1. The ubiquitin molecule, initially solvated, was put under mechanical stress, exerting forces from different directions. The rupture of five hydrogen bonds between parallel strands β1 and β5 takes place during the extension from 13 to 15 Å, defines a mechanical barrier for unfolding and dominates the point of maximum unfolding force. The simulations described here show that given adequate time, a small applied force can destabilize those five H-bonds relative to the bonds that can be created to water molecules; allowing the formation of stable H-bonds between a single water molecule and the donor and acceptor groups of the interstrand H-bonds. Thus, simulations run with PNW show that the force is not responsible for “ripping apart” the backbone H-bonds; it merely destabilizes them making them less stable than the H-bonds they can make with water. Additional simulations show that the force necessary to destabilize the H-bonds and allow them to be replaced by H-bonds to water molecules depends strongly on the pulling direction. By using a simulation protocol that allows equilibration at each extension we have been able to observe the details of the events leading to the unfolding of ubiquitin by mechanical force.

  3. Laboratory study of forced rotating shallow water turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espa, Stefania; Di Nitto, Gabriella; Cenedese, Antonio

    2011-12-01

    During the last three decades several authors have studied the appearance of multiple zonal jets in planetary atmospheres and in the Earths oceans. The appearance of zonal jets has been recovered in numerical simulations (Yoden & Yamada, 1993), laboratory experiments (Afanasyev & Wells, 2005; Espa et al., 2008, 2010) and in field measurements of the atmosphere of giant planets (Galperin et al., 2001). Recent studies have revealed the presence of zonation also in the Earths oceans, in fact zonal jets have been found in the outputs of Oceanic General Circulation Models-GCMs (Nakano & Hasumi, 2005) and from the analysis of satellite altimetry observations (Maximenko et al., 2005). In previous works (Espa et al., 2008, 2010) we have investigated the impact of the variation of the rotation rate and of the fluid depth on jets organization in decaying and forced regimes. In this work we show results from experiments performed in a bigger domain in which the fluid is forced continuously. The experimental set-up consists of a rotating tank (1m in diameter) where the initial distribution of vorticity has been generated via the Lorentz force in an electromagnetic cell. The latitudinal variation of the Coriolis parameter has been simulated by the parabolic profile assumed by the free surface of the rotating fluid. Flow measurements have been performed using an image analysis technique. Experiments have been performed changing the tank rotation rate and the fluid thickness. We have investigated the flow in terms of zonal and radial flow pattern, flow variability and jet scales.

  4. A New Force-Matched Reactive Force Field for Bulk Water Under Extreme Thermodynamic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Laurence; Koziol, Lucas

    2015-06-01

    A many-body classical force field is presented for water under dissociative thermodynamic conditions. The force field is optimized by force-matching to ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations calculated with Density Functional Theory (DFT). The force field contains short-ranged central and many-body over-coordination terms, and long-range Ewald electrostatics. It is optimized and tested on water at density 1.5 g/mL and 2000 K, which is approximately 10% dissociated according to DFT. Molecular dynamics simulations closely reproduce DFT radial distribution functions, as well as the distribution of wat and dissociation products. The calculated atomic self-diffusion constants appear about 50% lower than in DFT, although precise comparison is impossible due to the short timescale accessible to AIMD (about 20 ps). The force field is also compared to ReaxFF using the CHO parameter set of Chenowith et al. ReaxFF structural and dynamical properties are in overall fair agreement with DFT, although ReaxFF water is not dissociative at these conditions. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. [Comparision of forced expiratory time, recorded by two spirometers with flow sensors of various types, and acoustic duration of tracheal forced expiratory noises].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaeva, V V; Pochekutova, I A; Korenbaum, V I

    2015-01-01

    In the sample of 44 volunteers forced expiratory time values obtained in spirometers, equipped with flow sensor of Lilly type and turbine flow sensor, and acoustic duration of tracheal forced expiratory noises are compared. It is shown that spirometric forced expiratory time is dependent on flow sensor type. Therefore it can't be used in diagnostic aims.

  6. Flow Visualization of Forced and Natural Convection in Internal Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Crepeau; Hugh M. Mcllroy,Jr.; Donald M. McEligot; Keith G. Condie; Glenn McCreery; Randy Clarsean; Robert S. Brodkey; Yann G. Guezennec

    2002-01-31

    The report descries innovative flow visualization techniques, fluid mechanics measurements and computational models of flows in a spent nuclear fuel canister. The flow visualization methods used a fluid that reacted with a metal plate to show how a local reaction affects the surrounding flow. A matched index of refraction facility was used to take mean flow and turbulence measurements within a generic spent nuclear fuel canister. Computational models were also made of the flow in the canister. It was determined that the flow field in the canister was very complex, and modifications may need to be made to ensure that the spent fuel elements are completely passivated.

  7. Two-phase flow-induced forces on bends in small scale tubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cargnelutti, M.F.; Belfroid, S.P.C.; Schiferli, W.

    2010-01-01

    Two-phase flow occurs in many situations in industry. Under certain circumstances, it can be a source of flow-induced vibrations. The forces generated can be sufficiently large to affect the performance or efficiency of an industrial device. In the worst-case scenario, the mechanical forces that ari

  8. Hydro-dynamic damping theory in flowing water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monette, C.; Nennemann, B.; Seeley, C.; Coutu, A.; Marmont, H.

    2014-03-01

    Fluid-structure interaction (FSI) has a major impact on the dynamic response of the structural components of hydroelectric turbines. On mid-head to high-head Francis runners, the rotor-stator interaction (RSI) phenomenon always has to be considered carefully during the design phase to avoid operational issues later on. The RSI dynamic response amplitudes are driven by three main factors: (1) pressure forcing amplitudes, (2) excitation frequencies in relation to natural frequencies and (3) damping. The prediction of the two first factors has been largely documented in the literature. However, the prediction of fluid damping has received less attention in spite of being critical when the runner is close to resonance. Experimental damping measurements in flowing water on hydrofoils were presented previously. Those results showed that the hydro-dynamic damping increased linearly with the flow. This paper presents development and validation of a mathematical model, based on momentum exchange, to predict damping due to fluid structure interaction in flowing water. The model is implemented as an analytical procedure for simple structures, such as cantilever beams, but is also implemented in more general ways using three different approaches for more complex structures such as runner blades: a finite element procedure, a CFD modal work based approach and a CFD 1DOF approach. The mathematical model and all three implementation approaches are shown to agree well with experimental results.

  9. Developing Snow Model Forcing Data From WRF Model Output to Aid in Water Resource Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havens, S.; Marks, D. G.; Watson, K. A.; Masarik, M.; Flores, A. N.; Kormos, P.; Hedrick, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    Traditional operational modeling tools used by water managers in the west are challenged by more frequently occurring uncharacteristic stream flow patterns caused by climate change. Water managers are now turning to new models based on the physical processes within a watershed to combat the increasing number of events that do not follow the historical patterns. The USDA-ARS has provided near real time snow water equivalent (SWE) maps using iSnobal since WY2012 for the Boise River Basin in southwest Idaho and since WY2013 for the Tuolumne Basin in California that feeds the Hetch Hetchy reservoir. The goal of these projects is to not only provide current snowpack estimates but to use the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to drive iSnobal in order to produce a forecasted stream flow when coupled to a hydrology model. The first step is to develop methods on how to create snow model forcing data from WRF outputs. Using a reanalysis 1km WRF dataset from WY2009 over the Boise River Basin, WRF model results like surface air temperature, relative humidity, wind, precipitation, cloud cover, and incoming long wave radiation must be downscaled for use in iSnobal. iSnobal results forced with WRF output are validated at point locations throughout the basin, as well as compared with iSnobal results forced with traditional weather station data. The presentation will explore the differences in forcing data derived from WRF outputs and weather stations and how this affects the snowpack distribution.

  10. Complex Behavior of Forces Influencing Molten Weld Metal Flow based on Static Force Balance Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achebo, Joseph I.

    This study is aimed at investigating the forces responsible for the detachment of molten metal droplets formed at an electrode tip, which imminently and eventually drop into the weld pool during the welding process. The Equations used by Kim and Eagar in 1993 were applied to this study. It was found that the different detaching forces which are the gravitational force, the electromagnetic force, and the drag force, were determined to be 7.154 x 10-6N, 0.05N and 1.736N respectively. Whereas, the primary retaining force, which is the surface tension force, was calculated to be 0.0195N. From the findings, since the combination of the detaching forces taken together is greater than the retaining force, detachment of the molten metal droplet must inevitably occur. The combined effect of these forces on the behaviour of molten metal during the droplet detachment process was adequately investigated in this study.

  11. Alignment of dust particles by ion drag forces in subsonic flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piel, Alexander [IEAP, Christian-Albrechts-University, D-24098 Kiel (Germany)

    2011-07-15

    The role of ion drag forces for the alignment of dust particles is studied for subsonic flows. While alignment by wake-field attraction is a well known mechanism for supersonic flows, it is argued here that ion-scattering forces become more important in subsonic ion flows. A model of non-overlapping collisions is introduced and numerical results are discussed. For typical conditions of dusty plasma experiments, alignment by drag forces is found strong enough to overcome the destabilizing force from Coulomb repulsion between dust particles. It turns out that the major contribution to the horizontal restoring force originates from the transverse momentum transfer, which is usually neglected in ion drag force calculations because of an assumed rotational symmetry of the flow.

  12. Tracer injection techniques in flowing surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörman, A.

    2009-04-01

    Residence time distributions for flowing water and reactive matter are commonly used integrated properties of the transport process for determining technical issues of water resource management and in eco-hydrological science. Two general issues for tracer techniques are that the concentration-vs-time relation following a tracer injection (the breakthrough curve) gives unique transport information in different parts of the curve and separation of hydromechanical and reactive mechanisms often require simultaneous tracer injections. This presentation discusses evaluation methods for simultaneous tracer injections based on examples of tracer experiments in small rivers, streams and wetlands. Tritiated water is used as a practically inert substance to reflect the actual hydrodynamics, but other involved tracers are Cr(III)-51, P-32 and N-15. Hydromechanical, in-stream dispersion is reflected as a symmetrical spreading of the spatial concentration distribution. This requires that the transport distance over water depth is larger than about five times the flow Peclet number. Transversal retention of both inert and reactive solutes is reflected in terms of the tail of the breakthrough curve. Especially, reactive solutes can have a substantial magnification of the tailing behaviour depending on reaction rates or partitioning coefficients. To accurately discriminate between the effects of reactions and hydromechanical mixing its is relevant to use simultaneous injections of inert and reactive tracers with a sequential or integrated evaluation procedure. As an example, the slope of the P-32 tailing is consistently smaller than that of a simultaneous tritium injection in Ekeby wetland, Eskilstuna. The same applies to N-15 injected in the same experiment, but nitrogen is affected also by a systematic loss due to denitrification. Uptake in stream-bed sediments can be caused by a pumping effect arising when a variable pressure field is created on the stream bottom due to bed

  13. Experimental study of choking flow of water at supercritical conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muftuoglu, Altan

    Future nuclear reactors will operate at a coolant pressure close to 25 MPa and at outlet temperatures ranging from 500°C to 625°C. As a result, the outlet flow enthalpy in future Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactors (SCWR) will be much higher than those of actual ones which can increase overall nuclear plant efficiencies up to 48%. However, under such flow conditions, the thermal-hydraulic behavior of supercritical water is not fully known, e.g., pressure drop, forced convection and heat transfer deterioration, critical and blowdown flow rate, etc. Up to now, only a very limited number of studies have been performed under supercritical conditions. Moreover, these studies are conducted at conditions that are not representative of future SCWRs. In addition, existing choked flow data have been collected from experiments at atmospheric discharge pressure conditions and in most cases by using working fluids different than water which constrain researchers to analyze the data correctly. In particular, the knowledge of critical (choked) discharge of supercritical fluids is mandatory to perform nuclear reactor safety analyses and to design key mechanical components (e.g., control and safety relief valves, etc.). Hence, an experimental supercritical water facility has been built at Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal which allows researchers to perform choking flow experiments under supercritical conditions. The facility can also be used to carry out heat transfer and pressure drop experiments under supercritical conditions. In this thesis, we present the results obtained at this facility using a test section that contains a 1 mm inside diameter, 3.17 mm long orifice plate with sharp edges. Thus, 545 choking flow of water data points are obtained under supercritical conditions for flow pressures ranging from 22.1 MPa to 32.1 MPa, flow temperatures ranging from 50°C to 502°C and for discharge pressures from 0.1 MPa to 3.6 MPa. Obtained data are compared with the data given in

  14. Research on Hydrodynamic Force Enhancement and Water Environment Protection Measures of Dachan Bay, Shenzhen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv Wenbin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the research purpose of protection of water environmental quality in Dachan Bay Area in Shenzhen City, especially in National Development Zone in Qianhai Area, this paper establishes a horizontal two-dimensional water quality model of Dachan Bay and its branches by the use of WQ Module of Delft 3D. And this paper respectively simulates distribution of water quality in full high flow year, normal flow year and low flow year before and after the implementation of protection measures, predicts the effect of the water environment protection measures and focuses on the analysis of two kinds of hydrodynamic force enhancement pat-terns, that is, “water replenishing in dead zones” and “pollution discharge at back doors”, and finally recommends water environment protection measures with the core of “pollution discharge at back gates” by taking full advantage of natural dynamic, thus obtaining a better effect than that of the traditional “water replenishing in dead zones”.

  15. The drift force on an object in an inviscid weakly-varying rotational flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallis, G.B. [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The force on any stationary object in an inviscid incompressible extensive steady flow is derived in terms of the added mass tensor and gradient of velocity of the undisturbed fluid. Taylor`s theorem is extended to flows with weak vorticity. There are possible applications to constitutive equations for two-phase flow.

  16. Numerical investigation on feedback control of flow around an oscillating hydrofoil by Lorentz force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Zongkai; Zhou Benmou; Liu Huixing; Ji Yanliang; Huang Yadong, E-mail: kfliukai@126.com [Science and Technology on Transient Physics Laboratory, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China)

    2013-06-15

    In order to improve the hydrodynamic characteristics of a hydrofoil (NACA0012), this paper investigates an oscillating hydrofoil immersed in seawater (an electrically poorly conducting fluid) with feedback control of electromagnetic force (Lorentz force). This method is used in the iterative process, by forecasting the location of boundary layer separation points and attack angle at the next time step and figuring out the optimal force distribution function based on these parameters, then returns to the current time step and applies the optimal force onto the leeside to control the flow separation. Based on the basic flow governing equations, the flow field structures, lift evolutions and energy consumptions (the input impulse of Lorentz force) have been numerically investigated. Numerical results show that with this control, the flow separation could be fully suppressed. Meanwhile, the lift increases dramatically and oscillation is suppressed successfully. Furthermore, under similar lift improvement and control effects, the feedback control optimal ratio is 72.58%. (paper)

  17. Numerical investigation on feedback control of flow around an oscillating hydrofoil by Lorentz force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zong-Kai; Zhou, Ben-Mou; Liu, Hui-Xing; Ji, Yan-Liang; Huang, Ya-Dong

    2013-06-01

    In order to improve the hydrodynamic characteristics of a hydrofoil (NACA0012), this paper investigates an oscillating hydrofoil immersed in seawater (an electrically poorly conducting fluid) with feedback control of electromagnetic force (Lorentz force). This method is used in the iterative process, by forecasting the location of boundary layer separation points and attack angle at the next time step and figuring out the optimal force distribution function based on these parameters, then returns to the current time step and applies the optimal force onto the leeside to control the flow separation. Based on the basic flow governing equations, the flow field structures, lift evolutions and energy consumptions (the input impulse of Lorentz force) have been numerically investigated. Numerical results show that with this control, the flow separation could be fully suppressed. Meanwhile, the lift increases dramatically and oscillation is suppressed successfully. Furthermore, under similar lift improvement and control effects, the feedback control optimal ratio is 72.58%.

  18. Self Calibrating Flow Estimation in Waste Water Pumping Stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallesøe, Carsten Skovmose; Knudsen, Torben

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge about where waste water is flowing in waste water networks is essential to optimize the operation of the network pumping stations. However, installation of flow sensors is expensive and requires regular maintenance. This paper proposes an alternative approach where the pumps and the waste...... water pit are used for estimating both the inflow and the pump flow of the pumping station. Due to the nature of waste water, the waste water pumps are heavily affected by wear and tear. To compensate for the wear of the pumps, the pump parameters, used for the flow estimation, are automatically...

  19. Water Modeling of Optimizing Tundish Flow Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jin-gang; YAN Hui-cheng; LIU Liu; WANG Xin-hua

    2007-01-01

    In the water modeling experiments, three cases were considered, i.e. , a bare tundish, a tundish equipped with a turbulence inhibitor, and a rectangular tundish equipped with weirs (dams) and a turbulence inhibitor. Comparing the RTD curves, inclusion separation, and the result of the streamline experiment, it can be found that the tundish equipped with weirs (dams) and a turbulence inhibitor has a great effect on the flow field and the inclusion separation when compared with the sole use or no use of the turbulent inhibitor or weirs (dams). In addition, the enlargement of the distance between the weir and dam will result in a better effect when the tundish equipped with weirs (dam) and a turbulence inhibitor was used.

  20. Water flow energy harvesters for autonomous flowmeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisseau, Sebastien; Duret, Alexandre-Benoit; Perez, Matthias; Jallas, Emmanuel; Jallas, Eric

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports on a water flow energy harvester exploiting a horizontal axis turbine with distributed magnets of alternate polarities at the rotor periphery and air coils outside the pipe. The energy harvester operates down to 1.2L/min with an inlet section of 20mm of diameter and up to 25.2mW are provided at 20L/min in a 2.4V NiMH battery through a BQ25504 power management circuit. The pressure loss induced by the insertion of the energy harvester in the hydraulic circuit and by the extraction of energy has been limited to 0.05bars at 30L/min, corresponding to a minor loss coefficient of KEH=3.94.

  1. Analysis of Water Flow Pressure on Bridge Piers considering the Impact Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-hui Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effects of water current impact and fluid-structure interaction on the bridge piers, the mechanism of water flow impact on the bridge pier is firstly studied. Then a finite element model of a bridge pier is established including the effects of water flow impact as well as the water circumferential motion around the pier. Comparative study is conducted between the results of water impact effect, fluid-structure coupling effect, theoretical analysis, and also the results derived using the formulas specified in the design codes home and abroad. The results show that the water flow force calculated using the formulas provided by the codes should be multiplied by an impact amplifier to account for the effect of flood impact on the bridge pier. When the flood flows around the pier, the fluid-structure coupling effect on the bridge pier can be neglected. The method specified in the China guidelines of General Code for Design of Highway Bridges and Culverts tends to provide a larger result of the water flow force.

  2. Flow resistance characteristics of water in narrow annulus during heat exchange

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Li-cheng; YAN Chang-qi; SUN Zhong-ning; ZHANG Qing-hua

    2003-01-01

    Considering the special resistance characteristics of fluids flowing through ducts with small gaps, experiments are performed to investigate the resistance characteristics of single-phase water, which is forced to flow through vertical annuli. The gap sizes are 0.9, 1.4 and 2.4mm, respectively. The experiments are conducted under condition of 1atm. The water in the annuli is heated by high temperature water reversely flowing through the inner tube and the outer annulus. The results show that the flow pattern begin to change from laminar to turbulent before Reynolds number approaches 2000, the flow resistance in annulus has little relations with the temperature difference and ways of being heated, but mainly depends on the ratio of mass flux to the width of annulus.

  3. How can vorticity be produced in irrotationally forced flows?

    CERN Document Server

    Del Sordo, Fabio

    2010-01-01

    A spherical hydrodynamical expansion flow can be described as the gradient of a potential. In that case no vorticity should be produced, but several additional mechanisms can drive its production. Here we analyze the effects of baroclinicity, rotation and shear in the case of a viscous fluid. Those flows resemble what happens in the interstellar medium. In fact in this astrophysical environment supernovae explosion are the dominant flows and, in a first approximation, they can be seen as spherical. One of the main difference is that in our numerical study we examine only weakly supersonic flows, while supernovae explosions are strongly supersonic.

  4. Effect of Surface Forces on the Gas Flow in Nanosize Capillaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldughin, V. I.; Zhdanov, V. M.

    2005-05-01

    The flow of gas in ultrafine capillary under the action of temperature gradient is considered with allowance for the action of surface forces. It is shown that the presence of surface forces considerably increases the effect of thermal transpiration compared to the classical value determined in a free molecular regime of gas flow. The coefficient responsible for the mechanocaloric effect for the case of gas flow under the pressure gradient was also determined using Onsager relation for the kinetic coefficients calculated with accownt of the effect of surface forces.

  5. Chirality-specific lift forces of helix under shear flows: Helix perpendicular to shear plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi-Yi

    2017-02-01

    Chiral objects in shear flow experience a chirality-specific lift force. Shear flows past helices in a low Reynolds number regime were studied using slender-body theory. The chirality-specific lift forces in the vorticity direction experienced by helices are dominated by a set of helix geometry parameters: helix radius, pitch length, number of turns, and helix phase angle. Its analytical formula is given. The chirality-specific forces are the physical reasons for the chiral separation of helices in shear flow. Our results are well supported by the latest experimental observations.

  6. Water flow and solute transport in floating fen root mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stofberg, Sija F.; EATM van der Zee, Sjoerd

    2015-04-01

    Floating fens are valuable wetlands, found in North-Western Europe, that are formed by floating root mats when old turf ponds are colonized by plants. These terrestrialization ecosystems are known for their biodiversity and the presence of rare plant species, and the root mats reveal different vegetation zones at a small scale. The vegetation zones are a result of strong gradients in abiotic conditions, including groundwater dynamics, nutrients and pH. To prevent irreversible drought effects such as land subsidence and mineralization of peat, water management involves import of water from elsewhere to maintain constant surface water levels. Imported water may have elevated levels of salinity during dry summers, and salt exposure may threaten the vegetation. To assess the risk of exposure of the rare plant species to salinity, the hydrology of such root mats must be understood. Physical properties of root mats have scarcely been investigated. We have measured soil characteristics, hydraulic conductivity, vertical root mat movement and groundwater dynamics in a floating root mat in the nature reserve Nieuwkoopse Plassen, in the Netherlands. The root mat mostly consists of roots and organic material, in which the soil has a high saturated water content, and strongly varies in its stage of decomposition. We have found a distinct negative correlation between degree of decomposition and hydraulic conductivity, similar to observations for bogs in the literature. Our results show that the relatively young, thin edge of the root mat that colonizes the surface water has a high hydraulic conductivity and floats in the surface water, resulting in very small groundwater fluctuations within the root mat. The older part of the root mat, that is connected to the deeper peat layers is hydrologically more isolated and the material has a lower conductivity. Here, the groundwater fluctuates strongly with atmospheric forcing. The zones of hydraulic properties and vegetation, appear to

  7. Rotating Water Table for the Determination of Non-Steady Forces in a Turbine Stage Through Modified Hydraulic Analogy

    OpenAIRE

    J. S. Rao; E. Raghavacharyulu; Seshadri, V.; V.V.R. Rao

    1983-01-01

    Determination of non-steady forces in a real turbine stage is difficult due to the local flow conditions, for example high pressures, high temperatures and in-accessibility to the region etc. Experimentation in a real turbine is also prohibitive due to the costs involved. An alternate method of arriving at these non-steady forces through the use of modified hydraulic analogy is discussed. A rotating water table facility, developed and fabricated based on the principles of modified hydraulic a...

  8. Some new parallel flows due to Lorentz forces in electrically conducting fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Pantokratoras, A

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the fully developed flow between two parallel plates and the film flow over a plate in an electrically conducting fluid under the action of a parallel Lorentz force. Exact analytical solutions are derived for velocity, flow rate and wall shear stress at the plates. The velocity results are presented in figures. All these flows are new and are presented for the first time in the literature.

  9. Flow pattern and lift evolution of hydrofoil with control of electro-magnetic forces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN YaoHui; FAN BaoChun; CHEN ZhiHua; LI HongZhi

    2009-01-01

    The Initial responses and evolutions of the flow pattern and lift coefficient of a hydrofoil under the ac-tion of electro-magnetic (Lorentz) force have been studied experimentally and numerically,and trace particle methods are employed for them.With the introduction of BVF (boundary vortex flux),the quantitative relation among Lorentz forces,BVF and lifts is deduced.The influences of flow patterns on the hydrofoil lift coefficient have been discussed based on the BVF distribution,and the flow control mechanism of Lorentz force for a hydrofoil has been elucidated.Our results show that the flow pattern and lift of the hydrofoil vary periodically without any force.However,with the action of streamwise Lorentz forces,the separation point on the hydrofoil surface moves backward with a certain velocity,which makes the flow field steady finally.The streamwise Lorentz force raises the foil lift due to the Increase of BVF intensity.On the other hand,Lorentz force also increases the hydrofoil surface pres-sure,which makes the lift decrease.However,the factor leading to the lift enhancement is determinant,therefore,the Lorentz force on the suction side can increase the lift,and the stronger the Lorentz force,the larger the lift enhancement.Our results also show that the localized Lorentz force can also both suppress the flow separation and increase the hydrofoil lift coefficient,furthermore,the Lorentz force located on the tail acts better than that located on the front.

  10. Rotordynamic forces generated by discharge-to-suction leakage flows in centrifugal pumps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Quan-zhong; WANG Hong-jie; LIU Zhan-sheng

    2009-01-01

    In order to investigate the flow-induced vibration in the shroud passage of centrifugal pump and pre-dict rotordynamic forces of centrifugal pump rotor system,an analysis of rotordynamic forces arising from shrou-ded centnlugal pump is presented.CFD techniques were utilized to analyze the full three-dimensional viscous,primary/secondary flow field in a centrifugal pump impeller to determine rotordynamic forces. Multiple quasi-steady solutions of an eccentric three-dimensional model at different whirl frequency ratios yielded the rotordy-namic forces. The skew-symmetric stiffness,damping,and mass matrices were obtained by second-order least-squares analysis.Simulation of the coupled primary/secondary flow field was conducted,and the complex flow characteristcs.in the flow field of a shroud passage were achieved including the mean velocity and pressure,as well as the eddy in a large scale of flow field due to viscosity.The rotordynamic force coefficients were calculat-ed,and the results were in good agreement with those of experiment except for the direct inertial coefficient without the consideration of whirling forces from the impeller primary flow passage.

  11. Effect of ambient flow inhomogeneity on drag forces on a sphere at finite Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungwoo; Balachandar, S.; Lee, Hyungoo

    2013-11-01

    For studies on particle-laden flows involving particle transport and dispersion, the prediction capability of hydrodynamic forces on the particle in a non-uniform flow is one of the central issues. However, existing analytical expressions and empirical correlations are mainly made based on the homogeneous flow conditions such as uniform or uniform shear flows. Therefore, the objective of this study is to investigate the effect of flow inhomogeneity on drag forces on a sphere at finite Reynolds numbers. To do so, we perform direct numerical simulations of flow over a sphere in an inhomogeneous flow. In this study, we consider three different kinds of the inhomogeneous flows: cosine, hyperbolic cosine and hyperbolic secant profiles. The Reynolds number of the sphere based on the freestream velocity and sphere diameter is 100. The present simulations show that the quasi-steady drag forces in inhomogeneous flows are reasonably estimated by standard drag law based on the relative velocity if the fluid velocity seen by the particle is evaluated by surface average. The results support Loth and Dorgan (2009)'s proposed formula. In the final presentation, the effect of ambient flow inhomogeneity on drag forces would be presented in more detail.

  12. Plasma depletion layer: Magnetosheath flow structure and forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. L. Wang

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The plasma depletion layer (PDL is a layer on the sunward side of the magnetopause with lower plasma density and higher magnetic field compared to the corresponding upstream magnetosheath values. In a previous study, we have validated the UCLA global (MHD model in studying the formation of the PDL by comparing model results, using spacecraft solar wind observations as the driver, with in situ PDL observations. In this study, we extend our previous work and examine the detailed MHD forces responsible for the PDL formation. We argue that MHD models, instead of gasdynamic models, should be used to study the PDL, because gasdynamic models cannot produce the PDL on the sunward side of the magnetopause. For northward (IMF, flux tube depletion occurs in almost all the subsolar magnetosheath. However, the streamlines closest to the magnetopause and the stagnation line show the greatest depletion. The relative strength of the various MHD forces changes along these streamlines. Forces along a flux tube at different stages of its depletion in the magnetosheath are analyzed. We find that a strong plasma pressure gradient force along the magnetic field at the bow shock and a pressure gradient force along the flux tube within the magnetosheath usually exist pushing plasma away from the equatorial plane to deplete the flux tube. More complex force structures along the flux tube are found close to the magnetopause. This new, more detailed description of flux tube depletion is compared with the results of Zwan and Wolf (1976 and differences are found. Near the magnetopause, the pressure gradient force along the flux tube either drives plasma away from the equatorial plane or pushes plasma toward the equatorial plane. As a result, a slow mode structure is seen along the flux tube which might be responsible for the observed two-layered slow mode structures.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetosheath; solar wind-magnetosphere interactions. Space

  13. Modeling Rotating Turbulent Flows with the Body Force Potential Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Amitabh; Perot, Blair

    2000-11-01

    Like a Reynolds Stress Transport equation model, the turbulent potential model has an explicit Coriolis acceleration term that appears in the model that accounts for rotation effects. In this work the additional secondary effects that system rotation has on the dissipation rate, return-to-isotropy, and fast pressure strain terms are also included in the model. The resulting model is tested in the context of rotating isotropic turbulence, rotating homogeneous shear flow, rotating channel flow, and swirling pipe flow. Many of the model changes are applicable to Reynolds stress transport equation models. All model modifications are frame indifferent.

  14. Investigation on the liquid water droplet instability in a simulated flow channel of PEM fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Tae Hun; Kim, Bok Yung; Kim, Han Sang; Min, Kyoung Doug [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    To investigate the characteristics of water droplets on the gas diffusion layer from both top-view and side-view of the flow channel, a rig test apparatus was designed and fabricated with prism attached plate. This experimental device was used to simulate the growth of a single liquid water droplet and its transport process with various air flow velocity and channel height. Not only dry condition but also fully humidified condition was also simulated by using a water absorbing sponge. The detachment height of the water droplet with dry and wet conditions was measured and analyzed. It was found that the droplet tends towards becoming unstable by decreased channel height, increased flow velocity or making a gas diffusion layer (GDL) dryer. Also, peculiar behavior of the water droplet in the channel was presented like attachment to hydrophilic wall or sudden breaking of droplet in case of fully hydrated condition. The simplified force balance model matches with experimental data as well

  15. Effects of composition of grains of debris flow on its impact force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, jinbo; Hu, Kaiheng; Cui, Peng

    2017-04-01

    Debris flows compose of solid material with broad size distribution from fine sand to boulders. Impact force imposed by debris flows is a very important issue for protection engineering design and strongly influenced by their grain composition. However, this issue has not been studied in depth and the effects of grain composition not been considered in the calculation of the impact force. In this present study, the small-scale flume experiments with five kinds of compositions of grains for debris flow were carried out to study the effect of the composition of grains of debris flow on its impact force. The results show that the impact force of debris flow increases with the grain size, the hydrodynamic pressure of debris flow is calibrated based on the normalization parameter dmax/d50, in which dmax is the maximum size and d50 is the median size. Furthermore, a log-logistic statistic distribution could be used to describe the distribution of magnitude of impact force of debris flow, where the mean and the variance of the present distribution increase with grain size. This distribution proposed in the present study could be used to the reliability analysis of structures impacted by debris flow.

  16. Numerical simulation of oil-water two-phase flow in horizontal pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Michelly Martuchele; Ramirez, Ramiro Gustavo [Federal University of Itajuba (UNIFEI), MG (Brazil)], E-mail: ramirez@unifei.edu.br

    2010-07-01

    The numerical simulation of two phase flow through the CFD techniques have become of great interest due to the complexity of this type of flow. The present work aims to simulate the oil-water two-phase flow in horizontal pipes for stratification analysis of the mixture. In numerical simulations, incompressible flow, isothermal, steady state and laminar flow were considered. Numerical analysis of flow stratification was carried out for horizontal straight and curved pipe. FLUENT was the commercial software employed in the simulation. Three-dimensional mesh generated by ICEM-CFD program was used for numerical simulation. The numerical analysis flow pattern was carried out employing the Eulerian model, considering the drag and lift interphase forces. The simulation results for the horizontal straight pipe were qualitatively validated with experimental data obtained in the Laboratory of Phase Separation of UNIFEI. (author)

  17. Numerical simulation of laminar jet-forced flow using lattice Boltzmann method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan LI; Ya-li DUAN; Yan GUO; Ru-xun LIU

    2009-01-01

    In the paper, a numerical study on symmetrical and asymmetrical laminar jet-forced flows is carried out by using a lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) with a special boundary treatment. The simulation results are in very good agreement with the available numerical prediction. It is shown that the LBM is a competitive method for the laminar jet-forced flow in terms of computational efficiency and stability.

  18. Forcing of a bottom-mounted circular cylinder by steep regular water waves at finite depth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Bo Terp; Bredmose, Henrik; Bingham, Harry B.

    2014-01-01

    Forcing by steep regular water waves on a vertical circular cylinder at finite depth was investigated numerically by solving the two-phase incompressible Navier–Stokes equations. Consistently with potential flow theory, boundary layer effects were neglected at the sea bed and at the cylinder...... surface, but the strong nonlinear motion of the free surface was included. The numerical model was verified and validated by grid convergence and by comparison to relevant experimental measurements. First-order convergence towards an analytical solution was demonstrated and an excellent agreement...... of secondary load cycles. Special attention was paid to this secondary load cycle and the flow features that cause it. By visual observation and a simplified analytical model it was shown that the secondary load cycle was caused by the strong nonlinear motion of the free surface which drives a return flow...

  19. RE-AERATION LAW OF WATER FLOW OVER SPILLWAYS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Xiang-ju; LUO Lin; CHEN Yong-can; ZHAO Wen-qian

    2006-01-01

    In order to explore the re-aeration law of water flow over spillway, the transfer process of oxygen in water flow over spillway was studied. The interfacial mass transfer coefficients were obtained by experiments. The flow fields and the turbulence characteristics are simulated by numerical methods. The fractional volume of fluid model (VOF) of the air-water two phase flows was introduced to track the interface. Consequently, the quantitative expression of the interfacial mass transfer coefficients related with velocity and kinetic energy at the free surface was derived and the re-aeration model for the water flow over spillway was established. The examination with the experimental data of different conditions shows the validity of the re-aeration model for the water flow over spillways. This study will be important to evaluate the dissolved oxygen concentration and self-purification ability of rivers.

  20. Tangible Landscape: Cognitively Grasping the Flow of Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, B. A.; Petrasova, A.; Petras, V.; Mitasova, H.; Meentemeyer, R. K.

    2016-06-01

    Complex spatial forms like topography can be challenging to understand, much less intentionally shape, given the heavy cognitive load of visualizing and manipulating 3D form. Spatiotemporal processes like the flow of water over a landscape are even more challenging to understand and intentionally direct as they are dependent upon their context and require the simulation of forces like gravity and momentum. This cognitive work can be offloaded onto computers through 3D geospatial modeling, analysis, and simulation. Interacting with computers, however, can also be challenging, often requiring training and highly abstract thinking. Tangible computing - an emerging paradigm of human-computer interaction in which data is physically manifested so that users can feel it and directly manipulate it - aims to offload this added cognitive work onto the body. We have designed Tangible Landscape, a tangible interface powered by an open source geographic information system (GRASS GIS), so that users can naturally shape topography and interact with simulated processes with their hands in order to make observations, generate and test hypotheses, and make inferences about scientific phenomena in a rapid, iterative process. Conceptually Tangible Landscape couples a malleable physical model with a digital model of a landscape through a continuous cycle of 3D scanning, geospatial modeling, and projection. We ran a flow modeling experiment to test whether tangible interfaces like this can effectively enhance spatial performance by offloading cognitive processes onto computers and our bodies. We used hydrological simulations and statistics to quantitatively assess spatial performance. We found that Tangible Landscape enhanced 3D spatial performance and helped users understand water flow.

  1. Self-powered water splitting using flowing kinetic energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wei; Han, Yu; Han, Chang Bao; Gao, Cai Zhen; Cao, Xia; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-01-14

    By utilizing a water-flow-driven triboelectric nanogenerator, a fully self-powered water-splitting process is demonstrated using the electricity converted from a water flow without additional energy costs. Considering the extremely low costs, the demonstrated approach is universally applicable and practically usable for future water electrolysis, which may initiate a research direction in the field of triboelectrolysis and possibly impacts energy science in general. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Steady-State Flow-Force Compensation in a Hydraulic Spool Valve

    CERN Document Server

    Lugowski, Jan

    2013-01-01

    A high-speed jet flowing inside of a partially-open hydraulic valve is accompanied by a reaction force, also referred to as flow force. The nature of this force has remained a mystery despite an extensive research effort spanning many decades. The momentum theory on the flow force by Lee and Blackburn (1952) explains the origin of the flow force and offers a design solution to shape the valve spool as a turbine bucket. It provides a model to calculate the compensated flow force as well. This paper shows that the model applies to a different flow case due to incorrect assumptions made. A corrected equation is presented based on a detailed analysis of the static-pressure distribution in the valve cavity as well as on a literature review of pressure loss in diffusers and nozzles. The new equation is based on the compensation taking place upstream of the valve orifice, not downstream as assumed by the momentum theory. The new model can be applied to chamfers or notches on the valve spool without the need to machi...

  3. Comparison of Pore Water Chemical Extracted by Different Forces with In-situ Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, N.; Machida, I.; Marui, A.; Scheytt, T.; Hebig, K. H.

    2010-12-01

    Due to the difficulty involved for in-situ sampling of groundwater, pore water was extracted from rock core samples for chemical analysis. Available literature indicated that, the chemical constituents of pore water are affected by large extraction force. This study is therefore aimed at discussing the reason behind the change in pore water chemistry when samples are subjected to different extraction forces. The process involved extraction of pore water from sandstone core samples at different pF values by centrifuge method. The pF expresses the tension of water, retained in soil. It is the base 10 logarithm of tension, which is measured as a head of water head in centimeters. The samples of lengths 100 m each were obtained from three locations. Tracer test using Iodine was also conducted to remove pore water polluted by drilling water. Pore water was extracted from a total of 63 samples at three different values of pF (low: up to pF 2.3, medium: pF 2.3 - 3.9, high: pF 3.9 - 4.3). For each pF range the pore water was analyzed for major anions and cations. Results showed variation of ionic concentrations with pF and depth. The average concentrations rose with increase of pF in all ions except for potassium. Based on the concentration distribution of Ca2+, three zones could be defined: (1) Ca2+ concentration, which does not depend on pF, (2) Ca2+ concentration, which increases with the value of pF and (3) Ca2+ showing the same value for medium and high pF values. It is thus concluded that, water chemistry of deep pore water is likely to have reached equilibrium due to almost stagnant flow conditions, whereas shallow water is likely to participate in chemical interactions due to the relatively high flow velocity. The depths of the interfaces of these three zones are almost consistent with geological boundaries of weathered and fine sandstone and there is evidence of a relationship between pore water chemistry and physical rock properties. Using this knowledge, we

  4. Pumpage for the transient ground-water flow model, Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set represents ground-water discharged from the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system (DVRFS) through pumped wells. Pumping from wells in...

  5. Application of Neutron Radiography to Flow Visualization in Supercritical Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, N.; Sugimoto, K.; Takami, S.; Sugioka, K.; Tsukada, T.; Adschiri, T.; Saito, Y.

    Supercritical water is used in various chemical reaction processes including hydrothermal synthesis of metal oxide nano-particles, oxidation, chemical conversion of biomass and plastics. Density of the super critical water is much less than that of the sub-critical water. By using neutron radiography, Peterson et al. have studied salt precipitation processes in supercritical water and the flow pattern in a reverse-flow vessel for salt precipitation, and Balasko et al. have revealed the behaviour of supercritical water in a container. The nano-particles were made by mixing the super critical flow and the sub critical water solution. In the present study, neutron radiography was applied to the flow visualization of the super and sub critical water mixture in a T-junction made of stainless steel pipes for high pressure and temperature conditions to investigate their mixing process. Still images by a CCD camera were obtained by using the neutron radiography system at B4 port in KUR.

  6. Core-annular flow through a horizontal pipe: Hydrodynamic counterbalancing of buoyancy force on core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooms, G.; Vuik, C.; Poesio, P.

    2007-01-01

    A theoretical investigation has been made of core-annular flow: the flow of a high-viscosity liquid core surrounded by a low-viscosity liquid annular layer through a horizontal pipe. Special attention is paid to the question of how the buoyancy force on the core, caused by a density difference betwe

  7. Core-annular flow through a horizontal pipe: Hydrodynamic counterbalancing of buoyancy force on core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooms, G.; Vuik, C.; Poesio, P.

    2007-01-01

    A theoretical investigation has been made of core-annular flow: the flow of a high-viscosity liquid core surrounded by a low-viscosity liquid annular layer through a horizontal pipe. Special attention is paid to the question of how the buoyancy force on the core, caused by a density difference

  8. The electromagnetic force field, fluid flow field and temperature profiles in levitated metal droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kaddah, N.; Szekely, J.

    1982-01-01

    A mathematical representation was developed for the electromagnetic force field, the flow field, the temperature field (and for transport controlled kinetics), in a levitation melted metal droplet. The technique of mutual inductances was employed for the calculation of the electromagnetic force field, while the turbulent Navier - Stokes equations and the turbulent convective transport equations were used to represent the fluid flow field, the temperature field and the concentration field. The governing differential equations, written in spherical coordinates, were solved numerically. The computed results were in good agreement with measurements, regarding the lifting force, and the average temperature of the specimen and carburization rates, which were transport controlled.

  9. Water flow and hydraulic characteristics of Japanese red pine and oak trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yoshikazu; Tanaka, Tadashi

    2001-07-01

    To assess the characteristics of water flow in a tree and the contribution of the stem water storage to transpiration, some field observations were carried out in two natural forests: a Japanese red pine (Pinus densiflora Sieb. et Zucc.) forest and an oak (Quercus mongolica Fish) forest. Water potentials of leaf, stem, root and soil water, sap flow rate, volumetric water content of the stem and micrometeorological factors were measured during the observation periods. Clear diurnal variations in volumetric water content of a stem were observed. It was confirmed that water storage in the stem contributed to the transpiration process. This contribution appeared when the difference in water potential between the root and stem was more than 0·3 MPa. The stem water storage was extracted by the driving force due to the difference of the response of the root and stem water potential to change in the leaf water potential in daytime. The stem capacitance of 1·44 kg MPa-1 for the Japanese red pine and 0·44 kg MPa-1 for the oak were evaluated from the variation in the water storage in the stem and the difference of water potential between root and stem. Evaluations of the water budget were made for each test stand. The results indicated that the contribution of water storage in the stem to transpiration accounted for 10 to 20% of the daily transpiration.

  10. Study on an undershot cross-flow water turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Yasuyuki; Inagaki, Terumi; Li, Yanrong; Omiya, Ryota; Fukutomi, Junichiro

    2014-06-01

    This study aims to develop a water turbine suitable for ultra-low heads in open channels, with the end goal being the effective utilization of unutilized hydroelectric energy in agricultural water channels. We performed tests by applying a cross-flow runner to an open channel as an undershot water turbine while attempting to simplify the structure and eliminate the casing. We experimentally investigated the flow fields and performance of water turbines in states where the flow rate was constant for the undershot cross-flow water turbine mentioned above. In addition, we compared existing undershot water turbines with our undershot cross-flow water turbine after attaching a bottom plate to the runner. From the results, we were able to clarify the following. Although the effective head for cross-flow runners with no bottom plate was lower than those found in existing runners equipped with a bottom plate, the power output is greater in the high rotational speed range because of the high turbine efficiency. Also, the runner with no bottom plate differed from runners that had a bottom plate in that no water was being wound up by the blades or retained between the blades, and the former received twice the flow due to the flow-through effect. As a result, the turbine efficiency was greater for runners with no bottom plate in the full rotational speed range compared with that found in runners that had a bottom plate.

  11. Numerical Simulation of Water Jet Flow Using Diffusion Flux Mixture Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Shang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A multidimensional diffusion flux mixture model was developed to simulate water jet two-phase flows. Through the modification of the gravity using the gradients of the mixture velocity, the centrifugal force on the water droplets was able to be considered. The slip velocities between the continuous phase (gas and the dispersed phase (water droplets were able to be calculated through multidimensional diffusion flux velocities based on the modified multidimensional drift flux model. Through the numerical simulations, comparing with the experiments and the simulations of traditional algebraic slip mixture model on the water mist spray, the model was validated.

  12. On the unsteady inviscid force on cylinders and spheres in subcritical compressible flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, M; Haselbacher, A; Balachandar, S

    2008-06-28

    The unsteady inviscid force on cylinders and spheres in subcritical compressible flow is investigated. In the limit of incompressible flow, the unsteady inviscid force on a cylinder or sphere is the so-called added-mass force that is proportional to the product of the mass displaced by the body and the instantaneous acceleration. In compressible flow, the finite acoustic propagation speed means that the unsteady inviscid force arising from an instantaneously applied constant acceleration develops gradually and reaches steady values only for non-dimensional times c(infinity)t/R approximately >10, where c(infinity) is the freestream speed of sound and R is the radius of the cylinder or sphere. In this limit, an effective added-mass coefficient may be defined. The main conclusion of our study is that the freestream Mach number has a pronounced effect on both the peak value of the unsteady force and the effective added-mass coefficient. At a freestream Mach number of 0.5, the effective added-mass coefficient is about twice as large as the incompressible value for the sphere. Coupled with an impulsive acceleration, the unsteady inviscid force in compressible flow can be more than four times larger than that predicted from incompressible theory. Furthermore, the effect of the ratio of specific heats on the unsteady force becomes more pronounced as the Mach number increases.

  13. Effect of volumetric electromagnetic forces on shock wave structure of hypersonic air flow near plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomichev, Vladislav; Yadrenkin, Mikhail; Shipko, Evgeny

    2016-10-01

    Summarizing of experimental studies results of the local MHD-interaction at hypersonic air flow near the plate is presented. Pulsed and radiofrequency discharge have been used for the flow ionization. It is shown that MHD-effect on the shock-wave structure of the flow is significant at test conditions. Using of MHD-interaction parameter enabled to defining characteristic modes of MHD-interaction by the force effect: weak, moderate and strong.

