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Sample records for focused ultrasound heating

  1. Heating in vascular tissue and flow-through tissue phantoms induced by focused ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jinlan

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) can be used to control bleeding, both from individual blood vessels as well as from gross damage to the capillary bed. This process, called acoustic hemostasis, is being studied in the hope that such a method would ultimately provide a lifesaving treatment during the so-called "golden hour", a brief grace period after a severe trauma in which prompt therapy can save the life of an injured person. Thermal effects play a major role in occlusion of small vessels and also appear to contribute to the sealing of punctures in major blood vessels. However, aggressive ultrasound-induced tissue heating can also impact healthy tissue and can lead to deleterious mechanical bioeffects. Moreover, the presence of vascularity can limit one's ability to elevate the temperature of blood vessel walls owing to convective heat transport. In an effort to better understand the heating process in tissues with vascular structure we have developed a numerical simulation that couples models for ultrasound propagation, acoustic streaming, ultrasound heating and blood cooling in Newtonian viscous media. The 3-D simulation allows for the study of complicated biological structures and insonation geometries. We have also undertaken a series of in vitro experiments, in non-uniform flow-through tissue phantoms, designed to provide a ground truth verification of the model predictions. The calculated and measured results were compared over a range of values for insonation pressure, insonation time, and flow rate; we show good agreement between predictions and measurements. We then conducted a series of simulations that address two limiting problems of interest: hemostasis in small and large vessels. We employed realistic human tissue properties and considered more complex geometries. Results show that the heating pattern in and around a blood vessel is different for different vessel sizes, flow rates and for varying beam orientations relative to the flow axis

  2. Enhanced high intensity focused ultrasound heat deposition for more efficient hemostasis

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    Labuda, Cecille Pemberton

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is currently being developed for hemorrhage control since it provides rapid energy deposition in the form of heat in the HIFU focal region. When the HIFU focus is targeted on soft tissue wounds, the resulting elevation of tissue temperature cauterizes the tissues thus stopping the bleeding. If HIFU is targeted near blood vessels with millimeter-range diameter, the rate of heat deposition is limited by loss of heat to the blood flow. Maximizing the local heat deposition is important for the achievement of HIFU-induced hemorrhage control, or "hemostasis", near large vessels. In this study, the effect of a fiber device on the heat deposition in the HIFU focal region is investigated in tissue-mimicking flow phantoms with liquid albumen as the heat-sensitive denaturing flow fluid. The effect of the embedded fiber on albumen coagulation in the flow phantom is compared to the degree and rate of albumen coagulation when no fiber is present. The effect of the fiber device on the size of lesions formed in a heat-sensitive tissue-mimicking phantom is also investigated. Finally, finite difference time domain simulations are performed to determine the heat deposition in a tissue-mimicking phantom with a nylon disc embedded and a phantom with the nylon disc removed. The results of this study are quite promising for the possibility of increased efficacy of hemostasis for such a device in concert with HIFU in vessel-containing tissue volumes where HIFU alone is not completely effective.

  3. Evaluation of focused ultrasound algorithms: Issues for reducing pre-focal heating and treatment time.

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    Yiannakou, Marinos; Trimikliniotis, Michael; Yiallouras, Christos; Damianou, Christakis

    2016-02-01

    Due to the heating in the pre-focal field the delay between successive movements in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) are sometimes as long as 60s, resulting to treatment time in the order of 2-3h. Because there is generally a requirement to reduce treatment time, we were motivated to explore alternative transducer motion algorithms in order to reduce pre-focal heating and treatment time. A 1 MHz single element transducer with 4 cm diameter and 10 cm focal length was used. A simulation model was developed that estimates the temperature, thermal dose and lesion development in the pre-focal field. The simulated temperature history that was combined with the motion algorithms produced thermal maps in the pre-focal region. Polyacrylimde gel phantom was used to evaluate the induced pre-focal heating for each motion algorithm used, and also was used to assess the accuracy of the simulation model. Three out of the six algorithms having successive steps close to each other, exhibited severe heating in the pre-focal field. Minimal heating was produced with the algorithms having successive steps apart from each other (square, square spiral and random). The last three algorithms were improved further (with small cost in time), thus eliminating completely the pre-focal heating and reducing substantially the treatment time as compared to traditional algorithms. Out of the six algorithms, 3 were successful in eliminating the pre-focal heating completely. Because these 3 algorithms required no delay between successive movements (except in the last part of the motion), the treatment time was reduced by 93%. Therefore, it will be possible in the future, to achieve treatment time of focused ultrasound therapies shorter than 30 min. The rate of ablated volume achieved with one of the proposed algorithms was 71 cm(3)/h. The intention of this pilot study was to demonstrate that the navigation algorithms play the most important role in reducing pre-focal heating. By evaluating in

  4. Focused ultrasound in ophthalmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silverman RH

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ronald H Silverman1,2 1Department of Ophthalmology, Columbia University Medical Center, 2F.L. Lizzi Center for Biomedical Engineering, Riverside Research, New York, NY, USA Abstract: The use of focused ultrasound to obtain diagnostically significant information about the eye goes back to the 1950s. This review describes the historical and technological development of ophthalmic ultrasound and its clinical application and impact. Ultrasound, like light, can be focused, which is crucial for formation of high-resolution, diagnostically useful images. Focused, single-element, mechanically scanned transducers are most common in ophthalmology. Specially designed transducers have been used to generate focused, high-intensity ultrasound that through thermal effects has been used to treat glaucoma (via cilio-destruction, tumors, and other pathologies. Linear and annular transducer arrays offer synthetic focusing in which precise timing of the excitation of independently addressable array elements allows formation of a converging wavefront to create a focus at one or more programmable depths. Most recently, linear array-based plane-wave ultrasound, in which the array emits an unfocused wavefront and focusing is performed solely on received data, has been demonstrated for imaging ocular anatomy and blood flow. While the history of ophthalmic ultrasound extends back over half-a-century, new and powerful technologic advances continue to be made, offering the prospect of novel diagnostic capabilities. Keywords: ophthalmic ultrasound, ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM, high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU, ultrafast imaging, Doppler imaging 

  5. On a computational study for investigating acoustic streaming and heating during focused ultrasound ablation of liver tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solovchuk, Maxim A.; Sheu, Tony W.H.; Thiriet, Marc; Lin, Win-Li

    2013-01-01

    The influences of blood vessels and focused location on temperature distribution during high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation of liver tumors are studied numerically. A three-dimensional acoustics-thermal-fluid coupling model is employed to compute the temperature field in the hepatic cancerous region. The model construction is based on the linear Westervelt and bioheat equations as well as the nonlinear Navier–Stokes equations for the liver parenchyma and blood vessels. The effect of acoustic streaming is also taken into account in the present HIFU simulation study. Different blood vessel diameters and focal point locations were investigated. We found from this three-dimensional numerical study that in large blood vessels both the convective cooling and acoustic streaming can considerably change the temperature field and the thermal lesion near blood vessels. If the blood vessel is located within the beam width, both acoustic streaming and blood flow cooling effects should be addressed. The temperature rise on the blood vessel wall generated by a 1.0 MHz focused ultrasound transducer with the focal intensity 327 W/cm 2 was 54% lower when acoustic streaming effect was taken into account. Subject to the applied acoustic power the streaming velocity in a 3 mm blood vessel is 12 cm/s. Thirty percent of the necrosed volume can be reduced, when taking into account the acoustic streaming effect. -- Highlights: • 3D three-field coupling physical model for focused ultrasound tumor ablation is presented. • Acoustic streaming and blood flow cooling effects on ultrasound heating are investigated. • Acoustic streaming can considerably affect the temperature distribution. • The lesion can be reduced by 30% due to the acoustic streaming effect. • Temperature on the blood vessel wall is reduced by 54% due to the acoustic streaming effect

  6. The role of acoustic nonlinearity in tissue heating behind the rib cage using high intensity focused ultrasound phased array

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    Yuldashev, Petr V.; Shmeleva, Svetlana M.; Ilyin, Sergey A.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Gavrilov, Leonid R.; Khokhlova, Vera A.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate theoretically the effects of nonlinear propagation in a high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) field produced by a therapeutic phased array and the resultant heating of tissue behind a rib cage. Three configurations of focusing were simulated: in water, in water with ribs in the beam path, and in water with ribs backed by a layer of soft tissue. The Westervelt equation was used to model the nonlinear HIFU field and a 1 MHz phased array consisting of 254 circular elements was used as a boundary condition to the model. The temperature rise in tissue was modelled using the bioheat equation, and thermally necrosed volumes were calculated using the thermal dose formulation. The shapes of lesions predicted by the modelling were compared with those previously obtained in in vitro experiments at low power sonications. Intensity levels at the face of the array elements that corresponded to formation of high amplitude shock fronts in the focal region were determined as 10 W·cm−2 in the free field in water and 40 W·cm−2 in the presence of ribs. It was shown that exposures with shocks provided a substantial increase in tissue heating, and its better spatial localization in the main focal region only. The relative effects of overheating ribs and splitting of the focus due to the periodic structure of the ribs were therefore reduced. These results suggest that utilizing nonlinear propagation and shock formation effects can be beneficial for inducing confined HIFU lesions when irradiating through obstructions such as ribs. Design of compact therapeutic arrays to provide maximum power outputs with lower intensity levels at the elements is necessary to achieve shock wave regimes for clinically relevant sonication depths in tissue. PMID:23528338

  7. Heat transfer enhancement using 2MHz ultrasound.

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    Bulliard-Sauret, Odin; Ferrouillat, Sebastien; Vignal, Laure; Memponteil, Alain; Gondrexon, Nicolas

    2017-11-01

    The present work focuses on possible heat transfer enhancement from a heating plate towards tap water in forced convection by means of 2MHz ultrasound. The thermal approach allows to observe the increase of local convective heat transfer coefficients in the presence of ultrasound and to deduce a correlation between ultrasound power and Nusselt number. Heat transfer coefficient under ultrasound remains constant while heat transfer coefficient under silent conditions increases with Reynolds number from 900 up to 5000. Therefore, heat transfer enhancement factor ranges from 25% up to 90% for the same energy conditions (supplied ultrasonic power=110W and supplied thermal power=450W). In the same time cavitational activity due to 2MHz ultrasound emission was characterized from mechanical and chemical viewpoints without significant results. At least, Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements have been performed in order to investigate hydrodynamic modifications due to the presence of 2MHz ultrasound. It was therefore possible to propose a better understanding of heat transfer enhancement mechanism with high frequency ultrasound. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. CT and Ultrasound Guided Stereotactic High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, Bradford J.; Frenkel, V.; Viswanathan, A.; Dromi, S.; Oh, K.; Kam, A.; Li, K. C. P.; Yanof, J.; Bauer, C.; Kruecker, J.; Seip, R.

    2006-01-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of CT and B-mode Ultrasound (US) targeted HIFU, a prototype coaxial focused ultrasound transducer was registered and integrated to a CT scanner. CT and diagnostic ultrasound were used for HIFU targeting and monitoring, with the goals of both thermal ablation and non-thermal enhanced drug delivery. A 1 megahertz coaxial ultrasound transducer was custom fabricated and attached to a passive position-sensing arm and an active six degree-of-freedom robotic arm via a CT stereotactic frame. The outer therapeutic transducer with a 10 cm fixed focal zone was coaxially mounted to an inner diagnostic US transducer (2-4 megahertz, Philips Medical Systems). This coaxial US transducer was connected to a modified commercial focused ultrasound generator (Focus Surgery, Indianapolis, IN) with a maximum total acoustic power of 100 watts. This pre-clinical paradigm was tested for ability to heat tissue in phantoms with monitoring and navigation from CT and live US. The feasibility of navigation via image fusion of CT with other modalities such as PET and MRI was demonstrated. Heated water phantoms were tested for correlation between CT numbers and temperature (for ablation monitoring). The prototype transducer and integrated CT/US imaging system enabled simultaneous multimodality imaging and therapy. Pre-clinical phantom models validated the treatment paradigm and demonstrated integrated multimodality guidance and treatment monitoring. Temperature changes during phantom cooling corresponded to CT number changes. Contrast enhanced or non-enhanced CT numbers may potentially be used to monitor thermal ablation with HIFU. Integrated CT, diagnostic US, and therapeutic focused ultrasound bridges a gap between diagnosis and therapy. Preliminary results show that the multimodality system may represent a relatively inexpensive, accessible, and simple method of both targeting and monitoring HIFU effects. Small animal pre-clinical models may be translated to large

  9. CT and Ultrasound Guided Stereotactic High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Bradford J.; Yanof, J.; Frenkel, V.; Viswanathan, A.; Dromi, S.; Oh, K.; Kruecker, J.; Bauer, C.; Seip, R.; Kam, A.; Li, K. C. P.

    2006-05-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of CT and B-mode Ultrasound (US) targeted HIFU, a prototype coaxial focused ultrasound transducer was registered and integrated to a CT scanner. CT and diagnostic ultrasound were used for HIFU targeting and monitoring, with the goals of both thermal ablation and non-thermal enhanced drug delivery. A 1 megahertz coaxial ultrasound transducer was custom fabricated and attached to a passive position-sensing arm and an active six degree-of-freedom robotic arm via a CT stereotactic frame. The outer therapeutic transducer with a 10 cm fixed focal zone was coaxially mounted to an inner diagnostic US transducer (2-4 megahertz, Philips Medical Systems). This coaxial US transducer was connected to a modified commercial focused ultrasound generator (Focus Surgery, Indianapolis, IN) with a maximum total acoustic power of 100 watts. This pre-clinical paradigm was tested for ability to heat tissue in phantoms with monitoring and navigation from CT and live US. The feasibility of navigation via image fusion of CT with other modalities such as PET and MRI was demonstrated. Heated water phantoms were tested for correlation between CT numbers and temperature (for ablation monitoring). The prototype transducer and integrated CT/US imaging system enabled simultaneous multimodality imaging and therapy. Pre-clinical phantom models validated the treatment paradigm and demonstrated integrated multimodality guidance and treatment monitoring. Temperature changes during phantom cooling corresponded to CT number changes. Contrast enhanced or non-enhanced CT numbers may potentially be used to monitor thermal ablation with HIFU. Integrated CT, diagnostic US, and therapeutic focused ultrasound bridges a gap between diagnosis and therapy. Preliminary results show that the multimodality system may represent a relatively inexpensive, accessible, and simple method of both targeting and monitoring HIFU effects. Small animal pre-clinical models may be translated to large

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging for the exploitation of bubble-enhanced heating by high-intensity focused ultrasound: a feasibility study in ex vivo liver.

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    Elbes, Delphine; Denost, Quentin; Robert, Benjamin; Köhler, Max O; Tanter, Mickaël; Bruno, Quesson

    2014-05-01

    Bubble-enhanced heating (BEH) may be exploited to improve the heating efficiency of high-intensity focused ultrasound in liver and to protect tissues located beyond the focal point. The objectives of this study, performed in ex vivo pig liver, were (i) to develop a method to determine the acoustic power threshold for induction of BEH from displacement images measured by magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI), and (ii) to compare temperature distribution with MR thermometry for HIFU protocols with and without BEH. The acoustic threshold for generation of BEH was determined in ex vivo pig liver from MR-ARFI calibration curves of local tissue displacement resulting from sonication at different powers. Temperature distributions (MR thermometry) resulting from "conventional" sonications (20 W, 30 s) were compared with those from "composite" sonications performed at identical parameters, but after a HIFU burst pulse (0.5 s, acoustic power over the threshold for induction of BEH). Displacement images (MR-ARFI) were acquired between sonications to measure potential modifications of local tissue displacement associated with modifications of tissue acoustic characteristics induced by the burst HIFU pulse. The acoustic threshold for induction of BEH corresponded to a displacement amplitude of approximately 50 μm in ex vivo liver. The displacement and temperature images of the composite group exhibited a nearly spherical pattern, shifted approximately 4 mm toward the transducer, in contrast to elliptical shapes centered on the natural focal position for the conventional group. The gains in maximum temperature and displacement values were 1.5 and 2, and the full widths at half-maximum of the displacement data were 1.7 and 2.2 times larger than in the conventional group in directions perpendicular to ultrasound propagation axes. Combination of MR-ARFI and MR thermometry for calibration and exploitation of BEH appears to increase the efficiency and safety

  11. MR thermometry analysis program for laser- or high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU)-induced heating at a clinical MR scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Ju; Jeong, Ki Young; Oh, Seung Jae; Park, Eun Hae; Lee, Young Han; Suh, Jin Suck [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Hong [National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) thermometry is a noninvasive method for monitoring local temperature change during thermal therapy. In this study, a MR temperature analysis program was established for a laser with gold nanorods (GNRs) and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU)-induced heating MR thermometry. The MR temperature map was reconstructed using the water proton resonance frequency (PRF) method. The temperature-sensitive phase difference was acquired by using complex number subtraction instead of direct phase subtraction in order to avoid another phase unwrapping process. A temperature map-analyzing program was developed and implemented in IDL (Interactive Data Language) for effective temperature monitoring. This one program was applied to two different heating devices at a clinical MR scanner. All images were acquired with the fast spoiled gradient echo (fSPGR) pulse sequence on a 3.0 T GE Discovery MR750 scanner with an 8-channel knee array coil or with a home-built small surface coil. The analyzed temperature values were confirmed by using values simultaneously measured with an optical temperature probe (R{sup 2} = 0.996). The temperature change in small samples induced by a laser or by HIFU was analyzed by using a raw data, that consisted of complex numbers. This study shows that our MR thermometry analysis program can be used for thermal therapy study with a laser or HIFU at a clinical MR scanner. It can also be applied to temperature monitoring for any other thermal therapy based on the PRF method.

  12. Head phantoms for transcranial focused ultrasound.

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    Eames, Matthew D C; Farnum, Mercy; Khaled, Mohamad; Elias, W Jeff; Hananel, Arik; Snell, John W; Kassell, Neal F; Aubry, Jean-Francois

    2015-04-01

    In the ongoing endeavor of fine-tuning, the clinical application of transcranial MR-guided focused ultrasound (tcMRgFUS), ex-vivo studies wlkiith whole human skulls are of great use in improving the underlying technology guiding the accurate and precise thermal ablation of clinically relevant targets in the human skull. Described here are the designs, methods for fabrication, and notes on utility of three different ultrasound phantoms to be used for brain focused ultrasound research. Three different models of phantoms are developed and tested to be accurate, repeatable experimental options to provide means to further this research. The three models are a cadaver, a gel-filled skull, and a head mold containing a skull and filled with gel that mimics the brain and the skin. Each was positioned in a clinical tcMRgFUS system and sonicated at 1100 W (acoustic) for 12 s at different locations. Maximum temperature rise as measured by MR thermometry was recorded and compared against clinical data for a similar neurosurgical target. Results are presented as heating efficiency in units (°C/kW/s) for direct comparison to available clinical data. The procedure for casting thermal phantom material is presented. The utility of each phantom model is discussed in the context of various tcMRgFUS research areas. The cadaveric phantom model, gel-filled skull model, and full head phantom model had heating efficiencies of 5.3, 4.0, and 3.9 °C/(kW/s), respectively, compared to a sample clinical heating efficiency of 2.6 °C/(kW/s). In the seven research categories considered, the cadaveric phantom model was the most versatile, though less practical compared to the ex-vivo skull-based phantoms. Casting thermal phantom material was shown to be an effective way to prepare tissue-mimicking material for the phantoms presented. The phantom models presented are all useful in tcMRgFUS research, though some are better suited to a limited subset of applications depending on the researchers

  13. Synthetic focusing in ultrasound modulated tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Kuchment, Peter

    2010-09-01

    Several hybrid tomographic methods utilizing ultrasound modulation have been introduced lately. Success of these methods hinges on the feasibility of focusing ultrasound waves at an arbitrary point of interest. Such focusing, however, is difficult to achieve in practice. We thus propose a way to avoid the use of focused waves through what we call synthetic focusing, i.e. by reconstructing the would-be response to the focused modulation from the measurements corresponding to realistic unfocused waves. Examples of reconstructions from simulated data are provided. This non-technical paper describes only the general concept, while technical details will appear elsewhere. © 2010 American Institute of Mathematical Sciences.

  14. Pressure and temperature distribution in biological tissues by focused ultrasound

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    Mal, Ajit K.; Feng, Feng; Kabo, Michael; Wang, Jeffrey; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2003-07-01

    The interaction between ultrasound and biological tissues has been the subject of a number of investigators for nearly half a century and the number of applications of high intensity, focused ultrasound for therapeutic purposes continues to grow. This paper is motivated by possible medical applications of focused ultrasound in minimally invasive treatment of a variety of musculoskeletal disorders that are responsive to thermal treatment. The mechanical and thermal effects in a subject"s body induced by high-frequency ultrasound are simulated using PZFlex, a finite element based program. The FEM model described in this report is of a transverse section of the body at the level of the second lumbar vertebra (L2) extracted from a CT image. In order to protect the nerves inside the spinal canal as well as to obtain an effective heating result at the focal region within the intervertebral disk, a suitable orientation of axis of the focused ultrasound lens have to be determined in advance. The pressure, energy loss distribution and temperature distribution are investigated in this paper with the different orientations of the axis and different transverse diameter of the spherical ultrasound lens. Since nonlinear effects are expected to be important in the therapeutic application in some literatures, this paper also demonstrates the effects of nonlinearities on the pressure and temperature distribution induced by focused ultrasound in a two dimensional model. Finally, a comparison of the results between linear and nonlinear cases is reported.

  15. Manipulation of Microbubble Clusters Using Focused Ultrasound

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    Matsuzaki, Hironobu; Osaki, Taichi; Kawaguchi, Kei; Unga, Johan; Ichiyanagi, Mitsuhisa; Azuma, Takashi; Suzuki, Ryo; Maruyama, Kazuo; Takagi, Shu

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, microbubbles (MBs) are expected to be utilized for the ultrasound drug delivery system (DDS). For the MB-DDS, it is important to establish a method of controlling bubbles and bubble clusters using ultrasound field. The objective of this study is to clarify behaviors of bubble clusters with various physical conditions. MBs in the ultrasound field are subjected to the primary Bjerknes force. The force traps MBs at the focal region of the focused ultrasound field. The trapped MBs form a bubble cluster at the region. A bubble cluster continues growing with absorbing surrounding bubbles until it reaches a maximum size beyond which it disappears from the focal region. In the present study, two kinds of MBs are used for the experiment. One is Sonazoid with average diameter of 2.6 um and resonant frequency of 5 MHz. The other is developed by Teikyo Univ., with average diameter of 1.5 um and presumed resonant frequency of 4 MHz. The bubble cluster's behaviors are analyzed using the high-speed camera. Sonazoid clusters have larger critical size than the other in every frequency, and its cluster size is inversely proportional to the ultrasound frequency, while Teikyo-bubble clusters have different tendency. These results are discussed in the presentation.

  16. [Transcranial focused ultrasound: Neurological applications of magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound].

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    Werner, B; Martin, E

    2015-11-01

    Ultrasound surgery uses the thermal effects of the absorption of high-intensity focused ultrasound to induce localized thermal ablation of diseased tissue. The clinical introduction in recent years was made possible by a better understanding of the interactions of ultrasound with biological structures and the resulting physiological changes, major advances in the design of ultrasound applicators and the development of imaging modalities for reliable guiding the interventions. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) is especially appealing for applications in the brain where target volumes have to be accessed with high precision without inflicting collateral damage to surrounding healthy tissue. In 2013 a MRgFUS system was CE certified for the treatment of functional neurological disorders, such as chronic neuropathic pain and movement disorders. Currently, some 400 patients have been treated worldwide using this system, which is also undergoing clinical testing for the treatment of primary brain tumors and brain metastases. This article describes the technical basis of transcranial focused ultrasound neurosurgery and summarizes the current clinical experience of this new class of image-guided, non-invasive interventions.

  17. Optimizing sonication protocols for transthoracic focused ultrasound surgery

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    Gao, J.; Volovick, A.; Cao, R.; Nabi, G.; Cochran, S.; Melzer, A.; Huang, Z.

    2012-11-01

    During transthoracic focused ultrasound surgery (TFUS), the intervening ribs absorb and reflect the majority of the ultrasound energy excited by an acoustic source, resulting in pain, bone injuries and insufficient energy delivered to the target organs of liver, kidney, and pancreas. Localized hot spots may also exist at the interfaces between the ribs and soft tissue and in the highly absorptive regions such as the skin and connective tissue. The aims of this study were to clarify the effects of focal beam distortion and frequency-dependent rib heating in TFUS and to propose possible techniques to reduce the side-effects of rib heating and increase ultrasound efficacy. Frequency-dependent heating at the target and the ribs were estimated using finite element analysis (PZFlex, Weidlinger Associates Inc, USA) along with experimental verification on a range of different phantoms. The ratio of ultrasonic power density at the target and the ribs, the time-varying spatial distribution of temperature, and the ablated focus of each sonication were taken as key indicators to determine the optimal operating frequency. Comparison with a patient specific model was also made. TFUS seems to be useful to treat tumours that are small and near the surface of the abdominal organs. For targets deep inside these organs, severe attenuation of energy occurs, suggesting that purely ultrasound thermal ablation with advanced heating patterns will have limited effects in improving the treatment efficacy. Results demonstrate that the optimal ultrasound frequency is around 0.8 MHz for the configurations considered, but this may shift to higher frequencies with changes in the axial and lateral positions of the tumours relative to the ribs. To date, we have elucidated the most important effects and correlated these with idealised anatomical geometry. The changes in frequency and other techniques such as selection of excited element patterns in FUS arrays had some effect. However, more advanced

  18. Treatment of Movement Disorders With Focused Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S Fishman

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Although the use of ultrasound as a potential therapeutic modality in the brain has been under study for several decades, relatively few neuroscientists or neurologists are familiar with this technology. Stereotactic brain lesioning had been widely used as a treatment for medically refractory patients with essential tremor (ET, Parkinson disease (PD, and dystonia but has been largely replaced by deep brain stimulation (DBS surgery, with advantages both in safety and efficacy. However, DBS is associated with complications including intracerebral hemorrhage, infection, and hardware malfunction. The occurrence of these complications has spurred interest in less invasive stereotactic brain lesioning methods including magnetic resonance imaging–guided high intensity–focused ultrasound (FUS surgery. Engineering advances now allow sound waves to be targeted noninvasively through the skull to a brain target. High intensities of sonic energy can create a coagulation lesion similar to that of older radiofrequency stereotactic methods, but without opening the skull, recent Food and Drug Administration approval of unilateral thalamotomy for treatment of ET. Clinical studies of stereotactic FUS for aspects of PD are underway. Moderate intensity, pulsed FUS has also demonstrated the potential to safely open the blood-brain barrier for localized delivery of therapeutics including proteins, genes, and cell-based therapy for PD and related disorders. The goal of this review is to provide basic and clinical neuroscientists with a level of understanding to interact with medical physicists, biomedical engineers, and radiologists to accelerate the application of this powerful technology to brain disease

  19. Integrated ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging for simultaneous temperature and cavitation monitoring during focused ultrasound therapies.

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    Arvanitis, Costas D; McDannold, Nathan

    2013-11-01

    Ultrasound can be used to noninvasively produce different bioeffects via viscous heating, acoustic cavitation, or their combination, and these effects can be exploited to develop a wide range of therapies for cancer and other disorders. In order to accurately localize and control these different effects, imaging methods are desired that can map both temperature changes and cavitation activity. To address these needs, the authors integrated an ultrasound imaging array into an MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) system to simultaneously visualize thermal and mechanical effects via passive acoustic mapping (PAM) and MR temperature imaging (MRTI), respectively. The system was tested with an MRgFUS system developed for transcranial sonication for brain tumor ablation in experiments with a tissue mimicking phantom and a phantom-filled ex vivo macaque skull. In experiments on cavitation-enhanced heating, 10 s continuous wave sonications were applied at increasing power levels (30-110 W) until broadband acoustic emissions (a signature for inertial cavitation) were evident. The presence or lack of signal in the PAM, as well as its magnitude and location, were compared to the focal heating in the MRTI. Additional experiments compared PAM with standard B-mode ultrasound imaging and tested the feasibility of the system to map cavitation activity produced during low-power (5 W) burst sonications in a channel filled with a microbubble ultrasound contrast agent. When inertial cavitation was evident, localized activity was present in PAM and a marked increase in heating was observed in MRTI. The location of the cavitation activity and heating agreed on average after registration of the two imaging modalities; the distance between the maximum cavitation activity and focal heating was -3.4 ± 2.1 mm and -0.1 ± 3.3 mm in the axial and transverse ultrasound array directions, respectively. Distortions and other MRI issues introduced small uncertainties in the PAM

  20. Rapid prototyping fabrication of focused ultrasound transducers.

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    Kim, Yohan; Maxwell, Adam D; Hall, Timothy L; Xu, Zhen; Lin, Kuang-Wei; Cain, Charles A

    2014-09-01

    Rapid prototyping (RP) fabrication techniques are currently widely used in diverse industrial and medical fields, providing substantial advantages in development time and costs in comparison to more traditional manufacturing processes. This paper presents a new method for the fabrication of high-intensity focused ultrasound transducers using RP technology. The construction of a large-aperture hemispherical transducer designed by computer software is described to demonstrate the process. The transducer was conceived as a modular design consisting of 32 individually focused 50.8-mm (2-in) PZT-8 element modules distributed in a 300-mm hemispherical scaffold with a geometric focus of 150 mm. The entire structure of the array, including the module housings and the hemispherical scaffold was fabricated through a stereolithography (SLA) system using a proprietary photopolymer. The PZT elements were bonded to the lenses through a quarter-wave tungsten-epoxy matching layer developed in-house specifically for this purpose. Modules constructed in this manner displayed a high degree of electroacoustic consistency, with an electrical impedance mean and standard deviation of 109 ± 10.2 Ω for the 32 elements. Time-of-flight measurements for individually pulsed modules mounted on the hemispherical scaffold showed that all pulses arrived at the focus within a 350 ns range, indicating a good degree of element alignment. Pressure profile measurements of the fully assembled transducer also showed close agreement with simulated results. The measured focal beam FWHM dimensions were 1.9 × 4.0 mm (1.9 × 3.9 mm simulated) in the transversal and axial directions respectively. Total material expenses associated with the construction of the transducer were approximately 5000 USD (as of 2011). The versatility and lower fabrication costs afforded by RP methods may be beneficial in the development of complex transducer geometries suitable for a variety of research and clinical applications.

  1. Multi-gradient echo MR thermometry for monitoring of the near-field area during MR-guided high intensity focused ultrasound heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Mie K; de Greef, Martijn; Bouwman, Job G; Moonen, Chrit T W; Viergever, Max A; Bartels, Lambertus W

    2015-10-07

    The multi-gradient echo MR thermometry (MGE MRT) method is proposed to use at the interface of the muscle and fat layers found in the abdominal wall, to monitor MR-HIFU heating. As MGE MRT uses fat as a reference, it is field-drift corrected. Relative temperature maps were reconstructed by subtracting absolute temperature maps. Because the absolute temperature maps are reconstructed of individual scans, MGE MRT provides the flexibility of interleaved mapping of temperature changes between two arbitrary time points. The method's performance was assessed in an ex vivo water bath experiment. An ex vivo HIFU experiment was performed to show the method's ability to monitor heating of consecutive HIFU sonications and to estimate cooling time constants, in the presence of field drift. The interleaved use between scans of a clinical protocol was demonstrated in vivo in a patient during a clinical uterine fibroid treatment. The relative temperature measurements were accurate (mean absolute error 0.3 °C) and provided excellent visualization of the heating of consecutive HIFU sonications. Maps were reconstructed of estimated cooling time constants and mean ROI values could be well explained by the applied heating pattern. Heating upon HIFU sonication and subsequent cooling could be observed in the in vivo demonstration.

  2. High Voltage Staircase Drive Circuit for Triggered High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Keisuke; Okada, Jumpei; Nakamura, Kotaro; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2012-07-01

    In triggered high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment, cavitation clouds are produced by extremely high intensity trigger pulses and enhance the effect of following heating waves. The ultrasound intensity must be quickly changed from that for trigger pulses to that for heating waves before cavitation clouds vanish. We newly designed and constructed a class D amplifier based on a staircase voltage drive concept, which has the capability of outputting high voltage waves for trigger pulses and continuous waves for heating waves and the capability of fast switching between the two modes. Its efficacy was confirmed by an experiment with a BSA containing polyacrylamide gel.

  3. An integrated ultrasound-guided high intensity focused ultrasound system for in-vivo experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dalong; Ebbini, Emad S.

    2017-03-01

    We present the system architecture of an integrated Ultrasound-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (USgHIFU) system for image-guided surgery and temperature tracking in vivo. The system is capable of operating with multiple frontends. Current implementation has a SonixRP for imaging and a custom designed dual mode ultrasound array (DMUA) system (32Tx/32Rx) for imaging/therapy. The highlights of the system include a fully-programmable, multiple data stream capable data processing engine, and an arbitrarily programmable high power array driver that is able to synthesize complex beam patterns in space and time. The data processing engine features a pipeline-style design that can be programmed on-the-fly by re-arranging the pre-verified GPU-accelerated high performance pipeline blocks, which cover an extensive range from basic functions such as filtering to specialized processing like speckle tracking. Furthermore, the pipeline design also has the option of bringing in MATLAB (Mathworks, Natick, MA, US) as part of the processing chain, thus vastly increase the capability of the system. By properly balancing the processing load between GPU-enabled routine and MATLAB script. This allows one to achieve a high degree of flexibility while meeting real-time constraints. Results are presented from in vivo rat experiment. Where low dose of therapeutic ultrasound was delivered into the hind limb of the Copenhagen rats using DMUA and temperature was tracked using a linear probe (HST, Ultrasonix). The data is processed in realtime with MATLAB in the loop to perform temperature regularization. Results show that we can reliably track the low temperature heating in the presence of motion artifacts (respiration and pulsation).

  4. MR-guided Focused Ultrasound for Uterine Fibroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share your patient story here Related Articles and Media Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Body Uterine Fibroid Embolization (UFE) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Blood Clots Images related to MR-guided Focused Ultrasound for Uterine ...

  5. Noninvasive skin tightening: focus on new ultrasound techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabi SG

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sabrina Guillen Fabi Goldman, Butterwick, Fitzpatrick, Groff and Fabi, Cosmetic Laser Dermatology, San Diego, CA, USA Abstract: Microfocused ultrasound (MFU has been recently developed to meet the ever-growing public demand for achieving significant, noninvasive skin lifting and tightening. MFU can be focused on subcutaneous tissue where the temperature briefly reaches greater than 60°C, producing small (<1 mm3 thermal coagulation points to a depth of up to 5 mm within the mid-to-deep reticular layer of the dermis and subdermis. The intervening papillary dermal and epidermal layers of skin remain unaffected. The application of heat at these discrete thermal coagulation points causes collagen fibers in the facial planes such as the superficial musculoaponeurotic system and platysma, as well as the deep reticular dermis, to become denatured, contracting and stimulating de novo collagen. A commercially available device combines MFU with high-resolution ultrasound imaging (MFU-V, which enables visualization of tissue planes to a depth of 8 mm and allows the user to see where the MFU energy will be applied (Ultherapy®; Ulthera Inc., Mesa, AZ, USA. Using different transducers, MFU-V treatment can be customized to meet the unique physical characteristics of each patient by adjusting energy and focal depth of the emitted ultrasound. By targeting the facial superficial musculoaponeurotic system, noninvasive tightening and lifting of sagging facial and neck skin and improvements in the appearance of wrinkles can be achieved. MFU-V can also improve lines and wrinkles of the décolleté. Treatment protocols for the use of MFU-V continue to be refined, and its use in combination with other rejuvenation techniques has been demonstrated. Brief discomfort that often occurs during treatment can be minimized with oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Other treatment-related adverse events include transient erythema, edema, and occasional bruising. MFU-V is

  6. Focused ultrasound influence on calcein-loaded thermosensitive stealth liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novell, Anthony; Al Sabbagh, Chantal; Escoffre, Jean-Michel; Gaillard, Cédric; Tsapis, Nicolas; Fattal, Elias; Bouakaz, Ayache

    2015-06-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) is a versatile technology for non-invasive thermal therapies in oncology. Indeed, this technology has great potential for local heat-mediated drug delivery from thermosensitive liposomes (TSLs), thus improving therapeutic efficacy and reducing toxicity profiles. In the present study we evaluated the influence of FUS parameters on the release of calcein from TSLs used to model a hydrophilic drug. Quantitative calcein release from TSLs (DPPC/CHOL/DSPE-PEG2000: 90/5/5) and non-thermosensitive liposomes (NTSLs) (DPPC/CHOL/DSPE-PEG2000: 65/30/5) was measured by spectrofluorimetry after both water bath and FUS-induced in vitro heating. The heating of TSLs at 42 °C in a water bath resulted in a maximum calcein release of 45%. No additional calcein release was observed at temperatures above 42 °C. A similar percentage of calcein release was achieved when TSLs were exposed to 1 MHz sinusoidal waves at peak negative pressure of 1.5 MPa, 40% duty cycle, for 10 min (i.e. above 42 °C). No release was detected when NTSLs were heated in a water bath. For both TSLs and NTSLs, the calcein release was increased by more than 10% for acoustic pressures ranging from 1.5 MPa to 2 MPa. This additional release was attributed to the mechanical stress generated by FUS, which was sufficient to disrupt the liposomal membrane. Furthermore, analysis of cryo-TEM images showed a significant decrease in liposome size (14%) induced by the thermal effect, whereas the liposome diameter remained unaffected by the FUS-triggered non-thermal effects.

  7. Spatial filters for focusing ultrasound images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Gori, Paola

    2001-01-01

    Traditionally focusing is done by taking out one sample in the received signal from each transducer element and then sum these signals. This method does not take into account the temporal or spatial spread of the received signal from a point scatterer and does not make an optimal focus of the data...... for beamforming the received RF signals from the individual transducer elements. The matched filter is applied on RF signals from individual transducer elements, thus properly taking into account the spatial spread of the received signal. The method can be applied to any transducer and can also be used...... for synthetic aperture imaging for single element transducers. It is evaluated using the Field II program. Data from a single 3 MHz transducer focused at a distance of 80 mm is processed. Far from the transducer focal region, the processing greatly improves the image resolution: the lateral slice...

  8. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Therapy: an Overview for Radiologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Sun; Rhim, Hyun Chul; Lim, Hyo Keun; Choi, Dong Il [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Min Joo [College of Medicine, Cheju National University, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-08-15

    High-intensity focused ultrasound therapy is a novel, emerging, therapeutic modality that uses ultrasound waves, propagated through tissue media, as carriers of energy. This completely non-invasive technology has great potential for tumor ablation as well as hemostasis, thrombolysis and targeted drug/gene delivery. However, the application of this technology still has many drawbacks. It is expected that current obstacles to implementation will be resolved in the near future. In this review, we provide an overview of high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy from the basic physics to recent clinical studies with an interventional radiologist's perspective for the purpose of improving the general understanding of this cutting-edge technology as well as speculating on future developments

  9. Controlled tissue emulsification produced by high intensity focused ultrasound shock waves and millisecond boiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhlova, Tatiana D; Canney, Michael S; Khokhlova, Vera A; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A; Crum, Lawrence A; Bailey, Michael R

    2011-11-01

    In high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) applications, tissue may be thermally necrosed by heating, emulsified by cavitation, or, as was recently discovered, emulsified using repetitive millisecond boiling caused by shock wave heating. Here, this last approach was further investigated. Experiments were performed in transparent gels and ex vivo bovine heart tissue using 1, 2, and 3 MHz focused transducers and different pulsing schemes in which the pressure, duty factor, and pulse duration were varied. A previously developed derating procedure to determine in situ shock amplitudes and the time-to-boil was refined. Treatments were monitored using B-mode ultrasound. Both inertial cavitation and boiling were observed during exposures, but emulsification occurred only when shocks and boiling were present. Emulsified lesions without thermal denaturation were produced with shock amplitudes sufficient to induce boiling in less than 20 ms, duty factors of less than 0.02, and pulse lengths shorter than 30 ms. Higher duty factors or longer pulses produced varying degrees of thermal denaturation combined with mechanical emulsification. Larger lesions were obtained using lower ultrasound frequencies. The results show that shock wave heating and millisecond boiling is an effective and reliable way to emulsify tissue while monitoring the treatment with ultrasound.

  10. Numerical simulations of clinical focused ultrasound functional neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulkkinen, Aki; Werner, Beat; Martin, Ernst; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2014-04-01

    A computational model utilizing grid and finite difference methods were developed to simulate focused ultrasound functional neurosurgery interventions. The model couples the propagation of ultrasound in fluids (soft tissues) and solids (skull) with acoustic and visco-elastic wave equations. The computational model was applied to simulate clinical focused ultrasound functional neurosurgery treatments performed in patients suffering from therapy resistant chronic neuropathic pain. Datasets of five patients were used to derive the treatment geometry. Eight sonications performed in the treatments were then simulated with the developed model. Computations were performed by driving the simulated phased array ultrasound transducer with the acoustic parameters used in the treatments. Resulting focal temperatures and size of the thermal foci were compared quantitatively, in addition to qualitative inspection of the simulated pressure and temperature fields. This study found that the computational model and the simulation parameters predicted an average of 24 ± 13% lower focal temperature elevations than observed in the treatments. The size of the simulated thermal focus was found to be 40 ± 13% smaller in the anterior-posterior direction and 22 ± 14% smaller in the inferior-superior direction than in the treatments. The location of the simulated thermal focus was off from the prescribed target by 0.3 ± 0.1 mm, while the peak focal temperature elevation observed in the measurements was off by 1.6 ± 0.6 mm. Although the results of the simulations suggest that there could be some inaccuracies in either the tissue parameters used, or in the simulation methods, the simulations were able to predict the focal spot locations and temperature elevations adequately for initial treatment planning performed to assess, for example, the feasibility of sonication. The accuracy of the simulations could be improved if more precise ultrasound tissue properties (especially of the

  11. Focused ultrasound as a tool to input sensory information to humans (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilov, L. R.; Tsirulnikov, E. M.

    2012-01-01

    This review is devoted to the analysis of studies and implementations related to the use of focused ultrasound for functional effects on neuroreceptor structures. Special attention was paid to the stimulation of neuroreceptor structures in order to input sensory information to humans. This branch of medical and physiological acoustics appeared in Russia in the early 1970s and was being efficiently developed up to the late 1980s. Then, due to lack of financial support, only individual researchers remained at this field and, as a result, we have no full- fledged theoretical research and practical implementations in this area yet. Many promising possibilities of using functional effects of focused ultrasound in medicine and physiology have remained unimplemented for a long time. However, new interesting ideas and approaches have appeared in recent years. Very recently, very questionable projects have been reported related to the use of ultrasound for targeted functional effects on the human brain performed in some laboratories. In this review, the stages of the development of scientific research devoted to the functional effects of focused ultrasound are described. By activating the neuroreceptor structures of the skin by means pulses of focused ultrasound, one can cause all the sensations perceived by human beings through the skin in everyday life, such as tactile sensations, thermal (heat and cold), tickling, itching, and various types of pain. Stimulation of the ear labyrinth of humans with normal hearing using amplitude-modulated ultrasound causes auditory sensations corresponding to an audio modulating signal (pure tones, music, speech, etc.). Activation of neuroreceptor structures by means of focused ultrasound is used for the diagnosis of various neurological and skin diseases, as well as hearing disorders. It has been shown that the activation is related to the mechanical action of ultrasound, for example, by the radiation force, as well as to the direct

  12. Enhancement of Heat Transfer by Ultrasound: Review and Recent Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Legay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes some applications of ultrasonic vibrations regarding heat transfer enhancement techniques. Research literature is reviewed, with special attention to examples for which ultrasonic technology was used alongside a conventional heat transfer process in order to enhance it. In several industrial applications, the use of ultrasound is often a way to increase productivity in the process itself, but also to take advantage of various subsequent phenomena. The relevant example brought forward here concerns heat exchangers, where it was found that ultrasound not only increases heat transfer rates, but might also be a solution to fouling reduction.

  13. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Monitoring using Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) under boiling or slow denaturation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Gary Y.; Marquet, Fabrice; Wang, Shutao; Apostolakis, Iason-Zacharias; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2015-01-01

    Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) is a recently developed High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring method that utilizes an amplitude-modulated therapeutic ultrasound beam to induce an oscillatory radiation force at the HIFU focus and estimates the focal tissue displacement to monitor the HIFU thermal treatment. In this study, the performance of HMIFU under acoustic, thermal and mechanical effects were investigated. The performance of HMIFU was assessed in ex vivo canine liver specimens (n=13) under slow denaturation or boiling regimes. Passive Cavitation Detector (PCD) was used to assess the acoustic cavitation activity while a bare-wire thermocouple was used to monitor the focal temperature change. During lesioning with slow denaturation, high quality displacements (correlation coefficient above 0.97) were observed under minimum cavitation noise, indicating tissue the initial-softening-then-stiffening property change. During HIFU with boiling, HMIFU monitored a consistent change in lesion-to-background displacement contrast (0.46±0.37) despite the presence of strong cavitation noise due to boiling during lesion formation. Therefore, HMIFU effectively monitored softening-then-stiffening during lesioning under slow denaturation, and detected lesioning under boiling with a distinct change in displacement contrast under boiling in the presence of cavitation. In conclusion, HMIFU was shown effective in HIFU monitoring and lesioning identification without being significantly affected by cavitation noise. PMID:26168177

  14. High-intensity focused ultrasound monitoring using harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) under boiling or slow denaturation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Gary Y; Marquet, Fabrice; Wang, Shutao; Apostolakis, Iason-Zacharias; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-07-01

    Harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) is a recently developed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring method that utilizes an amplitude-modulated therapeutic ultrasound beam to induce an oscillatory radiation force at the HIFU focus and estimates the focal tissue displacement to monitor the HIFU thermal treatment. In this study, the performance of HMIFU under acoustic, thermal, and mechanical effects was investigated. The performance of HMIFU was assessed in ex vivo canine liver specimens (n = 13) under slow denaturation or boiling regimes. A passive cavitation detector (PCD) was used to assess the acoustic cavitation activity, and a bare-wire thermocouple was used to monitor the focal temperature change. During lesioning with slow denaturation, high quality displacements (correlation coefficient above 0.97) were observed under minimum cavitation noise, indicating the tissue initial-softening-then- stiffening property change. During HIFU with boiling, HMIFU monitored a consistent change in lesion-to-background displacement contrast (0.46 ± 0.37) despite the presence of strong cavitation noise due to boiling during lesion formation. Therefore, HMIFU effectively monitored softening-then-stiffening during lesioning under slow denaturation, and detected lesioning under boiling with a distinct change in displacement contrast under boiling in the presence of cavitation. In conclusion, HMIFU was shown under both boiling and slow denaturation regimes to be effective in HIFU monitoring and lesioning identification without being significantly affected by cavitation noise.

  15. Combined ultrasound and MR imaging to guide focused ultrasound therapies in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvanitis, Costas D; McDannold, Nathan; Livingstone, Margaret S

    2013-01-01

    Several emerging therapies with potential for use in the brain, harness effects produced by acoustic cavitation—the interaction between ultrasound and microbubbles either generated during sonication or introduced into the vasculature. Systems developed for transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) thermal ablation can enable their clinical translation, but methods for real-time monitoring and control are currently lacking. Acoustic emissions produced during sonication can provide information about the location, strength and type of the microbubble oscillations within the ultrasound field, and they can be mapped in real-time using passive imaging approaches. Here, we tested whether such mapping can be achieved transcranially within a clinical brain MRgFUS system. We integrated an ultrasound imaging array into the hemisphere transducer of the MRgFUS device. Passive cavitation maps were obtained during sonications combined with a circulating microbubble agent at 20 targets in the cingulate cortex in three macaques. The maps were compared with MRI-evident tissue effects. The system successfully mapped microbubble activity during both stable and inertial cavitation, which was correlated with MRI-evident transient blood–brain barrier disruption and vascular damage, respectively. The location of this activity was coincident with the resulting tissue changes within the expected resolution limits of the system. While preliminary, these data clearly demonstrate, for the first time, that it is possible to construct maps of stable and inertial cavitation transcranially, in a large animal model, and under clinically relevant conditions. Further, these results suggest that this hybrid ultrasound/MRI approach can provide comprehensive guidance for targeted drug delivery via blood–brain barrier disruption and other emerging ultrasound treatments, facilitating their clinical translation. We anticipate that it will also prove to be an important research tool that

  16. Clinical applications for magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU): present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, Samatha; Rieke, Viola; Kohi, Maureen; Westphalen, Antonio C.

    2013-01-01

    It has been well known for decades that high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) generates heat in tissues resulting in coagulative necrosis. Implementation, however, has been slow, due to difficulties with finding an appropriate imaging modality that could not only guide treatment, but also provide real-time thermal feedback. These problems have been overcome with the newest magnetic resonance-guided high intensity focused ultrasound systems (MRgHIFU). With its superior spatial resolution enabling accurate image guidance coupled with its ability to provide real-time thermography during treatments, MRI is moving further into the realm of therapeutics for oncologic patient care. This article will discuss the implementation of an MR-guided HIFU system, current clinical indications and touch on future directions.

  17. Noninvasive treatment of focal adenomyosis with MR-guided focused ultrasound in two patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laveena Polina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenomyosis is a common benign gynecological disorder presenting with dysmenorrhea, menorrhagia, and pressure symptoms. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS utilizes precisely focused USG waves to generate and maintain high temperatures within the targeted tissue to achieve protein denaturation and coagulative necrosis. The heat generated is monitored using MRI images acquired in real-time in three planes. We present two cases of focal adenomyosis treated with MRgFUS showing good symptomatic relief at 3 and 6 months follow-up.

  18. Feasibility of MRI-guided Focused Ultrasound as Organ-Sparing Treatment for Testicular Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staruch, Robert; Curiel, Laura; Chopra, Rajiv; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2009-04-01

    High cure rates for testicular cancer have prompted interest in organ-sparing surgery for patients with bilateral disease or single testis. Focused ultrasound (FUS) ablation could offer a noninvasive approach to organ-sparing surgery. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of using MR thermometry to guide organ-sparing focused ultrasound surgery in the testis. The testes of anesthetized rabbits were sonicated in several discrete locations using a single-element focused transducer operating at 2.787MHz. Focal heating was visualized with MR thermometry, using a measured PRF thermal coefficient of -0.0089±0.0003 ppm/° C. Sonications at 3.5-14 acoustic watts applied for 30 seconds produced maximum temperature elevations of 10-80° C, with coagulation verified by histology. Coagulation of precise volumes in the testicle is feasible with MRI-guided focused ultrasound. Variability in peak temperature for given sonication parameters suggests the need for online temperature feedback control.

  19. Pulmonary Vein Isolation by High Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Antz

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary vein isolation (PVI using radiofrequency current (RFC ablation is a potentially curative treatment option for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF. The shortcomings of the RFC technology (technically challenging, long procedure times, complications steadily kindle the interest in new energy sources and catheter designs. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU has the ability to precisely focus ultrasound waves in a defined area with a high energy density. HIFU balloon catheters (BC positioned at the PV ostia appear to be an ideal tool to transmit the ablation energy in a circumferential manner to the PV ostia and may therefore bear substantial advantage over conventional ablation catheters in PVI procedures. In clinical trials the HIFU BC has shown promising success rates similar to RFC catheter ablation for PVI in patients with AF. However, procedure times are still long and serious complications have been observed. Therefore, it may be a valuable alternative to the conventional techniques in selected patients but further clinical trials have to be initiated.

  20. A cMUT probe for ultrasound-guided focused ultrasound targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Dominique; Coutier, Caroline; Legros, Mathieu; Bouakaz, Ayache; Certon, Dominique

    2015-06-01

    Ultrasound-mediated targeted therapy represents a promising strategy in the arsenal of modern therapy. Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (cMUT) technology could overcome some difficulties encountered by traditional piezoelectric transducers. In this study, we report on the design, fabrication, and characterization of an ultrasound-guided focused ultrasound (USgFUS) cMUT probe dedicated to preclinical evaluation of targeted therapy (hyperthermia, thermosensitive liposomes activation, and sonoporation) at low frequency (1 MHz) with simultaneous ultrasonic imaging and guidance (15 to 20 MHz). The probe embeds two types of cMUT arrays to perform the modalities of targeted therapy and imaging respectively. The wafer-bonding process flow employed for the manufacturing of the cMUTs is reported. One of its main features is the possibility of implementing two different gap heights on the same wafer. All the design and characterization steps of the devices are described and discussed, starting from the array design up to the first in vitro measurements: optical (microscopy) and electrical (impedance) measurements, arrays' electroacoustic responses, focused pressure field mapping (maximum peak-to-peak pressure = 2.5 MPa), and the first B-scan image of a wire-target phantom.

  1. The heating of plasma focus electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angeli, E; Frignani, M; Mannucci, S; Rocchi, F; Sumini, M; Tartari, A

    2006-01-01

    Plasma focus (PF) technology development today is strictly related to the possibility of a high frequency repetitive working regime. One of the more relevant obstacles to this goal is the heating of structural components due to direct interaction with plasma. In this paper, temperature decay measurements of the inner electrode of a 7 kJ Mather type PF are presented. Data from several series of shots at different bank energies are analysed and compared with theoretical and numerical models. Two possible scale laws are derived from the experimental data to correlate thermal deposition with bank energy. It is found that a fraction of about 10% of total energy is released to the inner electrode. Finally, after some considerations about the cooling and heating mechanisms, an analysis on maximum temperature sustained by materials is presented

  2. Application of Zernike polynomials towards accelerated adaptive focusing of transcranial high intensity focused ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Elena A.; Hertzberg, Yoni; Marx, Michael; Werner, Beat; Navon, Gil; Levoy, Marc; Pauly, Kim Butts

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To study the phase aberrations produced by human skulls during transcranial magnetic resonance imaging guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS), to demonstrate the potential of Zernike polynomials (ZPs) to accelerate the adaptive focusing process, and to investigate the benefits of using phase corrections obtained in previous studies to provide the initial guess for correction of a new data set. Methods: The five phase aberration data sets, analyzed here, were calculated based on preoperative computerized tomography (CT) images of the head obtained during previous transcranial MRgFUS treatments performed using a clinical prototype hemispherical transducer. The noniterative adaptive focusing algorithm [Larrat , “MR-guided adaptive focusing of ultrasound,” IEEE Trans. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 57(8), 1734–1747 (2010)]10.1109/TUFFC.2010.1612 was modified by replacing Hadamard encoding with Zernike encoding. The algorithm was tested in simulations to correct the patients’ phase aberrations. MR acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) was used to visualize the effect of the phase aberration correction on the focusing of a hemispherical transducer. In addition, two methods for constructing initial phase correction estimate based on previous patient's data were investigated. The benefits of the initial estimates in the Zernike-based algorithm were analyzed by measuring their effect on the ultrasound intensity at the focus and on the number of ZP modes necessary to achieve 90% of the intensity of the nonaberrated case. Results: Covariance of the pairs of the phase aberrations data sets showed high correlation between aberration data of several patients and suggested that subgroups can be based on level of correlation. Simulation of the Zernike-based algorithm demonstrated the overall greater correction effectiveness of the low modes of ZPs. The focal intensity achieves 90% of nonaberrated intensity using fewer than 170 modes of ZPs. The

  3. Robotically assisted velocity-sensitive triggered focused ultrasound surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Florian; Brunner, Alexander; Jenne, Jürgen W.; Krafft, Axel J.; Semmler, Wolfhard; Bock, Michael

    2012-11-01

    Magnetic Resonance (MR) guided Focused Ultrasound Surgery (FUS) of abdominal organs is challenging due to breathing motion and limited patient access in the MR environment. In this work, an experimental robotically assisted FUS setup was combined with a MR-based navigator technique to realize motion-compensated sonications and online temperature imaging. Experiments were carried out in a static phantom, during periodic manual motion of the phantom without triggering, and with triggering to evaluate the triggering method. In contrast to the non-triggered sonication, the results of the triggered sonication show a confined symmetric temperature distribution. In conclusion, the velocity sensitive navigator can be employed for triggered FUS to compensate for periodic motion. Combined with the robotic FUS setup, flexible treatment of abdominal targets might be realized.

  4. Development of a Tissue-Mimicking Phantom for Evaluating the Focusing Performance of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing Zongyu; Li Faqi; Zou Jiangzhong; Wang Zhibiao

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: To develop a tissue mimicking phantom which can be used to evaluate the focusing performance of the HIFU transducer, and the phantom should has the same acoustic characteristic and thermotics characteristic as the biological tissue. Materials and methods: The tissue mimicking phantom was made from water, gelatin, fresh biologic tissue Its ultrasonic parameters (attenuation coefficient) of the phantom was measured by the method of radiation pressure, and thermotics parameters of the phantom, including thermal conductivity, specific heat/fusion point et al were tested under the Measurement meter. The HIFU biological effect of the phantom was evaluated under the Model JC focused ultrasound tumor therapeutic system, developed and produced by Chongqing HIFU Technology Co. Ltd (working frequency: 0.7MHz; acoustic power: 200W; focal distance: 135mm; Acoustic focal region: 3x3x25 cubic mm). Results: The self-made phantom is sable, has smooth and glossy appearance, well-distributed construction, and good elasticity. We measured the followed values for acoustic and thermal properties: density 1049±2 kg/m3; attenuation 0.532±0.017 dB/cm (0.8 MHz), 0.612±0.021 dB/cm (1.0 MHz); thermal conductivity 0.76±0.08 W/m/- deg. C; specific heat 3653±143 J/kg- deg. C; fusion point154±8 deg. C. The BFR induced in the phantom after HIFU exposure was stable in its size and appearance. Conclusion: We produced and improved one tissue mimicking phantom successfully which had semblable ultrasound and thermphysical properties like the soft tissue, and can replace the bovine liver to investigate the HIFU biological effect and to detect the focusing performance of the HIFU energy transducer. The research was supported by Chongqing University of Medical Science (CX200320)

  5. Intensification of heat and mass transfer by ultrasound: application to heat exchangers and membrane separation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondrexon, N; Cheze, L; Jin, Y; Legay, M; Tissot, Q; Hengl, N; Baup, S; Boldo, P; Pignon, F; Talansier, E

    2015-07-01

    This paper aims to illustrate the interest of ultrasound technology as an efficient technique for both heat and mass transfer intensification. It is demonstrated that the use of ultrasound results in an increase of heat exchanger performances and in a possible fouling monitoring in heat exchangers. Mass transfer intensification was observed in the case of cross-flow ultrafiltration. It is shown that the enhancement of the membrane separation process strongly depends on the physico-chemical properties of the filtered suspensions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Transcranial focused ultrasound stimulation of human primary visual cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonhye; Kim, Hyun-Chul; Jung, Yujin; Chung, Yong An; Song, In-Uk; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    2016-09-01

    Transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) is making progress as a new non-invasive mode of regional brain stimulation. Current evidence of FUS-mediated neurostimulation for humans has been limited to the observation of subjective sensory manifestations and electrophysiological responses, thus warranting the identification of stimulated brain regions. Here, we report FUS sonication of the primary visual cortex (V1) in humans, resulting in elicited activation not only from the sonicated brain area, but also from the network of regions involved in visual and higher-order cognitive processes (as revealed by simultaneous acquisition of blood-oxygenation-level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging). Accompanying phosphene perception was also reported. The electroencephalo graphic (EEG) responses showed distinct peaks associated with the stimulation. None of the participants showed any adverse effects from the sonication based on neuroimaging and neurological examinations. Retrospective numerical simulation of the acoustic profile showed the presence of individual variability in terms of the location and intensity of the acoustic focus. With exquisite spatial selectivity and capability for depth penetration, FUS may confer a unique utility in providing non-invasive stimulation of region-specific brain circuits for neuroscientific and therapeutic applications.

