WorldWideScience

Sample records for forage particle size

  1. Effects of forage type, animal characteristics and feed intake on faecal particle size in goat, sheep, llama and cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalali, A.R.; Weisbjerg, Martin Riis; Nadeau, E.;

    2015-01-01

    The effect of forage maturity stage at harvest, animal characteristics and neutral detergent fibre (NDF) intake on mean particle size and particle size distribution in faeces from sheep and cattle fed grass silages was studied (Study I). Models for prediction of faeces characteristics from sheep...... and cattle and feed characteristics established from Study I were tested on faeces samples from goat, sheep, llama and cattle fed other types of forages (Study II). Study I included 112 faeces samples from 5 trials, and Study II included 90 faeces samples from 3 trials. Animals were fed ad libitum...... and this effect was amplified in larger animals. The prediction model established from Study I, on the effect of BW, ADL/NDF in forage, C:F and forage NDF intake on particle size in faeces of grass silage-fed animals in Study I appeared to be valid to predict the geometric mean particle size in faeces from goat...

  2. Effect of feed forage particle size and dietary urea on excretion of phosphorus in lactating dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puggaard, Liselotte; Lund, Peter; Sehested, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    Thirty six multiparous Danish Holstein cows, 222 days from calving with a standard deviation (±) of 102 days, 627±7 kg of body weight, and 32±3 kg/d energy corrected milk were used to investigate the effect of forage particle size (FPS) and dietary urea supplementation on excretion of phosphorus (P......) in feces and urine when cows were fed P below requirement. Dietary P content was 2.5 g P/kg DM in all treatments. Treatments (CONTROL, SHORT and LOW-N) were all based on the same content of forage ingredients but varied in FPS and dietary urea content. In CONTROL and SHORT rumen degradable protein...... was optimized according to the Nordic protein evaluation system by supplementing dietary urea, whereas urea was excluded in LOW-N in order to obtain a supply of rumen degradable protein below requirements. It was hypothesized that dietary factors that reduce saliva secretion via reduced chewing activity...

  3. Effects of Varying Dietary Forage Particle Size in Two Concentrate Levels on Chewing Activity, Ruminal Mat Characteristics, and Passage in Dairy Cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zebeli, Q.; Tafaj, M.; Weber, I.; Dijkstra, J.; Steingass, H.; Drochner, W.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of varying dietary forage particle size on chewing activity, ruminal mat characteristics, passage, and in situ ruminal and total tract digestion in dairy cows at a low- and high-concentrate inclusion. The experiment was designed as a 4 x 4 L

  4. Growth performance and total tract nutrient digestion for Holstein heifers limit-fed diets high in distillers grains with different forage particle size

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study evaluated dairy heifer growth performance and total tract nutrient digestion when fed diets high in dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS) with different forage particle size. An 8-wk randomized complete block design study was conducted utilizing twenty-two Holstein heifers (123 ±...

  5. Dietary forage concentration and particle size affect sorting, feeding behaviour, intake and growth of Chinese Holstein male calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, A U R; Xia, C Q; Cao, B H

    2016-04-01

    The objective of study was to evaluate the effect of forage concentration (F:C) and forage particle length (FPL) on sorting, feeding behaviour, intake, growth and body measurements of growing calves. Twenty-eight weaned calves of body weight 156.79 ± 33.44 (mean ± SD) were used in 2 × 2 factorial arrangements with the factors FPL of hay grass (full and short) and hay grass concentrations (low, 50% and high, 65%). The treatments were as follows: full length (FL) with low F:C (50:50), FL with high F:C(65:35), short length (SL) with low F:C (50:50) and SL with high F:C (65:35). Increasing F:C and decreasing FPL enhanced sorting for short and fine particle and sorting against long particle (p behaviour, interaction for eating time and eating time per kilogram DM was present. Increasing the F:C increased the eating time in both FL and SL (p behaviour (p behaviour.

  6. Effects of forage particle size and long hay for cows fed total mixed rations based on alfalfa and corn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, J M; Buchanan-Smith, J G; Campbell, C; Grieve, D G; Allen, O B

    1994-01-01

    A 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments, in which particle length of alfalfa silage in the TMR and supplementary long alfalfa-grass hay were the factors, was used to determine whether hay benefits lactating cows and whether its effects depend on fibrosity of the main forage source. Without supplementary hay, TMR contained 45% forage, including corn silage, and 26 to 27.5% NDF. When hay was fed, the amount of alfalfa silage in the corresponding TMR was reduced. In the production trial, 40 cows (20 multiparous) were fed the diets for 8 wk in early lactation. No interactions of silage length and hay occurred on any production variables except lactose concentration in the milk of multiparous cows. Addition of hay to the diet enhanced DMI, without effect on production, so efficiency of milk production was reduced. Shorter alfalfa silage enhanced DMI by multiparous cows, reduced SCM and FCM in primiparous cows, and depressed fat test in both groups. Milk composition and component production generally were unaffected. Five rumen-fistulated cows in early to midlactation each were given the four treatments during four 3-wk periods. Hay enhanced rumination when short alfalfa silage was fed but tended to reduce it on long alfalfa silage. Hay also depressed rumen pH and enhanced VFA concentrations. Alfalfa silage length had minimal effects on rumination and no effect on fermentation, and neither hay nor silage length affected digestion of silage DM or NDF in the rumen. Addition of hay to the diet may not be beneficial for cows fed TMR, but longer term feeding studies are needed.

  7. Forage fiber effects on particle size reduction, ruminal stratification, and selective retention in heifers fed highly digestible grass/clover silages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, A K S; Weisbjerg, M R; Storm, A C; Nørgaard, P

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of NDF content in highly digestible grass/clover silage on particle size reduction, ruminal stratification, and selective retention in dairy heifers. The reduction in particle size from feed to feces was evaluated and related to feed intake, chewing activity, and apparent digestibility. Four grass/clover harvests (Mixtures of Lolium perenne, Trifolium pratense, and Trifolium repens) were performed from early May to late August at different maturities, at different regrowth stages, and with different clover proportions, resulting in silages with NDF contents of 312, 360, 371, and 446 g/kg DM, respectively, and decreasing NDF digestibility with greater NDF content. Four rumen-fistulated dairy heifers were fed silage at 90% of ad libitum level as the only feed source in a 4 × 4 Latin square design. Silage, ingested feed boluses, medial and ventral ruminal digesta, and feces samples were washed with neutral detergent in nylon bags of 10-μm pore size, freeze dried, and divided into small (1 mm) particles by dry-sieving. Chewing activity, rumen pool size, and apparent digestibility were measured. Intake of NDF increased linearly from 2.3 to 2.8 kg/d with greater NDF content of forages (P = 0.01), but silages were exposed to similar eating time (P = 0.55) and rumination time per kg NDF (P = 0.35). No linear effect of NDF content was found on proportion of LP in ingested feed boluses (P = 0.31), medial rumen digesta (P = 0.95), ventral rumen digesta (P = 0.84), and feces (P = 0.09). Greater proportions of DM (P silages (P > 0.13). The LP proportion was >30% of particles in the ventral and medial rumen, whereas in the feces, the LP proportion was silages, stressing that the retention mechanism of large undigested particles lies elsewhere than with particle entrapment in the rumen mat. In this study, forage particle breakdown, ruminal stratification, and retention of particles in the rumen were not affected by NDF

  8. Interactions between shoal size and conformity in guppy social foraging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Day, R.L.; Macdonald, T.; Brown, C.; Laland, K.N.; Reader, S.M.

    2001-01-01

    Previous experimental studies have established that shoaling fish forage more effectively in large than small groups. We investigated how shoal size affects the foraging efficiency of laboratory populations of the guppy, Poecilia reticulata, exposed to different foraging tasks. Experiment 1

  9. Short communication: Forage particle size and fat intake affect rumen passage, the fatty acid profile of milk, and milk fat production in dairy cows consuming dried distillers grains with solubles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez Ramirez, H A; Harvatine, K J; Kononoff, P J

    2016-01-01

    Four ruminally cannulated Holstein cows averaging (± SD) 116 ± 18 d in milk and 686 ± 52 kg of body weight were used in a 4 × 4 Latin square design with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments to test the effects of forage particle size and concentration of corn oil on milk fat depression. Cows were housed in individual stalls, milked daily at 0700 and 1800 h, and individually fed daily at 0900 h for ad libitum consumption allowing approximately 10% orts. Four 28-d periods, in which each cow was offered 1 of 4 total mixed rations, included reduced-fat dried distillers grains with solubles at 30% of dietary dry matter and differed in forage particle size by inclusion of chopped grass hay (LONGP) or grass hay pellets (SHORTP) and 0 or 2% corn oil (CO). Dietary treatments were 0% corn oil + short particle size (CO0+SHORTP), 0% corn oil + long particle size (CO0+LONGP), 2% corn oil + short particle size (CO2 + SHORTP), and 2% corn oil + long particle size (CO2 + LONGP). Dry matter intake and milk yield were not affected by treatment averaging 26.5 ± 1.19 kg/d and 32.8 ± 3.34 kg/d, respectively. A decrease was found in 3.5% fat-corrected milk with the inclusion of oil resulting in 34.6 and 26.6 ± 2.6 kg/d for 0 and 2% oil diets, respectively. An oil × size interaction was found for milk fat concentration resulting in 2.27, 3.02, 3.62, and 3.62 ± 0.23% for CO2+SHORTP, CO2 + LONGP, CO0 + SHORTP, and CO0 + LONGP, respectively. Fat yield was reduced from 1.22 to 0.81 ± 0.09 kg/d with 2% oil diets. Cows consuming diets with long particle size spent 29 more minutes eating compared with the cows consuming short particle size (198 and 169 ± 15 min/d). Rumination time decreased from 504 to 400 ± 35 min/d for cows consuming short particle size compared with long particle size. Total chewing was reduced from 702 to 570 ± 4 min/d when cows consumed short particle size. Feeding long particle size decreased rate of passage of dry matter from 3.38 to 2.89 ± 0.42%/h

  10. Auto-Clustering using Particle Swarm Optimization and Bacterial Foraging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rutkowski Olesen, Jakob; Cordero, Jorge; Zeng, Yifeng

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a hybrid approach for clustering based on particle swarm optimization (PSO) and bacteria foraging algorithms (BFA). The new method AutoCPB (Auto-Clustering based on particle bacterial foraging) makes use of autonomous agents whose primary objective is to cluster chunks of data...

  11. Interactions between shoal size and conformity in guppy social foraging

    OpenAIRE

    Day, R.L.; MacDonald, T; Brown, C.; Laland, K.N.; Reader, S.M.

    2001-01-01

    Previous experimental studies have established that shoaling fish forage more effectively in large than small groups. We investigated how shoal size affects the foraging efficiency of laboratory populations of the guppy, Poecilia reticulata, exposed to different foraging tasks. Experiment 1 confirmed the prediction that in open water the first fish and focal fish of larger shoals locate food faster than in smaller shoals. However, a second experiment, in which shoals of fish were required to ...

  12. Forage fiber effects on particle size reduction, ruminal stratification, and selective retention in heifers fed highly digestible grass/clover silages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulze, A.K.S.; Weisbjerg, Martin Riis; Storm, Adam Christian

    2014-01-01

    , chewing activity, and apparent digestibility. Four grass/clover harvests (Mixtures of Lolium perenne, Trifolium pratense, and Trifolium repens) were performed from early May to late August at different maturities, at different regrowth stages, and with different clover proportions, resulting in silages...... measured. Intake of NDF increased linearly from 2.3 to 2.8 kg/d with greater NDF content of forages (P = 0.01), but silages were exposed to similar eating time (P = 0.55) and rumination time per kg NDF (P = 0.35). No linear effect of NDF content was found on proportion of LP in ingested feed boluses (P = 0...

  13. Effect of forage quality on intake, chewing activity, faecal particle size distribution, and digestibility of neutral detergent fibre in sheep, goats, and llamas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalali, Alireza; Nørgaard, P.; Weisbjerg, Martin Riis;

    2012-01-01

    (GH) and grass seed straw (GSS). The contents of NDF in dry matter (DM) and of in situ indigestible NDF (%NDF) were 58 and 15% for GH and 81 and 28% for GSS, respectively. Total faeces were collected for five days. The faecal samples were washed in nylon bags and freeze dried before being sorted...... into six sieving fractions with pore sizes in the 2.4–0.1 mm range and a bottom bowl. The dimension of each particle in sub-samples from each fraction was measured using image analysis. The DM intake per metabolic body weight (BW) was higher in sheep and llamas fed GH than in those animals fed GSS (P ....05). Sheep and goats had a higher NDF intake per kg BW than did llamas when fed GSS (P times spent eating per kg of DM intake, ruminating, and in total chewing per kg of DM and NDF intakes were higher when GSS was fed (P time spent...

  14. Particle size alterations of feedstuffs during in situ NDF incubation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krämer, Monika; Nørgaard, P.; Lund, Peter

    2013-01-01

    evaluated in terms of particle size for a broad range of feedstuffs which typically serve as NDF sources in dairy cow rations. Early and late cut grass silages, corn silage, alfalfa silage, rapeseed meal and dried distillers grains were examined. Treatments were I) drying and grinding of forage samples...

  15. Particle sizes from sectional data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawlas, Zbynek; Nyengaard, Jens Randel; Jensen, Eva Bjørn Vedel

    2009-01-01

    We propose a new statistical method for obtaining information about particle size distributions from sectional data without specific assumptions about particle shape. The method utilizes recent advances in local stereology. We show how to estimate separately from sectional data the variance due t...

  16. Bed disturbance via foraging fish increases bedload transport during subsequent high flows and is controlled by fish size and species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pledger, A. G.; Rice, S. P.; Millett, J.

    2016-01-01

    Benthic foraging by fish can modify the nature and rates of fine sediment accrual and the structure and topography of coarse-grained fluvial substrates, with the potential to alter bed material characteristics, particle entrainment thresholds, and bedload transport fluxes. However, knowledge of what controls the nature, extent, and intensity of benthic foraging and the consequent influence of these controls on geomorphic impact remain rudimentary. An ex-situ experiment utilising Barbel Barbus barbus and Chub Leuciscus cephalus extended previous work by considering the role of fish size and species as controls of sediment disturbance by foraging and the implications for bed material characteristics and bedload transport. In a laboratory flume, changes in bed microtopography and structure were measured when a water-worked bed of 5.6-22.6 mm gravels was exposed to four size classes of Barbel (4-5″, 5-6″, 6-8″, 8-10″ in length) and a single size class of Chub (8-10″). In line with other studies that have investigated animal size as a control of zoogeomorphic agency, increasing the size of Barbel had a significant effect on measured disturbance and transport metrics. Specifically, the area of disturbed substrate, foraging depth, and the fish's impact on microtopographic roughness and imbrication all increased as a function of fish size. In a comparison of the foraging effects of like-sized Barbel and Chub, 8-10″ in length, Barbel foraged a larger area of the test bed and had a greater impact on microtopographic roughness and sediment structure. Relative to water-worked beds that were not foraged, bed conditioning by both species was associated with increased bedload transport during the subsequent application of high flows. However, the bedload flux after foraging by Barbel, which is a specialist benthivore, was 150% higher than that following foraging by Chub, which feed opportunistically from the bed, and the total transported mass of sediment was 98

  17. Prey size selection and distance estimation in foraging adult dragonflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olberg, R M; Worthington, A H; Fox, J L; Bessette, C E; Loosemore, M P

    2005-09-01

    To determine whether perching dragonflies visually assess the distance to potential prey items, we presented artificial prey, glass beads suspended from fine wires, to perching dragonflies in the field. We videotaped the responses of freely foraging dragonflies (Libellula luctuosa and Sympetrum vicinum-Odonata, suborder Anisoptera) to beads ranging from 0.5 mm to 8 mm in diameter, recording whether or not the dragonflies took off after the beads, and if so, at what distance. Our results indicated that dragonflies were highly selective for bead size. Furthermore, the smaller Sympetrum preferred beads of smaller size and the larger Libellula preferred larger beads. Each species rejected beads as large or larger than their heads, even when the beads subtended the same visual angles as the smaller, attractive beads. Since bead size cannot be determined without reference to distance, we conclude that dragonflies are able to estimate the distance to potential prey items. The range over which they estimate distance is about 1 m for the larger Libellula and 70 cm for the smaller Sympetrum. The mechanism of distance estimation is unknown, but it probably includes both stereopsis and the motion parallax produced by head movements.

  18. Knife mill operating factors effect on switchgrass particle size distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitra, Venkata S P; Womac, Alvin R; Yang, Yuechuan T; Igathinathane, C; Miu, Petre I; Chevanan, Nehru; Sokhansanj, Shahab

    2009-11-01

    Biomass particle size impacts handling, storage, conversion, and dust control systems. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) particle size distributions created by a knife mill were determined for integral classifying screen sizes from 12.7 to 50.8 mm, operating speeds from 250 to 500 rpm, and mass input rates from 2 to 11 kg/min. Particle distributions were classified with standardized sieves for forage analysis that included horizontal sieving motion with machined-aluminum sieves of thickness proportional to sieve opening dimensions. Then, a wide range of analytical descriptors were examined to mathematically represent the range of particle sizes in the distributions. Correlation coefficient of geometric mean length with knife mill screen size, feed rate, and speed were 0.872, 0.349, and 0.037, respectively. Hence, knife mill screen size largely determined particle size of switchgrass chop. Feed rate had an unexpected influence on particle size, though to a lesser degree than screen size. The Rosin-Rammler function fit the chopped switchgrass size distribution data with an R(2)>0.982. Mass relative span was greater than 1, which indicated a wide distribution of particle sizes. Uniformity coefficient was more than 4.0, which indicated a large assortment of particles and also represented a well-graded particle size distribution. Knife mill chopping of switchgrass produced 'strongly fine skewed mesokurtic' particles with 12.7-25.4 mm screens and 'fine skewed mesokurtic' particles with 50.8 mm screen. Results of this extensive analysis of particle sizes can be applied to selection of knife mill operating parameters to produce a particular size of switchgrass chop, and will serve as a guide for relations among the various analytic descriptors of biomass particle distributions.

  19. Size definitions for particle sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-05-01

    The recommendations of an ad hoc working group appointed by Committee TC 146 of the International Standards Organization on size definitions for particle sampling are reported. The task of the group was to collect the various definitions of 'respirable dust' and to propose a practical definition on recommendations for handling standardization on this matter. One of two proposed cut-sizes in regard to division at the larynx will be adopted after a ballot.

  20. Specialization on pollen or nectar in bumblebee foragers is not associated with ovary size, lipid reserves or sensory tuning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam R. Smith

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Foraging specialization allows social insects to more efficiently exploit resources in their environment. Recent research on honeybees suggests that specialization on pollen or nectar among foragers is linked to reproductive physiology and sensory tuning (the Reproductive Ground-Plan Hypothesis; RGPH. However, our understanding of the underlying physiological relationships in non-Apis bees is still limited. Here we show that the bumblebee Bombus terrestris has specialist pollen and nectar foragers, and test whether foraging specialization in B. terrestris is linked to reproductive physiology, measured as ovarian activation. We show that neither ovary size, sensory sensitivity, measured through proboscis extension response (PER, or whole-body lipid stores differed between pollen foragers, nectar foragers, or generalist foragers. Body size also did not differ between any of these three forager groups. Non-foragers had significantly larger ovaries than foragers. This suggests that potentially reproductive individuals avoid foraging.

  1. Quantifying the effect of colony size and food distribution on harvester ant foraging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Tatiana P; Letendre, Kenneth; Burnside, William R; Fricke, G Matthew; Moses, Melanie E

    2012-01-01

    Desert seed-harvester ants, genus Pogonomyrmex, are central place foragers that search for resources collectively. We quantify how seed harvesters exploit the spatial distribution of seeds to improve their rate of seed collection. We find that foraging rates are significantly influenced by the clumpiness of experimental seed baits. Colonies collected seeds from larger piles faster than randomly distributed seeds. We developed a method to compare foraging rates on clumped versus random seeds across three Pogonomyrmex species that differ substantially in forager population size. The increase in foraging rate when food was clumped in larger piles was indistinguishable across the three species, suggesting that species with larger colonies are no better than species with smaller colonies at collecting clumped seeds. These findings contradict the theoretical expectation that larger groups are more efficient at exploiting clumped resources, thus contributing to our understanding of the importance of the spatial distribution of food sources and colony size for communication and organization in social insects.

  2. Foraging mode and prey size spectra of suspension-feeding copepods and other zooplankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Prey size spectra of suspension-feeding zooplankton may be predicted from foraging mode and a mechanistic understanding of prey perception and capture. I examine this for suspension-feeding copepods where 2 foraging modes can be distinguished: ambush feeding and active (i.e. cruising and feeding...... the prediction. I also make qualitative predictions of food size spectra in zooplankton with other prey perception mechanisms that accord with observations....

  3. Ultrasound particle sizing: A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Malcolm J.W.Povey

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound spectrometry is one of very few methods that can size particles over the range 10 nm to 1 mm for optically opaque,undiluted materials.It has in-line,non-invasive capabilities which make it a serious contender for use in industrial process monitoring,with the potential for 100% inspection.In aqueous systems,it is more sensitive to nanoparticles than to particles in the micrometre range upwards because the scattering power varies as the inverse square of particle diameter,making it suitable for the detection of nanoparticles in concentrated,mixed systems.Future development of ultrasound spectrometers suitable for widespread laboratory and industrial use depends on meeting the challenges of complex data interpretation and the need for considerable know how.In this review we provide a brief account of ultrasound propagation and scattering theory which underlies the ultrasound spectrometer,describe several types of spectrometer and demonstrate its successful use in the characterization of colloidal silica,whole milk and protein solutions.

  4. Size-dependent foraging gene expression and behavioral caste differentiation in Bombus ignitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yokoyama Jun

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In eusocial hymenopteran insects, foraging genes, members of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase family, are considered to contribute to division of labor through behavioral caste differentiation. However, the relationship between foraging gene expression and behavioral caste in honeybees is opposite to that observed in ants and wasps. In the previously examined eusocial Hymenoptera, workers behave as foragers or nurses depending on age. We reasoned that examination of a different system of behavioral caste determination might provide new insights into the relationship between foraging genes and division of labor, and accordingly focused on bumblebees, which exhibit size-dependent behavioral caste differentiation. We characterized a foraging gene (Bifor in bumblebees (Bombus ignitus and examined the relationship between Bifor expression and size-dependent behavioral caste differentiation. Findings A putative open reading frame of the Bifor gene was 2004 bp in length. It encoded 668 aa residues and showed high identity to orthologous genes in other hymenopterans (85.3-99.0%. As in ants and wasps, Bifor expression levels were higher in nurses than in foragers. Bifor expression was negatively correlated with individual body size even within the same behavioral castes (regression coefficient = -0.376, P P = 0.018, within foragers. Conclusion These findings indicate that Bifor expression is size dependent and support the idea that Bifor expression levels are related to behavioral caste differentiation in B. ignitus. Thus, the relationship between foraging gene expression and behavioral caste differentiation found in ants and wasps was identified in a different system of labor determination.

  5. Foraging distance and population size of juvenile colonies of the Formosan Subterranean Termite (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) in laboratory extended arenas

    Science.gov (United States)

    The relationship between colony size and foraging distance was examined in extended foraging arenas with incipient colonies of the Formosan subterranean termite, Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki. Our results showed that as long as the royal pairs are present, larger colonies foraged at longer distance...

  6. Foraging arena size and structural complexity affect the dynamics of food distribution in ant colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczkowski, Grzegorz; VanWeelden, Matthew

    2010-12-01

    Food acquisition by ant colonies is a complex process that starts with acquiring food at the source (i.e., foraging) and culminates with food exchange in or around the nest (i.e., feeding). While ant foraging behavior is relatively well understood, the process of food distribution has received little attention, largely because of the lack of methodology that allows for accurate monitoring of food flow. In this study, we used the odorous house ant, Tapinoma sessile (Say) to investigate the effect of foraging arena size and structural complexity on the rate and the extent of spread of liquid carbohydrate food (sucrose solution) throughout a colony. To track the movement of food, we used protein marking and double-antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, DAS-ELISA. Variation in arena size, in conjunction with different colony sizes, allowed us to test the effect of different worker densities on food distribution. Results demonstrate that both arena size and colony size have a significant effect on the spread of the food and the number of workers receiving food decreased as arena size and colony size increased. When colony size was kept constant and arena size increased, the percentage of workers testing positive for the marker decreased, most likely because of fewer trophallactic interactions resulting from lower worker density. When arena size was kept constant and colony size increased, the percentage of workers testing positive decreased. Nonrandom (clustered) worker dispersion and a limited supply of food may have contributed to this result. Overall, results suggest that food distribution is more complete is smaller colonies regardless of the size of the foraging arena and that colony size, rather than worker density, is the primary factor affecting food distribution. The structural complexity of foraging arenas ranged from simple, two-dimensional space (empty arenas) to complex, three-dimensional space (arenas filled with mulch). The structural

  7. A relationship between maximum packing of particles and particle size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedors, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental data indicate that the volume fraction of particles in a packed bed (i.e. maximum packing) depends on particle size. One explanation for this is based on the idea that particle adhesion is the primary factor. In this paper, however, it is shown that entrainment and immobilization of liquid by the particles can also account for the facts.

  8. Magnetic particle characterization-magnetophoretic mobility and particle size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chen; Boland, Eugene D; Todd, Paul W; Hanley, Thomas R

    2016-06-01

    Quantitative characterization of magnetic particles is useful for analysis and separation of labeled cells and magnetic particles. A particle velocimeter is used to directly measure the magnetophoretic mobility, size, and other parameters of magnetic particle suspensions. The instrument provides quantitative video analysis of particles and their motion. The trajectories of magnetic particles in an isodynamic magnetic field are recorded using a high-definition camera/microscope system for image collection. Image analysis software then converts the image data to the parameters of interest. The distribution of magnetophoretic mobility is determined by combining fast image analysis with velocimetry measurements. Particle size distributions have been characterized to provide a better understanding of sample quality. The results have been used in the development and operation of analyzer protocols for counting particle concentrations accurately and measuring magnetic susceptibility and size for simultaneous display for routine application to particle suspensions and magnetically labeled biological cells. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  9. Relationship between channel morphology and foraging habitat for stream salmonids: Effects of body size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cienciala, P.; Hassan, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Channel morphology and dynamics strongly influence fish populations in running waters by defining habitat template for movement, spawning, incubation, and foraging. In this research we adopted a modeling approach to investigate how body size controls the relationship between salmonid fish and their foraging habitat in streams. Body size is a fundamental ecological parameter which affects resource acquisition, locomotory costs, metabolic rates, and competitive abilities. We focus on two specific questions. First, we examined how distinct types of channel morphology and associated flow fields shape specific growth potential for different body size classes of trout. Second, we modeled these fish-habitat relationships in a size-structured population in the presence of intraspecific competition. In the latter scenario, fish may not be able to occupy energetically optimal foraging habitat and the predicted specific growth potential may differ from the intrinsic habitat quality. To address the research questions, we linked a 2D hydrodynamic model with a bioenergetic foraging model for drift-feeding trout. Net energy intake, simulated for four study reaches with different channel morphology, was converted into maps of specific growth rate potential. We extended this model by including a component that enabled us to estimate territory size for fish of a given body size and account for the effects of competition on spatial distribution of fish. The predictions that emerge from our simulations highlight that fish body size is an important factor that determines the relationship between channel morphology and the quality of foraging habitat. The results also indicate that distinct types of channel morphology may give rise to different energetic conditions for different body size classes of drift-feeding salmonids.

  10. Quantifying the effect of colony size and food distribution on harvester ant foraging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana P Flanagan

    Full Text Available Desert seed-harvester ants, genus Pogonomyrmex, are central place foragers that search for resources collectively. We quantify how seed harvesters exploit the spatial distribution of seeds to improve their rate of seed collection. We find that foraging rates are significantly influenced by the clumpiness of experimental seed baits. Colonies collected seeds from larger piles faster than randomly distributed seeds. We developed a method to compare foraging rates on clumped versus random seeds across three Pogonomyrmex species that differ substantially in forager population size. The increase in foraging rate when food was clumped in larger piles was indistinguishable across the three species, suggesting that species with larger colonies are no better than species with smaller colonies at collecting clumped seeds. These findings contradict the theoretical expectation that larger groups are more efficient at exploiting clumped resources, thus contributing to our understanding of the importance of the spatial distribution of food sources and colony size for communication and organization in social insects.

  11. Method for producing size selected particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumdick, Gregory K.; Shin, Young Ho; Takeya, Kaname

    2016-09-20

    The invention provides a system for preparing specific sized particles, the system comprising a continuous stir tank reactor adapted to receive reactants; a centrifugal dispenser positioned downstream from the reactor and in fluid communication with the reactor; a particle separator positioned downstream of the dispenser; and a solution stream return conduit positioned between the separator and the reactor. Also provided is a method for preparing specific sized particles, the method comprising introducing reagent into a continuous stir reaction tank and allowing the reagents to react to produce product liquor containing particles; contacting the liquor particles with a centrifugal force for a time sufficient to generate particles of a predetermined size and morphology; and returning unused reagents and particles of a non-predetermined size to the tank.

  12. Method for producing size selected particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumdick, Gregory K.; Shin, Young Ho; Takeya, Kaname

    2016-09-20

    The invention provides a system for preparing specific sized particles, the system comprising a continuous stir tank reactor adapted to receive reactants; a centrifugal dispenser positioned downstream from the reactor and in fluid communication with the reactor; a particle separator positioned downstream of the dispenser; and a solution stream return conduit positioned between the separator and the reactor. Also provided is a method for preparing specific sized particles, the method comprising introducing reagent into a continuous stir reaction tank and allowing the reagents to react to produce product liquor containing particles; contacting the liquor particles with a centrifugal force for a time sufficient to generate particles of a predetermined size and morphology; and returning unused reagents and particles of a non-predetermined size to the tank.

  13. Prey to predator size ratio influences foraging efficiency of larval Aeshna juncea dragonflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirvonen, Heikki; Ranta, Esa

    1996-05-01

    We investigated foraging behaviour of larval dragonflies Aeshna juncea in order to examine the significance of prey density and body size in predator-prey dynamics. A. juncea were offered separately three size-classes of Daphnia magna at low and high densities. The data were collected with direct observations of the foraging individuals. We found that large A. juncea larvae could better enhance their intake of prey biomass as prey size and prey density increased than their smaller conspecifics. However, increasing feeding efficiency of both larval instars was constrained by declining attack success and search rate with increasing prey size and density. With small D. magna, in contrast to large A. juncea, small A. juncea increased their searching efficiency as prey density increased keeping D. magna mortality rate at a constant level. In a predator-prey relationship this indicates stabilizing potential and feeding thresholds set by both prey density and prey-predator size ratio. Attack success dropped with prey size and density, but did not change in the course of the foraging bout. For both A. juncea sizes prey handling times increased as more medium and large prey were eaten. The slope of the increase became steeper with increasing prey-predator size ratio. These observations indicate that components of the predator-prey relationship vary with prey density, contrary to the basic assumptions of functional response equations. Moreover, the results suggest that the effects of prey density change during the ontogeny of predators and prey.

  14. Method and apparatus for measuring particle size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemse, A.W.; Merkus, H.G.

    1998-01-01

    Described is a method for measuring the particle size of ultra-small particles (202) which are suspended in a fluid. Laser light (121, 123) is guided via a first optical path (160) to a suspension (201), and light (125) scattered by the particles (202) in the suspension (201) is guided to an optical

  15. Cobalt particle size effects in catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Breejen, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    Aim of the work described in this thesis was first to investigate cobalt particle size effects in heterogeneous catalysis. The main focus was to provide a deeper understanding of the origin of the cobalt particle size effects in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) catalysis in which synthesis gas (H2/CO) is conver

  16. Cobalt particle size effects in catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Breejen, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    Aim of the work described in this thesis was first to investigate cobalt particle size effects in heterogeneous catalysis. The main focus was to provide a deeper understanding of the origin of the cobalt particle size effects in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) catalysis in which synthesis gas (H2/CO) is

  17. Industrial Particle Size Measurement Using Light Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muly, E. C.; Frock, H. N.

    1980-12-01

    The precise knowledge of particle size and particle size distribution is fundamental to the control of a wide variety of industrial processes. Processing steps as diverse as crystallization, grinding, emulsification, and atomization, produce particles in the size range .1 to 1000 micrometers in diameter. While the object of some processes may be the production of particles of specified sizes, e.g., abrasives and glass beads, other processes may require particle size control for process efficiency, e.g., crystallization, and still others for control of final product quality, e.g., minerals, cement, and ceramics. In many processes more than one of these reasons may be important. A line of instruments has been developed using light scattering to measure various parameters of particulate distributions. These instruments employ laser illumination of a flowing stream of particles, producing Fraunhofer diffraction patterns which are processed both optically and electronically with unique, proprietary techniques. Various parameters of the particle size distribution are measured. The measurement is both rapid and precise. This paper will cover the importance of particle size measurements in various processes, different types of measurement methods, and the application of light scattering technology to size determinations in wet slurries and dry powders. A number of specific applications will be discussed encompassing minerals grinding, Portland cement, and rolling mill emulsions. Some references will be made to energy savings through automation.

  18. Particle size characterization by ultrasonic attenuation spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingxu Su; Minghua Xue; Xiaoshu Cai; Zhitao Shang; Feng Xu

    2008-01-01

    This paper contributes to extracting information from signals of broadband ultrasonic attenuation spectrum for effective utilization in particle size characterization. The single particle scattering model and the coupled-phase model are formulated simultaneously, the relationship between particle size distribution and ultrasonic spectrum is established, and a convergence criterion for calculation is quantified. Demonsa'ation inversion by the optimum regularization factor method is carded out to yield typical numerical results for discussion. With the experimental set-up developed by the Institute of Particle and Two-Phase Flow Measurement (IPTFM) at the University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, sand sediment particle size is measured by attenuation spectrum and analyzed using the above inversion algorithm and theoretical models. To validate the proposed ultrasonic spectrum particle sizing method, results are compared with those obtained by microscopy.

  19. Particle size distribution instrument. Topical report 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okhuysen, W.; Gassaway, J.D.

    1995-04-01

    The development of an instrument to measure the concentration of particles in gas is described in this report. An in situ instrument was designed and constructed which sizes individual particles and counts the number of occurrences for several size classes. Although this instrument was designed to detect the size distribution of slag and seed particles generated at an experimental coal-fired magnetohydrodynamic power facility, it can be used as a nonintrusive diagnostic tool for other hostile industrial processes involving the formation and growth of particulates. Two of the techniques developed are extensions of the widely used crossed beam velocimeter, providing simultaneous measurement of the size distribution and velocity of articles.

  20. Nectar foraging behaviour is affected by ant body size in Camponotus mus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medan, Violeta; Josens, Roxana B

    2005-08-01

    The nectivorous ant Camponotus mus shows a broad size variation within the worker caste. Large ants can ingest faster and larger loads than small ones. Differences in physiological abilities in fluid ingestion due to the insect size could be related to differences in decision-making according to ant size during nectar foraging. Sucrose solutions of different levels of sugar concentration (30% or 60%w/w), viscosity (high or low) or flow rate (ad libitum or 1microl/min) were offered in combination to analyse the behavioural responses to each of these properties separately. Differences were found depending on ant body size and the property compared. A regulated flow produced smaller crop loads for medium and large ants compared to the same solution given ad libitum. All foragers remained longer times feeding at the regulated flow source but larger ants often made longer interruptions. When sugar concentration was constant but viscosity was high, only large ants increased feeding time. Constant viscosity with different sugar concentration determined longer feeding time and bigger loads for the most concentrated solution for small but not for large ants. Small ants reached similar crop loads in a variety of conditions while large ants did not. These differences could be evidence of a possible specialization for nectar foraging based on ant body size.

  1. Measurements of radon daughter particle size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knutson, E.O.; George, A.C.; Knuth, R.H.; Koh, B.R. (Department of Energy, New York (USA). Environmental Measurements Lab.)

    1984-01-01

    Measurements using three types and sizes of diffusion batteries and two cascade impactors showed that the particle size distribution of the potential alpha energy concentration (PAEC) is usually bimodal. The major mode, comprising 85-100% of the PAEC, is well defined and centred at about 100 nm in diameter. The minor mode, comprising the balance of the PAEC, varies in location from below 5 nm to about 10 nm. The particle size of the minor mode appears to correlate to the 'age' of the /sup 218/Po. The impactor tests conducted showed that < 16% of the PAEC resides on particles > 0.6 ..mu..m in diameter.

  2. PARAMETERS AFFECTING PARTICLE SIZE OF POLYBUTYLACRYLATE MICROGELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xia; YU Yunzhao

    1989-01-01

    The factors affecting particle size of reactive microgels formed during the self-emulsifying copolymerization of unsaturated polyester (UP )with butyl acrylate (BA)have been studied. The parameters discussed are: the proportion of the UP in the monomer mixture, the molecular weight and the carboxyl value of the UP, the phase ratio, the electrolyte concentration and the polar solvent additive. The seeding emulsion polymerization is discussed as well. It turned out that the particle size of the reactive microgels can be controlled in a definite range by changing the experimental conditions. However the particle size distribution becomes broader as the average diameter increases. It is suggested that the agglomeration of primary particles plays an important role during the growth of microgel particle.

  3. Exit Creek Particle Size, June 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset presents particle size data collected at the surface of gravel bars along Exit Creek, a stream draining Exit Glacier in Kenai Fjords National Park,...

  4. Investigation of plasma particle interactions with variable particle sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dropmann, Michael; Laufer, Rene; Herdrich, Georg; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2015-11-01

    In dusty plasmas, the dust particles are subjected to many forces of different origins. Both the gas and plasma directly affect the dust particles through electric fields, neutral drag, ion drag and thermophoretic forces, while the particles themselves interact with one another through a screened coulomb potential, which can be influenced by flowing ions. Recently, micron sized particles have been used as probes to analyze the electric fields in the plasma directly. A proper analysis of the resulting data requires a full understanding of the manner in which these forces couple to the dust particles. In most cases each of the forces exhibit unique characteristics, many of which are partially dependent on the particle size. In this study, five different particle sizes are used to investigate the forces resident in the sheath above the lower electrode of a GEC RF reference cell. The particles are tracked using a high-speed camera, yielding two-dimensional force maps allowing the force on the particles to be described as a polynomial series. It will be shown that the data collected can be analyzed to reveal information about the origins of the various forces. Support from the NSF and the DOE (award numbers PHY-1262031 and PHY-1414523) is gratefully acknowledged.

  5. Particle Size Estimation Based on Edge Density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei-xing

    2005-01-01

    Given image sequences of closely packed particles, the underlying aim is to estimate diameters without explicit segmentation. In a way, this is similar to the task of counting objects without directly counting them. Such calculations may, for example, be useful fast estimation of particle size in different application areas. The topic is that of estimating average size (=average diameter) of packed particles, from formulas involving edge density, and the edges from moment-based thresholding are used. An average shape factor is involved in the calculations, obtained for some frames from crude partial segmentation. Measurement results from about 80 frames have been analyzed.

  6. Differential foraging preferences on seed size by rodents result in higher dispersal success of medium-sized seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lin; Wang, Zhenyu; Yan, Chuan; Chen, Jin; Guo, Cong; Zhang, Zhibin

    2016-11-01

    Rodent preference for scatter-hoarding large seeds has been widely considered to favor the evolution of large seeds. Previous studies supporting this conclusion were primarily based on observations at earlier stages of seed dispersal, or on a limited sample of successfully established seedlings. Because seed dispersal comprises multiple dispersal stages, we hypothesized that differential foraging preference on seed size by animal dispersers at different dispersal stages would ultimately result in medium-sized seeds having the highest dispersal success rates. In this study, by tracking a large number of seeds for 5 yr, we investigated the effects of seed size on seed fates from seed removal to seedling establishment of a dominant plant Pittosporopsis kerrii (Icacinaceae) dispersed by scatter-hoarding rodents in tropical forest in southwest China. We found that small seeds had a lower survival rate at the early dispersal stage where more small seeds were predated at seed stations and after removal; large seeds had a lower survival rate at the late dispersal stage, more large seeds were recovered, predated after being cached, or larder-hoarded. Medium-sized seeds experienced the highest dispersal success. Our study suggests that differential foraging preferences by scatter-hoarding rodents at different stages of seed dispersal could result in conflicting selective pressures on seed size and higher dispersal success of medium-sized seeds.

  7. Particle size distribution and particle size-related crystalline silica content in granite quarry dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirianni, Greg; Hosgood, Howard Dean; Slade, Martin D; Borak, Jonathan

    2008-05-01

    Previous studies indicate that the relationship between empirically derived particle counts, particle mass determinations, and particle size-related silica content are not constant within mines or across mine work tasks. To better understand the variability of particle size distributions and variations in silica content by particle size in a granite quarry, exposure surveys were conducted with side-by-side arrays of four closed face cassettes, four cyclones, four personal environmental monitors, and a real-time particle counter. In general, the proportion of silica increased as collected particulate size increased, but samples varied in an inconstant way. Significant differences in particle size distributions were seen depending on the extent of ventilation and the nature and activity of work performed. Such variability raises concerns about the adequacy of silica exposure assessments based on only limited numbers of samples or short-term samples.

  8. Guest Editorial Particle Sizing And Spray Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigier, Norman; Stewart, Gerald

    1984-10-01

    The measurement of particle size and velocity in particle laden flows is a subject of interest in a variety of industrial applications. In combustion systems for electricity generation, industrial processes and heating, and transportation, where liquid and solid fuels are injected into air streams for burning in furnaces, boilers, and gas turbine and diesel engines, the initial size and velocity distributions of particles are determining factors in the overall combustion efficiency and the emission of pollutants and particulates. In the design of injectors and burners for the atomization of liquid fuels, a great deal of attention is being focused on developing instrumentation for the accurate measurement of size and velocity distributions in sprays as a function of space and time. Most recent advances in optical engineering techniques using lasers for particle measurement have focused on detailed spray characterization, where there is a major concern with spherical liquid droplets within the size range of 1 to 500 μm in diameter, with droplet velocities within the range of 1 to 100 m/s, and the requirement for making in situ measurements of moving particles by nonintrusive optical probes. The instruments being developed for spray analysis have much wider applications. These include measurement in particle laden flows encountered in a variety of industrial processes with solid particles in gas and liquid streams and liquid particles in gas streams. Sprays used in agriculture, drying, food processing, coating of materials, chemical processing, clean rooms, pharmaceuticals, plasma spraying, and icing wind tunnels are examples of systems for which information is being sought on particle and fluid dynamic interactions in which there is heat, mass, and momentum transfer in turbulent reacting flows.

  9. Measurement of nonvolatile particle number size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkatzelis, G. I.; Papanastasiou, D. K.; Florou, K.; Kaltsonoudis, C.; Louvaris, E.; Pandis, S. N.

    2016-01-01

    An experimental methodology was developed to measure the nonvolatile particle number concentration using a thermodenuder (TD). The TD was coupled with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer, measuring the chemical composition and mass size distribution of the submicrometer aerosol and a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) that provided the number size distribution of the aerosol in the range from 10 to 500 nm. The method was evaluated with a set of smog chamber experiments and achieved almost complete evaporation (> 98 %) of secondary organic as well as freshly nucleated particles, using a TD temperature of 400 °C and a centerline residence time of 15 s. This experimental approach was applied in a winter field campaign in Athens and provided a direct measurement of number concentration and size distribution for particles emitted from major pollution sources. During periods in which the contribution of biomass burning sources was dominant, more than 80 % of particle number concentration remained after passing through the thermodenuder, suggesting that nearly all biomass burning particles had a nonvolatile core. These remaining particles consisted mostly of black carbon (60 % mass contribution) and organic aerosol (OA; 40 %). Organics that had not evaporated through the TD were mostly biomass burning OA (BBOA) and oxygenated OA (OOA) as determined from AMS source apportionment analysis. For periods during which traffic contribution was dominant 50-60 % of the particles had a nonvolatile core while the rest evaporated at 400 °C. The remaining particle mass consisted mostly of black carbon with an 80 % contribution, while OA was responsible for another 15-20 %. Organics were mostly hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and OOA. These results suggest that even at 400 °C some fraction of the OA does not evaporate from particles emitted from common combustion processes, such as biomass burning and car engines, indicating that a fraction of this type of OA

  10. Particle size reduction of propellants by cryocycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whinnery, L.; Griffiths, S.; Lipkin, J. [and others

    1995-05-01

    Repeated exposure of a propellant to liquid nitrogen causes thermal stress gradients within the material resulting in cracking and particle size reduction. This process is termed cryocycling. The authors conducted a feasibility study, combining experiments on both inert and live propellants with three modeling approaches. These models provided optimized cycle times, predicted ultimate particle size, and allowed crack behavior to be explored. Process safety evaluations conducted separately indicated that cryocycling does not increase the sensitivity of the propellants examined. The results of this study suggest that cryocycling is a promising technology for the demilitarization of tactical rocket motors.

  11. Can foraging ecology drive the evolution of body size in a diving endotherm?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothée R Cook

    Full Text Available Within a single animal species, different morphs can allow for differential exploitation of foraging niches between populations, while sexual size dimorphism can provide each sex with access to different resources. Despite being potentially important agents of evolution, resource polymorphisms, and the way they operate in wild populations, remain poorly understood. In this study, we examine how trophic factors can select for different body sizes between populations and sexes in a diving endotherm. Dive depth and duration are positively related to body size in diving birds and mammals, a relationship explained by a lower mass-specific metabolic rate and greater oxygen stores in larger individuals. Based on this allometry, we predict that selection for exploiting resources situated at different depths can drive the evolution of body size in species of diving endotherms at the population and sexual level. To test this prediction, we studied the foraging ecology of Blue-eyed Shags, a group of cormorants with male-biased sexual size dimorphism from across the Southern Ocean. We found that mean body mass and relative difference in body mass between sexes varied by up to 77% and 107% between neighbouring colonies, respectively. Birds from colonies with larger individuals dived deeper than birds from colonies with smaller individuals, when accounting for sex. In parallel, males dived further offshore and deeper than females and the sexual difference in dive depth reflected the level of sexual size dimorphism at each colony. We argue that body size in this group of birds is under intense selection for diving to depths of profitable benthic prey patches and that, locally, sexual niche divergence selection can exaggerate the sexual size dimorphism of Blue-eyed Shags initially set up by sexual selection. Our findings suggest that trophic resources can select for important geographic micro-variability in body size between populations and sexes.

  12. Particle size dependent response of aerosol counters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankilov, A.; Baklanov, A.; Colhoun, M.; Enderle, K.-H.; Gras, J.; Julanov, Yu.; Kaller, D.; Lindner, A.; Lushnikov, A. A.; Mavliev, R.; McGovern, F.; O'Connor, T. C.; Podzimek, J.; Preining, O.; Reischl, G. P.; Rudolf, R.; Sem, G. J.; Szymanski, W. W.; Vrtala, A. E.; Wagner, P. E.; Winklmayr, W.; Zagaynov, V.

    During an international workshop at the Institute for Experimental Physics of the University of Vienna, Austria, which was coordinated within the Committee on Nucleation and Atmospheric Aerosols (IAMAS-IUGG), 10 instruments for aerosol number concentration measurement were studied, covering a wide range of methods based on various different measuring principles. In order to investigate the detection limits of the instruments considered with respect to particle size, simultaneous number concentration measurements were performed for monodispersed aerosols with particle sizes ranging from 1.5 to 50 nm diameter and various compositions. The instruments considered show quite different response characteristics, apparently related to the different vapors used in the various counters to enlarge the particles to an optically detectable size. A strong dependence of the 50% cutoff diameter on the particle composition in correlation with the type of vapor used in the specific instrument was found. An enhanced detection efficiency for ultrafine hygroscopic sodium chloride aerosols was observed with water operated systems, an analogous trend was found for n-butanol operated systems with nonhygroscopic silver and tungsten oxide particles.

  13. Effect of Particle Size on Shear Stress of Magnetorheological Fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiranjit Sarkar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetorheological fluids (MRF, known for their variable shear stress contain magnetisable micrometer-sized particles (few micrometer to 200 micrometers in a nonmagnetic carrier liquid. To avoid settling of particles, smaller sized (3-10 micrometers particles are preferred, while larger sized particles can be used in MR brakes, MR clutches, etc. as mechanical stirring action in those mechanisms does not allow particles to settle down. Ideally larger sized particles provide higher shear stress compared to smaller sized particles. However there is need to explore the effect of particle sizes on the shear stress. In the current paper, a comparison of different particle sizes on MR effect has been presented. Particle size distributions of iron particles were measured using HORIBA Laser Scattering Particle Size Distribution Analyser. The particle size distribution, mean sizes and standard deviations have been presented. The nature of particle shapes has been observed using scanning electron microscopy. To explore the effect of particle sizes, nine MR fluids containing small, large and mixed sized carbonyl iron particles have been synthesized. Three concentrations (9%, 18% and 36% by volume for each size of particles have been used. The shear stresses of those MRF samples have been measured using ANTON PAAR MCR-102 Rheometer. With increase in volume fraction of iron particles, the MR fluids synthesized using “mixed sized particles” show better shear stress compared to the MR fluids containing “smaller sized spherical shaped particles” and “larger sized flaked shaped particles” at higher shear rate.

  14. Remote Laser Diffraction Particle Size Distribution Analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas; Huestis, Gary Michael; Bolton, Steven Michael

    2001-03-01

    In support of a radioactive slurry sampling and physical characterization task, an “off-the-shelf” laser diffraction (classical light scattering) particle size analyzer was utilized for remote particle size distribution (PSD) analysis. Spent nuclear fuel was previously reprocessed at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC—formerly recognized as the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant) which is on DOE’s INEEL site. The acidic, radioactive aqueous raffinate streams from these processes were transferred to 300,000 gallon stainless steel storage vessels located in the INTEC Tank Farm area. Due to the transfer piping configuration in these vessels, complete removal of the liquid can not be achieved. Consequently, a “heel” slurry remains at the bottom of an “emptied” vessel. Particle size distribution characterization of the settled solids in this remaining heel slurry, as well as suspended solids in the tank liquid, is the goal of this remote PSD analyzer task. A Horiba Instruments Inc. Model LA-300 PSD analyzer, which has a 0.1 to 600 micron measurement range, was modified for remote application in a “hot cell” (gamma radiation) environment. This technology provides rapid and simple PSD analysis, especially down in the fine and microscopic particle size regime. Particle size analysis of these radioactive slurries down in this smaller range was not previously achievable—making this technology far superior than the traditional methods used. Successful acquisition of this data, in conjunction with other characterization analyses, provides important information that can be used in the myriad of potential radioactive waste management alternatives.

  15. Rumen Contents and Ruminal Digesta Particle Size Distribution in Buffalo Steers Fed Three Different Size of Alfalfa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Teimouri Yansari

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate the effects of three sizes of alfalfa and time post-feeding on rumen contents and on particle size distribution of ruminal digesta. Three ruminally fistulated buffalo steers received a diet consisting just alfalfa that was harvested at 15% of flowering and chopped in three sizes. Individual small rectangular bales were chopped with a forage field harvester for theoretical cut length 19 and 10 mm for preparation of long and medium particle size, also the fine particles were prepared by milling. The geometric means and its standard deviation were 8.5, 5.5 and 2.5 mm; and 1.24, 1.16 and 1.06 mm, in coarse, medium and fine, respectively. The experimental design was a repeated 3×3 Latin squares with 21 day periods. The diets were offered twice daily at 09:00 and 21:00 h at ad libitum level. The rumens were evacuated manually at 3, 7.5 and 12h post-feeding and total ruminal contents separated into mat and bailable liquids. Dry matter weight distribution of total recovered particles was determined by a wet-sieving procedure and used to partition ruminal mat and bailable liquids among percentages of large (≥4.0 mm, medium (<4.0mm and ≥1.18 mm, and fine (<1.18 mm and ≥0.05 mm particles. Intake did not influence markedly the distribution of different particle fractions, whereas particle size and time post-feeding had a pronounced effect. With increasing time after feeding, percentage of large and medium particles significantly decreased, whereas the percentage of fine particles significantly increased. The ruminal digesta particle distributions illustrated intensive particle breakdown in the reticulo-rumen for coarse particle more than others. Dry matter contents and the proportion of particulate dry matter in the rumen increased as intake increased, i.e. ruminal mat increased at the expense of bailable liquids. It can be concluded that reduction of forage particle size for buffaloes at maintenance level

  16. Modelling complete particle-size distributions from operator estimates of particle-size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Sam; Weltje, Gert Jan

    2014-05-01

    Estimates of particle-size made by operators in the field and laboratory represent a vast and relatively untapped data archive. The wide spatial distribution of particle-size estimates makes them ideal for constructing geological models and soil maps. This study uses a large data set from the Netherlands (n = 4837) containing both operator estimates of particle size and complete particle-size distributions measured by laser granulometry. This study introduces a logit-based constrained-cubic-spline (CCS) algorithm to interpolate complete particle-size distributions from operator estimates. The CCS model is compared to four other models: (i) a linear interpolation; (ii) a log-hyperbolic interpolation; (iii) an empirical logistic function; and (iv) an empirical arctan function. Operator estimates were found to be both inaccurate and imprecise; only 14% of samples were successfully classified using the Dutch classification scheme for fine sediment. Operator estimates of sediment particle-size encompass the same range of values as particle-size distributions measured by laser analysis. However, the distributions measured by laser analysis show that most of the sand percentage values lie between zero and one, so the majority of the variability in the data is lost because operator estimates are made to the nearest 1% at best, and more frequently to the nearest 5%. A method for constructing complete particle-size distributions from operator estimates of sediment texture using a logit constrained cubit spline (CCS) interpolation algorithm is presented. This model and four other previously published methods are compared to establish the best approach to modelling particle-size distributions. The logit-CCS model is the most accurate method, although both logit-linear and log-linear interpolation models provide reasonable alternatives. Models based on empirical distribution functions are less accurate than interpolation algorithms for modelling particle-size distributions in

  17. Does the Waggle Dance Help Honey Bees to Forage at Greater Distances than Expected for their Body Size?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis L.W. Ratnieks

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A honey bee colony has been likened to an oil company. Some members of the company or colony prospect for valuable liquid resources. When these are discovered other group members can be recruited to exploit the resource. The recruitment of nestmates to a specific location where there is a patch of flowers should change the economics of scouting, that is, the search for new resource patches. In particular, communication is predicted to make scouting at longer distances worthwhile because a profitable resource patch, once discovered, will enhance the foraging not only of the discoverer but also of nestmates that can be directed to the patch. By virtue of having large colonies and dance communication, honey bees are predicted to be able to profitably scout, and hence forage, at greater distances from the nest than either solitary bees or social bees without communication. We test this hypothesis by first examining existing data on foraging distance to evaluate whether honey bees do indeed forage at greater distances than other bees given their body size. Second, we present a simple cost-benefit analysis of scouting which indicates that communication causes longer range scouting to be more profitable. Overall, our analyses are supportive, but not conclusive, that honey bees forage further than would be expected given their size and that the waggle dance is a cause of the honey bee’s exceptional foraging range.

  18. Particle Swarm and Bacterial Foraging Inspired Hybrid Artificial Bee Colony Algorithm for Numerical Function Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Mao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial bee colony (ABC algorithm has good performance in discovering the optimal solutions to difficult optimization problems, but it has weak local search ability and easily plunges into local optimum. In this paper, we introduce the chemotactic behavior of Bacterial Foraging Optimization into employed bees and adopt the principle of moving the particles toward the best solutions in the particle swarm optimization to improve the global search ability of onlooker bees and gain a hybrid artificial bee colony (HABC algorithm. To obtain a global optimal solution efficiently, we make HABC algorithm converge rapidly in the early stages of the search process, and the search range contracts dynamically during the late stages. Our experimental results on 16 benchmark functions of CEC 2014 show that HABC achieves significant improvement at accuracy and convergence rate, compared with the standard ABC, best-so-far ABC, directed ABC, Gaussian ABC, improved ABC, and memetic ABC algorithms.

  19. Evaluation of neutral detergent fiber contents in forages, concentrates and cattle feces ground at different particle sizes and using bags made from different textiles Avaliação dos teores de fibra em detergente neutro em forragens, concentrados e fezes bovinas moídas em diferentes tamanhos e em sacos de diferentes tecidos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Neves Pereira Valente

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Two experiments were carried out to evaluate the effects of particles sizes on contents of neutral detergent fiber (NDF by using nylon bags F57 (Ankom® and non-woven textile (NWT 100 g/m². In the first experiment, to check contents of NDF obtained with each one of the textilles, quantitative filter paper (purified cellulose was used as analytical standard. The material was processed in a 1 or 2 mm and put in the bags in a ratio of 20 mg of dry matter/cm² of surface. The analyses were performed in a fiber analyser (Ankom220 and using a heat-stable a-amylase. No effects of particles sizes were found. In the second experiment, it was used samples of forage (signal grass hay, sugar cane, coastcross hay, corn straw, corn silage, and elephant grass at 50 and 250 days of growing after cutting, concentrate feeds (sorghum grain, gluten meal, citrus pulp, cottonseed meal, soybean meal, wheat bran, corn grain, whole soybean, and soybean hulls, and feces of cattle of animals fed diets containing 15 or 50% of concentrate. The samples were prepared, put in bags, and analyzed as described in the previous experiment. In both experiments, the smallest contents of NDF were found by using nylon bags, indicating loss of particles through the bag porosity. It is suggested grind of samples by using 1-mm screen sieve, which provides efficient extraction of cell content by the action of neutral detergent and a greater specific surface by the action of the heat-stable a-amylase enzyme. The use of particles ground at 2-mm overestimates NDF contents.Foram realizados dois experimentos objetivando-se avaliar a influência do tamanho das partículas sobre os teores de fibra em detergente neutro (FDN utilizando-se sacos de náilon, F57 (Ankom® e tecido-não-tecido (TNT 100 g/m². No primeiro experimento, com o intuito de aferir os teores de FDN obtidos com cada um dos tecidos, utilizou-se papel-filtro quantitativo (celulose purificada como padrão analítico. O material

  20. DUAL-CHANNEL PARTICLE SIZE AND SHAPE ANALYZER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arjen van der Schoot

    2004-01-01

    @@ Fig. 1 shows a newly developed analyzer (Ankersmid CIS-100) that brings together two different measurement channels for accurate size and shape measurement of spherical and non-spherical particles. The size of spherical particles is measured by a HeNe Laser Beam; the size of non-spherical particles is analyzed by Dynamic Video Analysis of the particles' shape.

  1. Foraging mode affects the evolution of egg size in generalist predators embedded in complex food webs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdeny-Vilalta, O; Fox, C W; Wise, D H; Moya-Laraño, J

    2015-06-01

    Ecological networks incorporate myriad biotic interactions that determine the selection pressures experienced by the embedded populations. We argue that within food webs, the negative scaling of abundance with body mass and foraging theory predict that the selective advantages of larger egg size should be smaller for sit-and-wait than active-hunting generalist predators, leading to the evolution of a difference in egg size between them. Because body mass usually scales negatively with predator abundance and constrains predation rate, slightly increasing egg mass should simultaneously allow offspring to feed on more prey and escape from more predators. However, the benefits of larger offspring would be relatively smaller for sit-and-wait predators because (i) due to their lower mobility, encounters with other predators are less common, and (ii) they usually employ a set of alternative hunting strategies that help to subdue relatively larger prey. On the other hand, for active predators, which need to confront prey as they find them, body-size differences may be more important in subduing prey. This difference in benefits should lead to the evolution of larger egg sizes in active-hunting relative to sit-and-wait predators. This prediction was confirmed by a phylogenetically controlled analysis of 268 spider species, supporting the view that the structure of ecological networks may serve to predict relevant selective pressures acting on key life history traits.

  2. Particle size distribution control of Pt particles used for particle gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiji, M.; Akiba, H.; Nagao, H.; Hirasawa, I.

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study is particle size distribution (PSD) control of submicron sized Pt particles used for particle gun. In this report, simple reaction crystallization is conducted by mixing H2PtCl6 and ascorbic acid. Without the additive, obtained Pt particles have broad PSD and reproducibility of experiment is low. With seeding, Pt particles have narrow PSD and reproducibility improved. Additionally, mean particle diameter of 100-700 nm is controlled by changing seeding amount. Obtained particles are successfully characterized as Pt by XRD results. Moreover, XRD spectra indicate that obtained particles are polycrystals. These experimental results suggest that seeding consumed nucleation, as most nuclei attached on the seed surface. This mechanism virtually restricted nucleation to have narrow PSD can be obtained.

  3. An alternative method for determining particle-size distribution of forest road aggregate and soil with large-sized particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakjun Rhee; Randy B. Foltz; James L. Fridley; Finn Krogstad; Deborah S. Page-Dumroese

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of particle-size distribution (PSD) of soil with large-sized particles (e.g., 25.4 mm diameter) requires a large sample and numerous particle-size analyses (PSAs). A new method is needed that would reduce time, effort, and cost for PSAs of the soil and aggregate material with large-sized particles. We evaluated a nested method for sampling and PSA by...

  4. micron-sized polymeric particles from cashew nut shell liquid

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    LIQUID: INFLUENCE OF REACTION PARAMETERS ON PARTICLE SIZE. YMM Makame ... Chemistry Department, University of Dar es Salaam ... size and size distribution was studied for the given geometry of the reactor and the stirrer. It was.

