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Sample records for folding interaction potential

  1. Accuracy of simple folding model in the calculation of the direct part of real − interaction potential

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keshab C Panda; Binod C Sahu; Jhasaketan Bhoi

    2014-05-01

    The direct part of real − interaction potential is calculated in the simple folding model using density-dependent Brink–Boeker effective interaction. The simple folding potentials calculated from the short- and finite-range components of this effective interaction are compared with their corresponding double folding results obtained from the oscillator model wave function to establish the relative accuracy of the model. It is found that the direct part of real – interaction potential calculated in the simple folding model is reliable.

  2. A C-code for the double folding interaction potential of two spherical nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontchar, I. I.; Chushnyakova, M. V.

    2010-01-01

    We present a C-code designed to obtain the nucleus-nucleus potential by using the double folding model (DFM) and in particular to find the Coulomb barrier. The program calculates the nucleus-nucleus potential as a function of the distance between the centers of mass of colliding nuclei. The most important output parameters are the Coulomb barrier energy and the radius. Since many researchers use a Woods-Saxon profile for the nuclear term of the potential we provide an option in our code for fitting the DFM potential by such a profile. Program summaryProgram title: DFMSPH Catalogue identifier: AEFH_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEFH_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 5929 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 115 740 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C Computer: PC Operating system: Windows XP (with the GCC-compiler version 2) RAM: Below 10 Mbyte Classification: 17.9 Nature of problem: The code calculates in a semimicroscopic way the bare interaction potential between two colliding spherical nuclei as a function of the center of mass distance. The height and the position of the Coulomb barrier are found. The calculated potential is approximated by a conventional Woods-Saxon profile near the barrier. Dependence of the barrier parameters upon the characteristics of the effective NN forces (like, e.g. the range of the exchange part of the nuclear term) can be investigated. Solution method: The nucleus-nucleus potential is calculated using the double folding model with the Coulomb and the effective M3Y NN interactions. For the direct parts of the Coulomb and the nuclear terms, the Fourier transform method is used. In order to calculate the exchange parts the density matrix expansion method

  3. A C-code for the double folding interaction potential for reactions involving deformed target nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontchar, I. I.; Chushnyakova, M. V.

    2013-01-01

    We present a C-code designed to obtain the interaction potential between a spherical projectile nucleus and an axial-symmetrical deformed target nucleus and in particular to find the Coulomb barrier, by using the double folding model (DFM). The program calculates the nucleus-nucleus potential as a function of the distance between the centers of mass of colliding nuclei as well as of the angle between the axis of symmetry of the target nucleus and the beam direction. The most important output parameters are the Coulomb barrier energy and the radius. Since many researchers use a Woods-Saxon profile for the nuclear term of the potential we provide an option in our code for fitting the DFM potential by such a profile near the barrier. Program summaryProgram title: DFMDEF Catalogue identifier: AENI_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AENI_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2245 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 215442 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C. Computer: PC, Mac. Operating system: Windows XP (with the GCC-compiler version 2), MacOS, Linux. RAM: 100 MB with average parameters set Classification: 17.9. Nature of problem: The code calculates in a semimicroscopic way the bare interaction potential between a spherical projectile nucleus and a deformed but axially symmetric target nucleus as a function of the center of mass distance as well as of the angle between the axis of symmetry of the target nucleus and the beam direction. The height and the position of the Coulomb barrier are found. The calculated potential is approximated by a conventional Woods-Saxon profile near the barrier. Dependence of the barrier parameters upon the characteristics of the effective NN forces (like, e

  4. DFMSPH14: A C-code for the double folding interaction potential of two spherical nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontchar, I. I.; Chushnyakova, M. V.

    2016-09-01

    This is a new version of the DFMSPH code designed to obtain the nucleus-nucleus potential by using the double folding model (DFM) and in particular to find the Coulomb barrier. The new version uses the charge, proton, and neutron density distributions provided by the user. Also we added an option for fitting the DFM potential by the Gross-Kalinowski profile. The main functionalities of the original code (e.g. the nucleus-nucleus potential as a function of the distance between the centers of mass of colliding nuclei, the Coulomb barrier characteristics, etc.) have not been modified.

  5. Folding superfunnel to describe cooperative folding of interacting proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeller, László

    2016-07-01

    This paper proposes a generalization of the well-known folding funnel concept of proteins. In the funnel model the polypeptide chain is treated as an individual object not interacting with other proteins. Since biological systems are considerably crowded, protein-protein interaction is a fundamental feature during the life cycle of proteins. The folding superfunnel proposed here describes the folding process of interacting proteins in various situations. The first example discussed is the folding of the freshly synthesized protein with the aid of chaperones. Another important aspect of protein-protein interactions is the folding of the recently characterized intrinsically disordered proteins, where binding to target proteins plays a crucial role in the completion of the folding process. The third scenario where the folding superfunnel is used is the formation of aggregates from destabilized proteins, which is an important factor in case of several conformational diseases. The folding superfunnel constructed here with the minimal assumption about the interaction potential explains all three cases mentioned above. Proteins 2016; 84:1009-1016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Cooperative Tertiary Interaction Network Guides RNA Folding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrouzi, Reza; Roh, Joon Ho; Kilburn, Duncan; Briber, R.M.; Woodson, Sarah A. (JHU); (Maryland)

    2013-04-08

    Noncoding RNAs form unique 3D structures, which perform many regulatory functions. To understand how RNAs fold uniquely despite a small number of tertiary interaction motifs, we mutated the major tertiary interactions in a group I ribozyme by single-base substitutions. The resulting perturbations to the folding energy landscape were measured using SAXS, ribozyme activity, hydroxyl radical footprinting, and native PAGE. Double- and triple-mutant cycles show that most tertiary interactions have a small effect on the stability of the native state. Instead, the formation of core and peripheral structural motifs is cooperatively linked in near-native folding intermediates, and this cooperativity depends on the native helix orientation. The emergence of a cooperative interaction network at an early stage of folding suppresses nonnative structures and guides the search for the native state. We suggest that cooperativity in noncoding RNAs arose from natural selection of architectures conducive to forming a unique, stable fold.

  7. The Folding Deuteron Optical Model Potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Xiaohua; Cai, Chonghai

    2008-01-01

    For 52 target nuclei with deuteron as projectile, we calculate the reaction cross sections and elastic scattering angular distributions, as well as the $\\chi^2$ values for 11 kinds of deuteron optical model potentials: our global deuteron optical potentials and 10 folding optical potentials calculated with 2 phenomenological global nucleon optical potentials given by Koning \\textit{et al}(KD) and by Varner\\textit{et al}(CH89), and 8 microscopic nucleon optical potentials with the generalized Skyrme force parameters(GS1-6) and modified Skyrme force parameters(SKa, SKb). We find that for constructing the folding deuteron optical potential, both SKa and SKb are the best Skyrme force parameters of the microscopic nucleon optical potential proposed by Q. Shen \\textit{et al}.

  8. Role of local and nonlocal interactions in folding and misfolding of globular proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Adesh; Baruah, Anupaul; Biswas, Parbati

    2017-02-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation based sequence design method is proposed to study the role of the local and the nonlocal interactions with varying secondary structure content in protein folding, misfolding and unfolding. A statistical potential is developed from the compilation of a data set of proteins, which accounts for the respective contribution of local and the nonlocal interactions. Sequences are designed through a combination of positive and negative design by a Monte Carlo simulation in the sequence space. The weights of the local and the nonlocal interactions are tuned appropriately to study the role of the local and the nonlocal interactions in the folding, unfolding and misfolding of the designed sequences. Results suggest that the nonlocal interactions are the primary determinant of protein folding while the local interactions may be required but not always necessary. The nonlocal interactions mainly guide the polypeptide chain to form compact structures but do not differentiate between the native-like conformations, while the local interactions stabilize the target conformation against the native-like competing conformations. The study concludes that the local interactions govern the fold-misfold transition, while the nonlocal interactions regulate the fold-unfold transition of proteins. However, for proteins with predominantly β-sheet content, the nonlocal interactions control both fold-misfold and fold-unfold transitions.

  9. Matrix models of RNA folding with external interactions: A review

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I Garg; N Deo

    2011-11-01

    The matrix model of (simplified) RNA folding with an external linear interaction in the action of the partition function is reviewed. The important results for structure combinatorics of the model are discussed and analysed in terms of the already existing models.

  10. Interaction of β-sheet folds with a gold surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Hoefling

    Full Text Available The adsorption of proteins on inorganic surfaces is of fundamental biological importance. Further, biomedical and nanotechnological applications increasingly use interfaces between inorganic material and polypeptides. Yet, the underlying adsorption mechanism of polypeptides on surfaces is not well understood and experimentally difficult to analyze. Therefore, we investigate here the interactions of polypeptides with a gold(111 surface using computational molecular dynamics (MD simulations with a polarizable gold model in explicit water. Our focus in this paper is the investigation of the interaction of polypeptides with β-sheet folds. First, we concentrate on a β-sheet forming model peptide. Second, we investigate the interactions of two domains with high β-sheet content of the biologically important extracellular matrix protein fibronectin (FN. We find that adsorption occurs in a stepwise mechanism both for the model peptide and the protein. The positively charged amino acid Arg facilitates the initial contact formation between protein and gold surface. Our results suggest that an effective gold-binding surface patch is overall uncharged, but contains Arg for contact initiation. The polypeptides do not unfold on the gold surface within the simulation time. However, for the two FN domains, the relative domain-domain orientation changes. The observation of a very fast and strong adsorption indicates that in a biological matrix, no bare gold surfaces will be present. Hence, the bioactivity of gold surfaces (like bare gold nanoparticles will critically depend on the history of particle administration and the proteins present during initial contact between gold and biological material. Further, gold particles may act as seeds for protein aggregation. Structural re-organization and protein aggregation are potentially of immunological importance.

  11. Topology-based modeling of intrinsically disordered proteins: balancing intrinsic folding and intermolecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Debabani; Chen, Jianhan

    2011-04-01

    Coupled binding and folding is frequently involved in specific recognition of so-called intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), a newly recognized class of proteins that rely on a lack of stable tertiary fold for function. Here, we exploit topology-based Gō-like modeling as an effective tool for the mechanism of IDP recognition within the theoretical framework of minimally frustrated energy landscape. Importantly, substantial differences exist between IDPs and globular proteins in both amino acid sequence and binding interface characteristics. We demonstrate that established Gō-like models designed for folded proteins tend to over-estimate the level of residual structures in unbound IDPs, whereas under-estimating the strength of intermolecular interactions. Such systematic biases have important consequences in the predicted mechanism of interaction. A strategy is proposed to recalibrate topology-derived models to balance intrinsic folding propensities and intermolecular interactions, based on experimental knowledge of the overall residual structure level and binding affinity. Applied to pKID/KIX, the calibrated Gō-like model predicts a dominant multistep sequential pathway for binding-induced folding of pKID that is initiated by KIX binding via the C-terminus in disordered conformations, followed by binding and folding of the rest of C-terminal helix and finally the N-terminal helix. This novel mechanism is consistent with key observations derived from a recent NMR titration and relaxation dispersion study and provides a molecular-level interpretation of kinetic rates derived from dispersion curve analysis. These case studies provide important insight into the applicability and potential pitfalls of topology-based modeling for studying IDP folding and interaction in general.

  12. Nucleon-nucleon interactions in the double folding model for fusion reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Gao-Long; Liu Hao; Le Xiao-Yun

    2009-01-01

    Nucleus-nucleus potentials are determined in the framework of double folding model for M3Y-Reid and M3Y-Paris effective nucleon nucleon (NN) interactions. Both zero-range and finite-range exchange parts of NN interactions are considered in the folding procedure. In this paper the spherical projectile-spherical target system 16O+208Pb is selected for calculating the barrier energies, fusion cross sections and barrier distributions with the density-independent and density-dependcnt NN interactions on the basis of M3Y-Reid and M3Y-Paris NN interactions. The barrier energies become lower for Paris NN interactions in comparison with Reid NN interactions, and also for finite-range exchange part in comparison with zero-range exchange part. The density-dependent NN interactions give similar fusion cross sections and barrier distributions, and the density-independent NN interaction causes the barrier distribution moving to a higher position. However, the density-independent Reid NN interaction with zero-range exchange part gives the lowest fusion cross sections. We find that the calculated fusion cross sections and the barrier distributions are in agreement with the experimental data after rcnormalization of the nuclear potential due to coupled-channel effect.

  13. Nuclear mean field and double-folding model of the nucleus-nucleus optical potential

    CERN Document Server

    Khoa, Dao T; Loan, Doan Thi; Loc, Bui Minh

    2016-01-01

    Realistic density dependent CDM3Yn versions of the M3Y interaction have been used in an extended Hartree-Fock (HF) calculation of nuclear matter (NM), with the nucleon single-particle potential determined from the total NM energy based on the Hugenholtz-van Hove theorem that gives rise naturally to a rearrangement term (RT). Using the RT of the single-nucleon potential obtained exactly at different NM densities, the density- and energy dependence of the CDM3Yn interactions was modified to account properly for both the RT and observed energy dependence of the nucleon optical potential. Based on a local density approximation, the double-folding model of the nucleus-nucleus optical potential has been extended to take into account consistently the rearrangement effect and energy dependence of the nuclear mean-field potential, using the modified CDM3Yn interactions. The extended double-folding model was applied to study the elastic $^{12}$C+$^{12}$C and $^{16}$O+$^{12}$C scattering at the refractive energies, wher...

  14. Protein disulfide-isomerase interacts with a substrate protein at all stages along its folding pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair G Irvine

    Full Text Available In contrast to molecular chaperones that couple protein folding to ATP hydrolysis, protein disulfide-isomerase (PDI catalyzes protein folding coupled to formation of disulfide bonds (oxidative folding. However, we do not know how PDI distinguishes folded, partly-folded and unfolded protein substrates. As a model intermediate in an oxidative folding pathway, we prepared a two-disulfide mutant of basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI and showed by NMR that it is partly-folded and highly dynamic. NMR studies show that it binds to PDI at the same site that binds peptide ligands, with rapid binding and dissociation kinetics; surface plasmon resonance shows its interaction with PDI has a Kd of ca. 10(-5 M. For comparison, we characterized the interactions of PDI with native BPTI and fully-unfolded BPTI. Interestingly, PDI does bind native BPTI, but binding is quantitatively weaker than with partly-folded and unfolded BPTI. Hence PDI recognizes and binds substrates via permanently or transiently unfolded regions. This is the first study of PDI's interaction with a partly-folded protein, and the first to analyze this folding catalyst's changing interactions with substrates along an oxidative folding pathway. We have identified key features that make PDI an effective catalyst of oxidative protein folding - differential affinity, rapid ligand exchange and conformational flexibility.

  15. Inversion of the balance between hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding interactions in protein folding and aggregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony W Fitzpatrick

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the forces that drive proteins to misfold and aggregate, rather than to fold into their functional states, is fundamental to our understanding of living systems and to our ability to combat protein deposition disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and the spongiform encephalopathies. We report here the finding that the balance between hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding interactions is different for proteins in the processes of folding to their native states and misfolding to the alternative amyloid structures. We find that the minima of the protein free energy landscape for folding and misfolding tend to be respectively dominated by hydrophobic and by hydrogen bonding interactions. These results characterise the nature of the interactions that determine the competition between folding and misfolding of proteins by revealing that the stability of native proteins is primarily determined by hydrophobic interactions between side-chains, while the stability of amyloid fibrils depends more on backbone intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions.

  16. Efficient fold-change detection based on protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buijsman, W; Sheinman, M

    2014-02-01

    Various biological sensory systems exhibit a response to a relative change of the stimulus, often referred to as fold-change detection. In the past few years, fold-change detecting mechanisms, based on transcriptional networks, have been proposed. Here we present a fold-change detecting mechanism, based on protein-protein interactions, consisting of two interacting proteins. This mechanism does not consume chemical energy and is not subject to transcriptional and translational noise, in contrast to previously proposed mechanisms. We show by analytical and numerical calculations that the mechanism is robust and can have a fast, precise, and efficient response for parameters that are relevant to eukaryotic cells.

  17. Efficient fold-change detection based on protein-protein interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buijsman, W.; Sheinman, M.

    2014-02-01

    Various biological sensory systems exhibit a response to a relative change of the stimulus, often referred to as fold-change detection. In the past few years, fold-change detecting mechanisms, based on transcriptional networks, have been proposed. Here we present a fold-change detecting mechanism, based on protein-protein interactions, consisting of two interacting proteins. This mechanism does not consume chemical energy and is not subject to transcriptional and translational noise, in contrast to previously proposed mechanisms. We show by analytical and numerical calculations that the mechanism is robust and can have a fast, precise, and efficient response for parameters that are relevant to eukaryotic cells.

  18. Quantum Nuclear Extension of Electron Nuclear Dynamics on Folded Effective-Potential Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, B.; Deumens, E.; Ohrn, Y.;

    2014-01-01

    A perennial problem in quantum scattering calculations is accurate theoretical treatment of low energy collisions. We propose a method of extracting a folded, nonadiabatic, effective potential energy surface from electron nuclear dynamics (END) trajectories; we then perform nuclear wave packet...

  19. Predicting protein folding pathways at the mesoscopic level based on native interactions between secondary structure elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sze Sing-Hoi

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since experimental determination of protein folding pathways remains difficult, computational techniques are often used to simulate protein folding. Most current techniques to predict protein folding pathways are computationally intensive and are suitable only for small proteins. Results By assuming that the native structure of a protein is known and representing each intermediate conformation as a collection of fully folded structures in which each of them contains a set of interacting secondary structure elements, we show that it is possible to significantly reduce the conformation space while still being able to predict the most energetically favorable folding pathway of large proteins with hundreds of residues at the mesoscopic level, including the pig muscle phosphoglycerate kinase with 416 residues. The model is detailed enough to distinguish between different folding pathways of structurally very similar proteins, including the streptococcal protein G and the peptostreptococcal protein L. The model is also able to recognize the differences between the folding pathways of protein G and its two structurally similar variants NuG1 and NuG2, which are even harder to distinguish. We show that this strategy can produce accurate predictions on many other proteins with experimentally determined intermediate folding states. Conclusion Our technique is efficient enough to predict folding pathways for both large and small proteins at the mesoscopic level. Such a strategy is often the only feasible choice for large proteins. A software program implementing this strategy (SSFold is available at http://faculty.cs.tamu.edu/shsze/ssfold.

  20. Effects of pion-fold-pion diagrams in the energy-independent nucleon-nucleon potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Guzman, G.; Kuo, T. T. S.; Holinde, K.; Machleidt, R.; Faessler, A.; Müther, H.

    1985-10-01

    Based on a T-matrix equivalence theory, an energy-independent or locally energy-dependent nucléon-nucléon potential VNN derived from meson exchanges is studied. The potential, given as a series expansion of folded diagrams, is independent of the asymptotic energy of the scattering nucleons. It is, however, locally energy dependent in the sense that its matrix elements depend on the energies associated with its bra and ket states a and b. Our formulation makes use of right-hand-side on-shell T-matrix equivalence of the field-theoretical and potential descriptions when limited to the space of neutrons and protons only. This preserves not only scattering (e.g. phase shifts, projections of wave functions) but also bound-state properties. The matrix elements of V were calculated for two potential models, one based on one-pion exchange (OPEP) and the other on one-boson exchange (OBEP) using {π, ρ, σ, ω, δ, η }. Three types of phase-shift calculations have been carried out to study the viability of constructing an energy-independent potential using the folded-diagram expansion: (A) NN phase shifts for an energy-dependent OPEP and OBEP. For the OBEP we used parameters adjusted to fit experimental data. (B) The same phase shifts for the energy-independent case for both OPEP and OBEP. (C) Repetition of (B) with effects of the two-pion folded diagrams included. Our results show two important points: (i) folded diagrams are of essential importance, and (ii) the first-order folded diagrams contain the dominant effect and the neglect of terms with more than two folds can be regarded as a good approximation. The effects of folded diagrams are large especially for low partial waves and high energies. For high partial waves ( J greater than 2) the folded terms are negligible, and the phase shifts given by (A), (B) and (C) practically coincide.

  1. Diatomic interaction potential theory applications

    CERN Document Server

    Goodisman, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Diatomic Interaction Potential Theory, Volume 2: Applications discusses the variety of applicable theoretical material and approaches in the calculations for diatomic systems in their ground states. The volume covers the descriptions and illustrations of modern calculations. Chapter I discusses the calculation of the interaction potential for large and small values of the internuclear distance R (separated and united atom limits). Chapter II covers the methods used for intermediate values of R, which in principle means any values of R. The Hartree-Fock and configuration interaction schemes des

  2. Structure of human Sp140 PHD finger: an atypical fold interacting with Pin1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchelli, Chiara; Tamburri, Simone; Quilici, Giacomo; Palagano, Eleonora; Berardi, Andrea; Saare, Mario; Peterson, Pärt; Bachi, Angela; Musco, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    Sp140 is a nuclear leukocyte-specific protein involved in primary biliary cirrhosis and a risk factor in chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The presence of several chromatin related modules such as plant homeodomain (PHD), bromodomain and SAND domain suggests a role in chromatin-mediated regulation of gene expression; however, its real function is still elusive. Herein we present the solution structure of Sp140-PHD finger and investigate its role as epigenetic reader in vitro. Sp140-PHD presents an atypical PHD finger fold which does not bind to histone H3 tails but is recognized by peptidylprolyl isomerase Pin1. Pin1 specifically binds to a phosphopeptide corresponding to the L3 loop of Sp140-PHD and catalyzes cis-trans isomerization of a pThr-Pro bond. Moreover co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate FLAG-Sp140 interaction with endogenous Pin1 in vivo. Overall these data include Sp140 in the list of the increasing number of Pin1 binders and expand the regulatory potential of PHD fingers as versatile structural platforms for diversified interactions. © 2013 FEBS.

  3. Folded plate assemblies with branching column supports : interaction and control of overall shape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falk, A.; Turrin, M.; von Buelow, P.

    2010-01-01

    The work described in this paper aims at developing the interrelation and overall effects of interaction between a folded plate roof structure and a system of branching column supports. In the context of architectural performance it is of interest to discuss the effects of the material on environmen

  4. Calculation of Rydberg interaction potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Sebastian; Tresp, Christoph; Menke, Henri; Urvoy, Alban; Firstenberg, Ofer; Büchler, Hans Peter; Hofferberth, Sebastian

    2017-07-01

    The strong interaction between individual Rydberg atoms provides a powerful tool exploited in an ever-growing range of applications in quantum information science, quantum simulation and ultracold chemistry. One hallmark of the Rydberg interaction is that both its strength and angular dependence can be fine-tuned with great flexibility by choosing appropriate Rydberg states and applying external electric and magnetic fields. More and more experiments are probing this interaction at short atomic distances or with such high precision that perturbative calculations as well as restrictions to the leading dipole-dipole interaction term are no longer sufficient. In this tutorial, we review all relevant aspects of the full calculation of Rydberg interaction potentials. We discuss the derivation of the interaction Hamiltonian from the electrostatic multipole expansion, numerical and analytical methods for calculating the required electric multipole moments and the inclusion of electromagnetic fields with arbitrary direction. We focus specifically on symmetry arguments and selection rules, which greatly reduce the size of the Hamiltonian matrix, enabling the direct diagonalization of the Hamiltonian up to higher multipole orders on a desktop computer. Finally, we present example calculations showing the relevance of the full interaction calculation to current experiments. Our software for calculating Rydberg potentials including all features discussed in this tutorial is available as open source.

  5. n→π* Interactions in Poly(lactic acid) Suggest a Role in Protein Folding

    OpenAIRE

    Newberry, Robert W; Raines, Ronald T.

    2013-01-01

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) is a versatile synthetic polyester. We noted that this depsipeptide analog of polyalanine has a helical structure that resembles a polyproline II helix. Using natural bond orbital analysis, we find that n→π* interactions between sequential ester carbonyl groups contribute 0.44 kcal/mol per monomer to the conformational stability of PLA helices. We conclude that analogous n→π* interactions could direct the folding of a polypeptide chain into a polyproline II helix prior...

  6. Efficient fold-change detection based on protein-protein interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Buijsman, Wouter

    2012-01-01

    Various biological sensory systems exhibit a response to the relative change of the stimulus, often reffered to as fold-change detection. Here, we present a mechanism consisting of two interacting proteins, able to detect a fold-change effectively. This mechanism, in contrast to other proposed mechanisms, does not consume chemical energy and is not subject to transcriptional and translational noise. We show by analytical and numerical calculations that the mechanism can have a fast, precise and efficient response for parameters that are relevant to eukaryotic cells.

  7. Differences Between a Single- and a Double-Folding Nucleus-^{9}Be Optical Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaccorso, A.; Carstoiu, F.; Charity, R. J.; Kumar, R.; Salvioni, G.

    2016-05-01

    We have recently constructed two very successful n-^9Be optical potentials (Bonaccorso and Charity in Phys Rev C89:024619, 2014). One by the Dispersive Optical Model (DOM) method and the other (AB) fully phenomenological. The two potentials have strong surface terms in common for both the real and the imaginary parts. This feature makes them particularly suitable to build a single-folded (light-) nucleus-^9Be optical potential by using ab-initio projectile densities such as those obtained with the VMC method (Wiringa http://www.phy.anl.gov/theory/research/density/). On the other hand, a VMC density together with experimental nucleon-nucleon cross-sections can be used also to obtain a neutron and/or proton-^9Be imaginary folding potential. We will use here an ab-initio VMC density (Wiringa http://www.phy.anl.gov/theory/research/density/) to obtain both a n-^9Be single-folded potential and a nucleus-nucleus double-folded potential. In this work we report on the cases of ^8B, ^8Li and ^8C projectiles. Our approach could be the basis for a systematic study of optical potentials for light exotic nuclei scattering on such light targets. Some of the projectiles studied are cores of other exotic nuclei for which neutron knockout has been used to extract spectroscopic information. For those cases, our study will serve to make a quantitative assessment of the core-target part of the reaction description, in particular its localization.

  8. Formation of Tertiary Interactions during rRNA GTPase Center Folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Michael J; Welty, Robb; Tom Stump, W; Hall, Kathleen B

    2015-08-28

    The 60-nt GTPase center (GAC) of 23S rRNA has a phylogenetically conserved secondary structure with two hairpin loops and a 3-way junction. It folds into an intricate tertiary structure upon addition of Mg(2+) ions, which is stabilized by the L11 protein in cocrystal structures. Here, we monitor the kinetics of its tertiary folding and Mg(2+)-dependent intermediate states by observing selected nucleobases that contribute specific interactions to the GAC tertiary structure in the cocrystals. The fluorescent nucleobase 2-aminopurine replaced three individual adenines, two of which make long-range stacking interactions and one that also forms hydrogen bonds. Each site reveals a unique response to Mg(2+) addition and temperature, reflecting its environmental change from secondary to tertiary structure. Stopped-flow fluorescence experiments revealed that kinetics of tertiary structure formation upon addition of MgCl2 are also site specific, with local conformational changes occurring from 5 ms to 4s and with global folding from 1 to 5s. Site-specific substitution with (15)N-nucleobases allowed observation of stable hydrogen bond formation by NMR experiments. Equilibrium titration experiments indicate that a stable folding intermediate is present at stoichiometric concentrations of Mg(2+) and suggest that there are two initial sites of Mg(2+) ion association.

  9. Regulation of folding and photochromic reactivity of terarylenes through a host-guest interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Takuya; Fujii, Ryosuke; Kawai, Tsuyoshi

    2011-09-19

    The photochromic reactivity of terarylenes is integrated with molecular folding that is controlled through a host-guest interaction. A thieno[3,2,b]pyridine unit is introduced into a photochromic terarylene structure as an aryl unit to form a guest-interacting site. Thienopyridine-containing terarylenes showed solvent-dependent photochromic reactivity in solution. A terarylene moiety that contains two thienopyridyl units showed significantly high photocoloration reactivity as high as 88% of photocyclization quantum yield in methanol, whereas that value was only 24% in hexane. A temperature-dependent (1)H NMR spectroscopic study in different solvents indicated an interconversion between photochromic-reactive and unreactive conformations. In methanol, the intermolecular interaction between terarylene species and the solvent molecule slows the rate of interconversion and increases the population of the photochromic-active form, whereas the unreactive conformation is dominant in hexane. Crystal-structural studies demonstrated the perfect regulation of molecular folding between a photochromic-active form and an unreactive conformation by changing the solvents for recrystallization. Single crystals prepared from solutions in methanol showed reversible photochromic reactivity, whereas recrystallization from solutions in hexane did not show this reactivity. X-ray crystallographic studies of single crystals from solutions in methanol demonstrated that the photochromic molecules bind a solvent methanol molecule at the guest-interacting site to regulate the molecular conformation into a photochromic-active form in collaboration with specific intramolecular interactions, whereas crystals from solutions in hexane possess the photochromic-unreactive conformation.

  10. Linking computation and experiments to study the role of charge-charge interactions in protein folding and stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhatadze, George I.

    2017-02-01

    Over the past two decades there has been an increase in appreciation for the role of surface charge-charge interactions in protein folding and stability. The perception shifted from the belief that charge-charge interactions are not important for protein folding and stability to the near quantitative understanding of how these interactions shape the folding energy landscape. This led to the ability of computational approaches to rationally redesign surface charge-charge interactions to modulate thermodynamic properties of proteins. Here we summarize our progress in understanding the role of charge-charge interactions for protein stability using examples drawn from my own laboratory and touch upon unanswered questions.

  11. Higgs Potential from Derivative Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Quadri, A

    2016-01-01

    A formulation of the linear $\\sigma$ model with derivative interactions is studied. The theory is on-shell equivalent to the model with a quartic Higgs potential. The mass of the scalar mode only appears in the quadratic part and not in the interaction vertices, unlike in the ordinary formulation of the theory. Renormalization of the model is discussed. A natural non power-counting renormalizable extension of the theory is presented. The model is physically equivalent to the inclusion of a dimension six effective operator $\\partial_\\mu (\\Phi^\\dagger \\Phi) \\partial^\\mu (\\Phi^\\dagger \\Phi)$. The resulting UV divergences are arranged in a perturbation series around the power-counting renormalizable theory. UV completion of the non-power-counting renormalizable model through a symmetric deformation of the propagator of the massive physical scalar is addressed.

  12. Effect of hydrophobic interactions on the folding mechanism of β-hairpins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, Alexander; Wu, Ling; Keiderling, Timothy A; Hauser, Karin

    2014-12-11

    Hydrophobic interactions are essential in stabilizing protein structures. How they affect the folding pathway and kinetics, however, is less clear. We used time-resolved infrared spectroscopy to study the dynamics of hydrophobic interactions of β-hairpin variants of the sequence Trpzip2 (SWTWENGKWTWK-NH2) that is stabilized by two cross-strand Trp-Trp pairs. The hydrophobicity strength was varied by substituting the tryptophans pairwise by either tyrosines or valines. Relaxation dynamics were induced by a laser-excited temperature jump, which separately probed for the loss of the cross-strand β-hairpin interaction and the rise of the disordered structure. All substitutions tested result in reduced thermal stability, lower transition temperatures, and faster dynamics compared to Trpzip2. However, the changes in folding dynamics depend on the amino acid substituted for Trp. The aromatic substitution of Tyr for Trp results in the same kinetics for the unfolding of sheet and growth of disorder, with similar activation energies, independent of the substitution position. Substitution of Trp with a solely hydrophobic Val results in even faster kinetics than substitution with Tyr but is additionally site-dependent. If the hairpin has a Val pair close to its termini, the rate constants for loss of sheet and gain of disorder are the same, but if the pair is close to the turn, the sheet and disorder components show different relaxation kinetics. The Trp → Val substitutions reveal that hydrophobic interactions alone weakly stabilize the hairpin structure, but adding edge-to-face aromatic interaction strengthens it, and both modify the complex folding process.

  13. Single chain folding of synthetic polymers by covalent and non-covalent interactions: current status and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Ozcan; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2012-06-14

    The present feature article highlights the preparation of polymeric nanoparticles and initial attempts towards mimicking the structure of natural biomacromolecules by single chain folding of well-defined linear polymers through covalent and non-covalent interactions. Initially, the discussion focuses on the synthesis and characterization of single chain self-folded structures by non-covalent interactions. The second part of the article summarizes the folding of single chain polymers by means of covalent interactions into nanoparticle systems. The current state of the art in the field of single chain folding indicates that covalent-bond-driven nanoparticle preparation is well advanced, while the first encouraging steps towards building reversible single chain folding systems by the use of mutually orthogonal hydrogen-bonding motifs have been made. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Kinematics, Thermicity and Petroleum Potential Appraisal in the External Parts of FOLD-and-THRUST Belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roure, Francois

    2014-05-01

    Fold-and-thrust belts still constitute frontier areas for HC exploration. However, coupled 2D kinematic and thermal modelling techniques, based on seismic interpretation and the input of balanced cross sections, can be used to recontruct the burial history of source rocks and reservoirs, and to identify the timing of petroleum generation. Fluid flow and pore-fluid pressure modelling can be used also to get estimates on the hydrocarbon charge of potential prospects, and on chemical transfers occurring at both regional and reservoir scale when diagenesis operates in an open system. Bottom hole temperature and maturity ranks of the organic matter (Tmax, and R) can be used to calibrate the overall thermal history, but paleo-thermo-barometers are likely to provide better controls on the paleo-thickness of the eroded overburden. Further post-orogenic controls exerted by mantle dynamics must be also taken into account, because they can induce rapid uplift and erosion in both the foothills and adjacent foreland, and modify strongly the overall drainage areas. The integrated workflow developped at IFP-EN for the evaluation of the petroleum potential of fold-and-thrust belts will be documented by regional case studies in the Apennines, Sicily, Albania and North Algeria in the Mediterranean, as well as in the Sub-Andean basins from Veezuela and Colombia, and in Mexican and Canaduian segments of the North American Cordillera.

  15. Calculation of Interaction Potentials between Spherical and Deformed Nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Gao-Long; XU Xin-Xing; BAI Chun-Lin; YU Ning; ZHANG Huan-Qiao; LIU Zu-Hua; ZHANG Chun-Lei; LIN Cheng-Jian; YANG Feng; AN Guang-Peng; JIA Hui-Ming; WU Zhen-Dong

    2007-01-01

    The interaction potential for spherical-deformed reaction partners is calculated. The shape, separation and orientation dependence of the interaction potential and fusion cross section of the system 32S+154Sm are investigated within the double-folding model of the deformed nuclei. The effective nucleon-nucleon interaction is taken to be the M3Y-Reid potential. The density is considered for three terms of the expansion using the truncated multipole expansion method, which is a deformed Fermi shape with quadrupole and hexadecapole for the density distribution of 154Sm. It is found for the interaction potential that the height and the position of barrier strongly depend on the deformations, the orientation angle of the deformed nucleus, and hence produce great effects on fusion cross section. The integrated fusion cross section is in good agreement with the experimental data.

  16. Anomalous diffusion and dielectric relaxation in an N-fold cosine potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, W T; Kalmykov, Yu P; Titov, S V

    2003-06-01

    The fractional Klein-Kramers (Fokker-Planck) equation describing the fractal time dynamics of an assembly of fixed axis dipoles rotating in an N-fold cosine potential representing the internal field due to neighboring molecules is solved using matrix continued fractions. The result can be considered as a generalization of the solution for the normal Brownian motion in a cosine periodic potential to fractional dynamics (giving rise to anomalous diffusion) and also represents a generalization of Fröhlich's model of relaxation over a potential barrier. The solution includes both inertial and strong internal field effects, which in combination produce a strong resonance peak (Poley absorption) at high frequencies due to librations of the dipoles in the potential, an anomalous relaxation band at low frequencies mainly arising from overbarrier relaxation, and a weaker relaxation band at midfrequencies due to the fast intrawell modes. The high-frequency behavior is controlled by the inertia of the dipole, so that the Gordon sum rule for dipolar absorption is satisfied, ensuring a return to optical transparency at very high frequencies. Application of the model to the broadband (0-THz) dielectric loss spectrum of a dilute solution of the probe dipolar molecule CH2Cl2 in glassy decalin is demonstrated.

  17. Protein folding: complex potential for the driving force in a two-dimensional space of collective variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekmarev, Sergei F

    2013-10-14

    Using the Helmholtz decomposition of the vector field of folding fluxes in a two-dimensional space of collective variables, a potential of the driving force for protein folding is introduced. The potential has two components. One component is responsible for the source and sink of the folding flows, which represent respectively, the unfolded states and the native state of the protein, and the other, which accounts for the flow vorticity inherently generated at the periphery of the flow field, is responsible for the canalization of the flow between the source and sink. The theoretical consideration is illustrated by calculations for a model β-hairpin protein.

  18. Hierarchical folding of multiple sequence alignments for the prediction of structures and RNA-RNA interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorodkin Jan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many regulatory non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs function through complementary binding with mRNAs or other ncRNAs, e.g., microRNAs, snoRNAs and bacterial sRNAs. Predicting these RNA interactions is essential for functional studies of putative ncRNAs or for the design of artificial RNAs. Many ncRNAs show clear signs of undergoing compensating base changes over evolutionary time. Here, we postulate that a non-negligible part of the existing RNA-RNA interactions contain preserved but covarying patterns of interactions. Methods We present a novel method that takes compensating base changes across the binding sites into account. The algorithm works in two steps on two pre-generated multiple alignments. In the first step, individual base pairs with high reliability are found using the PETfold algorithm, which includes evolutionary and thermodynamic properties. In step two (where high reliability base pairs from step one are constrained as unpaired, the principle of cofolding is combined with hierarchical folding. The final prediction of intra- and inter-molecular base pairs consists of the reliabilities computed from the constrained expected accuracy scoring, which is an extended version of that used for individual multiple alignments. Results We derived a rather extensive algorithm. One of the advantages of our approach (in contrast to other RNA-RNA interaction prediction methods is the application of covariance detection and prediction of pseudoknots between intra- and inter-molecular base pairs. As a proof of concept, we show an example and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the approach.

  19. Transferable coarse-grained potential for $\\textit{de novo}$ protein folding and design

    CERN Document Server

    Coluzza, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Protein folding and design are major biophysical problems, the solution of which would lead to important applications especially in medicine. Here a novel protein model capable of simultaneously provide quantitative protein design and folding is introduced. With computer simulations it is shown that, for a large set of real protein structures, the model produces designed sequences with similar physical properties to the corresponding natural occurring sequences. The designed sequences are not yet fully realistic and require further experimental testing. For an independent set of proteins, notoriously difficult to fold, the correct folding of both the designed and the natural sequences is also demonstrated. The folding properties are characterized by free energy calculations. which not only are consistent among natural and designed proteins, but we also show a remarkable precision when the folded structures are compared to the experimentally determined ones. Ultimately, this novel coarse-grained protein model ...

  20. Resonant Structure Described by a Deep Folded Potential for the 12C+12C Scattering at Lower-Energy Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yong-Xu; LI Qing-Run; ZHAO Wei-Qin

    2002-01-01

    Based on the analyses of the elastic angular distributions,an energy-dependent folding potential for the 12C+12C system is established.This potential has a deep real part,and can reasonably well describe the resonant structure in the 12C+12C elastic scattering in the low-energy region of 10 ~ 70 MeV.

  1. Developing a general interaction potential for hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Stephen H; Røyne, Anja; Kristiansen, Kai; Rapp, Michael V; Das, Saurabh; Gebbie, Matthew A; Lee, Dong Woog; Stock, Philipp; Valtiner, Markus; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2015-02-24

    We review direct force measurements on a broad class of hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. These measurements have enabled the development of a general interaction potential per unit area, W(D) = -2γ(i)Hy exp(-D/D(H)) in terms of a nondimensional Hydra parameter, Hy, that applies to both hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions between extended surfaces. This potential allows one to quantitatively account for additional attractions and repulsions not included in the well-known combination of electrostatic double layer and van der Waals theories, the so-called Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. The interaction energy is exponentially decaying with decay length D(H) ≈ 0.3-2 nm for both hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions, with the exact value of D(H) depending on the precise system and conditions. The pre-exponential factor depends on the interfacial tension, γ(i), of the interacting surfaces and Hy. For Hy > 0, the interaction potential describes interactions between partially hydrophobic surfaces, with the maximum hydrophobic interaction (i.e., two fully hydrophobic surfaces) corresponding to Hy = 1. Hydrophobic interactions between hydrophobic monolayer surfaces measured with the surface forces apparatus (SFA) are shown to be well described by the proposed interaction potential. The potential becomes repulsive for Hy < 0, corresponding to partially hydrophilic (hydrated) interfaces. Hydrated surfaces such as mica, silica, and lipid bilayers are discussed and reviewed in the context of the values of Hy appropriate for each system.

  2. TBP binding-induced folding of the glucocorticoid receptor AF1 domain facilitates its interaction with steroid receptor coactivator-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shagufta H Khan

    Full Text Available The precise mechanism by which glucocorticoid receptor (GR regulates the transcription of its target genes is largely unknown. This is, in part, due to the lack of structural and functional information about GR's N-terminal activation function domain, AF1. Like many steroid hormone receptors (SHRs, the GR AF1 exists in an intrinsically disordered (ID conformation or an ensemble of conformers that collectively appears to be unstructured. The GR AF1 is known to recruit several coregulatory proteins, including those from the basal transcriptional machinery, e.g., TATA box binding protein (TBP that forms the basis for the multiprotein transcription initiation complex. However, the precise mechanism of this process is unknown. We have earlier shown that conditional folding of the GR AF1 is the key for its interactions with critical coactivator proteins. We hypothesize that binding of TBP to AF1 results in the structural rearrangement of the ID AF1 domain such that its surfaces become easily accessible for interaction with other coactivators. To test this hypothesis, we determined whether TBP binding-induced structure formation in the GR AF1 facilitates its interaction with steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1, a critical coactivator that is important for GR-mediated transcriptional activity. Our data show that stoichiometric binding of TBP induces significantly higher helical content at the expense of random coil configuration in the GR AF1. Further, we found that this induced AF1 conformation facilitates its interaction with SRC-1, and subsequent AF1-mediated transcriptional activity. Our results may provide a potential mechanism through which GR and by large other SHRs may regulate the expression of the GR-target genes.

  3. Circuit topology of self-interacting chains: implications for folding and unfolding dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugler, Andrew; Tans, Sander J; Mashaghi, Alireza

    2014-11-07

    Understanding the relationship between molecular structure and folding is a central problem in disciplines ranging from biology to polymer physics and DNA origami. Topology can be a powerful tool to address this question. For a folded linear chain, the arrangement of intra-chain contacts is a topological property because rearranging the contacts requires discontinuous deformations. Conversely, the topology is preserved when continuously stretching the chain while maintaining the contact arrangement. Here we investigate how the folding and unfolding of linear chains with binary contacts is guided by the topology of contact arrangements. We formalize the topology by describing the relations between any two contacts in the structure, which for a linear chain can either be in parallel, in series, or crossing each other. We show that even when other determinants of folding rate such as contact order and size are kept constant, this 'circuit' topology determines folding kinetics. In particular, we find that the folding rate increases with the fractions of parallel and crossed relations. Moreover, we show how circuit topology constrains the conformational phase space explored during folding and unfolding: the number of forbidden unfolding transitions is found to increase with the fraction of parallel relations and to decrease with the fraction of series relations. Finally, we find that circuit topology influences whether distinct intermediate states are present, with crossed contacts being the key factor. The approach presented here can be more generally applied to questions on molecular dynamics, evolutionary biology, molecular engineering, and single-molecule biophysics.

  4. Potential interactions between alternative therapies and warfarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, A M; DeWitt, B A; Lukes, A L

    2000-07-01

    Potential and documented interactions between alternative therapy agents and warfarin are discussed. An estimated one third of adults in the United States use alternative therapies, including herbs. A major safety concern is potential interactions of alternative medicine products with prescription medications. This issue is especially important with respect to drugs with narrow therapeutic indexes, such as warfarin. Herbal products that may potentially increase the risk of bleeding or potentiate the effects of warfarin therapy include angelica root, arnica flower, anise, asafoetida, bogbean, borage seed oil, bromelain, capsicum, celery, chamomile, clove, fenugreek, feverfew, garlic, ginger ginkgo, horse chestnut, licorice root, lovage root, meadowsweet, onion, parsley, passionflower herb, poplar, quassia, red clover, rue, sweet clover, turmeric, and willow bark. Products that have been associated with documented reports of potential interactions with warfarin include coenzyme Q10, danshen, devil's claw, dong quai, ginseng, green tea, papain, and vitamin E. Interpretation of the available information on herb-warfarin interactions is difficult because nearly all of it is based on in vitro data, animal studies, or individual case reports. More study is needed to confirm and assess the clinical significance of these potential interactions. There is evidence that a wide range of alternative therapy products have the potential to interact with warfarin. Pharmacists and other health care professionals should question all patients about use of alternative therapies and report documented interactions to FDA's MedWatch program.

  5. Improved $d +^{4}He$ potentials by inversion, the tensor force and validity of the double folding model

    CERN Document Server

    Kukulin, V I; Cooper, S G; Dubovichenko, S B

    1998-01-01

    Improved potential solutions are presented for the inverse scattering problem for $d$+$^4$He data. The input for the inversions includes both the data of recent phase shift analyses and phase shifts from RGM coupled-channel calculations based on the NN Minnesota force. The combined calculations provide a more reliable estimate of the odd-even splitting of the potentials than previously found, suggesting a rather moderate role for this splitting in deuteron-nucleus scattering generally. The approximate parity-independence of the deuteron optical potentials is shown to arise from the nontrivial interference between antisymmetrization and channel coupling to the deuteron breakup channels. A further comparison of the empirical potentials established here and the double folding potential derived from the M3Y effective NN force (with the appropriate normalisation factor) reveals strong similarities. This result supports the application of the double folding model, combined with a small Majorana component, to the de...

  6. Interaction networks in protein folding via atomic-resolution experiments and long-time-scale molecular dynamics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sborgi, Lorenzo; Verma, Abhinav; Piana, Stefano;

    2015-01-01

    The integration of atomic-resolution experimental and computational methods offers the potential for elucidating key aspects of protein folding that are not revealed by either approach alone. Here, we combine equilibrium NMR measurements of thermal unfolding and long molecular dynamics simulation...

  7. Integron gene cassettes: a repository of novel protein folds with distinct interaction sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Visaahini Sureshan

    Full Text Available Mobile gene cassettes captured within integron arrays encompass a vast and diverse pool of genetic novelty. In most cases, functional annotation of gene cassettes directly recovered by cassette-PCR is obscured by their characteristically high sequence novelty. This inhibits identification of those specific functions or biological features that might constitute preferential factors for lateral gene transfer via the integron system. A structural genomics approach incorporating x-ray crystallography has been utilised on a selection of cassettes to investigate evolutionary relationships hidden at the sequence level. Gene cassettes were accessed from marine sediments (pristine and contaminated sites, as well as a range of Vibrio spp. We present six crystal structures, a remarkably high proportion of our survey of soluble proteins, which were found to possess novel folds. These entirely new structures are diverse, encompassing all-α, α+β and α/β fold classes, and many contain clear binding pocket features for small molecule substrates. The new structures emphasise the large repertoire of protein families encoded within the integron cassette metagenome and which remain to be characterised. Oligomeric association is a notable recurring property common to these new integron-derived proteins. In some cases, the protein-protein contact sites utilised in homomeric assembly could instead form suitable contact points for heterogeneous regulator/activator proteins or domains. Such functional features are ideal for a flexible molecular componentry needed to ensure responsive and adaptive bacterial functions.

  8. Influences of heterogeneous native contact energy and many-body interactions on the prediction of protein folding mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhuqing; Ouyang, Yanhua; Chen, Tao

    2016-11-16

    Since single-point mutant perturbation has been used to probe protein folding mechanisms in experiments, the ϕ-value has become a critical parameter to infer the transition state (TS) for two-state proteins. Experimentally, large scale analysis has shown a nearly single uniform ϕ-value with normally distributed error from 24 different proteins; moreover, in zero stability conditions, the intrinsic variable ϕ(0) is around 0.36. To explore how and to what extent theoretical models can capture experimental phenomena, we here use structure-based explicit chain coarse-grained models to investigate the influence of single-point mutant perturbation on protein folding for single domain two-state proteins. Our results indicate that uniform, additive contact energetic interactions cannot predict experimental Brønsted plots well. Those points deviate largely from the main data sets in Brønsted plots, are mostly hydrophobic, and are located in N- and C-terminal contacting regions. Heterogenous contact energy, which is dependent on sequence separation, can narrow the point dispersion in a Brønsted plot. Moreover, we demonstrate that combining many-body interactions with heterogeneous native contact energy can present mean ϕ-values consistent with experimental findings, with a comparable distributed error. This indicates that for more accurate elucidation of protein folding mechanisms by residue-level structure-based models, these elements should be considered.

  9. Critique of the two-fold measure of prediction success for ratios: application for the assessment of drug-drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, Eleanor J; Aarons, Leon; Houston, J Brian; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin; Galetin, Aleksandra

    2011-02-01

    Current assessment of drug-drug interaction (DDI) prediction success is based on whether predictions fall within a two-fold range of the observed data. This strategy results in a potential bias toward successful prediction at lower interaction levels [ratio of the area under the concentration-time profile (AUC) in the presence of inhibitor/inducer compared with control is assessment of different DDI prediction algorithms if databases contain large proportion of interactions in this lower range. Therefore, the current study proposes an alternative method to assess prediction success with a variable prediction margin dependent on the particular AUC ratio. The method is applicable for assessment of both induction and inhibition-related algorithms. The inclusion of variability into this predictive measure is also considered using midazolam as a case study. Comparison of the traditional two-fold and the new predictive method was performed on a subset of midazolam DDIs collated from previous databases; in each case, DDIs were predicted using the dynamic model in Simcyp simulator. A 21% reduction in prediction accuracy was evident using the new predictive measure, in particular at the level of no/weak interaction (AUC ratio assessed via the new predictive measure. Thus, the study proposes a more logical method for the assessment of prediction success and its application for induction and inhibition DDIs.

  10. A new interaction potential for swarming models

    CERN Document Server

    Carrillo, J A; Panferov, V

    2012-01-01

    We consider a self-propelled particle system which has been used to describe certain types of collective motion of animals, such as fish schools and bird flocks. Interactions between particles are specified by means of a pairwise potential, repulsive at short ranges and attractive at longer ranges. The exponentially decaying Morse potential is a typical choice, and is known to reproduce certain types of collective motion observed in nature, particularly aligned flocks and rotating mills. We introduce a class of interaction potentials, that we call Quasi-Morse, for which flock and rotating mills states are also observed numerically, however in that case the corresponding macroscopic equations allow for explicit solutions in terms of special functions, with coefficients that can be obtained numerically without solving the particle evolution. We compare thus obtained solutions with long-time dynamics of the particle systems and find a close agreement for several types of flock and mill solutions.

  11. A new interaction potential for swarming models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, J. A.; Martin, S.; Panferov, V.

    2013-10-01

    We consider a self-propelled particle system which has been used to describe certain types of collective motion of animals, such as fish schools and bird flocks. Interactions between particles are specified by means of a pairwise potential, repulsive at short ranges and attractive at longer ranges. The exponentially decaying Morse potential is a typical choice, and is known to reproduce certain types of collective motion observed in nature, particularly aligned flocks and rotating mills. We introduce a class of interaction potentials, that we call Quasi-Morse, for which flock and rotating mills states are also observed numerically, however in that case the corresponding macroscopic equations allow for explicit solutions in terms of special functions, with coefficients that can be obtained numerically without solving the particle evolution. We compare the obtained solutions with long-time dynamics of the particle systems and find a close agreement for several types of flock and mill solutions.

  12. Potential interaction between pomegranate juice and warfarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komperda, Kathy E

    2009-08-01

    To my knowledge, no published reports have described an interaction between pomegranate juice and warfarin. Investigators from previous animal and in vitro studies have reported a potential for pomegranate juice to inhibit metabolism involving the cytochrome P450 system, an effect that could translate into a clinical drug-diet interaction with warfarin. This case report describes a 64-year-old Caucasian woman who was treated with warfarin for recurrent deep vein thrombosis. She had been receiving a relatively stable dosage of warfarin 4 mg/day for several months, with stable international normalized ratios (INRs). During that time, the patient was consuming pomegranate juice 2-3 times/week. She stopped drinking the juice, and her INRs became subtherapeutic. Her dosage of warfarin was increased to maintain therapeutic anticoagulation. No rechallenge with pomegranate juice was performed. Use of the Drug Interaction Probability Scale indicated a possible relationship between the patient's subtherapeutic INR and the pomegranate juice. Although this potential interaction needs to be explored further, clinicians should be aware of the interaction and thoroughly interview and closely monitor their patients who are receiving warfarin.

  13. Scale-free behaviour of amino acid pair interactions in folded proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Steffen B.; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa; Mortensen, Rasmus J.

    2012-01-01

    that they are in buried a-helices or b-strands, in a spatial distance of 3.8–4.3A° and in a sequence distance .4 residues. We speculate that the scale free organization of the amino acid pair interactions in the 8D protein structure combined with the clear dominance of pairs of Ala, Ile, Leu and Val is important......The protein structure is a cumulative result of interactions between amino acid residues interacting with each other through space and/or chemical bonds. Despite the large number of high resolution protein structures, the ‘‘protein structure code’’ has not been fully identified. Our manuscript...... presents a novel approach to protein structure analysis in order to identify rules for spatial packing of amino acid pairs in proteins. We have investigated 8706 high resolution non-redundant protein chains and quantified amino acid pair interactions in terms of solvent accessibility, spatial and sequence...

  14. Potential intravenous drug interactions in intensive care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiara Benevides Moreira

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To analyze potential intravenous drug interactions, and their level of severity associated with the administration of these drugs based on the prescriptions of an intensive care unit. METHOD Quantitative study, with aretrospective exploratory design, and descriptive statistical analysis of the ICU prescriptions of a teaching hospital from March to June 2014. RESULTS The sample consisted of 319 prescriptions and subsamples of 50 prescriptions. The mean number of drugs per patient was 9.3 records, and a higher probability of drug interaction inherent to polypharmacy was evidenced. The study identified severe drug interactions, such as concomitant administration of Tramadol with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drugs (e.g., Metoclopramide and Fluconazole, increasing the risk of seizures due to their epileptogenic actions, as well as the simultaneous use of Ranitidine-Fentanyl®, which can lead to respiratory depression. CONCLUSION A previous mapping of prescriptions enables the characterization of the drug therapy, contributing to prevent potential drug interactions and their clinical consequences.

  15. Hierarchical folding of multiple sequence alignments for the prediction of structures and RNA-RNA interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seemann, Ernst Stefan; Richter, Andreas S.; Gorodkin, Jan;

    2010-01-01

    Background: Many regulatory non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) function through complementary binding with mRNAs or other ncRNAs, e.g., microRNAs, snoRNAs and bacterial sRNAs. Predicting these RNA interactions is essential for functional studies of putative ncRNAs or for the design of artificial RNAs. Many...

  16. SCOWLP update: 3D classification of protein-protein, -peptide, -saccharide and -nucleic acid interactions, and structure-based binding inferences across folds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schreiber Sven

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein interactions are essential for coordinating cellular functions. Proteomic studies have already elucidated a huge amount of protein-protein interactions that require detailed functional analysis. Understanding the structural basis of each individual interaction through their structural determination is necessary, yet an unfeasible task. Therefore, computational tools able to predict protein binding regions and recognition modes are required to rationalize putative molecular functions for proteins. With this aim, we previously created SCOWLP, a structural classification of protein binding regions at protein family level, based on the information obtained from high-resolution 3D protein-protein and protein-peptide complexes. Description We present here a new version of SCOWLP that has been enhanced by the inclusion of protein-nucleic acid and protein-saccharide interactions. SCOWLP takes interfacial solvent into account for a detailed characterization of protein interactions. In addition, the binding regions obtained per protein family have been enriched by the inclusion of predicted binding regions, which have been inferred from structurally related proteins across all existing folds. These inferences might become very useful to suggest novel recognition regions and compare structurally similar interfaces from different families. Conclusions The updated SCOWLP has new functionalities that allow both, detection and comparison of protein regions recognizing different types of ligands, which include other proteins, peptides, nucleic acids and saccharides, within a solvated environment. Currently, SCOWLP allows the analysis of predicted protein binding regions based on structure-based inferences across fold space. These predictions may have a unique potential in assisting protein docking, in providing insights into protein interaction networks, and in guiding rational engineering of protein ligands. The newly designed

  17. Adaptive Correction from Virtually Complex Dynamic Libraries: The Role of Noncovalent Interactions in Structural Selection and Folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafuente, Maria; Atcher, Joan; Solà, Jordi; Alfonso, Ignacio

    2015-11-16

    The hierarchical self-assembling of complex molecular systems is dictated by the chemical and structural information stored in their components. This information can be expressed through an adaptive process that determines the structurally fittest assembly under given environmental conditions. We have set up complex disulfide-based dynamic covalent libraries of chemically and topologically diverse pseudopeptidic compounds. We show how the reaction evolves from very complex mixtures at short reaction times to the almost exclusive formation of a major compound, through the establishment of intramolecular noncovalent interactions. Our experiments demonstrate that the systems evolve through error-check and error-correction processes. The nature of these interactions, the importance of the folding and the effects of the environment are also discussed.

  18. PRESENTATION POTENTIAL USING IN PEDAGOGICAL INTERACTION PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga V. Ershova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The given article is aimed at considering multimedia presentation potential and its influence on strengthening classroom teacher-student interaction. In the article the importance of using this kind of activity in the study process is pointed in connection with educational state policy on the one hand. On the other hand, gained students’ skills as a final result of work with presentations met employers’ demand for both parent and world labour-markets and bring competitive benefit to the candidates. Scientific novelty and results. Multimedia presentation is considered as a specific complex of classroom activities. The students are oriented on the self analysis and presentation assessment. It is shown that well-organized process of peer students’ assessment allows to simultaneously helping in solving the didactic and methodical problems. To this purpose the system of assessment criteria should be developed. It has to be clear for students for making assessment feasible and time-saving. The example of a possible variant of criteria system is described; quality of the presentations prepared by students can be defined based on such system criteria. The author also analyzed software products of the three main platforms (Windows, Linux, MacOs which have different tools and allow to follow users’ needs for creating presentations. In the article there is a comparative table of the two most popular software development: the program Microsoft PowerPoint and the web-service Prezi for realizing the relevance of their use in the study process. Practical significance of the present article concludes in author’s suggestions of some recommendations for presentation potential use as a tool of improving pedagogical interaction process with contemporary students. 

  19. The interaction between deepwater channel systems and growing thrusts and folds, toe-thrust region of the deepwater Niger Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Byami; Whittaker, Alex; Lonergan, Lidia

    2015-04-01

    Gravity-driven seaward-verging thrusts, landward-verging back-thrusts and associated folds often characterize the slope and deepwater settings of passive margins. These structures, found in the 'toe-thrust' region of the system, exert a significant control on sediment gravity flows because they create and determine the location and configuration of sediment depocentres and transport systems. Consequently, a quantitative understanding of the interaction between sediment gravity flows and seabed topography is required to understand these systems effectively. Here we make quantitative measurements of the geomorphic response of submarine channels to growing tectonic structures with the aim of providing new constraints on the long-term erosional dynamics of submarine channel systems. This study exploits 3D seismic data in the outer toe-thrust region of the deepwater Niger Delta to analyze the interaction between Plio-Pleistocene channel systems and actively growing folds and thrusts. We mapped folds and thrusts from the seismic data and we used this data to reconstruct the history of fold growth. We then used the sea-bed seismic horizon to build a 50 m resolution Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the sea floor in Arc-GIS. We extracted channel long- profiles across growing structures from the DEM, and made measurements of channel geometries at regular intervals along the channel length. This information was used to infer morphodyanamic processes that sculpted the channel systems through time, and to estimate the bed shear stresses and fluid velocities of typical flow events. The bathymetric long profiles of these channels are relatively linear with concavity that range from -0.08 to -0.34, and an average gradient of ~1o. Actively growing thrusts are typically associated with a local steepening in channel gradient by a factor of up to 3, and this effect extends 0.5 - 2 km upstream of the thrust. Within these knickzones, channel incision increases by approximately by a

  20. Extreme Folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaine, Erik

    2012-02-01

    Our understanding of the mathematics and algorithms behind paper folding, and geometric folding in general, has increased dramatically over the past several years. These developments have found a surprisingly broad range of applications. In the art of origami, it has helped spur the technical origami revolution. In engineering and science, it has helped solve problems in areas such as manufacturing, robotics, graphics, and protein folding. On the recreational side, it has led to new kinds of folding puzzles and magic. I will give an overview of the mathematics and algorithms of folding, with a focus on new mathematics and sculpture.

  1. Exploiting Supramolecular Interactions for the Intramolecular Folding of Side-Chain Functionalized Polymers and Assembly of Anisotropic Colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romulus, Joy

    The overarching goal presented in this thesis is the self-assembly of synthetic systems into higher ordered structures utilizing supramolecular chemistry. Noncovalent interactions including charge-transfer and hydrogen bonding as well as DNA hybridization are exploited to induce the assembly of polymers and colloids into well-defined architectures. This strategy provides a tunable handle on materials bulk properties that can be adjusted by simply changing variables such as temperature and solvent. A brief overview of design principles for the supramolecular assembly of side-chain functionalized polymers is presented. The polymerization technique selected was living ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP), thus affording control over molecular weight and molecular weight distributions. ROMP also allowed for the incorporation of functional groups that were used to assemble the polymers into ordered structures. Charge-transfer motifs were exploited and shown to drive the assembly of random and alternating copolymers via intramolecular side-chain interactions. Incorporation of complementary hydrogen bonding motifs was shown to guide the single-chain folding of a multifunctional triblock copolymer into sheet-like structures. Precision over the size, shape, and monomer sequence were identified as key elements for efficient self-assembly. The self-assembly of colloids using DNA hybridization was also investigated. Previously, the majority of colloid-based research relied upon the self-assembly of spherical isotropic particles into closed-packed arrangements. In contrast, anisotropic particles may allow for the realization of open structures. By expanding upon a method to permanently cross-link DNA strands incubated on a colloidal surface, a new strategy to engineer patchy particles is described. These functional DNA-coated patches are demonstrated to direct particle assembly. The self-assembly of polymer and colloidal systems utilizing noncovalent interactions

  2. Systematic comparison of barriers for heavy-ion fusion calculated on the basis of the double-folding model by employing two versions of nucleon-nucleon interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontchar, I. I.; Chushnyakova, M. V.

    2016-07-01

    A systematic calculation of barriers for heavy-ion fusion was performed on the basis of the double-folding model by employing two versions of an effective nucleon-nucleon interaction: M3Y interaction and Migdal interaction. The results of calculations by the Hartree-Fockmethod with the SKX coefficients were taken for nuclear densities. The calculations reveal that the fusion barrier is higher in the case of employing theMigdal interaction than in the case of employing the M3Y interaction. In view of this, the use of the Migdal interaction in describing heavy-ion fusion is questionable.

  3. Potential for measurement of the distribution of DNA folds in complex environments using Correlated X-ray Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Gundolf; Krajina, Brad; Spakowitz, Andrew; Doniach, Sebastian

    2016-12-01

    In vivo chromosomal behavior is dictated by the organization of genomic DNA at length scales ranging from nanometers to microns. At these disparate scales, the DNA conformation is influenced by a range of proteins that package, twist and disentangle the DNA double helix, leading to a complex hierarchical structure that remains undetermined. Thus, there is a critical need for methods of structural characterization of DNA that can accommodate complex environmental conditions over biologically relevant length scales. Based on multiscale molecular simulations, we report on the possibility of measuring supercoiling in complex environments using angular correlations of scattered X-rays resulting from X-ray free electron laser (xFEL) experiments. We recently demonstrated the observation of structural detail for solutions of randomly oriented metallic nanoparticles [D. Mendez et al., Philos. Trans. R. Soc. B 360 (2014) 20130315]. Here, we argue, based on simulations, that correlated X-ray scattering (CXS) has the potential for measuring the distribution of DNA folds in complex environments, on the scale of a few persistence lengths.