  7. MO-AB-210-03: Workshop [Advancements in high intensity focused ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Z. [University of Chicago (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The goal of this ultrasound hands-on workshop is to demonstrate advancements in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and to demonstrate quality control (QC) testing in diagnostic ultrasound. HIFU is a therapeutic modality that uses ultrasound waves as carriers of energy. HIFU is used to focus a beam of ultrasound energy into a small volume at specific target locations within the body. The focused beam causes localized high temperatures and produces a well-defined regions of necrosis. This completely non-invasive technology has great potential for tumor ablation and targeted drug delivery. At the workshop, attendees will see configurations, applications, and hands-on demonstrations with on-site instructors at separate stations. The involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic ultrasound imaging service is increasing due to QC and accreditation requirements. At the workshop, an array of ultrasound testing phantoms and ultrasound scanners will be provided for attendees to learn diagnostic ultrasound QC in a hands-on environment with live demonstrations of the techniques. Target audience: Medical physicists and other medical professionals in diagnostic imaging and radiation oncology with interest in high-intensity focused ultrasound and in diagnostic ultrasound QC. Learning Objectives: Learn ultrasound physics and safety for HIFU applications through live demonstrations Get an overview of the state-of-the art in HIFU technologies and equipment Gain familiarity with common elements of a quality control program for diagnostic ultrasound imaging Identify QC tools available for testing diagnostic ultrasound systems and learn how to use these tools List of supporting vendors for HIFU and diagnostic ultrasound QC hands-on workshop: Philips Healthcare Alpinion Medical Systems Verasonics, Inc Zonare Medical Systems, Inc Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS), Inc. GAMMEX, Inc., Cablon Medical BV Steffen Sammet: NIH/NCI grant 5R25CA132822, NIH/NINDS grant 5R25NS

  8. Magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery for treatment of painful osseous metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Mark; Machtinger, Ronit; Fennessy, Fiona

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic resonance guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) is an emerging technology that can non-invasively heat and ablate targeted tissue utilizing ultrasound energy. Use of MR imaging for treatment guidance provides several key advantages over more widely used ultrasound guidance for focused ultrasound ablation. MR allows for precise targeting, detailed beam path visualization, real time non-invasive temperature measurement, and treatment feedback to ensure therapeutic goals are achieved. In the realm of oncology, management of painful bone metastases is a common and daunting clinical problem. The Insightec ExAblate System has been shown in phase I/II trials for treatment of bone metastases to have an excellent safety profile and high rates of pain response. An international multi-center phase III trial for patients with painful bone metastases or multiple myeloma who are not candidates for radiation therapy is currently open. Patients are randomized 3:1 to MRgFUS or sham treatment with crossover to study treatment allowed for sham failures. The primary study endpoint is assessment of pain control over 3 months following treatment. In addition safety, quality of life, cost effectiveness analysis, and patient perceived clinical benefit are also being assessed. Details of the MRgFUS system, technical and clinical therapeutic parameters, use of real time non-invasive MR thermometry, and examples of patient treatments with use of MRgFUS to treat bone metastases will be discussed. New directions in use of MRgFUS including an update on development of a new mobile applicator and integration of MRgFUS in multimodality oncologic care will also be presented.

  9. Ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment for abdominal wall endometriosis: Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Yang [Department of Ultrasound, Chinese PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing 100853 (China); Wang Wei, E-mail: wangyang301301@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Ultrasound, Chinese PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing 100853 (China); Wang Longxia; Wang Junyan; Tang Jie [Department of Ultrasound, Chinese PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing 100853 (China)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and therapeutic efficacy of ultrasound (US)-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation for the treatment of abdominal wall endometriosis (AWE). Materials and methods: Twenty-one consecutive patients with AWE were treated as outpatients by US-guided HIFU ablation under conscious sedation. The median size of the AWE was 2.4 cm (range 1.0-5.3 cm). An acoustic power of 200-420 W was used, intermittent HIFU exposure of 1 s was applied. Treatment was considered complete when the entire nodule and its nearby 1 cm margin become hyperechoic on US. Pain relief after HIFU ablation was observed and the treated nodule received serial US examinations during follow-up. Results: All AWE was successfully ablated after one session of HIFU ablation, the ablation time lasted for 5-48 min (median 13 min), no major complications occurred. The cyclic pain disappeared in all patients during a mean follow-up of 18.7 months (range 3-31 months). The treated nodules gradually shank over time, 16 nodules became unnoticeable on US during follow-up. Conclusion: US-guided HIFU ablation appears to be safe and effective for the treatment of AWE.

  10. Combinational light emitting diode-high frequency focused ultrasound treatment for HeLa cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Se-Woon; Park, Kitae; Park, Chulwoo; Ryu, Jaemyung; Choi, Hojong

    2017-12-01

    Light sources such as laser and light emitting diode or ultrasound devices have been widely used for cancer therapy and regenerative medicines, since they are more cost-effective and less harmful than radiation therapy, chemotherapy or magnetic treatment. Compared to laser and low intensity ultrasound techniques, light emitting diode and high frequency focused ultrasound shows enhanced therapeutic effects, especially for small tumors. We propose combinational light emitting diode-high frequency focused ultrasound treatment for human cervical cancer HeLa cells. Individual red, green, and blue light emitting diode light only, high frequency focused ultrasound only, or light emitting diode light combined with high frequency focused ultrasound treatments were applied in order to characterize the responses of HeLa cells. Cell density exposed by blue light emitting diode light combined with high frequency focused ultrasound (2.19 ± 0.58%) was much lower than that of cells exposed by red and green light emitting diode lights (81.71 ± 9.92% and 61.81 ± 4.09%), blue light emitting diode light (11.19 ± 2.51%) or high frequency focused ultrasound only (9.72 ± 1.04%). We believe that the proposed combinational blue light emitting diode-high frequency focused ultrasound treatment could have therapeutic benefits to alleviate cancer cell proliferation.

  11. Improvement of heat transfer by means of ultrasound: Application to a double-tube heat exchanger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legay, M; Simony, B; Boldo, P; Gondrexon, N; Le Person, S; Bontemps, A

    2012-11-01

    A new kind of ultrasonically-assisted heat exchanger has been designed, built and studied. It can be seen as a vibrating heat exchanger. A comprehensive description of the overall experimental set-up is provided, i.e. of the test rig and the acquisition system. Data acquisition and processing are explained step-by-step with a detailed example of graph obtained and how, from these experimental data, energy balance is calculated on the heat exchanger. It is demonstrated that ultrasound can be used efficiently as a heat transfer enhancement technique, even in such complex systems as heat exchangers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Modelling the temperature evolution of bone under high intensity focused ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Eikelder, H. M. M.; Bošnački, D.; Elevelt, A.; Donato, K.; Di Tullio, A.; Breuer, B. J. T.; van Wijk, J. H.; van Dijk, E. V. M.; Modena, D.; Yeo, S. Y.; Grüll, H.

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) has been clinically shown to be effective for palliative pain management in patients suffering from skeletal metastasis. The underlying mechanism is supposed to be periosteal denervation caused by ablative temperatures reached through ultrasound heating of the cortex. The challenge is exact temperature control during sonication as MR-based thermometry approaches for bone tissue are currently not available. Thus, in contrast to the MR-HIFU ablation of soft tissue, a thermometry feedback to the HIFU is lacking, and the treatment of bone metastasis is entirely based on temperature information acquired in the soft tissue adjacent to the bone surface. However, heating of the adjacent tissue depends on the exact sonication protocol and requires extensive modelling to estimate the actual temperature of the cortex. Here we develop a computational model to calculate the spatial temperature evolution in bone and the adjacent tissue during sonication. First, a ray-tracing technique is used to compute the heat production in each spatial point serving as a source term for the second part, where the actual temperature is calculated as a function of space and time by solving the Pennes bio-heat equation. Importantly, our model includes shear waves that arise at the bone interface as well as all geometrical considerations of transducer and bone geometry. The model was compared with a theoretical approach based on the far field approximation and an MR-HIFU experiment using a bone phantom. Furthermore, we investigated the contribution of shear waves to the heat production and resulting temperatures in bone. The temperature evolution predicted by our model was in accordance with the far field approximation and agreed well with the experimental data obtained in phantoms. Our model allows the simulation of the HIFU treatments of bone metastasis in patients and can be extended to a planning tool prior to MR

  13. Modelling the temperature evolution of bone under high intensity focused ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ten Eikelder, H M M; Bošnački, D; Breuer, B J T; Van Wijk, J H; Van Dijk, E V M; Modena, D; Yeo, S Y; Grüll, H; Elevelt, A; Donato, K; Di Tullio, A

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) has been clinically shown to be effective for palliative pain management in patients suffering from skeletal metastasis. The underlying mechanism is supposed to be periosteal denervation caused by ablative temperatures reached through ultrasound heating of the cortex. The challenge is exact temperature control during sonication as MR-based thermometry approaches for bone tissue are currently not available. Thus, in contrast to the MR-HIFU ablation of soft tissue, a thermometry feedback to the HIFU is lacking, and the treatment of bone metastasis is entirely based on temperature information acquired in the soft tissue adjacent to the bone surface. However, heating of the adjacent tissue depends on the exact sonication protocol and requires extensive modelling to estimate the actual temperature of the cortex. Here we develop a computational model to calculate the spatial temperature evolution in bone and the adjacent tissue during sonication. First, a ray-tracing technique is used to compute the heat production in each spatial point serving as a source term for the second part, where the actual temperature is calculated as a function of space and time by solving the Pennes bio-heat equation. Importantly, our model includes shear waves that arise at the bone interface as well as all geometrical considerations of transducer and bone geometry. The model was compared with a theoretical approach based on the far field approximation and an MR-HIFU experiment using a bone phantom. Furthermore, we investigated the contribution of shear waves to the heat production and resulting temperatures in bone. The temperature evolution predicted by our model was in accordance with the far field approximation and agreed well with the experimental data obtained in phantoms. Our model allows the simulation of the HIFU treatments of bone metastasis in patients and can be extended to a planning tool prior to MR

  14. Multifunctional pulse generator for high-intensity focused ultrasound system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamano, Satoshi; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-Ichiro

    2017-07-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) can achieve high spatial resolution for the treatment of diseases. A major technical challenge in implementing a HIFU therapeutic system is to generate high-voltage high-current signals for effectively exciting a multichannel HIFU transducer at high efficiencies. In this paper, we present the development of a multifunctional multichannel generator/driver. The generator can produce a long burst as well as an extremely high-voltage short pulse of pseudosinusoidal waves (trigger HIFU) and second-harmonic superimposed waves for HIFU transmission. The transmission timing, waveform, and frequency can be controlled using a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) via a universal serial bus (USB) microcontroller. The hardware is implemented in a compact printed circuit board. The test results of trigger HIFU reveal that the power consumption and the temperature rise of metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors were reduced by 19.9% and 38.2 °C, respectively, from the previous design. The highly flexible performance of the novel generator/driver is demonstrated in the generation of second-harmonic superimposed waves, which is useful for cavitation-enhanced HIFU treatment, although the previous design exhibited difficulty in generating it.

  15. Robotic Assisted Laparoscopic Prostatectomy after High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Telis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in men. As new focal therapies become more popular in treatment of prostate cancer, failure cases requiring salvage therapy with either surgical or other techniques are being reported. Objective. To report the options in treatment of prostate cancer after recurrence or failure of the primary treatment modality. Methods. We report a salvage robotic assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP for prostate cancer recurrence following high intensity focused ultrasound treatment (HIFU in the United States. Results. A 67-year-old man who underwent HIFU treatment for prostate adenocarcinoma 2 years prior was presented with a rising prostate specific antigen of 6.1 ng/mL to our clinic. A biopsy proven recurrent disease in the area of previous treatment documented the failure of treatment. The patient elected to undergo a salvage RALP. The operation time was 159 minutes. The patient was discharged from the hospital on postoperative day 1 with no complications. The catheter was removed on post-op day 10. The patient reserved sexual function and urinary continence. The PSA levels on 6 months’ follow-up are undetectable. Conclusions. Salvage RALP is an effective and safe treatment choice for recurrent prostate adenocarcinoma following failed HIFU treatment if operated by an experienced surgeon.

  16. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in Uterine Fibroid Treatment: Review Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoud, Mustafa Z.; Alkhorayef, Mohammed; Alzimami, Khalid S.; Aljuhani, Manal Saud; Sulieman, Abdelmoneim

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a highly precise medical procedure used locally to heat and destroy diseased tissue through ablation. This study intended to review HIFU in uterine fibroid therapy, to evaluate the role of HIFU in the therapy of leiomyomas as well as to review the actual clinical activities in this field including efficacy and safety measures beside the published clinical literature. An inclusive literature review was carried out in order to review the scientific foundation, and how it resulted in the development of extracorporeal distinct devices. Studies addressing HIFU in leiomyomas were identified from a search of the Internet scientific databases. The analysis of literature was limited to journal articles written in English and published between 2000 and 2013. In current gynecologic oncology, HIFU is used clinically in the treatment of leiomyomas. Clinical research on HIFU therapy for leiomyomas began in the 1990s, and the majority of patients with leiomyomas were treated predominantly with HIFUNIT 9000 and prototype single focus ultrasound devices. HIFU is a non-invasive and highly effective standard treatment with a large indication range for all sizes of leiomyomas, associated with high efficacy, low operative morbidity and no systemic side effects. Uterine fibroid treatment using HIFU was effective and safe in treating symptomatic uterine fibroids. Few studies are available in the literature regarding uterine artery embolization (UAE). HIFU provides an excellent option to treat uterine fibroids

  17. Numerical Simulation of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Therapy with Volume Model of Human Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okita, Kohei; Sugiyama, Kazuyasu; Ono, Kenji; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2010-03-01

    The development of the HIFU therapy for the deeply placed cancer has been desired. On problem is the displacement of the focal point due to the inhomogeneity of human body. The objectives are to realize the appropriate phase control of an array transducer and to support the preoperative planning of HIFU therapy by the computational prediction of treatment regions. Our approach is to solve the mass and momentum equations for mixture with the equation of state of media. The heat equation with a heat source of a viscous dissipation is solved to estimate the ablation region of tissue. The ablation, i.e., the heat denaturation of protein, is modeled as a phase transition by the phase field model. The HIFU therapy with a bowl-shape array transducer for a liver cancer is simulated. As the result with a phase control, we obtain a clear focus which is closer to a target point than the focus without a phase control, when the ultrasound propagates through lib bones. In addition, the development of the ablation region is reproduced numerically.

  18. Estimation of blood velocity vectors using transverse ultrasound beam focusing and cross-correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Lacasa, Isabel Rodriguez

    1999-01-01

    Modern ultrasound scanners estimate the blood velocity by tracking the movement of the blood scatterers along the ultrasound beam. This is done by emitting pulsed ultrasound fields and finding the shift in position from pulse to pulse by correlating the received signals. Only the velocity component...... in a correlation estimator to find the velocity across the beam. This approach is extended in this paper by making beamforming along the direction of the flow. A fairly broad beam is emitted and the received signal is then focused along a selected direction. This direction can be along the ultrasound beam...

  19. Transrectal ultrasound applicator for prostate heating monitored using MRI thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Nadine Barrie; Buchanan, Mark T.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: For potential localized hyperthermia treatment of tumors within the prostate, an ultrasound applicator consisting entirely of nonmagnetic materials for use with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been developed and tested on muscle tissue ex vivo and in vivo. Methods and Materials: A partial-cylindrical intracavitary transducer consisting of 16 elements in a 4 x 4 pattern was constructed. It produced a radially propagating acoustic pressure field. Each element of this array (1.5 x 0.75 cm), operating at 1.5 MHz, could be separately powered to produce a desired energy deposition pattern within a target volume. Spatial and temporal temperature elevations were determined using the temperature-dependent proton resonant frequency (PRF) shift and phase subtraction of MR images acquired during ultrasonic heating. Four rabbits were exposed to the ultrasound to raise the local tissue temperature to 45 deg. C for 25 minutes. Six experiments compared thermocouple temperature results to PRF shift temperature results. Results: The tests showed that the multi-element ultrasound applicator was MRI-compatible and allowed imaging during sonication. The induced temperature distribution could be controlled by monitoring the RF power to each transducer element. Therapeutic temperature elevations were easily achieved in vivo at power levels that were about 16% of the maximum system power. From the six thermocouple experiments, comparison between the thermocouple temperature and the PRF temperature yielded an average error of 0.34 ± 0.36 deg. C. Conclusions: The MRI-compatible intracavitary applicator and driving system was able to control the ultrasound field and temperature pattern in vivo. MRI thermometry using the PRF shift can provide adequate temperature accuracy and stability for controlling the temperature distribution

  20. Intramuscular Heating Characteristics of Multihour Low-Intensity Therapeutic Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, Justin H; Taggart, Rebecca M; Stratton, Kelly L; Lewis, George K; Draper, David O

    2015-11-01

    The heating characteristics of a stationary device delivering sustained acoustic medicine with low-intensity therapeutic ultrasound (LITUS) are unknown. To measure intramuscular (IM) heating produced by a LITUS device developed for long-duration treatment of musculoskeletal injuries. Controlled laboratory study. University research laboratory. A total of 26 healthy volunteers (16 men, 10 women; age = 23.0 ± 2.1 years, height = 1.74 ± 0.09 m, mass = 73.48 ± 14.65 kg). Participants were assigned randomly to receive active (n = 20) or placebo (n = 6) LITUS at a frequency of 3 MHz and an energy intensity of 0.132 W/cm(2) continuously for 3 hours with a single transducer or dual transducers on the triceps surae muscle. We measured IM temperature using thermocouples inserted at 1.5- and 3-cm depths into muscle. Temperatures were recorded throughout treatment and 30 minutes posttreatment. We used 2-sample t tests to determine the heating curve of the LITUS treatment and differences in final temperatures between depth and number of transducers. A mild IM temperature increase of 1 °C was reached 10 ± 5 minutes into the treatment, and a more vigorous temperature increase of 4 °C was reached 80 ± 10 minutes into the treatment. The maximal steady-state IM temperatures produced during the final 60 minutes of treatment at the 1.5-cm depth were 4.42 °C ± 0.08 °C and 3.92 °C ± 0.06 °C using 1 and 2 transducers, respectively. At the 3.0-cm depth, the maximal steady-state IM temperatures during the final 60 minutes of treatment were 3.05 °C ± 0.09 °C and 3.17 °C ± 0.05 °C using 1 and 2 transducers, respectively. We observed a difference between the temperatures measured at each depth (t78 = -2.45, P = .02), but the number of transducers used to generate heating was not different (t78 = 1.79, P = .08). The LITUS device elicited tissue heating equivalent to traditional ultrasound but could be sustained for multiple hours. It is a safe and effective alternative tool

  1. Simulation of high-intensity focused ultrasound lesions in presence of boiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisey, Anthony; Yon, Sylvain; Letort, Véronique; Lafitte, Pauline

    2016-01-01

    The lesions induced by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) thermal ablations are particularly difficult to simulate due to the complexity of the involved phenomena. In particular, boiling has a strong influence on the lesion shape. Thus, it must be accounted for if it happens during the pulses to be modeled. However, no acoustic model enables the simulation of the resulting wave scattering. Therefore, we propose an equivalent model for the heat deposition pattern in the presence of boiling. Firstly, the acoustic field is simulated with k-Wave and the heat source term is calculated. Then, a thermal model is designed, including the equivalent model for boiling. It is rigorously calibrated and validated through the use of diversified ex vivo and in vivo data, including usually unexploited data types related to the bubble clouds. The proposed model enabled to efficiently simulate unitary pulses properties, including the sizes of the lesions, their morphology, the boiling onset time, and the influence of the boiling onset time on the lesions sizes. In this article, the whole procedure of model design, calibration, and validation is discussed. In addition to depicting the creative use of data, our modeling approach focuses on the understanding of the mechanisms influencing the shape of the lesion. Further work is required to study the influence of the remaining bubble clouds in the context of pulse groups.

  2. PRESAGE® as a new calibration method for high intensity focused ultrasound therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, M.; McErlean, C.; Rivens, I.; Adamovics, J.; Leach, M. O.; ter Haar, G.; Doran, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    High Intensity Focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a non-invasive cancer therapy that makes use of the mainly thermal effects of ultrasound to destroy tissue. In order to achieve reliable treatment planning, it is necessary to characterise the ultrasound source (transducer) and to understand how the wave propagates in tissue and the energy deposition in the focal region. This novel exploratory study investigated how HIFU affects PRESAGE®, an optical phantom used for radiotherapy dosimetry, which is potentially a rapid method of calibrating the transducer. Samples, of two different formulations, were exposed to focused ultrasound and imaged using Optical Computed Tomography. First results showed that, PRESAGE® changes colour on ultrasound exposure (darker green regions were observed) with the alterations being related to the acoustic power and sample composition. Future work will involve quantification of these alterations and understanding how to relate them to the mechanisms of action of HIFU.

  3. 76 FR 43119 - Medical Devices; General and Plastic Surgery Devices; Classification of the Focused Ultrasound...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-20

    ... and Mechanical Safety Performance Testing. Inflammation/Foreign Body Response..... Section 10... and it is identified as a device using focused ultrasound to produce localized, mechanical motion... for mechanical cellular membrane disruption intended for noninvasive aesthetic use. FDA has identified...

  4. Determining temperature distribution in tissue in the focal plane of the high (>100 W/cm(2)) intensity focused ultrasound beam using phase shift of ultrasound echoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karwat, Piotr; Kujawska, Tamara; Lewin, Peter A; Secomski, Wojciech; Gambin, Barbara; Litniewski, Jerzy

    2016-02-01

    In therapeutic applications of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) the guidance of the HIFU beam and especially its focal plane is of crucial importance. This guidance is needed to appropriately target the focal plane and hence the whole focal volume inside the tumor tissue prior to thermo-ablative treatment and beginning of tissue necrosis. This is currently done using Magnetic Resonance Imaging that is relatively expensive. In this study an ultrasound method, which calculates the variations of speed of sound in the locally heated tissue volume by analyzing the phase shifts of echo-signals received by an ultrasound scanner from this very volume is presented. To improve spatial resolution of B-mode imaging and minimize the uncertainty of temperature estimation the acoustic signals were transmitted and received by 8 MHz linear phased array employing Synthetic Transmit Aperture (STA) technique. Initially, the validity of the algorithm developed was verified experimentally in a tissue-mimicking phantom heated from 20.6 to 48.6 °C. Subsequently, the method was tested using a pork loin sample heated locally by a 2 MHz pulsed HIFU beam with focal intensity ISATA of 129 W/cm(2). The temperature calibration of 2D maps of changes in the sound velocity induced by heating was performed by comparison of the algorithm-determined changes in the sound velocity with the temperatures measured by thermocouples located in the heated tissue volume. The method developed enabled ultrasound temperature imaging of the heated tissue volume from the very inception of heating with the contrast-to-noise ratio of 3.5-12 dB in the temperature range 21-56 °C. Concurrently performed, conventional B-mode imaging revealed CNR close to zero dB until the temperature reached 50 °C causing necrosis. The data presented suggest that the proposed method could offer an alternative to MRI-guided temperature imaging for prediction of the location and extent of the thermal lesion prior to applying the

  5. Review of magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound in the treatment of uterine fibroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Felipe Magalhães Peregrino

    Full Text Available Uterine leiomyoma is the most frequently occurring solid pelvic tumor in women during the reproductive period. Magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound is a promising technique for decreasing menorrhagia and dysmenorrhea in symptomatic women. The aim of this study is to review the role of Magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound in the treatment of uterine fibroids in symptomatic patients. We performed a review of the MEDLINE and Cochrane databases up to April 2016. The analysis and data collection were performed using the following keywords: Leiomyoma, High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation, Ultrasonography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Menorrhagia. Two reviewers independently performed a quality assessment; when there was a disagreement, a third reviewer was consulted. Nineteen studies of Magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound-treated fibroid patients were selected. The data indicated that tumor size was reduced and that symptoms were improved after treatment. There were few adverse effects, and they were not severe. Some studies have reported that in some cases, additional sessions of Magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound or other interventions, such as myomectomy, uterine artery embolization or even hysterectomy, were necessary. This review suggests that Magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound is a safe and effective technique. However, additional evidence from future studies will be required before the technique can be recommended as an alternative treatment for fibroids.

  6. Intracellular delivery of peptides and siRNAs using microbubble enhanced focused ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Manabu; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2006-05-01

    Bioactive substances such as peptides and nucleic acid based agents have attracted great attention for the next generation drug for various diseases. However, the greatest challenge for using these bioactive substances is the development of their delivery system, especially the method for delivering these substances through the cell membrane. With the advancement of ultrasound and ultrasound contrast agent technology, it has become possible to transiently change the permeability of the cell membrane. Moreover, using a focused ultrasound transducer, it is possible to narrow and focus the ultrasound energy within a small target, avoiding damage to the surrounding tissue. In this research we have searched the possibility of delivering the Bak BH3 peptide, the death domain of the Bc1-2 family of proteins, or the short interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) using microbubble-enhanced focused ultrasound in an in vitro setting. Using a 1.696 MHz focused ultrasound and a microbubble ultrasound contrast agent OPTISON®, we first tested the stability of BH3 peptide under microbubble-enhanced focused ultrasound exposure and proved that the peptide is stable under these circumstances. Next, we have tested the cell-killing effect of the intracellularly delivered Bak BH3 peptide in HeLa and BJAB cell line and observed a statistically enhanced cell death in BJAB cells but not in HeLa cells, leading to the conclusion that intracellularly delivered BH3 peptide by microbubble-enhanced ultrasound can exert its cell killing effect in some cells. We also investigated if we can silence the EGFP expression in the cell by delivering siRNA targeting the EGFP in both transient and stable EGFP expression cell line. Using a 1.653 MHz focused ultrasound and OPTISON®, in both cases, intracellularly delivered siRNA by microbubble-enhanced ultrasound was able to knock down the EGFP expression, which demonstrates the feasibility of using this novel method

  7. Dynamic T2-mapping during magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound ablation of bone marrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waspe, Adam C.; Looi, Thomas; Mougenot, Charles; Amaral, Joao; Temple, Michael; Sivaloganathan, Siv; Drake, James M.

    2012-11-01

    Focal bone tumor treatments include amputation, limb-sparing surgical excision with bone reconstruction, and high-dose external-beam radiation therapy. Magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) is an effective non-invasive thermotherapy for palliative management of bone metastases pain. MR thermometry (MRT) measures the proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS) of water molecules and produces accurate (<1°C) and dynamic (<5s) thermal maps in soft tissues. PRFS-MRT is ineffective in fatty tissues such as yellow bone marrow and, since accurate temperature measurements are required in the bone to ensure adequate thermal dose, MR-HIFU is not indicated for primary bone tumor treatments. Magnetic relaxation times are sensitive to lipid temperature and we hypothesize that bone marrow temperature can be determined accurately by measuring changes in T2, since T2 increases linearly in fat during heating. T2-mapping using dual echo times during a dynamic turbo spin-echo pulse sequence enabled rapid measurement of T2. Calibration of T2-based thermal maps involved heating the marrow in a bovine femur and simultaneously measuring T2 and temperature with a thermocouple. A positive T2 temperature dependence in bone marrow of 20 ms/°C was observed. Dynamic T2-mapping should enable accurate temperature monitoring during MR-HIFU treatment of bone marrow and shows promise for improving the safety and reducing the invasiveness of pediatric bone tumor treatments.

  8. Anti-inflammatory effect with high intensity focused ultrasound-mediated pulsatile delivery of diclofenac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chih-Yu; Yang, Chih-Hui; Lin, Yung-Sheng; Chen, Chih-Hsin; Huang, Keng-Shiang

    2012-02-01

    A pulsatile ultrasound controlled drug release platform with diclofenac-loaded alginate microcapsules (fabricated with a home-made electrostatic device, 75% embedded rate) was established to evaluate anti-inflammation efficiency. Better anti-inflammation efficiency was found using the ultrasound system and the drug delivery can be adjusted based on the programmed ultrasound cycle. The results of the in vitro study show that an approx. 30% higher drug release rate was obtained by using continuous ultrasound irradiation (9-Watt, 180 min), and an approx. 16% higher drug release rate was obtained by using pulsatile ultrasound irradiation (9-Watt, 60 min) compared to without ultrasound activation. For the in vivo study, the anti-inflammatory test with carrageenan-induced rat's paw edema shows that diclofenac-loaded microcapsules followed by ultrasound irradiation (9-Watt, 60 min) contributed to an 81% inhibition rate, which was significantly higher than diclofenac only (approx. 60% higher). In addition, because of their heat conducting properties, gold nanoparticles encapsulated in the diclofenac-loaded microcapsules resulted in better drug release efficiency, but tended to depress the anti-inflammation effect. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of frequency-dependent ultrasound attenuation in transparent medium using focused shadowgraph technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Yukina; Kudo, Nobuki

    2017-07-01

    Acoustic fields of a short-pulsed ultrasound propagating through a transparent medium with ultrasound attenuation were visualized by the focused shadowgraph technique. A brightness waveform and its spatial integrations were derived from a visualized field image and compared with a pressure waveform measured by a membrane hydrophone. The experimental results showed that first-order integration of the brightness wave has good agreement with the pressure waveforms. Frequency-dependent attenuation of the pulse propagating through castor oil was derived from brightness and pressure waveforms, and attenuation coefficients determined from focused shadowgraphy and hydrophone techniques showed good agreement. The results suggest the usefulness of the shadowgraph technique not only for the visualization of ultrasound fields but also for noncontact estimation of rough pressure waveforms and correct ultrasound attenuation.

  10. MO-AB-210-00: Diagnostic Ultrasound Imaging Quality Control and High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Therapy Hands-On Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    The goal of this ultrasound hands-on workshop is to demonstrate advancements in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and to demonstrate quality control (QC) testing in diagnostic ultrasound. HIFU is a therapeutic modality that uses ultrasound waves as carriers of energy. HIFU is used to focus a beam of ultrasound energy into a small volume at specific target locations within the body. The focused beam causes localized high temperatures and produces a well-defined regions of necrosis. This completely non-invasive technology has great potential for tumor ablation and targeted drug delivery. At the workshop, attendees will see configurations, applications, and hands-on demonstrations with on-site instructors at separate stations. The involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic ultrasound imaging service is increasing due to QC and accreditation requirements. At the workshop, an array of ultrasound testing phantoms and ultrasound scanners will be provided for attendees to learn diagnostic ultrasound QC in a hands-on environment with live demonstrations of the techniques. Target audience: Medical physicists and other medical professionals in diagnostic imaging and radiation oncology with interest in high-intensity focused ultrasound and in diagnostic ultrasound QC. Learning Objectives: Learn ultrasound physics and safety for HIFU applications through live demonstrations Get an overview of the state-of-the art in HIFU technologies and equipment Gain familiarity with common elements of a quality control program for diagnostic ultrasound imaging Identify QC tools available for testing diagnostic ultrasound systems and learn how to use these tools List of supporting vendors for HIFU and diagnostic ultrasound QC hands-on workshop: Philips Healthcare Alpinion Medical Systems Verasonics, Inc Zonare Medical Systems, Inc Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS), Inc. GAMMEX, Inc., Cablon Medical BV Steffen Sammet: NIH/NCI grant 5R25CA132822, NIH/NINDS grant 5R25NS

  11. MO-AB-210-00: Diagnostic Ultrasound Imaging Quality Control and High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Therapy Hands-On Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this ultrasound hands-on workshop is to demonstrate advancements in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and to demonstrate quality control (QC) testing in diagnostic ultrasound. HIFU is a therapeutic modality that uses ultrasound waves as carriers of energy. HIFU is used to focus a beam of ultrasound energy into a small volume at specific target locations within the body. The focused beam causes localized high temperatures and produces a well-defined regions of necrosis. This completely non-invasive technology has great potential for tumor ablation and targeted drug delivery. At the workshop, attendees will see configurations, applications, and hands-on demonstrations with on-site instructors at separate stations. The involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic ultrasound imaging service is increasing due to QC and accreditation requirements. At the workshop, an array of ultrasound testing phantoms and ultrasound scanners will be provided for attendees to learn diagnostic ultrasound QC in a hands-on environment with live demonstrations of the techniques. Target audience: Medical physicists and other medical professionals in diagnostic imaging and radiation oncology with interest in high-intensity focused ultrasound and in diagnostic ultrasound QC. Learning Objectives: Learn ultrasound physics and safety for HIFU applications through live demonstrations Get an overview of the state-of-the art in HIFU technologies and equipment Gain familiarity with common elements of a quality control program for diagnostic ultrasound imaging Identify QC tools available for testing diagnostic ultrasound systems and learn how to use these tools List of supporting vendors for HIFU and diagnostic ultrasound QC hands-on workshop: Philips Healthcare Alpinion Medical Systems Verasonics, Inc Zonare Medical Systems, Inc Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS), Inc. GAMMEX, Inc., Cablon Medical BV Steffen Sammet: NIH/NCI grant 5R25CA132822, NIH/NINDS grant 5R25NS

  12. Transcostal high-intensity-focused ultrasound: ex vivo adaptive focusing feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubry, J-F; Pernot, M; Marquet, F; Tanter, M; Fink, M [Laboratoire Ondes et Acoustique, CNRS UMR 7587, Universite Paris VII, Inserm, ESPCI, 10 rue Vauquelin, 75005 Paris (France)], E-mail: jean-francois.aubry@espci.fr

    2008-06-07

    Ex vivo experiments have been conducted through excised pork rib with bone, cartilage, muscle and skin. The aberrating effect of the ribcage has been experimentally evaluated. Adaptive ultrasonic focusing through ribs has been studied at low power. Without any correction, the pressure fields in the focal plane were both affected by inhomogeneous attenuation and phase distortion and three main effects were observed: a mean 2 mm shift of the main lobe, a mean 1.25 mm spreading of the half width of the main lobe and up to 20 dB increase of the secondary lobe level. Thanks to time-reversal focusing, a 5 dB decrease in the secondary lobes was obtained and the ratio between the energy deposited at the target location and the total amount of energy emitted by the therapeutic array was six times higher than that without correction. Time-reversal minimizes the heating of the ribs by automatically sonicating between the ribs, as demonstrated by temperature measurements using thermocouples placed at different locations on the ribcage. It is also discussed how this aberration correction process could be achieved non-invasively for clinical application.

  13. Focusing of high intensity ultrasound through the rib cage using a therapeutic random phased array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobkova, Svetlana; Gavrilov, Leonid; Khokhlova, Vera; Shaw, Adam; Hand, Jeffrey; #, ||

    2010-01-01

    A method for focusing high intensity ultrasound through a rib cage that aims to minimize heating of the ribs whilst maintaining high intensities at the focus (or foci) is proposed and tested theoretically and experimentally. Two approaches, one based on geometric acoustics and the other accounting for diffraction effects associated with propagation through the rib cage, are investigated theoretically for idealized source conditions. It is shown that for an idealized radiator the diffraction approach provides a 23% gain in peak intensity and results in significantly less power losses on the ribs (1% versus 7.5% of the irradiated power) compared with the geometric one. A 2D 1-MHz phased array with 254 randomly distributed elements, tissue mimicking phantoms, and samples of porcine rib cages are used in experiments; the geometric approach is used to configure how the array is driven. Intensity distributions are measured in the plane of the ribs and in the focal plane using an infra-red camera. Theoretical and experimental results show that it is possible to provide adequate focusing through the ribs without overheating them for a single focus and several foci, including steering at ± 10–15 mm off and ± 20 mm along the array axis. Focus splitting due to the periodic spatial structure of ribs is demonstrated both in simulations and experiments; the parameters of splitting are quantified. The ability to produce thermal lesions with a split focal pattern in ex vivo porcine tissue placed beyond the rib phantom is also demonstrated. The results suggest that the method is potentially useful for clinical applications of HIFU for which the rib cage lies between the transducer(s) and the targeted tissue. PMID:20510186

  14. Selective heating of soft tissue-bone interfaces during scanned focussed ultrasound hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hynynen, K.; De Young, D.; Roemer, R.; Kundrat, M.

    1987-01-01

    Bone heating has been a frequent problem with clinical hyperthermia treatments induced by plane ultrasonic transducers. In this study, detailed temperature distributions were measured in dogs' (5 dogs) thigh muscles and bone in vivo while focussed ultrasound was applied to elevate the muscle temperature next to the bone. Significantly higher temperature elevations were measured at the bone surface than in the target volume in front of the bone. The temperature distribution was sharp decreasing fast inside the bone and also in front of it. By using more sharply focussed and multiple beams the temperature elevation at the bone surface was reduced and by suitable choice of the distance between the bone surface and the acoustical focus almost uniform temperature could be induced in the overlying muscle tissue from the surface down to the bone - the bone surface being in the same temperature as the muscle. Similar result was obtained by using single, higher frequency focussed beam (3.58 MHz). Also the utilization of nonlinear ultrasonic propagation appeared to reduce bone heating. The results showed that by carefully planning ultrasound hyperthermia treatments, tissues close to bone can be heated without extensive temperature elevation at bone surface

  15. Direct thermal dose control of constrained focused ultrasound treatments: phantom and in vivo evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Dhiraj; Cooley, Daniel; Perry, Trent; Skliar, Mikhail; Roemer, Robert B

    2005-04-21

    The first treatment control system that explicitly and automatically balances the efficacy and safety goals of noninvasive thermal therapies is described, and its performance is evaluated in phantoms and in vivo using ultrasound heating with a fixed, focused transducer. The treatment efficacy is quantified in terms of thermal dose delivered to the target. The developed feedback thermal dose controller has a cascade structure with the main nonlinear dose controller continuously generating the reference temperature trajectory for the secondary, constrained, model predictive temperature controller. The control system ensures thermal safety of the normal tissue by automatically complying with user-specified constraints on the maximum allowable normal tissue temperatures. To reflect hardware limitations and to prevent cavitation, constraints on the maximum transducer power can also be imposed. It is shown that the developed controller can be used to achieve the minimum-time delivery of the desired thermal dose to the target without violating safety constraints, which is a novel and clinically desirable feature. The developed controller is model based, and requires patient- and site-specific models for its operation. These models were obtained during pre-treatment identification experiments. In our implementation, predictive models, internally used by the automatic treatment controller, are dynamically updated each time new temperature measurements become available. The adaptability of internal models safeguards against adverse effects of modelling errors, and ensures robust performance of the control system in the presence of a priori unknown treatment disturbances. The successful validation with two experimental models of considerably different thermal and ultrasound properties suggests the applicability of the developed treatment control system to different anatomical sites.

  16. Multi-Focus Beamforming for Thermal Strain Imaging Using a Single Ultrasound Linear Array Transducer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Man M; Ding, Xuan; Leers, Steven A; Kim, Kang

    2017-06-01

    Ultrasound-induced thermal strain imaging (TSI) has been used successfully to identify lipid- and water-based tissues in atherosclerotic plaques in some research settings. However, TSI faces several challenges to be realized in clinics. These challenges include motion artifacts and displacement tracking accuracy, as well as limited heating capability, which contributes to low thermal strain signal-to-noise ratio, and a limited field of view. Our goal was to address the challenge in heating tissue in TSI. Current TSI systems use separate heating and imaging transducers, which require physical alignment of the heating and imaging beams and result in a bulky setup that limits in vivo operation. We evaluated a new design for heating beams that can be implemented on a linear array imaging transducer and can provide improved heating area and efficiency as compared with previous implementations. The heating beams designed were implemented with a clinical linear array imaging transducer connected to a research ultrasound platform. In vitro experiments using tissue-mimicking phantoms with no blood flow revealed that the new design resulted in an effective heating area of approximately 0.85 cm 2 and a 0.3°C temperature rise in 2 s of heating, which compared well with in silico finite-element simulations. With the new heating beams, TSI was found to be able to detect a lipid-mimicking rubber inclusion with a diameter of 1 cm from the water-based gelatin background, with a strain contrast of 2.3 (+0.14% strain in the rubber inclusion and -0.06% strain in the gelatin background). Lastly, lipid-based tissue in a 1-cm-diameter human carotid endarterectomy (CEA) sample was identified in good agreement with histology. Copyright © 2017 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. MRI-guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound of Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merckel, L.G.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) is a promising technique for completely noninvasive tumor ablation. This thesis focuses on its application for the treatment of patients with breast cancer. The first part of the thesis describes the role of breast MRI for

  18. High intensity focused ultrasound technology, its scope and applications in therapy and drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phenix, Christopher Peter; Togtema, Melissa; Pichardo, Samuel; Zehbe, Ingeborg; Curiel, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasonography is a safe, inexpensive and wide-spread diagnostic tool capable of producing real-time non-invasive images without significant biological effects. However, the propagation of higher energy, intensity and frequency ultrasound waves through living tissues can induce thermal, mechanical and chemical effects useful for a variety of therapeutic applications. With the recent development of clinically approved High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) systems, therapeutic ultrasound is now a medical reality. Indeed, HIFU has been used for the thermal ablation of pathological lesions; localized, minimally invasive ultrasound-mediated drug delivery through the transient formation of pores on cell membranes; the temporary disruption of skin and the blood brain barrier; the ultrasound induced break-down of blood clots; and the targeted release of drugs using ultrasound and temperature sensitive drug carriers. This review seeks to engage the pharmaceutical research community by providing an overview on the biological effects of ultrasound as well as highlighting important therapeutic applications, current deficiencies and future directions.

  19. On the Development of Focused Ultrasound Liquid Atomizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Al-Jumaily

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the evolution of focused ultrasonic transducers of various kinds for fluid atomization and vaporization. Ultrasonic transducers used for atomization purposes in biomedical, pharmaceutical, or industrial applications, such as surface acoustic wave (SAW transducers, array of micromachined nozzles, and Fourier horn micromachined nozzles with or without a central channel, are all presented and compared. For simplicity of manufacturing and low cost, we focus on plates and curved and corrugated structures for biomedical humidification.

  20. Focus cardiac ultrasound core curriculum and core syllabus of the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neskovic, Aleksandar N; Skinner, Henry; Price, Susanna; Via, Gabriele; De Hert, Stefan; Stankovic, Ivan; Galderisi, Maurizio; Donal, Erwan; Muraru, Denisa; Sloth, Erik; Gargani, Luna; Cardim, Nuno; Stefanidis, Alexandros; Cameli, Matteo; Habib, Gilbert; Cosyns, Bernard; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Edvardsen, Thor; Popescu, Bogdan A

    2018-02-26

    There is a growing trend of using ultrasound examination of the heart as a first-line diagnostic tool for initial patient evaluation in acute settings. Focus cardiac ultrasound (FoCUS) is a standardized but restricted cardiac ultrasound examination that may be undertaken by a range of medical professionals with diverse backgrounds. The intention of this core curriculum and syllabus is to define a unifying framework for educational and training processes/programmes that should result in competence in FoCUS for various medical professionals dealing with diagnostics and treatment of cardiovascular emergencies. The European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging prepared this document in close cooperation with representatives of the European Society of Anaesthesiology, the European Association of Cardiothoracic Anaesthesiology, the Acute Cardiovascular Care Association of the European Society of Cardiology and the World Interactive Network Focused On Critical Ultrasound. It aims to provide the key principles and represents a guide for teaching and training of FoCUS. We offer this document to the emergency and critical care community as a reference outline for teaching materials and courses related to FoCUS, for promoting teamwork and encouraging the development of the field.

  1. Combined passive acoustic mapping and magnetic resonance thermometry for monitoring phase-shift nanoemulsion enhanced focused ultrasound therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crake, Calum; Meral, F. Can; Burgess, Mark T.; Papademetriou, Iason T.; McDannold, Nathan J.; Porter, Tyrone M.

    2017-08-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) has the potential to enable precise, image-guided noninvasive surgery for the treatment of cancer in which tumors are identified and destroyed in a single integrated procedure. However, success of the method in highly vascular organs has been limited due to heat losses to perfusion, requiring development of techniques to locally enhance energy absorption and heating. In addition, FUS procedures are conventionally monitored using MRI, which provides excellent anatomical images and can map temperature, but is not capable of capturing the full gamut of available data such as the acoustic emissions generated during this inherently acoustically-driven procedure. Here, we employed phase-shift nanoemulsions (PSNE) embedded in tissue phantoms to promote cavitation and hence temperature rise induced by FUS. In addition, we incorporated passive acoustic mapping (PAM) alongside simultaneous MR thermometry in order to visualize both acoustic emissions and temperature rise, within the bore of a full scale clinical MRI scanner. Focal cavitation of PSNE could be resolved using PAM and resulted in accelerated heating and increased the maximum elevated temperature measured via MR thermometry compared to experiments without nanoemulsions. Over time, the simultaneously acquired acoustic and temperature maps show translation of the focus of activity towards the FUS transducer, and the magnitude of the increase in cavitation and focal shift both increased with nanoemulsion concentration. PAM results were well correlated with MRI thermometry and demonstrated greater sensitivity, with the ability to detect cavitation before enhanced heating was observed. The results suggest that PSNE could be beneficial for enhancement of thermal focused ultrasound therapies and that PAM could be a critical tool for monitoring this process.

  2. Combined passive acoustic mapping and magnetic resonance thermometry for monitoring phase-shift nanoemulsion enhanced focused ultrasound therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crake, Calum; Meral, F Can; Burgess, Mark T; Papademetriou, Iason T; McDannold, Nathan J; Porter, Tyrone M

    2017-07-13

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) has the potential to enable precise, image-guided noninvasive surgery for the treatment of cancer in which tumors are identified and destroyed in a single integrated procedure. However, success of the method in highly vascular organs has been limited due to heat losses to perfusion, requiring development of techniques to locally enhance energy absorption and heating. In addition, FUS procedures are conventionally monitored using MRI, which provides excellent anatomical images and can map temperature, but is not capable of capturing the full gamut of available data such as the acoustic emissions generated during this inherently acoustically-driven procedure. Here, we employed phase-shift nanoemulsions (PSNE) embedded in tissue phantoms to promote cavitation and hence temperature rise induced by FUS. In addition, we incorporated passive acoustic mapping (PAM) alongside simultaneous MR thermometry in order to visualize both acoustic emissions and temperature rise, within the bore of a full scale clinical MRI scanner. Focal cavitation of PSNE could be resolved using PAM and resulted in accelerated heating and increased the maximum elevated temperature measured via MR thermometry compared to experiments without nanoemulsions. Over time, the simultaneously acquired acoustic and temperature maps show translation of the focus of activity towards the FUS transducer, and the magnitude of the increase in cavitation and focal shift both increased with nanoemulsion concentration. PAM results were well correlated with MRI thermometry and demonstrated greater sensitivity, with the ability to detect cavitation before enhanced heating was observed. The results suggest that PSNE could be beneficial for enhancement of thermal focused ultrasound therapies and that PAM could be a critical tool for monitoring this process.

  3. Treatment with focused ultrasound waves softens the rat cervix during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Daishen; Yu, Heng; Garfield, Robert E; Shi, Shao-Qing; Towe, Bruce

    2014-09-01

    Application of focused ultrasound stimulation (FUS) to the rat cervix during pregnancy has significant physiologic effects. One-millisecond-long pulses of 680-kHz ultrasound with a repetition frequency of 25 Hz, at ISPTA (spatial-peak, temporal-average intensity) of 1, 2 and 4W/cm(2), were applied to the rat abdomen over the cervix. FUS produced a significant change in cervical elasticity known as softening, which is part of the ripening process, comparable to the degree seen just before delivery. Timed-pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 40) were used. During gestation, the FUS system was applied to the cervix for variable times up to 1 h. Daily measurements of cervix light-induced florescence were made to estimate changes in softening. In addition, cervical stretch estimates of softening were made of isolated cervices of control and FUS-treated rats to measure distensiblity. The ultrasound power with ISPPA (spatial-peak, pulse-average intensity) of 40 W/cm(2) was considered tolerable; the U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulatory limit is 190 W/cm(2) for both the body periphery and the fetus. This is the first report of alterations induced by ultrasound in the connective tissue of the cervix and suggests the therapeutic application of ultrasound for the facilitation of labor and delivery. Copyright © 2014 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound (PAFUSion for identifying reflection artifacts in photoacoustic imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mithun Kuniyil Ajith Singh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Influence of acoustic inhomogeneities and resulting reflection artifacts is an important problem in reflection-mode photoacoustic imaging. Absorption of light by skin and superficial optical absorbers will generate photoacoustic transients, which traverse into the tissue and get reflected from structures having different acoustic impedance. These reflected photoacoustic signals, when reconstructed, may appear in the region of interest, which causes difficulties in image interpretation. We propose a novel method to identify and potentially eliminate reflection artifacts in photoacoustic images using photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound [PAFUSion]. Our method uses focused ultrasound pulses to mimic the wave field produced by photoacoustic sources and thus provides a way to identify reflection artifacts in clinical combined photoacoustic and pulse-echo ultrasound. Simulation and phantom results are presented to demonstrate the validity and impact of this method. Results show that PAFUSion can identify reflections in photoacoustic images and thus envisages potential for improving photoacoustic imaging of acoustically inhomogeneous tissue.

  5. Gold nanoparticle nucleated cavitation for enhanced high intensity focused ultrasound therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlan, J. R.; Cowell, D. M. J.; Freear, S.

    2018-01-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) or focused ultrasound surgery is a non-invasive technique for the treatment of cancerous tissue, which is limited by difficulties in getting real-time feedback on treatment progress and long treatment durations. The formation and activity of acoustic cavitation, specifically inertial cavitation, during HIFU exposures has been demonstrated to enhance heating rates. However, without the introduction of external nuclei its formation an activity can be unpredictable, and potentially counter-productive. In this study, a combination of pulse laser illumination (839 nm), HIFU exposures (3.3 MHz) and plasmonic gold nanorods (AuNR) was demonstrated as a new approach for the guidance and enhancement of HIFU treatments. For imaging, short duration HIFU pulses (10 μs) demonstrated broadband acoustic emissions from AuNR nucleated cavitation with a signal-to-noise ranging from 5-35 dB for peak negative pressures between 1.19-3.19  ±  0.01 MPa. In the absence of either AuNR or laser illumination these emissions were either not present or lower in magnitude (e.g. 5 dB for 3.19 MPa). Continuous wave (CW) HIFU exposures for 15 s, were then used to generate thermal lesions for peak negative pressures from 0.2-2.71  ±  0.01 MPa at a fluence of 3.4 mJ cm-2 . Inertial cavitation dose (ICD) was monitored during all CW exposures, where exposures combined with both laser illumination and AuNRs resulted in the highest level of detectable emissions. This parameter was integrated over the entire exposure to give a metric to compare with measured thermal lesion area, where it was found that a minimum total ICD of 1.5 × 103 a.u. was correlated with the formation of thermal lesions in gel phantoms. Furthermore, lesion area (mm2) was increased for equivalent exposures without either AuNRs or laser illumination. Once combined with cancer targeting AuNRs this approach could allow for the future theranostic use of HIFU, such as

  6. Numerical evaluation of the skull for human neuromodulation with transcranial focused ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Jerel K.; Ai, Leo; Bansal, Priya; Legon, Wynn

    2017-12-01

    Objective. Transcranial focused ultrasound is an emerging field for human non-invasive neuromodulation, but its dosing in humans is difficult to know due to the skull. The objective of the present study was to establish modeling methods based on medical images to assess skull differences between individuals on the wave propagation of ultrasound. Approach. Computational models of transcranial focused ultrasound were constructed using CT and MR scans to solve for intracranial pressure. We explored the effect of including the skull base in models, different transducer placements on the head, and differences between 250 kHz or 500 kHz acoustic frequency for both female and male models. We further tested these features using linear, nonlinear, and elastic simulations. To better understand inter-subject skull thickness and composition effects we evaluated the intracranial pressure maps between twelve individuals at two different skull sites. Main results. Nonlinear acoustic simulations resulted in virtually identical intracranial pressure maps with linear acoustic simulations. Elastic simulations showed a difference in max pressures and full width half maximum volumes of 15% at most. Ultrasound at an acoustic frequency of 250 kHz resulted in the creation of more prominent intracranial standing waves compared to 500 kHz. Finally, across twelve model human skulls, a significant linear relationship to characterize intracranial pressure maps was not found. Significance. Despite its appeal, an inherent problem with the use of a noninvasive transcranial ultrasound method is the difficulty of knowing intracranial effects because of the skull. Here we develop detailed computational models derived from medical images of individuals to simulate the propagation of neuromodulatory ultrasound across the skull and solve for intracranial pressure maps. These methods allow for a much better understanding of the intracranial effects of ultrasound for an individual in order to

  7. Focused ultrasound for treatment of uterine myoma: From experimental model to clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terzić Milan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that focused ultrasound has a biologic effect on tissue. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU on a small target area raises the temperature of the tissue enough to denaturate proteins and cause irreversible cell damage. The tight focus of the ultrasound energy allows delivery of the intended dose to a very precise location. The resulting coagulation necrosis is relatively painless. The application of this method in the human clinical setting has required pilot studies on an animal model. Although the treatment had a high success rate, there was a significant percentage of complications, mainly attributed to the technical drawbacks of the procedure. Therefore, this method has been modified for use in humans, and the HIFU is now guided, monitored and controlled by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. In October 2004, Food and Drug Adiministration (FDA approved MRI guided focused ultrasound treatment of uterine fibroids in humans. Since then, successful treatment of uterine myomas by HIFU has been performed in thousands of women.

  8. Simulation Based Investigation of Focusing Phased Array Ultrasound in Dissimilar Metal Welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hun-Hee Kim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Flaws at dissimilar metal welds (DMWs, such as reactor coolant systems components, Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM, Bottom Mounted Instrumentation (BMI etc., in nuclear power plants have been found. Notably, primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC in the DMWs could cause significant reliability problems at nuclear power plants. Therefore, phased array ultrasound is widely used for inspecting surface break cracks and stress corrosion cracks in DMWs. However, inspection of DMWs using phased array ultrasound has a relatively low probability of detection of cracks, because the crystalline structure of welds causes distortion and splitting of the ultrasonic beams which propagates anisotropic medium. Therefore, advanced evaluation techniques of phased array ultrasound are needed for improvement in the probability of detection of flaws in DMWs. Thus, in this study, an investigation of focusing and steering phased array ultrasound in DMWs was carried out using a time reversal technique, and an adaptive focusing technique based on finite element method (FEM simulation. Also, evaluation of focusing performance of three different focusing techniques was performed by comparing amplitude of phased array ultrasonic signals scattered from the targeted flaw with three different time delays.

  9. Bone metastasis treatment using magnetic resonance-guided high intensity focused ultrasound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yeo, Sin Yuin; Elevelt, Aaldert; Donato, Katia; van Rietbergen, Bert; ter Hoeve, Natalie D.; van Diest, Paul J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075281775; Grüll, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Bone pain resulting from cancer metastases reduces a patient's quality of life. Magnetic Resonance-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (MR-HIFU) is a promising alternative palliative thermal treatment technique for bone metastases that has been tested in a few clinical studies.

  10. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound for Evaluation of High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Treatment of Benign Uterine Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chong-Qing; Zhang, Rui-Tao; Xiong, Yu; Chen, Li; Wang, Jian; Huang, Guo-Hua; Li, Ke-Quan; Zhang, Lian; Bai, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract As a noninvasive treatment technique, ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been considered as a routine treatment for uterine fibroids and adenomyosis in China. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) has been proposed as another option to assess the treatment efficacy during HIFU treatment. The aim of this investigation is to evaluate the adverse effects of HIFU ablation for benign uterine diseases in a group of patients studied with ultrasound contrast agent (UCA), in comparison with a group of patients not exposed to UCA. From November 2010 to December 2013, 2604 patients with benign uterine diseases were treated with HIFU. Among them, 1300 patients were exposed to an UCA, whereas 1304 patients were not. During HIFU procedure, the incidences of leg pain, sacral/buttock pain, groin pain, treatment area pain, and the discomfort “hot” sensation on skin were higher in the patients who were exposed to SonoVue (Bracco, Milan, Italy) than those who were not (20.5% vs 11.7%, 52.5% vs 42.3%, 6.5% vs 4.5%, 68.9% vs 55.4%, and 48.1% vs 42.9%, respectively). Among the postoperative adverse effects, the incidence of lower abdominal pain was significantly higher in patients who were exposed to an UCA than those who were not (51.2% vs 39.9%, P < 0.05). Two patients who were exposed to an UCA had acute renal function failure. In conclusion, UCA may increase the incidences of some common HIFU-related adverse effects during HIFU treatment for benign uterine diseases, but most of which were acceptable and self-limited. After HIFU treatment, renal function should be monitored in patients with a history of hypertension or taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:25906100

  11. Focused cardiac ultrasound in the emergency department for patients admitted with respiratory symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, C. B.

    2015-01-01

    triage, patients with cardiac arrest, patients with undifferentiated shock, patients with cardiopulmonary instability, patients with respiratory symptoms, trauma patients with suspected cardiac injuries, and assessment of the fluid status before fluid loading. When using focused cardiac ultrasound (US...... help improve the diagnostic accuracy, the proportion of patients receiving appropriate treatment, and possibly the patient outcome. This article gives a practical guide and an overview of some of the current concepts of using focused cardiac US in patients admitted with respiratory symptoms....

  12. Focused ultrasound treatment of abscesses induced by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus: Feasibility study in a mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieck, Birgit; Bates, David; Pichardo, Samuel; Curiel, Laura; Zhang, Kunyan; Escott, Nicholas; Mougenot, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To study the therapeutic effect of focused ultrasound on abscesses induced by methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MRSA is a major nosocomial pathogen where immunocompromised patients are prone to develop infections that are less and less responsive to regular treatments. Because of its capability to induce a rise of temperature at a very precise location, the use of focused ultrasound represents a considerable opportunity for therapy of localized MRSA-related infections. Methods: 50μl of MRSA strain USA400 bacteria suspension at a concentration of 1.32 ± 0.5 × 10 5 colony forming units (cfu)/μl was injected subcutaneously in the left flank of BALB/c mice. An abscess of 6 ± 2 mm in diameter formed after 48 h. A transducer operating at 3 MHz with a focal length of 50 mm and diameter of 32 mm was used to treat the abscess. The focal point was positioned 2 mm under the skin at the abscess center. Forty-eight hours after injection four ultrasound exposures of 9 s each were applied to each abscess under magnetic resonance imaging guidance. Each exposure was followed by a 1 min pause. These parameters were based on preliminary experiments to ensure repetitive accurate heating of the abscess. Real-time estimation of change of temperature was done using water-proton resonance frequency and a communication toolbox (matMRI) developed inhouse. Three experimental groups of animals each were tested: control, moderate temperature (MT), and high temperature (HT). MT and HT groups reached, respectively, 52.3 ± 5.1 and 63.8 ± 7.5 °C at the end of exposure. Effectiveness of the treatment was assessed by evaluating the bacteria amount of the treated abscess 1 and 4 days after treatment. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) assay evaluating the neutrophil amount was performed to assess the local neutrophil recruitment and the white blood cell count was used to evaluate the systemic inflammatory response after focused ultrasound treatment. Results: Macroscopic

  13. Nonlinear behavior of micro bubbles under ultrasound due to heat transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Chan Soo; Kwak, Ho Young [Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeong Eun; Lee, Jae Young [Han Dong University, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    We investigated the nonlinear behavior of a microbubble under ultrasound, taking into account the heat transfer inside the bubble and through the bubble wall. The polytropic relation, which has been used for the process of pressure change depending on the volume variation of ideal gases, cannot properly treat heat transfer involving the oscillating bubble under ultrasound. In this study, a set of solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations for the gas inside the bubble along with an analytical treatment of the Navier-Stokes equations for the liquid adjacent to the bubble wall was used to treat properly the heat transfer process for the oscillating bubble under ultrasound. Entropy generation due to finite heat transfer, which induces the lost work during bubble evolution, reduces the collapsing process and considerably affects the nonlinear behavior of the bubble

  14. Evaluation of a novel therapeutic focused ultrasound transducer based on Fermat’s spiral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaekers, P.; de Greef, M.; Berriet, R.; Moonen, C. T. W.; Ries, M.

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a novel phased array transducer design rule for therapeutic focused ultrasound applications. This design rule uses the discretized Fermat’s spiral to determine the positioning of the transducer elements for a given number of elements and f-number. Using this principle, three variations of Fermat’s spiral were generated, aimed at (1) grating lobe minimization, (2) side lobe minimization, and (3) an optimized element packing efficiency. For each spiral, sparse layouts using identical circular elements and fully populated layouts based on additional Voronoi tessellation were evaluated numerically. Evaluation criteria included the element size distribution, beam steering capabilities, focal plane pressure distribution, prefocal pressure distribution, and practical considerations. Finally, one Voronoi-tessellated design with a focal length and aperture diameter of 16 cm and a natural frequency of 1.3 MHz was evaluated experimentally through hydrophone measurements. The numerical evaluation showed that while sparse arrays possess superior beam steering capabilities for a given number of elements, the focal point quality and prefocal pressure distribution is substantially more favorable when using the Voronoi-tessellated designs. Beam steering was shown to be feasible with the tessellated designs for lateral deflections up to 10 mm and axial deflections up to 20 mm. The experimental evaluation showed that such a transducer is capable of inducing 40.00 MPa rarefactional and 237.50 MPa compressional peak pressure levels at 800 W instantaneous acoustic output power under free-field conditions, making the system potentially relevant for thermal ablation therapy, histotripsy applications, and shockwave-enhanced heating.