  5. Information needs at the beginning of foraging: grass-cutting ants trade off load size for a faster return to the nest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Bollazzi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acquisition of information about food sources is essential for animals that forage collectively like social insects. Foragers deliver two commodities to the nest, food and information, and they may favor the delivery of one at the expenses of the other. We predict that information needs should be particularly high at the beginning of foraging: the decision to return faster to the nest will motivate a grass-cutting ant worker to reduce its loading time, and so to leave the source with a partial load. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Field results showed that at the initial foraging phase, most grass-cutting ant foragers (Acromyrmex heyeri returned unladen to the nest, and experienced head-on encounters with outgoing workers. Ant encounters were not simply collisions in a probabilistic sense: outgoing workers contacted in average 70% of the returning foragers at the initial foraging phase, and only 20% at the established phase. At the initial foraging phase, workers cut fragments that were shorter, narrower, lighter and tenderer than those harvested at the established one. Foragers walked at the initial phase significantly faster than expected for the observed temperatures, yet not at the established phase. Moreover, when controlling for differences in the fragment-size carried, workers still walked faster at the initial phase. Despite the higher speed, their individual transport rate of vegetable tissue was lower than that of similarly-sized workers foraging later at the same patch. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: At the initial foraging phase, workers compromised their individual transport rates of material in order to return faster to the colony. We suggest that the observed flexible cutting rules and the selection of partial loads at the beginning of foraging are driven by the need of information transfer, crucial for the establishment and maintenance of a foraging process to monopolize a discovered resource.

  6. Information needs at the beginning of foraging: grass-cutting ants trade off load size for a faster return to the nest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollazzi, Martin; Roces, Flavio

    2011-03-09

    Acquisition of information about food sources is essential for animals that forage collectively like social insects. Foragers deliver two commodities to the nest, food and information, and they may favor the delivery of one at the expenses of the other. We predict that information needs should be particularly high at the beginning of foraging: the decision to return faster to the nest will motivate a grass-cutting ant worker to reduce its loading time, and so to leave the source with a partial load. Field results showed that at the initial foraging phase, most grass-cutting ant foragers (Acromyrmex heyeri) returned unladen to the nest, and experienced head-on encounters with outgoing workers. Ant encounters were not simply collisions in a probabilistic sense: outgoing workers contacted in average 70% of the returning foragers at the initial foraging phase, and only 20% at the established phase. At the initial foraging phase, workers cut fragments that were shorter, narrower, lighter and tenderer than those harvested at the established one. Foragers walked at the initial phase significantly faster than expected for the observed temperatures, yet not at the established phase. Moreover, when controlling for differences in the fragment-size carried, workers still walked faster at the initial phase. Despite the higher speed, their individual transport rate of vegetable tissue was lower than that of similarly-sized workers foraging later at the same patch. At the initial foraging phase, workers compromised their individual transport rates of material in order to return faster to the colony. We suggest that the observed flexible cutting rules and the selection of partial loads at the beginning of foraging are driven by the need of information transfer, crucial for the establishment and maintenance of a foraging process to monopolize a discovered resource.

  7. Effect of particle size on lead absorption from the gut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barltrop, D.; Meek, F.

    1979-07-01

    The relationship between particle size and absorption of lead particles from the gastrointestinal tract of the rat has been investigated. Preparations of metallic lead of particle size between 0. and 250..mu.. were incorporated in laboratory rat diets and absorption determined by measurement of tissue lead concentrations attained under standard conditions. An inverse relationship was found between particle size and lead absorption; this relationship was most marked in the 0 to 100..mu.. range. A five-fold enhancement of absorption was observed from the diet with lead particles of mean size 6..mu.., compared with 197..mu.. particle size. Lead absorption from dried paint films containing lead chromate and lead octoate was measured using a similar technique. a marked enhancement of absorption was observed for both paints when particle size was reduced from 500 to 1000..mu.. to < 50..mu...

  8. Comparison of particle sizes determined with impactor, AFM and SEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwaze, Patience; Annegarn, Harold J.; Huth, Joachim; Helas, Günter

    2007-11-01

    Particles size comparisons were made between conventional aerodynamic and mobility sizing techniques and physical geometric sizes measured by high resolution microscopes. Atmospheric particles were collected during the wet and dry seasons in the Amazonian ecosystems. Individual particles deposited on four stages of the MOUDI (Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposition Impactor) were characterised for particle volumes, projected surface diameters and morphologies with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) and a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). AFM and SEM size distributions were verified against distributions derived from response functions of individual MOUDI stages as specified by Winklmayr et al. [Winklmayr, W., Wang, H.-C., John, W., 1990. Adaptation of the Twomey algorithm to the inversion of cascade impactor data. Aerosol Science and Technology 13, 322-331.]. Particles indicated inherent discrepancies in sizing techniques. Particle volumes were systematically lower than expected by factors of up to 3.6. Differences were attributed to loss of mass, presumably water adsorbed on particles. Losses were high and could not be accounted for by measured humidity growth factors suggesting significant losses of other volatile compounds as well, particularly on particles that were collected during the wet season. Microscopy results showed that for hygroscopic particles, microscopy sizes depend on the relative humidity history of particles before and after sampling. Changes in relative humidity significantly altered particle morphologies. Depending on when changes occur, such losses will bias not only microscopy particle sizes but also impactor mass distributions and number concentrations derived from collected particles.

  9. Intake and utilization of energy of rations with pelleted forages by dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honing, van der Y.

    1975-01-01

    A survey of the literature showed that forage processing, that is grinding and pelleting, increased feed intake of ruminants. This increase, due to reduction in particle size distribution of the forage, depends mainly on forage quality, proportion of concentrates in the diet and nutrient requirement

  10. The Abundance and Pollen Foraging Behaviour of Bumble Bees in Relation to Population Size of Whortleberry (Vaccinium uliginosum)

    OpenAIRE

    Carolin Mayer; Denis Michez; Alban Chyzy; Elise Brédat; Anne-Laure Jacquemart

    2012-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation can have severe effects on plant pollinator interactions, for example changing the foraging behaviour of pollinators. To date, the impact of plant population size on pollen collection by pollinators has not yet been investigated. From 2008 to 2010, we monitored nine bumble bee species (Bombus campestris, Bombus hortorum s.l., Bombus hypnorum, Bombus lapidarius, Bombus pascuorum, Bombus pratorum, Bombus soroensis, Bombus terrestris s.l., Bombus vestalis s.l.) on Vaccinium...

  11. Counting and measuring particles sized from soot to pollen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    For number concentration measurements of superfine particles a condensation nucleus counter (CNC) is frequently used. The combination of a new CNC module with a white light aerosol spectrometer and a passive collector makes possible accurate time-resolved determination of particle number within the overall size range of 10 nm to 40 μm and at concentrations up to 105 particles/cm3. With the aerosol spectrometer a high time-resolved particle size determination is also possible in the size range of 0.3-40 μm up to the same high number concentrations of 105 particles/cm3.

  12. Particle Size: A sediment tracing challenge or opportunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laceby, J. Patrick; Evrard, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    Tracing sediment back to their sources with biogeochemical fingerprints involves multiple assumptions. One of the most fundamental assumptions is the conservative behavior of tracer properties during sediment generation, transportation, and deposition processes. Essentially, the biogeochemical fingerprints used to trace sediment must remain constant, or conservative, during these erosion processes, or they must vary in a predictable way. At the core of this assumption of conservative behavior are potential particle size impacts. Owing to the significance of particle size for sediment tracing research, we believe it is important to present an overview of past and present techniques used to address particle size, along with possibilities for future research. The two primary approaches utilized to address particle size impacts are fractionation (e.g., testing fundamental assumptions central to the applicability of sediment tracing and fingerprinting. Alternative approaches to addressing particle size have also been presented. For example, researchers applying the tributary tracing approach or sampling sediment generated directly on hillslopes may potentially address particle size impacts in their sampling design. Although these approaches have been presented in the literature, their effectiveness has yet to be determined. For the future, we boldly suggest that there are likely situations where particle size may be potentially used as a fingerprint in and of itself. Indeed, potential particle size impacts are directly related to the biogeochemical fingerprints used to trace sediments and we believe that there is a fantastic opportunity to obtain further sediment source information through comprehensively investigating and unravelling inherent particle size complexities.

  13. The biological response to nanometre-sized polymer particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Aiqin; Richards, Laura; Bladen, Catherine L.; Ingham, Eileen; Fisher, John; Tipper, Joanne L.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, nanometre-sized UHMWPE particles generated from hip and knee replacements have been identified in vitro and in vivo. UHMWPE particles in the 0.1–1.0 μm size range have been shown to be more biologically active than larger particles, provoking an inflammatory response implicated in late aseptic loosening of total joint replacements. The biological activity of nanometre-sized particles has not previously been studied. The biological response to clinically-relevant UHMWPE wear particles including nanometre-sized and micrometre-sized, along with polystyrene particles (FluoSpheres 20 nm, 60 nm, 200 nm and 1.0 μm), and nanometre-sized model polyethylene particles (Ceridust 3615®), was determined in terms of osteolytic cytokine release from primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs). Nanometre-sized UHMWPE wear particles, nanometre-sized Ceridust 3615® and 20 nm FluoSpheres had no significant effect on TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 release from PBMNCs at a concentration of 100 μm3 particles per cell after 12 and 24 h. The micrometre-size UHMWPE wear particles (0.1–1.0 μm) and 60 nm, 200 nm and 1.0 μm FluoSpheres caused significantly elevated osteolytic cytokine release from PBMNCs. These results indicated that particles below circa 50 nm fail to activate PBMNCs and that particle size, composition and morphology played a crucial role in cytokine release by particle stimulated macrophages. PMID:26004221

  14. Magnetic Properties of Nanometer-sized Crystalline and Amorphous Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Bødker, Franz; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt;

    1997-01-01

    Amorphous transition metal-metalloid alloy particles can be prepared by chemical preparation techniques. We discuss the preparation of transition metal-boron and iron-carbon particles and their magnetic properties. Nanometer-sized particles of both crystalline and amorphous magnetic materials...... are superparamagnetic at finite temperatures. The temperature dependence of the superparamagnetic relaxation time and the influence of inter-particle interactions is discussed. Finally, some examples of studies of surface magnetization of alpha-Fe particles are presented....

  15. Magnetic Properties of Nanometer-sized Crystalline and Amorphous Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Bødker, Franz; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    1997-01-01

    Amorphous transition metal-metalloid alloy particles can be prepared by chemical preparation techniques. We discuss the preparation of transition metal-boron and iron-carbon particles and their magnetic properties. Nanometer-sized particles of both crystalline and amorphous magnetic materials...... are superparamagnetic at finite temperatures. The temperature dependence of the superparamagnetic relaxation time and the influence of inter-particle interactions is discussed. Finally, some examples of studies of surface magnetization of alpha-Fe particles are presented....

  16. Selective follicular targeting by modification of the particle sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzelt, Alexa; Richter, Heike; Knorr, Fanny; Schäfer, Ulrich; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Dähne, Lars; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Juergen

    2011-02-28

    Hair follicles represent interesting target sites for topically applied substances such as topical vaccinations or agents used in the field of regenerative medicine. In recent years, it could be shown that particles penetrate very effectively into the hair follicles. In the present study, the influence of particle size on the follicular penetration depths was examined. The penetration depths of two different types of particles sized 122 to 1000 nm were determined in vitro on porcine skin. The results revealed that the particles of medium size (643 and 646 nm, respectively) penetrated deeper into the porcine hair follicles than smaller or larger particles. It was concluded that by varying the particle size, different sites within the porcine hair follicle can be targeted selectively. For the human terminal hair follicle, the situation can be expected to be similar due to a similar size ratio of the hair follicles.

  17. Artificial neural network based particle size prediction of polymeric nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youshia, John; Ali, Mohamed Ehab; Lamprecht, Alf

    2017-10-01

    Particle size of nanoparticles and the respective polydispersity are key factors influencing their biopharmaceutical behavior in a large variety of therapeutic applications. Predicting these attributes would skip many preliminary studies usually required to optimize formulations. The aim was to build a mathematical model capable of predicting the particle size of polymeric nanoparticles produced by a pharmaceutical polymer of choice. Polymer properties controlling the particle size were identified as molecular weight, hydrophobicity and surface activity, and were quantified by measuring polymer viscosity, contact angle and interfacial tension, respectively. A model was built using artificial neural network including these properties as input with particle size and polydispersity index as output. The established model successfully predicted particle size of nanoparticles covering a range of 70-400nm prepared from other polymers. The percentage bias for particle prediction was 2%, 4% and 6%, for the training, validation and testing data, respectively. Polymer surface activity was found to have the highest impact on the particle size followed by viscosity and finally hydrophobicity. Results of this study successfully highlighted polymer properties affecting particle size and confirmed the usefulness of artificial neural networks in predicting the particle size and polydispersity of polymeric nanoparticles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Calculation method for particle mean diameter and particle size distribution function under dependent model algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Tang; Xiaogang Sun; Guibin Yuan

    2007-01-01

    In total light scattering particle sizing technique, the relationship among Sauter mean diameter D32, mean extinction efficiency Q, and particle size distribution function is studied in order to inverse the mean diameter and particle size distribution simply. We propose a method which utilizes the mean extinction efficiency ratio at only two selected wavelengths to solve D32 and then to inverse the particle size distribution associated with (Q) and D32. Numerical simulation results show that the particle size distribution is inversed accurately with this method, and the number of wavelengths used is reduced to the greatest extent in the measurement range. The calculation method has the advantages of simplicity and rapidness.

  19. Particle size distribution in ferrofluid macro-clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Wah-Keat, E-mail: wklee@bnl.gov [X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Ilavsky, Jan [X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Under an applied magnetic field, many commercial and concentrated ferrofluids agglomerate and form large micron-sized structures. Although large diameter particles have been implicated in the formation of these macro-clusters, the question of whether the particle size distribution of the macro-clusters are the same as the original fluid remains open. Some studies suggest that these macro-clusters consist of larger particles, while others have shown that there is no difference in the particle size distribution between the macro-clusters and the original fluid. In this study, we use X-ray imaging to aid in a sample (diluted EFH-1 from Ferrotec) separation process and conclusively show that the average particle size in the macro-clusters is significantly larger than those in the original sample. The average particle size in the macro-clusters is 19.6 nm while the average particle size of the original fluid is 11.6 nm. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-ray imaging was used to isolate ferrofluid macro-clusters under an applied field. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Small angle X-ray scattering was used to determine particle size distributions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results show that macro-clusters consist of particles that are larger than average.

  20. Methods for determining particle size distribution and growth rates between 1 and 3 nm using the Particle Size Magnifier

    CERN Document Server

    Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Kontkanen, Jenni; Kangasluoma, Juha; Franchin, Alessandro; Wimmer, Daniela; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Junninen, Heikki; Petäjä, Tuukka; Sipilä, Mikko; Mikkilä, Jyri; Vanhanen, Joonas; Worsnop, Douglas R; Kulmala, Markku

    2014-01-01

    The most important parameters describing the atmospheric new particle formation process are the particle formation and growth rates. These together determine the amount of cloud condensation nuclei attributed to secondary particle formation. Due to difficulties in detecting small neutral particles, it has previously not been possible to derive these directly from measurements in the size range below about 3 nm. The Airmodus Particle Size Magnifier has been used at the SMEAR II station in Hyytiälä, southern Finland, and during nucleation experiments in the CLOUD chamber at CERN for measuring particles as small as about 1 nm in mobility diameter. We developed several methods to determine the particle size distribution and growth rates in the size range of 1–3 nm from these data sets. Here we introduce the appearance-time method for calculating initial growth rates. The validity of the method was tested by simulations with the Ion-UHMA aerosol dynamic model.

  1. Method and apparatus for measuring particle size at low concentration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marijnissen, J.C.M.; Willemse, A.W.; Roos, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    Described is an improved method for measuring the particle size of ultrasmall particles (111) which are suspended in a fluid. Laser light (121) is scattered by the particles, and the scattered light (122) is received by a light detector (131) which provides an electrical measuring signal (Sm) which

  2. Transition to Turbulence in the Presence of Finite Size Particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lashgari, I.; Picano, F.; Breugem, W.P.; Brandt, L.

    2015-01-01

    We study the transition from laminar to turbulent flow in a channel seeded with finite-size neutrally buoyant particles. A fixed ratio of 10 between the channel height and the particle diameter is considered. The flow is examined in the range of Reynolds numbers 500 ≤ Re ≤ 5000 and the particle volu

  3. Particle size control of detergents in mixed flow spray dryers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Jonathan Crosby

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Particle size is a key quality parameter of a powder detergent as it determines its performance, the bulk density and the look and feel of the product. Consequently, it is essential that particle size is controlled to ensure the consistency of performance when comparing new formulations. The majority of study reported in the literature relating to particle size control, focuses on the spray produced by the atomisation technique. One approach advocated to achieve particle size control is the manipulation of the ratio of the mass slurry rate and mass flow rate of gas used for atomisation. Within this study, ratio control was compared with an automatic cascade loop approach using online measurements of the powder particle size on a small-scale pilot plant. It was concluded that cascade control of the mean particle size, based on manipulating the mass flow rate of gas, resulted in tighter, more responsive control. The effect of a ratio change varied with different formulations and different slurry rates. Furthermore, changes in slurry rate caused complications, as the impact on particle size growth in the dryer is non-linear and difficult to predict. The cascade loop enables further study into the effect of particle size on detergent performance.

  4. Particle Size Influences Fibronectin Internalization and Degradation by Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozavikov, Peter

    Particle size is a crucial factor that influences the fate and biological impact of particles and their surface proteins upon internalization. Here, using fibronectin-coated polystyrene nanoparticles and microparticles we examined the effect of particle size on degradation of fibronectin. Microparticle uptake depended primarily on beta1 integrins and actin filaments, while nanoparticle uptake relied mainly on lipid rafts and specifically on clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Further, biotinylated fibronectin when coated on microparticles underwent more intracellular processing than fibronectin coated on to nanoparticles. Thus, particle size affects actin and clathrin- dependent internalization, which in turn regulates intracellular fibronectin degradation.

  5. Synthesis of size-controlled Bi particles by electrochemical deposition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C N Tharamani; H C Thejaswini; S Sampath

    2008-06-01

    Small sized bismuth particles are prepared by an electrochemical method using a triple voltage pulse technique. The bath composition and electrochemical parameters are optimized to yield monodisperse particles. The particles have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction technique. The particles, as deposited, are highly crystalline in nature and the particle size and shape get tuned depending on the conditions of deposition.

  6. Stability of MC Carbide Particles Size in Creep Resisting Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vodopivec, F.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical analysis of the dependence microstructure creep rate. Discussion on the effects of carbide particles size and their distribution on the base of accelerated creep tests on a steel X20CrMoV121 tempered at 800 °C. Analysis of the stability of carbide particles size in terms of free energy of formation of the compound. Explanation of the different effect of VC and NbC particles on accelerated creep rate.

  7. Particle size and particle-particle interactions on tensile properties and reinforcement of corn flour particles in natural rubber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renewable corn flour has a significant reinforcement effect in natural rubber. The corn flour was hydrolyzed and microfluidized to reduce its particle size. Greater than 90% of the hydrolyzed corn flour had an average size of ~300 nm, a reduction of 33 times compared to unhydrolyzed corn flour. Comp...

  8. Reduction of glycine particle size by impinging jet crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tari, Tímea; Fekete, Zoltán; Szabó-Révész, Piroska; Aigner, Zoltán

    2015-01-15

    The parameters of crystallization processes determine the habit and particle size distribution of the products. A narrow particle size distribution and a small average particle size are crucial for the bioavailability of poorly water-soluble pharmacons. Thus, particle size reduction is often required during crystallization processes. Impinging jet crystallization is a method that results in a product with a reduced particle size due to the homogeneous and high degree of supersaturation at the impingement point. In this work, the applicability of the impinging jet technique as a new approach in crystallization was investigated for the antisolvent crystallization of glycine. A factorial design was applied to choose the relevant crystallization factors. The results were analysed by means of a statistical program. The particle size distribution of the crystallized products was investigated with a laser diffraction particle size analyser. The roundness and morphology were determined with the use of a light microscopic image analysis system and a scanning electron microscope. Polymorphism was characterized by differential scanning calorimetry and powder X-ray diffraction. Headspace gas chromatography was utilized to determine the residual solvent content. Impinging jet crystallization proved to reduce the particle size of glycine. The particle size distribution was appropriate, and the average particle size was an order of magnitude smaller (d(0.5)=8-35 μm) than that achieved with conventional crystallization (d(0.5)=82-680 μm). The polymorphic forms of the products were influenced by the solvent ratio. The quantity of residual solvent in the crystallized products was in compliance with the requirements of the International Conference on Harmonization.

  9. Particle size distributions in the Eastern Mediterranean troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalivitis, N.; Birmili, W.; Stock, M.; Wehner, B.; Massling, A.; Wiedensohler, A.; Gerasopoulos, E.; Mihalopoulos, N.

    2008-11-01

    Atmospheric particle size distributions were measured on Crete island, Greece in the Eastern Mediterranean during an intensive field campaign between 28 August and 20 October, 2005. Our instrumentation combined a differential mobility particle sizer (DMPS) and an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) and measured number size distributions in the size range 0.018 μm 10 μm. Four time periods with distinct aerosol characteristics were discriminated, two corresponding to marine and polluted air masses, respectively. In marine air, the sub-μm size distributions showed two particle modes centered at 67 nm and 195 nm having total number concentrations between 900 and 2000 cm-3. In polluted air masses, the size distributions were mainly unimodal with a mode typically centered at 140 nm, with number concentrations varying between 1800 and 2900 cm-3. Super-μm particles showed number concentrations in the range from 0.01 to 2.5 cm-3 without any clear relation to air mass origin. A small number of short-lived particle nucleation events were recorded, where the calculated particle formation rates ranged between 1.1 1.7 cm-3 s-1. However, no particle nucleation and growth events comparable to those typical for the continental boundary layer were observed. Particles concentrations (Diameter population was governed mainly by coagulation and that particle formation was absent during most days.

  10. Sonochemical synthesis of silica particles and their size control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hwa-Min [Advanced Materials and Chemical Engineering, Catholic University of Daegu, Gyeongbuk 38430 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chang-Hyun [Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Catholic University of Daegu, Gyeongbuk 38430 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Bonghwan, E-mail: bhkim@cu.ac.kr [Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Catholic University of Daegu, Gyeongbuk 38430 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Silica particles were easily prepared by an ultrasound-assisted sol–gel method. • The particle size was controlled by the ammonium hydroxide/water molar ratio. • The size-controlled diameter of silica particles ranged from 40 to 400 nm. • The particles were formed in a relatively short reaction time. - Abstract: Using an ultrasound-assisted sol–gel method, we successfully synthesized very uniformly shaped, monodisperse, and size-controlled spherical silica particles from a mixture of ethanol, water, and tetraethyl orthosilicate in the presence of ammonia as catalyst, at room temperature. The diameters of the silica particles were distributed in the range from 40 to 400 nm; their morphology was well characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The silica particle size could be adjusted by choosing suitable concentrations of ammonium hydroxide and water, which in turn determined the nucleation and growth rates of the particles during the reaction. This sonochemical-based silica synthesis offers an alternative way to produce spherical silica particles in a relatively short reaction time. Thus, we suggest that this simple, low-cost, and efficient method of preparing uniform silica particles of various sizes will have practical and wide-ranging industrial applicability.

  11. Evolution of particle size in turbid discharge plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    Evolution of particle size in turbid discharge plumes Paul S. Hill Department of Oceanography Dalhousie University Halifax, Nova Scotia, CANADA B3H...COVERED 00-00-1999 to 00-00-1999 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Evolution of particle size in turbid discharge plumes 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...experiment was designed to explore the evolution of disaggregated grain size distribution in a flowing suspension. RESULTS Bulk effective settling

  12. Size Segregation in Rapid Flows of Inelastic Particles with Continuous Size Distributions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Rui; ZHANG Duan-Ming; LI Zhi-Hao

    2012-01-01

    Two-dimensional numerical simulations are employed to gain insight into the segregation behavior of granular mixtures with a power-law particle size distribution in the presence of a granular temperature gradient.It is found that particles of all sizes move toward regions of low granular temperature.Species segregation is also observed.Large particles demonstrate a higher affinity for the low-temperature regions and accumulate in these cool regions to a greater extent than their smaller counterparts.Furthermore,the local particle size distribution maintains the same form as the overall (including all particles) size distribution.%Two-dimensional numerical simulations are employed to gain insight into the segregation behavior of granular mixtures with a power-law particle size distribution in the presence of a granular temperature gradient. It is found that particles of all sizes move toward regions of low granular temperature. Species segregation is also observed. Large particles demonstrate a higher affinity for the low-temperature regions and accumulate in these cool regions to a greater extent than their smaller counterparts. Furthermore, the local particle size distribution maintains the same form as the overall (including all particles) size distribution.

  13. Avoiding competition? Site use, diet and foraging behaviours in two similarly sized geese wintering in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Meijuan; Cao, Lei; Klaassen, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Competition may occur when two species with similar feeding ecologies exploit the same limited resources in time and space. In recent years, the Eastern Tundra Bean Goose Anser fabalis serrirostris and Greater White-fronted Goose Anser albifrons frontalis have increased in wintering numbers...... at Shengjin Lake, China. To examine the potential for coexistence and possible avoidance strategies, we studied (1) their habitat use, (2) foraging behaviours and (3) diets of birds foraging in mixed- and single-species flocks. Both species extensively exploited sedge meadows, where they showed considerable...... overlap in spatial distribution and diet. The percentage feeding time and diet of both species were unaffected by the presence of the other. Greater White-fronted Geese appeared diurnal sedge meadow specialists, almost never feeding in other habitats. Eastern Tundra Bean Geese were less selective...

  14. Particle size- and concentration-dependent separation of magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Kerstin; Müller, Knut; Grüttner, Cordula; Westphal, Fritz; Johansson, Christer

    2017-04-01

    Small magnetic nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution are of great interest for several biomedical applications. When the size of the particles decreases, the magnetic moment of the particles decreases. This leads to a significant increase in the separation time by several orders of magnitude. Therefore, in the present study the separation processes of bionized nanoferrites (BNF) with different sizes and concentrations were investigated with the commercial Sepmag Q system. It was found that an increasing initial particle concentration leads to a reduction of the separation time for large nanoparticles due to the higher probability of building chains. Small nanoparticles showed exactly the opposite behavior with rising particle concentration up to 0.1 mg(Fe)/ml. For higher iron concentrations the separation time remains constant and the measured Z-average decreases in the supernatant at same time intervals. At half separation time a high yield with decreasing hydrodynamic diameter of particles can be obtained using higher initial particle concentrations.

  15. Packing fraction of particles with lognormal size distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwers, H J H

    2014-05-01

    This paper addresses the packing and void fraction of polydisperse particles with a lognormal size distribution. It is demonstrated that a binomial particle size distribution can be transformed into a continuous particle-size distribution of the lognormal type. Furthermore, an original and exact expression is derived that predicts the packing fraction of mixtures of particles with a lognormal distribution, which is governed by the standard deviation, mode of packing, and particle shape only. For a number of particle shapes and their packing modes (close, loose) the applicable values are given. This closed-form analytical expression governing the packing fraction is thoroughly compared with empirical and computational data reported in the literature, and good agreement is found.

  16. Packing fraction of particles with lognormal size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwers, H. J. H.

    2014-05-01

    This paper addresses the packing and void fraction of polydisperse particles with a lognormal size distribution. It is demonstrated that a binomial particle size distribution can be transformed into a continuous particle-size distribution of the lognormal type. Furthermore, an original and exact expression is derived that predicts the packing fraction of mixtures of particles with a lognormal distribution, which is governed by the standard deviation, mode of packing, and particle shape only. For a number of particle shapes and their packing modes (close, loose) the applicable values are given. This closed-form analytical expression governing the packing fraction is thoroughly compared with empirical and computational data reported in the literature, and good agreement is found.

  17. Particle size and shape distributions of hammer milled pine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westover, Tyler Lott [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Matthews, Austin Colter [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Williams, Christopher Luke [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ryan, John Chadron Benjamin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Particle size and shape distributions impact particle heating rates and diffusion of volatized gases out of particles during fast pyrolysis conversion, and consequently must be modeled accurately in order for computational pyrolysis models to produce reliable results for bulk solid materials. For this milestone, lodge pole pine chips were ground using a Thomas-Wiley #4 mill using two screen sizes in order to produce two representative materials that are suitable for fast pyrolysis. For the first material, a 6 mm screen was employed in the mill and for the second material, a 3 mm screen was employed in the mill. Both materials were subjected to RoTap sieve analysis, and the distributions of the particle sizes and shapes were determined using digital image analysis. The results of the physical analysis will be fed into computational pyrolysis simulations to create models of materials with realistic particle size and shape distributions. This milestone was met on schedule.

  18. Image processing applied to measurement of particle size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Fabio; Lasso, Willian; Torres, Cesar

    2015-01-01

    Five different types of aggregates have been analyzed, and the size of particles on samples immersed in distilled water as silicon dioxide, titanium dioxide, styrenes and crushed silica particles is made; an attempt at applying the digital image processing (DIP) technique to analyze the particle size, we developed a system of measures microparticles using a microscope, a CCD camera and acquisition software and video processing developed in MATLAB. These studies are combined with laser light using measurements by diffractometry and obtain calibration in the system implemented, in this work we achievement measurement particle size on the order of 4 to 6 micrometers. The study demonstrates that DIP is a fast, convenient, versatile, and accurate technique for particle size analysis; the limitations of implemented setup too will be discussed.

  19. Particle size and shape distributions of hammer milled pine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westover, Tyler Lott [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Matthews, Austin Colter [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Williams, Christopher Luke [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ryan, John Chadron Benjamin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Particle size and shape distributions impact particle heating rates and diffusion of volatized gases out of particles during fast pyrolysis conversion, and consequently must be modeled accurately in order for computational pyrolysis models to produce reliable results for bulk solid materials. For this milestone, lodge pole pine chips were ground using a Thomas-Wiley #4 mill using two screen sizes in order to produce two representative materials that are suitable for fast pyrolysis. For the first material, a 6 mm screen was employed in the mill and for the second material, a 3 mm screen was employed in the mill. Both materials were subjected to RoTap sieve analysis, and the distributions of the particle sizes and shapes were determined using digital image analysis. The results of the physical analysis will be fed into computational pyrolysis simulations to create models of materials with realistic particle size and shape distributions. This milestone was met on schedule.

  20. Corn texture and particle size in broiler diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MP Benedetti

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of corn texture and the particle size on broiler performance, carcass yield, nutrient digestibility, and digestive organ morphometrics. In Experiment I, 720 male Cobb chicks were distributed in a completely randomized experimental design with a 2 x 3 factorial arrangement, consisting two corn textures (dented and hard and three corn particle sizes, was applied, with four replicates of 30 birds each. Corn particle size was classified according to geometric mean diameter (GMD as fine - 0.46 mm; medium - 0.73 mm, and coarse - 0.87 mm. In Experiment II, 120 broiler chicks were used to evaluate corn digestibility during the periods of 16 to 22 days and 35 to 41 days of age, using the method of total excreta collection. In Experiment I, corn particle size influenced body weight, average weight gain, feed intake and feed conversion ratio of 21-day-old birds. Corn texture and particle size did not affect the performance of 42-day-old broilers or carcass traits. In Experiment II, there was no influence of corn texture and particle size on digestive organ weights. Dented corn increased nitrogen excretion in the first trial, and hard corn improved dry matter digestibility in the second metabolic trial. Corn with fine particle size promotes better performance of broilers at 21 days of age. Hard corn results in higher dry matter digestibility and lower nitrogen excretion, and consequently higher production factor in 42-day-old broilers.

  1. Determination of reactivity rates of silicate particle-size fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Cristina Fernandes Deus

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of sources used for soil acidity correction depends on reactivity rate (RR and neutralization power (NP, indicated by effective calcium carbonate (ECC. Few studies establish relative efficiency of reactivity (RER for silicate particle-size fractions, therefore, the RER applied for lime are used. This study aimed to evaluate the reactivity of silicate materials affected by particle size throughout incubation periods in comparison to lime, and to calculate the RER for silicate particle-size fractions. Six correction sources were evaluated: three slags from distinct origins, dolomitic and calcitic lime separated into four particle-size fractions (2, 0.84, 0.30 and <0.30-mm sieves, and wollastonite, as an additional treatment. The treatments were applied to three soils with different texture classes. The dose of neutralizing material (calcium and magnesium oxides was applied at equal quantities, and the only variation was the particle-size material. After a 90-day incubation period, the RER was calculated for each particle-size fraction, as well as the RR and ECC of each source. The neutralization of soil acidity of the same particle-size fraction for different sources showed distinct solubility and a distinct reaction between silicates and lime. The RER for slag were higher than the limits established by Brazilian legislation, indicating that the method used for limes should not be used for the slags studied here.

  2. MONODISPERSE MICRON-SIZED POLYACRYLAMIDE PARTICLES SYNTHESIZED BY DISPERSION POLYMERIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Hou; Bo Gao; Zhe-guo Zhang; Kang-de Yao

    2007-01-01

    Monodisperse micron-sized polyacrylamide (PAM) particles with a regular shape have been successfully prepared through dispersion polymerization of the monomer using a rotary reactor. FTIR and NMR spectroscopic results demonstrated the formation of PAM. POM and TEM observations revealed that PAM particles had a regular shape and good dispersity. A thick layer of surfactant (PVP) still existed on PAM particles after multiple centrifugation and ultrasonic re-dispersion in ethanol, which indicates a strong interaction between PVP and PAM. The effects of various polymerization factors on the average size of PAM particles have also been studied.

  3. Influence of honey bee, Apis mellifera, hives and field size on foraging activity of native bee species in pumpkin fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artz, Derek R; Hsu, Cynthia L; Nault, Brian A

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify bee species active in pumpkin fields in New York and to estimate their potential as pollinators by examining their foraging activity. In addition, we examined whether foraging activity was affected by either the addition of hives of the honey bee, Apis mellifera L., or by field size. Thirty-five pumpkin (Cucurbita spp.) fields ranging from 0.6 to 26.3 ha, 12 supplemented with A. mellifera hives and 23 not supplemented, were sampled during peak flowering over three successive weeks in 2008 and 2009. Flowers from 300 plants per field were visually sampled for bees on each sampling date. A. mellifera, Bombus impatiens Cresson, and Peponapis pruinosa (Say) accounted for 99% of all bee visits to flowers. A. mellifera and B. impatiens visited significantly more pistillate flowers than would be expected by chance, whereas P. pruinosa showed no preference for visiting pistillate flowers. There were significantly more A. mellifera visits per flower in fields supplemented with A. mellifera hives than in fields not supplemented, but there were significantly fewer P. pruinosa visits in supplemented fields. The number of B. impatiens visits was not affected by supplementation, but was affected by number of flowers per field. A. mellifera and P. pruinosa visits were not affected by field size, but B. impatiens visited fewer flowers as field size increased in fields that were not supplemented with A. mellifera hives. Declining A. mellifera populations may increase the relative importance of B. impatiens in pollinating pumpkins in New York.

  4. Particle size distributions in the Eastern Mediterranean troposphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kalivitis

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric particle size distributions were measured on Crete island, Greece in the Eastern Mediterranean during an intensive field campaign between 28 August and 20 October 2005. Our instrumentation combined a differential mobility particle sizer (DMPS and an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS and measured number size distributions in the size range 0.018 μm–10 μm. Four time periods with distinct aerosol characteristics were discriminated, two corresponding to marine and polluted air masses, respectively. In marine air, the sub-μm size distributions showed two particle modes centered at 67 nm and 195 nm having total number concentrations between 900 and 2000 cm−3. In polluted air masses, the size distributions were mainly unimodal with a mode typically centered at 140 nm, with number concentrations varying between 1800 and 2900 cm−3. Super-μm particles showed number concentrations in the range from 0.01 to 2.5 cm−3 without any clear relation to air mass origin. A small number of short-lived particle nucleation events were recorded, where the calculated particle formation rates ranged between 1.1–1.7 cm−3 s−1. However, no particle nucleation and growth events comparable to those typical for the continental boundary layer were observed. Particles concentrations (Diameter <50 nm were low compared to continental boundary layer conditions with an average concentration of 300 cm−3. The production of sulfuric acid and its subsequently condensation on preexisting particles was examined with the use of a simplistic box model. These calculations suggested that the day-time evolution of the Aitken particle population was governed mainly by coagulation and that particle formation was absent during most days.

  5. Particle size distributions in the Eastern Mediterranean troposphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kalivitis

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric particle size distributions were measured on Crete island, Greece in the Eastern Mediterranean during an intensive field campaign between 28 August and 20 October, 2005. Our instrumentation combined a differential mobility particle sizer (DMPS and an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS and measured number size distributions in the size range 0.018 μm–10 μm. Four time periods with distinct aerosol characteristics were discriminated, two corresponding to marine and polluted air masses, respectively. In marine air, the sub-μm size distributions showed two particle modes centered at 67 nm and 195 nm having total number concentrations between 900 and 2000 cm−3. In polluted air masses, the size distributions were mainly unimodal with a mode typically centered at 140 nm, with number concentrations varying between 1800 and 2900 cm−3. Super-μm particles showed number concentrations in the range from 0.01 to 2.5 cm−3 without any clear relation to air mass origin. A small number of short-lived particle nucleation events were recorded, where the calculated particle formation rates ranged between 1.1–1.7 cm−3 s−1. However, no particle nucleation and growth events comparable to those typical for the continental boundary layer were observed. Particles concentrations (Diameter <50 nm were low compared to continental boundary layer conditions with an average concentration of 300 cm−3. The production of sulfuric acid and its subsequently condensation on preexisting particles was examined with the use of a simplistic box model. These calculations suggested that the day-time evolution of the Aitken particle population was governed mainly by coagulation and that particle formation was absent during most days.

  6. Electrodeposited Magnesium Nanoparticles Linking Particle Size to Activation Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaoqi Shen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of hydrogen absorption/desorption can be improved by decreasing particle size down to a few nanometres. However, the associated evolution of activation energy remains unclear. In an attempt to clarify such an evolution with respect to particle size, we electrochemically deposited Mg nanoparticles on a catalytic nickel and noncatalytic titanium substrate. At a short deposition time of 1 h, magnesium particles with a size of 68 ± 11 nm could be formed on the nickel substrate, whereas longer deposition times led to much larger particles of 421 ± 70 nm. Evaluation of the hydrogen desorption properties of the deposited magnesium nanoparticles confirmed the effectiveness of the nickel substrate in facilitating the recombination of hydrogen, but also a significant decrease in activation energy from 56.1 to 37.8 kJ·mol−1 H2 as particle size decreased from 421 ± 70 to 68 ± 11 nm. Hence, the activation energy was found to be intrinsically linked to magnesium particle size. Such a reduction in activation energy was associated with the decrease of path lengths for hydrogen diffusion at the desorbing MgH2/Mg interface. Further reduction in particle size to a few nanometres to remove any barrier for hydrogen diffusion would then leave the single nucleation and growth of the magnesium phase as the only remaining rate-limiting step, assuming that the magnesium surface can effectively catalyse the dissociation/recombination of hydrogen.

  7. Experimental analysis of particle sizes for PIV measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Overbrüggen, Timo; Klaas, Michael; Soria, Julio; Schröder, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    The right choice of seeding particles strongly influences the outcome of a particle-image velocimetry (PIV) measurement. Particles have to scatter enough light to be seen by cameras and follow the flow faithfully. As the flow following behavior depends on the inertia and therefore the size of the particle, smaller particles are desirable. Unfortunately, larger particles possess better light scattering behavior, which is especially important for volumetric PIV measurements. In this paper, the particle response of two exemplary solid particles to an oscillatory air flow created by a piston movement is analyzed and compared to analytic results by Hjelmfelt and Mockros (1966 Appl. Sci. Res. 16 149-61) concerning phase lag and amplitude ratio between particle movement and flow field. To achieve realistic experimental boundary conditions, polydispersed particles are used for the analysis. The analytic results show a strong dependence on the diameter. That is, using the volumetric mean diameter an overestimation of the phase lag of the particles is determined, whereas an underestimation of phase lag is computed for the number mean diameter. Hence, for polydispersed particles a more general analysis than that based on the particle mean diameter is required to determine in detail the particle following behavior.

  8. Inversion of spheroid particle size distribution in wider size range and aspect ratio range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Hong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The non-spherical particle sizing is very important in the aerosol science, and it can be determined by the light extinction measurement. This paper studies the effect of relationship of the size range and aspect ratio range on the inversion of spheroid particle size distribution by the dependent mode algorithm. The T matrix method and the geometric optics approximation method are used to calculate the extinction efficiency of the spheroids with different size range and aspect ratio range, and the inversion of spheroid particle size distribution in these different ranges is conducted. Numerical simulation indicates that a fairly reasonable representation of the spheroid particle size distribution can be obtained when the size range and aspect ratio range are suitably chosen.

  9. Noninvasive particle sizing using camera-based diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildgaard, Otto Højager Attermann; Frisvad, Jeppe Revall; Falster, Viggo

    2016-01-01

    , but their low spatial resolution limits their validity ranges for the coefficients. To cover a wider range of coefficients, we use camera-based spectroscopic oblique incidence reflectometry. We develop a noninvasive technique for acquisition of apparent particle size distributions based on this approach. Our......Diffuse reflectance measurements are useful for noninvasive inspection of optical properties such as reduced scattering and absorption coefficients. Spectroscopic analysis of these optical properties can be used for particle sizing. Systems based on optical fiber probes are commonly employed...... technique is validated using stable oil-in-water emulsions with a wide range of known particle size distributions. We also measure the apparent particle size distributions of complex dairy products. These results show that our tool, in contrast to those based on fiber probes, can deal with a range...

  10. Particle size distribution and physico-chemical composition of clay.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP USER

    obtained after acid digestion of clay samples were used in determining the elements by Atomic. Absorption ... ignition (LOI) reveal a general reduction in composition as particles sizes reduces. However, Mg .... Murray, H.H. Diagnostic Tests for.

  11. Karna Particle Size Dataset for Tables and Figures

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset contains 1) table of bulk Pb-XAS LCF results, 2) table of bulk As-XAS LCF results, 3) figure data of particle size distribution, and 4) figure data for...

  12. Effect of Cobalt Particle Size on Acetone Steam Reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Junming; Zhang, He; Yu, Ning; Davidson, Stephen; Wang, Yong

    2015-06-11

    Carbon-supported cobalt nanoparticles with different particle sizes were synthesized and characterized by complementary characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction, N-2 sorption, acetone temperature-programmed desorption, transmission electron microscopy, and CO chemisorption. Using acetone steam reforming reaction as a probe reaction, we revealed a volcano-shape curve of the intrinsic activity (turnover frequency of acetone) and the CO2 selectivity as a function of the cobalt particle size with the highest activity and selectivity observed at a particle size of approximately 12.8nm. Our results indicate that the overall performance of acetone steam reforming is related to a combination of particle-size-dependent acetone decomposition, water dissociation, and the oxidation state of the cobalt nanoparticles.

  13. Particle size effects in particle-particle triboelectric charging studied with an integrated fluidized bed and electrostatic separator system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilici, Mihai A.; Toth, Joseph R.; Sankaran, R. Mohan; Lacks, Daniel J.

    2014-10-01

    Fundamental studies of triboelectric charging of granular materials via particle-particle contact are challenging to control and interpret because of foreign material surfaces that are difficult to avoid during contacting and measurement. The measurement of particle charge itself can also induce charging, altering results. Here, we introduce a completely integrated fluidized bed and electrostatic separator system that charges particles solely by interparticle interactions and characterizes their charge on line. Particles are contacted in a free-surface fluidized bed (no reactor walls) with a well-controlled fountain-like flow to regulate particle-particle contact. The charged particles in the fountain are transferred by a pulsed jet of air to the top of a vertically-oriented electrostatic separator consisting of two electrodes at oppositely biased high voltage. The free-falling particles migrate towards the electrodes of opposite charge and are collected by an array of cups where their charge and size can be determined. We carried out experiments on a bidisperse size mixture of soda lime glass particles with systematically varying ratios of concentration. Results show that larger particles fall close to the negative electrode and smaller particles fall close to the positive electrode, consistent with theory and prior experiments that larger particles charge positively and smaller particles charge negatively. The segregation of particles by charge for one of the size components is strongest when its collisions are mostly with particles of the other size component; thus, small particles segregate most strongly to the negative sample when their concentration in the mixture is small (and analogous results occur for the large particles). Furthermore, we find additional size segregation due to granular flow, whereby the fountain becomes enriched in larger particles as the smaller particles are preferentially expelled from the fountain.

  14. Size-Dependent Melting Behaviour of Nanometre-Sized Pb Particles Studied by Dynamic Mechanical Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiao-Min; FEI Guang-Tao; CUI Ping

    2006-01-01

    Nanometre-sized (hereafter nano-)Pb particles embedded in an Al matrix are prepared by ball milling.It is found that the size of nano-Pb particles was decreased with increasing milling time.The melting behaviour of nano-Pb particles embedded in the Al matrix is studied by means of dynamic mechanical analysis,and a single internal friction peak in the vicinity of Pb melting temperature is observed.The onset temperature of the peak moves to lower temperature with the decrease of particles size and the internal friction peak height is increased,which indicates a size-dependent melting behaviour of nano-Pb particles.It is suggested that the size-dependent melting behaviour is associated with surface melting.

  15. Method and apparatus for measuring particle size at low concentration

    OpenAIRE

    Marijnissen, J.C.M.; Willemse, A.W.; Roos, R A

    1997-01-01

    Described is an improved method for measuring the particle size of ultrasmall particles (111) which are suspended in a fluid. Laser light (121) is scattered by the particles, and the scattered light (122) is received by a light detector (131) which provides an electrical measuring signal (Sm) which is representative of the intensity of the scattered light (122). According to the present invention, signal components with a relatively low characteristic frequency are removed from the electrical...

  16. Determination of reactivity rates of silicate particle-size fractions

    OpenAIRE

    Angélica Cristina Fernandes Deus; Leonardo Theodoro Büll; Juliano Corulli Corrêa; Roberto Lyra Villas Boas

    2014-01-01

    The efficiency of sources used for soil acidity correction depends on reactivity rate (RR) and neutralization power (NP), indicated by effective calcium carbonate (ECC). Few studies establish relative efficiency of reactivity (RER) for silicate particle-size fractions, therefore, the RER applied for lime are used. This study aimed to evaluate the reactivity of silicate materials affected by particle size throughout incubation periods in comparison to lime, and to calculate the RER for silicat...

  17. Effect of sonication on the particle size of montmorillonite clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, Alessandra L; Batista, Tatiana; Schmitt, Carla C; Gessner, Fergus; Neumann, Miguel G

    2008-09-15

    This paper reports on the effect of sonication on SAz-1 and SWy-1 montmorillonite suspensions. Changes in the size of the particles of these materials and modifications of their properties have been investigated. The variation of the particle size has been analyzed by DLS (dynamic light scattering). In all cases the clay particles show a bimodal distribution. Sonication resulted in a decrease of the larger modal diameter, as well as a reduction of its volume percentage. Simultaneously, the proportion of the smallest particles increases. After 60 min of sonication, SAz-1 presented a very broad particle size distribution with a modal diameter of 283 nm. On the other hand, the SWy-1 sonicated for 60 min presents a bimodal distribution of particles at 140 and 454 nm. Changes in the properties of the clay suspensions due to sonication were evaluated spectroscopically from dye-clay interactions, using Methylene Blue. The acidic sites present in the interlamellar region, which are responsible for dye protonation, disappeared after sonication of the clay. The changes in the size of the scattering particles and the lack of acidic sites after sonication suggest that sonication induces delamination of the clay particles.

  18. An overview of aerosol particle sensors for size distribution measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panich Intra

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Fine aerosols are generally referred to airborne particles of diameter in submicron or nanometer size range. Measurement capabilities are required to gain understanding of these particle dynamics. One of the most important physical and chemical parameters is the particle size distribution. The aim of this article is to give an overview of recent development of already existing sensors for particle size distribution measurement based on electrical mobility determination. Available instruments for particle size measurement include a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS, an electrical aerosol spectrometer (EAS, an engine exhaust particle sizer (EEPS, a bipolar charge aerosol classifier (BCAC, a fast aerosol spectrometer (FAS a differential mobility spectrometer (DMS, and a CMU electrical mobility spectrometer (EMS. The operating principles, as well as detailed physical characteristics of these instruments and their main components consisting of a particle charger, a mobility classifier, and a signal detector, are described. Typical measurements of aerosol from various sources by these instruments compared with an electrical low pressure impactor (ELPI are also presented.

  19. The abundance and pollen foraging behaviour of bumble bees in relation to population size of whortleberry (Vaccinium uliginosum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin Mayer

    Full Text Available Habitat fragmentation can have severe effects on plant pollinator interactions, for example changing the foraging behaviour of pollinators. To date, the impact of plant population size on pollen collection by pollinators has not yet been investigated. From 2008 to 2010, we monitored nine bumble bee species (Bombus campestris, Bombus hortorum s.l., Bombus hypnorum, Bombus lapidarius, Bombus pascuorum, Bombus pratorum, Bombus soroensis, Bombus terrestris s.l., Bombus vestalis s.l. on Vaccinium uliginosum (Ericaceae in up to nine populations in Belgium ranging in size from 80 m(2 to over 3.1 ha. Bumble bee abundance declined with decreasing plant population size, and especially the proportion of individuals of large bumble bee species diminished in smaller populations. The most remarkable and novel observation was that bumble bees seemed to switch foraging behaviour according to population size: while they collected both pollen and nectar in large populations, they largely neglected pollen collection in small populations. This pattern was due to large bumble bee species, which seem thus to be more likely to suffer from pollen shortages in smaller habitat fragments. Comparing pollen loads of bumble bees we found that fidelity to V. uliginosum pollen did not depend on plant population size but rather on the extent shrub cover and/or openness of the site. Bumble bees collected pollen only from three plant species (V.uliginosum, Sorbus aucuparia and Cytisus scoparius. We also did not discover any pollination limitation of V. uliginosum in small populations. We conclude that habitat fragmentation might not immediately threaten the pollination of V. uliginosum, nevertheless, it provides important nectar and pollen resources for bumble bees and declining populations of this plant could have negative effects for its pollinators. The finding that large bumble bee species abandon pollen collection when plant populations become small is of interest when

  20. The abundance and pollen foraging behaviour of bumble bees in relation to population size of whortleberry (Vaccinium uliginosum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Carolin; Michez, Denis; Chyzy, Alban; Brédat, Elise; Jacquemart, Anne-Laure

    2012-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation can have severe effects on plant pollinator interactions, for example changing the foraging behaviour of pollinators. To date, the impact of plant population size on pollen collection by pollinators has not yet been investigated. From 2008 to 2010, we monitored nine bumble bee species (Bombus campestris, Bombus hortorum s.l., Bombus hypnorum, Bombus lapidarius, Bombus pascuorum, Bombus pratorum, Bombus soroensis, Bombus terrestris s.l., Bombus vestalis s.l.) on Vaccinium uliginosum (Ericaceae) in up to nine populations in Belgium ranging in size from 80 m(2) to over 3.1 ha. Bumble bee abundance declined with decreasing plant population size, and especially the proportion of individuals of large bumble bee species diminished in smaller populations. The most remarkable and novel observation was that bumble bees seemed to switch foraging behaviour according to population size: while they collected both pollen and nectar in large populations, they largely neglected pollen collection in small populations. This pattern was due to large bumble bee species, which seem thus to be more likely to suffer from pollen shortages in smaller habitat fragments. Comparing pollen loads of bumble bees we found that fidelity to V. uliginosum pollen did not depend on plant population size but rather on the extent shrub cover and/or openness of the site. Bumble bees collected pollen only from three plant species (V.uliginosum, Sorbus aucuparia and Cytisus scoparius). We also did not discover any pollination limitation of V. uliginosum in small populations. We conclude that habitat fragmentation might not immediately threaten the pollination of V. uliginosum, nevertheless, it provides important nectar and pollen resources for bumble bees and declining populations of this plant could have negative effects for its pollinators. The finding that large bumble bee species abandon pollen collection when plant populations become small is of interest when considering plant and

  1. Modeling particle size distributions by the Weibull distribution function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Zhigang (Rogers Tool Works, Rogers, AR (United States)); Patterson, B.R.; Turner, M.E. Jr (Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL (United States))

    1993-10-01

    A method is proposed for modeling two- and three-dimensional particle size distributions using the Weibull distribution function. Experimental results show that, for tungsten particles in liquid phase sintered W-14Ni-6Fe, the experimental cumulative section size distributions were well fit by the Weibull probability function, which can also be used to compute the corresponding relative frequency distributions. Modeling the two-dimensional section size distributions facilitates the use of the Saltykov or other methods for unfolding three-dimensional (3-D) size distributions with minimal irregularities. Fitting the unfolded cumulative 3-D particle size distribution with the Weibull function enables computation of the statistical distribution parameters from the parameters of the fit Weibull function.

  2. A comparative study of submicron particle sizing platforms: accuracy, precision and resolution analysis of polydisperse particle size distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Will; Kozak, Darby; Coleman, Victoria A; Jämting, Åsa K; Trau, Matt

    2013-09-01

    The particle size distribution (PSD) of a polydisperse or multimodal system can often be difficult to obtain due to the inherent limitations in established measurement techniques. For this reason, the resolution, accuracy and precision of three new and one established, commercially available and fundamentally different particle size analysis platforms were compared by measuring both individual and a mixed sample of monodisperse, sub-micron (220, 330, and 410 nm - nominal modal size) polystyrene particles. The platforms compared were the qNano Tunable Resistive Pulse Sensor, Nanosight LM10 Particle Tracking Analysis System, the CPS Instruments's UHR24000 Disc Centrifuge, and the routinely used Malvern Zetasizer Nano ZS Dynamic Light Scattering system. All measurements were subjected to a peak detection algorithm so that the detected particle populations could be compared to 'reference' Transmission Electron Microscope measurements of the individual particle samples. Only the Tunable Resistive Pulse Sensor and Disc Centrifuge platforms provided the resolution required to resolve all three particle populations present in the mixed 'multimodal' particle sample. In contrast, the light scattering based Particle Tracking Analysis and Dynamic Light Scattering platforms were only able to detect a single population of particles corresponding to either the largest (410 nm) or smallest (220 nm) particles in the multimodal sample, respectively. When the particle sets were measured separately (monomodal) each platform was able to resolve and accurately obtain a mean particle size within 10% of the Transmission Electron Microscope reference values. However, the broadness of the PSD measured in the monomodal samples deviated greatly, with coefficients of variation being ~2-6-fold larger than the TEM measurements across all four platforms. The large variation in the PSDs obtained from these four, fundamentally different platforms, indicates that great care must still be taken in

  3. Modeling photoacoustic spectral features of micron-sized particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, Eric M; Gorelikov, Ivan; Matsuura, Naomi; Kolios, Michael C

    2014-10-07

    The photoacoustic signal generated from particles when irradiated by light is determined by attributes of the particle such as the size, speed of sound, morphology and the optical absorption coefficient. Unique features such as periodically varying minima and maxima are observed throughout the photoacoustic signal power spectrum, where the periodicity depends on these physical attributes. The frequency content of the photoacoustic signals can be used to obtain the physical attributes of unknown particles by comparison to analytical solutions of homogeneous symmetric geometric structures, such as spheres. However, analytical solutions do not exist for irregularly shaped particles, inhomogeneous particles or particles near structures. A finite element model (FEM) was used to simulate photoacoustic wave propagation from four different particle configurations: a homogeneous particle suspended in water, a homogeneous particle on a reflecting boundary, an inhomogeneous particle with an absorbing shell and non-absorbing core, and an irregularly shaped particle such as a red blood cell. Biocompatible perfluorocarbon droplets, 3-5 μm in diameter containing optically absorbing nanoparticles were used as the representative ideal particles, as they are spherical, homogeneous, optically translucent, and have known physical properties. The photoacoustic spectrum of micron-sized single droplets in suspension and on a reflecting boundary were measured over the frequency range of 100-500 MHz and compared directly to analytical models and the FEM. Good agreement between the analytical model, FEM and measured values were observed for a droplet in suspension, where the spectral minima agreed to within a 3.3 MHz standard deviation. For a droplet on a reflecting boundary, spectral features were correctly reproduced using the FEM but not the analytical model. The photoacoustic spectra from other common particle configurations such as particle with an absorbing shell and a

  4. Modeling photoacoustic spectral features of micron-sized particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, Eric M.; Gorelikov, Ivan; Matsuura, Naomi; Kolios, Michael C.

    2014-10-01

    The photoacoustic signal generated from particles when irradiated by light is determined by attributes of the particle such as the size, speed of sound, morphology and the optical absorption coefficient. Unique features such as periodically varying minima and maxima are observed throughout the photoacoustic signal power spectrum, where the periodicity depends on these physical attributes. The frequency content of the photoacoustic signals can be used to obtain the physical attributes of unknown particles by comparison to analytical solutions of homogeneous symmetric geometric structures, such as spheres. However, analytical solutions do not exist for irregularly shaped particles, inhomogeneous particles or particles near structures. A finite element model (FEM) was used to simulate photoacoustic wave propagation from four different particle configurations: a homogeneous particle suspended in water, a homogeneous particle on a reflecting boundary, an inhomogeneous particle with an absorbing shell and non-absorbing core, and an irregularly shaped particle such as a red blood cell. Biocompatible perfluorocarbon droplets, 3-5 μm in diameter containing optically absorbing nanoparticles were used as the representative ideal particles, as they are spherical, homogeneous, optically translucent, and have known physical properties. The photoacoustic spectrum of micron-sized single droplets in suspension and on a reflecting boundary were measured over the frequency range of 100-500 MHz and compared directly to analytical models and the FEM. Good agreement between the analytical model, FEM and measured values were observed for a droplet in suspension, where the spectral minima agreed to within a 3.3 MHz standard deviation. For a droplet on a reflecting boundary, spectral features were correctly reproduced using the FEM but not the analytical model. The photoacoustic spectra from other common particle configurations such as particle with an absorbing shell and a

  5. Modeling of particle size segregation: calibration using the discrete particle method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thornton, Anthony; Weinhart, Thomas; Luding, Stefan; Bokhove, Onno

    2012-01-01

    Over the last 25 years a lot of work has been undertaken on constructing continuum models for segregation of particles of different sizes. We focus on one model that is designed to predict segregation and remixing of two differently sized particle species. This model contains two dimensionless param

  6. A system for aerodynamically sizing ultrafine environmental radioactive particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olawoyin, L.

    1995-09-01

    The unattached environmental radioactive particles/clusters, produced mainly by {sup 222}Rn in indoor air, are usually few nanometers in size. The inhalation of these radioactive clusters can lead to deposition of radioactivity on the mucosal surface of the tracheobronchial tree. The ultimate size of the cluster together with the flow characteristics will determine the depositional site in the human lung and thus, the extent of damage that can be caused. Thus, there exists the need for the determination of the size of the radioactive clusters. However, the existing particle measuring device have low resolution in the sub-nanometer range. In this research, a system for the alternative detection and measurement of the size of particles/cluster in the less than 2 nm range have been developed. The system is a one stage impactor which has a solid state spectrometer as its impaction plate. It`s major feature is the nozzle-to-plate separation, L. The particle size collected changes with L and thus, particle size spectroscopy is achieved by varying L. The number of collected particles is determined by alpha spectroscopy. The size-discriminating ability of the system was tested with laboratory generated radon particles and it was subsequently used to characterize the physical (size) changes associated with the interaction of radon progeny with water vapor and short chain alcohols in various support gases. The theory of both traditional and high velocity jet impactors together with the design and evaluation of the system developed in this study are discussed in various chapters of this dissertation. The major results obtained in the course of the study are also presented.

  7. Comparison of optical particle sizing and cascade impaction for measuring the particle size of a suspension metered dose inhaler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Yu; Kline, Lukeysha C; Khawaja, Nazia; Van Liew, Melissa; Berry, Julianne

    2015-05-01

    Optical techniques for the particle size characterization of metered dose inhaler (MDI) suspensions have been developed as an alternative to the labor-intensive and time-consuming impaction method. In this study, a laser diffraction (LD) apparatus with a liquid cell ("wet cell" method) and a "time-of-flight" apparatus named aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) were utilized to assess MDI suspensions with varied formulation compositions and storage conditions. The results were compared with the conventional Anderson cascade impaction (ACI) data. The two optical methods were able to detect the changes in particle size distributions between formulations, yet to a lesser extent than those observed using the cascade impaction methodology. The median aerodynamic particle size measured by the APS method and the median geometric particle size obtained from the LD method were linearly correlated with the corresponding ACI results in the range of 2-5 µm. It was also found that the APS measurement was biased towards the finer particle size region and resulted in overestimated fine particle fraction (FPF) values which were 2-3 times folds of the ACI results. In conclusion, the optical particle sizing techniques may, under some circumstances, be viable techniques for the rapid assessment of MDI suspensions. The "wet cell" LD method, in particular, is found to be a valuable means of detecting active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) particle size changes in an MDI suspension. Using both the LD and the APS methods in early formulation screening followed by a final assessment with cascade impaction analysis can improve the efficiency of MDI formulation development.