  4. Influence of Rice Genotypes on Folding and Spinning Behaviour of Leaffolder (Cnaphalocrocis medinalis) and Its Interaction with Leaf Damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. PUNITHAVALLI; N. M. MUTHUKRISHNAN; M. BALAJI RAJKUMAR

    2013-01-01

    Folding and spinning behavior of Cnaphalocrocis medinalis (Guenee) (Lepidoptera:Pyralidae) in different categories of rice genotypes viz., resistant, susceptible, hybrid, scented, popular and wild rice genotypes were significantly different. Longer leaf selection time and folding time per primary fold;shorter primary fold and whole leaf fold; lower number of binds per primary fold and whole leaf fold were recorded in resistant and wild rice genotypes. In the correlation analysis, it was found that the leaf folding parameters were positively correlated to leaf folder damage whereas the leaf spinning parameters were negatively correlated. Similarly, the morphological characters differed significantly among the chosen genotypes and were related to leaffolder damage. The leaf width and total productive tiller number were positively correlated to leaffolder infestation. Results also indicated that the trichome density and length, leaf length and plant height might contribute to resistance whereas total number of green leaves had no effect on leaffolder infestation. In the scatter plot analysis between leaf folding and spinning characters and leaffolder damage, the genotypes were separated into four groups viz., resistant (TKM6, Ptb 33, LFR831311, Oryza rhizomatis and O. minuta), moderately resistant (ASD16 and CORH1), moderately susceptible (ADT36, Pusa Basmati and CB200290) and susceptible (IR36 and TN1). The present investigation proved that the leaf morphology viz., leaf length and width, plant height and trichome density and length may play a vital role in resistance against rice leaffolder.

  5. In vivo control of redox potential during protein folding catalyzed by bacterial protein disulfide-isomerase (DsbA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlich, M; Glockshuber, R

    1993-11-25

    The formation of disulfide bonds in Escherichia coli is catalyzed by periplasmic protein disulfide-isomerase (DsbA). When the alpha-amylase/trypsin inhibitor from Ragi, a protein containing five intramolecular disulfide bridges, is secreted into the periplasm of E. coli, large amounts of misfolded inhibitor with incomplete or incorrect disulfides are accumulated. Folding of the inhibitor in the periplasm is not improved when DsbA is coexpressed and cosecreted. However, an up to 14-fold increase in correctly folded inhibitor is observed by co-expression of DsbA in conjugation with the addition of reduced glutathione to the growth medium. This peptide acts as a disulfide-shuffling reagent and can pass the outer membrane of E. coli. Since the influence of DsbA on the folding yield of the inhibitor is reduced in the presence of oxidized glutathione, the in vivo function of DsbA appears to be dependent on the ratio between oxidizing and reducing thiol equivalents in the periplasm. The high stability of thiol reagents against air oxidation during growth of E. coli allows the investigation of oxidative protein folding in vivo under controlled, thiol-dependent redox conditions.

  6. Interaction of elementary waves for equations of potential flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈恕行; 王辉

    1997-01-01

    Interaction of elementary waves for equations of unsteady potential flow in gas dynamics is considered . Under the assumptions on weakness of strength of the elementary waves the structure of solutions has been given in various cases of interaction of simple wave with shock, or interaction between simple waves or shocks. Hence the complete results on interaction of weak elementary waves for second-order equation of potential flow are obtained.

  7. Impact of Thermostats on Folding and Aggregation Properties of Peptides Using the Optimized Potential for Efficient Structure Prediction Coarse-Grained Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spill, Yannick G; Pasquali, Samuela; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2011-05-10

    The simulation of amyloid fibril formation is impossible if one takes into account all chemical details of the amino acids and their detailed interactions with the solvent. We investigate the folding and aggregation of two model peptides using the optimized potential for efficient structure prediction (OPEP) coarse-grained model and replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations coupled with either the Langevin or the Berendsen thermostat. For both the monomer of blocked penta-alanine and the trimer of the 25-35 fragment of the Alzheimer's amyloid β protein, we find little variations in the equilibrium structures and heat capacity curves using the two thermostats. Despite this high similarity, we detect significant differences in the populations of the dominant conformations at low temperatures, whereas the configurational distributions remain the same in proximity of the melting temperature. Aβ25-35 trimers at 300 K have an averaged β-sheet content of 12% and are primarily characterized by fully disordered peptides or a small curved two-stranded β-sheet stabilized by a disordered peptide. In addition, OPEP molecular dynamics simulations of Aβ25-35 hexamers at 300 K with a small curved six-stranded antiparallel β-sheet do not show any extension of the β-sheet content. These data support the idea that the mechanism of Aβ25-35 amyloid formation does not result from a high fraction of extended β-sheet-rich trimers and hexamers.

  8. Integrated Method to Attach DNA Handles and Functionally Select Proteins to Study Folding and Protein-Ligand Interactions with Optical Tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yuxin; Canavan, Clare; Taylor, Susan S; Maillard, Rodrigo A

    2017-09-07

    Optical tweezers has emerged as a powerful tool to study folding, ligand binding, and motor enzymes. The manipulation of proteins with optical tweezers requires attaching molecular handles to the protein of interest. Here, we describe a novel method that integrates the covalent attachment of DNA handles to target proteins with a selection step for functional and properly folded molecules. In addition, this method enables obtaining protein molecules in different liganded states and can be used with handles of different lengths. We apply this method to study the cAMP binding domain A (CBD-A) of Protein kinase A. We find that the functional selection step drastically improves the reproducibility and homogeneity of the single molecule data. In contrast, without a functional selection step, proteins often display misfolded conformations. cAMP binding stabilizes the CBD-A against a denaturing force, and increases the folded state lifetime. Data obtained with handles of 370 and 70 base pairs are indistinguishable, but at low forces short handles provide a higher spatial resolution. Altogether, this method is flexible, selects for properly folded molecules in different liganded states, and can be readily applicable to study protein folding or protein-ligand interactions with force spectroscopy that require molecular handles.

  9. Potential Flow Interactions With Directional Solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddhavarapu, Sudhir S.; Meiburg, Eckart

    1999-01-01

    The effect of convective melt motion on the growth of morphological instabilities in crystal growth has been the focus of many studies in the past decade. While most of the efforts have been directed towards investigating the linear stability aspects, relatively little attention has been devoted to experimental and numerical studies. In a pure morphological case, when there is no flow, morphological changes in the solid-liquid interface are governed by heat conduction and solute distribution. Under the influence of a convective motion, both heat and solute are redistributed, thereby affecting the intrinsic morphological phenomenon. The overall effect of the convective motion could be either stabilizing or destabilizing. Recent investigations have predicted stabilization by a flow parallel to the interface. In the case of non-parallel flows, e.g., stagnation point flow, Brattkus and Davis have found a new flow-induced morphological instability that occurs at long wavelengths and also consists of waves propagating against the flow. Other studies have addressed the nonlinear aspects (Konstantinos and Brown, Wollkind and Segel)). In contrast to the earlier studies, our present investigation focuses on the effects of the potential flow fields typically encountered in Hele-Shaw cells. Such a Hele-Shaw cell can simulate a gravity-free environment in the sense that buoyancy-driven convection is largely suppressed, and hence negligible. Our interest lies both in analyzing the linear stability of the solidification process in the presence of potential flow fields, as well as in performing high-accuracy nonlinear simulations. Linear stability analysis can be performed for the flow configuration mentioned above. It is observed that a parallel potential flow is stabilizing and gives rise to waves traveling downstream. We have built a highly accurate numerical scheme which is validated at small amplitudes by comparing with the analytically predicted results for the pure

  10. The Suramin Derivative NF449 Interacts with the 5-fold Vertex of the Enterovirus A71 Capsid to Prevent Virus Attachment to PSGL-1 and Heparan Sulfate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yorihiro Nishimura

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available NF449, a sulfated compound derived from the antiparasitic drug suramin, was previously reported to inhibit infection by enterovirus A71 (EV-A71. In the current work, we found that NF449 inhibits virus attachment to target cells, and specifically blocks virus interaction with two identified receptors--the P-selectin ligand, PSGL-1, and heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycan--with no effect on virus binding to a third receptor, the scavenger receptor SCARB2. We also examined a number of commercially available suramin analogues, and newly synthesized derivatives of NF449; among these, NF110 and NM16, like NF449, inhibited virus attachment at submicromolar concentrations. PSGL-1 and heparan sulfate, but not SCARB2, are both sulfated molecules, and their interaction with EV-A71 is thought to involve positively charged capsid residues, including a conserved lysine at VP1-244, near the icosahedral 5-fold vertex. We found that mutation of VP1-244 resulted in resistance to NF449, suggesting that this residue is involved in NF449 interaction with the virus capsid. Consistent with this idea, NF449 and NF110 prevented virus interaction with monoclonal antibody MA28-7, which specifically recognizes an epitope overlapping VP1-244 at the 5-fold vertex. Based on these observations we propose that NF449 and related compounds compete with sulfated receptor molecules for a binding site at the 5-fold vertex of the EV-A71 capsid.

  11. Folding by Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Paul; Damasceno, Pablo; Glotzer, Sharon

    2014-03-01

    A form of self-assembly, ``self-folding'' presents an alternative approach to the creation of reconfigurable, responsive materials with applications ranging from robotics to drug design. However, the complexity of interactions present in biological and engineered systems that undergo folding makes it challenging to isolate the main factors controlling their assembly and dis-assembly. Here we use computer simulations of simple, minimalistic self-foldable structures and investigate their stochastic folding process. By dynamically accessing all the states that lead to, or inhibit, successful folding, we show that the mechanisms by which general stochastic systems can achieve their ``native'' structures can be identified and used to design rules for optimized folding propensity. Research supported by the National Science Foundation, Emerging Frontiers in Research and Innovation Award # EFRI-1240264.

  12. Discrete Time Markovian Agents Interacting Through a Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Budhiraja, Amarjit; Rubenthaler, Sylvain

    2011-01-01

    A discrete time stochastic model for a multiagent system given in terms of a large collection of interacting Markov chains is studied. The evolution of the interacting particles is described through a time inhomogeneous transition probability kernel that depends on the 'gradient' of the potential field. The particles, in turn, dynamically modify the potential field through their cumulative input. Interacting Markov processes of the above form have been suggested as models for active biological transport in response to external stimulus such as a chemical gradient. One of the basic mathematical challenges is to develop a general theory of stability for such interacting Markovian systems and for the corresponding nonlinear Markov processes that arise in the large agent limit. Such a theory would be key to a mathematical understanding of the interactive structure formation that results from the complex feedback between the agents and the potential field. It will also be a crucial ingredient in developing simulat...

  13. Helium-3 Microscopic Optical Model Potential Based on Skyrme Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>The helium-3 microscopic optical potential is obtained by Green function method through nuclear matter approximation and local density approximation based on the effective Skyrme interaction. The reaction cross

  14. The local dynamics of unfolded versus folded tRNA in comparison to synthetic polyelectrolytes and the role of electrostatic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Joon Ho; Tyagi, Madhu; Briber, Robert M.; Woodson, Sarah A.; Sokolov, Alexei

    2012-02-01

    The local dynamics of RNA is strongly coupled to biological functions such as ligand recognition and catalysis. We have used quasielastic neutron scattering spectroscopy to follow the local motion of RNA and a synthetic polyelectrolyte as a function of Mg2+ concentration. We have observed that increasing Mg+2 concentration increases the picosecond to nanosecond dynamics of hydrated tRNA while stabilizing the tRNA folded structure. Analyses of the atomic mean-squared displacement, relaxation time, persistence length, and fraction of mobile atoms showed that unfolded tRNA is more rigid than in the folded state. This same behavior was observed for sulfonated polystyrene indicating that the increased dynamics in arises from charge screening of the polyelectrolyte rather than specific interactions. These results are opposite to what is observed for proteins for the relationship between the unfolded/folded states and the internal dynamics where the folded state is observed to be more rigid than the unfolded state. We conclude that the local dynamics for both bio- and synthetic polymers are strongly influenced by the electrostatic environment.

  15. Potential drug interactions in patients given antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendel Mombaque dos Santos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to investigate potential drug-drug interactions (PDDI in patients with HIV infection on antiretroviral therapy. Methods: a cross-sectional study was conducted on 161 adults with HIV infection. Clinical, socio demographic, and antiretroviral treatment data were collected. To analyze the potential drug interactions, we used the software Micromedex(r. Statistical analysis was performed by binary logistic regression, with a p-value of ≤0.05 considered statistically significant. Results: of the participants, 52.2% were exposed to potential drug-drug interactions. In total, there were 218 potential drug-drug interactions, of which 79.8% occurred between drugs used for antiretroviral therapy. There was an association between the use of five or more medications and potential drug-drug interactions (p = 0.000 and between the time period of antiretroviral therapy being over six years and potential drug-drug interactions (p < 0.00. The clinical impact was prevalent sedation and cardiotoxicity. Conclusions: the PDDI identified in this study of moderate and higher severity are events that not only affect the therapeutic response leading to toxicity in the central nervous and cardiovascular systems, but also can interfere in tests used for detection of HIV resistance to antiretroviral drugs.

  16. Helical configurations of elastic rods in the presence of a long-range interaction potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Lillo, S; Lupo, G; Sommacal, M, E-mail: Matteo.Sommacal@pg.infn.i [Dipartimento di Matematica e Informatica and INSTM-Village, Universita degli Studi di Perugia, Via Vanvitelli 1, 06123 Perugia (Italy)

    2010-02-26

    Recently, the integrability of the stationary Kirchhoff equations describing an elastic rod folded in the shape of a circular helix was proven. In this paper we explicitly work out the solutions to the stationary Kirchhoff equations in the presence of a long-range potential which describes the average constant force due to a Morse-type interaction acting among the points of the rod. The average constant force results to be parallel to the normal vector to the central line of the folded rod; this condition remarkably permits to preserve the integrability (indeed the solvability) of the corresponding Kirchhoff equations if the elastic rod features constant or periodic stiffnesses and vanishing intrinsic twist. Furthermore, we discuss the elastic energy density with respect to the radius and pitch of the helix, showing the existence of stationary points, namely stable and unstable configurations, for plausible choices of the featured parameters corresponding to a real bio-polymer.

  17. Helical configurations of elastic rods in the presence of a long-range interaction potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lillo, S.; Lupo, G.; Sommacal, M.

    2010-02-01

    Recently, the integrability of the stationary Kirchhoff equations describing an elastic rod folded in the shape of a circular helix was proven. In this paper we explicitly work out the solutions to the stationary Kirchhoff equations in the presence of a long-range potential which describes the average constant force due to a Morse-type interaction acting among the points of the rod. The average constant force results to be parallel to the normal vector to the central line of the folded rod; this condition remarkably permits to preserve the integrability (indeed the solvability) of the corresponding Kirchhoff equations if the elastic rod features constant or periodic stiffnesses and vanishing intrinsic twist. Furthermore, we discuss the elastic energy density with respect to the radius and pitch of the helix, showing the existence of stationary points, namely stable and unstable configurations, for plausible choices of the featured parameters corresponding to a real bio-polymer.

  18. Incidence of potential drug-drug interactions with antidiabetic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samardzic, I; Bacic-Vrca, V

    2015-06-01

    In an effort to achieve normoglycemia more than one antidiabetic agent is usually needed. Diabetes is associated with several comorbidities and patients with diabetes are often treated with multiple medications. Therefore, patients with diabetes are especially exposed to drug-drug interactions (DDIs). The aim of this study was to analyse the incidence and type of potential DDIs of antidiabetic drugs in patients with diabetes. This retrospective study analyzed pharmacy record data of 225 patients with diabetes mellitus. Both type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients who were taking at least one antidiabetic agent during the period of six months were included. We investigated associated therapy in that period in order to identify potential DDIs with antidiabetic therapy. Potential interactions were identified by Lexicomp Lexi-Interat Online (Lexi-Comp, Inc., Hudson, USA) software which categorizes potential DDIs according to clinical significance in five types (A, B, C, D and X). Categories C, D and X are of clinical concern and always require medical attention (therapy monitoring, therapy modification or avoiding combination). We found that 80.9% of patients had at least one potential category C interaction while there were no D and X interactions. Most frequently encountered potential DDI (n = 176) included antidiabetic drugs and thiazide or thiazide like diuretics. Patients with diabetes are exposed to a large number of potential clinically significant DDIs that may require appropriate monitoring. Using databases of DDIs could be helpful in reducing the risk of potential clinically significant DDIs.

  19. Risk factors for potential drug interactions in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Lars; Gonzalez Lopez-Valcarcel, Beatriz; Petersen, Gert

    2008-01-01

    Pharmacoepidemiologic Database, OPED) covering prescriptions to all inhabitants in the county of Funen, Denmark. All individuals exposed to concurrent use of two or more drugs (polypharmacy) were identified. Combinations of drugs with potential interactions were registered and classified as major, moderate, or minor......, depending on the severity of outcome and the quality of documentation. A two-level random coefficient logistic regression model was used to investigate factors related to potential drug interactions. Results: One-third of the population was exposed to polypharmacy, and 6% were exposed to potential drug...

  20. Physical interactions between DNA and sepiolite nanofibers, and potential application for DNA transfer into mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Smirnov, Fidel Antonio; Piétrement, Olivier; Aranda, Pilar; Bertrand, Jean-Rémi; Ayache, Jeanne; Le Cam, Eric; Ruiz-Hitzky, Eduardo; Lopez, Bernard S.

    2016-01-01

    Nanofibers of sepiolite, a natural silicate belonging to the clay minerals family, might constitute a potential promising nanocarrier for the non-viral transfer of bio-molecules. We show here that sepiolite nanofibers efficiently bind different types of DNA molecules through electrostatic interactions, hydrogen bonding, cation bridges, and van der Waals forces. Moreover, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy identified the external silanol groups as the main sites of interaction with the DNA. Furthermore, as a proof of concept, we show that sepiolite is able to stably transfer plasmid DNA into mammalian cells and that the efficiency can be optimized. Indeed, sonication of sepiolite 100-fold stimulated DNA transfection efficiency. These results open the way to the use of sepiolite-based biohybrids as a novel class of nanoplatform for gene transfer with potential clinical applications. PMID:27808269

  1. Thermo-mechanical controls on intraplate deformation and the role of plume – folding interactions in continental topography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cloetingh, S.; Burov, E.; Francois, T.

    2013-01-01

    Thermo-tectonic age and inherited structure exert the main controls on the bulk strength of the lithosphere in intraplate settings. Mechanical decoupling within the lithosphere strongly affects the interaction between deep Earth and surface processes. Thermo-mechanical models demonstrate the particu

  2. EMERGING ROLE OF N- AND C-TERMINAL INTERACTIONS IN STABILIZING (β;/α8 FOLD WITH SPECIAL EMPHASIS ON FAMILY 10 XYLANASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Bhardwaj

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Xylanases belong to an important class of industrial enzymes. Various xylanases have been purified and characterized from a plethora of organisms including bacteria, marine algae, plants, protozoans, insects, snails and crustaceans. Depending on the source, the enzymatic activity of xylanases varies considerably under various physico-chemical conditions such as temperature, pH, high salt and in the presence of proteases. Family 10 or glycosyl hydrolase 10 (GH10 xylanases are one of the well characterized and thoroughly studied classes of industrial enzymes. The TIM-barrel fold structure which is ubiquitous in nature is one of the characteristics of family 10 xylanases. Family 10 xylanases have been used as a “model system” due to their TIM-barrel fold to dissect and understand protein stability under various conditions. A better understanding of structure-stability-function relationships of family 10 xylanases allows one to apply these governing molecular rules to engineer other TIM-barrel fold proteins to improve their stability and retain function(s under adverse conditions. In this review, we discuss the implications of N-and C-terminal interactions, observed in family 10 xylanases on protein stability under extreme conditions. The role of metal binding and aromatic clusters in protein stability is also discussed. Studying and understanding family 10 xylanase structure and function, can contribute to our protein engineering knowledge.

  3. Emerging role of N- and C-terminal interactions in stabilizing (β/α8 fold with special emphasis on Family 10 xylanases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Bhardwaj

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Xylanases belong to an important class of industrial enzymes. Various xylanases have been purified and characterized from a plethora of organisms including bacteria, marine algae, plants, protozoans, insects, snails and crustaceans. Depending on the source, the enzymatic activity of xylanases varies considerably under various physico-chemical conditions such as temperature, pH, high salt and in the presence of proteases. Family 10 or glycosyl hydrolase 10 (GH10 xylanases are one of the well characterized and thoroughly studied classes of industrial enzymes. The TIM-barrel fold structure which is ubiquitous in nature is one of the characteristics of family 10 xylanases. Family 10 xylanases have been used as a “model system” due to their TIM-barrel fold to dissect and understand protein stability under various conditions. A better understanding of structure-stability-function relationships of family 10 xylanases allows one to apply these governing molecular rules to engineer other TIM-barrel fold proteins to improve their stability and retain function(s under adverse conditions. In this review, we discuss the implications of N-and C-terminal interactions, observed in family 10 xylanases on protein stability under extreme conditions. The role of metal binding and aromatic clusters in protein stability is also discussed. Studying and understanding family 10 xylanase structure and function, can contribute to our protein engineering knowledge.

  4. Effective polarization interaction potentials of the partially ionized dense plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramazanov, T S [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Tole Bi 96a, 050012 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Dzhumagulova, K N [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Tole Bi 96a, 050012 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Omarbakiyeva, Yu A [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Tole Bi 96a, 050012 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Roepke, G [Institute of Physics, University of Rostock, D-18051 Rostock (Germany)

    2006-04-28

    The effective polarization interaction potential between charged and neutral particles is considered for a partially ionized plasma. This pseudopotential is deduced taking into account quantum-mechanical effects at short distances as well as screening effects at large distances. Furthermore, a cutoff radius is obtained using a modified effective-range theory. Explicit results for parameters describing the interaction of the atom with charged particles are given.

  5. Numerical impact simulation of gradually increased kinetic energy transfer has the potential to break up folded protein structures resulting in cytotoxic brain tissue edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Holst, Hans; Li, Xiaogai

    2013-07-01

    Although the consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and its treatment have been improved, there is still a substantial lack of understanding the mechanisms. Numerical simulation of the impact can throw further lights on site and mechanism of action. A finite element model of the human head and brain tissue was used to simulate TBI. The consequences of gradually increased kinetic energy transfer was analyzed by evaluating the impact intracranial pressure (ICP), strain level, and their potential influences on binding forces in folded protein structures. The gradually increased kinetic energy was found to have the potential to break apart bonds of Van der Waals in all impacts and hydrogen bonds at simulated impacts from 6 m/s and higher, thereby superseding the energy in folded protein structures. Further, impacts below 6 m/s showed none or very slight increase in impact ICP and strain levels, whereas impacts of 6 m/s or higher showed a gradual increase of the impact ICP and strain levels reaching over 1000 KPa and over 30%, respectively. The present simulation study shows that the free kinetic energy transfer, impact ICP, and strain levels all have the potential to initiate cytotoxic brain tissue edema by unfolding protein structures. The definition of mild, moderate, and severe TBI should thus be looked upon as the same condition and separated only by a gradual severity of impact.

  6. Generation of directional EOF by interactive oscillatory zeta potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chih-Yu; Wang, Chang-Yi; Chang, Chien-Cheng

    2008-11-01

    A steady directional EOF due to a nonlinear interaction between oscillatory axial electrical fields and oscillatory wall potentials (zeta potentials) is presented. This is a new mechanism to produce such a mean flow. It is found that the flow velocity depends not on the external driving frequency but on the phase angle difference between the electric fields and the zeta potentials. The formulation can also be reduced to the static EOF straightforwardly. For the purpose of theoretical demonstration, we use the Debye-Huckel approximation for the zeta potential. Results of planar and cylindrical capillaries are given.

  7. Electron interactions in graphene through an effective Coulomb potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Joao N. B.; Adam, Shaffique

    A recent numerical work [H.-K. Tang et al, PRL 115, 186602 (2015)] considering graphene's π-electrons interacting through an effective Coulomb potential that is finite at short-distances, stressed the importance of the sp2 -electrons in determining the semimetal to Mott insulator phase transition in graphene. Some years ago, I. F. Herbut [PRL 97, 146401 (2006)] studied such a transition by mapping graphene's π-electrons into a Gross-Neveu model. From a different perspective, D. T. Son [PRB 75, 235423 (2007)] put the emphasis on the long-range interactions by modelling graphene as Dirac fermions interacting through a bare Coulomb potential. Here we build on these works and explore the phase diagram of Dirac fermions interacting through an effective Coulomb-like potential screened at short-distances. The interaction potential used allows for analytic results that controllably switch between the two perspectives above. This work was supported by the Singapore National Research Foundation (NRF-NRFF2012-01 and CA2DM medium-sized centre program) and by the Singapore Ministry of Education and Yale-NUS College (R-607-265-01312).

  8. Observational evidences of the Yukawa Potential Interacting Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Man Ho

    2013-01-01

    Recent observations in galaxies and clusters indicate dark matter density profiles exhibit core-like structures which contradict to the numerical simulation results of collisionless cold dark matter. On the other hand, it has been shown that cold dark matter particles interacting through a Yukawa potential could naturally explain the cores in dwarf galaxies. In this article, I use the Yukawa Potential interacting dark matter model to derive two simple scaling relations on the galactic and cluster scales respectively, which give excellent agreements with observations. Also, in our model, the masses of the force carrier and dark matter particle can be constrained by the observational data.

  9. Study of interaction in silica glass via model potential approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Sarita; Rani, Pooja

    2016-05-01

    Silica is one of the most commonly encountered substances in daily life and in electronics industry. Crystalline SiO2 (in several forms: quartz, cristobalite, tridymite) is an important constituent of many minerals and gemstones, both in pure form and mixed with related oxides. Cohesive energy of amorphous SiO2 has been investigated via intermolecular potentials i.e weak Van der Waals interaction and Morse type short-range interaction. We suggest a simple atom-atom based Van der Waals as well as Morse potential to find cohesive energy of glass. It has been found that the study of silica structure using two different model potentials is significantly different. Van der Waals potential is too weak (P.E =0.142eV/molecule) to describe the interaction between silica molecules. Morse potential is a strong potential, earlier given for intramolecular bonding, but if applied for intermolecular bonding, it gives a value of P.E (=-21.92eV/molecule) to appropriately describe the structure of silica.

  10. Interacting Bose gas confined in a Kronig-Penney potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, O. A.; Solís, M. A.

    We analyze the effect of the 1D periodic Kronig-Penney potential, composed of barriers of width b and separated a distance a, over an interacting Bose gas. At T = 0 , the Gross-Pitaevskii equation is solved analytically in terms of the Jacobi elliptic functions for repulsive or attractive interaction between bosons. By applying the boundary conditions for periodic solutions as well as the normalization of the wave function, we arrive to a set of nonlinear equations from which we obtain the density profile and the chemical potential of the condensate as a function of the particle momentum. The profiles for attractive and repulsive interactions are compared with that of the non-interacting case. For attractive interaction we are able to observe a pronounced spatial localization in the middle of every two barriers. We reproduce the well known results when the Kronig-Penney potential becomes a Dirac Comb. We acknowledge partial support from Grants PAPIIT IN111613 and CONACyT 221030.

  11. Market potential for interactive audio-visual media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leurdijk, A.; Limonard, S.

    2005-01-01

    NM2 (New Media for a New Millennium) develops tools for interactive, personalised and non-linear audio-visual content that will be tested in seven pilot productions. This paper looks at the market potential for these productions from a technological, a business and a users' perspective. It shows tha

  12. Market potential for interactive audio-visual media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leurdijk, A.; Limonard, S.

    2005-01-01

    NM2 (New Media for a New Millennium) develops tools for interactive, personalised and non-linear audio-visual content that will be tested in seven pilot productions. This paper looks at the market potential for these productions from a technological, a business and a users' perspective. It shows tha

  13. Optimizing Interacting Potentials to Form Targeted Materials Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torquato, Salvatore [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Conventional applications of the principles of statistical mechanics (the "forward" problems), start with particle interaction potentials, and proceed to deduce local structure and macroscopic properties. Other applications (that may be classified as "inverse" problems), begin with targeted configurational information, such as low-order correlation functions that characterize local particle order, and attempt to back out full-system configurations and/or interaction potentials. To supplement these successful experimental and numerical "forward" approaches, we have focused on inverse approaches that make use of analytical and computational tools to optimize interactions for targeted self-assembly of nanosystems. The most original aspect of our work is its inherently inverse approach: instead of predicting structures that result from given interaction potentials among particles, we determine the optimal potential that most robustly stabilizes a given target structure subject to certain constraints. Our inverse approach could revolutionize the manner in which materials are designed and fabricated. There are a number of very tangible properties (e.g. zero thermal expansion behavior), elastic constants, optical properties for photonic applications, and transport properties.

  14. Comparison of biomolecules on the basis of Molecular Interaction Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Jordi

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular Interaction Potentials (MIP are frequently used for the comparison of series of compounds displaying related biological behaviors. These potentials are interaction energies between the considered compounds and relevant probes. The interaction energies are computed in the nodes of grids defined around the compounds. There is a need of detailed and objective comparative analyses of MIP distributions in the framework of structure-activity studies. On the other hand, MIP-based studies do not have to be restricted to series of small ligands, since such studies present also interesting possibilities for the analysis and comparison of biological macromolecules. Such analyses can benefit from the application of new methods and computational approaches. The new software MIPSim (Molecular Interaction Potentials Similarity analysis has recently been introduced with the purpose of analyzing and comparing MIP distributions of series of biomolecules. This program is transparently integrated with other programs, like GAMESS or GRID, which can be used for the computation of the potentials to be analyzed or compared. MIPSim incorporates several definitions of similarity coefficients, and is capable of combining several similarity measures into a single one. On the other hand, MIPSim can perform automatic explorations of the maximum similarity alignments between pairs of molecules.

  15. A single particle effective potential for interacting positron and positronium

    CERN Document Server

    Zubiaga, A; Puska, M

    2013-01-01

    We have studied small systems composed by an atom and a positron or a positronium atom. We have used many-body quantum mechanical calculations to describe the correlation effects of light particles. Explicitly correlated gaussian for the basis functions and a stochastical variational optimization method has allowed to obtain accurate wavefunctions and energies. We have discussed the chemistry of positrons in those systems by means of analyzing the densities of the light particles (electrons and positrons). During the discussion, we propose an effective potential that describes the properties of the positron in those systems, valid also when it forms a Ps cluster. The effective potential is a mean field description of the interaction of the positron that can be used to calculate the distribution of the positron and its interaction energy. This potential can be a step forward for an accurate single particle description of the positron in cases when it forms positronium, specially molecular soft matter.

  16. A novel human tectonin protein with multivalent beta-propeller folds interacts with ficolin and binds bacterial LPS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Hooi Ping Low

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although the human genome database has been completed a decade ago, approximately 50% of the proteome remains hypothetical as their functions are unknown. The elucidation of the functions of these hypothetical proteins can lead to additional protein pathways and revelation of new cascades. However, many of these inferences are limited to proteins with substantial sequence similarity. Of particular interest here is the Tectonin domain-containing family of proteins. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have identified hTectonin, a hypothetical protein in the human genome database, as a distant ortholog of the limulus galactose binding protein (GBP. Phylogenetic analysis revealed strong evolutionary conservation of hTectonin homologues from parasite to human. By computational analysis, we showed that both the hTectonin and GBP form beta-propeller structures with multiple Tectonin domains, each containing beta-sheets of 4 strands per beta-sheet. hTectonin is present in the human leukocyte cDNA library and immune-related cell lines. It interacts with M-ficolin, a known human complement protein whose ancient homolog, carcinolectin (CL5, is the functional protein partner of GBP during infection. Yeast 2-hybrid assay showed that only the Tectonin domains of hTectonin recognize the fibrinogen-like domain of the M-ficolin. Surface plasmon resonance analysis showed real-time interaction between the Tectonin domains 6 & 11 and bacterial LPS, indicating that despite forming 2 beta-propellers with its different Tectonin domains, the hTectonin molecule could precisely employ domains 6 & 11 to recognise bacteria. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: By virtue of a recent finding of another Tectonin protein, leukolectin, in the human leukocyte, and our structure-function analysis of the hypothetical hTectonin, we propose that Tectonin domains of proteins could play a vital role in innate immune defense, and that this function has been conserved over several

  17. Resonance energy transfer, pH-induced folded states and the molecular interaction of human serum albumin and icariin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiao-Xia; Fan, Xiao-Yang; Jiang, Feng-Lei; Liu, Yi; Lei, Ke-Lin

    2015-11-01

    Icariin is a flavonol glycoside with a wide range of pharmacological and biological activities. The pharmacological and biological functions of flavonoid compounds mainly originate from their binding to proteins. The mode of interaction of icariin with human serum albumin (HSA) has been characterized by fluorescence spectroscopy and far- and near-UV circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy under different pH conditions. Fluorescence quenching studies showed that the binding affinity of icariin with HSA in the buffer solution at different pH values is: Ka (pH 4.5) > Ka (pH 3.5) > Ka (pH 9.0) > Ka (pH 7.0). Red-edge excitation shift (REES) studies revealed that pH had an obvious effect on the mobility of the tryptophan microenvironment and the addition of icariin made the REES effect more distinct. The static quenching mechanism and number of binding sites (n ≈ 1) were obtained from fluorescence data at three temperatures (298, 304 and 310 K). Both ∆H(0) energy transfer theory. We found that pH had little impact on the energy transfer between HSA and icariin. Far- and near-UV CD spectroscopy studies further indicated the influence of pH on the complexation process and the alteration in the protein conformation upon binding.

  18. Potential disruption of protein-protein interactions by graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Mei; Kang, Hongsuk; Yang, Zaixing; Luan, Binquan; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-06-14

    Graphene oxide (GO) is a promising novel nanomaterial with a wide range of potential biomedical applications due to its many intriguing properties. However, very little research has been conducted to study its possible adverse effects on protein-protein interactions (and thus subsequent toxicity to human). Here, the potential cytotoxicity of GO is investigated at molecular level using large-scale, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to explore the interaction mechanism between a protein dimer and a GO nanosheet oxidized at different levels. Our theoretical results reveal that GO nanosheet could intercalate between the two monomers of HIV-1 integrase dimer, disrupting the protein-protein interactions and eventually lead to dimer disassociation as graphene does [B. Luan et al., ACS Nano 9(1), 663 (2015)], albeit its insertion process is slower when compared with graphene due to the additional steric and attractive interactions. This study helps to better understand the toxicity of GO to cell functions which could shed light on how to improve its biocompatibility and biosafety for its wide potential biomedical applications.

  19. Potential disruption of protein-protein interactions by graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Mei; Kang, Hongsuk; Yang, Zaixing; Luan, Binquan; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-06-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is a promising novel nanomaterial with a wide range of potential biomedical applications due to its many intriguing properties. However, very little research has been conducted to study its possible adverse effects on protein-protein interactions (and thus subsequent toxicity to human). Here, the potential cytotoxicity of GO is investigated at molecular level using large-scale, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to explore the interaction mechanism between a protein dimer and a GO nanosheet oxidized at different levels. Our theoretical results reveal that GO nanosheet could intercalate between the two monomers of HIV-1 integrase dimer, disrupting the protein-protein interactions and eventually lead to dimer disassociation as graphene does [B. Luan et al., ACS Nano 9(1), 663 (2015)], albeit its insertion process is slower when compared with graphene due to the additional steric and attractive interactions. This study helps to better understand the toxicity of GO to cell functions which could shed light on how to improve its biocompatibility and biosafety for its wide potential biomedical applications.

  20. Synovial folds in equine articular process joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Line Nymann; Berg, Lise Charlotte; Markussen, Bo;

    2013-01-01

    Cervical synovial folds have been suggested as a potential cause of neck pain in humans. Little is known about the extent and characteristics of cervical synovial folds in horses.......Cervical synovial folds have been suggested as a potential cause of neck pain in humans. Little is known about the extent and characteristics of cervical synovial folds in horses....

  1. Interaction Potential between Parabolic Rotator and an Outside Particle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available At micro/nanoscale, the interaction potential between parabolic rotator and a particle located outside the rotator is studied on the basis of the negative exponential pair potential 1/Rn between particles. Similar to two-dimensional curved surfaces, we confirm that the potential of the three-dimensional parabolic rotator and outside particle can also be expressed as a unified form of curvatures; that is, it can be written as the function of curvatures. Furthermore, we verify that the driving forces acting on the particle may be induced by the highly curved micro/nano-parabolic rotator. Curvatures and the gradient of curvatures are the essential elements forming the driving forces. Through the idealized numerical experiments, the accuracy of the curvature-based potential is preliminarily proved.

  2. Interaction potentials and thermodynamic properties of two component semiclassical plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramazanov, T. S.; Moldabekov, Zh. A.; Ismagambetova, T. N. [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, IETP, 71 al-Farabi Av., Almaty 050040 (Kazakhstan); Gabdullin, M. T. [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, NNLOT, 71 al-Farabi Av., Almaty 050040 (Kazakhstan)

    2014-01-15

    In this paper, the effective interaction potential in two component semiclassical plasma, taking into account the long-range screening and the quantum-mechanical diffraction effects at short distances, is obtained on the basis of dielectric response function method. The structural properties of the semiclassical plasma are considered. The thermodynamic characteristics (the internal energy and the equation of state) are calculated using two methods: the method of effective potentials and the method of micropotentials with screening effect taken into account by the Ornstein-Zernike equation in the HNC approximation.

  3. Cosmological solutions in string theory with dilaton self interaction potential

    CERN Document Server

    Mora, C

    2003-01-01

    In this work we present homogeneous and isotropic cosmological solutions for the low energy limit of string theory with a self interacting potential for the scalar field. For a potential that is a linear combination of two exponential, a family of exact solutions are found for the different spatial curvatures. Among this family a non singular accelerating solution for positive curvature is singled out and the violation of the energy conditions for that solution is studied, and also its astrophysical consequences. The string coupling for this solution is finite. (Author)

  4. POTENTIALS OF INTERACTIVE TEACHING TECHNIQUES TO TRAIN EXPERTS IN PHARMACY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Krikova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Various interactive teaching methods and techniques are extensively used in modern higher schools. Their implementation is considered to be one of the most significant and efficient ways to improve quality of pharmaceutical professional training. Efficiency of these interactive techniques applied at the Department of Economics and Management of Pharmaceutical Business of Smolensk State Medical University has been comprehensively investigated and assessed. Obtained results are presented in the paper, as well as students’ survey data as consumers of educational services. Fifth year full-time students were involved into the study. Students’ awareness on potentials and significance of applied interactive teaching methods, as well as their interest in innovative forms to gain professional knowledge comprised 93.3%. Potentials of interactive techniques to teach students to deal with a diversity of real life practical professional tasks and problems are particularly emphasized in the study (86.7% students.

  5. Comparing Extended System Interactions with Motions in Softened Potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, Eric I

    2015-01-01

    Using an $N$-body evolution code that does not rely on softened potentials, I have created a suite of interacting binary cluster simulations. The motions of the centers-of-mass of the clusters have been tracked and compared to the trajectories of point masses interacting via one of four different softened potential prescriptions. There is a robust, nearly linear relationship between the impact parameter of the cluster interaction and the point-mass softening length that best approximates the cluster centers-of-mass motion. In an $N$-body simulation that adopts a fixed softening length, such a relationship leads to regimes where two-body effects, like dynamical friction, can be either larger or smaller than the corresponding cluster situation. Further consideration of more specific $N$-body simulations leads to an estimate that roughly 10 per cent of point-mass interactions in an $N$-body simulation will experience two-body effects larger than those for equivalent clusters.

  6. Localization of interacting Fermi gases in quasiperiodic potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilati, Sebastiano; Varma, Vipin Kerala

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the zero-temperature metal-insulator transition in a one-dimensional two-component Fermi gas in the presence of a quasiperiodic potential resulting from the superposition of two optical lattices of equal intensity but incommensurate periods. A mobility edge separating (low-energy) Anderson localized and (high-energy) extended single-particle states appears in this continuous-space model beyond a critical intensity of the quasiperiodic potential. To discern the metallic phase from the insulating phase in the interacting many-fermion system, we employ unbiased quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations combined with the many-particle localization length familiar from the modern theory of the insulating state. In the noninteracting limit, the critical optical-lattice intensity for the metal-insulator transition predicted by the QMC simulations coincides with the Anderson localization transition of the single-particle eigenstates. We show that weak repulsive interactions induce a shift of this critical point towards larger intensities, meaning that repulsion favors metallic behavior. This shift appears to be linear in the interaction parameter, suggesting that even infinitesimal interactions can affect the position of the critical point.

  7. Semi-Empirical Effective Interactions for Inelastic Scattering Derived from the Reid Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiase, J. O.; Sharma, L. K.; Winkoun, D. P.; Hosaka, A.

    2001-09-01

    An effective local interaction suitable for inelastic scattering is constructed from the Reid soft - core potential. We proceed in two stages: We first calculated a set of relative two - body matrix elements in a variational approach using the Reid soft-core potential folded with two-body correlation functions. In the second stage we constructed a potential for inelastic scattering by fitting the matrix elements to a sum of Yukawa central, tensor and spin-orbit terms to the set of relative two - body matrix elements obtained in the first stage by a least squares fitting procedure. The ranges of the new potential were selected to ensure the OPEP tails in the relevant channels as well as the short - range part of the interaction. It is found that the results of our variational techniques are very similar to the G - matrix calculations of Bertsch and co - workers in the singlet - even, triplet - even, tensor - even and spin-orbit odd channels thus putting our calculations of two - body matrix elements of nuclear forces in these channels on a sound footing. However, there exist major differences in the singlet - odd, triplet - odd, tensor - odd and spin - orbit even channels which casts some doubt on our understanding of nuclear forces in these channels.

  8. [Identifying potential drug interactions in chronic kidney disease patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquito, Alessandra Batista; Fernandes, Natália Maria da Silva; Colugnati, Fernando Antonio Basile; de Paula, Rogério Baumgratz

    2014-01-01

    Drug interactions (DIs) are common in clinical practice and are directly related to factors such as polypharmacy, aging, hepatic metabolism and decreased renal function. Individuals with chronic kidney disease (CKD) often require multiple classes of drugs being at important risk for the development of DIs. Identify potential interactions among drugs prescribed to patients with CKD on conservative treatment, and factors associated with their occurrence. Observational cross-sectional study, with analysis of 558 prescriptions. Potential DIs were identified by the database MICROMEDEX®, software that provides an internationally known pharmacopoeia. There was a predominance of males (54.7%), seniors (69.4%), stage 3 CKD (47.5%), overweight and obese patients (66.7%). The most prevalent comorbidities were hypertension (68.5%) and diabetes mellitus (31.9%). Potential DIs were detected in 74.9% of prescriptions. Among the 1364 DIs diagnosed, 5 (0.4%) were contraindicated and 229 (16.8%) of greater severity, which need immediate intervention. Interactions of moderate and low severity were identified in 1049 (76.9%) and 81 (5.9%) prescriptions, respectively. The probability of one DI increased by 2.5 times for each additional drug (CI = 2.18 to 3.03). Obesity, hypertension, diabetes as well as advanced stage of CKD were risk factors strongly associated with DI occurrence. Drug associations in individuals with CKD were related to high prevalence of serious DIs, especially in the later stages of the disease.

  9. Potential interaction and potential investigation of science center exhibits and visitors' interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busque, Laurier

    This research consisted of studying the characteristics of interaction and investigation potential present in museum or science center exhibits. Categories (strong and weak) for the characteristics of interaction potential and investigation potential were established. Fifteen exhibits were chosen from the Museum of Science (Ottawa) and from two science centers (Sudbury and Toronto); these were representative of the established characteristics and categories. A test was constructed that measured the interest in an exhibit in a museum or a science center. The final analysis of the test (20 items) reflects a coefficient of homogeneity (Cronbach alpha) of 0.97 (n = 278). In terms of the characteristics of interaction potential and investigation potential, a significant difference among the ranks of interest was not found once they were regrouped under the categories of strong and weak. The hypothesis of a relationship between the interaction potential and visitors' interest in an exhibit in a museum or science center and the hypothesis of a relationship between the investigation potential and the interest aroused were both rejected. In regards to the interaction potential, median ranks of interest in exhibits of 8.6 for the strong category and of 7.5 for the weak category were observed. In terms of the investigation potential, median ranks of interest of 7.0 for the strong category and of 9.1 for the weak category were observed. In the case of investigation potential, even if the difference is not significant, there is an indication that the strong investigation potential seems to have the effect of creating disinterest in the presentation of an exhibit in a museum or in a science center. In the context of new museum and science centers, the view of developing exhibits which are primarily objects which stimulate interest must be maintained. If this is done with exhibits that arc interactive and have an investigative approach, it is necessary for those in charge of

  10. Describing the heavy-ion above-barrier fusion using the bare potentials resulting from Migdal and M3Y double-folding approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontchar, I. I.; Chushnyakova, M. V.

    2016-08-01

    Systematic calculations of the Coulomb barrier parameters for collisions of spherical nuclei are performed within the framework of the double folding approach. The value of the parameter {B}Z={Z}P{Z}T/({A}P{1/3}+{A}T{1/3}) (which estimates the Coulomb barrier height) varies in these calculations from 10 MeV up to 150 MeV. The nuclear densities came from the Hartree-Fock calculations which reproduce the experimental charge densities with good accuracy. For the nucleon-nucleon effective interaction two analytical approximations known in the literature are used: the M3Y and Migdal forces. The calculations show that Migdal interaction always results in the higher Coulomb barrier. Moreover, as B Z increases the difference between the M3Y and Migdal barrier heights systematically increases as well. As the result, the above barrier fusion cross sections calculated dynamically with the M3Y forces and surface friction are in agreement with the data. The cross sections calculated with the Migdal forces are always below the experimental data even without accounting for the dissipation.

  11. Describing the heavy-ion above-barrier fusion using the bare potentials resulting from Migdal and M3Y double-folding approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Gontchar, Igor

    2015-01-01

    Systematic calculations of the Coulomb barrier parameters for collisions of spherical nuclei are performed within the framework of the double folding approach. The value of the parameter $B_Z=Z_PZ_T/(A^{1/3}_P+(A^{1/3}_P)$ (which estimates the Coulomb barrier height) varies in these calculations from 10 MeV up to 150 MeV. The nuclear densities came from the Hartree-Fock calculations which reproduce the experimental charge densities with good accuracy. For the nucleon-nucleon effective interaction two analytical approximations known in the literature are used: the M3Y and Migdal forces. The calculations show that Migdal interaction always results in the higher Coulomb barrier. Moreover, as $B_Z$ increases the difference between the M3Y and Migdal barrier heights systematically increases as well. As the result, the above barrier fusion cross sections calculated dynamically with the M3Y forces and surface friction are in agreement with the data. The cross sections calculated with the Migdal forces are always bel...

  12. Potential interaction between warfarin and high dietary protein intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornsby, Lori B; Hester, E Kelly; Donaldson, Amy R

    2008-04-01

    A 55-year-old Caucasian man was receiving warfarin therapy after undergoing aortic valve replacement. His international normalized ratio (INR) was stabilized with warfarin 95 mg/week for 5 weeks. Commencement of a low-carbohydrate, high-protein diet resulted in a series of subtherapeutic INRs that led to a 16% increase in the dosage requirement to maintain therapeutic INRs. After the patient discontinued the diet, his INR increased, and several dosage reductions were required until his INR stabilized with his original dosage of 95 mg/week. Two additional case reports have described a possible interaction between warfarin and a high-protein diet. The potential for increased dietary protein intake to raise serum albumin levels and/or cytochrome P450 activity has been postulated as mechanisms for the resulting decrease in INRs. Given the available animal and human data that demonstrate alterations in drug metabolism in the presence of altered dietary protein intake, an increase in warfarin metabolism due to cytochrome P450 activation appears to be the most likely cause. In addition to the previously reported cases, this case indicates a potential interaction between warfarin and a high-protein diet. Because of the popularity of high-protein diets and because of the risks associated with inadequate or excessive warfarin anticoagulation, patients and health care providers should be aware of this interaction to ensure appropriate monitoring when warranted.

  13. Ab initio RNA folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cragnolini, Tristan; Derreumaux, Philippe; Pasquali, Samuela

    2015-06-17

    RNA molecules are essential cellular machines performing a wide variety of functions for which a specific three-dimensional structure is required. Over the last several years, the experimental determination of RNA structures through x-ray crystallography and NMR seems to have reached a plateau in the number of structures resolved each year, but as more and more RNA sequences are being discovered, the need for structure prediction tools to complement experimental data is strong. Theoretical approaches to RNA folding have been developed since the late nineties, when the first algorithms for secondary structure prediction appeared. Over the last 10 years a number of prediction methods for 3D structures have been developed, first based on bioinformatics and data-mining, and more recently based on a coarse-grained physical representation of the systems. In this review we are going to present the challenges of RNA structure prediction and the main ideas behind bioinformatic approaches and physics-based approaches. We will focus on the description of the more recent physics-based phenomenological models and on how they are built to include the specificity of the interactions of RNA bases, whose role is critical in folding. Through examples from different models, we will point out the strengths of physics-based approaches, which are able not only to predict equilibrium structures, but also to investigate dynamical and thermodynamical behavior, and the open challenges to include more key interactions ruling RNA folding.

  14. Spatial coincidence modulates interaction between visual and somatosensory evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schürmann, Martin; Kolev, Vasil; Menzel, Kristina; Yordanova, Juliana

    2002-05-07

    The time course of interaction between concurrently applied visual and somatosensory stimulation with respect to evoked potentials (EPs) was studied. Visual stimuli, either in the left or right hemifield, and electric stimuli to the left wrist were delivered either alone or simultaneously. Visual and somatosensory EPs were summed and compared to bimodal EPs (BiEP, response to actual combination of both modalities). Temporal coincidence of stimuli lead to sub-additive or over-additive amplitudes in BiEPs in several time windows between 75 and 275 ms. Additional effects of spatial coincidence (left wrist with left hemifield) were found between 75 and 300 ms and beyond 450 ms. These interaction effects hint at a temporo-spatial pattern of multiple brain areas participating in the process of multimodal integration.

  15. Potential drug interactions in patients given antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Wendel Mombaque Dos; Secoli, Silvia Regina; Padoin, Stela Maris de Mello

    2016-11-21

    to investigate potential drug-drug interactions (PDDI) in patients with HIV infection on antiretroviral therapy. a cross-sectional study was conducted on 161 adults with HIV infection. Clinical, socio demographic, and antiretroviral treatment data were collected. To analyze the potential drug interactions, we used the software Micromedex(r). Statistical analysis was performed by binary logistic regression, with a p-value of ≤0.05 considered statistically significant. of the participants, 52.2% were exposed to potential drug-drug interactions. In total, there were 218 potential drug-drug interactions, of which 79.8% occurred between drugs used for antiretroviral therapy. There was an association between the use of five or more medications and potential drug-drug interactions (p = 0.000) and between the time period of antiretroviral therapy being over six years and potential drug-drug interactions (p antirretroviral. um estudo de corte transversal foi conduzido em 161 pessoas infectadas com o HIV. Dados de tratamentos clínicos, sociodemográficos e antirretrovirais foram coletados. Para analisar a possível interação medicamentosa, nós usamos o software Micromedex(r). A análise estatística foi feita por regressão logística binária, com um valor P de ≤0.05, considerado estatisticamente significativo. dos participantes, 52.2% foram expostos a potenciais interações droga-droga. No total, houve 218 interações droga-droga, das quais 79.8% ocorreram entre drogas usadas para a terapia antirretroviral. Houve uma associação entre o uso de cinco ou mais medicamentos e possíveis interações droga-droga (p = 0.000), e entre o período de tempo de terapia antirretroviral acima de seis anos e possíveis interações droga-droga (p VIH que reciben terapia antirretroviral. un estudio transversal se llevó a cabo en 161 adultos con infección por VIH. Se recogieron datos clínicos, socio demográficos, y de tratamiento antirretroviral. Para analizar las posibles

  16. Clementine juice has the potential for drug interactions - In vitro comparison with grapefruit and mandarin juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theile, Dirk; Hohmann, Nicolas; Kiemel, Dominik; Gattuso, Giuseppe; Barreca, Davide; Mikus, Gerd; Haefeli, Walter Emil; Schwenger, Vedat; Weiss, Johanna

    2017-01-15

    Adverse drug interactions due to grapefruit juice are well known prompting warnings even in drug labels. Similar issues have not been reported for clementines and available data is scarce, despite of genetic descent. We observed substantially increased tacrolimus trough concentrations in a renal transplant patient consuming high clementine amounts and, thus, scrutinised the effects of clementine juice on drug metabolism and drug transporters in vitro and compared it to the effects of mandarin and grapefruit juice. All citrus juices profoundly induced several drug transporters and drug metabolising enzymes, whereas the effects of grapefruit juice were most pronounced (e.g. 156-fold and 34-fold induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 mRNA by grapefruit juice and clementine juice, respectively). However, the juices also inhibited e.g. CYP3A4, raising the question which effect prevails in vivo. Using an enzymatic activity assay, we demonstrated that at least in vitro CYP3A4 inhibition prevails for both grapefruit and clementine juice, whereas for CYP1A2 induction appears to predominate. Thus, inhibition of CYP3A4 is presumably the underlying reason for the observed increase in the concentrations of the CYP3A4 substrate tacrolimus in the patient. Taken together, our data indicate that clementine juice as well as grapefruit juice and to a lesser extent also mandarin juice can induce several important drug metabolising enzymes and drug transporters, but also inhibit some of these proteins. Our data indicate that clementine juice similar to grapefruit juice bears the potential for profound interactions with drugs potentially leading to adverse drug effects e.g. through over-exposure to CYP3A4 substrates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The SOCS-box of HIV-1 Vif interacts with ElonginBC by induced-folding to recruit its Cul5-containing ubiquitin ligase complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien R C Bergeron

    Full Text Available The HIV-1 viral infectivity factor (Vif protein recruits an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, comprising the cellular proteins elongin B and C (EloBC, cullin 5 (Cul5 and RING-box 2 (Rbx2, to the anti-viral proteins APOBEC3G (A3G and APOBEC3F (A3F and induces their polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. In this study, we used purified proteins and direct in vitro binding assays, isothermal titration calorimetry and NMR spectroscopy to describe the molecular mechanism for assembly of the Vif-EloBC ternary complex. We demonstrate that Vif binds to EloBC in two locations, and that both interactions induce structural changes in the SOCS box of Vif as well as EloBC. In particular, in addition to the previously established binding of Vif's BC box to EloC, we report a novel interaction between the conserved Pro-Pro-Leu-Pro motif of Vif and the C-terminal domain of EloB. Using cell-based assays, we further show that this interaction is necessary for the formation of a functional ligase complex, thus establishing a role of this motif. We conclude that HIV-1 Vif engages EloBC via an induced-folding mechanism that does not require additional co-factors, and speculate that these features distinguish Vif from other EloBC specificity factors such as cellular SOCS proteins, and may enhance the prospects of obtaining therapeutic inhibitors of Vif function.

  18. Teaching computers to fold proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Ole; Krogh, Anders Stærmose

    2004-01-01

    A new general algorithm for optimization of potential functions for protein folding is introduced. It is based upon gradient optimization of the thermodynamic stability of native folds of a training set of proteins with known structure. The iterative update rule contains two thermodynamic averages...

  19. Gender differences, polypharmacy, and potential pharmacological interactions in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Duarte Venturini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aims to analyze pharmacological interactions among drugs taken by elderly patients and their age and gender differences in a population from Porto Alegre, Brazil. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the database provided by the Institute of Geriatric and Gerontology, Porto Alegre, Brazil. The database was composed of 438 elderly and includes information about the patients' disease, therapy regimens, utilized drugs. All drugs reported by the elderly patients were classified using the Anatomical Therapeutic and Chemical Classification System. The drug-drug interactions and their severity were assessed using the Micromedex® Healthcare Series. RESULTS: Of the 438 elderly patients in the data base, 376 (85.8% used pharmacotherapy, 274 were female, and 90.4% of females used drugs. The average number of drugs used by each individual younger than 80 years was 3.2±2.6. Women younger than 80 years old used more drugs than men in the same age group whereas men older than 80 years increased their use of drugs in relation to other age groups. Therefore, 32.6% of men and 49.2% of women described at least one interaction, and 8.1% of men and 10.6% of women described four or more potential drug-drug interactions. Two-thirds of drug-drug interactions were moderate in both genders, and most of them involved angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory, loop and thiazide diuretics, and β-blockers. CONCLUSION: Elderly patients should be closely monitored, based on drug class, gender, age group and nutritional status.

  20. [St. John's wort: a pharmaceutical with potentially dangerous interactions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rätz, A E; von Moos, M; Drewe, J

    2001-05-10

    Over-the-counter preparations of St. John's wort are widely used as 'natural' herbal medicine alternative to traditional antidepressants. The antidepressant effect has been shown in numerous placebo controlled studies. The mechanism of action is assumed to be at least in part, similar to conventional antidepressants, due to presynaptic serotonin reuptake inhibition as well as GABA-modulation and inhibition of monoaminoxidases. Because of its favorable safety profile compared to conventional antidepressants, the use of St. John's wort preparations has gained high acceptance with doctors and patients. However, any biologically active compound contains a certain risk of untoward effects and/or interactions which often are neither known nor recognised with the use of herbal remedies. Thus, doctors, pharmacists, and patients might feel themselves in false safety. Recently, a variety of case reports of potentially hazardous interactions due to drug combinations with St. John's wort have been published (e.g. cellular rejection of pancreas-, kidney- as well as heart transplants with ciclosporin therapy, rise of INR with oral anticoagulants, bleeding with oral contraceptives, reduction of plasma concentration of digoxin, indinavir, amitriptyline, and theophylline). We report a case of irregular bleeding with oral contraception and discuss these drug interactions and the mechanisms.

  1. Potential interaction between proton pump inhibitor and clopidogrel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indra Kurniawan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Clopidogrel is an anti-platelet agent commonly used in patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular (CV disease. Although formerly considered safe, several studies reported that the use of clopidogrel may cause a significant increase in the rate of gastrointestinal (GI bleeding. This adverse effect could be minimized by coadministration of proton pump inhibitor (PPI. However, since PPI and clopidogrel share the same metabolic pathway, it has been hypothesized that the administration of PPI following clopidogrel therapy may cause a reduction in its anti-platelet effect, thereby increasing the risk of CV events. Recent studies found no significant inhibition in the activation of clopidogrel by CYP2C19 with administration of PPI in vitro. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies, as well as clinical studies, reported conflicting results regarding the potential interaction between PPI and clopidogrel. Until now, the available study investigated the PPI-clopidogrel interaction are primarily observational. The COGENT study is the only prospective, placebo-controlled trial examined the PPI-clopidogrel interaction. This study revealed no significant increase in CV events in patients receiving PPI following clopidogrel therapy, compared to the control group. Though remains controversial, current expert consensus recommended the administration of PPI in patients receiving clopidogrel, particularly in high-risk patients. (Med J Indones. 2013;22:57-62Keywords: Cardiovascular, clopidogrel, gastrointestinal, proton pump inhibitor

  2. Poxvirus K7 protein adopts a Bcl-2 fold: biochemical mapping of its interactions with human DEAD box RNA helicase DDX3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalverda, Arnout P; Thompson, Gary S; Vogel, Andre; Schröder, Martina; Bowie, Andrew G; Khan, Amir R; Homans, Steve W

    2009-01-23

    Poxviruses have evolved numerous strategies to evade host innate immunity. Vaccinia virus K7 is a 149-residue protein with previously unknown structure that is highly conserved in the orthopoxvirus family. K7 bears sequence and functional similarities to A52, which interacts with interleukin receptor-associated kinase 2 and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 to suppress nuclear factor kappaB activation and to stimulate the secretion of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10. In contrast to A52, K7 forms a complex with DEAD box RNA helicase DDX3, thereby suppressing DDX3-mediated ifnb promoter induction. We determined the NMR solution structure of K7 to provide insight into the structural basis for poxvirus antagonism of innate immune signaling. The structure reveals an alpha-helical fold belonging to the Bcl-2 family despite an unrelated primary sequence. NMR chemical-shift mapping studies have localized the binding surface for DDX3 on a negatively charged face of K7. Furthermore, thermodynamic studies have mapped the K7-binding region to a 30-residue N-terminal fragment of DDX3, ahead of the core RNA helicase domains.

  3. Structure of Ctk3, a subunit of the RNA polymerase II CTD kinase complex, reveals a noncanonical CTD-interacting domain fold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlbacher, Wolfgang; Mayer, Andreas; Sun, Mai; Remmert, Michael; Cheung, Alan C M; Niesser, Jürgen; Soeding, Johannes; Cramer, Patrick

    2015-10-01

    CTDK-I is a yeast kinase complex that phosphorylates the C-terminal repeat domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) to promote transcription elongation. CTDK-I contains the cyclin-dependent kinase Ctk1 (homologous to human CDK9/CDK12), the cyclin Ctk2 (human cyclin K), and the yeast-specific subunit Ctk3, which is required for CTDK-I stability and activity. Here we predict that Ctk3 consists of a N-terminal CTD-interacting domain (CID) and a C-terminal three-helix bundle domain. We determine the X-ray crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of the Ctk3 homologue Lsg1 from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe at 2.0 Å resolution. The structure reveals eight helices arranged into a right-handed superhelical fold that resembles the CID domain present in transcription termination factors Pcf11, Nrd1, and Rtt103. Ctk3 however shows different surface properties and no binding to CTD peptides. Together with the known structure of Ctk1 and Ctk2 homologues, our results lead to a molecular framework for analyzing the structure and function of the CTDK-I complex.

  4. ZG16p, an animal homolog of β-prism fold plant lectins, interacts with heparan sulfate proteoglycans in pancreatic zymogen granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumazawa-Inoue, Kaori; Mimura, Tomoko; Hosokawa-Tamiya, Sachiko; Nakano, Yukiko; Dohmae, Naoshi; Kinoshita-Toyoda, Akiko; Toyoda, Hidenao; Kojima-Aikawa, Kyoko

    2012-02-01

    ZG16p is a soluble 16 kDa pancreatic protein having structural similarities with plant β-prism fold lectins such as the banana lectin BanLec and the jackfruit lectin jacalin. ZG16p is postulated to be involved in the formation of zymogen granules by interacting with proteoglycans (PGs) localized in pancreatic exocrine granule membranes, but direct evidence was lacking. We characterized the structural properties of rat pancreatic zymogen granule PGs and examined their interaction with ZG16p. Structural analysis of the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) showed that rat pancreatic zymogen granule PGs have heparan sulfate chains with a unique property, a high degree of sulfation (ΔUA-GlcNAc:ΔUA-GlcNS:ΔUA-GlcNAc6S:ΔUA-GlcNS6S:ΔUA2S-GlcNS:ΔUA2S-GlcNS6S, 27.9:16.6:5.7:22.5:6.2:21.1). After heparin lyase II digestion, the core proteins derived from the PGs were detected at molecular weights of 66,000 and 35,000-40,000. An overlay binding assay revealed that ZG16p binds specifically to heparan sulfate PGs by recognizing their GAG chains. Affinity chromatography demonstrated that ZG16p binds most strongly to heparin among the zymogen granule proteins. Site-directed mutational analysis revealed that the basic amino acid residues located in two putative carbohydrate-binding sites (CBSs) of ZG16p, which were found in association with the crystal structure of BanLec, are responsible for the recognition of heparin. These observations suggest that ZG16p is the primary binding partner of the granule heparan sulfate PGs. ZG16p may cross-link the granule heparan sulfate chains via two CBSs and facilitate the formation of a submembranous matrix, a sorting platform for enzyme proteins on the luminal side of the zymogen granule membrane.

  5. Potential of Root Exudates from Wetland Plants and Their Potential Role for Denitrification and Allelopathic Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhai, Xu

    vary among different Phragmites haplotypes and consequently affect their invasion potential. The studies presented in this dissertation aimed at investigating the quantity and composition of the organic carbon released in root exudates from three common wetland species as affected by temperature...... wetlands. Furthermore, environmental factors such as temperature and light-regime affect the photosynthetic carbon fixation, which continuously influence the compositions and quantity of root exudates released into rhizosphere. Conversely, root exudates from invasive species might contain some phytotoxic...... and light-regime and how the root exudates potentially affect the nitrogen removal by denitrification in constructed wetlands. Also, the studies aimed at further elucidating the potential allelopathic interaction between the plants. The findings of the research suggest that the root exudates from wetland...

