WorldWideScience

Sample records for foot ulcers prospective

  1. A prospective study of risk factors for foot ulceration: The West of Ireland Diabetes Foot Study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hurley, L

    2013-09-25

    BackgroundThis is the first study to examine risk factors for diabetic foot ulceration in Irish general practice.AimTo determine the prevalence of established risk factors for foot ulceration in a community-based cohort, and to explore the potential for estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) to act as a novel risk factor.DesignA prospective observational study.MethodsPatients with diabetes attending 12 (of 17) invited general practices were invited for foot screening. Validated clinical tests were carried out at baseline to assess for vascular and sensory impairment and foot deformity. Ulcer incidence was ascertained by patient self-report and medical record. Patients were re-assessed 18 months later. ResultsOf 828 invitees, 563 (68%) attended screening. On examination 23-25% had sensory dysfunction and 18-39% had evidence of vascular impairment. Using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network risk stratification system we found the proportion at moderate and high risk of future ulceration to be 25% and 11% respectively. At follow-up 16\\/383 patients (4.2%) developed a new foot ulcer (annual incidence rate of 2.6%). We observed an increasing probability of abnormal vascular and sensory test results (pedal pulse palpation, doppler waveform assessment, 10g monofilament, vibration perception and neuropathy disability score) with declining eGFR levels. We were unable to show an independent association between new ulceration and reduced eGFR [Odds ratio 1.01; p=0.64].ConclusionsOur data show the extent of foot complications in a representative sample of diabetes patients in Ireland. Use of eGFR did not improve identification of patients at risk of foot ulceration.

  2. Spectrum of bacteria associated with diabetic foot ulcer and biofilm formation: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asima Banu

    2015-09-01

    The organisms causing chronic diabetic foot ulcers were commonly multidrug-resistant; this was also observed among biofilm formers. Therefore, screening for biofilm formation, along with the usual antibiogram, needs to be performed as a routine procedure in chronic diabetic ulcers to formulate effective treatment strategies for these patients.

  3. Hard-to-heal diabetes-related foot ulcers: current challenges and future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nube V

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Vanessa Nube,1 Georgina Frank,1 Jessica White,1 Sarah Stubbs,1 Sara Nannery,2 Louise Pfrunder,2 Stephen M Twigg,3 Susan V McLennan4 1Department of Podiatry, Sydney Local Health District, Camperdown, NSW, Australia; 2Diabetes Centre High Risk Foot Service, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, NSW, Australia; 3Discipline of Medicine, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Camperdown, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 4Department of Endocrinology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: Diabetes-related foot ulceration is a frequent cause for hospital admission and the leading cause of nontraumatic lower limb amputation, placing a high burden on the health system, patient, and their families. Considerable advances in treatments and the establishment of specialized services and teams have improved healing rates and reduced unnecessary amputations. However, amputation rates remain high in some areas, with unacceptable variations within countries yet to be resolved. Specific risk factors including infection, ischemia, ulcer size, depth, and duration as well as probing to bone (or osteomyelitis, location of ulcer, sensory loss, deformity (and high plantar pressure, advanced age, number of ulcers present, and renal disease are associated with poor outcome and delayed healing. To assist in prediction of difficult-to-heal ulcers, more than 13 classification systems have been developed. Ulcer depth (or size, infection, and ischemia are the most common risk factors identified. High-quality treatment protocols and guidelines exist to facilitate best practice in the standard of care. Under these conditions, 66%–77% of foot ulcers will heal. The remaining proportion represents a group unlikely to heal and who will live with a non-healing wound or undergo amputation. The authors have applied their experience of managing patients in this discussion of why some ulcers are harder to heal. The article explores the effects of

  4. A prospective, randomized, controlled study of hyperbaric oxygen therapy: effects on healing and oxidative stress of ulcer tissue in patients with a diabetic foot ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Le; Li, Pingsong; Shi, Zehong; Hou, Tuanjie; Chen, Xiao; Du, Jin

    2013-03-01

    Although hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy has been reported to help heal chronic foot ulcers in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), production of HBO-related oxidative stress is a concern. To assess the therapeutic effect and oxidative stress of HBO, a 2-week, prospective, randomized, controlled clinical study was conducted from January 1, 2010 to January1, 2012 among 36 consecutively admitted patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFU). Average patient age was 60.08 ± 5.97 years and average DM duration was 16.4 ± 11.3 years; 86.1% had type 2 DM, and 47.2% had Wagner grade-III foot ulcers. Patients randomized to the control group (n = 18) received standard care including offloading, wound debridement, and glucose control. HBO treatment group patients (n = 18) received standard care and twice-daily HBO sessions for 90 minutes at 2.5 atmospheres absolute (ATA) 5 days a week for 2 weeks. Transcutaneous oxygen pressure (TcPo2) at the edge of the ulcer and wound size were measured at baseline and after 7 and 14 days of treatment. Ulcer tissues were harvested on days 7 and 14 to determine oxidative stress by measuring malondialdehyde (MDA) and antioxidant enzyme (superoxide dismutase [SOD], catalase [CAT], and glutathione peroxidase [GPx]) levels. Compared to baseline, TcPo2 in the HBO group increased on day 7 (477.8 ± 118.2 mm Hg versus 37.06 ± 5.23 mm Hg, P Ulcer size reduction in the HBO group was greater than that of the control group (42.4% ± 20.0% versus 18.1% ± 6.5%, P ulcer tissue may offset this effect long-term. Until needed additional research has been conducted, prolonged and/or inappropriate HBO treatment should be avoided.

  5. Resource utilisation and costs associated with the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. Prospective data from the Eurodiale Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prompers, L.; Huijberts, M.; Schaper, N.

    2008-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis The aim of the present study was to investigate resource utilisation and associated costs in patients with diabetic foot ulcers and to analyse differences in resource utilisation between individuals with or without peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and/or infection. Methods Data....... In view of the magnitude of the costs associated with in-hospital stay, reducing the number and duration of hospital admissions seems an attractive option to decrease costs in diabetic foot disease Udgivelsesdato: 2008/10...... on resource utilisation were collected prospectively in a European multicentre study. Data on 1,088 patients were available for the analysis of resource use, and data on 821 patients were included in the costing analysis. Costs were calculated for each patient by multiplying the country-specific direct...

  6. 130 DIABETIC FOOT ULCERS: CURRENT TRENDS IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drclement

    achieved in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers in ... Fig II: WAGNER CLASSIFICATION OF DIABETIC FOOT ULCERS. Grade 0 .... to surgeries for correcting deformities .... Seamless socks and socks with flat, unobtrusive, soft seams should.

  7. Delivery of care to diabetic patients with foot ulcers in daily practice: results of the Eurodiale Study, a prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prompers, L.; Huijberts, M.; Apelqvist, J.

    2008-01-01

    Aims To determine current management and to identify patient-related factors and barriers that influence management strategies in diabetic foot disease. Methods The Eurodiale Study is a prospective cohort study of 1232 consecutive individuals presenting with a new diabetic foot ulcer in 14 centres...... suggest that current guidelines are too general and that healthcare organizational barriers and personal beliefs result in underuse of recommended therapies. Action should be undertaken to overcome these barriers and to guarantee the delivery of optimal care for the many individuals with diabetic foot...... across Europe. We determined the use of management strategies: referral, use of offloading, vascular imaging and revascularization. Results Twenty-seven percent of the patients had been treated for > 3 months before referral to a foot clinic. This varied considerably between countries (6-55%). At study...

  8. EFFICACY OF VACUUM ASSISTED CLOSURE DRESSINGS WHEN COMPARED TO MOIST WOUND DRESSINGS IN THE MANAGEMENT OF DIABETIC FOOT ULCERS : A PROSPECTIVE COMPARATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ballapalli Hari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: F oot ulceration is mainly responsible for the morbidity of diabetes mellitus. They deprive the patient of quality working days and add to his financial burden. Several novel methods of wound healing came to vogue among which vacuum assisted dressing is becoming quite popular. Present study aim s to evaluate its efficacy when compared to regular moist wound dressings. OBJECTIVES: To study the effectiveness of vacuum assisted dressings in terms of Rate of wound healing. MATERIALS AND METHODS: we carried out a prospective study at Narayana medical college hospital on two groups (group A and group B of diabetic foot ulcer patients, whom we selected randomly after considering inclusion and exclusion criteria . Vacuum assisted dressings were done in group A patients and normal moist wound dressings in group B. At the start of the treatment and every week thereafter, size and depth of ulcers were recorded and results were compared at complete wound healing or at the end of 12 weeks of treatment whichever is earlier. S trict glycaemic control was maintaine d throughout the treatment period. RESULTS : significant healing was noticed in group A patients (vacuum assisted dressings group both in terms of ulcer size and depth. Wounds appeared more - healthy i.e. with less slough and more red granulation tissue in g roup A patients. CONCLUSION: vacuum assisted dressing is an efficacious method in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers with significantly reduced hospital stay

  9. The use of low output laser therapy to accelerate healing of diabetic foot ulcers: a randomized prospective controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, S. V. L. G.; Subapriya, S.; Yeoh, C. N.; Soosai, S.; Shalini, V.; Harwant, S.

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of low output laser therapy as an adjuvant treatment in grade 1 diabetic foot ulcers. Methods: Sixteen patients were randomly divided equally into two groups. Group A had daily dressing only, while group B had low output laser therapy instituted five days a week in addition to daily dressing. Serial measurement of the ulcer was done weekly using digital photography and analyzed. Results: The rate of healing in group A was 10.42 mm2/week, and in group B was 66.14mm2/week. The difference in the rate of healing was statistically significant, ptherapy as an adjuvant treatment accelerates diabetic ulcer healing by six times in a six week period.

  10. Diabetic foot ulcers: practical treatment recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Michael

    2006-01-01

    When treating diabetic foot ulcers it is important to be aware of the natural history of the diabetic foot, which can be divided into five stages: stage 1, a normal foot; stage 2, a high risk foot; stage 3, an ulcerated foot; stage 4, an infected foot; and stage 5, a necrotic foot. This covers the entire spectrum of foot disease but emphasises the development of the foot ulcer as a pivotal event in stage 3, which demands urgent and aggressive management. Diabetic foot care in all stages needs multidisciplinary management to control mechanical, wound, microbiological, vascular, metabolic and educational aspects. Achieving good metabolic control of blood glucose, lipids and blood pressure is important in each stage, as is education to teach proper foot care appropriate for each stage. Ideally, it is important to prevent the development of ulcers in stages 1 and 2. In stage 1, the normal foot, it is important to encourage the use of suitable footwear, and to educate the patient to promote healthy foot care and footwear habits. In stage 2, the foot has developed one or more of the following risk factors for ulceration: neuropathy, ischaemia, deformity, swelling and callus. The majority of deformities can be accommodated in special footwear and as callus is an important precursor of ulceration it should be treated aggressively, especially in the neuropathic foot. In stage 3, ulcers can be divided into two distinct entities: those in the neuropathic foot and those in the neuroischaemic foot. In the neuropathic foot, ulcers commonly develop on the plantar surface of the foot and the toes, and are associated with neglected callus and high plantar pressures. In the neuroischaemic foot, ulcers are commonly seen around the edges of the foot, including the apices of the toes and back of the heel, and are associated with trauma or wearing unsuitable shoes. Ulcers in stage 3 need relief of pressure (mechanical control), sharp debridement and dressings (wound control), and

  11. DIABETIC FOOT ULCERS MICROBIOLOGICAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Rajagopal

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES Infections of all types are more common in patients with diabetes, on the basis of outcome of retrospective study in Canada. Many types of infections are very common in diabetic than non-diabetic patients. Foot is the most common site. Diabetic foot infections range from mild infections to limb threatening conditions. Most require emergency medical attention. Diabetic foot infection is a global burden and projected to increase from 246 million people to over 380 million people by the year 2025. Many people with diabetes develop complications that seriously affect their quality and length of life. Lower limb complications are common, particularly foot ulcers and gangrene. Development of these complications is attributed to individual risk factors, poverty, racial and ethnic differences, and quality of local and national health care systems. The wide variations noted suggest that best practices in low incidence areas could easily be adapted in high incidence areas to reduce the burden of complications. Almost every infection begins in a wound, often as neuropathic ulceration or a traumatic break in the skin. Infections that begin as a small problem may progress to involve soft tissue, bones and joints. Because of these morbidity and occasional mortality by these foot infections several authoritative groups have recently developed guidelines for assessing and treating diabetic foot. METHODOLOGY 100 Diabetic patients with foot ulcers were admitted and wounds were classified using wagner’s classification. Pus was sent for culture and sensitivity and treated accordingly. RESULTS In our study the most common organism cultured from the wound with diabetes mellitus was staphylococcus. The most sensitive drug for these organisms was found to be chloramphenicol on most occasions. CONCLUSION The rationale of pus culture and sensitivity is not only to definitively treat the diabetic wound after the culture sensitivity report is

  12. Minimally invasive surgery for diabetic plantar foot ulcerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caio Nery

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Complications of diabetes mellitus constitute the most common indications for hospitalization and non-traumatic amputations in the USA. The most important risk factors for the development of diabetic foot ulcerations include the presence of peripheral neuropathy, vasculopathy, limited joint mobility, and pre-existing foot deformities. In our study, 500 diabetic patients treated for plantar forefoot ulcerations were enrolled in a prospective study from 2000 to 2008 at the Federal University of São Paulo, Brazil. Fifty-two patients in the study met the criteria and underwent surgical treatment consisting of percutaneous Achilles tendon lengthening to treat plantar forefoot ulcerations. The postoperative follow-up demonstrated prevention of recurrent foot ulcerations in 92% of these diabetic patients that maintained an improved foot function. In conclusion, our study supports that identification and treatment of ankle equinus in the diabetic population may potentially lead to decreased patient morbidity, including reduced risk for both reulceration, and potential lower extremity amputation.

  13. Diabetic foot ulcer: assessment and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraogi, Ravi Kant

    2008-02-01

    Diabetic foot ulcer is a rising health problem with rising prevalence of diabetes. It is the most important cause of non-traumatic foot amputations. Diabetic foot ulcers are primarily due to neuropathy and/or ischaemia, and are frequently complicated by infection. Up to 85% of all diabetic foot related problems are preventable through a combination of good foot care and appropriate education for patients and healthcare providers. The holistic care of diabetic foot ulcer patients requires a multidisciplinary team approach. Apart from blood sugar control, treatment of ulcer involves debridement, offloading, appropriate dressings, vascular maintenance and infection control. Use of adjunctive treatments such as various growth factors, skin replacement dressings and vacuum assisted closure will accelerate healing in selected cases.

  14. Prevention and treatment of diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jonathan Zhang Ming; Ng, Natasha Su Lynn; Thomas, Cecil

    2017-03-01

    The rising prevalence of diabetes estimated at 3.6 million people in the UK represents a major public health and socioeconomic burden to our National Health Service. Diabetes and its associated complications are of a growing concern. Diabetes-related foot complications have been identified as the single most common cause of morbidity among diabetic patients. The complicating factor of underlying peripheral vascular disease renders the majority of diabetic foot ulcers asymptomatic until latter evidence of non-healing ulcers become evident. Therefore, preventative strategies including annual diabetic foot screening and diabetic foot care interventions facilitated through a multidisciplinary team have been implemented to enable early identification of diabetic patients at high risk of diabetic foot complications. The National Diabetes Foot Care Audit reported significant variability and deficiencies of care throughout England and Wales, with emphasis on change in the structure of healthcare provision and commissioning, improvement of patient education and availability of healthcare access, and emphasis on preventative strategies to reduce morbidities and mortality of this debilitating disease. This review article aims to summarise major risk factors contributing to the development of diabetic foot ulcers. It also considers the key evidence-based strategies towards preventing diabetic foot ulcer. We discuss tools used in risk stratification and classifications of foot ulcer.

  15. Complex interventions for preventing diabetic foot ulceration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogeveen, Ruben C; Dorresteijn, Johannes A N; Kriegsman, Didi M W; Valk, Gerlof D.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ulceration of the feet, which can lead to the amputation of feet and legs, is a major problem for people with diabetes mellitus, and can cause substantial economic burden. Single preventive strategies have not been shown to reduce the incidence of foot ulceration to a significant extent.

  16. Complex interventions for preventing diabetic foot ulceration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogeveen, Ruben C; Dorresteijn, Johannes A N; Kriegsman, Didi M W; Valk, Gerlof D.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ulceration of the feet, which can lead to the amputation of feet and legs, is a major problem for people with diabetes mellitus, and can cause substantial economic burden. Single preventive strategies have not been shown to reduce the incidence of foot ulceration to a significant extent.

  17. Vacuum-assisted closure versus conventional dressings in the management of diabetic foot ulcers: a prospective case–control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali M. Lone

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the effectiveness of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC versus conventional dressings in the healing of diabetic foot ulcerations (DFUs in terms of healing rate (time to prepare the wound for closure either spontaneously or by surgery, safety, and patient satisfaction. Methods: Randomized case–control study enrolling 56 patients, divided into two groups. Group A (patients treated with VAC and Group B (patients treated with conventional dressings, with an equal number of patients in each group. DFUs were treated until wound closure, either spontaneously, surgically, or until completion of the 8-week period. Results: Granulation tissue appeared in 26 (92.85% patients by the end of Week 2 in Group A, while it appeared in 15 (53.57% patients by that time in Group B. 100% granulation was achieved in 21 (77.78% patients by the end of Week 5 in Group A as compared to only 10 (40% patients by that time in Group B. Patients in Group A had fewer number of positive blood cultures, secondary amputations and were satisfied with treatment as compared to Group B. Conclusion: VAC appears to be more effective, safe, and patient satisfactory compared to conventional dressings for the treatment of DFUs.

  18. A prospective, randomised comparative study of weekly versus biweekly application of dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane allograft in the management of diabetic foot ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelen, Charles M; Serena, Thomas E; Snyder, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine if weekly application of dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane allograft reduce time to heal more effectively than biweekly application for treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. This was an institutional review board-approved, registered, prospective, randomised, comparative, non-blinded, single-centre clinical trial. Patients with non-infected ulcers of ≥ 4 weeks duration were included for the study. They were randomised to receive weekly or biweekly application of allograft in addition to a non-adherent, moist dressing with compressive wrapping. All wounds were offloaded. The primary study outcome was mean time to healing. Overall, during the 12-week study period, 92·5% (37/40) ulcers completely healed. Mean time to complete healing was 4·1 ± 2·9 versus 2·4 ± 1·8 weeks (P = 0·039) in the biweekly versus weekly groups, respectively. Complete healing occurred in 50% versus 90% by 4 weeks in the biweekly and weekly groups, respectively (P = 0·014). Number of grafts applied to healed wounds was similar at 2·4 ± 1·5 and 2·3 ± 1·8 for biweekly versus weekly groups, respectively (P = 0·841). These results validate previous studies showing that the allograft is an effective treatment for diabetic ulcers and show that wounds treated with weekly application heal more rapidly than with biweekly application. More rapid healing may decrease clinical operational costs and prevent long-term medical complications. PMID:24618401

  19. Diabetic foot ulcers: Part II. Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Afsaneh; Sibbald, R Gary; Mayer, Dieter; Goodman, Laurie; Botros, Mariam; Armstrong, David G; Woo, Kevin; Boeni, Thomas; Ayello, Elizabeth A; Kirsner, Robert S

    2014-01-01

    The management of diabetic foot ulcers can be optimized by using an interdisciplinary team approach addressing the correctable risk factors (ie, poor vascular supply, infection control and treatment, and plantar pressure redistribution) along with optimizing local wound care. Dermatologists can initiate diabetic foot care. The first step is recognizing that a loss of skin integrity (ie, a callus, blister, or ulcer) considerably increases the risk of preventable amputations. A holistic approach to wound assessment is required. Early detection and effective management of these ulcers can reduce complications, including preventable amputations and possible mortality.

  20. Diabetic foot ulcer management: the podiatrist's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turns, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic foot complications result from two broad pathologies-neuropathic and neuro-ischaemic feet. It is important for diabetic patients to have at least a yearly review of foot ulcer risk factors, and they should have a corresponding risk classification agreed based on this assessment. Diabetic foot ulcer assessment should include a wound classification tool, which can give an indication of wounds at greater risk of non-healing or amputation. The treatment of diabetic foot ulcers should be part of a comprehensive care plan that should also include treatment of infection, frequent debridement (if deemed appropriate by a skilled specialist clinician), biomechanical offloading, blood glucose control and treatment of comorbidities. Clinicians should base dressing selection on the wound's location, size and depth, amount of exudate, presence of infection or necrosis and the condition of the surrounding tissue.

  1. Treatment of chronic plantar ulcer of the diabetic foot using an irremovable windowed fibreglass cast boot: prospective study of 177 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha Van, Georges; Michaux, Caroline; Parquet, Hugues; Bourron, Olivier; Pradat-Diehl, Pascale; Hartemann, Agnes

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the level of healing of chronic neuropathic plantar ulcers, using an irremovable windowed fibreglass cast boot, which is only opened after healing. A single-centre prospective study of a cohort of 177 diabetic patients with chronic neuropathic plantar ulcers was carried out. The duration of neuropathic plantar ulcers was 604 ± 808 days, with a mean surface area of 4.6 ± 6.5 cm(2) , a mean depth of 1.04 ± 1.08 cm and a mean volume of 5.9 ± 17.7 cm(3) . After a mean of 96 days of wearing a windowed fibreglass cast boot (min 9 days, max 664 days and median 68 days), the level of healing reached 83.6%, although 29 patients did not heal (16.4%). The compliance was at 95%. NPUs with bigger volumes (p = 0.037) and those located at the heels ( p = 0.004) had significantly lower healing levels. Twenty-one patients had moderate peripheral arterial disease (12%), and 24 patients were ostectomized for underlying osteomyelitis (14%), before inclusion. Moderate peripheral arterial disease (p = 0.970) or operated osteomyelitis (p = 0.128) did not modify the level of healing significantly, which were of 81% and 70.8%, respectively. Complications include 12 ulcers due to the windowed fibreglass cast boot (i.e. 7%) and two other ulcers being moderately infected, resulting in 2% of toe amputation, but there was no major amputation or phlebitis. The treatment of old and deep NPUs of the diabetic foot by wearing a windowed fibreglass cast boot without opening the boot prior to healing offers very high ulcer recovery levels. Windowed fibreglass cast boots were changed in only 26 cases (14.6%). In addition, compliance was excellent and of the order of 95%. Furthermore, moderate peripheral arterial disease or a recent ostectomy did not affect the efficacy of windowed fibreglass cast boot.

  2. A prospective, randomized clinical study evaluating the effect of transdermal continuous oxygen therapy on biological processes and foot ulcer healing in persons with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, Vickie R; Yao, Min; Kantarci, Alpdogan; Gu, Guosheng; Park, Nanjin; Hasturk, Hatice

    2013-11-01

    Hypoxia is a major factor in delayed wound healing. The aim of this prospective, randomized, clinical trial was to compare outcomes of treatment in persons with chronic diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) randomly assigned to transdermal continuous oxygen therapy (TCOT) for 4 weeks as an adjunct to standard care (debridement, offloading, and moisture). Nine patients (age 58.6±7.1, range 38-73 years) received TCOT (treatment group) and eight patients (age 59.9±12.6, range 35-76 years) received standard care alone (control group). Most patients (12) were male, and all had a Wagner I or II foot ulcer for an average of 14 (control group) or 20 months (treatment group). Weekly wound measurements and wound tissue biopsies were obtained and wound fluid collected. Levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and proteases in wound fluid samples were analyzed using Luminex-based multiplex assays. Tissue-resident macrophages were quantified by immunohistochemistry. At week 4, average wound size reduction was 87% (range 55.7% to 100%) in the treatment group compared to 46% (15% to 99%) in the control group (P <0.05). Changes in cytokine levels (IL-6, IL-8) and proteinases (MMP-1,-2,-9, TIMP-1) at weeks 2 to 4 in wound fluid correlated with clinical findings. CD68+ macrophage counts showed statistically significant reduction in response to TCOT compared to the control group (P <0.01). The results of this study show that TCOT may facilitate healing of DFUs by reversing the inflammatory process through reduction in pro-inflammatory cytokines and tissue-degrading proteases. Additional research to elucidate the effects of this treatment on complete healing and increase understanding about the role of wound fluid analysis is needed.

  3. A Prospective, Descriptive Study to Assess the Clinical Benefits of Using Calendula officinalis Hydroglycolic Extract for the Topical Treatment of Diabetic Foot Ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzi, Marcelo; de Freitas, Franciele; Winter, Marcos

    2016-03-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) have a significant impact on patient quality of life. A prospective, descriptive pilot study was conducted between May 2012 and December 2013 through the dermatology outpatient unit in a Brazilian hospital to evaluate the clinical benefits of using Calendula officinalis hydroglycolic extract in the treatment of DFUs. Patients diagnosed with a stable neuropathic ulcer of >3 months' duration; ranging in size from 0.5-40 cm(2); without osteomyelitis, gangrene, bone exposure, cancer, or deep tissue infection; ages 18-90 years; with adequate glycemic control and no history of an allergy to C. officinalis were enrolled. Patients provided demographic and diabetes-related information and were evaluated biweekly for 30 weeks or until healing (ie, full epithelialization with no wound drainage). DFUs were measured and clinically examined for microbiological flora and presence of odor, tissue type (eg, granulation, fibrin sloth, necrosis), exudate, and retraction rate using planimetry images. Patients' blood tests and neuropathic pain assessment (the latter by clinician-directed questionnaire) were performed at baseline and the end of treatment; pain also was assessed during dressing changes using a 10-point rating scale. Patients' ulcers were treated twice daily with C. officinalis hydroglycolic extract spray solution and covered with saline-moistened, sterile, nonadherent gauze and bandages followed by foot offloading with adequate protective footwear. Patients received their first treatment in the clinic then performed care at home. From a potential population of 109 patients, 25 did not meet the inclusion criteria. Of the remaining 84 participants enrolled, 43 withdrew before study completion; cited reasons included lost to follow-up (16), medical judgment (2), failure to attend >3 scheduled visits (17), protocol violation (5), and death (3). Forty-one (41) - 17 women, average age 62 years (range 44-82 years), average glycemic level 153 mg

  4. Autonomic neuropathy and diabetic foot ulceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, M E; Nicolaides, K H; Watkins, P J

    1986-01-01

    Autonomic function was studied in three groups of insulin-dependent diabetic patients. Heart rate changes during deep breathing and on standing were significantly less in 28 patients with a recent history of foot ulceration compared with 40 patients with peripheral neuropathy but without ulceration (p less than 0.001) and 54 patients without neuropathy (p less than 0.001). Sympathetic function was assessed in 36 of these patients from peripheral arterial diastolic flow patterns obtained by Doppler ultrasound measurements and expressed as the pulsatility index (PI). Patients with a history of ulceration (n = 10) showed considerably increased diastolic flow (PI = 4.28 +/- 0.53, mean +/- S.E.M.) compared with 12 neuropathic patients with no history of ulceration (PI = 7.80 +/- 0.68, p less than 0.002) and 14 patients without neuropathy (PI = 9.55 +/- 0.89, p less than 0.002). Severely abnormal autonomic function occurs in association with neuropathic foot ulceration, but patients without ulcers have lesser degrees of autonomic neuropathy, thus a causal relationship has not been established.

  5. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Pattern in Diabetic Foot Ulcer: A Pilot Study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Globally, diabetic foot ulcers are one of the major public ... Background: Diabetic foot infections (DFIs) are major public health problems and knowledge ... Keywords: Antibiotic resistance, Antimicrobial susceptibility, Diabetic foot infection,.

  6. Pathogenesis of foot ulcers and the need for offloading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathur, H M; Boulton, A J

    2005-04-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration represents a major medical, social and economic problem all over the world. While more than 5% of diabetic patients have a history of foot ulceration, the cumulative lifetime incidence may be as high as 15%. Ethnic differences exist in both ulcer and amputation incidences. Foot ulceration results from the interaction of several contributory factors, the most important of which is neuropathy. The use of the total-contact cast is demonstrated in the treatment of plantar neuropathic ulcers. Histological evidence suggests that pressure relief results in chronic foot ulcers changing their morphological appearance by displaying some features of an acute wound. Thus, repetitive stresses on the insensate foot appear to play a major role in maintaining ulcer chronicity. It is hoped that research activity in foot disease will ultimately result in fewer ulcers and less amputation in diabetes.

  7. Classification of diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Game, Frances

    2016-01-01

    It is known that the relative importance of factors involved in the development of diabetic foot problems can vary in both their presence and severity between patients and lesions. This may be one of the reasons why outcomes seem to vary centre to centre and why some treatments may seem more effective in some people than others. There is a need therefore to classify and describe lesions of the foot in patients with diabetes in a manner that is agreed across all communities but is simple to use in clinical practice. No single system is currently in widespread use, although a number have been published. Not all are well validated outside the system from which they were derived, and it has not always been made clear the clinical purposes to which such classifications should be put to use, whether that be for research, clinical description in routine clinical care or audit. Here the currently published classification systems, their validation in clinical practice, whether they were designed for research, audit or clinical care, and the strengths and weaknesses of each are explored.

  8. Health literacy and diabetic foot ulcer healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, David J; Hampton, Michelle; Hoffstad, Ole; Malay, D Scot; Thom, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The adherence by patients to diabetic foot ulcer therapy is often difficult. The goal of this study was to begin to understand how a patient's health literacy affects their foot ulcer management decisions. Initially using a cross-sectional study design, we evaluated diabetics with foot ulcers within 4 weeks of being asked to participate in a longitudinal study. We assessed health literacy using measures of general health literacy, diabetes health literacy, diabetes self-efficacy, and diabetes numeracy. Individuals enrolled in the study had higher health literacy based on the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults [33.8 (SD 2.3) versus 27.3 (SD 9.6); p = 0.009] as compared to individuals who previously declined an invitation to enroll in the study. Furthermore, patients with lower Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults scores had larger (p = 0.04) and older (p = 0.125) wounds (markers for poorer prognosis). Other measures of literacy showed similar results. In conclusion, those with diminished health literacy were less likely to enroll in an investigational study and had wounds that were less likely to heal. © 2015 by the Wound Healing Society.

  9. Diabetes Foot Ulcers: A novel Treatment Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golnaz Namazi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Foot ulcers are common in 12-25 percent of diabetic patients. Preventing, controlling and treating of these kind chronic wounds are of the major clinical challenges.Evidence based documents revealed that DFU (Diabetic Foot ulcer is a chronic wound type originating from disturbed cellular and molecular mechanisms that have to be in its functional form to overcome its problem. In diabetes and some other chronic based diseases, harmonized acting machine causes chronic phases that result in conditions as foot ulceration and related complications seen commonly in diabetes.DFU needs to be transformed into acute phase in order to be healed in a physiological manner. Disturbed mechanisms have to be corrected reversely and to achieve such a goal it is essential to better understanding of disturbing factors responsible for biological abnormalities. Factors associated with DFU are as cellular and molecular recruitment and function impairments and there is need to repair these mechanisms. For this, we believe that the activated Th-1 cells (T helper-1 Cells might have a critical role in regulation of the several effector functions of the cellular and molecular mechanisms essential to the body to act the best. Evidences and our successful results urge us to suggest this regulatory role for effector cells and molecules generated through activation of Th-1 cells as a treatment strategy.

  10. [Role of yeasts in diabetic foot ulcer infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missoni, Emilija Mlinarić; Kalenić, Smilja; Vukelić, Milan; De Syo, Drago; Belicza, Mladen; Kern, Josipa; Babić, Verica Vazić

    2006-01-01

    The aim was to assess the incidence of isolation of individual fungal species and interpret the meaning of fungal isolates from foot ulcers of 509 diabetic outpatients using mycologic and histopathologic methods. Another aim was to explore risk factors for the development of fungal infections in foot ulcer. Fungus isolation was made on selective media and their identification by standard mycologic methods. Histopathologic diagnosis of fungal ulcer infections was made on PAS-stained histopathologic preparations and imprint preparations (PAS and Papanicolaou staining) of foot wound biopsy specimens. Fungal and mixed foot ulcer infections were found in 14.9% of diabetic patients. In 33.8% of patients, these infections were confirmed by a finding of fungal elements in histopathologic preparations of ulcer biopsy specimens, as follows: in 16.9% of patients, by finding fungal elements in imprint preparations of ulcer biopsy specimens and by isolation fungus from the swab of the same ulcer; in 2.3% by fungus isolation from ulcer biopsy specimens; in 36.9% by fungus isolation from ulcer swabs in pure culture and/or in a large number of colonies and/or from several ulcers on the foot of the same patient. More than 89% of patients had a single foot ulcer with fungal or mixed infection, big toe and the plantar-metatarsal region in one foot or both feet being the most common sites of ulcer. Fifteen species from the genera Candida, Cryptococcus, Trichosporon and Rhodotorula were the causative agents of fungal and mixed foot ulcer infections. C. parapsilosis (in 61.5% of patients), and C. albicans and C. tropicalis (in 10.8% of patients each) were the most common causes of these infections. The presence of yeasts and/or dermatophytes in the toe web of the same or other foot, or of both feet, did not influence the incidence of fungal and mixed foot ulcer infections. Patient sex and age, type and length of diabetes, or clinical picture of diabetic foot did not affect it either. In

  11. Predictors of lower-extremity amputation in patients with an infected diabetic foot ulcer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pickwell, Kirsty; Siersma, Volkert; Kars, Marleen

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Infection commonly complicates diabetic foot ulcers and is associated with a poor outcome. In a cohort of individuals with an infected diabetic foot ulcer, we aimed to determine independent predictors of lower-extremity amputation and the predictive value for amputation...... of the International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot (IWGDF) classification system and to develop a risk score for predicting amputation. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We prospectively studied 575 patients with an infected diabetic foot ulcer presenting to 1 of 14 diabetic foot clinics in 10 European countries....... RESULTS Among these patients, 159 (28%) underwent an amputation. Independent risk factors for amputation were as follows: periwound edema, foul smell, (non)purulent exudate, deep ulcer, positive probe-to-bone test, pretibial edema, fever, and elevated C-reactive protein. Increasing IWGDF severity...

  12. Diabetic foot ulcers: Part I. Pathophysiology and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Afsaneh; Sibbald, R Gary; Mayer, Dieter; Goodman, Laurie; Botros, Mariam; Armstrong, David G; Woo, Kevin; Boeni, Thomas; Ayello, Elizabeth A; Kirsner, Robert S

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a serious, life-long condition that is the sixth leading cause of death in North America. Dermatologists frequently encounter patients with diabetes mellitus. Up to 25% of patients with diabetes mellitus will develop diabetic foot ulcers. Foot ulcer patients have an increased risk of amputation and increased mortality rate. The high-risk diabetic foot can be identified with a simplified screening, and subsequent foot ulcers can be prevented. Early recognition of the high-risk foot and timely treatment will save legs and improve patients' quality of life. Peripheral arterial disease, neuropathy, deformity, previous amputation, and infection are the main factors contributing to the development of diabetic foot ulcers. Early recognition of the high-risk foot is imperative to decrease the rates of mortality and morbidity. An interprofessional approach (ie, physicians, nurses, and foot care specialists) is often needed to support patients' needs.

  13. How To Prevent Foot Ulcers In Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada Morshed

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of development of foot ulcers in diabetic patients is 4% to 10%, these ulcers may be infected, cause morbidity and may lead to lower extremity amputation.Objective: Prevention of diabetic foot ulcers in patients known to be diabetics by fasting blood sugar (FBS, HbA1C tests.Material and Methods: The study was done on 120 patients between March 2010 and July 2011 diagnosed as diabetics and they performed simple screening tests for peripheral neuropathy (Semmes-Weinstein monofilament examination (SWME, superficial pain, vibration testing by the on-off method, the timed method. Nerve conduction studies (NCS were used as standard criterion for detection of neuropathy, they also underwent Doppler ultrasound and ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI measurement to assess the vascularity of their lower limbs. All patients were given proper education to prevent foot ulcers, including optimising glycemic control, cessation of smoking, debridement of calluses, appropriate foot wear and foot care with periodic foot examination.Results: In our study we succeeded in increasing the prevention of foot ulceration in our diabetic patients by 95%, compared to results achieved with the previous measures.Conclusion: Screening tests are effective for all diabetic patients to identify patients at risk of foot ulceration. They may benefit from prophylactic interventions including, optimising glycemic control, cessation of smoking, debridement of calluses, appropriate foot wear and intensive foot care.Also, we take care of patients with low risk of foot ulceration by adequate foot care and periodic foot examination to prevent foot ulceration.

  14. Easy ways to offload diabetic foot ulcer in rural setup

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, Vijay P

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic wound management has become a foremost problem in recent era. Offloading is one of the cornerstones of gold-standard treatment in diabetic neuropathic foot ulcer. The following article reviews the easily made offloading systems which are ideal to use in rural setup to offload diabetic foot ulcer.

  15. Diabetic foot disease: impact of ulcer location on ulcer healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pickwell, KM; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Kars, M

    2013-01-01

    Healing of heel ulcers in patients with diabetes is considered to be poor, but there is relatively little information on the influence of ulcer location on ulcer healing.......Healing of heel ulcers in patients with diabetes is considered to be poor, but there is relatively little information on the influence of ulcer location on ulcer healing....

  16. Use of Pressure Offloading Devices in Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Stephanie C; Jensen, Jeffrey L.; Weber, Anna K.; Robinson, Daniel E.; David G Armstrong

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Pressure mitigation is crucial for the healing of plantar diabetic foot ulcers. We therefore discuss characteristics and considerations associated with the use of offloading devices. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—A diabetic foot ulcer management survey was sent to foot clinics in all 50 states and the District of Columbia in 2005. A total of 901 geographically diverse centers responded. The survey recorded information regarding usage frequency and characteristics of assessment and tre...

  17. Evaluation of skin perfusion pressure to assess refractory foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, M; Mihara, S; Takahagi, S; Iwamoto, K; Hiragun, T; Hide, M

    2017-05-02

    The number of patients with foot gangrene caused by critical ischaemia and severe infection is increasing significantly in developed countries. The measurement of perilesional skin blood flow by skin perfusion pressure (SPP) is useful to select the appropriate treatment of gangrenous lesions, in that it is not affected by calcifications of blood vessels. However, the prognosis of a foot ulcer may also be affected by the level of blood sugar and infections. This study aimed to validate the use of SPP in cases of foot gangrene and ulcers in patients with and without diabetes mellitus (DM) and infection. Clinical symptoms, ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI) and SPP were assessed to evaluate the condition of each foot ulcer. Every foot ulcer was treated as independent, even if a participant had multiple ulcers. All ulcers for which we measured SPP were subject to the analysis. All ulcers were purely ischaemic in nature and were exclusively located on the foot or toes. Data were collected from 117 foot ulcers on 91 toes and feet from 65 patients. Almost all SPP values in healed cases were > 27 mmHg. There were three patients whose ulcers failed to heal by conservative treatments were complicated with severe infection. However, no effect of DM on the relationship between SPP values and prognosis was observed. Logistic regression analysis of all ulcers except for the 5 cases complicated with infection revealed that those with 30 mmHg or lower SPP values are likely to heal by conservative treatment with 23% or lower probability, whereas any ulcer with more than 50 mmHg SPP value and without severe infection may heal without the need for further operations with 80% or higher probability. The combination of SPP and careful evaluation of infection may be a good parameter to decide the appropriate treatment for ischaemic skin ulcers, regardless of the complication of DM.

  18. Radiologic changes of ulcerated foot in leprosy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jung Hyun; Ahn, Eun Joo; Chung, Eun Chul; Rhee, Chung Sik [Ewha Woman' s University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sung Jun [Institute for Leprosy Research, KLCA, Uiwang (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-12-15

    There are radiologically characteristic bone changes on the foot and tarsus in leprosy. The bone changes are primarily due to Mycobacterium leprae infection and secondarily to the injurious effect, such as trauma, and infection on the denervated tissue. 117 bone changes of 100 leprosy patients with plantar ulcerations from Jan. 1984 to Oct. 1989 in the Korean Leprosy Control Center were analyzed. Male to female ratio was about 2 : 1 and the most prevalent age was 41 to 60 years, and according to Ridley-Jopling's classification. L-type was most common (46%). One hundred and eleven cases (94.9%) showed bone changes, suggesting high incidence of bone changes in patients with plantar ulcers. Specific findings were observed in two cases(1.7%). One hundred and nine cases showed nonspecific bone changes, which were osteomyelitis(23.1%), neurotrophic changes(39.3%), periostitis(5.1%) and arthritis(12.8%). Extensive bone involvement was seen in neurotrophic changes involving forefoot and metatarsal in 22 of 46 cases, and in secondary changes involving metatarsal bone in 23, tarsus in 20 of 49 cases.

  19. Clinical characteristics of foot ulceration in people with chronic gout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rome, Keith; Erikson, Kathryn; Otene, Cynthia; Sahid, Hazra; Sangster, Karyn; Gow, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Gout is the most common form of inflammatory arthritis and it has an affliction to the foot. Foot involvement in gout has been linked to foot pain, impairment and disability. There has been limited research on the effect of ulceration on foot pain, impairment, disability and health-related quality of life in patients already living with gout. The aim of the study was to describe the wound characteristics and the effect on foot pain, disability and health-related quality of life in patients with foot ulceration associated with gout. Participants were recruited from rheumatology clinics in Auckland, New Zealand. All the current foot ulceration sites and wound characteristics were recorded using the TIME wound assessment tool. The outcome measures included general pain, patient global assessment scale, foot pain, disability and impairment. Participants completed the Cardiff Wound Impact Schedule to assess the effect of ulcers on health-related quality of life. Sensory loss, vibrational thresholds and ankle brachial pressure index were collated to assess for lower limb arterial disease. Six participants were predominantly older men with a long duration of gout, high rates of obesity and co-morbidities such as hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The mean (SD) duration of the foot ulcers was 4 (2) months. The majority of foot ulcers observed were 0·5 cm(2) or smaller superficial thickness with surrounding callus. Partial thickness and full-thickness ulcers were also observed. Two patients presented with ulcers on multiple sites. There was only one case of infection. Gouty tophi were evident in most of the wounds. The dorsal aspect of the third toe was found to ulcerate in most cases. Moderate scores of foot pain, disability, impairment and health-related quality of life were observed. Most participants wore shoes deemed as poor. Foot ulceration in gout is chronic and multiple ulcers can occur with the potential of leading to delayed

  20. Neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers – evidence-to-practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndip A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Agbor Ndip1–3, Leonard Ebah3,4, Aloysius Mbako51Department of Diabetes and Medicine, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Central Manchester Foundation Trust, UK; 2Department of Medicine, Royal Bolton Hospital, Bolton, UK; 3Cardiovascular Research Group, School of Biomedicine, University of Manchester, UK; 4Department of Renal Medicine, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Central Manchester Foundation Trust, UK; 5Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Wrexham Maelor Hospital, Wales, UKAbstract: Foot ulcers and their attendant complications are disquietingly high in people with diabetes, a majority of whom have underlying neuropathy. This review examines the evidence base underpinning the prevention and management of neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers in order to inform best clinical practice. Since it may be impractical to ask patients not to weight-bear at all, relief of pressure through the use of offloading casting devices remains the mainstay for management of neuropathic ulcers, whilst provision of appropriate footwear is essential in ulcer prevention. Simple non-surgical debridement and application of hydrogels are both effective in preparing the wound bed for healthy granulation and therefore enhancing healing. Initial empirical antibiotic therapy for infected ulcers should cover the most common bacterial flora. There is limited evidence supporting the use of adjunctive therapies such as hyperbaric oxygen and cytokines or growth factors. In selected cases, recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor has been shown to enhance healing; however, its widespread use cannot be advised due to the availability of more cost-effective approaches. While patient education may be beneficial, the evidence base remains thin and conflicting. In conclusion, best management of foot ulcers is achieved by what is taken out of the foot (pressure, callus, infection, and slough rather than what is put on the foot (adjuvant treatment.Keywords: diabetic foot ulcers, neuropathic

  1. Prediction of protective sensory loss, neuropathy and foot ulceration in type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paisey, R B; Darby, T; George, A M; Waterson, M; Hewson, P; Paisey, C F; Thomson, M P

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To prospectively determine clinical and biochemical characteristics associated with the development of peripheral neuropathy, loss of protective sensation, and foot ulceration in persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) over 7 years. Research design and methods Graded monofilament (MF) testing, vibration perception threshold, and neuropathy symptom questionnaires were undertaken in 206 participants with type 2 DM without peripheral vascular disease or history of foot ulceration and 71 healthy participants without DM at baseline and after 7 years. 6 monthly glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels and annual serum lipid profiles were measured during follow-up of those with DM. Incident foot ulceration was recorded at follow-up. Results Taller stature and higher quartiles of serum triglyceride and HbA1c levels were associated with neuropathy at follow-up (p=0.008). Remission of baseline neuropathy was observed in 7 participants at follow-up. 9 participants with type 2 DM developed foot ulcers by the end of the study, only 1 at low risk. Mean HbA1c levels were higher in those who developed foot ulceration (pCharcot foot. Failure to perceive 2 or more 2, 4 and 6 g MF stimuli at baseline predicted loss of protective sensation at follow-up. Conclusions Tall stature and worse metabolic control were associated with progression to neuropathy. Mean HbA1c levels were higher in those who developed foot ulcers. Graded MF testing may enrich recruitment to clinical trials and assignation of high risk for foot ulceration. PMID:27239314

  2. Predictive factors for diabetic foot ulceration: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro-Soares, M; Boyko, E J; Ribeiro, J; Ribeiro, I; Dinis-Ribeiro, M

    2012-10-01

    Improving ability to predict and prevent diabetic foot ulceration is imperative because of the high personal and financial costs of this complication. We therefore conducted a systematic review in order to identify all studies of factors associated with DFU and assess whether available DFU risk stratification systems incorporate those factors of highest potential value. We performed a search in PubMed for studies published through April 2011 that analysed the association between independent variables and DFU. Articles were selected by two investigators-independently and blind to each other. Divergences were solved by a third investigator. A total of 71 studies were included that evaluated the association between diabetic foot ulceration and more than 100 independent variables. The variables most frequently assessed were age, gender, diabetes duration, BMI, HbA(1c) and neuropathy. Diabetic foot ulceration prevalence varied greatly among studies. The majority of the identified variables were assessed by only two or fewer studies. Diabetic neuropathy, peripheral vascular disease, foot deformity and previous diabetic foot ulceration or lower extremity amputation - which are the most common variables included in risk stratification systems - were consistently associated with diabetic foot ulceration development. Existing diabetic foot ulceration risk stratification systems often include variables shown repeatedly in the literature to be strongly predictive of this outcome. Improvement of these risk classification systems though is impaired because of deficiencies noted, including a great lack of standardization in outcome definition and variable selection and measurement.

  3. Diabetic foot ulceration with osteomyelitis: the importance of early detection

    OpenAIRE

    Tranter, Jennifer; McIntosh, Caroline

    2008-01-01

    This case study explores the\\ud management of a chronic diabetic\\ud foot ulcer complicated by severe\\ud soft tissue infection (cellulitis) and\\ud bony infection (osteomyelitis) in a\\ud patient with type 2 diabetes.

  4. Role of yeasts in diabetic foot ulcer infection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Missoni, Emilija Mlinarić; Kalenić, Smilja; Vukelić, Milan; De Syo, Drago; Belicza, Mladen; Kern, Josipa; Babić, Verica Vazić

    2006-01-01

    The aim was to assess the incidence of isolation of individual fungal species and interpret the meaning of fungal isolates from foot ulcers of 509 diabetic outpatients using mycologic and histopathologic methods...

  5. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Pattern in Diabetic Foot Ulcer: A Pilot Study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antimicrobial Susceptibility Pattern in Diabetic Foot Ulcer: A Pilot Study. ... of microbes that cause infections are helpful to determine proper antibiotic therapy. ... including extended spectrum beta lactamase producing strains of Proteus ...

  6. Clinical workflow for personalized foot pressure ulcer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucki, M; Luboz, V; Perrier, A; Champion, E; Diot, B; Vuillerme, N; Payan, Y

    2016-09-01

    Foot pressure ulcers are a common complication of diabetes because of patient's lack of sensitivity due to neuropathy. Deep pressure ulcers appear internally when pressures applied on the foot create high internal strains nearby bony structures. Monitoring tissue strains in persons with diabetes is therefore important for an efficient prevention. We propose to use personalized biomechanical foot models to assess strains within the foot and to determine the risk of ulcer formation. Our workflow generates a foot model adapted to a patient's morphology by deforming an atlas model to conform it to the contours of segmented medical images of the patient's foot. Our biomechanical model is composed of rigid bodies for the bones, joined by ligaments and muscles, and a finite element mesh representing the soft tissues. Using our registration algorithm to conform three datasets, three new patient models were created. After applying a pressure load below these foot models, the Von Mises equivalent strains and "cluster volumes" (i.e. volumes of contiguous elements with strains above a given threshold) were measured within eight functionally meaningful foot regions. The results show the variability of both location and strain values among the three considered patients. This study also confirms that the anatomy of the foot has an influence on the risk of pressure ulcer. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. RISK FACTORS AND PREVALENCE OF DIABETIC FOOT ULCERS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2003-01-01

    Jan 1, 2003 ... higher total cholesterol and diastolic blood pressure compared to other ulcer types. Wagner stage 2 ... Conclusion: The prevalence of diabetic foot ulcers was 4.6% in this tertiary clinic. The ..... The distribution and severity of ...

  8. Patient education for preventing diabetic foot ulceration (Review)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorresteijn, J.A.; Kriegsman, D.M.; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Valk, G.D.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ulceration of the feet, which can result in loss of limbs and even death, is one of the major health problems for people with diabetes mellitus. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of patient education on the prevention of foot ulcers in patients with diabetes mellitus. SEARCH METHODS: Eli

  9. Patient education for preventing diabetic foot ulceration (Review)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorresteijn, J.A.; Kriegsman, D.M.; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Valk, G.D.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ulceration of the feet, which can result in loss of limbs and even death, is one of the major health problems for people with diabetes mellitus. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of patient education on the prevention of foot ulcers in patients with diabetes mellitus. SEARCH METHODS:

  10. STUDIES ON DIABETIC FOOT ULCERS IN PATIENTS AT

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An epidemioloigcal and microbiological studies of diabetic foot ulcers were carried out in our hospital, with a ... ulcers to rule out yeast colonization which if not treated will delay wound healing. ... all skin infections in 1,050 Nigeria diabetics (9) ...

  11. Patient education for preventing diabetic foot ulceration (Review)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorresteijn, J.A.; Kriegsman, D.M.; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Valk, G.D.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ulceration of the feet, which can result in loss of limbs and even death, is one of the major health problems for people with diabetes mellitus. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of patient education on the prevention of foot ulcers in patients with diabetes mellitus. SEARCH METHODS: Eli

  12. Growth factors for treating diabetic foot ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martí-Carvajal, Arturo J; Gluud, Christian; Nicola, Susana

    2015-01-01

    with a foot ulcer. Trials were eligible for inclusion if they compared a growth factor plus standard care (e.g., antibiotic therapy, debridement, wound dressings) versus placebo or no growth factor plus standard care, or compared different growth factors against each other. We considered lower limb amputation......, vascular, or combined) was poorly defined in all trials. The trials were conducted in ten countries. The trials assessed 11 growth factors in 30 comparisons: platelet-derived wound healing formula, autologous growth factor, allogeneic platelet-derived growth factor, transforming growth factor β2, arginine...... with complete wound healing (345/657 (52.51%) versus 167/482 (34.64%); RR 1.51, 95% CI 1.31 to 1.73; I(2) = 51%, 12 trials; low quality evidence). The result is mainly based on platelet-derived wound healing formula (36/56 (64.28%) versus 7/27 (25.92%); RR 2.45, 95% 1.27 to 4.74; I(2) = 0%, two trials...

  13. Diabetic foot ulcers – evidence-based wound management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    management of diabetic foot ulcers to promote cost-effective evidence-based ... lowship (Australia) ... His practice focuses on cerebrovascular and peripheral vascular disease. He has ... decreased incidence of major amputation .... Best practice recommendations for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of diabetic foot.

  14. A shift in priority in diabetic foot care and research: 75% of foot ulcers are preventable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bus, Sicco A; van Netten, Jaap J

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration poses a heavy burden on the patient and the healthcare system, but prevention thereof receives little attention. For every euro spent on ulcer prevention, ten are spent on ulcer healing, and for every randomized controlled trial conducted on prevention, ten are conducted on healing. In this article, we argue that a shift in priorities is needed. For the prevention of a first foot ulcer, we need more insight into the effect of interventions and practices already applied globally in many settings. This requires systematic recording of interventions and outcomes, and well-designed randomized controlled trials that include analysis of cost-effectiveness. After healing of a foot ulcer, the risk of recurrence is high. For the prevention of a recurrent foot ulcer, home monitoring of foot temperature, pressure-relieving therapeutic footwear, and certain surgical interventions prove to be effective. The median effect size found in a total of 23 studies on these interventions is large, over 60%, and further increases when patients are adherent to treatment. These interventions should be investigated for efficacy as a state-of-the-art integrated foot care approach, where attempts are made to assure treatment adherence. Effect sizes of 75-80% may be expected. If such state-of-the-art integrated foot care is implemented, the majority of problems with foot ulcer recurrence in diabetes can be resolved. It is therefore time to act and to set a new target in diabetic foot care. This target is to reduce foot ulcer incidence with at least 75%.

  15. Neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers - evidence-to-practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndip, Agbor; Ebah, Leonard; Mbako, Aloysius

    2012-01-01

    Foot ulcers and their attendant complications are disquietingly high in people with diabetes, a majority of whom have underlying neuropathy. This review examines the evidence base underpinning the prevention and management of neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers in order to inform best clinical practice. Since it may be impractical to ask patients not to weight-bear at all, relief of pressure through the use of offloading casting devices remains the mainstay for management of neuropathic ulcers, whilst provision of appropriate footwear is essential in ulcer prevention. Simple non-surgical debridement and application of hydrogels are both effective in preparing the wound bed for healthy granulation and therefore enhancing healing. Initial empirical antibiotic therapy for infected ulcers should cover the most common bacterial flora. There is limited evidence supporting the use of adjunctive therapies such as hyperbaric oxygen and cytokines or growth factors. In selected cases, recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor has been shown to enhance healing; however, its widespread use cannot be advised due to the availability of more cost-effective approaches. While patient education may be beneficial, the evidence base remains thin and conflicting. In conclusion, best management of foot ulcers is achieved by what is taken out of the foot (pressure, callus, infection, and slough) rather than what is put on the foot (adjuvant treatment).

  16. Hyperbaric oxygen in the treatment of a diabetic foot ulcer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davenport, Colin

    2012-02-01

    Although simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplant improves most complications of type 1 diabetes, suppression of the immune system increases the risk for infection. The authors report the case of a patient who, despite receiving a simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplant, subsequently developed neuro-ischemic ulcers of his right foot requiring repeated amputations. He then developed an infected ulcer of his remaining right big toe, with significant implications for his mobility. This ulcer proved resistant to multiple courses of antibiotics and care in a specialist foot clinic but resolved completely following a course of hyperbaric oxygen therapy. The role of hyperbaric oxygen in diabetic foot ulcers is not yet fully established but should be considered in resistant cases with vascular insufficiency and a significant infective component.

  17. Hyperbaric oxygen in the treatment of a diabetic foot ulcer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davenport, Colin

    2011-02-01

    Although simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplant improves most complications of type 1 diabetes, suppression of the immune system increases the risk for infection. The authors report the case of a patient who, despite receiving a simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplant, subsequently developed neuro-ischemic ulcers of his right foot requiring repeated amputations. He then developed an infected ulcer of his remaining right big toe, with significant implications for his mobility. This ulcer proved resistant to multiple courses of antibiotics and care in a specialist foot clinic but resolved completely following a course of hyperbaric oxygen therapy. The role of hyperbaric oxygen in diabetic foot ulcers is not yet fully established but should be considered in resistant cases with vascular insufficiency and a significant infective component.

  18. CASE STUDY OF LEECH APPLICATION IN DIABETIC FOOT ULCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarprakash P. Dwivedi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In diabetes, slight injury to the glucose laden tissue may cause chronic infection and ulcer formation. About 15% of all diabetic patients develops foot ulcer in their life time. The etiological factors include increased sugar level, diabetic micro angiopathy and peripheral neuropathy.Mainstay of treatment includes antibiotics, debridement, and local wound care and footwear improvisation. In spite of all advances in health sciences, statistics reveals that about 3% patients yet have to undergo lower limb amputation.In Sushrut samhita, we get the most scientific description of wound and its management. Similarly, Sushrut has given the utmost importance to Bloodletting therapy and considered Leech as the most unique and effective method of bloodletting even in infected wounds and abscesses.Aforesaid description led us to try Leech therapy in Diabetic foot ulcer. Patient with Diabetic foot ulcer was advised to continue anti diabetic medicine along with weekly application of Leech around the ulcer which was followed by dressing with Nimb-Haridra oil.This Leech therapy proved very effective and the ulcer healed completely within 30 days.However, further evaluation is required to be done by taking a large sample size to prove its significance in treating Diabetic foot ulcer and avoiding lower limb amputation.

  19. Flexible and rigid casting tape as a novel approach to offloading diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, M; Gannass, A Al; Bowling, F

    2011-07-01

    Offloading diabetic ulceration is a key component to the success in healing ulcers on the plantar aspect of the foot. New advances in offloading techniques allow for differing approaches in sometimes complex diabetic foot pathologies with associated ulceration. This case study looks at the use of flexible and rigid casting technique as part of the treatment in offloading plantar foot ulceration.

  20. The management of neuropathic ulcers of the foot in diabetes by shock wave therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascone Michele

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes is becoming one of the most common chronic diseases, and ulcers are its most serious complication. Beginning with neuropathy, the subsequent foot wounds frequently lead to lower extremity amputation, even in the absence of critical limb ischemia. In recent years, some researchers have studied external shock wave therapy (ESWT as a new approach to soft tissue wound healing. The rationale of this study was to evaluate if ESWT is effective in the management of neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers. Methods We designed a randomized, prospective, controlled study in which we recruited 30 patients affected by neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers and then divided them into two groups based on different management strategies. One group was treated with standard care and shock wave therapy. The other group was treated with only standard care. The healing of the ulcers was evaluated over 20 weeks by the rate of re-epithelization. Results After 20 weeks of treatment, 53.33% of the ESWT-treated patients had complete wound closure compared with 33.33% of the control patients, and the healing times were 60.8 and 82.2 days, respectively (p 2/die in the ESWT-group and 1.30 mm2/die in the control group (p Conclusion Therefore, ESWT may be a useful adjunct in the management of diabetic foot ulceration. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN21800909

  1. Illness Beliefs Predict Mortality in Patients with Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedhara, Kavita; Dawe, Karen; Miles, Jeremy N. V.; Wetherell, Mark A.; Cullum, Nicky; Dayan, Colin; Drake, Nicola; Price, Patricia; Tarlton, John; Weinman, John; Day, Andrew; Campbell, Rona; Reps, Jenna; Soria, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients’ illness beliefs have been associated with glycaemic control in diabetes and survival in other conditions. Objective We examined whether illness beliefs independently predicted survival in patients with diabetes and foot ulceration. Methods Patients (n = 169) were recruited between 2002 and 2007. Data on illness beliefs were collected at baseline. Data on survival were extracted on 1st November 2011. Number of days survived reflected the number of days from date of recruitment to 1st November 2011. Results Cox regressions examined the predictors of time to death and identified ischemia and identity beliefs (beliefs regarding symptoms associated with foot ulceration) as significant predictors of time to death. Conclusions Our data indicate that illness beliefs have a significant independent effect on survival in patients with diabetes and foot ulceration. These findings suggest that illness beliefs could improve our understanding of mortality risk in this patient group and could also be the basis for future therapeutic interventions to improve survival. PMID:27096609

  2. Management of the diabetic foot ulcer: exercising control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Jenny; Foster, Ali

    2008-03-01

    The incidence of diabetes is increasing and therefore patients with diabetic foot ulcers will become increasingly common in the community. The NHS model of Health and Social Care (Department of Health (DH), 2005) places a high emphasis on self care and disease management, and, as a long-term condition, diabetes mellitus requires efficient and effective management. The supervision and organization of the care of diabetic patients is multi-factorial and for this reason, a multi-disciplinary approach is essential for effective care, without which patients with diabetic foot ulcers are at high risk of complications. Diabetic wounds present differently to other chronic wounds; unless these are adequately assessed and treated, there may be devastating consequences for the patient--the most serious being major amputation and/or death. In the first article, accurate assessment was discussed; in this second article, the management of diabetic foot ulcers is explored.

  3. Ulcer piercing: cleansing of complicated diabetic neuropathic foot ulcers by positive pressure irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallini, M

    2014-02-01

    To demonstrate the efficacy of the ulcer piercing procedure, which allows constant cleansing of the ulcer and facilitates a positive pressure irrigation of any pierced hidden tracts, in order to reduce the negative impact of stasis on wound healing. We designed a surgical procedure of ulcer piercing and drainage with a silastic tube, which allows positive pressure irrigation of any pierced tracts. This procedure was performed in a continuous series of 25 selected diabetic patients affected by a Wagner stage 3 ulcer of the toe (n=16), metatarsal midfoot (n=5) and plantar Charcot foot (n=4), and with adequate foot arterial blood supply. Within 6 months of the ulcer piercing procedure, 23/25 of ulcers had completely healed. In two further cases, the ulcer piercing ring was still in place after 3 and 5 months, progressively healing with no active signs of infection. Taking into consideration the advantages and the lack of side effects afforded by this procedure, ulcer piercing represents a small but effective step towards an easier and safer approach to treating complicated diabetic neuropathic foot ulcers with adequate arterial blood supply. There were no external sources of funding for this study. The author has no conflicts of interest to declare with regard to the manuscript or its content.

  4. A CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY OF PREVALENCE AND TYPE OF DIABETIC FOOT ULCERS IN TYPE 2 DIABETIC MELLITUS PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadavendra Reddy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACK GROUND : Diabetic foot ulcers are common and estimated to affect 15% of all diabetics. In India it is estimated that approximately 40 , 000 legs are being amputated every year of which 75% are potentially preventable. METHODOLOGY : To determine the prevalence of diabetic foot ulcers and the type of ulcers amongst the diagnosed diabetes mellitus patients a prospective study was carried out d uring the period January 2013 to December 2014 in the department of General medicine , Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences and Medical college , Kadapa , A.P. RESULTS : Diabetic foot ulcers were found in 14% diabetes mellitus patients. Neuropathic type of foot ulcer was present in 48.62% of patients (60.5% in male and 18.5% in female. Ischemic type of foot ulcer was present in 18.26% of patients (39.5% in male and in 14.06% females. Neuro - ischemic type of foot ulcer was present in 33.12% of patients (2 1% in males and 46.44% in females. CONCLUSION : Neuropathy occurred most frequently either singly or with peripheral vascular disease. General awareness about the disease , early diagnosis and proper management will prevent this dreaded complication.

  5. Foot ulcers in the diabetic patient, prevention and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie C Wu

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Stephanie C Wu1, Vickie R Driver1, James S Wrobel2, David G Armstrong21Center for Lower Extremity Ambulatory Research,William M. Scholl College of Podiatric Medicine at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, and National Center of Limb Salvage, Advocate Lutheran General Hospital, Chicago, IL, USA; 2Center for Lower Extremity Ambulatory Research, Dr. William M. Scholl College of Podiatric Medicine at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Lower extremity complications in persons with diabetes have become an increasingly significant public health concern in both the developed and developing world. These complications, beginning with neuropathy and subsequent diabetic foot wounds frequently lead to infection and lower extremity amputation even in the absence of critical limb ischemia. In order to diminish the detrimental consequences associated with diabetic foot ulcers, a common-sense-based treatment approach must be implemented. Many of the etiological factors contributing to the formation of diabetic foot ulceration may be identified using simple, inexpensive equipment in a clinical setting. Prevention of diabetic foot ulcers can be accomplished in a primary care setting with a brief history and screening for loss of protective sensation via the Semmes-Weinstein monofilament. Specialist clinics may quantify neuropathy, plantar foot pressure, and assess vascular status with Doppler ultrasound and ankle-brachial blood pressure indices. These measurements, in conjunction with other findings from the history and physical examination, may enable clinicians to stratify patients based on risk and help determine the type of intervention. Other effective clinical interventions may include patient education, optimizing glycemic control, smoking cessation, and diligent foot care. Recent technological advanced combined with better understanding of the wound healing process have resulted in a myriad of advanced

  6. Assessing diabetic foot ulcer development risk with hyperspectral tissue oximetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudovsky, Dmitry; Nouvong, Aksone; Schomacker, Kevin; Pilon, Laurent

    2011-02-01

    Foot ulceration remains a serious health concern for diabetic patients and has a major impact on the cost of diabetes treatment. Early detection and preventive care, such as offloading or improved hygiene, can greatly reduce the risk of further complications. We aim to assess the use of hyperspectral tissue oximetry in predicting the risk of diabetic foot ulcer formation. Tissue oximetry measurements are performed during several visits with hyperspectral imaging of the feet in type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus subjects that are at risk for foot ulceration. The data are retrospectively analyzed at 21 sites that ulcerated during the course of our study and an ulceration prediction index is developed. Then, an image processing algorithm based on this index is implemented. This algorithm is able to predict tissue at risk of ulceration with a sensitivity and specificity of 95 and 80%, respectively, for images taken, on average, 58 days before tissue damage is apparent to the naked eye. Receiver operating characteristic analysis is also performed to give a range of sensitivity/specificity values resulting in a Q-value of 89%.

  7. Increased healing in diabetic toe ulcers in a multidisciplinary foot clinic—An observational cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almdal, Thomas Peter; Nielsen, A.A.; Nielsen, K.E.

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study toe ulcer healing in patients with diabetic foot ulcers attending a multidisciplinary foot clinic over a 10 years period. METHODS: The study was retrospective, consecutive and observational during 2001 through 2011. The patients were treated according to the International Consensus...... on the Diabetic Foot. During the period the chiropodist staffing in the foot clinic was doubled; new offloading material and orthopedic foot corrections for recalcitrant ulcers were introduced. Healing was investigated in toe ulcers in Cox regression models. RESULTS: 2634 patients developed foot ulcers, of which...

  8. A clinicomicrobial study of diabetic foot ulcer infections in South India

    OpenAIRE

    Ranjini Chittur Yerat; Vidhya Rani Rangasamy

    2015-01-01

    Background: Approximately 85% of all diabetes-related lower-extremity amputations are preceded by foot ulcers. Diabetic foot ulcers are at high risk of infection secondary to high glucose levels and poor tissue perfusion. Aims of the Study: To identify the microbial pathogens and the antimicrobial sensitivity pattern of the bacterial isolates involved in the different grades of diabetic foot ulcers. Materials and Methods: Pus samples from 104 diabetic foot ulcers were processed for aerobic, a...

  9. Effect of Custom-Made Footwear on Foot Ulcer Recurrence in Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Bus, Sicco A.; Waaijman, Roelof; Arts, Mark; Haart, Mirjam de; Busch-Westbroek, Tessa; van Baal, Jeff; Nollet, Frans

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Custom-made footwear is the treatment of choice to prevent foot ulcer recurrence in diabetes. This footwear primarily aims to offload plantar regions at high ulcer risk. However, ulcer recurrence rates are high. We assessed the effect of offloading-improved custom-made footwear and the role of footwear adherence on plantar foot ulcer recurrence. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We randomly assigned 171 neuropathic diabetic patients with a recently healed plantar foot ulcer to custom-made...

  10. Neurogenic factors in the impaired healing of diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galkowska, Hanna; Olszewski, Waldemar L; Wojewodzka, Urszula; Rosinski, Grzegorz; Karnafel, Waldemar

    2006-08-01

    We hypothesize that the reduced innervation of skin can be observed both in clinically neuropathic and non-neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers and can contribute to low inflammatory cell infiltration. Twenty patients with type 2 diabetes and active foot ulcers, without clinical evidence of peripheral sensory neuropathy (n = 12) and with sensory neuropathy (n = 8) were involved in this study. Biopsies from ulcer margin were examined immunohistochemically. Studies revealed presence of protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5)+ nerve endings only in reticular dermis in 3 of 12 non-neuropathic subjects, however, regenerating GAP-43+ endings were seen in dermis of almost all specimens. Lack of substance P+ nerve endings was characteristic for both groups. The reduced distribution of calcitonin gene-related peptide+ nerves in epidermis and dermis was seen mainly in neuropathic group. In neo-epidermis lack of nerve growth factor expression was observed in both groups, whereas neurotrophin 3 immunostaining was characteristic for neuropathic specimens (P < 0.03). Expression of trkA and trkC receptors did not differ significantly between groups. Low inflammatory cell infiltration and moderate presence of fibroblasts was characteristic for all studied specimens. The observed reduction of foot skin innervation and neurogenic factors expression can be correlated with low inflammatory cell accumulation and subsequently leads to the observed chronicity of diabetic foot ulcer healing process in both neuropathic and non-neuropathic patients.