  8. Influences of Substrate Adhesion and Particle Size on the Shape Memory Effect of Polystyrene Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Lewis M; Killgore, Jason P; Li, Zhengwei; Long, Rong; Sanders, Aric W; Xiao, Jianliang; Ding, Yifu

    2016-04-19

    Formulations and applications of micro- and nanoscale polymer particles have proliferated rapidly in recent years, yet knowledge of their mechanical behavior has not grown accordingly. In this study, we examine the ways that compressive strain, substrate surface energy, and particle size influence the shape memory cycle of polystyrene particles. Using nanoimprint lithography, differently sized particles are programmed into highly deformed, temporary shapes in contact with substrates of differing surface energies. Atomic force microscopy is used to obtain in situ measurements of particle shape recovery kinetics, and scanning electron microscopy is employed to assess differences in the profiles of particles at the conclusion of the shape memory cycle. Finally, finite element models are used to investigate the growing impact of surface energies at smaller length scales. Results reveal that the influence of substrate adhesion on particle recovery is size-dependent and can become dominating at submicron length scales.

  9. Estimation of coal particle size distribution by image segmentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Zelin; Yang Jianguo; Ding Lihua; Zhao Yuemin

    2012-01-01

    Several industrial coal processes are largely determined by the distribution of particle sizes in their feed.Currently these parameters are measured by manual sampling,which is time consuming and cannot provide real time feedback for automatic control purposes.In this paper,an approach using image segmentation on images of overlapped coal particles is described.The estimation of the particle size distribution by number is also described.The particle overlap problem was solved using image enhancement algorithms that converted those image parts representing material in lower layers to black.Exponential high-pass filter (EHPF) algorithms were used to remove the texture from particles on the surface.Finally,the edges of the surface particles were identified by morphological edge detection.These algorithms are described in detail as is the method of extracting the coal particle size.Tests indicate that using more coal images gives a higher accuracy estimate.The positive absolute error of 50 random tests was consistently less than 2.5% and the errors were reduced as the size of the fraction increased.

  10. Measurement of particle size based on digital imaging technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Hong; TANG Hong-wu; LIU Yun; WANG Hao; LIU Gui-ping

    2013-01-01

    To improve the analysis methods for the measurement of the sediment particle sizes with a wide distribution and of irregular shapes,a sediment particle image measurement,an analysis system,and an extraction algorithm of the optimal threshold based on the gray histogram peak values are proposed.Recording the pixels of the sediment particles by labeling them,the algorithm can effectively separate the sediment particle images from the background images using the equivalent pixel circles with the same diameters to represent the sediment particles.Compared with the laser analyzer for the case of blue plastic sands,the measurement results of the system are shown to be reasonably similar.The errors are mainly due to the small size of the particles and the limitation of the apparatus.The measurement accuracy can be improved by increasing the Charge-Coupled Devices (CCD) camera resolution.The analysis method of the sediment particle images can provide a technical support for the rapid measurement of the sediment particle size and its distribution.

  11. Domain and droplet sizes in emulsions stabilized by colloidal particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frijters, Stefan; Günther, Florian; Harting, Jens

    2014-10-01

    Particle-stabilized emulsions are commonly used in various industrial applications. These emulsions can present in different forms, such as Pickering emulsions or bijels, which can be distinguished by their different topologies and rheology. We numerically investigate the effect of the volume fraction and the uniform wettability of the stabilizing spherical particles in mixtures of two fluids. For this, we use the well-established three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann method, extended to allow for the added colloidal particles with non-neutral wetting properties. We obtain data on the domain sizes in the emulsions by using both structure functions and the Hoshen-Kopelman (HK) algorithm, and we demonstrate that both methods have their own (dis)advantages. We confirm an inverse dependence between the concentration of particles and the average radius of the stabilized droplets. Furthermore, we demonstrate the effect of particles detaching from interfaces on the emulsion properties and domain-size measurements.

  12. Dust generation in powders: Effect of particle size distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakravarty Somik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the relationship between the bulk and grain-scale properties of powders and dust generation. A vortex shaker dustiness tester was used to evaluate 8 calcium carbonate test powders with median particle sizes ranging from 2μm to 136μm. Respirable aerosols released from the powder samples were characterised by their particle number and mass concentrations. All the powder samples were found to release respirable fractions of dust particles which end up decreasing with time. The variation of powder dustiness as a function of the particle size distribution was analysed for the powders, which were classified into three groups based on the fraction of particles within the respirable range. The trends we observe might be due to the interplay of several mechanisms like de-agglomeration and attrition and their relative importance.

  13. Size distribution of particle systems analyzed with organic photodetectors

    CERN Document Server

    Sentis, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    As part of a consortium between academic and industry, this PhD work investigates the interest and capabilities of organic photo-sensors (OPS) for the optical characterization of suspensions and two-phase flows. The principle of new optical particle sizing instruments is proposed to characterize particle systems confined in a cylinder glass (standard configuration for Process Analytical Technologies). To evaluate and optimize the performance of these systems, a Monte-Carlo model has been specifically developed. This model accounts for the numerous parameters of the system: laser beam profile, mirrors, lenses, sample cell, particle medium properties (concentration, mean & standard deviation, refractive indices), OPS shape and positions, etc. Light scattering by particles is treated either by using Lorenz-Mie theory, Debye, or a hybrid model (that takes into account the geometrical and physical contributions). For diluted media (single scattering), particle size analysis is based on the inversion of scatter...

  14. Observations of particles at their formation sizes in Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaratne, Rohan; Pushpawela, Buddhi; He, Congrong; Li, Hui; Gao, Jian; Chai, Fahe; Morawska, Lidia

    2017-07-01

    New particle formation (NPF) has been observed in many highly polluted environments of South East Asia, including Beijing, where the extent of its contribution to intense haze events is still an open question. Estimated characteristics of NPF events, such as their starting times and formation and growth rates of particles, are more accurate when the detection range of particles extends to smaller sizes. In order to understand the very first steps of particle formation, we used a neutral cluster and air ion spectrometer (NAIS) to investigate particle characteristics at sizes exactly at which atmospheric nucleation and cluster activity occurs. Observations over a continuous 3-month period in Beijing showed 26 NPF events. These events generally coincided with periods with relatively clean air when the wind direction was from the less industrialised north. No NPF events were observed when the daily mean PM2. 5 concentration exceeded 43 µg m-3, which was the upper threshold for particle formation in Beijing. The fraction of particles that are charged in the size range 2-42 nm was normally about 15 %. However, this fraction increased to 20-30 % during haze events and decreased to below 10 % during NPF events. With the NAIS, we very precisely determined the starting times of NPF to a greater accuracy than has been possible in Beijing before and provided a temporal distribution of NPF events with a maximum at about 08:30 LT. Particle formation rates varied between 12 and 38 cm-3 s-1. Particle growth rates were estimated to be in the range of 0.5-9.0 nm h-1. These results are more reliable than previous studies in Beijing as the measurements were conducted for the first time at the exact sizes at which clusters form into particles and provide useful insight into the formation of haze events.

  15. Size segregated ring pattern formation in particle impactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saylor, J. R.; Fredericks, S. A.

    2016-11-01

    Typical particle impactors consist of a nozzle that directs a particle laden flow onto a plate, and is designed to capture particles greater than a cutoff diameter. Connected in series as a cascade, with each impactor designed to have a progressively smaller cutoff diameter, the particle size distribution can be measured. Typical impactors utilize a nozzle-to-plate distance S that is on the order of one nozzle diameter W, S / W 1 , and give a nominally Gaussian particle deposition pattern on the plate. We explored conditions where S / W < < 1 and observed deposition patterns consisting of very fine rings. Moreover, we found that the ring diameter increased with decreasing particle diameter and the ring thickness increased with particle diameter. These results suggest a potential method for sizing particles by using the mature technology of impactors in a different way. Potential mechanisms for how these ring patterns are formed will be discussed. We note that prior studies have observed conditions where particle deposition patterns exhibited "halos". These halos appear less distinct than the rings we have observed, and it is unclear whether they are related.

  16. RNA Control of HIV-1 Particle Size Polydispersity

    CERN Document Server

    Faivre-Moskalenko, Cendrine; Thomas, Audrey; Tartour, Kevin; Beck, Yvonne; Iazykov, Maksym; Danial, John; Lourdin, Morgane; Muriaux, Delphine; Castelnovo, Martin

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1, an enveloped RNA virus, produces viral particles that are known to be much more heterogeneous in size than is typical of non-enveloped viruses. We present here a novel strategy to study HIV-1 Viral Like Particles (VLP) assembly by measuring the size distribution of these purified VLPs and subsequent viral cores thanks to Atomic Force Microscopy imaging and statistical analysis. This strategy allowed us to identify whether the presence of viral RNA acts as a modulator for VLPs and cores size heterogeneity in a large population of particles. These results are analyzed in the light of a recently proposed statistical physics model for the self-assembly process. In particular, our results reveal that the modulation of size distribution by the presence of viral RNA is qualitatively reproduced, suggesting therefore an entropic origin for the modulation of RNA uptake by the nascent VLP.

  17. Laser anemometer signals: visibility characteristics and application to particle sizing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian, R J; Orloff, K L

    1977-03-01

    The signal visibility characteristics of a dual beam laser anemometer operated in a backscatter mode have been investigated both experimentally and analytically. The analysis is based on Mie's electromagnetic scattering theory for spherical particles and is exact within the limitations of the scattering theory. It is shown that the signal visibility is a function of the ratio of the particle diameter to the fringe spacing in a certain, restricted case; but more generally it also depends on the Mie scattering size parameter, refractive index, the illuminating beam polarization, and the size, shape, and location of the light collecting aperture. The character of backscatter signal visibility differs significantly from the forward scatter case, and it is concluded that backscatter measurements of particle diameters using the visibility sizing technique may not always be possible. Restrictions on the forward scatter application of the visibility sizing method are also discussed.

  18. Sizing of sand and ash particles using their speckle pattern: influence of particle opacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Sara González; van Beeck, Jeroen

    2017-08-01

    A speckle pattern is an interference pattern produced by coherent light scattered from an irregular particle. This pattern is observed in the out-of-focus plane of the particle and it can be used to obtain information about the particle size. When the particle is observed in focus, several bright spots known as glare points are observed on its surface. They correspond to the points from which the light is scattered in the direction of observation. Previous studies using the speckle pattern to obtain the size of irregular particles are based on the hypothesis that the glare points are distributed homogeneously over the whole surface of the particle. The research presented in this paper shows that in the case of opaque particles (such as ash particles), only the areas illuminated by the laser light are covered with glare points. This results in an underestimation of the particle size when characterizing opaque particles using their speckle pattern. In this paper, the speckle pattern is used to perform sizing measurements of translucent and opaque particles, and the results are compared with the ones obtained by image processing of their in-focus images.

  19. Saharan Dust Particle Size And Concentration Distribution In Central Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunnu, A. K.

    2010-12-01

    A.K. Sunnu*, G. M. Afeti* and F. Resch+ *Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) Kumasi, Ghana. E-mail: albertsunnu@yahoo.com +Laboratoire Lepi, ISITV-Université du Sud Toulon-Var, 83162 La Valette cedex, France E-mail: resch@univ-tln.fr Keywords: Atmospheric aerosol; Saharan dust; Particle size distributions; Particle concentrations. Abstract The Saharan dust that is transported and deposited over many countries in the West African atmospheric environment (5°N), every year, during the months of November to March, known locally as the Harmattan season, have been studied over a 13-year period, between 1996 and 2009, using a location at Kumasi in central Ghana (6° 40'N, 1° 34'W) as the reference geographical point. The suspended Saharan dust particles were sampled by an optical particle counter, and the particle size distributions and concentrations were analysed. The counter gives the total dust loads as number of particles per unit volume of air. The optical particle counter used did not discriminate the smoke fractions (due to spontaneous bush fires during the dry season) from the Saharan dust. Within the particle size range measured (0.5 μm-25 μm.), the average inter-annual mean particle diameter, number and mass concentrations during the northern winter months of January and February were determined. The average daily number concentrations ranged from 15 particles/cm3 to 63 particles/cm3 with an average of 31 particles/cm3. The average daily mass concentrations ranged from 122 μg/m3 to 1344 μg/m3 with an average of 532 μg/m3. The measured particle concentrations outside the winter period were consistently less than 10 cm-3. The overall dust mean particle diameter, analyzed from the peak representative Harmattan periods over the 13-year period, ranged from 0.89 μm to 2.43 μm with an average of 1.5 μm ± 0.5. The particle size distributions exhibited the typical distribution pattern for

  20. Studies on the particle size control of gelatin microspheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruixue SUN; Jingjing SHI; Yanchuan GUO; Lijuan CHEN

    2009-01-01

    A series of gelatin microspheres (GMs) were prepared through emulsification-coacervation method in water-in-oil (w/o) emulsions. The influence of preparation parameters on particle size, surface morphology, and dispersion of GMs was examined. The studied preparation parameters include concentration of gelatin solutions, concentration of the emulsifier, w/o ratio, emulsifying time, stirring speed, and so on. The surface morphology, dispersion, and particle sizes of GMs were determined by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM), SemAfore 4 Demo software, and particle size distribution graphic charts. The experimental results indicated that increasing the concentration of gelatin solution would increase the particle size of GMs. When the solution concentration increased from 0.050 to 0.200 g/mL gradually, the particle size increased correspondingly. The relationship between the two quantities was linear. On the contrary, increasing the concentration of the emulsifier would decrease the particle size of GMs. Furthermore, the particle size reduced quickly at initial time and slowed down latterly. With the increase of emulsifier concentration from 0 to 0.020 g/mL, the mean diameters of GMs decreased from 17.32 to 5.38 urn. However, the particle size dwindled slowly when emulsifier concentration was higher than 0.020 g/mL. The excellent result was obtained with the condition of 0.050 g/mL of emulsifier concentration, 0.100 g/mL of gelatin solution concentration, 1/5 of w/o ratio, 10 min of emulsifying time, and 900 r/min of the stirring speed. The GMs prepared at this condition had the smallest sizes, the narrowest size distribution, the best spherical shape, and fluidity. The w/o ratio has the same influence on particle size of GMs as that of gelatin solution concentration. With the increase of w/o ratio, the average particle sizes increased linearly, and the surface of microspheres become smoother as well. It is supposed that w/o ratio can be used to change the diameters

  1. An overview of differential mobility analyzers for size classification of nanometer-sized aerosol particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakorn Tippayawong

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Size classification of nanoparticles is an important process in the electrical mobility particle size analyzer. The differential mobility analyzer (DMA is one of the most commonly used devices for classifying and measuring nanometersized aerosol particles between 1 nm to 1 μm in diameter, based on their electrical mobility. The DMA can be described as an assembly of two concentrically cylindrical electrodes with an air gap between the walls. In the DMA, air and aerosol flows enter from one end, pass through the annulus and exit the other end. An electric field is applied between the inner and outer electrodes. Particles having a specific mobility exit with the monodisperse air flow through a small slit located at the bottom of the inner electrode. These particles are transferred to a particle counter to determine the particle number concentration. In the past several decades, there have been numerous extensive studies and developments on the DMA. Nonetheless, they are different in terms of specific applications, construction, particle size range, as well as time response and resolution. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the state-of-the-art existing cylindrical DMAs for aerosol particle size classification as well as for the generation of monodisperse aerosol in nanometer size range. A description of the operating principles, detailed physical characteristics of these DMAs, including the single-channel and multi-channel DMAs, as well as some examples of applications to nanotechnology are given.

  2. Indetermination of particle sizing by laser diffraction in the anomalous size ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Linchao; Ge, Baozhen; Zhang, Fugen

    2017-09-01

    The laser diffraction method is widely used to measure particle size distributions. It is generally accepted that the scattering angle becomes smaller and the angles to the location of the main peak of scattered energy distributions in laser diffraction instruments shift to smaller values with increasing particle size. This specific principle forms the foundation of the laser diffraction method. However, this principle is not entirely correct for non-absorbing particles in certain size ranges and these particle size ranges are called anomalous size ranges. Here, we derive the analytical formulae for the bounds of the anomalous size ranges and discuss the influence of the width of the size segments on the signature of the Mie scattering kernel. This anomalous signature of the Mie scattering kernel will result in an indetermination of the particle size distribution when measured by laser diffraction instruments in the anomalous size ranges. By using the singular-value decomposition method we interpret the mechanism of occurrence of this indetermination in detail and then validate its existence by using inversion simulations.

  3. Spray pattern analysis for metered dose inhalers I: Orifice size, particle size, and droplet motion correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, H; Hickey, A J; Brace, G; Barbour, T; Gallion, J; Grove, J

    2006-10-01

    Factors that influence spray pattern measurements of pressurized, metered-dose inhalers have been evaluated. Spray patterns were correlated with changes in actuator orifice diameter, particle size profiles, and calculated estimates of particle-size dynamics of plumes during a spray. Spray patterns, regardless of actuator orifice size, were ellipsoid in the vertical direction. Measures of elliptical ratio, major axis, and minor axis were significantly influenced by orifice size in a non-linear fashion over the range of orifice sizes investigated. Spray patterns also correlated with particle size profile and spray geometry measurements. Spray distribution asymmetry may be related to droplet evaporation and sedimentation processes. However, the spray patterns did not appear sensitive to changes in gravitational force acting on the plume. Instead, it is postulated that elliptical spray patterns may have dependence on fluid dynamic processes within the inhaler actuator. Developing an understanding of these processes may provide a basis for developing spray pattern tests with relevance to product performance.

  4. [Theory and practice of electrospray crystallization in particle size reduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szunyogh, Tímea; Ambrus, Rita; Szabóné Révész, Piroska

    2015-01-01

    Nowdays, one of the most challenges for the researchers is the formulation of poorly water soluble drugs. Reduction of particle size of active agents to submicron range could result in a faster dissolution rate and higher bioavailability. Integration as crystallization process is an often used particle size decreasing technique. The aim of this study was to show the theoretical background and practical application of the electros pray crystallization as an innovative particle size decreasing technique. Our model drug was the niflumic acid (NIF), which belongs to the BCS Class II. After the optimization of the process parameters, the physico-chemical properties of the samples were characterized. Particle size and shape were visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Crystalline state of NIF and the samples were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray powder diffraction. Physico-chemical properties were determined using dissolution test from simulated media. The electrospray crytallization resulted in particle size reduction but the aggregation of nanonized NIF crystals (NIF-nano) could not avoid without excipient. Aggregates with poor secondary forces are suitable for production of the interactive physical mixture. It was found that NIF-nano could be well distributed on the surface of the mannitol as carrier and the Poloxamer R protected the NIF-nano crystals (320 nm)from aggregation. Consequently, the physical mixture resulted in product with higher polarity, better wettability and faster dissolution rate of NIF as raw NIF or NIF-nano.

  5. Selection Of Suitable Particle Size And Particle Ratio For Japanese Cucumber Cucumis Sativus L. Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galahitigama GAH

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to select the best particle size of coco peat for cucumber nurseries as well as best particle ratio for optimum plant growth and development of cucumber. The experiment was carried out in International Foodstuff Company and Faculty of Agriculture University of Ruhuna Sri Lanka during 2015 to 2016. Under experiment one three types of different particle sizes were used namely fine amp88040.5mm T2 medium 3mm-0.5mm T3 and coarse 4mm T4 with normal coco peat T1 as treatments. Complete Randomized Design CRD used as experimental design with five replicates. Germination percentage number of leaves per seedling seedling height in frequent day intervals was taken as growth parameters. Analysis of variance procedure was applied to analyze the data at 5 probability level. The results revealed that medium size particle media sieve size 0.5mm -3mm of coco peat was the best particle size for cucumber nursery practice when considered the physical and chemical properties of medium particles of coco peat. In the experiment of selecting of suitable particle ratio for cucumber plants the compressed mixture of coco peat particles that contain 70 ww unsieved coco peat 20 ww coarse particles and 10 ww coconut husk chips 5 12mm has given best results for growth performances compared to other treatments and cucumber grown in this mixture has shown maximum growth and yield performances.

  6. Particle-fluid interaction forces as the source of acceleration PDF invariance in particle size

    CERN Document Server

    Meller, Yosef

    2014-01-01

    The conditions allowing particle suspension in turbulent flow are of interest in many applications, but understanding them is complicated both by the nature of turbulence and by the interaction of flow with particles. Observations on small particles indicate an invariance of acceleration PDFs of small particles independent of size. We show to be true the postulated role of particle/fluid interaction forces in maintaining suspension. The 3D-PTV method, applied for two particle phases (tracers and inertial particles) simultaneously, was used to obtain velocity and acceleration data, and through the use of the particle's equation of motion the magnitude of forces representing either the flow or the particle interaction were derived and compared. The invariance of PDFs is shown to extend to the component forces, and lift forces are shown to be significant.

  7. Measurement of non-volatile particle number size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkatzelis, G. I.; Papanastasiou, D. K.; Florou, K.; Kaltsonoudis, C.; Louvaris, E.; Pandis, S. N.

    2015-06-01

    An experimental methodology was developed to measure the non-volatile particle number concentration using a thermodenuder (TD). The TD was coupled with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer, measuring the chemical composition and mass size distribution of the submicrometer aerosol and a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) that provided the number size distribution of the aerosol in the range from 10 to 500 nm. The method was evaluated with a set of smog chamber experiments and achieved almost complete evaporation (> 98 %) of secondary organic as well as freshly nucleated particles, using a TD temperature of 400 °C and a centerline residence time of 15 s. This experimental approach was applied in a winter field campaign in Athens and provided a direct measurement of number concentration and size distribution for particles emitted from major pollution sources. During periods in which the contribution of biomass burning sources was dominant, more than 80 % of particle number concentration remained after passing through the thermodenuder, suggesting that nearly all biomass burning particles had a non-volatile core. These remaining particles consisted mostly of black carbon (60 % mass contribution) and organic aerosol, OA (40 %). Organics that had not evaporated through the TD were mostly biomass burning OA (BBOA) and oxygenated OA (OOA) as determined from AMS source apportionment analysis. For periods during which traffic contribution was dominant 50-60 % of the particles had a non-volatile core while the rest evaporated at 400 °C. The remaining particle mass consisted mostly of black carbon (BC) with an 80 % contribution, while OA was responsible for another 15-20 %. Organics were mostly hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and OOA. These results suggest that even at 400 °C some fraction of the OA does not evaporate from particles emitted from common combustion processes, such as biomass burning and car engines, indicating that a fraction of this type

  8. Size-dependent collection of micrometer-sized particles using nylon mesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Naomichi; Kumagai, Kazukiyo; Fujii, Minoru; Shendell, Derek G.; Endo, Osamu; Yanagisawa, Yukio

    Our study explored the size-dependent collection characteristics for micron-sized particles using several kinds of commercially available woven nylon net filters. The particle concentrations with and without the filter were compared to determine the filtration characteristics. The theoretical efficiencies based on a single-fiber theory and a hole model were also computed. Although the theoretical efficiencies were generally consistent with the experimental results, the non-uniformity of air velocity profile within a mesh hole, and a particle's detachment from or bounce off the filters, should be further investigated in future research. Overall, the present study revealed the size-fractionation capability of the nylon wire mesh filters for micron-sized particles from experimental and theoretical points of view. Unlike impactors, the size-fractionation characteristics of the nylon wire mesh filter were determined by particle size, mesh fiber diameter, and a combination of different particle collection mechanisms including impaction, interception, and gravitational settling. Each mechanical process appears interdependently governed in part by the filter dimensions such as filter mesh size (diameter of opening) as well as related variables such as packing density and fiber diameter.

  9. Spontaneous formation of small sized albumin/acacia coacervate particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, D J; Singh, O N

    1993-07-01

    Microgel coacervate particles form spontaneously on mixing aqueous solutions of oppositely charged albumin and acacia, under specific conditions of pH, ionic strength, and polyion concentration, close to but not at the optimum conditions for maximum coacervate yield. The mean particle diameter of these coacervate particles is approximately 6 microns when suspended in aqueous media, as determined by HIAC/Royco particle analysis. The geometric standard deviation of the particles falls in the range 1.2-1.9 microns. The particle size was not dependent on the method of emulsification of the coacervate in the equilibrium phase, or on the stirring speed applied during the manufacturing process. The microgel particles were stable on storage, for periods up to forty-six days, without the addition of a chemical cross-linking agent, or the application of heat. Stability was measured with respect to the change in particle size of samples stored at different temperatures. The non-cross-linked microcapsules were also shown to be stable on pH change, to pH values outside the coacervation pH range. At the optimum conditions for maximum coacervate yield the albumin/acacia system formed a very viscous coacervate phase, which was unsuitable for microcapsule preparation. The rheological properties of albumin/acacia and gelatin/acacia complex coacervates optimized for maximum coacervate yield were compared. The albumin/acacia coacervate was shown to be three orders of magnitude more viscous than the gelatin/acacia system.

  10. HDL particle number and size as predictors of cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontush, Anatol

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that reduced concentrations of circulating high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles can be superior to HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels as a predictor of cardiovascular disease. Measurements of HDL particle numbers, therefore, bear a potential for the improved assessment of cardiovascular risk. Furthermore, such measurement can be relevant for the evaluation of novel therapeutic approaches targeting HDL. Modern in-depth analyses of HDL particle profile may further improve evaluation of cardiovascular risk. Although clinical relevance of circulating concentrations of HDL subpopulations to cardiovascular disease remains controversial, the negative relationship between the number of large HDL particles and cardiovascular disease suggests that assessment of HDL particle profile can be clinically useful. Reduced mean HDL size is equally associated with cardiovascular disease in large-scale clinical studies. Since HDL-C is primarily carried in the circulation by large, lipid-rich HDL particles, the inverse relationship between HDL size and cardiovascular risk can be secondary to those established for plasma levels of HDL particles, HDL-C, and large HDL. The epidemiological data thereby suggest that HDL particle number may represent a more relevant therapeutic target as compared to HDL-C.

  11. The Influence of Particle Size on Infrared Reflectance Spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, Tanya L.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Su, Yin-Fong; Blake, Thomas A.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Richardson, Robert L.

    2014-06-13

    Reflectance spectra of solids are influenced by the absorption coefficient as well as the particle size and morphology. In the infrared, spectral features may be observed as either maxima or minima: in general, the upward-going peaks in the reflectance spectrum result from surface scattering, which are rays that have reflected from the surface without penetration, whereas downward-going peaks result from either absorption or volume scattering, i.e. rays that have penetrated into the sample or refracted into the sample interior and are not reflected. The light signal reflected from solids usually encompasses all these effects which include dependencies on particle size, morphology and sample density. This paper measures the reflectance spectra in the 1.3 – 16 micron range for various bulk materials that have a combination of strong and weak absorption bands in order to understand the effects on the spectral features as a function of the mean grain size of the sample. The bulk materials were ground with a mortar and pestle and then sieved to separate the samples into various size fractions: 0-45, 45-90, 90-180, 180-250, 250-500, and >500 microns. The directional-hemispherical spectra were recorded using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer equipped with an integrating sphere to measure the reflectance for all of the particle-size fractions. We have studied both organic and inorganic materials, but this paper focuses on inorganic salts, NaNO3 in particular. Our studies clearly show that particle size has an enormous influence on the measured reflectance spectra for bulk materials and that successful identification requires sufficient representative reflectance data so as to include the particle size(s) of interest. Origins of the effects are discussed.

  12. Investigation of particles size effects in Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) modelling of colloidal suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai-Duy, N.; Phan-Thien, N.; Khoo, B. C.

    2015-04-01

    In the Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) simulation of suspension, the fluid (solvent) and colloidal particles are replaced by a set of DPD particles and therefore their relative sizes (as measured by their exclusion zones) can affect the maximal packing fraction of the colloidal particles. In this study, we investigate roles of the conservative, dissipative and random forces in this relative size ratio (colloidal/solvent). We propose a mechanism of adjusting the DPD parameters to properly model the solvent phase (the solvent here is supposed to have the same isothermal compressibility to that of water).

  13. Particle size dependent rheological property in magnetic fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jie; Pei, Lei; Xuan, Shouhu, E-mail: xuansh@ustc.edu.cn; Yan, Qifan; Gong, Xinglong, E-mail: gongxl@ustc.edu.cn

    2016-06-15

    The influence of the particle size on the rheological property of magnetic fluid was studied both by the experimental and computer simulation methods. Firstly, the magnetic fluids were prepared by dispersing Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanospheres with size varied from 40 nm to 100 nm and 200 nm in the solution. Then, the rheological properties were investigated and it was found that the relative magnetorheological effects increased with increasing the particle size. Finally, the molecular dynamic simulation was used to analyze the mechanical characteristics of the magnetic fluid and the chain-like model agreed well with the experimental result. The authentic chain-like structure observed by a microscope agreed with the simulation results. The three particles composed of the similar cluster nanostructure, thus they exhibited similar magnetic property. To this end, the unique assembling microstructures was the origination of the mechanical difference. And it was found that the higher MR (magnetorheological) effects of the large particle based magnetic fluid was originated from the stronger assembling microstructure under the applying magnetic field. - Highlights: • 40 nm, 100 nm and 200 nm Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanospheres were dispersed in water. • The magnetorheological effect increased with increasing the particle sizes. • Molecular dynamic simulation was used in this article.

  14. Diffusion of Finite-Size Particles in Confined Geometries

    KAUST Repository

    Bruna, Maria

    2013-05-10

    The diffusion of finite-size hard-core interacting particles in two- or three-dimensional confined domains is considered in the limit that the confinement dimensions become comparable to the particle\\'s dimensions. The result is a nonlinear diffusion equation for the one-particle probability density function, with an overall collective diffusion that depends on both the excluded-volume and the narrow confinement. By including both these effects, the equation is able to interpolate between severe confinement (for example, single-file diffusion) and unconfined diffusion. Numerical solutions of both the effective nonlinear diffusion equation and the stochastic particle system are presented and compared. As an application, the case of diffusion under a ratchet potential is considered, and the change in transport properties due to excluded-volume and confinement effects is examined. © 2013 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  15. Inhalation risk and particle size in dust and mist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, C.N.

    1949-01-01

    This paper presents a critical overview of particle uptake and retention from literature through 1949. Particles > 6-..mu..m are retained in nose, or by secondary bronchi with mouth breathing. Few > 2-..mu..m particles are exhaled, trapped mostly in bronchioles (some by alveoli) by sedimentation. Maximal deposition is 0.4- to 0.8-..mu..m size in bronchioles and alveoli. Minimim retention is at 0.1 to 0.15 ..mu..m; approx. 80% are exhaled. Brownian settling of smaller particles in alveoli occurs. Particles of low density penetrate farther. Slow breathing enhances retention. Soluble toxins may be absorbed at any point along respiratory tract, so deep penetration percentage is moot in most cases.

  16. Rock sampling. [method for controlling particle size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, P. (Inventor)

    1971-01-01

    A method for sampling rock and other brittle materials and for controlling resultant particle sizes is described. The method involves cutting grooves in the rock surface to provide a grouping of parallel ridges and subsequently machining the ridges to provide a powder specimen. The machining step may comprise milling, drilling, lathe cutting or the like; but a planing step is advantageous. Control of the particle size distribution is effected primarily by changing the height and width of these ridges. This control exceeds that obtainable by conventional grinding.

  17. Critical Bottleneck Size for Jamless Particle Flows in Two Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Takumi; Nishinari, Katsuhiro; Schadschneider, Andreas

    2014-04-01

    We propose a simple microscopic model for arching phenomena at bottlenecks. The dynamics of particles in front of a bottleneck is described by a one-dimensional stochastic cellular automaton on a semicircular geometry. The model reproduces oscillation phenomena due to the formation and collapsing of arches. It predicts the existence of a critical bottleneck size for continuous particle flows. The dependence of the jamming probability on the system size is approximated by the Gompertz function. The analytical results are in good agreement with simulations.

  18. Particle sizing in rocket motor studies utilizing hologram image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netzer, David; Powers, John

    1987-01-01

    A technique of obtaining particle size information from holograms of combustion products is described. The holograms are obtained with a pulsed ruby laser through windows in a combustion chamber. The reconstruction is done with a krypton laser with the real image being viewed through a microscope. The particle size information is measured with a Quantimet 720 image processing system which can discriminate various features and perform measurements of the portions of interest in the image. Various problems that arise in the technique are discussed, especially those that are a consequence of the speckle due to the diffuse illumination used in the recording process.

  19. Cerium dioxide with large particle size prepared by continuous precipitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李梅; 王觅堂; 柳召刚; 胡艳宏; 吴锦绣

    2009-01-01

    Cerium dioxide(CeO2) has attracted much attention and has wide applications such as automotive exhaust catalysts,polishing materials for optical glasses and additives for advanced glasses,as well as cosmetic materials.The particle size and its distribution are key factors to the performance of the materials in the functional applications.However,control of particle size is still a challenge in materials synthesis.Therefore,continuous precipitation of cerium oxalate(precursor of ceria) was carried out at dif...

  20. Biofilter media gas pressure loss as related to media particle size and particle shape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pugliese, Lorenzo; Poulsen, Tjalfe G.; Røjgaard Andreasen, Rune

    2013-01-01

    Pressure loss (ΔP) is a key parameter for estimating biofilter energy consumption. Accurate predictions of ΔP as a function of air velocity (V) are therefore essential, to assess energy consumption and minimize operation costs. This paper investigates the combined impact of medium particle size...... and shape on the V - ΔP relationship. V - ΔP measurements were performed using three commercially available materials with different particle shapes: crushed granite (very angular particles), gravel (particles of intermediate roundness) and Leca® (almost spherical particles). A total of 21 different...

  1. Particle size-dependent radical generation from wildland fire smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Stephen S; Castranova, Vince; Chen, Bean T; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Hoover, Mark; Piacitelli, Chris; Gaughan, Denise M

    2007-07-01

    Firefighting, along with construction, mining and agriculture, ranks among the most dangerous occupations. In addition, the work environment of firefighters is unlike that of any other occupation, not only because of the obvious physical hazards but also due to the respiratory and systemic health hazards of smoke inhalation resulting from combustion. A significant amount of research has been devoted to studying municipal firefighters; however, these studies may not be useful in wildland firefighter exposures, because the two work environments are so different. Not only are wildland firefighters exposed to different combustion products, but their exposure profiles are different. The combustion products wildland firefighters are exposed to can vary greatly in characteristics due to the type and amount of material being burned, soil conditions, temperature and exposure time. Smoke inhalation is one of the greatest concerns for firefighter health and it has been shown that the smoke consists of a large number of particles. These smoke particles contain intermediates of hydrogen, carbon and oxygen free radicals, which may pose a potential health risk. Our investigation looked into the involvement of free radicals in smoke toxicity and the relationship between particle size and radical generation. Samples were collected in discrete aerodynamic particle sizes from a wildfire in Alaska, preserved and then shipped to our laboratory for analysis. Electron spin resonance was used to measure carbon-centered as well as hydroxyl radicals produced by a Fenton-like reaction with wildfire smoke. Further study of reactive oxygen species was conducted using analysis of cellular H(2)O(2) generation, lipid peroxidation of cellular membranes and DNA damage. Results demonstrate that coarse size-range particles contained more carbon radicals per unit mass than the ultrafine particles; however, the ultrafine particles generated more *OH radicals in the acellular Fenton-like reaction. The

  2. EFFECTS OF ULTRASOUND ON THE MORPHOLOGY, PARTICLE SIZE, CRYSTALLINITY, AND CRYSTALLITE SIZE OF CELLULOSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUMARI SUMARI

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to optimize ultrasound treatment to produce fragment of cellulose that is low in particles size, crystallite size, and crystallinity. Slurry of 1 % (w/v the cellulose was sonicated at different time periods and temperatures. An ultrasonic reactor was operated at 300 Watts and 28 kHz to cut down the polymer into smaller particles. We proved that ultrasound damages and fragments the cellulose particles into shorter fibers. The fiber lengths were reduced from in the range of 80-120 µm to 30-50 µm due to an hour ultrasonication and became 20-30 µm after 5 hours. It was also found some signs of erosion on the surface and stringy. The acoustic cavitation also generated a decrease in particle size, crystallinity, and crystallite size of the cellulose along with increasing sonication time but it did not change d-spacing. However, the highest reduction of particle size, crystallite size, and crystallinity of the cellulose occurred within the first hour of ultrasonication, after which the efficiency was decreased. The particle diameter, crystallite size, and crystallinity were decreased from 19.88 µm to 15.96 µm, 5.81 Å to 2.98 Å, and 77.7% to 73.9% respectively due to an hour ultrasound treatment at 40 °C. The treatment that was conducted at 40 °C or 60 °C did not give a different effect significantly. Cellulose with a smaller particle and crystallite size as well as a more amorphous shape is preferred for further study.

  3. Particle number size distribution and new particle formation (NPF) in Lanzhou,Western China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Gao; Fahe Chai; Tao Wang; Wenxing Wang

    2011-01-01

    Particle number size distribution from 10 to 10,000 nm was measured by a wide-range particle spectrometer (WPS-1000XP) at a downwind site north of downtown Lanzhou,western China,from 25 June to 19 July 2006.we first report the pollution level,diurnal variation of particle concentration in different size ranges and then introduce the characteristics of the particle formation processes,to show that the number concentration of ultrafine particles was lower than the values measured in other urban or suburban areas in previous studies.However,the fraction of ultrafine particles in total aerosol number concentration was 0found to be much higher.Furthermore,sharp increase of ultrafine particle concentration was frequently observed at noon.An examination of the diurnal pattern suggests that the burst of the ultrafine particles was mainly due to nucleation process.During the 25-day observation,new particle formation (NPF) from homogeneous nucleation was observed during 33% of the study period.The average growth rate of the newly formed particles was 4.4 nm/h,varying from 1.3 to 16.9 nm/h.The needed concentration of condensable vapor was 6.1 × 107 cm-3,and its source rate was 1.1 × 106 cm-3 s-1.Further calculation on the source rate of sulphuric acid vapor indicated that the average participation of sulphuric acid to particle growth rate was 68.3%.

  4. Experimental Effects on IR Reflectance Spectra: Particle Size and Morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiswenger, Toya N.; Myers, Tanya L.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Su, Yin-Fong; Blake, Thomas A.; Ertel, Alyssa B.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Szecsody, James E.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Smith, Milton; Lanker, Cory

    2016-05-23

    For geologic and extraterrestrial samples it is known that both particle size and morphology can have strong effects on the species’ infrared reflectance spectra. Due to such effects, the reflectance spectra cannot be predicted from the absorption coefficients alone. This is because reflectance is both a surface as well as a bulk phenomenon, incorporating both dispersion as well as absorption effects. The same spectral features can even be observed as either a maximum or minimum. The complex effects depend on particle size and preparation, as well as the relative amplitudes of the optical constants n and k, i.e. the real and imaginary components of the complex refractive index. While somewhat oversimplified, upward-going amplitude in the reflectance spectrum usually result from surface scattering, i.e. rays that have been reflected from the surface without penetration, whereas downward-going peaks are due to either absorption or volume scattering, i.e. rays that have penetrated or refracted into the sample interior and are not reflected. While the effects are well known, we report seminal measurements of reflectance along with quantified particle size of the samples, the sizing obtained from optical microscopy measurements. The size measurements are correlated with the reflectance spectra in the 1.3 – 16 micron range for various bulk materials that have a combination of strong and weak absorption bands in order to understand the effects on the spectral features as a function of the mean grain size of the sample. We report results for both sodium sulfate Na2SO4 as well as ammonium sulfate (NH4)2SO4; the optical constants have been measured for (NH4)2SO4. To go a step further from the field to the laboratory we explore our understanding of particle size effects on reflectance spectra in the field using standoff detection. This has helped identify weaknesses and strengths in detection using standoff distances of up 160 meters away from the Target. The studies have

  5. Prey size and availability limits maximum size of rainbow trout in a large tailwater: insights from a drift-foraging bioenergetics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodrill, Michael J.; Yackulic, Charles B.; Kennedy, Theodore A.; Haye, John W

    2016-01-01

    The cold and clear water conditions present below many large dams create ideal conditions for the development of economically important salmonid fisheries. Many of these tailwater fisheries have experienced declines in the abundance and condition of large trout species, yet the causes of these declines remain uncertain. Here, we develop, assess, and apply a drift-foraging bioenergetics model to identify the factors limiting rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) growth in a large tailwater. We explored the relative importance of temperature, prey quantity, and prey size by constructing scenarios where these variables, both singly and in combination, were altered. Predicted growth matched empirical mass-at-age estimates, particularly for younger ages, demonstrating that the model accurately describes how current temperature and prey conditions interact to determine rainbow trout growth. Modeling scenarios that artificially inflated prey size and abundance demonstrate that rainbow trout growth is limited by the scarcity of large prey items and overall prey availability. For example, shifting 10% of the prey biomass to the 13 mm (large) length class, without increasing overall prey biomass, increased lifetime maximum mass of rainbow trout by 88%. Additionally, warmer temperatures resulted in lower predicted growth at current and lower levels of prey availability; however, growth was similar across all temperatures at higher levels of prey availability. Climate change will likely alter flow and temperature regimes in large rivers with corresponding changes to invertebrate prey resources used by fish. Broader application of drift-foraging bioenergetics models to build a mechanistic understanding of how changes to habitat conditions and prey resources affect growth of salmonids will benefit management of tailwater fisheries.

  6. Variations in the composition of house dust by particle size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzerstorfer, Christof

    2017-07-03

    In this study, the distribution of heavy metals and other components in the various size fractions of house dust is investigated. A house dust sample collected from a vacuum cleaner was separated into size fractions by sieving and air classification. The analysis of the size fractions showed that the heavy metals and other components are not uniformly distributed in the various size fractions. The highest total carbon concentrations were found in the size fractions with a mass median diameter of 18-95 µm, while in the coarser size fractions and in the finest size fraction, the total carbon concentration was lower. In contrast, for many heavy metals and other metals (Al, Fe, Ca, S, Mn, Ti, Ba, Sr, As, Co, and V), the maximum concentrations were found in the finest size fraction. With increasing size of the dust fractions, the concentrations decreased. For several of these components, the dependence of the concentration on the particle size can be approximately assessed well using a power function. The distribution of Zn, Cu, Mg and Na was different. While the concentration of Na and Mg was higher in the coarser size fractions, no distinct trend was found for the concentrations of Cu and Zn.

  7. Effect of MTA particle size on periapical healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabinejad, M; Moazami, M; Moaddel, H; Hawkins, J; Gustefson, C; Faras, H; Wright, K; Shabahang, S

    2016-12-15

    To examine the effect of reduction in MTA particle size on dento-alveolar and osseous healing in dogs. Root canals of 24 mandibular premolars in four 2-year-old beagles were prepared and filled with gutta-percha and sealer. Two to four weeks later, during periapical surgery, the root-end cavity preparations in these teeth were filled with either grey ProRoot MTA or modified (reduced particle sizes with faster setting time) MTA. The animals were sacrificed 4 months later. Degrees of inflammation, type of inflammatory cells, fibrous connective tissue adjacent to the root-end filling materials, cementum formation over the resected roots and root-end filling materials and bone healing were examined. Data were analysed using the McNemar test. No significant differences in healing of periapical tissues were found when comparing ProRoot MTA to a modified MTA containing reduced particle sizes. Reducing the particle sizes of MTA did not impact its biological properties. © 2016 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Ham particle size influences saltiness perception in flans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emorine, M; Septier, C; Thomas-Danguin, T; Salles, C

    2014-04-01

    One major issue of the food industry is reducing sodium content while maintaining food acceptability and liking. Despite extensive research in this field, little has been published on real complex food products. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the size of particles, a parameter easily adjusted in food processing, could influence the salty taste of low-salt food product. We thus evaluated the effect of ham particle sizes (4 levels, including a zero level) on salt perception and the consumer liking of flans varying in their overall salt concentrations (low- and high-salt content). Two consumer panels, composed of 107 and 77 subjects, rated, respectively, the saltiness of and liking for the developed flans (8 samples). The outcomes of this study indicated first, that the addition of ham to flans increased the salty taste perception and second, that a decrease in ham particle size (ground ham) increased the perceived saltiness. Moreover, low- and high-salt flans were equally liked, demonstrating that food manufacturers could reduce the salt contents (here, by over 15%) while maintaining consumer acceptability through the manipulation of the size of the salt-providing particles.

  9. Nano sized clay detected on chalk particle surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbjerg, Lone; Hassenkam, Tue; Makovicky, Emil

    2012-01-01

    that in calcite saturated water, both the polar and the nonpolar functional groups adhere to the nano sized clay particles but not to calcite. This is fundamentally important information for the development of conceptual and chemical models to explain wettability alterations in chalk reservoirs...

  10. Particle size and packing characterization by diffuse light transmission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Henrik Ehlers; Jyrki Hein(a)m(a)ki; Jouko Yliruusi

    2012-01-01

    Particle size,packing density and blend composition of glass ballotini,microcrystalline cellulose pellets and theophylline granules were studied by diffuse light transmission.Diffuse visible light was directed to the sample and the intensity of the light transmitted to the opposite side of the sample was measured through a diffusing lens using a phototransistor.Light transmission was found to decrease with decreasing particle size and with increasing packing density.There was a correlation,though somewhat irregular,between light transmission and particle size for glass ballotini and microcrystalline cellulose pellets,and a strong near-linear correlation between light transmission and particle size for theophylline granules.The effect of packing density on light transmission was significant.Differentiating the composition of binary blends of microcrystalline cellulose pellets and glass ballotini and blends of theophylline granules was found possible on the basis of light transmission.The method proposed showed potential as a rapid,simple and inexpensive analytical tool for basic process diagnostics.

  11. Particle size distributions in and exhausted from a poultry house

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here we describe a study looking at the full particulate size range of particles in a poultry house. Agricultural particulates are typically thought of as coarse mode dust. But recent emphasis of PM2.5 regulations on pre-cursors such as ammonia and volatile organic compounds increasingly makes it ne...

  12. The effects of flower, floral display, and reward sizes on bumblebee foraging behavior when pollen is the reward and plants are dichogamous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insect-pollinated plants have developed showy flowers and floral displays that attract pollinators. Pollinators, in turn, show preferences for specific floral traits and their foraging behavior is influenced by floral traits. In this study, we examined the preference of bumble bees for flower size, ...

  13. Influence of Particle Size on Piezoelectricity of Piezo-composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Dabing; LIU Hanxing; HAO Hua; LI Yanfeng; OUYANG Shixi

    2007-01-01

    Serial material model (Dilute model)and Limited Units (LU)method were employed to analyze the performance of binary piezo-composite system. The reckoned electric potential deployments illustrated difference while the particles were different. Their piezoelectricities were also calculated according to the model,and furthermore comparation suggested that small particles living in the tolerance improve the piezoelectricity of piezo-composite. Experiments coinciding with analyses were processed simultaneously.Ceramics were milled for different time in order to control the concentration of particle size.The results showed that the filled particles enhanced the piezoelectricity of binary piezo-composite system efficiently whereas too many chips deteriorated the performance of piezo-composites.

  14. Totally asymmetric exclusion processes with particles of arbitrary size

    CERN Document Server

    Lakatos, G

    2003-01-01

    The steady-state currents and densities of a one-dimensional totally asymmetric exclusion process (TASEP) with particles that occlude an integer number (d) of lattice sites are computed using various mean-field approximations and Monte Carlo simulations. TASEPs featuring particles of arbitrary size are relevant for modelling systems such as mRNA translation, vesicle locomotion along microtubules and protein sliding along DNA. We conjecture that the nonequilibrium steady-state properties separate into low-density, high-density, and maximal current phases similar to those of the standard (d = 1) TASEP. A simple mean-field approximation for steady-state particle currents and densities is found to be inaccurate. However, we find local equilibrium particle distributions derived from a discrete Tonks gas partition function yield apparently exact currents within the maximal current phase. For the boundary-limited phases, the equilibrium Tonks gas distribution cannot be used to predict currents, phase boundaries, or ...

  15. Ultrasonic cavitation for obtainment of nanometric sized particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A.; Guzmán, R.; Espinosa, J.; Estrada, J.

    2016-02-01

    This project aims to determine the possibility of obtaining nanometric size particles of aluminium oxide (Al2O3) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) from commercial micron-sized powders, through the physical principle of ultrasonic cavitation, in order to be used as supply material in coatings made through a process of thermal spray by flame. The tests are performed on a Hielscher UIP 1000hd Ultrasonics equipment, in a 20 micron wave amplitude and in times of 6, 8, 12, 18 and 24 hours. The determination of the particle size is done through image processing using ImageJ software, obtained by the technique of scanning electron microscopy (SEM); while the elemental composition of the processed samples is analyzed through the technique of energy dispersing spectroscopy (EDS). The results show that Al2O3 and TiO2 have a reduction behaviour of the particles size after being subjected to ultrasonic cavitation, however is only reached the nanometric size in the TiO2 samples.

  16. Optimal foraging in the thalassinidean shrimp Callianassa subterranea - Improving food quality by grain size selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stamhuis, EJ; Videler, JJ; de Wilde, PAWJ

    1998-01-01

    The grain size distributions and organic content of habitat sediment, stomach content and faecal pellets of the endobenthic shrimp C. subterranea were analyzed to study food selection and its nutritional yield. Sub-samples of sediment from the shrimps' habitat and the stomach content were fractioned

  17. Optimal foraging on perilous prey : risk of bill damage reduces optimal prey size in oystercatchers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, AL; Oosterbeek, K; Ens, Bruno J.; Verhulst, S

    2006-01-01

    Intake rate maximization alone is not. always sufficient in explaining prey size selection in predators. For example, bivalve-feeding oystercatchers regularly select. smaller prey than expected if they aimed to maximize their intake rat-C. It has been proposed that. to these birds large prey are

  18. Dependence of thermal stability of lithiated Si on particle size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao; Shi, Tongfei; Li, Decheng; Yoshitake, Hideya; Wang, Hongyu

    2016-12-01

    Thermal properties of the component materials are key issues in lithium ion batteries (LIBs). Si-based anodes are one of the most promising materials, but its thermal evolution have received much less attention than its electrochemical performance. In this article, the thermal behavior of various of Si material has been studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Three kinds of Si-particles, ranging from nano-to micro-sizes was subject to thermal analysis. It has been found that the thermal stability increases with the rise in particle-size. For the nanoparticles of 20 nm, both characteristic peaks of A and B regions in the heating process are stronger than the large-diameter particles. For three kinds of Si particles, the starting temperature of thermal reaction demonstrates a similar trend, gradually becoming lower with the increasing of the lithiation extent. At last, the ex situ XPS has also been conducted to explore the causes of surface state after temperature elevation. In A region, the heating decomposition of SEI with electrolyte, mainly consisting of a variety of esterification compounds, produces high content of lithium carbonate below 180 °C. When lithium in the inner phase of Si particles loses the protection of SEI film, the severe exothermic reaction occurred between lithium and the solvent species.

  19. Current Development Status of a Particle Size Analyzer for Coated Particle Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Andrew T [ORNL; Hunn, John D [ORNL; Karnowski, Thomas Paul [ORNL

    2007-08-01

    Work was performed to develop a prototype Particle Size Analyzer (PSA) for application to coated particle fuel characterization. This system was based on a light obscuration method and targeted towards high throughput analysis. Although never matured to the point of replacing existing lower throughput optical microscopy shadowgraph methods, the system was successfully applied to automating the counting of large particle samples for increased accuracy in calculating mean particle properties based on measurements of multiparticle samples. The measurement of particle size with the PSA was compared to current shadowgraph techniques and found to result in considerably greater throughput at the cost of larger measurement uncertainty. The current algorithm used by the PSA is more sensitive to particle shape and this is a likely cause of the greater uncertainty when attempting to measure average particle diameter. The use of the PSA to measure particle shape will require further development. Particle transport through the PSA and stability of the light source/detector are key elements in the successful application of this technique. A number of system pitfalls were studied and addressed.

  20. Risky business for a juvenile marine predator? Testing the influence of foraging strategies on size and growth rate under natural conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussey, Nigel E; DiBattista, Joseph D; Moore, Jonathan W; Ward, Eric J; Fisk, Aaron T; Kessel, Steven; Guttridge, Tristan L; Feldheim, Kevin A; Franks, Bryan R; Gruber, Samuel H; Weideli, Ornella C; Chapman, Demian D

    2017-04-12

    Mechanisms driving selection of body size and growth rate in wild marine vertebrates are poorly understood, thus limiting knowledge of their fitness costs at ecological, physiological and genetic scales. Here, we indirectly tested whether selection for size-related traits of juvenile sharks that inhabit a nursery hosting two dichotomous habitats, protected mangroves (low predation risk) and exposed seagrass beds (high predation risk), is influenced by their foraging behaviour. Juvenile sharks displayed a continuum of foraging strategies between mangrove and seagrass areas, with some individuals preferentially feeding in one habitat over another. Foraging habitat was correlated with growth rate, whereby slower growing, smaller individuals fed predominantly in sheltered mangroves, whereas larger, faster growing animals fed over exposed seagrass. Concomitantly, tracked juveniles undertook variable movement behaviours across both the low and high predation risk habitat. These data provide supporting evidence for the hypothesis that directional selection favouring smaller size and slower growth rate, both heritable traits in this shark population, may be driven by variability in foraging behaviour and predation risk. Such evolutionary pathways may be critical to adaptation within predator-driven marine ecosystems. © 2017 The Author(s).

  1. Effects of particle size on the leachability of trace elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Zandi; N.V. Russell; R.G.J. Edyvean; R. Hand; P. Ward [University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom). Department of Chemical and Process Engineering

    2007-07-01

    Leaching tests are widely used as indicators to estimate the release potential of hazardous elements from solid materials under laboratory conditions in order to assess environmental impacts of utilisation or deposition of the examined material. Several institutes and agencies have introduced standard leaching tests for estimating the mobility of trace elements from a solid material under specific conditions. These tests are often criticised on the grounds that the results obtained are neither reliable nor able to be extrapolated to the application. The lack of agreement between the estimates by standard leaching tests and measurements in the field may be the result of inadequate specification of the physical and chemical conditions used in the test. For example, in BS EN 12457 the particle size distribution of the sample is not well defined. This can lead to different interpretations by different laboratories resulting in different leaching rates being reported. The lack of understanding of the leaching mechanism leads to the design of poorly defined leaching tests. Therefore, there is a need to have a good understanding of all parameters involved in the leaching process and the factors that affect it. It is known that particle surface area has a great impact on the leachability of trace elements from solid matter. This paper investigates effects of particle size on the leaching process using BS EN 12457-2 conditions. A slag sample from a metal refiner has been crushed and sieved to obtain different fractions with different particle sizes from 4 to 0.5 mm. The leaching rate of trace elements from each fraction has been determined using deionised water as the leachant. It was found that sample preparation procedure is a critical step in leaching analysis and effects of particle size on the leachability should be taken into account. 9 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. The Size of Winter-Flooded Paddy Fields No Longer Limits the Foraging Habitat Use of the Endangered Crested Ibis (Nipponia nippon) in Winter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Can-Shi; Song, Xiao; Ding, Chang-Qing; Ye, Yuan-Xing; Qing, Bao-Ping; Wang, Chao

    2016-08-01

    Paddy fields have traditionally been viewed as the key foraging habitats for the endangered crested ibis (Nipponia nippon). With the population of this species now increasing, its distribution has expanded to both lowland areas and outside the nature reserve. However, little is known about the current foraging habitat preferences of these birds, especially during winter. In this research, a total of 54 used sites and 50 unused sites were investigated during winter from December 2011 to January 2012. The results of logistic regression analysis indicate that soil softness, human disturbance, and distance to the nearest road were important factors. For the site plots of winter-flooded paddy fields, the birds prefer the paddy fields with higher coverage of vegetation, except softer foraging sites and lower human-related disturbance. In lowland areas, the size of winter-flooded paddy fields was not a limiting factor, due to the availability of other wetlands capable of providing abundant food. The micro-habitat characteristics were important indicators of foraging habitat quality rather than the size of winter-flooded paddy fields, and the food accessibility may play an important role in the process of foraging habitat use. We suggest the improvement of the foraging micro-habitat and environmental characteristics would be effective in ensuring the availability of food in the dispersed lowland areas. The local people still needed to be encouraged and compensated by their single-cropping cultivation, ploughed the paddy fields after harvesting and irrigated them with shallow water flooded in the original core areas of the nature reserve.

  3. Infrared reflectance spectra: Effects of particle size, provenance and preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Yin-Fong; Myers, Tanya L.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Blake, Thomas A.; Forland, Brenda M.; Szecsody, James E.; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2014-09-22

    We have recently developed methods for making more accurate infrared total and diffuse directional - hemispherical reflectance measurements using an integrating sphere. We have found that reflectance spectra of solids, especially powders, are influenced by a number of factors including the sample preparation method, the particle size and morphology, as well as the sample origin. On a quantitative basis we have investigated some of these parameters and the effects they have on reflectance spectra, particularly in the longwave infrared. In the IR the spectral features may be observed as either maxima or minima: In general, upward-going peaks in the reflectance spectrum result from strong surface scattering, i.e. rays that are reflected from the surface without bulk penetration, whereas downward-going peaks are due to either absorption or volume scattering, i.e. rays that have penetrated or refracted into the sample interior and are not reflected. The light signals reflected from solids usually encompass all such effects, but with strong dependencies on particle size and preparation. This paper measures the reflectance spectra in the 1.3 – 16 micron range for various bulk materials that have a combination of strong and weak absorption bands in order to observe the effects on the spectral features: Bulk materials were ground with a mortar and pestle and sieved to separate the samples into various size fractions between 5 and 500 microns. The median particle size is demonstrated to have large effects on the reflectance spectra. For certain minerals we also observe significant spectral change depending on the geologic origin of the sample. All three such effects (particle size, preparation and provenance) result in substantial change in the reflectance spectra for solid materials; successful identification algorithms will require sufficient flexibility to account for these parameters.

  4. Thermal levitation of 10 um size particles in low vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Long Fung Frankie; Kowalski, Nicholas; Parker, Colin; Chin, Cheng

    2016-05-01

    We report on experimental methods for trapping 10 micron-sized ice, glass, ceramic and polyethylene particles with thermophoresis in medium vacuum, at pressures between 5 Torr and 25 Torr. Under appropriate conditions particles can launch and levitate robustly for up to an hour. We describe the experimental setup used to produce the temperature gradient necessary for the levitation, as well as our procedure for generating and introducing ice into the experimental setup. In addition to analyzing the conditions necessary for levitation, and the dependence of levitation on the experimental parameters, we report on the behavior of particles during levitation and ejection, including position and stability, under different pressures and temperatures. We also note a significant discrepancy between theory and data, suggesting the presence of other levitating forces.

  5. Influence of particle size distribution on nanopowder cold compaction processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltachev, G.; Volkov, N.; Lukyashin, K.; Markov, V.; Chingina, E.

    2017-06-01

    Nanopowder uniform and uniaxial cold compaction processes are simulated by 2D granular dynamics method. The interaction of particles in addition to wide-known contact laws involves the dispersion forces of attraction and possibility of interparticle solid bridges formation, which have a large importance for nanopowders. Different model systems are investigated: monosized systems with particle diameter of 10, 20 and 30 nm; bidisperse systems with different content of small (diameter is 10 nm) and large (30 nm) particles; polydisperse systems corresponding to the log-normal size distribution law with different width. Non-monotone dependence of compact density on powder content is revealed in bidisperse systems. The deviations of compact density in polydisperse systems from the density of corresponding monosized system are found to be minor, less than 1 per cent.

  6. Inversion method based on stochastic optimization for particle sizing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Escobar, Juan Jaime; Barbosa-Santillán, Liliana Ibeth; Vargas-Ubera, Javier; Aguilar-Valdés, Félix

    2016-08-01

    A stochastic inverse method is presented based on a hybrid evolutionary optimization algorithm (HEOA) to retrieve a monomodal particle-size distribution (PSD) from the angular distribution of scattered light. By solving an optimization problem, the HEOA (with the Fraunhofer approximation) retrieves the PSD from an intensity pattern generated by Mie theory. The analyzed light-scattering pattern can be attributed to unimodal normal, gamma, or lognormal distribution of spherical particles covering the interval of modal size parameters 46≤α≤150. The HEOA ensures convergence to the near-optimal solution during the optimization of a real-valued objective function by combining the advantages of a multimember evolution strategy and locally weighted linear regression. The numerical results show that our HEOA can be satisfactorily applied to solve the inverse light-scattering problem.

  7. Two castes sizes of leafcutter ants in task partitioning in foraging activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Arruda de Toledo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Task partitioning in eusocial animals is most likely an evolutionary adaptation that optimizes the efficiency of the colony to grow and reproduce. It was investigated indirect task partitioning in two castes sizes; this involves task partitioning in which the material transported is not transferred directly from one individual to another, but where it is dropped by one ant to be picked up by another. In two separate approaches, it was confirmed previous results pertaining to leaf caching activities among Atta colombica with task partitioning activities involving leaf dropping among Atta sexdens rubropilosa , in which there is a correlation between the size of an individual ant and the leaf fragment it transports. It was also suggested that this correlation exists only in individual ants that cut and transport (CaT the same fragment to the nest. When task partitioning occurs and individual ants transporting (T leaf fragments cut by other ants, the correlation becomes looser or disappears. We also observed that CaT ants are smaller than T ants.

  8. Energy conservation potential of Portland Cement particle size distribution control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tresouthick, S.W.