  6. Schematic potential energy for interaction between isobutene and zeolite mordenite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Serrano, L A [Programa de Crudo Maya, IMP, AP 15-805, DF 07730 (Mexico); Flores-Sandoval, C A [Programa de Crudo Maya, IMP, AP 15-805, DF 07730 (Mexico); Zaragoza, I P [Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, IMP, AP 15-805, DF 07730 (Mexico)

    2004-06-09

    A schematic representation of the potential energy for the interaction between isobutene and H mordenite was presented by using eight different positions (P1-P8) of C{sub 1} or C{sub 2} atoms located in front of the acid hydrogen (H{sup +}). In all cases a {pi} complex was formed yielding different values of the adsorption energy. In some cases of the adsorption point in P1-P8 the frontier orbitals are shown. The P8 position exhibits the highest value obtained for the adsorption energy, where the C{sub 1} atom is in front of the H{sup +}. Calculations were of all electron type employing HF/6-31G**.

  7. Strongly Interacting Matter at Finite Chemical Potential: Hybrid Model Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, P. K.; Singh, C. P.

    2013-06-01

    Search for a proper and realistic equation of state (EOS) for strongly interacting matter used in the study of the QCD phase diagram still appears as a challenging problem. Recently, we constructed a hybrid model description for the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) as well as hadron gas (HG) phases where we used an excluded volume model for HG and a thermodynamically consistent quasiparticle model for the QGP phase. The hybrid model suitably describes the recent lattice results of various thermodynamical as well as transport properties of the QCD matter at zero baryon chemical potential (μB). In this paper, we extend our investigations further in obtaining the properties of QCD matter at finite value of μB and compare our results with the most recent results of lattice QCD calculation.

  8. Biotechnological potential of aquatic plant-microbe interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, L; Nüsslein, K

    2010-06-01

    The rhizosphere in terrestrial systems is the region of soil surrounding plant roots where there is increased microbial activity; in aquatic plants, this definition may be less clear because of diffusion of nutrients in water, but there is still a zone of influence by plant roots in this environment [1]. Within that zone chemical conditions differ from those of the surrounding environment as a consequence of a range of processes that were induced either directly by the activity of plant roots or by the activity of rhizosphere microflora. Recently, there are a number of new studies related to rhizospheres of aquatic plants and specifically their increased potential for remediation of contaminants, especially remediation of metals through aquatic plant-microbial interaction.

  9. Interactions among endophytic bacteria and fungi: effects and potentials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    W M M S Bandara; Gamini Seneviratne; S A Kulasooriya

    2006-12-01

    Plants benefit extensively by harbouring endophytic microbes. They promote plant growth and confer enhanced resistance to various pathogens. However, the way the interactions among endophytes influence the plant productivity has not been explained. Present study experimentally showed that endophytes isolated from rice (Oryza sativa) used as the test plant produced two types of interactions; biofilms (bacteria attached to mycelia) and mixed cultures with no such attachments. Acidity, as measured by pH in cultures with biofilms was higher than that of fungi alone, bacteria alone or the mixed cultures. Production of indoleacetic acid like substances (IAAS) of biofilms was higher than that of mixed cultures, fungi or bacteria. Bacteria and fungi produced higher quantities of IAAS than mixed cultures. In mixed cultures, the potential of IAAS production of resident microbes was reduced considerably. There was a negative relationship between IAAS and pH of the biofilms, indicating that IAAS was the main contributor to the acidity. However, such a relationship was not observed in mixed cultures. Microbial acid production is important for suppressing plant pathogens. Thus the biofilm formation in endophytic environment seems to be very important for healthy and improved plant growth. However, it is unlikely that an interaction among endophytes takes place naturally in the endophytic environment, due to physical barriers of plant tissues. Further, critical cell density dependant quorum sensing that leads to biofilm formation may not occur in the endophytic environment as there is a limited space. As such in vitro production and application of beneficial biofilmed inocula of endophytes are important for improved plant production in any agro-ecosystem. The conventional practice of plant inoculation with monocultures or mixed cultures of effective microbes may not give the highest microbial effect, which may only be achieved by biofilm formation.

  10. Ciprofloxacin and Clozapine: A Potentially Fatal but Underappreciated Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan M. Meyer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Clozapine provides a 50%–60% response rate in refractory schizophrenia but has a narrow therapeutic index and is susceptible to pharmacokinetic interactions, particularly with strong inhibitors or inducers of cytochrome P450 (CYP 1A2. Case Report. We report the case of a 28-year-old nonsmoking female with intellectual disability who was maintained for 3 years on clozapine 100 mg orally twice daily. The patient was treated for presumptive urinary tract infection with ciprofloxacin 500 mg orally twice daily and two days later collapsed and died despite resuscitation efforts. The postmortem femoral clozapine plasma level was dramatically elevated at 2900 ng/mL, and the cause of death was listed as acute clozapine toxicity. Conclusion. Given the potentially fatal pharmacokinetic interaction between clozapine and ciprofloxacin, clinicians are advised to monitor baseline clozapine levels prior to adding strong CYP450 1A2 inhibitors, reduce the clozapine dose by at least two-thirds if adding a 1A2 inhibitor such as ciprofloxacin, check subsequent steady state clozapine levels, and adjust the clozapine dose to maintain levels close to those obtained at baseline.

  11. Analogue modeling of 3-D structural segmentation in fold-and-thrust belts: interactions between frictional and viscous provinces in foreland basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borderie, Sandra; Graveleau, Fabien; Witt, César; Vendeville, Bruno C.

    2016-04-01

    Accretionary wedges are generally segmented both across and along strike because of diverse factors including tectonic and stratigraphic inheritance. In fold-and-thrust belts, along-strike stratigraphic changes in the foreland sequence are classically observed and cause a curvature of the deformation front. Although the parameters controlling this curvature are well documented, the structural interactions and mutual influences between adjacent provinces are much less analyzed. To investigate this question, we deformed analogue models in a compressional box equipped with digital cameras and a topographic measurement apparatus. Models where shortened above a basal frictional detachment (glass microbeads) and segmentation was tested by having a region in which we added an interbedded viscous level (silicone polymer) within the sedimentary cover (dry sand). By changing the number (2 or 3) and the relative width of the purely frictional and viscous provinces, our goal was to characterize geometrically and kinematically the interactions between the viscous and the purely frictional provinces. We used a commercial geomodeller to generate 3-D geometrical models. The results indicate that regardless of the relative width of the purely frictional vs. viscous provinces, the deformation style in the frictional province is not influenced by the presence of the adjacent viscous province. On the contrary, the structural style and the deformation kinematics in the viscous province is significantly impacted by the presence or absence of an adjacent purely frictional province. At first order, the deformation style in the viscous province depends on its width, and three structural styles can be defined along strike. Far from the frictional area, structures are primarily of salt-massif type, and they do not seem to be influenced by the frictional wedge province. Towards the frictional province, deformation changes gradually to a zone of purely forethrusts (foreland verging), and

  12. Potential RNA polymerase II-induced interactions of transcription factor TFIIB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, S; Lee, D K; Roeder, R G

    1993-10-01

    The ubiquitous transcription factor TFIIB is required for initiation by RNA polymerase II and serves as a target of some regulatory factors. The carboxy-terminal portion of TFIIB contains a large imperfect direct repeat reminiscent of the structural organization of the TATA-binding component (TBP) of TFIID, as well as sequence homology to conserved regions of bacterial sigma factors. The present study shows that the carboxy-terminal portion of TFIIB, like that of TBP, is folded into a compact protease-resistant core. The TFIIB core, unlike the TBP core, is inactive in transcription but retains structural features that enable it to form a complex with promoter-bound TFIID. The protease-susceptible amino terminus appears to contain components responsible for direct interaction with RNA polymerase II (in association with TFIIF) either on the promoter (in association with TFIID) or independently. In addition, core TFIIB (but not intact TFIIB) extends the footprint of TBP on promoter DNA, suggesting that TFIIB has a cryptic DNA-binding potential. These results are consistent with a model in which TFIIB, in a manner functionally analogous to that of bacterial sigma factors, undergoes an RNA polymerase II-dependent conformational change with resultant DNA interactions during the pathway leading to a functional preinitiation complex.

  13. Cytosine deaminase adenoviral vector and 5-fluorocytosine selectively reduce breast cancer cells 1 million-fold when they contaminate hematopoietic cells: a potential purging method for autologous transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Sanchez, F; Pizzorno, G; Fu, S Q; Nanakorn, T; Krause, D S; Liang, J; Adams, E; Leffert, J J; Yin, L H; Cooperberg, M R; Hanania, E; Wang, W L; Won, J H; Peng, X Y; Cote, R; Brown, R; Burtness, B; Giles, R; Crystal, R; Deisseroth, A B

    1998-07-15

    48 hours. All of the BCC lines tested were shown to be sensitive to infection by adenoviral vectors when exposed to a recombinant adenoviral vector containing the reporter gene betagalactosidase (Ad.CMV-betagal). In contrast, less than 1% of the CD34-selected cells and their more immature subsets, such as the CD34+CD38- or CD34(+)CD33- subpopulations, were positive for infection by the Ad.CMV-betagal vector, as judged by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis, when exposed to the adenoviral vector under conditions that did not commit the early hematopoietic precursor cells to maturation. When artificial mixtures of hematopoietic cells and BCCs were exposed for 90 minutes to the Ad.CMV-CD vector and to 5-FC for 10 days or more, a greater than 1 million fold reduction in the number of BCCs, as measured by colony-limiting dilution assays, was observed. To test if the conditions were damaging for the hematopoietic reconstituting cells, marrow cells collected from 5-FU-treated male donor mice were incubated with the cytosine deaminase adenoviral vector and then exposed to 5-FC either for 4 days in vitro before transplantation or for 14 days immediately after transplantation in vivo. There was no significant decrease in the reconstituting capability of the male marrow cells, as measured by their persistence in female irradiated recipients for up to 6 months after transplantation. These observations suggest that adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of the Escherichia coli cytosine deaminase gene followed by exposure to the nontoxic pro-drug 5-FC may be a potential strategy to selectively reduce the level of contaminating BCCs in collections of hematopoietic cells used for autografts in breast cancer patients.

  14. Antiparkinsonian potential of interaction of LEK-8829 with bromocriptine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivin, M; Sprah, L; Sket, D

    1998-05-22

    The ergoline derivative, LEK-8829 (9,10-didehydro-N-methyl-(2-propynyl)-6-methyl-8-aminomethylerg oline), has been proposed as a potential atypical antipsychotic drug with antagonistic actions at dopamine D2 and serotonin 5-HT2 and 5-HT1A receptors (Krisch et al., 1994, 1996). LEK-8829 also induces contralateral turning in rats with 6-hydroxydopamine-induced unilateral lesion of dopamine nigrostriatal neurons. Turning is blocked by SCH-23390 (R(+)-chloro-8-hydroxy-3-methyl-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzaze pine), a dopamine D1 receptor antagonist. It has been suggested that LEK-8829 could have beneficial effects in parkinsonian patients suffering from psychotic episodes induced as a side-effect of antiparkinsonian treatment with dopamine D2 receptor agonists. Therefore, we now investigated the interaction of LEK-8829 with the dopamine D2 receptor agonist bromocriptine (2-bromo-alpha-ergokryptine) in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats. Treatment with either LEK-8829 (3 mg kg(-1)) or bromocriptine (3 mg kg(-1)) induced a vigorous contralateral turning response. The cumulated number of turns induced by the treatment with both drugs combined was not significantly different from the cumulated number of turns induced by single-drug treatment. The pretreatment with SCH-23390 (1 mg kg(-1)) did not have a significant effect on the bromocriptine-induced turning but significantly decreased the turning observed after the combined LEK-8829/bromocriptine treatment. We conclude that in the 6-hydroxydopamine model, the turning behaviour mediated by the LEK-8829/bromocriptine combination may be the result of opposing activity of both drugs at dopamine D2 receptors with concomitant stimulation of dopamine D1 receptors by LEK-8829. Therefore, LEK-8829 may have a potential for the therapy of parkinsonism complicated by dopamine D2 receptor agonist drug-induced psychosis.

  15. Myocardial fibroblast-matrix interactions and potential therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Edie C; Bradshaw, Amy D; Zile, Michael R; Spinale, Francis G

    2014-05-01

    The cardiac extracellular matrix (ECM) is a dynamic structure, adapting to physiological and pathological stresses placed on the myocardium. Deposition and organization of the matrix fall under the purview of cardiac fibroblasts. While often overlooked compared to myocytes, fibroblasts play a critical role in maintaining ECM homeostasis under normal conditions and in response to pathological stimuli assume an activated, myofibroblast phenotype associated with excessive collagen accumulation contributing to impaired cardiac function. Complete appreciation of fibroblast function is hampered by the lack of fibroblast-specific reagents and the heterogeneity of fibroblast precursors. This is further complicated by our ability to dissect the role of myofibroblasts versus fibroblasts in myocardial in remodeling. This review highlights critical points in the regulation of collagen deposition by fibroblasts, the current panel of molecular tools used to identify fibroblasts and the role of fibroblast-matrix interactions in fibroblast function and differentiation into the myofibroblast phenotype. The clinical potential of exploiting differences between fibroblasts and myofibroblasts and using them to target specific fibroblast populations is also discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Myocyte-Fibroblast Signalling in Myocardium." Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Probiotics: Interaction with gut microbiome and antiobesity potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Tulika; Singh, Satvinder; Sharma, Raj Kumar

    2013-04-01

    Obesity is a metabolic disorder afflicting people globally. There has been a pivotal advancement in the understanding of the intestinal microbiota composition and its implication in extraintestinal (metabolic) diseases. Therefore, any agent modulating gut microbiota may produce an influential effect in preventing the pathogenesis of disease. Probiotics are live microbes that, when administered in adequate amounts, have been shown to confer health benefits to the host. Over the years, probiotics have been a part of the human diet in the form of different fermented foods consumed around the world. Their influence on different physiologic functions in the host is increasingly being documented. The antiobesity potential of probiotics is also gaining wide attention because of increasing evidence of the role of gut microbiota in energy homeostasis and fat accumulation. Probiotics have also been shown to interact with the resident bacterial members already present in the gut by altering their properties, which may also affect the metabolic pathways involved in the regulation of fat metabolism. The underlying pathways governing the antiobesity effects of probiotics remain unclear. However, it is hoped that the evidence presented and discussed in this review will encourage and thus drive more extensive research in this field.

  17. Improved Interaction Potentials for Charged Residues in Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2008-01-01

    -consistent, experimental set of hydration free energies for acetate (Asp), propionate (Glu), 4-methylimidazolium (Hip), n-butylammonium (Lys), and n-propylguanidinium (Arg), all resembling charged residue side chains, including -carbons. It is shown that OPLS-AA free energies depend critically on the type of water model......, TIP4P or TIP3P; i.e., each water model requires specific water-charged molecule interaction potentials. New models (models 1 and 3) are thus described for both water models. Uncertainties in relative free energies of charged residues are ~2 kcal/mol with the new parameters, due to variations in system...... setup (MAEs of ca. 1 kcal/mol) and noise from simulations (ca. 1 kcal/mol). The latter error of ~1 kcal/mol contrasts MAEs from standard OPLS-AA of up to 13 kcal/mol for the entire series of charged residues or up to 5 kcal/mol for the cationic series Lys, Arg, and Hip. The new parameters can be used...

  18. Commercially available interactive video games in burn rehabilitation: therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Ingrid S; Bagley, Anita; Kawada, Jason; Sen, Soman; Greenhalgh, David G; Palmieri, Tina L

    2012-06-01

    Commercially available interactive video games (IVG) like the Nintendo Wii™ (NW) and PlayStation™II Eye Toy (PE) are increasingly used in the rehabilitation of patients with burn. Such games have gained popularity in burn rehabilitation because they encourage range of motion (ROM) while distracting from pain. However, IVGs were not originally designed for rehabilitation purposes but rather for entertainment and may lack specificity for achieving rehabilitative goals. Objectively evaluating the specific demands of IVGs in relation to common burn therapy goals will determine their true therapeutic benefit and guide their use in burn rehabilitation. Upper extremity (UE) motion of 24 normal children was measured using 3D motion analysis during play with the two types of IVGs most commonly described for use after burn: NW and PE. Data was analyzed using t-tests and One-way Analysis of Variance. Active range of motion for shoulder flexion and abduction during play with both PE and NW was within functional range, thus supporting the idea that IVGs offer activities with therapeutic potential to improve ROM. PE resulted in higher demands and longer duration of UE motion than NW, and therefore may be the preferred tool when UE ROM or muscular endurance are the goals of rehabilitation. When choosing a suitable IVG for application in rehabilitation, the user's impairment together with the therapeutic attributes of the IVG should be considered to optimize outcome.

  19. Induced gravity with Higgs potential. Elementary interactions and quantum processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezares Roder, Nils Manuel

    2010-07-01

    This work is intended to first serve as introduction in fundamental subjects of physics in order to be then able to review the mechanism of symmetry breakdown and its essential character in physics. It introduces the concept of scalar-tensor theories of gravity based on Bergmann-Wagoner models with a Higgs potential. The main physical context aimed is the problem of Dark Matter and Dark Energy. On the one hand, there is gravitation. Within this context, we have Dark Matter as an especially relevant concept. This work entails the following main contributions: - General features of Einstein's theory are introduced together with generalities of the different elementary interactions of physics from which the concepts of dark sectors and Higgs Mechanism are derived. - The concept of symmetry breaking and especially the Higgs Mechanism of mass generation are discussed in their relevance for the most different subjects of physics, especially in relation to the Standard Model of elementary particle physics with elementary Higgs fields. - Scalar-Tensor Theories are introduced in order to build in them the process of Higgs Mechanism. This is then fulfilled with a theory of induced gravity with a Higgs potential which seems renormalizable according to deWitt's power counting criterion, and with mass-generating Higgs fields which only couple gravitationally as well as with Higgs fields which act analogously to cosmon fields. - Further, the energy density of the gravitational field is derived for the specific model of induced gravity from an analogy to electrodynamics. It is shown that a nonvanishing value of pressure related to the scalar field is necessary in order to reproduce standard linear solar-relativistic dynamics. Within astrophysical considerations for flat rotation curves of galaxies, a possible dark-matter behavior is concluded within spherical symmetry. The scalar field and the dark-matter profile of total energy density are derived. An analogous

  20. Teaching computers to fold proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Winther, Ole; Krogh, Anders Stærmose

    2004-01-01

    A new general algorithm for optimization of potential functions for protein folding is introduced. It is based upon gradient optimization of the thermodynamic stability of native folds of a training set of proteins with known structure. The iterative update rule contains two thermodynamic averages which are estimated by (generalized ensemble) Monte Carlo. We test the learning algorithm on a Lennard-Jones (LJ) force field with a torsional angle degrees-of-freedom and a single-atom side-chain. ...

  1. Inverse folding of RNA pseudoknot structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Linda YM

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA exhibits a variety of structural configurations. Here we consider a structure to be tantamount to the noncrossing Watson-Crick and G-U-base pairings (secondary structure and additional cross-serial base pairs. These interactions are called pseudoknots and are observed across the whole spectrum of RNA functionalities. In the context of studying natural RNA structures, searching for new ribozymes and designing artificial RNA, it is of interest to find RNA sequences folding into a specific structure and to analyze their induced neutral networks. Since the established inverse folding algorithms, RNAinverse, RNA-SSD as well as INFO-RNA are limited to RNA secondary structures, we present in this paper the inverse folding algorithm Inv which can deal with 3-noncrossing, canonical pseudoknot structures. Results In this paper we present the inverse folding algorithm Inv. We give a detailed analysis of Inv, including pseudocodes. We show that Inv allows to design in particular 3-noncrossing nonplanar RNA pseudoknot 3-noncrossing RNA structures-a class which is difficult to construct via dynamic programming routines. Inv is freely available at http://www.combinatorics.cn/cbpc/inv.html. Conclusions The algorithm Inv extends inverse folding capabilities to RNA pseudoknot structures. In comparison with RNAinverse it uses new ideas, for instance by considering sets of competing structures. As a result, Inv is not only able to find novel sequences even for RNA secondary structures, it does so in the context of competing structures that potentially exhibit cross-serial interactions.

  2. Asymptotic Near Nucleus Structure of the Electron-Interaction Potential in Local Effective Potential Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahni, Viraht; Qian, Zhixin

    2007-03-01

    In previous work, it has been shown that for spherically symmetric or sphericalized systems, the asymptotic near nucleus structure of the electron-interaction potential is vee(r) = vee(0) + βr + γr^2. In this paper we prove via time-independent Quantal Density Functional Theory[1](Q-DFT): (i) correlations due to the Pauli exclusion principle and Coulomb repulsion do not contribute to the linear structure;(ii) these Pauli and Coulomb correlations contribute quadratically; (iii) the linear structure is solely due to Correlation-Kinetic effects, the coefficient β being determined analytically. By application of adiabatic coupling constant perturbation theory via QDFT we further prove: (iv) the Kohn-Sham (KS-DFT) `exchange' potential vx(r) approaches the nucleus linearly, this structure being due solely to lowest- order Correlation-Kinetic effects: (v) the KS-DFT `correlation' potential vc(r) also approaches the nucleus linearly, being solely due to higher-order Correlation-Kinetic contributions. The above conclusions are equally valid for system of arbitrary symmetry, provided spherical averages of the properties are employed. 1 Quantal Density Functional Theory, V. Sahni (Springer-Verlag 2004)

  3. A light-harvesting antenna protein retains its folded conformation in the absence of protein-lipid and protein-pigment interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, J; Asakura, T; Loach, P A; Parkes-Loach, P S; Shimada, K; Hunter, C N; Conroy, M J; Williamson, M P

    1999-04-15

    The first study by nmr of the integral membrane protein, the bacterial light-harvesting (LH) antenna protein LH1 beta, is reported. The photosynthetic apparatus of purple bacteria contains two different kinds of antenna complexes (LH1 and LH2), which consist of two small integral membrane proteins alpha and beta, each of approximately 6 kDa, and bacteriochlorophyll and carotenoid pigments. We have purified the antenna polypeptide LH1 beta from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, and have recorded CD spectra and a series of two-dimensional nmr spectra. A comparison of CD spectra of LH1 beta observed in organic solvents and detergent micelles shows that the helical character of the peptide does not change appreciably between the two milieus. A significantly high-field shifted methyl signal was observed both in organic solvents and in detergent micelles, implying that a similar three-dimensional structure is present in each case. However, the 1H-nmr signals observed in organic solvents had a narrower line width and better resolution, and it is shown that in this case organic solvents provide a better medium for nmr studies than detergent micelles. A sequential assignment has been carried out on the C-terminal transmembrane region, which is the region in which the pigment is bound. The region is shown to have a helical structure by the chemical shift values of the alpha-CH protons and the presence of nuclear Overhauser effects characteristic of helices. An analysis of the amide proton chemical shifts of the residues surrounding the histidine chlorophyll ligand suggests that the local structure is well ordered even in the absence of protein-lipid and protein-pigment interactions. Its structure was determined from 348 nmr-derived constraints by using distance geometry calculations. The polypeptide contains an alpha-helix extending from Leu19 (position of cytoplasmic surface) to Trp44 (position of periplasmic surface). The helix is bent, as expected from the amide proton chemical

  4. Covering folded shapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oswin Aichholzer

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Can folding a piece of paper flat make it larger? We explore whether a shape S must be scaled to cover a flat-folded copy of itself. We consider both single folds and arbitrary folds (continuous piecewise isometries \\(S\\to\\mathbb{R}^2\\. The underlying problem is motivated by computational origami, and is related to other covering and fixturing problems, such as Lebesgue's universal cover problem and force closure grasps. In addition to considering special shapes (squares, equilateral triangles, polygons and disks, we give upper and lower bounds on scale factors for single folds of convex objects and arbitrary folds of simply connected objects.

  5. Origami - Folded Plate Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Buri, Hans Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    This research investigates new methods of designing folded plate structures that can be built with cross-laminated timber panels. Folded plate structures are attractive to both architects and engineers for their structural, spatial, and plastic qualities. Thin surfaces can be stiffened by a series of folds, and thus not only cover space, but also act as load bearing elements. The variation of light and shadow along the folded faces emphasizes the plas...

  6. The Folded t Distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Psarakis, Stelios; Panaretos, John

    1990-01-01

    Measurements are frequently recorder without their algebraic sign. As a consequence the underlying distribution of measurements is replaced by a distribution of absolute measurements. When the underlying distribution is t the resulting distribution is called the “folded-t distribution”. Here we study this distribution, we find the relationship between the folded-t distribution and a special case of the folded normal distribution and we derive relationships of the folded-t distribution to othe...

  7. MODELS OF PROTEIN FOLDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unnati Ahluwalia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to explore the understanding of protein folding mechanism, various models have been proposed in the literature. Advances in recent experimental and computational techniques rationalized our understanding on some of the fundamental features of the protein folding pathways. The goal of this review is to revisit the various models and outline the essential aspects of the folding reaction.

  8. Interaction potentials for water from accurate cluster calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2006-03-15

    The abundance of water in nature, its function as a universal solvent and its role in many chemical and biological processes that are responsible for sustaining life on earth is the driving force behind the need for understanding its behavior under different conditions, and in various environments. The availability of models that describe the properties of either pure water/ice or its mixtures with a variety of solutes ranging from simple chemical species to complex biological molecules and environmental interfaces is therefore crucial in order to be able to develop predictive paradigms that attempt to model solvation and reaction and transport in aqueous environments. In attempting to develop these models the question naturally arises 'is water different/more complex than other hydrogen bonded liquids'. This proposition has been suggested based on the 'anomalous' behavior of its macroscopic properties such as the density maximum at 4 C, the non-monotonic behavior of its compressibility with temperature, the anomalous behavior of its relaxation time below typical temperatures of the human body, the large value and non-monotonic dependence below 35 C of the specific heat of constant pressure, the smaller than expected value of the coefficient of thermal expansion. This suggestion infers that simple models used to describe the relevant inter- and intra-molecular interactions will not suffice in order to reproduce the behavior of these properties under a wide temperature range. To this end, explicit microscopic level detailed information needs to be incorporated into the models in order to capture the appropriate physics at the molecular level. From the simple model of Bernal and Fowler, which was the first attempt to develop an empirical model for water back in 1933, this process has yielded ca. 50 different models to date. A recent review provides a nearly complete account of this effort coupled to the milestones in the area of molecular

  9. Electrochemistry of folded graphene edges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosi, Adriano; Bonanni, Alessandra; Pumera, Martin

    2011-05-01

    There is enormous interest in the investigation of electron transfer rates at the edges of graphene due to possible energy storage and sensing applications. While electrochemistry at the edges and the basal plane of graphene has been studied in the past, the new frontier is the electrochemistry of folded graphene edges. Here we describe the electrochemistry of folded graphene edges and compare it to that of open graphene edges. The materials were characterized in detail by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. We found that the heterogeneous electron transfer rate is significantly lower on folded graphene edges compared to open edge sites for ferro/ferricyanide, and that electrochemical properties of open edges offer lower potential detection of biomarkers than the folded ones. It is apparent, therefore, that for sensing and biosensing applications the folded edges are less active than open edges, which should then be preferred for such applications. As folded edges are the product of thermal treatment of multilayer graphene, such thermal procedures should be avoided when fabricating graphene for electrochemical applications.

  10. Effective potentials for atom-atom interaction at low temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Bo

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the concept and design of effective atom-atom potentials that accurately describe any physical processes involving only states around the threshold. The existence of such potentials gives hope to a quantitative, and systematic, understanding of quantum few-atom and quantum many-atom systems at relatively low temperatures.

  11. The Stability of Icosahedral Cluster and the Range of Interaction Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Feng; WANG Jin-Lan; SHEN Wei-Feng; WANG Bao-Lin; LI Hui; WANG Guang-Hou

    2001-01-01

    The relation between the stability of icosahedral clusters and the range of interaction potential is discussed.We found that the stability of icosahedral clusters nay decrease with decreasing range of interaction potential. A simple formula about the critical number of icosahedral clusters and the range of interaction potential (M1/3c = A1 + A2r2eff)was proposed. The calculation of the stability of icosahedral fullerence molecular clusters shows that our idea is right.``

  12. MicroRNAs and potential target interactions in psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibert, John Robert; Løvendorf, Marianne B.; Litman, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease often seen in patients with a genetic susceptibility. MicroRNAs (miRNA) are endogenous, short RNA molecules that can bind to parts of mRNA target genes, thus inhibiting their translation and causing accelerated turnover or transcript...... degradation. MicroRNAs are important in the pathogenesis of human diseases such as immunological disorders, as they regulate a broad range of biological processes. OBJECTIVE: We investigated miRNA-mRNA interactions in involved (PP) and non-involved (PN) psoriatic skin compared with healthy skin (NN). METHODS......: Biopsies were obtained from PP, PN and NN, the miRNA and mRNA expression was analyzed by microarray techniques and a subset of miRNAs and mRNAs were validated by q-RT-PCR. Novel target interactions in psoriasis were found using PubMed, miRBase and RNAhybrid. In addition, TIMP3 protein expression...

  13. Bubble-bubble interaction: A potential source of cavitation noise

    CERN Document Server

    Ida, Masato

    2009-01-01

    The interaction between microbubbles through pressure pulses has been studied to show that it can be a source of cavitation noise. A recent report demonstrated that the acoustic noise generated by a shrimp originates from the collapse of a cavitation bubble produced when the shrimp closes its snapper claw. The recorded acoustic signal contains a broadband noise that consists of positive and negative pulses, but a theoretical model for single bubbles fails to reproduce the negative ones. Using a nonlinear multibubble model we have shown here that the negative pulses can be explained by considering the interaction of microbubbles formed after the cavitation bubble has collapsed and fragmented: Positive pulses produced at the collapse of the microbubbles hit and impulsively compress neighboring microbubbles to generate reflected pulses whose amplitudes are negative. Discussing the details of the noise generation process, we have found that no negative pulses are generated if the internal pressure of the reflecti...

  14. Fast protein folding kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelman, Hannah; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Fast folding proteins have been a major focus of computational and experimental study because they are accessible to both techniques: they are small and fast enough to be reasonably simulated with current computational power, but have dynamics slow enough to be observed with specially developed experimental techniques. This coupled study of fast folding proteins has provided insight into the mechanisms which allow some proteins to find their native conformation well less than 1 ms and has uncovered examples of theoretically predicted phenomena such as downhill folding. The study of fast folders also informs our understanding of even “slow” folding processes: fast folders are small, relatively simple protein domains and the principles that govern their folding also govern the folding of more complex systems. This review summarizes the major theoretical and experimental techniques used to study fast folding proteins and provides an overview of the major findings of fast folding research. Finally, we examine the themes that have emerged from studying fast folders and briefly summarize their application to protein folding in general as well as some work that is left to do. PMID:24641816

  15. A galaxy of folds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alva, Vikram; Remmert, Michael; Biegert, Andreas; Lupas, Andrei N; Söding, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Many protein classification systems capture homologous relationships by grouping domains into families and superfamilies on the basis of sequence similarity. Superfamilies with similar 3D structures are further grouped into folds. In the absence of discernable sequence similarity, these structural similarities were long thought to have originated independently, by convergent evolution. However, the growth of databases and advances in sequence comparison methods have led to the discovery of many distant evolutionary relationships that transcend the boundaries of superfamilies and folds. To investigate the contributions of convergent versus divergent evolution in the origin of protein folds, we clustered representative domains of known structure by their sequence similarity, treating them as point masses in a virtual 2D space which attract or repel each other depending on their pairwise sequence similarities. As expected, families in the same superfamily form tight clusters. But often, superfamilies of the same fold are linked with each other, suggesting that the entire fold evolved from an ancient prototype. Strikingly, some links connect superfamilies with different folds. They arise from modular peptide fragments of between 20 and 40 residues that co-occur in the connected folds in disparate structural contexts. These may be descendants of an ancestral pool of peptide modules that evolved as cofactors in the RNA world and from which the first folded proteins arose by amplification and recombination. Our galaxy of folds summarizes, in a single image, most known and many yet undescribed homologous relationships between protein superfamilies, providing new insights into the evolution of protein domains.

  16. Improved Interaction Potentials for Charged Residues in Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2008-01-01

    Electrostatic interactions dominate the structure and free energy of biomolecules. To obtain accurate free energies involving charged groups from molecular simulations, OPLS-AA parameters have been reoptimized using Monte Carlo free energy perturbation. New parameters fit a self-consistent, exper...... directly in molecular simulations with no modification of neutral residues needed and are envisioned to be particular important in simulations where charged residues change environment....

  17. In vitro interactions between Armillaria species and potential biocontrol fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keča Nenad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Interaction between Armillaria species and seven other fungi were tested in vitro. Tree antagonistic (Trichoderma viride, Trichotecium roseum and Penicillium sp. and four decaying (Hypholoma fasciculare¸ Hypholoma capnoides, Phlebiopsis gigantea, and Pleurotus ostreatus fungi were chosen for this study. The best results were noted for Trichoderma viride, because fungus was able to kill both mycelia and rhizomorphs of Armillaria species, while Hypholoma spp. inhibited both growth of Armillaria colonies and rhizomorph production.

  18. Fluid-Structure Interaction Using Retarded Potential and ABAQUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-19

    but require the formuation and factoring of a global stiffness matrix. This is very costly and even prohibitive especially for Manuacript approved...Dimensional Retarded Potential Fluid - Finite Element Structural Analysis, NRL Memorandum, Report 5903, May 1987. 20. Tamm. M. A., A Parametric Patch

  19. Problems in the links between scattering data and interaction potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amos, K.

    1995-10-01

    The scattering function is of paramount importance in any approaches by which quantitative information on the interaction between colliding quantal systems of nuclear, atomic or molecular type, may be sought from measured, elastic scattering data. Therein there are two possible spectral parameters, the energy and the angular momentum. Most experimental results suggest use of fixed energy and variable angular momentum schemes. Such fixed energy data and their analyses are the subject of this report, with particular emphasis placed upon the problems of the link between data and the scattering function. 18 figs.

  20. On Safe Folding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bossi, Annalisa; Cocco, Nicoletta; Etalle, Sandro; Bruynooghe, Maurice; Wirsing, Martin

    1993-01-01

    In [3] a general fold operation has been introduced for definite programs wrt computed answer substitution semantics. It differs from the fold operation defined by Tamaki and Sato in [26,25] because its application does not depend on the transformation history. This paper extends the results in [3

  1. Fast protein folding kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelman, Hannah; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Fast-folding proteins have been a major focus of computational and experimental study because they are accessible to both techniques: they are small and fast enough to be reasonably simulated with current computational power, but have dynamics slow enough to be observed with specially developed experimental techniques. This coupled study of fast-folding proteins has provided insight into the mechanisms, which allow some proteins to find their native conformation well fast folders also informs our understanding of even 'slow' folding processes: fast folders are small; relatively simple protein domains and the principles that govern their folding also govern the folding of more complex systems. This review summarizes the major theoretical and experimental techniques used to study fast-folding proteins and provides an overview of the major findings of fast-folding research. Finally, we examine the themes that have emerged from studying fast folders and briefly summarize their application to protein folding in general, as well as some work that is left to do.

  2. A constructive model potential method for atomic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottcher, C.; Dalgarno, A.

    1974-01-01

    A model potential method is presented that can be applied to many electron single centre and two centre systems. The development leads to a Hamiltonian with terms arising from core polarization that depend parametrically upon the positions of the valence electrons. Some of the terms have been introduced empirically in previous studies. Their significance is clarified by an analysis of a similar model in classical electrostatics. The explicit forms of the expectation values of operators at large separations of two atoms given by the model potential method are shown to be equivalent to the exact forms when the assumption is made that the energy level differences of one atom are negligible compared to those of the other.

  3. Probing folding free energy landscape of small proteins through minimalistic models: Folding of HP-36 and -amyloid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arnab Mukherjee; Biman Bagchi

    2003-10-01

    Folding dynamics and energy landscape picture of protein conformations of HP-36 and -amyloid (A) are investigated by extensive Brownian dynamics simulations, where the inter amino acid interactions are given by a minimalistic model (MM) we recently introduced [J. Chem. Phys. 118 4733 (2003)]. In this model, a protein is constructed by taking two atoms for each amino acid. One atom represents the backbone C atom, while the other mimics the whole side chain residue. Sizes and interactions of the side residues are all different and specific to a particular amino acid. The effect of water-mediated folding is mapped into the MM by suitable choice of interaction parameters of the side residues obtained from the amino acid hydropathy scale. A new non-local helix potential is incorporated to generate helices at the appropriate positions in a protein. Simulations have been done by equilibrating the protein at high temperature followed by a sudden quench. The subsequent folding is monitored to observe the dynamics of topological contacts (topo), relative contact order parameter (RCO), and the root mean square deviation (RMSD) from the realprotein native structure. The folded structures of different model proteins (HP-36 and ) resemble their respective real native state rather well. The dynamics of folding shows multistage decay, with an initial hydrophobic collapse followed by a long plateau. Analysis of topo and RCO correlates the late stage folding with rearrangement of the side chain residues, particularly those far apart in the sequence. The long plateau also signifies large entropic free energy barrier near the native state, as predicted from theories of protein folding.

  4. The Statics Dielectric Function and Interaction Potential In Strong Coupling With AdS/CFT

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Lian; Liu, Hui

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we studied the static dielectric function and interaction potential in strong coupling limit with AdS/CFT correspondence. The dielectric function is depressed compared with that in weak coupling. The interaction potential then presents a weaker screening characteristics in strong coupling, which indicates a smaller Debye mass compared with weak coupling.

  5. On critical stability of three quantum charges interacting through delta potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia; Duclos, Pierre; Ricaud, Benjamin

    We consider three one dimensional quantum, charged and spinless particles interacting through delta potentials. We derive sufficient conditions which guarantee the existence of at least one bound state.......We consider three one dimensional quantum, charged and spinless particles interacting through delta potentials. We derive sufficient conditions which guarantee the existence of at least one bound state....

  6. Technological Dangers and the Potential of Human-Robot Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    watching a soccer game in which our child is one of the players. The question of which team we should cheer for never occurs to the parent. By changing the vantage point to a radical phenomenological perspective, informed by Eastern as well as Western thought, this chapter tests the basis for this type...... technological dangers and opportunities. Finally, aiming for the very limits of the theory, I discuss the contours of a praxis facilitating being-with-robots beyond conceptualization. Basically, this mode of being, pertaining to non-technological HRI, bypasses Heidegger’s warnings, and potentially facilitates...

  7. Hyperon-nucleon single-particle potentials with low-momentum interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Djapo, Haris; Wambach, Jochen

    2008-01-01

    Single-particle potentials in Hartree-Fock approximation for different hyperon-nucleon (YN) channels are calculated in the framework of the effective low-momentum YN interaction V_lowk. In contrast to the nucleon-nucleon interaction, the available experimental data for the YN interaction are scarce. As a consequence no unique YN low-momentum potential V_lowk can be predicted from the various bare potentials. The resulting momentum- and density-dependent single-particle potentials for several different bare OBE models and for chiral effective field theory are compared to each other.

  8. Host-Symbiont Interactions for Potentially Managing Heteropteran Pests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Souza Prado

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Insects in the suborder Heteroptera, the so-called true bugs, include over 40,000 species worldwide. This insect group includes many important agricultural pests and disease vectors, which often have bacterial symbionts associated with them. Some symbionts have coevolved with their hosts to the extent that host fitness is compromised with the removal or alteration of their symbiont. The first bug/microbial interactions were discovered over 50 years ago. Only recently, mainly due to advances in molecular techniques, has the nature of these associations become clearer. Some researchers have pursued the genetic modification (paratransgenesis of symbionts for disease control or pest management. With the increasing interest and understanding of the bug/symbiont associations and their ecological and physiological features, it will only be a matter of time before pest/vector control programs utilize this information and technique. This paper will focus on recent discoveries of the major symbiotic systems in Heteroptera, highlighting how the understanding of the evolutionary and biological aspects of these relationships may lead to the development of alternative techniques for efficient heteropteran pest control and suppression of diseases vectored by Heteroptera.

  9. The response of the polarized Fermi mixture to an artificial vector potential: The interaction strength and imbalance chemical potential effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimian, N.; Safiee, Z.

    2017-03-01

    We consider a polarized Fermi mixture (with normal-superfluid phase separation), subjected to artificial vector potential. We concentrate on the BCS regime with various interaction strengths and numerically obtain the polarisability of the system. We obtain the functional dependence of the polarisability of the system on frequency and the relevant physical parameters, namely the interaction strength, the mass ratio, the average and imbalance chemical potentials. Also, we find the special frequency (ωs), for which the rate of the response of system to the potential is changed and the cut-off frequency (ωcutoff), for which the response starts to become infinity. We investigate the behavior of the curves of polarisability versus proper physical parameters for ω physical parameters. Finally, the system's response can be controlled by relevant physical parameters, such as interaction strength.

  10. Severe potential drug-drug interactions in older adults with dementia and associated factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Bogetti-Salazar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify the main severe potential drug-drug interactions in older adults with dementia and to examine the factors associated with these interactions. METHOD: This was a cross-sectional study. The enrolled patients were selected from six geriatrics clinics of tertiary care hospitals across Mexico City. The patients had received a clinical diagnosis of dementia based on the current standards and were further divided into the following two groups: those with severe drug-drug interactions (contraindicated/severe (n=64 and those with non-severe drug-drug interactions (moderate/minor/absent (n=117. Additional socio-demographic, clinical and caregiver data were included. Potential drug-drug interactions were identified using Micromedex Drug Reax 2.0® database. RESULTS: A total of 181 patients were enrolled, including 57 men (31.5% and 124 women (68.5% with a mean age of 80.11±8.28 years. One hundred and seven (59.1% patients in our population had potential drug-drug interactions, of which 64 (59.81% were severe/contraindicated. The main severe potential drug-drug interactions were caused by the combinations citalopram/anti-platelet (11.6%, clopidogrel/omeprazole (6.1%, and clopidogrel/aspirin (5.5%. Depression, the use of a higher number of medications, dementia severity and caregiver burden were the most significant factors associated with severe potential drug-drug interactions. CONCLUSIONS: Older people with dementia experience many severe potential drug-drug interactions. Anti-depressants, antiplatelets, anti-psychotics and omeprazole were the drugs most commonly involved in these interactions. Despite their frequent use, anti-dementia drugs were not involved in severe potential drug-drug interactions. The number and type of medications taken, dementia severity and depression in patients in addition to caregiver burden should be considered to avoid possible drug interactions in this population.

  11. Macromolecule-Assisted de novo Protein Folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seong Il; Son, Ahyun; Lim, Keo-Heun; Jeong, Hotcherl; Seong, Baik L.

    2012-01-01

    In the processes of protein synthesis and folding, newly synthesized polypeptides are tightly connected to the macromolecules, such as ribosomes, lipid bilayers, or cotranslationally folded domains in multidomain proteins, representing a hallmark of de novo protein folding environments in vivo. Such linkage effects on the aggregation of endogenous polypeptides have been largely neglected, although all these macromolecules have been known to effectively and robustly solubilize their linked heterologous proteins in fusion or display technology. Thus, their roles in the aggregation of linked endogenous polypeptides need to be elucidated and incorporated into the mechanisms of de novo protein folding in vivo. In the classic hydrophobic interaction-based stabilizing mechanism underlying the molecular chaperone-assisted protein folding, it has been assumed that the macromolecules connected through a simple linkage without hydrophobic interactions and conformational changes would make no effect on the aggregation of their linked polypeptide chains. However, an increasing line of evidence indicates that the intrinsic properties of soluble macromolecules, especially their surface charges and excluded volume, could be important and universal factors for stabilizing their linked polypeptides against aggregation. Taken together, these macromolecules could act as folding helpers by keeping their linked nascent chains in a folding-competent state. The folding assistance provided by these macromolecules in the linkage context would give new insights into de novo protein folding inside the cell. PMID:22949867

  12. Attentional focus in social anxiety disorder: potential for interactive processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Luke T; Heimberg, Richard G

    2008-10-01

    The two preeminent cognitive behavioral models of social anxiety [Clark, D.M., & Wells, A., (1995). A cognitive model of social phobia. In Heimberg, R.G., Liebowitz, M., Hope, D.A., and Schneier, F.R. (Eds.), Social phobia: Diagnosis, assessment and treatment (pp. 69-93). New York: Guilford Press.; Rapee, R.M., & Heimberg, R.G., (1997). A cognitive behavioral model of anxiety in social phobia. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 35, 741-756.] suggest that attention to threat stimuli is critical in the maintenance of social fear. However, Clark and Wells assert that socially anxious persons attend almost exclusively to negative thoughts and self-imagery during social situations, whereas Rapee and Heimberg contend that socially anxious persons simultaneously attend to these internal cues and external stimuli potentially indicative of negative evaluation, such as an audience member's facial expressions. Rapee and Heimberg further suggest that attention to external and internal cues during social situations should be interdependent, such that focus on one has causal implications for the experience of the other. The current review examines the nature of the literature as it supports the assertions of each of these models of social anxiety, with particular attention to differing predictions regarding attentional focus. We conclude that socially anxious persons engage in both internal and external focus throughout the course of a social situation; however, there are a number of significant limitations to the literature. Accordingly, directions for future research are considered.

  13. On the theory of interaction potentials in ionic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Roberto; Soto-Bubert, Andrés

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this research work is to report a more comprehensive and detailed study of both, the intermolecular and intramolecular potencial functions with reference to the various families of the elpasolite type crystals. The cohesive energy has been thought as a sum of three terms; the long range (Coulombic), the Born and the van der Waals contributions to the total energy. The Born-Mayer-Buckingham potential1 has been employed in all of these current studies and a number of convergence tests are analyzed from a formal viewpoint. Our work has been focused to the following systems: Cs2NaLnF6, Cs2NaLnCl6, Cs2NaLnBr6, Rb2NaLnF6 and Cs2KLnF6 in the Fm3m space group. A substantial amount of theoretical models have been analyzed and several computing simulations have been undertaken to estimate the reticular energies and the corresponding heat of formation for these crystals. To achieve this goal, a Born-Haber thermodynamic cycle has been introduced in our model. It is shown that the calculated energy values are reasonable and follow the expected trend along the lanthanide series in the periodic chart. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the current and proposed generalized model. The most likely sources for improvement are discussed in detail. New convergence tests as well as some master equations have been introduced to study the various diagonal contributions to the total energy.

  14. Mutational analysis of the β-trefoil fold protein barley α-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor probes hot spots for the interaction with barley α-amylase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønsager, Birgit Christine; Nielsen, P. K.; Abou Hachem, Maher;

    2005-01-01

    increased 2-3 orders of magnitude, whereas mutations on the other side of the inhibitor had virtually no effect. The mutants K140L, D150N, and E168T lost inhibitory activity, revealing the pivotal role of charge interactions for BASI activity on AMY2. A fully hydrated Ca(2+) at the AMY2-BASI interface...

  15. On the theory of interaction potentials in ionic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acevedo, Roberto [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas y Matematicas, Beauchef 850, Santiago (Chile); Soto-Bubert, Andres [Instituto de Ciencias Basicas, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Diego Portales, Avenida Ejercito 441, Santiago (Chile)], E-mail: roberto.acevedo@umayor.cl

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this research work is to report a more comprehensive and detailed study of both, the intermolecular and intramolecular potencial functions with reference to the various families of the elpasolite type crystals. The cohesive energy has been thought as a sum of three terms; the long range (Coulombic), the Born and the van der Waals contributions to the total energy. The Born-Mayer-Buckingham potential{sup 1} has been employed in all of these current studies and a number of convergence tests are analyzed from a formal viewpoint. Our work has been focused to the following systems: Cs{sub 2}NaLnF{sub 6}, Cs{sub 2}NaLnCl{sub 6}, Cs{sub 2}NaLnBr{sub 6}, Rb{sub 2}NaLnF{sub 6} and Cs{sub 2}KLnF{sub 6} in the Fm3m space group. A substantial amount of theoretical models have been analyzed and several computing simulations have been undertaken to estimate the reticular energies and the corresponding heat of formation for these crystals. To achieve this goal, a Born-Haber thermodynamic cycle has been introduced in our model. It is shown that the calculated energy values are reasonable and follow the expected trend along the lanthanide series in the periodic chart. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the current and proposed generalized model. The most likely sources for improvement are discussed in detail. New convergence tests as well as some master equations have been introduced to study the various diagonal contributions to the total energy.

  16. Mutation in Cyclophilin B That Causes Hyperelastosis Cutis in American Quarter Horse Does Not Affect Peptidylprolyl cis-trans Isomerase Activity but Shows Altered Cyclophilin B-Protein Interactions and Affects Collagen Folding*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Vranka, Janice A.; Boudko, Sergei P.; Pokidysheva, Elena; Mizuno, Kazunori; Zientek, Keith; Keene, Douglas R.; Rashmir-Raven, Ann M.; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Winand, Nena J.; Bächinger, Hans Peter

    2012-01-01

    The rate-limiting step of folding of the collagen triple helix is catalyzed by cyclophilin B (CypB). The G6R mutation in cyclophilin B found in the American Quarter Horse leads to autosomal recessive hyperelastosis cutis, also known as hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia. The mutant protein shows small structural changes in the region of the mutation at the side opposite the catalytic domain of CypB. The peptidylprolyl cis-trans isomerase activity of the mutant CypB is normal when analyzed in vitro. However, the biosynthesis of type I collagen in affected horse fibroblasts shows a delay in folding and secretion and a decrease in hydroxylysine and glucosyl-galactosyl hydroxylysine. This leads to changes in the structure of collagen fibrils in tendon, similar to those observed in P3H1 null mice. In contrast to cyclophilin B null mice, where little 3-hydroxylation was found in type I collagen, 3-hydroxylation of type I collagen in affected horses is normal. The mutation disrupts the interaction of cyclophilin B with the P-domain of calreticulin, with lysyl hydroxylase 1, and probably other proteins, such as the formation of the P3H1·CypB·cartilage-associated protein complex, resulting in less effective catalysis of the rate-limiting step in collagen folding in the rough endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:22556420

  17. Mutation in cyclophilin B that causes hyperelastosis cutis in American Quarter Horse does not affect peptidylprolyl cis-trans isomerase activity but shows altered cyclophilin B-protein interactions and affects collagen folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Vranka, Janice A; Boudko, Sergei P; Pokidysheva, Elena; Mizuno, Kazunori; Zientek, Keith; Keene, Douglas R; Rashmir-Raven, Ann M; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Winand, Nena J; Bächinger, Hans Peter

    2012-06-22

    The rate-limiting step of folding of the collagen triple helix is catalyzed by cyclophilin B (CypB). The G6R mutation in cyclophilin B found in the American Quarter Horse leads to autosomal recessive hyperelastosis cutis, also known as hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia. The mutant protein shows small structural changes in the region of the mutation at the side opposite the catalytic domain of CypB. The peptidylprolyl cis-trans isomerase activity of the mutant CypB is normal when analyzed in vitro. However, the biosynthesis of type I collagen in affected horse fibroblasts shows a delay in folding and secretion and a decrease in hydroxylysine and glucosyl-galactosyl hydroxylysine. This leads to changes in the structure of collagen fibrils in tendon, similar to those observed in P3H1 null mice. In contrast to cyclophilin B null mice, where little 3-hydroxylation was found in type I collagen, 3-hydroxylation of type I collagen in affected horses is normal. The mutation disrupts the interaction of cyclophilin B with the P-domain of calreticulin, with lysyl hydroxylase 1, and probably other proteins, such as the formation of the P3H1·CypB·cartilage-associated protein complex, resulting in less effective catalysis of the rate-limiting step in collagen folding in the rough endoplasmic reticulum.

  18. Phase transition of strongly interacting matter with a chemical potential dependent Polyakov loop potential

    CERN Document Server

    Shao, Guo-yun; Di Toro, Massimo; Colonna, Maria; Gao, Xue-yan; Gao, Ning

    2016-01-01

    We construct a hadron-quark two-phase model based on the Walecka-quantum hadrodynamics and the improved Polyakov-Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model with an explicit chemical potential dependence of Polyakov-loop potential ($\\mu$PNJL model). With respect to the original PNJL model, the confined-deconfined phase transition is largely affected at low temperature and large chemical potential. Using the two-phase model, we investigate the equilibrium transition between hadronic and quark matter at finite chemical potentials and temperatures. The numerical results show that the transition boundaries from nuclear to quark matter move towards smaller chemical potential (lower density) when the $\\mu$-dependent Polyakov loop potential is taken. In particular, for charge asymmetric matter, we compute the local asymmetry of $u, d$ quarks in the hadron-quark coexisting phase, and analyse the isospin-relevant observables possibly measurable in heavy-ion collision (HIC) experiments. In general new HIC data on the location and proper...

  19. Structural Determination and Tryptophan Fluorescence of Heterokaryon Incompatibility C2 Protein (HET-C2), a Fungal Glycolipid Transfer Protein (GLTP), Provide Novel Insights into Glycolipid Specificity and Membrane Interaction by the GLTP Fold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenoth, Roopa; Simanshu, Dhirendra K.; Kamlekar, Ravi Kanth; Pike, Helen M.; Molotkovsky, Julian G.; Benson, Linda M.; Bergen, III, H. Robert; Prendergast, Franklyn G.; Malinina, Lucy; Venyaminov, Sergei Y.; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Brown, Rhoderick E. (Russ. Acad. Sci.); (SKI); (UMM); (Mayo)

    2010-06-21

    HET-C2 is a fungal protein that transfers glycosphingolipids between membranes and has limited sequence homology with human glycolipid transfer protein (GLTP). The human GLTP fold is unique among lipid binding/transfer proteins, defining the GLTP superfamily. Herein, GLTP fold formation by HET-C2, its glycolipid transfer specificity, and the functional role(s) of its two Trp residues have been investigated. X-ray diffraction (1.9 {angstrom}) revealed a GLTP fold with all key sugar headgroup recognition residues (Asp{sup 66}, Asn{sup 70}, Lys{sup 73}, Trp{sup 109}, and His{sup 147}) conserved and properly oriented for glycolipid binding. Far-UV CD showed secondary structure dominated by {alpha}-helices and a cooperative thermal unfolding transition of 49 C, features consistent with a GLTP fold. Environmentally induced optical activity of Trp/Tyr/Phe (2:4:12) detected by near-UV CD was unaffected by membranes containing glycolipid but was slightly altered by membranes lacking glycolipid. Trp fluorescence was maximal at {approx}355 nm and accessible to aqueous quenchers, indicating free exposure to the aqueous milieu and consistent with surface localization of the two Trps. Interaction with membranes lacking glycolipid triggered significant decreases in Trp emission intensity but lesser than decreases induced by membranes containing glycolipid. Binding of glycolipid (confirmed by electrospray injection mass spectrometry) resulted in a blue-shifted emission wavelength maximum ({approx}6 nm) permitting determination of binding affinities. The unique positioning of Trp{sup 208} at the HET-C2 C terminus revealed membrane-induced conformational changes that precede glycolipid uptake, whereas key differences in residues of the sugar headgroup recognition center accounted for altered glycolipid specificity and suggested evolutionary adaptation for the simpler glycosphingolipid compositions of filamentous fungi.

  20. Conjugation of cholesterol to HIV-1 fusion inhibitor C34 increases peptide-membrane interactions potentiating its action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Hollmann

    Full Text Available Recently, the covalent binding of a cholesterol moiety to a classical HIV-1 fusion inhibitor peptide, C34, was shown to potentiate its antiviral activity. Our purpose was to evaluate the interaction of cholesterol-conjugated and native C34 with membrane model systems and human blood cells to understand the effects of this derivatization. Lipid vesicles and monolayers with defined compositions were used as model membranes. C34-cholesterol partitions more to fluid phase membranes that mimic biological membranes. Importantly, there is a preference of the conjugate for liquid ordered membranes, rich in cholesterol and/or sphingomyelin, as observed both from partition and surface pressure studies. In human erythrocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC, C34-cholesterol significantly decreases the membrane dipole potential. In PBMC, the conjugate was 14- and 115-fold more membranotropic than T-1249 and enfuvirtide, respectively. C34 or cholesterol alone did not show significant membrane activity. The enhanced interaction of C34-cholesterol with biological membranes correlates with its higher antiviral potency. Higher partitions for lipid-raft like compositions direct the drug to the receptor-rich domains where membrane fusion is likely to occur. This intermediary membrane binding step may facilitate the drug delivery to gp41 in its pre-fusion state.

  1. In vitro metabolism and drug-drug interaction potential of UTL-5g, a novel chemo- and radioprotective agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianmei; Shaw, Jiajiu; Dubaisi, Sarah; Valeriote, Frederick; Li, Jing

    2014-12-01

    N-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-methyl-1,2-oxazole-3-carboxamide (UTL-5g), a potential chemo- and radioprotective agent, acts as a prodrug requiring bioactivation to the active metabolite 5-methylisoxazole-3-carboxylic acid (ISOX). UTL-5g hydrolysis to ISOX and 2,4-dichloroaniline (DCA) has been identified in porcine and rabbit liver esterases. The purpose of this study was to provide insights on the metabolism and drug interaction potential of UTL-5g in humans. The kinetics of UTL-5g hydrolysis was determined in human liver microsomes (HLM) and recombinant human carboxylesterases (hCE1b and hCE2). The potential of UTL-5g and its metabolites for competitive inhibition and time-dependent inhibition of microsomal cytochrome P450 (P450) was examined in HLM. UTL-5g hydrolysis to ISOX and DCA in HLM were NADPH-independent, with a maximum rate of reaction (Vmax) of 11.1 nmol/min per mg and substrate affinity (Km) of 41.6 µM. Both hCE1b and hCE2 effectively catalyzed UTL-5g hydrolysis, but hCE2 exhibited ∼30-fold higher catalytic efficiency (Vmax/Km) than hCE1b. UTL-5g and DCA competitively inhibited microsomal CYP1A2, CYP2B6, and CYP2C19 (IC50 values 5g. Factors influencing carboxylesterase activities may have a significant impact on the pharmacological and therapeutic effects of UTL-5g. UTL-5g has the potential to inhibit P450-mediated metabolism through competitive inhibition or time-dependent inhibition. Caution is particularly needed for potential drug interactions involving competitive inhibition or time-dependent inhibition of CYP1A2 in the future clinical development of UTL-5g. Copyright © 2014 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  2. Solitary Inhibition of the Breast Cancer Resistance Protein Efflux Transporter Results in a Clinically Significant Drug-Drug Interaction with Rosuvastatin by Causing up to a 2-Fold Increase in Statin Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsby, Robert; Martin, Paul; Surry, Dominic; Sharma, Pradeep; Fenner, Katherine

    2016-03-01

    The intestinal efflux transporter breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) restricts the absorption of rosuvastatin. Of the transporters important to rosuvastatin disposition, fostamatinib inhibited BCRP (IC50 = 50 nM) and organic anion-transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1; IC50 > 10 μM), but not organic anion transporter 3, in vitro, predicting a drug-drug interaction (DDI) in vivo through inhibition of BCRP only. Consequently, a clinical interaction study between fostamatinib and rosuvastatin was performed (and reported elsewhere). This confirmed the critical role BCRP plays in statin absorption, as inhibition by fostamatinib resulted in a significant 1.96-fold and 1.88-fold increase in rosuvastatin area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) and Cmax, respectively. An in vitro BCRP inhibition assay, using polarized Caco-2 cells and rosuvastatin as probe substrate, was subsequently validated with literature inhibitors and used to determine BCRP inhibitory potencies (IC50) of the perpetrator drugs eltrombopag, darunavir, lopinavir, clopidogrel, ezetimibe, fenofibrate, and fluconazole. OATP1B1 inhibition was also determined using human embryonic kidney 293-OATP1B1 cells versus estradiol 17β-glucuronide. Calculated parameters of maximum enterocyte concentration [Igut max], maximum unbound hepatic inlet concentration, transporter fraction excreted value, and determined IC50 value were incorporated into mechanistic static equations to compute theoretical increases in rosuvastatin AUC due to inhibition of BCRP and/or OATP1B1. Calculated theoretical increases in exposure correctly predicted the clinically observed changes in rosuvastatin exposure and suggested intestinal BCRP inhibition (not OATP1B1) to be the mechanism underlying the DDIs with these drugs. In conclusion, solitary inhibition of the intestinal BCRP transporter can result in clinically significant DDIs with rosuvastatin, causing up to a maximum 2-fold increase in exposure, which may warrant

  3. Viscoelastic properties of the false vocal fold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Roger W.

    2004-05-01

    The biomechanical properties of vocal fold tissues have been the focus of many previous studies, as vocal fold viscoelasticity critically dictates the acoustics and biomechanics of phonation. However, not much is known about the viscoelastic response of the ventricular fold or false vocal fold. It has been shown both clinically and in computer simulations that the false vocal fold may contribute significantly to the aerodynamics and sound generation processes of human voice production, with or without flow-induced oscillation of the false fold. To better understand the potential role of the false fold in phonation, this paper reports some preliminary measurements on the linear and nonlinear viscoelastic behavior of false vocal fold tissues. Linear viscoelastic shear properties of human false fold tissue samples were measured by a high-frequency controlled-strain rheometer as a function of frequency, and passive uniaxial tensile stress-strain response of the tissue samples was measured by a muscle lever system as a function of strain and loading rate. Elastic moduli (Young's modulus and shear modulus) of the false fold tissues were calculated from the measured data. [Work supported by NIH.

  4. Artificial abelian gauge potentials induced by dipole-dipole interactions between Rydberg atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Cesa, A

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the influence of dipole-dipole interactions between Rydberg atoms on the generation of abelian artificial gauge potentials and fields. When two Rydberg atoms are driven by a uniform laser field, we show that the combined atom-atom and atom-field interactions give rise to new, non-uniform, artificial gauge potentials. We identify the mechanism responsible for the emergence of these gauge potentials. Analytical expressions for the latter indicate that the strongest artificial magnetic fields are reached in the regime intermediate between the dipole blockade regime and the regime in which the atoms are sufficiently far apart such that atom-light interaction dominates over atom-atom interactions. We discuss the differences and similarities of artificial gauge fields originating from resonant dipole-dipole and van der Waals interactions. We also give an estimation of experimentally attainable artificial magnetic fields resulting from this mechanism.

  5. Student Interactions with CD-ROM Storybooks: A Look at Potential Relationships between Multiple Intelligence Strengths and Levels of Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Celia A.

    2012-01-01

    This study looked at the potential relationship that may exist between students' intelligence strengths, in particular their spatial and kinesthetic strengths, and their combined cognitive and metacognitive levels of interaction with a CD-ROM storybook. The multiple intelligence strengths of a sample of students, measured via the MIDAS/My…

  6. A Statistical Analysis of Protein-Protein Interaction with Knowledge-Based Potential at Residue Level

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林巍; 孙飞; 饶子和

    2003-01-01

    Protein-protein recognition is an important step in biological processes, which still largely remains elusive.The inter-residue contact potential, CPij, describes the propensity of contact between two types of residue.In this study, several different CPij variants were examined with the objective of discriminating the binding potential of surface pairs.Using solvent mediated inter-molecule contact potential (SM-IMCPij), an evaluation model was deduced and tested.Using the evaluation model it was found that the SM-IMCPij gives a better performance than either residue mediated IMCPij(RM-IMCPij) or folding-residue contact potential (FCPij).The results suggest that the evaluation model provides a fast, effective, and discriminative method for the evaluation of proposed binding interfaces.

  7. Understanding the folding process of synthetic polymers by small-molecule folding agents

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S G Ramkumar; S Ramakrishnan

    2008-01-01

    Two acceptor containing polyimides PDI and NDI carrying pyromellitic diimide units and 1,4,5,8-naphthalene tetracarboxy diimide units, respectively, along with hexa(oxyethylene) (EO6) segments as linkers, were prepared from the corresponding dianhydrides and diamines. These polyimides were made to fold by interaction with specifically designed folding agents containing a dialkoxynaphthalene (DAN) donor linked to a carboxylic acid group. The alkali-metal counter-ion of the donor carboxylic acid upon complexation with the EO6 segment brings the DAN unit in the right location to induce a charge-transfer complex formation with acceptor units in the polymer backbone. This two-point interaction between the folding agent and the polymer backbone leads to a folding of the polymer chain, which was readily monitored by NMR titrations. The effect of various parameters, such as structures of the folding agent and polymer, and the solvent composition, on the folding propensities of the polymer was studied.