  15. Ablative Focused Ultrasound Synergistically Enhances Thermally Triggered Chemotherapy for Prostate Cancer in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Jaspreet S; Murad, Hakm Y; Ashe, Stephen; Halliburton, Gray; Yu, Heng; He, Jibao; John, Vijay T; Khismatullin, Damir B

    2016-09-06

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) can locally ablate biological tissues such as tumors, i.e., induce their rapid heating and coagulative necrosis without causing damage to surrounding healthy structures. It is widely used in clinical practice for minimally invasive treatment of prostate cancer. Nonablative, low-power HIFU was established as a promising tool for triggering the release of chemotherapeutic drugs from temperature-sensitive liposomes (TSLs). In this study, we combine ablative HIFU and thermally triggered chemotherapy to address the lack of safe and effective treatment options for elderly patients with high-risk localized prostate cancer. DU145 prostate cancer cells were exposed to chemotherapy (free and liposomal Sorafenib) and ablative HIFU, alone or in combination. Prior to cell viability assessment by trypan blue exclusion and flow cytometry, the uptake of TSLs by DU145 cells was verified by confocal microscopy and cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM). The combination of TSLs encapsulating 10 μM Sorafenib and 8.7W HIFU resulted in a viability of less than 10% at 72 h post-treatment, which was significant less than the viability of the cells treated with free Sorafenib (76%), Sorafenib-loaded TSLs (63%), or HIFU alone (44%). This synergy was not observed on cells treated with Sorafenib-loaded nontemperature sensitive liposomes and HIFU. According to cryo-SEM analysis, cells exposed to ablative HIFU exhibited significant mechanical disruption. Water bath immersion experiments also showed an important role of mechanical effects in the synergistic enhancement of TSL-mediated chemotherapy by ablative HIFU. This combination therapy can be an effective strategy for treatment of geriatric prostate cancer patients.

  16. MR-guided focused ultrasound robot for performing experiments on large animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylonas, N.; Damianou, C.

    2011-09-01

    Introduction: In this paper an experimental MRI-guided focused ultrasound robot for large animals is presented. Materials and methods: A single element spherically focused transducer of 4 cm diameter, focusing at 10 cm and operating at 1 MHz was used. A positioning device was developed in order to scan the ultrasound transducer for performing MR-guided focused ultrasound experiments in large animals such as pig, sheep and dog. The positioning device incorporates only MRI compatible materials such as piezoelectric motors, Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) plastic, brass screws, and brass pulleys. The system is manufactured automatically using a rapid prototyping system. Results: The system was tested successfully in a number of animals for various tasks (creation of single lesions, creation of overlapping lesions, and MR compatibility). Conclusions: A simple, cost effective, portable positioning device has been developed which can be used in virtually any clinical MRI scanner since it can be sited on the scanner's table. The propagation of HIFU can be via a lateral or superior-inferior approach. This system has the potential to be marketed as a cost effective solution for performing experiments in small and large animals.

  17. Driving Circuitry for Focused Ultrasound Noninvasive Surgery and Drug Delivery Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kullervo Hynynen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent works on focused ultrasound (FUS have shown great promise for cancer therapy. Researchers are continuously trying to improve system performance, which is resulting in an increased complexity that is more apparent when using multi-element phased array systems. This has led to significant efforts to reduce system size and cost by relying on system integration. Although ideas from other fields such as microwave antenna phased arrays can be adopted in FUS, the application requirements differ significantly since the frequency range used in FUS is much lower. In this paper, we review recent efforts to design efficient power monitoring, phase shifting and output driving techniques used specifically for high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU.

  18. Current status of high-intensity focused ultrasound for the management of uterine adenomyosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Vincent Y. T. [Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Queen Mary Hospital, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China)

    2017-04-15

    While high-intensity focused ultrasound has been used for some time in the management of uterine fibroids, its effectiveness and safety in managing adenomyosis is less well established. A literature review was performed of all eligible reports using this modality as a treatment for adenomyosis. Relevant publications were obtained from the PubMed electronic database from inception through March 2016. Eleven articles, including information from 1,150 treatments and follow-up data from 990 patients, were reviewed. High-intensity focused ultrasound appears to be effective and safe in the management of symptomatic adenomyosis, and can be considered as an alternative uterine-sparing option for women with this condition.

  19. Accurate acoustic power measurement for low-intensity focused ultrasound using focal axial vibration velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Chenyang; Guo, Gepu; Ma, Qingyu; Tu, Juan; Zhang, Dong; Hu, Jimin

    2017-07-01

    Low-intensity focused ultrasound is a form of therapy that can have reversible acoustothermal effects on biological tissue, depending on the exposure parameters. The acoustic power (AP) should be chosen with caution for the sake of safety. To recover the energy of counteracted radial vibrations at the focal point, an accurate AP measurement method using the focal axial vibration velocity (FAVV) is proposed in explicit formulae and is demonstrated experimentally using a laser vibrometer. The experimental APs for two transducers agree well with theoretical calculations and numerical simulations, showing that AP is proportional to the square of the FAVV, with a fixed power gain determined by the physical parameters of the transducers. The favorable results suggest that the FAVV can be used as a valuable parameter for non-contact AP measurement, providing a new strategy for accurate power control for low-intensity focused ultrasound in biomedical engineering.

  20. Acoustic characterization of Thiel liver for magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakitsios, Ioannis; Joy, Joyce; Mihcin, Senay; Melzer, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to measure the essential acoustic parameters, i.e., acoustic impedance, reflection coefficient, attenuation coefficient, of Thiel embalmed human and animal liver. The Thiel embalmed tissue can be a promising, pre-clinical model to study liver treatment with Magnetic Resonance-guided Focused Ultrasound (MRgFUS). Using a single-element transducer and the contact pulse-echo method, the acoustic parameters, i.e., acoustic impedance, reflection coefficient and attenuation coefficient of Thiel embalmed human and animal liver were measured. The Thiel embalmed livers had higher impedance, similar reflection and lower attenuation compared to the fresh tissue. Embalming liver with Thiel fluid affects its acoustic properties. During MRgFUS sonication of a Thiel organ, more focused ultrasound (FUS) will be backscattered by the organ, and higher acoustic powers are required to reach coagulation levels (temperatures >56 °C).

  1. TU-B-210-00: MR-Guided Focused Ultrasound Therapy in Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    MR guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS), or alternatively high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU), is approved for thermal ablative treatment of uterine fibroids and pain palliation in bone metastases. Ablation of malignant tumors is under active investigation in sites such as breast, prostate, brain, liver, kidney, pancreas, and soft tissue. Hyperthermia therapy with MRgFUS is also feasible, and may be used in conjunction with radiotherapy and for local targeted drug delivery. MRI allows in situ target definition and provides continuous temperature monitoring and subsequent thermal dose mapping during HIFU. Although MRgHIFU can be very precise, treatment of mobile organs is challenging and advanced techniques are required because of artifacts in MR temperature mapping, the need for intercostal firing, and need for gated HIFU or tracking of the lesion in real time. The first invited talk, “MR guided Focused Ultrasound Treatment of Tumors in Bone and Soft Tissue”, will summarize the treatment protocol and review results from treatment of bone tumors. In addition, efforts to extend this technology to treat both benign and malignant soft tissue tumors of the extremities will be presented. The second invited talk, “MRI guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound – Advanced Approaches for Ablation and Hyperthermia”, will provide an overview of techniques that are in or near clinical trials for thermal ablation and hyperthermia, with an emphasis of applications in abdominal organs and breast, including methods for MRTI and tracking targets in moving organs. Learning Objectives: Learn background on devices and techniques for MR guided HIFU for cancer therapy Understand issues and current status of clinical MRg HIFU Understand strategies for compensating for organ movement during MRgHIFU Understand strategies for strategies for delivering hyperthermia with MRgHIFU CM - research collaboration with Philips

  2. TU-B-210-00: MR-Guided Focused Ultrasound Therapy in Oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    MR guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS), or alternatively high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU), is approved for thermal ablative treatment of uterine fibroids and pain palliation in bone metastases. Ablation of malignant tumors is under active investigation in sites such as breast, prostate, brain, liver, kidney, pancreas, and soft tissue. Hyperthermia therapy with MRgFUS is also feasible, and may be used in conjunction with radiotherapy and for local targeted drug delivery. MRI allows in situ target definition and provides continuous temperature monitoring and subsequent thermal dose mapping during HIFU. Although MRgHIFU can be very precise, treatment of mobile organs is challenging and advanced techniques are required because of artifacts in MR temperature mapping, the need for intercostal firing, and need for gated HIFU or tracking of the lesion in real time. The first invited talk, “MR guided Focused Ultrasound Treatment of Tumors in Bone and Soft Tissue”, will summarize the treatment protocol and review results from treatment of bone tumors. In addition, efforts to extend this technology to treat both benign and malignant soft tissue tumors of the extremities will be presented. The second invited talk, “MRI guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound – Advanced Approaches for Ablation and Hyperthermia”, will provide an overview of techniques that are in or near clinical trials for thermal ablation and hyperthermia, with an emphasis of applications in abdominal organs and breast, including methods for MRTI and tracking targets in moving organs. Learning Objectives: Learn background on devices and techniques for MR guided HIFU for cancer therapy Understand issues and current status of clinical MRg HIFU Understand strategies for compensating for organ movement during MRgHIFU Understand strategies for strategies for delivering hyperthermia with MRgHIFU CM - research collaboration with Philips.

  3. [Effects of high intensity focused ultrasound with SonoVue on blood vessels pathological examinations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yan; Bai, Jin; Li, Faqi; Wang, Zhibiao

    2010-12-01

    The injury of tumor blood vessels will break up the nutrition supply for the tumor. In this paper, we investigated the effects exerted by high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) combined with ultrasound microbubble agent on blood vessels. Ultrasound diagnosis was used to find the goat hepatic blood vessels each being approximately 3mm in diameter. HIFU was focused on the blood vessels. The acoustic power was 250W; HIFU irradiating Mode was line scan (the length of the line: 10 mm; speed: 3 mm/s; irradiating time: 30s). In the experimental group, 0.03 ml/kg SonoVue was injected into the goat before HIFU irradiation,while normal saline was given to the control group. The goats were killed at 24h after HIFU irradiation, then goat liver tissues and blood vessels of target area were taken out. HE staining and Victoria's blue and Ponceau's staining of tissue section showed that the endothelial cells of blood vessels dropped off and became necrosed, and the continuity of blood vessels was interrupted. HIFU combined with SonoVue will damage large blood vessels on HIFU focus, but there is no evident discrepancy between the group with SonoVue and the group without SonoVue.

  4. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound for Pain Management in Patients with Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dababou, Susan; Marrocchio, Cristina; Scipione, Roberto; Erasmus, Hans-Peter; Ghanouni, Pejman; Anzidei, Michele; Catalano, Carlo; Napoli, Alessandro

    2018-01-01

    Cancer-related pain affects up to 80% of patients with malignancies. Pain is an important distressing symptom that diminishes the quality of life and negatively affects the survival of patients. Opioid analgesics are generally the primary therapy for cancer-related pain, with surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and other interventions used in cases of treatment-resistant pain. These treatments, which can be associated with substantial side effects and systemic toxicity, may not be effective. High-intensity focused ultrasound is an entirely noninvasive technique that is approved for treatment of uterine fibroids, bone metastases, and essential tremors. With magnetic resonance imaging or ultrasonographic guidance, high-intensity ultrasound waves are focused on a small well-demarcated region to result in precise localized ablation. This treatment may represent a multimodality approach to treating patients with malignant diseases-facilitating pain palliation, enhanced local drug delivery and radiation therapy effects, and stimulation of anticancer specific immune responses, and potentially facilitating local tumor control. Focused ultrasound can be used to achieve pain palliation by producing several effects, including tissue denervation, tumor mass reduction, and neuromodulation, that can influence different pathways at the origin of the pain. This technology has several key advantages compared with other analgesic therapies: It is completely noninvasive, might be used to achieve rapid pain control, can be safely repeated, and can be used in combination with chemotherapy and radiation therapy to enhance their effects. Online supplemental material is available for this article. © RSNA, 2018.

  5. Brain Surface Heating After Exposure to Ultrasound: An Analysis Using Thermography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Michal E; Lombardo, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Ultrasound is the imaging modality of choice to monitor brain pathologies in neonates after complicated deliveries. Animal studies have indicated that ultrasound may cause heating of brain tissues. To date, no study has explored brain surface heating by ultrasound during clinically relevant exposure. Hence, we investigated heating effects of B-mode and pulsed Doppler (PD) mode on ex vivo lamb brains using thermography. Five brains were scanned for 5 min in B-mode or for 3 min, 1 min, 30 s or 15 s in PD mode. Brain surface temperature was measured pre- and post-exposure using thermography. The highest mean temperature increase was recorded by B-mode (3.82 ± 0.43°C). All five PD exposure protocols were associated with surface temperature increases of 2.1-2.7°C. These outcomes highlight for the first time that B-mode ultrasound can contribute to brain surface heating during a routine cranial scan. Scan duration should be minimised whenever possible. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cavitation-enhanced MR-guided focused ultrasound ablation of rabbit tumors in vivo using phase shift nanoemulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopechek, Jonathan A.; Park, Eun-Joo; Zhang, Yong-Zhi; Vykhodtseva, Natalia I.; McDannold, Nathan J.; Porter, Tyrone M.

    2014-07-01

    Advanced tumors are often inoperable due to their size and proximity to critical vascular structures. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been developed to non-invasively thermally ablate inoperable solid tumors. However, the clinical feasibility of HIFU ablation therapy has been limited by the long treatment times (on the order of hours) and high acoustic intensities required. Studies have shown that inertial cavitation can enhance HIFU-mediated heating by generating broadband acoustic emissions that increase tissue absorption and accelerate HIFU-induced heating. Unfortunately, initiating inertial cavitation in tumors requires high intensities and can be unpredictable. To address this need, phase-shift nanoemulsions (PSNE) have been developed. PSNE consist of lipid-coated liquid perfluorocarbon droplets that are less than 200 nm in diameter, thereby allowing passive accumulation in tumors through leaky tumor vasculature. PSNE can be vaporized into microbubbles in tumors in order to nucleate cavitation activity and enhance HIFU-mediated heating. In this study, MR-guided HIFU treatments were performed on intramuscular rabbit VX2 tumors in vivo to assess the effect of vaporized PSNE on acoustic cavitation and HIFU-mediated heating. HIFU pulses were delivered for 30 s using a 1.5 MHz, MR-compatible transducer, and cavitation emissions were recorded with a 650 kHz ring hydrophone while temperature was monitored using MR thermometry. Cavitation emissions were significantly higher (P W of acoustic power was 46 ± 22% with PSNE injection. The results indicate that PSNE nucleates cavitation which correlates with enhanced HIFU-mediated heating in tumors. This suggests that PSNE could potentially be used to reduce the time and/or acoustic intensity required for HIFU-mediated heating, thereby increasing the feasibility and clinical efficacy of HIFU thermal ablation therapy.

  7. Enhanced Detection of Cancer Biomarkers in Blood-Borne Extracellular Vesicles Using Nanodroplets and Focused Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paproski, Robert J; Jovel, Juan; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Lewis, John D; Zemp, Roger J

    2017-01-01

    The feasibility of personalized medicine approaches will be greatly improved by the development of noninvasive methods to interrogate tumor biology. Extracellular vesicles shed by solid tumors into the bloodstream have been under recent investigation as a source of tumor-derived biomarkers such as proteins and nucleic acids. We report here an approach using submicrometer perfluorobutane nanodroplets and focused ultrasound to enhance the release of extracellular vesicles from specific locations in tumors into the blood. The released extracellular vesicles were enumerated and characterized using micro flow cytometry. Only in the presence of nanodroplets could ultrasound release appreciable levels of tumor-derived vesicles into the blood. Sonication of HT1080-GFP tumors did not increase the number of circulating tumor cells or the metastatic burden in the tumor-bearing embryos. A variety of biological molecules were successfully detected in tumor-derived extracellular vesicles, including cancer-associated proteins, mRNAs, and miRNAs. Sonication of xenograft HT1080 fibrosarcoma tumors released extracellular vesicles that contained detectable RAC1 mRNA with the highly tumorigenic N92I mutation known to exist in HT1080 cells. Deep sequencing serum samples of embryos with sonicated tumors allowed the identification of an additional 13 known heterozygous mutations in HT1080 cells. Applying ultrasound to HT1080 tumors increased tumor-derived DNA in the serum by two orders of magnitude. This work is the first demonstration of enhanced extracellular vesicle release by ultrasound stimulation and suggests that nanodroplets/ultrasound offers promise for genetic profiling of tumor phenotype and aggressiveness by stimulating the release of extracellular vesicles. Cancer Res; 77(1); 3-13. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. MRI-Guided Focused Ultrasound as a New Method of Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Thanou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound-mediated drug delivery under the guidance of an imaging modality can improve drug disposition and achieve site-specific drug delivery. The term focal drug delivery has been introduced to describe the focal targeting of drugs in tissues with the help of imaging and focused ultrasound. Focal drug delivery aims to improve the therapeutic profile of drugs by improving their specificity and their permeation in defined areas. Focused-ultrasound- (FUS- mediated drug delivery has been applied with various molecules to improve their local distribution in tissues. FUS is applied with the aid of microbubbles to enhance the permeability of bioactive molecules across BBB and improve drug distribution in the brain. Recently, FUS has been utilised in combination with MRI-labelled liposomes that respond to temperature increase. This strategy aims to “activate” nanoparticles to release their cargo locally when triggered by hyperthermia induced by FUS. MRI-guided FUS drug delivery provides the opportunity to improve drug bioavailability locally and therefore improve the therapeutic profiles of drugs. This drug delivery strategy can be directly translated to clinic as MRg FUS is a promising clinically therapeutic approach. However, more basic research is required to understand the physiological mechanism of FUS-enhanced drug delivery.

  9. Characterization of Different Microbubbles in Assisting Focused Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Opening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sheng-Kai; Chu, Po-Chun; Chai, Wen-Yen; Kang, Shih-Tsung; Tsai, Chih-Hung; Fan, Ching-Hsiang; Yeh, Chih-Kuang; Liu, Hao-Li

    2017-04-01

    Microbubbles (MBs) serve as a critical catalyst to amplify local cavitation in CNS capillary lumen to facilitate focused ultrasound (FUS) to transiently open the blood-brain barrier (BBB). However, limited understanding is available regarding the effect of different microbubbles to induce BBB opening. The aim of this study is to characterize different MBs on their effect in FUS-induced BBB opening. Three MBs, SonoVue, Definity, and USphere, were tested, with 0.4-MHz FUS exposure at 0.62-1.38 of mechanical index (MI) on rats. Evans blue, dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI and small-animal ultrasound imaging were used as surrogates to allow molecule-penetrated quantification, BBB-opened observation, and MBs circulation/persistence. Cavitation activity was measured via the passive cavitation detection (PCD) setup to correlate with the exposure level and the histological effect. Under given and identical MB concentrations, the three MBs induced similar and equivalent BBB-opening effects and persistence. In addition, a treatment paradigm by adapting exposure time is proposed to compensate MB decay to retain the persistence of BBB-opening efficiency in multiple FUS exposures. The results potentially improve understanding of the equivalence among MBs in focused ultrasound CNS drug delivery, and provide an effective strategy for securing persistence in this treatment modality.

  10. Non-invasive peripheral nerve stimulation via focused ultrasound in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Matthew E.; Lee, Stephen A.; Yang, Georgiana; Kim, Seaok; Wang, Qi; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2018-02-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) has been employed on a wide range of clinical applications to safely and non-invasively achieve desired effects that have previously required invasive and lengthy procedures with conventional methods. Conventional electrical neuromodulation therapies that are applied to the peripheral nervous system (PNS) are invasive and/or non-specific. Recently, focused ultrasound has demonstrated the ability to modulate the central nervous system and ex vivo peripheral neurons. Here, for the first time, noninvasive stimulation of the sciatic nerve eliciting a physiological response in vivo is demonstrated with FUS. FUS was applied on the sciatic nerve in mice with simultaneous electromyography (EMG) on the tibialis anterior muscle. EMG signals were detected during or directly after ultrasound stimulation along with observable muscle contraction of the hind limb. Transecting the sciatic nerve downstream of FUS stimulation eliminated EMG activity during FUS stimulation. Peak-to-peak EMG response amplitudes and latency were found to be comparable to conventional electrical stimulation methods. Histology along with behavioral and thermal testing did not indicate damage to the nerve or surrounding regions. The findings presented herein demonstrate that FUS can serve as a targeted, safe and non-invasive alternative to conventional peripheral nervous system stimulation to treat peripheral neuropathic diseases in the clinic.

  11. A radiation emission shielding method for high intensity focus ultrasound probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; Shen, Guofeng; Chen, Yazhu

    2015-01-01

    Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) is a key issue in the design and development of safe and effective medical instruments. The treatment probes of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) systems not only receive and transmit electromagnetic waves, but also radiate ultrasound waves, resulting in electromagnetic coupling. In this paper, an electromagnetic shielding method involving the enclosure of the probe in a copper wire mesh was introduced. First, sound pressure distribution simulations and measurements were performed using a hydrophone in order to evaluate the effects of the wire mesh on the acoustic performance of the HIFU system. The results indicated that the wire mesh did not disturb the normalized sound pressure field. In addition, the attenuation of the maximum pressure in the focal plane was equal to 6.2%. Then, the electronic emission level was tested in a chamber. After the implementation of the wire mesh, the 10-100 MHz frequency band radiation was suppressed, and the HIFU system satisfied the national EMC standards.

  12. Optimizing MR imaging-guided navigation for focused ultrasound interventions in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, B.; Martin, E.; Bauer, R.; O'Gorman, R.

    2017-03-01

    MR imaging during transcranial MR imaging-guided Focused Ultrasound surgery (tcMRIgFUS) is challenging due to the complex ultrasound transducer setup and the water bolus used for acoustic coupling. Achievable image quality in the tcMRIgFUS setup using the standard body coil is significantly inferior to current neuroradiologic standards. As a consequence, MR image guidance for precise navigation in functional neurosurgical interventions using tcMRIgFUS is basically limited to the acquisition of MR coordinates of salient landmarks such as the anterior and posterior commissure for aligning a stereotactic atlas. Here, we show how improved MR image quality provided by a custom built MR coil and optimized MR imaging sequences can support imaging-guided navigation for functional tcMRIgFUS neurosurgery by visualizing anatomical landmarks that can be integrated into the navigation process to accommodate for patient specific anatomy.

  13. Feasibility of ultrasound-guided high intensity focused ultrasound ablating uterine fibroids with hyperintense on T2-weighted MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Wen-Peng; Chen, Jin-Yun; Zhang, Lian; Li, Quan; Qin, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively investigate whether uterine fibroids with hyperintense on pretreatment T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be treated with ultrasound-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (USgHIFU). Materials and methods: 282 patients with 282 symptomatic uterine fibroids who underwent USgHIFU treatment were retrospectively analyzed. Based on the signal intensity of T2-weighted MRI, uterine fibroids were classified as hypointense, isointense and hyperintense. Hyperintense fibroids were subjectively further subdivided into heterogeneous hyperintense, slightly homogeneous hyperintense and markedly homogeneous hyperintense based on the signal intensity of fibroid relative to myometrium and endometrium on T2-weighted MRI. Enhanced MRI was performed within one month after HIFU treatment. Non-perfused volume (NPV, indicative of successful ablation) ratio, treatment time, treatment efficiency, energy effect ratio and adverse events were recorded. Results: The median volume of uterine fibroids was 70.3 cm 3 (interquartile range, 41.1–132.5 cm 3 ). The average NPV ratio, defined as non-perfused volume divided by the fibroid volume after HIFU treatment, was 76.8 ± 19.0% (range, 0–100%) in the 282 patients. It was 86.3 ± 11.9% (range, 40.9–100.0%) in the group with hypointense fibroids, 77.1 ± 16.5% (range, 32.2–100.0%) in isointense fibroids, and 67.6 ± 23.9% (range, 0–100.0%) in hyperintense fibroids. The lowest NPV ratio, lowest treatment efficiency, more treatment time, more sonication energy and pain scores were observed in the slightly homogeneous hyperintense fibroids, and the NPV ratio was 55.8 ± 26.7% (range, 0–83.9%) in this subgroup. Conclusion: Based on our results, the heterogeneous and markedly homogeneous hyperintense fibroids were suitable for USgHIFU, and only the slightly homogeneous hyperintense fibroids should be excluded

  14. Curvelet based automatic segmentation of supraspinatus tendon from ultrasound image: a focused assistive diagnostic method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rishu; Elamvazuthi, Irraivan; Dass, Sarat Chandra; Faye, Ibrahima; Vasant, Pandian; George, John; Izza, Faizatul

    2014-12-04

    Disorders of rotator cuff tendons results in acute pain limiting the normal range of motion for shoulder. Of all the tendons in rotator cuff, supraspinatus (SSP) tendon is affected first of any pathological changes. Diagnosis of SSP tendon using ultrasound is considered to be operator dependent with its accuracy being related to operator's level of experience. The automatic segmentation of SSP tendon ultrasound image was performed to provide focused and more accurate diagnosis. The image processing techniques were employed for automatic segmentation of SSP tendon. The image processing techniques combines curvelet transform and mathematical concepts of logical and morphological operators along with area filtering. The segmentation assessment was performed using true positives rate, false positives rate and also accuracy of segmentation. The specificity and sensitivity of the algorithm was tested for diagnosis of partial thickness tears (PTTs) and full thickness tears (FTTs). The ultrasound images of SSP tendon were taken from medical center with the help of experienced radiologists. The algorithm was tested on 116 images taken from 51 different patients. The accuracy of segmentation of SSP tendon was calculated to be 95.61% in accordance with the segmentation performed by radiologists, with true positives rate of 91.37% and false positives rate of 8.62%. The specificity and sensitivity was found to be 93.6%, 94% and 95%, 95.6% for partial thickness tears and full thickness tears respectively. The proposed methodology was successfully tested over a database of more than 116 US images, for which radiologist assessment and validation was performed. The segmentation of SSP tendon from ultrasound images helps in focused, accurate and more reliable diagnosis which has been verified with the help of two experienced radiologists. The specificity and sensitivity for accurate detection of partial and full thickness tears has been considerably increased after segmentation when

  15. Non-invasive Measurement of Thermal Diffusivity Using High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound and Through-Transmission Ultrasonic Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeshurun, Lilach; Azhari, Haim

    2016-01-01

    Thermal diffusivity at the site ablated by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) plays an important role in the final therapeutic outcome, as it influences the temperature's spatial and temporal distribution. Moreover, as tissue thermal diffusivity is different in tumors as compared with normal tissue, it could also potentially be used as a new source of imaging contrast. The aim of this study was to examine the feasibility of combining through-transmission ultrasonic imaging and HIFU to estimate thermal diffusivity non-invasively. The concept was initially evaluated using a computer simulation. Then it was experimentally tested on phantoms made of agar and ex vivo porcine fat. A computerized imaging system combined with a HIFU system was used to heat the phantoms to temperatures below 42°C to avoid irreversible damage. Through-transmission scanning provided the time-of-flight values in a region of interest during its cooling process. The time-of-flight values were consequently converted into mean values of speed of sound. Using the speed-of-sound profiles along with the developed model, we estimated the changes in temperature profiles over time. These changes in temperature profiles were then used to calculate the corresponding thermal diffusivity of the studied specimen. Thermal diffusivity for porcine fat was found to be lower by one order of magnitude than that obtained for agar (0.313×10(-7)m(2)/s vs. 4.83×10(-7)m(2)/s, respectively, p ultrasound thermal diffusivity mapping is feasible. The suggested method may particularly be suitable for breast scanning. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ultrasound is a useful procedure for monitoring the baby's development in the uterus. Ultrasound uses inaudible sound waves to produce a two-dimensional image of the baby while inside the mother's ...

  17. Noninvasive body sculpting technologies with an emphasis on high-intensity focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewell, Mark L; Solish, Nowell J; Desilets, Charles S

    2011-10-01

    Body-sculpting procedures are becoming increasingly popular in the United States. Although surgical lipoplasty remains the most common body sculpting procedure, a demand exists for noninvasive alternatives capable of reducing focal adiposity without the risks of adverse events (AEs) associated with invasive excisional body-sculpting procedures. This report describes the mechanism of action, efficacy, safety, and tolerability of cryolipolysis, radiofrequency ablation, low-level external laser therapy, injection lipolysis, low-intensity nonthermal ultrasound, and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), with an emphasis on thermal HIFU. The articles cited were identified via a PubMed search, with additional article citations identified by manual searching of the reference lists of articles identified through the literature search. Each of the noninvasive treatments reviewed can be administered on an outpatient basis. These treatments generally have fewer complications than lipoplasty and require little or no anesthesia or analgesia. However, HIFU is the only treatment that can produce significant results in a single treatment, and only radiofrequency, low-level laser therapy, and cryolipolysis have been approved for use in the United States. Early clinical data on HIFU support its efficacy and safety for body sculpting. In contrast, radiofrequency, laser therapy, and injection lipolysis have been associated with significant AEs. The published literature suggests that noninvasive body-sculpting techniques such as radiofrequency ablation, cryolipolysis, external low-level lasers, laser ablation, nonthermal ultrasound, and HIFU may be appropriate options for nonobese patients requiring modest reduction of adipose tissue.

  18. Multi-parametric monitoring and assessment of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) boiling by Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU): An ex vivo feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Gary Y.; Marquet, Fabrice; Wang, Shutao; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2014-01-01

    Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) is a recently developed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring method with feasibilities demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. Here, a multi-parametric study is performed to investigate both elastic and acoustics-independent viscoelastic tissue changes using the Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI) displacement, axial compressive strain and change in relative phase-shift during high energy HIFU treatment with tissue boiling. Forty three (n=43) thermal lesions were formed in ex vivo canine liver specimens (n=28). Two dimensional (2D) transverse HMI displacement maps were also obtained before and after lesion formation. The same method was repeated in 10-s, 20-s and 30-s HIFU durations at three different acoustic powers of 8, 10, and 11W, which were selected and verified as treatment parameters capable of inducing boiling using both thermocouple and Passive Cavitation Detection (PCD) measurements. Although a steady decrease in the displacement, compressive strain, and relative change in the focal phase shift (Δφ) were obtained in numerous cases, indicating an overall increase in relative stiffness, the study outcomes also showed that during boiling, a reverse lesion-to-background displacement contrast was detected, indicating potential change in tissue absorption, geometrical change and/or, mechanical gelatification or pulverization. Following treatment, corresponding 2D HMI displacement images of the thermal lesions also mapped consistent discrepancy in the lesion-to-background displacement contrast. Despite unpredictable changes in acoustic properties with boiling, the relative change in phase shift showed a consistent decrease, indicating its robustness to monitor biomechanical properties independent of the acoustic property change throughout the HIFU treatment. In addition, the 2D HMI displacement images confirmed and indicated the increase in the thermal lesion size with treatment duration

  19. Multi-parametric monitoring and assessment of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) boiling by harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU): an ex vivo feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Gary Y; Marquet, Fabrice; Wang, Shutao; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2014-03-07

    Harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) is a recently developed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring method with feasibilities demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. Here, a multi-parametric study is performed to investigate both elastic and acoustics-independent viscoelastic tissue changes using the Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI) displacement, axial compressive strain and change in relative phase shift during high energy HIFU treatment with tissue boiling. Forty three (n = 43) thermal lesions were formed in ex vivo canine liver specimens (n = 28). Two-dimensional (2D) transverse HMI displacement maps were also obtained before and after lesion formation. The same method was repeated in 10 s, 20 s and 30 s HIFU durations at three different acoustic powers of 8, 10, and 11 W, which were selected and verified as treatment parameters capable of inducing boiling using both thermocouple and passive cavitation detection (PCD) measurements. Although a steady decrease in the displacement, compressive strain, and relative change in the focal phase shift (Δϕ) were obtained in numerous cases, indicating an overall increase in relative stiffness, the study outcomes also showed that during boiling, a reverse lesion-to-background displacement contrast was detected, indicating potential change in tissue absorption, geometrical change and/or, mechanical gelatification or pulverization. Following treatment, corresponding 2D HMI displacement images of the thermal lesions also mapped consistent discrepancy in the lesion-to-background displacement contrast. Despite the expectedly chaotic changes in acoustic properties with boiling, the relative change in phase shift showed a consistent decrease, indicating its robustness to monitor biomechanical properties independent of the acoustic property changes throughout the HIFU treatment. In addition, the 2D HMI displacement images confirmed and indicated the increase in the thermal lesion size with

  20. Magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound: a new technology for clinical neurosciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolesz, Ferenc A; McDannold, Nathan J

    2014-02-01

    Transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound (TcMRgFUS) is an old idea but a new technology that may change the entire clinical field of the neurosciences. TcMRgFUS has no cumulative effect, and it is applicable for repeatable treatments, controlled by real-time dosimetry, and capable of immediate tissue destruction. Most importantly, it has extremely accurate targeting and constant monitoring. It is potentially more precise than proton beam therapy and definitely more cost effective. Neuro-oncology may be the most promising area of future TcMRgFUS applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. NMR guided focused ultrasound for myoma therapy - results from the first radiology-gynecology expert meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, A.; Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin; David, M.; Kroencke, T.; Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Charite Mitte, Berlin

    2013-01-01

    The contribution on the results from the first radiology-gynecology expert meeting concerning NMR guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) for myoma therapy covers the following topics: structural prerequisites for MRgFUS therapy; required examinations before MRgFUS therapy; indication for MRgFUS therapy; success criteria for the MRgFUS therapy; contraindications; MRgFUS therapy for patients that want to have children; side effects and complications of MRgFUS therapy; post-examination after MRgFUS therapy.

  2. Magnetic resonance–guided interstitial high-intensity focused ultrasound for brain tumor ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonell, Jacquelyn; Patel, Niravkumar; Rubino, Sebastian; Ghoshal, Goutam; Fischer, Gregory; Burdette, E. Clif; Hwang, Roy; Pilitsis, Julie G.

    2018-01-01

    Currently, treatment of brain tumors is limited to resection, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. Thermal ablation has been recently explored. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is being explored as an alternative. Specifically, the authors propose delivering HIFU internally to the tumor with an MRI-guided robotic assistant (MRgRA). The advantage of the authors’ interstitial device over external MRI-guided HIFU (MRgHIFU) is that it allows for conformal, precise ablation and concurrent tissue sampling. The authors describe their workflow for MRgRA HIFU delivery. PMID:29385926

  3. A boundary condition to the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya equation for modeling strongly focused nonlinear ultrasound fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosnitskiy, P., E-mail: pavrosni@yandex.ru; Yuldashev, P., E-mail: petr@acs366.phys.msu.ru; Khokhlova, V., E-mail: vera@acs366.phys.msu.ru [Physics Faculty, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-28

    An equivalent source model was proposed as a boundary condition to the nonlinear parabolic Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya (KZ) equation to simulate high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) fields generated by medical ultrasound transducers with the shape of a spherical shell. The boundary condition was set in the initial plane; the aperture, the focal distance, and the initial pressure of the source were chosen based on the best match of the axial pressure amplitude and phase distributions in the Rayleigh integral analytic solution for a spherical transducer and the linear parabolic approximation solution for the equivalent source. Analytic expressions for the equivalent source parameters were derived. It was shown that the proposed approach allowed us to transfer the boundary condition from the spherical surface to the plane and to achieve a very good match between the linear field solutions of the parabolic and full diffraction models even for highly focused sources with F-number less than unity. The proposed method can be further used to expand the capabilities of the KZ nonlinear parabolic equation for efficient modeling of HIFU fields generated by strongly focused sources.

  4. Functional Assay of Cancer Cell Invasion Potential Based on Mechanotransduction of Focused Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew C. Weitz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells undergo a number of biophysical changes as they transform from an indolent to an aggressive state. These changes, which include altered mechanical and electrical properties, can reveal important diagnostic information about disease status. Here, we introduce a high-throughput, functional technique for assessing cancer cell invasion potential, which works by probing for the mechanically excitable phenotype exhibited by invasive cancer cells. Cells are labeled with fluorescent calcium dye and imaged during stimulation with low-intensity focused ultrasound, a non-contact mechanical stimulus. We show that cells located at the focus of the stimulus exhibit calcium elevation for invasive prostate (PC-3 and DU-145 and bladder (T24/83 cancer cell lines, but not for non-invasive cell lines (BPH-1, PNT1A, and RT112/84. In invasive cells, ultrasound stimulation initiates a calcium wave that propagates from the cells at the transducer focus to other cells, over distances greater than 1 mm. We demonstrate that this wave is mediated by extracellular signaling molecules and can be abolished through inhibition of transient receptor potential channels and inositol trisphosphate receptors, implicating these proteins in the mechanotransduction process. If validated clinically, our technology could provide a means to assess tumor invasion potential in cytology specimens, which is not currently possible. It may therefore have applications in diseases such as bladder cancer, where cytologic diagnosis of tumor invasion could improve clinical decision-making.

  5. Use of high-intensity focused ultrasound in the treatment of both benign and malignant prostatic disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernen, Kenneth M.; Miles, Brian J.

    2000-05-01

    power acoustic transducers, which produce focused ultrasound waves, that generate high temperatures to achieve coagulative necrosis of the target tissue. The ultrasound waves are emitted in discrete, timed bursts with a duration of several seconds. At the focal point of the ultrasound, the temperatures achieved are approximately 85 degrees Celsius, thereby ablating the prostate tissue. An attractive advantage of HIFU is its low risk of morbidity, due to the sudden, short bursts of the intensely focused ultrasound, which, along with the heat generated, are quickly absorbed by the target tissue, thereby protecting the surrounding tissues from damage.

  6. Focused ultrasound transducer spatial peak intensity estimation: a comparison of methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civale, John; Rivens, Ian; Shaw, Adam; ter Haar, Gail

    2018-03-01

    Characterisation of the spatial peak intensity at the focus of high intensity focused ultrasound transducers is difficult because of the risk of damage to hydrophone sensors at the high focal pressures generated. Hill et al (1994 Ultrasound Med. Biol. 20 259-69) provided a simple equation for estimating spatial-peak intensity for solid spherical bowl transducers using measured acoustic power and focal beamwidth. This paper demonstrates theoretically and experimentally that this expression is only strictly valid for spherical bowl transducers without a central (imaging) aperture. A hole in the centre of the transducer results in over-estimation of the peak intensity. Improved strategies for determining focal peak intensity from a measurement of total acoustic power are proposed. Four methods are compared: (i) a solid spherical bowl approximation (after Hill et al 1994 Ultrasound Med. Biol. 20 259-69), (ii) a numerical method derived from theory, (iii) a method using measured sidelobe to focal peak pressure ratio, and (iv) a method for measuring the focal power fraction (FPF) experimentally. Spatial-peak intensities were estimated for 8 transducers at three drive powers levels: low (approximately 1 W), moderate (~10 W) and high (20-70 W). The calculated intensities were compared with those derived from focal peak pressure measurements made using a calibrated hydrophone. The FPF measurement method was found to provide focal peak intensity estimates that agreed most closely (within 15%) with the hydrophone measurements, followed by the pressure ratio method (within 20%). The numerical method was found to consistently over-estimate focal peak intensity (+40% on average), however, for transducers with a central hole it was more accurate than using the solid bowl assumption (+70% over-estimation). In conclusion, the ability to make use of an automated beam plotting system, and a hydrophone with good spatial resolution, greatly facilitates characterisation of the FPF, and

  7. [Study on therapeutic dosimetry and biologic effect of high intensity focused ultrasound].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xuemei; Xiong, Xin; Zou, Jianzhong; Li, Faqi; Ma, Ping; Wang, Zhibiao

    2009-02-01

    This study was aimed at exploring the high intensity focused ultrasound(HIFU) therapeutic dosimetry and its biologic effect. In-vitro, bovine liver was immersed into 0.9% NS and degassed for application. The JC Model-focused ultrasound tumor therapeutic system was used in the experiment. The HIFU parameters were: frequency 1.6 MHz, depth 20 mm, acoustic power from 16.44 W to 196.32 W. Under each power, at radiating times from is to 20 s, bioptic specimens were obtained from all samples. The results showed when the acoustic power was equal to or higher than 179.96 W, only is of radiating is adequate to induce coagulative necrosis, and when the acoustic power was lower than 65.44 W, the radiating time to produce coagulative necrosis was about 7 s. In the range of 65.44-179.96 W, at each time when the acoustic power was set up with an increment of 16.36 W, the time to produce coagulative necrosis was 1-2 s shorter. The form of biological focal region (BFR) varied with the acoustic power and HIFU irradiation time. The size of BFR increased with the increase of HIFU irradiation dosage (acoustic power x exposure time). There is positive correlation between the size of BFR and the dosage of HIFU irradiation (y = 0.0164x(1.05591), R5 = 0.9238, P < 0.05).

  8. Thermometry during MR-guided focused ultrasound in a preclinical model based on Thiel embalmed tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakitsios, Ioannis; Bobeica, Mariana; Saliev, Timur; Rube, Martin; Melzer, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the accuracy of Proton Resonance Frequency (PRF) thermometry during MR-guided Focused Ultrasound (MRgFUS) ablation on explanted Thiel embalmed human and animal liver, fresh animal liver, and compared to gel phantom. PRF thermometry during MRgFUS was conducted using a 1.5T MRI system. The phantom and the organs were sonicated with the following energies: 300J, 600J, 1000J and 1400J. The temperature increase which was measured using PRF thermometry during sonication was compared to actual temperature rise in the same conditions measured by fibre optic thermocouple. Sonication of fresh animal liver showed temperature differences varying between 0.27°C and 0.40°C, whereas the phantom results showed temperature differences from 0.23°C to 0.40°C. For the Thiel embalmed organs, the temperature difference varied from 1.17 °C to 3.13°C for the ovine liver, and from 1.3°C to 3.10°C for the human liver. The temperature differences measured in the fresh liver were small and similar to those found for the gel phantom. However, the temperature differences calculated for the Thiel embalmed organs were higher compared to the fresh organ. This indicates that the PRF-based temperature calibration of the Focused Ultrasound machine for Thiel embalmed tissue is necessary.

  9. Focused ultrasound subthalamotomy in patients with asymmetric Parkinson's disease: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Fernández, Raul; Rodríguez-Rojas, Rafael; Del Álamo, Marta; Hernández-Fernández, Frida; Pineda-Pardo, Jose A; Dileone, Michele; Alonso-Frech, Fernando; Foffani, Guglielmo; Obeso, Ignacio; Gasca-Salas, Carmen; de Luis-Pastor, Esther; Vela, Lydia; Obeso, José A

    2018-01-01

    Ablative neurosurgery has been used to treat Parkinson's disease for many decades. MRI-guided focused ultrasound allows focal lesions to be made in deep brain structures without skull incision. We investigated the safety and preliminary efficacy of unilateral subthalamotomy by focused ultrasound in Parkinson's disease. This prospective, open-label pilot study was done at CINAC (Centro Integral de Neurociencias), University Hospital HM Puerta del Sur in Madrid, Spain. Eligible participants had Parkinson's disease with markedly asymmetric parkinsonism. Patients with severe dyskinesia, history of stereotactic surgery or brain haemorrhage, a diagnosis of an unstable cardiac or psychiatric disease, or a skull density ratio of 0·3 or less were excluded. Enrolled patients underwent focused ultrasound unilateral subthalamotomy. The subthalamic nucleus was targeted by means of brain images acquired with a 3-Tesla MRI apparatus. Several sonications above the definitive ablation temperature of 55°C were delivered and adjusted according to clinical response. The primary outcomes were safety and a change in the motor status of the treated hemibody as assessed with part III of the Movement Disorders Society-Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS III) in both off-medication and on-medication states at 6 months. Adverse events were monitored up to 48 h after treatment and at scheduled clinic visits at 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment. The study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02912871. Between April 26 and June 14, 2016, ten patients with markedly asymmetric parkinsonism that was poorly controlled pharmacologically were enrolled for focused ultrasound unilateral subthalamotomy. By 6 months follow-up, 38 incidents of adverse events had been recorded, none of which were serious or severe. Seven adverse events were present at 6 months. Three of these adverse events were directly related to subthalamotomy: off-medication dyskinesia in the treated arm

  10. Abdominal and obstetric applications of a dynamically focused phased array real time ultrasound system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, C L; Trought, W S; von Ramm, O T; Thurstone, F L

    1980-05-01

    Abdominal and obstetric applications of a dynamically focused phased array real time ultrasonic system are described. This work was performed utilising both the Thaumascan (two-dimensional, high resolution, actual time, ultrasound, multi-element array scanner) and the first commercial unit based on this system, the Grumman RT-400. Examples of normal and pathological anatomy are presented from over 300 examinations performed to date, including a series of 28 abdominal aortic aneurysms studied with the RT-400. Following electronic alterations in the Thaumascan with resultant improvement in the grey scale, prospective analyses in 86 obstetric and 23 abdominal examinations were undertaken. These studies indicate that fetal, intra-uterine, and abdominal structures can be rapidly and consistently imaged. The value of real time ultrasonic scanning in obstetric and abdominal examinations is illustrated. The principles of dynamically focused phased arrays are described, and the merits and limitations of these systems are discussed.

  11. Magnetic Resonance-Guided High-Intensity-Focused Ultrasound for Palliation of Painful Skeletal Metastases: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Michael; Dennis, Kristopher; Huang, Yuexi; Mougenot, Charles; Chow, Edward; DeAngelis, Carlo; Coccagna, Jennifer; Sahgal, Arjun; Hynynen, Kullervo; Czarnota, Gregory; Chu, William

    2017-10-01

    Bone is one of the most common sites of metastases, with bone metastases-related pain representing a significant source of morbidity among patients with cancer. Magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound is a noninvasive, outpatient modality with the potential for treating painful bone metastases. The aim of this study is to report our initial experience with magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound in the treatment of bone metastases and our preliminary analysis of urinary cytokine levels after therapy. This was a single-center pilot study of 10 patients with metastatic cancer to investigate the feasibility of magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound for primary pain control in device-accessible skeletal metastases. Treatments were performed on a clinical magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound system using a volumetric ablation technique. Primary efficacy was assessed using Brief Pain Inventory scores and morphine equivalent daily dose intake at 3 time points: before, day 14, and day 30 after the magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound treatment. Urine cytokines were measured 3 days before treatment and 2 days after the treatment. Of the 10 patients, 8 were followed up 14 days and 6 were followed up 30 days after the treatment. At day 14, 3 patients (37.5%) exhibited partial pain response and 4 patients (50%) exhibited an indeterminate response, and at day 30 after the treatment, 5 patients (83%) exhibited partial pain response. No treatment-related adverse events were recorded. Of the urine cytokines measured, only Transforming growth factor alpha (TGFα) demonstrated an overall decrease, with a trend toward statistical significance ( P = .078). Our study corroborates magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound as a feasible and safe modality as a primary, palliative treatment for painful bone metastases and contributes to the limited body of literature using magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound for this clinical indication.

  12. Shadow effects in simulated ultrasound images derived from computed tomography images using a focused beam tracing model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, An Hoai; Lundgren, Bo; Stage, Bjarne

    2012-01-01

    Simulation of ultrasound images based on computed tomography (CT) data has previously been performed with different approaches. Shadow effects are normally pronounced in ultrasound images, so they should be included in the simulation. In this study, a method to capture the shadow effects has been......Focus ultrasound scanner (BK Medical, Herlev, Denmark) equipped with a dedicated research interface giving access to beamformed radio frequency data. CT images were obtained with an Aquilion ONE Toshiba CT scanner (Toshiba Medical Systems Corp., Tochigi, Japan). CT data were mapped from Hounsfield units...

  13. A 3D reconstruction solution to ultrasound Joule heat density tomography based on acousto-electric effect: a simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, R; Li, X D; Lu, Y; Song, A; Yan, R; Xu, B; Li, X

    2014-01-01

    A 3D reconstruction solution to ultrasound Joule heat density tomography based on acousto-electric effect by deconvolution is proposed for noninvasive imaging of biological tissue. Compared with ultrasound current source density imaging, ultrasound Joule heat density tomography doesn't require any priori knowledge of conductivity distribution and lead fields, so it can gain better imaging result, more adaptive to environment and with wider application scope. For a general 3D volume conductor with broadly distributed current density field, in the AE equation the ultrasound pressure can't simply be separated from the 3D integration, so it is not a common modulation and basebanding (heterodyning) method is no longer suitable to separate Joule heat density from the AE signals. In the proposed method the measurement signal is viewed as the output of Joule heat density convolving with ultrasound wave. As a result, the internal 3D Joule heat density can be reconstructed by means of Wiener deconvolution. A series of computer simulations set for breast cancer imaging applications, with consideration of ultrasound beam diameter, noise level, conductivity contrast, position dependency and size of simulated tumors, have been conducted to evaluate the feasibility and performance of the proposed reconstruction method. The computer simulation results demonstrate that high spatial resolution 3D ultrasound Joule heat density imaging is feasible using the proposed method, and it has potential applications to breast cancer detection and imaging of other organs

  14. Comparison of heating of nonliving soft tissue produced by 45 kHz and 1 MHz frequency ultrasound machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, A R; Robertson, V J

    1996-04-01

    Ultrasound of 1 MHz frequency is used routinely for patient treatment because it can penetrate to and heat deeply located tissue. Benefits are claimed for newly introduced 45 kHz ultrasound machines, yet little evidence is available to confirm these benefits. This paper compares claims supporting the therapeutic use of 45 kHz ultrasound with those supporting the traditional MHz frequencies. The results of an empirical study comparing the heating effects are also presented. Thermocouples placed at different tissue depths in nonliving pig tissue measured temperature variations over a 40-minute period. Direct heating produced by the 45 kHz ultrasound machine was very superficial. By contrast, the 1 MHz ultrasound machine produced direct heating at all tissue depths. The results confirmed that although 45 kHz ultrasound machines may be useful for heating superficial tissues, they have limited or no use in heating deeper tissues. For treatment of deeply located tissue, 1 MHz ultrasound should continue to be used.

  15. Noninvasive, in vivo determination of uterine fibroid thermal conductivity in MRI-guided high intensity focused ultrasound therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiming; Fischer, John; Warner, Lizette; Oto, Aytekin; Hor, Pei-Herng; Muthupillai, Raja

    2015-06-01

    To estimate the local thermal conductivity of uterine fibroid in vivo at a high temperature range (60-80°C) typically encountered in magnetic resonance imaging-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) surgery. The thermal conductivity of uterine fibroids in vivo is unknown and knowledge about tissue thermal conductivity may aid in effective delivery of thermal energy for ablation. All subjects (nine women) provided written informed consent to participate in this Institutional Review Board-approved study. A total of 10 fibroids were treated using MRgHIFU surgery with real-time temperature monitoring during both heating and cooling periods. The local thermal conductivity was determined by analyzing the spatiotemporal spread of temperature during the cooling period. The thermal conductivity of MRgHIFU-treated uterine fibroids was 0.47 ± 0.07 W·m(-1) ·K(-1) (range: 0.25∼0.67 W·m(-1) ·K(-1) ) which is slightly lower than the reported value for skeletal muscle at temperatures of thermal conductivity of uterine fibroids in vivo from the spatiotemporal spread of temperature around the HIFU focus during the cooling period. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Angled-focused 45 MHz PMN-PT single element transducer for intravascular ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sangpil; Williams, Jay; Kang, Bong Jin; Yoon, Changhan; Cabrera-Munoz, Nestor; Jeong, Jong Seob; Lee, Sang Goo; Shung, K Kirk; Kim, Hyung Ham

    2015-06-01

    A transducer with an angled and focused aperture for intravascular ultrasound imaging has been developed. The acoustic stack for the angled-focused transducer was made of PMN-PT single crystal with one matching layer, one protective coating layer, and a highly damped backing layer. It was then press-focused to a desired focal length and inserted into a thin needle housing with an angled tip. A transducer with an angled and unfocused aperture was also made, following the same fabrication procedure, to compare the performance of the two transducers. The focused and unfocused transducers were tested to measure their center frequencies, bandwidths, and spatial resolutions. Lateral resolution of the angled-focused transducer (AFT) improved more than two times compared to that of the angled-unfocused transducer (AUT). A tissue-mimicking phantom in water and a rabbit aorta tissue sample in rabbit blood were scanned using AFT and AUT. Imaging with AFT offered improved contrast, over imaging with AUT, of the tissue-mimicking phantom and the rabbit aorta tissue sample by 23 dB and 8 dB, respectively. The results show that AFT has strong potential to provide morphological and pathological information of coronary arteries with high resolution and high contrast.

  17. Intrapleural fluid infusion for MR-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation in the liver dome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijlemans, Joost W; de Greef, Martijn; Schubert, Gerald; Moonen, Chrit T W; van den Bosch, Maurice A A J; Ries, Mario

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) ablation of tumors in the liver dome is challenging because of the presence of air in the costophrenic angle. In this study, we used a porcine liver model and a clinical MR-HIFU system to assess the feasibility and safety of using intrapleural fluid infusion (IPI) to create an acoustic window for MR-HIFU ablation in the liver dome. Healthy adult Dalland land pigs (n = 6) under general anesthesia were used with animal committee approval. Degassed saline (200-800 mL) was infused into the intrapleural space under ultrasound guidance. A clinical 1.5-T MR-HIFU system was used to perform sonications (4-mm treatment cells, 300-450 W, 20-30 seconds) in the liver dome under real-time MR thermometry. An intercostal firing technique was used to prevent rib heating in one experiment. Technical success was defined as a temperature increase (>10°C) in the target area. After termination, the animal was examined for thermal damage to liver, diaphragm, pleura, lung, or intercostal muscle. An acoustic window was established in all animals. A temperature increase in the target area was achieved in all animals (max. 47°C-67°C). MR thermometry showed no heating outside the target area. Intercostal firing effectively reduced rib heating (55°C vs. 42°C). Postmortem examination revealed no unwanted thermal damage. One complication occurred, in the first experiment, because of an ill-suited needle (displacement of the needle). The results indicate that IPI may be used safely to assist MR-HIFU ablation of tumors in the liver dome. For reliable tissue coagulation, IPI must be combined with an intercostal sonication technique. Considering the proportion of patients with tumors in the liver dome, IPI widens the applicability of MR-HIFU ablation for liver tumors considerably. Copyright © 2014 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Focused ultrasound treatment of abscesses induced by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus: Feasibility study in a mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieck, Birgit [Thunder Bay Regional Research Institute, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B6V4 (Canada); Bates, David; Pichardo, Samuel, E-mail: spichard@lakeheadu.ca, E-mail: lcuriel@lakeheadu.ca; Curiel, Laura, E-mail: spichard@lakeheadu.ca, E-mail: lcuriel@lakeheadu.ca [Thunder Bay Regional Research Institute, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B6V4, Canada and Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B6V4 (Canada); Zhang, Kunyan [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Escott, Nicholas [Department of Pathology, Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B 6V4 (Canada); Mougenot, Charles [Philips Healthcare, Ontario L6C 2S3 (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To study the therapeutic effect of focused ultrasound on abscesses induced by methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MRSA is a major nosocomial pathogen where immunocompromised patients are prone to develop infections that are less and less responsive to regular treatments. Because of its capability to induce a rise of temperature at a very precise location, the use of focused ultrasound represents a considerable opportunity for therapy of localized MRSA-related infections. Methods: 50μl of MRSA strain USA400 bacteria suspension at a concentration of 1.32 ± 0.5 × 10{sup 5} colony forming units (cfu)/μl was injected subcutaneously in the left flank of BALB/c mice. An abscess of 6 ± 2 mm in diameter formed after 48 h. A transducer operating at 3 MHz with a focal length of 50 mm and diameter of 32 mm was used to treat the abscess. The focal point was positioned 2 mm under the skin at the abscess center. Forty-eight hours after injection four ultrasound exposures of 9 s each were applied to each abscess under magnetic resonance imaging guidance. Each exposure was followed by a 1 min pause. These parameters were based on preliminary experiments to ensure repetitive accurate heating of the abscess. Real-time estimation of change of temperature was done using water-proton resonance frequency and a communication toolbox (matMRI) developed inhouse. Three experimental groups of animals each were tested: control, moderate temperature (MT), and high temperature (HT). MT and HT groups reached, respectively, 52.3 ± 5.1 and 63.8 ± 7.5 °C at the end of exposure. Effectiveness of the treatment was assessed by evaluating the bacteria amount of the treated abscess 1 and 4 days after treatment. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) assay evaluating the neutrophil amount was performed to assess the local neutrophil recruitment and the white blood cell count was used to evaluate the systemic inflammatory response after focused ultrasound treatment. Results: Macroscopic

  19. Motion compensation with skin contact control for high intensity focused ultrasound surgery in moving organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diodato, A.; Cafarelli, A.; Schiappacasse, A.; Tognarelli, S.; Ciuti, G.; Menciassi, A.

    2018-02-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is an emerging therapeutic solution that enables non-invasive treatment of several pathologies, mainly in oncology. On the other hand, accurate targeting of moving abdominal organs (e.g. liver, kidney, pancreas) is still an open challenge. This paper proposes a novel method to compensate the physiological respiratory motion of organs during HIFU procedures, by exploiting a robotic platform for ultrasound-guided HIFU surgery provided with a therapeutic annular phased array transducer. The proposed method enables us to keep the same contact point between the transducer and the patient’s skin during the whole procedure, thus minimizing the modification of the acoustic window during the breathing phases. The motion of the target point is compensated through the rotation of the transducer around a virtual pivot point, while the focal depth is continuously adjusted thanks to the axial electronically steering capabilities of the HIFU transducer. The feasibility of the angular motion compensation strategy has been demonstrated in a simulated respiratory-induced organ motion environment. Based on the experimental results, the proposed method appears to be significantly accurate (i.e. the maximum compensation error is always under 1 mm), thus paving the way for the potential use of this technique for in vivo treatment of moving organs, and therefore enabling a wide use of HIFU in clinics.

  20. Physiological Motion and Registration of Abnormalities in Liver During Focused Ultrasound Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Sunita; Rh, Abhilash

    Continuous deformation and dislocation of soft tissues in the abdominal and thoracic region presents a major issue for effective targeting of all non-invasive ablative modalities such as radiotherapy/surgery and Focused Ultrasound Surgery. Most significant among these is the movement of the target organs due to physiological processes such as respiration. The movement is found to be most significant for liver and kidneys. We studied movement and compensation strategies with the aim to implement them during ultrasound ablation using our robotic system for targeted FUS dose delivery. The motion pattern of the liver can be assumed to be in a single plane as it closely follows the movement of the diaphragm. However, the movement of kidneys is three dimensional and follows complicated patterns. Kidney motion is highly subject specific and has poor repeatability. In our research, we quantify the relation of liver movement and the breathing pattern so as to achieve real-time movement compensation using a prediction-correlation approach.

  1. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Circular Cyclocoagulation in Glaucoma: A Step Forward for Cyclodestruction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Mastropasqua

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The ciliary body ablation is still considered as a last resort treatment to reduce the intraocular pressure (IOP in uncontrolled glaucoma. Several ablation techniques have been proposed over the years, all presenting a high rate of complications, nonselectivity for the target organ, and unpredictable dose-effect relationship. These drawbacks limited the application of cyclodestructive procedures almost exclusively to refractory glaucoma. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU, proposed in the early 1980s and later abandoned because of the complexity and side effects of the procedure, was recently reconsidered in a new approach to destroy the ciliary body. Ultrasound circular cyclocoagulation (UC3, by using miniaturized transducers embedded in a dedicated circular-shaped device, permits to selectively treat the ciliary body in a one-step, computer-assisted, and non-operator-dependent procedure. UC3 shows a high level of safety along with a predictable and sustained IOP reduction in patients with refractory glaucoma. Because of this, the indication of UC3 was recently extended also to naïve-to-surgery patients, thus reconsidering the role and timing of ciliary body ablation in the surgical management of glaucoma. This article provides a review of the most used cycloablative techniques with particular attention to UC3, summarizing the current knowledge about this procedure and future possible developments.

