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Sample records for forage specific glycoside

  1. Habitat-specific foraging strategies in Australasian gannets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie R. Wells

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of top predator foraging adaptability is imperative for predicting their biological response to environmental variability. While seabirds have developed highly specialised techniques to locate prey, little is known about intraspecific variation in foraging strategies with many studies deriving information from uniform oceanic environments. Australasian gannets (Morus serrator typically forage in continental shelf regions on small schooling prey. The present study used GPS and video data loggers to compare habitat-specific foraging strategies at two sites of contrasting oceanographic regimes (deep water near the continental shelf edge, n=23; shallow inshore embayment, n=26, in south-eastern Australia. Individuals from the continental shelf site exhibited pelagic foraging behaviours typical of gannet species, using local enhancement to locate and feed on small schooling fish; in contrast only 50% of the individuals from the inshore site foraged offshore, displaying the typical pelagic foraging strategy. The remainder adopted a strategy of searching sand banks in shallow inshore waters in the absence of conspecifics and other predators for large, single prey items. Furthermore, of the individuals foraging inshore, 93% were male, indicating that the inshore strategy may be sex-specific. Large inter-colony differences in Australasian gannets suggest strong plasticity in foraging behaviours, essential for adapting to environmental change.

  2. Habitat-specific foraging strategies in Australasian gannets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Melanie R; Angel, Lauren P; Arnould, John P Y

    2016-07-15

    Knowledge of top predator foraging adaptability is imperative for predicting their biological response to environmental variability. While seabirds have developed highly specialised techniques to locate prey, little is known about intraspecific variation in foraging strategies with many studies deriving information from uniform oceanic environments. Australasian gannets (Morus serrator) typically forage in continental shelf regions on small schooling prey. The present study used GPS and video data loggers to compare habitat-specific foraging strategies at two sites of contrasting oceanographic regimes (deep water near the continental shelf edge, n=23; shallow inshore embayment, n=26), in south-eastern Australia. Individuals from the continental shelf site exhibited pelagic foraging behaviours typical of gannet species, using local enhancement to locate and feed on small schooling fish; in contrast only 50% of the individuals from the inshore site foraged offshore, displaying the typical pelagic foraging strategy. The remainder adopted a strategy of searching sand banks in shallow inshore waters in the absence of conspecifics and other predators for large, single prey items. Furthermore, of the individuals foraging inshore, 93% were male, indicating that the inshore strategy may be sex-specific. Large inter-colony differences in Australasian gannets suggest strong plasticity in foraging behaviours, essential for adapting to environmental change.

  3. Chemical-specific adjustment factors (inter-species toxicokinetics) to establish the ADI for steviol glycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Ashley; Lynch, Barry; Rogerson, Rebecca; Renwick, Andrew; Kern, Hua; Coffee, Matthew; Cuellar-Kingston, Nicole; Eapen, Alex; Crincoli, Christine; Pugh, George; Bhusari, Sachin; Purkayastha, Sidd; Carakostas, Michael

    2016-08-01

    The acceptable daily intake (ADI) of commercially available steviol glycosides is currently 0-4 mg/kg body weight (bw)/day, based on application of a 100-fold uncertainty factor to a no-observed-adverse-effect-level value from a chronic rat study. Within the 100-fold uncertainty factor is a 10-fold uncertainty factor to account for inter-species differences in toxicokinetics (4-fold) and toxicodynamics (2.5-fold). Single dose pharmacokinetics of stevioside were studied in rats (40 and 1000 mg/kg bw) and in male human subjects (40 mg/kg bw) to generate a chemical-specific, inter-species toxicokinetic adjustment factor. Tmax values for steviol were at ∼8 and ∼20 h after administration in rats and humans, respectively. Peak concentrations of steviol were similar in rats and humans, while steviol glucuronide concentrations were significantly higher in humans. Glucuronidation in rats was not saturated over the dose range 40-1000 mg/kg bw. The AUC0-last for steviol was approximately 2.8-fold greater in humans compared to rats. Chemical-specific adjustment factors for extrapolating toxicokinetics from rat to human of 1 and 2.8 were established based on Cmax and AUC0-last data respectively. Because these factors are lower than the default value of 4.0, a higher ADI for steviol glycosides of between 6 and 16 mg/kg bw/d is justified.

  4. Seasonal Variation in Parental Care Drives Sex-Specific Foraging by a Monomorphic Seabird.

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    Burke, Chantelle M; Montevecchi, William A; Regular, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of sex-specific foraging in monomorphic seabirds is increasing though the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We investigate differential parental care as a mechanism for sex-specific foraging in monomorphic Common Murres (Uria aalge), where the male parent alone provisions the chick after colony departure. Using a combination of geolocation-immersion loggers and stable isotopes, we assess two hypotheses: the reproductive role specialization hypothesis and the energetic constraint hypothesis. We compare the foraging behavior of females (n = 15) and males (n = 9) during bi-parental at the colony, post-fledging male-only parental care and winter when parental care is absent. As predicted by the reproductive role specialization hypothesis, we found evidence of sex-specific foraging during post-fledging only, the stage with the greatest divergence in parental care roles. Single-parenting males spent almost twice as much time diving per day and foraged at lower quality prey patches relative to independent females. This implies a potential energetic constraint for males during the estimated 62.8 ± 8.9 days of offspring dependence at sea. Contrary to the predictions of the energetic constraint hypothesis, we found no evidence of sex-specific foraging during biparental care, suggesting that male parents did not forage for their own benefit before colony departure in anticipation of post-fledging energy constraints. We hypothesize that unpredictable prey conditions at Newfoundland colonies in recent years may limit male parental ability to allocate additional time and energy to self-feeding during biparental care, without compromising chick survival. Our findings support differential parental care as a mechanism for sex-specific foraging in monomorphic murres, and highlight the need to consider ecological context in the interpretation of sex-specific foraging behavior.

  5. Seasonal Variation in Parental Care Drives Sex-Specific Foraging by a Monomorphic Seabird.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantelle M Burke

    Full Text Available Evidence of sex-specific foraging in monomorphic seabirds is increasing though the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We investigate differential parental care as a mechanism for sex-specific foraging in monomorphic Common Murres (Uria aalge, where the male parent alone provisions the chick after colony departure. Using a combination of geolocation-immersion loggers and stable isotopes, we assess two hypotheses: the reproductive role specialization hypothesis and the energetic constraint hypothesis. We compare the foraging behavior of females (n = 15 and males (n = 9 during bi-parental at the colony, post-fledging male-only parental care and winter when parental care is absent. As predicted by the reproductive role specialization hypothesis, we found evidence of sex-specific foraging during post-fledging only, the stage with the greatest divergence in parental care roles. Single-parenting males spent almost twice as much time diving per day and foraged at lower quality prey patches relative to independent females. This implies a potential energetic constraint for males during the estimated 62.8 ± 8.9 days of offspring dependence at sea. Contrary to the predictions of the energetic constraint hypothesis, we found no evidence of sex-specific foraging during biparental care, suggesting that male parents did not forage for their own benefit before colony departure in anticipation of post-fledging energy constraints. We hypothesize that unpredictable prey conditions at Newfoundland colonies in recent years may limit male parental ability to allocate additional time and energy to self-feeding during biparental care, without compromising chick survival. Our findings support differential parental care as a mechanism for sex-specific foraging in monomorphic murres, and highlight the need to consider ecological context in the interpretation of sex-specific foraging behavior.

  6. Geographic structure of adelie penguin populations: overlap in colony-specific foraging areas

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    Ainley, D.G.; Ribic, C.A.; Ballard, G.; Heath, S.; Gaffney, I.; Karl, B.J.; Barton, K.J.; Wilson, P.R.; Webb, S.

    2004-01-01

    In an investigation of the factors leading to geographic structuring among Ade??lie Penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) populations, we studied the size and overlap of colony-specific foraging areas within an isolated cluster of colonies. The study area, in the southwestern Ross Sea, included one large and three smaller colonies, ranging in size from 3900 to 135000 nesting pairs, clustered on Ross and Beaufort Islands. We used triangulation of radio signals from transmitters attached to breeding penguins to determine foraging locations and to define colony-specific foraging areas during the chick-provisioning period of four breeding seasons, 1997-2000. Colony populations (nesting pairs) were determined using aerial photography just after egg-laying; reproductive success was estimated by comparing ground counts of chicks fledged to the number of breeding pairs apparent in aerial photos. Foraging-trip duration, meal size, and adult body mass were estimated using RFID (radio frequency identification) tags and an automated reader and weighbridge. Chick growth was assessed by weekly weighing. We related the following variables to colony size: foraging distance, area, and duration; reproductive success; chick meal size and growth rate; and seasonal variation in adult body mass. We found that penguins foraged closest to their respective colonies, particularly at the smaller colonies. However, as the season progressed, foraging distance, duration, and area increased noticeably, especially at the largest colony. The foraging areas of the smaller colonies overlapped broadly, but very little foraging area overlap existed between the large colony and the smaller colonies, even though the foraging area of the large colony was well within range of the smaller colonies. Instead, the foraging areas of the smaller colonies shifted as that of the large colony grew. Colony size was not related to chick meal size, chick growth, or parental body mass. This differed from the year previous to

  7. α-Amylase: an enzyme specificity found in various families of glycoside hydrolases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janeček, Štefan; Svensson, Birte; MacGregor, E. Ann

    2014-01-01

    α-Amylase (EC 3.2.1.1) represents the best known amylolytic enzyme. It catalyzes the hydrolysis of α-1,4-glucosidic bonds in starch and related α-glucans. In general, the α-amylase is an enzyme with a broad substrate preference and product specificity. In the sequence-based classification system...... of all carbohydrate-active enzymes, it is one of the most frequently occurring glycoside hydrolases (GH). α-Amylase is the main representative of family GH13, but it is probably also present in the families GH57 and GH119, and possibly even in GH126. Family GH13, known generally as the main α...... investigation because of an obvious, but unexpected, homology with inverting β-glucan-active hydrolases....

  8. Sex-specific kleptoparasitic foraging in ant-eating spiders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martisová, Martina; Bilde, T.; Pekar, Stano

    2009-01-01

    . To investigate this hypothesis, we studied the effect of sex and life history stage on the frequency of kleptoparasitism in ant-eating spiders of the genus Zodarion in the field. These spiders use a special capture technique involving a quick attack on an ant that is left unguarded by spiders for several minutes......, providing ample opportunities for kleptoparasitism. We found that adult females consistently hunted actively, while adult males ceased active prey capture and instead engaged in kleptoparasitism. Juvenile spiders were active hunters irrespective of sex. Consistent with an ontogenetic shift in foraging...

  9. Sex-specific foraging behavior in response to fishing activities in a threatened seabird.

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    García-Tarrasón, Manuel; Bécares, Juan; Bateman, Santiago; Arcos, José Manuel; Jover, Lluís; Sanpera, Carolina

    2015-06-01

    Some seabird species have learnt to efficiently exploit fishing discards from trawling activities. However, a discard ban has been proposed as necessary in Europe to ensure the sustainability of the seas. It is of crucial importance for the management and conservation purposes to study the potential consequences of a discard ban on the foraging ecology of threatened seabirds. We assessed the influence of fishing activities on the feeding habits of 22 male and 15 female Audouin's gulls (Larus audouinii) from the Ebro Delta (Mediterranean Sea) during the breeding period using GPS loggers together with Stable Isotope Analysis (SIA), which provided new insights into their foraging behavior and trophic ecology, respectively. GPS data revealed different sex-specific foraging patterns between workdays and weekends. Females were highly consistent in that they foraged at sea throughout the week even though discarding stops at weekends. In contrast, males switched from foraging at sea during the week (when discards are produced) to an increased use of rice field habitats at weekends (when fishermen do not work). This sex-specific foraging behavior could be related to specific nutritional requirements associated with previous egg production, an energetically demanding period for females. However, on a broader time scale integrated by the SIA, both sexes showed a high degree of individual specialization in their trophic ecology. The need to obtain detailed information on the dependence and response of seabirds to fishing activities is crucial in conservation sciences. In this regard, sex-specific foraging behavior in relation to fisheries has been overlooked, despite the ecological and conservation implications. For instance, this situation may lead to sex differentiation in bycatch mortality in longlines when trawlers do not operate. Moreover, any new fisheries policy will need to be implemented gradually to facilitate the adaptation of a specialized species to a discard ban

  10. Steady state kinetic analysis of substrate specificity of glycoside hydrolases from families 13 and 38

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jonas Willum

    impaired mutant enzyme Y380A is described, in an effort to determine the potential role of SBS2 in amylopectin degradation. Progress curves of amylopectin degradation was best described by a bi-exponential equation comprising two rate constants (for reaction 'a' and 'b') associated with the degradation...... binding, mainly inhibited the 'a'-reaction suggesting a role of SBS in the 'a'-reaction. In contrast Y380A mutant enzyme did not display a similarly low apparent KM for the 'a'-reaction, and inhibition by ß-cyclodextrin was not observed. In conclusion, SBS2 appears to play a role in amylopectin......Glycosidases are widespread in nature, where they perform a diverse range of functions. The glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 38, α-mannosidase II enzymes play a crucial role in mammalian cells, in the maturation of N-glycosylated proteins in the Golgi apparatus and in catabolism in cytosol...

  11. Systemic, genotype-specific induction of two herbivore-deterrent iridoid glycosides in Plantago lanceolata L. in response to fungal infection by Diaporthe adunca (Rob.) Niessel.

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    Marak, Hamida B; Biere, Arjen; Van Damme, Jos M M

    2002-12-01

    Iridoid glycosides are a group of terpenoid secondary plant compounds known to deter generalist insect herbivores. In ribwort plantain (Plantago lanceolata), the iridoid glycosides aucubin and catalpol can be induced following damage by insect herbivores. In this study, we investigated whether the same compounds can be induced following infection by the fungal pathogen Diaporthe adunca, the causal agent of a stalk disease in P. lanceolata. Significant induction of aucubin and catalpol was observed in two of the three plant genotypes used in this study following inoculation with the pathogen. In one of the genotypes, induction occurred within 6 hr after inoculation, and no decay was observed within 8 days. The highest level of induction was observed in reproductive tissues (spikes and stalks) where infection took place. In these tissues, iridoid glycoside levels in infected plants were, on average, 97% and 37% higher than the constitutive levels in the corresponding control plants, respectively. Significant induction was also observed in leaves (24%) and roots (17%). In addition to significant genotypic variation in the level of induction, we found genetic variation for the tissue-specific pattern of induction, further broadening the scope for evolutionary fine-tuning of induced responses. Recent studies have revealed a negative association between iridoid glycoside levels in P. lanceolata genotypes and the amount of growth and reproduction of D. adunca that these genotypes support. However, for the three genotypes used in the present study, differences in resistance were not related to their constitutive or induced levels of iridoid glycosides, suggesting that additional resistance mechanisms are important in this host-pathogen system. We conclude that iridoid glycosides in P. lanceolata can be induced both by arthropods and pathogenic micro-organisms. Pathogen infection could, therefore, potentially enhance resistance to generalist insect herbivores in this

  12. Functional analysis of glycoside hydrolase family 8 xylanases shows narrow but distinct substrate specificities and biotechnological potential.

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    Pollet, Annick; Schoepe, Jan; Dornez, Emmie; Strelkov, Sergei V; Delcour, Jan A; Courtin, Christophe M

    2010-08-01

    The potential of glycoside hydrolase family (GH) 8 xylanases in biotechnological applications is virtually unexplored. Therefore, the substrate preference and hydrolysis product profiles of two GH8 xylanases were evaluated to investigate their activities and substrate specificities. A GH8 xylanase from an uncultured bacterium (rXyn8) shows endo action but very selectively releases xylotriose from its substrates. It has a higher activity than the Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis GH8 endo-xylanase (PhXyl) on xylononaose and smaller xylo-oligosaccharides. PhXyl preferably degrades xylan substrates with a high degree of polymerization. It is sterically more hindered by arabinose substituents than rXyn8, producing larger end hydrolysis products. The specificities of rXyn8 and PhXyl differ completely from these of the previously described GH8 xylanases from Bifidobacterium adolescentis (BaRexA) and Bacillus halodurans (BhRex). As reducing-end xylose-releasing exo-oligoxylanases, they selectively release xylose from the reducing end of small xylo-oligosaccharides. The findings of this study show that GH8 xylanases have a narrow substrate specificity, but also one that strongly varies between family members and is distinct from that of GH10 and GH11 xylanases. Structural comparison of rXyn8, PhXyl, BaRexA, and BhRex showed that subtle amino acid changes in the glycon as well as the aglycon subsites probably form the basis of the observed differences between GH8 xylanases. GH8 xylanases, therefore, are an interesting group of enzymes, with potential towards engineering and applications.

  13. Distinct substrate specificities of three glycoside hydrolase family 42 β-galactosidases from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis ATCC 15697

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viborg, Alexander Holm; Katayama, Takane; Abou Hachem, Maher

    2014-01-01

    Glycoside hydrolase family 42 (GH42) includes β-galactosidases catalyzing the release of galactose (Gal) from the non-reducing end of different β-d-galactosides. Health-promoting probiotic bifidobacteria, which are important members of the human gastrointestinal tract microbiota, produce GH42 enz...

  14. The Structure and Function of an Arabinan-specific [alpha]-1,2-Arabinofuranosidase Identified from Screening the Activities of Bacterial GH43 Glycoside Hydrolases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cartmell, Alan; McKee, Lauren S.; Pena, Maria J.; Larsbrink, Johan; Brumer, Harry; Kaneko, Satoshi; Ichinose, Hitomi; Lewis, Richard J.; Vikso-Nielsen, Anders; Gilbert, Harry; Marles-Wright, Jon (Newcastle); (National Food Research Institute); (Novozymes A/S); (RITS); (Georgia)

    2012-03-26

    Reflecting the diverse chemistry of plant cell walls, microorganisms that degrade these composite structures synthesize an array of glycoside hydrolases. These enzymes are organized into sequence-, mechanism-, and structure-based families. Genomic data have shown that several organisms that degrade the plant cell wall contain a large number of genes encoding family 43 (GH43) glycoside hydrolases. Here we report the biochemical properties of the GH43 enzymes of a saprophytic soil bacterium, Cellvibrio japonicus, and a human colonic symbiont, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron. The data show that C. japonicus uses predominantly exo-acting enzymes to degrade arabinan into arabinose, whereas B. thetaiotaomicron deploys a combination of endo- and side chain-cleaving glycoside hydrolases. Both organisms, however, utilize an arabinan-specific {alpha}-1,2-arabinofuranosidase in the degradative process, an activity that has not previously been reported. The enzyme can cleave {alpha}-1,2-arabinofuranose decorations in single or double substitutions, the latter being recalcitrant to the action of other arabinofuranosidases. The crystal structure of the C. japonicus arabinan-specific {alpha}-1,2-arabinofuranosidase, CjAbf43A, displays a five-bladed {beta}-propeller fold. The specificity of the enzyme for arabinan is conferred by a surface cleft that is complementary to the helical backbone of the polysaccharide. The specificity of CjAbf43A for {alpha}-1,2-L-arabinofuranose side chains is conferred by a polar residue that orientates the arabinan backbone such that O2 arabinose decorations are directed into the active site pocket. A shelflike structure adjacent to the active site pocket accommodates O3 arabinose side chains, explaining how the enzyme can target O2 linkages that are components of single or double substitutions.

  15. Sex-specific foraging strategies and resource partitioning in the southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Rebecca; O'Connell, Tamsin C; Lewis, Mirtha; Campagna, Claudio; Hoelzel, A Rus

    2006-11-22

    The evolution of resource specializations is poorly understood, especially in marine systems. The southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina) is the largest of the phocid seals, sexually dimorphic, and thought to prey predominantly on fish and squid. We collected vibrissae from male and female southern elephant seals, and assessed stable C and N isotope ratios along the length of the vibrissae. Given that whiskers grow slowly, this sampling strategy reflects any variation in feeding behaviour over a period of time. We found that isotopic variation among females was relatively small, and that the apparent prey choice and trophic level of females was different from that for males. Further, males showed a very broad range of trophic/prey choice positions, grouped into several clusters, and this included isotopic values too low to match a broad range of potential fish and cephalopod prey tested. One of these clusters overlapped with data for South American sea lions (Otaria flavescens), which were measured for comparison. Both male southern elephant seals and southern sea lions forage over the continental shelf, providing the potential for competition. We discuss the possibility that individual southern elephant seals are pursuing specialist foraging strategies to avoid competition, both with one another, and with the South American sea lions that breed nearby.

  16. Systemic, genotype-specific induction of two herbivore-deterrent iridoid glycosides in Plantago lanceolata L. in response to fungal infection by Diaporthe adunca (Rob.) Niessel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marak, H.B.; Biere, A.; Van Damme, J.M.M.

    2002-01-01

    Iridoid glycosides are a group of terpenoid secondary plant compounds known to deter generalist insect herbivores. In ribwort plantain (Plantago lanceolata), the iridoid glycosides aucubin and catalpol can be induced following damage by insect herbivores. In this study, we investigated whether the s

  17. The Bitter Taste Receptor TAS2R16 Achieves High Specificity and Accommodates Diverse Glycoside Ligands by using a Two-faced Binding Pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Anu; Sulli, Chidananda; Davidson, Edgar; Berdougo, Eli; Phillips, Morganne; Puffer, Bridget A; Paes, Cheryl; Doranz, Benjamin J; Rucker, Joseph B

    2017-08-10

    Although bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs) are important for human health, little is known of the determinants of ligand specificity. TAS2Rs such as TAS2R16 help define gustatory perception and dietary preferences that ultimately influence human health and disease. Each TAS2R must accommodate a broad diversity of chemical structures while simultaneously achieving high specificity so that diverse bitter toxins can be detected without all foods tasting bitter. However, how these G protein-coupled receptors achieve this balance is poorly understood. Here we used a comprehensive mutation library of human TAS2R16 to map its interactions with existing and novel agonists. We identified 13 TAS2R16 residues that contribute to ligand specificity and 38 residues whose mutation eliminated signal transduction by all ligands, providing a comprehensive assessment of how this GPCR binds and signals. Our data suggest a model in which hydrophobic residues on TM3 and TM7 form a broad ligand-binding pocket that can accommodate the diverse structural features of β-glycoside ligands while still achieving high specificity.

  18. Influence of light and temperature on gene expression leading to accumulation of specific flavonol glycosides and hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives in kale (Brassica oleracea var. sabellica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne eNeugart

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Light intensity and temperature are very important signals for the regulation of plant growth and development. Plants subjected to less favorable light or temperature conditions often respond with accumulation of secondary metabolites. Some of these metabolites have been identified as bioactive compounds, considered to exert positive effects on human health when consumed regularly. In order to test a typical range of growth parameters for the winter crop Brassica oleracea var. sabellica, plants were grown either at 400 µmol m-2 s-1 or 100 µmol m-2 s-1 at 10°C, or at 400 µmol m-2 s-1 with 5°C or 15°C. The higher light intensity overall increased flavonol content of leaves, favoring the main quercetin glycosides, a caffeic acid monoacylated kaempferol triglycoside, and disinapoyl-gentiobiose. The higher temperature mainly increased the hydroxycinnamic acid derivative disinapoyl-gentiobiose, while at lower temperature synthesis is in favor of very complex sinapic acid acylated flavonol tetraglycosides such as kaempferol-3-O-sinapoyl-sophoroside-7-O-diglucoside. A global analysis of light and temperature dependent alterations of gene expression in B. oleracea var. sabellica leaves was performed with the most comprehensive Brassica microarray. When compared to the light experiment much less genes were differentially expressed in kale leaves grown at 5°C or 15°C. A structured evaluation of differentially expressed genes revealed the expected enrichment in the functional categories of e.g. protein degradation at different light intensities or phytohormone metabolism at different temperature. Genes of the secondary metabolism namely phenylpropanoids are significantly enriched with both treatments. Thus, the genome of B. oleracea was screened for predicted genes putatively involved in the biosynthesis of flavonoids and hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives. All identified B. oleracea genes were analyzed for their most specific 60-mer oligonucleotides

  19. Influence of Light and Temperature on Gene Expression Leading to Accumulation of Specific Flavonol Glycosides and Hydroxycinnamic Acid Derivatives in Kale (Brassica oleracea var. sabellica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugart, Susanne; Krumbein, Angelika; Zrenner, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Light intensity and temperature are very important signals for the regulation of plant growth and development. Plants subjected to less favorable light or temperature conditions often respond with accumulation of secondary metabolites. Some of these metabolites have been identified as bioactive compounds, considered to exert positive effects on human health when consumed regularly. In order to test a typical range of growth parameters for the winter crop Brassica oleracea var. sabellica, plants were grown either at 400 μmol m(-2) s(-1) or 100 μmol m(-2) s(-1) at 10°C, or at 400 μmol m(-2) s(-1) with 5 or 15°C. The higher light intensity overall increased flavonol content of leaves, favoring the main quercetin glycosides, a caffeic acid monoacylated kaempferol triglycoside, and disinapoyl-gentiobiose. The higher temperature mainly increased the hydroxycinnamic acid derivative disinapoyl-gentiobiose, while at lower temperature synthesis is in favor of very complex sinapic acid acylated flavonol tetraglycosides such as kaempferol-3-O-sinapoyl-sophoroside-7-O-diglucoside. A global analysis of light and temperature dependent alterations of gene expression in B. oleracea var. sabellica leaves was performed with the most comprehensive Brassica microarray. When compared to the light experiment much less genes were differentially expressed in kale leaves grown at 5 or 15°C. A structured evaluation of differentially expressed genes revealed the expected enrichment in the functional categories of e.g. protein degradation at different light intensities or phytohormone metabolism at different temperature. Genes of the secondary metabolism namely phenylpropanoids are significantly enriched with both treatments. Thus, the genome of B. oleracea was screened for predicted genes putatively involved in the biosynthesis of flavonoids and hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives. All identified B. oleracea genes were analyzed for their most specific 60-mer oligonucleotides present on the

  20. High-performance liquid chromatography-ionspray mass spectrometry for the specific determination of digoxin and some related cardiac glycosides in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracqui, A; Kintz, P; Ludes, B; Mangin, P

    1997-04-25

    An original method based upon high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to ionspray mass spectrometry (HPLC-ISP-MS) has been developed for the identification and quantification in plasma of several cardiac glycosides, namely digoxin, digitoxin, lanatoside C and acetyldigitoxin. After single-step liquid-liquid extraction by chloroform-2-propanol (95:5, v/v) at pH 9.5 using oleandrin as an internal standard, solutes are separated on a 4 microm NovaPak C18 (Waters) column (150x2.0 mm, I.D.), using a gradient of acetonitrile-2 mM NH4COOH, pH 3 buffer (flow-rate 200 microl/min, post-column split 1:3). Detection is done by a Perkin-Elmer Sciex API-100 mass analyzer equipped with an ISP interface. In most instances the major ion observed is not [M+H]+ as expected, but [M+NH4]+. The mean retention times (min) are: lanatoside C, 5.74; digoxin, 6.00; digitoxin, 8.08, oleandrin, 8.30, acetyldigitoxin, 8.66 and 9.01 (isomers alpha and beta, respectively). The lower limits of detection in single ion monitoring mode range from 0.15 ng/ml (alpha- and beta-acetyldigitoxin) to 0.60 ng/ml (lanatoside C), making the method less sensitive than radioimmunoassay, whereas it is much more specific.

  1. Substrate specificity and gene expression of two Penicillium chrysogenum α-L-arabinofuranosidases (AFQ1 and AFS1) belonging to glycoside hydrolase families 51 and 54.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Tatsuji; Inui, Misako; Yasui, Kana; Hosokawa, Sachiko; Ihara, Hideshi

    2013-02-01

    We previously isolated two α-L-arabinofuranosidases (ABFs), termed AFQ1 and AFS1, from the culture filtrate of Penicillium chrysogenum 31B. afq1 and afs1 complementary DNAs encoding AFQ1 and AFS1 were isolated by in vitro cloning. The deduced amino acid sequences of AFQ1 and AFS1 are highly similar to those of Penicillium purpurogenum ABF 2 and ABF 1, respectively, which belong to glycoside hydrolase (GH) families 51 and 54, respectively. Pfam analysis revealed an "Alpha-L-AF_C" domain in AFQ1 and "ArabFuran-catal" and "AbfB" domains in AFS1. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis indicated that the afq1 gene was constitutively expressed in P. chrysogenum 31B at a low level, although the expression was slightly induced with arabinose, arabinitol, arabinan, and arabinoxylan. In contrast, expression of the afs1 gene was strongly expressed by the above four carbohydrates and less strongly induced by galactan. Recombinant enzymes (rAFQ1 and rAFS1) expressed in Escherichia coli were active against both p-nitrophenyl α-L-arabinofuranoside and polysaccharides with different specificities. (1)H-NMR analysis revealed that rAFS1 degraded arabinofuranosyl side chains that were both singly and doubly linked to the backbones of arabinoxylan and L-arabinan. On the other hand, rAFQ1 preferentially released arabinose linked to C-3 of single-substituted xylose or arabinose residues in the two polysaccharides.

  2. Web placement in sympatric linyphiid spiders ( Arachnida, Araneae): Individual foraging decisions reveal inter-specific competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herberstein, Marie Elisabeth

    1998-02-01

    The distribution of two sympatric web spiders, Frontinellina frutetorum (C. L. Koch) and Neriene radiata (Walckenaer) (Araneae: Linyphiidae) was studied on an area of forest regrowth in eastern Austria. Both species utilised significantly different heights on young conifer trees to construct their webs. F. frutetorum selected higher vegetation layers, whereas N. radiata constructed its webs, closer to the ground. This distribution may either be evidence of competition for web space or it may reflect specific distribution patterns unrelated to spider density. An experiment showed that when spiders of either species were released onto vacant trees they selected similar vegetation heights for web construction. On trees already occupied by a heterospecific individual however, F. frutetorum placed its webs significantly higher and N. radiata significantly lower compared to web placement on vacant trees suggesting that F. frutetorum and N. radiata compete for web space.

  3. Differences in bill form of the oystercatcher haematopus ostralegus; a dynamic adaptation to specific foraging techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swennen, C.; De Bruijn, L. L. M.; Duiven, P.; Leopold, M. F.; Marteijn, E. C. L.

    In wintering European oystercatchers 3 bill types: pointed, chisel-shaped, and blunt were found as well as their intermediates. The distribution of the different bill types varied widely in both time and space. Pointed bills had a larger mean length than both chisel-shaped and blunt bills, and occurred more often in young birds than in adults, and more often in females than in males. On an average, females had longer bills than males. In oystercatchers in the Wadden Sea area bill length was found to increase with age, but in the Delta area no increase was found. In semi-natural cage experiments each bill type proved to be most suitable for a specific manner of localization and handling of prey. Bills of individual oystercatchers were shown to change shape when the bird was forced to change its feeding method. A change in method accompanied by a gradual change in bill form only caused a temporary loss of feeding efficiency. It is concluded that differences in bill length influence prey choice and feeding method and hence induce different bill forms. Age- and sex-dependent differences in bill length and form, together with the ability of the individual to adapt bill form and feeding behaviour, enable the oystercatcher to lessen interspecific competition and to respond to changing environmental conditions.

  4. A switched catalysis qualified sealers capped one-step synthesis biocompatibility bimetallic scaffold film for Neu5Acα(2-6)Gal β MP Glycoside specific detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Chunyong; He, Junlin; Yuan, Guolin; Li, Yuliang; Li, Qingying; Yu, Chao

    2016-03-15

    In this work, a novel label-free biosensor was designed for the sensitive and selective determination of Neu5Acα(2-6)Gal β MP Glycoside using AuPt-PPy(polypyrrole) conductive nanocomposite film as the sensor platform. The introduced AuPt-PPy nanocomposite provided a large surface area for the immobilization of Sambucus nigra agglutinis (SNA) through a coupling agent for specifically recognizing analytes and exhibited high electrocatalytic activity toward the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as an analytical signal. Subsequently, to block the non-specific sites of the modified electrode, GOx was employed instead of the usual sealers. Most importantly, in the presence of glucose, these localized GOx further enhanced the electrochemical signal, which was achieved by the efficient catalysis of glucose. This study is the first that demonstrates the specific detection of Neu5Acα(2-6)Gal β MP Glycoside using AuPt-PPy as the electrocatalytic. Under optimal conditions, the electrochemical biosensor exhibited a wide linear range of 0.01 pgmL(-1)-800 ngmL(-1) with a low detection limit of 0.003 pgmL(-1) (S/N=3), due to the affinity between SNA and Neu5Acα(2-6)Gal β MP Glycoside. Therefore, the co-catalysis signal amplification approach has considerable potential in clinical applications and is suitable for the quantification of other biomarkers.

  5. Global and grain-specific accumulation of glycoside hydrolase family 10 xylanases in transgenic maize (Zea mays).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Benjamin N; Bougri, Oleg; Carlson, Alvar R; Meissner, Judy; Pan, Shihao; Parker, Matthew H; Zhang, Dongcheng; Samoylov, Vladimir; Ekborg, Nathan A; Michael Raab, R

    2011-12-01

    In planta expression of cell wall degrading enzymes is a promising approach for developing optimized biomass feedstocks that enable low-cost cellulosic biofuels production. Transgenic plants could serve as either an enzyme source for the hydrolysis of pretreated biomass or as the primary biomass feedstock in an autohydrolysis process. In this study, two xylanase genes, Bacillus sp. NG-27 bsx and Clostridium stercorarium xynB, were expressed in maize (Zea mays) under the control of two different promoters. Severe phenotypic effects were associated with xylanase accumulation in maize, including stunted plants and sterile grains. Global expression of these xylanases from the rice ubiquitin 3 promoter (rubi3) resulted in enzyme accumulation of approximately 0.01 mg enzyme per gram dry weight, or approximately 0.1% of total soluble protein (TSP). Grain-specific expression of these enzymes from the rice glutelin 4 promoter (GluB-4) resulted in higher-level accumulation of active enzyme, with BSX and XynB accumulating up to 4.0% TSP and 16.4% TSP, respectively, in shriveled grains from selected T0 plants. These results demonstrate the potential utility of the GluB-4 promoter for biotechnological applications. The phenotypic effects of xylanase expression in maize presented here demonstrate the difficulties of hemicellulase expression in an important crop for cellulosic biofuels production. Potential alternate approaches to achieve xylanase accumulation in planta without the accompanying negative phenotypes are discussed.

  6. Iridoid glycosides from Globularia trichosantha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliş, I; Kirmizibekmez, H; Sticher, O

    2001-01-01

    A new iridoid glycoside, deacetylalpinoside (2), was isolated from the aerial parts of Globularia trichosantha together with nine known iridoid glycosides: catalpol, 10-O-benzoyl-catalpol, aucubin, asperuloside, deacetylasperuloside, asperulosidic acid, scandoside, geniposidic acid, and alpinoside (1). From the underground parts of the same plant, two new bisiridoid glycosides, globulosides A (3) and B (4); a known iridoid glycoside, globularidin; a lignan glycoside, liriodendrin; and seven phenylethanoid glycosides, arenarioside, verbascoside (= acteoside), isoacteoside, crenatoside, isocrenatoside, and trichosanthosides A and B, were isolated. Compounds 2-4 are new iridoids containing an 8,9 double bond representing a rare carbon skeleton. Their structures were established by spectroscopic methods.

  7. Steviol glycoside biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandle, J E; Telmer, P G

    2007-07-01

    Steviol glycosides are found in high concentrations in the leaves of the Paraguayan perennial herb Stevia rebaudiana and their intense sweetness, as well as high concentration in Stevia leaf tissue, has made them the subject of research interest for over 100 years. Steviol glycosides are diterpenoids whose biosynthetic pathways share four steps in common with gibberellic acid formation. The convergence of genomics and plant biochemistry has led to the rapid elucidation of the genes coding for the various enzymes in the biosynthetic pathway. Functional characterization of the enzymes coded for by those genes is on-going. The first committed step in the pathway is the synthesis of the aglycone steviol and the various glycosides found in the leaf tissue result from the elaboration of steviol by a number of glucosyltransferases.

  8. Steviol glycosides in purified stevia leaf extract sharing the same metabolic fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purkayastha, Sidd; Markosyan, Avetik; Prakash, Indra; Bhusari, Sachin; Pugh, George; Lynch, Barry; Roberts, Ashley

    2016-06-01

    The safety of steviol glycosides is based on data available on several individual steviol glycosides and on the terminal absorbed metabolite, steviol. Many more steviol glycosides have been identified, but are not yet included in regulatory assessments. Demonstration that these glycosides share the same metabolic fate would indicate applicability of the same regulatory paradigm. In vitro incubation assays with pooled human fecal homogenates, using rebaudiosides A, B, C, D, E, F and M, as well as steviolbioside and dulcoside A, at two concentrations over 24-48 h, were conducted to assess the metabolic fate of various steviol glycoside classes and to demonstrate that likely all steviol glycosides are metabolized to steviol. The data show that glycosidic side chains containing glucose, rhamnose, xylose, fructose and deoxy-glucose, including combinations of α(1-2), β-1, β(1-2), β(1-3), and β(1-6) linkages, were degraded to steviol mostly within 24 h. Given a common metabolite structure and a shared metabolic fate, safety data available for individual steviol glycosides can be used to support safety of purified steviol glycosides in general. Therefore, steviol glycosides specifications adopted by the regulatory authorities should include all steviol glycosides belonging to the five groups of steviol glycosides and a group acceptable daily intake established.

  9. From food to offspring down: tissue-specific discrimination and turn-over of stable isotopes in herbivorous waterbirds and other avian foraging guilds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Hahn

    Full Text Available Isotopic discrimination and turn-over are fundamental to the application of stable isotope ecology in animals. However, detailed information for specific tissues and species are widely lacking, notably for herbivorous species. We provide details on tissue-specific carbon and nitrogen discrimination and turn-over times from food to blood, feathers, claws, egg tissues and offspring down feathers in four species of herbivorous waterbirds. Source-to-tissue discrimination factors for carbon (δ¹³C and nitrogen stable isotope ratios (δ¹⁵N showed little variation across species but varied between tissues. Apparent discrimination factors ranged between -0.5 to 2.5‰ for δ¹³C and 2.8 to 5.2‰ for δ¹⁵N, and were more similar between blood components than between keratinous tissues or egg tissue. Comparing these results with published data from other species we found no effect of foraging guild on discrimination factors for carbon but a significant foraging-guild effect for nitrogen discrimination factors.Turn-over of δ¹³C in tissues was most rapid in blood plasma, with a half-life of 4.3 d, whereas δ¹³C in blood cells had a half-life of approximately 32 d. Turn-over times for albumen and yolk in laying females were similar to those of blood plasma, at 3.2 and 6.0 d respectively. Within yolk, we found decreasing half-life times of δ¹³C from inner yolk (13.3 d to outer yolk (3.1 d, related to the temporal pattern of tissue formation.We found similarities in tissue-specific turn-over times across all avian species studied to date. Yet, while generalities regarding discrimination factors and tissue turn-over times can be made, a large amount of variation remains unexplained.

  10. Monitoring for a specific management objective: protection of shorebird foraging habitat adjacent to a waste water treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Liz; Petch, David; May, David; Steele, William K

    2017-05-01

    Intertidal invertebrates are often used in environmental monitoring programs as they are good indicators of water quality and an important food source for many species of fish and birds. We present data from a monitoring program where the primary aim is to report on the condition of the potential invertebrate prey abundance, biomass and diversity for migrating shorebirds on mudflats adjacent to a waste water treatment plant in a Ramsar listed wetland in Victoria, Australia. A key threat to the foraging habitat at this site has been assessed as a reduction in potential prey items as a result of the changes to the waste water treatment processes. We use control charts, which summarise data from intertidal mudflats across the whole shoreline of the adjacent waste water treatment plant, to elicit a management response when trigger levels are reached. We then examine data from replicate discharge and control sites to determine the most appropriate management response. The monitoring program sits within an adaptive management framework where management decisions are reviewed and the data is examined at different scales to evaluate and modify our models of the likely outcomes of management actions. This study provides a demonstration of the process undertaken in a year when trigger levels were reached and a management decision was required. This highlights the importance of monitoring data from a range of scales in reducing uncertainty and improving decision making in complex systems.

  11. Variants of glycoside hydrolases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teter, Sarah; Ward, Connie; Cherry, Joel; Jones, Aubrey; Harris, Paul; Yi, Jung

    2017-07-11

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent glycoside hydrolase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 21, 94, 157, 205, 206, 247, 337, 350, 373, 383, 438, 455, 467, and 486 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, and optionally further comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2 a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, wherein the variants have glycoside hydrolase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant glycoside hydrolases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  12. Variants of glycoside hydrolases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teter, Sarah (Davis, CA); Ward, Connie (Hamilton, MT); Cherry, Joel (Davis, CA); Jones, Aubrey (Davis, CA); Harris, Paul (Carnation, WA); Yi, Jung (Sacramento, CA)

    2011-04-26

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent glycoside hydrolase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 21, 94, 157, 205, 206, 247, 337, 350, 373, 383, 438, 455, 467, and 486 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, and optionally further comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2 a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, wherein the variants have glycoside hydrolase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant glycoside hydrolases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  13. Glycosides from Bougainvillea glabra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, András; Tóth, Gábor; Duddeck, Helmut; Soliman, Hesham S M; Mahmoud, Ibrahim I; Samir, Hanan

    2006-01-01

    Three glycosides were isolated from Bougainvillea glabra and their structures were determined by extensive use of 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy ((1)H and (13)C). First compound was identical to momordin IIc (quinoside D) [beta-D-glucopyranosyl 3-O-[beta-D-xylopyranosyl-(1 --> 3)-O-(beta-D-glucopyranosyluronic acid)] oleanolate], second compound was quercetin 3-O-alpha-L-(rhamnopyranosyl)(1 --> 6)-[alpha-L-rhamnopy-ranosyl(1 --> 2)]-beta-D-galactopyranoside and third compound was its derivative quercetin 3-O-alpha-L-(4-caffeoylrhamnopyranosyl)(1 --> 6)-[alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl (1 --> 2)]-beta-D-galactopyranoside, a new natural product.

  14. Factors affecting forage stand establishment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulc R.M.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Significant advances have been made in our knowledge of forage seed physiology, technology, and stand establishment practices; however, stand establishment continues to be one of the most common production problems affecting forage crops in the USA. There is a need for research on stand establishment of forage crops under abiotic and biotic stress. Although the forage seed industry produces and markets seed of high quality, new methods of assessing seed vigor are needed and their use should be expanded in the industry to enable matching seed lot performance to specific environmental conditions where performance can be maximized. Seed treatment and seed coating are used in the forage seed industry, and studies have shown they are of benefit in some environments. There is an increase in no-tillage seeding of forage crops, but improvements in the no-tillage planting equipment are needed to make them better suited to small seeds. Other recent developments in seeding techniques include broadcasting seed with dry granular and fluid fertilizers, which improves the efficiency of the seeding operation.

  15. Acylated flavone glycosides from Veronica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albach, Dirk C; Grayer, Renée J; Jensen, Søren Rosendal; Ozgökce, Fevzi; Veitch, Nigel C

    2003-12-01

    A survey of the flavonoid glycosides of selected taxa in the genus Veronica yielded two new acylated 5,6,7,3',4'-pentahydroxyflavone (6-hydroxyluteolin) glycosides and two unusual allose-containing acylated 5,7,8,4'-tetrahydroxyflavone (isoscutellarein) glycosides. The new compounds were isolated from V. liwanensis and V. longifolia and identified using NMR spectroscopy as 6-hydroxyluteolin 4'-methyl ether 7-O-alpha-rhamnopyranosyl(1"'-->2")[6"-O-acetyl-beta-glucopyranoside] and 6-hydroxyluteolin 7-O-(6"-O-(E)-caffeoyl)-beta-glucopyranoside, respectively. Isoscutellarein 7-O-(6"'-O-acetyl)-beta-allopyranosyl(1"'-->2")-beta-glucopyranoside was obtained from both V. intercedens and V. orientalis and its 4'-methyl ether from V. orientalis only. Complete 1H and 13C NMR spectral assignments are presented for both isoscutellarein glycosides. Two iridoid glucosides new to the genus Veronica (melittoside and globularifolin) were also isolated from V. intercedens.

  16. Annotation and comparative analysis of the glycoside hydrolase genes in Brachypodium distachyon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyler, Ludmila [United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Western Regional Research Center (WRRC), Albany; Bragg, Jennifer [United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Western Regional Research Center (WRRC), Albany; Wu, Jiajie [United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Western Regional Research Center (WRRC), Albany; Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Vogel, John [United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Western Regional Research Center (WRRC), Albany

    2010-01-01

    Background Glycoside hydrolases cleave the bond between a carbohydrate and another carbohydrate, a protein, lipid or other moiety. Genes encoding glycoside hydrolases are found in a wide range of organisms, from archea to animals, and are relatively abundant in plant genomes. In plants, these enzymes are involved in diverse processes, including starch metabolism, defense, and cell-wall remodeling. Glycoside hydrolase genes have been previously cataloged for Oryza sativa (rice), the model dicotyledonous plant Arabidopsis thaliana, and the fast-growing tree Populus trichocarpa (poplar). To improve our understanding of glycoside hydrolases in plants generally and in grasses specifically, we annotated the glycoside hydrolase genes in the grasses Brachypodium distachyon (an emerging monocotyledonous model) and Sorghum bicolor (sorghum). We then compared the glycoside hydrolases across species, both at the whole-genome level and at the level of individual glycoside hydrolase families. Results We identified 356 glycoside hydrolase genes in Brachypodium and 404 in sorghum. The corresponding proteins fell into the same 34 families that are represented in rice, Arabidopsis, and poplar, helping to define a glycoside hydrolase family profile which may be common to flowering plants. Examination of individual glycoside hydrolase familes (GH5, GH13, GH18, GH19, GH28, and GH51) revealed both similarities and distinctions between monocots and dicots, as well as between species. Shared evolutionary histories appear to be modified by lineage-specific expansions or deletions. Within families, the Brachypodium and sorghum proteins generally cluster with those from other monocots. Conclusions This work provides the foundation for further comparative and functional analyses of plant glycoside hydrolases. Defining the Brachypodium glycoside hydrolases sets the stage for Brachypodium to be a monocot model for investigations of these enzymes and their diverse roles in planta. Insights

  17. Universality classes of foraging with resource renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chupeau, M.; Bénichou, O.; Redner, S.

    2016-03-01

    We determine the impact of resource renewal on the lifetime of a forager that depletes its environment and starves if it wanders too long without eating. In the framework of a minimal starving random-walk model with resource renewal, there are three universal classes of behavior as a function of the renewal time. For sufficiently rapid renewal, foragers are immortal, while foragers have a finite lifetime otherwise. In the specific case of one dimension, there is a third regime, for sufficiently slow renewal, in which the lifetime of the forager is independent of the renewal time. We outline an enumeration method to determine the mean lifetime of the forager in the mortal regime.

  18. A new diterpene glycoside from Stevia rebaudiana

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chaturvedula, Venkata Sai Prakash; Prakash, Indra

    2011-01-01

    From the commercial extract of the leaves of Stevia rebaudiana, a new diterpene glycoside was isolated besides the known steviol glycosides including stevioside, rebaudiosides A-F, rubusoside and dulcoside...

  19. Effect of marine glycosides on adenosinetriphosphatase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorshkov, B A; Gorshkova, I A; Stonik, V A; Elyakov, G B

    1982-01-01

    Marine glycosides from the sea cucumbers Actinopyga agassizi, Holothuria atra, Bohadschia argus, Cucumaria fraudatrix, Astichopus multifidus and Thelenota ananas inhibit both Na+-K+ ATPase and Mg2+-ATPase of rat brain in vitro. The glycoside-cholesterol complex of these compounds does not influence ATPase activity. Asterosaponins from starfishes Linckia guildingi and Linckia laevigata possess a slight inhibiting effect. The triterpene glycosides from sea cucumbers are more powerful inhibitors than steroidal glycosides from starfishes.

  20. Steviol glycoside safety: is the genotoxicity database sufficient?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, J D; Carakostas, M C; Brusick, D J

    2013-01-01

    The safety of steviol glycoside sweeteners has been extensively reviewed in the literature. National and international food safety agencies and approximately 20 expert panels have concluded that steviol glycosides, including the widely used sweeteners stevioside and rebaudioside A, are not genotoxic. However, concern has been expressed in recent publications that steviol glycosides may be mutagenic based on select studies representing a small fraction of the overall database, and it has been suggested that further in vivo genotoxicity studies are required to complete their safety profiles. To address the utility of conducting additional in vivo genotoxicity studies, this review evaluates the specific genotoxicity studies that are the sources of concern, and evaluates the adequacy of the database including more recent genotoxicity data not mentioned in those publications. The current database of in vitro and in vivo studies for steviol glycosides is robust and does not indicate that either stevioside or rebaudioside A are genotoxic. This, combined with a lack of evidence for neoplasm development in rat bioassays, establish the safety of all steviol glycosides with respect to their genotoxic/carcinogenic potential.

  1. A glycoside of Nicotina tabacum affects mouse dopaminergic behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Y; Ohnuma, S; Kawagoe, M; Sugiyama, T

    2003-01-01

    Climbing in the forced swimming test is considered a dopaminergic-specific behavior. A substance of Nicotina tabacum affecting dopamine neuronal activity was investigated using the mouse behavioral system. The substance was found to be a glycoside with the peripheral sugar chain structures Fuc alpha 1-2Gal, Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc and GalNAc alpha 1-3GalNAc and with basic polymannoses. The glycoside dose-dependently increased behavior via D2 neuronal activity, but not D1 activity. This suggests that smoking can affect human brain function not only via the nicotinic cholinergic neuron, but also via the D2 neuron.

  2. TRITERPENE GLYCOSIDE FROM TERMINALIA ARJUNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R. K. UPADHYAY; M. B. PANDEY; R. N. JHA; V. P. SINGH; V. B. PANDEY

    2001-01-01

    A new triterpene glycoside, arjunetoside, together with oleanolic and arjunic acids has been isolated from the root bark of Terminalia arjuna. The structure of arjunetoside has been established as 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-2α,3β, 19α-trihydroxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid, 28-O-β-D-glucopyranoside by chemical and spectral data.

  3. Neolignan glycoside from Angelica dahurica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing Zeng Zhao; Xu Feng; Xiao Dong Jia; Yun Fa Dong; Ming Wang

    2007-01-01

    A new neolignan glycoside, 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-9-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(7R, 8S)-dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol was isolated from the fresh roots of Angelica dahurica. The structure of the new compound was elucidated on the basis of spectral analysis.

  4. Mass spectrometric imaging of flavonoid glycosides and biflavonoids in Ginkgo biloba L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Sebastian; Stengel, Julia

    2016-10-01

    Ginkgo biloba L. is known to be rich in flavonoids and flavonoid glycosides. However, the distribution within specific plant organs (e.g. within leaves) is not known. By using HPLC-MS and MS/MS we have identified a number of previously known G. biloba flavonoid glycosides and biflavonoids from leaves. Namely, kaempferol, quercetin, isorhamnetin, myricetin, laricitrin/mearnsetin and apigenin glycosides were identified. Furthermore, biflavonoids like ginkgetin/isoginkgetin were also detected. The application of MALDI mass spectrometric imaging, enabled the compilation of concentration profiles of flavonoid glycosides and biflavonoids in G. biloba L. leaves. Both, flavonoid glycosides and biflavonoids show a distinct distribution in leaf thin sections of G. biloba L.

  5. Stimulation of steviol glycoside accumulation in Stevia rebaudiana by red LED light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceunen, Stijn; Werbrouck, Stefaan; Geuns, Jan M C

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether steviol glycoside accumulation is under phytochrome control. The results indicate that Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni plants grown under short-day conditions showed precocious flowering and stagnation of steviol glycoside accumulation. Long night interruption by red LED light stimulated and sustained the vegetative growth as well as the accumulation of steviol glycosides in the leaves. After 7 weeks of treatment, steviol glycoside content was about two-fold higher in LED-treated plants than in the short-day control group. The effects of red LED light were measured both in a greenhouse and in a phytotron, irrespective of cultivar-specific differences. Therefore, it can be concluded that a mid-night interruption by red LED light during short photoperiods provides an easy and inexpensive method to increase vegetative leaf biomass production with an increased steviol glycoside yield.

  6. Diterpene Glycosides from Stevia rebaudiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indra Prakash

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Three novel diterpene glycosides were isolated for the first time from the commercial extract of the leaves of Stevia rebaudiana, along with several known steviol glycosides, namely stevioside, rebaudiosides A-F, rubusoside and dulcoside A. The new compounds were identified as 13-[(2-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-β-D-glucopyranosyloxy] ent-kaur-15-en-19-oic acid (1, 13-[(2-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-β-D-glucopyranosyloxy]-16β-hydroxy-ent-kauran-19-oic acid (2 and 13-methyl-16-oxo-17-nor-ent-kauran-19-oic acid-β-D-glucopyranosyl ester (3 on the basis of extensive 2D NMR and MS spectroscopic data as well as chemical studies.

  7. A recycling pathway for cyanogenic glycosides evidenced by the comparative metabolic profiling in three cyanogenic plant species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pičmanová, Martina; Neilson, Elizabeth H.; Motawia, Mohammed S.;

    2015-01-01

    nitrogen at specific developmental stages. To investigate the presence of putative turnover products of cyanogenic glycosides, comparative metabolic profiling using LC-MS/MS and HR-MS complemented by ion-mobility mass spectrometry was carried out in three cyanogenic plant species: cassava, almond...... products in cyanogenic plants open entirely new insights into the multiplicity of biological roles cyanogenic glycosides may play in plants.......Cyanogenic glycosides are phytoanticipins involved in plant defence against herbivores by virtue of their ability to release toxic HCN upon tissue disruption. In addition, endogenous turnover of cyanogenic glycosides without the liberation of HCN may offer plants an important source of reduced...

  8. Triterpenoid glycosides from Bacopa monnieri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaramakrishna, Chillara; Rao, Chirravuri V; Trimurtulu, Golakoti; Vanisree, Mulabagal; Subbaraju, Gottumukkala V

    2005-12-01

    Two triterpenoid glycosides have been isolated along with 10 known saponins from Bacopa monnieri. Structures of the compounds have been elucidated as 3-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->3)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl] jujubogenin (1) and 3-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->3)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl] pseudojujubogenin (2) by high resolution NMR spectral data and chemical correlations. Further, the chemical compositions of bacosides A and B have been delineated.

  9. GLYCOSIDES FROM LINARIA VULGARIS MILL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Mashcenko

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A new flavonol glycoside, 5,4′-dimethylkaempferol 3-O-β-D-(6′′-α-Lrhamnopyranosyl -glucopyranoside, together with three known compounds were isolated from the n-butanolic soluble fraction of underground and aerial parts of Linaria vulgaris Mill, collected on the territory of Moldova. The characterisation of these compounds was achieved by various chromatographic and spectroscopic methods (IR, UV, 13C-NMR, 1H-NMR and MS.

  10. The regulation of ant colony foraging activity without spatial information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, Balaji; Dektar, Katherine N; Gordon, Deborah M

    2012-01-01

    Many dynamical networks, such as the ones that produce the collective behavior of social insects, operate without any central control, instead arising from local interactions among individuals. A well-studied example is the formation of recruitment trails in ant colonies, but many ant species do not use pheromone trails. We present a model of the regulation of foraging by harvester ant (Pogonomyrmex barbatus) colonies. This species forages for scattered seeds that one ant can retrieve on its own, so there is no need for spatial information such as pheromone trails that lead ants to specific locations. Previous work shows that colony foraging activity, the rate at which ants go out to search individually for seeds, is regulated in response to current food availability throughout the colony's foraging area. Ants use the rate of brief antennal contacts inside the nest between foragers returning with food and outgoing foragers available to leave the nest on the next foraging trip. Here we present a feedback-based algorithm that captures the main features of data from field experiments in which the rate of returning foragers was manipulated. The algorithm draws on our finding that the distribution of intervals between successive ants returning to the nest is a Poisson process. We fitted the parameter that estimates the effect of each returning forager on the rate at which outgoing foragers leave the nest. We found that correlations between observed rates of returning foragers and simulated rates of outgoing foragers, using our model, were similar to those in the data. Our simple stochastic model shows how the regulation of ant colony foraging can operate without spatial information, describing a process at the level of individual ants that predicts the overall foraging activity of the colony.

  11. Microbial hydrolysis of steviol glycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renwick, A G; Tarka, S M

    2008-07-01

    A review of the role of gut microbiota in the metabolism of the steviol glycosides, stevioside and rebaudioside A, indicates that they are not absorbed intact but undergo hydrolysis by the intestinal microflora to steviol. Steviol is not metabolized by the intestinal flora and is absorbed from the intestine. The rate of hydrolysis for stevioside is greater than for rebaudioside A. Recent studies using mass spectrometry have shown that steviol-16,17-epoxide is not a microbial metabolite of steviol glycosides. Bacteroides species are primarily responsible for hydrolysis via their beta-glucosidase activity. Fecal incubation studies with both human and animal mixed flora provide similar results, and this indicates that the rat is an appropriate model for studies on steviol glycosides. Given the similarity in the microbial metabolism of stevioside and rebaudioside A with the formation of steviol as the single hydrolysis product that is absorbed from the intestinal tract, the toxicological data on stevioside are relevant to the risk assessment of rebaudioside A.

  12. Ultraviolet-absorbing compounds in milk are related to forage polyphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besle, J M; Viala, D; Martin, B; Pradel, P; Meunier, B; Berdagué, J L; Fraisse, D; Lamaison, J L; Coulon, J B

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this work was to characterize UV-absorbing compounds (UAC) in milk in relation to diet. In winter, 4 groups of cows each received a different diet: concentrate rich containing 35% cocksfoot hay (CCH), maize silage (MS), rye grass silage (RS), or rye grass hay (RH). In summer, 2 additional diets were given: mountain grassland hay (GH) and mountain grassland pasture (GP). Polyphenols were analyzed by HPLC and Folin reaction on forages and UAC were extracted from milks and analyzed by HPLC. In forages, the number of polyphenols was lowest in MS (57) and greatest in GP (85). Twenty-four peaks were identified, accounting for 28 to 47% peak area at 280 nm. Caffeoyl compounds and flavonoid glycosides were mainly found in RH, GH, and GP. Hydrolyzed compounds such as hydroxycinnamic acids and aglycones were found in MS and RS. Estimated amounts of polyphenols were lowest for MS (3.7 g/kg), roughly similar for CH, RS, and RH (about 15 g/kg), and greatest for GH and GP (21.6 and 35.3 g/kg, respectively). About 230 different peaks were separated in milks. Milks from RH and GP contained the lowest (87) and the greatest (127) numbers of peaks, respectively. Only 10 peaks were identified, accounting for 21 to 54% of the total spectra area. In addition to the major compound hippuric acid, phenylacetic acid, benzoic acid, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid benzaldehyde, catechol, and small amounts of ferulic acid were found in varying amounts depending on the diet. Flavonoids such as quercetin, luteolin, and apigenin were also present. Hippuric acid was clearly related to the presence of caffeoylquinic compounds in forages. Other identified UAC may originate essentially from forage simple polyphenols or from cell wall aromatics. Some of the several unknown compounds may also originate from the transformation of other nutrients. Estimated amounts of UAC were widely variable within each animal group. They were surprisingly high in CCH and roughly similar in all milks from preserved

  13. Aroma Glycosides in Grapes and Wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jibin; Zhu, Xiao-Lin; Ullah, Niamat; Tao, Yong-Sheng

    2017-02-01

    The major aroma components in grapes and wine include free volatile compounds and glycosidic nonvolatile compounds. The latter group of compounds is more than 10 times abundant of the former, and constitutes a big aroma reserve in grapes and wine. This review summarizes the research results obtained recently for the identification of aroma glycosides in grapes and wine, including grape glycoside structures, differences in aroma glycosides among grape varieties, hydrolysis mechanisms, and the factors that influence them. It also presents the analytical techniques used to identify the glycosidic aroma precursors. The operational strategies, challenges, and improvements of each step encountered in the analysis of glycosidic aroma precursors are described. This review intends to provide a convenient reference for researchers interested in the methods used for the determination of the aroma glucosides composition and the recognition of their chemical structures.