  8. Stability of stationary states of non-local equations with singular interaction potentials

    KAUST Repository

    Fellner, Klemens

    2011-04-01

    We study the large-time behaviour of a non-local evolution equation for the density of particles or individuals subject to an external and an interaction potential. In particular, we consider interaction potentials which are singular in the sense that their first derivative is discontinuous at the origin.For locally attractive singular interaction potentials we prove under a linear stability condition local non-linear stability of stationary states consisting of a finite sum of Dirac masses. For singular repulsive interaction potentials we show the stability of stationary states of uniformly bounded solutions under a convexity condition.Finally, we present numerical simulations to illustrate our results. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Vocal Fold Collision Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granados, Alba; Brunskog, Jonas; Misztal, M. K.

    2015-01-01

    When vocal folds vibrate at normal speaking frequencies, collisions occurs. The numerics and formulations behind a position-based continuum model of contact is an active field of research in the contact mechanics community. In this paper, a frictionless three-dimensional finite element model...... of the vocal fold collision is proposed, which incorporates different procedures used in contact mechanics and mathematical optimization theories. The penalty approach and the Lagrange multiplier method are investigated. The contact force solution obtained by the penalty formulation is highly dependent...

  10. Simulations of Protein Folding

    CERN Document Server

    Cahill, M; Cahill, K E; Cahill, Michael; Fleharty, Mark; Cahill, Kevin

    2000-01-01

    We have developed a simple, phenomenological, Monte-Carlo code that predicts the three-dimensional structure of globular proteins from the DNA sequences that define them. We have applied this code to two small proteins, the villin headpiece (1VII) and cole1 rop (1ROP). Our code folded the 36-residue villin headpiece to a mean rms distance of less than 5 A from its native structure as revealed by NMR; it folded a 56-residue fragment of the protein cole1 rop to within 11 A of its native structure. The denatured starting configurations of these two proteins were, respectively, 29 A and 55 A distant from their native structures.

  11. Peculiar features of the interaction potential between hydrogen and antihydrogen at intermediate separations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lee Teck-Ghee; Wong Cheuk-Yin; Wang Lee-Shien

    2008-01-01

    This paper evaluates the interaction potential between a hydrogen and an antihydrogen using the second-order perturbation theory within the framework of the four-body system in a separable two-body basis. It finds that the H-H interaction potential possesses the peculiar features of a shallow local minimum located around interatomic separations of r ~ 6a.u. and a barrier rising at r<~ 5a.u.

  12. Dynamic interaction potential and the scattering cross sections of the semiclassical plasma particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Shalenov, E. O.; Gabdullina, G. L. [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, 71al Farabi Street, Almaty 050040 (Kazakhstan)

    2013-04-15

    The dynamic model of the charged particles interaction in non-ideal semiclassical plasma is presented. This model takes into account the quantum mechanical diffraction effect and the dynamic screening effect. On the basis of the dynamic interaction potential, the electron scattering cross sections are investigated. Comparison with the results obtained on the basis of other models and conclusions were made.

  13. Reactive Boundary Conditions as Limits of Interaction Potentials for Brownian and Langevin Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Chapman, S Jonathan; Isaacson, Samuel A

    2015-01-01

    A popular approach to modeling bimolecular reactions between diffusing molecules is through the use of reactive boundary conditions. One common model is the Smoluchowski partial absorption condition, which uses a Robin boundary condition in the separation coordinate between two possible reactants. This boundary condition can be interpreted as an idealization of a reactive interaction potential model, in which a potential barrier must be surmounted before reactions can occur. In this work we show how the reactive boundary condition arises as the limit of an interaction potential encoding a steep barrier within a shrinking region in the particle separation, where molecules react instantly upon reaching the peak of the barrier. The limiting boundary condition is derived by the method of matched asymptotic expansions, and shown to depend critically on the relative rate of increase of the barrier height as the width of the potential is decreased. Limiting boundary conditions for the same interaction potential in b...

  14. Folding worlds between pages

    CERN Multimedia

    Meier, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    "We all remember pop-up books form our childhood. As fascinated as we were back then, we probably never imagined how much engineering know-how went into these books. Pop-up engineer Anton Radevsky has even managed to fold a 27-kilometre particle accelerator into a book" (4 pages)

  15. Folds and Etudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Robert

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about "Folds" and "Etudes" which are images derived from anonymous typing exercises that he found in a used copy of "Touch Typing Made Simple". "Etudes" refers to the musical tradition of studies for a solo instrument, which is a typewriter. Typing exercises are repetitive attempts to type words and phrases…

  16. ProbFold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahoo, Sudhakar; Świtnicki, Michał P; Pedersen, Jakob Skou

    2016-01-01

    ) with probabilistic graphical models. This approach allows rapid adaptation and integration of new probing data types. AVAILABILITY AND IMPLEMENTATION: ProbFold is implemented in C ++. Models are specified using simple textual formats. Data reformatting is done using separate C ++ programs. Source code, statically...

  17. Expanding Interaction Potentials within Virtual Environments: Investigating the Usability of Speech and Manual Input Modes for Decoupled Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Stedmon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Distributed technologies and ubiquitous computing now support users who may be detached or decoupled from traditional interactions. In order to investigate the potential usability of speech and manual input devices, an evaluation of speech input across different user groups and a usability assessment of independent-user and collaborative-user interactions was conducted. Whilst the primary focus was on a formative usability evaluation, the user group evaluation provided a formal basis to underpin the academic rigor of the exercise. The results illustrate that using a speech interface is important in understanding user acceptance of such technologies. From the usability assessment it was possible to translate interactions and make them compatible with innovative input devices. This approach to interaction is still at an early stage of development, and the potential or validity of this interfacing concept is still under evaluation; however, as a concept demonstrator, the results of these initial evaluations demonstrate the potential usability issues of both input devices as well as highlighting their suitability for advanced virtual applications.

  18. Collisional interactions between self-interacting nonrelativistic boson stars: Effective potential analysis and numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotner, Eric

    2016-09-01

    Scalar particles are a common prediction of many beyond the Standard Model theories. If they are light and cold enough, there is a possibility they may form Bose-Einstein condensates, which will then become gravitationally bound. These boson stars are solitonic solutions to the Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations but may be approximated in the nonrelativistic regime with a coupled Schrödinger-Poisson system. General properties of single soliton states are derived, including the possibility of quartic self-interactions. Binary collisions between two solitons are then studied, and the effects of different mass ratios, relative phases, self-couplings, and separation distances are characterized, leading to an easy conceptual understanding of how these parameters affect the collision outcome in terms of conservation of energy. Applications to dark matter are discussed.

  19. [Potential drug-drug interactions among elderly using antihypertensives from the Brazilian List of Essential Medicines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mibielli, Pablo; Rozenfeld, Suely; Matos, Guacira Corrêa de; Acurcio, Francisco de Assis

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of potential interactions between antihypertensives and other drugs. A household survey was conducted with individuals 60 years or older residing in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Potential moderately or very severe drug-drug interactions with antihypertensives, documented as suspected, probable or established, were identified. A total of 577 elderly were interviewed (mean age = 72 years), 45.2% of whom were using antihypertensives, of which 31.0% were subject to potential drug-drug interactions. Most of the interactions were moderately severe. Compared to the other elderly, those with potential drug-drug interactions showed more than fourfold odds of using five or more medicines and more than twofold odds of having been hospitalized in the previous year. Among the most frequent pairs of interactions, 75% cause a reduction in the hypotensive effect (65/87), which can result in low effectiveness of blood pressure control, prescribing of more drugs, and risk of other adverse events and interactions.

  20. Potential Drug-drug Interactions in Post-CCU of a Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji Aghajani, Mohammad; Sistanizad, Mohammad; Abbasinazari, Mohammad; Abiar Ghamsari, Mahdieh; Ayazkhoo, Ladan; Safi, Olia; Kazemi, Katayoon; Kouchek, Mehran

    2013-01-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) can lead to increased toxicity or reduction in therapeutic efficacy. This study was designed to assess the incidence of potential drug interactions (PDI) and rank their clinical value in post coronary care unit (Post-CCU) of a teaching hospital in Tehran, Iran. In this prospective study, three pharmacists with supervision of a clinical pharmacist actively gathered necessary information for detection of DDIs. Data were tabulated according to the combinations of drugs in treatment chart. Verification of potential drug interactions was carried out using the online Lexi-Interact™ 2011. A total of 203 patients (113 males and 90 females) were enrolled in the study. The mean age of patients was 61 ± 12.55 years (range = 26-93). A total of 90 drugs were prescribed to 203 patients and most prescribed drugs were atorvastatin, clopidogrel and metoprolol. Mean of drugs was 11.22 per patient. A total of 3166 potential drug interactions have been identified by Lexi- Interact™, 149 (4.71%) and 55 (1.73%) of which were categorized as D and X, respectively. The most serious interactions were clopidogrel+omeprazole and metoprolol+salbutamol. Drug interactions leading to serious adverse effects are to be cautiously watched for when multiple drugs are used simultaneously. In settings with multiple drug use attendance of a pharmacist or clinical pharmacist, taking the responsibility for monitoring drug interactions and notifying the physician about potential problems could decrease the harm in patient and increase the patient safety.

  1. Side chain and backbone contributions of Phe508 to CFTR folding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thibodeau, Patrick H.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Machius, Mischa; Thomas, Philip J. (U. of Texas-SMED)

    2010-12-07

    Mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an integral membrane protein, cause cystic fibrosis (CF). The most common CF-causing mutant, deletion of Phe508, fails to properly fold. To elucidate the role Phe508 plays in the folding of CFTR, missense mutations at this position were generated. Only one missense mutation had a pronounced effect on the stability and folding of the isolated domain in vitro. In contrast, many substitutions, including those of charged and bulky residues, disrupted folding of full-length CFTR in cells. Structures of two mutant nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) reveal only local alterations of the surface near position 508. These results suggest that the peptide backbone plays a role in the proper folding of the domain, whereas the side chain plays a role in defining a surface of NBD1 that potentially interacts with other domains during the maturation of intact CFTR.

  2. Prevalence of potential drug-drug interactions in cancer patients treated with oral anticancer drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.W.F. van Leeuwen (Roelof); D.H.S. Brundel (D. H S); C. Neef (Cees); T. van Gelder (Teun); A.H.J. Mathijssen (Ron); D.M. Burger (David); F.G.A. Jansman (Frank)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Potential drug-drug interactions (PDDIs) in patients with cancer are common, but have not previously been quantified for oral anticancer treatment. We assessed the prevalence and seriousness of potential PDDIs among ambulatory cancer patients on oral anticancer treatment.

  3. Prevalence of potential drug-drug interactions in cancer patients treated with oral anticancer drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, R. W. F.; Brundel, D. H. S.; Neef, C.; van Gelder, T.; Mathijssen, R. H. J.; Burger, D. M.; Jansman, F. G. A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Potential drug-drug interactions (PDDIs) in patients with cancer are common, but have not previously been quantified for oral anticancer treatment. We assessed the prevalence and seriousness of potential PDDIs among ambulatory cancer patients on oral anticancer treatment. Methods: A

  4. Chemical Potential Dependence of the Dressed-Quark Propagator from an Effective Quark-Quark Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZONG Hong-Shi; PING Jia-Lun; SUN Wei-Min; CHANG Chao-Hsi; WANG Fan

    2002-01-01

    We exhibit a method for obtaining the low chemical potential dependence of the dressed quark propagatorfrom an effective quark-quark interaction model. Within this approach we explore the chemical potential dependenceof the dressed-quark propagator, which provides a means of determining the behavior of the chiral and deconfinementorder parameters. A comparison with the results of previous researches is given.

  5. Soliton-potential interaction in the Nonlinear Klein-Gordon Model

    CERN Document Server

    Saadatmand, Danial

    2011-01-01

    Interaction of solitons with external potentials in nonlinear Klein-Gordon field theory is investigated using an improved model. Presented model is constructed with a better approximation for adding the potential to the lagrangian through the metric of background space-time. The results of the model are compared with the another model and the differences are discussed.

  6. A new model for the three-dimensional folding of Escherichia coli 16 S ribosomal RNA. II. The RNA-protein interaction data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, F; Brimacombe, R

    1997-08-29

    The map of the mass centres of the 21 proteins from the Escherichia coli 30 S ribosomal subunit, as determined by neutron scattering, was fitted to a cryoelectron microscopic (cryo-EM) model at a resolution of 20 A of 70 S ribosomes in the pre-translocational state, carrying tRNA molecules at the A and P sites. The fit to the 30 S moiety of the 70 S particles was accomplished with the help of the well-known distribution of the ribosomal proteins in the head, body and side lobe regions of the 30 S subunit, as determined by immuno electron microscopy (IEM). Most of the protein mass centres were found to lie close to the surface (or even outside) of the cryo-EM contour of the 30 S subunit, supporting the idea that the ribosomal proteins are arranged peripherally around the rRNA. The ribosomal protein distribution was then compared with the corresponding model for the 16 S rRNA, fitted to the same EM contour (described in an accompanying paper), in order to analyse the mutual compatibility of the arrangement of proteins and rRNA in terms of the available RNA-protein interaction data. The information taken into account included the hydroxyl radical and base foot-printing data from Noller's laboratory, and our own in situ cross-linking results. Proteins S1 and S14 were not considered, due to the lack of RNA-protein data. Among the 19 proteins analysed, 12 (namely S2, S4, S5, S7, S8, S9, S10, S11, S12, S15, S17 and S21) showed a fit to the rRNA model that varied from being excellent to at least acceptable. Of the remaining 7, S3 and S13 showed a rather poor fit, as did S18 (which is considered in combination with S6 in the foot-printing experiments). S16 was difficult to evaluate, as the foot-print data for this protein cover a large area of the rRNA. S19 and S20 showed a bad fit in terms of the neutron map, but their foot-print and cross-link sites were clustered into compact groups in the rRNA model in those regions of the 30 S subunit where these proteins have

  7. Potential drug-drug interactions in intensive care units of a hospital in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Henrique Oliveira-Paula

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Drug-drug interactions are important causes of adverse reactions in health units. The high consumption of medicines in intensive care units predisposes patients to potential drug-drug interactions. This study aimed at examining the frequency and the characteristics of drug-drug interactions in intensive care units of Hospital Universitario of Universidade Estadual de Londrina. We analyzed the prescriptions of patients over 18 years, admitted from January to May 2010, who remained hospitalized for at least four days. The analysis of drug-drug interactions was carried out using the Micromedex Drug-Reax® system. The interactions were classified by severity, time required for the onset of adverse effects, mechanism of action and quality of scientific evidence. Moreover, the possible adverse events were analyzed, as well as the recommended strategies of management and monitoring. Altogether, 198 different potential drug-drug interactions were identified with the occurrence of 1242 episodes. Of these, 43% were characterized by moderate interactions, 35% major, 16% minor and 6% contraindicated. The therapeutic inefficacy was the most frequent possible adverse event (18% and the main recommended strategy of management was the dose adjustment (35.6%. The most frequent interactions were: fentanyl + midazolam (8.6%, phenytoin + ranitidine (5.5% and midazolam + ranitidine (4.8%. These results demonstrate the importance of drug-drug interactions as a significant adverse event in intensive care units and thus, preventive measures are required to minimize this problem.

  8. Antiepileptic drugs: are women aware of interactions with oral contraceptives and potential teratogenicity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pack, Alison M; Davis, Anne R; Kritzer, Jordana; Yoon, Ava; Camus, Adela

    2009-04-01

    Women with epilepsy (WWE)'s knowledge of the interaction between antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and oral contraceptives (OCs) and the potential teratogenicity of AEDs has received limited study. We conducted a cross-sectional questionnaire study (English or Spanish) among young WWE (18-44 years) to assess demographic characteristics, current AED use, and knowledge of AED interactions with OCs and teratogenicity. We used the Food and Drug Administration's classification system to categorize each AED's teratogenic potential. Participants (n=148) had a mean age of 32 years (SD 8); 32% spoke Spanish and described themselves as Hispanic. Among women prescribed a cytochrome p450-inducing AED, 65% were unaware of decreased OC efficacy. Forty percent of those prescribed Category D AEDs were unaware of potential teratogenic effects. WWE have limited knowledge of the potential interaction between AEDs and OCs and the teratogenic effects of AEDs. Educational efforts should highlight the reproductive health effects of AEDs in WWE.

  9. Protein Folding: A New Geometric Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Simmons, Walter A.; Joel L. Weiner

    2008-01-01

    A geometric analysis of protein folding, which complements many of the models in the literature, is presented. We examine the process from unfolded strand to the point where the strand becomes self-interacting. A central question is how it is possible that so many initial configurations proceed to fold to a unique final configuration. We put energy and dynamical considerations temporarily aside and focus upon the geometry alone. We parameterize the structure of an idealized protein using the ...

  10. Accelerated molecular dynamics simulations of protein folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yinglong; Feixas, Ferran; Eun, Changsun; McCammon, J Andrew

    2015-07-30

    Folding of four fast-folding proteins, including chignolin, Trp-cage, villin headpiece and WW domain, was simulated via accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD). In comparison with hundred-of-microsecond timescale conventional molecular dynamics (cMD) simulations performed on the Anton supercomputer, aMD captured complete folding of the four proteins in significantly shorter simulation time. The folded protein conformations were found within 0.2-2.1 Å of the native NMR or X-ray crystal structures. Free energy profiles calculated through improved reweighting of the aMD simulations using cumulant expansion to the second-order are in good agreement with those obtained from cMD simulations. This allows us to identify distinct conformational states (e.g., unfolded and intermediate) other than the native structure and the protein folding energy barriers. Detailed analysis of protein secondary structures and local key residue interactions provided important insights into the protein folding pathways. Furthermore, the selections of force fields and aMD simulation parameters are discussed in detail. Our work shows usefulness and accuracy of aMD in studying protein folding, providing basic references in using aMD in future protein-folding studies.

  11. DnaG interacts with a linker region that joins the N- and C-domains of DnaB and induces the formation of 3-fold symmetric rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirlway, Jenny; Turner, Ian J.; Gibson, Christopher T.; Gardiner, Laurence; Brady, Kevin; Allen, Stephanie; Roberts, Clive J.; Soultanas, Panos

    2004-01-01

    Loading of the replicative ring helicase onto the origin of replication (oriC) is the final outcome of a well coordinated series of events that collectively constitute a primosomal cascade. Once the ring helicase is loaded, it recruits the primase and signals the switch to the polymerization mode. The transient nature of the helicase–primase (DnaB–DnaG) interaction in the Escherichia coli system has hindered our efforts to elucidate its structure and function. Taking advantage of the stable DnaB–DnaG complex in Bacillus stearothermophilus, we have reviewed conflicting mutagenic data from other bacterial systems and shown that DnaG interacts with the flexible linker that connects the N- and C-terminal domains of DnaB. Furthermore, atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging experiments show that binding of the primase to the helicase induces predominantly a 3-fold symmetric morphology to the hexameric ring. Overall, three DnaG molecules appear to interact with the hexameric ring helicase but a small number of complexes with two and even one DnaG molecule bound to DnaB were also detected. The structural/functional significance of these data is discussed and a speculative structural model for this complex is suggested. PMID:15173380

  12. Seaweed-coral interactions: variance in seaweed allelopathy, coral susceptibility, and potential effects on coral resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaldo, Roberta M; Hay, Mark E

    2014-01-01

    Tropical reefs are in global decline with seaweeds commonly replacing corals. Negative associations between macroalgae and corals are well documented, but the mechanisms involved, the dynamics of the interactions, and variance in effects of different macroalgal-coral pairings are poorly investigated. We assessed the frequency, magnitude, and dynamics of macroalgal-coral competition involving allelopathic and non-allelopathic macroalgae on three, spatially grouped pairs of no-take Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) and non-MPAs in Fiji. In non-MPAs, biomass of herbivorous fishes was 70-80% lower, macroalgal cover 4-9 fold higher, macroalgal-coral contacts 5-15 fold more frequent and 23-67 fold more extensive (measured as % of colony margin contacted by macroalgae), and coral cover 51-68% lower than in MPAs. Coral contacts with allelopathic macroalgae occurred less frequently than expected by chance across all sites, while contact with non-allelopathic macroalgae tended to occur more frequently than expected. Transplants of allelopathic macroalgae (Chlorodesmis fastigiata and Galaxaura filamentosa) against coral edges inflicted damage to Acropora aspera and Pocillopora damicornis more rapidly and extensively than to Porites cylindrica and Porites lobata, which appeared more resistant to these macroalgae. Montipora digitata experienced intermediate damage. Extent of damage from macroalgal contact was independent of coral colony size for each of the 10 macroalgal-coral pairings we established. When natural contacts with Galaxaura filamentosa were removed in the field, recovery was rapid for Porites lobata, but Pocillopora damicornis did not recover and damage continued to expand. As macroalgae increase on overfished tropical reefs, allelopathy could produce feedbacks that suppress coral resilience, prevent coral recovery, and promote the stability of algal beds in habitats previously available to corals.

  13. Seaweed-coral interactions: variance in seaweed allelopathy, coral susceptibility, and potential effects on coral resilience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta M Bonaldo

    Full Text Available Tropical reefs are in global decline with seaweeds commonly replacing corals. Negative associations between macroalgae and corals are well documented, but the mechanisms involved, the dynamics of the interactions, and variance in effects of different macroalgal-coral pairings are poorly investigated. We assessed the frequency, magnitude, and dynamics of macroalgal-coral competition involving allelopathic and non-allelopathic macroalgae on three, spatially grouped pairs of no-take Marine Protected Areas (MPAs and non-MPAs in Fiji. In non-MPAs, biomass of herbivorous fishes was 70-80% lower, macroalgal cover 4-9 fold higher, macroalgal-coral contacts 5-15 fold more frequent and 23-67 fold more extensive (measured as % of colony margin contacted by macroalgae, and coral cover 51-68% lower than in MPAs. Coral contacts with allelopathic macroalgae occurred less frequently than expected by chance across all sites, while contact with non-allelopathic macroalgae tended to occur more frequently than expected. Transplants of allelopathic macroalgae (Chlorodesmis fastigiata and Galaxaura filamentosa against coral edges inflicted damage to Acropora aspera and Pocillopora damicornis more rapidly and extensively than to Porites cylindrica and Porites lobata, which appeared more resistant to these macroalgae. Montipora digitata experienced intermediate damage. Extent of damage from macroalgal contact was independent of coral colony size for each of the 10 macroalgal-coral pairings we established. When natural contacts with Galaxaura filamentosa were removed in the field, recovery was rapid for Porites lobata, but Pocillopora damicornis did not recover and damage continued to expand. As macroalgae increase on overfished tropical reefs, allelopathy could produce feedbacks that suppress coral resilience, prevent coral recovery, and promote the stability of algal beds in habitats previously available to corals.

  14. Potential drug-drug interactions in cardiothoracic intensive care unit of a pulmonary teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzanegan, Behrooz; Alehashem, Maryam; Bastani, Marjan; Baniasadi, Shadi

    2015-02-01

    Little is known about clinically significant drug-drug interactions (DDIs) in respiratory settings. DDIs are more likely to occur in critically ill patients due to complex pharmacotherapy regimens and organ dysfunctions. The aim of this study was to identify the pattern of potential DDIs (pDDIs) occurring in cardiothoracic intensive care unit (ICU) of a pulmonary hospital. A prospective observational study was conducted for 6 months. All pDDIs for admitted patients in cardiothoracic ICU were identified with Lexi-Interact program and assessed by a clinical pharmacologist. The interacting drugs, reliability, mechanisms, potential outcomes, and clinical management were evaluated for severe and contraindicated interactions. The study included 195 patients. Lung cancer (14.9%) was the most common diagnosis followed by tracheal stenosis (14.3%). The rate of pDDIs was 720.5/100 patients. Interactions were more commonly observed in transplant patients. 17.7% of pDDIs were considered as severe and contraindicated interactions. Metabolism (54.8%) and additive (24.2%) interactions were the most frequent mechanisms leading to pDDIs, and azole antifungals and fluoroquinolones were the main drug classes involved. The pattern of pDDIs in cardiothoracic ICU differs from other ICU settings. Specialized epidemiological knowledge of drug interactions may help clinical practitioners to reduce the risk of adverse drug events.

  15. Folding at the birth of the nascent chain: coordinating translation with co-translational folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gong; Ignatova, Zoya

    2011-02-01

    In the living cells, the folding of many proteins is largely believed to begin co-translationally, during their biosynthesis at the ribosomes. In the ribosomal tunnel, the nascent peptide may establish local interactions and stabilize α-helical structures. Long-range contacts are more likely outside the ribosomes after release of larger segments of the nascent chain. Examples suggest that domains can attain native-like structure on the ribosome with and without population of folding intermediates. The co-translational folding is limited by the speed of the gradual extrusion of the nascent peptide which imposes conformational restraints on its folding landscape. Recent experimental and in silico modeling studies indicate that translation kinetics fine-tunes co-translational folding by providing a time delay for sequential folding of distinct portions of the nascent chain.

  16. The robustness and innovability of protein folds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth-Petróczy, Agnes; Tawfik, Dan S

    2014-06-01

    Assignment of protein folds to functions indicates that >60% of folds carry out one or two enzymatic functions, while few folds, for example, the TIM-barrel and Rossmann folds, exhibit hundreds. Are there structural features that make a fold amenable to functional innovation (innovability)? Do these features relate to robustness--the ability to readily accumulate sequence changes? We discuss several hypotheses regarding the relationship between the architecture of a protein and its evolutionary potential. We describe how, in a seemingly paradoxical manner, opposite properties, such as high stability and rigidity versus conformational plasticity and structural order versus disorder, promote robustness and/or innovability. We hypothesize that polarity--differentiation and low connectivity between a protein's scaffold and its active-site--is a key prerequisite for innovability.

  17. Consistency of multi-time Dirac equations with general interaction potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckert, Dirk-André; Nickel, Lukas

    2016-07-01

    In 1932, Dirac proposed a formulation in terms of multi-time wave functions as candidate for relativistic many-particle quantum mechanics. A well-known consistency condition that is necessary for existence of solutions strongly restricts the possible interaction types between the particles. It was conjectured by Petrat and Tumulka that interactions described by multiplication operators are generally excluded by this condition, and they gave a proof of this claim for potentials without spin-coupling. Under suitable assumptions on the differentiability of possible solutions, we show that there are potentials which are admissible, give an explicit example, however, show that none of them fulfills the physically desirable Poincaré invariance. We conclude that in this sense, Dirac's multi-time formalism does not allow to model interaction by multiplication operators, and briefly point out several promising approaches to interacting models one can instead pursue.

  18. α-α folding cluster model for α-radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soylu, A.; Bayrak, O.

    2015-04-01

    The -decay half-lives are calculated for heavy and superheavy nuclei for and from the ground state to ground state transitions within the framework of the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) method and the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization. In the calculations, the - single folding cluster potential obtained with the folded integral of the - potential with the -cluster density distributions is used in order to model the nuclear interaction between the -particle and core nucleus. While the results show very good agreement with the experimental ones in the heavy-nuclei region, especially for even-even nuclei, smaller values than the experimental ones are obtained for superheavy nuclei. As both the density of the core and the interaction term in the folding integral include the -clustering effects and, in this way, all cluster effects are taken into account in the model, the results of calculations are more physical and reasonable than the calculations done in the other models. The present method could be applied to light nuclei with different types of nuclear densities.

  19. α-α folding cluster model for α-radioactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soylu, A. [Nigde University, Department of Physics, Nigde (Turkey); Bayrak, O. [Akdeniz University, Department of Physics, Antalya (Turkey)

    2015-04-01

    The α-decay half-lives are calculated for heavy and superheavy nuclei for 52 ≤ Z ≤ 112 and 108 ≤ A ≤ 285 from the ground state to ground state α transitions within the framework of the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) method and the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization. In the calculations, the α-α single folding cluster potential obtained with the folded integral of the α-α potential with the α-cluster density distributions is used in order to model the nuclear interaction between the α-particle and core nucleus. While the results show very good agreement with the experimental ones in the heavy-nuclei region, especially for even-even nuclei, smaller values than the experimental ones are obtained for superheavy nuclei. As both the density of the core and the interaction term in the folding integral include the α-clustering effects and, in this way, all cluster effects are taken into account in the model, the results of calculations are more physical and reasonable than the calculations done in the other models. The present method could be applied to light nuclei with different types of nuclear densities. (orig.)

  20. Thermodynamic stability of a weakly interacting Fermi gas trapped in a harmonic potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Men Fu-Dian; Liu Hui; Zhu Hou-Yu

    2008-01-01

    Based on the theoretical results derived from pseudopotential method and local approximation,this paper studies the thermodynamic stability of a weakly interacting Fermi gas trapped in a harmonic potential by using analytical method of thermodynamics.The effects of the interparticle interactions as well as external potential on the thermodynamic stability of the system are discussed.It is shown that the system is stable as for the complete average,but as for local parts,the system is unstable anywhere.This instability shows that the stability conditions of mechanics cannot be satisfied anywhere,and the stability conditions of thermostatics cannot be satisfied somewhere.In addition,the interactions and external potential have direct effects on the local stability of the system.

  1. Host-pathogen Interaction at the Intestinal Mucosa Correlates With Zoonotic Potential of Streptococcus suis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrando, Maria Laura; de Greeff, Astrid; van Rooijen, Willemien J. M.;

    2015-01-01

    of SS2 infection. Methods. We developed a noninvasive in vivo model to study oral SS2 infection in piglets. We compared in vitro interaction of S. suis with human and porcine intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). Results. Two out of 15 piglets showed clinical symptoms compatible with S. suis infection 24...... be considered a food-borne pathogen. S. suis interaction with human and pig IEC correlates with S. suis serotype and genotype, which can explain the zoonotic potential of SS2....

  2. Prevalence and factors associated with potential drug interactions among elderly in a population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Riani Gotardelo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of potential drug interactions and the factors associated with them among elderly patients covered by the Family Health Strategy in the municipality of Timóteo, state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Methods: Cross-sectional study, using stratified random sampling. A total of 273 household interviews were conducted in subjects aged 60 years or older, after obtaining informed consent, using a questionnaire containing questions related to identification, demography, health conditions and medication use. Drug interactions were identified and classified according to the software Micromedex®. Results: The overall prevalence of potential drug interactions was 55.6%, a total of 466 cases, of which 5.6% were mild, 81.6% moderate and 12.8% of greater severity. Therapeutic classes most frequently involved were anti-inflammatory drugs and especially drugs used in cardiovascular disease. The absence of hospitalization in the last four months was significantly associated with a lower chance of serious drug interactions and most patients who did not have any moderate drug interactions used only drugs prescribed by physicians. Conclusions: The prevalence of potential drug interactions was similar to that described in the literature, demonstrating the high frequency of this phenomenon among the elderly. The absence of prior hospitalization and drug prescription by physicians were associated with a lower frequency of interactions. The prescription of multiple drugs simultaneously to elderly patients can compromise the safety and health of this population, requiring, by caregivers, observation for the occurrence of potential drug interactions.

  3. Severe potential drug-drug interactions in older adults with dementia and associated factors

    OpenAIRE

    Michele Bogetti-Salazar; Cesar González-González; Teresa Juárez-Cedillo; Sergio Sánchez-García; Oscar Rosas-Carrasco

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the main severe potential drug-drug interactions in older adults with dementia and to examine the factors associated with these interactions. METHOD: This was a cross-sectional study. The enrolled patients were selected from six geriatrics clinics of tertiary care hospitals across Mexico City. The patients had received a clinical diagnosis of dementia based on the current standards and were further divided into the following two groups: those with severe drug-drug inte...

  4. Intermolecular interaction potentials of methane-argon complex calculated using LDA approaches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bai Yu-Lin; Chen Xiang-Rong; Zhou Xiao-Lin; Yang Xiang-Dong; Wang Hai-Yan

    2004-01-01

    The intermolecular interaction potential for methane-argon complex is calculated by local density approximation (LDA) approaches. The calculated potential has a minimum when the intermolecular distance of methane-argon complex is 6.75 a.u.; the corresponding depth of the potential is 0.0163eV which has good agreement with experimental data. We also have made a nonlinear fitting of our results for the Lennard-Jones (12-6) potential function and obtain that V(R) = 143794365.332/R12 - 3032.093/R6 (R in a.u. and V(R) in eV).

  5. Equation of state and interaction potential of helium under high temperatures and high densities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Based on the thermodynamics statistic method, the improved variational perturbation theory and the modified quantum mechanics correction model have been used to calculate the equation of state of liquid helium at pressure from 0.7 to 108 GPa. The calculation results are in good agreement with the experimental data. The EXP-6 potential (α = 13.1) can more accurately describe the interaction of helium atoms than other potentials in the scheme. Finally, a comparison is shown between our interatomic potentials and other potentials.

  6. Equation of state and interaction potential of helium under high temperatures and high densities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG JinWen; YAN YuanHong

    2009-01-01

    Based on the thermodynamics statistic method, the improved variational perturbation theory and the modified quantum mechanics correction model have been used to calculate the equation of state of liquid helium at pressure from 0.7 to 108 GPa. The calculation results are in good agreement with the experimental data. The EXP-6 potential (α=13.1) can more accurately describe the interaction of helium atoms than other potentials in the scheme. Finally, s comparison is shown between our interatomic potentials and other potentials.

  7. The dynamical behaviour of homogeneous scalar-field spacetimes with general self-interaction potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Giambó, Roberto; Magli, Giulio

    2008-01-01

    The dynamics of homogeneous Robertson--Walker cosmological models with a self-interacting scalar field source is examined here in full generality, requiring only the scalar field potential to be bounded from below and divergent when the field diverges. In this way we are able to give a unified treatment of all the already studied cases - such as positive potentials which exhibit asymptotically polynomial or exponential behaviors - together with its extension to a much wider set of physically sensible potentials. Since the set includes potentials with negative inferior bound, we are able to give, in particular, the analysis of the asymptotically anti De Sitter states for such cosmologies.

  8. Diet-gene interactions and PUFA metabolism: a potential contributor to health disparities and human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilton, Floyd H; Murphy, Robert C; Wilson, Bryan A; Sergeant, Susan; Ainsworth, Hannah; Seeds, Michael C; Mathias, Rasika A

    2014-05-21

    The "modern western" diet (MWD) has increased the onset and progression of chronic human diseases as qualitatively and quantitatively maladaptive dietary components give rise to obesity and destructive gene-diet interactions. There has been a three-fold increase in dietary levels of the omega-6 (n-6) 18 carbon (C18), polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) linoleic acid (LA; 18:2n-6), with the addition of cooking oils and processed foods to the MWD. Intense debate has emerged regarding the impact of this increase on human health. Recent studies have uncovered population-related genetic variation in the LCPUFA biosynthetic pathway (especially within the fatty acid desaturase gene (FADS) cluster) that is associated with levels of circulating and tissue PUFAs and several biomarkers and clinical endpoints of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Importantly, populations of African descent have higher frequencies of variants associated with elevated levels of arachidonic acid (ARA), CVD biomarkers and disease endpoints. Additionally, nutrigenomic interactions between dietary n-6 PUFAs and variants in genes that encode for enzymes that mobilize and metabolize ARA to eicosanoids have been identified. These observations raise important questions of whether gene-PUFA interactions are differentially driving the risk of cardiovascular and other diseases in diverse populations, and contributing to health disparities, especially in African American populations.

  9. Diet-Gene Interactions and PUFA Metabolism: A Potential Contributor to Health Disparities and Human Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floyd H. Chilton

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The “modern western” diet (MWD has increased the onset and progression of chronic human diseases as qualitatively and quantitatively maladaptive dietary components give rise to obesity and destructive gene-diet interactions. There has been a three-fold increase in dietary levels of the omega-6 (n-6 18 carbon (C18, polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA linoleic acid (LA; 18:2n-6, with the addition of cooking oils and processed foods to the MWD. Intense debate has emerged regarding the impact of this increase on human health. Recent studies have uncovered population-related genetic variation in the LCPUFA biosynthetic pathway (especially within the fatty acid desaturase gene (FADS cluster that is associated with levels of circulating and tissue PUFAs and several biomarkers and clinical endpoints of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Importantly, populations of African descent have higher frequencies of variants associated with elevated levels of arachidonic acid (ARA, CVD biomarkers and disease endpoints. Additionally, nutrigenomic interactions between dietary n-6 PUFAs and variants in genes that encode for enzymes that mobilize and metabolize ARA to eicosanoids have been identified. These observations raise important questions of whether gene-PUFA interactions are differentially driving the risk of cardiovascular and other diseases in diverse populations, and contributing to health disparities, especially in African American populations.

  10. [Potential antimicrobial drug interactions in clinical practice: consequences of polypharmacy and multidrug resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Múgica, Cristina

    2015-12-01

    Polypharmacy is a growing problem nowadays, which can increase the risk of potential drug interactions, and result in a loss of effectiveness. This is particularly relevant to the anti-infective therapy, especially when infection is produced by resistant bacteria, because therapeutic options are limited and interactions can cause treatment failure. All antimicrobial prescriptions were retrospectively reviewed during a week in the Pharmacy Department, in order to detect potential drug-interactions and analysing their clinical significance. A total of 314 antimicrobial prescriptions from 151 patients were checked. There was at least one potential interaction detected in 40% of patients, being more frequent and severe in those infected with multidrug-resistant microorganisms. Drugs most commonly involved were quinolones, azoles, linezolid and vancomycin. Potential drug interactions with antimicrobial agents are a frequent problem that can result in a loss of effectiveness. This is why they should be detected and avoided when possible, in order to optimize antimicrobial therapy, especially in case of multidrug resistant infections.

  11. Intermolecular interaction of thiosemicarbazone derivatives to solvents and a potential Aedes aegypti target

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, João Bosco P.; Hallwass, Fernando; da Silva, Aluizio G.; Moreira, Diogo Rodrigo; Ramos, Mozart N.; Espíndola, José Wanderlan P.; de Oliveira, Ana Daura T.; Brondani, Dalci José; Leite, Ana Cristina L.; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2015-08-01

    DFT calculations were used to access information about structure, energy and electronic properties of series of phenyl- and phenoxymethyl-(thio)semicarbazone derivatives with demonstrated activity against the larvae of Aedes aegypti in stage L4. The way as the thiosemicarbazone derivatives can interact with solvents like DMSO and water were analyzed from the comparison between calculated and experimental 1H NMR chemical shifts. The evidences of thiosemicarbazone derivatives making H-bond interaction to solvent have provide us insights on how they can interact with a potential A. aegypti's biological target, the Sterol Carrier Protein-2.

  12. Cosmological model with fermion and tachyon fields interacting via Yukawa-type potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas, Marlos O.; Devecchi, Fernando P.; Kremer, Gilberto M.

    2016-02-01

    A model for the universe with tachyonic and fermionic fields interacting through a Yukawa-type potential is investigated. It is shown that the tachyonic field answers for the initial accelerated regime and for the subsequent decelerated regime so that it behaves as an inflaton at early times and as a matter field at intermediate times, while the fermionic field has the role of a dark energy constituent, since it leads to an accelerated regime at later times. The interaction between the fields via a Yukawa-type potential controls the duration of the decelerated era, since a stronger coupling makes a shorter decelerated period.

  13. A Riccati equation based approach to isotropic scalar field cosmologies with arbitrary self-interaction potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Harko, Tiberiu; Mak, M K

    2014-01-01

    Gravitationally coupled scalar fields $\\phi $, distinguished by the choice of an effective self-interaction potential $V(\\phi )$, simulating a temporarily non-vanishing cosmological term, can generate both inflation and late time acceleration. In scalar field cosmological models the evolution of the Hubble function is determined, in terms of the interaction potential, by a Riccati type equation. In the present work we investigate scalar field cosmological models that can be obtained as solutions of the Riccati evolution equation for the Hubble function. Four exact integrability cases of the field equations are presented, representing classes of general solutions of the Riccati evolution equation, and their cosmological properties are investigated in detail.

  14. Cosmological model with fermion and tachyon fields interacting via Yukawa-type potential

    CERN Document Server

    Ribas, Marlos O; Kremer, Gilberto M

    2016-01-01

    A model for the universe with tachyonic and fermionic fields interacting through a Yukawa-type potential is investigated. It is shown that the tachyonic field answers for the initial accelerated regime and for the subsequent decelerated regime so that it behaves as an inflaton at early times and as a matter field at intermediate times, while the fermionic field has the role of a dark energy constituent, since it leads to an accelerated regime at later times. The interaction between the fields via a Yukawa-type potential controls the duration of the decelerated era, since a stronger coupling makes a shorter decelerated period.

  15. The Fold of Commitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raastrup Kristensen, Anders; Pedersen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This paper serves two purposes. First, a rereading of Douglas McGregor’s An uneasy look at performance appraisal serves to show how McGregor’s conceptualization of commitment as a question of integrating personal goals with organizational purpose has helped shape founding the modern understanding...... of corporate community representation. Second, we suggest that French philosopher Gilles Deleuze’s concepts of fold, desire and interests can be useful in comprehending this modern form of corporate representation already present in McGregor’s text....

  16. Folding of Pollen Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katifori, Eleni; Alben, Silas; Cerda, Enrique; Nelson, David; Dumais, Jacques

    2008-03-01

    At dehiscence, which occurs when the anther reaches maturity and opens, pollen grains dehydrate and their volume is reduced. The pollen wall deforms to accommodate the volume loss, and the deformation pathway depends on the initial turgid pollen grain geometry and the mechanical properties of the pollen wall. We demonstrate, using both experimental and theoretical approaches, that the design of the apertures (areas on the pollen wall where the stretching and the bending modulus are reduced) is critical for controlling the folding pattern, and ensures the pollen grain viability. An excellent fit to the experiments is obtained using a discretized version of the theory of thin elastic shells.

  17. Designing pH induced fold switch in proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruah, Anupaul; Biswas, Parbati

    2015-05-01

    This work investigates the computational design of a pH induced protein fold switch based on a self-consistent mean-field approach by identifying the ensemble averaged characteristics of sequences that encode a fold switch. The primary challenge to balance the alternative sets of interactions present in both target structures is overcome by simultaneously optimizing two foldability criteria corresponding to two target structures. The change in pH is modeled by altering the residual charge on the amino acids. The energy landscape of the fold switch protein is found to be double funneled. The fold switch sequences stabilize the interactions of the sites with similar relative surface accessibility in both target structures. Fold switch sequences have low sequence complexity and hence lower sequence entropy. The pH induced fold switch is mediated by attractive electrostatic interactions rather than hydrophobic-hydrophobic contacts. This study may provide valuable insights to the design of fold switch proteins.

  18. Mapping the Universe of RNA Tetraloop Folds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottaro, Sandro; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten

    2017-07-25

    We report a map of RNA tetraloop conformations constructed by calculating pairwise distances among all experimentally determined four-nucleotide hairpin loops. Tetraloops with similar structures are clustered together and, as expected, the two largest clusters are the canonical GNRA and UNCG folds. We identify clusters corresponding to known tetraloop folds such as GGUG, RNYA, AGNN, and CUUG. These clusters are represented in a simple two-dimensional projection that recapitulates the relationship among the different folds. The cluster analysis also identifies 20 novel tetraloop folds that are peculiar to specific positions in ribosomal RNAs and that are stabilized by tertiary interactions. In our RNA tetraloop database we find a significant number of non-GNRA and non-UNCG sequences adopting the canonical GNRA and UNCG folds. Conversely, we find a significant number of GNRA and UNCG sequences adopting non-GNRA and non-UNCG folds. Our analysis demonstrates that there is not a simple one-to-one, but rather a many-to-many mapping between tetraloop sequence and tetraloop fold. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mean field propagation of infinite dimensional Wigner measures with a singular two-body interaction potential

    CERN Document Server

    Ammari, Zied

    2011-01-01

    We consider the quantum dynamics of many bosons systems in the mean field limit with a singular pair-interaction potential, including the attractive or repulsive Coulombic case in three dimensions. By using a measure transportation technique, we show that Wigner measures propagate along the nonlinear Hartree flow. Such property was previously proved only for bounded potentials in our previous works with a slightly different strategy.

  20. Evolution of a quantum system of many particles interacting via the generalized Yukawa potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogoliubov, N. N.; Rasulova, M. Yu.; Avazov, U. A.

    2016-12-01

    We study the evolution of a system of N particles that have identical masses and charges and interact via the generalized Yukawa potential. The system is placed in a bounded region. The evolution of such a system is described by the Bogoliubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon (BBGKY) chain of quantum kinetic equations. Using semigroup theory, we prove the existence of a unique solution of the BBGKY chain of quantum kinetic equations with the generalized Yukawa potential.

  1. A review of potential harmful interactions between anticoagulant/antiplatelet agents and Chinese herbal medicines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Hui Tsai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The risks attributed to drug-herb interactions, even when known, are often ignored or underestimated, especially for those involving anti-clotting drugs and Chinese medicines. The aim of this study was to structurally search and evaluate the existing evidence-based data associated with potential drug interactions between anticoagulant/antiplatelet drugs and Chinese herbal medicines (CHMs and evaluate the documented mechanisms, consequences, and/or severity of interactions. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: Information related to anticoagulant/antiplatelet drug-CHM interactions was retrieved from eight interaction-based textbooks, four web resources and available primary biomedical literature. The primary literature searches were conducted in English and/or Chinese from January 2000 through December 2011 using the secondary databases (e.g., PubMed, Airiti Library, China Journal full-text database. The search terms included the corresponding medical subject headings and key words. Herbs or natural products not used as a single entity CHM or in Chinese Medicinal Prescriptions were excluded from further review. The corresponding mechanisms and severity ratings of interactions were retrieved using MicroMedex®, Lexicomp® and Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database®. Finally, we found 90 single entity CHMs contributed to 306 documented drug-CHM interactions. A total of 194 (63.4% interactions were verified for its evidence describing possible mechanisms and severity. Of them, 155 interactions (79.9% were attributable to pharmacodynamic interactions, and almost all were rated as moderate to severe interactions. The major consequences of these interactions were increased bleeding risks due to the additive anticoagulant or antiplatelet effects of the CHMs, specifically danshen, dong quai, ginger, ginkgo, licorice, and turmeric. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Conventional anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs were documented to have harmful interactions

  2. Inverse Folding of RNA Pseudoknot Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, James Z M; Reidys, Christian M

    2010-01-01

    Background: RNA exhibits a variety of structural configurations. Here we consider a structure to be tantamount to the noncrossing Watson-Crick and \\pairGU-base pairings (secondary structure) and additional cross-serial base pairs. These interactions are called pseudoknots and are observed across the whole spectrum of RNA functionalities. In the context of studying natural RNA structures, searching for new ribozymes and designing artificial RNA, it is of interest to find RNA sequences folding into a specific structure and to analyze their induced neutral networks. Since the established inverse folding algorithms, {\\tt RNAinverse}, {\\tt RNA-SSD} as well as {\\tt INFO-RNA} are limited to RNA secondary structures, we present in this paper the inverse folding algorithm {\\tt Inv} which can deal with 3-noncrossing, canonical pseudoknot structures. Results: In this paper we present the inverse folding algorithm {\\tt Inv}. We give a detailed analysis of {\\tt Inv}, including pseudocodes. We show that {\\tt Inv} allows to...

  3. Protein-protein interactions: principles, techniques, and their potential role in new drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shagufta H; Ahmad, Faizan; Ahmad, Nihal; Flynn, Daniel C; Kumar, Raj

    2011-06-01

    A vast network of genes is inter-linked through protein-protein interactions and is critical component of almost every biological process under physiological conditions. Any disruption of the biologically essential network leads to pathological conditions resulting into related diseases. Therefore, proper understanding of biological functions warrants a comprehensive knowledge of protein-protein interactions and the molecular mechanisms that govern such processes. The importance of protein-protein interaction process is highlighted by the fact that a number of powerful techniques/methods have been developed to understand how such interactions take place under various physiological and pathological conditions. Many of the key protein-protein interactions are known to participate in disease-associated signaling pathways, and represent novel targets for therapeutic intervention. Thus, controlling protein-protein interactions offers a rich dividend for the discovery of new drug targets. Availability of various tools to study and the knowledge of human genome have put us in a unique position to understand highly complex biological network, and the mechanisms involved therein. In this review article, we have summarized protein-protein interaction networks, techniques/methods of their binding/kinetic parameters, and the role of these interactions in the development of potential tools for drug designing.

  4. PDZ Domains and Viral Infection: Versatile Potentials of HPV-PDZ Interactions in relation to Malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazunori Nagasaka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is caused by high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs, and a unique characteristic of these is a PDZ (P̲SD-95/D̲lg/Z̲O-1-binding motif in their E6 proteins. Through this motif HPV E6 interacts with a variety of PDZ domain-containing proteins and targets them mainly for degradation. These E6-PDZ interactions exhibit extraordinarily different functions in relation to HPV-induced malignancy, depending upon various cellular contexts; for example, Dlg and Scrib show different distribution patterns from what is seen in normal epithelium, both in localization and in amount, and their loss may be a late-stage marker in malignant progression. Recent studies show that interactions with specific forms of the proteins may have oncogenic potential. In addition, it is interesting that PDZ proteins make a contribution to the stabilization of E6 and viral episomal maintenance during the course of HPV life cycle. Various posttranslational modifications also greatly affect their functions. Phosphorylation of hDlg and hScrib by certain kinases regulates several important signaling cascades, and E6-PDZ interactions themselves are regulated through PKA-dependent phosphorylation. Thus these interactions naturally have great potential for both predictive and therapeutic applications, and, with development of screening tools for identifying novel targets of their interactions, comprehensive spatiotemporal analysis is currently underway.

  5. The potential of protein-nanomaterial interaction for advanced drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qiang; Mu, Huiling

    2016-03-10

    Nanomaterials, like nanoparticles, micelles, nano-sheets, nanotubes and quantum dots, have great potentials in biomedical fields. However, their delivery is highly limited by the formation of protein corona upon interaction with endogenous proteins. This new identity, instead of nanomaterial itself, would be the real substance the organs and cells firstly encounter. Consequently, the behavior of nanomaterials in vivo is uncontrollable and some undesired effects may occur, like rapid clearance from blood stream; risk of capillary blockage; loss of targeting capacity; and potential toxicity. Therefore, protein-nanomaterial interaction is a great challenge for nanomaterial systems and should be inhibited. However, this interaction can also be used to functionalize nanomaterials by forming a selected protein corona. Unlike other decoration using exogenous molecules, nanomaterials functionalized by selected protein corona using endogenous proteins would have greater promise for clinical use. In this review, we aim to provide a comprehensive understanding of protein-nanomaterial interaction. Importantly, a discussion about how to use such interaction is launched and some possible applications of such interaction for advanced drug delivery are presented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. On the configuration of systems of interacting particle with minimum potential energy per particle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ventevogel, W.J.; Nijboer, B.R.A.

    1979-01-01

    In continuation of previous work we extend the class of two-body potentials, either repulsive or of generalized Lennard-Jones type, for which it can be proved that among all configurations of an infinite one-dimensional system of interacting particles (with fixed density in the case of repulsive int

  7. On Local Smooth Solutions for the Vlasov Equation with the Potential of Interactions {\\pm} r^{-2}

    CERN Document Server

    Zhidkov, P E

    2003-01-01

    For the initial value problem for the Vlasov equation with the potential of interactions {\\pm} r^{-2} we prove the existence and uniqueness of a local solution with values in the Schwartz space S of infinitely differentiable functions rapidly decaying at infinity.

  8. The potential of protein-nanomaterial interaction for advanced drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Qiang; Mu, Huiling

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials, like nanoparticles, micelles, nano-sheets, nanotubes and quantum dots, have great potentials in biomedical fields. However, their delivery is highly limited by the formation of protein corona upon interaction with endogenous proteins. This new identity, instead of nanomaterial itself......, would be the real substance the organs and cells firstly encounter. Consequently, the behavior of nanomaterials in vivo is uncontrollable and some undesired effects may occur, like rapid clearance from blood stream; risk of capillary blockage; loss of targeting capacity; and potential toxicity....... Therefore, protein-nanomaterial interaction is a great challenge for nanomaterial systems and should be inhibited. However, this interaction can also be used to functionalize nanomaterials by forming a selected protein corona. Unlike other decoration using exogenous molecules, nanomaterials functionalized...

  9. Critical temperature of Bose-Einstein condensation for weakly interacting bose gas in a potential trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU; Xuecai; YE; Yutang; WU; Yunfeng; XIE; Kang; CHENG; Lin

    2005-01-01

    The critical temperature of Bose-Einstein condensation at minimum momentum state for weakly interacting Bose gases in a power-law potential and the deviation of the critical temperature from ideal bose gas are studied. The effect of interaction on the critical temperature is ascribed to the ratiao α/λc, where α is the scattering length for s wave and λc is de Broglie wavelength at critical temperature. As α/λc<<1/(2π)2, the interaction is negligible. The presented deviation of the critical temperature for three dimensional harmonic potential is well in agreement with recent measurement of critical temperature for 87Rb bose gas trapped in a harmonic well.

  10. Anti-antimicrobial peptides: folding-mediated host defense antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Lloyd; Lamarre, Baptiste; Diu, Ting; Ravi, Jascindra; Judge, Peter J; Temple, Adam; Carr, Matthew; Cerasoli, Eleonora; Su, Bo; Jenkinson, Howard F; Martyna, Glenn; Crain, Jason; Watts, Anthony; Ryadnov, Maxim G

    2013-07-12

    Antimicrobial or host defense peptides are innate immune regulators found in all multicellular organisms. Many of them fold into membrane-bound α-helices and function by causing cell wall disruption in microorganisms. Herein we probe the possibility and functional implications of antimicrobial antagonism mediated by complementary coiled-coil interactions between antimicrobial peptides and de novo designed antagonists: anti-antimicrobial peptides. Using sequences from native helical families such as cathelicidins, cecropins, and magainins we demonstrate that designed antagonists can co-fold with antimicrobial peptides into functionally inert helical oligomers. The properties and function of the resulting assemblies were studied in solution, membrane environments, and in bacterial culture by a combination of chiroptical and solid-state NMR spectroscopies, microscopy, bioassays, and molecular dynamics simulations. The findings offer a molecular rationale for anti-antimicrobial responses with potential implications for antimicrobial resistance.

  11. New approach to folding with the Coulomb wave function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blokhintsev, L. D.; Savin, D. A. [Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Kadyrov, A. S. [Department of Physics, Astronomy and Medical Radiation Sciences, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth 6845 (Australia); Mukhamedzhanov, A. M. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Due to the long-range character of the Coulomb interaction theoretical description of low-energy nuclear reactions with charged particles still remains a formidable task. One way of dealing with the problem in an integral-equation approach is to employ a screened Coulomb potential. A general approach without screening requires folding of kernels of the integral equations with the Coulomb wave. A new method of folding a function with the Coulomb partial waves is presented. The partial-wave Coulomb function both in the configuration and momentum representations is written in the form of separable series. Each term of the series is represented as a product of a factor depending only on the Coulomb parameter and a function depending on the spatial variable in the configuration space and the momentum variable if the momentum representation is used. Using a trial function, the method is demonstrated to be efficient and reliable.

  12. Folded MEMS approach to NMRG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundeti, Venu Madhav

    Atomic gyroscopes have a potential for good performance advantages and several attempts are being made to miniaturize them. This thesis describes the efforts made in implementing a Folded MEMS based NMRG. The micro implementations of all the essential components for NMRG (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope) are described in detail in regards to their design, fabrication, and characterization. A set of micro-scale Helmholtz coils are described and the homogeneity of the generated magnetic field is analyzed for different designs of heaters. The dielectric mirrors and metallic mirrors are compared in terms of reflectivity and polarization change up on reflection. A pyramid shaped folded backbone structure is designed, fabricated, and assembled along with all the required components. A novel double-folded structure 1/4th the size of original version is fabricated and assembled. Design and modeling details of a 5 layered shield with shielding factor > 106 and total volume of around 90 cc are also presented. A table top setup for characterization of atomic vapor cell is described in detail. A micro vapor cell based Rb magnetometer with a sensitivity of 108 pT/√Hz is demonstrated. The challenges due to DC heating are addressed and mitigated using an AC heater. Several experiments related to measuring the relaxation time of Xe are provided along with results. For Xe131, relaxation times of T1 = 23.78 sec, T2 = 18.06 sec and for Xe129, T1 = 21.65 sec and T2 = 20.45 sec are reported.

  13. Potential pharmacokinetic interactions between antiretrovirals and medicinal plants used as complementary and African traditional medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Adrienne C; Kanfer, Isadore

    2011-11-01

    The use of traditional/complementary/alternate medicines (TCAMs) in HIV/AIDS patients who reside in Southern Africa is quite common. Those who use TCAMs in addition to antiretroviral (ARV) treatment may be at risk of experiencing clinically significant pharmacokinetic (PK) interactions, particularly between the TCAMs and the protease inhibitors (PIs) and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). Mechanisms of PK interactions include alterations to the normal functioning of drug efflux transporters, such as P-gp and/or CYP isoenzymes, such a CYP3A4 that mediate the absorption and elimination of drugs in the small intestine and liver. Specific mechanisms include inhibition and activation of these proteins and induction via the pregnane X receptor (PXR). Several clinical studies and case reports involving ARV-herb PK interactions have been reported. St John's Wort, Garlic and Cat's Claw exhibited potentially significant interactions, each with a PI or NNRTI. The potential for these herbs to induce PK interactions with drugs was first identified in reports of in vitro studies. Other in vitro studies have shown that several African traditional medicinal (ATM) plants and extracts may also demonstrate PK interactions with ARVs, through effects on CYP3A4, P-gp and PXR. The most complex effects were exhibited by Hypoxis hemerocallidea, Sutherlandia frutescens, Cyphostemma hildebrandtii, Acacia nilotica, Agauria salicifolia and Elaeodendron buchananii. Despite a high incidence of HIV/AIDs in the African region, only one clinical study, between efavirenz and Hypoxis hemerocallidea has been conducted. However, several issues/concerns still remain to be addressed and thus more studies on ATMs are warranted in order for more meaningful data to be generated and the true potential for such interactions to be determined.

  14. Time evolution of initial states that extend beyond the potential interaction region in quantum decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Calderón, Gastón; Villavicencio, Jorge; Hernández-Maldonado, Alberto; Romo, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the decay of initial states that possess a tail that extends beyond the interaction potential region, for potentials of arbitrary shape that vanish exactly after a distance. This is the case for a relevant class of artificial quantum structures. We obtain that along the internal interaction region, the time evolution of the decaying wave function is formed by two terms. The first one refers to the proper decay of the internal portion of the initial state, whereas the second one, that arises from the external tail, yields a transient contribution that tunnels into the internal region, builds up to a value, and then decays. We obtain that depending on the parameters of the initial state, the nonexponential tail decaying contribution may be larger than the contribution of the proper nonexponential term. These results are illustrated by an exactly solvable model and the Heidelberg potential for decay of ultracold atoms and open the possibility to control initial states in artificial decaying systems.

  15. Many-Body Coarse-Grained Interactions using Gaussian Approximation Potentials

    CERN Document Server

    John, S T

    2016-01-01

    This thesis introduces a framework that is able to describe general many-body coarse-grained interactions. We make use of this to describe the free energy surface as a cluster expansion in terms of monomer, dimer, and trimer terms. The contributions to the free energy due to these terms are inferred from MD results of the underlying all-atom model using Gaussian Approximation Potentials, a type of machine-learning potential based on Gaussian process regression. This provides CG interactions that are much more accurate than is possible with site-based pair potentials. While slower than these, it can still be faster than all-atom simulations for solvent-free CG models of systems with a large amount of solvent, as is common in biomolecular simulations.

  16. Evaluation of screening length corrections for interaction potentials in impact-collision ion scattering spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Wataru, E-mail: take@sp.ous.ac.jp

    2013-10-15

    Since in impact-collision ion scattering spectroscopy (ICISS) data analysis the interaction potential represented by the screening length as the screening effect is not satisfactorily established up to the present, we introduce commonly the correction factor in the screening length. Previously, Yamamura, Takeuchi and Kawamura (YTK) have suggested the theory taking the shell effect of electron distributions into account for the correction factor to Firsov screening length in the Moliere potential. The application of YTK theory to the evaluation of screening length corrections for the interaction potentials in ICISS manifested that the screening length corrections calculated by the YTK theory agree almost with those determined by simulations or numerical calculations in ICISS and its variants data analyses, being superior to the evaluation of screening length corrections with the O’Connor and Biersack (OB) formula.

  17. Quantification of a Helical Origami Fold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Eric; Han, Xiaomin; Chen, Zi

    2015-03-01

    Origami, the Japanese art of paper folding, is traditionally viewed as an amusing pastime and medium of artistic expression. However, in recent years, origami has served as a source of inspiration for innovations in science and engineering. Here, we present the geometric and mechanical properties of a twisting origami fold. The origami structure created by the fold exhibits several interesting properties, including rigid foldibility, local bistability and finely tunable helical coiling, with control over pitch, radius and handedness of the helix. In addition, the pattern generated by the fold closely mimics the twist buckling patterns shown by thin materials, for example, a mobius strip. We use six parameters of the twisting origami pattern to generate a fully tunable graphical model of the fold. Finally, we present a mathematical model of the local bistability of the twisting origami fold. Our study elucidates the mechanisms behind the helical coiling and local bistability of the twisting origami fold, with potential applications in robotics and deployable structures. Acknowledgment to Branco Weiss Fellowship for funding.

  18. Insect antimicrobial peptides show potentiating functional interactions against Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahnamaeian, Mohammad; Cytryńska, Małgorzata; Zdybicka-Barabas, Agnieszka; Dobslaff, Kristin; Wiesner, Jochen; Twyman, Richard M; Zuchner, Thole; Sadd, Ben M; Regoes, Roland R; Schmid-Hempel, Paul; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and proteins are important components of innate immunity against pathogens in insects. The production of AMPs is costly owing to resource-based trade-offs, and strategies maximizing the efficacy of AMPs at low concentrations are therefore likely to be advantageous. Here, we show the potentiating functional interaction of co-occurring insect AMPs (the bumblebee linear peptides hymenoptaecin and abaecin) resulting in more potent antimicrobial effects at low concentrations. Abaecin displayed no detectable activity against Escherichia coli when tested alone at concentrations of up to 200 μM, whereas hymenoptaecin affected bacterial cell growth and viability but only at concentrations greater than 2 μM. In combination, as little as 1.25 μM abaecin enhanced the bactericidal effects of hymenoptaecin. To understand these potentiating functional interactions, we investigated their mechanisms of action using atomic force microscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based quenching assays. Abaecin was found to reduce the minimal inhibitory concentration of hymenoptaecin and to interact with the bacterial chaperone DnaK (an evolutionarily conserved central organizer of the bacterial chaperone network) when the membrane was compromised by hymenoptaecin. These naturally occurring potentiating interactions suggest that combinations of AMPs could be used therapeutically against Gram-negative bacterial pathogens that have acquired resistance to common antibiotics.

  19. Frequency of potential interactions between drugs in medical prescriptions in a city in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genici Weyh Bleich

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Drug interactions form part of current clinical practice and they affect between 3 and 5% of polypharmacy patients. The aim of this study was to identify the frequency of potential drug-drug interactions in prescriptions for adult and elderly patients. TYPE OF STUDY AND SETTING: Cross-sectional pharmacoepidemiological survey in the Parque Verde housing project, municipality of Cascavel, Paraná, Brazil, between December 2006 and February 2007. METHODS: Stratified cluster sampling, proportional to the total number of homes in the housing project, was used. The sample consisted of 95 homes and 96 male or female patients aged 19 or over, with medical prescriptions for at least two pharmaceutical drugs. Interactions were identified using DrugDigest, Medscape and Micromedex softwares. RESULTS: Most of the patients were female (69.8%, married (59.4% and in the age group of 60 years or over (56.3%, with an income less than or equal to three minimum monthly salaries (81.3% and less than eight years of schooling (69.8%; 90.6% of the patients were living with another person. The total number of pharmaceutical drugs was 406 (average of 4.2 medications per patient. The drugs most prescribed were antihypertensives (47.5%. The frequency of drug interactions was 66.6%. Among the 154 potential drug interactions, 4.6% were classified as major, 65.6% as moderate and 20.1% as minor. CONCLUSION: The high frequency of drug prescriptions with a potential for differentiated interactions indicates a situation that has so far been little explored, albeit a reality in household surveys.