  11. Amputation predictors in diabetic foot ulcers treated with hyperbaric oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, S T; Hemsinli, D; Kaplan, S; Arslan, A

    2017-07-02

    Although hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) has long been used for diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs), its effectiveness is still controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of HBOT in the management of DFUs and identify amputation predictors. Patients with chronic DFUs (Wanger grade 2-5) were included in the study, which took place between January 2010 and December 2012. HBOT, 100% oxygen, 2.4 atmosphere absolute (ATA) for 120 minutes, was administered to all patients in addition to standard treatment. DFUs were monitored for at least 3 years, or until healing or amputation occurred. Patients with a total of 146 chronic DFUswere recruited. Complete healing (69.6%) and significant improvement (17.9%) was observed in 87.5% of the patients. The cases with no improvement resulted in amputation (minor amputation: 15.0%; major amputation: 8.2%). The duration of diabetes (p=0.037), new wound formation (p=0.045), C-reactive protein (p=0.001) and Wagner grade (p=0.0001) were correlated with amputation in multiple regression analysis. Mortality was higher in the amputation group than in the non-amputation group (47.1 % versus 21.4 %, p=0.007). The inclusion of HBOT with standard treatment and a multidisciplinary approach may be useful in the treatment of DFUs. We found the most important predictors of amputation to be Wagner grade and wound infection. Multicentre, prospective, randomised studies are needed to provide more evidence.

  12. Diabetic foot disease: From the evaluation of the “foot at risk” to the novel diabetic ulcer treatment modalities

    OpenAIRE

    Amin, Noha; Doupis, John

    2016-01-01

    The burden of diabetic foot disease (DFD) is expected to increase in the future. The incidence of DFD is still rising due to the high prevalence of DFD predisposing factors. DFD is multifactorial in nature; however most of the diabetic foot amputations are preceded by foot ulceration. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a major risk factor for foot ulceration. DPN leads to loss of protective sensation resulting in continuous unconscious traumas. Patient education and detection of high ris...

  13. Diabetic foot ulcer treatment by activated platelet rich plasma: a clinical study

    OpenAIRE

    Tung Dang-Xuan Tran; Phuong Thi-Bich Le and Phuc Van Pham

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcer is a major complication of diabetes mellitus. It occurred in about 15% of all diabetic patients. To date, the outcome of management of diabetic foot ulcer is poor and low sufficient. Some new therapies were suggested to manage and treat this disease. In almost therapies, management of diabetic foot ulcer relates to debridement of the wound, revascularization, off-loading of the ulcer, antibacterial actions, stimulating granulation, epidermization and angiogenesis. This stu...

  14. Microsurgical Reconstruction of Plantar Ulcers of the Insensate Foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadam, Dinesh

    2016-06-01

    Background Plantar, neuropathic, or trophic ulcers are often found in patients with decreased sensation in the foot. These ulcers can be complicated by infection, deformity, and increased patient morbidity. Excision results in wider defects and local tissues are often insufficient for reconstruction Methods Total 26 free flaps were used in 25 patients to reconstruct plantar ulcers between years 2007 and 2013. The etiology included diabetic neuropathy (n = 13), leprosy (n = 3), spinal/peripheral nerve injury (n = 7), spina bifida (n = 1), and peripheral neuropathy (n = 1). The duration of the ulcer ranged from 1 to 18 years. Fifteen patients had associated systemic comorbidities and six had previous attempts. Free flaps used in reconstruction were the anterolateral thigh flap (n = 18), radial artery forearm flap (n = 4), and the gracilis muscle flap (n = 4). Recipient vessels were the posterior tibial artery (end to side) in 19 and the dorsalis pedis artery in 7. Results The average age at presentation was 44.6 years with mean duration of ulcer of 5.8 years predominantly located over weight-bearing areas. Mean size of ulcer was 59.45 cm(2) and mean follow-up period was 48 months. All flaps survived except a partial loss. Average time to resume ambulation was 6 weeks. Three patients had recurrence with mean follow-up of 48 months. Secondary flap reduction and bony resection was done in four. Conclusion Microvascular reconstruction of the sole has advantages of vascularity, adequate tissue, and leaving rest of the foot undisturbed for offloading. Three significant local conditions influencing selection and transfer of the flap include (1) distally located forefoot ulcers, (2) extensive subcutaneous fibrosis secondary to frequent inflammation, and (3) Charcot arthropathy. In our series, the anterolateral thigh flap is our first choice for reconstruction of these defects.

  15. Assessment of foot perfusion in patients with a diabetic foot ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, Rachael O; Hinchliffe, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of foot perfusion is a vital step in the management of patients with diabetic foot ulceration, in order to understand the risk of amputation and likelihood of wound healing. Underlying peripheral artery disease is a common finding in patients with foot ulceration and is associated with poor outcomes. Assessment of foot perfusion should therefore focus on identifying the presence of peripheral artery disease and to subsequently estimate the effect this may have on wound healing. Assessment of perfusion can be difficult because of the often complex, diffuse and distal nature of peripheral artery disease in patients with diabetes, as well as poor collateralisation and heavy vascular calcification. Conventional methods of assessing tissue perfusion in the peripheral circulation may be unreliable in patients with diabetes, and it may therefore be difficult to determine the extent to which poor perfusion contributes to foot ulceration. Anatomical data obtained on cross-sectional imaging is important but must be combined with measurements of tissue perfusion (such as transcutaneous oxygen tension) in order to understand the global and regional perfusion deficit present in a patient with diabetic foot ulceration. Ankle-brachial pressure index is routinely used to screen for peripheral artery disease, but its use in patients with diabetes is limited in the presence of neuropathy and medial arterial calcification. Toe pressure index may be more useful because of the relative sparing of pedal arteries from medial calcification but may not always be possible in patients with ulceration. Fluorescence angiography is a non-invasive technique that can provide rapid quantitative information about regional tissue perfusion; capillaroscopy, iontophoresis and hyperspectral imaging may also be useful in assessing physiological perfusion but are not widely available. There may be a future role for specialized perfusion imaging of these patients, including magnetic resonance

  16. A COMPARATIVE STUDY BETWEEN HYDROFIBER DRESSING & POVIDONE DRESSING IN DIABETIC FOOT ULCERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rithin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Diabetic Foot Ulcer (DFU is the most common complication of Diabetes Mellitus (DM. It occurs in 15% of all patients with DM. Major increase in mortality among diabetic patients, observed over the past 20 years is considered to be due to the development of macro and micro vascular complications, including failure of the wound healing process. Non-healing chronic diabetic ulcers are often treated with extracellular matrix replacement therapy.so far, it is a common trend in diabetic foot care domain to use advanced moist wound therapy. At present, there are various categories of moist dressings available such as povidone dressings, adhesive backing film, silicone coated foam, hydrogels, hydrocolloids etc. AIMS & OBJECTIVES 1 To study efficacy of hydrofiber dressings and wound healing in diabetic foot ulcers. 2 To compare the safety, final outcome and patient compliance in hydrofiber and povidone dressing. MATERIALS & METHODS This prospective, observational study is carried in our department from September 2014 to September 2015. All the patients with age of 30 years and above were admitted in AJIMS satisfying the inclusion and exclusion criteria were taken into the study. The patients were followed until the ulcer is treated. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS Data are presented as Mean and Standard Deviation (SD. Fischer’s exact test and Chi-Square Test were used as appropriate. GraphPad Prism Version 6.0h was used to analyze data and to prepare graphs. A ‘P’ value below the level of 0.05 was taken as statistically significant. RESULTS Among the patients who were studied, hydrofiber dressings helped in the better & faster healing of DFU. CONCLUSION In comparison with povidone gauze dressings to hydrofiber dressings in diabetic foot ulcers, the latter is more efficacious in controlling the infection, minimal usage of antibiotics, faster healing rate and patient compliance during dressings.

  17. Diabetic foot disease: From the evaluation of the “foot at risk” to the novel diabetic ulcer treatment modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Noha; Doupis, John

    2016-01-01

    The burden of diabetic foot disease (DFD) is expected to increase in the future. The incidence of DFD is still rising due to the high prevalence of DFD predisposing factors. DFD is multifactorial in nature; however most of the diabetic foot amputations are preceded by foot ulceration. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a major risk factor for foot ulceration. DPN leads to loss of protective sensation resulting in continuous unconscious traumas. Patient education and detection of high risk foot are essential for the prevention of foot ulceration and amputation. Proper assessment of the diabetic foot ulceration and appropriate management ensure better prognosis. Management is based on revascularization procedures, wound debridement, treatment of infection and ulcer offloading. Management and type of dressing applied are tailored according to the type of wound and the foot condition. The scope of this review paper is to describe the diabetic foot syndrome starting from the evaluation of the foot at risk for ulceration, up to the new treatment modalities. PMID:27076876

  18. Diabetic foot disease: From the evaluation of the “foot at risk” to the novel diabetic ulcer treatment modalities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Noha; Amin[1; John; Doupis[2,3

    2016-01-01

    The burden of diabetic foot disease (DFD) is expected to increase in the future. The incidence of DFD is still rising due to the high prevalence of DFD predisposing factors. DFD is multifactorial in nature; however most of the diabetic foot amputations are preceded by foot ulceration. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a major risk factor for foot ulceration. DPN leads to loss of protective sensation resulting in continuous unconscious traumas. Patient education and detection of high risk foot are essential for the prevention of foot ulceration and amputation. Proper assessment of the diabetic foot ulceration and appropriate management ensure better prognosis. Management is based on revascularization procedures, wound debridement, treatment of infection and ulcer offloading. Management and type of dressing applied are tailored according to the type of wound and the foot condition. The scope of this review paper is to describe the diabetic foot syndrome starting from the evaluation of the foot at risk for ulceration, up to the new treatment modalities.

  19. Diabetic foot disease: From the evaluation of the "foot at risk" to the novel diabetic ulcer treatment modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Noha; Doupis, John

    2016-04-10

    The burden of diabetic foot disease (DFD) is expected to increase in the future. The incidence of DFD is still rising due to the high prevalence of DFD predisposing factors. DFD is multifactorial in nature; however most of the diabetic foot amputations are preceded by foot ulceration. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a major risk factor for foot ulceration. DPN leads to loss of protective sensation resulting in continuous unconscious traumas. Patient education and detection of high risk foot are essential for the prevention of foot ulceration and amputation. Proper assessment of the diabetic foot ulceration and appropriate management ensure better prognosis. Management is based on revascularization procedures, wound debridement, treatment of infection and ulcer offloading. Management and type of dressing applied are tailored according to the type of wound and the foot condition. The scope of this review paper is to describe the diabetic foot syndrome starting from the evaluation of the foot at risk for ulceration, up to the new treatment modalities.

  20. Characterization of multidrug-resistant diabetic foot ulcer enterococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semedo-Lemsaddek, Teresa; Mottola, Carla; Alves-Barroco, Cynthia; Cavaco-Silva, Patrícia; Tavares, Luís; Oliveira, Manuela

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a highly prevalent chronic progressive disease with complications that include diabetic-foot ulcers. Enterococci isolated from diabetic-foot infections were identified, evaluated by macro-restriction analysis, and screened for virulence traits and antimicrobial resistance. All isolates were considered multidrug-resistant, cytolysin and gelatinase producers, and the majority also demonstrated the ability to produce biofilms. These results indicate the importance of enterococci in diabetic-foot infection development and persistence, especially regarding their biofilm-forming ability and resistance to clinically relevant antibiotics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  1. Probing community nurses' professional basis: a situational case study in diabetic foot ulcer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaarup, Clara; Pape-Haugaard, Louise; Jensen, Merete Hartun; Laursen, Anders Christian; Bermark, Susan; Hejlesen, Ole Kristian

    2017-03-01

    Complicated and long-lasting wound care of diabetic foot ulcers are moving from specialists in wound care at hospitals towards community nurses without specialist diabetic foot ulcer wound care knowledge. The aim of the study is to elucidate community nurses' professional basis for treating diabetic foot ulcers. A situational case study design was adopted in an archetypical Danish community nursing setting. Experience is a crucial component in the community nurses' professional basis for treating diabetic foot ulcers. Peer-to-peer training is the prevailing way to learn about diabetic foot ulcer, however, this contributes to the risk of low evidence-based practice. Finally, a frequent behaviour among the community nurses is to consult colleagues before treating the diabetic foot ulcers.

  2. Clinical examination and foot pressure analysis of diabetic foot: Prospective analytical study in Indian diabetic patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshanand Popalwar

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: Meticulous clinical examination can easily identify diabetic neuropathy and related pathological complications of diabetic foot. This shall help for early diagnosis and prevention of diabetic foot complications. Foot pressure analysis can be useful tool to screen patients of diabetic foot for abnormal high pressure point areas and can predict future risk of ulceration due to high foot pressure. This study states findings in Indian diabetic patients. [Natl J Med Res 2016; 6(1.000: 17-22

  3. Surgical management of Diabetic foot ulcers: A Tanzanian university teaching hospital experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kataraihya Johannes B

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs pose a therapeutic challenge to surgeons, especially in developing countries where health care resources are limited and the vast majority of patients present to health facilities late with advanced foot ulcers. A prospective descriptive study was done at Bugando Medical Centre from February 2008 to January 2010 to describe our experience in the surgical management of DFUs in our local environment and compare with what is known in the literature. Findings Of the total 4238 diabetic patients seen at BMC during the period under study, 136 (3.2% patients had DFUs. Males outnumbered females by the ratio of 1.2:1. Their mean age was 54.32 years (ranged 21-72years. Thirty-eight (27.9% patients were newly diagnosed diabetic patients. The majority of patients (95.5% had type 2 diabetes mellitus. The mean duration of diabetes was 8.2 years while the duration of DFUs was 18.34 weeks. Fourteen (10.3% patients had previous history of foot ulcers and six (4.4% patients had previous amputations. The forefoot was commonly affected in 60.3% of cases. Neuropathic ulcers were the most common type of DFUs in 57.4% of cases. Wagner's stage 4 and 5 ulcers were the most prevalent at 29.4% and 23.5% respectively. The majority of patients (72.1% were treated surgically. Lower limb amputation was the most common surgical procedure performed in 56.7% of cases. The complication rate was (33.5% and surgical site infection was the most common complication (18.8%. Bacterial profile revealed polymicrobial pattern and Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent microorganism isolated. All the microorganisms isolated showed high resistance to commonly used antibiotics except for Meropenem and imipenem, which were 100% sensitive each respectively. The mean hospital stay was 36.24 ± 12.62 days (ranged 18-128 days. Mortality rate was 13.2%. Conclusion Diabetic foot ulceration constitutes a major source of morbidity and mortality

  4. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Improve Healing of Diabetic Foot Ulcer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chenglin

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), an ideal cell source for regenerative therapy with no ethical issues, play an important role in diabetic foot ulcer (DFU). Growing evidence has demonstrated that MSCs transplantation can accelerate wound closure, ameliorate clinical parameters, and avoid amputation. In this review, we clarify the mechanism of preclinical studies, as well as safety and efficacy of clinical trials in the treatment of DFU. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs), compared with MSCs derived from other tissues, may be a suitable cell type that can provide easy, effective, and cost-efficient transplantation to treat DFU and protect patients from amputation. PMID:28386568

  5. New Research Methods Developed for Studying Diabetic Foot Ulceration

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Brian Davis, one of the Cleveland Clinic Foundation's researchers, has been investigating the risk factors related to diabetic foot ulceration, a problem that accounts for 20 percent of all hospital admissions for diabetic patients. He had developed a sensor pad to measure the friction and pressure forces under a person's foot when walking. As part of NASA Lewis Research Center's Space Act Agreement with the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Dr. Davis requested Lewis' assistance in visualizing the data from the sensor pad. As a result, Lewis' Interactive Data Display System (IDDS) was installed at the Cleveland Clinic. This computer graphics program is normally used to visualize the flow of air through aircraft turbine engines, producing color two- and three-dimensional images.

  6. Trichloroacetic Acid Spray for the Treatment of Foot Ulcers of Foot and Mouth Disease in Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imad I. Aldabagh, Oday S. Al-Obaddy and Hafidh I. Al-Sadi*

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An attempt was made to evaluate the therapeutic effect of trichloroacetic acid (TCA for ulcers of the hooves of 120 cattle affected with foot and mouth disease (FMD. Each hoof was cleaned and washed with water before using the TCA spray (2% once daily. Biopsies were taken from the soft tissue lesions before and after10 days of treatment. These tissue specimens were processed routinely for histopathological examination. A marked improvement was seen in the pain inflicted by palpation of the affected hoof. Microscopically, coagulative necrosis of the soft tissue of the hoof was seen. An advanced stage of healing of the hoof ulcers was observed on 10th day post–treatment. It was concluded that 2% solution of TCA was an effective treatment of ulcers of the hooves of cattle affected with FMD.

  7. Comparative study of different treatment options of grade III and IV diabetic foot ulcers to reduce the incidence of amputations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poras Chaudhary

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to compare the efficacy of antiseptic dressings, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and recombinant human platelet derived growth factor (rhPDGF for two reasons: i to reduce the incidence of lower limb amputations in diabetic foot ulcer; ii to limit the duration of stay in the hospital. A prospective randomized trial was conducted on 60 patients with stage III and IV diabetic foot ulcers (International Association of Enterostomal Therapy classification and patients were divided randomly in three different therapy groups - antiseptics, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, recombinant platelet derived growth factor, with 20 patients in each group. Patients were managed initially on inpatient and then on outpatient basis till the ulcer healed completely. Results among three groups were compared using unpaired T test and the level of significance was set at P<0.05 using ANOVA. This study compares the efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen therapy, antiseptic dressings, and rhPDGF in grade III and IV diabetic foot ulcers. P value (0.0348 was significant for complete wound contraction while p value healing time (0.6534 and ulcer size (0.0593 in the groups was not significant. PDGF is safe, effective and easy to apply. Results are comparable with hyperbaric oxygen (HBO therapy and cost of treatment is lower than other therapies. Diabetic foot ulcer management requires multidisciplinary and aggressive approach. PDGF should be recommended for all grade III and IV diabetic foot ulcer at least 8 weeks old. HBO is equally good an option but has limitations and side effects.

  8. High osteoprotegerin is associated with development of foot ulcer in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zobel, Emilie H; von Scholten, Bernt J; Lajer, Maria

    2016-01-01

    =153), Charcot foot (n=14), vascular surgery/amputation (n=53), loss of foot pulse (n=57), and peripheral neuropathy (n=99). In unadjusted analyses, higher osteoprotegerin was associated with development of all endpoints (p≤0.026). Higher osteoprotegerin remained associated with development of foot...... ulcer, and the combination of vascular surgery/amputation, loss of foot pulse and neuropathy (p≤0.001) in a sex and age adjusted model. After further adjustment (nephropathy status, smoking, HbA1c, systolic blood pressure, serum cholesterol, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, eGFR, and presence...... of neuropathy and/or claudication and/or foot ulcer at baseline), higher osteoprotegerin remained associated with development of foot ulcer (HR (95% CI) per doubling: 1.75 (1.04-2.97); p=0.037). CONCLUSION: Higher osteoprotegerin levels were associated with development of foot ulcer, even after comprehensive...

  9. Prediction of outcome in individuals with diabetic foot ulcers: focus on the differences between individuals with and without peripheral arterial disease. The EURODIALE Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prompers, L.; Schaper, N.; Apelqvist, J.

    2008-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Outcome data on individuals with diabetic foot ulcers are scarce, especially in those with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). We therefore examined the clinical characteristics that best predict poor outcome in a large population of diabetic foot ulcer patients and examined whether...... such predictors differ between patients with and without PAD. Methods Analyses were conducted within the EURODIALE Study, a prospective cohort study of 1,088 diabetic foot ulcer patients across 14 centres in Europe. Multiple logistic regression modelling was used to identify independent predictors of outcome (i...... ulcer size, peripheral neuropathy and PAD. When analyses were performed according to PAD status, infection emerged as a specific predictor of non-healing in PAD patients only. Conclusions/Interpretation Predictors of healing differ between patients with and without PAD, suggesting that diabetic foot...

  10. Plantar pressure in diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients with active foot ulceration, previous ulceration and no history of ulceration: a meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malindu Eranga Fernando

    Full Text Available AIMS: Elevated dynamic plantar pressures are a consistent finding in diabetes patients with peripheral neuropathy with implications for plantar foot ulceration. This meta-analysis aimed to compare the plantar pressures of diabetes patients that had peripheral neuropathy and those with neuropathy with active or previous foot ulcers. METHODS: Published articles were identified from Medline via OVID, CINAHL, SCOPUS, INFORMIT, Cochrane Central EMBASE via OVID and Web of Science via ISI Web of Knowledge bibliographic databases. Observational studies reporting barefoot dynamic plantar pressure in adults with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, where at least one group had a history of plantar foot ulcers were included. Interventional studies, shod plantar pressure studies and studies not published in English were excluded. Overall mean peak plantar pressure (MPP and pressure time integral (PTI were primary outcomes. The six secondary outcomes were MPP and PTI at the rear foot, mid foot and fore foot. The protocol of the meta-analysis was published with PROPSERO, (registration number CRD42013004310. RESULTS: Eight observational studies were included. Overall MPP and PTI were greater in diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients with foot ulceration compared to those without ulceration (standardised mean difference 0.551, 95% CI 0.290-0.811, p<0.001; and 0.762, 95% CI 0.303-1.221, p = 0.001, respectively. Sub-group analyses demonstrated no significant difference in MPP for those with neuropathy with active ulceration compared to those without ulcers. A significant difference in MPP was found for those with neuropathy with a past history of ulceration compared to those without ulcers; (0.467, 95% CI 0.181- 0.753, p = 0.001. Statistical heterogeneity between studies was moderate. CONCLUSIONS: Plantar pressures appear to be significantly higher in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy with a history of foot ulceration compared to those with diabetic

  11. Literature review on the management of diabetic foot ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdanpanah, Leila; Nasiri, Morteza; Adarvishi, Sara

    2015-02-15

    Diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) is the most costly and devastating complication of diabetes mellitus, which affect 15% of diabetic patients during their lifetime. Based on National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence strategies, early effective management of DFU can reduce the severity of complications such as preventable amputations and possible mortality, and also can improve overall quality of life. The management of DFU should be optimized by using a multidisciplinary team, due to a holistic approach to wound management is required. Based on studies, blood sugar control, wound debridement, advanced dressings and offloading modalities should always be a part of DFU management. Furthermore, surgery to heal chronic ulcer and prevent recurrence should be considered as an essential component of management in some cases. Also, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, electrical stimulation, negative pressure wound therapy, bio-engineered skin and growth factors could be used as adjunct therapies for rapid healing of DFU. So, it's suggested that with appropriate patient education encourages them to regular foot care in order to prevent DFU and its complications.

  12. Glucose metabolism in chronic diabetic foot ulcers measured in vivo using microdialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, L; Holstein, P; Larsen, K;

    1998-01-01

    Ten subjects with diabetes mellitus and unilateral chronic foot ulcer were investigated. Local tissue concentrations of glucose and lactate were measured using the microdialysis method at a distance of 0.5-1 cm from the edge of the ulcer and in normal skin in the contralateral foot. Subcutaneous ...

  13. Glucose metabolism in chronic diabetic foot ulcers measured in vivo using microdialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, L; Holstein, P; Larsen, K

    1998-01-01

    Ten subjects with diabetes mellitus and unilateral chronic foot ulcer were investigated. Local tissue concentrations of glucose and lactate were measured using the microdialysis method at a distance of 0.5-1 cm from the edge of the ulcer and in normal skin in the contralateral foot. Subcutaneous...

  14. Plantar pressures in diabetic patients with foot ulcers which have remained healed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.M. Owings; J. Apelqvist; A. Stenstrom; M. Becker; S.A. Bus; A. Kalpen; J.S. Ulbrecht; P.R. Cavanagh

    2009-01-01

    Aims The recurrence of foot ulcers is a significant problem in people with diabetic neuropathy. The purpose of this study was to measure in-shoe plantar pressures and other characteristics in a group of neuropathic patients with diabetes who had prior foot ulcers which had remained healed. Methods T

  15. A case series to describe the clinical characteristics of foot ulceration in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddle, Heidi J; Firth, Jill; Waxman, Robin; Nelson, E Andrea; Helliwell, Philip S

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics of foot ulceration in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Adults with RA and current foot ulceration but without diabetes were recruited. Clinical examination included assessment of RA disease activity, foot deformity, peripheral vascular disease, neuropathy and plantar pressures. Location, wound characteristics and time to healing were recorded for each ulcer. Participants completed the Health Assessment Questionnaire and Leeds Foot Impact Scale. Thirty-two cases with 52 current ulcers were recruited. Thirteen patients (41%) experienced more than one current ulcer: 5 (16%) had bilateral ulceration, 15 (47%) had previous ulceration at a current ulcer site. The majority (n = 33) of open ulcers were located over the dorsal aspect of the interphalangeal joints (n = 12), plantar aspect of the metatarsophalangeal joints (MTPJs) (n = 12) and medial aspect of first MTPJs (n = 9). In ulcerated limbs (n = 37), ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI) was plantar pressures were >6 kg/cm(2) in 6 (16%). Mean ulcer size was 4.84 by 3.29 mm. Most ulcers (n = 42, 81%) were superficial; five (9.6%) were infected. Time to healing was available for 41 ulcers: mean duration was 28 weeks. Three ulcers remained open. In conclusion, foot ulceration in RA is recurrent and multiple ulcers are common. Whilst ulcers are small and shallow, time to achieve healing is slow, posing infection risk. Reduced protective sensation is common in affected patients. The prevalence of arterial disease is low but may be under estimated due to high intolerance of ABPI.

  16. Health-Related Quality of Life Predicts Major Amputation and Death, but Not Healing, in People With Diabetes Presenting With Foot Ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersma, V.; Thorsen, H.; Holstein, P.E.

    2014-01-01

    ObjectiveLow health-related quality of life (HRQoL) has been consistently reported to be associated with poor prognosis for a variety of health outcomes in various settings. We aimed to evaluate whether HRQoL in patients presenting with new diabetic foot ulcers has prognostic significance for ulcer...... healing, major amputation and death.Research design and methodsWe followed 1088 patients with new diabetic foot ulcers presenting for treatment at one of the 14 centers in 10 European countries participating in the Eurodiale study, prospectively until healing (76.9%), major amputation (4.6%) or death (6...

  17. Mortality Risk of Charcot Arthropathy Compared With That of Diabetic Foot Ulcer and Diabetes Alone

    OpenAIRE

    Sohn, Min-Woong; Lee, Todd A.; Stuck, Rodney M; Frykberg, Robert G.; Budiman-Mak,Elly

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to compare mortality risks of patients with Charcot arthropathy with those of patients with diabetic foot ulcer and those of patients with diabetes alone (no ulcer or Charcot arthropathy). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A retrospective cohort of 1,050 patients with incident Charcot arthropathy in 2003 in a large health care system was compared with patients with foot ulcer and those with diabetes alone. Mortality was determined during a 5-year follow-up pe...

  18. Risk factors for ulceration and amputation in diabetic foot: study in a cohort of 496 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura Neto, Arnaldo; Zantut-Wittmann, Denise Engelbrecht; Fernandes, Tulio Diniz; Nery, Marcia; Parisi, Maria Candida Ribeiro

    2013-08-01

    Treatment strategies for foot at risk and diabetic foot are mainly preventive. Studies describing demographic data, clinical and impacting factors continue to be, however, scarce. Our objective was to determine the epidemiological presentation of diabetic foot and understand whether there were easily assessable variables capable of predicting the development of diabetic foot. This was a retrospective study of 496 patients with established foot at risk or diabetic foot, who were evaluated based on age, gender, type and duration of diabetes, foot at risk classification, and the presence of deformities, ulceration, and amputation. The presence of deformities, ulceration, and amputation was recorded in 45.9, 25.3, and 12.9 % of patients, respectively. As for diabetic foot classification, the great majority of our cohort had diabetic neuropathy (92.9 %). Approximately 30 % had neuro-ischemic disease and only 7.1 % had ischemic disease alone. Sixty-two percent of patients presented neuropathy with no signs of arteriopathy. Foot classification was as a significant predictor for the presence of ulcer (p = 0.009; OR = 3.2; 95 % CI = 1.18-7.3). Only male gender was a significant predictor for ulceration (p diabetic foot (p diabetic foot were male gender and the presence of neuropathy. The combination of neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease adds significantly to the risk for amputation among patients with the diabetic foot syndrome. Men, presenting combined risk factors, should be a group receiving special attention and in the foot clinic, due to their potentially worse evolution.

  19. Surgical Correction of the Achilles Tendon for Diabetic Foot Ulcerations and Charcot Neuroarthropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanujam, Crystal L; Zgonis, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Achilles tendon pathologic conditions are implicated in contributing to the development of many diabetic foot complications including diabetic foot ulceration and Charcot neuroarthropathy. Surgical correction of the diabetic equinus deformity has been studied as an isolated or adjunctive treatment when dealing with difficult-to-close diabetic foot ulcerations or when surgically addressing the diabetic Charcot neuroarthropathy foot or ankle. This article reviews the most common indications, complications, and surgical procedures for equinus correction by either a tendo-Achilles lengthening or gastrocnemius recession for the management of diabetic foot conditions.

  20. The prevention of diabetic foot ulceration: how biomechanical research informs clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank E. DiLiberto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Implementation of interprofessional clinical guidelines for the prevention of neuropathic diabetic foot ulceration has demonstrated positive effects regarding ulceration and amputation rates. Current foot care recommendations are primarily based on research regarding the prevention of ulcer recurrence and focused on reducing the magnitude of plantar stress (pressure overload. Yet, foot ulceration remains to be a prevalent and debilitating consequence of Diabetes Mellitus. There is limited evidence targeting the prevention of first-time ulceration, and there is a need to consider additional factors of plantar stress to supplement current guidelines. Objectives The first purpose of this article is to discuss the biomechanical theory underpinning diabetic foot ulcerations and illustrate how plantar tissue underloading may precede overloading and breakdown. The second purpose of this commentary is to discuss how advances in biomechanical foot modeling can inform clinical practice in the prevention of first-time ulceration. Discussion Research demonstrates that progressive weight-bearing activity programs to address the frequency of plantar stress and avoid underloading do not increase ulceration risk. Multi-segment foot modeling studies indicate that dynamic foot function of the midfoot and forefoot is compromised in people with diabetes. Emerging research demonstrates that implementation of foot-specific exercises may positively influence dynamic foot function and improve plantar stress in people with diabetes. Conclusion Continued work is needed to determine how to best design and integrate activity recommendations and foot-specific exercise programs into the current interprofessional paradigm for the prevention of first-time ulceration in people with Diabetes Mellitus.

  1. Cost-effectiveness of telemonitoring of diabetic foot ulcer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fasterholdt, Iben; Gerstrøm, Marie; Rasmussen, Benjamin Schnack Brandt

    2017-01-01

    This study compared the cost-effectiveness of telemonitoring with standard monitoring for patients with diabetic foot ulcers. The economic evaluation was nested within a pragmatic randomised controlled trial. A total of 374 patients were randomised to either telemonitoring or standard monitoring....... Telemonitoring consisted of two tele-consultations in the patient's own home and one consultation at the outpatient clinic; standard monitoring consisted of three outpatient clinic consultations. Total healthcare costs were estimated over a 6-month period at individual patient level, from a healthcare sector...... perspective. The bootstrap method was used to calculate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio, and one-way sensitivity analyses were performed. Telemonitoring costs were found to be €2039 less per patient compared to standard monitoring; however, this difference was not statistically significant...

  2. Cost-effectiveness of telemonitoring of diabetic foot ulcer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasterholdt, Iben; Gerstrøm, Marie; Rasmussen, Benjamin Schnack Brandt; Yderstræde, Knud Bonnet; Kidholm, Kristian; Pedersen, Kjeld Møller

    2016-09-16

    This study compared the cost-effectiveness of telemonitoring with standard monitoring for patients with diabetic foot ulcers. The economic evaluation was nested within a pragmatic randomised controlled trial. A total of 374 patients were randomised to either telemonitoring or standard monitoring. Telemonitoring consisted of two tele-consultations in the patient's own home and one consultation at the outpatient clinic; standard monitoring consisted of three outpatient clinic consultations. Total healthcare costs were estimated over a 6-month period at individual patient level, from a healthcare sector perspective. The bootstrap method was used to calculate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio, and one-way sensitivity analyses were performed. Telemonitoring costs were found to be €2039 less per patient compared to standard monitoring; however, this difference was not statistically significant. Amputation rate was similar in the two groups. In conclusion, a telemonitoring service in this form had similar costs and effects as standard monitoring. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Diabetic foot ulcer treatment by activated platelet rich plasma: a clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tung Dang-Xuan Tran

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic foot ulcer is a major complication of diabetes mellitus. It occurred in about 15% of all diabetic patients. To date, the outcome of management of diabetic foot ulcer is poor and low sufficient. Some new therapies were suggested to manage and treat this disease. In almost therapies, management of diabetic foot ulcer relates to debridement of the wound, revascularization, off-loading of the ulcer, antibacterial actions, stimulating granulation, epidermization and angiogenesis. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of activated platelet rich plasma (aPRP on diabetic foot ulcer healing on volunteer patients. There were 6 patients enrolled in this study. All patients have non-healing foot ulcers. aPRP was isolated from peripheral blood and activated with calcium chloride. Patients were injected with aPRP two times with 14-day interval. All patients were monitored during 12 weeks. The results showed that 100% (6/6 ulcers completely closed after about 7 weeks. This result initially suggests that aPRP injection is efficient method to treat the non-healing foot ulcers. Level of evidence: IV [Biomed Res Ther 2014; 1(2.000: 37-42

  4. Concordance of nasal and diabetic foot ulcer staphylococcal colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haleem, Ambar; Schultz, Jonathan S.; Heilmann, Kristopher P.; Dohrn, Cassie L.; Diekema, Daniel J.; Gardner, Sue E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus (SA) is an important risk factor for surgical site infections. The goal of this study was to investigate the concordance between nasal and diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) SA carriage. Methods 79 subjects with DFUs were assessed for nasal and DFU colonization with SA, including Methicillin-resistant-SA (MRSA). Results Twenty-five (31.6%) subjects had nares colonization with SA; 29 (36.7%) had DFU colonization with SA. Seven (8.8%) subjects had nares colonization with MRSA and 7 (8.8%) had DFU colonization with MRSA. Ulcer duration was associated with MRSA presence (p=0.01). Sensitivity and specificity of positive nasal SA colonization with positive DFU colonization were 41 and 74%. Conclusions We found substantial discordance between SA strains colonizing DFU and the nasal cavity. The poor positive predictive values for SA isolation in a DFU based on nasal carriage suggests SA colonization of a DFU by endogenous SA strains cannot be assumed. PMID:24560808

  5. Primary squamous cell carcinoma with mucormycosis in a diabetic foot ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Palash Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Nirmal Kumar; Mookerjee, Sekhar Kumar; Chaudhuri, Bhaskarnarayan

    2013-02-01

    The diabetic foot ulcer is one of the major complications of diabetes mellitus leading to prolonged hospital stay. Non-healing foot ulcers in diabetes may be due to peripheral neuropathy and/or vasculopathy. Non-healing occurs following a trivial trauma due to loss of local immunity and increased infection by bacteria and fungus. Candida and mucormycosis are common fungal infection in diabetic foot ulcer. Squamous cell carcinoma in any non-healing ulcer is a common occurrence. But squamous cell carcinoma in non-healing diabetic foot ulcer is rarely reported. Here, mucormycosis in a diabetic foot ulcer which turned into squamous cell carcinoma is reported in a 62-year-old male with poor glycaemic control for last 21 years who presented with a non-healing ulcer of 8 months' duration over dorsum of left forefoot. Microbiological examination revealed presence of mucormycosis infection and histopathology of ulcer showed infiltrating well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. The clinicians and pathologists should be aware of these combinations because only eradication of mucormycosis may not cure the ulcer, rather presence of squamous cell carcinoma may be ignored that may be an immediate threat to the patient's life.

  6. Literature review on the management of diabetic foot ulcer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Leila Yazdanpanah; Morteza Nasiri; Sara Adarvishi

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) is the most costly anddevastating complication of diabetes mellitus, whichaffect 15% of diabetic patients during their lifetime.Based on National Institute for Health and ClinicalExcellence strategies, early effective management ofDFU can reduce the severity of complications suchas preventable amputations and possible mortality,and also can improve overall quality of life. Themanagement of DFU should be optimized by using amultidisciplinary team, due to a holistic approach towound management is required. Based on studies, bloodsugar control, wound debridement, advanced dressingsand offloading modalities should always be a part ofDFU management. Furthermore, surgery to heal chroniculcer and prevent recurrence should be considered as anessential component of management in some cases. Also,hyperbaric oxygen therapy, electrical stimulation, negativepressure wound therapy, bio-engineered skin and growthfactors could be used as adjunct therapies for rapidhealing of DFU. So, it's suggested that with appropriatepatient education encourages them to regular foot carein order to prevent DFU and its complications.

  7. Presence and Characterisation of Anaemia in Diabetic Foot Ulceration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, J. A.; Oddy, M. J.; Richards, T.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Diabetic foot ulceration (DFU) is the commonest cause of severe limb ischaemia in the western world. In diabetes mellitus, anaemia is frequently unrecognized, yet studies have shown that it is twice as common in diabetics compared with nondiabetics. We aimed to assess the incidence of anaemia and further classify the iron deficiency seen in a high-risk DFU patient group. Methods. An observational study was undertaken in a multidisciplinary diabetic foot clinic setting. All patients with DFU attending over a four-month period were included. Anaemia was defined as haemoglobin (Hb) levels anaemia (Hb anaemia, there was significant spread of indices. Only one patient had “textbook” absolute iron deficiency (AID) defined as low Hb, MCV, MCH, and ferritin. Functional iron deficiency (FID) was seen in a further seven patients (25.5%). Conclusion. Anaemia and iron deficiency are a common problem in patients with DFU. With current clinical markers, it is incredibly difficult to determine causal relationships and further in-depth scientific study is required. PMID:25197565

  8. The efficacy of topical Royal Jelly on diabetic foot ulcers healing: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Siavash

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Foot ulcers and infections are the major sources of morbidity in individuals with diabetes mellitus. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of topical Royal Jelly (a worker honey bee product on healing diabetic foot ulcers. Methods: Diabetic patients with foot ulcers that were referred to our clinic at Khorshid Hospital, Isfahan, Iran; were evaluated three times a week and treated according to standard treatments consisted of offloading, infection control, vascular improvement and debridement if required. In addition, all ulcers were measured and then topical sterile 5% Royal Jelly was applied on the total surface area of the wounds. Eventually, they were covered with sterile dressings. Each patient was followed for a period of three months or until the complete healing. Results: A total of eight patients were enrolled in this study. Of these, two had two ulcers and, therefore, ten ulcers were evaluated. Two ulcers were excluded. Seven of the remained eight ulcers healed. Mean duration of complete healing was 41 days. One ulcer did not completely heal but improved to 40% smaller in length, 32% in width and 28% in depth. The mean length, width and depth reduction rates were 0.35 mm/day, 0.28 mm/day and 0.11 mm/day, respectively. Conclusions: Royal Jelly dressing may be an effective method for treating diabetic foot ulcers besides standard treatments.

  9. The process of implementing a rural VA wound care program for diabetic foot ulcer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiber, Gayle E; Raugi, Gregory J; Rowberg, Donald

    2007-10-01

    Delivering and documenting evidence-based treatment to all Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) foot ulcer patients has wide appeal. However, primary and secondary care medical centers where 52% of these patients receive care are at a disadvantage given the frequent absence of trained specialists to manage diabetic foot ulcers. A retrospective review of diabetic foot ulcer patient records and a provider survey were conducted to document the foot ulcer problem and to assess practitioner needs. Results showed of the 125 persons with foot ulcers identified through administrative data, only, 21% of diabetic foot patients were correctly coded. Chronic Care and Microsystem models were used to prepare a tailored intervention in a VA primary care medical center. The site Principal Investigators, a multidisciplinary site wound care team, and study investigators jointly implemented a diabetic foot ulcer program. Intervention components include wound care team education and training, standardized good wound care practices based on strong scientific evidence, and a wound care template embedded in the electronic medical record to facilitate data collection, clinical decision making, patient ordering, and coding. A strategy for delivering offloading pressure devices, regular case management support, and 24/7 emergency assistance also was developed. It took 9 months to implement the model. Patients were enrolled and followed for 1 year. Process and outcome evaluations are on-going.

  10. Recognizing the prevalence of changing adult foot size: an opportunity to prevent diabetic foot ulcers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, John E; Wrobel, James S

    2014-01-01

    Ill-fitting shoes may precipitate up to half of all diabetes-related amputations and are often cited as a leading cause of diabetic foot ulcers (DFU), with those patients being 5 to 10 times more likely to present wearing improperly fitting shoes. Among patients with prior DFU, those who self-select their shoe wear are at a three-fold risk for reulceration at 3 years versus those patients wearing prescribed shoes. Properly designed and fitted shoes should then address much of this problem, but evidence supporting the benefit of therapeutic shoe programs is inconclusive. The current study, performed in a male veteran population, is the first such effort to examine the prevalence and extent of change in foot length affecting individuals following skeletal maturity. Nearly half of all participants in our study experienced a ≥1 shoe size change in foot length during adulthood. We suggest that these often unrecognized changes may explain the broad use of improperly sized shoe wear, and its associated sequelae such as DFU and amputation. Regular clinical assessment of shoe fit in at-risk populations is therefore also strongly recommended as part of a comprehensive amputation prevention program.

  11. Topical honey for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcer: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kateel, Ramya; Adhikari, Prabha; Augustine, Alfred J; Ullal, Sheetal

    2016-08-01

    Topical honey has been used for the treatment of wound since ancient time. But the medical evidence proving it is limited. Hence a systematic review was planned. An exhaustive literature search was done in PUBMED, COCHRANE, GOOGLE using 'topical honey', 'diabetic foot ulcer', 'chronic wounds' as key words. Literature search showed total of five clinical trials and about ten observational studies in various part of world. Out of five clinical trials three concluded that honey dressing is better than conventional dressing, all the clinical trials proved safety of honey for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcer. Observational studies included total of 320 patients which also showed safety of honey but efficacy cannot be considered from observational studies. This review showed that honey dressing is safer for treatment of diabetic foot ulcer but there is insufficient good quality data to realistically conclude on the efficacy of honey on diabetic foot ulcers.

  12. Choice of wound care in diabetic foot ulcer: A practical approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Karakkattu; Vijayan; Kavitha; Shalbha; Tiwari; Vedavati; Bharat; Purandare; Sudam; Khedkar; Shilpa; Sameer; Bhosale; Ambika; Gopalakrishnan; Unnikrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers are the consequence of multiple factors including peripheral neuropathy,decreased blood supply,high plantar pressures,etc.,and pose a significant risk for morbidity,limb loss and mortality.The critical aspects of the wound healing mechanism and host physiological status in patients with diabetes necessitate the selection of an appropriate treatment strategy based on the complexity and type of wound.In addition to systemic antibiotics and surgical intervention,wound care is considered to be an important component of diabetic foot ulcer management.This article will focus on the use of different wound care materials in diabetic foot.From a clinical perspective,it is important to decide on the wound care material depending on the type and grade of the ulcer.This article will also provide clinicians with a simple approach to the choice of wound care materials in diabetic foot ulcer.

  13. A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Telemedical and Standard Outpatient Monitoring of Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Benjamin S B; Froekjaer, Johnny; Bjerregaard, Mads R

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The role of telemedical monitoring in diabetic foot ulcer care is still uncertain. Our aim was to compare telemedical and standard outpatient monitoring in the care of patients with diabetic foot ulcers in a randomized controlled trial. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Of the 736 screened...... individuals with diabetic foot ulcers, 401 met the eligibility criteria and were randomized between October 2010 and November 2014. The per-protocol telemedical monitoring consisted of two consultations in the patient's own home and one consultation at the outpatient clinic. Standard practice consisted...... monitoring, a higher mortality throws into question the role of telemedicine in monitoring diabetic foot ulcers. Further studies are needed to investigate effects of telemedicine on mortality and other clinical outcomes and to identify patient subgroups that may have a poorer outcome through telemedical...

  14. Distribution and drug sensitivity of pathogens in diabetic foot ulcer secretions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李惠琴

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the distribution and drug sensitivity of pathogens isolated from diabetic foot ulcer(DFU) secretions. Methods A retrospective study was carried out on the distribution and drug sensitivity of pathogens isolated from the secretions of 218 DFU

  15. The pivotal role of offloading in the management of neuropathic foot ulceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Stephanie C; Crews, Ryan T; Armstrong, David G

    2005-12-01

    Lower extremity amputations among persons with diabetes are generally preceded by neuropathic foot ulcerations. Healing of diabetic ulcerations in a timely manner is of central importance in any plan for amputation prevention. With sufficient vascular supply, appropriate débridement, and infection control, the primary mode of healing a diabetic neuropathic foot ulcer is pressure dispersion. The total contact cast has been deemed by many to be the gold standard in offloading; however, modification of a standard removable cast walker to ensure patient compliance may be as efficacious in healing diabetic foot ulcers as the total contact cast. Combining an effective, easy to use offloading device that ensures patient compliance with advanced wound healing modalities may form a formidable team in healing ulcers and potentially averting lower limb amputations.

  16. Translation and Validation of the Chinese Diabetic Foot Ulcer Scale - Short Form

    OpenAIRE

    Lan Fong Hui; Daniel Yee-Tak Fong; Michael Yam; Wing Yuk Ip

    2008-01-01

    Background: The need to assess quality of life (QOL) in patients with a diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) has been well documented. However, no appropriate instrument was available for the Chinese population. Objective: The Diabetic Foot Ulcer Scale - Short Form (DFS-SF) is a reliable and valid 29-item instrument comprising six scales, which is used for assessing QOL in patients with DFU. This study aimed to translate the DFS-SF into Chinese and evaluate its psychometric performance. Methods: The Chi...

  17. Comparing the Effects of Two Teaching Methods on Healing of Diabetic Foot Ulcer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Alinaqipoor, Tahereh

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Some studies have reported that diabetic patients do not adhere well to the foot care recommendations. Reasons for non-adherence are less evident and the methods used in education programs may have an effect. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to compare the effects of lecture method and combined method of education on foot care of patients and healing rates of diabetic foot ulcers. Methods: A matched controlled trial study was conducted on a sample of 45 diabetic patients with foot ulcers. The two intervention groups were taught with similar content but different methods. Patients’ foot care and healing rates of diabetic foot ulcers were assessed at the beginning of study and after 3 months in the two training groups as well as the control group. Results: Ulcer surface was decreased by 46%, 61% and 81.6% in the control, lecture group and com-bined group, respectively. The ulcer depth was also decreased by 66.7%, 97.5% and 69.1% in the three groups respectively. A significant relationship was observed between the group adherence of the self-care program and the amount of decrease in the ulcer surface area (r = 0.36, p = 0.04). Conclusion: The foot care education could significantly affect the healing of diabetic foot ulcer, especially in terms of the ulcers’ surface area. Therefore, a self-care education program should be integrated in the health system to empower those living with diabetes to manage their own foot appropriately. PMID:25276671

  18. Effect of Custom-Made Footwear on Foot Ulcer Recurrence in Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bus, Sicco A.; Waaijman, Roelof; Arts, Mark; de Haart, Mirjam; Busch-Westbroek, Tessa; van Baal, Jeff; Nollet, Frans

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Custom-made footwear is the treatment of choice to prevent foot ulcer recurrence in diabetes. This footwear primarily aims to offload plantar regions at high ulcer risk. However, ulcer recurrence rates are high. We assessed the effect of offloading-improved custom-made footwear and the role of footwear adherence on plantar foot ulcer recurrence. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We randomly assigned 171 neuropathic diabetic patients with a recently healed plantar foot ulcer to custom-made footwear with improved and subsequently preserved offloading (∼20% peak pressure relief by modifying the footwear) or to usual care (i.e., nonimproved custom-made footwear). Primary outcome was plantar foot ulcer recurrence in 18 months. Secondary outcome was ulcer recurrence in patients with an objectively measured adherence of ≥80% of steps taken. RESULTS On the basis of intention-to-treat, 33 of 85 patients (38.8%) with improved footwear and 38 of 86 patients (44.2%) with usual care had a recurrent ulcer (relative risk −11%, odds ratio 0.80 [95% CI 0.44–1.47], P = 0.48). Ulcer-free survival curves were not significantly different between groups (P = 0.40). In the 79 patients (46% of total group) with high adherence, 9 of 35 (25.7%) with improved footwear and 21 of 44 (47.8%) with usual care had a recurrent ulcer (relative risk −46%, odds ratio 0.38 [0.15–0.99], P = 0.045). CONCLUSIONS Offloading-improved custom-made footwear does not significantly reduce the incidence of plantar foot ulcer recurrence in diabetes compared with custom-made footwear that does not undergo such improvement, unless it is worn as recommended. PMID:24130357

  19. Effects of vacuum-compression therapy on healing of diabetic foot ulcers: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Asghar; Moodi, Hesam; Ghiasi, Fatemeh; Sagheb, Hamidreza Mahmoudzadeh; Rashidi, Homayra

    2007-01-01

    A single-blind, randomized controlled trial was conducted to evaluate vacuum-compression therapy (VCT) for the healing of diabetic foot ulcers. Eighteen diabetic patients with foot ulcers were recruited through simple nonprobability sampling. Subjects were randomly assigned to either an experimental or a control group. Before and after intervention, the foot ulcer surface area was estimated stereologically, based on Cavalieri's principle. The experimental group was treated with VCT in addition to conventional therapy for 10 sessions. The control group received only conventional therapy, including debridement, blood glucose control agents, systemic antibiotics, wound cleaning with normal saline, offloading (pressure relief), and daily wound dressings. The mean foot ulcer surface area decreased from 46.88 +/- 9.28 mm(2) to 35.09 +/- 4.09 mm(2) in the experimental group (p = 0.006) and from 46.62 +/- 10.03 mm(2) to 42.89 +/- 8.1 mm(2) in the control group (p = 0.01). After treatment, the experimental group significantly improved in measures of foot ulcer surface area compared with the control group (p = 0.024). VCT enhances diabetic foot ulcer healing when combined with appropriate wound care.

  20. Common clinical features of diabetic foot ulcers: perspectives from a developing nation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbera, Okeoghene A; Osa, Eregie; Edo, Andrew; Chukwum, Ekebegh

    2008-06-01

    Foot ulceration is a prominent cause of diabetes mellitus morbidity and mortality in developing countries. This is an observational study in which 47 consecutive diabetes mellitus patients with foot ulcers were studied over a 2-year period. Each patient's medical history, physical examination findings, and hematological and radiological features were documented. The mean age of the patients was 56 (11) years. The majority of the patients (40, 85%) had type 2 diabetes mellitus; 25% of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus were diagnosed when they presented with foot ulceration. Grades 2 and 3 Wagner lesions were the most frequently noted grades of foot ulceration. The risk factors/precipitants of foot ulceration included neuropathy, vasculopathy, spontaneous blisters, walking unshoed, and wearing inadequate shoes. Prominent hematologic abnormalities included anemia and leucocytosis. Diabetes mellitus foot ulceration often occurs in middle-aged Nigerians with diabetes mellitus, and this diabetes mellitus complication may be present at diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Subcutaneous emphysema, osteolysis, and soft tissue swelling are often documented radiological features of DFU in our patients.

  1. Treatment of a non-healing diabetic foot ulcer with platelet-rich plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak H Suresh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lower extremity ulcers and amputations are an increasing problem among individuals with diabetes. Among diabetes mellitus-related complications, foot ulceration is the most common, affecting approximately 15% of diabetic patients during their lifetime. The pathogenesis of diabetic ulcer is peripheral sensory neuropathy, calluses, oedema and peripheral vascular disease. Diabetic ulcer is managed by adequate control of infections and blood sugar levels, surgical debridement with various dressings and off loading of the foot from pressure. In spite of these standard measures, some recalcitrant non-healing ulcers need additional growth factors for healing. Autologous platelet-rich plasma is easy and cost-effective method in treating diabetic ulcers as it provides necessary growth factors which enhance healing.

  2. Treatment of a non-healing diabetic foot ulcer with platelet-rich plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Deepak H; Suryanarayan, Shwetha; Sarvajnamurthy, Sacchidanand; Puvvadi, Srikanth

    2014-01-01

    Lower extremity ulcers and amputations are an increasing problem among individuals with diabetes. Among diabetes mellitus-related complications, foot ulceration is the most common, affecting approximately 15% of diabetic patients during their lifetime. The pathogenesis of diabetic ulcer is peripheral sensory neuropathy, calluses, oedema and peripheral vascular disease. Diabetic ulcer is managed by adequate control of infections and blood sugar levels, surgical debridement with various dressings and off loading of the foot from pressure. In spite of these standard measures, some recalcitrant non-healing ulcers need additional growth factors for healing. Autologous platelet-rich plasma is easy and cost-effective method in treating diabetic ulcers as it provides necessary growth factors which enhance healing.

  3. Collagen-based wound dressings for the treatment of diabetes-related foot ulcers: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holmes C

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Crystal Holmes,1 James S Wrobel,1 Mark P MacEachern,2 Blaise R Boles31Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, 2A Alfred Taubman Health Sciences Library, University of Michigan, 3Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USABackground: Diabetic foot ulcers are a major source of morbidity, limb loss, and mortality. A prolonged inflammatory response, extracellular matrix degradation irregularities, and increased bacteria presence have all been hypothesized as major contributing factors in the delayed healing of diabetic wounds. Collagen components such as fibroblast and keratinocytes are fundamental to the process of wound healing and skin formation. Wound dressings that contain collagen products create a biological scaffold matrix that supports the regulation of extracellular components and promotes wound healing.Methods: A systematic review of studies reporting collagen wound dressings used in the treatment of Diabetic foot ulcers was conducted. Comprehensive searches were run in Ovid MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, and ISI Web of Science to capture citations pertaining to the use of collagen wound dressings in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. The searches were limited to human studies reported in English.Results: Using our search strategy, 26 papers were discussed, and included 13 randomized designs, twelve prospective cohorts, and one retrospective cohort, representing 2386 patients with diabetic foot ulcers. Our design was not a formal meta-analysis. In those studies where complete epithelialization, 58% of collagen-treated wounds completely healed (weighted mean 67%. Only 23% of studies reported control group healing with 29% healing (weighted mean 11% described for controls.Conclusion: Collagen- based wound dressings can be an effective tool in the healing of diabetic foot wounds. The current studies show an overall increase in healing rates despite

  4. Implementation of foot thermometry plus mHealth to prevent diabetic foot ulcers: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazo-Porras, Maria; Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio; Sacksteder, Katherine A; Gilman, Robert H; Malaga, German; Armstrong, David G; Miranda, J Jaime

    2016-04-19

    Diabetic foot neuropathy (DFN) is one of the most important complications of diabetes mellitus; its early diagnosis and intervention can prevent foot ulcers and the need for amputation. Thermometry, measuring the temperature of the feet, is a promising emerging modality for diabetic foot ulcer prevention. However, patient compliance with at-home monitoring is concerning. Delivering messages to remind patients to perform thermometry and foot care might be helpful to guarantee regular foot monitoring. This trial was designed to compare the incidence of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) between participants who receive thermometry alone and those who receive thermometry as well as mHealth (SMS and voice messaging) over a year-long study period. This is an evaluator-blinded, randomized, 12-month trial. Individuals with a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus, aged between 18-80 years, having a present dorsalis pedis pulse in both feet, are in risk group 2 or 3 using the diabetic foot risk classification system (as specified by the International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot), have an operating cell phone or a caregiver with an operating cell phone, and have the ability to provide informed consent will be eligible to participate in the study. Recruitment will be performed in diabetes outpatient clinics at two Ministry of Health tertiary hospitals in Lima, Peru. participants in both groups will receive education about foot care at the beginning of the study and they will be provided with a thermometry device (TempStat™). TempStat™ is a tool that captures a thermal image of the feet, which, depending on the temperature of the feet, shows different colors. In this study, if a participant notes a single yellow image or variance between one foot and the contralateral foot, they will be prompted to notify a nurse to evaluate their activity within the previous 2 weeks and make appropriate recommendations. In addition to thermometry, participants in the intervention arm

  5. Risk factors for occurrence and recurrence of diabetic foot ulcers among Iraqi diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer I. Mohammed

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There are a few studies that discuss the medical causes for diabetic foot (DF ulcerations in Iraq, one of them in Wasit province. The aim of our study was to analyze the medical, therapeutic, and patient risk factors for developing DF ulcerations among diabetic patients in Baghdad, Iraq.

  6. Diabetic foot ulcer--A review on pathophysiology, classification and microbial etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Saba; Zubair, Mohammad; Ahmad, Jamal

    2015-01-01

    As the prevalence of diabetes is increasing globally, secondary complications associated to this endocrinal disorder are also ascending. Diabetic foot ulcers are potentially modifying complications. Disruption of harmony in glucose homeostasis causes hyperglycemic status, results in activation of certain metabolic pathways which in their abnormal state subsequently leads to development of vascular insufficiency, nerve damages headed by ulceration in lower extremity due to plantar pressures and foot deformity. Insult to foot caused by trauma at the affected site goes unnoticeable to patient due to loss of sensation. Among the above mention causes, resistance to infection is also considered as chief modulator of pathophysiological image of diabetic foot lesions. Healing as well as non-healing nature of ulcer relies upon the wound microbial communities and the extent of their pathogenicity. A validated classification system of foot ulcer is primarily necessary for clinicians in management of diabetic foot problems. Another aspect which needs management is proper identification of causative pathogen causing infection. The way of approaches presently employed in the diagnosis for treatment of foot ulcer colonized by different microbes is conventional techniques. Conventional diagnostic methods are widely acceptable since decades. But in recent years newly invented molecular techniques are exploring the use of 16S ribosomal regions specific to prokaryotes in bacterial identification and quantification. Molecular techniques would be a better choice if engaged, in finding the specific species harboring the wound.

  7. Neuropathic foot ulcer prevention in diabetic American Indians with hallux limitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannels, E

    1989-09-01

    Infected neuropathic ulcerations are the leading cause of diabetes-related partial foot amputations at the Phoenix Indian Medical Center. Ten hallucal ulcerations in seven American Indian patients with hallux limitus were resolved by local wound care and partial first metatarsophalangeal joint resection. The average length of postsurgical follow-up care was 28.8 months. There have been no recurrences of the plantar hallux ulcerations in any of the patients.

  8. Fibrinogen: A Marker in Predicting Diabetic Foot Ulcer Severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. H. Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To examine whether fibrinogen levels are a valuable biomarker for assessing disease severity and monitoring disease progression in patients with diabetic foot ulcer (DFU. Methods. A retrospective study was designed to examine the utility of fibrinogen in estimating disease severity in patients with DFU admitted to our hospital between January 2015 and January 2016. In total, 152 patients with DFU were enrolled in the study group, and 52 age and gender matched people with diabetes but no DFU were included as the control group. DFU severity was assessed using Wagner criteria. Results. Patients with DFU were divided into 2 subgroups based on the Wagner criteria. Mean fibrinogen values were significantly higher in patients with DFU grade ≧ 3 compared to those with DFU grades 1-2 (5.23 ± 1.37 g/L versus 3.61 ± 1.04 g/L. Using ROC statistic, a cut-off value of 5.13 g/L indicated the possible amputation with a sensitivity of 81.8% and a specificity of 78.9% (positive predictive value [PPV] 78.6%, negative predictive value [89.0%]. Fibrinogen values were found to be correlated with CRP levels, neutrophil, and WBC count. Conclusions. Fibrinogen levels might be a valuable tool for assessing the disease severity and monitoring the disease progression in patients with DFU.

  9. Pervasive Home Care - Technological support for treatment of diabetic foot ulcers at home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon Bo

    2006-01-01

    of the patient in collaboration with patient and home care clinicians. My main research method has been qualitative analysis of the empirical results generated during an experimental project using Participatory Design (PD) to investigate potential futures in the treatment of patients with diabetic foot ulcers...... quality in the treatment and managing of long-term conditions such as diabetic foot ulcers....... ideas for pervasive sensors in the home are not targeting an immediate need when dealing with diabetic ulcers and that clinical research is required to investigate whether technology could have an impact. To the telemedical society I contribute with the feasibility study of a setup consisting of mobile...

  10. A Comparative Study Between Total Contact Cast and Pressure-Relieving Ankle Foot Orthosis in Diabetic Neuropathic Foot Ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Partha Pratim; Ray, Sayantan; Biswas, Dibakar; Baidya, Arjun; Bhattacharjee, Rana; Mukhopadhyay, Pradip; Ghosh, Sujoy; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Chowdhury, Subhankar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Off-loading of the ulcer area is extremely important for the healing of plantar ulcers. Off-loading with total contact cast (TCC) may be superior to other off-loading strategies studied so far, but practical limitations can dissuade clinicians from using this modality. This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of TCC compared with that of a pressure-relieving ankle foot orthosis (PRAFO) in healing of diabetic neuropathic foot ulcers and their effect on gait parameters. Methods: Thirty adult diabetic patients attending the foot clinic with neuropathic plantar ulcers irrespective of sex, age, duration and type of diabetes were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 off-loading modalities (TCC and PRAFO). Main outcome measures were ulcer healing after 4 weeks of randomization and effect of each of the modalities on various gait parameters. Results: The percentage reduction of the ulcer surface area at 4 weeks from baseline was 75.75 ± 9.25 with TCC and 34.72 ± 13.07 with PRAFO, which was significantly different (P < .001). The results of this study however, showed that most of the gait parameters were better with PRAFO than with TCC. Conclusions: This study comprehensively evaluated the well known advantages and disadvantages of a removable (PRAFO) and a nonremovable device (TCC) in the treatment of diabetic neuropathic foot ulcer. Further studies are needed involving larger subjects and using 3D gait analysis to collect more accurate data on gait parameters and wound healing with different off-loading devices. PMID:25452635

  11. A Prophage in Diabetic Foot Ulcer-Colonizing Staphylococcus aureus Impairs Invasiveness by Limiting Intracellular Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Dunyach-Rémy, Catherine; Sapin, Anaïs; Messad, Nourredine; Trouillet-Assant, Sophie; Dupieux, Céline; Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Laurent, Frédéric

    2016-11-15

    The mechanisms that drive the transition from commensality to invasiveness in Staphylococcus aureus are poorly understood. We recently reported that >50% of S. aureus isolates from uninfected diabetic foot ulcers in French patients harbor a prophage, ROSA-like, that is absent from invasive isolates from diabetic foot infections, including osteomyelitis. Here we show that the ROSA-like insertion abolishes the ability of S. aureus to replicate within osteoblasts, the bone-forming cells, greatly reducing damage to infected cells. These results unravel an important mechanism by which particular S. aureus strains are maintained in a commensal state in diabetic foot ulcers.

  12. Effectiveness of Heberprot P for Diabetic Foot Ulcer in a Health Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grisell Mariela Mass Basulto

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: many papers on the effectiveness of Heberprot P in granulation and healing of diabetic foot ulcer in outpatient settings have been published, but very few stem from Primary Health Care. Objective: to evaluate the therapeutic effectiveness of Herberprot P in patients with diabetic foot ulcer. Methods: a descriptive, case series study was conducted in 15 patients with diabetic foot treated with Herberprot P in the Area IV Community Teaching Polyclinic from January to December 2012. Variables analyzed were age, sex, clinical classification of the disease and classification and evolution of the lesion. Results: diabetic foot ulcer was more frequent in patients aged 60-69 years, predominantly females. Most patients were diagnosed with neuroinfectious diabetic foot, and the most frequent lesion was deep ulcer, developed by 9 patients. Complete healing was observed in 11 patients, 6 of them in a period of 20-30 days. Conclusion: results show, and especially confirm the effectiveness of Heberprot P in the treatment of patients with diabetic foot ulcer in Primary Health Care.

  13. The role of procalcitonin as a marker of diabetic foot ulcer infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massara, Mafalda; De Caridi, Giovanni; Serra, Raffaele; Barillà, David; Cutrupi, Andrea; Volpe, Alberto; Cutrupi, Francesco; Alberti, Antonino; Volpe, Pietro

    2017-02-01

    Foot ulcers are frequent in diabetic patients and are responsible for 85% of amputations, especially in the presence of infection. The diagnosis of diabetic foot ulcer infection is essentially based on clinical evaluation, but laboratory parameters such as erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), white blood count (WBC), C-reactive protein (CRP) and, more recently, procalcitonin (PCT) could aid the diagnosis, especially when clinical signs are misleading. Fifteen diabetic patients with infected foot ulcers were admitted to our department and were compared with an additional group of patients with non-infected diabetic foot ulcers (NIDFUs). Blood samples were collected from all patients in order to evaluate laboratory markers. In the current study, the diagnostic accuracy of PCT serum levels was evaluated in comparison with other inflammatory markers such as CRP, ESR and WBC as an indicator to make the distinction between infected diabetic foot ulcers (IDFUs) and NIDFUs. CRP, WBC, ESR and especially PCT measurements represent effective biomarkers in the diagnosis of foot infections in diabetic patients particularly when clinical signs are misleading.

  14. Effect of intensive nursing education on the prevention of diabetic foot ulceration among patients with high-risk diabetic foot: a follow-up analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Meng; Yang, Chuan; Lin, Diao Zhu; Xiao, Hui Sheng; Mai, Li Fang; Guo, Yi Chen; Yan, Li

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the study was to discuss the effect of intensive nursing education on the prevention of diabetic foot ulceration among patients at high risk for diabetic foot. One hundred eighty-five diabetes patients at high risk for foot diseases were enrolled in this study and provided with intensive nursing education, including individualized education about diabetes mellitus and diabetic foot diseases, instruction in podiatric care (the right way of washing the foot, the care of foot skin, appropriate choice of shoes and socks, intense examinations and records of feet by patients themselves every day, and the assistant management of calluses). Study subjects were followed up for 2 years. Once the foot ulceration developed, the inducing factors of foot ulceration were inquired about, the ulcers were evaluated, and the incidence of foot ulceration was analyzed before and after the intensive nursing education according to self-paired data. Results showed there were highly statistically significant improvements in the intensive treatment group compared with the control group in plasma glucose, blood pressure, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. More important is that intensive nursing education helps to prevent diabetic foot ulceration and to decrease the rate of amputation among patients at high risk for diabetic foot.

  15. Topical Administration of Pirfenidone Increases Healing of Chronic Diabetic Foot Ulcers: A Randomized Crossover Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Janka-Zires

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Only 30 percent of chronic diabetic foot ulcers heal after 20 weeks of standard treatment. Pirfenidone is a drug with biological, anti-inflammatory, and antifibrotic effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of topical pirfenidone added to conventional treatment in noninfected chronic diabetic foot ulcers. This was a randomized crossover study. Group 1 received topical pirfenidone plus conventional treatment for 8 weeks; after this period, they were switched to receive conventional treatment only for 8 more weeks. In group 2, the order of the treatments was the opposite. The end points were complete ulcer healing and size reduction. Final data were obtained from 35 ulcers in 24 patients. Fifty-two percent of ulcers treated with pirfenidone healed before 8 weeks versus 14.3% treated with conventional treatment only (P=0.025. Between 8 and 16 weeks, 30.8% ulcers that received pirfenidone healed versus 0% with conventional treatment (P=0.081. By week 8, the reduction in ulcer size was 100% [73–100] with pirfenidone versus 57.5% with conventional treatment [28.9–74] (P=0.011. By week 16, the reduction was 93% [42.7–100] with pirfenidone and 21.8% [8–77.5] with conventional treatment (P=0.050. The addition of topical pirfenidone to conventional treatment significantly improves the healing of chronic diabetic noninfected foot ulcers.

  16. Topical Administration of Pirfenidone Increases Healing of Chronic Diabetic Foot Ulcers: A Randomized Crossover Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janka-Zires, Marcela; Almeda-Valdes, Paloma; Uribe-Wiechers, Ana Cecilia; Juárez-Comboni, Sonia Citlali; López-Gutiérrez, Joel; Escobar-Jiménez, Jarod Jazek; Gómez-Pérez, Francisco J

    2016-01-01

    Only 30 percent of chronic diabetic foot ulcers heal after 20 weeks of standard treatment. Pirfenidone is a drug with biological, anti-inflammatory, and antifibrotic effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of topical pirfenidone added to conventional treatment in noninfected chronic diabetic foot ulcers. This was a randomized crossover study. Group 1 received topical pirfenidone plus conventional treatment for 8 weeks; after this period, they were switched to receive conventional treatment only for 8 more weeks. In group 2, the order of the treatments was the opposite. The end points were complete ulcer healing and size reduction. Final data were obtained from 35 ulcers in 24 patients. Fifty-two percent of ulcers treated with pirfenidone healed before 8 weeks versus 14.3% treated with conventional treatment only (P = 0.025). Between 8 and 16 weeks, 30.8% ulcers that received pirfenidone healed versus 0% with conventional treatment (P = 0.081). By week 8, the reduction in ulcer size was 100% [73-100] with pirfenidone versus 57.5% with conventional treatment [28.9-74] (P = 0.011). By week 16, the reduction was 93% [42.7-100] with pirfenidone and 21.8% [8-77.5] with conventional treatment (P = 0.050). The addition of topical pirfenidone to conventional treatment significantly improves the healing of chronic diabetic noninfected foot ulcers.