  14. FORCE CHARACTERISTICS AND VORTEX SHEDDING OF A PITCHING FOIL IN SHEAR FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Dan-yong; LIU Nan-sheng; LU Xi-yun; YIN Xie-zhen

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study is to deal with unsteady force acting on a pitching foil in shear flow and to study the relation of the force characteristics with vortex shedding near the foil. The two-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in the vorticity and stream-function formulation were solved with the fourth-order essentially compact finite difference schemes for the space derivatives and a fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme for the time advancement. The force characteristics and vortex shedding of the pitching foil in shear flows were investigated. The effects of some typical factors, including the incoming flow shear, the oscillating frequency and amplitude, on the vortex shedding and force behavior were analyzed and discussed.

  15. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Atomic Force Microscopy at the Water-Muscovite Interface: Hydration Layer Structure and Force Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kazuya; Liang, Yunfeng; Amano, Ken-ichi; Murata, Sumihiko; Matsuoka, Toshifumi; Takahashi, Satoru; Nishi, Naoya; Sakka, Tetsuo

    2016-04-19

    With the development of atomic force microscopy (AFM), it is now possible to detect the buried liquid-solid interfacial structure in three dimensions at the atomic scale. One of the model surfaces used for AFM is the muscovite surface because it is atomically flat after cleavage along the basal plane. Although it is considered that force profiles obtained by AFM reflect the interfacial structures (e.g., muscovite surface and water structure), the force profiles are not straightforward because of the lack of a quantitative relationship between the force and the interfacial structure. In the present study, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the relationship between the muscovite-water interfacial structure and the measured AFM force using a capped carbon nanotube (CNT) AFM tip. We provide divided force profiles, where the force contributions from each water layer at the interface are shown. They reveal that the first hydration layer is dominant in the total force from water even after destruction of the layer. Moreover, the lateral structure of the first hydration layer transcribes the muscovite surface structure. It resembles the experimentally resolved surface structure of muscovite in previous AFM studies. The local density profile of water between the tip and the surface provides further insight into the relationship between the water structure and the detected force structure. The detected force structure reflects the basic features of the atomic structure for the local hydration layers. However, details including the peak-peak distance in the force profile (force-distance curve) differ from those in the density profile (density-distance curve) because of disturbance by the tip.

  16. Pore Water Pressure Contribution to Debris Flow Mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Deangeli

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Debris flows are very to extremely rapid flows of saturated granular soils. Two main types of debris flow are generally recognized: Open slope debris flows and channelized debris flows. The former is the results of some form of slope failures, the latter can develop along preexisting stream courses by the mobilization of previously deposited debris blanket. The problem to be addressed is the influence of the mode of initiation on the subsequent mechanism of propagation. In particular the role of pore water pressure on debris flow mobility in both types was debated. Approach: Laboratory flume experiments were set up in order to analyze the behavior of debris flows generated by model sand slope failures. Failures were induced in sand slopes by raising the water level by seepage from a drain located at the top end of the flume, and by rainfall supplied by a set of pierced plastic pipes placed above the flume. Video recordings of the tests were performed to analyze debris flow characteristics. Results: In all the tests the sand water mixture flows were unsteady and non uniform and sand deposition along the channel bed was a relevant phenomenon. The flows were characterized by a behavioral stratification of the sand water mixture along the flow depth. Back analyzed pore water pressure were just in excess to the hydrostatic condition. The reliability of the experimental results was checked by comparison with other flume experiment data. Conclusion: Debris flow behavior was influenced by the mode of initiation, the inclination of the channel and grain size of the soils. These factors affected the attained velocities and the pore water pressure values. The mobility of debris flows was not always enhanced by high excess pore water pressure values.

  17. Effects of ultrasonic waves on the interfacial forces between oil and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamida, Tarek; Babadagli, Tayfun

    2008-04-01

    The effect of ultrasound on flow through a capillary using the pendant drop method was investigated. Water was injected into a 0.1 mm Hastelloy C-276 capillary tube submersed into several mineral oils with different viscosity, and kerosene. The average drop rate per minute was measured at several ultrasonic intensities. We observed that there exists a peak drop rate at a characteristic intensity, which strongly depends on oil viscosity and the interfacial tension between water and the oil. The semi-quantitative results reveal that the remarkable change in the interfacial forces between oil and water could be the explanation to the enhancement of oil recovery when the ultrasonic waves are applied.

  18. Forced-flow chromatographic determination of calcium and magnesium with continuous spectrophotometric detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arguello, M.D.

    1977-12-01

    Modifications to the forced-flow chromatograph include a flow-through pH monitor to continuously monitor the pH of the final effluent and an active low-pass filter to eliminate noise in the spectrophotometric detector. All separations are performed using partially sulfonated XAD-2 as the ion exchanger. Elution of calcium and magnesium is accomplished using ammonium chloride and ethylenediammonium chloride solutions. Calcium and magnesium are detected by means of Arsenazo I and PAR-ZnEDTA color-forming reagents. Other metal ions are detected by means of PAR and Chromazurol S color-forming reagents. Calcium and magnesium distribution coefficients on partially sulfonated XAD-2 as functions of ammonium chloride and ethylenediammonium chloride concentration are given together with distribution coefficients of other metal ions. Methods for the selective elution of interfering metal ions prior to the elution of calcium and magnesium are described. Beryllium and aluminum are selectively eluted with sulfosalicylic acid. Those elements forming anionic chloride complexes are selectively eluted with HCl-acetone. Nickel is selectively eluted with HCl-acetone-dimethylglyoxime. Synthetic samples containing calcium and magnesium, both alone and in combination with alkali metals, strontium, barium, beryllium, aluminum, transition metals, and rare earths, are analyzed. Hard water samples are analyzed for calcium and magnesium and the results compared to those obtained by EDTA titration, atomic absorption spectroscopy, and plasma emission spectroscopy. Several clinical serum samples are analyzed for calcium and magnesium and the results compared to those obtained by atomic absorption spectroscopy.

  19. Nanofluid flow and forced convection heat transfer over a stretching surface considering heat source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadpour, M.; Valipour, P.; Shambooli, M.; Ayani, M.; Mirparizi, M.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, magnetic field effects on the forced convection flow of a nanofluid over a stretching surface in the presence of heat generation/absorption are studied. The equations of continuity, momentum and energy are transformed into ordinary differential equations and solved numerically using the fourth-order Runge-Kutta integration scheme featuring the shooting technique. Different types of nanoparticles as copper (Cu), silver (Ag), alumina (Al2O3) and titania (TiO2) with water as their base fluid has been considered. The influence of significant parameters, such as magnetic parameter, volume fraction of the nanoparticles, heat generation/absorption parameter, velocity ratio parameter and temperature index parameter on the flow and heat transfer characteristics are discussed. The results show that the values of temperature profiles increase with increasing heat generation/absorption and volume fraction of the nanoparticles but they decrease with increasing velocity ratio parameter and temperature index parameter. Also, it can be found that selecting silver as nanoparticle leads to the highest heat transfer enhancement.

  20. Force and Flow Structure of an Airfoil Performing Some

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun; Mao; Hossein; Hamdani

    2000-01-01

    0 Introduction  Insects use their wings to provide lifting Propulsive and control for ces for the flight.for these prrposes the wings must frequently change direction.speed and orientation .Therefore unsteddy flow effects are of great importance[1].As a result in recent years.unsteddy aerodynamics of insect flight received much attention(e.g.[2][3]).……

  1. Marine Forces Reserve: Accelerating Knowledge Flow through Asynchronous Learning Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-19

    pedagogic techniques that are infeasible in the classroom , and they suggest that in some respects technologically intermediated learning can be even better...frameworks and technologies to examine I-I knowledge flows, and from the practitioner perspective, we bring to bear deep inside knowledge of the focal...ASYNCHRONOUS LEARNING TECHNOLOGIES by Mark Nissen, Robert McGuiness and Anthony Davis December 2014 Further distribution of all or part of this

  2. Behavior of Boundary Layer in Supersonic Flow with Applied Lorentz Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udagawa, Keisuke; Saito, Shinya; Kawaguchi, Kenji; Tomioka, Sadatake; Yamasaki, Hiroyuki

    Experimental study on behavior of boundary layer in supersonic flow with applied Lorentz force was carried out. In the experiment, Mach 1.5 supersonic wind tunnel driven by a shock-tube was used. At the test section, the current from the external DC power supply and the magnetic field of 2.4 Tesla were applied to the boundary layer developing on the bottom wall. Argon seeded with cesium was used as an electrically conducting gas. Effect of the direction of the Lorentz force on static pressure distribution was investigated, and the remarkable increase of static pressure at the test section was observed for the decelerating Lorentz force. It is noted that the acceleration of the flow inside the boundary layer was demonstrated for the first time without accelerating the main flow when the accelerating Lorentz force was applied. At the same time, the acceleration efficiency defined by a ratio of work done by the Lorentz force to energy input into the flow was found 54-61%. These results have suggested the possibility of the boundary layer separation control by applying the accelerating Lorentz force. In the case of the decelerating Lorentz force, the significant reduction of Mach number was observed not only inside the boundary layer but also in the main flow. The reduction of Mach number could be ascribed to the growth of the boundary layer due to gas heating inside the boundary layer. When the direction of the current was changed, the difference of light emission from the discharge inside the boundary layer was observed, and this was due to the difference of the electromotive force induced in the supersonic flow.

  3. A numerical analysis of forces exerted by laminar flow on spreading cells in a parallel plate flow chamber assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, L A; Truskey, G A

    1993-10-01

    Exposure of spreading anchorage-dependent cells to laminar flow is a common technique to measure the strength of cell adhesion. Since cells protrude into the flow stream, the force exerted by the fluid on the cells is a function of cell shape. To assess the relationship between cell shape and the hydrodynamic force on adherent cells, we obtained numerical solutions of the velocity and stress fields around bovine aortic endothelial cells during various stages of spreading and calculated the force required to detach the cells. Morphometric parameters were obtained from light and scanning electron microscopy measurements. Cells were assumed to have a constant volume, but the surface area increased during spreading until the membrane was stretched taut. Two-dimensional models of steady flow were generated using the software packages ANSYS (mesh generation) and FIDAP (problem solution). The validity of the numerical results was tested by comparison with published results for a semicircle in contact with the surface. The drag force and torque were greatest for round cells making initial contact with the surface. During spreading, the drag force and torque declined by factors of 2 and 20, respectively. The calculated forces and moments were used in adhesion models to predict the wall shear stress at which the cells detached. Based upon published values for the bond force and receptor number, round cells should detach at shear stresses between 2.5 and 6 dyn/cm(2), whereas substantially higher stresses are needed to detach spreading and fully spread cells. Results from the simulations indicate that (1) the drag force varies little with cell shape whereas the torque is very sensitive to cell shape, and (2) the increase in the strength of adhesion during spreading is due to increased contact area and receptor densities within the contact area.

  4. The water value-flow concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seyam, I.M.; Hoekstra, A.Y.; Savenije, H.H.G.

    2003-01-01

    The value of water is a key issue in managing water resources in an efficient, equitable and sustainable way. Efforts to assess the value of water are often not linked to the properties of the natural water system, which makes it difficult to analyse upstream–downstream dependency. In order to accou

  5. The water value-flow concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seyam, I.M.; Hoekstra, Arjen Ysbert; Savenije, H.H.G.

    2003-01-01

    The value of water is a key issue in managing water resources in an efficient, equitable and sustainable way. Efforts to assess the value of water are often not linked to the properties of the natural water system, which makes it difficult to analyse upstream–downstream dependency. In order to accou

  6. Rotating water table for the determination of non-steady forces in a turbine stage through modified hydraulic analogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, J. S.; Raghavacharyulu, E.; Seshadri, V.; Rao, V. V. R.

    1983-10-01

    Determination of non-steady forces in a real turbine stage is difficult due to the local flow conditions, for example high pressures, high temperatures and in-accessibility to the region etc. Experimentation in a real turbine is also prohibitive due to the costs involved. An alternate method of arriving at these non-steady forces through the use of modified hydraulic analogy is discussed. A rotating water table facility, developed and fabricated based on the principles of modified hydraulic analogy is described. A flat plate stage is simulated on the rotating water table, and the results obtained are presented.

  7. Rotating Water Table for the Determination of Non-Steady Forces in a Turbine Stage Through Modified Hydraulic Analogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Rao

    1983-10-01

    Full Text Available Determination of non-steady forces in a real turbine stage is difficult due to the local flow conditions, for example high pressures, high temperatures and in-accessibility to the region etc. Experimentation in a real turbine is also prohibitive due to the costs involved. An alternate method of arriving at these non-steady forces through the use of modified hydraulic analogy is discussed. A rotating water table facility, developed and fabricated based on the principles of modified hydraulic analogy ia described. A flat plate stage is simulated on the rotating water table, and the results obtalned are presented.

  8. Self Calibrating Flow Estimation in Waste Water Pumping Stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallesøe, Carsten Skovmose; Knudsen, Torben

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge about where waste water is flowing in waste water networks is essential to optimize the operation of the network pumping stations. However, installation of flow sensors is expensive and requires regular maintenance. This paper proposes an alternative approach where the pumps and the waste...... water pit are used for estimating both the inflow and the pump flow of the pumping station. Due to the nature of waste water, the waste water pumps are heavily affected by wear and tear. To compensate for the wear of the pumps, the pump parameters, used for the flow estimation, are automatically...... calibrated. This calibration is done based on data batches stored at each pump cycle, hence makes the approach a self calibrating system. The approach is tested on a pumping station operating in a real waste water network....

  9. Imaging water velocity and volume fraction distributions in water continuous multiphase flows using inductive flow tomography and electrical resistance tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yiqing; Lucas, Gary P.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of an inductive flow tomography (IFT) system, employing a multi-electrode electromagnetic flow meter (EMFM) and novel reconstruction techniques, for measuring the local water velocity distribution in water continuous single and multiphase flows. A series of experiments were carried out in vertical-upward and upward-inclined single phase water flows and ‘water continuous’ gas-water and oil-gas-water flows in which the velocity profiles ranged from axisymmetric (single phase and vertical-upward multiphase flows) to highly asymmetric (upward-inclined multiphase flows). Using potential difference measurements obtained from the electrode array of the EMFM, local axial velocity distributions of the continuous water phase were reconstructed using two different IFT reconstruction algorithms denoted RT#1, which assumes that the overall water velocity profile comprises the sum of a series of polynomial velocity components, and RT#2, which is similar to RT#1 but which assumes that the zero’th order velocity component may be replaced by an axisymmetric ‘power law’ velocity distribution. During each experiment, measurement of the local water volume fraction distribution was also made using the well-established technique of electrical resistance tomography (ERT). By integrating the product of the local axial water velocity and the local water volume fraction in the cross section an estimate of the water volumetric flow rate was made which was compared with a reference measurement of the water volumetric flow rate. In vertical upward flows RT#2 was found to give rise to water velocity profiles which are consistent with the previous literature although the profiles obtained in the multiphase flows had relatively higher central velocity peaks than was observed for the single phase profiles. This observation was almost certainly a result of the transfer of axial momentum from the less dense dispersed phases to the water

  10. Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California -- hydrogeologic framework and transient ground-water flow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    : Belcher, Wayne R.

    2004-01-01

    A numerical three-dimensional (3D) transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley region was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey for the U.S. Department of Energy programs at the Nevada Test Site and at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Decades of study of aspects of the ground-water flow system and previous less extensive ground-water flow models were incorporated and reevaluated together with new data to provide greater detail for the complex, digital model. A 3D digital hydrogeologic framework model (HFM) was developed from digital elevation models, geologic maps, borehole information, geologic and hydrogeologic cross sections, and other 3D models to represent the geometry of the hydrogeologic units (HGUs). Structural features, such as faults and fractures, that affect ground-water flow also were added. The HFM represents Precambrian and Paleozoic crystalline and sedimentary rocks, Mesozoic sedimentary rocks, Mesozoic to Cenozoic intrusive rocks, Cenozoic volcanic tuffs and lavas, and late Cenozoic sedimentary deposits of the Death Valley Regional Ground-Water Flow System (DVRFS) region in 27 HGUs. Information from a series of investigations was compiled to conceptualize and quantify hydrologic components of the ground-water flow system within the DVRFS model domain and to provide hydraulic-property and head-observation data used in the calibration of the transient-flow model. These studies reevaluated natural ground-water discharge occurring through evapotranspiration and spring flow; the history of ground-water pumping from 1913 through 1998; ground-water recharge simulated as net infiltration; model boundary inflows and outflows based on regional hydraulic gradients and water budgets of surrounding areas; hydraulic conductivity and its relation to depth; and water levels appropriate for regional simulation of prepumped and pumped conditions within the DVRFS model domain. Simulation results appropriate for the regional extent and scale of the model were

  11. Flow of Dividends under a Constant Force of Interest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juma Kasozi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses the issue of maximization of dividends of an insurer whose portfolio is exposed to insurance risk. The insurance risk arises from the classical surplus process commonly known as the Cramér-Lundberg model in the insurance literature. To enhance his financial base, the insurer invests in a risk free asset whose price dynamics are governed by a constant force of interest. We derive a linear Volterra integral equation of the second kind and apply an order four Block-by-block method of Paulsen et al.[1] in conjunction with the Simpson rule to solve the Volterra integral equations for each chosen barrier thus generating corresponding dividend value functions. We have obtained the optimal barrier that maximizes the dividends. In the absence of the financial world, the analytical solution has been used to assess the accuracy of our results.

  12. Simplified model for a ventilated glass window under forced air flow conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, K.A.R. [Depto. de Engenharia Termica e de Fluidos-FEM-UNICAMP CP: 6122 CEP 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Henriquez, J.R. [Depto. de Eng. Mecanica-DEMEC, UFPE Av. Academico Helio Ramos, S/N CEP 50740-530, Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2006-02-01

    This paper presents a study on a ventilated window composed of two glass sheets separated by a spacing through which air is forced to flow. The proposed model is one dimensional and unsteady based upon global energy balance over the glass sheets and the flowing fluid. The external glass sheet of the cavity is subjected to variable heat flow due to the solar radiation as well as variable external ambient temperature. The exchange of radiation energy (infrared radiation) between the glass sheets is also included in the formulation. Effects of the spacing between the glass sheets, variation of the forced mass flow rate on the total heat gain and the shading coefficients are investigated. The results show that the effect of the increase of the mass flow rate is found to reduce the mean solar heat gain and the shading coefficients while the increase of the fluid entry temperature is found to deteriorate the window thermal performance. (author)

  13. Analytical solution of conjugate turbulent forced convection boundary layer flow over plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joneydi Shariatzadeh Omid

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A conjugate (coupled forced convection heat transfer from a heated conducting plate under turbulent boundary layer flow is considered. A heated plate of finite thickness is cooled under turbulent forced convection boundary layer flow. Because the conduction and convection boundary layer flow is coupled (conjugated in the problem, a semi-analytical solution based on Differential Transform Method (DTM is presented for solving the non-linear integro-differential equation occurring in the problem. The main conclusion is that in the conjugate heat transfer case the temperature distribution of the plate is flatter than the one in the non-conjugate case. This feature is more pronounced under turbulent flow when compared with the laminar flow.

  14. Investigation on flow and mixing characteristics of supersonic mixing layer induced by forced vibration of cantilever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongdong; Tan, Jianguo; Lv, Liang

    2015-12-01

    The mixing process has been an important issue for the design of supersonic combustion ramjet engine, and the mixing efficiency plays a crucial role in the improvement of the combustion efficiency. In the present study, nanoparticle-based planar laser scattering (NPLS), particle image velocimetry (PIV) and large eddy simulation (LES) are employed to investigate the flow and mixing characteristics of supersonic mixing layer under different forced vibration conditions. The indexes of fractal dimension, mixing layer thickness, momentum thickness and scalar mixing level are applied to describe the mixing process. Results show that different from the development and evolution of supersonic mixing layer without vibration, the flow under forced vibration is more likely to present the characteristics of three-dimensionality. The laminar flow region of mixing layer under forced vibration is greatly shortened and the scales of rolled up Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices become larger, which promote the mixing process remarkably. The fractal dimension distribution reveals that comparing with the flow without vibration, the turbulent fluctuation of supersonic mixing layer under forced vibration is more intense. Besides, the distribution of mixing layer thickness, momentum thickness and scalar mixing level are strongly influenced by forced vibration. Especially, when the forcing frequency is 4000 Hz, the mixing layer thickness and momentum thickness are 0.0391 m and 0.0222 m at the far field of 0.16 m, 83% and 131% higher than that without vibration at the same position, respectively.

  15. Basic study on hot-wire flow meter in forced flow of liquid hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oura, Y.; Shirai, Y.; Shiotsu, M.; Murakami, K.; Tatsumoto, H.; Naruo, Y.; Nonaka, S.; Kobayashi, H.; Inatani, Y.; Narita, N.

    2014-01-01

    Liquid hydrogen (LH2) is a key issue in a carbon-free energy infrastructure at the energy storage and transportation stage. The typical features of LH2 are low viscosity, large latent heat and small density, compared with other general liquids. It is necessary to measure a mass flow of liquid hydrogen with a simple and compact method, especially in a two phase separate flow condition. We have proposed applying a hot-wire type flow meter, which is usually used a for gas flow meter, to LH2 flow due to the quite low viscosity and density. A test model of a compact LH2 hot-wire flow meter to measure local flow velocities near and around an inside perimeter of a horizontal tube by resistance thermometry was designed and made. The model flow meter consists of two thin heater wires made of manganin fixed in a 10 mm-diameter and 40 mm-length tube flow path made of GFRP. Each rigid heater wire was set twisted by 90 degrees from the inlet to the outlet along the inner wall. In other words, the wires were aslant with regard to the LH2 stream line. The heated wire was cooled by flowing LH2, and the flow velocity was obtained by means of the difference of the cooling characteristic in response to the flow velocity. In this report, we show results on the basic experiments with the model LH2 hot-wire flow meter. First, the heat transfer characteristics of the two heater wires for several LH2 flow velocities were measured. Second, the heating current was controlled to keep the wire temperature constant for various flow velocities. The relations between the flow velocity and the heating current were measured. The feasibility of the proposed model was confirmed.

  16. Trading water to improve environmental flow outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Jeffery D.; Franklin, Brad; Loch, Adam; Kirby, Mac; Wheeler, Sarah Ann

    2013-07-01

    As consumptive extractions and water scarcity pressures brought about by climate change increase in many world river basins, so do the risks to water-dependent ecological assets. In response, public or not for profit environmental water holders (EWHs) have been established in many areas and bestowed with endowments of water and mandates to manage water for ecological outcomes. Water scarcity has also increasingly spawned water trade arrangements in many river basins, and in many instances, EWHs are now operating in water markets. A number of EWHs, especially in Australia, begin with an endowment of permanent water entitlements purchased from irrigators. Such water entitlements typically have relatively constant interannual supply profiles that often do not match ecological water demand involving flood pulses and periods of drying. This article develops a hydrologic-economic simulation model of the Murrumbidgee catchment within the Murray-Darling Basin to assess the scope of possibilities to improve environmental outcomes through EWH trading on an annual water lease market. We find that there are some modest opportunities for EWHs to improve environmental outcomes through water trade. The best opportunities occur in periods of drought and for ecological outcomes that benefit from moderately large floods. We also assess the extent to which EWH trading in annual water leases may create pecuniary externalities via bidding up or down the water lease prices faced by irrigators. Environmental water trading is found to have relatively small impacts on water market price outcomes. Overall our results suggest that the benefits of developing EWH trading may well justify the costs.

  17. Horizontal flow barriers for the transient ground-water flow model, Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset defines the surface traces of regional features simulated as horizontal flow barriers in the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system...

  18. Horizontal flow barriers for the transient ground-water flow model, Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset defines the surface traces of regional features simulated as horizontal flow barriers in the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system...

  19. Effects of Wrist Posture and Fingertip Force on Median Nerve Blood Flow Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Katherine E.; Tat, Jimmy

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to assess nerve hypervascularization using high resolution ultrasonography to determine the effects of wrist posture and fingertip force on median nerve blood flow at the wrist in healthy participants and those experiencing carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) symptoms. Methods. The median nerves of nine healthy participants and nine participants experiencing symptoms of CTS were evaluated using optimized ultrasonography in five wrist postures with and without a middle digit fingertip press (0, 6 N). Results. Both wrist posture and fingertip force had significant main effects on mean peak blood flow velocity. Blood flow velocity with a neutral wrist (2.87 cm/s) was significantly lower than flexed 30° (3.37 cm/s), flexed 15° (3.27 cm/s), and extended 30° (3.29 cm/s). Similarly, median nerve blood flow velocity was lower without force (2.81 cm/s) than with force (3.56 cm/s). A significant difference was not found between groups. Discussion. Vascular changes associated with CTS may be acutely induced by nonneutral wrist postures and fingertip force. This study represents an early evaluation of intraneural blood flow as a measure of nerve hypervascularization in response to occupational risk factors and advances our understanding of the vascular phenomena associated with peripheral nerve compression.

  20. Lubrication forces in dense granular flow with interstitial fluid: A simulation study with Discrete Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Oleh; Ertas, Deniz; Halsey, Thomas; Zhou, Fuping

    2007-03-01

    Using three-dimensional molecular dynamics simulations, we study steady gravity-driven flows of frictional inelastic spheres of diameter d and density ρg down an incline, interacting through two-body lubrication forces in addition to granular contact forces. Scaling arguments suggest that, in 3D, these forces constitute the dominant perturbation of an interstitial fluid for small Reynolds number Re and low fluid densityρ. Two important parameters that characterize the strength of the lubrication forces are fluid viscosity and grain roughness. We observe that incline flows with lubrication forces exhibit a packing density that decreases with increasing distance from the surface. As the incline angle is increased, this results in a severely dilated basal layer that looks like ``hydroplaning'' similar to that observed in geological subaqueous debris flows. This is surprising since the model explicitly disallows any buildup of fluid pressure in the base of the flow, and suggests that hydroplaning might have other contributing factors besides this traditional explanation. The local packing density is still determined by the dimensionless strain rate I≡γ1ptd√ρg/p , where p is the average normal stress, obeying a ``dilatancy law'' similar to dry granular flows.

  1. Effects of Wrist Posture and Fingertip Force on Median Nerve Blood Flow Velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine E. Wilson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this study was to assess nerve hypervascularization using high resolution ultrasonography to determine the effects of wrist posture and fingertip force on median nerve blood flow at the wrist in healthy participants and those experiencing carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS symptoms. Methods. The median nerves of nine healthy participants and nine participants experiencing symptoms of CTS were evaluated using optimized ultrasonography in five wrist postures with and without a middle digit fingertip press (0, 6 N. Results. Both wrist posture and fingertip force had significant main effects on mean peak blood flow velocity. Blood flow velocity with a neutral wrist (2.87 cm/s was significantly lower than flexed 30° (3.37 cm/s, flexed 15° (3.27 cm/s, and extended 30° (3.29 cm/s. Similarly, median nerve blood flow velocity was lower without force (2.81 cm/s than with force (3.56 cm/s. A significant difference was not found between groups. Discussion. Vascular changes associated with CTS may be acutely induced by nonneutral wrist postures and fingertip force. This study represents an early evaluation of intraneural blood flow as a measure of nerve hypervascularization in response to occupational risk factors and advances our understanding of the vascular phenomena associated with peripheral nerve compression.

  2. Distributed forcing of the flow past a blunt-based axisymmetric bluff body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardin, Thierry; Bury, Yannick

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we address the influence of a blowing-/suction-type distributed forcing on the flow past a blunt-based axisymmetric bluff body by means of direct numerical simulations. The forcing is applied via consecutive blowing and suction slots azimuthally distributed along the trailing edge of the bluff body. We examine the impact of the forcing wavelength, amplitude and waveform on the drag experienced by the bluff body and on the occurrence of the reflectional symmetry preserving and reflectional symmetry breaking wake modes, for Reynolds numbers 800 and 1,000. We show that forcing the flow at wavelengths inherent to the unforced flow drastically damps drag oscillations associated with the vortex shedding and vorticity bursts, up to their complete suppression. The overall parameter analysis suggests that this damping results from the surplus of streamwise vorticity provided by the forcing that tends to stabilize the ternary vorticity lobes observed at the aft part of the bluff body. In addition, conversely to a blowing-type or suction-type forcing, the blowing-/suction-type forcing involves strong nonlinear interactions between locally decelerated and accelerated regions, severely affecting both the mean drag and the frequencies representative of the vortex shedding and vorticity bursts.

  3. Lift Enhancement and Oscillatory Suppression of Vortex-induced Vibration in Shear Flow by Loentz Force

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张辉; 范宝春; 李鸿志

    2012-01-01

    The flow of the weak electrolyte solution can be controlled by Lorentz force achieved with the suitable magnetic and electric fields, and it has the advantages of vortex street suppression, drag reduction, lift enhancement and oscillatory suppression for the flow over a bluff body. The electro-magnetic control of vortex-induced vibration (VIV) of a circular cyl- inder in the shear flow was investigated numerically in the exponential-polar coordinates attached on the moving cylinder for Re = 150. With the effect of background vorticity, the vortex street of VIV cylinder was composed of two parallel rows with an opposite sign of the vortices which inclines toward the lower side and the strength of upper vortex is larger than that of lower vortex. The lift force vibrated periodically with the effect of vortex shedding and the mean value was negative due to the background vorticity. The Lorentz force for controlling the VIV cylinder was classified into the field Lorentz force and the wall Lorentz force. The field Lorentz force suppresses the lift oscillation, and in turn, suppresses the VIV, whereas the wall Loreutz force increases the lift.

  4. Accounting for environmental flow requirements in global water assessments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pastor, A.V.; Ludwig, F.; Biemans, H.; Hoff, H.; Kabat, P.

    2014-01-01

    As the water requirement for food production and other human needs grows, quantification of environmental flow requirements (EFRs) is necessary to assess the amount of water needed to sustain freshwater ecosystems. EFRs are the result of the quantification of water necessary to sustain the riverine

  5. Design, construction and evaluation of a system of forced solar water heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, E.; Bautista, G. A.; Ortiz, I. L.

    2016-07-01

    The main purpose of this project was to design, construct and evaluate a system of forced solar water heating for domestic consumption, at the Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana-Bucaramanga, Colombia; using solar energy. This is a totally system independent of the electrical grid and an important characteristic is the heating water doesn't mix with the consumption water. The system receives the solar radiation through a flat-plate collector, which it transmits the heat to the water that it flow with impulse from the centrifugal pump of 12VDC, the water circulates toward helical serpentine it is inside of the tank of the storage whose capacity is 100 liters of water. The temperature of the tank is regulated with a controller in such a way that de-energized the pump when it gets the temperature required. The performance thermal or efficiency of the system was evaluated like a relationship between the delivered energy to the water in storage tank and the incident energy in the flat-plate collector.

  6. Flow Regimes of Mesoscale Circulations Forced by Inhomogeneous Surface Heating

    CERN Document Server

    Hossain, M Alamgir

    2016-01-01

    Urbanization is one of the extreme process that increases uncertainty in future climate projections. Flow regimes of mesoscale circulations associated with surface heating due to urbanization have been investigated using a wavelet based computational fluid dynamics~(CFD) model. The results of our numerical model have been validated against that of a laboratory model, as well as reference numerical simulations. Characteristics of urban induced circulations have been studied for surface heat flux perturbation ($H_0$) between $28.93$Wm$^{-2}$ and $925.92$Wm$^{-2}$, and the results have been analyzed against available boundary layer measurements under similar physical conditions. Our primary study shows that urban/rural heat flux anomalies introduce strong oscillations in the convective boundary layer (CBL), and transfers a fraction of the turbulent kinetic energy vertically through internal waves. Such results complement previous investigators' hypothesis that temporal oscillations in urban-induced mesoscale cir...

  7. A Further Note on the Force Discrepancy for Wing Theory in Euler Flow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Edmund Chadwick; Ali Hatam

    2009-11-01

    Uniform steady potential flow past a wing aligned at a small angle to the flow direction is considered. The standard approach is to model this by a vortex sheet, approximated by a finite distribution of horseshoe vortices. In the limit as the span of the horseshoe vortices tends to zero, an integral distribution of infinitesimal horseshoe vortices over the vortex sheet is obtained. The contribution to the force on the wing due to the presence of one of the infinitesimal horseshoe vortices in the distribution is focused upon. Most of the algebra in the force calculation is evaluated using Maple software and is given in the appendices. As in the two previous papers by the authors on wing theory in Euler flow [E Chadwick, A slender-wing theory in potential flow, Proc. R. Soc. A461 (2005) 415–432, and E Chadwick and A Hatam, The physical interpretation of the lift discrepancy in Lanchester–Prandtl lifting wing theory for Euler flow, leading to the proposal of an alternative model in Oseen flow, Proc. R. Soc. A463 (2007) 2257–2275], it is shown that the normal force is half that expected. In this further note, in addition it is demonstrated that the axial force is infinite. The implications and reasons for these results are discussed.

  8. EFFECTS OF WATER-DEPTH ON HYDRODYNAMIC FORCE OF ARTIFICIAL REEF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIAO Zhen-qing; XIE Yong-he

    2007-01-01

    The effects of water-depth on the hydrodynamic force of the artificial reef were studied by simulating regular and irregular waves. The computational results show that the water-depth has a substantial effect on hydrodynamic force. The hydrodynamic force increases with the decrease of water-depth in shallow. Especially, in the ultra-shallow water these loads increase very evidently with the decrease of water-depth. The long-term values of hydrodynamic force increase with the decrease of the ratio of water-depth to reef height, and are about 10% larger than those of deep water when the ratio of water-depth to reef height is 4.0. However water-depth hardly affects the long term values of hydrodynamic force when the ratio of water-depth to reef height is larger than 6.0.

  9. Globalisation of water resources: Global virtual water flows in relation to international crop trade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, A.Y.; Hung, P.Q.

    2005-01-01

    The water that is used in the production process of a commodity is called the ‘virtual water’ contained in the commodity. International trade of commodities brings along international flows of virtual water. The objective of this paper is to quantify the volumes of virtual water flows between nation

  10. AERODYNAMIC FORCE AND FLOW STRUCTURES OF TWO AIRFOILS IN FLAPPING MOTIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    兰世隆; 孙茂

    2001-01-01

    Aerodynamic force and flow structures of two airfoils in a tandem configuration in flapping motions are studied, by solving the Navier-Stokes equations in moving overset grids. Three typical phase differences between the fore- and aftairfoil flapping cycles are considered. It is shown that: (1) in the case of no interaction (single airfoil), the time average of the vertical force coefficient over the downstroke is 2.74, which is about 3 times as large as the maximum steady-state lift coefficient of a dragonfly wing; the time average of the horizontal force coefficient is 1.97, which is also large. The reasons for the large force coefficients are the acceleration at the beginning of a stroke, the delayed stall and the “pitching-up” motion near the end of the stroke. (2) In the cases of two-airfoils, the time-variations of the force and moment coefficients on each airfoil are broadly similar to that of the single airfoil in that the vertical force is mainly produced in downstroke and the horizontal force in upstroke, but very large differences exist due to the interaction. (3) For in-phase stroking, the major differences caused by the interaction are that the vertical force on FA in downstroke is increased and the horizontal force on FA in upstroke decreased.As a result, the magnitude of the resultant force is almost unchanged but it inclines less forward. (4) For counter stroking, the major differences are that the vertical force on AA in downstroke and the horizontal force on FA in upstroke are decreased. As a result, the magnitude of the resultant force is decreased by about 20 percent but its direction is almost unchanged. (5) For 90°-phase-difference stroking, the major differences are that the vertical force on AA in downstroke and the horizontal force on FA in upstroke are decreased greatly and the horizontal force on AA in upstrokeincreased. As a result, the magnitude of the resultant force is decreased by about 28% and it inclines more forward. (6

  11. TWO-DIMENSIONAL PLANE WATER FLOW AND WATER QUALITY DISTRIBUTION IN BOSTEN LAKE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Min-quan; Zhou Xiao-de; Zheng Bang-min; Min Tao; Zhao Ke-yu

    2003-01-01

    The two-dimensional plane water flow and water quality was developed by using the techniques of coordinate transformation, alternating directions, staggered grid, linear recurrence, and implicit scheme in the study of large water body in lakes. The model was proved to be suitable for treating the irregular boundary and predicting quickly water flow and water quality. The application of the model to the Bosten Lake in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of China shows that it is reasonable and practicable.

  12. Radar Based Flow and Water Level Forecasting in Sewer Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorndahl, Søren; Rasmussen, Michael R.; Grum, M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the first radar based forecast of flow and/or water level in sewer systems in Denmark. The rainfall is successfully forecasted with a lead time of 1-2 hours, and flow/levels are forecasted an additional ½-1½ hours using models describing the behaviour of the sewer system. Both...... radar data and flow/water level model are continuously updated using online rain gauges and online in-sewer measurements, in order to make the best possible predictions. The project show very promising results, and show large potentials, exploiting the existing water infrastructure in future climate...

  13. Regression modeling of ground-water flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, R.L.; Naff, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Nonlinear multiple regression methods are developed to model and analyze groundwater flow systems. Complete descriptions of regression methodology as applied to groundwater flow models allow scientists and engineers engaged in flow modeling to apply the methods to a wide range of problems. Organization of the text proceeds from an introduction that discusses the general topic of groundwater flow modeling, to a review of basic statistics necessary to properly apply regression techniques, and then to the main topic: exposition and use of linear and nonlinear regression to model groundwater flow. Statistical procedures are given to analyze and use the regression models. A number of exercises and answers are included to exercise the student on nearly all the methods that are presented for modeling and statistical analysis. Three computer programs implement the more complex methods. These three are a general two-dimensional, steady-state regression model for flow in an anisotropic, heterogeneous porous medium, a program to calculate a measure of model nonlinearity with respect to the regression parameters, and a program to analyze model errors in computed dependent variables such as hydraulic head. (USGS)

  14. Guidelines for random excitation forces due to cross flow in steam generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, C.E.; Pettigrew, M.J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    1998-07-01

    Random excitation forces can cause low-amplitude tube motion that will result in long-term fretting-wear or fatigue. To prevent these tube failures in steam generators and other heat exchangers, designers and trouble-shooters must have guidelines that incorporate random or turbulent fluid forces. Experiments designed to measure fluid forces have been carried out at Chalk River Laboratories and at other labs around the world. The data from these experiments have been studied and collated to determine suitable guidelines for random excitation forces. In this paper, a guideline for random excitation forces in single-phase cross flow is presented in the form of normalised spectra that are applicable to a wide range of flow conditions and tube frequencies. In particular, the experimental results used in this study were carried out over the full range of flow conditions found in a nuclear steam generator. The proposed guidelines are applicable to steam generators, condensers, reheaters and other shell-and-tube heat exchangers. They may be used for flow-induced vibration analysis of new or existing components, as input to vibration analysis computer codes and as specifications in procurement documents. (author)

  15. Prediction of fluid forces acting on a hand model in unsteady flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Shigetada; Yanai, Toshimasa; Wilson, Barry; Takagi, Hideki; Vennell, Ross

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a method to predict fluid forces acting on the human hand in unsteady flow swimming conditions. A mechanical system consisting of a pulley and chain mechanism and load cell was constructed to rotate a hand model in fluid flows. To measure the angular displacement of the hand model a potentiometer was attached to the axis of the rotation. The hand model was then fixed at various angles about the longitudinal axis of the hand model and rotated at different flow velocities in a swimming flume for 258 different trials to approximate a swimmer's stroke in unsteady flow conditions. Pressures were taken from 12 transducers embedded in the hand model at a sampling frequency of 200Hz. The resultant fluid force acting on the hand model was then determined on the basis of the kinetic and kinematic data taken from the mechanical system at the frequency of 200Hz. A stepwise regression analysis was applied to acquire higher order polynomial equations that predict the fluid force acting on the accelerating hand model from the 12 pressure values. The root mean square (RMS) difference between the resultant fluid force measured and that predicted from the single best-fit polynomial equation across all trials was 5N. The method developed in the present study accurately predicted the fluid forces acting on the hand model.

  16. Prediction of forces and moments on finned bodies at high angle of attack in transonic flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberkampf, W. L.

    1981-04-01

    This report describes a theoretical method for the prediction of fin forces and moments on bodies at high angle of attack in subsonic and transonic flow. The body is assumed to be a circular cylinder with cruciform fins (or wings) of arbitrary planform. The body can have an arbitrary roll (or bank) angle, and each fin can have individual control deflection. The method combines a body vortex flow model and lifting surface theory to predict the normal force distribution over each fin surface. Extensive comparisons are made between theory and experiment for various planform fins. A description of the use of the computer program that implements the method is given.

  17. Mode competition and destabilization of microfluidic channel flows by the Coriolis force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Saunak; Saha, Sandeep; Chakraborty, Suman

    2016-11-01

    Understanding flow stability in inertial microfluidics is very important due to its increased application in medical and chemical engineering. On a steady rotating platform centrifugal actuation drives fluid flow but Coriolis force can destabilize the flow and enhance mixing in a short span. We investigate the role of Coriolis force in micro-mixing and the structure of the roll-cells formed in rotating channel flow using linear stability theory. We conduct a parametric study at different rotation numbers, Reynolds number, axial and spanwise wavenumbers. Our results reveal existence of multiple competing unstable modes (Types I to IV) due to Coriolis force: Types I and II have been reported in literature and are responsible for the formation of evenly-spaced roll-cells. We find new instabilities (Types III and IV) which contribute to the formation of twisted roll cells. The existence of the instabilities is clearly demarcated on a regime map to assist future experiments to identify them. The kinetic energy budget has been analyzed to gain insight into the mechanism of energy transfer by Coriolis force from the mean flow to the perturbations. We make a qualitative comparison of roll-cells predicted by linear stability with previously reported experiments.

  18. An electrode polarization impedance based flow sensor for low water flow measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Tinghu; Sabic, Darko

    2013-06-01

    This note describes an electrode polarization impedance based flow sensor for low water flow measurement. It consists of two pairs of stainless steel electrodes set apart and inserted into a non-conductive flow tube with each pair of electrodes placed diametrically at the opposite sides. The flow sensor is modeled as a typical four-electrode system of which two electrodes are current-carrying and the other two serve as output pick ups. The polarization impedances of the two current carrying electrodes are affected by water flows resulting in changes of differential potential between the two pick-up electrodes which are separated by the same fluid. The interrogation of the two excitation electrodes with dc biased ac signals offers significantly higher sensor sensitivities to flow. The prototype flow sensor constructed for a 20 mm diameter pipeline was able to measure water flow rate as low as tested at 1.06 l h-1 and remained sensitive at a flow rate of 25.18 l h-1 when it was driven with a sinusoidal voltage at 1000 Hz with a peak ac amplitude of 2 V and a dc offset of +8 V. The nonlinear characteristics of the sensor response indicate that the sensor is more sensitive at low flows and will not be able to measure at very high flows. Additional experiments are needed to evaluate the influences of impurities, chemical species, ions constituents, conductivity and temperature over a practical range of residential water conditions, the effects of fluctuating ground signals, measurement uncertainty, power consumption, compensation of effects and practical operations. The flow sensor (principle) presented may be used as (in) a secondary sensor in combination with an existing electronic water meter to extend the low end of measurement range in residential water metering.

  19. Periodic equatorial water flows from a Hamiltonian perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu-Kruse, Delia; Martin, Calin Iulian

    2017-04-01

    The main result of this paper is a Hamiltonian formulation of the nonlinear governing equations for geophysical periodic stratified water flows in the equatorial f-plane approximation allowing for piecewise constant vorticity.

  20. Initial Survey Instructions for Spring Water Monitoring : Flow

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Initial survey instructions for the Spring Water Monitoring - Flow 1.02 survey at Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge. This coop baseline monitoring survey has...

  1. Governing urban water flows in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhong, L.

    2007-01-01

    China has been witnessing an unprecedented period of continuous high economic growth during the past three decades. But this has been paralleled by severe environmental challenges, of which water problems are of key importance. This thesis addresses the urban water challenges of contemporary China,

  2. Governing urban water flows in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhong, L.

    2007-01-01

    China has been witnessing an unprecedented period of continuous high economic growth during the past three decades. But this has been paralleled by severe environmental challenges, of which water problems are of key importance. This thesis addresses the urban water challenges of contemporary China,

  3. Flume experiments on wind induced flow in static water bodies in the presence of protruding vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Tirtha; Muste, Marian; Katul, Gabriel

    2015-02-01

    The problem of wind-induced flow in inland waters is drawing significant research attention given its relevance to a plethora of applications in wetlands including treatment designs, pollution reduction, and biogeochemical cycling. The present work addresses the role of wind induced turbulence and waves within an otherwise static water body in the presence of rigid and flexible emergent vegetation through flume experimentation and time series analysis. Because no prior example of Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) experiments involving air-water and flexible oscillating components have been found in the literature, a spectral analysis framework is needed and proposed here to guide the analysis involving noise, wave and turbulence separation. The experiments reveal that wave and turbulence effects are simultaneously produced at the air-water interface and the nature of their coexistence is found to vary with different flow parameters including water level, mean wind speed, vegetation density and its flexibility. For deep water levels, signature of fine-scaled inertial turbulence is found at deeper layers of the water system. The wave action appears stronger close to the air-water interface and damped by the turbulence deeper inside the water system. As expected, wave action is found to be dominated in a certain frequency range driven by the wind forcing, while it is also diffused to lower frequencies by means of (wind-induced) oscillations in vegetation. Regarding the mean water velocity, existence of a counter-current flow and its switching to fully forward flow in the direction of the wind under certain combinations of flow parameters were studied. The relative importance of wave and turbulence to the overall energy, degree of anisotropy in the turbulent energy components, and turbulent momentum transport at different depths from the air-water interface and flow combinations were then quantified. The flume experiments reported here differ from previous laboratory

  4. Separation of bacterial spores from flowing water in macro-scale cavities by ultrasonic standing waves

    CERN Document Server

    Lipkens, B; Costolo, M; Stevens, A; Rietman, Edward

    2010-01-01

    The separation of micron-sized bacterial spores (Bacillus cereus) from a steady flow of water through the use of ultrasonic standing waves is demonstrated. An ultrasonic resonator with cross-section of 0.0254 m x 0.0254 m has been designed with a flow inlet and outlet for a water stream that ensures laminar flow conditions into and out of the resonator section of the flow tube. A 0.01905-m diameter PZT-4, nominal 2-MHz transducer is used to generate ultrasonic standing waves in the resonator. The acoustic resonator is 0.0356 m from transducer face to the opposite reflector wall with the acoustic field in a direction orthogonal to the water flow direction. At fixed frequency excitation, spores are concentrated at the stable locations of the acoustic radiation force and trapped in the resonator region. The effect of the transducer voltage and frequency on the efficiency of spore capture in the resonator has been investigated. Successful separation of B. cereus spores from water with typical volume flow rates of...

  5. Mantle flow beneath the Asian continent and its force to the crust

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙荀英; 张怀; 梁国平

    2002-01-01

    The mantle unsteady flows, which are in an incompressible and isoviscous spherical shell, are investigated by using algorithms of the parallel Lagrange multiplier dissonant decomposition method (LMDDM) and the parallel Lagrange multiplier discontinuous deformation analyses (LMDDA) in this paper. Some physical fields about mantle flows such as velocity, pressure, temperature, stress and the force to the crust of the Asian continent are calculated on a parallel computer.