    1985-01-01

    The main objective of Phase 3 is to develop practical economic methods of controlling the particle size distribution of portland cements using existing or modified mill circuits with the principal aim of reducing electrical energy requirements for cement manufacturing. The work of Phase 3, because of its scope, will be carried out in 10 main tasks, some of which will be handled simultaneously. Progress on each of these tasks is discussed in this paper.

  9. Particles size segregation and roll waves in dense granular flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viroulet, Sylvain; Baker, James; Kokelaar, Peter; Gray, Nico

    2015-11-01

    Geophysical granular flows, such as landslides, snow avalanches and pyroclastic flows commonly involve particles with different sizes which are prone to segregate during the flow. This particle-size segregation may lead to the formation of regions with different frictional properties which can have a feedback on the flow. This study aims to understand this effect in the context of bi-disperse roll waves in shallow granular free-surface flows. Experiments have been performed in a 3 meter long chute using several mixtures of spherical glass beads of diameter 75-150 and 400-600 microns flowing on a rough bed. These show that the waves propagate at constant speed that depends on the initial mixture composition. In addition, during their propagation, a higher concentration of large particles is localized at the front of the waves. A theoretical and numerical approach is presented using depth-averaged equations for the conservation of mass, momentum and depth-averaged small particle concentration. Results without frictional feedback are investigated and compared to those that include the enhanced frictional resistance to motion of the large grains.

  10. Packing fraction of particles with a Weibull size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwers, H. J. H.

    2016-07-01

    This paper addresses the void fraction of polydisperse particles with a Weibull (or Rosin-Rammler) size distribution. It is demonstrated that the governing parameters of this distribution can be uniquely related to those of the lognormal distribution. Hence, an existing closed-form expression that predicts the void fraction of particles with a lognormal size distribution can be transformed into an expression for Weibull distributions. Both expressions contain the contraction coefficient β. Likewise the monosized void fraction φ1, it is a physical parameter which depends on the particles' shape and their state of compaction only. Based on a consideration of the scaled binary void contraction, a linear relation for (1 - φ1)β as function of φ1 is proposed, with proportionality constant B, depending on the state of compaction only. This is validated using computational and experimental packing data concerning random close and random loose packing arrangements. Finally, using this β, the closed-form analytical expression governing the void fraction of Weibull distributions is thoroughly compared with empirical data reported in the literature, and good agreement is found. Furthermore, the present analysis yields an algebraic equation relating the void fraction of monosized particles at different compaction states. This expression appears to be in good agreement with a broad collection of random close and random loose packing data.

  11. Effect of proteins, polysaccharides, and particle sizes on sludge dewaterability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO Liming; HE Peipei; YU Guanghui; HE Pinjing

    2009-01-01

    Four batch experiments of hydrolysis and acidification were carried out to investigate the distributions of proteins (PN) and polysaccharides (PS) in the sludge, the PN/PS ratio, the particle sizes, and their relationship with sludge dewaterability (as determined by capillary suction time, CST). The sludge flocs were stratified through centrifugation- and ultrasound-based method into four layers: (1) slime, (2) loosely bound extracellular polymeric substances (LB-EPS), (3) tightly bound EPS (TB-EPS), and (4) pellet. The results showed that PN was mainly partitioned in the pellet (80.7%) and TB-EPS (9.6%) layers, while PS distributed evenly in the four layers. During hydrolysis and acidification, PN was transferred from the pellet and TB-EPS layers to the slime layer, but PS had no significant transfer trends. The mean particle sizes of the sludge flocs decreased with hydrolysis and acidification. The pH had a more significant influence on the dewaterability of sludge flocs than temperature. Sludge dewaterability during hydrolysis and acidification processes greatly deteriorated from 9.7 s at raw sludge to 340--450 s under alkaline conditions. However, it was just slightly increased under acidic conditions. Further investigation suggested that CST was affected by soluble PN, soluble PN/PS, and particle sizes of sludge flocs, but was affected slightly by total PN, PS, or PN/PS in the whole sludge flocs and other layers (except slime).

  12. Phorid flies, Pseudacteon spp. (Diptera: Phoridae), affect forager size ratios of red imported fire ants Solenopsis invicta (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puckett, R T; Harris, M K

    2010-10-01

    Multiple species of Pseudacteon phorid flies (Diptera: Phoridae) are currently being released throughout the southern United States to aid biological control of red imported fire ants, Solenopsis invicta Buren (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). It is anticipated that these flies will interfere with S. invicta foraging, allowing native ant assemblages to outcompete S. invicta for available resources. Numerous studies have shown a decrease in S. invicta foraging intensity when exposed to phorids. This study documents a behavioral change in phorid-exposed S. invicta colonies at a phorid release site in central Texas. Significant differences in forager size ratios were detected between phorid-exposed and phorid-absent colonies. A similar phenomenon was recently documented in the native range of these insects in South America as well. Experimental manipulation of ratios of S. invicta worker sizes has been shown to have important effects on colony success. This newly documented phorid-mediated S. invicta colony-level effect represents a significant shift in S. invicta foraging dynamics and may provide an additional mechanism by which phorids can influence S. invicta populations in their United States range.

  13. Mass size distribution of particle-bound water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canepari, S.; Simonetti, G.; Perrino, C.

    2017-09-01

    The thermal-ramp Karl-Fisher method (tr-KF) for the determination of PM-bound water has been applied to size-segregated PM samples collected in areas subjected to different environmental conditions (protracted atmospheric stability, desert dust intrusion, urban atmosphere). This method, based on the use of a thermal ramp for the desorption of water from PM samples and the subsequent analysis by the coulometric KF technique, had been previously shown to differentiate water contributes retained with different strength and associated to different chemical components in the atmospheric aerosol. The application of the method to size-segregated samples has revealed that water showed a typical mass size distribution in each one of the three environmental situations that were taken into consideration. A very similar size distribution was shown by the chemical PM components that prevailed during each event: ammonium nitrate in the case of atmospheric stability, crustal species in the case of desert dust, road-dust components in the case of urban sites. The shape of the tr-KF curve varied according to the size of the collected particles. Considering the size ranges that better characterize the event (fine fraction for atmospheric stability, coarse fraction for dust intrusion, bi-modal distribution for urban dust), this shape is coherent with the typical tr-KF shape shown by water bound to the chemical species that predominate in the same PM size range (ammonium nitrate, crustal species, secondary/combustion species - road dust components).

  14. DISCRETE PARTICLE SIMULATION OF SIZE SEGREGATION OF PARTICLE MIXTURES IN A GAS FLUIDIZED BED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y. Q. Feng; A. B. Yu

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the mixing/segregation behaviour of particle mixtures in a gas fluidized bed by use of the discrete particle simulation. Spherical particles with diameters 2 mm (jetsam) and 1 mm (flotsam) and density 2 500 kg·m-3 are used as solid mixtures with different volume fractions. The particles are initially packed uniformly in a rectangular bed and then fluidized by gas uniformly injected at the bottom of the bed. The gas injection velocities vary to cover fixed, partially and fully fluidized bed conditions. Segregation/mixing behaviour is discussed in terms of flow patterns, solid concentration profile and mixing kinetics. The results show that segregation, as a transient fluidization process, is strongly affected by gas injection velocities for a given particle mixture. With the increase of the volume fraction of flotsam, size segregation appears at lower velocities.

  15. Effects of particle size on the mechanical properties of particle-reinforced Sn-Ag composite solder joint

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Particulate size has significant influenced on the mechanical properties of particle-reinforced composite solder joints. In this current research, Cu or Ni reinforcement particles were mechanically added to the Sn-3.5Ag eutectic solder, and the effects of the particle size on the mechanical properties of particle-reinforced composite solder joint were systematically studied. This investigation touched on how mechanical properties of the solder joints are affected by particles size. A quantitative formula was set up to correlate the mechanical property of the solder joint with particle size in different processing conditions. Besides, the fracture mechanism of the composite solder joint was analyzed.

  16. Composition and Particle Size Retrievals for Homogeneous Binary Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedziela, R. F.; Argon, P.; Bejcek, L.

    2014-12-01

    Tropospheric aerosols have widely varying compositions, shapes, and sizes. The ability to measure these physical characteristics, coupled with knowledge about their optical properties, can provide insight as to how these particles might participate in atmospheric processes, including their interaction with light. Over the past several years, our laboratory has been involved in developing methods to determine basic physical properties of laboratory-generated particles based on the analysis of infrared extinction spectra of multi-component aerosols. Here we report the results of a complete study on the applicability of well-known refractive index mixing rules to homogeneous binary liquid organic aerosols in an effort to yield in situ measurements of particle size and composition. In particular, we present results for terpenoid (carvone/nopinone) and long-chain hydrocarbon (squalane/squalene) mixtures. The included image shows model carvone/nopinone extinction spectra that were computed using the Lorentz-Lorenz mixing rule on complex refractive index data for the pure components.

  17. Depositing nanometer-sized particles of metals onto carbon allotropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Kent A. (Inventor); Fallbach, Michael J. (Inventor); Ghose, Sayata (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G. (Inventor); Delozier, Donavon M. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A process for depositing nanometer-sized metal particles onto a substrate in the absence of aqueous solvents, organic solvents, and reducing agents, and without any required pre-treatment of the substrate, includes preparing an admixture of a metal compound and a substrate by dry mixing a chosen amount of the metal compound with a chosen amount of the substrate; and supplying energy to the admixture in an amount sufficient to deposit zero valance metal particles onto the substrate. This process gives rise to a number of deposited metallic particle sizes which may be controlled. The compositions prepared by this process are used to produce polymer composites by combining them with readily available commodity and engineering plastics. The polymer composites are used as coatings, or they are used to fabricate articles, such as free-standing films, fibers, fabrics, foams, molded and laminated articles, tubes, adhesives, and fiber reinforced articles. These articles are well-suited for many applications requiring thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity, antibacterial activity, catalytic activity, and combinations thereof.

  18. Chemically generated convective transport of micron sized particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shklyaev, Oleg; Das, Sambeeta; Altemose, Alicia; Shum, Henry; Balazs, Anna; Sen, Ayusman

    2015-11-01

    A variety of chemical and biological applications require manipulation of micron sized objects like cells, viruses, and large molecules. Increasing the size of particles up to a micron reduces performance of techniques based on diffusive transport. Directional transport of cargo toward detecting elements reduces the delivery time and improves performance of sensing devices. We demonstrate how chemical reactions can be used to organize fluid flows carrying particles toward the assigned destinations. Convection is driven by density variations caused by a chemical reaction occurring at a catalyst or enzyme-covered target site. If the reaction causes a reduction in fluid density, as in the case of catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, then fluid and suspended cargo is drawn toward the target along the bottom surface. The intensity of the fluid flow and the time of cargo delivery are controlled by the amount of reagent in the system. After the reagent has been consumed, the fluid pump stops and particles are found aggregated on and around the enzyme-coated patch. The pumps are reusable, being reactivated upon injection of additional reagent. The developed technique can be implemented in lab-on-a-chip devices for transportation of micro-scale object immersed in solution.

  19. Totally asymmetric exclusion processes with particles of arbitrary size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Greg; Chou, Tom

    2003-02-01

    The steady-state currents and densities of a one-dimensional totally asymmetric exclusion process (TASEP) with particles that occlude an integer number (d) of lattice sites are computed using various mean-field approximations and Monte Carlo simulations. TASEPs featuring particles of arbitrary size are relevant for modelling systems such as mRNA translation, vesicle locomotion along microtubules and protein sliding along DNA. We conjecture that the nonequilibrium steady-state properties separate into low-density, high-density, and maximal current phases similar to those of the standard (d = 1) TASEP. A simple mean-field approximation for steady-state particle currents and densities is found to be inaccurate. However, we find local equilibrium particle distributions derived from a discrete Tonks gas partition function yield apparently exact currents within the maximal current phase. For the boundary-limited phases, the equilibrium Tonks gas distribution cannot be used to predict currents, phase boundaries, or the order of the phase transitions. However, we employ a refined mean-field approach to find apparently exact expressions for the steady-state currents, boundary densities, and phase diagrams of the d geq 1 TASEP. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations are performed to support our analytic, mean-field results.

  20. Totally asymmetric exclusion processes with particles of arbitrary size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakatos, Greg; Chou, Tom [Department of Biomathematics and Institute for Pure and Applied Mathematics, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2003-02-28

    The steady-state currents and densities of a one-dimensional totally asymmetric exclusion process (TASEP) with particles that occlude an integer number (d) of lattice sites are computed using various mean-field approximations and Monte Carlo simulations. TASEPs featuring particles of arbitrary size are relevant for modelling systems such as mRNA translation, vesicle locomotion along microtubules and protein sliding along DNA. We conjecture that the nonequilibrium steady-state properties separate into low-density, high-density, and maximal current phases similar to those of the standard (d = 1) TASEP. A simple mean-field approximation for steady-state particle currents and densities is found to be inaccurate. However, we find local equilibrium particle distributions derived from a discrete Tonks gas partition function yield apparently exact currents within the maximal current phase. For the boundary-limited phases, the equilibrium Tonks gas distribution cannot be used to predict currents, phase boundaries, or the order of the phase transitions. However, we employ a refined mean-field approach to find apparently exact expressions for the steady-state currents, boundary densities, and phase diagrams of the d {>=} 1 TASEP. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations are performed to support our analytic, mean-field results.

  1. Biofilter media gas pressure loss as related to media particle size and particle shape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pugliese, Lorenzo; Poulsen, Tjalfe G.; Røjgaard Andreasen, Rune

    2013-01-01

    Pressure loss (ΔP) is a key parameter for estimating biofilter energy consumption. Accurate predictions of ΔP as a function of air velocity (V) are therefore essential, to assess energy consumption and minimize operation costs. This paper investigates the combined impact of medium particle size...

  2. Size Distribution of Chlorinated Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Atmospheric Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakimoto, Kensaku; Nagayoshi, Haruna; Konishi, Yoshimasa; Kajimura, Keiji; Ohura, Takeshi; Nakano, Takeshi; Hata, Mitsuhiko; Furuuchi, Masami; Tang, Ning; Hayakawa, Kazuichi; Toriba, Akira

    2017-01-01

    The particle size distribution of chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (ClPAHs) in particulate matter (PM) in Japan is examined for the first time. PM was collected using a PM0.1 air sampler with a six-stage filter. PM was collected in October 2014 and January 2015 to observe potential seasonal variation in the atmospheric behavior and size of PM, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and ClPAHs. We found that the concentration of PAHs and ClPAHs between 0.5-1.0 μm and 1.0-2.5 μm markedly increase in January (i.e., the winter season). Among the ClPAHs, 1-ClPyrene and 6-ClBenzo[a]Pyrene were the most commonly occurring compounds; further, approximately 15% of ClPAHs were in the nanoparticle phase (<0.1 μm). The relatively high presence of nanoparticles is a potential human health concern because these particles can easily be deposited in the lung periphery. Lastly, we evaluated the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligand activity of PM extracts in each size fraction. The result indicates that PM < 2.5 μm has the strong AhR ligand activity.

  3. Building predictive models of soil particle-size distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Samuel-Rosa

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Is it possible to build predictive models (PMs of soil particle-size distribution (psd in a region with complex geology and a young and unstable land-surface? The main objective of this study was to answer this question. A set of 339 soil samples from a small slope catchment in Southern Brazil was used to build PMs of psd in the surface soil layer. Multiple linear regression models were constructed using terrain attributes (elevation, slope, catchment area, convergence index, and topographic wetness index. The PMs explained more than half of the data variance. This performance is similar to (or even better than that of the conventional soil mapping approach. For some size fractions, the PM performance can reach 70 %. Largest uncertainties were observed in geologically more complex areas. Therefore, significant improvements in the predictions can only be achieved if accurate geological data is made available. Meanwhile, PMs built on terrain attributes are efficient in predicting the particle-size distribution (psd of soils in regions of complex geology.

  4. Analysis of filler particle levels and sizes in dental alginates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Lemes Carlo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the inorganic filler fractions and sizes of commercially alginates. The inorganic particles volumetric fractions of five alginates - Jeltrate(J, Jeltrate Plus(JP, Jeltrate Chromatic Ortho(JC, Hydrogum(H and Ezact Krom(E were accessed by weighing a previously determined mass of each material in water before and after burning samples at 450 °C for 3 hours. Unsettled materials were soaked in acetone and chloroform and sputter-coated with gold for SEM evaluation of fillers' morphology and size. The results for the volumetric inorganic particle content were (%: J - 48.33, JP - 48.33, JC - 33.79, H - 37.55 and E - 40.55. The fillers presented a circular appearance with helical form and various perforations. Hydrogum fillers looked like cylindrical, perforated sticks. The mean values for fillers size were (μm: J - 12.91, JP - 13.67, JC - 13.44, E - 14.59 and H - 9 (diameter, 8.81 (length. The results of this study revealed differences in filler characteristics that could lead to different results when testing mechanical properties.

  5. Hybrid Bacterial Foraging and Particle Swarm Optimization for detecting Bundle Branch Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kora, Padmavathi; Kalva, Sri Ramakrishna

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal cardiac beat identification is a key process in the detection of heart diseases. Our present study describes a procedure for the detection of left and right bundle branch block (LBBB and RBBB) Electrocardiogram (ECG) patterns. The electrical impulses that control the cardiac beat face difficulty in moving inside the heart. This problem is termed as bundle branch block (BBB). BBB makes it harder for the heart to pump blood effectively through the heart circulatory system. ECG feature extraction is a key process in detecting heart ailments. Our present study comes up with a hybrid method combining two heuristic optimization methods: Bacterial Forging Optimization (BFO) and Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) for the feature selection of ECG signals. One of the major controlling forces of BFO algorithm is the chemotactic movement of a bacterium that models a test solution. The chemotaxis process of the BFO depends on random search directions which may lead to a delay in achieving the global optimum solution. The hybrid technique: Bacterial Forging-Particle Swarm Optimization (BFPSO) incorporates the concepts from BFO and PSO and it creates individuals in a new generation. This BFPSO method performs local search through the chemotactic movement of BFO and the global search over the entire search domain is accomplished by a PSO operator. The BFPSO feature values are given as the input for the Levenberg-Marquardt Neural Network classifier.

  6. Influence of Particle Size on Properties of Expanded Graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurajica, S

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Expanded graphite has been applied widely in thermal insulation, adsorption, vibration damping, gasketing, electromagnetic interference shielding etc. It is made by intercalation of natural flake graphite followed by thermal expansion. Intercalation is a process whereby an intercalant material is inserted between the graphene layers of a graphite crystal. Exfoliation, a huge unidirectional expansion of the starting intercalated flakes, occurs when the graphene layers are forced apart by the sudden decomposition and vaporization of the intercalated species by thermal shock. Along with production methodologies, such as the intercalation process and heat treatment, the raw material characteristics, especially particle size, strongly influence the properties of the final product.This report evaluates the influence of the particle size of the raw material on the intercalation and expansion processes and consequently the properties of the exfoliated graphite. Natural crystalline flake graphite with wide particle diameter distribution (between dp = 80 and 425 µm was divided into four size-range portions by sieving. Graphite was intercalated via perchloric acid, glacial acetic acid and potassium dichromate oxidation and intercalation procedure. 5.0 g of graphite, 7.0 g of perchloric acid, 4.0 g of glacial acetic acid and 2.0 g of potassium dichromate were placed in glass reactor. The mixture was stirred with n = 200 min–1 at temperature of 45 °C during 60 min. Then it was filtered and washed with distilled water until pH~6 and dried at 60 °C during 24 h. Expansion was accomplished by thermal shock at 1000 °C for 1 min. The prepared samples were characterized by means of exfoliation volume measurements, simultaneous differential thermal analysis and thermo-gravimetry (DTA/TGA, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, BET measurements and scanning electron microscopy (SEM.X-ray diffraction indicated a change of distance

  7. Tokamak dust particle size and surface area measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmack, W.J.; Smolik, G.R.; Anderl, R.A.; Pawelko, R.J.; Hembree, P.B.

    1998-07-01

    The INEEL has analyzed a variety of dust samples from experimental tokamaks: General Atomics` DII-D, Massachusetts Institute of Technology`s Alcator CMOD, and Princeton`s TFTR. These dust samples were collected and analyzed because of the importance of dust to safety. The dust may contain tritium, be activated, be chemically toxic, and chemically reactive. The INEEL has carried out numerous characterization procedures on the samples yielding information useful both to tokamak designers and to safety researchers. Two different methods were used for particle characterization: optical microscopy (count based) and laser based volumetric diffraction (mass based). Surface area of the dust samples was measured using Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller, BET, a gas adsorption technique. The purpose of this paper is to present the correlation between the particle size measurements and the surface area measurements for tokamak dust.

  8. How does particle size influence caking in lactose powder?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carpin, Melanie Anne; Bertelsen, H.; Dalberg, A.

    2017-01-01

    Particle size distribution (PSD) is known to influence product properties such as flowability and compressibility. When producing crystalline lactose, different steps can affect the PSD of the final powder. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of PSD on caking and the mechanisms...... involved. Smaller particles showed higher moisture sorption and a greater caking tendency, measured by dynamic vapor sorption and ring shear testing, respectively. Therefore, moisture sorption isotherms appeared as a valuable tool to predict the effect of PSD on humidity caking, as confirmed by the results...... of ring shear testing. Controlling the amount of fines, characterized by a higher content of impurities, a larger specific surface area and a broader span of the PSD, was found critical to limit caking. More precisely, both the total surface area and the span of the PSD require close attention as they can...

  9. Aerosol particle size distributions in the lower Fraser Valley: evidence for particle nucleation and growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mozurkewich

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Particle size distributions from 9 to 640nm diameter were measured at Eagle Ridge in the lower Fraser Valley from 13 August to 1 September 2001 as part of the Pacific 2001 Air Quality Study. The site was on top of a ridge, about 300m above the valley floor, in a predominantly agricultural area about 70km ESE of Vancouver. To further characterize the particles, their hygroscopic properties (affinity for water were measured. The maximum of the number distributions was generally between 40 and 100nm diameter, but the number distribution was sometimes dominated by ultrafine particles with diameters below 40nm. These ultrafine particles, which appeared to some extent on all days, were frequently associated with elevated levels of CO and NOx, as expected for fresh vehicular emissions. The appearance of these fresh emissions was most pronounced when the growing mixed layer reached the altitude of the site. In contrast, pronounced nucleation events occurred on the five cleanest days; these resulted in particle number concentrations as high as 5x104 particles cm-3 and growth rates of 5 to 10nmhr-1. Nucleation appears to have been triggered when the UV flux reached about 25Wm-2. The growth of these newly formed particles was probably driven by the photochemical oxidation of biogenic organic compounds. Dramatic growth events were also observed on the afternoons of the more polluted days; these produced an extremely narrow mode σ<0.3 at a diameter of about 40nm. Rainy days showed low number concentrations with the size distributions shifted to small sizes. On one of these days there was evidence of nucleation not far from the site; this may have been occurring in the vicinity of the clouds.

  10. Statistical properties of the normalized ice particle size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delanoë, Julien; Protat, Alain; Testud, Jacques; Bouniol, Dominique; Heymsfield, A. J.; Bansemer, A.; Brown, P. R. A.; Forbes, R. M.

    2005-05-01

    Testud et al. (2001) have recently developed a formalism, known as the "normalized particle size distribution (PSD)", which consists in scaling the diameter and concentration axes in such a way that the normalized PSDs are independent of water content and mean volume-weighted diameter. In this paper we investigate the statistical properties of the normalized PSD for the particular case of ice clouds, which are known to play a crucial role in the Earth's radiation balance. To do so, an extensive database of airborne in situ microphysical measurements has been constructed. A remarkable stability in shape of the normalized PSD is obtained. The impact of using a single analytical shape to represent all PSDs in the database is estimated through an error analysis on the instrumental (radar reflectivity and attenuation) and cloud (ice water content, effective radius, terminal fall velocity of ice crystals, visible extinction) properties. This resulted in a roughly unbiased estimate of the instrumental and cloud parameters, with small standard deviations ranging from 5 to 12%. This error is found to be roughly independent of the temperature range. This stability in shape and its single analytical approximation implies that two parameters are now sufficient to describe any normalized PSD in ice clouds: the intercept parameter N*0 and the mean volume-weighted diameter Dm. Statistical relationships (parameterizations) between N*0 and Dm have then been evaluated in order to reduce again the number of unknowns. It has been shown that a parameterization of N*0 and Dm by temperature could not be envisaged to retrieve the cloud parameters. Nevertheless, Dm-T and mean maximum dimension diameter -T parameterizations have been derived and compared to the parameterization of Kristjánsson et al. (2000) currently used to characterize particle size in climate models. The new parameterization generally produces larger particle sizes at any temperature than the Kristjánsson et al. (2000

  11. Experimental investigation of suspended particles transport through porous media: particle and grain size effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Quansheng; Cui, Xianze; Zhang, Chengyuan; Huang, Shibing

    2016-01-01

    Particle and grain size may influence the transportation and deposition characteristics of particles within pollutant transport and within granular filters that are typically used in wastewater treatment. We conducted two-dimensional sandbox experiments using quartz powder as the particles and quartz sand as the porous medium to study the response of transportation and deposition formation to changes in particle diameter (ds, with median diameter 18, 41, and 82 μm) and grain diameter (dp, with median diameter 0.36, 1.25, and 2.82 mm) considering a wide range of diameter ratios (ds/dp) from 0.0064 to 0.228. Particles were suspended in deionized water, and quartz sand was used as the porous medium, which was meticulously cleaned to minimize any physicochemical and impurities effects that could result in indeterminate results. After the experiments, the particle concentration of the effluent and particle mass per gram of dry sands were measured to explore changes in transportation and deposition characteristics under different conditions. In addition, a micro-analysis was conducted to better analyse the results on a mesoscopic scale. The experimental observation analyses indicate that different diameter ratios (ds/dp) may lead to different deposit formations. As ds/dp increased, the deposit formation changed from 'Random Deposition Type' to 'Gradient Deposition Type', and eventually became 'Inlet Deposition Type'.

  12. Interactions of tallow and hay particle size on yield and composition of milk from lactating Holstein cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, T C; Bertrand, J A; Bridges, W C

    1998-05-01

    An 18-wk lactation study was conducted to determine whether the effects of tallow on the lactation performance of dairy cows were influenced by particle size of hay in the ration. A total mixed ration containing 50% concentrate, 25% corn silage, and 25% alfalfa hay (dry matter basis) was fed to Holstein cows. Four total mixed rations were developed based on differences in the percentage of tallow in the concentrate and particle size of alfalfa hay: 1) 0% tallow, long-cut hay; 2) 0% tallow, short-cut hay; 3) 5% tallow, long-cut hay; and 4) 5% tallow, short-cut hay. Ration had no effect on dry matter intake, body weight gain or change in body condition score. Tallow increased milk and milk protein yields but reduced milk protein concentration. However, the effects of tallow on milk and milk protein yields were the same, regardless of hay length in the ration. A tendency for an interaction of tallow and hay particle size was detected for fat-corrected milk (FCM) because tallow increased FCM more when hay was short. Ration had no effect on volatile fatty acids in ruminal samples collected via a stomach tube. In this study, the effects of tallow on milk yield and composition from Holstein cows were the same, regardless of hay particle size in the ration. The tendency for tallow to increase FCM more when hay was short suggests at least a limited role of forage particle size in the determination of how fat supplements in dairy rations affect lactation performance.

  13. Particle Size Effect in Granular Composite Aluminum/tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Po-Hsun; Wang, Sophia; Vitali, Efrem; Herbold, Eric B.; Benson, David J.; Nesterenko, Vitali F.

    2009-12-01

    Compressive dynamic strength and fracture pattern of Al-W granular composites with an identical weight ratio of Al (23.8 wt%) and W (76.2 wt%) with different porosities, size and shape of W component were investigated at strain rates 1000-1500 l/s. Samples were fabricated by Cold Isostatic Pressing. A dynamic strength of composites with fine W particles (100 MPa) was significantly larger than the strength of composite with the coarse W particles (75 MPa) at the same porosity 26% (samples with porosity 15% with coarse W particles exhibited a higher strength of 175 MPa). Morphology of W inclusions had a strong effect on dynamic strength. Samples with W wires arranged in axial direction (diameter 100 microns) and porosity 16%) with the same volume content of components had a dynamic strength of 350 MPa. Dynamic behavior was numerically simulated using computer code Raven, demonstrating a strain hardening effect due to in situ densification which was observed experimentally for cold isostatically pressed Al and Al-coarse W powders.

  14. Particle size effect on velocity of gold particle embedded laser driven plastic targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhareshwar, L. J.; Chaurasia, S.; Manmohan, K.; Badziak, J.; Wolowski, J.; Kasperczuk, A.; Pisarczyk, T.; Ryc, L.; Rosinski, M.; Parys, P.; Pisarczyk, P.; Ullschmidt, J.; Krousky, E.; Masek, K.

    2013-11-01

    A scheme to enhance the target foil velocity has been investigated for a direct drive inertial fusion target. Polymer PVA (polyvinyl alcohol or (C2H4O)n) target foils of thickness 15-20 μm were used in plain form and also embedded with gold in the nano-particle (Au-np) or micro-particle (Au-mp) form. Nano-particles were of 20-50 nm and micro-particles of 2-3 μm in size. 17% higher target velocity was measured for foils embedded with nano-particle gold (Au-np) as compared to targets embedded with micro-particles gold (Au-mp). The weight of gold in both cases was in the range 40-55% of the full target weight (atomic percentage of about 22%). Experiments were performed with the single beam of the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS) at 0.43 μm wavelength (3ω of the fundamental wavelength), 120 Joule energy and 300 psec pulse duration. Laser intensity on the target was about 1015 W/cm2. A simple model has been proposed to explain the experimental results.

  15. Particle size effect on velocity of gold particle embedded laser driven plastic targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhareshwar L.J.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A scheme to enhance the target foil velocity has been investigated for a direct drive inertial fusion target. Polymer PVA (polyvinyl alcohol or (C2H4On target foils of thickness 15–20 μm were used in plain form and also embedded with gold in the nano-particle (Au-np or micro-particle (Au-mp form. Nano-particles were of 20–50 nm and micro-particles of 2–3 μm in size. 17% higher target velocity was measured for foils embedded with nano-particle gold (Au-np as compared to targets embedded with micro-particles gold (Au-mp. The weight of gold in both cases was in the range 40–55% of the full target weight (atomic percentage of about 22%. Experiments were performed with the single beam of the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS at 0.43 μm wavelength (3ω of the fundamental wavelength, 120 Joule energy and 300 psec pulse duration. Laser intensity on the target was about 1015 W/cm2. A simple model has been proposed to explain the experimental results.

  16. Size Resolved High Temperature Oxidation Kinetics of Nano-Sized Titanium and Zirconium Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Yichen; Jacob, Rohit J; Li, Shuiqing; Zachariah, Michael R

    2015-06-18

    While ultrafine metal particles offer the possibility of very high energy density fuels, there is considerable uncertainty in the mechanism by which metal nanoparticles burn, and few studies that have examined the size dependence to their kinetics at the nanoscale. In this work we quantify the size dependence to the burning rate of titanium and zirconium nanoparticles. Nanoparticles in the range of 20-150 nm were produced via pulsed laser ablation, and then in-flight size-selected using differential electrical mobility. The size-selected oxide free metal particles were directly injected into the post flame region of a laminar flame to create a high temperature (1700-2500 K) oxidizing environment. The reaction was monitored using high-speed videography by tracking the emission from individual nanoparticles. We find that sintering occurs prior to significant reaction, and that once sintering is accounted for, the rate of combustion follows a near nearly (diameter)(1) power-law dependence. Additionally, Arrhenius parameters for the combustion of these nanoparticles were evaluated by measuring the burn times at different ambient temperatures. The optical emission from combustion was also used to model the oxidation process, which we find can be reasonably described with a kinetically controlled shrinking core model.

  17. Use of a magnetic fluid for particle size analysis by a sedimentation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dikansky, Yury [Department of Physics, Stavropol State University, 1 Pushkin Street, Stavropol 355009 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: dikansky@mail.ru; Zakinyan, Arthur; Bedganian, Marita [Department of Physics, Stavropol State University, 1 Pushkin Street, Stavropol 355009 (Russian Federation)

    2009-05-15

    A new method of particle size analysis of micrometer-sized particles is discussed. The improved method of sedimentation analysis with magnetic fluids has the potential and versatility to characterize polydisperse systems.

  18. Measurement of Size-dependent Dynamic Shape Factors of Quartz Particles in Two Flow Regimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, Jennifer M.; Bell, David M.; Imre, D.; Kleiber, Paul; Grassian, Vicki H.; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2016-08-02

    Understanding and modeling the behavior of quartz dust particles, commonly found in the atmosphere, requires knowledge of many relevant particles properties, including particle shape. This study uses a single particle mass spectrometer, a differential mobility analyzer, and an aerosol particle mass analyzer to measure quartz aerosol particles mobility, aerodynamic, and volume equivalent diameters, mass, composition, effective density, and dynamic shape factor as a function of particle size, in both the free molecular and transition flow regimes. The results clearly demonstrate that dynamic shape factors can vary significantly as a function of particle size. For the quartz samples studied here, the dynamic shape factors increase with size, indicating that larger particles are significantly more aspherical than smaller particles. In addition, dynamic shape factors measured in the free-molecular (χv) and transition (χt) flow regimes can be significantly different, and these differences vary with the size of the quartz particles. For quartz, χv of small (d < 200 nm) particles is 1.25, while χv of larger particles (d ~ 440 nm) is 1.6, with a continuously increasing trend with particle size. In contrast χt, of small particles starts at 1.1 increasing slowly to 1.34 for 550 nm diameter particles. The multidimensional particle characterization approach used here goes beyond determination of average properties for each size, to provide additional information about how the particle dynamic shape factor may vary even for particles with the same mass and volume equivalent diameter.

  19. Particle sizing of airborne radioactivity field measurements at Olympic Dam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, S.B.; Wilkis, M.; O`Brein, R.; Ganakas, G.

    1993-12-01

    On July 1, 1991 the Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL) commenced a two year project entitled - Particle sizing of airborne radioactivity, funded by a Mining and Quarrying Occupational Health and Safety Committee - grant (submission No. 9138). This study was set out to measure airborne radioactivity size distributions in an underground uranium mine, in order to provide better estimates of the health risks associated with inhalation of airborne radiation in the work place. These measurements included both active and passive measurement of radon gas, continuous and spot sample of radon daughter levels, as well as wire screen diffusion battery measurements of the radon daughter size distributions. The results of measurements at over 50 sites within the mine are reported, together with the calculated dose conversion factors derived from the older dosimetric models and from the new ICRP lung model using the computer code RADEP. The results showed that the ventilation is relatively uniform within the mine and the radon daughter concentrations are kept to less than 20% of the equilibrium concentration. The radon and radon daughter concentrations showed marked variability with both time and position within the mine. It is concluded that the present radiation protection methods and dose conversion factors used in Australia provide a good estimate of the radiation risk for the inhalation of radon progeny. 29 refs., 8 tabs., 9 figs.

  20. Matching forage systems with cow size and environment for sustainable cow-calf production in the southern region

    Science.gov (United States)

    There has been increased interest in intensification of cow-calf production due to an increasing world population and red meat demand along with reductions in available grazing lands. Intensified production can come about by increasing fertilization, supplementation, or feeding of stored forages, bu...

  1. Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) particles prepared by microfluidics and conventional methods. Modulated particle size and rheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Aurora; Hernández, Rebeca; Velasco, Diego; Voicu, Dan; Mijangos, Carmen

    2015-03-01

    Microfluidic techniques are expected to provide narrower particle size distribution than conventional methods for the preparation of poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles. Besides, it is hypothesized that the particle size distribution of poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) microparticles influences the settling behavior and rheological properties of its aqueous dispersions. For the preparation of PLGA particles, two different methods, microfluidic and conventional oil-in-water emulsification methods were employed. The particle size and particle size distribution of PLGA particles prepared by microfluidics were studied as a function of the flow rate of the organic phase while particles prepared by conventional methods were studied as a function of stirring rate. In order to study the stability and structural organization of colloidal dispersions, settling experiments and oscillatory rheological measurements were carried out on aqueous dispersions of PLGA particles with different particle size distributions. Microfluidics technique allowed the control of size and size distribution of the droplets formed in the process of emulsification. This resulted in a narrower particle size distribution for samples prepared by MF with respect to samples prepared by conventional methods. Polydisperse samples showed a larger tendency to aggregate, thus confirming the advantages of microfluidics over conventional methods, especially if biomedical applications are envisaged. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mixtures of organic and inorganic substrates, particle size and proportion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Raymundo Morales-Maldonado

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper was to review the mixtures of organic and inorganic materials used in the preparation of a new material, particle size, proportion, and their response in plant. In Mexico, agricultural waste is considered as a pollutant reservoir; however, from another perspective, this represents an industry with great potential. The nutrients ingested by animals represent nutriments available for plants when properly recycled. An option that minimizes the risk of contamination and improves its quality is the production of compost and vermicompost. Both processes are an alternative to organic production. A material by itself does not meet the optimum conditions. Reducing the volume of an organic material increases compaction and compression of roots, affecting the efficiency of irrigation and fertilization, so it is necessary to make mixtures with inorganic materials, that is used in the development of a new material for better growing conditions of the plant.

  3. Reinforced polypropylene composites: effects of chemical compositions and particle size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashori, Alireza; Nourbakhsh, Amir

    2010-04-01

    In this work, the effects of wood species, particle sizes and hot-water treatment on some physical and mechanical properties of wood-plastic composites were studied. Composites of thermoplastic reinforced with oak (Quercus castaneifolia) and pine (Pinus eldarica) wood were prepared. Polypropylene (PP) and maleic anhydride grafted polypropylene (MAPP) were used as the polymer matrix and coupling agent, respectively. The results showed that pine fiber had significant effect on the mechanical properties considered in this study. This effect is explained by the higher fiber length and aspect ratio of pine compared to the oak fiber. The hot-water treated (extractive-free) samples, in both wood species, improved the tensile, flexural and impact properties, but increased the water absorption for 24h. This work clearly showed that lignocellulosic materials in both forms of fiber and flour could be effectively used as reinforcing elements in PP matrix. Furthermore, extractives have marked effects on the mechanical and physical properties.

  4. Control over Particle Size Distribution by Autoclaving Poloxamer-Stabilized Trimyristin Nanodispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göke, Katrin; Roese, Elin; Arnold, Andreas; Kuntsche, Judith; Bunjes, Heike

    2016-09-06

    Lipid nanoparticles are under investigation as delivery systems for poorly water-soluble drugs. The particle size in these dispersions strongly influences important pharmaceutical properties like biodistribution and drug loading capacity; it should be below 500 nm for direct injection into the bloodstream. Consequently, small particles with a narrow particle size distribution are desired. Hitherto, there are, however, only limited possibilities for the preparation of monodisperse, pharmaceutically relevant dispersions. In this work, the effect of autoclaving at 121 °C on the particle size distribution of lipid nanoemulsions and -suspensions consisting of the pharmaceutically relevant components trimyristin and poloxamer 188 was studied. Additionally, the amount of emulsifier needed to stabilize both untreated and autoclaved particles was assessed. In our study, four dispersions of mean particle sizes from 45 to 150 nm were prepared by high-pressure melt homogenization. The particle size distribution before and after autoclaving was characterized using static and dynamic light scattering, differential scanning calorimetry, and transmission electron microscopy. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation was used for particle size distribution analyses and for the determination of free poloxamer 188. Upon autoclaving, the mean particle size increased to up to 200 nm, but not proportionally to the initial size. At the same time, the particle size distribution width decreased remarkably. Heat treatment thus seems to be a promising approach to achieve the desired narrow particle size distribution of such dispersions. Related to the lipid content, suspension particles needed more emulsifier for stabilization than emulsion droplets, and smaller particles more than larger ones.

  5. Note: Evaluation of slurry particle size analyzers for chemical mechanical planarization process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sunjae; Kulkarni, Atul; Qin, Hongyi; Kim, Taesung

    2016-04-01

    In the chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) process, slurry particle size is important because large particles can cause defects. Hence, selection of an appropriate particle measuring system is necessary in the CMP process. In this study, a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) were compared for particle size distribution (PSD) measurements. In addition, the actual particle size and shape were confirmed by transmission electron microscope (TEM) results. SMPS classifies the particle size according to the electrical mobility, and measures the particle concentration (single particle measurement). On the other hand, the DLS measures the particle size distribution by analyzing scattered light from multiple particles (multiple particle measurement). For the slurry particles selected for evaluation, it is observed that SMPS shows bi-modal particle sizes 30 nm and 80 nm, which closely matches with the TEM measurements, whereas DLS shows only single mode distribution in the range of 90 nm to 100 nm and showing incapability of measuring small particles. Hence, SMPS can be a better choice for the evaluation of CMP slurry particle size and concentration measurements.

  6. Note: Evaluation of slurry particle size analyzers for chemical mechanical planarization process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Sunjae; Kulkarni, Atul [School of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Qin, Hongyi [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nano Technology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Taesung, E-mail: tkim@skku.edu [School of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); SKKU Advanced Institute of Nano Technology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    In the chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) process, slurry particle size is important because large particles can cause defects. Hence, selection of an appropriate particle measuring system is necessary in the CMP process. In this study, a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) were compared for particle size distribution (PSD) measurements. In addition, the actual particle size and shape were confirmed by transmission electron microscope (TEM) results. SMPS classifies the particle size according to the electrical mobility, and measures the particle concentration (single particle measurement). On the other hand, the DLS measures the particle size distribution by analyzing scattered light from multiple particles (multiple particle measurement). For the slurry particles selected for evaluation, it is observed that SMPS shows bi-modal particle sizes 30 nm and 80 nm, which closely matches with the TEM measurements, whereas DLS shows only single mode distribution in the range of 90 nm to 100 nm and showing incapability of measuring small particles. Hence, SMPS can be a better choice for the evaluation of CMP slurry particle size and concentration measurements.

  7. Note: Evaluation of slurry particle size analyzers for chemical mechanical planarization process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sunjae; Kulkarni, Atul; Qin, Hongyi; Kim, Taesung

    2016-04-01

    In the chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) process, slurry particle size is important because large particles can cause defects. Hence, selection of an appropriate particle measuring system is necessary in the CMP process. In this study, a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) were compared for particle size distribution (PSD) measurements. In addition, the actual particle size and shape were confirmed by transmission electron microscope (TEM) results. SMPS classifies the particle size according to the electrical mobility, and measures the particle concentration (single particle measurement). On the other hand, the DLS measures the particle size distribution by analyzing scattered light from multiple particles (multiple particle measurement). For the slurry particles selected for evaluation, it is observed that SMPS shows bi-modal particle sizes 30 nm and 80 nm, which closely matches with the TEM measurements, whereas DLS shows only single mode distribution in the range of 90 nm to 100 nm and showing incapability of measuring small particles. Hence, SMPS can be a better choice for the evaluation of CMP slurry particle size and concentration measurements.

  8. Ultrafine particle size as a tracer for aircraft turbine emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Erin A; Gould, Timothy; Hartin, Kris; Fruin, Scott A; Simpson, Christopher D; Yost, Michael G; Larson, Timothy

    2016-08-01

    Ultrafine particle number (UFPN) and size distributions, black carbon, and nitrogen dioxide concentrations were measured downwind of two of the busiest airports in the world, Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) and Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport (ATL - Atlanta, GA) using a mobile monitoring platform. Transects were located between 5 km and 10 km from the ATL and LAX airports. In addition, measurements were taken at 43 additional urban neighborhood locations in each city and on freeways. We found a 3-5 fold increase in UFPN concentrations in transects under the landing approach path to both airports relative to surrounding urban areas with similar ground traffic characteristics. The latter UFPN concentrations measured were distinct in size distributional properties from both freeways and across urban neighborhoods, clearly indicating different sources. Elevated concentrations of Black Carbon (BC) and NO2 were also observed on airport transects, and the corresponding pattern of elevated BC was consistent with the observed excess UFPN concentrations relative to other urban locations.

  9. Vertical Variation of Ice Particle Size in Convective Cloud Tops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Fridlind, Ann M.; Cairns, Brian; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Yorks, John E.

    2016-01-01

    A novel technique is used to estimate derivatives of ice effective radius with respect to height near convective cloud tops (dr(sub e)/dz) from airborne shortwave reflectance measurements and lidar. Values of dr(sub e)/dz are about -6 micrometer/km for cloud tops below the homogeneous freezing level, increasing to near 0 micrometer/km above the estimated level of neutral buoyancy. Retrieved dr(sub e)/dz compares well with previously documented remote sensing and in situ estimates. Effective radii decrease with increasing cloud top height, while cloud top extinction increases. This is consistent with weaker size sorting in high, dense cloud tops above the level of neutral buoyancy where fewer large particles are present and with stronger size sorting in lower cloud tops that are less dense. The results also confirm that cloud top trends of effective radius can generally be used as surrogates for trends with height within convective cloud tops. These results provide valuable observational targets for model evaluation.

  10. Particle size effects on protein and virus-like particle adsorption on perfusion chromatography media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yige; Abraham, Dicky; Carta, Giorgio

    2015-01-02

    The resin structure, chromatographic behavior, and adsorption kinetics of proteins and virus-like-particles (VLPs) are studied for POROS HS 20 and POROS HS 50 (23 and 52 μm mean diameter, respectively) to determine the effects of particle size on perfusion chromatography and to determine the predictive ability of available models. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and inverse size-exclusion chromatography (iSEC) show similar structures for the two resins, both containing 200-1000 nm pores that transect a network of much smaller pores. For non-binding conditions, trends of the height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP) as a function of reduced velocity are consistent with perfusion. The estimated intraparticle flow fractions for these conditions are 0.0018 and 0.00063 for POROS HS 20 and HS 50, respectively. For strong binding conditions, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) shows asymmetrical intraparticle concentrations profiles and enhanced rates of IgG adsorption on POROS HS 20 at 1000 cm/h. The corresponding effective diffusivity under flow is 2-3 times larger than for non-flow conditions and much larger than observed for POROS HS 50, consistent with available models. For VLPs, however, adsorption is confined to a thin layer near the particle surface for both resins, suggesting that the bound VLPs block the pores.

  11. The permeability of poly-disperse porous media and effective particle size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markicevic, B. I.; Preston, C.; Osterroth, S.; Iliev, O.; Hurwitz, M.

    2015-11-01

    The interactions between the fluid and solid phases in porous media account for the openness and length of the flow path that the fluid needs to travel within. The same reasoning applies for both mono- and poly-disperse media, and is reflected in the adoption of the same permeability models. The only difference is that an effective particle size diameter has to be used for the poly-disperse samples. A filtration experiment is used to form a particle layer, filter cake, consisting of particles of different sizes. Both inflow and outflow particle size distribution are measured by particle counting method, and from their difference, the particle size distribution in the cake is determined. In a set of experiments, the filtration history is altered by changing (i) filtration medium; (ii) suspension flow rate; and (iii) particle concentration, where in all cases investigated the cake permeability remains constant. In order to predict the permeability of poly-disperse cake from the analytical models, the particle size distribution moments are calculated, and the permeability is found for each moment. Comparing the experimental to the analytical permeability values the effective particle size is found, where the permeability calculated by using the harmonic mean of the particle size distribution reproduces the permeability experimental value best. Finally, in the parametric study, reducing the cake porosity and/or lowering the particle retention shifts effective particle size used in the permeability model toward higher moments of the particle size distribution function.

  12. [Size distributions of organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) in Shanghai atmospheric particles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guang-Hua; Wei, Nan-Nan; Liu, Wei; Lin, Jun; Fan, Xue-Bo; Yao, Jian; Geng, Yan-Hong; Li, Yu-Lan; Li, Yan

    2010-09-01

    Size distributions of organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC) and secondary organic carbon (SOC) in atmospheric particles with size range from 7.20 microm, collected in Jiading District, Shanghai were determined. For estimating size distribution of SOC in these atmospheric particles, a method of determining (OC/EC)(pri) in atmospheric particles with different sizes was discussed and developed, with which SOC was estimated. According to the correlation between OC and EC, main sources of the particles were also estimated roughly. The size distributions of OC and SOC showed a bi-modal with peaks in the particles with size of 3.0 microm, respectively. EC showed both of a bi-modal and tri-modal. Compared with OC, EC was preferably enriched in particles with size of particles (particles. OC and EC were preferably enriched in fine particles (particles with different sizes accounted for 15.7%-79.1% of OC in the particles with corresponding size. Concentrations of SOC in fine aerosols ( 3.00 microm) accounted for 41.4% and 43.5% of corresponding OC. Size distributions of OC, EC and SOC showed time-dependence. The correlation between OC and EC showed that the main contribution to atmospheric particles in Jiading District derived from light petrol vehicles exhaust.

  13. Effect of the Size Distribution of Nanoscale Dispersed Particles on the Zener Drag Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eivani, A. R.; Valipour, S.; Ahmed, H.; Zhou, J.; Duszczyk, J.

    2011-04-01

    In this article, a new relationship for the calculation of the Zener drag pressure is described in which the effect of the size distribution of nanoscale dispersed particles is taken into account, in addition to particle radius and volume fraction, which have been incorporated in the existing relationships. Microstructural observations indicated a clear correlation between the size distribution of dispersed particles and recrystallized grain sizes in the AA7020 aluminum alloy. However, the existing relationship to calculate the Zener drag pressure yielded a negligible difference of 0.016 pct between the two structures homogenized at different conditions resulting in totally different size distributions of nanoscale dispersed particles and, consequently, recrystallized grain sizes. The difference in the Zener drag pressure calculated by the application of the new relationship was 5.1 pct, being in line with the experimental observations of the recrystallized grain sizes. Mathematical investigations showed that the ratio of the Zener drag pressure from the new equation to that from the existing equation is maximized when the number densities of all the particles with different sizes are equal. This finding indicates that in the two structures with identical parameters except the size distribution of nanoscale dispersed particles, the one that possesses a broader size distribution of particles, i.e., the number densities of particles with different sizes being equal, gives rise to a larger Zener drag pressure than that having a narrow size distribution of nanoscale dispersed particles, i.e., most of the particles being in the same size range.

  14. ESTIMATING SOIL PARTICLE-SIZE DISTRIBUTION FOR SICILIAN SOILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Bagarello

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The soil particle-size distribution (PSD is commonly used for soil classification and for estimating soil behavior. An accurate mathematical representation of the PSD is required to estimate soil hydraulic properties and to compare texture measurements from different classification systems. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of the Haverkamp and Parlange (HP and Fredlund et al. (F PSD models to fit 243 measured PSDs from a wide range of 38 005_Bagarello(547_33 18-11-2009 11:55 Pagina 38 soil textures in Sicily and to test the effect of the number of measured particle diameters on the fitting of the theoretical PSD. For each soil textural class, the best fitting performance, established using three statistical indices (MXE, ME, RMSE, was obtained for the F model with three fitting parameters. In particular, this model performed better in the fine-textured soils than the coarse-textured ones but a good performance (i.e., RMSE < 0.03 was detected for the majority of the investigated soil textural classes, i.e. clay, silty-clay, silty-clay-loam, silt-loam, clay-loam, loamy-sand, and loam classes. Decreasing the number of measured data pairs from 14 to eight determined a worse fitting of the theoretical distribution to the measured one. It was concluded that the F model with three fitting parameters has a wide applicability for Sicilian soils and that the comparison of different PSD investigations can be affected by the number of measured data pairs.

  15. Carbon-based phytoplankton size classes retrieved via ocean color estimates of the particle size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostadinov, Tihomir S.; Milutinović, Svetlana; Marinov, Irina; Cabré, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Owing to their important roles in biogeochemical cycles, phytoplankton functional types (PFTs) have been the aim of an increasing number of ocean color algorithms. Yet, none of the existing methods are based on phytoplankton carbon (C) biomass, which is a fundamental biogeochemical and ecological variable and the "unit of accounting" in Earth system models. We present a novel bio-optical algorithm to retrieve size-partitioned phytoplankton carbon from ocean color satellite data. The algorithm is based on existing methods to estimate particle volume from a power-law particle size distribution (PSD). Volume is converted to carbon concentrations using a compilation of allometric relationships. We quantify absolute and fractional biomass in three PFTs based on size - picophytoplankton (0.5-2 µm in diameter), nanophytoplankton (2-20 µm) and microphytoplankton (20-50 µm). The mean spatial distributions of total phytoplankton C biomass and individual PFTs, derived from global text">SeaWiFS monthly ocean color data, are consistent with current understanding of oceanic ecosystems, i.e., oligotrophic regions are characterized by low biomass and dominance of picoplankton, whereas eutrophic regions have high biomass to which nanoplankton and microplankton contribute relatively larger fractions. Global climatological, spatially integrated phytoplankton carbon biomass standing stock estimates using our PSD-based approach yield ˜ 0.25 Gt of C, consistent with analogous estimates from two other ocean color algorithms and several state-of-the-art Earth system models. Satisfactory in situ closure observed between PSD and POC measurements lends support to the theoretical basis of the PSD-based algorithm. Uncertainty budget analyses indicate that absolute carbon concentration uncertainties are driven by the PSD parameter No which determines particle number concentration to first order, while uncertainties in PFTs' fractional contributions to total C biomass are mostly due to the

  16. Size effect on solid solid reaction growth between Cu film and Se particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaito, Chihiro; Nonaka, Akira; Kimura, Seiji; Suzuki, Nobuhiko; Saito, Yoshio

    1998-03-01

    A recently developed experimental method of producing a compound by making use of the reaction between thin film and ultrafine particles has been used for copper selenide crystal formation to elucidate the particle size effect on the reaction process. In the case of reaction between Cu film Se particles with size of μm order, CuSe crystals were grown on Se particles by the diffusion of predominantly Cu atoms. In the case of Se particles of the order of 100 nm, amorphous Se particles changed into copper selenide particles by the mutual diffusion of Cu and Se atoms. If the size of Se particles was less than 20 nm, a part of the Cu film changed to copper selenide crystal due to the diffusion of Se atoms to the Cu film. Morphological differences have also been shown and discussed to be the result of the particle size effect.

  17. Particle-size segregation in dense granular avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, John Mark Nicholas Timm; Gajjar, Parmesh; Kokelaar, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Particles of differing sizes are notoriously prone to segregate, which is a chronic problem in the manufacture of a wide variety of products that are used by billions of people worldwide every day. Segregation is the single most important factor in product non-uniformity, which can lead to significant handling problems as well as complete batches being discarded at huge financial loss. It is generally regarded that the most important mechanism for segregation is the combination of kinetic sieving and squeeze expulsion in shallow granular avalanches. These free-surface flows are more common than one might expect, often forming part of more complicated flows in drums, heaps and silos, where there is mass exchange with underlying regions of static or slowly moving grains. The combination of segregation and solid-fluid granular phase transitions creates incredibly complicated and beautiful patterns in the resulting deposits, but a full understanding of such effects lies beyond our capabilities at present. This paper reviews recent advances in our ability to model the basic segregation processes in a single avalanche (without mass exchange) and the subtle feedback effects that they can have on the bulk flow. This is particularly important for geophysical applications, where segregation can spontaneously self-channelize and lubricate the flow, significantly enhancing the run-out of debris-flows, pyroclastic flows, rock-falls and snow-slab avalanches.

  18. CONTROL OF POLYMER PARTICLE SIZE USING POROUS GLASS MEMBRANE EMULSIFICATION A REVIEW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guanghui Ma

    2003-01-01

    Much attention has in recent years been paid to fine applications of polymer particles, e.g., carrier for enzyme, separation media for protein, DNA and cell, and carrier for drug in Drug Delivery System (DDS). Control of polymer particle size is especially important in such fine applications. For instance, when the particles are used as a carrier of anti-cancer agents, the locations of particles containing anti-cancer agents also depend on the size of the particles. In this paper, various techniques of controlling polymer particle size are described, with emphasis on Shirasu Porous Glass (SPG) membrane emulsification, as carried out in our research group.

  19. The effect of size and density on the mean retention time of particles in the reticulorumen of cattle ( Bos primigenius f. taurus), muskoxen ( Ovibos moschatus) and moose ( Alces alces).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauss, Marcus; Lechner, Isabel; Barboza, Perry; Collins, William; Tervoort, Theo A; Südekum, Karl-Heinz; Codron, Daryl; Hummel, Jürgen

    2011-02-01

    Particle passage from the reticulorumen (RR) depends on particle density and size. Forage particle density and size are related and change over time in the RR. Particle density mainly influences sorting in the reticulum, whereas particle size influences particle retention in the fibre mat of stratified rumen contents ('filter-bed' effect). We investigated these effects independently, by inserting plastic particles of different sizes (1, 10 and 20 mm) and densities (1·03, 1·20 and 1·44 mg/ml) in the RR of cattle (Bos primigenius f. taurus) as a pilot study, and of muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus; n 4) and moose (Alces alces; n 2) both fed two diets (browse and grass). Faeces were analysed for plastic residues for 13 d after dosing to calculate mean retention times (MRT). The results confirmed previous findings of differences in absolute MRT between species. Comparing muskoxen with moose, there was no difference in the effect of particle density on the MRT between species but particle size had a more pronounced effect on the MRT in muskoxen than in moose. This indicated a stronger 'filter-bed effect' in muskoxen, in accord with the reports of stratified RR contents in this species v. the absence of RR content stratification in moose. Low-density particles were retained longer in both species fed on grass diets, indicating a contribution of forage type to the 'filter-bed effect'. The results indicate that retention based on particle size may differ between ruminant species, depending on the presence of a fibre mat in the RR, whereas the density-dependent mechanism of sedimentation in the RR is rather constant across species.

  20. Understanding particle size and distance driven competition of interparticle interactions and effective single-particle anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacakova, B.; Mantlikova, A.; Niznansky, D.; Kubickova, S.; Vejpravova, J.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic response of single-domain nanoparticles (NPs) in concentrated systems is strongly affected by mutual interparticle interactions. However, particle proximity significantly influences single-particle effective anisotropy. To solve which of these two phenomena plays a dominant role in the magnetic response of real NP systems, systematic study on samples with well-defined parameters is required. In our work, we prepared a series of nanocomposites constituted of highly-crystalline and well-isolated CoFe2O4 NPs embedded in an amorphous SiO2 matrix using a single-molecule precursor method. This preparation method enabled us to reach a wide interval of particle size and concentration. We observed that the characteristic parameters of the single-domain state (coercivity, blocking temperature) and dipole-dipole interaction energy ({{E}\\text{d-\\text{d}}} ) scaled with each other and increased with increasing {{≤ft({{d}\\text{XRD}}/r\\right)}3} , where d XRD was the NP diameter and r was the interparticle distance. Our results are in excellent agreement with Monte-Carlo simulations of the particle growth. Moreover, we demonstrated that the contribution of {{E}\\text{d-\\text{d}}} acting as an additional energetic barrier to the superspin reversal or as an average static field did not sufficiently explain how the concentrated NP systems responded to an external magnetic field. Alternations in the blocking temperature and coercivity of our NP systems accounted for reformed relaxations of the NP superspins and modified effective anisotropy energy of the interacting NPs. Therefore, the concept of modified NP effective anisotropy explains the magnetic response of our concentrated NP systems better than the concept of the energy barrier influenced by interparticle interactions.

  1. Preparation of gold nanoparticles and determination of their particles size via different methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iqbal, Muhammad; Usanase, Gisele [University of Lyon, University Lyon-1, CNRS, UMR-5007, LAGEP, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Oulmi, Kafia; Aberkane, Fairouz; Bendaikha, Tahar [Laboratory of Chemistry and Environmental Chemistry(LCCE), Faculty of Science, Material Science Department, University of Batna, 05000 (Algeria); Fessi, Hatem [University of Lyon, University Lyon-1, CNRS, UMR-5007, LAGEP, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Zine, Nadia [Institut des Sciences Analytiques (ISA), Université Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon-1, UMR-5180, 5 rue de la Doua, F-69100 Villeurbanne (France); Agusti, Géraldine [University of Lyon, University Lyon-1, CNRS, UMR-5007, LAGEP, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Errachid, El-Salhi [Institut des Sciences Analytiques (ISA), Université Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon-1, UMR-5180, 5 rue de la Doua, F-69100 Villeurbanne (France); Elaissari, Abdelhamid, E-mail: elaissari@lagep.univ-lyon1.fr [University of Lyon, University Lyon-1, CNRS, UMR-5007, LAGEP, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France)

    2016-07-15

    Graphical abstract: Preparation of gold nanoparticles via NaBH{sub 4} reduction method, and determination of their particle size, size distribution and morphology by using different techniques. - Highlights: • Gold nanoparticles were synthesized by NaBH{sub 4} reduction method. • Excess of reducing agent leads to tendency of aggregation. • The particle size, size distribution and morphology were investigated. • Particle size was determined both experimentally as well as theoretically. - Abstract: Gold nanoparticles have been used in various applications covering both electronics, biosensors, in vivo biomedical imaging and in vitro biomedical diagnosis. As a general requirement, gold nanoparticles should be prepared in large scale, easy to be functionalized by chemical compound of by specific ligands or biomolecules. In this study, gold nanoparticles were prepared by using different concentrations of reducing agent (NaBH{sub 4}) in various formulations and their effect on the particle size, size distribution and morphology was investigated. Moreover, special attention has been dedicated to comparison of particles size measured by various techniques, such as, light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, UV spectrum using standard curve and particles size calculated by using Mie theory and UV spectrum of gold nanoparticles dispersion. Particle size determined by various techniques can be correlated for monodispersed particles and excess of reducing agent leads to increase in the particle size.