  17. Topical Administration of Pirfenidone Increases Healing of Chronic Diabetic Foot Ulcers: A Randomized Crossover Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janka-Zires, Marcela; Uribe-Wiechers, Ana Cecilia; Juárez-Comboni, Sonia Citlali; López-Gutiérrez, Joel; Escobar-Jiménez, Jarod Jazek; Gómez-Pérez, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Only 30 percent of chronic diabetic foot ulcers heal after 20 weeks of standard treatment. Pirfenidone is a drug with biological, anti-inflammatory, and antifibrotic effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of topical pirfenidone added to conventional treatment in noninfected chronic diabetic foot ulcers. This was a randomized crossover study. Group 1 received topical pirfenidone plus conventional treatment for 8 weeks; after this period, they were switched to receive conventional treatment only for 8 more weeks. In group 2, the order of the treatments was the opposite. The end points were complete ulcer healing and size reduction. Final data were obtained from 35 ulcers in 24 patients. Fifty-two percent of ulcers treated with pirfenidone healed before 8 weeks versus 14.3% treated with conventional treatment only (P = 0.025). Between 8 and 16 weeks, 30.8% ulcers that received pirfenidone healed versus 0% with conventional treatment (P = 0.081). By week 8, the reduction in ulcer size was 100% [73–100] with pirfenidone versus 57.5% with conventional treatment [28.9–74] (P = 0.011). By week 16, the reduction was 93% [42.7–100] with pirfenidone and 21.8% [8–77.5] with conventional treatment (P = 0.050). The addition of topical pirfenidone to conventional treatment significantly improves the healing of chronic diabetic noninfected foot ulcers. PMID:27478849

  18. Is simulation training effective in increasing podiatrists' confidence in foot ulcer management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Foot ulcers are a frequent reason for diabetes-related hospitalisation. Clinical training is known to have a beneficial impact on foot ulcer outcomes. Clinical training using simulation techniques has rarely been used in the management of diabetes-related foot complications or chronic wounds. Simulation can be defined as a device or environment that attempts to replicate the real world. The few non-web-based foot-related simulation courses have focused solely on training for a single skill or "part task" (for example, practicing ingrown toenail procedures on models). This pilot study aimed to primarily investigate the effect of a training program using multiple methods of simulation on participants' clinical confidence in the management of foot ulcers. Methods Sixteen podiatrists participated in a two-day Foot Ulcer Simulation Training (FUST) course. The course included pre-requisite web-based learning modules, practicing individual foot ulcer management part tasks (for example, debriding a model foot ulcer), and participating in replicated clinical consultation scenarios (for example, treating a standardised patient (actor) with a model foot ulcer). The primary outcome measure of the course was participants' pre- and post completion of confidence surveys, using a five-point Likert scale (1 = Unacceptable-5 = Proficient). Participants' knowledge, satisfaction and their perception of the relevance and fidelity (realism) of a range of course elements were also investigated. Parametric statistics were used to analyse the data. Pearson's r was used for correlation, ANOVA for testing the differences between groups, and a paired-sample t-test to determine the significance between pre- and post-workshop scores. A minimum significance level of p < 0.05 was used. Results An overall 42% improvement in clinical confidence was observed following completion of FUST (mean scores 3.10 compared to 4.40, p < 0.05). The lack of an overall significant change in knowledge

  19. Is simulation training effective in increasing podiatrists' confidence in foot ulcer management?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Régo Patricia M

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foot ulcers are a frequent reason for diabetes-related hospitalisation. Clinical training is known to have a beneficial impact on foot ulcer outcomes. Clinical training using simulation techniques has rarely been used in the management of diabetes-related foot complications or chronic wounds. Simulation can be defined as a device or environment that attempts to replicate the real world. The few non-web-based foot-related simulation courses have focused solely on training for a single skill or "part task" (for example, practicing ingrown toenail procedures on models. This pilot study aimed to primarily investigate the effect of a training program using multiple methods of simulation on participants' clinical confidence in the management of foot ulcers. Methods Sixteen podiatrists participated in a two-day Foot Ulcer Simulation Training (FUST course. The course included pre-requisite web-based learning modules, practicing individual foot ulcer management part tasks (for example, debriding a model foot ulcer, and participating in replicated clinical consultation scenarios (for example, treating a standardised patient (actor with a model foot ulcer. The primary outcome measure of the course was participants' pre- and post completion of confidence surveys, using a five-point Likert scale (1 = Unacceptable-5 = Proficient. Participants' knowledge, satisfaction and their perception of the relevance and fidelity (realism of a range of course elements were also investigated. Parametric statistics were used to analyse the data. Pearson's r was used for correlation, ANOVA for testing the differences between groups, and a paired-sample t-test to determine the significance between pre- and post-workshop scores. A minimum significance level of p Results An overall 42% improvement in clinical confidence was observed following completion of FUST (mean scores 3.10 compared to 4.40, p Conclusions This pilot study suggests simulation training

  20. History of Foot Ulcer Increases Mortality Among Individuals With Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, Marjolein M.; Tell, Grethe S.; Riise, Trond; Hanestad, Berit R.; Østbye, Truls; Graue, Marit; Midthjell, Kristian

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare mortality rates for individuals with diabetes with and without a history of foot ulcer (HFU) and with that for the nondiabetic population. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This population-based study included 155 diabetic individuals with an HFU, 1,339 diabetic individuals without an HFU, and 63,632 nondiabetic individuals who were all followed for 10 years with mortality as the end point. RESULTS During the follow-up period, a total of 49.0% of diabetic individuals with an HFU died, compared with 35.2% of diabetic individuals without an HFU and 10.5% of those without diabetes. In Cox regression analyses adjusted for age, sex, education, current smoking, and waist circumference, having an HFU was associated with more than a twofold (2.29 [95% CI 1.82–2.88]) hazard risk for mortality compared with that of the nondiabetic group. In corresponding analyses comparing diabetic individuals with and without an HFU, an HFU was associated with 47% increased mortality (1.47 [1.14–1.89]). Significant covariates were older age, male sex, and current smoking. After inclusion of A1C, insulin use, microalbuminuria, cardiovascular disease, and depression scores in the model, each was significantly related to life expectancy. CONCLUSIONS AN HFU increased mortality risk among community-dwelling adults and elderly individuals with diabetes. The excess risk persisted after adjustment for comorbidity and depression scores, indicating that close clinical monitoring might be warranted among individuals with an HFU, who may be particularly vulnerable to adverse outcomes. PMID:19729524

  1. Ostectomy and Medial Plantar Artery Flap Reconstruction for Charcot Foot Ulceration Involving the Midfoot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tomoya; Ichioka, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Charcot foot is a serious complication of diabetes, characterized by deformity and overlying ulceration. The condition most commonly affects the midfoot. However, little information is available on the use of a medial plantar artery flap to treat diabetic midfoot ulceration. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the versatility of ostectomy and medial plantar flap reconstruction for midfoot plantar ulceration associated with rocker-bottom deformity secondary to Charcot foot. Four patients underwent ostectomy and medial plantar flap reconstruction. Before flap reconstruction, the devitalized soft tissues and bone were radically resected. After the infection had been controlled, the ulcerated portion was minimally excised, and the bony prominence underlying the ulcer was removed. A medial plantar artery flap was applied to the ulcer. The donor site was covered with a split-thickness skin graft or artificial dermis. In all patients, the ulcers healed and independent ambulation was achieved. However, 1 patient experienced ulcer recurrence, and subsequent infection necessitated a major amputation. Limb salvage is challenging in the setting of deformity and intractable plantar ulceration. The advantages of medial plantar artery flap reconstruction are that tissues with a rich blood supply are used to cover the exposed bone, and the flap can withstand the pressure and shear stress of the patient's body weight. However, a dominant artery in the foot is sacrificed. Therefore, the patency of the dorsalis pedis artery must be confirmed in every patient. The results of the present study have demonstrated that a medial plantar artery can be an effective alternative for diabetic patients with a plantar ulcer secondary to Charcot foot.

  2. Diabetic foot disease:From the evaluation of the “foot at risk” to the novel diabetic ulcer treatment modalities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Noha; Amin; John; Doupis

    2016-01-01

    The burden of diabetic foot disease(DFD) is expected to increase in the future. The incidence of DFD is still rising due to the high prevalence of DFD predisposing factors. DFD is multifactorial in nature; however most of the diabetic foot amputations are preceded by foot ulceration. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy(DPN) is a major risk factor for foot ulceration. DPN leads to loss of protective sensation resulting in continuous unconscious traumas. Patient education and detection of high risk foot are essential for the prevention of foot ulceration and amputation. Proper assessment of the diabetic foot ulceration and appropriate management ensure better prognosis. Management is based on revascularization procedures, wound debridement, treatment of infection and ulcer offloading. Management and type of dressing applied are tailored according to the type of wound and the foot condition. The scope of this review paper is to describe the diabetic foot syndrome starting from the evaluation of the foot at risk for ulceration, up to the new treatment modalities.

  3. A review of becaplermin gel in the treatment of diabetic neuropathic foot ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C Fang

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Robert C Fang, Robert D GalianoDivision of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Wound Healing Research Laboratory, Department of Surgery, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Diabetic neuropathic foot ulcers represent a serious health care burden to patients and to society. While the management of chronic diabetic foot ulcers has improved in recent years, it remains a frustrating problem for a variety of clinicians. This review examines the scientific underpinnings supporting the use of becaplermin (Regranex®; Ortho-McNeil Pharmaceutical, Raritan, NJ, or recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor (rhPDGF-BB, in diabetic forefoot wounds. An emphasis is placed upon proper medical and surgical care of diabetic foot wounds, as multiple studies have demonstrated that the success of this growth factor in accelerating healing is ultimately dependent on proper ulcer care. A focus on the cost-effectiveness of this form of therapy in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers is also outlined.Keywords: becaplermin, diabetes, foot ulcer, growth factor

  4. Low-level laser therapy and Calendula officinalis in repairing diabetic foot ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Flávia Machado de Carvalho

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effects of low-level laser therapy isolated and associated with Calendula officinalis oil in treating diabetic foot ulcers. METHOD An experimental, randomized, controlled, prospective, interventional clinical case study using a quantitative approach. The sample consisted of 32 diabetic patients of both genders. Participants were randomly divided into four groups. Doppler Ultrasound evaluation of the Ankle-Brachial Index, brief pain inventory and analog pain scale were performed at baseline and after 30 days. RESULTS Reduced pain was observed in the Low-level laser therapy and Low-level laser therapy associated with Essential Fatty Acids groups (p<0.01. Regarding the Ankle-Brachial Index and Doppler Ultrasound, all groups remained stable. By analyzing lesion area reduction, Low-level laser therapy associated with Essential fatty acids group showed a significance of p=0.0032, and the Low-level laser therapy group showed p=0.0428. CONCLUSION Low-level laser therapy, performed alone or associated with the Calendula officinalis oil was effective in relieving pain and accelerating the tissue repair process of diabetic foot.

  5. Profile, Bacteriology, and Risk Factors for Foot Ulcers among Diabetics in a Tertiary Hospital in Calabar, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akaninyene Asuquo Otu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic foot disease is a major medical, social, and economic problem. This retrospective study assessed the profile of diabetes mellitus patients with foot ulcers in the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital (UCTH, Nigeria. Admission records of all patients admitted unto the medical wards of UCTH over a 5 year period were analysed. The records of diabetic patients were retrieved. Data on patient characteristics and possible risk factors for diabetes mellitus foot ulcers was extracted. Of the 3,882 patients admitted, 297 (7% were on account of complications of diabetes mellitus. Foot ulcers accounted for 63 (21.2% of all diabetic admissions. The elderly constituted the majority of patients admitted with foot ulcers. The average duration of stay of diabetics with foot ulcers was 38.5 days. Diabetics admitted for other conditions had average duration of admission of 15.8 days. Staphylococcus aureus was the commonest organism isolated from swabs of foot ulcers. Most of the organisms identified from ulcer swab cultures were sensitive to quinolones and resistant to penicillins. These diabetic foot ulcers were significantly associated with peripheral sensory neuropathy, peripheral vascular disease, intermittent claudication, and walking barefoot. An effective diabetes foot programme is required to address these risk factors and reverse the current trend.

  6. Spectrum of microbial flora in diabetic foot ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bansal Ekta

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A prospective study was carried out on patients with diabetic foot lesions to determine their clinical characteristics, the spectrum of aerobic microbial flora and to assess their comparative in vitro susceptibility to the commonly used antibiotics. A total of 157 organisms (143 bacteria and 14 fungi were isolated and an average of 1.52 isolates per case was reported. Polymicrobial infection was found in 35% of the patients. In this study, Pseudomonas aeruginosa among the gram-negative (22% and Staphylococcus aureus among the gram-positive (19% were the predominantly isolated organisms, while Candida was the most predominantly isolated fungus. Antimicrobial sensitivity pattern of the isolates is discussed in detail. There was a linear increase in the prevalence of organisms with increase in Wagner′s grade. Neuropathy (76% and peripheral vascular disease (57.28% was a common feature among the patients. Poor glycemic control was found in 67% of the patients. Awareness about lower limb complications of diabetes was very low (23% among the patients

  7. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF FIBRONECTIN GENE EXPRESSION IN TISSUES FROM HYPERTROPHIC SCARS AND DIABETIC FOOT ULCERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付小兵; 杨银辉; 孙同柱; 王亚平; 盛志勇

    2002-01-01

    Objective.To explore the expression characteristic of fibronectin gene in hypertrophic scars and diabetic ulcer tissues.Methods.The biopsies from normal skins,hypertrophic scars and diabetic foot ulcers were taken.The technique of quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to evaluate the gene expression of fibronectin in the above biopsies.Results.Fibronectin gene expression was enhanced in hypertrophic scars and decreased in diabetic foot ulcers compared with that in normal skins.Quantitative comparison showed about 2 fold increase of fibronectin mRNA level in hypertrophic scars and about 3 fold decrease of fibronectin mRNA level in diabetic ulcers as compared with that in normal skins.Conclusions.Fibronectin gene expression is influenced by the tissue environment.Different expression and synthesis of fibronectin may cause different outcomes in wound healing.

  8. Effects of intravenous Semelil (ANGIPARSTM on diabetic foot ulcers healing: A multicenter clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larijani B

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Some diabetic foot ulcers, which are notoriously difficult to cure, are one of the most common health problems in diabetic patients .There are several surgical and medical options which already have been introduced for treatment of diabetic foot ulcers, so some patient will require amputation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of intravenous Semelil (ANGIPARSTM, a naive herbal extract to accelerate healing of diabetic foot ulcers. A multi-centric randomized controlled trial was conducted to evaluate intravenous Semelil for healing of diabetic foot ulcers. Sixteen diabetic patients were treated with intravenous Semelil, and nine other patients were treated with placebo as control group. Both groups were otherwise treated by wound debridement and irrigation with normal saline solution, systemic antibiotic therapy and daily wound dressing. Before and after intervention, the foot ulcer surface area was measured, by digital photography, mapping and planimetry. After 4 weeks, the mean foot ulcer surface area decreased from 479.93±379.75 mm2 to 198.93±143.75 mm2 in the intervention group (p = 0.000 and from 766.22±960.50 mm2 to 689.11±846.74 mm2 in the control group (p = 0.076. Average wound closure in the treatment group was significantly greater than placebo group (64% vs. 25%, p= 0.015. This herbal extract by intravenous rout in combination with conventional therapy is more effective than conventional therapy by itself probably without side effect. However, further studies are required in the future to confirm these results in larger population.

  9. Radix Astragali and Radix Rehmanniae, the principal components of two antidiabetic foot ulcer herbal formulae, elicit viability-promoting effects on primary fibroblasts cultured from diabetic foot ulcer tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, T W; Chan, Y W; Lau, C P; Lau, K M; Lau, C B S; Fung, K P; Leung, P C; Ho, Y Y

    2009-06-01

    Over 194 million people suffer from diabetes worldwide. The improper control of diabetes may result in diabetic foot ulcer or even amputation. Herbal medicine provides a means for treating diabetic foot ulcers for a large population in developing countries. The wound healing-enhancing activities of the principal herbs, Radix Astragali (RA) and Radix Rehmanniae (RR) in two clinically efficacious Chinese herbal formulae were studied in primary fibroblasts from diabetic foot ulcer patients. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay showed that RA and RR significantly enhanced the viability of fibroblasts isolated from foot ulcers of diabetic patients, even from those with no response to insulin treatment. The results in this study indicate that fibroblast viability enhancement effects of RA and RR likely underlie the healing effects of F1 and F2 in diabetic foot ulcers. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. A pilot study evaluating non-contact low-frequency ultrasound and underlying molecular mechanism on diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Min; Hasturk, Hatice; Kantarci, Alpdogan; Gu, Guosheng; Garcia-Lavin, Silvia; Fabbi, Matteo; Park, Nanjin; Hayashi, Hisae; Attala, Khaled; French, Michael A; Driver, Vickie R

    2014-12-01

    Non-contact low-frequency ultrasound (NCLF-US) devices have been increasingly used for the treatment of chronic non-healing wounds. The appropriate dose for NCLF-US is still in debate. The aims of this pilot study were to evaluate the relationship between dose and duration of treatment for subjects with non-healing diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) and to explore the correlation between wound healing and change of cytokine/proteinase/growth factor profile. This was a prospective randomised clinical study designed to evaluate subjects with non-healing DFUs for 5 weeks receiving standard of care and/or NCLF-US treatment. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of the three groups: application of NCLF-US thrice per week (Group 1), NCLF-US once per week (Group 2) and the control (Group 3) that received no NCLF-US. All subjects received standard wound care plus offloading for a total of 4 weeks. Percent area reduction (PAR) of each wound compared with baseline was evaluated weekly. Profiles of cytokines/proteinase/growth factors in wound fluid and biopsied tissue were quantified to explore the correlation between wound healing and cytokines/growth factor expression. Twelve DFU patients, 2 (16·7%) type 1 and 10 (83·3%) type 2 diabetics, with an average age of 58 ± 10 years and a total of 12 foot ulcers were enrolled. Average ulcer duration was 36·44 ± 24·78 weeks and the average ABI was 0·91 ± 0·06. Group 1 showed significant wound area reduction at weeks 3, 4 and 5 compared with baseline, with the greatest PAR, 86% (P diabetic foot ulcers through, at least in part, inhibiting pro-inflammatory cytokines in chronic wound and improving tissue regeneration. Therapeutic application of NFLU, thrice (3) per week, renders the best wound area reduction.

  11. The Efficacy of Jing Wan Hong Ointment for Nerve Injury Diabetic Foot Ulcer and Its Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shumei Jin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Jing Wan Hong ointment contains 30 kinds of Chinese herbs, with functions of activating blood circulation to disperse blood stasis, clearing heat, eliminating dampness, and reducing swelling by detoxification. Therefore, Jing Wan Hong ointment may facilitate the healing of ulcers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and mechanisms of Jing Wan Hong ointment for healing diabetic foot ulceration in Wistar rats induced by streptozotocin and sciatic nerve damage. The results showed that Jing Wan Hong ointment had a marked effect on foot ulcers in diabetic rats induced by initial nerve injury. These effects were manifested by reducing the foot ulcer size and Wagner grade after seven days of treatment. The diabetic rats with foot ulcers were almost healed after 21 days of treatment. Moreover, the mechanisms of this effect seem to be dependent on increased expression of PDGF mRNA, but there was no influence on the expression of TGF-β, VEGF, and FLT-1 mRNA.

  12. Cilostazol prevents foot ulcers in diabetic patients with peripheral vascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Franciscis, Stefano; Gallelli, Luca; Battaglia, Luigi; Molinari, Vincenzo; Montemurro, Rossella; Stillitano, Domenico M; Buffone, Gianluca; Serra, Raffaele

    2015-06-01

    Diabetic patients are at high risk of foot ulcerations that may lead to limb amputations with important socio-economic impact. Peripheral vascular disease may be frequently associated in diabetes mellitus type II with its main symptom, intermittent claudication. Many studies reported the known efficacy of cilostazol in treating vascular claudication. Metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) seems to be a biochemical marker implicated in chronic wounds and in particular in diabetic foot ulcers. Cilostazol appears to have a lowering effect on MMP-9 levels and this may suggest a beneficial effect in order to prevent or retard the onset of foot ulcer in diabetic patients. In our study, two groups of diabetic patients with peripheral vascular disease were divided into two groups according to the presence of claudication in order to receive cilostazol. Group A (31 patients without claudication) were not eligible to receive cilostazol whereas Group B (47 patients with claudication) received cilostazol administration for 24 weeks (100 mg orally twice daily). Median follow up was of 16 months. During the follow up, 4·25% of patients of Group B and 35·48% of patients of Group A (P ulceration. Although further randomised and controlled studies are required cilostazol seems to show beneficial effects for primary prevention of diabetic foot ulcers.

  13. The efficacy of Jing Wan Hong ointment for nerve injury diabetic foot ulcer and its mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shumei; Zhang, Mixia; Gao, Yan; Zhang, Xuebin; Cui, Guangzhi; Zhang, Yanjun

    2014-01-01

    Jing Wan Hong ointment contains 30 kinds of Chinese herbs, with functions of activating blood circulation to disperse blood stasis, clearing heat, eliminating dampness, and reducing swelling by detoxification. Therefore, Jing Wan Hong ointment may facilitate the healing of ulcers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and mechanisms of Jing Wan Hong ointment for healing diabetic foot ulceration in Wistar rats induced by streptozotocin and sciatic nerve damage. The results showed that Jing Wan Hong ointment had a marked effect on foot ulcers in diabetic rats induced by initial nerve injury. These effects were manifested by reducing the foot ulcer size and Wagner grade after seven days of treatment. The diabetic rats with foot ulcers were almost healed after 21 days of treatment. Moreover, the mechanisms of this effect seem to be dependent on increased expression of PDGF mRNA, but there was no influence on the expression of TGF-β, VEGF, and FLT-1 mRNA.

  14. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for monitoring diabetic foot ulcer - A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Suresh; Sujatha, N.; Narayanamurthy, V. B.; Seshadri, V.; Poddar, Richa

    2014-02-01

    Foot ulceration due to diabetes mellitus is a major problem affecting 12-25% of diabetic subjects in their lifetime. An untreated ulcer further gets infected which causes necrosis leading to amputation of lower extremities. Early identification of risk factors and treatment for these chronic wounds would reduce health care costs and improve the quality of life for people with diabetes. Recent clinical investigations have shown that a series of factors including reduced oxygen delivery and disturbed metabolism have been observed on patients with foot ulceration due to diabetes. Also, these factors can impair the wound healing process. Optical techniques based on diffuse reflectance spectroscopy provide characteristic spectral finger prints shed light on tissue oxygenation levels and morphological composition of a tissue. This study deals with the application of diffuse reflectance intensity ratios based on oxyhemoglobin bands (R542/R580), ratios of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin bands (R580/R555), total hemoglobin concentration and hemoglobin oxygen saturation between normal and diabetic foot ulcer sites. Preliminary results obtained are found to be promising indicating the application of reflectance spectroscopy in the assessment of foot ulcer healing.

  15. [The importance of multidisciplinary foot-care services in the management of diabetic patients with peripheral artery disease and diabetic foot ulcers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Xing-Wu; Zhao, Ji-Chun

    2012-09-01

    Diabetic peripheral artery disease and diabetic foot ulcers are leading causes of hospitalization, for patients with diabetes mellitus, and also are the most important causes of amputation of the lower extremity in those patients, which contribute to the increased mortality and cardiovascular death. The incidence of diabetic peripheral artery disease and diabetic foot ulcers shows increasing trend. Diabetic peripheral artery disease and diabetic foot ulcers can be successfully treated only by the multidisciplinary foot-care services which provide more comprehensive and integrated care as compared to ordinary medical team or single specialist. Multidisciplinary foot-care services are provided by the team consist of: diabetologist, diabetes nurse, vascular surgeon, general surgeon, orthopedist, orthopaedic surgeon, podiatrist and orthotist, interventional radiologist and a radiology coordinator, microbiologist, psychologist, educators, shoemaker and rehabilitation team. Contrary to developed countries, multidisciplinary foot-care team has not been constructed in most centres in China. Diabetic education, appropriate foot care, early detection of risk factors of foot ulcers and early intervention are key components in the overall management of diabetic foot disorders and have assumed important roles in programs focused on amputation prevention. Prompt and aggressive treatments of diabetic peripheral artery disease and diabetic foot ulcers can often prevent an exacerbation of the problem and the potential need for amputation, which include correction of biomechanical abnormalities, infection control, serial debridement of ulcers, peripheral revascularization and wound coverage, etc. It is very important to construct a multidisciplinary diabetic foot care team to more effectively improve the survival and prognosis of patients with diabetic peripheral artery disease and diabetic foot ulcers with comprehensive treatments.

  16. A STUDY OF THE BACTERIOLOGICAL PROFILE OF DIABETIC FOOT ULCER AND ANTIBIOTIC SENSITIVITY PATTERN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajila Nalakath

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTI ON: Diabetic foot infection is the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients. Appropriate antibiotic therapy is required to reduce complication. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To study the bacteriological profile of diabetic foot ulcer and antibiotic sensitivity pattern of organisms. MATERIALS AND METHOD S: A retrospective study was conducted in 290 patients presented with diabetic foot ulcer , in KIMS hospital in the year of 2013 . Swab technique was used to collect samples. RESULTS: A total of 372 was isolates obtained from 290 patients. Mono - microbial infection was found to be more than poly - microbial infection. Gram negative bacilli was found to be more prevalent than gram posit ive cocci. The commonest isolate was Pseudomonas (23.7% , followed by klebsiella (21.7%. The commonest gram positive organisms was enterococcus (17.5% , followed by Staphyococcus aureus (16.6%. Pseudomonas showed multidrug resistance. None of the cocci w ere resistant to vancomycin. CONCLUSION: Diabetic foot ulcers are one of the most common cause of hospitalization in diabetic patients , appropriate antibiotic therapy is essential to prevent complications in these patients. Wound infection begin superficia lly , but with delay in treatment and impaired body defense can lead to catastrophic outcome. KEYWORDS: Diabetic Foot Ulcer.

  17. Off-loading the diabetic foot for ulcer prevention and healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.R. Cavanagh; S.A. Bus

    2010-01-01

    Background: Retrospective and prospective studies have shown that elevated plantar pressure is a causative factor in the development of many plantar ulcers in diabetic patients and that ulceration is often a precursor of lower extremity amputation. In this article, we review the evidence that reliev

  18. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy in the treatment of chronic diabetic foot ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, S M; Yderstraede, K B; Rasmussen, B S B

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the efficacy of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) on healing chronic diabetic foot ulcers (DFU). METHOD: Patients with chronic DFUs were randomised (1:1) to receive a series of six ESWT treatments over 3 weeks in combination with standard care or standard care alone...... with those receiving standard care alone at 3 weeks (p=0.044). Ulcer area reduction was 34.5% in the intervention group versus 5.6% in the control group at 7 weeks (p=0.387). Within-group analysis revealed a significant reduction of ulcer area in the intervention group (phealing...... was not demonstrated in the control group (p>0.05) (data tested for trend). CONCLUSION: This randomised study indicates a potential beneficial effect of ESWT on ulcer healing as well as tissue oxygenation. Owing to weaknesses of the study and the fact that ulcer healing was not significantly improved...

  19. Effects of topical Kiwifruit on healing of neuropathic diabetic foot ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Mohajeri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Kiwifruit (Actindia Deliciosa is demonstrated to have antibacterial and pro-angiogenic effects. It also contains proteolytic enzymes (actinidin and ascorbic acid. In this study, the effects of Kiwifruit on neuropathic diabetic foot ulcer healing in clinical settings were evaluated. Materials and Methods: In this randomized clinical trial of 37 patients (17 in experimental and 20 in control groups with neuropathic diabetic foot ulcer were studied in Isfahan-Iran. Patients of the control group received just the standard treatments. In the experimental group, in addition to the standard treatments, ulcers were dressed with pure extract of kiwifruit twice daily for 21 days. The ulcers were examined and evaluated based on macroscopic, microscopic and microbiological status. Pre- and post-interventions, biopsies were taken from the ulcers to perform microbiological and histological studies. Results: Mean reduction in surface area of foot ulcer in the experimental group was significantly higher than the control group (168.11 ± 22.31 vs. 88.80 ± 12.04 mm 2 respectively, P < 0.0001. The amount of collagen and granulation tissues was significantly higher in the experimental groups than the control group (P value < 0.0001. Significantly higher levels of angiogenesis and vascularization were found in the kiwifruit treated patients (P value < 0.0001. No significant antibacterial effect was observed for kiwifruit. Conclusion: Natural compounds in the kiwifruit including protein-dissolving enzymes (Actinidin improved different aspects of the wound healing process. Based on these benefits and safety aspects, we conclude that using kiwifruit is a simple, applicable and effective way for treatment of neuropathic diabetic foot ulcer.

  20. Associated risk factors and management of chronic diabetic foot ulcers exceeding 6 months’ duration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Gubara Musa

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The management of chronic diabetic foot ulcers (DFU poses a great challenge to the treating physician and surgeon. The aim of this study was to identify the risk factors, clinical presentation, and outcomes associated with chronic DFU > 6 months’ duration. Methods: This prospective study was performed in Jabir Abu Eliz Diabetic Centre (JADC, Khartoum, Sudan. A total of 108 patients who had DFU for >6 months were included. Recorded data included patient's demographics, DFU presentation, associated comorbidities, and outcomes. DFU description included size, depth, protective sensation, perfusion, and presence of infection. Comorbidities assessed included eye impairment, renal and heart disease. All patients received necessary local wound care with sharp debridement of any concomitant necrotic and infected tissues and off-loading with appropriate shoe gear and therapeutic devices. Results: The mean age of the studied patients was 56+SD 9 years with a male to female ratio of 3:3.3. The mean duration of DFU was 18±SD 17 months (ranging from 6 to 84 months. Ulcer healing was significantly associated with off-loading, mainly the use of total contact cast (TCC (p=0.013. Non-healing ulcerations were significantly associated with longer duration of the chronic DFU > 12 months (p=0.002, smoking (p=0.000, poor glycemic control as evidenced by an elevated HbA1c (>7%, large size (mean SD 8+4 cm, increased depth (p<0.001, presence of skin callus (p<0.000, impaired limb perfusion (p=0.001, impaired protective sensation as measured by 10 g monofilament (p=0.002, neuroischemia (p=0.002, and Charcot neuroarthropathy (p=0.017. Discussion: Risk factors associated with chronic DFU of > 6 months’ duration included the presentation of an ulcer with increased size and depth, with associated skin callus and neuroischemia, in a diabetic patient with a history of smoking and increased HbA1c >7%. Off-loading mainly with the use of TCC is an effective method

  1. A qualitative study of the key factors in implementing telemedical monitoring of diabetic foot ulcer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, B.S.B.; Jensen, L.K.; Frøkjær, J.

    2015-01-01

    of a telemedical intervention. We posed the following research question: What are the key organizational factors in the implementation of telemedicine in wound care? METHODS: In connection with a randomized controlled trial of telemedical intervention for patients with diabetic foot ulcers in the region...

  2. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Diabetes Patients with Foot Ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamil Selvi Sivanmaliappan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an invasive organism that frequently causes severe tissue damage in diabetic foot ulcers. A major problem in P. aeruginosa infection may be that this pathogen exhibits a high degree of resistance to a broad spectrum of antibiotics. The study aimed to isolate and determine the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of the P. aeruginosa population from diabetes patients with foot ulcers attending tertiary care hospitals in and around Coimbatore and their antimicrobial susceptibility pattern. The study was carried out at the Department of Microbiology, Dr. N.G.P. Arts and Science College, Coimbatore, for a period of one year (June 2006 to April 2007. The present study comprised 270 pus specimens collected from diabetic patients with foot ulcers. All pus samples were subjected to gram staining; bacterial culture and subsequently the antibiotic sensitivity to 15 different antibiotics for the confirmed P. aeruginosa were performed as per the standard procedures. Eighteen strains (14.28% of P. aeruginosa from 270 diabetic foot ulcers were detected. Almost all the strains exhibited a varying degree of resistance to the antibiotics tested. Multidrug resistance for about 8 to 11 antibiotics was observed among the 55.5% of the isolates. Disk diffusion results show 100% resistance to ampicillin, cefoperazone, erythromycin, norfloxacin, and only cefotaxime, ciprofloxacin exhibited greater activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  3. Role of endothelial progenitor cells and inflammatory cytokines in healing of diabetic foot ulcers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Tecilazich

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To evaluate changes in endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs and cytokines in patients with diabetic foot ulceration (DFU in association with wound healing. METHODS: We studied healthy subjects, diabetic patients not at risk of DFU, at risk of DFU and with active DFU. We prospectively followed the DFU patients over a 12-week period. We also investigated similar changes in diabetic rabbit and mouse models of wound healing. RESULTS: All EPC phenotypes except the kinase insert domain receptor (KDR(+CD133(+ were reduced in the at risk and the DFU groups compared to the controls. There were no major EPC differences between the control and not at risk group, and between the at risk and DFU groups. Serum stromal-cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1 and stem cell factor (SCF were increased in DFU patients. DFU patients who healed their ulcers had lower CD34(+KDR(+ count at visits 3 and 4, serum c-reactive protein (CRP and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF at visit 1, interleukin-1 (IL-1 at visits 1 and 4. EPCs tended to be higher in both diabetic animal models when compared to their non-diabetic counterparts both before and ten days after wounding. CONCLUSIONS: Uncomplicated diabetes does not affect EPCs. EPCs are reduced in patients at risk or with DFU while complete wound healing is associated with CD34(+KDR(+ reduction, suggesting possible increased homing. Low baseline CRP, IL-1α and GM-CSF serum levels were associated with complete wound healing and may potentially serve as prognostic markers of DFU healing. No animal model alone is representative of the human condition, indicating the need for multiple experimental models.

  4. Global epidemiology of diabetic foot ulceration: a systematic review and meta-analysis (†).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengzi; Lu, Jing; Jing, Yali; Tang, Sunyinyan; Zhu, Dalong; Bi, Yan

    2017-03-01

    Diabetic foot is a severe public health issue, yet rare studies investigated its global epidemiology. Here we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis through searching PubMed, EMBASE, ISI Web of science, and Cochrane database. We found that that global diabetic foot ulcer prevalence was 6.3% (95%CI: 5.4-7.3%), which was higher in males (4.5%, 95%CI: 3.7-5.2%) than in females (3.5%, 95%CI: 2.8-4.2%), and higher in type 2 diabetic patients (6.4%, 95%CI: 4.6-8.1%) than in type 1 diabetics (5.5%, 95%CI: 3.2-7.7%). North America had the highest prevalence (13.0%, 95%CI: 10.0-15.9%), Oceania had the lowest (3.0%, 95% CI: 0.9-5.0%), and the prevalence in Asia, Europe, and Africa were 5.5% (95%CI: 4.6-6.4%), 5.1% (95%CI: 4.1-6.0%), and 7.2% (95%CI: 5.1-9.3%), respectively. Australia has the lowest (1.5%, 95%CI: 0.7-2.4%) and Belgium has the highest prevalence (16.6%, 95%CI: 10.7-22.4%), followed by Canada (14.8%, 95%CI: 9.4-20.1%) and USA (13.0%, 95%CI: 8.3-17.7%). The patients with diabetic foot ulcer were older, had a lower body mass index, longer diabetic duration, and had more hypertension, diabetic retinopathy, and smoking history than patients without diabetic foot ulceration. Our results provide suggestions for policy makers in deciding preventing strategy of diabetic foot ulceration in the future. Key messages Global prevalence of diabetic foot is 6.3% (95%CI: 5.4-7.3%), and the prevalence in North America, Asia, Europe, Africa and Oceania was 13.0% (95%CI: 10.0-15.9%), 5.5% (95%CI: 4.6-6.4%), 5.1% (95%CI: 4.1-6.0%), 7.2% (95%CI: 5.1-9.3%), and 3.0% (95% CI: 0.9-5.0%). Diabetic foot was more prevalent in males than in females, and more prevalent in type 2 diabetic foot patients than in type 1 diabetic foot patients. The patients with diabetic foot were older, had a lower body mass index, longer diabetic duration, and had more hypertension, diabetic retinopathy, and smoking history than patients without diabetic foot.

  5. Diabetes mellitus and the elderly: special considerations for foot ulcer prevention and care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gils, Carl C; Stark, Lee Ann

    2006-09-01

    The risk of lower extremity amputation in persons with diabetes mellitus increases with advanced age, necessitating clinical vigilance. Individualized and comprehensive prevention efforts are required to address the complicated and diverse nature of the diabetic foot in the elderly patient, including promotion of lifestyle changes to offset diabetes, attention to cognitive deficits and economic limitations, and provision of foot care education and management (eg, emphasizing the need for appropriate foot wear). If an ulcer develops, physiologic and socioeconomic factors may influence its clinical presentation, assessment, diagnosis, and treatment. To help ulcer-related complications and prevent lower leg amputations, clinicians must address diabetes management; the cost of supplies; the importance of offloading, nutrition, and exercise; and challenges inherent to impaired eyesight, dexterity, and ability to self-care. A multidisciplinary approach is recommended. Additional research to enhance understanding of practice parameters in this population is needed to help clinicians manage the increasing numbers of older adults with diabetes mellitus.

  6. Non invasive blood flow assessment in diabetic foot ulcer using laser speckle contrast imaging technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayanthy, A. K.; Sujatha, N.; Reddy, M. Ramasubba; Narayanamoorthy, V. B.

    2014-03-01

    Measuring microcirculatory tissue blood perfusion is of interest for both clinicians and researchers in a wide range of applications and can provide essential information of the progress of treatment of certain diseases which causes either an increased or decreased blood flow. Diabetic ulcer associated with alterations in tissue blood flow is the most common cause of non-traumatic lower extremity amputations. A technique which can detect the onset of ulcer and provide essential information on the progress of the treatment of ulcer would be of great help to the clinicians. A noninvasive, noncontact and whole field laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) technique has been described in this paper which is used to assess the changes in blood flow in diabetic ulcer affected areas of the foot. The blood flow assessment at the wound site can provide critical information on the efficiency and progress of the treatment given to the diabetic ulcer subjects. The technique may also potentially fulfill a significant need in diabetic foot ulcer screening and management.

  7. Factors Associated With Quality of Life in Patients With Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasiriziba

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Diabetic foot ulcer (DFU is a serious and costly complication in diabetes which affects approximately 15% of patients with diabetes and affects their quality of life (QOL. Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors associated with QOL in patients with DFU. Patients and Methods This cross-sectional study was performed on 60 patients (32 males and 28 females hospitalized for DFU, performed through convenience sampling. Data related factors and the QOL questionnaire for patients with DFU were abridged. This questionnaire has 29 questions in six dimensions of enjoying life, physical health, daily activities dependence, negative emotions, concern about wound, and wound caring, which evaluate the QOL in patients with DFU. The scoring method for this tool is five optional Likert. Descriptive and analytic statistical methods were used to analyze the data. Results Of the 60 patients with DFU, 53% were male and 47% female with an average age of 58.08 ± 11.95 years and average QOL of 41.1 ± 9.15. Statistical analysis showed that age (P = 0.002, employment (P ≤ 0001, socioeconomic status (P = 0.016, leg ulcer (P ≤ 0001, and the number of foot ulcer (P = 0.017 had a statistically significant relationship with QOL and its dimensions. Other variables did not have a significant relationship with QOL, but some of them such as smoking during negative emotions (P = 0.046 and marital status affecting the foot care difficulties (P = 0.03 had significant statistical relationships with QOL. Conclusions Diabetic foot ulcer affects different aspects of life and can reduce patient’s QOL. To improve the care behaviors and have a better control of foot ulcers and improve the QOL for these patients, taking into account factors such as age, occupation, marital status, number of wounds, and economic status is essential to plan for care and health needs in these patients.

  8. Buruli ulcer disease : prospects for a vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huygen, Kris; Adjei, Ohene; Affolabi, Dissou; Bretzel, Gisela; Demangel, Caroline; Fleischer, Bernhard; Johnson, Roch Christian; Pedrosa, Jorge; Phanzu, Delphin M.; Phillips, Richard O.; Pluschke, Gerd; Siegmund, Vera; Singh, Mahavir; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Wansbrough-Jones, Mark; Portaels, Francoise

    2009-01-01

    Buruli ulcer disease (BUD), caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, is a neglected bacterial infection of the poor in remote rural areas, mostly affecting children. BUD is a mutilating disease leading to severe disability; it is the third most common mycobacterial infection in immunocompetent people after

  9. The effect of flexor tenotomy on healing and prevention of neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers on the distal end of the toe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Netten Jaap J

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flexor tenotomy is a minimally invasive surgical alternative for the treatment of neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers on the distal end of the toe. The influence of infection on healing and time to heal after flexor tenotomy is unknown. Flexor tenotomy can also be used as a prophylactic treatment. The effectiveness as a prophylactic treatment has not been described before. Methods A retrospective study was performed with the inclusion of all consecutive flexor tenotomies from one hospital between January 2005 and December 2011. Results From 38 ulcers, 35 healed (92%, with a mean time to heal of 22 ± 26 days. The longest duration for healing was found for infected ulcers that were penetrating to bone (35 days; p = .042. Cases of prophylactic flexor tenotomies (n=9 did not result in any ulcer or other complications during follow-up. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that flexor tenotomy may be beneficial for neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers on the distal end of the toe, with a high healing percentage and a short mean time to heal. Infected ulcers that penetrated to bone took a significantly longer time to heal. Prospective research, to confirm the results of this retrospective study, should be performed.

  10. Sural artery perforator flap with posterior tibial neurovascular decompression for recurrent foot ulcer in leprosy patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail, Hossam El-din Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The sensory loss and alteration of the shape of the foot make the foot liable to trauma and pressure, and subsequently cause more callus formation, blisters, and ulcers. Foot ulcers usually are liable to secondary infection as cellulitis or osteomyelitis, and may result in amputations. Foot ulcers are a major problem and a major cause of handicaps in leprosy patients. The current study is to present our clinical experience and evaluate the use of sural flap with posterior tibial neurovascular decompression (PTND in recurrent foot ulcers in leprosy patients.Patient and methods: A total number of 9 patients were suffering from chronic sequelae of leprosy as recurrent foot ulcers. All the patients were reconstructed with the reverse sural artery fasciocutaneous flap with posterior tibial neurovascular decompression from September 2012 to August 2015. Six patients were male and three were female with a mean age of 39.8 years (range, 30–50 years. All the soft tissue defects were in the weight-bearing area of the inside of the foot. The flap sizes ranged from 15/4 to 18/6 cm. Mean follow-up period was 21.2 months (range, 35–2 months.Results: All the flaps healed uneventfully. There was no major complication as total flap necrosis. Only minor complications occurred which were treated without surgical intervention except in two patients who developed superficial necrosis of the skin paddle. Surgical debridement was done one week later. The flap was completely viable after surgery, and the contour of the foot was restored. We found that an improvement of sensation occurred in those patients in whom the anesthesia started one year ago or less and no sensory recovery in patient in whom the anesthesia had lasted for more than two years.Conclusion: The reverse sural artery flap with posterior tibial neurovascular decompression provides a reliable method for recurrent foot soft tissue reconstruction in leprosy patients with encouraging

  11. Sural artery perforator flap with posterior tibial neurovascular decompression for recurrent foot ulcer in leprosy patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Hossam El-din Ali; El Fahar, Mohamed Hassan

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The sensory loss and alteration of the shape of the foot make the foot liable to trauma and pressure, and subsequently cause more callus formation, blisters, and ulcers. Foot ulcers usually are liable to secondary infection as cellulitis or osteomyelitis, and may result in amputations. Foot ulcers are a major problem and a major cause of handicaps in leprosy patients. The current study is to present our clinical experience and evaluate the use of sural flap with posterior tibial neurovascular decompression (PTND) in recurrent foot ulcers in leprosy patients. Patient and methods: A total number of 9 patients were suffering from chronic sequelae of leprosy as recurrent foot ulcers. All the patients were reconstructed with the reverse sural artery fasciocutaneous flap with posterior tibial neurovascular decompression from September 2012 to August 2015. Six patients were male and three were female with a mean age of 39.8 years (range, 30–50 years). All the soft tissue defects were in the weight-bearing area of the inside of the foot. The flap sizes ranged from 15/4 to 18/6 cm. Mean follow-up period was 21.2 months (range, 35–2 months). Results: All the flaps healed uneventfully. There was no major complication as total flap necrosis. Only minor complications occurred which were treated without surgical intervention except in two patients who developed superficial necrosis of the skin paddle. Surgical debridement was done one week later. The flap was completely viable after surgery, and the contour of the foot was restored. We found that an improvement of sensation occurred in those patients in whom the anesthesia started one year ago or less and no sensory recovery in patient in whom the anesthesia had lasted for more than two years. Conclusion: The reverse sural artery flap with posterior tibial neurovascular decompression provides a reliable method for recurrent foot soft tissue reconstruction in leprosy patients with encouraging function and

  12. Risk factors of foot ulceration in patients with Diabetes Mellitus type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Bañuelos-Barrera

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Identify the risk factors for foot ulceration in patients with diabetes type 2 (DM2 who attended a primary care center in the city of Colima (Mexico. Methodology. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study conducted during 2012 with the participation of 87 patients with DM2 from both sexes and older than 30 years of age. Socio-demographic, anthropometric, clinical, and biochemical variables were measured. The study inquired about prior evaluation of the feet and prior education on diabetes by the healthcare team. Results. The mean age was 59 years and 70% were women. The average number of years since diagnosis was nine years; only 35% had good glycemia control; 66% engage in exercise; 51% wear open shoes; none had temperature differences in the feet; 82% had some type of dermatological abnormality; 50% had deformities in their feet. A total of 24% had been diagnosed with peripheral neuropathy and another 11% had peripheral vascular disease. Sixty percent of all the patients had risk of foot ulceration. Only 23% of the participants had had previous foot exams. One of every three diabetic patients had received education about the disease. Conclusion. An important proportion of the patients had risk of foot ulceration, contrary to the insufficient percentage of individuals with previous inspection and education about foot care. For nursing, it is an area of opportunity in this level of care to improve the inspection and education on diabetes, specifically on foot care, mainly in those patients with a prolonged evolution of the disease, deficient glycemia control, and risk of ulceration.

  13. A STUDY OF EFFICACY OF TOPICAL INSULIN THERAPY IN THE TREATMENT OF CHRONIC DIABETIC FOOT ULCERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahidhar Reddy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic wounds are an economic burden to the patient as they put him out of work and consume quality working days. Local insulin therapy is an innovative method in wound care which accelerates wound healing by increasing angiogenesis and granulation tissue formation. This study aims to evaluate its efficacy. OBJECTIVES: To study the efficacy of topical use of insulin in terms of (1 Rate of wound healing (2 Hospital stay. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a prospective study carried out in a tertiary health care center in 46 patients after taking informed and written consent. All patients who were satisfying inclusion and exclusion criteria were randomised into two groups A and B. Local insulin therapy was given to group A and normal saline dressing were done to group B. Size and depth were recorded at the start of the treatment and every week thereafter during the period of study. Strict glycemic control was maintained. Results were compared at complete wound healing or at the end of 8 weeks which was earlier. RESULTS: Improvement of the wound in the form of diameter and depth is seen. Significantly increased proliferation of granulation tissue is noticed in most of the patients belonging to group A, that is who received local insulin therapy. CONCLUSION: Local insulin therapy appears to be an efficacious method in the treatment of chronic diabetic foot ulcers and is safe and effective without any systemic side effects. It significantly reduces the hospital stay

  14. Plantar pressure distribution patterns during gait in diabetic neuropathy patients with a history of foot ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Almeida Bacarin

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate and compare the influence of a previous history of foot ulcers on plantar pressure variables during gait of patients with diabetic neuropathy. INTRODUCTION: Foot ulcers may be an indicator of worsening diabetic neuropathy. However, the behavior of plantar pressure patterns over time and during the progression of neuropathy, especially in patients who have a clinical history of foot ulcers, is still unclear. METHODS: Subjects were divided into the following groups: control group, 20 subjects; diabetic neuropathy patients without foot ulcers, 17 subjects; and diabetic neuropathy patients with at least one healed foot ulcer within the last year, 10 subjects. Plantar pressure distribution was recorded during barefoot gait using the Pedar-X system. RESULTS: Neuropathic subjects from both the diabetic neuropathy and DNU groups showed higher plantar pressure than control subjects. At midfoot, the peak pressure was significantly different among all groups: control group (139.4±76.4 kPa, diabetic neuropathy (205.3±118.6 kPa and DNU (290.7±151.5 kPa (p=0.008. The pressure-time integral was significantly higher in the ulcerated neuropathic groups at midfoot (CG: 37.3±11.4 kPa.s; DN: 43.3±9.1 kPa.s; DNU: 68.7±36.5 kPa.s; p=0.002 and rearfoot (CG: 83.3±21.2 kPa.s; DN: 94.9±29.4 kPa.s; DNU: 102.5±37.9 kPa.s; p=0.048. CONCLUSION: A history of foot ulcers in the clinical history of diabetic neuropathy subjects influenced plantar pressure distribution, resulting in an increased load under the midfoot and rearfoot and an increase in the variability of plantar pressure during barefoot gait. The progression of diabetic neuropathy was not found to influence plantar pressure distribution.

  15. Platelet rich plasma for treatment of nonhealing diabetic foot ulcers: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrannia, Masoud; Vaezi, Mitra; Yousefshahi, Fardin; Rouhipour, Nahid

    2014-02-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers are one of the most important causes of lower limb amputations worldwide. The conventional treatments of diabetic foot ulcers are costly and often require patients to be hospitalized for long periods of time, thus representing a huge burden on any health care system. The use of autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP), which is rich in multiple growth factors, may bear some similarities to the natural wound healing process. Nonetheless, few studies on human subjects have so far addressed the efficacy of PRP as a novel and minimally invasive treatment. Today, there is only 1 approved and available system to separate PRP from a patient's own blood in order to be used in diabetic ulcers. This system incorporates bovine thrombin for activation of PRP gel and may be applied by many healthcare providers without the need for extensive special training. In this report, a patient with extensive diabetic foot ulcers, non-responsive to other treatment modalities, was successfully treated by PRP. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Painful ulceration and quality of life of patients with the diabetic foot syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radka Vymětalová

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of pain on quality of life of patients with diabetic foot syndrome. Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: Quality of life was assessed using a Czech version of the Diabetic Foot Ulcer Scale (DFS, a standardized questionnaire. The sample consisted of 247 patients with diabetic foot syndrome. The intensity of pain in diabetic ulcers was measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS from 0 (no pain to 10 (maximum pain. Data was collected between April 2014 and December 2014 in 18 podiatric and chronic wound outpatient clinics throughout the Czech Republic. Results: Quality of life in patients with permanent pain was lower in all domains of the DFS questionnaire in comparison with patients who reported no pain. For patients who attended chronic wound outpatient clinics quality of life was significantly lower in four domains of the DFS (Leisure, Physical health, Emotions, and Friends than for patients who did not attend chronic pain outpatient clinics. A statistically significant moderate negative correlation was found between intensity of pain and quality of life in the following domains: Physical health (r = -0.592, Daily activities (r = -0.456, Emotions (r = -0.503, and Treatment (r = -0.434. Conclusion: Pain ulceration affects quality of life of patients with diabetic foot syndrome.

  17. Experiences of healthcare provision for foot ulceration occurring in people with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firth, Jill; Nelson, Andrea; Briggs, Michelle; Gorecki, Claudia

    2013-09-01

    Participants with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) report that foot ulceration has an impact on their health-related quality of life (HRQL) across physical, social and psychological domains. What is not known is how experiences of healthcare provision influence HRQL. The present study set out to map the patent journey while integrating the impact on HRQL. A purposive sample of RA patients with open foot ulceration was recruited from podiatry clinics in West Yorkshire (UK) between May 2008 and June 2009. Patients with diabetes were excluded (the impact of foot ulceration in this group is well established). In-depth interviews were taped and transcribed. A framework approach to data management was used to facilitate a case- and theme-based analysis. Twenty-three RA patients (18 female, five male; aged 45-88 years) participated. Two themes and five sub-themes were identified. The patient journey theme comprised the following sub-themes: access to care; knowledge acquisition; care pathways and continuity of care. Patient-professional relationships comprised the sub-themes: therapeutic patient-professional relationships and task-orientated care. The journey took a highly variable course that was influenced by patient-specific factors (past experience of ulceration; symptomology; knowledge and self-efficacy); service-specific factors (access to care and care pathways) and professional-specific factors (knowing and trusting someone; holism). The present study highlights the need for clearer care pathways for patients affected by foot ulceration improved patient education and better coordination of care. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Analyzing treatment aggressiveness and identifying high-risk patients in diabetic foot ulcer return to care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remington, Austin C; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Warstadt, Nicholus M; Finnegan, Micaela A; Shaffer, Robyn; Kwong, Jereen Z; Curtin, Catherine

    2016-07-01

    Rates of diabetes and its associated comorbidities have been increasing in the United States, with diabetic foot ulcer treatment representing a large cost to the patient and healthcare system. These ulcers often result in multiple hospital admissions. This study examined readmissions following inpatient care for a diabetic foot ulcer and identified modifiable factors associated with all-cause 30-day readmissions to the inpatient or emergency department (ED) setting. We hypothesized that patients undergoing aggressive treatment would have lower 30-day readmission rates. We identified patient discharge records containing International Classification of Disease ninth revision codes for both diabetes mellitus and distal foot ulcer in the State Inpatient and Emergency Department databases from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project in Florida and New York, 2011-2012. All-cause 30-day return to care visits (ED or inpatient) were analyzed. Patient demographics and treatment characteristics were evaluated using univariate and multivariable regression models. The cohort included 25,911 discharges, having a mean age of 63 and an average of 3.8 comorbidities. The overall rate of return to care was 30%, and 21% of subjects underwent a toe or midfoot amputation during their index stay. The most common diagnosis codes upon readmission were diabetes mellitus (19%) and infection (13%). Patients with a toe or midfoot amputation procedure were less likely to be readmitted within 30 days (odds ratio: 0.78; 95% confidence interval: 0.73, 0.84). Presence of comorbidities, black and Hispanic ethnicities, and Medicare and Medicaid payer status were also associated with higher odds of readmission following initial hospitalization (p < 0.05). The study suggests that there are many factors that affect readmission rates for diabetic foot ulcer patients. Understanding patients at high-risk for readmission can improve counseling and

  19. Spectrum of Microbial Flora in Diabetic Foot Ulcer and Its Antibiotic Sensitivity Pattern in Tertiary Care Hospital in Ahmedabad, Gujarat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Jain

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A Prospective study “Spectrum of Microbial flora in diabetic foot ulcer and its antibiotic sensitivity pattern” was carried out in a tertiary care hospital, Ahmedabad on 125 patients in which 85 were male patients and 40 were female patients. Material and Methods: Swabs samples were collected from the edge and margins of ulcers and organism were identified by gram staining culture and biochemical reactions. Results: Out of 125 specimens 108 specimens showed growth of organisms. Total 157 aerobic organisms were isolated from culture positive specimens. It represents an average of 1.25 organisms per case. Among these organisms, 130 gram negative and 27 gram positive organisms were isolated. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (30.57% was predominant organism followed by Klebsiella spp. (22.29%. Staphylococcus aureus were 12.74% in which Methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA was 55%. Conclusion: incidence of growth was 86.4% in which Pseudomonas aeruginosa (30.57% is most common isolate. Organisms in mixed infections showed multidrug resistance as compared to single isolated strain. Diabetic foot infections are polymicrobial in nature. As the Wagner’s grade increased, the prevalence of isolates also increased. [National J of Med Res 2012; 2(3.000: 354-357

  20. The impact of foot ulceration and amputation on mortality in diabetic patients. I: From ulceration to death, a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jupiter, Daniel C; Thorud, Jakob C; Buckley, Clifford J; Shibuya, Naohiro

    2016-10-01

    A great deal of emphasis, clinical and financial, is placed on limb salvage efforts in diabetic patients suffering from lower extremity ulceration. This is because of the impression that amputation in such patients may be a proximal cause of death. While amputation is certainly a negative clinical outcome, it is not entirely clear that it causes death. In this systematic review, we examine the available literature to attempt to understand the role that the ulceration itself may play in mortality. In brief, we searched for human studies in OVID, CINAHL and the COCHRANE CENTRAL DATABASE from 1980 to 2013, looking for articles related to ulcer or wound of the foot, in patients with diabetes or peripheral vascular disease, and death. We looked for articles with 5 years of follow-up, or Kaplan-Meier estimates of 5-year mortality, and excluded reviews and letters. Articles were assessed for quality and potential bias using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. We find that while the patient populations studied varied widely in terms of demographics and comorbidities, limiting generalisability, 5-year mortality rates after ulceration were around 40%. Risk factors for death commonly identified were increased age, male gender, peripheral vascular disease and renal disease.

  1. Evaluation of the Efficacy of Highly Hydrophilic Polyurethane Foam Dressing in Treating a Diabetic Foot Ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae-A; Yoo, Ki-Hyun; Han, Seung-Kyu; Dhong, Eun-Sang; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2016-12-01

    To demonstrate the efficacy of a highly hydrophilic polyurethane foam dressing in the treatment of diabetic ulcers. Diabetic foot ulcers often pose a difficult treatment problem. Polyurethane foam dressings have been used worldwide to accelerate wound healing, but only a few clinical studies demonstrate the effect of foam dressing on the healing of diabetic ulcers. Medical records of 1342 patients with diabetic ulcers who were admitted and treated at the authors' institution were reviewed. A total of 208 patients met the study's inclusion criteria. Of these 208 patients, 137 were treated with a highly hydrophilic polyurethane foam dressing, and 71 were treated with saline gauze (control group). Except for the application of polyurethane foam dressing, the treatment method was identical for patients in both groups. The wound healing outcomes of the 2 groups were compared. Complete wound healing occurred in 87 patients (63.5%) in the polyurethane foam dressing group and in 28 patients (39.4%) in the control group within 12 weeks (P polyurethane foam dressing and control groups, respectively (P polyurethane foam dressing may provide an effective treatment strategy for diabetic foot ulcers.

  2. Unsuspected osteomyelitis in diabetic foot ulcers. Diagnosis and monitoring by leukocyte scanning with indium in 111 oxyquinoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, L.G.; Waller, J.; Palestro, C.J.; Schwartz, M.; Klein, M.J.; Hermann, G.; Harrington, E.; Harrington, M.; Roman, S.H.; Stagnaro-Green, A. (Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY (USA))

    1991-09-04

    The prevalence of osteomyelitis in diabetic foot ulcers is unknown. Early diagnosis of this infection is critical, as prompt antibiotic treatment decreases the rate of amputation. The authors therefore assessed the prevalence of osteomyelitis in 35 diabetic patients with 41 foot ulcers. They compared results of roentgenograms, leukocyte scans with indium In 111 oxyquinoline, and bone scans with the diagnostic criterion standards of bone histologic and culture findings. Leukocyte scans were repeated at 2- to 3-week intervals during antibiotic treatment. Consecutive samples were obtained from 54 diabetic patients. Thirty-five patients with 41 foot ulcers were included. As determined by bone biopsy and culture, osteomyelitis was found to underlie 28 (68%) of 41 diabetic foot ulcers. Only nine (32%) of the 28 cases were diagnosed clinically by the referring physician. Underscoring the clinically silent nature of osteomyelitis in these ulcers, 19 (68%) of 28 occurred in outpatients, 19 (68%) of 28 occurred in ulcers not exposing bone, and 18 (64%) of 28 had no evidence of inflammation on physical examination. All patients with ulcers that exposed bone had osteomyelitis. Of the imaging tests, the leukocyte scan had the highest sensitivity, 89%. In patients with osteomyelitis, the leukocyte scan image intensity decreased by 16 to 34 days of antibiotic treatment and normalized by 36 to 54 days. The majority of diabetic foot ulcers have an underlying osteomyelitis that is clinically unsuspected. Leukocyte scans are highly sensitive for diagnosing osteomyelitis in diabetic foot ulcers and may be useful for monitoring the efficacy of antibiotic treatment. The recommend that diabetic patients with foot ulcers that expose bone should be treated for osteomyelitis.

  3. Role of Ampicillin-Sulbactam: A District Hospital’s Experience in Treating Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ng C S

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Ampicillin-sulbactam combination is themost frequently prescribed antibiotic in diabetic footulcers. We conducted a retrospective study to evaluatethe antibiotic sensitivity of bacteria isolated to thisantibiotic. In 33 patients with diabetic foot ulcer(September 2008-March 2009, 67% were culturepositive in which Citrobacter spp accounted for 36% ofthese isolates. The rest isolated included Pseudomonasaeruginosa (22%, Proteus spp (18%, Acinetobacter spp(9%, Klebsiella pneumoniae (5%, Escherichia coli (5%and Staphylococcus aureus (5%. These isolates weremore likely to be ampicillin-resistant (n=18 thanwere ampicillin-sensitive isolates (n=4. Ampicillinresistance has raised our concern about current practiceof prescribing ampicillin/ sulbactam as monotherapy formajority of our patients with such ulcers

  4. Plantar pressures are elevated in people with longstanding diabetes-related foot ulcers during follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Malindu E.; Crowther, Robert G.; Lazzarini, Peter A.; Yogakanthi, Saiumaeswar; Sangla, Kunwarjit S.; Buttner, Petra; Jones, Rhondda; Golledge, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Objective High plantar pressures are implicated in the development of diabetes-related foot ulcers. Whether plantar pressures remain high in patients with chronic diabetes-related foot ulcers over time is uncertain. The primary aim of this study was to compare plantar pressures at baseline and three and six months later in participants with chronic diabetes-related foot ulcers (cases) to participants without foot ulcers (controls). Methods Standardised protocols were used to measure mean peak plantar pressure and pressure-time integral at 10 plantar foot sites (the hallux, toes, metatarsals 1 to 5, mid-foot, medial heel and lateral heel) during barefoot walking. Measurements were performed at three study visits: baseline, three and six months. Linear mixed effects random-intercept models were utilised to assess whether plantar pressures differed between cases and controls after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, neuropathy status and follow-up time. Standardised mean differences (Cohen’s d) were used to measure effect size. Results Twenty-one cases and 69 controls started the study and 16 cases and 63 controls completed the study. Cases had a higher mean peak plantar pressure at several foot sites including the toes (p = 0.005, Cohen’s d = 0.36) and mid-foot (p = 0.01, d = 0.36) and a higher pressure-time integral at the hallux (ppressure-time integral at multiple plantar sites over time was detected in all participants (ppressures assessed during gait are higher in diabetes patients with chronic foot ulcers than controls at several plantar sites throughout prolonged follow-up. Long term offloading is needed in diabetes patients with diabetes-related foot ulcers to facilitate ulcer healing. PMID:28859075

  5. Rare Case of Aspergillus ochraceus Osteomyelitis of Calcaneus Bone in a Patient with Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    OpenAIRE

    Babamahmoodi, Farhang; Shokohi, Tahereh; Ahangarkani, Fatemeh; Nabili, Mojtaba; Afzalian Ashkezari, Elham; Alinezhad, Sosan

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is the most common metabolic disease in humans. One of the major complications of the disease is foot ulcer that is prone to infection. The most common causes of infection which have been reported in these patients are bacteria and fungi such as Candida, Aspergillus, and Rhizopus species. We report one such rare case with calcaneal osteomyelitis caused by Aspergillus ochraceus in a patient with diabetic foot osteomyelitis. The case was a 68-year-old male with a history of type II dia...

  6. Rare Case of Aspergillus ochraceus Osteomyelitis of Calcaneus Bone in a Patient with Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    OpenAIRE

    Farhang Babamahmoodi; Tahereh Shokohi; Fatemeh Ahangarkani; Mojtaba Nabili; Elham Afzalian Ashkezari; Sosan Alinezhad

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is the most common metabolic disease in humans. One of the major complications of the disease is foot ulcer that is prone to infection. The most common causes of infection which have been reported in these patients are bacteria and fungi such as Candida, Aspergillus, and Rhizopus species. We report one such rare case with calcaneal osteomyelitis caused by Aspergillus ochraceus in a patient with diabetic foot osteomyelitis. The case was a 68-year-old male with a history of type II di...

  7. Motivation, effort and life circumstances as predictors of foot ulcers and amputations in people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Christine; Guassora, Ann Dorrit; Nielsen, Anni Brit Sternhagen

    2014-01-01

    Abstract AIM: To investigate the predictive value of both patients' motivation and effort in their management of Type 2 diabetes and their life circumstances for the development of foot ulcers and amputations. METHODS: This study was based on the Diabetes Care in General Practice study and Danish...... population and health registers. The associations between patient motivation, effort and life circumstances and foot ulcer prevalence 6 years after diabetes diagnosis and the incidence of amputation in the following 13 years were analysed using odds ratios from logistic regression and hazard ratios from Cox...... regression models, respectively. RESULTS: Foot ulcer prevalence 6 years after diabetes diagnosis was 2.93% (95% CI 1.86-4.00) among 956 patients. General practitioners' indication of 'poor' vs 'very good' patient motivation for diabetes management was associated with higher foot ulcer prevalence (odds ratio...

  8. The role of qualitative research in understanding diabetic foot ulcers and amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhnke, Janet L; Bailey, Patricia Hill; Woodbury, M Gail; Burrows, Mona

    2014-04-01

    To enhance the learner's competence with knowledge about using qualitative methodologies to understand diabetic foot ulcers and amputations. This continuing education activity is intended for physicians and nurses with an interest in skin and wound care. After participating in this educational activity, the participant should be better able to:1. Analyze qualitative research methodologies.2. Summarize how conclusions from qualitative research relate to diabetes mellitus and its complications. Persons living with diabetes are at high risk for foot complications, lower extremity trauma, injury, ulceration, infection, and potential amputation. Qualitative health research helps to explore and understand more fully the complexities of diabetes. Qualitative health research seeks to understand what is happening and going on for the individual and his/her support persons. In addition, qualitative health research enables clinicians to appreciate how different qualitative research approaches can explore illness from the perspective of the individual living with the disease.

  9. Noninvasive assessment of diabetic foot ulcers with diffuse photon density wave methodology: pilot human study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papazoglou, Elisabeth S.; Neidrauer, Michael; Zubkov, Leonid; Weingarten, Michael S.; Pourrezaei, Kambiz

    2009-11-01

    A pilot human study is conducted to evaluate the potential of using diffuse photon density wave (DPDW) methodology at near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths (685 to 830 nm) to monitor changes in tissue hemoglobin concentration in diabetic foot ulcers. Hemoglobin concentration is measured by DPDW in 12 human wounds for a period ranging from 10 to 61 weeks. In all wounds that healed completely, gradual decreases in optical absorption coefficient, oxygenated hemoglobin concentration, and total hemoglobin concentration are observed between the first and last measurements. In nonhealing wounds, the rates of change of these properties are nearly zero or slightly positive, and a statistically significant difference (pdiabetic foot ulcers, and indicate that it may have clinical utility in the evaluation of wound healing potential.

  10. A study to determine the knowledge and practice of foot care in patients with chronic diabetic ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chamil Vidusha Madushan Jinadasa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetic foot ulcers accounts for many hospital admissions and it is also a major cause of amputations. More importantly it is preventable by effective identification, education and preventive foot care practice. Therefore, lifestyle modification remains a cornerstone of management.Objective: Determine the level of knowledge and practice of foot care among patients with chronic diabetic foot ulcers.Methodology: Individuals having diagnosed diabetic foot ulcers (n=110 were selected from National Hospital of Sri Lanka(NHSL for this descriptive cross sectional study. They were given an interviewer administered, pre tested questionnaire following informed consent. Patient perceptions of foot care were inquired. A scoring system ranging from 0-10 was employed to analyze the responses given for level of knowledge and practice of diabetic foot care. The study was approved by the Ethics Review Committees of Faculty of Medicine, Colombo.Results: Mean age was 58.4 years( SD ±8.6 and 57.3% were males. Non healing ulcers were present among 82.7% and amputations amounted to 38.2%. The control of diabetes was poor in 60%. Regarding foot care knowledge, the mean score was 8.37, 75.5% had scored above mean and 52.7% were aware of all principles of foot care. Regarding foot care practices, the mean score was 4.55, 47.3% participants had scored below mean and 22.7% did not practice any foot care principle and hence scored 0. A Statistically significant difference exists between the foot care knowledge and practice scores (p<0.001, z= -8.151. In the study sample 51% were not educated prior to occurrence of complications.Conclusion: Results demonstrate a satisfactory knowledge on diabetic foot disease, however their practices of preventive techniques were unsatisfactory. Implementation of a national policy on diabetic foot management and good patient follow-up to increase compliance would help to improve this situation.

  11. A system for treatment of diabetic foot ulcers using led irradiation and natural latex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Adolfo Marcelino de Almeida Nunes

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: We developed and tested a new system for inducing the healing of diabetic foot ulcers. The system relies on the regenerative properties of its two components: an insole with a sheet of natural latex and a device that contains a matrix of light emitting diodes with wavelength of 635 nm. Methods The electronic and latex based devices were developed, and a four weeks test was performed in one control group (CG of five ulcers and one experimental group (EG of eight ulcers. The CG was treated with a standard approach, based on a silver-releasing foam dressing, and the EG was treated with the system under test. For each ulcer, an index for quantifying the percentage ulcer recovery, named CRU(%, has been calculated; a CRU(% = 0% means no healing, and a CRU(% = 100% means total healing. Results There were statistically significant increases of CRU(% of 51.8% (p = 0.022, for the CG, and of 78.4% (p < 0.001, for the EG. The increase in the EG was higher than the increase in the CG, and the difference was statistically significant (p < 0.001. The results showed that the proposed method had, for these particular sets of ulcers, faster healing rates, than for the standard method. Conclusion The results hint that the proposed method seems promising as a future treatment method. However, the technique must undergo further testing before it can be considered for extensive clinical applications.