  6. Sculpting of an erodible body by flowing water

    OpenAIRE

    Ristroph, Leif; Moore, Matthew N. J.; Childress, Stephen; Shelley, Michael J.; ZHANG, JUN

    2012-01-01

    Erosion by flowing fluids carves striking landforms on Earth and also provides important clues to the past and present environments of other worlds. In these processes, solid boundaries both influence and are shaped by the surrounding fluid, but the emergence of morphology as a result of this interaction is not well understood. We study the coevolution of shape and flow in the context of erodible bodies molded from clay and immersed in a fast, unidirectional water flow. Although commonly view...

  7. Modeling of movement-induced and flow-induced fluid forces in fast switching valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roemer, Daniel Beck; Johansen, Per; Schmidt, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    Fast switching fluid power valves set strict requirements on performance, size and energy efficiency and simulation models are therefore needed to obtain good designs of such components. The valve moving member is subject to fluid forces depending on the valve flow rate and movement of the valve...... valve design. Simulated results of the total fluid force are presented showing the movement-induced fluid force to be significant for a reference application. The model form established is useful for valve designers during development and for accurate operation simulation....... member itself. These fluid forces may be accurately simulated using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis, but such models suffer from being computationally expensive and is not suited for optimization routines. In this paper, a computationally inexpensive method for modeling the fluid forces...

  8. Analytical Model of Water Flow in Coal with Active Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemek, Jakub; Stopa, Jerzy

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents new analytical model of gas-water flow in coal seams in one dimension with emphasis on interactions between water flowing in cleats and coal matrix. Coal as a flowing system, can be viewed as a solid organic material consisting of two flow subsystems: a microporous matrix and a system of interconnected macropores and fractures. Most of gas is accumulated in the microporous matrix, where the primary flow mechanism is diffusion. Fractures and cleats existing in coal play an important role as a transportation system for macro scale flow of water and gas governed by Darcy's law. The coal matrix can imbibe water under capillary forces leading to exchange of mass between fractures and coal matrix. In this paper new partial differential equation for water saturation in fractures has been formulated, respecting mass exchange between coal matrix and fractures. Exact analytical solution has been obtained using the method of characteristics. The final solution has very simple form that may be useful for practical engineering calculations. It was observed that the rate of exchange of mass between the fractures and the coal matrix is governed by an expression which is analogous to the Newton cooling law known from theory of heat exchange, but in present case the mass transfer coefficient depends not only on coal and fluid properties but also on time and position. The constant term of mass transfer coefficient depends on relation between micro porosity and macro porosity of coal, capillary forces, and microporous structure of coal matrix. This term can be expressed theoretically or obtained experimentally. W artykule zaprezentowano nowy model matematyczny przepływu wody i gazu w jednowymiarowej warstwie węglowej z uwzględnieniem wymiany masy między systemem szczelin i matrycą węglową. Węgiel jako system przepływowy traktowany jest jako układ o podwójnej porowatości i przepuszczalności, składający się z mikroporowatej matrycy węglowej oraz z

  9. Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single Family Homes (Revised)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cummings, J.; Withers, C.; Martin, E.; Moyer, N.

    2012-10-01

    This document focuses on managing the driving forces which move air and moisture across the building envelope. While other previously published Measure Guidelines focus on elimination of air pathways, the ultimate goal of this Measure Guideline is to manage drivers which cause air flow and water vapor transport across the building envelope (and also within the home), control air infiltration, keep relative humidity (RH) within acceptable limits, avoid combustion safety problems, improve occupant comfort, and reduce house energy use.

  10. Interfacial-tension-force model for the wavy stratified liquid-liquid flow pattern transition: The usage of two different approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Marcelo Souza; Rodriguez, Oscar Mauricio Hernandez

    2016-06-01

    The study of the hydrodynamic stability of flow patterns is important in the design of equipment and pipelines for multiphase flows. The maintenance of a particular flow pattern becomes important in many applications, e.g., stratified flow pattern in heavy oil production avoiding the formation of emulsions because of the separation of phases and annular flow pattern in heat exchangers which increases the heat transfer coefficient. Flow maps are drawn to orientate engineers which flow pattern is present in a pipeline, for example. The ways how these flow maps are drawn have changed from totally experimental work, to phenomenological models, and then to stability analysis theories. In this work an experimental liquid-liquid flow map, with water and viscous oil as work fluids, drawn via subjective approach with high speed camera was used to compare to approaches of the same theory: the interfacial-tension-force model. This theory was used to drawn the wavy stratified flow pattern transition boundary. This paper presents a comparison between the two approaches of the interfacial-tension-force model for transition boundaries of liquid-liquid flow patterns: (i) solving the wave equation for the wave speed and using average values for wave number and wave speed; and (ii) solving the same equation for the wave number and then using a correlation for the wave speed. The results show that the second approach presents better results.

  11. Dynamic control of aerodynamic forces on a moving platform using active flow control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzozowski, Daniel P.

    The unsteady interaction between trailing edge aerodynamic flow control and airfoil motion in pitch and plunge is investigated in wind tunnel experiments using a two degree-of-freedom traverse which enables application of time-dependent external torque and forces by servo motors. The global aerodynamic forces and moments are regulated by controlling vorticity generation and accumulation near the trailing edge of the airfoil using hybrid synthetic jet actuators. The dynamic coupling between the actuation and the time-dependent flow field is characterized using simultaneous force and particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements that are taken phase-locked to the commanded actuation waveform. The effect of the unsteady motion on the model-embedded flow control is assessed in both trajectory tracking and disturbance rejection maneuvers. The time-varying aerodynamic lift and pitching moment are estimated from a PIV wake survey using a reduced order model based on classical unsteady aerodynamic theory. These measurements suggest that the entire flow over the airfoil readjusts within 2--3 convective time scales, which is about two orders of magnitude shorter than the characteristic time associated with the controlled maneuver of the wind tunnel model. This illustrates that flow-control actuation can be typically effected on time scales that are commensurate with the flow's convective time scale, and that the maneuver response is primarily limited by the inertia of the platform.

  12. Crop modeling: Studying the effect of water stress on the driving forces governing plant water potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Emmerik, T. H. M.; Mirfenderesgi, G.; Bohrer, G.; Steele-Dunne, S. C.; Van De Giesen, N.

    2015-12-01

    Water stress is one of the most important environmental factors that influence plant water dynamics. To prevent excessive water loss and physiological damage, plants can regulate transpiration by adjusting the stomatal aperture. This enhances survival, but also reduced photosynthesis and productivity. During periods of low water availability, stomatal regulation is a trade-off between optimization of either survival or production. Water stress defence mechanisms lead to significant changes in plant dynamics, e.g. leaf and stem water content. Recent research has shown that water content in a corn canopy can change up to 30% diurnally as a result of water stress, which has a considerable influence on radar backscatter from a corn canopy [1]. This highlighted the potential of water stress detection using radar. To fully explore the potential of water stress monitoring using radar, we need to understand the driving forces governing plant water potential. For this study, the recently developed the Finite-Element Tree-Crown Hydrodynamic model version 2 (FETCH2) model is applied to a corn canopy. FETCH2 is developed to resolve the hydrodynamic processes within a plant using the porous media analogy, allowing investigation of the influence of environmental stress factors on plant dynamics such as transpiration, photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and leaf and stem water content. The model is parameterized and evaluated using a detailed dataset obtained during a three-month field experiment in Flevoland, the Netherlands, on a corn canopy. [1] van Emmerik, T., S. Steele-Dunne, J. Judge and N. van de Giesen: "Impact of Diurnal Variation in Vegetation Water Content on Radar Backscatter of Maize During Water Stress", Geosciences and Remote Sensing, IEEE Transactions on, vol. 52, issue 7, doi: 10.1109/TGRS.2014.2386142, 2015.

  13. On the similarity in shape between debris-flow channels and high-gradient flood channels: Initial insight from continuum models for granular and water flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kean, J. W.; McCoy, S. W.; Tucker, G. E.

    2011-12-01

    cases, with the granular-flow field exhibiting more uniformity across the cross section than the water-velocity field, which decreases rapidly near the banks. Thus, while the internal dynamics of granular flow and water flow differ, the theoretical distribution of forces transmitted to the bed by granular flow and turbulent water flow are similar enough to form channels having comparable morphology. These initial results highlight that cross-sectional channel geometry alone does not encode flow dynamics to such a degree that the two end-member processes can be distinguished. If a distinction between dry and wet erosive processes is to be made from remotely sensed topographic data, then additional morphologic signatures must be investigated.

  14. Two-phase air-water flows:Scale effects in physical modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PFISTER Michael; CHANSON Hubert

    2014-01-01

    Physical modeling represents probably the oldest design tool in hydraulic engineering together with analytical approaches. In free surface flows, the similitude based upon a Froude similarity allows for a correct representation of the dominant forces, namely gravity and inertia. As a result fluid flow properties such as the capillary forces and the viscous forces might be incorrectly reproduced, affecting the air entrainment and transport capacity of a high-speed model flow. Small physical models operating under a Froude similitude systematically underestimate the air entrainment rate and air-water interfacial properties. To limit scale effects, minimal values of Reynolds or Weber number have to be respected. The present article summarizes the physical background of such limitations and their combination in terms of the Morton number. Based upon a literature review, the existing limits are presented and discussed, resulting in a series of more conservative recommendations in terms of air concentration scaling. For other air-water flow parameters, the selection of the criteria to assess scale effects is critical because some parameters (e.g., bubble sizes, turbulent scales) can be affected by scale effects, even in relatively large laboratory models.

  15. The importance of base flow in sustaining surface water flow in the Upper Colorado River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Matthew P.; Buto, Susan G.; Susong, David D.; Rumsey, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The Colorado River has been identified as the most overallocated river in the world. Considering predicted future imbalances between water supply and demand and the growing recognition that base flow (a proxy for groundwater discharge to streams) is critical for sustaining flow in streams and rivers, there is a need to develop methods to better quantify present-day base flow across large regions. We adapted and applied the spatially referenced regression on watershed attributes (SPARROW) water quality model to assess the spatial distribution of base flow, the fraction of streamflow supported by base flow, and estimates of and potential processes contributing to the amount of base flow that is lost during in-stream transport in the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB). On average, 56% of the streamflow in the UCRB originated as base flow, and precipitation was identified as the dominant driver of spatial variability in base flow at the scale of the UCRB, with the majority of base flow discharge to streams occurring in upper elevation watersheds. The model estimates an average of 1.8 × 1010 m3/yr of base flow in the UCRB; greater than 80% of which is lost during in-stream transport to the Lower Colorado River Basin via processes including evapotranspiration and water diversion for irrigation. Our results indicate that surface waters in the Colorado River Basin are dependent on base flow, and that management approaches that consider groundwater and surface water as a joint resource will be needed to effectively manage current and future water resources in the Basin.

  16. Hydrodynamic Forces on Macromolecules Protruding from Lipid Bilayers Due to External Liquid Flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jönsson, Peter; Jönsson, Bengt

    2015-11-24

    It has previously been observed that an externally applied hydrodynamic shear flow above a fluid lipid bilayer can change the local concentration of macromolecules that are associated with the lipid bilayer. The external liquid flow results in a hydrodynamic force on molecules protruding from the lipid bilayer, causing them to move in the direction of the flow. However, there has been no quantitative study about the magnitude of these forces. We here use finite element simulations to investigate how the magnitude of the external hydrodynamic forces varies with the size and shape of the studied macromolecule. The simulations show that the hydrodynamic force is proportional to the effective hydrodynamic area of the studied molecule, Ahydro, multiplied by the mean hydrodynamic shear stress acting on the membrane surface, σhydro. The parameter Ahydro depends on the size and shape of the studied macromolecule above the lipid bilayer and scales with the cross-sectional area of the molecule. We also investigate how hydrodynamic shielding from other surrounding macromolecules decreases Ahydro when the surface coverage of the shielding macromolecules increases. Experiments where the protein streptavidin is anchored to a supported lipid bilayer on the floor of a microfluidic channel were finally performed at three different surface concentrations, Φ = 1%, 6%, and 10%, where the protein is being moved relative to the lipid bilayer by a liquid flow through the channel. From photobleaching measurements of fluorescently labeled streptavidin we found the experimental drift data to be within good accuracy of the simulated results, less than 12% difference, indicating the validity of the results obtained from the simulations. In addition to giving a deeper insight into how a liquid flow can affect membrane-associated molecules in a lipid bilayer, we also see an interesting potential of using hydrodynamic flow experiments together with the obtained results to study the size and

  17. Design and implementation of CUAHSI WaterML and WaterOneFlow Web Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, D. W.; Zaslavsky, I.; Whitenack, T.; Maidment, D.

    2007-12-01

    WaterOneFlow is a term for a group of web services created by and for the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science, Inc. (CUAHSI) community. CUAHSI web services facilitate the retrieval of hydrologic observations information from online data sources using the SOAP protocol. CUAHSI Water Markup Language (below referred to as WaterML) is an XML schema defining the format of messages returned by the WaterOneFlow web services. \

  18. Potential structural barriers to ground-water flow, Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset defines the surface traces of regional geologic structures designated as potential ground-water flow barriers in an approximately 45,000...

  19. Potential structural barriers to ground-water flow, Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset defines the surface traces of regional geologic structures designated as potential ground-water flow barriers in an approximately 45,000...

  20. An Experimental Study of Oil / Water Flow in Horizontal Pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elseth, Geir

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to study the behaviour of the simultaneous flow of oil and water in horizontal pipes. In this connection, two test facilities are used. Both facilities have horizontal test sections with inner pipe diameters equal to 2 inches. The largest facility, called the model oil facility, has reservoirs of 1 m{sub 3} of each medium enabling flow rates as high as 30 m{sub 3}/h, which corresponds to mixture velocities as high as 3.35 m/s. The flow rates of oil and water can be varied individually producing different flow patterns according to variations in mixture velocity and input water cut. Two main classes of flows are seen, stratified and dispersed. In this facility, the main focus has been on stratified flows. Pressure drops and local phase fractions are measured for a large number of flow conditions. Among the instruments used are differential pressure transmitters and a traversing gamma densitometer, respectively. The flow patterns that appear are classified in flow pattern maps as functions of either mixture velocity and water cut or superficial velocities. From these experiments a smaller number of stratified flows are selected for studies of velocity and turbulence. A laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) is applied for these measurements in a transparent part of the test section. To be able to produce accurate measurements a partial refractive index matching procedure is used. The other facility, called the matched refractive index facility, has a 0.2 m{sub 3} reservoir enabling mainly dispersed flows. Mixture velocities range from 0.75 m/s to 3 m/s. The fluids in this facility are carefully selected to match the refractive index of the transparent part of the test section. A full refractive index matching procedure is carried out producing excellent optical conditions for velocity and turbulence studies by LDA. In addition, pressure drops and local phase fractions are measured. (author)

  1. Analysis of unsteady flow forces acting on the thermowell in a steam turbine control stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badur, J.; Kornet, S.; Sławiński, D.; Ziółkowski, P.

    2016-10-01

    In the present paper the phenomenon of unsteady flow forces acting on the thermowell for measuring steam temperature in a steam turbine control stage has been presented. The non-stationarity of fluid acting on the thermowell such as: Strouhal frequency, pressure amplitude, pressure peaks, pressure field, velocity field etc. have been studied analytically and numerically. There have been examined two cases of flow with changing mass flow rate, pressure and temperature in the control stage chamber of a turbine high-pressure cylinder. The problem of entry into resonance by thermowell has been described in the ASME standard PTC19.3 TW-2010 with providing detailed guidelines for thermowell designs.

  2. Soil Moisture Data Assimilation in Soil Water Flow Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachepsky, Y. A.; Guber, A.; Jacques, D.; Pan, F.; van Genuchten, M.; Cady, R. E.; Nicholson, T. J.

    2010-12-01

    Soil water flow modeling has multiple applications. This modeling is based on simplifications stemming from both conceptual uncertainty and lack of detailed knowledge about parameters. Modern soil moisture sensors can provide detailed information about changes in soil water content in time and with depth. This information can be used for data assimilation in soil water flow modeling. The ensemble Kalman filter appears to be an appropriate method for that. Earlier we demonstrated ensemble simulations of soil water flow by using sets of pedotransfer functions (empirical relationships between soil hydraulic properties and soil basic properties, such as particle size distribution, bulk density, organic carbon content, etc.). The objective of this work was to apply the data assimilation with the ensemble Kalman filter to soil water flow modeling, using soil water content monitoring with TDR probes and an ensemble of soil water flow models parameterized with different pedotransfer functions. Experiments were carried out at the Bekkevoort site, Belgium. Sixty time domain reflectometry (TDR) probes with two rods) were installed along the trench in loamy soil at 12 locations with 50-cm horizontal spacing at five depths (15, 35, 55, 75, and 95 cm). Water content and weather parameters were monitored for one year with 15 min frequency. Soil water flow was simulated using the HYDRUS6 software. Mean daily means of water contents at the observation depths were the measurements used in data assimilation. Eighteen pedotransfer functions for water retention and one for hydraulic conductivity were applied to generate ensembles to evaluate the uncertainty in simulation results, whereas the replicated measurements at each of measurement depths were used to characterize the uncertainty in data. Data assimilation appeared to be very efficient. Even assimilating measurements at a single depth provided substantial improvement in simulations at other observation depths. Results on

  3. Rotating turbulent Rayleigh–Bénard convection subject to harmonically forced flow reversals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, Bernard J.; Kunnen, Rudie P.J.

    2014-01-01

    The characteristics of turbulent flow in a cylindrical Rayleigh–Bénard convection cell which can be modified considerably in case rotation is included in the dynamics. By incorporating the additional effects of an Euler force, i.e., effects induced by non-constant rotation rates, a remarkably strong

  4. Three-dimensional flow structures and unsteady forces on pitching and surging revolving flat plates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Percin, M.; Van Oudheusden, B.W.

    2015-01-01

    Tomographic particle image velocimetry was used to explore the evolution of three-dimensional flow structures of revolving low-aspect-ratio flat plates in combination with force measurements at a Reynolds number of 10,000. Two motion kinematics are compared that result in the same terminal condition

  5. Force and torque on spherical particles in micro-channel flows using computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suo, Jin; Edwards, Erin E.; Anilkumar, Ananyaveena; Sulchek, Todd; Giddens, Don P.

    2016-01-01

    To delineate the influence of hemodynamic force on cell adhesion processes, model in vitro fluidic assays that mimic physiological conditions are commonly employed. Herein, we offer a framework for solution of the three-dimensional Navier–Stokes equations using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to estimate the forces resulting from fluid flow near a plane acting on a sphere that is either stationary or in free flow, and we compare these results to a widely used theoretical model that assumes Stokes flow with a constant shear rate. We find that while the full three-dimensional solutions using a parabolic velocity profile in CFD simulations yield similar translational velocities to those predicted by the theoretical method, the CFD approach results in approximately 50% larger rotational velocities over the wall shear stress range of 0.1–5.0 dynes cm−2. This leads to an approximately 25% difference in force and torque calculations between the two methods. When compared with experimental measurements of translational and rotational velocities of microspheres or cells perfused in microfluidic channels, the CFD simulations yield significantly less error. We propose that CFD modelling can provide better estimations of hemodynamic force levels acting on perfused microspheres and cells in flow fields through microfluidic devices used for cell adhesion dynamics analysis. PMID:27493783

  6. Three-dimensional flow structures and unsteady forces on pitching and surging revolving flat plates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Percin, M.; Van Oudheusden, B.W.

    2015-01-01

    Tomographic particle image velocimetry was used to explore the evolution of three-dimensional flow structures of revolving low-aspect-ratio flat plates in combination with force measurements at a Reynolds number of 10,000. Two motion kinematics are compared that result in the same terminal condition

  7. Force and torque on spherical particles in micro-channel flows using computational fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suo, Jin; Edwards, Erin E; Anilkumar, Ananyaveena; Sulchek, Todd; Giddens, Don P; Thomas, Susan N

    2016-07-01

    To delineate the influence of hemodynamic force on cell adhesion processes, model in vitro fluidic assays that mimic physiological conditions are commonly employed. Herein, we offer a framework for solution of the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to estimate the forces resulting from fluid flow near a plane acting on a sphere that is either stationary or in free flow, and we compare these results to a widely used theoretical model that assumes Stokes flow with a constant shear rate. We find that while the full three-dimensional solutions using a parabolic velocity profile in CFD simulations yield similar translational velocities to those predicted by the theoretical method, the CFD approach results in approximately 50% larger rotational velocities over the wall shear stress range of 0.1-5.0 dynes cm(-2). This leads to an approximately 25% difference in force and torque calculations between the two methods. When compared with experimental measurements of translational and rotational velocities of microspheres or cells perfused in microfluidic channels, the CFD simulations yield significantly less error. We propose that CFD modelling can provide better estimations of hemodynamic force levels acting on perfused microspheres and cells in flow fields through microfluidic devices used for cell adhesion dynamics analysis.

  8. Characterizing local forces and rearrangements inside a gravity-driven granular flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackray, Emma; Nordstrom, Kerstin

    While the gravity-driven flow of a granular material in a silo geometry can be modeled by the Beverloo equation, the mesoscale-level particle rearrangements and interactions that drive this flow are not well-understood. We have constructed a quasi-two-dimensional system of bidisperse, millimeter-scale disks with photoelastic properties that make force networks within the material visible. The system is contained in an acrylic box with an adjustable bottom opening. We can approach the clogging transition by adjusting this opening and by adding external forcing to the top of the flowing pile. By placing the system between cross-polarizers, we can obtain high-speed video of this system during flow, and extract intensity signals that can be used to identify and quantify localized, otherwise indeterminate forces. We can simultaneously track individual particle motions, which can be used to identify shear transformation zones in the system. We are therefore able to correlate local forces with rearrangements within the system, and characterize the evolution of this interplay on the approach to the clogging transition.

  9. Computing nonhydrostatic shallow-water flow over steep terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denlinger, R.P.; O'Connell, D. R. H.

    2008-01-01

    Flood and dambreak hazards are not limited to moderate terrain, yet most shallow-water models assume that flow occurs over gentle slopes. Shallow-water flow over rugged or steep terrain often generates significant nonhydrostatic pressures, violating the assumption of hydrostatic pressure made in most shallow-water codes. In this paper, we adapt a previously published nonhydrostatic granular flow model to simulate shallow-water flow, and we solve conservation equations using a finite volume approach and an Harten, Lax, Van Leer, and Einfeldt approximate Riemann solver that is modified for a sloping bed and transient wetting and drying conditions. To simulate bed friction, we use the law of the wall. We test the model by comparison with an analytical solution and with results of experiments in flumes that have steep (31??) or shallow (0.3??) slopes. The law of the wall provides an accurate prediction of the effect of bed roughness on mean flow velocity over two orders of magnitude of bed roughness. Our nonhydrostatic, law-of-the-wall flow simulation accurately reproduces flume measurements of front propagation speed, flow depth, and bed-shear stress for conditions of large bed roughness. ?? 2008 ASCE.

  10. Simulation of non-Newtonian oil-water core annular flow through return bends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fan; Wang, Ke; Skote, Martin; Wong, Teck Neng; Duan, Fei

    2017-07-01

    The volume of fluid (VOF) model is used together with the continuum surface force (CSF) model to numerically simulate the non-Newtonian oil-water core annular flow across return bends. A comprehensive study is conducted to generate the profiles of pressure, velocity, volume fraction and wall shear stress for different oil properties, flow directions, and bend geometries. It is revealed that the oil core may adhere to the bend wall under certain operating conditions. Through the analysis of the total pressure gradient and fouling angle, suitable bend geometric parameters are identified for avoiding the risk of fouling.

  11. Launch Environment Water Flow Simulations Using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Bruce T.; Berg, Jared J.; Harris, Michael F.; Crespo, Alejandro C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the use of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) to simulate the water flow from the rainbird nozzle system used in the sound suppression system during pad abort and nominal launch. The simulations help determine if water from rainbird nozzles will impinge on the rocket nozzles and other sensitive ground support elements.

  12. Accounting for environmental flow requirements in global water assessments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pastor, A.V.; Ludwig, F.; Biemans, H.; Hoff, H.; Kabat, P.

    2013-01-01

    With growing water needs for food production, it is necessary to improve the quantification of "Environmental Flow Requirements (EFRs)" to secure enough water for the freshwater ecosystems. In this study, five methods for calculating EFRs were compared to 11 case studies of locally-calculated EFRs.

  13. The Propulsive Force of the Water-jet to the Flying Weft in Water-jet Looms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    In order to study the propulsive force on the water-jet to the flying weft in water-jet looms, a dynamic model has been established. Based on the analysis and example testing, an experiential formula of the propulsive force of the water-jet to the flying weft is obtained for the first time. The formula will profit the further research of the water-jet weft insertion and the production of textile.

  14. TRENDS IN VARIABILITY OF WATER FLOW OF TELEAJEN RIVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. JIPA

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available TRENDS IN VARIABILITY OF WATER FLOW OF TELEAJEN RIVER. In the context of climate change at global and regional scale, this study intends to identify the trends in variability of the annual and monthly flow of Teleajen river. The study is based on processing the series of mean, maximum and minimum flows at Cheia and Moara Domnească hydrometric stations (these data were taken from the National Institute of Meteorology and Hydrology. The period of analysis is 1966-1998, statistical methods beeing mostly used, among which the Mann – Kendall test, that identifies the liniar trend and its statistic significance, comes into focus. The trends in the variability of water annual and monthly flows are highlighted. The results obtained show downward trends for the mean and maximum annual flows, and for the minimum water discharge, a downward trend for Cheia station and an upward trend for Moara Domnească station. Knowing the trends in the variability of the rivers’ flow is important empirically in view of taking adequate administration measures of the water resources and managment measures for the risks lead by extreme hidrologic events (floods, low-water, according to the possible identified changes.

  15. Design configurations affecting flow pattern and solids accumulation in horizontal free water and subsurface flow constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedescoll, A; Sidrach-Cardona, R; Sánchez, J C; Carretero, J; Garfi, M; Bécares, E

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different horizontal constructed wetland (CW) design parameters on solids distribution, loss of hydraulic conductivity over time and hydraulic behaviour, in order to assess clogging processes in wetlands. For this purpose, an experimental plant with eight CWs was built at mesocosm scale. Each CW presented a different design characteristic, and the most common CW configurations were all represented: free water surface flow (FWS) with different effluent pipe locations, FWS with floating macrophytes and subsurface flow (SSF), and the presence of plants and specific species (Typha angustifolia and Phragmites australis) was also considered. The loss of the hydraulic conductivity of gravel was greatly influenced by the presence of plants and organic load (representing a loss of 20% and c.a. 10% in planted wetlands and an overloaded system, respectively). Cattail seems to have a greater effect on the development of clogging since its below-ground biomass weighed twice as much as that of common reed. Hydraulic behaviour was greatly influenced by the presence of a gravel matrix and the outlet pipe position. In strict SSF CW, the water was forced to cross the gravel and tended to flow diagonally from the top inlet to the bottom outlet (where the inlet and outlet pipes were located). However, when FWS was considered, water preferentially flowed above the gravel, thus losing half the effective volume of the system. Only the presence of plants seemed to help the water flow partially within the gravel matrix. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Pairwise Force Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics model for multiphase flow: Surface tension and contact line dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Panchenko, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel formulation of the Pairwise Force Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Model (PF-SPH) and use it to simulate two- and three-phase flows in bounded domains. In the PF-SPH model, the Navier-Stokes equations are discretized with the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method and the Young-Laplace boundary condition at the fluid-fluid interface and the Young boundary condition at the fluid-fluid-solid interface are replaced with pairwise forces added into the Navier-Stokes equations. We derive a relationship between the parameters in the pairwise forces and the surface tension and static contact angle. Next, we demonstrate the accuracy of the model under static and dynamic conditions. Finally, to demonstrate the capabilities and robustness of the model we use it to simulate flow of three fluids in a porous material.

  17. Delayed Effect of Blood-Flow-Restricted Resistance Training on Rapid Force Capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jakob Lindberg; Frandsen, Ulrik; Prokhorova, Tatyana

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect and time course of high-frequent low-load resistance training with blood-flow restriction (BFR) on rapid force capacity (i.e. rate of torque development (RTD)). METHODS: Ten male subjects (22.8±2.3 years) performed four sets...... and rapid force capacity (e.g. RTD) as well as evoked twitch contractile parameters was assessed before (Pre) and 5 and 12 days after training (Post5, Post12). Muscle biopsies were obtained Pre, after 8 days (Mid8) and 3 and 10 days post training (Post3, Post10) to examine changes in myofiber area...... exercise performed with blood-flow restriction leads to marked increases in rapid force capacity (RTD). However, a general delayed adaptive response was observed for voluntary contractile parameters (including RTD) in parallel with a decline and subsequent recovery in evoked contractile properties...

  18. Pairwise Force Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics model for multiphase flow: Surface tension and contact line dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Panchenko, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel formulation of the Pairwise Force Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (PF-SPH) model and use it to simulate two- and three-phase flows in bounded domains. In the PF-SPH model, the Navier-Stokes equations are discretized with the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method, and the Young-Laplace boundary condition at the fluid-fluid interface and the Young boundary condition at the fluid-fluid-solid interface are replaced with pairwise forces added into the Navier-Stokes equations. We derive a relationship between the parameters in the pairwise forces and the surface tension and static contact angle. Next, we demonstrate the model's accuracy under static and dynamic conditions. Finally, we use the Pf-SPH model to simulate three phase flow in a porous medium.

  19. WEAKLY SWIRLING TURBULENT FLOW IN TURBID WATER HYDRAULIC SEPARATION DEVICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Lin; QIU Xiu-yun; JIN Sheng; XIAO Jun; GONG Shou-yuan

    2008-01-01

    This article deals with the characteristics of weakly swirling turbulent flow field in a Turbid Water Hydraulic Separation Device (TWHSD) through experimental and numerical researches. The flow field was measured by PIV, which provided streamlines, vortex structure, vorticity and velocity distribution in different test planes in the TWHSD. On the basis of the experimental results, the tangential and radial velocity distributions of the swirling flow field were obtained. Meanwhile, the numerical simulations were conducted with the RNG and RSM turbulence models, respectively. According to the experimental and numerical results, the characteristics of the clear water flow field inside the TWHSD were determined. In view of simulation accuracy and time consumption, it is suggested to apply the RNG model instead of the RSM model, which is more time consuming, to make further study on two-phases flow fields in the device.

  20. Continuum simulations of water flow past fullerene molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popadić, A.; Praprotnik, M.; Koumoutsakos, P.; Walther, J. H.

    2015-09-01

    We present continuum simulations of water flow past fullerene molecules. The governing Navier-Stokes equations are complemented with the Navier slip boundary condition with a slip length that is extracted from related molecular dynamics simulations. We find that several quantities of interest as computed by the present model are in good agreement with results from atomistic and atomistic-continuum simulations at a fraction of the cost. We simulate the flow past a single fullerene and an array of fullerenes and demonstrate that such nanoscale flows can be computed efficiently by continuum flow solvers, allowing for investigations into spatiotemporal scales inaccessible to atomistic simulations.

  1. Combined effect of free and forced convection on MHD flow in a rotating porous channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. V. Prasada Rao

    1982-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives a steady linear theory of the combined effect of the free and forced convection in rotating hydromagnetic viscous fluid flows in a porous channel under the action of a uniform magnetic field. The flow is governed by the Grashof number G, the Hartmann number H, the Ekman number E, and the suction Reynolds number S. The solutions for the velocity field, temperature distribution, magnetic field, mass rate of flow and the shear stresses on the channel boundaries are obtained using a perturbation method with the small parameter S. The nature of the associated boundary layers is investigated for various values of the governing flow parameters. The velocity, the temperature, and the shear stresses are discussed numerically by drawing profiles with reference to the variations in the flow parameters.

  2. Influence of lubrication forces in direct numerical simulations of particle-laden flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitri, Rohit; Peters, Frank; Padding, Johan; Kuipers, Hans

    2016-11-01

    Accurate numerical representation of particle-laden flows is important for fundamental understanding and optimizing the complex processes such as proppant transport in fracking. Liquid-solid flows are fundamentally different from gas-solid flows because of lower density ratios (solid to fluid) and non-negligible lubrication forces. In this interface resolved model, fluid-solid coupling is achieved by incorporating the no-slip boundary condition implicitly at particle's surfaces by means of an efficient second order ghost-cell immersed boundary method. A fixed Eulerian grid is used for solving the Navier-Stokes equations and the particle-particle interactions are implemented using the soft sphere collision and sub-grid scale lubrication model. Due to the range of influence of lubrication force on a smaller scale than the grid size, it is important to implement the lubrication model accurately. In this work, different implementations of the lubrication model on particle dynamics are studied for various flow conditions. The effect of a particle surface roughness on lubrication force and the particle transport is also investigated. This study is aimed at developing a validated methodology to incorporate lubrication models in direct numerical simulation of particle laden flows. This research is supported from Grant 13CSER014 of the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), which is part of the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO).

  3. The Effect of Coriolis Force on the Formation of Dip on the Free Surface of Water Draining from a Tank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Jong Chull; Kang, Dong Gu; Kim, Hho Jhung; Roh, Kyung Wan; Yune, Young Gill [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-15

    For the case of RWT (refueling water tank) connecting to the ECC (emergency core cooling) line, it can be surmised that there is a possibility of ECC pump failure due to air ingression into the ECC supply line even before the RWT is drained away. Therefore, it is important to check if the operational limit of the RWT water level is set at a value higher than the critical height that causes a dip formation on the free surface of a draining liquid. In the previous work, such complex unsteady flow fields both in a simple water tank and in the RWT at the Korean standard nuclear power plant have been simulated using the CFX5.10 code which is well-known as one of the well-validated commercial CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) codes. However, for the simplicity of those calculations the Coriolis force has not been taken into account. Thus, in the present paper, the effect of Coriolis force-induced vortex flow on the dip formation of dip has been investigated for the simple water tank to confirm validity of the previous work. To do this the unsteady flow fields accompanied by vortex in the simple water tank has been simulated using the CFX5.10 code.

  4. Multiscale simulation of water flow past a C540 fullerene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Jens H.; Praprotnik, Matej; Kotsalis, Evangelos M.; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2012-04-01

    We present a novel, three-dimensional, multiscale algorithm for simulations of water flow past a fullerene. We employ the Schwarz alternating overlapping domain method to couple molecular dynamics (MD) of liquid water around the C540 buckyball with a Lattice-Boltzmann (LB) description for the Navier-Stokes equations. The proposed method links the MD and LB domains using a fully three-dimensional interface and coupling of velocity gradients. The present overlapping domain method implicitly preserves the flux of mass and momentum and bridges flux-based and Schwarz domain decomposition algorithms. We use this method to determine the slip length and hydrodynamic radius for water flow past a buckyball.

  5. Carbon Nanotubes in Water: MD Simulations of Internal and External Flow, Self Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Richard L.; Halicioglu, Timur; Werder, Thomas; Walther, Jens; Koumoutsakos, Petros; Arnold, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have developed computational tools, based on particle codes, for molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of carbon nanotubes (CNT) in aqueous environments. The interaction of CNTs with water is envisioned as a prototype for the design of engineering nano-devices, such as artificial sterocillia and molecular biosensors. Large scale simulations involving thousands of water molecules are possible due to our efficient parallel MD code that takes long range electrostatic interactions into account. Since CNTs can be considered as rolled up sheets of graphite, we expect the CNT-water interaction to be similar to the interaction of graphite with water. However, there are fundamental differences between considering graphite and CNTs, since the curvature of CNTs affects their chemical activity and also since capillary effects play an important role for both dynamic and static behaviour of materials inside CNTs. In recent studies Gordillo and Marti described the hydrogen bond structure as well as time dependent properties of water confined in CNTs. We are presenting results from the development of force fields describing the interaction of CNTs and water based on ab-initio quantum mechanical calculations. Furthermore, our results include both water flows external to CNTs and the behaviour of water nanodroplets inside heated CNTs. In the first case (external flows) the hydrophobic behaviour of CNTs is quantified and we analyze structural properties of water in the vicinity of CNTs with diagnostics such as hydrogen bond distribution, water dipole orientation and radial distribution functions. The presence of water leads to attractive forces between CNTs as a result of their hydrophobicity. Through extensive simulations we quantify these attractive forces in terms of the number and separation of the CNT. Results of our simulations involving arrays of CNTs indicate that these exhibit a hydrophobic behaviour that leads to self-organising structures capable of trapping water clusters

  6. A design methodology for cross flow water turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanette, J.; Imbault, D.; Tourabi, A. [Laboratoire Sols, Solides, Structures - Risques (3S-R) Domaine Universitaire, B.P. 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2010-05-15

    This contribution deals with the design of cross flow water turbines. The mechanical stress sustained by the blades depends on the basic geometrical specifications of the cross flow water turbine, its rotational speed, the exact geometry of the blades and the velocity of the upstream water current. During the operation, the blades are submitted to severe cyclic loadings generated by pressure field's variation as function of angular position. This paper proposes a simplified design methodology for structural analysis of cross flow water turbine blades, with quite low computational time. A new trapezoidal-bladed turbine obtained from this method promises to be more efficient than the classical designs. Its most distinctive characteristic is a variable profiled cross-section area, which should significantly reduce the intensity of cyclic loadings in the material and improve the turbine's durability. The advantages of this new geometry will be compared with three other geometries based on NACA0018 hydrofoil. (author)

  7. Study on the water flow in the xylem of plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wenkui

    2017-05-01

    Water is one of the direct materials of plant photosynthesis, and water through transpiration control plant stomatal opening and closing, which affects the important life activities of plant photosynthesis. Therefore, water transport in plant tissue has been an important topic in the field of plant fluid mechanics. This paper mainly use the method and theory of fluid mechanics to analyses plant xylem water transport mechanism, namely: C - T theory; And based on the knowledge of fluid mechanics, the state of water flow in the xylem is analyzed, and the mass conservation equation, momentum conservation equation, energy conservation equation and so on are obtained.

  8. Behavior of CO2/water flow in porous media for CO2 geological storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lanlan; Yu, Minghao; Liu, Yu; Yang, Mingjun; Zhang, Yi; Xue, Ziqiu; Suekane, Tetsuya; Song, Yongchen

    2017-04-01

    A clear understanding of two-phase fluid flow properties in porous media is of importance to CO2 geological storage. The study visually measured the immiscible and miscible displacement of water by CO2 using MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), and investigated the factor influencing the displacement process in porous media which were filled with quartz glass beads. For immiscible displacement at slow flow rates, the MR signal intensity of images increased because of CO2 dissolution; before the dissolution phenomenon became inconspicuous at flow rate of 0.8mLmin(-1). For miscible displacement, the MR signal intensity decreased gradually independent of flow rates, because supercritical CO2 and water became miscible in the beginning of CO2 injection. CO2 channeling or fingering phenomena were more obviously observed with lower permeable porous media. Capillary force decreases with increasing particle size, which would increase permeability and allow CO2 and water to invade into small pore spaces more easily. The study also showed CO2 flow patterns were dominated by dimensionless capillary number, changing from capillary finger to stable flow. The relative permeability curve was calculated using Brooks-Corey model, while the results showed the relative permeability of CO2 slightly decreases with the increase of capillary number.

  9. An investigation of channel flow with a smooth air-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madad, Reza; Elsnab, John; Chin, Cheng; Klewicki, Joseph; Marusic, Ivan

    2015-06-01

    Experiments and numerical simulation are used to investigate fully developed laminar and turbulent channel flow with an air-water interface as the lower boundary condition. Laser Doppler velocimetry measurements of streamwise and wall-normal velocity components are made over a range of Reynolds number based upon channel height and bulk velocity from 1100 to 4300, which encompasses the laminar, transitional and low Reynolds numbers turbulent regimes. The results show that the airflow statistics near the stationary wall are not significantly altered by the air-water moving interface and reflect those found in channel flows. The mean statistics on the water interface side largely exhibit results similar to simulated Poiseuille-Couette flow (PCF) with a solid moving wall. For second-order statistics, however, the simulation and experimental results show some discrepancies near the moving water surface, suggesting that a full two-phase simulation is required. A momentum and energy transport tubes analysis is investigated for laminar and turbulent PCFs. This analysis builds upon the classical notion of a streamtube and indicates that part of the energy from the pressure gradient is transported towards the stationary wall and is dissipated as heat inside the energy tubes, while the remainder is transmitted to the moving wall. For the experiments, the airflow energy is transmitted towards the water to overcome the drag force and drive the water forward; therefore, the amount of energy transferred to the water is higher than the energy transferred to a solid moving wall.

  10. Results of soil, ground-water, surface-water, and streambed-sediment sampling at Air Force Plane 85, Columbus, Ohio, 1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnell, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Aeronautical Systems Center, Environmental Management Directorate, Restoration Division, prepared the Surface- and Ground- Water Monitoring Work Plan for Air Force Plant 85 (AFP 85 or Plant), Columbus, Ohio, under the Air Force Installation Restoration Program to characterize any ground-water, surface-water, and soil contamination that may exist at AFP 85. The USGS began the study in November 1996. The Plant was divided into nine sampling areas, which included some previously investi gated study sites. The investigation activities included the collection and presentation of data taken during drilling and water-quality sampling. Data collection focused on the saturated and unsatur ated zones and surface water. Twenty-three soil borings were completed. Ten monitoring wells (six existing wells and four newly constructed monitoring wells) were selected for water-quality sam pling. Surface-water and streambed-sediment sampling locations were chosen to monitor flow onto and off of the Plant. Seven sites were sampled for both surface-water and streambed-sediment quality. This report presents data on the selected inorganic and organic constituents in soil, ground water, surface water, and streambed sediments at AFP 85. The methods of data collection and anal ysis also are included. Knowledge of the geologic and hydrologic setting could aid Aeronautical Systems Center, Environmental Management Directorate, Restoration Division, and its governing regulatory agencies in future remediation studies.

  11. Slip Flow Effects over Hydromagnetic Forced Convective Flow over a Slendering Stretching Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    anjali devi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Theobjectiveofthisstudyistodeterminethecharacteristicsofhydromagneticflowoveraslendering stretching sheet in slip flow regime. Steady, two dimensional, nonlinear, hydromagnetic laminar flow of an incompressible, viscous and electrically conducting fluid over a stretching sheet with variable thickness in the presence of variable magnetic field and slip flow regime is considered. Governing equations of the problem are converted into ordinary differential equations utilizing similarity transformations. The resulting non-linear differential equations are solved numerically by utilizing Nachtsheim-swigert shooting iterative scheme for satisfaction of asymptotic boundary conditions along with fourth order Runge-Kutta integration method. Numerical computations are carried out for various values of the physical parameters and their effects over the velocity and temperature are analyzed. Numerical values of dimensionless skin friction coefficient and non-dimensional rate of heat transfer are also obtained.

  12. DETERMINATION OF WATER FLOW CONNECTION IN WATER SUPPLY SYSTEM IN PUBLIC BUILDINGS

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    An important factor for selection of main water meters is a precise determination of design flow, value of “nieprzewyższenia”. Presently, technical norms, on which determination of design flow for diameter selection of waterworks selection and consequently water meters selection are based, are no reliable in relation to the actual flow. This gives arguments to ascertain that harmonized standards do not meet Polish conditions and it requires correction. The article presents the method of de...

  13. Mean Flow Evolution of Saturated Forced Shear Flows in Polytropic Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Witzke, V

    2016-01-01

    In stellar interiors shear flows play an important role in many physical processes. So far helioseismology provides only large-scale measurements, and so the small-scale dynamics remains insufficiently understood. To draw a connection between observations and three-dimensional DNS of shear driven turbulence, we investigate horizontally averaged profiles of the numerically obtained mean state. We focus here on just one of the possible methods that can maintain a shear flow, namely the average relaxation method. We show that although some systems saturate by restoring linear marginal stability this is not a general trend. Finally, we discuss the reason that the results are more complex than expected.

  14. Statistical analysis of the influence of forces on particles in EM driven recirculated turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ščepanskis, M.; Jakovičs, A.; Baake, E.

    2011-12-01

    The present paper contains an analysis of the statistical distribution of forces affecting non-conducting particles dispersed in an EM induced recirculated flow in induction furnaces. The simulation is conducted adopting the LES-based Euler-Lagrange approach in the limit of dilute conditions (one-way coupling). It is done by means of a development of OpenFOAM software code. The used Lagrange equation for particle tracking includes drag, EM, buoyancy, lift, acceleration and added mass forces. The relevant approximations for the forces are chosen on the basis of the statistical analysis of the non-dimensional parameters (particle Reynolds number, shear stress and acceleration parameter). The effect of force distribution on particle homogenization is described under different density ratios and particle sizes. The recommendations of the consistence of the Lagrange model for the simulation of the particle motion in the laboratory scale induction crucible furnace are given in conclusion.

  15. Experimental investigation of drag force, Magnus force and drag torque acting on rough sphere moving in calm water

    OpenAIRE

    Lukerchenko, N. (Nikolay); Keita, I. (Ibrahima); Chára, Z. (Zdeněk); Vlasák, P. (Pavel)

    2010-01-01

    The paper describes the results of experiments with a rotating golf ball moving quasi-steadily in calm water. The motion of the ball was recorded on a digital video camera. The dimensionless drag force, Magnus force, and drag torque coefficients were determined from the comparison of the calculated translational and angular velocities and trajectory with experimental ones for the rough particle. The proper value of the correction coefficients were established from condition of the best fittin...

  16. Nitrogen transformations in wetlands: Effects of water flow patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidsson, T.