  2. EFFECT OF MOISTURE CONTENT AND PARTICLE SIZE ON BULK DENSITY, POROSITY, PARTICLE DENSITY AND COEFFICIENT OF FRICTION OF COIR PITH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr.I.Neethi Manickam,

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Coir pith can be used as fuel in loose form or in briquettes. Bulk density, coefficient of friction, porosity and particle density affects densification and combustion of coir pith. The moisture content and particle size ranges were 10.1 to 60.2%w.b. and 0.098 to 0.925mm respectively. Porosity was varied from 0.623 to 0.862 and the particle density was varied from 0.939 to 0.605 gm/cc for the above ranges of moisture content and particle size. Bulk density was in the range of 0.097 to 0.341gm/cc. The coefficient of friction against mild steel was in the range of 0.5043 to 0.6332. Models were developed to find out bulk density, porosity, particle density and coefficient of friction for different moisture content and particle size.

  3. Particle size evolution in non-adhered ductile powders during mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero-Paz, J. [Centro de Investigaciones en Materiales y Metalurgica, UAEH (Mexico); Robles-Hernandez, F.C.; Hernandez-Silva, D.; Jaramillo-Vigueras, D. [Dept. de Ingenieria Metalurgica, ESIQIE - Inst. Politecnico Nacional, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Martinez-Sanchez, R. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, Chihuahua (Mexico)

    2001-07-01

    The interaction among events as deformation, cold-welding and fracture, occurring during the mechanical milling of powders is unclear and controversial. We believe that the understanding of such interaction can be deduced from particle size evolution studies. It is well known that the elemental ductile powders adhere to the milling media. However when some of these powders are combined to form an alloy by milling, the adherence phenomenon is not observed. Systems which include ductile powders, such as, Cu-15at.%Al, Co-68at.%Al and Ni-25at.%Al were processed with not adherence to the milling media, thus allowing to follow up the particle size evolution during the complete milling process. The particle size was measured by the sedimentation-photometry technique. Those results were supported by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The results showed a high proportion near 95% in number of particles of submicrometric size at early milling times for the three systems. However its particle size evolution for each system was different. Such findings can be important to understand some mechanisms as the grain size refinement, the alloy formation and the microstructural evolution. In the studied systems, the particle size measurements are presented based on volume or mass, area, line and number of the particles. The particle size results based on volume and line or number of the particles can give an idea of the evolution of the biggest particles and the finest ones respectively during the milling. Also the behavior of the complete particle system can be deduced from the results based in the area of the particles. Results of particle size as well as observations by microscopy helped to suggest the particle size and shape evolution of the studied systems. Such findings were employed to previously propose a grain size refinement mechanism for ductile powder systems non-adherent to the milling media during the mechanical alloying. (orig.)

  4. Effect of conservation and maturity of primary growth grass/clover on chewing activity and fecal particle size in heifers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Anne-Katrine Skovsted; Nørgaard, Peder; Weisbjerg, Martin Riis

    2013-01-01

    spent eating, but lower mean rumination per kg NDF intake (P=0.002). Hay compared to silage caused higher NDF intake (Pmean time spent eating (P=0.02) and ruminating (P=0.004) in min/kg NDF intake. Feeding silage compared to hay resulted in a higher proportion of washed fecal particle......The study evaluated structural effectiveness of NDF from of spring harvest grass/clover forages of primary growth by assessing chewing activity and feces particles >1.0 mm in heifers. Two batches of mixed ryegrass, red and white clover harvested in 2009 on May 9 and 25 were conserved as either...... and eating and summarized into min per day. Feces were sampled 3 times daily and machine washed in nylon bags of 0.01 mm pore size. Feces particulate matter was freeze dried and divided into small (0-1.0 mm) and large (>1.0 mm) particle fractions by dry sieving. Data was analyzed by the MIXED procedure...

  5. Rates of particle size reduction and passage are faster for legume compared with cool-season grass, resulting in lower rumen fill and less effective fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammes, K L; Allen, M S

    2012-06-01

    Effects of forage family on rates of particle size reduction in, and passage from, the rumen and the relationship of these effects with preliminary dry matter intake (pDMI) were evaluated using 13 ruminally and duodenally cannulated Holstein cows in a crossover design with a 14-d preliminary period and two 18-d treatment periods. During the preliminary period, pDMI of individual cows ranged from 19.6 to 29.5 kg/d (mean = 25.9 kg/d). Experimental treatments were diets containing either a) alfalfa silage (AL) or b) orchardgrass silage (OG) as the sole forage. Silages were chopped to 10-mm theoretical length of cut and contained 42.3 and 58.2% neutral detergent fiber (NDF) for alfalfa and orchardgrass, respectively. Both diets contained approximately 25% forage NDF and 30% total NDF. Feed, orts, rumen, and duodenal samples were wet sieved to fractionate particles above (large) and below (small) 2.36 mm. Indigestible NDF (iNDF) was used as a flow marker. Preliminary DMI, an index of nutrient demand, was determined during the last 4 d of the preliminary period when cows were fed a common diet and used as a covariate. Main effects of forage family and their interaction with pDMI were tested by ANOVA. Approximately 75% of the NDF consumed was large and 25% was small for both treatments, but cows fed AL consumed more iNDF and less potentially digestible NDF (pdNDF) than cows fed OG. The AL diet increased the reduction rate (large to small) compared with OG despite less rumination per unit of forage NDF for AL than OG, suggesting alfalfa NDF was more fragile than orchardgrass NDF. Over 55% of particles in the rumen were below 2.36 mm for AL and OG, indicating that particle size was not a limiting constraint to passage. Passage rates (k(p)) of large iNDF and large pdNDF were similar for AL and OG, but AL increased k(p) of large pdNDF and OG decreased it as pDMI increased. The AL diet increased k(p) of small iNDF and small pdNDF compared with OG, resulting in lower rumen fill

  6. A Hot Spots Ignition Probability Model for Low-Velocity Impacted Explosive Particles Based on the Particle Size and Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-fu Guo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Particle size and distribution play an important role in ignition. The size and distribution of the cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX particles were investigated by Laser Particle Size Analyzer Malvern MS2000 before experiment and calculation. The mean size of particles is 161 μm. Minimum and maximum sizes are 80 μm and 263 μm, respectively. The distribution function is like a quadratic function. Based on the distribution of micron scale explosive particles, a microscopic model is established to describe the process of ignition of HMX particles under drop weight. Both temperature of contact zones and ignition probability of powder explosive can be predicted. The calculated results show that the temperature of the contact zones between the particles and the drop weight surface increases faster and higher than that of the contact zones between two neighboring particles. For HMX particles, with all other conditions being kept constant, if the drop height is less than 0.1 m, ignition probability will be close to 0. When the drop heights are 0.2 m and 0.3 m, the ignition probability is 0.27 and 0.64, respectively, whereas when the drop height is more than 0.4 m, ignition probability will be close to 0.82. In comparison with experimental results, the two curves are reasonably close to each other, which indicates our model has a certain degree of rationality.

  7. Size measurement of radioactive aerosol particles in intense radiation fields using wire screens and imaging plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oki, Yuichi; Tanaka, Toru; Takamiya, Koichi; Ishi, Yoshihiro; UesugI, Tomonori; Kuriyama, Yasutoshi; Sakamoto, Masaaki; Ohtsuki, Tsutomu [Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, Osaka (Japan); Nitta, Shinnosuke [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Osada, Naoyuki [Advanced Science Research Center, Okayama University, Okayama (Japan)

    2016-09-15

    Very fine radiation-induced aerosol particles are produced in intense radiation fields, such as high-intensity accelerator rooms and containment vessels such as those in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP). Size measurement of the aerosol particles is very important for understanding the behavior of radioactive aerosols released in the FDNPP accident and radiation safety in high-energy accelerators. A combined technique using wire screens and imaging plates was developed for size measurement of fine radioactive aerosol particles smaller than 100 nm in diameter. This technique was applied to the radiation field of a proton accelerator room, in which radioactive atoms produced in air during machine operation are incorporated into radiation-induced aerosol particles. The size of 11C-bearing aerosol particles was analyzed using the wire screen technique in distinction from other positron emitters in combination with a radioactive decay analysis. The size distribution for 11C-bearing aerosol particles was found to be ca. 70 μm in geometric mean diameter. The size was similar to that for 7Be-bearing particles obtained by a Ge detector measurement, and was slightly larger than the number-based size distribution measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer. The particle size measuring method using wire screens and imaging plates was successfully applied to the fine aerosol particles produced in an intense radiation field of a proton accelerator. This technique is applicable to size measurement of radioactive aerosol particles produced in the intense radiation fields of radiation facilities.

  8. Effect of pressure and fat content on particle sizes in microfluidized milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, D W; White, C H; Richter, R L

    2004-10-01

    Average diameters and particle size distributions in fluid milks with different fat contents and subjected to various homogenization pressures with a "microfluidizer" were evaluated. Skim, 2%, and whole milks were microfluidized at 50, 100, 150, and 200 MPa. Cream containing 41% milk fat was microfluidized at 50, 100, and 150 MPa. Particle sizes were determined by laser light scattering. As microfluidization pressure was increased from 50 to 100 MPa, particle sizes in skim, 2%, and whole milks decreased. Microfluidization at pressures greater than 100 MPa had little additional effect on reducing the particle sizes in skim and 2% milks compared with microfluidization at 100 MPa, but the particle sizes in whole milk increased as the microfluidization pressure was increased from 100 to 200 MPa due to formation of homogenization clusters. The particle sizes in cream increased as the microfluidization pressure was increased from 50 to 150 MPa. When the microfluidization pressure was held constant, the particle sizes increased as the milk fat concentration was increased. The coefficients of variations of the volume-weighted particle size distributions for cream were higher than for skim, 2%, and whole milks. Larger "big" particles and smaller "small" particles were formed in whole milk after microfluidization at 200 MPa than at 100 MPa. Although microfluidization can be used to produce small particles in skim, 2%, and whole milks, a higher than optimum pressure (above 100 MPa) applied to whole milk will not lead to the minimum d(43) (volume-weighted average diameter) due to formation of clusters.

  9. Effects of Particle Size on the Attenuated Total Reflection Spectrum of Minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udvardi, Beatrix; Kovács, István J; Fancsik, Tamás; Kónya, Péter; Bátori, Miklósné; Stercel, Ferenc; Falus, György; Szalai, Zoltán

    2017-06-01

    This study focuses on particle size effect on monomineralic powders recorded using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopy. Six particle size fractions of quartz, feldspar, calcite, and dolomite were prepared (size. As particle size increases, the intensity and area of IR bands usually decrease while the width of bands increases. The band positions usually shifted to higher wavenumbers with decreasing particle size. Infrared spectra of minerals are the most intensive in the particle size fraction of 2-4 µm. However, if the particle size is very small (size are compared, as in regression analysis for modal predictions using ATR FT-IR, it is also important to report the grain size distribution or surface area of samples. The band area of water (3000-3620 cm(-1)) is similar in each mineral fraction, except for the particles below 2 µm. It indicates that the finest particles could have disproportionately more water adsorbed on their larger surface area. Thus, these higher wavenumbers of the ATR FT-IR spectra may be more sensitive to this spectral interference if the number of particles below 2 µm is considerable. It is also concluded that at least a proportion of the moisture could be very adhesive to the particles due to the band shift towards lower wavenumbers in the IR range of 3000-3620 cm(-1).

  10. Assessment of active pharmaceutical ingredient particle size in tablets by Raman chemical imaging validated using polystyrene microsphere size standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriyama, Atsushi; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2014-04-01

    Particle size is a critical parameter for controlling pharmaceutical quality. The aim of this study was to assess the size of the micrometer-scale active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) in tablets using Raman chemical imaging and to understand the effects of formulation on particle size. Model tablets containing National Institute of Standards and Technology traceable polystyrene microsphere size standards were developed to determine the binarization threshold value of Raman chemical images for API particle sizing in specific formulations and processes. Three sets of model tablets containing 5, 10, and 15 μm polystyrene microspheres, used to mimic API, were prepared using a commercial tablet formulation (Ebastel tablets, mean API particle size was about 5 μm). Raman mapping with a 50× objective (NA, 0.75) was applied to tablet cross-sections, and particle size of polystyrene microspheres was estimated from binary images using several binarization thresholds. Mean particle size for three sets of polystyrene microspheres showed good agreement between pre- and postformulation (the slope = 1.024, R = 1.000) at the specific threshold value ((mean + 0.5σ) of the polystyrene-specific peak intensity histogram), regardless of particle agglomeration, tablet surface roughness, and laser penetration depth. The binarization threshold value showed good applicability to Ebastel tablets, where the API-specific peak intensity histogram showed a pattern similar to that of polystyrene microspheres in model tablets. The model tablets enabled determination of an appropriate binarization threshold for assessing the mean particle size of micrometer-scale API in tablets by utilizing the unique physicochemical properties of polystyrene microspheres.

  11. Comparison of particle size of cracking catalyst determined by laser light scattering and dry sieve methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dishman, K.L.; Doolin, P.K.; Hoffman, J.F. (Ashland Petroleum Co., Ashland, KY (United States))

    1993-07-01

    A method of interconversion of dry sieve and laser light scattering particle size values has been developed for cracking catalysts. Values obtained by light scattering techniques were consistently larger than those obtained by dry sieve analysis. The differences were primarily due to lack of sphericity of the particles. The particle size distribution determined by light scattering techniques was based on an average particle diameter. Conversely, the sieve measured the smallest diameter of the particle which can pass through the opening. Microscopic examination of commercial cracking catalysts confirmed their nonuniformity. The sphericity of the catalyst particles decreased as particle size increased. Therefore, the divergence between the laser light scattering and dry sieving value became greater as the catalyst particle size increased.

  12. Verification of Gyrokinetic Particle of Turbulent Simulation of Device Size Scaling Transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Zhihong; S. ETHIER; T. S. HAHM; W. M. TANG

    2012-01-01

    Verification and historical perspective are presented on the gyrokinetic particle simulations that discovered the device size scaling of turbulent transport and indentified the geometry model as the source of the long-standing disagreement between gyrokinetic particle and continuum simulations.

  13. Effect of particle size on the performance of batchwise centrifugal filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, K J

    2001-01-01

    The effect of particle size distribution on the performance of batchwise centrifugal filtration is studied. By analyzing the velocity of particles in a filter, a numerical program is designed for simulating the migration and deposition of particles. The particle size distributions and the average specific filtration resistances of cake are then estimated under various rotating speeds of the centrifuge. A large deviation of particle concentration profiles in the filter chamber will occur if the particle size distribution is not taken into consideration. A more heterogeneous cake will form under a lower rotating speed due to the sedimentation effect of particles. The predicted results of particle size distribution and average specific filtration resistance of cake agree well with the available experimental data.

  14. Single and Joint Multifractal Analysis of Soil Particle Size Distributions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yi; LI Min; R.HORTON

    2011-01-01

    It is noted that there has been little research to compare volume-based and number-based soil particle size distributions (PSDs).Our objectives were to characterize the scaling properties and the possible connections between volume-based and number-based PSDs by applying single and joint multifractal analysis.Twelve soil samples were taken from selected sites in Northwest China and their PSDs were analyzed using laser diffractometry.The results indicated that the volume-based PSDs of all 12 samples and thc number-based PSDs of 4 samples had multifractal scalings for moment order -6 < q < 6.Some empirical relationships were identified between the extreme probability values, maximum probability (Pmax), minimum probability (Pmin), and Pmax/Pmin, and the multifractal indices,the difference and the ratio of generalized dimensions at q=0 and 1(D0-D1 and D1/D0), maximum and minimum singularity strength (αmax and αmin) and their difference (αmax - αmin, spectrum width), and asymmetric index (RD).An increase in Pmax generally resulted in corresponding increases of D0 - D1, αmax, αmax - αmin, and RD, which indicated that a large Pmax increased the multifractality of a distribution.Joint multifractal analysis showed that there was significant correlation between the scaling indices of volume-based and number-based PSDs.The multifractality indices indicated that for a given soil, the volume-based PSD was more homogeneous than the number-based PSD, and more likely to display monofractal rather than multifractal scaling.

  15. PARTICLE SIZE ESTIMATION AND ELEMENTAL ANALYSIS OF LAUHA BHASMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Neetu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Ayurveda is the science of life. It consists of medicaments prepared by materials obtained from nature, viz; plant products, animal products and metal/ mineral products. Converting the metals/minerals into acceptable form (i.e bhasma preparation for internal administration is done by following various pharmaceutical processing methods. These methods are extensively mentioned in Rasa Shastra (A branch of Ayurveda. Lauha (iron is one of the most important metals mentioned in Rasa Shastra for preparing Lauha bhasma. As iron supplementation is required for formation of hemoglobin of blood and is most essential component for maintaining physiological condition of the body system, in Ayurveda utmost importance is given for Lauha bhasma preparation and also Lauha bhasma were used for preparing many number of Ayurvedic dosage form. In ancient pharmaceutical science of Ayurveda to determine the quality of bhasma certain testing procedures have been mentioned such as varitar, rekhapurnata etc. but in present day scenario apart from these testing procedure there is a need of more sophisticated testing methods for determining quality of Lauha bhasma. In present study Lauha bhsma has been prepared by following Ayurvedic textual reference. After preparation of Lauha bhasma it is subjected to various testing procedures like AAS, EDAX, SEM and TEM. The details including results of these testing procedures with illustrated photographs, tables etc. are mentioned in the paper. SEM & TEM result confirms the formation of nanoparticles after 20th puta. Decrease in particle size after successive steps is observed. Whereas tests like AAS and EDAX show incorporation of trace elements in the finally prepared bhasma.

  16. Ragweed subpollen particles of respirable size activate human dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitti Pazmandi

    Full Text Available Ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia pollen grains, which are generally considered too large to reach the lower respiratory tract, release subpollen particles (SPPs of respirable size upon hydration. These SPPs contain allergenic proteins and functional NAD(PH oxidases. In this study, we examined whether exposure to SPPs initiates the activation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs. We found that treatment with freshly isolated ragweed SPPs increased the intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS in moDCs. Phagocytosis of SPPs by moDCs, as demonstrated by confocal laser-scanning microscopy, led to an up-regulation of the cell surface expression of CD40, CD80, CD86, and HLA-DQ and an increase in the production of IL-6, TNF-α, IL-8, and IL-10. Furthermore, SPP-treated moDCs had an increased capacity to stimulate the proliferation of naïve T cells. Co-culture of SPP-treated moDCs with allogeneic CD3(+ pan-T cells resulted in increased secretion of IFN-γ and IL-17 by T cells of both allergic and non-allergic subjects, but induced the production of IL-4 exclusively from the T cells of allergic individuals. Addition of exogenous NADPH further increased, while heat-inactivation or pre-treatment with diphenyleneiodonium (DPI, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidases, strongly diminished, the ability of SPPs to induce phenotypic and functional changes in moDCs, indicating that these processes were mediated, at least partly, by the intrinsic NAD(PH oxidase activity of SPPs. Collectively, our data suggest that inhaled ragweed SPPs are fully capable of activating dendritic cells (DCs in the airways and SPPs' NAD(PH oxidase activity is involved in initiation of adaptive immune responses against innocuous pollen proteins.

  17. Chemical characterization, nano-particle mineralogy and particle size distribution of basalt dust wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalmora, Adilson C. [Laboratory of Environmental Researches and Nanotechnology Development, Centro Universitário La Salle, Mestrado em Avaliação de Impactos Ambientais em Mineração. Victor Barreto, 2288 Centro 92010-000, Canoas, RS (Brazil); Institute for Environmental Assessment and Water Studies (IDÆA), Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), C/Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Ramos, Claudete G.; Oliveira, Marcos L.S. [Laboratory of Environmental Researches and Nanotechnology Development, Centro Universitário La Salle, Mestrado em Avaliação de Impactos Ambientais em Mineração. Victor Barreto, 2288 Centro 92010-000, Canoas, RS (Brazil); Teixeira, Elba C. [Fundação Estadual de Proteção Ambiental Henrique Luis Roessler, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Kautzmann, Rubens M.; Taffarel, Silvio R. [Laboratory of Environmental Researches and Nanotechnology Development, Centro Universitário La Salle, Mestrado em Avaliação de Impactos Ambientais em Mineração. Victor Barreto, 2288 Centro 92010-000, Canoas, RS (Brazil); Brum, Irineu A.S. de [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Escola de Engenharia, Departamento de Metalurgia, Centro de Tecnologia, Av. Bento Gonçalves, 9500. Bairro Agronomia. CEP: 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); and others

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the geochemistry of basalt alteration is central to the study of agriculture systems. Various nano-minerals play an important role in the mobilization of contaminants and their subsequent uptake by plants. We present a new analytical experimental approach in combination with an integrated analytical protocol designed to study basalt alteration processes. Recently, throughout the world, ultra-fine and nano-particles derived from basalt dust wastes (BDW) during “stonemeal” soil fertilizer application have been of great concern for their possible adverse effects on human health and environmental pollution. Samples of BDW utilized were obtained from companies in the Nova Prata mining district in southern Brazil for chemical characterization and nano-mineralogy investigation, using an integrated application of advanced characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), High Resolution-Transmission Electron microscopy (HR-TEM)/Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS)/(selected-area diffraction pattern) SAED, Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM/EDS), and granulometric distribution analysis. The investigation has revealed that BDW materials are dominated by SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3,} with a complex micromineralogy including alkali feldspar, augite, barite, labradorite, hematite, heulandrite, gypsum, kaolinite, quartz, and smectite. In addition, we have identified a number of trace metals such as Cd, Cu, Cr, and Zn, that are preferentially concentrated into the finer, inhalable, dust fraction and, thus, could present a health hazard in the urban areas around the basalt mining zone. The implication of this observation is that use of these nanometric-sized particulates as soil fertilizer may present different health challenges to those of conventional fertilizers, inviting future work regarding the relative toxicities of these materials. Our investigation on the particle size distribution, nano-particle

  18. Influence of particle size on physical and sensory attributes of mango pulp powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, M.; Kadam, D. M.; Chadha, S.; Wilson, R. A.; Gupta, R. K.

    2013-09-01

    The present investigation was aimed to observe the effect of particle size on physical, sensory and thermal properties of foam-mat dried mango pulp powder. Mango pulp of Dussehri variety was foam-mat dried using 3% egg white at 65ºC. Dried foam-mats were pulverized and passed through a sieve shaker for obtaining three grades of powder with 50, 60, and 85 mesh size sieves. The particle size of these samples measured using laser diffraction particle size analyzer ranged from 191.26 to 296.19 μm. The data was analysed statistically using ANOVA of SAS. There was a linear increase in lightness (`L' value) with a decrease in particle size, however, `a' value decreased with a decrease in particle size, indicating the decrease in redness. An increase in bulk density and decrease in water solubility index and water absorption index % were observed with a decrease in particle size. Particle size had a significant effect on sensory parameters. Particle size in the range of 258.01 to 264.60μmwas found most acceptable with respect to sensory characteristics. This finding can be exploited for various commercial applicationswhere powder quality is dependent on the particle size and has foremost priority for end users.

  19. Particle Size Control for PIV Seeding Using Dry Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    unsuccessful in forming discrete particles from either location and instead, gaseous CO2 clouds were present in the test section. Using the simple shroud...which was then kept pressurized by a pneumatic butterfly valve. The butterfly valve was operated and electronically controlled by a Fisher R© system. The...distribution was nonuniform , so even though a single number is presented to describe the particles at each test condition, the actual particles varied

  20. Improved particle size estimation in digital holography via sign matched filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiang; Shaw, Raymond A; Yang, Weidong

    2012-06-04

    A matched filter method is provided for obtaining improved particle size estimates from digital in-line holograms. This improvement is relative to conventional reconstruction and pixel counting methods for particle size estimation, which is greatly limited by the CCD camera pixel size. The proposed method is based on iterative application of a sign matched filter in the Fourier domain, with sign meaning the matched filter takes values of ±1 depending on the sign of the angular spectrum of the particle aperture function. Using simulated data the method is demonstrated to work for particle diameters several times the pixel size. Holograms of piezoelectrically generated water droplets taken in the laboratory show greatly improved particle size measurements. The method is robust to additive noise and can be applied to real holograms over a wide range of matched-filter particle sizes.

  1. Influence of feedstock particle size on lignocellulose conversion--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Bernardo C; Dien, Bruce S; Ting, K C; Singh, Vijay

    2011-08-01

    Feedstock particle sizing can impact the economics of cellulosic ethanol commercialization through its effects on conversion yield and energy cost. Past studies demonstrated that particle size influences biomass enzyme digestibility to a limited extent. Physical size reduction was able to increase conversion rates to maximum of ≈ 50%, whereas chemical modification achieved conversions of >70% regardless of biomass particle size. This suggests that (1) mechanical pretreatment by itself is insufficient to attain economically feasible biomass conversion, and, therefore, (2) necessary particle sizing needs to be determined in the context of thermochemical pretreatment employed for lignocellulose conversion. Studies of thermochemical pretreatments that have taken into account particle size as a factor have exhibited a wide range of maximal sizes (i.e., particle sizes below which no increase in pretreatment effectiveness, measured in terms of the enzymatic conversion resulting from the pretreatment, were observed) from pretreatment employed, with maximal size range decreasing as follows: steam explosion > liquid hot water > dilute acid and base pretreatments. Maximal sizes also appeared dependent on feedstock, with herbaceous or grassy biomass exhibiting lower maximal size range (biomass (>3 mm). Such trends, considered alongside the intensive energy requirement of size reduction processes, warrant a more systematic study of particle size effects across different pretreatment technologies and feedstock, as a requisite for optimizing the feedstock supply system.

  2. Dynamics of finite size neutrally buoyant particles in isotropic turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elhimer, M; Jean, A; Praud, O; Bazile, R; Marchal, M; Couteau, G, E-mail: elhimer@imft.fr [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, IMFT - Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse, Allee Camille Soula, F-31400 Toulouse (France); CNRS, IMFT, F-31400 Toulouse (France)

    2011-12-22

    The dynamics of neutrally buoyant particles suspended in a turbulent flow is investigated experimentally, with particles having diameters larger than the Kolmogorov length scale. To that purpose, a turbulence generator have been constructed and the resulting flow characterized. The fluid was then seeded with polystyrene particles of diameter about 1 mm and their velocity measured separately and simultaneously with the surrounding fluid. Comparison of the velocities statistics between the two phases shows no appreciable discrepancy. However, simultaneous velocity measurement shows that particles may move in different direction from the underlying flow.

  3. Predicting the film and lens water volume between soil particles using particle size distribution data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, M. H.; Meskini-Vishkaee, F.

    2012-12-01

    SummaryWe develop four conceptual approaches to quantify the volume of water lenses between soil particles (ɛi) and adsorbed water films (δi) coating soil particles based on soil Particle Size Distribution (PSD) data. Method 1 is based on expression of the ɛi as matric suction independent pendular rings and method 2 is based on expression of the ɛi as function of matric suction. Methods 3 and 4 are based on the coupling of δi estimated with van der Waals and electrostatic forces, with ɛi estimated with methods 1 and 2 respectively. We show that the filling angle of the lens water is independent of surface tension but increases with the porosity. The four methods are applied to predict effects of ɛi and δi on Soil Moisture Characteristics (SMC) in eighty soil samples selected from UNSODA database. The total component of the ɛi in soil water content ranged from 0.0111 (L3 L-3) to 0.1604 (L3 L-3), with the average of 0.0703 (L3 L-3) for method 1 and from 0.0082 (L3 L-3) to 0.0523 (L3 L-3), with the average of 0.0237 (L3 L-3) for method 2. The component of δi is less than 0.0121 of each pore water content. Results showed that for methods 1 and 2, the component of the ɛi in the soil water content was partially relevant for the prediction of SMC, especially in dry range. Moreover, the accuracy of the method 1 was slightly greater than that of the method 2. We attribute the methods error to the roughness of soil particles, high surface energy content of clay particles and, to the simplified pore geometric concepts that does not effectively reflect the pore geometry. We conclude that the main advantage of the present approaches is developing two different methods for estimation of the volume of the lens water by using only the PSD data and bulk density which are measured easily.

  4. Taille des particules et catalyse Particle Size and Catalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boitiaux J. P.

    2006-11-01

    hydrogène pouvaient tout à fait rendre compte des phénomènes observés. En plus de cela un métal déposé sur silice et un métal déposé sur alumine peuvent se comporter de façon tout à fait différente. Tout ceci montre que certaines interprétations sont trop simplistes et que faire varier la taille des particules par n'importe quel moyen et étudier les conséquences sur l'acte catalytique n'est pas suffisant. Les deux approches complémentaires, celle du cristallographe qui tente de décrire les petites particules à partir des paramètres du métal massique et celle du chimiste qui tente de déduire la structure du comportement du catalyseur observé dans la réaction étudiée, n'arrivent pas vraiment à se rejoindre pour aboutir à une description en tout point acceptable de la structure de la particule. D'un côté le physico-chimiste utilise des simplifications outrancières lorsqu'il tente de décrire ses structures grâce à l'usage de fonctions d'état qui n'ont pas toujours des solutions évidentes. D'un autre le chimiste manipule des objets réels mais arrive difficilement à isoler le paramètre qu'il veut étudier. Ses conclusions ne sont jamais à l'abri des artefacts apportés par les conditions opératoires ou les effets de support. Ce dilemme existe aussi pour le physicien qui tente de synthétiser des agrégats bien définis dans un flux gazeux mais loin de la réalité de la catalyse. De même pour le chimiste qui veut ramener les effets de structure à de simples comparaisons entre les faces exposées par les monocristaux. Néanmoins l'apport des deux est indispensable car ils donnent des idées directrices indispensables pour l'homme de catalyse qui tente de maîtriser l'ensemble des paramètres. While heterogeneous catalysis, and especially catalysis by metals, is concerned with the size of the particles and hence with the developed surface area, this is not only to prepare an effective product at minimum cost. The study of the

  5. Lattice Constant Dependence on Particle Size for Ceria prepared from a Citrate Sol-Gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, V N [Analog Devices, Raheen Business Park, Raheen, Limerick (Ireland); Dimensional Solids Group, Chemistry Department, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Farrell, R A [Dimensional Solids Group, Chemistry Department, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Sexton, A M [Dimensional Solids Group, Chemistry Department, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Morris, M A [Dimensional Solids Group, Chemistry Department, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Centre for Research into Advanced Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), Trinity College, Dublin (Ireland)

    2006-02-22

    High surface area ceria nanoparticles have been prepared using a citrate solgel precipitation method. Changes to the particle size have been made by calcining the ceria powders at different temperatures, and X-ray methods used to determine their lattice parameters. The particle sizes have been assessed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the lattice parameter found to fall with decreasing particle size. The results are discussed in the light of the role played by surface tension effects.

  6. Particle Size Controls on Water Adsorption and Condensation Regimes at Mineral Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Merve Yeşilbaş; Jean-François Boily

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric water vapour interacting with hydrophilic mineral surfaces can produce water films of various thicknesses and structures. In this work we show that mineral particle size controls water loadings achieved by water vapour deposition on 21 contrasting mineral samples exposed to atmospheres of up to ~16 Torr water (70% relative humidity at 25 °C). Submicrometer-sized particles hosted up to ~5 monolayers of water, while micrometer-sized particles up to several thousand monolayers. All f...

  7. Experimental Investigations into the Use of Piezoelectric Film Transducers to Determine Particle Size through Impact Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Coombes, James Robert; Yan, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Sensors are required to determine the particle size of granular materials in a variety of industries such as energy, chemical manufacturing and food processing. The importance of accurately monitoring the particle size is essential in quality control in these industrial sectors. This paper presents the use of a custom made piezoelectric PVDF film transducer that is capable of determining the particle size of granular material through impact analysis. Experiments were carried out using a purpo...

  8. Effect of the size distribution of nanoscale dispersed particles on the Zener drag pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Eivani, A.R.; Valipour, S.; Ahmed, H.; Zhou, J; Duszczyk, J.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, a new relationship for the calculation of the Zener drag pressure is described in which the effect of the size distribution of nanoscale dispersed particles is taken into account, in addition to particle radius and volume fraction, which have been incorporated in the existing relationships. Microstructural observations indicated a clear correlation between the size distribution of dispersed particles and recrystallized grain sizes in the AA7020 aluminum alloy. However, the ex...

  9. Deconvolution of the particle size distribution of ProRoot MTA and MTA Angelus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, William Nguyen; Shakibaie, Fardad; Kahler, Bill; Walsh, Laurence James

    2016-01-01

    Objective Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) cements contain two types of particles, namely Portland cement (PC) (nominally 80% w/w) and bismuth oxide (BO) (20%). This study aims to determine the particle size distribution (PSD) of PC and BO found in MTA. Materials and methods The PSDs of ProRoot MTA (MTA-P) and MTA Angelus (MTA-A) powder were determined using laser diffraction, and compared to samples of PC (at three different particle sizes) and BO. The non-linear least squares method was used to deconvolute the PSDs into the constituents. MTA-P and MTA-A powders were also assessed with scanning electron microscopy. Results BO showed a near Gaussian distribution for particle size, with a mode distribution peak at 10.48 μm. PC samples milled to differing degrees of fineness had mode distribution peaks from 19.31 down to 4.88 μm. MTA-P had a complex PSD composed of both fine and large PC particles, with BO at an intermediate size, whereas MTA-A had only small BO particles and large PC particles. Conclusions The PSD of MTA cement products is bimodal or more complex, which has implications for understanding how particle size influences the overall properties of the material. Smaller particles may be reactive PC or unreactive radiopaque agent. Manufacturers should disclose particle size information for PC and radiopaque agents to prevent simplistic conclusions being drawn from statements of average particle size for MTA materials.

  10. Theoretical studies on bioaerosol particle size and shape measurement from spatial scattering profiles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunxia Feng; Lihua Huang; Jianbo Wang; Yongkai Zhao; Huijie Huang

    2011-01-01

    @@ A method of clarifying bioaerosol particles is proposed based on T-matrix.Size and shape characterizations are simultaneously acquired for individual bioaerosol particles by analyzing the spatial distribution of scattered light.The particle size can be determined according to the scattering intensity,while shape information can be obtained through asymmetry factor(AF).The azimuthal distribution of the scattered light for spherical particles is symmetrical,whereas it is asymmetrical for non-spherical ones,and the asymmetry becomes intense with increasing asphericity.The calculated results denote that the 50-100 scattering angle is an effective range to classify the bioaerosol particles that we axe concerned of.The method is very useful in real-time environmental monitoring of particle sizes and shapes.%A method of clarifying bioaerosol particles is proposed based on T-matrix. Size and shape characterizations are simultaneously acquired for individual bioaerosol particles by analyzing the spatial distribution of scattered light. The particle size can be determined according to the scattering intensity, while shape information can be obtained through asymmetry factor (AF). The azimuthal distribution of the scattered light for spherical particles is symmetrical, whereas it is asymmetrical for non-spherical ones, and the asymmetry becomes intense with increasing asphericity. The calculated results denote that the 5°-10° scattering angle is an effective range to classify the bioaerosol particles that we are concerned of. The method is very useful in real-time environmental monitoring of particle sizes and shapes.

  11. Cloud particle size distributions measured with an airborne digital in-line holographic instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Fugal

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Holographic data from the prototype airborne digital holographic instrument HOLODEC (Holographic Detector for Clouds, taken during test flights are digitally reconstructed to obtain the size (equivalent diameters in the range 23 to 1000 μm, three-dimensional position, and two-dimensional profile of ice particles and then ice particle size distributions and number densities are calculated using an automated algorithm with minimal user intervention. The holographic method offers the advantages of a well-defined sample volume size that is not dependent on particle size or airspeed, and offers a unique method of detecting shattered particles. The holographic method also allows the volume sample rate to be increased beyond that of the prototype HOLODEC instrument, limited solely by camera technology.

    HOLODEC size distributions taken in mixed-phase regions of cloud compare well to size distributions from a PMS FSSP probe also onboard the aircraft during the test flights. A conservative algorithm for detecting shattered particles utilizing the particles depth-position along the optical axis eliminates the obvious ice particle shattering events from the data set. In this particular case, the size distributions of non-shattered particles are reduced by approximately a factor of two for particles 15 to 70 μm in equivalent diameter, compared to size distributions of all particles.

  12. Performance of diethylene glycol-based particle counters in the sub-3 nm size range

    CERN Document Server

    Wimmer, D; Franchin, A; Kangasluoma, J; Kreissl, F; Kürten, A; Kupc, A; Metzger, A; Mikkilä, J; Petäjä, J; Riccobono, F; Vanhanen, J; Kulmala, M; Curtius, J

    2013-01-01

    When studying new particle formation, the uncertainty in determining the "true" nucleation rate is considerably reduced when using condensation particle counters (CPCs) capable of measuring concentrations of aerosol particles at sizes close to or even at the critical cluster size (1–2 nm). Recently, CPCs able to reliably detect particles below 2 nm in size and even close to 1 nm became available. Using these instruments, the corrections needed for calculating nucleation rates are substantially reduced compared to scaling the observed formation rate to the nucleation rate at the critical cluster size. However, this improved instrumentation requires a careful characterization of their cut-off size and the shape of the detection efficiency curve because relatively small shifts in the cut-off size can translate into larger relative errors when measuring particles close to the cut-off size. Here we describe the development of two continuous-flow CPCs using diethylene glycol (DEG) as the working fluid. The desig...

  13. Measuring the mass, density, and size of particles and cells using a suspended microchannel resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Michel; Bryan, Andrea K.; Burg, Thomas P.; Babcock, Ken; Manalis, Scott R.

    2007-09-01

    We demonstrate the measurement of mass, density, and size of cells and nanoparticles using suspended microchannel resonators. The masses of individual particles are quantified as transient frequency shifts, while the particles transit a microfluidic channel embedded in the resonating cantilever. Mass histograms resulting from these data reveal the distribution of a population of heterogeneously sized particles. Particle density is inferred from measurements made in different carrier fluids since the frequency shift for a particle is proportional to the mass difference relative to the displaced solution. We have characterized the density of polystyrene particles, Escherichia coli, and human red blood cells with a resolution down to 10-4g/cm3.

  14. Simulating the particle size distribution of rockfill materials based on its statistical regularity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Zongling; QIU Xiande; YU Yongqiang

    2003-01-01

    The particle size distribution of rockfill is studied by using granular mechanics, mesomechanics and probability statistics to reveal the relationship of the distribution of particle size to that of the potential energy intensity before fragmentation,which finds out that the potential energy density has a linear relation to the logarithm of particle size and deduces that the distribution of the logarithm of particle size conforms to normal distribution because the distribution of the potential energy density does so. Based on this finding and by including the energy principle of rock fragmentation, the logarithm distribution model of particle size is formulated, which uncovers the natural characteristics of particle sizes on statistical distribution. Exploring the properties of the average value, the expectation, and the unbiased variance of particle size indicates that the expectation does notequal to the average value, but increases with increasing particle size and its ununiformity, and is always larger than the average value, and the unbiased variance increases as the ununiformity and geometric average value increase. A case study proves that the simulated results by the proposed logarithm distribution model accord with the actual data. It is concluded that the logarithm distribution model and Kuz-Ram model can be used to forecast the particle-size distribution of inartificial rockfill while for blasted rockfill, Kuz-Ram model is an option, and in combined application of the two models, it is necessary to do field tests to adjust some parameters of the model.

  15. Particle number size distribution and new particle formation:New characteristics during the special pollution control period in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Gao; Fahe Chai; Tao Wang; Shulan Wang; Wenxing Wang

    2012-01-01

    New particle formation is a key process in shaping the size distribution of aerosols in the atmosphere.We present here the measurement results of number and size distribution of aerosol particles (10-10000 nm in diameter) obtained in the summer of 2008,at a suburban site in Beijing,China.We firstly reported the pollution level,particle number size distribution,diurnal variation of the particle number size distribution and then introduced the characteristics of the particle formation processes.The results showed that the number concentration of ultrafine particles was much lower than the values measured in other urban or suburban areas in previous studies.Sharp increases of ultrafine particle count were frequently observed at noon.An examination of the diurnal pattern suggested that the burst of ultrafine particles was mainly due to new particle formation promoted by photochemical processes.In addition,high relative humidity was a key factor driving the growth of the particles in the afternoon.During the 2-month observations,new particle formation from homogeneous nucleation was observed for 42.7% of the study period.The average growth rate of newly formed particles was 3.2 nm/hr,and varied from 1.2 to 8.0 nm/hr.The required concentration of condensable vapor was 4.4 × 107 cm-3,and its source rate was 1.2 × 106 cm-3sec-1.Further calculation on the source rate of sulphuric acid vapor indicated that the average participation of sulphuric acid to particle growth rates was 28.7%.

  16. Chemical characterization, nano-particle mineralogy and particle size distribution of basalt dust wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmora, Adilson C; Ramos, Claudete G; Oliveira, Marcos L S; Teixeira, Elba C; Kautzmann, Rubens M; Taffarel, Silvio R; de Brum, Irineu A S; Silva, Luis F O

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the geochemistry of basalt alteration is central to the study of agriculture systems. Various nano-minerals play an important role in the mobilization of contaminants and their subsequent uptake by plants. We present a new analytical experimental approach in combination with an integrated analytical protocol designed to study basalt alteration processes. Recently, throughout the world, ultra-fine and nano-particles derived from basalt dust wastes (BDW) during "stonemeal" soil fertilizer application have been of great concern for their possible adverse effects on human health and environmental pollution. Samples of BDW utilized were obtained from companies in the Nova Prata mining district in southern Brazil for chemical characterization and nano-mineralogy investigation, using an integrated application of advanced characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), High Resolution-Transmission Electron microscopy (HR-TEM)/Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS)/(selected-area diffraction pattern) SAED, Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM/EDS), and granulometric distribution analysis. The investigation has revealed that BDW materials are dominated by SiO2, Al2O3, and Fe2O3, with a complex micromineralogy including alkali feldspar, augite, barite, labradorite, hematite, heulandrite, gypsum, kaolinite, quartz, and smectite. In addition, we have identified a number of trace metals such as Cd, Cu, Cr, and Zn, that are preferentially concentrated into the finer, inhalable, dust fraction and, thus, could present a health hazard in the urban areas around the basalt mining zone. The implication of this observation is that use of these nanometric-sized particulates as soil fertilizer may present different health challenges to those of conventional fertilizers, inviting future work regarding the relative toxicities of these materials. Our investigation on the particle size distribution, nano-particle mineralogy and chemical composition in

  17. Testosterone sorption and desorption: Effects of soil particle size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Yong, E-mail: yqi01@unomaha.edu [Civil Engineering Dept., University of Nebraska-Lincoln at Omaha Campus, Omaha, NE 68182 (United States); Zhang, Tian C. [Civil Engineering Dept., University of Nebraska-Lincoln at Omaha Campus, Omaha, NE 68182 (United States); Ren, Yongzheng [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Smaller soil particles have higher sorption and lower desorption rates. • The sorption capacity ranks as clay > silt > sand. • Small particles like clays have less potential for desorption. • Colloids (clays) have high potential to facilitate the transport of hormones in soil–water environments. - Abstract: Soils contain a wide range of particles of different diameters with different mobility during rainfall events. Effects of soil particles on sorption and desorption behaviors of steroid hormones have not been investigated. In this study, wet sieve washing and repeated sedimentation methods were used to fractionate the soils into five ranges. The sorption and desorption properties and related mechanisms of testosterone in batch reactors filled with fractionated soil particles were evaluated. Results of sorption and desorption kinetics indicate that small soil particles have higher sorption and lower desorption rates than that of big ones. Thermodynamic results show the sorption processes are spontaneous and exothermal. The sorption capacity ranks as clay > silt > sand, depending mainly on specific surface area and surface functional groups. The urea control test shows that hydrogen bonding contributes to testosterone sorption onto clay and silt but not on sand. Desorption tests indicate sorption is 36–65% irreversible from clay to sand. Clays have highest desorption hysteresis among these five soil fractions, indicating small particles like clays have less potential for desorption. The results provide indirect evidence on the colloid (clay)-facilitated transport of hormones (micro-pollutants) in soil environments.

  18. Determination of Size Distribution of Nano-particles by Capillary Zone Electrophoresis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan XUE; Hai Ying YANG; Yong Tan YANG

    2005-01-01

    A new method was developed for the determination of the size distribution of nano-particles by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). Scattering effect of nanoparticles was studied. This method for the determination of size distribution was statistical.

  19. Effect of particle shape and size on flow properties of lactose powders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaowei Fu; Deborah Huck; Lisa Makein; Brian Armstrong; Ulf Willen; Tim Freeman

    2012-01-01

    The shape and size of particles are understood to affect the bulk behaviour of powders,though there are but few studies that present quantitative information on the relationship between particle shape and the flow properties of powder.This is due in part to the lack of techniques for rapidly determining both particle shape and the range of flow characteristics that describe the response of powders to the stress and shear experienced during their processing.This study presents data that quantifies the influence of particle shape/size of three different lactose powders on their respective flow and bulk characteristics.Two of the samples differ in size but have similar shapes; the third sample is more spherical but similar in size to one of the other two samples.The results demonstrate that in addition to particle size,particle shape significantly affect the flow characteristics of a powder over a wide range of stress conditions.

  20. Size-selective separation of submicron particles in suspensions with ultrasonic atomization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nii, Susumu; Oka, Naoyoshi

    2014-11-01

    Aqueous suspensions containing silica or polystyrene latex were ultrasonically atomized for separating particles of a specific size. With the help of a fog involving fine liquid droplets with a narrow size distribution, submicron particles in a limited size-range were successfully separated from suspensions. Performance of the separation was characterized by analyzing the size and the concentration of collected particles with a high resolution method. Irradiation of 2.4MHz ultrasound to sample suspensions allowed the separation of particles of specific size from 90 to 320nm without regarding the type of material. Addition of a small amount of nonionic surfactant, PONPE20 to SiO2 suspensions enhanced the collection of finer particles, and achieved a remarkable increase in the number of collected particles. Degassing of the sample suspension resulted in eliminating the separation performance. Dissolved air in suspensions plays an important role in this separation.

  1. Viscous properties of ferrofluids containing both micrometer-size magnetic particles and fine needle-like particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ido, Yasushi; Nishida, Hitoshi; Iwamoto, Yuhiro; Yokoyama, Hiroki

    2017-06-01

    Ferrofluids containing both micrometer-size spherical magnetic particles and nanometer-size needle-like nonmagnetic hematite particles were newly produced. Average length of long axis of the needle-like nonmagnetic particles was 194 nm and the aspect ratio was 8.3. Shear stress and viscosity were measured using the rheometer with the additional equipment for viscosity measurements in the presence of magnetic field. When the total volume fraction of particles in the fluid is constant (0.30), there is the specific mixing ratio of the particles to increase viscosity of the fluid drastically in the absence of magnetic field due to the percolation phenomenon. The fluid of the specific mixing ratio shows solid-like behavior even in the absence of magnetic field. Mixing the needle-like nonmagnetic particles causes strong yield stress and strong viscous force in the presence of magnetic field.

  2. A review: Different methods producing different particles size and distribution in synthesis of calcium carbonate nano particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulimai, N. H.; Rusop, M.; Alrokayan, Salman A. H.; Khan, Haseeb A.

    2016-07-01

    Carbonates exist as 73 percent of world crust carbon. Abundance and bioavailability of Calcium Carbonates offer reliable resources, costs saving and environmental friendly potentials in its applications. Studies proven nano-sized Calcium Cabonate (nCC) employs a more significant characteristics compared to larger sizes. Properties of nCC is affected by the dispersion of the particles in which agglomeration occurs. It is important to gain more understanding of the conditions contributing or stunting the agglomeration to gain more control of the particles morphology and dynamic. A few recent studies with different methods to prepare calcium carbonate nanoparticles were listed in Table 1 .Particle size and dispersity of calcium carbonate are affected by different conditions of its preparation. Other factors such as mechanical aggression, concentration of solution, temperature of precipitation, pH of reaction are all contributing factors towards particle sizes and distribution.

  3. Investigate the relationship between multiwavelength lidar ratios and aerosol size distributions using aerodynamic particle sizer spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hu; Hua, Dengxin; Mao, Jiandong; Zhou, Chunyan

    2017-02-01

    The real aerosol size distributions were obtained by aerodynamic particle sizer spectrometer (APS) in China YinChuan. The lidar ratios at wavelengths of 355 nm, 532 nm and 1064 nm were calculated using Mie theory. The effective radius of aerosol particles reff and volume C/F ratio (coarse/fine) Vc/f were retrieved from the real aerosol size distributions. The relationship between multiwavelength lidar ratios and particle reff and Vc/f were investigated. The results indicate that the lidar ratio is positive correlated to the particle reff and Vc/f. The lidar ratio is more sensitive to the coarse particles. The short wavelength lidar ratio is more sensitive to the particle Vc/f and the long wavelength lidar ratio is more sensitive to the particle reff. The wavelength dependency indicated that the lidar ratios decrease with increasing the wavelength. The lidar ratios are almost irrelevant to the shape and total particles of aerosol size distributions.

  4. Particle motion in a periodic driving flow. The role of added mass force and the finite size of particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Chavarria, Gerardo; Lopez Sanchez, Erick Javier

    2016-11-01

    The motion of particles in a fluid is an open problem. The main difficulty arises from the fact that hydrodynamical forces acting on a particle depend on the flow properties. In addition, the form and the size of particles must be taken into account. In this work we present numerical results of the particle transport in a periodic driving flow in a channel flushing into an open domain. To study the transport of particles we solve the equation of motion for a spherical particle in which we include the drag, the gravity, the buoyancy, the added mass and the history force. Additionally we include the corrections for a particle of finite size. For solving this equation a knowledge of the velocity field is required. To obtain the velocity field we solve the Navier Stokes and the continuity equations with a finite volume method. In the flow under study a vorticity dipole and a spanwise vortex are present, both have an important influence on the motion of particles. The dipole enhances displacement of particles because flow between vortices behaves like a jet and the spanwise vortex produces the lifting and deposition of particles from/to the bottom. We observe clustering of particles both into the channel and in the open domain as observed in coastal systems. The authors acknowledge DGAPA-UNAM by support under project PAPIIT IN115315 "Ondas y estructuras coherentes en dinámica de fluidos".

  5. Morphologically and size uniform monodisperse particles and their shape-directed self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Joshua E.; Bell, Howard Y.; Ye, Xingchen; Murray, Christopher Bruce

    2015-11-17

    Monodisperse particles having: a single pure crystalline phase of a rare earth-containing lattice, a uniform three-dimensional size, and a uniform polyhedral morphology are disclosed. Due to their uniform size and shape, the monodisperse particles self assemble into superlattices. The particles may be luminescent particles such as down-converting phosphor particles and up-converting phosphors. The monodisperse particles of the invention have a rare earth-containing lattice which in one embodiment may be an yttrium-containing lattice or in another may be a lanthanide-containing lattice. The monodisperse particles may have different optical properties based on their composition, their size, and/or their morphology (or shape). Also disclosed is a combination of at least two types of monodisperse particles, where each type is a plurality of monodisperse particles having a single pure crystalline phase of a rare earth-containing lattice, a uniform three-dimensional size, and a uniform polyhedral morphology; and where the types of monodisperse particles differ from one another by composition, by size, or by morphology. In a preferred embodiment, the types of monodisperse particles have the same composition but different morphologies. Methods of making and methods of using the monodisperse particles are disclosed.

  6. Morphologically and size uniform monodisperse particles and their shape-directed self-assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Joshua E.; Bell, Howard Y.; Ye, Xingchen; Murray, Christopher Bruce

    2017-09-12

    Monodisperse particles having: a single pure crystalline phase of a rare earth-containing lattice, a uniform three-dimensional size, and a uniform polyhedral morphology are disclosed. Due to their uniform size and shape, the monodisperse particles self assemble into superlattices. The particles may be luminescent particles such as down-converting phosphor particles and up-converting phosphors. The monodisperse particles of the invention have a rare earth-containing lattice which in one embodiment may be an yttrium-containing lattice or in another may be a lanthanide-containing lattice. The monodisperse particles may have different optical properties based on their composition, their size, and/or their morphology (or shape). Also disclosed is a combination of at least two types of monodisperse particles, where each type is a plurality of monodisperse particles having a single pure crystalline phase of a rare earth-containing lattice, a uniform three-dimensional size, and a uniform polyhedral morphology; and where the types of monodisperse particles differ from one another by composition, by size, or by morphology. In a preferred embodiment, the types of monodisperse particles have the same composition but different morphologies. Methods of making and methods of using the monodisperse particles are disclosed.

  7. Particle Size Reduction in Geophysical Granular Flows: The Role of Rock Fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, G.; Sklar, L. S.

    2016-12-01

    Particle size reduction in geophysical granular flows is caused by abrasion and fragmentation, and can affect transport dynamics by altering the particle size distribution. While the Sternberg equation is commonly used to predict the mean abrasion rate in the fluvial environment, and can also be applied to geophysical granular flows, predicting the evolution of the particle size distribution requires a better understanding the controls on the rate of fragmentation and the size distribution of resulting particle fragments. To address this knowledge gap we are using single-particle free-fall experiments to test for the influence of particle size, impact velocity, and rock properties on fragmentation and abrasion rates. Rock types tested include granodiorite, basalt, and serpentinite. Initial particle masses and drop heights range from 20 to 1000 grams and 0.1 to 3.0 meters respectively. Preliminary results of free-fall experiments suggest that the probability of fragmentation varies as a power function of kinetic energy on impact. The resulting size distributions of rock fragments can be collapsed by normalizing by initial particle mass, and can be fit with a generalized Pareto distribution. We apply the free-fall results to understand the evolution of granodiorite particle-size distributions in granular flow experiments using rotating drums ranging in diameter from 0.2 to 4.0 meters. In the drums, we find that the rates of silt production by abrasion and gravel production by fragmentation scale with drum size. To compare these rates with free-fall results we estimate the particle impact frequency and velocity. We then use population balance equations to model the evolution of particle size distributions due to the combined effects of abrasion and fragmentation. Finally, we use the free-fall and drum experimental results to model particle size evolution in Inyo Creek, a steep, debris-flow dominated catchment, and compare model results to field measurements.

  8. Thoughening of SAN with acryliv core-shell rubber particles: particle size effect or cross-link density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbrink, A.C.; Steenbrink, A.C.; Litvinov, V.M.; Gaymans, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of rubber particle size on fracture toughness and tensile properties have been investigated using styrene-acrylonitrile as a matrix. Pre-formed particles with poly(butyl-acrylate) core and a poly(methylmethacrylate) shell, ranging from 0.1 to 0.6 μm in diameter, were used as a toughening

  9. Particle-size distribution and gas/particle partitioning of atmospheric polybrominated diphenyl ethers in urban areas of Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandalakis, Manolis; Besis, Athanasios [Environmental Chemical Processes Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Crete, GR-71003 Heraklion-Voutes (Greece); Stephanou, Euripides G. [Environmental Chemical Processes Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Crete, GR-71003 Heraklion-Voutes (Greece)], E-mail: stephanou@chemistry.uoc.gr

    2009-04-15

    Ambient concentrations, gas/particle partitioning and particle-size distribution of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were investigated in two urban areas (Athens and Heraklion) of Greece. Atmospheric (gas + particle) concentrations of {sigma}PBDE varied from 21 to 30 pg m{sup -3} in the center of Athens and from 4 to 44 pg m{sup -3} in the suburbs of Heraklion. A predominance of particulate PBDEs was observed in Athens (71-76% in particles), whereas the opposite was evident in Heraklion (69-92% in gas phase). In both urban areas, PBDE particle-size distribution featured a distinct enrichment in smaller particles. A similar trend was also observed in aerosols of a background marine site. For all sampling sites, more than 46% of {sigma}PBDE was associated with particles of <0.57 {mu}m in diameter. Our results imply that particulate PBDEs may have long atmospheric residence time and they may be capable of reaching the deeper parts of the human respiratory system. - Analysis of size-segregated aerosol samples indicates a predominance of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in the small particle-size fraction.

  10. To chew or not to chew: fecal particle size in herbivorous reptiles and mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Julia; Hummel, Jürgen; Kienzle, Ellen; Streich, W Jürgen; Clauss, Marcus

    2010-11-01

    A major difference between reptile and mammalian herbivores is that the former do not masticate their food. Actually, food particle size reduction by chewing is usually considered one of the adaptations facilitating the higher metabolic rates of mammals. However, quantitative comparisons of ingesta particle size between the clades have, to our knowledge, not been performed so far. We measured mean fecal particle size (MPS) in 79 captive individuals of 14 reptile herbivore species (tortoises, lizards, and Corucia zebrata) by wet sieving and compared the results with a mammalian dataset. MPS increased with body mass in both clades, but at a significantly higher level in reptiles. Limited evidence in free-ranging and captive individuals of Testudo hermanni indicates that in reptiles, the ability to crop food and food particle size significantly influence fecal particle size. The opportunistic observation of a drastic particle size difference between stomach and intestinal contents corroborates findings that in reptiles, in contrast to terrestrial mammals, significant ingesta particle size reduction does occur in the gastrointestinal tract, most likely owing to microbial action during very long ingesta retention. Whether behavioral adaptations to controlling ingesta particle size, such as deliberate small bite sizes, are adaptive strategies in reptiles remains to be investigated.

  11. Hydrodynamics of multi-sized particles in stable regime of a swirling bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miin, Chin Swee; Sulaiman, Shaharin Anwar; Raghavan, Vijay Raj; Heikal, Morgan Raymond; Naz, Muhammad Yasin [Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Perak (Malaysia)

    2015-11-15

    Using particle imaging velocimetry (PIV), we observed particle motion within the stable operating regime of a swirling fluidized bed with an annular blade distributor. This paper presents velocity profiles of particle flow in an effort to determine effects from blade angle, particle size and shape and bed weight on characteristics of a swirling fluidized bed. Generally, particle velocity increased with airflow rate and shallow bed height, but decreased with bed weight. A 3 .deg. increase in blade angle reduced particle velocity by approximately 18%. In addition, particle shape, size and bed weight affected various characteristics of the swirling regime. Swirling began soon after incipience in the form of a supra-linear curve, which is the characteristic of a swirling regime. The relationship between particle and gas velocities enabled us to predict heat and mass transfer rates between gas and particles.

  12. Metal uptake by corn grown on media treated with particle-size fractionated biosolids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Weiping [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States)], E-mail: chenweip@yahoo.com.cn; Chang, Andrew C.; Wu, Laosheng [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Zhang, Yongsong [School of Environmental and Natural Resources Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, 31009 (China)

    2008-03-15

    Particle-size of biosolids may affect plant uptake of heavy metals when the biosolids are land applied. In this study, corn (Zea mays L.) was grown on sand media treated with biosolids to study how particle-size of biosolids affected the plant uptake of cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn). Two biosolids, the Nu-Earth biosolids and the Los Angeles biosolids, of dissimilar surface morphology were utilized. The former exhibited a porous and spongy structure and had considerably greater specific surface area than that of the latter, which was granular and blocky. The specific surface area of the Los Angeles biosolids was inversely proportional to its particle-size, while that of Nu-Earth biosolids did not change significantly with particle-size. For each biosolid, the metal concentrations were not affected by particle sizes. The biomass yields of plants grown on the treated media increased as the biosolid particle-size decreased, indicating that plant uptake of nutrients from biosolids was dependent on interactions at the root-biosolids interface. The effect of particle-size on a metal's availability to plants was element-specific. The uptake rate of Cd, Zn, Cu, and Ni was correlated with the surface area of the particles, i.e., smaller particles having higher specific area provided greater root-biosolids contact and resulted in enhanced uptake of Cd and Zn and slightly less increased uptake of Cu and Ni. The particle morphology of biosolids had limited influence on the plant tissue concentrations of Cr and Pb. For both types of biosolids, total metal uptake increased as biosolid particle-size decreased. Our research indicates that biosolid particle-size distribution plays a deciding role in plant uptake of heavy metals when they are land applied.

  13. Effect of particle size on microstructure and mechanical properties of composites produced by ARB process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamaati, Roohollah, E-mail: r.jamaatikenari@ma.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amirkhanlou, Sajjad; Toroghinejad, Mohammad Reza; Niroumand, Behzad [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-02-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Microstructure of MMC with larger particles becomes completely uniform, sooner. {yields} When the number of cycles increased, tensile strength for both samples improved. {yields} Up to the seventh cycle, tensile strength of MMC with larger particles was bigger. {yields} First, the tensile elongation of MMCs was decreased, and then it was improved. - Abstract: In the present work, Al/10 vol.% SiC metal matrix composite (MMC) was manufactured by accumulative roll bonding (ARB) process. The silicon carbide particles with two various particle sizes of 40 and 2 {mu}m were used. Effect of particle size on microstructure (by scanning electron microscopy) and mechanical properties (tensile strength and elongation) at various ARB cycles was investigated. It was found that the microstructural evolution in MMC with 40 {mu}m particle size was more salient compared to the MMCs with 2 {mu}m particle size. Also, the composite strip with 40 {mu}m particle size became uniform with high bonding quality and without any porosity sooner than the strip of 2 {mu}m particle size. Moreover, when the number of cycles was increased, the tensile strength for both samples was improved. The tensile strength of the composite strip with 40 {mu}m particle size was more than the composite strip with 2 {mu}m up to the seventh cycle. By increasing the number of cycles after the seventh cycle, the value of tensile strength of MMC with 40 {mu}m particle size became saturated and then decreased, and its tensile strength became less than that of the composite with 2 {mu}m particle size for the ninth and eleventh cycles. Up to the seventh cycle, when the number of ARB cycles was increased, the elongation of composite strips was decreased, but after the ninth cycle, the tensile elongation for both samples was improved.