  14. New lignan glycosides from Justicia procumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hong; Yang, Shu; Dong, Jun-Xing

    2017-01-01

    Four new lignan glycosides (1-4), named procumbenosides I, K, L, and M, together with cleistanthin B (5) reported for the first time in the genus Justicia, and 5 other known arylnaphthalene lignan glycosides (6-10) were isolated from the whole plant of Justicia procumbens. The structures of the new compounds were elucidated by extensive one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) NMR experiments and mass spectrometry. Procumbenoside M (4) was a rare sesquilignan glycoside never previously reported in the species of Justicia. The paper also provided insight into the conformational equilibria existing in the lignan glycosides of the plant.

  15. Naphthalene glycosides in Cassia senna and Cassia angustifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemli, J; Toppet, S; Cuveele, J; Janssen, G

    1981-09-01

    From leaves and pods of Cassia senna L. and C. angustifolia Vahl. were isolated the naphthalene glycosides 6-hydroxymusizin glycoside and the new tinnevellin glycoside. The structures were established mainly by spectroscopic methods ( (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, MS).

  16. STEROIDAL GLYCOSIDES FROM THE ROOTS OF SOLANUM MELONGENA L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepan Shvets

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available One new cholestane glycoside, six steroidal glycosides of spirostane series and one pregnane glycoside have been isolated from the roots of Solanum melongena L. for the first time. Their structures were determined by physico-chemical methods.

  17. Spatiotemporal resource distribution and foraging strategies of ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanan, Michele

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of food resources in space and time is likely to be an important factor governing the type of foraging strategy used by ants. However, no previous systematic attempt has been made to determine whether spatiotemporal resource distribution is in fact correlated with foraging strategy across the ants. In this analysis, I present data compiled from the literature on the foraging strategy and food resource use of 402 species of ants from across the phylogenetic tree. By categorizing the distribution of resources reported in these studies in terms of size relative to colony size, spatial distribution relative to colony foraging range, frequency of occurrence in time relative to worker life span, and depletability (i.e., whether the colony can cause a change in resource frequency), I demonstrate that different foraging strategies are indeed associated with specific spatiotemporal resource attributes. The general patterns I describe here can therefore be used as a framework to inform predictions in future studies of ant foraging behavior. No differences were found between resources collected via short-term recruitment strategies (group recruitment, short-term trails, and volatile recruitment), whereas different resource distributions were associated with solitary foraging, trunk trails, long-term trail networks, group raiding, and raiding. In many cases, ant species use a combination of different foraging strategies to collect diverse resources. It is useful to consider these foraging strategies not as separate options but as modular parts of the total foraging effort of a colony. PMID:25525497

  18. Spatiotemporal resource distribution and foraging strategies of ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanan, Michele

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of food resources in space and time is likely to be an important factor governing the type of foraging strategy used by ants. However, no previous systematic attempt has been made to determine whether spatiotemporal resource distribution is in fact correlated with foraging strategy across the ants. In this analysis, I present data compiled from the literature on the foraging strategy and food resource use of 402 species of ants from across the phylogenetic tree. By categorizing the distribution of resources reported in these studies in terms of size relative to colony size, spatial distribution relative to colony foraging range, frequency of occurrence in time relative to worker life span, and depletability (i.e., whether the colony can cause a change in resource frequency), I demonstrate that different foraging strategies are indeed associated with specific spatiotemporal resource attributes. The general patterns I describe here can therefore be used as a framework to inform predictions in future studies of ant foraging behavior. No differences were found between resources collected via short-term recruitment strategies (group recruitment, short-term trails, and volatile recruitment), whereas different resource distributions were associated with solitary foraging, trunk trails, long-term trail networks, group raiding, and raiding. In many cases, ant species use a combination of different foraging strategies to collect diverse resources. It is useful to consider these foraging strategies not as separate options but as modular parts of the total foraging effort of a colony.

  19. Foraging Experiences with Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Helen Ross

    1976-01-01

    Provided are foraging experiences and wild foods information for utilization in the urban school curriculum. Food uses are detailed for roses, dandelions, wild onions, acorns, cattails, violets and mints. (BT)

  20. Modeling of Habitat and Foraging Behavior of Beaked Whales in the Southern California Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    whale distribution and foraging behavior and to describe inter -specific differences. We investigated spatio-temporal patterns for Cuvier’s beaked whale...distribution and foraging behavior and to describe inter -specific differences. Knowledge about foraging behavior and habitat preference and...Foraging bouts (buzzes) were automatically detected by an algorithm that searched for consecutive low inter -click intervals (5-10 ms) and low received

  1. New minor spirostanol glycosides from Helleborus thibetanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Su, Yan-Fang; Yang, Feng-Ying; Gao, Xiu-Mei

    2017-04-01

    Phytochemical reinvestigation of the dried roots and rhizomes of Helleborus thibetanus afforded four new minor spirostanol glycosides (1-4) and four known spirostanol glycosides (5-8). Their structures were determined on the basis of spectroscopic analyses, including 1D and 2D NMR experiments, together with HR-ESI-MS and IR measurements and the results of acid hydrolysis.

  2. Process for the preparation of alkyl glycosides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Goede, A.T.J.; Van der Leij, I.G.; Van der Heijden, A.M.; Van Rantwijk, F.; Van Bekkum, H.

    1996-01-01

    Abstract of WO 9636640 (A2) The present invention relates to a process for the preparation of alkyl glycosides by reacting an alcohol with a saccharide or a lower-alkyl glycoside in the presence of a catalyst, wherein the catalyst is a mesoporous silica-based molecular sieve material. This proce

  3. Two New Triterpene Glycosides from Centella asiatica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytochemical investigation of the leaves of Centella asiatica resulted in the isolation and characterization of one new ursane type triterpene glycoside; asiaticoside G along with nine known compounds, that were characterized as ursane type triterpenes and /or their glycoside; asiatic acid (2), mad...

  4. Phenolic glycosides from Kaempferia parviflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Toshiaki; Tanaka, Yasuo; Kikuzaki, Hiroe

    2008-11-01

    Three phenolic glycosides were isolated together with two known flavonol glycosides from the H2O-soluble fraction of rhizomes of Kaempferia parviflora. Their structures were determined to be rel-(5aS,10bS)-5a,10b-dihydro-1,3,5a,9-tetrahydroxy-8-methoxy-6H-benz[b]indeno[1,2-d]furan-6-one 5a-O-[alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->6)-beta-d-glucopyranoside] (1), its rel-5aS,10bR isomer (2), and (2R,3S,4S)-3-O-[alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->6)-beta-d-glucopyranosyl]-3'-O-methyl-ent-epicatechin-(2alpha-->O-->3,4alpha-->4)-(5aS,10bS)-5a,10b-dihydro-1,3,5a,9-tetrahydroxy-8-methoxy-6H-benz[b]indeno[1,2-d]furan-6-one 5a-O-[alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->6)-beta-D-glucopyranoside] (3). The structures were elucidated on the basis of analyses of chemical and spectroscopic evidence.

  5. Adaptive Bacterial Foraging Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanning Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial Foraging Optimization (BFO is a recently developed nature-inspired optimization algorithm, which is based on the foraging behavior of E. coli bacteria. Up to now, BFO has been applied successfully to some engineering problems due to its simplicity and ease of implementation. However, BFO possesses a poor convergence behavior over complex optimization problems as compared to other nature-inspired optimization techniques. This paper first analyzes how the run-length unit parameter of BFO controls the exploration of the whole search space and the exploitation of the promising areas. Then it presents a variation on the original BFO, called the adaptive bacterial foraging optimization (ABFO, employing the adaptive foraging strategies to improve the performance of the original BFO. This improvement is achieved by enabling the bacterial foraging algorithm to adjust the run-length unit parameter dynamically during algorithm execution in order to balance the exploration/exploitation tradeoff. The experiments compare the performance of two versions of ABFO with the original BFO, the standard particle swarm optimization (PSO and a real-coded genetic algorithm (GA on four widely-used benchmark functions. The proposed ABFO shows a marked improvement in performance over the original BFO and appears to be comparable with the PSO and GA.

  6. Cooperative Bacterial Foraging Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanning Chen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial Foraging Optimization (BFO is a novel optimization algorithm based on the social foraging behavior of E. coli bacteria. This paper presents a variation on the original BFO algorithm, namely, the Cooperative Bacterial Foraging Optimization (CBFO, which significantly improve the original BFO in solving complex optimization problems. This significant improvement is achieved by applying two cooperative approaches to the original BFO, namely, the serial heterogeneous cooperation on the implicit space decomposition level and the serial heterogeneous cooperation on the hybrid space decomposition level. The experiments compare the performance of two CBFO variants with the original BFO, the standard PSO and a real-coded GA on four widely used benchmark functions. The new method shows a marked improvement in performance over the original BFO and appears to be comparable with the PSO and GA.

  7. Redesigning forages with condensed tannins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximizing protein content in forages and minimizing protein loss during silage fermentation and rumen digestion are concerns for livestock and dairy producers. Substantial amounts of forage protein undergo proteolysis (breakdown) during the ensiling process and during rumen fermentation, transforme...

  8. Triterpenoidal glycosides from Justicia betonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanchanapoom, Tripetch; Noiarsa, Pawadee; Ruchirawat, Somsak; Kasai, Ryoji; Otsuka, Hideaki

    2004-09-01

    dFrom the aerial portion of Justicia betonica L., four triterpenoidal glycosides (justiciosides A-D) were isolated. Their structures were established through chemical and NMR spectroscopic analyses as olean-12-ene-1beta,3beta,11alpha,28-tetraol 28-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-D-glucopyranoside, olean-12-ene-1beta,3beta,11alpha,28-tetraol 28-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-D-glucopyranoside, 11alpha-methoxy-olean-12-ene-1beta,3beta,28-triol 28-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-D-glucopyranoside, 11alpha-methoxy-olean-12-ene-1beta,3beta,28-triol 28-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-D-glucopyranoside, respectively.

  9. A New Furostanol Glycoside from Tribulus terrestris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonghua Liu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Besides two known glycosides, a new furostanol glycoside was isolated from the Fruits of Tribulus terrestris L. The structure of the new furostanol glycoside was established as 26-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(25S-5α-furostane-20(22-en-12-one-3β, 26-diol-3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2-[β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→4]-β-D-galactopyranoside (1 on the basis of 1D and 2D-NMR techniques, including COSY, HMBC, and HMQC correlations.

  10. Glycosides from the root of Iodes cirrhosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Maoluo; Zhang, Yanling; Lin, Sheng; Liu, Mingtao; Song, Weixia; Zi, Jiachen; Yang, Yongchun; Fan, Xiaona; Shi, Jiangong; Hu, Jinfeng; Sun, Jiandong; Chen, Naihong

    2008-04-01

    Seven new neolignan glycosides ( 1- 7), two arylglycerol glycosides ( 8, 9), and 18 known glycosides have been isolated from an ethanolic extract of the root of Iodes cirrhosa. Their structures including absolute configurations were determined by spectroscopic and chemical methods. Based on analysis of the NMR data of threo and erythro 8-4'-oxyneolignans and arylglycerols in different solvents, the validity of J 7,8 and Deltadelta C8-C7 values to distinguish threo and erythro derivatives was discussed. In the in vitro assays, compound 4 and liriodendrin ( 17) both showed activity against glutamate-induced PC12 cell damage at 10 (-5) M.

  11. A new furostanol glycoside from Tribulus terrestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yajuan; Liu, Yonghong; Xu, Tunhai; Xie, Shengxu; Si, Yunshan; Liu, Yue; Zhou, Haiou; Liu, Tonghua; Xu, Dongming

    2010-01-27

    Besides two known glycosides, a new furostanol glycoside was isolated from the Fruits of Tribulus terrestris L. The structure of the new furostanol glycoside was established as 26-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(25S)-5alpha-furostane-20(22)-en-12-one-3beta, 26-diol-3-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)]-beta-D-galactopyranoside (1) on the basis of 1D and 2D-NMR techniques, including COSY, HMBC, and HMQC correlations.

  12. Optimal Foraging in Semantic Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Thomas T.; Jones, Michael N.; Todd, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    Do humans search in memory using dynamic local-to-global search strategies similar to those that animals use to forage between patches in space? If so, do their dynamic memory search policies correspond to optimal foraging strategies seen for spatial foraging? Results from a number of fields suggest these possibilities, including the shared…

  13. Perching but not foraging networks predict the spread of novel foraging skills in starlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boogert, Neeltje J; Nightingale, Glenna F; Hoppitt, William; Laland, Kevin N

    2014-11-01

    The directed social learning hypothesis suggests that information does not spread evenly through animal groups, but rather individual characteristics and patterns of physical proximity guide the social transmission of information along specific pathways. Network-based diffusion analysis (NBDA) allows researchers to test whether information spreads following a social network. However, the explanatory power of different social networks has rarely been compared, and current models do not easily accommodate random effects (e.g. allowing for individuals within groups to correlate in their asocial solving rates). We tested whether the spread of two novel foraging skills through captive starling groups was affected by individual- and group-level random and fixed effects (i.e. sex, age, body condition, dominance rank and demonstrator status) and perching or foraging networks. We extended NBDA to include random effects and conducted model discrimination in a Bayesian context. We found that social learning increased the rate at which birds acquired the novel foraging task solutions by 6.67 times, and acquiring one of the two novel foraging task solutions facilitated the asocial acquisition of the other. Surprisingly, the spread of task solutions followed the perching rather than the foraging social network. Upon acquiring a task solution, foraging performance was facilitated by the presence of group mates. Our results highlight the importance of considering more than one social network when predicting the spread of information through animal groups. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cognition in the wild.

  14. Endogenous Turnover of Cyanogenic Glycosides in Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Picmanova, Martina

    Amongst the vast multitude of plant secondary metabolites, cyanogenic glycosides (CNglcs) occupy an important place as sophisticated defence compounds, releasing toxic hydrogen cyanide (HCN) upon herbivore attack – a process known as cyanogenesis. Beside this wellestablished function, there is st...

  15. A New Dihydroflavone Glycoside from Glycyrrhiza uralensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Xia LIU; Wen Han LIN; Jun Shan YANG

    2004-01-01

    A new dihydroflavone glycoside was isolated from the underground parts of Glycyrrhiza uralensis.Its structure was elucidated as 7-hydroxyl-4'-O-β-D-(6"-O-α-hydroxylpropionyl) glucopyranosyl dihydroflavone by spectral methods.

  16. A New Flavonoid Glycoside from Lysionotus pauciflorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wei; Wen, Yaya; Tu, Yanbei; Du, Hongjian; Li, Qin; Zhu, Chao; Li, Yanfang

    2016-05-01

    Ten flavonoids (1-10), including a new glycoside (nevadensin-7-sambubioside, 7), together with a phenylpropanoid glycoside (11) were isolated from Lysionotus pauciflorus. Their structures were elucidated by a combination of spectroscopic methods and comparing with literature data. Five compounds (1, 3, 4, 8, and 9) were obtained from the family Gesneriaceae for the first time. The new compound was evaluated in vitro for anticholinesterase activities against acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), but was found to be inactive.

  17. Individual foraging strategies reveal niche overlap between endangered galapagos pinnipeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Villegas-Amtmann

    Full Text Available Most competition studies between species are conducted from a population-level approach. Few studies have examined inter-specific competition in conjunction with intra-specific competition, with an individual-based approach. To our knowledge, none has been conducted on marine top predators. Sympatric Galapagos fur seals (Arctocephalus galapagoensis and sea lions (Zalophus wollebaeki share similar geographic habitats and potentially compete. We studied their foraging niche overlap at Cabo Douglas, Fernandina Island from simultaneously collected dive and movement data to examine spatial and temporal inter- and intra-specific competition. Sea lions exhibited 3 foraging strategies (shallow, intermediate and deep indicating intra-specific competition. Fur seals exhibited one foraging strategy, diving predominantly at night, between 0-80 m depth and mostly at 19-22 h. Most sea lion dives also occurred at night (63%, between 0-40 m, within fur seals' diving depth range. 34% of sea lions night dives occurred at 19-22 h, when fur seals dived the most, but most of them occurred at dawn and dusk, when fur seals exhibited the least amount of dives. Fur seals and sea lions foraging behavior overlapped at 19 and 21 h between 0-30 m depths. Sea lions from the deep diving strategy exhibited the greatest foraging overlap with fur seals, in time (19 h, depth during overlapping time (21-24 m, and foraging range (37.7%. Fur seals foraging range was larger. Cabo Douglas northwest coastal area, region of highest diving density, is a foraging "hot spot" for both species. Fur seals and sea lions foraging niche overlap occurred, but segregation also occurred; fur seals primarily dived at night, while sea lions exhibited night and day diving. Both species exploited depths and areas exclusive to their species. Niche breadth generally increases with environmental uncertainty and decreased productivity. Potential competition between these species could be greater during

  18. Identifying robustness in the regulation of collective foraging of ant colonies using an interaction-based model with backward bifurcation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udiani, Oyita; Pinter-Wollman, Noa; Kang, Yun

    2015-02-21

    Collective behaviors in social insect societies often emerge from simple local rules. However, little is known about how these behaviors are dynamically regulated in response to environmental changes. Here, we use a compartmental modeling approach to identify factors that allow harvester ant colonies to regulate collective foraging activity in response to their environment. We propose a set of differential equations describing the dynamics of: (1) available foragers inside the nest, (2) active foragers outside the nest, and (3) successful returning foragers, to understand how colony-specific parameters, such as baseline number of foragers, interactions among foragers, food discovery rates, successful forager return rates, and foraging duration might influence collective foraging dynamics, while maintaining functional robustness to perturbations. Our analysis indicates that the model can undergo a forward (transcritical) bifurcation or a backward bifurcation depending on colony-specific parameters. In the former case, foraging activity persists when the average number of recruits per successful returning forager is larger than one. In the latter case, the backward bifurcation creates a region of bistability in which the size and fate of foraging activity depends on the distribution of the foraging workforce among the model's compartments. We validate the model with experimental data from harvester ants (Pogonomyrmex barbatus) and perform sensitivity analysis. Our model provides insights on how simple, local interactions can achieve an emergent and robust regulatory system of collective foraging activity in ant colonies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Therapeutic Potential of Temperate Forage Legumes: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornara, Laura; Xiao, Jianbo; Burlando, Bruno

    2016-07-29

    The discovery of bioactive molecules from botanical sources is an expanding field, preferentially oriented to plants having a tradition of use in medicine and providing high yields and availability. Temperate forage legumes are Fabaceae species that include worldwide-important crops. These plants possess therapeutic virtues that have not only been used in veterinary and folk medicine, but have also attracted the interest of official medicine. We have examined here Medicago sativa (alfalfa), Trifolium pratense and T. repens (clovers), Melilotus albus and M. officinalis (sweet clovers), Lotus corniculatus (birdsfoot trefoil), Onobrychis viciifolia (sainfoin), Lespedeza capitata (roundhead lespedeza), and Galega officinalis (goat's rue). The phytochemical complexes of these species contain secondary metabolites whose pharmacological potentials deserve investigation. Major classes of compounds include alkaloids and amines, cyanogenic glycosides, flavonoids, coumarins, condensed tannins, and saponins. Some of these phytochemicals have been related to antihypercholesterolemia, antidiabetic, antimenopause, anti-inflammatory, antiedema, anthelmintic, and kidney protective effects. Two widely prescribed drugs have been developed starting from temperate forage legumes, namely, the antithrombotic warfarin, inspired from sweet clover's coumarin, and the antidiabetic metformin, a derivative of sainfoin's guanidine. Available evidence suggests that temperate forage legumes are a potentially important resource for the extraction of active principles to be used as nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals.

  20. Steroidal glycosides from the leaves of Cestrum nocturnum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Watanabe, Kazuki; Sakagami, Hiroshi; Sashida, Yutaka

    2002-12-01

    Further phytochemical analysis aimed at the steroidal glycoside constituents of the leaves of Cestrum nocturnum has resulted in the isolation of eight new steroidal glycosides (1-8), which were classified into a spirostanol saponin (1), a furostanol saponin (2), a pseudo-furostanol saponin (3), two pregnane glycosides (4, 5), two cholestane glycosides (6, 7), and pregnane-carboxylic acid gamma-lactone glycoside (8), and of two known spirostanol glycosides (9, 10). The structures of the new compounds were elucidated on the basis of chemical and spectroscopic evidence.

  1. Foraging enrichment modulates open field response to monosodium glutamate in mice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Onaolapo, Olakunle J; Onaolapo, Adejoke Y; Akanmu, Moses A; Olayiwola, Gbola

    2015-01-01

    Environmental enrichment can enhance expression of species-specific behaviour. While foraging enrichment is encouraged in laboratory animals, its impact on novelty induced behaviour remain largely unknown...

  2. Diterpene glycosides from Stevia phlebophylla A. Gray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceunen, Stijn; Wim, De Borggraeve; Compernolle, Frans; Mai, Anh Hung; Geuns, Jan M C

    2013-09-20

    The rare Mexican species Stevia phlebophylla A. Gray was long considered to be the only known Stevia species, beside the well-known S. rebaudiana, containing the highly sweet diterpenoid steviol glycosides. We report a re-evaluation of this claim after phytochemically screening leaves obtained from two herbarium specimens of S. phlebophylla for the presence of steviol glycosides. Despite extensive MS analyses, no steviol glycosides could be unambiguously verified. Instead, the main chromatographic peak eluting at retention times similar to those of steviol glycosides was identified as a new compound, namely 16β-hydroxy-17-acetoxy-ent-kauran-19-oic acid-(6-O-β-D-xylopyranosyl-β-D-glucopyranosyl) ester (1) on the basis of extensive NMR and MS data as well as the characterization of its acid hydrolysate. Seven more compounds were detected by ESIMS which are possibly structurally related to 1. It can therefore be concluded that S. phlebophylla is unlikely to contain significant amounts of steviol glycosides, if any.

  3. Effects of different pretreatments on specific heat of forage maize%不同前处理对饲料玉米比热的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王红英; 李倪薇; 高蕊; 杨洁; 康宏彬

    2012-01-01

    为了明确以玉米为原料的配方饲料在调质、膨化、冷却过程中传热传质的基本特性,该文利用差示量热扫描仪(differential scanning calorimeter,DSC)测比热的方法,研究了自然干燥条件下,不同的烘干温度(45~105℃)、含水率(12%~16%,湿基计)、粉碎粒度(0.2~0.6 mm)等前处理因素对玉米比热的影响.采用3因素5水平2次正交旋转设计,通过回归分析和响应面分析,建立了玉米比热基于烘干温度、含水率(湿基计)、粉碎粒度的数学模型.研究结果表明:所得同归方程拟合情况良好,当烘干温度为45℃、含水率为12%(湿基计)、粉碎粒度为0.6mm时,玉米的比热值最小为2051J/(kg·K).此模型的建立可为不同处理条件下玉米比热值的直接获得提供理论方法与依据,为不同配方饲料的湿热加工特性研究提供参考.%In order to determine the heat and mass transfer properties of corn-based feedstuff's during the process of conditioning, extrusion and cooling, the effects of drying temperature (45-105℃), moisture content (12%-16%) wet basis, particle size (0.2-0.6 mm) on the specific heat of corn grain were investigated using a continuous differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) method. The experiments in three factors with five levels were designed by quadratic orthogonal rotation approach. A model of specific heat of corn grain versus dry temperature, moisture content and particle size was established by regression analysis and response surface methodology (RSM). The results showed that the minimum specific heat of corn grain was obtained(2051 J/(kg·K)) under the processing condition of drying temperature 45℃, moisture content 12% wet basis , and particle size 0.6 mm. This model can be used to evaluate the specific heat of corn grain processing in different conditions and to provide a reference for thermal processing of similar feedstuffs.

  4. The Dynamics of Foraging Ants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, G. William

    2009-03-01

    We experimentally study the foraging of small black ants, Formicinae lasius flavus, in order to describe their foraging behavior mathematically. Individual ants are allowed to forage on a two-dimensional surface in the absence of any food sources. The position of the ant as a function of time is determined using a high-resolution digital camera. Analysis of the average square displacements of many ants suggests that the foraging strategy is a non-reversing random walk. Moreover, the ants do not retrace their steps to return home but instead continue the random walk until it brings them back near their starting point.

  5. Collective foraging in heterogeneous landscapes

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Kunal

    2013-01-01

    Animals foraging alone are hypothesized to optimize the encounter rates with resources through L\\'evy walks. However, the issue of how the interactions between multiple foragers influence their search efficiency is still not completely understood. To address this, we consider a model to study the optimal strategy for a group of foragers searching for targets distributed heterogeneously. In our model foragers move on a square lattice containing immobile but regenerative targets. At any instant a forager is able to detect only those targets that happen to be in the same site. However, we allow the foragers to have information about the state of other foragers. A forager who has not detected any target walks towards the nearest location, where another forager has detected a target, with probability $\\exp{\\left(-\\alpha d\\right)}$, where $d$ is the distance and $\\alpha$ is a parameter. The model reveals that neither overcrowding ($\\alpha\\to 0$) nor independent searching ($\\alpha\\to\\infty$) is beneficial for the gr...

  6. Caffeoyl phenylethanoid glycosides in Sanango racemosum and in the gesneriaceae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren Rosendal

    1996-01-01

    An investigation of Samango racemosum for systematically useful glycosides has been performed. No iridoids could be detected, but reverse phase chromatography provided the caffeoyl phenylethanoid glycosides (CPGs) calceolarioside C and conandroside together with the new 2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl...

  7. A Synoptical Introduction of The Clinical Application of Tripterygium Glycosides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li-juan; GONG Ning-bo; GU Tong-nan

    2005-01-01

    @@ Tripterygium glycosides (TG) refers to the total glycosides, mainly the epoxy diterpene lactones extracted from the root of Tripterygium Wilfordii Hook f (TW), a common vine-like toxic plant grown in the wide area of South China.

  8. Iridoid and megastigmane glycosides from Phlomis aurea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, M S; Mohamed, K M; Hassanean, H A; Ohtani, K; Kasai, R; Yamasaki, K

    2000-10-01

    From the leaves of Phlomis aurea, two new iridoids of unique structures named 3-epiphlomurin (1) and phlomurin (2), a new megastigmane glucoside phlomuroside (3) and a new benzyl alcohol glycoside having the structure benzyl alcohol-O-beta-xylopyranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-glucopyranoside (4) have been isolated together with four known iridoids auroside, lamiide, 8-epiloganin and ipolamiide, two known phenolic glycosides acteoside (verbascoside) and syringin, one known phenylethanoid glycoside 2-phenylethyl-O-beta-xylopyranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-glucopyranoside, one known lignan liriodendrin and three known flavonoids chrysoeriol-7-O-beta-glucopyranoside, acacetin-7-O-beta-glucopyranoside and luteolin-7-O-beta-glucopyranoside. The structures of the isolated compounds were verified by means of mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral analyses.

  9. Steviol glycosides: chemical diversity, metabolism, and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceunen, Stijn; Geuns, Jan M C

    2013-06-28

    Steviol glycosides are a group of highly sweet diterpene glycosides discovered in only a few plant species, most notably the Paraguayan shrub Stevia rebaudiana. During the past few decades, the nutritional and pharmacological benefits of these secondary metabolites have become increasingly apparent. While these properties are now widely recognized, many aspects related to their in vivo biochemistry and metabolism and their relationship to the overall plant physiology of S. rebaudiana are not yet understood. Furthermore, the large size of the steviol glycoside pool commonly found within S. rebaudiana leaves implies a significant metabolic investment and poses questions regarding the benefits S. rebaudiana might gain from their accumulation. The current review intends to thoroughly discuss the available knowledge on these issues.

  10. Breeding tropical forages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Jank

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Brazil has the largest commercial beef cattle herd and is the main beef exporter in the world. Cultivated pastures arethe basis for the Brazilian beef production, and occupy an area of 101.4 million hectares. However, very few forage cultivars arecommercially available, and the majority of these are of apomictic reproduction, thus genetically homogeneous. Tropical foragebreeding is at its infancy, but much investment and efforts have been applied in the last three decades and some new cultivars havebeen released. In this paper, origin of different species, modes of reproduction, breeding programs and targets are discussed andthe resulting new cultivars released are presented.

  11. A New Diterpene Glycoside from Stevia rebaudiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indra Prakash

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available From the commercial extract of the leaves of Stevia rebaudiana, a new diterpene glycoside was isolated besides the known steviol glycosides including stevioside, rebaudiosides A-F, rubusoside and dulcoside A. The new compound was identified as 13-[(2-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-β-D-glucopyranosyloxy] ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid-(2-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-β-D-glucopyranosyl ester (1 on the basis of extensive spectroscopic (NMR and MS and chemical studies.

  12. Stereoselective Synthesis of C-Glycosides by Suzuki Cross-coupling Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI,Xiao-Liu; XING,Chun-Yong; WANG,Huan-Xin; TAKAHASHI,Hideyo; IKEGAMI,Shiro

    2004-01-01

    @@ Carbohydrates and their conjugates have been recognized to play a wide variety of metabolic roles in numerous biological processes.[1] Various modified sugars and analogues have been recently synthesized for further investigation of glycosidase reactions and for the development of specific glycosidase inhibitors.[2] As one of the most important carbohydrate mimics, C-glycosides have attracted great attention due to their stability to chemical or enzymatic hydrolysis of the glycosidic linkage. A number of methodologies for the preparation of C-glycosides have been extensively investigated.[3] We have recently reported the syntheses of novel C-glycosyl amino acids and amino-C-disaccharides possessing a ketose form via the stereoselective 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of exo-methylenesugars (1) and nitrones.[4,5] As a continuation of our research on the synthesis of C-glycosides using exo-methylenesugar as the precursor, we wish to describe here a stereoselective synthesis of C-glycosides by Suzuki cross-coupling reaction.

  13. Spatial memory in foraging games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerster, Bryan E; Rhodes, Theo; Kello, Christopher T

    2016-03-01

    Foraging and foraging-like processes are found in spatial navigation, memory, visual search, and many other search functions in human cognition and behavior. Foraging is commonly theorized using either random or correlated movements based on Lévy walks, or a series of decisions to remain or leave proximal areas known as "patches". Neither class of model makes use of spatial memory, but search performance may be enhanced when information about searched and unsearched locations is encoded. A video game was developed to test the role of human spatial memory in a canonical foraging task. Analyses of search trajectories from over 2000 human players yielded evidence that foraging movements were inherently clustered, and that clustering was facilitated by spatial memory cues and influenced by memory for spatial locations of targets found. A simple foraging model is presented in which spatial memory is used to integrate aspects of Lévy-based and patch-based foraging theories to perform a kind of area-restricted search, and thereby enhance performance as search unfolds. Using only two free parameters, the model accounts for a variety of findings that individually support competing theories, but together they argue for the integration of spatial memory into theories of foraging.

  14. Colony variation in the collective regulation of foraging by harvester ants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guetz, Adam; Greene, Michael J.; Holmes, Susan

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates variation in collective behavior in a natural population of colonies of the harvester ant, Pogonomyrmex barbatus. Harvester ant colonies regulate foraging activity to adjust to current food availability; the rate at which inactive foragers leave the nest on the next trip depends on the rate at which successful foragers return with food. This study investigates differences among colonies in foraging activity and how these differences are associated with variation among colonies in the regulation of foraging. Colonies differ in the baseline rate at which patrollers leave the nest, without stimulation from returning ants. This baseline rate predicts a colony's foraging activity, suggesting there is a colony-specific activity level that influences how quickly any ant leaves the nest. When a colony's foraging activity is high, the colony is more likely to regulate foraging. Moreover, colonies differ in the propensity to adjust the rate of outgoing foragers to the rate of forager return. Naturally occurring variation in the regulation of foraging may lead to variation in colony survival and reproductive success. PMID:22479133

  15. Colony variation in the collective regulation of foraging by harvester ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Deborah M; Guetz, Adam; Greene, Michael J; Holmes, Susan

    2011-03-01

    This study investigates variation in collective behavior in a natural population of colonies of the harvester ant, Pogonomyrmex barbatus. Harvester ant colonies regulate foraging activity to adjust to current food availability; the rate at which inactive foragers leave the nest on the next trip depends on the rate at which successful foragers return with food. This study investigates differences among colonies in foraging activity and how these differences are associated with variation among colonies in the regulation of foraging. Colonies differ in the baseline rate at which patrollers leave the nest, without stimulation from returning ants. This baseline rate predicts a colony's foraging activity, suggesting there is a colony-specific activity level that influences how quickly any ant leaves the nest. When a colony's foraging activity is high, the colony is more likely to regulate foraging. Moreover, colonies differ in the propensity to adjust the rate of outgoing foragers to the rate of forager return. Naturally occurring variation in the regulation of foraging may lead to variation in colony survival and reproductive success.

  16. Synthesis of O- and C-glycosides derived from β-(1,3)-D-glucans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marca, Eduardo; Valero-Gonzalez, Jessika; Delso, Ignacio; Tejero, Tomás; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon; Merino, Pedro

    2013-12-15

    A series of β-(1,3)-d-glucans have been synthesized incorporating structural variations specifically on the reducing end of the oligomers. Both O- and C-glucosides derived from di- and trisaccharides have been obtained in good overall yields and with complete selectivity. Whereas the O-glycosides were obtained via a classical Koenigs-Knorr glycosylation, the corresponding C-glycosides were obtained through allylation of the anomeric carbon and further cross-metathesis reaction. Finally, the compounds were evaluated against two glycosidases and two endo-glucanases and no inhibitory activity was observed.

  17. Methods for the enzymatic modification of steviol glycosides, modified steviol glycosides obtainable thereby, and the use thereof as sweeteners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    te Poele, Evelien; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Gerwig, Gerrit; Kamerling, Johannis

    2016-01-01

    The present invention relates generally to the production of steviol glycosides. Provided is a method for enzymatically providing a modified steviol glycoside, comprising incubating a steviol glycoside substrate in the presence of sucrose and the glucansucrase GTF180 of Lactobacillus reuteri strain

  18. METHODS FOR THE ENZYMATIC MODIFICATION OF STEVIOL GLYCOSIDES, MODIFIED STEVIOL GLYCOSIDES OBTAINABLE THEREBY, AND THE USE THEREOF AS SWEETENERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    te Poele, Evelien; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Gerwig, Gerrit; Kamerling, Johannis

    2016-01-01

    The present invention relates generally to the production of steviol glycosides. Provided is a method for enzymatically providing a modified steviol glycoside, comprising incubating a steviol glycoside substrate in the presence of sucrose and the glucansucrase GTF180 of Lactobacillus reuteri strain

  19. Two New Xanthone Glycosides from Securidaca inappendiculata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Two new xanthone glycosides, securixanside B and C, were isolated from the stems of Securidaca inappendiculata. Their structures were determined as 3-O-(-D-glucopyranosyl- 1,7-dihydroxy-2-methoxyxanthone and 6-O-(-D-glucopyranosyl-1-hydroxy-4,7-dimethoxyxan-thone by spectroscopic methods.

  20. Two New Steroidal Glycosides from Caryopteris terniflora

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Hong ZHANG; Qing Yi WEI; Zhong Li LIU; Li YANG; Dong Liang CHENG

    2004-01-01

    Two new steroidal glycosides were isolated from the Chinese medicinal plantCaryopteris terniflora. The spectroscopic and chemical evidences revealed that their structures tobe 6′-(β-sitosteroyl-3-O-β-glucopyranosidyl) hexacosanate 1 and 6′-(stigmasteroyl-3-O-β-glucopyranosidyl) linolenate 2, respectively.

  1. A Steroidal Glycoside from Cynanchum versicolor Bunge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Guang ZHENG; Run Hui LIU; Ling Yi KONG; Wei Dong ZHANG

    2006-01-01

    A new C21 steroidal glycoside, named cynanversicoside F (1), was isolated from the root of Cynanchum versicolor Bunge. Its structure was established as glaucogenin-A 3-O-β-D-digitoxopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-cymaropyranoside by spectroscopic and chemical methods.

  2. Nematicidal isochromane glycoside from Kigelia pinnata leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olubunmi ATOLANI

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic nematicides such as oxamyl and carbofuran play significant roles in the management of plant-parasitic nematodes. However, their negative environmental impacts have it imperative to search for safer alternatives. As part of our contribution in the search for bio-nematicides, compounds from plant extract were screened for possible potent nematicidal agent. A new isochromane carboxylic acid glycoside, isolated from the leaves of Kigelia pinnata (Lam. Benth (Bignoniaceae was evaluated for its nematicidal activity. The structure of the proposed compound was characterized by various spectroscopic methods, which included UV, FTIR, 1D-, and 2D-NMR, FAB-MS, TOF-ESI-MS and TOF-ESI-MS/MS (TANDEM. The in vitro experiment conducted on the glycoside against Meloidogyne incognita juveniles and eggs indicated an induced mortality. Its activity can be compared favourably with oxamyl, when tested at 0.1 mg/mL concentration. At four hours of observation, no significant difference (P < 0.05 between oxamyl and the glycoside was observed. The present data sustains that natural glycoside is a promising oxamyl alternate for controlling nematode-induced plant root knots and may contribute to integrated pest management.

  3. Bioavailability of genistein and its glycoside genistin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steensma, A.

    2006-01-01

    Genistein belongs to the class of isoflavones. The main sources of isofiavones in food are soybeans and soy-based products. Most isoflavones in plants are bound to sugars such as the glycosides genistin and daidzin. Understanding the various factors that influence absorption and metabolism of isofla

  4. A New Neolignan Glycoside from Pedicularis armata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Shan YUAN; Zhan Xin ZHANG; Xue GAO; Zhong Jian JIA

    2005-01-01

    A new neolignan glycoside named armaoside (1) was isolated from the whole plant of Pedicularis armata Maxim. Its structure was elucidated by spectroscopic and chemical methods.Antibacterial assay showed that it has moderately antibacterial activities against Eschecichia coli,Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus.

  5. Glycosides of the Magydaris pastinacea L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerri, R; Dessì, G; Manconi, P M; Serra, D; Pau, A

    1988-12-01

    From the alcoholic extract of fresh rhizomes from Magydaris pastinacea the glycosidic fraction was separated: it appears to be made up of seven different constituents one of which, 7-0-beta-D-glucopyranosil-8(2',3'-dihydroxy-3'methyl)-butylcoum arin isolated and identified by us, is relatively more abundant.

  6. New Acetylated Flavonol Glycosides from Knoxia corymbosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Bo WANG; Jian Xin PU; Hai Ying, REN; Jing Feng ZHAO; Shuang Xi MEI; Zi Yan LI; Hong Bin ZHANG; Liang LI

    2003-01-01

    Two new diacetylated flavonol glycosides, kampferol-3-O-β-3〃, 6〃-diacetylglucopyrano- side and quercetin-3-O-β-3〃, 6〃-diacetylglucopyranoside were isolated from knoxia corymbosa. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic evidents.

  7. Anticancer Activity of Sea Cucumber Triterpene Glycosides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry L. Aminin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Triterpene glycosides are characteristic secondary metabolites of sea cucumbers (Holothurioidea, Echinodermata. They have hemolytic, cytotoxic, antifungal, and other biological activities caused by membranotropic action. These natural products suppress the proliferation of various human tumor cell lines in vitro and, more importantly, intraperitoneal administration in rodents of solutions of some sea cucumber triterpene glycosides significantly reduces both tumor burden and metastasis. The anticancer molecular mechanisms include the induction of tumor cell apoptosis through the activation of intracellular caspase cell death pathways, arrest of the cell cycle at S or G2/M phases, influence on nuclear factors, NF-κB, and up-down regulation of certain cellular receptors and enzymes participating in cancerogenesis, such as EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor, Akt (protein kinase B, ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinases, FAK (focal adhesion kinase, MMP-9 (matrix metalloproteinase-9 and others. Administration of some glycosides leads to a reduction of cancer cell adhesion, suppression of cell migration and tube formation in those cells, suppression of angiogenesis, inhibition of cell proliferation, colony formation and tumor invasion. As a result, marked growth inhibition of tumors occurs in vitro and in vivo. Some holothurian triterpene glycosides have the potential to be used as P-gp mediated MDR reversal agents in combined therapy with standard cytostatics.

  8. Two New Flavonoid Glycosides from Chrysanthemum morifolium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian ZHANG; An Wei DING; You Bin LI; Da Wei QIAN; Jin Ao DUAN; Zhi Qi YIN

    2006-01-01

    Two new flavonoid glycosides were isolated from the flowering heads of Chrysanthemum morifolium. Their structures were determined to be luteolin 4'-methoxy-7- O-(6"-O-acetyl)-β-D-glucopyranoside (1) and acacetin 7-O-(3"-O-acetyl)-β-D-glucopyranoside (2) by means of 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopic analysis, including 2D NMR technique.

  9. Veronica: Acylated flavone glycosides as chemosystematic markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albach, Dirk C.; Grayer, Renée J.; Kite, Geoffrey C.

    2005-01-01

    HPLC/DAD and LCeMS of an extract of Veronica spicata subgenus Pseudolysimachium, Plantaginaceae) revealed the presence of six 6-hydroxyluteolin glycosides acylated with phenolic acids, three of which are new compounds and which we called spicosides. A flavonoid survey of seven more species...

  10. A New Diterpene Glycoside from Isodon forrestii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A new diterpene glycoside named 9(10?20)-abeo-7b,10b,11,15-tetrahydroxy-8,11,13- abietatrien-12-O-b-D-glucopyranoside was isolated from aerial parts of Isodon forrestii. Its structure was determined by means of spectroscopic studies.

  11. A New Flavone Glycoside from Isodon enanderianus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A new flavone glycoside, 5,8-dihydroxy-4',6,7-trimethoxyflavone 8-O-b -D-glucopyranoside 1, together with three known flavonoids, pedalitin 2, cirsimartin 3 and genkwanin 4, were isolated from the aerial parts of Isodon enanderianus. Their structures were determined on the basis of spectral data.

  12. Glycoside hydrolases having multiple hydrolase activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhiwei; Friedland, Gregory D.; Chhabra, Swapnil R.; Chivian, Dylan C.; Simmons, Blake A

    2017-08-08

    Glycoside hydrolases having at least two different hydrolytic activities are provided. In one embodiment, an isolated recombinant hydrolase having at least two activities selected from a group including asparagine derivatives, glutamine derivatives, and histidine derivatives is provided. Further, a method of generating free sugars from a mixture comprising asparagine derivatives, glutamine derivatives, and histidine derivatives is provided.

  13. Enzymatic Processing of Bioactive Glycosides from Natural Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weignerová, Lenka; Křen, Vladimír

    A number of biologically active natural products are glycosides. Often, the glycosidic residue is crucial for their activity. In other cases, glycosylation only improves their pharmacokinetic parameters. Enzymatic modification of these glycosides - both extension of the glycoside moiety and its selective trimming - is advantageous due to their selectivity and mildness of the reaction conditions in the presence of reactive and sensitive complex aglycones. Enzymatic reactions enable the resulting products to be used as "natural products", e.g., in nutraceuticals. This chapter concentrates on naturally occurring glycosides used in medicine but also in the food and flavor industry (e.g., sweeteners). Both "classical" and modern methods will be discussed.

  14. Intersexual and temporal variation in foraging ecology of prothonotary warblers during the breeding season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, L.J.; Petit, D.R.; Petit, K.E.; Fleming, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    We studied foraging ecology of Prothonotary Warblers (Protonotaria citrea) over four breeding seasons to determine if this species exhibited sex-specific or temporal variation in foraging behavior. Significant differences between sexes during the prenestling period were found for foraging height and substrate height (foraging method, plant species/substrate, perch diameter, horizontal location from trunk, and prey location were not significantly different). During the nestling period, this divergence between sexes was evident for foraging height, substrate height, substrate / tree species, and prey location. Additionally, male warblers significantly altered their behavior for all seven foraging variables between the two periods, whereas females exhibited changes similar to those of males for five of the foraging variables. This parallel shift suggests a strong behavioral response by both sexes to proximate factors (such as vegetation structure, and prey abundance and distribution) that varied throughout the breeding season. Sex-specific foraging behavior during the prenestling period was best explained by differences in reproductive responsibilities rather than by the theory of intersexual competition for limited resources. During the nestling period, neither hypothesis by itself explained foraging divergences adequately. However, when integrated with the temporal responses of the warblers to changes in prey availability, reproductive responsibilities seemed to be of primary importance in explaining intersexual niche partitioning during the nestling period. We emphasize the importance of considering both intersexual and intraseasonal variation when quantifying a species' foraging ecology.

  15. Attention in Urban Foraging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm McCullough

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This position paper argues how there has to be much more to smart city learning than just wayshowing, and something better as augmented reality than covering the world with instructions. Attention has become something for many people to know better in an age of information superabundance. Embodied cognition explains how the work-ings of attention are not solely a foreground task, as if attention is something to pay. As digital media appear in ever more formats and contexts, their hybrids with physical form increasing influence how habitual engagement with persistent situations creates learning. Ambient information can just add to the distraction by multitasking, or it can support more favorable processes of shifting among different kinds of information with a particular intent. As one word for this latter process, foraging deserves more consideration in smart city learning

  16. Advance on the Flavonoid C-glycosides and Health Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jianbo; Capanoglu, Esra; Jassbi, Amir Reza; Miron, Anca

    2016-07-29

    The dietary flavonoids, especially their glycosides, are the most vital phytochemicals in diets and are of great general interest due to their diverse bioactivity. Almost all natural flavonoids exist as their O-glycoside or C-glycoside forms in plants. The dietary flavonoid C-glycosides have received less attention than their corresponding O-glycosides. This review summarizes current knowledge regarding flavonoid C-glycosides and their influence on human health. Among the flavonoid C-glycosides, flavone C-glycosides, especially vitexin, isoorientin, orientin, isovitexin and their multiglycosides are more frequently mentioned than others. Flavonoid C-monoglycosides are poorly absorbed in human beings with very few metabolites in urine and blood and are deglycosylated and degraded by human intestinal bacteria in colon. However, flavonoid C-multiglycosides are absorbed unchanged in the intestine and distributed to other tissues. Flavonoid C-glycosides showed significant antioxidant activity, anticancer and antitumor activity, hepatoprotective activity, anti-inflammatory activity, anti-diabetes activity, antiviral activity, antibacterial and antifungal activity, and other biological effects. It looks like that the C-glycosylflavonoids in most cases showed higher antioxidant and anti-diabetes potential than their corresponding O-glycosylflavonoids and aglycones. However, there is a lack of in vivo data on the biological benefits of flavonoid C-glycosides. It is necessary to investigate more on how flavonoid C-glycosides prevent and handle the diseases.

  17. The ecological economics of kleptoparasitism: pay-offs from self-foraging versus kleptoparasitism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flower, Tom P; Child, Matthew F; Ridley, Amanda R

    2013-01-01

    Animals commonly steal food from other species, termed interspecific kleptoparasitism, but why animals engage in kleptoparasitism compared with alternate foraging tactics, and under what circumstances they do so, is not fully understood. Determining what specific benefits animals gain from kleptoparasitism could provide valuable insight into its evolution. Here, we investigate the benefits of kleptoparasitism for a population of individually recognizable and free-living fork-tailed drongos (Dicrurus adsimilis) in the southern Kalahari Desert. Drongos engaged in two foraging behaviours: self-foraging for small insects or following other species which they kleptoparasitized for larger terrestrial prey that they could not capture themselves. Kleptoparasitism consequently enabled drongos to exploit a new foraging niche. Kleptoparasitism benefitted drongos most in the morning and on colder days because at these times pay-offs from kleptoparasitism remained stable, while those from self-foraging declined. However, drongos engaged in kleptoparasitism less than expected given the overall high (but more variable) pay-offs from this behaviour, suggesting that kleptoparasitism is a risky foraging tactic and may incur additional foraging costs compared with self-foraging. This is the first study to comprehensively investigate the benefits of facultatively engaging in kleptoparasitism, demonstrating that animals may switch to kleptoparasitism to exploit a new foraging niche when pay-offs exceed those from alternate foraging behaviours.

  18. The forager oral tradition and the evolution of prolonged juvenility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Scalise Sugiyama

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The foraging niche is characterized by the exploitation of nutrient-rich resources using complex extraction techniques that take a long time to acquire. This costly period of development is supported by intensive parental investment. Although human life history theory tends to characterize this investment in terms of food and care, ethnographic research on foraging skill transmission suggests that the flow of resources from old to young also includes knowledge. Given the adaptive value of information, parents may have been under selection pressure to invest knowledge—e.g., warnings, advice--in children: proactive provisioning of reliable information would have increased offspring survival rates and, hence, parental fitness. One way that foragers acquire subsistence knowledge is through symbolic communication, including narrative. Tellingly, oral traditions are characterized by an old-to-young transmission pattern, which suggests that, in forager groups, storytelling might be an important means by which adults transfer knowledge to juveniles. In particular, by providing juveniles with vicarious experience, storytelling may expand episodic memory, which is believed to be integral to the generation of possible future scenarios (i.e., planning. In support of this hypothesis, this essay reviews evidence that: mastery of foraging knowledge and skill sets takes a long time to acquire; foraging knowledge is transmitted from parent to child; the human mind contains adaptations specific to social learning; full assembly of learning mechanisms is not complete in early childhood; and forager oral traditions contain a wide range of information integral to occupation of the foraging niche. It concludes with suggestions for tests of the proposed hypothesis.

  19. Structural Elucidation and HPLC Analysis of Six Flavone Glycosides from Artemisia frigida Willd.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qing-hu; AO Wu-li-ji; DAI Na-yin-tai

    2013-01-01

    An investigation of the EtOAc-soluble fraction from the aerial parts ofArtemisiafrigida Willd.(A.frigida)led to the isolation of three new flavonoid glycosides together with three known compounds.Their structures were elucidated by spectral experiments.At the same time,high-performance liquid chromatographic(HPLC) method was used for the simultaneous determination of the six flavonoid glycosides from the aerial parts of A.frigida.The separation by gradient elution was performed on a Hypersil ODS-2 column(250 mm×4.6 mm,5 μm) at 30 ℃ with acetonitrile and water as the mobile phase,and monitored by absorbance at 276 nm.The parameters of linearity,precision,accuracy and specificity of the method were evaluated.The recovery of the method is 96.50%-98.01%,and linearity(r>0.9992) was obtained for all the flavonoid glycosides.A high degree of specificity as well as repeatability and reproducibility(relative standard deviation values less than 2.0%) were also achieved.This assay was applied to the determination of six flavonoid glycosides in ten samples.The results indicate that the developed assay method was ranid,accurate,reliable and could be readily utilized as a quantitative analysis method for A.frigida.

  20. A molecular phylogeny of Dorylus army ants provides evidence for multiple evolutionary transitions in foraging niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilhelmsen Lars B

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Army ants are the prime arthropod predators in tropical forests, with huge colonies and an evolutionary derived nomadic life style. Five of the six recognized subgenera of Old World Dorylus army ants forage in the soil, whereas some species of the sixth subgenus (Anomma forage in the leaf-litter and some as conspicuous swarm raiders on the forest floor and in the lower vegetation (the infamous driver ants. Here we use a combination of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences to reconstruct the phylogeny of the Dorylus s.l. army ants and to infer the evolutionary transitions in foraging niche and associated morphological adaptations. Results Underground foraging is basal and gave rise to leaf-litter foraging. Leaf-litter foraging in turn gave rise to two derived conditions: true surface foraging (the driver ants and a reversal to subterranean foraging (a clade with most of the extant Dorylus s.s. species. This means that neither the subgenus Anomma nor Dorylus s.s. is monophyletic, and that one of the Dorylus s.s. lineages adopted subterranean foraging secondarily. We show that this latter group evolved a series of morphological adaptations to underground foraging that are remarkably convergent to the basal state. Conclusion The evolutionary transitions in foraging niche were more complex than previously thought, but our comparative analysis of worker morphology lends strong support to the contention that particular foraging niches have selected for very specific worker morphologies. The surprising reversal to underground foraging is therefore a striking example of convergent morphological evolution.

  1. Hepatoprotective phenylethanoid glycosides from Cirsium setosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qinge; Guo, Yongming; Luo, Baomin; Liu, Wenmin; Wei, Rongrui; Yang, Chunxia; Ding, Chenghua; Xu, Xuefeng; He, Minghui

    2016-08-01

    Two new phenylethanoid glycosides, namely β-D-glucopyranoside, 1″-O-(7S)-7-(3-methoxyl-4-hydroxyphenyl)-7-methoxyethyl-3″-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-4″-[(8E)-7-(3-methoxyl-4-hydroxyphenyl)-8-propenoate] (1) and β-D-glucopyranoside, 1″-O-(7S)-7-(3-methoxyl-4-hydroxyphenyl)-7-methoxyethyl-3″-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-4″-[(8E)-7-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-8-propenoate] (2), together with six phenylethanoid glycosides were isolated from Cirsium setosum. Their structures were elucidated by their spectroscopic data and references. Compounds 2, 4, 5, 7 and 8 (10 μM) exhibited moderate hepatoprotective activities. Compounds (3-8) were obtained from this plant for the first time.

  2. Two new coumarin glycosides from Chimonanthus nitens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi-Ji; Wang, Ming-Li; Yang, Xiao-Sheng; Ma, Lin; Hao, Xiao-Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Two new coumarin glycosides, namely nitensosides A-B (1-2), together with six known compounds, scopolin (3), 5,6,7-trimethoxycoumarin (4), d-calycanthine (5), calycanthoside (6), xeroboside (7), and scopoletin (8), were isolated from Chimonanthus nitens. The structures of the new compounds were elucidated by comprehensive analysis of IR, MS, and NMR spectroscopic data. Compounds 3, 4, 7, and 8 showed moderate inhibitory activity against Micrococcus luteus.

  3. A new iridoid glycoside from Paederia scandens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A new glycoside named 6β-O-β-D-glucosylpaederosidic acid(1) was isolated from Paederia scandens and its structure was elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic and chemical evidence,together with four known iridoids,paederoside(2),paederosidic acid(3),paederosidic acid methyl ester(4),and deacetyl asperulosidic acid methyl ester(5).Compound 5 was isolated from this plant for the first time.

  4. Triterpenoid glycosides from bark of Meliosma lanceolata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, F; Yamauchi, T; Shibuya, H; Kitagawa, I

    1996-06-01

    From the bark of Meliosma lanceolate, nine triterpenoid glycosides including the 28-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl ester of bayogenin-3-O-beta-D-glucuronopyranoside, its 4'-O-beta-D-galactopyranoside and 4'-O-alpha-L-arabinopyranoside were isolated and the structures characterized along with that of 28-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-bayogenin-3-O-beta-D-4'-anhydro-4', 5'-didehydroglucuronopyranoside. Bisdesmosidic triosides of hederagenin were obtained as minor components.

  5. Two New Cardenolide Glycosides from Biondia hemsleyana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Two new cardenolide glycosides, biondianosides A and B, were isolated from the roots of endemic plant of Biondia hemsleyana (Warb.) Tsiang. Their structures were elucidated as periplogenin-3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→6)-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-cymaropyranoside (1) and 17βH-periplogenin-3-O-β-D-cymaropyranoside (2) by the spectroscopic and chemical methods.

  6. New Pregnane Glycosides from Gymnema sylvestre

    OpenAIRE

    Rui Xu; Yu Yang; Yang Zhang; Fengxia Ren; Jinlong Xu; Nengjiang Yu; Yimin Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Four new pregnane glycosides 1–4 were isolated from the ethanol extract of the stem of Gymnema sylvestre and named gymsylvestrosides A–D. Hydrolysis of compound 1 under the catalysis of Aspergilus niger β-glucosidase afforded compound 5 (gymsylvestroside E). Their structures were determined by spectroscopic methods such as HRESIMS, 1D and 2D NMR, as well as HMQC-TOCSY experiment. Compounds 1–4 were screened for Saccharomyces cerevisiae α-glucosidase inhibitory activity.

  7. New pregnane glycosides from Gymnema sylvestre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rui; Yang, Yu; Zhang, Yang; Ren, Fengxia; Xu, Jinlong; Yu, Nengjiang; Zhao, Yimin

    2015-02-12

    Four new pregnane glycosides 1-4 were isolated from the ethanol extract of the stem of Gymnema sylvestre and named gymsylvestrosides A-D. Hydrolysis of compound 1 under the catalysis of Aspergilus niger β-glucosidase afforded compound 5 (gymsylvestroside E). Their structures were determined by spectroscopic methods such as HRESIMS, 1D and 2D NMR, as well as HMQC-TOCSY experiment. Compounds 1-4 were screened for Saccharomyces cerevisiae α-glucosidase inhibitory activity.

  8. New Pregnane Glycosides from Gymnema sylvestre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Xu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Four new pregnane glycosides 1–4 were isolated from the ethanol extract of the stem of Gymnema sylvestre and named gymsylvestrosides A–D. Hydrolysis of compound 1 under the catalysis of Aspergilus niger β-glucosidase afforded compound 5 (gymsylvestroside E. Their structures were determined by spectroscopic methods such as HRESIMS, 1D and 2D NMR, as well as HMQC-TOCSY experiment. Compounds 1–4 were screened for Saccharomyces cerevisiae α-glucosidase inhibitory activity.

  9. Two New Flavonol Glycosides from Knoxia corymbosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Bo WANG; Shuang Xi MEI; Yao Hua WANG; Jing Feng ZHAO; Hai Ying REN; Jie GUO; Hong Bin ZHANG; Liang LI

    2003-01-01

    Two new flavonol glycosides (1 and 2) together with two known flavonoides (3 and 4),were isolated from the whole plant of Knoxia corymbosa willd. The structures of 1 and 2 wereelucidated as kaempferol-7-O-α-L-arabinosyl-3-O-β-D-6"-acetylglucopyranoside and kaempferol-7-O-α-L-arabinosyl-3-O-β-D-3",6"-diacetylglucopyranoside respectively.

  10. A new lignan glycoside from Eleutherococcus senticosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X C; Barnes, D L; Khan, I A

    2001-11-01

    A new lignan glycoside, named eleutheroside E(2) (1), has been isolated from the roots of Eleutherococcus senticosus (known as "Siberian ginseng"), along with isomaltol 3-O-alpha-D-glucopyranoside (2), eleutherosides B, E and E(1), and thymidine. The structure of 1 was established by spectral interpretations as episyringaresinol 4"-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside. Compound 2 is described here for the first time as a naturally occurring compound.

  11. A new coumarin glycoside from Daphne giraldii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A new coumarin glycoside was isolated from the ethanol extract of the barks of stem of Daphne giraldii Nitsche. Its structure was defined as daphnetin 8-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 → 6)-β-D-glucopyranoside on the basis of spectral evidences.(C) 2007 Wei Dong Zhang. Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of Chinese Chemical Society. All rights reserved.

  12. Four Pentasaccharide Resin Glycosides from Argyreia acuta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bang-Wei Yu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Four pentasaccharide resin glycosides, acutacoside F–I (1–4, were isolated from the aerial parts of Argyreia acuta. These compounds were characterized as a group of macrolactones of operculinic acid A, and their lactonization site of 11S-hydroxyhexadecanoic acid was esterified at the second saccharide moiety (Rhamnose at C-2. The absolute configuration of the aglycone was S. Their structures were elucidated by established spectroscopic and chemical methods.

  13. A new phenylethanoid glycoside from Isodon sculponeatus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Mei Li; Jian Xin Pu; Wei Lie Xiao; Han Dong Sun

    2011-01-01

    A new phenylethanoid glycoside, sculponiside (1) was isolated from the aerial parts of Isodon sculponeatus (Vaniot) Kudo, along with six known compounds martynoside (2), verbascoside (3), (+)-hydroxypinoresinol-8-O-β-D-glucoside (4), cedrusin (5), 7-megastigmene-3S,5R,6R,7E,9S-tetrol (6) and 4-oxo-β-ionol-β-D-glucopyranoside (7). Their chemical structures were elucidated from physicochemical data and by acidic hydrolysis.

  14. Endogenous Turnover of Cyanogenic Glycosides in Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Picmanova, Martina

    Amongst the vast multitude of plant secondary metabolites, cyanogenic glycosides (CNglcs) occupy an important place as sophisticated defence compounds, releasing toxic hydrogen cyanide (HCN) upon herbivore attack – a process known as cyanogenesis. Beside this wellestablished function, there is st......Amongst the vast multitude of plant secondary metabolites, cyanogenic glycosides (CNglcs) occupy an important place as sophisticated defence compounds, releasing toxic hydrogen cyanide (HCN) upon herbivore attack – a process known as cyanogenesis. Beside this wellestablished function...... through the formation of β- cyanoalanine, or, potentially, in an alternative endogenous turnover pathway circumventing the release of HCN. The investigation of the latter is the primary focus of this PhD project. Scattered data from the literature indicated that CNglcs co-occur in plants...... revealed the formation of glycosides of amides, carboxylic acids and "anitriles", including their di- and triglycosides, evidently derived from CNglcs. Based on results common to the three phylogenetically unrelated plant species, a recycling endogenous turnover pathway for CNglcs was suggested in which...