    1997-11-01

    In this thesis, I have studied nitrogen turnover processes in water meadows. A water meadow is a wetland where water infiltrates through the soil of a grassland field. It is hypothesized that infiltration of water through the soil matrix promotes nutrient transformations compared to surface flow of water, by increasing the contact between water, nutrients, soil organic matter and bacteria. I have studied how the balance between nitrogen removal (denitrification, assimilative uptake, adsorption) and release (mineralization, desorption) processes are affected by water flow characteristics. Mass balance studies and direct denitrification measurements at two field sites showed that, although denitrification was high, net nitrogen removal in the water meadows was poor. This was due to release of ammonium and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) from the soils. In laboratory studies, using {sup 15}N isotope techniques, I have shown that nitrogen turnover is considerably affected by hydrological conditions and by soil type. Infiltration increased virtually all the nitrogen processes, due to deeper penetration of nitrate and oxygen, and extended zones of turnover processes. On the contrary, soils and sediments with surface water flow, diffusion is the main transfer mechanism. The relation between release and removal processes sometimes resulted in shifts towards net nitrogen production. This occurred in infiltration treatments when ammonium efflux was high in relation to denitrification. It was concluded that ammonium and DON was of soil origin and hence not a product of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium. Both denitrification potential and mineralization rates were higher in peaty than in sandy soil. Vertical or horizontal subsurface flow is substantial in many wetland types, such as riparian zones, tidal salt marshes, fens, root-zone systems and water meadows. Moreover, any environment where aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems meet, and where water level fluctuates

  17. Experimental study of flow patterns and pressure drops of heavy oil-water-gas vertical flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xi-mao; ZHONG Hai-quan; LI Ying-chuan; LIU Zhong-neng; WANG Qi

    2014-01-01

    A stainless steel apparatus of 18.5 m high and 0.05 m in inner diameter is developed, with the heavy oil from Lukeqin Xinjiang oil field as the test medium, to carry out the orthogonal experiments for the interactions between heavy oil-water and heavy oil-water-gas. With the aid of observation windows, the pressure drop signal can be collected and the general multiple flow patterns of heavy oil-water-gas can be observed, including the bubble, slug, churn and annular ones. Compared with the conventional oil, the bubble flows are identified in three specific flow patterns which are the dispersed bubble (DB), the bubble gas-bubble heavy oil go(B-B), and the bubble gas-intermittent heavy oilgo(B-I). The slug flows are identified in two specific flow patterns which are the intermittent gas-bubble heavy oilgo(I-B)and the intermittent gas-intermittent heavy oilgo(I-I). Compared with the observa- tions in the heavy oil-water experiment, it is found that the conventional models can not accurately predict the pressure gradient. And it is not water but heavy oil and water mixed phase that is in contact with the tube wall. So, based on the principle of the energy con- servation and the kinematic wave theory, a new method is proposed to calculate the frictional pressure gradient. Furthermore, with the new friction gradient calculation method and a due consideration of the flow characteristics of the heavy oil-water-gas high speed flow, a new model is built to predict the heavy oil-water-gas pressure gradient. The predictions are compared with the experiment data and the field data. The accuracy of the predictions shows the rationality and the applicability of the new model.

  18. Application of Tank Model for Predicting Water Balance and Flow Discharge Components of Cisadane Upper Catchment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana Mulyana Arifjaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of hydrological tank model was well described into four compartments (tanks. The first tank (tank A comprised of one vertical (qA0 and two lateral (qA1 and qA2 water flow components and tank B comprised of one vertical (qB0 and one lateral (qB1 water flow components. Tank C comprised of one vertical (qC0 and one lateral (qC1 water flow components, whereas tank D comprised of one lateral water flow component (qD1.  These vertical water flows would also contribute to the depletion of water flow in the related tanks but would replenish tanks in the deeper layers. It was assumed that at all lateral water flow components would finally accumulate in one stream, summing-up of the lateral water flow, much or less, should be equal to the water discharge (Qo at specified time concerns. Tank A received precipitation (R and evapo-transpiration (ET which was its gradientof (R-ET over time would become the driving force for the changes of water stored in the soil profiles and thosewater flows leaving the soil layer.  Thus tank model could describe th vertical and horizontal water flow withinthe watershed. The research site was Cisadane Upper Catchment, located at Pasir Buncir Village of CaringinSub-District within the Regency of Bogor in West Java Province.  The elevations ranged 512 –2,235 m above sealevel, with a total drainage area of 1,811.5 ha and total length of main stream of 14,340.7 m.  The land cover wasdominated by  forest  with a total of 1,044.6 ha (57.67%,  upland agriculture with a total of 477.96 ha (26.38%,mixed garden with a total of 92.85 ha(5.13% and semitechnical irigated rice field with a total of 196.09 ha (10,8%.  The soil was classified as hydraquent (96.6% and distropept (3.4%.  Based on the calibration of tank model application in the study area, the resulting coefficient of determination (R2 was 0.72 with model efficiency (NSEof= 0.75, thus tank model could well illustrate the water flow distribution of

  19. Boundary of the area contributing flow to the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set defines the boundary of the area contributing ground-water flow to the Death Valley regional ground-water flow-system (DVRFS) model domain. The...

  20. Boundary of the area contributing flow to the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set defines the boundary of the area contributing ground-water flow to the Death Valley regional ground-water flow-system (DVRFS) model domain....

  1. Extended Approach to Water Flow Algorithm for Text Line Segmentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Darko Brodi(c)

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a new approach to the water flow algorithm for text line segmentation.In the basic method the hypothetical water flows under few specified angles which have been defined by water flow angle as parameter.It is applied to the document image frame from left to right and vice versa.As a result,the unwetted and wetted areas are established.Thesc areas separate text from non-text elements in each text line,respectively.Hence,they represent the control areas that are of major importance for text line segmentation.Primarily,an extended approach means extraction of the connected-components by bounding boxes ovcr text.By this way,each connected component is mutually separated.Hence,the water flow angle,which defines the unwetted areas,is determined adaptively.By choosing appropriate water flow angle,the unwetted areas are lengthening which leads to the better text line segmentation.Results of this approach are encouraging due to the text line segmentation improvement which is the most challenging step in document image processing.

  2. Water flow experiments and analyses on the cross-flow type mercury target model with the flow guide plates

    CERN Document Server

    Haga, K; Kaminaga, M; Hino, R

    2001-01-01

    A mercury target is used in the spallation neutron source driven by a high-intensity proton accelerator. In this study, the effectiveness of the cross-flow type mercury target structure was evaluated experimentally and analytically. Prior to the experiment, the mercury flow field and the temperature distribution in the target container were analyzed assuming a proton beam energy and power of 1.5 GeV and 5 MW, respectively, and the feasibility of the cross-flow type target was evaluated. Then the average water flow velocity field in the target mock-up model, which was fabricated from Plexiglass for a water experiment, was measured at room temperature using the PIV technique. Water flow analyses were conducted and the analytical results were compared with the experimental results. The experimental results showed that the cross-flow could be realized in most of the proton beam path area and the analytical result of the water flow velocity field showed good correspondence to the experimental results in the case w...

  3. Experimental measurements of the cavitating flow after horizontal water entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tat Nguyen, Thang; Hai, Duong Ngoc; Quang Thai, Nguyen; Phuong, Truong Thi

    2017-10-01

    Water-entry cavitating flow is of considerable importance in underwater high-speed applications. That is because of the drag-reduction effect that concerns the presence of a cavity around moving objects. Though the study of the flow has long been carried out, little data are documented in literature so far. Besides, currently, in the case of unsteady flow, experimental measurements of some flow parameters such as the cavity pressure still encounter difficulties. Hence continuing research efforts are of important significance. The objective of this study is to investigate experimentally the unsteady cavitating flow after the horizontal water entry of projectiles. An experimental apparatus has been developed. Qualitative and quantitative optical visualizations of the flow have been carried out by using high-speed videography. Digital image processing has been applied to analyzing the recorded flow images. Based on the known correlations between the ellipsoidal super-cavity’s size and the corresponding cavitation number, the cavity pressure has been measured by utilizing the data of image processing. A comparison between the partial- and super-cavitating flow regimes is reported. The received results can be useful for the design of high-speed underwater projectiles.

  4. Stability of steam-water countercurrent stratified flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S C

    1985-10-01

    Two flow instabilities which limit the normal condensation processes in countercurrent stratified steam-water flow have been identified experimentally: flooding and condensation-induced waterhammer. In order to initiate condensation-induced waterhammer in nearly horizontal or moderately-inclined steam/subcooled-water flow, two conditions, the appearance of a wavy interface and complete condensation of the incoming steam, are necessary. Analyses of these conditions are performed on a basis of flow stability and heat transfer considerations. Flooding data for several inclinations and channel heights are collected. Effects of condensation, inclination angle and channel height on the flooding characteristics are discussed. An envelope theory for the onset of flooding in inclined stratified flow is developed, which agrees well with the experimental data. Some empirical information on basic flow parameters, such as mean film thickness and interfacial friction factor required for this theory are measured. The previous viewpoints on flooding appear not to conflict with the present experimental data in nearly horizontal flow but the flooding phenomena in nearly vertical flow appear to be more complicated than those described by these viewpoints because of liquid droplet entrainment.

  5. Ductile flow by water-assisted cataclasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Brok, Bas

    2003-04-01

    In the presence of water otherwise brittle materials may deform macroscopically ductile by water-assisted cataclastic creep. This is possible as long as (i) solubility is high enough, so that stress-corrosion can occur, and (ii) local stress is low enough, to that fracturing remains subcritical. Water-assisted cataclastic creep (WACC) may play an important role in the middle and lower continental crust where mineral solubilities are high and stresses low. WACC is a poorly understood deformation process. Experiments were performed on very soluble brittle salts (Na-chlorate; K-alum) to study microstructure development by WACC. The experiments were carried out at room temperature and atmospheric pressure in a small see-through vessel. In this way the cataclastic deformation process could be studied "in-situ" under the microscope. Crystals were loaded in the presence of saturated salt solution. It appeared that originally straight mineral surfaces were instable when kept under stress. Grooves (or channels) slowly developed in the surface by local dissolution. These grooves behave like so-called Grinfeld instabilities. They develop because the energy of a grooved surface under stress is lower than the energy of a straight surface under stress. The grooves may deepen and turn into subcritical cracks when local stress further increases. These cracks propagate slowly. They propagate parallel to sigma1 but also at an angle and even perpendicular to sigma1, often following crystallographically controlled directions. The fractures mostly change direction while propagating, locally making turns of more than 180 degrees. Irregular fracture fragments thus develop. The fractures may migrate sideways (as with grain bounday migration) probably by solution-redeposition driven by differences in stress between both sides of the fracture. Thus the shape of the fragments changes. The size of the fracture fragments seems to be controlled by the distance of the grooves, which decreases

  6. Unstable Pore-Water Flow in Intertidal Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, D. A.; Shen, C.; Li, L.

    2014-12-01

    Salt marshes are important intertidal wetlands strongly influenced by interactions between surface water and groundwater. Bordered by coastal water, the marsh system undergoes cycles of inundation and exposure driven by the tide. This leads to dynamic, complex pore-water flow and solute transport in the marsh soil. Pore-water circulations occur over vastly different spatial and temporal scales with strong link to the marsh topography. These circulations control solute transport between the marsh soil and the tidal creek, and ultimately affect the overall nutrient exchange between the marsh and coastal water. The pore-water flows also dictate the soil condition, particularly aeration, which influences the marsh plant growth. Numerous studies have been carried out to examine the pore-water flow process in the marsh soil driven by tides, focusing on stable flow with the assumption of homogeneity in soil and fluid properties. This assumption, however, is questionable given the actual inhomogeneous conditions in the field. For example, the salinity of surface water in the tidal creek varies temporally and spatially due to the influence of rainfall and evapotranspiration as well as the freshwater input from upland areas to the estuary, creating density gradients across the marsh surface and within the marsh soil. Many marshes possess soil stratigraphy with low-permeability mud typically overlying high-permeability sandy deposits. Macropores such as crab burrows are commonly distributed in salt marsh sediments. All these conditions are prone to the development of non-uniform, unstable preferential pore-water flow in the marsh soil, for example, funnelling and fingering. Here we present results from laboratory experiments and numerical simulations to explore such unstable flow. In particular, the analysis aims to address how the unstable flow modifies patterns of local pore-water movement and solute transport, as well as the overall exchange between the marsh soil and

  7. Simulation of bidirectional pedestrian flow in transfer station corridor based on multi forces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周雪梅; 纪翔峰; 黄凰; 杨晓光

    2014-01-01

    A good understanding of pedestrian movement in the transfer corridor is vital for the planning and design of the station, especially for efficiency and safety.A multi-force vector grid model was presented to simulate the movement of bidirectional pedestrian flow based on cellular automata and forces between pedestrians. The model improves rule-based characteristics of cellular automata, details forces between pedestrians and solves pedestrian collisions by a several-step updating method to simulate pedestrian movements. Two general scenarios in corridor were simulated. One is bidirectional pedestrian flow simulation with isolation facility, and the other is bidirectional pedestrian flow simulation without isolation facility, where there exists disturbance in the middle. Through simulation, some facts can be seen that pedestrians in the case with isolation facility have the largest speed and pedestrians in the case without isolation facility have the smallest speed; pedestrians in the case of unidirectional flow have the largest volume and pedestrians in the case of without isolation facility have the smallest volume.

  8. Effect of thermal diffusion and electrostatic force on evolution of wind-blown sand flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUE Gao-wei; ZHENG Xiao-jing

    2007-01-01

    A theoretical model is suggested to mathematically describe the effect of thermal diffusion from a sand-bed on evolution of a wind-blown sand flow. An upward wind field is engendered by the thermal diffusion and the coupling interaction among the horizontal and upward wind flow, saltating grains, and a kind of electrostatic force exerted on the grains are considered in this theoretical model. The numerical results show that the effect of the thermal diffusion on the evolution process of wind-blown grain flow is quite obvious and very similar to the effect of the electrostatic force on the evolution. Not only the time for the entire system to reach a steady state (called the duration time), the transport rate of grains, the mass-flux profiles and the trajectory of saltating grains are affected by the thermal diffusion and the electrostatic force exerted on saltating grains,but also the wind profiles and the temperature profiles at the steady state are affected by the wind-blown sand flow.

  9. Gas-Water Flow Behavior in Water-Bearing Tight Gas Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renyi Cao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Some tight sandstone gas reservoirs contain mobile water, and the mobile water generally has a significant impact on the gas flowing in tight pores. The flow behavior of gas and water in tight pores is different than in conventional formations, yet there is a lack of adequate models to predict the gas production and describe the gas-water flow behaviors in water-bearing tight gas reservoirs. Based on the experimental results, this paper presents mathematical models to describe flow behaviors of gas and water in tight gas formations; the threshold pressure gradient, stress sensitivity, and relative permeability are all considered in our models. A numerical simulator using these models has been developed to improve the flow simulation accuracy for water-bearing tight gas reservoirs. The results show that the effect of stress sensitivity becomes larger as water saturation increases, leading to a fast decline of gas production; in addition, the nonlinear flow of gas phase is aggravated with the increase of water saturation and the decrease of permeability. The gas recovery decreases when the threshold pressure gradient (TPG and stress sensitivity are taken into account. Therefore, a reasonable drawdown pressure should be set to minimize the damage of nonlinear factors to gas recovery.

  10. Self-Assembly and Intermolecular Forces When Cellulose and Water Interact Using Molecular Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Chami Khazraji

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose chains are linear and aggregation occurs via both intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Cellulose has a strong affinity to itself and toward materials containing hydroxyls groups. Based on the preponderance of hydroxyl functional groups, cellulose is very reactive with water. At room temperature, cellulose chains will have at least a monomolecular layer of water associated to it. The formation of hydrogen bonds at the cellulose/water interface is shown to depend essentially on the adsorption site, for example, the equatorial hydroxyls or OH moieties pointing outward from the cellulose chains. The vdW forces also contribute significantly to the adsorption energy. They are a considerable cohesive energy into the cellulose network. At the surface of the cellulose chains, many intermolecular hydrogen bonds of the cellulose chains are lost. However, they are compensated by hydrogen bonds with water molecules. Electronic clouds can be distorted and create electrostatic dipoles. The large antibonding electron cloud that exists around the glucosidic bonds produces an induced polarization at the approach of water molecules. The electron cloud can be distorted and create an electrostatic dipole. It applies to the total displacement of the atoms within the material. Orbitals play a special role in reaction mechanism. Hydrophilic/hydrophobic nature of cellulose is based on its structural anisotropy. Cellulose-water interactions are exothermic reactions. These interactions may occur spontaneously and result in higher randomness of the system. They are denoted by a negative heat flow (heat is lost to the surroundings. Energy does not need to be inputted in order for cellulose-water interactions to occur.

  11. Force

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Forces are at work all around us. Discover what a force is, and different kinds of forces that work on contact and at a distance. We use simple language and vocabulary to make this invisible world easy for students to ""see"" and understand. Examine how forces ""add up"" to create the total force on an object, and reinforce concepts and extend learning with sample problems.

  12. Unsteady 2D potential-flow forces on a thin variable geometry airfoil undergoing arbitrary motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaunaa, M.

    2006-01-01

    In this report analytical expressions for the unsteady 2D force distribution on a variable geometry airfoil undergoing arbitrary motion are derived under the assumption of incompressible, irrotational, inviscid flow. The airfoil is represented by itscamberline as in classic thin-airfoil theory...... of the present theory in problems employing the eigenvalue approach, such as stabilityanalysis. The analytical expressions for the forces simplify to all previously known steady and unsteady thin-airfoil solutions. Apart from the obvious applications within active load control/reduction, the current theory can...

  13. How fast does water flow in carbon nanotubes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kannam, Sridhar; Todd, Billy; Hansen, Jesper Schmidt

    2013-01-01

    the slip length using equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations, from which the interfacial friction between water and carbon nanotubes can be found, and also via external field driven non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations (NEMD). We discuss some of the issues in simulation studies which......The purpose of this paper is threefold. First, we review the existing literature on flow rates of water in carbon nanotubes. Data for the slip length which characterizes the flow rate are scattered over 5 orders of magnitude for nanotubes of diameter 0.81–10 nm. Second, we precisely compute...... and reliably extrapolate the results for the slip length to values of the field corresponding to experimentally accessible pressure gradients. Finally, we comment on several issues concerning water flow rates in carbon nanotubes which may lead to some future research directions in this area....

  14. Analysis on Issues of Variable Flow Water System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinming Yang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Variable flow water system has played an important role in the field of energy saving with the Electronic Variable Frequency Drive (VFD widely used in practical projects. How to control the frequency converter to work properly is an essential issue which we must first emphatically solve. The control technology of frequency converter is closely related to characteristics of pumps. Based on the mathmatical a model of pumps with or without inverters, the article discusses some issues in detail, such as inverters configuration, flow rate regulation and overload. These are key issues of control technology of variable flow water system. For those multiple-pump water systems, the engineers may select synchronous frequency conversion control technology or Add-Sub pumps control technology to achieve the maximum energy-saving benefits.  

  15. Root water uptake as simulated by three water flow models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willigen, de P.; Dam, van J.C.; Javaux, M.; Heinen, M.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of our study was to determine to what extent four root water uptake (RWU) models differed when tested under extreme conditions. Cumulative transpiration patterns were similar, contrary to the spatial extraction patterns. The analysis showed that both soil physical and root physiologica

  16. Water: The Flow of Women's Work. Water in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Amy

    The Water in Africa Project was realized over a 2-year period by a team of Peace Corps volunteers, World Wise Schools (WWS) classroom teachers, and WWS staff members. As part of an expanded, detailed design, resources were collected from over 90 volunteers serving in African countries, photos and stories were prepared, and standards-based learning…

  17. Pilot Field Demonstration of Alternative Fuels in Force Projection Petroleum and Water Distribution Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-04

    UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED PILOT FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF ALTERNATIVE FUELS IN FORCE PROJECTION PETROLEUM AND WATER DISTRIBUTION EQUIPMENT...Fort Belvoir, Virginia 22060- 6218. Disposition Instructions Destroy this report when no longer needed. Do not return it to the originator ...UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED PILOT FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF ALTERNATIVE FUELS IN FORCE PROJECTION PETROLEUM AND WATER DISTRIBUTION EQUIPMENT

  18. Turbulence-induced bubble collision force modeling and validation in adiabatic two-phase flow using CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Subash L., E-mail: sharma55@purdue.edu [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1290 (United States); Hibiki, Takashi; Ishii, Mamoru [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1290 (United States); Brooks, Caleb S. [Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Schlegel, Joshua P. [Nuclear Engineering Program, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Liu, Yang [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Buchanan, John R. [Bechtel Marine Propulsion Corporation, Bettis Laboratory, West Mifflin, PA 15122 (United States)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Void distribution in narrow rectangular channel with various non-uniform inlet conditions. • Modeling of void diffusion due to bubble collision force. • Validation of new modeling in adiabatic air–water two-phase flow in a narrow channel. - Abstract: The prediction capability of the two-fluid model for gas–liquid dispersed two-phase flow depends on the accuracy of the closure relations for the interfacial forces. In previous studies of two-phase flow Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), interfacial force models for a single isolated bubble has been extended to disperse two-phase flow assuming the effect in a swarm of bubbles is similar. Limited studies have been performed investigating the effect of the bubble concentration on the lateral phase distribution. Bubbles, while moving through the liquid phase, may undergo turbulence-driven random collision with neighboring bubbles without significant coalescence. The rate of these collisions depends upon the bubble approach velocity and bubble spacing. The bubble collision frequency is expected to be higher in locations with higher bubble concentrations, i.e., volume fraction. This turbulence-driven random collision causes the diffusion of the bubbles from high concentration to low concentration. Based on experimental observations, a phenomenological model has been developed for a “turbulence-induced bubble collision force” for use in the two-fluid model. For testing the validity of the model, two-phase flow data measured at Purdue University are utilized. The geometry is a 10 mm × 200 mm cross section channel. Experimentally, non-uniform inlet boundary conditions are applied with different sparger combinations to vary the volume fraction distribution across the wider dimension. Examining uniform and non-uniform inlet data allows for the influence of the volume fraction to be studied as a separate effect. The turbulence-induced bubble collision force has been implemented in ANSYS CFX. The

  19. Prediction of bubble detachment diameter in flow boiling based on force analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Deqi [Key Laboratory of Low-grade Energy Utilization Technologies and Systems (Chongqing University), Ministry of Education, Chongqing 400044 (China); Pan Liangming, E-mail: cneng@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low-grade Energy Utilization Technologies and Systems (Chongqing University), Ministry of Education, Chongqing 400044 (China); Ren Song [Key Laboratory of Low-grade Energy Utilization Technologies and Systems (Chongqing University), Ministry of Education, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer All the forces acting on the growing bubbles are taken into account in the model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The bubble contact diameter has significant effect on bubble detachment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bubble growth force and surface tension are more significant in narrow channel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A good agreement between the predicted and the measured results is achieved. - Abstract: Bubble detachment diameter is one of the key parameters in the study of bubble dynamics and boiling heat transfer, and it is hard to be measured in a boiling system. In order to predict the bubble detachment diameter, a theoretical model is proposed based on forces analysis in this paper. All the forces acting on a bubble are taken into account to establish a model for different flow boiling configurations, including narrow and conventional channels, upward, downward and horizontal flows. A correlation of bubble contact circle diameter is adopted in this study, and it is found that the bubble contact circle diameter has significant effect on bubble detachment. A new correlation taking the bubble contact circle diameter into account for the evaluation of bubble growth force is proposed in this study, and it is found that the bubble growth force and surface tension force are more significant in narrow channel when comparing with that in conventional channel. A visual experiment was carried out in order to verify present model; and the experimental data from published literature are used also. A good agreement between predicted and measured results is achieved.

  20. Portable dual field gradient force multichannel flow cytometer device with a dual wavelength low noise detection scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Conrad D; Galambos, Paul C; Derzon, Mark S; Graf, Darin C; Pohl, Kenneth R; Bourdon, Chris J

    2012-10-23

    Systems and methods for combining dielectrophoresis, magnetic forces, and hydrodynamic forces to manipulate particles in channels formed on top of an electrode substrate are discussed. A magnet placed in contact under the electrode substrate while particles are flowing within the channel above the electrode substrate allows these three forces to be balanced when the system is in operation. An optical detection scheme using near-confocal microscopy for simultaneously detecting two wavelengths of light emitted from the flowing particles is also discussed.

  1. Of ice and water: Quaternary fluvial response to glacial forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordier, Stéphane; Adamson, Kathryn; Delmas, Magali; Calvet, Marc; Harmand, Dominique

    2017-06-01

    Much research, especially within the framework of the Fluvial Archives Group, has focused on river response to climate change in mid-latitude non-glaciated areas, but research into the relationships between Quaternary glacial and fluvial dynamics remains sparse. Understanding glacial-fluvial interactions is important because glaciers are able to influence river behaviour significantly, especially during glacial and deglacial periods: (1) when they are located downstream of a pre-existing fluvial system and disrupt its activity, leading to hydrographical, hydrosedimentary and isostatic adjustments, and (2) when they are located upstream, which is a common scenario in mid-latitude mountains that were glaciated during Pleistocene cold periods. In these instances, glaciers are major water and sediment sources. Their role is particularly significant during deglaciation, when meltwater transfer towards the fluvial system is greatly increased while downstream sediment evacuation is influenced by changes to glacial-fluvial connectivity and basin-wide sediment storage. This means that discharge and sediment flux do not always respond simultaneously, which can lead to complex fluvial behaviour involving proglacial erosion and sedimentation and longer-term paraglacial reworking. These processes may vary spatially and temporally according to the position relative to the ice margin (ice-proximal versus ice-distal). With a focus on the catchments of Europe, this paper aims to review our understanding of glacial impacts on riversystem behaviour. We examine the methods used to unravel fluvial response to 'glacial forcing', and propose a synthesis of the behaviour of glacially-fed rivers, opening perspectives for further research.

  2. An integrated model for the assessment of global water resources – Part 1: Model description and input meteorological forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Hanasaki

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available To assess global water availability and use at a subannual timescale, an integrated global water resources model was developed consisting of six modules: land surface hydrology, river routing, crop growth, reservoir operation, environmental flow requirement estimation, and anthropogenic water withdrawal. The model simulates both natural and anthropogenic water flow globally (excluding Antarctica on a daily basis at a spatial resolution of 1°×1° (longitude and latitude. This first part of the two-feature report describes the six modules and the input meteorological forcing. The input meteorological forcing was provided by the second Global Soil Wetness Project (GSWP2, an international land surface modeling project. Several reported shortcomings of the forcing component were improved. The land surface hydrology module was developed based on a bucket type model that simulates energy and water balance on land surfaces. The crop growth module is a relatively simple model based on concepts of heat unit theory, potential biomass, and a harvest index. In the reservoir operation module, 452 major reservoirs with >1 km3 each of storage capacity store and release water according to their own rules of operation. Operating rules were determined for each reservoir by an algorithm that used currently available global data such as reservoir storage capacity, intended purposes, simulated inflow, and water demand in the lower reaches. The environmental flow requirement module was newly developed based on case studies from around the world. Simulated runoff was compared and validated with observation-based global runoff data sets and observed streamflow records at 32 major river gauging stations around the world. Mean annual runoff agreed well with earlier studies at global and continental scales, and in individual basins, the mean bias was less than ±20% in 14 of the 32 river basins and less than ±50% in 24 basins. The error in the peak was less

  3. An integrated model for the assessment of global water resources Part 1: Model description and input meteorological forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanasaki, N.; Kanae, S.; Oki, T.; Masuda, K.; Motoya, K.; Shirakawa, N.; Shen, Y.; Tanaka, K.

    2008-07-01

    To assess global water availability and use at a subannual timescale, an integrated global water resources model was developed consisting of six modules: land surface hydrology, river routing, crop growth, reservoir operation, environmental flow requirement estimation, and anthropogenic water withdrawal. The model simulates both natural and anthropogenic water flow globally (excluding Antarctica) on a daily basis at a spatial resolution of 1°×1° (longitude and latitude). This first part of the two-feature report describes the six modules and the input meteorological forcing. The input meteorological forcing was provided by the second Global Soil Wetness Project (GSWP2), an international land surface modeling project. Several reported shortcomings of the forcing component were improved. The land surface hydrology module was developed based on a bucket type model that simulates energy and water balance on land surfaces. The crop growth module is a relatively simple model based on concepts of heat unit theory, potential biomass, and a harvest index. In the reservoir operation module, 452 major reservoirs with >1 km3 each of storage capacity store and release water according to their own rules of operation. Operating rules were determined for each reservoir by an algorithm that used currently available global data such as reservoir storage capacity, intended purposes, simulated inflow, and water demand in the lower reaches. The environmental flow requirement module was newly developed based on case studies from around the world. Simulated runoff was compared and validated with observation-based global runoff data sets and observed streamflow records at 32 major river gauging stations around the world. Mean annual runoff agreed well with earlier studies at global and continental scales, and in individual basins, the mean bias was less than ±20% in 14 of the 32 river basins and less than ±50% in 24 basins. The error in the peak was less than ±1 mo in 19 of the 27

  4. Sap flow index as an indicator of water storage use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadezhdina Nadezhda

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Symmetrical temperature difference also known as the sap flow index (SFI forms the basis of the Heat Field Deformation sap flow measurement and is simultaneously collected whilst measuring the sap flow. SFI can also be measured by any sap flow method applying internal continuous heating through the additional installation of an axial differential thermocouple equidistantly around a heater. In earlier research on apple trees SFI was found to be an informative parameter for tree physiological studies, namely for assessing the contribution of stem water storage to daily transpiration. The studies presented in this work are based on the comparative monitoring of SFI and diameter in stems of different species (Pseudotsuga menziesii, Picea omorika, Pinus sylvestris and tree sizes. The ability of SFI to follow the patterns of daily stem water storage use was empirically confirmed by our data. Additionally, as the HFD multipointsensors can measure sap flow at several stem sapwood depths, their use allowed to analyze the use of stored water in different xylem layers through SFI records. Radial and circumferential monitoring of SFI on large cork oak trees provided insight into the relative magnitude and timing of the contribution of water stored in different sapwood layers or stem sectors to transpiration.

  5. Experimental study of forces on freely moving spherical particles during resuspension into turbulent flow

    CERN Document Server

    Traugott, Hadar

    2015-01-01

    Turbulent resuspension is the process of lifting solid particles from the bottom by turbulent flow, ubiquitous in natural and industrial problems. The process is a sequence of events that start with an incipient motion when the particle is dislodged from its place, continue as sliding or rolling along the surface, and ending with the detachment of the particle from the surface and lifting it up into the flow. In this study we measure in details the motion of freely moving solid spherical particles along the bottom smooth wall under an oscillating grid turbulence and track them through the lift-off events. We measure simultaneously the Lagrangian trajectories of the particles and the flow tracers around them. We estimate the local flow parameters and extract the different force terms that act on a particle. For the particles of the diameter comparable with the Kolmogorov length scale, either sliding or rolling along the smooth wall under a zero-mean turbulent flow, we find that: i) the lift force is a dominant...

  6. Continuous surface force based lattice Boltzmann equation method for simulating thermocapillary flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Lin, E-mail: lz@njust.edu.cn [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Zheng, Song [School of Mathematics and Statistics, Zhejiang University of Finance and Economics, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Zhai, Qinglan [School of Economics Management and Law, Chaohu University, Chaohu 238000 (China)

    2016-02-05

    In this paper, we extend a lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) with continuous surface force (CSF) to simulate thermocapillary flows. The model is designed on our previous CSF LBE for athermal two phase flow, in which the interfacial tension forces and the Marangoni stresses as the results of the interface interactions between different phases are described by a conception of CSF. In this model, the sharp interfaces between different phases are separated by a narrow transition layers, and the kinetics and morphology evolution of phase separation would be characterized by an order parameter via Cahn–Hilliard equation which is solved in the frame work of LBE. The scalar convection–diffusion equation for temperature field is resolved by thermal LBE. The models are validated by thermal two layered Poiseuille flow, and two superimposed planar fluids at negligibly small Reynolds and Marangoni numbers for the thermocapillary driven convection, which have analytical solutions for the velocity and temperature. Then thermocapillary migration of two/three dimensional deformable droplet are simulated. Numerical results show that the predictions of present LBE agreed with the analytical solution/other numerical results. - Highlights: • A CSF LBE to thermocapillary flows. • Thermal layered Poiseuille flows. • Thermocapillary migration.

  7. Numerical simulation of turbulent flow around a forced moving circular cylinder on cut cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Wei

    2013-01-01

    Fixed and forced moving circular cylinders in turbulent flows are studied by using the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and two-equation based Detached Eddy Simulation (DES) turbulence models. The Cartesian cut cell approach is adopted to track the body surface across a stationary background grid covering the whole computational domain. A cell-centered finite volume method of second-order accuracy in both time and space is developed to solve the flow field in fluid cells, which is also modified accordingly in cut cells and merged cells. In order to compare different turbulence models, the current flow past a fixed circular cylinder at a mode- rate Reynolds number,Re=3 900, is tested first. The model is also applied to the simulation of a forced oscillating circular cylinder in the turbulent flow, and the influences of different oscillation amplitudes, frequencies and free stream velocities are discussed. The numerical results indicate that the present numerical model based on the Cartesian cut cell approach is capable of solving the turbu- lent flow around a body undergoing motions, which is a foundation for the possible future study on wake induced oscillation and vor- tex induced vibration.

  8. Experimental investigation on flow characteristics of deionized water in microtubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU ShaoLiang; YUE XiangAn; HOU JiRui

    2007-01-01

    The flow characteristics of deionized water in microtubes with diameters ranging from 2 to 30 μm are investigated. The experimental results show that the flow characteristics in microtubes with diameters of 16 μm and larger ones are in agreement with the classical theory. However, as the diameters are decreased to 5 and 2 μm, the nonlinear flow characteristics prevail and the results indicate significant departure of flow characteristics from the predictions of the conventional theory, and the smaller the diameters, the larger the departure. As the Reynolds number increases, the degree of nonlinear flow characteristics decrease gradually and the experimental results are approximately equal to the theoretical expectation. The minimum Reynolds number in this study is only 2.46×10-5.

  9. Ground water recharge and flow characterization using multiple isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Ali H; Uliana, Matthew; Wade, Shirley

    2008-01-01

    Stable isotopes of delta(18)O, delta(2)H, and (13)C, radiogenic isotopes of (14)C and (3)H, and ground water chemical compositions were used to distinguish ground water, recharge areas, and possible recharge processes in an arid zone, fault-bounded alluvial aquifer. Recharge mainly occurs through exposed stream channel beds as opposed to subsurface inflow along mountain fronts. This recharge distribution pattern may also occur in other fault-bounded aquifers, with important implications for conceptualization of ground water flow systems, development of ground water models, and ground water resource management. Ground water along the mountain front near the basin margins contains low delta(18)O, (14)C (percent modern carbon [pmC]), and (3)H (tritium units [TU]), suggesting older recharge. In addition, water levels lie at greater depths, and basin-bounding faults that locally act as a flow barrier may further reduce subsurface inflow into the aquifer along the mountain front. Chemical differences in ground water composition, attributed to varying aquifer mineralogy and recharge processes, further discriminate the basin-margin and the basin-center water. Direct recharge through the indurated sandstones and mudstones in the basin center is minimal. Modern recharge in the aquifer is mainly through the broad, exposed stream channel beds containing coarse sand and gravel where ground water contains higher delta(18)O, (14)C (pmC), and (3)H (TU). Spatial differences in delta(18)O, (14)C (pmC), and (3)H (TU) and occurrences of extensive mudstones in the basin center suggest sluggish ground water movement, including local compartmentalization of the flow system.

  10. DIGITAL IMAGE MEASUREMENT OF BUBBLE MOTION IN AERATED WATER FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Digital image measurement method, as an ex-tension of Particle Image Velocimetry of single-phase flowmeasurement, was investigated for application to air-watertwo-phase flows. The method has strong potential ability inmeasuring bubble geometrical features and moving velocitiesfor complex bubble motion in aerated water flow. Both dilutedand dense bubble rising flows are measured using the digitalimage method. Measured bubble shapes and sizes, and bubblevelocities are affected by threshold selection for binary image.Several algorithms for selecting threshold are compared andmethods for calculating the time-averaged void fraction arediscussed.

  11. Solar forcing of the stream flow of a continental scale South American river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauas, Pablo J D; Flamenco, Eduardo; Buccino, Andrea P

    2008-10-17

    Solar forcing on climate has been reported in several studies although the evidence so far remains inconclusive. Here, we analyze the stream flow of one of the largest rivers in the world, the Paraná in southeastern South America. For the last century, we find a strong correlation with the sunspot number, in multidecadal time scales, and with larger solar activity corresponding to larger stream flow. The correlation coefficient is r=0.78, significant to a 99% level. In shorter time scales we find a strong correlation with El Niño. These results are a step toward flood prediction, which might have great social and economic impacts.

  12. Material-property zones used in the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Zones in this data set represent spatially contiguous areas that influence ground-water flow in the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system (DVRFS), an...

  13. Boundary of the ground-water flow model by IT Corporation (1996), for the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system study, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set defines the boundary of the steady-state ground-water flow model built by IT Corporation (1996). The regional, 20-layer ground-water flow...

  14. Material-property zones used in the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Zones in this data set represent spatially contiguous areas that influence ground-water flow in the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system (DVRFS), an...

  15. Naturally-Forced Slug Flow Expander for Application in a Waste-Heat Recovery Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben de Witt

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates a slug-flow expander (SFE for conversion of high-pressure gas/vapor into kinetic energy of liquid slugs. The energy transfer from high-pressure to kinetic energy is quantified using thrust plate measurements. Non-dimensional thrust data is used to quantify performance by normalizing measured thrust by thrust for the same water flow rate at zero air flow rate. A total of 13 expander configurations are investigated and geometries with the shortest cavity length and the smallest exit diameter are found to result in the largest non-dimensional thrust increase. Results show that thrust augmentation increases with the initiation of slug flow in the SFE. The analysis performed on the normalized thrust readings suggested that as the water and air flow were increased to critical conditions, the liquid slugs produced by the SFE augmented the thrust measurements. The final performance evaluation was based on linear regression of the normalized thrust measurements where slug flow was generated for each SFE architecture. Greater magnitudes of the slope from the linear regression indicated the propensity of the SFE to augment thrust. This analysis confirmed that for the SFE configurations over the range of values investigated, the SFE increased thrust up to three times its original value at no air flow. Given the inherent multiphase nature of the slug-flow expander, application to systems involving expansion of wetting fluids (water as part of a waste-heat recovery system or air with water droplet formation (as part of a compressed-air energy storage system could be considered.

  16. Numerical investigation on added mass and damping force coefficient of an underwater vehicle in cavitating flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z. Y.; Wang, G. Y.; Hu, C. L.; Cui, Z. Y.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper is mainly to study the influence of cavitation on the added mass and damping force coefficient. Based on Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations, the dynamic mesh is used to calculate the added mass, and the rotating coordinate frame method is applied to research on the damping force coefficient. In order to obtain fluid damping force coefficients, the movement pattern is set as a uniform circular motion. Then the additional force coefficient and pitch damping moment coefficient could be obtained using the method of least squares. The result shows that the method to calculate added mass is reliable by comparing with the analytical solution. With the cavitation number decreasing, the absolute value of the added mass of λ22 decreases and λ26 increases. What's more, both the absolute value of damping force and moment coefficient decrease substantially with the development of cavity when the cavitation number is larger than 0.45. However, with the cavitation number less than 0.45, the un-symmetric cavity is more prominent, the absolute value of damping force and moment coefficient increase slightly. This is probably caused by the strengthened pressure peak at the suction side induced by the re-entrant flow.

  17. Forcing homogeneous turbulence in DNS of particulate flow with interface resolution and gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Chouippe, Agathe

    2015-01-01

    We consider the case of finite-size spherical particles which are settling under gravity in a homogeneous turbulent background flow. Turbulence is forced with the aid of the random forcing method of Eswaran and Pope [Comput. Fluids, 16(3):257-278, 1988], while the solid particles are represented with an immersed-boundary method. The forcing scheme is used to generate isotropic turbulence in vertically elongated boxes in order to warrant better decorrelation of the Lagrangian signals in the direction of gravity. Since only a limited number of Fourier modes are forced, it is possible to evaluate the forcing field directly in physical space, thereby avoiding full-size transforms. The budget of box-averaged kinetic energy is derived from the forced momentum equations. Medium-sized simulations for dilute suspensions at low Taylor-scale Reynolds number $Re_\\lambda=65$, small density ratio $\\rho_p/\\rho_f=1.5$ and for two Galileo numbers $Ga=0$ and 120 are carried out over long time intervals in order to exclude the ...

  18. Parametric Studies on Buoyancy Induced Flow through Circular Pipes in Solar water heating system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. S. V. Prayagi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar energy is the primary source of energy for our planet. The average solar energy reaching the earth in the tropical zone is about 1kWh/m2 giving approximately 5 to 10 kWh/m2 per day. Increased utilization of solar energy in India would result in all around benefits, both in term of cleaner environment and monetary gain.The energy from the sun can be used for various purposes such as water heating, water distillation, refrigeration, drying, power generation etc. The present work deals with solar water heating system in particular. Performance of the solar collectors can be determined using the famous Hottel-Whillier-Bliss equation [1]. The analysis is simple for the forced convection situation, where the flow rate is artificially maintained constant to a desired value and the heat transfer coefficient can easily be predicted using the information available in the literature. However the natural convection situation it is very difficult to analyze as appropriate correlations for predicting the values of induced mass flow rate due to thermosiphon effect and the associated heat transfer coefficient are not available. The aim of the present investigation, therefore, is to establish correlations for heat transfer and flow characteristics for the buoyancy induced flow through inclined tubes in case of solar water heating system in particular. Considering the complexity of the problem, experimental approach is preferred. In order to produce required data, experiments were performed using inclined tubes of various lengths, diameters, inclinations, and different heat inputs.

  19. The hemodynamic and embolizing forces acting on thrombi--II. The effect of pulsatile blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basmadjian, D

    1986-01-01

    A previous analysis (Basmadjian, J. Biomechanics 17, 287-298, 1984) of the embolizing forces acting on thrombi in steady Poiseuille flow has been extended to pulsatile blood flow conditions in the major blood vessels. We show that for incipient and small compact thrombi up to 0.1 mm height, the maximum embolizing stresses can be calculated from the corresponding 'quasi-steady' viscous drag forces and measured maximum wall shear. Their magnitude is from 5 to 30 times (tau w)Max, the maximum wall shear stress during the cardiac cycle in the absence of thrombi. For larger thrombi, inertial and 'history' effects have to be taken into account, leading to embolizing stresses in excess of 100 Pa (1000 dyn cm-2).

  20. Temperature rise of He Ⅱ forced flow and its negative Joule-Thomson effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yu; JU Yong-lin; ZHENG Qing-rong; LU Xue-sheng; GU An-zhong

    2009-01-01

    The temperature rise of He Ⅱ transfer system due to the negative Joule-Thomson (JT) effect is one of the major problems in the He Ⅱ forced flow system design. Negative Joule-Thomson effect of the He Ⅱ forced flow was analyzed and calculated in this paper. The temperature rise due to the heat leak along the transfer pipeline was calculated by the simplified equation and was modified by considering the negative Joule-Thomson effect. The modified results were compared with the temperature rise obtained by non-linear differential equations with consideration of the pressure gradient. The results show that the pressure gradient has strong effect on the temperature distribution. The modified results are in good agreement with the values calculated by the complicated equation, which verifies the effectiveness of the simplified equation in calculating the temperature rise when the negative JT effect of He Ⅱ is known.

  1. Effect of advective pore water flow on degradation of organic matter in permeable sandy sediment : - A study of fresh- and brackish water

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The carbon metabolism in costal sediments is of major importance for the global carbon cycle. Costal sediments are also subjected to physical forcing generating water fluxes above and through the sediments, but how the physical affect the carbon metabolism is currently poorly known. In this study, the effect of advective pore water flow on degradation of organic matter in permeable sandy sediment was investigated in a laboratory study during wintertime. Sediments were collected from both brac...

  2. Virtual water trade flows and savings under climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konar, Megan; Hussein, Zekarias; Hanasaki, Naota; Mauzerall, Denise; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio

    2014-05-01

    The international trade of food commodities links water and food systems, with important implications for both water and food security. The embodied water resources associated with food trade are referred to as `virtual water trade'. We present the first study of the impact of climate change on global virtual water trade flows and associated savings for the year 2030. In order to project virtual water trade and savings under climate change, it is essential to obtain projections of both bilateral crop trade and the virtual water content of crops in each country of production. We use the Global Trade Analysis Project model to estimate bilateral crop trade under changes in agricultural productivity for rice, soy, and wheat. We use the H08 global hydrologic model to determine the impact of climatic changes to crop evapotranspiration for rice, soy, and wheat in each country of production. Then, we combine projections of bilateral crop trade with estimates of virtual water content to obtain virtual water trade flows under climate change. We find that the total volume of virtual water trade is likely to go down under climate change, due to decreased crop trade from higher crop prices under scenarios of declining crop yields and due to decreased virtual water content under high agricultural productivity scenarios. However, the staple food trade is projected to save more water across most climate change scenarios, largely because the wheat trade re-organizes into a structure where large volumes of wheat are traded from relatively water-efficient exporters to less efficient importers.

  3. Flow Field of Metallic Fluid Acted by Electromagnetic and Centrifugal Force

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Yi-qing; LUO Zong-an; JIA Guang-lin; LIU Xiang-hua; WANG Guo-dong

    2004-01-01

    According to the principle of electromagnetism and hydrodynamics, a mathematical model of flow field for metallic fluid acted by electromagnetic and centrifugal forces was established. The calculation results showed that the relative velocity between metallic fluid layers rises and the absolute rotational velocity of metallic fluid falls with the increase of magnetic induction intensity. The increase of centrifugal revolution hardly affects the relative velocity between metallic fluid layers, but can enhance the absolute rotational velocity of metallic fluid.

  4. Experimental study of temperature fluctuations in forced stably stratified turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Eidelman, A; Gluzman, Y; Kleeorin, N; Rogachevskii, I

    2013-01-01

    We study experimentally temperature fluctuations in stably stratified forced turbulence in air flow. In the experiments with an imposed vertical temperature gradient, the turbulence is produced by two oscillating grids located nearby the side walls of the chamber. Particle Image Velocimetry is used to determine the turbulent and mean velocity fields, and a specially designed temperature probe with sensitive thermocouples is employed to measure the temperature field. We found that the ratio [(\\ell_x \

  5. Analytical Studies of Two-Dimensional Channel Turbulent Flow Subjected to Coriolis Force

    OpenAIRE

    鬼頭, 修己; 中林, 功一; キトウ, オサミ; Kito, Osami

    1992-01-01

    Coriolis effects on fully developed turbulent flow in a two-dimensional channel rotating about an axis perpendicular to its axis are considered. The Coriolis force has stabilizing/destabilizing effects on turbulence, and the mean velocity distribution changes accordingly. Experimental and numerical studies on the velocity characteristics have already been conducted by other researchers for various conditions. However, we cannot assemble the overall picture of the Coriolis effect on the veloci...

  6. Particle-laden flows forced by the disperse phase: Comparison between Lagrangian and Eulerian simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Vié, Aymeric; Pouransari, Hadi; Zamansky, Rémi; Mani, Ali

    2015-01-01

    International audience; The goal of the present work is to assess the ability of Eulerian moment methods to reproduce the physics of two-way coupled particle-laden turbulent flow systems. Previous investigations have been focused on effects such as preferential concentration, and turbulence modulation, but in regimes in which turbulence is sustained by an imposed external forcing. We show that in such regimes, Eulerian methods need resolutions finer than nominal Kolmogorov scale in order to c...