  12. Iloprost infusion in diabetic patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease and foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirenda, Francesco; La Spada, Michele; Baccellieri, Domenico; Stilo, Francesco; Benedetto, Filippo; Spinelli, Francesco

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate iloprost infusion as an alternative to open surgical revascularisation in diabetic patients with foot ulcers, also as a support measure in conjunction with endovascular procedures. We studied 244 patients with critical ischaemia of the lower limbs, 146 of whom (59.8%) affected by diabetes. A femoro-distal bypass was performed in 175 patients. In the 69 nonsurgical diabetic patients (47.3% of the diabetics) an iloprost infusion was started. These diabetics presented foot ulcers, a palpable or slightly hypo-sphygmic popliteal pulse and high distal arterial flow at the ankle. In 55 of these patients (79.7% of those not operated on and 37.6% of the diabetics) who were non-responders to medical therapy, an endovascular procedure was also performed. The results of the iloprost infusion (69 pts.) were evaluated after one week. In 14 responders treated only with iloprost infusion, complete healing of the lesions occurred during the 3 weeks following the end of the 4-week course of therapy. No severe ischaemia recurrences were reported in the follow-up of these 69 patients. In the 47.3% of subjects with diabetic arteriopathy presenting foot ulcers and high distal flow, it proved possible to avoid an open surgical revascularisation procedure and to resort to medical therapy with iloprost, completed in 79.7% of cases with endovascular procedures. Iloprost infusion improves limb perfusion and, in selected cases may be an important therapeutic tool for the care of ulcerative lesions of the diabetic foot, also as a support measure in conjunction with endovascular procedures.

  13. Diabetic foot ulcer mobile detection system using smart phone thermal camera: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraiwan, Luay; AlKhodari, Mohanad; Ninan, Jolu; Mustafa, Basil; Saleh, Adel; Ghazal, Mohammed

    2017-10-03

    Nowadays, the whole world is being concerned with a major health problem, which is diabetes. A very common symptom of diabetes is the diabetic foot ulcer (DFU). The early detection of such foot complications can protect diabetic patients from any dangerous stages that develop later and may require foot amputation. This work aims at building a mobile thermal imaging system that can be used as an indicator for possible developing ulcers. The proposed system consists of a thermal camera connected to a Samsung smart phone, which is used to acquire thermal images. This thermal imaging system has a simulated temperature gradient of more than 2.2 °C, which represents the temperature difference (in the literature) than can indicate a possible development of ulcers. The acquired images are processed and segmented using basic image processing techniques. The analysis and interpretation is conducted using two techniques: Otsu thresholding technique and Point-to-Point mean difference technique. The proposed system was implemented under MATLAB Mobile platform and thermal images were analyzed and interpreted. Four testing images (feet images) were used to test this procedure; one image with any temperature variation to the feet, and three images with skin temperature increased to more than 2.2 °C introduced at different locations. With the two techniques applied during the analysis and interpretation stage, the system was successful in identifying the location of the temperature increase. This work successfully implemented a mobile thermal imaging system that includes an automated method to identify possible ulcers in diabetic patients. This may give diabetic patients the ability for a frequent self-check of possible ulcers. Although this work was implemented in simulated conditions, it provides the necessary feasibility to be further developed and tested in a clinical environment.

  14. Microbiological profile and clinical outcome of severe foot ulcers of diabetic inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marivaldo Loyola Aragão(

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To describe the microbiological profile and clinical outcomes of diabetic foot ulcers of inpatients of a tertiary university hospital, at Ceara, Brazil. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of medical charts data of all diabetic inpatients of the Endocrine and Diabetes Unit of Walter Cantídio University Hospital (Federal University of Ceará, admitted from January, 2006 to June, 2007 for severe foot ulcers (minimum of grade 2 of Wagner`s classification, which were refractory to ambulatory treatment. Clinical data from each patient were recorded (sex, age, diabetes duration, and comorbidities as well as microbiological characteristics of foot ulcers and surgical (amputations material. Results: We identified 17 diabetic patients, all type 2, aged 58.11 ± 10.8 years and 12.4 ± 8.4 years of disease, 58.8% male. Of ulcers, 41.1% were grade 2; 35.2% grade 3; 11.7% grade 4 and 11.7% grade 5 of Wagner; 64.7% with less than 3 months of evolution. Debridement was performed in 82.3% of patients and amputation in 47%; osteomyelitis was identified in 47% of cases. All patients started empiric antibiotic therapy, where ciprofloxacin/metronidazole was the most used scheme (76.5%. Cultures were negative in 12.5% of the patients. In the positive ones, the most prevalent bacterial pathogens detected in the culture materials were: S. aureus (57.1%; S. viridans (28.7%; P. aeruginosas (28.7%; M. morganii (28.7%. The majority (75% of isolated S. aureus were methicillin-resistant, but were sensitive to vacomicin. Conclusion: We observed the presence of polymicrobial flora with a large number of multiresistant pathogens and high prevalence of osteomyelitis and amputations in diabetic patients with severe ulcers, neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease.

  15. Tinea pedis and onychomycosis frequency in diabetes mellitus patients and diabetic foot ulcers. A cross sectional - observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkus, Gamze; Evran, Mehtap; Gungor, Dilek; Karakas, Mehmet; Sert, Murat; Tetiker, Tamer

    2016-01-01

    Impaired cellular immunity and reduced phagocytic function of polymorphonuclear leukocytes facilitate the development of skin fungal and bacterial infections due to uncontrolled hyperglycemia in diabetic patients. In our study, we aimed to assess onychomycosis and/or tinea pedis frequency in diabetic patients, and effects on the development of chronic complications, particularly foot ulcer. We included 227 diabetic patients in the study. Forty-three patients had diabetic foot ulcer. We screened and recorded demographic characteristics, HbA1c levels of patients, and presence of complications We examined patients dermatologically, and collected samples by scalpel from skin between toes, and from sole, toe nail, and area surrounding nails from suspected to have fungal infection. Native positivity between toes was higher in men compared to women (pFungal infection between toes, at sole and toe nail significantly increased in patients with diabetic foot ulcer compared to patients without diabetic foot ulcer (pdiabetic foot ulcer correlated with presence of fungal infection examination findings (pFungal infections were more frequently observed in the presence of poor glycemic control and peripheral vascular disease in diabetic patients in compliance with the literature, and the presence of fungal infection may also responsible for the development of foot ulcers.

  16. Tinea pedis and onychomycosis frequency in diabetes mellitus patients and diabetic foot ulcers. A cross sectional – observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkus, Gamze; Evran, Mehtap; Gungor, Dilek; Karakas, Mehmet; Sert, Murat; Tetiker, Tamer

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Impaired cellular immunity and reduced phagocytic function of polymorphonuclear leukocytes facilitate the development of skin fungal and bacterial infections due to uncontrolled hyperglycemia in diabetic patients. In our study, we aimed to assess onychomycosis and/or tinea pedis frequency in diabetic patients, and effects on the development of chronic complications, particularly foot ulcer. Methods: We included 227 diabetic patients in the study. Forty-three patients had diabetic foot ulcer. We screened and recorded demographic characteristics, HbA1c levels of patients, and presence of complications We examined patients dermatologically, and collected samples by scalpel from skin between toes, and from sole, toe nail, and area surrounding nails from suspected to have fungal infection. Results: Native positivity between toes was higher in men compared to women (pFungal infection between toes, at sole and toe nail significantly increased in patients with diabetic foot ulcer compared to patients without diabetic foot ulcer (pdiabetic foot ulcer correlated with presence of fungal infection examination findings (pFungal infections were more frequently observed in the presence of poor glycemic control and peripheral vascular disease in diabetic patients in compliance with the literature, and the presence of fungal infection may also responsible for the development of foot ulcers. PMID:27648034

  17. Plectranthus amboinicus and Centella asiatica Cream for the Treatment of Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Sung Kuo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of a topical cream containing P. amboinicus (Lour. Spreng. (Lamiaceae and C. asiatica (L. Urban (Umbelliferae were evaluated and compared to effects of hydrocolloid fiber wound dressing for diabetic foot ulcers. A single-center, randomized, controlled, open-label study was conducted. Twenty-four type 1 or type 2 diabetes patients aged 20 years or older with Wagner grade 3 foot ulcers postsurgical debridement were enrolled between October 2008 and December 2009. Twelve randomly assigned patients were treated with WH-1 cream containing P. amboinicus and C. asiatica twice daily for two weeks. Another 12 patients were treated with hydrocolloid fiber dressings changed at 7 days or when clinically indicated. Wound condition and safety were assessed at days 7 and 14 and results were compared between groups. No statistically significant differences were seen in percent changes in wound size at 7- and 14-day assessments of WH-1 cream and hydrocolloid dressing groups. A slightly higher proportion of patients in the WH-1 cream group (10 of 12; 90.9% showed Wagner grade improvement compared to the hydrocolloid fiber dressing group but without statistical significance. For treating diabetic foot ulcers, P. amboinicus and C. asiatica cream is a safe alternative to hydrocolloid fiber dressing without significant difference in effectiveness.

  18. Plectranthus amboinicus and Centella asiatica Cream for the Treatment of Diabetic Foot Ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yuan-Sung; Chien, Hsiung-Fei; Lu, William

    2012-01-01

    Effects of a topical cream containing P. amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng. (Lamiaceae) and C. asiatica (L.) Urban (Umbelliferae) were evaluated and compared to effects of hydrocolloid fiber wound dressing for diabetic foot ulcers. A single-center, randomized, controlled, open-label study was conducted. Twenty-four type 1 or type 2 diabetes patients aged 20 years or older with Wagner grade 3 foot ulcers postsurgical debridement were enrolled between October 2008 and December 2009. Twelve randomly assigned patients were treated with WH-1 cream containing P. amboinicus and C. asiatica twice daily for two weeks. Another 12 patients were treated with hydrocolloid fiber dressings changed at 7 days or when clinically indicated. Wound condition and safety were assessed at days 7 and 14 and results were compared between groups. No statistically significant differences were seen in percent changes in wound size at 7- and 14-day assessments of WH-1 cream and hydrocolloid dressing groups. A slightly higher proportion of patients in the WH-1 cream group (10 of 12; 90.9%) showed Wagner grade improvement compared to the hydrocolloid fiber dressing group but without statistical significance. For treating diabetic foot ulcers, P. amboinicus and C. asiatica cream is a safe alternative to hydrocolloid fiber dressing without significant difference in effectiveness.

  19. Prediction of Wound Healing in Diabetic Foot Ulcers: an Observational Study in Tertiary Hospital in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradana Soewondo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to evaluate the role of clinical characteristics, functional markers of vasodilation, inflammatory response, and atherosclerosis in predicting wound healing in diabetic foot ulcer. Methods: a cohort study (February – October 2010 was conducted from 40 subjects with acute diabetic foot ulcer at clinical ward of Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo National Central General Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia. Each subject underwent at least two variable measurements, i.e. during inflammatory phase and proliferation phase. The studied variables were clinical characteristics, complete peripheral blood count (CBC and differential count, levels of HbA1c, ureum, creatinine, lipid profile, fasting blood glucose (FBG, marker of endothelial dysfunction (asymmetric dimethylarginine/ADMA, endothelin-1/ET-1, and flow-mediated dilation/FMD of brachial artery, and marker of vascular calcification (osteoprotegerin/OPG. Results: median of time achieving 50% granulation tissue in our study was 21 days. There were nine factors that contribute in the development of 50% granulation tissue, i.e. family history of diabetes mellitus (DM, previous history of wound, wound area, duration of existing wound, captopril and simvastatin medications, levels of ADMA, ET-1, and OPG. There were three out of the nine factors that significantly correlated with wound healing, i.e. wound area, OPG levels, and simvastatin medications. Conclusion: in acute diabetic foot ulcers, wound area and OPG levels had positive correlation with wound healing, whereas simvastatin medications had negative correlation with wound healing.

  20. Fungal infections among diabetic foot ulcer- patients attending diabetic clinic in Kenyatta National Hospital, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitau, A M; Ng'ang'a, Z W; Sigilai, W; Bii, C; Mwangi, M

    2011-01-01

    To isolate and identify fungal pathogens associated with dermatophytoses in diabetic patients and identify the spectrum of yeasts colonising diabetic foot ulcers at Kenyatta National Hospital. A cross sectional Laboratory based study. The Kenyatta National Hospital diabetic clinic. Sixty one patients with diabetic foot ulcers from August to November 2009. The five most occurring pathogens were Biopolaris hawaiiensis (5.5%), Trichophyton schoenleinii (3.7%), Aspergillus niger (3.0%), Trichophyton rubrum (3.0%), Fusarium oxysporum (3.0%). Other moulds accounted forless than 3.0%. One suspected case (0.6%) of Penicilium marneffei was isolated although it couldnotbe ascertained due to its high containment requirement. Among the dermatophytes, the most occurring mould was Trichophyton schoenleinii (3.7%) while innon-dermatophyte was Biopolaris hawaiiensis (5.5%). Eight pathogenic yeasts were identified with C. parapsilosis (6.1%) being the most common followed by C. famata (3.0%). Fungal infestation was highest in callus formation (78.6%). Fungal aetiological agents are significant cause of diabetic woundinfection and may require antifungal intervention for successful management of diabetic foot ulcers.

  1. Temperature- and pH-sensitive wearable materials for monitoring foot ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvo, Pietro; Calisi, Nicola; Melai, Bernardo; Dini, Valentina; Paoletti, Clara; Lomonaco, Tommaso; Pucci, Andrea; Di Francesco, Fabio; Piaggesi, Alberto; Romanelli, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Foot ulcers account for 15% of comorbidities associated with diabetes. Presently, no device allows the status of foot ulcers to be continuously monitored when patients are not hospitalized. In this study, we describe a temperature and a pH sensor capable of monitoring diabetic foot and venous leg ulcers developed in the frame of the seventh framework program European Union project SWAN-iCare (smart wearable and autonomous negative pressure device for wound monitoring and therapy). Temperature is measured by exploiting the variations in the electrical resistance of a nanocomposite consisting of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and poly(styrene-b-(ethylene-co-butylene)-b-styrene). The pH sensor used a graphene oxide (GO) layer that changes its electrical potential when pH changes. The temperature sensor has a sensitivity of ~85 Ω/°C in the range 25°C–50°C and a high repeatability (maximum standard deviation of 0.1% over seven repeated measurements). For a GO concentration of 4 mg/mL, the pH sensor has a sensitivity of ~42 mV/pH and high linearity (R2=0.99). PMID:28203074

  2. Different surgical treatment of post-burn trophic ulcers of the plantar surface in foot burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakirov, Babur M

    2011-12-01

    Burns of the plantar surface of the foot with the subsequent formation of scar is often complicated by unhealing trophic ulcers. Trophic ulcers increase due to constant local irritation, reaching various depth and area, penetrating to the bone and the tendons and covering the area of several centimetres in diameter up to the whole heel area. A total of 21 patients (12 men and nine women) have been under our observation at Samarkand Inter-Regional Burn Center, Uzbekistan, for prolonged trophic ulcers of soft tissues of the plantar surface of the foot. Ulcers sizes were from 1.0-2.5 to 3-5 cm in diameter. All patients had undergone earlier unsuccessful operation (3-5 times). The method of closure should be chosen according to both severity and localisation of the injury, using local uninjured tissues and soft scars to make bilobed skin-flap plasty, one-lobed skin-flat flap, tube graft and other shaped flaps and free grafts placed on the area of the excised scars. In 18 observations, a good result was achieved and no complications were noted. The grafts were viable, sensibility was preserved and no marginal necrosis was noticed. Patients can take up their work by 1.5-2.0 months after surgery. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  3. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for the Treatment of Diabetic Foot Ulcers: A Health Technology Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrinos, Anna; Chan, Brian; Wells, David; Holubowich, Corinne

    2017-01-01

    Background About 15% to 25% of people with diabetes will develop a foot ulcer. These wounds are often resistant to healing; therefore, people with diabetes experience lower limb amputation at about 20 times the rate of people without diabetes. If an ulcer does not heal with standard wound care, other therapeutic interventions are offered, one of which is hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT). However, the effectiveness of this therapy is not clearly known. The objectives of this health technology assessment were to assess the safety, clinical effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness of standard wound care plus HBOT versus standard wound care alone for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. We also investigated the preferences and perspectives of people with diabetic foot ulcers through lived experience. Methods We performed a review of the clinical and economic literature for the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of hyperbaric oxygen therapy, as well as the budget impact of HBOT from the perspective of the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. We assessed the quality of the body of clinical evidence using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) Working Group criteria. To better understand the preferences, perspectives, and values of patients with diabetic foot ulcers and their experience with HBOT, we conducted interviews and administered an online survey. Results Seven randomized controlled trials and one nonrandomized controlled trial met the inclusion criteria. Comparing standard wound care plus HBOT with standard wound care alone, we found mixed results for major amputation rates (GRADE quality of evidence: low), a significant difference in favour of standard wound care plus HBOT on ulcers healed (GRADE quality of evidence: low), and no difference in terms of adverse events (GRADE quality of evidence: moderate). There is a large degree of uncertainty associated with the evaluation of the cost-effectiveness of standard wound

  4. The Assessment of Social Support and Self-Care Requisites for Preventing Diabetic Foot Ulcer in Diabetic Foot Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Taher

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Diabetic foot as one of the most common complications of diabetes is involved in more than %25 of diabetic patients’ lives, and if not treated properly can lead to amputation up to %20. The lack of self-care is the underlying cause of mortality, morbidity and chronic complications of diabetes. Identification and rectifying of diabetic foot care needs of patients can additionally reduce readmission; also, %85 of diabetic foot problems can be prevented. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study, 130patients with diabetic foot from Shahid Modarres hospital were selected using census method. Data in forms of demographic questionnaire, self-care requisites assessment tool for preventing diabetic foot ulcer, and Social Support Behavior Scale were completed by patients and then were collected. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 16. Results: In this study, a significant relationship was found between self-care and social support (P<0.05. This means that people with better social support reported better self-care than those with weaker social support. A significant relationship in level of education and monthly income with self-care was seen, as well as in level of education, monthly income and marital status with social support (P<0.001. Conclusions: The results showed that social support can be considered as an effective factor in individual self-care behaviors, and with regard to this factor in educational, treatment and care programs of patients, can improve their self-care, in addition to decreasing economic costs, and improve their qualities of lives as well.

  5. Unresolved issues in the management of ulcers of the foot in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffcoate, W J; Lipsky, B A; Berendt, A R; Cavanagh, P R; Bus, S A; Peters, E J G; van Houtum, W H; Valk, G D; Bakker, K

    2008-12-01

    Management of diabetic foot ulcers presents a major clinical challenge. The response to treatment is often poor and the outcome disappointing, while the costs are high for both healthcare providers and the patient. In such circumstances, it is essential that management should be based on firm evidence and follow consensus. In the case of the diabetic foot, however, clinical practice can vary widely. It is for these reasons that the International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot has published guidelines for adoption worldwide. The Group has now also completed a series of non-systematic and systematic reviews on the subjects of soft tissue infection, osteomyelitis, offloading and other interventions designed to promote ulcer healing. The current article collates the results of this work in order to demonstrate the extent and quality of the evidence which is available in these areas. In general, the available scientific evidence is thin, leaving many issues unresolved. Although the complex nature of diabetic foot disease presents particular difficulties in the design of robust clinical trials, and the absence of published evidence to support the use of an intervention does not always mean that the intervention is ineffective, there is a clear need for more research in the area. Evidence from sound clinical studies is urgently needed to guide consensus and to underpin clinical practice. It is only in this way that patients suffering with these frequently neglected complications of diabetes can be offered the best hope for a favourable outcome, at the least cost.

  6. Plantar Fat Grafting and Tendon Balancing for the Diabetic Foot Ulcer in Remission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Cynthia A.; Larson, Ethan; Rankin, Timothy M.; Pappalardo, Jennifer L.; Slepian, Marvin J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: We report on the use of free fat grafting as a means of redistributing normal and shear stress after healing of plantar diabetic foot wounds. Although fat augmentation (lipofilling) has been described previously as an approach to supplement defects and prevent atrophy, including use as an adjunct to wound healing and to mitigate pain in the foot, we are unaware of any reports in the medical literature that have described its use in the high-risk diabetic foot in remission. An active 37-year-old man with type 2 diabetes and neuropathy presented with gangrene of his fifth ray, which was amputated. He subsequently developed a chronic styloid process ulceration that progressed despite treatment. We performed a tibialis anterior tendon transfer and total contact casting. He went on to heal but with residual fat pad atrophy and recalcitrant preulcerative lesions. We then used autologous fat grafting for the plantar atrophy. The patient was able to successfully transition to normal shoe gear after 4 weeks with successful engraftment without complication or recurrence of the wound at 6 weeks. This therapy may provide a promising adjunct to increase ulcer-free days to the patient in diabetic foot remission. PMID:27536489

  7. Heat-washout measurements compared to distal blood pressure and perfusion in orthopaedic patients with foot ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midttun, M; Azad, B B S; Broholm, R

    2015-01-01

    Distal blood pressure and local skin perfusion pressure were compared to measurement of blood flow rate (BFR) measured by the heat-washout method in orthopaedic patients with and without diabetes, all with a foot ulcer in one foot, compared to healthy controls. The correlation was good between heat...

  8. Diabetes self-management, fasting blood sugar and quality of life among type 2 diabetic patients with foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navicharern, Rungrawee

    2012-02-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers have a negative impact on quality of life and diabetes self-management of the condition is a key component of diabetes treatment. However no study has yet been conducted to determine the relationship between diabetes self-management, fasting blood sugar and quality of life among type 2 diabetic patients with foot ulcers in Thailand. To examine the relationship between diabetes self-management, fasting blood sugar and quality of life (QOL) among type 2 diabetic patients with foot ulcers who received the diabetes treatment in King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thailand. This was a cross-sectional study of 80 participants with type 2 diabetes who had foot ulcers in King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand. Participants with diabetic foot ulcers were given a questionnaire regarding demographic data, fasting blood sugar, diabetes self-management and quality of life. Self-management was assessed by evaluating dietary intake, exercise, medication, self-monitoring, hygienic and foot care. WHOQOL-BREF-THAI, comprising of 26 items, was used to investigate quality of life. A purposive sampling technique was used for selecting patients from two outpatient departments, surgical and rehabilitation. Data were collected between September 2009 and October 2010. Simple descriptive statistics were used to provide the basic information and Pearson's product moment was applied. The majority (51.3%) of study participants were males and in the age group of > 60 years (50%). Over half (61.5%) of the participants had a severity of foot ulcer at the first level. The analysis revealed that there was a negative significant association between fasting blood sugar and quality of life (r = -0.30, p sugar control in type 2 diabetes patients with foot ulcers. Therefore, these patients should be encouraged to perform self-management for controlling their blood sugar and improving their quality of life.

  9. A descriptive study on prevalence of bacterial pathogens in diabetic ulcer and Interventional component for the prevention of foot ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerlin Priya, Rajamanickam Rajkumar, Bakthasingh

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is considered to have reached epidemic proportions worldwide. The most distressing complication of diabetes is foot ulcer and is the major cause of lower limb amputation. Hence, they require a prolonged hospital stay to combat more serious complications like gangrene and lower limb amputation. Early detection and prompt treatment help in alleviating the ulceration. Methods: The present study was conducted among 50 diabetes patients. Study subjects were selected using non probability purposive sampling technique. Pus samples were collected by using sterile swabs in a sterile manner from the ulcerated area. The wounds are washed vigorously with normal saline solution before collection of specimen. The specimens were transported immediately to the laboratory for culture. The clinical specimens were first screened microscopically by Gram’s stain, and then cultured on blood agar (aerobically and an aerobically, MacConkey agar and Robertson cooked meat broth for 48 hours at 37°C in 5-10 percent CO2 and bacteria’s were isolated. Results: The socio demographic profile of the present study reveals that males were predominant among the study population. Type II diabetes was more common, majority of study subjects are suffering from diabetes for more than 5 years and are treated with oral hypoglycemic drugs. The wound size was ≤ 2cms in majority of study subjects. The bacteriological profile of diabetic ulcer reveals that a majority of 23 (46% had growth of Staphylococcus aureus and 19 (38% had growth of klebsiella and a minimum of 6 (12% and 2 (4% had grown of Pseudomonas and Staphylococcus albus. Conclusion: Early detection of these bacterial pathogens helps to minimize the disease progress.

  10. The Use of Best Practice in the Treatment of a Complex Diabetic Foot Ulcer: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Melodie Blakely

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Published guidelines for effective management of diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) include total contact casting (TCC). The purpose of this case study is to describe the application of best practice guidelines for the treatment of a diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) in a complex patient where TCC offloading could not be utilized. Case Description: The patient was a 47 year-old female with a five-plus year history of a full-thickness DFU on the left plantar mid-foot. Treatment include...

  11. Low Level Laser Therapy for the Treatment of Diabetic Foot Ulcers: A Critical Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin H. Beckmann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic foot ulcers as one of the most common complications of diabetes mellitus are defined as nonhealing or long-lasting chronic skin ulcers in diabetic patients. Multidisciplinary care for the diabetic foot is common, but treatment results are often unsatisfactory. Low level laser therapy (LLLT on wound areas as well as on acupuncture points, as a noninvasive, pain-free method with minor side effects, has been considered as a possible treatment option for the diabetic foot syndrome. A systematic literature review identified 1764 articles on this topic. Finally, we adopted 22 eligible references; 8 of them were cell studies, 6 were animal studies, and 8 were clinical trials. Cell studies and animal studies gave evidence of cellular migration, viability, and proliferation of fibroblast cells, quicker reepithelization and reformed connective tissue, enhancement of microcirculation, and anti-inflammatory effects by inhibition of prostaglandine, interleukin, and cytokine as well as direct antibacterial effects by induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS. The transferral of these data into clinical medicine is under debate. The majority of clinical studies show a potential benefit of LLLT in wound healing of diabetic ulcers. But there are a lot of aspects in these studies limiting final evidence about the actual output of this kind of treatment method. In summary, all studies give enough evidence to continue research on laser therapy for diabetic ulcers, but clinical trials using human models do not provide sufficient evidence to establish the usefulness of LLLT as an effective tool in wound care regimes at present. Further well designed research trials are required to determine the true value of LLLT in routine wound care.

  12. The Important Role of Specialist Nurse in the Improvement of Patients With Diabetic Foot Ulcer: Letter to the Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirmohseni

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic Foot Ulcer (DFU is considered as one of the main causes of hospitalization in diabetic patients, which can lead to infection, gangrene, amputation, and even death if the necessary care is not provided. Based on the recent investigations, one of the most effective tactics to manage diabetic foot ulcer is to form a multidisciplinary team including a general practitioner, a nurse, an educator, podiatrists, and some consultants. Although all team members play their own important roles in reduction of DFU and amputation incidence, the role of nurses seems to be more essential. In the developed countries, the diabetes nursing is divided into several categories which one of them is diabetic foot specialist nurse. Totally, these specialists play an effective role in prevention, care, and rehabilitation of the patients with diabetic foot ulcer. Today, the specialist nurses provide effective foot ulcer management and treatment in many countries; however, these specialists, in some developing countries such as Iran, highlight a lack of specialist training as an obstacle to effective healthcare provision. Therefore, the current study aimed to emphasize on the important role of specialist nurses in the improvement of patients with diabetic foot ulcer to encourage the authorities in order to take appropriate strategies.

  13. Minor amputation does not negatively affect health-related quality of life as compared with conservative treatment in patients with a diabetic foot ulcer: An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickwell, K; Siersma, V; Kars, M; Apelqvist, J; Bakker, K; Edmonds, M; Holstein, P; Jirkovská, A; Jude, E B; Mauricio, D; Piaggesi, A; Reike, H; Spraul, M; Uccioli, L; Urbancic, V; van Acker, K; van Baal, J; Schaper, N

    2017-03-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is poor in patients with persistent diabetic foot ulcers and poor HRQoL predicts worse outcomes in these patients. Amputation is often considered a treatment failure, which is why conservative treatment is generally preferred over amputation. However, it is unclear whether minor amputation negatively affects HRQoL compared with conservative treatment in patients with diabetic foot ulcers. In the cohort of the multicenter, prospective, observational Eurodiale study, we determined difference in change of HRQoL measured by EQ-5D between patients with a diabetic foot ulcers that healed after conservative treatment (n = 676) and after minor amputation (n = 145). Propensity score was used to adjust for known confounders, attempting to overcome lack of randomization. Baseline HRQoL was not significantly different between patients treated conservatively and undergoing minor amputation. In addition, there was no difference in the change of HRQoL between these groups. In patients who healed 6 to 12 months after the first visit, HRQoL on the anxiety/depression subscale even appeared to improve more in those who underwent minor amputation. Minor amputation was not associated with a negative impact on HRQoL in patients with a diabetic foot ulcers. It may therefore not be considered treatment failure in terms of HRQoL but rather a viable treatment option. A randomized controlled trial is warranted to further examine the influence of minor amputations on health-related quality of life. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. The foot-health of people with diabetes in a regional Australian population: a prospective clinical audit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perrin Byron M

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is limited understanding of the foot-health of people with diabetes in Australian regional areas. The aim of this study was to document the foot-health of people with diabetes who attend publically funded podiatric services in a regional Australian population. Methods A three month prospective clinical audit was undertaken by the publically-funded podiatric services of a large regional area of Victoria, Australia. The primary variables of interest were the University of Texas (UT diabetic foot risk classification of each patient and the incidence of new foot ulceration during the study period. Age, gender, diabetes type, duration of diabetes and the podiatric service the patients attended were the other variables of interest. Results Five hundred and seventy six patients were seen during the three month period. Over 49% had a UT risk classification at a level at least peripheral neuropathy or more serious diabetes-related foot morbidity. Higher risk at baseline was associated with longer duration of diabetes (F = 31.7, p χ2 = 40.3, p 0.001 and type 1 diabetes (χ2 = 37.3, p 0.001. A prior history of foot pathology was the overwhelming predictor for incident ulceration during the time period (OR 8.1 (95% CI 3.6 to 18.2, p Conclusions The publically funded podiatric services of this large regional area of Australia deal with a disproportionally large number of people with diabetes at high risk of future diabetes-related foot complications. These findings may be useful in ensuring appropriate allocation of resources for future public health services involved in diabetic foot health service delivery in regional areas.

  15. Bilayered skin-substitute technology for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers: current insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karr JC

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey C Karr Karr Foot and Leg Center, Lakeland, FL, USA Abstract: The estimated prevalence of diabetes mellitus in New Zealand is 7%, and as in many other developed countries is a growing problem. One of the most common and costly complications, diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs are chronic wounds that result when the phases of wound healing are disrupted or incomplete, resulting in wounds that persist for several months or even years. Despite standard-care therapy (ie, debridement, infection elimination, use of dressings, off-loading, the majority of DFUs remain unhealed, and it is thus appropriate to consider advanced therapies. One such therapy is a bioengineered bilayered living cellular construct (BLCC comprised of living keratinocytes and fibroblasts. BLCC facilitates the delivery of a broad array of cytokines and growth factors often deficient in chronic nonhealing wounds, and in doing so reverses patients’ wounds from a chronic wound to an acute normally healing wound. BLCC has an important body of evidence to support its use in DFUs, including randomized clinical trials, a real-world comparative-effectiveness analysis, and health-economics data. Keywords: bilayer skin substitute, bilayered living cellular construct, chronic wounds, diabetic foot ulcers, wound healing

  16. Rare Case of Aspergillus ochraceus Osteomyelitis of Calcaneus Bone in a Patient with Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhang Babamahmoodi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is the most common metabolic disease in humans. One of the major complications of the disease is foot ulcer that is prone to infection. The most common causes of infection which have been reported in these patients are bacteria and fungi such as Candida, Aspergillus, and Rhizopus species. We report one such rare case with calcaneal osteomyelitis caused by Aspergillus ochraceus in a patient with diabetic foot osteomyelitis. The case was a 68-year-old male with a history of type II diabetes for 2 years. The patient had two ulcers on the right heel bones for the past 6 months with no significant improvement. One of the most important predisposing factors to infectious diseases, especially opportunistic fungal infection, is diabetes mellitus. Aspergillus species can involve bony tissue through vascular system, direct infection, and trauma. Proper and early diagnosis and treatment of diabetic foot infection can reduce or prevent complications, such as osteomyelitis and amputation. The annual examination of feet for skin and nail lesion, sensation, anatomical changes, and vascular circulation can be useful for prevention and control of infection.

  17. Rare Case of Aspergillus ochraceus Osteomyelitis of Calcaneus Bone in a Patient with Diabetic Foot Ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babamahmoodi, Farhang; Shokohi, Tahereh; Ahangarkani, Fatemeh; Nabili, Mojtaba; Afzalian Ashkezari, Elham; Alinezhad, Sosan

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is the most common metabolic disease in humans. One of the major complications of the disease is foot ulcer that is prone to infection. The most common causes of infection which have been reported in these patients are bacteria and fungi such as Candida, Aspergillus, and Rhizopus species. We report one such rare case with calcaneal osteomyelitis caused by Aspergillus ochraceus in a patient with diabetic foot osteomyelitis. The case was a 68-year-old male with a history of type II diabetes for 2 years. The patient had two ulcers on the right heel bones for the past 6 months with no significant improvement. One of the most important predisposing factors to infectious diseases, especially opportunistic fungal infection, is diabetes mellitus. Aspergillus species can involve bony tissue through vascular system, direct infection, and trauma. Proper and early diagnosis and treatment of diabetic foot infection can reduce or prevent complications, such as osteomyelitis and amputation. The annual examination of feet for skin and nail lesion, sensation, anatomical changes, and vascular circulation can be useful for prevention and control of infection.

  18. THE INFLUENCE OF PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY AND PERIPHERAL VASCULAR DISEASE IN THE OUTCOME OF DIABETIC FOOT MANAGEMENT – A PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundar Prakash S, Krishnakumar, Chandra Prabha

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Peripheral neuropathy and Peripheral Vascular Disease are the risk factors for the development of diabetic foot. The aim of this study was to evaluate differences and predictors of outcome parameters in patients with diabetic foot by stratifying these subjects according to the severity of these risk factors. Materials and methods: This is a prospective study conducted in 70 patients in the age group of 30-90 years diagnosed as Type II Diabetes with foot ulcers. After detailed clinical examination the following tests were conducted in all the patients: Complete blood count (CBC, Haemoglobin (Hb, Random Blood Sugar (RBS, Erythrocyte Sedimentation rate (ESR, Chest X-ray(CXR, Electrocardiography (ECG, foot X-ray, pus culture, Neuropathy testing by Semmes Weinstein Monofilament Test and Vibration Perception Threshold and Peripheral vascularity assessment by Duplex Doppler. Then grading of the ulcers was done using Wagner’s Grade. The outcome of the patients was assessed by recording the healing time, mode of surgery and amputation rates of the patients. Results: A total of 70 patients with diabetic foot were consecutively included into the study (65.7% male, age (31% in 51-60 years, mean diabetes duration (5.2 years, Ulcer Grade (37% in Grade IV, Foot lesions (45.7% in toe, Blood sugar levels (64% in 300-400 mg/dl, Neuropathy (84%, Peripheral vascular disease (67%, major amputation (7% and mortality (1.4%. Conclusion: All diabetic patients should undergo testing for neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease apart from doing other tests.

  19. Treatment of Diabetic Foot Ulcers through Systemic Effects of Extremely Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trejo-Núñez, A. D.; Pérez-Chávez, F.; García-Sánchez, C.; Serrano-Luna, G.; Cañendo-Dorantes, L.

    2008-08-01

    This study was designed to, investigate the healing effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) on diabetic foot ulcers and test two different exposure systems aimed at reducing the ELF-EMF exposure time of patients. In the first system the ELF-EMF were applied to the arm where only 3% of the total blood volume/min circulates at any given time. In the second system the ELF-EMF were applied to the thorax where more than 100% of the total blood volume/minute circulates at any given time. Twenty-six diabetic patients, with superficial neuropathic ulcers unresponsive to medical treatment were included in this preliminary report. In the first group (17 patients), the arm was exposed two hours twice a week to a extremely low frequency electromagnetic field of 0.45-0.9 mTrms, 120 Hz generated inside a solenoid coil of 10.1 cm by 20.5 cm long. In the second group the thorax of 7 patients was exposed 25 minutes twice a week to an electromagnetic field of 0.4-0.85 mTrms, 120 Hz generated in the center of a squared quasi-Helmholtz coil 52 cm by side. One patient was assigned to a placebo configuration of each exposure system with identical appearance as the active equipment but without magnetic field. Patients with deep ulcers, infected ulcers, cancer, or auto-immune disease were excluded. These preliminary results showed that the two exposure systems accelerate the healing process of neuropathic ulcers. Complete healing of the ulcer had a median duration of 90 days in both exposure systems. Therefore thorax exposure where more blood is exposed to ELF-EMF per unit of time was able to reduce 4.8 times the patient treatment time. In those patients assigned to the placebo equipment no healing effects were observed. This study will continue with a parallel, double blind placebo controlled protocol.

  20. Effective and Economic Offloading of Diabetic Foot Ulcers in India with the Bohler Iron Plaster Cast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, Priyanka; Hariharan, Rajalakshmi; Shankar, Nachiket; Gaur, Anil Kumar; Jose, Naveen Matthew

    2016-04-01

    Economic constraints are a major obstacle to the implementation of offloading casts in India. The aim of this study is to monitor the healing and activity limitations related to Bohler iron plaster cast (BIPC) when used for offloading diabetic neuropathic plantar foot ulcers. Thirty patients were cast for 1 month and evaluated for healing using the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH), and for activity limitation using the Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS). The change in the scores after intervention was the outcome measure. There was good healing as evidenced by a statistical difference in mean PUSH scores. The baseline PUSH score of 9.76-0.41 (T1-SEM) was greater than follow-up PUSH score of 6.32 + 0.41 (T2 + SEM) and the p value ulcer area, exudate, and tissue type. There was no mobility effect as there was no significant difference in LEFS. Significant negative correlation was there between PUSH and LEFS. The r value was less than -0.7 both at baseline and after intervention. The combined benefits of good healing, lack of affect on lower extremity function, the ease of application and dressing, and relative affordability make BIPC a commendable offloading modality for the management of diabetic plantar ulcers.

  1. Safety and efficacy of Becaplermin gel in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blume P

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Peter Blume,1 Melinda Bowlby,2 Brian M Schmidt,2 Ryan Donegan2 1Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, and Anesthesia, Yale School of Medicine, 2Section of Podiatric Surgery, Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, Yale New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT, USA Abstract: Becaplermin gel remains the only US Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved growth factor for the treatment of diabetic neuropathic foot ulcers. Becaplermin gel has shown to be efficacious in a number of clinical trials. The FDA has added a black box warning label about the risk of cancer associated with the use of three or more Becaplermin tubes. Other adverse drug reactions associated with Becaplermin gel use are minimal. There is a need for further research regarding the true correlation between cancer and Becaplermin gel use. Keywords: diabetic, ulcer, wound care, advanced biologic therapy

  2. Diagnostic accuracy of existing methods for identifying diabetic foot ulcers from inpatient and outpatient datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budiman-Mak Elly

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As the number of persons with diabetes is projected to double in the next 25 years in the US, an accurate method of identifying diabetic foot ulcers in population-based data sources are ever more important for disease surveillance and public health purposes. The objectives of this study are to evaluate the accuracy of existing methods and to propose a new method. Methods Four existing methods were used to identify all patients diagnosed with a foot ulcer in a Department of Veterans Affairs (VA hospital from the inpatient and outpatient datasets for 2003. Their electronic medical records were reviewed to verify whether the medical records positively indicate presence of a diabetic foot ulcer in diagnoses, medical assessments, or consults. For each method, five measures of accuracy and agreement were evaluated using data from medical records as the gold standard. Results Our medical record reviews show that all methods had sensitivity > 92% but their specificity varied substantially between 74% and 91%. A method used in Harrington et al. (2004 was the most accurate with 94% sensitivity and 91% specificity and produced an annual prevalence of 3.3% among VA users with diabetes nationwide. A new and simpler method consisting of two codes (707.1× and 707.9 shows an equally good accuracy with 93% sensitivity and 91% specificity and 3.1% prevalence. Conclusions Our results indicate that the Harrington and New methods are highly comparable and accurate. We recommend the Harrington method for its accuracy and the New method for its simplicity and comparable accuracy.

  3. Catalase-negative Staphylococcus aureus isolated from a diabetic foot ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MR Zali

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We report a catalase-negative Staphylococcus aureus isolated from a 56-year-old male diabetic patient with foot ulcer who attended our surgery ward. Species identification was confirmed by Gram staining, standard biochemical tests and PCR amplification of the nuc and fem genes. Antibiotic susceptibility showed that the strain was sensitive to imepenem, chloramphenicol, amoxicillin, vancomycin and resistant to oxacillin, penicillin, ceftriaxone, erythromycin, clindamycin, and amikacin. Clinicians and microbiologists must be encouraged to identify and report these atypical strains and the infections associated with them in order to establish their role in pathogenesis.

  4. Prevalence and Prognostic Value of Depression and Anxiety in Patients with Diabetic Foot Ulcers and Possibilities of their Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udovichenko, Oleg V; Maximova, N V; Amosova, M V; Yunilaynen, O A; Berseneva, E A; Starostina, E G

    2017-01-01

    Depression and anxiety can potentially influence treatment results of diabetic complications. Of our study was to explore: (1) prevalence of these disorders in patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFU); (2) possible risk factors of depression and anxiety; (3) possible links between ulcer treatment results and depression/anxiety status. 285 outpatients with diabetes and foot or leg ulcers were tested for depression and anxiety with self-report scales: CES-D and the anxiety subscale from HADS. Ulcer treatment results, incidence of new ulcers and number of hospital admissions were assessed after 1.5 years of follow-up. Depression was detected in 110 patients (39%), anxiety in 103 (36%). Females had depression and anxiety more often than males (48% and 46% vs. 27% and 25% respectively). A combined score based on diabetes duration, insulin treatment, history of myocardial infarction, history of foot ulcers and recent foot surgery was higher in patients with than without depression (3.0 vs. 2.0, p=0.02). Every of these or other potential risk factors alone was not associated with depression or anxiety. Patients with depression did not demonstrate poorer prognosis except higher mortality in subgroup of severely depressed patients without ulcer history. For anxiety we got similar results as its presence strongly correlated with depression. The overall prevalence of depression and anxiety in DFU patients is compatible with other diabetic populations. Various parameters of ulcer severity and duration did not influence the probability of depression and anxiety occurrence. Depression in general was not associated with poorer ulcer treatment results. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Problems related to functioning and quality of life of patients with diabetic foot ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna R. Wiraszka

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, diabetes constitutes a significant medical, social and economic problem. According to the World Health Organization in 2025 the incidence of this disease will double in both developed and developing countries. Incidence of diabetes in Poland is 2–5% depending on the region. This disease leads to numerous restrictions in patient functioning. The need for continuous therapy and medical supervision as well as various complications exert a negative influence on the quality of life (QOL in this group of patients. One of those complications – the diabetic foot – is a particularly important problem. In many cases it leads to foot ulceration and, in consequence, amputation. These unfavorable aftermaths of diabetes not only cause limitations in physical functioning, but also negatively influence patients’ psychosocial functioning and require multidisciplinary support from a therapeutic care team.

  6. Effectiveness of combined laser-puncture and conventional wound care to accelerate diabetic foot ulcer healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adiningsih Srilestari

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Impaired wound healing is a common complication of diabetes. It has complex pathophysiologic mechanisms and often necessitates amputation. Our study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of combined laser-puncture and conventional wound care in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers.Methods: This was a double-blind controlled randomized clinical trial on 36 patients, conducted at the Metabolic Endocrine Outpatient Clinic, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, between May and August 2015. Stimulation by laser-puncture (the treatment group or sham stimulation (the control group were performed on top of the standard wound care. Laser-puncture or sham were done on several acupuncture points i.e. LI4 Hegu, ST36 Zusanli, SP6 Sanyinjiao and KI3 Taixi bilaterally, combined with irradiation on the ulcers itself twice a week for four weeks. The mean reduction in ulcer sizes (week 2–1, week 3–1, week 4–1 were measured every week and compared between the two groups and analyzed by Mann-Whitney test.Results: The initial median ulcer size were 4.75 (0.10–9.94 cm2 and 2.33 (0.90–9.88 cm2 in laser-puncture and sham groups, respectively (p=0.027. The median reduction of ulcer size at week 2–1 was -1.079 (-3.25 to -0.09 vs -0.36 (-0.81 to -1.47 cm2, (p=0.000; at week 3–1 was -1.70 (-3.15 to -0.01 vs -0.36 (-0.80 to -0.28 cm2, (p=0.000; and at week 4–1 was -1.22 (-2.72 to 0.00 vs -0.38 (-0.74 to -0.57 cm2, (p=0.012.Conclusion: Combined laser-puncture and conventional wound care treatment are effective in accelerating the healing of diabetic foot ulcer.

  7. Epidemiology and prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis in patients with diabetic foot ulcers: focus on the differences between species isolated from individuals with ischemic vs. neuropathic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galkowska, Hanna; Podbielska, Adrianna; Olszewski, Waldemar L; Stelmach, Ewa; Luczak, Miroslaw; Rosinski, Grzegorz; Karnafel, Waldemar

    2009-05-01

    We examined whether foot ischemia or neuropathy with diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) promote selection of staphylococci species, evaluated frequency of MRSA and MRSE among strains yielded from patients with DFU and assessed multidrug resistance of isolates. Patients with DFU and foot osteomyelitis were divided into ischemic foot ulcer (IFU, n=21) and neuropathic foot ulcer (NFU, n=29) groups. Frequency of Staphylococcus epidermidis yielded from curettage of IFU was higher compared with NFU (P<0.05). S. epidermidis was also more frequently isolated from the toe web surface of patients with IFU compared with NFU (55% vs. 17.9%, respectively) and healthy volunteers (HV, n=20) (17.6%, P<0.05). These mostly MRSE strains (83.3-100%) originating from DFU patients were multidrug resistant (88.8%). Also, most of MRSA isolates were multidrug resistant (70.3%). Higher rates of MSSA from DFU patients than HV showed resistance to antimicrobials. This is the first report indicating that diabetic patients with IFU differ with NFU patients in higher frequency of S. epidermidis skin colonization and ulcer infection. We suggest that IFU should be defined as separate disease state of DFU and S. epidermidis should be appreciated as a nosocomial pathogen.

  8. Low-level laser therapy and Calendula officinalis in repairing diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Ana Flávia Machado de; Feitosa, Maura Cristina Porto; Coelho, Nayana Pinheiro Machado de Freitas; Rebêlo, Veruska Cronemberger Nogueira; Castro, Juçara Gonçalves de; Sousa, Patrícia Regina Gomes de; Feitosa, Valrian Campos; Arisawa, Emilia Angela Lo Schiavo

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of low-level laser therapy isolated and associated with Calendula officinalis oil in treating diabetic foot ulcers. An experimental, randomized, controlled, prospective, interventional clinical case study using a quantitative approach. The sample consisted of 32 diabetic patients of both genders. Participants were randomly divided into four groups. Doppler Ultrasound evaluation of the Ankle-Brachial Index, brief pain inventory and analog pain scale were performed at baseline and after 30 days. Reduced pain was observed in the Low-level laser therapy and Low-level laser therapy associated with Essential Fatty Acids groups (pTerapia a Laser de Baixa Intensidade isolada e associada ao óleo de Calendula officinalis no reparo de úlceras em pé diabético. Estudo de caso clínico, experimental, controlado, randomizado, prospectivo, intervencional, de caráter quantitativo. A amostra foi composta de 32 pacientes diabéticos, de ambos os gêneros. Os participantes foram distribuídos aleatoriamente em quatro grupos. Ultrassom Doppler, avaliação do Índice Tornozelo-Braquial, Inventário breve de dor e escala de dor analógica foram realizados no início e após 30 dias. Houve redução da dor nos grupos Terapia a Laser de Baixa Intensidade e Terapia a Laser de Baixa intensidade associada aos Ácidos Graxos Essenciais, com pgrupos mantiveram-se estáveis. Na análise da redução de área da lesão, o grupo Terapia a Laser de Baixa Intensidade associada aos Ácidos Graxos Essenciais apresentou uma significância p=0,0032, e o grupo Terapia a Laser de Baixa Intensidade, p=0,0428. A Terapia a Laser de Baixa Intensidade, realizada tanto isoladamente quanto associada ao óleo de Calendula officinalis, foi eficaz no alívio da dor e na aceleração do processo de reparo tecidual de pé diabético.

  9. THE ANALYSIS OF THE DIABETIC FOOT OSTEOMYELITIS AT A TERTIARY CARE CENTER - A PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Mithun N; Pattanashetty; Reshmina; Sharath Babu; Harikrishna; Sreedhar Reddy; Ramakrishna J

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION : India is considered as the diabetic capital of the world. Diabetic foot osteomyelitis is considered as one of the severe complications of diabetes mellitus. Diabetic foot osteomyelitis tends to complicate around one third of diabetic foot infections. In v iew of this we conducted a prospective study on the bacteriological analysis of diabetic foot osteomyelitis at a tertiary care center. MATERIALS AND METHODS : A prospective study was perform...

  10. In-hospital metabolic regulation in patients with a diabetic foot ulcer: is it worthwhile?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Aoife M; Dinneen, Sean F

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that hyperglycaemia is associated with many negative cardiovascular and immunological effects. Because of the high prevalence of underlying vascular disease along with associated infection, patients with diabetic foot ulcers are especially vulnerable to these adverse consequences. While studies consistently demonstrate worse outcomes in the setting of hyperglycaemia during hospitalization, multiple trials examining the effects of intensive glycaemic control reveal mixed results. In particular, effects on mortality are varied, and although there may be some benefit in the setting of infection, hypoglycaemia is a concern when glucose levels are treated down to the normoglycaemic range. Therefore, although metabolic regulation is worthwhile theoretically, the optimal intensity of control is unclear. There is a need for future research to clarify the benefits and risks associated with strict metabolic control in patients with diabetic foot ulceration. In the interim recommendations from international guidelines should be followed; these advise pre-meal glucose targets of <7.8 mmol/L and random targets of <10.0 mmol/L in general medical and surgical settings.

  11. Diabetic foot ulcers in conjunction with lower limb lymphedema: pathophysiology and treatment procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanapathy M

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Muholan Kanapathy,1 Mark J Portou,1,2 Janice Tsui,1,2 Toby Richards1,21Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, 2Department of Vascular Surgery, Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust Hospital, London, UKAbstract: Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs are complex, chronic, and progressive wounds, and have a significant impact on morbidity, mortality, and quality of life. A particular aspect of DFU that has not been reviewed extensively thus far is its management in conjunction with peripheral limb edema. Peripheral limb edema is a feature of diabetes that has been identified as a significant risk factor for amputation in patients with DFU. Three major etiological factors in development of lymphedema with concurrent DFU are diabetic microangiopathy, failure of autonomic regulation, and recurrent infection. This review outlines the pathophysiology of lymphedema formation in patients with DFU and highlights the cellular and immune components of impaired wound healing in lymphedematous DFU. We then discuss the principles of management of DFU in conjunction with lymphedema.Keywords: diabetic foot ulcer, lymphedema, chronic wound, wound management

  12. Safety, efficacy and pitfalls of fibrocyte application in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behjati, Mohaddeseh; Hashemi, Mohammad; Shoarayenejati, Alireza; Karbalaie, Khadijeh; Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad H

    2015-02-01

    Fibrocytes are unique bone marrow-derived cells with great potential in wound healing. Hence, the aim of this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of the applied circulating fibrocytes in the treatment of non healing diabetic foot ulcers. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated by centrifugation through Ficoll-Paque method. After 3 days, the non adherent cells were removed by a single, gentle aspiration. Adherent cells were cultured in the same medium for 10 days. The cells were characterised using mouse anti-human-CD45-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and mouse anti-human-collagen I, and also characterised by immunofluorescence microscopy using the above mentioned antibodies. Sterility measures were applied for clinical evaluation. Based on the literature review, cell transplantation generally requires at least 3 × 10(6) cells regarding efficacy measures. As fibrocytes are non proliferating cells, 350 ml patient's blood is required to prepare patient-specific serum before cell isolation and culture, and 85 ml patient's blood is needed for cell isolation and differentiation on cell transplantation applications. In our survey, no diabetic patient was inclined to be donor of such blood volume, mainly because of their pre-assumption that they are anaemic. It is concluded that fibrocytes do not seem to be candidate cells for cell therapy in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers because of the rarity of this cell population in circulation.

  13. Health locus of control theory in diabetes: a worthwhile approach in managing diabetic foot ulcers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybylski, M

    2010-06-01

    The current global epidemic of type two diabetes mellitus has led to an accompanying increase in both foot ulceration and amputations, which pose significant health problems to populations worldwide. If improved treatment options are to be offered, then we clearly need a better understanding of all aspects of this disease. To date the major focus of diabetes research has been on physical factors, which are undeniably important, but there has been little acknowledgement of the significant psychological effects that can influence health and delay wound healing. The 'health locus of control' (HLC) theory, a psychological theory concerning patients' perceptions of how much control they have over life events (both positive and negative) may well be of use in this patient group. It has been suggested that concordance with treatment is improved when patients have a high 'internal' HLC (as measured by a questionnaire), which aligns with the belief that they have greater control over their health. It has further been suggested that through the implementation of 'group-care' education programmes, patients' attitudes can change, with a shift towards higher 'internal' HLC values. Thus a new approach in patient management might be to implement such education programmes, in the hope of improving adherence to treatment regimens and, hence, patient outcomes. To date there has been little conclusive evidence of the application of this theory, and although various studies have been performed in diabetic populations, only one study has been conducted specifically regarding diabetic foot ulcers. Clearly more research is needed.

  14. Bacteriocin from Bacillus subtilis as a novel drug against diabetic foot ulcer bacterial pathogens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baby Joseph; Berlina Dhas; Vimalin Hena; Justin Raj

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To isolate and identify Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) from soil and to characterize and partially purify the bacteriocin. To evaluate the antimicrobial activity against four diabetic foot ulcer bacterial pathogens. Methods:Genotypic identification was done based on Bergey’s manual of systemic bacteriology. Antimicrobial susceptibility test was done by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Colonies were identified by colony morphology and biochemical characterization and also compared with MTCC 121 strain. Further identification was done by 16S rRNA sequencing. Inhibitory activities of partially purified bacteriocin on all the DFU isolates were done by agar well diffusion method. The strain was identified to produce bacteriocin by stab overlay assay. Bacteriocin was extracted by organic solvent extraction using chloroform, further purified by HPLC and physical, and chemical characterization was performed. Results: The four isolates showed high level of resistance to amoxyclav and sensitivity to ciprofloxacin. HPLC purification revealed that the extracts are bacteriocin. The phylogenetic tree analysis results showed that the isolate was 99%related to B. subtilis BSF01. The results reveled activity to all the four isolates and high level of activity was seen in case of Klebsiella sp. Conclusions:Partially purified bacteriocin was found to have antimicrobial activity against the four diabetic foot ulcer bacterial pathogens, which can thus be applied as a better drug molecule on further studies. The strain B. subtilis are found to be safe for use and these antimicrobial peptides can be used as an antimicrobial in humans to treat DFU bacterial pathogens.

  15. Noninvasive assessment of diabetic foot ulcers with diffuse photon density wave methodology: pilot human study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papazoglou, Elisabeth S; Neidrauer, Michael; Zubkov, Leonid; Weingarten, Michael S; Pourrezaei, Kambiz

    2009-01-01

    A pilot human study is conducted to evaluate the potential of using diffuse photon density wave (DPDW) methodology at near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths (685 to 830 nm) to monitor changes in tissue hemoglobin concentration in diabetic foot ulcers. Hemoglobin concentration is measured by DPDW in 12 human wounds for a period ranging from 10 to 61 weeks. In all wounds that healed completely, gradual decreases in optical absorption coefficient, oxygenated hemoglobin concentration, and total hemoglobin concentration are observed between the first and last measurements. In nonhealing wounds, the rates of change of these properties are nearly zero or slightly positive, and a statistically significant difference (p<0.05) is observed in the rates of change between healing and nonhealing wounds. Differences in the variability of DPDW measurements over time are observed between healing and nonhealing wounds, and this variance may also be a useful indicator of nonhealing wounds. Our results demonstrate that DPDW methodology with a frequency domain NIR device can differentiate healing from nonhealing diabetic foot ulcers, and indicate that it may have clinical utility in the evaluation of wound healing potential.

  16. Importance of factors determining the low health-related quality of life in people presenting with a diabetic foot ulcer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersma, V; Thorsen, H; Holstein, P E

    2013-01-01

    To identify the factors responsible for the low health-related quality of life associated with foot ulcers and the relative importance of these factors.......To identify the factors responsible for the low health-related quality of life associated with foot ulcers and the relative importance of these factors....

  17. Utilizing the Ipswich Touch Test to simplify screening methods for identifying the risk of foot ulceration among diabetics: The Saudi experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madanat, Amal; Sheshah, Eman; Badawy, El-Badry; Abbas, Ameera; Al-Bakheet, Anas

    2015-08-01

    Our study demonstrates that Ipswich Touch Test is reliable and comparable to established standardized tests that identify the risk of foot ulceration among Saudi patients with diabetes mellitus. The simplicity of the test will assist in overcoming the barriers to screen for and detect the risk of foot ulceration.

  18. The Association Between Geographic Density of Infectious Disease Physicians and Limb Preservation in Patients With Diabetic Foot Ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Meghan B; Allen, Glenn O; Ferguson, Patrick D; McBride, Joseph A; Crnich, Christopher J; Smith, Maureen A

    2017-01-01

    Avoiding major (above-ankle) amputation in patients with diabetic foot ulcers is best accomplished by multidisciplinary care teams with access to infectious disease specialists. However, access to infectious disease physicians is partially influenced by geography. We assessed the effect of living in a hospital referral region with a high geographic density of infectious disease physicians on major amputation for patients with diabetic foot ulcers. We studied geographic density, rather than infectious disease consultation, to capture both the direct and indirect (eg, informal consultation) effects of access to these providers on major amputation. We used a national retrospective cohort of 56440 Medicare enrollees with incident diabetic foot ulcers. Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess the relationship between infectious disease physician density and major amputation, while controlling for patient demographics, comorbidities, and ulcer severity. Living in hospital referral regions with high geographic density of infectious disease physicians was associated with a reduced risk of major amputation after controlling for demographics, comorbidities, and ulcer severity (hazard ratio, .83; 95% confidence interval, .75-.91; P geographic density of infectious disease physicians and major amputation was not different based on ulcer severity and was maintained when adjusting for socioeconomic factors and modeling amputation-free survival. Infectious disease physicians may play an important role in limb salvage. Future studies should explore whether improved access to infectious disease physicians results in fewer major amputations.

  19. CLINICAL STUDY AND SURGICAL MANAGEMENT OF DIABETIC FOOT: A PROSPECTIVE SINGLE INSTITUTIONAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananda

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The most frequent reason for hospitalization for patients with diabetes is foot complications, which accounts for up to 25% of all diabetic admissions. The clinical triad most commonly seen in diabetic foot ulcer is peripheral sensory neuropathy, trauma and deformity. Approximately 15% to 20 % of the population in US is hospitalized with complications at some-time during course of their disease. Diabetic foot infections are defines as any inframalleolar infection in a person with diabetes mellitus. Diabetic patients may develop many types of foot ulcers, any of which can get infected. Infection should be diagnosed clinically on the basis of cardinal manifestations. Selection of antibiotic regimen initially involves decision about route of therapy, spectrum of microorganisms to be covered, and the specific drugs to administer and later involves choosing the definitive regimen and the duration of treatment. OBJECTIVE: 1. Early detection of risk factors for ulceration by specific history and systematic examination of the foot. 2. To study the microbial agents of wound infection in the diabetic foot infections. 3. To classify the ulcers, which facilitates in logical approach to treatment and in predicting outcome? 4. To formulate the management by multidisciplinary approach. 5. To describe the surgical treatment and wound care of diabetic foot ulcers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All the patients (Both out-patient basis and hospitalized patients with diabetic foot ulcers of more than two weeks duration at Dr. B R Ambedkar Medical College and Hospital from November 2012 to February 2014 are counseled for investigation and treatment of diabetic foot ulcer and its complications. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: 1. The incidence of diabetic foot was seen highest in 51 to 60 years. 2. Male to female ratio was 4:1. 3. By occupation, most patients were farmers (44%. 4. Diabetic foot most commonly seen in patients with duration of diabetes more than 5 years

  20. A clinical trial of Integra Template for diabetic foot ulcer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, Vickie R; Lavery, Lawrence A; Reyzelman, Alexander M; Dutra, Timothy G; Dove, Cyaandi R; Kotsis, Sandra V; Kim, Hyungjin Myra; Chung, Kevin C

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with diabetes mellitus are at an increased risk of developing a diabetic foot ulcer (DFU). This study evaluated the safety and efficacy of Integra Dermal Regeneration Template (IDRT) for the treatment of nonhealing DFUs. The Foot Ulcer New Dermal Replacement Study was a multicenter, randomized, controlled, parallel group clinical trial conducted under an Investigational Device Exemption. Thirty-two sites enrolled and randomized 307 subjects with at least one DFU. Consented patients were entered into the 14-day run-in phase where they were treated with the standard of care (0.9% sodium chloride gel) plus a secondary dressing and an offloading/protective device. Patients with less than 30% reepithelialization of the study ulcer after the run-in phase were randomized into the treatment phase. The subjects were randomized to the control treatment group (0.9% sodium chloride gel; n = 153) or the active treatment group (IDRT, n = 154). The treatment phase was 16 weeks or until confirmation of complete wound closure (100% reepithelialization of the wound surface), whichever occurred first. Following the treatment phase, all subjects were followed for 12 weeks. Complete DFU closure during the treatment phase was significantly greater with IDRT treatment (51%) than control treatment (32%; p = 0.001) at sixteen weeks. The median time to complete DFU closure was 43 days for IDRT subjects and 78 days for control subjects in wounds that healed. The rate of wound size reduction was 7.2% per week for IDRT subjects vs. 4.8% per week for control subjects (p = 0.012). For the treatment of chronic DFUs, IDRT treatment decreased the time to complete wound closure, increased the rate of wound closure, improved components of quality of life and had less adverse events compared with the standard of care treatment. IDRT could greatly enhance the treatment of nonhealing DFUs.

  1. Association of limited joint mobility and increased plantar hardness in diabetic foot ulceration in north Asian Indian: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periyasamy, R; Anand, Sneh; Ammini, A C

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this article is to investigate the association of limited joint mobility and foot sole hardness in north Asian Indian type 2 diabetic patients. Limited joint mobility and hardness of the foot sole were measured for 39 subjects attending the AIIMS Endocrinology & Metabolism Clinic. The total subject divided into three groups: 13 control subjects (nondiabetic), 13 diabetic patients without neuropathy and 13 diabetic neuropathy patients. Neuropathy status was assessed using 10 gm Semen's Weinstein monofilament. Joint mobility parameters, such as ankle dorsiflexion/plantar flexion and metatarsophalangeal-1 dorsiflexion/plantar flexion, are measured using a goniometer. Foot sole hardness was measured using a durometer or shore meter. We found that diabetic patients with a neuropathic foot had significantly reduced joint mobility and increased foot sole hardness, placing them at risk for subsequent ulceration. Metatarsophalangeal-1 dorsiflexion/plantar flexion of both feet of diabetic patients had significant correlation (at p hardness in both feet of diabetic neuropathy subjects. Also linear regression analysis showed that duration of diabetes was significantly associated with the joint mobility parameters. In this study we conclude that joint mobility had reduced further if neuropathy and increased foot sole hardness coexisted owing to high plantar pressures. Hence, both limited joint mobility and increased foot sole hardness appears to be important determinants of foot sole ulceration in diabetic neuropathic subject.

  2. The clinical assessment study of the foot (CASF): study protocol for a prospective observational study of foot pain and foot osteoarthritis in the general population

    OpenAIRE

    Menz Hylton B; D'Cruz Deborah; Marshall Michelle; Thomas Martin J; Myers Helen; Roddy Edward; Belcher John; Muller Sara; Peat George

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Symptomatic osteoarthritis (OA) affects approximately 10% of adults aged over 60 years. The foot joint complex is commonly affected by OA, yet there is relatively little research into OA of the foot, compared with other frequently affected sites such as the knee and hand. Existing epidemiological studies of foot OA have focussed predominantly on the first metatarsophalangeal joint at the expense of other joints. This three-year prospective population-based observational co...

  3. Clinical and behavioral factors associated with management outcome in hospitalized patients with diabetic foot ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yekta Z

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Zahra Yekta1, Reza Pourali2, Rahim Nezhadrahim3, Leila Ravanyar4, Mohammad Ghasemi-rad5 1Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Urmia University of Medical Sciences, Urmia, 2Medical Demonstrator, Urmia University of Medical Sciences, Urmia, 3Department of Infectious Disease, Urmia University of Medical Sciences, Urmia, 4Master of Health Education, Urmia University of Medical Sciences, Urmia, 5Student Research Committee, Urmia University of Medical Sciences, Urmia, Islamic Republic of Iran Objectives: Diabetic foot ulcer (DFU has been linked to high mortality and morbidity in diabetic patients. In spite of the increasing prevalence of diabetes and its complications, this issue has not been adequately studied in Iran. Materials and methods: In this cross-sectional study we attempt to describe the prevalence of diabetic foot amputation in patients admitted to our training hospitals in Urmia, Iran, and also to determine the associated demographic, behavioral, and clinical factors. Results: Of 94 patients with DFU, 34 (32% had amputation. Those with amputation were significantly older and were also less educated than those without amputation, had longer duration of diabetes (hence were more likely to suffer from complications, and had high-risk wounds plus a poor glycemic control. On logistic regression analysis two variables were associated with amputation: Wagner classification ≥3 and HbA1c. On a receiver operating characteristics curve, the HbA1c cutoff point of 9.7% significantly discriminated to predict increasing risk of amputation. Conclusion: Both glycemic control and promoting the knowledge of patients and health care professionals in order to diagnose DFU in the early stages and to prevent development of the high-grade wounds would be a significant step in reducing the burden of DFU and its effect on quality of life in Iran. Keywords: diabetes mellitus, foot ulcer, amputation

  4. Prospective diagnosis of marginal ulceration following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass with computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J. Adduci, MD, PhD

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Marginal ulcers are reported to be the most common complication following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. Despite their frequency, they are rarely diagnosed prospectively with cross-sectional imaging. We present four cases in which the diagnosis of marginal ulceration was made prospectively with CT and confirmed with endoscopy.

  5. A Pilot Randomized, Controlled Study of Nanocrystalline Silver, Manuka Honey, and Conventional Dressing in Healing Diabetic Foot Ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ka-Kit Tsang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystalline silver (nAg and Manuka honey (MH dressing have increasing popularity for treating diabetic foot ulcer (DFU. This study was an open-label randomized controlled trial with three parallel groups’ design in examining the preliminary effectiveness of nAg against MH and conventional dressing in healing DFU in terms of ulcer healing, ulcer infection, and inflammation. 31 participants (11 in the nAg group, 10 in the MH group, and 10 in the convention group diagnosed with type 2 diabetes were enrolled. Wound cleaning, debridement, and topical dressing application were performed according to the group allocation in each visit at weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12. The results found that the proportions of complete ulcer healing were 81.8%, 50%, and 40% in the nAg, MH, and conventional groups, respectively. The ulcer size reduction rate was potentially higher in the nAg group (97.45% than the MH group (86.21% and the conventional group (75.17%. In bacteriology, nAg showed a greater rate of microorganism reduction although it was not significant. To conclude, nAg alginate was potentially superior to MH and conventional dressing in healing diabetic foot ulcer in terms of ulcer size reduction rate.

  6. A Pilot Randomized, Controlled Study of Nanocrystalline Silver, Manuka Honey, and Conventional Dressing in Healing Diabetic Foot Ulcer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Enid Wai-Yung; To, Tony Shing-Shun; Wong, Thomas Kwok-Shing

    2017-01-01

    Nanocrystalline silver (nAg) and Manuka honey (MH) dressing have increasing popularity for treating diabetic foot ulcer (DFU). This study was an open-label randomized controlled trial with three parallel groups' design in examining the preliminary effectiveness of nAg against MH and conventional dressing in healing DFU in terms of ulcer healing, ulcer infection, and inflammation. 31 participants (11 in the nAg group, 10 in the MH group, and 10 in the convention group) diagnosed with type 2 diabetes were enrolled. Wound cleaning, debridement, and topical dressing application were performed according to the group allocation in each visit at weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12. The results found that the proportions of complete ulcer healing were 81.8%, 50%, and 40% in the nAg, MH, and conventional groups, respectively. The ulcer size reduction rate was potentially higher in the nAg group (97.45%) than the MH group (86.21%) and the conventional group (75.17%). In bacteriology, nAg showed a greater rate of microorganism reduction although it was not significant. To conclude, nAg alginate was potentially superior to MH and conventional dressing in healing diabetic foot ulcer in terms of ulcer size reduction rate. PMID:28239398

  7. Staphylococcus aureus Toxins and Diabetic Foot Ulcers: Role in Pathogenesis and Interest in Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Dunyach-Remy

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Infection of foot ulcers is a common, often severe and costly complication in diabetes. Diabetic foot infections (DFI are mainly polymicrobial, and Staphylococcus aureus is the most frequent pathogen isolated. The numerous virulence factors and toxins produced by S. aureus during an infection are well characterized. However, some particular features could be observed in DFI. The aim of this review is to describe the role of S. aureus in DFI and the implication of its toxins in the establishment of the infection. Studies on this issue have helped to distinguish two S. aureus populations in DFI: toxinogenic S. aureus strains (harboring exfoliatin-, EDIN-, PVL- or TSST-encoding genes and non-toxinogenic strains. Toxinogenic strains are often present in infections with a more severe grade and systemic impact, whereas non-toxinogenic strains seem to remain localized in deep structures and bone involving diabetic foot osteomyelitis. Testing the virulence profile of bacteria seems to be a promising way to predict the behavior of S. aureus in the chronic wounds.