  2. The design of a focused ultrasound transducer array for the treatment of stroke: a simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajek, Daniel; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2012-01-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is capable of mechanically disintegrating blood clots at high pressures. Safe thrombolysis may require frequencies higher than those currently utilized by transcranial HIFU. Since the attenuation and focal distortion of ultrasound in bone increases at higher frequencies, resulting focal pressures are diminished. This study investigated the feasibility of using transcranial HIFU for the non-invasive treatment of ischemic stroke. The use of large aperture, 1.1–1.5 MHz phased arrays in targeting four clinically relevant vessel locations was simulated. Resulting focal sizes decreased with frequency, producing a maximum –3 dB depth of field and lateral width of 2.0 and 1.2 mm, respectively. Mean focal gains above an order of magnitude were observed in three of four targets and transducer intensities required to achieve thrombolysis were determined. Required transducer element counts are about an order of magnitude higher than what currently exists and so, although technically feasible, new arrays would need to be developed to realize this as a treatment modality for stroke. (paper)

  3. Deep tissue penetration of nanoparticles using pulsed-high intensity focused ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Dong Gil; Yoon, Hong Yeol; Jeon, Sangmin; Um, Wooram; Son, Sejin; Park, Jae Hyung; Kwon, Ick Chan; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2017-11-01

    Recently, ultrasound (US)-based drug delivery strategies have received attention to improve enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) effect-based passive targeting efficiency of nanoparticles in vitro and in vivo conditions. Among the US treatment techniques, pulsed-high intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU) have specialized for improving tissue penetration of various macromolecules and nanoparticles without irreversible tissue damages. In this study, we have demonstrated that pHIFU could be utilized to improve tissue penetration of fluorescent dye-labeled glycol chitosan nanoparticles (FCNPs) in femoral tissue of mice. pHIFU could improve blood flow of the targeted-blood vessel in femoral tissue. In addition, tissue penetration of FCNPs was specifically increased 5.7-, 8- and 9.3-folds than that of non-treated (0 W pHIFU) femoral tissue, when the femoral tissue was treated with 10, 20 and 50 W of pHIFU, respectively. However, tissue penetration of FCNPs was significantly reduced after 3 h post-pHIFU treatment (50 W). Because overdose (50 W) of pHIFU led to irreversible tissue damages, including the edema and chapped red blood cells. These overall results support that pHIFU treatment can enhance the extravasation and tissue penetration of FCNPs as well as induce irreversible tissue damages. We expect that our results can provide advantages to optimize pHIFU-mediated delivery strategy of nanoparticles for further clinical applications.

  4. Power cavitation-guided blood-brain barrier opening with focused ultrasound and microbubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, M. T.; Apostolakis, I.; Konofagou, E. E.

    2018-03-01

    Image-guided monitoring of microbubble-based focused ultrasound (FUS) therapies relies on the accurate localization of FUS-stimulated microbubble activity (i.e. acoustic cavitation). Passive cavitation imaging with ultrasound arrays can achieve this, but with insufficient spatial resolution. In this study, we address this limitation and perform high-resolution monitoring of acoustic cavitation-mediated blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening with a new technique called power cavitation imaging. By synchronizing the FUS transmit and passive receive acquisition, high-resolution passive cavitation imaging was achieved by using delay and sum beamforming with absolute time delays. Since the axial image resolution is now dependent on the duration of the received acoustic cavitation emission, short pulses of FUS were used to limit its duration. Image sets were acquired at high-frame rates for calculation of power cavitation images analogous to power Doppler imaging. Power cavitation imaging displays the mean intensity of acoustic cavitation over time and was correlated with areas of acoustic cavitation-induced BBB opening. Power cavitation-guided BBB opening with FUS could constitute a standalone system that may not require MRI guidance during the procedure. The same technique can be used for other acoustic cavitation-based FUS therapies, for both safety and guidance.

  5. Design and validation of an MR-conditional robot for transcranial focused ultrasound surgery in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Karl D; Sin, Vivian W; Mougenot, Charles; Pichardo, Samuel; Looi, Thomas; Waspe, Adam C; Drake, James M

    2016-09-01

    Current treatment of intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) involves cerebral shunt placement or an invasive brain surgery. Magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) applied to the brains of pediatric patients presents an opportunity to treat IVH in a noninvasive manner, termed "incision-less surgery." Current clinical and research focused ultrasound systems lack the capability to perform neonatal transcranial surgeries due to either range of motion or dexterity requirements. A novel robotic system is proposed to position a focused ultrasound transducer accurately above the head of a neonatal patient inside an MRI machine to deliver the therapy. A clinical Philips Sonalleve MRgFUS system was expanded to perform transcranial treatment. A five degree-of-freedom MR-conditional robot was designed and manufactured using MR compatible materials. The robot electronics and control were integrated into existing Philips electronics and software interfaces. The user commands the position of the robot with a graphical user interface, and is presented with real-time MR imaging of the patient throughout the surgery. The robot is validated through a series of experiments that characterize accuracy, signal-to-noise ratio degeneration of an MR image as a result of the robot, MR imaging artifacts generated by the robot, and the robot's ability to operate in a representative surgical environment inside an MR machine. Experimental results show the robot responds reliably within an MR environment, has achieved 0.59 ± 0.25 mm accuracy, does not produce severe MR-imaging artifacts, has a workspace providing sufficient coverage of a neonatal brain, and can manipulate a 5 kg payload. A full system demonstration shows these characteristics apply in an application environment. This paper presents a comprehensive look at the process of designing and validating a new robot from concept to implementation for use in an MR environment. An MR conditional robot has been designed and

  6. Design and validation of an MR-conditional robot for transcranial focused ultrasound surgery in infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, Karl D.; Sin, Vivian W.; Mougenot, Charles; Pichardo, Samuel; Looi, Thomas; Waspe, Adam C.; Drake, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Current treatment of intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) involves cerebral shunt placement or an invasive brain surgery. Magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) applied to the brains of pediatric patients presents an opportunity to treat IVH in a noninvasive manner, termed “incision-less surgery.” Current clinical and research focused ultrasound systems lack the capability to perform neonatal transcranial surgeries due to either range of motion or dexterity requirements. A novel robotic system is proposed to position a focused ultrasound transducer accurately above the head of a neonatal patient inside an MRI machine to deliver the therapy. Methods: A clinical Philips Sonalleve MRgFUS system was expanded to perform transcranial treatment. A five degree-of-freedom MR-conditional robot was designed and manufactured using MR compatible materials. The robot electronics and control were integrated into existing Philips electronics and software interfaces. The user commands the position of the robot with a graphical user interface, and is presented with real-time MR imaging of the patient throughout the surgery. The robot is validated through a series of experiments that characterize accuracy, signal-to-noise ratio degeneration of an MR image as a result of the robot, MR imaging artifacts generated by the robot, and the robot’s ability to operate in a representative surgical environment inside an MR machine. Results: Experimental results show the robot responds reliably within an MR environment, has achieved 0.59 ± 0.25 mm accuracy, does not produce severe MR-imaging artifacts, has a workspace providing sufficient coverage of a neonatal brain, and can manipulate a 5 kg payload. A full system demonstration shows these characteristics apply in an application environment. Conclusions: This paper presents a comprehensive look at the process of designing and validating a new robot from concept to implementation for use in an MR environment. An MR

  7. Determination of tissue thermal conductivity by measuring and modeling temperature rise induced in tissue by pulsed focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujawska, Tamara; Secomski, Wojciech; Kruglenko, Eleonora; Krawczyk, Kazimierz; Nowicki, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    A tissue thermal conductivity (Ks) is an important parameter which knowledge is essential whenever thermal fields induced in selected organs are predicted. The main objective of this study was to develop an alternative ultrasonic method for determining Ks of tissues in vitro suitable for living tissues. First, the method involves measuring of temperature-time T(t) rises induced in a tested tissue sample by a pulsed focused ultrasound with measured acoustic properties using thermocouples located on the acoustic beam axis. Measurements were performed for 20-cycle tone bursts with a 2 MHz frequency, 0.2 duty-cycle and 3 different initial pressures corresponding to average acoustic powers equal to 0.7 W, 1.4 W and 2.1 W generated from a circular focused transducer with a diameter of 15 mm and f-number of 1.7 in a two-layer system of media: water/beef liver. Measurement results allowed to determine position of maximum heating located inside the beef liver. It was found that this position is at the same axial distance from the source as the maximum peak-peak pressure calculated for each nonlinear beam produced in the two-layer system of media. Then, the method involves modeling of T(t) at the point of maximum heating and fitting it to the experimental data by adjusting Ks. The averaged value of Ks determined by the proposed method was found to be 0.5±0.02 W/(m·°C) being in good agreement with values determined by other methods. The proposed method is suitable for determining Ks of some animal tissues in vivo (for example a rat liver).

  8. Determination of tissue thermal conductivity by measuring and modeling temperature rise induced in tissue by pulsed focused ultrasound.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Kujawska

    Full Text Available A tissue thermal conductivity (Ks is an important parameter which knowledge is essential whenever thermal fields induced in selected organs are predicted. The main objective of this study was to develop an alternative ultrasonic method for determining Ks of tissues in vitro suitable for living tissues. First, the method involves measuring of temperature-time T(t rises induced in a tested tissue sample by a pulsed focused ultrasound with measured acoustic properties using thermocouples located on the acoustic beam axis. Measurements were performed for 20-cycle tone bursts with a 2 MHz frequency, 0.2 duty-cycle and 3 different initial pressures corresponding to average acoustic powers equal to 0.7 W, 1.4 W and 2.1 W generated from a circular focused transducer with a diameter of 15 mm and f-number of 1.7 in a two-layer system of media: water/beef liver. Measurement results allowed to determine position of maximum heating located inside the beef liver. It was found that this position is at the same axial distance from the source as the maximum peak-peak pressure calculated for each nonlinear beam produced in the two-layer system of media. Then, the method involves modeling of T(t at the point of maximum heating and fitting it to the experimental data by adjusting Ks. The averaged value of Ks determined by the proposed method was found to be 0.5±0.02 W/(m·°C being in good agreement with values determined by other methods. The proposed method is suitable for determining Ks of some animal tissues in vivo (for example a rat liver.

  9. A random phased array device for delivery of high intensity focused ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hand, J W; Shaw, A; Sadhoo, N; Rajagopal, S; Dickinson, R J; Gavrilov, L R

    2009-01-01

    Randomized phased arrays can offer electronic steering of a single focus and simultaneous multiple foci concomitant with low levels of secondary maxima and are potentially useful as sources of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). This work describes laboratory testing of a 1 MHz random phased array consisting of 254 elements on a spherical shell of radius of curvature 130 mm and diameter 170 mm. Acoustic output power and efficiency are measured for a range of input electrical powers, and field distributions for various single- and multiple-focus conditions are evaluated by a novel technique using an infrared camera to provide rapid imaging of temperature changes on the surface of an absorbing target. Experimental results show that the array can steer a single focus laterally to at least ±15 mm off axis and axially to more than ±15 mm from the centre of curvature of the array and patterns of four and five simultaneous foci ±10 mm laterally and axially whilst maintaining low intensity levels in secondary maxima away from the targeted area in good agreement with linear theoretical predictions. Experiments in which pork meat was thermally ablated indicate that contiguous lesions several cm 3 in volume can be produced using the patterns of multiple foci.

  10. Basic study on ultrasonic monitoring using 1.5-dimensional ultrasound phased array for ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Ryo; Iwasaki, Ryosuke; Tomiyasu, Kentaro; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2017-07-01

    We have been studying a real-time detection method for tissue changes induced by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment using ultrasonic RF signals. It has been difficult to track the target region when the tissue to be treated deviates from the imaging plane along the elevation axis of the probe. In this study, a new 1.5-dimensional (1.5D) prototype phased array probe consisting of transducer elements along both the lateral and elevation axes was developed to track tissue motion along the elevation axis of the probe, and the elevational displacement range where the tracking is effective was investigated. The complex cross-correlation coefficient based on a block matching algorithm was applied to 2.5D volumetric RF images acquired by the 1.5D probe and the displacement vector along the elevation axis was calculated. From the results, it was found that the effective tracking range using this prototype probe was up to 3 mm, about 3 times that of a conventional 1D imaging probe. The proposed 1.5D phased array probe has the potential to track target tissue with intrafractional motion.

  11. Review Paper: A Review on Brain Stimulation Using Low Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Rezayat

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Brain stimulation techniques are important in both basic and clinical studies. Majority of well-known brain stimulating techniques have low spatial resolution or entail invasive processes. Low intensity focused ultrasound (LIFU seems to be a proper candidate for dealing with such deficiencies. This review recapitulates studies which explored the effects of LIFU on brain structures and its function, in both research and clinical areas. Although the mechanism of LIFU action is still unclear, its different effects from molecular level up to behavioral level can be explored in animal and human brain. It can also be coupled with brain imaging assessments in future research.

  12. Influence of the abdominal wall on the nonlinear propagation of focused therapeutic ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhen-Bo, Liu; Ting-Bo, Fan; Dong, Zhang; Xiu-Fen, Gong

    2009-01-01

    This article theoretically studies the influence of inhomogeneous abdominal walls on focused therapeutic ultrasound based on the phase screen model. An inhomogeneous tissue is considered as a combination of a homogeneous medium and a phase aberration screen. Variations of acoustic parameters such as peak positive pressure, peak negative pressure, and acoustic intensity are discussed with respect to the phase screen statistics of human abdominal walls. Results indicate that the abdominal wall can result in energy loss of the sound in the focal plane. For a typical human abdominal wall with correlation length of 7.9 mm and variance of 0.36, the peak acoustic intensity radiated from a 1 MHz transmitter with a radius of 30 mm can be reduced by about 14% at the focal plane. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  13. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) for the Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer using Sonablate-500

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Toyoaki; Ohkusa, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Hideyuki; Nagata, Yoshihiro

    2005-03-01

    We evaluated 181 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for biochemical disease-free rate, safety, morbidity and predictors of biochemical outcome. A total of 181 patients underwent HIFU with the Sonablate-500 and with at least 12 months of follow-up. Biochemical failure was defined according to the criteria recommended by the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Consensus Panel. The biochemical disease-free rates at 1, 3 and 5 years in all patients were 84%, 80% and 78%, respectively. The biochemical disease-free rates at 3 years for patients with pretreatment PSA less than 10 ng/ml, 10.01 to 20.0 ng/ml and more than 20.0 ng/ml were 94%, 75% and 35%, respectively (ppatients with localized prostate cancer, especially those with a pretreatment PSA level less than 20 ng/ml.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused ultrasound to increase localized blood-spinal cord barrier permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Allison H; Hawryluk, Gregory W; Anzai, Yoshimi; Odéen, Henrik; Ostlie, Megan A; Reichert, Ethan C; Stump, Amanda J; Minoshima, Satoshi; Cross, Donna J

    2017-12-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) affects thousands of people every year in the USA, and most patients are left with some permanent paralysis. Therapeutic options are limited and only modestly affect outcome. To address this issue, we used magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) as a non-invasive approach to increase permeability in the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB). We hypothesize that localized, controlled sonoporation of the BSCB by MRgFUS will aid delivery of therapeutics to the injury. Here, we report our preliminary findings for the ability of MRgFUS to increase BSCB permeability in the thoracic spinal cord of a normal rat model. First, an excised portion of normal rat spinal column was used to characterize the acoustic field and to estimate the insertion losses that could be expected in an MRgFUS blood spinal cord barrier opening. Then, in normal rats, MRgFUS was applied in combination with intravenously administered microbubbles to the spinal cord region. Permeability of the BSCB was indicated as signal enhancement by contrast administered prior to T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and verified by Evans blue dye. Neurological testing using the Basso, Beattie, and Breshnahan scale and the ladder walk was normal in 8 of 10 rats tested. Two rats showed minor impairment indicating need for further refinement of parameters. No gross tissue damage was evident by histology. In this study, we have opened successfully the blood spinal cord barrier in the thoracic region of the normal rat spine using magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound combined with microbubbles.

  15. Preliminary assessment of one-dimensional MR elastography for use in monitoring focused ultrasound therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeYuan; Glaser, Kevin J.; Rouviere, Olivier; Gorny, Krzysztof R.; Chen, Shigao; Manduca, Armando; Ehman, Richard L.; Felmlee, Joel P.

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of this work is to assess a fast technique that measures tissue stiffness and temperature during focused ultrasound thermal therapy (FUS). A one-dimensional (1D) MR elastography (MRE) pulse sequence was evaluated for the purpose of obtaining rapid measurements of thermally induced changes in tissue stiffness and temperature for monitoring FUS treatments. The accuracy of the 1D measurement was studied by comparing tissue displacements measured by 1D MRE with those measured by the well-established 2D MRE pulse sequence. The reproducibility of the 1D MRE measurement was assessed, in gel phantoms and ex vivo porcine tissue, for varied FUS intensity levels (31.5 199.9 W cm-2) and over a range of displacements at the focus (0.1 1 µm). Temperature elevations in agarose gel phantoms were measured using 1D MRE and calibrated using fiberoptic-thermometer-based measurements. The 1D MRE displacement measurements are highly correlated with those obtained with the 2D technique (R2 = 0.88 0.93), indicating that 1D MRE can successfully measure tissue displacement. Ten repeated trials at each FUS power level yielded a minimum detectable displacement change of 0.2 µm in phantoms and 0.4 µm in tissue (at 95% confidence level). The 1D MRE temperature measurements correlated well with temperature changes measured simultaneously with fiberoptic thermometers (R2 = 0.97). The 1D MRE technique is capable of detecting tissue displacements as low as 0.4 µm, which is an order of magnitude smaller than 5 µm displacements expected during FUS therapy (Le et al 2005 AIP Conf. Proc.: Ther. Ultrasound 829 186 90). Additionally, 1D MRE was shown to provide adequate measurements of temperature elevations in tissue. These findings indicate that 1D MRE may be an effective tool for monitoring FUS treatments.

  16. MR guided focused ultrasound: technical acceptance measures for a clinical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorny, K. R.; Hangiandreou, N. J.; Hesley, G. K.; Gostout, B. S.; McGee, K. P.; Felmlee, J. P.

    2006-06-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) is a hybrid technique which offers efficient and safe focused ultrasound (FUS) treatments of uterine fibroids under MR guidance and monitoring. As a therapy device, MRgFUS requires systematic testing over a wide range of operational parameters prior to use in the clinical environment. We present technical acceptance tests and data for the first clinical MRgFUS system, ExAblate® 2000 (InSightec Inc., Haifa, Israel), that has been FDA approved for treating uterine fibroids. These tests characterize MRgFUS by employing MR temperature measurements in tissue mimicking phantoms. The coronal scan plane is empirically demonstrated to be most reliable for measuring temperature elevations resulting from high intensity ultrasound (US) pulses ('sonications') and shows high sensitivity to changes in sonication parameters. Temperatures measured in the coronal plane were used as a measure of US energy deposited within the focal spot for a range of sonication parameters used in clinical treatments: spot type, spot length, output power, sonication duration, US frequency, and depth of sonication. In addition, MR images acquired during sonications were used to measure effective diameters and lengths of available sonication spot types and lengths. At a constant 60 W output power, the effective spot type diameters were measured to vary between 4.7 ± 0.3 mm and 6.6 ± 0.4 mm; treatment temperatures were found to decrease with increasing spot diameter. Prescribing different spot lengths was found to have no effect on the measured length or on measured temperatures. Tests of MRgFUS positioning accuracy determined errors in the direction parallel to the propagation of the US beam to be significantly greater than those in the perpendicular direction; most sonication spots were erroneously positioned towards the FUS transducer. The tests reported here have been demonstrated to be sufficiently sensitive to detect water leakage

  17. Methods for characterizing convective cryoprobe heat transfer in ultrasound gel phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etheridge, Michael L; Choi, Jeunghwan; Ramadhyani, Satish; Bischof, John C

    2013-02-01

    While cryosurgery has proven capable in treating of a variety of conditions, it has met with some resistance among physicians, in part due to shortcomings in the ability to predict treatment outcomes. Here we attempt to address several key issues related to predictive modeling by demonstrating methods for accurately characterizing heat transfer from cryoprobes, report temperature dependent thermal properties for ultrasound gel (a convenient tissue phantom) down to cryogenic temperatures, and demonstrate the ability of convective exchange heat transfer boundary conditions to accurately describe freezing in the case of single and multiple interacting cryoprobe(s). Temperature dependent changes in the specific heat and thermal conductivity for ultrasound gel are reported down to -150 °C for the first time here and these data were used to accurately describe freezing in ultrasound gel in subsequent modeling. Freezing around a single and two interacting cryoprobe(s) was characterized in the ultrasound gel phantom by mapping the temperature in and around the "iceball" with carefully placed thermocouple arrays. These experimental data were fit with finite-element modeling in COMSOL Multiphysics, which was used to investigate the sensitivity and effectiveness of convective boundary conditions in describing heat transfer from the cryoprobes. Heat transfer at the probe tip was described in terms of a convective coefficient and the cryogen temperature. While model accuracy depended strongly on spatial (i.e., along the exchange surface) variation in the convective coefficient, it was much less sensitive to spatial and transient variations in the cryogen temperature parameter. The optimized fit, convective exchange conditions for the single-probe case also provided close agreement with the experimental data for the case of two interacting cryoprobes, suggesting that this basic characterization and modeling approach can be extended to accurately describe more complicated

  18. Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chap 66. Cosgrove DO, Eckersley RJ, Harvey CJ, Lim A. Ultrasound. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. ... by: Jason Levy, MD, Northside Radiology Associates, Atlanta, GA. Also ...

  19. Focused ultrasound of the pleural cavities and the pericardium by nurses after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graven, Torbjørn; Wahba, Alexander; Hammer, Anne Marie; Sagen, Ove; Olsen, Øystein; Skjetne, Kyrre; Kleinau, Jens Olaf; Dalen, Havard

    2015-02-01

    We aimed to study the feasibility and reliability of focused ultrasound (US) examinations to quantify pericardial (PE)- and pleural effusion (PLE) by a pocket-size imaging device (PSID) performed by nurses in patients early after cardiac surgery. After a 3-month training period, with cardiologists as supervisors, two nurses examined 59 patients (20 women) with US using a PSID at a median of 5 days after cardiac surgery. The amount of PE and PLE was classified in four categories by US (both) and chest x-ray (PLE only). Echocardiography, including US of the pleural cavities, by experienced cardiologists was used as reference. Focused US by the nurses was more sensitive than x-ray to detect PLE. The correlations of the quantification of PE and PLE by the nurses and reference was r (95% confidence interval) 0.76 (0.46-0.89) and 0.81 (0.73-0.89), both p PLE were drained in one and six (eight cavities) patients, all classified as large amount by the nurses. Cardiac nurses were able to obtain reliable measurements and quantification of both PE and PLE bedside by focused US and outperform the commonly used chest x-ray regarding PLE after cardiac surgery.

  20. Prehospital Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Tang Sun

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound is a commonly used diagnostic tool in clinical conditions. With recent developments in technology, use of portable ultrasound devices has become feasible in prehospital settings. Many studies also proved the feasibility and accuracy of prehospital ultrasound. In this article, we focus on the use of prehospital ultrasound, with emphasis on trauma and chest ultrasound.

  1. Open-source, small-animal magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorman, Megan E; Chaplin, Vandiver L; Wilkens, Ken; Dockery, Mary D; Giorgio, Todd D; Grissom, William A; Caskey, Charles F

    2016-01-01

    MR-guided focused ultrasound or high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgFUS/MRgHIFU) is a non-invasive therapeutic modality with many potential applications in areas such as cancer therapy, drug delivery, and blood-brain barrier opening. However, the large financial costs involved in developing preclinical MRgFUS systems represent a barrier to research groups interested in developing new techniques and applications. We aim to mitigate these challenges by detailing a validated, open-source preclinical MRgFUS system capable of delivering thermal and mechanical FUS in a quantifiable and repeatable manner under real-time MRI guidance. A hardware and software package was developed that includes closed-loop feedback controlled thermometry code and CAD drawings for a therapy table designed for a preclinical MRI scanner. For thermal treatments, the modular software uses a proportional integral derivative controller to maintain a precise focal temperature rise in the target given input from MR phase images obtained concurrently. The software computes the required voltage output and transmits it to a FUS transducer that is embedded in the delivery table within the magnet bore. The delivery table holds the FUS transducer, a small animal and its monitoring equipment, and a transmit/receive RF coil. The transducer is coupled to the animal via a water bath and is translatable in two dimensions from outside the magnet. The transducer is driven by a waveform generator and amplifier controlled by real-time software in Matlab. MR acoustic radiation force imaging is also implemented to confirm the position of the focus for mechanical and thermal treatments. The system was validated in tissue-mimicking phantoms and in vivo during murine tumor hyperthermia treatments. Sonications were successfully controlled over a range of temperatures and thermal doses for up to 20 min with minimal temperature overshoot. MR thermometry was validated with an optical temperature probe, and focus

  2. Imaging high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced tissue denaturation by multispectral photoacoustic method: an ex vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yao; O'Neill, Brian

    2013-03-10

    We present an ex vivo study for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, in multispectral photoacoustic imaging (PAI) of tissue denaturation induced by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) in this paper. Tissue of bovine muscle was thermally treated in a heated water bath and by HIFU, and then was imaged using a multispectral photoacoustic approach. Light at multiple optical wavelengths between 700 and 900 nm was delivered to the treated bovine muscle tissue to excite the photoacoustic signal. Apparent tissue denaturation has been observed in multispectral photoacoustic images after being treated in a water bath and by HIFU. It is interesting that the denaturation is more striking at shorter optical wavelength photoacoustic images than at longer optical wavelength photoacoustic images. Multispectral photoacoustic images of the tissue denaturation were further analyzed and the photoacoustic spectrums of the denaturized tissue were calculated in this paper. This study suggests that a multispectral PAI approach might be a promising tool to evaluate tissue denaturation induced by HIFU treatment.

  3. Focused Cardiac Ultrasound in Place of Repeat Echocardiography: Reliability and Cost Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kini, Vinay; Mehta, Nidhi; Mazurek, Jeremy A; Ferrari, Victor A; Epstein, Andrew J; Groeneveld, Peter W; Kirkpatrick, James N

    2015-09-01

    Health care systems are increasingly moving toward models that emphasize the delivery of high-quality health care at lower costs. Rates of repeat echocardiography (two or more transthoracic echocardiographic studies performed within a short interval) are high and can contribute substantially to the cost of providing cardiovascular care. Certain findings from handheld ultrasound scans performed by echocardiographers have been shown to correlate well with findings on transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). It therefore may be feasible and cost effective to use expert focused cardiac ultrasound (eFCU) in place of repeat TTE for highly selected indications in certain settings. The aim of this study was to determine the reliability and cost implications of using eFCU in place of repeat TTE in selected inpatients. Inpatients who underwent repeat TTE (prior TTE within 30 days) ordered for the assessment of ventricular function, pericardial effusion, or inferior vena cava collapse were prospectively enrolled. Subjects underwent eFCU in addition to TTE, and results were compared for correlation using the weighted κ statistic. The potential cost savings of using eFCU in place of TTE were modeled from the provider perspective (i.e., physicians and hospitals). Over 45 days, 105 patients were enrolled. The majority of scans were performed for assessment of left ventricular function and pericardial effusions. eFCU showed excellent correlation with TTE for most parameters, including left ventricular systolic function (κ = 0.80) and the presence and size of pericardial effusions (κ = 0.81) (P TTE when used in the setting of repeat testing for assessment of ventricular function, pericardial effusion, and inferior vena cava collapse. The judicious use of eFCU in place of repeat inpatient TTE has the potential to deliver quality cardiac imaging at reduced cost. Copyright © 2015 American Society of Echocardiography. All rights reserved.

  4. Dynamic T{sub 2}-mapping during magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound ablation of bone marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waspe, Adam C.; Looi, Thomas; Mougenot, Charles; Amaral, Joao; Temple, Michael; Sivaloganathan, Siv; Drake, James M. [Centre for Image Guided Innovation and Therapeutic Intervention, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, M5G 1X8 (Canada); Philips Healthcare Canada, Markham, ON, L6C 2S3 (Canada); Centre for Image Guided Innovation and Therapeutic Intervention, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, M5G 1X8 (Canada); Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Centre for Image Guided Innovation and Therapeutic Intervention, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, M5G 1X8 (Canada)

    2012-11-28

    Focal bone tumor treatments include amputation, limb-sparing surgical excision with bone reconstruction, and high-dose external-beam radiation therapy. Magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) is an effective non-invasive thermotherapy for palliative management of bone metastases pain. MR thermometry (MRT) measures the proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS) of water molecules and produces accurate (<1 Degree-Sign C) and dynamic (<5s) thermal maps in soft tissues. PRFS-MRT is ineffective in fatty tissues such as yellow bone marrow and, since accurate temperature measurements are required in the bone to ensure adequate thermal dose, MR-HIFU is not indicated for primary bone tumor treatments. Magnetic relaxation times are sensitive to lipid temperature and we hypothesize that bone marrow temperature can be determined accurately by measuring changes in T{sub 2}, since T{sub 2} increases linearly in fat during heating. T{sub 2}-mapping using dual echo times during a dynamic turbo spin-echo pulse sequence enabled rapid measurement of T{sub 2}. Calibration of T{sub 2}-based thermal maps involved heating the marrow in a bovine femur and simultaneously measuring T{sub 2} and temperature with a thermocouple. A positive T{sub 2} temperature dependence in bone marrow of 20 ms/ Degree-Sign C was observed. Dynamic T{sub 2}-mapping should enable accurate temperature monitoring during MR-HIFU treatment of bone marrow and shows promise for improving the safety and reducing the invasiveness of pediatric bone tumor treatments.

  5. Assessment of Gold Nanoparticle-Mediated-Enhanced Hyperthermia Using MR-Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devarakonda, Surendra B; Myers, Matthew R; Lanier, Mathew; Dumoulin, Charles; Banerjee, Rupak K

    2017-04-12

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has gained increasing popularity as a noninvasive therapeutic procedure to treat solid tumors. However, collateral damage due to the use of high acoustic powers during HIFU procedures remains a challenge. The objective of this study is to assess the utility of using gold nanoparticles (gNPs) during HIFU procedures to locally enhance heating at low powers, thereby reducing the likelihood of collateral damage. Phantoms containing tissue-mimicking material (TMM) and physiologically relevant concentrations (0%, 0.0625%, and 0.125%) of gNPs were fabricated. Sonications at acoustic powers of 10, 15, and 20 W were performed for a duration of 16 s using an MR-HIFU system. Temperature rises and lesion volumes were calculated and compared for phantoms with and without gNPs. For an acoustic power of 10 W, the maximum temperature rise increased by 32% and 43% for gNPs concentrations of 0.0625% and 0.125%, respectively, when compared to the 0% gNPs concentration. For the power of 15 W, a lesion volume of 0, 44.5 ± 7, and 63.4 ± 32 mm 3 was calculated for the gNPs concentration of 0%, 0.0625%, and 0.125%, respectively. For a power of 20 W, it was found that the lesion volume doubled and tripled for concentrations of 0.0625% and 0.125% gNPs, respectively, when compared to the concentration of 0% gNPs. We conclude that gNPs have the potential to locally enhance the heating and reduce damage to healthy tissue during tumor ablation using HIFU.

  6. [Obstetrical ultrasound: can the fetus hear the wave and feel the heat?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramowicz, J S; Kremkau, F W; Merz, E

    2012-06-01

    "Fetuses can hear ultrasound and the sound is as loud as a subway train entering a station." This statement originates in a single report in a non-peer reviewed journal, despite its name 1, of a presentation at a scientific meeting by researchers who reported measuring the sound intensity in the uterus of pregnant women and being able to demonstrate the above. This was later published in a peer-review journal 2 probably not very widely read by clinicians or the general public. From time to time, the popular press or various pregnancy-related websites repeat the assertion or a worried pregnant patient inquires about the truthfulness of this statement. A second, oft-quoted concern is that ultrasound leads to heating of the amniotic fluid. These two assertions may be very concerning to expectant parents and merit scientific scrutiny. In this editorial, we shall examine the known facts about the physical properties of ultrasound as they relate to these two issues. Diagnostic ultrasound employs a pulsed sound wave with positive and negative pressures and the Mayo team, quoted in the New Scientist, predicted that the pulsing would translate into a "tapping" effect 1. According to their report, they placed a tiny hydrophone inside a woman's uterus while she was undergoing an ultrasound examination. They stated that they picked up a hum at around the frequency of the pulsing generated when the ultrasound is switched on and off. The sound was similar to the highest notes on a piano. They also indicated that when the ultrasound probe was pointed right at the hydrophone, it registered a level of 100 decibels, as loud as a subway train coming into a station. Sound levels in decibels are defined for audible frequencies with the reference level being the threshold for hearing at a given frequency. Although the operating frequencies used in sonography are inaudible, it is possible for the pulsing rate (pulse repetition frequency, PRF) to be heard, thus falling in the audible

  7. Focused cardiac ultrasound is feasible in the general practice setting and alters diagnosis and management of cardiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Yates

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ultrasound-assisted examination of the cardiovascular system with focused cardiac ultrasound by the treating physician is non-invasive and changes diagnosis and management of patient’s with suspected cardiac disease. This has not been reported in a general practice setting. Aim: To determine whether focused cardiac ultrasound performed on patients aged over 50 years changes the diagnosis and management of cardiac disease by a general practitioner. Design and setting: A prospective observational study of 80 patients aged over 50 years and who had not received echocardiography or chest CT within 12 months presenting to a general practice. Method: Clinical assessment and management of significant cardiac disorders in patients presenting to general practitioners were recorded before and after focused cardiac ultrasound. Echocardiography was performed by a medical student with sufficient training, which was verified by an expert. Differences in diagnosis and management between conventional and ultrasound-assisted assessment were recorded. Results and conclusion: Echocardiography and interpretation were acceptable in all patients. Significant cardiac disease was detected in 16 (20% patients, including aortic stenosis in 9 (11% and cardiac failure in 7 (9%, which were missed by clinical examination in 10 (62.5% of these patients. Changes in management occurred in 12 patients (15% overall and 75% of those found to have significant cardiac disease including referral for diagnostic echocardiography in 8 (10%, commencement of heart failure treatment in 3 (4% and referral to a cardiologist in 1 patient (1%. Routine focused cardiac ultrasound is feasible and frequently alters the diagnosis and management of cardiac disease in patients aged over 50 years presenting to a general practice.

  8. Thermal and mechanical high-intensity focused ultrasound: perspectives on tumor ablation, immune effects and combination strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijgaart, R.J.E. van den; Eikelenboom, D.C.; Hoogenboom, M.; Futterer, J.J.; Brok, M.H.M.G.M. den; Adema, G.J.

    2017-01-01

    Tumor ablation technologies, such as radiofrequency-, cryo- or high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation will destroy tumor tissue in a minimally invasive manner. Ablation generates large volumes of tumor debris in situ, releasing multiple bio-molecules like tumor antigens and

  9. A framework for continuous target tracking during MR-guided high intensity focused ultrasound thermal ablations in the abdomen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zachiu, Cornel; Denis de Senneville, Baudouin; Dmitriev, Ivan D.; Moonen, Chrit T.W.; Ries, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Background: During lengthy magnetic resonance-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MRg-HIFU) thermal ablations in abdominal organs, the therapeutic work-flow is frequently hampered by various types of physiological motion occurring at different time-scales. If left un-addressed this can lead to

  10. MRI Guided Focused Ultrasound Thalamotomy for Moderate-to-Severe Tremor in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilana Schlesinger

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Thalamotomy is effective in alleviating tremor in Parkinson’s disease (PD. Methods. Seven PD patients, mean age 59.4 ± 9.8 years (range, 46–74 with a mean disease duration of 5.4 ± 2.8 years (range, 2–10 suffering from severe refractory tremor, underwent ventral intermediate nucleus thalamotomy using MRI guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS, an innovative technology that enables noninvasive surgery. Results. Tremor stopped in the contralateral upper extremity in all patients immediately following treatment. Total UPDRS decreased from 37.4 ± 12.2 to 18.8 ± 11.1 (p=0.007 and PDQ-39 decreased from 42.3 ± 16.4 to 21.6 ± 10.8 (p=0.008 following MRgFUS. These effects were sustained (mean follow-up 7.3 months. Adverse events during MRgFUS included headache (n=3, dizziness (n=2, vertigo (n=4, and lip paresthesia (n=1 and following MRgFUS were hypogeusia (n=1, unsteady feeling when walking (n=1, resolved, and disturbance when walking tandem (n=1, resolved. Conclusions. Thalamotomy using MRgFUS is safe and effective in PD patients. Large randomized studies are needed to assess prolonged efficacy and safety.

  11. Treatment of murine tumors using acoustic droplet vaporization-enhanced high intensity focused ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Meili; Zhang Aili; Xu, Lisa X; Jiang Lixing; Fabiilli, Mario L; Fowlkes, J Brian

    2013-01-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) can be applied focally and noninvasively to thermally ablate solid tumors. Long treatment times are typically required for large tumors, which can expose patients to certain risks while potentially decreasing the therapeutic efficacy of the treatment. Acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) is a promising modality that can enhance the efficacy of tumor treatment using HIFU. In this study, the therapeutic effects of combined HIFU and ADV was evaluated in mice bearing subcutaneously-implanted 4T1 tumors. Histological examination showed that the combination of HIFU and ADV generated a mean necrotic area in the tumor that was 2.9-fold larger than with HIFU alone. A significant enhancement of necrosis was found in the periphery of the tumor, where the blood supply was abundant. Seven days after treatment, the tumors treated with combined HIFU and ADV were 30-fold smaller in volume than tumors treated with HIFU alone. The study demonstrates the potential advantage of combining HIFU and ADV in tumor treatment. (paper)

  12. Measurement and numerical simulation of high intensity focused ultrasound field in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang Il

    2017-11-01

    In the present study, the acoustic field of a high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) transducer in water was measured by using a commercially available needle hydrophone intended for HIFU use. To validate the results of hydrophone measurements, numerical simulations of HIFU fields were performed by integrating the axisymmetric Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov (KZK) equation from the frequency-domain perspective with the help of a MATLAB-based software package developed for HIFU simulation. Quantitative values for the focal waveforms, the peak pressures, and the size of the focal spot were obtained in various regimes of linear, quasilinear, and nonlinear propagation up to the source pressure levels when the shock front was formed in the waveform. The numerical results with the HIFU simulator solving the KZK equation were compared with the experimental data and found to be in good agreement. This confirms that the numerical simulation based on the KZK equation is capable of capturing the nonlinear pressure field of therapeutic HIFU transducers well enough to make it suitable for HIFU treatment planning.

  13. PATHOMORPHISM OF PROSTATE CANCER DURING HIGH-INTENSITY FOCUSED ULTRASOUND TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. N. Fomkin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to evaluate the efficiency of prostate cancer (PC treatment using high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU on the basis of morphometric and immunohistochemical (IHC analyses of postoperative prostate biopsy specimens. The study subjects were 40 patients with localized and locally advanced PC. The postoperative morphological analysis was made on the basis of standard hematoxylineosin staining and morphometric and IHC studies using the following antibodies: PCNA, Bcl-2, AMACR, Е-cadherin, and ANDR (Dako. Pre- and post-HIFU therapy histological examination of the routinely hematoxylin-eosin-stained specimens showed that the therapeutic pathomorphism of the tumor corresponded to grades III and IV. It was established that the IHC study should be used as an additional crite-rion for the efficiency of PC therapy after HIFU ablation. In spite of positive clinical, laboratory, instrumental, and objective changes, the patients with high AMACR and Bcl-2 levels and decreased Е-cadherin expression may be considered as a group at risk for prolonged malignant growth or recurrent PC.

  14. Feasibility study on photoacoustic guidance for high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced hemostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Van Phuc; Kim, Jeehyun; Ha, Kang-lyeol; Oh, Junghwan; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2014-10-01

    The feasibility of photoacoustic imaging (PAI) application was evaluated to map punctured blood vessels thermally treated by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for hemostasis. A single-element HIFU transducer with a central frequency of 2.0 MHz, was used to induce thermal hemostasis on the punctured arteries. The HIFU-treated lesion was imaged and localized by high-contrast PAI guidance. The results showed that complete hemostasis was achieved after treatment of the damaged blood vessels within 25 to 52 s at the acoustic intensity of 3600 W/cm2. The coagulation time for the animal artery was ˜20% longer than that of the phantom possibly due to a lower Young's modulus. The reconstructed PA images were able to distinguish the treated area from the surrounding tissue in terms of augmented signal amplitudes (up to three times). Spectroscopic studies demonstrated that the optimal imaging wavelength was found to be 700 nm in order to reconstruct high-contrast photoacoustic images on HIFU-treated lesions. The proposed PAI integrated with HIFU treatment can be a feasible application to obtain safe and rapid hemostasis for acute arterial bleeding.

  15. Pixel based focusing for photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Changhan; Yoo, Yangmo; Song, Tai-Kyong; Chang, Jin Ho

    2014-12-01

    It is desired that the same imaging functional modules such as beamformation, envelope detection, and digital scan conversion (DSC) are employed for the efficient development of a cross-sectional photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasound (US) dual-modality imaging system. The beamformation can be implemented using either delay-and-sum beamforming (DAS-BF) or adaptive beamforming methods, each with their own advantages and disadvantages for the dual-modality imaging. However, the DSC is always problematic because it causes blurring the fine details of an image, e.g., edges. This paper demonstrates that the pixel based focusing method is suitable for the dual-modality imaging; beamformation is directly conducted on each display pixel and thus DSC is not necessary. As a result, the artifacts by DSC are no longer a problem, so that the proposed method is capable of providing the maximum spatial resolution achievable by DAS-BF. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated through simulation and ex vivo experiments with a microcalcification-contained breast specimen, and the results were compared with those from DAS-BF and adaptive beamforming methods with DSC. The comparison demonstrated that the proposed method effectively overcomes the disadvantages of each beamforming method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Image-Guided Transcranial Focused Ultrasound Stimulates Human Primary Somatosensory Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonhye; Kim, Hyungmin; Jung, Yujin; Song, In-Uk; Chung, Yong An; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    2015-03-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) has recently been investigated as a new mode of non-invasive brain stimulation, which offers exquisite spatial resolution and depth control. We report on the elicitation of explicit somatosensory sensations as well as accompanying evoked electroencephalographic (EEG) potentials induced by FUS stimulation of the human somatosensory cortex. As guided by individual-specific neuroimage data, FUS was transcranially delivered to the hand somatosensory cortex among healthy volunteers. The sonication elicited transient tactile sensations on the hand area contralateral to the sonicated hemisphere, with anatomical specificity of up to a finger, while EEG recordings revealed the elicitation of sonication-specific evoked potentials. Retrospective numerical simulation of the acoustic propagation through the skull showed that a threshold of acoustic intensity may exist for successful cortical stimulation. The neurological and neuroradiological assessment before and after the sonication, along with strict safety considerations through the individual-specific estimation of effective acoustic intensity in situ and thermal effects, showed promising initial safety profile; however, equal/more rigorous precautionary procedures are advised for future studies. The transient and localized stimulation of the brain using image-guided transcranial FUS may serve as a novel tool for the non-invasive assessment and modification of region-specific brain function.

  17. Does the phase of menstrual cycle affect MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery of uterine leiomyomas?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    So, Minna J. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Fennessy, Fiona M. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Zou, Kelly H. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); McDannold, Nathan [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Hynynen, Kullervo [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Jolesz, Ferenc A. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Stewart, Elizabeth A. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Rybicki, Frank J. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Tempany, Clare M. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)]. E-mail: ctempanyafdhal@partners.org

    2006-08-15

    Purpose: To determine whether the phase of menstrual cycle at the time of MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) treatment for uterine leiomyomas affects treatment outcome. Methods: We enrolled all patients participating in a prospective phase III clinical trial from our center who completed 6 months of clinical and imaging follow-up. Patients with irregular cycles and those on oral contraceptives were excluded. Data prospectively documenting the date of the last menstrual period (LMP) at the time of treatment, length and duration of cycle, and raw symptom severity score (SSS) from the Uterine Fibroid Symptom and Quality of Life questionnaire, at baseline and 6 months were collected. Proliferative phase patients were determined retrospectively as those who were treated within less than 14 days from LMP; secretory phase patients were classified as those who were treated greater than 14 days from LMP. Results: A total of 58 patients were enrolled. There was no significant difference in the mean SSS at baseline and mean SSS at 6 months between patients treated in the proliferative versus secretory phase of the cycle. No significant difference in the SSS change from baseline to 6 months was seen between the two groups. Conclusions: Menstrual cycle phase does not influence MRgFUS treatment outcome. Symptomatic improvement occurs with treatment during either phase of the menstrual cycle. Thus, the scheduling of MRgFUS treatment need not be based upon the phase of the menstrual cycle.

  18. Does the phase of menstrual cycle affect MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery of uterine leiomyomas?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    So, Minna J.; Fennessy, Fiona M.; Zou, Kelly H.; McDannold, Nathan; Hynynen, Kullervo; Jolesz, Ferenc A.; Stewart, Elizabeth A.; Rybicki, Frank J.; Tempany, Clare M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the phase of menstrual cycle at the time of MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) treatment for uterine leiomyomas affects treatment outcome. Methods: We enrolled all patients participating in a prospective phase III clinical trial from our center who completed 6 months of clinical and imaging follow-up. Patients with irregular cycles and those on oral contraceptives were excluded. Data prospectively documenting the date of the last menstrual period (LMP) at the time of treatment, length and duration of cycle, and raw symptom severity score (SSS) from the Uterine Fibroid Symptom and Quality of Life questionnaire, at baseline and 6 months were collected. Proliferative phase patients were determined retrospectively as those who were treated within less than 14 days from LMP; secretory phase patients were classified as those who were treated greater than 14 days from LMP. Results: A total of 58 patients were enrolled. There was no significant difference in the mean SSS at baseline and mean SSS at 6 months between patients treated in the proliferative versus secretory phase of the cycle. No significant difference in the SSS change from baseline to 6 months was seen between the two groups. Conclusions: Menstrual cycle phase does not influence MRgFUS treatment outcome. Symptomatic improvement occurs with treatment during either phase of the menstrual cycle. Thus, the scheduling of MRgFUS treatment need not be based upon the phase of the menstrual cycle

  19. Use of micro-focused ultrasound with visualization to lift and tighten lax knee skin (1.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Michael H; Sensing, Whitney; Biron, Julie

    2014-10-01

    Public interest in noninvasive, aesthetic treatments for the rejuvenation of appearance continues to grow. The following prospective, open-label, nonrandomized trial was conducted to evaluate the safety and efficacy of micro-focused ultrasound with visualization (MFU-V) for achieving lift and tightening of lax skin above the knee. Healthy adult women (N = 30) with mild- to moderate bilateral skin laxity above the knees were enrolled. MFU-V was applied to a grid of eight 25 mm(2) squares above each knee. MFU-V was first applied using a 4 MHz, 4.5 mm transducer followed by a 7 MHz, 3.0 mm transducer. Approximately 320 treatment lines applied to each knee [corrected]. The primary efficacy endpoint was lifting and tightening of lax skin above the knee as determined by the principle investigator using the Physician Global Aesthetic Improvement Scale (PGAIS). Among 28 evaluable subjects, 24 subjects (86%) showed improved lifting and tightening of knee skin laxity at 90- and 180-day follow-up visits. Three subjects showed no change and the appearance of one subject worsened. There were no adverse events or evidence of skin injury. Similar to its safety and efficacy for tightening facial skin and reducing wrinkles, MFU-V is an effective, noninvasive method for reducing skin laxity and improving the appearance of skin above the knee. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01708434.

  20. Non-invasive cardiac pacing with image-guided focused ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquet, Fabrice; Bour, Pierre; Vaillant, Fanny; Amraoui, Sana; Dubois, Rémi; Ritter, Philippe; Haïssaguerre, Michel; Hocini, Mélèze; Bernus, Olivier; Quesson, Bruno

    2016-11-01

    Currently, no non-invasive cardiac pacing device acceptable for prolonged use in conscious patients exists. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) can be used to perform remote pacing using reversibility of electromechanical coupling of cardiomyocytes. Here we described an extracorporeal cardiac stimulation device and study its efficacy and safety. We conducted experiments ex vivo and in vivo in a large animal model (pig) to evaluate clinical potential of such a technique. The stimulation threshold was determined in 10 different ex vivo hearts and different clinically relevant electrical effects such as consecutive stimulations of different heart chambers with a single ultrasonic probe, continuous pacing or the inducibility of ventricular tachycardia were shown. Using ultrasonic contrast agent, consistent cardiac stimulation was achievable in vivo for up to 1 hour sessions in 4 different animals. No damage was observed in inversion-recovery MR sequences performed in vivo in the 4 animals. Histological analysis revealed no differences between stimulated and control regions, for all ex vivo and in vivo cases.

  1. Focused Ultrasound for Essential Tremor: Review of the Evidence and Discussion of Current Hurdles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Rohani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. While there is no breakthrough progress in the medical treatment of essential tremor (ET, in the past decades several remarkable achievements happened in the surgical field, such as radiofrequency thalamotomy, thalamic deep brain stimulation and gamma knife thalamotomy. The most recent advance in this area is magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS. Methods. Purpose of this review is to discuss the new developments and trials of MRgFUS in the treatment of ET and other tremor disorders. Results. MRgFUS is an incision-less surgery performed without anesthesia and ionizing radiation (no risk of cumulative dose and delayed side effects. Studies have shown the safety and effectiveness of unilateral MRgFUS-thalamotomy in the treatment of ET. It has been successfully used in few patients with Parkinson's disease-related tremor and fewer patients with Fragile X-associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome. Safety and long-term effects of the procedure are still unclear, as temporary and permanent adverse events have been reported as well as reoccurrence of tremor. Discussion. MRgFUS is a promising new surgical approach with still a number of unknowns and unsolved issues. It represents a valuable option particularly for patients who refused or could not be candidate for other procedures, deep brain stimulation in particular. 

  2. Positioning device for MRI-guided high intensity focused ultrasound system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damianou, Christakis [Frederick Institute of Technology (FIT), Limassol (Cyprus); MEDSONIC, LTD, Limassol (Cyprus); Ioannides, Kleanthis [Polikliniki Igia, Limassol (Cyprus); Milonas, Nicos [Frederick Institute of Technology (FIT), Limassol (Cyprus)

    2008-04-15

    A prototype magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)- compatible positioning device was used to move an MRI-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) transducer. The positioning device has three user-controlled degrees of freedom that allow access to various targeted lesions. The positioning device was designed and fabricated using construction materials selected for compatibility with high magnetic fields and fast switching magnetic field gradients encountered inside MRI scanners. The positioning device incorporates only MRI compatible materials such as piezoelectric motors, plastic sheets, brass screws, plastic pulleys and timing belts. The HIFU/MRI system includes the multiple subsystems (a) HIFU system, (b) MR imaging, (c) Positioning device (robot) and associate drivers, (d) temperature measurement, (e) cavitation detection, (f) MRI compatible camera, and (g) Soft ware. The MRI compatibility of the system was successfully demonstrated in a clinical high-field MRI scanner. The ability of the robot to accurately move the transducer thus creating discrete and overlapping lesions in biological tissue was tested successfully. A simple, cost effective, portable positioning device has been developed which can be used in virtually any clinical MRI scanner since it can be sited on the scanner's table. The propagation of HIFU can use either a lateral or superior-inferior approach. Discrete and large lesions were created successfully with reproducible results. (orig.)

  3. Electropolymerization of pyrrole on oxidizable metal under high frequency ultrasound irradiation. Application of focused beam to a selective masking technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Et Taouil, A. [Institut UTINAM, UMR 6213 CNRS, Universite de Franche-Comte, 30 Avenue de l' observatoire, 25009 Besancon Cedex (France); Lallemand, F., E-mail: fabrice.lallemand@univ-fcomte.f [Institut UTINAM, UMR 6213 CNRS, Universite de Franche-Comte, 30 Avenue de l' observatoire, 25009 Besancon Cedex (France); Hallez, L.; Hihn, J-Y. [Institut UTINAM, UMR 6213 CNRS, Universite de Franche-Comte, 30 Avenue de l' observatoire, 25009 Besancon Cedex (France)

    2010-12-01

    A novel masking technique against polymer deposition based on High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) irradiation was developed for the first time. With this in mind, a variety of background salts were tested. Sodium salicylate was found to be the most effective electrolytic medium for pyrrole sonoelectropolymerization on copper as it leads to a very efficient passivating oxide layer preventing copper dissolution while enabling polymer formation independently from sonication. In such a medium, high frequency ultrasound greatly refines surface structure, and a slight increase in doping level is observed. Finally, it was proved that focused ultrasound increases copper dissolution in sodium oxalate electrolyte while preventing polypyrrole deposition. A selected zone on the copper substrate was thus irradiated by the focused ultrasound beam to protect it from polymerization. In a second stage, a self-assembled monolayer was deposited on this polymer-free area to create a surface biphased substrate. This type of masking technique can be proposed as an interesting alternative to lithography as it is easier to carry out and allows chemical waste reduction.

  4. A retrospective comparison of microwave ablation and high intensity focused ultrasound for treating symptomatic uterine fibroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Wen-Peng, E-mail: zwp215@163.com; Han, Zhi-Yu, E-mail: hanzhiyu301@hotmail.com; Zhang, Jing, E-mail: zjbch@sina.com; Liang, Ping, E-mail: liangping301@hotmail.com

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: •Both HIFU and PMWA are thermal ablation techniques and they all provide safe and reliable alternative treatment methods for uterine fibroids. •However, whether there are obvious difference between these two kinds of approaches in improving symptom, treatment time, ablation rate, regression rate and adverse events, until now, there are no clinical trials which have been performed to compare the therapeutic effects of HIFU and PMWA. •In this research, we retrospectively compare the results of these two treatment methods. •To our knowledge, our study is the first directly comparing long-term outcome after PMWA and HIFU in patients with uterine fibroids. -- Abstract: Objectives: To retrospectively compare the effectiveness and safety of percutaneous microwave ablation (PMWA) and ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (USgHIFU) for treating symptomatic uterine fibroids. Methods: Seventy-three women with symptomatic uterine fibroids who met the inclusion criteria were enrolled in our study from September 2012 to December 2013. Thirty-one patients with forty uterine fibroids underwent PMWA, and forty-two patients with fifty-one uterine fibroids underwent USgHIFU. A contrast-enhanced MRI was performed before and after treatment, and all patients were followed up for 6 months. Assessment endpoints included symptom severity scores (SSS), treatment time, ablation rate, fibroid regression rate and adverse events. Results: The mean age of the patients in our study was 35.4 ± 6.2 years (range, 21–49 years), and the median volume of uterine fibroids was 95.7 cm{sup 3} (60.3–131.5 cm{sup 3}). The ablation rate of uterine fibroids was 79.8 ± 18.2% and 77.1 ± 14.9% in the PMWA group and the USgHIFU group, respectively, and showed no significant difference between the groups. Changes in SSS after PMWA were similar in the PMWA group (47.7 pre-treatment vs. 29.9 post-treatment) and USgHIFU group (42.1 pre-treatment vs. 24.6 post-treatment). The

  5. Kinetics of fluoride ion release from dental restorative glass ionomer cements: the influence of ultrasound, radiant heat and glass composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanjal, N K; Billington, R W; Shahid, S; Luo, J; Hill, R G; Pearson, G J

    2010-02-01

    To compare the effect of ultrasonic setting with self curing on fluoride release from conventional and experimental dental glass ionomer cements. To compare hand mixed and capsule mixing and the effect of replacing some of the reactive glass with zirconia. In a novel material which advocated using radiant heat to cure it, to compare the effect of this with ultrasound. To evaluate the effect of ultrasound on a glass ionomer with fluoride in the water but not in the glass. 10 samples of each cement were ultrasonically set for 55 s; 10 controls self cured for 6 min. Each was placed in 10 ml of deionised water which was changed at 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, 28 days. The solution fluoride content was measured using a selective ion electrode. All ultrasound samples released more fluoride than the controls. Release patterns were similar; after a few days, cumulative fluoride was linear with respect to t(1/2). Slope and intercept of linear regression plots increased with ultrasound. With radiant heat the cement released less fluoride than controls. The effect of ultrasound on cement with F in water increased only slope not intercept. Zirconia addition enhances fluoride release although the cement fluorine content is reduced. Comparison of capsule and hand mixing showed no consistent effect on fluoride release. Ultrasound enhances fluoride release from GICs. As heat has an opposite effect the heat from ultrasound is not its only action. The lesser effect on cement with fluoride only in the water indicates that of ultrasound enhances fluoride release from glass.

  6. A Focused Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound (FLIPUS) System for Cell Stimulation: Physical and Biological Proof of Principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puts, Regina; Ruschke, Karen; Ambrosi, Thomas H; Kadow-Romacker, Anke; Knaus, Petra; Jenderka, Klaus-Vitold; Raum, Kay

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) is a promising technique for bone tissue evaluation. Highly focused transducers used for QUS also have the capability to be applied for tissue-regenerative purposes and can provide spatially limited deposition of acoustic energy. We describe a focused low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (FLIPUS) system, which has been developed for the stimulation of cell monolayers in the defocused far field of the transducer through the bottom of the well plate. Tissue culture well plates, carrying the cells, were incubated in a special chamber, immersed in a temperature-controlled water tank. A stimulation frequency of 3.6 MHz provided an optimal sound transmission through the polystyrene well plate. The ultrasound was pulsed for 20 min daily at 100-Hz repetition frequency with 27.8% duty cycle. The calibrated output intensity corresponded to I(SATA) = 44.5 ± 7.1 mW/cm2, which is comparable to the most frequently reported nominal output levels in LIPUS studies. No temperature change by the ultrasound exposure was observed in the well plate. The system was used to stimulate rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs). The applied intensity had no apoptotic effect and enhanced the expression of osteogenic markers, i.e., osteopontin (OPN), collagen 1 (Col-1), the osteoblast-specific transcription factor-Runx-2 and E11 protein, an early osteocyte marker, in stimulated cells on day 5. The proposed FLIPUS setup opens new perspectives for the evaluation of the mechanistic effects of LIPUS.