  7. A Methodology for Modeling the Flow of Military Personnel Across Air Force Active and Reserve Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    for pilots will depend on the • number of active component pilots who separate • fraction of separating pilots who affiliate with the reserve ...when tracking economic output over a period of time. GDP data were collected from the Federal Reserve Economic Data (FRED), Federal Reserve Bank of St...C O R P O R A T I O N Research Report A Methodology for Modeling the Flow of Military Personnel Across Air Force Active and Reserve Components

  8. CFD Numerical Simulation of the Complex Turbulent Flow Field in an Axial-Flow Water Pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-You Li

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Further optimal design of an axial-flow water pump calls for a thorough recognition of the characteristics of the complex turbulent flow field in the pump, which is however extremely difficult to be measured using the up-to-date experimental techniques. In this study, a numerical simulation procedure based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD was elaborated in order to obtain the fully three-dimensional unsteady turbulent flow field in an axial-flow water pump. The shear stress transport (SST k-ω model was employed in the CFD calculation to study the unsteady internal flow of the axial-flow pump. Upon the numerical simulation results, the characteristics of the velocity field and pressure field inside the impeller region were discussed in detail. The established model procedure in this study may provide guidance to the numerical simulations of turbomachines during the design phase or the investigation of flow and pressure field characteristics and performance. The presented information can be of reference value in further optimal design of the axial-flow pump.

  9. Water flow and fin shape polymorphism in coral reef fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binning, Sandra A; Roche, Dominique G

    2015-03-01

    Water flow gradients have been linked to phenotypic differences and swimming performance across a variety of fish assemblages. However, the extent to which water motion shapes patterns of phenotypic divergence within species remains unknown. We tested the generality of the functional relationship between swimming morphology and water flow by exploring the extent of fin and body shape polymorphism in 12 widespread species from three families (Acanthuridae, Labridae, Pomacentridae) of pectoral-fin swimming (labriform) fishes living across localized wave exposure gradients. The pectoral fin shape of Labridae and Acanthuridae species was strongly related to wave exposure: individuals with more tapered, higher aspect ratio (AR) fins were found on windward reef crests, whereas individuals with rounder, lower AR fins were found on leeward, sheltered reefs. Three of seven Pomacentridae species showed similar trends, and pectoral fin shape was also strongly related to wave exposure in pomacentrids when fin aspect ratios of three species were compared across flow habitats at very small spatial scales (back lagoon). Unlike fin shape, there were no intraspecific differences in fish body fineless ratio across habitats or depths. Contrary to our predictions, there was no pattern relating species' abundances to polymorphism across habitats (i.e., abundance was not higher at sites where morphology is better adapted to the environment). This suggests that there are behavioral and/or physiological mechanisms enabling some species to persist across flow habitats in the absence of morphological differences. We suggest that functional relationships between swimming morphology and water flow not only structure species assemblages, but are yet another important variable contributing to phenotypic differences within species. The close links between fin shape polymorphism and local water flow conditions appear to be important for understanding species' distributions as well as patterns of

  10. Flow based vs. demand based energy-water modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozos, Evangelos; Nikolopoulos, Dionysis; Efstratiadis, Andreas; Koukouvinos, Antonios; Makropoulos, Christos

    2015-04-01

    The water flow in hydro-power generation systems is often used downstream to cover other type of demands like irrigation and water supply. However, the typical case is that the energy demand (operation of hydro-power plant) and the water demand do not coincide. Furthermore, the water inflow into a reservoir is a stochastic process. Things become more complicated if renewable resources (wind-turbines or photovoltaic panels) are included into the system. For this reason, the assessment and optimization of the operation of hydro-power systems are challenging tasks that require computer modelling. This modelling should not only simulate the water budget of the reservoirs and the energy production/consumption (pumped-storage), but should also take into account the constraints imposed by the natural or artificial water network using a flow routing algorithm. HYDRONOMEAS, for example, uses an elegant mathematical approach (digraph) to calculate the flow in a water network based on: the demands (input timeseries), the water availability (simulated) and the capacity of the transmission components (properties of channels, rivers, pipes, etc.). The input timeseries of demand should be estimated by another model and linked to the corresponding network nodes. A model that could be used to estimate these timeseries is UWOT. UWOT is a bottom up urban water cycle model that simulates the generation, aggregation and routing of water demand signals. In this study, we explore the potentials of UWOT in simulating the operation of complex hydrosystems that include energy generation. The evident advantage of this approach is the use of a single model instead of one for estimation of demands and another for the system simulation. An application of UWOT in a large scale system is attempted in mainland Greece in an area extending over 130×170 km². The challenges, the peculiarities and the advantages of this approach are examined and critically discussed.

  11. Additional interfacial force in lattice Boltzmann models for incompressible multiphase flows

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Q; Gao, Y J

    2011-01-01

    The existing lattice Boltzmann models for incompressible multiphase flows are mostly constructed with two distribution functions, one is the order parameter distribution function, which is used to track the interface between different phases, and the other is the pressure distribution function for solving the velocity field. In this brief report, it is shown that in these models the recovered momentum equation is inconsistent with the target one: an additional interfacial force is included in the recovered momentum equation. The effects of the additional force are investigated by numerical simulations of droplet splashing on a thin liquid film and falling droplet under gravity. In the former test, it is found that the formation and evolution of secondary droplets are greatly affected, while in the latter the additional force is found to increase the falling velocity and limit the stretch of the droplet.

  12. Streamwise-body-force-model for rapid simulation combining internal and external flow fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Rong

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A streamwise-body-force-model (SBFM is developed and applied in the overall flow simulation for the distributed propulsion system, combining internal and external flow fields. In view of axial stage effects, fan or compressor effects could be simplified as body forces along the streamline. These body forces which are functions of local parameters could be added as source terms in Navier-Stokes equations to replace solid boundary conditions of blades and hubs. The validation of SBFM with uniform inlet and distortion inlet of compressors shows that pressure performance characteristics agree well with experimental data. A three-dimensional simulation of the integration configuration, via a blended wing body aircraft with a distributed propulsion system using the SBFM, has been completed. Lift coefficient and drag coefficient agree well with wind tunnel test results. Results show that to reach the goal of rapid integrated simulation combining internal and external flow fields, the computational fluid dynamics method based on SBFM is reasonable.

  13. Drag and Lift Force Acting on a Rotational Spherical Particle in a Logarithmic Boundary Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Wei-jiang; CHE De-fu; XU Tong-mo

    2006-01-01

    The drag and lift forces acting on a rotational spherical particle in a logarithmic boundary flow are numerically studied. The effects of the drag velocity and rotational speed of the sphere on the drag force are examined for the particle Reynolds number from 50 to 300 and for the dimensionless rotational angular speed of 0≤Ω≤1.0. The influence of dimensionless roughness height z0of the wall is also evaluated for z0≤10. The results show that the drag forces on a sphere both in a logarithmic flow and in a uniform unsheared flow increase with the increase of the drag velocity. For 50≤Rep≤300, the drag coefficient (-C)D increases with decreased roughness height z0. The time-averaged drag coefficient is also significantly affected by rotational speed of the sphere and roughness height z0 . The lift coefficient -CL increases with increased rotational speed and decreases with increased roughness height.

  14. Compensation Method for Die Shift Caused by Flow Drag Force in Wafer-Level Molding Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simo Yeon

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Wafer-level packaging (WLP is a next-generation semiconductor packaging technology that is important for realizing high-performance and ultra-thin semiconductor devices. However, the molding process, which is a part of the WLP process, has various problems such as a high defect rate and low predictability. Among the various defect factors, the die shift primarily determines the quality of the final product; therefore, predicting the die shift is necessary to achieve high-yield production in WLP. In this study, the die shift caused by the flow drag force of the epoxy molding compound (EMC is evaluated from the die shift of a debonded molding wafer. Experimental and analytical methods were employed to evaluate the die shift occurring during each stage of the molding process and that resulting from the geometrical changes after the debonding process. The die shift caused by the EMC flow drag force is evaluated from the data on die movements due to thermal contraction/expansion and warpage. The relationship between the die shift and variation in the die gap is determined through regression analysis in order to predict the die shift due to the flow drag force. The results can be used for die realignment by predicting and compensating for the die shift.

  15. 3D Laboratory Measurements of Forces, Flows, and Collimation in Arched Flux Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haw, Magnus; Bellan, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Fully 3D, vector MHD force measurements from an arched, current carrying flux tube (flux rope) are presented. The experiment consists of two arched plasma-filled flux ropes each powered by a capacitor bank. The two loops are partially overlapped, as in a Venn diagram, and collide and reconnect during their evolution. B-field data is taken on the lower plasma arch using a 54 channel B-dot probe. 3D volumetric data is acquired by placing the probe at 2700 locations and taking 5 plasma shots at each location. The resulting data set gives high resolution (2cm, 10ns) volumetric B-field data with high reproducibility (deviation of 3% between shots). Taking the curl of the measured 3D B-field gives current densities (J) in good agreement with measured capacitor bank current. The JxB forces calculated from the data have a strong axial component at the base of the current channel and are shown to scale linearly with axial gradients in current density. Assuming force balance in the flux tube minor radius direction, we infer near-Alfvenic axial flows from the footpoint regions which are consistent with the measured axial forces. Flux tube collimation is observed in conjunction with these axial flows. These dynamic processes are relevant to the stability and dynamics of coronal loops. Supported provided by NSF, AFOSR.

  16. Contribution of Leg-Muscle Forces to Paddle Force and Kayak Speed During Maximal-Effort Flat-Water Paddling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Johnny E; Rosdahl, Hans G

    2016-01-01

    The purpose was to investigate the contribution of leg-muscle-generated forces to paddle force and kayak speed during maximal-effort flat-water paddling. Five elite male kayakers at national and international level participated. The participants warmed up at progressively increasing speeds and then performed a maximal-effort, nonrestricted paddling sequence. This was followed after 5 min rest by a maximal-effort paddling sequence with the leg action restricted--the knee joints "locked." Left- and right-side foot-bar and paddle forces were recorded with specially designed force devices. In addition, knee angular displacement of the right and left knees was recorded with electrogoniometric technique, and the kayak speed was calculated from GPS signals sampled at 5 Hz. The results showed that reduction in both push and pull foot-bar forces resulted in a reduction of 21% and 16% in mean paddle-stroke force and mean kayak speed, respectively. Thus, the contribution of foot-bar force from lower-limb action significantly contributes to kayakers' paddling performance.

  17. Helix-like biopolymers can act as dampers of force for bacteria in flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrisson, Johan; Wiklund, Krister; Axner, Ove; Andersson, Magnus

    2012-06-01

    Biopolymers are vital structures for many living organisms; for a variety of bacteria, adhesion polymers play a crucial role for the initiation of colonization. Some bacteria express, on their surface, attachment organelles (pili) that comprise subunits formed into stiff helix-like structures that possess unique biomechanical properties. These helix-like structures possess a high degree of flexibility that gives the biopolymers a unique extendibility. This has been considered beneficial for piliated bacteria adhering to host surfaces in the presence of a fluid flow. We show in this work that helix-like pili have the ability to act as efficient dampers of force that can, for a limited time, lower the load on the force-mediating adhesin-receptor bond on the tip of an individual pilus. The model presented is applied to bacteria adhering with a single pilus of either of the two most common types expressed by uropathogenic Escherichia coli, P or type 1 pili, subjected to realistic flows. The results indicate that for moderate flows (~25 mm/s) the force experienced by the adhesin-receptor interaction at the tip of the pilus can be reduced by a factor of ~6 and ~4, respectively. The uncoiling ability provides a bacterium with a "go with the flow" possibility that acts as a damping. It is surmised that this can be an important factor for the initial part of the adhesion process, in particular in turbulent flows, and thereby be of use for bacteria in their striving to survive a natural defense such as fluid rinsing actions.

  18. Numerical simulations of viscous flow around the obliquely towed KVLCC2M model in deep and shallow water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟庆杰; 万德成

    2016-01-01

    By solving the unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) equations in combination with thek-ω SST turbulence model, the unsteady viscous flow around the obliquely towed tanker KVLCC2M model in both deep and shallow waters is simulated and the hydrodynamic forces, the surface pressure distribution, and the wake field are calculated. The overset grid technology is used to avoid the grid distortion in large drift angle cases. The effects of the free surface are taken into account. At the first stage, the deep water cases with five oblique angles are designed as the benchmark test cases. The predicted wake field, the surface pressure distribution and the hydrodynamic forces acting on the hull agree well with the corresponding experimental data, implying the capability of the present method in the prediction of the viscous flow around the tanker drifting in shallow water. A set of systematic computations with varying water depths and drift angles are then carried out to study the viscous flow around the model drifting in shallow water. The forces and moments, as well as the surface pressure distribution are predicted and analyzed. The most significant changes such as the increased stagnation pressure in the bow, the acceleration of the flow along the ship’s sides and in the gap between ship and seabed, the lower hull pressure and finally, the stronger vortices along the bilges and weaker vortices with larger diameters in the wake are noticed.

  19. Direct simulations of two-phase flow on micro-CT images of porous media and upscaling of pore-scale forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeini, Ali Q.; Blunt, Martin J.; Bijeljic, Branko

    2014-12-01

    Pore-scale forces have a significant effect on the macroscopic behaviour of multiphase flow through porous media. This paper studies the effect of these forces using a new volume-of-fluid based finite volume method developed for simulating two-phase flow directly on micro-CT images of porous media. An analytical analysis of the relationship between the pore-scale forces and the Darcy-scale pressure drops is presented. We use this analysis to propose unambiguous definitions of Darcy-scale viscous pressure drops as the rate of energy dissipation per unit flow rate of each phase, and then use them to obtain the relative permeability curves. We show that this definition is consistent with conventional laboratory/field measurements by comparing our predictions with experimental relative permeability. We present single and two-phase flow simulations for primary oil injection followed by water injection on a sandpack and a Berea sandstone. The two-phase flow simulations are presented at different capillary numbers which cover the transition from capillary fingering at low capillary numbers to a more viscous fingering displacement pattern at higher capillary numbers, and the effect of capillary number on the relative permeability curves is investigated. Overall, this paper presents a new finite volume-based methodology for the detailed analysis of two-phase flow directly on micro-CT images of porous media and upscaling of the results to the Darcy scale.

  20. Effect of capillary-condensed water on the dynamic friction force at nanoasperity contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirghi, L.

    2003-05-01

    A single nanoasperity contact in ambient air is usually wetted by capillary condensation of water vapor and is surrounded by a water meniscus. This phenomenon strongly affects the contact friction, not only by the effect of meniscus loading force (superficial tension and capillary forces), but also by a friction force that accounts for the energy loss in the meniscus movement along with the sliding contact. Occurrence of the water-meniscus-generated friction is experimentally proved by atomic force microscopy measurements of the tip-sample friction force at minimum possible external load (before pull-off). A qualitative explanation for the observed dependence of the friction force on air humidity and solid surface wettability is proposed.

  1. Force exerted by a nanoscale capillary water bridge between two planar substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Gerson E; Saavedra, Jorge H; Rozas, Roberto E; Toledo, Pedro G

    2016-04-28

    Molecular dynamics simulation of a nanoscale capillary water bridge between two planar substrates is used to determine the resulting force between the substrates without arbitrariness regarding geometry and location of the free surface of the bridge. The substrates are moderately hydrophilic. The force changes continuously as the separation between the substrates changes except for small gaps where it becomes discontinuous because the bridge is unable to adopt stable configurations at any distance apart. Further exploration of the bridge and the force as the substrates approach each other reveals an underlying oscillatory force with an increasing repulsive component at separation distances equivalent to few water molecules. According to the average number of hydrogen bonds per water molecule (HBN), at very small gap sizes, water molecules which are very close to the surfaces are unable to maximize HBN thus contributing to the repulsive force. Our simulation results of force versus gap size agree with calculations based on other methods, some very different, and also reproduce the typical magnitude of the experimental force. Finally, a macroscopic force balance correctly describes the force-distance curve except for bridges constituted of water layers only.

  2. Hydrogel Regulation of Xylem Water Flow: An Alternative Hypothesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van W.G.; Hiemstra, T.; Fanourakis, D.

    2011-01-01

    The concentration of cations in the xylem sap influences the rate of xylem water flow in angiosperm plants. It has been speculated that this is due to the shrinking and swelling of pectins in the pit membranes. However, there is as yet minimal evidence for the presence of pectin in pit membranes of

  3. Erosional processes in channelized water flows on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, V. R.

    1979-01-01

    A hypothesis is investigated according to which the Martian outflow channels were formed by high-velocity flows of water or dynamically similar liquid. It is suggested that the outflow channels are largely the result of several interacting erosional mechanisms, including fluvial processes involving ice covers, macroturbulence, streamlining, and cavitation.

  4. Streamline curvature and bed resistance in shallow water flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vriend, H.J.

    1979-01-01

    The relationship between streamline curvature and bed resistance in shallow water flow with little side constraint, as derived in 1970 by H.J. Schoemaker, is reconsidered. Schoemaker concluded that the bed resistance causes the curvature of a free streamline to grow exponentially with the distance a

  5. Continuum simulations of water flow past fullerene molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popadic, A.; Praprotnik, M.; Koumoutsakos, P.;

    2015-01-01

    We present continuum simulations of water flow past fullerene molecules. The governing Navier-Stokes equations are complemented with the Navier slip boundary condition with a slip length that is extracted from related molecular dynamics simulations. We find that several quantities of interest as ...

  6. Soil surfactant stops water repellency and preferential flow paths

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostindie, K.; Dekker, L.W.; Wesseling, J.G.; Ritsema, C.J.

    2008-01-01

    This study reports the effects of a soil surfactant on reduction and prevention of water repellency and preferential flow paths in a sandy soil of a golf course fairway, located at Bosch en Duin near Utrecht, the Netherlands. The golf course is constructed on inland dunes composed of fine sand with

  7. Reduction of large-scale numerical ground water flow models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, P.T.M.; Heemink, A.W.; Testroet, C.B.M.

    2002-01-01

    Numerical models are often used for simulating ground water flow. Written in state space form, the dimension of these models is of the order of the number of model cells and can be very high (> million). As a result, these models are computationally very demanding, especially if many different scena

  8. Scaling up ecohydrological processes: role of surface water flow in water-limited landscapes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Popp, A

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available microscale processes like ecohydrological feedback mechanisms and spatial exchange like surface water flow, the authors derive transition probabilities from a fine-scale simulation model. They applied two versions of the landscape model, one that includes...

  9. DRAG FORCE IN DENSE GAS-PARTICLE TWO-PHASE FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    由长福; 祁海鹰; 徐旭常

    2003-01-01

    Numerical simulations of flow over a stationary particle in a dense gas-particle two-phase flow have been carried out for small Reynolds numbers (less than 100).In order to study the influence of the particles interaction on the drag force,three particle arrangements have been tested:a single particle,two particles placed in the flow direction and many particles located regularly in the flow field.The Navier-Stokes equations are discretized in the three-dimensional space using finite volume method.For the first and second cases,the numerical results agree reasonably well with the data in literature.For the third case,i.e.,the multiparticle case,the influence of the particle volume fraction and Reynolds numbers on the drag force has been investigated.The results show that the computational values of the drag ratio agree approximately with the published results at higher Reynolds numbers (from 34.2 to 68.4),but there is a large difference between them at small Reynolds numbers.

  10. Modeling of stochastic dynamics of time-dependent flows under high-dimensional random forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaee, Hessam; Karniadakis, George

    2016-11-01

    In this numerical study the effect of high-dimensional stochastic forcing in time-dependent flows is investigated. To efficiently quantify the evolution of stochasticity in such a system, the dynamically orthogonal method is used. In this methodology, the solution is approximated by a generalized Karhunen-Loeve (KL) expansion in the form of u (x , t ω) = u ̲ (x , t) + ∑ i = 1 N yi (t ω)ui (x , t) , in which u ̲ (x , t) is the stochastic mean, the set of ui (x , t) 's is a deterministic orthogonal basis and yi (t ω) 's are the stochastic coefficients. Explicit evolution equations for u ̲ , ui and yi are formulated. The elements of the basis ui (x , t) 's remain orthogonal for all times and they evolve according to the system dynamics to capture the energetically dominant stochastic subspace. We consider two classical fluid dynamics problems: (1) flow over a cylinder, and (2) flow over an airfoil under up to one-hundred dimensional random forcing. We explore the interaction of intrinsic with extrinsic stochasticity in these flows. DARPA N66001-15-2-4055, Office of Naval Research N00014-14-1-0166.

  11. Continuum simulations of water flow in carbon nanotube membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popadić, A.; Walther, Jens Honore; Koumoutsakos, P-

    2014-01-01

    We propose the use of the Navier–Stokes equations subject to partial-slip boundary conditions to simulate water flows in Carbon NanoTube (CNT) membranes. The finite volume discretizations of the Navier–Stokes equations are combined with slip lengths extracted from molecular dynamics (MD) simulati......We propose the use of the Navier–Stokes equations subject to partial-slip boundary conditions to simulate water flows in Carbon NanoTube (CNT) membranes. The finite volume discretizations of the Navier–Stokes equations are combined with slip lengths extracted from molecular dynamics (MD...... that flows at nanoscale channels can be described by continuum solvers with proper boundary conditions that reflect the molecular interactions of the liquid with the walls of the nanochannel....

  12. Hydroelastic responses of pontoon type very large floating offshore structures. 2nd Report. Effect of the water depth and the drift forces; Pontoon gata choogata futaishiki kaiyo kozobutsu no harochu chosei oto ni kansuru kenkyu. 2. Senkai eikyo to hyoryuryoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, H.; Miyajima, S. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Institute of Industrial Science; Masuda, K.; Ikoma, T. [Nihon University, Tokyo (Japan). College of Science and Technology

    1996-12-31

    Steady-state drift force in regular waves is theoretically analyzed. It is also studied under combined external force experimentally using a two-dimensional water tank. The fluid forces are analyzed by the pressure distribution method based on the potential theory, in which the effects of water depth are taken into account to discuss the effects of elastic deformation of the floating structure on the drift characteristics of steady-state waves. The tests were carried out using a wave-making circulating water tank equipped with a wind duct to create wind, waves and tidal flow. Drift force under a combined external force by wind, wave and/or tidal flow cannot be accurately predicted by arithmetically adding these components. For predicting drift force by tidal flow, it is necessary to take into account drag force in current at the floating structure bottom as well as that in wind at the front face. Drift force by tidal flow is affected by shallowness of water, which should be taken into account for drag forces. The floating structure will be deformed along the wave face as its stiffness decreases, basically decreasing steady-state drift force. 9 refs., 14 figs.

  13. Hydroelastic responses of pontoon type very large floating offshore structures. 2nd Report. Effect of the water depth and the drift forces; Pontoon gata choogata futaishiki kaiyo kozobutsu no harochu chosei oto ni kansuru kenkyu. 2. Senkai eikyo to hyoryuryoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, H.; Miyajima, S. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Institute of Industrial Science; Masuda, K.; Ikoma, T. [Nihon University, Tokyo (Japan). College of Science and Technology

    1996-12-31

    Steady-state drift force in regular waves is theoretically analyzed. It is also studied under combined external force experimentally using a two-dimensional water tank. The fluid forces are analyzed by the pressure distribution method based on the potential theory, in which the effects of water depth are taken into account to discuss the effects of elastic deformation of the floating structure on the drift characteristics of steady-state waves. The tests were carried out using a wave-making circulating water tank equipped with a wind duct to create wind, waves and tidal flow. Drift force under a combined external force by wind, wave and/or tidal flow cannot be accurately predicted by arithmetically adding these components. For predicting drift force by tidal flow, it is necessary to take into account drag force in current at the floating structure bottom as well as that in wind at the front face. Drift force by tidal flow is affected by shallowness of water, which should be taken into account for drag forces. The floating structure will be deformed along the wave face as its stiffness decreases, basically decreasing steady-state drift force. 9 refs., 14 figs.

  14. Severe brain hypothermia as a factor underlying behavioral immobility during cold-water forced swim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taltavull, J F; Chefer, V I; Shippenberg, T S; Kiyatkin, E A

    2003-06-13

    Behavioral immobility during forced swim is usually considered a consequence of inescapable stress, and is used to screen antidepressant drugs. However, immobility in this test may also result from inhibition of neural functions because of brain hypothermia due to body cooling. To explore this possibility, we measured brain temperature dynamics during a 10-min forced swim in cold (25 degrees C) and warm (37 degrees C) water and correlated brain temperatures with behavioral changes. Cold water forced swim resulted in significant brain hypothermia (-6-7 degrees C) and immobility, while no immobility was observed during warm water forced swim, when brain temperature transiently increased (0.5 degrees C) then decreased below baseline in the post-swim period. These data suggest that immobility, which rapidly develops during forced swim in cold water, may result from dramatic inhibition of neural functions because of severe brain hypothermia.

  15. Nonequilibrium water dynamics in the rhizosphere: How mucilage affects water flow in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroener, Eva; Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Kaestner, Anders; Carminati, Andrea

    2014-08-01

    The flow of water from soil to plant roots is controlled by the properties of the narrow region of soil close to the roots, the rhizosphere. In particular, the hydraulic properties of the rhizosphere are altered by mucilage, a polymeric gel exuded by the roots. In this paper we present experimental results and a conceptual model of water flow in unsaturated soils mixed with mucilage. A central hypothesis of the model is that the different drying/wetting rate of mucilage compared to the bulk soil results in nonequilibrium relations between water content and water potential in the rhizosphere. We coupled this nonequilibrium relation with the Richards equation and obtained a constitutive equation for water flow in soil and mucilage. To test the model assumptions, we measured the water retention curve and the saturated hydraulic conductivity of sandy soil mixed with mucilage from chia seeds. Additionally, we used neutron radiography to image water content in a layer of soil mixed with mucilage during drying and wetting cycles. The radiographs demonstrated the occurrence of nonequilibrium water dynamics in the soil-mucilage mixture. The experiments were simulated by numerically solving the nonequilibrium model. Our study provides conceptual and experimental evidences that mucilage has a strong impact on soil water dynamics. During drying, mucilage maintains a greater soil water content for an extended time, while during irrigation it delays the soil rewetting. We postulate that mucilage exudation by roots attenuates plant water stress by modulating water content dynamics in the rhizosphere.

  16. Interparticle force based methodology for prediction of cohesive powder flow properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esayanur, Madhavan Sujatha Sarma

    The transport and handling of powders are key areas in the process industry that have a direct impact on the efficiency and/or the quality of the finished product. A lack of fundamental understanding of powder flow properties as a function of operating variables such as relative humidity, and particle size, leading to problems such as arching, rat-holing and segregation, is one the main causes for unscheduled down times in plant operation and loss of billions of dollars in revenues. Most of the current design strategies and characterization techniques for industrial powders are based on a continuum approach similar to the field of soil mechanics. Due to an increase in complexity of the synthesis process and reduction in size of powders to the nanoscale, the surface properties and inter particle forces play a significant role in determining the flow characteristics. The use of ensemble techniques such as direct shear testing to characterize powders are no longer adequate due to lack of understanding of the changes in the property of powders as a function of the major operating variables such as relative humidity, temperature etc. New instrumentation or techniques need to be developed to reliably characterize powder flow behavior. Simultaneously, scalability of the current models to predict powder flow needs to be revisited. Specifically, this study focuses on the development of an inter particle force based model for predicting the unconfined yield strength of cohesive powders. To understand the role of interparticle forces in determining the strength of cohesive powders, the particle scale interactions were characterized using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), contact angle, surface tension, and coefficient of friction. The bulk scale properties such as unconfined yield strength, packing structure, and size of the shear zone were also investigated. It was determined that an interparticle force based model incorporating the effect of particle size and packing structure

  17. A many-body dissipative particle dynamics study of forced water-oil displacement in capillary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen; Zhuang, Lin; Li, Xuefeng; Dong, Jinfeng; Lu, Juntao

    2012-01-17

    The forced water-oil displacement in capillary is a model that has important applications such as the groundwater remediation and the oil recovery. Whereas it is difficult for experimental studies to observe the displacement process in a capillary at nanoscale, the computational simulation is a unique approach in this regard. In the present work, the many-body dissipative particle dynamics (MDPD) method is employed to simulate the process of water-oil displacement in capillary with external force applied by a piston. As the property of all interfaces involved in this system can be manipulated independently, the dynamic displacement process is studied systematically under various conditions of distinct wettability of water in capillary and miscibility between water and oil as well as of different external forces. By analyzing the dependence of the starting force on the properties of water/capillary and water/oil interfaces, we find that there exist two different modes of the water-oil displacement. In the case of stronger water-oil interaction, the water particles cannot displace those oil particles sticking to the capillary wall, leaving a low oil recovery efficiency. To minimize the residual oil content in capillary, enhancing the wettability of water and reducing the external force will be beneficial. This simulation study provides microscopic insights into the water-oil displacement process in capillary and guiding information for relevant applications.

  18. Continuous surface force based lattice Boltzmann equation method for simulating thermocapillary flow

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Lin; Zhai, Qinglan

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we extend a lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) with continuous surface fore (CSF) to simulate thermocapillary flows. The model is designed on our previous CSF LBE for athermal two phase flow, in which the interfacial tension forces and the Marangoni stresses as the results of the interface interactions between different phases are described by a conception of CSF. In this model, the sharp interfaces between different phases are separated by a narrow transition layers, and the kinetics and morphology evolution of phase separation would be characterized by an order parameter visa Cahn-Hilliard equation which is solved in the frame work of LBE. The scalar convection-diffusion equation for temperature field is also solved by thermal LBE. The models are validated by thermal two layered Poiseuille flow, and a two superimposed planar fluids at negligibly small Reynolds and Marangoni numbers for the thermocapillary driven convection, which have analytical solutions for the velocity and temperature. Then ...

  19. Transient flow between aquifers and surface water: analytically derived field-scale hydraulic heads and fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. H. de Rooij

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The increasing importance of catchment-scale and basin-scale models of the hydrological cycle makes it desirable to have a simple, yet physically realistic model for lateral subsurface water flow. As a first building block towards such a model, analytical solutions are presented for horizontal groundwater flow to surface waters held at prescribed water levels for aquifers with parallel and radial flow. The solutions are valid for a wide array of initial and boundary conditions and additions or withdrawals of water, and can handle discharge into as well as lateral infiltration from the surface water. Expressions for the average hydraulic head, the flux to or from the surface water, and the aquifer-scale hydraulic conductivity are developed to provide output at the scale of the modelled system rather than just point-scale values. The upscaled conductivity is time-variant. It does not depend on the magnitude of the flux but is determined by medium properties as well as the external forcings that drive the flow. For the systems studied, with lateral travel distances not exceeding 10 m, the circular aquifers respond very differently from the infinite-strip aquifers. The modelled fluxes are sensitive to the magnitude of the storage coefficient. For phreatic aquifers a value of 0.2 is argued to be representative, but considerable variations are likely. The effect of varying distributions over the day of recharge damps out rapidly; a soil water model that can provide accurate daily totals is preferable over a less accurate model hat correctly estimates the timing of recharge peaks.

  20. Fracture control of ground water flow and water chemistry in a rock aquitard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Timothy T; Anderson, Mary P; Bradbury, Kenneth R

    2007-01-01

    There are few studies on the hydrogeology of sedimentary rock aquitards although they are important controls in regional ground water flow systems. We formulate and test a three-dimensional (3D) conceptual model of ground water flow and hydrochemistry in a fractured sedimentary rock aquitard to show that flow dynamics within the aquitard are more complex than previously believed. Similar conceptual models, based on regional observations and recently emerging principles of mechanical stratigraphy in heterogeneous sedimentary rocks, have previously been applied only to aquifers, but we show that they are potentially applicable to aquitards. The major elements of this conceptual model, which is based on detailed information from two sites in the Maquoketa Formation in southeastern Wisconsin, include orders of magnitude contrast between hydraulic diffusivity (K/S(s)) of fractured zones and relatively intact aquitard rock matrix, laterally extensive bedding-plane fracture zones extending over distances of over 10 km, very low vertical hydraulic conductivity of thick shale-rich intervals of the aquitard, and a vertical hydraulic head profile controlled by a lateral boundary at the aquitard subcrop, where numerous surface water bodies dominate the shallow aquifer system. Results from a 3D numerical flow model based on this conceptual model are consistent with field observations, which did not fit the typical conceptual model of strictly vertical flow through an aquitard. The 3D flow through an aquitard has implications for predicting ground water flow and for planning and protecting water supplies.

  1. Space shuttle orbiter flow visualization study. [water tunnel study of vortex flow during atmospheric entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorincz, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    The vortex flows generated at subsonic speed during the final portion of atmospheric reentry were defined using a 0.01 scale model of the orbiter in a diagnostic water tunnel. Flow visualization photographs were obtained over an angle-of-attack range to 40 deg and sideslip angles up to 10 deg. The vortex flow field development, vortex path, and vortex breakdown characteristics were determined as a function of angle-of-attack at zero sideslip. Vortex flows were found to develop on the highly swept glove, on the wing, and on the upper surface of the fuselage. No significant asymmetries were observed at zero sideslip in the water tunnel tests. The sensitivity of the upper surface vortex flow fields to variations in sideslip angle was also studied. The vortex formed on the glove remained very stable in position above the wing up through the 10 deg of sideslip tested. There was a change in the vortex lifts under sideslip due to effective change in leading-edge sweep angles. Asymmetric flow separation occurred on the upper surface of the fuselage at small sideslip angles. The influence of vortex flow fields in sideslip on the lateral/ directional characteristics of the orbiter is discussed.

  2. Characterization of horizontal air–water two-phase flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Ran; Kim, Seungjin, E-mail: skim@psu.edu

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • A visualization study is performed to develop flow regime map in horizontal flow. • Database in horizontal bubbly flow is extended using a local conductivity probe. • Frictional pressure drop analysis is performed in horizontal bubbly flow. • Drift flux analysis is performed in horizontal bubbly flow. - Abstract: This paper presents experimental studies performed to characterize horizontal air–water two-phase flow in a round pipe with an inner diameter of 3.81 cm. A detailed flow visualization study is performed using a high-speed video camera in a wide range of two-phase flow conditions to verify previous flow regime maps. Two-phase flows are classified into bubbly, plug, slug, stratified, stratified-wavy, and annular flow regimes. While the transition boundaries identified in the present study compare well with the existing ones (Mandhane et al., 1974) in general, some discrepancies are observed for bubbly-to-plug/slug, and plug-to-slug transition boundaries. Based on the new transition boundaries, three additional test conditions are determined in horizontal bubbly flow to extend the database by Talley et al. (2015a). Various local two-phase flow parameters including void fraction, interfacial area concentration, bubble velocity, and bubble Sauter mean diameter are obtained. The effects of increasing gas flow rate on void fraction, bubble Sauter mean diameter, and bubble velocity are discussed. Bubbles begin to coalesce near the gas–liquid layer instead of in the highly packed region when gas flow rate increases. Using all the current experimental data, two-phase frictional pressure loss analysis is performed using the Lockhart–Martinelli method. It is found that the coefficient C = 24 yields the best agreement with the data with the minimum average difference. Moreover, drift flux analysis is performed to predict void-weighted area-averaged bubble velocity and area-averaged void fraction. Based on the current database, functional

  3. Stability of shear shallow water flows with free surface

    CERN Document Server

    Chesnokov, Alexander; Gavrilyuk, Sergey; Pavlov, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    Stability of inviscid shear shallow water flows with free surface is studied in the framework of the Benney equations. This is done by investigating the generalized hyperbolicity of the integrodifferential Benney system of equations. It is shown that all shear flows having monotonic convex velocity profiles are stable. The hydrodynamic approximations of the model corresponding to the classes of flows with piecewise linear continuous and discontinuous velocity profiles are derived and studied. It is shown that these approximations possess Hamiltonian structure and a complete system of Riemann invariants, which are found in an explicit form. Sufficient conditions for hyperbolicity of the governing equations for such multilayer flows are formulated. The generalization of the above results to the case of stratified fluid is less obvious, however, it is established that vorticity has a stabilizing effect.

  4. Flow and cavitation characteristics of water hydraulic poppet valves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖义德; 刘银水; 黄艳; 李壮云

    2002-01-01

    Two types of poppet valves were tested, one is a poppet with a sharp-edged seats, and the other is that with a chamfered seat. During the tests, the effects of backpressure and poppet lift on flow characteristics were considered. Cavitation inception was detected by the appearance and rapid growth of a particular low frequency component of the outlet pressure fluctuation of valve when cavitation occurs. Experimental results show cavitation, back pressure, valve opening and its geometrical shape have significant effects on the flow characteristics of valve. The flow coefficient of throttle with water used as working medium is 0. 85~0. 95 when there is no cavitation. The pressure drop of flow saturation decreases with the increasing of poppet lift. The sharp-edged throttle has stronger anti-cavitation ability than the chamfered one.

  5. Computational Agents For Flows: Waterballs, Water Paths and Ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servat, D.; Leonard, J.; Perrier, E.

    For the past four years, the RIVAGE project has been an ongoing methodological re- search involving both computer scientists from LIP6 and hydrologists from research unit GEODES at IRD around the question of applying DAI and agent-based simula- tion techniques to environmental water flow modeling. It led us to design an agent- based simulation environment which is intended to model coupled runoff dynamics, infiltration and erosion processes, so as to integrate heterogeneous events occuring at different time and space scales. A main feature of this modeling approach is the ability to account for a structured vision of the hydrological network produced during rainfall, much like that of an on field observer : for instance, when water accumulates in topographic depressions, the simulator creates pond objects, and when stable wa- ter paths emerge, water path objects are created. Beside this vision of water flow, the natural environment itself can be given a structured representation of natural objects (e.g. vegetation, infiltration maps, furrow or ditch networks, macropore patterns, etc.) which belong to various information layers. According to the scale of study, these layers may contain different types of geometrical and geographical data. Given that, our long term objective is to simulate the influence of spatial structurations of the environment on water flow dynamics and vice versa.

  6. Hydrothermal alteration of kimberlite by convective flows of external water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasyev, A A; Melnik, O; Porritt, L; Schumacher, J C; Sparks, R S J

    Kimberlite volcanism involves the emplacement of olivine-rich volcaniclastic deposits into volcanic vents or pipes. Kimberlite deposits are typically pervasively serpentinised as a result of the reaction of olivine and water within a temperature range of 130-400 °C or less. We present a model for the influx of ground water into hot kimberlite deposits coupled with progressive cooling and serpentisation. Large-pressure gradients cause influx and heating of water within the pipe with horizontal convergent flow in the host rock and along pipe margins, and upward flow within the pipe centre. Complete serpentisation is predicted for wide ranges of permeability of the host rocks and kimberlite deposits. For typical pipe dimensions, cooling times are centuries to a few millennia. Excess volume of serpentine results in filling of pore spaces, eventually inhibiting fluid flow. Fresh olivine is preserved in lithofacies with initial low porosity, and at the base of the pipe where deeper-level host rocks have low permeability, and the pipe is narrower leading to faster cooling. These predictions are consistent with fresh olivine and serpentine distribution in the Diavik A418 kimberlite pipe, (NWT, Canada) and with features of kimberlites of the Yakutian province in Russia affected by influx of ground water brines. Fast reactions and increases in the volume of solid products compared to the reactants result in self-sealing and low water-rock ratios (estimated at alteration of kimberlites predominantly by interactions with external non-magmatic fluids.

  7. Elephant overflows: Multi-annual variability in Weddell Sea Deep Water driven by surface forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijers, Andrew; Meredith, Michael; Abrahamsen, Povl; Naviera-Garabato, Alberto; Ángel Morales Maqueda, Miguel; Polzin, Kurt

    2015-04-01

    The volume of the deepest and densest water mass in Drake Passage, Lower Weddell Sea Deep Water (LWSDW), is shown to have been decreasing over the last 20 years of observations, with an associated reduction in density driven by freshening. Superimposed on this long term trend is a multi-annual oscillation with a period of 3-5 years. This variability only appears in Drake Passage; observations in the east of the Scotia Sea show a similar long term trend, but with no apparent multi-annual variability. Clues as to the source of this variability may be found on the continental slope at approximately 1000 m immediately north of Elephant Island on the northern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula. Here there is an intermittent westward flowing cold/fresh slope current whose volume and properties are strongly correlated with the LWSDW multi-annual variability, although leading the LWSDW by around one year. As the slope current and LWSDW are separated from each other both geographically and in water mass characteristics, their co-variability implies that they are responding to a common forcing, while the lag between deep LWSDW and shallow slope current provides information on the timescale of this response. A newly available high resolution temperature and salinity multi-year time series from the Elephant Island slope at 1000 m is compared with reanalysis and model derived surface fluxes, sea ice extent and wind stress. We find that there are strong positive relationships between the surface wind stress and heat flux over the shelf at the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula and the properties of the slope current at 1000 m on seasonal to annual timescales. We use tracer release experiments in the Southern Ocean State Estimate (SOSE) model to investigate the lag between the slope current and LWSDW timeseries and hypothesise that the observed multi-annual variability in both water masses is driven by surface forcing over the shelf and the overflow of modified water from the slope in

  8. Forced Convection Film Boiling Heat Transfer from a Horizontal Cylinder to Liquid Cross-flowing Upward : 1st Report, Saturated Liquid

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Takehiro; Nishikawa, Kaneyasu; Shigechi, Tooru

    1981-01-01

    Forced convection film boiling heat transfer from a horizontal cylinder to saturated liquid cross-flowing upward is analyzed based on the two-phase boundary-layer theory. Numerical solution of the conservation equations is determined by means of the integral method of boundary-layer for water, ethanol and hexane under the atmospheric pressure. The velocity profile, separation point of the boundary-layer, thickness of the boundary-layer, distribution of the heat transfer coefficients and avera...

  9. Forced Convection Film Boiling Heat Transfer from a Horizontal Cylinder to Liquid Cross-flowing Upward : 2nd Report, Subcooled Liquid

    OpenAIRE

    Shigechi, Tooru; Ito, Takehiro; Nishikawa, Kaneyasu

    1983-01-01

    Forced convection film boiling heat transfer from a horizontal cylinder to a subcooled liquid cross-flowing upward is analysed based on the two-phase boundary-layer theory. Numerical solution of the conservation equations is determined for subcooled water, ethanol and hexane under the atmospheric pressure by the method similar to that of the first report for saturated liquid. The velocity profile, the separation point in the vapor film, the thickness of the boundary-layer and the average Nuss...

  10. 76 FR 79604 - Effective Date for the Water Quality Standards for the State of Florida's Lakes and Flowing Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-22

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 131 RIN 2040-AF36 Effective Date for the Water Quality Standards for the State of... of the ``Water Quality Standards for the State of Florida's Lakes and Flowing Waters; Final Rule... for the ``Water Quality Standards for the State of Florida's Lakes and Flowing Waters; Final...

  11. A Guide for Using the Transient Ground-Water Flow Model of the Death Valley Regional Ground-Water Flow System, Nevada and California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joan B. Blainey; Claudia C. Faunt, and Mary C. Hill

    2006-05-16

    This report is a guide for executing numerical simulations with the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California using the U.S. Geological Survey modular finite-difference ground-water flow model, MODFLOW-2000. Model inputs, including observations of hydraulic head, discharge, and boundary flows, are summarized. Modification of the DVRFS transient ground-water model is discussed for two common uses of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system model: predictive pumping scenarios that extend beyond the end of the model simulation period (1998), and model simulations with only steady-state conditions.

  12. Measurements of Burnout Conditions for Flow of Boiling Water in Vertical Round Ducts (Part 2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Kurt M.; Mathisen, R.P.; Eklind, O.; Norman, B.

    1964-01-15

    The hydrodynamic stability and the burnout conditions for flow of boiling water have been studied in a natural circulation loop in the pressure range from 10 to 70 atg. The test section was a round, duct of 20 mm inner diameter and 4890 mm heated length. The experimental results showed that within the ranges tested the stability of the flow increases with increasing pressure, increasing throttling before the test section, but decreases with increasing inlet sub-cooling and increasing throttling after the test section. The measured thresholds of instability compared well with the analytical results by Jahnberg. For an inlet sub-cooling temperature of about 2 deg C the measured burnout steam qualities were low by a factor of about 1.3 compared to forced circulation data obtained with the same test section. At higher sub-cooling temperatures the discrepancy between forced and natural circulation data increased, so that at {delta}t{sub sub} = 16 deg C, the natural circulation data were low by a factor of about 2.5. However, by applying inlet throttling of the flow the burnout values approached and finally coincided with the forced circulation data.

  13. On the transferability of three water models developed by adaptive force matching

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Hongyi; Wang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Water is perhaps the most simulated liquid. Recently three water models have been developed following the adaptive force matching (AFM) method that provides excellent predictions of water properties with only electronic structure information as a reference. Compared to many other electronic structure based force fields that rely on fairly sophisticated energy expressions, the AFM water models use point-charge based energy expressions that are supported by most popular molecular dynamics packages. An outstanding question regarding simple force fields is whether such force fields provide reasonable transferability outside of their conditions of parameterization. A survey of three AFM water models, B3LYPD-4F, BLYPSP-4F, and WAIL are provided for simulations under conditions ranging from the melting point up to the critical point. By including ice-Ih configurations in the training set, the WAIL potential predicts the melting temperate, TM, of ice-Ih correctly. Without training for ice, BLYPSP-4F underestimates TM...

  14. Flow structures in submarine channels affected by Coriolis forces: Experimental observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossu, R.; Wells, M. G.

    2011-12-01

    In this talk we will show how Coriolis forces can control the flow dynamics of turbidity currents flowing in sinuous channels at high latitudes. We describe how the internal velocity structure changes with latitude, based on observations from rotating laboratory experiments. When these results are combined with existing conceptual facies and depositional models we can now describe the changes in sedimentation patterns that are observed at different latitudes. The experiments were conducted in a sinuous channel model placed in a tank that was rotated at various rates (reflected by the Coriolis parameters f) ranging from f = 0 (at the equator) to ± 0.5 rad s-1 (at higher latitudes). The dependence of the density interface of gravity currents on rotation is shown in Figure 1a. At the equator the interface slopes up to the outer bend due to the centrifugal forces. In the Northern Hemisphere (NH) the tilt of the interface increases as now the Coriolis forces reinforce the centrifugal acceleration. In contrast, in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) the current ramps up to the inner bend and Coriolis forces dominate over centrifugal forces. Figure 1b shows the corresponding position of the downstream velocity core in the bend apex. At the equator the core is predominantly close to the centerline, whilst in the NH the core is deflected to the inner bend and in the SH the velocity core is shifted to the outer bank. Based upon our experimental results, we hypothesize that Coriolis forces can affect the velocity structure and sedimentation regime. Lateral accretion packages (LAPs) are built only on one side in the channel and finer sediments will be deposited mainly on the levee bank to which the high velocity core is deflected. The Rossby number RoW = U/fW (where U is the mean downstream velocity and W the channel width) can be used to determine the influence of Coriolis forces. In channel systems at high-latitudes (with RoW 1 implying that Coriolis forces are negligible. LAPs

  15. Exploiting a nonlinear restoring force to improve the performance of flow energy harvesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibo, Amin; Alhadidi, Ali H.; Daqaq, Mohammed F.