  8. Management of negative pressure wound therapy in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, Marco; Izzo, Valentina; Vainieri, Erika; Giurato, Laura; Ruotolo, Valeria; Uccioli, Luigi

    2015-05-18

    Diabetic foot (DF) is a common complication of diabetes and the first cause of hospital admission in diabetic patients. In recent years several guidelines have been proposed to reinforce the the management of DF with a notable increase in diabetes knowledge and an overall reduction of amputations. Significant improvements have been reached in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) and nowadays clinicians have several advanced medications to apply for the best local therapy. Among these, negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is a useful adjunct in the management of chronic and complex wounds to promote healing and wound bed preparation for surgical procedures such as skin grafts and flap surgery. NPWT has shown remarkable results although its mechanisms of action are not completely understood. In this paper, we offer a complete overview of this medication and its implication in the clinical setting. We have examined literature related to NPWT concerning human, animal and in vitro studies, and we have summarized why, when and how we can use NPWT to treat DFUs. Further we have associated our clinical experience to scientific evidence in the field of diabetic foot to identify a defined strategy that could guide clinician in the use of NPWT approaching to DFUs.

  9. Effect of A New Wound Management System Kerraboot for Diabetic Foot Ulcer%新型敷料Kerraboot(R)治疗糖尿病足溃疡的疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张妲; 杜昕; 关小宏; 杨彩哲

    2011-01-01

    目的 观察新型敷料Kerraboot(R)治疗糖尿病足溃疡的临床疗效.方法 本研究入选糖尿病足溃疡患者3例,连续使用Kerraboot(R)4周.记录患者的病史,数码拍照记录每周创面愈合情况.观察结束后随访患者至糖尿病足创面愈合.结果 3例患者创面分级为Wagner 1~2级.使用Kerraboot(R)期间创面愈合加快,平均愈合速度为4.39~40.34 mm2/d.不良反应轻微.结论 Kerraboot(R)适用于治疗糖尿病足溃疡,能明显促进糖尿病足溃疡的创面愈合.%Objective To investigate the clinical efficacy of a new wound management system, Kerraboot(R) , designed for the management of leg and foot ulcers. Methods This was a small sample prospective trial of four weeks that three patients with diabetic foot ulcer were included. Clinical efficacy was accessed in terms of mean changes in ulcer size. Patients were followed till ulcers completely healed. Results The classification of diabetic foot ulcers of the three patients were Wagner 1 ~2. Kerraboot(R) significantly increased wound healing rate which mean changes in ulcer size were 4. 39 ~ 40. 34 mm2/d. Adverse incidents were slight. Conclusion Kerraboot(R) is recommended for the management of diabetic foot ulcers.

  10. Risk factors for amputation in patients with diabetic foot infection: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Serhat; Arda, Bilgin; Taşbakan, Meltem I; Çetinkalp, Şevki; Şimşir, Ilgın Y; Öztürk, Anıl M; Uysal, Ayşe; Ertam, İlgen

    2017-07-19

    There is a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic algorithms for diabetic foot infections (DFIs). Some of them are too difficult to be applied in routine clinical approach. In the routine clinical approach, it is necessary to find new risk factors and end up with a quick and easy assessment of DFIs. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the independent risk factors for osteomyelitis, amputation and major amputation in patients with DFI using standard scoring procedures. We prospectively studied 379 patients with DFI. The variables were analysed using logistic analysis. A total of 126 cases (33·2%) underwent amputation. The odds ratios in the amputation model were 3·09 for osteomyelitis (P ulcer duration >60 days (P = 0·001), 3·10 for ulcer depth > 15 mm (P fungal DFI (P = 0·015). In this study, the unusual result of well-known literature was fungal DFI as an independent risk factor for amputation in patients with DFI. © 2017 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. A study of prognostic factors in Chinese patients with diabetic foot ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiping Wang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Few studies have identified factors as predictors of clinical prognosis of patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs, especially of Chinese patients. In this study, we assessed the prognostic factors of Chinese patients with DFUs. Methods and materials: This was a retrospective study (January 2009–January 2011 of 194 DFUs conducted in an inpatient population at PLA 454 Hospital in Nanjing, China, to determine the prognostic influential factors of DFUs in Chinese patients. All of the studied patients were grouped into an amputation group, a non-healing group, and a cured group, according to the clinical prognosis. Patient parameters, including gender, age, smoking habits, education level, family history of diabetes mellitus, medical history, duration of foot lesions and complications, ankle-brachial index (ABI, transcutaneous oxygen pressure (TcPO2, urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (Alb/Cr, fundus oculi, electrocardiogram, DFU characteristics, bacterial nature, and neuropathy, were cross-studied among the three groups. Results: Compared with the other two groups, the amputation group showed a higher number of males, older in age, lower ABI and TcPO2 levels, higher Wagner wound grading and size, and significantly higher urinary Alb/Cr ratio, blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, white blood cell count, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Compared to the cured group (162 patients, more patients with an older age, smoking, family history of diabetes mellitus, medical history of foot ulcerations, lower ABI and TcPO2 levels, higher urine Alb/Cr ratio, and serum creatinine were found in the non-healing group. Regression analysis was used to study the correlation between various factors and clinical prognosis, and the results were as follows: age, Wagner wound classification, and heel ulcerations were negatively correlated to the DFU prognosis, whereas the female population, ABI, and TcPO2 were positively correlated with DFU prognosis

  12. New and experimental approaches to treatment of diabetic foot ulcers: a comprehensive review of emerging treatment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldor, R; Raz, I; Ben Yehuda, A; Boulton, A J M

    2004-11-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers occur in up to 15% of all diabetic patients and are a leading cause of nontraumatic amputation worldwide. Neuropathy, abnormal foot biomechanics, peripheral vascular disease and external trauma are the major contributors to the development of a foot ulcer in the diabetic patient. Therapy today includes repeated debridement, offloading, and dressings, for lower grade ulcers, and broad spectrum antibiotics and occasionally limited or complete amputation for higher grades, requiring a team effort of health care workers from various specialties. The large population affected by diabetic foot ulcers and the high rates of failure ending with amputation even with the best therapeutic regimens, have resulted in the development of new therapies and are the focus of this review. These include new off loading techniques, dressings from various materials, methods to promote wound closure using artificial skin grafts, different growth factors or wound bed modulators and methods of debridement. These new techniques are promising but still mostly unproven and traditional approaches cannot be replaced. New and generally more expensive therapies should be seen as adding to traditional approaches.

  13. In vitro studies on medicinal plants used against bacterial diabetic foot ulcer (BDFU) and urinary tract infected (UTI) causing pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbu Lakshmi, S; Chelladurai, G; Suresh, B

    2016-09-01

    The pus samples from diabetic foot ulcer patients and urine samples from urinary tract infected patients were collected and inoculated in nutrient agar plates. The colonies showing different morphologies were streaked on selective agar plates. The antibacterial assay of selected commercial antibiotics was tested against the foot ulcer and urinary tract isolates. The result revealed that most of the organisms were found to be resistant against the antibiotics. Screening of antibacterial activity of selected plants, methanol extracts of plants were prepared and tested against foot ulcer pathogens. Among the plants used, the methanolic extract Tragia involucrata was very effective against the foot ulcer pathogens and to separate the compounds present in the methanolic extract of T. involucrata, when it was subjected to column chromatography. The fractions obtained were further checked for their antibacterial property and fraction 1 which inhibited the pathogens, were subjected to thin layer chromatography and the structure of the particular phytochemical compound was elucidated by NMR study. The spices were tested for their antibacterial property against the urinary tract pathogens. Among the spices tested; Allium sativum inhibited the growth of the pathogens isolated from urinary tract infection. It can be concluded that the plants extract can be used to discover natural products that may serve as lead for the development of new pharmaceuticals addressing the major therapeutic needs.

  14. A feasibility study of UMTS mobile phones for supporting nurses doing home visits to patients with diabetic foot ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon Bo; Clemensen, Jane; Ejskjær, Niels

    2006-01-01

    We tested the feasibility of Universal Mobile Telephone System (UMTS) mobile phones for video consultations in the home. Five patients with diabetic foot ulcers were included in the study. Each of them was offered three video consultations instead of visits to the hospital outpatient clinic...

  15. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers--prudent or problematic: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutluoglu, Mesut; Uzun, Günalp; Yildiz, Senol

    2010-06-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy is increasingly used in the management of problem wounds, notably diabetic foot ulcers. However, concerns about unnecessary, inappropriate, and prolonged use of this adjunctive treatment exist. A case report of a 52-year-old patient with diabetes mellitus, Charcot foot, and a nonhealing plantar ulcer who had received HBO treatments only illustrates these concerns. He presented with normal pedal pulses, adequate transcutaneous partial oxygen pressure levels, no offloading footwear, and a heavily contaminated ulcer (Pseudomonas spp.). Following a course of oral antibiotics, appropriate topical wound care, and offloading instructions, the wound healed within 3 months. Advanced wound therapy modalities are only indicated for use in patients when accepted standards of wound care, including identification and correction of underlying disorders and comorbidities, have failed. To prevent misuse/overuse of HBO therapy, stand-alone HBO centers should include a multidisciplinary wound care team.

  16. Diabetic foot ulcer calluses show histological similarities to HPV infection without evidence of HPV involvement by nested PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lucy; Iwamoto, Satori; Jisun Cha; Falanga, Vincent

    2010-06-01

    A number of studies have reported an association between callus formation and the development of foot ulcers in diabetic patients. However, it has been noted that calluses may continue to form in spite of bed rest and, presumably, excellent patient compliance with offloading. Additionally, the authors have noted that, histologically, calluses in the diabetic foot often resemble lesions induced by human papillomavirus (HPV). As diabetes is associated with immune depression, the authors hypothesized that HPV may play at least a partial role in the pathogenesis of calluses in diabetic patients. The objective of the reported study was to determine whether calluses around diabetic neuropathic foot ulcers are associated with HPV infection. The authors carried out biopsies on 11 independent calluses from 6 patients with diabetic foot ulcers and analyzed each sample by histology and by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR), screening for the presence of DNA from HPV-1, -2, -3, -4, -6, -10, -11, -16, -18, -27, -28, -29, -31, -41, -50, -57, -60, -63, -65, and -77. The callus biopsy specimens showed histological evidence of koilocytes, papillary hyperplasia, hypergranulosis, and hyperkeratosis, a picture very similar to HPV cutaneous infection. However, nested PCR using positive and negative controls did not show detectable levels of HPV DNA. The authors therefore conclude that HPV infection is unlikely to play a significant role in diabetic foot callus pathogenesis, in spite of histological findings similar to those seen with verruca vulgaris.

  17. Lower limb ischaemia in patients with diabetic foot ulcers and gangrene: recognition, anatomic patterns and revascularization strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Joseph L

    2016-01-01

    The confluence of several chronic conditions--in particular ageing, peripheral artery disease, diabetes, and chronic kidney disease--has created a global wave of lower limbs at risk for major amputation. While frequently asymptomatic or not lifestyle limiting, at least 1% of the population has peripheral artery disease of sufficient severity to be limb threatening. To avoid the critical error of failing to diagnose ischaemia, all patients with diabetic foot ulcers and gangrene should routinely undergo physiologic evaluation of foot perfusion. Ankle brachial index is useful when measurable, but may be falsely elevated or not obtainable in as many as 30% of patients with diabetic foot ulcers primarily because of medial calcinosis. Toe pressures and skin perfusion pressures are applicable to such patients.

  18. Haemolytic differential identification of Arcanobacterium haemolyticum isolated from a patient with diabetic foot ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyesook; Park, Gyunam; Kim, Hyeran

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Arcanobacterium haemolyticum (formerly known as Corynebacterium haemolyticum) is the causative agent of sore throat and also causes skin and soft tissue infections in diabetes patients. A. haemolyticum is a Gram-positive, catalase-negative, β-haemolytic bacillus. A. haemolyticum poses a diagnostic challenge in the hospital laboratory because most coryneform bacilli are considered as normal flora or contaminants, and it is therefore difficult to differentiate from β-haemolytic streptococci by colony characteristics. Case presentation: A. haemolyticum was isolated from a diabetic patient with foot ulcers and the isolate was identified by using a VITEK-2 system, CAMP inhibition test, reverse CAMP test and a 23S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The isolated A. haemolyticum inhibited haemolysis of Staphylococcus aureus in the CAMP test and enhanced haemolysis of Streptococcus agalactiae in the reverse CAMP test. The diabetic patient was treated with teicoplanin and imipenem, and the ulcers healed within 2 weeks. Conclusion: The present study suggests that a haemolytic differential method using the CAMP inhibition and reverse CAMP tests can be useful for differentiating A. haemolyticum from β-haemolytic streptococci. PMID:28348747

  19. A cross-sectional study of depression and self-care in patients with type 2 diabetes with and without foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Camila Ribeiro; Zantut-Wittmann, Denise Engelbrecht; Parisi, Maria Cândida Ribeiro

    2014-02-01

    Depression has been recognized as a risk factor for foot ulceration in persons with diabetes mellitus. Using convenience sampling methods, a cross-sectional study was conducted among persons with type 2 diabetes treated in a diabetic foot clinic in Sao Paulo, Brazil between February 2010 and December 2011. One hundred (100) patients (average age 62 years, range 38 to 83 years), 50 with a foot ulcer and 50 at risk for developing a foot ulcer, participated. Symptoms of depression were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), where scores increase with severity; and patients were interviewed about foot self-care behaviors. Average BDI scores among patients with an ulcer were higher (mean 20.37; range 1 to 42) than those of patients that had not developed a foot ulcer (mean 15.70; range 2 to 49) (P = 0.030). Self-care behavior was not significantly different between the two groups. Severe depression (P = 0.049, OR= 6.56 95% CI 1.01-42.58) and male gender (P <0.001, OR=14.87 95% CI 3.83-57.82) were associated with the presence of a foot ulcer. Despite reported adequate self-care behaviors, patients with an ulcer had more symptoms of depression than patients who were at risk for developing a foot ulcer. Studies examining cause-and-effect relationships between these observations and the potential role of depression interventions are needed. The results of this and other studies suggest depression screening is important in patients with diabetes mellitus and foot ulcers.

  20. High matrix metalloproteinase levels are associated with dermal graft failure in diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Valentina; Meloni, Marco; Vainieri, Erika; Giurato, Laura; Ruotolo, Valeria; Uccioli, Luigi

    2014-09-01

    The aim of our study is to analyze factors, including matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) levels, that could influence the integration of dermal grafts in diabetic foot ulcers. From September 2012 to September 2013, 35 diabetic patients with IIA lesion (Texas Wound Classification) and an extensive foot tissue loss were considered suitable for dermal graft. Before the enrollment we ensured the best local conditions: adequate blood supply, control of infection, and offloading. The MMP level of each lesion was evaluated blindly before the application of dermal substitutes. At 1-month follow-up, we analyzed the correlation between clinical patient characteristics, local wound features including MMP levels, dermal substitute applied, and the outcome expressed in terms of dermal graft integration. We observed dermal graft integration in 28/35 patients (80% of our population). In multivariate analysis high MMP level was the only negative predictor for dermal graft integration (P < .0007). In addition, we divided the patients into 2 groups according to MMP levels: group 1 with low protease activity (24 patients) and group 2 with elevated protease activity (11 patients). The integration of the dermal graft was 100% in group 1 (n = 24 patients) and 36.4% in group 2 (n = 4patients), P < .0001. According to our data, the evaluation of MMP levels may be useful to choose the right strategy to get the best results in terms of clinical success and cost saving. However, further studies are necessary to confirm these findings.

  1. Foot deformities, function in the lower extremities, and plantar pressure in patients with diabetes at high risk to develop foot ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulla Hellstrand Tang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Foot deformities, neuropathy, and dysfunction in the lower extremities are known risk factors that increase plantar peak pressure (PP and, as a result, the risk of developing foot ulcers in patients with diabetes. However, knowledge about the prevalence of these factors is still limited. The aim of the present study was to describe the prevalence of risk factors observed in patients with diabetes without foot ulcers and to explore possible connections between the risk factors and high plantar pressure. Patients and methods: Patients diagnosed with type 1 (n=27 or type 2 (n=47 diabetes (mean age 60.0±15.0 years were included in this cross-sectional study. Assessments included the registration of foot deformities; test of gross function at the hip, knee, and ankle joints; a stratification of the risk of developing foot ulcers according to the Swedish National Diabetes Register; a walking test; and self-reported questionnaires including the SF-36 health survey. In-shoe PP was measured in seven regions of interests on the sole of the foot using F-Scan®. An exploratory analysis of the association of risk factors with PP was performed. Results: Neuropathy was present in 28 (38%, and 39 (53% had callosities in the heel region. Low forefoot arch was present in 57 (77%. Gait-related parameters, such as the ability to walk on the forefoot or heel, were normal in all patients. Eighty percent had normal function at the hip and ankle joints. Gait velocity was 1.2±0.2 m/s. All patients were stratified to risk group 3. Hallux valgus and hallux rigidus were associated with an increase in the PP in the medial forefoot. A higher body mass index (BMI was found to increase the PP at metatarsal heads 4 and 5. Pes planus was associated with a decrease in PP at metatarsal head 1. Neuropathy did not have a high association with PP. Conclusions: This study identified several potential risk factors for the onset of diabetic foot ulcers (DFU. Hallux valgus

  2. Low-level laser therapy as an adjunct to conventional therapy in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, R K; Sahu, Khageswar; Saraf, Siddharth; Patheja, Pooja; Khan, Fareed; Gupta, P K

    2017-02-01

    Foot ulcers are serious complications of diabetes mellitus (DM) and are known to be resistant to conventional treatment. This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers in a tertiary care centre (Department of Surgery, Mahatma Gandhi Memorial Medical College and Maharaja Yashwantrao Hospital, A.B. Road, Indore). A total of 30 patients with type 2 DM having Meggitt-Wagner grade I foot ulcers of more than 6 weeks duration with negative culture were studied. Patients were randomized into two groups of 15 each. Patients in study group received LLLT (660 ± 20 nm, 3 J/cm(2)) along with conventional therapy and those in control group were treated with conventional therapy alone. The primary outcome measure was the absolute and relative wound size reduction at 2 weeks compared to the baseline parameter. Percentage ulcer area reduction was 37 ± 9% in the LLLT group and 15 ± 5.4% in the control group (p < 0.001). For ∼75% of wounds of the treatment group, wound area reduction of 30-50% was observed. In contrast, for the control group, ∼80% of wounds showed a wound area reduction of <20% on day 15. Further, the wounds with initial wound area 1000-2000 mm(2) seems to have better final outcome than the groups with larger areas. The treated groups showed higher amount of granulation than the control group. The results suggest that LLLT is beneficial as an adjunct to conventional therapy in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers.

  3. Elevated skin autofluorescence is strongly associated with foot ulcers in patients with diabetes: a cross-sectional,observational study of Chinese subjects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hang HU; Chun-mao HAN; Xin-lei HU; Wan-lan YE; Wen-juan HUANG; Andries J. SMIT

    2012-01-01

    Objective:This study was designed to evaluate the association between skin autofluorescence (AF),an indicator of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs),and foot ulcers in subjects with diabetes.Methods:In this study,195 Chinese diabetic subjects were examined.Their feet were examined regardless of whether an ulcer was present or not.Skin AF was measured with an AGE reader.Demographic characteristics and blood data were recorded.Results:The mean values of skin AF were 2.29+0.47 for subjects without foot ulcers,and 2.80+0.69 for those with foot ulcers,a significant difference (P<0.05).Skin AF was strongly correlated with age and duration of diabetes.After adjusting for these factors,multivariate logistic regression showed that skin AF was independently associated with foot ulcerations.Conclusions:Skin AF is independently associated with diabetic foot ulcerations.It might be a useful screening method for foot ulceration risk of diabetic patients.

  4. Diet in the Aetiology of Ulcerative Colitis: A European Prospective Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hart, Andrew R; Luben, Robert; Olsen, Anja

    2008-01-01

    Background/Aims: The causes of ulcerative colitis are unknown, although it is plausible that dietary factors are involved. Case-control studies of diet and ulcerative colitis are subject to recall biases. The aim of this study was to examine the prospective relationship between the intake of nutr...

  5. Epidemiology of Diabetic Foot Ulcers and Amputations in Romania: Results of a Cross-Sectional Quality of Life Questionnaire Based Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosmina I. Bondor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a post hoc analysis of quality of life in diabetic neuropathy patients in a cross-sectional survey performed in 2012 in Romania, using the Norfolk QOL-DN in which 21,756 patients with self-reported diabetes were enrolled. This current analysis aims to expand research on the diabetic foot and to provide an update on the number of foot ulcers found in Romania. Of the 21,174 patients included in this analysis, 14.85% reported a history of foot ulcers and 3.60% reported an amputation. The percentage of neuropathy patients with foot ulcers increased with age; the lowest percentage was observed in the 20–29-year age group (6.62% and the highest in the 80–89-year age group (17.68%. The highest number of amputations was reported in the 70–79-year age group (largest group. Compared to patients without foot ulcers, those with foot ulcers had significantly higher scores for total DN and all its subdomains translating to worse QOL (p<0.001. This analysis showed a high rate of foot ulcers and amputations in Romanian diabetic patients. It underscores the need for implementation of effective screening and educational programs.

  6. A comparative study between total contact casting and conventional dressings in the non-surgical management of diabetic plantar foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Suparno; Chakraborty, Koustubh; Mandal, Pankaj Kumar; Ballav, Ambar; Choudhury, Subhankar; Bagchi, Subrata; Mukherjee, Satinath

    2008-04-01

    Of all non-traumatic amputations 50% occur in Diabetics, mostly as a final outcome of foot ulcers. A major biomechanical factor in the causation of foot ulcers in persons with diabetes mellitus is elevated peak plantar pressure. Offloading the ulcer area in the form of equalisation of pressure across the plantar surface can accelerate healing of the ulcer. Total contact casting is one such method of offloading, and this study attempts to investigate the advantages of the above method as compared to conventional dressings in the physiatric management of the depth--ischaemia grades 1A, 1B, 2A, 2B neuropathic plantar ulcers in a diabetic patient. The outcome measure was the time taken for complete resolution of the ulcers. Of the 29 patients in Category A treated with total contact casting involving a total of 39 foot ulcers, 36 healed, which was statistically significant (p ulcers healing in Category B consisting of 26 patients treated by conventional dressings alone. Total contact casting is an effective, rapid, economical, ambulatory and outpatient--based method for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers.

  7. A prospective cohort study of prognostic factors for the healing of heel pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinnis, Elizabeth; Greenwood, Darren C; Nelson, E Andrea; Nixon, Jane

    2014-03-01

    pressure ulcers, 25-30% of which are on the heels are a major burden to patients and healthcare systems. A better understanding of factors associated with healing is required to inform treatment and research priorities. to identify patient and pressure ulcer characteristics associated with the healing of heel pressure ulcers. patients with heel pressure ulcers were recruited to a prospective cohort study in a large teaching hospital in the UK, with a maximum 18-month follow-up. Cox proportional hazards model regression analysis was used to identify prognostic factors for healing. one hundred and forty of 148 patients recruited were analysed. They had 183 pressure ulcers: 77 ulcers healed, 5 were on limbs amputated prior to ulcer healing, 88 were on patients who died prior to healing, 11 were present at the end of the study and 2 were lost to follow-up. The median time to healing was 121 (range 8-440) days. Of 12 variables associated with healing (P ≤ 0.2), multi-variable analysis identified two factors which were independently predictive of healing including the presence of a severe (versus superficial) ulcer (hazard ratio = 0.48, P ulcer severity and the presence of peripheral arterial disease significantly reduced the probability of healing. Treatments for heel pressure ulcers should consider the severity of the ulcer and the presence of peripheral arterial disease.

  8. First Report of Myiasis Caused by Cochliomyia hominivorax (Diptera: Calliphoridae) in a Diabetic Foot Ulcer Patient in Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Olea, María Sofía; Néstor CENTENO; Aybar, Cecilia Adriana Veggiani; Ortega, Eugenia Silvana; Galante, Guillermina Begoña; Olea, Luis; Juri, María Julia Dantur

    2014-01-01

    Myiasis is usually caused by flies of the Calliphoridae family, and Cochliomyia hominivorax is the etiological agent most frequently found in myiasis. The first case of myiasis in a diabetic foot of a 54-year-old male patient in Argentina is reported. The patient attended the hospital of the capital city of Tucumán Province for a consultation concerning an ulcer in his right foot, where the larval specimens were found. The identification of the immature larvae was based on their morphological...

  9. Incidence of ulcerative colitis in Central Greece: A prospective study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Spiros D. Ladas; Elias Mallas; Konstantinos Giorgiotis; Georgios Karamanolis; Dimitrios Trigonis; Apostolos Markadas; Vana Sipsa; Sotirios A. Raptis

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the incidence of ulcerative colitis UC in the prefecture of Trikala, Central Greece.METHODS: A prospective and population basedepidemiological study of UC from 1990 to the end of 1994was conducted. Trikala is a semirural prefecture of Central Greece with a population of 138 946 (census 1991). Three gastroenterologists (one hospital based, two private doctors)of the prefecture participated in this study.RESULTS: During the study period, 66 new histologically verified cases of UC were recorded. The mean annual incidence of the disease in 1990-1994 was 11.2 per 105inhabitants (95%CI: 8.7-14.3). There was no difference between men and women (annual incidence: 10.5 and 12.0 per 105 inhabitants respectively), either among urban,semirural or rural populations (annual incidence: 11.7,17.1 and 9.9 per 105 inhabitants respectively). The majority (56%) of the patients never smoked and a quarter were ex-smokers. About a half of all cases had proctitis.CONCLUSION: UC is common in Central Greece and its incidence is similar to that in North-Western European countries.

  10. Motivation, effort and life circumstances as predictors of foot ulcers and amputations in people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Christine; Guassora, Ann Dorrit; Nielsen, Anni Brit Sternhagen

    2014-01-01

    Abstract AIM: To investigate the predictive value of both patients' motivation and effort in their management of Type 2 diabetes and their life circumstances for the development of foot ulcers and amputations. METHODS: This study was based on the Diabetes Care in General Practice study and Danish...... population and health registers. The associations between patient motivation, effort and life circumstances and foot ulcer prevalence 6 years after diabetes diagnosis and the incidence of amputation in the following 13 years were analysed using odds ratios from logistic regression and hazard ratios from Cox...... 6.11, 95% CI 1.22-30.61). The same trend was seen for 'poor' vs 'good' influence of the patient's own effort in diabetes treatment (odds ratio 7.06, 95% CI 2.65-18.84). Of 1058 patients examined at 6-year follow-up, 45 experienced amputation during the following 13 years. 'Poor' vs 'good' influence...

  11. Amputations and foot ulcers in patients newly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes mellitus and observed for 19 years. The role of age, gender and co-morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, C; Siersma, V.; Guassora, A.D.

    2013-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of foot ulcers and the incidence of amputations in patients with Type 2 diabetes observed for 19 years after diagnosis. We investigated the role of gender, age and co-morbidities.......To determine the prevalence of foot ulcers and the incidence of amputations in patients with Type 2 diabetes observed for 19 years after diagnosis. We investigated the role of gender, age and co-morbidities....

  12. Diagnosis and treatment of diabetic foot ulcers%糖尿病足溃疡诊治进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘志国

    2012-01-01

    糖尿病足溃疡发病率不断升高,经常导致截肢和死亡,其主要的病理基础是糖尿病代谢综合征引起的下肢血管和神经病变,最终发生溃疡.诊断必须经过系统的体检及影像学检查,确定溃疡的类型和分级.整体接触模具减压对预防神经性溃疡发生疗效较好.创面修复和血管重建是保肢的主要环节.生物工程和负压疗法较标准湿润疗法有效,电刺激、超声和高压氧疗效不确切.%Increasing diabetic foot ulcer prevalence inevitably results in increasing proportions of major amputation and death.The pathophysiology of diabetic foot ulcers mainly includes peripheral neurpathy and arterial disease associated with diabetes mellitus.History and physical examination,vascular and neurological examination,imaging are necessary to diagnosis.Validated wound classification is very important for treatment and prognosis.The emergence of multidisciplinnary foot clinics has made a very important contribution to decreasing the amputation rate.Off loading of plantar ulcers is an effective treatment modality to assist in healing of diabetic foot ulcer.Wound debridement and surgery repair,vascular reconstruction may be required for the goal of diabetic limb savage.Bio-engineering advanced wound healing and negative pressure therapy are effective.The evidence to support the use of hyperbaric oxygen,electrical stimulation and ultrasound is insufficient.

  13. Ultrasound therapy for recalcitrant diabetic foot ulcers: results of a randomized, double-blind, controlled, multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, William J; Foremann, Phil; Mozen, Neal; Massey, Joi; Conner-Kerr, Teresa; Meneses, Patricio

    2005-08-01

    An estimated 15% of patients with diabetes will develop a foot ulcer sometime in their life, making them 30 to 40 times more likely to undergo amputation due to a non-healing foot ulcer than the non-diabetic population. To determine the safety and efficacy of a new, non-contact, kilohertz ultrasound therapy for the healing of recalcitrant diabetic foot ulcers - as well as to evaluate the impact on total closure and quantitative bacterial cultures and the effect on healing of various levels of sharp/surgical debridement - a randomized, double-blinded, sham-controlled, multicenter study was conducted in hospital-based and private wound care clinics. Patients (55 met criteria for efficacy analysis) received standard of care, which included products that provide a moist environment, offloading diabetic shoes and socks, debridement, wound evaluation, and measurement. The "therapy" was either active 40 KHz ultrasound delivered by a saline mist or a "sham device" which delivered a saline mist without the use of ultrasound. After 12 weeks of care, the proportion of wounds healed (defined as complete epithelialization without drainage) in the active ultrasound therapy device group was significantly higher than that in the sham control group (40.7% versus 14.3%, P = 0.0366, Fisher's exact test). The ultrasound treatment was easy to use and no difference in the number and type of adverse events between the two treatment groups was noted. Of interest, wounds were debrided at baseline followed by a quantitative culture biopsy. The results of these cultures demonstrated a significant bioburden (greater than 10(5)) in the majority of cases, despite a lack of clinical signs of infection. Compared to control, this therapeutic modality was found to increase the healing rate of recalcitrant, diabetic foot ulcers.

  14. Patients' Experience of therapeutic footwear whilst living at risk of neuropathic diabetic foot ulceration: an interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton, Joanne S; Roberts, Anne; Bruce, Graham K; Marsden, Jonathan

    2014-02-22

    Previous work has found that people with diabetes do not wear their therapeutic footwear as directed, but the thinking behind this behaviour is unclear. Adherence to therapeutic footwear advice must improve in order to reduce foot ulceration and amputation risk in people with diabetes and neuropathy. Therefore this study aimed to explore the psychological influences and personal experiences behind the daily footwear selection of individuals with diabetes and neuropathy. An interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) approach was used to explore the understanding and experience of therapeutic footwear use in people living at risk of diabetic neuropathic foot ulceration. This study benefited from the purposive selection of a small sample of four people and used in-depth semi structured interviews because it facilitated the deep and detailed examination of personal thoughts and feelings behind footwear selection. Four overlapping themes that interact to regulate footwear choice emerged from the analyses: a) Self-perception dilemma; resolving the balance of risk experienced by people with diabetes and neuropathy day to day, between choosing to wear footwear to look and feel normal and choosing footwear to protect their feet from foot ulceration; b) Reflective adaption; The modification and individualisation of a set of values about footwear usage created in the minds of people with diabetes and neuropathy; c) Adherence response; The realignment of footwear choice with personal values, to reinforce the decision not to change behaviour or bring about increased footwear adherence, with or without appearance management; d) Reality appraisal; A here and now appraisal of the personal benefit of footwear choice on emotional and physical wellbeing, with additional consideration to the preservation of therapeutic footwear. For some people living at risk of diabetic neuropathic foot ulceration, the decision whether or not to wear therapeutic footwear is driven by the

  15. Tinea pedis and onychomycosis frequency in diabetes mellitus patients and diabetic foot ulcers. A cross sectional – observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Akkus, Gamze; Evran, Mehtap; Gungor, Dilek; Karakas, Mehmet; Sert, Murat; Tetiker, Tamer

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Impaired cellular immunity and reduced phagocytic function of polymorphonuclear leukocytes facilitate the development of skin fungal and bacterial infections due to uncontrolled hyperglycemia in diabetic patients. In our study, we aimed to assess onychomycosis and/or tinea pedis frequency in diabetic patients, and effects on the development of chronic complications, particularly foot ulcer. Methods: We included 227 diabetic patients in the study. Forty-three patients had diabetic f...

  16. Three cousins with chronic foot ulcers from late-onset hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies type 2 (HSAN2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaei, Shahin; Pakmanesh, Kambiz

    2006-02-28

    The hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN) are a group of rare disorders characterized by prominent sensory and autonomic neuropathy without motor involvement. We report three male cousins with chronic foot ulcers, all were affected with late-onset HSAN type 2 (HSAN2). In view of the history of consanguinity and male sex, X-linked recessive transmission was likely in our patients. According to the authors' knowledge this is the first report of HSAN2 from Iran.

  17. Factors Affecting Length of Hospital Stay and Mortality in Infected Diabetic Foot Ulcers Undergoing Surgical Drainage without Major Amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Gyun; Moon, Sang Young; Park, Moon Seok; Kwon, Soon-Sun; Jung, Ki Jin; Lee, Taeseung; Kim, Baek Kyu; Yoon, Chan; Lee, Kyoung Min

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate factors affecting length of hospital stay and mortality of a specific group of patients with infected diabetic foot ulcer who underwent surgical drainage without major amputation, which is frequently encountered by orthopedic surgeons. Data on length of hospital stay, mortality, demographics, and other medical information were collected for 79 consecutive patients (60 men, 19 women; mean age, 66.1 [SD, 12.3] yr) with infected diabetic foot ulcer who underwent surgical drainage while retaining the heel between October 2003 and May 2013. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to determine factors affecting length of hospital stay, while multiple Cox regression analysis was conducted to assess factors contributing to mortality. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, P=0.034), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level (P=0.021), body mass index (BMI, P=0.001), and major vascular disease (cerebrovascular accident or coronary artery disease, P=0.004) were significant factors affecting length of hospital stay, whereas age (P=0.005) and serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN) level (P=0.024) were significant factors contributing to mortality. In conclusion, as prognostic factors, the length of hospital stay was affected by the severity of inflammation, the recent control of blood glucose level, BMI, and major vascular disease, whereas patient mortality was affected by age and renal function in patients with infected diabetic foot ulcer undergoing surgical drainage and antibiotic treatment.

  18. S100A8/A9 is an important host defence mediator in neuropathic foot ulcers in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trøstrup, Hannah; Holstein, Per; Christophersen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Chronic wounds and in particular diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are a growing clinical challenge, but the underlying molecular pathophysiological mechanisms are unclear. Recently, we reported reduced levels of the immunomodulating and antimicrobial S100A8/A9 in non-healing venous leg ulcers (VLUs...

  19. Foot & Mouth Disease & Ulcerative/Vesicular Rule-outs: Challenges Encountered in Recent Outbreaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hullinger, P

    2008-01-28

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD) is a highly infectious and contagious viral disease affecting bovidae (cattle, zebus, domestic buffaloes, yaks), sheep, goats, swine, all wild ruminants and suidae. Camelidae (camels, dromedaries, llamas, vicunas) have low susceptibility. Foot and mouth disease is caused by a RNS virus of the family Picornaviridae, genus Aphthovirus. There are seven immunologically distinct serotypes: A, O, C, SAT1, SAT2, SAT3, Asia 1. Foot and mouth disease causes significant economic loss both to countries who manage it as an endemic disease (with or without vaccination), as well as those FMD free countries which may become infected. The mortality rate is low in adult animals, but often higher in young due to myocarditis. Foot and mouth disease is endemic in parts of Asia, Africa, the Middle East and South America (sporadic outbreaks in free areas). The Office of International Epizootics (OIE), also referred to the World Organization for Animal Health maintains an official list of free countries and zones.1 The OIE Terrestrial Code (Chapter 2.2.10) provides detailed information on the categories of freedom that can be allocated to a country as well as guidelines for the surveillance for foot and mouth disease (Appendix 3.8.7). In short, countries may be completely free of FMD, free with vaccination or infected with foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV). Source of FMDV include incubating and clinically affected animals with virus present in breath, saliva, faeces, urine, milk and semen. In experimental settings virus has been detected in milk several days before the onset of clinical signs2. Additional sources of virus are meat and by-products in which pH has remained above 6.0 as well as persistently infected carrier animals. Carrier animals may include cattle and water buffalo; convalescent animals and exposed vaccinates (virus persists in the oropharynx for up to 30 months in cattle or longer in buffalo, 9 months in sheep). Pigs do not become carriers

  20. Wound Chronicity, Inpatient Care, and Chronic Kidney Disease Predispose to MRSA Infection in Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Christopher; May, Kerry; Hale, Thomas; Allard, Bernard; Rowlings, Naomi; Freeman, Amy; Harrison, Jessica; McCann, Jane; Wraight, Paul

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the microbiological profile of diabetes-related foot infections (DRFIs) and the impact of wound duration, inpatient treatment, and chronic kidney disease (CKD). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Postdebridement microbiological samples were collected from individuals presenting with DRFIs from 1 January 2005 to 31 December 2007. RESULTS A total of 653 specimens were collected from 379 individuals with 36% identifying only one isolate. Of the total isolates, 77% were gram-positive bacteria (staphylococci 43%, streptococci 13%). Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was isolated from 23%; risk factors for MRSA included prolonged wound duration (odds ratio 2.31), inpatient management (2.19), and CKD (OR 1.49). Gram-negative infections were more prevalent with inpatient management (P = 0.002) and prolonged wound duration (P < 0.001). Pseudomonal isolates were more common in chronic wounds (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS DRFIs are predominantly due to gram-positive aerobes but are usually polymicrobial and increase in complexity with inpatient care and ulcer duration. In the presence of prolonged duration, inpatient management, or CKD, empiric MRSA antibiotic cover should be considered. PMID:19587371

  1. A two-phase model of plantar tissue: a step toward prediction of diabetic foot ulceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciumè, G; Boso, D P; Gray, W G; Cobelli, C; Schrefler, B A

    2014-11-01

    A new computational model, based on the thermodynamically constrained averaging theory, has been recently proposed to predict tumor initiation and proliferation. A similar mathematical approach is proposed here as an aid in diabetic ulcer prevention. The common aspects at the continuum level are the macroscopic balance equations governing the flow of the fluid phase, diffusion of chemical species, tissue mechanics, and some of the constitutive equations. The soft plantar tissue is modeled as a two-phase system: a solid phase consisting of the tissue cells and their extracellular matrix, and a fluid one (interstitial fluid and dissolved chemical species). The solid phase may become necrotic depending on the stress level and on the oxygen availability in the tissue. Actually, in diabetic patients, peripheral vascular disease impacts tissue necrosis; this is considered in the model via the introduction of an effective diffusion coefficient that governs transport of nutrients within the microvasculature. The governing equations of the mathematical model are discretized in space by the finite element method and in time domain using the θ-Wilson Method. While the full mathematical model is developed in this paper, the example is limited to the simulation of several gait cycles of a healthy foot.

  2. Disturbed hypoxic responses as a pathogenic mechanism of diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catrina, Sergiu-Bogdan; Zheng, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration (DFU) is a chronic complication of diabetes that is characterized by impaired wound healing in the lower extremities. DFU remains a major clinical challenge because of poor understanding of its pathogenic mechanisms. Impaired wound healing in diabetes is characterized by decreased angiogenesis, reduced bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) recruitment, and decreased fibroblast and keratinocyte proliferation and migration. Recently, increasing evidence has suggested that increased hypoxic conditions and impaired cellular responses to hypoxia are essential pathogenic factors of delayed wound healing in DFU. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1, a heterodimer of HIF-1α and HIF-1β) is a master regulator of oxygen homeostasis that mediates the adaptive cellular responses to hypoxia by regulating the expression of genes involved in angiogenesis, metabolic changes, proliferation, migration, and cell survival. However, HIF-1 signalling is inhibited in diabetes as a result of hyperglycaemia-induced HIF-1α destabilization and functional repression. Increasing HIF-1α expression and activity using various approaches promotes angiogenesis, EPC recruitment, and granulation, thereby improving wound healing in experimental diabetes. The mechanisms underlying HIF-1α regulation in diabetes and the therapeutic strategies targeting HIF-1 signalling for the treatment of diabetic wounds are discussed in this review. Further investigations of the pathways involved in HIF-1α regulation in diabetes are required to advance our understanding of the mechanisms underlying impaired wound healing in diabetes and to provide a foundation for developing novel therapeutic approaches to treat DFU.

  3. Effects of insulin on the skin: possible healing benefits for diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuelli, T; Burgeiro, A; Carvalho, E

    2016-12-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers affect 15-20 % of all diabetic patients and remain an important challenge since the available therapies have limited efficacy and some of the novel therapeutic approaches, which include growth factors and stem cells, are highly expensive and their safety remains to be evaluated. Despite its low cost and safety, the interest for topical insulin as a healing agent has increased only in the last 20 years. The molecular mechanisms of insulin signaling and its metabolic effects have been well studied in its classical target tissues. However, little is known about the specific effects of insulin in healthy or even diabetic skin. In addition, the mechanisms involved in the effects of insulin on wound healing have been virtually unknown until about 10 years ago. This paper will review the most recent advances in the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie the beneficial effects of insulin on skin wound healing in diabetes. Emerging evidence that links dysfunction of key cellular organelles, namely the endoplasmic reticulum and the mitochondria, to changes in the autophagy response, as well as the impaired wound healing in diabetic patients will also be discussed along with the putative mechanisms whereby insulin could regulate/modulate these alterations.

  4. Marjolin's Ulcers: A Review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alasia Datonye

    and treatment. Conclusion: The .... The flat indurated, infilterative, ulcerative marjolin ulcer. ·. The less ... TREATMENT. Surgery remains the main stay of treatment for Marjolin's ulcer. ..... Marjolin's ulcer of the foot caused by non-burn trauma.

  5. Prospective study of ankle and foot fractures in elderly women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadagiri Surender Rao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The epidemiology of ankle fractures in old people is changing as time passes on. The incidence of ankle fractures increases with advancing age. The study conducted was among a rural popula-tion which comprised of 68 women (32 women with ankle fractures & 36 women with foot fractures. Patients studied were in the age group more than 50 years. The study highlights the etiological & risk factors for fractures of ankle & foot. The commonest ankle fracture was the lateral malleolar fracture & the commonest foot fracture was the 5th Metatarsal fracture. Diabetes is a risk factor which increases the occurrence of ankle and foot injuries.

  6. Treatment of diabetic foot ulcers with total contact casts: a critical review of the current literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro-Duhart, G

    2005-11-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes and may lead to ulcers, often resulting in amputations. Total contact casts are advocated for healing neuropathic ulcers but there are serious reservations about its use.

  7. A prospective window into medical device-related pressure ulcers in intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyer, Fiona M; Stotts, Nancy A; Blackman, Virginia Schmied

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence, severity, location, aetiology, treatment and healing of medical device-related pressure ulcers (PUs) in intensive care patients for up to 7 days. A prospective repeated measures study design was used. Patients in six intensive care units of two major medical centres, one each in Australia and the USA, were screened 1 day per month for 6 months. Those with device-related ulcers were followed daily for up to 7 days. The outcome measures were device-related ulcer prevalence, pain, infection, treatment and healing. Fifteen of 483 patients had device-related ulcers and 9 of 15 with 11 ulcers were followed beyond screening. Their mean age was 60·5 years, and most were men, overweight and at increased risk of PU. Endotracheal (ET) and nasogastric (NG) tubes were the cause of most device-related ulcers. Repositioning was the most frequent treatment. Four of 11 ulcers healed within the 7-day observation period. In conclusion, device-related ulcer prevalence was 3·1%, similar to that reported in the limited literature available, indicating an ongoing problem. Systematic assessment and repositioning of devices are the mainstays of care. We recommend continued prevalence determination and that nurses remain vigilant to prevent device-related ulcers, especially in patients with NG and ET tubes.

  8. What Is the Clinical Utility of the Ankle-Brachial Index in Patients With Diabetic Foot Ulcers and Radiographic Arterial Calcification?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvaro-Afonso, Francisco Javier; Lázaro-Martínez, José Luis; Aragón-Sánchez, Javier; García-Morales, Esther; García-Álvarez, Yolanda; Molines-Barroso, Raúl Juan

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the influence of radiographic arterial calcification (RAC) on the clinical interpretation of ankle-brachial index (ABI) values in patients with diabetic foot ulcers. We analyzed a retrospective clinical database of 60 patients with diabetic foot ulcers from the Diabetic Foot Unit (Complutense University, Madrid, Spain) between January 2012 and March 2014. For each patient, anteroposterior XR-plains were evaluated, and the ABI and toe-brachial index (TBI) were assessed by an experienced clinician. To analyze the correlation among quantitative variables, we applied the Pearson correlation coefficient. Fifty percent (n = 9/18) of our patients with a normal ABI and RAC had a TBI diabetic foot ulcers, or RAC.

  9. The clinical assessment study of the foot (CASF: study protocol for a prospective observational study of foot pain and foot osteoarthritis in the general population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menz Hylton B

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Symptomatic osteoarthritis (OA affects approximately 10% of adults aged over 60 years. The foot joint complex is commonly affected by OA, yet there is relatively little research into OA of the foot, compared with other frequently affected sites such as the knee and hand. Existing epidemiological studies of foot OA have focussed predominantly on the first metatarsophalangeal joint at the expense of other joints. This three-year prospective population-based observational cohort study will describe the prevalence of symptomatic radiographic foot OA, relate its occurrence to symptoms, examination findings and life-style-factors, describe the natural history of foot OA, and examine how it presents to, and is diagnosed and managed in primary care. Methods All adults aged 50 years and over registered with four general practices in North Staffordshire, UK, will be invited to participate in a postal Health Survey questionnaire. Respondents to the questionnaire who indicate that they have experienced foot pain in the preceding twelve months will be invited to attend a research clinic for a detailed clinical assessment. This assessment will consist of: clinical interview; physical examination; digital photography of both feet and ankles; plain x-rays of both feet, ankles and hands; ultrasound examination of the plantar fascia; anthropometric measurement; and a further self-complete questionnaire. Follow-up will be undertaken in consenting participants by postal questionnaire at 18 months (clinic attenders only and three years (clinic attenders and survey participants, and also by review of medical records. Discussion This three-year prospective epidemiological study will combine survey data, comprehensive clinical, x-ray and ultrasound assessment, and review of primary care records to identify radiographic phenotypes of foot OA in a population of community-dwelling older adults, and describe their impact on symptoms, function and

  10. Virulence determinants in clinical Staphylococcus aureus from monomicrobial and polymicrobial infections of diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shettigar, Kavitha; Jain, Spoorthi; Bhat, Deepika V; Acharya, Raviraj; Ramachandra, Lingadakai; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu; Murali, Thokur Sreepathy

    2016-12-01

    Antibiotic resistance in Staphylococcus aureus is a major public health concern, and methicillin-resistant S. aureus has emerged as an important pathogen. We characterized S. aureus isolates from monomicrobial and polymicrobial wound infections from 200 diabetic individuals with foot ulcers to understand their underlying diversity and pathogenicity. Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec typing was performed, and genes coding for production of biofilm, Panton-Valentine leukocidin, toxic shock syndrome toxin and leukotoxins DE and M were screened. Biofilm production was also quantified by the tissue culture plate method. Strains were genotyped using multilocus sequence typing, multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis and repetitive sequence PCR methods. Polymicrobial infections were present in 115 samples, 61 samples showed monomicrobial infection and 24 samples were culture negative. Polymicrobial infections were significantly higher in patients with previous amputation history. Of the 86 samples infected with S. aureus, virulence genes were found in 81 isolates, and 41 isolates possessed more than one virulence gene. Strains which contained pvl gene alone or luk-DE alone were significantly higher in polymicrobial wounds. Based on biofilm production, 18.6 % of isolates were classified as high, 24.4 % as moderate and 57 % as low biofilm producers. Genotyping of 30 strains revealed 10 different sequence types with a strong association among sequence types, specific virulence markers and antibiotic resistance profiles. Moreover, isolates from monomicrobial and polymicrobial wounds differed significantly in their virulence potential and the sequence types to which they belonged, and these are helpful in mapping the evolution of the identified strains of S. aureus.

  11. The Use of Best Practice in the Treatment of a Complex Diabetic Foot Ulcer: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melodie Blakely

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Published guidelines for effective management of diabetic foot ulcers (DFU include total contact casting (TCC. The purpose of this case study is to describe the application of best practice guidelines for the treatment of a diabetic foot ulcer (DFU in a complex patient where TCC offloading could not be utilized. Case Description: The patient was a 47 year-old female with a five-plus year history of a full-thickness DFU on the left plantar mid-foot. Treatment included sharp and ultrasound debridement, the use of a silver hydrofiber dressing, edema management via compression therapy, negative pressure wound therapy, offloading via customized 1/4 inch adhesive-backed felt applied to the plantar foot in addition to an offloading boot and use of a wheelchair, patient education regarding diabetes management, and the application of a bilayered living skin-equivalent biologic dressing. Outcomes: At 15 weeks the wound was closed and the patient was transitioned into diabetic footwear. Discussion: The felt offloading was a beneficial alternative to TCC. The patient’s longer than average healing rate may have been complicated by the duration of her wound, her 41 year history of diabetes, and the fact that gold standard offloading (TCC was not able to be used. Further research is needed regarding the use of felt for offloading, such as application technique for wounds on different areas of the foot, comparison of different types of felt, and the use of felt in conjunction with various offloading devices.

  12. Risk factors for foot ulceration and lower extremity amputation in adults with end-stage renal disease on dialysis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Michelle R; Raspovic, Anita; McMahon, Lawrence P; Strippoli, Giovanni F M; Palmer, Suetonia C; Ruospo, Marinella; Dallimore, Sarah; Landorf, Karl B

    2015-10-01

    Adults with end-stage renal disease are at increased risk of foot ulceration and lower extremity amputation. However, the central determinants of lower limb injury and loss are incompletely understood. We conducted a systematic review of non-randomized studies that quantified the major risk factors for foot ulceration and amputation in adults treated with dialysis and analysed patient populations in which risks were greatest. Random-effects meta-analysis was used to generate summary estimates. Thirty studies (48 566 participants) were identified. Risk factors for foot ulceration and amputation included previous foot ulceration (odds ratios, OR, 17.56 and 70.13), peripheral arterial disease (OR, 7.52 and 9.12), diabetes (OR, 3.76 and 7.48), peripheral neuropathy (OR, 3.24 and 3.36) and coronary artery disease (OR, 3.92 and 2.49). Participants with foot ulceration or amputation had experienced a longer duration of diabetes (mean difference, MD, 4.04 and 6.07 years) and had lower serum albumin levels (MD, -0.23 and -0.13 g/dL). Risk factors for foot ulceration also included retinopathy (OR, 3.03), previous amputation (OR, 15.50) and higher serum phosphorus levels (MD, 0.40 mg/dL), while risk factors for amputation also included male sex (OR, 1.50), current smoking (OR, 2.26) and higher glycated haemoglobin levels (MD, 0.75%). Dialysis patients who have markedly higher risks of ulceration or amputation include those with previous foot ulceration or amputation, peripheral neuropathy, diabetes or macrovascular disease. The temporal relationship between these risk factors and the development of foot ulceration and/or limb loss is uncertain and requires further study. Stable estimates of the key risk factors for ulceration and amputation can inform the design of future trials investigating clinical interventions to reduce the burden of lower limb disease in the dialysis population. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights

  13. Diabetic Foot Ulcers and Epidermal Growth Factor: Revisiting the Local Delivery Route for a Successful Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Berlanga-Acosta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Soon after epidermal growth factor (EGF discovery, some in vivo models appeared demonstrating its property to enhance cutaneous wound healing. EGF was the first growth factor (GF introduced in the clinical arena as a healing enhancer, exerting its mitogenic effects on epithelial, fibroblastoid, and endothelial cells via a tyrosine kinase membrane receptor. Compelling evidences from the 90s documented that, for EGF, locally prolonged bioavailability and hourly interaction with the receptor were necessary for a successful tissue response. Eventually, the enthusiasm on the clinical use of EGF to steer the healing process was wiped out as the topical route to deliver proteins started to be questioned. The simultaneous in vivo experiments, emphasizing the impact of the parenterally administered EGF on epithelial and nonepithelial organs in terms of mitogenesis and cytoprotection, rendered the theoretical fundamentals for the injectable use of EGF and shaped the hypothesis that locally infiltrating the diabetic ulcers would lead to an effective healing. Although the diabetic chronic wounds microenvironment is hostile for local GFs bioavailability, EGF local infiltration circumvented the limitations of its topical application, thus expanding its therapeutic prospect. Our clinical pharmacovigilance and basic studies attest the significance of the GF local infiltration for chronic wounds healing.

  14. Use of maggot therapy for treating a diabetic foot ulcer colonized by multidrug resistant bacteria in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Marilia A R Q; Ferraz, Julianny B; Junior, Miguel A A; Moura, Andrew D; da Costa, Maria E S M; Costa, Fagner J M D; Neto, Valter F A; Neto, Renato M; Gama, Renata A

    2015-03-01

    This study reports the efficacy of maggot therapy in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcer infected with multidrug resistant microorganisms. A 74 year old female patient with diabetes for over 30 years, was treated with maggot therapy using larvae of Chrysomya megacephala. The microbiological samples were collected to evaluate aetiology of the infection. The therapy done for 43 days resulted in a reduction of necrosis and the ulcer's retraction of 0.7 cm [2] in area. Analysis of the bacteriological swabs revealed the presence of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Further studies need to be done to confirm the role of maggot therapy in wound healing using a large sample and a proper study design.

  15. The efficacy of topical royal jelly on healing of diabetic foot ulcers: a double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siavash, Mansour; Shokri, Saeideh; Haghighi, Sepehr; Shahtalebi, Mohammad Ali; Farajzadehgan, Ziba

    2015-04-01

    Foot ulcers are major sources of morbidity in individuals with diabetes mellitus. As royal jelly (RJ, a worker honey bee product) contains enzymatic, antibacterial and vasodilative properties, it can potentially help in healing of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs). This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of topical RJ on healing of DFUs. Diabetic patients with foot ulcers who were referred to us at Khorshid Hospital, Isfahan, Iran, were managed by offloading, infection control, vascular improvement and debridement (if required). Then, all ulcers were randomly selected to receive either 5% sterile topical RJ or placebo on their total surface area. Patients were followed for 3 months or until complete healing. Twenty-five patients (6 females and 19 males) and a total of 64 ulcers were included and randomly allocated to case or control group (32 per group). Four ulcers were excluded and 60 ulcers included in the final analysis. Healing parameters including depth, length and width reduction rate, duration of complete healing and incidence of complete healing did not show any significant difference (P = 0·69, 0·95, 0·7, 0·74 and 0·6, respectively) between groups. We did not observe any side effect of topical RJ application. This study could not confirm any significant superiority of 5% topical RJ over placebo for the treatment of DFUs.

  16. Building Effective Partnerships Between Vascular Surgeons and Podiatric Physicians in the Effective Management of Diabetic Foot Ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Timothy; Chaer, Rabih A; Salvo, Nichol L

    2016-07-01

    Both vascular surgeons and podiatric physicians care for patients with diabetic foot ulcerations (DFUs), one of today's most challenging health-care populations in the United States. The prevalence of DFUs has steadily increased, along with the rising costs associated with care. Because of the numerous comorbidities affecting these patients, it is necessary to take a multidisciplinary approach in the management of these patients. Such efforts, primarily led by podiatric physicians and vascular surgeons, have been shown to effectively decrease major limb loss. Establishing an interprofessional partnership between vascular surgery and podiatric medicine can lead to an improvement in the delivery of care and outcomes of this vulnerable patient population.

  17. The risk factors of foot ulceration in diabetic patients%糖尿病足溃疡危险因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔国敏; 乔庆荣; 刘国芹

    2001-01-01

    观察23例糖尿病足溃疡患者的年龄、糖尿病病程、空腹血糖、血清总蛋白、血清白蛋白、血清肌酐、血清尿素氮及溃疡发生的位置,并与20例无溃疡糖尿病患者进行对比分析。结果显示:两组患者糖尿病病程、空腹血糖、血清总蛋白、血清白蛋白有显著性差异,年龄、血清肌酐、尿素氮无显著性差异;糖尿病足溃疡患者右足溃疡发生率(86%)显著高于左足(39%),双趾溃疡发生率(65%)高于其他部位(35%),但无显著性差异。结果提示:糖尿病病程、高血糖、低蛋白血症及足部受力过多和压迫是糖尿病足溃疡发生的危险因素。%23 diabetic foot ulcer patients were observed and compared with20 non foot ulcer diabetes.The results showed that the duration of diabetes and fasting plasma glucose of the patients with foot ulcer were significantly higher than that of the nonfoot ulcer patients(P<0.05).The serum total protein and serum albumin of the patients with foot ulcer were significantly lower than that of the non foot ulcer patients(P<0.01).There were no differences in serum creatin,blood urea nitrogen and age of the two groups.The right foot ulcer occuring rate was significantly higher than that of the left(P<0.005),and the great toes ulcers occuring rate(65%)were higher ehan that of the other area,but no differences.The results indicate that the duration of diabetes,hyperglycemia,hypoproteinemia and the high foot pressure are the risk factor,for diabetic foot ulcer

  18. Incidence and risk factors for surgically acquired pressure ulcers: a prospective cohort study investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Joan; Lister, Carolyn; Corry, Jean; Holland, Michelle; Coleman, Kerrie; Marquart, Louise

    2015-01-01

    To assess the incidence of hospital-acquired, surgery-related pressure injury (ulcers) and identify risk factors for these injuries. We used a prospective cohort study to investigate the research question. The study was conducted at a major metropolitan hospital in Brisbane, Australia. Five hundred thirty-four adult patients booked for any surgical procedure expected to last more than 30 minutes were eligible for inclusion. Patients who provided informed consent for study participation were assessed for pressure ulcers, using the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel and National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel Guidelines, before entering the operating room and again in the post-anesthetic care unit (PACU). Research nurses and all PACU nurses were trained in skin assessment and in pressure ulcer staging. Patients were not assessed again after their discharge from the PACU. Seven patients (1.3%) had existing pressure injuries (ulcers) and a further 6 (1.3%) developed a surgery-related pressure ulcer. Risk factors associated with surgery-related pressure injuries were similar to non-surgically related risks and included older age, skin condition, and being admitted from a location other than one's own home. Length of surgery was not associated with pressure ulcer development in this cohort. Perioperative nurses play an important role in identifying existing or new pressure injuries. However, many of these nurses are unfamiliar with pressure ulcer classification, so education in this area is essential. Although the incidence of surgically acquired pressure ulcers was low in this cohort, careful skin inspection before and after surgery provides an opportunity for early treatment and may prevent existing lesions progressing to higher stages.

  19. Polymicrobial nature of chronic diabetic foot ulcer biofilm infections determined using bacterial tag encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scot E Dowd

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diabetic extremity ulcers are associated with chronic infections. Such ulcer infections are too often followed by amputation because there is little or no understanding of the ecology of such infections or how to control or eliminate this type of chronic infection. A primary impediment to the healing of chronic wounds is biofilm phenotype infections. Diabetic foot ulcers are the most common, disabling, and costly complications of diabetes. Here we seek to derive a better understanding of the polymicrobial nature of chronic diabetic extremity ulcer infections. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using a new bacterial tag encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP approach we have evaluated the bacterial diversity of 40 chronic diabetic foot ulcers from different patients. The most prevalent bacterial genus associated with diabetic chronic wounds was Corynebacterium spp. Findings also show that obligate anaerobes including Bacteroides, Peptoniphilus, Fingoldia, Anaerococcus, and Peptostreptococcus spp. are ubiquitous in diabetic ulcers, comprising a significant portion of the wound biofilm communities. Other major components of the bacterial communities included commonly cultured genera such as Streptococcus, Serratia, Staphylococcus and Enterococcus spp. CONCLUSIONS: In this article, we highlight the patterns of population diversity observed in the samples and introduce preliminary evidence to support the concept of functional equivalent pathogroups (FEP. Here we introduce FEP as consortia of genotypically distinct bacteria that symbiotically produce a pathogenic community. According to this hypothesis, individual members of these communities when they occur alone may not cause disease but when they coaggregate or consort together into a FEP the synergistic effect provides the functional equivalence of well-known pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus, giving the biofilm community the factors necessary to maintain chronic biofilm infections

  20. AREA DETERMINATION OF DIABETIC FOOT ULCER IMAGES USING A CASCADED TWO-STAGE SVM BASED CLASSIFICATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Pedersen, Peder; Agu, Emmanuel; Strong, Diane; Tulu, Bengisu

    2016-11-23

    It is standard practice for clinicians and nurses to primarily assess patients' wounds via visual examination. This subjective method can be inaccurate in wound assessment and also represents a significant clinical workload. Hence, computer-based systems, especially implemented on mobile devices, can provide automatic, quantitative wound assessment and can thus be valuable for accurately monitoring wound healing status. Out of all wound assessment parameters, the measurement of the wound area is the most suitable for automated analysis. Most of the current wound boundary determination methods only process the image of the wound area along with a small amount of surrounding healthy skin. In this paper, we present a novel approach that uses Support Vector Machine (SVM) to determine the wound boundary on a foot ulcer image captured with an image capture box, which provides controlled lighting, angle and range conditions. The Simple Linear Iterative Clustering (SLIC) method is applied for effective super-pixel segmentation. A cascaded two-stage classifier is trained as follows: in the first stage a set of k binary SVM classifiers are trained and applied to different subsets of the entire training images dataset, and a set of incorrectly classified instances are collected. In the second stage, another binary SVM classifier is trained on the incorrectly classified set. We extracted various color and texture descriptors from super-pixels that are used as input for each stage in the classifier training. Specifically, we apply the color and Bag-of-Word (BoW) representation of local Dense SIFT features (DSIFT) as the descriptor for ruling out irrelevant regions (first stage), and apply color and wavelet based features as descriptors for distinguishing healthy tissue from wound regions (second stage). Finally, the detected wound boundary is refined by applying a Conditional Random Field (CRF) image processing technique. We have implemented the wound classification on a Nexus

  1. Isolation and Genetic Analysis of Multidrug Resistant Bacteria from Diabetic Foot Ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, Shailesh K; Kumar, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Severe diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) patients visiting Sir Sunderlal Hospital, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, were selected for this study. Bacteria were isolated from swab and deep tissue of 42 patients, for examining their prevalence and antibiotic sensitivity. DFUs of majority of the patients were found infected with Enterococcus spp. (47.61%), Escherichia coli (35.71%), Staphylococcus spp. (33.33%), Alcaligenes spp. (30.95%), Pseudomonas spp. (30.95%), and Stenotrophomonas spp. (30.95%). Antibiotic susceptibility assay of 142 bacteria with 16 antibiotics belonging to eight classes showed the presence of 38 (26.76%) isolates with multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotypes. MDR character appeared to be governed by integrons as class 1 integrons were detected in 26 (68.42%) isolates. Altogether six different arrays of genes (aadA1, aadB, aadAV, dhfrV, dhfrXII, and dhfrXVII) were found within class 1 integron. Gene cassette dhfrAXVII-aadAV (1.6 kb) was present in 12 (3 Gram positive and 9 Gram negative) isolates and was conserved across all the isolates as evident from RFLP analysis. In addition to the presence of class 1 integron, six β-lactamase resistance encoding genes namely bla TEM, bla SHV, bla OXA, bla CTX-M-gp1, bla CTX-M-gp2, and bla CTX-M-gp9 and two methicillin resistance genes namely mecA and femA and vancomycin resistance encoding genes (vanA and vanB) were identified in different isolates. Majority of the MDR isolates were positive for bla TEM (89.47%), bla OXA (52.63%), and bla CTX-M-gp1 (34.21%). To our knowledge, this is the first report of molecular characterization of antibiotic resistance in bacteria isolated from DFUs from North India. In conclusion, findings of this study suggest that class-1 integrons and β-lactamase genes contributed to the MDR in above bacteria.

  2. Isolation and genetic analysis of multidrug resistant bacteria from diabetic foot ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh Kumar Shahi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs patients visiting Sir Sunderlal Hospital, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, were selected for this study. Bacteria were isolated from swab and deep tissue of 42 patients, for examining their prevalence and antibiotic sensitivity. DFUs of majority of the patients were found infected with Enterococcus spp. (47.61%, Escherichia coli (35.71%, Staphylococcus spp. (33.33%, Alcaligenes spp. (30.95%, Pseudomonas spp. (30.95% and Stenotrophomonas spp. (30.95%. Antibiotic susceptibility assay of 142 bacteria with 16 antibiotics belonging to eight classes showed the presence of 38 (26.76% isolates with multidrug resistance (MDR phenotypes. MDR character appeared to be governed by integrons as class 1 integrons were detected in 26 (68.42% isolates. Altogether six different arrays of genes (aadA1, aadB, aadAV, dhfrV, dhfrXII and dhfrXVII were found within class 1 integron. Gene cassette dhfrAXVII-aadAV (1.6 kb was present in 12 (3 Gram positive and 9 Gram negative isolates and was conserved across all the isolates as evident from RFLP analysis. In addition to the presence of class 1 integron, six β-lactamase resistance encoding genes namely blaTEM, blaSHV, blaOXA, blaCTX-M-gp1, blaCTX-M-gp2 and blaCTX-M-gp9 and two methicillin resistance genes namely mecA and femA and vancomycin resistance encoding genes (vanA and vanB were identified in different isolates. Majority of the MDR isolates were positive for blaTEM (89.47%, blaOXA (52.63% and blaCTX-M-gp1 (34.21%. To our knowledge, this is the first report of molecular characterization of antibiotic resistance in bacteria isolated from DFUs from North India. In conclusion, findings of this study suggest that class-1 integrons and β-lactamase genes contributed to the MDR in above bacteria.

  3. Non-healing foot ulcers in diabetic patients: general and local interfering conditions and management options with advanced wound dressings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uccioli, Luigi; Izzo, Valentina; Meloni, Marco; Vainieri, Erika; Ruotolo, Valeria; Giurato, Laura

    2015-04-01

    Medical knowledge about wound management has improved as recent studies have investigated the healing process and its biochemical background. Despite this, foot ulcers remain an important clinical problem, often resulting in costly, prolonged treatment. A non-healing ulcer is also a strong risk factor for major amputation. Many factors can interfere with wound healing, including the patient's general health status (i.e., nutritional condition indicated by albumin levels) or drugs such as steroids that can interfere with normal healing. Diabetic complications (i.e., renal insufficiency) may delay healing and account for higher amputation rates observed in diabetic patients under dialysis treatment. Wound environment (e.g., presence of neuropathy, ischaemia, and infection) may significantly influence healing by interfering with the physiological healing cascade and adding local release of factors that may worsen the wound. The timely and well-orchestrated release of factors regulating the healing process, observed in acute wounds, is impaired in non-healing wounds that are blocked in a chronic inflammatory phase without progressing to healing. This chronic phase is characterised by elevated protease activity (EPA) of metalloproteinases (MMPs) and serine proteases (e.g., human neutrophil elastase) that interfere with collagen synthesis, as well as growth factor release and action. EPA (mainly MMP 9, MMP-8 and elastase) and inflammatory factors present in the wound bed (such as IL-1, IL-6, and TNFa) account for the catabolic state of non-healing ulcers. The availability of wound dressings that modulate EPA has added new therapeutic options for treating non-healing ulcers. The literature confirms advantages obtained by reducing protease activity in the wound bed, with better outcomes achieved by using these dressings compared with traditional ones. New technologies also allow a physician to know the status of the wound bed environment, particularly EPA, in a clinical

  4. Predictors of diabetic foot and leg ulcers in a developing country with a rapid increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumarasinghe A Sriyani

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify the socio demographic, life style and foot examination related predictors of diabetic foot and leg ulcers with a view to develop a screening tool appropriate for the use in an outpatient setting. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: This cross sectional study included type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM patients; 88 subjects with leg and foot ulcers and 80 non ulcer controls. Socio demographic data and life style factors were documented. Foot was examined for skin changes and structural abnormalities. Distal peripheral neuropathy was assessed by pressure sense, vibration sense and joint position sense. Multivariate analysis by logistic regression was used to determine the significant predictors in screening for foot ulcers. RESULTS: Education of grade 6 and below (OR--1.41, 95% CI; 1.03-4.68, low income (OR--23.3, 95% CI; 1.5-34.0, impaired vibration sense (OR--24.79, 95% CI; 9.3-66.2, abnormal monofilament test on first (OR--1.69, 95% CI; 1.36-16.6, third (OR--3.4, 95% CI; 1.1-10.6 and fifth (OR--1.8, 95% CI; 1.61-12.6 toes are found to be predictors of increased risk whereas incidental diagnosis of DM (OR--0.03, 95% CI; 0.003-0.28, wearing covered shoes (OR--0.003, 95% CI; 0.00-0.28, presence of normal skin color (OR--0.01, 95% CI; 0.001-0.14 and normal monofilament test on first metatarsal head (OR--0.10, 95% CI; 0.00-0.67 are protective factors for ulcers. CONCLUSIONS: Ten independent risk and protective factors identified in this study are proposed as a simple screening tool to predict the risk of developing leg and foot ulcers in patients with DM.