  20. Potential drug–drug interactions in Alzheimer patients with behavioral symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasqualetti G

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Pasqualetti, Sara Tognini, Valeria Calsolaro, Antonio Polini, Fabio Monzani Geriatrics Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy Abstract: The use of multi drug regimens among the elderly population has increased tremendously over the last decade although the benefits of medications are always accompanied by potential harm, even when prescribed at recommended doses. The elderly populations are particularly at an increased risk of adverse drug reactions considering comorbidity, poly-therapy, physiological changes affecting the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of many drugs and, in some cases, poor compliance due to cognitive impairment and/or depression. In this setting, drug–drug interaction may represent a serious and even life-threatening clinical condition. Moreover, the inability to distinguish drug-induced symptoms from a definitive medical diagnosis often results in addition of yet another drug to treat the symptoms, which in turn increases drug–drug interactions. Cognitive enhancers, including acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and memantine, are the most widely prescribed agents for Alzheimer’s disease (AD patients. Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, including psychotic symptoms and behavioral disorders, represent noncognitive disturbances frequently observed in AD patients. Antipsychotic drugs are at high risk of adverse events, even at modest doses, and may interfere with the progression of cognitive impairment and interact with several drugs including anti-arrhythmics and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Other medications often used in AD patients are represented by anxiolytic, like benzodiazepine, or antidepressant agents. These agents also might interfere with other concomitant drugs through both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic mechanisms. In this review we focus on the most frequent drug–drug interactions, potentially harmful, in AD patients with

  1. Association of COMT and COMT-DRD2 interaction with creative potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun eZhang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Several lines of evidence suggest that genes involved in dopamine (DA transmission may contribute to creativity. Among these genes, the catechol-O-methyltransferase gene (COMT and the dopamine D2 receptor gene (DRD2 are the most promising candidates. Our previous study has revealed evidence for the involvement of DRD2 in creative potential. The present study extended our previous study by systematically exploring the association of COMT with creative potential as well as the interaction between COMT and DRD2. Twelve single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs covering COMT were genotyped in 543 healthy Chinese college students whose creative potentials were assessed by divergent thinking tests. Single SNP analysis showed that rs174697 was nominally associated with verbal originality, two SNPs (rs737865 and rs5993883 were nominally associated with figural fluency, and two SNPs (rs737865 and rs4680 were nominally associated with figural originality. Haplotype analysis showed that, the TCT and CCT haplotype (rs737865-rs174675-rs5993882 were nominally associated with figural originality, and the TATGCAG and CGCGGGA haplotype (rs4646312-rs6269-rs4633-rs6267-rs4818-rs4680-rs769224 were nominally associated with figural originality and verbal flexibility, respectively. However, none of these nominal findings survived correction for multiple testing. Gene-gene interaction analysis identified one significant four-way interaction of rs174675 (COMT, rs174697 (COMT, rs1076560 (DRD2 and rs4436578 (DRD2 on verbal fluency, one significant four-way interaction of rs174675 (COMT, rs4818 (COMT, rs1076560 (DRD2 and rs4648317 (DRD2 on verbal flexibility, and one significant three-way interaction of rs5993883 (COMT, rs4648319 (DRD2 and rs4648317 (DRD2 on figural flexibility. In conclusion, the present study provides nominal evidence for the involvement of COMT in creative potential and suggests that DA related genes may act in coordination to contribute to creativity.

  2. A Study on Potential of Integrating Multimodal Interaction into Musical Conducting Education

    CERN Document Server

    Siang, Gilbert Phuah Leong; Yong, Pang Yee

    2010-01-01

    With the rapid development of computer technology, computer music has begun to appear in the laboratory. Many potential utility of computer music is gradually increasing. The purpose of this paper is attempted to analyze the possibility of integrating multimodal interaction such as vision-based hand gesture and speech interaction into musical conducting education. To achieve this purpose, this paper is focus on discuss some related research and the traditional musical conducting education. To do so, six musical conductors had been interviewed to share their musical conducting learning/ teaching experience. These interviews had been analyzed in this paper to show the syllabus and the focus of musical conducting education for beginners.

  3. A new method for detecting interactions between the senses in event-related potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gondan, Matthias; Röder, B.

    2006-01-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) can be used in multisensory research to determine the point in time when different senses start to interact, for example, the auditory and the visual system. For this purpose, the ERP to bimodal stimuli (AV) is often compared to the sum of the ERPs to auditory (A...... - (A + V), but common activity is eliminated because two ERPs are subtracted from two others. With this new comparison technique, the first auditory-visual interaction starts around 80 ms after stimulus onset for the present experimental setting. It is possible to apply the new comparison method...

  4. Interactions of neuropathy inducers and potentiators/promoters with soluble esterases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estévez, Jorge; Mangas, Iris; Sogorb, Miguel Ángel; Vilanova, Eugenio

    2013-03-25

    Organophosphorus compounds (OPs) cause neurotoxic disorders through interactions with well-known target esterases, such as acetylcholinesterase and neuropathy target esterase (NTE). However, the OPs can potentially interact with other esterases of unknown significance. Therefore, identifying, characterizing and elucidating the nature and functional significance of the OP-sensitive pool of esterases in the central and peripheral nervous systems need to be investigated. Kinetic models have been developed and applied by considering multi-enzymatic systems, inhibition, spontaneous reactivation, the chemical hydrolysis of the inhibitor and "ongoing inhibition" (inhibition during the substrate reaction time). These models have been applied to discriminate enzymatic components among the esterases in nerve tissues of adult chicken, this being the experimental model for delayed neuropathy and to identify different modes of interactions between OPs and soluble brain esterases. The covalent interaction with the substrate catalytic site has been demonstrated by time-progressive inhibition during ongoing inhibition. The interaction of sequential exposure to an esterase inhibitor has been tested in brain soluble fraction where exposure to one inhibitor at a non inhibitory concentration has been seen to modify sensitivity to further exposure to others. The effect has been suggested to be caused by interaction with sites other than the inhibition site at the substrate catalytic site. This kind of interaction among esterase inhibitors should be considered to study the potentiation/promotion phenomenon, which is observed when some esterase inhibitors enhance the severity of the OP induced neuropathy if they are dosed after a non neuropathic low dose of a neuropathy inducer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Charged patchy particle models in explicit salt: Ion distributions, electrostatic potentials, and effective interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yigit, Cemil; Dzubiella, Joachim, E-mail: joachim.dzubiella@helmholtz-berlin.de [Soft Matter and Functional Materials, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Helmholtz Virtual Institute “Multifunctional Biomaterials for Medicine,” 14513 Teltow (Germany); Institut für Physik, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Heyda, Jan [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Chemistry and Technology, Prague, 166 28 Praha 6 (Czech Republic)

    2015-08-14

    We introduce a set of charged patchy particle models (CPPMs) in order to systematically study the influence of electrostatic charge patchiness and multipolarity on macromolecular interactions by means of implicit-solvent, explicit-ion Langevin dynamics simulations employing the Gromacs software. We consider well-defined zero-, one-, and two-patched spherical globules each of the same net charge and (nanometer) size which are composed of discrete atoms. The studied mono- and multipole moments of the CPPMs are comparable to those of globular proteins with similar size. We first characterize ion distributions and electrostatic potentials around a single CPPM. Although angle-resolved radial distribution functions reveal the expected local accumulation and depletion of counter- and co-ions around the patches, respectively, the orientation-averaged electrostatic potential shows only a small variation among the various CPPMs due to space charge cancellations. Furthermore, we study the orientation-averaged potential of mean force (PMF), the number of accumulated ions on the patches, as well as the CPPM orientations along the center-to-center distance of a pair of CPPMs. We compare the PMFs to the classical Derjaguin-Verwey-Landau-Overbeek theory and previously introduced orientation-averaged Debye-Hückel pair potentials including dipolar interactions. Our simulations confirm the adequacy of the theories in their respective regimes of validity, while low salt concentrations and large multipolar interactions remain a challenge for tractable theoretical descriptions.

  6. Concomitant therapy in people with epilepsy: potential drug-drug interactions and patient awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyal, Sara; Rasaby, Sivan; Ekstein, Dana

    2014-02-01

    People with epilepsy (PWE) may use prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) drugs for the treatment of concomitant diseases. Combinations of these drugs, as well as dietary supplements, with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) may lead to reduced control of seizures and of coexisting medical conditions and increased risk of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The aims of this study were to obtain comprehensive lists of medications, dietary supplements, botanicals, and specific food components used by adult PWE and to evaluate the potential for interactions involving AEDs and patients' awareness of such potential interactions. We conducted a prospective, questionnaire-based study of PWE attending the Hadassah-Hebrew University Epilepsy Clinic over a period of 7months. The questionnaire interview included the listing of medications, medicinal herbs, dietary supplements, and specific food components consumed and the knowledge of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs), and it was conducted by a pharmacist. Drug-drug interactions were analyzed via the Micromedex online database. Out of 179 patients who attended the clinic over the study period, we interviewed 73 PWE, of which 71 were included in our final analysis. The mean number of AEDs consumed per subject was 1.7 (SD: 0.8, range: 1-4). Forty (56%) subjects were also treated with other prescription and/or OTC medications, and thirty-four (48%) took dietary supplements. Drug families most prone to DDIs involving AEDs included antipsychotic agents, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and statins. Two-thirds of study participants (67%) knew that DDIs may lead to ADRs, but only half (56%) were aware of the potential for reduced seizure control. Only 44% always reported treatment with AEDs to medical professionals. This study provides for the first time a comprehensive picture of prescription and OTC drugs and food supplements used by PWE. Despite a considerable potential for DDIs involving AEDs, patient awareness is limited

  7. How the genome folds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman Aiden, Erez

    2012-02-01

    I describe Hi-C, a novel technology for probing the three-dimensional architecture of whole genomes by coupling proximity-based ligation with massively parallel sequencing. Working with collaborators at the Broad Institute and UMass Medical School, we used Hi-C to construct spatial proximity maps of the human genome at a resolution of 1Mb. These maps confirm the presence of chromosome territories and the spatial proximity of small, gene-rich chromosomes. We identified an additional level of genome organization that is characterized by the spatial segregation of open and closed chromatin to form two genome-wide compartments. At the megabase scale, the chromatin conformation is consistent with a fractal globule, a knot-free conformation that enables maximally dense packing while preserving the ability to easily fold and unfold any genomic locus. The fractal globule is distinct from the more commonly used globular equilibrium model. Our results demonstrate the power of Hi-C to map the dynamic conformations of whole genomes.

  8. Medicinal plant reported with adverse reactions in Cuba: potential interactions with conventional drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioanna Martínez

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Context: Herbal drugs are a mixture of active compounds and the chemical complexity of each formulation increase with the possibility of interactions between them and conventional drugs. Many mechanisms are implicated in the interactions; scientific community has dedicated the attentions to enzymes as P-gp and CYP450. Aims: To investigate in the literature the principal plants with suspicions of adverse reactions in Cuba and their potential interactions with conventional drugs. Methods: PubMed was the database used as source of information until February 2014. Key words: Herb-Drug, Drug-Plant, Herbal–Drug, Interactions with scientific names of plants was used. Information was structured and analysed with EndNote X4. Analysis and integration of the information: Allium sativum L. (garlic was the plant with the high number of studies related with CYP450 and P-gp. Plants with great demand as Morinda citrifolia L. (noni, Psidium guajava L. (guayaba, Zingiber officinale Roscoe (ginger and Eucalyptus spp. (eucalyptus have a very small number of studies. The professionals of the health should keep in mind the possibility of interactions between herbal products and conventional drugs to increase the effectiveness of phytotherapy. Conclusions: It is necessary enhance reports and investigations and to put to disposition of the system of health information on the interactions of plants and to stimulate the investigation that offers information for the rational use of our medicinal plants.

  9. Natural enemy-mediated indirect interactions among prey species: potential for enhancing biocontrol services in agroecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chailleux, Anaïs; Mohl, Emily K; Teixeira Alves, Mickaël; Messelink, Gerben J; Desneux, Nicolas

    2014-12-01

    Understanding how arthropod pests and their natural enemies interact in complex agroecosystems is essential for pest management programmes. Theory predicts that prey sharing a predator, such as a biological control agent, can indirectly reduce each other's density at equilibrium (apparent competition). From this premise, we (i) discuss the complexity of indirect interactions among pests in agroecosystems and highlight the importance of natural enemy-mediated indirect interactions other than apparent competition, (ii) outline factors that affect the nature of enemy-mediated indirect interactions in the field and (iii) identify the way to manipulate enemy-mediated interactions for biological control. We argue that there is a need to increase the link between community ecology theory and biological control to develop better agroecological methods of crop protection via conservation biological control. In conclusion, we identify (i) interventions to be chosen depending on agroecosystem characteristics and (ii) several lines of research that will improve the potential for enemy-mediated indirect interactions to be applied to biological control. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Strategy for the Prediction of Steady-State Exposure of Digoxin to Determine Drug-Drug Interaction Potential of Digoxin With Other Drugs in Digitalization Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, Nuggehally R

    2016-01-20

    Digoxin, a narrow therapeutic index drug, is widely used in congestive heart failure. However, the digitalization therapy involves dose titration and can exhibit drug-drug interaction. Ctrough versus area under the plasma concentration versus time curve in a dosing interval of 24 hours (AUC0-24h) and Cmax versus AUC0-24h for digoxin were established by linear regression. The predictions of digoxin AUC0-24h values were performed using published Ctrough or Cmax with appropriate regression lines. The fold difference, defined as the quotient of the observed/predicted AUC0-24h values, was evaluated. The mean square error and root mean square error, correlation coefficient (r), and goodness of the fold prediction were used to evaluate the models. Both Ctrough versus AUC0-24h (r = 0.9215) and Cmax versus AUC0-24h models for digoxin (r = 0.7781) showed strong correlations. Approximately 93.8% of the predicted digoxin AUC0-24h values were within 0.76-fold to 1.25-fold difference for Ctrough model. In sharp contrast, the Cmax model showed larger variability with only 51.6% of AUC0-24h predictions within 0.76-1.25-fold difference. The r value for observed versus predicted AUC0-24h for Ctrough (r = 0.9551; n = 177; P < 0.001) was superior to the Cmax (r = 0.6134; n = 275; P < 0.001) model. The mean square error and root mean square error (%) for the Ctrough model were 11.95% and 16.2% as compared to 67.17% and 42.3% obtained for the Cmax model. Simple linear regression models for Ctrough/Cmax versus AUC0-24h were derived for digoxin. On the basis of statistical evaluation, Ctrough was superior to Cmax model for the prediction of digoxin AUC0-24h and can be potentially used in a prospective setting for predicting drug-drug interaction or lack of it.

  11. Epidemiology of Polypharmacy and Potential Drug-Drug Interactions Among Pediatric Patients in ICUs of U.S. Children's Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Dingwei; Feinstein, James A; Morrison, Wynne; Zuppa, Athena F; Feudtner, Chris

    2016-05-01

    Polypharmacy is common in hospitalized children in the United States and has been identified as a major risk factor for exposure to potential drug-drug interactions. Little is known about the characteristics and prevalence of exposure of pediatric patients to polypharmacy and potential drug-drug interactions in PICUs. Retrospective cohort study using the Pediatric Health Information System database. Forty-two freestanding children's hospitals throughout the United States. A total of 54,549 patients less than 18 years old cared for in PICUs in 2011. Patients in neonatal ICUs were not included. PICU patients were on average exposed to 10 distinct drugs each hospital day and to 20 drugs cumulatively during their hospitalization. Seventy-five percent of patients were exposed to greater than or equal to one potential drug-drug interaction regardless of severity level, 6% to greater than or equal to one contraindicated potential drug-drug interaction, 69% to greater than or equal to one major potential drug-drug interaction, 57% to greater than or equal to one moderate potential drug-drug interaction, 19% to greater than or equal to one minor potential drug-drug interaction. Potential drug-drug interaction exposures were significantly associated with specific diagnoses (p risk of adverse drug events following specific potential drug-drug interaction exposures, especially the risk of adverse drug events due to multiple potential drug-drug interaction exposures, and determine the probability and magnitude of the actual harm (if any) for each specific potential drug-drug interaction, especially for multiple potential drug-drug interaction exposures.

  12. Hyperon Single-Particle Potentials Calculated from SU6 Quark-Model Baryon-Baryon Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kohno, M; Fujita, T; Nakamoto, C; Suzuki, Y

    2000-01-01

    Using the SU6 quark-model baryon-baryon interaction recently developed by the Kyoto-Niigata group, we calculate NN, Lambda N and Sigma N G-matrices in ordinary nuclear matter. This is the first attempt to discuss the Lambda and Sigma single-particle potentials in nuclear medium, based on the realistic quark-model potential. The Lambda potential has the depth of more than 40 MeV, which is more attractive than the value expected from the experimental data of Lambda-hypernuclei. The Sigma potential turns out to be repulsive, the origin of which is traced back to the strong Pauli repulsion in the Sigma N (I=3/2) ^3S_1 state.

  13. Electrostatic potential profile and nonlinear current in an interacting one-dimensional molecular wire

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Lakshmi; Swapan K Pati

    2003-10-01

    We consider an interacting one-dimensional molecular wire attached to two metal electrodes on either side of it. The electrostatic potential profile across the wire-electrode interface has been deduced solving the Schrodinger and Poisson equations self-consistently. Since the Poisson distribution crucially depends on charge densities, we have considered different Hamiltonian parameters to model the nanoscale wire. We find that for very weak electron correlations, the potential gradient is almost zero in the middle of the wire but are large near the chain ends. However, for strong correlations, the potential is essentially a ramp function. The nonlinear current, obtained from the scattering formalism, is found to be less with the ramp potential than for weak correlations. Some of the interesting features in current-voltage characteristics have been explained using one-electron formalism and instabilities in the system.

  14. Scalar-fluid interacting dark energy: Cosmological dynamics beyond the exponential potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Jibitesh; Khyllep, Wompherdeiki; Tamanini, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    We extend the dynamical systems analysis of scalar-fluid interacting dark energy models performed in C. G. Boehmer et al., Phys. Rev. D 91, 123002 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevD.91.123002 by considering scalar field potentials beyond the exponential type. The properties and stability of critical points are examined using a combination of linear analysis, computational methods and advanced mathematical techniques, such as center manifold theory. We show that the interesting results obtained with an exponential potential can generally be recovered also for more complicated scalar field potentials. In particular, employing power law and hyperbolic potentials as examples, we find late time accelerated attractors, transitions from dark matter to dark energy domination with specific distinguishing features, and accelerated scaling solutions capable of solving the cosmic coincidence problem.

  15. Understanding consumer motivations for interacting in online food communities – potential for innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Lina; Sørensen, Bjarne Taulo; Tudoran, Ana Alina

    This study contributes to the understanding of online user communities as a potential source of innovation. That would require an interest from users in interacting in such communities. In order to establish interaction, users must provide as well as consume information. However, depending...... on the innovation task, one may be more important than the other. It is therefore important to understand, how companies can increase user willingness to engage in these different interaction forms. This study investigates the influence of various motivation factors and user interests on intention to provide...... or consume information in online food communities. A survey was conducted among 1009 respondents followed by analysis based on Structural Equation Modelling. Results revealed the effect of motivation factors to be stronger than basic consumer interests indicating that companies can influence the intended...

  16. Potential costs of heterospecific sexual interactions in golden orbweb spiders (Nephila spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiñones-Lebrón, Shakira G; Kralj-Fišer, Simona; Gregorič, Matjaž; Lokovšek, Tjaša; Čandek, Klemen; Haddad, Charles R; Kuntner, Matjaž

    2016-11-15

    Though not uncommon in other animals, heterospecific mating is rarely reported in arachnids. We investigated sexual interactions among four closely related and syntopical African golden orbweb spiders, Nephila inaurata, N. fenestrata, N. komaci, and N. senegalensis. In two South African localities, female webs were often inhabited by heterospecific males that sometimes outnumbered conspecifics. Species association of males with females was random in nature. In subsequent laboratory choice experiments, N. inaurata males chose heterospecific females in 30% of trials. We also observed natural mating interactions between N. inaurata males and N. komaci females, and between N. komaci males and N. inaurata females in laboratory experiments. While heterospecific mating in the laboratory never produced offspring, conspecific mating did. We discuss potential ecological and evolutionary consequences of heterospecific mating interactions in Nephila that may be particularly costly to the rarer species.

  17. Multireference configuration interaction calculations of the first six ionization potentials of the uranium atom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bross, David H.; Parmar, Payal; Peterson, Kirk A., E-mail: kipeters@wsu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-4630 (United States)

    2015-11-14

    The first 6 ionization potentials (IPs) of the uranium atom have been calculated using multireference configuration interaction (MRCI+Q) with extrapolations to the complete basis set limit using new all-electron correlation consistent basis sets. The latter was carried out with the third-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonian. Correlation down through the 5s5p5d electrons has been taken into account, as well as contributions to the IPs due to the Lamb shift. Spin-orbit coupling contributions calculated at the 4-component Kramers restricted configuration interaction level, as well as the Gaunt term computed at the Dirac-Hartree-Fock level, were added to the best scalar relativistic results. The final ionization potentials are expected to be accurate to at least 5 kcal/mol (0.2 eV) and thus more reliable than the current experimental values of IP{sub 3} through IP{sub 6}.

  18. Multiple scattering of low energy ions in matter: Influence of energy loss and interaction potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mekhtiche, A. [Laboratoire SNIRM, Faculté de Physique, Université des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumediene (USTHB), BP 32 El Alia, Bab Ezzouar, Algiers (Algeria); Faculté des Sciences et de la Technologie, Université Yahia Farès de Médéa (Algeria); Khalal-Kouache, K., E-mail: kkouache@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire SNIRM, Faculté de Physique, Université des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumediene (USTHB), BP 32 El Alia, Bab Ezzouar, Algiers (Algeria)

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, the effect of inelastic energy loss and interaction potential on transmitted ions at low energy is studied. For this purpose, angular distributions of slow He{sup +} ions transmitted through thin Ag films are calculated using the theory of multiple scattering. Thin films (20–50 Å at 2 keV and 50–200 Å at 10 keV) are considered so that the total path length of transmitted ions can be approximated by the value of the target thickness in this calculation. The corresponding values of the relative energy loss ΔE/E are comprised between 0.04 and 0.17. We show that even if low values of the thickness are considered, the total energy loss of ions in the target should be included in the calculation. These calculated angular distributions are also influenced by the potential used to describe the interaction between the incident ion and the target atom.

  19. Multireference configuration interaction calculations of the first six ionization potentials of the uranium atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bross, David H.; Parmar, Payal; Peterson, Kirk A.

    2015-11-01

    The first 6 ionization potentials (IPs) of the uranium atom have been calculated using multireference configuration interaction (MRCI+Q) with extrapolations to the complete basis set limit using new all-electron correlation consistent basis sets. The latter was carried out with the third-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonian. Correlation down through the 5s5p5d electrons has been taken into account, as well as contributions to the IPs due to the Lamb shift. Spin-orbit coupling contributions calculated at the 4-component Kramers restricted configuration interaction level, as well as the Gaunt term computed at the Dirac-Hartree-Fock level, were added to the best scalar relativistic results. The final ionization potentials are expected to be accurate to at least 5 kcal/mol (0.2 eV) and thus more reliable than the current experimental values of IP3 through IP6.

  20. Interaction potential of microparticles in a plasma: role of collisions with plasma particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrapak, S A; Ivlev, A V; Morfill, G

    2001-10-01

    The interaction potential of two charged microparticles in a plasma is studied. Violation of the plasma equilibrium around the dust particles due to plasma-particle inelastic collisions results in three effects: long-range (non-Yukawa) electrostatic repulsion, attraction due to ion shadowing, and attraction or repulsion due to neutral shadowing (depending on the sign of the temperature difference between the particle surface and neutral gas). An analytical expression for the total potential is obtained and compared with previous theoretical results. The relative contribution of these effects is studied in two limiting cases-an isotropic bulk plasma and the plasma sheath region. The results obtained are compared with existing experimental results on pair particle interaction. The possibility of the so-called dust molecule formation is discussed.

  1. Essential multimeric enzymes in kinetoplastid parasites: A host of potentially druggable protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachsmuth, Leah M; Johnson, Meredith G; Gavenonis, Jason

    2017-06-01

    Parasitic diseases caused by kinetoplastid parasites of the genera Trypanosoma and Leishmania are an urgent public health crisis in the developing world. These closely related species possess a number of multimeric enzymes in highly conserved pathways involved in vital functions, such as redox homeostasis and nucleotide synthesis. Computational alanine scanning of these protein-protein interfaces has revealed a host of potentially ligandable sites on several established and emerging anti-parasitic drug targets. Analysis of interfaces with multiple clustered hotspots has suggested several potentially inhibitable protein-protein interactions that may have been overlooked by previous large-scale analyses focusing solely on secondary structure. These protein-protein interactions provide a promising lead for the development of new peptide and macrocycle inhibitors of these enzymes.

  2. Reconstructing interaction potentials in thin films from real-space images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gienger, Jonas; Severin, Nikolai; Rabe, Jürgen P; Sokolov, Igor M

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate that an inverse Monte Carlo approach allows one to reconstruct effective interaction potentials from real-space images. The method is exemplified on monomolecular ethanol-water films imaged with scanning force microscopy, which provides the spatial distribution of the molecules. Direct Monte Carlo simulations with the reconstructed potential allow for obtaining characteristics of the system which are unavailable in the experiment, such as the heat capacity of the monomolecularly thin film, and for a prediction of the critical temperature of the demixing transition.

  3. Potential drug-drug interactions in Alzheimer patients with behavioral symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualetti, Giuseppe; Tognini, Sara; Calsolaro, Valeria; Polini, Antonio; Monzani, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    The use of multi drug regimens among the elderly population has increased tremendously over the last decade although the benefits of medications are always accompanied by potential harm, even when prescribed at recommended doses. The elderly populations are particularly at an increased risk of adverse drug reactions considering comorbidity, poly-therapy, physiological changes affecting the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of many drugs and, in some cases, poor compliance due to cognitive impairment and/or depression. In this setting, drug-drug interaction may represent a serious and even life-threatening clinical condition. Moreover, the inability to distinguish drug-induced symptoms from a definitive medical diagnosis often results in addition of yet another drug to treat the symptoms, which in turn increases drug-drug interactions. Cognitive enhancers, including acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and memantine, are the most widely prescribed agents for Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, including psychotic symptoms and behavioral disorders, represent noncognitive disturbances frequently observed in AD patients. Antipsychotic drugs are at high risk of adverse events, even at modest doses, and may interfere with the progression of cognitive impairment and interact with several drugs including anti-arrhythmics and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Other medications often used in AD patients are represented by anxiolytic, like benzodiazepine, or antidepressant agents. These agents also might interfere with other concomitant drugs through both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic mechanisms. In this review we focus on the most frequent drug-drug interactions, potentially harmful, in AD patients with behavioral symptoms considering both physiological and pathological changes in AD patients, and potential pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic drug interaction mechanisms.

  4. Herbal medicines in Brazil: pharmacokinetic profile and potential herb-drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzari, Andre L D A; Prieto, Jose M

    2014-01-01

    A plethora of active compounds found in herbal medicines can serve as substrate for enzymes involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics. When a medicinal plant is co-administered with a conventional drug and little or no information is known about the pharmacokinetics of the plant metabolites, there is an increased risk of potential herb-drug interactions. Moreover, genetic polymorphisms in a population may act to predispose individuals to adverse reactions. The use of herbal medicines is rapidly increasing in many countries, particularly Brazil where the vast biodiversity is a potential source of new and more affordable treatments for numerous conditions. Accordingly, the Brazilian Unified Public Health System (SUS) produced a list of 71 plant species of interest, which could be made available to the population in the near future. Physicians at SUS prescribe a number of essential drugs and should herbal medicines be added to this system the chance of herb-drug interactions further increases. A review of the effects of these medicinal plants on Phase 1 and Phase 2 metabolic mechanisms and the transporter P-glycoprotein was conducted. The results have shown that approximately half of these medicinal plants lack any pharmacokinetic data. Moreover, most of the studies carried out are in vitro. Only a few reports on herb-drug interactions with essential drugs prescribed by SUS were found, suggesting that very little attention is being given to the safety of herbal medicines. Here we have taken this information to discuss the potential interactions between herbal medicines and essential drugs prescribed to Brazilian patients whilst taking into account the most common polymorphisms present in the Brazilian population. A number of theoretical interactions are pinpointed but more pharmacokinetic studies and pharmacovigilance data are needed to ascertain their clinical significance.

  5. Isospin effects of the Skyrme potential and the momentum dependent interaction at intermediate energy heavy ion collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Wen-Jun; LIU Jian-Ye

    2008-01-01

    We improve the isospin dependent quantum molecular dynamical model by including isospin effects in the Skyrme potential and the momentum dependent interaction to obtain an isospin dependent Skyrme potential and an isospin dependent momentum interaction. We investigate the isospin effects of Skyrme potential and momentum dependent interaction on the isospin fractionation ratio and the dynamical mechanism in intermediate energy heavy ion collisions. It is found that the isospin dependent Skyrme potential and the isospin dependent momentum interaction produce some important isospin effects in the isospin fractionation ratio.

  6. Effect of taurine and potential interactions with caffeine on cardiovascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Stephen W; Shimada, Kayoko; Jong, Chian Ju; Ito, Takashi; Azuma, Junichi; Takahashi, Kyoko

    2014-05-01

    The major impetus behind the rise in energy drink popularity among adults is their ability to heighten mental alertness, improve physical performance and supply energy. However, accompanying the exponential growth in energy drink usage have been recent case reports and analyses from the National Poison Data System, raising questions regarding the safety of energy drinks. Most of the safety concerns have centered on the effect of energy drinks on cardiovascular and central nervous system function. Although the effects of caffeine excess have been widely studied, little information is available on potential interactions between the other active ingredients of energy drinks and caffeine. One of the active ingredients often mentioned as a candidate for interactions with caffeine is the beta-amino acid, taurine. Although taurine is considered a conditionally essential nutrient for humans and is thought to play a key role in several human diseases, clinical studies evaluating the effects of taurine are limited. However, based on this review regarding possible interactions between caffeine and taurine, we conclude that taurine should neutralize several untoward effects of caffeine excess. In agreement with this conclusion, the European Union's Scientific Committee on Food published a report in March 2003 summarizing its investigation into potential interactions of the ingredients in energy drinks. At the cardiovascular level, they concluded that "if there are any interactions between caffeine and taurine, taurine might reduce the cardiovascular effects of caffeine." Although these interactions remain to be further examined in humans, the physiological functions of taurine appear to be inconsistent with the adverse cardiovascular symptoms associated with excessive consumption of caffeine-taurine containing beverages.

  7. Advances in adult asthma diagnosis and treatment in 2012: potential therapeutics and gene-environment interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apter, Andrea J

    2013-01-01

    In the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology in 2012, research reports related to asthma in adults clustered around mechanisms of disease, with a special focus on their potential for informing new therapies. There was also consideration of the effect of the environment on health from pollution, climate change, and epigenetic influences, underlining the importance of understanding gene-environment interactions in the pathogenesis of asthma and response to treatment.

  8. Formation of chain structures in systems of charged grains interacting via isotropic pair potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaulina, O. S.; Lisina, I. I.; Koss, K. G., E-mail: Xeniya.Koss@gmail.com [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-15

    Conditions for the formation of chain structures of charged grains confined in the gravitational field by external electric fields are studied analytically and numerically. The relationships between the parameters of the pair interaction potential, the number of grains, and the electric field gradient in the trap are found. A criterion for the violation of stable equilibrium in a quasi-one-dimensional chain of grains and the formation of a new configuration in the system is proposed.

  9. Role of cofactors in metalloprotein folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Corey J; Apiyo, David; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2004-01-01

    Metals are commonly found as natural constituents of proteins. Since many such metals can interact specifically with their corresponding unfolded proteins in vitro , cofactor-binding prior to polypeptide folding may be a biological path to active metalloproteins. By interacting with the unfolded polypeptide, the metal may create local structure that initiates and directs the polypeptide-folding process. Here, we review recent literature that addresses the involvement of metals in protein-folding reactions in vitro . To date, the best characterized systems are simple one such as blue-copper proteins, heme-binding proteins, iron-sulfur-cluster proteins and synthetic metallopeptides. Taken together, the available data demonstrates that metals can play diverse roles: it is clear that many cofactors bind before polypeptide folding and influence the reaction; yet, some do not bind until a well-structured active site is formed. The significance of characterizing the effects of metals on protein conformational changes is underscored by the many human diseases that are directly linked to anomalous protein-metal interactions.

  10. A simple theory of protein folding kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Pande, Vijay S

    2010-01-01

    We present a simple model of protein folding dynamics that captures key qualitative elements recently seen in all-atom simulations. The goals of this theory are to serve as a simple formalism for gaining deeper insight into the physical properties seen in detailed simulations as well as to serve as a model to easily compare why these simulations suggest a different kinetic mechanism than previous simple models. Specifically, we find that non-native contacts play a key role in determining the mechanism, which can shift dramatically as the energetic strength of non-native interactions is changed. For protein-like non-native interactions, our model finds that the native state is a kinetic hub, connecting the strength of relevant interactions directly to the nature of folding kinetics.

  11. RNA folding: structure prediction, folding kinetics and ion electrostatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhijie; Zhang, Wenbing; Shi, Yazhou; Wang, Fenghua

    2015-01-01

    Beyond the "traditional" functions such as gene storage, transport and protein synthesis, recent discoveries reveal that RNAs have important "new" biological functions including the RNA silence and gene regulation of riboswitch. Such functions of noncoding RNAs are strongly coupled to the RNA structures and proper structure change, which naturally leads to the RNA folding problem including structure prediction and folding kinetics. Due to the polyanionic nature of RNAs, RNA folding structure, stability and kinetics are strongly coupled to the ion condition of solution. The main focus of this chapter is to review the recent progress in the three major aspects in RNA folding problem: structure prediction, folding kinetics and ion electrostatics. This chapter will introduce both the recent experimental and theoretical progress, while emphasize the theoretical modelling on the three aspects in RNA folding.

  12. Folding of non-Euclidean curved shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bende, Nakul; Evans, Arthur; Innes-Gold, Sarah; Marin, Luis; Cohen, Itai; Santangelo, Christian; Hayward, Ryan

    2015-03-01

    Origami-based folding of 2D sheets has been of recent interest for a variety of applications ranging from deployable structures to self-folding robots. Though folding of planar sheets follows well-established principles, folding of curved shells involves an added level of complexity due to the inherent influence of curvature on mechanics. In this study, we use principles from differential geometry and thin shell mechanics to establish fundamental rules that govern folding of prototypical creased shells. In particular, we show how the normal curvature of a crease line controls whether the deformation is smooth or discontinuous, and investigate the influence of shell thickness and boundary conditions. We show that snap-folding of shells provides a route to rapid actuation on time-scales dictated by the speed of sound. The simple geometric design principles developed can be applied at any length-scale, offering potential for bio-inspired soft actuators for tunable optics, microfluidics, and robotics. This work was funded by the National Science Foundation through EFRI ODISSEI-1240441 with additional support to S.I.-G. through the UMass MRSEC DMR-0820506 REU program.

  13. Improving intermolecular interactions in DFTB3 using extended polarization from chemical-potential equalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, Anders S., E-mail: andersx@chem.wisc.edu, E-mail: cui@chem.wisc.edu; Cui, Qiang, E-mail: andersx@chem.wisc.edu, E-mail: cui@chem.wisc.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1101 University Ave., Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Elstner, Marcus [Theoretische Chemische Biologie, Universität Karlsruhe, Kaiserstr. 12, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-08-28

    Semi-empirical quantum mechanical methods traditionally expand the electron density in a minimal, valence-only electron basis set. The minimal-basis approximation causes molecular polarization to be underestimated, and hence intermolecular interaction energies are also underestimated, especially for intermolecular interactions involving charged species. In this work, the third-order self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding method (DFTB3) is augmented with an auxiliary response density using the chemical-potential equalization (CPE) method and an empirical dispersion correction (D3). The parameters in the CPE and D3 models are fitted to high-level CCSD(T) reference interaction energies for a broad range of chemical species, as well as dipole moments calculated at the DFT level; the impact of including polarizabilities of molecules in the parameterization is also considered. Parameters for the elements H, C, N, O, and S are presented. The Root Mean Square Deviation (RMSD) interaction energy is improved from 6.07 kcal/mol to 1.49 kcal/mol for interactions with one charged species, whereas the RMSD is improved from 5.60 kcal/mol to 1.73 for a set of 9 salt bridges, compared to uncorrected DFTB3. For large water clusters and complexes that are dominated by dispersion interactions, the already satisfactory performance of the DFTB3-D3 model is retained; polarizabilities of neutral molecules are also notably improved. Overall, the CPE extension of DFTB3-D3 provides a more balanced description of different types of non-covalent interactions than Neglect of Diatomic Differential Overlap type of semi-empirical methods (e.g., PM6-D3H4) and PBE-D3 with modest basis sets.

  14. Potential interactions of central nervous system drugs used in the elderly population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Bueno Morrone

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the use of CNS drugs and to identify the most frequently observed potential drug interactions in the elderly living in Southern Brazil. METHODS: A population-based, transversal and observational study was carried out during 2006-2007. Four hundred and eighty elderly individuals of both genders were randomly recruited and interviewed. A validated pharmacotherapeutic questionnaire and the Micromedex® Healthcare Series were utilized to analyze potential drug interactions. A severity rating scale employing the categories of "mild", "moderate" and "severe" was used to describe the interactions. RESULTS: A population of elderly living in Southern Brazil was interviewed and 98 reported using CNS drugs, 74.5% female and 25.5% male. Out of these patients, 32.0% reported severe or moderate pharmacological interactions related to the use of other drugs. Alprazolam and imipramine were reported to potentially interact with tobacco. Twenty potential moderate drug/ethanol interactions were found. The potential drug/caffeine interactions were classified as mild on the severity scale. CONCLUSION: Elderly being prescribed drugs that act on the CNS should be closely monitored, and furthermore, should be warned against potential drug-drug, drug-ethanol, and drug-tobacco interactions.OBJETIVO: Descrever o uso de medicamentos que atuam no sistema nervoso central (SNC e identificar as possíveis interações mais frequentes com esses medicamentos em idosos do sul do Brasil. MÉTODOS: Estudo de base populacional, transversal e observacional, realizado durante 2006-2007. Quatrocentos e oitenta idosos de ambos os sexos foram randomizados e entrevistados. Foram utilizados um questionário farmacoterapêutico validado e o programa Micromedex® Healthcare Series para analisar as potenciais interações com os medicamentos. Foi utilizada uma escala para descrever a gravidade das interações nas categorias de "leve", "moderada" e "grave". RESULTADOS

  15. Atomistic protein folding simulations on the submillisecond time scale using worldwide distributed computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Vijay S; Baker, Ian; Chapman, Jarrod; Elmer, Sidney P; Khaliq, Siraj; Larson, Stefan M; Rhee, Young Min; Shirts, Michael R; Snow, Christopher D; Sorin, Eric J; Zagrovic, Bojan

    2003-01-01

    Atomistic simulations of protein folding have the potential to be a great complement to experimental studies, but have been severely limited by the time scales accessible with current computer hardware and algorithms. By employing a worldwide distributed computing network of tens of thousands of PCs and algorithms designed to efficiently utilize this new many-processor, highly heterogeneous, loosely coupled distributed computing paradigm, we have been able to simulate hundreds of microseconds of atomistic molecular dynamics. This has allowed us to directly simulate the folding mechanism and to accurately predict the folding rate of several fast-folding proteins and polymers, including a nonbiological helix, polypeptide alpha-helices, a beta-hairpin, and a three-helix bundle protein from the villin headpiece. Our results demonstrate that one can reach the time scales needed to simulate fast folding using distributed computing, and that potential sets used to describe interatomic interactions are sufficiently accurate to reach the folded state with experimentally validated rates, at least for small proteins.

  16. Study of Potential Drug-Drug Interactions in Prescriptions of University- Based Pharmacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Mousavi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Drug-Drug Interactions (DDIs are adverse reactions caused by a combination of drugs; they are often predictable and therefore avoidable or manageable. The objective of this study was to evaluate the nature, type and prevalence of potential DDIs in prescriptions dispensed in university-based community pharmacies in Tehran, Iran.Methods: From July 2012 to February 2014, sample of 1260 prescriptions were collected from community and outpatient hospital pharmacies affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS, Iran. The prescriptions were assessed using the reference text “drug interaction facts”. The identified DDIs were categorized according to their level of significance into three classes (minor, moderate, major.Results: At least one drug-drug interaction was present in 339 (26.9% of prescriptions and a total of 751 cases of interactions were found in prescriptions. Major DDIs represented 7.3% of all DDIs detected, whereas moderate DDIs were 75% of all DDIs. The mean number of drugs per prescriptions was 3.2, with a median of 4 (range, 2-10.There was a positive association between number of prescribed drugs and occurrence of DDIs (OR: 2.14, 95% CI: 1.9-2.4. The prescriptions of medical specialist had greater risk of occurrence of moderate severity DDIs than general practitioners (OR: 1.52, 95%CI: 1.08-2.15.Conclusion: Despite the prescriptions were collected from university-based pharmacies, but the overall prevalence of potential DDIs were high among patients. Physicians should be aware of potentially harmful DDIs. Meanwhile Pharmacists can contribute to the detection and prevention of drug-related injuries. Appropriate education, collaborating drug selection and pharmaceutical care are strongly recommended for physicians and pharmacists.

  17. Whitebark pine facilitation at treeline: potential interactions for disruption by an invasive pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomback, Diana F; Blakeslee, Sarah C; Wagner, Aaron C; Wunder, Michael B; Resler, Lynn M; Pyatt, Jill C; Diaz, Soledad

    2016-08-01

    In stressful environments, facilitation often aids plant establishment, but invasive plant pathogens may potentially disrupt these interactions. In many treeline communities in the northern Rocky Mountains of the U.S. and Canada, Pinus albicaulis, a stress-tolerant pine, initiates tree islands at higher frequencies than other conifers - that is, leads to leeward tree establishment more frequently. The facilitation provided by a solitary (isolated) P. albicaulis leading to tree island initiation may be important for different life-history stages for leeward conifers, but it is not known which life-history stages are influenced and protection provided. However, P. albicaulis mortality from the non-native pathogen Cronartium ribicola potentially disrupts these facilitative interactions, reducing tree island initiation. In two Rocky Mountain eastern slope study areas, we experimentally examined fundamental plant-plant interactions which might facilitate tree island formation: the protection offered by P. albicaulis to leeward seed and seedling life-history stages, and to leeward krummholz conifers. In the latter case, we simulated mortality from C. ribicola for windward P. albicaulis to determine whether loss of P. albicaulis from C. ribicola impacts leeward conifers. Relative to other common solitary conifers at treeline, solitary P. albicaulis had higher abundance. More seeds germinated in leeward rock microsites than in conifer or exposed microsites, but the odds of cotyledon seedling survival during the growing season were highest in P. albicaulis microsites. Planted seedling survival was low among all microsites examined. Simulating death of windward P. albicaulis by C. ribicola reduced shoot growth of leeward trees. Loss of P. albicaulis to exotic disease may limit facilitation interactions and conifer community development at treeline and potentially impede upward movement as climate warms.

  18. Mapping of the interaction sites of galanthamine: a quantitative analysis through pairwise potentials and quantum chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galland, Nicolas; Kone, Soleymane; Le Questel, Jean-Yves

    2012-10-01

    A quantitative analysis of the interaction sites of the anti-Alzheimer drug galanthamine with molecular probes (water and benzene molecules) representative of its surroundings in the binding site of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) has been realized through pairwise potentials calculations and quantum chemistry. This strategy allows a full and accurate exploration of the galanthamine potential energy surface of interaction. Significantly different results are obtained according to the distances of approaches between the various molecular fragments and the conformation of the galanthamine N-methyl substituent. The geometry of the most relevant complexes has then been fully optimized through MPWB1K/6-31 + G(d,p) calculations, final energies being recomputed at the LMP2/aug-cc-pVTZ(-f) level of theory. Unexpectedly, galanthamine is found to interact mainly from its hydrogen-bond donor groups. Among those, CH groups in the vicinity of the ammonium group are prominent. The trends obtained provide rationales to the predilection of the equatorial orientation of the galanthamine N-methyl substituent for binding to AChE. The analysis of the interaction energies pointed out the independence between the various interaction sites and the rigid character of galanthamine. The comparison between the cluster calculations and the crystallographic observations in galanthamine-AChE co-crystals allows the validation of the theoretical methodology. In particular, the positions of several water molecules appearing as strongly conserved in galanthamine-AChE co-crystals are predicted by the calculations. Moreover, the experimental position and orientation of lateral chains of functionally important aminoacid residues are in close agreement with the ones predicted theoretically. Our study provides relevant information for a rational drug design of galanthamine based AChE inhibitors.

  19. Mapping of the interaction sites of galanthamine: a quantitative analysis through pairwise potentials and quantum chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galland, Nicolas; Kone, Soleymane; Le Questel, Jean-Yves

    2012-10-01

    A quantitative analysis of the interaction sites of the anti-Alzheimer drug galanthamine with molecular probes (water and benzene molecules) representative of its surroundings in the binding site of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) has been realized through pairwise potentials calculations and quantum chemistry. This strategy allows a full and accurate exploration of the galanthamine potential energy surface of interaction. Significantly different results are obtained according to the distances of approaches between the various molecular fragments and the conformation of the galanthamine N-methyl substituent. The geometry of the most relevant complexes has then been fully optimized through MPWB1K/6-31 + G(d,p) calculations, final energies being recomputed at the LMP2/aug-cc-pVTZ(-f) level of theory. Unexpectedly, galanthamine is found to interact mainly from its hydrogen-bond donor groups. Among those, CH groups in the vicinity of the ammonium group are prominent. The trends obtained provide rationales to the predilection of the equatorial orientation of the galanthamine N-methyl substituent for binding to AChE. The analysis of the interaction energies pointed out the independence between the various interaction sites and the rigid character of galanthamine. The comparison between the cluster calculations and the crystallographic observations in galanthamine-AChE co-crystals allows the validation of the theoretical methodology. In particular, the positions of several water molecules appearing as strongly conserved in galanthamine-AChE co-crystals are predicted by the calculations. Moreover, the experimental position and orientation of lateral chains of functionally important aminoacid residues are in close agreement with the ones predicted theoretically. Our study provides relevant information for a rational drug design of galanthamine based AChE inhibitors.

  20. Dirac equation for the Hulthén potential within the Yukawa-type tensor interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oktay Aydo(g)du; Elham Maghsoodi; Hassan Hassanabadi

    2013-01-01

    Using the Nikiforov-Uvarov (NU) method,pseudospin and spin symmetric solutions of the Dirac equation for the scalar and vector Hulthén potentials with the Yukawa-type tensor potential are obtained for an arbitrary spin-orbit coupling quantum number κ.We deduce the energy eigenvalue equations and corresponding upper-and lower-spinor wave functions in both the pseudospin and spin symmetry cases.Numerical results of the energy eigenvalue equations and the upper-and lower-spinor wave functions are presented to show the effects of the external potential and particle mass parameters as well as pseudospin and spin symmetric constants on the bound-state energies and wave functions in the absence and presence of the tensor interaction.

  1. Unexplored regions in QFT: delocalization of quantum matter through interactions with zero mass potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Schroer, Bert

    2010-01-01

    Massive quantum matter of prescribed spin permits infinitely many possibilities of covariantization in terms of spinorial (undotted/dotted) pointlike fields, whereas massless finite helicity representations lead to large gap in this spinorial spectrum which quantum field theorists usually try to fill by inventing an indefinite metric vectorpotential (Gupta-Bleuler, BRST) outside the quantum theoretic realm. Only after completing the computation the expecration of the gauge invariant observables are obtained. The full range of covariant possiblities (without indefinite metric) is restored if one allows localization along semiinfinite strings in addition to pointlike localization. These stringlike potentials fluctuate in the direction of the string (points in a lower de Sitter space) and absorb part of the short distance singularity: there always exists a potential with the smallest short distance dimension allowed by unitarity: sdd=1. In case the interaction with the potential remains linear (QED), there is a ...

  2. Haustral fold segmentation with curvature-guided level set evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongbin; Barish, Matthew; Pickhardt, Perry; Liang, Zhengrong

    2013-02-01

    Human colon has complex structures mostly because of the haustral folds. The folds are thin flat protrusions on the colon wall, which complicate the shape analysis for computer-aided detection (CAD) of colonic polyps. Fold segmentation may help reduce the structural complexity, and the folds can serve as an anatomic reference for computed tomographic colonography (CTC). Therefore, in this study, based on a model of the haustral fold boundaries, we developed a level-set approach to automatically segment the fold surfaces. To evaluate the developed fold segmentation algorithm, we first established the ground truth of haustral fold boundaries by experts' drawing on 15 patient CTC datasets without severe under/over colon distention from two medical centers. The segmentation algorithm successfully detected 92.7% of the folds in the ground truth. In addition to the sensitivity measure, we further developed a merit of segmented-area ratio (SAR), i.e., the ratio between the area of the intersection and union of the expert-drawn folds and the area of the automatically segmented folds, to measure the segmentation accuracy. The segmentation algorithm reached an average value of SAR = 86.2%, showing a good match with the ground truth on the fold surfaces. We believe the automatically segmented fold surfaces have the potential to benefit many postprocedures in CTC, such as CAD, taenia coli extraction, supine-prone registration, etc.

  3. Intermolecular Interaction Potentials of CH4-Ne Complex Calculated with Local Density Approximation Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Yu-Lin; CHENG Xiao-Hong; CHEN Xiang-Rong; YANG Xiang-Dong; ZHU Jun

    2004-01-01

    @@ The intermolecular interactions potentials for two configurations of CH4-Ne complex are calculated with local density approximation methods in the frame of density functional theory. It is found that the calculated potentials have two minima when the distance between the carbon atom of CH4 and the Ne atom takes R = 5.80 a.u.and 6.20a. u. for both the two configurations. For the edge configuration, the corresponding depth of the potential is 0.0669536 eV and 0.0671416 eV. For the face configuration, the corresponding depth of the potential is 0.0737956 eV and 0.0645506 eV. The global minimum occurs at R = 5.80 a.u. for the face configuration with a depth of the potential 0.0737956 eV. The depths of our calculation are in better agreement with the experimental data than the quantum chemical calculation approach, while the position of minimum potential for our calculation is underestimated.

  4. Graphene folding on flat substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiaoming; Zhao, Yadong; Ke, Changhong, E-mail: cke@binghamton.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Zhang, Liuyang; Wang, Xianqiao [College of Engineering, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States)

    2014-10-28

    We present a combined experimental-theoretical study of graphene folding on flat substrates. The structure and deformation of the folded graphene sheet are experimentally characterized by atomic force microscopy. The local graphene folding behaviors are interpreted based on nonlinear continuum mechanics modeling and molecular dynamics simulations. Our study on self-folding of a trilayer graphene sheet reports a bending stiffness of about 6.57 eV, which is about four times the reported values for monolayer graphene. Our results reveal that an intriguing free sliding phenomenon occurs at the interlayer van der Waals interfaces during the graphene folding process. This work demonstrates that it is a plausible venue to quantify the bending stiffness of graphene based on its self-folding conformation on flat substrates. The findings reported in this work are useful to a better understanding of the mechanical properties of graphene and in the pursuit of its applications.

  5. Microorganisms in potential host rocks for geological disposal of nuclear waste and their interactions with radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherkouk, A.; Liebe, M.; Luetke, L.; Moll, H.; Stumpf, T. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology

    2015-07-01

    The long-term safety of nuclear waste in a deep geological repository is an important issue in our society. Microorganisms indigenous to potential host rocks are able to influence the oxidation state, speciation and therefore the mobility of radionuclides as well as gas generation or canister corrosion. Therefore, for the safety assessment of such a repository it is necessary to know which microorganisms are present in the potential host rocks (e.g. clay, salt) and if these microorganisms can influence the performance of a repository. Microbial diversity in potential host rocks for geological disposal of nuclear waste was analyzed by culture-independent molecular biological methods (e.g. 16S rRNA gene retrieval) as well as enrichment and isolation of indigenous microbes. Among other isolates, a Paenibacillus strain, as a representative of Firmicutes, was recovered in R2A media under anaerobic conditions from Opalinus clay from the Mont Terri in Switzerland. Accumulation experiments and potentiometric titrations showed a strong interaction of Paenibacillus sp. cells with U(VI) within a broad pH range (3-7). Additionally, the interactions of the halophilic archaeal strain Halobacterium noricense DSM 15987, a salt rock representative reference strain, with U(VI) at high ionic strength was investigated. After 48 h the cells were still alive at uranium concentrations up to 60 μM, which demonstrates that Halobacterium noricense can tolerate uranium concentrations up to this level. The formed uranium sorption species were examined with time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). The results about the microbial communities present in potential host rocks for nuclear waste repositories and their interactions with radionuclides contribute to the safety assessment of a prospective nuclear waste repository.

  6. Immersed Lagrangian deformations of a branched covering of a special Lagrangian 3-sphere in a Calabi-Yau 3-fold and its deviation from Joyce's criteria: Potential image-support rigidity of A-branes that wrap around a sL $S^3$

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Chien-Hao

    2011-01-01

    Using a hyperK\\"{a}hler rotation on complex structures of a Calabi-Yau 2-fold and rolling of an isotropic 2-submanifold in a symplectic 6-manifold, we construct, by gluing, a natural family of immersed Lagrangian deformations of a branched covering of a special Lagrangian 3-sphere in a Calabi-Yau 3-fold and study how they deviate from being deformable to a family of special Lagrangian deformations by examining in detail Joyce's criteria on this family. The result suggests a potential image-support rigidity of A-branes that wrap around a special Lagrangian 3-sphere in a Calabi-Yau 3-fold, which resembles a similar phenomenon for holomorphic curves that wrap around a rigid smooth rational curve in a Calabi-Yau 3-fold in Gromov-Witten theory.

  7. Folding of β-barrel membrane proteins in lipid bilayers - Unassisted and assisted folding and insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinschmidt, Jörg H

    2015-09-01

    In cells, β-barrel membrane proteins are transported in unfolded form to an outer membrane into which they fold and insert. Model systems have been established to investigate the mechanisms of insertion and folding of these versatile proteins into detergent micelles, lipid bilayers and even synthetic amphipathic polymers. In these experiments, insertion into lipid membranes is initiated from unfolded forms that do not display residual β-sheet secondary structure. These studies therefore have allowed the investigation of membrane protein folding and insertion in great detail. Folding of β-barrel membrane proteins into lipid bilayers has been monitored from unfolded forms by dilution of chaotropic denaturants that keep the protein unfolded as well as from unfolded forms present in complexes with molecular chaperones from cells. This review is aimed to provide an overview of the principles and mechanisms observed for the folding of β-barrel transmembrane proteins into lipid bilayers, the importance of lipid-protein interactions and the function of molecular chaperones and folding assistants. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid-protein interactions.

  8. Isolating the non-polar contributions to the intermolecular potential for water-alkane interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballal, Deepti; Venkataraman, Pradeep; Fouad, Wael A; Cox, Kenneth R; Chapman, Walter G

    2014-08-14

    Intermolecular potential models for water and alkanes describe pure component properties fairly well, but fail to reproduce properties of water-alkane mixtures. Understanding interactions between water and non-polar molecules like alkanes is important not only for the hydrocarbon industry but has implications to biological processes as well. Although non-polar solutes in water have been widely studied, much less work has focused on water in non-polar solvents. In this study we calculate the solubility of water in different alkanes (methane to dodecane) at ambient conditions where the water content in alkanes is very low so that the non-polar water-alkane interactions determine solubility. Only the alkane-rich phase is simulated since the fugacity of water in the water rich phase is calculated from an accurate equation of state. Using the SPC/E model for water and TraPPE model for alkanes along with Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rules for the cross parameters produces a water solubility that is an order of magnitude lower than the experimental value. It is found that an effective water Lennard-Jones energy ε(W)/k = 220 K is required to match the experimental water solubility in TraPPE alkanes. This number is much higher than used in most simulation water models (SPC/E-ε(W)/k = 78.2 K). It is surprising that the interaction energy obtained here is also higher than the water-alkane interaction energy predicted by studies on solubility of alkanes in water. The reason for this high water-alkane interaction energy is not completely understood. Some factors that might contribute to the large interaction energy, such as polarizability of alkanes, octupole moment of methane, and clustering of water at low concentrations in alkanes, are examined. It is found that, though important, these factors do not completely explain the anomalously strong attraction between alkanes and water observed experimentally.

  9. A method for computing the inter-residue interaction potentials for reduced amino acid alphabet

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abhinav Luthra; Anupam Nath Jha; G K Ananthasuresh; Saraswathi Vishveswara

    2007-08-01

    Inter-residue potentials are extensively used in the design and evaluation of protein structures. However, dealing with all (20×20) interactions becomes computationally difficult in extensive investigations. Hence, it is desirable to reduce the alphabet of 20 amino acids to a smaller number. Currently, several methods of reducing the residue types exist; however a critical assessment of these methods is not available. Towards this goal, here we review and evaluate different methods by comparing with the complete (20×20) matrix of Miyazawa-Jernigan potential, including a method of grouping adopted by us, based on multi dimensional scaling (MDS). The second goal of this paper is the computation of inter-residue interaction energies for the reduced amino acid alphabet, which has not been explicitly addressed in the literature until now. By using a least squares technique, we present a systematic method of obtaining the interaction energy values for any type of grouping scheme that reduces the amino acid alphabet. This can be valuable in designing the protein structures.

  10. Subsystem-DFT potential-energy curves for weakly interacting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlüns, Danny; Klahr, Kevin; Mück-Lichtenfeld, Christian; Visscher, Lucas; Neugebauer, Johannes

    2015-06-14

    Kohn-Sham density-functional theory (DFT) within the local-density approximation (LDA) or the generalized-gradient approximation (GGA) is known to fail for the correct description of London dispersion interactions. Often, not even bound potential-energy surfaces are obtained for van der Waals complexes, unless special correction schemes are employed. In contrast to that, there has been some evidence for the fact that subsystem-based density functional theory produces interaction energies for weakly bound systems which are superior to Kohn-Sham DFT results without dispersion corrections. This is usually attributed to an error cancellation between the approximate exchange-correlation and non-additive kinetic-energy functionals employed in subsystem DFT. Here, we investigate the accuracy of subsystem DFT for weakly interacting systems in detail, paying special attention to the shape of the potential-energy surfaces (PESs). Our test sets include the extensive S22x5 and S66x8 data sets. Our results indicate that subsystem DFT PESs strongly vary depending on the functional. LDA results are usually quite good, but behave differently from their KS counterparts. GGA results from the popular Perdew-Wang (PW91) set of functionals produce PESs that are often, but not in general overbinding. Results from Becke-Perdew (BP86) GGAs, by contrast, show the typical problems known from the corresponding KS results. We provide some preliminary results for empirical corrections for both PW91 and BP86 in subsystem DFT.

  11. The hyperon-nucleon interaction potential in the bound-state soliton model: the {lambda} N case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, G.L.; Herscovitz, V.E. [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Schat, C.L. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Scoccola, N.N. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Dept. de Fisica

    1999-05-01

    We develop the formalism the study the hyperon-nucleon interaction potential within the bound state approach to the SU (3) Skyrme model. The general framework is illustratedby applying it to the diagonal {lambda} N potential. The central, spin-spin and tensor components of this interaction are obtained and compared with those derived using alternative schemes. (author)

  12. Assessment of potential drug–drug interactions and its associated factors in the hospitalized cardiac patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghulam Murtaza

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Drug–drug interactions (DDIs may result in the alteration of therapeutic response. Sometimes they may increase the untoward effects of many drugs. Hospitalized cardiac patients need more attention regarding drug–drug interactions due to complexity of their disease and therapeutic regimen. This research was performed to find out types, prevalence and association between various predictors of potential drug–drug interactions (pDDIs in the Department of Cardiology and to report common interactions. This study was performed in the hospitalized cardiac patients at Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad, Pakistan. Patient charts of 2342 patients were assessed for pDDIs using Micromedex® Drug Information. Logistic regression was applied to find predictors of pDDIs. The main outcome measure in the study was the association of the potential drug–drug interactions with various factors such as age, gender, polypharmacy, and hospital stay of the patients. We identified 53 interacting-combinations that were present in total 5109 pDDIs with median number of 02 pDDIs per patient. Overall, 91.6% patients had at least one pDDI; 86.3% were having at least one major pDDI, and 84.5% patients had at least one moderate pDDI. Among 5109 identified pDDIs, most were of moderate (55% or major severity (45%; established (24.2%, theoretical (18.8% or probable (57% type of scientific evidence. Top 10 common pDDIs included 3 major and 7 moderate interactions. Results obtained by multivariate logistic regression revealed a significant association of the occurrence of pDDIs in patient with age of 60 years or more (p < 0.001, hospital stay of 7 days or longer (p < 0.001 and taking 7 or more drugs (p < 0.001. We found a high prevalence for pDDIs in the Department of Cardiology, most of which were of moderate severity. Older patients, patients with longer hospital stay and with elevated number of prescribed drugs were at higher risk of pDDIs.

  13. Assessment of potential drug-drug interactions and its associated factors in the hospitalized cardiac patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtaza, Ghulam; Khan, Muhammad Yasir Ghani; Azhar, Saira; Khan, Shujaat Ali; Khan, Tahir M

    2016-03-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) may result in the alteration of therapeutic response. Sometimes they may increase the untoward effects of many drugs. Hospitalized cardiac patients need more attention regarding drug-drug interactions due to complexity of their disease and therapeutic regimen. This research was performed to find out types, prevalence and association between various predictors of potential drug-drug interactions (pDDIs) in the Department of Cardiology and to report common interactions. This study was performed in the hospitalized cardiac patients at Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad, Pakistan. Patient charts of 2342 patients were assessed for pDDIs using Micromedex® Drug Information. Logistic regression was applied to find predictors of pDDIs. The main outcome measure in the study was the association of the potential drug-drug interactions with various factors such as age, gender, polypharmacy, and hospital stay of the patients. We identified 53 interacting-combinations that were present in total 5109 pDDIs with median number of 02 pDDIs per patient. Overall, 91.6% patients had at least one pDDI; 86.3% were having at least one major pDDI, and 84.5% patients had at least one moderate pDDI. Among 5109 identified pDDIs, most were of moderate (55%) or major severity (45%); established (24.2%), theoretical (18.8%) or probable (57%) type of scientific evidence. Top 10 common pDDIs included 3 major and 7 moderate interactions. Results obtained by multivariate logistic regression revealed a significant association of the occurrence of pDDIs in patient with age of 60 years or more (p < 0.001), hospital stay of 7 days or longer (p < 0.001) and taking 7 or more drugs (p < 0.001). We found a high prevalence for pDDIs in the Department of Cardiology, most of which were of moderate severity. Older patients, patients with longer hospital stay and with elevated number of prescribed drugs were at higher risk of pDDIs.

  14. Folding model analysis of the nucleus–nucleus scattering based on Jacobi coordinates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    F PAKDEL; A A RAJABI; L NICKHAH

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents the results of scattering of $^{16}O+^{209}Bi interaction near the Coulomb barrier. The interaction potential between two nuclei is calculated using the double folding model with the effective nucleon–nucleon (NN) interaction. The calculations of the exchange part of the interaction were assumed to be of finite range and the density dependence of the $NN$ interaction is accounted for. Also the results are compared with thezero-range approximation. All these calculations are done using the wave functions of the two colliding nuclei in place of their density distributions. The wave functions are obtained by the $D$-dimensional wave equationusing the hyper spherical calculations on the basis of Jacobi coordinates. The numerical results for the interaction potential and the differential scattering are in good agreement with the previous works.

  15. Protein-Folding Landscapes in Multi-Chain Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cellmer, Troy; Bratko, Dusan; Prausnitz, John M.; Blanch, Harvey

    2005-06-20

    Computational studies of proteins have significantly improved our understanding of protein folding. These studies are normally carried out using chains in isolation. However, in many systems of practical interest, proteins fold in the presence of other molecules. To obtain insight into folding in such situations, we compare the thermodynamics of folding for a Miyazawa-Jernigan model 64-mer in isolation to results obtained in the presence of additional chains. The melting temperature falls as the chain concentration increases. In multi-chain systems, free-energy landscapes for folding show an increased preference for misfolded states. Misfolding is accompanied by an increase in inter-protein interactions; however, near the folding temperature, the transition from folded chains to misfolded and associated chains isentropically driven. A majority of the most probable inter-protein contacts are also native contacts, suggesting that native topology plays a role in early stages of aggregation.