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates employing a nonlinear restoring force to improve the performance of flow energy harvesters (FEHs). To that end, a galloping FEH possessing a quartic potential energy function of the form V =1/2 μy2+1/4 γy4 is considered. This potential function is used to model either a softening (μ > 0, γ 0, γ > 0), or bi-stable (μ 0) restoring force. A physics-based model of the harvester is obtained assuming piezoelectric transduction and a quasi-steady flow field. The model is validated against experimental data and used to obtain a closed-form solution of the response by employing a multiple scaling perturbation analysis using the Jacobi elliptic functions. The attained solution is subsequently used to investigate the influence of the nonlinearity on the performance of the harvester and to illustrate how to optimize the restoring force in order to maximize the output power for given design conditions and airflow parameters. Specifically, it is shown that for similar design parameters and equal magnitudes of μ, and γ, a bi-stable energy harvester outperforms all other configurations as long as the inter-well motions are activated. On the other hand, if the motion of the bi-stable harvester is limited to a single well, then a harvester incorporating a softening nonlinear restoring force outperforms all other configurations. Furthermore, when comparing two FEHs incorporating the same type of restoring force at the optimal load and similar values of μ, then the FEH with the smaller γ is shown to provide higher output power levels.

  16. Continuous-Flow System Produces Medical-Grade Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akse, James R.; Dahl, Roger W.; Wheeler, Richard R.

    2009-01-01

    A continuous-flow system utilizes microwave heating to sterilize water and to thermally inactivate endotoxins produced in the sterilization process. The system is designed for use in converting potable water to medical-grade water. Systems like this one could be used for efficient, small-scale production of medical- grade water in laboratories, clinics, and hospitals. This system could be adapted to use in selective sterilization of connections in ultra-pure-water-producing equipment and other equipment into which intrusion by microorganisms cannot be tolerated. Lightweight, port - able systems based on the design of this system could be rapidly deployed to remote locations (e.g., military field hospitals) or in response to emergencies in which the normal infrastructure for providing medical-grade water is disrupted. Larger systems based on the design of this system could be useful for industrial production of medical-grade water. The basic microwave-heating principle of this system is the same as that of a microwave oven: An item to be heated, made of a lossy dielectric material (in this case, flowing water) is irradiated with microwaves in a multimode microwave cavity. The heating is rapid and efficient because it results from absorption of microwave power throughout the volume of the lossy dielectric material. In this system, a copper tube having a length of 49.5 cm and a diameter of 2.25 cm serves as both the microwave cavity and the sterilization chamber. Microwave power is fed via a coaxial cable to an antenna mounted inside the tube at mid-length (see figure). Efficient power transfer occurs due to the shift in wavelength associated with the high permittivity of water combined with the strong coupling of 2.45-GHz microwaves with rotational-vibrational transitions of the dipolar water molecule.

  17. Contributing recharge areas to water-supply wells at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, in southwestern Ohio, has operated three well fields--Area B, Skeel Road, and the East Well Fields--to supply potable water for consumption and use for base activities. To protect these well fields from contamination and to comply with the Ohio Wellhead Protection Plan, the Base is developing a wellhead-protection program for the well fields. A three-dimensional, steady-state ground-water-flow model was developed in 1993 to simulate heads in (1) the buried-valley aquifer system that is tapped by the two active well fields, and in (2) an upland bedrock aquifer that may supply water to the wells. An advective particle-tracking algorithm that requires estimated porosities and simulated heads was used to estimate ground-water-flow pathlines and traveltimes to the active well fields. Contributing recharge areas (CRA's)--areas on the water table that contribute water to a well or well field--were generated for 1-, 5-, and 10-year traveltimes. Results from the simulation and subsequent particle tracking indicate that the CRA's for the Skeel Road Well Fields are oval and extend north- ward, toward the Mad River, as pumping at the well field increases. The sizes of the 1-, 5-, and 10-year CRA's of Skeel Road Well Field, under maximum pumping conditions, are approximately 0.5, 1.5 and 3.2 square miles, respectively. The CRA's for the Area B Well Field extend to the north, up the Mad River Valley; as pumping increases at the well field, the CRA's extend up the Mad River Valley under Huffman Dam. The sizes of the 1-, 5-, and 10-year CRA's of Area B Well Field, under maximum pumping conditions, are approximately 0.1, 0.5, and 0.9 square miles, respectively. The CRA's for the East Well Field are affected by nearby streams under average pumping conditions. The sizes of the 1-, 5-, and 10-year CRA's of the East Well Field, under maximum pumping conditions, are approximately 0.2, 1.2, and 2.4 square miles, respectively. However, as pumping increases

  18. The physics of confined flow and its application to water leaks, water permeation and water nanoflows: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Wenwen; Rigozzi, Michelle K; McKenzie, David R

    2016-02-01

    This review assesses the current state of understanding of the calculation of the rate of flow of gases, vapours and liquids confined in channels, in porous media and in permeable materials with an emphasis on the flow of water and its vapour. One motivation is to investigate the relation between the permeation rate of moisture and that of a noncondensable test gas such as helium, another is to assist in unifying theory and experiment across disparate fields. Available theories of single component ideal gas flows in channels of defined geometry (cylindrical, rectangular and elliptical) are described and their predictions compared with measurement over a wide range of conditions defined by the Knudsen number. Theory for two phase flows is assembled in order to understand the behaviour of four standard water leak configurations: vapour, slug, Washburn and liquid flow, distinguished by the number and location of phase boundaries (menisci). Air may or may not be present as a background gas. Slip length is an important parameter that greatly affects leak rates. Measurements of water vapour flows confirm that water vapour shows ideal gas behaviour. Results on carbon nanotubes show that smooth walls may lead to anomalously high slip lengths arising from the properties of 'confined' water. In porous media, behaviour can be matched to the four standard leaks. Traditional membrane permeation models consider that the permeant dissolves, diffuses and evaporates at the outlet side, ideas we align with those from channel flow. Recent results on graphite oxide membranes show examples where helium which does not permeate while at the same time moisture is almost unimpeded, again a result of confined water. We conclude that while there is no a priori relation between a noncondensable gas flow and a moisture flow, measurements using helium will give results within two orders of magnitude of the moisture flow rate, except in the case where there is anomalous slip or confined water

  19. Numerical simulation and analysis of water flow over stepped spillways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN ZhongDong; HU XiaoQing; HUAI WenXin; AMADOR António

    2009-01-01

    Numerical simulation of water flow over the stepped spillway is conducted using Mixture multiphase flow model. Different turbulence models are chosen to enclose the controlling equations. The turbulence models investigated are realizable k-ε model, SST k-ω model, v2-f model and LES model. The computational results by the four turbulence models are compared with experimental ones in the following aspects: mean velocity, the spanwise vorticity and the growth of the turbulent boundary layer thickness in the streamwise direction. It is found from the comparison that the realizable k-ε model, in which the rotation tensor is included, shows good performance for simulation of flows involving rotation, boundary layer and recirculation. The realizable k-e model is the most efficient in simulating flow over stepped spillways. Further, the characteristics of water flow on the stepped spillway are studied in terms of the mean velocity profile normal to the pseudo-bottom and the pressure field on the steps based on the simulation results using realizable k-ε model.

  20. Numerical simulation and analysis of water flow over stepped spillways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AMADOR; António

    2009-01-01

    Numerical simulation of water flow over the stepped spillway is conducted using Mixture multiphase flow model. Different turbulence models are chosen to enclose the controlling equations. The turbulence models investigated are realizable k-ε model, SST k-ω model, v2-f model and LES model. The computational results by the four turbulence models are compared with experimental ones in the following aspects: mean velocity, the spanwise vorticity and the growth of the turbulent boundary layer thickness in the streamwise direction. It is found from the comparison that the realizable k-ε model, in which the rotation tensor is included, shows good performance for simulation of flows involving rotation, boundary layer and recirculation. The realizable k-ε model is the most efficient in simulating flow over stepped spillways. Further, the characteristics of water flow on the stepped spillway are studied in terms of the mean velocity profile normal to the pseudo-bottom and the pressure field on the steps based on the simulation results using realizable k-ε model.

  1. Implications of sediment transport by subglacial water flow for interpreting contemporary glacial erosion rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaud, Flavien; Flowers, Gwenn E.; Venditti, Jeremy G.

    2017-04-01

    The role of glaciers in landscape evolution is central to the interactions between climate and tectonic forces at high latitudes and in mountainous regions. Sediment yields from glacierized basins are used to quantify contemporary erosion rates on seasonal to decadal timescales, often under the assumption that subglacial water flow is the main contributor to these yields. Two recent studies have furthermore used such sediment fluxes to calibrate a glacial erosion rule, where erosion rate scales with ice sliding speed raised to a power greater than one. Subglacial sediment transport by water flow has however seldom been studied, thus the controls on sediment yield from glacierized basins remain enigmatic. To bridge this gap, we develop a 1-D model of morphodynamics in semi-circular bedrock-floored subglacial channels. We adapt a sediment conservation law from the fluvial literature, developed for both mixed bedrock / alluvial and alluvial conditions, to subglacial channels. Channel evolution is a function of the traditional melt-opening due to viscous heat dissipation from the water flow, and creep closure of the overlying ice, to which we add the closure or enlargement due to sediment deposition or removal, respectively. Using a simple ice geometry representing a land-terminating glacier, we find that the shear stresses produced by the water flow on the bed decrease significantly near the terminus. As the ice thins, creep closure decreases and large hydraulic potential gradients cannot be sustained. The resulting gradients in sediment transport lead to a bottleneck, and sediment accumulates if the sediment supply is adequate. A similar bottleneck occurs if a channel is well established and water discharge drops. Whether such constriction happens in space of time, in the presence of a sufficiently large sediment supply sediment accumulates temporarily near the terminus, followed shortly thereafter by enhanced sediment transport. Reduction in the cross-sectional area

  2. What maintains the waters flowing in our rivers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Vitor Vieira

    2017-07-01

    This article discusses how new contributions from hydrogeological science in the 20th and 21st centuries have allowed for a better understanding of the processes that affect the maintenance of river flows. Moreover, the way in which this knowledge has been conveyed beyond academia and has been gradually incorporated into public policy for natural resource management is also discussed. This article explains the development of several approaches used to understand the relationships among the management of aquifers, vegetation and river flows, including water balance, aquifer recharge, the piston effect, seasonal effects, and safe and sustainable yields. Additionally, the current challenges regarding the modeling of hydrological processes that integrate groundwater and surface waters are discussed. Examples of studies applied in Brazil that demonstrate these processes and stimulate thought regarding water management strategies are presented. In light of the case studies, it is possible to propose different strategies, each adapted for specific hydrogeological context to maximize aquifer recharge or base flow maintenance. Based on these strategies, the role of infiltration ponds and other artificial recharge techniques is re-evaluated in the context of the mitigation of environmental impacts on the maintenance of river flows. Proposals for the improvement of public policies regarding the payment of related environmental services to stimulate investment in aquifer recharge and the maintenance of base flow, for which the goal is to attain win-win-win situations for the environment, farmers and water users, while preventing land speculation, are discussed. Lastly, a conceptual model for the dissemination of hydrogeological knowledge in public policies is provided, and its challenges and possibilities are discussed.

  3. Local properties of countercurrent stratified steam-water flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H J

    1985-10-01

    A study of steam condensation in countercurrent stratified flow of steam and subcooled water has been carried out in a rectangular channel/flat plate geometry over a wide range of inclination angles (4/sup 0/-87/sup 0/) at several aspect ratios. Variables were inlet water and steam flow rates, and inlet water temperature. Local condensation rates and pressure gradients were measured, and local condensation heat transfer coefficients and interfacial shear stress were calculated. Contact probe traverses of the surface waves were made, which allowed a statistical analysis of the wave properties. The local condensation Nusselt number was correlated in terms of local water and steam Reynolds or Froude numbers, as well as the liquid Prandtl number. A turbulence-centered model developed by Theofanous, et al. principally for gas absorption in several geometries, was modified. A correlation for the interfacial shear stress and the pressure gradient agreed with measured values. Mean water layer thicknesses were calculated. Interfacial wave parameters, such as the mean water layer thickness, liquid fraction probability distribution, wave amplitude and wave frequency, are analyzed.

  4. OCT-based quantification of flow velocity, shear force, and power generated by a biological ciliated surface (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Brendan K.; Khokha, Mustafa K.; Loewenberg, Michael; Choma, Michael A.

    2016-03-01

    In cilia-driven fluid flow physiology, quantification of flow velocity, shearing force, and power dissipation is important in defining abnormal ciliary function. The capacity to generate flow can be robustly described in terms of shearing force. Dissipated power can be related to net ATP consumption by ciliary molecular motors. To date, however, only flow velocity can be routinely quantified in a non-invasive, non-contact manner. Additionally, traditional power-based metrics rely on metabolic consumption that reflects energy consumption not just from cilia but also from all active cellular processes. Here, we demonstrate the estimation of all three of these quantities (flow velocity, shear force, and power dissipation) using only optical coherence tomography (OCT). Specifically, we develop a framework that can extract force and power information from vectorial flow velocity fields obtained using OCT-based methods. We do so by (a) estimating the viscous stress tensor from flow velocity fields to estimate shearing force and (b) using the viscous stress tensor to estimate the power dissipation function to infer total mechanical power. These estimates have the advantage of (a) requiring only a single modality, (b) being non-invasive in nature, and (c) being reflective of only the net power work generated by a ciliated surface. We demonstrate our all-optical approach to the estimation of these parameters in the Xenopus animal model system under normal and increased viscous loading. Our preliminary data support the hypothesis that the Xenopus ciliated surface can increase force output under loading conditions.

  5. Energy Performance and Radial Force of a Mixed-Flow Pump with Symmetrical and Unsymmetrical Tip Clearances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Hao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The energy performance and radial force of a mixed flow pump with symmetrical and unsymmetrical tip clearance are investigated in this paper. As the tip clearance increases, the pump head and efficiency both decrease. The center of the radial force on the principal axis is located at the coordinate origin when the tip clearance is symmetrical, and moves to the third quadrant when the tip clearance is unsymmetrical. Analysis results show that the total radial force on the principal axis is closely related to the fluctuation of mass flow rate in each single flow channel. Unsteady simulations show that the dominant frequencies of radial force on the hub and blade correspond to the blade number, vane number, or double blade number because of the rotor stator interaction. The radial force on the blade pressure side decreases with the tip clearance increase because of leakage flow. The unsymmetrical tip clearances in an impeller induce uneven leakage flow rate and then result in unsymmetrical work ability of each blade and flow pattern in each channel. Thus, the energy performance decreases and the total radial force increases for a mixed flow pump with unsymmetrical tip clearance.

  6. Virtual water flows and Water Balance Impacts of the U.S. Great Lakes Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddell, B. L.; Mayer, A. S.; Mubako, S. T.

    2014-12-01

    To assess the impacts of human water use and trade on water balances, we estimate virtual water flows for counties in the U.S. portion of the Great Lakes basin. This is a water-rich region, but one where ecohydrological 'hotspots' are created by water scarcity in certain locations (Mubako et al., 2012). Trade shifts water uses from one location to another, causing water scarcity in some locations but mitigating water scarcity in other locations. A database of water withdrawals was assembled to give point-wise withdrawals by location, source, and use category (commercial, thermoelectric power, industrial, agricultural, mining). Point-wise consumptive use is aggregated to the county level, giving direct, virtual water exports by county. A county-level trade database provides import and export data for the various use categories. We link the annual virtual water exported from a county for a given use category to corresponding annual trade exports. Virtual water balances for each county by use category are calculated, and then compared with the renewable annual freshwater supply. Preliminary findings are that overall virtual water balances (imports - exports) are positive for almost all counties, because urban areas import goods and services that are more water intensive than the exported goods and services. However, for some agriculturally-intensive counties, the overall impact of virtual water trade on the water balance is close to zero, and the balance for agricultural sector virtual water trade is negative, reflecting a net impact of economic trade on the water balance in these locations. We also compare the virtual water balance to available water resources, using annual precipitation less evapotranspiration as a crude estimate of net renewable water availability. In some counties virtual water exports approach 30% of the available water resources, indicating the potential for water scarcity, especially from an aquatic ecosystem standpoint.

  7. Uncovering regional disparity of China's water footprint and inter-provincial virtual water flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Huijuan; Geng, Yong; Fujita, Tsuyoshi; Fujii, Minoru; Hao, Dong; Yu, Xiaoman

    2014-12-01

    With rapid economic development in China, water crisis is becoming serious and may impede future sustainable development. The uneven distribution of water resources further aggravates such a problem. Under such a circumstance, the concepts of water footprint and virtual water have been proposed in order to respond water scarcity problems. This paper focuses on studying provincial disparity of China's water footprints and inter-provincial virtual water trade flows by adopting inter-regional input-output (IRIO) method. The results show that fast developing areas with larger economic scales such as Guangdong, Jiangsu, Shandong, Zhejiang, Shanghai and Xinjiang had the largest water footprints. The most developed and water scarce areas such as Shanghai, Beijing, Tianjin and Shandong intended to import virtual water, a rational choice for mitigating their water crisis. Xinjiang, Jiangsu, Heilongjiang, Inner Mongolia, Guangxi and Hunan, had the largest per GDP water intensities and were the main water import regions. Another key finding is that agriculture water footprint was the main part in water footprint composition and water export trade. On the basis of these findings, policy implications on agriculture geographical dispersion, consumption behavior changes, trade structure adjustment and water use efficiency improvement are further discussed.

  8. Flow enhancement of water flow through silica slit pores with graphene-coated walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walther, J. H.; Popadic, A.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    We present continuum simulations of water flow past fullerene molecules. The governing Navier-Stokes equations are complemented with the Navier slip bound-ary condition with a slip length that is extracted from related molecular dynamics simulations. We find that several quantities of interest...

  9. Correlation of Normal Gravity Mixed Convection Blowoff Limits with Microgravity Forced Flow Blowoff Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcum, Jeremy W.; Olson, Sandra L.; Ferkul, Paul V.

    2016-01-01

    The axisymmetric rod geometry in upward axial stagnation flow provides a simple way to measure normal gravity blowoff limits to compare with microgravity Burning and Suppression of Solids - II (BASS-II) results recently obtained aboard the International Space Station. This testing utilized the same BASS-II concurrent rod geometry, but with the addition of normal gravity buoyant flow. Cast polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) rods of diameters ranging from 0.635 cm to 3.81 cm were burned at oxygen concentrations ranging from 14 to 18% by volume. The forced flow velocity where blowoff occurred was determined for each rod size and oxygen concentration. These blowoff limits compare favorably with the BASS-II results when the buoyant stretch is included and the flow is corrected by considering the blockage factor of the fuel. From these results, the normal gravity blowoff boundary for this axisymmetric rod geometry is determined to be linear, with oxygen concentration directly proportional to flow speed. We describe a new normal gravity 'upward flame spread test' method which extrapolates the linear blowoff boundary to the zero stretch limit in order to resolve microgravity flammability limits-something current methods cannot do. This new test method can improve spacecraft fire safety for future exploration missions by providing a tractable way to obtain good estimates of material flammability in low gravity.

  10. Response of North Pacific eastern subtropical mode water to greenhouse gas versus aerosol forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Luo, Yiyong

    2016-04-01

    Mode water is a distinct water mass characterized by a near vertical homogeneous layer or low potential vorticity, and is considered essential for understanding ocean climate variability. Based on the output of GFDL CM3, this study investigates the response of eastern subtropical mode water (ESTMW) in the North Pacific to two different single forcings: greenhouse gases (GHGs) and aerosol. Under GHG forcing, ESTMW is produced on lighter isopycnal surfaces and is decreased in volume. Under aerosol forcing, in sharp contrast, it is produced on denser isopycnal surfaces and is increased in volume. The main reason for the opposite response is because surface ocean-to-atmosphere latent heat flux change over the ESTMW formation region shoals the mixed layer and thus weakens the lateral induction under GHG forcing, but deepens the mixed layer and thus strengthens the lateral induction under aerosol forcing. In addition, local wind changes are also favorable to the opposite response of ESTMW production to GHG versus aerosol.

  11. Investigation of MEMS force sensors for nano-scale water measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Soyoung; Jhe, Wonho; Stambaugh, Corey

    2011-03-01

    Nanoscale water formed by capillary condensation has typically been studied by means of an atomic force microscope (AFM). While this approach can provide details about the dynamic visco-elastic properties, it is limited in the type of information that can be measured. Here we propose replacing the fixed sample surface generally used in AFM systems with movable micro-mechanical force sensors (MEMS) fabricated specifically for tapping mode or shear mode. By incorporating a MEMS device we can directly measure the adhesion force, pull-in distance and capillary force of nano confined water while the AFM collects information pertaining to the dynamic visco-elastic properties. In this talk, we will characterize the force measurement in the system and discuss the behavior of the device in the presence of nano-scale water. Work supported NRF of Korea and NSF grant OISE #0853104.

  12. DRAG FORCE IN DENSE GAS—PARTICLE TWO—PHASE FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    由长福; 祁海鹰; 徐旭常

    2003-01-01

    Numerical simulations of flow over a stationary particle in a dense gas-particle two-phase flow have been carried out for small Reynolds numbers (leas than 100). In order to study theinfluence of the particles interaction on the drag force, three particle arrangements have been tested: asingle particle, two particles placed in the flow direction and many particles located regularly in the flowfield. The Navier-Stokes equations are discretized in the three-dimensional space using finite volumemethod. For the first and second cases, the numerical results agree reasonably well with the data inliterature. For the third case, i.e., the multiparticle case, the influence of the particle volume fractionand Reynolds numbers on the drag force has been investigated. The results show that the computationalvalues of the drag ratio agree approximately with the published results at higher Reynolds numbers(from 34.2 to 68.4), but there is a large difference between them at small Reynolds numbers.

  13. Continuous surface force based lattice Boltzmann equation method for simulating thermocapillary flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lin; Zheng, Song; Zhai, Qinglan

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we extend a lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) with continuous surface force (CSF) to simulate thermocapillary flows. The model is designed on our previous CSF LBE for athermal two phase flow, in which the interfacial tension forces and the Marangoni stresses as the results of the interface interactions between different phases are described by a conception of CSF. In this model, the sharp interfaces between different phases are separated by a narrow transition layers, and the kinetics and morphology evolution of phase separation would be characterized by an order parameter via Cahn-Hilliard equation which is solved in the frame work of LBE. The scalar convection-diffusion equation for temperature field is resolved by thermal LBE. The models are validated by thermal two layered Poiseuille flow, and two superimposed planar fluids at negligibly small Reynolds and Marangoni numbers for the thermocapillary driven convection, which have analytical solutions for the velocity and temperature. Then thermocapillary migration of two/three dimensional deformable droplet are simulated. Numerical results show that the predictions of present LBE agreed with the analytical solution/other numerical results.

  14. Simulations of cardiovascular blood flow accounting for time dependent deformational forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters Randles, Amanda; Melchionna, Simone; Latt, Jonas; Succi, Sauro; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2012-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is currently the leading cause of death in the United States, and early detection is critical. Despite advances in imaging technology, 50% of these deaths occur suddenly and with no prior symptoms. The development and progression of coronary diseases such as atherosclerosis has been linked to prolonged areas of low endothelial shear stress (ESS); however, there is currently no way to measure ESS in vivo. We will present a patient specific fluid simulation that applies the Lattice Boltzmann equation to model the blood flow in the coronary arteries whose geometries are derived from computed tomography angiography data. Using large-scale supercomputers up to 294,912 processors, we can model a full heartbeat at the resolution of the red blood cells. We are investigating the time dependent deformational forces exerted on the arterial flows from the movement of the heart. The change in arterial curvature that occurs over a heartbeat has been shown to have significant impact on flow velocity and macroscopic quantities like shear stress. We will discuss a method for accounting for these resulting forces by casting them into a kinetic formalism via a Gauss-Hermite projection and their impact on ESS while maintaining the static geomtry obtained from CTA data.

  15. Development of a stream-aquifer numerical flow model to assess river water management under water scarcity in a Mediterranean basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mas-Pla, Josep, E-mail: josep.mas@udg.edu [Grup de Geologia Aplicada i Ambiental (GAiA), Centre de Geologia i Cartografia Ambiental (Geocamb), Dept. de Ciencies Ambientals, Universitat de Girona (Spain); Font, Eva [Grup de Geologia Aplicada i Ambiental (GAiA), Centre de Geologia i Cartografia Ambiental (Geocamb), Dept. de Ciencies Ambientals, Universitat de Girona (Spain); Astui, Oihane [Agencia Catalana de l' Aigua, Barcelona (Spain); Mencio, Anna; Rodriguez-Florit, Agusti [Grup de Geologia Aplicada i Ambiental (GAiA), Centre de Geologia i Cartografia Ambiental (Geocamb), Dept. de Ciencies Ambientals, Universitat de Girona (Spain); Folch, Albert [Unitat de Geodinamica Externa i Hidrogeologia Dept. de Geologia, Universitat Autonoma of Barcelona (Spain); Brusi, David [Grup de Geologia Aplicada i Ambiental (GAiA), Centre de Geologia i Cartografia Ambiental (Geocamb), Dept. de Ciencies Ambientals, Universitat de Girona (Spain); Perez-Paricio, Alfredo [Agencia Catalana de l' Aigua, Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-12-01

    could be self-sufficient units so long as the response of the main hydrological components to external forces that produce water scarcity, as climate change or human pressures, is appropriately considered in water resource planning. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Climate changes will imply water scarcity and thus affect river discharge. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The role of stream flow is a key to define the aquifer water balance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Flow models are valid tools for assessing climate change effects on water resources. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Threshold flow values are set to preserve aquifer recharge and ecological processes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Water planning using flow models may turn small basins into self-sufficient units.

  16. Microstructure-sensitive flow stress modeling for force prediction in laser assisted milling of Inconel 718

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Zhipeng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Inconel 718 is a typical hard-to-machine material that requires thermally enhanced machining technology such as laser-assisted milling. Based upon finite element analysis, this study simulates the forces in the laser-assisted milling process of Inconel 718 considering the effects of grain growth due to γ' and γ" phases. The γ" phase is unstable and becomes the δ phase, which is likely to precipitate at a temperature over 750 °C. The temperature around the center of spot in the experiments is 850 °C, so the phase transformation and grain growth happen throughout the milling process. In the analysis, this study includes the microstructure evolution while accounting for the effects of dynamic recrystallization and grain growth through the Avrami model. The grain growth reduces the yield stress and flow stress, which improves the machinability. In finite element analysis (FEA, several boundary conditions of temperature varying with time are defined to simulate the movement of laser spot, and the constitutive model is described by Johnson-Cook equation. In experiments, this study collects three sets of cutting forces and finds that the predicted values are in close agreements with measurements especially in feed direction, in which the smallest error is around 5%. In another three simulations, this study also examines the effect of laser preheating on the cutting forces by comparison with a traditional milling process without laser assist. When the laser is off, the forces increase in all cases, which prove the softening effect of laser-assisted milling. In addition, when the axial depth of milling increases, the laser has a more significant influence, especially in axial direction, in which the force with laser is more than 18% smaller than the one without laser. Overall, this study validates the influence of laser-assisted milling on Inconel 718 by predicting the cutting forces in FEA.

  17. Removing the impact of water abstractions on flow duration curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoero, Alessandro; Ganora, Daniele; Galeati, Giorgio; Laio, Francesco; Claps, Pierluigi

    2015-04-01

    Changes and interactions between human system and water cycle are getting increased attention in the scientific community. Commonly discharge data needed for water resources studies were collected close to urban or industrial settlements, thus in environments where the interest for surveying was not merely scientific, but also for socio-economical purposes. Working in non-natural environments we must take into account human impacts, like the one due to water intakes for irrigation or hydropower generation, while assessing the actual water availability and variability in a river. This can became an issue in alpine areas, where hydropower exploitation is heavy and it is common to have water abstraction before a gauge station. To have a gauge station downstream a water intake can be useful to survey the environmental flow release and to record the maximum flood values, which should not be affected by the water abstraction. Nevertheless with this configuration we are unable to define properly the water volumes available in the river, information crucial to assess low flows and investigate drought risk. This situation leads to a substantial difference between observed data (affected by the human impact) and natural data (as would have been without abstraction). A main issue is how to correct these impacts and restore the natural streamflow values. The most obvious and reliable solution would be to ask for abstraction data to water users, but these data are hard to collect. Usually they are not available, because not public or not even collected by the water exploiters. A solution could be to develop a rainfall-run-off model of the basin upstream the gauge station, but this approach needs a great number of data and parameters Working in a regional framework and not on single case studies, our goal is to provide a consistent estimate of the non-impacted statistics of the river (i.e. mean value, L-moments of variation and skewness). We proposed a parsimonious method, based

  18. Further Investigation on Laminar Forced Convection of Nanofluid Flows in a Uniformly Heated Pipe Using Direct Numerical Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghofrane Sekrani

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, laminar forced convection nanofluid flows in a uniformly heated horizontal tube were revisited by direct numerical simulations. Single and two-phase models were employed with constant and temperature-dependent properties. Comparisons with experimental data showed that the mixture model performs better than the single-phase model in the all cases studied. Temperature-dependent fluid properties also resulted in a better prediction of the thermal field. Particular attention was paid to the grid arrangement. The two-phase model was used then confidently to investigate the influence of the nanoparticle size on the heat and fluid flow with a particular emphasis on the sedimentation process. Four nanoparticle diameters were considered: 10, 42, 100 and 200 nm for both copper-water and alumina/water nanofluids. For the largest diameter d n p = 200 nm, the Cu nanoparticles were more sedimented by around 80%, while the A l 2 O 3 nanoparticles sedimented only by 2 . 5 %. Besides, it was found that increasing the Reynolds number improved the heat transfer rate, while it decreased the friction factor allowing the nanoparticles to stay more dispersed in the base fluid. The effect of nanoparticle type on the heat transfer coefficient was also investigated for six different water-based nanofluids. Results showed that the Cu-water nanofluid achieved the highest heat transfer coefficient, followed by C, A l 2 O 3 , C u O , T i O 2 , and S i O 2 , respectively. All results were presented and discussed for four different values of the concentration in nanoparticles, namely φ = 0 , 0 . 6 % , 1 % and 1 . 6 % . Empirical correlations for the friction coefficient and the average Nusselt number were also provided summarizing all the presented results.

  19. Variations of global and continental water balance components as impacted by climate forcing uncertainty and human water use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller Schmied, Hannes; Adam, Linda; Eisner, Stephanie; Fink, Gabriel; Flörke, Martina; Kim, Hyungjun; Oki, Taikan; Portmann, Felix Theodor; Reinecke, Robert; Riedel, Claudia; Song, Qi; Zhang, Jing; Döll, Petra

    2016-07-01

    When assessing global water resources with hydrological models, it is essential to know about methodological uncertainties. The values of simulated water balance components may vary due to different spatial and temporal aggregations, reference periods, and applied climate forcings, as well as due to the consideration of human water use, or the lack thereof. We analyzed these variations over the period 1901-2010 by forcing the global hydrological model WaterGAP 2.2 (ISIMIP2a) with five state-of-the-art climate data sets, including a homogenized version of the concatenated WFD/WFDEI data set. Absolute values and temporal variations of global water balance components are strongly affected by the uncertainty in the climate forcing, and no temporal trends of the global water balance components are detected for the four homogeneous climate forcings considered (except for human water abstractions). The calibration of WaterGAP against observed long-term average river discharge Q significantly reduces the impact of climate forcing uncertainty on estimated Q and renewable water resources. For the homogeneous forcings, Q of the calibrated and non-calibrated regions of the globe varies by 1.6 and 18.5 %, respectively, for 1971-2000. On the continental scale, most differences for long-term average precipitation P and Q estimates occur in Africa and, due to snow undercatch of rain gauges, also in the data-rich continents Europe and North America. Variations of Q at the grid-cell scale are large, except in a few grid cells upstream and downstream of calibration stations, with an average variation of 37 and 74 % among the four homogeneous forcings in calibrated and non-calibrated regions, respectively. Considering only the forcings GSWP3 and WFDEI_hom, i.e., excluding the forcing without undercatch correction (PGFv2.1) and the one with a much lower shortwave downward radiation SWD than the others (WFD), Q variations are reduced to 16 and 31 % in calibrated and non

  20. MASS TRANSFER CONTROL OF A BACKWARD-FACING STEP FLOW BY LOCAL FORCING- EFFECT OF REYNOLDS NUMBER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zouhaier MEHREZ

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The control of fluid mechanics and mass transfer in separated and reattaching flow over a backward-facing step by a local forcing, is studied using Large Eddy Simulation (LES.To control the flow, the local forcing is realized by a sinusoidal oscillating jet at the step edge. The Reynolds number is varied in the range 10000 ≤ Re≤ 50000 and the Schmidt number is fixed at 1.The found results show that the flow structure is modified and the local mass transfer is enhanced by the applied forcing. The observed changes depend on the Reynolds number and vary with the frequency and amplitude of the local forcing. For the all Reynolds numbers, the largest recirculation zone size reduction is obtained at the optimum forcing frequency St = 0.25. At this frequency the local mass transfer enhancement attains the maximum.

  1. Hyperconcentrated flows as influenced by coupled wind-water processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Jiongxin

    2005-01-01

    Using data from more than 40 rivers in the middle Yellow River basin, a study has been made of the influence of coupled wind-water processes on hyperconcentrated flows. A simple "vehicle" model has been proposed to describe hyperconcentrated flows. The liquid phase of two-phase flows is a "vehicle", in which coarse sediment particles are carried as solid-phase. The formation and characteristics of hyperconcentrated flows are closely related with the formation and characteristics of this liquid-phase and solid-phase. Surface materials and geomorphic agents of the middle Yellow River basin form some patterns of combination, which have deep influence on the formation and characteristics of liquid- and solid-phases of hyperconcentrated flows. The combination of high percentages of relatively coarse material with low percentages of fine material appears in the area predominated by the wind process, where the supply of relatively coarse sediment is sufficient, but the supply of relatively coarse sediment is not. The combination of low percentages of relatively coarse material with high percentages of fine material appears in the area predominated by the water process, where the supply of fine sediment is sufficient, but the supply of fine sediment is not. In the area predominated by coupled wind-water processes appears the combination of medium percentages of coarse and fine materials, and thus both coarse and fine sediments are in relatively sufficient supply. The manner in which the mean annual sediment concentrations of liquid- and solid-phases vary with total suspended sediment concentration is different. With the increased total suspended sediment concentration, mean annual sediment concentration of liquid-phase increased to a limit and then remained constant; however, mean annual sediment concentrations of solid-phase increased continuously. Thus, the magnitude of total suspended sediment concentration depends on the supply conditions of relatively coarse sediment

  2. Evaluation of heat and water flow in porosity permeable horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquale, Vincenzo; Verdoya, Massimo; Chiozzi, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    Several strategies have been developed to explore the circulation of geofluids, which can yield heat transport over large spatial scales. Groundwater flow from recharge areas, where precipitation seeps downwards beneath the ground surface and reaches the saturated zone, to discharge areas, where subsurface water is discharged to streams, lakes, ponds or swamps, forms an additional mechanism of heat transfer to pure conduction, which is generally assumed for the underground thermal regime. In this paper we discuss and apply two different analytical models of heat and water flow, both valid for steady-state thermal conditions and for uniform, isotropic, homogeneous, and saturated porous media. By combining conductive and groundwater advective heat transfer, a first model assumes heat and water flow in vertical direction and neglects thermal gradient along the horizontal. The thermal field is influenced only by the flow of water parallel to the thermal gradient, whereas perpendicular water flow if any has no effect. Because most layers are sloping and because surface topographic relief usually exists across the aquifer, usually isotherms are not horizontal. Hence, we applied a second model for heat and water flow, neither purely horizontal nor purely vertical. In the governing equation of heat conduction-advection we take account of the horizontal flow of heat and water. The flow rate is assumed to be constant and sufficient small that thermal equilibrium is maintained between the water and the rock matrix. Examples of application are given for a set of boreholes drilled for geothermal exploration. Hydrothermal parameters (vertical and horizontal components of the Darcy velocity and the Péclet number) are determined by matching temperature and thermal gradient versus depth data with the two models. Thermal information is completed by a set of thermal conductivity measurements carried out on core samples recovered during drillings. The analysed underground

  3. Balancing the Interactions of Ions, Water, and DNA in the Drude Polarizable Force Field

    OpenAIRE

    Savelyev, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2014-01-01

    Recently we presented a first-generation all-atom Drude polarizable force field for DNA based on the classical Drude oscillator model, focusing on optimization of key dihedral angles followed by extensive validation of the force field parameters. Presently, we describe the procedure for balancing the electrostatic interactions between ions, water, and DNA as required for development of the Drude force field for DNA. The proper balance of these interactions is shown to impact DNA stability and...

  4. Force transmissibility and vibration power flow behaviour of inerter-based vibration isolators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian

    2016-09-01

    This paper investigates the dynamics and performance of inerter-based vibration isolators. Force / displacement transmissibility and vibration power flow are obtained to evaluate the isolation performance. Both force and motion excitations are considered. It is demonstrated that the use of inerters can enhance vibration isolation performance by enlarging the frequency band of effective vibration isolation. It is found that adding inerters can introduce anti-resonances in the frequency-response curves and in the curves of the force and displacement transmissibility such that vibration transmission can be suppressed at interested excitation frequencies. It is found that the introduction of inerters enhances inertial coupling and thus have a large influence on the dynamic behaviour at high frequencies. It is shown that force and displacement transmissibility increases with the excitation frequency and tends to an asymptotic value as the excitation frequency increases. In the high-frequency range, it was shown that adding inerters can result in a lower level of input power. These findings provide a better understanding of the effects of introducing inerters to vibration isolation and demonstrate the performance benefits of inerter-based vibration isolators.

  5. Nonlinear analysis of gas-water/oil-water two-phase flow in complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Zhong-Ke; Wang, Wen-Xu

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of multi-phase flows has been a challenge in the fields of nonlinear dynamics and fluid mechanics. This chapter reviews our work on two-phase flow dynamics in combination with complex network theory. We systematically carried out gas-water/oil-water two-phase flow experiments for measuring the time series of flow signals which is studied in terms of the mapping from time series to complex networks. Three network mapping methods were proposed for the analysis and identification of flow patterns, i.e. Flow Pattern Complex Network (FPCN), Fluid Dynamic Complex Network (FDCN) and Fluid Structure Complex Network (FSCN). Through detecting the community structure of FPCN based on K-means clustering, distinct flow patterns can be successfully distinguished and identified. A number of FDCN’s under different flow conditions were constructed in order to reveal the dynamical characteristics of two-phase flows. The FDCNs exhibit universal power-law degree distributions. The power-law exponent ...

  6. International energy trade impacts on water resource crises: an embodied water flows perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J. C.; Zhong, R.; Zhao, P.; Zhang, H. W.; Wang, Y.; Mao, G. Z.

    2016-07-01

    Water and energy are coupled in intimate ways (Siddiqi and Anadon 2011 Energy Policy 39 4529-40), which is amplified by international energy trade. The study shows that the total volume of energy related international embodied water flows averaged 6298 Mm3 yr-1 from 1992-2010, which represents 10% of the water used for energy production including oil, coal, gas and electricity production. This study calculates embodied water import and export status of 219 countries from 1992 to 2010 and embodied water flow changes of seven regions over time (1992/2000/2010). In addition, the embodied water net export risk-crisis index and net embodied water import benefit index are established. According to the index system, 33 countries export vast amounts of water who have a water shortage, which causes water risk and crisis related to energy trade. While 29 countries abate this risk due to their rich water resource, 45 countries import embodied water linked to energy imports. Based on the different status of countries studied, the countries were classified into six groups with different policy recommendations.

  7. FORCES ON PARTICLES AND THEIR EFFECTS ON VERTICAL SEDIMENT SORTING IN SOLID-LIQUID TWO-PHASE FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NI Jinren; MENG Xiaogang

    2001-01-01

    Vertical motion of particles was simulated by the Lagrangian method in one-dimensional solid-liquid two-phase flow. The conventional equation was modified by inserting a particle-particle interaction term,which was identified by Bagnold's experimental results. Effects of various forces have been examined under different particle concentrations. The results showed that the vertical sorting patterns are primarily determined by the joint action of inter-particle force and effective gravitational force, whereas the pace towards the steady sorting pattern was affected by Basset force and additional mass force.

  8. Influence of Reynolds number and forcing type in a turbulent von K\\'arm\\'an flow

    CERN Document Server

    Saint-Michel, Brice; Marié, Louis; Ravelet, Florent; Daviaud, François

    2014-01-01

    We present a detailed study of of a global bifurcation occuring in a turbulent von K\\'arm\\'an swirling flow. In this system, the statistically steady states progressively display hysteretic behaviour when the Reynolds number is increased above the transition to turbulence. We examine in detail this hysteresis using asymmetric forcing conditions --- rotating the impellers at different speeds. For very high Reynolds numbers, we study the sensitivity of the hysteresis cycle --- using complementary Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and global mechanical measurements --- to the forcing nature, imposing either the torque or the speed of the impellers. New mean states, displaying multiple quasi-steady states and negative differential responses, are experimentally observed in torque control. A simple analogy with electrical circuits is performed to understand the link between multi-stability and negative responses. The system is compared to other, similar "bulk" systems, to understand some relevant ingredients of nega...

  9. Influence of an external magnetic field on forced turbulence in a swirling flow of liquid metal

    CERN Document Server

    Gallet, Basile; Mordant, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    We report an experimental investigation on the influence of an external magnetic field on forced 3D turbulence of liquid gallium in a closed vessel. We observe an exponential damping of the turbulent velocity fluctuations as a function of the interaction parameter N (ratio of Lorentz force over inertial terms of the Navier-Stokes equation). The flow structures develop some anisotropy but do not become bidimensional. From a dynamical viewpoint, the damping first occurs homogeneously over the whole spectrum of frequencies. For larger values of N, a very strong additional damping occurs at the highest frequencies. However, the injected mechanical power remains independent of the applied magnetic field. The simultaneous measurement of induced magnetic field and electrical potential differences shows a very weak correlation between magnetic field and velocity fluctuations. The observed reduction of the fluctuations is in agreement with a previously proposed mechanism for the saturation of turbulent dynamos and wit...

  10. Paper capillary force driven hollow channel as a platform for multiphase flows bioassays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Tengfei

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a simple, inexpensive, and portable diagnostic assays that may be useful in remote settings, and in particular, in less industrialized countries where simple assays are becoming increasingly important for detecting disease and monitoring health. In this assays, the paper capillary force is first used to transport complex fluids such as whole blood or colloidal suspensions that contain particulates in a new type channel - paper capillary driven hollow channel, which offset the disadvantages of current paper microfluidic technologies. To demonstrate the various applications of the paper capillary force driven hollow channel, several devices are design and made to complete the purpose of exhibiting laminar flow in a T-junction microchannel, sheath a core stream in a three-inlet channel and transportation whole blood.

  11. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    This report presents information concerning field procedures employed during the monitoring, well construction, well purging, sampling, and well logging at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. Activities were conducted in an effort to evaluate ground water contamination.

  12. Soft colloidal probes for AFM force measurements between water droplets in oil

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2014-11-01

    Here we introduce an extension of the atomic force microscopy (AFM) colloidal probe technique, as a simple and reliable experimental approach to measure the interaction forces between small water droplets (~80-160. μm) dispersed in oil. Small water droplets are formed by capillary breakup of a microscale water jet in air, which is forced out of a fine capillary nozzle, and deposited on a superhydrophobic substrate immersed in tetradecane oil medium. In these conditions the water droplets are very loosely attached to the superhydrophobic substrate and are easily picked up with a hydrophobic AFM cantilever to form a soft colloidal probe. Sample force measurements are conducted to demonstrate the capability of the technique.

  13. 2008 Northwest Florida Water Management District (NWFWMD) Lidar: Eglin Air Force Base, Walton County, FL

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In the summer of 2008, the Northwest Florida Water Management District collected lidar data over a portion of Walton County, FL (Eglin Air force Base) to support...

  14. 2008 Northwest Florida Water Management District Lidar: Eglin Air Force Base, Walton County, FL

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In the summer of 2008, the Northwest Florida Water Management District collected lidar data over a portion of Walton County, FL (Eglin Air force Base) to support...

  15. Relating water and air flow characteristics in coarse granular materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Rune Røjgaard; Canga, Eriona; Poulsen, Tjalfe Gorm

    2013-01-01

    Water pressure drop as a function of velocity controls w 1 ater cleaning biofilter operation 2 cost. At present this relationship in biofilter materials must be determined experimentally as no 3 universal link between pressure drop, velocity and filter material properties have been established. 4...... Pressure drop - velocity in porous media is much simpler and faster to measure for air than for water. 5 For soils and similar materials, observations show a strong connection between pressure drop – 6 velocity relations for air and water, indicating that water pressure drop – velocity may be estimated 7...... from air flow data. The objective of this study was, therefore, to investigate if this approach is valid 8 also for coarse granular biofilter media which usually consists of much larger particles than soils. In 9 this paper the connection between the pressure drop – velocity relationships for air...

  16. Comparison of the lateral retention forces on sessile and pendant water drops on a solid surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Madrid, Rafael; Whitehead, Taylor; Irwin, George M.

    2015-06-01

    We present a simple experiment that demonstrates how a water drop hanging from a Plexiglas surface (pendant drop) experiences a lateral retention force that is comparable to, and in some cases larger than, the lateral retention force on a drop resting on top of the surface (sessile drop). The experiment also affords a simple demonstration of the Coriolis effect in two dimensions.

  17. Comparison of the lateral retention forces on sessile and pendant water drops on a solid surface

    OpenAIRE

    de la Madrid, Rafael; Whitehead, Taylor; Irwin, George

    2015-01-01

    We present a simple experiment that demonstrates how a water drop hanging from a Plexiglas surface (pendant drop) experiences a lateral retention force that is comparable to, and in some cases larger than, the lateral retention force on a drop resting on top of the surface (sessile drop). The experiment also affords a simple demonstration of the Coriolis effect in two dimensions.