  5. Elevated skin autofluorescence is strongly associated with foot ulcers in patients with diabetes: a cross-sectional, observational study of Chinese subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Hang; Han, Chun-mao; Hu, Xin-lei; Ye, Wan-lan; Huang, Wen-Juan; Smit, Andries J

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to evaluate the association between skin autofluorescence (AF), an indicator of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), and foot ulcers in subjects with diabetes. Methods: In this study, 195 Chinese diabetic subjects were examined. Their feet were examined regardless of whether an ulcer was present or not. Skin AF was measured with an AGE reader. Demographic characteristics and blood data were recorded. Results: The mean values of skin AF were 2.29±0.47 for ...

  6. Local treatment of diabetic foot ulcers%糖尿病足溃疡的局部治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王颖超

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers is a common complications of diabetes, and will lead to limb amputation if not treated timely. the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers should stress local treatment based on systemic therapy. Local treatment includes debridement, biological dressing, offloading, revascularization( which contains intervention therapy, blood vessal bypass , stemcell therapy) , medical maggot therapy and so on. In this paper, recent progress in local treatment will be introduced.%糖尿病足溃疡是一种常见的糖尿病并发症,治疗不及时会导致截肢.糖尿病足溃疡的治疗应在全身治疗的基础上强调局部治疗,主要包括清创术、生物敷料、减轻负重、血管重建治疗(包括介入治疗、血管搭桥与干细胞治疗)、医用蛆治疗等.本文就近年来局部治疗的研究进展作一综述.

  7. Diagnosing pelvic osteomyelitis beneath pressure ulcers in spinal cord injured patients: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunel, A-S; Lamy, B; Cyteval, C; Perrochia, H; Téot, L; Masson, R; Bertet, H; Bourdon, A; Morquin, D; Reynes, J; Le Moing, V

    2016-03-01

    There is no consensus on a diagnostic strategy for osteomyelitis underlying pressure ulcers. We conducted a prospective study to assess the accuracy of multiple bone biopsies and imaging to diagnose pelvic osteomyelitis. Patients with clinically suspected osteomyelitis beneath pelvic pressure ulcers were enrolled. Bone magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and surgical bone biopsies (three or more for microbiology and one for histology per ulcer) were performed. Bacterial osteomyelitis diagnosis relied upon the association of positive histology and microbiology (at least one positive culture for non-commensal microorganisms or three or more for commensal microorganisms of the skin). From 2011 to 2014, 34 patients with 44 pressure ulcers were included. Bacterial osteomyelitis was diagnosed for 28 (82.3%) patients and 35 (79.5%) ulcers according to the composite criterion. Discrepancy was observed between histology and microbiology for 5 (11.4%) ulcers. Most common isolates were Staphylococcus aureus (77.1%), Peptostreptococcus (48.6%) and Bacteroides (40%), cultured in three or more samples in 42.9% of ulcers for S. aureus and ≥20% for anaerobes. Only 2.8% of ulcers had three or more positive specimens with coagulase-negative staphylococci, group B Streptococcus, and nil with enterococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus and group milleri Streptococcus were recovered from one sample in 22.8%, 11.4% and 11.4% of ulcers, respectively. Agreement was poor between biopsies and MRI (κ 0.2). Sensitivity of MRI was 94.3% and specificity was 22.2%. The diagnosis of pelvic osteomyelitis relies on multiple surgical bone biopsies with microbiological and histological analyses. At least three bone samples allows the detection of pathogens and exclusion of contaminants. MRI is not routinely useful for diagnosis.

  8. Pressure ulcer incidence in Dutch and German nursing homes: design of a prospective multicenter cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lohrmann Christa

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pressure ulcers are a common and serious health care problem in all health care settings. Results from annual national pressure ulcer prevalence surveys in the Netherlands and Germany reveal large differences in prevalence rates between both countries over the past ten years, especially in nursing homes. When examining differences in prevalence and incidence rates, it is important to take into account all factors associated with the development of pressure ulcers. Numerous studies have identified patient related factors, as well as nursing related interventions as risk factors for the development of pressure ulcers. Next to these more process oriented factors, also structural factors such as staffing levels and staff quality play a role in the development of pressure ulcers. This study has been designed to investigate the incidence of pressure ulcers in nursing homes in the Netherlands and Germany and to identify patient related factors, nursing related factors and structural factors associated with pressure ulcer development. The present article describes the protocol for this study. Methods/design A prospective multicenter study is designed in which a cohort of newly admitted nursing home residents in 10 Dutch and 11 German nursing homes will be followed for a period of 12 weeks. Data will be collected by research assistants using questionnaires on four different levels: resident, staff, ward, and nursing home. Discussion The results of the study will provide information on the incidence of pressure ulcers in Dutch and German nursing homes. Furthermore, information will be gathered on the influence of patient related factors, nursing related factors and structural factors on the incidence of pressure ulcers. The present article describes the study design and addresses the study's strengths and weaknesses.

  9. Ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... someone's risk of getting an ulcer because the nicotine in cigarettes causes the stomach to produce more ... endoscopy is given anesthesia and will have no memory of the procedure. For an endoscopy, the doctor ...

  10. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis identifies a metabolic memory profile in patient-derived diabetic foot ulcer fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Lara K; Maione, Anna G; Smith, Avi; Gerami-Naini, Behzad; Iyer, Lakshmanan K; Mooney, David J; Veves, Aristidis; Garlick, Jonathan A

    2014-10-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are a serious complication of diabetes. Previous exposure to hyperglycemic conditions accelerates a decline in cellular function through metabolic memory despite normalization of glycemic control. Persistent, hyperglycemia-induced epigenetic patterns are considered a central mechanism that activates metabolic memory; however, this has not been investigated in patient-derived fibroblasts from DFUs. We generated a cohort of patient-derived lines from DFU fibroblasts (DFUF), and site- and age-matched diabetic foot fibroblasts (DFF) and non-diabetic foot fibroblasts (NFF) to investigate global and genome-wide DNA methylation patterns using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry and the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450K array. DFFs and DFUFs demonstrated significantly lower global DNA methylation compared to NFFs (p = 0.03). Hierarchical clustering of differentially methylated probes (DMPs, p = 0.05) showed that DFFs and DFUFs cluster together and separately from NFFs. Twenty-five percent of the same probes were identified as DMPs when individually comparing DFF and DFUF to NFF. Functional annotation identified enrichment of DMPs associated with genes critical to wound repair, including angiogenesis (p = 0.07) and extracellular matrix assembly (p = 0.035). Identification of sustained DNA methylation patterns in patient-derived fibroblasts after prolonged passage in normoglycemic conditions demonstrates persistent metabolic memory. These findings suggest that epigenetic-related metabolic memory may also underlie differences in wound healing phenotypes and can potentially identify therapeutic targets.

  11. Comparison of healing rate in diabetes-related foot ulcers with low frequency ultrasonic debridement versus non-surgical sharps debridement: a randomised trial protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Foot ulceration has been reported as the leading cause of hospital admission and amputation in individuals with diabetes. Diabetes-related foot ulcers require multidisciplinary management and best practice care, including debridement, offloading, dressings, management of infection, modified footwear and management of extrinsic factors. Ulcer debridement is a commonly applied management approach involving removal of non-viable tissue from the ulcer bed. Different methods of debridement have been reported in the literature including autolytic debridement via moist wound healing, mechanical debridement utilising wet to dry dressings, theatre based sharps debridement, biological debridement, non-surgical sharps debridement and newer technology such as low frequency ultrasonic debridement. Methods People with diabetes and a foot ulcer, referred to and treated by the Podiatry Department at Monash Health and who meet the inclusion criteria will be invited to participate in this randomised controlled trial. Participants will be randomly and equally allocated to either the non-surgical sharps debridement (control) or low frequency ultrasonic debridement (intervention) group (n = 322 ulcers/n = 108 participants). Where participants have more than one ulcer, only the participant will be randomised, not the ulcer. An investigator not involved in participant recruitment or assessment will be responsible for preparing the random allocation sequence and envelopes. Each participant will receive weekly treatment for six months including best practice podiatric management. Each ulcer will be measured on a weekly basis by calculating total area in centimetres squared. Measurement will be undertaken by a trained research assistant to ensure outcomes are blinded from the treating podiatrist. Another member of the research team will assess the final primary outcome. Discussion The primary aim of this study is to compare healing rates for diabetes-related foot ulcers

  12. Pitfalls of Intralesional Ozone Injection in Diabetic Foot Ulcers: A Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Uzun, Günalp; Mutluoğlu, Mesut; Karagöz, Hüseyin; Memiş, Ali; Karabacak, Ercan; Ay, Hakan

    2014-01-01

    Although the history of ozone therapy dates back to the 19th century, its use has shown a rapid growth of interest in recent decades. Intralesional ozone injection is seldom performed and its safety has not yet been reliably assessed for the treatment of diabetic foot wounds. Herein, we describe a diabetic patient who developed severe foot necrosis and infection after receiving intralesional ozone injections for a non-healing wound.

  13. Pitfalls of Intralesional Ozone Injection in Diabetic Foot Ulcers: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun, Günalp; Mutluoğlu, Mesut; Karagöz, Hüseyin; Memiş, Ali; Karabacak, Ercan; Ay, Hakan

    2012-12-01

    Although the history of ozone therapy dates back to the 19th century, its use has shown a rapid growth of interest in recent decades. Intralesional ozone injection is seldom performed and its safety has not yet been reliably assessed for the treatment of diabetic foot wounds. Herein, we describe a diabetic patient who developed severe foot necrosis and infection after receiving intralesional ozone injections for a non-healing wound.

  14. Diabetic complications do not hamper improvement of health-related quality of life over the course of treatment of diabetic foot ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersma, Volkert; Thorsen, Hanne; Holstein, Per E.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Diabetic complications, and in particular diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs), are associated with low health-related quality of life (HRQoL). We evaluated whether the presence of diabetic complications also influenced the improvement of HRQoL during DFU treatment. Methods: 1088 patients presenting...

  15. Twenty-eight Cases of Diabetic Foot Ulcer and Gangrene Treated with the Chinese Herbal Medicine Combined with Injection of Ahylsantinfarctase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王凡

    2002-01-01

    @@ Since 1995, the Chinese herbal medicine for supplementing qi and activating blood circulation combined with injection of ahylsantinfarctase into the femoral artery has been used in 28 cases of diabetes complicated with gangrene and ulcer of the foot, with quite good therapeutic effects as reported in the following.

  16. Elevated skin autofluorescence is strongly associated with foot ulcers in patients with diabetes : a cross-sectional, observational study of Chinese subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Hang; Han, Chun-mao; Hu, Xin-lei; Ye, Wan-lan; Huang, Wen-juan; Smit, Andries J.

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the association between skin autofluorescence (AF), an indicator of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), and foot ulcers in subjects with diabetes. In this study, 195 Chinese diabetic subjects were examined. Their feet were examined regardless of whether an ulc

  17. Elevated skin autofluorescence is strongly associated with foot ulcers in patients with diabetes : a cross-sectional, observational study of Chinese subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Hang; Han, Chun-mao; Hu, Xin-lei; Ye, Wan-lan; Huang, Wen-juan; Smit, Andries J.

    This study was designed to evaluate the association between skin autofluorescence (AF), an indicator of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), and foot ulcers in subjects with diabetes. In this study, 195 Chinese diabetic subjects were examined. Their feet were examined regardless of whether an

  18. Four-fold increase in foot ulcers in type 2 diabetic subjects without an increase in major amputations by a multidisciplinary setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedetoft, Christoffer; Rasmussen, Anne; Fabrin, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    AIMS: We observed a large increase in type 2 diabetic subjects with foot ulcers in our diabetic outpatient foot clinic and wanted to identify the amputations rate and individuals at risk of amputations by comparing those who had had a regular control in the multidisciplinary foot clinic prior...... to the amputations and those who had not. METHODS: We examined all clinical records from the orthopaedic surgery department and the diabetic outpatient foot clinic of diabetic patients who underwent amputations for 6 years. RESULTS: Eighty-eight patients with type 2 diabetes underwent 142 amputations; 42 major...... and 100 minor amputations. There was no increase in the number of major amputations in this period. In the group not followed in the foot clinic prior to amputations we showed a greater major amputations rate (p

  19. Use of maggot therapy for treating a diabetic foot ulcer colonized by multidrug resistant bacteria in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilia A.R.Q. Pinheiro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the efficacy of maggot therapy in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcer infected with multidrug resistant microorganisms. A 74 year old female patient with diabetes for over 30 years, was treated with maggot therapy using larvae of Chrysomya megacephala. The microbiological samples were collected to evaluate aetiology of the infection. The therapy done for 43 days resulted in a reduction of necrosis and the ulcer′s retraction of 0.7 cm [2] in area. Analysis of the bacteriological swabs revealed the presence of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Further studies need to be done to confirm the role of maggot therapy in wound healing using a large sample and a proper study design.

  20. 糖尿病足溃疡中趋化因子的作用及机制%Roles of chemokines in diabetic foot ulcer and the mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈金安; 柳岚; 蒋克春; 王爱萍

    2015-01-01

    糖尿病足溃疡(DFUs)是糖尿病患者常见的慢性并发症之一,有感染、神经和(或)血管病变、愈合障碍等病理生理学特点.趋化因子具有免疫调节、趋化等作用,与DFUs的关系仍不清楚.它可能通过介导炎性细胞、血管平滑肌细胞、内皮祖细胞、上皮细胞,参与DFUs的炎性反应、动脉粥样斑块形成、新生血管生成和组织修复等过程.探讨趋化因子在DFUs中的作用,可为DFUs的治疗提供可能的新方法.%Diabetic foot ulcer is one of the most common chronic complications of diabetes.Infection,nerve and/or vascular lesions,and healing impairment are common pathophysiologic characteristics of diabetic foot ulcer.Chemokines play roles in immune regulation,chemotaxis and catalytic,but their roles in diabetic foot ulcer are still unclear.They may play roles in inflammatory response,atherosclerosis,angiogenesis as well as wound healing by acting on inflammatory cells,vascular smooth muscle cells,endothelial progenitor cells and epithelial cells.Further researches on the role of chemokines in diabetic foot ulcer may provide new direction for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers.

  1. Influence of an anti-diabetic foot ulcer formula and its component herbs on tissue and systemic glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, C M; Chan, Y W; Lau, C H; Lau, T W; Lau, K M; Lam, F C; Che, C T; Leung, P C; Fung, K P; Lau, C B S; Ho, Y Y

    2007-01-03

    Complications of diabetes impose major public health burdens worldwide. The positive effect of a Radix Astragali-based herbal preparation on healing diabetic foot ulcers in patients has been reported. Formula 1 is also referred as the 'Herbal drink to strengthen muscle and control swelling'. This formula contains six Chinese medical herbs, including Radix Astragali, Radix Rehmanniae, Rhizoma Smilacis Chinensis, Rhizoma Atractylodis Macrocephalae, Radix Polygoni Multiflori Preparata, and Radix Stephania Tetrandrae. Three of these herbs (Radix Astragali, Radix Rehmanniae, Rhizoma Atractylodis Macrocephalae) are commonly used in different anti-diabetic formulae of Chinese medicine. The objective of the current study is to use an interdisciplinary approach to test the hypothesis that Formula 1 and its components influence tissue and systemic glucose homeostasis. In vitro and in vivo models have been established including: (1) glucose absorption into intestinal brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV); (2) gluconeogenesis by H4IIE hepatoma cells; (3) glucose uptake by 3T3-L1 adipocytes and Hs68 skin fibroblasts; (4) normalization of glycaemic control in a diabetic rat model. The results of in vitro studies indicated that all herbal extracts can modify cellular glucose homeostasis. Since Formula 1 and Rhizoma Smilacis Chinensis extracts demonstrated potent effects on modifying glucose homeostasis in multiple tissues in vitro, they were further studied for their anti-diabetic activities in vivo using a streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rat model. The results showed that Formula 1 and Rhizoma Smilacis Chinensis extracts did not significantly improve oral glucose tolerance or basal glycaemia in diabetic rats. In conclusion, the anti-diabetic foot ulcer Formula 1 contains ingredients active in modifying tissue glucose homeostasis in vitro but these biological activities could not be associated with improved glycaemic control of diabetes in vivo.

  2. Pharmacoeconomic analysis of epidermal growth factor (HeberprotP ® for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G R Galstyan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The epidermal growth factor (EGF; HeberprotP ® is the new treatment for deep persistent diabetic foot ulcers (Wagner grade 3–4. The effectiveness of EGF measured as the reduction of the time to complete granulation of tissue lesions was confirmed in randomised clinical trials, but the cost of this new treatment is high. Aim. To analyze the costs and outcomes of the use of EGF (Heberprot-P® for the treatment of DFU in high- ly specialized medical institutions. Material and methods. We tested the hypothesis that the use of Heberprot-P® in diabetic foot ulcers – DFU – (Wagner grade 3–4 would reduce the rate of amputations and increase survival at acceptable cost for the Russian healthcare system. We used the data from international published literature to construct mathematical model representing clinical outcomes in the cohort of patients treated with only standard methods or standard methods in combination with Heberport-P®. We calculated direct costs associated with both strategies of treatment taking into account the risk of amputation. Results. The use of Heberprot-P® may prevent 52 amputations and save 29.54 years of life in a cohort of 100 DFU patients (Wagner grade 3–4. The incremental costs of EGF treatment were RUR 1.170.000 per life year gained and did not exceed the accepted threshold of less than three times GDP per capita. Conclusion. Mathematic modelling demonstrated the feasibility of introduction of EGF in combination with standard treatment for DFU in highly specialized medical institutions.

  3. How can I maintain my patient with diabetes and history of foot ulcer in remission?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, John D; Salloum, Michelle; Button, Alex; Giovinco, Nicholas A; Armstrong, David G

    2014-12-01

    Patients with diabetes and previous history of ulceration occupy the highest category of risk for reulceration and amputation. Annual recurrence rates of diabetic ulcerations have been reported as high as 34%, 61%, and 70% at 1, 3, and 5 years, respectively, with studies reporting 20% to 58% recurrence rate within 1 year. As the ever growing epidemic of diabetes expands globally, this sequelae of diabetic complication will continue to require increasing resources from the healthcare community to effectively manage. Recent data suggest that removal of preventative podiatric care from statewide reimbursement systems lead to significant and sustained increases in hospital admission (37%), charges (38%), length of stay (23%), and severe aggregate outcomes including amputation, sepsis and death (49%). The addition of comorbidities such as peripheral artery disease, poor nutrition, and non-adherence to preventive therapies not only increase a patient's likelihood for ulcer recurrence, but also cost of care and certainty of hospital admission. Currently, numerous efforts, guidelines, and industry generated products exist to prolong remission from ulceration; however, the clinical science for treating this patient population calls for much more effort. Despite this, data continue to suggest to demonstrate that appropriate follow-up care, shoe and insole modification, and patient education play a central role in reducing reulceration and amputation. Novel modalities for offloading and wearable sensor technologies offer the advantage of round-the-clock, patient specific and active response healthcare. These have the potential to detect, or even prevent, many wounds before they begin.

  4. The management of diabetic foot ulcers in Danish hospitals is not optimal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus; Svendsen, Ole Lander; Jansen, Rasmus Bo

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The diabetic foot is a complicated health issue which ideally involves several different specialists to ensure the most effective treatment. The Danish Health and Medicines Authority recently published a national guideline to address the implementation of multidisciplinary teams......) were mostly orthopaedic surgeons. A classification system of the diabetic foot was rarely or never used, and eight respondents (42%) reported having a multidisciplinary team in accordance with the national guidelines. 73% of the respondents performed some form of surgical intervention on diabetic feet......, mainly minor procedures. CONCLUSION: The study demonstrated that several areas of treatment practices relating to the diabetic foot had potential for improvement as they did not adhere to national Danish guidelines. A follow-up survey, allowing time for local implementation, seems warranted....

  5. First report of myiasis caused by Cochliomyia hominivorax (Diptera: Calliphoridae) in a diabetic foot ulcer patient in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olea, María Sofía; Centeno, Néstor; Aybar, Cecilia Adriana Veggiani; Ortega, Eugenia Silvana; Galante, Guillermina Begoña; Olea, Luis; Juri, María Julia Dantur

    2014-02-01

    Myiasis is usually caused by flies of the Calliphoridae family, and Cochliomyia hominivorax is the etiological agent most frequently found in myiasis. The first case of myiasis in a diabetic foot of a 54-year-old male patient in Argentina is reported. The patient attended the hospital of the capital city of Tucumán Province for a consultation concerning an ulcer in his right foot, where the larval specimens were found. The identification of the immature larvae was based on their morphological characters, such as the cylindrical, segmented, white yellow-coloured body and tracheas with strong pigmentation. The larvae were removed, and the patient was treated with antibiotics. The larvae were reared until the adults were obtained. The adults were identified by the setose basal vein in the upper surface of the wing, denuded lower surface of the wing, short and reduced palps, and parafrontalia with black hairs outside the front row of setae. The main factor that favoured the development of myiasis is due to diabetes, which caused a loss of sensibility in the limb that resulted in late consultation. Moreover, the poor personal hygiene attracted the flies, and the foul-smelling discharge from the wound favoured the female's oviposition. There is a need to implement a program for prevention of myiasis, in which the population is made aware not only of the importance of good personal hygiene and home sanitation but also of the degree of implication of flies in the occurrence and development of this disease.

  6. Abductor Hallucis: Anatomical Variation and Its Clinical Implications in the Reconstruction of Chronic Nonhealing Ulcers and Defects of Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chittoria, Ravi Kumar; Pratap, Harsha; Yekappa, Suma Hottigoudar

    2015-01-01

    Abductor hallucis (AH) is an intrinsic muscle of sole of the foot. It is commonly used in the coverage of ankle and heel defects and chronic nonhealing ulcers of the foot; its use is reported to have a favorable long-term outcome. The muscle's apt bulk and size, its simple surgical isolation, absence of donor-site defect, unvaried anatomy, and long neurovascular pedicle are some of the advantages that make it a promising muscle flap. During routine cadaver dissection in the Department of Anatomy of Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research (JIPMER), Pondicherry, India, we identified an anatomical variation in AH in both feet of a 45-year-old embalmed male Indian cadaver. The variant muscle had innumerable proximal attachments, a majority of them arising atypically in the form of tough tendinous slips from the medial intermuscular septum at the junction of central and tibial components of plantar aponeurosis, the medial surface of first metatarsal and the intermuscular septum separating AH from the flexor hallucis brevis. The tendon: muscle ratio was 1.76, higher than the normal reported ratio of 0.56±0.07. This article highlights the variation noted and its implication for clinicians. On Internet search, we did not come across the variations described in our article. Findings of the anatomical variation reported in this article could benefit surgeons who decide to use AH flaps in the future. PMID:26634184

  7. Decreasing incidence of foot ulcer among patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes in the period 2001-2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Anne; Almdal, T; Anker Nielsen, A

    2017-01-01

    AIM: Diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) is a serious complication to diabetes. The aim was to study the incidence of first DFU among patients with type 1 (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM), stratified according to etiology: neuropathic, neuro-ischemic or ischemic, over a period of 14years (2001......-2014). METHODS: DFU incidence rates were calculated from electronic patient record data from patients with T1DM and complicated T2DM from a large specialized diabetes hospital with a multidisciplinary foot clinic in Denmark. Poisson regression was used to model incidence of first DFU according to calendar year......, diabetes type and etiology. RESULTS: Among 5640 patients with T1DM 255 developed a DFU, corresponding to an incidence of 5.8 (95% confidence interval (95%CI) 5.1-6.5) per 1000 patient years; this incidence dropped from 8.1 (95%CI 5.4-11.9) per 1000 patient years in 2002 to 2.6 (95%CI 1.3-5.3) in 2014 (p=0...

  8. When a diabetic foot ulcer results in amputation: a qualitative study of the lived experience of 15 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, DeSales; Lauver, Lori S

    2014-11-01

    Diabetes is a chronic disease that can lead to complications resulting in diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs), foot infections, osteomyelitis, and amputations. Almost 50,000 amputations performed every year in the United States are due to DFUs. A qualitative analysis using Colaizzi's step-by-step approach to phenomenology was conducted to describe the experiences of 15 patients with diabetes living with a foot amputation. Semi-structured interviews were recorded digitally,transcribed, and analyzed. The analysis included reading transcripts multiple times, identifying noteworthy verbatim statements, then abstracting key words and phrases; similar key words and phrases were grouped into a meaning unit. The researchers rereviewed original transcripts, verbatim statements, and extracted key words and phrases and devised meaning units to identify main themes. Rigor in this study was ensured by developing an audit trail that linked the meaning units and themes back to key words and verbatim statements in the original transcripts and then allowing the participant to ensure accuracy of recounted information. Five major themes emerged from the data regarding patient concern about the ability to be productive members of society (i.e., transitioning from having a nonhealing wound to living as a new amputee)--financial burden, powerlessness, social support, placing blame, and uncertainty in one's continued ability--each having implications for health care providers as well as patients. By considering the experience from the patient perspective, health care professionals may be better prepared to discuss patient concerns with follow-up care and day to-day living, especially in getting help with finances. Additional research is needed to uncover models of care that may help these patients remain productive members of society and reduce the burden of amputation on patient quality of life.

  9. The importance of growth factors for the treatment of chronic wounds in the case of diabetic foot ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehm, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ulcers as a result of diabetes mellitus are a serious problem with an enormous impact on the overall global disease burden due to the increasing prevalence of diabetes. Because of long hospital stays, rehabilitation, often required home care and the use of social services diabetic foot complications are costly. Therapy with growth factors could be an effective and innovative add-on to standard wound care. Research questions: What is the benefit of therapies with growth factors alone or in combination with other technologies in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcer assessed regarding medical, economical, social, ethical and juridical aspects? Methods: We systematically searched relevant databases limited to English and German language and publications since 1990. Cost values were adjusted to the price level of 2008 and converted into Euro. A review and an assessment of the quality of publications were conducted following approved methodical standards conforming to evidence-based medicine and health economics. Results: We identified 25 studies (14 randomized controlled trials (RCT, nine cost-effectiveness analyses, two meta-analyses. The RCT compared an add-on therapy to standard wound care with standard wound care/placebo alone or extracellular wound matrix: in six studies becaplermin, in two rhEGF, in one bFGF, and in five studies the metabolically active skin grafts Dermagraft and Apligraf. The study duration ranged from twelve to 20 weeks and the study population included between 17 to 382 patients, average 130 patients. The treatment with becaplermin, rhEGF and skin implants Dermagraft and Apligraf showed in eight out of 13 studies an advantage concerning complete wound closure and the time to complete wound healing. Evidence for a benefit of treatment with bFGF could not be found. In four out of 14 studies the proportion of adverse events was 30% per study group with no difference between the treatment groups. The methodological

  10. The importance of growth factors for the treatment of chronic wounds in the case of diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchberger, Barbara; Follmann, Markus; Freyer, Daniela; Huppertz, Hendrik; Ehm, Alexandra; Wasem, Jürgen

    2010-09-01

    Ulcers as a result of diabetes mellitus are a serious problem with an enormous impact on the overall global disease burden due to the increasing prevalence of diabetes. Because of long hospital stays, rehabilitation, often required home care and the use of social services diabetic foot complications are costly. Therapy with growth factors could be an effective and innovative add-on to standard wound care. What is the benefit of therapies with growth factors alone or in combination with other technologies in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcer assessed regarding medical, economical, social, ethical and juridical aspects? We systematically searched relevant databases limited to English and German language and publications since 1990. Cost values were adjusted to the price level of 2008 and converted into Euro. A review and an assessment of the quality of publications were conducted following approved methodical standards conforming to evidence-based medicine and health economics. We identified 25 studies (14 randomized controlled trials (RCT), nine cost-effectiveness analyses, two meta-analyses). The RCT compared an add-on therapy to standard wound care with standard wound care/placebo alone or extracellular wound matrix: in six studies becaplermin, in two rhEGF, in one bFGF, and in five studies the metabolically active skin grafts Dermagraft and Apligraf. The study duration ranged from twelve to 20 weeks and the study population included between 17 to 382 patients, average 130 patients. The treatment with becaplermin, rhEGF and skin implants Dermagraft and Apligraf showed in eight out of 13 studies an advantage concerning complete wound closure and the time to complete wound healing. Evidence for a benefit of treatment with bFGF could not be found. In four out of 14 studies the proportion of adverse events was 30% per study group with no difference between the treatment groups. The methodological quality of the studies was affected by significant deficiencies. The

  11. FETAL GESTATIONAL AGE ESTIMATION BY FETAL FOOT LENGTH MEASUREMENT AND FETAL FEMUR TO FOOT LENGTH RATIO IN INDIAN POPULATION - A PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukta

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multiple parameters are in use for the accurate assessment of the gestational age by ultrasound, but the literature suggests that fetal foot length can be used to estimate gestational age, when other parameters are not available for measurement. Foetal femur/ foot length ratio can help in differentiating the foeti that have dysplastic limb reduction, from those whose limbs are short because of constitutional factors/IUGR. A prospective study was done to measure the fetal foot length for gestational age and to evaluate fetal femur to foot length ratio in pregnant women of 16-37 weeks gestation. MATERIALS & METHOD: One hundred and three normal singleton pregnant women of 16-37 weeks gestation were examined for routine obstetrics ultrasound. In these patients fetal foot length measurements were taken and the gestational age was assessed. In addition, fetal femur length to foot length ratio was calculated in each patient. RESULTS/OBSERVATION: Linear relationship between foot length and gestational age was present with a R2 value of 0.90 (p < than 0.001 and the fetal femur length/foot length ratio was found to be more than or equal to 0.92.The foot length can be a reliable parameter for use in assessment of gestational age and as most skeletal dysplasias spare the feet, the fetal femur length/foot length ratio can be used to detect most skeletal dysplasia. CONCLUSIONS: Foetal foot length is a reliable parameter for assessment of gestational age and femur length/foot length ratio is approximately 1 and a ratio of < 0.92 shall be useful in the detection of most skeletal dysplasia.

  12. Leucocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin (L-PRF) as a regenerative medicine strategy for the treatment of refractory leg ulcers: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Nelson R; Ubilla, Matias; Zamora, Yelka; Del Rio, Verónica; Dohan Ehrenfest, David M; Quirynen, Marc

    2017-07-20

    Chronic wounds (VLU: venous leg ulcer, DFU: diabetic foot ulcer, PU: pressure ulcer, or complex wounds) affect a significant proportion of the population. Despite appropriate standard wound care, such ulcers unfortunately may remain open for months or even years. The use of leukocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin (L-PRF) to cure skin ulcers is a simple and inexpensive method, widely used in some countries but unknown or neglected in most others. This auto-controlled prospective cohort study explored and quantified accurately for the first time the adjunctive benefits of topical applications of L-PRF in the management of such refractory ulcers in a diverse group of patients. Forty-four consecutive patients with VLUs (n = 28, 32 wounds: 17 ≤ 10 cm(2) and 15 > 10 cm(2)), DPUs (n = 9, 10 wounds), PUs (n = 5), or complex wounds (n = 2), all refractory to standard treatment for ≥3 months, received a weekly application of L-PRF membranes. L-PRF was prepared following the original L-PRF method developed more than 15 years ago (400g, 12 minutes) using the Intra-Spin L-PRF centrifuge/system and the XPression box kit (Intra-Lock, Boca Raton, FL, USA; the only CE/FDA cleared system for the preparation of L-PRF). Changes in wound area were recorded longitudinally via digital planimetry. Adverse events and pain levels were also registered. All wounds showed significant improvements after the L-PRF therapy. All VLUs ≤ 10 cm(2), all DFUs, as well as the two complex wounds showed full closure within a 3-month period. All wounds of patients with VLUs > 10 cm(2) who continued therapy (10 wounds) could be closed, whereas in the five patients who discontinued therapy improvement of wound size was observed. Two out of the five PUs were closed, with improvement in the remaining three patients who again interrupted therapy (surface evolution from 7.35 ± 4.31 cm(2) to 5.78 ± 3.81 cm(2)). No adverse events were observed. A topical application of L-PRF on

  13. Prospective evaluation of the treatment of solitary rectal ulcer syndrome with biofeedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaizey, C; Roy, A; Kamm, M

    1997-01-01

    Background—Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome (SRUS) is often resistant to medical and surgical treatment. 
Aim—To determine whether biofeedback retraining is a useful treatment for this condition. 
Patients—Thirteen consecutive patients with SRUS (three men, median age 34 years, median duration of symptoms three years) underwent treatment. Previous surgical treatment had failed in five. 
Methods—Patients were evaluated prospectively. Anorectal physiological studies were performed in 11 patients before treatment. A standardised questionnaire was used before and after treatment, and all but two patients were examined after treatment. 
Results—Median follow up was nine months (range 3-22 months). After treatment four patients were asymptomatic, and four felt improved. Symptom improvement or elimination occurred in: need to strain (7/13 patients), digitation (7/11), laxative use (5/9). Time in the toilet (median 30 v 10 minutes, before v after treatment) and number of visits to toilet (6 v 3/day) were also improved. Three patients were able to maintain employment before treatment compared with eight after treatment. The solitary ulcer did not heal completely in any of the nine patients examined after treatment, but improved in four. Previous surgery, the macroscopic appearance of the ulcer, the presence of pelvic floor paradox, and other physiological parameters did not predict outcome. 
Conclusion—Biofeedback retraining is a useful treatment for this condition. Long term studies are now required. 

 Keywords: solitary rectal ulcer syndrome; biofeedback therapy PMID:9462216

  14. Application of diabetic foot screening on tertiaty prevention of diabetic ulcer%糖尿病足筛查在糖尿病足溃疡三级预防中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丽; 徐浣白; 高丽; 任启芳; 顾娟; 张艳丽

    2011-01-01

    目的:了解糖尿病患者糖尿病足溃疡危险状况,以指导糖尿病足溃疡三级预防.方法:采用英国Huntieigh糖尿病足筛查诊断箱和Gavin's糖尿病足危险因素加权值积分评价方法,对148例糖尿病患者的一般临床资料、各项检查、化验、足部状况等与足溃疡发生相关因素进行筛查.结果:低危足28例,中危足69例,高危足43例,正常足8例.结论:糖尿病患者发生糖尿病足溃疡的危险性高,需加强筛查,根据足溃疡危险等级进行糖尿病足溃疡的三级预防,降低致残、致死率.%Objective: To guard tertiary prevention of diabetic foot ulcer, we investigated danger condition of diabetic foot.Methods: General clinical data, results of laboratory examination, and foot ulcer correlated contents including foot condition were screened using diabetic foot diagnose box( Huntieigh; England )in 148 cases of diabetics.Gavin's risk factors of diabetic foot were assessed with weighted value integration.Results:28 hyp - danger foot ( 18.92% ), 69 moderate danger foot ( 46.62% ), 43 high danger foot ( 29.05% ) and 8 normal foot ( 5.40% ) were identified.Conclusion:The risk of foot ulcer in diabetics is high.To prevent diabetic foot development and decrease mutilation and fatality, we should strengthen diabetic foot screening and tertiary prevention of diabetic foot according to foot ulcer danger classes.

  15. 糖尿病足筛查在患者足溃疡三级预防中的应用分析%Analysis of the Application of Diabetic Foot Screening in Tertiary Prevention for Foot Ulcers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江浩

    2015-01-01

    [Objective]To understand the risk of diabetic foot and analyze the efficacy of diabetic foot screening in the prevention of diabetic foot ulcer through diabetic foot screening for diabetic patients .[Meth‐ods] On the basis of routine education ,28 patients with diabetes mellitus in our hospital received regular dia‐betic foot screening .The indexes resulting in the incidence of foot ulcer such as foot condition of patients were recorded in detail .All patients were followed up at least 24 months .Foot condition of patients was evaluated .[Results] After 24 months ,patients had good living habit ,examined their foot daily and bathed their foot un‐der with suitable water temperature .Except some patients ,many patients stopped smoking and drinking .The incidence of foot infection was 14 .6% (12/82) ,and the incidence of foot ulcers was 3 .7% (3/82) .Compared with before the implementation of preventive measures ,the risk of foot disease was decreased greatly ,and there was significant difference( P<0 .05) .[Conclusion]Regular screening for diabetic patients can effective‐ly prevent foot ulcers .Therefore ,it is worthy of clinical promotion .%【目的】通过对糖尿病(DM )患者进行糖尿病足筛查,了解患者糖尿病足的危险状况,分析其在预防糖尿病足溃疡的效果。【方法】将本院收治的82例DM患者在接受常规教育的基础上,定期接受糖尿病足现状筛查,详细记录患者的足部状况等各项导致足溃疡发生的因素,进行至少24个月随访,对患者的足部状况进行评估分析。【结果】24个月后,患者的生活习惯良好,患者每日检查足部,用合适的水温泡脚,除极个别患者吸烟、喝酒外,大多均已戒烟戒酒;患者足部感染率为14.6%(12/82),足部溃疡3.7%(3/82);与实施预防措施前相比,足部病变危险率有大幅减低,差异有统计学意义( P<0.05)。【结论】定期对DM 患

  16. The management of diabetic foot ulcers in Danish hospitals is not optimal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus; Svendsen, Ole Lander; Jansen, Rasmus Bo

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The diabetic foot is a complicated health issue which ideally involves several different specialists to ensure the most effective treatment. The Danish Health and Medicines Authority recently published a national guideline to address the implementation of multidisciplinary teams...... and the participant answering the questionnaire was identified as knowledgeable about the department's procedures on treatment of diabetic feet. Only one questionnaire per department was allowed. RESULTS: A total of 62 questionnaires were sent out. We achieved a response rate of ~37% (n = 23). Respondents (n = 13...

  17. [Plastic closure of wounds and trophic ulcers in patients with diabetic foot syndrome by relief autoshred].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlyshin, A V; Shidlovskiĭ, V A; Gerasimchuk, P A

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the features of the surgical treatment of patients with diabetes mellitus complicated with diabetic foot syndrome. Results of autodermoplasty of acute and chronic skin damages with ripped and flat skin graft in 185 patients who were treated in the clinic of general surgery of I.Ya. Horbachevsky Ternopil State Medical University, Ukraine, in the period from 2007 to 2012 Using of this method leads to improved cosmetic and functional results in 81.7% of patients with reducing of treatment duration up to 12 days.

  18. NorLeu3-Angiotensin (1-7) [DSC127] as a Therapy for the Healing of Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Kathleen E.; Bolton, Laura L.; Verco, Shelagh; diZerega, Gere S.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Diabetes is a disorder that is well known to delay wound repair resulting in the formation of colonized chronic wounds. Over their lifetime, diabetic patients have a 25% incidence of foot ulcers (DFUs), which contribute to increased risk of morbidity, including osteomyelitis and amputations, and increased burden to the healthcare system. Recent Advances: The only active product approved for the treatment of diabetic ulcers, Regranex®, is not widely used due to minimal proven efficacy and recent warnings added to the Instructions for Use. A novel topical agent that accelerates healing and increases the proportion of fully healed DFUs, DSC127 [aclerastide; active ingredient, NorLeu3-angiotensin (1-7) (NorLeu3-A(1-7))], is recruiting patients in Phase III clinical trials (NCT01830348 and NCT01849965). NorLeu3-A(1-7) is an analog of the naturally occurring peptide, angiotensin 1-7. The mechanisms of action include induction of progenitor proliferation, accelerated vascularization, collagen deposition, and re-epithelialization. Critical Issues: Current modalities for the treatment of DFUs include strict offloading, bandaging, debridement and, on a limited basis, application of Regranex. Novel potent therapies are needed to combat this significant burden to the diabetic patient and the healthcare system. Future Direction: Preclinical and clinical research shows that DSC127 is highly effective in the closure of diabetic wounds and is superior to Regranex in animal studies. Clinical development of DSC127 as a topical agent for the healing of DFU is underway. Further investigation into the mechanisms by which this product accelerates healing is warranted. PMID:26029484

  19. Evaluation of the pressure ulcers risk scales with critically ill patients: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andressa Tomazini Borghardt

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: to evaluate the accuracy of the Braden and Waterlow risk assessment scales in critically ill inpatients.METHOD: this prospective cohort study, with 55 patients in intensive care units, was performed through evaluation of sociodemographic and clinical variables, through the application of the scales (Braden and Waterlow upon admission and every 48 hours; and through the evaluation and classification of the ulcers into categories.RESULTS: the pressure ulcer incidence was 30.9%, with the Braden and Waterlow scales presenting high sensitivity (41% and 71% and low specificity (21% and 47% respectively in the three evaluations. The cut off scores found in the first, second and third evaluations were 12, 12 and 11 in the Braden scale, and 16, 15 and 14 in the Waterlow scale.CONCLUSION: the Braden scale was shown to be a good screening instrument, and the Waterlow scale proved to have better predictive power.

  20. Reporting standards of studies and papers on the prevention and management of foot ulcers in diabetes: required details and markers of good quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffcoate, William J; Bus, Sicco A; Game, Frances L; Hinchliffe, Robert J; Price, Patricia E; Schaper, Nicolaas C

    2016-09-01

    The evidence base for many aspects of the management of foot ulcers in people with diabetes is weak, and good-quality research, especially relating to studies of direct relevance to routine clinical care, is needed. In this paper, we summarise the core details required in the planning and reporting of intervention studies in the prevention and management of diabetic foot ulcers, including studies that focus on off-loading, stimulation of wound healing, peripheral artery disease, and infection. We highlight aspects of trial design, conduct, and reporting that should be taken into account to minimise bias and improve quality. We also provide a 21-point checklist for researchers and for readers who assess the quality of published work.

  1. Increased Growth Factors Play a Role in Wound Healing Promoted by Noninvasive Oxygen-Ozone Therapy in Diabetic Patients with Foot Ulcers

    OpenAIRE

    Jing Zhang; Meiping Guan; Cuihua Xie; Xiangrong Luo; Qian Zhang; Yaoming Xue

    2014-01-01

    Management of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) is a great challenge for clinicians. Although the oxygen-ozone treatment improves the diabetic outcome, there are few clinical trials to verify the efficacy and illuminate the underlying mechanisms of oxygen-ozone treatment on DFUs. In the present study, a total of 50 type 2 diabetic patients complicated with DFUs, Wagner stage 2~4, were randomized into control group treated by standard therapy only and ozone group treated by standard therapy plus oxy...

  2. Foot & Mouth Disease & Ulcerative/Vesicular Rule-outs: Challenges Encountered in Recent Outbreaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hullinger, P

    2008-01-28

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD) is a highly infectious and contagious viral disease affecting bovidae (cattle, zebus, domestic buffaloes, yaks), sheep, goats, swine, all wild ruminants and suidae. Camelidae (camels, dromedaries, llamas, vicunas) have low susceptibility. Foot and mouth disease is caused by a RNS virus of the family Picornaviridae, genus Aphthovirus. There are seven immunologically distinct serotypes: A, O, C, SAT1, SAT2, SAT3, Asia 1. Foot and mouth disease causes significant economic loss both to countries who manage it as an endemic disease (with or without vaccination), as well as those FMD free countries which may become infected. The mortality rate is low in adult animals, but often higher in young due to myocarditis. Foot and mouth disease is endemic in parts of Asia, Africa, the Middle East and South America (sporadic outbreaks in free areas). The Office of International Epizootics (OIE), also referred to the World Organization for Animal Health maintains an official list of free countries and zones.1 The OIE Terrestrial Code (Chapter 2.2.10) provides detailed information on the categories of freedom that can be allocated to a country as well as guidelines for the surveillance for foot and mouth disease (Appendix 3.8.7). In short, countries may be completely free of FMD, free with vaccination or infected with foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV). Source of FMDV include incubating and clinically affected animals with virus present in breath, saliva, faeces, urine, milk and semen. In experimental settings virus has been detected in milk several days before the onset of clinical signs2. Additional sources of virus are meat and by-products in which pH has remained above 6.0 as well as persistently infected carrier animals. Carrier animals may include cattle and water buffalo; convalescent animals and exposed vaccinates (virus persists in the oropharynx for up to 30 months in cattle or longer in buffalo, 9 months in sheep). Pigs do not become carriers

  3. 康复新外敷治疗糖尿病足部溃疡%External application of Kang Fu Xin in diabetic foot ulcer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡梅

    2012-01-01

      Objective: To study the effect of external application of Kang Fu Xin in diabetic foot ulcer. Methods: Choosed 79 patients of diabetic foot ulcer to divide into two groups with controling the blood sugar, anti-infection, and improve circulation. The study group were treated with external application of Kang Fu Xin in 40 cases, and controled group were treateed with common drug changing. Conclusion: Kang Fu Xin could improve diabetic foot ulcer to coalescence to ameliorate clinical symptoms.%  目的研究康复新治疗糖尿病足部溃疡的疗效。方法在良好控制血糖、抗感染、改善微循环等综合治疗基础之上,将79例糖尿病足患者随机分2组,治疗组40例采用康复新外敷创面;对照组39例采用常规换药。结论康复新疗效由于常规换药,能有效促进糖尿病足部溃疡的愈合,明显改善患者的临床症状。

  4. The management of diabetic foot ulcers in Danish hospitals is not optimal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus; Svendsen, Ole Lander; Jansen, Rasmus Bo

    2015-01-01

    and the participant answering the questionnaire was identified as knowledgeable about the department's procedures on treatment of diabetic feet. Only one questionnaire per department was allowed. RESULTS: A total of 62 questionnaires were sent out. We achieved a response rate of ~37% (n = 23). Respondents (n = 13......INTRODUCTION: The diabetic foot is a complicated health issue which ideally involves several different specialists to ensure the most effective treatment. The Danish Health and Medicines Authority recently published a national guideline to address the implementation of multidisciplinary teams...... in the treatment. The objective of this study was to describe the treatment practices at the time the guidelines were launched. METHODS: A questionnaire-based survey was conducted among Danish hospital departments working with diabetic feet. All public departments were invited by e-mail to participate...

  5. The management of diabetic foot ulcers in Danish hospitals is not optimal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus; Svendsen, Ole Lander; Jansen, Rasmus Bo

    2015-01-01

    in the treatment. The objective of this study was to describe the treatment practices at the time the guidelines were launched. METHODS: A questionnaire-based survey was conducted among Danish hospital departments working with diabetic feet. All public departments were invited by e-mail to participate...... and the participant answering the questionnaire was identified as knowledgeable about the department's procedures on treatment of diabetic feet. Only one questionnaire per department was allowed. RESULTS: A total of 62 questionnaires were sent out. We achieved a response rate of ~37% (n = 23). Respondents (n = 13......, mainly minor procedures. CONCLUSION: The study demonstrated that several areas of treatment practices relating to the diabetic foot had potential for improvement as they did not adhere to national Danish guidelines. A follow-up survey, allowing time for local implementation, seems warranted....

  6. Reactive Eccrine Syringofibroadenoma Associated with Neuropathy, Venous Stasis, and Diabetic Foot Ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thirawut Sirikham

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Eccrine syringofibroadenoma (ESFA is an uncommon benign adnexal neoplasm which derives from cells of the acrosyringium of eccrine sweat glands. The clinical appearance is nonspecific but the histological features are typical. Five clinical subtypes of ESFA exist: (1 solitary ESFA; (2 multiple ESFA associated with ectodermal dysplasia; (3 multiple ESFA without cutaneous features; (4 unilateral linear ESFA (nevoid, and (5 reactive ESFA associated with inflammatory or neoplastic dermatoses. We report the case of a 42-year-old man with long-standing diabetes and neuropathy, presenting with a 4-year history of asymptomatic erythematous plaques on a background of brown hyperpigmentation on the left foot. The clinical presentation and histopathological findings are compatible with reactive ESFA.

  7. Association between Serum Cystatin C and Diabetic Foot Ulceration in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jie; Deng, Wuquan; Zhang, Yuping; Zheng, Yanling; Zhou, Lina; Boey, Johnson; Armstrong, David G.; Yang, Gangyi

    2016-01-01

    Serum cystatin C (CysC) has been identified as a possible potential biomarker in a variety of diabetic complications, including diabetic peripheral neuropathy and peripheral artery disease. We aimed to examine the association between CysC and diabetic foot ulceration (DFU) in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). 411 patients with T2D were enrolled in this cross-sectional study at a university hospital. Clinical manifestations and biochemical parameters were compared between DFU group and non-DFU group. The association between serum CysC and DFU was explored by binary logistic regression analysis. The cut point of CysC for DFU was also evaluated by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. The prevalence of coronary artery disease, diabetic nephropathy (DN), and DFU dramatically increased with CysC (P < 0.01) in CysC quartiles. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that the significant risk factors for DFU were serum CysC, coronary artery disease, hypertension, insulin use, the differences between supine and sitting TcPO2, and hypertension. ROC curve analysis revealed that the cut point of CysC for DFU was 0.735 mg/L. Serum CysC levels correlated with DFU and severity of tissue loss. Our study results indicated that serum CysC was associated with a high prevalence of DFU in Chinese T2D subjects. PMID:27668262

  8. Association between Serum Cystatin C and Diabetic Foot Ulceration in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Serum cystatin C (CysC has been identified as a possible potential biomarker in a variety of diabetic complications, including diabetic peripheral neuropathy and peripheral artery disease. We aimed to examine the association between CysC and diabetic foot ulceration (DFU in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D. 411 patients with T2D were enrolled in this cross-sectional study at a university hospital. Clinical manifestations and biochemical parameters were compared between DFU group and non-DFU group. The association between serum CysC and DFU was explored by binary logistic regression analysis. The cut point of CysC for DFU was also evaluated by receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve. The prevalence of coronary artery disease, diabetic nephropathy (DN, and DFU dramatically increased with CysC (P<0.01 in CysC quartiles. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that the significant risk factors for DFU were serum CysC, coronary artery disease, hypertension, insulin use, the differences between supine and sitting TcPO2, and hypertension. ROC curve analysis revealed that the cut point of CysC for DFU was 0.735 mg/L. Serum CysC levels correlated with DFU and severity of tissue loss. Our study results indicated that serum CysC was associated with a high prevalence of DFU in Chinese T2D subjects.

  9. Neuropathy and Diabetic Foot Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volmer-Thole, Maren; Lobmann, Ralf

    2016-06-10

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus worldwide and the most common cause of hospitalization in diabetic patients. The etiology of diabetic foot ulcerations is complex due to their multifactorial nature; in the pathophysiology of diabetic foot ulceration polyneuropathy is important. Proper adherence to standard treatment strategies and interdisciplinary cooperation can reduce the still high rates of major amputations.

  10. Integrative analysis of miRNA and mRNA paired expression profiling of primary fibroblast derived from diabetic foot ulcers reveals multiple impaired cellular functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Liang; Stone, Rivka C; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Ramirez, Horacio; Pastar, Irena; Maione, Anna G; Smith, Avi; Yanez, Vanessa; Veves, Aristides; Kirsner, Robert S; Garlick, Jonathan A; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2016-11-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are one of the major complications of diabetes. Its molecular pathology remains poorly understood, impeding the development of effective treatments. Although it has been established that multiple cell types, including fibroblasts, keratinocytes, macrophages, and endothelial cells, all contribute to inhibition of healing, less is known regarding contributions of individual cell type. Thus, we generated primary fibroblasts from nonhealing DFUs and evaluated their cellular and molecular properties in comparison to nondiabetic foot fibroblasts (NFFs). Specifically, we analyzed both micro-RNA and mRNA expression profiles of primary DFU fibroblasts. Paired genomic analyses identified a total of 331 reciprocal miRNA-mRNA pairs including 21 miRNAs (FC > 2.0) along with 239 predicted target genes (FC > 1.5) that are significantly and differentially expressed. Of these, we focused on three miRNAs (miR-21-5p, miR-34a-5p, miR-145-5p) that were induced in DFU fibroblasts as most differentially regulated. The involvement of these microRNAs in wound healing was investigated by testing the expression of their downstream targets as well as by quantifying cellular behaviors in prospectively collected and generated cell lines from 15 patients (seven DFUF and eight NFF samples). We found large number of downstream targets of miR-21-5p, miR-34a-5p, miR-145-5p to be coordinately regulated in mRNA profiles, which was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. Pathway analysis on paired miRNA-mRNA profiles predicted inhibition of cell movement and cell proliferation, as well as activation of cell differentiation and senescence in DFU fibroblasts, which was confirmed by cellular assays. We concluded that induction of miR-21-5p, miR-34a-5p, miR-145-5p in DFU dermal fibroblasts plays an important role in impairing multiple cellular functions, thus contributing to overall inhibition of healing in DFUs.

  11. A prospective cohort study of postoperative complications in the management of perforated peptic ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Mamta S

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With dwindling rates of postoperative mortality in perforated peptic ulcer that is attributable to H2-receptor blocker usage, there is a need to shift the focus towards the prevention of postoperative morbidity. Further, the simultaneous contribution of several putative clinical predictors to this postoperative morbidity is not fully appreciated. Our objective was to assess the predictors of the risk, rate and number of postoperative complications in surgically treated patients of perforated peptic ulcer. Methods In a prospective cohort study of 96 subjects presenting as perforated peptic ulcer and treated using Graham's omentoplatsy patch or gastrojejunostomy (with total truncal vagotomy, we assessed the association of clinical predictors with three domains of postoperative complications: the risk of developing a complication, the rate of developing the first complication and the risk of developing higher number of complications. We used multiple regression methods – logistic regression, Cox proportional hazards regression and Poisson regression, respectively – to examine the association of the predictors with these three domains. Results We observed that the risk of developing a postoperative complication was significantly influenced by the presence of a concomitant medical illness [odds ratio (OR = 8.9, p = 0.001], abdominal distension (3.8, 0.048 and a need of blood transfusion (OR = 8.2, p = 0.027. Using Poisson regression, it was observed that the risk for a higher number of complications was influenced by the same three factors [relative risk (RR = 2.6, p = 0.015; RR = 4.6, p - blood group (RH = 4.7, p = 0.04. Conclusion Abdominal distension, presence of a concomitant medical illness and a history suggestive of shock at the time of admission warrant a closer and alacritous postoperative management in patients of perforated peptic ulcer.

  12. 开展糖尿病足部门诊在预防糖尿病足溃疡中的体会%Experience of Prevention of Diabetic Foot Ulcers in Carry on Diabetic Foot Clinic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈芳芳; 郑建娣; 徐亚青

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of out-patient management on high-risk diabetic foot. Methods We Carried out diabetic foot care clinic, treat with 32 cases of patients with high-risk diabetic foot, provide them with individualized education and guidance of prevention and care. Besides we use"diabetic foot related knowledge and self-efficacy and self-care ability evaluation form" to assess the effect on patients after 3 month, 6 months, 12 months. At the same time 32 patients from the endocrine outpatient clinic were selected as control group,Control group accepted routine diabetes health education . Results Except 2 cases were missing, and 1 cases developed foot ulcer, the rest of patients , health education knowledge, self-care ability increased with the extension of time of treatment. After 12 months, the score of Foot disease out-patients is higher than the ordinary outpatient department of endocrinology. Conclusion The diabetic foot clinics can provide us with effective management on patients with high-risk diabetic foot, and prevent foot ulcers.%目的:探讨糖尿病足病门诊在管理糖尿病高危足中的效果。方法开展糖尿病足部护理门诊,对32例糖尿病高危足患者进行足部处理,个体化宣教,预防保健的指导,并且在3个月,6个月,12个月时采用“糖尿病足相关知识、自我效能及自护能力评价表”对患者进行评估。同时在内分泌普通门诊选32例患者作为对照组。结果32例糖尿病高危足患者中有2例脱访,1例发生足溃疡,患者的健康教育知识,自护能力都随着时间的延长而提高。足病门诊的患者12个月后各评分都高于内分泌科普通门诊。结论糖尿病足病门诊能有效管理糖尿病高危足患者,预防足溃疡的发生。

  13. Clinical Analysis of Malignant Melanoma Presenting as Foot Ulcer%表现为足溃疡的恶性黑色素瘤临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈大伟; 高伟; 康馨; 王椿; 岑石强; 冉兴无

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical features of malignant melanoma presenting as foot ulcer. Methods The clinical data of 46 patients (17 females and 29 males with the average age of 57 years) with malignant melanoma presenting as foot ulcer diagnosed in our hospital between January 2002 and December 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. Results All of the patients were diagnosed by biopsy, and it almost presented as masses, melanotic macules, naevus, blisters, onychomycosis, clavus, wart, etc, before the formation of foot ulcer. After the formation of the ulcer, it presented as nonhealed trauma or frequently ulcerates, central or marginal ulceration, uneven or granular scar-like surface, eschar, etc. Planta, calcar pedis, and hallux were the most predilection sites of malignant melanoma. The majority of lesions were located in foot sole, heel, and the first toe. There were 3 patients without pigment The course of ulcer was (10.74±0.94) months and 18 patients had far-distance metastasis before the diagnosis of malignant melanoma. Thirty-eighty cases were misdiagnosed as melanotic macules, naevus, chronic ulcers, etc. The median time of misdiagnosis was 6 (2.75-48) months. Conclusions The clinical manifestations of malignant melanoma are not typical, which leads to the misdiagnosis. We should pay more attention to the patients with foot ulcer which should be examined by biopsy as early as possible to reduce the misdiagnosis rate.%目的 探讨表现为足溃疡的恶性黑色素瘤临床特点.方法 回顾性分析2002年1月-2010年12月收治的46例表现为足溃疡的恶性黑色素瘤患者.结果 46例均病理组织活检确诊,男29例,女17例,平均年龄57岁.溃疡形成前多表现为包块、黑素斑、痣、水泡、灰指甲、鸡眼、疣等;溃疡形成后表现为外伤不愈或反复复发、溃疡中央或边缘破溃、不规则、表面凹凸不平、颗粒状或呈瘢痕状态、焦痂、菜花样新生物等;溃疡好发部位

  14. BLEEDING PEPTIC ULCER, NONSTEROIDAL ANTIINFLAMMATORY DRUGS AND HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION – A PROSPECTIVE, CONTROLLED, RANDOMIZED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Skok

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. The explanation of peptic ulcer etiology has changed significantly in the past decade after the clarification of the significance of Helicobacter pylori infection.Aim. To evaluate the effectiveness of Helicobacter pylori eradication in patients with hemorrhaging peptic ulcer and patients with peptic ulcer without complications.Study ethics. The study was approved in 1998 by the Medical Ethics Committee of the Republic of Slovenia (No. 90/09/98.Type of study. Prospective, controlled and randomized study, carried out between 1998–2000.Patients and methods. The study included 80 patients (50 male and 30 female, av.age 57.5 years, SD ± 17.1, range 22– 80 in which endoscopy confirmed hemorrhage from peptic ulcer of stomach or duodenum and Helicobacter pylori infection. In all cases endoscopic hemostasis was performed: injection sclerotherapy with diluted adrenalin 1:10,000 and 1% polidocanol or argon plasma coagulation. The control group was made up of 80 patients (50 male and 30 female, av.age 56.8 years, SD ± 16.8, range 19–80 with peptic ulcer of stomach or duodenum and Helicobacter pylori infection. Infection was confirmed by a rapid urease test and histologic investigation of the gastric mucosa. In all cases the recommended drug combinations were used in the treatment of the infection: a proton pump inhibitor, omeprazol (4 weeks, and combination of antibiotics, claritromycin and metronidazole or with regard to the antibiogram (1 week. The therapeutic success was ascertained endoscopically four weeks after inclusion in the study. Infection eradication was confirmed by the rapid urease test and histologic investigation of the gastric mucosa.Results. Four weeks after inclusion in the study the success of infection eradication was 92.5% in the study group, in the control group it was 91.3% (p > 0.05. In 6 patients (7.5%, 6/ 80 from the study group and in 7 (8.8%, 7/80 from the control group we introduced a replacement treatment

  15. Cost-effectiveness of using adjunctive porcine small intestine submucosa tri-layer matrix compared with standard care in managing diabetic foot ulcers in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, J F; Weidlich, D; Singh, H; La Fontaine, J; Garrett, A; Abularrage, C J; Waycaster, C R

    2017-01-02

    To estimate the cost-effectiveness of using tri-layer porcine small intestine submucosa (SIS; Oasis Ultra) as an adjunct to standard care compared with standard care alone in managing diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) in the US, from the perspective of Medicare. A Markov model was constructed to simulate the management of diabetic neuropathic lower extremity ulcers over a period of one year in the US. The model was used to estimate the cost-effectiveness of initially using adjunctive SIS compared with standard care alone to treat a DFU in the US at 2016 prices. At 12 months after the start of treatment, the use of adjunctive SIS instead of standard care alone is expected to lead to a 42 % increase in the number of ulcer-free months, 32 % increase in the probability of healing, a 3 % decrease in the probability of developing complicated ulcers and a 1 % decrease in the probability of undergoing an amputation. Health-care resource use is expected to be reduced by 11-14 % among patients who are initially managed with adjunctive SIS compared with those initially managed with standard care alone, with the exception of debridement, which is expected to be reduced by 35 %. Hence, the total health-care cost of starting treatment with adjunctive SIS instead of standard care alone was estimated to reduce payer costs by 1% (i.e. $105 per patient) over 12 months following the start of treatment. Within the study's limitations, the use of adjunctive SIS instead of standard care alone improves outcome for less cost and thereby affords a cost-effective use of Medicare-funded resources in the management of neuropathic foot ulcers among adult patients with type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus in the US.

  16. Systematic review of economic evaluations of human cell-derived wound care products for the treatment of venous leg and diabetic foot ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langer Astrid

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tissue engineering is an emerging field. Novel bioengineered skin substitutes and genetically derived growth factors offer innovative approaches to reduce the burden of diabetic foot and venous leg ulcers for both patients and health care systems. However, they frequently are very costly. Based on a systematic review of the literature, this study assesses the cost-effectiveness of these growth factors and tissue-engineered artificial skin for treating chronic wounds. Methods On the basis of an extensive explorative search, an appropriate algorithm for a systematic database search was developed. The following databases were searched: BIOSIS Previews, CRD databases, Cochrane Library, EconLit, Embase, Medline, and Web of Science. Only completed and published trial- or model-based studies which contained a full economic evaluation of growth factors and bioengineered skin substitutes for the treatment of chronic wounds were included. Two reviewers independently undertook the assessment of study quality. The relevant studies were assessed by a modified version of the Consensus on Health Economic Criteria (CHEC list and a published checklist for evaluating model-based economic evaluations. Results Eleven health economic evaluations were included. Three biotechnology products were identified for which topical growth factors or bioengineered skin substitutes for the treatment of chronic leg ulceration were economically assessed: (1 Apligraf®, a bilayered living human skin equivalent indicated for the treatment of diabetic foot and venous leg ulcers (five studies; (2 Dermagraft®, a human fibroblast-derived dermal substitute, which is indicated only for use in the treatment of full-thickness diabetic foot ulcers (one study; (3 REGRANEX® Gel, a human platelet-derived growth factor for the treatment of deep neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers (five studies. The studies considered in this review were of varying and partly low

  17. The prevalence and incidence of diabetic foot ulcers among five countries in the Arab world: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairghani, M; Elmusharaf, K; Patton, D; Burns, J; Eltahir, O; Jassim, G; Moore, Z

    2017-09-01

    There is a rising incidence of diabetes worldwide; however there seems to be a higher incidence and prevalence rates in the Arab world when compared with the global average. (1) Out of the top 10 countries with the highest prevalence rates, six are Arab countries and almost 20.5 million people in that part of the world live with diabetes. Despite this, published scientific research from the 22 Arab countries is limited and seems to be of lower quality when compared with the rest of the developed world. (2) Therefore, our aim was to explore the contribution of the different Arab countries in the world literature, to identify the diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) prevalence and incidence rates and to quality appraise these studies. A systematic review, following PRISMA guidelines, was undertaken to identify the incidence and prevalence of DFUs in the Arab world. The following databases were searched: PubMed, Embase CINAHL, Web of Science (Scopus), Global Health and EBSCO Results: A total of nine papers were identified. The mean prevalence of DFU in Saudi Arabia was 11.85% (4.7-19%), in Egypt was 4.2% (1-7.4%), in Jordan was 4.65% (4-5.3%), in Bahrain was 5.9% and in Iraq was 2.7%. A single study identified DFU incidence in Saudi Arabia as 1.8% between 2009-2010. The mean prevalence rates of DFU were highest in Saudi Arabia and Bahrain and lowest in Iraq. Saudi Arabia had the only reported incidence study, thus findings could not be compared to other countries of the Arab world. There were no studies identified during our search reporting prevalence rates of DFU in 17 of the 22 Arab countries. It is clear that further research is required to determine the incidence and prevalance of DFUs in the Arab world and that progress is needed in order to improve the quality of research conducted in those countries.

  18. Cellular versus acellular matrix devices in treatment of diabetic foot ulcers: study protocol for a comparative efficacy randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lev-Tov Hadar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs represent a significant source of morbidity and an enormous financial burden. Standard care for DFUs involves systemic glucose control, ensuring adequate perfusion, debridement of nonviable tissue, off-loading, control of infection, local wound care and patient education, all administered by a multidisciplinary team. Unfortunately, even with the best standard of care (SOC available, only 24% or 30% of DFUs will heal at weeks 12 or 20, respectively. The extracellular matrix (ECM in DFUs is abnormal and its impairment has been proposed as a key target for new therapeutic devices. These devices intend to replace the aberrant ECM by implanting a matrix, either devoid of cells or enhanced with fibroblasts, keratinocytes or both as well as various growth factors. These new bioengineered skin substitutes are proposed to encourage angiogenesis and in-growth of new tissue, and to utilize living cells to generate cytokines needed for wound repair. To date, the efficacy of bioengineered ECM containing live cellular elements for improving healing above that of a SOC control group has not been compared with the efficacy of an ECM devoid of cells relative to the same SOC. Our hypothesis is that there is no difference in the improved healing effected by either of these two product types relative to SOC. Methods/Design To test this hypothesis we propose a randomized, single-blind, clinical trial with three arms: SOC, SOC plus Dermagraft® (bioengineered ECM containing living fibroblasts and SOC plus Oasis® (ECM devoid of living cells in patients with nonhealing DFUs. The primary outcome is the percentage of subjects that achieved complete wound closure by week 12. Discussion If our hypothesis is correct, then immense cost savings could be realized by using the orders-of-magnitude less expensive acellular ECM device without compromising patient health outcomes. The article describes the protocol proposed to test

  19. Bicycle-spoke injuries of the foot and ankle: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HK Gupta

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective Bicycle spoke wheel injuries can be as simple as minor abrasions and lacerations even to amputation of toes and heel injuries. The purpose of this study was to assess the severity of soft tissue damage and skeletal injuries in such injuries. Methods This prospective observational study included all the cases with spoke wheel injuries presenting between October 2012 to September 2013 in the College of Medical Sciences and Teaching Hospital, Bharatpur. Demographic information was collected from each patient including age, sex, injured side, position at the time of injury, and characteristic of injury. The soft tissue injury was classified according to Oestern and Tscherne classification and managed accordingly. Results A total of 50 cases were included in the study with 29 males ( 58% and 21 females (42% . Their age ranged from 6 yrs to 12 yrs (mean 9 yrs.. The mean interval from injury to presentation in hospital was 5 hrs (range 1-22 hrs. Majority had injury to right ankle and foot. Fore foot and mid foot injuries were more common when the feet got entrapped in front wheel. 36 cases had sustained injury while riding as pillion on the back seat and their injury was on posterior ankle (n=20 and posterolateral aspect of ankle and foot (n=16. Majority of cases were of grade 0 and 1 injury. Two patients had grade 3 injury, one with great toe amputation another with partial heel avulsion and exposed tendoachilles. All cases were managed with wound care, tetanus prophylaxis and splintage of the foot. Conclusion In our study we found that these spoke wheel related injuries were more common in children and are important cause of temporary loss of daily activities. Although all injuries healed properly, risk of severe injuries like amputations and heel pad loss and tendoachilles transaction and fractures of foot and ankle still prevails where bicycle is a common mode of transportation. Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2013, Vol-9

  20. The Society for Vascular Surgery Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) classification system predicts wound healing but not major amputation in patients with diabetic foot ulcers treated in a multidisciplinary setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathioudakis, Nestoras; Hicks, Caitlin W; Canner, Joseph K; Sherman, Ronald L; Hines, Kathryn F; Lum, Ying W; Perler, Bruce A; Abularrage, Christopher J

    2017-06-01

    The Society for Vascular Surgery Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) threatened limb classification has been shown to correlate well with risk of major amputation and time to wound healing in heterogeneous diabetic and nondiabetic populations. Major amputation continues to plague the most severe stage 4 WIfI patients, with 1-year amputation rates of 20% to 64%. Our aim was to determine the association between WIfI stage and wound healing and major amputation among patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) treated in a multidisciplinary setting. All patients presenting to our multidisciplinary DFU clinic from July 2012 to December 2015 were enrolled in a prospective database. Wound healing and major amputation were compared for patients stratified by WIfI classification. There were 217 DFU patients with 439 wounds (mean age, 58.3 ± 0.8 years; 58% male, 63% black) enrolled, including 28% WIfI stage 1, 11% stage 2, 33% stage 3, and 28% stage 4. Peripheral arterial disease and dialysis were more common in patients with advanced (stage 3 or 4) wounds (P ≤ .05). Demographics of the patients, socioeconomic status, and comorbidities were otherwise similar between groups. There was a significant increase in the number of active wounds per limb at presentation with increasing WIfI stage (stage 1, 1.1 ± 0.1; stage 4, 1.4 ± 0.1; P = .03). Mean wound area (stage 1, 2.6 ± 0.6 cm(2); stage 4, 15.3 ± 2.8 cm(2)) and depth (stage 1, 0.2 ± 0.0 cm; stage 4, 0.8 ± 0.1 cm) also increased progressively with increasing wound stage (P amputations (stage 1, 18%; stage 4, 56%) and revascularizations (stage 1, 6%; stage 4, 55%) were more common with increasing WIfI stage (P amputation (P = .99). For stage 4 wounds, the mean wound healing time was 190 ± 17 days, and risk of major amputation at 1 year was 5.7% ± 3.2%. Among patients with DFU, the WIfI classification system correlated well with wound healing but was not associated with risk of major

  1. Effect of low-intensity direct current on expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and nitric oxide in diabetic foot ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Mohajeri-Tehrani, MD

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of low-intensity cathodal direct current on the release of plasma vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and nitric oxide (NO in diabetic foot ulceration. Twenty type 2 diabetic patients with foot ulceration and thirteen age-matched healthy subjects were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned to electrical stimulation (ES (n = 10 or sham ES (placebo, n = 10 groups. The ES group received cathodal direct current (1.48 +/– 0.98 mA for 1 h/d, 3 d/wk for 4 wk (12 sessions. Blood samples were collected for VEGF and NO measurement in the first and last treatment sessions before and after intervention. Wound surface area and skin temperature were measured at the 1st, 6th, and 12th sessions. VEGF significantly increased in the ES group compared with the placebo group after the 1st (106.61 +/– 79.50 and 40.88 +/– 26.20, respectively and 12th sessions (109.28 +/– 67.30 and 34.79 +/– 13.20, respectively. NO level also increased significantly in the ES group compared with the placebo group after the 12th session (44.21 +/– 14.00 and 35.25 +/– 11.00, respectively. The increase of skin temperature was significantly higher in the ES group than the placebo group. Application of low-intensity ES increases the expression of VEGF and NO, which may lead to improved blood flow and tissue temperature and, consequently, wound healing in diabetic foot ulceration.