  15. Alkyl and phenolic glycosides from Saussurea stella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tian-Min; Wang, Ru-Feng; Chen, Hu-Biao; Shang, Ming-Ying; Cai, Shao-Qing

    2013-07-01

    One alkyl glycoside, saussurostelloside A (1), two phenolic glycosides, saussurostellosides B1 (2) and B2 (3), and 27 known compounds, including eleven flavonoids, seven phenolics, six lignans, one neolignan, one phenethyl glucoside and one fatty acid, were isolated from an ethanol extract of Saussurea stella (Asteraceae). Their structures were elucidated by NMR, MS, UV, and IR spectroscopic analysis. Of the known compounds, (+)-medioresinol-di-O-β-D-glucoside (7), picraquassioside C (10), and diosmetin-3'-O-β-D-glucoside (27) were isolated from the Asteraceae family for the first time, while (+)-pinoresinol-di-O-β-D-glucoside (6), di-O-methylcrenatin (11), protocatechuic acid (14), 1,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid (17), formononetin (28), and phenethyl glucoside (29) were isolated from the Saussurea genus for the first time. The anti-inflammatory activities of three new compounds (1-3), five lignans ((-)-arctiin (4), (+)-pinoresinol-4-O-β-D-glucoside (5), (+)-pinoresinol-di-O-β-D-glucoside (6), (+)-medioresinol-di-O-β-D-glucoside (7) and (+)-syringaresinol-4-O-β-D-glucoside (8)), one neolignan (picraquassioside C (10)), and one phenolic glycoside (di-O-methylcrenatin (11)) were evaluated by testing their inhibition of the release of β-glucuronidase from PAF-stimulated neutrophils. Only compound 5 showed moderate inhibition of the release of β-glucuronidase, with an inhibition ratio of 39.1%.

  16. Synthesis of Indole Derivatives from 2-Keto Glycoside

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ 2-Oxo derivatives of glycosides, called 2-keto glycosides or glycoside 2-uloses, are biologically important in carbohydrate metabolism and are very useful in synthesis of branched-chain sugars and amino sugars. Very little is known of their chemistry because of the high susceptibility of these compounds to degradation in solution, and in particular their instability to base. Thus it is important to study the reactivities of 2-keto glycosides. In a previous paper, we reported the transformation of 2-keto glycosides in pyridine solution. During the transformation of 2-and 3-keto glycosides, a demethoxylation reaction of the enol intermediate was shown to take place simultaneously with elimination to give hex-1-enopyran-3-ulose.

  17. Synthesis of Indole Derivatives from 2-Keto Glycoside

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; HongMin

    2001-01-01

    2-Oxo derivatives of glycosides, called 2-keto glycosides or glycoside 2-uloses, are biologically important in carbohydrate metabolism and are very useful in synthesis of branched-chain sugars and amino sugars. Very little is known of their chemistry because of the high susceptibility of these compounds to degradation in solution, and in particular their instability to base. Thus it is important to study the reactivities of 2-keto glycosides. In a previous paper, we reported the transformation of 2-keto glycosides in pyridine solution. During the transformation of 2-and 3-keto glycosides, a demethoxylation reaction of the enol intermediate was shown to take place simultaneously with elimination to give hex-1-enopyran-3-ulose.……

  18. Does greed help a forager survive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, U.; Redner, S.; Bénichou, O.

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the role of greed on the lifetime of a random-walking forager on an initially resource-rich lattice. Whenever the forager lands on a food-containing site, all the food there is eaten and the forager can hop S more steps without food before starving. Upon reaching an empty site, the forager comes one time unit closer to starvation. The forager is also greedy—given a choice to move to an empty or to a food-containing site in its local neighborhood, the forager moves preferentially toward food. Surprisingly, the forager lifetime varies nonmonotonically with greed, with different senses of the nonmonotonicity in one and two dimensions. Also unexpectedly, the forager lifetime in one dimension has a huge peak for very negative greed where the forager is food averse.

  19. Flavonol and chalcone ester glycosides from Bidens andicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Tommasi, N; Piacente, S; Pizza, C

    1998-08-01

    Five new flavonol 7-O-glycosides (1-5), having quercetin or quercetin 3-methyl ether as their aglycons, and sugar chains made up of three or four sugars, including beta-D-glucopyranose, alpha-L-rhamnopyranose, and beta-D-xylopyranose, have been isolated from the aerial parts of Bidens andicola, along with a new chalcone ester glycoside (6) and five known chalcone ester glycosides. The structures of 1-6 were elucidated using a combination of spectroscopic techniques.

  20. CARDIAC GLYCOSIDES IN UP-TO-DATE CLINICAL PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Gurevich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews the use of cardiac glycosides in patients with chronic heart failure, paroxysmal tachyarrhythmia and chronic atrial fibrillation (rate control. According to the recent studies results cardiac glycosides may be substituted by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor antagonists, diuretics, calcium antagonists and beta-adrenoceptor blockers in order to decrease the risk of cardiac glycoside toxicity and, in some cases, to improve quality of life and prognosis of the patients.

  1. Microbial Degradation of Steviol derived from steviol glycosides

    OpenAIRE

    Jooken, Etienne; Amery, Ruis; Monballiu, Annick; Moons, Nico; De Borggraeve, Wim; Dehaen, Wim; Meesschaert, Boudewijn

    2013-01-01

    As well as from Paraguayan soil samples of a stevia plantation as from samples of Belgian soils that never had contact with stevia or steviol glycosides bacterial consortia were derived that hydrolysed steviol glycosides to steviol. This activity was not influenced by heating (20 min. 80 °C) or boiling (10 min. 100 °C) the soil samples. The type of steviol glycosides that were hydrolysed as well as the hydrolytic pathway of the hydrolysis was highly influenced by the conditions...

  2. [Phenylethanoid glycosides distribution in medicinal plants of Gesneriaceae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Zhen-Fang; Wang, Xiao-Qin; Xiao, Pei-Gen; Liu, Yong

    2013-12-01

    To investigate the role of distribution and phylogeny of phenylethanoid glycoside in medicinal plants of Gesneriaceae, five phenylpropanoid glycosides, acteoside, paraboside B, isonuomioside A, paraboside II, and paraboside III were quantitatively determined in 12 species of Gesneriaceae by HPLC. The existence and content of these compounds were analyzed. The results showed that phenylethanoid glycosides were found in the most of those plants, but the kind of phenylethanoid glycosides varied in different species. Acteoside distribute in most of this plant group, paraboside B, isonuomioside A, paraboside II, and paraboside III were rare in those plants. The results of this study support morphological viewpoint that Trib. Trichosporeae is more developmental than Trib. Didymocarpeae.

  3. The influence of stevia glycosides on the growth of Lactobacillus reuteri strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniņa, I; Semjonovs, P; Fomina, A; Treimane, R; Linde, R

    2014-03-01

    Use of stevia-derived sweeteners was recently officially approved by the European Commission, and their application in the food industry has increased, especially in functional foods. However, there are scarce data about the influence of stevia on probiotic bacteria, which are important both as an inhabitant of the human gut and as a functional food additive. Taking into consideration the broad application of Lactobacillus reuteri in functional foods, the aim of the research was to evaluate the influence of stevia glycosides on its growth. Six Lact. reuteri strains were tested for their ability to grow in the presence of stevioside and rebaudioside A (0·2-2·6 g l(-1) ). The effect of stevia glycosides on biomass concentration, cell count, pH and lactic and acetic acid synthesis was analysed. Both glycosides impaired the growth of analysed strains. However, the inhibitory effect was strain specific, and the concentration-dependent effect was not observed for all parameters. The most pronounced concentration-dependent effect was on lactic and acetic acid production. Taking into account the observed strain-specific inhibitory effect of stevia glycosides, it could be suggested to evaluate the influence of them on each strain employed before their simultaneous application in functional foods. The study showed that the growth of Lactobacillus reuteri strains was inhibited in the presence of stevia sweeteners stevioside and rebaudioside A. Probiotics, for example Lact. reuteri strains, are often used as functional additives in health foods and are an important natural inhabitant of the human gastrointestinal tract. Stevia glycosides application in food is increasing; yet, there are no data about the influence of stevia glycosides on Lact. reuteri growth and very few data on growth of other lactobacilli, either in probiotic foods or in the gastrointestinal tract. This research shows that it is necessary to evaluate the influence of stevia glycosides on other groups

  4. Root Foraging Performance and Life-History Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiser, Martin; Koubek, Tomáš; Herben, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Plants use their roots to forage for nutrients in heterogeneous soil environments, but different plant species vastly differ in the intensity of foraging they perform. This diversity suggests the existence of constraints on foraging at the species level. We therefore examined the relationships between the intensity of root foraging and plant body traits across species in order to estimate the degree of coordination between plant body traits and root foraging as a form of plant behavior. We cultivated 37 perennial herbaceous Central European species from open terrestrial habitats in pots with three different spatial gradients of nutrient availability (steep, shallow, and no gradient). We assessed the intensity of foraging as differences in root placement inside pots with and without a spatial gradient of resource supply. For the same set of species, we retrieved data about body traits from available databases: maximum height at maturity, mean area of leaf, specific leaf area, shoot lifespan, ability to self-propagate clonally, maximal lateral spread (in clonal plants only), realized vegetative growth in cultivation, and realized seed regeneration in cultivation. Clonal plants and plants with extensive vegetative growth showed considerably weaker foraging than their non-clonal or slow-growing counterparts. There was no phylogenetic signal in the amount of expressed root foraging intensity. Since clonal plants foraged less than non-clonals and foraging intensity did not seem to be correlated with species phylogeny, we hypothesize that clonal growth itself (i.e., the ability to develop at least partly self-sustaining ramets) may be an answer to soil heterogeneity. Whereas unitary plants use roots as organs specialized for both resource acquisition and transport to overcome spatial heterogeneity in resource supply, clonal plants separate these two functions. Becoming a clonal plant allows higher specialization at the organ level, since a typical clonal plant can be

  5. Does foraging mode affect metabolic responses to feeding? A study of pygopodid lizards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael WALL, Michael B. THOMPSON, Richard SHINE

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Foraging mode (ambush vs. active profoundly affects many aspects of organismal biology, including metabolic rates and their relationship with food intake. Previous studies on snakes suggest that ambushers tend to have lower standard metabolic rates (SMR and higher energetic costs of digestion and assimilation of prey (specific dynamic action, or SDA than do active foragers. However, phylogenetic considerations may be at least partly responsible for such patterns, as foraging mode is strongly conserved evolutionarily and most SDA studies have focused on species from only two lineages of ambush foragers (pythonid and viperid snakes and one lineage of active foragers (colubrid snakes. We sought to deconfound the effects of phylogeny and foraging mode, investigating SMR and SDA in two closely related pygopodid lizards, the common scaly-foot Pygopus lepidopodus (active forager and Burton’s legless lizard Lialis burtonis (ambush forager. Consistent with the pattern seen in snakes, L. burtonis exhibits a significantly lower SMR and a higher SDA than does P. lepidopodus. The magnitude of SDA in L. burtonis is comparable to that of some pythons and vipers, providing yet more evidence for the remarkable convergence between this species and ambush-foraging snakes [Current Zoology 59 (5: 618–625, 2013]. 

  6. Diet Overlap and Foraging Activity between Feral Pigs and Native Peccaries in the Pantanal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galetti, Mauro; Camargo, Hiléia; Siqueira, Tadeu; Keuroghlian, Alexine; Donatti, Camila I; Jorge, Maria Luisa S P; Pedrosa, Felipe; Kanda, Claudia Z; Ribeiro, Milton C

    2015-01-01

    Inter-specific competition is considered one of the main selective pressures affecting species distribution and coexistence. Different species vary in the way they forage in order to minimize encounters with their competitors and with their predators. However, it is still poorly known whether and how native species change their foraging behavior in the presence of exotic species, particularly in South America. Here we compare diet overlap of fruits and foraging activity period of two sympatric native ungulates (the white-lipped peccary, Tayassu pecari, and the collared peccary, Pecari tajacu) with the invasive feral pig (Sus scrofa) in the Brazilian Pantanal. We found high diet overlap between white-lipped peccaries and feral pigs, but low overlap between collared peccaries and feral pigs. Furthermore, we found that feral pigs may influence the foraging period of both native peccaries, but in different ways. In the absence of feral pigs, collared peccary activity peaks in the early evening, possibly allowing them to avoid white-lipped peccary activity peaks, which occur in the morning. In the presence of feral pigs, collared peccaries forage mostly in early morning, while white-lipped peccaries forage throughout the day. Our results indicate that collared peccaries may avoid foraging at the same time as white-lipped peccaries. However, they forage during the same periods as feral pigs, with whom they have lower diet overlap. Our study highlights how an exotic species may alter interactions between native species by interfering in their foraging periods.

  7. Simulating secondary succession of elk forage values in a managed forest landscape, western Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Kurt J.; Starkey, Edward E.

    1996-01-01

    Modern timber management practices often influence forage production for elk (Cervus elaphus) on broad temporal and spatial scales in forested landscapes. We incorporated site-specific information on postharvesting forest succession and forage characteristics in a simulation model to evaluate past and future influences of forest management practices on forage values for elk in a commercially managed Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii, PSME)-western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla, TSHE) forest in western Washington. We evaluated future effects of: (1) clear-cut logging 0, 20, and 40% of harvestable stands every five years; (2) thinning 20-year-old Douglas fir forests; and (3) reducing the harvesting cycle from 60 to 45 years. Reconstruction of historical patterns of vegetation succession indicated that forage values peaked in the 1960s and declined from the 1970s to the present, but recent values still were higher than may have existed in the unmanaged landscape in 1945. Increased forest harvesting rates had little short-term influence on forage trends because harvestable stands were scarce. Simulations of forest thinning also produced negligible benefits because thinning did not improve forage productivity appreciably at the stand level. Simulations of reduced harvesting cycles shortened the duration of declining forage values from approximately 30 to 15 years. We concluded that simulation models are useful tools for examining landscape responses of forage production to forest management strategies, but the options examined provided little potential for improving elk forages in the immediate future.

  8. Diet Overlap and Foraging Activity between Feral Pigs and Native Peccaries in the Pantanal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Galetti

    Full Text Available Inter-specific competition is considered one of the main selective pressures affecting species distribution and coexistence. Different species vary in the way they forage in order to minimize encounters with their competitors and with their predators. However, it is still poorly known whether and how native species change their foraging behavior in the presence of exotic species, particularly in South America. Here we compare diet overlap of fruits and foraging activity period of two sympatric native ungulates (the white-lipped peccary, Tayassu pecari, and the collared peccary, Pecari tajacu with the invasive feral pig (Sus scrofa in the Brazilian Pantanal. We found high diet overlap between white-lipped peccaries and feral pigs, but low overlap between collared peccaries and feral pigs. Furthermore, we found that feral pigs may influence the foraging period of both native peccaries, but in different ways. In the absence of feral pigs, collared peccary activity peaks in the early evening, possibly allowing them to avoid white-lipped peccary activity peaks, which occur in the morning. In the presence of feral pigs, collared peccaries forage mostly in early morning, while white-lipped peccaries forage throughout the day. Our results indicate that collared peccaries may avoid foraging at the same time as white-lipped peccaries. However, they forage during the same periods as feral pigs, with whom they have lower diet overlap. Our study highlights how an exotic species may alter interactions between native species by interfering in their foraging periods.

  9. The sialate O-acetylesterase EstA from gut Bacteroidetes species enables sialidase-mediated cross-species foraging of 9-O-acetylated sialoglycans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Lloyd S.; Lewis, Warren G.

    2017-01-01

    The gut harbors many symbiotic, commensal, and pathogenic microbes that break down and metabolize host carbohydrates. Sialic acids are prominent outermost carbohydrates on host glycoproteins called mucins and protect underlying glycan chains from enzymatic degradation. Sialidases produced by some members of the colonic microbiota can promote the expansion of several potential pathogens (e.g. Clostridium difficile, Salmonella, and Escherichia coli) that do not produce sialidases. O-Acetyl ester modifications of sialic acids help resist the action of many sialidases and are present at high levels in the mammalian colon. However, some gut bacteria, in turn, produce sialylate-O-acetylesterases to remove them. Here, we investigated O-acetyl ester removal and sialic acid degradation by Bacteroidetes sialate-O-acetylesterases and sialidases, respectively, and subsequent utilization of host sialic acids by both commensal and pathogenic E. coli strains. In vitro foraging studies demonstrated that sialidase-dependent E. coli growth on mucin is enabled by Bacteroides EstA, a sialate O-acetylesterase acting on glycosidically linked sialylate-O-acetylesterase substrates, particularly at neutral pH. Biochemical studies suggested that spontaneous migration of O-acetyl esters on the sialic acid side chain, which can occur at colonic pH, may serve as a switch controlling EstA-assisted sialic acid liberation. Specifically, EstA did not act on O-acetyl esters in their initial 7-position. However, following migration to the 9-position, glycans with O-acetyl esters became susceptible to the sequential actions of bacterial esterases and sialidases. We conclude that EstA specifically unlocks the nutritive potential of 9-O-acetylated mucus sialic acids for foraging by bacteria that otherwise are prevented from accessing this carbon source. PMID:28526748

  10. The sialate O-acetylesterase EstA from gut Bacteroidetes species enables sialidase-mediated cross-species foraging of 9-O-acetylated sialoglycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Lloyd S; Lewis, Warren G; Lewis, Amanda L

    2017-07-14

    The gut harbors many symbiotic, commensal, and pathogenic microbes that break down and metabolize host carbohydrates. Sialic acids are prominent outermost carbohydrates on host glycoproteins called mucins and protect underlying glycan chains from enzymatic degradation. Sialidases produced by some members of the colonic microbiota can promote the expansion of several potential pathogens (e.g. Clostridium difficile, Salmonella, and Escherichia coli) that do not produce sialidases. O-Acetyl ester modifications of sialic acids help resist the action of many sialidases and are present at high levels in the mammalian colon. However, some gut bacteria, in turn, produce sialylate-O-acetylesterases to remove them. Here, we investigated O-acetyl ester removal and sialic acid degradation by Bacteroidetes sialate-O-acetylesterases and sialidases, respectively, and subsequent utilization of host sialic acids by both commensal and pathogenic E. coli strains. In vitro foraging studies demonstrated that sialidase-dependent E. coli growth on mucin is enabled by Bacteroides EstA, a sialate O-acetylesterase acting on glycosidically linked sialylate-O-acetylesterase substrates, particularly at neutral pH. Biochemical studies suggested that spontaneous migration of O-acetyl esters on the sialic acid side chain, which can occur at colonic pH, may serve as a switch controlling EstA-assisted sialic acid liberation. Specifically, EstA did not act on O-acetyl esters in their initial 7-position. However, following migration to the 9-position, glycans with O-acetyl esters became susceptible to the sequential actions of bacterial esterases and sialidases. We conclude that EstA specifically unlocks the nutritive potential of 9-O-acetylated mucus sialic acids for foraging by bacteria that otherwise are prevented from accessing this carbon source. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. One New Iridoid Glycoside from Hedyotis tenelliflora

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Qing-mei; YANG Hong-wei; ZHAO Jing-feng; LI Liang

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the chemical constituents of Hedyotis tenelliflora. Methods The compounds were isolated by chromatographic separation technology. The structures were identified on the basis of chemical and spectral data. Results Four iridoid glycosides were isolated from the whole plant of H. tenelliflora. On the basis of the chemical and spectral methods, their structures were elucidated as teneoside C (1), harpagoside (2), harpagide (3), and asperulosidic acid (4). Conclusion Compound 1 is a new compound, and compounds 2 and 3 are isolated from H. tenelliflora for the first time.

  12. Iridoid and Phenylethanoid Glycosides from Verbascum lasianthum

    OpenAIRE

    AKDEMİR, Zeliha Ş.; TATLI, İ. İrem

    2004-01-01

    Three iridoid glucosides, 8-O-acethylharpagide (1), harpagoside (2), and 6-O-vanilloylajugol (3), were isolated from the roots of Verbascum lasianthum Boiss. ex Bentham. In addition, 2 phenylethanoid glycosides, verbascoside {=acteoside, [b -(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-ethyl]-(3' -O-a -L-rhamnopyranosyl)-(4' -O-caffeoyl)-b -D-glucopyranoside} (4) and poliumoside {= [b -(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-ethyl]-(3',6' -O-a -L-dirhamnopyranosyl)-(4' -O-caffeoyl)-b -D-glucopyranos...

  13. A new iridoid glycoside from Scrophularia ningpoensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Zheng-Rui; Wang, Ru-Feng; Shang, Ming-Ying; Cai, Shao-Qing

    2009-01-01

    A new iridoid glycoside, named 6'-O-cinnamoylharpagide (1), has been isolated from the roots of Scrophularia ningpoensis (Scrophulariaceae) together with nine known compounds, harpagide (2), harpagoside (3), 8-O-feruloylharpagide (4), 8-O-(p-coumaroyl)harpagide (5), 6-O-methylcatalpol (6), aucubin (7), buergerinin B (8), teuhircoside (9) and 6-O-cinnamoyl-D-glucopyranose (10). Compound 10 was obtained as an inseparable mixture of 6-O-cinnamoyl-alpha-D-glucopyranose and 6-O-cinnamoyl-beta-D-glucopyranose at a ratio of 1 : 1, which is presumably formed by cleavage of compound 1. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of chemical and spectral analysis.

  14. Flavononol Glycosides of Reseda arabica (Resedaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djemaa Berrehal

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Five flavonol glycosides, kaempferol 3,7-di-O- α -L-rhamnopyranoside (1 , isorhamnetin 3,7-di-O- α -L-rhamnopyranoside (2 , kaempferol 3-O- β -D-glucopyranoside-7-O- α -L-rhamnopyranoside (3 , isorhamnetin 3-O- β -D-glucopyranoside-7-O- α -L-rhamnopyranoside (4, Kaempferol 3-O- β -xylopyranosyl-(1'''→2''-O- α -L-rhamnopyranoside-7-O- α -L-rhamnopyranoside (5, have been isolated from the aerial parts of Reseda arabica. Their structures were established on the basis of physical and spectroscopic analysis, and by comparison with the literature data.

  15. Two New Chromone Glycosides from Selaginella uncinata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Two new chromone glycosides, 5-hydroxy-2,6,8-trimethylchromon-7-O-β-D-gluco-pyranoside, named uncinoside A; 5-acetoxy-2,6,8-trimethylchromone-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, named uncinoside B, and a known chromone compound named 8-methyl eugenitol were isolated from Selaginella uncinata. Their structures were elucidated by spectra analysis of FAB-MS, 1D NMR and 2D NMR including 1H NMR, 13C NMR, HMQC, HMBC and single-crystal X-ray diffraction techniques.

  16. A new phenylpropanoid glycoside from Cirsium setosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Rui; Zhu, En-Yuan; Chou, Gui-xin

    2010-07-01

    To study the chemical constituents of Cirsium setosum (Willd.) MB., 70% ethanol extract of the aerial parts was subjected to column chromatography. One new phenylpropanoid glycoside, sinapyl alcohol 9-O-(E)-p-coumaroyl-4-O-beta-D-glucopyanoside (1) was isolated, along with three known compounds: lycoperodine-1 (2), apigenin-7-O-(6"-(E)-p-coumaroyl)-beta-D-galactopyranoside (3) and quercetin (4). The structures were elucidated on the basis of spectral and chemical evidence. Compound 2 was obtained from Cirsium genus for the first time, compounds 3 and 4 were obtained from this plant for the first time.

  17. Two pentasaccharide resin glycosides from Argyreia acuta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yong-Qin; Pan, Jie-Tao; Yu, Bang-Wei; Cui, Hong-Hua; Yan, You-Shao; Chen, Yan-Fen

    2016-01-01

    Two new compounds of acutacosides 1 and 2, pentasaccharide resin glycosides were isolated from the aerial parts of Argyreia acuta. The core of the two compounds was operculinic acid A, and they were esterfied at the same position, just one substituent group was linked at C-2 of Rha. The absolute configuration of the aglycone in the two compounds was established by Mosher's method, which was (11S)-hydroxyhexadecanoic acid (jalapinolic acid). Their structures were established by a combination of spectroscopic and chemical methods.

  18. New lignan glycosides from Cupressus duclouxian (Cupessaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian-Feng; Cao, De-Hua; Tan, Ning-Hua; Liu, Zhi-Li; Zhang, Yu-Mei; Yang, Ya-Bin

    2006-01-01

    From the branches and leaves of Cupressus duclouxiana two new lignan glycosides named cupressoside A (1) and cupressoside B (2), together with matairesinoside (3), dihydrodehydrodiconiferyl alcohol (4), dihydrodehydrodiconiferyl alcohol-9-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranoside (5), dihydrodehydrodiconiferyl alcohol-4-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranoside (6), ( - )-isolariciresinol (7) and ( - )-isolariciresinol-9-O-beta-D-xylopyranoside (8), were isolated. The structures of these compounds were determined on the basis of their HR-FAB-MS, IR, UV, 1H and 13C NMR (DEPT), and 2D NMR (HMQC, HMBC, COSY, NOESY) spectral data.

  19. Foraging task specialisation and foraging labour allocation in stingless bees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstede, Frouke Elisabeth

    2006-01-01

    Social bees collect nectar and pollen from flowering plants for energy of the adult bees and for feeding the larvae in the colony. The flowering patterns of plants imply that periods of high food availability are often followed by periods of meagre foraging conditions. Being dependent on such a dyna

  20. Evaluating the Cancer Therapeutic Potential of Cardiac Glycosides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Calderón-Montaño

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac glycosides, also known as cardiotonic steroids, are a group of natural products that share a steroid-like structure with an unsaturated lactone ring and the ability to induce cardiotonic effects mediated by a selective inhibition of the Na+/K+-ATPase. Cardiac glycosides have been used for many years in the treatment of cardiac congestion and some types of cardiac arrhythmias. Recent data suggest that cardiac glycosides may also be useful in the treatment of cancer. These compounds typically inhibit cancer cell proliferation at nanomolar concentrations, and recent high-throughput screenings of drug libraries have therefore identified cardiac glycosides as potent inhibitors of cancer cell growth. Cardiac glycosides can also block tumor growth in rodent models, which further supports the idea that they have potential for cancer therapy. Evidence also suggests, however, that cardiac glycosides may not inhibit cancer cell proliferation selectively and the potent inhibition of tumor growth induced by cardiac glycosides in mice xenografted with human cancer cells is probably an experimental artifact caused by their ability to selectively kill human cells versus rodent cells. This paper reviews such evidence and discusses experimental approaches that could be used to reveal the cancer therapeutic potential of cardiac glycosides in preclinical studies.

  1. Chemical and enzymatic hydrolysis fo anthraquinone glycosides from madder roots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, G.C.H.; Naayer, M.; Beek, van T.A.; Capelle, A.; Haaksman, I.K.; Doren, H.A.; Groot, de Æ.

    2003-01-01

    For the production of a commercially useful dye extract from madder, the glycoside ruberythric acid has to be hydrolysed to the aglycone alizarin which is the main dye component. An intrinsic problem is the simultaneous hydrolysis of the glycoside lucidin primeveroside to the unwanted mutagenic agly

  2. Phytosteryl glycosides reduce cholesterol absorption: mechanisms in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytosteryl glycosides occur in natural foods but little is known about their metabolism and bioactivity. Purified acylated steryl glycosides (ASG) were compared with phytosteryl esters (PSE) in mice. Animals on a phytosterol-free diet received ASG or PSE by gavage in purified soybean oil along with...

  3. Evolution of Optimum Foraging Distributions in Two Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dees, Nathan; Bahar, Sonya; Moss, Frank

    2008-03-01

    In the pursuit of optimally efficient foraging, preferred distributions of movement characteristics have been shown to exist for many types of animals and environments. Specifically, planktonic organisms such as Daphnia use exponential distributions of turning angles, α, in a ``hop, pause, turn by angle α, hop'' random walk-type sequence of movement when traversing experimentally prepared feeding solutions consisting of freeze dried Spirolina and water. We investigate the evolution of such random walks in a two-dimensional foraging model. In this model, agents traverse a feeding patch of finite size and for a finite amount of time using hop lengths and turning angles chosen randomly from inherited distributions. Distributions evolve as the choices made by the most efficient forager of one generation influence the distributions available to the succeeding generation. Preliminary results show that initially uniform turning angle distributions evolve to explicit exponential distributions after thousands of generations, consistent with the experimental observations described above.

  4. Differential regulation of the foraging gene associated with task behaviors in harvester ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Krista K; Kleeman, Lindsay; Peteru, Swetha

    2011-08-10

    regulation rather than evolutionary changes in the encoded protein. The task-specific expression patterns of foraging are consistent with the task-specific circadian rhythms observed in harvester ants. Whether the molecular clock plays a role in regulating foraging gene expression (or vice versa) remains to be determined. Our results represent the first time series analysis of foraging gene expression and underscore the importance of assaying time-related expression differences in behavioral studies. Understanding how this gene is regulated within species is critical to explaining the mechanism by which foraging influences behavior.

  5. Differential regulation of the foraging gene associated with task behaviors in harvester ants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleeman Lindsay

    2011-08-01

    social insect species are likely due to differences in gene regulation rather than evolutionary changes in the encoded protein. The task-specific expression patterns of foraging are consistent with the task-specific circadian rhythms observed in harvester ants. Whether the molecular clock plays a role in regulating foraging gene expression (or vice versa remains to be determined. Our results represent the first time series analysis of foraging gene expression and underscore the importance of assaying time-related expression differences in behavioral studies. Understanding how this gene is regulated within species is critical to explaining the mechanism by which foraging influences behavior.

  6. Triterpene Glycosides from Sea Cucumber Holothuria scabra with Cytotoxic Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Hua; LI Ling; YI Yang-hua; WANG Xiao-hua; PAN Min-xiang

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the new triterpene glycosides from sea cucumber Holothuria scabra with cytotoxic activity.Methods Triterpene glycosides from H.scabra were separated and purified by chromatography on DA-101,silica gel,and reversed-phase silica gel column,as well as RP-HPLC.Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectral data and chemical evidence.Results Three triterpene glycosides were identified as scabraside D (1),fuscocineroside C (2),and 24-dehydroechinoside A (3).Their inhibition on P-388,A549,MKN-28,HCT116,and MCF-7 cells were significant.Conclusion Scabraside D (1) is a new triterpene glycoside,and compounds 2 and 3 are isolated from H.scabra for the first time.The glycosides 1-3 show the in vitro cytotoxicity against five human tumor cell lines in comparison to 10-hydroxycamptothecin.

  7. Execution Plans for Cyber Foraging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Mads Darø

    2008-01-01

    Cyber foraging helps small devices perform heavy tasks by opportunistically discovering and utilising available resources (such as computation, storage, bandwidth, etc.) held by larger, nearby peers. This offloading is done in an ad-hoc manner, as larger machines will not always be within reach. ...

  8. Cardiac Glycoside Plants Self-Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radenkova-Saeva J.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac glycosides are found in a diverse group of plants including Digitalis purpurea and Digitalis lanata (foxgloves, Nerium oleander, Convallaria majalis (lily of the valley, Strophanthus gratus, etc. Nerium Oleander is an indoor and ornamental plant of an evergreen shrub. It’s widespread in countries with a Mediterranean climate. Oleander is one of the most poisonous plants known to humans. All parts of the nerium oleander are poisonous, primarily due to the contained cardiac glycosides - oleandrin, nerin, digitoxigenin, and olinerin of which oleandrin is the principal toxin. The bark contains the toxic substances of rosagenin which causes strychnine-like effects. Signs of poisoning appear a few hours after the adoption of the parts of the plant. Two cases of Nerium Oleander poisoning were presented. Clinical picture included gastrointestinal, cardiovascular and central nervous system effects. The clinical symptoms were characterized by nausea, vomiting, salivation, colic, diarrhoea, ventricular tachycardia, dysrhythmia, heart block, ataxia, drowsiness, muscular tremor. Treatment included administration of activated charcoal, symptomatic and supportive care.

  9. Bias to pollen odors is affected by early exposure and foraging experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas, A; Farina, W M

    2014-07-01

    In many pollinating insects, foraging preferences are adjusted on the basis of floral cues learned at the foraging site. In addition, olfactory experiences gained at early adult stages might also help them to initially choose food sources. To understand pollen search behavior of honeybees, we studied how responses elicited by pollen-based odors are biased in foraging-age workers according to (i) their genetic predisposition to collect pollen, (ii) pollen related information gained during foraging and (iii) different experiences with pollen gained at early adult ages. Bees returning to the hive carrying pollen loads, were strongly biased to unfamiliar pollen bouquets when tested in a food choice device against pure odors. Moreover, pollen foragers' orientation response was specific to the odors emitted by the pollen type they were carrying on their baskets, which suggests that foragers retrieve pollen odor information to recognize rewarding flowers outside the hive. We observed that attraction to pollen odor was mediated by the exposure to a pollen diet during the first week of life. We did not observe the same attraction in foraging-age bees early exposed to an artificial diet that did not contain pollen. Contrary to the specific response observed to cues acquired during foraging, early exposure to single-pollen diets did not bias orientation response towards a specific pollen odor in foraging-age bees (i.e. bees chose equally between the exposed and the novel monofloral pollen odors). Our results show that pollen exposure at early ages together with olfactory experiences gained in a foraging context are both relevant to bias honeybees' pollen search behavior.

  10. Features of development of Stevia rebaudiana shoots cultivated in the roller bioreactor and their production of steviol glycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarev, Nikolai; Reshetnyak, Oxana; Nosov, Alexander

    2002-08-01

    Growth and development of Stevia rebaudiana shoots cultivated in the roller bioreactor and their production of steviol glycosides (SGs) were investigated. It was found that, owing to the highly favorable conditions of shoot cultivation created in such an apparatus, the intensity of shoot growth and SG production appeared to be 1.5 - 2.0 times higher than those of the shoots grown in tubes. These results indicate the existence of a positive correlation between these two processes. The data obtained suggest that the enhanced SG production is due to the differentiation of chlorenchyma cells and formation of specific subcellular structures for the glycoside to be accumulated.

  11. Systematic review of the influence of foraging habitat on red-cockaded woodpecker reproductive success.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garabedian, James E. [North Carolina State University

    2014-04-01

    Relationships between foraging habitat and reproductive success provide compelling evidence of the contribution of specific vegetative features to foraging habitat quality, a potentially limiting factor for many animal populations. For example, foraging habitat quality likely will gain importance in the recovery of the threatened red-cockaded woodpecker Picoides borealis (RCW) in the USA as immediate nesting constraints are mitigated. Several researchers have characterized resource selection by foraging RCWs, but emerging research linking reproductive success (e.g. clutch size, nestling and fledgling production, and group size) and foraging habitat features has yet to be synthesized. Therefore, we reviewed peer-refereed scientific literature and technical resources (e.g. books, symposia proceedings, and technical reports) that examined RCW foraging ecology, foraging habitat, or demography to evaluate evidence for effects of the key foraging habitat features described in the species’ recovery plan on group reproductive success. Fitness-based habitat models suggest foraging habitat with low to intermediate pine Pinus spp. densities, presence of large and old pines, minimal midstory development, and herbaceous groundcover support more productive RCW groups. However, the relationships between some foraging habitat features and RCW reproductive success are not well supported by empirical data. In addition, few regression models account for > 30% of variation in reproductive success, and unstandardized multiple and simple linear regression coefficient estimates typically range from -0.100 to 0.100, suggesting ancillary variables and perhaps indirect mechanisms influence reproductive success. These findings suggest additional research is needed to address uncertainty in relationships between foraging habitat features and RCW reproductive success and in the mechanisms underlying those relationships.

  12. Corn in consortium with forages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássia Maria de Paula Garcia

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The basic premises for sustainable agricultural development with focus on rural producers are reducing the costs of production and aggregation of values through the use crop-livestock system (CLS throughout the year. The CLS is based on the consortium of grain crops, especially corn with tropical forages, mainly of the genus Panicum and Urochloa. The study aimed to evaluate the grain yield of irrigated corn crop intercropped with forage of the genus Panicum and Urochloa. The experiment was conducted at the Fazenda de Ensino, Pesquisa e Extensão – FEPE  of the Faculdade de Engenharia - UNESP, Ilha Solteira in an Oxisol in savannah conditions and in the autumn winter of 2009. The experimental area was irrigated by a center pivot and had a history of no-tillage system for 8 years. The corn hybrid used was simple DKB 390 YG at distances of 0.90 m. The seeds of grasses were sown in 0.34 m spacing in the amount of 5 kg ha-1, they were mixed with fertilizer minutes before sowing  and placed in a compartment fertilizer seeder and fertilizers were mechanically deposited in the soil at a depth of 0.03 m. The experimental design used was a randomized block with four replications and five treatments: Panicum maximum cv. Tanzania sown during the nitrogen fertilization (CTD of the corn; Panicum maximum cv. Mombaça sown during the nitrogen fertilization (CMD of the corn; Urochloa brizantha cv. Xaraés sown during the occasion of nitrogen fertilization (CBD of the corn; Urochloa ruziziensis cv. Comumsown during the nitrogen fertilization (CRD of the corn and single corn (control. The production components of corn: plant population per hectare (PlPo, number of ears per hectare (NE ha-1, number of rows per ear (NRE, number of kernels per row on the cob (NKR, number of grain in the ear (NGE and mass of 100 grains (M100G were not influenced by consortium with forage. Comparing grain yield (GY single corn and maize intercropped with forage of the genus Panicum

  13. Steviol glycoside safety: are highly purified steviol glycoside sweeteners food allergens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Jonathan D; Carakostas, Michael C; Taylor, Steve L

    2015-01-01

    Steviol glycoside sweeteners are extracted from the plant Stevia rebaudiana (Bertoni), a member of the Asteraceae (Compositae) family. Many plants from this family can induce hypersensitivity reactions via multiple routes of exposure (e.g., ragweed, goldenrod, chrysanthemum, echinacea, chamomile, lettuce, sunflower and chicory). Based on this common taxonomy, some popular media reports and resources have issued food warnings alleging the potential for stevia allergy. To determine if such allergy warnings are warranted on stevia-based sweeteners, a comprehensive literature search was conducted to identify all available data related to allergic responses following the consumption of stevia extracts or highly purified steviol glycosides. Hypersensitivity reactions to stevia in any form are rare. The few cases documented in the peer-reviewed literature were reported prior to the introduction of high-purity products to the market in 2008 when many global regulatory authorities began to affirm the safety of steviol glycosides. Neither stevia manufacturers nor food allergy networks have reported significant numbers of any adverse events related to ingestion of stevia-based sweeteners, and there have been no reports of stevia-related allergy in the literature since 2008. Therefore, there is little substantiated scientific evidence to support warning statements to consumers about allergy to highly purified stevia extracts.

  14. An agent-based model to investigate the roles of attractive and repellent pheromones in ant decision making during foraging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Elva J H; Ratnieks, Francis L W; Holcombe, M

    2008-11-21

    Pharaoh's ants organise their foraging system using three types of trail pheromone. All previous foraging models based on specific ant foraging systems have assumed that only a single attractive pheromone is used. Here we present an agent-based model based on trail choice at a trail bifurcation within the foraging trail network of a Pharaoh's ant colony which includes both attractive (positive) and repellent (negative) trail pheromones. Experiments have previously shown that Pharaoh's ants use both types of pheromone. We investigate how the repellent pheromone affects trail choice and foraging success in our simulated foraging system. We find that both the repellent and attractive pheromones have a role in trail choice, and that the repellent pheromone prevents random fluctuations which could otherwise lead to a positive feedback loop causing the colony to concentrate its foraging on the unrewarding trail. An emergent feature of the model is a high level of variability in the level of repellent pheromone on the unrewarding branch. This is caused by the repellent pheromone exerting negative feedback on its own deposition. We also investigate the dynamic situation where the location of the food is changed after foraging trails are established. We find that the repellent pheromone has a key role in enabling the colony to refocus the foraging effort to the new location. Our results show that having a repellent pheromone is adaptive, as it increases the robustness and flexibility of the colony's overall foraging response.

  15. New steroidal glycosides from Tribulus terrestris L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Liu, Tao; Lu, Xuan; Wang, Hai-Feng; Hua, Hui-Ming; Pei, Yue-Hu

    2012-01-01

    Two new steroidal glycosides were isolated from Tribulus terrestris L. Their structures were elucidated as 26-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-5α-furostan-12-one-20(22)-ene-3β,23,26-triol-3-O-β-D-xylopyranosyl-(1 → 2)-[β-D-xylopyranosyl-(1 → 3)]-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 → 4)-[α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1 → 2)]-β-D-galactopyranoside (1) and 26-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-5α-furostan-20(22)-ene-3β,23,26-triol-3-O-β-D-xylopyranosyl-(1 → 2)-[β-D-xylopyranosyl-(1 → 3)]-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 → 4)-[α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1 → 2)]-β-D-galactopyranoside (2) by spectroscopic methods including 1D and 2D NMR experiments.

  16. A new phenolic glycoside from Juglans mandshurica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Dalei; Jin, Mei; Zhang, Changhao; Luo, Jie; Li, Ren; Zheng, Mingshan; Cui, Jiongmo; Li, Gao

    2014-01-01

    A new phenolic glycoside, 6-O-(4'-hydroxy-3',5'-dimethoxybenzoyl)-d-glucopyranose (4), and nine known compounds (1-3 and 5-10) were isolated from Juglans mandshurica Maxim. Compound structures were elucidated by NMR, HR-ESI-MS and acid hydrolysis. Compounds 5 and 6 are reported from this genus for the first time. Among compounds 1-10, only 1 exhibited cytotoxicity against MGC-803, A549, K562, JAR, HeLa, CaSKi and SiHa cell lines (IC50: 2.0, 5.3, 2.3, 6.9, 4.0, 6.6 and 2.7 μM, respectively).

  17. Phenylethanoid glycosides isolated from Paraboea paniculata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Tan Hor; Hock, Anthony Ho Siong; Kiang, Lim Chan; Mooi, Lim Yang

    2012-06-01

    Phytochemical studies of the leaves and rhizomes of Paraboea pa niculata (Gesneriaceae) are reported for the first time. Three phenylethanoid glycosides were isolated and characterized as 3,4-dihydroxyphenethyl-(3"-O-beta-D-apiofuranosyl)-beta-D-glucopyranoside, calceoralarioside E, and acteoside. These isolates exhibited weak cytotoxic activity against the K-562 cell line with a 50% of cell killing rate of 40.18 microM, 27.05 microM, and 27.24 microM, respectively. In the DPPH free radical scavenging assay, their IC50 values were determined as 75.89 microM, 25.00 microM, and 26.04 microM, respectively.

  18. Two triterpene glycosides from the sea cucumber Bohadschia marmorata Jaeger

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Hua Yuan; Yang Hua Yi; Ling Li; Bao Shu Liu; Hong Wei Zhang; Peng Sun

    2008-01-01

    Further studies on the sea cucumber Bohadschia marmorata Jaeger led to the isolation of a new holostan-type triterpene glycoside,Marmoroside C (1) together with a known triterpene glycoside (2).On the basis of spectroscopic analyses,including twodimensional NMR techniques,and chemical reactions,the structure of the new triterpene glycoside was elucidated as 3-0-[3-O-methyl-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→3)-13-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-quinovopyranosyl-(1→2)-4-O-sodium-sulfato-β-D-xylo-pyranosyl]-25-acetoxy-22-oxo-9(11)-holostene-3β,12α,17α-triol.

  19. TRITERPENE GLYCOSIDES OF HERB OF SOLIDAGO CAUCASICA KEM.-NATH.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Fedotova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Species of the Solidago genus are used to treat diseases of the urinary system but we study Solidago caucasica for the first time. The aim of this work is to study triterpene glycosides of Solidago caucasica. Spectrophotometry revealed that the triterpene glycosides in herb of Solidago caucasica are derivants of oleanolic acid. The quantitative determination of the amount of triterpene glycosides in the Solidago caucasica herb was done by gravimetric method (content is 0,93% and UV spectrophotometry, based on oleanolic acid (content is 1,01 ± 0,03%.

  20. Synthesis and sensory evaluation of ent-kaurane diterpene glycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Indra; Campbell, Mary; San Miguel, Rafael Ignacio; Chaturvedula, Venkata Sai Prakash

    2012-07-26

    Catalytic hydrogenation of the three ent-kaurane diterpene glycosides isolated from Stevia rebaudiana, namely rubusoside, stevioside, and rebaudioside-A has been carried out using Pd(OH)₂ and their corresponding dihydro derivatives have been isolated as the products. Synthesis of reduced steviol glycosides was performed using straightforward chemistry and their structures were characterized on the basis of 1D and 2D NMR spectral data and chemical studies. Also, we report herewith the sensory evaluation of all the reduced compounds against their corresponding original steviol glycosides and sucrose for the sweetness property of these molecules.

  1. Starvation dynamics of a greedy forager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, U.; Redner, S.; Bénichou, O.

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a greedy forager that moves by random walking in an environment where each site initially contains one unit of food. Upon encountering a food-containing site, the forager eats all the food there and can subsequently hop an additional S steps without food before starving to death. Upon encountering an empty site, the forager goes hungry and comes one time unit closer to starvation. We investigate the new feature of forager greed; if the forager has a choice between hopping to an empty site or to a food-containing site in its nearest neighborhood, it hops preferentially towards food. If the neighboring sites all contain food or are all empty, the forager hops equiprobably to one of these neighbors. Paradoxically, the lifetime of the forager can depend non-monotonically on greed, and the sense of the non-monotonicity is opposite in one and two dimensions. Even more unexpectedly, the forager lifetime in one dimension is substantially enhanced when the greed is negative; here the forager tends to avoid food in its local neighborhood. We also determine the average amount of food consumed at the instant when the forager starves. We present analytic, heuristic, and numerical results to elucidate these intriguing phenomena.

  2. Foraging currencies, metabolism and behavioural routines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Alasdair I; McNamara, John M

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental issue in foraging theory is whether it is possible to find a simple currency that characterizes foraging behaviour. If such a currency exists, then it is tempting to argue that the selective forces that have shaped the evolution of foraging behaviour have been understood. We review previous work on currencies for the foraging behaviour of an animal that maximizes total energy gained. In many circumstances, it is optimal to maximize a suitably modified form of efficiency. We show how energy gain, predation and damage can be combined in a single currency based on reproductive value. We draw attention to the idea that hard work may have an adverse effect on an animal's condition. We develop a model of optimal foraging over a day when a forager's state consists of its energy reserves and its condition. Optimal foraging behaviour in our model depends on energy reserves, condition and time of day. The pattern of optimal behaviour depends strongly on assumptions about the probability that the forager is killed by a predator. If condition is important, no simple currency characterizes foraging behaviour, but behaviour can be understood in terms of the maximization of reproductive value. It may be optimal to adopt a foraging option that results in a rate of energy expenditure that is less than the rate associated with maximizing efficiency.

  3. Geographic profiling and animal foraging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Comber, Steven C; Nicholls, Barry; Rossmo, D Kim; Racey, Paul A

    2006-05-21

    Geographic profiling was originally developed as a statistical tool for use in criminal cases, particularly those involving serial killers and rapists. It is designed to help police forces prioritize lists of suspects by using the location of crime scenes to identify the areas in which the criminal is most likely to live. Two important concepts are the buffer zone (criminals are less likely to commit crimes in the immediate vicinity of their home) and distance decay (criminals commit fewer crimes as the distance from their home increases). In this study, we show how the techniques of geographic profiling may be applied to animal data, using as an example foraging patterns in two sympatric colonies of pipistrelle bats, Pipistrellus pipistrellus and P. pygmaeus, in the northeast of Scotland. We show that if model variables are fitted to known roost locations, these variables may be used as numerical descriptors of foraging patterns. We go on to show that these variables can be used to differentiate patterns of foraging in these two species.

  4. Dissecting the role of Kr-h1 brain gene expression in foraging behavior in honey bees (Apis mellifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fussnecker, B; Grozinger, C

    2008-09-01

    Expression of Krüppel homolog-1 (Kr-h1) in the honey bee brain is strongly associated with foraging behavior. We performed a series of studies to determine if Kr-h1 expression correlates with specific aspects of foraging. We found that Kr-h1 expression is unaffected by flight experience in male bees. Expression was unaffected by behavioral reversion of workers from foraging to brood care, suggesting that expression is not associated with the active performance of foraging, but rather with stable physiological changes. Kr-h1 expression is increased by cGMP treatment in workers, and the Kr-h1 promoter contains a conserved potential cGMP response element. Since cGMP treatment causes precocious foraging, our results suggest that Kr-h1 expression is associated with cGMP-mediated changes in the brain that occur early in the transition to foraging behavior.

  5. Feeding-Related Traits Are Affected by Dosage of the foraging Gene in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Aaron M; Anreiter, Ina; Neville, Megan C; Sokolowski, Marla B

    2017-02-01

    Nutrient acquisition and energy storage are critical parts of achieving metabolic homeostasis. The foraging gene in Drosophila melanogaster has previously been implicated in multiple feeding-related and metabolic traits. Before foraging's functions can be further dissected, we need a precise genetic null mutant to definitively map its amorphic phenotypes. We used homologous recombination to precisely delete foraging, generating the for(0) null allele, and used recombineering to reintegrate a full copy of the gene, generating the {for(BAC)} rescue allele. We show that a total loss of foraging expression in larvae results in reduced larval path length and food intake behavior, while conversely showing an increase in triglyceride levels. Furthermore, varying foraging gene dosage demonstrates a linear dose-response on these phenotypes in relation to foraging gene expression levels. These experiments have unequivocally proven a causal, dose-dependent relationship between the foraging gene and its pleiotropic influence on these feeding-related traits. Our analysis of foraging's transcription start sites, termination sites, and splicing patterns using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) and full-length cDNA sequencing, revealed four independent promoters, pr1-4, that produce 21 transcripts with nine distinct open reading frames (ORFs). The use of alternative promoters and alternative splicing at the foraging locus creates diversity and flexibility in the regulation of gene expression, and ultimately function. Future studies will exploit these genetic tools to precisely dissect the isoform- and tissue-specific requirements of foraging's functions and shed light on the genetic control of feeding-related traits involved in energy homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  6. Phylogenetic meta-analysis of the functional traits of clonal plants foraging in changing environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiu-Fang; Song, Yao-Bin; Zhang, Ya-Lin; Pan, Xu; Dong, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Foraging behavior, one of the adaptive strategies of clonal plants, has stimulated a tremendous amount of research. However, it is a matter of debate whether there is any general pattern in the foraging traits (functional traits related to foraging behavior) of clonal plants in response to diverse environments. We collected data from 97 published papers concerning the relationships between foraging traits (e.g., spacer length, specific spacer length, branch intensity and branch angle) of clonal plants and essential resources (e.g., light, nutrients and water) for plant growth and reproduction. We incorporated the phylogenetic information of 85 plant species to examine the universality of foraging hypotheses using phylogenetic meta-analysis. The trends toward forming longer spacers and fewer branches in shaded environments were detected in clonal plants, but no evidence for a relation between foraging traits and nutrient availability was detected, except that there was a positive correlation between branch intensity and nutrient availability in stoloniferous plants. The response of the foraging traits of clonal plants to water availability was also not obvious. Additionally, our results indicated that the foraging traits of stoloniferous plants were more sensitive to resource availability than those of rhizomatous plants. In consideration of plant phylogeny, these results implied that the foraging traits of clonal plants (notably stoloniferous plants) only responded to light intensity in a general pattern but did not respond to nutrient or water availability. In conclusion, our findings on the effects of the environment on the foraging traits of clonal plants avoided the confounding effects of phylogeny because we incorporated phylogeny into the meta-analysis.

  7. Varying foraging patterns in response to competition? A multicolony approach in a generalist seabird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corman, Anna-Marie; Mendel, Bettina; Voigt, Christian C; Garthe, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    Reducing resource competition is a crucial requirement for colonial seabirds to ensure adequate self- and chick-provisioning during breeding season. Spatial segregation is a common avoidance strategy among and within species from neighboring breeding colonies. We determined whether the foraging behaviors of incubating lesser black-backed gulls (Larus fuscus) differed between six colonies varying in size and distance to mainland, and whether any differences could be related to the foraging habitats visited. Seventy-nine incubating individuals from six study colonies along the German North Sea coast were equipped with GPS data loggers in multiple years. Dietary information was gained by sampling food pellets, and blood samples were taken for stable isotope analyses. Foraging patterns clearly differed among and within colonies. Foraging range increased with increasing colony size and decreased with increasing colony distance from the mainland, although the latter might be due to the inclusion of the only offshore colony. Gulls from larger colonies with consequently greater density-dependent competition were more likely to forage at land instead of at sea. The diets of the gulls from the colonies furthest from each other differed, while the diets from the other colonies overlapped with each other. The spatial segregation and dietary similarities suggest that lesser black-backed gulls foraged at different sites and utilized two main habitat types, although these were similar across foraging areas for all colonies except the single offshore island. The avoidance of intraspecific competition results in colony-specific foraging patterns, potentially causing more intensive utilization of terrestrial foraging sites, which may offer more predictable and easily available foraging compared with the marine environment.

  8. Dynamic oceanography determines fine scale foraging behavior of Masked Boobies in the Gulf of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, Caroline L; Harrison, Autumn-Lynn; Vallarino, Adriana; Gerard, Patrick D; Jodice, Patrick G R

    2017-01-01

    During breeding, foraging marine birds are under biological, geographic, and temporal constraints. These contraints require foraging birds to efficiently process environmental cues derived from physical habitat features that occur at nested spatial scales. Mesoscale oceanography in particular may change rapidly within and between breeding seasons, and findings from well-studied systems that relate oceanography to seabird foraging may transfer poorly to regions with substantially different oceanographic conditions. Our objective was to examine foraging behavior of a pan-tropical seabird, the Masked Booby (Sula dactylatra), in the understudied Caribbean province, a moderately productive region driven by highly dynamic currents and fronts. We tracked 135 individuals with GPS units during May 2013, November 2013, and December 2014 at a regionally important breeding colony in the southern Gulf of Mexico. We measured foraging behavior using characteristics of foraging trips and used area restricted search as a proxy for foraging events. Among individual attributes, nest stage contributed to differences in foraging behavior whereas sex did not. Birds searched for prey at nested hierarchical scales ranging from 200 m-35 km. Large-scale coastal and shelf-slope fronts shifted position between sampling periods and overlapped geographically with overall foraging locations. At small scales (at the prey patch level), the specific relationship between environmental variables and foraging behavior was highly variable among individuals but general patterns emerged. Sea surface height anomaly and velocity of water were the strongest predictors of area restricted search behavior in random forest models, a finding that is consistent with the characterization of the Gulf of Mexico as an energetic system strongly influenced by currents and eddies. Our data may be combined with tracking efforts in the Caribbean province and across tropical regions to advance understanding of seabird

  9. Simultaneous determination of iridoid glycosides, phenethylalcohol glycosides and furfural derivatives in Rehmanniae Radix by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Jun; Wu, Jie; Zhu, Ling-Ying

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a sensitive and selective method for simultaneously quantifying eight major components (four iridoid glycosides, three phenethylalcohol glycosides and one furfural derivative) of Rehmanniae Radix by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with triple-quadrupole mass...

  10. Two New C - 21 Steroidal Glycosides from Cynanchum aurichulatum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Two new C-21 steroidal glycosides, cynanauriculoside I and cynanauriculoside II, were isolated from the roots of Cynanchum aurichulatum. Their structures were established using spectroscopic methods including one and two-dimensional NMR.

  11. Rebaudioside F, a diterpene glycoside from Stevia rebaudiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starratt, Alvin N; Kirby, Christopher W; Pocs, Robert; Brandle, James E

    2002-02-01

    The sweet diterpenoid glycoside, rebaudioside F, was isolated from leaves of a high rebaudioside C producing line of Stevia rebaudiana, and its structure was established by chemical and spectral studies.

  12. Caffeic glycoside esters from Jasminum nudiflorum and some related species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andary, C; Tahrouch, S; Marion, C; Wylde, R; Heitz, A

    1992-03-01

    Poliumoside, forsythoside B, echinacoside and arenarioside, caffeic glycoside esters, were isolated from several species of Oleaceae. The poliumoside/forsythoside ratio distinguishes Jasminum nudiflorum from J. mesnyi. Arenarioside and forsythoside B act in Forsythia species as good hybridization markers.

  13. Resin glycosides from the aerial parts of Operculina turpethum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wenbing; Jiang, Zi-Hua; Wu, Ping; Xu, Liangxiong; Wei, Xiaoyi

    2012-09-01

    Three glycosidic acids, turpethic acids A-C, and two intact resin glycosides, turpethosides A and B, all having a common pentasaccharide moiety and 12-hydroxy fatty acid aglycones of different chain lengths, were obtained from the aerial parts of Operculina turpethum. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analyses and chemical correlations. The aglycones were characterized as 12-hydroxypentadecanoic acid in two compounds, 12-hydroxyhexadecanoic acid in two other components, and 12-hydroxyheptadecanoic acid in the fifth compound, which were all confirmed by synthesis. The absolute configurations of these aglycones were all established as S by Mosher's method. These compounds represent the first examples of resin glycosides with a monohydroxylated 12-hydroxy fatty acid as an aglycone, and one compound is the first described resin glycoside having a hydroxylated C(17) fatty acid as its aglycone.

  14. Chrysophanol glycosides from callus cultures of monocotyledonous Kniphofia spp. (Asphodelaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hideyuki; Nishida, Yasuko; Yamazaki, Mie; Nakahara, Keisuke; Michalska-Hartwich, Malgorzata; Furmanowa, Miroslawa; Leistner, Eckhard; Yoshida, Takashi

    2004-10-01

    We established callus cultures of the monocotyledonous plants Kniphofia foliosa and K. tuckii (Asphodelaceae), which produce the anthraquinone derivatives chrysophanol and its glycosides. The minor product chrysophanol 8-O-beta-gentiobioside was fully characterized by spectroscopic analysis and synthesis.

  15. A New Pregnane Glycoside from Fermented Leaves of Agave americana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A new minor pregnane glycoside was isolated from the fermented leaves of Agave americana. Its structure was elucidated as (20S)-5α-pregnane-3β, 20-diol 20-O-β-D-glucopyrano- side (1) by spectral methods.

  16. Synthesis and Fluorescence Properties of Coumarin Glycosides and Triazoylglycosides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Zheng; FU Xin-ling; YANG Nan; WANG Qiu-an

    2013-01-01

    Four coumarin glycosides(1-4) and four coumarin triazoylglycosides(5-8) were synthesized by phase transfer catalytic glycosylation and copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition(CuAAC) respectively from 4-methyl-7-hydroxyl coumarin(4-methylumbelliferone).The structures were characterized by 1H NMR,MS or IR.The fluorescent properties of the coumarin glycosides and triazoylglycosides were studied in different solvents and compared to those of 4-methyl-7-hydroxyl coumarin.

  17. A new anthraquinone glycoside from seeds of Cassia obtusifolia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Ying Tang; Zhu Ju Wang; Mei Hong Fu; Yan He; Hong Wei Wu; Lu Qi Huang

    2008-01-01

    A new anthraquinone glycoside 1, along with a known anthraquinone glycoside aurantio-obtusin-6-O-β-D-glucopyranoside 2, were isolated from the seeds of Cassia obtusifolia. On the basis of spectral and chemical evidences, the structure of 1 was established as 1-demethylaurantio-obtusin-2-O-β-D-glucopyranoside. Moreover, the 13C NMR of 2 was assigned totally and correctly for the first time based on the two-dimensional NMR.

  18. Furostanol glycosides from the rhizomes of Helleborus orientalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Matsuo, Yukiko; Watanabe, Kazuki; Sakagami, Hiroshi

    2010-10-01

    Eight new furostanol glycosides (1-8), together with two known ones (9 and 10), have been isolated from a glycoside-enriched fraction prepared from the rhizomes of Helleborus orientalis (Ranunculaceae). The structures of 1-8 were determined on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analysis, including 2D NMR, and the results of hydrolytic cleavage. The isolated compounds were evaluated for their cytotoxic activity against HSC-2 cells.