  16. Entangling spin-spin interactions of ions in individually controlled potential wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Andrew; Colombe, Yves; Brown, Kenton; Knill, Emanuel; Leibfried, Dietrich; Wineland, David

    2014-03-01

    Physical systems that cannot be modeled with classical computers appear in many different branches of science, including condensed-matter physics, statistical mechanics, high-energy physics, atomic physics and quantum chemistry. Despite impressive progress on the control and manipulation of various quantum systems, implementation of scalable devices for quantum simulation remains a formidable challenge. As one approach to scalability in simulation, here we demonstrate an elementary building-block of a configurable quantum simulator based on atomic ions. Two ions are trapped in separate potential wells that can individually be tailored to emulate a number of different spin-spin couplings mediated by the ions' Coulomb interaction together with classical laser and microwave fields. We demonstrate deterministic tuning of this interaction by independent control of the local wells and emulate a particular spin-spin interaction to entangle the internal states of the two ions with 0.81(2) fidelity. Extension of the building-block demonstrated here to a 2D-network, which ion-trap micro-fabrication processes enable, may provide a new quantum simulator architecture with broad flexibility in designing and scaling the arrangement of ions and their mutual interactions. This research was funded by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA), ONR, and the NIST Quantum Information Program.

  17. Clinical relevancy and risks of potential drug–drug interactions in intensive therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Aline Teotonio; Stahlschmidt, Rebeca; Granja, Silvia; Falcão, Antonio Luis Eiras; Moriel, Patricia; Mazzola, Priscila Gava

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Evaluate the potential Drug–Drug Interactions (pDDI) found in prescription orders of adult Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a Brazilian public health system hospital; quantify and qualify the pDDI regarding their severity and risks to the critical patient, using the database from Micromedex®. Methods Prospective study (January–December of 2011) collecting and evaluating 369 prescription orders (convenient sampling), one per patient. Results During the study 1844 pDDIs were identified and distributed in 405 pairs (medication A × medication B combination). There was an average of 5.00 ± 5.06 pDDIs per prescription order, the most prevalent being moderate and important interactions, present in 74% and 67% of prescription orders, respectively. In total, there were 9 contraindicated, 129 important and 204 moderate pDDIs. Among them 52 had as management recommendation to “avoid concomitant use” or “suspension of medication”, while 306 had as recommendation “continuous and adequate monitoring”. Conclusion The high number of pDDIs found in the study combined with the evaluation of the clinical relevancy of the most frequent pDDIs in the ICU shows that moderate and important interactions are highly incident. As the majority of them demand monitoring and adequate management, being aware of these interactions is major information for the safe and individualized risk management. PMID:27134536

  18. Construction of Exchange-Correlation Potentials for Strongly Interacting One-Dimensional Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, J. Wildon O.; Vieira, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    One-dimensional (1D) systems are useful laboratories aiming further improvement of electronic structure calculations. In order to simulate electron-electron interactions, two types of expressions are commonly considered: soft-Coulomb and exponential. For both cases, in the context of density-functional theory (DFT), 1D systems can be employed to gain insight into the ingredients accurate exchange-correlation (XC) density functionals must incorporate. A question of major interest is the treatment of strongly interacting situations, one of the main modern challenges for DFT. In this manuscript, we propose a generalization of preexisting XC potentials which can be applied to investigate the transition from weak to strong interactions. Specifically, we employ the intriguing behavior of electrons confined in one dimension: the spin-charge separation, for which spin and charge are decoupled to form two independent quasiparticles, spinons, and chargons. By means of Friedel oscillations, our results indicate it is possible to reproduce the weak-strong interaction transition by using a simple strategy we name, from previous works, spin-charge separation correction (SCSC). In addition, SCSC also yields good results in reproducing the constancy of the highest occupied Kohn-Sham eigenvalues upon fractional electron charges.

  19. Language learning, recasts, and interaction involving AAC: background and potential for intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Michael T; Soto, Gloria; Nelson, Keith

    2017-03-01

    For children with typical development, language is learned through everyday discursive interaction. Adults mediate child participation in such interactions through the deployment of a range of co-constructive strategies, including repeating, questioning, prompting, expanding, and reformulating the child's utterances. Adult reformulations of child utterances, also known as recasts, have also been shown to relate to the acquisition of linguistic structures in children with language and learning disabilities and children and adults learning a foreign language. In this paper we discuss the theoretical basis and empirical evidence for the use of different types of recasts as a major language learning catalyst, and what may account for their facilitative effects. We consider the occurrence of different types of recasts in AAC-mediated interactions and their potential for language facilitation, within the typical operational and linguistic constraints of such interactions. We also consider the benefit of explicit and corrective forms of recasts for language facilitation in conversations with children who rely on AAC. We conclude by outlining future research directions.

  20. Atom-by-atom analysis of global downhill protein folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadqi, Mourad; Fushman, David; Muñoz, Victor

    2006-07-01

    Protein folding is an inherently complex process involving coordination of the intricate networks of weak interactions that stabilize native three-dimensional structures. In the conventional paradigm, simple protein structures are assumed to fold in an all-or-none process that is inaccessible to experiment. Existing experimental methods therefore probe folding mechanisms indirectly. A widely used approach interprets changes in protein stability and/or folding kinetics, induced by engineered mutations, in terms of the structure of the native protein. In addition to limitations in connecting energetics with structure, mutational methods have significant experimental uncertainties and are unable to map complex networks of interactions. In contrast, analytical theory predicts small barriers to folding and the possibility of downhill folding. These theoretical predictions have been confirmed experimentally in recent years, including the observation of global downhill folding. However, a key remaining question is whether downhill folding can indeed lead to the high-resolution analysis of protein folding processes. Here we show, with the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), that the downhill protein BBL from Escherichia coli unfolds atom by atom starting from a defined three-dimensional structure. Thermal unfolding data on 158 backbone and side-chain protons out of a total of 204 provide a detailed view of the structural events during folding. This view confirms the statistical nature of folding, and exposes the interplay between hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic forces, backbone conformation and side-chain entropy. From the data we also obtain a map of the interaction network in this protein, which reveals the source of folding cooperativity. Our approach can be extended to other proteins with marginal barriers (less than 3RT), providing a new tool for the study of protein folding.

  1. Analytical Determination of the Confinement Potential and Coupling Constant of Spin--Orbit Interactions of Electrons in Nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Dineykhan, M; Zhaugasheva, S A; Al Farabi Kazakh State National University. Almaty

    2005-01-01

    Multilayer nanocrystalline structure is represented by the electrostatic field inducted by total image charge, and the confinement potential for electrons is determined. Assuming that at a given distance the confinement potential is equal to the Coulomb repulsion and an interaction between electrons becomes spin-orbit, the constant of the spin-orbit interaction of electrons in nanostructures is determined. The dependence of the constant of the spin-orbit interaction on environment parameters and the distance between electrons is studied.

  2. [Interactive effects between plant allelochemicals, plant allelopathic potential and soil nutrients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Huilin; Peng, Shaolin; Zheng, Yuji; Mo, Jiangming; Luo, Wei; Zeng, Xiaoduo; He, Xiaoxia

    2006-09-01

    Plant allelopathy relates to many ecological factors. The deficit of soil nutrients can influence the production of plant allelochemicals, and thus, influence plant allelopathic potential, while plant allelochemicals can influence the form and level of soil nutrients by the ways of complexation, adsorption, acid dissolution, competition, inhibition, and others. In this paper, the interactive effects between plant allelochemicals, plant allelopathic potential and soil nutrients were summarized, and further research aspects in this field were prospected. It was suggested that following aspects should be strengthened: (1) the integration of plant allelopathy and soil-plant nutrition research to more precisely and deeply interpret the relationships between plant allelochemicals, plant allelopathic potential and soil nutrients, (2) the integration of plant allelopathy and ecosystem nutrient cycling research to simulate the plant nutrients disturbance in nature and make the allelopathy research results more true and more reliable, and (3) the allelopathy research with soils containing excessive nutrients or polluted to provide new ideas and scientific basis in revealing the mechanisms of plants interaction and biomass variation in agricultural and forestry production, and in ecological protection.

  3. Influence of Solvent-Solvent and Solute-Solvent Interaction Properties on Solvent-Mediated Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Shi-Qi

    2005-01-01

    A recently proposed universal calculational recipe for solvent-mediated potential is applied to calculate excess potential of mean force between two large Lennard-Jones (LJ) or hard core attractive Yukawa particles immersed in small LJ solvent bath at supercritical state. Comparison between the present prediction with a hypernetted chain approximation adopted for solute-solute correlation at infinitely dilute limit and existing simulation data shows high accuracy for the region with large separation, and qualitative reliability for the solute particle contact region. The calculational simplicity of the present recipe allows for a detailed investigation on the effect of the solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interaction details on the excess potential of mean force. The resultant conclusion is that gathering of solvent particles near a solute particle leads to repulsive excess PMF, while depletion of solvent particles away from the solute particle leads to attractive excess PMF, and minor change of the solvent-solvent interaction range has large influence on the excess PMF.

  4. Radiative bound-state-formation cross-sections for dark matter interacting via a Yukawa potential

    CERN Document Server

    Petraki, Kalliopi; de Vries, Jordy

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the cross-sections for the radiative formation of bound states by dark matter whose interactions are described in the non-relativistic regime by a Yukawa potential. These cross-sections are important for cosmological and phenomenological studies of dark matter with long-range interactions, residing in a hidden sector, as well as for TeV-scale WIMP dark matter. We provide the leading-order contributions to the cross-sections for the dominant capture processes occurring via emission of a vector or a scalar boson. We offer a detailed inspection of their features, including their velocity dependence within and outside the Coulomb regime, and their resonance structure. For pairs of annihilating particles, we compare bound-state formation with annihilation.

  5. Experimenting with ecosystem interaction networks in search of threshold potentials in real-world marine ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrush, Simon F; Hewitt, Judi E; Parkes, Samantha; Lohrer, Andrew M; Pilditch, Conrad; Woodin, Sarah A; Wethey, David S; Chiantore, Mariachiara; Asnaghi, Valentina; De Juan, Silvia; Kraan, Casper; Rodil, Ivan; Savage, Candida; Van Colen, Carl

    2014-06-01

    Thresholds profoundly affect our understanding and management of ecosystem dynamics, but we have yet to develop practical techniques to assess the risk that thresholds will be crossed. Combining ecological knowledge of critical system interdependencies with a large-scale experiment, we tested for breaks in the ecosystem interaction network to identify threshold potential in real-world ecosystem dynamics. Our experiment with the bivalves Macomona liliana and Austrovenus stutchburyi on marine sandflats in New Zealand demonstrated that reductions in incident sunlight changed the interaction network between sediment biogeochemical fluxes, productivity, and macrofauna. By demonstrating loss of positive feedbacks and changes in the architecture of the network, we provide mechanistic evidence that stressors lead to break points in dynamics, which theory predicts predispose a system to a critical transition.

  6. Mechanisms of radiation interaction with DNA: Potential implications for radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinclair, W.K.; Fry, R.J.M.

    1987-01-01

    An overview of presentations and discussions which took place at the US Department of Energy/Commission of European Communities (DOE/CEC) workshop on ''Mechanisms of Radiation Interaction with DNA: Potential Implications for Radiation Protection,'' held at San Diego, California, January 21-22, 1987, is provided. The Department has traditionally supported fundamental research on interactions of ionizing radiation with different biological systems and at all levels of biological organization. The aim of this workshop was to review the base of knowledge in the area of mechanisms of radiation action at the DNA level, and to explore ways in which this information can be applied to the development of scientifically sound concepts and procedures for use in the field of radiation protection.

  7. Arsenic: A Review of the Element's Toxicity, Plant Interactions, and Potential Methods of Remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettick, Bryan E; Cañas-Carrell, Jaclyn E; French, Amanda D; Klein, David M

    2015-08-19

    Arsenic is a naturally occurring element with a long history of toxicity. Sites of contamination are found worldwide as a result of both natural processes and anthropogenic activities. The broad scope of arsenic toxicity to humans and its unique interaction with the environment have led to extensive research into its physicochemical properties and toxic behavior in biological systems. The purpose of this review is to compile the results of recent studies concerning the metalloid and consider the chemical and physical properties of arsenic in the broad context of human toxicity and phytoremediation. Areas of focus include arsenic's mechanisms of human toxicity, interaction with plant systems, potential methods of remediation, and protocols for the determination of metals in experimentation. This assessment of the literature indicates that controlling contamination of water sources and plants through effective remediation and management is essential to successfully addressing the problems of arsenic toxicity and contamination.

  8. Antinucleon-nucleus interaction near threshold from the Paris $\\bar NN$ potential

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, E; Loiseau, B; Wycech, S

    2015-01-01

    A general algorithm for handling the energy dependence of hadron-nucleon amplitudes in the nuclear medium, consistently with their density dependence, has been recently applied to antikaons, eta mesons and pions interacting with nuclei. Here we apply this approach to antiprotons below threshold, analyzing experimental results for antiprotonic atoms across the periodic table. It is also applied to antiproton and antineutron interaction with nuclei up to 400~MeV/c, comparing with elastic scattering and annihilation cross sections. The underlying $\\bar pN$ scattering amplitudes are derived from the Paris $\\bar NN$ potential, including modifications in the medium. Emphasis is placed on the role of the $P$-wave amplitudes with respect to the repulsive $S$-wave amplitudes.

  9. Research on the potential use of interactive materials on astronomy education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelzke, Marcos Rincon; Macedo, Josue

    2016-07-01

    This study presents results of a survey conducted at the Federal Institution of Education, Science and Technology in the North of Minas Gerais (IFNMG), and aimed to investigate the potentialities of the use of interactive materials in the teaching of astronomy. An advanced training course with involved learning activities about basic concepts of astronomy was offered to thirty-two Licenciate students in Physics, Mathematics and Biological Sciences, using the mixed methodology, combined with the three pedagogical moments. Among other aspects, the viability of the use of resources was noticed, involving digital technologies and interactive materials on teaching of astronomy, which may contribute to the broadening of methodological options for future teachers and meet their training needs.

  10. Antinucleon-nucleus interaction near threshold from the Paris N bar N potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E.; Gal, A.; Loiseau, B.; Wycech, S.

    2015-11-01

    A general algorithm for handling the energy dependence of hadron-nucleon amplitudes in the nuclear medium, consistently with their density dependence, has been recently applied to antikaons, eta mesons and pions interacting with nuclei. Here we apply this approach to antiprotons below threshold, analyzing experimental results for antiprotonic atoms across the periodic table. It is also applied to antiproton and antineutron interactions with nuclei up to 400 MeV/c, comparing with elastic scattering and annihilation cross sections. The underlying p bar N scattering amplitudes are derived from the Paris N bar N potential, including in-medium modifications. Emphasis is placed on the role of the P-wave amplitudes with respect to the repulsive S-wave amplitudes.

  11. Solid phase stability of a double-minimum interaction potential system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suematsu, Ayumi; Yoshimori, Akira, E-mail: a.yoshimori@cmt.phys.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Saiki, Masafumi; Matsui, Jun [Department of Physics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Odagaki, Takashi [School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Denki University, Hatoyama, Saitama 350-0394 (Japan)

    2014-06-28

    We study phase stability of a system with double-minimum interaction potential in a wide range of parameters by a thermodynamic perturbation theory. The present double-minimum potential is the Lennard-Jones-Gauss potential, which has a Gaussian pocket as well as a standard Lennard-Jones minimum. As a function of the depth and position of the Gaussian pocket in the potential, we determine the coexistence pressure of crystals (fcc and bcc). We show that the fcc crystallizes even at zero pressure when the position of the Gaussian pocket is coincident with the first or third nearest neighbor site of the fcc crystal. The bcc crystal is more stable than the fcc crystal when the position of the Gaussian pocket is coincident with the second nearest neighbor sites of the bcc crystal. The stable crystal structure is determined by the position of the Gaussian pocket. These results show that we can control the stability of the solid phase by tuning the potential function.

  12. Baryon interactions in lattice QCD: the direct method vs. the HAL QCD potential method

    CERN Document Server

    Iritani, Takumi

    2016-01-01

    We make a detailed comparison between the direct method and the HAL QCD potential method for the baryon-baryon interactions, taking the $\\Xi\\Xi$ system at $m_\\pi= 0.51$ GeV in 2+1 flavor QCD and using both smeared and wall quark sources. The energy shift $\\Delta E_\\mathrm{eff}(t)$ in the direct method shows the strong dependence on the choice of quark source operators, which means that the results with either (or both) source are false. The time-dependent HAL QCD method, on the other hand, gives the quark source independent $\\Xi\\Xi$ potential, thanks to the derivative expansion of the potential, which absorbs the source dependence to the next leading order correction. The HAL QCD potential predicts the absence of the bound state in the $\\Xi\\Xi$($^1$S$_0$) channel at $m_\\pi= 0.51$ GeV, which is also confirmed by the volume dependence of finite volume energy from the potential. We also demonstrate that the origin of the fake plateau in the effective energy shift $\\Delta E_\\mathrm{eff}(t)$ at $t \\sim 1$ fm can b...

  13. Matter-Wave Solitons in Two-Component Bose-Einstein Condensates with Tunable Interactions and Time Varying Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宣恒农; 左苗

    2011-01-01

    We present three families of exact matter-wave soliton solutions for an effective one-dimension two- component Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) with tunable interactions, harmonic potential and gain or loss term. We investigate the dynamics of bright-bright solitons, bright-dark solitons and dark-dark solitons for the time-dependent expulsive harmonic trap potential, periodically modulated harmonic trap potential, and kinklike modulated harmonic trap potential. Through the Feshbach resonance, these dynamics can be realized in experiments by suitable control of time-dependent trap parameters, atomic interactions, and interaction with thermal cloud.

  14. Host-Microbiome Interaction and Cancer: Potential Application in Precision Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Alejandra V.; Cocom-Chan, Benjamin; Hernandez-Montes, Georgina; Portillo-Bobadilla, Tobias; Resendis-Antonio, Osbaldo

    2016-01-01

    It has been experimentally shown that host-microbial interaction plays a major role in shaping the wellness or disease of the human body. Microorganisms coexisting in human tissues provide a variety of benefits that contribute to proper functional activity in the host through the modulation of fundamental processes such as signal transduction, immunity and metabolism. The unbalance of this microbial profile, or dysbiosis, has been correlated with the genesis and evolution of complex diseases such as cancer. Although this latter disease has been thoroughly studied using different high-throughput (HT) technologies, its heterogeneous nature makes its understanding and proper treatment in patients a remaining challenge in clinical settings. Notably, given the outstanding role of host-microbiome interactions, the ecological interactions with microorganisms have become a new significant aspect in the systems that can contribute to the diagnosis and potential treatment of solid cancers. As a part of expanding precision medicine in the area of cancer research, efforts aimed at effective treatments for various kinds of cancer based on the knowledge of genetics, biology of the disease and host-microbiome interactions might improve the prediction of disease risk and implement potential microbiota-directed therapeutics. In this review, we present the state of the art of sequencing and metabolome technologies, computational methods and schemes in systems biology that have addressed recent breakthroughs of uncovering relationships or associations between microorganisms and cancer. Together, microbiome studies extend the horizon of new personalized treatments against cancer from the perspective of precision medicine through a synergistic strategy integrating clinical knowledge, HT data, bioinformatics, and systems biology. PMID:28018236

  15. Host-microbiome interaction and cancer: potential application in precision medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra V Contreras

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been experimentally shown that host-microbial interaction plays a major role in shaping the wellness or disease of the human body. Microorganisms coexisting in human tissues provide a variety of benefits that contribute to proper functional activity in the host through the modulation of fundamental processes such as signal transduction, immunity and metabolism. The unbalance of this microbial profile, or dysbiosis, has been correlated with the genesis and evolution of complex diseases such as cancer. Although this latter disease has been thoroughly studied using different high-throughput technologies, its heterogeneous nature makes its understanding and proper treatment in patients a remaining challenge in clinical settings. Notably, given the outstanding role of host-microbiome interactions, the ecological interactions with microorganisms have become a new significant aspect in the systems that can contribute to the diagnosis and potential treatment of solid cancers. As a part of expanding precision medicine in the area of cancer research, efforts aimed at effective treatments for various kinds of cancer based on the knowledge of genetics, biology of the disease and host-microbiome interactions might improve the prediction of disease risk and implement potential microbiota-directed therapeutics. In this review, we present the state of the art of sequencing and metabolome technologies, computational methods and schemes in systems biology that have addressed recent breakthroughs of uncovering relationships or associations between microorganisms and cancer. Together, microbiome studies extend the horizon of new personalized treatments against cancer from the perspective of precision medicine through a synergistic strategy integrating clinical knowledge, high-throughput data, bioinformatics and systems biology.

  16. How Does Your Protein Fold? Elucidating the Apomyoglobin Folding Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, H Jane; Wright, Peter E

    2017-01-17

    Although each type of protein fold and in some cases individual proteins within a fold classification can have very different mechanisms of folding, the underlying biophysical and biochemical principles that operate to cause a linear polypeptide chain to fold into a globular structure must be the same. In an aqueous solution, the protein takes up the thermodynamically most stable structure, but the pathway along which the polypeptide proceeds in order to reach that structure is a function of the amino acid sequence, which must be the final determining factor, not only in shaping the final folded structure, but in dictating the folding pathway. A number of groups have focused on a single protein or group of proteins, to determine in detail the factors that influence the rate and mechanism of folding in a defined system, with the hope that hypothesis-driven experiments can elucidate the underlying principles governing the folding process. Our research group has focused on the folding of the globin family of proteins, and in particular on the monomeric protein apomyoglobin. Apomyoglobin (apoMb) folds relatively slowly (∼2 s) via an ensemble of obligatory intermediates that form rapidly after the initiation of folding. The folding pathway can be dissected using rapid-mixing techniques, which can probe processes in the millisecond time range. Stopped-flow measurements detected by circular dichroism (CD) or fluorescence spectroscopy give information on the rates of folding events. Quench-flow experiments utilize the differential rates of hydrogen-deuterium exchange of amide protons protected in parts of the structure that are folded early; protection of amides can be detected by mass spectrometry or proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). In addition, apoMb forms an intermediate at equilibrium at pH ∼ 4, which is sufficiently stable for it to be structurally characterized by solution methods such as CD, fluorescence and NMR spectroscopies, and the

  17. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of CYP1a interaction potential of terminalia arjuna bark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Varghese

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Terminalia arjuna Wight and Arn. (Combretaceae is a tree having an extensive medicinal potential in cardiovascular disorders. Triterpenoids are mainly responsible for cardiovascular properties. Aqueous, hydroalcoholic and alcoholic extract of T. arjuna, arjunic acid and arjungenin were examined for their potential to inhibit CYP1A enzyme in rat and human liver microsomes. IC 50 values of aqueous, hydroalcoholic and alcoholic extract of T. arjuna was found to be 11.4, 28.9 and 44.6 μg/ml in rat liver microsomes while 30.0, 29.7 and 39.0 μg/ml in human liver microsomes, respectively for CYP1A. However IC 50 values of arjunic acid and arjungenin for both rat liver microsomes and human liver microsomes were found to be >50 μM. Arjunic acid and arjungenin did not show inhibition of CYP1A enzyme up to concentrations of 50 μM. These in vitro data indicate that Terminalia arjuna extracts contain constituents that can potently inhibit the activity of CYP1A, which could in turn lead to undesirable pharmacokinetic drug-herb interactions in vivo. Based on the in vitro data, interaction potential of the aqueous extract of Terminalia arjuna orally in rats was investigated. A probe substrate, phenacetin, was used to index the activity of CYP1A. In vivo pharmacokinetic study of coadministration of aqueous extract of Terminalia arjuna and phenacetin, revealed that the aqueous extract did not lead to any significant change in the pharmacokinetic parameters of phenacetin as compared with control group. Though there was no in vivo-in vitro correlation, drug interactions could arise with drugs having a narrow therapeutic range and extensively cleared by CYP1A enzyme, which could lead to undesirable side effects.

  18. Predicting potential responses to future climate in an alpine ungulate: interspecific interactions exceed climate effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Tom H E; Stephens, Philip A; Apollonio, Marco; Willis, Stephen G

    2014-12-01

    The altitudinal shifts of many montane populations are lagging behind climate change. Understanding habitual, daily behavioural rhythms, and their climatic and environmental influences, could shed light on the constraints on long-term upslope range-shifts. In addition, behavioural rhythms can be affected by interspecific interactions, which can ameliorate or exacerbate climate-driven effects on ecology. Here, we investigate the relative influences of ambient temperature and an interaction with domestic sheep (Ovis aries) on the altitude use and activity budgets of a mountain ungulate, the Alpine chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra). Chamois moved upslope when it was hotter but this effect was modest compared to that of the presence of sheep, to which they reacted by moving 89-103 m upslope, into an entirely novel altitudinal range. Across the European Alps, a range-shift of this magnitude corresponds to a 46% decrease in the availability of suitable foraging habitat. This highlights the importance of understanding how factors such as competition and disturbance shape a given species' realised niche when predicting potential future responses to change. Furthermore, it exposes the potential for manipulations of species interactions to ameliorate the impacts of climate change, in this case by the careful management of livestock. Such manipulations could be particularly appropriate for species where competition or disturbance already strongly restricts their available niche. Our results also reveal the potential role of behavioural flexibility in responses to climate change. Chamois reduced their activity when it was warmer, which could explain their modest altitudinal migrations. Considering this behavioural flexibility, our model predicts a small 15-30 m upslope shift by 2100 in response to climate change, less than 4% of the altitudinal shift that would be predicted using a traditional species distribution model-type approach (SDM), which assumes that species' behaviour

  19. Scalar-field cosmological and collapse models with general self-interaction potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giambo, Roberto; Giannoni, Fabio [Dipartimento di Matematica e Informatica, Universita di Camerino (Italy); Magli, Giulio, E-mail: roberto.giambo@unicam.i, E-mail: fabio.giannoni@unicam.i, E-mail: magli@mate.polimi.i [Dipartimento di Matematica, Politecnico di Milano (Italy)

    2009-10-01

    We present the results of the investigation of a wide class of self-interacting, self-gravitating homogeneous scalar fields models, characterized by quite general conditions on the scalar field potential, and including both asymptotically polynomial and exponential behaviors. We show that the generic evolution is always divergent in a finite time, and this result is used to construct cosmological models as well as radiating collapsing star models of the Vaidya type - for the latter it turns out that black holes are generically formed.

  20. A case of a potential drug interaction between clobazam and etravirine-based antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naccarato, Mark; Yoong, Deborah; Kovacs, Colin; Gough, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 isoforms primarily involved in clobazam metabolism are CYP3A4 and 2C19. Drugs that modulate these enzymes would then be expected to alter the exposure of clobazam and its major metabolites. Etravirine, a second-generation non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor has been shown to induce CYP3A4, while inhibiting CYP2C9 and CYP2C19. We report a case in which a potential drug interaction between clobazam and etravirine may have led to increased concentrations of clobazam and its pharmacologically active metabolite, N-desmethylclobazam, causing neurotoxic symptoms.

  1. Improvement of a Vocal Fold Imaging System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauter, K. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Medical professionals can better serve their patients through continual update of their imaging tools. A wide range of pathologies and disease may afflict human vocal cords or, as they’re also known, vocal folds. These diseases can affect human speech hampering the ability of the patient to communicate. Vocal folds must be opened for breathing and the closed to produce speech. Currently methodologies to image markers of potential pathologies are difficult to use and often fail to detect early signs of disease. These current methodologies rely on a strobe light and slower frame rate camera in an attempt to obtain images as the vocal folds travel over the full extent of their motion.

  2. Novel sequences propel familiar folds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawad, Zahra; Paoli, Massimo

    2002-04-01

    Recent structure determinations have made new additions to a set of strikingly different sequences that give rise to the same topology. Proteins with a beta propeller fold are characterized by extreme sequence diversity despite the similarity in their three-dimensional structures. Several fold predictions, based in part on sequence repeats thought to match modular beta sheets, have been proved correct.

  3. Isotropization in Bianchi type-I cosmological model with fermions and bosons interacting via Yukawa potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas, M. O.; Samojeden, L. L.; Devecchi, F. P.; Kremer, G. M.

    2015-10-01

    In this work we investigate a model for the early Universe in a Bianchi type-I metric, where the sources of the gravitational field are a fermionic and a bosonic field, interacting through a Yukawa potential, following the standard model of elementary particles. It is shown that the fermionic field has a negative pressure, while the boson has a small positive pressure. The fermionic field is the responsible for an accelerated regime at early times, but since the total pressure tends to zero for large times, a transition to a decelerated regime occurs. Here the Yukawa potential answers for the duration of the accelerated regime, since by decreasing the value of its coupling constant the transition accelerated-decelerated occurs in later times. The isotropization which occurs for late times is due to the presence of the fermionic field as one of the sources of the gravitational field.

  4. Isotropization in Bianchi type-I cosmological model with fermions and bosons interacting via Yukawa potential

    CERN Document Server

    Ribas, M O; Devecchi, F P; Kremer, G M

    2015-01-01

    In this work we investigate a model for the early Universe in a Bianchi type-I metric, where the sources of the gravitational field are a fermionic and a bosonic field, interacting through a Yukawa potential, following the standard model of elementary particles. It is shown that the fermionic field has a negative pressure, while the boson has a small positive pressure. The fermionic field is the responsible for an accelerated regime at early times, but since the total pressure tends to zero for large times, a transition to a decelerated regime occurs. Here the Yukawa potential answers for the duration of the accelerated regime, since by decreasing the value of its coupling constant the transition accelerated-decelerated occurs in later times. The isotropization which occurs for late times is due to the presence of the fermionic field as one of the sources of the gravitational field.

  5. Interactions of zearalenone with native and chemically modified cyclodextrins and their potential utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poór, Miklós; Kunsági-Máté, Sándor; Sali, Nikolett; Kőszegi, Tamás; Szente, Lajos; Peles-Lemli, Beáta

    2015-10-01

    Zearalenone (ZEA) is a widespread xenoestrogenic mycotoxin produced by several Fusarium species. ZEA can cause reproductive disorders in farm animals and hyperoestrogenic syndromes in humans; therefore, development of more sensitive analytical methods (to quantify the mycotoxin) as well as strategies for prevention of its toxic impacts is highly important. In this study, the interactions of ZEA with native and chemically modified cyclodextrins (CDs) were investigated using fluorescence spectroscopy. Furthermore, in vitro experiments on liver cells were also performed to test the potential effect of CDs on toxin uptake. Our results demonstrate that ZEA forms stable complexes with CDs (logK values are approximately 3.7-4.7) resulting in the considerable elevation of its fluorescence signal. In addition, some of the CDs show ability to inhibit the cellular uptake of ZEA, suggesting their potential suitability to develop new CD-based preventive/detoxification strategies against ZEA in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The interaction of anticipatory anxiety and emotional picture processing: an event-related brain potential study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bublatzky, Florian; Flaisch, Tobias; Stockburger, Jessica; Schmälzle, Ralf; Schupp, Harald T

    2010-07-01

    The present study examined the interaction of anticipatory anxiety and selective emotion processing. Toward this end, a rapid stream of pleasant, neutral, and unpleasant pictures was presented in alternating blocks of threat-of-shock or safety, which were signaled by colored picture frames. The main finding is that pleasant pictures elicited a sustained negative difference potential over occipital regions during threat as compared to safety periods. In contrast, unpleasant and neutral picture processing did not vary as a function of threat-of-shock. Furthermore, in both the safety and threat-of-shock conditions, emotional pictures elicited an enlarged early posterior negativity and late positive potential. These data show that the activation of the fear/anxiety network exerts valence-specific effects on affective picture processing. Pleasant stimuli mismatching the current state of anticipatory anxiety apparently draw more attentional resources.

  7. Equi-Gaussian Curvature Folding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E M El-Kholy; El-Said R Lashin; Salama N Daoud

    2007-08-01

    In this paper we introduce a new type of folding called equi-Gaussian curvature folding of connected Riemannian 2-manifolds. We prove that the composition and the cartesian product of such foldings is again an equi-Gaussian curvature folding. In case of equi-Gaussian curvature foldings, $f:M→ P_n$, of an orientable surface onto a polygon $P_n$ we prove that (i) $f\\in\\mathcal{F}_{EG}(S^2)\\Leftrightarrow n=3$ (ii) $f\\in\\mathcal{F}_{EG}(T^2)\\Rightarrow n=4$ (iii) $f\\in\\mathcal{F}_{EG}(\\# 2T^2)\\Rightarrow n=5, 6$ and we generalize (iii) for $\\# nT^2$.

  8. Interaction of landscape varibles on the potential geographical distribution of parrots in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plasencia–Vázquez, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The loss, degradation, and fragmentation of forested areas are endangering parrot populations. In this study, we determined the influence of fragmentation in relation to vegetation cover, land use, and spatial configuration of fragments on the potential geographical distribution patterns of parrots in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. We used the potential geographical distribution for eight parrot species, considering the recently published maps obtained with the maximum entropy algorithm, and we incorporated the probability distribution for each species. We calculated 71 metrics/variables that evaluate forest fragmentation, spatial configuration of fragments, the ratio occupied by vegetation, and the land use in 100 plots of approximately 29 km², randomly distributed within the presence and absence areas predicted for each species. We also considered the relationship between environmental variables and the distribution probability of species. We used a partial least squares regression to explore patterns between the variables used and the potential distribution models. None of the environmental variables analyzed alone determined the presence/absence or the probability distribution of parrots in the Peninsula. We found that for the eight species, either due to the presence/absence or the probability distribution, the most important explanatory variables were the interaction among three variables, particularly the interactions among the total forest area, the total edge, and the tropical semi–evergreen medium– height forest. Habitat fragmentation influenced the potential geographical distribution of these species in terms of the characteristics of other environmental factors that are expressed together with the geographical division, such as the different vegetation cover ratio and land uses in deforested areas.

  9. An accurate H2-H2 interaction potential from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diep, Phong; Johnson, J. Karl

    2000-03-01

    We have calculated the potential energy surface extrapolated to the complete basis set limit using coupled-cluster theory with singles, doubles, and perturbational triples excitations [CCSD(T)] for the rigid monomer model of (H2)2. There is significant anisotropy among the 37 unique angular configurations selected to represent the surface. A four term spherical harmonics expansion model was chosen to fit the surface. The calculated potential energy surface reproduces the quadrupole moment to within 0.58% and the experimental well depth to within 1%. The second virial coefficient has been computed from the fitted potential energy surface. The usual semiclassical treatment of quantum mechanical effects on the second virial coefficient was applied in the temperature range of 100-500 K. We have developed a new technique for computing the quantum second virial coefficient by combining Feynman's path integral formalism and Monte Carlo integration. The calculated virial coefficient compares very well with published experimental measurements. Integral elastic cross sections were calculated for the scattering of para-H2/para-H2 by use of the close-coupling method. The interaction potential model from this work is able to reproduce the experimental cross sections in the relative kinetic velocity range of 900-2300 m/s.

  10. Benzene-pyridine interactions predicted by the effective fragment potential method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Quentin A; Gordon, Mark S; Slipchenko, Lyudmila V

    2011-05-12

    The accurate representation of nitrogen-containing heterocycles is essential for modeling biological systems. In this study, the general effective fragment potential (EFP2) method is used to model dimers of benzene and pyridine, complexes for which high-level theoretical data -including large basis spin-component-scaled second-order perturbation theory (SCS-MP2), symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT), and coupled cluster with singles, doubles, and perturbative triples (CCSD(T))-are available. An extensive comparison of potential energy curves and components of the interaction energy is presented for sandwich, T-shaped, parallel displaced, and hydrogen-bonded structures of these dimers. EFP2 and CCSD(T) potential energy curves for the sandwich, T-shaped, and hydrogen-bonded dimers have an average root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) of 0.49 kcal/mol; EFP2 and SCS-MP2 curves for the parallel displaced dimers have an average RMSD of 0.52 kcal/mol. Additionally, results are presented from an EFP2 Monte Carlo/simulated annealing (MC/SA) computation to sample the potential energy surface of the benzene-pyridine and pyridine dimers.

  11. Spatial representation in the social interaction potential metric: an analysis of scale and parameter sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao; Farber, Steven

    2016-10-01

    The social interaction potential (SIP) metric measures urban structural constraints on social interaction opportunities of a metropolitan region based on the time geographic concept of joint accessibility. Previous implementations of the metric used an interaction surface based on census tracts and the locations of their centroids. This has been shown to be a shortcoming, as the metric strongly depends on the scale of the zoning system in the region, making it difficult to compare the SIP metric between metropolitan regions. This research explores the role of spatial representation in the SIP metric and identifies a suitable grid-based representation that allows for comparison between regions while retaining cost-effectiveness with respect to computational burden. We also report on findings from an extensive sensitivity analysis investigating the SIP metric's input parameters such as a travel flow congestion factor and the length of the allowable time budget for social activities. The results provide new insights on the role of the modifiable areal unit problem in the computation of time geographic measures of accessibility.

  12. Potential-of-mean-force description of ionic interactions and structural hydration in biomolecular systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hummer, G.; Garcia, A.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Theoretical Biology and Biophysics Group; Soumpasis, D.M. [Max-Planck-Inst for Biophysical Chemistry, Goettingen (Germany). Biocomputation Group

    1994-10-01

    To understand the functioning of living organisms on a molecular level, it is crucial to dissect the intricate interplay of the immense number of biological molecules. Most of the biochemical processes in cells occur in a liquid environment formed mainly by water and ions. This solvent environment plays an important role in biological systems. The potential-of-mean-force (PMF) formalism attempts to describe quantitatively the interactions of the solvent with biological macromolecules on the basis of an approximate statistical-mechanical representation. At its current status of development, it deals with ionic effects on the biomolecular structure and with the structural hydration of biomolecules. The underlying idea of the PMF formalism is to identify the dominant sources of interactions and incorporate these interactions into the theoretical formalism using PMF`s (or particle correlation functions) extracted from bulk-liquid systems. In the following, the authors shall briefly outline the statistical-mechanical foundation of the PMF formalism and introduce the PMF expansion formalism, which is intimately linked to superposition approximations for higher-order particle correlation functions. The authors shall then sketch applications, which describe the effects of the ionic environment on nucleic-acid structure. Finally, the authors shall present the more recent extension of the PMF idea to describe quantitatively the structural hydration of biomolecules. Results for the interface of ice and water and for the hydration of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) will be discussed.

  13. Pressure Effects on the Intermolecular Interaction Potential of Condensed Protein Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the intermolecular interaction potential of proteins as a function of their solution conditions is essential for understanding protein aggregation, crystallization, and the phase behavior of proteins in general. Here, we report on a combined small-angle X-ray scattering and liquid-state theoretical approach to study dense lysozyme solutions as a function of temperature and pressure, but also in the presence of salts and osmolytes of different nature. We show that the pressure-dependent interaction potential of lysozyme changes in a nonlinear fashion over a wide range of temperatures, salt and protein concentrations, indicating that changes of the bulk water structure mediate the pressure dependence of the intermolecular forces. We present also results on the effect of high hydrostatic pressure on the phase behavior of dense lysozyme solutions in the liquid-liquid phase-coexistence region. As also shown in this study, the application of pressure can be used to fine-tune the second virial coefficient of protein solutions, which can be used to control nucleation rates and hence protein crystallization, or to prevent protein aggregation. Moreover, these results are also important for understanding the hydration behavior of biological matter under extreme environmental conditions, and the high stability of dense protein solutions (as they occur intracellularly) in organisms thriving under hydrostatic pressure conditions such as in the deep sea, where pressures up to the 100 MPa-level are reached.

  14. Macromolecular Crowding Modulates Folding Mechanism of α/β Protein Apoflavodoxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homouz, D.; Stagg, L.; Wittungstafshede, P.; Cheung, M.

    2009-01-01

    Protein dynamics in cells may be different from that in dilute solutions in vitro since the environment in cells is highly concentrated with other macromolecules. This volume exclusion due to macromolecular crowding is predicted to affect both equilibrium and kinetic processes involving protein conformational changes. To quantify macromolecular crowding effects on protein folding mechanisms, here we have investigated the folding energy landscape of an alpha/beta protein, apoflavodoxin, in the presence of inert macromolecular crowding agents using in silico and in vitro approaches. By coarse-grained molecular simulations and topology-based potential interactions, we probed the effects of increased volume fraction of crowding agents (phi_c) as well as of crowding agent geometry (sphere or spherocylinder) at high phi_c. Parallel kinetic folding experiments with purified Desulfovibro desulfuricans apoflavodoxin in vitro were performed in the presence of Ficoll (sphere) and Dextran (spherocylinder) synthetic crowding agents. In conclusion, we have identified in silico crowding conditions that best enhance protein stability and discovered that upon manipulation of the crowding conditions, folding routes experiencing topological frustrations can be either enhanced or relieved. The test-tube experiments confirmed that apoflavodoxin's time-resolved folding path is modulated by crowding agent geometry. We propose that macromolecular crowding effects may be a tool for manipulation of protein folding and function in living cells.

  15. Folding model study of the elastic $\\alpha + \\alpha$ scattering at low energies

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Ngo Hai; Khoa, Dao T

    2014-01-01

    The folding model analysis of the elastic $\\alpha + \\alpha$ scattering at the incident energies below the reaction threshold of 34.7 MeV (in the lab system) has been done using the well-tested density dependent versions of the M3Y interaction and realistic choices for the $^4$He density. Because the absorption is negligible at the energies below the reaction threshold, we were able to probe the $\\alpha + \\alpha$ optical potential at low energies quite unambiguously and found that the $\\alpha + \\alpha$ overlap density used to construct the density dependence of the M3Y interaction is strongly distorted by the Pauli blocking. This result gives possible explanation of a long-standing inconsistency of the double-folding model in its study of the elastic $\\alpha + \\alpha$ and $\\alpha$-nucleus scattering at low energies using the same realistic density dependent M3Y interaction.

  16. Potential drug-drug interactions in infant, child, and adolescent patients in children's hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, James; Dai, Dingwei; Zhong, Wenjun; Freedman, Jason; Feudtner, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Hospitalized infants, children, and adolescents are typically exposed to numerous distinct medications during inpatient admissions, increasing their risk of potential drug-drug interactions (PDDIs). We assessed the prevalence and characteristics of PDDI exposure of pediatric patients treated in children's hospitals. This retrospective cohort study included patients hospitalized in children's hospitals throughout the United States. PDDIs were identified by using the MicroMedex DRUG-REAX system. We calculated the patients exposed to PDDIs, stratified according to the seriousness of the interaction; daily and cumulative counts of PDDI exposures; and characterization of the cited potential adverse effects. Of 498 956 hospitalizations in 2011, 49% were associated with ≥1 PDDI, with a "contraindicated" PDDI occurring in 5% of all hospitalizations, a "major" PDDI present in 41%, a "moderate" PDDI in 28%, and a "minor" PDDI in 11%. Opioids were involved in 25% of all PDDIs, followed by antiinfective agents (17%), neurologic agents (15%), gastrointestinal agents (13%), and cardiovascular agents (13%). One-half of all PDDI exposures were due to specific drug pairs occurring in ≤3% of patients per hospital day. The most common potential adverse drug events included additive respiratory depression (in 21% of PDDIs), bleeding risk (5%), QT interval prolongation (4%), reduced iron absorption/availability (4%), central nervous system depression (4%), hyperkalemia (3%), and altered diuretic effectiveness (3%). Exposure to PDDIs is common among hospitalized children. Empirical data are needed to determine the probability and magnitude of the actual harm for each specific PDDI, particularly for less common drug pairs. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  17. Monte Carlo simulations of fluids whose particles interact with a logarithmic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyes, D M; Rickayzen, G; Powles, J G

    2008-04-07

    Monte Carlo simulations of a model fluid in which the particles interact via a continuous potential that has a logarithmic divergence at a pair separation of sigma, which we introduced in J. G. Powles et al., Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 455, 3725 (1999), have been carried out. The potential has the form, phi(r)= -epsilon ln(fr), where epsilon sets the energy scale and fr=1-(sigma/r)m. The value of m chosen was 12 but the qualitative trends depend only weakly on the value of m, providing it is greater than 3. The potential is entirely repulsive and has a logarithmic divergence as approximately -ln(r/sigma-1) in the r-->sigma limit. Predictions of the previous paper that the internal energy can be computed at all temperatures using the standard statistical mechanics formula for continuous potentials are verified here. The pressure can be calculated using the usual virial expression for continuous potentials, although there are practical limitations in resolving the increasingly important contribution from the r-->sigma limit at reduced temperatures greater than approximately 5. The mean square force F2 and infinite frequency shear Ginfinity and bulk Kinfinity moduli are only finite for T*=kBT/epsilon<1. The logarithmic fluid's physical properties become increasingly more like that of the hard sphere fluid with increasing temperature, showing a sharp transition in the behavior of the mean square force and infinite frequency elastic constants at T*=1. The logarithmic fluid is shown to exhibit a solid-fluid phase transition.

  18. Prevalence of potential drug interactions in patients in an intensive care unit of a university hospital in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Max Moreira Reis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To investigate the prevalence of potential drug interactions at the intensive care unit of a university hospital in Brazil and to analyze their clinical significance. METHODS: This cross-sectional retrospective study included 299 patients who had been hospitalized in the intensive care unit of the hospital. The drugs administered during the first 24 hours of hospitalization, in the 50th length-ofstay percentile and at the time of discharge were analyzed to identify potential drug-drug and drug-enteral nutrition interactions using DRUG-REAXH software. The drugs were classified according to the anatomical therapeutic chemical classification. RESULTS: The median number of medications per patient was smaller at the time of discharge than in the 50th length-of-stay percentile and in the first 24 hours of hospitalization. There was a 70% prevalence of potential drug interactions at the intensive care unit at the studied time points of hospitalization. Most of the drug interactions were either severe or moderate, and the scientific evidence for the interactions was, in general, either good or excellent. Pharmacodynamic interactions presented a subtle predominance in relation to pharmacokinetic interactions. The occurrence of potential drug interactions was associated with the number of medications administered and the length of stay. Medications that induced cytochrome P450, drugs that prolong the QT interval and cardiovascular drugs were pharmacotherapy factors associated with potential drug interactions. CONCLUSION: The study showed that potential drug interactions were prevalent in the intensive care unit due to the complexity of the pharmacotherapies administered. The interactions were associated with the number of drugs, the length of stay and the characteristics of the administered medications.

  19. Underground Potential for Urban Sustainability: Mapping Resources and Their Interactions with the Deep City Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R. Doyle

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the process of urban growth, the underground is often only addressed once all surface alternatives have been exhausted. Experience shows that this can lead to unforeseen conflicts (e.g., subsidence, groundwater pollution and to lost opportunities (e.g., combined geothermal systems and building foundations or recycling of excavation materials. One challenge is how the underground potentials are assessed by urban actors; data collection, analysis and visualization for the different resources are often conducted in separate disciplinary corners and administrative divisions. This paper presents a mapping method developed within the Deep City project at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL and its application to San Antonio, Texas. San Antonio is interesting in its lack of major underground infrastructure and its few means and political support for short-term underground development. We will specifically look at the production of a series of interaction maps, an original mapping strategy that is complementary to the resource potential maps we have produced in prior work. After situating this research within larger theoretical and philosophical questions, we will show how mapping the combined potentiality of underground resources can serve as a compass for future interdisciplinary discussions that address the urban underground as a source of opportunity, rather than as an afterthought.

  20. Accurately controlled sequential self-folding structures by polystyrene film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dongping; Yang, Yang; Chen, Yong; Lan, Xing; Tice, Jesse

    2017-08-01

    Four-dimensional (4D) printing overcomes the traditional fabrication limitations by designing heterogeneous materials to enable the printed structures evolve over time (the fourth dimension) under external stimuli. Here, we present a simple 4D printing of self-folding structures that can be sequentially and accurately folded. When heated above their glass transition temperature pre-strained polystyrene films shrink along the XY plane. In our process silver ink traces printed on the film are used to provide heat stimuli by conducting current to trigger the self-folding behavior. The parameters affecting the folding process are studied and discussed. Sequential folding and accurately controlled folding angles are achieved by using printed ink traces and angle lock design. Theoretical analyses are done to guide the design of the folding processes. Programmable structures such as a lock and a three-dimensional antenna are achieved to test the feasibility and potential applications of this method. These self-folding structures change their shapes after fabrication under controlled stimuli (electric current) and have potential applications in the fields of electronics, consumer devices, and robotics. Our design and fabrication method provides an easy way by using silver ink printed on polystyrene films to 4D print self-folding structures for electrically induced sequential folding with angular control.

  1. Short GC-rich RNA similar to miR 1909 and 1915 folds in silico with the 5'-UTR and ORF of Notch and responders: potential for the elimination of cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yufeng; Mine, Takashi; Ioannides, Constantin G

    2010-12-01

    Novel therapeutic approaches to eliminate cancer stem cells (CSCs) are being developed. This development is imperative as CSCs are resistant to drugs; they divide activated by ligands on the epithelium or on neighboring cancer cells. Specific commands for division originate from Notch-1 ligands. Notch-1 cleavage inhibitors can have opposite effects from the ones expected when the levels of Notch ligands are high on neighboring cancer cells. High levels of Jagged-1 are a common feature of ovarian tumors. Some gene pathways enhance, others repress transcription of Notch-1, while Notch-1 itself activates Myc and HIF-1α. RNA-based therapies need effector RNAs (eRNAs) with broad and focused specificity. eRNAs are short RNAs (20-30 nt long) which mediate biological effects. Two to three inhibitory RNAs with high net folding/hybridization/binding (and thereafter folding), and free energy (Net-ΔG) with multiple mRNAs can replace many miRs as eRNAs and overcome the complexity of identification of specific targets for each miR and competitive inhibition on delivery of small amounts of many miRs at the same time. To discover candidate eRNAs with multiple high affinity target sites or sequences (and thereafter targets), we searched for sequences containing more than randomly probable G and C. G and C bind with more hydrogen bonds than the pair A:T. We identified the sequence, Notch-1,33-56 in the ORF of Notch-1 mRNA. Notch-1,33-56 has a GC frame of 2 asymmetrical halves in 24 nucleotides. Each GC group has a different third nucleotide. Since GC is repeated, the third nucleotide defines the specificity as a 'bar code'. The complementary strand to Notch-1,33-56, binds in silico nt at 5'-UTR, ORF and 3'-UTR of mRNA. For simplification, the sequence of Notch-1,33-56 was designated HHN1 and its complementary strand, anti-HHB. We introduced novel quantitative parameters: Net-ΔG and mean Net-ΔG/bond. We quantified the Net-ΔG of folding, in silico, of anti-HHB with additional

  2. Folding gravitational-wave interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, J. R.; Ballmer, Stefan W.

    2017-01-01

    The sensitivity of kilometer-scale terrestrial gravitational wave interferometers is limited by mirror coating thermal noise. Alternative interferometer topologies can mitigate the impact of thermal noise on interferometer noise curves. In this work, we explore the impact of introducing a single folding mirror into the arm cavities of dual-recycled Fabry–Perot interferometers. While simple folding alone does not reduce the mirror coating thermal noise, it makes the folding mirror the critical mirror, opening up a variety of design and upgrade options. Improvements to the folding mirror thermal noise through crystalline coatings or cryogenic cooling can increase interferometer range by as much as a factor of two over the Advanced LIGO reference design.

  3. Structure-based prediction of protein-folding transition paths

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobs, William M

    2016-01-01

    We propose a general theory to describe the distribution of protein-folding transition paths. We show that transition paths follow a predictable sequence of high-free-energy transient states that are separated by free-energy barriers. Each transient state corresponds to the assembly of one or more discrete, cooperative units, which are determined directly from the native structure. We show that the transition state on a folding pathway is reached when a small number of critical contacts are formed between a specific set of substructures, after which folding proceeds downhill in free energy. This approach suggests a natural resolution for distinguishing parallel folding pathways and provides a simple means to predict the rate-limiting step in a folding reaction. Our theory identifies a common folding mechanism for proteins with diverse native structures and establishes general principles for the self-assembly of polymers with specific interactions.

  4. A dynamic skull model for simulation of cerebral cortex folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hanbo; Guo, Lei; Nie, Jingxin; Zhang, Tuo; Hu, Xintao; Liu, Tianming

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms of human cerebral cortex folding and their interactions during brain development are largely unknown, partly due to the difficulties in biological experiments and data acquisition for the developing fetus brain. Computational modeling and simulation provide a novel approach to the understanding of cortex folding processes in normal or aberrant neurodevelopment. Based on our recently developed computational model of the cerebral cortex folding using neuronal growth model and mechanical skull constraint, this paper presents a computational dynamic model of the brain skull that regulates the cortical folding simulation. Our simulation results show that the dynamic skull model is more biologically realistic and significantly improves our cortical folding simulation results. This work provides further computational support to the hypothesis that skull is an important regulator of cortical folding.

  5. Atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy on the assessment of protein folding and functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Filomena A; Martins, Ivo C; Santos, Nuno C

    2013-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) applied to biological systems can, besides generating high-quality and well-resolved images, be employed to study protein folding via AFM-based force spectroscopy. This approach allowed remarkable advances in the measurement of inter- and intramolecular interaction forces with piconewton resolution. The detection of specific interaction forces between molecules based on the AFM sensitivity and the manipulation of individual molecules greatly advanced the understanding of intra-protein and protein-ligand interactions. Apart from the academic interest in the resolution of basic scientific questions, this technique has also key importance on the clarification of several biological questions of immediate biomedical relevance. Force spectroscopy is an especially appropriate technique for "mechanical proteins" that can provide crucial information on single protein molecules and/or domains. Importantly, it also has the potential of combining in a single experiment spatial and kinetic measurements. Here, the main principles of this methodology are described, after which the ability to measure interactions at the single-molecule level is discussed, in the context of relevant protein-folding examples. We intend to demonstrate the potential of AFM-based force spectroscopy in the study of protein folding, especially since this technique is able to circumvent some of the difficulties typically encountered in classical thermal/chemical denaturation studies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Double folding model analysis of elastic scattering of halo nucleus 11Be from 64Zn

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Hemalatha

    2014-05-01

    Calculations of elastic scattering cross-sections for 9,10,11Be+64Zn at near-Coulomb barrier energy have been performed using a potential obtained from the double folding model and are compared with the experiment. In the framework of the double folding model, the nuclear matter densities of 9,10,11Be projectiles and a 64Zn target are folded with the complex energydependent effective M3Y interaction. The angular distributions of the differential cross-section for 9,10Be scattering from 64Zn at $E_{c.m.} ≈$24.5 MeV agree remarkably well with the data, while in case of 11Be, calculations show a Coulomb–nuclear interference peak which is not observed in the data.

  7. Protein folding by motion planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Shawna; Song, Guang; Amato, Nancy M.

    2005-12-01

    We investigate a novel approach for studying protein folding that has evolved from robotics motion planning techniques called probabilistic roadmap methods (PRMs). Our focus is to study issues related to the folding process, such as the formation of secondary and tertiary structures, assuming we know the native fold. A feature of our PRM-based framework is that the large sets of folding pathways in the roadmaps it produces, in just a few hours on a desktop PC, provide global information about the protein's energy landscape. This is an advantage over other simulation methods such as molecular dynamics or Monte Carlo methods which require more computation and produce only a single trajectory in each run. In our initial studies, we obtained encouraging results for several small proteins. In this paper, we investigate more sophisticated techniques for analyzing the folding pathways in our roadmaps. In addition to more formally revalidating our previous results, we present a case study showing that our technique captures known folding differences between the structurally similar proteins G and L. This research was supported in part by NSF CAREER Award CCR-9624315, NSF Grants ACI-9872126, EIA-9975018, EIA-0103742, EIA-9805823, ACR-0113971, CCR-0113974, EIA-9810937, EIA-0079874 and the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board grant ATP-000512-0261-2001. ST was supported in part by an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship. GS was supported in part by an IBM PhD Fellowship.

  8. Exploring the properties of valence electron based potential functions for the nonbonded interactions in atomistic force fields

    CERN Document Server

    Plattner, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    The possibility to construct and parametrize the nonbonded interactions in atomistic force fields based on the valence electron structure of molecules is explored in this paper. Three different charge distribution models using simple valence electron based potential functions are introduced and compared. It is shown that the three models can be constructed such that they only require one adjustable parameter for the electrostatic potential of a molecule. The accuracy of the electrostatic potential is evaluated for the three models and compared to population-derived charges and higher order multipole moments for a set of 12 small molecules. Furthermore the accuracy and parametrization of the interaction energies of the three models is evaluated based on {\\it ab initio} intermolecular interaction energies. It is shown that the valence electron potential models provide systematic advantages over conventional point charge models for the calculation of intermolecular interaction energies even with the very simple ...

  9. Incidence of Potential Drug-Drug Interaction and Related Factors in Hospitalized Neurological Patients in two Iranian Teaching Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soha Namazi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reciprocal drug interactions are among the most common causes of adverse drug reactions. We investigated the incidence and related risk factors associated with mutual drug interactions in relation to prescriptions written in the neurology wards of two major teaching hospitals in Shiraz, southern Iran. Methods: Data was collected from hand-written prescriptions on a daily basis. Mutual drug interactions were identified using Lexi-Comp 2012 version 1.9.1. Type D and X drug interactions were considered as potential drug-drug interactions. The potential risk factors associated with drug-drug interactions included the patient’s age and gender, number of medications and orders, length of hospitalization and the type of neurological disorder. To determine potential drug-drug interactions, relevant interventions were suggested to the physicians or nurses and the outcome of the interventions were documented. Results: The study comprised 589 patients, of which 53% were males and 47% females, with a mean age of 56.65±18.19 SD years. A total of 4942 drug orders and 3784 medications were prescribed among which 4539 drug-drug interactions were detected, including 4118 type C, 403 type D, and 18 type X. Using a logistic regression model, the number of medications, length of hospitalization and non-vascular type of the neurological disorder were found to be significantly associated with potential drug-drug interactions. From the total interventions, 74.24% were accepted by physicians and nurses. Conclusion: Potentially hazardous reciprocal drug interactions are common among patients in neurology wards. Clinical pharmacists can play a critical role in the prevention of drug-drug interactions in hospitalized patients.

  10. Plant-Microbial Interactions Define Potential Mechanisms of Organic Matter Priming in the Rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhalnina, K.; Cho, H. J.; Hao, Z.; Mansoori, N.; Karaoz, U.; Jenkins, S.; White, R. A., III; Lipton, M. S.; Deng, K.; Zhou, J.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Northen, T.; Firestone, M. K.; Brodie, E.

    2015-12-01

    In the rhizosphere, metabolic processes of plants and microorganisms are closely coupled, and together with soil minerals, their interactions regulate the turnover of soil organic C (SOC). Plants provide readily assimilable metabolites for microorganisms through exudation, and it has been hypothesized that increasing concentrations of exudate C may either stimulate or suppress rates of SOC mineralization (rhizosphere priming). Both positive and negative rhizosphere priming has been widely observed, however the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. To begin to identify the molecular mechanisms underlying rhizosphere priming, we isolated a broad range of soil bacteria from a Mediterranean grassland dominated by annual grass. Thirty-nine heterotrophic bacteria were selected for genome sequencing and both rRNA gene analysis and metagenome coverage suggest that these isolates represent naturally abundant strain variants. We analyzed their genomes for potential metabolic traits related to life in the rhizosphere and the decomposition of polymeric SOC. While the two dominant groups, Alphaproteobacteria and Actinobacteria, were enriched in polymer degrading enzymes, Alphaproteobacterial isolates contained greater gene copies of transporters related to amino acid, organic acid and auxin uptake or export, suggesting an enhanced metabolic potential for life in the root zone. To verify this metabolic potential, we determined the enzymatic activities of these isolates and revealed preferences of strains to degrade certain polymers (xylan, cellulose or lignin). Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy is being used to determine which polymeric components of plant roots are targeted by specific strains and how exudates may impact their degradation. To verify the potential of isolates to assimilate root exudates and export key metabolites we are using LC-MS/MS based exometabolomic profiling. The traits hypothesized and verified here (transporters, enzymes, exudate uptake

  11. Permutation invariant polynomial neural network approach to fitting potential energy surfaces. III. Molecule-surface interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bin; Guo, Hua

    2014-07-01

    The permutation invariant polynomial-neural network (PIP-NN) method for constructing highly accurate potential energy surfaces (PESs) for gas phase molecules is extended to molecule-surface interaction PESs. The symmetry adaptation in the NN fitting of a PES is achieved by employing as the input symmetry functions that fulfill both the translational symmetry of the surface and permutation symmetry of the molecule. These symmetry functions are low-order PIPs of the primitive symmetry functions containing the surface periodic symmetry. It is stressed that permutationally invariant cross terms are needed to avoid oversymmetrization. The accuracy and efficiency are demonstrated in fitting both a model PES for the H2 + Cu(111) system and density functional theory points for the H2 + Ag(111) system.

  12. Atomic size zone interaction potential between two ground-state cold atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zhaoying; Wu, Yunhan

    2016-01-01

    The complex-source-point model are already used in the exact solution for the urtrashort pulse and nonparaxial beam. In this letter we have used the complex-source-point model to deduce the interaction potential equation for the separation R between two atoms which is comparable with the size of the atoms. We show the result and the characteristics of the numerical calculation. Since the singular point around R=0 is removed by using the complex-source-point model, so that we can obtain the result force around R=0. With the decreasing of the distance between two atoms, the force switches from the electromagnetic force to the strong force by use our equation.

  13. An Invariance Principle for the Tagged Particle Process in Continuum with Singular Interaction Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Conrad, Florian; Grothaus, Martin

    2011-01-01

    We consider the dynamics of a tagged particle in an infinite particle environment moving according to a stochastic gradient dynamics. For singular interaction potentials this tagged particle dynamics was constructed first in [FG11], using closures of pre-Dirichlet forms which were already proposed in [GP87] and [Osa98]. The environment dynamics and the coupled dynamics of the tagged particle and the environment were constructed separately. Here we continue the analysis of these processes: Proving an essential m-dissipativity result for the generator of the coupled dynamics from [FG11], we show that this dynamics does not only contain the environment dynamics (as one component), but is, given the latter, the only possible choice for being the coupled process. Moreover, we identify the uniform motion of the environment as the reversed motion of the tagged particle. (Since the dynamics are constructed as martingale solutions on configuration space, this is not immediate.) Furthermore, we prove ergodicity of the ...

  14. The emotion potential of simple sentences: additive or interactive effects of nouns and adjectives?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana eLüdtke

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The vast majority of studies on affective processes in reading focus on single words. The most robust finding is a processing advantage for positively valenced words, which has been replicated in the rare studies investigating effects of affective features of words during sentence or story comprehension. Here we were interested in how the different valences of words in a sentence influence its processing and supralexical affective evaluation. Using a sentence verification task we investigated how comprehension of simple declarative sentences containing a noun and an adjective depends on the valences of both words. The results are in line with the assumed general processing advantage for positive words. We also observed a clear interaction effect, as can be expected from the affective priming literature: sentences with emotionally congruent words (e.g., The grandpa is clever were verified faster than sentences containing emotionally incongruent words (e.g., The grandpa is lonely. The priming effect was most prominent for sentences with positive words suggesting that both, early processing as well as later meaning integration and situation model construction, is modulated by affective processing. In a second rating task we investigated how the emotion potential of supralexical units depends on word valence. The simplest hypothesis predicts that the supralexical affective structure is a linear combination of the valences of the nouns and adjectives (Bestgen, 1994. Overall, our results do not support this: The observed clear interaction effect on ratings indicate that especially negative adjectives dominated supralexical evaluation, i.e. a sort of negativity bias in sentence evaluation. Future models of sentence processing thus should take interactive affective effects into account.