  14. Particle size effects in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis by Co catalyst supported on carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ali Nakhaei Pour; Elham Hosaini; Mohammad Izadyar; Mohammad Reza Housaindokht

    2015-01-01

    The effect of Co particle size on the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) activity of carbon nanotube (CNT)-supported Co catalysts was investigated. Microemulsion (using water-to-surfactant molar ratios of 2 to12) and impregnation techniques were used to prepare catalysts with different Co particle sizes. Kinetic studies were performed to understand the effect of Co particle size on catalytic activity. Size-dependent kinetic parameters were developed using a thermodynamic method, to evaluate the structural sensitivity of the CNT-supported Co catalysts. The size-independent FTS reaction rate constant and size-independent adsorption parameter increased with increasing reac-tion temperature. The Polani parameter also depended on catalyst particle size, because of changes in the catalyst surface coverage.

  15. Porous media grain size distribution and hydrodynamic forces effects on transport and deposition of suspended particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahfir, Nasre-Dine; Hammadi, Ahmed; Alem, Abdellah; Wang, HuaQing; Le Bras, Gilbert; Ouahbi, Tariq

    2017-03-01

    The effects of porous media grain size distribution on the transport and deposition of polydisperse suspended particles under different flow velocities were investigated. Selected Kaolinite particles (2-30μm) and Fluorescein (dissolved tracer) were injected in the porous media by step input injection technique. Three sands filled columns were used: Fine sand, Coarse sand, and a third sand (Mixture) obtained by mixing the two last sands in equal weight proportion. The porous media performance on the particle removal was evaluated by analysing particles breakthrough curves, hydro-dispersive parameters determined using the analytical solution of convection-dispersion equation with a first order deposition kinetics, particles deposition profiles, and particle-size distribution of the recovered and the deposited particles. The deposition kinetics and the longitudinal hydrodynamic dispersion coefficients are controlled by the porous media grain size distribution. Mixture sand is more dispersive than Fine and Coarse sands. More the uniformity coefficient of the porous medium is large, higher is the filtration efficiency. At low velocities, porous media capture all sizes of suspended particles injected with larger ones mainly captured at the entrance. A high flow velocity carries the particles deeper into the porous media, producing more gradual changes in the deposition profile. The median diameter of the deposited particles at different depth increases with flow velocity. The large grain size distribution leads to build narrow pores enhancing the deposition of the particles by straining. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Nutrient demand interacts with legume particle length to affect digestion responses and rumen pool sizes in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammes, K L; Ying, Y; Allen, M S

    2012-05-01

    Effects of legume particle length on dry matter intake (DMI), milk production, ruminal fermentation and pool sizes, and digestion and passage kinetics, and the relationship of these effects with preliminary DMI (pDMI) were evaluated using 13 ruminally and duodenally cannulated Holstein cows in a crossover design with a 14-d preliminary period and two 19-d treatment periods. During the preliminary period, pDMI of individual cows ranged from 22.8 to 32.4 kg/d (mean=26.5 kg/d) and 3.5% fat-corrected milk yield ranged from 22.9 to 62.4 kg/d (mean=35.1 kg/d). Experimental treatments were diets containing alfalfa silage chopped to (1) 19 mm (long cut, LC) or (2) 10 mm (short cut, SC) theoretical length of cut as the sole forage. Alfalfa silages contained approximately 43% neutral detergent fiber (NDF); diets contained approximately 47% forage and 20% forage NDF. Preliminary DMI, an index of nutrient demand, was determined during the last 4 d of the preliminary period, when cows were fed a common diet, and used as a covariate. Main effects of legume particle length and their interaction with pDMI were tested by ANOVA. Alfalfa particle length and its interaction with pDMI did not affect milk yield or rumen pH. The LC diet decreased milk fat concentration more per kilogram of pDMI increase than the SC diet and increased yields of milk fat and fat-corrected milk less per kilogram of pDMI increase than the SC diet, resulting in a greater benefit for LC at low pDMI and for SC at high pDMI. The LC diet tended to decrease DMI compared with the SC diet. Ruminal digestion and passage rates of feed fractions did not differ between LC and SC and were not related to level of intake. The LC diet tended to decrease the rate of ruminal turnover for NDF but increased NDF rumen pools at a slower rate than the SC diet as pDMI increased. This indicated that the faster NDF turnover rate did not counterbalance the higher DMI for SC, resulting in larger NDF rumen pools for SC than LC. As p

  17. Effect of flower shape and size on foraging performance and trade-offs in a tropical hummingbird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temeles, Ethan J; Koulouris, Carolyn R; Sander, Sarah E; Kress, W John

    2009-05-01

    Matches between the bills of hummingbirds and the flowers they visit have been interpreted as examples of coadaptation and feeding specialization. Observations of birds feeding at flowers longer or shorter than their bills combined with a lack of experimental evidence for foraging trade-offs, however, fail to support these interpretations. We addressed these inconsistencies by considering a seldom-studied dimension of hummingbird-flower relationships, the shape of bills and flowers, through experiments on the Purple-throated Carib, Eulampis jugularis, and its major food plant, Heliconia, in the eastern Caribbean. Bills of male E. jugularis are considerably shorter and straighter than bills of females. We examined foraging performances and trade-offs during visits to natural heliconias and 34 artificial flowers of differing length and curvature. Supporting predictions based on matches between bill and flower morphology, handling times of females were significantly shorter than those of males at the long, curved flowers of a green morph of H. bihai. Contrary to predictions, handling times of males were not significantly shorter than handling times of females at the short flowers of H. caribaea. At artificial flowers, maximum extraction depths of females were significantly longer than maximum extraction depths of males at all curved flowers, but not at straight flowers. Handling times of females were significantly shorter than handling times of males at the longest artificial flowers for all curvatures, whereas handling times of males were significantly shorter at short, straight, artificial flowers, but only while hover-feeding without a perch. Within each sex, handling times were inversely related to bill length at long flowers for all shapes. Taken together, these performance trade-offs suggest that the long, curved bills of females are adapted for feeding from long, curved flowers, whereas the short bills of males are adapted for hover-feeding from short

  18. Particle-size distribution and packing fraction of geometric random packings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2006-01-01

    This paper addresses the geometric random packing and void fraction of polydisperse particles. It is demonstrated that the bimodal packing can be transformed into a continuous particle-size distribution of the power law type. It follows that a maximum packing fraction of particles is obtained when t

  19. Apparatus for determining the shape and/or size of little particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuis, J.H.; Lubking, G.W.; Vellekoop, M.J.

    2002-01-01

    The invention relates to an apparatus for determining the shape and/or size of small particles, comprising a cell into which the particles are placed, at least one light source for illuminating the particles, and at least one one-dimensional image sensor for measuring an image of the illuminated

  20. Number size distributions and seasonality of submicron particles in Europe 2008-2009

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asmi, A.; Wiedensohler, A.; Laj, P.; Fjaeraa, A.-M.; Sellegri, K.; Birmili, W.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.; Zdimal, V.; Zikova, N.; Putaud, J.-P.; Marinoni, A.; Tunved, P.; Hansson, H.-C.; Fiebig, M.; Kivekäs, N.; Lihavainen, H.; Asmi, E.; Ulevicius, V.; Aalto, P.P.; Swietlicki, E.; Kristensson, A.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Kalivitis, N.; Kalapov, I.; Kiss, G.; Leeuw, G. de; Henzing, B.; Harrison, R.M.; Beddows, D.; O'Dowd, C.; Jennings, S.G.; Flentje, H.; Weinhold, K.; Meinhardt, F.; Ries, L.; Kulmala, M.

    2011-01-01

    Two years of harmonized aerosol number size distribution data from 24 European field monitoring sites have been analysed. The results give a comprehensive overview of the European near surface aerosol particle number concentrations and number size distributions between 30 and 500 nm of dry particle

  1. On the origin of the cobalt particle size effects in Fischer−Tropsch catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Breejen, J.P.; Radstake, P.B.; Bezemer, G.L.; Bitter, J.H.; Froseth, V.; Holmen, A.; de Jong, K.P.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of metal particle size in catalysis are of prime scientific and industrial importance and call for a better understanding. In this paper the origin of the cobalt particle size effects in Fischer−Tropsch (FT) catalysis was studied. Steady-State Isotopic Transient Kinetic Analysis (SSITKA)

  2. Uptake characteristics of liposomes by rat alveolar macrophages: influence of particle size and surface mannose modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chono, Sumio; Tanino, Tomoharu; Seki, Toshinobu; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2007-01-01

    The influence of particle size and surface mannose modification on the uptake of liposomes by alveolar macrophages (AMs) was investigated in-vitro and in-vivo. Non-modified liposomes of five different particle sizes (100, 200, 400, 1000 and 2000 nm) and mannosylated liposomes with 4-aminophenyl-alpha-D-mannopyranoside (particle size 1000 nm) were prepared, and the uptake characteristics by rat AMs in-vitro and in-vivo were examined. The uptake of non-modified liposomes by rat AMs in-vitro increased with an increase in particle size over the range of 100-1000 nm, and became constant at over 1000 nm. The uptake of non-modified liposomes by AMs after pulmonary administration to rats in-vivo increased with an increase in particle size in the range 100-2000 nm. The uptake of mannosylated liposomes (particle size 1000 nm) by rat AMs both in-vitro and in-vivo was significantly greater than that of non-modified liposomes (particle size 1000 nm). The results indicate that the uptake of liposomes by rat AMs is dependent on particle size and is increased by surface mannose modification.

  3. Cobalt particle size effects on catalytic performance for ethanol steam reforming - Smaller is better

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Da Silva, Andre L M; Den Breejen, Johan P.; Mattos, Lisiane V.; Bitter, Johannes H.; De Jong, Krijn P.; Noronha, Fábio B.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of the cobalt particle size in the ethanol steam reforming reaction at 773 K for hydrogen production was investigated using cobalt on carbon nanofiber catalysts. It was found that the turnover frequency increases with decreasing Co particle size, which was attributed to the increasing fra

  4. Cobalt particle size effects on catalytic performance for ethanol steam reforming – Smaller is better

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, da A.L.M.; Breejen, den J.P.; Mattos, L.V.; Bitter, J.H.; Jong, de K.P.; Noronha, F.B.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of the cobalt particle size in the ethanol steam reforming reaction at 773 K for hydrogen production was investigated using cobalt on carbon nanofiber catalysts. It was found that the turnover frequency increases with decreasing Co particle size, which was attributed to the increasing fra

  5. Crumb rubber used in concrete to provide freeze-thaw protection (OPTIMAL particle size)

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, Alan; Coventry, Kathryn; Edmondson, Vikki; Dias, Eli

    2016-01-01

    This research has examined the optimum particle size of crumb rubber, used as an additive to concrete that would provide maximum freeze-thaw protection whilst minimising the compressive strength loss. The crumb rubber as used in the paper was divided into five batches, with increasing particle size, graded in increments of 0.5mm, from

  6. Modelling and validation of particle size distributions of supported nanoparticles using the pair distribution function technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamez-Mendoza, Liliana; Terban, Maxwell W.; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Martinez-Inesta, Maria

    2017-04-13

    The particle size of supported catalysts is a key characteristic for determining structure–property relationships. It is a challenge to obtain this information accurately andin situusing crystallographic methods owing to the small size of such particles (<5 nm) and the fact that they are supported. In this work, the pair distribution function (PDF) technique was used to obtain the particle size distribution of supported Pt catalysts as they grow under typical synthesis conditions. The PDF of Pt nanoparticles grown on zeolite X was isolated and refined using two models: a monodisperse spherical model (single particle size) and a lognormal size distribution. The results were compared and validated using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) results. Both models describe the same trends in average particle size with temperature, but the results of the number-weighted lognormal size distributions can also accurately describe the mean size and the width of the size distributions obtained from STEM. Since the PDF yields crystallite sizes, these results suggest that the grown Pt nanoparticles are monocrystalline. This work shows that refinement of the PDF of small supported monocrystalline nanoparticles can yield accurate mean particle sizes and distributions.

  7. The effect of particle size distributions on the microstructural evolution during sintering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Tikare, V.; Frandsen, Henrik Lund

    2013-01-01

    Microstructural evolution and sintering behavior of powder compacts composed of spherical particles with different particle size distributions (PSDs) were simulated using a kinetic Monte Carlo model of solid state sintering. Compacts of monosized particles, normal PSDs with fixed mean particle...... PSDs, but the final grain sizes were smaller. These behaviors are explained by the smallest grains in the broader PSDs being consumed very quickly by larger neighboring grains. The elimination of the small grains reduces both the total number of necks and the neck area between particles, which in turn...

  8. Control over particle size distribution by autoclaving poloxamer-stabilized trimyristin nanodispersions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Göke, Katrin; Roese, Elin; Arnold, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    into the bloodstream. Consequently, small particles with a narrow particle size distribution are desired. Hitherto, there are, however, only limited possibilities for the preparation of monodisperse, pharmaceutically relevant dispersions. In this work, the effect of autoclaving at 121 °C on the particle size...... distribution of lipid nanoemulsions and -suspensions consisting of the pharmaceutically relevant components trimyristin and poloxamer 188 was studied. Additionally, the amount of emulsifier needed to stabilize both untreated and autoclaved particles was assessed. In our study, four dispersions of mean particle...... sizes from 45 to 150 nm were prepared by high-pressure melt homogenization. The particle size distribution before and after autoclaving was characterized using static and dynamic light scattering, differential scanning calorimetry, and transmission electron microscopy. Asymmetrical flow field...

  9. Influence on nickel particle size on the hydrodeoxygenation of phenol over Ni/SiO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Peter M.; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Jensen, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of phenol over nickel nano-particles of different size (5-22 nm) supported on SiO2 has been investigated in a batch reactor at 275 °C and 100 bar. Deoxygenation was only observed as a consecutive step of initial hydrogenation of phenol at the given conditions. Both...... the hydrogenation and deoxygenation reaction were found to be Ni-particle size dependent. Rapid hydrogenation of phenol to cyclohexanol was achieved over the catalysts with large particles, while the rate of deoxygenation of cyclohexanol was slow. For the catalysts with small Ni particles, the opposite behavior...... was observed Specifically, the turn over frequency (TOF) of hydrogenation was 85 times slower for 5 nm particles than for 22 nm particles. On the contrary, the TOF of cyclohexanol deoxygenation increased by a factor of 20 when decreasing the particle size from 20 nm to 5 nm. A simple kinetic model showed...

  10. Biofilm effects on size gradation, drag coefficient and settling velocity of sediment particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian-qian SHANG; Hong-wei FANG; Hui-ming ZHAO; Guo-jian HE; Zheng-hui CUI

    2014-01-01

    Sediment particles are often colonized by biofilm in a natural aquatic ecological system, especially in eutrophic water body. A series of laboratory experiments on particle size gradation, drag coefficient and settling velocity were conducted after natural sediment was colonized by biofilm for 5, 10, 15 and 20 days. Particle image acquisition, particle tracking techniques of Particle Image Velocimetry and Particle Tracking Velocimetry were utilized to analyze the changes of these properties. The experimental results indicate that the size gradation, the drag force exerted on bio-particles, and the settling velocity of bio-particles underwent significant change due to the growth of biofilm onto the sediment surface. The study proposes a characteristic particle size formula and a bio-particle settling velocity formula based on the regression of experiment results, that the settling velocity is only 50% to 60%as the single particle which has the same diameter and density. However, biofilm growth causes large particle which the settling velocities are approximately 10 times larger than that of primary particles. These results may be specifically used in the low energy reservoir or lake environment.

  11. Gas-solute dispersivity ratio in granular porous media as related to particle size distribution and particle shape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pugliese, Lorenzo; Poulsen, Tjalfe; Straface, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    data. This paper evaluates the possibility for estimating solute dispersion based on gas dispersion measurements. Breakthrough measurements were carried out at different fluid velocities (covering the same range in Reynolds number), using O2 and NaCl as gas and solute tracers, respectively. Three...... different, granular porous materials were used: (1) crushed granite (very angular particles), (2) gravel (particles of intermediate roundness) and (3) Leca® (almost spherical particles). For each material, 21 different particle size fractions were used. Gas and solute dispersion coefficients were determined...

  12. Determining size-specific emission factors for environmental tobacco smoke particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klepeis, Neil E.; Apte, Michael G.; Gundel, Lara A.; Sextro, Richard G.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2002-07-07

    Because size is a major controlling factor for indoor airborne particle behavior, human particle exposure assessments will benefit from improved knowledge of size-specific particle emissions. We report a method of inferring size-specific mass emission factors for indoor sources that makes use of an indoor aerosol dynamics model, measured particle concentration time series data, and an optimization routine. This approach provides--in addition to estimates of the emissions size distribution and integrated emission factors--estimates of deposition rate, an enhanced understanding of particle dynamics, and information about model performance. We applied the method to size-specific environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) particle concentrations measured every minute with an 8-channel optical particle counter (PMS-LASAIR; 0.1-2+ micrometer diameters) and every 10 or 30 min with a 34-channel differential mobility particle sizer (TSI-DMPS; 0.01-1+ micrometer diameters) after a single cigarette or cigar was machine-smoked inside a low air-exchange-rate 20 m{sup 3} chamber. The aerosol dynamics model provided good fits to observed concentrations when using optimized values of mass emission rate and deposition rate for each particle size range as input. Small discrepancies observed in the first 1-2 hours after smoking are likely due to the effect of particle evaporation, a process neglected by the model. Size-specific ETS particle emission factors were fit with log-normal distributions, yielding an average mass median diameter of 0.2 micrometers and an average geometric standard deviation of 2.3 with no systematic differences between cigars and cigarettes. The equivalent total particle emission rate, obtained integrating each size distribution, was 0.2-0.7 mg/min for cigars and 0.7-0.9 mg/min for cigarettes.

  13. Phase Separation of Binary Charged Particle Systems with Small Size Disparities using a Dusty Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killer, Carsten; Bockwoldt, Tim; Schütt, Stefan; Himpel, Michael; Melzer, André; Piel, Alexander

    2016-03-18

    The phase separation in binary mixtures of charged particles has been investigated in a dusty plasma under microgravity on parabolic flights. A method based on the use of fluorescent dust particles was developed that allows us to distinguish between particles of slightly different size. A clear trend towards phase separation even for smallest size (charge) disparities is observed. The diffusion flux is directly measured from the experiment and uphill diffusion coefficients have been determined.

  14. Adaptive Bacterial Foraging Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanning Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial Foraging Optimization (BFO is a recently developed nature-inspired optimization algorithm, which is based on the foraging behavior of E. coli bacteria. Up to now, BFO has been applied successfully to some engineering problems due to its simplicity and ease of implementation. However, BFO possesses a poor convergence behavior over complex optimization problems as compared to other nature-inspired optimization techniques. This paper first analyzes how the run-length unit parameter of BFO controls the exploration of the whole search space and the exploitation of the promising areas. Then it presents a variation on the original BFO, called the adaptive bacterial foraging optimization (ABFO, employing the adaptive foraging strategies to improve the performance of the original BFO. This improvement is achieved by enabling the bacterial foraging algorithm to adjust the run-length unit parameter dynamically during algorithm execution in order to balance the exploration/exploitation tradeoff. The experiments compare the performance of two versions of ABFO with the original BFO, the standard particle swarm optimization (PSO and a real-coded genetic algorithm (GA on four widely-used benchmark functions. The proposed ABFO shows a marked improvement in performance over the original BFO and appears to be comparable with the PSO and GA.

  15. micron-sized polymer particles from tanzanian cashew nut shell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    CNSL is branded as natural or technical depending on the method of ... Cashew nut shell liquid was collected from TANITA cashew nut processing industry located in ... The washing and filtration cycles were repeated and finally the particles ... strong agitation and inorganic insoluble powdered salts [19] are used to stabilize ...

  16. Fragment and particle size distribution of impacted ceramic tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Weerheijm, J.; Ditzhuijzen, C.; Tuinman, I.

    2014-01-01

    The fragmentation of ceramic tiles under ballistic impact has been studied. Fragments and aerosol (respirable) particles were collected and analyzed to determine the total surface area generated by fracturing (macro-cracking and comminution) of armor grade ceramics. The larger fragments were collect

  17. Surface structures of cerium oxide nanocrystalline particles from the size dependence of the lattice parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunekawa, S.; Ito, S.; Kawazoe, Y.

    2004-10-01

    Cerium oxide nanocrystalline particles are synthesized and monodispersed in the size range from 2 to 8nm in diameter. The dependence of the lattice parameters on particle size is obtained by x-ray and electron diffraction analyses. The size dependence well coincides with the estimation based on the assumption that the surface is composed of one layer of Ce2O3 and the inside consists of CeO2. The effect of particle size on lattice parameters is discussed from the differences in the fabrication method and the surface structure.

  18. The effect of particle shape and size distribution on the acoustical properties of mixtures of hemp particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glé, Philippe; Gourdon, Emmanuel; Arnaud, Laurent; Horoshenkov, Kirill-V; Khan, Amir

    2013-12-01

    Hemp concrete is an attractive alternative to traditional materials used in building construction. It has a very low environmental impact, and it is characterized by high thermal insulation. Hemp aggregate particles are parallelepiped in shape and can be organized in a plurality of ways to create a considerable proportion of open pores with a complex connectivity pattern, the acoustical properties of which have never been examined systematically. Therefore this paper is focused on the fundamental understanding of the relations between the particle shape and size distribution, pore size distribution, and the acoustical properties of the resultant porous material mixture. The sound absorption and the transmission loss of various hemp aggregates is characterized using laboratory experiments and three theoretical models. These models are used to relate the particle size distribution to the pore size distribution. It is shown that the shape of particles and particle size control the pore size distribution and tortuosity in shiv. These properties in turn relate directly to the observed acoustical behavior.

  19. Accurate particle speed prediction by improved particle speed measurement and 3-dimensional particle size and shape characterization technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cernuschi, Federico; Rothleitner, Christian; Clausen, Sønnik

    2017-01-01

    Accurate particle mass and velocity measurement is needed for interpreting test results in erosion tests of materials and coatings. The impact and damage of a surface is influenced by the kinetic energy of a particle, i.e. particle mass and velocity. Particle mass is usually determined with optic...

  20. Role of Surface Area, Primary Particle Size, and Crystal Phase on Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticle Dispersion Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvachittanont Sirikalaya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Characterizing nanoparticle dispersions and understanding the effect of parameters that alter dispersion properties are important for both environmental applications and toxicity investigations. The role of particle surface area, primary particle size, and crystal phase on TiO2 nanoparticle dispersion properties is reported. Hydrodynamic size, zeta potential, and isoelectric point (IEP of ten laboratory synthesized TiO2 samples, and one commercial Degussa TiO2 sample (P25 dispersed in different solutions were characterized. Solution ionic strength and pH affect titania dispersion properties. The effect of monovalent (NaCl and divalent (MgCl2 inert electrolytes on dispersion properties was quantified through their contribution to ionic strength. Increasing titania particle surface area resulted in a decrease in solution pH. At fixed pH, increasing the particle surface area enhanced the collision frequency between particles and led to a higher degree of agglomeration. In addition to the synthesis method, TiO2 isoelectric point was found to be dependent on particle size. As anatase TiO2 primary particle size increased from 6 nm to 104 nm, its IEP decreased from 6.0 to 3.8 that also results in changes in dispersion zeta potential and hydrodynamic size. In contrast to particle size, TiO2 nanoparticle IEP was found to be insensitive to particle crystal structure.

  1. Constant size, variable density aerosol particles by ultrasonic spray freeze drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Addio, Suzanne M; Chan, John Gar Yan; Kwok, Philip Chi Lip; Prud'homme, Robert K; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2012-05-10

    This work provides a new understanding of critical process parameters involved in the production of inhalation aerosol particles by ultrasonic spray freeze drying to enable precise control over particle size and aerodynamic properties. A series of highly porous mannitol, lysozyme, and bovine serum albumin (BSA) particles were produced, varying only the solute concentration in the liquid feed, c(s), from 1 to 5 wt%. The particle sizes of mannitol, BSA, and lysozyme powders were independent of solute concentration, and depend only on the drop size produced by atomization. Both mannitol and lysozyme formulations showed a linear relationship between the computed Fine Particle Fraction (FPF) and the square root of c(s), which is proportional to the particle density, ρ, given a constant particle size d(g). The FPF decreased with increasing c(s) from 57.0% to 16.6% for mannitol and 44.5% to 17.2% for lysozyme. Due to cohesion, the BSA powder FPF measured by cascade impaction was less than 10% and independent of c(s). Ultrasonic spray freeze drying enables separate control over particle size, d(g), and aerodynamic size, d(a) which has allowed us to make the first experimental demonstration of the widely accepted rule d(a)=d(g)(ρ/ρ(o))(1/2) with particles of constant d(g), but variable density, ρ (ρ(o) is unit density).

  2. Effect of colloidal particle size on adsorbed monodisperse and bidisperse monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Rachel T; Dan, Nily

    2011-07-19

    Coating hydrogel films or microspheres by an adsorbed colloidal shell is one synthesis method for forming colloidosomes. The colloidal shell allows control of the release rate of encapsulated materials, as well as selective transport. Previous studies found that the packing density of self-assembled, adsorbed colloidal monolayers is independent of the colloidal particle size. In this paper we develop an equilibrium model that correlates the packing density of charged colloidal particles in an adsorbed shell to the particle dimensions in monodisperse and bidisperse systems. In systems where the molar concentration in solution is fixed, the increase in adsorption energy with increasing particle size leads to a monotonic increase in the monolayer packing density with particle radius. However, in systems where the mass fraction of the particles in the adsorbing solutions is fixed, increasing particle size also reduces the molar concentration of particles in solution, thereby reducing the probability of adsorption. The result is a nonmonotonic dependence of the packing density in the adsorbed layer on the particle radius. In bidisperse monolayers composed of two particle sizes, the packing density in the layer increases significantly with size asymmetry. These results may be utilized to design the properties of colloidal shells and coatings to achieve specific properties such as transport rate and selectivity.

  3. Experimental study on size-dependency of effective permittivity of particle-gas mixture with agglomeration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xiaomin; Xu Lijun; Li Songyun

    2007-01-01

    The effective medium approximation (EMA) theory is the basis of a capacitance sensor used for concentration measurement of a particulate solid flow, its measurement result is independent on particle size. In existence of particle agglomeration or aggradation, however, it is found that the effective permittivity of a gas/solid mixture is dependent on particle size. In this paper, a parallel plate, differential capacitance sensor is utilized to investigate the influence of particle size on the effective permittivity of the mixture in such a case. Static experiments using three materials including glass, limestone and quartz particles were carried out in an off-line manner. The volume fraction of particles being tested ranged from 20×10-6 to 600×10-6, while the particle size was between 3 and 100 μm. Experimental results show that the effective permittivity of a particle-gas mixture with particle agglomeration is larger than that predicted by EMA and the smaller the particle size, the larger the effective permittivity. The experiment process and analysis results are discussed in detail in the paper.

  4. Size limits for rounding of volcanic ash particles heated by lightning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadsworth, Fabian B; Vasseur, Jérémie; Llewellin, Edward W; Genareau, Kimberly; Cimarelli, Corrado; Dingwell, Donald B

    2017-03-01

    Volcanic ash particles can be remelted by the high temperatures induced in volcanic lightning discharges. The molten particles can round under surface tension then quench to produce glass spheres. Melting and rounding timescales for volcanic materials are strongly dependent on heating duration and peak temperature and are shorter for small particles than for large particles. Therefore, the size distribution of glass spheres recovered from ash deposits potentially record the short duration, high-temperature conditions of volcanic lightning discharges, which are hard to measure directly. We use a 1-D numerical solution to the heat equation to determine the timescales of heating and cooling of volcanic particles during and after rapid heating and compare these with the capillary timescale for rounding an angular particle. We define dimensionless parameters-capillary, Fourier, Stark, Biot, and Peclet numbers-to characterize the competition between heat transfer within the particle, heat transfer at the particle rim, and capillary motion, for particles of different sizes. We apply this framework to the lightning case and constrain a maximum size for ash particles susceptible to surface tension-driven rounding, as a function of lightning temperature and duration, and ash properties. The size limit agrees well with maximum sizes of glass spheres found in volcanic ash that has been subjected to lightning or experimental discharges, demonstrating that the approach that we develop can be used to obtain a first-order estimate of lightning conditions in volcanic plumes.

  5. Uncertainty in volcanic ash particle size distribution and implications for infrared remote sensing and airspace management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western, L.; Watson, M.; Francis, P. N.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanic ash particle size distributions are critical in determining the fate of airborne ash in drifting clouds. A significant amount of global airspace is managed using dispersion models that rely on a single ash particle size distribution, derived from a single source - Hobbs et al., 1991. This is clearly wholly inadequate given the range of magmatic compositions and eruptive styles that volcanoes present. Available measurements of airborne ash lognormal particle size distributions show geometric standard deviation values that range from 1.0 - 2.5, with others showing mainly polymodal distributions. This paucity of data pertaining to airborne sampling of volcanic ash results in large uncertainties both when using an assumed distribution to retrieve mass loadings from satellite observations and when prescribing particle size distributions of ash in dispersion models. Uncertainty in the particle size distribution can yield order of magnitude differences to mass loading retrievals of an ash cloud from satellite observations, a result that can easily reclassify zones of airspace closure. The uncertainty arises from the assumptions made when defining both the geometric particle size and particle single scattering properties in terms of an effective radius. This has significant implications for airspace management and emphasises the need for an improved quantification of airborne volcanic ash particle size distributions.

  6. Synthesis and optical properties of quantum-size metal sulfide particles in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedeljkovic, J.M.; Patel, R.C.; Kaufman, P.; Joyce-Pruden, C.; O' Leary, N. (Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY (United States))

    1993-04-01

    During the past decade, small-particle' research has become quite popular in various fields of chemistry and physics. The recognition of quantum-size effects in very small colloidal particles has led to renewed interest in this area. Small particles' are clusters of atoms or molecules ranging in size from 1 nm to almost 10 nm or having agglomeration numbers from 10 up to a few hundred. In other words, small particles fall in size between single atoms or molecules and bulk materials. The agglomeration number specifies the number of individual atoms or molecules in a given cluster. The research in this area is interdisciplinary, and it links colloidal science and molecular chemistry. The symbiosis of these two areas of research has revealed some intriguing characteristics of small particles. This experiment illustrates the following: simple colloidal techniques for the preparation of two different types of quantum-size metal sulfide particles; the blue shift of the measured optical absorption spectra when the particle size is decreased in the quantum-size regime; and use of a simple quantum mechanical model to calculate the particle size from the absorption onset measured for CdS.

  7. Optical sensor technology for simultaneous measurement of particle speed and concentration of micro sized particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Casper; Han, Anpan; Kristensen, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Experimental characterization of a sensor technology that can measure particle speed and concentration simultaneously in liquids and gases is presented here. The basic sensor principle is based on an optical element that shapes a light beam into well-defined fringes. The technology can be described...... independently from particle speeds and is a key advantage compared to normal Laser Particle Counters....

  8. Particle Size Effect on Wetting Kinetics of a Nanosuspension Drop: MD Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Baiou; Webb, Edmund

    The behavior of nano-fluids, or fluid suspensions containing nanoparticles, has garnered tremendous attention recently for applications in advanced manufacturing. In our previous results from MD simulations, for a wetting system with different advancing contact angles, cases where self-pinning was observed were compared to cases where it was not and relevant forces on particles at the contact line were computed. To advance this work, the roles of particle size and particle loading are examined. Results presented illustrate how particle size affects spreading kinetics and how this connects to dynamic droplet morphology and relevant forces that exist nearby the contact line region. Furthermore, increased particle size in simulations permits a more detailed investigation of particle/substrate interfacial contributions to behavior observed at the advancing contact line. Based on changes in spreading kinetics with particle size, forces between the particle and liquid front are predicted and compared to those computed from simulations. At high loading, particle/particle interactions become relevant and forces computed between particles entrained to an advancing contact line will be presented.

  9. Analysis of particle size reduction on overall surface area and enzymatic hydrolysis yield of corn stover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hanjie; Ye, Chenlin; Liu, Ke; Gu, Hanqi; Du, Weitao; Bao, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Particle size of lignocellulose materials is an important factor for enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency. In this study, corn stover was milled and sieved into different size fractions from 1.42, 0.69, 0.34, to 0.21 mm, and the corresponding enzymatic hydrolysis yields were 24.69, 23.96, 25.34, and 26.97 %, respectively. The results indicate that the hydrolysis yield is approximately constant with changing corn stover particle sizes in the experimental range. The overall surface area and the inner pore size measurement show that the overall specific surface area was less than 2 % with the half reduction of particle size due to the greater inner pore surface area. The scanning electron microscope photographs gave direct evidence of the much greater inner pore surface area of corn stover particles. This result provided a reference when a proper size reduction of lignocellulose materials is considered in biorefining operations.

  10. Size Distribution of Particles Emitted from Liquefied Natural Gas Fueled Engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The results of measurements conducted to determine the number and mass concentration of particles emitted from the liquefied natural gas (LNG) fueled spark ignition engines are presented. Particle size distributions were measured at different speeds, different loads and ESC cycles. The nanoparticles with diameter smaller than 39nm, measured by the electrical low-pressure impactor (ELPI), are dominant in number concentration that is nearly 92.7% of the total number of the emitted particles at the peak point. As for the mass of emission particle, it is shown that the mass of the particles greater than 1.2μm is more than 65% that of the emitted particles.

  11. Radiation pressure forces on individual micron-size dust particles: a new experimental approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, Oliver [Institute for Planetology, University of Muenster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Str. 10, D-48149 Muenster (Germany)]. E-mail: okrauss@uni-muenster.de; Wurm, Gerhard [Institute for Planetology, University of Muenster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Str. 10, D-48149 Muenster (Germany)

    2004-12-15

    We present a newly developed experimental setup for the measurement of radiation pressure forces on individual dust particles. The principle of measurement is to observe the momentum transfer from a high-power laser pulse to a particle that is levitated in a quadrupole trap. Microscopic observation of the particle motion provides information on the forces that act on the particle in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the incident laser beam. First measurements with micron-size graphite grains that serve as analog particles for carbonaceous dust grains in various astrophysical environments reveal that such highly irregularly shaped particles show very high ratios of transversal to radial radiation pressure forces.

  12. Effect of sodium citrate on preparation of nano-sized cobalt particles by organic colloidal process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huaping ZHU; Hao LI; Huiyu SONG; Shijun LIAO

    2009-01-01

    Nano-sized cobalt particles with the diameter of 2 nm were prepared via an organic colloidal process with sodium formate, ethylene glycol and sodium citrate as the reducing agent, the solvent and the complexing agent, respectively. The effects of sodium citrate on the yield, crystal structure, particle size and size distribution of the prepared nano-sized cobalt particles were then investigated. The results show that the average particle diameter decreases from 200 nm to 2 nm when the molar ratio of sodium citrate to cobalt chloride changes from 0 to 6. Furthermore, sodium citrate plays a crucial role in the controlling of size distribution of the nano-sized particles. The size distribution of the particle without sodium citrate addition is in range from tens of nanometers to 300 or 400 nm, while that with sodium citrate addition is limited in the range of (2±0.25) nm. Moreover, it is found that the addition of sodium citrate as a complex agent could decrease the yield of the nano-sized cobalt particle.

  13. A Review of Discrete Element Method (DEM) Particle Shapes and Size Distributions for Lunar Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, John E.; Metzger, Philip T.; Wilkinson, R. Allen

    2010-01-01

    As part of ongoing efforts to develop models of lunar soil mechanics, this report reviews two topics that are important to discrete element method (DEM) modeling the behavior of soils (such as lunar soils): (1) methods of modeling particle shapes and (2) analytical representations of particle size distribution. The choice of particle shape complexity is driven primarily by opposing tradeoffs with total number of particles, computer memory, and total simulation computer processing time. The choice is also dependent on available DEM software capabilities. For example, PFC2D/PFC3D and EDEM support clustering of spheres; MIMES incorporates superquadric particle shapes; and BLOKS3D provides polyhedra shapes. Most commercial and custom DEM software supports some type of complex particle shape beyond the standard sphere. Convex polyhedra, clusters of spheres and single parametric particle shapes such as the ellipsoid, polyellipsoid, and superquadric, are all motivated by the desire to introduce asymmetry into the particle shape, as well as edges and corners, in order to better simulate actual granular particle shapes and behavior. An empirical particle size distribution (PSD) formula is shown to fit desert sand data from Bagnold. Particle size data of JSC-1a obtained from a fine particle analyzer at the NASA Kennedy Space Center is also fitted to a similar empirical PSD function.

  14. A novel method for size uniform 200nm particles: multimetallic particles and in vitro gene delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, Lamar; Ford, Kris; Superfine, Richard

    2008-10-01

    We report on the fabrication of arrays of mono- and multimetallic particles via metal evaporation onto lithographically patterned posts. Metal particles evaporated on cylindrical structures 0.20μm in diameter and 0.33μm tall are released via photoresist dissolution, resulting in freely suspended, shape defined particles. These Post-Particles have highly tunable composition, as demonstrated by our deposition of five different multimetallic particle blends. We calculate the susceptibility and magnetization of 200nm Fe particles in an applied 0.081T magnetic field. In order to evaluate their usefulness as magnetofection agents an antisense oligonucleotide designed to correct the aberrant splicing of enhanced green fluorescent protein mRNA was successfully attached to Fe Post-Particles via a polyethyleneimine linker and transfected into a modified HeLa cell line.

  15. Interaction of tallow and hay particle size on ruminal parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, W D; Bertrand, J A; Jenkins, T C

    1999-07-01

    Four nonlactating ruminally cannulated Holstein cows were used in a 4 x 4 Latin square experiment with 4 21-d periods to determine if the effects of dietary fat would be affected by hay particle length. Treatments consisted of two levels of tallow (0 and 5%) and two hay particle lengths (short-cut and long-cut) in a 2 x 2 factorial. Diets contained alfalfa hay, corn silage, and concentrate [1:1:2, dry matter (DM) basis] fed as a total mixed ration (TMR) once per day. Samples of the 0 and 5% tallow TMR were ground and incubated in situ in polyester bags for 24 and 48 h. Ruminal samples were taken on day 21 at 0800 h and at 2-h intervals until 1600 h. The total tract digestibilities of acid detergent fiber (ADF) and neutral detergent fiber (NDF) were not affected by tallow or by hay by tallow interactions. There was a trend for tallow to improve total tract digestibility of crude protein (CP) (70.2 vs. 74.7%). After 48 h of ruminal incubation, tallow significantly decreased the digestibilities of DM, ADF, and NDF. No hay length by tallow interactions for DM, NDF, ADF or CP digestibilities occurred after 24 or 48 h. Tallow increased concentrations of propionate and decreased concentrations of acetate and valerate and the acetate-to-propionate ratio. Total volatile fatty acids increased when tallow was added to diets with short-cut hay, which suggests that when unprotected fat is added to diets with a high level of hay, a short-cut hay length may be advantageous. This result may be due to shorter rumen retention time of feed particles, which reduces the time for fatty acids to exert antimicrobial effects. Or, it may because the increased surface area of the hay particle provides more area for microbial attachment and increased fermentation.

  16. Medical Modeling of Particle Size Effects for CB Inhalation Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    of body orientation ( posture ) on deposition, and availability of 30 stochastic lung geometry for more realistic assessment of variation of dose in... hygiene community, with their role of monitoring and protecting workers in the workplace, has had a key role in developing standard models of...M.G., Miller, F.J. and Raabe, O.G. (1995). Particle Inhalability Curves for Humans and Small Laboratory Animals. Annals of Occupational Hygiene 39

  17. Influence of Particle Size on Reaction Selectivity in Cyclohexene Hydrogenation and Dehydrogenation over Silica-Supported Monodisperse Pt Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rioux, R. M.; Hsu, B. B.; Grass, M. E.; Song, H.; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-07-11

    The role of particle size during the hydrogenation/dehydrogenation of cyclohexene (10 Torr C{sub 6}H{sub 10}, 200-600 Torr H{sub 2}, and 273-650 K) was studied over a series of monodisperse Pt/SBA-15 catalysts. The conversion of cyclohexene in the presence of excess H{sub 2} (H{sub 2}:C{sub 6}H{sub 10} ratio = 20-60) is characterized by three regimes: hydrogenation of cyclohexene to cyclohexane at low temperature (< 423 K), an intermediate temperature range in which both hydrogenation and dehydrogenation occur; and a high temperature regime in which the dehydrogenation of cyclohexene dominates (> 573 K). The rate of both reactions demonstrated maxima with temperature, regardless of Pt particle size. For the hydrogenation of cyclohexene, a non-Arrhenius temperature dependence (apparent negative activation energy) was observed. Hydrogenation is structure insensitive at low temperatures, and apparently structure sensitive in the non-Arrhenius regime; the origin of the particle-size dependent reactivity with temperature is attributed to a change in the coverage of reactive hydrogen. Small particles were more active for dehydrogenation and had lower apparent activation energies than large particles. The selectivity can be controlled by changing the particle size, which is attributed to the structure sensitivity of both reactions in the temperature regime where hydrogenation and dehydrogenation are catalyzed simultaneously.

  18. Dealing with non-unique and non-monotonic response in particle sizing instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Phil

    2017-04-01

    A number of instruments used as de-facto standards for measuring particle size distributions are actually incapable of uniquely determining the size of an individual particle. This is due to non-unique or non-monotonic response functions. Optical particle counters have non monotonic response due to oscillations in the Mie response curves, especially for large aerosol and small cloud droplets. Scanning mobility particle sizers respond identically to two particles where the ratio of particle size to particle charge is approximately the same. Images of two differently sized cloud or precipitation particles taken by an optical array probe can have similar dimensions or shadowed area depending upon where they are in the imaging plane. A number of methods exist to deal with these issues, including assuming that positive and negative errors cancel, smoothing response curves, integrating regions in measurement space before conversion to size space and matrix inversion. Matrix inversion (also called kernel inversion) has the advantage that it determines the size distribution which best matches the observations, given specific information about the instrument (a matrix which specifies the probability that a particle of a given size will be measured in a given instrument size bin). In this way it maximises use of the information in the measurements. However this technique can be confused by poor counting statistics which can cause erroneous results and negative concentrations. Also an effective method for propagating uncertainties is yet to be published or routinely implemented. Her we present a new alternative which overcomes these issues. We use Bayesian methods to determine the probability that a given size distribution is correct given a set of instrument data and then we use Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods to sample this many dimensional probability distribution function to determine the expectation and (co)variances - hence providing a best guess and an uncertainty for

  19. On airborne nano/micro-sized wear particles released from low-metallic automotive brakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukutschová, Jana; Moravec, Pavel; Tomášek, Vladimír; Matějka, Vlastimil; Smolík, Jiří; Schwarz, Jaroslav; Seidlerová, Jana; Safářová, Klára; Filip, Peter

    2011-04-01

    The paper addresses the wear particles released from commercially available "low-metallic" automotive brake pads subjected to brake dynamometer tests. Particle size distribution was measured in situ and the generated particles were collected. The collected fractions and the original bulk material were analyzed using several chemical and microscopic techniques. The experiments demonstrated that airborne wear particles with sizes between 10 nm and 20 μm were released into the air. The numbers of nanoparticles (release of nanoparticles was measured when the average temperature of the rotor reached 300°C, the combustion initiation temperature of organics present in brakes. In contrast to particle size distribution data, the microscopic analysis revealed the presence of nanoparticles, mostly in the form of agglomerates, in all captured fractions. The majority of elements present in the bulk material were also detected in the ultra-fine fraction of the wear particles.

  20. Size-resolved fluxes of sub-100-nm particles over forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryor, Sara; Barthelmie, Rebecca Jane; Spaulding, A.M.;

    2009-01-01

    Dry deposition of atmospheric particles is critically dependent on particle size and plays a key role in dictating the mass and number distributions of atmospheric particles. However, modeling dry deposition is constrained by a lack of understanding of controlling dependencies and accurate size...... leaf-on and are statistically robust. Particle deposition velocities normalized by friction velocity (v d +) are approximately four times smaller than comparable values for coniferous forests reported elsewhere. Comparison of the data with output from a new one-dimensional mechanistic particle...... deposition model designed for broadleaf forest exhibits greater accord with the measurements than two previous analytical models, but modeled v d + underestimate observed values by at least a factor of two for all Dp between 6 and 100 nm. When size-resolved particle deposition velocities for Dp

  1. Experimental and modeling studies on number and size spectrum evolutions of aerosol particles within a chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Zai; HUANG Zhen; WANG JiaSong

    2007-01-01

    A size-specific aerosol dynamic model is set up to predict the evolution of particle number concentration within a chamber. Particle aggregation is based on the theory of Brownian coagulation, and the model not only comprises particle loss due to coagulation, but also considers the formation of large particles by collision. To validate the model, three different groups of chamber experiments with SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer) are conducted. The results indicate that the advantage of the model over the past simple size bin model is its provision of detailed information of size spectrum evolution,and the results can be used to analyze the variations of number concentration and CMD (Count Median Diameter). Furthermore, some aerosol dynamic mechanisms that cannot be measured by instrument can be analyzed by the model simulation, which is significant for better understanding the removal and control mechanisms of ultrafine particles.

  2. Size distribution of particle-associated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and their implications for health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Yan; Xu, Tingting; Li, Xiang; Cheng, Tiantao; Yang, Xin; Sun, Xiaomin; Chen, Jianmin

    2016-03-01

    In order to better understand the size distribution of particle-associated PBDEs and their deposition pattern in the human respiratory tract, we carried out a 1-year campaign during 2012-2013 for the measurement of size-resolved particles at the urban site of Shanghai. The results showed that particulate PBDEs exhibited a bimodal distribution with a mode peak in the accumulation particle size range and the second mode peak in the coarse particle size ranges. As the number of bromine atoms in the molecule increases, accumulation-mode peak intensity increased while coarse-mode peak intensity decreased. This change was consistent with the variation of PBDEs' subcooled vapor pressure. Absorption and adsorption processes dominated the distribution of PBDEs among the different size particles. The evaluated deposition flux of Σ13 PBDEs was 26.8 pg h-1, in which coarse particles contributed most PBDEs in head and tracheobronchial regions, while fine-mode particles contributed major PBDEs in the alveoli region. In association with the fact that fine particles can penetrate deeper into the respiratory system, fine-particle-bound highly brominated PBDEs can be inhaled more deeply into human lungs and cause a greater risk to human health.

  3. Particle-size distribution of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and its implications for health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Y.; Xu, T.; Li, X.; Cheng, T.; Yang, X.; Sun, X.; Chen, J.

    2015-12-01

    In order better to understand the particle-size distribution of particulate PBDEs and their deposition pattern in human respiratory tract, we made an one year campaign 2012-2013 for the measurement of size-resolved aerosol particles at Shanghai urban site. The results showed that particulate PBDEs exhibited a bimodal distribution with a mode peak in the accumulation particle size range and the second mode peak in the coarse particle size ranges. As the number of bromine atoms in the molecule increased, accumulation mode peak intensity increased while coarse mode peak intensity decreased. This change was the consistent with the variation of PBDEs' sub-cooled vapor pressure. Absorption and adsorption process dominated the distribution of PBDEs among the different size particles. Evaluated deposition flux of Σ13PBDE was 26.8 pg h-1, in which coarse particles contributed most PBDEs in head and tracheobronchial regions, while fine mode particles contributed major PBDEs in the alveoli region. In associated with the fact that fine particles can penetrate deeper into the respiratory system, fine particle-bound highly brominated PBDEs can be inhaled more deeply into human lungs and cause a greater risk to human health.

  4. Soot particle sizing based on analytical formula derived from laser-induced incandescence decay signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian; Chen, Linghong; Yan, Mingming; Wu, Xuecheng; Gréhan, Gérard; Cen, Kefa

    2017-01-01

    The laser-induced incandescence (LII) signal during a heat-conduction-dominated cooling process was used to derive an analytical formula to describe the relationship between the soot particle size and the LII signal decay time by exponential fitting. The formula was used to determine particle sizes based on the experimental LII signals at different detection wavelengths for an atmospheric C2H4/air diffusion flame. The results agree with those obtained from temporal temperature measurements. The measurements and numerical calculations demonstrate that particle sizing depends weakly on the maximum temperature in the formula within a typical heat-up temperature range. The results show that based on this formula, a compact single-color LII detection system can be used for particle sizing with low uncertainty under most practical combustion conditions, at least in cases where heat conduction is dominant and occurs in a free molecular regime during particle cooling.

  5. Intercomparison of Numerical Inversion Algorithms for Particle Size Determination of Polystyrene Suspensions Using Spectral Turbidimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Glasse

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The continuous monitoring of the particle size distribution in particulate processes with suspensions or emulsions requires measurement techniques that can be used as in situ devices in contrast to ex situ or laboratory methods. In this context, for the evaluation of turbidimetric spectral measurements, the application of different numerical inversion algorithms is investigated with respect to the particle size distribution determination of polystyrene suspensions. A modified regularization concept consisting of a Twomey-Phillips-Regularization with an integrated nonnegative constraint and a modified L-curve criterion for the selection of the regularization parameter is used. The particle size (i.e., particle diameter of polystyrene suspensions in the range x=0.03–3 µm was validated via dynamic light scattering and differential centrifugal sedimentation and compared to the retrieved particle size distribution from the inverted turbidimetry measurements.

  6. Retrieving the size of particles with rough and complex surfaces from two-dimensional scattering patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulanowski, Z.; Hirst, E.; Kaye, P. H.; Greenaway, R.

    2012-12-01

    Scattered intensity measurement is a commonly used method for determining the size of small particles. However, it requires calibration and is subject to errors due to changes in incident irradiance or detector sensitivity. Analysis of two-dimensional scattering patterns offers an alternative approach. We test morphological image processing operations on patterns from a diverse range of particles with rough surfaces and/or complex structure, including mineral dust, spores, pollen, ice analogs and sphere clusters from 4 to 88 μm in size. It is found that the median surface area of intensity peaks is the most robust measure, and it is inversely proportional to particle size. The trend holds well for most particle types, as long as substantial roughness or complexity is present. One important application of this technique is the sizing of atmospheric particles, such as ice crystals.

  7. Radial particle-size segregation during packing of particulates into cylindrical containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripple, C.D.; James, R.V.; Rubin, J.

    1973-01-01

    In a series of experiments, soil materials were placed in long cylindrical containers, using various packing procedures. Soil columns produced by deposition and simultaneous vibratory compaction were dense and axially uniform, but showed significant radial segregation of particle sizes. Similar results were obtained with deposition and simultaneous impact-type compaction when the impacts resulted in significant container "bouncing". The latter procedure, modified to minimize "bouncing" produced dense, uniform soil columns, showing little radial particle-size segregation. Other procedures tested (deposition alone and deposition followed by compaction) did not result in radial segregation, but produced columns showing either relatively low or axially nonuniform densities. Current data suggest that radial particle-size segregation is mainly due to vibration-induced particle circulation in which particles of various sizes have different circulation rates and paths. ?? 1973.

  8. Particle size dependent heat of adsorption for CO on supported Pd nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer-Wolfarth, Jan-Henrik; Flores-Camacho, Jose Manuel; Hartmann, Jens; Schauermann, Swetlana; Freund, Hans-Joachim [Fritz-Haber-Institute, Max-Planck-Society, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Farmer, Jason; Campbell, Charles [Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle (United States)

    2010-07-01

    The particle size dependence of the heat of adsorption for carbon monoxide on supported Pd nanoparticles has been investigated at 300 K with a new single crystal microcalorimeter and compared to the heat of adsorption on Pd(111). The average Pd particle size was varied systematically in the range of 100 to 4900 Pd atoms, i.e. 2 to 8 nm diameter. All nanoparticles were supported on Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}(111)/Pt(111). The initial heat of adsorption was found to decrease monotonically with decreasing particle size below 4 nm. The correlation of the heat of adsorption with a particle size dependent reduction of the particle lattice constant is discussed. Further, the microcalorimetry technique used to determine the adsorption energies and its performance is presented.

  9. Effects of particle size on residual stresses of metal matrix composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Yi-wu; GENG Lin; LI Ai-bin

    2006-01-01

    A finite element analysis was carried out on the development of residual stresses during the cooling process from the fabrication temperature in the SiCp reinforced Al matrix composites. In the simulation, the two-dimensional and random distribution multi-particle unit cell model and plane strain conditions were used. By incorporating the Taylor-based nonlocal plasticity theory, the effect of particle size on the nature, magnitude and distribution of residual stresses of the composites was studied. The magnitude thermal-stress-induced plastic deformation during cooling was also calculated. The results show similarities in the patterns of thermal residual stress and strain distributions for all ranges of particle size. However, they show differences in magnitude of thermal residual stress as a result of strain gradient effect. The average thermal residual stress increases with decreasing particle size, and the residual plastic strain decreases with decreasing particle size.

  10. Size Differentiation Of A Continuous Stream Of Particles Using Acoustic Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsugbe, E.; Starr, A.; Foote, P.; Ruiz-Carcel, C.; Jennions, I.

    2016-11-01

    Procter and Gamble (P&G) require an online system that can monitor the particle size distribution of their washing powder mixing process. This would enable the process to take a closed loop form which would enable process optimisation to take place in real time. Acoustic Emission (AE) was selected as the sensing method due to its non-invasive nature and primary sensitivity to frequencies which particle events emanate. This work details the results of the first experiment carried out in this research project. This experiment involved the use of AE to distinguish between the sizes of sieved polyethylene particle (53-250microns) and glass beads (150-600microns) which were dispensed on a target plate using a funnel. By conducting a threshold analysis of the impact peaks in the signal, the sizes of the particles could be distinguished and a signal feature was found which could be directly linked to the sizes of the particles.

  11. Particle number size distribution in the eastern Mediterranean: Formation and growth rates of ultrafine airborne atmospheric particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopanakis, I.; Chatoutsidou, S. E.; Torseth, K.; Glytsos, T.; Lazaridis, M.

    2013-10-01

    Particle number concentration was measured between June 2009 and June 2010 at Akrotiri research station in a rural/suburban region of western Crete (Greece). Overall, the available data covered 157 days during the aforementioned period of measurements. The objectives were to study the number size distribution characteristics of ambient aerosols and furthermore to identify new particle formation events and to evaluate particle formation rates and growth rates of the newborn particles. Aerosol particles with mobility diameters between 10 and 1100 nm were measured using a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) system. Measurements were performed at ambient relative humidities. The median total particle number concentration was 525 #/cm3 whereas the number concentration ranged between 130 #/cm3 and 9597 #/cm3. The average percentage of particles with diameters between 10 nm and 100 nm (N10-100) to total particles was 53% during summer and spring, but reached 80% during winter. Maximum average contribution of nano-particles (10 nm coagulation sinks. Mean growth and formation rates were calculated and showed values equal to 6 nm hr-1 and 13 cm-3 s-1, respectively.

  12. The Effect of Solid Constituent Particle Size Distributions on TP-H1148 Propellant Slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Douglas H.; Miles, William L.; Taylor, David S.; Rackham, Jon L.

    1997-01-01

    Special aluminum and ammonium perchlorate (AP) particle size distributions were prepared for a matrix of five-inch diameter, center-perforated (CP) motor tests to measure the aluminum oxide slag response in Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) propellant. Previous tests of TP-H1148 propellant in five-inch CP spin motors have shown a correlation between aluminum particle size and generated slag. The motors for this study were cast from thirteen five-gallon propellant mixes which used five particle size levels of aluminum powder, five of unground AP and three of ground AP. Aluminum had the greatest effect on slag formation, the more coarse fractions causing greater slag quantities and larger slag particles. Unground AP had about half the effect of aluminum with the coarser fractions again producing more and larger sized slag particles. The variation in ground AP did not have a significant effect on slag formation. Quench bomb tests showed the same trends as the spin motors, that is, larger aluminum and AP particle size distributions generated larger slag particles leaving the propellant surface. Cured propellant mechanical properties were also impacted by particle size variation.

  13. Effect of sulfate and carbonate minerals on particle-size distributions in arid soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, Dirk; Buck, Brenda J.; Teng, Yuazxin; Robins, Colin; Goldstein, Harland L.

    2014-01-01

    Arid soils pose unique problems during measurement and interpretation of particle-size distributions (PSDs) because they often contain high concentrations of water-soluble salts. This study investigates the effects of sulfate and carbonate minerals on grain-size analysis by comparing analyses in water, in which the minerals dissolve, and isopropanol (IPA), in which they do not. The presence of gypsum, in particular, substantially affects particle-size analysis once the concentration of gypsum in the sample exceeds the mineral’s solubility threshold. For smaller concentrations particle-size results are unaffected. This is because at concentrations above the solubility threshold fine particles cement together or bind to coarser particles or aggregates already present in the sample, or soluble mineral coatings enlarge grains. Formation of discrete crystallites exacerbates the problem. When soluble minerals are dissolved the original, insoluble grains will become partly or entirely liberated. Thus, removing soluble minerals will result in an increase in measured fine particles. Distortion of particle-size analysis is larger for sulfate minerals than for carbonate minerals because of the much higher solubility in water of the former. When possible, arid soils should be analyzed using a liquid in which the mineral grains do not dissolve, such as IPA, because the results will more accurately reflect the PSD under most arid soil field conditions. This is especially important when interpreting soil and environmental processes affected by particle size.

  14. Deformation Behavior of Sub-micron and Micron Sized Alumina Particles in Compression.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarobol, Pylin; Chandross, Michael E.; Carroll, Jay; Mook, William; Boyce, Brad; Kotula, Paul Gabriel; McKenzie, Bonnie Beth; Bufford, Daniel Charles; Hall, Aaron Christopher.

    2014-09-01

    The ability to integrate ceramics with other materials has been limited due to high temperature (>800degC) ceramic processing. Recently, researchers demonstrated a novel process , aerosol deposition (AD), to fabricate ceramic films at room temperature (RT). In this process, sub - micro n sized ceramic particles are accelerated by pressurized gas, impacted on the substrate, plastically deformed, and form a dense film under vacuum. This AD process eliminates high temperature processing thereby enabling new coatings and device integration, in which ceramics can be deposited on metals, plastics, and glass. However, k nowledge in fundamental mechanisms for ceramic particle s to deform and form a dense ceramic film is still needed and is essential in advancing this novel RT technology. In this wo rk, a combination of experimentation and atomistic simulation was used to determine the deformation behavior of sub - micron sized ceramic particle s ; this is the first fundamental step needed to explain coating formation in the AD process . High purity, singl e crystal, alpha alumina particles with nominal size s of 0.3 um and 3.0 um were examined. Particle characterization, using transmission electron microscopy (TEM ), showed that the 0.3 u m particles were relatively defect - free single crystals whereas 3.0 u m p articles were highly defective single crystals or particles contained low angle grain boundaries. Sub - micron sized Al 2 O 3 particles exhibited ductile failure in compression. In situ compression experiments showed 0.3um particles deformed plastically, fractured, and became polycrystalline. Moreover, dislocation activit y was observed within the se particles during compression . These sub - micron sized Al 2 O 3 particles exhibited large accum ulated strain (2 - 3 times those of micron - sized particles) before first fracture. I n agreement with the findings from experimentation , a tomistic simulation s of nano - Al 2 O 3 particles showed dislocation slip and

  15. Acoustophoretic separation of airborne millimeter-size particles by a Fresnel lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicek, Ahmet; Korozlu, Nurettin; Adem Kaya, Olgun; Ulug, Bulent

    2017-01-01

    We numerically demonstrate acoustophoretic separation of spherical solid particles in air by means of an acoustic Fresnel lens. Beside gravitational and drag forces, freely-falling millimeter-size particles experience large acoustic radiation forces around the focus of the lens, where interplay of forces lead to differentiation of particle trajectories with respect to either size or material properties. Due to the strong acoustic field at the focus, radiation force can divert particles with source intensities significantly smaller than those required for acoustic levitation in a standing field. When the lens is designed to have a focal length of 100 mm at 25 kHz, finite-element method simulations reveal a sharp focus with a full-width at half-maximum of 0.5 wavelenghts and a field enhancement of 18 dB. Through numerical calculation of forces and simulation of particle trajectories, we demonstrate size-based separation of acrylic particles at a source sound pressure level of 153 dB such that particles with diameters larger than 0.5 mm are admitted into the central hole, whereas smaller particles are rejected. Besides, efficient separation of particles with similar acoustic properties such as polyethylene, polystyrene and acrylic particles of the same size is also demonstrated. PMID:28252033

  16. The Isolation of DNA by Polycharged Magnetic Particles: An Analysis of the Interaction by Zeta Potential and Particle Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazan Haddad

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic isolation of biological targets is in major demand in the biotechnology industry today. This study considers the interaction of four surface-modified magnetic micro- and nanoparticles with selected DNA fragments. Different surface modifications of nanomaghemite precursors were investigated: MAN37 (silica-coated, MAN127 (polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated, MAN158 (phosphate-coated, and MAN164 (tripolyphosphate-coated. All particles were positive polycharged agglomerated monodispersed systems. Mean particle sizes were 0.48, 2.97, 2.93, and 3.67 μm for MAN37, MAN127, MAN164, and MAN158, respectively. DNA fragments exhibited negative zeta potential of −0.22 mV under binding conditions (high ionic strength, low pH, and dehydration. A decrease in zeta potential of particles upon exposure to DNA was observed with exception of MAN158 particles. The measured particle size of MAN164 particles increased by nearly twofold upon exposure to DNA. Quantitative PCR isolation of DNA with a high retrieval rate was observed by magnetic particles MAN127 and MAN164. Interaction between polycharged magnetic particles and DNA is mediated by various binding mechanisms such as hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Future development of DNA isolation technology requires an understanding of the physical and biochemical conditions of this process.