  7. Intense focused ultrasound stimulation of the rotator cuff: evaluation of the source of pain in rotator cuff tears and tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellhorn, Alfred C; Gillenwater, Cody; Mourad, Pierre D

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this preliminary study was to evaluate the ability of individual 0.1-s long pulses of intense focused ultrasound (iFU) emitted with a carrier frequency of 2 MHz to evoke diagnostic sensations when applied to patients whose shoulders have rotator cuff tears or tendinopathy. Patients were adults with painful shoulders and clinical and imaging findings consistent with rotator cuff disease. iFU stimulation of the shoulder was performed using B-mode ultrasound coupled with a focused ultrasound transducer that allowed image-guided delivery of precisely localized pulses of energy to different anatomic areas around the rotator cuff. The main outcome measure was iFU spatial average-temporal average intensity (I_SATA), and location required to elicit sensation. In control patients, iFU produced no sensation throughout the range of stimulation intensities (≤2000 W/cm(2) I_SATA). In patients with rotator cuff disease, iFU was able to induce sensation in the tendons of the rotator cuff, the subacromial bursa, and the subchondral bone in patients with chronic shoulder pain and rotator cuff disease, with an average ± standard deviation intensity equaling 680 ± 281 W/cm(2) I_SATA. This result suggests a primary role for these tissues in the pathogenesis of shoulder pain related to rotator cuff tendinopathy. Copyright © 2015 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Biomechanical assessment and monitoring of thermal ablation using Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Gary Yi

    Cancer remains, one of the major public health problems in the United States as well as many other countries worldwide. According to According to the World Health Organization, cancer is currently the leading cause of death worldwide, accounting for 7.6 million deaths annually, and 25% of the annual death was due to Cancer during the year of 2011. In the long history of the cancer treatment field, many treatment options have been established up to date. Traditional procedures include surgical procedures as well as systemic therapies such as biologic therapy, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, and radiation therapy. Nevertheless, side-effects are often associated with such procedures due to the systemic delivery across the entire body. Recently technologies have been focused on localized therapy under minimally or noninvasive procedure with imaging-guidance, such as cryoablation, laser ablation, radio-frequency (RF) ablation, and High Intensity F-ocused Ultrasound (HIFU). HIFU is a non-invasive procedure aims to coagulate tissue thermally at a localized focal zone created with noninvasively emitting a set of focused ultrasound beams while the surrounding healthy tissues remain relatively untreated. Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) is a dynamic, radiation-force-based imaging technique, which utilizes a single HIFU transducer by emitting an Amplitude-modulated (AM) beam to both thermally ablate the tumor while inducing a stable oscillatory tissue displacement at its focal zone. The oscillatory response is then estimated by a cross-correlation based motion tracking technique on the signal collected by a confocally-aligned diagnostic transducer. HMIFU addresses the most critical aspect and one of the major unmet needs of HIFU treatment, which is the ability to perform real-time monitoring and mapping of tissue property change during the HIFU treatment. In this dissertation, both the assessment and monitoring aspects of HMIFU have been investigated

  9. Effects of oxytocin on high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation of adenomysis: A prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xin; Zou, Min; Zhang, Cai; He, Jia; Mao, Shihua; Wu, Qingrong; He, Min; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Ruitao; Zhang, Lian

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of oxytocin on high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation for the treatment of adenomyosis. Materials and methods: Eighty-six patients with adenomyosis from three hospitals were randomly assigned to the oxytocin group or control group for HIFU treatment. During HIFU treatment, 80 units of oxytocin was added in 500 ml of 0.9% normal saline running at the rate of 2 ml/min (0.32 U/min) in the oxytocin group, while 0.9% normal saline was used in the control group. Both patients and HIFU operators were blinded to oxytocin or saline application. Treatment results, adverse effects were compared. Results: When using oxytocin, the non-perfused volume (NPV) ratio was 80.7 ± 11.6%, the energy-efficiency factor (EEF) was 8.1 ± 9.9 J/mm 3 , and the sonication time required to ablate 1 cm 3 was 30.0 ± 36.0 s/cm 3 . When not using oxytocin, the non-perfused volume ratio was 70.8 ± 16.7%, the EEF was 15.8 ± 19.6 J/mm 3 , and the sonication time required to ablate 1 cm 3 was 58.2 ± 72.7 S/cm 3 . Significant difference in the NPV ratio, EEF, and the sonication time required to ablate 1 cm 3 between the two groups was observed. No oxytocin related adverse effects occurred. Conclusion: Oxytocin could significantly decrease the energy for ablating adenomyosis with HIFU, safely enhance the treatment efficiency

  10. The 100 Most-Cited Articles Focused on Ultrasound Imaging: A Bibliometric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, J Y; Yun, E J; Yoon, D Y; Choi, C S; Seo, Y L; Cho, Y K; Lim, K J; Baek, S; Hong, S J; Yoon, S J

    2017-06-01

    Purpose  The number of citations that an article has received reflects its impact on a particular research area. The aim of this study was to identify the 100 most-cited articles focused on ultrasound (US) imaging and to analyze the characteristics of these articles. Methods  We determined the 100 most-cited articles on US imaging via the Web of Science database, using the search term. The following parameters were used to analyze the characteristics of the 100 most-cited articles: publication year, journal, journal impact factor, number of citations and annual citations, authors, department, institution, country, type of article, and topic. Results  The number of citations for the 100 most-cited articles ranged from 1849 to 341 (median: 442.0) and the number of annual citations ranged from 108.0 to 8.1 (median: 22.1). The majority of articles were published in 1990 - 1999 (39 %), published in radiology journals (20 %), originated in the United States (45 %), were clinical observation studies (67 %), and dealt with the vessels (35 %). The Department of Internal Medicine at the University of California and the Research Institute of Public Health at the University of Kuopio (n = 4 each) were the leading institutions and Salonen JT and Salonen R (n = 4 each) were the most prolific authors. Conclusion  Our study presents a detailed list and analysis of the 100 most-cited US articles, which provides a unique insight into the historical development in this field. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Focused ultrasound as a non-invasive intervention for neurological disease: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Rory J; Hughes, Mark A; Moran, Carmel M; Kandasamy, Jothy

    2016-06-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) is an incision-less intervention that is a Food and Drug Association (FDA) approved surgical treatment for various pathologies including uterine fibroids and bone metastases. Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging thermometry and ability to use FUS across the intact calvarium have re-opened interest in the use of FUS in the treatment of neurological diseases. FUS currently has a European CE mark for use in movement disorders. However, it shows potential in the treatment of other neuropathologies including tumours and as a lesional tool in epilepsy. FUS may exert its therapeutic effect through thermal or mechanical fragmentation of intracranial lesions, or by enhancing delivery of pharmaceutical agents across the blood-brain barrier. In this review, we summarise the mechanisms, clinical applications and potential future of FUS for the treatment of neurological disease. We have searched for and described the recently completed and on-going clinical trials investigating FUS for the treatment of neurological disorders. We identified phase one trials investigating utility of FUS in: movement disorders (including essential tremor and Parkinson's disease), chronic pain, obsessive-compulsive disorder and cerebral tumours. Current literature also reports pre-clinical work exploring utility in epilepsy, neurodegenerative conditions (such as Alzheimer's disease) and thrombolysis. Safety and early efficacy data are now emerging, suggesting that transcalvarial FUS is a feasible and safe intervention. Further evidence is required to determine whether FUS is an effective alternative in comparison to current neurosurgical interventions. The cost of requisite hardware is currently a barrier to widespread uptake in UK neurosurgical centres.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused ultrasound ablation of uterine fibroids. Early clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikami, Koji; Osuga, Keigo; Tomoda, Kaname; Nakamura, Hironobu; Murakami, Takamichi; Okada, Atsuya

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of magnetic resonance (MRI)-guided focused ultrasound (MRIgFUS) ablation for uterine fibroids and to identify the candidates for this treatment. A total of 48 patients with a symptomatic uterine fibroid underwent MRIgFUS. The percent ablation volume was calculated, and the patients' characteristics and the MR imaging features of the fibroids that might predict the effect of this treatment were assessed. Changes in the symptoms related to the uterine fibroid were assessed at 6 and 12 months. The planned target zone were successfully treated in 32 patients with bulk-related and menstrual symptoms but unsuccessfully treated in the remaining 16 patients. These 16 patients were obese or their uterine fibroid showed heterogeneous high signal intensity on T2-weighted images. The 32 successfully treated patients were followed up for 6 months. At the 6-month follow-up, bulk-related and menstrual symptoms were diminished in 60% and 51% of patients, respectively. Among them, 17 patients were followed up for 12 months, and 9 of them who showed alleviation of bulk-related symptoms at 6 months had further improvement. The mean percent ablation volume of those nine patients was 51%. In 5 (33%) of the 15 patients with alleviation of menstrual symptoms at 6 months, the symptoms became worse at 12 months. There was a significant difference in the mean percent ablation volume between patients with alleviation of menstrual symptoms and those without (54% vs. 37%; P=0.03). MRIgFUS ablation is a safe, effective treatment for nonobese patients with symptomatic fibroids that show low signal intensity on T2-weighted images. Ablation of more than 50% of the fibroid volume may be needed with a short-term follow-up. (author)

  13. Simultaneous acoustic stimulation of human primary and secondary somatosensory cortices using transcranial focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonhye; Chung, Yong An; Jung, Yujin; Song, In-Uk; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    2016-10-26

    Transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) is gaining momentum as a novel non-invasive brain stimulation method, with promising potential for superior spatial resolution and depth penetration compared to transcranial magnetic stimulation or transcranial direct current stimulation. We examined the presence of tactile sensations elicited by FUS stimulation of two separate brain regions in humans-the primary (SI) and secondary (SII) somatosensory areas of the hand, as guided by individual-specific functional magnetic resonance imaging data. Under image-guidance, acoustic stimulations were delivered to the SI and SII areas either separately or simultaneously. The SII areas were divided into sub-regions that are activated by four types of external tactile sensations to the palmar side of the right hand-vibrotactile, pressure, warmth, and coolness. Across the stimulation conditions (SI only, SII only, SI and SII simultaneously), participants reported various types of tactile sensations that arose from the hand contralateral to the stimulation, such as the palm/back of the hand or as single/neighboring fingers. The type of tactile sensations did not match the sensations that are associated with specific sub-regions in the SII. The neuro-stimulatory effects of FUS were transient and reversible, and the procedure did not cause any adverse changes or discomforts in the subject's mental/physical status. The use of multiple FUS transducers allowed for simultaneous stimulation of the SI/SII in the same hemisphere and elicited various tactile sensations in the absence of any external sensory stimuli. Stimulation of the SII area alone could also induce perception of tactile sensations. The ability to stimulate multiple brain areas in a spatially restricted fashion can be used to study causal relationships between regional brain activities and their cognitive/behavioral outcomes.

  14. A new brain drug delivery strategy: focused ultrasound-enhanced intranasal drug delivery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Chen

    Full Text Available Central nervous system (CNS diseases are difficult to treat because of the blood-brain barrier (BBB, which prevents most drugs from entering into the brain. Intranasal (i.n. administration is a promising approach for drug delivery to the brain, bypassing the BBB; however, its application has been restricted to particularly potent substances and it does not offer localized delivery to specific brain sites. Focused ultrasound (FUS in combination with microbubbles can deliver drugs to the brain at targeted locations. The present study proposed to combine these two different platform techniques (FUS+i.n. for enhancing the delivery efficiency of intranasally administered drugs at a targeted location. After i.n. administration of 40 kDa fluorescently-labeled dextran as the model drug, FUS targeted at one region within the caudate putamen of mouse brains was applied in the presence of systemically administered microbubbles. To compare with the conventional FUS technique, in which intravenous (i.v. drug injection is employed, FUS was also applied after i.v. injection of the same amount of dextran in another group of mice. Dextran delivery outcomes were evaluated using fluorescence imaging of brain slices. The results showed that FUS+i.n. enhanced drug delivery within the targeted region compared with that achieved by i.n. only. Despite the fact that the i.n. route has limited drug absorption across the nasal mucosa, the delivery efficiency of FUS+i.n. was not significantly different from that of FUS+i.v.. As a new drug delivery platform, the FUS+i.n. technique is potentially useful for treating CNS diseases.

  15. Focused ultrasound-facilitated brain drug delivery using optimized nanodroplets: vaporization efficiency dictates large molecular delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shih-Ying; Fix, Samantha M.; Arena, Christopher B.; Chen, Cherry C.; Zheng, Wenlan; Olumolade, Oluyemi O.; Papadopoulou, Virginie; Novell, Anthony; Dayton, Paul A.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2018-02-01

    Focused ultrasound with nanodroplets could facilitate localized drug delivery after vaporization with potentially improved in vivo stability, drug payload, and minimal interference outside of the focal zone compared with microbubbles. While the feasibility of blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening using nanodroplets has been previously reported, characterization of the associated delivery has not been achieved. It was hypothesized that the outcome of drug delivery was associated with the droplet’s sensitivity to acoustic energy, and can be modulated with the boiling point of the liquid core. Therefore, in this study, octafluoropropane (OFP) and decafluorobutane (DFB) nanodroplets were used both in vitro for assessing their relative vaporization efficiency with high-speed microscopy, and in vivo for delivering molecules with a size relevant to proteins (40 kDa dextran) to the murine brain. It was found that at low pressures (300-450 kPa), OFP droplets vaporized into a greater number of microbubbles compared to DFB droplets at higher pressures (750-900 kPa) in the in vitro study. In the in vivo study, successful delivery was achieved with OFP droplets at 300 kPa and 450 kPa without evidence of cavitation damage using ¼ dosage, compared to DFB droplets at 900 kPa where histology indicated tissue damage due to inertial cavitation. In conclusion, the vaporization efficiency of nanodroplets positively impacted the amount of molecules delivered to the brain. The OFP droplets due to the higher vaporization efficiency served as better acoustic agents to deliver large molecules efficiently to the brain compared with the DFB droplets.

  16. Training Program for Cardiology Residents to Perform Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Examination with Portable Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, Vicente N; Mancuso, Frederico J N; Campos, Orlando; De Paola, Angelo A; Carvalho, Antonio C; Moises, Valdir A

    2015-10-01

    Training requirements for general cardiologists without echocardiographic expertise to perform focused cardiac ultrasound (FCU) with portable devices have not yet been defined. The objective of this study was to evaluate a training program to instruct cardiology residents to perform FCU with a hand-carried device (HCD) in different clinical settings. Twelve cardiology residents were subjected to a 50-question test, 4 lectures on basic echocardiography and imaging interpretation, the supervised interpretation of 50 echocardiograms and performance of 30 exams using HCD. After this period, they repeated the written test and were administered a practical test comprising 30 exams each (360 patients) in different clinical settings. They reported on 15 parameters and a final diagnosis; their findings were compared to the HCD exam of a specialist in echocardiography. The proportion of correct answers on the theoretical test was higher after training (86%) than before (51%; P = 0.001). The agreement was substantial among the 15 parameters analyzed (kappa ranging from 0.615 to 0.891; P < 0.001). The percentage of correct interpretation was lower for abnormal (75%) than normal (95%) items, for valve abnormalities (85%) compared to other items (92%) and for graded scale (87%) than for dichotomous (95%) items (P < 0.0001, for all). For the final diagnoses, the kappa value was higher than 0.941 (P < 0.001; 95% CI [0.914, 0.955]). The training proposed enabled residents to perform FCU with HCD, and their findings were in good agreement with those of a cardiologist specialized in echocardiography. © 2015, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Simultaneous pasteurization and homogenization of human milk by combining heat and ultrasound: effect on milk quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czank, Charles; Simmer, Karen; Hartmann, Peter E

    2010-05-01

    The combination of ultrasound and heat (thermoultrasound) is an emerging food preservation technique that retains higher quantities of bioactive components compared with current thermal pasteurization practice, but has not yet been assessed for pasteurizing human milk. Artificially contaminated human milk samples were treated with ultrasound (20 kHz, 150 watts) with and without heating. The retention of four human milk proteins was quantified by biochemical assay and laser scattering particle sizing was used to determine the extent of homogenization. While ultrasonic treatment was effective at inactivating Escherichia coli (D4 degrees C=5.94 min), Staphylococcus epidermidis exhibited resistance (D4 degrees C=16.01 min). Thermoultrasonic treatment was considerably more effective (Esch. coli D45 degrees C=1.74 min, D50 degrees C=0.89 min; Staph. epidermidis D45 degrees C=2.08 min, D50 degrees C=0.94 minutes) with a predicted retention (2.8 min treatment, 50 degrees C) of secretory IgA lysozyme, lactoferrin and bile salt stimulated lipase of 91, 80, 77, and 45%, respectively. Homogenization of the milk samples occurred after 5 min and 2 min of ultrasonic and thermoultrasonic treatment, respectively. Thermoultrasonic treatment is an effective method for pasteurizing donor human milk and retaining a greater proportion of bioactive components compared with current practices. However, further studies are required to assess the practicality of applying this technique routinely to donor human milk.

  18. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound for the Treatment of Wrinkles and Skin Laxity in Seven Different Facial Areas

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Hyunchul; Kim, Eunjin; Kim, Jeongeun; Ro, Youngsuck; Ko, Jooyeon

    2015-01-01

    Background High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment has recently emerged in response to the increasing demand for noninvasive procedures for skin lifting and tightening. Objective This study was aimed at evaluating the clinical efficacy of and patient satisfaction with HIFU treatment for wrinkles and laxity in seven different areas of the face in Asian skin. Methods Twenty Korean patients with facial wrinkle and laxity were analyzed after a single session of HIFU treatment. Two inde...

  19. The effect of ultrasound irradiation on the convective heat transfer rate during immersion cooling of a stationary sphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiani, Hossein; Sun, Da-Wen; Zhang, Zhihang

    2012-11-01

    It has been proven that ultrasound irradiation can enhance the rate of heat transfer processes. The objective of this work was to study the heat transfer phenomenon, mainly the heat exchange at the surface, as affected by ultrasound irradiation around a stationary copper sphere (k=386W m(-1)K(-1), C(p)=384J kg(-1)K(-1), ρ=8660kg m(-3)) during cooling. The sphere (0.01m in diameter) was immersed in an ethylene glycol-water mixture (-10°C) in an ultrasonic cooling system that included a refrigerated circulator, a flow meter, an ultrasound generator and an ultrasonic bath. The temperature of the sphere was recorded using a data logger equipped with a T-type thermocouple in the center of the sphere. The temperature of the cooling medium was also monitored by four thermocouples situated at different places in the bath. The sphere was located at different positions (0.02, 0.04 and 0.06m) above the transducer surface of the bath calculated considering the center of the sphere as the center of the reference system and was exposed to different intensities of ultrasound (0, 120, 190, 450, 890, 1800, 2800, 3400 and 4100W m(-2)) during cooling. The frequency of the ultrasound was 25kHz. It was demonstrated that ultrasound irradiation can increase the rate of heat transfer significantly, resulting in considerably shorter cooling times. Higher intensities caused higher cooling rates, and Nu values were increased from about 23-27 to 25-108 depending on the intensity of ultrasound and the position of the sphere. However, high intensities of ultrasound led to the generation of heat at the surface of the sphere, thus limiting the lowest final temperature achieved. An analytical solution was developed considering the heat generation and was fitted to the experimental data with R(2) values in the range of 0.910-0.998. Visual observations revealed that both cavitation and acoustic streaming were important for heat transfer phenomenon. Cavitation clouds at the surface of the sphere

  20. Magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS): Ablation of liver tissue in a porcine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopelman, Doron [Department of Surgery B, ' HaEmek' Medical Center, Afula, and the Technion, Israel institute of technology, Haifa (Israel)]. E-mail: Kopelman_d@clalit.org.il; Inbar, Yael [Focused Ultrasound Treatment Center, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer (Israel); Hanannel, Arik [InSightec Ltd., Tirat Hacarmel (Israel); Freundlich, David [InSightec Ltd., Tirat Hacarmel (Israel); Castel, David [Focused Ultrasound Treatment Center, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer (Israel); Perel, Azriel [Department of Anesthesiology, and intensive care, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Hashomer (Israel); Greenfeld, Adrian [Department of Anesthesiology, and intensive care, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Hashomer (Israel); Salamon, Tal [Department of Surgery B, ' HaEmek' Medical Center, Afula, and the Technion, Israel institute of technology, Haifa (Israel); Sareli, Merab [Department of Surgery C, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Hashomer (Israel); Valeanu, Adrian [Department of Surgery C, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Hashomer (Israel); Papa, Moshe [Department of Surgery C, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Hashomer (Israel)

    2006-08-15

    Background: Liver surgery is technically demanding and is considered a major procedure with relatively high morbidity rates. Magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) uses focused ultrasonic energy to create a heat coagulation lesion, which can be achieved in a totally controlled, very accurate manner (<1 mm). The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and accuracy of non-invasive focal ablation of liver tissue achieved by consecutive MRgFUS sonications. Materials and methods: Six MRgFUS procedures were performed in five pigs under general anesthesia, with the ExAblate 2000 system (InSightec, Israel). Real-time imaging and temperature mapping (Signa Twinspeed 1.5T, GEHC, USA) enabled the immediate evaluation of the results of each sonication. Different foci were chosen within the liver. These mock lesions were ablated by several sonications, each of them performed during 20-30 s of apnea. Between sonications, the pigs were normally ventilated. The pigs were sacrificed 3-21 days after the procedure and their livers were examined. Results: The MRgFUS created complete tissue destruction of mock lesions in different areas of the pig's liver. The lesion sizes in each animal varied according to the number of sonications used and the extent of overlap between adjacent sonications. The lesion ranged in size from 1.5 cm x 1.5 cm x 2.0 cm to 5.5 cm x 4.5 cm x 2.0 cm. There was no morbidity. Conclusions: MRgFUS under general anesthesia is a safe, completely non-invasive technology for the ablation of liver tissue. Liver tissue can be ablated in a very accurate manner, based on the pre-treatment planning on the MR images. The MR imaging characteristics, including real-time temperature mapping, enable real-time control of every step of the ablation process. Mechanical ventilation with intermittent periods of apnea is a technique that overcomes the problem of the respiratory movements of the liver.

  1. A modeling approach for district heating systems with focus on transient heat transfer in pipe networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohammadi, Soma; Bojesen, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the building energy efficiency in recent years results in noticeably reduction in their heating demand. Combined with the current trend for utilizing low temperature heat sources, it raises the necessity of introducing a new generation of district heating [DH] systems with lowered...... km pipelines (supply and return pipes). At the first stage, the Studstrup DH system is developed in TERMIS, which is commercial software for district heating system simulation, and then the developed model is validated and compared with the results obtained from TERMIS and measurements. The TERMIS...

  2. Workflow and intervention times of MR-guided focused ultrasound - Predicting the impact of new techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeve, Arjo J; Al-Issawi, Jumana; Fernandez-Gutiérrez, Fabiola; Langø, Thomas; Strehlow, Jan; Haase, Sabrina; Matzko, Matthias; Napoli, Alessandro; Melzer, Andreas; Dankelman, Jenny

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic resonance guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) has become an attractive, non-invasive treatment for benign and malignant tumours, and offers specific benefits for poorly accessible locations in the liver. However, the presence of the ribcage and the occurrence of liver motion due to respiration limit the applicability MRgFUS. Several techniques are being developed to address these issues or to decrease treatment times in other ways. However, the potential benefit of such improvements has not been quantified. In this research, the detailed workflow of current MRgFUS procedures was determined qualitatively and quantitatively by using observation studies on uterine MRgFUS interventions, and the bottlenecks in MRgFUS were identified. A validated simulation model based on discrete events simulation was developed to quantitatively predict the effect of new technological developments on the intervention duration of MRgFUS on the liver. During the observation studies, the duration and occurrence frequencies of all actions and decisions in the MRgFUS workflow were registered, as were the occurrence frequencies of motion detections and intervention halts. The observation results show that current MRgFUS uterine interventions take on average 213min. Organ motion was detected on average 2.9 times per intervention, of which on average 1.0 actually caused a need for rework. Nevertheless, these motion occurrences and the actions required to continue after their detection consumed on average 11% and up to 29% of the total intervention duration. The simulation results suggest that, depending on the motion occurrence frequency, the addition of new technology to automate currently manual MRgFUS tasks and motion compensation could potentially reduce the intervention durations by 98.4% (from 256h 5min to 4h 4min) in the case of 90% motion occurrence, and with 24% (from 5h 19min to 4h 2min) in the case of no motion. In conclusion, new tools were developed to predict how

  3. Volumetric analysis of magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound thalamotomy lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harary, Maya; Essayed, Walid I; Valdes, Pablo A; McDannold, Nathan; Cosgrove, G Rees

    2018-02-01

    OBJECTIVE Magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) thalamotomy was recently approved for use in the treatment of medication-refractory essential tremor (ET). Previous work has described lesion appearance and volume on MRI up to 6 months after treatment. Here, the authors report on the volumetric segmentation of the thalamotomy lesion and associated edema in the immediate postoperative period and 1 year following treatment, and relate these radiographic characteristics with clinical outcome. METHODS Seven patients with medication-refractory ET underwent MRgFUS thalamotomy at Brigham and Women's Hospital and were monitored clinically for 1 year posttreatment. Treatment effect was measured using the Clinical Rating Scale for Tremor (CRST). MRI was performed immediately postoperatively, 24 hours posttreatment, and at 1 year. Lesion location and the volumes of the necrotic core (zone I) and surrounding edema (cytotoxic, zone II; vasogenic, zone III) were measured on thin-slice T2-weighted images using Slicer 3D software. RESULTS Patients had significant improvement in overall CRST scores (baseline 51.4 ± 10.8 to 24.9 ± 11.0 at 1 year, p = 0.001). The most common adverse events (AEs) in the 1-month posttreatment period were transient gait disturbance (6 patients) and paresthesia (3 patients). The center of zone I immediately posttreatment was 5.61 ± 0.9 mm anterior to the posterior commissure, 14.6 ± 0.8 mm lateral to midline, and 11.0 ± 0.5 mm lateral to the border of the third ventricle on the anterior commissure-posterior commissure plane. Zone I, II, and III volumes immediately posttreatment were 0.01 ± 0.01, 0.05 ± 0.02, and 0.33 ± 0.21 cm 3 , respectively. These volumes increased significantly over the first 24 hours following surgery. The edema did not spread evenly, with more notable expansion in the superoinferior and lateral directions. The spread of edema inferiorly was associated with the incidence of gait disturbance. At 1 year, the

  4. Complete high-intensity focused ultrasound in prostate cancer: outcome from the @-Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blana, A; Robertson, C N; Brown, S C W; Chaussy, C; Crouzet, S; Gelet, A; Conti, G N; Ganzer, R; Pasticier, G; Thuroff, S; Ward, J F

    2012-09-01

    To analyze data on patients with localized prostate cancer who were treated with complete high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) prospectively captured within a voluntary HIFU user database (@-Registry). The @-Registry includes data from consecutive patients treated with Ablatherm (EDAP-TMS) HIFU at nine European Centres during the period 1994 and 2009. For this analysis, the data repository was reviewed for information on patients with localized prostate cancer (T1 -- T2) treated with complete (whole-gland) HIFU on the basis of an anterior-posterior prostate height of ≤24 mm and a treated volume >120% of the prostate volume. Patients were regularly followed with PSA measurement and biopsy. Biochemical failure was defined for this study as PSA nadir +2 ngml(-1) (Phoenix definition). Disease-free survival was based on a biopsy, retreatment and biochemical data. Patients were risk group-stratified using the D'Amico classification system. The median follow-up was 2.8 years for the 356 patients included in the analysis. The majority could be classified as either low (44.9%) or intermediate risk (39.6%); 14.6% patients were classified as high risk. The median (mean, s.d.) PSA nadir was 0.11 ng ml(-1) (0.78 and 3.6), achieved at a mean (s.d.) of 14.4 (11.6) weeks after HIFU. Follow-up biopsies on 226/356 (63.5%) patients revealed an overall negative biopsy rate of 80.5% (182/226); there was no statistically significant difference in positive biopsy rate by risk group-stratification. Actuarial freedom from biochemical recurrence at 5 and 7 years according to the Phoenix definition was 85% and 79%, respectively. Disease-free progression rates at 5 and 7 years were 64% and 54%, respectively. Whole-gland prostate HIFU as primary monotherapy for localized prostate cancer achieves a recurrence-free survival in short-term analysis as assessed by prostate biopsy and serum PSA endpoints in a majority of patients.

  5. Therapeutic effects of microbubble added to combined high-intensity focused ultrasound and chemotherapy in a pancreatic cancer xenograft model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Mi Hye; Lee, Jae Young; Kim, Bo Ram; Park, Eun Joo; Kim, Hoe Suk; Han, Joon Koo; Kim, Hae Ri; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2016-01-01

    To investigate whether high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of chemotherapy. A pancreatic cancer xenograft model was established using BALB/c nude mice and luciferase-expressing human pancreatic cancer cells. Mice were randomly assigned to five groups according to treatment: control (n = 10), gemcitabine alone (GEM; n = 12), HIFU with microbubbles (HIFU + MB, n = 11), combined HIFU and gemcitabine (HIGEM; n = 12), and HIGEM + MB (n = 13). After three weekly treatments, apoptosis rates were evaluated using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay in two mice per group. Tumor volume and bioluminescence were monitored using high-resolution 3D ultrasound imaging and in vivo bioluminescence imaging for eight weeks in the remaining mice. The HIGEM + MB group showed significantly higher apoptosis rates than the other groups (p < 0.05) and exhibited the slowest tumor growth. From week 5, the tumor-volume-ratio relative to the baseline tumor volume was significantly lower in the HIGEM + MB group than in the control, GEM, and HIFU + MB groups (p < 0.05). Despite visible distinction, the HIGEM and HIGEM + MB groups showed no significant differences. High-intensity focused ultrasound combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of gemcitabine chemotherapy in a pancreatic cancer xenograft model

  6. Therapeutic Effects of Microbubbles Added to Combined High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound and Chemotherapy in a Pancreatic Cancer Xenograft Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Mi Hye; Lee, Jae Young; Kim, Hae Ri; Kim, Bo Ram; Park, Eun-Joo; Kim, Hoe Suk; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2016-01-01

    To investigate whether high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of chemotherapy. A pancreatic cancer xenograft model was established using BALB/c nude mice and luciferase-expressing human pancreatic cancer cells. Mice were randomly assigned to five groups according to treatment: control (n = 10), gemcitabine alone (GEM; n = 12), HIFU with microbubbles (HIFU + MB, n = 11), combined HIFU and gemcitabine (HIGEM; n = 12), and HIGEM + MB (n = 13). After three weekly treatments, apoptosis rates were evaluated using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay in two mice per group. Tumor volume and bioluminescence were monitored using high-resolution 3D ultrasound imaging and in vivo bioluminescence imaging for eight weeks in the remaining mice. The HIGEM + MB group showed significantly higher apoptosis rates than the other groups (p < 0.05) and exhibited the slowest tumor growth. From week 5, the tumor-volume-ratio relative to the baseline tumor volume was significantly lower in the HIGEM + MB group than in the control, GEM, and HIFU + MB groups (p < 0.05). Despite visible distinction, the HIGEM and HIGEM + MB groups showed no significant differences. High-intensity focused ultrasound combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of gemcitabine chemotherapy in a pancreatic cancer xenograft model

  7. Therapeutic effects of microbubble added to combined high-intensity focused ultrasound and chemotherapy in a pancreatic cancer xenograft model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Mi Hye [Dept. of Radiology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Young; Kim, Bo Ram; Park, Eun Joo; Kim, Hoe Suk; Han, Joon Koo [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hae Ri [Dept. of Pre-Dentistry, Gangneung-Wonju National University College of Dentistry, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Byung Ihn [Dept. of Radiology, Chung-Ang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    To investigate whether high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of chemotherapy. A pancreatic cancer xenograft model was established using BALB/c nude mice and luciferase-expressing human pancreatic cancer cells. Mice were randomly assigned to five groups according to treatment: control (n = 10), gemcitabine alone (GEM; n = 12), HIFU with microbubbles (HIFU + MB, n = 11), combined HIFU and gemcitabine (HIGEM; n = 12), and HIGEM + MB (n = 13). After three weekly treatments, apoptosis rates were evaluated using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay in two mice per group. Tumor volume and bioluminescence were monitored using high-resolution 3D ultrasound imaging and in vivo bioluminescence imaging for eight weeks in the remaining mice. The HIGEM + MB group showed significantly higher apoptosis rates than the other groups (p < 0.05) and exhibited the slowest tumor growth. From week 5, the tumor-volume-ratio relative to the baseline tumor volume was significantly lower in the HIGEM + MB group than in the control, GEM, and HIFU + MB groups (p < 0.05). Despite visible distinction, the HIGEM and HIGEM + MB groups showed no significant differences. High-intensity focused ultrasound combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of gemcitabine chemotherapy in a pancreatic cancer xenograft model.

  8. Therapeutic Effects of Microbubbles Added to Combined High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound and Chemotherapy in a Pancreatic Cancer Xenograft Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Mi Hye [Department of Radiology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul 05030 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Young [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 03080 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hae Ri [Department of Pre-Dentistry, Gangneung-Wonju National University College of Dentistry, Gangneung 25457 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Bo Ram; Park, Eun-Joo; Kim, Hoe Suk; Han, Joon Koo [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 03080 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Byung Ihn [Department of Radiology, Chung-Ang University Hospital, Seoul 06973 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    To investigate whether high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of chemotherapy. A pancreatic cancer xenograft model was established using BALB/c nude mice and luciferase-expressing human pancreatic cancer cells. Mice were randomly assigned to five groups according to treatment: control (n = 10), gemcitabine alone (GEM; n = 12), HIFU with microbubbles (HIFU + MB, n = 11), combined HIFU and gemcitabine (HIGEM; n = 12), and HIGEM + MB (n = 13). After three weekly treatments, apoptosis rates were evaluated using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay in two mice per group. Tumor volume and bioluminescence were monitored using high-resolution 3D ultrasound imaging and in vivo bioluminescence imaging for eight weeks in the remaining mice. The HIGEM + MB group showed significantly higher apoptosis rates than the other groups (p < 0.05) and exhibited the slowest tumor growth. From week 5, the tumor-volume-ratio relative to the baseline tumor volume was significantly lower in the HIGEM + MB group than in the control, GEM, and HIFU + MB groups (p < 0.05). Despite visible distinction, the HIGEM and HIGEM + MB groups showed no significant differences. High-intensity focused ultrasound combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of gemcitabine chemotherapy in a pancreatic cancer xenograft model.

  9. In-vivo pilot study on physical absorption enhancement of active skin whitening ingredients by heat and ultrasound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheja, M.M.; Wang, X.; Ma, P.

    2012-01-01

    In Q3 of 2011, Philips Research received a brief from the Skin Carecategory of the Philips Consumer Lifestyle sector to explore the feasibility of heat and ultrasound to increase skin uptake of active skin whitening ingredients from cosmetics. Philips Research Asia-Shanghai performed an in-vivo

  10. Magnetic Resonance–Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Hyperthermia for Recurrent Rectal Cancer: MR Thermometry Evaluation and Preclinical Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, William, E-mail: William.Chu@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and the University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Staruch, Robert M. [Clinical Sites Research Program, Philips Research, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Pichardo, Samuel [Thunder Bay Regional Research Institute, Thunder Bay, Ontario (Canada); Physics and Electrical Engineering, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario (Canada); Tillander, Matti; Köhler, Max O. [MR Therapy, Philips Healthcare, Vantaa (Finland); Huang, Yuexi [Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ylihautala, Mika [MR Therapy, Philips Healthcare, Vantaa (Finland); McGuffin, Merrylee [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and the University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Czarnota, Gregory [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and the University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Hynynen, Kullervo [Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of magnetic resonance–guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) mild hyperthermia in deep tissue targets for enhancing radiation therapy and chemotherapy in the context of recurrent rectal cancer. A preclinical study was performed to evaluate the safety and performance of MR-HIFU mild hyperthermia. A prospective imaging study was performed in volunteers with rectal cancer to evaluate MR thermometry quality near the rectum and accessibility of rectal tumors using MR-HIFU. Methods and Materials: Mild hyperthermia was performed in pig thigh (9 sonications, 6 pigs) using a clinical MR-HIFU system. Targets near the rectal wall and deep thigh were evaluated. Thermal maps obtained in 6 planes every 3.2 seconds were used to control sonications in 18-mm diameter treatment regions at temperatures of 42°C to 42.5°C for 10 to 60 minutes. Volunteer imaging-only studies to assess the quality of MR thermometry (without heating) were approved by the institutional research ethics board. Anatomic and MR thermometry images were acquired in consenting volunteers with rectal cancer. In 3 of 6 study participants, rectal filling with saline was used to reduce motion-related MR thermometry artifacts near the tumor. Results: In pigs, mean target temperature matched the desired hyperthermia temperature within 0.2°C; temporal standard deviation ≤0.5°C. With optimized control thresholds, no undesired tissue damage was observed. In human volunteers, MR temperature measurements had adequate precision and stability, especially when rectal filling was used to reduce bowel motion. Conclusions: In pigs, MR-HIFU can safely deliver mild hyperthermia (41°C-43°C) to a targeted volume for 30 minutes. In humans, careful patient selection and preparation will enable adequate targeting for recurrent rectal cancers and sufficient MR temperature mapping stability to control mild hyperthermia. These results enable human trials of MR-HIFU hyperthermia.

  11. Robotized High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) system for treatment of mobile organs using motion tracking by ultrasound imaging: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanel, Laure-Anais; Nageotte, Florent; Vappou, Jonathan; Luo, Jianwen; Cuvillon, Loic; de Mathelin, Michel

    2015-01-01

    High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) therapy is a very promising method for ablation of solid tumors. However, intra-abdominal organ motion, principally due to breathing, is a substantial limitation that results in incorrect tumor targeting. The objective of this work is to develop an all-in-one robotized HIFU system that can compensate motion in real-time during HIFU treatment. To this end, an ultrasound visual servoing scheme working at 20 Hz was designed. It relies on the motion estimation by using a fast ultrasonic speckle tracking algorithm and on the use of an interleaved imaging/HIFU sonication sequence for avoiding ultrasonic wave interferences. The robotized HIFU system was tested on a sample of chicken breast undergoing a vertical sinusoidal motion at 0.25 Hz. Sonications with and without motion compensation were performed in order to assess the effect of motion compensation on thermal lesions induced by HIFU. Motion was reduced by more than 80% thanks to this ultrasonic visual servoing system.

  12. Evaluation of local density enhancement of microcapsules in artificial blood vessel during exposure to focused ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamoto, Ryusuke; Masuda, Kohji; Watarai, Nobuyuki; Taguchi, Yuto; Kato, Toshikazu; Yoshinaga, Takashi; Miyamoto, Yoshitaka; Chiba, Toshio

    2011-09-01

    We have proposed a physical DDS (Drug Delivery System) which makes use of microcapsules of μm size, which may contain a specified drug and also are easily affected by ultrasound exposure near their resonant frequency, to release various kinds of medications. These capsules are easily detected and actuated by ultrasound. However, because of the diffusion of capsules after injection into human body, it was difficult to enhance the efficiency of drug delivery. Thus we have considered a method for controlling the density of capsules in flow which uses acoustic radiation force, which moves the capsules to balance flow resistance. We have experimented with trapping microcapsules or microbubbles in flow of an artificial blood vessel. We have evaluated the effect of radiation force by measuring the trapped area of capsules or bubbles for various frequencies, sound pressures, and exposure times of sinusoidal ultrasound. The trapped area of capsules or bubbles increased with sound pressure and exposure time, and decreased with frequency. From those results, we have derived optimal conditions for trapping the capsules or bubbles.

  13. Modeling the thermo-acoustic effects of thermal-dependent speed of sound and acoustic absorption of biological tissues during focused ultrasound hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Haro, S A; Gutiérrez, M I; Vera, A; Leija, L

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the effects of thermal dependence of speed of sound (SOS) and acoustic absorption of biological tissues during noninvasive focused ultrasound (US) hyperthermia therapy. A finite element (FE) model was used to simulate hyperthermia therapy in the liver by noninvasive focused US. The model consisted of an ultrasonic focused transducer radiating a four-layer biological medium composed of skin, fat, muscle, and liver. The acoustic field and temperature distribution along the layers were obtained after 15 s of hyperthermia therapy using the bio-heat equation. The model solution was found with and without the thermal dependence of SOS and acoustic absorption of biological tissues. The inclusion of the thermal dependence of the SOS generated an increment of 0.4 mm in the longitudinal focus axis of the acoustic field. Moreover, results indicate an increment of the hyperthermia area (zone with temperature above 43 °C), and a maximum temperature difference of almost 3.5 °C when the thermal dependence of absorption was taken into account. The increment of the achieved temperatures at the treatment zone indicated that the effects produced by the thermal dependence of SOS and absorption must be accounted for when planning hyperthermia treatment in order to avoid overheating undesired regions.

  14. Sampling strategies for subsampled segmented EPI PRF thermometry in MR guided high intensity focused ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odéen, Henrik; Todd, Nick; Diakite, Mahamadou; Minalga, Emilee; Payne, Allison; Parker, Dennis L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate k-space subsampling strategies to achieve fast, large field-of-view (FOV) temperature monitoring using segmented echo planar imaging (EPI) proton resonance frequency shift thermometry for MR guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) applications. Methods: Five different k-space sampling approaches were investigated, varying sample spacing (equally vs nonequally spaced within the echo train), sampling density (variable sampling density in zero, one, and two dimensions), and utilizing sequential or centric sampling. Three of the schemes utilized sequential sampling with the sampling density varied in zero, one, and two dimensions, to investigate sampling the k-space center more frequently. Two of the schemes utilized centric sampling to acquire the k-space center with a longer echo time for improved phase measurements, and vary the sampling density in zero and two dimensions, respectively. Phantom experiments and a theoretical point spread function analysis were performed to investigate their performance. Variable density sampling in zero and two dimensions was also implemented in a non-EPI GRE pulse sequence for comparison. All subsampled data were reconstructed with a previously described temporally constrained reconstruction (TCR) algorithm. Results: The accuracy of each sampling strategy in measuring the temperature rise in the HIFU focal spot was measured in terms of the root-mean-square-error (RMSE) compared to fully sampled “truth.” For the schemes utilizing sequential sampling, the accuracy was found to improve with the dimensionality of the variable density sampling, giving values of 0.65 °C, 0.49 °C, and 0.35 °C for density variation in zero, one, and two dimensions, respectively. The schemes utilizing centric sampling were found to underestimate the temperature rise, with RMSE values of 1.05 °C and 1.31 °C, for variable density sampling in zero and two dimensions, respectively. Similar subsampling schemes

  15. Sampling strategies for subsampled segmented EPI PRF thermometry in MR guided high intensity focused ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odéen, Henrik; Diakite, Mahamadou; Todd, Nick; Minalga, Emilee; Payne, Allison; Parker, Dennis L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate k-space subsampling strategies to achieve fast, large field-of-view (FOV) temperature monitoring using segmented echo planar imaging (EPI) proton resonance frequency shift thermometry for MR guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) applications. Methods: Five different k-space sampling approaches were investigated, varying sample spacing (equally vs nonequally spaced within the echo train), sampling density (variable sampling density in zero, one, and two dimensions), and utilizing sequential or centric sampling. Three of the schemes utilized sequential sampling with the sampling density varied in zero, one, and two dimensions, to investigate sampling the k-space center more frequently. Two of the schemes utilized centric sampling to acquire the k-space center with a longer echo time for improved phase measurements, and vary the sampling density in zero and two dimensions, respectively. Phantom experiments and a theoretical point spread function analysis were performed to investigate their performance. Variable density sampling in zero and two dimensions was also implemented in a non-EPI GRE pulse sequence for comparison. All subsampled data were reconstructed with a previously described temporally constrained reconstruction (TCR) algorithm. Results: The accuracy of each sampling strategy in measuring the temperature rise in the HIFU focal spot was measured in terms of the root-mean-square-error (RMSE) compared to fully sampled “truth.” For the schemes utilizing sequential sampling, the accuracy was found to improve with the dimensionality of the variable density sampling, giving values of 0.65 °C, 0.49 °C, and 0.35 °C for density variation in zero, one, and two dimensions, respectively. The schemes utilizing centric sampling were found to underestimate the temperature rise, with RMSE values of 1.05 °C and 1.31 °C, for variable density sampling in zero and two dimensions, respectively. Similar subsampling schemes

  16. Jet formation and shock wave emission during collapse of ultrasound-induced cavitation bubbles and their role in the therapeutic applications of high-intensity focused ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brujan, E A; Ikeda, T; Matsumoto, Y

    2005-01-01

    The dynamics of inertial cavitation bubbles produced by short pulses of high-intensity focused ultrasound near a rigid boundary are studied to get a better understanding of the role of jet formation and shock wave emission during bubble collapse in the therapeutic applications of ultrasound. The bubble dynamics are investigated by high-speed photography with up to 2 million frames/s and acoustic measurements, as well as by numerical calculations. The significant parameter of this study is the dimensionless stand-off, γ, which is defined as the distance of the bubble centre at its maximum expansion scaled by the maximum bubble radius. High-speed photography is applied to observe the bubble motion and the velocity of the liquid jet formed during bubble collapse. Hydrophone measurements are used to determine the pressure and the duration of the shock wave emitted during bubble rebound. Calculations yield the variation with time of the bubble wall, the maximum velocity and the kinetic energy of the re-entrant jet. The comparisons between experimental and numerical data are favourable with regard to both shape history and translational motion of the bubble. The acoustic energy constitutes the largest individual amount in the energy balance of bubble collapse. The ratio of the shock wave energy, measured at 10 mm from the emission centre, to the cavitation bubble energy was 1:2.4 at γ = 1.55 and 1:3.5 at γ = 1. At this distance, the shock wave pressure ranges from 0.122 MPa, at γ = 1, to 0.162 MPa, at γ 1.55, and the temporal duration at the half maximum level is 87 ns. The maximum jet velocity ranges from 27 m s -1 , at γ = 1, to 36 m s -1 , at γ = 1.55. For γ < 1.2, the re-entrant jet can generate an impact pressure on the nearby boundary larger than 50 MPa. We discuss the implications of the results for the therapeutic applications of high-intensity focused ultrasound

  17. A high-frequency ultrasound imaging system combining limited-angle spatial compounding and model-based synthetic aperture focusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opretzka, Jörn; Vogt, Michael; Ermert, Helmut

    2011-07-01

    High-frequency ultrasound (HFUS) imaging systems are routinely used for medical diagnostics (skin, eyes) and for medical research (small animal imaging). Although systems with array transducers are already commercially available, imaging systems with single-element transducers are still of interest and available as well, because this type of transducer is less complex, less expensive, and technically mature. Nevertheless, drawbacks exist, for example, the need for mechanical scanning units and the limited depth of field. In this paper, we present a high-frequency (20 MHz) ultrasound imaging system equipped with a spherically focused transducer. Limited-angle spatial compounding is utilized to improve the image contrast, to suppress speckle and noise, and to reduce imaging artifacts. To overcome the limitation in depth of field, the system uses a novel synthetic aperture focusing technique based on the correlation of the recorded echo signals with the simulated point spread function of the imaging system. This method results in lower side lobe levels and greater noise reduction compared with delay-and-sum focusing, which is demonstrated by wire phantom measurements. When used in combination with limited-angle spatial compounding, as presented in this paper, the resulting image quality is superior to conventional single-element HFUS imaging systems and to array systems. Examples of measurements on tissue phantoms and small animals (ex vivo) are presented and discussed in detail.

  18. Gallbladder ascariasis in Kosovo - focus on ultrasound and conservative therapy: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismaili-Jaha, Vlora; Toro, Halim; Spahiu, Lidvana; Azemi, Mehmedali; Hoxha-Kamberi, Teuta; Avdiu, Muharrem; Spahiu-Konjusha, Shqipe; Jaha, Luan

    2018-01-13

    Ascaris lumbricoides is one of the most common intestinal infections in developing countries, including Kosovo. In contrast to migration to the bile duct, migration of the worm to the gallbladder, due to the narrow and tortuous nature of the cystic duct, is rare. When it does occur, it incites acalculous cholecystitis. This case series describes a 16-month-old Albanian girl, a 22-month-old Albanian girl, a 4-year-old Albanian girl, and a 10-year-old Albanian boy. Here we report our experience with gallbladder ascariasis including clinical manifestations, diagnostic procedures, and treatment. Fever, diarrhea and vomiting, dehydration, pale appearance, and weakness were the manifestations of the primary disease. In all patients, a physical examination revealed reduced turgor and elasticity of the skin. Abdomen was at the level of the chest, soft, with minimal palpatory pain. The liver and spleen were not palpable. A laboratory examination was not specific except for eosinophilia. There were no pathogenic bacteria in coproculture but Ascaris was found in all patients. At an ultrasound examination in all cases we found single, long, linear echogenic structure without acoustic shadowing containing a central, longitudinal anechoic tube with characteristic movement within the gallbladder. Edema of the gallbladder wall was suggestive of associated inflammation. There were no other findings on adjacent structures and organs. All patients received mebendazole 100 mg twice a day for 3 days. They also received symptomatic therapy for gastroenteritis. Because of elevated markers of inflammation all patients were treated with antibiotics, assuming acute cholecystitis, although ultrasound was able to confirm cholecystitis in only two of our four patients. Since the length of stay was dependent on the primary pathology it was 7 to 10 days. At control ultrasounds on 14th day, third and sixth month, all patients were free of ascariasis. Gallbladder ascariasis should be considered in

  19. MR-guided pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound enhancement of docetaxel combined with radiotherapy for prostate cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu Zhaomei; Ma, C-M; Chen Xiaoming; Cvetkovic, Dusica; Chen Lili; Pollack, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of the enhancement of docetaxel by pulsed focused ultrasound (pFUS) in combination with radiotherapy (RT) for treatment of prostate cancer in vivo. LNCaP cells were grown in the prostates of male nude mice. When the tumors reached a designated volume by MRI, tumor bearing mice were randomly divided into seven groups (n = 5): (1) pFUS alone; (2) RT alone; (3) docetaxel alone; (4) docetaxel + pFUS; (5) docetaxel + RT; (6) docetaxel + pFUS + RT, and (7) control. MR-guided pFUS treatment was performed using a focused ultrasound treatment system (InSightec ExAblate 2000) with a 1.5T GE MR scanner. Animals were treated once with pFUS, docetaxel, RT or their combinations. Docetaxel was given by i.v. injection at 5 mg kg −1 before pFUS. RT was given 2 Gy after pFUS. Animals were euthanized 4 weeks after treatment. Tumor volumes were measured on MRI at 1 and 4 weeks post-treatment. Results showed that triple combination therapies of docetaxel, pFUS and RT provided the most significant tumor growth inhibition among all groups, which may have potential for the treatment of prostate cancer due to an improved therapeutic ratio. (paper)

  20. MR-Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation of Breast Cancer with a Dedicated Breast Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merckel, Laura G., E-mail: L.G.Merckel-2@umcutrecht.nl [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology (Netherlands); Bartels, Lambertus W., E-mail: W.Bartels@umcutrecht.nl [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute (Netherlands); Koehler, Max O., E-mail: max.kohler@philips.com [Philips Healthcare (Finland); Bongard, H. J. G. Desiree van den, E-mail: D.vandenBongard@umcutrecht.nl [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiotherapy (Netherlands); Deckers, Roel, E-mail: R.Deckers-2@umcutrecht.nl [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute (Netherlands); Mali, Willem P. Th. M., E-mail: W.Mali@umcutrecht.nl [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology (Netherlands); Binkert, Christoph A., E-mail: Christoph.Binkert@ksw.ch [Cantonal Hospital Winterthur, Department of Radiology (Switzerland); Moonen, Chrit T., E-mail: C.Moonen@umcutrecht.nl [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute (Netherlands); Gilhuijs, Kenneth G. A., E-mail: K.G.A.Gilhuijs@umcutrecht.nl; Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den, E-mail: mbosch@umcutrecht.nl [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology (Netherlands)

    2013-04-15

    Optimizing the treatment of breast cancer remains a major topic of interest. In current clinical practice, breast-conserving therapy is the standard of care for patients with localized breast cancer. Technological developments have fueled interest in less invasive breast cancer treatment. Magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) is a completely noninvasive ablation technique. Focused beams of ultrasound are used for ablation of the target lesion without disrupting the skin and subcutaneous tissues in the beam path. MRI is an excellent imaging method for tumor targeting, treatment monitoring, and evaluation of treatment results. The combination of HIFU and MR imaging offers an opportunity for image-guided ablation of breast cancer. Previous studies of MR-HIFU in breast cancer patients reported a limited efficacy, which hampered the clinical translation of this technique. These prior studies were performed without an MR-HIFU system specifically developed for breast cancer treatment. In this article, a novel and dedicated MR-HIFU breast platform is presented. This system has been designed for safe and effective MR-HIFU ablation of breast cancer. Furthermore, both clinical and technical challenges are discussed, which have to be solved before MR-HIFU ablation of breast cancer can be implemented in routine clinical practice.

  1. A comparison of ultrasound-guided high intensity focused ultrasound for the treatment of uterine fibroids in patients with an anteverted uterus and a retroverted uterus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenyi; He, Min; Huang, Guohua; He, Jia

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the treatment outcomes of ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (USgHIFU) for uterine fibroids in patients with an anteverted uterus versus a retroverted uterus. Based on the principles of statistics we enrolled 221patients with an anteverted uterus and 221 with a retroverted uterus. All patients had a solitary uterine fibroid and every fibroid was identified as hypointense on the T2 weighted images (T2WI) on magnetic resonance. The baseline characteristics of the patients, treatment results and adverse events were compared between the two groups. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between the two groups. The average non-perfused volume ratio of fibroids was 85.2 ± 18.7% in the group of patients with a retroverted uterus, while it was 87.7 ± 11.8% in patients with an anteverted uterus (P uterus were treated using lower sonication power and longer sonication time. During the procedure patients with a retroverted uterus had a higher incidence of sciatic/buttock pain and groin pain, while patients with an anteverted uterus complained of lower abdominal pain or a burning sensation on the skin. Immediately after USgHIFU, the rates of sciatic/buttock pain and skin burn were significantly higher in patients with a retroverted uterus. The results of this study indicated that uterine fibroids with hypointensity on T2WI in a retroverted uterus can be safely and effectively treated with USgHIFU. However, the fibroids in an anteverted uterus are easier to treat with USgHIFU.

  2. Synergistic effects of focus ultrasound with different frequency and hematoporphyrin on human tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, H; Tan, S; Ma, Y; Song, C

    1998-10-01

    Human hematopoietic cell K(562), human melenoma cell LiBr and human stomach cancer cells were exposed to ultrasound (US, 1.75 W/cm(2), 1.4, 2.16 and 2.4 MHz)in vitro in the presence or absence of hematoporphyrin (Hp, 100 microg/mL). The cell damaging effects of treatments were determined by means of the Trypan Blue dye exclusion test, MTT test and FDA test. The experimental results showed that the same cell line had different sensibilities to the US of different frequencies, and different cell line had different damage at the same acoustical radiation. The combined treatment with US and Hp enhanced greatly the cell damage, and no sensibility of insonation cells to US with Hp was observed. The cell damage tests showed that the results of MTT test corresponded well with that of Trypan Blue dye test.

  3. Low-intensity focused ultrasound alters the latency and spatial patterns of sensory-evoked cortical responses in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jonathan A N; Gumenchuk, Iryna

    2018-02-13

    The use of transcranial, low intensity focused ultrasound (FUS) is an emerging neuromodulation technology that shows promise for both therapeutic and research applications. Among many, one of the most exciting applications is the use of FUS to rehabilitate or augment human sensory capabilities. While there is compelling empirical evidence demonstrating this capability, basic questions regarding the spatiotemporal extent of the modulatory effects remain. Our objective was to assess the basic, yet often overlooked hypothesis that FUS in fact alters sensory-evoked neural activity within the region of the cerebral cortex at the beam's focus. To address this knowledge gap, we developed an approach to optically interrogate patterns of neural activity in the cortex directly at the acoustic focus, in vivo. Implementing simultaneous wide-field optical imaging and FUS stimulation in mice, our experiments probed somatosensory-evoked electrical activity through the use of voltage sensitive dyes (VSDs) and, in transgenic mice expressing GCaMP6f, monitored associated Ca 2+ responses. Our results demonstrate that low-intensity FUS alters both the kinetics and spatial patterns of neural activity in primary somatosensory cortex at the acoustic focus. When preceded by 1 s of pulsed ultrasound at intensities below 1 W cm -2 (I sppa ), the onset of sensory-evoked cortical responses occurred 3.0  ±  0.7 ms earlier and altered the surface spatial morphology of Ca 2+ responses. These findings support the heretofore unconfirmed assumption that FUS-induced sensory modulation reflects, at least in part, altered reactivity in primary sensory cortex at the site of sonication. The findings are significant given the interest in using FUS to target and alter spatial aspects of sensory receptive fields on the cerebral cortex.

  4. The effect of the shape and size of gold seeds irradiated with ultrasound on the bio-heat transfer in tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkigkitzis, Ioannis; Austerlitz, Carlos; Haranas, Ioannis; Campos, Diana

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this report is to propose a new methodology to treat prostate cancer with macro-rod-shaped gold seeds irradiated with ultrasound and develop a new computational method for temperature and thermal dose control of hyperthermia therapy induced by the proposed procedure. A computer code representation, based on the bio-heat diffusion equation, was developed to calculate the heat deposition and temperature elevation patterns in a gold rod and in the tissue surrounding it as a result of different therapy durations and ultrasound power simulations. The numerical results computed provide quantitative information on the interaction between high-energy ultrasound, gold seeds and biological tissues and can replicate the pattern observed in experimental studies. The effect of differences in shapes and sizes of gold rod targets irradiated with ultrasound is calculated and the heat enhancement and the bio-heat transfer in tissue are analyzed.

  5. MR-guided transcranial focused ultrasound safely enhances interstitial dispersion of large polymeric nanoparticles in the living brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S Hersh

    Full Text Available Generating spatially controlled, non-destructive changes in the interstitial spaces of the brain has a host of potential clinical applications, including enhancing the delivery of therapeutics, modulating biological features within the tissue microenvironment, altering fluid and pressure dynamics, and increasing the clearance of toxins, such as plaques found in Alzheimer's disease. Recently we demonstrated that ultrasound can non-destructively enlarge the interstitial spaces of the brain ex vivo. The goal of the current study was to determine whether these effects could be reproduced in the living brain using non-invasive, transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS. The left striatum of healthy rats was treated using MRgFUS. Computer simulations facilitated treatment planning, and targeting was validated using MRI acoustic radiation force impulse imaging. Following MRgFUS treatments, Evans blue dye or nanoparticle probes were infused to assess changes in the interstitial space. In MRgFUS-treated animals, enhanced dispersion was observed compared to controls for 70 nm (12.8 ± 0.9 mm3 vs. 10.6 ± 1.0 mm3, p = 0.01, 200 nm (10.9 ± 1.4 mm3 vs. 7.4 ± 0.7 mm3, p = 0.01 and 700 nm (7.5 ± 0.4 mm3 vs. 5.4 ± 1.2 mm3, p = 0.02 nanoparticles, indicating enlargement of the interstitial spaces. No evidence of significant histological or electrophysiological injury was identified. These findings suggest that transcranial ultrasound can safely and effectively modulate the brain interstitium and increase the dispersion of large therapeutic entities such as particulate drug carriers or modified viruses. This has the potential to expand the therapeutic uses of MRgFUS.

  6. Therapeutic response assessment of high intensity focused ultrasound therapy for uterine fibroid: Utility of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Xiaodong [Department of Ultrasonography, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, No. 17 West Changle Road, Xi' an 710032 (China)]. E-mail: zhouxd@fmmu.edu.cn; Ren Xiaolong [Department of Ultrasonography, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, No. 17 West Changle Road, Xi' an 710032 (China)]. E-mail: renxiaolong70@hotmail.com; Zhang Jun [Department of Ultrasonography, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, No. 17 West Changle Road, Xi' an 710032 (China); He Guangbin [Department of Ultrasonography, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, No. 17 West Changle Road, Xi' an 710032 (China); Zheng Minjuan [Department of Ultrasonography, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, No. 17 West Changle Road, Xi' an 710032 (China); Tian Xue [Department of Ultrasonography, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, No. 17 West Changle Road, Xi' an 710032 (China); Li Li [Department of Ultrasonography, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, No. 17 West Changle Road, Xi' an 710032 (China); Zhu Ting [Department of Ultrasonography, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, No. 17 West Changle Road, Xi' an 710032 (China); Zhang Min [Department of Ultrasonography, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, No. 17 West Changle Road, Xi' an 710032 (China); Wang Lei [Department of Ultrasonography, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, No. 17 West Changle Road, Xi' an 710032 (China); Luo Wen [Department of Ultrasonography, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, No. 17 West Changle Road, Xi' an 710032 (China)

    2007-05-15

    Purpose: To assess the utility of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (ceUS) in the assessment of the therapeutic response to high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation in patients with uterine fibroid. Materials and methods: Sixty-four patients with a total of 64 uterine fibroids (mean: 5.3 {+-} 1.2 cm; range: 3.2-8.9 cm) treated with HIFU ablation under the ultrasound guidance were evaluated with ceUS after receiving an intravenous bolus injection of a microbubble contrast agent (SonoVue) within 1 week after intervention. We obtained serial ceUS images during the time period from beginning to 5 min after the initiation of the bolus contrast injection. All of the patients underwent a contrast enhanced MRI (ceMRI) and ultrasound guided needle puncture biopsy within 1 week after HIFU ablation. And as a follow-up, all of the patients underwent US at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after HIFU treatment. The volume change was observed and compared to pre- and post-HIFU ablation. The results of the ceUS were compared with those of the ceMRI in terms of the presence or absence of residual unablated tumor and pathologic change in the treated lesions. Results: On ceUS, diagnostic accuracy was 100%, while residual unablated tumors were found in three uterine fibroids (4.7%) and failed treatment was found in eight uterine fibroids (12.5%). All the 11 fibroids were subjected to additional HIFU ablation. Of the 58 ablated fibroids without residual tumors on both the ceUS and ceMRI after the HIFU ablation, the volumes of all the fibroids decreased in different degrees during the 1 year follow-up USs. And histologic examinations confirmed findings of necrotic and viable tumor tissue, respectively. Conclusion: CEUS is potentially useful for evaluating the early therapeutic effect of percutaneous HIFU ablation for uterine fibroids.