  15. Final Report - Assessment of Potential Phosphate Ion-Cementitious Materials Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, Dan J [ORNL; Mattus, Catherine H [ORNL; Dole, Leslie Robert [ORNL

    2007-06-01

    The objectives of this limited study were to: (1) review the potential for degradation of cementitious materials due to exposure to high concentrations of phosphate ions; (2) provide an improved understanding of any significant factors that may lead to a requirement to establish exposure limits for concrete structures exposed to soils or ground waters containing high levels of phosphate ions; (3) recommend, as appropriate, whether a limitation on phosphate ion concentration in soils or ground water is required to avoid degradation of concrete structures; and (4) provide a "primer" on factors that can affect the durability of concrete materials and structures in nuclear power plants. An assessment of the potential effects of phosphate ions on cementitious materials was made through a review of the literature, contacts with concrete research personnel, and conduct of a "bench-scale" laboratory investigation. Results of these activities indicate that: no harmful interactions occur between phosphates and cementitious materials unless phosphates are present in the form of phosphoric acid; phosphates have been incorporated into concrete as set retarders, and phosphate cements have been used for infrastructure repair; no standards or guidelines exist pertaining to applications of reinforced concrete structures in high-phosphate environments; interactions of phosphate ions and cementitious materials has not been a concern of the research community; and laboratory results indicate similar performance of specimens cured in phosphate solutions and those cured in a calcium hydroxide solution after exposure periods of up to eighteen months. Relative to the "primer," a separate NUREG report has been prepared that provides a review of pertinent factors that can affect the durability of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures.

  16. Phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, a potentiator of neuropathy, alters the interaction of organophosphorus compounds with soluble brain esterases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangas, Iris; Vilanova, Eugenio; Estévez, Jorge

    2012-11-19

    Phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) is a protease and esterase inhibitor that causes protection or potentiation/promotion of organophosphorus delayed neuropathy (OPIDN) depending on whether it is dosed before or after an inducer of delayed neuropathy. The molecular target of promotion has not yet been identified. Kinetic data of esterase inhibition were first obtained for PMSF with a soluble chicken brain fraction and then analyzed using a kinetic model with a multienzymatic system in which inhibition occurred with the simultaneous chemical hydrolysis of the inhibitor and ongoing inhibition (inhibition during the substrate reaction). The best fitting model was a model with resistant fraction, Eα (28%), and two sensitive enzymatic entities, Eβ (61%) and Eγ (11%), with I(50) at 20 min of 70 and 447 μM, respectively. The estimated constant of the chemical hydrolysis of PMSF was kh = 0.23 min(-1). Eα, which is sensitive to mipafox and resistant to PMSF, became less sensitive to mipafox when the preparation was preincubated with PMSF. Its Eα I(50) (30 min) of mipafox increased with the PMSF concentration used to preincubate it. Eγ is sensitive to both PMSF and mipafox, and after preincubation with PMSF, Eγ became less sensitive to mipafox and was totally resistant after preincubation with 10 μM PMSF or more. The sensitivity of Eα to paraoxon (I(50) 30 min from 9 to 11 nM) diminished after PMSF preincubation (I(50) 30 min 185 nM) and showed no spontaneous reactivation capacity. The nature of these interactions is unknown but might be due to covalent binding at sites other than the substrate catalytic center. Such interactions should be considered to interpret the potentiation/promotion phenomenon of PMSF and to understand the effects of multiple exposures to chemicals.

  17. Evaluation of drug interaction potential of Labisia pumila (Kacip Fatimah and its constituents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vamshikrishna eManda

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Labisia pumila (Kacip Fatimah is a popular herb in Malaysia that has been traditionally used in a number of women’s health applications such as to improve libido, relieve postmenopausal symptoms, and to facilitate or hasten delivery in childbirth. In addition, the constituents of this plant have been reported to possess anticancer, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties. Clinical studies have indicated that cytochrome P450s (CYPs, P-glycoprotein (P-gp, and Pregnane X receptor (PXR are the three main modulators of drug-drug interactions which alter the absorption, distribution, and metabolism of drugs. Given the widespread use of Kacip Fatimah in dietary supplements, the current study focuses on determining the potential of its constituents to affect the activities of CYPs, P-gp, or PXR using in vitro assays which may provide useful information towards the risk of herb-drug interaction with concomitantly used drugs. Six compounds isolated from the roots of Labisia pumila (2 saponins and 4 alkyl phenols were tested, in addition to the methanolic extract. The extract of Labisia pumila showed a significant time dependent inhibition (TDI of CYP3A4, reversible inhibition of CYP2C9 and 2C19 and a weak inhibition of 1A2 and 2D6 as well as an inhibition of P-gp and rifampicin-induced PXR activation. The alkyl phenols inhibited CYP3A4 (TDI, CYP2C9 and 2C19 (reversible while saponins inhibited P-gp and PXR. In conclusion, Labisia pumila and its constituents showed significant modulation of all three regulatory proteins (CYPs, P-gp and PXR suggesting a potential to alter the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of conventional drugs if used concomitantly.

  18. Evaluation of drug interaction potential of Labisia pumila (Kacip Fatimah) and its constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manda, Vamshi K; Dale, Olivia R; Awortwe, Charles; Ali, Zulfiqar; Khan, Ikhlas A; Walker, Larry A; Khan, Shabana I

    2014-01-01

    Labisia pumila (Kacip Fatimah) is a popular herb in Malaysia that has been traditionally used in a number of women's health applications such as to improve libido, relieve postmenopausal symptoms, and to facilitate or hasten delivery in childbirth. In addition, the constituents of this plant have been reported to possess anticancer, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties. Clinical studies have indicated that cytochrome P450s (CYPs), P-glycoprotein (P-gp), and Pregnane X receptor (PXR) are the three main modulators of drug-drug interactions which alter the absorption, distribution, and metabolism of drugs. Given the widespread use of Kacip Fatimah in dietary supplements, the current study focuses on determining the potential of its constituents to affect the activities of CYPs, P-gp, or PXR using in vitro assays which may provide useful information toward the risk of herb-drug interaction with concomitantly used drugs. Six compounds isolated from the roots of L. pumila (2 saponins and 4 alkyl phenols) were tested, in addition to the methanolic extract. The extract of L. pumila showed a significant time dependent inhibition (TDI) of CYP3A4, reversible inhibition of CYP2C9 and 2C19 and a weak inhibition of 1A2 and 2D6 as well as an inhibition of P-gp and rifampicin-induced PXR activation. The alkyl phenols inhibited CYP3A4 (TDI), CYP2C9, and 2C19 (reversible) while saponins inhibited P-gp and PXR. In conclusion, L. pumila and its constituents showed significant modulation of all three regulatory proteins (CYPs, P-gp, and PXR) suggesting a potential to alter the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of conventional drugs if used concomitantly.

  19. Combining genomic sequencing methods to explore viral diversity and reveal potential virus-host interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl-Emiliane Tien Chow

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Viral diversity and virus-host interactions in oxygen-starved regions of the ocean, also known as oxygen minimum zones (OMZs, remain relatively unexplored. Microbial community metabolism in OMZs alters nutrient and energy flow through marine food webs, resulting in biological nitrogen loss and greenhouse gas production. Thus, viruses infecting OMZ microbes have the potential to modulate community metabolism with resulting feedback on ecosystem function. Here, we describe viral communities inhabiting oxic surface (10m and oxygen-starved basin (200m waters of Saanich Inlet, a seasonally anoxic fjord on the coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia using viral metagenomics and complete viral fosmid sequencing on samples collected between April 2007 and April 2010. Of 6459 open reading frames (ORFs predicted across all 34 viral fosmids, 77.6% (n=5010 had no homology to reference viral genomes. These fosmids recruited a higher proportion of viral metagenomic sequences from Saanich Inlet than from nearby northeastern subarctic Pacific Ocean (Line P waters, indicating differences in the viral communities between coastal and open ocean locations. While functional annotations of fosmid ORFs were limited, recruitment to NCBI’s non-redundant ‘nr’ database and publicly available single-cell genomes identified putative viruses infecting marine thaumarchaeal and SUP05 proteobacteria to provide potential host linkages with relevance to coupled biogeochemical cycling processes in OMZ waters. Taken together, these results highlight the power of coupled analyses of multiple sequence data types, such as viral metagenomic and fosmid sequence data with prokaryotic single cell genomes, to chart viral diversity, elucidate genomic and ecological contexts for previously unclassifiable viral sequences, and identify novel host interactions in natural and engineered ecosystems.

  20. Therapeutic potential of mitotic interaction between the nucleoporin Tpr and aurora kinase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Akiko; Hashizume, Chieko; Dowaki, Takayuki; Wong, Richard W

    2015-01-01

    Spindle poles are defined by centrosomes; therefore, an abnormal number or defective structural organization of centrosomes can lead to loss of spindle bipolarity and genetic integrity. Previously, we showed that Tpr (translocated promoter region), a component of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), interacts with Mad1 and dynein to promote proper chromosome segregation during mitosis. Tpr also associates with p53 to induce autophagy. Here, we report that Tpr depletion induces mitotic catastrophe and enhances the rate of tetraploidy and polyploidy. Mechanistically, Tpr interacts, via its central domain, with Aurora A but not Aurora B kinase. In Tpr-depleted cells, the expression levels, centrosomal localization and phosphorylation of Aurora A were all reduced. Surprisingly, an Aurora A inhibitor, Alisertib (MLN8237), also disrupted centrosomal localization of Tpr and induced mitotic catastrophe and cell death in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Strikingly, over-expression of Aurora A disrupted Tpr centrosomal localization only in cells with supernumerary centrosomes but not in bipolar cells. Our results highlight the mutual regulation between Tpr and Aurora A and further confirm the importance of nucleoporin function in spindle pole organization, bipolar spindle assembly, and mitosis; functions that are beyond the conventional nucleocytoplasmic transport and NPC structural roles of nucleoporins. Furthermore, the central coiled-coil domain of Tpr binds to and sequesters extra Aurora A to safeguard bipolarity. This Tpr domain merits further investigation for its ability to inhibit Aurora kinase and as a potential therapeutic agent in cancer treatment.

  1. Computerized interactive morphometry as a potentially useful tool for the classification of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchevsky, A; Gil, J; Silage, D

    1986-04-15

    The use of a simple form of Computerized Interactive Morphometry (CIM) is proposed as a tool to achieve a reproducible classification of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. This system combines a random sampling method for cells with simple size measurements and additional subjective criteria such as a shape, mitotic counts, and follicular or diffuse features. In this system, which utilizes a high resolution touch screen as interactive peripheral, the video image of the specimen is superimposed to a computer generated reference system which consists of a test area and four fixed points for random sampling of cells and a series of concentric circles to serve as internal standard for nuclear size; the computer tabulates and facilitates data processing. Forty-four lymphoid lesions have been characterized with the CIM system and specific criteria for diagnoses according to the Working Formulation of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas for clinical usage are derived. Studies of inter- and intraobserver variations in data collection are discussed, and a diagnostic algorithm that categorizes non-Hodgkin's lymphomas according to the relative proportions of various lymphoid cells and densities of mitotic counts is proposed. The potential applications of touch screen-based CIM for the study of malignant lymphomas and its practical technical advantages over other quantitative systems based on either gray-level analysis or tracings of cell contours on photographs or digitizer pads are emphasized.

  2. The interactive potential of post-modern film narrative - Frequency, Order and Simultaneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Sena Caires

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available A considerable number of contemporary films are now using narrative models that allow several adaptations on digital and interactive operating systems. This trend is seen in films such as Memento by Christopher Nolan (2000, Irréversible by Gaspar Noé (2002 and Smoking / No Smoking by Alain Resnais (1993, concerning the chronological organization of their narrative parts – here it is a question of order. Or in films such as Elephant by Gus Van Sant (2003, Groundhog Day by Harold Ramis, 1993 and Rashômon by Akira Kurosawa (1950, for the diegetic repetition – a question of frequency. Or even, in films such as Magnolia by Paul Thomas Anderson (1999 and Short Cuts by Robert Altman, 1993 which use the idea of expansion or compression of the narrative – a question of simultaneity. To change the accessibility of the cinematographic experience and to constantly re-evaluate the way in which the narrative tool is used, is from now on considered the interactive potential of the contemporary film narrative.

  3. Inverse Effectiveness and Multisensory Interactions in Visual Event-Related Potentials with Audiovisual Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushmakin, Maxim; Kim, Sunah; Wallace, Mark T.; Puce, Aina; James, Thomas W.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, it has become evident that neural responses previously considered to be unisensory can be modulated by sensory input from other modalities. In this regard, visual neural activity elicited to viewing a face is strongly influenced by concurrent incoming auditory information, particularly speech. Here, we applied an additive-factors paradigm aimed at quantifying the impact that auditory speech has on visual event-related potentials (ERPs) elicited to visual speech. These multisensory interactions were measured across parametrically varied stimulus salience, quantified in terms of signal to noise, to provide novel insights into the neural mechanisms of audiovisual speech perception. First, we measured a monotonic increase of the amplitude of the visual P1-N1-P2 ERP complex during a spoken-word recognition task with increases in stimulus salience. ERP component amplitudes varied directly with stimulus salience for visual, audiovisual, and summed unisensory recordings. Second, we measured changes in multisensory gain across salience levels. During audiovisual speech, the P1 and P1-N1 components exhibited less multisensory gain relative to the summed unisensory components with reduced salience, while N1-P2 amplitude exhibited greater multisensory gain as salience was reduced, consistent with the principle of inverse effectiveness. The amplitude interactions were correlated with behavioral measures of multisensory gain across salience levels as measured by response times, suggesting that change in multisensory gain associated with unisensory salience modulations reflects an increased efficiency of visual speech processing. PMID:22367585

  4. Interaction potential for water dimer from symmetry-adapted perturbation theory based on density functional description of monomers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bukowski, R.; Szalewicz, K.; Groenenboom, G.C.; Avoird, A. van der

    2006-01-01

    A new six-dimensional interaction potential for the water dimer has been obtained by fitting interaction energies computed at 2510 geometries using a variant of symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) based on density functional theory (DFT) description of monomers, referred to as SAPT(DFT). The

  5. Prevalence of potential drug-drug interactions among internal medicine ward in University of Gondar Teaching Hospital, Ethiopia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akshaya Srikanth Bhagavathula; Alemayehu Berhanie; Habtamu Tigistu; Yishak Abraham; Yosheph Getachew; Tahir Mehmood Khan; Chandrashekhar Unakal

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence, clinical significance and the associated risk factors of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) at internal medicine ward of University of Gondar (UOG) hospital.Method:medicine ward of UOG hospital from April 29, 2013 to June 2, 2013. Data was collected from medical records and by interviewing the patients face to face. Descriptive analysis was conducted for back ground characteristics and logistic regression was used to determine the associated risk factors.Result:A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted on patients treated in internal interacting combinations with 4.13 potential DDIs per patient. Among 413 potential DDIs most were of moderate interactions 61.2% (n=253) followed by 26% (n=107) of minor interactions and 12.8% (n=53) of major interactions. There was significant association of occurrence of potential DDIs only with taking three or more medications.Conclusion:We have recorded a high rate of prevalence of potential DDI in the internal In our study, we have identified a total number of 413 potential DDIs and 184 types of medicine ward of UOG hospital and a high number of clinically significant DDIs which the most prevalent DDI were of moderate severity. Careful selection of drugs and active pharmaceutical care is encouraged in order to avoid negative consequences of these interactions.

  6. Ca-Dependent Folding of Human Calumenin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzorana, Marco; Hussain, Rohanah; Sorensen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Human calumenin (hCALU) is a six EF-hand protein belonging to the CREC family. As other members of the family, it is localized in the secretory pathway and regulates the activity of SERCA2a and of the ryanodine receptor in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We have studied the effects of Ca2+ binding to the protein and found it to attain a more compact structure upon ion binding. Circular Dichroism (CD) measurements suggest a major rearrangement of the protein secondary structure, which reversibly switches from disordered at low Ca2+ concentrations to predominantly alpha-helical when Ca2+ is added. SAXS experiments confirm the transition from an unfolded to a compact structure, which matches the structural prediction of a trilobal fold. Overall our experiments suggest that calumenin is a Ca2+ sensor, which folds into a compact structure, capable of interacting with its molecular partners, when Ca2+ concentration within the ER reaches the millimolar range. PMID:26991433

  7. Coordinated modular functionality and prognostic potential of a heart failure biomarker-driven interaction network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Daniel R

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of potentially relevant biomarkers and a deeper understanding of molecular mechanisms related to heart failure (HF development can be enhanced by the implementation of biological network-based analyses. To support these efforts, here we report a global network of protein-protein interactions (PPIs relevant to HF, which was characterized through integrative bioinformatic analyses of multiple sources of "omic" information. Results We found that the structural and functional architecture of this PPI network is highly modular. These network modules can be assigned to specialized processes, specific cellular regions and their functional roles tend to partially overlap. Our results suggest that HF biomarkers may be defined as key coordinators of intra- and inter-module communication. Putative biomarkers can, in general, be distinguished as "information traffic" mediators within this network. The top high traffic proteins are encoded by genes that are not highly differentially expressed across HF and non-HF patients. Nevertheless, we present evidence that the integration of expression patterns from high traffic genes may support accurate prediction of HF. We quantitatively demonstrate that intra- and inter-module functional activity may be controlled by a family of transcription factors known to be associated with the prevention of hypertrophy. Conclusion The systems-driven analysis reported here provides the basis for the identification of potentially novel biomarkers and understanding HF-related mechanisms in a more comprehensive and integrated way.

  8. Visuo-tactile interactions in the congenitally deaf: A behavioral and event-related potential study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine eHauthal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Auditory deprivation is known to be accompanied by alterations in visual processing. Yet not much is known about tactile processing and the interplay of the intact sensory modalities in the deaf. We presented visual, tactile, and visuo-tactile stimuli to congenitally deaf and hearing individuals in a speeded detection task. Analyses of multisensory responses showed a redundant signals effect that was attributable to a coactivation mechanism in both groups, although the redundancy gain was less in the deaf. In hearing but not deaf participants, N200 latencies of somatosensory event-related potentials were modulated by simultaneous visual stimulation. In deaf but not hearing participants, however, there was a modulation of N200 latencies of visual event-related potentials due to simultaneous tactile stimulation. A comparison of unisensory responses between groups revealed larger N200 amplitudes for visual and shorter N200 latencies for tactile stimuli in the deaf. P300 amplitudes in response to both stimuli were larger in deaf participants. The differences in visual and tactile processing between deaf and hearing participants, however, were not reflected in behavior. The electroencephalography (EEG results suggest an asymmetry in visuo-tactile interactions between deaf and hearing individuals. Visuo-tactile enhancements could neither be fully explained by perceptual deficiency nor by inverse effectiveness. Instead, we suggest that results might be explained by a shift in the relative importance of touch and vision in deaf individuals.

  9. The role of the ion-molecule and molecule-molecule interactions in the formation of the two-ion average force interaction potential

    CERN Document Server

    Ajrian, E A; Sidorenko, S N

    2002-01-01

    The effect of the ion-molecule and intermolecular interactions on the formation of inter-ion average force potentials is investigated within the framework of a classical ion-dipole model of electrolyte solutions. These potentials are shown to possess the Coulomb asymptotics at large distances while in the region of mean distances they reveal creation and disintegration of solvent-shared ion pairs. The calculation results provide a qualitatively authentic physical picture which is experimentally observed in strong electrolytes solutions. In particular, an increased interaction between an ion and a molecule enhances formation of ion pairs in which the ions are separated by one solvent molecule

  10. Differential equations and folding of $n$-mani-folds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Mousa

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we will describe some topological and geometric characters of $n$-manifold by using the properties of differential equations. The folding and unfolding of $n$-manifold into itself will be deduced from viewpoint of the differential equations.

  11. Analysis of protein folds using protein contact networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pankaj Barah; Somdatta Sinha

    2008-08-01

    Proteins are important biomolecules, which perform diverse structural and functional roles in living systems. Starting from a linear chain of amino acids, proteins fold to different secondary structures, which then fold through short- and long-range interactions to give rise to the final three-dimensional shapes useful to carry out the biophysical and biochemical functions. Proteins are defined as having a common `fold' if they have major secondary structural elements with same topological connections. It is known that folding mechanisms are largely determined by a protein's topology rather than its interatomic interactions. The native state protein structures can, thus, be modelled, using a graph-theoretical approach, as coarse-grained networks of amino acid residues as `nodes' and the inter-residue interactions/contacts as `links'. Using the network representation of protein structures and their 2D contact maps, we have identified the conserved contact patterns (groups of contacts) representing two typical folds – the EF-hand and the ubiquitin-like folds. Our results suggest that this direct and computationally simple methodology can be used to infer about the presence of specific folds from the protein's contact map alone.

  12. A study of potential drug-drug interactions among hospitalized cardiac patients in a teaching hospital in Western Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushmita Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Drug-drug interaction (DDI is of major concern in patients with complex therapeutic regimens. The involvement of cardiovascular medicines in drug interaction is even higher. However, reports of DDI between these groups of drugs are few. The study aims to identify the potential DDI among hospitalized cardiac patients. Furthermore, we assessed the possible risk factors associated with these interactions. Subjects and Methods: The prospective observational study was conducted from May 2012 to August 2012 among hospitalized cardiac patients. Cardiac patients who were taking at least two drugs and who had a hospital stay of at least 24 h were enrolled. The medications of the patients were analyzed for possible interactions using the standard drug interaction database - Micromedex -2 (Thomson Reuters × 2.0. Results: From a total of 150 enrolled patients, at least one interacting drug combination was identified among 32 patients. The incidence of potential DDI was 21.3%. A total of 48 potentially hazardous drug interactions were identified. Atorvastatin/azithromycin (10.4%, enalapril/metformin (10.4%, enalapril/potassium chloride (10.4%, atorvastatin/clarithromycin (8.3% and furosemide/gentamicin (6.3% were the most common interacting pairs. Drugs most commonly involved were atorvastatin, enalapril, digoxin, furosemide, clopidogrel and warfarin. Majority of interactions were of moderate severity (62.5% and pharmacokinetic (58.3% in nature. Increased number of medicines, prolonged hospital stays and comorbid conditions were the risk factors found associated with the potential DDI. Conclusions: This study highlighted the need of intense monitoring of patients who have identified risk factors to help detect and prevent them from serious health hazards associated with drug interactions.

  13. Potential energy curves for the interaction of Ag(5s) and Ag(5p) with noble gas atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Loreau, J; Dalgarno, A

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the interaction of ground and excited states of a silver atom with noble gases (NG), including helium. Born-Oppenheimer potential energy curves are calculated with quantum chemistry methods and spin-orbit effects in the excited states are included by assuming a spin-orbit splitting independent of the internuclear distance. We compare our results with experimentally available spectroscopic data, as well as with previous calculations. Because of strong spin-orbit interactions, excited Ag-NG potential energy curves cannot be fitted to Morse-like potentials. We find that the labeling of the observed vibrational levels has to be shifted by one unit.

  14. NoFold: RNA structure clustering without folding or alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Sarah A; Kim, Junhyong

    2014-11-01

    Structures that recur across multiple different transcripts, called structure motifs, often perform a similar function-for example, recruiting a specific RNA-binding protein that then regulates translation, splicing, or subcellular localization. Identifying common motifs between coregulated transcripts may therefore yield significant insight into their binding partners and mechanism of regulation. However, as most methods for clustering structures are based on folding individual sequences or doing many pairwise alignments, this results in a tradeoff between speed and accuracy that can be problematic for large-scale data sets. Here we describe a novel method for comparing and characterizing RNA secondary structures that does not require folding or pairwise alignment of the input sequences. Our method uses the idea of constructing a distance function between two objects by their respective distances to a collection of empirical examples or models, which in our case consists of 1973 Rfam family covariance models. Using this as a basis for measuring structural similarity, we developed a clustering pipeline called NoFold to automatically identify and annotate structure motifs within large sequence data sets. We demonstrate that NoFold can simultaneously identify multiple structure motifs with an average sensitivity of 0.80 and precision of 0.98 and generally exceeds the performance of existing methods. We also perform a cross-validation analysis of the entire set of Rfam families, achieving an average sensitivity of 0.57. We apply NoFold to identify motifs enriched in dendritically localized transcripts and report 213 enriched motifs, including both known and novel structures.

  15. Hydrodynamic interactions of two nearly touching Brownian spheres in a stiff potential: Effect of fluid inertia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radiom, Milad, E-mail: milad.radiom@unige.ch; Ducker, William, E-mail: wducker@vt.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24060 (United States); Robbins, Brian; Paul, Mark [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24060 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    The hydrodynamic interaction of two closely spaced micron-scale spheres undergoing Brownian motion was measured as a function of their separation. Each sphere was attached to the distal end of a different atomic force microscopy cantilever, placing each sphere in a stiff one-dimensional potential (0.08 Nm{sup −1}) with a high frequency of thermal oscillations (resonance at 4 kHz). As a result, the sphere’s inertial and restoring forces were significant when compared to the force due to viscous drag. We explored interparticle gap regions where there was overlap between the two Stokes layers surrounding each sphere. Our experimental measurements are the first of their kind in this parameter regime. The high frequency of oscillation of the spheres means that an analysis of the fluid dynamics would include the effects of fluid inertia, as described by the unsteady Stokes equation. However, we find that, for interparticle separations less than twice the thickness of the wake of the unsteady viscous boundary layer (the Stokes layer), the hydrodynamic interaction between the Brownian particles is well-approximated by analytical expressions that neglect the inertia of the fluid. This is because elevated frictional forces at narrow gaps dominate fluid inertial effects. The significance is that interparticle collisions and concentrated suspensions at this condition can be modeled without the need to incorporate fluid inertia. We suggest a way to predict when fluid inertial effects can be ignored by including the gap-width dependence into the frequency number. We also show that low frequency number analysis can be used to determine the microrheology of mixtures at interfaces.

  16. Mesoscale Modeling of Chromatin Folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlick, Tamar

    2009-03-01

    Eukaryotic chromatin is the fundamental protein/nucleic acid unit that stores the genetic material. Understanding how chromatin fibers fold and unfold in physiological conditions is important for interpreting fundamental biological processes like DNA replication and transcription regulation. Using a mesoscopic model of oligonucleosome chains and tailored sampling protocols, we elucidate the energetics of oligonucleosome folding/unfolding and the role of each histone tail, linker histones, and divalent ions in regulating chromatin structure. The resulting compact topologies reconcile features of the zigzag model with straight linker DNAs with the solenoid model with bent linker DNAs for optimal fiber organization and reveal dynamic and energetic aspects involved.

  17. Investigating interactional competencies in Parkinson's disease: the potential benefits of a conversation analytic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Sarah; Barnes, Rebecca; Britten, Nicky; Wilkinson, Ray

    2011-01-01

    Around 70% of people who develop Parkinson's disease (PD) experience speech and voice changes. Clinicians often find that when asked about their primary communication concerns, PD clients will talk about the difficulties they have 'getting into' conversations. This is an important area for clients and it has implications for quality of life and clinical management. To review the extant literature on PD and communication impairments in order to reveal key topic areas, the range of methodologies applied, and any gaps in knowledge relating to PD and social interaction and how these might be usefully addressed. A systematic search of a number of key databases and available grey literatures regarding PD and communication impairment was conducted (including motor speech changes, intelligibility, cognitive/language changes) to obtain a sense of key areas and methodologies applied. Research applying conversation analysis in the field of communication disability was also reviewed to illustrate the value of this methodology in uncovering common interactional difficulties, and in revealing the use of strategic collaborative competencies in naturally occurring conversation. In addition, available speech and language therapy assessment and intervention approaches to PD were examined with a view to their effectiveness in promoting individualized intervention planning and advice-giving for everyday interaction. A great deal has been written about the deficits underpinning communication changes in PD and the impact of communication disability on the self and others as measured in a clinical setting. Less is known about what happens for this client group in everyday conversations outside of the clinic. Current speech and language therapy assessments and interventions focus on the individual and are largely impairment based or focused on compensatory speaker-oriented techniques. A conversation analysis approach would complement basic research on what actually happens in everyday

  18. Potential impact of climate-related changes is buffered by differential responses to recruitment and interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Menge, Bruce A.

    2011-08-01

    Detection of ecosystem responsiveness to climatic perturbations can provide insight into climate change consequences. Recent analyses linking phytoplankton abundance and mussel recruitment to the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation (NPGO) revealed a paradox. Despite large increases in mussel recruitment beginning in 2000, adult mussel responses were idiosyncratic by site and intertidal zone, with no response at one long-term site, and increases in the low zone (1.5% per year) and decreases in the mid zone (1.3% per year) at the other. What are the mechanisms underlying these differential changes? Species interactions such as facilitation by barnacles and predation are potential determinants of successful mussel colonization. To evaluate these effects, we analyzed patterns of barnacle recruitment, determined if predation rate covaried with the increase in mussel recruitment, and tested facilitation interactions in a field experiment. Neither magnitude nor season of barnacle recruitment changed meaningfully with site or zone from the 1990s to the 2000s. In contrast to the relationship between NPGO and local-scale mussel recruitment, relationships between local-scale patterns of barnacle recruitment and climate indices were weak. Despite differences in rates of prey recruitment and abundance of sea stars in 1990–1991, 1999–2000, and 2007–2008, predation rates were nearly identical in experiments before, during, and after 1999–2000. The facilitation experiment showed that mussels M. trossulus only became abundant when barnacle recruitment was allowed, when abundance of barnacles reached high abundance of ∼50% cover, and when mussel recruitment was sufficiently high. Thus, in the low zone minimal changes in mussel abundance despite sharply increased recruitment rates are consistent with the hypothesis that change in adult mussel cover was buffered by the relative insensitivity of barnacle recruitment to climatic fluctuations, and a resultant lack of change in

  19. Interspecies interactions and potential Influenza A virus risk in small swine farms in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCune Sarah

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent avian influenza epidemic in Asia and the H1N1 pandemic demonstrated that influenza A viruses pose a threat to global public health. The animal origins of the viruses confirmed the potential for interspecies transmission. Swine are hypothesized to be prime "mixing vessels" due to the dual receptivity of their trachea to human and avian strains. Additionally, avian and human influenza viruses have previously been isolated in swine. Therefore, understanding interspecies contact on smallholder swine farms and its potential role in the transmission of pathogens such as influenza virus is very important. Methods This qualitative study aimed to determine swine-associated interspecies contacts in two coastal areas of Peru. Direct observations were conducted at both small-scale confined and low-investment swine farms (n = 36 and in open areas where swine freely range during the day (n = 4. Interviews were also conducted with key stakeholders in swine farming. Results In both locations, the intermingling of swine and domestic birds was common. An unexpected contact with avian species was that swine were fed poultry mortality in 6/20 of the farms in Chancay. Human-swine contacts were common, with a higher frequency on the confined farms. Mixed farming of swine with chickens or ducks was observed in 36% of all farms. Human-avian interactions were less frequent overall. Use of adequate biosecurity and hygiene practices by farmers was suboptimal at both locations. Conclusions Close human-animal interaction, frequent interspecies contacts and suboptimal biosecurity and hygiene practices pose significant risks of interspecies influenza virus transmission. Farmers in small-scale swine production systems constitute a high-risk population and need to be recognized as key in preventing interspecies pathogen transfer. A two-pronged prevention approach, which offers educational activities for swine farmers about sound hygiene and

  20. Quantification of fold growth of frontal antiforms in the Zagros fold and thrust belt (Kurdistan, NE Iraq)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretis, Bernhard; Bartl, Nikolaus; Graseman, Bernhard; Lockhart, Duncan

    2010-05-01

    The Zagros fold and thrust belt is a seismically active orogen, where actual kinematic models based on GPS networks suggest a north-south shortening between Arabian and Eurasian in the order of 1.5-2.5 cm/yr. Most of this deformation is partitioned in south-southwest oriented folding and thrusting with northwest-southeast to north-south trending dextral strike slip faults. The Zagros fold and thrust belt is of great economic interest because it has been estimated that this area contains about 15% of the global recoverable hydrocarbons. Whereas the SE parts of the Zagros have been investigated by detailed geological studies, the NW extent being part of the Republic of Iraq have experienced considerably less attention. In this study we combine field work and remote sensing techniques in order to investigate the interaction of erosion and fold growth in the area NE of Erbil (Kurdistan, Iraq). In particular we focus on the interaction of the transient development of drainage patterns along growing antiforms, which directly reflects the kinematics of progressive fold growth. Detailed geomorphological studies of the Bana Bawi-, Permam- and Safeen fold trains show that these anticlines have not developed from subcylindrical embryonic folds but they have merged from different fold segments that joined laterally during fold amplification. This fold segments with length between 5 and 25 km have been detected by mapping ancient and modern river courses that initially cut the nose of growing folds and eventually got defeated leaving behind a wind gap. Fold segments, propagating in different directions force rivers to join resulting in steep gorges, which dissect the merging fold noses. Along rapidly lateral growing folds (e.g. at the SE end of the Bana Bawi Anticline) we observed "curved wind gaps", a new type of abandoned river course, where form of the wind gap mimics a formed nose of a growing antiform. The inherited curved segments of uplifted curved river courses strongly

  1. Interplay between interaction and nonidentical coupling for a Bose–Einstein Condensate in a triple-well potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong, Shiguang, E-mail: rong_shiguang@sina.com [Department of Physics, Hunan University of Science & Technology, Xiangtan 411201 (China); Xie, Qiongtao [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Hainan Normal University, Haikou 571158 (China); Hai, Wenhua [Department of Physics, Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China)

    2015-09-18

    Highlights: • The interplay between interaction and nonidentical coupling gives rive to a “two negatives make a positive” effect. • In the weak interaction regime, the beating phenomenon is found. • In the strong interaction region, the collapse and revival sequences can appear instead of the beating sequences. - Abstract: We investigate the effect of interaction and nonidentical coupling on the tunneling dynamics of a Bose–Einstein Condensate trapped in a triple-well potential. In certain parameter regions, we find a “two negatives make a positive” effect. While interaction or nonidentical coupling by itself can suppress the tunneling between the wells, both together enhance the tunneling. In addition, it is shown that under appropriate conditions, the mean-field dynamics displays beating phenomenon in the weak interaction regime. We present a physical explanation for such beating phenomenon. The effect of quantum fluctuation on the beating structure is also discussed numerically.

  2. Approaching climate-adaptive facades with foldings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sack-Nielsen, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    envelopes based on folding principles such as origami. Three major aspects cover the project’s interest in this topic: Shape, kinetics and the application of new multi-functional materials form the interdisciplinary framework of this research. Shape// Initially small paper sketch models demonstrate folding......Buildings are responsible for approximately more than 40% of the worldwide energy consumption . The aim is to bring this amount significantly down. In order to achieve substantially optimized results, new ways of approaching architectural solutions have to be investigated. Recent studies have...... rises then how actually this dynamic problem of changing climatic conditions can be solved. Static solutions are not capable to respond fully satisfying to the task given. The project ‘responsive foldings’ is carried out in a research-by-design methodology to investigate the potentials of building...

  3. Detecting Selection on Protein Stability through Statistical Mechanical Models of Folding and Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugo Bastolla

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The properties of biomolecules depend both on physics and on the evolutionary process that formed them. These two points of view produce a powerful synergism. Physics sets the stage and the constraints that molecular evolution has to obey, and evolutionary theory helps in rationalizing the physical properties of biomolecules, including protein folding thermodynamics. To complete the parallelism, protein thermodynamics is founded on the statistical mechanics in the space of protein structures, and molecular evolution can be viewed as statistical mechanics in the space of protein sequences. In this review, we will integrate both points of view, applying them to detecting selection on the stability of the folded state of proteins. We will start discussing positive design, which strengthens the stability of the folded against the unfolded state of proteins. Positive design justifies why statistical potentials for protein folding can be obtained from the frequencies of structural motifs. Stability against unfolding is easier to achieve for longer proteins. On the contrary, negative design, which consists in destabilizing frequently formed misfolded conformations, is more difficult to achieve for longer proteins. The folding rate can be enhanced by strengthening short-range native interactions, but this requirement contrasts with negative design, and evolution has to trade-off between them. Finally, selection can accelerate functional movements by favoring low frequency normal modes of the dynamics of the native state that strongly correlate with the functional conformation change.

  4. Simulation of folding of a small alpha-helical protein in atomistic detail using worldwide-distributed computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagrovic, Bojan; Snow, Christopher D; Shirts, Michael R; Pande, Vijay S

    2002-11-08

    By employing thousands of PCs and new worldwide-distributed computing techniques, we have simulated in atomistic detail the folding of a fast-folding 36-residue alpha-helical protein from the villin headpiece. The total simulated time exceeds 300 micros, orders of magnitude more than previous simulations of a molecule of this size. Starting from an extended state, we obtained an ensemble of folded structures, which is on average 1.7A and 1.9A away from the native state in C(alpha) distance-based root-mean-square deviation (dRMS) and C(beta) dRMS sense, respectively. The folding mechanism of villin is most consistent with the hydrophobic collapse view of folding: the molecule collapses non-specifically very quickly ( approximately 20ns), which greatly reduces the size of the conformational space that needs to be explored in search of the native state. The conformational search in the collapsed state appears to be rate-limited by the formation of the aromatic core: in a significant fraction of our simulations, the C-terminal phenylalanine residue packs improperly with the rest of the hydrophobic core. We suggest that the breaking of this interaction may be the rate-determining step in the course of folding. On the basis of our simulations we estimate the folding rate of villin to be approximately 5micros. By analyzing the average features of the folded ensemble obtained by simulation, we see that the mean folded structure is more similar to the native fold than any individual folded structure. This finding highlights the need for simulating ensembles of molecules and averaging the results in an experiment-like fashion if meaningful comparison between simulation and experiment is to be attempted. Moreover, our results demonstrate that (1) the computational methodology exists to simulate the multi-microsecond regime using distributed computing and (2) that potential sets used to describe interatomic interactions may be sufficiently accurate to reach the folded state

  5. Water structure near single and multi-layer nanoscopic hydrophobic plates of varying separation and interaction potentials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Malay Rana; Amalendu Chandra

    2008-06-01

    We have performed a series of molecular dynamics simulations of water containing two nanoscopic hydrophobic plates to investigate the modifications of the density and hydrogen bond distributions of water in the vicinity of the surfaces. Our primary goal is to look at the effects of plate thickness, solute–solvent interaction and also interplate separation on the solvent structure in the confined region between two graphite-like plates and also near the outer surfaces of the plates. The thickness of the plates is varied by considering single and triple-layer graphite plates and the interaction potential is varied by tuning the attractive strength of the 12–6 pair interaction potential between a carbon atom of the graphite plates and a water molecule. The calculations are done for four different values of the tuning parameter ranging from fully Lennard–Jones to pure repulsive pair interactions. It is found that both the solvation characteristics and hydrogen bond distributions can depend rather strongly on the strength of the attractive part of the solute–water interaction potential. The thickness of the plates, however, is found to have only minor effects on the density profiles and hydrogen bond network. This indicates that the long range electrostatic interactions between water molecules on the two opposite sides of the same plate do not make any significant contribution to the overall solvation structure of these hydrophobic plates. The solvation characteristics are primarily determined by the balance between the loss of energy due to hydrogen bond network disruption, cavity repulsion potential and offset of the same by attractive component of the solute–water interactions. Our studies with different system sizes show that the essential features of solvation properties, e.g. wetting and dewetting characteristics for different interplate separations and interaction potentials, are also present in relatively smaller systems consisting of a few hundred

  6. Bodies Folded in Migrant Crypts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galis, Vasilis; Tzokas, Spyros; Tympas, Aristotle

    2016-01-01

    and human migrants generates a dis/abled subject. In this context, dis/ability may be a cause or consequence of migration, both in physical/material (the folding of bodies in the crypt) and cultural/semiotic terms, and may become a barrier to accessing protection, to entering and/or crossing a country...

  7. Gothic Elements in Folding Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua Yan

    2016-01-01

    The study claims that Folding Beijing can not only be read as science fiction but also as Gothic literature,in which perspective,Gothic Elements such as Gothic Setting, Gothic Wanderer and Transgressions,and Gothic Terror are discussed respectively.

  8. Mechanisms of radiation interaction with DNA: Potential implications for radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) of the US Department of Energy conducts a broad multidisciplinary research program which includes basic biophysics, biophysical chemistry, molecular and cellular biology as well as experimental animal studies and opportunistic human studies. This research is directed at understanding how low levels of radiation of various qualities produce the spectrum of biological effects that are seen for such exposures. This workshop was entitled ''Mechanisms of Radiation Interaction with DNA: Potential Implications for Radiation Protection.'' It ws jointly sponsored by the Department of Energy and the Commission of European Communities. The aim of the workshop was to review the base of knowledge in the area of mechanisms of radiation action at the DNA level, and to explore ways in which this information can be applied to the development of scientifically sound concepts and procedures for use in the field of radiation protection. The overview of research provided by this multidisciplinary group will be helpful to the Office in program planning. This report includes a summary of the presentations, extended abstracts, the meeting agenda, research recommendations, and a list of participants. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base.

  9. In vitro interactions of extracellular histones with LDL suggest a potential pro-atherogenic role.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan D Pemberton

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nuclear histones have previously been shown to aggregate LDL in vitro, suggestive of a possible pro-atherogenic role. Recent studies indicate that histones are released during acute inflammation, and therefore might interact with circulating lipoproteins in vivo. In view of the associative link between inflammation and cardiovascular disease, the behaviour of histones was investigated using in vitro models of LDL retention and foam cell formation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Heparin agarose beads were used as a model of a matrix rich in sulphated glycosaminoglycans, to which histones bind strongly. Histone-modified beads were observed to pull down more LDL from solution than untreated beads, indicating that histones can function as bridging molecules, enhancing LDL retention. Furthermore, addition of heparin inhibited histone-induced aggregation of LDL. To model foam cell formation, murine RAW 264.7 macrophages were incubated for 24 h in the presence of LDL, histones, LDL plus histones or vehicle control. Cells incubated with LDL in the presence of histones accumulated significantly more intracellular lipid than with LDL or histone alone. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results are consistent with a potential pro-atherogenic role for extracellular histones, which should be investigated further.

  10. Invaders eating invaders: potential trophic interactions between the amphipod Dikerogammarus villosus and juvenile crayfish Orconectes limosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Buřič

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated potential interspecific predation between two invasive crustacean species, currently widespread and co-occurring in European inland waters: the Ponto-Caspian amphipod Dikerogammarus villosus (Gammaridae and the North American spiny-cheek crayfish Orconectes limosus (Cambaridae. We evaluated interactions of adult specimens of D. villosus and juvenile O. limosus (from the 3rd developmental stage – DS under conditions with and without feeding. We used two different experimental setups: short-term (one-week rearing in aquaria each containing 30 specimens of either single-species or mixed stock, and 20-daylong rearing in small circular plates with one individual of each species. In the aquaria, a significant effect of D. villosus presence on survival of O. limosus stocks was found, with stronger influence on unfed stocks. Survival of D. villosus was not influenced by either O. limosus presence or feeding. Direct predation of D. villosus on juvenile O. limosus, predominantly on the 3rd DS, was often observed in the small plates. The 5th DS O. limosus was killed only a few times and was already able to feed on adult D. villosus. Our results show that both species are able to affect each other negatively through intra-guild predation: D. villosus may successfully feed on juvenile O. limosus (3rd and 4th DS, but larger crayfish can resist predation by the amphipod.

  11. Cadmium promotes breast cancer cell proliferation by potentiating the interaction between ERalpha and c-Jun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewit, Christina L; Gengler, Bridget; Vegas, Esera; Puckett, Rachel; Louie, Maggie C

    2010-05-01

    Cadmium is an environmental contaminant that enters the body through diet or cigarette smoke. It affects multiple cellular processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Recently, cadmium has been shown to function as an endocrine disruptor, to stimulate estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) activity and promote uterine and mammary gland growth in mice. Although cadmium exposure has been associated with the development of breast cancer, the mechanism of action of cadmium remains unclear. To address this deficit, we examined the effects of cadmium treatment on breast cancer cells. We found that ERalpha is required for both cadmium-induced cell growth and modulation of gene expression. We also determined that ERalpha translocates to the nucleus in response to cadmium exposure. Additionally, we provide evidence that cadmium potentiates the interaction between ERalpha and c-Jun and enhances recruitment of this transcription factor complex to the proximal promoters of cyclin D1 and c-myc, thus increasing their expression. This study provides a mechanistic link between cadmium exposure and ERalpha and demonstrates that cadmium plays an important role in the promotion of breast cancer.

  12. Interaction among hERG channel blockers is a potential mechanism of death in caffeine overdose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jifeng; Zhao, Wei; Xu, Kai; Chen, Qingmao; Chen, Yingying; Shen, Yueliang; Xiao, Liping; Jiang, Liqin; Chen, Yuan

    2017-04-05

    Caffeine overdose death is due to cardiac arrest, but its mechanism has not been explored in detail. In this study, our data showed that caffeine significantly prolonged the heart rate-corrected QT interval (QTc) of rabbits in vivo (PCaffeine was also found to be a hERG channel blocker with an IC50 of 5.04mM (n=5). Although these two findings likely link caffeine overdose death with hERG channel blockade, the amount of caffeine consumption needed to reach the IC50 is very high. Further study demonstrated that addition another hERG blocker could lower the consumption of caffeine significantly, no matter whether two hERG blockers share the same binding sites. Our data does not rule out other possibility, however, it suggests that there is a potential causal relationship between caffeine overdose death with hERG channel and the interaction among these hERG blockers. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Vortices in a rotating two-component Bose–Einstein condensate with tunable interactions and harmonic potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiao-Fei, E-mail: xfzhang@ntsc.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Time and Frequency Primary Standards, National Time Service Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an 710600 (China); Du, Zhi-Jing [Key Laboratory of Time and Frequency Primary Standards, National Time Service Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an 710600 (China); Tan, Ren-Bing [Department of Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Chongqing University of Science and Technology, Chongqing 401331 (China); Dong, Rui-Fang; Chang, Hong; Zhang, Shou-Gang [Key Laboratory of Time and Frequency Primary Standards, National Time Service Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an 710600 (China)

    2014-07-15

    We consider a pair of coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations modeling a rotating two-component Bose–Einstein condensate with tunable interactions and harmonic potential, with emphasis on the structure of vortex states by varying the strength of inter-component interaction, rotational frequency, and the aspect ratio of the harmonic potential. Our results show that the inter-component interaction greatly enhances the effect of rotation. For the case of isotropic harmonic potential and small inter-component interaction, the initial vortex structure remains unchanged. As the ratio of inter- to intra-component interactions increases, each component undergoes a transition from a vortex lattice (vortex line) in an isotropic (anisotropic) harmonic potential to an alternatively arranged stripe pattern, and eventually to the interwoven “serpentine” vortex sheets. Moreover, in the case of anisotropic harmonic potential the system can develop to a rotating droplet structure. -- Highlights: •Different vortex structures are obtained within the full parameter space. •Effects of system parameters on the ground state structure are discussed. •Phase transition between different vortex structures is also examined. •Present one possible way to obtain the rotating droplet structure. •Provide many possibilities to manipulate vortex in two-component BEC.

  14. Identifying potential survival strategies of HIV-1 through virus-host protein interaction networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, David; Ertaylan, Gokhan; Boucher, Charles Ab; Sloot, Peter Ma

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has launched the HIV-1 Human Protein Interaction Database in an effort to catalogue all published interactions between HIV-1 and human proteins. In order to systematically investigate these interactions functionally and dynamicall

  15. Interactions of biotic and abiotic environmental factors in an ectomycorrhizal symbiosis, and the potential for selection mosaics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoeksema Jason D

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geographic selection mosaics, in which species exert different evolutionary impacts on each other in different environments, may drive diversification in coevolving species. We studied the potential for geographic selection mosaics in plant-mycorrhizal interactions by testing whether the interaction between bishop pine (Pinus muricata D. Don and one of its common ectomycorrhizal fungi (Rhizopogon occidentalis Zeller and Dodge varies in outcome, when different combinations of plant and fungal genotypes are tested under a range of different abiotic and biotic conditions. Results We used a 2 × 2 × 2 × 2 factorial experiment to test the main and interactive effects of plant lineage (two maternal seed families, fungal lineage (two spore collections, soil type (lab mix or field soil, and non-mycorrhizal microbes (with or without on the performance of plants and fungi. Ecological outcomes, as assessed by plant and fungal performance, varied widely across experimental environments, including interactions between plant or fungal lineages and soil environmental factors. Conclusion These results show the potential for selection mosaics in plant-mycorrhizal interactions, and indicate that these interactions are likely to coevolve in different ways in different environments, even when initially the genotypes of the interacting species are the same across all environments. Hence, selection mosaics may be equally as effective as genetic differences among populations in driving divergent coevolution among populations of interacting species.

  16. Protein Folding:. Physics on Products of Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Nobuhiro

    2001-09-01

    Proteins are self-assembling molecular systems. A polypeptide chain of a protein molecule folds into a globular three-dimensional structure, which is specific to the amino acid sequence of the chain. A protein molecule is in the "native state" when folded into its specific three-dimensional structure. Only in the native state, a protein molecule carries out its biological function. This extraordinary self-assembly ability of proteins can be explained based on the three generally accepted empirical observations in proteins: (1) Two-state character; Folding and unfolding transitions in small globular proteins are generally of the two-state character. (2) Consistency principle; Various components of intra-molecular interactions responsible for stabilizing the native state of globular proteins are consistent to each other in their native state. (3) Principle of marginal stability; The native folded states of globular proteins are generally only marginally stable against their unfolded states. Deduction of the self-assembly ability from the three observations is a problem of physical nature. Very sophisticated theories have been developed recently as to this point. I shall give a very simple and intuitive discussion on this point. Asking why protein molecules show the three observations is another problem. Observation (1) can be derived from the globularity of native states. Observations (2) and (3) can be understood only by considering the evolutionary history of protein molecules, i.e., only polypeptide chains with very specific amino acid sequences selected during the history of evolution show properties of observations (2) and (3). Here we see a case where the mechanism of an extraordinary ability of biopolymers is elucidated in terms of physics, and physics expects that only a very small fraction of amino acid sequences have such an ability. Nature has left the job of finding able sequences to the history of evolution.

  17. Effective potentials for charge-helium and charge-singly-ionized helium interactions in a dense plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramazanov, T.S.; Amirov, S.M.; Moldabekov, Zh.A. [Institute for Experimental and Theoretical Physics, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2016-06-15

    The effective electron (proton)-He and electron (proton)-He{sup +} screened pair interaction potentials arising as a result of partial screening of the helium nucleus field by bound electrons, taking into account both screening by free charged particles and quantum diffraction effect in dense plasmas were derived. The impact of quantum effects on screening was analyzed. It was shown that plasma polarization around the atom leads to the additional repulsion (attraction) between the electron (proton) and the helium atom. The method of constructing the full electron (proton)-He and electron (proton)-He{sup +} screened pair interaction potentials as the sum of the derived potentials with the polarization potential and exchange potential is discussed. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Synthesis and bioactive evaluations of novel benzotriazole compounds as potential antimicrobial agents and the interaction with calf thymus DNA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yu Ren; Hui Zhen Zhang; Shao Lin Zhang; Yun Lei Luo; Ling Zhang; Cheng He Zhou; Rong Xia Geng

    2015-12-01

    A novel series of benzotriazole derivatives were synthesized and characterized by NMR, IR and MS spectra. The bioactive assay manifested that most of the new compounds exhibited moderate to good antibacterial and antifungal activities against the tested strains in comparison to reference drugs chloromycin, norfloxacin and fluconazole. Especially, 2,4-dichlorophenyl substituted benzotriazole derivative 6f displayed good antibacterial activity against MRSA with MIC value of 4 g/mL, which was 2-fold more potent than Chloromycin, and it also displayed 3-fold stronger antifungal activity (MIC = 4 g/mL) than fluconazole (MIC = 16 g/mL) against Beer yeast. The preliminary interactive investigations of compound 6f with calf thymus DNA revealed that compound 6f could effectively intercalate into DNA to form compound 6f–DNA complex which might block DNA replication to exert antimicrobial activities. Molecular docking experiments suggested that compound 6f projected into base-pairs of DNA hexamer duplex forming two hydrogen bonds with guanine of DNA. The theoretical calculations were in accordance with the experimental results.

  19. The study of synchronization in the periodic nonuniform folded waveguide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Ao; Wang Wen-Xiang; Wei Yan-Yu; Gong Yu-Bin

    2009-01-01

    The periodic nonuniform folded waveguides are special structures, the physical dimension of which is between the periodic folded waveguide and the tapering period folded waveguide. Therefore, the synchronization between the microwave and the electron beam can be maintained in the whole interaction process and the periods are not tapered.In comparison with the tapering period folded waveguide, the theoretical analysis and the technological requirements for this structure are more convenient. In order to study this structure, the space harmonics are analysed, the conditions to make the m-th space harmonic synchronizing with the electron beam in the whole interaction process are present,and the dispersion curve and the coupling impedance curve axe obtained by the simulation software HFSS.

  20. MONITORING POTENTIAL DRUG INTERACTIONS AND REACTIONS VIA NETWORK ANALYSIS OF INSTAGRAM USER TIMELINES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Rion Brattig; Li, Lang; Rocha, Luis M

    2016-01-01

    Much recent research aims to identify evidence for Drug-Drug Interactions (DDI) and Adverse Drug reactions (ADR) from the biomedical scientific literature. In addition to this "Bibliome", the universe of social media provides a very promising source of large-scale data that can help identify DDI and ADR in ways that have not been hitherto possible. Given the large number of users, analysis of social media data may be useful to identify under-reported, population-level pathology associated with DDI, thus further contributing to improvements in population health. Moreover, tapping into this data allows us to infer drug interactions with natural products-including cannabis-which constitute an array of DDI very poorly explored by biomedical research thus far. Our goal is to determine the potential of Instagram for public health monitoring and surveillance for DDI, ADR, and behavioral pathology at large. Most social media analysis focuses on Twitter and Facebook, but Instagram is an increasingly important platform, especially among teens, with unrestricted access of public posts, high availability of posts with geolocation coordinates, and images to supplement textual analysis. Using drug, symptom, and natural product dictionaries for identification of the various types of DDI and ADR evidence, we have collected close to 7000 user timelines spanning from October 2010 to June 2015.We report on 1) the development of a monitoring tool to easily observe user-level timelines associated with drug and symptom terms of interest, and 2) population-level behavior via the analysis of co-occurrence networks computed from user timelines at three different scales: monthly, weekly, and daily occurrences. Analysis of these networks further reveals 3) drug and symptom direct and indirect associations with greater support in user timelines, as well as 4) clusters of symptoms and drugs revealed by the collective behavior of the observed population. This demonstrates that Instagram

  1. Deuteron - $\\alpha$ interaction by inversion of RGM S-matrix determination of spin-orbit potential for spin-1 projectile

    CERN Document Server

    MacIntosh, R S

    1997-01-01

    The iterative-perturbative (IP) procedure for S-matrix to potential inversion is applied to spin-one projectiles for the restricted case of vector spin-orbit interaction only. In order to evaluate this extension of IP inversion we have inverted the multi-channel RGM $S_{lj}$ of Kanada et al for deuterons scattering from $^4$He with deuteron distortion and then compared the central components with those derived from RGM with spin set to zero. Attention is given to the question of how well the resulting potentials are established. Reliable spin-1 inversion is demonstrated. Results relating to inversion, to deuteron-nucleus interactions and to RGM are presented and suggest the range of nuclear interaction information which the procedure makes possible. Unusual non-locality and parity dependence effects are found; these are of possible relevance to generic properties of nuclear potentials.

  2. Interacting He and Ar atoms: Revised theoretical interaction potential, dipole moment, and collision-induced absorption spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Wilfried; Frommhold, Lothar

    2015-09-21

    Coupled cluster quantum chemical calculations of the potential energy surface and the induced dipole surface are reported for the He-Ar van der Waals collisional complex. Spectroscopic parameters are derived from global analytical fits while an accurate value for the long-range dipole coefficient D7 is obtained by perturbation methods. Collision-induced absorption spectra are computed quantum mechanically and compared with existing measurements.

  3. Revealing hidden text in rolled and folded papyri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Daniel; Lindow, Norbert; Hege, Hans-Christian; Lepper, Verena; Siopi, Tzulia; Kutz, Frank; Mahlow, Kristin; Mahnke, Heinz-Eberhard

    2017-03-01

    Ancient Egyptian papyri are often folded, rolled up or kept as small packages, sometimes even sealed. Physically unrolling or unfolding these packages might severely damage them. We demonstrate a way to get access to the hidden script without physical unfolding by employing computed tomography and mathematical algorithms for virtual unrolling and unfolding. Our algorithmic approaches are combined with manual interaction. This provides the necessary flexibility to enable the unfolding of even complicated and partly damaged papyrus packages. In addition, it allows us to cope with challenges posed by the structure of ancient papyrus, which is rather irregular, compared to other writing substrates like metallic foils or parchment. Unfolding of packages is done in two stages. In the first stage, we virtually invert the physical folding process step by step until the partially unfolded package is topologically equivalent to a scroll or a papyrus sheet folded only along one fold line. To minimize distortions at this stage, we apply the method of moving least squares. In the second stage, the papyrus is flattened, which requires the definition of a medial surface. We have applied our software framework to several papyri. In this work, we present the results of applying our approaches to mockup papyri that were either rolled or folded along perpendicular fold lines. In the case of the folded papyrus, our approach represents the first attempt to address the unfolding of such complicated folds.

  4. The two dimensional fold test in paleomagnetism using ipython notebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiabudidaya, Dedi; Piper, John D. A.

    2016-01-01

    One aspect of paleomagnetic analysis prone to controversy is the result of the fold test used to evaluate the age of a magnetisation component relative to the age of a structural event. Initially, the fold test was conducted by comparing the Fisherian precision parameter (k) to results from different limbs of a fold structure before and after tilt adjustment. To accommodate synfolding magnetisation, the tilt correction can be performed in stepwise fashion to both limbs simultaneously, here called one dimensional (1D) fold test. The two dimensional (2D) fold test described in this paper is carried out by applying stepwise tilt adjustment to each limb of the fold separately. The rationale for this is that tilts observed on contrasting limbs of deformed structure may not be synchronous or even belong to the same episode of deformation. A program for the procedure is presented here which generates two dimensional values of the k-parameter visually presented in contoured form. The use of ipython notebook enables this 2D fold test to be performed interactively and yield a more precise evaluation than the primitive 1D fold test.

  5. Factorial experimental design for the culture of human embryonic stem cells as aggregates in stirred suspension bioreactors reveals the potential for interaction effects between bioprocess parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Megan M; Meng, Guoliang; Rancourt, Derrick E; Gates, Ian D; Kallos, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    Traditional optimization of culture parameters for the large-scale culture of human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) as aggregates is carried out in a stepwise manner whereby the effect of varying each culture parameter is investigated individually. However, as evidenced by the wide range of published protocols and culture performance indicators (growth rates, pluripotency marker expression, etc.), there is a lack of systematic investigation into the true effect of varying culture parameters especially with respect to potential interactions between culture variables. Here we describe the design and execution of a two-parameter, three-level (3(2)) factorial experiment resulting in nine conditions that were run in duplicate 125-mL stirred suspension bioreactors. The two parameters investigated here were inoculation density and agitation rate, which are easily controlled, but currently, poorly characterized. Cell readouts analyzed included fold expansion, maximum density, and exponential growth rate. Our results reveal that the choice of best case culture parameters was dependent on which cell property was chosen as the primary output variable. Subsequent statistical analyses via two-way analysis of variance indicated significant interaction effects between inoculation density and agitation rate specifically in the case of exponential growth rates. Results indicate that stepwise optimization has the potential to miss out on the true optimal case. In addition, choosing an optimum condition for a culture output of interest from the factorial design yielded similar results when repeated with the same cell line indicating reproducibility. We finally validated that human ESCs remain pluripotent in suspension culture as aggregates under our optimal conditions and maintain their differentiation capabilities as well as a stable karyotype and strong expression levels of specific human ESC markers over several passages in suspension bioreactors.

  6. Collisional interactions between self-interacting non-relativistic boson stars: effective potential analysis and numerical simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Cotner, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Scalar particles are a common prediction of many beyond the Standard Model theories. If they are light and cold enough, there is a possibility they may form Bose-Einstein condensates, which will then become gravitationally bound. These boson stars are solitonic solutions to the Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations, but may be approximated in the non-relativistic regime with a coupled Schr\\"odinger-Poisson system. General properties of single soliton states are derived, including the possibility of quartic self-interactions. Binary collisions between two solitons are then studied, and the effects of different mass ratios, relative phases, self-couplings, and separation distances are characterized, leading to an easy conceptual understanding of how these parameters affect the collision outcome in terms of conservation of energy. Applications to dark matter are discussed.

  7. Herbal medicinals: selected clinical considerations focusing on known or potential drug-herb interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L G

    1998-11-09

    Herbal medicinals are being used by an increasing number of patients who typically do not advise their clinicians of concomitant use. Known or potential drug-herb interactions exist and should be screened for. If used beyond 8 weeks, Echinacea could cause hepatotoxicity and therefore should not be used with other known hepatoxic drugs, such as anabolic steroids, amiodarone, methotrexate, and ketoconazole. However, Echinacea lacks the 1,2 saturated necrine ring associated with hepatoxicity of pyrrolizidine alkaloids. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may negate the usefulness of feverfew in the treatment of migraine headaches. Feverfew, garlic, Ginkgo, ginger, and ginseng may alter bleeding time and should not be used concomitantly with warfarin sodium. Additionally, ginseng may cause headache, tremulousness, and manic episodes in patients treated with phenelzine sulfate. Ginseng should also not be used with estrogens or corticosteroids because of possible additive effects. Since the mechanism of action of St John wort is uncertain, concomitant use with monoamine oxidase inhibitors and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors is ill advised. Valerian should not be used concomitantly with barbiturates because excessive sedation may occur. Kyushin, licorice, plantain, uzara root, hawthorn, and ginseng may interfere with either digoxin pharmacodynamically or with digoxin monitoring. Evening primrose oil and borage should not be used with anticonvulsants because they may lower the seizure threshold. Shankapulshpi, an Ayurvedic preparation, may decrease phenytoin levels as well as diminish drug efficacy. Kava when used with alprazolam has resulted in coma. Immunostimulants (eg, Echinacea and zinc) should not be given with immunosuppressants (eg, corticosteroids and cyclosporine). Tannic acids present in some herbs (eg, St John wort and saw palmetto) may inhibit the absorption of iron. Kelp as a source of iodine may interfere with thyroid replacement therapies. Licorice

  8. Potential for electropositive metal to reduce the interactions of Atlantic sturgeon with fishing gear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouyoucos, Ian; Bushnell, Peter; Brill, Richard

    2014-02-01

    Atlantic sturgeon (Acipenser oxyrhynchus) populations have been declared either endangered or threatened under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. Effective measures to repel sturgeon from fishing gear would be beneficial to both fish and fishers because they could reduce both fishery-associated mortality and the need for seasonal and area closures of specific fisheries. Some chondrostean fishes (e.g., sturgeons and paddlefishes) can detect weak electric field gradients (possibly as low as 5 Μv/cm) due to arrays of electroreceptors (ampullae of Lorenzini) on their snout and gill covers. Weak electric fields, such as those produced by electropositive metals (typically mixtures of the lanthanide elements), could therefore potentially be used as a deterrent. To test this idea, we recorded the behavioral responses of juvenile Atlantic sturgeon (31-43 cm fork length) to electropositive metal (primarily a mixture of the lanthanide elements neodymium and praseodymium) both in the presence and absence of food stimuli. Trials were conducted in an approximately 2.5 m diameter × 0.3 m deep tank, and fish behaviors were recorded with an overhead digital video camera. Video records were subsequently digitized (x, y coordinate system), the distance between the fish and the electropositive metal calculated, and data summarized by compiling frequency distributions with 5-cm bins. Juvenile sturgeon showed clear avoidance of electropositive metal but only when food was present. On the basis of our results, we conclude that the electropositive metals, or other sources of weak electric fields, may eventually be used to reduce the interactions of Atlantic sturgeon with fishing gear, but further investigation is needed.