  17. The Isolation of DNA by Polycharged Magnetic Particles: An Analysis of the Interaction by Zeta Potential and Particle Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Yazan; Xhaxhiu, Kledi; Kopel, Pavel; Hynek, David; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech

    2016-04-20

    Magnetic isolation of biological targets is in major demand in the biotechnology industry today. This study considers the interaction of four surface-modified magnetic micro- and nanoparticles with selected DNA fragments. Different surface modifications of nanomaghemite precursors were investigated: MAN37 (silica-coated), MAN127 (polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated), MAN158 (phosphate-coated), and MAN164 (tripolyphosphate-coated). All particles were positive polycharged agglomerated monodispersed systems. Mean particle sizes were 0.48, 2.97, 2.93, and 3.67 μm for MAN37, MAN127, MAN164, and MAN158, respectively. DNA fragments exhibited negative zeta potential of -0.22 mV under binding conditions (high ionic strength, low pH, and dehydration). A decrease in zeta potential of particles upon exposure to DNA was observed with exception of MAN158 particles. The measured particle size of MAN164 particles increased by nearly twofold upon exposure to DNA. Quantitative PCR isolation of DNA with a high retrieval rate was observed by magnetic particles MAN127 and MAN164. Interaction between polycharged magnetic particles and DNA is mediated by various binding mechanisms such as hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Future development of DNA isolation technology requires an understanding of the physical and biochemical conditions of this process.

  18. Theoretical Study on the Effects of Particle Size Distribution on the Optical Properties of Colloidal Gold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyo Jeong; Chandra, Saha Leton; Jang, Joon Kyung [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-15

    Mie theory has been used to calculate the extinction of a gold nanoparticle in water by varying its diameter from 1 to 1000 nm. Utilizing this size-dependent theoretical spectrum, we have calculated the extinction spectrum of a colloidal gold by taking into account the size distribution of particle. Such calculation is in better agreement with experiment than the calculation without considering the size distribution. A least-squares fitting is used to deduce the size distribution from an experimental extinction spectrum. For particles with their diameters ranging from 10 to 28 nanometers, the fitting gives reasonable agreement with the size distribution obtained from tunneling electron microscope images.

  19. NUMBER CONCENTRATION, SIZE DISTRIBUTION AND FINE PARTICLE FRACTION OF TROPOSPHERIC AND STRATOSPHERIC AEROSOLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xu; Guangyu Shi; Li Zhang; Jun Zhou; Yasunobu Iwasaka

    2003-01-01

    Aerosol observations were carried out at Xianghe Scientific Balloon Base (39.45°N, 117°E) using a stratospheric balloon. The particle number concentrations of the tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols were directly explored.The vertical distributions of the number concentration, number-size (that is, particle number versus particle size)distribution, and the fraction of fine particles (0.5 μm>r>0.15 μm/r>0.15 μm) are reported in this paper. The profiles of particle concentration present multi-peak phenomenon. The pattern of size distribution for atmospheric aerosol indicates a tri-modal (r=~0.2 μm, ~0.88 μm and ~7.0 μm) and a bi-modal (r=~0.13 μm and 2.0 μm). The number-size distribution almost fits the Junge distribution for particles with r<0.5 μm in the stratosphere of 1993 and the troposphere of 1994. But the distributions of coarse particles (r>0.5 μm) are not uniform. The number-size distribution exhibits also a wide size range in the troposphere of 1993. The results demonstrate that fine particles represent the major portion in the troposphere during the measurement period, reaching as high as 95% in 1994. Certain coarse particle peaks in the troposphere were attributed to clouds and other causes, and in the stratosphere to volcanic eruption. The stratospheric aerosol layer consists of unique fractions of fine or coarse particles depending on their sources. In summary, the process of gas-to-particles conversion was active and the coarse particles were rich over the Xianghe area. The measurements also demonstrate that the spatial and temporal atmospheric aerosol distributions are nonuniform and changeful.

  20. The Influence of Particle Size and Dissolution Rate on Bioavailabilty of Two Indomethacine Capsules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Bijanzadeh

    1995-08-01

    Full Text Available Indomethacin is a drug of very low aqueous solubility and poor wetability, all characteristics which make it a drug with a potenial bioavailability problem. Thus, the present study was undertaken to estimate the bioavailability of indomethacin capsules, having different particle sizes and dissolution rates. The particle size, dissolution rates and the bioavailabilities of two indomethacin capsules, indomethacin generic capsules DP (Darou Pakhsh Co. and indocid (Merk sharp & Dohmewere studied. The median indomethacin particle size of indocid MSD and indomethacin capsules DP were found to be 5.23 mm and 8.61 mm respectively. It also has been found that the dissolution rates and rates of absorption (measured as Ka and peak plasma time are dependent upon the particle size of indomethacin preparations (i.e.the higher particle size, the slower dissolution and absorption. But the total amount of drug absorbed (measured as AUCinf is not affected by the particle size. While the plasma concentration time curve after the administration of indocid capsules shows a distinct distribution and elimination phases, this was iess apparent following the administration of indomethacin generic capsules. Therefore, it is concluded that the particle size and rate of dissolution not only affect the peak time and level, but it may also affect the apparent pattern of indomethacin pharmacokinetics.

  1. Predicting Soil-Water Characteristics from Volumetric Contents of Pore-Size Analogue Particle Fractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naveed, Muhammad; Møldrup, Per; Tuller, Markus;

    F value. Hereby, the Xw*-model implicitly assumes that a given particle size fraction creates an analogue pore size fraction and, also, is based on the validity of the well-known capillary law equation relating equivalent drained pore size to the soil-water matric potential. The Xw*-model was found...

  2. Lifetimes and sizes from two-particle correlation functions

    CERN Document Server

    Heinz, Ulrich W; Wiedemann, Urs Achim; Wu Yuang Fang

    1996-01-01

    We discuss the Yano-Koonin-Podgoretsky (YKP) parametrization of the two-particle correlation function for azimuthally symmetric expanding sources. We derive model-independent expressions for the YKP fit parameters and discuss their physical interpretation. We use them to evaluate the YKP fit parameters and their momentum dependence for a simple model for the emission function and propose new strategies for extracting the source lifetime. Longitudinal expansion of the source can be seen directly in the rapidity dependence of the Yano-Koonin velocity.

  3. Feed particle size evaluation: conventional approach versus digital holography based image analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Dell’Orto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the application of image analysis approach based on digital holography in defining particle size in comparison with the sieve shaker method (sieving method as reference method. For this purpose ground corn meal was analyzed by a sieve shaker Retsch VS 1000 and by image analysis approach based on digital holography. Particle size from digital holography were compared with results obtained by screen (sieving analysis for each of size classes by a cumulative distribution plot. Comparison between particle size values obtained by sieving method and image analysis indicated that values were comparable in term of particle size information, introducing a potential application for digital holography and image analysis in feed industry.

  4. Values of Particle Size Particle Density & Slurry Viscosity to use in Waste Feed Delivery Transfer System Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JEWETT, J R

    2002-01-30

    Recommended values have been developed for particle size distribution, particle density, and slurry viscosity that maybe used in slurry flow calculations that support the design of the piping system that is being modified to deliver Hanford wastes from the underground storage tanks to the planned Waste Treatment Plant for vitrification. The objective of this document is to provide recommended values for three waste properties to be used in a planned revision of the Waste Feed Delivery Transfer System Analysis. These properties are particle size distribution (PSD), particle density, and slurry viscosity. In this document, the results of laboratory and engineering studies will be collated and summarized to provide a succinct source of physical property data for use in the hydraulic analysis of the transfer system.

  5. Effects of particle-fluid density ratio on the interactions between the turbulent channel flow and finite-size particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhaosheng; Lin, Zhaowu; Shao, Xueming; Wang, Lian-Ping

    2017-09-01

    A parallel direct-forcing fictitious domain method is employed to perform fully resolved numerical simulations of turbulent channel flow laden with finite-size particles. The effects of the particle-fluid density ratio on the turbulence modulation in the channel flow are investigated at the friction Reynolds number of 180, the particle volume fraction of 0.84 % , and the particle-fluid density ratio ranging from 1 to 104.2. The results show that the variation of the flow drag with the particle-fluid density ratio is not monotonic, with a larger flow drag for the density ratio of 10.42, compared to those of unity and 104.2. A significant drag reduction by the particles is observed for large particle-fluid density ratios during the transient stage, but not at the statistically stationary stage. The intensity of particle velocity fluctuations generally decreases with increasing particle inertia, except that the particle streamwise root-mean-square velocity and streamwise-transverse velocity correlation in the near-wall region are largest at the density ratio of the order of 10. The averaged momentum equations are derived with the spatial averaging theorem and are used to analyze the mechanisms for the effects of the particles on the flow drag. The results indicate that the drag-reduction effect due to the decrease in the fluid Reynolds shear stress is counteracted by the drag-enhancement effect due to the increase in the total particle stress or the interphase drag force for the large particle-inertia case. The sum of the total Reynolds stress and particle inner stress contributions to the flow drag is largest at the density ratio of the order of 10, which is the reason for the largest flow drag at this density ratio. The interphase drag force obtained from the averaged momentum equation (the balance theory) is significantly smaller than (but agrees qualitatively with) that from the empirical drag formula based on the phase-averaged slip velocity for large density

  6. Size selected clusters and particles: from physical chemistry and chemical physics to catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Bokhoven, Jeroen A.; Vajda, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    When changing the size of metals from single atoms to monodispersed subnanometer clusters to well defined nanoparticles, their properties may change dramatically, as the type and fraction of their atoms gradually shifts from being dominantly under-coordinated to those organized in crystalline facets. Taking into account the one- to three-dimensional particle shapes, structural fluxionality and attachment of particles to a support where interfaces form and changes in electronic properties of the particles may take place, there is a further modification to the intrinsic size- and composition dependent properties in supported particles which add to the complexity of the system.

  7. Hysteretic sediment fluxes in rainfall-driven soil erosion: Particle size effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheraghi, Mohsen; Jomaa, Seifeddine; Sander, Graham C.; Barry, D. A.

    2016-11-01

    A detailed laboratory study was conducted to examine the effects of particle size on hysteretic sediment transport under time-varying rainfall. A rainfall pattern composed of seven sequential stepwise varying rainfall intensities (30, 37.5, 45, 60, 45, 37.5, and 30 mm h-1), each of 20 min duration, was applied to a 5 m × 2 m soil erosion flume. The soil in the flume was initially dried, ploughed to a depth of 20 cm and had a mechanically smoothed surface. Flow rates and sediment concentration data for seven particle size classes (1000 µm) were measured in the flume effluent. Clockwise hysteresis loops in the sediment concentration versus discharge curves were measured for the total eroded soil and the finer particle sizes (erosion model agreed well with the experimental data for the total eroded soil and for the finer particle size classes (up to 50 µm). For the larger particle size classes, the model provided reasonable qualitative agreement with the measurements although the fit was poor for the largest size class (>1000 µm). Overall, it is found that hysteresis varies amongst particle sizes and that the predictions of the HR model are consistent with hysteretic behavior of different sediment size classes.

  8. Ultrafine particle size distributions near freeways: Effects of differing wind directions on exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozawa, Kathleen H.; Winer, Arthur M.; Fruin, Scott A.

    2012-12-01

    High ambient ultrafine particle (UFP) concentrations may play an important role in the adverse health effects associated with living near busy roadways. However, UFP size distributions change rapidly as vehicle emissions dilute and age. These size changes can influence UFP lung deposition rates and dose because deposition in the respiratory system is a strong function of particle size. Few studies to date have measured and characterized changes in near-road UFP size distributions in real-time, thus missing transient variations in size distribution due to short-term fluctuations in wind speed, direction, or particle dynamics. In this study we measured important wind direction effects on near-freeway UFP size distributions and gradients using a mobile platform with 5-s time resolution. Compared to more commonly measured perpendicular (downwind) conditions, parallel wind conditions appeared to promote formation of broader and larger size distributions of roughly one-half the particle concentration. Particles during more parallel wind conditions also changed less in size with downwind distance and the fraction of lung-deposited particle number was calculated to be 15% lower than for downwind conditions, giving a combined decrease of about 60%. In addition, a multivariate analysis of several variables found meteorology, particularly wind direction and temperature, to be important in predicting UFP concentrations within 150 m of a freeway (R2 = 0.46, p = 0.014).

  9. Size measurement of nano-particles using self-mixing effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huarui Wang; Jianqi Shen

    2008-01-01

    In this letter, the technique of laser self-mixing effect is employed for nano-particle size analysis. In contrast to the photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) and photon cross correlation spectroscopy (PCCS),the main advantages of this technique are sensitive, compact, low-cost, and simple experimental setup etc.An improved Kaczmarz projection method is developed in the inversion problem to extract the particle size distribution. The experimental results prove that nano-particle size can be measured reasonably by using the self-mixing effect technique combined with the improved projection algorithm.

  10. Estimation of particle size variations for laser speckle rheology of materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajjarian, Zeinab; Nadkarni, Seemantini K

    2015-03-01

    Laser speckle rheology (LSR) is an optical technique for assessing the viscoelastic properties of materials with several industrial, biological, and medical applications. In LSR, the viscoelastic modulus, G*(ω), of a material is quantified by analyzing the temporal fluctuations of speckle patterns. However, the size of scattering particles within the material also influences the rate of speckle fluctuations, independent of sample mechanical properties, and complicates the accurate estimation of G*(ω). Here, we demonstrate that the average particle size may be retrieved from the azimuth-angle dependence of time-averaged speckle intensities, permitting the accurate quantification of the viscoelastic moduli of materials with unknown particle size distribution using LSR.

  11. Effect of Oxidizer Particle Size on Burning Rate and Thermal Decomposition of Composite Solid Propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kishore

    1982-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies on Thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorarte(AP- polystyrene(PS propellant and burning rate of PS/AP propellant have been carried out as a function of oxidizer particle size. Thermal decomposition of AP and AP/PS propellant as function of AP particle size shows a maximum rate around 100 micro particle size which has been explained on the basis of Mample's theory. No such maximum is observed in the case of PS/AP propellant burning rate.

  12. Effect of particle size of rice flour on physical and sensory properties of Sel-roti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subba, Dilip; Katawal, Surendra Bahadur

    2013-02-01

    Sel-roti is a delicious, deep-fat fried, puffed, ring shaped spongy doughnut like Nepalese indigenous food prepared from the batter of rice flour, ghee and sugar. A study was conducted to determine the effect of particle size of rice flour on bulk density, oil uptake and texture of Sel-roti. Rice was soaked in water and ground with the help of iron mortar and pestle and the flour was analyzed for particle size distribution by using standard sieves and separated into three particle size categories as coarse (> 890 u), medium (120-890 u) and fine ( 0.05) were found.

  13. [Particle Size and Number Density Online Analysis for Particle Suspension with Polarization-Differentiation Elastic Light Scattering Spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-kang; Fang, Hui

    2016-03-01

    The basic principle of polarization-differentiation elastic light scattering spectroscopy based techniques is that under the linear polarized light incidence, the singlely scattered light from the superficial biological tissue and diffusively scattered light from the deep tissue can be separated according to the difference of polarization characteristics. The novel point of the paper is to apply this method to the detection of particle suspension and, to realize the simultaneous measurement of its particle size and number density in its natural status. We design and build a coaxial cage optical system, and measure the backscatter signal at a specified angle from a polystyrene microsphere suspension. By controlling the polarization direction of incident light with a linear polarizer and adjusting the polarization direction of collected light with another linear polarizer, we obtain the parallel polarized elastic light scattering spectrum and cross polarized elastic light scattering spectrum. The difference between the two is the differential polarized elastic light scattering spectrum which include only the single scattering information of the particles. We thus compare this spectrum to the Mie scattering calculation and extract the particle size. We then also analyze the cross polarized elastic light scattering spectrum by applying the particle size already extracted. The analysis is based on the approximate expressions taking account of light diffusing, from which we are able to obtain the number density of the particle suspension. We compare our experimental outcomes with the manufacturer-provided values and further analyze the influence of the particle diameter standard deviation on the number density extraction, by which we finally verify the experimental method. The potential applications of the method include the on-line particle quality monitoring for particle manufacture as well as the fat and protein density detection of milk products.

  14. Effect of maize silage to grass silage ratio and feed particle size on ruminal fermentation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, B; Boguhn, J; Rodehutscord, M

    2011-02-01

    The effect of the forage source on ruminal fermentation in vitro was investigated for fine (F) and coarse (C) milled diets, using a modified Hohenheim gas production test and a semi-continuous rumen simulation technique (Rusitec). It was hypothesised that the replacement of maize silage by grass silage might lead to associative effects and that interactions related to particle size variation could occur. Five diets with a maize silage to grass silage ratio of 100 : 0, 79 : 21, 52 : 48, 24 : 76 and 0 : 100 differed in their content of CP and carbohydrate fractions, as well as digestible crude nutrients, derived from a digestibility trial with wether sheep. For in vitro investigations, the diets were ground to pass a sieve of either 1 mm (F) or 4 mm (C) perforation. Cumulative gas production was recorded during 93 h of incubation and its capacity decreased with increasing proportion of grass silage in the diet. Across all diets, gas production was delayed in C treatments compared with F treatments. Degradation of crude nutrients and detergent fibre fractions was determined in a Rusitec system. Daily amounts of NH3-N and short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) were measured in the effluent. Degradation of organic matter (OM) and fibre fractions, as well as amounts of NH3-N, increased with stepwise replacement of maize silage by grass silage. Degradability of CP was unaffected by diet composition, as well as total SCFA production. In contrast to the results of the gas production test, degradation of OM and CP was higher in C than in F treatments, accompanied by higher amounts of NH3-N and SCFA. Interactions of silage ratio and particle size were rare. It was concluded that the stepwise replacement of maize silage by grass silage might lead to a linear response of most fermentation characteristics in vitro. This linear effect was also supported by total tract digestibility data. However, further investigations with silages of variable quality seem to be necessary.

  15. In vitro particle size distributions in electronic and conventional cigarette aerosols suggest comparable deposition patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaping; Sumner, Walton; Chen, Da-Ren

    2013-02-01

    Electronic cigarette users ("vapers") inhale aerosols of water, nicotine, and propylene glycol (PG) or vegetable glycerin (VG). Aerosol particle sizes should affect deposition patterns in vapers and bystanders. Aerosols were generated by a smoking machine and an electronic cigarette filled with 16mg/ml nicotine in aqueous PG or VG solution. A scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) counted particles of 10-1,000 nm diameters. A single puff experiment counted particles immediately and after aging 10 and 40 s. A steady-state experiment counted particles emitted from a collection chamber, untreated and after desiccation or organic vapor removal. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) human respiratory tract model was used to estimate deposition. Results were compared to similar data from reference cigarettes. Puffs generated peak particle counts at (VG) 180 nm and (PG) 120 nm. Steady-state peaks occurred around 400 nm. Organic vapor removal eliminated small particles and reduced the size and number of large particles. Desiccation reduced the total volume of particles by 70% (VG, small PG) to 88% (large PG). The ICRP model predicted 7%-18% alveolar delivery; 9%-19% venous delivery, mostly in the head; and 73%-80% losses by exhalation. Reference cigarettes generated more particles initially, but were otherwise similar; however, in vivo smoke particle deposition is higher than the model predicts. Nicotine delivery may depend on vaping technique, particle evolution, and cloud effects. Predicted 10% arterial and 15% venous delivery may describe bystander exposure better than vapers exposure.

  16. Seasonal cycle and modal structure of particle number size distribution at Dome C, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Järvinen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We studied new particle formation and modal behavior of ultrafine aerosol particles on the high Antarctic East-Plateau at the Concordia station, Dome C (75°06' S, 123°23' E. Aerosol particle number size distributions were measured in the size range 10–600 nm from 14 December 2007 to 7 November 2009. We used an automatic algorithm for fitting up to three modes to the size distribution data. The total particle number concentration was low with the median of 109 cm−3. There was a clear seasonal cycle in the total particle number and the volume concentrations. The concentrations were at their highest during the austral summer with the median values of 260 cm−3 and 0.086 μm3 cm−3, and at their lowest during the austral winter with corresponding values of 15 cm−3 and 0.009 μm3 cm−3. New particle formation events were determined from the size distribution data. During the measurement period, new particle formation was seen on 80 days and for 15 of these days the particle growth rates from 10 to 25 nm size could be determined. The median particle growth rate during all these events was 2.5 nm h−1 and the median formation rate of 10 nm particles was 0.023 cm−3 s−1. Most of the events were similar to those observed in other continental locations, yet also some variability in event types was observed. Exceptional features in Dome C were the winter events that occurred during dark periods, as well as the events for which the growth could be followed during several consecutive days. We called these latter events as slowly-growing events. This paper is the first one to analyze long-term size distribution data from Dome C, and also the first paper to show that new particle formation events occur in the central Antarctica.

  17. Seasonal cycle and modal structure of particle number size distribution at Dome C, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Järvinen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We studied new particle formation and modal behavior of ultrafine aerosol particles on the high East Antarctic plateau at the Concordia station, Dome C (75°06' S, 123°23' E. Aerosol particle number size distributions were measured in the size range 10–600 nm from 14 December 2007 to 7 November 2009. We used an automatic algorithm for fitting up to three modes to the size distribution data. The total particle number concentration was low with the median of 109 cm−3. There was a clear seasonal cycle in the total particle number and the volume concentrations. The concentrations were at their highest during the austral summer with the median values of 260 cm−3 and 0.086 μm3 cm−3, and at their lowest during the austral winter with corresponding values of 15 cm−3 and 0.009 μm3 cm−3. New particle formation events were determined from the size distribution data. During the measurement period, natural new particle formation was observed on 60 days and for 15 of these days the particle growth rates from 10 to 25 nm in size could be determined. The median particle growth rate during all these events was 2.5 nm h−1 and the median formation rate of 10 nm particles was 0.023 cm−3 s−1. Most of the events were similar to those observed at other continental locations, yet also some variability in event types was observed. Exceptional features in Dome C were the winter events that occurred during dark periods, as well as the events for which the growth could be followed during several consecutive days. We called these latter events slowly growing events. This paper is the first one to analyze long-term size distribution data from Dome C, and also the first paper to show that new particle formation events occur in central Antarctica.

  18. Influence of Particle Size on Magnetic Properties of Soils in Zhejiang Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The relationship between magnetic properties and particle size of soils derived from metamorphic rock,basalt, granite, Quaternary red clay, limestone and mudstone from Zhejiang Province, East China was stu died. Based on the variations of the mass magnetic susceptibility (x), anhysteretic remanent magnetization (ARM), and saturation isothermal remanent magnetizatization (SIRM) with soil particle size, the relationship could be classified into three groups. For the soils derived from metamorphic rock and basalt, magnetic values were the highest in the gravel and coarse sand fractions and decreased with decreasing soil particle size. The soils derived from sedimentary rock had a bimodal distribution of magnetic values, with peaks in 1~0.5 and 0.005~0.000 5 mm fractions. The soil developed on granite was characterized by a peak of magnetic valuein 0.001~0.000 5 mm fractions. Frequency-dependent susceptibility (xfd) and ratios of magnetic parameters (ARM/x, SIRM/x and SIRM/ARM) of soil particle fractions showed that variations in ferrimagnetic grainsize paralleled those in particle size. xfd peaked in clay fraction and decreased with increasing particle size,irrespective of soil parent materials. The acquisition curves of IRM and demagnetization parameter of different soil particles indicated that there were different agnetic minerals assemblages in different particle fractions..

  19. Evaluation of char combustion models: measurement and analysis of variability in char particle size and density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloney, Daniel J; Monazam, Esmail R; Casleton, Kent H; Shaddix, Christopher R

    2008-08-01

    Char samples representing a range of combustion conditions and extents of burnout were obtained from a well-characterized laminar flow combustion experiment. Individual particles from the parent coal and char samples were characterized to determine distributions in particle volume, mass, and density at different extent of burnout. The data were then compared with predictions from a comprehensive char combustion model referred to as the char burnout kinetics model (CBK). The data clearly reflect the particle- to-particle heterogeneity of the parent coal and show a significant broadening in the size and density distributions of the chars resulting from both devolatilization and combustion. Data for chars prepared in a lower oxygen content environment (6% oxygen by vol.) are consistent with zone II type combustion behavior where most of the combustion is occurring near the particle surface. At higher oxygen contents (12% by vol.), the data show indications of more burning occurring in the particle interior. The CBK model does a good job of predicting the general nature of the development of size and density distributions during burning but the input distribution of particle size and density is critical to obtaining good predictions. A significant reduction in particle size was observed to occur as a result of devolatilization. For comprehensive combustion models to provide accurate predictions, this size reduction phenomenon needs to be included in devolatilization models so that representative char distributions are carried through the calculations.

  20. (99m)Tc-human serum albumin nanocolloids: particle sizing and radioactivity distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persico, Marco G; Lodola, Lorenzo; Buroni, Federica E; Morandotti, Marco; Pallavicini, Piersandro; Aprile, Carlo

    2015-07-01

    Several parameters affect the biodistribution of administered nanocolloids (NC) for Sentinel Lymph Node (SLN) detection: particle size distribution, number of Tc atoms per particle and specific activity (SA). Relatively few data are available with frequently conflicting results. (99m)Tc-NC-human serum albumin (HSA) Nanocoll®, Nanoalbumon® and Nanotop® were analysed for particles' dimensional and radioactivity distribution, and a mathematical model was elaborated to estimate the number of particles involved. Commercially available kits were reconstituted at maximal SA of 11 MBq/µg HSA. Particles size distribution was evaluated by Dynamic Light Scattering. These data were related to the radioactivity distribution analysis passing labelled NC through three polycarbonate filters (15-30-50-nm pore size) under vacuum. Highest radioactivity was carried by 30-50 nm particles. The smallest ones, even though most numerous, carried only the 10% of (99m)Tc atoms. Nanocoll and Nanotop are not significantly different, while Nanoalbumon is characterized by largest particles (>30 nm) that carried the most of radioactivity (80%). Smallest particles could saturate the clearing capacity of macrophages; therefore, if the tracer is used for SLN detection, more node tiers could be visualized, reducing accuracy of SLN mapping. Manufacturers could implement technical leaflets with particle size distribution and could improve the labelling protocol to provide clinicians useful information.

  1. Laser tweezers: spectroscopy of optically trapped micron-sized particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, K.M.; Livett, M.K.; Nugent, K.W. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    Information is often obtained about biological systems by analysis of single cells in the system. The optimum conditions for this analysis are when the cells are living and in their natural surroundings as they will be performing their normal functions and interactions. Analysis of cells can be difficult due to their mobility. Laser tweezing is a non contact method that can be employed to overcome this problem and provides a powerful tool in the analysis of functions and interactions at single cell level. In this investigation Raman spectra of a molecule of {beta} - carotene, dissolved in microdroplets of oil was obtained. The droplets were trapped using Nd-YAG beam and a low intensity Ar{sup +} beam was used to analyse the trapped particles. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  2. [Impact of particle size and morphology on zinc cation adsorption by hydroxyapatite and dentifrice containing hydroxyapatite].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian-Zhen; Shen, Xiao-Qing; Liu, Cheng-Xia; Xu, Ping-Ping

    2016-05-01

    To study the influence of particle size and morphology on zinc cation adsorption by hydroxyapatite (HA) and dentifrice containing HA. Four HAs with different particle sizes and morphologies, HA-containing dentifrice and blank dentifrice were prepared into suspensions of serial concentrations. Zinc ion solutions with an initial concentration of 10 mg/L was mixed with the suspensions and kept for 24 h for adsorption reaction. The zinc ion concentration in the supernatant was measured by inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometer and the sorption rate of zinc ion was calculated. HA and HA-containing dentifrice with various particle sizes and morphologies were all capable of absorbing zinc ions from simulated waste water, and the adsorption rate of HA-containing dentifrice was 3%-10% higher than that of HA. HA with a particle size of 12 µm and a spherical morphology showed the strongest adsorption ability, followed by short bar-shaped HA with a particle size of 30 µm. Both Langmuir and Freundlich equation could simulate the sorption processes of HA dentifrice, while only Langmuir equation could simulate the sorption processes of HA. Incorporation of HA in dentifrice can enhance zinc ion adsorption capacity of the material. The particle size and morphology of HA both affect the adsorption of zinc ions, and 12-µm HA particle with a spherical morphology has the best adsorption ability.

  3. Particle Size Distributions Measured in the Stratospheric Plumes of Three Rockets During the ACCENT Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedinmyer, C.; Brock, C. A.; Reeves, J. M.; Ross, M. N.; Schmid, O.; Toohey, D.; Wilson, J. C.

    2001-12-01

    The global impact of particles emitted by rocket engines on stratospheric ozone is not well understood, mainly due to the lack of comprehensive in situ measurements of the size distributions of these emitted particles. During the Atmospheric Chemistry of Combustion Emissions Near the Tropopause (ACCENT) missions in 1999, the NASA WB-57F aircraft carried the University of Denver N-MASS and FCAS instruments into the stratospheric plumes from three rockets. Size distributions of particles with diameters from 4 to approximately 2000 nm were calculated from the instrument measurements using numerical inversion techniques. The data have been averaged over 30-second intervals. The particle size distributions observed in all of the rocket plumes included a dominant mode near 60 nm diameter, probably composed of alumina particles. A smaller mode at approximately 25 nm, possibly composed of soot particles, was seen in only the plumes of rockets that used liquid oxygen and kerosene as a propellant. Aircraft exhaust emitted by the WB-57F was also sampled; the size distributions within these plumes are consistent with prior measurements in aircraft plumes. The size distributions for all rocket intercepts have been fitted to bimodal, lognormal distributions to provide input for global models of the stratosphere. Our data suggest that previous estimates of the solid rocket motor alumina size distributions may underestimate the alumina surface area emission index, and so underestimate the particle surface area available for heterogeneous chlorine activation reactions in the global stratosphere.

  4. Removal of Cryptosporidium sized particle under different filtration temperature, flow rate and alum dosing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Guo-ren; Fitzpatrick S. B. Caroline; Gregory John; DENG Lin-yu

    2007-01-01

    Recent Cryptosporidium outbreaks have highlighted concerns about filter efficiency and in particular particle breakthrough. It is essential to ascertain the causes of Cryptosporidium sized particle breakthrough for Cryptosporidium cannot be destroyed by conventional chlorine disinfection. This research tried to investigate the influence of temperature, flow rate and chemical dosing on particle breakthrough during filtration. The results showed that higher temperatures and coagulant doses could reduce particle breakthrough. The increase of filtration rate made the residual particle counts become larger. There was an optimal dose in filtration and was well correlated to ζ potential.

  5. Impact of agglomeration state of nano- and submicron sized gold particles on pulmonary inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassee Flemming R

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nanoparticle (NP toxicity testing comes with many challenges. Characterization of the test substance is of crucial importance and in the case of NPs, agglomeration/aggregation state in physiological media needs to be considered. In this study, we have addressed the effect of agglomerated versus single particle suspensions of nano- and submicron sized gold on the inflammatory response in the lung. Rats were exposed to a single dose of 1.6 mg/kg body weight (bw of spherical gold particles with geometric diameters of 50 nm or 250 nm diluted either by ultrapure water or by adding phosphate buffered saline (PBS. A single dose of 1.6 mg/kg bw DQ12 quartz was used as a positive control for pulmonary inflammation. Extensive characterization of the particle suspensions has been performed by determining the zetapotential, pH, gold concentration and particle size distribution. Primary particle size and particle purity has been verified using transmission electron microscopy (TEM techniques. Pulmonary inflammation (total cell number, differential cell count and pro-inflammatory cytokines, cell damage (total protein and albumin and cytotoxicity (alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase were determined in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF and acute systemic effects in blood (total cell number, differential cell counts, fibrinogen and C-reactive protein 3 and 24 hours post exposure. Uptake of gold particles in alveolar macrophages has been determined by TEM. Results Particles diluted in ultrapure water are well dispersed, while agglomerates are formed when diluting in PBS. The particle size of the 50 nm particles was confirmed, while the 250 nm particles appear to be 200 nm using tracking analysis and 210 nm using TEM. No major differences in pulmonary and systemic toxicity markers were observed after instillation of agglomerated versus single gold particles of different sizes. Both agglomerated as well as single nanoparticles were

  6. The influence of powder particle size on properties of Cu-Al2O3 composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajković V.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Inert gas atomized prealloyed copper powder containing 2 wt.% Al (average particle size ≈ 30 μm and a mixture consisting of copper (average particle sizes ≈ 15 μm and 30 μm and 4 wt.% of commercial Al2O3 powder particles (average particle size ≈ 0.75 μm were milled separately in a high-energy planetary ball mill up to 20 h in air. Milling was performed in order to strengthen the copper matrix by grain size refinement and Al2O3 particles. Milling in air of prealloyed copper powder promoted formation of finely dispersed nano-sized Al2O3 particles by internal oxidation. On the other side, composite powders with commercial micro-sized Al2O3 particles were obtained by mechanical alloying. Following milling, powders were treated in hydrogen at 400 0C for 1h in order to eliminate copper oxides formed on their surface during milling. Hot-pressing (800 0C for 3 h in argon at pressure of 35 MPa was used for compaction of milled powders. Hot-pressed composite compacts processed from 5 and 20 h milled powders were additionally subjected to high temperature exposure (800°C for 1 and 5h in argon in order to examine their thermal stability. The results were discussed in terms of the effects of different size of starting powders, the grain size refinement and different size of Al2O3 particles on strengthening, thermal stability and electrical conductivity of copper-based composites.

  7. Particle size tailoring of ursolic acid nanosuspensions for improved anticancer activity by controlled antisolvent precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yancai; Song, Ju; Chow, Shing Fung; Chow, Albert H L; Zheng, Ying

    2015-10-15

    The present study was aimed at tailoring the particle size of ursolic acid (UA) nanosuspension for improved anticancer activity. UA nanosuspensions were prepared by antisolvent precipitation using a four-stream multi-inlet vortex mixer (MIVM) under defined conditions of varying solvent composition, drug feeding concentration or stream flow rate. The resulting products were characterized for particle size and polydispersity. Two of the UA nanosuspensions with mean particle sizes of 100 and 300 nm were further assessed for their in-vitro activity against MCF-7 breast cancer cells using fluorescence microscopy with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining, as well as flow cytometry with propidium (PI) staining and with double staining by fluorescein isothiocyanate. It was revealed that the solvent composition, drug feeding concentration and stream flow rate were critical parameters for particle size control of the UA nanosuspensions generated with the MIVM. Specifically, decreasing the UA feeding concentration or increasing the stream flow rate or ethanol content resulted in a reduction of particle size. Excellent reproducibility for nanosuspension production was demonstrated for the 100 and 300 nm UA preparations with a deviation of not more than 5% in particle size from the mean value of three independent batches. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry revealed that these two different sized UA nanosuspensions, particularly the 300 nm sample, exhibited a higher anti-proliferation activity against the MCF-7 cells and afforded a larger population of these cells in both early and late apoptotic phases. In conclusion, MIVM is a robust and pragmatic tool for tailoring the particle size of the UA nanosuspension. Particle size appears to be a critical determinant of the anticancer activity of the UA nanoparticles.

  8. The influence of competition between foragers on clutch size decisions in an insect parasitoid with scramble larval competition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, M.E.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of competition between ovipositing females on their clutch size decisions is studied in animals that lay their eggs in discrete units of larval food (hosts). In such species the effect of competition depends on the form of the larval competition within such units. In insect parasitoids, t

  9. The influence of competition between foragers on clutch size decisions in an insect parasitoid with scramble larval competition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, M.E.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of competition between ovipositing females on their clutch size decisions is studied in animals that lay their eggs in discrete units of larval food (hosts). In such species the effect of competition depends on the form of the larval competition within such units. In insect parasitoids,

  10. Experimental study of the relationship between local particle-size distributions and local ordering in random close packing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurita, Rei

    2015-12-01

    We experimentally study the structural properties of a sediment of size distributed colloids. By determining each particle size using a size estimation algorithm, we are able to investigate the relationship between local environment and local ordering. Our results show that ordered environments of particles tend to generate where the local particle-size distribution is within 5%. In addition, we show that particles whose size is close to the average size have 12 coordinate neighbors, which matches the coordination number of the fcc and hcp crystals. On the other hand, bcc structures are observed around larger particles. Our results represent experiments to show a size dependence of the specific ordering in colloidal systems.

  11. Size Distributions of Solar Flares and Solar Energetic Particle Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliver, E. W.; Ling, A. G.; Belov, A.; Yashiro, S.

    2012-01-01

    We suggest that the flatter size distribution of solar energetic proton (SEP) events relative to that of flare soft X-ray (SXR) events is primarily due to the fact that SEP flares are an energetic subset of all flares. Flares associated with gradual SEP events are characteristically accompanied by fast (much > 1000 km/s) coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that drive coronal/interplanetary shock waves. For the 1996-2005 interval, the slopes (alpha values) of power-law size distributions of the peak 1-8 Angs fluxes of SXR flares associated with (a) >10 MeV SEP events (with peak fluxes much > 1 pr/sq cm/s/sr) and (b) fast CMEs were approx 1.3-1.4 compared to approx 1.2 for the peak proton fluxes of >10 MeV SEP events and approx 2 for the peak 1-8 Angs fluxes of all SXR flares. The difference of approx 0.15 between the slopes of the distributions of SEP events and SEP SXR flares is consistent with the observed variation of SEP event peak flux with SXR peak flux.

  12. Size-dependent structures and properties of metallic particles and thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenyuan

    Fundamental aspects of metallic nanoparticles, especially size-dependent properties and their interaction with their surrounding have been investigated. Several conclusions were reached as follows, (1) Au and Pt particles form dense SAMs on glass. Interparticle resonance is absent for 15 nm Au particles, but present for 30 nm ones. A new strategy was developed to deposit silica insulation layers in between Au particle monolayers. (2) Au particles, 1.5--20 nm in size, were encapsulated in silica shells. Their melting point was determined and we show that it decreases significantly as particle size decreases, leading to increased self-diffusion coefficient of the Au atoms. (3) Au core particles of different sizes were synthesized and Ag shells of different thickness were deposited on them. XAFS measurements show that Au/Ag alloy is spontaneously formed for the particles with small core size (2.5 nm). The alloy formation is size-dependent and molecular dynamics calculations demonstrate that vacancies at the bimetallic boundary dramatically enhance the rate of mixing. (4) EPR spectroscopy was used to study the interactions between stable free radicals and gold nanoparticles. The EPR signal is reduced upon adsorption of the radicals onto Au particle surface. We propose that the reduction in signal intensity arises from exchange interactions between the unpaired electrons of the adsorbed radicals and conduction-band electrons of the metallic particles. Catalytic autoxidation of TEMPAMINE to TEMPO was also observed and a mechanism for this unexpected reaction is proposed. (5) Redox/galvanic exchange reactions between Au and Pt nanoparticles and Ag(CN)2- were investigated. For Au particles, the exchange reaction is size dependent. 2.5 nm Au particles form an alloy with Ag and the extinction coefficient of the alloy particle linearly depends on the Au/Ag mole fraction. The full exchange for both 2 and 8 nm Pt particles indicates that the atom diffusion rate within particles

  13. The effect of particle size on fracture properties and size effect of concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlangen, E.; Lim, H.S.; Weerheijm, J.

    2005-01-01

    In the study the effect of scaling the material structure on the fracture behaviour of concrete is investigated. Next to this the size effect of concrete fracture strength and fracture energy is studied. The fracture mechanism of concrete made with different size aggregates are tested numerically. A

  14. Simultaneous Comparison of Two Roller Compaction Techniques and Two Particle Size Analysis Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarinen, Tuomas; Antikainen, Osmo; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2017-05-24

    A new dry granulation technique, gas-assisted roller compaction (GARC), was compared with conventional roller compaction (CRC) by manufacturing 34 granulation batches. The process variables studied were roll pressure, roll speed, and sieve size of the conical mill. The main quality attributes measured were granule size and flow characteristics. Within granulations also the real applicability of two particle size analysis techniques, sieve analysis (SA) and fast imaging technique (Flashsizer, FS), was tested. All granules obtained were acceptable. In general, the particle size of GARC granules was slightly larger than that of CRC granules. In addition, the GARC granules had better flowability. For example, the tablet weight variation of GARC granules was close to 2%, indicating good flowing and packing characteristics. The comparison of the two particle size analysis techniques showed that SA was more accurate in determining wide and bimodal size distributions while FS showed narrower and mono-modal distributions. However, both techniques gave good estimates for mean granule sizes. Overall, SA was a time-consuming but accurate technique that provided reliable information for the entire granule size distribution. By contrast, FS oversimplified the shape of the size distribution, but nevertheless yielded acceptable estimates for mean particle size. In general, FS was two to three orders of magnitude faster than SA.

  15. Electromechanical characterization of individual micron-sized metal coated polymer particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazilchuk, Molly; Pettersen, Sigurd Rolland; Kristiansen, Helge; Zhang, Zhiliang; He, Jianying

    2016-06-01

    Micron-sized polymer particles with nanoscale metal coatings are essential in conductive adhesives for electronics assembly. The particles function in a compressed state in the adhesives. The link between mechanical properties and electrical conductivity is thus of the utmost importance in the formation of good electrical contact. A custom flat punch set-up based on nanoindentation has been developed to simultaneously deform and electrically probe individual particles. The set-up has a sufficiently low internal resistance to allow the measurement of sub-Ohm contact resistances. Additionally, the set-up can capture mechanical failure of the particles. Combining this data yields a fundamental understanding of contact behavior. We demonstrate that this method can clearly distinguish between particles of different sizes, with different thicknesses of metal coating, and different metallization schemes. The technique provides good repeatability and physical insight into the behavior of these particles that can guide adhesive design and the optimization of bonding processes.

  16. Size-dependent microstructures in rapidly solidified uraniumsbnd niobium powder particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Hsiung, Luke L.; Park, Jong M.; Ryu, Ho J.; Turchi, Patrice E. A.; King, Wayne E.

    2016-10-01

    The microstructures of rapidly solidified U-6wt%Nb powder particles synthesized by centrifugal atomization were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Observed variations in microstructure are related to particle sizes. All of the powder particles exhibited a two-zone microstructure. The formation of this two-zone microstructure is described by a transition from solidification controlled by internal heat flow and high solidification rate during recalescence (micro-segregation-free or partitionless growth) to solidification controlled by external heat flow with slower solidification rates (dendritic growth with solute redistribution). The extent of partitionless solidification increased with decreasing particle size due to larger undercoolings in smaller particles prior to solidification. The metastable phases that formed are related to variations in Nb concentration across the particles. The microstructures of the powders were heavily twinned.

  17. Particle size distribution and removal in the chemical-biological flocculation process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhi-bin; ZHAO Jian-fu; XIA Si-qing; LIU Chang-qing; KANG Xing-sheng

    2007-01-01

    The particle characterization from the influent and effluent of a chemical-biological flocculation (CBF) process was studied with a laser diffraction device. Water samples from a chemically enhanced primary treatment (CEPT) process and a primary sediment tank process were also analyzed for comparison. The results showed that CBF process was not only effective for both the big size particles and small size particles removal, but also the best particle removal process in the three processes. The results also indicated that CBF process was superior to CEPT process in the heavy metals removal. The high and non-selective removal for heavy metals might be closely related to its strong ability to eliminate small particles. Samples from different locations in CBF reactors showed that small particles were easier to aggregate into big ones and those disrupted flocs could properly flocculate again along CBF reactor because of the biological flocculation.

  18. Effect of Particle Size on the HDS Activity of Molybdenum Sulfide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carola Contreras

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available More than half of the total world oil reserves are heavy oil, extra heavy oil, and bitumen; however their catalytic conversion to more valuable products is challenging. The use of submicronic particles or nanoparticles of catalysts suspended in the feedstock may be a viable alternative to the conversion of heavy oils at refinery level or downhole (in situ upgrading. In the present work, molybdenum sulfide (MoS2 particles with varying diameters (10000–10 nm were prepared using polyvinylpyrrolidone as capping agent. The prepared particles were characterized by DLS, TEM, XRD, and XPS and tested in the hydrodesulfurization (HDS of a vacuum gas oil (VGO. A correlation between particle size and activity is presented. It was found that particles with diameters around 13 nm show double the HDS activity compared with the material with micrometric particle sizes (diameter ≈ 10,000 nm.

  19. Electromechanical characterization of individual micron-sized metal coated polymer particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazilchuk, Molly; Kristiansen, Helge [Department of Structural Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim 7491 (Norway); Conpart AS, Skjetten 2013 (Norway); Pettersen, Sigurd Rolland; Zhang, Zhiliang; He, Jianying, E-mail: jianying.he@ntnu.no [Department of Structural Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim 7491 (Norway)

    2016-06-28

    Micron-sized polymer particles with nanoscale metal coatings are essential in conductive adhesives for electronics assembly. The particles function in a compressed state in the adhesives. The link between mechanical properties and electrical conductivity is thus of the utmost importance in the formation of good electrical contact. A custom flat punch set-up based on nanoindentation has been developed to simultaneously deform and electrically probe individual particles. The set-up has a sufficiently low internal resistance to allow the measurement of sub-Ohm contact resistances. Additionally, the set-up can capture mechanical failure of the particles. Combining this data yields a fundamental understanding of contact behavior. We demonstrate that this method can clearly distinguish between particles of different sizes, with different thicknesses of metal coating, and different metallization schemes. The technique provides good repeatability and physical insight into the behavior of these particles that can guide adhesive design and the optimization of bonding processes.

  20. Measuring shape and size of micrometric particles from the analysis of the forward scattered field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villa, S.; Paroli, B.; Pullia, A.; Potenza, M. A. C., E-mail: marco.potenza@unimi.it [Department of Physics and CIMAINA, University of Milan, via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milan (Italy); Sanvito, T. [DISAT Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); EOS s.r.l., viale Ortles 22/4, 20139 Milan (Italy); Delmonte, B. [DISAT Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy)

    2016-06-14

    Characterizing nano- and micro-particles in fluids still proves to be a significant challenge for both science and industry. Here, we show how to determine shape and size distributions of polydisperse water suspensions of micron-sized particles by the analysis of the field scattered in the forward direction by single particles illuminated by a laser beam. We exploit the novel Single Particle Extinction and Scattering method in connection with shear conditions which give preferred orientations to the particles passing through the scattering volume. Water suspensions of calibrated non-spherical particles, polydisperse standard monophasic mineral samples of quartz and kaolinite, and a mixture of quartz and illite are studied in detail. Application and limitation of the method are discussed.

  1. Effect of particle size of granules on some mechanical properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-11-02

    Nov 2, 2009 ... Solid dosage forms are invariably multiparticulate systems of heterogenous particle size distribution. ... Tablet mechanical parameters evaluated were packing fraction (Pf), tensile strength (T), .... the liquid paraffin displacement method because liquid paraffin .... Dispensing for Pharmaceutical students. 11.

  2. Effect of particle size on the exchange bias of Fe-doped CuO nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, S. Y.; Yuan, S. L.; Tian, Z. M.; Liu, L.; Wang, C. H.; Zheng, X. F.; Duan, H. N.; Huo, S. X.

    2010-02-01

    Effect of particle size on exchange bias in Fe-doped CuO nanoparticles is investigated, which are sintered at different temperatures from 350 to 650 °C, respectively. The structure and magnetic properties for different particle size samples were probed. It is found that the system shows magnetic properties transition from paramagnetic to ferromagnetic with increasing grain size, and exhibits the variations in exchange bias field (HEB) and coercivity (HC) at low temperature after field-cooled from 300 K. With the increase in the particles size, HEB decreases monotonously. Furthermore, vertical magnetization shift was also observed for the small particles. Exchange bias is attributed to the exchange coupling interactions between ferromagnetic and spin-glass-like (or antiferromagnetic) phase interface layers.

  3. Nanoparticles and metrology: a comparison of methods for the determination of particle size distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Victoria A.; Jämting, Åsa K.; Catchpoole, Heather J.; Roy, Maitreyee; Herrmann, Jan

    2011-10-01

    Nanoparticles and products incorporating nanoparticles are a growing branch of nanotechnology industry. They have found a broad market, including the cosmetic, health care and energy sectors. Accurate and representative determination of particle size distributions in such products is critical at all stages of the product lifecycle, extending from quality control at point of manufacture to environmental fate at the point of disposal. Determination of particle size distributions is non-trivial, and is complicated by the fact that different techniques measure different quantities, leading to differences in the measured size distributions. In this study we use both mono- and multi-modal dispersions of nanoparticle reference materials to compare and contrast traditional and novel methods for particle size distribution determination. The methods investigated include ensemble techniques such as dynamic light scattering (DLS) and differential centrifugal sedimentation (DCS), as well as single particle techniques such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and microchannel resonator (ultra high-resolution mass sensor).

  4. PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS FROM SELECT RESIDENCES PARTICIPATING IN THE NERL RTP PM PANEL STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Particle Size Distributions from Select Residences Participating in the NERL RTP PM Panel Study. Alan Vette, Ronald Williams, and Michael Riediker, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Exposure Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711; Jonathan Thornburg...

  5. Sediment particle size and initial radiocesium accumulation in ponds following the Fukushima DNPP accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Kazuya; Onda, Yuichi; Fukushima, Takehiko

    2014-01-01

    This study used particle size analysis to investigate the initial accumulation and trap efficiency of radiocesium ((137)Cs) in four irrigation ponds, ~4-5 months after the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (DNPP) accident. Trap efficiency, represented by the inventory of (137)Cs in pond sediment to the inventory of radiocesium in soil surrounding the pond (i.e., total (137)Cs inventory), was less than 100% for all but one pond. Trap efficiency decreased as sediment particle size increased, indicating that sediments with a smaller particle size accumulate more (137)Cs. In ponds showing low trap efficiency, fine sediment containing high concentrations of (137)Cs appeared to be removed from the system by hydraulic flushing, leaving behind mostly coarse sediment. The results of this study suggest that sediment particle size can be used to estimate the initial accumulation and trap efficiency of (137)Cs in pond sediment, as well as the amount lost through hydraulic flushing.

  6. Effect of supercritical fluid density on nanoencapsulated drug particle size using the supercritical antisolvent method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalani, Mahshid; Yunus, Robiah

    2012-01-01

    The reported work demonstrates and discusses the effect of supercritical fluid density (pressure and temperature of supercritical fluid carbon dioxide) on particle size and distribution using the supercritical antisolvent (SAS) method in the purpose of drug encapsulation. In this study, paracetamol was encapsulated inside L-polylactic acid, a semicrystalline polymer, with different process parameters, including pressure and temperature, using the SAS process. The morphology and particle size of the prepared nanoparticles were determined by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The results revealed that increasing temperature enhanced mean particle size due to the plasticizing effect. Furthermore, increasing pressure enhanced molecular interaction and solubility; thus, particle size was reduced. Transmission electron microscopy images defined the internal structure of nanoparticles. Thermal characteristics of nanoparticles were also investigated via differential scanning calorimetry. Furthermore, X-ray diffraction pattern revealed the changes in crystallinity structure during the SAS process. In vitro drug release analysis determined the sustained release of paracetamol in over 4 weeks.

  7. Insight into morphology and structure of different particle sized kaolinites with same origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yude; Liu, Qinfu; Xiang, Jingjing; Zhang, Shilong; Frost, Ray L

    2014-07-15

    The particle size, morphology, crystallinity order and structural defects of four kaolinite samples are characterized by the techniques including particle size analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MAS NMR). The particle size of four kaolinite samples gradually increases. Four samples all belong to the ordered kaolinite and show a decrease in structural order with the increase of kaolinite particle size. The changes of structural defect are proved by the increase of the band splitting in Raman spectroscopy, the decrease of the intensity of absorption bands in infrared spectroscopy, and the decrease of equivalent silicon atom and the increase of non-equivalent aluminum atom in MAS NMR spectroscopy. The differences in morphology and structural defect are attributed to the broken bonds of Al-O-Si, Al-O-Al and Si-O-Si and the Al substitution for Si in tetrahedral sheets.

  8. Digital image processing of nanometer-size metal particles on amorphous substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, F.; Artal, P.; Bescos, J.; Heinemann, K.

    1989-01-01

    The task of differentiating very small metal aggregates supported on amorphous films from the phase contrast image features inherently stemming from the support is extremely difficult in the nanometer particle size range. Digital image processing was employed to overcome some of the ambiguities in evaluating such micrographs. It was demonstrated that such processing allowed positive particle detection and a limited degree of statistical size analysis even for micrographs where by bare eye examination the distribution between particles and erroneous substrate features would seem highly ambiguous. The smallest size class detected for Pd/C samples peaks at 0.8 nm. This size class was found in various samples prepared under different evaporation conditions and it is concluded that these particles consist of 'a magic number' of 13 atoms and have cubooctahedral or icosahedral crystal structure.

  9. The interactive effect of agitation condition and titania particle size in hydrothermal synthesis of titanate nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safaei, Maryam; Sarraf-Mamoory, Rasoul, E-mail: rsarrafm@modares.ac.i [Tarbiat Modares University (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rashidzadeh, Mehdi [Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    The nucleation and growth mechanisms of hydrothermal synthesized nanotitanates are proposed based on the interaction effect between agitation condition and pristine titania particle size. TEM examination and N{sub 2} adsorption measurements revealed distinct morphology and textural properties depending on TiO{sub 2} particle size in constant agitation condition. Regarding to the supersaturation degree, heterogeneous nucleation dominates for nanotubes formation from large particle size of raw material. On the other hand, homogeneous nucleation determines nanospheres formation from small particle size of raw material. The nanotubes have an outer diameter ranging from 8 to 10 nm and inner diameter of 2 to 3 nm. The nanospheres have diameters ranging from 50 to 100 nm.

  10. Effect the Grain Size on the Polymer Matrix Composites Reinforced by Reenia Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kdhim khaion kahlol

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic polymers such as polyurethane are used widely in the field of biomedical applications such as implants or part of implant systems.This paper focuses on the preparation of base polymer matrix composite materials by (Hand Lay-Up method, and studying the effect of selected grain size (32, 53, 63, 75, and 90 µm of (Reenia particles on some properties of the prepared composite.Mechanical tests were used to evaluate the prepared system (Tensile, Compression, Impact, and Hardness tests, and a physical test of (Water absorption %, and all tests were accomplished at room temperature.Where results showed tensile test (maximum tensile strength and modulus of elasticity high at small grain size while the percentage of elongation decreased with increasing size. As the compressive strength increased with small grain size. And also the values of hardness and fracture energy affected by particle size where the hardness and fracture energy increased at small particles size of compared to larger particles size. While the percentage of water absorption increased at large particle size.In general the results showed clear improvement in properties and maximum values which get it of tensile strength, Modulus of elasticity, elongation percentage, compression strength, fracture energy, hardness and water absorption were as follows ((34.8 MPa, (10%, (268 N/mm2, ( 54.2 MPa,( o.408 J, (78.9 Shor (D, (0.2668 % at using (32µm except water absorption was at (90µm .

  11. Crystallite sizes and lattice parameters of nano-biomagnetite particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Ji-Won; Rawn, Claudia J; Rondinone, Adam J; Wang, Wei; Vali, Hajatollah; Yeary, Lucas W; Love, Lonnie J; Kirkham, Melanie J; Gu, Baohua; Phelps, Tommy J

    2010-12-01

    Average crystallite sizes of microbially synthesized pure, metal-, and lanthanide-substituted magnetite (bio-magnetite) were determined for a variety of incubation times and temperatures, substitutional elements and amounts, bacterial species, and precursor types. The intriguing difference between nanoparticle bio-magnetite and chemically synthesized magnetite (chem-magnetite) was that powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) data showed that the bio-magnetite exhibited slightly smaller lattice parameters, however, Raman Spectroscopy exhibited no difference in Fe-O bonding. These results indicate that bio-magnetite likely exhibits a more compact crystal structure with less uncoordinated iron on the surface suppressing negative pressure effects. The bio-magnetite with decreased lattice parameters could have potential technological advantages over current commercial chemically synthesized magnetites.

  12. Determination of optimum particle size in black coal flotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Øepka Vlastimil

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The work deals with the preparation of bituminous coal with focus on fine grains. An increasing share of fine grains arises during mechanized mining which needs to be processed. The most widespread separation technology for processing of fine grains around the world is foam floatation. This physicochemical method of separation is used in the Czech Republic for processing coking coal with a high coalification level. Based on the coalification level, it is possible to determine the floatability of coal grains. Generally it can be said that floatability improves with increasing coalification. In this work we have tested two samples of coking coal with various coalification levels. Two mixtures of floatation agents were also used: commercial Flotakol NX and the second floatation agent - a mixture of dodecane as a collector and cyclohexanol as a frother. Both samples were classified into eight grain size groups and they were floated under the equal conditions

  13. Size-resolved chemical composition, effective density, and optical properties of biomass burning particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Jinghao; Lu, Xiaohui; Li, Ling; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Ci; Chen, Hong; Yang, Xin; Chen, Jianmin

    2017-06-01

    Biomass burning aerosol has an important impact on the global radiative budget. A better understanding of the correlations between the mixing states of biomass burning particles and their optical properties is the goal of a number of current studies. In this work, the effective density, chemical composition, and optical properties of rice straw burning particles in the size range of 50-400 nm were measured using a suite of online methods. We found that the major components of particles produced by burning rice straw included black carbon (BC), organic carbon (OC), and potassium salts, but the mixing states of particles were strongly size dependent. Particles of 50 nm had the smallest effective density (1.16 g cm-3) due to a relatively large proportion of aggregate BC. The average effective densities of 100-400 nm particles ranged from 1.35 to 1.51 g cm-3 with OC and inorganic salts as dominant components. Both density distribution and single-particle mass spectrometry showed more complex mixing states in larger particles. Upon heating, the separation of the effective density distribution modes confirmed the external mixing state of less-volatile BC or soot and potassium salts. The size-resolved optical properties of biomass burning particles were investigated at two wavelengths (λ = 450 and 530 nm). The single-scattering albedo (SSA) showed the lowest value for 50 nm particles (0.741 ± 0.007 and 0.889 ± 0.006) because of the larger proportion of BC content. Brown carbon played an important role for the SSA of 100-400 nm particles. The Ångström absorption exponent (AAE) values for all particles were above 1.6, indicating the significant presence of brown carbon in all sizes. Concurrent measurements in our work provide a basis for discussing the physicochemical properties of biomass burning aerosol and its effects on the global climate and atmospheric environment.

  14. Macrophage Responses to Silica Nanoparticles are Highly Conserved Across Particle Sizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, Katrina M.; Masiello, Lisa M.; Zangar, Richard C.; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Karin, Norman J.; Quesenberry, Ryan D.; Bandyopadhyay, Somnath; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Pounds, Joel G.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2009-02-03

    Concerns about the potential adverse health effects of engineered nanoparticles stems in part from the possibility that some materials display unique chemical and physical properties at nanoscales which could exacerbate their biological activity. However, studies that have assessed the effect of particle size across a comprehensive set of biological responses have not been reported. Using a macrophage cell model, we demonstrate that the ability of unopsonized amorphous silica particles to stimulate inflammatory protein secretion and induce macrophage cytotoxicity scales closely with the total administered particle surface area across a wide range of particle diameters (7-500 nm). Whole genome microarray analysis of the early gene expression changes induced by 10 nm and 500 nm particles showed that the magnitude of change for the majority of genes affected correlated more tightly with particle surface area than either particle mass or number. Gene expression changes that were particle size-specific were also identified. However, the overall biological processes represented by all gene expression changes were nearly identical, irrespective of particle diameter. Direct comparison of the cell processes represented in the 10 nm and 500 nm particle gene sets using gene set enrichment analysis revealed that among 1009 total biological processes, none were statistically enriched in one particle size group over the other. The key mechanisms involved in silica nanoparticle-mediated gene regulation and cytotoxicity have yet to be established. However, our results suggest that on an equivalent nominal surface area basis, common biological modes of action are expected for nano- and supranano-sized silica particles.

  15. Radiative transfer modeling constraints on the size of the spoke particles in Saturn's rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Laurance R.; Gruen, Eberhard

    1990-01-01

    The spoke particle sizes of Saturn's outer B ring constitute an important parameter for spoke formation and evolution theories, prompting the present effort to find constraining observations. The spokes' apparent optical depths are found to increase with wavelength. A relationship is derived for the contribution of the spokes' small particle optical depth, taking multiple-scatter and flatter spoke-region large-particle phase functions into account; the spokes' optical depths still generally appear to increase or remain constant with increasing wavelength.

  16. Schlieren visualization of ultrasonic standing waves in mm-sized chambers for ultrasonic particle manipulation

    OpenAIRE

    Möller, Dirk; Degen, Nicolas; Dual, Jurg

    2013-01-01

    Background For the design and characterization of ultrasonic particle manipulation devices the pressure field in the fluid cavity is of great interest. The schlieren method provides an optical tool for the visualization of such pressure fields. Due to its purely optical nature this experimental method has got some unique advantages compared to methods like particle tracking. Results A vertical schlieren setup and an investigation with the same of a mm-sized chamber used to agglomerate particl...