  19. Bufadienolide and spirostanol glycosides from the rhizomes of helleborusorientalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kazuki; Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Sakagami, Hiroshi; Sashida, Yutaka

    2003-02-01

    The rhizomes of Helleborus orientalis have been analyzed for the bufadienolide glycoside and spirostanol saponin constituents, resulting in the isolation of a new bufadienolide rhamnoside (1), along with two known bufadienolide glycosides (2 and 3) and five new spirostanol saponins (4-8). The structures of the new compounds were determined on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analysis, including 2D NMR, and the results of hydrolytic cleavage. The isolated compounds were evaluated for their cytotoxic activities against cultured tumor and normal cells.

  20. Flavonol 3-O-Glycosides from Three Algerian Bupleurum Species

    OpenAIRE

    Reguia Bencheraiet; Ahmed Kabouche; Zahia Kabouche; Rachid Touzani; Maurice Jay

    2012-01-01

    Flavonoids distribution in three algerian Bupleureum (Apiaceae) species has been investigated. Quercetin (1), quercetin 3-rutinoside (2) and isorhamnetin 3-rutinoside (3) were found in the endemic species B. plantagineum Desf. Three kaempferol glycosides, kaempferol 3-glucoside (4), kaempferol 3-galactoside (5), kaempferol 3-rutinoside (6) and three quercetin glycosides, quercetin 3-rutinoside (2), quercetin 3-glucoside (7) and quercetin 3-galactoside (8), have been isolated from B. fruticosu...

  1. Triterpene glycosides from the aerial parts of Larrea tridentata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jitsuno, Maki; Mimaki, Yoshihiro

    2010-12-01

    Chemical study of the aerial parts of Larrea tridentata (Zygophyllaceae) resulted in the isolation of 25 triterpene glycosides, 13 of which were previously unknown. Their structures were determined on the basis of comprehensive spectroscopic analyses, including 2D NMR spectroscopy, and hydrolytic cleavage followed by chromatographic and spectroscopic analyses. This is the first systematic phytochemical study of L. tridentata with attention paid to its triterpene glycoside constituents. The isolated compounds were evaluated for their cytotoxic activity against HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cells.

  2. Predator personality and prey behavioural predictability jointly determine foraging performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-chen; Teo, Huey Yee; Norma-Rashid, Y.; Li, Daiqin

    2017-01-01

    Predator-prey interactions play important roles in ecological communities. Personality, consistent inter-individual differences in behaviour, of predators, prey or both are known to influence inter-specific interactions. An individual may also behave differently under the same situation and the level of such variability may differ between individuals. Such intra-individual variability (IIV) or predictability may be a trait on which selection can also act. A few studies have revealed the joint effect of personality types of both predators and prey on predator foraging performance. However, how personality type and IIV of both predators and prey jointly influence predator foraging performance remains untested empirically. Here, we addressed this using a specialized spider-eating jumping spider, Portia labiata (Salticidae), as the predator, and a jumping spider, Cosmophasis umbratica, as the prey. We examined personality types and IIVs of both P. labiata and C. umbratica and used their inter- and intra-individual behavioural variation as predictors of foraging performance (i.e., number of attempts to capture prey). Personality type and predictability had a joint effect on predator foraging performance. Aggressive predators performed better in capturing unpredictable (high IIV) prey than predictable (low IIV) prey, while docile predators demonstrated better performance when encountering predictable prey. This study highlights the importance of the joint effect of both predator and prey personality types and IIVs on predator-prey interactions. PMID:28094288

  3. Nutrient compensatory foraging in a free-living social insect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Keri L.; Gallacher, Anthony P.; Martin, Lizzie; Tong, Desmond; Elgar, Mark A.

    2010-10-01

    The geometric framework model predicts that animal foraging decisions are influenced by their dietary history, with animals targeting a combination of essential nutrients through compensatory foraging. We provide experimental confirmation of nutrient-specific compensatory foraging in a natural, free-living population of social insects by supplementing their diet with sources of protein- or carbohydrate-rich food. Colonies of the ant Iridomyrmex suchieri were provided with feeders containing food rich in either carbohydrate or protein for 6 days, and were then provided with a feeder containing the same or different diet. The patterns of recruitment were consistent with the geometric framework: while feeders with a carbohydrate diet typically attracted more workers than did feeders with protein diet, the difference in recruitment between the two nutrients was smaller if the colonies had had prior access to carbohydrate than protein. Further, fewer ants visited feeders if the colony had had prior access to protein than to carbohydrates, suggesting that the larvae play a role in worker foraging behaviour.

  4. Optimal foraging, not biogenetic law, predicts spider orb web allometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorič, Matjaž; Kiesbüy, Heine C.; Quiñones Lebrón, Shakira G.; Rozman, Alenka; Agnarsson, Ingi; Kuntner, Matjaž

    2013-03-01

    The biogenetic law posits that the ontogeny of an organism recapitulates the pattern of evolutionary changes. Morphological evidence has offered some support for, but also considerable evidence against, the hypothesis. However, biogenetic law in behavior remains underexplored. As physical manifestation of behavior, spider webs offer an interesting model for the study of ontogenetic behavioral changes. In orb-weaving spiders, web symmetry often gets distorted through ontogeny, and these changes have been interpreted to reflect the biogenetic law. Here, we test the biogenetic law hypothesis against the alternative, the optimal foraging hypothesis, by studying the allometry in Leucauge venusta orb webs. These webs range in inclination from vertical through tilted to horizontal; biogenetic law predicts that allometry relates to ontogenetic stage, whereas optimal foraging predicts that allometry relates to gravity. Specifically, pronounced asymmetry should only be seen in vertical webs under optimal foraging theory. We show that, through ontogeny, vertical webs in L. venusta become more asymmetrical in contrast to tilted and horizontal webs. Biogenetic law thus cannot explain L. venusta web allometry, but our results instead support optimization of foraging area in response to spider size.

  5. Human memory retrieval as Lévy foraging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Theo; Turvey, Michael T.

    2007-11-01

    When people attempt to recall as many words as possible from a specific category (e.g., animal names) their retrievals occur sporadically over an extended temporal period. Retrievals decline as recall progresses, but short retrieval bursts can occur even after tens of minutes of performing the task. To date, efforts to gain insight into the nature of retrieval from this fundamental phenomenon of semantic memory have focused primarily upon the exponential growth rate of cumulative recall. Here we focus upon the time intervals between retrievals. We expected and found that, for each participant in our experiment, these intervals conformed to a Lévy distribution suggesting that the Lévy flight dynamics that characterize foraging behavior may also characterize retrieval from semantic memory. The closer the exponent on the inverse square power-law distribution of retrieval intervals approximated the optimal foraging value of 2, the more efficient was the retrieval. At an abstract dynamical level, foraging for particular foods in one's niche and searching for particular words in one's memory must be similar processes if particular foods and particular words are randomly and sparsely located in their respective spaces at sites that are not known a priori. We discuss whether Lévy dynamics imply that memory processes, like foraging, are optimized in an ecological way.

  6. The influence of the physical environment on the self-organised foraging patterns of ants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detrain, C.; Natan, C.; Deneubourg, J.-L.

    2001-04-01

    Among social insects such as ants, scouts that modulate their recruiting behaviour, following simple rules based on local information, generate collective patterns of foraging. Here we demonstrate that features of the abiotic environment, specifically the foraging substrate, may also be influential in the emergence of group-level decisions such as the choice of one foraging path. Experimental data and theoretical analyses show that the collective patterns can arise independently of behavioural changes of individual scouts and can result, through self-organising processes, from the physico-chemical properties of the environment that alter the dynamics of information transfer by chemical trails.

  7. Determination of six steviol glycosides of Stevia rebaudiana (Bertoni) from different geographical origin by LC-ESI-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoro, Paola; Molfetta, Ilaria; Maldini, Mariateresa; Ceccarini, Lucia; Piacente, Sonia; Pizza, Cosimo; Macchia, Mario

    2013-11-15

    Liquid chromatography electro-spray tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI/MS/MS) was applied to the determination of sweet glycosides (steviol glycosides), and toxic aglycon steviol in 24 samples of Stevia rebaudiana (Bertoni) aerial parts, which had been experimentally cultivated in Italy, although derived from seeds of different geographical origin. On the basis of the specific fragmentation of these compounds, an LC-MS/MS method was developed with the aim of quantifying analytes in plant material. Although toxic steviol was not detectable in all the samples, the samples with the highest levels of steviol glycosides were identified. Analysis of the different samples revealed that they were good quality samples, quality being directly linked to the presence of sweet glycosides in the plants cultivated in Italy, although there were differences in the content of these compounds according to the origin of the seeds, and in particular, a major concentration of compounds with major sweetness activity and minor toxicity was found in the population coming from Brazil (for example: sample 10, stevioside content 15.74±2.0% p/p and rebaudioside A content 3.09±0.39% p/p of dried plant). Finally, based on this metabolomic targeted approach, the results obtained for the samples were treated by Principal Component Analysis, identifying specific genotypic differences based on the geographic origin of the seeds.

  8. Human skeletal muscle digitalis glycoside receptors (Na,K-ATPase)--importance during digitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, T A; Holm-Nielsen, P; Kjeldsen, K

    1993-02-01

    The aims of the present study were to evaluate in humans the putative importance of skeletal muscle digitalis glycoside receptors (Na,K-ATPase) in the volume of distribution of digoxin and to assess whether therapeutic digoxin exposure might cause digitalis receptor upregulation in skeletal muscle. Samples of the vastus lateralis were obtained postmortem from 11 long-term (9 months to 9 years) digitalized (125-187.5 micrograms daily) and eight undigitalized subjects. In intact samples from digitalized patients, vanadate-facilitated 3H-ouabain binding increased 15% (p 0.30) before and after washing in specific digoxin antibody fragments, respectively. Thus, the present study indicates a approximately 13% occupancy of skeletal muscle digitalis glycoside receptors with digoxin during digitalization. In light of the large skeletal muscle contribution to body mass, this indicates that the skeletal muscle Na,K-ATPase pool constitutes a major volume of distribution for digoxin during digitalization. The results gave no indication of skeletal muscle digitalis glycoside receptor upregulation in response to digoxin treatment. On the contrary, there was evidence of significantly lower (37%, p digitalized patients, which may be of importance for skeletal muscle incapacity in heart failure.

  9. Decomposition of α-Tocopheryl Glycosides in Rat Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaś, Małgorzata; Wałejko, Piotr; Maj, Jadwiga; Hryniewicka, Agnieszka; Witkowski, Stanisław; Borzym-Kluczyk, Małgorzata; Dudzik, Danuta; Zwierz, Krzysztof

    2008-01-01

    Background The aim of our investigation was to estimate the stability of α-tocopheryl O-glycosides in relation to activity of exoglycosidases in selected rat tissues. Material and Methods Acetylated glycosides were obtained in glucosidation of α-tocopherol using the Helferich method. The activity of exoglycosidases was determined by the Zwierz et al. method. Protein concentrations were determined by the biuret method. The concentration of released α-tocopherol was determined with the HPLC method. Results The comparison of the amount of released α-tocopherol with the amount of released p-nitrophenol shows that glycoside bound in 2a–5a derivatives of α-tocopherol undergoes hydrolysis significantly harder than in appropriate 2b–5b p-nitrophenyl derivatives. Conclusion The results indicate that tocopheryl O-glycosides are more resistant to enzymatic hydrolysis than appropriate p-nitrophenol O-glycosides 2a–5a. Among examined tocopheryl O-glycosides, galactoside 4 is the only compound that caused the significant increase in tocopherol concentration, as compared to its endogenic content. PMID:19696909

  10. Stability of steviol glycosides in several food matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jooken, Etienne; Amery, Ruis; Struyf, Tom; Duquenne, Barbara; Geuns, Jan; Meesschaert, Boudewijn

    2012-10-24

    As steviol glycosides are now allowed as a food additive in the European market, it is important to assess the stability of these steviol glycosides after they have been added to different food matrices. We analyzed and tested the stability of steviol glycosides in semiskimmed milk, soy drink, fermented milk drink, ice cream, full-fat and skimmed set yogurt, dry biscuits, and jam. The fat was removed by centrifugation from the dairy and soy drink samples. Proteins were precipitated by the addition of acetonitrile and also removed by centrifugation. Samples of jam were extracted with water. Dry biscuits were extracted with ethanol. The resulting samples were concentrated with solid-phase extraction and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography on a C18 stationary phase and a gradient of acetonitrile/aqueous 25 mM phosphoric acid. The accuracy was checked using a standard addition on some samples. For assessing the stability of the steviol glycosides, samples were stored in conditions relevant to each food matrix and analyzed periodically. The results indicate that steviol glycosides can be analyzed with good precision and accuracy in these food categories. The recovery was between 96 and 103%. The method was also validated by standard addition, which showed excellent agreement with the external calibration curve. No sign of decomposition of steviol glycosides was found in any of the samples.

  11. Simultaneous estimation of glycosidic isoflavones in fermented and unfermented soybeans by TLC-densitometric method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Alka; Panda, Bibhu P

    2015-02-01

    A simple, accurate and rapid high-performance thin-layer chromatographic (HPTLC) method for the simultaneous quantification of three glycosidic isoflavones (daidzin, genistin and glycitin) in soybean (Glycine max L.) has been established and validated. Chromatography was performed on aluminum foil-backed silica gel 60 F254 HPTLC plates and found compact spots for daidzin, genistin and glycitin (Rf value of 0.39, 0.51 and 0.32, respectively) with mobile phase toluene : ethyl acetate : formic acid : acetic acid in the ratio of 1 : 8 : 1 : 0.5, v/v/v/v. Ultraviolet detection was performed densitometrically at the maximum absorbance wavelength, 260 nm. The method was validated for precision, recovery, robustness, specificity, limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ), in accordance with the ICH guidelines. The LOD (2.9, 19.3 and 3.5 µg mL(-1)), LOQ (9.03, 58.6 and 10.7 µg mL(-1)), recovery (95.9-106.66, 86.97-106.56 and 98.54-105.65%) and precision (≤2.12, ≤0.722 and ≤0.066) were satisfactory for glycosidic form of isoflavones daidzin, genistin and glycitin, respectively. Soybean variety Kh-09 bragg was found to have relatively higher amount of glycosidic isoflavones, namely daidzin, genistin and glycitin 278, 597.5 and 109.4 µg g(-1), respectively, and after fermentation the glycosidic isoflavones concentration in soybean fermented with Bacillus subtilis strain were decreased significantly after 24 h of incubation; conversely, aglycone isoflavones were increased significantly. The method for quantification of isoflavones in unfermented and fermented soybeans, with good resolution has been developed.

  12. Developing Cyber Foraging Applications for Portable Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Mads Darø; Bouvin, Niels Olof

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the Locusts cyber foraging framework. Cyber foraging is the opportunistic use of computing resources available in the nearby environment, and using such resources thus fall into the category of distributed computing. Furthermore, for the resources to be used efficiently......, parallel computing techniques must also be employed. Distributed and parallel computing are two concepts that are both notoriously known for being very hard for developers to grasp. Because of this one might think that techniques such as cyber foraging would have a hard time surviving outside of research...... environments. In this paper a framework is presented that has special focus on making cyber foraging accessible for all developers....

  13. Visual Foraging With Fingers and Eye Gaze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jóhannesson, Ómar I; Thornton, Ian M; Smith, Irene J; Chetverikov, Andrey; Kristjánsson, Árni

    2016-03-01

    A popular model of the function of selective visual attention involves search where a single target is to be found among distractors. For many scenarios, a more realistic model involves search for multiple targets of various types, since natural tasks typically do not involve a single target. Here we present results from a novel multiple-target foraging paradigm. We compare finger foraging where observers cancel a set of predesignated targets by tapping them, to gaze foraging where observers cancel items by fixating them for 100 ms. During finger foraging, for most observers, there was a large difference between foraging based on a single feature, where observers switch easily between target types, and foraging based on a conjunction of features where observers tended to stick to one target type. The pattern was notably different during gaze foraging where these condition differences were smaller. Two conclusions follow: (a) The fact that a sizeable number of observers (in particular during gaze foraging) had little trouble switching between different target types raises challenges for many prominent theoretical accounts of visual attention and working memory. (b) While caveats must be noted for the comparison of gaze and finger foraging, the results suggest that selection mechanisms for gaze and pointing have different operational constraints.

  14. U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Vision: Leading the world in integrated dairy forage systems research. Mission: Providing dairy industry solutions for food security, environmental sustainability,...

  15. U.S. DAIRY FORAGE RESEARCH CENTER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Vision: Leading the world in integrated dairy forage systems research. Mission: Providing dairy industry solutions for food security, environmental sustainability,...

  16. High precision during food recruitment of experienced (reactivated) foragers in the stingless bee Scaptotrigona mexicana (Apidae, Meliponini)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Daniel; Nieh, James C.; Hénaut, Yann; Cruz, Leopoldo; Vandame, Rémy

    Several studies have examined the existence of recruitment communication mechanisms in stingless bees. However, the spatial accuracy of location-specific recruitment has not been examined. Moreover, the location-specific recruitment of reactivated foragers, i.e., foragers that have previously experienced the same food source at a different location and time, has not been explicitly examined. However, such foragers may also play a significant role in colony foraging, particularly in small colonies. Here we report that reactivated Scaptotrigona mexicana foragers can recruit with high precision to a specific food location. The recruitment precision of reactivated foragers was evaluated by placing control feeders to the left and the right of the training feeder (direction-precision tests) and between the nest and the training feeder and beyond it (distance-precision tests). Reactivated foragers arrived at the correct location with high precision: 98.44% arrived at the training feeder in the direction trials (five-feeder fan-shaped array, accuracy of at least +/-6° of azimuth at 50 m from the nest), and 88.62% arrived at the training feeder in the distance trials (five-feeder linear array, accuracy of at least +/-5 m or +/-10% at 50 m from the nest). Thus, S. mexicana reactivated foragers can find the indicated food source at a specific distance and direction with high precision, higher than that shown by honeybees, Apis mellifera, which do not communicate food location at such close distances to the nest.

  17. Changes in forage lichen biomass after insect outbreaks and fuel reduction treatment in the Blue Mountains, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce McCune; Sarah Jovan; Amanda. Hardman

    2008-01-01

    Forage lichens are pendulous, hairlike species eaten by a wide range of mammals. Our overall goal was to estimate losses of Bryoria, a genus of ecologically important forage species, in forests subjected to disease and fuel reduction treatments at Starkey Experimental Forest in the Blue Mountains of northeastern Oregon. Specific objectives were to...

  18. Interactions between shoal size and conformity in guppy social foraging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Day, R.L.; Macdonald, T.; Brown, C.; Laland, K.N.; Reader, S.M.

    2001-01-01

    Previous experimental studies have established that shoaling fish forage more effectively in large than small groups. We investigated how shoal size affects the foraging efficiency of laboratory populations of the guppy, Poecilia reticulata, exposed to different foraging tasks. Experiment 1

  19. Antioxidant flavonol glycosides from Schinus molle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzouk, Mohamed S; Moharram, Fatma A; Haggag, Eman G; Ibrahim, Magda T; Badary, Osama A

    2006-03-01

    Chromatographic separation of aqueous MeOH extract of the leaves of Schinus molle L. has yielded two new acylated quercetin glycosides, named isoquercitrin 6''-O-p-hydroxybenzoate (12) and 2''-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-hyperin 6''-O-gallate (13), together with 12 known polyphenolic metabolites for the first time from this species, namely gallic acid (1), methyl gallate (2), chlorogenic acid (3), 2''-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-hyperin (4), quercetin 3-O-beta-D-neohesperidoside (5), miquelianin (6), quercetin 3-O-beta-D-galacturonopyranoside (7), isoquercitrin (8), hyperin (9), isoquercitrin 6''-gallate (10), hyperin 6''-O-gallate (11) and (+)-catechin (14). Their structures were established on the basis of chromatographic properties, chemical, spectroscopic (UV, 1H, 13C NMR) and ESI-MS (positive and negative modes) analyses. Compounds 4-9 and 11 exhibited moderate to strong radical scavenging properties on lipid peroxidation, hydroxyl radical and superoxide anion generations with the highest activities shown by 6 and 7 in comparison with that of quercetin as a positive control in vitro.

  20. A new lignan glycoside from Juniperus rigida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Kyeong Wan; Choi, Sang Un; Park, Jong Cheol; Lee, Kang Ro

    2011-12-01

    A new lignan glycoside, named juniperigiside (1) was isolated from the CHCl(3) soluble fraction of the MeOH extract of stems and leaves of Juniperus rigida S.et Z. Compound 1 was identified by 1D- and 2D-NMR spectroscopy as well as CD analysis as (2R,3S)-2,3-dihydro-7-methoxy-2-(4'-hydroxy-3'-methoxyphenyl)-3-hydroxymethyl-5-benzofuranpropanol 4'-O-(3-O-methyl)-α-L-rhamnopyranoside. Five known lignans, icariside E4 (2), desoxypodophyllotoxin (3), savinin (4), thujastandin (5), and (-)-nortrachelogenin (6) in addition to five known labdane diterpenes including trans-communic acid (7), 13-epi-torulosal (8), 13-epi-cupressic acid (9), imbricatoric acid (10), and isocupressic acid (11) were also isolated and their structures were characterized by comparing their spectroscopic data with those in the literature. All compounds were isolated for the first time from this plant, and 5 and 6 were first reported from the genus Juniperus. The isolated compounds were tested for cytotoxicity against four human tumor cell lines in vitro using a Sulforhodamin B bioassay. Compounds 3, 4, 7, and 8 showed considerable cytotoxicity against four human cancer cell lines in vitro.

  1. Overview: the history, technical function and safety of rebaudioside A, a naturally occurring steviol glycoside, for use in food and beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carakostas, M C; Curry, L L; Boileau, A C; Brusick, D J

    2008-07-01

    Rebaudioside A is a sweet tasting steviol glycoside extracted and purified from Stevia rebaudiana (Bertoni). Steviol glycosides can currently be used as a food ingredient in only a handful of countries. Questions on specifications, safety and special population effects have prevented steviol glycosides from obtaining a legal status permitting their use as a sweetener in most countries. A set of papers reporting results of research studies and reviews has been compiled in this Supplement to definitively answer unresolved questions. Specifically, recently completed studies on the general and reproductive toxicity of rebaudioside A corroborate studies carried out with purified steviol glycosides demonstrating safety at high dietary intake levels. Comparative metabolism studies provide further affirmation of the common metabolic pathway for all steviol glycosides and the common metabolism between rats and humans. Finally, clinical studies provide further evidence that purified rebaudioside A has no effect on either blood pressure or glucose homeostasis. This paper summarizes the information used to conclude that high purity rebaudioside A (rebiana) produced to food-grade specifications and according to Good Manufacturing Practices is safe for human consumption under its intended conditions of use as a general purpose sweetener.

  2. The effects of spatially heterogeneous prey distributions on detection patterns in foraging seabirds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavio Miramontes

    Full Text Available Many attempts to relate animal foraging patterns to landscape heterogeneity are focused on the analysis of foragers movements. Resource detection patterns in space and time are not commonly studied, yet they are tightly coupled to landscape properties and add relevant information on foraging behavior. By exploring simple foraging models in unpredictable environments we show that the distribution of intervals between detected prey (detection statistics is mostly determined by the spatial structure of the prey field and essentially distinct from predator displacement statistics. Detections are expected to be Poissonian in uniform random environments for markedly different foraging movements (e.g. Lévy and ballistic. This prediction is supported by data on the time intervals between diving events on short-range foraging seabirds such as the thick-billed murre (Uria lomvia. However, Poissonian detection statistics is not observed in long-range seabirds such as the wandering albatross (Diomedea exulans due to the fractal nature of the prey field, covering a wide range of spatial scales. For this scenario, models of fractal prey fields induce non-Poissonian patterns of detection in good agreement with two albatross data sets. We find that the specific shape of the distribution of time intervals between prey detection is mainly driven by meso and submeso-scale landscape structures and depends little on the forager strategy or behavioral responses.

  3. Reduced foraging investment as an adaptation to patchy food sources: A phasic army ant simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teseo, Serafino; Delloro, Francesco

    2017-09-07

    Colonies of several ant species within the subfamily Dorylinae alternate stereotypical discrete phases of foraging and reproduction. Such phasic cycles are thought to be adaptive because they minimize the amount of foraging and the related costs, and at the same time enhance the colony-level ability to rely on patchily distributed food sources. In order to investigate these hypotheses, we use here a simple computational approach to study the population dynamics of two species of virtual ant colonies that differ quantitatively in their foraging investment. One species, which we refer to as "phasic", forages only half of the time, mirroring the phasic activity of some army ants; the other "non-phasic" species forages instead all the time. We show that, when foraging costs are relatively high, populations of phasic colonies grow on average faster than non-phasic populations, outcompeting them in mixed populations. Interestingly, such tendency becomes more consistent as food becomes more difficult to find but locally abundant. According to our results, reducing the foraging investment, for example by adopting a phasic lifestyle, can result in a reproductive advantage, but only in specific conditions. We thus suggest phasic colony cycles to have emerged together with the doryline specialization in feeding on the brood of other eusocial insects, a resource that is hard to obtain but highly abundant if available. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Multidimensional differentiation in foraging resource use during breeding of two sympatric top predators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedemann, Guilad; Leshem, Yossi; Kerem, Lior; Shacham, Boaz; Bar-Massada, Avi; McClain, Krystaal M.; Bohrer, Gil; Izhaki, Ido

    2016-10-01

    Ecologically-similar species were found to develop specific strategies to partition their resources, leading to niche differentiation and divergence, in order to avoid interspecific competition. Our study determines multi-dimensional differentiation of two sympatric top-predators, long-legged buzzards (LLB) and short-toed eagles (STE), which recently became sympatric during their breeding season in the Judean Foothills, Israel. By combining information from comprehensive diet and movement analyses we found four dimensions of differentiation: (1) Geographic foraging area: LLB tended to forage relatively close to their nests (2.35 ± 0.62 km), while STE forage far from their nest (13.03 ± 2.20 km) (2) Foraging-habitat type: LLBs forage at low natural vegetation, avoiding cultivated fields, whereas STEs forage in cultivated fields, avoiding low natural vegetation; (3) Diurnal dynamics of foraging: LLBs are uniformly active during daytime, whereas STEs activity peaks in the early afternoon; and (4) Food-niche: while both species largely rely on reptiles (47.8% and 76.3% for LLB and STE, respectively), LLB had a more diverse diet and consumed significantly higher percentages of lizards, while STE consumed significantly higher percentages of snakes. Our results suggest that this multidimensional differentiation allows the spatial coexistence of these two dense populations in the study area.

  5. Integrating multiple technologies to understand the foraging behaviour of Hawaiian monk seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littnan, Charles; Halpin, Patrick; Read, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate and describe the foraging behaviour of monk seals in the main Hawaiian Islands. Specifically, our goal was to identify a metric to classify foraging behaviour from telemetry instruments. We deployed accelerometers, seal-mounted cameras and GPS tags on six monk seals during 2012–2014 on the islands of Molokai, Kauai and Oahu. We used pitch, calculated from the accelerometer, to identify search events and thus classify foraging dives. A search event and consequent ‘foraging dive’ occurred when the pitch was greater than or equal to 70° at a depth less than or equal to −3 m. By integrating data from the accelerometers with video and GPS, we were able to ground-truth this classification method and identify environmental variables associated with each foraging dive. We used Bayesian logistic regression to identify the variables that influenced search events. Dive depth, body motion (mean overall dynamic body acceleration during the dive) and proximity to the sea floor were the best predictors of search events for these seals. Search events typically occurred on long, deep dives, with more time spent at the bottom (more than 50% bottom time). We can now identify where monk seals are foraging in the main Hawaiian Islands (MHI) and what covariates influence foraging behaviour in this region. This increased understanding will inform management strategies and supplement outreach and recovery efforts. PMID:28405358

  6. Contrasting Foraging Patterns: Testing Resource-Concentration and Dilution Effects with Pollinators and Seed Predators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandria Wenninger

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Resource concentration effects occur when high resource density patches attract and support more foragers than low density patches. In contrast, resource dilution effects can occur if high density patches support fewer consumers. In this study, we examined the foraging rates of pollinators and seed predators on two perennial plant species (Rudbeckia triloba and Verbena stricta as functions of resource density. Specifically, we examined whether resource-dense patches (densities of flower and seeds on individual plants resulted in greater visitation and seed removal rates, respectively. We also examined whether foraging rates were context-dependent by conducting the study in two sites that varied in resource densities. For pollinators, we found negative relationships between the density of flowers per plant and visitation rates, suggesting dilution effects. For seed predators, we found positive relationships consistent with concentration effects. Saturation effects and differences in foraging behaviors might explain the opposite relationships; most of the seed predators were ants (recruitment-based foragers, and pollinators were mostly solitary foragers. We also found that foraging rates were site-dependent, possibly due to site-level differences in resource abundance and consumer densities. These results suggest that these two plant species may benefit from producing as many flowers as possible, given high levels of pollination and low seed predation.

  7. Antitrypanosomal isothiocyanate and thiocarbamate glycosides from Moringa peregrina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyari, Mahdi; Salehi, Peyman; Ebrahimi, Samad Nejad; Zimmermann, Stefanie; Portmann, Lena; Krauth-Siegel, R Luise; Kaiser, Marcel; Brun, Reto; Rezadoost, Hassan; Rezazadeh, Shamsali; Hamburger, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    O-Methyl (1), O-ethyl (2), and O-butyl (3) 4-[(α-L-rhamnosyloxy) benzyl] thiocarbamate (E), along with 4-(α-L-rhamnosyloxy) benzyl isothiocyanate (4) have been isolated from the aerial parts of Moringa peregrina. The compounds were tested for in vitro activity against Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and cytotoxicity in rat skeletal myoblasts (L6 cells). The most potent compound was 4 with an IC50 of 0.10 µM against T.b. rhodesiense and a selectivity index of 73, while the thiocarbamate glycosides 1, 2, and 3 showed only moderate activity. Intraperitoneal administration of 50 mg/kg body weight/day of 4 in the T.b. rhodesiense STIB 900 acute mouse model revealed significant in vivo toxicity. Administration of 10 mg/kg body weight/day resulted in a 95% reduction of parasitemia on day 7 postinfection, but did not cure the animals. Because of its high in vitro activity and its ability to irreversibly inhibit trypanothione reductase, an attractive parasite-specific target enzyme, 4-[(α-L-rhamnosyloxy) benzyl] isothiocyanate (4), can be considered as a lead structure for the development and characterization of novel antitrypanosomal drugs. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. A simple rule for the costs of vigilance: empirical evidence from a social forager.

    OpenAIRE

    Cowlishaw, Guy; Lawes, Michael J.; Lightbody, Margaret; Martin, Alison; Pettifor, Richard; Rowcliffe, J. Marcus

    2004-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that anti-predator vigilance by foraging animals is costly because it interrupts food searching and handling time, leading to a reduction in feeding rate. When food handling does not require visual attention, however, a forager may handle food while simultaneously searching for the next food item or scanning for predators. We present a simple model of this process, showing that when the length of such compatible handling time Hc is long relative to search time S, specif...

  9. Structures of Some Novel α-Glucosyl Diterpene Glycosides from the Glycosylation of Steviol Glycosides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indra Prakash

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Four new minor diterpene glycosides with a rare α-glucosyl linkage were isolated from a cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase glucosylated stevia extract containing more than 98% steviol glycosides. The new compounds were identified as 13-[(2-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-3-O-(4-O-α-D-glucopyranosyl-β-D-glucopyranosyl-β-D-glucopyranosyloxy] ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid-[(4-O-α-D-glucopyranosyl-β-D-glucopyranosyl ester] (1, 13-[(2-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-β-D-glucopyranosyloxy] ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid-[(4-O-(4-O-(4-O-α-D-glucopyranosyl-α-D-glucopyranosyl-α-D-glucopyranosyl-β-D-glucopyranosyl ester] (2, 13-[(2-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-3-O-(4-O-(4-O-(4-O-α-D-glucopyranosyl-α-D-glucopyranosyl-α-D-glucopyranosyl-β-D-glucopyranosyl-β-D-glucopyranosyloxy] ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester (3, and 13-[(2-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-3-O-(4-O-(4-O-(4-O-α-D-glucopyranosyl-α-D-glucopyranosyl-α-D-glucopyranosyl-β-D-glucopyranosyl- β-D-glucopyranosyloxy] ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid-[(4-O-α-D-glucopyranosyl-β-D-glucopyranosyl ester] (4 on the basis of extensive NMR and mass spectral (MS data as well as hydrolysis studies.

  10. Structures of some novel α-glucosyl diterpene glycosides from the glycosylation of steviol glycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Indra; Chaturvedula, Venkata Sai Prakash

    2014-12-04

    Four new minor diterpene glycosides with a rare α-glucosyl linkage were isolated from a cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase glucosylated stevia extract containing more than 98% steviol glycosides. The new compounds were identified as 13-[(2-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-3-O-(4-O-α-D-glucopyranosyl)-β-D-glucopyranosyl-β-D-glucopyranosyl)oxy] ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid-[(4-O-α-D-glucopyranosyl-β-D-glucopyranosyl) ester] (1), 13-[(2-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-β-D-glucopyranosyl)oxy] ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid-[(4-O-(4-O-(4-O-α-D-glucopyranosyl)-α-D-glucopyranosyl)-α-D-glucopyranosyl)-β-D-glucopyranosyl ester] (2), 13-[(2-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-3-O-(4-O-(4-O-(4-O-α-D-glucopyranosyl)-α-D-glucopyranosyl)-α-D-glucopyranosyl)-β-D-glucopyranosyl-β-D-glucopyranosyl)oxy] ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester (3), and 13-[(2-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-3-O-(4-O-(4-O-(4-O-α-D-glucopyranosyl)-α-D-glucopyranosyl)-α-D-glucopyranosyl)-β-D-glucopyranosyl- β-D-glucopyranosyl)oxy] ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid-[(4-O-α-D-glucopyranosyl-β-D-glucopyranosyl) ester] (4) on the basis of extensive NMR and mass spectral (MS) data as well as hydrolysis studies.

  11. Foraging behaviour by parasitoids in multiherbivore communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijk, de M.; Dicke, M.; Poelman, E.H.

    2013-01-01

    Parasitoid foraging decisions are often affected by community characteristics such as community diversity and complexity. As part of a complex habitat, the presence of unsuitable hosts may affect foraging behaviour of parasitoids. First, unsuitable herbivores may affect the localization of patches w

  12. Increased carrying capacity with perennial forage kochia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrying capacity can be increased on grass-dominated rangeland pastures by including perennial forage kochia (Kochia prostrata) as one of the plant components. The objectives of the study reported here were to compare the differences of traditional winter pastures versus pastures with forage kochi...

  13. Optimal forager against ideal free distributed prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garay, József; Cressman, Ross; Xu, Fei; Varga, Zoltan; Cabello, Tomás

    2015-07-01

    The introduced dispersal-foraging game is a combination of prey habitat selection between two patch types and optimal-foraging approaches. Prey's patch preference and forager behavior determine the prey's survival rate. The forager's energy gain depends on local prey density in both types of exhaustible patches and on leaving time. We introduce two game-solution concepts. The static solution combines the ideal free distribution of the prey with optimal-foraging theory. The dynamical solution is given by a game dynamics describing the behavioral changes of prey and forager. We show (1) that each stable equilibrium dynamical solution is always a static solution, but not conversely; (2) that at an equilibrium dynamical solution, the forager can stabilize prey mixed patch use strategy in cases where ideal free distribution theory predicts that prey will use only one patch type; and (3) that when the equilibrium dynamical solution is unstable at fixed prey density, stable behavior cycles occur where neither forager nor prey keep a fixed behavior.

  14. Foraging strategy switch of a top marine predator according to seasonal resource differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm Daniel O'Toole

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The spatio-temporal variability in marine resources influences the foraging behaviour and success of top marine predators. However, little is known about the links between these animals and ocean productivity, specifically, how plankton density influences their foraging behaviour. Southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina have two annual at-sea foraging trips: a two month post-breeding foraging trip (Nov – Jan that coincides with elevated summer productivity; and an eight month post-moulting foraging trip (Feb – Oct over winter, when productivity is low. Physical parameters are often used to describe seal habitat, whereas information about important biological parameters is lacking. We used electronic tags deployed on elephant seals during both trips to determine their movement and foraging behaviour. The tags also recorded light, which measured the bio-optical properties of the water column, the bulk of which is presumably influenced by phytoplankton. We investigated the relationship between plankton density and seal foraging behaviour; comparing trends between summer and winter trips. We found a positive relationship between plankton density and foraging behaviour, which did not vary seasonally. We propose that profitable concentrations of seal prey are more likely to coincide with planktonic aggregations, but we also acknowledge that trophic dynamics may shift in response to seasonal trends in productivity. Seal prey (mid-trophic level and plankton (lower-trophic level are expected to overlap in space and time during summer trips when peak phytoplankton blooms occur. In contrast, aggregated patches of lower trophic levels are likely to be more dispersed during winter trips when plankton density is considerably lower and heterogeneous. These results show that southern elephant seals are able to exploit prey resources in different ways throughout the year as demonstrated by the variation observed between seal foraging behaviour and trophic

  15. Foraging behaviour of juvenile female New Zealand sea lions (Phocarctos hookeri in contrasting environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine S Leung

    Full Text Available Foragers can show adaptive responses to changes within their environment through morphological and behavioural plasticity. We investigated the plasticity in body size, at sea movements and diving behaviour of juvenile female New Zealand (NZ sea lions (Phocarctos hookeri in two contrasting environments. The NZ sea lion is one of the rarest pinnipeds in the world. Most of the species is based at the subantarctic Auckland Islands (AI; considered to be marginal foraging habitat, with a recolonizing population on the Otago Peninsula, NZ mainland (considered to be more optimal habitat. We investigated how juvenile NZ sea lions adjust their foraging behaviour in contrasting environments by deploying satellite-linked platform transmitting terminals (PTTs and time-depth recorders (TDRs on 2-3 year-old females at AI (2007-2010 and Otago (2009-2010. Juvenile female NZ sea lions exhibited plasticity in body size and behaviour. Otago juveniles were significantly heavier than AI juveniles. Linear mixed effects models showed that study site had the most important effect on foraging behaviour, while mass and age had little influence. AI juveniles spent more time at sea, foraged over larger areas, and dove deeper and longer than Otago juveniles. It is difficult to attribute a specific cause to the observed contrasts in foraging behaviour because these differences may be driven by disparities in habitat/prey characteristics, conspecific density levels or interseasonal variation. Nevertheless, the smaller size and increased foraging effort of AI juveniles, combined with the lower productivity in this region, support the hypothesis that AI are less optimal habitat than Otago. It is more difficult for juveniles to forage in suboptimal habitats given their restricted foraging ability and lower tolerance for food limitation compared to adults. Thus, effective management measures should consider the impacts of low resource environments, along with changes that can

  16. Diving deeper into individual foraging specializations of a large marine predator, the southern sea lion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylis, A M M; Orben, R A; Arnould, J P Y; Peters, K; Knox, T; Costa, D P; Staniland, I J

    2015-12-01

    Despite global declines in the abundance of marine predators, knowledge of foraging ecology, necessary to predict the ecological consequences of large changes in marine predator abundance, remains enigmatic for many species. Given that populations suffering severe declines are of conservation concern, we examined the foraging ecology of southern sea lions (SSL) (Otaria flavescens)-one of the least studied otariids (fur seal and sea lions)-which have declined by over 90% at the Falkland Islands since the 1930s. Using a combination of biologging devices and stable isotope analysis of vibrissae, we redress major gaps in the knowledge of SSL ecology and quantify patterns of individual specialization. Specifically, we revealed two discrete foraging strategies, these being inshore (coastal) and offshore (outer Patagonian Shelf). The majority of adult female SSL (72% or n = 21 of 29 SSL) foraged offshore. Adult female SSL that foraged offshore travelled further (92 ± 20 vs. 10 ± 4 km) and dived deeper (75 ± 23 vs. 21 ± 8 m) when compared to those that foraged inshore. Stable isotope analysis revealed long-term fidelity (years) to these discrete foraging habitats. In addition, we found further specialization within the offshore group, with adult female SSL separated into two clusters on the basis of benthic or mixed (benthic and pelagic) dive behavior (benthic dive proportion was 76 ± 9 vs. 51 ± 8%, respectively). We suggest that foraging specialization in depleted populations such as SSL breeding at the Falkland Islands, are influenced by foraging site fidelity, and could be independent of intraspecific competition. Finally, the behavioral differences we describe are crucial to understanding population-level dynamics, impediments to population recovery, and threats to population persistence.

  17. Key aromatic residues at subsites +2 and +3 of glycoside hydrolase family 31 α-glucosidase contribute to recognition of long-chain substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tagami, Takayoshi; Okuyama, Masayuki; Nakai, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Glycoside hydrolase family 31 α-glucosidases (31AGs) show various specificities for maltooligosaccharides according to chain length. Aspergillus niger α-glucosidase (ANG) is specific for short-chain substrates with the highest kcat/Km for maltotriose, while sugar beet α-glucosidase (SBG) prefers ...

  18. Foraging in groups affects giving-up densities: solo foragers quit sooner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carthey, Alexandra J R; Banks, Peter B

    2015-07-01

    The giving-up density framework is an elegant and widely adopted mathematical approach to measuring animals' foraging decisions at non-replenishing artificial resource patches. Under this framework, an animal should "give up" when the benefits of foraging are outweighed by the costs (e.g., predation risk, energetic, and/or missed opportunity costs). However, animals of many species may forage in groups, and group size is expected to alter perceived predation risk and hence influence quitting decisions. Yet, most giving-up density studies assume either that individuals forage alone or that giving-up densities are not affected by group foraging. For animals that forage both alone and in groups, differences in giving-up densities due to group foraging rather than experimental variables may substantially alter interpretation. However, no research to date has directly investigated how group foraging affects the giving-up density. We used remote-sensing cameras to identify instances of group foraging in two species of Rattus across three giving-up density experiments to determine whether group foraging influences giving-up densities. Both Rattus species have been observed to vary between foraging alone and in groups. In all three experiments, solo foragers left higher giving-up densities on average than did group foragers. This result has important implications for studies using giving-up densities to investigate perceived risk, the energetic costs of searching, handling time, digestion, and missed opportunity costs, particularly if groups of animals are more likely to experience certain experimental treatments. It is critically important that future giving-up density studies consider the effects of group foraging.

  19. Human psychometric and taste receptor responses to steviol glycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellfritsch, Caroline; Brockhoff, Anne; Stähler, Frauke; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Hofmann, Thomas

    2012-07-11

    Steviol glycosides, the sweet principle of Stevia Rebaudiana (Bertoni) Bertoni, have recently been approved as a food additive in the EU. The herbal non-nutritive high-potency sweeteners perfectly meet the rising consumer demand for natural food ingredients in Europe. We have characterized the organoleptic properties of the most common steviol glycosides by an experimental approach combining human sensory studies and cell-based functional taste receptor expression assays. On the basis of their potency to elicit sweet and bitter taste sensations, we identified glycone chain length, pyranose substitution, and the C16 double bond as the structural features giving distinction to the gustatory profile of steviol glycosides. A comprehensive screening of 25 human bitter taste receptors revealed that two receptors, hTAS2R4 and hTAS2R14, mediate the bitter off-taste of steviol glycosides. For some test substances, e.g., stevioside, we observed a decline in sweet intensity at supra-maximum concentrations. This effect did not arise from allosteric modulation of the hTAS1R2/R3 sweet taste receptor but might be explained by intramolecular cross-modal suppression between the sweet and bitter taste component of steviol glycosides. These results might contribute to the production of preferentially sweet and least bitter tasting Stevia extracts by an optimization of breeding and postharvest downstream processing.

  20. Patches of bare ground as a staple commodity for declining ground-foraging insectivorous farmland birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaub, Michael; Martinez, Nicolas; Tagmann-Ioset, Aline; Weisshaupt, Nadja; Maurer, Melanie L; Reichlin, Thomas S; Abadi, Fitsum; Zbinden, Niklaus; Jenni, Lukas; Arlettaz, Raphaël

    2010-10-06

    Conceived to combat widescale biodiversity erosion in farmland, agri-environment schemes have largely failed to deliver their promises despite massive financial support. While several common species have shown to react positively to existing measures, rare species have continued to decline in most European countries. Of particular concern is the status of insectivorous farmland birds that forage on the ground. We modelled the foraging habitat preferences of four declining insectivorous bird species (hoopoe, wryneck, woodlark, common redstart) inhabiting fruit tree plantations, orchards and vineyards. All species preferred foraging in habitat mosaics consisting of patches of grass and bare ground, with an optimal, species-specific bare ground coverage of 30-70% at the foraging patch scale. In the study areas, birds thrived in intensively cultivated farmland where such ground vegetation mosaics existed. Not promoted by conventional agri-environment schemes until now, patches of bare ground should be implemented throughout grassland in order to prevent further decline of insectivorous farmland birds.

  1. Identifying Space Use at Foraging Arena Scale within the Home Ranges of Large Herbivores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Owen-Smith

    Full Text Available An intermediate spatiotemporal scale of food procurement by large herbivores is evident within annual or seasonal home ranges. It takes the form of settlement periods spanning several days or weeks during which foraging activity is confined to spatially discrete foraging arenas, separated by roaming interludes. Extended by areas occupied for other activities, these foraging arenas contribute towards generating the home range structure. We delineated and compared the foraging arenas exploited by two African large herbivores, sable antelope (a ruminant and plains zebra (a non-ruminant, using GPS-derived movement data. We developed a novel approach to specifically delineate foraging arenas based on local change points in distance relative to adjoining clusters of locations, and compared its output with modifications of two published methods developed for home range estimation and residence time estimation respectively. We compared how these herbivore species responded to seasonal variation in food resources and how they differed in their spatial patterns of resource utilization. Sable antelope herds tended to concentrate their space use locally, while zebra herds moved more opportunistically over a wider set of foraging arenas. The amalgamated extent of the foraging arenas exploited by sable herds amounted to 12-30 km2, compared with 22-100 km2 for the zebra herds. Half-day displacement distances differed between settlement periods and roaming interludes, and zebra herds generally shifted further over 12h than sable herds. Foraging arenas of sable herds tended to be smaller than those of zebra, and were occupied for period twice as long, and hence exploited more intensively in days spent per unit area than the foraging arenas of zebra. For sable both the intensity of utilization of foraging arenas and proportion of days spent in foraging arenas relative to roaming interludes declined as food resources diminished seasonally, while zebra showed no

  2. Identifying Space Use at Foraging Arena Scale within the Home Ranges of Large Herbivores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen-Smith, Norman; Martin, Jodie

    2015-01-01

    An intermediate spatiotemporal scale of food procurement by large herbivores is evident within annual or seasonal home ranges. It takes the form of settlement periods spanning several days or weeks during which foraging activity is confined to spatially discrete foraging arenas, separated by roaming interludes. Extended by areas occupied for other activities, these foraging arenas contribute towards generating the home range structure. We delineated and compared the foraging arenas exploited by two African large herbivores, sable antelope (a ruminant) and plains zebra (a non-ruminant), using GPS-derived movement data. We developed a novel approach to specifically delineate foraging arenas based on local change points in distance relative to adjoining clusters of locations, and compared its output with modifications of two published methods developed for home range estimation and residence time estimation respectively. We compared how these herbivore species responded to seasonal variation in food resources and how they differed in their spatial patterns of resource utilization. Sable antelope herds tended to concentrate their space use locally, while zebra herds moved more opportunistically over a wider set of foraging arenas. The amalgamated extent of the foraging arenas exploited by sable herds amounted to 12-30 km2, compared with 22-100 km2 for the zebra herds. Half-day displacement distances differed between settlement periods and roaming interludes, and zebra herds generally shifted further over 12h than sable herds. Foraging arenas of sable herds tended to be smaller than those of zebra, and were occupied for period twice as long, and hence exploited more intensively in days spent per unit area than the foraging arenas of zebra. For sable both the intensity of utilization of foraging arenas and proportion of days spent in foraging arenas relative to roaming interludes declined as food resources diminished seasonally, while zebra showed no seasonal variation

  3. Mapping the navigational knowledge of individually foraging ants, Myrmecia croslandi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narendra, Ajay; Gourmaud, Sarah; Zeil, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    Ants are efficient navigators, guided by path integration and visual landmarks. Path integration is the primary strategy in landmark-poor habitats, but landmarks are readily used when available. The landmark panorama provides reliable information about heading direction, routes and specific location. Visual memories for guidance are often acquired along routes or near to significant places. Over what area can such locally acquired memories provide information for reaching a place? This question is unusually approachable in the solitary foraging Australian jack jumper ant, since individual foragers typically travel to one or two nest-specific foraging trees. We find that within 10 m from the nest, ants both with and without home vector information available from path integration return directly to the nest from all compass directions, after briefly scanning the panorama. By reconstructing panoramic views within the successful homing range, we show that in the open woodland habitat of these ants, snapshot memories acquired close to the nest provide sufficient navigational information to determine nest-directed heading direction over a surprisingly large area, including areas that animals may have not visited previously. PMID:23804615

  4. Forage as a primary source of mycotoxins in animal diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skládanka, Jiří; Nedělník, Jan; Adam, Vojtěch; Doležal, Petr; Moravcová, Hana; Dohnal, Vlastimil

    2011-01-01

    The issue of moulds and, thus, contamination with mycotoxins is very topical, particularly in connexion with forages from grass stands used at the end of the growing season. Deoxynivalenol (DON), zearalenone (ZEA), fumonisins (FUM) and aflatoxins (AFL) are among the most common mycotoxins. The aim of the paper was to determine concentrations of mycotoxins in selected grasses (Lolium perenne, Festulolium pabulare, Festulolium braunii) and their mixtures with Festuca rubra an/or Poa pratensis during the growing season as a marker of grass safety, which was assessed according to content of the aforementioned mycotoxins. During the growing season grass forage was contaminated with mycotoxins, most of all by DON and ZEA. The contents of AFL and FUM were zero or below the limit of quantification. Moreover, the level of the occurrence of mould was quantified as ergosterol content, which was higher at the specific date of cut. All results were statistically processed and significant changes were discussed.

  5. Do bigger bats need more time to forage?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CEL. Esbérard

    Full Text Available We test the hypothesis is that bats using the same area and at the same time would be using similar preys, but they would have different foraging times due to specific differences in biomass. A total of 730 captures was analyzed 13 species of Vespertilionidae and Molossidae bats netted over a small dam in southeastern Brazil from 1993 and 1999. The relationship between the average time of captures and the biomass of the species of Vespertilinidae and Molossidae most frequent (captures > 4 was positive and significant (r = 0.83, p = 0.022, N = 7. Two lines are discussed to answer the longer foraging time for bigger bats: 1 larger insectivorous bats don't consume proportionally larger preys and 2 larger insects are less available.

  6. Direct and correlated responses to selection on iridoid glycosides in Plantago lanceolata L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marak, H.B.; Biere, A.; Van Damme, J.M.M.

    2000-01-01

    Plantago lanceolata L. (ribwort plantain) produces two costly terpenoid secondary plant compounds, the iridoid glycosides aucubin and catalpol. We performed an artificial selection experiment to investigate direct and correlated responses to selection on the constitutive level of iridoid glycosides

  7. Nickel-catalyzed proton-deuterium exchange (HDX) procedures for glycosidic linkage analysis of complex carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    The structural analysis of complex carbohydrates typically requires the assignment of three parameters: monosaccharide composition, the position of glycosidic linkages between monosaccharides, and the position and nature of non-carbohydrate substituents. The glycosidic linkage positions are often de...

  8. Differential Recognition and Hydrolysis of Host Carbohydrate Antigens by Streptococcus pneumoniae Family 98 Glycoside Hydrolases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, M.; Whitworth, G; El Warry, N; Randriantsoa, M; Samain, E; Burke, R; Vocadlo, D; Boraston, A

    2009-01-01

    The presence of a fucose utilization operon in the Streptococcus pneumoniae genome and its established importance in virulence indicates a reliance of this bacterium on the harvesting of host fucose-containing glycans. The identities of these glycans, however, and how they are harvested is presently unknown. The biochemical and high resolution x-ray crystallographic analysis of two family 98 glycoside hydrolases (GH98s) from distinctive forms of the fucose utilization operon that originate from different S. pneumoniae strains reveal that one enzyme, the predominant type among pneumococcal isolates, has a unique endo-{beta}-galactosidase activity on the LewisY antigen. Altered active site topography in the other species of GH98 enzyme tune its endo-{beta}-galactosidase activity to the blood group A and B antigens. Despite their different specificities, these enzymes, and by extension all family 98 glycoside hydrolases, use an inverting catalytic mechanism. Many bacterial and viral pathogens exploit host carbohydrate antigens for adherence as a precursor to colonization or infection. However, this is the first evidence of bacterial endoglycosidase enzymes that are known to play a role in virulence and are specific for distinct host carbohydrate antigens. The strain-specific distribution of two distinct types of GH98 enzymes further suggests that S. pneumoniae strains may specialize to exploit host-specific antigens that vary from host to host, a factor that may feature in whether a strain is capable of colonizing a host or establishing an invasive infection.

  9. Sexual segregation in foraging giraffe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mramba, Rosemary Peter; Mahenya, Obeid; Siyaya, Annetjie; Mathisen, Karen Marie; Andreassen, Harry Peter; Skarpe, Christina

    2017-02-01

    Sexual segregation in giraffe is known to vary between savannas. In this study, we compared sexual segregation in giraffe in one nutrient-rich savanna, the Serengeti National Park, one nutrient-poor, Mikumi National Park, and one medium rich savanna, Arusha National Park, (from here on referred to just by name) based on effects of sexual size dimorphism and related hypotheses. Data were collected in the wet and dry seasons, by driving road transects and making visual observations of browsing giraffe. Additional data were collected from literature (plant chemistry; mammal communities). There was a noticeable difference in browsing by females and males and in browsing between the three savannas. Females browsed a higher diversity of tree species in Serengeti whereas males browsed a higher diversity in Arusha, while the diversity of species browsed in Mikumi was high and about the same in both sexes. Females selected for high concentrations of nitrogen and low concentrations of tannins and phenolics compared to males in Serengeti but selection in Mikumi was more complex. Males browsed higher in the canopy than females in all sites, but the browsing height was generally higher in Serengeti than Mikumi and Arusha. Season had an effect on the browsing height independent of sex in Mikumi, where giraffes browsed higher in the dry season compared to the wet season. Males spent more time browsing per tree compared to females in all three sites; however, browsing time in Mikumi was also affected by season, where giraffes had longer browsing bouts in the wet season compared to the dry season. We suggest that sexual differences in forage requirement and in foraging interacts with differences in tree chemistry and in competing herbivore communities between nutrient rich and nutrient poor savanna in shaping the sexual segregation.

  10. Glycosides of polyenoic branched fatty acids from myxomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezanka, Tomás

    2002-07-01

    The determination of chemical structures of five novel compounds, i.e. one multibranched polyunsaturated fatty acid ((2E,4E,7S,8E,10E,12E,14S)-7,9,13,17-tetramethyl-7,14-dihydroxy-2,4,8,10,12,16-octadecahexaenoic acid) and its four glycosides from seven different myxomycetes is described. The absolute configuration of both hydroxyl groups was determined. The glycosides containing glucose, mannose and rhamnose. These compounds were identified by means of 1H and 13C NMR, MS, UV and IR spectra. Three of them were identified in Arcyria cinerea (Bull.) Pers., two in A. denudata (L.) Wetts., and A. nutans (Bull.) Grev., Fuligo septica (L.) Wigg., Lycogala epidendrum (L.) Fries, Physarum polycephalum Schwein., and Trichia varia Pers. contained one of the identified glycosides each.

  11. Sesquiterpene glycosides from the roots of Codonopsis pilosula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueping Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Three new sesquiterpene glycosides, named codonopsesquilosides A−C (1−3, were isolated from an aqueous extract of the dried roots of Codonopsis pilosula. Their structures including absolute configurations were determined by spectroscopic and chemical methods. These glycosides are categorized as C15 carotenoid (1, gymnomitrane (2, and eudesmane (3 types of sesquiterpenoids, respectively. Compound 1 is the first diglycoside of C15 carotenoids to be reported. Compound 2 represents the second reported example of gymnomitrane-type sesquiterpenoids from higher plants. The absolute configurations were supported by comparison of the experimental circular dichroism (CD spectra with the calculated electronic CD (ECD spectra of 1−3, their aglycones, and model compounds based on quantum-mechanical time-dependent density functional theory. The influences of the glycosyls on the calculated ECD spectra of the glycosidic sesquiterpenoids, as well as some nomenclature and descriptive problems with gymnomitrane-type sesquiterpenoids are discussed.

  12. Iridoid glycoside biosynthesis in Penstemon secundiflorus. Another H-5, H-9 trans iridoid glycoside

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krull, Robert E.; Stermitz, Frank R.; Franzyk, Henrik

    1998-01-01

    Isolation and characterization of the new iridoid 10-hydroxy-(5 alpha H)-6-epidihydrocornin from Penstemon secundiflorus (Scrophulariaceae) is described. In biosynthetic experiments, deoxyloganic acid was incorporated into the transfused iridoid glycosides (5 alpha H)-6-epidihydrocornin and 10-hy......-hydroxy-(5 alpha H)-6-epidihydrocornin in P. secundiflorus. Formation of the trans-fused compounds is therefore a late event in the biosynthesis and does not occur during iridoid formation by cyclization of the open chain monoterpene precursor. In the same plant, 8-epideoxyloganic acid...... was not incorporated into the trans-iridoids. Deoxyloganic acid was also incorporated into 10-hydroxyhastatoside (which bears an 8 beta-methyl group), while 8-epideoxyloganic acid was incorporated into penstemoside (with an 8 alpha-methyl group). Thus, iridoid biosynthetic pathways leading from both deoxyloganic acid...

  13. Activation of cardiac ryanodine receptors by cardiac glycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagawa, Toshio; Sagawa, Kazuko; Kelly, James E; Tsushima, Robert G; Wasserstrom, J Andrew

    2002-03-01

    This study investigated the effects of cardiac glycosides on single-channel activity of the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release channels or ryanodine receptor (RyR2) channels and how this action might contribute to their inotropic and/or toxic actions. Heavy SR vesicles isolated from canine left ventricle were fused with artificial planar lipid bilayers to measure single RyR2 channel activity. Digoxin and actodigin increased single-channel activity at low concentrations normally associated with therapeutic plasma levels, yielding a 50% of maximal effect of approximately 0.2 nM for each agent. Channel activation by glycosides did not require MgATP and occurred only when digoxin was applied to the cytoplasmic side of the channel. Similar results were obtained in human RyR2 channels; however, neither the crude skeletal nor the purified cardiac channel was activated by glycosides. Channel activation was dependent on [Ca2+] on the luminal side of the bilayer with maximal stimulation occurring between 0.3 and 10 mM. Rat RyR2 channels were activated by digoxin only at 1 microM, consistent with the lower sensitivity to glycosides in rat heart. These results suggest a model in which RyR2 channel activation by digoxin occurs only when luminal [Ca2+] was increased above 300 microM (in the physiological range). Consequently, increasing SR load (by Na+ pump inhibition) serves to amplify SR release by promoting direct RyR2 channel activation via a luminal Ca2+-sensitive mechanism. This high-affinity effect of glycosides could contribute to increased SR Ca2+ release and might play a role in the inotropic and/or toxic actions of glycosides in vivo.

  14. Bioactive glycosides from the African medicinal plant Boerhavia erecta L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugraha, Ari S; Hilou, Adama; Vandegraaff, Nicholas; Rhodes, David I; Haritakun, Rachada; Keller, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    Phytochemical studies of the previously unexplored stem of Boerhavia erecta from Burkina Faso, resulted in the isolation of an unreported glycoside 4, 2,3-dihydroxypropylbenzoate-3-O-β-[4″-methoxy] glucuronide as well as seven known glycosides (1-3, 5-8). The major isolate 5 and 8 indicated a significant inhibition against HIV integrase (IC50 10 and 22 μg/mL, respectively). The extracts and isolates were also tested for anti-malarial activity, but insignificant activity was observed.

  15. A new flavone glycoside from Selaginella moellendorffii Hieron.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    From the ethanol extract of Selaginella moellendorffii Hieron., a new flavone O-glycoside and three known flavone C-glycosides have been isolated and identified as 5-carboxymethyl-4'-hydroxyflavone-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside 1, 6,8-di-C-β-D-glucopyrano-sylapigenin 2, 6-C-β-D-glucopyranosyl-8-C-β-D-xylopyranosyl apigenin 3, 6-C-β-D-xylopyranosyl-8-C-β-D-glucopyranosylapi-genin 4, respectively. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods.