  9. Uptake of munitions materiels (TNT, RDX) by crop plants and potential interactions of nitrogen nutrition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellows, R.J.; Harvey, S.D.; Cataldo, D.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Mitchell, W. [USABRDL, Ft. Detrick, MD (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Munitions materiel such as trinitrotoluene (TNT) and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and their combustion/decomposition products can accumulate/cycle in terrestrial environs. High soil organic matter and fertility have been previously shown to negatively correlate with both TNT or RDX uptake in plants such as grass, wheat, and bean. The present study was therefore conducted using low fertility soil to assess uptake and distribution patterns of C-radiolabelled TNT and RDX (15 and 30 {micro}g/g) within corn (Zea mays), spinach (Spinacea oleraceae), carrot (Daucus carota), and alfalfa (Medicago sativa) grown to maturity in growth chambers. Uptake by the plants at maturity (90- to 120-days) ranged from 1.8 to 2.7% of total amended {sup 14}C-TNT for carrots and corn respectively and 17 to 33% of total amended {sup 14}C-RDX for corn and carrots respectively. Distribution patterns of total radiolabel indicate that the TNT-derived label was primarily retained within the roots (60 to 85%) while the RDX-derived label was distributed to the shoots (85 to 97%). Less than 0.01 {micro}g/g dry wt. TNT was found in all analyzed shoot tissues with > 90% of the TNT-derived radiolabel in the form of polar metabolites. Concentrations of RDX in shoot tissues of corn exceeded 180 {micro}g/g dry wt. Alfalfa grown in unfertilized, fertilized (NO{sub 3}), or unfertilized-inoculated (Rhizobia) soil exhibited a 70 to 100% increase in dry wt. after 45 days in the TNT-amended (15 {micro}g/g) fertilized and unfertilized-inoculated plants versus the controls. A potential TNT/nitrogen interaction will be discussed.

  10. Potential interaction between zinc ions and a cyclodextrin-based diclofenac formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Imad I; El-Sabawi, Dina; Abdel Jalil, Mariam

    2016-01-01

    Complexes of diclofenac sodium (DF-Na) with hydroxypropyl betacyclodextrin (HPβCD) were prepared by co-evaporation in a 1:1 ratio and characterized in light of previously reported data. Phase solubility diagrams were obtained for DF-Na with HPβCD in the presence and absence of zinc ions. Dissolution profiles were obtained for DF-Na and its HPβCD complex at acidic (pH 1.2) as well as in phosphate buffer (pH 6.8), in the presence and absence of zinc. HPβCD, as expected, was shown to improve the dissolution of DF-Na in acidic medium but not in phosphate buffer (pH 6.8). The presence of zinc ions decreased the in vitro dissolution of DF-HPβCD complex in acidic medium (pH 1.2) but not in phosphate buffer (pH 6.8). It was confirmed that the precipitate that was formed by zinc ions in the presence of HPβCD and DF-Na contained no cyclodextrin and most likely it was a mixture of the complexes: DF2-Zn and DF-Zn with some molecules of water. In vivo experiments on rats have shown that HPβCD has no statistically significant effect on absorption or bioavailability of DF-Na in spite of the observed improvement of its in vitro dissolution by HPβCD. Moreover, zinc ions were shown to decrease the absorption rate of DF-Na in rats model but did neither significantly alter the absorption nor bioavailability of DF-HPβCD complex. The zinc induced precipitates of DF were shown to have significantly different crystalline properties when HPβCD was present. Therefore, the pharmaceutical details of a DF-Na preparation should be considered when designing the formulation and predicting possible interaction between DF-Na (or other potential NSAIDs) and zinc metal.

  11. Development of immune-specific interaction potentials and their application in the multi-agent-system VaccImm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woelke, Anna Lena; von Eichborn, Joachim; Murgueitio, Manuela S; Worth, Catherine L; Castiglione, Filippo; Preissner, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Peptide vaccination in cancer therapy is a promising alternative to conventional methods. However, the parameters for this personalized treatment are difficult to access experimentally. In this respect, in silico models can help to narrow down the parameter space or to explain certain phenomena at a systems level. Herein, we develop two empirical interaction potentials specific to B-cell and T-cell receptor complexes and validate their applicability in comparison to a more general potential. The interaction potentials are applied to the model VaccImm which simulates the immune response against solid tumors under peptide vaccination therapy. This multi-agent system is derived from another immune system simulator (C-ImmSim) and now includes a module that enables the amino acid sequence of immune receptors and their ligands to be taken into account. The multi-agent approach is combined with approved methods for prediction of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-binding peptides and the newly developed interaction potentials. In the analysis, we critically assess the impact of the different modules on the simulation with VaccImm and how they influence each other. In addition, we explore the reasons for failures in inducing an immune response by examining the activation states of the immune cell populations in detail.In summary, the present work introduces immune-specific interaction potentials and their application to the agent-based model VaccImm which simulates peptide vaccination in cancer therapy.

  12. Development of immune-specific interaction potentials and their application in the multi-agent-system VaccImm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lena Woelke

    Full Text Available Peptide vaccination in cancer therapy is a promising alternative to conventional methods. However, the parameters for this personalized treatment are difficult to access experimentally. In this respect, in silico models can help to narrow down the parameter space or to explain certain phenomena at a systems level. Herein, we develop two empirical interaction potentials specific to B-cell and T-cell receptor complexes and validate their applicability in comparison to a more general potential. The interaction potentials are applied to the model VaccImm which simulates the immune response against solid tumors under peptide vaccination therapy. This multi-agent system is derived from another immune system simulator (C-ImmSim and now includes a module that enables the amino acid sequence of immune receptors and their ligands to be taken into account. The multi-agent approach is combined with approved methods for prediction of major histocompatibility complex (MHC-binding peptides and the newly developed interaction potentials. In the analysis, we critically assess the impact of the different modules on the simulation with VaccImm and how they influence each other. In addition, we explore the reasons for failures in inducing an immune response by examining the activation states of the immune cell populations in detail.In summary, the present work introduces immune-specific interaction potentials and their application to the agent-based model VaccImm which simulates peptide vaccination in cancer therapy.

  13. The feto-maternal interface: setting the stage for potential immune interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppertz, Berthold

    2007-06-01

    Human implantation and placentation comprise the direct contact of fetal with maternal tissues culminating in the erosion of maternal tissues by fetal cells. A complex interplay of maternal and fetal factors is key to maintain pregnancy until delivery. Immunological interactions can be found at different stages, such as blastocyst attachment, trophoblast invasion into maternal tissues, and flow of maternal blood through the placenta. These interactions need tightly controlled mechanisms to avoid rejection of the conceptus. In this study, these sites of interaction are introduced on a morphological level to help immunologists create their hypotheses on how the immunological interactions may work.

  14. When fast is better: protein folding fundamentals and mechanisms from ultrafast approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Victor; Cerminara, Michele

    2016-09-01

    Protein folding research stalled for decades because conventional experiments indicated that proteins fold slowly and in single strokes, whereas theory predicted a complex interplay between dynamics and energetics resulting in myriad microscopic pathways. Ultrafast kinetic methods turned the field upside down by providing the means to probe fundamental aspects of folding, test theoretical predictions and benchmark simulations. Accordingly, experimentalists could measure the timescales for all relevant folding motions, determine the folding speed limit and confirm that folding barriers are entropic bottlenecks. Moreover, a catalogue of proteins that fold extremely fast (microseconds) could be identified. Such fast-folding proteins cross shallow free energy barriers or fold downhill, and thus unfold with minimal co-operativity (gradually). A new generation of thermodynamic methods has exploited this property to map folding landscapes, interaction networks and mechanisms at nearly atomic resolution. In parallel, modern molecular dynamics simulations have finally reached the timescales required to watch fast-folding proteins fold and unfold in silico All of these findings have buttressed the fundamentals of protein folding predicted by theory, and are now offering the first glimpses at the underlying mechanisms. Fast folding appears to also have functional implications as recent results connect downhill folding with intrinsically disordered proteins, their complex binding modes and ability to moonlight. These connections suggest that the coupling between downhill (un)folding and binding enables such protein domains to operate analogically as conformational rheostats.

  15. A New Relativistic Study for Interactions in One-electron atoms (Spin ½ Particles) with Modified Mie-type Potential

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelmadjid Maireche

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel theoretical analytical perform further investigation for the exact solvability of relativistic quantum spectrum systems for modified Mie-type potential (m.m.t.) potential is discussed for spin-1/2 particles by means Boopp’s shift method instead to solving deformed Dirac equation with star product, in the framework of noncommutativity three dimensional real space (NC: 3D-RS). The exact corrections for excited states are found straightforwardly for interactions...

  16. Interactions among Future Study Abroad Students: Exploring Potential Intercultural Learning Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghetti, C.; Beaven, A.; Pugliese, R.

    2015-01-01

    The study presented in this article aims to explore if and how intercultural learning may take place in students' class interaction. It is grounded in the assumption that interculturality is not a clear-cut feature inherent to interactions occurring when individuals with presumed different linguistic and cultural/national backgrounds talk to…

  17. The potential interaction between oral anticoagulants and acetaminophen in everyday practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bemt, PMLA; Geven, LM; Kuitert, NA; Risselada, A; Brouwers, JRBJ

    2002-01-01

    Objective: The drug-drug interaction between oral anticoagulants (especially warfarin) and acetaminophen has been described, but evidence is conflicting and evidence for a similar interaction between acenocoumarol or phenprocoumon and acetaminophen is limited. Therefore, a study was performed to det

  18. The potential interaction between oral anticoagulants and acetaminophen in everyday practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bemt, PMLA; Geven, LM; Kuitert, NA; Risselada, A; Brouwers, JRBJ

    2002-01-01

    Objective: The drug-drug interaction between oral anticoagulants (especially warfarin) and acetaminophen has been described, but evidence is conflicting and evidence for a similar interaction between acenocoumarol or phenprocoumon and acetaminophen is limited. Therefore, a study was performed to det

  19. [Evaluation of potential drug interactions in primary health care prescriptions in Vitória da Conquista, Bahia (Brazil)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leão, Danyllo Fábio Lessa; de Moura, Cristiano Soares; de Medeiros, Danielle Souto

    2014-01-01

    Drug interactions are risk factors for the occurrence of adverse drug reactions. The risk for drug interactions includes factors related to prescription that are intrinsic to the patient. This study sought to evaluate the potential drug interactions in primary care prescriptions in Vitória da Conquista in the state of Bahia to fill the knowledge gap on this topic in Brazil. Information about several variables derived from the primary health care prescriptions was collected and drug interactions were evaluated based on information from Medscape and Micromedex(R) databases. Polypharmacy frequency and its association with the occurrence of drug interactions were also evaluated. Results revealed a 48,9% frequency of drug interactions, 74,9% of moderate or greater severity, 8,6% of prescriptions in polypharmacy that in the chi-square test showed a positive association with the occurrence of drug interactions (p < 0,001). Prescriptions from primary care in Vitória da Conquista in the state of Bahia showed a high frequency of drug interactions, however it is necessary to analyze other risk factors for their occurrence at this level of health care.

  20. Potential job facilitation benefits of "water cooler" conversations: the importance of social interactions in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Iris Y; Kwantes, Catherine T

    2015-01-01

    This study looked at the extent to which personality and cultural factors predicted participants' perceptions of the importance private interactions played in the workplace. The 134 participants read a vignette (where a new employee socially interacted at low or high levels with co-workers) and completed the Big Five Inventory, Social Axioms Survey, and questions concerning expected workplace experiences. Results indicated employees who engaged in high levels of private interaction with co-workers were expected to be better liked, to receive better performance evaluations, were more likely to receive co-worker assistance, and were thought to be more likely chosen for future projects. However, the personality and social axiom variables studied did not significantly interact with social interaction to influence expectations of workplace outcomes.

  1. Ventricular-Fold Dynamics in Human Phonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailly, Lucie; Bernardoni, Nathalie Henrich; Müller, Frank; Rohlfs, Anna-Katharina; Hess, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors aimed (a) to provide a classification of the ventricular-fold dynamics during voicing, (b) to study the aerodynamic impact of these motions on vocal-fold vibrations, and (c) to assess whether ventricular-fold oscillations could be sustained by aerodynamic coupling with the vocal folds. Method: A 72-sample…

  2. The influence of prejudice and stereotypes on anticipated affect : feelings about a potentially negative interaction with another ethnic group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordijn, Ernestine; Finchilescu, Gillian; Brix, Louise; Wijnants, Nienke; Koomen, Willem

    2008-01-01

    In this research we investigated whether feelings about an imagined potentially negative interaction with a member of another ethnic group was affected more by valence than content of stereotypes, and whether the differential influence of perception and meta-perception was similar for dominant and d

  3. In-vitro evaluation of the P-glycoprotein interactions of a series of potentially CNS-active Amaryllidaceae alkaloids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, André Huss; Rønsted, Nina; Jäger, Anna Katharina

    2012-01-01

    Drug compounds interacting with the blood-brain barrier efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) might have limited access to brain tissue. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether nine potentially CNS-active Amaryllidaceae alkaloids of the crinine, lycorine and galanthamine types...

  4. The influence of prejudice and stereotypes on anticipated affect : feelings about a potentially negative interaction with another ethnic group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordijn, Ernestine; Finchilescu, Gillian; Brix, Louise; Wijnants, Nienke; Koomen, Willem

    2008-01-01

    In this research we investigated whether feelings about an imagined potentially negative interaction with a member of another ethnic group was affected more by valence than content of stereotypes, and whether the differential influence of perception and meta-perception was similar for dominant and

  5. Prevalence of potential drug–drug interactions among internal medicine ward in University of Gondar Teaching Hospital, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshaya Srikanth Bhagavathula

    2014-05-01

    Conclusion: We have recorded a high rate of prevalence of potential DDI in the internal medicine ward of UOG hospital and a high number of clinically significant DDIs which the most prevalent DDI were of moderate severity. Careful selection of drugs and active pharmaceutical care is encouraged in order to avoid negative consequences of these interactions.

  6. On local smooth solutions for the Vlasov equation with the potential of interactions ±r−2

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Zhidkov

    2004-01-01

    For the initial value problem for the Vlasov equation with the potential of interactions ±r−2, we prove the existence and uniqueness of a local solution with values in the Schwartz space S of infinitely differentiable functions rapidly decaying at infinity.

  7. The influence of prejudice and stereotypes on anticipated affect: Feelings about a potentially negative interaction with another ethnic group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordijn, E.; Finchilescu, G.; Brix, L.; Wijnants, N.; Koomen, W.

    2008-01-01

    In this research we investigated whether feelings about an imagined potentially negative interaction with a member of another ethnic group was affected more by valence than content of stereotypes, and whether the differential influence of perception and meta-perception was similar for dominant and d

  8. The influence of prejudice and stereotypes on anticipated affect : feelings about a potentially negative interaction with another ethnic group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordijn, Ernestine; Finchilescu, Gillian; Brix, Louise; Wijnants, Nienke; Koomen, Willem

    2008-01-01

    In this research we investigated whether feelings about an imagined potentially negative interaction with a member of another ethnic group was affected more by valence than content of stereotypes, and whether the differential influence of perception and meta-perception was similar for dominant and d

  9. The APP-Interacting Protein FE65 is Required for Hippocampus-Dependent Learning and Long-Term Potentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Ming; Moon, Changjong; Hu, Qubai; Wang, Baiping; Martin, George; Sun, Zhongsheng; Wang, Hongbing

    2009-01-01

    FE65 is expressed predominantly in the brain and interacts with the C-terminal domain of [beta]-amyloid precursor protein (APP). We examined hippocampus-dependent memory and in vivo long-term potentiation (LTP) at the CA1 synapses with isoform-specific FE65 knockout (p97FE65[superscript -/-]) mice. When examined using the Morris water maze,…

  10. The effect of temperature, interaction range, and pair potential on the formation of dodecagonal quasicrystals in core-corona systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattabhiraman, Harini; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2017-03-01

    A two-dimensional dodecagonal quasicrystal was previously reported by Dotera et al (2014 Nature 506 208) in a system of particles interacting with a hard core of diameter σ and a repulsive square shoulder of diameter δ =1.40σ . In the current work, we examine the formation of this quasicrystal using bond orientational order parameters, correlation functions and tiling distributions. We find that this dodecagonal quasicrystal forms from a fluid phase. We further study the effect of the width of the repulsive shoulder by simulating the system over a range of values of δ. For the range of densities and temperatures considered, we observe the formation of the dodecagonal quasicrystal between δ =1.30σ and 1.44σ . We also study the effect of shape of the interaction potential by simulating the system using three other interaction potentials with two length scales, namely hard-core plus a linear ramp, modified exponential, or Buckingham (exp-6) potential. We observe the presence of the quasicrystal in all three systems. However, depending on the shape of the potential, the formation of the quasicrystal takes place at lower temperatures (or higher interaction strengths). Using free-energy calculations, we demonstrate that the quasicrystal is thermodynamically stable in the square-shoulder and linear-ramp system.

  11. A study of potential drug-drug interactions among critically ill patients at a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjeeta Gupta

    2016-08-01

    Conclusions: The present study showed high concomitant administration of potentially interacting drugs. The prevalence confirmed the association of age and polypharmacy. Vigilant prescribing approach is needed to prevent hazardous outcomes of pDDI. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(4.000: 1281-1285

  12. Comparative aspects of spin-dependent interaction potentials for spin-1/2 and spin-1 matter fields

    CERN Document Server

    Malta, P C; Veiga, K; Helayël-Neto, J A

    2015-01-01

    This paper sets out to establish a comparative study between classes of spin- and velocity-dependent current-current interaction potentials for spin-1/2 and spin-1 matter sources in the non-relativistic regime. Both (neutral massive) scalar and vector particles are considered to mediate the interactions between scalar, pseudo-scalar, vector and pseudo-vector matter currents. We contemplate specific cases in which our results may describe the electromagnetic interaction with a massive (Proca-type) photon exchanged between two spin-1/2 or two spin-1 carriers. We highlight the similarities and peculiarities of the potentials for the two different types of charged matter and also focus our attention to the comparison between two different field representations for spin-1 matter particles. We believe that our results may contribute to a further discussion of the relation between charge, spin and extensibility.

  13. Variable separation solutions and interacting waves of a coupled system of the modified KdV and potential BLMP equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Xiao-yan, E-mail: xytang@sjtu.edu.cn [Institute of System Science, School of Information Science Technology, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Faculty of Science, Ningbo University, Ningbo 315211 (China); Li, Jing [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Liang, Zu-feng [Department of Physics, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 310036 (China); Wang, Jian-yong [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2014-04-01

    The multilinear variable separation approach (MLVSA) is applied to a coupled modified Korteweg–de Vries and potential Boiti–Leon–Manna–Pempinelli equations, as a result, the potential fields u{sub y} and v{sub y} are exactly the universal quantity applicable to all multilinear variable separable systems. The generalized MLVSA is also applied, and it is found that u{sub y} (v{sub y}) is rightly the subtraction (addition) of two universal quantities with different parameters. Then interactions between periodic waves are discussed, for instance, the elastic interaction between two semi-periodic waves and non-elastic interaction between two periodic instantons. An attractive phenomenon is observed that a dromion moves along a semi-periodic wave.

  14. Chromosome conformation capture uncovers potential genome-wide interactions between human conserved non-coding sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Robyr

    Full Text Available Comparative analyses of various mammalian genomes have identified numerous conserved non-coding (CNC DNA elements that display striking conservation among species, suggesting that they have maintained specific functions throughout evolution. CNC function remains poorly understood, although recent studies have identified a role in gene regulation. We hypothesized that the identification of genomic loci that interact physically with CNCs would provide information on their functions. We have used circular chromosome conformation capture (4C to characterize interactions of 10 CNCs from human chromosome 21 in K562 cells. The data provide evidence that CNCs are capable of interacting with loci that are enriched for CNCs. The number of trans interactions varies among CNCs; some show interactions with many loci, while others interact with few. Some of the tested CNCs are capable of driving the expression of a reporter gene in the mouse embryo, and associate with the oligodendrocyte genes OLIG1 and OLIG2. Our results underscore the power of chromosome conformation capture for the identification of targets of functional DNA elements and raise the possibility that CNCs exert their functions by physical association with defined genomic regions enriched in CNCs. These CNC-CNC interactions may in part explain their stringent conservation as a group of regulatory sequences.

  15. Theory of Auger-electron and appearance-potential spectroscopy for interacting valence-band electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolting, W.; Geipel, G.; Ertl, K.

    1991-12-01

    A theory of Auger-electron spectroscopy (AES) and appearance-potential spectroscopy (APS) is presented for interacting electrons in a nondegenerate energy band, described within the framework of the Hubbard model. Both types of spectroscopy are based on the same two-particle spectral density. A diagrammatic vertex-correction method (Matsubara formalism) is used to express this function in terms of the one-particle spectral density. The latter is approximately determined for arbitrary temperature T, arbitrary coupling strength U/W (U, the intra-atomic Coulomb matrix element; W, the width of the ``free'' Bloch band), and arbitrary band occupations n (0QDOS) in relation to the Bloch density of states (BDOS), where, however, spontaneous magnetic order is excluded, irrespective of the band filling n. The AE (AP) spectra consist of only one structure a few eV wide (``bandlike'') which is strongly n dependent, but only slightly T dependent, being rather well approximated by a simple self-convolution of the occupied (unoccupied) QDOS. For strongly correlated electrons the Bloch band splits into two quasiparticle subbands. This leads for n1. For sufficiently strong correlations U/W additional satellites appear that refer to situations where the two excited quasiparticles (quasiholes) propagate as tightly bound pairs through the lattice without being scattered by other charge carriers. As soon as the satellite splits off from the bandlike part of the spectrum, it takes almost the full spectral weight, conveying the impression of an ``atomiclike'' AE (AP) line shape. The satellite has almost exactly the structure of the free BDOS. If the particle density n as well as the hole density 2-n exceed certain critical values determined by U/W and the BDOS ρ0(E), spontaneous ferromagnetism becomes possible in the strongly correlated electron band. The magnetic phase transition gives rise to a distinctive T dependence for the QDOS and hence also for the AE and AP line shapes

  16. Excited state potential energy surfaces and their interactions in Fe(IV)=O active sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srnec, Martin; Wong, Shaun D; Solomon, Edward I

    2014-12-21

    The non-heme ferryl active sites are of significant interest for their application in biomedical and green catalysis. These sites have been shown to have an S = 1 or S = 2 ground spin state; the latter is functional in biology. Low-temperature magnetic circular dichroism (LT MCD) spectroscopy probes the nature of the excited states in these species including ligand-field (LF) states that are otherwise difficult to study by other spectroscopies. In particular, the temperature dependences of MCD features enable their unambiguous assignment and thus determination of the low-lying excited states in two prototypical S = 1 and S = 2 NHFe(IV)[double bond, length as m-dash]O complexes. Furthermore, some MCD bands exhibit vibronic structures that allow mapping of excited-state interactions and their effects on the potential energy surfaces (PESs). For the S = 2 species, there is also an unusual spectral feature in both near-infrared absorption and MCD spectra - Fano antiresonance (dip in Abs) and Fano resonance (sharp peak in MCD) that indicates the weak spin-orbit coupling of an S = 1 state with the S = 2 LF state. These experimental data are correlated with quantum-chemical calculations that are further extended to analyze the low-lying electronic states and the evolution of their multiconfigurational characters along the Fe-O PESs. These investigations show that the lowest-energy states develop oxyl Fe(III) character at distances that are relevant to the transition state (TS) for H-atom abstraction and define the frontier molecular orbitals that participate in the reactivity of S = 1 vs. S = 2 non-heme Fe(IV)[double bond, length as m-dash]O active sites. The S = 1 species has only one available channel that requires the C-H bond of a substrate to approach perpendicular to the Fe-oxo bond (the π channel). In contrast, there are three channels (one σ and two π) available for the S = 2 non-heme Fe(IV)[double bond, length as m-dash]O system allowing C-H substrate approach

  17. Complete fold annotation of the human proteome using a novel structural feature space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Sarah A; Illuminati, Joseph; Kim, Junhyong

    2017-04-13

    Recognition of protein structural fold is the starting point for many structure prediction tools and protein function inference. Fold prediction is computationally demanding and recognizing novel folds is difficult such that the majority of proteins have not been annotated for fold classification. Here we describe a new machine learning approach using a novel feature space that can be used for accurate recognition of all 1,221 currently known folds and inference of unknown novel folds. We show that our method achieves better than 94% accuracy even when many folds have only one training example. We demonstrate the utility of this method by predicting the folds of 34,330 human protein domains and showing that these predictions can yield useful insights into potential biological function, such as prediction of RNA-binding ability. Our method can be applied to de novo fold prediction of entire proteomes and identify candidate novel fold families.

  18. Identifying potential survival strategies of HIV-1 through virus-host protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boucher Charles AB

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has launched the HIV-1 Human Protein Interaction Database in an effort to catalogue all published interactions between HIV-1 and human proteins. In order to systematically investigate these interactions functionally and dynamically, we have constructed an HIV-1 human protein interaction network. This network was analyzed for important proteins and processes that are specific for the HIV life-cycle. In order to expose viral strategies, network motif analysis was carried out showing reoccurring patterns in virus-host dynamics. Results Our analyses show that human proteins interacting with HIV form a densely connected and central sub-network within the total human protein interaction network. The evaluation of this sub-network for connectivity and centrality resulted in a set of proteins essential for the HIV life-cycle. Remarkably, we were able to associate proteins involved in RNA polymerase II transcription with hubs and proteasome formation with bottlenecks. Inferred network motifs show significant over-representation of positive and negative feedback patterns between virus and host. Strikingly, such patterns have never been reported in combined virus-host systems. Conclusions HIV infection results in a reprioritization of cellular processes reflected by an increase in the relative importance of transcriptional machinery and proteasome formation. We conclude that during the evolution of HIV, some patterns of interaction have been selected for resulting in a system where virus proteins preferably interact with central human proteins for direct control and with proteasomal proteins for indirect control over the cellular processes. Finally, the patterns described by network motifs illustrate how virus and host interact with one another.

  19. Energy landscapes, folding mechanisms, and kinetics of RNA tetraloop hairpins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Debayan; Collepardo-Guevara, Rosana; Wales, David J

    2014-12-31

    RNA hairpins play a pivotal role in a diverse range of cellular functions, and are integral components of ribozymes, mRNA, and riboswitches. However, the mechanistic and kinetic details of RNA hairpin folding, which are key determinants of most of its biological functions, are poorly understood. In this work, we use the discrete path sampling (DPS) approach to explore the energy landscapes of two RNA tetraloop hairpins, and provide insights into their folding mechanisms and kinetics in atomistic detail. Our results show that the potential energy landscapes have a distinct funnel-like bias toward the folded hairpin state, consistent with efficient structure-seeking properties. Mechanistic and kinetic information is analyzed in terms of kinetic transition networks. We find microsecond folding times, consistent with temperature jump experiments, for hairpin folding initiated from relatively compact unfolded states. This process is essentially driven by an initial collapse, followed by rapid zippering of the helix stem in the final phase. Much lower folding rates are predicted when the folding is initiated from extended chains, which undergo longer excursions on the energy landscape before nucleation events can occur. Our work therefore explains recent experiments and coarse-grained simulations, where the folding kinetics exhibit precisely this dependency on the initial conditions.

  20. Relation between the change of density of states and the shape of the potential in two-body interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bo

    2017-04-01

    We derive a general relation in two-body scattering theory that more directly relates the change of density of states (DDOS) due to interaction to the shape of the potential. The relation allows us to infer certain global properties of the DDOS from the global properties of the potential. In particular, we show that DDOS is negative at all energies and for all partial waves, for potentials that are more repulsive than +1 /r2 everywhere. This behavior represents a different class of global properties of DDOS from that described by the Levinson's theorem.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulation of crystalline UF6 using the pair interaction potentials of the uranium and fluorine particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekunov, G. S.; Nekrasov, K. A.; Boyarchenkov, A. S.; Kupryazhkin, A. Ya.

    2016-09-01

    A model of uranium hexafluoride is suggested that is based on the empirical pair potentials of U-U, F-F, U-F used for both intra- and intermolecular interactions. The potentials for this model are obtained from the lattice parameters and the thermal expansion coefficient of UF6 crystal using the molecular dynamics simulation under the periodic boundary conditions with constant volume and temperature. Within the framework of the model, the thermal expansion and sublimation of crystalline UF6 are investigated. A set of potential parameters is identified that provides satisfactory simulation of both UF6 crystal and the dependence of the UF6 saturated vapor pressure on temperature.

  2. RNAiFOLD: a constraint programming algorithm for RNA inverse folding and molecular design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Martin, Juan Antonio; Clote, Peter; Dotu, Ivan

    2013-04-01

    Synthetic biology is a rapidly emerging discipline with long-term ramifications that range from single-molecule detection within cells to the creation of synthetic genomes and novel life forms. Truly phenomenal results have been obtained by pioneering groups--for instance, the combinatorial synthesis of genetic networks, genome synthesis using BioBricks, and hybridization chain reaction (HCR), in which stable DNA monomers assemble only upon exposure to a target DNA fragment, biomolecular self-assembly pathways, etc. Such work strongly suggests that nanotechnology and synthetic biology together seem poised to constitute the most transformative development of the 21st century. In this paper, we present a Constraint Programming (CP) approach to solve the RNA inverse folding problem. Given a target RNA secondary structure, we determine an RNA sequence which folds into the target structure; i.e. whose minimum free energy structure is the target structure. Our approach represents a step forward in RNA design--we produce the first complete RNA inverse folding approach which allows for the specification of a wide range of design constraints. We also introduce a Large Neighborhood Search approach which allows us to tackle larger instances at the cost of losing completeness, while retaining the advantages of meeting design constraints (motif, GC-content, etc.). Results demonstrate that our software, RNAiFold, performs as well or better than all state-of-the-art approaches; nevertheless, our approach is unique in terms of completeness, flexibility, and the support of various design constraints. The algorithms presented in this paper are publicly available via the interactive webserver http://bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/RNAiFold; additionally, the source code can be downloaded from that site.

  3. Potential turning points in cluster radioactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, D N

    2002-01-01

    Effect of various nuclear interaction potentials on the decay lifetimes and the turning points of the WKB action integral has been studied. The microscopic nuclear potential obtained by folding in the density distribution functions of the two clusters with a realistic effective interaction has also been used to calculate the turning points. Half lives of $\\alpha$ and $^{20} O$ cluster emissions from $^{228} Th$ have been calculated within the superasymmetric fission model using various phenomenological and the microscopic double folding potentials. Calculations of half lives with the microscopic double folding potentials are found to be in good agreement with the observed experimental data. Present calculations put the superasymmetric fission model on a firm theoretical basis.

  4. Low Power Folded Cascode OTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Kundra

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Low power is one of the key research area in today’s electronic industry. Need of low power has created a major pattern shift in the field of electronics where power dissipation is equally important as area, performance etc. Several low power portable electronic equipments, low voltage design techniques havebeen developed and have driven analog designers to create techniques eg. Self cascode mosfet and stacking technique. For this aim in mind we designed a Folded Cascode using low power techniques and analyzed its various properties through the Spice simulations for 0.13 micron CMOS technology from TSMC and thesupply voltage 1.8V.

  5. Low Power Folded Cascode OTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Kundra

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Low power is one of the key research area in today’s electronic industry. Need of low power has created a major pattern shift in the field of electronics where power dissipation is equally important as area, performance etc. Several low power portable electronic equipments, low voltage design techniques have been developed and have driven analog designers to create techniques eg. Self cascode mosfet and stacking technique. For this aim in mind we designed a Folded Cascode using low power techniques and analyzed its various properties through the Spice simulations for 0.13 micron CMOS technology from TSMC and the supply voltage 1.8V.

  6. Single walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with hydrides as potential hydrogen storage media: A survey of intermolecular interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surya, V.J.; Iyakutti, K. [School of Physics, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai, Tamil Nadu (India); Venkataramanan, N.S.; Mizuseki, H.; Kawazoe, Y. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Katahira Aoba-ku, Sendai (Japan)

    2011-09-15

    In this paper, we have analyzed the intermolecular interactions between H{sub 2} and single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-hydride complexes and project their capability as a practicable hydrogen storage medium (HSM). In this respect, we have investigated the type of interactions namely van der Waals, electrostatic, and orbital interactions to understand the molecular hydrogen binding affinity of various systems. We found that the charge transfer effects coupled with induced electrostatic interactions are responsible for synergetic action of SWCNT and hydrides on adsorption of H{sub 2} molecules at ambient conditions. Also we have calculated the thermodynamically usable capacity of hydrogen in all the systems. This study enables one to identify and design potential hydrogen storage materials. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Non-Chemical Distant Cellular Interactions as a potential confounder of cell biology experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhadi, Ashkan

    2014-01-01

    Distant cells can communicate with each other through a variety of methods. Two such methods involve electrical and/or chemical mechanisms. Non-chemical, distant cellular interactions may be another method of communication that cells can use to modify the behavior of other cells that are mechanically separated. Moreover, non-chemical, distant cellular interactions may explain some cases of confounding effects in Cell Biology experiments. In this article, we review non-chemical, distant cellular interactions studies to try to shed light on the mechanisms in this highly unconventional field of cell biology. Despite the existence of several theories that try to explain the mechanism of non-chemical, distant cellular interactions, this phenomenon is still speculative. Among candidate mechanisms, electromagnetic waves appear to have the most experimental support. In this brief article, we try to answer a few key questions that may further clarify this mechanism.

  8. Non-Chemical Distant Cellular Interactions as a potential confounder of Cell Biology Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashkan eFarhadi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Distant cells can communicate with each other through a variety of methods. Two such methods involve electrical and/or chemical mechanisms. Non-chemical, distant cellular interactions may be another method of communication that cells can use to modify the behavior of other cells that are mechanically separated. Moreover, non-chemical, distant cellular interactions may explain some cases of confounding effects in Cell Biology experiments. In this article, we review non-chemical, distant cellular interactions studies to try to shed light on the mechanisms in this highly unconventional field of cell biology. Despite the existence of several theories that try to explain the mechanism of non-chemical, distant cellular interactions, this phenomenon is still speculative. Among candidate mechanisms, electromagnetic waves appear to have the most experimental support. In this brief article, we try to answer a few key questions that may further clarify this mechanism.

  9. The potential drug-drug interaction between proton pump inhibitors and warfarin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Daniel Pilsgaard; Stage, Tore Bjerregaard; Hansen, Morten Rix

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been suggested to increase the effect of warfarin, and clinical guidelines recommend careful monitoring of international normalized ratio (INR) when initiating PPI among warfarin users. However, this drug-drug interaction is sparsely investigated...

  10. Natural enemy-mediated indirect interactions among prey species: potential for enhancing biocontrol services in agroecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chailleux, A.; Mohl, E.K.; Teixeira Alves, M.; Messelink, G.J.; Desneux, N.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how arthropod pests and their natural enemies interact in complex agroecosystems is essential for pest management programmes. Theory predicts that prey sharing a predator, such as a biological control agent, can indirectly reduce each other's density at equilibrium (apparent

  11. Influence of protein interactions on oxidation/reduction midpoint potentials of cofactors in natural and de novo metalloproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, T L; Williams, J C; Allen, J P

    2013-01-01

    As discussed throughout this special issue, oxidation and reduction reactions play critical roles in the function of many organisms. In photosynthetic organisms, the conversion of light energy drives oxidation and reduction reactions through the transfer of electrons and protons in order to create energy-rich compounds. These reactions occur in proteins such as cytochrome c, a heme-containing water-soluble protein, the bacteriochlorophyll-containing reaction center, and photosystem II where water is oxidized at the manganese cluster. A critical measure describing the ability of cofactors in proteins to participate in such reactions is the oxidation/reduction midpoint potential. In this review, the basic concepts of oxidation/reduction reactions are reviewed with a summary of the experimental approaches used to measure the midpoint potential of metal cofactors. For cofactors in proteins, the midpoint potential not only depends upon the specific chemical characteristics of cofactors but also upon interactions with the surrounding protein, such as the nature of the coordinating ligands and protein environment. These interactions can be tailored to optimize an oxidation/reduction reaction carried out by the protein. As examples, the midpoint potentials of hemes in cytochromes, bacteriochlorophylls in reaction centers, and the manganese cluster of photosystem II are discussed with an emphasis on the influence that protein interactions have on these potentials. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Metals in Bioenergetics and Biomimetics Systems.

  12. Plant Virus–Insect Vector Interactions: Current and Potential Future Research Directions

    OpenAIRE

    Dietzgen, Ralf G.; Krin S. Mann; Karyn N. Johnson

    2016-01-01

    Acquisition and transmission by an insect vector is central to the infection cycle of the majority of plant pathogenic viruses. Plant viruses can interact with their insect host in a variety of ways including both non-persistent and circulative transmission; in some cases, the latter involves virus replication in cells of the insect host. Replicating viruses can also elicit both innate and specific defense responses in the insect host. A consistent feature is that the interaction of the virus...

  13. Capturing RNA Folding Free Energy with Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, David R.; Cheng, Sara Y.; Salazar, Heber; Ren, Pengyu

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a coarse-grained RNA model for molecular dynamics simulations, RACER (RnA CoarsE-gRained). RACER achieves accurate native structure prediction for a number of RNAs (average RMSD of 2.93 Å) and the sequence-specific variation of free energy is in excellent agreement with experimentally measured stabilities (R2 = 0.93). Using RACER, we identified hydrogen-bonding (or base pairing), base stacking, and electrostatic interactions as essential driving forces for RNA folding. Also, we found that separating pairing vs. stacking interactions allowed RACER to distinguish folded vs. unfolded states. In RACER, base pairing and stacking interactions each provide an approximate stability of 3–4 kcal/mol for an A-form helix. RACER was developed based on PDB structural statistics and experimental thermodynamic data. In contrast with previous work, RACER implements a novel effective vdW potential energy function, which led us to re-parameterize hydrogen bond and electrostatic potential energy functions. Further, RACER is validated and optimized using a simulated annealing protocol to generate potential energy vs. RMSD landscapes. Finally, RACER is tested using extensive equilibrium pulling simulations (0.86 ms total) on eleven RNA sequences (hairpins and duplexes). PMID:28393861

  14. Computational simulations of protein folding to engineer amino acid sequences to encourage desired supersecondary structure formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstman, Bernard S; Chapagain, Prem P

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics of protein folding are complicated because of the various types of amino acid interactions that create secondary, supersecondary, and tertiary interactions. Computational modeling can be used to simulate the biophysical and biochemical interactions that determine protein folding. Effective folding to a desired protein configuration requires a compromise between speed, stability, and specificity. If the primary sequence of amino acids emphasizes one of these characteristics, the others might suffer and the folding process may not be optimized. We provide an example of a model peptide whose primary sequence produces a highly stable supersecondary two-helix bundle structure, but at the expense of lower speed and specificity of the folding process. We show how computational simulations can be used to discover the configuration of the kinetic trap that causes the degradation in the speed and specificity of folding. We also show how amino acid sequences can be engineered by specific substitutions to optimize the folding to the desired supersecondary structure.

  15. Plant Virus–Insect Vector Interactions: Current and Potential Future Research Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf G. Dietzgen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Acquisition and transmission by an insect vector is central to the infection cycle of the majority of plant pathogenic viruses. Plant viruses can interact with their insect host in a variety of ways including both non-persistent and circulative transmission; in some cases, the latter involves virus replication in cells of the insect host. Replicating viruses can also elicit both innate and specific defense responses in the insect host. A consistent feature is that the interaction of the virus with its insect host/vector requires specific molecular interactions between virus and host, commonly via proteins. Understanding the interactions between plant viruses and their insect host can underpin approaches to protect plants from infection by interfering with virus uptake and transmission. Here, we provide a perspective focused on identifying novel approaches and research directions to facilitate control of plant viruses by better understanding and targeting virus–insect molecular interactions. We also draw parallels with molecular interactions in insect vectors of animal viruses, and consider technical advances for their control that may be more broadly applicable to plant virus vectors.

  16. Plant Virus-Insect Vector Interactions: Current and Potential Future Research Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietzgen, Ralf G; Mann, Krin S; Johnson, Karyn N

    2016-11-09

    Acquisition and transmission by an insect vector is central to the infection cycle of the majority of plant pathogenic viruses. Plant viruses can interact with their insect host in a variety of ways including both non-persistent and circulative transmission; in some cases, the latter involves virus replication in cells of the insect host. Replicating viruses can also elicit both innate and specific defense responses in the insect host. A consistent feature is that the interaction of the virus with its insect host/vector requires specific molecular interactions between virus and host, commonly via proteins. Understanding the interactions between plant viruses and their insect host can underpin approaches to protect plants from infection by interfering with virus uptake and transmission. Here, we provide a perspective focused on identifying novel approaches and research directions to facilitate control of plant viruses by better understanding and targeting virus-insect molecular interactions. We also draw parallels with molecular interactions in insect vectors of animal viruses, and consider technical advances for their control that may be more broadly applicable to plant virus vectors.

  17. Assessment of potential drug-drug interactions among outpatients receiving cardiovascular medications at Jimma University specialized hospital, South West Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Legese Chelkeba

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The quality of pharmacotherapy is highly dependent on the process of choosing a drug in relation to nature of the disease. Several factors should be considered in choosing optimal pharmacotherapeutics strategy including efficacy, safety, availability and cost of the drugs. The objective of this study was to assess potential drug-drug interactions and risk factors in outpatients taking cardiovascular drugs at Jimma University specialized hospital. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted from Feb. to April, 2011on patients visiting the cardiac clinic of Jimma University Specialized hospital. A sample of 332 outpatients who were taking cardiovascular medications at study clinic was studied. MicroMedex software was used to screen drug-drug interactions and SPSS for windows software versions-16.0 was used for data analysis. Results: A total of 1249 drugs with average of 3.76 drugs per prescription were prescribed for the 332 patients. The frequency of potential DDIs was found to be 241 (72.6%. Among these 200 (67.3% were of "moderate" severity and 164 (55.2% were delayed in onset. The most common potential DDI observed was between Enalapril and Furosemide (20%. Patients who prescribed many drugs (AOR=4.09; P=0.00 by medical intern had a higher risk of developing potential DDIs (AOR=4.6; P=0.00. Conclusions: Patients with cardiovascular disorders are subjected to high risk of potential drug-drug interactions and the number of drugs prescribed and educational level of the prescribers has a high significantly associated with the occurrence of potential drug-drug interactions. Therefore, it is imperative that further studies need to be conducted to identify reasons for and tackle the problem and provide appropriate mechanisms for management. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2013; 2(2.000: 144-152

  18. On the polymer physics origins of protein folding thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Mark P.; Paul, Wolfgang; Binder, Kurt

    2016-11-01

    A remarkable feature of the spontaneous folding of many small proteins is the striking similarity in the thermodynamics of the folding process. This process is characterized by simple two-state thermodynamics with large and compensating changes in entropy and enthalpy and a funnel-like free energy landscape with a free-energy barrier that varies linearly with temperature. One might attribute the commonality of this two-state folding behavior to features particular to these proteins (e.g., chain length, hydrophobic/hydrophilic balance, attributes of the native state) or one might suspect that this similarity in behavior has a more general polymer-physics origin. Here we show that this behavior is also typical for flexible homopolymer chains with sufficiently short range interactions. Two-state behavior arises from the presence of a low entropy ground (folded) state separated from a set of high entropy disordered (unfolded) states by a free energy barrier. This homopolymer model exhibits a funneled free energy landscape that reveals a complex underlying dynamics involving competition between folding and non-folding pathways. Despite the presence of multiple pathways, this simple physics model gives the robust result of two-state thermodynamics for both the cases of folding from a basin of expanded coil states and from a basin of compact globule states.

  19. Relativistic study of the energy-dependent Coulomb potential including Coulomb-like tensor interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Hamzavi, Majid

    2012-01-01

    The exact Dirac equation for the energy-dependent Coulomb (EDC) potential including a Coulomb-like tensor (CLT) potential has been studied in the presence of spin and pseudospin (p-spin) symmetries with arbitrary spin-orbit quantum number The energy eigenvalues and corresponding eigenfunctions are obtained in the framework of asymptotic iteration method (AIM). Some numerical results are obtained in the presence and absence of EDC and CLT potentials.

  20. Evaluation of Drug-Drug Interaction Potential Between Sacubitril/Valsartan (LCZ696) and Statins Using a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wen; Ji, Tao; Einolf, Heidi; Ayalasomayajula, Surya; Lin, Tsu-Han; Hanna, Imad; Heimbach, Tycho; Breen, Christopher; Jarugula, Venkateswar; He, Handan

    2017-01-13

    Sacubitril/valsartan (LCZ696) has been approved for the treatment of heart failure. Sacubitril is an in vitro inhibitor of organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs). In clinical studies, LCZ696 increased atorvastatin Cmax by 1.7-fold and area under the plasma concentration-time curve by 1.3-fold, but had little or no effect on simvastatin or simvastatin acid exposure. A physiologically based pharmacokinetics modeling approach was applied to explore the underlying mechanisms behind the statin-specific LCZ696 drug interaction observations. The model incorporated OATP-mediated clearance (CLint,T) for simvastatin and simvastatin acid to successfully describe the pharmacokinetic profiles of either analyte in the absence or presence of LCZ696. Moreover, the model successfully described the clinically observed drug effect with atorvastatin. The simulations clarified the critical parameters responsible for the observation of a low, yet clinically relevant, drug-drug interaction DDI between sacubitril and atorvastatin and the lack of effect with simvastatin acid. Atorvastatin is administered in its active form and rapidly achieves Cmax that coincide with the low Cmax of sacubitril. In contrast, simvastatin requires a hydrolysis step to the acid form and therefore is not present at the site of interactions at sacubitril concentrations that are inhibitory. Similar models were used to evaluate the drug-drug interaction risk for additional OATP-transported statins which predicted to maximally result in a 1.5-fold exposure increase.

  1. Transitioning from microbiome composition to microbial community interactions: the potential of the metaorganism Hydra as an experimental model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Deines

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Animals are home to complex microbial communities, which are shaped through interactions within the community, interactions with the host, and through environmental factors. The advent of high-throughput sequencing methods has led to novel insights in changing patterns of community composition and structure. However, deciphering the different types of interactions among community members, with their hosts and their interplay with their environment is still a challenge of major proportion. The emerging fields of synthetic microbial ecology and community systems biology have the potential to decrypt these complex relationships. Studying host-associated microbiota across multiple spatial and temporal scales will bridge the gap between individual microorganism studies and large-scale whole community surveys. Here, we discuss the unique potential of Hydra as an emerging experimental model in microbiome research. Through in vivo, in vitro, and in silico approaches the interaction structure of host-associated microbial communities and the effects of the host on the microbiota and its interactions can be disentangled. Research in the model system Hydra can unify disciplines from molecular genetics to ecology, opening up the opportunity to discover fundamental rules that govern microbiome community stability.

  2. Metabolism-mediated interaction potential of standardized extract of Tinospora cordifolia through rat and human liver microsomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiv Bahadur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Tinospora cordifolia is used for treatment of several diseases in Indian system of medicine. In the present study, the inhibition potential of T. cordifolia extracts and its constituent tinosporaside to cause herb-drug interactions through rat and human liver cytochrome enzymes was evaluated. Materials and Methods: Bioactive compound was quantified through reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography, to standardize the plant extracts and interaction potential of standardized extract. Interaction potential of the test sample was evaluated through cytochrome P450-carbon monoxide complex (CYP450-CO assay with pooled rat liver microsome. Influence on individual recombinant human liver microsomes such as CYP3A4, CYP2D6, CYP2C9, and CYP1A2 isozymes was analyzed through fluorescence microplate assay, and respective IC 50 values were determined. Results: The content of tinosporaside was found to be 1.64% (w/w in T. cordifolia extract. Concentration-dependent inhibition was observed through T. cordifolia extract. Observed IC 50 (μg/ml value was 136.45 (CYP3A4, 144.37 (CYP2D6, 127.55 (CYP2C9, and 141.82 (CYP1A2. Tinosporaside and extract showed higher IC 50 (μg/ml value than the known inhibitors. T. cordifolia extract showed significantly less interaction potential and indicates that the selected plant has not significant herb-drug interactions relating to the inhibition of major CYP450 isozymes. Conclusions: Plant extract showed significantly higher IC 50 value than respective positive inhibitors against CYP3A4, 2D6, 2C9, and 1A2 isozymes. Consumption of T. cordifolia may not cause any adverse effects when consumed along with other xenobiotics.

  3. Metabolism-mediated interaction potential of standardized extract of Tinospora cordifolia through rat and human liver microsomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadur, Shiv; Mukherjee, Pulok K.; Milan Ahmmed, S. K.; Kar, Amit; Harwansh, Ranjit K.; Pandit, Subrata

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Tinospora cordifolia is used for treatment of several diseases in Indian system of medicine. In the present study, the inhibition potential of T. cordifolia extracts and its constituent tinosporaside to cause herb-drug interactions through rat and human liver cytochrome enzymes was evaluated. Materials and Methods: Bioactive compound was quantified through reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography, to standardize the plant extracts and interaction potential of standardized extract. Interaction potential of the test sample was evaluated through cytochrome P450-carbon monoxide complex (CYP450-CO) assay with pooled rat liver microsome. Influence on individual recombinant human liver microsomes such as CYP3A4, CYP2D6, CYP2C9, and CYP1A2 isozymes was analyzed through fluorescence microplate assay, and respective IC50 values were determined. Results: The content of tinosporaside was found to be 1.64% (w/w) in T. cordifolia extract. Concentration-dependent inhibition was observed through T. cordifolia extract. Observed IC50 (μg/ml) value was 136.45 (CYP3A4), 144.37 (CYP2D6), 127.55 (CYP2C9), and 141.82 (CYP1A2). Tinosporaside and extract showed higher IC50 (μg/ml) value than the known inhibitors. T. cordifolia extract showed significantly less interaction potential and indicates that the selected plant has not significant herb-drug interactions relating to the inhibition of major CYP450 isozymes. Conclusions: Plant extract showed significantly higher IC50 value than respective positive inhibitors against CYP3A4, 2D6, 2C9, and 1A2 isozymes. Consumption of T. cordifolia may not cause any adverse effects when consumed along with other xenobiotics. PMID:27721546

  4. Older Age and Steroid Use Are Associated with Increasing Polypharmacy and Potential Medication Interactions Among Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parian, Alyssa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Comorbidity and polypharmacy, more prevalent among older persons, may impact the treatment of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aims of this study were to assess the frequency of polypharmacy and medication interactions within a cohort of older patients with IBD and describe IBD treatment patterns. Methods: Cohort study of 190 patients with IBD 65 years or older followed at a tertiary IBD referral center from 2006 to 2012. Data collected included demographics, IBD-specific characteristics including disease activity, and comorbidity. Medication histories were extracted from medical records, and data were used to classify polypharmacy, frequency, and severity of potential medication interactions and inappropriate medication use. Results: Older patients with IBD were prescribed an average of 9 routine medications. Severe polypharmacy (≥10 routine medications) was present in 43.2% of studied patients and associated with increasing age, greater comorbidity, and steroid use. Overall, 73.7% of patients had at least 1 potential medication interaction, including 40% of patients with potential IBD medication-associated interactions. Chronic steroids were prescribed to 40% of the older patients including 24% who were in remission or with mild disease activity. Only 39.5% of patients were on immunomodulators and 21.1% on biologics. Approximately, 35% of patients were given at least 1 Beers inappropriate medication and almost 10% were receiving chronic narcotics. Conclusions: Older patients with IBD are at increased risk for severe polypharmacy and potential major medication interactions especially with increasing comorbidity and chronic steroid use. Steroid-maintenance therapies are prevalent among the older patients with IBD with lower utilization of steroid-sparing regimens. PMID:25856768

  5. Potential drug-drug interactions in a Brazilian teaching hospital: age-related differences?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Oliveira Melo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes to measure frequency and to characterize the profile of potential drug interactions (pDDI in a general medicine ward of a teaching hospital. Data about identification and clinical status of patients were extracted from medical records between March to August 2006. The occurrence of pDDI was analyzed using the database monographs Micromedex® DrugReax® System. From 5,336 prescriptions with two or more drugs, 3,097 (58.0% contained pDDI. The frequency of major and well document pDDI was 26.5%. Among 647 patients, 432 (66.8% were exposed to at least one pDDI and 283 (43.7% to major pDDI. The multivariate analysis identified that factors related to higher rates of major pDDI were the same age (p< 0.0001, length of stay (p< 0.0001, prevalence of hypertension [OR=3.42 (p< 0.0001] and diabetes mellitus [OR=2.1 (p< 0.0001], cardiovascular diseases (p< 0.0001 and the number of prescribed drugs (Spearman’s correlation=0.640622, p< 0.0001. Between major pDDI, the main risk was hemorrhage (50.3%, the most frequent major pDDI involved combination of anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs. Among moderate pDDI, 3,866 (90.8% involved medicines for the treatment of chronic non-communicable diseases, mainly hypertension. In HU-USP, the profile of pDDI was similar among adults and elderly (the most frequent pDDI and major pDDI were same, the difference was only the frequency in either group. The efforts of the clinical pharmacists should be directed to elderly patients with cardiovascular compromise, mainly in use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs. Furthermore, hospital managers should increase the integration between levels of health care to promote safety patient after discharge.Keywords: Drug interactions. Aged. Internal Medicine. Hospitals, University. RESUMOInterações medicamentosas potenciais em um hospital escolar brasileiro: diferenças relacionadas à idade?O estudo tem por objetivo descrever o perfil de intera

  6. Comparing the energy landscapes for native folding and aggregation of PrP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dee, Derek R; Woodside, Michael T

    2016-05-03

    Protein sequences are evolved to encode generally one folded structure, out of a nearly infinite array of possible folds. Underlying this code is a funneled free energy landscape that guides folding to the native conformation. Protein misfolding and aggregation are also a manifestation of free-energy landscapes. The detailed mechanisms of these processes are poorly understood, but often involve rare, transient species and a variety of different pathways. The inherent complexity of misfolding has hampered efforts to measure aggregation pathways and the underlying energy landscape, especially using traditional methods where ensemble averaging obscures important rare and transient events. We recently studied the misfolding and aggregation of prion protein by examining 2 monomers tethered in close proximity as a dimer, showing how the steps leading to the formation of a stable aggregated state can be resolved in the single-molecule limit and the underlying energy landscape thereby reconstructed. This approach allows a more quantitative comparison of native folding versus misfolding, including fundamental differences in the dynamics for misfolding. By identifying key steps and interactions leading to misfolding, it should help to identify potential drug targets. Here we describe the importance of characterizing free-energy landscapes for aggregation and the challenges involved in doing so, and we discuss how single-molecule studies can help test proposed structural models for PrP aggregates.

  7. Structural perturbations on huntingtin N17 domain during its folding on 2D-nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Leili; Feng, Mei; Zhou, Ruhong; Luan, Binquan

    2017-09-01

    A globular protein’s folded structure in its physiological environment is largely determined by its amino acid sequence. Recently, newly discovered transformer proteins as well as intrinsically disordered proteins may adopt the folding-upon-binding mechanism where their secondary structures are highly dependent on their binding partners. Due to the various applications of nanomaterials in biological sensors and potential wearable devices, it is important to discover possible conformational changes of proteins on nanomaterials. Here, through molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the first 17 residues of the huntingtin protein (HTT-N17) exhibit appreciable differences during its folding on 2D-nanomaterials, such as graphene and MoS2 nanosheets. Namely, the protein is disordered on the graphene surface but is helical on the MoS2 surface. Despite that the amphiphilic environment at the nanosheet-water interface promotes the folding of the amphipathic proteins (such as HTT-N17), competitions between protein-nanosheet and intra-protein interactions yield very different protein conformations. Therefore, as engineered binding partners, nanomaterials might significantly affect the structures of adsorbed proteins.

  8. The evaluation of statins as potential inhibitors of the LEDGF/p75-HIV-1 integrase interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Angela T; Kriel, Frederik H; Papathanasopoulos, Maria A; Mosebi, Salerwe; Abrahams, Shaakira; Hewer, Raymond

    2015-03-01

    Lovastatin was identified through virtual screening as a potential inhibitor of the LEDGF/p75-HIV-1 integrase interaction. In an AlphaScreen assay, lovastatin inhibited the purified recombinant protein-protein interaction (IC50 = 1.97 ± 0.45 μm) more effectively than seven other tested statins. None of the eight statins, however, yielded antiviral activity in vitro, while only pravastatin lactone yielded detectable inhibition of HIV-1 integrase strand transfer activity (31.65% at 100 μm). A correlation between lipophilicity and increased cellular toxicity of the statins was observed.

  9. Modelling particles moving in a potential field with pairwise interactions and an application

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. R. Brillinger; Haiganoush Preisler; M. J. Wisdom

    2011-01-01

    Motions of particles in fields characterized by real-valued potential functions, are considered. Three particular expressions for potential functions are studied. One, U, depends on the ith particle’s location, ri(t) at times t

  10. Propagation-of-uncertainty from contact angle and streaming potential measurements to XDLVO model assessments of membrane-colloid interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthu, Satish; Childress, Amy; Brant, Jonathan

    2014-08-15

    Membrane fouling assessed from a fundamental standpoint within the context of the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) model. The DLVO model requires that the properties of the membrane and foulant(s) be quantified. Membrane surface charge (zeta potential) and free energy values are characterized using streaming potential and contact angle measurements, respectively. Comparing theoretical assessments for membrane-colloid interactions between research groups requires that the variability of the measured inputs be established. The impact that such variability in input values on the outcome from interfacial models must be quantified to determine an acceptable variance in inputs. An interlaboratory study was conducted to quantify the variability in streaming potential and contact angle measurements when using standard protocols. The propagation of uncertainty from these errors was evaluated in terms of their impact on the quantitative and qualitative conclusions on extended DLVO (XDLVO) calculated interaction terms. The error introduced into XDLVO calculated values was of the same magnitude as the calculated free energy values at contact and at any given separation distance. For two independent laboratories to draw similar quantitative conclusions regarding membrane-foulant interfacial interactions the standard error in contact angle values must be⩽2.5°, while that for the zeta potential values must be⩽7 mV.

  11. Identification of potential target levels for Central Baltic Sea fishing mortalities, taking multispecies interactions into account

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Morten; Neuenfeldt, Stefan; Eero, Margit

    2012-01-01

    The main biological interactions between Baltic cod, herring and sprat have been modelled in a stochastic multispecies (SMS) model. Based on this, a simple approach has been developed to quantify candidates for FMSY proxies (fishing mortality that produces the maximum sustainable yield) in a mult......The main biological interactions between Baltic cod, herring and sprat have been modelled in a stochastic multispecies (SMS) model. Based on this, a simple approach has been developed to quantify candidates for FMSY proxies (fishing mortality that produces the maximum sustainable yield...

  12. Organo-mineral interactions mask the true sorption potential of biochars in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Neera; Kookana, Rai S

    2009-03-01

    The sorption of carbaryl (1-naphthyl methyl carbamate) and ethion [O,O,O',O'-tetraethyl S,S'-methylene bis(phosphorodithioate)] was studied in whole soils as well as after treatment of soil with 2% hydrofluoric acid (HF) to remove paramagnetic materials and to oxidize most forms of labile carbon by photo-oxidation with high energy (UV) on organo-mineral interactions of char in whole soils. This has implications for the modification of surfaces of the freshly applied biochars in soils due to organo-mineral interactions.

  13. One spatial dimensional finite volume three-body interaction for a short-range potential

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Peng

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we use McGuire's model to describe scattering of three spinless identical particles in one spatial dimension, we first present analytic solutions of Faddeev's equation for scattering of three spinless particles in free space. The three particles interaction in finite volume is derived subsequently, and the quantization conditions by matching wave functions in free space and finite volume are presented in terms of two-body scattering phase shifts. The quantization conditions obtained in this work for short range interaction are L\\"uscher's formula like and consistent with Yang's results in \\cite{Yang:1967bm}.

  14. Potential turning points in cluster radioactivity

    OpenAIRE

    Basu, D. N.

    2002-01-01

    Effects of various nuclear interaction potentials on the decay lifetimes and the turning points of the WKB action integral has been studied. The microscopic nuclear potential obtained by folding in the density distribution functions of the two clusters with a realistic effective interaction has also been used to calculate the turning points. Half lives of alpha and ^{20}O cluster emissions from ^{228}Th have been calculated within the superasymmetric fission model using various phenomenologic...

  15. The structure of a conserved piezo channel domain reveals a topologically distinct β sandwich fold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamajaya, Aron; Kaiser, Jens T; Lee, Jonas; Reid, Michelle; Rees, Douglas C

    2014-10-07

    Piezo has recently been identified as a family of eukaryotic mechanosensitive channels composed of subunits containing over 2,000 amino acids, without recognizable sequence similarity to other channels. Here, we present the crystal structure of a large, conserved extramembrane domain located just before the last predicted transmembrane helix of C. elegans PIEZO, which adopts a topologically distinct β sandwich fold. The structure was also determined of a point mutation located on a conserved surface at the position equivalent to the human PIEZO1 mutation found in dehydrated hereditary stomatocytosis patients (M2225R). While the point mutation does not change the overall domain structure, it does alter the surface electrostatic potential that may perturb interactions with a yet-to-be-identified ligand or protein. The lack of structural similarity between this domain and any previously characterized fold, including those of eukaryotic and bacterial channels, highlights the distinctive nature of the Piezo family of eukaryotic mechanosensitive channels.

  16. Involvement of platelet-tumor cell interaction in immune evasion. Potential role of podocalyxin-like protein 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eAmo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Besides their essential role in hemostasis and thrombosis, platelets are involved in the onset of cancer metastasis by interacting with tumor cells. Platelets release secretory factors that promote tumor growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Furthermore, the formation of platelet-tumor cell aggregates in the bloodstream provides cancer cells with an immune escape mechanism by protecting circulating malignant cells from immune-mediated lysis by natural killer (NK cells. Platelet-tumor cell interaction is accomplished by specific adhesion molecules, including integrins, selectins, and their ligands. Podocalyxin-like protein 1 (PCLP1 is a selectin ligand protein which overexpression has been associated with several aggressive cancers. PCLP1 expression enhances cell adherence to platelets in an integrin-dependent process and through the interaction with P-selectin expressed on activated platelets. However, the involvement of PCLP1-induced tumor-platelet interaction in tumor immune evasion still remains unexplored. The identification of selectin ligands involved in the interaction of platelets with tumor cells may provide help for the development of effective therapies to restrain cancer cell dissemination. This article summarizes the current knowledge on molecules that participate in platelet-tumor cell interaction as well as discusses the potential role of PCLP1 as a molecule implicated in tumor immune evasion.

  17. Stretching Folding Instability and Nanoemulsions

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Chon U

    2009-01-01

    Here we show a folding-stretching instability in a microfluidic flow focusing device using silicon oil (100cSt) and water. The fluid dynamics video demonstrates an oscillating thread of oil focused by two co-flowing streams of water. We show several high-speed sequences of these oscillations with 30,000 frames/s. Once the thread is decelerated in a slower moving pool downstream an instability sets in and water-in-oil droplets are formed. We reveal the details of the pinch-off with 500,000 frames/s. The pinch-off is so repeatable that complex droplet patterns emerge. Some of droplets are below the resolution limit, thus smaller than 1 micrometer in diameter.

  18. Topological Solitons and Folded Proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Chernodub, M N; Niemi, Antti J

    2010-01-01

    We propose that protein loops can be interpreted as topological domain-wall solitons. They interpolate between ground states that are the secondary structures like alpha-helices and beta-strands. Entire proteins can then be folded simply by assembling the solitons together, one after another. We present a simple theoretical model that realizes our proposal and apply it to a number of biologically active proteins including 1VII, 2RB8, 3EBX (Protein Data Bank codes). In all the examples that we have considered we are able to construct solitons that reproduce secondary structural motifs such as alpha-helix-loop-alpha-helix and beta-sheet-loop-beta-sheet with an overall root-mean-square-distance accuracy of around 0.7 Angstrom or less for the central alpha-carbons, i.e. within the limits of current experimental accuracy.

  19. Protein folding and wring resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob; Bohr, Henrik; Brunak, Søren

    1997-01-01

    The polypeptide chain of a protein is shown to obey topological contraints which enable long range excitations in the form of wring modes of the protein backbone. Wring modes of proteins of specific lengths can therefore resonate with molecular modes present in the cell. It is suggested that prot......The polypeptide chain of a protein is shown to obey topological contraints which enable long range excitations in the form of wring modes of the protein backbone. Wring modes of proteins of specific lengths can therefore resonate with molecular modes present in the cell. It is suggested...... that protein folding takes place when the amplitude of a wring excitation becomes so large that it is energetically favorable to bend the protein backbone. The condition under which such structural transformations can occur is found, and it is shown that both cold and hot denaturation (the unfolding...

  20. Stepping into futures: exploring the potential of interactive media for participatory scenarios on social ecological systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervoort, J.M.; Kok, K.; Lammeren, van R.J.A.; Veldkamp, A.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a strategy for the development of interactive media scenarios to help communicate uncertainties and complexities in coupled human and natural systems. Insights arising from Complex Adaptive Systems theory advocate the need for more adaptive perspectives on natural resources