  2. A comparison of customised and prefabricated insoles to reduce risk factors for neuropathic diabetic foot ulceration: a participant-blinded randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paton Joanne S

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuropathic diabetic foot ulceration may be prevented if the mechanical stress transmitted to the plantar tissues is reduced. Insole therapy is one practical method commonly used to reduce plantar loads and ulceration risk. The type of insole best suited to achieve this is unknown. This trial compared custom-made functional insoles with prefabricated insoles to reduce risk factors for ulceration of neuropathic diabetic feet. Method A participant-blinded randomised controlled trial recruited 119 neuropathic participants with diabetes who were randomly allocated to custom-made functional or prefabricated insoles. Data were collected at issue and six month follow-up using the F-scan in-shoe pressure measurement system. Primary outcomes were: peak pressure, forefoot pressure time integral, total contact area, forefoot rate of load, duration of load as a percentage of stance. Secondary outcomes were patient perceived foot health (Bristol Foot Score, quality of life (Audit of Diabetes Dependent Quality of Life. We also assessed cost of supply and fitting. Analysis was by intention-to-treat. Results There were no differences between insoles in peak pressure, or three of the other four kinetic measures. The custom-made functional insole was slightly more effective than the prefabricated insole in reducing forefoot pressure time integral at issue (27% vs. 22%, remained more effective at six month follow-up (30% vs. 24%, p=0.001, but was more expensive (UK £656 vs. £554, p Conclusion The custom-made insoles are more expensive than prefabricated insoles evaluated in this trial and no better in reducing peak pressure. We recommend that where clinically appropriate, the more cost effective prefabricated insole should be considered for use by patients with diabetes and neuropathy. Trial registration Clinical trials.gov (NCT00999635. Note: this trial was registered on completion.

  3. [Prospective study of 420 biopsies realised in patients with duodenal ulcer with positive Helicobacter pylori].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khayat, Olfa; Kilani, Afef; Chedly-Debbiche, Achraf; Zeddini, Abdelfattah; Gargouri, Dalila; Kharrat, Jamel; Souissi, Adnene; Ghorbel, Abdel Jabbar; Ben Ayed, Mohamed; Ben Khelifa, Habib

    2006-06-01

    It's a prospective study leaded between September 1997 and july 1999 (23 months ) in 75 patients with duodenal ulcer and positif for Helicobacter pylori. All patients had a first endoscopy with antral, fundic and duodenal biopsies, followed one month later by a second control fibroscopy with biopsies of the same sites. A total of 420 biopsies was realised. Chronic gastritis was evaluated according to sydney system. Patients was divided by randomisation in 4 groups. Every group was received a different therapeutic association. The results was conform to liberation concering activity 80%, intestinal metaplasia 12%. inflammation 100%. Atrophy was observed in 56% of cases, this percentage is variable in literature; chronic gastritis was predominant in antre relatively to fundus (pomeprazol, amoxcillin, metronidazol by comparison with the others 3 groups (p<0.005).

  4. Factors predicting the outcome of customised foot orthoses in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roorda Leo D

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conservative management of foot problems in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA may consist of the prescription of customised foot orthoses. Indications for foot orthoses are not clear and the effectiveness of the intervention is highly variable among patients. Knowledge on which patients benefit the most from foot orthoses can help to select patients eligible for this type of intervention. The objective of the present study was to determine clinical and demographic factors that predict the outcome of customised foot orthoses on pain and disability in patients with RA. Methods A total of 135 RA patients who were supplied with customised foot orthoses were included in this prospective cohort study. Pain and disability were measured before and after the intervention period using a Numeric Rating Scale (NRS for foot pain, the Foot Function Index (FFI, the Western Ontario and McMasters Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC and a 10-meter walking test. The intervention period consisted of one or more appointments with the podiatrist during which the foot orthoses were customised. Swollen foot joint count, foot deformity scores, forefoot peak pressure, disease duration, age, gender, body mass index and baseline values of the outcome measures were selected as potential factors predicting outcome. Multivariate linear regression analyses were performed to determine factors associated with change in pain and disability (at P Results Disease duration was negatively associated with the change scores in NRS foot pain (P = 0.018, WOMAC pain (P = 0.001, FFI disability (P = 0.003 and WOMAC physical function (P = 0.002. Age was negatively associated with the change score in 10 meter walking time (P = 0.008. For all outcome measures baseline values were positively associated with the change scores (P Conclusions Shorter disease duration predicted greater improvements in self-reported foot pain and disability, and younger age predicted

  5. Double blind, randomized, placebo controlled clinical trial for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers, using a nitric oxide releasing patch: PATHON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Sandra Y; Rueda, Ligia C; Márquez, Gustavo A; López, Marcos; Smith, Daniel J; Calderón, Carlos A; Castillo, Juan C; Matute, Jaime; Rueda-Clausen, Christian F; Orduz, Arturo; Silva, Federico A; Kampeerapappun, Piyaporn; Bhide, Mahesh; López-Jaramillo, Patricio

    2007-01-01

    Background Diabetes Mellitus constitutes one of the most important public health problems due to its high prevalence and enormous social and economic consequences. Diabetic foot ulcers are one of the chronic complications of diabetes mellitus and constitute the most important cause of non-traumatic amputation of inferior limbs. It is estimated that 15% of the diabetic population will develop an ulcer sometime in their lives. Although novel therapies have been proposed, there is no effective treatment for this pathology. Naturally produced nitric oxide participates in the wound healing process by stimulating the synthesis of collagen, triggering the release of chemotactic cytokines, increasing blood vessels permeability, promoting angiogenic activity, stimulating the release of epidermical growth factors, and by interfering with the bacterial mitochondrial respiratory chain. Topically administered nitric oxide has demonstrated to be effective and safe for the treatment of chronic ulcers secondary to cutaneous leishmaniasis. However, due to their unstable nitric oxide release, the topical donors needed to be applied frequently, diminishing the adherence to the treatment. This difficulty has led to the development of a multilayer polymeric transdermal patch produced by electrospinning technique that guarantees a constant nitric oxide release. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of this novel nitric oxide releasing wound dressing for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. Methods and design A double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial, including 100 diabetic patients was designed. At the time of enrollment, a complete medical evaluation and laboratory tests will be performed, and those patients who meet the inclusion criteria randomly assigned to one of two groups. Over the course of 90 days group 1 will receive active patches and group 2 placebo patches. The patients will be seen by the research group at least every two

  6. Double blind, randomized, placebo controlled clinical trial for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers, using a nitric oxide releasing patch: PATHON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Federico A

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes Mellitus constitutes one of the most important public health problems due to its high prevalence and enormous social and economic consequences. Diabetic foot ulcers are one of the chronic complications of diabetes mellitus and constitute the most important cause of non-traumatic amputation of inferior limbs. It is estimated that 15% of the diabetic population will develop an ulcer sometime in their lives. Although novel therapies have been proposed, there is no effective treatment for this pathology. Naturally produced nitric oxide participates in the wound healing process by stimulating the synthesis of collagen, triggering the release of chemotactic cytokines, increasing blood vessels permeability, promoting angiogenic activity, stimulating the release of epidermical growth factors, and by interfering with the bacterial mitochondrial respiratory chain. Topically administered nitric oxide has demonstrated to be effective and safe for the treatment of chronic ulcers secondary to cutaneous leishmaniasis. However, due to their unstable nitric oxide release, the topical donors needed to be applied frequently, diminishing the adherence to the treatment. This difficulty has led to the development of a multilayer polymeric transdermal patch produced by electrospinning technique that guarantees a constant nitric oxide release. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of this novel nitric oxide releasing wound dressing for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. Methods and design A double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial, including 100 diabetic patients was designed. At the time of enrollment, a complete medical evaluation and laboratory tests will be performed, and those patients who meet the inclusion criteria randomly assigned to one of two groups. Over the course of 90 days group 1 will receive active patches and group 2 placebo patches. The patients will be seen by the

  7. Diabetes - foot ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagliero E. Diabetes and long-term complications. In: Jameson JL, De Groot LJ, de Kretser DM, et al, eds. Endocrinology: Adult and Pediatric . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 51. Kim PJ, Steinberg JS. Complications of ...

  8. The Anti-Inflammatory and Antibacterial Action of Nanocrystalline Silver and Manuka Honey on the Molecular Alternation of Diabetic Foot Ulcer: A Comprehensive Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Ka-Kit; Kwong, Enid Wai-Yung; Woo, Kevin Y; To, Tony Shing-Shun; Chung, Joanne Wai-Yee; Wong, Thomas Kwok-Shing

    2015-01-01

    Honey and silver have been used since ancient times for treating wounds. Their widespread clinical application has attracted attention in light of the increasing prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. While there have been a number of studies exploring the anti-inflammatory and antibacterial effects of manuka honey and nanocrystalline silver, their advantages and limitations with regard to the treatment of chronic wounds remain a subject of debate. The aim of this paper is to examine the evidence on the use of nanocrystalline silver and manuka honey for treating diabetic foot ulcers through a critical and comprehensive review of in vitro studies, animal studies, and in vivo studies. The findings from the in vitro and animal studies suggest that both agents have effective antibacterial actions. Their anti-inflammatory action and related impact on wound healing are unclear. Besides, there is no evidence to suggest that any topical agent is more effective for use in treating diabetic foot ulcer. Overall, high-quality, clinical human studies supported by findings from the molecular science on the use of manuka honey or nanocrystalline silver are lacking. There is a need for rigorously designed human clinical studies on the subject to fill this knowledge gap and guide clinical practice.

  9. Performance of prognostic markers in the prediction of wound healing or amputation among patients with foot ulcers in diabetes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownrigg, J R W; Hinchliffe, R J; Apelqvist, J; Boyko, E J; Fitridge, R; Mills, J L; Reekers, J; Shearman, C P; Zierler, R E; Schaper, N C

    2016-01-01

    Prediction of wound healing and major amputation in patients with diabetic foot ulceration is clinically important to stratify risk and target interventions for limb salvage. No consensus exists as to which measure of peripheral artery disease (PAD) can best predict outcomes. To evaluate the prognostic utility of index PAD measures for the prediction of healing and/or major amputation among patients with active diabetic foot ulceration, two reviewers independently screened potential studies for inclusion. Two further reviewers independently extracted study data and performed an assessment of methodological quality using the Quality in Prognostic Studies instrument. Of 9476 citations reviewed, 11 studies reporting on 9 markers of PAD met the inclusion criteria. Annualized healing rates varied from 18% to 61%; corresponding major amputation rates varied from 3% to 19%. Among 10 studies, skin perfusion pressure ≥ 40 mmHg, toe pressure ≥ 30 mmHg (and ≥ 45 mmHg) and transcutaneous pressure of oxygen (TcPO2 ) ≥ 25 mmHg were associated with at least a 25% higher chance of healing. Four studies evaluated PAD measures for predicting major amputation. Ankle pressure 70 mmHg and fluorescein toe slope mmHg or an ankle brachial index (ABI) mmHg or an ABI < 0.5 is associated with a significant increase in the incidence of major amputation.

  10. Experience of SUN Wen-liang for treating diabetic foot ulcers with Xuanshen%孙文亮主任医师重用玄参治疗糖尿病足溃疡经验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭建辉

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcer is serious complications of diabetes. SUN Wen-liang uses Xuanshen to treat diabetic foot ulcers. Qingre Yangyin, Liangxue Jiedu, annealing and sterilizing. He often receives good effect.%糖尿病足溃疡是严重糖尿病并发症。孙文亮主任医师重用玄参清热养阴,凉血解毒,走血分以退瘀火,行经络来消痈毒,治疗糖尿病足溃疡往往收到良效。

  11. Biofilm detection by wound blotting can predict slough development in pressure ulcers: A prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagami, Gojiro; Schultz, Gregory; Gibson, Daniel J; Phillips, Priscilla; Kitamura, Aya; Minematsu, Takeo; Miyagaki, Tomomitsu; Hayashi, Akitatsu; Sasaki, Sanae; Sugama, Junko; Sanada, Hiromi

    2016-12-26

    Bacteria have been found to form multicellular aggregates which have collectively been termed "biofilms." It is hypothesized that biofilm formation is a means to protect bacterial cells including protection form the immune response of humans. This protective mechanism is believed to explain persistent chronic wound infections. At times, the biofilms are abundant enough to see, and remove by simple wiping. However, recent evidence has shown that the removal of these visible portions are not sufficient, and that biofilms can continue to form even with daily wiping. In this work, we tested an approach to detect the biofilms which are present after clinically wiping or sharp wound debridement. Our method is based on a variation of impression cytology in which a nitrocellulose membrane was used to collect surface biofilm components, which were then differentially stained. In this prospective study, members of an interdisciplinary pressure ulcer team at a university hospital tested our method's ability to predict the generation of wound slough in the week that followed each blotting. A total of 70 blots collected from 23 pressure ulcers produced 27 wounds negative for staining and 43 positive. In the negative blots 55.6% were found to have decreased wound slough, while 81.4% with positive staining had either increase or unchanged wound slough generation. These results lead to an odds ratio of positive blotting cases of 9.37 (95% confidence intervals: 2.47-35.5, p = 0.001) for slough formation; suggesting that the changes in wound slough formation can be predicted clinically using a non-invasive wound blotting method.

  12. An in vivo and in vitro investigation of the effect of Aloe vera gel ethanolic extract using animal model with diabetic foot ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Daburkar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To examine the preventive effect of Aloe vera gel ethanolic extract using diabetic foot ulcer (DFUs protocol in Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: Male Wistar rats were divided into untreated control (Group I, untreated DFUs (Group II, DFUs treated with A. vera gel ethanolic extract (Group III, DFUs treated with topical A. vera gel (Group IV, DFUs treated with A. vera gel ethanolic extract and topical A. vera gel (Group V. The rats in the treatment groups were daily administered the A. vera gel and ethanolic extract for 9 days. Fasting blood glucose levels and percentage of wound ulcer contraction were measured on day 3, 6, and 9. Statistical Analysis used: The results are expressed as a mean ± Standard Error Mean (SEM. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA after Newman-Keuls test. P < 0.05 were considered statistically significant in all cases. Results: Oral administration of A. vera gel ethanolic extract at a dose of 300 mg/kg body weight per day to diabetic rats for a period of 9 days resulted in a significant reduction in fasting blood glucose and a significant improvement in plasma insulin. Topical application of A. vera gel at a dose 30 mg/kg body weight per day to streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic rats for a period of 9 days resulted in no change in blood glucose and plasma insulin. Oral administration as well as topical application of A. vera gel ethanolic extract and gel significantly reduced the blood glucose, improved the plasma insulin, and significantly increased DNA and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs to improve the wound ulcer healing as well as the breaking strength on day 9. Conclusions: Present findings provide a scientific rationale for the use of A. vera gel ethanolic extract, and showed that the gel attenuated the diabetic foot wound in rats.

  13. Bacteriological profile of diabetic foot ulcer with special reference to drug-resistant strains in a tertiary care center in North-East India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir K Jain

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was carried out to determine the bacteriological profile of infected diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs and the antibiotic resistance pattern from the isolates. An attempt was made to suggest an empiric antibiotic regimen to treat such patients. Materials and Methods: Tissue samples were collected from 150 patients between February 2015 and January 2016 with DFUs under aseptic precautions and they were processed as per the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. Results: A total of 185 bacterial isolates were obtained from 150 persons with diabetic and with foot ulcers. The age group of these persons ranged from 35 to 80 years and the maximum number of persons with DFUs was in the age group of 60–65 years. Among the isolates, Gram-negative bacilli were isolated in 112/185 (61% and Gram-positive cocci in 73/185 (39% cases. The most common isolate was Staphylococcus spp. 46 (25%, followed by Escherichia coli (20% and Enterococcus spp. (15%. The antibiotic sensitivity profile of the bacteria was also studied. Among the isolates, 59/112 (53% of the Gram-negative bacilli were extended spectrum beta-lactamase producers, 19/46 (41% were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and 5/27 (19% were vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus. Conclusions: This study showed a preponderance of multidrug-resistant strains among the isolates from the DFUs. Knowledge on the antibiotic sensitivity pattern of the isolates will be helpful in determining the drugs for the empirical treatment of diabetic ulcers. Thus, indiscriminate use of antibiotics and chances of subsequent development of antibiotic resistance can also be reduced.

  14. Phase change material for thermotherapy of Buruli ulcer: a prospective observational single centre proof-of-principle trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Junghanss

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Buruli ulcer (BU is an infection of the subcutaneous tissue leading to chronic necrotizing skin ulcers. The causative pathogen, Mycobacterium ulcerans, grows best at 30 degrees C-33 degrees C and not above 37 degrees C. We explored the safety, tolerability and efficacy of phase change material (PCM, a novel heat application system for thermotherapy of BU. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a prospective observational single centre proof-of-principle trial in Ayos/Cameroon, six laboratory reconfirmed patients with ulcerative Buruli lesions received 28-31 (ulcers 2 cm days of thermotherapy with the PCM sodium acetate trihydrate as heat application system. This PCM is widely used in commercial pocket heat pads, it is easy to apply, rechargeable in hot water, non-toxic and non-hazardous to the environment. All patients enrolled in the trial completed treatment. Being completely mobile during the well-tolerated heat application, acceptability of the PCM bandages was very high. In patients with smaller ulcers, wounds healed completely without further intervention. Patients with large defects had skin grafting after successful heat treatment. Heat treatment was not associated with marked increases in local inflammation or the development of ectopic lymphoid tissue. One and a half years after completion of treatment, all patients are relapse-free. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our reusable PCM-based heat application device appears perfectly suited to treat BU in endemic countries with limited resources and infrastructure. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN88392614.

  15. Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4 Inhibition May Facilitate Healing of Chronic Foot Ulcers in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Marfella

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathophysiology of chronic diabetic ulcers is complex and still incompletely understood, both micro- and macroangiopathy strongly contribute to the development and delayed healing of diabetic wounds, through an impaired tissue feeding and response to ischemia. With adequate treatment, some ulcers may last only weeks; however, many ulcers are difficult to treat and may last months, in certain cases years; 19–35% of ulcers are reported as nonhealing. As no efficient therapy is available, it is a high priority to develop new strategies for treatment of this devastating complication. Because experimental and pathological studies suggest that incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 may improves VEGF generation and promote the upregulation of HIF-1α through a reduction of oxidative stress, the study evaluated the effect of the augmentation of GLP-1, by inhibitors of the dipeptidyl peptidase-4, such as vildagliptin, on angiogenesis process and wound healing in diabetic chronic ulcers. Although elucidation of the pathophysiologic importance of these aspects awaits further confirmations, the present study evidences an additional aspect of how DPP-4 inhibition might contribute to improved ulcer outcome.

  16. Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibition may facilitate healing of chronic foot ulcers in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfella, Raffaele; Sasso, Ferdinando Carlo; Rizzo, Maria Rosaria; Paolisso, Pasquale; Barbieri, Michelangela; Padovano, Vincenzo; Carbonara, Ornella; Gualdiero, Pasquale; Petronella, Pasquale; Ferraraccio, Franca; Petrella, Antonello; Canonico, Raffaele; Campitiello, Ferdinando; Della Corte, Angela; Paolisso, Giuseppe; Canonico, Silvestro

    2012-01-01

    The pathophysiology of chronic diabetic ulcers is complex and still incompletely understood, both micro- and macroangiopathy strongly contribute to the development and delayed healing of diabetic wounds, through an impaired tissue feeding and response to ischemia. With adequate treatment, some ulcers may last only weeks; however, many ulcers are difficult to treat and may last months, in certain cases years; 19-35% of ulcers are reported as nonhealing. As no efficient therapy is available, it is a high priority to develop new strategies for treatment of this devastating complication. Because experimental and pathological studies suggest that incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 may improves VEGF generation and promote the upregulation of HIF-1α through a reduction of oxidative stress, the study evaluated the effect of the augmentation of GLP-1, by inhibitors of the dipeptidyl peptidase-4, such as vildagliptin, on angiogenesis process and wound healing in diabetic chronic ulcers. Although elucidation of the pathophysiologic importance of these aspects awaits further confirmations, the present study evidences an additional aspect of how DPP-4 inhibition might contribute to improved ulcer outcome.

  17. Transcutaneous oximetry but not arterial toe blood pressure or ankle-brachial index is related to macular thickness in patients with chronic diabetic foot ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Katzman

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Diabetes related vascular complications of the lower extremity could be classified as micro- and macrovascular. Ankle-brachial index (ABI and toe blood pressure (TBP measurements evaluate macro-circulation, whereas transcutaneous oximetry (TcPO2 is considered to be a composite measure of vascular function, thereby also reflecting microcirculation. Microvascular disease in the eye involves abnormal capillary permeability and possibly thereby increased macular thickness. The aim of the present clinical study was to evaluate if microvascular disease in the eye was related to measures of foot ischemia in patients with diabetes mellitus. Methods: Twenty consecutive patients with diabetes and chronic full-thickness foot ulcers were included. Peripheral ischemia was diagnosed using TcPO2, TBP and ABI. Macular thickness was measured with optical coherence tomography technique. Results: Based on TcPO2, TBP and ABI measurements 14, 13 and 13 patients, respectively, were classified as ischemic. Patients with ischemic TcPO2 levels at the dorsum of the foot had significantly higher macular thicknesses. This was not the case in patients with ischemic TBP or ABI levels. Conclusion: TcPO2, unlike TBP and ABI, seems to be a clinically relevant measure of peripheral microvascular disease in patients with diabetes mellitus and may, if low, indicate an increased risk of macular edema. [J Exp Integr Med 2013; 3(2.000: 81-85

  18. A Real World, Observational Registry of Chronic Wounds and Ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-18

    Diabetic Foot; Varicose Ulcer; Pressure Ulcer; Surgical Wound Dehiscence; Vasculitis; Skin Ulcer; Leg Ulcer; Wounds and Injuries; Pyoderma; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Diabetic Neuropathies; Lymphedema; Venous Insufficiency; Diabetes Complications; Amputation Stump

  19. 糖尿病足溃疡程度与病原菌感染的关系%Correlation between severity of diabetic foot ulcers and pathogen infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴英; 黄慧萍; 张劲丰; 苏荣; 杨烨建; 林旋; 庄健海

    2014-01-01

    目的:研究糖尿病足不同溃疡程度的病原菌感染分布及耐药性,为临床用药提供理论依据。方法对医院79例糖尿病足患者的创面分泌物进行病原菌培养和药敏结果分析;采用法国生物梅里埃公司VITEK-2 Com-pact全自动细菌鉴定仪进行细菌鉴定,采用纸片扩散法进行药敏试验,结果判断采用CLSI 2010年标准;采用WHONET5.6软件进行数据分析,组间比较采用χ2检验,各研究变量与糖尿病足溃疡Wagner分级之间的关系采用Spearmen等级相关分析。结果79例糖尿病足患者中培养阳性65例,阳性率为82.3%,共分离出病原菌101株,其中革兰阳性球菌32株占31.7%,革兰阴性菌66株占65.3%,真菌2株占2.0%,革兰阳性杆菌1株占1.0%;革兰阳性球菌对万古霉素、利奈唑胺均敏感,葡萄球菌属对青霉素均耐药,未发现耐万古霉素金黄色葡萄球菌(VRSA)及耐万古霉素肠球菌(VRE),革兰阴性菌对亚胺培南、美罗培南均敏感;感染患者中单一菌感染29例,感染率36.7%,多重感染36例,感染率45.6%;1级溃疡感染以革兰阳性球菌为主,金黄色葡萄球菌和肠球菌属占75.0%,未发现多药耐药株;2、3级溃疡感染以革兰阴性菌为主;4级均为多重感染。结论糖尿病足溃疡的病原体以革兰阴性菌为主,对亚胺培南、美罗培南均敏感;糖尿病足溃疡程度与病原菌种类无明显相关,而与细菌多药耐药性正相关。%OBJECTIVE To investigate the distribution and drug resistance of pathogens causing difference severities of diabetic foot ulcers so as to provide guidance for clinical use of antibiotics .METHODS The wound secretions ob-tained from 79 diabetic foot patients were cultured ,and the results of drug susceptibility testing were analyzed ;the bacteria were identified by means of the VITEK-2 Compact automatic bacteria identification

  20. Identification of high-risk groups of charcot foot in the people with diabetic foot neuropathic ulcerations%糖尿病足神经性溃疡进展为Charcot足的高危因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王璐宁; 关小宏; 田慧

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify high⁃risk groups of Charcot foot( CN) in the people with diabetic foot neuropathic ulcerations( NU) . Methods Twenty cases patients with CN who were diagnosed in General Hospital of the Chinese People Air Force from June 2008 to June 2013 and 58 patients with diabetic neuropathic ulcer who were hospitalized from January 2010 to December 2011 and followed up until June 2014 without foot deform⁃ity were retrospectively analyzed. All patient's general condition, examination and laboratory results, diabetic chronic complications,complication,diabetes distribution of foot ulcers,and plain features. Results There were no statistically significant differences in terms of patients' average age, sex ratio, proportion of smokers, BMI, HbA1c,blood lipid,dorsalis pedis artery diameter and diabetic nephropathy (Ⅲ⁃Ⅳperiod) ,chronic kidney dis⁃ease stage 3 above,proliferation diabetic retinal pathological changes,the prevalence of coronary heart disease between the two groups(P>0. 05). Compared with NU group,patients with single high proportion(40. 00%(8/20) vs. 10. 34%(6/58)),Short duration of diabetes((12. 37±5. 64) years vs. (14. 27±8. 04) years),Feet long numbness(6(5,9) years vs. 4(2,20) years),low rate of hardening of the arteries narrow(ABI<0. 9)( 0 ( 0/20) vs. 39. 66%( 13/58) ) ,high recurrent diabetic foot ulcer prevalence( 70. 00%( 14/20) vs. 25. 86%( 15/58)),more patients with diabetes mellitus autonomic neuropathy(75. 00%(15/20) vs. 39. 66%(23/58)),less combined with hypertension ( 25. 00%( 5/20 ) vs. 58. 62%( 34/58 ) ) , the differences were significant ( t orχ2=6. 981,2. 259,4. 068,3. 887,12. 405,7. 436,6. 724;P<0. 05) . Diabetic foot wound distribution on mesopodi⁃um of CN group and NU group was 36. 84%(7/19),6. 90%(4/58) respectively,the difference was significant (χ2=11. 443,P=0. 003) . Diabetic foot amputation rate( Wanger 4,5 grade) of CN group and NU group was 44. 44%(4/9),6. 90%(2/29) respectively,the difference was

  1. Assessment of maximum tolerated dose of a new herbal drug, Semelil (ANGIPARSTM in patients with diabetic foot ulcer: A Phase I clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heshmat R

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and the purpose of the study: In many cases of diabetic foot ulcer (DFU management, wound healing is incomplete, and wound closure and epithelial junctional integrity are rarely achieved. Our aim was to evaluate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD and dose-limiting toxicity (DLT of Semelil (ANGIPARSTM, a new herbal compound for wound treatment in a Phase I clinical trial.Methods: In this open label study, six male diabetic patients with a mean age of 57±7.6 years were treated with escalating intravenous doses of Semelil, which started at 2 cc/day to 13.5 cc/day for 28 days. Patients were assessed with a full physical exam; variables which analyzed included age, past history of diabetes and its duration, blood pressure, body temperature, weight, characteristics of DFU, Na, K, liver function test, Complete Blood Count and Differential(CBC & diff, serum amylase, HbA1c, PT, PTT, proteinuria, hematuria, and side effects were recorded. All the measurements were taken at the beginning of treatment, the end of week 2 and week 4. We also evaluated Semelil's side effects at the end of weeks 4 and 8 after ending therapy.Results and major conclusions: Up to the drug dose of 10 cc/day foot ulcer dramatically improved. We did not observe any clinical or laboratory side effects at this or lower dose levels in diabetic patients. With daily dose of 13.5 cc of Semelil we observed phlebitis at the infusion site, which was the only side effect. Therefore, in this study we determined the MTD of Semelil at 10 cc/day, and the only DLT was phlebitis in injection vein. The recommended dose of Semelil I.V. administration for Phase II studies was 4 cc/day.

  2. LESSER METATARSAL SESAMOIDITIS-POTENTIAL CAUSE OF FORE FOOT PAIN?? : A PROSPECTIVE MULTICENTER EPIDEMIOLOGICAL SCREENING STUDY OF THE ODISHA POPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Sesamoiditis as a cause of fore foot pain is less often thought of, patients suffer for extended periods due to misdiagnosis and analgesic abuse resulting in dissatisfaction, depression and anxiety. METHODS: We performed a multicenter prospective epidemiological screening study in Bhubaneswar, Odisha from Nov’ 2013 to July’ 2014 in patients of foot pain for the presence of lesser sesamoids to study the incidences and causes of fore foot pain in Odisha Population. RESULTS: We screened 960 patients (1920 feet in 500 male and 460 female patients. 5th Metatarsal sesamoids were present in 77 (8% patients (M/F: 1.8:1, Bilateral in 67 (86 % patients. (48% patients lesser sesamoids were bipartite and (82% were symptomatic. 52% recovered with conservative measures, 40 % patients required ultrasound guided injections and sesamoidectomy was performed in 8 % patients due to recurrence and/or failure. Other causes of fore foot pain were Rheumatoid Arthritis, Gouty Arthritis, Callosities, Hallux Valgus, Stress Fractures of the Metatarsals, Plantar Fasciitis, Infections, Morton’s Metatarsalgia and Barefoot Walking (mechanical. DISCUSSION: High incidences of lesser sesamoids is attributed to genetics, low socioeconomic status, bare foot walking and high prevalence of Diabetes Mellitus, Smoking and Gout in our country. CT and MRI provide useful information regarding the presence and pathology involving these bones, and should be used in concert with clinical findings to guide successful patient management. An initial trial of conservative measures should follow minimally invasive ultrasound guided injections of anesthetic with steroids and lastly surgical excision.

  3. Do pressure ulcers influence length of hospital stay in surgical cardiothoracic patients? A prospective evaluation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman, J.P.; Schoonhoven, L.J.; Keller, B.P.; Ramshorst, B. van

    2009-01-01

    AIM AND OBJECTIVE: The aim and objective of this study was to determine whether the occurrence of pressure ulcers following cardiothoracic surgery increases the length of hospitalisation. BACKGROUND: Literature suggests that a pressure ulcer extends the length of hospital stay. The impact of

  4. Do pressure ulcers influence length of hospital stay in surgical cardiothoracic patients? A prospective evaluation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman, J.P.; Schoonhoven, L.J.; Keller, B.P.; Ramshorst, B. van

    2009-01-01

    AIM AND OBJECTIVE: The aim and objective of this study was to determine whether the occurrence of pressure ulcers following cardiothoracic surgery increases the length of hospitalisation. BACKGROUND: Literature suggests that a pressure ulcer extends the length of hospital stay. The impact of pressur

  5. Clinical approach to the neuroischemic ulcers in diabetic foot%缺血神经性糖尿病足溃疡的临床处理流程

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈金安; 陈寅晨; 孙新娟; 王伟; 罗宁; 张洁; 王爱萍

    2015-01-01

    [Summary] Neuroischemic diabetic foot ulcer ( NDFU) is characterized by infection, ulceration of deep tissues, neurological abnormalities, and various degrees of peripheral vascular disease in the lower limbs. The patients often have multiple risk factors such as older, longer duration, cardiovascular disease. The treatment is very difficult. The prognosis depends on the severity of complications, tissue range of infections, and the peripheral vascular disease. In this article, the treatment process of an old inpatient with NDFU and severe complications was reviewed and to propose a standard pathway for its management.%缺血神经性糖尿病足溃疡(NDFU)表现为下肢感染、深组织溃疡、神经病变和不同程度的外周血管病变,患者常伴有高龄、病程长、心血管疾病等多种危险因素,治疗难度大,预后取决于合并症的严重程度、组织侵犯的范围和外周血管疾病。本文报道1例高龄伴严重并发症的NDUF 患者的临床诊治过程,试图阐明和规范其临床处理流程。

  6. A post-hoc analysis of reduction in diabetic foot ulcer size at 4 weeks as a predictor of healing by 12 weeks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Robert J; Cardinal, Matthew; Dauphinée, Damien M; Stavosky, James

    2010-03-01

    Percent area reduction (PAR) after 4 weeks of diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) treatment has been suggested as a clinical monitoring parameter to distinguish DFUs that will heal within 12 weeks from those that will not despite standard wound care. The purpose of this post-hoc analysis of control DFU treatment outcomes from two published, randomized, controlled studies was to assess the relationship between PAR during early standard wound care and ulcer closure by week 12. The proportion of DFUs healed after 12 weeks was 57% (39 out of 69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 44% to 68%) in study A and 52% (38 out of 73; 95% CI, 40% to 64%) in study B for wounds with > or = 50% PAR by week 4 and 5% (three out of 64; 95% CI, 1% to 13%) and 2% (one out of 44; 95% CI, 0.1% to 12%), respectively, for DFUs with or = 50% PAR (P protocols of care should be re-evaluated if > or = 50% PAR is not achieved. Studies to assess DFU healing before and after 4 weeks of standard wound care are needed to further refine these guidelines of care.

  7. Preoperative medical treatment in patients undergoing diabetic foot surgery with a Wagner Grade-3 or higher ulcer: a retrospective analysis of 52 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Korkmaz

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic foot ulcers (DFU are one of the most important complications in people with diabetes mellitus. The present study was aimed to retrospectively review the efficacy of at least 1-week medical treatment before any surgical intervention in patients with Grade-3 and higher DFU according to Wagner's classification. A total of 52 patients (36 males and 16 females hospitalized and treated between June 2006 and February 2009 and had initially received therapeutic treatment (local wound care, antibiotic therapy and blood glucose regulation for a period of at least 1 week were included in the study. The level of amputation, rates of reulceration and mortality in both groups were recorded in the following period of 2 years. Group 1 (did not respond to preoperative medical intervention included 16 patients where a surgical debridement, flap or skin graft surgery was performed in 2 (12.5% patients, major amputation was performed in another 2 (12.5% patients and minor amputation was performed in the remaining 12 (75% patients. Of 36 patients in Group 2 (did respond to preoperative medical intervention, 5 (13.9% patients underwent the surgical debridement, flap or skin graft surgery, 8 (22.2% patients had a major amputation and the remaining 23 (63.9% patients lead to a minor amputation. The ulcer recurrence and mortality rates were obtained as 2 (12.5% and 2 (12.5% in Group 1 and 2 (5.6% and 1 (2.8% in Group 2, respectively. Despite the lower rates of ulcer recurrence and mortality in patients having adequate responses to initial treatment before surgical procedures were performed, no statistically significant difference was observed between the 2 groups. In addition, there was no statistically significant difference between the levels of amputation in both groups.

  8. The association between skin autofluorescence and vascular complications in Chinese patients with diabetic foot ulcer: an observational study done in Shanghai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuanbo; Xu, Liying; Gao, Hui; Ye, Junna; Huang, Yao; Wu, Minjie; Xie, Ting; Ni, Pengwen; Yu, Xiaoping; Cao, Yemin; Lu, Shuliang

    2015-03-01

    The tissue accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) can be noninvasively assessed as skin autofluorescence (SAF) by the AGE Reader(TM) device. We aimed to detect the association between SAF and diabetes-associated vascular complications in diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) patients engaged in this study. This cross-sectional survey consisted of 118 consecutive hospitalized diabetic foot patients. The diabetic microvascular (retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy) and macrovascular referring to coronary heart disease (CHD), cerebrovascular disease (CVD), or peripheral artery disease (PAD) complications were evaluated, and then they were divided into different subgroups based on the assessment of vascular complications. As seen from the results, the mean SAF value was 2.8 ± 0.2 AU. SAF was significantly associated with diabetes duration and blood urea nitrogen (R(2) = 62.8%; P < .01). Moreover, in logistic regression analysis, SAF was significantly associated with retinopathy (odds ratio [OR] = 40.11), nephropathy (OR = 8.44), CHD (OR = 44.31), CVD (OR = 80.73), and PAD (OR = 5.98 × 10(9)). In conclusion, SAF, reflecting tissue accumulation of AGEs, is independently associated with the presence of vascular complications in DFU patients.

  9. Clinical application of oral form of ANGIPARSTM and in combination with topical form as a new treatment for diabetic foot ulcers: A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahrami A

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available ANGIPARSTM is a new herbal extract which has been produced in oral, topical, and intravenous forms. The present article contains preliminary results of the study which was planned to evaluate the efficacy and safety of orally applied ANGIPARSTM and to compare it with the combination of oral and topical forms and also with conventional therapy in patients with diabetic ulcers of the lower extremities."nTwenty one patients with diabetic foot ulcers were divided into 3 groups. The first group received 100 mg of oral ANGIPARSTM twice a day for 6 weeks in addition to conventional therapies. In the second group, ANGIPARSTM gel 3% was added to the oral form of the same product besides the conventional therapies for the same period of time. Finally, in the third group which was considered as control, only conventional therapies were performed. The patients were followed for 6 weeks. Parameters such as granulation tissue formation, skin epithelization, and wound surface areas changes were analyzed to determine the effectiveness of the compound in wounds healing. Furthermore, drug safety was assessed by monitoring adverse events and by clinical and laboratory evaluations."nThe study data showed significant differences between the intervention and control groups with respect to efficacy and tolerability. In each intervention group, primary wound healings occurred following 2 weeks. Complete wound healing which was greater than 70% improvement in wounds surface areas was achieved in 83% and 100% of group 1 and group 2 participants, respectively after 6 weeks. On the other hand, at the same period of time, only 22.2% of patients in control group revealed complete healing. Therefore, ANGIPARSTM had significant positive effect in increasing the incidence of complete wound closure compared with control group (p = 0.042. However, our evaluations indicated that adding topical treatment with 3% gel once a day to the oral therapy with the same product did not make

  10. Osteomyelitis in the diabetic foot

    OpenAIRE

    Malhotra, Rishi; Chan, Claire Shu-Yi; Nather, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Osteomyelitis (OM) is a common complication of diabetic foot ulcers and/or diabetic foot infections. This review article discusses the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of OM in the diabetic foot. Clinical features that point to the possibility of OM include the presence of exposed bone in the depth of a diabetic foot ulcer. Medical imaging studies include plain radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging, and bone scintigraphy. A high index of suspicion is also required to make the...

  11. Spectroscopic detection of the blanch response at the heel of the foot: a possible diagnostic for stage I pressure ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlenberg, Elicia M.; Zanca, Jeanne; Brienza, David M.; Levasseur, Michelle A.; Sowa, Michael G.

    2005-09-01

    Pressure ulcers (sores) can occur when there is constant pressure being applied to tissue for extended periods of time. Immobile people are particularly prone to this problem. Ideally, pressure damage is detected at an early stage, pressure relief is applied and the pressure ulcer is averted. One of the hallmarks of pressure damaged skin is an obliterated blanch response due to compromised microcirculation near the surface of the skin. Visible reflectance spectroscopy can noninvasively probe the blood circulation of the upper layers of skin by measuring the electronic transitions arising from hemoglobin, the primary oxygen carrying protein in blood. A spectroscopic test was developed on a mixed population of 30 subjects to determine if the blanch response could be detected in healthy skin with high sensitivity and specificity regardless of the pigmentation of the skin. Our results suggest that a spectroscopic based blanch response test can accurately detect the blanching of healthy tissue and has the potential to be developed into a screening test for early stage I pressure ulcers.

  12. Hallux ulceration in diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElMakki Ahmed, Mohamed; Tamimi, Abdulhakim O; Mahadi, Seif I; Widatalla, Abubakr H; Shawer, Mohamed A

    2010-01-01

    We undertook a prospective cohort study to assess risk factors associated with hallux ulceration, and to determine the incidence of healing or amputation, in consecutive patients with diabetes mellitus who were treated over the observation period extending from September 2004 to March 2005, at the Jabir Abu Eliz Diabetic Centre, Khartoum City, Sudan. There were 122 diabetic patients in the cohort (92 males and 30 females) with an overall mean age of 58 +/- 9 years. Fifty-three percent of patients had complete healing within 8 weeks and 43% healed within 20 weeks. The overall mean time to healing was 16 +/- 8 weeks. In 32 (26.2%) patients, osteomyelitic bone was removed, leaving a healed and boneless hallux. The hallux was amputated in 17 (13.9%) patients; in 2 (1.6%) patients it was followed by forefoot amputation and in 7 (5.7%) patients by below-the-knee amputation. In 90 (73.8%) patients the initial lesion was a blister. In conclusion, hallux ulceration is common in patients with diabetes mellitus and is usually preceded by a blister. Neuropathy, foot deformity, and wearing new shoes are common causative factors; and ischemia, osteomyelitis, any form of wound infection, and the size of the ulcer are main outcome determinants. Complete healing occurred in 103 (85%) of diabetic patients with a hallux ulcer. Vascular intervention is important relative to limb salvage when ischemia is the main cause of the ulcer.

  13. Epidemiology of hand foot mouth disease in Northern Thailand in 2016: A prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panupong Upala

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the correlations between the meteorological data and the number of hand foot mouth disease (HFMD cases in 2016 in Northern Thailand, and to estimate the medical costs. Methods: A prospective cohort study was conducted. Data on numbers of HFMD cases were collected from 49 hospitals in three different provinces in Northern Thailand: 16 hospitals from Chiang Rai Province, 7 hospitals from Pha Yao Province, and 26 hospitals from Chiang Mai Province. A questionnaire had been developed and tested for validity and reliability before used. The specific form for collecting meteorological data was developed and used in the field. All information was recorded in the same data spread sheet before analysis. Chi-square and correlation tests were used for explaining the epidemiology of HFMD in the areas. An alpha error at 0.05 was used to determine the statistical significance level. Results: A total of 8 261 cases were analyzed in the study. 56.0% were males, 97.5% aged less than 6 years, 82.6% were out-patient department (OPD cases, 75.5% were reported in raining season, and 43.2% were from Chiang Mai Province. The number of HFMD cases had statistically significant correlations with temperature, air pressure, relative humidity, and rainfall amount. Averagely, 216 baht and 3 678 baht per case per visit had to be expended for medical cost in OPD and IPD cases, respectively. Most of the cases had been reported in the border areas: Thai-Myanmar, and Thai-Lao. Conclusions: Thailand health care system should provide a concrete schedule for taking care of HFMD patients during raining season, and should develop an effective preventive and control program for HFMD particularly among children less than 6 years.

  14. Effect of rhubarb powder on diabetic foot ulcer%大黄粉对糖尿病足溃疡创面的疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    成威; 杨忠丽; 胡慧玲; 朱卫华; 石璇; 贺丹; 左喜阳

    2013-01-01

    目的:比较大黄粉、碘伏对糖尿病足溃疡创面的疗效。方法:随机将52例糖尿病足1级的患者均分为观察组(使用大黄)及对照组(使用碘伏)。在严格控制血糖基础、改善循环、改善基础病情的情况下,分别采用大黄粉或碘伏外用并用无菌纱布覆盖糖尿病足,观察两种方法的疗效。结果:观察组有效26例,愈合时间(5.2±2.3)d;对照组有效23例,愈合时间(8.3±2.5)d,两组有效率(愈合时间)比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.01)。结论:大黄粉可缩短糖尿病足I级创面愈合时间。%Objective:To investigate therapeutic effect of rhubarb powder on diabetic foot ulcer. Methods:Fitfy-two patients with diabetic foot at Level I were divided into 2 groups:A rhubarb group and a control group. Atfer the strict control of blood sugar, improving circulation, improving the basic situation, we used rhubarb powder or iodine topically on the diabetic foot with sterile gauze. The therapeutic effect was observed atfer 14 days treatment. Results:Twenty-six patients were effective in the rhubarb group, and healing time was (5.2 ± 2.3) d. Twenty-three patients were effective in the control group and healing time was (8.3 ± 2.5) d. There were signiifcant difference between 2 groups (P<0.01). Conclusion:Rhubarb can shorten the time of wound healing of diabetic foot at Level I.

  15. Evaluation of 5 versus 10 granulocyteaphaeresis sessions in steroid-dependent ulcerative colitis: A pilot, prospective, multicenter, randomized study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elena Ricart; Maria Esteve; Montserrat Andreu; Francesc Casellas; David Monfort; Miquel Sans; Natalia Oudovenko; Raúl Lafuente; Julián Panés

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of 5 compared to 10 granulocyteaphaeresis sessions in patients with active steroid-dependent ulcerative colitis.METHODS: In this pilot, prospective, multicenter randomized trial, 20 patients with moderately active steroid-dependent ulcerative colitis were randomized to 5 or 10 granulocyteaphaeresis sessions. The primary objective was clinical remission at wk 17. Secondary measures included endoscopic remission and steroid consumption.RESULTS: Nine patients were randomized to 5 granulocyteaphaeresis sessions (group 1) and L1 patients to 10 granulocyteaphaeresis sessions (group 2). At wk 17, 37.5% of patients in group 1 and 45.45% of patients in group 2 were in clinical remission. Clinical remission was accompanied by endoscopic remission in all cases.Eighty-six percent of patients achieving remission were steroid-free at wk 17. Daily steroid requirements were significantly lower in group 2. Eighty-nine per cent of patients remained in remission during a one year follow-up. One serious adverse event, not related to the study therapy, was reported.CONCLUSION: Granulocyteaphaeresis is safe and effective for the treatment of steroid-dependent ulcerative colitis. In this population, increasing the number of aphaeresis sessions is not associated with higher remission rates, but affords a significant steroid-sparing effect.

  16. Differential diagnosis of leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannier, F; Rabe, E

    2013-03-01

    Leg and foot ulcers are symptoms of very different diseases. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the differential diagnosis of leg ulcers. The majority of leg ulcers occur in the lower leg or foot. In non-venous ulcers the localization in the foot area is more frequent. The most frequent underlying disease is chronic venous disease. In 354 leg ulcers, Koerber found 75.25% venous leg ulcers, 3.66% arterial leg ulcers, 14.66% ulcers of mixed venous and arterial origin and 13.5% vasculitic ulcers. In the Swedish population of Skaraborg, Nelzen found a venous origin in 54% of the ulcer patients. Each leg ulcer needs a clinical and anamnestic evaluation. Duplex ultrasound is the basic diagnostic tool to exclude vascular anomalies especially chronic venous and arterial occlusive disease. Skin biopsies help to find a correct diagnosis in unclear or non-healing cases. In conclusion, chronic venous disease is the most frequent cause of leg ulcerations. Because 25% of the population have varicose veins or other chronic venous disease the coincidence of pathological venous findings and ulceration is very frequent even in non-venous ulcerations. Leg ulcers without the symptoms of chronic venous disease should be considered as non-venous.

  17. 糖尿病足溃疡的综合性治疗效果观察%Observation of comprehensive therapy of diabetic foot ulcers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘泽亮; 于洪波

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the efficacy of a comprehensive treatment method for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers.Methods 63 patients in the intensive treatment with insulin or insulin pump strict glycemic control,nutrition nerve microcirculation,antibiotic was taken in accordance with susceptibility testing, debridement and dressing according to the theory of wound bed preparation and wet therapy, if necessary, endovascular treatment blood was opened.Results63 patients with 98 ulcers,61 were healed (62.2%);improved 22 cases (22.5%),84.7% of the total valid,invalid 15 cases (15.3%),where amputation (toe) 4 cases (4.0%).Conclusion The etiology of diabetic foot complex,such as blood vessels,nerve disease and infection factors involved,comprehensive treatment can significantly improve the cure rate and limb salvage rate,shorten the course.%目的:探讨综合性治疗在糖尿病足溃疡治疗中的疗效。方法63例患者应用胰岛素强化治疗或胰岛素泵严格控制血糖,营养神经改善微循环,按照药敏实验应用抗菌素,按照创面床准备理论和湿性疗法清创换药,必要时血管腔内治疗开通血流。结果63例患者98处溃疡面,治愈61处(62.2%),好转22例(22.5%),总有效84.7%,无效15例(15.3%),其中截肢(趾)4例(4.0%)。结论糖尿病足病因复杂,涉及血管、神经病变以及感染等因素,综合性治疗能明显提高治愈率和保肢率,缩短病程。

  18. Clinical and metabolic response to flaxseed oil omega-3 fatty acids supplementation in patients with diabetic foot ulcer: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimani, Zahra; Hashemdokht, Fatemeh; Bahmani, Fereshteh; Taghizadeh, Mohsen; Memarzadeh, Mohammad Reza; Asemi, Zatollah

    2017-09-01

    Data on the effects of flaxseed oil omega-3 fatty acids supplementation on wound healing and metabolic status in subjects with diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) are scarce. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of flaxseed oil omega-3 fatty acids supplementation on wound healing and metabolic status in subjects with DFU. The current randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted among 60 subjects (aged 40-85years old) with grade 3 DFU. Subjects were randomly allocated into two groups (30 subjects each group) to receive either 1000mg omega-3 fatty acids from flaxseed oil supplements or placebo twice a day for 12weeks. After the 12-week intervention, compared with the placebo, omega-3 fatty acids supplementation resulted in significant decreases in ulcer length (-2.0±2.3 vs. -1.0±1.1cm, P=0.03), width (-1.8±1.7 vs. -1.0±1.0cm, P=0.02) and depth (-0.8±0.6 vs. -0.5±0.5cm, P=0.01). Additionally, significant reductions in serum insulin concentrations (-4.4±5.5 vs. +1.4±8.3 μIU/mL, P=0.002), homeostasis model of assessment-estimated insulin resistance (-2.1±3.0 vs. +1.0±5.0, P=0.005) and HbA1c (-0.9±1.5 vs. -0.1±0.4%, P=0.01), and a significant rise in the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (+0.01±0.01 vs. -0.005±0.02, P=0.002) were seen following supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids compared with the placebo. In addition, omega-3 fatty acids supplementation significantly decreased serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) (-25.5±31.5 vs. -8.2±18.9μg/mL, P=0.01), and significantly increased plasma total antioxidant capacity (TAC) (+83.5±111.7 vs. -73.4±195.5mmol/L, Pfatty acids supplementation for 12weeks among subjects with DFU had beneficial effects on parameters of ulcer size, markers of insulin metabolism, serum hs-CRP, plasma TAC and GSH levels. In addition, flaxseed oil omega-3 fatty acids may have played an indirect role in wound healing due to its effects on improved metabolic profiles. Copyright

  19. Wound bed preparation and debridement in management of foot ulcer in diabetes patients%糖尿病足溃疡创面床准备及清创处理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋飞; 简华刚

    2011-01-01

    糖尿病患者足部溃疡发病率较高,创面愈合慢,并发症多,截肢发生率高,严重影响患者的生活质量.糖尿病足溃疡的治疗是通过积极治疗感染,评价血管状况及重建血运,减轻患肢伤口压力,清创、改善创面微环境得以实现.本文就糖尿病足溃疡创面床准备及清创处理等相关文献报道做一综述.%Foot ulcers of diabetic patients have characteristics of high prevalence , slow wound healing, more complications and high incidence of amputation , seriously affecting the quality of patients ' life. Foot ulcers in diabetes patients can be treated by actively controlling infection .evaluating vascular status , reconstructing blood sup ply , reducing pressure on the affected limb ,performing debridement and improving the wound microenvironment . In this paper,we reviewed the related literatures on the wound bed preparation and debridement for the management of foot ulcer in diabetic patients.

  20. Increased growth factors play a role in wound healing promoted by noninvasive oxygen-ozone therapy in diabetic patients with foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Guan, Meiping; Xie, Cuihua; Luo, Xiangrong; Zhang, Qian; Xue, Yaoming

    2014-01-01

    Management of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) is a great challenge for clinicians. Although the oxygen-ozone treatment improves the diabetic outcome, there are few clinical trials to verify the efficacy and illuminate the underlying mechanisms of oxygen-ozone treatment on DFUs. In the present study, a total of 50 type 2 diabetic patients complicated with DFUs, Wagner stage 2~4, were randomized into control group treated by standard therapy only and ozone group treated by standard therapy plus oxygen-ozone treatment. The therapeutic effects were graded into 4 levels from grade 0 (no change) to grade 3 (wound healing). The wound sizes were measured at baseline and day 20, respectively. Tissue biopsies were performed at baseline and day 11. The expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) proteins in the pathologic specimens were determined by immunohistochemical examinations. The effective rate of ozone group was significantly higher than that of control group (92% versus 64%, P ozone group than in control group (P ozone group than in control group. Ozone therapy promotes the wound healing of DFUs via potential induction of VEGF, TGF-β, and PDGF at early stage of the treatment. (Clinical trial registry number is ChiCTR-TRC-14004415).

  1. Cost and mortality data of a regional limb salvage and hyperbaric medicine program for Wagner Grade 3 or 4 diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggert, J V; Worth, E R; Van Gils, C C

    2016-01-01

    We obtained costs and mortality data in two retrospective cohorts totaling 159 patients who have diabetes mellitus and onset of a diabetic foot ulcer (DFU). Data were collected from 2005 to 2013, with a follow-up period through September 30, 2014. A total of 106 patients entered an evidence-based limb salvage protocol (LSP) for Wagner Grade 3 or 4 (WG3/4) DFU and intention-to-treat adjunctive hyperbaric oxygen (HBO₂) therapy. A second cohort of 53 patients had a primary lower extremity amputation (LEA), either below the knee (BKA) or above the knee (AKA) and were not part of the LSP. Ninety-six of 106 patients completed the LSP/HBO₂with an average cost of USD $33,100. Eighty-eight of 96 patients (91.7%) who completed the LSP/HBO₂had intact lower extremities at one year. Thirty-four of the 96 patients (35.4%) died during the follow-up period. Costs for a historical cohort of 53 patients having a primary major LEA range from USD $66,300 to USD $73,000. Twenty-five of the 53 patients (47.2%) died. The difference in cost of care and mortality between an LSP with adjunctive HBO₂therapy vs. primary LEA is staggering. We conclude that an aggressive limb salvage program that includes HBO₂ therapy is cost-effective.

  2. Clinical significance of pyloric aperture in the aetiology of peptic ulcer disease: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Sisir Kumar

    2009-04-01

    Despite so much contributions reported in the literature, the aetiology of the duodenal ulcer remains an enigmatic subject to the medical profession. Findings of Helicobacter pylori seem to have overshadowed the real issue, in that, how a small area of the duodenal mucosa could be inflicted with the acid-pepsin injury has not been questioned? One hundred and sixty-eight consecutive patients, presented with epigastric pain were included in the endoscopic study. The aim of the study was to find out the prevalence and its clinical importance on the sizes of the pyloric aperture in the aetiology of peptic ulcer disease. Demographic data on the sizes of the pyloric aperture were divided into two groups, in that, those up to 3 mm in diameter were included in one and those over the size of 3 mm in another. Among the 168 cases, the gastric ulcer was found in 12 and duodenal ulcer in 27 patients. The sex ratio of men to women was 1.4:1 found in the former and 8:1 in the latter. Among other findings, a knuckle of duodenal mucoa was noticed prolapsing through the large pyloric aperture. It could be postulated that a knuckle of the mucosa that keeps peeping through the pylorus acts as a mucosal plug in empty stomach, like a cork in the acid bottle. The main physiological function is to protect the mucosa from being damaged by the acid-pepsin injury or by the reflux of bile, but the tip of the plug seems to be subjected to such injury. Furthermore, the surface epithelial cells could also be subjected to ischaemic change while prolapsing through the pylorus. This may lead to reduced production of the mucosal gel and bicarbonate secretion, thus exposing the damaged mucosa to acid bath. This supports the concept, how a small area of the stomach or duodenum could be inflicted with ulceration.

  3. Study on the Comprehensive Treatment of Foot Ulcers Department of Internal Medicine in Patients With Diabetes Mellitus%糖尿病患者并发足部溃疡内科综合治疗的探索研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丽杰

    2015-01-01

    Objective Complications of diabetes in patients with diabetic foot comprehensive medical treatment after clinical efifcacy, and explore new clinic thinking.Methods The data of 100 patients with diabetic foot were collected in January 2014 to December in our hospital, followed by a retrospective study of the clinical records.Results Have elderly diabetic foot disease characteristics of foot ulcers and nervous ischemic ulcer incidence was 45% and 55%, respectively, this collection diabetic foot main level with Wagner4 reached 37.0%.Conclusion Elderly patients with diabetic foot and has the characteristics of long duration, clinical cure and improvement rate was signiifcantly Wanger graded inverse relationship.%目的:分析糖尿病患者的并发症糖尿病足内科综合诊疗后的临床疗效,探索新的诊疗思维。方法整理搜集2014年1~12月我院收治的糖尿病足患者资料共100例,对其临床病历进行回顾性研究。结果糖尿病足具有高龄性的发病特点,足溃疡和神经缺血性溃疡发病率分别为45%和55%;本次搜集糖尿病足患者以Wagner 4级为主,达到37.0%。结论糖尿病足患者具有高龄和病程长的特征,临床治愈好转率与Wanger分级呈明显的反比关系。

  4. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging features of diabetic foot ulcers%糖尿病足溃疡超声造影的影像学特点及临床意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张瑕; 刘宏伟; 吕雅赐; 黄君; 钟兴; 邵建立

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨糖尿病足溃疡的超声造影灌注动态变化.方法 研究16例糖尿病足溃疡的常规及超声造影图像,分析其造影增强的图像特点,并对部分病例进行病理检查.结果 注射SonoVue后,16个病灶超声造影动脉期清晰显示随时间推移呈缓慢增强,平均开始增强时间为(30.02+2.35)s,达峰时间为(37.54-4.13)s.5例呈均匀增强区域,11例呈周边较均匀增强,内部可见片状无增强区域,即液化坏死区.造影提示病灶范围较常规超声范围大.结论 超声造影能有效地对糖尿病足溃疡进行范围评估和治疗随访.%Objective To investigate contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging features of diabetic foot ulcers. Methods Sixteen patients with diabetic foot ulcers underwent conventional and contrast-enhanced ultrasound examinations, and the features of contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging were analyzed. Pathological examination was also carried out in some cases. Results Contrast-enhanced ultrasound showed slow enhancement in the artery phase in the 16 ulcers after administration of SonoVue. The mean time of initial enhancement was 30.02±2.35 s, and the mean time for the occurrence of peak enhancement was 37.54± 4.13 s. In 5 cases a homogeneous enhancement pattern was clearly displayed, and in the other 11 cases, a pattern of homogenous peripheral enhancement with non-enhanced patches within the ulcers was found. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound showed a greater ulcerous area than conventional ultrasound. Conclusion Contrast-enhanced ultrasound is a valuable means for evaluating the ulcerous area and the treatment efficacy for diabetic foot ulcers.

  5. Exostectomy for chronic midfoot plantar ulcer in Charcot deformity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurinaviciene, R.; Kirketerp-Moeller, K.; Holstein, Per Evald

    2008-01-01

    Charcot midfoot ulcers are rare and very difficult to heal, with surgery being an option. This retrospective study assessed healing rates, complications, and the incidence of re-ulceration and other foot ulcer problems following exostectomies Udgivelsesdato: 2008/2......Charcot midfoot ulcers are rare and very difficult to heal, with surgery being an option. This retrospective study assessed healing rates, complications, and the incidence of re-ulceration and other foot ulcer problems following exostectomies Udgivelsesdato: 2008/2...

  6. Differential Diagnosis of Skin Ulcers in a Mycobacterium ulcerans Endemic Area: Data from a Prospective Study in Cameroon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutous Trellu, Laurence; Nkemenang, Patrick; Comte, Eric; Ehounou, Geneviève; Atangana, Paul; Rusch, Barbara; Njih Tabah, Earnest; Etard, Jean-François; Mueller, Yolanda K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical diagnosis of Buruli ulcer (BU) due to Mycobacterium ulcerans can be challenging. We aimed to specify the differential diagnosis of skin lesions in a BU endemic area. Method We conducted a prospective diagnostic study in Akonolinga, Cameroon. Patients presenting with a skin ulcer suspect of BU were included. M. ulcerans was detected using swabs for Ziehl-Neelsen staining, PCR and culture. Skin punch biopsies were taken and reviewed by two histopathologists. Photographs of the lesions were taken and independently reviewed by two dermatologists. Final diagnosis was based on consensus, combining the results of laboratory tests and expert opinion. Results/ Discussion Between October 2011 and December 2013, 327 patients with ulcerative lesions were included. Median age was 37 years (0 to 87), 65% were males, and 19% HIV-positive. BU was considered the final diagnosis for 27% of the lesions, 85% of which had at least one positive laboratory test. Differential diagnoses were vascular lesions (22%), bacterial infections (21%), post-traumatic (8%), fistulated osteomyelitis (6%), neoplasia (5%), inflammatory lesions (3%), hemopathies and other systemic diseases (2%) and others (2%). The proportion of BU was similar between HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients (27.0% vs. 26.5%; p = 0.940). Half of children below 15 years of age were diagnosed with BU, compared to 26.8% and 13.9% among individuals 15 to 44 years of age and above, respectively (chi2 p<0.001). Children had more superficial bacterial infections (24.3%) and osteomyelitis (11.4%). Conclusion We described differential diagnosis of skin lesions in a BU endemic area, stratifying results by age and HIV-status. PMID:27074157

  7. Clinical Characteristics and Risk Factor Analysis for Lower-Extremity Amputations in Diabetic Patients With Foot Ulcer Complicated by Necrotizing Fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, I-Wen; Yang, Hui-Mei; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Yeh, Jiun-Ting; Huang, Chung-Huei; Huang, Yu-Yao

    2015-11-01

    Patients with diabetes are at a higher risk of having diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) or necrotizing fasciitis (NF). The present study aims to examine the clinical characteristics and associated risk factors for lower-extremity amputation (LEA) in patients with DFU complicated by NF.We retrospectively reviewed patients treated at a major diabetic foot center in Taiwan between 2009 and 2014. Of the 2265 cases 110 had lower-extremity NF. Limb preservation outcomes were classified as major LEA, minor LEA, or limb-preserved. Clinical characteristics, laboratory data, and bacterial culture results were collected for analysis.Of the 110 patients with NF, 100 had concomitant DFUs (NF with DFU) and the remaining 10 had no DFU (NF without DFU). None of the NF patients without DFU died nor had their leg amputated. Two NF patients with DFU died of complications. The amputation rate in the surviving 98 NF patients with DFU was 72.4% (46.9% minor LEA and 25.5% major LEA). Seventy percent of the NF patients without DFU had monomicrobial infections (60% with Streptococcus species), and 81.4% NF patients with DFU had polymicrobial infections. Anaerobic organisms were identified in 66% of the NF patients with DFU. Multinomial logistic regression analysis revealed an association between high-grade Wagner wound classification (Wagner 4 and Wagner 5) and LEA (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 21.856, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 1.625-203.947, P = 0.02 and aOR = 20.094, 95% CI = 1.968-205.216, P = 0.01 for major and minor LEA, respectively) for NF patients with DFU. In addition, a lower serum albumin level was associated with major LEA (OR = 0.066, P = 0.002).In summary, once DFUs were complicated by NF, the risk of amputation increased. Empirical treatment for NF patients with DFU should cover polymicrobial infections, including anaerobic organisms. The high-grade wound classification and low serum albumin level were associated with LEA.

  8. Current Status and Future Prospects to Achieve Foot-and-Mouth Disease Eradication in South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavijo, A; Sanchez-Vazquez, M J; Buzanovsky, L P; Martini, M; Pompei, J C; Cosivi, O

    2017-02-01

    South America has a favourable position with respect to foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) compared with other FMD-affected regions due to the elimination of endemic clinical presentation of the disease. South America has reached the final stage of control and aims to eradicate the disease in the region under the provisions of the Hemispheric Program for the Eradication of FMD 2011-2020 (PHEFA). This programme aims at bringing eradication to completion, thereby eliminating the pool of foot-and-mouth disease genotypes active in South America. This plan includes a regional political agreement that provides strategies and technical guidelines for the eradication of foot-and-mouth disease from South America. It incorporates knowledge and experience regarding the disease's history and its connection with the different production systems, animal movement and trade. The Pan American Foot and Mouth Disease Center has led the control and eradication programmes, providing the framework for designing national and subregional programmes that have led to significant progress in controlling the disease in South America. The current situation is the result of several factors, including the proper implementation of a national control programmes, good veterinary infrastructure in most countries and public-private participation in the process of eradicating the disease. Notwithstanding the favourable health status, there are significant challenges for the goal of eradication. At this stage, South American countries should enhance their surveillance strategies particularly through the use of target or risk-based surveys that contribute to increase the degree of sensitivity in the search for viral circulation in the context of absence of clinical occurrence of FMD.

  9. Increased Growth Factors Play a Role in Wound Healing Promoted by Noninvasive Oxygen-Ozone Therapy in Diabetic Patients with Foot Ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs is a great challenge for clinicians. Although the oxygen-ozone treatment improves the diabetic outcome, there are few clinical trials to verify the efficacy and illuminate the underlying mechanisms of oxygen-ozone treatment on DFUs. In the present study, a total of 50 type 2 diabetic patients complicated with DFUs, Wagner stage 2~4, were randomized into control group treated by standard therapy only and ozone group treated by standard therapy plus oxygen-ozone treatment. The therapeutic effects were graded into 4 levels from grade 0 (no change to grade 3 (wound healing. The wound sizes were measured at baseline and day 20, respectively. Tissue biopsies were performed at baseline and day 11. The expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β, and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF proteins in the pathologic specimens were determined by immunohistochemical examinations. The effective rate of ozone group was significantly higher than that of control group (92% versus 64%, P<0.05. The wound size reduction was significantly more in ozone group than in control group (P<0.001. After treatment, the expressions of VEGF, TGF-β, and PDGF proteins at day 11 were significantly higher in ozone group than in control group. Ozone therapy promotes the wound healing of DFUs via potential induction of VEGF, TGF-β, and PDGF at early stage of the treatment. (Clinical trial registry number is ChiCTR-TRC-14004415.