  16. Cytotoxic cardiac glycosides and other compounds from Asclepias syriaca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, Juan J; Kindscher, Kelly; Timmermann, Barbara N

    2012-03-23

    Phytochemical investigation of the dried biomass of Asclepias syriaca afforded five new compounds (1-5), along with 19 known structures. Overall, the secondary metabolites isolated and identified from this plant showed a wide structural diversity including pentacyclic triterpenes, cardiac glycosides, flavonoid glycosides, lignans, a phenylethanoid, and a glycosylated megastigmane. In addition, the isolates were tested against the cancer breast cell line Hs578T, and those showing IC(50) values lower than 50 μM (1 and 6-9) were further investigated in three additional breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47D, and Sk-Br-3) and the normal breast cell line Hs578Bst.

  17. Caucasicosides E-M, furostanol glycosides from Helleborus caucasicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzashvili, Tamar; Perrone, Angela; Napolitano, Assunta; Kemertelidze, Ether; Pizza, Cosimo; Piacente, Sonia

    2011-12-01

    Nine furostanol glycosides, namely caucasicosides E-M, were isolated from the MeOH extract of the leaves of Helleborus caucasicus, along with 11 known compounds including nine furostanol glycosides, a bufadienolide and an ecdysteroid. Their structures were established by the extensive use of 1D and 2D NMR experiments along with ESIMS(n) analyses. The steroidal composition of leaves of H. caucasicus shows as particular feature the occurrence of steroidal compounds belonging to the 5β series, unusual for Helleborus species, and in particular, caucasicosides F-H are based on a 5β-polyhydroxylated steroidal aglycon never reported before. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Flavonol 3-O-Glycosides from Three Algerian Bupleurum Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reguia Bencheraiet

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Flavonoids distribution in three algerian Bupleureum (Apiaceae species has been investigated. Quercetin (1, quercetin 3-rutinoside (2 and isorhamnetin 3-rutinoside (3 were found in the endemic species B. plantagineum Desf. Three kaempferol glycosides, kaempferol 3-glucoside (4, kaempferol 3-galactoside (5, kaempferol 3-rutinoside (6 and three quercetin glycosides, quercetin 3-rutinoside (2, quercetin 3-glucoside (7 and quercetin 3-galactoside (8, have been isolated from B. fruticosum L. while isorhamnetin (9, isorhamnetin 3-galactoside (10 and isorhamnetin 3-galactorhamnoside (11 were found in B. spinosum L. Seven flavonols are reported here for the first time from the genus.

  19. Structural investigation of resin glycosides from Ipomoea lonchophylla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, J K; Ward, A; Oelrichs, P B

    1997-05-01

    A fraction from Ipomoea lonchophylla, which was toxic to mice, contained an inseparable mixture of resin glycosides with differing numbers of C5 ester groups on the hexasaccharide chain. After alkaline hydrolysis of the esters, the structure of the major component (1) was elucidated using high-field NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, chemical studies, and comparison with known resin glycosides. Compound 1 was identified as 3,11-dihydroxytetradecanoic acid 11-O-beta-quinovopyranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-glucopyranosyl-(1-->3)- [alpha-rhamnopyranosyl- (1-->4)]-quinovopyranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-glucopyranosyl-(1-->2)-beta -fucopyranoside.

  20. Sympatric cattle grazing and desert bighorn sheep foraging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Kyle R.; Cain, James W.; Rominger, Eric M.; Goldstein, Elise J.

    2015-01-01

    Foraging behavior affects animal fitness and is largely dictated by the resources available to an animal. Understanding factors that affect forage resources is important for conservation and management of wildlife. Cattle sympatry is proposed to limit desert bighorn population performance, but few studies have quantified the effect of cattle foraging on bighorn forage resources or foraging behavior by desert bighorn. We estimated forage biomass for desert bighorn sheep in 2 mountain ranges: the cattle-grazed Caballo Mountains and the ungrazed San Andres Mountains, New Mexico. We recorded foraging bout efficiency of adult females by recording feeding time/step while foraging, and activity budgets of 3 age-sex classes (i.e., adult males, adult females, yearlings). We also estimated forage biomass at sites where bighorn were observed foraging. We expected lower forage biomass in the cattle-grazed Caballo range than in the ungrazed San Andres range and lower biomass at cattle-accessible versus inaccessible areas within the Caballo range. We predicted bighorn would be less efficient foragers in the Caballo range. Groundcover forage biomass was low in both ranges throughout the study (Jun 2012–Nov 2013). Browse biomass, however, was 4.7 times lower in the Caballo range versus the San Andres range. Bighorn in the Caballo range exhibited greater overall daily travel time, presumably to locate areas of higher forage abundance. By selecting areas with greater forage abundance, adult females in the Caballo range exhibited foraging bout efficiency similar to their San Andres counterparts but lower overall daily browsing time. We did not find a significant reduction in forage biomass at cattle-accessible areas in the Caballo range. Only the most rugged areas in the Caballo range had abundant forage, potentially a result of intensive historical livestock use in less rugged areas. Forage conditions in the Caballo range apparently force bighorn to increase foraging effort by

  1. Harvester ants use interactions to regulate forager activation and availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinter-Wollman, Noa; Bala, Ashwin; Merrell, Andrew; Queirolo, Jovel; Stumpe, Martin C; Holmes, Susan; Gordon, Deborah M

    2013-07-01

    Social groups balance flexibility and robustness in their collective response to environmental changes using feedback between behavioural processes that operate at different timescales. Here we examine how behavioural processes operating at two timescales regulate the foraging activity of colonies of the harvester ant, Pogonomyrmex barbatus, allowing them to balance their response to food availability and predation. Previous work showed that the rate at which foragers return to the nest with food influences the rate at which foragers leave the nest. To investigate how interactions inside the nest link the rates of returning and outgoing foragers, we observed outgoing foragers inside the nest in field colonies using a novel observation method. We found that the interaction rate experienced by outgoing foragers inside the nest corresponded to forager return rate, and that the interactions of outgoing foragers were spatially clustered. Activation of a forager occurred on the timescale of seconds: a forager left the nest 3-8 s after a substantial increase in interactions with returning foragers. The availability of outgoing foragers to become activated was adjusted on the timescale of minutes: when forager return was interrupted for more than 4-5 min, available foragers waiting near the nest entrance went deeper into the nest. Thus, forager activation and forager availability both increased with the rate at which foragers returned to the nest. This process was checked by negative feedback between forager activation and forager availability. Regulation of foraging activation on the timescale of seconds provides flexibility in response to fluctuations in food abundance, whereas regulation of forager availability on the timescale of minutes provides robustness in response to sustained disturbance such as predation.

  2. Optimal Foraging by Birds: Experiments for Secondary & Postsecondary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecor, Keith W.; Lake, Ellen C.; Wund, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    Optimal foraging theory attempts to explain the foraging patterns observed in animals, including their choice of particular food items and foraging locations. We describe three experiments designed to test hypotheses about food choice and foraging habitat preference using bird feeders. These experiments can be used alone or in combination and can…

  3. A review on studies in forage in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG Wenxing; YANG Xiaobo; QI Meiying

    2007-01-01

    A review is made of the achievements in the collection,conservation,and genetic diversity of forage germplasm resources;methods and goals for forage breeding;and development and utilization of forage in China.The current problems based on the researches in forage are analyzed,and some suggestions are put forward.

  4. Experimental Wing Damage Affects Foraging Effort and Foraging Distance in Honeybees Apis mellifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D. Higginson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bees acquire wing damage as they age, and loss of wing area affects longevity and behaviour. This may influence colony performance via effects on worker behaviour. The effects of experimental wing damage were studied in worker honeybees in observation hives by recording survivorship, how often and for how long bees foraged, and by decoding waggle dances. Mortality rate increased with both age and wing damage. Damaged bees carried out shorter and/or less frequent foraging trips, foraged closer to the hive, and reported the profitability of flower patches to be lower than did controls. These results suggest that wing damage caused a reduction in foraging ability, and that damaged bees adjusted their foraging behaviour accordingly. Furthermore, the results suggest that wing damage affects the profitability of nectar sources. These results have implications for the colony dynamics and foraging efficiency in honeybees.

  5. HPLC-PDA method for quinovic acid glycosides assay in Cat's claw (Uncaria tomentosa) associated with UPLC/Q-TOF-MS analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavei, Cabral; Kaiser, Samuel; Verza, Simone Gasparin; Borre, Gustavo Luis; Ortega, George Gonzalez

    2012-03-25

    Uncaria tomentosa (Willd.) is a medicinal plant largely used in folk medicine due to its wide range of biological activities, many of which are usually ascribed to the two main classes of secondary metabolites, namely, alkaloids and quinovic acid glycosides. In this work, a reversed phase HPLC-PDA method was developed and validated for the assay of quinovic acid glycosides in crude and dried extracts of Uncaria tomentosa (Cat's claw) bark. The validation comprised tests of specificity, accuracy, linearity, intermediate precision, repeatability and limits of detection and of quantification. Alpha-hederin was used as the external standard. High coefficients of determination with lower R.S.D. were achieved for both external standard and crude extract. The structural characterization of the main quinovic acid glycosides presented in the crude extract was carried out through UPLC/Q-TOF-MS. The identities of the compounds were obtained through the comparison of their fragmentation patterns with those reported in the literature. The analytical method was successfully applied for quantifying quinovic acid glycosides in two different dried extracts from U. tomentosa and in one quinovic acid glycosides purified fraction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. 葡萄果实糖苷键合态萜烯物质的研究进展%Research Progress of Glycosidically-bound Terpenes in Grapes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    问亚琴; 崔婧; 潘秋红

    2012-01-01

    Terpenes, the main components of varietal aroma of grapes, exist in free volatile form and glycosidically-bound form as well. Generally, glycosidically-bound terpenes accumulate in much higher amounts than free forms in developing grape berries, and they are thus considered to be the important aroma precursors. The present paper summarizes the research progress of glycosidically-bound terpenes in grapes, including the composition and content of glycosidically-bound terpenes, the factors affecting the accumulation of these compounds, the study statue concerning terpene-specific glycosyltransferases as well as the qualitative and quantitative methods of glycosidically-bound terpenes.%萜烯是构成葡萄果实品种香气的重要成分,主要以游离态和糖苷键合态形式存在。通常糖苷键合态萜烯的含量远远高于游离态,是构成葡萄酒香气的重要前体物质。对葡萄果实中糖苷键合态萜烯物质的组成、含量及其影响因素,催化糖苷键合态萜烯形成的糖基转移酶等的研究进展以及糖苷键合态香气物质的分析方法进行了综述。

  7. Worker honey bee pheromone regulation of foraging ontogeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankiw, Tanya

    The evolution of sociality has configured communication chemicals, called primer pheromones, which play key roles in regulating the organization of social life. Primer pheromones exert relatively slow effects that fundamentally alter developmental, physiological, and neural systems. Here, I demonstrate how substances extracted from the surface of foraging and young pre-foraging worker bees regulated age at onset of foraging, a developmental process. Hexane-extractable compounds washed from foraging workers increased foraging age compared with controls, whereas extracts of young pre-foraging workers decreased foraging age. This represents the first known direct demonstration of primer pheromone activity derived from adult worker bees.

  8. Herbaceous plant species invading natural areas tend to have stronger adaptive root foraging than other naturalized species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keser, Lidewij H; Visser, Eric J W; Dawson, Wayne; Song, Yao-Bin; Yu, Fei-Hai; Fischer, Markus; Dong, Ming; van Kleunen, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Although plastic root-foraging responses are thought to be adaptive, as they may optimize nutrient capture of plants, this has rarely been tested. We investigated whether nutrient-foraging responses are adaptive, and whether they pre-adapt alien species to become natural-area invaders. We grew 12 pairs of congeneric species (i.e., 24 species) native to Europe in heterogeneous and homogeneous nutrient environments, and compared their foraging responses and performance. One species in each pair is a USA natural-area invader, and the other one is not. Within species, individuals with strong foraging responses, measured as plasticity in root diameter and specific root length, had a higher biomass. Among species, the ones with strong foraging responses, measured as plasticity in root length and root biomass, had a higher biomass. Our results therefore suggest that root foraging is an adaptive trait. Invasive species showed significantly stronger root-foraging responses than non-invasive species when measured as root diameter. Biomass accumulation was decreased in the heterogeneous vs. the homogeneous environment. In aboveground, but not belowground and total biomass, this decrease was smaller in invasive than in non-invasive species. Our results show that strong plastic root-foraging responses are adaptive, and suggest that it might aid in pre-adapting species to becoming natural-area invaders.

  9. Quitting time: When do honey bee foragers decide to stop foraging on natural resources?

    OpenAIRE

    Michael eRivera; Matina eDonaldson-Matasci; Anna eDornhaus

    2015-01-01

    Honey bee foragers may use both personal and social information when making decisions about when to visit resources. In particular, foragers may stop foraging at resources when their own experience indicates declining resource quality, or when social information, namely the delay to being able to unload nectar to receiver bees, indicates that the colony has little need for the particular resource being collected. Here we test the relative importance of these two factors in a natural setting, ...

  10. Maize forage aptitude: Combining ability of inbred lines and stability of hybrids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Máximo Bertoia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Breeding of forage maize should combine improvement achieved for grain with the specific needs of forage hybrids. Production stability is important when maize is used for silage if the planting area is not in the ideal agronomic environment. The objectives of the present research were: (i to quantify environmental and genetic and their interaction effects on maize silage traits; (ii to identify possible heterotic groups for forage aptitude and suggest the formation of potential heterotic patterns, and (iii to identify suitable inbred line combinations for producing hybrids with forage aptitude. Forty-five hybrids derived from diallelic crosses (without reciprocals among ten inbred lines of maize were evaluated in this study. Combined ANOVA over environments showed differences between genotypes (G, environments (E, and their interactions (GEI. Heritability (H2, and genotypic and phenotypic correlations were estimated to evaluate the variation in and relationships between forage traits. Postdictive and predictive AMMI models were fitted to determine the importance of each source of variation, G, E, and GEI, and to select genotypes simultaneously on yield, quality and stability. A predominance of additive effects was found in the evaluated traits. The heterotic pattern Reid-BSSS × Argentine flint was confirmed for ear yield (EY and harvest index (HI. High and broad genetic variation was found for stover and whole plant traits. Some inbred lines had genes with differential breeding aptitude for ear and stover. Stover and ear yield should be the main breeding objectives in maize forage breeding.

  11. Foraging behavior of the queenless ant Dinoponera quadriceps Santschi (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Arrilton; Rodrigues, Zenilde

    2006-01-01

    The search for and ingestion of food are essential to all animals, which spend most of their lives looking for nutritional sources, more than other activities such as mating, intra-specific disputes or escaping from predators. The present study aims to describe and quantify several aspects of foraging behavior, diet and food transport in the queenless ant Dinoponera quadriceps Santschi in a secondary Atlantic forest, Northeastern Brazil. Three colonies were randomly selected at a distance of at least 50 m from one another. On leaving the colony, worker ants were followed until their return, with no nutritional provision or interference with their activities. Activities were recorded using focal time sampling with instantaneous recording every minute for 10 consecutive minutes. Each colony was observed 1 day/week, for at least 6 h/day resulting in 53.8h of direct observation of the workers. Foraging activities, success in transporting food, type of food, cleaning and interaction among the workers were recorded. Foraging was always individual, with no occurrence of recruitment. Diet was composed mainly of arthropods, mostly insects. The collection of small fruits (Eugenia sp.) was also observed. Foraging time was greater when workers transported food to the colony, the return time being shorter than the foraging period, suggesting the use of chemical and visual cues for orientation during their foraging and food-collecting activities.

  12. Maize forage aptitude: Combining ability of inbred lines and stability of hybrids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luis; Máximo; Bertoia; Mónica; Beatriz; Aulicino

    2014-01-01

    Breeding of forage maize should combine improvement achieved for grain with the specific needs of forage hybrids. Production stability is important when maize is used for silage if the planting area is not in the ideal agronomic environment. The objectives of the present research were:(i) to quantify environmental and genetic and their interaction effects on maize silage traits;(ii) to identify possible heterotic groups for forage aptitude and suggest the formation of potential heterotic patterns, and(iii) to identify suitable inbred line combinations for producing hybrids with forage aptitude. Forty-five hybrids derived from diallelic crosses(without reciprocals) among ten inbred lines of maize were evaluated in this study. Combined ANOVA over environments showed differences between genotypes(G), environments(E), and their interactions(GEI). Heritability(H2), and genotypic and phenotypic correlations were estimated to evaluate the variation in and relationships between forage traits. Postdictive and predictive AMMI models were fitted to determine the importance of each source of variation, G, E, and GEI, and to select genotypes simultaneously on yield, quality and stability. A predominance of additive effects was found in the evaluated traits. The heterotic pattern Reid-BSSS × Argentine flint was confirmed for ear yield(EY) and harvest index(HI). High and broad genetic variation was found for stover and whole plant traits. Some inbred lines had genes with differential breeding aptitude for ear and stover. Stover and ear yield should be the main breeding objectives in maize forage breeding.

  13. Foraging strategies of the ant Ectatomma vizottoi (Hymenoptera, Formicidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Lima,Luan D.; Antonialli-Junior, William F.

    2013-01-01

    Foraging strategies of the ant Ectatomma vizottoi (Hymenoptera, Formicidae). Foraging activity may be limited by temperature, humidity, radiation, wind, and other abiotic factors, all of which can affect energy costs during foraging. Ectatomma vizottoi's biology has only recently been studied, and no detailed information is available on its foraging patterns or diet in the field. For this reason, and because foraging activity is an important part of the ecological success of social insects, t...

  14. Resource heterogeneity and foraging behaviour of cattle across spatial scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demment Montague W

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the mechanisms that influence grazing selectivity in patchy environments is vital to promote sustainable production and conservation of cultivated and natural grasslands. To better understand how patch size and spatial dynamics influence selectivity in cattle, we examined grazing selectivity under 9 different treatments by offering alfalfa and fescue in patches of 3 sizes spaced with 1, 4, and 8 m between patches along an alley. We hypothesized that (1 selectivity is driven by preference for the forage species that maximizes forage intake over feeding scales ranging from single bites to patches along grazing paths, (2 that increasing patch size enhances selectivity for the preferred species, and that (3 increasing distances between patches restricts selectivity because of the aggregation of scale-specific behaviours across foraging scales. Results Cows preferred and selected alfalfa, the species that yielded greater short-term intake rates (P Conclusion We conclude that patch size and spacing affect components of intake rate and, to a lesser extent, the selectivity of livestock at lower hierarchies of the grazing process, particularly by enticing livestock to make more even use of the available species as patches are spaced further apart. Thus, modifications in the spatial pattern of plant patches along with reductions in the temporal and spatial allocation of grazing may offer opportunities to improve uniformity of grazing by livestock and help sustain biodiversity and stability of plant communities.

  15. Evidence for acoustic communication among bottom foraging humpback whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Susan E; Cusano, Dana A; Stimpert, Alison K; Weinrich, Mason T; Friedlaender, Ari S; Wiley, David N

    2014-12-16

    Humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae), a mysticete with a cosmopolitan distribution, demonstrate marked behavioural plasticity. Recent studies show evidence of social learning in the transmission of specific population level traits ranging from complex singing to stereotyped prey capturing behaviour. Humpback whales have been observed to employ group foraging techniques, however details on how individuals coordinate behaviour in these groups is challenging to obtain. This study investigates the role of a novel broadband patterned pulsed sound produced by humpback whales engaged in bottom-feeding behaviours, referred to here as a 'paired burst' sound. Data collected from 56 archival acoustic tag deployments were investigated to determine the functional significance of these signals. Paired burst sound production was associated exclusively with bottom feeding under low-light conditions, predominantly with evidence of associated conspecifics nearby suggesting that the sound likely serves either as a communicative signal to conspecifics, a signal to affect prey behaviour, or possibly both. This study provides additional evidence for individual variation and phenotypic plasticity of foraging behaviours in humpback whales and provides important evidence for the use of acoustic signals among foraging individuals in this species.

  16. Interactions Increase Forager Availability and Activity in Harvester Ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pless, Evlyn; Queirolo, Jovel; Pinter-Wollman, Noa; Crow, Sam; Allen, Kelsey; Mathur, Maya B; Gordon, Deborah M

    2015-01-01

    Social insect colonies use interactions among workers to regulate collective behavior. Harvester ant foragers interact in a chamber just inside the nest entrance, here called the 'entrance chamber'. Previous studies of the activation of foragers in red harvester ants show that an outgoing forager inside the nest experiences an increase in brief antennal contacts before it leaves the nest to forage. Here we compare the interaction rate experienced by foragers that left the nest and ants that did not. We found that ants in the entrance chamber that leave the nest to forage experienced more interactions than ants that descend to the deeper nest without foraging. Additionally, we found that the availability of foragers in the entrance chamber is associated with the rate of forager return. An increase in the rate of forager return leads to an increase in the rate at which ants descend to the deeper nest, which then stimulates more ants to ascend into the entrance chamber. Thus a higher rate of forager return leads to more available foragers in the entrance chamber. The highest density of interactions occurs near the nest entrance and the entrances of the tunnels from the entrance chamber to the deeper nest. Local interactions with returning foragers regulate both the activation of waiting foragers and the number of foragers available to be activated.

  17. Interactions Increase Forager Availability and Activity in Harvester Ants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evlyn Pless

    Full Text Available Social insect colonies use interactions among workers to regulate collective behavior. Harvester ant foragers interact in a chamber just inside the nest entrance, here called the 'entrance chamber'. Previous studies of the activation of foragers in red harvester ants show that an outgoing forager inside the nest experiences an increase in brief antennal contacts before it leaves the nest to forage. Here we compare the interaction rate experienced by foragers that left the nest and ants that did not. We found that ants in the entrance chamber that leave the nest to forage experienced more interactions than ants that descend to the deeper nest without foraging. Additionally, we found that the availability of foragers in the entrance chamber is associated with the rate of forager return. An increase in the rate of forager return leads to an increase in the rate at which ants descend to the deeper nest, which then stimulates more ants to ascend into the entrance chamber. Thus a higher rate of forager return leads to more available foragers in the entrance chamber. The highest density of interactions occurs near the nest entrance and the entrances of the tunnels from the entrance chamber to the deeper nest. Local interactions with returning foragers regulate both the activation of waiting foragers and the number of foragers available to be activated.

  18. Fishing amplifies forage fish population collapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essington, Timothy E; Moriarty, Pamela E; Froehlich, Halley E; Hodgson, Emma E; Koehn, Laura E; Oken, Kiva L; Siple, Margaret C; Stawitz, Christine C

    2015-05-26

    Forage fish support the largest fisheries in the world but also play key roles in marine food webs by transferring energy from plankton to upper trophic-level predators, such as large fish, seabirds, and marine mammals. Fishing can, thereby, have far reaching consequences on marine food webs unless safeguards are in place to avoid depleting forage fish to dangerously low levels, where dependent predators are most vulnerable. However, disentangling the contributions of fishing vs. natural processes on population dynamics has been difficult because of the sensitivity of these stocks to environmental conditions. Here, we overcome this difficulty by collating population time series for forage fish populations that account for nearly two-thirds of global catch of forage fish to identify the fingerprint of fisheries on their population dynamics. Forage fish population collapses shared a set of common and unique characteristics: high fishing pressure for several years before collapse, a sharp drop in natural population productivity, and a lagged response to reduce fishing pressure. Lagged response to natural productivity declines can sharply amplify the magnitude of naturally occurring population fluctuations. Finally, we show that the magnitude and frequency of collapses are greater than expected from natural productivity characteristics and therefore, likely attributed to fishing. The durations of collapses, however, were not different from those expected based on natural productivity shifts. A risk-based management scheme that reduces fishing when populations become scarce would protect forage fish and their predators from collapse with little effect on long-term average catches.

  19. Marruboside, a new phenylethanoid glycoside from Marrubium vulgare L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahpaz, Sevser; Hennebelle, Thierry; Bailleul, François

    2002-06-01

    A new phenylethanoid glycoside, marruboside, has been isolated from the aerial parts of Marrubium vulgare L. Its structure was established as 3,4-dihydroxy-beta-phenylethoxy-O-[beta-D-apiofuranosyl-(1-->2)-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->3)]-[beta-D-apiofuranosyl-(1-->6)]-4-O-caffeoyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside, on the basis of spectroscopic evidence.

  20. Monoterpene Glycosides from the Roots of Paeonia lactiflora

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Ling WANG; Wei JIAO; Xun LIAO; Shu Ling PENG; Li Sheng DING

    2006-01-01

    A new monoterpene glycoside, together with nine known ones, 3-O-methylpaeoniflorin,mudanpioside J, paeoniflorin, benzoylpaeoniflorin, oxypaeoniflorin, benzoyloxypaeoniflorin,oxybenzoylpaeoniflorin, albiflorin and lactiflorin, was isolated from the roots of Paeonia lactiflora Pall.. The structure of the new compound was elucidated as galloylalbiflorin by the spectroscopic evidence including ESI-MS, 1D- and 2D-NMR spectra.

  1. Two new benzofuran lignan glycosides from Gelsemium elegans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Hua; Qing Chun Zhao; Jia Yang; Guo Bing Shi; Li Jun Wu; Tao Guo

    2008-01-01

    Two new benzofuran lignan glycosides,gelsemiunoside A and B,were isolated from the whole plant of Gelsemium elegans Benth.Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic evidence.Furthermore,gelsemiunoside A and B were shown a potent cytotoxic activity by suppressing the proliferation of A375-S2 cells.

  2. Investigations of Reactive Carbohydrates in Glycosidic Bond Formation and Degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heuckendorff, Mads

    The overall objective of the research described in this thesis was to explore the field of glycosidic bond formation and degradation. In more detail, the objective was to do further research in the field of highly reactive glycosyl donors. New ways of making highly reactive donors were explored...

  3. Cytotoxicity of natural ginseng glycosides and semisynthetic analogues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atopkina, LN; Malinovskaya, GV; Elyakov, GB; Uvarova, NI; Woerdenbag, HJ; Koulman, A; Potier, P

    1999-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of natural glycosides from Ginseng, semisynthetic analogues and related triterpenes of the dammarane series, isolated from the leaves of the Far-East species of the genus Betula was studied in order to elucidate structure-activity relationships. Some of the compounds studied were ac

  4. Triterpenoid glycosides from the leaves of Meliosma henryi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabdul Magid, Abdulmagid; Morjani, Hamid; Harakat, Dominique; Madoulet, Claudie; Dumontet, Vincent; Lavaud, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Seven triterpenoid glycosides, named meliosmosides A-G, were isolated from the leaves of Meliosma henryi Diels (Sabiaceae). Their structures were elucidated by different spectroscopic methods including 1D and 2D NMR experiments as well as HRESIMS analysis. Isolated compounds were evaluated for their cytotoxic activity against KB cell line.

  5. New Iridoid Glycosides from Lamium eriocephalum subsp. eriocephalum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yalcin, Funda Nuray; Ersöz, Tayfun; Avci, Kürsat;

    2007-01-01

    Two new iridoid glycosides, eriobioside (1) and lamerioside (2) were isolated from the aerial parts of Lamium eriocephalum subsp. eriocephalum, along with two known componds, lamiide (3) and ipolamiide (4). Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods (UV, 1D- and 2D-NMR) and by mass...

  6. A new phenylpropanoid glycoside from Jasminum subtriplinerve Blume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huong, Nguyen Thi Hong; Cu, Nguyen Khac Quynh; Quy, Trinh Van; Zidorn, Christian; Ganzera, Markus; Stuppner, Hermann

    2008-01-01

    From the ethyl acetate extract of the aerial parts of Jasminum subtriplinerve Blume (Oleaceae), 6'-O-menthiafoloylverbascoside (1), rutin (2), isoverbascoside (4), isooleoverbascoside (6), apiosylverbascoside (7), astragalin (9), isoquercitrin (10), and verbascoside (11) were isolated. Their structures were elucidated by extensive MS and NMR spectroscopy. Amongst 6'-O-menthiafoloylverbascoside (1) is a new phenylpropanoid glycoside.

  7. A New 10-Hydroxyl Anthrone Glycoside from Cassia siamea Lam.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A new 10-hydroxyl anthrone glycoside, 1, 8, 10 - trihydroxyl-1-O-β-D-glucopyrano-syl-3-methyl-10- C (S) - β - D- glucopyranosyl-anthrone-9 1 was isolated from the stem of Cassia siamea Lam. The structure was elucidated by spectral evidences, especially by 2 D techniques.

  8. A new C-methylated flavonoid glycoside from Pinus densiflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, M J; Choi, J H; Chung, H Y; Jung, J H; Choi, J S

    2001-12-01

    A new C-methyl flavonol glycoside, 5,7,8,4'-tetrahydroxy-3-methoxy-6-methylflavone 8-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (1), has been isolated from the needles of Pinus densiflora, together with kaempferol 3-O-beta-(6"-acetyl)-galactopyranoside.

  9. On the differences between ouabain and digitalis glycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuerstenwerth, Hauke

    2014-01-01

    Digoxin and digitoxin are widely used in the treatment of heart diseases. The exact mechanism of action of these drugs has remained an enigma. Ouabain has become the standard tool to investigate the mode of action of cardiotonic steroids, and results with ouabain are regarded as generally valid for all cardiac glycosides. However, there are marked differences between the effects of ouabain and digitalis glycosides. Ouabain has a different therapeutic profile from digitalis derivatives. Unlike digitalis glycosides, ouabain has a fast onset of action and stimulates myocardial metabolism. The inotropic effect of cardiotonic steroids is not related to inhibition of the Na-K-ATPase. Ouabain and digitalis derivatives develop their effects in different cellular spaces. Digitalis glycosides increase the intracellular calcium concentration by entering the cell interior and acting on the ryanodine receptors and by forming transmembrane calcium channels. Ouabain, by activation of the Na-K-ATPase from the extracellular side, triggers release of calcium from intracellular stores via signal transduction pathways and activates myocardial metabolism. These data no longer support the concept that all cardiotonic steroids exhibit their therapeutic effects by partial inhibition of the ion-pumping function of the Na-K-ATPase. Hence, it is suggested that this deeply rooted dogma be revised.

  10. Bottom-up elucidation of glycosidic bond stereochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gray, Christopher J.; Schindler, Baptiste; Migas, Lukasz G.

    2017-01-01

    a particular challenge. Here, we show that "memory" of anomeric configuration is retained following gas-phase glycosidic bond fragmentation during tandem mass spectrometry (MS(2)). These findings allow for integration of MS(2) with ion mobility spectrometry (IM-MS(2)) and lead to a strategy to distinguish α...

  11. A biflavonoid glycoside from Lomatogonium carinthiacum (Wulf) Reichb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qinghu; Han, Narenchaoketu; Wu, Xiaolan; Tai, Wenquan; Dai, Nayintai; Wu, Rongjun; Wu, Jiesi; Bao, Bagenna

    2015-01-01

    A biflavonoid glycoside with a new carbon skeleton, named carinoside A, was isolated from the n-BuOH crude extract of the whole plant of Lomatogonium carinthiacum (Wulf) Reichb. The structure of the new compound was elucidated by using spectroscopic methods, including UV, IR, HR-ESI-MS and extensive 1D and 2D NMR techniques.

  12. Hydrolysis of black soybean isoflavone glycosides by Bacillus subtilis natto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Lun-Cheng; Cheng, Wei-Yi; Wu, Ren-Yu; Huang, Ching-Jang; Lee, Kung-Ta

    2006-11-01

    Hydrolysis of isoflavone glycosides by Bacillus subtilis natto NTU-18 in black soymilk is reported. At the concentration of 3-5% (w/v), black soymilk in flask cultures, the isoflavones, daidzin, and genistin were highly deglycosylated within 24 h. Deglycosylation of isoflavones was further carried out in a 7-l fermenter with 5% black soymilk. During the fermentation, viable cells increased from 10(3) to 10(9) CFU ml(-1) in 15 h, and the activity of beta-glucosidase appeared at 8 h after inoculation and reached a maximum (3.3 U/ml) at 12 h, then decreased rapidly. Deglycosylation of isoflavone glycosides was observed at the same period, the deglycosylation rate of daidzin and genistin at 24 h was 100 and 75%, respectively. It is significantly higher than the previous reports of fermentation with lactic acid bacteria. In accordance with the deglycosylation of isoflavone glycosides, the estrogenic activity of the 24 h fermented black soymilk for ERbeta estrogen receptor increased to threefold; meanwhile, the fermented broth activated ERalpha estrogen receptor to a less extent than ERbeta. These results suggest that this fermentation effectively hydrolyzed the glycosides from isoflavone in black soymilk and the fermented black soymilk has the potential to be applied to selective estrogen receptor modulator products.

  13. A new phenolic glycoside from the stem of Dendrobium nobile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xue-Ming; Zheng, Cai-Juan; Wu, Jia-Ting; Chen, Guang-Ying; Zhang, Bin; Sun, Chong-Ge

    2017-05-01

    A new phenolic glycoside dendroside (1), together with seven known compounds (2-8) were isolated from the stems of Dendrobium nobile. The structures of these compounds were elucidated using comprehensive spectroscopic methods. The inhibitory activities of all compounds against three cancer cell lines HeLa, MCF-7 and A549 were evaluated.

  14. A new flavonol glycoside from Hydrangea macrophylla (Thunb.) Seringe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei

    2010-01-01

    A new kaempferol glycoside, named kaempferol 3-O-[6"-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-6'"-O-α-L-rhamnopy ranosyl-2""-O-α-L-rharnnopyranosyl]-β-D-glucopyranoside, was isolated from Hydrangea macrophylla (Thunb.) Seringe. Its structure was established by spectroscopic techniques including MS, IR, UV, and 2D NMR.

  15. Cytotoxicity of natural ginseng glycosides and semisynthetic analogues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atopkina, LN; Malinovskaya, GV; Elyakov, GB; Uvarova, NI; Woerdenbag, HJ; Koulman, A; Potier, P

    The cytotoxicity of natural glycosides from Ginseng, semisynthetic analogues and related triterpenes of the dammarane series, isolated from the leaves of the Far-East species of the genus Betula was studied in order to elucidate structure-activity relationships. Some of the compounds studied were

  16. Two new glycosides from the seeds of Cassia obtusifolia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cun Zhang; Gui Liu Li; Yong Qing Xiao; Li Li; Zhen Pang

    2009-01-01

    Two new glycosides,nor-rubrofusarin-6-O-β-D-(6'-O-acetyl)glucopyranoside(1)and l-desmethylaurantio-obtusin-2-O-β-D-glucopyranoside(2)were isolated from the seeds of Cassia obtusifolia and their structures were established by chemical and spectral evidences.

  17. Soulieoside R : A New Cycloartane Triterpenoid Glycoside from Souliea vaginata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiongyu Zou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A new cycloartane triterpenoid glycoside, named soulieoside R, was isolated from the rhizomes of Souliea vaginata. Its structure was characterized by comprehensive analyses of 1H, 13C NMR, COSY, HSQC, HMBC, NOESY spectroscopic, and HRESIMS mass spectrometric data, as well as chemical methods. The new compound showed weak inhibitory activity against three human cancer cell lines.

  18. Five new phenylpropanoid glycosides from Paraboea glutinosa (Gesneriaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoqin; Li, Li; Bai, Zhenfang; Peng, Yong; Xiao, Peigen; Liu, Yong

    2011-04-01

    Five new phenylpropanoid glycosides, paraboside A, paraboside B, paraboside I, paraboside II and paraboside III along with the three known phenylethanoids, nuomioside A, caleolarioside B, isonuomioside A have been isolated from the whole plants of Paraboea glutinosa. The structures of the new compounds have been elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data.

  19. Glycosidation of Methanol with Ribose: An Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Erin; Cook, Katie; Pritchard, Meredith R.; Stripe, Wayne; Bruch, Martha; Bendinskas, Kestutis

    2010-01-01

    This exercise provides students hands-on experience with the topics of glycosidation, hemiacetal and acetal formation, proton nuclear magnetic resonance ([superscript 1]H NMR) spectroscopy, and kinetic and thermodynamic product formation. In this laboratory experiment, the methyl acetal of ribose is synthesized, and the kinetic and thermodynamic…

  20. A New Flavanonol Glycoside from Adansonia digitata Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, J S; Kumar, S; Chaturvedi, R

    1984-02-01

    A new flavanonol glycoside isolated from the roots of Adansonia digitata has been characterised as 3,7-dihydroxy flavan-4-one-5-O-beta- D-galactopyranosyl (1 --> 4)-beta- D-glucopyranoside on the basis of degradation, spectral and chemical studies.

  1. Three New Cycloartane Triterpene Glycosides from Actaea asiatica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun Shuang FAN; Wei JIA; Ai Hua ZHAO; Jie TENG; Hong Quan DUAN

    2006-01-01

    Three new cycloartane triterpene glycosides were isolated from the rhizomes of Actaea asiatica. Their structures were elucidated as 25-ethoxyl-cimigenol-3-O-β-D-xylopyranoside 1,2'-O-acetyl soulieoside C 2, 2'-O-acetyl cimiracemoside M 3.

  2. Sesquiterpene lactone glycosides from the roots of Ferula varia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurimoto, Shin-ichiro; Suzuki, Kyoko; Okasaka, Mamoru; Kashiwada, Yoshiki; Kodzhimatov, Olimjion Kakhkharovich; Takaishi, Yoshihisa

    2012-01-01

    Seven new sesquiterpene lactone glycosides (1-7) were isolated from the H2O-soluble fraction from the MeOH extract of the roots of Ferula varia. Their structures were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic analyses. The absolute configurations of compounds 1 and 2 were determined by modified Mosher's method.

  3. Characterization of pentasaccharide glycosides from the roots of Ipomoea arborescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Ismael; Mirón, Gumersindo; Alonso, Daniel

    2006-06-01

    Ten new pentasaccharide glycosides, arboresins 1-6 (1-6) and murucins 6-9 (8-11), along with five known glycolipids, were isolated from the roots of Ipomoea arborescens, and their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic and chemical methods. Compounds 1-6 and 8-11 were evaluated for cytotoxicity against a small panel of cancer cell lines.

  4. Hydrolytical instability of hydroxyanthraquinone glycosides in pressurized liquid extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wianowska, Dorota

    2014-05-01

    Hydroxyanthraquinones represent a group of pharmacologically active compounds characteristic for plants of the Rumex and Rheum genera. These compounds in the human intestine act as laxative compounds. As they cause the greatest side effects and are often abused by the public, their accurate analysis in plants and plant-derived laxatives is much needed. To isolate compounds from plants, pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) is frequently applied. The technique has been regarded, so far, as very effective, even in isolation of sensitive compounds for which exposure time in high temperature has a negative impact. This work demonstrates some interesting and surprising results accompanying PLE of hydroxyanthraquinones from the Rumex crispus L. root using methanol/water mixtures as extractant. The presented results demonstrate that glycoside forms of hydroxyanthraquinones (emodin-8-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, chrysophanol-8-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, and physcion-8-O-β-D-glucopyranoside) are hydrolytically unstable even in the short-lasting PLE. The increase of water concentration in the extractant leads to the increase of the transformation degree of the glycoside forms to the corresponding aglycones (emodin, chrysophanol, and physcion), increasing the concentration of the latter. The rise in the PLE temperature accelerates the hydrolytical degradation of the glycoside forms. The extension of the extraction time also intensifies this process. The presented results show that extraction of glycosides using extractants containing water can lead to false conclusions about the chemical composition of plants.

  5. New glycosides of acetophenone derivatives and phenylpropanoids from Juniperus occidentalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inatomi, Yuka; Murata, Hiroko; Inada, Akira; Nakanishi, Tsutomu; Lang, Frank A; Murata, Jin; Iinuma, Munekazu

    2013-04-01

    New glycosides of seven acetophenone derivatives (1-7) and two phenylpropanoids (8, 9), named juniperosides III-XI, have been isolated from the MeOH extract of the leaves and stems of Juniperus occidentalis Hook. (Cupressaceae), together with eleven other known compounds. The structures of these compounds have been successfully elucidated using a variety of spectroscopic techniques.

  6. Two aurone glycosides from heartwood of Pterocarpus santalinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesari, Achyut Narayan; Gupta, Rajesh Kumar; Watal, Geeta

    2004-12-01

    Two new aurone glycosides, 6 hydroxy 5 methyl 3',4',5' trimethoxy aurone 4-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranoside and 6,4' dihydroxy aurone 4-O-rutinoside have been isolated from the ethanolic extract of the wood of Pterocarpus santalinus. Their structures were determined on the basis of chemical and spectroscopic analysis (UV, IR, EIMS, (1)H and (13)C NMR).

  7. Cytotoxicity of natural ginseng glycosides and semisynthetic analogues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atopkina, LN; Malinovskaya, GV; Elyakov, GB; Uvarova, NI; Woerdenbag, HJ; Koulman, A; Potier, P

    1999-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of natural glycosides from Ginseng, semisynthetic analogues and related triterpenes of the dammarane series, isolated from the leaves of the Far-East species of the genus Betula was studied in order to elucidate structure-activity relationships. Some of the compounds studied were ac

  8. A new lathyrane diterpene glycoside from Euphorbia helioscopia L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A new lathyrane diterpene glycoside,named 3β,7β,15β-trihydroxy-14-oxolathyra-5E,12E-dienyl-16-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, was isolated from Euphorbia helioscopia L.Its structure was established by spectroscopic techniques including 2D NMR.

  9. Chlorophytoside A, a New Labdane Diterpene Glycoside from Chlorophytum laxum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You Heng GAO; Quan Xi MEI; Hui Fei WU; Yuan Ming DIAO; Xin Sheng PENG; Rui Fang ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    A new labdane-type diterpene glycoside 1 , chlorophytoside A, had been isolated from Chlorophytum laxum R.Br. The structure had been elucidated as (10S)-6α-hydroxylabda-8,13-dien-15,16-olide 3R-O-β-D-glucopyranoside on the basis of chemical and spectroscopic data.

  10. A new modified sesquiterpene glycoside from Cupressus chengiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yan; Li, Rong-Jiao; Li, Yan; McGarvey, Brian D; Wu, Hai-Feng; Wang, Xiao-Ling

    2014-01-01

    A new sesquiterpene glycoside, cupressusoside (1), and five known compounds were isolated from the 70% aqueous ethanol extract of the branches and leaves of Cupressus chengiana. Their structures were elucidated by using spectroscopic methods. All the isolates expressed no remarkable cytotoxic activity against colon carcinoma (HCT-8) and breast cancer (MCF-7) cell lines, with IC50>40 mg/mL.

  11. Three new hecogenin glycosides from fermented leaves of Agave americana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jian-Ming; Liu, Xi-Kui; Yang, Chong-Ren

    2003-06-01

    Eight steroidal compounds, including three new hecogenin glycosides, agamenosides D-F, were isolated from the fermented leaves of Agave americana. The structures of the new steroidal saponins were elucidated by spectroscopic data and chemical methods. The activity of the isolated compounds on deformations of mycelia germinated from conidia of Pyricularia oaryzae P-2b was evaluated.

  12. Biochemical characterization of Lactobacillus reuteri Glycoside Hydrolase family 70 GTFB type of 4,6-α-Glucanotransferase enzymes that synthesize soluble dietary starch fibers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bai, Yuxiang; van der Kaaij, Rachel Maria; Leemhuis, Hans; Pijning, Tjaard; van Leeuwen, Sander Sebastiaan; Jin, Zhengyu; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2015-01-01

    4,6-α-Glucanotransferase (4,6-α-GTase) enzymes, such as GTFB and GTFW of Lactobacillus reuteri strains, constitute a new reaction specificity in Glycoside Hydrolase Family 70 (GH70) and are novel enzymes that convert starch or starch hydrolysates into isomalto/malto-polysaccharides (IMMPs). These

  13. Transcriptome and Metabolite analysis reveal candidate genes of the cardiac glycoside biosynthetic pathway from Calotropis procera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Akansha; Swarnkar, Vishakha; Pandey, Tushar; Srivastava, Piush; Kanojiya, Sanjeev; Mishra, Dipak Kumar; Tripathi, Vineeta

    2016-01-01

    Calotropis procera is a medicinal plant of immense importance due to its pharmaceutical active components, especially cardiac glycosides (CG). As genomic resources for this plant are limited, the genes involved in CG biosynthetic pathway remain largely unknown till date. Our study on stage and tissue specific metabolite accumulation showed that CG’s were maximally accumulated in stems of 3 month old seedlings. De novo transcriptome sequencing of same was done using high throughput Illumina HiSeq platform generating 44074 unigenes with average mean length of 1785 base pair. Around 66.6% of unigenes were annotated by using various public databases and 5324 unigenes showed significant match in the KEGG database involved in 133 different pathways of plant metabolism. Further KEGG analysis resulted in identification of 336 unigenes involved in cardenolide biosynthesis. Tissue specific expression analysis of 30 putative transcripts involved in terpenoid, steroid and cardenolide pathways showed a positive correlation between metabolite and transcript accumulation. Wound stress elevated CG levels as well the levels of the putative transcripts involved in its biosynthetic pathways. This result further validated the involvement of identified transcripts in CGs biosynthesis. The identified transcripts will lay a substantial foundation for further research on metabolic engineering and regulation of cardiac glycosides biosynthesis pathway genes. PMID:27703261

  14. Evaluation of yield and forage quality in main and ratoon crops of different sorghum lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.S. Vinutha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Improving the yield and quality of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor forage for livestock feeding is a major breeding objective, because of sorghum’s inherently high biomass accumulation, high productivity per unit water utilized and its ability to produce a ratoon crop after harvesting of the plant crop. Newly bred sorghum lines, including 36 lines falling in 5 different categories, i.e. 12 experimental dual-purpose lines, 6 germplasm accessions from the ICRISAT collection, 11 commercial varieties and hybrids, 6 forage varieties and 1 bmr mutant line, were evaluated in terms of fodder yield, quality and ratooning ability. The main crop produced more dry biomass (P<0.05 at 80 days after planting (mean 22.87 t DM/ha; range 17.32‒33.82 t DM/ha than the ratoon crop (mean 8.47 t DM/ha; range 3.2‒17.42 t DM/ha after a further 80 days of growth. Mean nitrogen concentration in forage did not differ greatly between main and ratoon crops (2.56 vs. 2.40%, respectively but there was wide variation between lines (2.06‒2.89%. The line N 610 recorded highest N percentage of 2.89%, followed by SSG 59 3 (2.86% and SX 17 (2.81%. Highest acid detergent fiber % was recorded by ICSV 12008 (42.1%, closely followed by CO 31 and IS 34638 (40.0%. The least acid detergent lignin % was observed in MLSH-296 Gold (3.59%, ICSV 700 (3.75% and ICSSH 28 (3.83%. Metabolizable energy concentration was highest in N 610, Phule Yashodha and SX 17 (mean 8.34 MJ/kg DM, while in vitro organic matter digestibility ranged from 52.5 to 62.6%. The main crop contained much higher mean concentrations of the cyanogenic glycoside, dhurrin, than the ratoon (639 vs. 233 ppm, respectively with ranges of 38 to 2,298 ppm and 7 to 767 ppm, respectively. There was no significant correlation between dhurrin concentration and dry biomass yield so breeding and selection for low dhurrin concentrations should not jeopardize yields. Hence, breeding for sorghum can target simultaneously both quality and

  15. Social influences on the acquisition of sex-typical foraging patterns by juveniles in a group of wild tufted capuchin monkeys (Cebus nigritus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, Ilaria; Visalberghi, Elisabetta

    2005-04-01

    Foraging traditions in primates are becoming the subject of increasing debate. Recent evidence for such a phenomenon was recently provided for wild Cebus capucinus [Fragaszy & Perry, 2003]. To better understand the bases of animal traditions, one should examine intrapopulation behavioral variability and the influence of social context on within-group transmission of specific foraging patterns. We studied the variability of foraging patterns across age and sex classes, and the proximity patterns of juveniles to adults of both sexes in a group of wild tufted capuchin monkeys (Cebus nigritus) living in the Iguazu National Park, Argentina. Foraging activity was examined for a period of 9 months in terms of proportions of focal samples devoted to foraging on certain food targets, microhabitats, and supports, and using specific foraging patterns. Proximity analyses were performed to reveal patterns of association between juveniles and adults. Sex differences in foraging behavior were present and overrode age differences. Overall, males ate more animal foods, foraged more for invertebrates on woody microhabitats (especially large branches), palms, and epiphytes, and used lower and larger supports than females. Females ate more fruits, foraged more on leaves and bamboo microhabitats, and used smaller supports than males. Juveniles were similar to adults of the same sex in terms of food targets, foraging substrates, and choice of supports, but were less efficient than adults. Proximity patterns indicated that juvenile males stayed in close spatial association with adult males and preferentially focused their "food interest" on them. This phenomenon was less evident in juvenile females. The degree to which juveniles, especially males, showed some of the sex-typical foraging patterns correlated positively with their proximity to adults of the same sex. These findings suggest that the acquisition of foraging behaviors by juvenile males is socially biased by their closeness to

  16. Quitting time: When do honey bee foragers decide to stop foraging on natural resources?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eRivera

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Honey bee foragers may use both personal and social information when making decisions about when to visit resources. In particular, foragers may stop foraging at resources when their own experience indicates declining resource quality, or when social information, namely the delay to being able to unload nectar to receiver bees, indicates that the colony has little need for the particular resource being collected. Here we test the relative importance of these two factors in a natural setting, where colonies are using many dynamically changing resources. We recorded detailed foraging histories of individually marked bees, and identified when they appeared to abandon any resources (such as flower patches that they had previously been collecting from consistently. As in previous studies, we recorded duration of trophallaxis events (unloading nectar to receiver bees as a proxy for resource quality and the delays before returning foragers started trophallaxis as a proxy for social need for the resource. If these proxy measures accurately reflect changes in resource quality and social need, they should predict whether bees continue foraging or not. However, neither factor predicted when individuals stopped foraging on a particular resource, nor did they explain changes in colony-level foraging activity. This may indicate that other, as yet unstudied processes also affect individual decisions to abandon particular resources.

  17. Synthesis of neohesperidin glycosides and naringin glycosides by cyclodextrin glucanotransferase from an alkalophilic Bacillus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kometani, T; Nishimura, T; Nakae, T; Takii, H; Okada, S

    1996-04-01

    Cyclodextrin glucanotransferase from an alkalophilic Bacillus species produced neohesperidin monoglucoside and a series of its maltooligoglucosides by transglycosylation with neohesperidin as an acceptor and soluble starch as a donor. As the reaction using beta-CD as a donor at an alkaline pH was very effective for solubilizing neohesperidin, the amount of glycosides formed was increased. As a result, its amount with beta-CD at pH 10 was about 7 times greater than that with soluble starch at pH 5. Neohesperidin monoglucoside was purified from the reaction mixture by glucoamylase and naringinase treatments, an Amberlite XAD-16 column, a Sephadex LH20 column, and HPLC on an ODS column. The structure of the purified monoglucoside was identified as 3G-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl neohesperidin by FAB-MS, methylation analysis, and 1H- and 13C-NMR. The solubility of neohesperidin monoglucoside in water was approximately 1500 times higher than that of neohesperidin, and the bitterness of the monoglucoside was about 10 times less than that of neophesperidin. In addition, naringin was also glycosylated by the same method as neohesperidin, and its monoglucoside was identified as 3G-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl naringin. The solubility of naringin monoglucoside in water was also at least 1000 times higher than that of naringin without altering its bitterness.

  18. Flooding tolerance of forage legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striker, Gustavo G; Colmer, Timothy D

    2016-06-20

    We review waterlogging and submergence tolerances of forage (pasture) legumes. Growth reductions from waterlogging in perennial species ranged from >50% for Medicago sativa and Trifolium pratense to Lotus corniculatus, L. tenuis, and T. fragiferum For annual species, waterlogging reduced Medicago truncatula by ~50%, whereas Melilotus siculus and T. michelianum were not reduced. Tolerant species have higher root porosity (gas-filled volume in tissues) owing to aerenchyma formation. Plant dry mass (waterlogged relative to control) had a positive (hyperbolic) relationship to root porosity across eight species. Metabolism in hypoxic roots was influenced by internal aeration. Sugars accumulate in M. sativa due to growth inhibition from limited respiration and low energy in roots of low porosity (i.e. 4.5%). In contrast, L. corniculatus, with higher root porosity (i.e. 17.2%) and O2 supply allowing respiration, maintained growth better and sugars did not accumulate. Tolerant legumes form nodules, and internal O2 diffusion along roots can sustain metabolism, including N2 fixation, in submerged nodules. Shoot physiology depends on species tolerance. In M. sativa, photosynthesis soon declines and in the longer term (>10 d) leaves suffer chlorophyll degradation, damage, and N, P, and K deficiencies. In tolerant L corniculatus and L. tenuis, photosynthesis is maintained longer, shoot N is less affected, and shoot P can even increase during waterlogging. Species also differ in tolerance of partial and complete shoot submergence. Gaps in knowledge include anoxia tolerance of roots, N2 fixation during field waterlogging, and identification of traits conferring the ability to recover after water subsides.

  19. Evolution of foraging behavior in Drosophilid larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Alba, Marta; Kabra, Mayank; Branson, Kristin; Mirth, Christen

    2015-03-01

    Drosophilids, like other insects, go through a larval phase before metamorphosing into adults. Larvae increase their body weight by several orders of magnitude in a few days. We therefore hypothesized that foraging behavior is under strong evolutionary pressure to best fit the larval environment. To test our hypothesis we used a multidisciplinary approach to analyze foraging behavior across species and larval stages. First, we recorded several videos of larvae foraging for each of 47 Drosophilid species. Then, using a supervised machine learning approach, we automatically annotated the video collection for the foraging sub-behaviors, including crawling, turning, head casting or burrowing. We also computed over 100 features to describe the posture and dynamics of each animal in each video frame. From these data, we fit models to the behavior of each species. The models each had the same parametric form, but differed in the exact parameters. By simulating larva behavior in virtual arenas we can infer which properties of the environments are better for each species. Comparisons between these inferred environments and the actual environments where these animals live will give us a deeper understanding about the evolution of foraging behavior in Drosophilid larvae.

  20. Development of a High Throughput Platform for Screening Glycoside Hydrolases Based on Oxime-NIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Kai; Guenther, Joel M.; Gao, Jian; Bowen, Benjamin P.; Tran, Huu; Reyes-Ortiz, Vimalier; Cheng, Xiaoliang; Sathitsuksanoh, Noppadon; Heins, Richard; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Bergeman, Lai F.; Geertz-Hansen, Henrik; Deutsch, Samuel; Loqué, Dominique; Sale, Kenneth L.; Simmons, Blake A.; Adams, Paul D.; Singh, Anup K.; Fox, Brian G.; Northen, Trent R.

    2015-01-01

    Cost-effective hydrolysis of biomass into sugars for biofuel production requires high-performance low-cost glycoside hydrolase (GH) cocktails that are active under demanding process conditions. Improving the performance of GH cocktails depends on knowledge of many critical parameters, including individual enzyme stabilities, optimal reaction conditions, kinetics, and specificity of reaction. With this information, rate- and/or yield-limiting reactions can be potentially improved through substitution, synergistic complementation, or protein engineering. Given the wide range of substrates and methods used for GH characterization, it is difficult to compare results across a myriad of approaches to identify high performance and synergistic combinations of enzymes. Here, we describe a platform for systematic screening of GH activities using automatic biomass handling, bioconjugate chemistry, robotic liquid handling, and nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS). Twelve well-characterized substrates spanning the types of glycosidic linkages found in plant cell walls are included in the experimental workflow. To test the application of this platform and substrate panel, we studied the reactivity of three engineered cellulases and their synergy of combination across a range of reaction conditions and enzyme concentrations. We anticipate that large-scale screening using the standardized platform and substrates will generate critical datasets to enable direct comparison of enzyme activities for cocktail design. PMID:26528471

  1. Comparative Analysis of Glycoside Hydrolases Activities from Phylogenetically Diverse Marine Bacteria of the Genus Arenibacter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valery Mikhailov

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A total of 16 marine strains belonging to the genus Arenibacter, recovered from diverse microbial communities associated with various marine habitats and collected from different locations, were evaluated in degradation of natural polysaccharides and chromogenic glycosides. Most strains were affiliated with five recognized species, and some presented three new species within the genus Arenibacter. No strains contained enzymes depolymerizing polysaccharides, but synthesized a wide spectrum of glycosidases. Highly active β-N-acetylglucosaminidases and α-N-acetylgalactosaminidases were the main glycosidases for all Arenibacter. The genes, encoding two new members of glycoside hydrolyses (GH families, 20 and 109, were isolated and characterized from the genomes of Arenibacter latericius. Molecular genetic analysis using glycosidase-specific primers shows the absence of GH27 and GH36 genes. A sequence comparison with functionally-characterized GH20 and GH109 enzymes shows that both sequences are closest to the enzymes of chitinolytic bacteria Vibrio furnissii and Cellulomonas fimi of marine and terrestrial origin, as well as human pathogen Elisabethkingia meningoseptica and simbionts Akkermansia muciniphila, gut and non-gut Bacteroides, respectively. These results revealed that the genus Arenibacter is a highly taxonomic diverse group of microorganisms, which can participate in degradation of natural polymers in marine environments depending on their niche and habitat adaptations. They are new prospective candidates for biotechnological applications due to their production of unique glycosidases.

  2. Antioxidant and cholinesterases inhibitory activities of Verbascum xanthophoeniceum Griseb. and its phenylethanoid glycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Milen; Alipieva, Kalina; Orhan, Ilkay; Abrashev, Radoslav; Denev, Petko; Angelova, Maria

    2011-09-01

    The members of Verbascum L. (Scrophulariaceae) are known to be rich in phenylethnoid glycosides, and among them Verbascum xanthophoeniceum is an endemic plant species for the Balkan region, Northwestern, and Southern Turkey. A scheme was developed for the isolation of the main active constituents that accumulate in plant aerial parts. The antioxidant activities of total methanol extracts, collected phenylethanoid glycosides fractions and specific active constituents (forsythoside B, verbascoside and leucosceptoside B) were then evaluated in 2,2'-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH·), oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORACFL), hydroxyl radical averting capacity (HORACFL), ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), and superoxide anion (O2(-)) radical scavenging assays. In vitro acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChe) inhibitory activities of abovementioned extracts, fractions and isolated pure compounds were also examined. Depending on the method used, forsythoside B, verbascoside and leucosceptoside B proved to be effective radical scavengers and cholinesterases inhibitors. On the basis of these findings it can be proposed that in addition to providing a potent source of antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory compounds, Verbascum plants could serve as attractive mines of powerful antioxidants for various purposes.

  3. New flav-3-en-3-ol glycosides, kaempferiaosides C and D, and acetophenone glycosides, kaempferiaosides E and F, from the rhizomes of Kaempferia parviflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaipech, Saowanee; Morikawa, Toshio; Ninomiya, Kiyofumi; Yoshikawa, Masayuki; Pongpiriyadacha, Yutana; Hayakawa, Takao; Muraoka, Osamu

    2012-07-01

    Two new flav-3-en-3-ol glycosides, kaempferiaosides C (3) and D(4), and two new acetophenone glycosides, kaempferiaosides E (5) and F (6), were isolated from the Thai natural medicine Krachai Dum, the rhizomes of Kaempferia parviflora Wall. ex Baker. Their structures were established mainly on the basis of 1D and 2D NMR spectral data.

  4. Assessing the Effects of Grassland Management on Forage Production and Environmental Quality to Identify Paths to Ecological Intensification in Mountain Grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucougaray, Grégory; Dobremez, Laurent; Gos, Pierre; Pauthenet, Yves; Nettier, Baptiste; Lavorel, Sandra

    2015-11-01

    Ecological intensification in grasslands can be regarded as a process for increasing forage production while maintaining high levels of ecosystem functions and biodiversity. In the mountain Vercors massif, where dairy cattle farming is the main component of agriculture, how to achieve forage autonomy at farm level while sustaining environmental quality for tourism and local dairy products has recently stimulated local debate. As specific management is one of the main drivers of ecosystem functioning, we assessed the response of forage production and environmental quality at grassland scale across a wide range of management practices. We aimed to determine which components of management can be harnessed to better match forage production and environmental quality. We sampled the vegetation of 51 grasslands stratified across 13 grassland types. We assessed each grassland for agronomic and environmental properties, measuring forage production, forage quality, and indices based on the abundance of particular plant species such as timing flexibility, apiarian potential, and aromatic plants. Our results revealed an expected trade-off between forage production and environmental quality, notably by stressing the contrasts between sown and permanent grasslands. However, strong within-type variability in both production and environmental quality as well as in flexibility of timing of use suggests possible ways to improve this trade-off at grassland and farm scales. As achieving forage autonomy relies on increasing both forage production and grassland resilience, our results highlight the critical role of the ratio between sown and permanent grasslands as a major path for ecological intensification in mountain grasslands.