  7. Transmission electron microscopy of VX2 liver tumors after high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation enhanced with SonoVue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiuyang; Du, Junfeng; Yu, Ming; He, Guangbin; Luo, Wen; Li, Hongling; Zhou, Xiaodong

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe sequential changes in rabbit VX2 liver tumors using transmission electron microscopy after high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation enhanced with the contrast agent SonoVuer (Bracco, Milan, Italy). Thirty New Zealand rabbits with VX2 liver tumors were randomly divided into two groups. The liver tumors of rabbits in Group A underwent single HIFU ablation; those in Group B were given the ultrasound contrast agent SonoVue 0.2 mL/kg before HIFU exposure. Five rabbits from each of the two groups were killed at 0 hours, 6 days, and 14 days after HIFU ablation. Tissue samples that included targeted and untargeted tissue were observed using transmission electron microscopy. Using transmission electron microscopy, it was evident that most of the cellular organs in the targeted areas of tumors in Groups A and B had disappeared early after HIFU, but the basic cell structure was seen in Group A. On the sixth day after HIFU ablation, all cells in the targeted areas were disrupted, and fibrous bands were detected in the rims of targeted areas in both groups. In the surrounding areas, cell swelling in Group B was more severe than in Group A, and a greater number of apoptotic bodies were found in Group B. The use of an ultrasound contrast agent can enhance the effects of HIFU ablation on the destruction of cell ultrastructure and can enlarge the region of HIFU ablation; this provides experimental evidence for the use of contrast agents in controlling the effects of HIFU.

  8. Treatment of hepatic tumors by thermal versus mechanical effects of pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Song; Zhou, Ping; He, Wei; Liao, Manqiong; Chen, Lili; Ma, C.-M.

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to comparatively assess the thermal versus mechanical effects of pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment on hepatic tumors in vivo. Forty-five rabbits with hepatic VX2 tumors were randomly separated into three groups (15 animals per group) before HIFU ablation. The total HIFU energy (in situ) of 1250 J was used for each tumor for three groups. In groups I and II, animals were treated with 1 MHz pulsed ultrasound at 1 Hz pulsed repetition frequency (PRF), 0.5 duty cycle (0.5 s on and 0.5 s off) and10 s duration for one spot sonication. For group II, in addition to HIFU treatment, microbubbles (SonoVue, Bracco, Milan, Italy) were injected via vein before sonication acting as a synergist. In group III, animals were treated with 1 MHz pulsed ultrasound at 10 Hz PRF, 0.1 duty cycle (0.1 s on and 0.9 s off) and 10 s duration for one sonication. The total treatment spots were calculated according to the tumor volume. Tumors were examined with contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) immediately prior to and post HIFU treatment. Histopathologic assessment was performed 3 h after treatment. Our study showed that all animals tolerated the HIFU treatment well. Our data showed that mechanical HIFU could lead to controlled injury in rabbit hepatic tumors with different histological changes in comparison to thermal HIFU with or without microbubbles.

  9. Therapeutic response assessment of high intensity focused ultrasound therapy for uterine fibroid: Utility of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xiaodong; Ren Xiaolong; Zhang Jun; He Guangbin; Zheng Minjuan; Tian Xue; Li Li; Zhu Ting; Zhang Min; Wang Lei; Luo Wen

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the utility of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (ceUS) in the assessment of the therapeutic response to high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation in patients with uterine fibroid. Materials and methods: Sixty-four patients with a total of 64 uterine fibroids (mean: 5.3 ± 1.2 cm; range: 3.2-8.9 cm) treated with HIFU ablation under the ultrasound guidance were evaluated with ceUS after receiving an intravenous bolus injection of a microbubble contrast agent (SonoVue) within 1 week after intervention. We obtained serial ceUS images during the time period from beginning to 5 min after the initiation of the bolus contrast injection. All of the patients underwent a contrast enhanced MRI (ceMRI) and ultrasound guided needle puncture biopsy within 1 week after HIFU ablation. And as a follow-up, all of the patients underwent US at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after HIFU treatment. The volume change was observed and compared to pre- and post-HIFU ablation. The results of the ceUS were compared with those of the ceMRI in terms of the presence or absence of residual unablated tumor and pathologic change in the treated lesions. Results: On ceUS, diagnostic accuracy was 100%, while residual unablated tumors were found in three uterine fibroids (4.7%) and failed treatment was found in eight uterine fibroids (12.5%). All the 11 fibroids were subjected to additional HIFU ablation. Of the 58 ablated fibroids without residual tumors on both the ceUS and ceMRI after the HIFU ablation, the volumes of all the fibroids decreased in different degrees during the 1 year follow-up USs. And histologic examinations confirmed findings of necrotic and viable tumor tissue, respectively. Conclusion: CEUS is potentially useful for evaluating the early therapeutic effect of percutaneous HIFU ablation for uterine fibroids

  10. An ethnic predilection for fetal echogenic intracardiac focus identified during targeted midtrimester ultrasound examination: A retrospective review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monda Susan

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Echogenic intracardiac focus (EIF has been identified as a common ultrasound finding in association with fetal aneuploidy. Little is known about the association of this soft marker aneuploidy in various ethnic groups. Although it is commonly thought Asians in general have a higher incidence of EIF, it is unknown whether this also applies to Japanese as a subpopulation. The purpose of this study is to determine the antenatal incidence and postnatal significance of EIF observed during sonography in Japanese patients. Methods A cohort of Japanese patients who underwent ultrasound screening from 1997 to 1999 in the ultrasound unit at the New York University School of Medicine was identified. Variables included age, gestational age, serum markers, and the presence or absence of aneuploidy. Patients with first degree paternal or maternal Japanese ancestry were included for analysis. Examinations were performed between 14 and 24 weeks gestation. The prevalence of EIF was calculated. The control group was based on previously published data in the U.S (7.3% prevalence. Results A total of 154 subjects were identified, 148 were available for final analysis. Twenty-two fetuses had an EIF, 19 (86.4% left-sided, 3 (13.6% right-sided. Seventeen patients had other sonographic markers associated with aneuploidy. The mean maternal age at diagnosis was 30.7 ± 3.9 years and the mean gestational age was 19.8 ± 1.6 weeks. The prevalence of EIF was 14.8%. Compared to published population prevalence, there was a statistically significant difference (p Conclusion Asians of Japanese origin may have a higher prevalence of echogenic intracardiac foci, thus affecting the positive predictive value of this sonographic marker for aneuploidy.

  11. Protein denaturation of whey protein isolates (WPIs) induced by high intensity ultrasound during heat gelation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydenberg, Rikke P; Hammershøj, Marianne; Andersen, Ulf; Greve, Marie T; Wiking, Lars

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the impact of high intensity ultrasound (HIU) on proteins in whey protein isolates was examined. Effects on thermal behavior, secondary structure and nature of intra- and intermolecular bonds during heat-induced gelling were investigated. Ultrasonication (24 kHz, 300 W/cm(2), 2078 J/mL) significantly reduced denaturation enthalpies, whereas no change in secondary structure was detected by circular dichroism. The thiol-blocking agent N-ethylmaleimide was applied in order to inhibit formation of disulfide bonds during gel formation. Results showed that increased contents of α-lactalbumin (α-La) were associated with increased sensitivity to ultrasonication. The α-La:β-lactoglobulin (β-Lg) ratio greatly affected the nature of the interactions formed during gelation, where higher amounts of α-La lead to a gel more dependent on disulfide bonds. These results contribute to clarifying the mechanisms mediating the effects of HIU on whey proteins on the molecular level, thus moving further toward implementing HIU in the processing chain in the food industry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Noninvasive and Transient Blood-Brain Barrier Opening in the Hippocampus of Alzheimer's Double Transgenic Mice Using Focused Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, James J.; Wang, Shougang; Brown, Truman R.; Small, Scott A.; Duff, Karen E. K.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2009-01-01

    The spatio-temporal nature of focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening as a brain drug delivery method was investigated in Alzheimer's disease model mice. The left hippocampus of transgenic (APP/PS1, n = 3) and nontransgenic (n = 3) mice was sonicated (frequency: 1.525 MHz, peak-negative pressure: 600 kPa, pulse length: 20 ms, duty cycle: 20%, duration: 1 min) in vivo, through their intact skin and skull, after intravenous injection of microbubbles (SonoVue®; 25 μl). Sequential, high-field MR images (9.4 Tesla) were acquired before and after injection of gadolinium (Omniscan™; 0.75 ml, molecular weight: 573.7 Da) on two separate days for each mouse. Gadolinium deposits through the ultrasound-induced BBB opening in the left hippocampus revealed significant contrast-enhancement in the MRI. On the following day, MRI revealed significant BBB closure within the same region. However, the BBB opening extent and BBB closing timeline varied in different regions within the same sonicated location. This indicates that opening and closing were dependent on the brain region targeted. No significant difference in BBB opening or closing behaviors was observed between the APP/PS1 and the nontransgenic mice. In conclusion, a BBB-impermeable molecule was noninvasively, transiently and reproducibly delivered to the hippocampus of Alzheimer's APP/PS1 mice. PMID:19149463

  13. Polylactic acid nano- and microchamber arrays for encapsulation of small hydrophilic molecules featuring drug release via high intensity focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai, Meiyu; Frueh, Johannes; Tao, Tianyi; Petrov, Arseniy V; Petrov, Vladimir V; Shesterikov, Evgeniy V; Tverdokhlebov, Sergei I; Sukhorukov, Gleb B

    2017-06-01

    Long term encapsulation combined with spatiotemporal release for a precisely defined quantity of small hydrophilic molecules on demand remains a challenge in various fields ranging from medical drug delivery, controlled release of catalysts to industrial anti-corrosion systems. Free-standing individually sealed polylactic acid (PLA) nano- and microchamber arrays were produced by one-step dip-coating a PDMS stamp into PLA solution for 5 s followed by drying under ambient conditions. The wall thickness of these hydrophobic nano-microchambers is tunable from 150 nm to 7 μm by varying the PLA solution concentration. Furthermore, small hydrophilic molecules were successfully in situ precipitated within individual microchambers in the course of solvent evaporation after sonicating the PLA@PDMS stamp to remove air-bubbles and to load the active substance containing solvent. The cargo capacity of single chambers was determined to be in the range of several picograms, while it amounts to several micrograms per cm 2 . Two different methods for sealing chambers were compared: microcontact printing versus dip-coating whereby microcontact printing onto a flat PLA sheet allows for entrapment of micro-air-bubbles enabling microchambers with both ultrasound responsiveness and reduced permeability. Cargo release triggered by external high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) stimuli is demonstrated by experiment and compared with numerical simulations.

  14. Intense Focused Ultrasound as a Potential Research Tool for the Quantification of Diurnal Inflammatory Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, Josephine D.; Gofeld, Michael; Illian, P. Ray; Loeser, John D.; Kliot, Michel; McClintic, Abbi M.; Ward, Alice; Yao, Anning; Mourad, Pierre D.

    2012-01-01

    Quantifying pain through assay of a human’s or animal’s response to a known stimulus as a function of time of day is a critical means of advancing chronotherapeutic pain management. Current methods for quantifying pain, even in the context of etiologies involving deep tissue, generally involve stimulation by quantifiable means of either cutaneous (heat-lamp tests, electrical stimuli) or both cutaneous and subcutaneous tissue (von Frey hairs, tourniquets, etc.) or study of proxies for pain (su...

  15. SU-E-J-04: Integration of Interstitial High Intensity Therapeutic Ultrasound Applicators On a Clinical MRI-Guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Treatment Planning Software Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellens, N [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Partanen, A [Philips Healthcare, Andover, Massachusetts (United States); Ghoshal, G; Burdette, E [Acoustic MedSystems Inc., Savoy, IL (United States); Farahani, K [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Interstitial high intensity therapeutic ultrasound (HITU) applicators can be used to ablate tissue percutaneously, allowing for minimally-invasive treatment without ionizing radiation [1,2]. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and usability of combining multielement interstitial HITU applicators with a clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided focused ultrasound software platform. Methods: The Sonalleve software platform (Philips Healthcare, Vantaa, Finland) combines anatomical MRI for target selection and multi-planar MRI thermometry to provide real-time temperature information. The MRI-compatible interstitial US applicators (Acoustic MedSystems, Savoy, IL, USA) had 1–4 cylindrical US elements, each 1 cm long with either 180° or 360° of active surface. Each applicator (4 Fr diameter, enclosed within a 13 Fr flexible catheter) was inserted into a tissue-mimicking agar-silica phantom. Degassed water was circulated around the transducers for cooling and coupling. Based on the location of the applicator, a virtual transducer overlay was added to the software to assist targeting and to allow automatic thermometry slice placement. The phantom was sonicated at 7 MHz for 5 minutes with 6–8 W of acoustic power for each element. MR thermometry data were collected during and after sonication. Results: Preliminary testing indicated that the applicator location could be identified in the planning images and the transducer locations predicted within 1 mm accuracy using the overlay. Ablation zones (thermal dose ≥ 240 CEM43) for 2 active, adjacent US elements ranged from 18 mm × 24 mm (width × length) to 25 mm × 25 mm for the 6 W and 8 W sonications, respectively. Conclusion: The combination of interstitial HITU applicators and this software platform holds promise for novel approaches in minimally-invasive MRI-guided therapy, especially when bony structures or air-filled cavities may preclude extracorporeal HIFU.[1] Diederich et al

  16. SU-E-J-04: Integration of Interstitial High Intensity Therapeutic Ultrasound Applicators On a Clinical MRI-Guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Treatment Planning Software Platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellens, N; Partanen, A; Ghoshal, G; Burdette, E; Farahani, K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Interstitial high intensity therapeutic ultrasound (HITU) applicators can be used to ablate tissue percutaneously, allowing for minimally-invasive treatment without ionizing radiation [1,2]. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and usability of combining multielement interstitial HITU applicators with a clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided focused ultrasound software platform. Methods: The Sonalleve software platform (Philips Healthcare, Vantaa, Finland) combines anatomical MRI for target selection and multi-planar MRI thermometry to provide real-time temperature information. The MRI-compatible interstitial US applicators (Acoustic MedSystems, Savoy, IL, USA) had 1–4 cylindrical US elements, each 1 cm long with either 180° or 360° of active surface. Each applicator (4 Fr diameter, enclosed within a 13 Fr flexible catheter) was inserted into a tissue-mimicking agar-silica phantom. Degassed water was circulated around the transducers for cooling and coupling. Based on the location of the applicator, a virtual transducer overlay was added to the software to assist targeting and to allow automatic thermometry slice placement. The phantom was sonicated at 7 MHz for 5 minutes with 6–8 W of acoustic power for each element. MR thermometry data were collected during and after sonication. Results: Preliminary testing indicated that the applicator location could be identified in the planning images and the transducer locations predicted within 1 mm accuracy using the overlay. Ablation zones (thermal dose ≥ 240 CEM43) for 2 active, adjacent US elements ranged from 18 mm × 24 mm (width × length) to 25 mm × 25 mm for the 6 W and 8 W sonications, respectively. Conclusion: The combination of interstitial HITU applicators and this software platform holds promise for novel approaches in minimally-invasive MRI-guided therapy, especially when bony structures or air-filled cavities may preclude extracorporeal HIFU.[1] Diederich et al

  17. Efficient generation of cavitation bubbles and reactive oxygen species using triggered high-intensity focused ultrasound sequence for sonodynamic treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Jun; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    Sonodynamic treatment is a method of treating cancer using reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by cavitation bubbles in collaboration with a sonosensitizer at a target tissue. In this treatment method, both localized ROS generation and ROS generation with high efficiency are important. In this study, a triggered high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) sequence, which consists of a short, extremely high intensity pulse immediately followed by a long, moderate-intensity burst, was employed for the efficient generation of ROS. In experiments, a solution sealed in a chamber was exposed to a triggered HIFU sequence. Then, the distribution of generated ROS was observed by the luminol reaction, and the amount of generated ROS was quantified using KI method. As a result, the localized ROS generation was demonstrated by light emission from the luminol reaction. Moreover, it was demonstrated that the triggered HIFU sequence has higher efficiency of ROS generation by both the KI method and the luminol reaction emission.

  18. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) Using Sonablate-500 for the Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer: 6-year experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Toyoaki; Shoji, Sunao; Nagata, Yoshihiro

    2006-05-01

    We evaluated 281 patients of localized prostate cancer treated with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for biochemical disease-free rate, safety, morbidity and predictors of biochemical outcome. A total of 281 patients underwent HIFU with the use of Sonablate-500 and with at least 12 months of follow-up. Biochemical failure was defined according to the criteria recommended by the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Consensus Panel. The biochemical disease-free rates at 1, 3 and 5 years in all patients were 78%, 74% and 72%, respectively. The biochemical disease-free rates at 5 years for patients with pretreatment PSA less than 10 ng/ml, 10.01 to 20.0 ng/ml and more than 20.0 ng/ml were 88%, 70% and 17%, respectively (ppatients with localized prostate cancer, especially those with a pretreatment PSA level less than 20 ng/ml.

  19. Effect of ultrasound and heat on percutaneous absorption of l-ascorbic acid: human in vitro studies on Franz cell and Petri dish systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, E C; Zhu, H; Zou, Y; Elmahdy, A; Cao, Y; Hui, X; Maibach, H I

    2016-12-01

    Percutaneous absorption of l-ascorbic acid (LAA) is limited due to its high hydrophilicity and low stability. Here, we investigated the effect of post-dosing sonophoresis (329 kHz, 20 mW cm -2 ) and heat (36°C) on transdermal delivery of LAA. Ultrasound/heat, heat and control treatments were applied on skin surface for 2 and 5 min after topical application of C14-labelled LAA aqueous solution. After 15 min post-exposure, radioactivity was measured in tape-striped stratum corneum (TS-SC), epidermis, dermis and receptor fluid. As Franz diffusion cell model may have different acoustic response than in vivo human tissues, a novel Petri dish model was developed and compared with Franz cell model on the effects of ultrasound/heat treatment on the skin permeability. Five-min ultrasound/heat treatment significantly accelerated skin absorption/penetration of LAA; 2-min treatment showed no enhancement effect on Franz diffusion cell model at the end of experiment. The use of Petri dish model significantly increased LAA concentrations in epidermis after 5 min of ultrasound/heat treatment, compared to the results of Franz cell model. Combination of ultrasound (329 kHz, 20 mW cm -2 ) and heat (36°C) significantly enhanced LAA transdermal penetration, when the time of treatment was sufficient (5 min). As Petri dish model was designed to simulate acoustic respond of dense human tissue to ultrasound, the difference between Franz cell and Petri dish models suggests that the enhancement effect of ultrasound/heat on skin penetration in vivo may be greater than that determined on in vitro Franz cell model. © 2016 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  20. The contemporary role of ablative treatment approaches in the management of renal cell carcinoma (RCC): focus on radiofrequency ablation (RFA), high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), and cryoablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klatte, Tobias; Kroeger, Nils; Zimmermann, Uwe; Burchardt, Martin; Belldegrun, Arie S; Pantuck, Allan J

    2014-06-01

    Currently, most of renal tumors are small, low grade, with a slow growth rate, a low metastatic potential, and with up to 30 % of these tumors being benign on the final pathology. Moreover, they are often diagnosed in elderly patients with preexisting medical comorbidities in whom the underlying medical conditions may pose a greater risk of death than the small renal mass. Concerns regarding overdiagnosis and overtreatment of patients with indolent small renal tumors have led to an increasing interest in minimally invasive, ablative as an alternative to extirpative interventions for selected patients. To provide an overview about the state of the art in radiofrequency ablation (RFA), high-intensity focused ultrasound, and cryoablation in the clinical management of renal cell carcinoma. A PubMed wide the literature search of was conducted. International consensus panels recommend ablative techniques in patients who are unfit for surgery, who are not considered candidates for or elect against elective surveillance, and who have small renal masses. The most often used techniques are cryoablation and RFA. These ablative techniques offer potentially curative outcomes while conferring several advantages over extirpative surgery, including improved patient procedural tolerance, faster recovery, preservation of renal function, and reduction in the risk of intraoperative and postsurgical complications. While it is likely that outcomes associated with ablative modalities will improve with further advances in technology, their application will expand to more elective indications as longer-term efficacy data become available. Ablative techniques pose a valid treatment option in selected patients.

  1. Ultrasound guided supraclavicular block.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hanumanthaiah, Deepak

    2013-09-01

    Ultrasound guided regional anaesthesia is becoming increasingly popular. The supraclavicular block has been transformed by ultrasound guidance into a potentially safe superficial block. We reviewed the techniques of performing supraclavicular block with special focus on ultrasound guidance.

  2. Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Using a Pocket-Size Device in the Emergency Room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancuso, Frederico José Neves, E-mail: frederico.mancuso@grupofleury.com.br [Disciplina de Cardiologia - Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Disciplina de Medicina de Urgência - Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Siqueira, Vicente Nicoliello; Moisés, Valdir Ambrósio [Disciplina de Cardiologia - Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Gois, Aécio Flavio Teixeira [Disciplina de Medicina de Urgência - Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Paola, Angelo Amato Vincenzo de; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Camargo; Campos, Orlando [Disciplina de Cardiologia - Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-12-15

    Cardiovascular urgencies are frequent reasons for seeking medical care. Prompt and accurate medical diagnosis is critical to reduce the morbidity and mortality of these conditions. To evaluate the use of a pocket-size echocardiography in addition to clinical history and physical exam in a tertiary medical emergency care. One hundred adult patients without known cardiac or lung diseases who sought emergency care with cardiac complaints were included. Patients with ischemic changes in the electrocardiography or fever were excluded. A focused echocardiography with GE Vscan equipment was performed after the initial evaluation in the emergency room. Cardiac chambers dimensions, left and right ventricular systolic function, intracardiac flows with color, pericardium, and aorta were evaluated. The mean age was 61 ± 17 years old. The patient complaint was chest pain in 51 patients, dyspnea in 32 patients, arrhythmia to evaluate the left ventricular function in ten patients, hypotension/dizziness in five patients and edema in one patient. In 28 patients, the focused echocardiography allowed to confirm the initial diagnosis: 19 patients with heart failure, five with acute coronary syndrome, two with pulmonary embolism and two patients with cardiac tamponade. In 17 patients, the echocardiography changed the diagnosis: ten with suspicious of heart failure, two with pulmonary embolism suspicious, two with hypotension without cause, one suspicious of acute coronary syndrome, one of cardiac tamponade and one of aortic dissection. The focused echocardiography with pocket-size equipment in the emergency care may allow a prompt diagnosis and, consequently, an earlier initiation of the therapy.

  3. Sagittal crystal focusing of undulator radiation with high heat load inclined crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ice, G.E.; Sparks, C.J.

    1992-01-01

    Sagittal focusing of undulator radiation is shown to be compatible with the proposed inclined double-crystal monochromator geometry for heat load reduction. The focusing aberrations are found to be negligible for typical undulator-beam divergences over a range of magnifications from 1:2 to 6:1 and energies from 3 to 40 keV. The inclined geometry reduces the required signal sagittal curvature of the focusing crystal compared to focusing with conventional symmetric crystals; hence, focusing is possible at higher X-ray energies and with less anticlastic bending. In addition, anticlastic stiffening ribs project a smaller footprint to the beam so that the achievable focal spot size is potentially better than with conventional symmetrically cut crystals. 16 refs

  4. An experimental model to investigate the targeting accuracy of MR-guided focused ultrasound ablation in liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrusca, Lorena; Viallon, Magalie; Breguet, Romain; Terraz, Sylvain; Manasseh, Gibran; Auboiroux, Vincent; Goget, Thomas; Baboi, Loredana; Gross, Patrick; Sekins, K Michael; Becker, Christoph D; Salomir, Rares

    2014-01-16

    Magnetic Resonance-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (MRgHIFU) is a hybrid technology that aims to offer non-invasive thermal ablation of targeted tumors or other pathological tissues. Acoustic aberrations and non-linear wave propagating effects may shift the focal point significantly away from the prescribed (or, theoretical) position. It is therefore mandatory to evaluate the spatial accuracy of ablation for a given HIFU protocol and/or device. We describe here a method for producing a user-defined ballistic target as an absolute reference marker for MRgHIFU ablations. The investigated method is based on trapping a mixture of MR contrast agent and histology stain using radiofrequency (RF) ablation causing cell death and coagulation. A dedicated RF-electrode was used for the marker fixation as follows: a RF coagulation (4 W, 15 seconds) and injection of the mixture followed by a second RF coagulation. As a result, the contrast agent/stain is encapsulated in the intercellular space. Ultrasonography imaging was performed during the procedure, while high resolution T1w 3D VIBE MR acquisition was used right after to identify the position of the ballistic marker and hence the target tissue. For some cases, after the marker fixation procedure, HIFU volumetric ablations were produced by a phased-array HIFU platform. First ex vivo experiments were followed by in vivo investigation on four rabbits in thigh muscle and six pigs in liver, with follow-up at Day 7. At the end of the procedure, no ultrasound indication of the marker's presence could be observed, while it was clearly visible under MR and could be conveniently used to prescribe the HIFU ablation, centered on the so-created target. The marker was identified at Day 7 after treatment, immediately after animal sacrifice, after 3 weeks of post-mortem formalin fixation and during histology analysis. Its size ranged between 2.5 and 4 mm. Experimental validation of this new ballistic marker method was performed for

  5. Monitoring imaging of lesions induced by high intensity focused ultrasound based on differential ultrasonic attenuation and integrated backscatter estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Hui; Wan, Ming-Xi; Jiang, Yi-Feng; Wang, Su-Pin

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the feasibility of two monitoring imaging methods to visualize and evaluate the high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) induced lesions in vitro during and after their formation, which were based on differential ultrasonic parameter estimation. Firstly, ultrasonic attenuation slope of tissue sample was estimated based on the spectral analysis of ultrasound RF backscattered signals. The differential attenuation slope maps were acquired, which were interpreted as the differences between the pretreatment image and those obtained in different stages during HIFU therapy. Secondly, ultrasonic integrated backscatter (IBS), defined as the frequency average of the backscatter transfer function over the useful bandwidth, was proposed quantitatively to evaluate the extent of lesions with the same RF signals as the first method. Differential IBS maps were also acquired to visualize temporal evolution of lesion formation. It was found in pig liver in vitro that more precise definition of the treated area was obtained from the differential IBS images than from differential attenuation slope images. Dramatic increase in both attenuation and IBS value was observed during the therapy, which may be related to dramatic enhancement of cavitation due to boiling and accompanying tissue damage. Two methods to obtain one differential image were compared and the cumulative differential image was found to be able to eliminate noises and artifacts to some extent, which was the cumulation of a series of differential images acquired from the differences between the temporally adjacent RF data frames. Moreover, we presented a bidirectional color code for identification of the artifacts due to tissue movements caused by HIFU radiation force. We conclude that cumulative differential IBS images have the potential to monitor the formation of HIFU-induced lesions.

  6. Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Using a Pocket-Size Device in the Emergency Room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico José Neves Mancuso

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiovascular urgencies are frequent reasons for seeking medical care. Prompt and accurate medical diagnosis is critical to reduce the morbidity and mortality of these conditions. Objective: To evaluate the use of a pocket-size echocardiography in addition to clinical history and physical exam in a tertiary medical emergency care. Methods: One hundred adult patients without known cardiac or lung diseases who sought emergency care with cardiac complaints were included. Patients with ischemic changes in the electrocardiography or fever were excluded. A focused echocardiography with GE Vscan equipment was performed after the initial evaluation in the emergency room. Cardiac chambers dimensions, left and right ventricular systolic function, intracardiac flows with color, pericardium, and aorta were evaluated. Results: The mean age was 61 ± 17 years old. The patient complaint was chest pain in 51 patients, dyspnea in 32 patients, arrhythmia to evaluate the left ventricular function in ten patients, hypotension/dizziness in five patients and edema in one patient. In 28 patients, the focused echocardiography allowed to confirm the initial diagnosis: 19 patients with heart failure, five with acute coronary syndrome, two with pulmonary embolism and two patients with cardiac tamponade. In 17 patients, the echocardiography changed the diagnosis: ten with suspicious of heart failure, two with pulmonary embolism suspicious, two with hypotension without cause, one suspicious of acute coronary syndrome, one of cardiac tamponade and one of aortic dissection. Conclusion: The focused echocardiography with pocket-size equipment in the emergency care may allow a prompt diagnosis and, consequently, an earlier initiation of the therapy.

  7. Focused Ultrasound Lipolysis in the Treatment of Abdominal Cellulite: An Open-Label Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravvej, Hamideh; Akbari, Zahra; Mohammadian, Shahrzad; Razzaghi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Despite a growing popularity of noninvasive ultrasonic lipolysis procedure, there is a lack of evidence about the efficacy of this method. This study was performed to evaluate the efficacy of focused ultrasonic lipolysis on abdominal cellulite treatment. Twenty-eight consecutive subjects (age: 37.8 ± 8 years) underwent weekly transdermal focused ultrasonic lipolysis (Med Contour, General Project Ltd., Florence, Italy) and vacuum drainage for a maximum of eight sessions. Largest abdominal girth and 2 lines at 4 cm to 7 cm distance above and under it were located as fixed points of measurements. The mean value of the three fixed lines was considered as the abdominal circumference. Subjects were evaluated using measurements of circumference, immediately after and 3 weeks after the final treatment and compared using paired t test. One hundred ninety-four ultrasonic lipolysis procedures were performed on 28 subjects. A statistically significant (P cellulite, although some amount of circumference reduction reversal may be observed in long term follow-up visit.

  8. Improving Thermal Dose Accuracy in Magnetic Resonance-Guided Focused Ultrasound Surgery: Long-Term Thermometry Using a Prior Baseline as a Reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitton, Rachel R.; Webb, Taylor D.; Pauly, Kim Butts; Ghanouni, Pejman

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate thermal dose volume (TDV) and non-perfused volume (NPV) of magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) treatments in patients with soft tissue tumors, and describe a method for MR thermal dosimetry using a baseline reference. Materials and Methods Agreement between TDV and immediate post treatment NPV was evaluated from MRgFUS treatments of five patients with biopsy-proven desmoid tumors. Thermometry data (gradient echo, 3T) were analyzed over the entire course of the treatments to discern temperature errors in the standard approach. The technique searches previously acquired baseline images for a match using 2D normalized cross-correlation and a weighted mean of phase difference images. Thermal dose maps and TDVs were recalculated using the matched baseline and compared to NPV. Results TDV and NPV showed between 47%–91% disagreement, using the standard immediate baseline method for calculating TDV. Long-term thermometry showed a nonlinear local temperature accrual, where peak additional temperature varied between 4–13°C (mean = 7.8°C) across patients. The prior baseline method could be implemented by finding a previously acquired matching baseline 61% ± 8% (mean ± SD) of the time. We found 7%–42% of the disagreement between TDV and NPV was due to errors in thermometry caused by heat accrual. For all patients, the prior baseline method increased the estimated treatment volume and reduced the discrepancies between TDV and NPV (P = 0.023). Conclusion This study presents a mismatch between in-treatment and post treatment efficacy measures. The prior baseline approach accounts for local heating and improves the accuracy of thermal dose-predicted volume. PMID:26119129

  9. Feasibility study of a single-element transcranial focused ultrasound system for blood-brain barrier opening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquet, Fabrice; Tung, Yao-Sheng; Teichert, Tobias; Ferrera, Vincent P.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2012-10-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a specialized vascular system that impedes entry of all large and the vast majority of small molecules including the most potent CNS disease therapeutic agents from entering from the lumen into the brain parenchyma. Microbubble-enhanced, focused ultrasound (ME-FUS) has been previously shown to disrupt noninvasively, selectively, and transiently the BBB in small animals in vivo. The study addresses the focusing properties of single-element transducers at intermediate frequencies (500 kHz) through primate and human skulls, targeting clinically relevant targets extracted from 3D brain atlases such as the hippocampus and the basal ganglia, which are typically affected by early Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, respectively. A preliminary in vivo study was performed to study the frequency dependence of BBB opening parameters in mice. Then, feasibility of transcranial ME-FUS BBB opening in non-human primates was demonstrated with subsequent BBB recovery. Sonications were combined with two different types of microbubbles (custom made 4-5 μm and Definity®). 3T MRI was used to confirm the BBB disruption and to assess brain damage.

  10. Safety and Efficacy of Focused Ultrasound Thalamotomy for Patients With Medication-Refractory, Tremor-Dominant Parkinson Disease: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Aaron E; Shah, Binit B; Huss, Diane S; Dallapiazza, Robert F; Warren, Amy; Harrison, Madaline B; Sperling, Scott A; Wang, Xin-Qun; Gwinn, Ryder; Witt, Jennie; Ro, Susie; Elias, W Jeffrey

    2017-12-01

    procedures. Early in the study, heating of the internal capsule resulted in 2 cases (8%) of mild hemiparesis, which improved and prompted monitoring of an additional axis during magnetic resonance thermometry. Other persistent adverse events were orofacial paresthesia (4 events [20%]), finger paresthesia (1 event [5%]), and ataxia (1 event [5%]). Focused ultrasound thalamotomy for patients with TDPD demonstrated improvements in medication-refractory tremor by CRST assessments, even in the setting of a placebo response. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01772693.

  11. Single session of high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy for the management of organ-confined prostate cancer: A single-institute experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Cing Juho

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: High-intensity focused ultrasound is an alternative therapy for patients with localized prostate cancer. In combination with preceding transurethral resection of the prostate, this treatment shows promise in disease control with a low complication rate in short-term follow-up.

  12. Cluster analysis of DCE-MRI data identifies regional tracer-kinetic changes after tumor treatment with high intensity focused ultrasound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, Igor; Hectors, Stefanie J. C. G.; Schabel, Matthias C.; Grüll, Holger; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Nicolay, Klaas

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment with MRI is generally based on assessment of the non-perfused volume from contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. However, the vascular status of tissue surrounding the non-perfused volume has not been extensively investigated with MRI.

  13. T1-weighted MRI as a substitute to CT for refocusing planning in MR-guided focused ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wintermark, Max; Sumer, Suna; Lau, Benison; Cupino, Alan; Tustison, Nicholas J; Demartini, Nicholas; Elias, William J; Kassell, Neal; Patrie, James T; Xin, Wenjun; Eames, Matt; Snell, John; Hananel, Arik; Aubry, Jean-Francois

    2014-01-01

    Precise focusing is essential for transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound (TcMRgFUS) to minimize collateral damage to non-diseased tissues and to achieve temperatures capable of inducing coagulative necrosis at acceptable power deposition levels. CT is usually used for this refocusing but requires a separate study (CT) ahead of the TcMRgFUS procedure. The goal of this study was to determine whether MRI using an appropriate sequence would be a viable alternative to CT for planning ultrasound refocusing in TcMRgFUS. We tested three MRI pulse sequences (3D T1 weighted 3D volume interpolated breath hold examination (VIBE), proton density weighted 3D sampling perfection with applications optimized contrasts using different flip angle evolution and 3D true fast imaging with steady state precision T2-weighted imaging) on patients who have already had a CT scan performed. We made detailed measurements of the calvarial structure based on the MRI data and compared those so-called ‘virtual CT’ to detailed measurements of the calvarial structure based on the CT data, used as a reference standard. We then loaded both standard and virtual CT in a TcMRgFUS device and compared the calculated phase correction values, as well as the temperature elevation in a phantom. A series of Bland–Altman measurement agreement analyses showed T1 3D VIBE as the optimal MRI sequence, with respect to minimizing the measurement discrepancy between the MRI derived total skull thickness measurement and the CT derived total skull thickness measurement (mean measurement discrepancy: 0.025; 95% CL (−0.22–0.27); p = 0.825). The T1-weighted sequence was also optimal in estimating skull CT density and skull layer thickness. The mean difference between the phase shifts calculated with the standard CT and the virtual CT reconstructed from the T1 dataset was 0.08 ± 1.2 rad on patients and 0.1 ± 0.9 rad on phantom. Compared to the real CT, the MR-based correction showed a 1 °C drop on the

  14. Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Using a Pocket-Size Device in the Emergency Room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Frederico José Neves; Siqueira, Vicente Nicoliello; Moisés, Valdir Ambrósio; Gois, Aécio Flavio Teixeira; Paola, Angelo Amato Vincenzo de; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Camargo; Campos, Orlando

    2014-10-28

    Background: Cardiovascular urgencies are frequent reasons for seeking medical care. Prompt and accurate medical diagnosis is critical to reduce the morbidity and mortality of these conditions. Objective: To evaluate the use of a pocket-size echocardiography in addition to clinical history and physical exam in a tertiary medical emergency care. Methods: One hundred adult patients without known cardiac or lung diseases who sought emergency care with cardiac complaints were included. Patients with ischemic changes in the electrocardiography or fever were excluded. A focused echocardiography with GE Vscan equipment was performed after the initial evaluation in the emergency room. Cardiac chambers dimensions, left and right ventricular systolic function, intracardiac flows with color, pericardium, and aorta were evaluated. Results: The mean age was 61 ± 17 years old. The patient complaint was chest pain in 51 patients, dyspnea in 32 patients, arrhythmia to evaluate the left ventricular function in ten patients, hypotension/dizziness in five patients and edema in one patient. In 28 patients, the focused echocardiography allowed to confirm the initial diagnosis: 19 patients with heart failure, five with acute coronary syndrome, two with pulmonary embolism and two patients with cardiac tamponade. In 17 patients, the echocardiography changed the diagnosis: ten with suspicious of heart failure, two with pulmonary embolism suspicious, two with hypotension without cause, one suspicious of acute coronary syndrome, one of cardiac tamponade and one of aortic dissection. Conclusion: The focused echocardiography with pocket-size equipment in the emergency care may allow a prompt diagnosis and, consequently, an earlier initiation of the therapy.Fundamento: As urgências cardiovasculares são causas importantes de procura por atendimento médico, sendo fundamentais a rapidez e a precisão no diagnóstico para diminuir sua morbimortalidade. Objetivo: Avaliar o uso da ecocardiografia

  15. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound for the Treatment of Wrinkles and Skin Laxity in Seven Different Facial Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyunchul; Kim, Eunjin; Kim, Jeongeun; Ro, Youngsuck; Ko, Jooyeon

    2015-12-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment has recently emerged in response to the increasing demand for noninvasive procedures for skin lifting and tightening. This study was aimed at evaluating the clinical efficacy of and patient satisfaction with HIFU treatment for wrinkles and laxity in seven different areas of the face in Asian skin. Twenty Korean patients with facial wrinkle and laxity were analyzed after a single session of HIFU treatment. Two independent, blinded clinicians evaluated the clinical improvement in seven areas of the face by comparison of standardized photographs obtained before, and at 3 and 6 months after treatment. Assessment of subjective satisfaction and adverse effects of treatment were done by using questionnaires. The physicians' evaluation and patients' satisfaction with the clinical effects of HIFU in each area were similar regardless of the number of treatment shots. The jawline, cheek, and perioral areas were the sites where HIFU was most effective, in decreasing order. The adverse effects included erythema and swelling in six cases, and purpura and bruising in two cases. However, the adverse effects were mild and transient. HIFU could be a safe, effective, and noninvasive procedure that can be used to improve facial wrinkles and skin laxity in Asian skin. It is particularly effective for clinical improvement in the jawline, cheek, and perioral areas.

  16. [Neuroprotective subthalamotomy in Parkinson's disease. The role of magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound in early surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guridi, Jorge; Marigil, Miguel; Becerra, Victoria; Parras, Olga

    Subthalamic nucleus hyperactivity in Parkinson's disease may be a very early phenomenon. Its start is not well known, and it may occur during the pre-symptomatic disease stage. Glutamatergic hyperactivity may be neurotoxic over the substantia nigra compacta dopaminergic neurons. If this occurred, the excitatory neurotransmitter, glutamate, should affect the neurons that maintain a high turnover as a compensatory mechanism. Would a subthalamic nucleus lesion decrease this hyperactivity and thus be considered as a neuroprotective mechanism for dopaminergic neurons? The authors hypothesise about the possibility to perform surgery on a subthalamic nucleus lesion at a very early stage in order to avoid the neurotoxic glutamatergic effect over the dopaminergic neurons, and therefore be considered as a neuroprotective surgery able to alter the progress of the disease during early motor symptoms. In this regard, magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound techniques open a new window in the stereotactic armamentarium. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. First clinical experience with a dedicated MRI-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound system for breast cancer ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merckel, Laura G.; Knuttel, Floor M.; Peters, Nicky H.G.M.; Mali, Willem P.T.M.; Bosch, Maurice A.A.J. van den [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, HP E 01.132, Utrecht (Netherlands); Deckers, Roel; Moonen, Chrit T.W.; Bartels, Lambertus W. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute, Utrecht (Netherlands); Dalen, Thijs van [Diakonessenhuis Utrecht, Department of Surgery, Utrecht (Netherlands); Schubert, Gerald [Philips Healthcare, Best (Netherlands); Weits, Teun [Diakonessenhuis Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Diest, Paul J. van [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pathology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Vaessen, Paul H.H.B. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Anesthesiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Gorp, Joost M.H.H. van [Diakonessenhuis Utrecht, Department of Pathology, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2016-11-15

    To assess the safety and feasibility of MRI-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) ablation in breast cancer patients using a dedicated breast platform. Patients with early-stage invasive breast cancer underwent partial tumour ablation prior to surgical resection. MR-HIFU ablation was performed using proton resonance frequency shift MR thermometry and an MR-HIFU system specifically designed for breast tumour ablation. The presence and extent of tumour necrosis was assessed by histopathological analysis of the surgical specimen. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated to assess the relationship between sonication parameters, temperature increase and size of tumour necrosis at histopathology. Ten female patients underwent MR-HIFU treatment. No skin redness or burns were observed in any of the patients. No correlation was found between the applied energy and the temperature increase. In six patients, tumour necrosis was observed with a maximum diameter of 3-11 mm. In these patients, the number of targeted locations was equal to the number of areas with tumour necrosis. A good correlation was found between the applied energy and the size of tumour necrosis at histopathology (Pearson = 0.76, p = 0.002). Our results show that MR-HIFU ablation with the dedicated breast system is safe and results in histopathologically proven tumour necrosis. (orig.)

  18. The efficacy and safety of intense focused ultrasound in the treatment of enlarged facial pores in Asian skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Jung; Lee, Kyung Real; Park, Jae Yang; Yoon, Moon Soo; Lee, Sang Eun

    2015-02-01

    Intense focused ultrasound (IFUS) has been used successfully for skin tightening. To investigate the efficacy of IFUS in treating enlarged pores and to evaluate changes in skin elasticity and sebum production following IFUS. Twenty-two subjects with enlarged pores were randomized to receive a single treatment with IFUS using 1.5-mm transducer on one side of the face, and 3.0-mm transducer on the other. OBJECTIVE clinical assessments were made by blinded photographic evaluation. Subjective satisfaction and adverse effects were evaluated. Measurements of elasticity and sebum were performed at baseline, 3 and 6 weeks post-treatment. Physicians' evaluation showed clinical pore improvements in 86% and 91% of the IFUS-treated sites using 1.5-mm and 3.0-mm transducer, respectively. The mean improvement scores were 1.7 and 1.9 for 1.5-mm and 3.0-mm transducer, respectively, with no statistical differences. Cutometer measurement demonstrated a significant improvement in skin elasticity. Sebum level showed a reduction without statistical significance. There was a positive correlation between improvement in elasticity and pore improvement grades. All treatments were well tolerated without significant side effects. IFUS using 1.5-mm or 3.0-mm transducer was safe and effective for reducing enlarged pores in Asian skin with an improvement in skin elasticity.

  19. Single High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Session as a Whole Gland Primary Treatment for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: 10-Year Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksenija Limani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To assess the treatment outcomes of a single session of whole gland high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU for patients with localized prostate cancer (PCa. Methods. Response rates were defined using the Stuttgart and Phoenix criteria. Complications were graded according to the Clavien score. Results. At a median follow-up of 94months, 48 (44.4% and 50 (46.3% patients experienced biochemical recurrence for Phoenix and Stuttgart definition, respectively. The 5- and 10-year actuarial biochemical recurrence free survival rates were 57% and 40%, respectively. The 10-year overall survival rate, cancer specific survival rate, and metastasis free survival rate were 72%, 90%, and 70%, respectively. Preoperative high risk category, Gleason score, preoperative PSA, and postoperative nadir PSA were independent predictors of oncological failure. 24.5% of patients had self-resolving LUTS, 18.2% had urinary tract infection, and 18.2% had acute urinary retention. A grade 3b complication occurred in 27 patients. Pad-free continence rate was 87.9% and the erectile dysfunction rate was 30.8%. Conclusion. Single session HIFU can be alternative therapy for patients with low risk PCa. Patients with intermediate risk should be informed about the need of multiple sessions of HIFU and/or adjuvant treatments and HIFU performed very poorly in high risk patients.

  20. Transarterial infusion chemotherapy combined with high intensity focused ultrasound for the treatment of pancreatic carcinomas: a clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yiping; Zhao Jingzhi; Qiao Xinrong; Huang Hankui

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical value of transarterial infusion chemotherapy combined with high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for the treatment of pancreatic carcinomas. Methods: A total of 64 patients with inoperable pancreatic carcinomas were randomly divided into study group (n=32) and control group (n=32). Transarterial infusion chemotherapy combined with HIFU was employed in patients of study group, while simple transarterial infusion chemotherapy was conducted in patients of control group. The effective rate, the clinical benefit rate (CBR), the occurrence of side effect and the survival time of the two groups were recorded. The results were compared between the two groups. Results: The effective rate (PR + MR), the median survival time and the one-year survival rate of the study group were 55.56%, 13.0 months and 68.75% respectively, while the effective rate (PR + MR), the median survival time and the one-year survival rate of the control group were 28.57%, 9.0 months and 43.75% respectively. Both the effective rate and the one-year survival rate of the study group were significantly higher than those of the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: Compared with pure transarterial infusion chemotherapy, transarterial infusion chemotherapy combined with HIFU can significantly improve the short-term efficacy and increase the one-year survival rate for patients with advanced pancreatic carcinomas. (authors)

  1. Thermal treatment planning for SonoKnife focused-ultrasound thermal treatment of head and neck cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Chen, Duo; Xia, Rongmin; Shafirstein, Gal; Corry, Peter; Moros, Eduardo G.

    2011-03-01

    The purpose is to develop a patient-specific treatment planning method for a cylindrically-focused (i.e., SonoKnife) ultrasound thermal therapy system to optimize the thermal treatment of locally-advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) and/or positive lymph nodes. To achieve a more efficient and effective treatment, a temperature-based treatment planning was devised, which was composed of : (1) a 3D acoustic-thermal model has been developed to simulate the acoustic field, temperature distribution, and thermal dose coverage induced by the SonoKnife applicator. (2) A 3D relevant anatomical structures (e.g. the H&N tumors, bones and cavities) were reconstructed based on multislice CT scans. A step-and-shoot strategy was devised to perform the treatment, in which the initial applied power levels, placement of the transducers, and sonication times per scan were determined by conducting a temperature-based forward simulation. The maximum temperature, thermal dose coverage of target, and thermal exposure to surrounding tissue were analyzed. For performance evaluation, the treatment planning was applied on representative examples obtained from the clinical radiation therapy of HNSCC and positive lymph nodes. This treatment planning platforms can be used to guide applicator placement, set-up configurations, and applied power levels prior to delivery of a treatment or for post-procedure analysis of temperature distributions.

  2. Focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening to enhance temozolomide delivery for glioblastoma treatment: a preclinical study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Chen Wei

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to assess the preclinical therapeutic efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-monitored focused ultrasound (FUS-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB disruption to enhance Temozolomide (TMZ delivery for improving Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM treatment. MRI-monitored FUS with microbubbles was used to transcranially disrupt the BBB in brains of Fisher rats implanted with 9L glioma cells. FUS-BBB opening was spectrophotometrically determined by leakage of dyes into the brain, and TMZ was quantitated in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and plasma by LC-MS\\MS. The effects of treatment on tumor progression (by MRI, animal survival and brain tissue histology were investigated. Results demonstrated that FUS-BBB opening increased the local accumulation of dyes in brain parenchyma by 3.8-/2.1-fold in normal/tumor tissues. Compared to TMZ alone, combined FUS treatment increased the TMZ CSF/plasma ratio from 22.7% to 38.6%, reduced the 7-day tumor progression ratio from 24.03 to 5.06, and extended the median survival from 20 to 23 days. In conclusion, this study provided preclinical evidence that FUS BBB-opening increased the local concentration of TMZ to improve the control of tumor progression and animal survival, suggesting its clinical potential for improving current brain tumor treatment.

  3. Focused ultrasound delivery of Raman nanoparticles across the blood-brain barrier: Potential for targeting experimental brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Roberto Jose; McVeigh, Patrick Z.; O’Reilly, Meaghan A.; Burrell, Kelly; Bebenek, Matthew; Smith, Christian; Etame, Arnold; Zadeh, Gelareh; Hynynen, Kullervo; Wilson, Brian C.; Rutka, James T.

    2014-01-01

    Spectral mapping of nanoparticles with surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) capability in the near-infrared range is an emerging molecular imaging technique. We used magnetic resonance image-guided transcranial focused ultrasound (TcMRgFUS) to reversibly disrupt the blood-brain barrier (BBB) adjacent to brain tumor margins in rats. Glioma cells were found to internalize SERS capable nanoparticles of 50 nm or 120 nm physical diameter. Surface coating with anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibody or non-specific human immunoglobulin G, resulted in enhanced cell uptake of nanoparticles in-vitro compared to nanoparticles with methyl terminated 12-unit polyethylene glycol surface. BBB disruption permitted the delivery of SERS capable spherical 50 or 120 nm gold nanoparticles to the tumor margins. Thus, nanoparticles with SERS imaging capability can be delivered across the BBB non-invasively using TcMRgFUS and have the potential to be used as optical tracking agents at the invasive front of malignant brain tumors. PMID:24374363

  4. Enhanced Delivery of Gold Nanoparticles with Therapeutic Potential into the Brain using MRI-Guided Focused Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etame, Arnold B.; Diaz, Roberto J.; O’Reilly, Meaghan A.; Smith, Christian A.; Mainprize, Todd G.; Hynynen, Kullervo; Rutka, James T.

    2014-01-01

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) is a major impediment to the delivery of therapeutics into the central nervous system (CNS). Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been successfully employed in multiple potential therapeutic and diagnostic applications outside the CNS. However, AuNPs have very limited biodistribution within the CNS following intravenous administration. Magnetic resonance imaging guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) is a novel technique that can transiently increase BBB permeability allowing delivery of therapeutics into the CNS. MRgFUS has not been previously employed for delivery of AuNPs into the CNS. This work represents the first demonstration of focal enhanced delivery of AuNPs into the CNS using MRgFUS in a rat model both safely and effectively. Histologic visualization and analytical quantification of AuNPs within the brain parenchyma suggest BBB transgression. These results suggest a role for MRgFUS in the delivery of AuNPs with therapeutic potential into the CNS for targeting neurological diseases. PMID:22349099

  5. Characterizing Focused-Ultrasound Mediated Drug Delivery to the Heterogeneous Primate Brain In Vivo with Acoustic Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shih-Ying; Sanchez, Carlos Sierra; Samiotaki, Gesthimani; Buch, Amanda; Ferrera, Vincent P.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2016-11-01

    Focused ultrasound with microbubbles has been used to noninvasively and selectively deliver pharmacological agents across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) for treating brain diseases. Acoustic cavitation monitoring could serve as an on-line tool to assess and control the treatment. While it demonstrated a strong correlation in small animals, its translation to primates remains in question due to the anatomically different and highly heterogeneous brain structures with gray and white matteras well as dense vasculature. In addition, the drug delivery efficiency and the BBB opening volume have never been shown to be predictable through cavitation monitoring in primates. This study aimed at determining how cavitation activity is correlated with the amount and concentration of gadolinium delivered through the BBB and its associated delivery efficiency as well as the BBB opening volume in non-human primates. Another important finding entails the effect of heterogeneous brain anatomy and vasculature of a primate brain, i.e., presence of large cerebral vessels, gray and white matter that will also affect the cavitation activity associated with variation of BBB opening in different tissue types, which is not typically observed in small animals. Both these new findings are critical in the primate brain and provide essential information for clinical applications.

  6. MR-guided high-focused ultrasound for renal sympathetic denervation-a feasibility study in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyhardt, Patrick; Heckmann, Lilian; Beck, Alexander; Stolzenburg, Nicola; Schnorr, Jörg; Kamp, Julia; Rinnenthal, Jan L; Hamm, Bernd; Günther, Rolf W; Streitparth, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Renal sympathetic denervation has recently gained clinical relevance for the treatment of therapy-resistant hypertension. Denervation is currently mainly performed using catheter-based transarterial radiofrequency ablation of periarterial sympathetic nerve fibers. Since this approach has numerous limitations, we conducted a study to evaluate the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of magnetic resonance-guided high-focused ultrasound (MRgHiFUS) for renal sympathetic denervation in pigs as an alternative to catheter-based ablation. Renal periarterial MRgHiFUS was performed under general anesthesia in ten pigs. Blood pressure measurements and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the kidneys, renal arteries, and surrounding structures were obtained immediately before and after the interventions and after 4 weeks. Histological examinations of periarterial tissues and determination of renal norepinephrine (NE) concentration were performed to assess treatment efficacy. In each pig, 9.8 ± 2.6 sonications with a mean energy deposition of 2,670 ± 486 J were performed. The procedure was well tolerated by all pigs. No major complications occurred. MRgHiFUS induced periarterial edema in three pigs, but only one pig showed corresponding histological changes. The NE level of the treated kidney was lower in five pigs (-8% to -38%) compared to the untreated side. Overall, there was no significant difference between the NE values of both kidneys in any of the treated pigs. Postinterventional MRI indicated absorption of ultrasound energy at the transverse process and fascia. MRgHiFUS had some thermal periarterial effects but failed to induce renal denervation. Insufficient energy deposition is most likely attributable to a small acoustic window with beam path impediment in the porcine model. Since HiFUS treatment in humans is expected to be easier to perform due to better access to renal sympathetic nerves, further studies of this method are desirable to investigate the

  7. Real-time monitoring of high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment using axial strain and axial-shear strain elastograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Rongmin; Thittai, Arun K

    2014-03-01

    Axial strain elastograms (ASEs) have been found to help visualize sonographically invisible thermal lesions. However, in most studies involving high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU)-induced thermal lesions, elastography imaging was performed separately later, after the lesion was formed. In this article, the feasibility of monitoring, in real time, tissue elasticity variation during HIFU treatment and immediately thereafter is explored using quasi-static elastography. Further, in addition to ASEs, we also explore the use of simultaneously acquired axial-shear strain elastograms (ASSEs) for HIFU lesion visualization. Experiments were performed on commercial porcine liver samples in vitro. The HIFU experiments were conducted at two applied acoustic power settings, 35 and 20 W. The experimental setup allowed us to interrupt the HIFU pulse momentarily several different times during treatment to perform elastographic compression and data acquisition. At the end of the experiments, the samples were cut along the imaging plane and photographed to compare size and location of the formed lesion with those visualized on ASEs and ASSEs. Single-lesion and multiple-lesion experiments were performed to assess the contribution of ASEs and ASSEs to lesion visualization and treatment monitoring tasks. At both power settings, ASEs and ASSEs provided accurate location information during HIFU treatment. At the low-power setting case, ASEs and ASSEs provide accurate lesion size in real-time monitoring. Lesion appearance in ASEs and ASSEs was affected by the cavitation bubbles produced at the high-power setting. The results further indicate that the cavitation bubbles influence lesion appearance more in ASEs than in ASSEs. Both ASEs and ASSEs provided accurate size information after a waiting period that allowed the cavitation bubbles to disappear. The results indicate that ASSEs not only improve lesion visualization and size measurement of a single lesion, but, under certain

  8. Development, Characterization, and Implementation of a System for Focused Ultrasound-Mediated Blood-Brain Barrier Opening in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Michael Aaron

    The blood-brain barrier BBB refers to the set of specialized endothelial cells that line the vasculature in the brain and effectively control movement of molecules into and out of the brain. While necessary for proper brain function, the BBB blocks 98% of drugs from entering the brain and is the most significant barrier to developing therapies for neurodegenerative diseases. Active transport allows some specific molecules to cross the BBB, but therapeutic development using this route has had limited success. A number of techniques have been used to bypass the BBB, but are often highly invasive and ineffective. Over the last two decades, a minimally invasive technique to transiently open the BBB has been under development that utilizes transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) in combination with intravascular microbubble contrast agents. This method is often carried out in conjunction with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to guide and assess BBB opening and has been referred to as MRI guided FUS (MRgFUS). Because of the utility of mouse models of neurological disease and the exploratory nature of MRgFUS, systems that allow BBB opening in mice are a useful and necessary tool to develop and evaluate this method for clinical application. In this dissertation project, a custom built, cost-effective FUS system for opening the BBB in mice was developed, with the objective of using this device to deliver therapeutics to the brain. Being a custom device, it was necessary to evaluate the ultrasound output, verify in vivo safety, and anticipate the therapeutic effect. The scope of the work herein consists of the design, construction, and evaluation of system that fulfills these requirements. The final constructed system cost was an order of magnitude less than any commercially available MRgFUS system. At this low price point, the hardware could allow the implementation of the methodology in many more research areas than previously possible. Additionally, to anticipate the

  9. Intercostal high intensity focused ultrasound for liver ablation: The influence of beam shaping on sonication efficacy and near-field risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greef, M. de; Wijlemans, J. W.; Bartels, L. W.; Moonen, C. T. W.; Ries, M.; Schubert, G.; Koskela, J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: One of the major issues in high intensity focused ultrasound ablation of abdominal lesions is obstruction of the ultrasound beam by the thoracic cage. Beam shaping strategies have been shown by several authors to increase focal point intensity while limiting rib exposure. However, as rib obstruction leaves only part of the aperture available for energy transmission, conserving total emitted acoustic power, the intensity in the near-field tissues inherently increases after beam shaping. Despite of effective rib sparing, those tissues are therefore subjected to increased risk of thermal damage. In this study, for a number of clinically representative intercostal sonication geometries, modeling clinically available hardware, the effect of beam shaping on both the exposure of the ribs and near-field to acoustic energy was evaluated and the implications for the volumetric ablation rate were addressed. Methods: A relationship between rib temperature rise and acoustic energy density was established by means of in vivo MR thermometry and simulations of the incident acoustic energy for the corresponding anatomies. This relationship was used for interpretation of rib exposure in subsequent numerical simulations in which rib spacing, focal point placement, and the focal point trajectory were varied. The time required to heat a targeted region to 65 °C was determined without and with the application of beam shaping. The required sonication time was used to calculate the acoustic energy density at the fat–muscle interface and at the surface of the ribs. At the fat–muscle interface, exposure was compared to available literature data and rib exposure was interpreted based on the earlier obtained relation between measured temperature rise and simulated acoustic energy density. To estimate the volumetric ablation rate, the cool-down time between periods of energy exposure was estimated using a time-averaged power limit of 100 kJ/h. Results: At the level of the ribs

  10. Intercostal high intensity focused ultrasound for liver ablation: The influence of beam shaping on sonication efficacy and near-field risks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greef, M. de, E-mail: m.degreef@umcutrecht.nl; Wijlemans, J. W.; Bartels, L. W.; Moonen, C. T. W.; Ries, M. [Imaging Division, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht 3508GA (Netherlands); Schubert, G.; Koskela, J. [Philips Healthcare, Vantaa FI-01511 (Finland)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: One of the major issues in high intensity focused ultrasound ablation of abdominal lesions is obstruction of the ultrasound beam by the thoracic cage. Beam shaping strategies have been shown by several authors to increase focal point intensity while limiting rib exposure. However, as rib obstruction leaves only part of the aperture available for energy transmission, conserving total emitted acoustic power, the intensity in the near-field tissues inherently increases after beam shaping. Despite of effective rib sparing, those tissues are therefore subjected to increased risk of thermal damage. In this study, for a number of clinically representative intercostal sonication geometries, modeling clinically available hardware, the effect of beam shaping on both the exposure of the ribs and near-field to acoustic energy was evaluated and the implications for the volumetric ablation rate were addressed. Methods: A relationship between rib temperature rise and acoustic energy density was established by means of in vivo MR thermometry and simulations of the incident acoustic energy for the corresponding anatomies. This relationship was used for interpretation of rib exposure in subsequent numerical simulations in which rib spacing, focal point placement, and the focal point trajectory were varied. The time required to heat a targeted region to 65 °C was determined without and with the application of beam shaping. The required sonication time was used to calculate the acoustic energy density at the fat–muscle interface and at the surface of the ribs. At the fat–muscle interface, exposure was compared to available literature data and rib exposure was interpreted based on the earlier obtained relation between measured temperature rise and simulated acoustic energy density. To estimate the volumetric ablation rate, the cool-down time between periods of energy exposure was estimated using a time-averaged power limit of 100 kJ/h. Results: At the level of the ribs

  11. SU-E-J-162: Quality Assurance Procedures for MR Guided Focused Ultrasound Treatment of Bone Metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, L; Chen, X; Wang, B; Gupta, R; Ma, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to develop and verify our quality assurance (QA) procedures to ensure the safety and efficacy of MR-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) treatment of bone metastases. Methods: A practical QA program was developed. Monthly and daily QA (DQA) procedures were performed. The major QA items included the checks of the machine hardware, software and patient safety features. Briefly, these checks/tests include: 1) the cooling system reservoir and treatment table; 2) power to the treatment table; 3) the MR coil; 4) the transducer position with MRI; 5) image display on the treatment work station; 6) the effective focal spot in 3 directions using MR thermometry; and 7) all the safety devices including a sonication lamp, and the emergency stop-sonication switches. In order to avoid patient skin burn, it is important to remove gas bubbles in the interfaces between the treatment table and the gel pad, and the gel pad and patients skin during the patient setup. Our QA procedures have been verified and evaluated through patient treatments. Seven patients with scapula, humeral head, sacrum, ilium, pubic ramus and acetabular bone metastases were treated using MRgFUS. Results: Our study showed that all seven patients tolerated the MRgFUS treatment well. No skin toxicity or other complications were observed. The pain score (0–10) using the visual analog scale (VAS) was significantly reduced from 8.0 ± 1.1 before treatment to 4.7 ± 3.0, 3.0 ± 1.5, 3.2 ± 2.8 and 3.4 ± 1.5 at one day, one month, two months and three months after the MRgFUS treatment, respectively. Conclusion: We demonstrated that with the appropriate QA procedures, MRgFUS is a safe, effective and noninvasive treatment modality for palliation of bone metastases

  12. Concurrent Chemotherapy and Pulsed High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Therapy for the Treatment of Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer: Initial Experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Young; Choi, Byung Ihn; Ryu, Ji Kon; Kim, Yong Tae; Kim, Se Hyung; Han, Joon Koo [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Joo Ha [University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle (United States)

    2011-04-15

    This study was performed to evaluate the potential clinical value of concurrent chemotherapy and pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy (CCHT), as well as the safety of pulsed HIFU, for the treatment of unresectable pancreatic cancer. Twelve patients were treated with HIFU from October 2008 to May 2010, and three of them underwent CCHT as the main treatment (the CCHT group). The overall survival (OS), the time to tumor progression (TTP), the complications and the current performance status in the CCHT and non-CCHT groups were analyzed. Nine patients in the non-CCHT group were evaluated to determine why CCHT could not be performed more than twice. The OS of the three patients in the CCHT group was 26.0, 21.6 and 10.8 months, respectively, from the time of diagnosis. Two of them were alive at the time of preparing this manuscript with an excellent performance status, and one of them underwent a surgical resection one year after the initiation of CCHT. The TTP of the three patients in the CCHT group was 13.4, 11.5 and 9.9 months, respectively. The median OS and TTP of the non-CCHT group were 10.3 months and 4.4 months, respectively. The main reasons why the nine patients of the non-CCHT group failed to undergo CCHT more than twice were as follows: pancreatitis (n = 1), intolerance of the pain during treatment (n = 4), palliative use of HIFU for pain relief (n = 1) and a poor physical condition due to disease progression (n = 3). No major complications were encountered except one case of pancreatitis. This study shows that CCHT is a potentially effective and safe modality for the treatment of unresectable pancreatic cancer

  13. SU-E-T-245: MR Guided Focused Ultrasound Increased PARP Related Apoptosis On Prostate Cancer in Vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, L; Chen, X; Cvetkovic, D; Gupta, R; Yang, D; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Our previous study demonstrated that significant tumor growth delay was observed in the mice treated with pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU). The purpose of this study is to understand the cell killing mechanisms of pHIFU. Methods: Prostate cancer cells (LNCaP), were grown orthotopically in 17 nude mice. Tumor-bearing mice were treated using pHIFU with an acoustic power of 25W, pulse width 100msec and 300 pulses in one sonication under MR guidance. Mutiple sonications were used to cover the whole tumor volume. Temperature (less than 40 degree centigrade in the focal spot) was monitored using MR thermometry. Animals were euthanized at pre-determined time points (n=2) after treatment: 0 hours; 6 hrs; 24 hrs; 48 hrs; 4 days and 7 days. Two tumorbearing mice were used as control. Three tumor-bearing mice were treated with radiation (RT, 2 Gy) using 6 MV photon beams. RT treated mice were euthanized at 0 hr, 6 hrs and 24 hrs. The tumors were processed for immunohistochemical (IHC) staining for PARP (a surrogate of apoptosis). A multispectral imaging analysis system was used to quantify the expression of PARP staining. Cell apoptosis was calculated based on the PARP expression level, which is the intensity of the DAB reaction. Results: Our data showed that PARP related apoptosis peaked at 48 hrs and 7 days in pHIFU treated mice, which is comparable to that for the RT group at 24 hrs. The preliminary results from this study were consistent with our previous study on tumor growth delay using pHIFU. Conclusion: Our results demonstrated that non-thermal pHIFU increased apoptotic tumor cell death through the PARP related pathway. MR guided pHIFU may have a great potential as a safe, noninvasive treatment modality for cancer therapy. This treatment modality might be able to synergize with PARP inhibitors to achieve better result.