  18. Flow structure from a horizontal cylinder coincident with a free surface in shallow water flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahraman Ali

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vortex formation from a horizontal cylinder coincident with a free surface of a shallow water flow having a depth of 25.4 [mm] was experimentally investigated using the PIV technique. Instantaneous and time-averaged flow patterns in the wake region of the cylinder were examined for three different cylinder diameter values under the fully developed turbulent boundary layer condition. Reynolds numbers were in the range of 1124£ Re£ 3374 and Froude numbers were in the range of 0.41 £ Fr £ 0.71 based on the cylinder diameter. It was found that a jet-like flow giving rise to increasing the flow entrainment between the core and wake regions depending on the cylinder diameter was formed between the lower surface of the cylinder and bottom surface of the channel. Vorticity intensity, Reynolds stress correlations and the primary recirculating bubble lengths were grown to higher values with increasing the cylinder diameter. On the other hand, in the case of the lowest level of the jet-like flow emanating from the beneath of the smallest cylinder, the variation of flow characteristics were attenuated significantly in a shorter distance. The variation of the reattachment location of the separated flow to the free-surface is a strong function of the cylinder diameter and the Froude number.

  19. Ground-water flow and quality near Canon City, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearne, G.A.; Litke, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Water in aquifers that underlie the Lincoln Park area near Canon City, Colorado, contains measurable concentrations of chemical constituents that are similar to those in raffinate (liquid waste) produced by a nearby uranium ore processing mill. The objective of this study was to expand the existing geohydrologic data base by collecting additional geohydrologic and water quality, in order to refine the description of the geohydrologic and geochemical systems in the study area. Geohydrologic data were collected from nine tests wells drilled in the area between the U.S. Soil Conservation Service dam and Lincoln Park. Lithologic and geophysical logs of these wells indicated that the section of Vermejo Formation penetrated consisted of interbedded sandstone and shale. The sandstone beds had a small porosity and small hydraulic conductivity. Groundwater flow from the U.S. Soil Conservation Service dam to Lincoln Park seemed to be along an alluvium-filled channel in the irregular and relatively undescribed topography of the Vermejo Formation subcrop. North of the De Weese Dye Ditch, the alluvium becomes saturated and groundwater generally flows to the northeast. Water samples from 28 sites were collected and analyzed for major ions and trace elements; selected water samples also were analyzed for stable isotopes; samples were collected from wells near the uranium ore processing mill, from privately owned wells in Lincoln Park, and from the test wells drilled in the intervening area. Results from the quality assurance samples indicate that cross-contamination between samples from different wells was avoided and that the data are reliable. Water in the alluvial aquifer underlying Lincoln Park is mainly a calcium bicarbonate type. Small variations in the composition of water in the alluvial aquifer appears to result from a reaction of water leaking from the De Weese Dye Ditch with alluvial material. Upward leakage from underlying aquifers does not seem to be significant in

  20. ABRUPT DEFLECTED SUPERCRITICAL WATER FLOW IN SLOPED CHANNELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ya-kun; NI Han-gen

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the bottom slope on abrupt deflected supercritical water flow was experimentally and theoretically studied. Model tests were conducted in a flume of 1.2 m wide and 2.6 m long with sloped bottom at an angle 35.54o, its length of deflector was 0.2 m and the deflection angles were 15o and 30o. An approximate method for calculatjng the shock wave angle and depth ratio of the abrupt deflected supercritical water flow was suggested, and a correction coefficient for the hydrodynamic pressure was introduced to generalize the momentum equation in the direction perpendicular to the shock front. It must be noticed that in the sloped channel the shock wave angle and the depth ratio are no longer constant as those in the horizontal channels, but slowly change along the shock front. The calculated results are in good agreement with measured data.

  1. Dinoflagellate bioluminescence in response to mechanical stimuli in water flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Cussatlegras

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioluminescence of plankton organisms induced by water movements has long been observed and is still under investigations because of its great complexity. In particular, the exact mechanism occurring at the level of the cell has not been yet fully understood. This work is devoted to the study of the bioluminescence of the dinoflagellates plankton species Pyrocystis noctiluca in response to mechanical stimuli generated by water flows. Several experiments were performed with different types of flows in a Couette shearing apparatus. All of them converge to the conclusion that stationary homogeneous laminar shear does not trigger massive bioluminescence, but that acceleration and shear are both necessary to stimulate together an intense bioluminescence response. The distribution of the experimental bioluminescence thresholds is finally calculated from the light emission response for the Pyrocystis noctiluca species.

  2. An accurate quantification of the flow structure along the acoustic signal cycle in a forced two-phase jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calvo Bernad Esteban

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an experimental study of an acoustically forced two-phase air jet generated by a convergent nozzle. The used particles are transparent glass spheres with diameters between 2 and 50 μm (which gives Stokes number of order 1 and the selected forcing frequency (f=400 Hz induces a powerful nearly periodic flow pattern. Measurements were done by a two-colour Phase-Doppler Anemometer. The experimental setup is computer-controlled to provide an accurate control with a high long-term stability. Measurements cover the whole forcing signal cycle. Raw measurements were carefully post-processed to avoid bias induced by the forcing and the instrument setup, as well as obtain right mean values of the dispersed flow. The effect of the forcing and the particle load allows authors to establish the effect of the acoustic forcing and the particle load on the jet.

  3. Low cryogen inventory, forced flow Ne cooling system with room temperature compression stage and heat recuperation

    CERN Document Server

    Shornikov, A; Wolf, A

    2014-01-01

    We present design and commissioning results of a forced flow cooling system utilizing neon at 30 K. The cryogen is pumped through the system by a room-temperature compression stage. To decouple the cold zone from the compression stage a recuperating counterflow tube-in-tube heat exchanger is used. Commissioning demonstrated successful condensation of neon and transfer of up to 30 W cooling power to the load at 30 K using only 30 g of the cryogen circulating in the system at pressures below 170 kPa.

  4. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of a Membrane/Water Interface : The Ordering of Water and Its Relation to the Hydration Force

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marrink, Siewert-Jan; Berkowitz, Max; Berendsen, Herman J.C.

    1993-01-01

    In order to obtain a better understanding of the origin of the hydration force, three molecular dynamic simulations of phospholipid/water multilamellar systems were performed. The simulated systems only differed in the amount of interbilayer water, ranging from the minimum to the maximum amount of

  5. Effect of electromagnetic force on turbulent flow of molten metal in aluminum electrolysis cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周萍; 梅炽; 周乃君; 姜昌伟

    2004-01-01

    The standard k-ε model was adopted to simulate the flow field of molten metal in three aluminum electrolysis cells with different anode risers. The Hartman number, Reynolds number and the turbulent Reynolds number of molten metal were calculated quantitatively. The turbulent Reynolds number is in the order of 103 , and Reynolds number is in the order of 104 if taking the depth of molten metal as the characteristic length. The results show that the molten metal flow is the turbulence of high Reynolds number, the turbulent Reynolds number is more appropriate than Reynolds number to be used to describe the turbulent characteristic of molten metal, and Hartman number displays very well that electromagnetic force inhibits turbulent motion of molten metal.

  6. Discrete unified gas kinetic scheme with force term for incompressible fluid flows

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Chen; Chai, Zhenhua; Wang, Peng

    2014-01-01

    The discrete unified gas kinetic scheme (DUGKS) is a finite-volume scheme with discretization of particle velocity space, which combines the advantages of both lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) method and unified gas kinetic scheme (UGKS) method, such as the simplified flux evaluation scheme, flexible mesh adaption and the asymptotic preserving properties. However, DUGKS is proposed for near incompressible fluid flows, the existing compressible effect may cause some serious errors in simulating incompressible problems. To diminish the compressible effect, in this paper a novel DUGKS model with external force is developed for incompressible fluid flows by modifying the approximation of Maxwellian distribution. Meanwhile, due to the pressure boundary scheme, which is wildly used in many applications, has not been constructed for DUGKS, the non-equilibrium extrapolation (NEQ) scheme for both velocity and pressure boundary conditions is introduced. To illustrate the potential of the proposed model, numerical simul...

  7. The effects of magnetic field on forced and free convection flow

    CERN Document Server

    Abdel-Khalek, M M

    2003-01-01

    The effects of magnetic field and permeability of the porous medium on unsteady forced and free convection flow past an infinite vertical porous plate have been studied when the temperature of the plate is oscillating with time about a constant nonzero mean value and in the presence of temperature dependent heat source. The governing equations for the hydromagnetic fluid flow and the heat transfer are solved subject to the relevant boundary conditions. The perturbation technique is used to obtain expressions for velocity field, skin friction and Nusselt number. Also, the effects of magnetic parameter, heat source parameter, suction parameter and permeability of porous medium on velocity field, skin friction and Nusselt number are discussed.

  8. Forced convection of power-law fluids flow over a rotating nonisothermal body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H. W.; Essemyi, A. J.

    1993-10-01

    Presented is an analysis of steady laminar flow of power-law fluids past a rotating body with nonisothermal surfaces. A coordinate transformation combined with the Merk-type series expansion is employed to transform the governing momentum equations into a set of coupled ordinary differential equations. The equations are numerically integrated to obtain the axial and tangential velocity gradients for determining the friction coefficient. For forced convection, a generalized coordinate transformation is used to analyze the temperature field of the power-law flow. Solutions to the transformed energy equations are obtained in the form of universal functions. The heat transfer coefficients in terms of NuRe(sup 1/(n + 1)) are presented for a rotating sphere. The effects of power-law index, rotation sphere, Prandtl number, and the location of step discontinuity in surface temperature on the local Nusselt number are fully investigated and demonstrated.

  9. Heat transfer enhancement on thin wires in superfluid helium forced flows

    CERN Document Server

    Duri, Davide; Moro, Jean-Paul; Roche, Philippe-Emmanuel; Diribarne, Pantxo

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we report the first evidence of an enhancement of the heat transfer from a heated wire by an external turbulent flow of superfluid helium. We used a standard Pt-Rh hot-wire anemometer and overheat it up to 21 K in a pressurized liquid helium turbulent round jet at temperatures between 1.9 K and 2.12 K. The null-velocity response of the sensor can be satisfactorily modeled by the counter flow mechanism while the extra cooling produced by the forced convection is found to scale similarly as the corresponding extra cooling in classical fluids. We propose a preliminary analysis of the response of the sensor and show that -contrary to a common assumption- such sensor can be used to probe local velocity in turbulent superfluid helium.

  10. Correlation networks from flows. The case of forced and time-dependent advection-diffusion dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Tupikina, Liubov; López, Cristóbal; Hernández-García, Emilio; Marwan, Norbert; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Complex network theory provides an elegant and powerful framework to statistically investigate different types of systems such as society, brain or the structure of local and long-range dynamical interrelationships in the climate system. Network links in climate networks typically imply information, mass or energy exchange. However, the specific connection between oceanic or atmospheric flows and the climate network's structure is still unclear. We propose a theoretical approach for verifying relations between the correlation matrix and the climate network measures, generalizing previous studies and overcoming the restriction to stationary flows. Our methods are developed for correlations of a scalar quantity (temperature, for example) which satisfies an advection-diffusion dynamics in the presence of forcing and dissipation. Our approach reveals that correlation networks are not sensitive to steady sources and sinks and the profound impact of the signal decay rate on the network topology. We illustrate our r...

  11. Multiphase forces on bend structures – critical gas fraction for transition single phase gas to multiphase flow behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belfroid, S.P.C.; Nennie, E.D.; Lewis, M.

    2016-01-01

    Piping structures are generally subjected to high dynamic loading due to multiphase forces. In particular subsea structures are very vulnerable as large flexibility is required to cope for instance with thermal stresses. The forces due to multiphase flow are characterized by a broadband spectrum wit

  12. Multiphase forces on bend structures – critical gas fraction for transition single phase gas to multiphase flow behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belfroid, S.P.C.; Nennie, E.D.; Lewis, M.

    2016-01-01

    Piping structures are generally subjected to high dynamic loading due to multiphase forces. In particular subsea structures are very vulnerable as large flexibility is required to cope for instance with thermal stresses. The forces due to multiphase flow are characterized by a broadband spectrum wit

  13. Experimental investigation of flow-structure interaction between a model biofilm streamer and water flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemifar, Farzan; Blois, Gianluca; Sinha, Sumit; Hardy, Richard; Best, James; Sambrook Smith, Gregory; Christensen, Kenneth

    2016-11-01

    Biofilms are permeable and deformable material whose bulk structure is composed of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) that houses bacterial colonies. The EPS is responsible for the mechanical properties of the biofilm. In this study we investigate the fluid-structure interaction between a model biofilm streamer and water flow in a closed-loop water channel in the laminar and transitional flow regimes, using the particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique. The model streamer is fabricated from acrylamide polymer hydrogel. The purpose for using this material is twofold: 1) its mechanical properties (i.e. elastic modulus) can be tuned by controlling its chemical composition, 2) the hydrogel is transparent with a refractive index (RI) very close to that of water, thus minimizing the optical distortions for flow visualization. The velocity vector fields obtained from PIV measurements are used to investigate the temporal evolution of the flow structure in the vicinity of the streamer, focusing on the vortex shedding mechanism and the resulting oscillations of the streamer.

  14. A 3-D nonisothermal flow simulation and pulling force model for injection pultrusion processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Ibrahim

    1998-12-01

    Injected Pultrusion (IP) is an efficient way of producing high quality, low cost, high volume and constant cross-section polymeric composites. This process has been developed recently, and the efforts to optimize it are still underway. This work is related to the development of a 3-D non-isothermal flow model for the IP processes. The governing equations for transport of mass, momentum and, energy are formulated by using a local volume averaging approach, and the Finite Element/Control Volume method is used to solve the system of equations numerically. The chemical species balance equation is solved in the Lagrangian frame of reference whereas the energy equation is solved using Galerkin, SU (Streamline Upwind), and SUPG (Streamline Upwind Petrov Galerkin) approaches. By varying degrees of freedom and the flow rates of the resin, it is shown that at high Peclet numbers the SUPG formulation performs better than the SU and the Galerkin methods in all cases. The 3-D model predictions for degree of cure and temperature are compared with a one dimensional analytical solution and the results are found satisfactory. Moreover, by varying the Brinkman Number, it is shown that the effect of viscous dissipation is insignificant. The 3-D flow simulations have been carried out for both thin and thick parts and the results are compared with the 2-D model. It is shown that for thick parts 2-D simulations render erroneous results. The effect of changing permeability on the flow fronts is also addressed. The effect of increasing taper angle on the model prediction is also investigated. A parametric study is conducted to isolate optimum conditions for both isothermal and non-isothermal cases using a straight rectangular die and a die with a tapered inlet. Finally, a simple pulling force model is developed and the pulling force required to pull the carbon-epoxy fiber resin system is estimated for dies of varying tapered inlet.

  15. Droplet and slug formation in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell flow channels: The role of interfacial forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colosqui, Carlos E.; Cheah, May J.; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G.; Benziger, Jay B.

    A microfluidic device is employed to emulate water droplet emergence from a porous electrode and slug formation in the gas flow channel of a PEM fuel cell. Liquid water emerges from a 50 μm pore forming a droplet; the droplet grows to span the entire cross-section of a microchannel and transitions into a slug which detaches and is swept downstream. Droplet growth, slug formation, detachment, and motion are analyzed using high-speed video images and pressure-time traces. Slug volume is controlled primarily by channel geometry, interfacial forces, and gravity. As water slugs move downstream, they leave residual micro-droplets that act as nucleation sites for the next droplet-to-slug transition. Residual liquid in the form of micro-droplets results in a significant decrease in slug volume between the very first slug formed in an initially dry channel and the ultimate "steady-state" slug. A physics-based model is presented to predict slug volumes and pressure drops for slug detachment and motion.

  16. 77 FR 74449 - Water Quality Standards for the State of Florida's Lakes and Flowing Waters; Proposed Rule; Stay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-14

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 131 RIN 2040-AF41 Water Quality Standards for the State of Florida's Lakes and Flowing... regulation the ``Water Quality Standards for the State of Florida's Lakes and Flowing Waters; Final Rule... Information Does this action apply to me? Citizens concerned with water quality in Florida may be interested...

  17. A COMBINED DATA PROCESSING METHOD ON WATER IMPACT FORCE MEASUREMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Meng-hua; CHEN Xiao-peng

    2012-01-01

    A combined method is proposed to determine the water entry acceleration at a low impact velocity through image processing.The procedure includes:(1) a sequence of images for water impact are recorded by a high speed camera,(2) the sub-pixel image processing method is employed to calculate the displacement with an accuracy on the “sub-pixel” level,(3) the acceleration of the object is acquired by differentiating the displacement twice and with results being further filtered by a carefully designed low-pass Butterworth filter.A theoretically based analysis is conducted for designing the parameters of the low-pass filters.It is shown that the water entry can be regarded as a procedure with a slowly changing velocity.The method is validated with the standard sinusoidal motion and the water entry of a sphere.This approach could be considered as an auxiliary method during the early-stage study of the water entry,and it could be further applied to some complicated circumstances,like the water entry of spinning spheres.

  18. Forced flow heat transfer from a round wire in a vertically- mounted pipe to supercritical hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horie, Y.; Shiotsu, M.; Shirai, Y.; Higa, D.; Shigeta, H.; Tatsumoto, H.; Naruo, Y.; Nonaka, S.; Kobayashi, H.; Inatani, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Forced flow heat transfer of hydrogen from a round wire in a vertically-mounted pipe was measured at pressure of 1.5 MPa and temperature of 21 K by applying electrical current to give an exponential heat input (Q=Q0exp(t/τ),τ=10 s) to the round wire. Two round wire heaters, which were made of Pt-Co alloy, with a diameter of 1.2 mm and lengths of 54.5 and 120 mm were set on the central axis of a flow channel made of FRP with inner diameter of 5.7 and 8.0 mm, respectively. Supercritical hydrogen flowed upward in the channel. Flow velocities were varied from 1 to 12.5 m/s. The heat transfer coefficients of supercritical hydrogen were compared with the conventional correlation presented by Shiotsu et al. It was confirmed that the heat transfer coefficients for a round wire were expressed well by the correlation using the hydraulic equivalent diameter.

  19. Continuum Simulations of Water Flow in Carbon Nanotube Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, J. H.; Popadic, A.; Koumoutsakos, P.; Praprotnik, M.

    2014-11-01

    We propose the use of the Navier-Stokes equations subject to partial-slip boundary conditions to simulate water flows in Carbon NanoTube (CNT) membranes. The finite volume discretisations of the Navier-Stokes equations are combined with slip lengths extracted from Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations to predict the pressure losses at the CNT entrance as well as the enhancement of the flow rate in the CNT. The flow quantities calculated from the present hybrid approach are in excellent agreement with pure MD results while they are obtained at a fraction of the computational cost. The method enables simulations of system sizes and times well beyond the present capabilities of MD simulations. Our simulations provide an asymptotic flow rate enhancement and indicate that the pressure losses at the CNT ends can be reduced by reducing their curvature. More importantly, our results suggest that flows at nanoscale channels can be described by continuum solvers with proper boundary conditions that reflect the molecular interactions of the liquid with the walls of the nanochannel.

  20. Water flow simulation and analysis in HMA microstructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Chen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a new method for reconstructing virtual two-dimensional (2-D microstructure of hot mix asphalt (HMA. Based on the method, the gradation of coarse aggregates and the film thickness of the asphalt binder can be defined by the user. The HMA microstructure then serves as the input to the computational fluid dynamic (CFD software (ANSYS-FLUENT to investigate the water flow pattern through it. It is found that the realistic flow fields can be simulated in the 2-D micro-structure and the flow patterns in some typical air void structures can be identified. These flow patterns can be used to explain the mechanism that could result in moisture damage in HMA pavement. The one-dimensional numerical permeability values are also derived from the flow fields of the 2-D HMA microstructure and compared with the measured values obtained by the Karol-Warner permeameter. Because the interconnected air voids channels in actual HMA samples cannot be fully represented in a 2-D model, some poor agreements need to be improved.

  1. Water flow boiling behaviors in hydrophilic and hydrophobic microchannels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Chiwoong; Yu, Dongin; Kim, Moohwan [Pohang University of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2009-07-01

    The wettability is one of issues on two-phase flow in a microchannel. However, previous studies of wettability effect on two-phase flow have conducted only isothermal condition. Moreover, most studies have used conventional micro/mini-tubes due to difficulties of their fabrication. The objective of our study is to understand the wettability effect on flow boiling in a rectangular microchannel. In the first, new micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) fabrication technique was developed to obtain a single glass rectangular microchannel and localized six micro heaters. A photosensitive glass was used as base material. The photosensitive glass is hydrophilic, so the hydrophobic microchannel was prepared by coating SAM, flow boiling experiments were conducted in hydrophilic and hydrophobic microchannels with micro heaters. The experiment range was the mass flux of 25 and 75 kg/m{sup 2}s, the heat flux of 30 - 430 k W/m2 and quality of 0 - 0.3. A working fluid was de-ionized and degassed water. The local heat transfer coefficient was evaluated at the local micro heater section. Also, flow regimes in the microchannel were visualized by using a high-speed camera with a long-distance microscope. Heat transfer was analyzed with visualization results. Heat transfer in the hydrophobic microchannel was enhanced by higher nucleation site density and delayed local dryout. The pressure drop in the hydrophobic microchannel was higher than that in the hydrophilic microchannel. (author)

  2. Sculpting of an erodible body by flowing water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristroph, Leif; Moore, Matthew N J; Childress, Stephen; Shelley, Michael J; Zhang, Jun

    2012-11-27

    Erosion by flowing fluids carves striking landforms on Earth and also provides important clues to the past and present environments of other worlds. In these processes, solid boundaries both influence and are shaped by the surrounding fluid, but the emergence of morphology as a result of this interaction is not well understood. We study the coevolution of shape and flow in the context of erodible bodies molded from clay and immersed in a fast, unidirectional water flow. Although commonly viewed as a smoothing process, we find that erosion sculpts pointed and cornerlike features that persist as the solid shrinks. We explain these observations using flow visualization and a fluid mechanical model in which the surface shear stress dictates the rate of material removal. Experiments and simulations show that this interaction ultimately leads to self-similarly receding boundaries and a unique front surface characterized by nearly uniform shear stress. This tendency toward conformity of stress offers a principle for understanding erosion in more complex geometries and flows, such as those present in nature.

  3. Effects of rainfall on water quality in six sequentially disposed fishponds with continuous water flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LH. Sipaúba-Tavares

    Full Text Available An investigation was carried out during the rainy period in six semi-intensive production fish ponds in which water flowed from one pond to another without undergoing any treatment. Eight sampling sites were assigned at pond outlets during the rainy period (December-February. Lowest and highest physical and chemical parameters of water occurred in pond P1 (a site near the springs and in pond P4 (a critical site that received allochthonous material from the other ponds and also from frog culture ponds, respectively. Pond sequential layout caused concentration of nutrients, chlorophyll-a and conductivity. Seasonal rains increased the water flow in the ponds and, consequently, silted more particles and other dissolved material from one fish pond to another. Silting increased limnological variables from P3 to P6. Although results suggest that during the period under analysis, rainfall affected positively the ponds' water quality and since the analyzed systems have been aligned in a sequential layout with constant water flow from fish ponds and parallel tanks without any previous treatment, care has to be taken so that an increase in rain-induced water flow does not have a contrary effect in the fish ponds investigated.

  4. EFFECT OF SURFACTANT ON TWO-PHASE FLOW PATTERNS OF WATER-GAS IN CAPILLARY TUBES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Flow patterns of liquid-gas two-phase flow were experimentally investigated. The experiments were carried out in both vertical and horizontal capillary tubes having inner diameters of 1.60 mm. The working liquid was the mixture of water and Sodium Dodecyl Benzoyl Sulfate (SDBS). The working gas was Nitrogen. For the water/SDBS mixture-gas flow in the vertical capillary tube, flow-pattern transitions occurred at lower flow velocities than those for the water-gas flow in the same tube. For the water/SDBS mixture-gas flow in the horizontal capillary tube, surface tension had little effect on the bubbly-intermittent transition and had only slight effect on the plug-slug and slug-annular transitions. However, surface tension had significant effect on the wavy stratified flow regime. The wavy stratified flow regime of water/SDBS mixture-gas flow expanded compared with that of water-gas.

  5. Impacts of land use and land cover change on water resources and water scarcity in the 20th century: a multi-model multi-forcing analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldkamp, Ted; Wada, Yoshihide; Ward, Philip; Aerts, Jeroen

    2016-04-01

    Socioeconomic developments increasingly put pressure on our global fresh water resources. Over the past century, increasing extents of land were converted into (irrigated) agricultural production areas whilst dams and reservoirs were built to get grip on the timing and availability of fresh water resources. Often targeted to be of use at local, regional, or national levels, such human interventions affect, however, terrestrial water fluxes on larger scales. Although many of these interventions have been studied intensively at global and regional scales, the impact of land use and land cover change has often been omitted, and an assessment on how land conversions impact water resources availability and water scarcity conditions was not executed before, despite its importance in the development of sound integrated river basin water management plans. To address this issue, we evaluate in this contribution how land use and land cover change impact water resources and water scarcity conditions in the 20th century, using a multi-model multi-forcing framework. A novelty of this research is that the impact models applied in this study use the dynamic HYDE 3.1 - MIRCA dataset to cover the historical (1971-2010) changes in land use and land cover. Preliminary results show that more than 60% of the global population, predominantly living in downstream areas, is adversely affected by the impacts of land use and land cover change on water resources and water scarcity conditions. Whilst incoming discharge generally (in 97% of the global land area) tends to decrease due to upstream land conversions, we found at the same time increases in local runoff levels for a significant share (27%) of the global land area. Which effect eventually dominates and whether it causes water scarcity conditions is determined by the dependency of a region to water resources originating in upstream areas, and by the increasing rates with which the (locally generated) stream flow is used to fulfil (non

  6. Superhydrophobic gecko feet with high adhesive forces towards water and their bio-inspired materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kesong; Du, Jiexing; Wu, Juntao; Jiang, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Functional integration is an inherent characteristic for multiscale structures of biological materials. In this contribution, we first investigate the liquid-solid adhesive forces between water droplets and superhydrophobic gecko feet using a high-sensitivity micro-electromechanical balance system. It was found, in addition to the well-known solid-solid adhesion, the gecko foot, with a multiscale structure, possesses both superhydrophobic functionality and a high adhesive force towards water. The origin of the high adhesive forces of gecko feet to water could be attributed to the high density nanopillars that contact the water. Inspired by this, polyimide films with gecko-like multiscale structures were constructed by using anodic aluminum oxide templates, exhibiting superhydrophobicity and a strong adhesive force towards water. The static water contact angle is larger than 150° and the adhesive force to water is about 66 μN. The resultant gecko-inspired polyimide film can be used as a ``mechanical hand'' to snatch micro-liter liquids. We expect this work will provide the inspiration to reveal the mechanism of the high-adhesive superhydrophobic of geckos and extend the practical applications of polyimide materials.

  7. A Numerical Analysis of the Forced Convection Condensation of Saturated Vapor Flowing Axially Outside a Horizontal Tube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WeizhongLi; WeichengWang; 等

    1995-01-01

    Physical and mathematical models are developed to describe the forced convection condensation heat transfer of saturated vapor flowing axially outside a horizontal tube.The numerical solution of the models indicates the effects of vapor velocity on the liquid film thickness.The result verifies the enhancement of condensation heat transfer caused by such flow.

  8. On the levitation force in horizontal core-annular flow with a large viscosity ratio and small density ratio

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooms, G.; Pourquie, M.J.B.M.; Beerens, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    A numerical study has been made of horizontal core-annular flow: the flow of a high-viscosity liquid core surrounded by a low-viscosity liquid annular layer through a horizontal pipe. Special attention is paid to the question how the buoyancy force on the core, caused by a density difference between

  9. Tomography of ground water flow from self-potential data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revil, A.; Jardani, A.

    2007-12-01

    An inversion algorithm is developed to interpret self-potential (SP) data in terms of distribution of the seepage velocity of the ground water. The model is based on the proportionality existing between the electrokinetic source current density and the seepage velocity of the water phase. As the inverse problem is underdetermined, we use a Tikhonov regularization method with a smoothness constraint based on the differential Laplacian operator to solve the inverse problem. The regularization parameter is determined by the L-shape method. The recovery of the distribution of the seepage velocity vector of the ground water flow depends on the localization and number of non-polarizing electrodes and information relative to the distribution of the electrical resistivity of the ground. The inversion method is tested on two 2D synthetic cases and on two real SP data. The first field test corresponds to the infiltration of water from a ditch. The second one corresponds to large flow at the Cerro Prieto geothermal field in Baja California.

  10. Dynamical Fluctuating Charge Force Fields Application to Liquid Water

    CERN Document Server

    Rick, S W; Berne, B J; Rick, Steven W.; Stuart, Steven J.

    1994-01-01

    A new molecular dynamics model in which the point charges on atomic sites are allowed to fluctuate in response to the environment is developed and applied to water. The idea for treating charges as variables is based on the concept of electronegativity equalization according to which: (a) The electronegativity of an atomic site is dependent on the atom's type and charge and is perturbed by the electrostatic potential it experiences from its neighbors and (b) Charge is transferred between atomic sites in such a way that electronegativities are equalized. The charges are treated as dynamical variables using an extended Lagrangian method in which the charges are given a fictitious mass, velocities and kinetic energy and then propagated according to Newtonian mechanics along with the atomic degrees of freedom. Models for water with fluctuating charges are developed using the geometries of two common fixed-charge water potentials: the simple point charge (SPC) and the 4-point transferable intermolecular potential ...

  11. On spurious water flow during numerical simulation of steam injection into water-saturated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudbjerg, J; Trötschler, O; Färber, A; Sonnenborg, T O; Jensen, K H

    2004-12-01

    Numerical simulation of steam injection into a water-saturated porous medium may be hindered by unphysical behavior causing the model to slow down. We show how spurious water flow may arise on the boundary between a steam zone and a saturated zone, giving rise to dramatic pressure drops. This is caused by the discretization of the temperature gradient coupled with the direct relation between pressure and temperature in the steam zone. The problem may be a severe limitation to numerical modeling. A solution is presented where the spurious water flow is blocked and this widely enhances the performance of the model. This new method is applied to a previously reported example exhibiting numerical problems. Furthermore, it is applied to the simulation of 2-D sandbox experiments where LNAPL is remediated from a smearing zone by steam injection. These experiments would have been difficult to analyze numerically without the adjustment to prevent spurious flow.

  12. Altitudes of the top of model layers for the transient ground-water flow model, Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set defines the altitudes of the tops of 16 model layers simulated in the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system (DVRFS) transient flow...

  13. Subregions of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set defines the subregions of the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system (DVRFS). Subregions are...

  14. Water Resource Inventory and Assessment - Flow Map Poster: William L. Finley National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This flow map depicts the flow and control of water on William L. Finley National Wildlife Refuge. It was produced as part of the Water Resource Inventory and...

  15. Water Resource Inventory and Assessment - Flow Map Poster: Baskett Slough National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This flow map depicts the flow and control of water on Baskett Slough National Wildlife Refuge. It was produced as part of the Water Resource Inventory and...

  16. Water Resource Inventory and Assessment - Flow Map Poster: Ankeny National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This flow map depicts the flow and control of water on Ankeny National Wildlife Refuge. It was produced as part of the Water Resource Inventory and Assessment...

  17. Ion motion in salt water flowing under a transverse magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Luca R.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The problem of ion motion in an electrolyte solution flowing in a thin rectangular duct with velocity VE in the presence of a transverse magnetic field B0 is studied by means of classical mechanics and electrodynamics. Because of Lorentz force on the ions in the electrolyte solution, a so called Faraday voltage appears at the electrodes orthogonal to both the field B0 and the velocity VE. The dynamics of positive and negative ions (cations and anions, respectively in this classical system is studied by taking into account the viscosity of the fluid and the process of charge accumulation on the opposite walls of the duct. Hydrogen production is seen to take place at one of the electrodes when salt water is taken as the flowing electrolyte.

  18. Numerical study of saturation steam/water mixture flow and flashing initial sub-cooled water flow inside throttling devices

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a Computational Fluid-Dynamics (CFD) approach to model this phenomenon inside throttling devices is proposed. To validate CFD results, different nozzle geometries are analyzed, comparing numerical results with experimental data. Two cases are studied: Case 1: saturation steam/water mixture flow inside 2D convergent-divergent nozzle (inlet, outlet and throat diameter of nozzle are 0.1213m, 0.0452m and 0.0191m respectively). In this benchmark, a range of total inle...

  19. Water flow exchange characteristics in coarse granular filter media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Rune Røjgaard; Pugliese, Lorenzo; Poulsen, Tjalfe

    2013-01-01

    in this study are performed at a concurrent airflow of 0.3 m s−1, water irrigation rates of 1–21 cm h−1 in materials with particle diameters ranging from 2 to 14 mm to represent media and operation conditions relevant for low flow biotrickling filter design. Specific surface area related elution velocity...... distribution was closely related to the filter water content, water irrigation rate, media specific surface area and particle size distribution. A predictive model linking the specific surface area related elution velocity distribution to irrigation rate, specific surface area and particle size distribution......Elution of inhibitory metabolites is a key parameter controlling the efficiency of air cleaning bio- and biotrickling filters. To the authors knowledge no studies have yet considered the relationship between specific surface area related elution velocity and physical media characteristics, which...

  20. Water flow exchange characteristics in coarse granular filter media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Rune Røjgaard; Pugliese, Lorenzo; Poulsen, Tjalfe

    2013-01-01

    Elution of inhibitory metabolites is a key parameter controlling the efficiency of air cleaning bio- and biotrickling filters. To the authors knowledge no studies have yet considered the relationship between specific surface area related elution velocity and physical media characteristics, which...... in this study are performed at a concurrent airflow of 0.3 m s−1, water irrigation rates of 1–21 cm h−1 in materials with particle diameters ranging from 2 to 14 mm to represent media and operation conditions relevant for low flow biotrickling filter design. Specific surface area related elution velocity...... distribution was closely related to the filter water content, water irrigation rate, media specific surface area and particle size distribution. A predictive model linking the specific surface area related elution velocity distribution to irrigation rate, specific surface area and particle size distribution...

  1. Montana's Clark Fork River Basin Task Force: a vehicle for integrated water resources management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shively, David D; Mueller, Gerald

    2010-11-01

    This article examines what is generally considered to be an unattainable goal in the western United States: integrated water resources management (IWRM). Specifically, we examine an organization that is quite unique in the West, Montana's Clark Fork River Basin Task Force (Task Force), and we analyze its activities since its formation in 2001 to answer the question: are the activities and contributions of the Task Force working to promote a more strongly integrated approach to water resources management in Montana? After reviewing the concepts underlying IWRM, some of the issues that have been identified for achieving IWRM in the West, and the Montana system of water right allocation and issues it faces, we adapt Mitchell's IWRM framework and apply it to the analysis of the Task Force's activities in the context of IWRM. In evaluating the physical, interaction, and protocol/planning/policy components of IWRM, we find that the Task Force has been contributing to the evolution of Montana's water resources management towards this framework, though several factors will likely continue to prevent its complete realization. The Task Force has been successful in this regard because of its unique nature and charge, and because of the authority and power given it by successive Montana legislatures. Also critical to the success of the organization is its ability to help translate into policy the outcomes of legal and quasi-judicial decisions that have impacted the state's water resources management agency.

  2. Magnetic forces and stationary electron flow in a three-terminal semiconductor quantum ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poniedziałek, M R; Szafran, B

    2010-06-01

    We study stationary electron flow through a three-terminal quantum ring and describe effects due to deflection of electron trajectories by classical magnetic forces. We demonstrate that generally at high magnetic field (B) the current is guided by magnetic forces to follow a classical path, which for B > 0 leads via the left arm of the ring to the left output terminal. The transport to the left output terminal is blocked for narrow windows of magnetic field for which the interference within the ring leads to formation of wavefunctions that are only weakly coupled to the output channel wavefunctions. These interference conditions are accompanied by injection of the current to the right arm of the ring and by appearance of sharp peaks of the transfer probability to the right output terminal. We find that these peaks at high magnetic field are attenuated by thermal widening of the transport window. We also demonstrate that the interference conditions that lead to their appearance vanish when elastic scattering within the ring is present. The clear effect of magnetic forces on the transfer probabilities disappears along with Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in a chaotic transport regime that is found for rings whose width is larger than the width of the channels.

  3. Unsteady 2D potential-flow forces and a thin variable geometry airfoil undergoing arbitrary motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaunaa, M.

    2006-07-15

    In this report analytical expressions for the unsteady 2D force distribution on a variable geometry airfoil undergoing arbitrary motion are derived under the assumption of incompressible, irrotational, inviscid flow. The airfoil is represented by its camberline as in classic thin-airfoil theory, and the deflection of the airfoil is given by superposition of chordwise deflection mode shapes. It is shown from the expressions for the forces, that the influence from the shed vorticity in the wake is described by the same time-lag for all chordwise positions on the airfoil. This time-lag term can be approximated using an indicial function approach, making the practical calculation of the aerodynamic response numerically very efficient by use of Duhamel superposition. Furthermore, the indicial function expressions for the time-lag terms are formulated in their equivalent state-space form, allowing for use of the present theory in problems employing the eigenvalue approach, such as stability analysis. The analytical expressions for the forces simplify to all previously known steady and unsteady thin-airfoil solutions. Apart from the obvious applications within active load control/reduction, the current theory can be used for various applications which up to now have been possible only using much more computational costly methods. The propulsive performance of a soft heaving propulsor, and the influence of airfoil camberline elasticity on the flutter limit are two computational examples given in the report that highlight this feature. (au)

  4. Modeling of flow and solidification of liquid water during unidirectional freezing in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saruya, Tomotaka; Rempel, Alan; Kurita, Kei

    2014-05-01

    Flow and phase change of liquid in porous media are fundamental processes in earth science and soil physics. Particularly in cold region or periglacial environment, the flow and solidification of pore water in the ground simultaneously occur and their collective interactions control the growth of ice lenses and upward displacement of surface called as frost heave. In the nucleation and growth of ice lenses, the homogeneous mixture of soil particles and pore water is transformed to the heterogeneous structure due to the water redistribution and the particle migration. Unfrozen water that is adsorbed to the particle surface or confined to capillary regions plays an important role in the formation of ice lenses and its behaviors have been investigated from a perspective of premelting dynamics (e.g., Worster and Wettlaufer 2006). In the porous media below the nominal melting temperature, intermolecular forces that act between particles and ice through the liquid thin film produce the net thermomolecular force that is responsible for the particle separation form the ice lenses(Dash et al. 2006). Although the mechanisms of ice lens formation have been investigated by many researchers, still large uncertainties remain and more experimental constraints are required. Here we present experimental results of ice lens formation, particularly focusing on the role of grain size and compare the model by Rempel et al (2004). We have performed the unidirectional freezing experiments using water-saturated glass beads that have uniform structures. Since the flow of water in porous media depends on the particles size and pore throat size (Darcy's law), we have prepared various sizes of glass beads from submicron to submillimeter. Our experiments reveal the clear relationships between the host particle sizes and nucleated location and lens thickness. Part of this work is already published in Saruya et al, PRE but we extended to smaller sized regime. We compared our experimental results

  5. Determination of blade-to-coolant heat-transfer coefficients on a forced-convection, water-cooled, single-stage turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freche, John C; Schum, Eugene F

    1951-01-01

    Blade-to-coolant convective heat-transfer coefficients were obtained on a forced-convection water-cooled single-stage turbine over a large laminar flow range and over a portion of the transition range between laminar and turbulent flow. The convective coefficients were correlated by the general relation for forced-convection heat transfer with laminar flow. Natural-convection heat transfer was negligible for this turbine over the Grashof number range investigated. Comparison of turbine data with stationary tube data for the laminar flow of heated liquids showed good agreement. Calculated average midspan blade temperatures using theoretical gas-to-blade coefficients and blade-to-coolant coefficients from stationary-tube data resulted in close agreement with experimental data.

  6. Elegant Shadow Making Tiny Force Visible for Water-Walking Arthropods and Updated Archimedes' Principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yelong; Lu, Hongyu; Yin, Wei; Tao, Dashuai; Shi, Lichun; Tian, Yu

    2016-10-07

    Forces acted on legs of water-walking arthropods with weights in dynes are of great interest for entomologist, physicists, and engineers. While their floating mechanism has been recognized, the in vivo leg forces stationary have not yet been simultaneously achieved. In this study, their elegant bright-edged leg shadows are used to make the tiny forces visible and measurable based on the updated Archimedes' principle. The force was approximately proportional to the shadow area with a resolution from nanonewton to piconewton/pixel. The sum of leg forces agreed well with the body weight measured with an accurate electronic balance, which verified updated Archimedes' principle at the arthropod level. The slight changes of vertical body weight focus position and the body pitch angle have also been revealed for the first time. The visualization of tiny force by shadow is cost-effective and very sensitive and could be used in many other applications.

  7. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    This report presents information related to the sampling of ground water at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. It is part of an investigation into possible ground water contamination. Information concerns well drilling/construction; x-ray diffraction and sampling; soil boring logs; and chain-of-custody records.

  8. Can irrigation water use be guided by market forces? Theory and practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellegers, P.J.G.J.; Perry, C.J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides insight into the relevance of market forces to typical problems found in irrigated agriculture. It first considers the theoretical basis for the use of economic instruments, such as volumetric water charges and tradable water rights, then considers their usefulness in the context

  9. Can irrigation water use be guided by market forces? Theory and practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellegers, P.J.G.J.; Perry, C.J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides insight into the relevance of market forces to typical problems found in irrigated agriculture. It first considers the theoretical basis for the use of economic instruments, such as volumetric water charges and tradable water rights, then considers their usefulness in the context

  10. Influence of ultrathin water layer on the van der Waals/Casimir force between gold surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G.; Svetovoy, V. B.; van Zwol, P. J.

    In this paper we investigate the influence of ultrathin water layer (similar to 1-1.5 nm) on the van der Waals/Casimir force between gold surfaces. Adsorbed water is inevitably present on gold surfaces at ambient conditions as jump-up-to contact during adhesion experiments demonstrate. Calculations

  11. 33 CFR 165.1411 - Security zone; waters surrounding U.S. Forces vessel SBX-1, HI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security zone; waters surrounding U.S. Forces vessel SBX-1, HI. 165.1411 Section 165.1411 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.1411 Security zone; waters surrounding U.S. Forces vessel SBX-1, HI. (a) Location. The...

  12. Influence of periodic water level increase on flow in Poznań Water Ways System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Kałuża

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the period 1968-1972, a project named “Rebuilding of the Poznań Water Ways System” was carried out. Within the scope of the project the Chwaliszewo Meander of the Warta river was cut off and covered. A discussion about reconstruction of Chwaliszewo Meander has been run for many years. The results of hydraulic computations of the influence of a weir on water table distribution in Poznań Water Ways System have been presented in the paper. Two different localizations of the weir were considered. Initial maximum water level of upper side of the weir was calculated. The influence of damming up on water level distribution in the Poznań Water Ways System was analysed. One-dimensional unsteady open channel flow computer systems HEC-RAS and SPRuNeR were used to carry out calculations. Building the weir, regardless of its localization, allows to raise water level in the main channel of the Warta river, increase minimum water depth and point to the architecture and recreation values of the Warta river. It is assumed that damming up is necessary only for flow rate below 100 m3/s in both localizations of the weir. The weir in focus should not create obstacles to the inland navigation and fish migration. To meet these requirements two additional hydraulic constructions must be projected: sluice and fish migration water gate.

  13. Downhole water flow controller for aquifer storage recovery wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyne, R.D.

    1987-09-08

    This patent describes a downhole flow control device for continuous automatic control of water flowing into or out of wells, aquifers and the like through pipe columns. The upper end of the first tubular member is mounted to the pipe column so as to be in fluid communication therewith. The lower end of the first tubular member is substantially closed. A second tubular member is mounted concentrically within and proximate to the first tubular member and has an open upper end and side walls and a substantially closed lower end. First openings are spaced in vertical relationship to the second openings. Third openings are through the second tubular member. The second tubular member is vertically movable with respect to the first tubular member so as to selectively align the third openings with either of the first and second openings. Biasing means are located between the lower ends of the first and second tubular members for normally urging the second tubular member vertically upward with respect to the first tubular member. The biasing means are yieldable upon the introduction of water into the pump column to permit the second tubular member to be vertically displaced relative to the first tubular member to thereby close the third openings with respect to the first or second openings. The third openings align with one of the first and second openings dependent upon the direction of fluid flow within the pipe column.

  14. Field-scale water flow and solute transport : Swap model concepts, parameter estimation and case studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van J.C.

    2000-01-01

    Water flow and solute transport in top soils are important elements in many environmental studies. The agro- and ecohydrological model SWAP (Soil-Water-Plant-Atmosphere) has been developed to simulate simultaneously water flow, solute transport, heat flow and crop growth at field scale level. The ma

  15. Optimal forcing perturbations for regional flow patterns conditioning polar low development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansen, Jørn; Iversen, Trond; Jung, Thomas; Barkmeijer, Jan

    2013-04-01

    olar lows are short lived maritime mesoscale cyclones that develop because of processes unique to the Polar Regions. In the ice-free Nordic and Barents Seas they are associated with violent weather during wintertime and form in cold air outbreaks underneath a cold through. The longer predictability of the large-scales may provide early warnings of the potential for polar lows. We investigate the rare events when the atmosphere is highly sensitive to small external forcings that excite changes in the variability of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). Employing a numerical weather prediction model, the period 1957-2002 is sampled for 4-day optimal forcing sensitivity patterns (FSPs). The highly sensitive events are relatively well-defined. A flow pattern resembling the negative-phase NAO is identified as a potential precursor of the most unpredictable transitions in the NAO. The least sensitive events are dominated by a coinciding cyclonic circulation. In the former there is high polar low potential (40-45%) in the northern North Atlantic but it is low south of Iceland. The least sensitive events display high potential along the storm track reaching 80% south of Iceland. The FSPs tend to either strengthen or hamper the transition toward the negative-phase NAO. The strengthened circulation makes the atmosphere favourable in 70% of the events for the formation of polar lows in the Nordic and Barents Seas with high potentials also in the North Sea. From the hampered transition we learn that in the Nordic Seas high- and low-pressure systems can produce similar levels of polar low potential. Temperature and momentum are equally important forcing variables and there are positive feedbacks between them. The forcing is dominantly in-situ and strongest in mid-troposphere. The variability is more localized and larger than the average. Close to the surface the FSPs appear influenced by the Norwegian current.

  16. Definition of hydraulic stability of KVGM-100 hot-water boiler and minimum water flow rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, A. A.; Ozerov, A. N.; Usikov, N. V.; Shkondin, I. A.