  17. Effects of soil surface roughness on interrill erosion processes and sediment particle size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wenfeng; Huang, Chihua

    2017-10-01

    Soil surface roughness significantly impacts runoff and erosion under rainfall. Few previous studies on runoff generation focused on the effects of soil surface roughness on the sediment particle size distribution (PSD), which greatly affects interrill erosion and sedimentation processes. To address this issue, a rainfall-simulation experiment was conducted with treatments that included two different initial soil surface roughnesses and two rainfall intensities. Soil surface roughness was determined by using photogrammetric method. For each simulated event, runoff and sediment samples were collected at different experimental times. The effective (undispersed) PSD of each sediment sample and the ultimate (after dispersion) PSD were used to investigate the detachment and transport mechanisms involved in sediment movement. The results show that soil surface roughness significantly delayed runoff initiation, but had no significant effect on the steady runoff rate. However, a significant difference in the soil loss rate was observed between the smooth and rough soil surfaces. Sediments from smooth soil surfaces were more depleted in clay-size particles, but more enriched in sand-size particles than those from rough soil surfaces, suggesting that erosion was less selective on smooth than on rough soil surfaces. The ratio of different sizes of transported sediment to the soil matrix indicates that most of the clay was eroded in the form of aggregates, silt-size particles were transported mainly as primary particles, and sand-size particles were predominantly aggregates of finer particles. Soil surface roughness has a crucial effect on the sediment size distribution and erosion processes. Significant differences of the enrichment ratios for the effective PSD and the ultimate PSD were observed under the two soil surface roughness treatments. These findings demonstrate that we should consider each particle size separately rather than use only the total sediment discharge in

  18. Particle Sizing in a Solid Rocket Motor Using the Management of Scattered Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    performance losses due to the presence of original metal and its oxides (AlZ03 ) are very sensitive to the aluminium oxide particle size distri- bution, and...using various sizes of glass, polystyrene, and aluminium oxide particles from 5 to 60 microns in diameter. S The purpose of this investigation was to use...less than 3 millisecond. For good combustion efficiency (the conversion of all alumi- nium to aluminium oxide ), typical minimum residence times are

  19. Optimization of regularization parameter of inversion in particle sizing using light extinction method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In particle sizing by light extinction method, the regularization parameter plays an important role in applying regularization to find the solution to ill-posed inverse problems. We combine the generalized cross-validation (GCV) and L-curve criteria with the Twomey-NNLS algorithm in parameter optimization. Numerical simulation and experimental validation show that the resistance of the newly developed algorithms to measurement errors can be improved leading to stable inversion results for unimodal particle size distribution.

  20. Spatiotemporal variability of submicrometer particle number size distributions in an air quality management district.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Li-Hao; Wang, Yi-Ting; Hsu, Hung-Chieh; Lin, Ching-Hui; Liou, Yi-Jyun; Lai, Ying-Chung; Lin, Yun-Hua; Chang, Wei-Lun; Chiang, Hung-Lung; Cheng, Man-Ting

    2012-05-15

    First measurements of ambient 10-1000 nm particle number concentrations (N(TOT)) and size distributions were made at an urban, coastal, mountain and downwind site within the Central Taiwan Air Quality Management District during a cold and a warm period. The primary objectives were to characterize the spatial and temporal variability of the size-fractionated submicrometer particles and their relationships with copollutants and meteorological parameters. The results show that the ultrafine particles (modal characteristics were modestly to substantially different between study sites. Correlation analyses of time-resolved collocated aerosol, copollutants and meteorological data suggest that the observed variability is largely attributable to the local traffic and to a lesser extent photochemistry and SO(2) possibly from combustion sources or regional transport. Despite sharing a common traffic source, the ultrafine particles were poorly correlated with the accumulation particles (100-1000 nm), between which the latter showed strong positive correlation with the PM(2.5) and PM(10). Overall, the N(TOT) and size distributions show modest spatial heterogeneity and strong diurnal variability. In addition, the ultrafine particles have variable sources or meteorology-dependent formation processes within the study area. The results imply that single-site measurements of PM(2.5), PM(10) or N(TOT) alone and without discriminating particle sizes would be inadequate for exposure and impact assessment of submicrometer particle numbers in a region of diverse environments.

  1. Fluorocarbon coatings deposited on micron-sized particles by atmospheric PECVD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abadjieva, E.; Heijden, A.E.D.M. van der; Creyghton, Y.L.M.; Ommen, J.R. van

    2012-01-01

    Fluorocarbon coatings have been deposited on micron-sized silica particles by means of atmospheric pressure plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The silica particles have a diameter in the range between 40 and 70 ?m. They are fluidized at atmospheric pressure in a circulating fluidized

  2. On the origin of the cobalt particle size effects in Fischer-Tropsch catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Breejen, J P; Radstake, P B; Bezemer, G L; Bitter, J H; Frøseth, V; Holmen, A; de Jong, K P

    2009-05-27

    The effects of metal particle size in catalysis are of prime scientific and industrial importance and call for a better understanding. In this paper the origin of the cobalt particle size effects in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) catalysis was studied. Steady-State Isotopic Transient Kinetic Analysis (SSITKA) was applied to provide surface residence times and coverages of reaction intermediates as a function of Co particle size (2.6-16 nm). For carbon nanofiber supported cobalt catalysts at 210 degrees C and H(2)/CO = 10 v/v, it appeared that the surface residence times of reversibly bonded CH(x) and OH(x) intermediates increased, whereas that of CO decreased for small (particles. A higher coverage of irreversibly bonded CO was found for small Co particles that was ascribed to a larger fraction of low-coordinated surface sites. The coverages and residence times obtained from SSITKA were used to describe the surface-specific activity (TOF) quantitatively and the CH(4) selectivity qualitatively as a function of Co particle size for the FT reaction (220 degrees C, H(2)/CO = 2). The lower TOF of Co particles particles is mainly brought about by their higher hydrogen coverages.

  3. HNF/HTPB propellants: Influence of HNF particle size on ballistic properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, A.E.D.M. van der; Leeuwenburgh, A.B.

    2009-01-01

    The burning rate characteristics of solid composite propellants can be modified via different methods. One of these is the application of different oxidizer particle sizes in the propellant. The effect of the use of fine and coarse particles of the oxidizer hydrazinium nitroformate (HNF) in hydroxyl

  4. Particle-size distribution of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs and its implications for health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Lyu

    2015-12-01

    tract, we made an one year campaign 2012–2013 for the measurement of size-resolved aerosol particles at Shanghai urban site. The results showed that particulate PBDEs exhibited a bimodal distribution with a mode peak in the accumulation particle size range and the second mode peak in the coarse particle size ranges. As the number of bromine atoms in the molecule increased, accumulation mode peak intensity increased while coarse mode peak intensity decreased. This change was the consistent with the variation of PBDEs' sub-cooled vapor pressure. Absorption and adsorption process dominated the distribution of PBDEs among the different size particles. Evaluated deposition flux of Σ13PBDE was 26.8 pg h−1, in which coarse particles contributed most PBDEs in head and tracheobronchial regions, while fine mode particles contributed major PBDEs in the alveoli region. In associated with the fact that fine particles can penetrate deeper into the respiratory system, fine particle-bound highly brominated PBDEs can be inhaled more deeply into human lungs and cause a greater risk to human health.

  5. Atomic-Scale Modeling of Particle Size Effects for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction of Pt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tritsaris, Georgios; Greeley, Jeffrey Philip; Rossmeisl, Jan;

    2011-01-01

    in both the specific and mass activities for particle sizes in the range between 2 and 30 nm. The mass activity is calculated to be maximized for particles of a diameter between 2 and 4 nm. Our study demonstrates how an atomic-scale description of the surface microstructure is a key component...

  6. Effect of the size distribution of nanoscale dispersed particles on the Zener drag pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eivani, A.R.; Valipour, S.; Ahmed, H.; Zhou, J.; Duszczyk, J.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, a new relationship for the calculation of the Zener drag pressure is described in which the effect of the size distribution of nanoscale dispersed particles is taken into account, in addition to particle radius and volume fraction, which have been incorporated in the existing relati

  7. Standard Test Methods for Microscopical Sizing and Counting Particles from Aerospace Fluids on Membrane Filters

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover the determination of the size distribution and quantity of particulate matter contamination from aerospace fluids isolated on a membrane filter. The microscopical techniques described may also be applied to other properly prepared samples of small particles. Two test methods are described for sizing particles as follows: 1.1.1 Test Method A—Particle sizes are measured as the diameter of a circle whose area is equal to the projected area of the particle. 1.1.2 Test Method B—Particle sizes are measured by their longest dimension. 1.2 The test methods are intended for application to particle contamination determination of aerospace fluids, gases, surfaces, and environments. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.4 These test methods do not provide for sizing particles smaller than 5 μm. Note 1—Results of these methods are subject to variables inherent in any statistical method. The...

  8. Atomization method for verifying size effects of inhalable particles on lung damage of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Chen; Tang, Yue; Zhang, Lan; Tian, Yonggang; Zhang, Yingmei

    2017-02-01

    To explore the size effects of inhalable particles on lung damage, aqueous aerosol containing cadmium was studied as a model to design a new type of two-stage atomization device that was composed of two adjustable parts with electronic ultrasonic atomization and pneumatic atomization. The working parameters and effectiveness of this device were tested with H2O atomization and CdCl2 inhalation, respectively. By gravimetrically detecting the mass concentrations of PM2.5 and PM10 and analysing the particle size with a laser sensor, we confirmed the particle size distribution of the aqueous aerosol produced by the new device under different working conditions. Then, we conducted experiments in male Kunming mice that inhaled CdCl2 to determine the size effects of inhalable particles on lung damage and to confirm the effectiveness of the device. The new device could effectively control the particle size in the aqueous aerosol. The inhaled CdCl2 entered and injured the lungs of the mice by causing tissue damage, oxidative stress, increasing endoplasmic reticulum stress and triggering an inflammatory response, which might be related to where the particles deposited. The smaller particles in the aqueous aerosol atomized by the new two-stage atomization device deposited deeper into lung causing more damage. This device could provide a new method for animal experiments involving inhalation with water-soluble toxins.

  9. Seasonal differences of the atmospheric particle size distribution in a metropolitan area in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujitani, Yuji; Kumar, Prashant; Tamura, Kenji; Fushimi, Akihiro; Hasegawa, Shuich; Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Tanabe, Kiyoshi; Kobayashi, Shinji; Hirano, Seishiro

    2012-10-15

    We compared the effect of ambient temperature observed in two different seasons on the size distribution and particle number concentration (PNC) as a function of distance (up to ~250 m) from a major traffic road (25% of the vehicles are heavy-duty diesel vehicles). The modal particle diameter was found between 10 and 30 nm at the roadside in the winter. However, there was no peak for this size range in the summer, even at the roadside. Ambient temperature affects both the atmospheric dilution ratio (DR) and the evaporation rate of particles, thus it affects the decay rate of PNC. We corrected the DR effect in order to focus on the effect of particle evaporation on PNC decay. The decay rate of PNC with DR was found to depend on the season and particle diameter. During the winter, the decay rate for smaller particles (particles >30 nm in diameter, the decay rate was nearly the same during both seasons. This distinction between particles less than or greater than 30 nm in diameter reflects differences in particle volatility properties. Mass-transfer theory was used to estimate evaporation rates of C20-C36 n-alkane particles, which are the major n-alkanes in diesel exhaust particles. The C20-C28 n-alkanes of 30-nm particles completely evaporate at 31.2 °C (summer), and their lifetime is shorter than the transport time of air masses in our region of interest. Absence of the peak at 10-30 nm and the low decay rate of PNC particles near the exhaust pipes of vehicles, and complete evaporation of semivolatile materials before they reached the roadside. These results suggest that the lifetime of particles particles show distinctly different spatial distributions depending on the season.

  10. Emission of submicron aerosol particles in cement kilns: Total concentration and size distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotatori, Mauro; Mosca, Silvia; Guerriero, Ettore; Febo, Antonio; Giusto, Marco; Montagnoli, Mauro; Bianchini, Massimo; Ferrero, Renato

    2015-01-01

    Cement plants are responsible for particle and gaseous emissions into the atmosphere. With respect to particle emission, the greater part of is in the range from 0.05 to 5.0 µm in diameter. In the last years attention was paid to submicron particles, but there is a lack of available data on the emission from stationary sources. In this paper, concentration and size distribution of particles emitted from four cement kilns, in relationship to operational conditions (especially the use of alternative fuel to coal) of the clinker process are reported. Experimental campaigns were carried out by measuring particles concentration and size distribution at the stack of four cement plants through condensation particle counter (CPC) and scanning mobility particle sizer spectrometer (SMPS). Average total particle number concentrations were between 2000 and 4000 particles/cm³, about 8-10 times lower that those found in the corresponding surrounding areas. As for size distribution, for all the investigated plants it is stable with a unimodal distribution (120-150 nm), independent from the fuel used.

  11. Optical characterization of nano-sized organic carbon particles emitted from a small gasoline engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bireswar Paul; Amitava Datta; Aparna Datta; Abhijit Saha

    2013-01-01

    The nano-sized organic carbon (NOC) particles emitted from a small gasoline engine were characterized using various ex situ optical techniques to assess their hazardous impact.The exhaust gas was sampled iso-kinetically by a quartz probe and passed through de-ionized water to gather the hydrophilic carbonaceous particulates as hydrosol.The hydrodynamic diameter of the particles ranged between 1.7 and 3.6 nm at no load,with a mean diameter of 2.4 nm.The particle size in the engine exhaust was found to increase at higher loads,which is attributed to coagulation of the particles.The chemical structure of the particles was analyzed using UV-vis and infra-red spectroscopy.Both the band gap energy and oscillator strength data evaluated from the UV-vis absorbance showed that the NOC particles contained polyaromatic hydrocarbon structures with three to five aromatic rings.Infra-red spectroscopy analysis further confirmed the presence of aliphatic and carbonyl functionalities in the aromatic structures of the particles.The fine size of the particles,their high number concentration for the type of the engine under study and their structural features,make the particles extremely hazardous for environment and health.

  12. Generating Color from Polydisperse, Near Micron-Sized TiO2 Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Al-Mahmnur; Baek, Kyungnae; Son, Jieun; Pei, Yi-Rong; Kim, Dong Ha; Choy, Jin-Ho; Hyun, Jerome K

    2017-07-19

    Single particle Mie calculations of near micron-sized TiO2 particles predict strong light scattering dominating the visible range that would give rise to a white appearance. We demonstrate that a polydisperse collection of these "white" particles can result in the generation of visible colors through ensemble scattering. The weighted averaging of the scattering over the particle size distribution modifies the sharp, multiple, high order scattering modes from individual particles into broad variations in the collective extinction. These extinction variations are apparent as visible colors for particles suspended in organic solvent at low concentration, or for a monolayer of particles supported on a transparent substrate viewed in front of a white light source. We further exploit the color variations on optical sensitivity to the surrounding environment to promote micron-sized TiO2 particles as stable and robust agents for detecting the optical index of homogeneous media with high contrast sensitivities. Such distribution-modulated scattering properties provide TiO2 particles an intriguing opportunity to impart color and optical sensitivity to their widespread electronic and chemical platforms such as antibacterial windows, catalysis, photocatalysis, optical sensors, and photovoltaics.

  13. Particle size distribution of aerosols and associated heavy metals in kitchen environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sandeep; Srivastava, Arun; Jain, V K

    2008-07-01

    Mass size distributions of total suspended particulate matter (TSPM) was measured from Sep 2002 to April 2003 in indoor kitchen environments of five locations in Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU), New Delhi, with the help of a high volume cascade impactor. Particulate matters were separated in five different size ranges, i.e. >10.9 microm, 10.9-5.4 microm, 5.4-1.6 microm, 1.6-0.7 microm and particle size distribution at various sites appears to follow uni-modal trend corresponding to fine particles i.e. size range particles are estimated to be approximately 50% of TSPM and PM10.9, while PM10.9 comprises 80% of TSPM. Good correlations were observed between various size fractions. Regression results reveal that TSPM can adequately act as a surrogate for PM10.9 and fine particles, while PM10.9 can also act as surrogate for fine particles. The concentrations of heavy metals are found to be dominantly associated with fine particles. However, the concentration of some metals and their size distribution, to some extent is also site specific (fuel type used).

  14. Variation of Particle Size and Pretreatment Temperature to the Crystallinity of Leucaena Leucocephala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Safaai Nor Sharliza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted in order to determine the effect of different particle size and pretreatment temperature to the crystallinity of leucaena leucocephala. The leucaena was pretreated by ionic liquid [1-ethyl-3 methylimidazolium acetate [Emim]Ac. There were three different particle sizes that have been tested in this experiment; less than 0.3 mm, 0.5 mm and 0.7 mm. In the other hand, the pretreatment temperature tested were 30°C, 60°C and 90°C. The effect of particle size and pretreatment temperature to the crystallinity of leucaena was investigated by using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. The crystallinity index of the sample represents the percentage of crystalline materials. A lower in the cristallinity index indicated that the material has lower crystillinity, hence give more benefit to the cellulose hydrolysis. From XRD analysis, it shows that the cristallinity index of leucaena decreased with decreasing particle size and increasing pretreatment temperature. SEM analysis also shows that the structure of leucaena has more irregular, porous and destroyed structure with decreasing particle size and increasing pretreatment temperature. Thus, the result from this experiment shows that the smaller particle size and higher pretreatment temperature would provide a more accessible surface area to enhance the cellulose hydrolysis.

  15. Effects of particle size distribution on some physical, chemical and functional properties of unripe banana flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savlak, Nazlı; Türker, Burcu; Yeşilkanat, Nazlıcan

    2016-12-15

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of particle size distribution on physical, chemical and functional properties of unripe banana flour for the first time. A pure triploid (AAA group) of Musa acuminata subgroup Cavendish (°Brix;0.2, pH;4.73, titratable acidity; 0.56g/100g malic acid, total solids; 27.42%) which was supplied from Gazipaşa, Antalya, Turkey from October 2014 to October 2015 was used. Size fractions of physical, functional and antioxidant properties. Particle size significantly effected color, water absorbtion index and wettability. L(∗) value decreased, a(∗) and b(∗) values decreased by increasing particle size (r(2)=-0.94, r(2)=0.72, r(2)=0.73 respectively). Particles under 212μm had the lowest rate of wettability (83.40s). A negative correlation between particle size and wettability (r(2)=-0.75) and positive correlation between particle size and water absorption index (r(2)=0.94) was observed.

  16. The generation of diesel exhaust particle aerosols from a bulk source in an aerodynamic size range similar to atmospheric particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Cooney

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Daniel J Cooney1, Anthony J Hickey21Department of Biomedical Engineering; 2School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USAAbstract: The influence of diesel exhaust particles (DEP on the lungs and heart is currently a topic of great interest in inhalation toxicology. Epidemiological data and animal studies have implicated airborne particulate matter and DEP in increased morbidity and mortality due to a number of cardiopulmonary diseases including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, and lung cancer. The pathogeneses of these diseases are being studied using animal models and cell culture techniques. Real-time exposures to freshly combusted diesel fuel are complex and require significant infrastructure including engine operations, dilution air, and monitoring and control of gases. A method of generating DEP aerosols from a bulk source in an aerodynamic size range similar to atmospheric DEP would be a desirable and useful alternative. Metered dose inhaler technology was adopted to generate aerosols from suspensions of DEP in the propellant hydrofluoroalkane 134a. Inertial impaction data indicated that the particle size distributions of the generated aerosols were trimodal, with count median aerodynamic diameters less than 100 nm. Scanning electron microscopy of deposited particles showed tightly aggregated particles, as would be expected from an evaporative process. Chemical analysis indicated that there were no major changes in the mass proportion of 2 specific aromatic hydrocarbons (benzo[a]pyrene and benzo[k]fluoranthene in the particles resulting from the aerosolization process.Keywords: diesel exhaust particles, aerosol, inhalation toxicology

  17. Decreasing Particle Size of Paclitaxel Using Polymer in Fractional Precipitation Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Jae; Kim, Jin-Hyun [Kongju National University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    In this study, we have for the first time applied fractional precipitation with hydrophilic polymer in order to decrease the particle size of the anticancer agent paclitaxel from plant cell cultures. When compared with the case where no hydrophilic polymer was employed, the addition of hydrophilic polymer in fractional precipitation resulted in a decrease in the size of the paclitaxel precipitate. Among the polymers used, HPMC 2910 was the most effective for inhibition of precipitate growth. A polymer concentration of 0.2% (w/v) obtained the smallest particle size. The particle size was reduced by -35% compared to control. In addition, the precipitate size was inversely correlated with the absolute value of the zeta potential.

  18. Estimation of drug particle size in intact tablets by two dimensional X-ray diffractometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakral, Seema; Thakral, Naveen K; Suryanarayanan, Raj

    2017-09-09

    The average grain size of a crystalline material can be determined from the γ-profile of Debye rings in two-dimensional X-ray diffraction (2D XRD) frames. Our objectives were to: (i) validate the method for organic powders and use it to determine the grain size in intact tablets, and (ii) demonstrate the pharmaceutical application of this technique by determining the grain size of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) in marketed formulations. Six sieve fractions of sucrose were prepared and the particle size distribution was confirmed by laser diffraction. Their average grain size was determined from the 2D XRD frames by the γ-profile method. For particles size determined by the three methods were in good agreement. When these particles were compressed, there was no discernible change in the sucrose grain size in tablets. When the particles were > 250 μm, compression resulted in a mixture of large grains and fine powder. The grain size of acetaminophen in eleven marketed tablet formulations was determined to be either ∼ 35 μm or ∼ 80 μm. This non-destructive technique can therefore be potentially useful to estimate the grain size of crystalline formulation components in intact tablets. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Stable carbon and radiocarbon isotope compositions of particle size fractions to determine origins of sedimentary organic matter in an estuary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Megens, L; van der Plicht, J; de Leeuw, JW; Smedes, F; Altabet, M.

    2002-01-01

    Stable and radioactive carbon isotopic compositions of particle size fractions of a surface sediment from the Ems-Dollard estuary vary considerably with particle size. The organic material in the fine fractions (

  20. Stable carbon and radiocarbon isotope compositions of particle size fractions to determine origins of sedimentary organic matter in an estuary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Megens, L; van der Plicht, J; de Leeuw, JW; Smedes, F; Altabet, M.

    2002-01-01

    Stable and radioactive carbon isotopic compositions of particle size fractions of a surface sediment from the Ems-Dollard estuary vary considerably with particle size. The organic material in the fine fractions (

  1. The effect of carrier particle size on adhesion, content uniformity and inhalation performance of budesonide using dry powder inhalers

    OpenAIRE

    Kaialy, Waseem; Larhrib, El Hassan; Nokhodchi, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Dry Powder Inhalers (DPIs) are the result of the development of two technologies: powder technology and device technology. Particle deposition in the respiratory tract is affected by many aerosol particle properties such as particle size, shape, density, charge, and hygroscopicity.1 In particular, particle size is of great importance as it is known that particleparticle interactions within DPI formulations are related to van der Waals forces. Therefore, particle size is the mos...

  2. Effect of particle size on thermal decomposition of alkali metal picrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Rui; Zhang, Tonglai, E-mail: ztlbit@bit.edu.cn; Yang, Li; Zhou, Zunning

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: The smaller-sized picrate has greater gas emission than do its larger counterpart. The small size effect reduces the thermal decomposition activation energy, accelerates the reaction rate, and promotes the reaction activity. - Highlights: • Picrates were prepared into three micron sizes by microemulsion synthesis. • Thermal decomposition kinetics and thermodynamics were studied by DPTA and DSC. • Smaller-sized picrate has higher activity and faster reaction rate. • Particle size effect on thermal decomposition kinetics and thermodynamics was revealed. - Abstract: Three alkali metal picrates, KPA, RbPA and CsPA, were prepared into three micron sizes by microemulsion synthesis, and their thermal decomposition behaviors were investigated by DPTA at different temperatures and by DSC at different heating rates. The smaller-sized picrate has greater gas emission and smaller kinetic and thermodynamic parameters than do its larger counterpart. It can be attributed to the decreasing particle size which leads to the high surface energy, the fast mass and heat transfer, and the increasing active sites on the reaction interface. The small size effect and surface effect cause the autocatalysis which reduces the activation energy and promotes the reaction activity. The particle size does not affect the reaction mechanism. However, the picrates with different central alkali metals exhibit different reaction mechanisms even though they are of the same size. This is because the central metal determines the bond energy and consequently affects the stability of picrate.

  3. Transition and self-sustained turbulence in dilute suspensions of finite-size particles

    CERN Document Server

    Lashgari, Iman; Brandt, Luca

    2015-01-01

    We study the transition to turbulence of channel flow of finite-size particle suspensions at low volume fraction, i.e. $\\Phi \\approx 0.001$. The critical Reynolds number above which turbulence is sustained reduces to $Re \\approx 1675$, in the presence of few particles, independently of the initial condition, a value lower than that of the corresponding single-phase flow, i.e. $Re\\approx1775$. In the dilute suspension, the initial arrangement of the particles is important to trigger the transition at a fixed Reynolds number and particle volume fraction. As in single phase flows, streamwise elongated disturbances are initially induced in the flow. If particles can induce oblique disturbances with high enough energy within a certain time, the streaks breakdown, flow experiences the transition to turbulence and the particle trajectories become chaotic. Otherwise, the streaks decay in time and the particles immigrate towards the channel core in a laminar flow.

  4. Finite-size particles, advection, and chaos: a collective phenomenon of intermittent bursting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrano-T, Rene O; Moura, Alessandro; Tél, Tamás; Caldas, Iberê L; Grebogi, Celso

    2008-11-01

    We consider finite-size particles colliding elastically, advected by a chaotic flow. The collisionless dynamics has a quasiperiodic attractor and particles are advected towards this attractor. We show in this work that the collisions have dramatic effects in the system's dynamics, giving rise to collective phenomena not found in the one-particle dynamics. In particular, the collisions induce a kind of instability, in which particles abruptly spread out from the vicinity of the attractor, reaching the neighborhood of a coexisting chaotic saddle, in an autoexcitable regime. This saddle, not present in the dynamics of a single particle, emerges due to the collective particle interaction. We argue that this phenomenon is general for advected, interacting particles in chaotic flows.

  5. Influence of particle size on the distributions of liposomes to atherosclerotic lesions in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chono, Sumio; Tauchi, Yoshihiko; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2006-01-01

    In order to confirm the efficacy of liposomes as a drug carrier for atherosclerotic therapy, the influence of particle size on the distribution of liposomes to atherosclerotic lesions in mice was investigated. In brief, liposomes of three different particle sizes (500, 200, and 70 nm) were prepared, and the uptake of liposomes by the macrophages and foam cells in vitro and the biodistributions of liposomes administered intravenously to atherogenic mice in vivo were examined. The uptake by the macrophages and foam cells increased with the increase in particle size. Although the elimination rate from the blood circulation and the hepatic and splenic distribution increased with the increase in particle size in atherogenic mice, the aortic distribution was independent of the particle size. The aortic distribution of 200 nm liposomes was the highest in comparison with the other sizes. Surprisingly, the aortic distribution of liposomes in vivo did not correspond with the uptake by macrophages and foam cells in vitro. These results suggest that there is an optimal size for the distribution of liposomes to atherosclerotic lesions.

  6. Influence of Coal Particle Size on Coal Adsorption and Desorption Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Aziz, Naj; Ren, Ting; Nemcik, Jan; Tu, Shihao

    2014-10-01

    Accurate testing coal isotherm can play a significant role in the areas of coal seam gas drainage, outburst control, CO2 geo-sequestration, coalbed methane (CBM) and enhanced coalbed methane recovery (ECBM) etc. The effect of particle size on the CO2 and CH4 sorption capacity of bituminous coal from Illawarra, Australia was investigated at 35°C and at pressure up to 4 MPa. A unique indirect gravimetric apparatus was used to measure the gas adsorption and desorption isotherms of coal of different particle sizes ranging from around 150 urn to 16 mm. Langmuir model was used to analysis the experimental results of all gases. Coal particle size was found to have an apparent effect on the coal ash content and helium density results. Coal with larger particle size had higher ash content and higher helium density. The sorption isotherm was found to be highly sensitive with helium density of coal which was determined in the procedure of testing the void volume of sample cell. Hence, coal particle size had a significant influence on the coal sorption characteristics including sorption capacity and desorption hysteresis for CO2 and CH4, especially calculated with dry basis of coal. In this study, the 150-212 um (150 um) coal samples achieved higher sorption capacity and followed by 2.36-3.35 mm (2.4 mm), 8-9.5 mm (8 mm) and 16-19 mm (16 mm) particle size samples. However, the differences between different coal particles were getting smaller when the sorption isotherms are calculated with dry ash free basis. Test with 150 um coal samples were also found to have relatively smaller desorption hysteresis compared with the other larger particle size samples. The different results including adsorption/desorption isotherm, Langmuir parameters and coal hysteresis were all analysed with the CO2 and CH4 gases.

  7. Synthesis and study of properties of dental resin composites with different nanosilica particles size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabela, Maria M; Sideridou, Irini D

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this work was the synthesis of light-cured resin nanocomposites using nanosilica particles with different particle size and the study of some physical-mechanical properties of the composites. Various types of silica nanoparticles (Aerosil) with average particle size of 40, 20, 16, 14, and 7 nm, used as filler were silanized with the silane 3-methacryloxypropyl-trimethoxysilane (MPS). The total amount of silane used was kept constant at 10 wt% relative to the filler weight to ensure the complete silanization of nanoparticles. The silanizated silica nanoparticles were identified by FT-IR spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Then the silanized nanoparticles (55 wt%) were mixed with a photoactivated Bis-GMA/TEGDMA (50/50 wt/wt) matrix. Degree of conversion of composites was determined by FT-IR analysis. The static flexural strength and flexural modulus were measured using a three-point bending set up. The dynamic thermomechanical properties were determined by dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA). Sorption, solubility and volumetric change were determined after storage of composites in water or ethanol/water solution 75 vol% for 30 days. The TGA for composites was performed in nitrogen atmosphere from 30 to 700 °C. As the average silica particle size decreases, the percentage amount of MPS attached on the silica surface increases. However, the number of MPS molecules attached on the silica surface area of 1 nm(2) is independent of filler particle size. As the average filler particles size decreases a progressive increase in the degree of conversion of composites and an increase in the amount of sorbed water is observed. The prepared composites containing different amount of silica filler, with different particle size, but with the same amount of silanized silica and organic matrix showed similar flexural strength and flexural modulus, except composite with the lowest filler particle size, which showed lower flexural modulus. Copyright © 2011

  8. Modelling Inter-Particle Forces and Resulting Agglomerate Sizes in Cement-Based Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Ane Mette; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2005-01-01

    The theory of inter-particle forces versus external shear in cement-based materials is reviewed. On this basis, calculations on maximum agglomerate size present after the combined action of superplasticizers and shear are carried out. Qualitative experimental results indicate that external shear...... affects the particle size distribution of Mg(OH)2 (used as model material) as well as silica, whereas the addition of superplasticizers affects only the smallest particles in cement and thus primarily acts as water reducers and not dispersers....

  9. Saturn's rings through a microscope - Particle size constraints from the Voyager PPS scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showalter, Mark R.; Nicholson, Philip D.

    1990-01-01

    The Voyager-2 photopolarimeter PPS experiment obtained the highest resolution of any ring observation of Saturn, profiling the variation of optical depth in radial steps of about 100 meters. A detailed treatment of the PPS statistics is presented here, and it is shown how these statistics can be related to the particle size distribution. An expression for the excess noise in the scan due to large particles is obtained, and the observed noise is used to constrain the upper end of the size distribution through the rings. It is shown that the Cassini Division and the C Ring have the smallest proportion of large particles, while the A ring has the largest proportion.

  10. Mechanism for Particle Transport and Size Sorting via Low-Frequency Vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Scott, James S.; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Badescu, Mircea; Bao, Xiaoqi

    2010-01-01

    There is a need for effective sample handling tools to deliver and sort particles for analytical instruments that are planned for use in future NASA missions. Specifically, a need exists for a compact mechanism that allows transporting and sieving particle sizes of powdered cuttings and soil grains that may be acquired by sampling tools such as a robotic scoop or drill. The required tool needs to be low mass and compact to operate from such platforms as a lander or rover. This technology also would be applicable to sample handling when transporting samples to analyzers and sorting particles by size.

  11. In situ exhaust cloud measurements. [particle size distribution and cloud physics of rocket exhaust clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wornom, D.

    1980-01-01

    Airborne in situ exhaust cloud measurements were conducted to obtain definitions of cloud particle size range, Cl2 content, and HCl partitioning. Particle size distribution data and Cl2 measurements were made during the May, August, and September 1977 Titan launches. The measurements of three basic effluents - HCl, NO sub X, and particles - against minutes after launch are plotted. The maximum observed HCl concentration to the maximum Cl2 concentration are compared and the ratios of the Cl2 to the HCl is calculated.

  12. Particle Size, Number Density, And Velocity Measurements In A 2800 K Combustion System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, W. M.; Schwartz, F. A.; Stallings, E. S.; Belz, R. A.

    1983-10-01

    Particle size and velocity measurements have been obtained in a low-speed (6 to 10 m/s), 2800 K combustor 30 cm in diameter. The measurements were obtained using a particle-sizing interferometer coupled to a 0.5 m spectrometer for background light rejection from radiant particles. Results obtained for the combustion of powdered coke clearly indicate the capabilities of this type of instrument to estimate combustor efficiency as a function of temperature. Comparison of the optically sampled measurements with other sampling techniques shows reasonable agreement.

  13. The effect of particles in different sizes on the mechanical properties of spray formed steel composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kenneth; Pedersen, A. S.; Pryds, N.

    2000-01-01

    The main objective of the work was to investigate the effect of addition of ceramic particles with different size distributions on the mechanical properties, e.g. wear resistance and tensile strength, of spray formed materials. The experiments were carried out in a spray-forming unit at Risø...... particle size of 46 and 134 μm were carried out with respect to their mechanical properties e.g. wear resistance and tensile strength. It was found that the addition of Al2O3 particles to the steel improves its wear properties and reduces the elongation and tensile strength of the material...

  14. Evaluation of Plasticity and Particle Size Distribution Characteristics of Bagasse Ash on Cement Treated Lateritic Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Abdullahi MU'AZU

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Lateritic soil was treated with 1-4% cement contents and was admixtured with 2-8% bagasse ash content. The paper evaluated the plasticity and particle size distribution characteristic of bagasse ash on cement treated laterite. It was observed that liquid limit and plasticity index reduced while plastic limit increased. As regards the particle size distribution, the was reduction in the percentage of fines as a result of formation of heavier pseudo- and particle with percentage passing BS Sieve No. 200 reduced from 63% to almost zero. However the recommended percentage of bagasse ash should be between 4%-6%.

  15. Limitations in the Use of Unipolar Charging for Electrical Mobility Sizing Instruments: A Study of the Fast Mobility Particle Sizer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levin, Marcus; Gudmundsson, A.; Pagels, J. H.;

    2015-01-01

    A comparison between three different types of particle sizing instruments (fast mobility particle sizer, FMPS; electrical low pressure impactor, ELPI; and scanning mobility particle sizer, SMPS) and one condensation particle counter (CPC) was made to compare instrument response in terms of size d...

  16. Influence of removal time and particle size on the particle substrate adhesion force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Felicetti

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available An investigation was conducted on influence of removal time on the particle substrate adhesive force. The centrifuge technique was used to determine the adhesion force at different compression and removal rates. A microcentrifuge with a maximum rotation of 14000 rpm was used to both compress upon particles and remove them from the surface of the substrate. An image analysis program (Image-Pro Plus 4.5 was employed to monitor the number of particles adhering to and removed from the surface of the substrate after each increase in angular speed. The influence of removal time on the adhesion force was investigated, using removal times of 1, 3 and 5 minutes, which indicated that removal time does not interfere with the adhesion force within the diameter range analyzed here.

  17. Aerosol number size distributions over a coastal semi urban location: Seasonal changes and ultrafine particle bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babu, S. Suresh, E-mail: s_sureshbabu@vssc.gov.in [Space Physics Laboratory, Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, Thiruvananthapuram 695022 (India); Kompalli, Sobhan Kumar [Space Physics Laboratory, Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, Thiruvananthapuram 695022 (India); Moorthy, K. Krishna [Centre for Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

    2016-09-01

    Number-size distribution is one of the important microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosols that influence aerosol life cycle, aerosol-radiation interaction as well as aerosol-cloud interactions. Making use of one-yearlong measurements of aerosol particle number-size distributions (PNSD) over a broad size spectrum (~ 15–15,000 nm) from a tropical coastal semi-urban location-Trivandrum (Thiruvananthapuram), the size characteristics, their seasonality and response to mesoscale and synoptic scale meteorology are examined. While the accumulation mode contributed mostly to the annual mean concentration, ultrafine particles (having diameter < 100 nm) contributed as much as 45% to the total concentration, and thus constitute a strong reservoir, that would add to the larger particles through size transformation. The size distributions were, in general, bimodal with well-defined modes in the accumulation and coarse regimes, with mode diameters lying in the range 141 to 167 nm and 1150 to 1760 nm respectively, in different seasons. Despite the contribution of the coarse sized particles to the total number concentration being meager, they contributed significantly to the surface area and volume, especially during transport of marine air mass highlighting the role of synoptic air mass changes. Significant diurnal variation occurred in the number concentrations, geometric mean diameters, which is mostly attributed to the dynamics of the local coastal atmospheric boundary layer and the effect of mesoscale land/sea breeze circulation. Bursts of ultrafine particles (UFP) occurred quite frequently, apparently during periods of land-sea breeze transitions, caused by the strong mixing of precursor-rich urban air mass with the cleaner marine air mass; the resulting turbulence along with boundary layer dynamics aiding the nucleation. These ex-situ particles were observed at the surface due to the transport associated with boundary layer dynamics. The particle growth rates from

  18. Removal of virus to protozoan sized particles in point-of-use ceramic water filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielefeldt, Angela R; Kowalski, Kate; Schilling, Cherylynn; Schreier, Simon; Kohler, Amanda; Scott Summers, R

    2010-03-01

    The particle removal performance of point-of-use ceramic water filters (CWFs) was characterized in the size range of 0.02-100 microm using carboxylate-coated polystyrene fluorescent microspheres, natural particles and clay. Particles were spiked into dechlorinated tap water, and three successive water batches treated in each of six different CWFs. Particle removal generally increased with increasing size. The removal of virus-sized 0.02 and 0.1 microm spheres were highly variable between the six filters, ranging from 63 to 99.6%. For the 0.5 microm spheres removal was less variable and in the range of 95.1-99.6%, while for the 1, 2, 4.5, and 10 microm spheres removal was >99.6%. Recoating four of the CWFs with colloidal silver solution improved removal of the 0.02 microm spheres, but had no significant effects on the other particle sizes. Log removals of 1.8-3.2 were found for natural turbidity and spiked kaolin clay particles; however, particles as large as 95 microm were detected in filtered water.

  19. [Experimental study on the size spectra and emission factor of ultrafine particle from coal combustion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zai; Yang, Wen-jun; Xie, Xiao-fang; Chen, Qiu-fang; Cai, Zhi-liang

    2014-12-01

    The emission characteristics of ultrafine particles released from pulverized coal combustion were studied, the size spectra of ultrafine particles (5.6-560 nm) were measured with FMPS (fast mobility particle sizer) on a self-built aerosol experiment platform. Meanwhile, a particle dynamic evolution model was established to obtain the particle deposition rate and the emission rate through the optimized algorithm. Finally, the emission factor was calculated. The results showed that at the beginning of particle generation, the size spectra were polydisperse and complex, the initial size spectra was mainly composed of three modes including 10 nm, 30-40 nm and 100-200 nm. Among them, the number concentration of mode around 10 nm was higher than those of other modes, the size spectrum of around 100-200 nm was lognormal distributed, with a CMD (count median diameter) of around 16 nm. Then, as time went on, the total number concentration was decayed by exponential law, the CMD first increased and then tended to be stable gradually. The calculation results showed that the emission factor of particles from coal combustion under laboratory condition was (5.54 x 10(12) ± 2.18 x 10(12)) unit x g(-1).

  20. Measurement of particle size distribution of soil and selected aggregate sizes using the hydrometer method and laser diffractometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, G.; Gómez, J. A.; Giráldez, J. V.

    2010-05-01

    Soil particle size distribution has been traditionally determined by the hydrometer or the sieve-pipette methods, both of them time consuming and requiring a relatively large soil sample. This might be a limitation in situations, such as for instance analysis of suspended sediment, when the sample is small. A possible alternative to these methods are the optical techniques such as laser diffractometry. However the literature indicates that the use of this technique as an alternative to traditional methods is still limited, because the difficulty in replicating the results obtained with the standard methods. In this study we present the percentages of soil grain size determined using laser diffractometry within ranges set between 0.04 - 2000 μm. A Beckman-Coulter ® LS-230 with a 750 nm laser beam and software version 3.2 in five soils, representative of southern Spain: Alameda, Benacazón, Conchuela, Lanjarón and Pedrera. In three of the studied soils (Alameda, Benacazón and Conchuela) the particle size distribution of each aggregate size class was also determined. Aggregate size classes were obtained by dry sieve analysis using a Retsch AS 200 basic ®. Two hundred grams of air dried soil were sieved during 150 s, at amplitude 2 mm, getting nine different sizes between 2000 μm and 10 μm. Analyses were performed by triplicate. The soil sample preparation was also adapted to our conditions. A small amount each soil sample (less than 1 g) was transferred to the fluid module full of running water and disaggregated by ultrasonication at energy level 4 and 80 ml of sodium hexametaphosphate solution during 580 seconds. Two replicates of each sample were performed. Each measurement was made for a 90 second reading at a pump speed of 62. After the laser diffractometry analysis, each soil and its aggregate classes were processed calibrating its own optical model fitting the optical parameters that mainly depends on the color and the shape of the analyzed particle. As a

  1. Measuring Bubble, Drop and Particle Sizes in Multiphase Systems with Ultrasound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cents, A.H.G.; Brilman, D.W.F.; Versteeg, G.F.; Wijnstra, P.J.; Regtien, P.P.L.

    2004-01-01

    A technique is developed for measurement of bubble, droplet and particle-size distributions in multiphase systems, based on the propagation speed and attenuation of ultrasound. The measurement of the size distribution of the dispersed phase in multiphase systems was desired to analyze the mass-trans

  2. A simple algorithm for measuring particle size distributions on an uneven background from TEM images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gontard, Lionel Cervera; Ozkaya, Dogan; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticles have a wide range of applications in science and technology. Their sizes are often measured using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or X-ray diffraction. Here, we describe a simple computer algorithm for measuring particle size distributions from TEM images in the presence of a...

  3. Anomalous Particle Size Dependence of Magnetic Relaxation Phenomena in Goethite Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Cathrine; Madsen, Daniel Esmarch; Boothroyd, Chris B.

    2015-01-01

    By use of Mossbauer spectroscopy we have studied the magnetic properties of samples of goethite nanoparticles with different particle size. The spectra are influenced by fluctuations of the magnetization directions, but the size dependence is not in accordance with the Neel-Brown expression for s...

  4. Fructose intake is a predictor of LDL particle size in overweight schoolchildren

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aeberli, I.; Zimmermann, M.B.; Molinari, L.; Lehmann, R.; Allemand, l' D.; Spinas, G.A.; Berneis, K.

    2007-01-01

    Background: High amounts of dietary fructose may contribute to dyslipidemia in adults, but there are few data in children. Childhood adiposity is associated with smaller LDL particle size, but the dietary predictors of LDL size in overweight children have not been studied. Objectives: We aimed to de

  5. Size-Dependent Photodynamic Anticancer Activity of Biocompatible Multifunctional Magnetic Submicron Particles in Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyong-Hoon; Nam, Ki Chang; Malkinski, Leszek; Choi, Eun Ha; Jung, Jin-Seung; Park, Bong Joo

    2016-09-06

    In this study, newly designed biocompatible multifunctional magnetic submicron particles (CoFe₂O₄-HPs-FAs) of well-defined sizes (60, 133, 245, and 335 nm) were fabricated for application as a photosensitizer delivery agent for photodynamic therapy in cancer cells. To provide selective targeting of cancer cells and destruction of cancer cell functionality, basic cobalt ferrite (CoFe₂O₄) particles were covalently bonded with a photosensitizer (PS), which comprises hematoporphyrin (HP), and folic acid (FA) molecules. The magnetic properties of the CoFe₂O₄ particles were finely adjusted by controlling the size of the primary CoFe₂O₄ nanograins, and secondary superstructured composite particles were formed by aggregation of the nanograins. The prepared CoFe₂O₄-HP-FA exhibited high water solubility, good MR-imaging capacity, and biocompatibility without any in vitro cytotoxicity. In particular, our CoFe₂O₄-HP-FA exhibited remarkable photodynamic anticancer efficiency via induction of apoptotic death in PC-3 prostate cancer cells in a particle size- and concentration-dependent manner. This size-dependent effect was determined by the specific surface area of the particles because the number of HP molecules increased with decreasing size and increasing surface area. These results indicate that our CoFe₂O₄-HP-FA may be applicable for photodynamic therapy (PDT) as a PS delivery material and a therapeutic agent for MR-imaging based PDT owing to their high saturation value for magnetization and superparamagnetism.

  6. Effect of particle size on compaction of materials with different deformation mechanisms with and without lubricants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaya, Ahmad; Aburub, Aktham

    2008-01-01

    This work investigates the effect of excipient particle size on compaction properties of brittle, plastic and viscoelastic materials with and without added lubricants. Sieve cuts of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), starch and dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate were obtained by sieving, then samples were tested without lubrication or with added lubricant (0.5% Mg stearate mixed for either 5 or 30-min). Compacts were left overnight before testing. It was found that in the absence of lubricant, compact tensile strength (TS) was dependent on particle size only for starch. With Mg stearate, lubricant sensitivity shows a strong dependence on excipient particle size for both starch and MCC, where smaller particles are less affected by lubricant. Dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate was not sensitive to lubricant even after 30 min mixing. This study highlights that in the absence of lubricant, initial particle size of excipients has no impact on compact strength not only for dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate (brittle), but also for MCC (plastic). On the other hand, TS is dependent on particle size both with or without added lubricant for starch (viscoelastic).

  7. Soot particle size measurements in ethylene diffusion flames at elevated pressures

    KAUST Repository

    Steinmetz, Scott

    2016-05-07

    Soot particle size is investigated in laminar nitrogen-diluted ethylene coflow diffusion flames at 4, 8, 12 and 16 atm. Line of sight attenuation and scattering are used to measure two-dimensional soot volume fraction and particle size fields for the first time at elevated pressures. Soot volume fraction dependence on pressure is consistent with the observations of similar studies, scaling approximately with the square of pressure. Scattering intensity is analyzed through Rayleigh and Rayleigh-Debye-Gans polydisperse fractal aggregate theories to provide two estimates of particle size. An increase in overall particle sizes with pressure is found, consistent with similar one-dimensional studies. Particle diameters in the annulus of the flame increase faster with pressure than those on centerline. Contrary to previous studies, the dependence of particle size on pressure was found to taper off between 8 and 12 atm, with little observed growth beyond 12 atm. The measurements provide additional data for one of the International Sooting Flame (ISF) workshop\\'s target pressurized flames.

  8. The dissolution rates of SiO2 nanoparticles as a function of particle size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diedrich, Tamara; Dybowska, Agnieszka; Schott, Jacques; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Oelkers, Eric H

    2012-05-01

    There is a critical need to better define the relationship among particle size, surface area, and dissolution rate for nanoscale materials to determine their role in the environment, their toxicity, and their technological utility. Although some previous studies concluded that nanoparticles dissolve faster than their bulk analogs, contradictory evidence suggests that nanoparticles dissolve more slowly. Furthermore, insufficient characterization of the nanoparticulate samples and the solution chemistry in past studies obscures the relationship between particle size, surface area, and dissolution rate. Here we report amorphous SiO(2) dissolution rates in aqueous solutions determined from complementary mixed-flow and closed reactor experiments at 6.9 ≥ pH ≥ 11.2 and 25 °C as a function of particle diameter from 25 to 177 nm. Experiments were performed at far-from-equilibrium conditions to isolate kinetic effects from those of changing the reaction driving force on overall dissolution rates. Measured far-from-equilibrium mass normalized dissolution rates are nearly independent of particle size, but corresponding BET surface area normalized rates decrease substantially with decreasing particle size. Combining these observations with existing established kinetic rate equations allows the prediction of nanoparticle dissolution rates as a function of both particle size and aqueous fluid saturation state.

  9. Limestone particle size and artificial light for laying hens in the second laying cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexsandro Nunes de Oliveira

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of limestone particle size and the use of artificial light for laying hens in the second laying cycle. We used 240 Hisex White laying hens at 82 weeks of age in a completely randomized design in a 5 × 2 factorial arrangement, resulting in 10 treatments with 4 replicates of 6 birds. The variables were the five particle sizes obtained by increasing the proportion of thick limestone (0, 25, 50, 75 and 100% compared with thin limestone and two lighting programs: with and without artificial light. Limestone particle size and light did not affect performance or egg quality. However, there were changes in bird feeding schedule throughout the day as a response to the lighting program. Bone quality, density and mineral content of the tibia were not affected by the treatments, but limestone particle size had a quadratic effect of on bone deformity and strength, obtaining maximum inclusion points with 63% and 59% of thick limestone, respectively. The use of large particles of limestone in the diet and the use of a lighting program does not influence the performance and quality of the eggs of laying hens in the second production cycle, but the use of a proportion of 63.3 g of average particle size (0.60 mm replacing the fine limestone (0.23 mm per 100 g of total limestone added to the diet improves bone quality in these birds.

  10. Hydrodynamic Properties of Fe3O4 Kerosene-Based Ferrofluids with Narrow Particle Size Distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jian-Hui; XU Xue-Fei; SI Ming-Su; ZHOU You-He; XUE De-Sheng

    2005-01-01

    @@ We investigate the hydrodynamic properties of Fe3O4 kerosene-based ferrofluids with narrow particle size distri-bution. The ferrofluids are synthesized by improving chemical coprecipitation technique. A narrow distribution of 8.6-10.8nm particle sizes is obtained from the magnetization curve with the free-form model based on the Bayesian inference theory. The fitting result is consistent with average particle size obtained from x-ray diffraction. With the increase of applied magnetic field and magnetic particle concentration, apparent viscosity of ferrofluids increases. At concentration 4.04%, the type of flow for the ferrofluid transforms from Newtonian to Bingham plastic fluid as the applied magnetic field increases.

  11. Simulation of Particle Size Effect on Dynamic Properties and Fracture of PTFE-W-Al Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbold, E. B.; Cai, J.; Benson, D. J.; Nesterenko, V. F.

    2007-12-01

    Recent investigations of the dynamic compressive strength of cold isostatically pressed composites of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), tungsten (W) and aluminum (Al) powders show significant differences depending on the size of metallic particles. The addition of W increases the density and changes the overall strength of the sample depending on the size of W particles. To investigate relatively large deformations, multi-material Eulerian and arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian methods, which have the ability to efficiently handle the formation of free surfaces, were used. The calculations indicate that the increased sample strength with fine metallic particles is due to the dynamic formation of force chains. This phenomenon occurs for samples with a higher porosity of the PTFE matrix compared to samples with larger particle size of W and a higher density PTFE matrix.

  12. EFFECTS OF CONSOLIDATION TIME AND PARTICLE SIZE ON SCOUR RATES OF COHESIVE SEDIMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Guang-ming; WANG Jun; SHU Cai-wen; LAI Yong-hui

    2007-01-01

    By means of flumes, experiments have been done in order to determine the effects of consolidation time and particle size on scour rates of cohesive sediment. Experimental results shown dry unit weight increased and scour rates decreased during the course of consolidation, the resistance to scour was related to consolidation time, but it presented different consolidation properties that depended on particle size. For the finer particle, the consolidation process was longer, the range of dry unit weight altered was greater, the consolidated sediments moved in chunks. On the other hand, based on analysis of the relationship of dry unit weight change with consolidation time, the simplified analytical expressions of dry unit weight and scour rates were derived, the results were checked with experimental data in the same flow situation and good agreements were achieved. Since the effects of different particle size were considered during the process of consolidation, the variations of consolidation properties were well reflected in these formulas.

  13. The equilibrium velocity of spherical particles in rectangular microfluidic channels for size measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Christian; Quint, Stephan; Spang, Peter; Walther, Thomas; Bassler, Michael

    2014-07-01

    According to the Segré-Silberberg effect, spherical particles migrate to a lateral equilibrium position in parabolic flow profiles. Here, for the first time, the corresponding equilibrium velocity is studied experimentally for micro particles in channels with rectangular cross section. Micro channels are fabricated in PMMA substrate based on a hot embossing process. To measure individual particle velocities at very high precision, the technique of spatially modulated emission is applied. It is found that the equilibrium velocity is size-dependent and the method offers a new way to measure particle size in microfluidic systems. The method is of particular interest for microfluidic flow cytometry as it delivers an alternative to the scatter signal for cell size determination.

  14. A method for detecting the presence of organic fraction in nucleation mode sized particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Vaattovaara

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available New particle formation and growth has a very important role in many climate processes. However, the overall knowlegde of the chemical composition of atmospheric nucleation mode (particle diameter, d<20 nm and the lower end of Aitken mode particles (d≤50 nm is still insufficient. In this work, we have applied the UFO-TDMA (ultrafine organic tandem differential mobility analyzer method to shed light on the presence of an organic fraction in the nucleation mode size class in different atmospheric environments. The basic principle of the organic fraction detection is based on our laboratory UFO-TDMA measurements with organic and inorganic compounds. Our laboratory measurements indicate that the usefulness of the UFO-TDMA in the field experiments would arise especially from the fact that atmospherically the most relevant inorganic compounds do not grow in subsaturated ethanol vapor, when particle size is 10 nm in diameter and saturation ratio is about 86% or below it. Furthermore, internally mixed particles composed of ammonium bisulfate and sulfuric acid with sulfuric acid mass fraction ≤33% show no growth at 85% saturation ratio. In contrast, 10 nm particles composed of various oxidized organic compounds of atmospheric relevance are able to grow in those conditions. These discoveries indicate that it is possible to detect the presence of organics in atmospheric nucleation mode sized particles using the UFO-TDMA method. In the future, the UFO-TDMA is expected to be an important aid to describe the composition of atmospheric newly-formed particles.

  15. A method for detecting the presence of organic fraction in nucleation mode sized particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Vaattovaara

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available New particle formation and growth has a very important role in many climate processes. However, the overall knowlegde of the chemical composition of atmospheric nucleation mode (particle diameter, d<20 nm and the lower end of Aitken mode particles (d≤50 nm is still insufficient. In this work, we have applied the UFO-TDMA (ultrafine organic tandem differential mobility analyzer method to shed light on the presence of organic fraction in the nucleation mode size class in different atmospheric environments. The basic principle of the organic fraction detection is based on our laboratory UFO-TDMA measurements with organic and inorganic compounds. Our laboratory measurements indicate that the usefulness of the UFO-TDMA in the field experiments would arise especially from the fact that atmospherically the most relevant inorganic compounds do not grow in subsaturated ethanol vapor, when particle size is 10nm in diameter and saturation ratio is about 86% or below it. Furthermore, internally mixed particles composed of ammonium bisulfate and sulfuric acid with sulfuric acid mass fraction ≤33% show no growth at 85% saturation ratio. In contrast, 10 nm particles composed of various organic compounds of atmospheric relevance are able to grow in those conditions. These discoveries indicate that it is possible to detect the presence of organics in atmospheric nucleation mode sized particles using the UFO-TDMA method. In the future, the UFO-TDMA is expected to be an important aid to describe the composition of atmospheric newly-formed particles.

  16. PARTICULATE SIZE EFFECTS IN THE PARTICLE-REINFORCED METAL-MATRIX COMPOSITES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏悦广

    2001-01-01

    The influences of particle size on the mechanical properties of the particulate metal matrix composite are obviously displayed in the experimental observations. However, the phenomenon can not be predicted directly using the conventional elastic-plastic theory. It is because that no length scale parameters are involved in the conventional theory. In the present research, using the strain gradient plasticity theory, a systematic research of the particle size effect in the particulate metal matrix composite is carried out. The roles of many composite factors, such as: the particle size, the Young's modulus of the particle, the particle aspect ratio and volume fraction, as well as the plastic strain hardening exponent of the matrix material,are studied in detail. In order to obtain a general understanding for the composite behavior, two kinds of particle shapes, ellipsoid and cylinder, are considered to check the strength dependence of the smooth or non-smooth particle surface. Finally,the prediction results will be applied to the several experiments about the ceramic particle-reinforced metal-matrix composites. The material length scale parameter is predicted.

  17. Biodistribution of colloidal gold nanoparticles after intravenous administration: effect of particle size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonavane, Ganeshchandra; Tomoda, Keishiro; Makino, Kimiko

    2008-10-15

    Purpose of the present research work was to evaluate the biological distribution of differently size gold nanoparticles (NP) up on intravenous administration in mice. Another objective was to study effect of particle size on biological distribution of gold NP to enable their diverse applications in nanotechnology. Gold NP of different particle sizes, mainly 15, 50, 100 and 200 nm, were synthesized by modifying citrate ion concentration. Synthesized gold nanoparticles were characterized by SEM and their size distribution was studied by particle size analyzer. Gold NP was suspended in sodium alginate solution (0.5%, w/v) and administered to mice (1g/kg, intravenously) [n=3]. After 24h of administration of gold NP, blood was collected under light ether anesthesia, mice were sacrificed by cervical dislocation and various tissues/organs were removed. The tissues were then washed with saline, homogenized and lysed with aqua regia. The determination of gold in samples was carried out quantitatively by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). SEM study revealed spherical morphology of gold NP with narrow particle size distribution. Biodistribution study revealed gold NPs of all sizes were mainly accumulated in organs like liver, lung and spleen. The accumulation of gold NP in various tissues was found to be depending on particle size. 15 nm gold NP revealed higher amount of gold and number of particles in all the tissues including blood, liver, lung, spleen, kidney, brain, heart, stomach. Interestingly, 15 and 50 nm gold NP were able to pass blood-brain barrier as evident from gold concentration in brain. Two-hundred nanometers gold NP showed very minute presence in organs including blood, brain, stomach and pancreas. The results revealed that tissue distribution of gold nanoparticles is size-dependent with the smallest 15 nm nanoparticles showing the most widespread organ distribution.

  18. Sintering of Spherical Particles of Equal and Different Size Arranged in a Body Centered Cubic Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Redanz, Pia; McMeeking, R. M.

    2003-01-01

    Solid-state sintering of a bcc structure of spherical particles has been studied numerically by use of simple shape parameters to describe the state of the unit cell. Both free and pressure-assisted sintering of particles of equal and different sizes for various ratios of boundary and surface...... to interact, or the next-nearest neighbours in the particle structure attain contact. Quantative measures of the density at the transition from open pore space between the particles to closed porosity as well as the density at which the next-nearest neighbours start to touch are derived. Furthermore...

  19. Particle impaction efficiency and size distribution in a MSWI super heater tube bundle

    CERN Document Server

    Haugen, Nils Erland L; Bugge, Mette; Warnecke, Ragnar; Weghaus, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Particle impaction in the super heater geometry found in the municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) of GKS in Schweinfurt, Germany, has been investigated. By using direct numerical simulations for the fluid flow, inertial particles coupled to the fluid through the classical Stokes' drag law have been tracked. Focus has been on the effect of flow velocity, and it is shown that decreasing the flow velocity will drastically decrease the impaction efficiency for some particle radii. Finally particle size distribution measurements are presented and used to find quantitative mass fluxes both on the front and the back side of the tubes in the super heater tube bundle.

  20. New computer program plots coal particle size to monitor pulverizer performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tartar, A.M. (Univ. of Missouri, St. Louis, MO (United States)); Mueller, W.K. (Union Electric Co., St. Louis, MO (United States)); Marrero, T.R.

    1994-11-01

    Maintaining proper coal particle size and distribution is one of many considerations in achieving efficient combustion performance. Improper pulverizer operation and maintenance can result in an excessive percentage of either coarse coal particles, which tends to increase the amount of unburned carbon in the ash, or fine coal particles, which can limit the throughput of the pulverizer and, if too fine, can affect coal burning rates and residence time in boilers. Traditionally, coal particle size plotting and distribution have been done by hand and required special graphing paper formulated using the Rosin and Rammler equation. Now there is an alternative. This article describes a computerized procedure for plotting the fineness of coal particles after the milling process developed by engineers at Union Electric Co., St. Louis, Mo., and the University of Missouri, Columbia. Known as an ANTAR-UE, this procedure is being used by the Betterment Engineering group at Union Electric to plot mill fineness data.

  1. Impact of controlled particle size nanofillers on the mechanical properties of segmented polyurethane nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finnigan, Bradley; Casey, Phil; Cookson, David; Halley, Peter; Jack, Kevin; Truss, Rowan; Martin, Darren (Queensland); (UC)

    2008-04-02

    The impact of average layered silicate particle size on the mechanical properties of thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) nanocomposites has been investigated. At fixed addition levels (3 wt% organosilicate), an increase in average particle size resulted in an increase in stiffness. Negligible stiffening was observed for the smallest