  10. HDL cholesterol as a predictor for the incidence of lower extremity amputation and wound-related death in patients with diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikura, Kazuki; Hanai, Ko; Shinjyo, Takamichi; Uchigata, Yasuko

    2015-04-01

    We examined whether HDL cholesterol levels are a predictor for an incidence of lower-extremity amputation (LEA) and wound-related death in patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs). This was a single-center, observational, longitudinal historical cohort study of 163 Japanese ambulatory patients with DFUs, 45 woman and 118 men, with a mean (standard deviation) age of 62 (14) years. The primary composite endpoint was defined as the worst of the following outcomes for each individual; (1) minor amputation, defined as amputation below the ankle, (2) major amputation, defined as amputation above the ankle, and (3) wound-related death. During the median follow-up period of 5.1 months, 67 patients (41.1%) reached the endpoint (43 minor amputations, 16 major amputations, and 8 wound-related deaths). In the univariate Cox proportional hazard model analysis, lower HDL cholesterol levels (mmol/L) were significantly associated with the incidence of the primary composite endpoint (hazard ratio 0.16 [95% CI 0.08-0.32], p < 0.001). In the multivariate Cox proportional hazard model analysis using a stepwise variable-selecting procedure, HDL cholesterol levels in addition to the presence of ankle brachial index <0.9 or ≥1.4 and serum albumin levels were selected as independent risk factors for the incidence of the endpoint (hazard ratio 0.30 [95% CI 0.14-0.63], p = 0.002). Similar results were obtained when HDL cholesterol levels were treated as a categorical variable (≥1.03 mmol/L or less). HDL cholesterol levels might be a novel clinical predictor for the incidence of LEA and wound-related death in patients with DFUs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical Analysis of Gel Dressing in the Treatment of Diabetic Foot Ulcer%凝胶敷料用于糖尿病足溃疡的疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆艳; 黄伟英

    2014-01-01

    目的:观察凝胶敷料(微赛恩凝胶)用于糖尿病足溃疡的疗效。方法将100例糖尿病足患者随机分为观察组50例用凝胶敷料喷涂;对照组50例常规治疗不予凝胶敷料喷涂.比较两组治疗效果。结果观察组疗效优于对照组(P<0.01)。结论凝胶敷料治疗糖尿病足溃疡疗效显著。%Objective To observe the gel dressing (micro scion gel) for treatment of diabetic foot ulcer. Methods 100 cases of diabetic foot were randomly divided into the observation group of 50 cases with gel dressing spray; 50 cases in the control group conventional treatment not gel dressing spray. The treatment ef ect of the two groups were compared. Results The observation group was bet er than control group (P<0.01). Conclusion Gel dressing on the treatment of diabetic foot ulcer is significantly.

  12. Effectiveness of hyaluronic acid for treating diabetic foot: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao-Pen; Hung, Wei; Lin, Sheng-Hsuan

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a major complication of diabetes mellitus. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is used in the treatment of diabetic foot. This meta-analysis was designed to evaluate if HA increased the complete healing rate of diabetic foot compared with controls. We searched Medline, Cochrane, EMBASE, Google Scholar (until January 31, 2014) databases for prospective randomized controlled trials that assessed the effectiveness of HA in treating foot ulcers resulting from diabetes. The primary outcome for the study was complete healing rate of the ulcer at 12 weeks. Three hundred twenty-eight patients were identified from four studies that evaluated the rate of healing of diabetic foot that were treated with HA or controls. Among the four studies, odd ratios (OR) ranged from 1.19 to 8.86, with the overall OR being 1.71 (p = 0.047; 95% confidence interval = 1.01 to 2.90). In summary, our meta-analysis strengthens the findings that HA is beneficial in treating diabetic foot by increasing the rate of wound healing. These findings support the use of HA in treating diabetic foot.

  13. Capacidade funcional dos pacientes com diabetes mellitus e pé ulcerado Capacidad funcional de pacientes con diabetes mellitus y pié ulcerado Functional capability of patients with diabetes with foot ulceration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Magela Salomé

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a capacidade funcional de pessoas com diabetes mellitus e pé ulcerado. MÉTODOS: Estudo analítico, transversal e comparativo, realizado em hospital público do município de São Paulo, sendo os dados coletados no período de 2 de junho a 30 julho de 2008. Foram selecionados para compor o Grupo de Estudo, 20 pacientes com diabetes mellitus e pé ulcerado; para o Grupo Controle 20 pessoas com diagnóstico médico de diabetes mellitus, sem úlcera no pé. O instrumento utilizado foi Health Assessment Questionnaire-20. RESULTADOS: O grupo estudo diferiu do grupo controle, quanto ao escores HAQ-20, bem como em relação aos componentes 1,2,3,5,6,7 e 8. Também apresentaram diferença estatística significante (POBJETIVO: Evaluar la capacidad funcional de personas con diabetes mellitus y pié ulcerado. MÉTODOS: Se trata de un estudio analítico, transversal y comparativo, realizado en un hospital público del municipio de Sao Paulo, cuyos datos fueron recolectados en el período del 2 de junio al 30 julio del 2008. Fueron seleccionados para componer el Grupo de Estudio, 20 pacientes con diabetes mellitus y pié ulcerado; para el Grupo Control 20 personas con diagnóstico médico de diabetes mellitus, sin úlcera en el pié. El instrumento utilizado fue el Health Assessment Questionnaire-20. RESULTADOS: El grupo de estudio difirió del grupo control, en cuanto a los escores HAQ-20, así como en relación a los componentes 1,2,3,5,6,7 y 8. También presentaron diferencia estadísticamente significativa (POBJECTIVE: To evaluate and compare the functional capability of patients with diabetes with foot ulceration and patients with diabetes without foot ulceration. METHODS: A cross sectional descriptive comparative study was conducted in a public hospital in the district of São Paulo. The sample consisted of 20 patients with foot ulceration and 20 patients without foot ulceration. Data were collected from June 2 to July 30, 2008. The

  14. Foot pronation is not associated with increased injury risk in novice runners wearing a neutral shoe : a 1-year prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Oestergaard; Buist, Ida; Parner, Erik Thorlund; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard; Sorensen, Henrik; Lind, Martin; Rasmussen, Sten

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate if running distance to first running-related injury varies between foot postures in novice runners wearing neutral shoes. Design A 1-year epidemiological observational prospective cohort study. Setting Denmark. Participants A total of 927 novice runners equivalent to 1854 fe

  15. 再生复原疗法对糖尿病足的临床规范化应用%Standardized Application of Regenerative Restoration Therapy in the Clinical Treatment of Diabetic Foot Ulcer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王洪生

    2013-01-01

    Objective As the progressing of disease, diabetic foot will worsen to develop ulceration, necrosis and especially infection successively due to tissue ischemia, neuropathy and infection of the involved foot. Since the immunity of infected tissue weakens and antibiotics can not reach an effective treatment concentration in the diseased tissue, the conven-tional treatment has no effective methods, and leads to amputation eventually. In contrast, the application of regenerative restoration therapy in the treatment of diabetic foot can easily solve such difficult problems as ulcer, infection and etc. , so that the affected foot can be saved as much as possible. But the lack of a unified and standardized wound management proto-col leads to the variation of clinical efficacy. Thus, with the purpose of improving the efficacy, this paper aims to summarize a clinical treatment standard of regenerative restoration therapy in treating diabetic foot ulcer. Methods To conclude and summarize the clinical treatment standard of regenerative restoration therapy in treating diabetic foot ulcer based on the theo-ry and science of Human Body Regenerative Restoration Science and regenerative restoration technology set up by Dr. XU Rong-xiang. Results A clinical treatment standard was summarized under the guidance of Human Body Regenerative Res-toration Science and pertinent clinical practicing techniques. Conclusion The standard has reference meaning for unifying the application of regenerative restoration therapy in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcer.%  目的糖尿病足病因是患足组织缺血、神经病变,随着病程发展会依次发生溃疡、感染、坏死;因感染组织免疫力降低且抗生素在病变组织不能达到有效治疗浓度,常规治疗方法常缺乏有效性,最终将导致截肢,而再生复原疗法在糖尿病足中的应用,使糖尿病足溃疡、感染等难题迎刃而解,患足得到了最大限度地保全,但目前创

  16. 糖尿病足溃疡的临床特点及危险因素分析%Analysis of the clinical characteristics and risk factors of diabetic foot ulceration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨群英; 薛耀明; 曹瑛; 高方; 朱波; 罗祥蓉; 李际敏; 符霞军

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the clinical characteristics and risk factors of diabetic foot ulceration (DF). Methods The clinical characteristics of 154 DF patients were retrospectively studied. Logistic multiple regression analysis was used to screen the risk factors of foot ulceration. Results The incidence of diabetic foot rose along with the increases of age and duration. Logistic multiple regression analysis exhibited that pain, temperature sensation, vibration sensation , autonomic nerve function and ABI were closely related with the occurrence of diabetic foot. Most of the incentives of foot ulcers (57. 1%) were from patients and relatives paying no attention to the details in daily life, which can be completely avoided. With the increase of Wagner grade, the length and the cost of hospitalization gradually increased, the healing situations of foot ulcers became worse, with statistically significant differences among groups (P<0. 05), and amputation rate gradually increased. Conclusions For reducing medical costs and avoiding amputation, it is of a great significance to strengthen the screening of diabetic neuropathy and vasculopathy for diabetic patients and to enhance the education for diabetic patients at high risk for foot ulceration so as to prevent the occurrence of DF and to treat scientifically as soon as possible.%目的 探讨糖尿病足(DF)的临床特点及影响足溃疡发生的危险因素. 方法 回顾性研究154例DF患者的临床特点,并用Logistic多元回归分析影响足溃疡发生的危险因素. 结果 随着年龄、病程增加,DF的发病率呈上升趋势.Logistic多元回归分析显示,痛觉、温度觉、振动觉、自主神经功能及踝肱指数(ABI)水平与DF的发生密切相关.大多数足溃疡(57.1%)是由日常生活中一些可以避免的细节原因所诱发.随着Wagner分级的增加,DF患者的平均住院时间和平均住院费用逐渐增加,足溃疡的愈合情况越来越差,且各组

  17. The use of vaccum endocrinology sealing drainage in diabetes foot nerve ulcer%负压封闭引流技术在糖尿病足神经性溃疡治疗中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王璐宁; 关小宏

    2011-01-01

    Objective To observe the effectiveness of vaccum sealing drainage(VSD) in the treatment of diabetes foot nerve ulcer,and to provide an effective method to treat diabetes foot chronic and stubborn ulcer.Methods There was not necrosis tissue in the wound after controlling blood sugar,infection and debridement.Then the wound was healed by VSD 1-4 courses of treatment when it was filled with granulation. Afterwards routine treatment was continued till the wound healed. Results With the treatment of VSD,32 wounds of diabetes foot nerve ulcer were healed successfully. Conclusion The treatment of VSD for diabetes foot nerve ulcer can improve local blood circulation,reduce local edema,promote the granulation growing andreduce the time of recover.%目的 探讨负压封闭引流技术(VSD)治疗糖尿病足神经性溃疡的有效性.方法 抗感染、降血糖等全身治疗加局部清创至创面无明显坏死组织,分泌物细菌培养阴性前提下,应用VSD治疗,待创面肉芽填充丰满再常规换药至伤口愈合.结果 32例Wagner分级3~4级的糖尿病足神经性溃疡患者经VSD治疗1~4个疗程后,创面肉芽组织生长新鲜、平整,无感染、水肿、渗出,暴露的骨骼、肌腱被肉芽组织覆盖,创面平均愈合时间(70±22)d,较常规换药平均愈合时间[(80±21)d]明显缩短.结论 VSD治疗糖尿病足神经性溃疡可改善局部血运,减轻局部水肿、促进创面肉芽组织生长,缩短创面愈合时间.

  18. Cultural adaptation and validation of the Neuropathy - and Foot Ulcer - Specific Quality of Life instrument (NeuroQol for Brazilian Portuguese - Phase 1 Adaptación cultural y validación del Neuropathy - and Foot Ulcer - Specific Quality of Life (NeuroQol para el idioma portugués de Brasil - Fase 1 Adaptação cultural e validação do Neuropathy - and Foot Ulcer - Specific Quality of Life (NeuroQol para a língua portuguesa do Brasil - Fase 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Tayana da Franca Xavier

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This methodological study aimed to adapt the Neuropathy - and Foot Ulcer - Specific Quality of Life instrument - NeuroQol to Brazilian Portuguese and to analyze its psychometric properties. Participants were 50 people with peripheral diabetic neuropathy and foot ulcers. The floor and ceiling effects, the convergent and discriminant validity and the reliability were analyzed. The Cronbach’s alpha coefficient was used to test the reliability and the Pearson’s correlation coefficient to estimate the convergent validity, the Student’s t test was used to evaluate the discriminant validity in the comparison of the NeuroQol scores between participants with and without ulcers. Floor and ceiling effects were found in some domains of the NeuroQol. The reliability was satisfactory. The correlations between the domains of the NeuroQol and the SF-36 were negative, significant and of moderate to strong magnitude. The findings show that the Brazilian version of the NeuroQol is reliable and valid and may be employed as a useful tool for improving nursing care for people with DM.Estudio metodológico que tuvo como objetivos adaptar el Neuropathy - and Foot Ulcer - Specific Quality of Life - NeuroQol para el idioma portugués de Brasil y analizar sus propiedades psicométricas. Participaron 50 personas con neuropatía diabética periférica y úlceras en los pies. Fueron analizados los efectos floor y ceiling, la validez convergente, la discriminante y la confiabilidad. Fue utilizado el coeficiente alfa de Cronbach para comprobar la confiabilidad y la correlación de Pearson para estimar la validez convergente; el test t-Student fue empleado para evaluar la validez discriminante en la comparación de los puntajes del NeuroQol entre los participantes con y sin úlceras. Se constataron efectos floor y ceiling en algunos dominios del NeuroQol. La confiabilidad fue satisfactoria. Las correlaciones entre los dominios del NeuroQol y SF-36 fueron negativas

  19. 糖尿病足溃疡大鼠血锌水平及金属硫蛋白的表达意义%Study on blood zinc levels and significance of metallothionein expression in rats with diabetic foot ulcer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴杰; 王虎; 马飞煜; 仇烨; 林镇荣

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨糖尿病足溃疡大鼠血锌水平及金属硫蛋白( metallothionein,MT)的表达对清除自由基及抗氧化作用的意义.方法 将60只雄性Wistar大鼠随机分为对照组(20只)和造模组(40只),其中造模组链脲佐菌素尾静脉注射诱导糖尿病,对照组注射等量柠檬酸-柠檬酸钠缓冲液.将两组大鼠足背部一矩形全层皮肤组织切除,建立糖尿病足溃疡大鼠模型,监测两组大鼠血锌水平变化,应用免疫组化技术检测MT的表达.结果 造模组大鼠血锌水平(1.17 ±0.09)较对照组( 1.48±0.07)明显减低,差异有统计学意义(t=12.94,P<0.01).免疫组化研究发现在对照组大鼠有少量MT表达,而造模组大鼠MT的表达明显增高,差异有统计学意义(x2=12.78,P<0.01).结论 糖尿病足溃疡大鼠的血锌水平及MT的表达情况可能与清除自由基、抗氧化作用有关,MT的表达增高对防止糖尿病足溃疡病变进一步发展可能具有重要作用.%diabetic foot ulcer of rats induced by streptozotosin,and to find the significance of free radical scavenging and the antioxidative function.Methods A total of 60 male wistar rats were randomized into the control group (20 rats) and diabetic model group (40 rats).The model group was induced to diabetic foot ulcer using streptozotosin tail intravenous injection,and the control group was injected equal citric acid-citric acid sodium buffer fluid instead.A rectangular full-thickness skin of dorsum of foot in the two groups was removed from model rats to construct diabetic foot ulcer.Serum zinc levels of the two groups were monitored,and immunohistochemical technique was used to detect the MT expression.Results Serum zinc levels in the model group( 1.17 ±0.09) was significantly lower than control group( 1.48 ±0.07),and the difference was statistically significant ( t =12.94,P <0.01 ).The MT expression in control group was low,while it significantly increased in diabetic model group,and the

  20. Challenges and prospects for the control of foot-and-mouth disease: an African perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maree FF

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Francois F Maree,1,2 Christopher J Kasanga,3, Katherine A Scott,1 Pamela A Opperman,1,2 Melanie Chitray,1,2, Abraham K Sangula,4 Raphael Sallu,3 Yona Sinkala,5 Philemon N Wambura,3 Donald P King,6 David J Paton,6 Mark M Rweyemamu,3 1Transboundary Animal Diseases Programme, Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute, Agricultural Research Council, Onderstepoort, Pretoria, South Africa; 2Department of Microbiology and Plant Pathology, Faculty of Agricultural and Natural Sciences, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa; 3Southern African Centre for Infectious Diseases Surveillance, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro, Tanzania; 4Foot-and-Mouth Disease Laboratory, Embakasi, Nairobi, Kenya; 5Department of Disease Control, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia; 6The Pirbright Institute, Pirbright, Surrey, UK Abstract: The epidemiology of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD in Africa is unique in the sense that six of the seven serotypes of FMD viruses (Southern African Territories [SAT] 1, SAT2, SAT3, A, O, and C, with the exception of Asia-1, have occurred in the last decade. Due to underreporting of FMD, the current strains circulating throughout sub-Saharan Africa are in many cases unknown. For SAT1, SAT2, and serotype A viruses, the genetic diversity is reflected in antigenic variation, and indications are that vaccine strains may be needed for each topotype. This has serious implications for control using vaccines and for choice of strains to include in regional antigen banks. The epidemiology is further complicated by the fact that SAT1, SAT2, and SAT3 viruses are maintained and spread by wildlife, persistently infecting African buffalo in particular. Although the precise mechanism of transmission of FMD from buffalo to cattle is not well understood, it is facilitated by direct contact between these two species. Once cattle are infected they may maintain SAT infections without the further involvement of buffalo. No

  1. A prospective, longitudinal study to assess use of continuous and reactive low-pressure mattresses to reduce pressure ulcer incidence in a pediatric intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    García Molina, Pablo; Balaguer López, Evelin; Torra i Bou, Joan Enric; Álvarez Ordiales, Adán; Quesada Ramos, Cristina; Verdú Soriano, José

    2012-01-01

    Pressure between bony prominences and sleep surfaces, as well as pressure from the use of medical devices, put children admitted to pediatric intensive care units (PICUs) at risk of developing pressure ulcers (PUs). To assess the effect of two pediatric-specific, continuous and reactive low-pressure mattresses on the incidence of PUs, an observational, descriptive, prospective, longitudinal (2009–2011) study was conducted among PICU patients. The two pediatric mattresses — one for children we...

  2. Avoiding foot complications in diabetes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to pain, heat, cold, pressure and proprioception allows increased callus formation at pressure points. This usually precedes an ulcer. Autonomic neuropathy causes a warm foot with bulging veins ... inadequate individual or family awareness.

  3. First report of the predominance of clonal complex 398 Staphylococcus aureus strains in osteomyelitis complicating diabetic foot ulcers: a national French study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senneville, E; Brière, M; Neut, C; Messad, N; Lina, G; Richard, J-L; Sotto, A; Lavigne, J-P

    2014-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most common pathogen cultured from diabetic foot infection including diabetic foot osteomyelitis. This French multicentre study determined the genetic content of S. aureus isolated from 157 consecutive cases admitted to 12 diabetic foot centres between 2008 and 2011. We describe for the first time the emergence of the CC398 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus clone, the main clone in diabetic foot osteomyelitis, and its tropism for bone. This clone spreads to humans from an animal source through its intrinsic virulence. This adaptation of S. aureus isolates looks to be a worrisome problem and should be carefully monitored.

  4. A prospective study of long-term intake of dietary fiber and risk of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N; Khalili, Hamed; Konijeti, Gauree G; Higuchi, Leslie M; de Silva, Punyanganie; Korzenik, Joshua R; Fuchs, Charles S; Willett, Walter C; Richter, James M; Chan, Andrew T

    2013-11-01

    Increased intake of dietary fiber has been proposed to reduce the risk of inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's disease [CD] and ulcerative colitis [UC]). However, few prospective studies have examined associations between long-term intake of dietary fiber and risk of incident CD or UC. We collected and analyzed data from 170,776 women, followed up over 26 years, who participated in the Nurses' Health Study, followed up for 3,317,425 person-years. Dietary information was prospectively ascertained via administration of a validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire every 4 years. Self-reported CD and UC were confirmed through review of medical records. Cox proportional hazards models, adjusting for potential confounders, were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs). We confirmed 269 incident cases of CD (incidence, 8/100,000 person-years) and 338 cases of UC (incidence, 10/100,000 person-years). Compared with the lowest quintile of energy-adjusted cumulative average intake of dietary fiber, intake of the highest quintile (median of 24.3 g/day) was associated with a 40% reduction in risk of CD (multivariate HR for CD, 0.59; 95% confidence interval, 0.39-0.90). This apparent reduction appeared to be greatest for fiber derived from fruits; fiber from cereals, whole grains, or legumes did not modify risk. In contrast, neither total intake of dietary fiber (multivariate HR, 0.82; 95% confidence interval, 0.58-1.17) nor intake of fiber from specific sources appeared to be significantly associated with risk of UC. Based on data from the Nurses' Health Study, long-term intake of dietary fiber, particularly from fruit, is associated with lower risk of CD but not UC. Further studies are needed to determine the mechanisms that mediate this association. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Early Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Vietnamese Patients with Acute Peptic Ulcer Bleeding: A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duc Trong Quach

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To investigate H. pylori infection rate and evaluate a combined set of tests for H. pylori diagnosis in Vietnamese patients with acute peptic ulcer bleeding (PUD. Methods. Consecutive patients with acute PUB were enrolled prospectively. Rapid urease test (RUT with 3 biopsies was carried out randomly. Patients without RUT or with negative RUT received urea breath test (UBT and serological and urinary H. pylori antibody tests. H. pylori was considered positive if RUT or any noninvasive test was positive. Patients were divided into group A (RUT plus noninvasive tests and group B (only noninvasive tests. Results. The overall H. pylori infection rate was 94.2% (161/171. Groups A and B had no differences in demographic characteristics, bleeding severity, endoscopic findings, and proton pump inhibitor use. H. pylori-positive rate in group A was significantly higher than that in group B (98.2% versus 86.7%, p=0.004. The positive rate of RUT was similar at each biopsy site but significantly increased if RUT results from 2 or 3 sites were combined (p<0.05. Conclusions. H. pylori infection rate in Vietnamese patients with acute PUB is high. RUT is an excellent test if at least 2 biopsies are taken.

  6. Early Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Vietnamese Patients with Acute Peptic Ulcer Bleeding: A Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quach, Duc Trong; Luu, Mai Ngoc; To, Thuy-HuongThi; Bui, Quy Nhuan; Tran, Tuan Anh; Tran, Binh Duy; Vo, Minh-Cong Hong; Tanaka, Shinji; Uemura, Naomi

    2017-01-01

    Aims. To investigate H. pylori infection rate and evaluate a combined set of tests for H. pylori diagnosis in Vietnamese patients with acute peptic ulcer bleeding (PUD). Methods. Consecutive patients with acute PUB were enrolled prospectively. Rapid urease test (RUT) with 3 biopsies was carried out randomly. Patients without RUT or with negative RUT received urea breath test (UBT) and serological and urinary H. pylori antibody tests. H. pylori was considered positive if RUT or any noninvasive test was positive. Patients were divided into group A (RUT plus noninvasive tests) and group B (only noninvasive tests). Results. The overall H. pylori infection rate was 94.2% (161/171). Groups A and B had no differences in demographic characteristics, bleeding severity, endoscopic findings, and proton pump inhibitor use. H. pylori-positive rate in group A was significantly higher than that in group B (98.2% versus 86.7%, p = 0.004). The positive rate of RUT was similar at each biopsy site but significantly increased if RUT results from 2 or 3 sites were combined (p < 0.05). Conclusions. H. pylori infection rate in Vietnamese patients with acute PUB is high. RUT is an excellent test if at least 2 biopsies are taken. PMID:28133477

  7. 糖尿病足及溃疡发生的临床特点分析%Analysis of clinical characteristics of the occurence of diabetic foot and ulcers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王萍; 王晶; 章秋

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨2 糖尿病患者发生糖尿病足(DF)及溃疡的临床特点,为防治糖尿病足提供依据.方法 2 型糖尿病患者按有、无糖尿病足分组,每组各89 例,对其临床资料进行回顾性分析.结果 (1)两组比较,年龄、糖尿病病程、糖化血红蛋白、血清白蛋白、尿素氮、肌酐、胆固醇、吸烟、冠心病、糖尿病周围神经病变、糖尿病外周血管病变、糖尿病肾病等因素差异有统计学意义(P < 0.05);多因素非条件Logistic 回归分析显示,与糖尿病足发病相关的危险因素包括年龄、糖尿病周围神经病变、血清白蛋白、糖尿病肾病,差异有统计学意义(P <0.05);糖尿病病程、糖化血红蛋白、肌酐、吸烟、冠心病、糖尿病外周血管病变使糖尿病足发生的相对危险度增加(OR >1),但差异无统计学意义.(2)DF 以同时合并有周围神经病变和外周血管病变者(76.40%)居多;足溃疡诱因包括烫伤、自发水疱破损、穿鞋摩擦伤等;溃疡以单发(58.43%)居多,合并坏疽者10.11%,部位多在足趾,以干性坏疽居多.足溃疡合并感染以单纯感染居多.溃疡分级以Wagner 分级1 ~2 级者(70.79%)居多,预后较好;Wagner 分级3 ~5 级者,预后不佳.结论 年龄、血清白蛋白水平、糖尿病周围神经病变、糖尿病肾病是糖尿病足发病的独立危险因素.足溃疡以单发、表浅及同时合并有周围神经病变和外周血管病变者多见;合并感染者以单种病原菌感染居多;Wagner 分级越高预后越差.溃疡的诱发因素多与防护不当有关,对糖尿病患者进行足防护知识教育极其重要.%Objective To analyze the clinical characteristics of diahetic foot and ulcers in patients with type 2 diahetes mellitus ( T2DM) . and provide the basis for the prevention and treatment of diabetic foot. Methods Patients with T2DM were grouped according to whether they had diabetic foot . Every group had 89 cases . and their

  8. Contact sensitization to the allergens of European baseline series in patients with chronic leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beliauskienė, Aistė; Valiukevičienė, Skaidra; Sitkauskienė, Brigita; Schnuch, Axel; Uter, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    The pattern of contact sensitization among patients with chronic leg ulcers depends on the local practice of wound treatment along with demographic and clinical confounders. The study was aimed at revealing the associations between chronic leg ulcers and contact sensitization. Between 2006 and 2008, 35 patients with chronic leg ulcers and surrounding dermatitis and 59 patients with contact dermatitis of the lower leg or foot were prospectively recruited at the Department of Skin and Venereal Diseases, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences. Demographic and clinical data were collected in accordance with the "minimal data set" of the European Surveillance System on Contact Allergy. Patch testing was performed with the allergens of the European baseline series. At least one positive patch test reaction was found in 28 (80%) of the patients with chronic leg ulcers and in 24 (41%) of the patients with dermatitis of the lower leg or foot (Pmethyldibromo glutaronitrile, was prevalent in both the groups of patients, whereas sensitization to benzocaine, p-phenylenediamine, and lanolin alcohol was associated with the presence of chronic leg ulcers. Benzocaine was found to be the leading allergen among patients with chronic leg ulcers (positive patch test reactions in 34.4% of the patients). Contact sensitization to benzocaine, p-phenylenediamine, and lanolin was found to be associated with the presence of chronic leg ulcers.

  9. Incidence and risk factors of amputation among 570 patients with diabetic foot ulcer%570例糖尿病足患者截肢率及截肢影响因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪静; 朱虹; 吴文俊; 葛胜洁; 潘晓燕; 谷雪梅; 沈飞霞

    2014-01-01

    目的:了解糖尿病足患者截肢率及截肢影响因素。方法:收集2007年1月至2012年3月住院的糖尿病足患者,比较截肢与非截肢组的临床特征,采用Logistic回归分析截肢的主要影响因素。结果:570例糖尿病足患者中有88例(15.4%)接受截肢手术,截肢组足病病程、血白细胞及中性粒细胞比例、饮酒率、多发溃疡率、创面混合感染率高于非截肢组( P<0.05)。白蛋白、血红蛋白、HDL-C低于非截肢组( P<0.05)。大截肢组创面革兰氏阴性菌比例、多发溃疡率、血白细胞及中性粒细胞比例高于小截肢组,血白蛋白低于小截肢组( P<0.05)。Logistic回归分析发现足背动脉、饮酒、贫血、血白细胞是截肢的危险因素,HDL -C是截肢的保护因素。结论:足背动脉搏动差、饮酒、贫血、感染、低HDL-C是糖尿病足患者截肢的主要影响因素。%Objective ] To evaluate the incidence of amputation among patients with diabetic foot ulcer and risk factors for am-putations .[Method] Inpatients with diabetic foot ulcer were recruited from January 2007 to March 2012 .Clinical character was compared between amputation group and non-amputation group and the critical factors contributing to amputations were ana-lyzed with logistic regression .[Result] 88 patient (15.4% ) underwent amputation .Higher foot ulcer duration, white blood cell counts, neutrophils percentage, rates of alcohol consumption, multiple ulcer and mixed infections and lower plasma albu-min, blood hemoglobin, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol were found in amputation group compared with the non-ampu-tation group ( P<0.05 ) .The major amputation group had higher white blood cell counts, neutrophils percentage, proportion of Gram-negtive bacteria, rate of multiple ulcer and lower plasma albumin than minor amputation group ( P<0.05 ) .Upon lo-gistic regression analysis, dorsal artery of foot, alcohol

  10. 紫草油纱治疗糖尿病足溃疡的临床研究%A Multi-center,Randomized,Double-blind,Placebo-controlled Clinical Studies on the Efficiency of ZICAOYOUSHA in Treating Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚明; 葛晓东

    2013-01-01

    [Objective] To observe the clinical efficacy of ZICAOYOUSHA in treating diabetic foot ulcers.[Method] A multi-center ,randomized,double-blind,placebo-control ed study was conducted. A total of 232 patients with diabetic foot ulcers were randomly assigned the treatment group and control group,in foundation treatment at the same time,the therapy group which was treated by External Application ZICAOYOUSHA had 174 patients,the contrast group which was treated by External Application Gentamicin Emery cloth had 58 patients. Observe the aspect improvement situation in two groups separately in accordance with Wagner grading,carry out statistics processing.[Results] Two groups of curative effect indices had significant differ-ence. [Conclusion] ZICAOYOUSHA is an effective drug for external use in treating diabetic foot ulcers.%  [目的]观察紫草油纱治疗糖尿病足溃疡(diabetic foot ulcers,DFU)的临床疗效。[方法]根据患者就诊顺序依照随机法将232例DFU患者分为治疗组及对照组,在常规治疗基础上,根据溃疡面大小,治疗组选用紫草油纱覆盖溃疡面外加消毒纱布重叠包扎,对照组选用庆大霉素纱条覆盖溃疡面外加消毒纱布重叠包扎,每2d换药1次,观察两组在Wagner分级方面的改善情况。[结果]治疗组、对照组总有效率分别为89.88%、74.07%,两组比较,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。[结论]紫草油纱治疗DFU有良好的疗效。

  11. The Importance of Multidisciplinary Foot-care Services in the Management of Diabetic Patients with Peripheral Artery Disease and Diabetic Foot Ulcers%加强多学科协作团队建设,提高糖尿病周围血管病变与足病的诊治水平

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冉兴无; 赵纪春

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral artery disease and diabetic foot ulcers are leading causes of hospitalization, for patients with diabetes mellitus, and also are the most important causes of amputation of the lower extremity in those patients, which contribute to the increased mortality and cardiovascular death. The incidence of diabetic peripheral artery disease and diabetic foot ulcers shows increasing trend. Diabetic peripheral artery disease and diabetic foot ulcers can be successfully treated only by the multidisciplinary foot-care services which provide more comprehensive and integrated care as compared to ordinary medical team or single specialist. Multidisciplinary foot-care services are provided by the team consist of: diabetologist, diabetes nurse, vascular surgeon, general surgeon, orthopedist, orthopaedic surgeon, podiatrist and orthotist, interventional radiologist and a radiology coordinator, microbiologist, psychologist, educators, shoemaker and rehabilitation team. Contrary to developed countries, multidisciplinary foot-care team has not been constructed in most centres in China. Diabetic education, appropriate foot care, early detection of risk factors of foot ulcers and early intervention are key components in the overall management of diabetic foot disorders and have assumed important roles in programs focused on amputation prevention. Prompt and aggressive treatments of diabetic peripheral artery disease and diabetic foot ulcers can often prevent an exacerbation of the problem and the potential need for amputation, which include correction of biomechanical abnormalities, infection control, serial debridement of ulcers, peripheral revascularization and wound coverage, etc. It is very important to construct a multidisciplinary diabetic foot care team to more effectively improve the survival and prognosis of patients with diabetic peripheral artery disease and diabetic foot ulcers with comprehensive treatments.%糖尿病下肢血管病变与糖尿病足溃疡

  12. Surgical outcomes for perforated peptic ulcer: A prospective case series at an academic hospital in Monrovia, Liberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fallah Moses

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: Peptic ulcer disease and its treatment represent a potentially substantial source of morbidity and mortality in limited-resource settings. In this case series, surgical treatment for perforated peptic ulcer disease carried a high mortality, and the results highlight the potential for public health systems strengthening to prevent poor health outcomes. Peptic ulcer disease in low- and middle-income countries presents unique epidemiology and treatment challenges that may differ significantly from evidence-based guidelines in high-income countries.

  13. The neuropathic diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathur, Haris M; Boulton, Andrew J M

    2007-01-01

    Diabetic foot problems are common throughout the world, and result in major medical, social and economic consequences for the patients, their families, and society. Foot ulcers are likely to be of neuropathic origin and, therefore, are eminently preventable. Individuals with the greatest risk of ulceration can easily be identified by careful clinical examination of their feet: education and frequent follow-up is indicated for these patients. When infection complicates a foot ulcer, the combination can be limb-threatening, or life-threatening. Infection is defined clinically, but wound cultures assist in identification of causative pathogens. Tissue specimens are strongly preferred to wound swabs for wound cultures. Antimicrobial therapy should be guided by culture results, and although such therapy may cure the infection, it does not heal the wound. Alleviation of the mechanical load on ulcers (offloading) should always be a part of treatment. Plantar neuropathic ulcers typically heal in 6 weeks with nonremovable casts, because pressure at the ulcer site is mitigated and compliance is enforced. The success of other approaches to offloading similarly depends on the patient's adherence to the strategy used for pressure relief.

  14. The diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathur, Haris M; Boulton, Andrew J M

    2007-01-01

    Diabetic foot problems are common throughout the world, resulting in major medical, social and economic consequences for the patients, their families, and society. Foot ulcers are more likely to be of neuropathic origin, and therefore eminently preventable. People at greatest risk of ulceration can easily be identified by careful clinical examination of the feet: education and frequent follow-up is indicated for these patients. When infection complicates a foot ulcer, the combination can be limb or life-threatening. Infection is defined clinically, but wound cultures assist in identifying the causative pathogens. Tissue specimens are strongly preferred to wound swabs for wound cultures. Antimicrobial therapy should be guided by culture results, and although such therapy may cure the infection, it does not heal the wound. Alleviation of the mechanical load on ulcers (offloading) should always be a part of treatment. Plantar neuropathic ulcers typically heal in 6 weeks with irremovable casting, because pressure at the ulcer site is mitigated and compliance is enforced. The success of other approaches to offloading similarly depends on the patients' adherence to the effectiveness of pressure relief.

  15. Prevention of recurrent foot ulcers with plantar pressure-based in-shoe orthoses: the CareFUL prevention multicenter randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrecht, Jan S; Hurley, Timothy; Mauger, David T; Cavanagh, Peter R

    2014-07-01

    To assess the efficacy of in-shoe orthoses that were designed based on shape and barefoot plantar pressure in reducing the incidence of submetatarsal head plantar ulcers in people with diabetes, peripheral neuropathy, and a history of similar prior ulceration. Single-blinded multicenter randomized controlled trial with subjects randomized to wear shape- and pressure-based orthoses (experimental, n = 66) or standard-of-care A5513 orthoses (control, n = 64). Patients were followed for 15 months, until a study end point (forefoot plantar ulcer or nonulcerative plantar forefoot lesion) or to study termination. Proportional hazards regression was used for analysis. There was a trend in the composite primary end point (both ulcers and nonulcerative lesions) across the full follow-up period (P = 0.13) in favor of the experimental orthoses. This trend was due to a marked difference in ulcer occurrence (P = 0.007) but no difference in the rate of nonulcerative lesions (P = 0.76). At 180 days, the ulcer prevention effect of the experimental orthoses was already significant (P = 0.003) when compared with control, and the benefit of the experimental orthoses with respect to the composite end point was also significant (P = 0.042). The hazard ratio was 3.4 (95% CI 1.3-8.7) for the occurrence of a submetatarsal head plantar ulcer in the control compared with experimental arm over the duration of the study. We conclude that shape- and barefoot plantar pressure-based orthoses were more effective in reducing submetatarsal head plantar ulcer recurrence than current standard-of-care orthoses, but they did not significantly reduce nonulcerative lesions. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association.

  16. The prevalence and incidence of pressure ulcers in hospitalised patients in the Netherlands: a prospective inception cohort study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonhoven, L.; Bousema, M.T.; Buskens, E.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pressure ulcers frequently occur in hospitalised patients. The prevalence of pressure ulcers grade 2 or worse varies from 3% to 12% in hospitalised patients. Incidence figures are not frequently reported. While incidence and prevalence are both measures of disease frequency, they provide

  17. Frequency and risk factors of gastric and duodenal ulcers or erosions in children: a prospective 1-month European multicenter study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalach, Nicolas; Bontems, Patrick; Koletzko, Sibylle;

    2010-01-01

    There are no solid figures of the frequency of ulcer disease during childhood in Europe. We assessed its frequency and analyzed known risk factors.......There are no solid figures of the frequency of ulcer disease during childhood in Europe. We assessed its frequency and analyzed known risk factors....

  18. Frequency and risk factors of gastric and duodenal ulcers or erosions in children: a prospective 1-month European multicenter study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalach, Nicolas; Bontems, Patrick; Koletzko, Sibylle

    2010-01-01

    There are no solid figures of the frequency of ulcer disease during childhood in Europe. We assessed its frequency and analyzed known risk factors.......There are no solid figures of the frequency of ulcer disease during childhood in Europe. We assessed its frequency and analyzed known risk factors....

  19. 糖尿病足溃疡患者并发抑郁症临床分析%The prevalence and risk factors of depression in patients with diabetes foot ulcer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王海燕; 刘文丽; 卢静

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the prevalence of depression in diabetes foot ulcer patients , and to an-alyze the correlation between depression morbidity and various factors such as age , HbA1c level, and quality of life etc.Methods 73 diabetes foot ulcer patients admitted from Sep .2012 to Sep.2014 were enrolled.Depres-sion was assessed using the 9-item patient health questionnaire (PHQ-9).Data such as the age, sex, duration of diabetes and foot ulcer , HbA1C level, smoking were recorded .The severity of foot ulcer was evaluated by Wagner's classification.The quality of life was scored by short form(SF-36)health survey questionnaire.Results The morbidity of depression in diabetes foot ulcer patients was 49.3%in total and 17.8% in the moderate to severe depression group .The prevalence in patients with HbA 1c≥7.0%was significantly higher than that in pa-tients with HbA1c0.05).Conclusions This study shows a high prevalence of depression symptom in diabetes foot ulcer pa -tients.Depression is associated with HbA1c level, the extent and duration of foot ulcer .%目的:探讨糖尿病足溃疡患者抑郁症发病情况及其与年龄、糖化血红蛋白水平、溃疡严重程度及持续时间、患者生存质量等因素的相关性。方法收集2012年9月至2014年9月淄博市第一医院门诊接收的糖尿病足溃疡患者73例。采用健康问卷抑郁分表( PHQ-9)评估患者抑郁情况及严重程度。记录患者的性别、年龄,糖尿病病程、糖化血红蛋白( HbA1 c )水平、糖尿病足溃疡持续时间、吸烟史等。wagner分级判断患者糖尿病足溃疡的严重程度, SF-36健康调查简表评价患者生存质量。结果根据PHQ评分,入组患者总抑郁症发病率49.3%,中重度抑郁发病率17.8%。 HbA1c≥7.0%者抑郁发病率(66.7%)较HbA1c<7.0%者(35%)明显升高(P<0.01),中重度抑郁患者较轻度抑郁患者HbA1c不达标比率更高(P<0.01)。 wagner分级1

  20. Risk Factors of Diabetic Foot Ulcer and Clinical Significance of its Preventive Testing%糖尿病足溃疡的危险因素及预防性检查的临床意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李鸿燕; 赵萍; 安欣儒

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the risk factors and clinical values of preventive testing for diabetic foot ulcer, and to provide evidences for the clinical practice. Methods Fifty patients with diabetes mellitus hospitalized in the Affiliated Hospital of Hebei University from October 2009 to October 2012 were selected to serve as the research objects. They were divided into diabetic foot group and non - diabetic foot group (each n= 25). 20 physical examinees were simultaneously chosen as controls. The coagulation indexes, lower limb EMG and ultrasound results of all objects were observed. Results The diabetes patients' peripheral vascular disease, peripheral neuropathy and the changes of foot biomechanics were all risk factors for diabetic foot ulcers. The prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), fibrinogen (FIB) of diabetes patients were all significantly increased, there were statistically significant differences in above indicators between diabetes patients and healthy controls (P<0.05) as well as between diabetic foot group and non-diabetic foot group (P<0.05). The abnormal proportions of lower limb electromyography and ultrasound in diabetic foot patients were 84. 0% and 92.0% , respectively, which were both significantly higher than those of other two groups, and the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). Conclusions Peripheral vascular disease, peripheral neuropathy and changes in foot biomechanics are risk factors for occurring foot ulcer in diabetic patients. The coagulation indexes, lower limb EMG and ultrasound results show clinical values in the diagnosis and treatment of diabetic foot ulcer, which can be used as the preventive examination items.%目的 分析糖尿病足溃疡的危险因素及预防性检查的临床情况,为临床工作提供参考依据.方法 选择河北大学附属医院2009年10月-2012年10月收治的糖尿病患者50例作为研究对象,其中糖尿病足及非糖尿病足者各25

  1. Comprehensive treatment of complicated plantar ulcers in leprosy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Liangbin 严良斌; ZHANG Guocheng 张国成; ZHENG Zhiju 郑志菊; LI Wenzhong 李文忠; ZHENG Tisheng 郑逖生; Jean M. Watson; Angelika Piefer

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate feasible treatment methods for plantar ulcers in leprosy patients according to the agreement between the Ministry of Health (MOH) of China and the Leprosy Mission International (LMI).Methods A total of 2599 complicated foot ulcers in 1804 leprosy cases underwent surgic treatment. Plastic fixation and supports were used, dressings were changed regularly, and protective footwear and modified insoles were provided.Results Of the 2599 foot ulcers 1446 (55.64%) healed. The cure rate of the patients treated in leprosy hospitals was 71.31%, with 219 (15.15%) recurrences of foot ulcers. The recurrence rate of those who lived at home was 18.35%.Conclusions Comprehensive treatment of foot ulcers has a high cure rate and a low recurrence rate. Reduction of workload, avoidance of long distance walking, intensification of education on foot self-care and provision of financial support are the main measures for preventing a recurrence of foot ulcers.

  2. A prospective, randomized, multisite clinical evaluation of a transparent absorbent acrylic dressing and a hydrocolloid dressing in the management of Stage II and shallow Stage III pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown-Etris, Marie; Milne, Catherine; Orsted, Heather; Gates, Judy L; Netsch, Debra; Punchello, Marion; Couture, Nancy; Albert, Martine; Attrell, Edie; Freyberg, Julie

    2008-04-01

    To compare clinical performance of a transparent absorbent acrylic dressing (3M Tegaderm Absorbent Clear Acrylic Dressing ]TAAD[; 3M Company, St Paul, MN) and a hydrocolloid dressing (HD ]DuoDERM CGF, ConvaTec, ER Squibb & Sons, Princeton, NJ[) in the management of Stage II and shallow Stage III pressure ulcers. Prospective, open-label, randomized, comparative, multisite clinical evaluation. Patients were followed up for a maximum of 56 days or until their ulcer healed. At weekly intervals, investigators conducted wound assessments and dressing performance evaluations. Wound care clinics, home care, and long-term care. Thirty-five patients received the TAAD, and 37 received the HD. Dressing performance assessments, patient comfort, dressing wear time, and wound healing were measured. The majority of investigator assessments favored the TAAD. Considerations given included the ability to center dressings over the ulcer (P = .005), ability to assess the ulcer before (P < .001) and after (P < .001) absorption, barrier properties (P = .039), patient comfort during removal (P < .001), overall patient comfort (P = .048), conformability before (P = .026) and after (P = .001) absorption, ease of removal (P < .001), nonadherence to wound bed (P < .001), residue in the wound (P = .002), residue on periwound skin (P < .001), and odor after absorption (P = .016). Overall satisfaction favored the TAAD (P < .001), and a high value was placed on its transparent feature (P < .001). Mean (SD) wear time for the TAAD was 5.7 (2.55) days compared with 4.7 (2.29) days for the HD (P = .086). This 1-day difference in wear time was clinically noticeable by the investigators (P = .035). Wound closure for the 2 dressing groups was nearly identical (P = .9627). Performance results favored the TAAD over the HD as standard treatment for Stage II and shallow Stage III pressure ulcers.

  3. A Prospective, Descriptive Study to Determine the Rate and Characteristics of and Risk Factors for the Development of Medical Device-related Pressure Ulcers in Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanonu, Seval; Karadag, Ayise

    2016-02-01

    Pressure ulcers do not develop only in areas with bony prominences; they can develop in any tissue under pressure, including pressure exerted by medical devices. A prospective, descriptive study was conducted from December 15, 2013 to March 25, 2014 to determine the prevalence, risk factors, and characteristics of medical device-related hospitalacquired pressure ulcers (MDR HAPUs) among all patients (N = 175) in 5 adult intensive care units (ICUs) in a university hospital in Turkey. The previously established point prevalence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPUs) in these ICUs was 15%. Patients were evaluated in the first 24 hours after admission and observed 6 times thereafter in intervals of 48 hours. Demographic (eg, age, gender, body mass index) and medical device-related pressure ulcer data (eg, location, device type, stage), and Braden Scale scores were collected and analyzed; frequencies and percentages were calculated and Mann-Whitney U Test, t-test, and odds ratios were applied. Twenty-seven (27) patients (15.4%) developed nonMDR HAPUs and 70 (40.0%) developed MDR HAPUs. MDR HAPUs occurred most frequently (45.0%) in patients with an endotracheal tube. The most frequent type (42.6%) was Stage II. The highest rates of MDR HAPUs were observed among internal medicine ICU patients (OR 7.041), patients who also had a nonMDR HAPU (OR 6.6), patients in the high Braden risk score group (OR 1.8), or patients who received enteral feeding (OR 2.12). Because of the high rate of MDR HAPUs noted, policies and procedures aimed at preventing medical device-related pressure ulcers are needed.

  4. Priorities in offloading the diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bus, Sicco A

    2012-02-01

    Biomechanical factors play an important role in diabetic foot disease. Reducing high foot pressures (i.e. offloading) is one of the main goals in healing and preventing foot ulceration. Evidence-based guidelines show the strong association between the efficacy to offload the foot and clinical outcome. However, several aspects related to offloading are underexposed. First, in the management of foot complications, offloading is mostly studied as a single entity, whereas it should be analysed in a broader perspective of contributing factors to better predict clinical outcome. This includes assessment of patient behavioural factors such as type and intensity of daily physical activity and adherence to prescribed treatment. Second, a large gap exists between evidence-based recommendations and clinical practice in the use of offloading for ulcer treatment, and this gap needs to be bridged. Possible ways to achieve this are discussed in this article. Third, our knowledge about the efficacy and role of offloading in treating complicated and non-plantar neuropathic foot ulcers needs to be expanded because these ulcers currently dominate presentation in multidisciplinary foot practice. Finally, foot ulcer prevention is underexposed when compared with ulcer treatment. Prevention requires a larger focus, in particular regarding the efficacy of therapeutic footwear and its relative role in comparison with other preventative strategies. These priorities need the attention of clinicians, scientists and professional societies to improve our understanding of offloading and to improve clinical outcome in the management of the diabetic foot.

  5. Prospective, Descriptive Study of Critically Colonized Venous Leg Ulcers Managed With Silver Containing Absorbent Dressings and Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Michael F

    2013-08-01

    Chronic non-healing venous ulcers are by their very nature colonized with bacteria. The amount and make up will vary based on many variables. The transition from colonization to contamination, critical colonization, and infection complicates the treatment of these ulcers. Silver has been shown to be an effective antimicrobial agent with a diverse antimicrobial footprint, minimal allergic reactions, and has been employed for over twenty-five years with little resistance being encountered. Based on these factors, this study was initiated to evaluate the impact of silver containing absorbent dressings on critically colonized venous leg ulcers.

  6. [Operative treatment of diabetic foot].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintermann, B

    1999-07-08

    The majority of diabetic foot ulcers are the results of repetitive pressure that exceeds the threshold of soft-tissue tolerance, leading to mechanical destruction of the tissue. Progression of plantar ulcers can rapidly lead to osteomyelitis that may result in loss of the foot through amputation. In order to prevent such a disaster, surgical treatment should be taken into consideration when conservative treatment remains without success. The goal of surgical treatment of an infected ulcer is debridement of the soft-tissue and removal of the underlying pressure by careful bone resection or correction of a deformity by arthrodesis. Various authors have recently reported successful surgical reconstruction of neuroarthropathic foot deformity and instability. Apparently arthrodesis is a viable alternative to amputation for patients with unstable deformity or recurrent ulceration. Proper preoperative evaluation is mandatory. The indications are not well defined yet.

  7. 糖尿病足溃疡感染的踝肱指数评价和抗菌药物治疗%Infected diabetic foot ulcers ankle-brachial index evaluation and antibiotic therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈菊萍; 罗晓红; 周琳; 杨玲; 郑超

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨踝肱指数(ABI)对糖尿病足溃疡感染的评价作用,总结抗菌药物效果,以期提高临床治疗水平。方法选取2010年4月至2013年4月85例糖尿病足溃疡感染患者为研究对象,通过多普勒血流探测仪观察患者在足背动脉、胫后动脉和肱动脉的血压值,并结合血压水平计算出ABI值,ABI≤0.9为降低组,ABI 0.9~1.4为正常组,比较两组在血压等方面变化情况,并观察感染程度和预后相关指标情况。结果两组在冠心病、脑血管病和周围血管病变一般合并疾病、BMI、SBP、DBP、HbA1c、TC、TG、HDL‐C、LDL‐C、病程上比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);且糖尿病足溃疡感染随着病情的加重,在住院天数、治疗费用、愈合时间、愈合情况、截肢和死亡例数上变化也逐渐升高,呈正相关。结论 ABI可作为糖尿病足溃疡感染的前兆,早期抗菌药物治疗预后较为理想。%Objective To investigate the ankle‐brachial index (ABI) infected diabetic foot ulcers evaluation role ,summed up the effect of antimicrobial drugs in order to improve the level of clinical treatment .Methods April 2010 April 2013 85 cases of infected diabetic foot ulcers in patients for the study ,observed by Doppler flow detector in patients with dorsal artery ,posterior tibial artery and brachial artery blood pressure values ,combined with ABI blood pressure levels calculated value ,ABIc0 .9 reduce group ,ABI 0 .9 -1 .4 for the control group were compared changes in blood pressure ,etc .,and to observe the extent of infection and prognostic indicators .Results The two groups in coronary heart disease ,cerebrovascular disease and peripheral vascular disease in general comorbidities in BMI ,SBP ,DBP ,HbA1c ,TC ,TG ,HDL‐C ,LDL‐C ,are more significant differences (P<0 .05 ) ;diabetic foot ulcers and infection as the disease worsens ,the number of days of hospitalization ,cost of

  8. Comprehensive ozone treatment and nursing of patients with infected diabetic foot ulcer%糖尿病感染性足溃疡的臭氧综合治疗及护理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁婵波; 黄健宁

    2010-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of comprehensive ozone treatment and nursing of patients with infected diabetic foot ulcer.Methods Forty eight patients of T2DM with infected diabetic foot ulcer were randomly divided into two groups,23 cases of experimental group and 25 cases of control group.Experimental group was given comprehensive ozone treatment and nursing while control group WKS given rutine therapy and conventional care only.Comprehensive ozone treatment and nursing were given to the experimental group once per day,10 days as a course,and repeated 2-4 courses due to the condictions of foot ulcer.Results Experimental group WaS significantly higher (P<0.05) in cure rate with 60.9% versus 32.0% in control group,and was very significantly higher (P<0.01) in total effective rate with 95.7% versus 60% in control group.Conclusions Rutine therapy and conventional care plus comprehensive ozone treatment and nursing of patients with infected diabetic foot ulcer can effectively improve both care rate and total effective rote.%目的 探讨常规治疗加臭氧(O3)综合治疗、护理方式(臭氧气浴配合使用臭氧化橄榄油等)治疗糖尿病感染性足溃疡的疗效.方法 将2型糖尿病感染性足溃疡患者48例,随机分为实验组23例和对照组25例,两组均行常规治疗和常规护理;实验组还进行臭氧(O3)综合治疗及护理.结果 对照组治愈8例,显效7例,无效2例其中截趾1例,治愈率32.0%,总有效率60%;实验组治愈14例,显效8例,无效3例其中截趾1例,治愈率60.9%,总有效率95.7%,与对照组比较,实验组治愈率、总有效率更高,差异有统计学意义(P值分别为P=0.045,P=0.003).结论 常规治疗加臭氧(O3)综合治疗、护理方式(臭氧气浴配合使用臭氧化橄榄油等)治疗糖尿病感染性足溃疡有效提高治愈率和总有效率.

  9. Retraction statement: Manuka honey vs. hydrogel - a prospective, open label, multicentre, randomised controlled trial to compare desloughing efficacy and healing outcomes in venous ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The following article from Journal of Clinical Nursing, 'Manuka honey vs. hydrogel - a prospective, open label, multicentre, randomised controlled trial to compare desloughing efficacy and healing outcomes in venous ulcers' by Georgina Gethin and Seamus Cowman published online on 25 August 2008 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com) and in Volume 18, pp. 466-474, has been retracted by agreement between the journal Editor-in-Chief, the authors and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. The retraction has been agreed due to errors in the data analysis which affect the article's findings.

  10. Comorbidities associated with Egyptian diabetic foot disease subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary N. Rizk

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion Special attention should be paid toward the identification of patients who are at risk of foot ulceration to help prevent foot problems. Comorbid conditions must also be identified early and managed aggressively.

  11. A Descriptive Study Of Foot Complications In Diabetic Patients With ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Symptomatic peripheral neuropathy in a diabetic patient may be associated with the ... skin and fungal infections were the most frequent lesions seen in diabetic ... Foot complications other than foot ulcers may occur in diabetic patients with ...

  12. Surgical treatment for diabetic foot ulcers%糖尿病足溃疡外科修复的临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王灿; 果磊; 李晶; 蒲晓姝; 汪正燕; 李茂华

    2013-01-01

    目的 分析总结糖尿病足(diabeticfoot,DF)溃疡外科修复的临床治疗经验.方法 回顾性分析2010年1月至2012年12月重庆医科大学附属第一医院烧伤整形外科收治的85例(108条患肢)DF患者的临床资料.结果 ①85例中DF创面培养结果:共培养出142株细菌,7例真菌感染,感染以金黄色葡萄球菌、大肠埃希菌、凝固酶阴性葡萄球菌、肠球菌、铜绿假单胞菌、鲍曼不动杆菌为主.②DF的愈合情况与Wagner分级呈负相关性:分级越高,一期愈合越低,截趾(肢)率及二期或多期愈合越高,愈合时间及平均住院时间越长.③对85例DF患者行手术治疗,植皮术为45例(52.9%),皮瓣修复8例(9.4%),皮瓣修复+植皮术为7例,28例截趾(肢)术,扩创后直接缝合2例.经1次或多次手术治疗后创面全部愈合,随访10 d~2个月溃疡无复发,修复部位无迟发感染,外形及负重行走功能良好.结论 DF的治疗需要遵循多学科合作、专业化治疗、全身治疗与局部治疗的原则.需要重视病因、积极预防、加强创面床准备,选择最佳治疗方案,早期手术,才能促进创面愈合.%Objective To get the experience of surgical treatment for diabetic foot (DF) ulcer.Methods Clinical data of 85 patiems (108 limbs in total) admitted in Department of Bum and Plastic Surgery in The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University from Jan 2010 to Dec 2012 were retrospectively analyzed.Results Wound culture results of the 85 patients were:bacteria in 142 limbs,and fungi in 7 limbs.The main bacteria cultured were staphylococcus aureus,escherichia coli,coagulase negative staphylococcus,enterococcus,pseudomonas aeruginosa,and acinetobacter baumannii.DF healing and Wagner classification was negatively correlated:the higher the class,the less the primary healing rate.The higher amputation rate were found in the higher class patients.The more delayed healing,and the longer the healing time and average

  13. Mortality from nonulcer bleeding is similar to that of ulcer bleeding in high-risk patients with nonvariceal hemorrhage: a prospective database study in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmo, Riccardo; Del Piano, Mario; Rotondano, Gianluca; Koch, Maurizio; Bianco, Maria Antonia; Zambelli, Alessandro; Di Matteo, Giovanni; Grossi, Enzo; Cipolletta, Livio; Prometeo Investigators

    2012-02-01

    Nonulcer causes of bleeding are often regarded as minor, ie, associated with a lower risk of mortality. To assess the risk of death from nonulcer causes of upper GI bleeding (UGIB). Secondary analysis of prospectively collected data from 3 national databases. Community and teaching hospitals. Consecutive patients admitted for acute nonvariceal UGIB. Early endoscopy, medical and endoscopic treatment as appropriate. Thirty-day mortality, recurrent bleeding, and need for surgery. A total of 3207 patients (65.8% male), mean (standard deviation) age 68.3 (16.4) years, were analyzed. Overall mortality was 4.45% (143 patients). According to the source of bleeding, mortality was 9.8% for neoplasia, 4.8% for Mallory-Weiss tears, 4.8% for vascular lesions, 4.4% for gastroduodenal erosions, 4.4% for duodenal ulcer, and 3.1% for gastric ulcer. Frequency of death was not different among benign endoscopic diagnoses (overall P = .567). Risk of death was significantly higher in patients with neoplasia compared with benign conditions (odds ratio 2.50; 95% CI, 1.32-4.46; P bleeding peptic ulcers in the clinical context of a high-risk patient. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Staphylococcus aureus small colony variants in diabetic foot infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes-García, Estrella; García-Gonzalez, Rafael; Reyes-Torres, Angélica; Resendiz-Albor, Aldo Arturo; Salazar-Schettino, Paz María

    2015-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is one of the major pathogens causing chronic infections. The ability of S. aureus to acquire resistance to a diverse range of antimicrobial compounds results in limited treatment options, particularly in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). A mechanism by which S. aureus develops reduced susceptibility to antimicrobials is through the formation of small colony variants (SCVs). Infections by SCVs of S. aureus are an upcoming problem due to difficulties in laboratory diagnosis and resistance to antimicrobial therapy. Methods A prospective study was performed on 120 patients diagnosed with both type 2 diabetes mellitus and infected diabetic foot ulcers. The study was carried out from July 2012 to December 2013 in Hospital General de Mexico. The samples were cultured in blood agar, mannitol salt agar, and MacConkey agar media, and incubated at 37°C in aerobic conditions. Results We describe the first known cases of diabetic foot infections caused by MRSA-SCVs in patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus and infected diabetic foot ulcers. In all of our cases, the patients had not received any form of gentamicin therapy. Conclusions The antibiotic therapy commonly used in diabetic patients with infected diabetic foot ulcers fails in the case of MRSA-SCVs because the intracellular location protects S. aureus-SCVs from the host's defenses and also helps them resist antibiotics. The cases studied in this article add to the spectrum of persistent and relapsing infections attributed to MRSA-SCVs and emphasizes that these variants may also play a relevant role in diabetic foot infections. PMID:25787018

  15. Staphylococcus aureus small colony variants in diabetic foot infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estrella Cervantes-García

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus is one of the major pathogens causing chronic infections. The ability of S. aureus to acquire resistance to a diverse range of antimicrobial compounds results in limited treatment options, particularly in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA. A mechanism by which S. aureus develops reduced susceptibility to antimicrobials is through the formation of small colony variants (SCVs. Infections by SCVs of S. aureus are an upcoming problem due to difficulties in laboratory diagnosis and resistance to antimicrobial therapy. Methods: A prospective study was performed on 120 patients diagnosed with both type 2 diabetes mellitus and infected diabetic foot ulcers. The study was carried out from July 2012 to December 2013 in Hospital General de Mexico. The samples were cultured in blood agar, mannitol salt agar, and MacConkey agar media, and incubated at 37°C in aerobic conditions. Results: We describe the first known cases of diabetic foot infections caused by MRSA-SCVs in patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus and infected diabetic foot ulcers. In all of our cases, the patients had not received any form of gentamicin therapy. Conclusions: The antibiotic therapy commonly used in diabetic patients with infected diabetic foot ulcers fails in the case of MRSA-SCVs because the intracellular location protects S. aureus-SCVs from the host's defenses and also helps them resist antibiotics. The cases studied in this article add to the spectrum of persistent and relapsing infections attributed to MRSA-SCVs and emphasizes that these variants may also play a relevant role in diabetic foot infections.

  16. [Minor foot amputations in diabetic foot syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biehl, C; Eckhard, M; Szalay, G; Heiss, C

    2016-10-01

    The treatment strategy for diabetic foot syndrome must take into account protective sensibility of the foot, open wounds, infection status, and the rules of septic bone surgery. Interventions are classified as elective, prophylactic, curative, or emergency. Amputations in the forefoot and midfoot region are performed as ray amputations (including metatarsal), which can often be carried out as "inner" amputations. Gentle tissue treatment mandatory because of greater risk of revision with re-amputation compared to classical amputation. Good demarcation of infection, acute osteomyelitis, osteolytic lesions, neurotropic ulcer, arterial and venous blood flow to the other toes, gangrene of other toes with metatarsal affection. Arterial occlusive disease, infection of neighboring areas, avoidable amputations, poorly healing ulcers on the lower leg. Primary dorsal approach; minimal incisional distance (5 cm) to minimize skin necrosis risk. Atraumatic preparation, minimize hemostasis to not compromise the borderline perfusion situation. In amputations, plantar skin preparation and longer seams placed as dorsal as possible, either disarticulated and maintain cartilage, or round the cortical metatarsal bone after resection. Diabetes control. Braun splint, mobilization in a shoe with forefoot decompression and hindfoot support, physiotherapy. Antibiotics based on resistance testing. If no complications, dressing change on postoperative day 1. Optimal wound drainage by lowering foot several times a day; drainage removal after 12-24 h. Insoles and footwear optimization. Amputations require continued attention and if necessary treatment to avoid sequelae. Insufficient treatment associated with recurrent ulceration and altered anatomy.

  17. BACTERIAL FLORA IN DIABETIC ULCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anitha Lavanya

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Diabetic foot infections are one of the most feared complications of diabetes. This study was undertaken to determine the common etiological agents of diabetic foot infections and their in vitro antibiotic susceptibility. METHODS : A prospective study was p erformed over a period of two years in a tertiary care hospital. The aerobic and anaerobic bacterial agents were isolated and their antibiotic susceptibility pattern was determined . RESULTS : One hundred patients with Diabetic ulcer were studied, of which 6 5 were males and 35 were females. Majority of patients were in the age group of 51 to 60 years (37% and polymicrobial etiology was 64 % and monomicrobial etiology was 36%. A total of 187 organisms were isolated of which 165 were aerobic and 22 were anaero bic. Most frequently isolated aerobic organisms were Pseudomonas Sp., Klebsiella Sp., E coli Sp., and Staphylococcus aureus. The common anaerobic organisms isolated were Peptostreptococcus Sp. And Bacterioids Sp. CONCLUSION : High prevalence of multi - drug r esistant pathogens was observed. Amikacin, Imipenem were active against gram - negative bacilli, while vancomycin was found to be active against gram - positive bacteria.

  18. Detection of Escherichia coli and Associated β-Lactamases Genes from Diabetic Foot Ulcers by Multiplex PCR and Molecular Modeling and Docking of SHV-1, TEM-1, and OXA-1 β-Lactamases with Clindamycin and Piperacillin-Tazobactam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, Shailesh K.; Singh, Vinay K.; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) is a common and devastating complication in diabetes. Antimicrobial resistance mediated by extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) production by bacteria is considered to be a major threat for foot amputation. The present study deals with the detection of Escherichia coli and the prevalence of blaTEM, blaSHV and blaOXA genes directly from biopsy and swab of foot ulcers of diabetic patients. In total, 116 DFU patients were screened, of which 42 suffering with severe DFUs were selected for this study. Altogether 16 E. coli strains were successfully isolated from biopsy and/or swab samples of 15 (35.71%) patients. ESBL production was noted in 12 (75%) strains. Amplification of β-lactamase genes by multiplex PCR showed the presence of blaCTX-M like genes in 10 strains, blaTEM and blaOXA in 9 strains each, and blaSHV in 8 of the total 16 strains of E. coli. Out of the ten antibiotics tested, E. coli strains were found to be resistant to ampicillin (75%), cefoxitin (56.25%), cefazolin (50%), meropenem (37.5%), cefoperazone (25%), cefepime (31.25%), ceftazidime (56.25%), and cefotaxime (68.75%) but all showed sensitivity (100%) to clindamycin and piperacillin-tazobactam. 3D models of the most prevalent variants of β-lactamases namely TEM-1, SHV-1, OXA-1, and ESBL namely CTX-M-15 were predicted and docking was performed with clindamycin and piperacillin-tazobactam to reveal the molecular basis of drug sensitivity. Docking showed the best docking score with significant interactions, forming hydrogen bond, Van der Waals and polar level interaction with active site residues. Findings of the present study may provide useful insights for the development of new antibiotic drugs and may also prevent ESBLs-mediated resistance problem in DFU. The novel multiplex PCR assay designed in this study may be routinely used in clinical diagnostics of E. coli and associated blaTEM, blaSHV, and blaOXA like genes. PMID:23861873

  19. 糖尿病足溃疡不同程度感染的影响因素分析%Influencing factors for varying degrees of infections in patients with diabetic foot ulcers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阚全娥; 杨慧慧; 李全忠

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨不同程度糖尿病足溃疡感染的影响因素,制定治疗对策,降低感染率。方法选取2013年6月-2014年3月收治的糖尿病足溃疡患者共172例,根据患者的糖尿病足感染程度分为4组:无感染为1组43例,轻度感染为2组66例,中度感染为3组32例,重度感染为4组31例;4组数据结果采用SPSS17.0进行统计分析。结果感染程度低的患者愈合时间短,1~4组愈合时间分别为(17±3.4)、(31±2.9)、(65±11)、(92±21) d;感染程度低的患者住院时间短,1~4组住院时间分别为(22±2.5)、(36±5.1)、(72±9.2)、(98±11)d;而随着感染程度的增加,其愈合率出现明显下降,患者的致残率高达23.3%,病死率为35.5%。结论影响糖尿病足溃疡预后与感染程度相关,感染程度越严重其预后质量越差,溃疡严重程度Wagner评级增加趋势与感染严重程度增加趋势相一致,两者之间有相关性。%OBJECTIVE To explore the influencing factors for varying degrees of infections in patients with diabetic foot ulcers and put forward treatment countermeasures so as to reduce the infection rate .METHODS A total of 172 patients with diabetic foot ulcers who were treated in the hospital from Jun 2013 to Mar 2014 were enrolled in the study and divided into four groups according to the degree of diabetic foot ulcers :the non‐infection group with 43 cases ,the mild infection group with 66 cases ,the moderate infection group with 32 cases ,and the severe infection group with 31 cases;the data of the four groups were statistically analyzed by using SPSS 17 .0 software . RESULTS The lower the degree of the infection ,the shorter the healing time was ;the healing time was (17 ± 3 .4) days in the non‐infection group ,(31 ± 2 .9) days in the mild infection group ,(65 ± 11)days in the moderate infec‐tion group ,(92 ± 21)days in the severe infection group

  20. Depression impacts prognosis of the patients with Wagner grades 3 diabetic foot ulcers%抑郁情绪对Wagner3级糖尿病足溃疡住院患者预后的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘倩; 李代清; 柳雷; 孙茜; 杨蔚; 张达; 褚月颉; 王鹏华

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of depression on prognosis of Wagner grade 3 diabetic foot ulcer patients by a psychological assessment.Methods One hundred and sixty-eight patients suffered from Wagner grade 3 diabetic foot ulcers hospitalized in the Tianjin Metabolic Diseases Hospital from June 2010 to May 2011 were included in the study.Their psychological disorders were evaluated by a self-rating depression scale (SDS) to identify depression.Patients complicated with depression or not were divided into two groups accordingly.Unhealing rate and amputation risk of the patients in the two groups were compared using Chi-square test and logistic regression,respectively.Results Ninety-five out of 168 patients (56.5%) were identified as depression and the others (73 out of 168,43.5%) were not.The unhealing rate of the patients complicated with depression was significantly higher than that of the patients without depression analyzed by Chi-square test (18.9% and 6.8% respectively,OR =2.779,95% CI:1.120-9.023).Logistic regression analysis indicated that depression was a risk factor of unhealed ulcers