  5. Assessing the Effects of Grassland Management on Forage Production and Environmental Quality to Identify Paths to Ecological Intensification in Mountain Grasslands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucougaray, Grégory; Dobremez, Laurent; Gos, Pierre; Pauthenet, Yves; Nettier, Baptiste; Lavorel, Sandra

    2015-11-01

    Ecological intensification in grasslands can be regarded as a process for increasing forage production while maintaining high levels of ecosystem functions and biodiversity. In the mountain Vercors massif, where dairy cattle farming is the main component of agriculture, how to achieve forage autonomy at farm level while sustaining environmental quality for tourism and local dairy products has recently stimulated local debate. As specific management is one of the main drivers of ecosystem functioning, we assessed the response of forage production and environmental quality at grassland scale across a wide range of management practices. We aimed to determine which components of management can be harnessed to better match forage production and environmental quality. We sampled the vegetation of 51 grasslands stratified across 13 grassland types. We assessed each grassland for agronomic and environmental properties, measuring forage production, forage quality, and indices based on the abundance of particular plant species such as timing flexibility, apiarian potential, and aromatic plants. Our results revealed an expected trade-off between forage production and environmental quality, notably by stressing the contrasts between sown and permanent grasslands. However, strong within-type variability in both production and environmental quality as well as in flexibility of timing of use suggests possible ways to improve this trade-off at grassland and farm scales. As achieving forage autonomy relies on increasing both forage production and grassland resilience, our results highlight the critical role of the ratio between sown and permanent grasslands as a major path for ecological intensification in mountain grasslands.

  6. Forage fish of the Pacific Rim as revealed by diet of a piscivorous seabird: Synchrony and relationships with sea surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, J.A.; Bertram, D.F.; Hatch, Shyla A.; Hipfner, M.J.; Slater, L.; Sydeman, W.J.; Watanuki, Y.

    2008-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis of synchronous interannual changes in forage fish dynamics around the North Pacific Rim. To do this, we sampled forage fish communities using a seabird predator, the rhinoceros auklet (Cerorhinca monocerata), at six coastal study sites from Japan to California. We investigated whether take of forage fishes was related to local marine conditions as indexed by sea surface temperature (SST). SST was concordant across sites in the eastern Pacific, but inversely correlated between east and west. Forage fish communities consisted of anchovy (Engraulis spp.), sandlance (Ammodytes spp.), capelin (Mallotus spp.), and juvenile rockfish (Sebastes spp.), among others, and take of forage fish varied in response to interannual and possibly lower-frequency oceanographic variability. Take of primary forage species were significantly related to changes in SST only at the eastern sites. We found synchrony in interannual variation of primary forage fishes across several regions in the eastern Pacific, but no significant east-west correlations. Specifically in the Japan Sea, factors other than local SST or interannual variability may more strongly influence forage fishes. Predator diet sampling offers a fishery-independent, large-scale perspective on forage fish dynamics that may be difficult to obtain using conventional means of study. ?? 2008 NRC.

  7. Interpatch foraging in honeybees-rational decision making at secondary hubs based upon time and motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najera, Daniel A; McCullough, Erin L; Jander, Rudolf

    2012-11-01

    For honeybees, Apis mellifera, the hive has been well known to function as a primary decision-making hub, a place from which foragers decide among various directions, distances, and times of day to forage efficiently. Whether foraging honeybees can make similarly complex navigational decisions from locations away from the hive is unknown. To examine whether or not such secondary decision-making hubs exist, we trained bees to forage at four different locations. Specifically, we trained honeybees to first forage to a distal site "CT" 100 m away from the hive; if food was present, they fed and then chose to go home. If food was not present, the honeybees were trained to forage to three auxiliary sites, each at a different time of the day: A in the morning, B at noon, and C in the afternoon. The foragers learned to check site CT for food first and then efficiently depart to the correct location based upon the time of day if there was no food at site CT. Thus, the honeybees were able to cognitively map motivation, time, and five different locations (Hive, CT, A, B, and C) in two spatial dimensions; these are the contents of the cognitive map used by the honeybees here. While at site CT, we verified that the honeybees could choose between 4 different directions (to A, B, C, and the Hive) and thus label it as a secondary decision-making hub. The observed decision making uncovered here is inferred to constitute genuine logical operations, involving a branched structure, based upon the premises of motivational state, and spatiotemporal knowledge.

  8. Identification and quantification of major steviol glycosides in Stevia rebaudiana purified extracts by 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieri, Valerio; Belancic, Andrea; Morales, Susana; Stuppner, Hermann

    2011-05-11

    The use of (1)H NMR spectroscopy for the characterization of Stevia rebaudiana extracts is presented. The developed method allows qualitative and quantitative determination of the major steviol glycosides in purified extracts and fractions obtained from various stages of the purification process. Moreover, it proved to be a powerful tool to differentiate between glycosides which are naturally occurring in the stevia plant and artifacts formed in the course of the manufacturing process. Identification of steviol glycosides was achieved by the use of 2D NMR techniques, whereas quantification is based on qHNMR using anthracene as internal standard. The solvent mixture pyridine-d(5)-DMSO-d(6) (6:1) enabled satisfactory separation of the signals to be integrated. Validation of the method was performed in terms of specificity, precision, accuracy, linearity, robustness, and stability. Quantitative results were compared to those obtained with the JECFA HPLC-UV method and were found to be in reasonable agreement. NMR analysis does not rely on the use of reference compounds and enables significantly faster analysis compared to HPLC-UV. Thus, NMR represents a feasible alternative to HPLC-based methods for the quality control of Stevia rebaudiana extracts.

  9. Spatiotemporal chemotactic model for ant foraging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Subramanian; Laurent, Thomas; Kumar, Manish; Bertozzi, Andrea L.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we present a generic theoretical chemotactic model that accounts for certain emergent behaviors observed in ant foraging. The model does not have many of the constraints and limitations of existing models for ants colony dynamics and takes into account the distinctly different behaviors exhibited in nature by ant foragers in search of food and food ferrying ants. Numerical simulations based on the model show trail formation in foraging ant colonies to be an emergent phenomenon and, in particular, replicate behavior observed in experiments involving the species P. megacephala. The results have broader implications for the study of randomness in chemotactic models. Potential applications include the developments of novel algorithms for stochastic search in engineered complex systems such as robotic swarms.

  10. Seasonal Changes in Forage Nutrients and Mineral Contents in Water Resources,Forage and Yak Blood

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阎萍

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports results of a study conducted to investigate the concentrations of seven mineral elements in yak blood, forage and water resources around the Qinghai Lake in Qinghai Province in different seasons. Meanwhile, the nutritional compositions of the forage were also surveyed. The results suggest that the mineral elements and the forage nutrients change in a seasonal pattern. In yak blood,the sodium(Na)concentration varies from 0.291 to 0.034 mg/mL,and this is lower than the normal value. In the forage,the ratio calcium(Ca)to phosphorus(P)is 4.06~7.47:1 and potassium(K)to Na 30~27:1. These results indicate that the nutrition of the yak in the area is deficient in Na but high in K. For the withered forage sampled in February,the protein content is only 31.14% of the total protein in the forage growing at puerile stage in June. The severe loss of protein by 68. 9% and decrease of effective nutrients in the wintered forage are considered to be the reasons resulting in the poor condition of yak in winter and spring seasons.

  11. Coumarins of Matricaria chamomilla L.: aglycones and glycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruľová-Poracká, Veronika; Repčák, Miroslav; Vilková, Mária; Imrich, Ján

    2013-11-01

    The identity and quantity of coumarin-like compounds in leaves and anthodia of Matricaria chamomilla L. were studied by LC-DAD and NMR. So far, two monosubstituted coumarins, herniarin and umbelliferone, and two herniarin precursors were identified therein. In this paper, two other coumarin glycosides and one aglycone were confirmed. Skimmin (umbelliferone-7-O-β-d-glucoside), daphnin (daphnetin-7-O-β-d-glucoside) and daphnetin (7,8-dihydroxycoumarin) were found for the first time in diploid and tetraploid leaves and anthodia of M. chamomilla L. Daphnetin is known as a strong sensitizer, so this compound and its glycosidic derivative can contribute to the allergic potential of chamomile. Commercial chamomile preparations were tested for their presence.

  12. New pregnane and phenolic glycosides from Solenostemma argel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ounaissia, Karima; Pertuit, David; Mitaine-Offer, Anne-Claire; Miyamoto, Tomofumi; Tanaka, Chiaki; Delemasure, Stéphanie; Dutartre, Patrick; Smati, Dalila; Lacaille-Dubois, Marie-Aleth

    2016-10-01

    From the aerial parts, pericarps and roots of Solenostemma argel, three new pregnane glycosides (1-3) with two known ones and a new phenolic glycoside (4) have been isolated. Their structures were established by extensive 1D - and 2D NMR and mass spectroscopic analysis. The cytotoxicity of all compounds was evaluated against two human tumor cell lines (SW 480, MCF-7), but none of them was active in the concentration range 0.9-59.0μM. Compounds 2 and the known argeloside F at non toxic concentrations for the PBMCs (27.3μM and 27.6μM, respectively) significantly decreased the Il-1β production by LPS-stimulated PBMCs. All isolated compounds showed a significant antioxidant potential with ORAC values in the concentration range 3481-9617μmoleq. Trolox/100g. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Four new neuroprotective iridoid glycosides from Scrophularia buergeriana roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, So Ra; Lee, Ki Yong; Koo, Kyung Ah; Sung, Sang Hyun; Lee, Na-Gyong; Kim, Jinwoong; Kim, Young Choong

    2002-11-01

    Four new iridoid glycosides were isolated from a 90% MeOH extract of Scrophularia buergeriana roots and characterized as 8-O-E-p-methoxycinnamoylharpagide (1), 8-O-Z-p-methoxycinnamoylharpagide (2), 6'-O-E-p-methoxycinnamoylharpagide (3), and 6'-O-Z-p-methoxycinnamoylharpagide (4), respectively. In addition, three known iridoids were identified as E-harpagoside (5), Z-harpagoside (6), and harpagide (7). Compounds 1-7 significantly attenuated glutamate-induced neurotoxicity when added to primary cultures of rat cortical cells at concentrations ranging from 100 nM to 10 microM. The results obtained indicate that the iridoid glycosides isolated from S. buergeriana have significant protective effects against glutamate-induced neurodegeneration in primary cultures of rat cortical neurons.

  14. A New Flavone C-Glycoside from Clematis rehderiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Zhi Du

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A new flavone C-glycoside, isovitexin 6″-O-E-p-coumarate (1 and two known flavonoid glycosides—quercetin 3-O-β-D-glucuronopyranoside (2 and isoorientin (3—were isolated from an ethanol extract of aerial parts of Clematis rehderiana. Their structures were determined by spectroscopic methods. The antioxidant effects of the two flavone C-glycosides were evaluated by both the MTT and DPPH assays. Compound 1 showed potent activities against H2O2-induced impairment in PC12 cells within the concentration range tested, whereas compound 3 scavenged DPPH radical strongly, with an IC50 value of 13.5 μM.

  15. Isoflavanones and their O-glycosides from Desmodium styracifolium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming; Duan, Jin-Ao; Che, Chun-Tao

    2007-05-01

    Two isoflavanones (5,7-dihydroxy-2',3',4'-trimethoxy-isoflavanone and 5,7-dihydroxy-2'-methoxy-3',4'-methylenedioxy-isoflavanone), four isoflavanone O-glycosides (5,7-dihydroxy-2',3',4'-trimethoxy-isoflavanone 7-O-beta-glucopyranoside, 5,7-dihydroxy-2'-methoxy-3',4'-methylenedioxy-isoflavanone 7-O-beta-glucopyranoside, 5,7-dihydroxy-2',4'-dimethoxy-isoflavanone 7-O-beta-glucopyranoside, and 5,7,4'-trihydroxy-2',3'-dimethoxy-isoflavanone 7-O-beta-glucopyranoside), and a coumaronochromone (3,5,7,4'-tetrahydroxy-coumaronochromone), along with 25 known compounds, were isolated from the aerial parts of Desmodium styracifolium. This is for the first time isoflavanone O-glycosides were isolated from a natural source.

  16. Investigations of Reactive Carbohydrates in Glycosidic Bond Formation and Degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heuckendorff, Mads

    was to develop new synthetic methods to evolve the field of synthetic carbohydrate chemistry. In addition, easy methods for obtaining complex oligosaccharides are needed to accommodate biochemical research and drug development. Furthermore, the aim was to shed light on the complex mechanisms of glycosylation...... and hy rolysis of glycosides. This mechanistic insight can then be used to develop new synthetic methods and obtain a better understanding of already existing methods. In Chapter 1 general aspects of synthetic carbohydrate chemistry is described with an emphasis on elements that affects reactivity...... and their properties in glycosylations were carefully examined. The physical chemistry aspects of conformationally changed donors were investigated with emphasis on the anomeric effect. Finally, neighboring group effects in glycosylations and hydrolysis of glycosides were investigated. The goal of this research...

  17. New terpenoid glycosides obtained from Rosmarinus officinalis L. aerial parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Adelakun, Tiwalade Adegoke; Qu, Lu; Li, Xiaoxia; Li, Jian; Han, Lifeng; Wang, Tao

    2014-12-01

    Five new terpenoid glycosides, named as officinoterpenosides A₁ (1), A₂ (2), B (3), C (4), and D (5), together with 11 known ones, (1S,4S,5S)-5-exo-hydrocamphor 5-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (6), isorosmanol (7), rosmanol (8), 7-methoxyrosmanol (9), epirosmanol (10), ursolic acid (11), micromeric acid (12), oleanolic acid (13), niga-ichigoside F₁ (14), glucosyl tormentate (15), and asteryunnanoside B (16), were obtained from the aerial parts of Rosmarinus officinalis L. Their structures were elucidated by chemical and spectroscopic methods (UV, IR, HRESI-TOF-MS, 1D and 2D NMR). Among the new ones, 1 and 2, 3 and 4 are diterpenoid and triterpenoid glycosides, respectively; and 5 is a normonoterpenoid. For the known ones, 6 was isolated from the Rosmarinus genus first, and 15, 16 were obtained from this species for the first time.

  18. Synthesis and antihyperglycemic activity of phenolic C-glycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Preeti; Kumar, Manmeet; Rahuja, Neha; Lal Srivastava, Daya Shankar; Srivastava, Arvind Kumar; Maurya, Rakesh

    2011-01-01

    Various phenolic C-glycosides were evaluated for their in vitro and in vivo antihyperglycemic activity employing glucose uptake by rat muscle cell lines (L-6) and low dosed-streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, respectively. Some of phenolic C-glycosides were isolated from Pterocarpus marsupium and Ulmus wallichiana and other were synthesized by unprotected sugar and phloroacetophenone using Sc(OTf)(3) in aqueous ethanol. Eight among tested compounds showed significant lowering of blood glucose level on low dosed-streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The compound 24 lowered the blood glucose levels by 34.9% and 33.6% during 0-5h and 0-24h, respectively, at the dose of 25mg/kg body weight which is comparable to standard antidiabetic drug metformin. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Determination of catechins and flavonol glycosides in Chinese tea varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chunyan; Xu, Hairong; Héritier, Julien; Andlauer, Wilfried

    2012-05-01

    A standardised profiling method based on high performance liquid chromatography combined with ultraviolet (UV) and mass spectrometric detection (MS) was established to analyse the phenolic compounds of selected tea varieties used for manufacturing of green, black and oolong teas. The composition and content of 24 tea constituents were analysed, including catechins, flavonol and flavones glycosides, phenolic acids and purine alkaloids. Each tea variety had a unique chemical profile. The compositions of catechins were lower in the tea varieties for green tea manufacturing, while the content of myricetin glycosides was the lowest in the tea variety for oolong tea manufacturing. The content of individual phenolic compounds in the selected tea varieties is highly variable. However, the content of total catechins is proposed to be helpful to classify tea according to the future application as non fermented green and fermented oolong or black tea.

  20. Mahuangchiside, a New Flavone Glycoside from Chirita fimbrisepala

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new flavone glycoside, named mahuangchiside, was isolated from the root of Chirita fimbrisepala Hand.-Mazz. The structure was elucidated as 5,4'-dihydroxy-6-methoxy-flavone-7-O-β -D-xylopyranosyl(1(r) 2)-β -D-xylopyranoside on the basis of spectral analysis (1H-1H COSY, 13C-1H HETCOR and HMBC) and chemical evidence.

  1. Two new monoterpenoid glycosides from Mentha spicata L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jian; Wu, Li-Jun; Zheng, Lu; Wu, Bin; Song, Ai-Hua

    2003-03-01

    Two new monoterpenoid glycosides, spicatoside A and spicatoside B, were isolated from the whole herbs of Mentha spicata L. which have anti-inflammatory and hemostatic activities. Their structures have been determined on the basis of spectral and chemical analysis. They are (+)-5-[1-(beta-D-glucopyranosyloxymethyl)ethenyl]-2-methyl-2-cyclohexen-1-one (1), and (-)-5-[[2-(beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-1-hydroxy-l-methyl]ethyl]-2-methyl-2-cyclohexen-1-one (2).

  2. A New Antimicrobial Flavonol Glycoside from Alchornea davidii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A new flavonol glycoside, isorhamnetin-3-O-β-D-xyloside, was isolated from the extract of leaves and twigs of Alchornea davidii (Euphorbiaceae). Its structure was established on the basis of the spectral analysis and chemical degradation. Antimicrobial assay showed that it moderately inhibited the growth of test bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas fluorescens) and fungi (Candida albicans, Aspergillus niger and Trichophyton rubrum) with MICs at 50 μg/Ml.

  3. Two new glycosides from the genus of Cassia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Two new glycosides were isolated and characterized by spectral analysis from the seeds of Cassia obtusifolia and the leaves of Cassia angustifolia. The structure was elucidated as 1-hydroxyl-2-acetyl-3,8-dimethoxynaphthalene-6-O-β-D-apiofuranosyl-(1 → 2)-β-D-glucopyranoside and 2-acetyl-3-methyl-8-methoxyl-1,4-naphthoquinone-6-O-β-D-glucopyranoside.

  4. A New Anthranquinone Glycoside from the Seeds of Cassia obtusifolia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chu Hua LI; Xiao Yi WEI; Xu ELI; Ping WU; Bao Jiang GUO

    2004-01-01

    A new anthraquinone glycoside, emodin-1-O-β-gentiobioside 1, together with three known compounds, chrysophanol-1-O-β-gentiobioside 2, physcion-8-O-β-gentiobioside 3, and chrysophanol- 1-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 → 3)-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 → 6)-β-D-glucopyranoside 4 was isolated from the seeds of Cassia obtusifolia. Its structure was elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic evidence.

  5. New phenolic glycosides from the seeds of Cucurbita moschata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fa-Sheng; Dou, De-Qiang; Xu, Liang; Chi, Xiao-Feng; Kang, Ting-Guo; Kuang, Hai-Xue

    2009-07-01

    Two new phenolic glycosides were isolated from the seeds of Cucurbita moschata. Their structures were elucidated as (2-hydroxy)phenylcarbinyl 5-O-benzoyl-beta-D-apiofuranosyl(1-->2)-beta-D-glucopyranoside (1) and 4-beta-D-(glucopyranosyl hydroxymethyl)phenyl 5-O-benzoyl-beta-D-apiofuranosyl(1-->2)-beta-D-glucopyranoside (2) on the basis of spectroscopic analysis and chemical evidence.

  6. Two new flavonol glycosides from Gymnema sylvestre and Euphorbia ebracteolata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Ye, Wencai; Yu, Biao; Zhao, Shouxun; Wu, Houming; Che, Chuntao

    2004-03-15

    Two new flavonol glycosides, namely kaempferol 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->6)-beta-D-galactopyranoside (1) and quercetin 3-O-6"-(3-hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl)-beta-D-glucopyranoside (2), have been isolated from the aerial parts of Gymnema sylvestre and Euphorbia ebracteolata, respectively. Their structures were determined on the basis of chemical and spectroscopic methods.

  7. Enzymatic Biosynthesis of Novel Resveratrol Glucoside and Glycoside Derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey, Ramesh Prasad; Parajuli, Prakash; Shin, Ju Yong; Lee, Jisun; Lee, Seul; Hong, Young-Soo; Park, Yong Il; Kim, Joong Su; Sohng, Jae Kyung

    2014-01-01

    A UDP glucosyltransferase from Bacillus licheniformis was overexpressed, purified, and incubated with nucleotide diphosphate (NDP) d- and l-sugars to produce glucose, galactose, 2-deoxyglucose, viosamine, rhamnose, and fucose sugar-conjugated resveratrol glycosides. Significantly higher (90%) bioconversion of resveratrol was achieved with α-d-glucose as the sugar donor to produce four different glucosides of resveratrol: resveratrol 3-O-β-d-glucoside, resveratrol 4′-O-β-d-glucoside, resveratr...

  8. Vina-Carb: Improving Glycosidic Angles during Carbohydrate Docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivedha, Anita K; Thieker, David F; Makeneni, Spandana; Hu, Huimin; Woods, Robert J

    2016-02-09

    Molecular docking programs are primarily designed to align rigid, drug-like fragments into the binding sites of macromolecules and frequently display poor performance when applied to flexible carbohydrate molecules. A critical source of flexibility within an oligosaccharide is the glycosidic linkages. Recently, Carbohydrate Intrinsic (CHI) energy functions were reported that attempt to quantify the glycosidic torsion angle preferences. In the present work, the CHI-energy functions have been incorporated into the AutoDock Vina (ADV) scoring function, subsequently termed Vina-Carb (VC). Two user-adjustable parameters have been introduced, namely, a CHI- energy weight term (chi_coeff) that affects the magnitude of the CHI-energy penalty and a CHI-cutoff term (chi_cutoff) that negates CHI-energy penalties below a specified value. A data set consisting of 101 protein-carbohydrate complexes and 29 apoprotein structures was used in the development and testing of VC, including antibodies, lectins, and carbohydrate binding modules. Accounting for the intramolecular energies of the glycosidic linkages in the oligosaccharides during docking led VC to produce acceptable structures within the top five ranked poses in 74% of the systems tested, compared to a success rate of 55% for ADV. An enzyme system was employed in order to illustrate the potential application of VC to proteins that may distort glycosidic linkages of carbohydrate ligands upon binding. VC represents a significant step toward accurately predicting the structures of protein-carbohydrate complexes. Furthermore, the described approach is conceptually applicable to any class of ligands that populate well-defined conformational states.

  9. Phenylpropanoid glycosides from the leaves of Paulownia coreana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Kyu; Si, Chuan-Ling; Bae, Young-Soo

    2008-02-15

    Study on the water soluble fraction from the leaves of Paulownia coreana led to the isolation of verbascoside (1), isoverbascoside (2), campneoside II (3), and a new phenylpropanoid glycoside, (R,S)-7-hydroxy-7-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-ethyl-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl(1 --> 3)-beta-d-(6-O-caffeoyl)-glucopyranoside (4). The structures of these compounds were established on the basis of spectroscopic evidence.

  10. Enzymatic Biosynthesis of Novel Resveratrol Glucoside and Glycoside Derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey, Ramesh Prasad; Parajuli, Prakash; Shin, Ju Yong; Lee, Jisun; Lee, Seul; Hong, Young-Soo; Park, Yong Il; Kim, Joong Su; Sohng, Jae Kyung

    2014-01-01

    A UDP glucosyltransferase from Bacillus licheniformis was overexpressed, purified, and incubated with nucleotide diphosphate (NDP) d- and l-sugars to produce glucose, galactose, 2-deoxyglucose, viosamine, rhamnose, and fucose sugar-conjugated resveratrol glycosides. Significantly higher (90%) bioconversion of resveratrol was achieved with α-d-glucose as the sugar donor to produce four different glucosides of resveratrol: resveratrol 3-O-β-d-glucoside, resveratrol 4′-O-β-d-glucoside, resveratr...

  11. β-cyclodextrin assistant flavonoid glycosides enzymatic hydrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Jin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The content of icaritin and genistein in herba is very low, preparation with relatively large quantities is an important issue for extensive pharmacological studies. Objective: This study focuses on preparing and enzymic hydrolysis of flavonoid glycosides /β-cyclodextrin inclusion complex to increase the hydrolysis rate. Materials and Methods: The physical property of newly prepared inclusion complex was tested by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The conditions of enzymatic hydrolysis were optimized for the bioconversion of flavonoid glycosides /β-cyclodextrin inclusion complex by mono-factor experimental design. The experiments are using the icariin and genistein as the model drugs. Results: The solubility of icariin and genistein were increased almost 17 times from 29.2 μg/ml to 513.5 μg/ml at 60˚ C and 28 times from 7.78 μg/ml to 221.46 μg/ml at 50˚ C, respectively, demonstrating that the inclusion complex could significantly increase the solubility of flavonoid glycosides. Under the optimal conditions, the reaction time of icariin and genistin decreased by 68% and 145%, when compared with that without β-CD inclusion. By using this enzymatic condition, 473 mg icaritin (with the purity of 99.34% and 567 mg genistein(with the purity of 99.46%, which was finally determined by melt point, ESI-MS, UV, IR, 1 H NMR and 13 C NMR, was obtained eventually by transforming the inclusion complex(contains 1.0 g substrates. Conclusion: This study can clearly indicate a new attempt to improve the speed of enzyme-hydrolysis of poorly water-soluble flavonoid glycosides and find a more superior condition which is used to prepare icaritin and genistein.

  12. A Glycosidation Reaction Employing Montmorillonite K-10 as Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedell, Brooke L.; Crouch, R. David; Holden, Michael S.; Martinson, Heidi E.

    1996-11-01

    The large number of biology majors and prehealth students enrolled in Organic Chemistry makes it desirable to have laboratories that involve biologically interesting molecules. Although many laboratory manuals contain sections on carbohydrate chemistry, the experiments are typically limited to esterification or hydrolysis reactions. A recent publication (Toshima, K.; Ishizuka, T.; Matsuo, G.; Nakata, M. Synlett. 1995, 306. ) on the glycosidation of glycals offered a different possibility.

  13. A new glycoside from the leaves of Neoalsomitra integrifoliola

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Min Su; Jing Qu; You Cai Hu; Shi Shan Yu; Wen Zhao Tang; Yun Bao Liu; Shuang Gang Ma; De Quan Yu

    2008-01-01

    A new ionone glycoside (6R,9R)-blumenyl α-L-rhanmopyranosyl-(1→6)-β-D-gluco-pyranoside (1),together with a new natural product 2-methoxyl-4-trans-propenyl-phenol α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→6)-β-D-glucopyranoside (2),was isolated from the leaves of Neoalsomitra integrifoliola.Their structures were elucidated by chemical and spectral analysis.Compound 1 showed weak anti-inflammatory and low-level antioxidant activities.

  14. Article original Agronomy Foraging behaviour of Apis mellifera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hilaire

    Foraging behaviour of Apis mellifera adansonii and its impact on pollination, fruit and .... temperature is about 25°C. ... area before November 15, sugar baby variety of ... abundance, direct observations of the foraging ..... 4 Cane J.H., 2002.

  15. A properly adjusted forage harvester can save time and money

    Science.gov (United States)

    A properly adjusted forage harvester can save fuel and increase the realizable milk per ton of your silage. This article details the adjustments necessary to minimize energy while maximizing productivity and forage quality....

  16. Minor diterpene glycosides from the leaves of Stevia rebaudiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mohamed A; Rodenburg, Douglas L; Alves, Kamilla; Fronczek, Frank R; McChesney, James D; Wu, Chongming; Nettles, Brian J; Venkataraman, Sylesh K; Jaksch, Frank

    2014-05-23

    Two new diterpene glycosides in addition to five known glycosides have been isolated from a commercial extract of the leaves of Stevia rebaudiana. Compound 1 (rebaudioside KA) was shown to be 13-[(O-β-d-glucopyranosyl)oxy]ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid 2-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-β-d-glucopyranosyl ester and compound 2, 12-α-[(2-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-β-d-glucopyranosyl)oxy]ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid β-d-glucopyranosyl ester. Five additional known compounds were identified, rebaudioside E, rebaudioside M, rebaudioside N, rebaudioside O, and stevioside, respectively. Enzymatic hydrolysis of stevioside afforded the known ent-kaurane aglycone 13-hydroxy-ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid (steviol) (3). The isolated metabolite 1 possesses the ent-kaurane aglycone steviol (3), while compound 2 represents the first example of the isomeric diterpene 12-α-hydroxy-ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid existing as a glycoside in S. rebaudiana. The structures of the isolated metabolites 1 and 2 were determined based on comprehensive 1D- and 2D-NMR (COSY, HSQC, and HMBC) studies. A high-quality crystal of compound 3 has formed, which allowed the acquisition of X-ray diffraction data that confirmed its structure. The structural similarities between the new metabolites and the commercially available stevioside sweeteners suggest the newly isolated metabolites should be examined for their organoleptic properties. Accordingly rebaudiosides E, M, N, O, and KA have been isolated in greater than gram quantities.

  17. Thermal Degradation of Flavonol Glycosides in Noni Leaves During Roasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shixin Deng

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Noni leaves have been used for a variety of health benefits for thousands of years. Noni leaf tea, a commercial product made by a roasting process, is attracting more attention due to its potential health benefits. Flavonoids appear to be some of the predominant constituents in noni leaves. As flavonoids exist mostly in the forms of glycosides or polymers, degradation to corresponding metabolites is usually needed for bio-absorption. This study investigates the effects of thermal treatment (non-aqueous roasting on flavonoids in noni leaves. Rutin and kaempferol glycoside contents decreased dramatically as roasting time and/or temperature increased, while quercetin and kaempferol aglycones were produced. A quantitative comparison demonstrated that quercetin and kaempferol concentrations were 3.74 and 6.28 times greater in noni leaf tea than in raw noni leaves, respectively. These findings indicate that the roasting process for the noni leaf tea could induce the degradation of flavonol glycosides, and produce their aglycone metabolites, which in turn, may lead to more beneficial bioactivities and bioavailability.

  18. Forced Degradation of Flavonol Glycosides Extraced from Ginkgo biloba

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Ye; ZHANG Wei-yu; MENG Qing-fan; LI Dan-hui; GARG Sajay; TENG Li-rong; WEN Jing-yuan

    2013-01-01

    The degradation of flavonol glycosides extracted from Ginkgo biloba was performed under different conditions and the degraded products were determined by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) method.Four stress conditions including acid(0.1 mol/L HCl),base(0.1 mol/L NaOH),temperature (70 ℃) and oxidation(0.03% H2O2,volume fraction) were used for the forced degradation studies.The pH stabilities of the flavonol glycosides were determined in phosphate buffers of varying pH values from 4.5 to 7.4.The degradation rate constants and half-life of three Ginkgo flavonol aglycones(quercetin,kaempferol and isorhamnetin) which represent Ginkgo flavonol glycosides were calculated in forced degradation and pH-stability studies of them.The resuits indicate that the three substances were more stable when incubated under acid condition and showed pH-dependent stability.The degradation was observed to follow first-order kinetics in all degradation studies.The stability results could provide important bases on development,preparation and storage of products of Ginkgo biloba extract and should be significantly considered during the further formulation development.

  19. Steroidal glycosides from the underground parts of Helleborus caucasicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassarello, Carla; Muzashvili, Tamara; Skhirtladze, Alexandre; Kemertelidze, Ether; Pizza, Cosimo; Piacente, Sonia

    2008-03-01

    Four polyhydroxylated and polyunsaturated furostanol glycosides (1-4), named caucasicosides A (1), B (2), C (3) and D (4), were isolated from the MeOH extract of the underground parts of Helleborus caucasicus, along with four spirostanol derivatives, a furostanol glycoside, a furospirostanol glycoside, 20-hydroxyecdysone and the bufadienolides hellebrigenin and deglucohellebrin. The structures of 1-4 were elucidated as furosta-5,20(22),25(27)-triene-1beta,3beta,11alpha,26-tetrol 26-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (1), 26-O-beta-D-glucopyranosylfurosta-5,20(22),25(27)-triene-1beta,3beta,11alpha,26-tetrol 3-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-D-glucopyranoside (2), 26-O-beta-d-glucopyranosyl-22alpha-methoxyfurosta-5,25(27)-diene-1beta,3beta,11alpha,26-tetrol 3-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-D-glucopyranoside (3), 26-O-beta-D-glucopyranosylfurosta-5,20(22),25(27)-triene-1beta,3beta,26-triol 3-O-beta-D-xylopyranosyl-(1-->3)-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-4-O-sulfo-alpha-L-arabinopyranoside (4). Structure elucidation was accomplished through the extensive use of 1D- and 2D NMR experiments including 1H-1H (COSY, 1D-TOCSY) and 1H-13C (HSQC, HMBC) spectroscopy along with ESI-MS and HR-ESI-MS. The aglycones of 1-4 have never been reported before.

  20. C-Glycosidic Genistein Conjugates and Their Antiproliferative Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Rusin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents our attempt to investigate scopes and the limitations of olefin cross-metathesis (CM reaction in the synthesis of complex C-glycosides of genistein and evaluation of their antiproliferative activities. Novel genistein glycoconjugates were synthesized with the utility of CM reaction initiated by first and second generation of Grubbs catalysts. The relative reactivity of utilized olefins, based on categories proposed by Grubbs, was estimated. In vitro experiments in cancer cell lines showed that the selected derivatives (3a and 3f exhibited higher antiproliferative potential than the parent compound, genistein, and were able to block the cell cycle in the G2/M phase. The observed mechanism of action of C-glycosidic derivatives was similar to the activity of their O-glycosidic counterparts. These compounds were stable in culture medium. The obtained results show that our approach to genistein modification with application of cross-metathesis reaction allowed to obtain stable glycoconjugates with improved anticancer potential, compared to the parent isoflavone.

  1. Return customers: foraging site fidelity and the effect of environmental variability in wide-ranging antarctic fur seals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Benjamin; Hindell, Mark; Bester, Marthan; Trathan, Phil; Jonsen, Ian; Staniland, Iain; Oosthuizen, W Chris; Wege, Mia; Lea, Mary-Anne

    2015-01-01

    Strategies employed by wide-ranging foraging animals involve consideration of habitat quality and predictability and should maximise net energy gain. Fidelity to foraging sites is common in areas of high resource availability or where predictable changes in resource availability occur. However, if resource availability is heterogeneous or unpredictable, as it often is in marine environments, then habitat familiarity may also present ecological benefits to individuals. We examined the winter foraging distribution of female Antarctic fur seals, Arctocephalus gazelle, over four years to assess the degree of foraging site fidelity at two scales; within and between years. On average, between-year fidelity was strong, with most individuals utilising more than half of their annual foraging home range over multiple years. However, fidelity was a bimodal strategy among individuals, with five out of eight animals recording between-year overlap values of greater than 50%, while three animals recorded values of less than 5%. High long-term variance in sea surface temperature, a potential proxy for elevated long-term productivity and prey availability, typified areas of overlap. Within-year foraging site fidelity was weak, indicating that successive trips over the winter target different geographic areas. We suggest that over a season, changes in prey availability are predictable enough for individuals to shift foraging area in response, with limited associated energetic costs. Conversely, over multiple years, the availability of prey resources is less spatially and temporally predictable, increasing the potential costs of shifting foraging area and favouring long-term site fidelity. In a dynamic and patchy environment, multi-year foraging site fidelity may confer a long-term energetic advantage to the individual. Such behaviours that operate at the individual level have evolutionary and ecological implications and are potential drivers of niche specialization and modifiers of

  2. Return customers: foraging site fidelity and the effect of environmental variability in wide-ranging antarctic fur seals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Arthur

    Full Text Available Strategies employed by wide-ranging foraging animals involve consideration of habitat quality and predictability and should maximise net energy gain. Fidelity to foraging sites is common in areas of high resource availability or where predictable changes in resource availability occur. However, if resource availability is heterogeneous or unpredictable, as it often is in marine environments, then habitat familiarity may also present ecological benefits to individuals. We examined the winter foraging distribution of female Antarctic fur seals, Arctocephalus gazelle, over four years to assess the degree of foraging site fidelity at two scales; within and between years. On average, between-year fidelity was strong, with most individuals utilising more than half of their annual foraging home range over multiple years. However, fidelity was a bimodal strategy among individuals, with five out of eight animals recording between-year overlap values of greater than 50%, while three animals recorded values of less than 5%. High long-term variance in sea surface temperature, a potential proxy for elevated long-term productivity and prey availability, typified areas of overlap. Within-year foraging site fidelity was weak, indicating that successive trips over the winter target different geographic areas. We suggest that over a season, changes in prey availability are predictable enough for individuals to shift foraging area in response, with limited associated energetic costs. Conversely, over multiple years, the availability of prey resources is less spatially and temporally predictable, increasing the potential costs of shifting foraging area and favouring long-term site fidelity. In a dynamic and patchy environment, multi-year foraging site fidelity may confer a long-term energetic advantage to the individual. Such behaviours that operate at the individual level have evolutionary and ecological implications and are potential drivers of niche

  3. Foraging Behavior of Odontomachus bauri on Barro Colorado Island, Panama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Ehmer

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Foraging behavior and partitioning of foraging areas of Odonomachus bauri were investigated on Barro Colorado Island in Panama. The activity of the ants did not show any daily pattern; foragers were active day and night. The type of prey captured by O. bauri supports the idea that in higher Odontomachus and Anochetus species, the high speed of mandible closure serves more for generating power than capturing elusive prey. Polydomous nests may enable O. bauri colonies to enlarge their foraging areas.

  4. Foraging Behaviour in Magellanic Woodpeckers Is Consistent with a Multi-Scale Assessment of Tree Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, Pablo M.; Soto, Gerardo E.; Rodewald, Amanda D.; Meneses, Luis O.; Pérez-Hernández, Christian G.

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical models predict that animals should make foraging decisions after assessing the quality of available habitat, but most models fail to consider the spatio-temporal scales at which animals perceive habitat availability. We tested three foraging strategies that explain how Magellanic woodpeckers (Campephilus magellanicus) assess the relative quality of trees: 1) Woodpeckers with local knowledge select trees based on the available trees in the immediate vicinity. 2) Woodpeckers lacking local knowledge select trees based on their availability at previously visited locations. 3) Woodpeckers using information from long-term memory select trees based on knowledge about trees available within the entire landscape. We observed foraging woodpeckers and used a Brownian Bridge Movement Model to identify trees available to woodpeckers along foraging routes. Woodpeckers selected trees with a later decay stage than available trees. Selection models indicated that preferences of Magellanic woodpeckers were based on clusters of trees near the most recently visited trees, thus suggesting that woodpeckers use visual cues from neighboring trees. In a second analysis, Cox’s proportional hazards models showed that woodpeckers used information consolidated across broader spatial scales to adjust tree residence times. Specifically, woodpeckers spent more time at trees with larger diameters and in a more advanced stage of decay than trees available along their routes. These results suggest that Magellanic woodpeckers make foraging decisions based on the relative quality of trees that they perceive and memorize information at different spatio-temporal scales. PMID:27416115

  5. Alterations of hippocampal place cells in foraging rats facing a "predatory" threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Joo; Park, Mijeong; Kong, Mi-Seon; Park, Sang Geon; Cho, Jeiwon; Kim, Jeansok J

    2015-05-18

    Fear is an adaptive mechanism evolved to influence the primal decisions of foragers in "approach resource-avoid predator" conflicts. To survive and reproduce, animals must attain the basic needs (food, water, shelter, and mate) while avoiding the ultimate cost of predation. Consistent with this view, ecological studies have found that predatory threats cause animals to limit foraging to fewer places in their habitat and/or to restricted times. However, the neurophysiological basis through which animals alter their foraging boundaries when confronted with danger remains largely unknown. Here, we investigated place cells in the hippocampus, implicated in processing spatial information and memory, in male Long-Evans rats foraging for food under risky situations that would be common in nature. Specifically, place cells from dorsal cornu ammonis field 1 (CA1) were recorded while rats searched for food in a semi-naturalistic apparatus (consisting of a nest and a relatively large open area) before, during, and after encountering a "predatory" robot situated remotely from the nest. The looming robot induced remapping of place fields and increased the theta rhythm as the animals advanced toward the vicinity of threat, but not when they were around the safety of the nest. These neurophysiological effects on the hippocampus were prevented by lesioning of the amygdala. Based on these findings, we suggest that the amygdalar signaling of fear influences the stability of hippocampal place cells as a function of threat distance in rats foraging for food.

  6. Linking root traits to nutrient foraging in arbuscular mycorrhizal trees in a temperate forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissenstat, David M; Kucharski, Joshua M; Zadworny, Marcin; Adams, Thomas S; Koide, Roger T

    2015-10-01

    The identification of plant functional traits that can be linked to ecosystem processes is of wide interest, especially for predicting vegetational responses to climate change. Root diameter of the finest absorptive roots may be one plant trait that has wide significance. Do species with relatively thick absorptive roots forage in nutrient-rich patches differently from species with relatively fine absorptive roots? We measured traits related to nutrient foraging (root morphology and architecture, root proliferation, and mycorrhizal colonization) across six coexisting arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) temperate tree species with and without nutrient addition. Root traits such as root diameter and specific root length were highly correlated with root branching intensity, with thin-root species having higher branching intensity than thick-root species. In both fertilized and unfertilized soil, species with thin absorptive roots and high branching intensity showed much greater root length and mass proliferation but lower mycorrhizal colonization than species with thick absorptive roots. Across all species, fertilization led to increased root proliferation and reduced mycorrhizal colonization. These results suggest that thin-root species forage more by root proliferation, whereas thick-root species forage more by mycorrhizal fungi. In mineral nutrient-rich patches, AM trees seem to forage more by proliferating roots than by mycorrhizal fungi.

  7. Foraging Behaviour in Magellanic Woodpeckers Is Consistent with a Multi-Scale Assessment of Tree Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, Pablo M; Soto, Gerardo E; Moreira-Arce, Darío; Rodewald, Amanda D; Meneses, Luis O; Pérez-Hernández, Christian G

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical models predict that animals should make foraging decisions after assessing the quality of available habitat, but most models fail to consider the spatio-temporal scales at which animals perceive habitat availability. We tested three foraging strategies that explain how Magellanic woodpeckers (Campephilus magellanicus) assess the relative quality of trees: 1) Woodpeckers with local knowledge select trees based on the available trees in the immediate vicinity. 2) Woodpeckers lacking local knowledge select trees based on their availability at previously visited locations. 3) Woodpeckers using information from long-term memory select trees based on knowledge about trees available within the entire landscape. We observed foraging woodpeckers and used a Brownian Bridge Movement Model to identify trees available to woodpeckers along foraging routes. Woodpeckers selected trees with a later decay stage than available trees. Selection models indicated that preferences of Magellanic woodpeckers were based on clusters of trees near the most recently visited trees, thus suggesting that woodpeckers use visual cues from neighboring trees. In a second analysis, Cox's proportional hazards models showed that woodpeckers used information consolidated across broader spatial scales to adjust tree residence times. Specifically, woodpeckers spent more time at trees with larger diameters and in a more advanced stage of decay than trees available along their routes. These results suggest that Magellanic woodpeckers make foraging decisions based on the relative quality of trees that they perceive and memorize information at different spatio-temporal scales.

  8. Foraging Behaviour in Magellanic Woodpeckers Is Consistent with a Multi-Scale Assessment of Tree Quality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo M Vergara

    Full Text Available Theoretical models predict that animals should make foraging decisions after assessing the quality of available habitat, but most models fail to consider the spatio-temporal scales at which animals perceive habitat availability. We tested three foraging strategies that explain how Magellanic woodpeckers (Campephilus magellanicus assess the relative quality of trees: 1 Woodpeckers with local knowledge select trees based on the available trees in the immediate vicinity. 2 Woodpeckers lacking local knowledge select trees based on their availability at previously visited locations. 3 Woodpeckers using information from long-term memory select trees based on knowledge about trees available within the entire landscape. We observed foraging woodpeckers and used a Brownian Bridge Movement Model to identify trees available to woodpeckers along foraging routes. Woodpeckers selected trees with a later decay stage than available trees. Selection models indicated that preferences of Magellanic woodpeckers were based on clusters of trees near the most recently visited trees, thus suggesting that woodpeckers use visual cues from neighboring trees. In a second analysis, Cox's proportional hazards models showed that woodpeckers used information consolidated across broader spatial scales to adjust tree residence times. Specifically, woodpeckers spent more time at trees with larger diameters and in a more advanced stage of decay than trees available along their routes. These results suggest that Magellanic woodpeckers make foraging decisions based on the relative quality of trees that they perceive and memorize information at different spatio-temporal scales.

  9. Differences in foraging ecology align with genetically divergent ecotypes of a highly mobile marine top predator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeglinski, Jana W E; Wolf, Jochen B W; Werner, Christiane; Costa, Daniel P; Trillmich, Fritz

    2015-12-01

    Foraging differentiation within a species can contribute to restricted gene flow between ecologically different groups, promoting ecological speciation. Galapagos sea lions (Zalophus wollebaeki) show genetic and morphological divergence between the western and central archipelago, possibly as a result of an ecologically mediated contrast in the marine habitat. We use global positioning system (GPS) data, time-depth recordings (TDR), stable isotope and scat data to compare foraging habitat characteristics, diving behaviour and diet composition of Galapagos sea lions from a western and a central colony. We consider both juvenile and adult life stages to assess the potential role of ontogenetic shifts that can be crucial in shaping foraging behaviour and habitat choice for life. We found differences in foraging habitat use, foraging style and diet composition that aligned with genetic differentiation. These differences were consistent between juvenile and adult sea lions from the same colony, overriding age-specific behavioural differences. Our study contributes to an understanding of the complex interaction of ecological condition, plastic behavioural response and genetic make-up of interconnected populations.

  10. Nectar profitability, not empty honey stores, stimulate recruitment and foraging in Melipona scutellaris (Apidae, Meliponini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorkopf, Dirk Louis P; de Sá Filho, Geovan Figueirêdo; Maia-Silva, Camila; Schorkopf, Martina; Hrncir, Michael; Barth, Friedrich G

    2016-10-01

    In stingless bees (Meliponini) like in many other eusocial insect colonies food hoarding plays an important role in colony survival. However, very little is known on how Meliponini, a taxon restricted to tropical and subtropical regions, respond to different store conditions. We studied the impact of honey removal on nectar foraging activity and recruitment behaviour in Melipona scutellaris and compared our results with studies of the honey bee Apis mellifera. As expected, foraging activity increased significantly during abundance of artificial nectar and when increasing its profitability. Foraging activity on colony level could thereby frequently increase by an order of magnitude. Intriguingly, however, poor honey store conditions did not induce increased nectar foraging or recruitment activity. We discuss possible reasons explaining why increasing recruitment and foraging activity are not used by meliponines to compensate for poor food conditions in the nest. Among these are meliponine specific adaptations to climatic and environmental conditions, as well as physiology and brood rearing, such as mass provisioning of the brood.

  11. Foraging patch selection in winter: a balance between predation risk and thermoregulation benefit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Villén-Pérez

    Full Text Available In winter, foraging activity is intended to optimize food search while minimizing both thermoregulation costs and predation risk. Here we quantify the relative importance of thermoregulation and predation in foraging patch selection of woodland birds wintering in a Mediterranean montane forest. Specifically, we account for thermoregulation benefits related to temperature, and predation risk associated with both illumination of the feeding patch and distance to the nearest refuge provided by vegetation. We measured the amount of time that 38 marked individual birds belonging to five small passerine species spent foraging at artificial feeders. Feeders were located in forest patches that vary in distance to protective cover and exposure to sun radiation; temperature and illumination were registered locally by data loggers. Our results support the influence of both thermoregulation benefits and predation costs on feeding patch choice. The influence of distance to refuge (negative relationship was nearly three times higher than that of temperature (positive relationship in determining total foraging time spent at a patch. Light intensity had a negligible and no significant effect. This pattern was generalizable among species and individuals within species, and highlights the preponderance of latent predation risk over thermoregulation benefits on foraging decisions of birds wintering in temperate Mediterranean forests.

  12. Foraging patch selection in winter: a balance between predation risk and thermoregulation benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villén-Pérez, Sara; Carrascal, Luis M; Seoane, Javier

    2013-01-01

    In winter, foraging activity is intended to optimize food search while minimizing both thermoregulation costs and predation risk. Here we quantify the relative importance of thermoregulation and predation in foraging patch selection of woodland birds wintering in a Mediterranean montane forest. Specifically, we account for thermoregulation benefits related to temperature, and predation risk associated with both illumination of the feeding patch and distance to the nearest refuge provided by vegetation. We measured the amount of time that 38 marked individual birds belonging to five small passerine species spent foraging at artificial feeders. Feeders were located in forest patches that vary in distance to protective cover and exposure to sun radiation; temperature and illumination were registered locally by data loggers. Our results support the influence of both thermoregulation benefits and predation costs on feeding patch choice. The influence of distance to refuge (negative relationship) was nearly three times higher than that of temperature (positive relationship) in determining total foraging time spent at a patch. Light intensity had a negligible and no significant effect. This pattern was generalizable among species and individuals within species, and highlights the preponderance of latent predation risk over thermoregulation benefits on foraging decisions of birds wintering in temperate Mediterranean forests.

  13. Foraging Habitat and Chick Diets of Roseate Tern, Sterna dougallii, Breeding on Country Island, Nova Scotia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer C. Rock

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Breeding seabirds are threatened by human activities that affect nesting and foraging habitat. In Canada, one of the seabirds most at risk of extirpation is the Roseate Tern, Sterna dougallii. Although critical nesting habitat has been identified for the Roseate Tern in Canada, its foraging locations and the diet of its chicks are unknown. Therefore, our goal was to determine the foraging locations and diet of chicks of Roseate Tern breeding on Country Island, Nova Scotia, which is one of Canada's two main breeding colonies. In 2003 and 2004, we radio-tracked the Roseate Tern by plane to locate foraging areas and conducted feeding watches to determine the diet of chicks. Roseate Tern foraged approximately 7 km from the breeding colony over shallow water < 5 m deep. In both years, sand lance, Ammodytes spp., was the most common prey item delivered to chicks, followed by hake, Urophycis spp. Our results are consistent with previous work at colonies in the northeastern United States, suggesting that throughout its range, this species may be restricted in both habitat use and prey selection. The reliance on a specific habitat type and narrow range of prey species makes the Roseate Tern generally susceptible to habitat perturbations and reductions in the availability of prey.

  14. A comparison of flavonoid glycosides by electrospray tandem mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, Raymond E.; Lewars, Errol G.; Stadey, Christopher J.; Miao, Xiu-Sheng; Zhao, Xiaoming; Metcalfe, Chris D.

    2006-01-01

    A comparison is presented of product ion mass spectra of protonated and deprotonated molecules of kaempferol-3-O-glucoside, quercitin-3-O-glucoside (isoquercitrin), quercitin-3-O-galactoside (hyperoin), apigenin-7-O-glucoside, luteolin-7-O-glucoside, genistein-7-O-glucoside, naringenin-7-O-glucoside (prunin), luteolin-4'-O-glucoside, luteolin-6-C-glucoside (homoorientin, known also as isoorientin), apigenin-8-C-glucoside (vitexin), and luteolin-8-C-glucoside (orientin) together with the product ion mass spectrum of deprotonated kaempferol-7-O-glucoside. All isomeric ions were distinguishable on the basis of their product ion mass spectra. For protonated 3-O-, 7-O-, and 4'-O-glycosides at a collision energy of 46-47 eV, homolytic cleavage of the O-glycosidic bond yielded aglycon Y+ ions, whereas in deprotonated 3-O-, 7-O-, and 4'-O-glycosides, heterolytic and homolytic cleavage of the O-glycosidic bond yielded radical aglycon (Y-H)- and aglycon (Y-) ions. In each case, fragmentation of either the glycan or the aglycon or both was observed. For 6-C- and 8-C-glycosides at a collision energy of 46-47 eV, fragmentation was restricted almost exclusively to the glycan. For luteolin-6-C-glucoside, the integrity of the aglycon structure is preserved at the expense of the glycan for which some 30 fragmentations were observed. Breakdown curves were determined as a function of collision energy for protonated and deprotonated luteolin-6-C-glucoside. An attempt has been made to rationalize the product ion mass spectra derived from C-O- and C-C-luteolin glucosides in terms of computed structures that indicate significant intramolecular hydrogen bonding and rotation of the B-ring to form a coplanar luteolin structure. It is proposed that protonated and deprotonated luteolin-6-C-glucoside may afford examples of cooperative interactive bonding that plays a major role in directing fragmentation.

  15. Nitrogen transfer between herbivores and their forage species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sjogersten, Sofie; Kuijper, Dries P. J.; van der Wal, Rene; Loonen, Maarten J. J. E.; Huiskes, Ad H. L.; Woodin, Sarah J.

    2010-01-01

    Herbivores may increase the productivity of forage plants; however, this depends on the return of nutrients from faeces to the forage plants. The aim of this study was to test if nitrogen (N) from faeces is available to forage plants and whether the return of nutrients differs between plant species

  16. Blue Oak Canopy Effect on Seasonal Forage Production and Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    William E. Frost; Neil K. McDougald; Montague W. Demment

    1991-01-01

    Forage production and forage quality were measured seasonally beneath the canopy of blue oak (Quercus douglasii) and in open grassland at the San Joaquin Experimental Range. At the March and peak standing crop sampling dates forage production was significantly greater (p=.05) beneath blue oak compared to open grassland. At most sampling dates, the...

  17. Scheduling and development support in the Scavenger cyber foraging system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Mads Darø; Bouvin, Niels Olof

    2010-01-01

    Cyber foraging is a pervasive computing technique where small mobile devices offload resource intensive tasks to stronger computing machinery in the vicinity. One of the main challenges within cyber foraging is that it is very difficult to develop cyber foraging enabled applications. An applicati...

  18. Intra-seasonal variation in foraging behavior among Adélie penguins (Pygocelis adeliae) breeding at Cape Hallett, Ross Sea, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyver, P.O.B.; MacLeod, C.J.; Ballard, G.; Karl, B.J.; Barton, K.J.; Adams, J.; Ainley, D.G.; Wilson, P.R.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated intra-seasonal variation in foraging behavior of chick-rearing Adélie penguins, Pygoscelis adeliae, during two consecutive summers at Cape Hallett, northwestern Ross Sea. Although foraging behavior of this species has been extensively studied throughout the broad continental shelf region of the Ross Sea, this is the first study to report foraging behaviors and habitat affiliations among birds occupying continental slope waters. Continental slope habitat supports the greatest abundances of this species throughout its range, but we lack information about how intra-specific competition for prey might affect foraging and at-sea distribution and how these attributes compare with previous Ross Sea studies. Foraging trips increased in both distance and duration as breeding advanced from guard to crèche stage, but foraging dive depth, dive rates, and vertical dive distances travelled per hour decreased. Consistent with previous studies within slope habitats elsewhere in Antarctic waters, Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) dominated chick meal composition, but fish increased four-fold from guard to crèche stages. Foraging-, focal-, and core areas all doubled during the crèche stage as individuals shifted distribution in a southeasterly direction away from the coast while simultaneously becoming more widely dispersed (i.e., less spatial overlap among individuals). Intra-specific competition for prey among Adélie penguins appears to influence foraging behavior of this species, even in food webs dominated by Antarctic krill.

  19. Cell Wall Diversity in Forage Maize

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torres, A.F.; Noordam-Boot, C.M.M.; Dolstra, Oene; Weijde, van der Tim; Combes, Eliette; Dufour, Philippe; Vlaswinkel, Louis; Visser, R.G.F.; Trindade, L.M.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic studies are ideal platforms for assessing the extent of genetic diversity, inferring the genetic architecture, and evaluating complex trait interrelations for cell wall compositional and bioconversion traits relevant to bioenergy applications. Through the characterization of a forage maiz

  20. Investigating Optimal Foraging Theory in the Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, Siegfried; Grilliot, Matthew E.

    2014-01-01

    Optimal foraging theory is a principle that is often presented in the community ecology section of biology textbooks, but also can be demonstrated in the laboratory. We introduce a lab activity that uses an interactive strategy to teach high school and/or college students about this ecological concept. The activity is ideal because it engages…

  1. The Dynamics of Infant Visual Foraging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Steven S.; Guckenheimer, John; Masnick, Amy M.; Bacher, Leigh F.

    2004-01-01

    Human infants actively forage for visual information from the moment of birth onward. Although we know a great deal about how stimulus characteristics influence looking behavior in the first few postnatal weeks, we know much less about the intrinsic dynamics of the behavior. Here we show that a simple stochastic dynamical system acts…

  2. Balancing organization and flexibility in foraging dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabone, Michaelangelo; Ermentrout, Bard; Doiron, Brent

    2010-10-07

    Proper pattern organization and reorganization are central problems facing many biological networks which thrive in fluctuating environments. However, in many cases the mechanisms that organize system activity oppose those that support behavioral flexibility. Thus, a balance between pattern organization and pattern flexibility is critically important for overall biological fitness. We study this balance in the foraging strategies of ant colonies exploiting food in dynamic environments. We present discrete time and space simulations of colony activity that uses a pheromone-based recruitment strategy biasing foraging towards a food source. After food relocation, the pheromone must evaporate sufficiently before foraging can shift colony attention to a new food source. The amount of food consumed within the dynamic environment depends non-monotonically on the pheromone evaporation time constant-with maximal consumption occurring at a time constant which balances trail formation and trail flexibility. A deterministic, 'mean field' model of pheromone and foragers on trails mimics our colony simulations. This reduced framework captures the essence of the flexibility-organization balance, and relates optimal pheromone evaporation to the timescale of the dynamic environment. We expect that the principles exposed in our study will generalize and motivate novel analysis across a broad range systems biology.

  3. Synthesis and evaluation of C-glycosides as hydrotropes and solubilizing agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RANOUX; Adeline; LEMIEGRE; Loc; BENVEGNU; Thierry

    2010-01-01

    This work presents expeditious synthesis of C-glycoside amphiphiles in aqueous media from unprotected di-or mono-saccharides.A Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons/Michael addition/Barbier allylation sequence led to C-glycosides that exhibit hydrotropic properties.The hydrotropic and solubilizing properties of these homoallylic alcohols including a β-C-glycoside moiety as well as additional β-C-glycosidic ketones with a short(C7) alkyl chain are also described and compared with those of commercial O-glucoside references.

  4. Analgesic, antiinflammatory and CNS depressant activities of sesquiterpenes and a flavonoid glycoside from Polygonum viscosum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Datta, B K; Datta, S K; Chowdhury, M M; Khan, T H; Kundu, J K; Rashid, M A; Nahar, L; Sarker, S D

    2004-01-01

    Analgesic, antiinflammatory and CNS depressant activities of four sesquiterpenes, viscosumic acid, viscozulenic acid, viscoazucine and viscoazulone, and a flavonoid glycoside, quercetin-3-O-(6''-feruloyl...

  5. Estimation of aroma glycosides of nutmeg and their changes during radiation processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthakumar, Arul; Variyar, Prasad S; Sharma, Arun

    2006-03-10

    Glycosidically bound volatile compounds of nutmeg were identified as glyco-conjugates of p-cymene-7-ol, eugenol, methoxyeugenol and alpha-terpineol. Using phenyl-beta-glucoside as external standard the contents of these glycosidic precursors were estimated based on the measurement of TLC spot density on a densitometer. p-Cymene-7-ol rutinoside was the major aroma glycoside (3.15 mg/100 g), followed by glucosides of methoxyeugenol (0.61 mg/100 g), eugenol (0.50 mg/100 g) and alpha-terpineol (0.51 mg/100 g). A dose-dependent breakdown of these glycosidic precursors was observed during gamma-radiation processing. Among the four glycosides, alpha-terpineol glucoside was the most sensitive to radiation while p-cymene-7-ol rutinoside was the least sensitive. A reduction in the content of total glycosides by almost 50% was noted at a dose of 5kGy. Partitioning of aroma glycoside into n-butanol from aqueous extracts was found to result in rapid isolation of aroma glycosides, avoiding time consuming pre-purification on Amberlite XAD-2 column. A routine method based on extraction into n-butanol and subsequent quantification of post-irradiation changes in aroma glycosides on a TLC plate using a densitometer is proposed.