  14. SU-F-J-225: Histology Study of MR Guided Pulsed Focused Ultrasound On Treatment of Prostate Cancer in Vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, L; Cvetkovic, D; Chen, X; Wang, B; Gupta, R; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Our previous study demonstrated significant tumor growth delay in the mice treated with pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU). The purpose of this study is to understand the cell killing mechanisms of pHIFU. Methods: Prostate cancer cells (LNCaP), were grown orthotopically in 17 nude mice. Tumor-bearing mice were treated using pHIFU with an acoustic power of 25W, pulse width 100msec and 300 pulses in one sonication under MR guidance. Mutiple sonications were used to cover the whole tumor volume. The temperature (less than 40 degree centigrade in the focal spot) was monitored using MR thermometry. Animals were euthanized at pre-determined time points (n=2) after treatment: 0 hours; 6 hrs; 24 hrs; 48 hrs; 4 days and 7 days. Two tumorbearing mice were used as control. Three tumor-bearing mice were treated with radiation (RT, 2 Gy) using 6 MV photon beams. RT treated mice were euthanized at 0 hr, 6 hrs and 24 hrs. The tumors were processed for immunohistochemical (IHC) staining for PARP (a surrogate of apoptosis). A multispectral imaging analysis system was used to quantify the expression of PARP staining. Cell apoptosis was calculated based on the PARP expression level using the DAB analysis software. Results: Our data showed that PARP related apoptosis peaked at 48 hrs and 7 days in pHIFU treated mice, which is comparable to that for the RT group at 24 hrs. The preliminary results from this study were consistent with our previous study on tumor growth delay using pHIFU. Conclusion: Our results demonstrated that non-thermal pHIFU increased apoptotic tumor cell death through the PARP related pathway. MR guided pHIFU may have a great potential as a safe, noninvasive treatment modality for cancer therapy. This treatment modality may synergize with PARP inhibitors to achieve better therapeutic result.

  15. Histopathology of breast cancer after magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound and radiofrequency ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuttel, Floortje M; Waaijer, Laurien; Merckel, Laura G; van den Bosch, Maurice A A J; Witkamp, Arjen J; Deckers, Roel; van Diest, Paul J

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) ablation and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) are being researched as possible substitutes for surgery in breast cancer patients. The histopathological appearance of ablated tissue has not been studied in great detail. This study aimed to compare histopathological features of breast cancer after MR-HIFU ablation and RFA. MR-HIFU ablation and RFA were performed in- and ex-vivo. Tumours in six mastectomy specimens were partially ablated with RFA or MR-HIFU. In-vivo MR-HIFU ablation was performed 3-6 days before excision; RFA was performed in the operation room. Tissue was fixed in formalin and processed to haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and cytokeratin-8 (CK-8)-stained slides. Morphology and cell viability were assessed. Ex-vivo ablation resulted in clear morphological changes after RFA versus subtle differences after MR-HIFU. CK-8 staining was decreased or absent. H&E tended to underestimate the size of thermal damage. In-vivo MR-HIFU resulted in necrotic-like changes. Surprisingly, some ablated lesions were CK-8-positive. Histopathology after in-vivo RFA resembled ex-vivo RFA, with hyper-eosinophilic stroma and elongated nuclei. Lesion borders were sharp after MR-HIFU and indistinct after RFA. Histopathological differences between MR-HIFU-ablated tissue and RF-ablated tissue were demonstrated. CK-8 was more reliable for cell viability assessment than H&E when used directly after ablation, while H&E was more reliable in ablated tissue left in situ for a few days. Our results contribute to improved understanding of histopathological features in breast cancer lesions treated with minimally invasive ablative techniques. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Submicron-bubble-enhanced focused ultrasound for blood-brain barrier disruption and improved CNS drug delivery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Hsiang Fan

    Full Text Available The use of focused ultrasound (FUS with microbubbles has been proven to induce transient blood-brain barrier opening (BBB-opening. However, FUS-induced inertial cavitation of microbubbles can also result in erythrocyte extravasations. Here we investigated whether induction of submicron bubbles to oscillate at their resonant frequency would reduce inertial cavitation during BBB-opening and thereby eliminate erythrocyte extravasations in a rat brain model. FUS was delivered with acoustic pressures of 0.1-4.5 MPa using either in-house manufactured submicron bubbles or standard SonoVue microbubbles. Wideband and subharmonic emissions from bubbles were used to quantify inertial and stable cavitation, respectively. Erythrocyte extravasations were evaluated by in vivo post-treatment magnetic resonance susceptibility-weighted imaging, and finally by histological confirmation. We found that excitation of submicron bubbles with resonant frequency-matched FUS (10 MHz can greatly limit inertial cavitation while enhancing stable cavitation. The BBB-opening was mainly caused by stable cavitation, whereas the erythrocyte extravasation was closely correlated with inertial cavitation. Our technique allows extensive reduction of inertial cavitation to induce safe BBB-opening. Furthermore, the safety issue of BBB-opening was not compromised by prolonging FUS exposure time, and the local drug concentrations in the brain tissues were significantly improved to 60 times (BCNU; 18.6 µg versus 0.3 µg by using chemotherapeutic agent-loaded submicron bubbles with FUS. This study provides important information towards the goal of successfully translating FUS brain drug delivery into clinical use.

  17. Optimisation of focused ultrasound extraction (FUSE) and microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) of hydrocarbons in geological chert samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, Maitane; Vallejo, Asier; Irazola, Mireia; Murelaga, Xabier; Baceta, Juan Ignacio; Tarriño, Andoni; Etxebarria, Nestor

    2010-12-15

    The analysis of hydrocarbons in chert rocks provides a worthwhile source of information regarding the geochemical features of a depositional setting. Since the typical analytical procedure requires long Soxhlet extractions and the use of large quantities of sample (30-50 g), in this work we have optimised the focused ultrasound extraction (FUSE) and the microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) to make available a less severe procedure. In both cases a full experimental design including solvent mixture composition (Dichloromethane/Hexane/Acetone) and process variables (sonication time and cycles, and extraction temperature and time) by means of D-optimal designs. In the extracted fractions hydrocarbons (C(16)-C(40)) were analysed by gas-chromatography-mass spectrometry. In the case of FUSE the process variables were the most sensitive variables and the optimum conditions were defined at 60:40 DCM/Hex mixture and a sonication time of 30 min and 9 cycles. In the case of MAE all the variables shown a significant effect on the extraction yield and the most adequate conditions (60:30:10 DCM/Hex/Ace mixture and an irradiation time of 15 min at 110 °C) were established from the analysis of the response surface. Both methods were systematically applied with different chert samples collected in Cucho (Trebiño County, Burgos, Spain) and we were able to assure quantitative extractions (>85%) in the first extraction. Additionally, from the distribution patterns of n-alkanes obtained in the different chert samples (nodular chert, laminar chert and massive-brechoid chert) collected in Cucho, we were able to distinguish different origins and diagenetic history. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Mechanic effect of pulsed focused ultrasound in tumor and muscle tissue evaluated by MRI, histology, and microarray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hundt, Walter; Yuh, Esther L.; Steinbach, Silke; Bednarski, Mark D.; Guccione, Samira

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) to tumor and muscle tissue. Pulsed HIFU was applied to tumor and muscle tissue in C3H/Km mice. Three hours after HIFU treatment pre- and post-contrast T1-wt, T2-wt images and a diffusion-wt STEAM-sequence were obtained. After MR imaging, the animals were euthenized and the treated tumor and muscle was taken out for histology and functional genomic analysis. In the tumor tissue a slight increase of the diffusion coefficient could be found. In the muscle tissue T2 images showed increased signal intensity and post-contrast T1 showed a decreased contrast uptake in the center and a severe contrast uptake in the surrounding muscle tissue. A significant increase of the diffusion coefficient was found. Gene expression analysis revealed profound changes in the expression levels of 29 genes being up-regulated and 3 genes being down-regulated in the muscle tissue and 31 genes being up-regulated and 15 genes being down-regulated in the SCCVII tumor tissue. Seven genes were up-regulated in both tissue types. The highest up-regulated gene in the tumor and muscle tissue encoded for Mouse histone H2A.1 gene (FC = 13.2 ± 20.6) and Apolipoprotein E (FC = 12.8 ± 27.4) respectively MHC class III (FC = 83.7 ± 67.4) and hsp70 (FC = 75.3 ± 85.0). Immunoblot confirmed the presence of HSP70 protein in the muscle tissue. Pulsed HIFU treatment on tumor and muscle tissue results in dramatic changes in gene expression, indicating that the effect of pulsed HIFU is in some regard dependent and also independent of the tissue type.

  19. Preliminary safety and efficacy results with robotic high-intensity focused ultrasound : A single center Indian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashikant Mishra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : There are no Indian data of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU. Being an alternative, still experimental modality, reporting short-term safety outcome is paramount. Aims : This study was aimed at to assess the safety and short-term outcome in patients with prostate cancer treated by HIFU. Settings and Design : A retrospective study of case records of 30 patients undergoing HIFU between January 2008 to September 2010 was designed and conducted. Materials and Methods : The procedural safety was analyzed at 3 months. Follow-up consisted of 3 monthly prostate-specific antigen (PSA levels and transrectal biopsy if indicated. All the patients had a minimum follow-up of 6 months. Results : A mean prostate volume of 26.9 ± 8.5 cm 3 was treated in a mean time of 115 ± 37.4 min. There was no intraoperative complication. The postoperative pain visual analogue score at day 0 was 2.1 ± 1.9 and at day 1 was 0.4 ± 0.8 on a scale of 1-10. Mean duration of perurethral catheter removal was 3.9 days. The complications after treatment were: LUTS in seven patients, stress incontinence in two, stricture in two, and symptomatic urinary tract infection in five. Average follow-up duration was 10.4 months (range, 6-20 months. Mean time to obtain PSA nadir was 6 ± 3 months with a median PSA nadir value of 0.3 ng/ml. Two patients had positive prostatic biopsy in the localized (high risk group. Conclusions : HIFU was safe in carcinoma prostate patients. The short-term results were efficacious in localized disease. The low complication rates and favorable functional outcome support the planning of further larger studies.

  20. Biomechanical properties of bone treated by magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound - an in vivo porcine model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Amir; Avivi, Eran; Brosh, Tamar; Schwartz, Ignat; Liberman, Boaz

    2013-11-01

    The magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) system uses MR imaging for real-time aiming of thermal ablation of bone and soft tissue tumors. Past clinical studies showed no increase in fracture rate after MRgFUS treatment. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of MRgFUS treatment on mechanical properties of bone and correlate the effect to histological findings of treated bone. Four fully grown mini-pigs were treated by MRgFUS. Six consecutive right normal ribs were treated in each animal, and the left corresponding ribs served as controls. The animals were sacrificed at pre-set intervals (0, 2, 6 and 12weeks after treatment), and the treated and control bones were extracted. Mechanical properties of each bone were examined using three points bending studies for comparing treated bones to the corresponding controls. Histologic properties using Masson and hematoxylin-eosin stains were also compared. The ratio between treated and control biomechanical properties showed reduction in bone biomechanical properties at 6weeks post-MRgFUS treatment. The mean±SD yield load ratio and maximum ratios were 0.69±0.11 and 0.71±0.13, respectively (both p=0.031). These findings showed some recovery trend at 12weeks after treatment. Histological analysis showed a reduction in mean osteon size at 2weeks after treatment (0.58×10(-3)±0.1×10(-3)mm and 0.16×10(-3)±0.017×10(-3)mm) in control vs. treated bones, respectively (p=0.005). Treatment with the MRgFUS system resulted in a ~30% reduction in mechanical strength at 6weeks post-treatment. The reduction showed a reversible trend, with a 25%-20% decrease in strength at 12weeks post-treatment. © 2013.

  1. SU-E-T-245: MR Guided Focused Ultrasound Increased PARP Related Apoptosis On Prostate Cancer in Vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, L; Chen, X; Cvetkovic, D; Gupta, R; Yang, D; Ma, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Our previous study demonstrated that significant tumor growth delay was observed in the mice treated with pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU). The purpose of this study is to understand the cell killing mechanisms of pHIFU. Methods: Prostate cancer cells (LNCaP), were grown orthotopically in 17 nude mice. Tumor-bearing mice were treated using pHIFU with an acoustic power of 25W, pulse width 100msec and 300 pulses in one sonication under MR guidance. Mutiple sonications were used to cover the whole tumor volume. Temperature (less than 40 degree centigrade in the focal spot) was monitored using MR thermometry. Animals were euthanized at pre-determined time points (n=2) after treatment: 0 hours; 6 hrs; 24 hrs; 48 hrs; 4 days and 7 days. Two tumorbearing mice were used as control. Three tumor-bearing mice were treated with radiation (RT, 2 Gy) using 6 MV photon beams. RT treated mice were euthanized at 0 hr, 6 hrs and 24 hrs. The tumors were processed for immunohistochemical (IHC) staining for PARP (a surrogate of apoptosis). A multispectral imaging analysis system was used to quantify the expression of PARP staining. Cell apoptosis was calculated based on the PARP expression level, which is the intensity of the DAB reaction. Results: Our data showed that PARP related apoptosis peaked at 48 hrs and 7 days in pHIFU treated mice, which is comparable to that for the RT group at 24 hrs. The preliminary results from this study were consistent with our previous study on tumor growth delay using pHIFU. Conclusion: Our results demonstrated that non-thermal pHIFU increased apoptotic tumor cell death through the PARP related pathway. MR guided pHIFU may have a great potential as a safe, noninvasive treatment modality for cancer therapy. This treatment modality might be able to synergize with PARP inhibitors to achieve better result

  2. SU-F-J-225: Histology Study of MR Guided Pulsed Focused Ultrasound On Treatment of Prostate Cancer in Vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, L; Cvetkovic, D; Chen, X; Wang, B; Gupta, R; Ma, C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Our previous study demonstrated significant tumor growth delay in the mice treated with pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU). The purpose of this study is to understand the cell killing mechanisms of pHIFU. Methods: Prostate cancer cells (LNCaP), were grown orthotopically in 17 nude mice. Tumor-bearing mice were treated using pHIFU with an acoustic power of 25W, pulse width 100msec and 300 pulses in one sonication under MR guidance. Mutiple sonications were used to cover the whole tumor volume. The temperature (less than 40 degree centigrade in the focal spot) was monitored using MR thermometry. Animals were euthanized at pre-determined time points (n=2) after treatment: 0 hours; 6 hrs; 24 hrs; 48 hrs; 4 days and 7 days. Two tumorbearing mice were used as control. Three tumor-bearing mice were treated with radiation (RT, 2 Gy) using 6 MV photon beams. RT treated mice were euthanized at 0 hr, 6 hrs and 24 hrs. The tumors were processed for immunohistochemical (IHC) staining for PARP (a surrogate of apoptosis). A multispectral imaging analysis system was used to quantify the expression of PARP staining. Cell apoptosis was calculated based on the PARP expression level using the DAB analysis software. Results: Our data showed that PARP related apoptosis peaked at 48 hrs and 7 days in pHIFU treated mice, which is comparable to that for the RT group at 24 hrs. The preliminary results from this study were consistent with our previous study on tumor growth delay using pHIFU. Conclusion: Our results demonstrated that non-thermal pHIFU increased apoptotic tumor cell death through the PARP related pathway. MR guided pHIFU may have a great potential as a safe, noninvasive treatment modality for cancer therapy. This treatment modality may synergize with PARP inhibitors to achieve better therapeutic result.

  3. ANALYSIS OF FACTORS AFFECTING OUTCOME OF ULTRASOUND-GUIDED RADIOFREQUENCY HEAT ABLATION FOR TREATMENT OF PRIMARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM IN DOGS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucy, Daniel; Pollard, Rachel; Nelson, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) parathyroid ablation is a noninvasive treatment for hyperparathyroidism in dogs. There are no published data assessing factors associated with RF parathyroid ablation success or failure in order to guide patient selection and improve outcome. The purpose of this retrospective analytical study was to determine whether imaging findings, biochemical data, or concurrent diseases were associated with RF heat ablation treatment failure. For inclusion in the study, dogs must have had a clinical diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism, undergone cervical ultrasound and RF ablation of abnormal parathyroid tissue, and must have had at least 3 months of follow-up information available following the date of ultrasound-guided parathyroid ablation. Dogs were grouped based on those with recurrent or persistent hypercalcemia and those without recurrent or persistent hypercalcemia following therapy. Parathyroid nodule size, thyroid lobe size, nodule location, and presence of concurrent disease were recorded. Recurrence of hypercalcemia occurred in 9/32 dogs that had ablation of abnormal parathyroid tissue (28%) and one patient had persistent hypercalcemia (3%) following parathyroid ablation. Nodule width (P = 0.036), height (P = 0.028), and largest cross-sectional area (P = 0.023) were larger in dogs that had recurrent or persistent hypercalcemia following ablation. Hypothyroidism was more common in dogs with recurrent disease (P = 0.044). Radiofrequency ablation was successful in 22/32 (69%) dogs. Larger parathyroid nodule size and/or concurrent hypothyroidism were associated with treatment failure in dogs that underwent ultrasound-guided RF parathyroid nodule ablation. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused ultrasound treatment of symptomatic uterine fibroids: impact of technology advancement on ablation volumes in 115 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumm, Christoph G; Stahl, Robert; Clevert, Dirk-André; Herzog, Peter; Mindjuk, Irene; Kornprobst, Sabine; Schwarz, Christina; Hoffmann, Ralf-Thorsten; Reiser, Maximilian F; Matzko, Matthias

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of the advanced technology of the new ExAblate 2100 system (Insightec Ltd, Haifa, Israel) for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided focused ultrasound surgery on treatment outcomes in patients with symptomatic uterine fibroids, as measured by the nonperfused volume ratio. This is a retrospective analysis of 115 women (mean age, 42 years; range, 27-54 years) with symptomatic fibroids who consecutively underwent MRI-guided focused ultrasound treatment in a single center with the new generation ExAblate 2100 system from November 2010 to June 2011. Mean ± SD total volume and number of treated fibroids (per patient) were 89 ± 94 cm and 2.2 ± 1.7, respectively. Patient baseline characteristics were analyzed regarding their impact on the resulting nonperfused volume ratio. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused ultrasound treatment was technically successful in 115 of 123 patients (93.5%). In 8 patients, treatment was not possible because of bowel loops in the beam pathway that could not be mitigated (n = 6), patient movement (n = 1), and system malfunction (n = 1). Mean nonperfused volume ratio was 88% ± 15% (range, 38%-100%). Mean applied energy level was 5400 ± 1200 J, and mean number of sonications was 74 ± 27. No major complications occurred. Two cases of first-degree skin burn resolved within 1 week after the intervention. Of the baseline characteristics analyzed, only the planned treatment volume had a statistically significant impact on nonperfused volume ratio. With technological advancement, the outcome of MRI-guided focused ultrasound treatment in terms of the nonperfused volume ratio can be enhanced with a high safety profile, markedly exceeding results reported in previous clinical trials.

  5. Transrectal high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment of localized prostate cancer: Review of technical incidents and morbidity after 5 years of use

    OpenAIRE

    RIPERT, Thomas; AZEMAR, Marie Dominique; MENARD, Johann; BAYOUD, Younes; MESSAOUDI, Rabah; DUVAL, François; STAERMAN, Frédéric

    2010-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To report on technical incidents, and early and late complications, occurring on high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment of patients with localized prostate cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS We performed a retrospective review of patients who were treated by Ablatherm? in our centre. We recorded all technical incidents, treatment discontinuations, and early (< 1 month) and late complications. RESULTS A total of 74 HIFU procedures were perfor...

  6. Sequential transcatheter arterial chemoembolization, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, and high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ni, Shengfa; Liu, Lingxiang; Shu, Yongqian

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome of patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated by sequential therapy of transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE), three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3-DCRT) and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). From October, 2005 to September, 2010, 120 patients with unresectable HCC received the sequential treatments of several courses of TACE followed in 2-4 weeks by 3-DCRT and then a single session of HIFU wi...

  7. Intensification of heat transfer during mild thermal treatment of dry-cured ham by using airborne ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, M; Benedito, J; Bon, J; Garcia-Perez, J V

    2018-03-01

    The application of power ultrasound (PuS) could be used as a novel technology with which to intensify thermal treatments using hot air. Mild thermal treatments have been applied to improve the soft texture of dry-cured ham caused by defective processing. In this regard, the aim of this study was to assess the kinetic intensification linked to the application of airborne PuS in the mild thermal treatment using hot air of dry-cured ham. For this purpose, vacuum packed cylindrical samples (2.52±0.11cm in diameter and 1.90±0.14cm in height) of dry-cured ham were heated using hot air at different temperatures (40, 45, 50°C) and air velocities (1, 2, 3, 4, 6m/s) with (22.3kHz, 50W) and without PuS application. Heat transfer was analyzed by considering that it was entirely controlled by conduction and the apparent thermal diffusivity was identified by fitting the model to the heating kinetics. The obtained results revealed that PuS application sped up the heat transfer, showing an increase in the apparent thermal diffusivity (up to 37%). The improvement in the apparent thermal diffusivity produced by PuS application was greater at high temperatures (50°C) but negligible at high air velocities (6m/s). Heating caused an increase in the hardness and elasticity of dry-cured ham, which would correct ham pastiness defects, while the influence of PuS on such textural parameters was negligible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Heating produced by therapeutic ultrasound in the presence of a metal plate in the femur of canine cadavers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.O. Andrades

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to assess the heat generated by a therapeutic ultrasound (TUS in a metal bone plate and adjacent structures after fixation to the femur of canine cadavers. Ten pairs of hind limbs were used, and they were equally distributed between groups that were subjected to 1- and 3-MHz frequencies, with each frequency testing 1- and 2-W/cm² intensities. The right hind limb was defined as the control group (absence of the metal plate, and the left hind limb was the test group (presence of the metal plate. Therefore, the control groups (CG were denominated CGI, using TUS with 1-MHz frequency and 1-W/cm² intensity; CGII, using 1-MHz frequency and 2-W/cm² intensity; CGIII, using 3-MHz frequency and 1-W/cm² intensity; and CGIV, using 3-MHz frequency and 2-W/cm² intensity. For each control group, its respective test group (TG was denominated TGI, TGII, TGIII and TGIV. The TUS was applied to the lateral aspect of the thigh using the continuous mode and a 3.5-cm² transducer in a 6.25-cm² area for 2 minutes. Sensors were coupled to digital thermometers that measured the temperature in different sites before (t0 and after (t1 of the TUS application. The temperatures in t1 were higher in all tested groups. The intramuscular temperature was significantly higher (P<0.05 in the groups used to test the 3-MHz frequency in the presence of the metal plate. The therapeutic ultrasound in the continuous mode using frequencies of 1 and 3 MHz and intensities of 1 and 2 W/cm2 for 2 minutes caused heating of the metal plate and adjacent structures after fixation to the femur of canine cadavers.

  9. Proton Therapy as Salvage Treatment for Local Relapse of Prostate Cancer Following Cryosurgery or High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holtzman, Adam L. [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Hoppe, Bradford S., E-mail: bhoppe@floridaproton.org [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Letter, Haley P.; Bryant, Curtis; Nichols, Romaine C.; Henderson, Randal H.; Mendenhall, William M.; Morris, Christopher G. [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Williams, Christopher R. [Department of Surgery, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Li, Zuofeng; Mendenhall, Nancy P. [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Local recurrence of prostate cancer after cryosurgery (CS) and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is an emerging problem for which optimal management is unknown. Proton therapy (PT) may offer advantages over other local therapeutic options. This article reviews a single institution's experience using PT for salvage of local recurrent disease after HIFU or CS. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the medical records of 21 consecutive patients treated with salvage PT following a local recurrence of prostate cancer after CS (n=12) or HIFU (n=9) between January 2007 and July 2014. Patients were treated to a median dose of 74 Gy(relative biological effectiveness [RBE]; range: 74-82 Gy[RBE]) and 8 patients received androgen deprivation therapy with radiation therapy. Patients were evaluated for quality of life (QOL) by using the Expanded Prostate Index Composite questionnaire and toxicity by using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, weekly during treatment, every 6 months for 2 years after treatment, and then annually. Results: Median follow-up was 37 months (range: 6-95 months). The 3-year biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS) rate was 77%. The 3-year grade 3 toxicity rate was 17%; however, 2 of these patients had pre-existing grade 3 GU toxicities from their HIFU/CRYO prior to PT. At 1 year, bowel summary, urinary incontinence, and urinary obstructive QOL scores declined, but only the bowel QOL score at 12 months met the minimally important difference threshold. Conclusions: PT achieved a high rate of bPFS with acceptable toxicity and minimal changes in QOL scores compared with baseline pre-PT functions. Although most patients have done fairly well, the study size is small, follow-up is short, and early results suggest that outcomes with PT for salvage after HIFU or CS failure are inferior to outcomes with PT given in the de novo setting with respect to disease control, toxicity, and QOL.

  10. Proton Therapy as Salvage Treatment for Local Relapse of Prostate Cancer Following Cryosurgery or High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtzman, Adam L.; Hoppe, Bradford S.; Letter, Haley P.; Bryant, Curtis; Nichols, Romaine C.; Henderson, Randal H.; Mendenhall, William M.; Morris, Christopher G.; Williams, Christopher R.; Li, Zuofeng; Mendenhall, Nancy P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Local recurrence of prostate cancer after cryosurgery (CS) and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is an emerging problem for which optimal management is unknown. Proton therapy (PT) may offer advantages over other local therapeutic options. This article reviews a single institution's experience using PT for salvage of local recurrent disease after HIFU or CS. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the medical records of 21 consecutive patients treated with salvage PT following a local recurrence of prostate cancer after CS (n=12) or HIFU (n=9) between January 2007 and July 2014. Patients were treated to a median dose of 74 Gy(relative biological effectiveness [RBE]; range: 74-82 Gy[RBE]) and 8 patients received androgen deprivation therapy with radiation therapy. Patients were evaluated for quality of life (QOL) by using the Expanded Prostate Index Composite questionnaire and toxicity by using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, weekly during treatment, every 6 months for 2 years after treatment, and then annually. Results: Median follow-up was 37 months (range: 6-95 months). The 3-year biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS) rate was 77%. The 3-year grade 3 toxicity rate was 17%; however, 2 of these patients had pre-existing grade 3 GU toxicities from their HIFU/CRYO prior to PT. At 1 year, bowel summary, urinary incontinence, and urinary obstructive QOL scores declined, but only the bowel QOL score at 12 months met the minimally important difference threshold. Conclusions: PT achieved a high rate of bPFS with acceptable toxicity and minimal changes in QOL scores compared with baseline pre-PT functions. Although most patients have done fairly well, the study size is small, follow-up is short, and early results suggest that outcomes with PT for salvage after HIFU or CS failure are inferior to outcomes with PT given in the de novo setting with respect to disease control, toxicity, and QOL.

  11. Clinical outcome of magnetic-resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) in the treatment of symptomatic uterine fibroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamp, J.E.K.; Scheurig-Muenkler, C.; Beck, A.; David, M.; Hengst, S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical outcome of magnetic-resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) treatment for symptomatic uterine fibroids in premenopausal women using the validated USF-QOL (Uterine Fibroid Symptom and Quality of Life) Questionnaire. Materials and Methods: 54 patients with symptomatic uterine fibroids were enrolled in this prospective study. The patients completed the UFS-QOL Questionnaire prior to MRgFUS treatment as well as after 3, 6, and 12 months. Results: The rate of technical success was 91.5 % (95.2 % after subtraction of screening errors). 6/54 patients (11 %) had other treatments (surgery, n = 4; UAE, n = 2), 8/54 (15 %) dropped out due to pregnancy, and 8/54 were lost to follow-up. The remaining group showed considerable symptom relief as early as after 3 months. The median overall quality of life score increased from 64.7 (quartile range QR: 49.8 - 77.6) before treatment to 77.6 (QR: 61.4 - 87.1) (p < 0.001), 78.4 (QR: 66.4 - 89.7) (p < 0.001), and 82.8 (QR: 69.8 - 92.2) (p < 0.001) at 3, 6, and 12 months, respectively. The corresponding median symptom severity score decreased from 46.9 (QR: 28.1 - 56.2) to 34.4 (QR: 21.9 - 43.7) at 3 months (p = 0.003) and 28.1 at 6 and 12 months (QR: 18.7 - 38.3, QR: 15.6 - 34.4) (p < 0.001, p = 0.002). The rate of complications requiring treatment was 9 %, and the rate of overall complications was 39 %. No major complications occurred. Conclusion: Our results indicate significant alleviation of fibroid-related symptoms within 12 months of MRgFUS with improvement beginning as early as 3 months after treatment. We observed no major complications, and some women became pregnant after MRgFUS. There was a low treatment failure rate of 11 %. (orig.)

  12. Boiling histotripsy lesion characterization on a clinical magnetic resonance imaging-guided high intensity focused ultrasound system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Eranki

    Full Text Available High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU is a non-invasive therapeutic technique that can thermally ablate tumors. Boiling histotripsy (BH is a HIFU approach that can emulsify tissue in a few milliseconds. Lesion volume and temperature effects for different BH sonication parameters are currently not well characterized. In this work, lesion volume, temperature distribution, and area of lethal thermal dose were characterized for varying BH sonication parameters in tissue-mimicking phantoms (TMP and demonstrated in ex vivo tissues.The following BH sonication parameters were varied using a clinical MR-HIFU system (Sonalleve V2, Philips, Vantaa, Finland: acoustic power, number of cycles/pulse, total sonication time, and pulse repetition frequency (PRF. A 3×3×3 pattern was sonicated inside TMP's and ex vivo tissues. Post sonication, lesion volumes were quantified using 3D ultrasonography and temperature and thermal dose distributions were analyzed offline. Ex vivo tissues were sectioned and stained with H&E post sonication to assess tissue damage.Significant increase in lesion volume was observed while increasing the number of cycles/pulse and PRF. Other sonication parameters had no significant effect on lesion volume. Temperature full width at half maximum at the end of sonication increased significantly with all parameters except total sonication time. Positive correlation was also found between lethal thermal dose and lesion volume for all parameters except number of cycles/pulse. Gross pathology of ex vivo tissues post sonication displayed either completely or partially damaged tissue at the focal region. Surrounding tissues presented sharp boundaries, with little or no structural damage to adjacent critical structures such as bile duct and nerves.Our characterization of effects of HIFU sonication parameters on the resulting lesion demonstrates the ability to control lesion morphologic and thermal characteristics with a clinical MR-HIFU system in

  13. Effects of magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation on bone mechanical properties and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Sin Yuin; Arias Moreno, Andrés J; van Rietbergen, Bert; Ter Hoeve, Natalie D; van Diest, Paul J; Grüll, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) is a promising technique for palliative treatment of bone pain. In this study, the effects of MR-HIFU ablation on bone mechanics and modeling were investigated. A total of 12 healthy rat femurs were ablated using 10 W for 46 ± 4 s per sonication with 4 sonications for each femur. At 7 days after treatments, all animals underwent MR and single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging. Then, six animals were euthanized. At 1 month following ablations, the remaining six animals were scanned again with MR and SPECT/CT prior to euthanization. Thereafter, both the HIFU-treated and contralateral control bones of three animals from each time interval were processed for histology, whereas the remaining bones were subjected to micro-CT (μCT), three-point bending tests, and micro-finite element (micro-FE) analyses. At 7 days after HIFU ablations, edema formation around the treated bones coupled with bone marrow and cortical bone necrosis was observed on MRI and histological images. SPECT/CT and μCT images revealed presence of bone modeling through an increased uptake of (99m)Tc-MDP and formation of woven bone, respectively. At 31 days after ablations, as illustrated by imaging and histology, healing of the treated bone and the surrounding soft tissue was noted, marked by decreased in amount of tissue damage, formation of scar tissue, and sub-periosteal reaction. The results of three-point bending tests showed no significant differences in elastic stiffness, ultimate load, and yield load between the HIFU-treated and contralateral control bones at 7 days and 1 month after treatments. Similarly, the elastic stiffness and Young's moduli determined by micro-FE analyses at both time intervals were not statistically different. Multimodality imaging and histological data illustrated the presence of HIFU-induced bone damage at the cellular level, which activated the

  14. Multimodality Image Fusion with PSMA PET/CT and High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Focal Therapy for Primary Diagnosis and Management of Prostate Cancer: A Planned Research Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia C. Javitt

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in diagnostic imaging herald a new approach to diagnosis and management of prostate cancer. Multimodality fusion that combines anatomic with functional imaging data has surpassed either of the two alone. This opens up the possibility to “find and fix” malignancy with greater accuracy than ever before. This is particularly important for prostate cancer because it is the most common male cancer in most developed countries. This article describes technical advances under investigation at our institution and others using multimodality image fusion of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, transrectal ultrasound (TRUS, and PSMA PET/CT (defined as the combination of prostate-specific membrane antigen [PSMA], positron emission tomography [PET], and computed tomography [CT] for personalized medicine in the diagnosis and focal therapy of prostate cancer with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HiFUS.

  15. Transient disruption of vascular barriers using focused ultrasound and microbubbles for targeted drug delivery in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, Muna

    The physiology of the vasculature in the central nervous system (CNS) which includes the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) and other factors, prevents the transport of most anticancer agents to the brain and restricts delivery to infiltrating brain tumors. The heterogeneous vascular permeability in tumor vessels (blood-tumor barrier; BTB), along with several other factors, creates additional hurdles for drug treatment of brain tumors. Different methods have been used to bypass the BBB/BTB, but they have their own limitations such as being invasive, non-targeted or requiring the formulation of new drugs. Magnetic Resonance Imaging guided Focused Ultrasound (MRIgFUS), when combined with circulating microbubbles, is an emerging noninvasive method to temporarily permeabilize the BBB and BTB. The purpose of this thesis was to use this alternative approach to deliver chemotherapeutic agents through the BBB/BTB for brain tumor treatment in a rodent model to overcome the hinderances encountered in prior approaches tested for drug delivery in the CNS. The results presented in thesis demonstrate that MRIgFUS can be used to achieve consistent and reproducible BBB/BTB disruption in rats. It enabled us to achieve clinically-relevant concentrations of doxorubicin (~ 4.8+/-0.5 microg/g) delivered to the brain with the sonication parameters (0.69 MHz; 0.55 MPa; 10 ms bursts; 1 Hz PRF; 60 s duration), microbubble concentration (Definity, 10 microl/kg), and liposomoal doxorubicin (Lipo-DOX) dose (5.67 mg/kg) used. The resulting doxorubicin concentration was reduced by 32% when the agent was injected 10 minute after the last sonication. Three weekly sessions of FUS and Lipo-DOX appeared to be safe in the rat brain, despite some minor tissue damage. Importantly, the severe neurotoxicity seen in earlier works using other approaches does not appear to occur with delivery via FUS-BBB disruption. The resuls from three weekly treatments of FUS and Lipo-DOX in a rat glioma model are highly

  16. Development and internal validation of prediction models for biochemical failure and composite failure after focal salvage high intensity focused ultrasound for local radiorecurrent prostate cancer : Presentation of risk scores for individual patient prognoses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Max; Kanthabalan, Abi; Shah, Taimur T; McCartan, Neil; Moore, Caroline M.; Arya, Manit; van der Voort van Zyp, Jochem R.; Moerland, Marinus A.; Hindley, Richard G.; Emberton, Mark; Ahmed, Hashim U

    2018-01-01

    Purpose Patient selection for focal salvage remains difficult. Therefore, we developed and internally validated prediction models for biochemical failure (BF) and a composite endpoint (CE) following focal salvage high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for radiorecurrent prostate cancer. Materials

  17. Comparison of the synergistic effect of lipid nanobubbles and SonoVue microbubbles for high intensity focused ultrasound thermal ablation of tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanzhi Yao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Microbubbles (MBs are considered as an important enhancer for high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU treatment of benign or malignant tumors. Recently, different sizes of gas-filled bubbles have been investigated to improve the therapeutic efficiency of HIFU thermal ablation and reduce side effects associated with ultrasound power and irradiation time. However, nanobubbles (NBs as an ultrasound contrast agent for synergistic therapy of HIFU thermal ablation remain controversial due to their small nano-size in diameter. In this study, phospholipid-shell and gas-core NBs with a narrow size range of 500–600 nm were developed. The synergistic effect of NBs for HIFU thermal ablation was carefully studied both in excised bovine livers and in breast tumor models of rabbits, and made a critical comparison with that of commercial SonoVue microbubbles (SonoVue MBs. In addition, the pathological changes of the targeted area in tumor tissue after HIFU ablation were further investigated. Phosphate buffer saline (PBS was used as the control. Under the same HIFU parameters, the quantitative echo intensity of B-mode ultrasound image and the volume of coagulative necrosis in lipid NBs groups were significantly higher and larger than that in PBS groups, but could not be demonstrated a difference to that in SonoVue MBs groups both ex vivo and in vivo. These results showed that the synergistic effect of lipid NBs for HIFU thermal ablation were similar with that of SonoVue MBs, and further indicate that lipid NBs could potentially become an enhancer for HIFU thermal ablation of tumors.

  18. Comparison of the synergistic effect of lipid nanobubbles and SonoVue microbubbles for high intensity focused ultrasound thermal ablation of tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yuanzhi; Yang, Ke; Cao, Yang; Zhou, Xuan; Xu, Jinshun; Liu, Jianxin; Wang, Qi; Wang, Zhigang; Wang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Microbubbles (MBs) are considered as an important enhancer for high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment of benign or malignant tumors. Recently, different sizes of gas-filled bubbles have been investigated to improve the therapeutic efficiency of HIFU thermal ablation and reduce side effects associated with ultrasound power and irradiation time. However, nanobubbles (NBs) as an ultrasound contrast agent for synergistic therapy of HIFU thermal ablation remain controversial due to their small nano-size in diameter. In this study, phospholipid-shell and gas-core NBs with a narrow size range of 500-600 nm were developed. The synergistic effect of NBs for HIFU thermal ablation was carefully studied both in excised bovine livers and in breast tumor models of rabbits, and made a critical comparison with that of commercial SonoVue microbubbles (SonoVue MBs). In addition, the pathological changes of the targeted area in tumor tissue after HIFU ablation were further investigated. Phosphate buffer saline (PBS) was used as the control. Under the same HIFU parameters, the quantitative echo intensity of B-mode ultrasound image and the volume of coagulative necrosis in lipid NBs groups were significantly higher and larger than that in PBS groups, but could not be demonstrated a difference to that in SonoVue MBs groups both ex vivo and in vivo. These results showed that the synergistic effect of lipid NBs for HIFU thermal ablation were similar with that of SonoVue MBs, and further indicate that lipid NBs could potentially become an enhancer for HIFU thermal ablation of tumors.

  19. Time to threshold (TT), a safety parameter for heating by diagnostic ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubbers, Jaap; Hekkenberg, Rob T; Bezemer, Robert A

    2003-05-01

    Activities in the standardisation of medical ultrasonic imaging and monitoring devices have been undertaken to ensure the safe application and to provide the user with tools to perform risk-to-benefit analysis. Internationally, agreement has not been reached to implement a system based on a physical quantity such as temperature rise. Therefore, recently, the IEC Standard 60601-2-37 has adopted the thermal index (TI) as a safety parameter. TI indicates conditions that are more likely than others to produce thermal effects. The models used to calculate TI are based on the equilibrium temperature rise for a stationary transducer. Ultrasound (US) is often applied during a short time at one place. To characterise the situation before equilibrium is reached, this study proposes a new parameter: TT (time to threshold). TT indicates the time after which a threshold temperature rise is exceeded. TT is calculated for some tissue models to illustrate the meaning of TT. TT indicates how long one piece of tissue can be insonated safely, provided the safe threshold is known. Using TT, higher intensities can be applied safely during a limited time. This paper illustrates the effects of short insonation times and the influence of the beam diameter. Questions that are critical to the introduction of TT as a safety parameter are discussed.

  20. Investigation of joule-heating flow using ultrasound velocity profiler-effect of cold cap condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duong, T.T.; Tsuzuki, N.; Kikura, H.

    2015-01-01

    The High Level Radioactive Wastes (HLWs) are vitrified in a glass melter. However, sometimes the glass melter operation is not stable due to abnormal phenomena. If this happens, the glass melter has to be shut down. Understanding the flow behavior in glass melter is important to improve the applicability of the melter operation. Ultrasonic Velocity Profiler (UVP) is appropriate to observe the Joule-heating flow behavior which is scaled into experiment and conducted in Laboratory scale. The cubic cavity for Joule heating flow has dimension of 100 mm with a top surface condition is under cooling condition and the other walls is set as adiabatic condition. The effect of cold cap condition on the flow behavior is investigated by changing the top surface as fully or partly cooling as 50%, 75%. As a result, Joule-heating flow convection is observed by UVP and displayed in color scale (so-called spatio-temporal velocity profile). This information is very useful to observe the unstable flow convection. It is revealed that cold cap boundary conditions affect the flow field in the whole cavity. In case of full cooling on the top wall, the flow behavior is unstable by multi-vortex inside the cavity. However, the main vortex has a diameter of about 90 mm in both cases of 50% cooling and 75% cooling. These characteristics are also confirmed using a Computational Fluid Dynamic, named GSMAC-Finite Element Method that combined three fields: Flow field, Thermal field and electromagnetic field. (author)

  1. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding Ovarian Cancer Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored by Please ...

  2. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound - Abdomen Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding Ovarian Cancer Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored by Please ...

  3. Opening the Blood-Brain Barrier with MR Imaging-guided Focused Ultrasound: Preclinical Testing on a Trans-Human Skull Porcine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuexi; Alkins, Ryan; Schwartz, Michael L; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To develop and test a protocol in preparation for a clinical trial on opening the blood-brain barrier (BBB) with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-guided focused ultrasound for the delivery of chemotherapy drugs to brain tumors. Materials and Methods The procedures were approved by the institutional animal care committee. A trans-human skull porcine model was designed for the preclinical testing. Wide craniotomies were applied in 11 pigs (weight, approximately 15 kg). A partial human skull was positioned over the animal's brain. A modified clinical MR imaging-guided focused ultrasound brain system was used with a 3.0-T MR unit. The ultrasound beam was steered during sonications over a 3 × 3 grid at 3-mm spacing. Acoustic power levels of 3-20 W were tested. Bolus injections of microbubbles at 4 μL/kg were tested for each sonication. Levels of BBB opening, hemorrhage, and cavitation signal were measured with MR imaging, histologic examination, and cavitation receivers, respectively. A cavitation safety algorithm was developed on the basis of logistic regression of the measurements and tested to minimize the risk of hemorrhage. Results BBB openings of approximately 1 cm 3 in volume were visualized with gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging after sonication at an acoustic power of approximately 5 W. Gross examination of histologic specimens helped confirm Evans blue (bound to macromolecule albumin) extravasation, and hematoxylin-eosin staining helped detect only scattered extravasation of red blood cells. In cases where cavitation signals were higher than thresholds, sonications were terminated immediately without causing hemorrhage. Conclusion With a trans-human skull porcine model, this study demonstrated BBB opening with a 230-kHz system in preparation for a clinical trial. © RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  4. Method for optimal design of pipes for low-energy district heating, with focus on heat losses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalla Rosa, Alessandro; Li, Hongwei; Svendsen, Svend

    2011-01-01

    factors in the optimal design of low-energy DH systems. Various pipe configurations are considered in this paper: flexible pre-insulated twin pipes with symmetrical or asymmetrical insulation, double pipes, and triple pipes. These technologies represent potential energy-efficient and cost......-effective solutions for DH networks in low-heat density areas. We start with a review of theories and methods for steady-state heat loss calculation. Next, the article shows how detailed calculations with 2D-modeling of pipes can be carried out by means of computer software based on the finite-element method (FEM......). The model was validated by comparison with experimental measurements, analytical formulas, and data from the literature. We took into account the influence of the temperature-dependent conductivity coefficient of polyurethane insulation foam, which enabled us to achieve a high degree of accuracy. We also...

  5. Safety of Medical Diagnostic Ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breyer, B.

    1998-01-01

    Large numbers of people (both sick and healthy) are routinely exposed to ultrasound waves. We shall discuss wave parameters and scanner properties that are relevant to the safety aspect. This includes central pulse frequency, pulse length, intensity (ISPTA and others), focusing, pulse repetition frequency, pulse pressure, etc. Since the transmitted ultrasound power has steadily been increasing during the last two decades, the problems are becoming more serious with time. Doppler methods have gained importance and 'popularity, which additionally increases ultrasound power requirements since the reflectivity of red blood cells is so small that the backscattered pressure is about 100 times less than that from soft tissue structures in the body. Main mechanisms that can potentially present hazard are heating and cavitation. The basic parameter used to assess thermal hazard is ISPTA and the optimal predictor of cavitation hazard is the peak rarefractional pressure. The hazard of heating-up can be summarized in saying that temperatures up to 38.5 o C are safe, while temperatures above 41 o C are definitely not. Care must be taken to stay within the safe zone. However, there does not exist a confirmed report of any type of hazardous effects on humans using intensities presently applied in diagnostic ultrasound scanners. Taking this into account, various international bodies have put limits to the application of ultrasound, which is best summarized in the FDA (USA) regulation that diagnostic apparatus may have an output of maximally 720 mW/cm 2 (derated) provided thermal and mechanical properties are indicated (onscreen) by properly defined Thermal Indices (TI) and Mechanical Index (MI). These aspects shall be discussed in some detail. We shall give the rules for the operator to apply ultrasound with minimal hazard. The general conclusion is that diagnostic ultrasound, as presently known, may be used whenever a qualified expert expects essential medical benefit for the

  6. Effect of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU combined with radiotherapy on tumor malignancy in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer and evaluation of side effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU combined with radiotherapy on tumor malignancy in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer and the corresponding side effects. Methods: A total of 84 patients with advanced pancreatic cancer treated in our hospital between May 2013 and March 2016 were selected and randomly divided into HIFU group and IGRT group, HIFU group accepted high-intensity focused ultrasound combined with radiotherapy and IGRT group received radiotherapy alone. 4 weeks after treatment, the levels of tumor markers, liver and kidney function indexes, perineural invasionrelated molecules and cytokines in serum as well as the levels of immune cells in peripheral blood were determined. Results: 4 weeks after treatment, serum CA199, CA242, OPN, NGAL, RBP4, NGF, TrkA, p75, BDNF and TrkB levels of HIFU group were significantly lower than those of IGRT group, serum IL-2, TNF-毩, IFN-γ and IL-13 levels as well as peripheral blood NKT cell and CD4+T cell levels were significantly higher than those of IGRT group, and serum ALT, AST, Cr and BUN levels were not significantly different from those of IGRT group. Conclusion: HIFU combined with radiotherapy treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer can more effectively kill cancer cells, inhibit pancreatic cancer cell invasion to the peripheral nerve and enhance the antitumor immune response mediated by NKT cells and CD4+T cells.

  7. Feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging-guided high intensity focused ultrasound therapy for ablating uterine fibroids in patients with bowel lies anterior to uterus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lian; Chen Wenzhi; Liu Yinjiang; Hu Xiao; Zhou Kun; Chen Li; Peng Song; Zhu Hui; Zou Huiling; Bai Jin; Wang Zhibiao

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate the feasibility of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapeutic ablation of uterine fibroids in patients with bowel lies anterior to uterus. Materials and methods: Twenty-one patients with 23 uterine fibroids underwent MR imaging-guided high intensity focused ultrasound treatment, with a mean age of 39.4 ± 6.9 (20-49) years, with fibroids average measuring 6.0 ± 1.6 (range, 2.9-9.5) cm in diameter. After being compressed with a degassed water balloon on abdominal wall, MR imaging-guided high intensity focused ultrasound treatment was performed under conscious sedation by using fentanyl and midazolam. This procedure was performed by a Haifu JM focused ultrasound tumour therapeutic system (JM2.5C, Chongqing Haifu Technology Co., Ltd., China), in combination with a 1.5-Tesla MRI system (Symphony, Siemens, Germany), which provides real-time guidance and control. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging was performed to evaluate the efficacy of thermal ablation immediately and 3 months after HIFU treatment. The treatment time and adverse events were recorded. Results: The mean fibroid volume was 97.0 ± 78.3 (range, 12.7-318.3) cm 3 . According to the treatment plan, an average 75.0 ± 11.4% (range, 37.8-92.4%) of the fibroid volume was treated. The mean fibroid volume immediately after HIFU was 109.7 ± 93.1 (range, 11.9-389.6) cm 3 , slightly enlarged because of edema. The average non-perfused volume was 83.3 ± 71.7 (range, 7.7-282.9) cm 3 , the average fractional ablation, which was defined as non-perfused volume divided by the fibroid volume immediately after HIFU treatment, was 76.9 ± 18.7% (range, 21.0-97.0%). There were no statistically significant differences between the treatment volume and the non-perfused volume. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3 months obtained in 12 patients, the fibroid volume decreased by 31.4 ± 29.3% (range, -1.9 to 60.0%) in average, with paired t

  8. Feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging-guided high intensity focused ultrasound therapy for ablating uterine fibroids in patients with bowel lies anterior to uterus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Lian; Chen Wenzhi [Clinical Center for Tumour Therapy of 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing University of Medical Sciences, Chongqing 400010 (China); Liu Yinjiang; Hu Xiao [National Engineering Research Center of Ultrasound Medicine, Chongqing 400010 (China); Zhou Kun [Clinical Center for Tumour Therapy of 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing University of Medical Sciences, Chongqing 400010 (China); Chen Li [National Engineering Research Center of Ultrasound Medicine, Chongqing 400010 (China); Peng Song; Zhu Hui [Clinical Center for Tumour Therapy of 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing University of Medical Sciences, Chongqing 400010 (China); Zou Huiling [National Engineering Research Center of Ultrasound Medicine, Chongqing 400010 (China); Bai Jin [Institute of Ultrasound Engineering in Medicine of Chongqing University of Medical Sciences, Chongqing 400016 (China); Wang Zhibiao [Clinical Center for Tumour Therapy of 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing University of Medical Sciences, Chongqing 400010 (China); National Engineering Research Center of Ultrasound Medicine, Chongqing 400010 (China); Institute of Ultrasound Engineering in Medicine of Chongqing University of Medical Sciences, Chongqing 400016 (China)], E-mail: wangzhibiao@haifu.com.cn

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate the feasibility of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapeutic ablation of uterine fibroids in patients with bowel lies anterior to uterus. Materials and methods: Twenty-one patients with 23 uterine fibroids underwent MR imaging-guided high intensity focused ultrasound treatment, with a mean age of 39.4 {+-} 6.9 (20-49) years, with fibroids average measuring 6.0 {+-} 1.6 (range, 2.9-9.5) cm in diameter. After being compressed with a degassed water balloon on abdominal wall, MR imaging-guided high intensity focused ultrasound treatment was performed under conscious sedation by using fentanyl and midazolam. This procedure was performed by a Haifu JM focused ultrasound tumour therapeutic system (JM2.5C, Chongqing Haifu Technology Co., Ltd., China), in combination with a 1.5-Tesla MRI system (Symphony, Siemens, Germany), which provides real-time guidance and control. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging was performed to evaluate the efficacy of thermal ablation immediately and 3 months after HIFU treatment. The treatment time and adverse events were recorded. Results: The mean fibroid volume was 97.0 {+-} 78.3 (range, 12.7-318.3) cm{sup 3}. According to the treatment plan, an average 75.0 {+-} 11.4% (range, 37.8-92.4%) of the fibroid volume was treated. The mean fibroid volume immediately after HIFU was 109.7 {+-} 93.1 (range, 11.9-389.6) cm{sup 3}, slightly enlarged because of edema. The average non-perfused volume was 83.3 {+-} 71.7 (range, 7.7-282.9) cm{sup 3}, the average fractional ablation, which was defined as non-perfused volume divided by the fibroid volume immediately after HIFU treatment, was 76.9 {+-} 18.7% (range, 21.0-97.0%). There were no statistically significant differences between the treatment volume and the non-perfused volume. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3 months obtained in 12 patients, the fibroid volume decreased by 31.4 {+-} 29.3% (range, -1.9 to 60

  9. A dual-mode hemispherical sparse array for 3D passive acoustic mapping and skull localization within a clinical MRI guided focused ultrasound device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crake, Calum; Brinker, Spencer T.; Coviello, Christian M.; Livingstone, Margaret S.; McDannold, Nathan J.

    2018-03-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that passive acoustic imaging may be used alongside MRI for monitoring of focused ultrasound therapy. However, past implementations have generally made use of either linear arrays originally designed for diagnostic imaging or custom narrowband arrays specific to in-house therapeutic transducer designs, neither of which is fully compatible with clinical MR-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) devices. Here we have designed an array which is suitable for use within an FDA-approved MR-guided transcranial focused ultrasound device, within the bore of a 3 Tesla clinical MRI scanner. The array is constructed from 5  ×  0.4 mm piezoceramic disc elements arranged in pseudorandom fashion on a low-profile laser-cut acrylic frame designed to fit between the therapeutic elements of a 230 kHz InSightec ExAblate 4000 transducer. By exploiting thickness and radial resonance modes of the piezo discs the array is capable of both B-mode imaging at 5 MHz for skull localization, as well as passive reception at the second harmonic of the therapy array for detection of cavitation and 3D passive acoustic imaging. In active mode, the array was able to perform B-mode imaging of a human skull, showing the outer skull surface with good qualitative agreement with MR imaging. Extension to 3D showed the array was able to locate the skull within  ±2 mm/2° of reference points derived from MRI, which could potentially allow registration of a patient to the therapy system without the expense of real-time MRI. In passive mode, the array was able to resolve a point source in 3D within a  ±10 mm region about each axis from the focus, detect cavitation (SNR ~ 12 dB) at burst lengths from 10 cycles to continuous wave, and produce 3D acoustic maps in a flow phantom. Finally, the array was used to detect and map cavitation associated with microbubble activity in the brain in nonhuman primates.