    2016-08-01

    In domestic power engineering, the methods of quantitative and qualitative-quantitative adjusting the load of the heat supply systems are widely distributed; furthermore, during the greater part of the heating period, the actual discharge of network water is less than estimated values when changing to quantitative adjustment. Hence, the hydraulic circuits of hot-water boilers should ensure the water velocities, minimizing the scale formation and excluding the formation of stagnant zones. The results of the calculations of hot-water KVGM-100 boiler and minimum water flow rate for the basic and peak modes at the fulfillment of condition of the lack of surface boil are presented in the article. The minimal flow rates of water at its underheating to the saturation state and the thermal flows in the furnace chamber were defined. The boiler hydraulic calculation was performed using the "Hydraulic" program, and the analysis of permissible and actual velocities of the water movement in the pipes of the heating surfaces was carried out. Based on the thermal calculations of furnace chamber and thermal- hydraulic calculations of heating surfaces, the following conclusions were drawn: the minimum velocity of water movement (by condition of boiling surface) at lifting movement of environment increases from 0.64 to 0.79 m/s; it increases from 1.14 to 1.38 m/s at down movement of environmental; the minimum water flow rate by the boiler in the basic mode (by condition of the surface boiling) increased from 887 t/h at the load of 20% up to 1074 t/h at the load of 100%. The minimum flow rate is 1074 t/h at nominal load and is achieved at the pressure at the boiler outlet equal to 1.1 MPa; the minimum water flow rate by the boiler in the peak mode by condition of surface boiling increases from 1669 t/h at the load of 20% up to 2021 t/h at the load of 100%.

  17. Open water processes of the San Francisco Estuary: From physical forcing to biological responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim Kimmerer

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the current state of knowledge of the open waters of the San Francisco Estuary. This estuary is well known for the extent to which it has been altered through loss of wetlands, changes in hydrography, and the introduction of chemical and biological contaminants. It is also one of the most studied estuaries in the world, with much of the recent research effort aimed at supporting restoration efforts. In this review I emphasize the conceptual foundations for our current understanding of estuarine dynamics, particularly those aspects relevant to restoration. Several themes run throughout this paper. First is the critical role physical dynamics play in setting the stage for chemical and biological responses. Physical forcing by the tides and by variation in freshwater input combine to control the movement of the salinity field, and to establish stratification, mixing, and dilution patterns throughout the estuary. Many aspects of estuarine dynamics respond to interannual variation in freshwater flow; in particular, abundance of several estuarine-dependent species of fish and shrimp varies positively with flow, although the mechanisms behind these relationships are largely unknown. The second theme is the importance of time scales in determining the degree of interaction between dynamic processes. Physical effects tend to dominate when they operate at shorter time scales than biological processes; when the two time scales are similar, important interactions can arise between physical and biological variability. These interactions can be seen, for example, in the response of phytoplankton blooms, with characteristic time scales of days, to stratification events occurring during neap tides. The third theme is the key role of introduced species in all estuarine habitats; particularly noteworthy are introduced waterweeds and fishes in the tidal freshwater reaches of the estuary, and introduced clams there and in brackish water. The

  18. Modelling of a water plasma flow: I. Basic results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KotalIk, Pavel [INP Greifswald, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Strasse 19, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2006-06-21

    One-fluid MHD equations are numerically solved for an axisymmetric flow of thermal water plasma inside and outside a discharge chamber of a plasma torch with water vortex stabilization of electric arc. Comparisons with experimental data and previous calculations are given. For arc currents of 300-600 A, the respective temperatures and velocities in the range 16 700-26 400 K and 2300-6900 m s{sup -1} are obtained at the centre of the nozzle exit. The flow velocity on axis increases by 1-2 km s{sup -1} in the 5 mm long nozzle. Ohmic heating and radiative losses are two competitive processes influencing most the plasma temperature and velocity. The radiative losses represent 39% to 46% of the torch power of 69-174 kW when optical thickness of 3 mm is assumed for the plasma column. In front of the cathode, inside the discharge chamber, a recirculation zone is predicted and discussed. Effects of the temperature dependence of the plasma viscosity and sound velocity and of the optical thickness are examined. It is shown that the results such as waviness of the Mach number isolines are direct consequences of these dependences. Different lengths of 55 and 60 mm of the water vortex stabilized part of the electric arc do not substantially influence the plasma temperature and velocity at the nozzle exit.

  19. Experimental study of critical flow of water at supercritical pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuzhou CHEN; Chunsheng YANG; Shuming ZHANG; Minfu ZHAO; Kaiwen DU; Xu CHENG

    2009-01-01

    Experimental studies of the critical flow of water were conducted under steady-state conditions with a nozzle 1.41mm in diameter and 4.35 mm in length, covering the inlet pressure range of 22.1-26.8 MPa and inlet temperature range of 38^74°C. The parametric trend of the flow rate was investigated, and the experimental data were compared with the predictions of the homogeneous equilibrium model, the Bernoulli correlation, and the models used in the reactor safety analysis code RELAP5/ MOD3.3. It is concluded that in the near or beyond pseudo-critical region, thermal-dynamic equilibrium is dominant, and at a lower temperature, choking does not occur. The onset of the choking condition is not predicted reasonably by the RELAP5 code.

  20. Effect of microscale protrusions on local fluid flow and mass transport in the presence of forced convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matzen, Gehard W. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Three-dimensional creeping flow around single, axisymmetric protrusions is studied numerically using the boundary-integral technique. Emphasis is placed upon cylindrical protrusions on plane walls for various height-to-radius (h-to-a) aspect ratios, but cones and sections of spheres protruding from plane walls are also briefly examined. The presented items include shear-stress distributions, shear-stress contours, extents of the fluid-flow disturbance, total forces and torques on the cylinders, streamlines, and skin-friction lines. Also included is a discussion of flow topology around axisymmetric geometries. No flow reversal is observed for cylindrical protrusions with aspect ratios greater than 2.4 to 2.6. At higher aspect ratios, the fluid tends to be swept around cylindrical protrusions with little vertical motion. At lower aspect ratios, the strength of the recirculation increases, and the recirculation region becomes wider in the transverse direction and narrower in the flow direction. Also, the recirculation pattern begins to resemble the closed streamline patterns in two-dimensional flow over square ridges. However, unlike two-dimensional flow, closed streamline patterns are not observed. For arbitrary axisymmetric geometries, the extent of the fluid-flow disturbance can be estimated with the total force that is exerted on the protrusion. When the same force is exerted on protrusions with different aspect ratios, the protrusion with the higher aspect ratio tends to have a greater disturbance in the flow direction and a smaller disturbance in the transverse direction. The total force exerted on cylindrical protrusions with rounded corners is only slightly lower than the total force exerted on cylindrical protrusions with sharp corners.

  1. Discharge areas for the transient ground-water flow model, Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set represents discharge areas in the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system (DVRFS) transient model. Natural ground-water discharge occurs...

  2. Model grid and infiltration values for the transient ground-water flow model, Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set defines the model grid and infiltration values simulated in the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water...

  3. Model grid and infiltration values for the transient ground-water flow model, Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set defines the model grid and infiltration values simulated in the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water...

  4. Discharge areas for the transient ground-water flow model, Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set represents discharge areas in the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system (DVRFS) transient model. Natural ground-water discharge...

  5. An Experimental Study on the Flow Characteristics of OilWater Two-Phase Flow in Horizontal Straight Pipes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘文红; 郭烈锦; 吴铁军; 张西民

    2003-01-01

    The flow patterns and their transitions of oil-water two-phase flow in horizontal pipes were studied. The experiments were conducted in two kinds of horizontal tubes, made of plexiglas pipe and stainless steel pipe with 40mm ID respectively. No. 46 mechanical oil and tap water were used as working fluids. The superficial velocity ranges of oil and water were: 0.04-1.2m·s-1 and 0.04-2.2 m·s-1, respectively. The flow patterns were identified by visualization and by transient fluctuation signals of differential pressure drop. The flow patterns were defined according to the relative distribution ofoil and water phases in the pipes. Flow pattern maps were obtained for both pipelines. In addition, semi-theoretical transition criteria for the flow patterns were proposed, and the proposed transitional criteria are in reasonable agreement with available data in liquid-liquid systems.

  6. Bioinspired oil strider floating at the oil/water interface supported by huge superoleophobic force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xueli; Gao, Jun; Xue, Zhongxin; Chen, Li; Lin, Ling; Jiang, Lei; Wang, Shutao

    2012-06-26

    Oil pollution to aquatic devices, especially to those oil-cleaning devices and equipment-repairing robots during oil spill accidents, has drawn great attention and remains an urgent problem to be resolved. Developing devices that can move freely in an oil/water system without contamination from oil has both scientific and practical importance. In nature, the insect water strider can float on water by utilizing the superhydrophobic supporting force received by its legs. Inspired by this unique floating phenomenon, in this article, we designed a model device named "oil strider" that could float stably at the oil/water interface without contamination by oil. The floating capability of the oil strider originated from the huge underwater superoleophobic supporting force its "legs" received. We prepared the micro/nanohierarchical structured copper-oxide-coated copper wires, acting as the artificial legs of oil strider, by a simple base-corrosion process. The surface structures and hydrophilic chemical components of the coatings on copper wires induced the huge superoleophobic force at the oil/water interface, to support the oil strider from sinking into the oil. Experimental results and theoretical analysis demonstrate that this supporting force is mainly composed of three parts: the buoyancy force, the curvature force, and the deformation force. We anticipate that this artificial oil strider will provide a guide for the design of smart aquatic devices that can move freely in an oil/water system with excellent oil repellent capability, and be helpful in practical situations such as oil handling and oil spill cleanup.

  7. In-Line Oil-Water Separation in Swirling Flow (USB stick)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slot, J.J.; van Campen, L.J.A.M.; Hoeijmakers, Hendrik Willem Marie; Mudde, R.F.; Johansen, S.T.

    2011-01-01

    An in-line oil-water separator has been designed and is investigated for single- and two-phase flow. Numerical single-phase flow results show an annular reversed flow region. This flow pattern agrees qualitatively with results from measurements. In the two-phase flow simulations two different drag

  8. Experimental Study of Natural Convective Flow over a Hot Horizontal Rhombus Cylinder Immersed in Water via PIV Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Karbasi pour

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural convective flow over a horizontal cylinder is a phenomenon used in many industries such as heat transfer from an electrical wire, heat exchanger, pipe heat transfer, etc. In this research, fluid dynamics of natural convective flow over a horizontal rhombus cylinder, with uniform heat flux, is investigated by using two-dimensional Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV Technique. Experiments are carried out in a cubical tank full of water having an interface with air and the cylinder is placed horizontally inside the tank. The heater is turned on for 40s and the effects of heater's power and the height of water above the cylinder are surveyed. The experiments are carried out in three different heights of water and two different heater’s powers in which Rayleigh number changes from 1.33×107 to 1.76×107. The emitted heat flux causes the buoyancy force to be made and the main branch of flow to be formed. Then, moving up the main branch flow through the stationary water generates two equal anti-direction vortexes. These vortexes are developed when they reach the free surface. The results indicate that the flow pattern changes for different values of water height and heater’s power.

  9. Analog modeling of pressurized subglacial water flow: Implications for tunnel valley formation and ice flow dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelandais, Thomas; Ravier, Edouard; Mourgues, Régis; Pochat, Stéphane; Strzerzynski, Pierre; Bourgeois, Olivier

    2017-04-01

    Tunnel valleys are elongated and overdeepened depressions up to hundreds of kilometers long, several kilometers wide and hundreds of meters deep, found in formerly glaciated areas. These drainage features are interpreted as the result of subglacial meltwater erosion beneath ice sheets and constitute a major component of the subglacial drainage system. Although tunnel valleys have been described worldwide in the past decades, their formation is still a matter of debate. Here, we present an innovative experimental approach simulating pressurized water flow in a subglacial environment in order to study the erosional processes occurring at the ice-bed interface. We use a sandbox partially covered by a circular, viscous and transparent lid (silicon putty), simulating an impermeable ice cap. Punctual injection of pressurized water in the substratum at the center of the lid simulates meltwater production beneath the ice cap. Surface images collected by six synchronized cameras allow to monitor the evolution of the experiment through time, using photogrammetry methods and DEM generation. UV markers placed in the silicon are used to follow the silicon flow during the drainage of water at the substratum-lid interface, and give the unique opportunity to simultaneously follow the formation of tunnel valleys and the evolution of ice dynamics. When the water pressure is low, groundwater circulates within the substratum only and no drainage landforms appear at the lid-substratum interface. By contrast, when the water pressure exceeds a threshold that is larger than the sum of glaciostatic and lithostatic pressures, additional water circulation occurs at the lid-substratum interface and drainage landforms develop from the lid margin. These landforms share numerous morphological criteria with tunnel valleys such as undulating longitudinal profiles, U-shaped cross-sectional profiles with flat floors, constant widths and abrupt flanks. Continuous generation of DEMs and flow velocity

  10. Compounding Effects of Agricultural Land Use and Water Use in Free-Flowing Rivers: Confounding Issues for Environmental Flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardie, Scott A; Bobbi, Chris J

    2017-03-03

    Defining the ecological impacts of water extraction from free-flowing river systems in altered landscapes is challenging as multiple stressors (e.g., flow regime alteration, increased sedimentation) may have simultaneous effects and attributing causality is problematic. This multiple-stressor context has been acknowledged in environmental flows science, but is often neglected when it comes to examining flow-ecology relationships, and setting and implementing environmental flows. We examined the impacts of land and water use on rivers in the upper Ringarooma River catchment in Tasmania (south-east Australia), which contains intensively irrigated agriculture, to support implementation of a water management plan. Temporal and spatial and trends in river condition were assessed using benthic macroinvertebrates as bioindicators. Relationships between macroinvertebrate community structure and environmental variables were examined using univariate and multivariate analyses, focusing on the impacts of agricultural land use and water use. Structural changes in macroinvertebrate communities in rivers in the catchment indicated temporal and spatial declines in the ecological condition of some stretches of river associated with agricultural land and water use. Moreover, water extraction appeared to exacerbate impairment associated with agricultural land use (e.g., reduced macroinvertebrate density, more flow-avoiding taxa). The findings of our catchment-specific bioassessments will underpin decision-making during the implementation of the Ringarooma water management plan, and highlight the need to consider compounding impacts of land and water use in environmental flows and water planning in agricultural landscapes.

  11. Free jet water flow in Pelton turbines; Freistrahlstroemungen in Peltonturbinen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Z.; Casey, M.

    2003-07-01

    This short article presents the results of experimental investigations made on the flow processes found in the jets of water in Pelton turbines. The results can be used to improve basic knowledge on the design of nozzles and the interaction between the jet and the cups on the Pelton turbine's wheel and thus help improve the efficiency of Pelton turbine systems. Brief details are given on the experimental arrangement and the measurement methods used, which included a Laser-Doppler-Anemometer system.

  12. Cells in 3D matrices under interstitial flow: effects of extracellular matrix alignment on cell shear stress and drag forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, John A; Lichter, Seth; Swartz, Melody A

    2010-03-22

    Interstitial flow is an important regulator of various cell behaviors both in vitro and in vivo, yet the forces that fluid flow imposes on cells embedded in a 3D extracellular matrix (ECM), and the effects of matrix architecture on those forces, are not well understood. Here, we demonstrate how fiber alignment can affect the shear and pressure forces on the cell and ECM. Using computational fluid dynamics simulations, we show that while the solutions of the Brinkman equation accurately estimate the average fluid shear stress and the drag forces on a cell within a 3D fibrous medium, the distribution of shear stress on the cellular surface as well as the peak shear stresses remain intimately related to the pericellular fiber architecture and cannot be estimated using bulk-averaged properties. We demonstrate that perpendicular fiber alignment of the ECM yields lower shear stress and pressure forces on the cells and higher stresses on the ECM, leading to decreased permeability, while parallel fiber alignment leads to higher stresses on cells and increased permeability, as compared to a cubic lattice arrangement. The Spielman-Goren permeability relationships for fibrous media agreed well with CFD simulations of flow with explicitly considered fibers. These results suggest that the experimentally observed active remodeling of ECM fibers by fibroblasts under interstitial flow to a perpendicular alignment could serve to decrease the shear and drag forces on the cell.

  13. 75 FR 45579 - Water Quality Standards for the State of Florida's Lakes and Flowing Waters; Supplemental Notice...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-03

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 131 RIN 2040-AF11 Water Quality Standards for the State of Florida's Lakes and Flowing... 26, 2010, notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM), proposing numeric nutrient water quality criteria to protect aquatic life in lakes and flowing waters within the State of Florida. In the January 2010 NPRM...

  14. MRI investigation of water-oil two phase flow in straight capillary, bifurcate channel and monolayered glass bead pack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Jiang, Lanlan; Zhu, Ningjun; Zhao, Yuechao; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Dayong; Yang, Mingjun; Zhao, Jiafei; Song, Yongchen

    2015-09-01

    The study of immiscible fluid displacement between aqueous-phase liquids and non-aqueous-phase liquids in porous media is of great importance to oil recovery, groundwater contamination, and underground pollutant migration. Moreover, the attendant viscous, capillary, and gravitational forces are essential to describing the two-phase flows. In this study, magnetic resonance imaging was used to experimentally examine the detailed effects of the viscous, capillary, and gravitational forces on water-oil flows through a vertical straight capillary, bifurcate channel, and monolayered glass-bead pack. Water flooding experiments were performed at atmospheric pressure and 37.8°C, and the evolution of the distribution and saturation of the oil as well as the characteristics of the two-phase flow were investigated and analyzed. The results showed that the flow paths, i.e., the fingers of the displacing phase, during the immiscible displacement in the porous medium were determined by the viscous, capillary, and gravitational forces as well as the sizes of the pores and throats. The experimental results afford a fundamental understanding of immiscible fluid displacement in a porous medium.

  15. Numerical investigation of forced convection of nano fluid flow in horizontal U-longitudinal finned tube heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qasim, S. M.; Sahar, A. F. A.; Firas, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    A numerical study has been carried out to investigate the heat transfer by laminar forced convection of nanofluid taking Titania (TiO2) and Alumina (Al2O3) as nanoparticles and the water as based fluid in a three dimensional plain and U-longitudinal finned tube heat exchanger. A Solid WORKS PREMIUM 2012 is used to draw the geometries of plain tube heat exchanger or U-longitudinal copper finned tube heat exchanger. Four U-longitudinal copper fins have 100 cm long, 3.8cm height and 1mm thickness are attached to a straight copper tube of 100 cm length, 2.2 cm inner diameter and 2.39 cm outer diameter. The governing equations which used as continuity, momentum and energy equations under assumptions are utilized to predict the flow field, temperature distribution, and heat transfer of the heat exchanger. The finite volume approach is used to obtain all the computational results using commercial ANSYS Fluent copy package 14.0 with assist of solid works and Gambit software program. The effect of various parameters on the performance of heat exchanger are investigated numerically such as Reynolds' number (ranging from 270 to 1900), volume consternation of nanoparticles (0.2%, 0.4%, 0.6%, 0.8%), type of nanoparticles, and mass flow rate of nanofluid in the hot region of heat exchanger. For 0.8% consternation of nanoparticles, heat transfer has significant enhancement in both nanofluids. It can be found about 7.3% for TiO2 and about 7.5% for Al2O3 compared with the water only as a working fluid.

  16. Diabatic forcing and initialization with assimilation of cloud and rain water in a forecast model: Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, William H.; Olson, William S.; Callan, Geary

    1990-01-01

    The focus of this part of the investigation is to find one or more general modeling techniques that will help reduce the time taken by numerical forecast models to initiate or spin-up precipitation processes and enhance storm intensity. If the conventional data base could explain the atmospheric mesoscale flow in detail, then much of our problem would be eliminated. But the data base is primarily synoptic scale, requiring that a solution must be sought either in nonconventional data, in methods to initialize mesoscale circulations, or in ways of retaining between forecasts the model generated mesoscale dynamics and precipitation fields. All three methods are investigated. The initialization and assimilation of explicit cloud and rainwater quantities computed from conservation equations in a mesoscale regional model are examined. The physical processes include condensation, evaporation, autoconversion, accretion, and the removal of rainwater by fallout. The question of how to initialize the explicit liquid water calculations in numerical models and how to retain information about precipitation processes during the 4-D assimilation cycle are important issues that are addressed. The explicit cloud calculations were purposely kept simple so that different initialization techniques can be easily and economically tested. Precipitation spin-up processes associated with three different types of weather phenomena are examined. Our findings show that diabatic initialization, or diabatic initialization in combination with a new diabatic forcing procedure, work effectively to enhance the spin-up of precipitation in a mesoscale numerical weather prediction forecast. Also, the retention of cloud and rain water during the analysis phase of the 4-D data assimilation procedure is shown to be valuable. Without detailed observations, the vertical placement of the diabatic heating remains a critical problem.

  17. THE HEAT AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS FOR WATER HEATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Nan Lin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the heat transfer and fluid flow are studied for the water heater of RV cars, in which the hot water is heated by the combustion energy of liquefied petroleum gases. Three types of combustion tubes are performed in this investigation, which are circular tube, elliptic tube and elliptic tube with screwed wire inserted. The heat transfer performances of numerical simulation results are compared with those of the experimental works; they are in good trend agreement. The elliptic combustion tube performs better than the circular one, which indicates the average 7% energy saving for the elliptic combustion tube and 12% energy saving for the elliptic combustion tube with screwed wire under static heating.

  18. Flow boiling of water on nanocoated surfaces in a microchannel

    CERN Document Server

    Phan, Hai Trieu; Marty, Philippe; Colasson, Stéphane; Gavillet, Jérôme

    2010-01-01

    Experiments were performed to study the effects of surface wettability on flow boiling of water at atmospheric pressure. The test channel is a single rectangular channel 0.5 mm high, 5 mm wide and 180 mm long. The mass flux was set at 100 kg/m2 s and the base heat flux varied from 30 to 80 kW/m2. Water enters the test channel under subcooled conditions. The samples are silicone oxide (SiOx), titanium (Ti), diamond-like carbon (DLC) and carbon-doped silicon oxide (SiOC) surfaces with static contact angles of 26{\\deg}, 49{\\deg}, 63{\\deg} and 103{\\deg}, respectively. The results show significant impacts of surface wettability on heat transfer coefficient.

  19. Complete genome sequence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus FORC_023 isolated from raw fish storage water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Han Young; Na, Eun Jung; Lee, Kyu-Ho; Ryu, Sangryeol; Yoon, Hyunjin; Lee, Ju-Hoon; Kim, Hyeun Bum; Kim, Heebal; Choi, Sang Ho; Kim, Bong-Soo

    2016-06-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticusis a Gram-negative halophilic bacterium that causes food-borne gastroenteritis in humans who consumeV. parahaemolyticus-contaminated seafood.The FORC_023 strain was isolated from raw fish storage water, containing live fish at a sashimi restaurant. Here, we aimed to sequence and characterize the genome of the FORC_023 strain. The genome of the FORC_023 strain showed two circular chromosomes, which contained 4227 open reading frames (ORFs), 131 tRNA genes and 37 rRNA genes. Although the genome of FORC_023 did not include major virulence genes, such as genes encoding thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and TDH-related hemolysin (TRH), it contained genes encoding other hemolysins, secretion systems, iron uptake-related proteins and severalV. parahaemolyticusislands. The highest average nucleotide identity value was obtained between the FORC_023 strain and UCM-V493 (CP007004-6). Comparative genomic analysis of FORC_023 with UCM-V493 revealed that FORC_023 carried an additional genomic region encoding virulence factors, such as repeats-in-toxin and type II secretion factors. Furthermore,in vitrocytotoxicity testing showed that FORC_023 exhibited a high level of cytotoxicity toward INT-407 human epithelial cells. These results suggested that the FORC_023 strain may be a food-borne pathogen.

  20. Unsaturated water flow and tracer transport modeling with Alliances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constantin, Alina, E-mail: alina.constantin@nuclear.ro [Institute for Nuclear Research, Campului Str, No. 1, PO Box 78, Postal Code 115400 Mioveni, Arges County (Romania); Genty, Alain, E-mail: alain.genty@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DM2S/SFME/LSE, Gif-sur-Yvette 91191 cedex (France); Diaconu, Daniela; Bucur, Crina [Institute for Nuclear Research, Campului Str, No. 1, PO Box 78, Postal Code 115400 Mioveni, Arges County (Romania)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Simulation of water flow and solute transport at Saligny site, Romania was done. • Computation was based on the available experimental data with Alliances platform. • Very good results were obtained for the saturation profile in steady state. • Close fit to experimental data for saturation profile at 3 m in transient state. • Large dispersivity coefficients were fitted to match tracer experiment. - Abstract: Understanding water flow and solute transport in porous media is of central importance in predicting the radionuclide fate in the geological environment, a topic of interest for the performance and safety assessment studies for nuclear waste disposal. However, it is not easy to predict transport properties in real systems because they are geologically heterogeneous from the pore scale upwards. This paper addresses the simulation of water flow and solute transport in the unsaturated zone of the Saligny site, the potential location for the Romanian low and intermediate level waste (LILW) disposal. Computation was based on the current available experimental data for this zone and was performed within Alliances, a software platform initially jointly developed by French organizations CEA, ANDRA and EDF. The output of the model developed was compared with the measured values in terms of saturation profile of the soil for water movement, in both steady and transient state. Very good results were obtained for the saturation profile in steady state and a close fit of the simulation over experimental data for the water saturation profile at a depth of 3 m in transient state. In order to obtain information regarding the solute migration in depth and the solute lateral dispersion, a tracer test was launched on site and dispersivity coefficients of the solute were fitted in order to match the experimental concentration determined on samples from different locations of the site. Results much close to the experiment were obtained for a longitudinal

  1. Forced convection analysis for generalized Burgers nanofluid flow over a stretching sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Masood; Khan, Waqar Azeem

    2015-10-01

    This article reports the two-dimensional forced convective flow of a generalized Burgers fluid over a linearly stretched sheet under the impacts of nano-sized material particles. Utilizing appropriate similarity transformations the coupled nonlinear partial differential equations are converted into a set of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The analytic results are carried out through the homotopy analysis method (HAM) to investigate the impact of various pertinent parameters for the velocity, temperature and concentration fields. The obtained results are presented in tabular form as well as graphically and discussed in detail. The presented results show that the rate of heat transfer at the wall and rate of nanoparticle volume fraction diminish with each increment of the thermophoresis parameter. While incremented values of the Brownian motion parameter lead to a quite opposite effect on the rates of heat transfer and nanoparticle volume fraction at the wall.

  2. Laminar forced convection slip-flow in a micro-annulus between two concentric cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avci, Mete; Aydin, Orhan [Karadeniz Technical University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey)

    2008-07-01

    Forced convection heat transfer in hydrodynamically and thermally fully developed flows of viscous dissipating gases in annular microducts between two concentric micro cylinders is analyzed analytically. The viscous dissipation effect, the velocity slip and the temperature jump at the wall are taken into consideration. Two different cases of the thermal boundary conditions are considered: uniform heat flux at the outer wall and adiabatic inner wall (Case A) and uniform heat flux at the inner wall and adiabatic outer wall (Case B). Solutions for the velocity and temperature distributions and the Nusselt number are obtained for different values of the aspect ratio, the Knudsen number and the Brinkman number. The analytical results obtained are compared with those available in the literature and an excellent agreement is observed. (author)

  3. The effects of outward forced convective flow on inward diffusion in human dentine in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashley, D H; Matthews, W G

    1993-07-01

    In vitro experiments were conducted to evaluate the influence of outward forced convective flow on the inward diffusion of radioactive iodide. When the smear layer was present, application of 15 cmH2O (1.47 kPa) outward-directed filtration pressure reduced the inward flux of iodide by about 10-20% depending upon the hydraulic conductance of each specimen. When the smear layer was removed by acid etching, the same 1.47 kPa pressure lowered the inward iodide flux by as much as 60%, depending on the hydraulic conductance. The results demonstrate the importance of the balance between inward diffusion and outward bulk-fluid movement on the rate of permeation of exogenous solutes.

  4. Experimental Investigation of Forced Convective Boiling Flow Instabilities in Horizontal Helically Coiled Tubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    An experimental investigation is described for the characteristics of convective boiling flow instabilities in horizontally helically coiled tubes using a steam-water two-phase closed circulation test loop at pressure from 0.5 MPa to 3.5MPa.Three kinds of oscillation are reported.density waves;pressure drop excorsions;thermal fluctuations.We describe their dependence on main system parameters such as system pressure,mass flowrate,inlet subcooling,compressible volume and heat flux.Utilising the experimental data together with conservation constraints,a dimensionless correlation is proposed for the occurrence of density waves.

  5. Well-to-Wheels Water Consumption: Tracking the Virtual Flow of Water into Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampert, D. J.; Elgowainy, A.; Hao, C.

    2015-12-01

    Water and energy resources are fundamental to life on Earth and essential for the production of consumer goods and services in the economy. Energy and water resources are heavily interdependent—energy production consumes water, while water treatment and distribution consume energy. One example of this so-called energy-water nexus is the consumption of water associated with the production of transportation fuels. The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model is an analytical tool that can be used to compare the environmental impacts of different transportation fuels on a consistent basis. In this presentation, the expansion of GREET to perform life cycle water accounting or the "virtual flow" of water into transportation and other energy sectors and the associated implications will be discussed. The results indicate that increased usage of alternative fuels may increase freshwater resource consumption. The increased water consumption must be weighed against the benefits of decreased greenhouse gas and fossil energy consumption. Our analysis highlights the importance of regionality, co-product allocation, and consistent system boundaries when comparing the water intensity of alternative transportation fuel production pathways such as ethanol, biodiesel, compressed natural gas, hydrogen, and electricity with conventional petroleum-based fuels such as diesel and gasoline.

  6. Subharmonic excitation in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy in the presence of adsorbed water layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Sergio [Laboratory of Energy and Nanosciences, Masdar Institute of Science and Technology, P.O. BOX 54224, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Barcons, Victor [Departament de Disseny i Programacio de Sistemes Electronics, UPC - Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya Av. Bases, 61, 08242 Manresa (Spain); Verdaguer, Albert [Centre d' Investigacio en Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia (CIN2) (CSIC-ICN), Esfera UAB, Campus de la UAB, Edifici CM-7, 08193-Bellaterra, Catalunya (Spain); Chiesa, Matteo [Laboratory of Energy and Nanosciences, Masdar Institute of Science and Technology, P.O. BOX 54224, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307 (United States)

    2011-12-01

    In ambient conditions, nanometric water layers form on hydrophilic surfaces covering them and significantly changing their properties and characteristics. Here we report the excitation of subharmonics in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy induced by intermittent water contacts. Our simulations show that there are several regimes of operation depending on whether there is perturbation of water layers. Single period orbitals, where subharmonics are never induced, follow only when the tip is either in permanent contact with the water layers or in pure noncontact where the water layers are never perturbed. When the water layers are perturbed subharmonic excitation increases with decreasing oscillation amplitude. We derive an analytical expression which establishes whether water perturbations compromise harmonic motion and show that the predictions are in agreement with numerical simulations. Empirical validation of our interpretation is provided by the observation of a range of values for apparent height of water layers when subharmonic excitation is predicted.

  7. Climatology and trends in the forcing of the stratospheric zonal-mean flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Monier

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The momentum budget of the Transformed Eulerian-Mean (TEM equation is calculated using the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF Re-Analysis (ERA-40. This study outlines the considerable contribution of unresolved waves, dominated by gravity waves, to the forcing of the zonal-mean flow. A trend analysis, from 1980 to 2001, shows that the onset and break down of the Northern Hemisphere (NH stratospheric polar night jet has a tendency to occur later. This temporal shift is associated with long-term changes in the planetary wave activity that are mainly due to synoptic waves. In the Southern Hemisphere (SH, the polar vortex shows a tendency to persist further into the SH summertime. This is associated with a statistically significant decrease in the intensity of the stationary EP flux divergence over the 1980–2001 period. Ozone depletion is well known for strengthening westerly winds through the thermal wind balance, which in turn causes a reduction in wave activity in high latitudes. This study suggests that the decrease in planetary wave activity provides an important feedback to the zonal wind as it delays the breakdown of the polar vortex. Finally, we identify long-term changes in the Brewer-Dobson circulation that, this study suggests, are largely caused by trends in the planetary wave activity during winter and by trends in the gravity wave forcing otherwise.

  8. Non-Newtonian particulate flow simulation: A direct-forcing immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri Delouei, A.; Nazari, M.; Kayhani, M. H.; Kang, S. K.; Succi, S.

    2016-04-01

    In the current study, a direct-forcing immersed boundary-non-Newtonian lattice Boltzmann method (IB-NLBM) is developed to investigate the sedimentation and interaction of particles in shear-thinning and shear-thickening fluids. In the proposed IB-NLBM, the non-linear mechanics of non-Newtonian particulate flows is detected by combination of the most desirable features of immersed boundary and lattice Boltzmann methods. The noticeable roles of non-Newtonian behavior on particle motion, settling velocity and generalized Reynolds number are investigated by simulating benchmark problem of one-particle sedimentation under the same generalized Archimedes number. The effects of extra force due to added accelerated mass are analyzed on the particle motion which have a significant impact on shear-thinning fluids. For the first time, the phenomena of interaction among the particles, such as Drafting, Kissing, and Tumbling in non-Newtonian fluids are investigated by simulation of two-particle sedimentation and twelve-particle sedimentation. The results show that increasing the shear-thickening behavior of fluid leads to a significant increase in the kissing time. Moreover, the transverse position of particles for shear-thinning fluids during the tumbling interval is different from Newtonian and the shear-thickening fluids. The present non-Newtonian particulate study can be applied in several industrial and scientific applications, like the non-Newtonian sedimentation behavior of particles in food industrial and biological fluids.

  9. Water shortage risk assessment using spatiotemporal flow simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Hsin-I.; Su, Ming-Daw; Wu, Yii-Chen; Cheng, Ke-Sheng

    2016-12-01

    Paddy irrigation practices in Taiwan utilize complicated water conveyance networks which draw streamflows from different tributaries. Characterizing and simulating streamflow series is thus an essential task for irrigation risk assessment and planning mitigation measures. It generally involves modeling the temporal variation and spatial correlation of streamflow data at different sites. Like many other environmental variables, streamflows are asymmetric and non-Gaussian. Such properties exacerbate the difficulties in spatiotemporal modeling of streamflow data. A stochastic spatiotemporal simulation approach capable of generating non-Gaussian ten-day period streamflow data series at different sites is presented in this paper. Historical flow data from different flow stations in southern Taiwan were used to exemplify the application of the proposed model. Simulated realizations of the spatiotemporal anisotropic multivariate Pearson type III distribution were validated by comparing parameters and spatiotemporal correlation characteristics of the simulated data and the observed streamflow data. Risks of irrigation water shortage were estimated and the effect of mitigation measures was assessed using the simulated data.

  10. Bridge Pressure Flow Scour at Clear Water Threshold Condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Junke; KERENYI Kornel; PAGAN-ORTIZ Jorge E; FLORA Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Bridge pressure flow scour at clear water threshold condition is studied theoretically and experimentally. The flume experiments reveal that the measured scour profiles under a bridge are more or less 2-dimensional; all the measured scour profiles can be described by two similarity equations, where the horizontal distance is scaled by the deck width while the local scour by the maximum scour depth; the maximum scour position is located just under the bridge about 15% deck width from the downstream deck edge; the scour begins at about one deck width upstream the bridge while the deposition occurs at about 2.5 deck widths downstream the bridge; and the maximum scour depth decreases with increas-ing sediment size, but increases with deck inundation. The theoretical analysis shows that: bridge scour can be divided into three cases, i.e. downstream unsubmerged, partially submerged, and totally submerged. For downstream unsubmerged flows, the maximum bridge scour depth is an open-channel problem where the conventional methods in terms of critical velocity or bed shear stress can be applied; for partially and totally submerged flows, the equilibrium maximum scour depth can be described by a scour and an inundation similarity number, which has been confirmed by experiments with two decks and two sediment sizes. For application, a design and field evaluation procedure with examples is presented, including the maximum scour depth and scour profile.

  11. Flow and fracture in water-saturated, unconstrained granular beds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán eVaras

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The injection of gas in a liquid-saturated granular bed gives rise to a wide variety of invasion patterns. Many studies have focused on constrained porous media, in which the grains are fixed in the bed and only the interstitial fluid flows when the gas invades the system. With a free upper boundary, however, the grains can be entrained by the ascending gas or fluid motion, and the competition between the upward motion of grains and sedimentation leads to new patterns. We propose a brief review of the experimental investigation of the dynamics of air rising through a water-saturated, unconstrained granular bed, in both two and three dimensions. After describing the invasion pattern at short and long time, a tentative regime-diagram is proposed. We report original results showing a dependence of the fluidized zone shape, at long times, on the injection flow rate and grain size. A method based on image analysis makes it possible to detect not only the fluidized zone profile in the stationary regime, but also to follow the transient dynamics of its formation. Finally, we describe the degassing dynamics inside the fluidized zone, in the stationary regime. Depending on the experimental conditions, regular bubbling, continuous degassing, intermittent regime or even spontaneous flow-to-fracture transition are observed.

  12. Boundary of the ground-water flow model by IT Corporation (1996), for the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system study, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set defines the boundary of the steady-state ground-water flow model built by IT Corporation (1996). The regional, 20-layer ground-water flow model...

  13. Ground-water levels and water-quality data for wells in the Spring Creek area near Arnold Air Force Base, Tennessee, April and May 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Shannon D.; Aycock, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Arnold Air Force Base (AAFB) occupies about 40,000 acres in Coffee and Franklin Counties, Tennessee. Numerous site-specific ground-water contamination investigations have been conducted at designated solid waste management units (SWMU?s) at AAFB. Several synthetic volatile organic compounds (VOC?s), primarily chlorinated solvents, have been identified in groundwater samples collected from monitoring wells near SWMU 8 in the Spring Creek area. During April and May 2000, a study of the groundwater resources in the Spring Creek area was conducted to determine if VOC?s from AAFB have affected local private water supplies and to advance understanding of the ground-water-flow system in this area. The study focused on sampling private wells located within the Spring Creek area that are used as a source of drinking water. Ground-water-flow directions were determined by measuring water levels in wells and constructing a potentiometric-surface map of the Manchester aquifer in the study area. Data were collected from a total of 35 private wells and 22 monitoring wells during the period of study. Depths to ground water were determined for 22 of the private wells and all 22 of the monitoring wells. The wells ranged in depth from 21 to 105 feet. Water-level altitudes ranged from 930 to 1,062 feet above sea level. Depths to water ranged from 8 to 83 feet below land surface. Water-quality samples were collected from 29 private wells which draw water from either gravel zones in the upper part of the Manchester aquifer, fractured bedrock in the lower part of the Manchester aquifer, or a combination of these two zones. Concentrations of 50 of the 55 VOC?s analyzed for were less than method detection limits. Chloroform, acetone, chloromethane, 2-butanone, and tetrachloroethylene were detected in concentrations exceeding the method detection limits. Only chloroform and acetone were detected in concentrations equal to or exceeding reporting limits. Chloroform was detected in a sample

  14. Gothic simulation of single-channel fuel heatup following a loss of forced flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, X-Q; Tahir, A. [NSS, Dept. of Thermal Hydraulics Analysis, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Parlatan, Y. [Ontario Power Generation, NSATD, Pickering, Ontario (Canada); Kwee, M. [Bruce Power, NSASD, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    GOTHIC v7.2 was used to develop a computer model for the simulation of 28- and 37-element fuel heat-up at a loss of forced flow. The model has accounted for the non-uniformity of both axial and radial power distributions along the fuel channel for a typical CANDU reactor. In addition, the model has also accounted for the fuel rods, end-fittings, feeders and headers. Experimental test conditions for both 28- and 37-element bundles at either low or high powers were used for model validation. GOTHIC predictions of the rod and/or pressure-tube temperatures at a variety of test locations were compared with the corresponding experimental measurements. It is found that the numerical results agree well with the experimental measurements for most of the test locations. Results have also shown that the channel venting time is sensitive to the initial temperature distribution in the feeders and headers. An imposed temperature asymmetry at the beginning will cause the channel flow to vent earlier. (author)

  15. The dynamics of capillary-driven two-phase flow: the role of nanofluid structural forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolov, Alex; Zhang, Hua

    2015-07-01

    Capillary-driven flows are fundamental phenomena and are involved in many key technological processes, such as oil recovery through porous rocks, ink-jet printing, the bubble dynamics in a capillary, microfluidic devices and labs on chips. Here, we discuss and propose a model for the oil displacement dynamics from the capillary by the nanofluid (which is composed of a liquid suspension of nanoparticles); we elucidate the physics of the novelty of the phenomenon and its application. The oil displacement by the nanofluid flow is a multi-stage phenomenon, first leading to the oil film formation on the capillary wall, its break-up, and retraction over the capillary wall; this lead to the formation of the oil double concave meniscus. With time, the process repeats itself, leading to the formation of a regular "necklace" of oil droplets inside the capillary. Finally, the oil droplets are separated by the nanofluid film from the capillary wall. The light reflected differential interferometry technique is applied to investigate the nanofluid interactions with the glass wall. We find nanoparticles tend to self-structure into multiple layers close to the solid wall, which cause the structural forces to arise that lead to the oil displacement from the capillary. This research is expected to benefit the understanding of nanofluid phenomena in a capillary and promote their use in technological applications.

  16. Evaluating the morphology of erythrocyte population: An approach based on atomic force microscopy and flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sayari; Chakraborty, Ishita; Chakraborty, Monojit; Mukhopadhyay, Ashis; Mishra, Raghwendra; Sarkar, Debasish

    2016-04-01

    Erythrocyte morphology is gaining importance as a powerful pathological index in identifying the severity of any blood related disease. However, the existing technique of quantitative microscopy is highly time consuming and prone to personalized bias. On the other hand, relatively unexplored, complementary technique based on flow cytometry has not been standardized till date, particularly due to the lack of a proper morphological scoring scale. In this article, we have presented a new approach to formulate a non-empirical scoring scale based on membrane roughness (R(rms)) data obtained from atomic force microscopy. Subsequently, the respective morphological quantifier of the whole erythrocyte population, commonly known as morphological index, was expressed as a function of highest correlated statistical parameters of scattered signal profiles generated by flow cytometry. Feed forward artificial neural network model with multilayer perceptron architecture was used to develop the intended functional form. High correlation coefficient (R(2) = 0.95), even for model-formulation exclusive samples, clearly indicates the universal validity of the proposed model. Moreover, a direct pathological application of the proposed model has been illustrated in relation to patients, diagnosed to be suffering from a wide variety of cancer.

  17. Quantitative imaging of water flow in soil and roots using neutron radiography and deuterated water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen

    2013-05-08

    Where and how fast do roots take up water? Despite its importance in plant and soil sciences, there is limited experimental information on the location of water uptake along the roots of transpiring plants growing in soil. The answer to this question requires direct and in-situ measurement of the local flow of water into the roots. The aim of this study was to develop and apply a new method to quantify the local fluxes of water into different segments of the roots of intact plants. To this end, neutron radiography was used to trace the transport of deuterated water (D{sub 2}O) into the roots of lupines. Lupines were grown in aluminum containers filled with sandy soil. The soil was partitioned into different compartments using 1 cm-thick layers of coarse sand as capillary barriers. These barriers limited the diffusion of D{sub 2}O within the soil compartments. D{sub 2}O was locally injected into the selected soil compartments during the day (transpiring plants) and night (non-transpiring plants). Transport of D{sub 2}O into roots was then monitored by neutron radiography with spatial resolution of 100 μm and time intervals of 10 seconds. Neutron radiographs showed that: i) transport of D{sub 2}O into roots was faster during the day than during the night; 2) D{sub 2}O quickly moved along the roots towards the shoots during the day, while at night this axial transport was negligible. The differences between day and night measurements were explained by convective transport of D{sub 2}O into the roots. To quantify the net flow of water into roots, a simple convection-diffusion model was developed, where the increase rate of D{sub 2}O concentration in roots depended on the convective transport (net root water uptake) and the diffusion of D{sub 2}O into roots. The results showed that water uptake was not uniform along the roots. Water uptake was higher in the upper soil layers than in the deeper ones. Along an individual roots, the water uptake rate was higher in the

  18. Pressure drop, heat transfer, critical heat flux, and flow stability of two-phase flow boiling of water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures - final report for project "Efficent cooling in engines with nucleate boiling."

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, W.; France, D. M.; Routbort, J. L. (Energy Systems)

    2011-01-19

    Because of its order-of-magnitude higher heat transfer rates, there is interest in using controllable two-phase nucleate boiling instead of conventional single-phase forced convection in vehicular cooling systems to remove ever increasing heat loads and to eliminate potential hot spots in engines. However, the fundamental understanding of flow boiling mechanisms of a 50/50 ethylene glycol/water mixture under engineering application conditions is still limited. In addition, it is impractical to precisely maintain the volume concentration ratio of the ethylene glycol/water mixture coolant at 50/50. Therefore, any investigation into engine coolant characteristics should include a range of volume concentration ratios around the nominal 50/50 mark. In this study, the forced convective boiling heat transfer of distilled water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures with volume concentration ratios of 40/60, 50/50, and 60/40 in a 2.98-mm-inner-diameter circular tube has been investigated in both the horizontal flow and the vertical flow. The two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux of the test fluids were determined experimentally over a range of the mass flux, the vapor mass quality, and the inlet subcooling through a new boiling data reduction procedure that allowed the analytical calculation of the fluid boiling temperatures along the experimental test section by applying the ideal mixture assumption and the equilibrium assumption along with Raoult's law. Based on the experimental data, predictive methods for the two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux under engine application conditions were developed. The results summarized in this final project report provide the necessary information for designing and implementing nucleate-boiling vehicular cooling systems.

  19. Enhanced solar evaporation of water from porous media, through capillary mediated forces and surface treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canbazoglu, F. M.; Fan, B.; Kargar, A.; Vemuri, K.; Bandaru, P. R., E-mail: pbandaru@ucsd.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2016-08-15

    The relative influence of the capillary, Marangoni, and hydrophobic forces in mediating the evaporation of water from carbon foam based porous media, in response to incident solar radiation, are investigated. It is indicated that inducing hydrophilic interactions on the surface, through nitric acid treatment of the foams, has a similar effect to reduced pore diameter and the ensuing capillary forces. The efficiency of water evaporation may be parameterized through the Capillary number (Ca), with a lower Ca being preferred. The proposed study is of much relevance to efficient solar energy utilization.

  20. Enhanced solar evaporation of water from porous media, through capillary mediated forces and surface treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canbazoglu, F. M.; Fan, B.; Kargar, A.; Vemuri, K.; Bandaru, P. R.

    2016-08-01

    The relative influence of the capillary, Marangoni, and hydrophobic forces in mediating the evaporation of water from carbon foam based porous media, in response to incident solar radiation, are investigated. It is indicated that inducing hydrophilic interactions on the surface, through nitric acid treatment of the foams, has a similar effect to reduced pore diameter and the ensuing capillary forces. The efficiency of water evaporation may be parameterized through the Capillary number (Ca), with a lower Ca being preferred. The proposed study is of much relevance to efficient solar energy utilization.