  6. Glycosides from Marine Sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae: Structures, Taxonomical Distribution, Biological Activities and Biological Roles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin A. Stonik

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Literature data about glycosides from sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae are reviewed. Structural diversity, biological activities, taxonomic distribution and biological functions of these natural products are discussed.

  7. Glycosides from marine sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae): structures, taxonomical distribution, biological activities and biological roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinin, Vladimir I; Ivanchina, Natalia V; Krasokhin, Vladimir B; Makarieva, Tatyana N; Stonik, Valentin A

    2012-08-01

    Literature data about glycosides from sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae) are reviewed. Structural diversity, biological activities, taxonomic distribution and biological functions of these natural products are discussed.

  8. Tandem mass spectrometric fragmentation patterns of known and new steviol glycosides with structure proposals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Benno F

    2011-06-15

    Stevia rebaudiana contains several steviol glycosides that have a sweet flavor. They are up to 450 times sweeter than sucrose, but some have an undesirable aftertaste. Up to 2010, ten different steviol glycosides have been described from the leaves or purified extracts of S. rebaudiana. In this paper, the tandem mass spectrometric fragmentation patterns of these ten compounds are compiled, along with a scheme for structural elucidation. This scheme is then applied to 12 steviol glycosides that have not yet been described. The proposed structures of five steviol glycosides have been confirmed by other authors.

  9. Effects of drought stress and nutrient availability on dry matter allocation, phenolic glycosides, and rapid induced resistance of poplar to two lymantriid defoliators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Bethan K; Herms, Daniel A; Hansen, Robert C; Clausen, Thomas P; Arnold, Danielle

    2005-11-01

    The growth-differentiation balance hypothesis (GDBH) postulates that variation in resource availability can increase or decrease allocation to secondary metabolism, depending on how growth is affected relative to carbon assimilation. Growth and leaf area of black poplar (Populus nigra) increased substantially in response to increased nutrient availability, while net assimilation rate and photosynthesis were less strongly affected. In response, total phenolic glycoside concentrations declined, which is consistent with GDBH. Drought stress decreased net assimilation rate and photosynthesis as well as growth, while increasing total phenolic glycoside concentrations. This pattern does not follow GDBH, which predicts lower secondary metabolism when resource limitation decreases both growth and carbon assimilation. However, there was a strong negative correlation between growth and total phenolic glycoside concentration consistent with a trade-off between primary and secondary metabolism, a key premise of GDBH. Drought decreased the growth of gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) larvae but had no effect on whitemarked tussock moth (Orgyia leucostigma). Increased nutrient availability had a positive linear effect on growth of whitemarked tussock moth, but no effect on gypsy moth. Treatment effects on gypsy moth corresponded closely with effects on total phenolic glycosides, whereas effects on whitemarked tussock moth more closely tracked changes in nutritional quality. Localized gypsy moth herbivory elicited rapid induced resistance to gypsy moth, with the effect being independent of water and nutrient availability, but did not affect whitemarked tussock moth, indicating that the effects of biotic and abiotic stress on insect resistance of trees can be species-specific.

  10. Hydrolysis of flavanone glycosides by β-glucosidase from Pyrococcus furiosus and its application to the production of flavanone aglycones from citrus extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kyung-Chul; Nam, Hyun-Koo; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2013-11-27

    The hydrolytic activity of the recombinant β-glucosidase from Pyrococcus furiosus for the flavanone glycoside hesperidin was optimal at pH 5.5 and 95 °C in the presence of 0.5% (v/v) dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and 0.1% (w/v) Tween 40 with a half-life of 88 h, a Km of 1.6 mM, and a kcat of 68.4 1/s. The specific activity of the enzyme for flavonoid glycosides followed the order hesperidin > neohesperidin > naringin > narirutin > poncirin > diosmin > neoponcirin > rutin. The specific activity for flavanone was higher than that for flavone or flavonol. DMSO at 10% (v/v) was used to increase the solubility of flavanone glycosides as substrates. The enzyme completely converted flavanone glycosides (1 g/L) to flavanone aglycones and disaccharides via one-step reaction. The major flavanone in grapefruit peel, grapefruit pulp, or orange peel extract was naringin (47.5 mg/g), naringin (16.6 mg/g), or hesperidin (18.2 mg/g), respectively. β-Glucosidase from P. furiosus completely converted naringin and narirutin in 100% (w/v) grapefruit peel extract to 22.5 g/L naringenin after 12 h, with a productivity of 1.88 g L(-1) h(-1); naringin and narirutin in 100% (w/v) grapefruit pulp extract to 8.1 g/L naringenin after 9 h, with a productivity of 0.90 g L(-1) h(-1); and hesperidin in 100% (w/v) orange peel extract to 9.0 g/L hesperetin after 9 h, with a productivity of 1.00 g L(-1) h(-1). The conversion yields, concentrations, and productivities of flavanone aglycones in this study are the highest among those obtained from citrus extracts. Thus, this enzyme may be useful for the industrial hydrolysis of flavanone glycosides in citrus extracts.

  11. Responses of late-lactation cows to forage substitutes in low-forage diets supplemented with by-products

    Science.gov (United States)

    In response to drought-induced shortages of forage and increased corn and soy prices, a study was conducted to evaluate lactation response of dairy cows to lower-forage diets supplemented with forage substitutes and with byproduct feeds entirely substituted for corn grain and soybean feeds. The desi...

  12. From foraging to autonoetic consciousness: The primal self as a consequence of embodied prospective foraging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thomas T.HILLS; Stephen BUTTERFILL

    2015-01-01

    The capacity to adapt to resource distributions by modulating the frequency of exploratory and exploitative behaviors is common across metazoans and is arguably a principal selective force in the evolution of cognition.Here we (1) review recent work investigating behavioral and biological commonalities between external foraging in space and internal foraging over environmcnts specified by cognitive representations,and (2) explore the implications of these commonalities for understanding the origins of the self.Behavioural commonalities include the capacity for what is known as area-restricted search in the ecological literature:this is search focussed around locations where resources have been found in the past,but moving away from locations where few resources are found,and capable of producing movement patterns mimicking Lévy flights.Area-restricted search shares a neural basis across metazoans,and these biological commonalities in vertebrates suggest an evolutionary homology between external and internal foraging.Internal foraging,and in particular a form we call embodied prospective foraging,makes available additional capacities for prediction based on search through a cognitive representation of the external environment,and allows predictions about outcomes of possible future actions.We demonstrate that cognitive systems that use embodied prospective foraging require a primitive sense of self,needed to distinguish actual from simulated action.This relationship has implications for understanding the evolution of autonoetic consciousness and self-awareness [Current Zoology 61 (2):368-381,2015].

  13. Phenylpropanoid-substituted procyanidins and tentatively identified procyanidin glycosides from hawthorn (Crataegus spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendker, Jandirk; Petereit, Frank; Lautenschläger, Marcus; Hellenbrand, Nils; Hensel, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The rational use of hawthorn leafs and flowers from Crataegus spp. for declining cardiac performance is mainly due to flavon-C-glycosides and oligomeric procyanidins (OPC). From OPC-enriched extracts from different batches, a dimeric phenylpropanoid-substituted procyanidin (cinchonain II b, 1) was isolated and characterized by MS, CD, and NMR. Also the presence of higher oligomeric cinchonains (degree of polymerization 3 to 8) in hawthorn extracts was shown by a specific ultrahigh-pressure liquid chromatography-ESI-qTOF-MS method. Interestingly, strong evidence for the occurrence of oligomeric procyanidin hexosides was found by ultrahigh-pressure liquid chromatography-ESI-qTOF-MS analysis which additionally revealed the presence of peaks indicative of dimeric procyanidin hexosides by their exact mass, which were clearly distinguishable from the cinchonain II type peaks. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Cholesteryl oligoethyleneglycol glycosides: fluidizing effect of their embedment into phospholipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardonnet, Pierre-Louis; Faivre, Vincent; Pirot, Fabrice; Boullanger, Paul; Falson, Françoise

    2005-04-22

    Glycosides of cholesteryl oligoethyleneglycols have been synthesized and embedded in liposome bilayers. Several methods as steady-state fluorescence polarization, differential scanning calorimetry, zeta potential, and agglutination have been used to describe the physicochemical outcome of the incorporation of these synthetic glycolipids within phospholipid layers. From calorimetry and fluorescence experiments, it is apparent that the glycolipids decrease the transition temperature of the bilayers in a more important extent than cholesterol. Furthermore, the thickness of the aqueous layer fixed around the liposome is independent of the presence of glycolipids, suggesting that their hydrophilic parts (tetraethyleneglycol spacer and sugar moiety) are not completely extended towards the aqueous phase. Nevertheless, an important and specific interaction has been observed between such glycosylated liposomes and vegetal lectins.

  15. Use of nanostructure initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS to deduce selectivity of reaction in glycoside hydrolases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai eDeng

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Chemically synthesized nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS probes derivatized with tetrasaccharides were used to study the reactivity of representative Clostridium thermocellum β-glucosidase, endoglucanases and cellobiohydrolase. Diagnostic patterns for reactions of these different classes of enzymes were observed. Results show sequential removal of glucose by the β-glucosidase and a progressive increase in specificity of reaction from endoglucanases to cellobiohydrolase. Time-dependent reactions of these polysaccharide-selective enzymes were modeled by numerical integration, which provides a quantitative basis to make functional distinctions among a continuum of naturally evolved catalytic properties. Consequently, our method, which combines automated protein translation with high-sensitivity and time-dependent detection of multiple products, provides a new approach to annotate glycoside hydrolase phylogenetic trees with functional measurements.

  16. Characterizing Variation of Isotopic Markers in Northern Alaskan Caribou Forages

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanSomeren, L.; Barboza, P. S.; Gustine, D. D.; Parrett, L. S.; Stricker, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    Isotopic markers in feces and tissues are a potential tool for monitoring the importance of feeding areas for migratory herbivores such as caribou (Rangifer tarandus). Many of these techniques are currently limited by gaps in our knowledge of how these isotopic signatures vary over the landscape. We collected seven species of preferred caribou forages along a latitudinal gradient in the summer ranges of the Central Arctic (9 sites) and Teshekpuk Lake (4 sites) caribou herds during 2011 and 2012. We analyzed forages at peak protein content and at the end of the season to characterize temporal, species-specific, and spatial variation in isotopic markers. The availability of C and N was measured by digestion in vitro. Isotopic signatures of digested samples were used to calculate fractionation that would bias the isotopic signature of feces. The range of values for isotopes (all values ‰) of nitrogen (δ15N -9.5 - +4.3), and sulfur (δ34S -3.6 - +15.5) were greater than those for carbon (δ13C -30.5 - -24.9). Small declines in forage δ13C with latitude (Carex aquatilis, Eriophorum vaginatum, Salix pulchra, and S. richardsonii [all P Sedges (Carex and Eriophorum) were significantly higher in δ15N than Salix spp. and other dicots (2.0 × 1.1 vs. -2.9 × 2.2; P < 0.01). For Salix spp., δ15N was consistent over the season and between years. Fractionation of δ15N in early season forages was 0.2 × 1.8 and not related to N availability (60% × 17%). For S. pulchra, δ34S may indicate usage of coastal habitats over foothills because δ34S was higher on the coastal plain than in the foothills (11.1 × 3.3 and 3.1 × 2.6; P < 0.01). Isotopic ratios in N and S show the greatest promise for tracking diet and location of migratory caribou whereas the narrow range in δ13C is affected by species, season and location.

  17. Foraging strategies of the ant Ectatomma vizottoi (Hymenoptera, Formicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luan D. Lima

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Foraging strategies of the ant Ectatomma vizottoi (Hymenoptera, Formicidae. Foraging activity may be limited by temperature, humidity, radiation, wind, and other abiotic factors, all of which can affect energy costs during foraging. Ectatomma vizottoi's biology has only recently been studied, and no detailed information is available on its foraging patterns or diet in the field. For this reason, and because foraging activity is an important part of the ecological success of social insects, the present study aimed to investigate E. vizottoi's foraging strategies and dietary habits. First, we determined how abiotic factors constrained E. vizottoi's foraging patterns in the field by monitoring the foraging activity of 16 colonies on eight different days across two seasons. Second, we characterized E. vizottoi's diet by monitoring another set of 26 colonies during peak foraging activity. Our results show that E. vizottoi has foraging strategies that are similar to those of congeneric species. In spite of having a low efficiency index, colonies adopted strategies that allowed them to successfully obtain food resources while avoiding adverse conditions. These strategies included preying on other ant species, a foraging tactic that could arise if a wide variety of food items are not available in the environment or if E. vizottoi simply prefers, regardless of resource availability, to prey on other invertebrates and especially on other ant species.

  18. Scavenger: Transparent Development of Efficient Cyber Foraging Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Mads Darø

    2010-01-01

    Cyber foraging is a pervasive computing technique where small mobile devices offload resource intensive tasks to stronger computing machinery in the vicinity. This paper presents Scavenger-a new cyber foraging system supporting easy development of mobile cyber foraging applications, while still...... delivering efficient, mobile use of remote computing resources through the use of a custom built mobile code execution environment and a new dual-profiling scheduler. One of the main difficulties within cyber foraging is that it is very challenging for application programmers to develop cyber foraging...... enabled applications. An application using cyber foraging is working with mobile, distributed and, possibly, parallel computing; fields within computer science known to be hard for programmers to grasp. In this paper it is shown by example, how a highly distributed, parallel, cyber foraging enabled...

  19. Summertime blues: August foraging leaves honey bees empty-handed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvillon, Margaret J; Fensome, Katherine A; Quah, Shaun Kl; Schürch, Roger

    2014-01-01

    A successful honey bee forager tells her nestmates the location of good nectar and pollen with the waggle dance, a symbolic language that communicates a distance and direction. Because bees are adept at scouting out profitable forage and are very sensitive to energetic reward, we can use the distance that bees communicate via waggle dances as a proxy for forage availability, where the further the bees fly, the less forage can be found locally. Previously we demonstrated that bees fly furthest in the summer compared with spring or autumn to bring back forage that is not necessarily of better quality. Here we show that August is also the month when significantly more foragers return with empty crops (P = 7.63e-06). This provides additional support that summer may represent a seasonal foraging challenge for honey bees.

  20. A new flavonol glycoside from the Abelmoschus esculentus Linn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibing Liao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Abelmoschus esculentus L. belonging to the family Malvaceae is a kind of one year herbage plant, which is one of the most important vegetables widely grown in Nigeria for its tender fruits and young leaves. It′s easy to be cultivated and grows well in both tropical and temperate zones, that is, it is widely planted from Africa to Asia, South European to America. A new flavonol glycoside characterized as 5,7,3′,4′-tetrahydroxy-4′′-O-methyl flavonol -3-O-β-D- glucopyranoside (1 has been isolated from the fruit of A. esculentus together with one known compound 5,7,3′,4′-tetrahydroxy flavonol -3-O-[β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→6]-β-D-glucopyranoside (2. The structure of the new compound was elucidated on the basis of its spectral data, including 2-D NMR and mass (MS spectra. The antioxidant activities of the isolated compounds 1 and 2 were evaluated by 2 assays, the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP. The present work deals with the isolation, identification and antioxidant activity of the two compounds. Materials and Methods: The compounds were isolated by Diaion HP-20, Sephedex LH-20 column chromatography methods, their structures were identified by physicochemical properties and spectroscopic analysis. The antioxidant activities of the isolated compounds 1 and 2 were evaluated by two assays, e.g., DPPH and FRAP. Results: Two flavonol glycosides have been isolated from the fruit of Abelmoschus esculentus L. for the first time, and the compound 1 was a new compound, the compound 2 was isolated from the plant for the first time. Conclusion: The results show that the two flavonol glycosides have strong ability for scavenging DPPH and FRAP free radical by the experiment of antioxidant activities, so A. esculentus may be a natural antioxidants resource.

  1. Relationship between channel morphology and foraging habitat for stream salmonids: Effects of body size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cienciala, P.; Hassan, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Channel morphology and dynamics strongly influence fish populations in running waters by defining habitat template for movement, spawning, incubation, and foraging. In this research we adopted a modeling approach to investigate how body size controls the relationship between salmonid fish and their foraging habitat in streams. Body size is a fundamental ecological parameter which affects resource acquisition, locomotory costs, metabolic rates, and competitive abilities. We focus on two specific questions. First, we examined how distinct types of channel morphology and associated flow fields shape specific growth potential for different body size classes of trout. Second, we modeled these fish-habitat relationships in a size-structured population in the presence of intraspecific competition. In the latter scenario, fish may not be able to occupy energetically optimal foraging habitat and the predicted specific growth potential may differ from the intrinsic habitat quality. To address the research questions, we linked a 2D hydrodynamic model with a bioenergetic foraging model for drift-feeding trout. Net energy intake, simulated for four study reaches with different channel morphology, was converted into maps of specific growth rate potential. We extended this model by including a component that enabled us to estimate territory size for fish of a given body size and account for the effects of competition on spatial distribution of fish. The predictions that emerge from our simulations highlight that fish body size is an important factor that determines the relationship between channel morphology and the quality of foraging habitat. The results also indicate that distinct types of channel morphology may give rise to different energetic conditions for different body size classes of drift-feeding salmonids.

  2. Effects of forage:concentrate ratio and forage type on apparent digestibility, ruminal fermentation, and microbial growth in goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantalapiedra-Hijar, G; Yáñez-Ruiz, D R; Martín-García, A I; Molina-Alcaide, E

    2009-02-01

    The effects of forage type and forage:concentrate ratio (F:C) on apparent nutrient digestibility, ruminal fermentation, and microbial growth were investigated in goats. A comparison between liquid (LAB) and solid (SAB)-associated bacteria to estimate microbial N flow (MNF) from urinary purine derivative excretion was also examined. Treatments were a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of forage type (grass hay vs. alfalfa hay) and high vs. low F:C (70:30 and 30:70, respectively). Four ruminally cannulated goats were fed, at maintenance intake, 4 experimental diets according to a 4 x 4 Latin square design. High-concentrate diets resulted in greater (P diets including grass hay. Likewise, N retention, ruminal NH(3)-N concentration, and urinary excretion of purine derivatives increased (P diets based on grass hay (0.23 vs. 0.13 g of retained N/g of digested N, 30.1 vs. 12.9 mg of NH(3)-N/100 mL, and 11.5 vs. 8.40 mmol/d, respectively), but not (P > 0.05) when diets included alfalfa hay. Total protozoa numbers and holotricha proportion were greater and less (P diets. The F:C affected (P diets. Estimated MNF was strongly influenced by using either the purine bases:N ratio obtained in our experimental conditions or values reported in the literature for small ruminants. There was a F:C effect (P = 0.006) on MNF estimated from LAB but not from SAB. The effect of F:C shifting from 70:30 to 30:70 in goat diets depends on the type of forage used. The MNF measured in goats fed different diets was influenced by the bacterial pellet (LAB or SAB). In addition, the purine bases:N ratio values found were different from those reported in the literature, which underlines the need for these variables to be analyzed directly in pellets isolated from specific animals and experimental conditions.

  3. Phototaxic foraging of the archaepaddler, a hypothetical deep-sea species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, R J; van de Grind, W A

    1998-01-01

    An autonomous agent (animat, hypothetical animal), called the (archae) paddler, is simulated in sufficient detail to regard its simulated aquatic locomotion (paddling) as physically possible. The paddler is supposed to be a model of an animal that might exist, although it is perfectly possible to view it as a model of a robot that might be built. The agent is assumed to navigate in a simulated deep-sea environment, where it forages for autoluminescent prey. It uses a biologically inspired phototaxic foraging strategy, while paddling in a layer just above the bottom. The advantage of this living space is that the navigation problem--and hence our model--is essentially two-dimensional. Moreover, the deep-sea environment is physically simple (and hence easy to simulate): no significant currents, constant temperature, completely dark. A foraging performance metric is developed that circumvents the necessity to solve the traveling salesman problem. A parametric simulation study then quantifies the influence of habitat factors, such as the density of prey, and body geometry (e.g., placement, direction and directional selectivity of the eyes) on foraging success. Adequate performance proves to require a specific body geometry adapted to the habitat characteristics. In general, performance degrades gracefully for modest changes of the geometric and habitat parameters, indicating that we work in a stable region of "design space." The parameters have to strike a compromise between, on the one hand, to "see" as many targets at the same time as possible. One important conclusion is that simple reflex-based navigation can be surprisingly efficient. Additionally, performance in a global task (foraging) depends strongly on local parameters such as visual direction tuning, position of the eyes and paddles, and so forth. Behavior and habitat "mold" the body, and the body geometry strongly influences performance. The resulting platform enables further testing of foraging strategies

  4. Food load manipulation ability shapes flight morphology in females of central-place foraging Hymenoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polidori, Carlo; Crottini, Angelica; Della Venezia, Lidia; Selfa, Jesús; Saino, Nicola; Rubolini, Diego

    2013-06-28

    Ecological constraints related to foraging are expected to affect the evolution of morphological traits relevant to food capture, manipulation and transport. Females of central-place foraging Hymenoptera vary in their food load manipulation ability. Bees and social wasps modulate the amount of food taken per foraging trip (in terms of e.g. number of pollen grains or parts of prey), while solitary wasps carry exclusively entire prey items. We hypothesized that the foraging constraints acting on females of the latter species, imposed by the upper limit to the load size they are able to transport in flight, should promote the evolution of a greater load-lifting capacity and manoeuvrability, specifically in terms of greater flight muscle to body mass ratio and lower wing loading. Our comparative study of 28 species confirms that, accounting for shared ancestry, female flight muscle ratio was significantly higher and wing loading lower in species taking entire prey compared to those that are able to modulate load size. Body mass had no effect on flight muscle ratio, though it strongly and negatively co-varied with wing loading. Across species, flight muscle ratio and wing loading were negatively correlated, suggesting coevolution of these traits. Natural selection has led to the coevolution of resource load manipulation ability and morphological traits affecting flying ability with additional loads in females of central-place foraging Hymenoptera. Release from load-carrying constraints related to foraging, which took place with the evolution of food load manipulation ability, has selected against the maintenance of a powerful flight apparatus. This could be the case since investment in flight muscles may have to be traded against other life-history traits, such as reproductive investment.

  5. Cellular basis for the species differences in sensitivity to cardiac glycosides (digitalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, R S; Chopra, A; Stetsko, D K

    1986-05-01

    The relative toxicity of numerous cardiotonic steroids (viz. ouabain, digitoxin, digoxin, convallatoxin, SC4453, bufalin, gitaloxin, digoxigenin, actodigin, oleandrin, digitoxigenin, gitoxin, strophanthidin, gitoxigenin, lanatosides A, B and C, alpha- and beta-acetyl digoxin, alpha- and beta-methyl digoxin) and related compounds towards a number of independent cell lines established from human, monkey, mouse, Syrian hamster, and Chinese hamster have been determined. All cardiac glycosides and their genins, as well as the cardiotonic alkaloid cassaine, exhibited greater than 100-fold higher toxicity towards cultured human and monkey cells in comparison to the cell lines of mouse, Syrian hamster, and Chinese hamster origins. These differences are species-related as all cell lines (both normal as well as transformed) from any one species, as well as cells from the closely related species (e.g., man and monkey or mouse, Chinese hamster, and Syrian hamster), showed similar sensitivity towards these drugs. The failure to see any significant differences in cellular toxicity for a larger number of other compounds which either bear limited structural resemblance to cardiac glycosides (viz. estradiol 17-beta-acetate, testosterone propionate, 21-acetoxy pregnenolone, beta-estradiol, digitonin, tigogenin, and tomatine) or interact with the Na+/K+ ATPase in a different manner (viz. veratridine, sanguinarine nitrate, penicillic acid, vanadium pentoxide, harmaline-HCI,5,5'-diphenyl hydantoin, quindonium bromide, and methyl quinolizinum bromide) provides strong evidence that the observed species-related differences are highly specific for cardiotonic steroids. Studies on the binding of [3H]ouabain show that, in comparison to human and monkey cell lines, no significant binding of the drug is observed in cells derived from the resistant species (i.e., mouse and Chinese hamster). The Na+/K+ ATPase from cells of the resistant species is inhibited at much higher concentrations of

  6. Acylated flavonol glycosides from the flower of Elaeagnus angustifolia L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendaikha, Sarah; Gadaut, Méredith; Harakat, Dominique; Magid, Alabdul

    2014-07-01

    Seven acylated flavonol glycosides named elaeagnosides A-G, in addition to seven known flavonoids were isolated from the flowers of Elaeagnus angustifolia. Their structures were elucidated by different spectroscopic methods including 1D, 2D NMR experiments and HR-ESI-MS analysis. In order to identify natural antioxidant and tyrosinase inhibitor agents, the abilities of these flavonoids to scavenge the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) and to inhibit tyrosinase activity were evaluated. Results revealed that two of these compounds had significant anti-oxidant effect and one compound showed weak tyrosinase-inhibitory activity compared with kojic acid, quercetin, or ascorbic acid, which were used as positive control.

  7. Flavonoid glycosides and other constituents of Psorospermum androsaemifolium BAKER (Clusiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poumale, Herve Martial Poumale; Randrianasolo, Rivoarison; Rakotoarimanga, Jeannot Victor; Raharisololalao, Amelie; Krebs, Hans Christoph; Tchouankeu, Jean Claude; Ngadjui, Bonaventure Tchaleu

    2008-10-01

    Two new flavonoid glycosides, namely 3'-(2'',4''-dihydroxybenzyloxy)acanthophorin B (1b) and beta,2,3',4,4',6-hexahydroxy-alpha-(alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl)dihydrochalcone (2) were isolated from the leaves of Psorospermum androsaemifolium together with quercetin (1), acanthophorin B (1a), alpha- (3) and beta-amyrine (3a), vismiaquinone (4), 12-hentriacontanol and hentriacontane. The structures of these secondary metabolites were established using detailed spectroscopic analysis and by comparison with published data. Compounds 1, 1a, 1b, 2, 3, 3a and 4 showed weak antifungal and antibacterial activities.

  8. A New Phenylpropanoid Glycoside from Dragon's Blood of Dracaena cambodiana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Hai-yan; WANG Hui; ZUO Wen-jian; ZHAO You-xing; LUO Ying; MEI Wen-li; DAI Hao-fu

    2013-01-01

    A new phenylpropanoid glycoside,named cambodianin F(1),together with three known compounds,1-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-2-hydroxy-4-allylbenzene(2),1-O-(6-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-β-D-glucopyranosyl)-2-hydroxy-4-allylbenzene(3) and 1,2-di-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-4-allylbenzene(4) was isolated from the dragon's blood of Dracaena cambodiana.The new compound was elucidated by HR-ESI-MS and spectroscopic techniques(UV,IR,1D and 2D NMR).

  9. [Iridoid glycosides from buds of Jasminum officinale L. var. grandiflorum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gui-qin; Yin, Zhi-feng; Liu, Yu-cui; Li, Hong-bo

    2011-10-01

    The study on the buds of Jasminum officinale L. var. grandiflorum was carried out to look for anti-HBV constituents. The isolation and purification were performed by HPLC and chromatography on silica gel, polyamide and Sephadex LH-20 column. The structures were elucidated on the basis of physicochemical properties and spectral analysis. Six iridoid glycosides were identified as jasgranoside B (1), 6-O-methy-catalpol (2), deacetyl asperulosidic acid (3), aucubin (4), 8-dehydroxy shanzhiside (5), and loganin (6). Jasgranoside B (1) is a new compound. Compounds 2-6 were isolated from Jasminum officinale L. var. grandiflorum for the first time.

  10. Additional New Minor Cucurbitane Glycosides from Siraitia grosvenorii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indra Prakash

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Continuous phytochemical studies of the crude extract of Luo Han Guo (Siraitia grosvenorii furnished three additional new cucurbitane triterpene glycosides, namely 11-deoxymogroside V, 11-deoxyisomogroside V, and 11-deoxymogroside VI. The structures of all the isolated compounds were characterized on the basis of extensive NMR and mass spectral data as well as hydrolysis studies. The complete 1H- and 13C-NMR spectral assignments of the three unknown compounds are reported for the first time based on COSY, TOCSY, HSQC, and HMBC spectroscopic data.

  11. A New Flavonol Glycoside from Anaphalis sinica Hance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A new flavonol glycoside, 5,7,3,4-tetrahydroxy-3-methoxyflavonol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside(1) was isolated along with quercetin(2), quercetin-3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside(3), quercetin-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside(4) and kaempferol-3-O-β-D-(6"-O-p-coumaroyl)-glucopyranoside(5) from Anaphalis sinica Hance. Their structures were determined on the basis of spectral data(MS, UV, IR, 1H and 13C NMR). The structure of compound 1 was confirmed by X-ray crystallographic analysis.

  12. A new flavonol glycoside from the Abelmoschus esculentus Linn.

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Background: Abelmoschus esculentus L. belonging to the family Malvaceae is a kind of one year herbage plant, which is one of the most important vegetables widely grown in Nigeria for its tender fruits and young leaves. It's easy to be cultivated and grows well in both tropical and temperate zones, that is, it is widely planted from Africa to Asia, South European to America. A new flavonol glycoside characterized as 5,7,3′,4′-tetrahydroxy-4′′-O-methyl flavonol -3-O-β-D- glucopyranoside (1) has...

  13. Flavonoid glycosides in bergamot juice (Citrus bergamia Risso).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattuso, Giuseppe; Caristi, Corrado; Gargiulli, Claudia; Bellocco, Ersilia; Toscano, Giovanni; Leuzzi, Ugo

    2006-05-31

    A comprehensive profile of flavonoids in bergamot juice was obtained by a single DAD-ESI-LC-MS-MS course. Eight flavonoids were found for the first time, five of these are C-glucosides (lucenin-2, stellarin-2, isovitexin, scoparin, and orientin 4'-methyl ether), and three are O-glycosides (rhoifolin 4'-O-glucoside, chrysoeriol 7-O-neohesperidoside-4'-O-glucoside, and chrysoeriol 7-O-neohesperidoside). A method is proposed to differentiate chrysoeriol and diosmetin derivatives, which are often indistinguishable by LC-MS-MS. In-depth knowledge of the flavonoid content is the starting point for bergamot juice exploitation in food industry applications.

  14. A New Flavonoid Glycoside from Salix denticulata Aerial Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amita Bamola

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: A new flavonoid glycoside (1 has been isolated from the aerial parts of Salix denticulata (Salicaceae together with five known compounds, β-sitosterol, 2,6-dihydroxy- 4-methoxy acetophenone, eugenol-1-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, 1-O-β-D-(3’-benzoyl salicyl alcohol and luteolin-7-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-6-glucopyranoside. The structure of 1 was elucidated as 2’,5-dihydroxy-3’-methoxyflavone-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside by means of chemical and spectral data including 2D NMR studies.

  15. Flavonoid Glycosides from Arnica montana and Arnica chamissonis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merfort, I; Wendisch, D

    1987-10-01

    Five flavonoid glycosides were identified from flowers of ARNICA MONTANA, four from A. CHAMISSONIS subsp. FOLIOSA var. INCANA. The structures were established on the basis of total acid hydrolysis and spectral data (UV, (1)H-NMR, (13)C-NMR, MS) as hispidulin 7- O-beta-glucoside, isorhamnetin 3- O-beta-glucoside, 3- O-beta- D-glucopyranosides of spinacetin, 6-methoxykaempferol and patuletin and querectin 3- O-(6''- O-acetyl)-beta- D-glucopyranoside. The latter compound can serve as distinctive marker between these two ARNICA species. The (1)H-NMR spectra in CD (3)OD are discussed.

  16. Phenylpropanoid Glycosides from the Leaves of Ananas comosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Hao; Huang, Xiao-Juan; Shu, Huo-Ming; Hui, Yang; Guo, Fei-Yan; Song, Xiao-Ping; Ji, Ming-Hui; Chen, Guang-Ying

    2015-12-01

    Two new phenylpropanoid glycosides, named β-D-(1-O-acetyl-3,6-O-diferuloyl) fructofuranosyl β-D-6'-O-acetylglucopyranoside (1) and β-D-(1-O-acetyl-3,6-O-diferuloyl) fructofuranosyl α-D-glucopyranoside (2), along with two known analogues (3-4) and four glycerides (5-8), were isolated from the EtOAc extract of the leaves of Ananas comosus. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of 1D- and 2D-NMR analyses, as well as HR-ESI-MS experiments. Compounds 1-4 showed significant antibacterial activities against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli.

  17. New cyclopeptide alkaloid and lignan glycoside from Justicia procumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hong; Chen, Li; Tian, Ying; Li, Bin; Dong, Jun-Xing

    2015-01-01

    This study reported a new cyclopeptide alkaloid, justicianene A (1), and a new lignan glycoside, procumbenoside H (2), isolated from Justicia procumbens. The structures of the new compounds were elucidated by means of spectroscopic analysis, including extensive 2D NMR studies and mass spectrometry. Cyclopeptide alkaloids were first observed from the genus Justicia. Compound 2 was cytotoxic against human LoVo colon carcinoma cells with an IC50 value of 17.908 ± 1.949 μM.

  18. Two new glycosides from the fruits of Morinda citrifolia L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ming-Xu; Zhang, Hong-Cai; Wang, Yu; Liu, Shu-Min; Liu, Li

    2012-01-01

    To study the chemical constituents of the fruits of noni (Morinda citrifolia L.), and find novel compounds, an n-butanol extract of the ethanol soluble fraction was subjected to repeated silica gel and ODS column chromatography and HPLC. Two new glycosides were isolated and their structures elucidated by NMR and HRFAB-MS spectrometry as (2E,4E,7Z)-deca-2,4,7-trienoate-2-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-β-D-glucopyranoside and amyl-1-O-β-D-apio-furanosyl-1,6-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, respectively.

  19. Two New Glycosides from the Fruits of Morinda citrifolia L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available To study the chemical constituents of the fruits of noni (Morinda citrifolia L., and find novel compounds, an n-butanol extract of the ethanol soluble fraction was subjected to repeated silica gel and ODS column chromatography and HPLC. Two new glycosides were isolated and their structures elucidated by NMR and HRFAB-MS spectrometry as (2E,4E,7Z-deca-2,4,7-trienoate-2-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-β-D-glucopyra-noside (1 and amyl-1-O-β-D-apio-furanosyl-1,6-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (2, respectively.

  20. Two New Flavone Glycosides from Chenopodiumambrosioides Growing Wildly in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala M. Hammoda

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chenopodiumambrosioides (Chenopodiaceae growing wildly in Egypt was subjected to antioxidant –guided phytochemical investigation and the EtOAc fraction afforded the two new flavone glycosides; scutellarein-7-O-α-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2-α-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2-α-rhamnopyranoside (1 and scutella-rein-7-O-α-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2-α-rhamnopyranoside (2. In addition, the invitro antioxidant activities of the plant alcohol extract, CHCl 3 fraction, EtOAc fraction and isolates were studied.

  1. Pentasaccharide resin glycosides from Ipomoea cairica and their cytotoxic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bangwei; Luo, Jianguang; Wang, Junsong; Zhang, Dongming; Yu, Shishan; Kong, Lingyi

    2013-11-01

    Six partially acylated pentasaccharide resin glycosides, cairicosides A-F, were isolated from the aerial parts of Ipomoea cairica. These compounds were characterized as a group of macrolactones of simonic acid A, partially acylated with different organic acids. The lactonization site of 11S-hydroxyhexadecanoic acid (jalapinolic acid) was bound to the second saccharide moiety at C-3 in cairicosides A-E, while at C-2 in cairicoside F. Structures were established by spectroscopic and chemical methods. Compounds cairicosides A-E exhibited moderate cytotoxicity against a small panel of human tumor cell lines with IC50 values in the range of 4.28-14.31μM.

  2. Calysolins I-IV, resin glycosides from Calystegia soldanella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takigawa, Ayako; Muto, Haruka; Kabata, Kiyotaka; Okawa, Masafumi; Kinjo, Junei; Yoshimitsu, Hitoshi; Nohara, Toshihiro; Ono, Masateru

    2011-11-28

    Four new resin glycosides having intramolecular cyclic ester structures (jalapins), named calysolins I-IV (1-4), were isolated from the methanol extract of leaves, stems, and roots of Calystegia soldanella , along with one known jalapin (5) derivative. The structures of 1-4 were determined on the basis of spectroscopic data and chemical evidence. They fall into two types, one having a 22-membered ring (1 and 4) and the other with a 27-membered ring (2 and 3). The sugar moieties of 1-4 were partially acylated by some organic acids. Compound 4 is the first example of a hexaglycoside of jalapin.

  3. A New Iridoid Glycoside from the Roots of Dipsacus asper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonglin Yang

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A new iridoid glycoside, named loganic acid ethyl ester (1, together with five known compounds: chlorogenic acid (2, caffeic acid (3, loganin (4, cantleyoside (5 and syringaresinol-4′,4′′-O-bis-β-D-glucoside (6 were isolated from the roots of Dipsacus asper. The structure of compound 1 was elucidated on the basis of detailed spectroscopic analyses. Lignan is isolated from Dipsacaceae species for the first time. Compounds 1, 4 and 5 had moderate neuroprotective effects against the Aβ25–35 induced cell death in PC12 cells.

  4. In situ absorption and metabolism of stilbene glycoside in rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Stilbene glycoside(TSG)has been shown to have many beneficial properties.It is therefore essential to understand the absorption and metabolism of TSG in detail.We determined the recovery of TSG and its metabolites(TSG sulfate/glucuronides)in rat gastric contents,gastric mucosa,portal vein plasma,celiac arterial plasma,bile,and urine after administration of 15 mg of TSG in 0.5 mL physiological saline or incubation for 20 min in situ in the stomach of rats.Within 20 min,(64.0±9.8)% of the administered TSG dis...

  5. A Low-Energy Fast Cyber Foraging Mechanism for Mobile Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Kafaie, Somayeh; Sharifi, Mohsen; 10.5121/ijwmn.2011.3516

    2011-01-01

    The ever increasing demands for using resource-constrained mobile devices for running more resource intensive applications nowadays has initiated the development of cyber foraging solutions that offload parts or whole computational intensive tasks to more powerful surrogate stationary computers and run them on behalf of mobile devices as required. The choice of proper mix of mobile devices and surrogates has remained an unresolved challenge though. In this paper, we propose a new decision-making mechanism for cyber foraging systems to select the best locations to run an application, based on context metrics such as the specifications of surrogates, the specifications of mobile devices, application specification, and communication network specification. Experimental results show faster response time and lower energy consumption of benched applications compared to when applications run wholly on mobile devices and when applications are offloaded to surrogates blindly for execution.

  6. Does the Waggle Dance Help Honey Bees to Forage at Greater Distances than Expected for their Body Size?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis L.W. Ratnieks

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A honey bee colony has been likened to an oil company. Some members of the company or colony prospect for valuable liquid resources. When these are discovered other group members can be recruited to exploit the resource. The recruitment of nestmates to a specific location where there is a patch of flowers should change the economics of scouting, that is, the search for new resource patches. In particular, communication is predicted to make scouting at longer distances worthwhile because a profitable resource patch, once discovered, will enhance the foraging not only of the discoverer but also of nestmates that can be directed to the patch. By virtue of having large colonies and dance communication, honey bees are predicted to be able to profitably scout, and hence forage, at greater distances from the nest than either solitary bees or social bees without communication. We test this hypothesis by first examining existing data on foraging distance to evaluate whether honey bees do indeed forage at greater distances than other bees given their body size. Second, we present a simple cost-benefit analysis of scouting which indicates that communication causes longer range scouting to be more profitable. Overall, our analyses are supportive, but not conclusive, that honey bees forage further than would be expected given their size and that the waggle dance is a cause of the honey bee’s exceptional foraging range.

  7. Two new nor-triterpene glycosides from peruvian "Uña de Gato" (Uncaria tomentosa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Mariko; Hashimoto, Ken-Ichiro; Yokoya, Masashi; Takayama, Hiromitsu; Sandoval, Manuel; Aimi, Norio

    2003-02-01

    Two new 27-nor-triterpene glycosides, tomentosides A (1) and B (2), were isolated from Peruvian "Uña de Gato" (cat's claw, plant of origin: Uncaria tomentosa), a traditional herbal medicine in Peru. Their structures were determined by spectroscopic analysis and chemical interconversions. This is the first report of naturally occurring pyroquinovic acid glycosides.

  8. Synthesis and evaluation of cardiac glycoside mimics as potential anticancer drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Marie; Schmidt, Steffen; Fedosova, Natalya

    2011-01-01

    The cardiac glycoside digitoxin, consisting of a steroid core linked to a labile trisaccharide, has been used for centuries for the treatment of congestive heart failure. The well known pharmacological effect is a result of the ability of cardiac glycosides to inhibit the Na(+), K(+)-ATPase. With...

  9. A GH57 4-alpha-glucanotransferase of hyperthermophilic origin with potential for alkyl glycoside production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paul, Catherine J.; Leemhuis, Hans; Dobruchowska, Justyna M.; Grey, Carl; Onnby, Linda; van Leeuwen, Sander S.; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Karlsson, Eva Nordberg

    4-alpha-Glucanotransferase (GTase) enzymes (EC 2.4.1.25) modulate the size of alpha-glucans by cleaving and reforming alpha-1,4 glycosidic bonds in alpha-glucans, an essential process in starch and glycogen metabolism in plants and microorganisms. The glycoside hydrolase family 57 enzyme (GTase57)

  10. Two new secoiridoid glycosides from the rhizomes of Gentiana scabra Bunge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Ah; Son, Nam Seo; Son, Jong Keun; Jahng, Yurngdong; Chang, Hyeun Wook; Jang, Tae Su; Na, Minkyun; Lee, Seung-Ho

    2009-06-01

    Two new secoiridoid glycosides, 4'''-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyltrifloroside 1 and 4'''-O-beta-D-glucopyranosylscabraside 2, along with three known secoiridoids were isolated from the rhizomes of Gentiana scabra (Gentianaceae) in our recent phytochemical study. Their chemical structures were determined by spectroscopic data including 1D and 2D NMR spectra. The chemotaxonomic significance of the secoiridoid glycosides is briefly discussed.

  11. A GH57 4-alpha-glucanotransferase of hyperthermophilic origin with potential for alkyl glycoside production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paul, Catherine J.; Leemhuis, Hans; Dobruchowska, Justyna M.; Grey, Carl; Onnby, Linda; van Leeuwen, Sander S.; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Karlsson, Eva Nordberg

    2015-01-01

    4-alpha-Glucanotransferase (GTase) enzymes (EC 2.4.1.25) modulate the size of alpha-glucans by cleaving and reforming alpha-1,4 glycosidic bonds in alpha-glucans, an essential process in starch and glycogen metabolism in plants and microorganisms. The glycoside hydrolase family 57 enzyme (GTase57) s

  12. Structural Characterization of Anhydroicaritin Glycosides Using ESI-FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) was used to determine the structures of anhydroicaritin glycosides by the MS/MS experiments of anhydroicaritin glycosides and their methylated derivatives. With high accuracy FT-ICR-MS provides much information about the structures of compounds, FT-ICR-MS shows the great potential application in the structural characterization of unknown compounds.

  13. Uncovering the complexity of ant foraging trails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaczkes, Tomer J; Grüter, Christoph; Jones, Sam M; Ratnieks, Francis L W

    2012-01-01

    The common garden ant Lasius niger use both trail pheromones and memory of past visits to navigate to and from food sources. In a recent paper we demonstrated a synergistic effect between route memory and trail pheromones: the presence of trail pheromones results in experienced ants walking straighter and faster. We also found that experienced ants leaving a pheromone trail deposit less pheromone. Here we focus on another finding of the experiment: the presence of cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs), which are used as home range markers by ants, also affects pheromone deposition behavior. When walking on a trail on which CHCs are present but trail pheromones are not, experienced foragers deposit less pheromone on the outward journey than on the return journey. The regulatory mechanisms ants use during foraging and recruitment behavior is subtle and complex, affected by multiple interacting factors such as route memory, travel direction and the presence trail pheromone and home-range markings.

  14. 2-C-branched glycosides from 2'-carbonylalkyl 2-O-Ms(Ts)-C-glycosides. A tandem SN2-SN2 reaction via 1,2-cyclopropanated sugars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Huawu; Ekthawatchai, Sanchai; Wu, Shih-Hsiung; Zou, Wei

    2004-09-30

    [reaction: see text] Under basic conditions, 2'-aldehydo (acetonyl) 2-O-Ms(Ts)-alpha-C-glycosides undergo an intramolecular S(N)2 reaction to form 1,2-cyclopropanated sugars, which react with nucleophiles (alcohols, thiols, and azide) at the anomeric carbon to give 2-C-branched glycosides. By way of contrast, the 1,2-cyclopropanes derived from 2'-ketones only react with thiols to give 2-C-branched thioglycosides.

  15. 1-C-(2 '-Oxoalkyl)-Glycosides as Latent α, β-Unsaturated Conjugates. Synthesis of Aza-C-glycosides and Thio-C-Glycosides by an Intramolecular Hetero-michael Addition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Yi; An-tai WU; Shih-hsiung WU; Wei ZOU

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction Aza-sugars, a class of polyhydroxylated pyrrolidine and piperidine, are powerful glyco-processing enzyme inhibitors and potential therapeutics for the treatment of diabetic, cancer, viral infection and other diseases[1].For example, N-hydroxyethyl-1-deoxynojirimycin (Miglitol) and N-butyl-1-deoxynojirimycin (Zavestca)have been approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and type 1 Gaucher disease, respectively. Numerous synthetic methods towards azasugars have been developed[1,2] which include various reductive and double-reductive amination between an azido/amino group and carbonyl groups and SN2 substitutions by nucleophilic amine to epoxides, halides, and other leaving groups. Aza-C-glycosides, azasugars with a C-linked aglycon,which often possess improved inhibition specificity and membrane permeability, have been obtained from azasugars via an elimination reaction followed by the addition of organometallic reagent, and from properly constructed substrates by an intramolecular or intermolecular conjugate additions of nucleophilic amines[3,4]. One of the major limitations associated with these procedures, however, is the accessibility of the intermediates,which highly depend on the stereochemistry of the hydroxy groups of the starting material to achieve regio-selective protection. Therefore, an easy access to molecules with both amine and α ,β-unsaturated ester (ketone) functionalities is desired.

  16. Adaptive Levy walks in foraging fallow deer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Focardi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lévy flights are random walks, the step lengths of which come from probability distributions with heavy power-law tails, such that clusters of short steps are connected by rare long steps. Lévy walks maximise search efficiency of mobile foragers. Recently, several studies raised some concerns about the reliability of the statistical analysis used in previous analyses. Further, it is unclear whether Lévy walks represent adaptive strategies or emergent properties determined by the interaction between foragers and resource distribution. Thus two fundamental questions still need to be addressed: the presence of Lévy walks in the wild and whether or not they represent a form of adaptive behaviour. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied 235 paths of solitary and clustered (i.e. foraging in group fallow deer (Dama dama, exploiting the same pasture. We used maximum likelihood estimation for discriminating between a power-tailed distribution and the exponential alternative and rank/frequency plots to discriminate between Lévy walks and composite Brownian walks. We showed that solitary deer perform Lévy searches, while clustered animals did not adopt that strategy. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our demonstration of the presence of Lévy walks is, at our knowledge, the first available which adopts up-to-date statistical methodologies in a terrestrial mammal. Comparing solitary and clustered deer, we concluded that the Lévy walks of solitary deer represent an adaptation maximising encounter rates with forage resources and not an epiphenomenon induced by a peculiar food distribution.

  17. Effect of interactions between harvester ants on forager decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob D Davidson

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Harvester ant colonies adjust their foraging activity to day-to-day changes in food availability and hour-to-hour changes in environmental conditions. This collective behavior is regulated through interactions, in the form of brief antennal contacts, between outgoing foragers and returning foragers with food. Here we consider how an ant, waiting in the entrance chamber just inside the nest entrance, uses its accumulated experience of interactions to decide whether to leave the nest to forage. Using videos of field observations, we tracked the interactions and foraging decisions of ants in the entrance chamber. Outgoing foragers tended to interact with returning foragers at higher rates than ants that returned to the deeper nest and did not forage. To provide a mechanistic framework for interpreting these results, we develop a decision model in which ants make decisions based upon a noisy accumulation of individual contacts with returning foragers. The model can reproduce core trends and realistic distributions for individual ant interaction statistics, and suggests possible mechanisms by which foraging activity may be regulated at an individual ant level.

  18. Quantitation of sweet steviol glycosides by means of a HILIC-MS/MS-SIDA approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Well, Caroline; Frank, Oliver; Hofmann, Thomas

    2013-11-27

    Meeting the rising consumer demand for natural food ingredients, steviol glycosides, the sweet principle of Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni (Bertoni), have recently been approved as food additives in the European Union. As regulatory constraints require sensitive methods to analyze the sweet-tasting steviol glycosides in foods and beverages, a HILIC-MS/MS method was developed enabling the accurate and reliable quantitation of the major steviol glycosides stevioside, rebaudiosides A-F, steviolbioside, rubusoside, and dulcoside A by using the corresponding deuterated 16,17-dihydrosteviol glycosides as suitable internal standards. This quantitation not only enables the analysis of the individual steviol glycosides in foods and beverages but also can support the optimization of breeding and postharvest downstream processing of Stevia plants to produce preferentially sweet and least bitter tasting Stevia extracts.

  19. Synthesis of gold nanoparticles with glycosides: synthetic trends based on the structures of glycones and aglycones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jisung; Park, Suryeon; Hong, Suckchang; Ha, Min Woo; Park, Hyeung-geun; Park, Youmie; Lee, Hyo-Jong; Park, Yohan

    2014-03-11

    A new, room temperature synthetic method for gold nanoparticles from auric acid with glycosides as reducing agents in aqueous NaOH is presented. As a mechanistic study of the oxidation sites on the glycosides, eight sugar-containing reductants (glycoside, glucose, glucuronic acid) have been tested in the synthesis of gold nanoparticles to determine their trends based on the structures of glycones and aglycones. As a result of the comparison among the eight sugar-containing reductants, it was determined that C-6 of glycosides is oxidized to a carboxylic acid during the reduction of auric acid. To detect the oxidized compounds of the glycosides, the reaction mixtures were monitored by (13)C NMR. Among the eight sugar-containing reductants, phenyl β-D-glucoside generated the highest synthetic yield of mono-dispersed, round gold nanoparticles (13.15±1.30 nm, 99.7% yield).

  20. Merremins A-G, resin glycosides from Merremia hederacea with multidrug resistance reversal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-qiong; Song, Wei-bin; Lan, Xiao-jing; Huang, Min; Xuan, Li-jiang

    2014-10-24

    Five new pentasaccharide resin glycosides, named merremins A-E (1-5), two new pentasaccharide resin glycoside methyl esters, named merremins F and G (6, 7), and four known resin glycosides, murucoidin IV, murucoidin V, stoloniferin IV, and murucoidin XVII, were obtained from the aerial parts of Merremia hederacea. This is the first report of resin glycosides obtained from M. hederacea. In addition, the new compounds can be divided into three types: those possessing an 18-membered ring (1-4), compound 5 with a 20-membered ring, and those with an acyclic core (6, 7). Furthermore, the different types of resin glycosides were evaluated for their multidrug resistance reversal activities. Compounds 1, 5, 6, and murucoidin V were noncytotoxic and enhanced the cytotoxicity of vinblastine by 2.3-142.5-fold at 25 μM. Compound 5 and murucoidin V, with 20-membered rings, were more active than compound 1, with an 18-membered ring.

  1. Utilisation of intensive foraging zones by female Australian fur seals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Hoskins

    Full Text Available Within a heterogeneous environment, animals must efficiently locate and utilise foraging patches. One way animals can achieve this is by increasing residency times in areas where foraging success is highest (area-restricted search. For air-breathing diving predators, increased patch residency times can be achieved by altering both surface movements and diving patterns. The current study aimed to spatially identify the areas where female Australian fur seals allocated the most foraging effort, while simultaneously determining the behavioural changes that occur when they increase their foraging intensity. To achieve this, foraging behaviour was successfully recorded with a FastLoc GPS logger and dive behaviour recorder from 29 individual females provisioning pups. Females travelled an average of 118 ± 50 km from their colony during foraging trips that lasted 7.3 ± 3.4 days. Comparison of two methods for calculating foraging intensity (first-passage time and first-passage time modified to include diving behaviour determined that, due to extended surface intervals where individuals did not travel, inclusion of diving behaviour into foraging analyses was important for this species. Foraging intensity 'hot spots' were found to exist in a mosaic of patches within the Bass Basin, primarily to the south-west of the colony. However, the composition of benthic habitat being targeted remains unclear. When increasing their foraging intensity, individuals tended to perform dives around 148 s or greater, with descent/ascent rates of approximately 1.9 m•s-1 or greater and reduced postdive durations. This suggests individuals were maximising their time within the benthic foraging zone. Furthermore, individuals increased tortuosity and decreased travel speeds while at the surface to maximise their time within a foraging location. These results suggest Australian fur seals will modify both surface movements and diving behaviour to maximise their time within a

  2. Utilisation of intensive foraging zones by female Australian fur seals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskins, Andrew J; Costa, Daniel P; Arnould, John P Y

    2015-01-01

    Within a heterogeneous environment, animals must efficiently locate and utilise foraging patches. One way animals can achieve this is by increasing residency times in areas where foraging success is highest (area-restricted search). For air-breathing diving predators, increased patch residency times can be achieved by altering both surface movements and diving patterns. The current study aimed to spatially identify the areas where female Australian fur seals allocated the most foraging effort, while simultaneously determining the behavioural changes that occur when they increase their foraging intensity. To achieve this, foraging behaviour was successfully recorded with a FastLoc GPS logger and dive behaviour recorder from 29 individual females provisioning pups. Females travelled an average of 118 ± 50 km from their colony during foraging trips that lasted 7.3 ± 3.4 days. Comparison of two methods for calculating foraging intensity (first-passage time and first-passage time modified to include diving behaviour) determined that, due to extended surface intervals where individuals did not travel, inclusion of diving behaviour into foraging analyses was important for this species. Foraging intensity 'hot spots' were found to exist in a mosaic of patches within the Bass Basin, primarily to the south-west of the colony. However, the composition of benthic habitat being targeted remains unclear. When increasing their foraging intensity, individuals tended to perform dives around 148 s or greater, with descent/ascent rates of approximately 1.9 m•s-1 or greater and reduced postdive durations. This suggests individuals were maximising their time within the benthic foraging zone. Furthermore, individuals increased tortuosity and decreased travel speeds while at the surface to maximise their time within a foraging location. These results suggest Australian fur seals will modify both surface movements and diving behaviour to maximise their time within a foraging patch.

  3. Utilisation of Intensive Foraging Zones by Female Australian Fur Seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskins, Andrew J.; Costa, Daniel P.; Arnould, John P. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Within a heterogeneous environment, animals must efficiently locate and utilise foraging patches. One way animals can achieve this is by increasing residency times in areas where foraging success is highest (area-restricted search). For air-breathing diving predators, increased patch residency times can be achieved by altering both surface movements and diving patterns. The current study aimed to spatially identify the areas where female Australian fur seals allocated the most foraging effort, while simultaneously determining the behavioural changes that occur when they increase their foraging intensity. To achieve this, foraging behaviour was successfully recorded with a FastLoc GPS logger and dive behaviour recorder from 29 individual females provisioning pups. Females travelled an average of 118 ± 50 km from their colony during foraging trips that lasted 7.3 ± 3.4 days. Comparison of two methods for calculating foraging intensity (first-passage time and first-passage time modified to include diving behaviour) determined that, due to extended surface intervals where individuals did not travel, inclusion of diving behaviour into foraging analyses was important for this species. Foraging intensity ‘hot spots’ were found to exist in a mosaic of patches within the Bass Basin, primarily to the south-west of the colony. However, the composition of benthic habitat being targeted remains unclear. When increasing their foraging intensity, individuals tended to perform dives around 148 s or greater, with descent/ascent rates of approximately 1.9 m•s-1 or greater and reduced postdive durations. This suggests individuals were maximising their time within the benthic foraging zone. Furthermore, individuals increased tortuosity and decreased travel speeds while at the surface to maximise their time within a foraging location. These results suggest Australian fur seals will modify both surface movements and diving behaviour to maximise their time within a foraging patch

  4. Salt preferences of honey bee water foragers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Pierre W; Nieh, James C

    2016-03-01

    The importance of dietary salt may explain why bees are often observed collecting brackish water, a habit that may expose them to harmful xenobiotics. However, the individual salt preferences of water-collecting bees were not known. We measured the proboscis extension reflex (PER) response of Apis mellifera water foragers to 0-10% w/w solutions of Na, Mg and K, ions that provide essential nutrients. We also tested phosphate, which can deter foraging. Bees exhibited significant preferences, with the most PER responses for 1.5-3% Na and 1.5% Mg. However, K and phosphate were largely aversive and elicited PER responses only for the lowest concentrations, suggesting a way to deter bees from visiting contaminated water. We then analyzed the salt content of water sources that bees collected in urban and semi-urban environments. Bees collected water with a wide range of salt concentrations, but most collected water sources had relatively low salt concentrations, with the exception of seawater and swimming pools, which had >0.6% Na. The high levels of PER responsiveness elicited by 1.5-3% Na may explain why bees are willing to collect such salty water. Interestingly, bees exhibited high individual variation in salt preferences: individual identity accounted for 32% of variation in PER responses. Salt specialization may therefore occur in water foragers.

  5. BIOACCUMULATION OF HEAVY METALS IN FORAGE GRASSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Łukowski

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was estimation of bioaccumulation of heavy metals (Pb, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd in forage grasses from the area of Podlasie Province based on the bioaccumulation factor. In the soil samples the pH, organic carbon content and CEC were determined. Determination of heavy metals contents in plant and soil material was carried out by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Soils were characterized mainly by acidic reaction, high cation exchange capacity and organic carbon content. The content of heavy metals in studied forage grasses did not exceed the polish regulations related to plant usage for feeding purposes, except the lead content in seven samples. Coefficients of variation for particular heavy metals content in studied forage grasses were as follows: Pb - 37%, Ni - 63%, Cu - 30%, Zn - 34%, Cd - 48%. The highest bioaccumulation factor was found for nickel and grass from the village Remieńkiń (11.54, while the lowest for cadmium and grass from the village Jemieliste (0.04.

  6. Polydomy enhances foraging performance in ant colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroeymeyt, N; Joye, P; Keller, L

    2017-04-26

    Collective foraging confers benefits in terms of reduced predation risk and access to social information, but it heightens local competition when resources are limited. In social insects, resource limitation has been suggested as a possible cause for the typical decrease in per capita productivity observed with increasing colony size, a phenomenon known as Michener's paradox. Polydomy (distribution of a colony's brood and workers across multiple nests) is believed to help circumvent this paradox through its positive effect on foraging efficiency, but there is still little supporting evidence for this hypothesis. Here, we show experimentally that polydomy enhances the foraging performance of food-deprived Temnothorax nylanderi ant colonies via several mechanisms. First, polydomy influences task allocation within colonies, resulting in faster retrieval of protein resources. Second, communication between sister nests reduces search times for far away resources. Third, colonies move queens, brood and workers across available nest sites in response to spatial heterogeneities in protein and carbohydrate resources. This suggests that polydomy represents a flexible mechanism for space occupancy, helping ant colonies adjust to the environment. © 2017 The Author(s).

  7. High-pressure hetero-Diels-Alder route to (+/-)-6,6,6-trifluoro-beta-C-naphthyl glycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maingot, Lucie; Leconte, Stéphane; Chataigner, Isabelle; Martel, Arnaud; Dujardin, Gilles

    2009-04-02

    The first de novo synthesis of a beta-C-naphthyl glycoside displaying a convenient functionality for subsequent transformations into complex C-aryl glycosides is reported. The synthesis of this (+/-)-beta-C-1,5-dibenzyloxynaphthyl 6,6,6-trifluoro-3-amino glycoside relies on a hyperbaric HDA reaction involving a new 2-vinylnaphthalenic dienophile.

  8. Structural relationships in the lysozyme superfamily: significant evidence for glycoside hydrolase signature motifs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Wohlkönig

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chitin is a polysaccharide that forms the hard, outer shell of arthropods and the cell walls of fungi and some algae. Peptidoglycan is a polymer of sugars and amino acids constituting the cell walls of most bacteria. Enzymes that are able to hydrolyze these cell membrane polymers generally play important roles for protecting plants and animals against infection with insects and pathogens. A particular group of such glycoside hydrolase enzymes share some common features in their three-dimensional structure and in their molecular mechanism, forming the lysozyme superfamily. RESULTS: Besides having a similar fold, all known catalytic domains of glycoside hydrolase proteins of lysozyme superfamily (families and subfamilies GH19, GH22, GH23, GH24 and GH46 share in common two structural elements: the central helix of the all-α domain, which invariably contains the catalytic glutamate residue acting as general-acid catalyst, and a β-hairpin pointed towards the substrate binding cleft. The invariant β-hairpin structure is interestingly found to display the highest amino acid conservation in aligned sequences of a given family, thereby allowing to define signature motifs for each GH family. Most of such signature motifs are found to have promising performances for searching sequence databases. Our structural analysis further indicates that the GH motifs participate in enzymatic catalysis essentially by containing the catalytic water positioning residue of inverting mechanism. CONCLUSIONS: The seven families and subfamilies of the lysozyme superfamily all have in common a β-hairpin structure which displays a family-specific sequence motif. These GH β-hairpin motifs contain potentially important residues for the catalytic activity, thereby suggesting the participation of the GH motif to catalysis and also revealing a common catalytic scheme utilized by enzymes of the lysozyme superfamily.

  9. Bottom-Up Elucidation of Glycosidic Bond Stereochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Christopher J; Schindler, Baptiste; Migas, Lukasz G; Pičmanová, Martina; Allouche, Abdul R; Green, Anthony P; Mandal, Santanu; Motawia, Mohammed S; Sánchez-Pérez, Raquel; Bjarnholt, Nanna; Møller, Birger L; Rijs, Anouk M; Barran, Perdita E; Compagnon, Isabelle; Eyers, Claire E; Flitsch, Sabine L

    2017-04-18

    The lack of robust, high-throughput, and sensitive analytical strategies that can conclusively map the structure of glycans has significantly hampered progress in fundamental and applied aspects of glycoscience. Resolution of the anomeric α/β glycan linkage within oligosaccharides remains a particular challenge. Here, we show that "memory" of anomeric configuration is retained following gas-phase glycosidic bond fragmentation during tandem mass spectrometry (MS(2)). These findings allow for integration of MS(2) with ion mobility spectrometry (IM-MS(2)) and lead to a strategy to distinguish α- and β-linkages within natural underivatized carbohydrates. We have applied this fragment-based hyphenated MS technology to oligosaccharide standards and to de novo sequencing of purified plant metabolite glycoconjugates, showing that the anomeric signature is also observable in fragments derived from larger glycans. The discovery of the unexpected anomeric memory effect is further supported by IR-MS action spectroscopy and ab initio calculations. Quantum mechanical calculations provide candidate geometries for the distinct anomeric fragment ions, in turn shedding light on gas-phase dissociation mechanisms of glycosidic linkages.

  10. Glycosidated phospholipids - a promising group of anti-tumour lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semini, Geo; Hildmann, Annette; von Haefen, Clarissa; Danker, Kerstin

    2014-05-01

    Synthetic alkylphospholipids (APLs), exhibit similarity to the platelet-activating factor (PAF). These compounds have antiproliferative effects on tumour cells and can therefore be regarded as a new class of drugs. Unlike classic cytostatic agents, synthetic alkylphospholipids do not interfere with the DNA or the mitotic spindle apparatus. Instead, due to their aliphatic character, alkylphospholipids accumulate in cell membranes, where they have an impact on lipid metabolism and lipid-dependent signalling pathways which leads to inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis in malignant cells. Normal cells remain unaffected by these compounds. Glycosidated phospholipids, are a novel class of alkylphospholipids, in which carbohydrates or carbohydrate-related molecules are introduced in the chemical lead of PAF. These hybrid alkylphospholipids also exhibit anti-proliferative capacity. Furthermore, members of this subfamily also modulate cell adhesion, differentiation, apoptosis and migration of tumour cells. Among the members of this group, Inositol-C2-platelet-activating factor (Ino-C2-PAF) is the most effective compound developed so far. Recently, we also showed that Ino-C2-PAF exhibited the strongest impact on the gene expression levels of immortalised keratinocytes in comparison to edelfosine and another glycosidated alkylphospholipid, Glucose-platelet-activating factor (Glc-PAF). Furthermore, Ino-C2-PAF reduced the expression of genes encoding proteins associated with inflammation and the innate and acquired immune responses.

  11. Steviol Glycosides Modulate Glucose Transport in Different Cell Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Benedetta; Zambonin, Laura; Leoncini, Emanuela; Vieceli Dalla Sega, Francesco; Prata, Cecilia; Fiorentini, Diana; Hrelia, Silvana

    2013-01-01

    Extracts from Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni, a plant native to Central and South America, have been used as a sweetener since ancient times. Currently, Stevia extracts are largely used as a noncaloric high-potency biosweetener alternative to sugar, due to the growing incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus, obesity, and metabolic disorders worldwide. Despite the large number of studies on Stevia and steviol glycosides in vivo, little is reported concerning the cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning the beneficial effects on human health. The effect of four commercial Stevia extracts on glucose transport activity was evaluated in HL-60 human leukaemia and in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. The extracts were able to enhance glucose uptake in both cellular lines, as efficiently as insulin. Our data suggest that steviol glycosides could act by modulating GLUT translocation through the PI3K/Akt pathway since treatments with both insulin and Stevia extracts increased the phosphorylation of PI3K and Akt. Furthermore, Stevia extracts were able to revert the effect of the reduction of glucose uptake caused by methylglyoxal, an inhibitor of the insulin receptor/PI3K/Akt pathway. These results corroborate the hypothesis that Stevia extracts could mimic insulin effects modulating PI3K/Akt pathway. PMID:24327825

  12. Anti-HIV diphyllin glycosides from Justicia gendarussa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Jie; Rumschlag-Booms, Emily; Guan, Yi-Fu; Liu, Kang-Lun; Wang, Dong-Ying; Li, Wan-Fei; Nguyen, Van Hung; Cuong, Nguyen Manh; Soejarto, Djaja Doel; Fong, Harry H S; Rong, Lijun

    2017-04-01

    In a search for new anti-HIV active leads from over several thousands of plant extracts, we have identified a potent plant lead. The active plant is determined as Justicia gendarussa (Acanthaceae), a medicinal plant that has been used for the treatment of injury, arthritis and rheumatism in Asia including China. Our bioassay-guided fractionation of the methanol extract of the stems and barks of the plant led to the isolation of two anti-HIV compounds, justiprocumins A and B. The compounds are identified as new arylnaphthalide lignans (ANL) glycosides. We further determined that the ANL glycosides are the chemical constituents that contribute to the anti-HIV activity of this plant. Justiprocumin B displayed potent activity against a broad spectrum of HIV strains with IC50 values in the range of 15-21 nM (AZT, IC50 77-95 nM). The compound also displayed potent inhibitory activity against the NRTI (nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor)-resistant isolate (HIV-11617-1) of the analogue (AZT) as well as the NNRTI (non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor)-resistant isolate (HIV-1N119) of the analogue (nevaripine).

  13. Steviol Glycosides Modulate Glucose Transport in Different Cell Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedetta Rizzo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracts from Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni, a plant native to Central and South America, have been used as a sweetener since ancient times. Currently, Stevia extracts are largely used as a noncaloric high-potency biosweetener alternative to sugar, due to the growing incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus, obesity, and metabolic disorders worldwide. Despite the large number of studies on Stevia and steviol glycosides in vivo, little is reported concerning the cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning the beneficial effects on human health. The effect of four commercial Stevia extracts on glucose transport activity was evaluated in HL-60 human leukaemia and in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. The extracts were able to enhance glucose uptake in both cellular lines, as efficiently as insulin. Our data suggest that steviol glycosides could act by modulating GLUT translocation through the PI3K/Akt pathway since treatments with both insulin and Stevia extracts increased the phosphorylation of PI3K and Akt. Furthermore, Stevia extracts were able to revert the effect of the reduction of glucose uptake caused by methylglyoxal, an inhibitor of the insulin receptor/PI3K/Akt pathway. These results corroborate the hypothesis that Stevia extracts could mimic insulin effects modulating PI3K/Akt pathway.

  14. Steviol glycosides modulate glucose transport in different cell types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Benedetta; Zambonin, Laura; Angeloni, Cristina; Leoncini, Emanuela; Dalla Sega, Francesco Vieceli; Prata, Cecilia; Fiorentini, Diana; Hrelia, Silvana

    2013-01-01

    Extracts from Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni, a plant native to Central and South America, have been used as a sweetener since ancient times. Currently, Stevia extracts are largely used as a noncaloric high-potency biosweetener alternative to sugar, due to the growing incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus, obesity, and metabolic disorders worldwide. Despite the large number of studies on Stevia and steviol glycosides in vivo, little is reported concerning the cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning the beneficial effects on human health. The effect of four commercial Stevia extracts on glucose transport activity was evaluated in HL-60 human leukaemia and in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. The extracts were able to enhance glucose uptake in both cellular lines, as efficiently as insulin. Our data suggest that steviol glycosides could act by modulating GLUT translocation through the PI3K/Akt pathway since treatments with both insulin and Stevia extracts increased the phosphorylation of PI3K and Akt. Furthermore, Stevia extracts were able to revert the effect of the reduction of glucose uptake caused by methylglyoxal, an inhibitor of the insulin receptor/PI3K/Akt pathway. These results corroborate the hypothesis that Stevia extracts could mimic insulin effects modulating PI3K/Akt pathway.

  15. Iridoid glycosides from the root of Acanthus sennii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etagegnehu Assefa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Context: Acanthus sennii is a plant traditionally used for the treatment of antifungal, cytotoxic, anti-inflammatory, antipyretic, antioxidant, insecticidal, hepatoprotective, immunomodulatory, anti-platelet aggregation and anti-viral potential. Aims: To investigate the phytochemical constituents of roots of Acanthus sennii. Methods: Phytochemical screening tests were conducted to identify the class of compounds present in the root extract. Silica gel column chromatographic technique was applied to separate the constituents of the extracts. Various spectroscopic techniques (IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, DEPT-135, COSY, gHSQC, and gHMBC were applied to determine the structures of isolated compounds. Results: Phytochemical screening of the dichloromethane/methanol (1:1 and methanol (100% root extract of the plant revealed the presence of phenolic compounds, steroids, flavonoids, and terpenes. Chromatographic separation of dichloromethane/methanol (1:1 root extract of Acanthus sennii yielded two iridoid glycosides (1, 2. Conclusions: The roots of Acanthus senni contain various class of constituents such as flavonoids, phenols, terpenoids, tannins, and iridoid glycosides identified through phytochemical screening test and purification process, which might be responsible for the traditional use of the plant. To the best of our knowledge, these compounds are isolated for the first time from this genus.

  16. A new glycosidic flavonoid from Jwarhar mahakashay (antipyretic) Ayurvedic preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Mradu; Shaw, B P; Mukherjee, A

    2010-04-01

    The aqueous extract of Jwarhar mahakashay Ayurvedic preparation (from the roots of Hemidesmus indicus R. Br., Rubia cordifolia L., Cissampelos pareira L.; fruits of Terminalia chebula Retz., Emblica officinalis Gaertn., Terminalia bellirica Roxb., Vitis vinifera L., Grewia asiatica L., Salvadora persica L. and granules of Saccharum officinarum L.) has been used as a traditional antipyretic. Experimental studies confirmed its antipyretic-analgesic effect with very low ulcerogenicity and toxicity. Flavonoids, glycosides and tannins were later found to be present in the extract. Detailed chemical investigations were undertaken after hydrolysis of extract using spectroscopic and chromatography methods to determine its active chemical constituent. UV-Visible spectroscopy showed absorbance maxima at 220 and 276 nm, while fourier transform infra-red investigations indicated an end carboxylic O-H structure at 2940 cm(-1) suggesting the presence of glycoside-linked flavonoids. Thin layer chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography also confirmed the possibility of at least one major and two minor compounds in this abstract. Detailed examination using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry led to the identification of the principal component as 2-(1-oxopropyl)-benzoic acid, which is quite similar to the active compound found in the standard drug Aspirin (2-acetyl-oxybenzoic acid).

  17. Allosteric indicator displacement enzyme assay for a cyanogenic glycoside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, D Amilan; Elstner, Martin; Schiller, Alexander

    2013-10-18

    Indicator displacement assays (IDAs) represent an elegant approach in supramolecular analytical chemistry. Herein, we report a chemical biosensor for the selective detection of the cyanogenic glycoside amygdalin in aqueous solution. The hybrid sensor consists of the enzyme β-glucosidase and a boronic acid appended viologen together with a fluorescent reporter dye. β-Glucosidase degrades the cyanogenic glycoside amygdalin into hydrogen cyanide, glucose, and benzaldehyde. Only the released cyanide binds at the allosteric site of the receptor (boronic acid) thereby inducing changes in the affinity of a formerly bound fluorescent indicator dye at the other side of the receptor. Thus, the sensing probe performs as allosteric indicator displacement assay (AIDA) for cyanide in water. Interference studies with inorganic anions and glucose revealed that cyanide is solely responsible for the change in the fluorescent signal. DFT calculations on a model compound revealed a 1:1 binding ratio of the boronic acid and cyanide ion. The fluorescent enzyme assay for β-glucosidase uses amygdalin as natural substrate and allows measuring Michaelis-Menten kinetics in microtiter plates. The allosteric indicator displacement assay (AIDA) probe can also be used to detect cyanide traces in commercial amygdalin samples. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Prey-capture efficiency between juveniles and adults, feeding habitat and abundance of Wattled Jacana foragers in northern Pantanal, Mato Grosso state, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forti, L R; Nóbrega, P F A

    2012-05-01

    The choice of foraging strategies implies an attempt at gaining energy by predators. Supposedly, the difference in employing the "sit and wait" or "active foraging" behavior lays in hunter skills, experience and the kind of prey consumed. With the hypothesis that "active foraging" demands no learning, in this study we compared the prey capture efficiency among Wattled Jacana juveniles and adults, and also present descriptive information about feeding habitat and the abundance variation of foragers throughout the day in the northern Pantanal. Prey capture efficiency did not differ significantly among juveniles and adults, corroborating our initial hypothesis that "active foraging" is an instinctive behavior and demands no experience to be effective. However, future work is necessary to compare the energetic quality of consumed items by juveniles and adults, searching for differences explained by adults' experience. Foraging individuals were found at an average distance of 14 m ranging from 2 to 42 m) from the margin of the sampled swamps, however 64% of the foragers were found closer to the margins. The average depth of foraging sites was 17 cm, ranging from 5 to 40 cm, although no preference for specific classes of depth was found (p > 0,05). Despite the accepted general pattern of birds being more active in the early morning, the largest number of individuals foraging was observed between 11:00 and 12:00 AM, but no significant difference was found in the abundance of foraging individuals among different periods of the day. Factors, which were not analyzed, such as food availability and presence of competitors and predators need to be studied to reveal the main factors of the spatial and temporal distribution of the Wattled Jacana.

  19. Antennal proteome comparison of sexually mature drone and forager honeybees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Mao; Song, Feifei; Aleku, Dereje Woltedji; Han, Bin; Fang, Yu; Li, Jianke

    2011-07-01

    Honeybees have evolved an intricate system of chemical communication to regulate their complex social interactions. Specific proteins involved in odorant detection most likely supported this chemical communication. Odorant reception takes place mainly in the antennae within hairlike structures called olfactory sensilla. Antennal proteomes of sexually mature drone and forager worker bees (an age group of bees assigned to perform field tasks) were compared using two-dimensional electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and bioinformatics. Sixty-one differentially expressed proteins were identified in which 67% were highly upregulated in the drones' antennae whereas only 33% upregulated in the worker bees' antennae. The antennae of the worker bees strongly expressed carbohydrate and energy metabolism and molecular transporters signifying a strong demand for metabolic energy and odorant binding proteins for their foraging activities and other olfactory responses, while proteins related to fatty acid metabolism, antioxidation, and protein folding were strongly upregulated in the drones' antennae as an indication of the importance for the detection and degradation of sex pheromones during queen identification for mating. On the basis of both groups of altered antenna proteins, carbohydrate metabolism and energy production and molecular transporters comprised more than 80% of the functional enrichment analysis and 45% of the constructed biological interaction networks (BIN), respectively. This suggests these two protein families play crucial roles in the antennal olfactory function of sexually mature drone and forager worker bees. Several key node proteins in the BIN were validated at the transcript level. This first global proteomic comparative analysis of antennae reveals sex-biased protein expression in both bees, indicating that odorant response mechanisms are sex-specific because of natural selection for different olfactory

  20. OPTIMAL DESIGN OF SINGLE PHASE TRANSFORMER USING BACTERIAL FORAGING ALGORITHM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.SUBRAMANIAN,

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the transformer design is to obtain the dimensions of all the parts of the transformer based on the given specification, using available materials economically in order to achieve lower cost,reduced size and better operating performance. In this paper, the task of finding optimal design of single phase transformer has been formulated as nonlinear programming problem, so as to meet thespecification with the minimum cost and improve the efficiency. Four independent variables and two constraints are taken to meet the requirement of the design. The method utilizes Bacterial ForagingAlgorithm (BFA to provide optimum design of single phase transformer. The validity of the proposed method has been tested on a sample transformer and the simulation results obtained are compared with conventional method and Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO technique. The simulation results reveal that the proposed scheme determines the optimal variables of transformer along with the performance parameters efficiently.

  1. Thermodynamic properties of water desorption of forage turnip seeds

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly Aparecida Sousa; Osvaldo Resende; André Luis Duarte Goneli; Thaís Adriana de Souza Smaniotto; Daniel Emanuel Cabral de Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the thermodynamic properties of the process of water sorption in forage turnip  seeds. The equilibrium moisture content of forage turnip  seeds was determined by the gravimetric-dynamic method for different values of temperature and water activity. According to the results, increasing the moisture content increases the energy required for the evaporation of water in forage turnip seeds, and the values of integral isosteric heat of desorption, within ...

  2. Thermodynamic properties of water desorption of forage turnip seeds

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa,Kelly Aparecida de; Resende,Osvaldo; Goneli, André Luis Duarte; Smaniotto,Thaís Adriana de Souza; Oliveira,Daniel Emanuel Cabral de

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the thermodynamic properties of the process of water sorption in forage turnip seeds. The equilibrium moisture content of forage turnip seeds was determined by the gravimetric-dynamic method for different values of temperature and water activity. According to the results, increasing the moisture content increases the energy required for the evaporation of water in forage turnip seeds, and the values of integral isosteric heat of desorption, within th...

  3. Information Foraging Theory: A Framework for Intelligence Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Applying information foraging theory to ntelligence analysis This section lays out a plan for the application of IFT to the military...psychologist, 53(5), 533. [24] Wells, V. K. (2012). Foraging: An ecology model of consumer behaviour ? Marketing Theory , 12,117-136. [25] Mantovani, G. (2001...discrete information sources, and the use of semantic cues to enhance the search process. A plan for the application of Information Foraging Theory to the

  4. Interactions between shoal size and conformity in guppy social foraging

    OpenAIRE

    Day, R.L.; MacDonald, T; Brown, C.; Laland, K.N.; Reader, S.M.

    2001-01-01

    Previous experimental studies have established that shoaling fish forage more effectively in large than small groups. We investigated how shoal size affects the foraging efficiency of laboratory populations of the guppy, Poecilia reticulata, exposed to different foraging tasks. Experiment 1 confirmed the prediction that in open water the first fish and focal fish of larger shoals locate food faster than in smaller shoals. However, a second experiment, in which shoals of fish were required to ...

  5. Diallel analysis of maize hybrids for agronomic and bromatological forage traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Henrique Silveira Mendes

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate a diallel of maize hybrids for traits related to forage production and nutritional value. Six commercial hybrids were used as parents. The crosses were made according to a complete diallel design, obtaining the F1 and reciprocal crosses. The evaluations were performed in the main and second crop seasons in the 2010/2011 crop year at the Center for Technological Development in Agriculture of the Federal University of Lavras, located in Lavras, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. The experimental precision indicated by the coefficient of variation was good for all the traits measured. Significant differences were not observed among the crosses for traits related to the nutritional value of the forage. For fresh matter yield and dehusked ear yield, the general combining ability (GCA and specific combining ability (SCA effects were significant. Sowing in the second crop season reduced the yield and nutritional value of the forage. The interaction among the crosses and sowing seasons was not significant. For the beginning of an intrapopulational breeding program, the parent BM 3061 stands out by showing high estimates of GCA for the grain and forage yields.

  6. Patches of bare ground as a staple commodity for declining ground-foraging insectivorous farmland birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Schaub

    Full Text Available Conceived to combat widescale biodiversity erosion in farmland, agri-environment schemes have largely failed to deliver their promises despite massive financial support. While several common species have shown to react positively to existing measures, rare species have continued to decline in most European countries. Of particular concern is the status of insectivorous farmland birds that forage on the ground. We modelled the foraging habitat preferences of four declining insectivorous bird species (hoopoe, wryneck, woodlark, common redstart inhabiting fruit tree plantations, orchards and vineyards. All species preferred foraging in habitat mosaics consisting of patches of grass and bare ground, with an optimal, species-specific bare ground coverage of 30-70% at the foraging patch scale. In the study areas, birds thrived in intensively cultivated farmland where such ground vegetation mosaics existed. Not promoted by conventional agri-environment schemes until now, patches of bare ground should be implemented throughout grassland in order to prevent further decline of insectivorous farmland birds.

  7. Root morphology and mycorrhizal symbioses together shape nutrient foraging strategies of temperate trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weile; Koide, Roger T; Adams, Thomas S; DeForest, Jared L; Cheng, Lei; Eissenstat, David M

    2016-08-01

    Photosynthesis by leaves and acquisition of water and minerals by roots are required for plant growth, which is a key component of many ecosystem functions. Although the role of leaf functional traits in photosynthesis is generally well understood, the relationship of root functional traits to nutrient uptake is not. In particular, predictions of nutrient acquisition strategies from specific root traits are often vague. Roots of nearly all plants cooperate with mycorrhizal fungi in nutrient acquisition. Most tree species form symbioses with either arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) or ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi. Nutrients are distributed heterogeneously in the soil, and nutrient-rich "hotspots" can be a key source for plants. Thus, predicting the foraging strategies that enable mycorrhizal root systems to exploit these hotspots can be critical to the understanding of plant nutrition and ecosystem carbon and nutrient cycling. Here, we show that in 13 sympatric temperate tree species, when nutrient availability is patchy, thinner root species alter their foraging to exploit patches, whereas thicker root species do not. Moreover, there appear to be two distinct pathways by which thinner root tree species enhance foraging in nutrient-rich patches: AM trees produce more roots, whereas EM trees produce more mycorrhizal fungal hyphae. Our results indicate that strategies of nutrient foraging are complementary among tree species with contrasting mycorrhiza types and root morphologies, and that predictable relationships between below-ground traits and nutrient acquisition emerge only when both roots and mycorrhizal fungi are considered together.

  8. Food preference and foraging activity of ants: recommendations for field applications of low-toxicity baits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyamukondiwa, Casper; Addison, Pia

    2014-04-10

    Control of ants using baits of low toxicity cannot be effective without knowledge of bait distribution patterns and bait station densities, which are determined by ants' foraging activities. Furthermore, the success of toxic baits also depends upon attractiveness of bait carriers. Here, we assessed ground and vine foraging activity and food preferences for the three ant species ( Linepithema humile (Mayr) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), Anoplolepis custodiens (F. Smith) and Crematogaster peringueyi Emery) under field conditions. We found that L. humile's vineyard foraging activity was high and that movement of ant bait by C. peringueyi and A. custodiens in the vineyard was relatively low. Consequently, more bait stations need to be dispensed for more effective control of C. peringueyi and A. custodiens than for L. humile. Different bait densities are discussed for the various ant species. Food preference trials indicated that vineyard foraging ants preferred wet bait attractants over dry ones, making liquids the most ideal carriers for baiting these ants. Linepithema humile was attracted to 25% sugar water, while C. peringueyi was attracted to both 25% sugar water and honey. Anoplolepis custodiens was attracted to tuna but was also attracted to 25% sugar water. Thus, future bait formulations should be tailor made to suit these specific food requirements if baits are to be successful in ant pest management. This is an open access paper. We use the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 license that permits unrestricted use, provided that the paper is properly attributed.

  9. Application of genomics to forage crop breeding for quality traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lübberstedt, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Forage quality depends on the digestibility of fodder, and can be directly measured by the intake and metabolic conversion in animal trials. However, animal trials are time-consuming, laborious, and thus expensive. It is not possible to study thousands of plant genotypes, as required in breeding...... studied in detail and sequence motifs with likely effect on forage quality have been identified by association studies. Moreover, transgenic approaches substantiated the effect of several of these genes on forage quality. Perspectives and limitations of these findings for forage crop breeding...

  10. Adaptive collective foraging in groups with conflicting nutritional needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, Alistair M.; Lihoreau, Mathieu; Charleston, Michael A.; Buhl, Jerome; Raubenheimer, David; Simpson, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Collective foraging, based on positive feedback and quorum responses, is believed to improve the foraging efficiency of animals. Nutritional models suggest that social information transfer increases the ability of foragers with closely aligned nutritional needs to find nutrients and maintain a balanced diet. However, whether or not collective foraging is adaptive in a heterogeneous group composed of individuals with differing nutritional needs is virtually unexplored. Here we develop an evolutionary agent-based model using concepts of nutritional ecology to address this knowledge gap. Our aim was to evaluate how collective foraging, mediated by social retention on foods, can improve nutrient balancing in individuals with different requirements. The model suggests that in groups where inter-individual nutritional needs are unimodally distributed, high levels of collective foraging yield optimal individual fitness by reducing search times that result from moving between nutritionally imbalanced foods. However, where nutritional needs are highly bimodal (e.g. where the requirements of males and females differ) collective foraging is selected against, leading to group fission. In this case, additional mechanisms such as assortative interactions can coevolve to allow collective foraging by subgroups of individuals with aligned requirements. Our findings indicate that collective foraging is an efficient strategy for nutrient regulation in animals inhabiting complex nutritional environments and exhibiting a range of social forms. PMID:27152206

  11. Adaptive collective foraging in groups with conflicting nutritional needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, Alistair M; Lihoreau, Mathieu; Charleston, Michael A; Buhl, Jerome; Raubenheimer, David; Simpson, Stephen J

    2016-04-01

    Collective foraging, based on positive feedback and quorum responses, is believed to improve the foraging efficiency of animals. Nutritional models suggest that social information transfer increases the ability of foragers with closely aligned nutritional needs to find nutrients and maintain a balanced diet. However, whether or not collective foraging is adaptive in a heterogeneous group composed of individuals with differing nutritional needs is virtually unexplored. Here we develop an evolutionary agent-based model using concepts of nutritional ecology to address this knowledge gap. Our aim was to evaluate how collective foraging, mediated by social retention on foods, can improve nutrient balancing in individuals with different requirements. The model suggests that in groups where inter-individual nutritional needs are unimodally distributed, high levels of collective foraging yield optimal individual fitness by reducing search times that result from moving between nutritionally imbalanced foods. However, where nutritional needs are highly bimodal (e.g. where the requirements of males and females differ) collective foraging is selected against, leading to group fission. In this case, additional mechanisms such as assortative interactions can coevolve to allow collective foraging by subgroups of individuals with aligned requirements. Our findings indicate that collective foraging is an efficient strategy for nutrient regulation in animals inhabiting complex nutritional environments and exhibiting a range of social forms.

  12. Suboptimal foraging behavior: a new perspective on gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addicott, Merideth A; Pearson, John M; Kaiser, Nicole; Platt, Michael L; McClernon, F Joseph

    2015-10-01

    Why do people gamble? Conventional views hold that gambling may be motivated by irrational beliefs, risk-seeking, impulsive temperament, or dysfunction within the same reward circuitry affected by drugs of abuse. An alternate, unexplored perspective is that gambling is an extension of natural foraging behavior to a financial environment. However, when these foraging algorithms are applied to stochastic gambling outcomes, undesirable results may occur. To test this hypothesis, we recruited participants based on their frequency of gambling-yearly (or less), monthly, and weekly-and investigated how gambling frequency related to irrational beliefs, risk-taking/impulsivity, and foraging behavior. We found that increased gambling frequency corresponded to greater gambling-related beliefs, more exploratory choices on an explore/exploit foraging task, and fewer points earned on a Patchy Foraging Task. Gambling-related beliefs negatively related to performance on the Patchy Foraging Task, indicating that individuals with more gambling-related cognitions tended to leave a patch too quickly. This indicates that frequent gamblers have reduced foraging ability to maximize rewards; however, gambling frequency -and by extension, poor foraging ability- was not related to risk-taking or impulsive behavior. These results suggest that gambling reflects the application of a dysfunctional foraging process to financial outcomes.

  13. Characterization of the endogenous enzymatic hydrolyses of Petroselinum crispum glycosides: determined by chromatography upon their sugar and flavonoid products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldizsár, Imre; Füzfai, Zsófia; Molnár-Perl, Ibolya

    2013-06-07

    The behavior of the flavonoid diglycosides, relevant constituents of parsley (Petroselinum crispum) fruit (PFr) and leaf (PLe) samples was characterized upon their enzymatic hydrolyses applying complementary liquid chromatography-ultraviolet (LC-UV) and gas chromatography mass selective (GC-MS) detections. Analyses were performed in quantitative manner, from the same extracts as a function of hydrolysis times. Both in fruit and leaf tissue extracts, in intact and in enzyme hydrolyzed ones, apigenin, chrysoeriol, their glycosides, sugars, sugar alcohols, carboxylic acids and phytosterols, in total 17 constituents were identified and quantified. Based primarily on the selective mass fragmentation properties of the trimethylsilyl (oxime) ether/ester derivatives of constituents, we confirmed several novelties to the field. (i) It was shown for the first time that in parsley tissues different types of glycosidase enzyme are active. In PFr samples, both the stepwise and disaccharide specific endogenous mechanisms were certified, quantifying simultaneously the continuous release of apigenin, chrysoeriol, 2-O-apiosyl-apiose, apiose and glucose. (ii) 2-O-Apiosyl-glucose was demonstrated as disaccharide due to its formation under derivatization conditions from parsley glycosides. (iii) Both in PFr and in PLe samples even the invertase enzyme activity was attainable: sucrose decomposition in both tissues was going on with the same intensity. Three different types of enzymatic glycosidase processes were followed with their specific hydrolysis products by means of HPLC-UV and GC-MS, simultaneously.

  14. Growth and Photosynthetic Characteristics of Two Strawberry Cultivars in Response to Furostanol Glycosides Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca Petronela CĂULEŢ

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Furostanol glycosides represent a large group of steroid compounds of plant origin with a broad spectrum of biological activities (anabolic, antioxidant, anti-fungal and nematicidal. Most of the research exhibits this effect in stress induced response on different pathogen attacks and only a few studies show the effect of glycoside on plants growth and development. In order to investigate the effects of furostanol glycoside treatment on rooting, growth performance and photosynthetic system efficiency, young unrooted strawberry plants (cv. ‘Real’ and ‘Magic’ were immersed in different concentrations (0.03 mM, 0.3 mM, 3 mM of G1 solution (glycoside extracted from Lycopersicon sp. and G2 (extracted from Digitalis sp. and morphometric parameters were determined. The results showed that immersion in 0.3 mM glycoside solution improved the quality of strawberry planting material by increasing the number and length of roots, as well as by stimulating formation of new leaves. Moreover, the influence of foliar spraying with G1 and G2 on plants growth, assimilator pigments content and photosynthesis was determined. Foliar spraying with both glycosides solutions improved radicular growth and development, but dimensions of foliar apparatus increased only in G1 treated variants. Although both glycoside treatments induced an increase in assimilator pigments content, photosynthetic rate decreased as a consequence of stomatal limitations associated with better efficiency of water use and of internal CO2, which suggests that these chemicals may have an antitranspirant action.

  15. Glycosides from Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni Possess Insulin-Mimetic and Antioxidant Activities in Rat Cardiac Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Prata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni is a shrub having a high content of sweet diterpenoid glycosides in its leaves, mainly stevioside and rebaudioside A, which are used as noncaloric, natural sweeteners. The aim of this study was to deepen the knowledge about the insulin-mimetic effect exerted by four different mixtures of steviol glycosides, rich in stevioside and rebaudioside A, in neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts. The potential antioxidant activity of these steviol glycosides was also assessed, as oxidative stress is associated with diabetes. Likewise the insulin effect, steviol glycosides caused an increase in glucose uptake into rat fibroblasts by activating the PI3K/Akt pathway, thus inducing Glut4 translocation to the plasma membrane. The presence of S961, an insulin antagonist, completely abolished these effects, allowing to hypothesize that steviol glycosides could act as ligands of the same receptor engaged by insulin. Moreover, steviol glycosides counteracted oxidative stress by increasing reduced glutathione intracellular levels and upregulating expression and activity of the two antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase. The present work unravels the insulin-mimetic effect and the antioxidant property exerted by steviol glycosides, suggesting their potential beneficial role in the cotreatment of diabetes and in health maintenance.

  16. Glycosides from Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni Possess Insulin-Mimetic and Antioxidant Activities in Rat Cardiac Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prata, Cecilia; Zambonin, Laura; Rizzo, Benedetta; Vieceli Dalla Sega, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni is a shrub having a high content of sweet diterpenoid glycosides in its leaves, mainly stevioside and rebaudioside A, which are used as noncaloric, natural sweeteners. The aim of this study was to deepen the knowledge about the insulin-mimetic effect exerted by four different mixtures of steviol glycosides, rich in stevioside and rebaudioside A, in neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts. The potential antioxidant activity of these steviol glycosides was also assessed, as oxidative stress is associated with diabetes. Likewise the insulin effect, steviol glycosides caused an increase in glucose uptake into rat fibroblasts by activating the PI3K/Akt pathway, thus inducing Glut4 translocation to the plasma membrane. The presence of S961, an insulin antagonist, completely abolished these effects, allowing to hypothesize that steviol glycosides could act as ligands of the same receptor engaged by insulin. Moreover, steviol glycosides counteracted oxidative stress by increasing reduced glutathione intracellular levels and upregulating expression and activity of the two antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase. The present work unravels the insulin-mimetic effect and the antioxidant property exerted by steviol glycosides, suggesting their potential beneficial role in the cotreatment of diabetes and in health maintenance.

  17. Identification and characterisation of foraging areas of seabirds in upwelling systems: biological and hydrographic implications for foraging at sea

    OpenAIRE

    Ludynia, Katrin

    2007-01-01

    This thesis investigates the foraging behaviour of three seabird species, the African penguin (Spheniscus demersus) and the Cape gannet (Morus capensis) in the Benguela upwelling system as well as the Peruvian booby (Sula variegata) in the Humboldt Current. Biological and hydrographic parameters were considered when evaluating the characteristics of foraging areas and the behaviour of the species studied. Foraging areas used by the birds as well as the birds' diving behaviour were assessed by...

  18. Foraging modality and plasticity in foraging traits determine the strength of competitive interactions among carnivorous plants, spiders and toads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, David E; Krupa, James J; Rohr, Jason R

    2016-07-01

    Foraging modalities (e.g. passive, sit-and-wait, active) and traits are plastic in some species, but the extent to which this plasticity affects interspecific competition remains unclear. Using a long-term laboratory mesocosm experiment, we quantified competition strength and the plasticity of foraging traits in a guild of generalist predators of arthropods with a range of foraging modalities. Each mesocosm contained eight passively foraging pink sundews, and we employed an experimental design where treatments were the presence or absence of a sit-and-wait foraging spider and actively foraging toad crossed with five levels of prey abundance. We hypothesized that actively foraging toads would outcompete the other species at low prey abundance, but that spiders and sundews would exhibit plasticity in foraging traits to compensate for strong competition when prey were limited. Results generally supported our hypotheses. Toads had a greater effect on sundews at low prey abundances, and toad presence caused spiders to locate webs higher above the ground. Additionally, the closer large spider webs were to the ground, the greater the trichome densities produced by sundews. Also, spider webs were larger with than without toads and as sundew numbers increased, and these effects were more prominent as resources became limited. Finally, spiders negatively affected toad growth only at low prey abundance. These findings highlight the long-term importance of foraging modality and plasticity of foraging traits in determining the strength of competition within and across taxonomic kingdoms. Future research should assess whether plasticity in foraging traits helps to maintain coexistence within this guild and whether foraging modality can be used as a trait to reliably predict the strength of competitive interactions. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2016 British Ecological Society.

  19. Agrobacterium mediated transient gene silencing (AMTS in Stevia rebaudiana: insights into steviol glycoside biosynthesis pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Guleria

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Steviol glycoside biosynthesis pathway has emerged as bifurcation from ent-kaurenoic acid, substrate of methyl erythritol phosphate pathway that also leads to gibberellin biosynthesis. However, the genetic regulation of steviol glycoside biosynthesis has not been studied. So, in present study RNA interference (RNAi based Agrobacterium mediated transient gene silencing (AMTS approach was followed. SrKA13H and three SrUGTs (SrUGT85C2, SrUGT74G1 and SrUGT76G1 genes encoding ent-kaurenoic acid-13 hydroxylase and three UDP glycosyltransferases of steviol glycoside biosynthesis pathway were silenced in Stevia rebaudiana to understand its molecular mechanism and association with gibberellins. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: RNAi mediated AMTS of SrKA13H and three SrUGTs has significantly reduced the expression of targeted endogenous genes as well as total steviol glycoside accumulation. While gibberellins (GA3 content was significantly enhanced on AMTS of SrUGT85C2 and SrKA13H. Silencing of SrKA13H and SrUGT85C2 was found to block the metabolite flux of steviol glycoside pathway and shifted it towards GA3 biosynthesis. Further, molecular docking of three SrUGT proteins has documented highest affinity of SrUGT76G1 for the substrates of alternate pathways synthesizing steviol glycosides. This could be a plausible reason for maximum reduction in steviol glycoside content on silencing of SrUGT76G1 than other genes. CONCLUSIONS: SrKA13H and SrUGT85C2 were identified as regulatory genes influencing carbon flux between steviol glycoside and gibberellin biosynthesis. This study has also documented the existence of alternate steviol glycoside biosynthesis route.

  20. Agrobacterium Mediated Transient Gene Silencing (AMTS) in Stevia rebaudiana: Insights into Steviol Glycoside Biosynthesis Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guleria, Praveen; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Background Steviol glycoside biosynthesis pathway has emerged as bifurcation from ent-kaurenoic acid, substrate of methyl erythritol phosphate pathway that also leads to gibberellin biosynthesis. However, the genetic regulation of steviol glycoside biosynthesis has not been studied. So, in present study RNA interference (RNAi) based Agrobacterium mediated transient gene silencing (AMTS) approach was followed. SrKA13H and three SrUGTs (SrUGT85C2, SrUGT74G1 and SrUGT76G1) genes encoding ent-kaurenoic acid-13 hydroxylase and three UDP glycosyltransferases of steviol glycoside biosynthesis pathway were silenced in Stevia rebaudiana to understand its molecular mechanism and association with gibberellins. Methodology/Principal Findings RNAi mediated AMTS of SrKA13H and three SrUGTs has significantly reduced the expression of targeted endogenous genes as well as total steviol glycoside accumulation. While gibberellins (GA3) content was significantly enhanced on AMTS of SrUGT85C2 and SrKA13H. Silencing of SrKA13H and SrUGT85C2 was found to block the metabolite flux of steviol glycoside pathway and shifted it towards GA3 biosynthesis. Further, molecular docking of three SrUGT proteins has documented highest affinity of SrUGT76G1 for the substrates of alternate pathways synthesizing steviol glycosides. This could be a plausible reason for maximum reduction in steviol glycoside content on silencing of SrUGT76G1 than other genes. Conclusions SrKA13H and SrUGT85C2 were identified as regulatory genes influencing carbon flux between steviol glycoside and gibberellin biosynthesis. This study has also documented the existence of alternate steviol glycoside biosynthesis route. PMID:24023961

  1. Bed disturbance via foraging fish increases bedload transport during subsequent high flows and is controlled by fish size and species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pledger, A. G.; Rice, S. P.; Millett, J.

    2016-01-01

    Benthic foraging by fish can modify the nature and rates of fine sediment accrual and the structure and topography of coarse-grained fluvial substrates, with the potential to alter bed material characteristics, particle entrainment thresholds, and bedload transport fluxes. However, knowledge of what controls the nature, extent, and intensity of benthic foraging and the consequent influence of these controls on geomorphic impact remain rudimentary. An ex-situ experiment utilising Barbel Barbus barbus and Chub Leuciscus cephalus extended previous work by considering the role of fish size and species as controls of sediment disturbance by foraging and the implications for bed material characteristics and bedload transport. In a laboratory flume, changes in bed microtopography and structure were measured when a water-worked bed of 5.6-22.6 mm gravels was exposed to four size classes of Barbel (4-5″, 5-6″, 6-8″, 8-10″ in length) and a single size class of Chub (8-10″). In line with other studies that have investigated animal size as a control of zoogeomorphic agency, increasing the size of Barbel had a significant effect on measured disturbance and transport metrics. Specifically, the area of disturbed substrate, foraging depth, and the fish's impact on microtopographic roughness and imbrication all increased as a function of fish size. In a comparison of the foraging effects of like-sized Barbel and Chub, 8-10″ in length, Barbel foraged a larger area of the test bed and had a greater impact on microtopographic roughness and sediment structure. Relative to water-worked beds that were not foraged, bed conditioning by both species was associated with increased bedload transport during the subsequent application of high flows. However, the bedload flux after foraging by Barbel, which is a specialist benthivore, was 150% higher than that following foraging by Chub, which feed opportunistically from the bed, and the total transported mass of sediment was 98

  2. Development and application of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the quantification of amygdalin, a cyanogenic glycoside, in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolarinwa, Islamiyat F; Orfila, Caroline; Morgan, Michael R A

    2014-07-09

    Amygdalin is a member of the cyanogenic glycoside group of plant secondary metabolites capable of generating hydrogen cyanide under certain conditions. As a consequence, the cyanogenic glycosides have been associated with incidents of acute and subacute food poisoning. Specific antibodies were raised against an amygdalin-bovine serum albumin immunogen synthesized using a novel approach. The antibodies were used in a microtitration plate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the quantification, for the first time, of amygdalin in commercially available foods. Correlation of results with high-performance liquid chromatography was very high (r = 0.983). The limit of detection of the immunoassay was 200 ± 0.05 pg mL(-1), and the 50% inhibitory concentration of amygdalin was 50 ± 0.02 ng mL(-1), making the ELISA particularly sensitive.

  3. Complex scaling behavior in animal foraging patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premachandra, Prabhavi Kaushalya

    This dissertation attempts to answer questions from two different areas of biology, ecology and neuroscience, using physics-based techniques. In Section 2, suitability of three competing random walk models is tested to describe the emergent movement patterns of two species of primates. The truncated power law (power law with exponential cut off) is the most suitable random walk model that characterizes the emergent movement patterns of these primates. In Section 3, an agent-based model is used to simulate search behavior in different environments (landscapes) to investigate the impact of the resource landscape on the optimal foraging movement patterns of deterministic foragers. It should be noted that this model goes beyond previous work in that it includes parameters such as spatial memory and satiation, which have received little consideration to date in the field of movement ecology. When the food availability is scarce in a tropical forest-like environment with feeding trees distributed in a clumped fashion and the size of those trees are distributed according to a lognormal distribution, the optimal foraging pattern of a generalist who can consume various and abundant food types indeed reaches the Levy range, and hence, show evidence for Levy-flight-like (power law distribution with exponent between 1 and 3) behavior. Section 4 of the dissertation presents an investigation of phase transition behavior in a network of locally coupled self-sustained oscillators as the system passes through various bursting states. The results suggest that a phase transition does not occur for this locally coupled neuronal network. The data analysis in the dissertation adopts a model selection approach and relies on methods based on information theory and maximum likelihood.

  4. Forage Polyphenol Oxidase and Ruminant Livestock Nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Richard F. Lee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Polyphenol oxidase (PPO is associated with the detrimental effect of browning fruit and vegetables, however interest within PPO containing forage crops has grown since the brownng reaction was associated with reduced nitrogen (N losses in silo and the rumen. The reduction in protein breakdown in silo of red clover (high PPO forage increased the quality of protein, improving N-use efficiency (NUE when fed to ruminants. A further benefit of red clover silage feeding is a significant reduction in lipolysis in silo and an increase in the deposition of beneficial C18 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA in animal products, which has also been linked to PPO activity. PPOs protection of plant protein and glycerol based-PUFA in silo is related to the deactivation of plant proteases and lipases. This deactivation occurs through PPO catalysing the conversion of diphenols to quinones which bind with cellular nucleophiles such as protein reforming a protein-bound phenol (PBP. If the protein is an enzyme the complexing denatures the enzyme. However, PPO is inactive in the anaerobic rumen and therefore any subsequent protection of plant protein and glycerol based-PUFA in the rumen must be as a result of events that occurred to the forage pre-ingestion. Reduced activity of plant proteases and lipases would have little effect on NUE and glycerol based-PUFA in the rumen due to the greater concentration of rumen microbial proteases and lipases. The mechanism for PPOs protection of plant protein in the rumen is a consequence of complexing plant protein, rather than protease deactivation per se. These complexed proteins reduce protein digestibility in the rumen and subsequently increase un-degraded dietary protein flow to the small intestine. The mechanism for protecting glycerol-based PUFA has yet to be fully elucidated but may be associated with entrapment within PBP reducing access to microbial lipases or differences in rumen digestion kinetics of red clover.

  5. A New Acylated Flavonol Glycoside from Chenopodium foliosum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlatina Kokanova-Nedialkova, , , , , and

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A new acylated flavonol glycoside, namely gomphrenol-3-O-( 5 '''-O-E-feruloyl-β-D-apiofuranosyl-(1→2[β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→6]-β-D-glucopyranoside (1 was isolated from the aerial parts of Chenopodium foliosum Asch. The structure of 1 was determined by means of spectroscopic methods (1D and 2D NMR, UV, IR, and HRESIMS. Radical scavenging and antioxidant activities of 1 were established using DPPH and ABTS radicals, FRAP assay and inhibition of lipid peroxidation (LP in linoleic acid system by the ferric thiocyanate method. Compound 1 showed low activity (DPPH and ABTS or lack of activity (FRAP and LP. In combination with CCl 4, 1 reduced the damage caused by the hepatotoxic agent and preserved cell viability and GSH level, decreased LDH leakage and reduced lipid damage. Effects were concentration dependent, most visible at the highest concentration (100 µg/m L , and similar to those of silymarin .

  6. Two New Steroidal Glycosides from Fermented Leaves of Agave americana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JianMingJIN; XiKuiLIU; 等

    2002-01-01

    Two new spirostanol glycosides named agamenoside A and B, ere isolated from the fermented leaves of Agave americana. Their structures were elucidated as (23S,25R)-5α-spirostan-3β,6α,23-triol 3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→3)-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-[β-D-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)]-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-galactopyranoside(1) and (25R)-5α-spiro-stan-3β,6α-diol 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-[β-D-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)]-β-D-glucopyra-nosyl-(1→4)-β-D-galactopyranoside(2) by a combination of chemical and spectral methods.

  7. Two New Steroidal Glycosides from Fermented Leaves of Agave americana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Two new spirostanol glycosides named agamenoside A and B, were isolated from the fcrmcnted leaves of Agave americana. Their structures were elucidated as (23S, 25R)-5α-spirostan-3β, 6α, 23-triol 3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→3)- β-D-glucopyranosyl-(l→2)-[β-D-xylopyranosyl-( 1 →3)]-β-D-glucopyranosyl-( l →4)-β-D-galactopyranoside (1) and (25R)-5α-spiro stan-3β, 6α-diol 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(l→2)-[ β-D-xylopyranosyl-(l→3)]- β-D-glucopyra nosyl-(1→4)- β-D-galactopyranoside (2) by a combination of chemical and spectral methods.

  8. Four New Flavonol Glycosides from the Leaves of Brugmansia suaveolens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Geller

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Four new flavonol glycosides were isolated from the leaves of Brugmansia suaveolens: kaempferol 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1'''→2''-O-α-L-arabinopyranoside (1, kaempferol 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1'''→2''-O-α-L-arabinopyranoside-7-O-į-D-gluco-pyranoside (2, kaempferol 3-O-β-D-[6'''-O-(E-caffeoyl]-glucopyranosyl-(1'''→2''-O-α-l-arabinopyranoside-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (3, and kaempferol 3-O-β-D-[2'''-O-(E-caffeoyl]-glucopyranosyl-(1'''→2''-O-α-l-arabinopyranoside-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (4. The structure elucidation was performed by MS, 1D and 2D NMR analyses.

  9. Four new flavonol glycosides from the leaves of Brugmansia suaveolens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Fabiana; Murillo, Renato; Steinhauser, Lisa; Heinzmann, Berta; Albert, Klaus; Merfort, Irmgard; Laufer, Stefan

    2014-05-22

    Four new flavonol glycosides were isolated from the leaves of Brugmansia suaveolens: kaempferol 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1'''→2'')-O-α-L-arabinopyranoside (1), kaempferol 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1'''→2'')-O-α-L-arabinopyranoside-7-O-į-D-gluco-pyranoside (2), kaempferol 3-O-β-D-[6'''-O-(E-caffeoyl)]-glucopyranosyl-(1'''→2'')-O-α-l-arabinopyranoside-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (3), and kaempferol 3-O-β-D-[2'''-O-(E-caffeoyl)]-glucopyranosyl-(1'''→2'')-O-α-l-arabinopyranoside-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (4). The structure elucidation was performed by MS, 1D and 2D NMR analyses.

  10. A new flavonol glycoside from glandless cotton seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanqin Yuan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A new flavonol glycoside, namely quercetin 3-O-[α-d-apiofuranosyl(1–5-β-d-apiofuranosyl(1–2]-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl(1–6-β-d-glucopyranoside (1, was isolated from glandless cotton seeds together with the known compounds quercetin 3-O-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl(1–2-[α-l-rhamnopyranosyl(1–6]-β-d-glucopyranoside (manghaslin, 2, kaempferol 3-O-β-d-apiofruranosyl(1–2-β-d-glucopyranoside (3 and kaempferol 3-O-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl(1–6-β-d-glucopyranoside (4. It is interesting that the tetrasaccharide fragment of 1 contained both a β-apiosyl and an unusual α-apiosyl group.

  11. Antiviral compounds and one new iridoid glycoside from Cornus officinalis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    From Cornus officinalis Sieb. et Zucc., bioassay-guided fractionation led to the isolation of four active tannin compounds with high effectiveness of inhibiting Hepatitis C virus NS3 serine protease in vitro. The compounds are: 1, 2, 3, 6-tetragalloyl-β-D-glucopyranose ( 1 ), 1, 2, 3, 4, 6- pentagalloyl-β-D-glucopyranose (2), Tellimagrandin Ⅰ (3) and Tellimagrandin Ⅱ (4). The four compounds could inhibit HCV NS3 protease in vitro with IC50 values of 6.98, 5.11, 7.0 and 4.8 μmol/L respectively. In addition, a new iridoid glycoside (5) was also isolated from Cornus officinalis Sieb. et Zucc., which was assigned to be 7-O-butyl morroniside by spectroscopic analysis.

  12. [Glycosides from flowers of Jasminum officinale L. var. grandiflorum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gui-qin; Xia, Jing-jing; Dong, Jun-xing

    2007-10-01

    To study the chemical constituents of the flower of Jasminum officinale L. var. grandiflorum. The compounds were isolated and purified by re-crystallization and chromatography on silica gel and Sephadex LH-20 column. Their structures were elucidated on the physicochemical properties and spectral analysis. Seven glycosides were identified as kaempferol-3-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl (1-->3)-[alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl (1-->6)]-beta-D-galactopyranoside (I), kaempferol-3-O-rutinoside (II), 7-ketologanin (III), oleoside-11-methyl ester (IV), 7-glucosyl-l1-methyl oleoside (V), ligstroside (VI), oleuropein (VII). Compound I is a new compound. Compounds III and V were isolated from the family of Jasminum for the first time and compounds II, IV and VI were isolated from Jasminum officinale L. var. grandiflorum for the first time.

  13. [Studies on triterpenoids and their glycosides from Aralia dasyphylla Miq].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Y H; Gu, J Q; Xiao, K; Wang, Z Z; Lin, H W

    1997-10-01

    The structures of two triterpenoids and their glycosides were isolated from Aralia dasyphylla Miq. Their structures have been identified to be oleanoic acid(I), 16 beta-hydroxy-18 beta-H-oleanoic acid(II), oleanoic acid-28-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside(III) and 16 beta-hydroxy-18 beta-H-oleanoic acid-28-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside(IV), respectively, mainly through interpretation of UV, IR, MS, 1H and 13CNMR, DEPT, HMQC and HMBC spectra data. The stereochemistry of II has been confirmed by NOESY. Pharmacological experiments showed that the total saponins exerted preventative effect on CCl4-induced liver injury of male mice and hypoglycemic effect on a model of alloxan-induced diabetes in rats.

  14. Flavanone glycosides as acetylcholinesterase inhibitors: Computational and experimental evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Remya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholinesterase hydrolyzes the neurotransmitter called acetylcholine and is crucially involved in the regulation of neurotransmission. One of the observable facts in the neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer′s disease is the decrease in the level of acetylcholine. Available drugs that are used for the treatment of Alzheimer′s disease are primarily acetylcholinesterase inhibitors with multiple activities. They maintain the level of acetylcholine in the brain by inhibiting the acetylcholinesterase function. Hence acetylcholinesterase inhibitors can be used as lead compounds for the development of drugs against AD. In the present study, the binding potential of four flavanone glycosides such as naringin, hesperidin, poncirin and sakuranin against acetylcholinesterase was analysed by using the method of molecular modeling and docking. The activity of the top scored compound, naringin was further investigated by enzyme inhibition studies and its inhibitory concentration (IC 50 towards acetylcholinesterase was also determined.

  15. Diterpene glycosides from the ethanol extract of Diplopterygium rufopilosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiang; Song, Yan; Li, Hui; Mao, Xia; Shi, Xiao-Dong

    2015-01-01

    A phytochemical investigation on the 70% EtOH extract from the dry fronds of Diplopterygium rufopilosum afforded two new labdane-type diterpene glycosides, (3β,13S)-3-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-13-O-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-labda-8(17),14-diene (1) and (3β,13S)-3-O-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-13-O-[6-O-acetyl-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1 → 4)-2-O-acetyl-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl]-labda-8(17),14-diene (2). Their structures were determined on the basis of chemical method and spectroscopic analyses, including 1D and 2D NMR (COSY, HMQC, HMBC, and NOESY) and HR-ESI-MS analyses.

  16. Phenylethanoid Glycosides of Cistanche on menopausal syndrome model in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Tian

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cistanche is the traditional and precious Chinese herbal, with two thousand years of use history in China. It has the effect on tonifying kidney, strong supplement to the liver and kidney, and replenishing essence and blood, known as the “desert ginseng”. Here, we explored the mechanism of Phenylethanoid Glycosides of Cistanche (PGC to the model mice of menopausal syndrome, as well as the therapeutic effect and characteristics of PGC to the menopausal syndrome. In this study, KM mice were reproduced by the complete resection of the ovaries on both sides of the back to establish the model mice of menopausal syndrome (MPS, and received distilled water or drugs, respectively. Model mice received distilled water. Mice received 200 mg/(kg day high doses of Phenylethanoid Glycosides of Cistanche (HPGC, and 100 mg/(kg day medium doses of Phenylethanoid Glycosides of Cistanche (MPGC, and 50 mg/(kg day low doses of Phenylethanoid Glycosides of Cistanche (LPGC. After 21 days, it could determine the number of independent activities and the number of standing, the latent period of first entering the dark room, and the electric number. It also calculated the viscera index of uterus, thymus, spleen, measured the levels of estradiol (E2, testosterone (T, luteinizing hormone (LH, and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH in the serum. Furthermore, it observed the pathological changes of uterus, thymus, spleen and pituitary of mice. The results showed that behavioral indicators: Compared with the model group (MG, HPGC, MPGC, LPGC could increase the independent activities (P < 0.01; HPGC, MPGC could increase the number of standing, the latent period of first entering the dark room, and reduce the electric number (P < 0.01; LPGC could increase the number of standing (P < 0.05; Viscera index: Compared with MG, HPGC, MPGC could increase the viscera index of uterus, thymus, spleen (P < 0.01; LPGC could increase the viscera index of uterus (P < 0

  17. Flavanone glycosides as acetylcholinesterase inhibitors: computational and experimental evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remya, C; Dileep, K V; Tintu, I; Variyar, E J; Sadasivan, C

    2014-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase hydrolyzes the neurotransmitter called acetylcholine and is crucially involved in the regulation of neurotransmission. One of the observable facts in the neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease is the decrease in the level of acetylcholine. Available drugs that are used for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease are primarily acetylcholinesterase inhibitors with multiple activities. They maintain the level of acetylcholine in the brain by inhibiting the acetylcholinesterase function. Hence acetylcholinesterase inhibitors can be used as lead compounds for the development of drugs against AD. In the present study, the binding potential of four flavanone glycosides such as naringin, hesperidin, poncirin and sakuranin against acetylcholinesterase was analysed by using the method of molecular modeling and docking. The activity of the top scored compound, naringin was further investigated by enzyme inhibition studies and its inhibitory concentration (IC50) towards acetylcholinesterase was also determined.

  18. Three New Flavone Glycosides from Drymaria diandra Bl.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-Tao DING; Xue-Qiong YANG; Qiu-E CAO; Fei LI

    2005-01-01

    In order to find new structural and biologically active compounds, the constituents from the whole plant of Drymaria diandra B1. (Caryophyllaceae) were investigated and three new flavone glycosides,named drymariatins B (1), C (2), and D (3), were isolated by solvent partition, Si gel, sephadex LH-20, and Rp-18 column chromatography. Using spectroscopic methods, including two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance analysis, the structures of these compounds were elucidated as 6-C-(2-deoxy-β-D-fucopyranosyl)-5,7,4'-trihydroxyl-flavone, 6-C-(2-deoxy-β-D-fucopyranosyl)-7-O-(β-D-glucopyranosyl)-5,4'-dihydroxylflavone, and 6-C-(3-keto-β-digitoxopyranosyl)-7-O-(β-D-glucopyranosyl)-5,4'-dihydroxyl-flavone.

  19. Forager Polymorphism and Foraging Ecology in the Leaf-Cutting Ant, Atta colombica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James K. Wetterer

    1995-01-01

    workers are smaller and do not appear to be so specialized as soldiers as are A. cephalotes maxima workers. The broader size-range of workers participating in foraging appears to allow A. colombica to exploit a wider range of resources than A. cephalotes, including tougher, denser vegetation and fallen fruits.

  20. Isolation of human intestinal bacteria metabolizing the natural isoflavone glycosides daidzin and genistin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, H G; Lay, J O; Beger, R D; Freeman, J P; Rafii, F

    2000-12-01

    Fecal bacteria from a healthy individual were screened for the specific bacteria involved in the metabolism of dietary isoflavonoids. Two strains of bacteria capable of producing primary and secondary metabolites from the natural isoflavone glycosides daidzin and genistin were detected. The metabolites were identified by comparison of their HPLC/mass, 1H NMR and UV spectra with those of standard and synthetic compounds. Both Escherichia coli HGH21 and the gram-positive strain HGH6 converted daidzin and genistin to the their respective aglycones daidzein and genistein. Under anoxic conditions, strain HGH6 further metabolized the isoflavones daidzein and genistein to dihydrodaidzein and dihydrogenistein, respectively. The reduction of a double bond between C-2 and C-3 to a single bond was isoflavonoid-specific by strain HGH6, which did not reduce a similar bond in the flavonoids apigenin and chrysin. Strain HGH6 did not further metabolize dihydrodaidzein and dihydrogenistein. This is the first study in which specific colonic bacteria that are involved in the metabolism of daidzin and genistin have been detected.