  10. Clinical utility of a microbubble-enhancing contrast (“SonoVue”) in treatment of uterine fibroids with high intensity focused ultrasound: A retrospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Song [State Key Laboratory of Ultrasound Engineering in Medicine Co-founded by Chongqing and the Ministry of Science and Technology, Chongqing Key Laboratory of Ultrasound in Medicine and Engineering, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Non-invasive and Minimally Invasive Therapeutic Research Center for Uterine Benign Diseases of Chongqing, Chongqing 401121 (China); Xiong, Yu [Department of Obstetrics of Chongqing Haifu Hospital, Chongqing 401121 (China); Non-invasive and Minimally Invasive Therapeutic Research Center for Uterine Benign Diseases of Chongqing, Chongqing 401121 (China); Li, Kequan [State Key Laboratory of Ultrasound Engineering in Medicine Co-founded by Chongqing and the Ministry of Science and Technology, Chongqing Key Laboratory of Ultrasound in Medicine and Engineering, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Non-invasive and Minimally Invasive Therapeutic Research Center for Uterine Benign Diseases of Chongqing, Chongqing 401121 (China); He, Min [Department of Obstetrics of Chongqing Haifu Hospital, Chongqing 401121 (China); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Suining Central Hospital, Sichuan 629000 (China); Deng, Yongbin; Chen, Li; Zou, Min [Department of Obstetrics of Chongqing Haifu Hospital, Chongqing 401121 (China); Chen, Wenzhi; Wang, Zhibiao [State Key Laboratory of Ultrasound Engineering in Medicine Co-founded by Chongqing and the Ministry of Science and Technology, Chongqing Key Laboratory of Ultrasound in Medicine and Engineering, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Non-invasive and Minimally Invasive Therapeutic Research Center for Uterine Benign Diseases of Chongqing, Chongqing 401121 (China); He, Jia, E-mail: hejia0820@sina.com.cn [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Suining Central Hospital, Sichuan 629000 (China); and others

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical value of the contrast agent SonoVue in the treatment of uterine fibroids with ultrasound-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapeutic ablation. Materials and Methods: A total of 291 patients with solitary uterine fibroid from three centers were treated with ultrasound-guided HIFU. Among them, 129 patients from Suining Central Hospital of Sichuan were treated without using SonoVue. 162 patients from the First Hospital of Chongqing Medical University and Chongqing Haifu Hospital were treated with using SonoVue before, during and after HIFU procedure to assess the extent of HIFU. Results: The non-perfused volume (indicative of successful ablation) was observed in all treated uterine fibroids immediately after HIFU ablation; median fractional ablation, defined as non-perfused volume divided by the fibroid volume immediately after HIFU treatment, was 86.0% (range, 28.8–100.0%) in the group with using SonoVue, and 83.0% (8.7–100.0%) without SonoVue. The rate of massive gray scale changes was higher with SonoVue than without the agent. The sonication time to achieve massive gray scale changes was shorter with SonoVue than without. The sonication time for ablating 1 cm{sup 3} of fibroid volume was significantly shorter with using SonoVue than without. No major complications were observed in any patients. Conclusions: Based on our results, SonoVue may enhance the outcome of HIFU ablation and can be used to assess the extent of treatment.

  11. Clinical utility of a microbubble-enhancing contrast ("SonoVue") in treatment of uterine fibroids with high intensity focused ultrasound: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Song; Xiong, Yu; Li, Kequan; He, Min; Deng, Yongbin; Chen, Li; Zou, Min; Chen, Wenzhi; Wang, Zhibiao; He, Jia; Zhang, Lian

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the clinical value of the contrast agent SonoVue in the treatment of uterine fibroids with ultrasound-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapeutic ablation. A total of 291 patients with solitary uterine fibroid from three centers were treated with ultrasound-guided HIFU. Among them, 129 patients from Suining Central Hospital of Sichuan were treated without using SonoVue. 162 patients from the First Hospital of Chongqing Medical University and Chongqing Haifu Hospital were treated with using SonoVue before, during and after HIFU procedure to assess the extent of HIFU. The non-perfused volume (indicative of successful ablation) was observed in all treated uterine fibroids immediately after HIFU ablation; median fractional ablation, defined as non-perfused volume divided by the fibroid volume immediately after HIFU treatment, was 86.0% (range, 28.8-100.0%) in the group with using SonoVue, and 83.0% (8.7-100.0%) without SonoVue. The rate of massive gray scale changes was higher with SonoVue than without the agent. The sonication time to achieve massive gray scale changes was shorter with SonoVue than without. The sonication time for ablating 1cm(3) of fibroid volume was significantly shorter with using SonoVue than without. No major complications were observed in any patients. Based on our results, SonoVue may enhance the outcome of HIFU ablation and can be used to assess the extent of treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical utility of a microbubble-enhancing contrast (“SonoVue”) in treatment of uterine fibroids with high intensity focused ultrasound: A retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Song; Xiong, Yu; Li, Kequan; He, Min; Deng, Yongbin; Chen, Li; Zou, Min; Chen, Wenzhi; Wang, Zhibiao; He, Jia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical value of the contrast agent SonoVue in the treatment of uterine fibroids with ultrasound-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapeutic ablation. Materials and Methods: A total of 291 patients with solitary uterine fibroid from three centers were treated with ultrasound-guided HIFU. Among them, 129 patients from Suining Central Hospital of Sichuan were treated without using SonoVue. 162 patients from the First Hospital of Chongqing Medical University and Chongqing Haifu Hospital were treated with using SonoVue before, during and after HIFU procedure to assess the extent of HIFU. Results: The non-perfused volume (indicative of successful ablation) was observed in all treated uterine fibroids immediately after HIFU ablation; median fractional ablation, defined as non-perfused volume divided by the fibroid volume immediately after HIFU treatment, was 86.0% (range, 28.8–100.0%) in the group with using SonoVue, and 83.0% (8.7–100.0%) without SonoVue. The rate of massive gray scale changes was higher with SonoVue than without the agent. The sonication time to achieve massive gray scale changes was shorter with SonoVue than without. The sonication time for ablating 1 cm 3 of fibroid volume was significantly shorter with using SonoVue than without. No major complications were observed in any patients. Conclusions: Based on our results, SonoVue may enhance the outcome of HIFU ablation and can be used to assess the extent of treatment.

  13. Focused parathyroidectomy without intra-operative parathormone monitoring: The value of PTH assay in preoperative ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration washout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzu, Fatih; Arpaci, Dilek; Cakmak, Guldeniz Karadeniz; Emre, Ali Ugur; Elri, Tarik; Ilikhan, Sevil Uygun; Bahadir, Burak; Bayraktaoglu, Taner

    2016-03-01

    The accurate identification of hyperfunctioning parathyroid (HP) gland is the only issue for definitive surgical treatment in primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT). Various imaging and operative techniques have been proposed to confirm the localization of the diseased gland. Nevertheless, none of these methods proved to be the gold standard. The presented study aimed to assess the value of parathyroid hormone assay in preoperative ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (FNA)-PTH washout fluid to verify the correct localisation for focused parathyroidectomy without intra-operative PTH monitoring. The retrospective analysis of 57 patients with pHPT who underwent FNA-PTH was conducted from a prospective database. Biochemical assessment together with radiological (ultrasonography) and nuclear (MIBI scan) imaging was reviewed. Associations between FNA-PTH washout values and localization technics were evaluated and compared in terms of operative findings. Focused parathyroidectomy without intraoperative PTH monitoring was performed to 45 patients with high FNA-PTH values. The median largest diameter of the target parathyroid lesion identified by ultrasonography was 13 mm (range, 6 to 36). The median serum PTH level was 190 pg/mL (range, 78 to 1709; reference range, 15 to 65) whereas the median washout PTH was 2500 pg/mL (range, 480 to 3389). According to operative findings high FNA-PTH levels correctly identified parathyroid adenoma in 40 cases (89% of sensitivity and 100% of specificity and positive predictive value) whereas MIBI scan localized the lesion in 36 of these cases (80% of sensitivity). The higher level of PTH in preoperative ultrasound guided FNA washout is a considerable data to predict the correct localization of HP, particularly in circumstances of greater values than the serum PTH level. However, although its specificity is high, in cases of coexisting nodular thyroid disease, associated additional HP might be missed at focused parathyroidectomy

  14. Real-time monitoring of focused ultrasound blood-brain barrier opening via subharmonic acoustic emission detection: implementation of confocal dual-frequency piezoelectric transducers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Chih-Hung; Zhang, Jia-Wei; Liao, Yi-Yi; Liu, Hao-Li

    2016-01-01

    Burst-tone focused ultrasound exposure in the presence of microbubbles has been demonstrated to be effective at inducing temporal and local opening of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which promises significant clinical potential to deliver therapeutic molecules into the central nervous system (CNS). Traditional contrast-enhanced imaging confirmation after focused ultrasound (FUS) exposure serves as a post-operative indicator of the effectiveness of FUS-BBB opening, however, an indicator that can concurrently report the BBB status and BBB-opening effectiveness is required to provide effective feedback to implement this treatment clinically. In this study, we demonstrate the use of subharmonic acoustic emission detection with implementation on a confocal dual-frequency piezoelectric ceramic structure to perform real-time monitoring of FUS-BBB opening. A confocal dual-frequency (0.55 MHz/1.1 MHz) focused ultrasound transducer was designed. The 1.1 MHz spherically-curved ceramic was employed to deliver FUS exposure to induce BBB-opening, whereas the outer-ring 0.55 MHz ceramic was employed to detect the subharmonic acoustic emissions originating from the target position. In stage-1 experiments, we employed spectral analysis and performed an energy spectrum density (ESD) calculation. An optimized 0.55 MHz ESD level change was shown to effectively discriminate the occurrence of BBB-opening. Wideband acoustic emissions received from 0.55 MHz ceramics were also analyzed to evaluate its correlations with erythrocyte extravasations. In stage-2 real-time monitoring experiments, we applied the predetermined ESD change as a detection threshold in PC-controlled algorithm to predict the FUS exposure intra-operatively. In stage-1 experiment, we showed that subharmonic ESD presents distinguishable dynamics between intact BBB and opened BBB, and therefore a threshold ESD change level (5.5 dB) can be identified for BBB-opening prediction. Using this ESD change threshold detection as a

  15. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) Using Sonablate® Devices for the Treatment of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia and Localized Prostate Cancer: 18-year experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Toyoaki

    2011-09-01

    From 1993 to 2010, we have treated 156 patients benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and 1,052 patients localized prostate cancer high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Four different HIFU devices, SonablateR-200, SonablateR-500, SonablateR-500 version 4 and Sonablate® TCM, have been used for this study. Clinical outcome of HIFU for BPH did not show any superior effects to transurethral resection of the prostate, laser surgery or transurethral vapolization of the prostate. However, HIFU appears to be a safe and minimally invasive therapy for patients with localized prostate cancer, especially low- and intermediate-risk patients. The rate of clinical outcome has significantly improved over the years due to technical improvements in the device.

  16. Measurement of the radial temperature distribution of the heated spot produced by a focused laser beam using an optical pyrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, L J; Zobrist, S P

    1981-05-15

    A method is described for the evaluation of the Gaussian curve parameters needed for the description of the temperature distribution of the heated spot produced on a target substrate by a well-focused laser beam, using an optical pyrometer to read the weighted average temperatures from two distinct distances. The parameter so found gave a calculated distribution curve in excellent agreement with experimental determinations of that distribution.

  17. Transport phenomena in solid oxide fuel cell electrodes focusing on heat transfer related to chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navasa, M; Andersson, M; Yuan, J; Sundén, B

    2012-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are widely studied for their advantages especially at high temperatures. However, operating at high temperatures represents a high cost due to the strict requirements the materials are expected to fulfill. Thus, the main goal in SOFC research has been to decrease the operating temperature so that the range of available materials is widened and hence, the operating cost can be reduced. In this paper, the different heat sources that contribute to the cell energy balance are presented with strong emphasis on the chemical reactions that take place in SOFCs. The knowledge of which heat sources or sinks taking place and their locations within the SOFC can provide useful information for further design and efficiency improvements.

  18. Focus group discussions among owners and non-owners of ground source heat pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberson, B.F.

    1988-07-01

    This research was sponsored by the Office of Buildings and Community Systems and conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory as part of an ongoing effort to enhance the commercial use of federally developed technology. Federal dollars have supported research on the development of ground source heat pumps (GSHP) for several years. Though several companies currently sell GSHP's for residential use, their share of the total heating and air conditioning business remains less than one percent. Large manufacturing companies with national distribution have not yet added GSHP equipment to their product line. GSHP's use only about one half (Braud 1987) to one third (Bose 1987) of the energy needed to operate conventional furnaces and air conditioners. Consequently, a high level of market penetration by the GSHP offers direct benefits to both utility companies and individual users of the systems. Widespread use of these highly efficient systems will reduce both total energy consupmtion, and problems associated with high levels of energy use during peak periods. This will allow utility companies to delay capital expenditures for new facilities to meet the growing energy demand during peak periods. The cost effective use of electricity also reduces the likelihood of homeowners switching to a different fuel source for heating. 5 refs.

  19. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Prostate ultrasound, also called transrectal ultrasound, provides ...

  20. Design approaches for solar industrial process-heat systems: nontracking and line-focus collector technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutscher, C.F.; Davenport, R.L.; Dougherty, D.A.; Gee, R.C.; Masterson, P.M.; May, E.K.

    1982-08-01

    The design methodology for solar industrial process heat systems is described, and an overview is given of the use of solar energy in industry. A way to determine whether solar energy makes sense for a particular application is described. The basic system configurations used to supply hot water or steam are discussed, and computer-generated graphs are supplied that allow the user to select a collector type. Detailed energy calculations are provided, including the effects of thermal losses and storage. The selection of subsystem components is described, and control systems, installation and start-up details, economics, and safety and environmental issues are explained. (LEW)

  1. Therapeutic ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crum, Lawrence A

    2004-01-01

    The use of ultrasound in medicine is now quite commonplace, especially with the recent introduction of small, portable and relatively inexpensive, hand-held diagnostic imaging devices. Moreover, ultrasound has expanded beyond the imaging realm, with methods and applications extending to novel therapeutic and surgical uses. These applications broadly include: tissue ablation, acoustocautery, lipoplasty, site-specific and ultrasound mediated drug activity, extracorporeal lithotripsy, and the enhancement of natural physiological functions such as wound healing and tissue regeneration. A particularly attractive aspect of this technology is that diagnostic and therapeutic systems can be combined to produce totally non-invasive, imageguided therapy. This general lecture will review a number of these exciting new applications of ultrasound and address some of the basic scientific questions and future challenges in developing these methods and technologies for general use in our society. We shall particularly emphasize the use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in the treatment of benign and malignant tumors as well as the introduction of acoustic hemostasis, especially in organs which are difficult to treat using conventional medical and surgical techniques. (amum lecture)

  2. Evaluation of the therapeutic efficacy of high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma by three-dimensional sonography with a perflubutane-based contrast agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numata, Kazushi; Fukuda, Hiroyuki; Ohto, Masao; Itou, Ryu; Nozaki, Akito; Kondou, Masaaki; Morimoto, Manabu; Karasawa, Eii; Tanaka, Katsuaki

    2010-01-01

    Objective: We performed contrast-enhanced three-dimensional sonography (CE 3D US) with a perflubutane-based contrast agent to immediately evaluate the completeness of ablation of small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) lesions by extracorporeal high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Subjects and methods: Twenty-one HCC lesions were treated by a single ultrasound-guided HIFU ablation session, and CE 3D US was performed before, immediately after, and 1 week, and 1 month after HIFU, and contrast-enhanced CT (CE CT) or contrast-enhanced MRI (CE MRI) was performed before HIFU, 1 week and 1 month after HIFU, and during the follow-up period. Results: Immediately and 1 month after HIFU, 17 lesions were evaluated as adequately ablated by CE 3D US, and the other 4 lesions as residual tumors. One month after HIFU, 18 were evaluated as adequately ablated by CE CT or CE MRI, and the other 3 as residual tumors. The evaluation by CE 3D US immediately after HIFU and by CE CT or CE MRI 1 month after HIFU was concordant with 20 lesions. The kappa value for agreement between the findings of CE 3D US and other modalities by two blinded observers was 0.83. When the 1-month CE CT or CE MRI findings were used as the reference standard, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of CE 3D US immediately after HIFU for the diagnosis of the adequate ablation were 100%, 75%, and 95%, respectively. Conclusion: CE 3D US appears to be a useful method for immediate evaluation of therapeutic efficacy of HIFU ablation of HCC lesions.

  3. The potential of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) combine phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PhS-OCT) for diseases diagnosis, treatment and monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kanheng; Wang, Yan; Feng, Kairui; Li, Chunhui; Huang, Zhihong

    2018-02-01

    HIFU is a truly noninvasive, acoustic therapeutic technique that utilizes high intensity acoustic field in the focus to kill the targeted tissue for disease treatment purpose. The mechanical properties of targeted tissue changes before and after treatment, and this change can be accurately detected by shear wave elastography. Hence, shear wave elastography is usually used for monitoring HIFU treatment asynchronously. To improve the low spatial resolution in ultrasound shear wave elastography, and to perform diseases diagnosis, treatment and monitoring in the same system, a new setup that combines HIFU and PhS-OCT system was proposed in this study. This proposed setup could do 1) HIFU treatment when the transducer works at high energy level, 2) ultrasound induced shear wave optical coherence elastography for HIFU treatment asynchronous monitoring when the transducer works at low energy level. Ex-vivo bovine liver tissue was treated at the same energy level for different time (0s, 1s, 5s, 9s) in this research. Elastography was performed on the lesion area of the sample after HIFU treatment, and the elastogram was reconstructed by the time of flight time method. The elastogram results clearly show the boundary of HIFU lesion area and surrounding normal tissue, even for 1s treatment time. And the average elasticity of the lesion grows linearly as the treatment time increases. Combined with OCT needle probe, the proposed method has a large potential not only to be used for superficial diseases treatment, but also to be used for high-precision-demanded diseases treatment, e.g. nervous disease treatment.

  4. [High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for tumor pain relief in inoperable pancreatic cancer : Evaluation with the pain sensation scale (SES)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinova, M; Strunk, H M; Rauch, M; Henseler, J; Clarens, T; Brüx, L; Dolscheid-Pommerich, R; Conrad, R; Cuhls, H; Radbruch, L; Schild, H H; Mücke, M

    2017-02-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) in combination with palliative standard therapy is an innovative and effective treatment option for pain reduction in patients with inoperable pancreatic cancer. Evaluation of the effects of additive ultrasound (US)-guided HIFU treatment in inoperable pancreatic cancer on the sensory and affective pain perception using validated questionnaries. In this study 20 patients with locally advanced inoperable pancreatic cancer and tumor-related pain were treated by US-guided HIFU (6 stage III, 12 stage IV according to UICC and 2 with local recurrence after surgery). Ablation was performed using the JC HIFU system (HAIFU, Chongqing, China) with an ultrasonic device for real-time imaging. Clinical assessment included evaluation of pain severity using validated questionnaires with particular attention to the pain sensation scale (SES) with its affective and sensory component and the numeric rating scale (NRS). The average pain reduction after HIFU was 2.87 points on the NRS scale and 57.3 % compared to the mean baseline score (n = 15, 75 %) in 19 of 20 treated patients. Four patients did not report pain relief, however, the previous opioid medication could be stopped (n = 2) or the analgesic dosage could be reduced (n = 2). No pain reduction was achieved in one patient. Furthermore, after HIFU emotional as well as sensory pain aspects were significantly reduced (before vs. 1 week after HIFU, p pain scales). US-guided HIFU can be used for effective and early pain relief and reduction of emotional and sensory pain sensation in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

  5. A model of integrated lung and focused heart ultrasound as a new screening examination in infants at risk of respiratory or hemodynamic compromise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser Elsayed

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This was a feasibility study to determine whether an edu­cational program conducted over 2 days followed by 25 performed studies under supervision equips physicians with the skills to accurately interpret and perform integrated lung ultrasound (LUS and focused heart ultrasound (FHUS as a screening exam in infants at risk of respiratory or hemodynamic compromise.Methods: We conducted a training course over 2 days (total of 16 hours to teach fellows how to interpret a pre-designed model of LUS and FHUS, as a screening exam for infants at risk of respiratory or hemodynamic compromise. Then trainees performed 25 cases with different neonatal lung and functional heart issues. The screening model included only the basic views required to evaluate common lung parenchymal and functional neonatal heart conditions in sick infants. The accuracy of interpretation during the course was assessed by Kappa.Results: The inter-rater agreement between all trainees and instructor improved on the second day of the course to Kappa 0.86 (95% CI: 0.72-0.97 for LUS views and 0.78 (95% CI: 0.69-0.91 for FHUS views. The inter-rater agreement between trainees themselves improved from Kappa 0.64 (95% CI: 0.47-0.81 for LUS on day one to 0.89 (95% CI: 0.81-0.96 on day two. And from 0.58 (95% CI: 0.44-0.73 on day one to 0.75 (95% CI: 0.68-0.84 on day two.Conclusion: Bedside screening, using integrated LUS and FHUS can be a useful adjunct to clinical examination in infants at risk of respiratory or hemodynamic compromise.

  6. Non-Invasive, Focal Disconnection of Brain Circuitry Using Magnetic Resonance-Guided Low-Intensity Focused Ultrasound to Deliver a Neurotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanrong; Tan, Hongying; Bertram, Edward H; Aubry, Jean-François; Lopes, Maria-Beatriz; Roy, Jack; Dumont, Erik; Xie, Mingxing; Zuo, Zhiyi; Klibanov, Alexander L; Lee, Kevin S; Wintermark, Max

    2016-09-01

    Disturbances in the function of neuronal circuitry contribute to most neurologic disorders. As knowledge of the brain's connectome continues to improve, a more refined understanding of the role of specific circuits in pathologic states will also evolve. Tools capable of manipulating identified circuits in a targeted and restricted manner will be essential not only to expand our understanding of the functional roles of such circuits, but also to therapeutically disconnect critical pathways contributing to neurologic disease. This study took advantage of the ability of low-intensity focused ultrasound (FUS) to transiently disrupt the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to deliver a neurotoxin with poor BBB permeability (quinolinic acid [QA]) in a guided manner to a target region in the brain parenchyma. Ten male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups receiving the following treatments: (i) magnetic resonance-guided FUS + microbubbles + saline (n = 5), or (ii) magnetic resonance-guided FUS + microbubbles + QA (n = 5). Systemic administration of QA was well tolerated. However, when QA and microbubbles were systemically administered in conjunction with magnetic resonance-guided FUS, the BBB was disrupted and primary neurons were destroyed in the targeted subregion of the hippocampus in all QA-treated animals. Administration of vehicle (saline) together with microbubbles and FUS also disrupted the BBB but did not produce neuronal injury. These findings indicate the feasibility of non-invasively destroying a targeted region of the brain parenchyma using low-intensity FUS together with systemic administration of microbubbles and a neurotoxin. This approach could be of therapeutic value in various disorders in which disturbances of neural circuitry contribute to neurologic disease. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. In Situ Tuning of Focused-Ion-Beam Defined Nanomechanical Resonators Using Joule Heating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Homann, Lasse Vinther; Booth, Tim; Lei, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Nanomechanical resonators have a huge potential for a variety of applications, including high-resolution mass sensing. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel rapid prototyping method for fabricating nanoelectromechanical systems using focused-ion-beam milling as well as in situ electromechanical c...

  8. In-line silica capillary tube all-silica fiber-optic Fabry-Perot interferometric sensor for detecting high intensity focused ultrasound fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D H; Wang, S J; Jia, P G

    2012-06-01

    Aiming at detecting high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) fields, this letter reports on a novel in-line silica capillary tube all-silica fiber-optic Fabry-Perot (ILSCT-ASFP) interferometric sensor fabricated by splicing a commercially available silica capillary tube to two single-mode fibers. The experimental results show that such a novel ILSCT-ASFP interferometric sensor with a cavity length of ∼60.76 μm has an excellent fringe visibility of up to ∼20 dB, and the fringe visibility is still good when the cavity length extends up to ∼1031.07 μm. The measured wavelength-temperature sensitivity of 0.000858 nm/°C shows that the wavelength drift of the fabricated ILSCT-ASFP interferometric sensor towards temperature is extremely low. Meanwhile, the measurement of HIFU fields by this novel sensor is demonstrated, and the experimental results indicate that the signal-to-noise ratio of the sensing system for sensing a 0.93 MHz HIFU field with a pressure of 2.69 MPa in the focus area can reach 42.8 dB. The corresponding noise equivalent pressure is 0.0194 MPa, and the calculated acoustic sensitivity is 65.4 mV/MPa over a 2.5 MHz measurement bandwidth.

  9. The impact of standing wave effects on transcranial focused ultrasound disruption of the blood-brain barrier in a rat model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Reilly, Meaghan A; Huang Yuexi; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2010-01-01

    Microbubble-mediated disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) for targeted drug delivery using focused ultrasound shows great potential as a therapy for a wide range of brain disorders. This technique is currently at the pre-clinical stage and important work is being conducted in animal models. Measurements of standing waves in ex vivo rat skulls were conducted using an optical hydrophone and a geometry dependence was identified. Standing waves could not be eliminated through the use of swept frequencies, which have been suggested to eliminate standing waves. Definitive standing wave patterns were detected in over 25% of animals used in a single study. Standing waves were successfully eliminated using a wideband composite sharply focused transducer and a reduced duty cycle. The modified pulse parameters were used in vivo to disrupt the BBB in a rat indicating that, unlike some other bioeffects, BBB disruption is not dependent on standing wave conditions. Due to the high variability of standing waves and the inability to correctly estimate in situ pressures given standing wave conditions, attempts to minimize standing waves should be made in all future work in this field to ensure that results are clinically translatable.

  10. Obstetrical Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Obstetric Ultrasound Obstetric ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures of ... What are the limitations of Obstetrical Ultrasound Imaging? Obstetric ultrasound cannot identify all fetal abnormalities. Consequently, when ...

  11. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound - Pelvis Ultrasound imaging of the pelvis uses sound waves to produce pictures of the structures and ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  12. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of the prostate uses sound waves to produce pictures of a man’s prostate ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  13. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound or with a rectal examination, an ultrasound-guided biopsy can be performed. This procedure involves advancing ... of the Prostate) Prostate Cancer Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy Images related to Ultrasound - Prostate Sponsored ...

  14. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Prostate Ultrasound Imaging? What is Ultrasound Imaging of the Prostate? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and produces ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A transrectal ultrasound of the prostate gland ...

  15. Developing an emergency ultrasound app

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Kim Thestrup; Subhi, Yousif; Aagaard, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    Focused emergency ultrasound is rapidly evolving as a clinical skill for bedside examination by physicians at all levels of education. Ultrasound is highly operator-dependent and relevant training is essential to ensure appropriate use. When supplementing hands-on focused ultrasound courses, e...

  16. Moderate-to-deep sedation technique, using propofol and ketamine, allowing synchronised breathing for magnetic resonance high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) treatment for uterine fibroids : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaessen, Hermanus H B; Knuttel, F M; van Breugel, J M M; Ikink, M E; Dieleman, J M; van den Bosch, Maurice; Knape, J T A

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Magnetic resonance high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) treatment for uterine fibroids is rapidly gaining popularity as a treatment modality. This procedure is generally uncomfortable, painful, and requires minimal or absence of movement and an MR-HIFU synchronised breathing

  17. Focus on Bioenergy in the electricity and heat market. Project results 2015-2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thraen, Daniela; Pfeiffer, Diana

    2017-01-01

    The report covers the following contributions: DeHoGas - sustainable local wood gasification plant with coupled micro gas turbine; SEVERA - sensor technique for efficient fermentation og biogenic residuals and wastes; FuelBand - extension of the fuel band of modern biomass combustion; REPOWERING - measures for efficiency improvement for the existing plants; PROKOSYS - processes, components and systems for flexible operation of biogas plants using biogenic residuals and wastes; Carola - electrostatic finest particle separator for flexible adaptation to biomass vessels; HydoCon - hydrolysis container - flexible plant components for substrate usage improvement in biogas plants; EFFIGEST - efficiency improvement in poultry manure fermentation using modified straw fractions and process integrated production of marketable fertilizer; FLUHKE - dry low-temperature entrained flow gasification with bio-coals from hydrothermal carbonization for local electricity and heat production with motor-cogeneration; REMISBIO - measures for emissions reduction of bio gas plants - catalyst test; Mini-bio-cogeneration - readiness of prototype for decentralized gasification of residual pellets for serial production; IbeKEt - innovative communal demand-adaptive energy carrier concept; Regiobalance - flexible bioenergy as regional compensation option in the German electricity market; FLEXHKW - flexible operation of cogeneration plants.

  18. Pharmacokinetic analysis of 111 in-labeled liposomal Doxorubicin in murine glioblastoma after blood-brain barrier disruption by focused ultrasound.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Yi Yang

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of targeted and untargeted (111In-doxorubicin liposomes after these have been intravenously administrated to tumor-bearing mice in the presence of blood-brain barrier disruption (BBB-D induced by focused ultrasound (FUS. An intracranial brain tumor model in NOD-scid mice using human brain glioblastoma multiforme (GBM 8401 cells was developed in this study. (111In-labeled human atherosclerotic plaque-specific peptide-1 (AP-1-conjugated liposomes containing doxorubicin (Lipo-Dox; AP-1 Lipo-Dox were used as a microSPECT probe for radioactivity measurements in the GBM-bearing mice. Compared to the control tumors treated with an injection of (111In-AP-1 Lipo-Dox or (111In-Lipo-Dox, the animals receiving the drugs followed by FUS exhibited enhanced accumulation of the drug in the brain tumors (p<0.05. Combining sonication with drugs significantly increased the tumor-to-normal brain doxorubicin ratio of the target tumors compared to the control tumors. The tumor-to-normal brain ratio was highest after the injection of (111In-AP-1 Lipo-Dox with sonication. The (111In-liposomes micro-SPECT/CT should be able to provide important information about the optimum therapeutic window for the chemotherapy of brain tumors using sonication.

  19. Enhanced therapeutic agent delivery through magnetic resonance imaging-monitored focused ultrasound blood-brain barrier disruption for brain tumor treatment: an overview of the current preclinical status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao-Li; Yang, Hung-Wei; Hua, Mu-Yi; Wei, Kuo-Chen

    2012-01-01

    Malignant glioma is a severe primary CNS cancer with a high recurrence and mortality rate. The current strategy of surgical debulking combined with radiation therapy or chemotherapy does not provide good prognosis, tumor progression control, or improved patient survival. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) acts as a major obstacle to chemotherapeutic treatment of brain tumors by severely restricting drug delivery into the brain. Because of their high toxicity, chemotherapeutic drugs cannot be administered at sufficient concentrations by conventional delivery methods to significantly improve long-term survival of patients with brain tumors. Temporal disruption of the BBB by microbubble-enhanced focused ultrasound (FUS) exposure can increase CNS-blood permeability, providing a promising new direction to increase the concentration of therapeutic agents in the brain tumor and improve disease control. Under the guidance and monitoring of MR imaging, a brain drug-delivery platform can be developed to control and monitor therapeutic agent distribution and kinetics. The success of FUS BBB disruption in delivering a variety of therapeutic molecules into brain tumors has recently been demonstrated in an animal model. In this paper the authors review a number of critical studies that have demonstrated successful outcomes, including enhancement of the delivery of traditional clinically used chemotherapeutic agents or application of novel nanocarrier designs for actively transporting drugs or extending drug half-lives to significantly improve treatment efficacy in preclinical animal models.

  20. Enhancing effects of SonoVue, a microbubble sonographic contrast agent, on high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation in rabbit livers in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wen; Zhou, Xiaodong; Ren, Xiaolong; Zheng, Minjuan; Zhang, Jun; He, Guangbin

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the enhancing biological effects of SonoVue (Bracco SpA, Milan, Italy), a sulfur hexafluoride sonographic contrast agent, on high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation in vivo. Forty-five rabbits were randomly divided into 3 groups and underwent laparotomy. Animals in group 1 were given injections of 0.2 mL of SonoVue intravenously; animals in group 2 were given physiologic saline; and those in group 3 were not given injections as control. The exposure time was set at 2 seconds with the acoustic power at 600 W. After HIFU ablations, volumes of coagulated regions were measured. Liver tissues were examined under light microscopy with hematoxylin-eosin staining and under transmission electron microscopy. Coagulated volumes in group 1 (mean +/- SD, 2.41 +/- 0.44 cm(3)) were larger than those in group 2 (0.80 +/- 0.13 cm(3)) and group 3 (0.83 +/- 0.16 cm(3)) (P SonoVue can substantially enhance the ablation effects of HIFU, suggesting that microbubble contrast agents may be useful for improving HIFU efficiency.

  1. MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) to treat facet joint osteoarthritis low back pain - case series of an innovative new technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, Evan M.; Platt, Michael W.; Gedroyc, Wladyslaw

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) to treat facet joint osteoarthritis pain. Patients with a positive response to facet joint interventions were recruited from Pain and Spinal Clinics. Treatments were performed at the levels of pain according to symptomatology, previous invasive treatment and MRI grading of facet joint osteoarthritis. Both safety and efficacy data were collected. Pain palliation was evaluated using a validated pain numerical rating scale (NRS), Oswestry disability questionnaire (ODQ), Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) and the EuroQol (EQ-5D) health state score Eighteen patients were treated. There were no major adverse events. At 6/12 we found a reduction in both the NRS (average/worst) pain scores (60.2 %/51.2 %). This was associated with 45.9 % improvement in the ODQ score and 61.9 % reduction in the BPI interference score. We observed an improvement in the EuroQol (EQ-5D) health state score based on UK coefficients of +0.379 (0.317 to 0.696). Our phase I observational pilot study has evaluated an innovative new technique that is both non-invasive and radiation free. It is the first description of this procedure in the literature. In all patients the technique was safe, free of complications, effective and well tolerated. (orig.)

  2. MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) to treat facet joint osteoarthritis low back pain - case series of an innovative new technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weeks, Evan M.; Platt, Michael W. [St Mary' s Hospital, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Department of Anaesthesia and Pain Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Gedroyc, Wladyslaw [St Mary' s Hospital, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-15

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) to treat facet joint osteoarthritis pain. Patients with a positive response to facet joint interventions were recruited from Pain and Spinal Clinics. Treatments were performed at the levels of pain according to symptomatology, previous invasive treatment and MRI grading of facet joint osteoarthritis. Both safety and efficacy data were collected. Pain palliation was evaluated using a validated pain numerical rating scale (NRS), Oswestry disability questionnaire (ODQ), Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) and the EuroQol (EQ-5D) health state score Eighteen patients were treated. There were no major adverse events. At 6/12 we found a reduction in both the NRS (average/worst) pain scores (60.2 %/51.2 %). This was associated with 45.9 % improvement in the ODQ score and 61.9 % reduction in the BPI interference score. We observed an improvement in the EuroQol (EQ-5D) health state score based on UK coefficients of +0.379 (0.317 to 0.696). Our phase I observational pilot study has evaluated an innovative new technique that is both non-invasive and radiation free. It is the first description of this procedure in the literature. In all patients the technique was safe, free of complications, effective and well tolerated. (orig.)

  3. MRI-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation of bone: evaluation of acute findings with MR and CT imaging in a swine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucknor, Matthew D; Rieke, Viola; Do, Loi; Majumdar, Sharmila; Link, Thomas M; Saeed, Maythem

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate hyperacute (guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) in a swine bone model as a function of sonication number and energy. Experimental procedures received approval from the local Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. MRgHIFU was used to create distal and proximal ablations in the right femur of eight pigs. Each target was dosed with four or six sonications within similar volumes. The energy dosed to the distal target was higher (419 ± 19 J) than the proximal target (324 ± 17 J). The targeted femur and contralateral control were imaged before and after ablation using MR at 3T. Qualitative changes in signal on T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and T1-weighted postcontrast images were assessed. Ablation dimensions were calculated from postcontrast MRI. The 64-slice CT images were also obtained before and after ablation and qualitative changes were assessed. MRgHIFU bone ablation size measured on average 8.5 × 21.1 × 16.2 mm (transverse × craniocaudal × anteroposterior). Interestingly, within similar prescribed volumes, increasing the number of sonications from 4 to 6 increased the depth of the intramedullary hypoenhanced zone from 2.9 mm to 6.5 mm (P bone. Unlike CT, T2-weighted and contrast-enhanced MR demonstrated the hyperacute structural changes in the femur and surrounding soft tissue. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Analysis of the spatial and temporal accuracy of heating in the prostate gland using transurethral ultrasound therapy and active MR temperature feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, Rajiv; Tang, Kee; Burtnyk, Mathieu; Boyes, Aaron; Bronskill, Michael; Sugar, Linda; Appu, Sree; Klotz, Laurence

    2009-01-01

    A new MRI-guided therapy is being developed as a minimally invasive treatment for localized prostate cancer utilizing high-intensity ultrasound energy to generate a precise region of thermal coagulation within the prostate gland. The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vivo the capability to produce a spatial heating pattern in the prostate that accurately matched the shape of a target region using transurethral ultrasound heating and active MR temperature feedback. Experiments were performed in a canine model (n = 9) in a 1.5 T MR imager using a prototype device comprising a single planar transducer operated under rotational control. The spatial temperature distribution, measured every 5 s with MR thermometry, was used to adjust the acoustic power and rotation rate in order to achieve a temperature of 55 0 C along the outer boundary of the target region. The results demonstrated the capability to produce accurate spatial heating patterns within the prostate gland. An average temperature of 56.2 ± 0.6 0 C was measured along the outer boundary of the target region across all experiments in this study. The average spatial error between the target boundary and the 55 0 C isotherm was 0.8 ± 0.7 mm (-0.2 to 3.2 mm), and the overall treatment time was ≤20 min for all experiments. Excellent spatial agreement was observed between the temperature information acquired with MRI and the pattern of thermal damage measured on H and E-stained tissue sections. This study demonstrates the benefit of adaptive energy delivery using active MR temperature feedback, and an excellent capability to treat precise regions within the prostate gland with this technology.

  5. Line focus by the ellipsoidal and hyperbolic mirrors, and the fabrication of the new type`s heated air engine. 1; Daenmenkyo to sokyokumenkyo ni yoru line focus to shingata netsu kuki engine no shisaku. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shishido, K.; Kazimierski, Z.; Shoji, T. [Tohoku Gakuin University, Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Sugiura, M. [Tohoku Gakuin Tsutsujigaoka High School, Sendai (Japan); Kobayashi, Y. [Tokyo Special Glass Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-27

    Line focusing by ellipsoidal and hyperbolic mirrors was devised for solar heat collection, and the new prototype heated air engine is under fabrication based on such focusing. Ellipse is a locus of the point at which the distance from the 2nd focus is equal to that from the circle with the 1st focus as a center and the major axis as a radius. Hyperbola can be also figured under similar geometric conditions. The link mechanism possible to machine quadratic surfaces based on the above principle has been developed. High-precision quadratic surface mirrors can be fabricated by the link mechanism for convergent solar heat power generation, achieving line focusing of light. The new prototype heated air engine is also proposed which is composed of the heating part by line focusing, cylinder, piston and cooling column. This engine is featured by simple function, light weight, compact body, high efficiency and safety, and is under fabrication. Although conventional converging mirrors use all the mirror surface, the new line focusing uses only the upper part of the mirror, and the lower part is turned over for protection of the mirror from strong wind. 9 figs.

  6. Calibration and Evaluation of Ultrasound Thermography using Infrared Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yi-Sing; Deng, Cheri X.

    2015-01-01

    Real-time monitoring of the spatiotemporal evolution of tissue temperature is important to ensure safe and effective treatment in thermal therapies including hyperthermia and thermal ablation. Ultrasound thermography has been proposed as a non-invasive technique for temperature measurement, and accurate calibration of the temperature-dependent ultrasound signal changes against temperature is required. Here we report a method that uses infrared (IR) thermography for calibration and validation of ultrasound thermography. Using phantoms and cardiac tissue specimens subjected to high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) heating, we simultaneously acquired ultrasound and IR imaging data from the same surface plane of a sample. The commonly used echo time shift-based method was chosen to compute ultrasound thermometry. We first correlated the ultrasound echo time shifts with IR-measured temperatures for material-dependent calibration and found that the calibration coefficient was positive for fat-mimicking phantom (1.49 ± 0.27) but negative for tissue-mimicking phantom (− 0.59 ± 0.08) and cardiac tissue (− 0.69 ± 0.18 °C-mm/ns). We then obtained the estimation error of the ultrasound thermometry by comparing against the IR measured temperature and revealed that the error increased with decreased size of the heated region. Consistent with previous findings, the echo time shifts were no longer linearly dependent on temperature beyond 45 – 50 °C in cardiac tissues. Unlike previous studies where thermocouples or water-bath techniques were used to evaluate the performance of ultrasound thermography, our results show that high resolution IR thermography provides a useful tool that can be applied to evaluate and understand the limitations of ultrasound thermography methods. PMID:26547634

  7. Evaluation of superparamagnetic iron oxide-polymer composite microcapsules for magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yang; Zheng, Yuanyi; Li, Pan; Wang, Dong; Niu, Chengcheng; Gong, Yuping; Huang, Rongzhong; Wang, Zhibiao; Wang, Zhigang; Ran, Haitao

    2014-11-03

    Superparamagnetic poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)-coated Fe3O4 microcapsules are receiving increased attention as potential diagnostic and therapeutic modalities in the field of oncology. In this study, PLGA-coated Fe3O4 microcapsules were combined with a magnetic resonance imaging-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-guided HIFU) platform, with the objective of investigating the effects of these composite microcapsules regarding MR-guided HIFU liver cancer surgery in vivo. PLGA-coated Fe3O4 microcapsules consisting of a liquid core and a PLGA-Fe3O4 shell were fabricated using a modified double emulsion evaporation method. Their acute biosafety was confirmed in vitro using MDA cells and in vivo using rabbits. To perform MR-guided HIFU surgery, the microcapsules were intravenously injected into a rabbit liver tumor model before MR-guided HIFU. T2-weighted images and MR signal intensity in normal liver parenchyma and tumor tissue were acquired before and after injection, to assess the MR imaging ability of the microcapsules. After MR-guided HIFU ablation tissue temperature mapping, the coagulative volume and histopathology of the tumor tissue were analyzed to investigate the ablation effects of MR-guided HIFUs. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy showed that the microcapsules displayed a spherical morphology and a shell-core structure (mean diameter, 587 nm). The hysteresis curve displayed the typical superparamagnetic properties of the microcapsules, which are critical to their application in MR-guided HIFU surgery. In MR-guided HIFU surgery, these microcapsules functioned as an MRI contrast agent, induced significant hyperthermal enhancement (P microcapsules is a potentially synergistic technique regarding the enhancement of MR-guided HIFU cancer surgery.

  8. High intensity focused ultrasound treatment of adenomyosis: The relationship between the features of magnetic resonance imaging on T2 weighted images and the therapeutic efficacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Chunmei; Setzen, Raymond; Liu, Zhongqiong; Liu, Yunchang; Xie, Bin; Aili, Aixingzi; Zhang, Lian

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the relationship between the features of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on T2 weighted images (T2WI) and the therapeutic efficacy of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) on adenomyosis. Materials and methods: From January 2011 to November 2015, four hundred and twenty-eight patients with symptomatic adenomyosis were treated with HIFU. Based on the signal intensity and the number of hyperintense foci in the adenomyotic lesions on T2WI, the patients were classified into groups. The day after HIFU ablation patients underwent contrast-enhanced MRI and a comparison was made of non-perfused volume (NPV) ratio, energy efficiency factor (EEF), treatment time, sonication time, and adverse effects. Results: No significant difference in terms of HIFU treatment settings and results was observed between the group of patients with hypointense adenomyotic lesions and the group with isointense adenomyotic lesions (P > 0.05). However, the sonication time and EEF were significantly higher in the group with multiple hyperintense foci compared to the group with few hyperintense foci. The NPV ratio achieved in the lesions with multiple hyperintenese foci was significantly lower than that in the lesions with few hyperintense foci (P < 0.05). No significant difference was observed in the rate of adverse effects between the two groups. Conclusions: Based on our results, the response of the adenomyotic lesions to HIFU treatment is not related to the signal intensity of adenomyotic lesions on T2WI. However, the number of the high signal intensity foci in the adenomyotic lesions on T2WI can be considered as a predictive factor to help select patients for HIFU treatment.

  9. Numerical Study for Optimizing Parameters of High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound-Induced Thermal Field during Liver Tumor Ablation: HIFU Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh gharloghi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU is considered a noninvasive and effective technique for tumor ablation. Frequency and acoustic power are the most effective parameters for temperature distribution and the extent of tissue damage. The aim of this study was to optimize the operating transducer parameters such as frequency and input power in order to acquire suitable temperature and thermal dose distribution in the course of a numerical assessment. Materials and Methods To model the sound propagation, the Khokhlov-Zabolotskava-Kuznetsov (KZK nonlinear wave equation was used and simulation was carried out using MATLAB HIFU toolbox. Bioheat equation was applied to calculate the transient temperature in the liver tissue. Frequency ranges of 2, 3, 4, and 5 MHz and power levels of 50 and 100 W were applied using an extracorporeal transducer. Results Using a frequency of 2 MHz, the maximum temperatures reached 53°C and 90°C in the focal point for power levels of 50 W and 100 W, respectively. With the same powers and using a frequency of 3 MHz, the temperature reached to 71°C and 170°C, respectively. In addition, for these power levels at the frequency of 4 MHz, the temperature reached to 72°C and 145°C, respectively. However, at the 5 MHz frequency, the temperature in the focal spot was either 57°C or 79°C. Conclusion Use of frequency of 2 MHz and power of 100 W led to higher thermal dose distribution, and subsequently, reduction of the treatment duration and complications at the same exposure time in ablation of large tumors.

  10. Preservation of the endometrial enhancement after magnetic resonance imaging-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation of submucosal uterine fibroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young-sun [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Uterine Fibroid Integrated Management Center, MINT Intervention Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae-Joong; Lee, Jeong-Won; Kim, Byoung-Gie [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Hyo Keun [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); SAIHST, Sungkyunkwan University, Department of Health Sciences and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Rhim, Hyunchul [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Sin-Ho [SAIHST, Sungkyunkwan University, Department of Health Sciences and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Samsung Medical Center, Department of Biostatistics and Clinical Epidemiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Joong Hyun [Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Samsung Medical Center, Biostatistics Team, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    To evaluate the integrity of endometrial enhancement after magnetic resonance imaging-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) ablation of submucosal uterine fibroids based on contrast-enhanced MRI findings, and to identify the risk factors for endometrial impairment. In total, 117 submucosal fibroids (diameter: 5.9 ± 3.0 cm) in 101 women (age: 43.6 ± 4.4 years) treated with MR-HIFU ablation were retrospectively analysed. Endometrial integrity was assessed with contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images at immediate (n = 101), 3-month (n = 62) and 12-month (n = 15) follow-ups. Endometrial impairment was classified into grades 0 (continuous endometrium), 1 (pin-point, full-thickness discontinuity), 2 (between grade 1 and 3), or 3 (full-thickness discontinuity >1 cm). Risk factors were assessed with generalized estimating equation (GEE) analysis. Among 117 fibroids, grades 0, 1, 2 and 3 endometrial impairments were observed at initial examination in 56.4%, 24.8%, 13.7% and 4.3%, respectively. Among 37 fibroid cases of endometrial impairment for which follow-ups were conducted, 30 showed improvements at 3- and/or 12-month follow-up. GEE analysis revealed the degree of endometrial protrusion was significantly associated with severity of endometrial injury (P < 0.0001). After MR-HIFU ablation of submucosal fibroids, endometrial enhancement was preserved intact or minimally impaired in most cases. Impaired endometrium, which is more common after treating endometrially-protruded fibroids, may recover spontaneously. (orig.)

  11. Preservation of the endometrial enhancement after magnetic resonance imaging-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation of submucosal uterine fibroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young-sun; Kim, Tae-Joong; Lee, Jeong-Won; Kim, Byoung-Gie; Lim, Hyo Keun; Rhim, Hyunchul; Jung, Sin-Ho; Ahn, Joong Hyun

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the integrity of endometrial enhancement after magnetic resonance imaging-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) ablation of submucosal uterine fibroids based on contrast-enhanced MRI findings, and to identify the risk factors for endometrial impairment. In total, 117 submucosal fibroids (diameter: 5.9 ± 3.0 cm) in 101 women (age: 43.6 ± 4.4 years) treated with MR-HIFU ablation were retrospectively analysed. Endometrial integrity was assessed with contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images at immediate (n = 101), 3-month (n = 62) and 12-month (n = 15) follow-ups. Endometrial impairment was classified into grades 0 (continuous endometrium), 1 (pin-point, full-thickness discontinuity), 2 (between grade 1 and 3), or 3 (full-thickness discontinuity >1 cm). Risk factors were assessed with generalized estimating equation (GEE) analysis. Among 117 fibroids, grades 0, 1, 2 and 3 endometrial impairments were observed at initial examination in 56.4%, 24.8%, 13.7% and 4.3%, respectively. Among 37 fibroid cases of endometrial impairment for which follow-ups were conducted, 30 showed improvements at 3- and/or 12-month follow-up. GEE analysis revealed the degree of endometrial protrusion was significantly associated with severity of endometrial injury (P < 0.0001). After MR-HIFU ablation of submucosal fibroids, endometrial enhancement was preserved intact or minimally impaired in most cases. Impaired endometrium, which is more common after treating endometrially-protruded fibroids, may recover spontaneously. (orig.)

  12. Sonosensitive theranostic liposomes for preclinical in vivo MRI-guided visualization of doxorubicin release stimulated by pulsed low intensity non-focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzitelli, S; Giustetto, P; Cutrin, J C; Delli Castelli, D; Boffa, C; Ruzza, M; Menchise, V; Molinari, F; Aime, S; Terreno, E

    2015-03-28

    The main goal of this study was to assess the theranostic performance of a nanomedicine able to generate MRI contrast as a response to the release from liposomes of the antitumor drug Doxorubicin triggered by the local exposure to pulsed low intensity non focused ultrasounds (pLINFU). In vitro experiments showed that Gadoteridol was an excellent imaging agent for probing the release of Doxorubicin following pLINFU stimulation. On this basis, the theranostic system was investigated in vivo on a syngeneic murine model of TS/A breast cancer. MRI offered an excellent guidance for monitoring the pLINFU-stimulated release of the drug. Moreover, it provided: i) an in vivo proof of the effective release of the liposomal content, and ii) a confirmation of the therapeutic benefits of the overall protocol. Ex vivo fluorescence microscopy indicated that the good therapeutic outcome was originated from a better diffusion of the drug in the tumor following the pLINFU stimulus. Very interestingly, the broad diffusion of the drug in the tumor stroma appeared to be mediated by the presence of the liposomes themselves. The results of this study highlighted either the great potential of US-based stimuli to safely trigger the release of a drug from its nanocarrier or the associated significant therapeutic improvement. Finally, MRI demonstrated to be a valuable technique to support chemotherapy and monitoring the outcome. Furthermore, in this specific case, the theranostic agent developed has a high clinical translatability because the MRI agent utilized is already approved for human use. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Determination of caffeoylquinic acids in feed and related products by focused ultrasound solid-liquid extraction and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tena, M T; Martínez-Moral, M P; Cardozo, P W

    2015-06-26

    A method to determine caffeoylquinic acids (CQAs) in three sources (herbal extract, feed additive and finished feed) using for the first time focused ultrasound solid-liquid extraction (FUSLE) followed by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled to quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry is presented. Pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) was also tested as extraction technique but it was discarded because cynarin was not stable under temperature values used in PLE. The separation of the CQAs isomers was carried out in only seven minutes. FUSLE variables such as extraction solvent, power and time were optimized by a central composite design. Under optimal conditions, FUSLE extraction was performed with 8mL of an 83:17 methanol-water mixture for 30s at a power of 60%. Only two extraction steps were found necessary to recover analytes quantitatively. Sensitivity, linearity, accuracy and precision were established. Matrix effect was studied for each type of sample. It was not detected for mono-CQAs, whereas the cynarin signal was strongly decreased due to ionization suppression in presence of matrix components; so the quantification by standard addition was mandatory for the determination of di-caffeoylquinic acids. Finally, the method was applied to the analysis of herbal extracts, feed additives and finished feed. In all samples, chlorogenic acid was the predominant CQA, followed by criptochlorogenic acid, neochlorogenic acid and cynarin. The method allows an efficient determination of chlorogenic acid with good recovery rates. Therefore, it may be used for screening of raw material and for process and quality control in feed manufacture. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Feasibility Study on MR-Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation of Sciatic Nerve in a Swine Model: Preliminary Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaye, Elena A., E-mail: kayee@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics (United States); Gutta, Narendra Babu, E-mail: gnbabu.aiims@gmail.com [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States); Monette, Sebastien, E-mail: monettes@mskcc.org [The Rockefeller University, Tri-Institutional Laboratory of Comparative Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College (United States); Gulati, Amitabh, E-mail: gulatia@mskcc.org; Loh, Jeffrey, E-mail: jeffreyloh@gmail.com [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Anesthesiology-Critical Care (United States); Srimathveeravalli, Govindarajan, E-mail: srimaths@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States); Ezell, Paula C., E-mail: paula.ezell@intusurg.com [The Rockefeller University, Tri-Institutional Laboratory of Comparative Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College (United States); Erinjeri, Joseph P., E-mail: erinjerj@mskcc.org; Solomon, Stephen B., E-mail: solomons@mskcc.org; Maybody, Majid, E-mail: maybodym@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2015-08-15

    IntroductionSpastic patients often seek neurolysis, the permanent destruction of the sciatic nerve, for better pain management. MRI-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) may serve as a noninvasive alternative to the prevailing, more intrusive techniques. This in vivo acute study is aimed at performing sciatic nerve neurolysis using a clinical MRgHIFU system.MethodsThe HIFU ablation of sciatic nerves was performed in swine (n = 5) using a HIFU system integrated with a 3 T MRI scanner. Acute lesions were confirmed using T1-weighted contrast-enhanced (CE) MRI and histopathology using hematoxylin and eosin staining. The animals were euthanized immediately following post-ablation imaging.ResultsReddening and mild thickening of the nerve and pallor of the adjacent muscle were seen in all animals. The HIFU-treated sections of the nerves displayed nuclear pyknosis of Schwann cells, vascular hyperemia, perineural edema, hyalinization of the collagenous stroma of the nerve, myelin sheet swelling, and loss of axons. Ablations were visible on CE MRI. Non-perfused volume of the lesions (5.8–64.6 cc) linearly correlated with estimated lethal thermal dose volume (4.7–34.2 cc). Skin burn adjacent to the largest ablated zone was observed in the first animal. Bilateral treatment time ranged from 55 to 138 min, and preparation time required 2 h on average.ConclusionThe acute pilot study in swine demonstrated the feasibility of a noninvasive neurolysis of the sciatic nerve using a clinical MRgHIFU system. Results revealed that acute HIFU nerve lesions were detectable on CE MRI, gross pathology, and histology.

  15. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) applied to hepato-bilio-pancreatic and the digestive system—current state of the art and future perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diana, Michele; Schiraldi, Luigi; Liu, Yu-Yin; Memeo, Riccardo; Mutter, Didier; Pessaux, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Background High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is emerging as a valid minimally-invasive image-guided treatment of malignancies. We aimed to review to current state of the art of HIFU therapy applied to the digestive system and discuss some promising avenues of the technology. Methods Pertinent studies were identified through PubMed and Embase search engines using the following keywords, combined in different ways: HIFU, esophagus, stomach, liver, pancreas, gallbladder, colon, rectum, and cancer. Experimental proof of the concept of endoluminal HIFU mucosa/submucosa ablation using a custom-made transducer has been obtained in vivo in the porcine model. Results Forty-four studies reported on the clinical use of HIFU to treat liver lesions, while 19 series were found on HIFU treatment of pancreatic cancers and four studies included patients suffering from both liver and pancreatic cancers, reporting on a total of 1,682 and 823 cases for liver and pancreas, respectively. Only very limited comparative prospective studies have been reported. Conclusions Digestive system clinical applications of HIFU are limited to pancreatic and liver cancer. It is safe and well tolerated. The exact place in the hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) management algorithm remains to be defined. HIFU seems to add clear survival advantages over trans arterial chemo embolization (TACE) alone and similar results when compared to radio frequency (RF). For pancreatic cancer, HIFU achieves consistent cancer-related pain relief. Further research is warranted to improve targeting accuracy and efficacy monitoring. Furthermore, additional work is required to transfer this technology on appealing treatments such as endoscopic HIFU-based therapies. PMID:27500145

  16. Restoring Neurological Physiology: The Innovative Role of High-Energy MR-Guided Focused Ultrasound (HIMRgFUS). Preliminary Data from a New Method of Lesioning Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giugno, Antonella; Maugeri, Rosario; Graziano, Francesca; Gagliardo, Cesare; Franzini, Angelo; Catalano, Carlo; Midiri, Massimo; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo

    2017-01-01

    Tremor is a disabling condition, common to several neurodegenerative diseases. Lesioning procedures and deep brain stimulation, respectively, of the ventralis intermedius nucleus for intentional tremor, and of the subthalamic nucleus for parkinsonian resting tremor, have been introduced in clinical practice for patients refractory to medical treatment. The combination of high-energy focused ultrasound (HIFUS) with sophisticated magnetic resonance (MR) instrumentation, together with accurate knowledge of the stereotactic brain coordinates, represents a revolution in neuromodulation. At the Neurosurgical Clinic and the Radiology Department of the University of Palermo,, two patients affected by severe and refractory forms of intentional tremor were treated by MRI-guided FUS (MRgFUS) with a unique 1.5 T MR scanner prototype that uses FUS. This apparatus is the only one of its type in the world." This is the first Italian experience, and the second in Europe, of treatment with MRI-gFUS for intentional tremor. But this is the very first experience in which a 1.5 T MRI apparatus was used. In both patients, the treatment completely abolished the tremor on the treated side, with results being excellent and stable after 7 and 5 months, respectively; no side effects were encountered. MRgFUS, recently introduced in clinical practice, and widely used at several clinical centers, has been shown to be a valid therapeutic alternative in the treatment of tremor in several neurodegenerative diseases. It is virtually safe, noninvasive, and very efficacious. We report this technique in which a 1.5 T MR scanner was used. Further investigations with long-term follow up and larger clinical series are needed.

  17. High intensity focused ultrasound treatment of adenomyosis: The relationship between the features of magnetic resonance imaging on T2 weighted images and the therapeutic efficacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Chunmei [State Key Laboratory of Ultrasound Engineering in Medicine Co-founded by Chongqing and the Ministry of Science and Technology, Chongqing Key Laboratory of Ultrasound in Medicine and Engineering, Chongqing Haifu Hospital, College of Biomedical Engineering, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Setzen, Raymond [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital, Johannesburg (South Africa); Liu, Zhongqiong; Liu, Yunchang [State Key Laboratory of Ultrasound Engineering in Medicine Co-founded by Chongqing and the Ministry of Science and Technology, Chongqing Key Laboratory of Ultrasound in Medicine and Engineering, Chongqing Haifu Hospital, College of Biomedical Engineering, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Xie, Bin [Department of Ultrasound, Huanggang Central Hospital, Huanggang City, Hubei 438000 (China); Aili, Aixingzi, E-mail: 1819483078@qq.com [Shanghai First Maternity and Infant Health Hospital, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Lian, E-mail: lianwzhang@yahoo.com [State Key Laboratory of Ultrasound Engineering in Medicine Co-founded by Chongqing and the Ministry of Science and Technology, Chongqing Key Laboratory of Ultrasound in Medicine and Engineering, Chongqing Haifu Hospital, College of Biomedical Engineering, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China)

    2017-04-15

    Objectives: To investigate the relationship between the features of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on T2 weighted images (T2WI) and the therapeutic efficacy of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) on adenomyosis. Materials and methods: From January 2011 to November 2015, four hundred and twenty-eight patients with symptomatic adenomyosis were treated with HIFU. Based on the signal intensity and the number of hyperintense foci in the adenomyotic lesions on T2WI, the patients were classified into groups. The day after HIFU ablation patients underwent contrast-enhanced MRI and a comparison was made of non-perfused volume (NPV) ratio, energy efficiency factor (EEF), treatment time, sonication time, and adverse effects. Results: No significant difference in terms of HIFU treatment settings and results was observed between the group of patients with hypointense adenomyotic lesions and the group with isointense adenomyotic lesions (P > 0.05). However, the sonication time and EEF were significantly higher in the group with multiple hyperintense foci compared to the group with few hyperintense foci. The NPV ratio achieved in the lesions with multiple hyperintenese foci was significantly lower than that in the lesions with few hyperintense foci (P < 0.05). No significant difference was observed in the rate of adverse effects between the two groups. Conclusions: Based on our results, the response of the adenomyotic lesions to HIFU treatment is not related to the signal intensity of adenomyotic lesions on T2WI. However, the number of the high signal intensity foci in the adenomyotic lesions on T2WI can be considered as a predictive factor to help select patients for HIFU treatment.

  18. Medical ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2007-01-01

    The paper gives an introduction to current medical ultrasound imaging systems. The basics of anatomic and blood flow imaging are described. The properties of medical ultrasound and its focusing are described, and the various methods for two- and three-dimensional imaging of the human anatomy...

  19. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound is most often performed to evaluate the: uterus cervix ovaries fallopian tubes bladder Pelvic ultrasound exams ... to view the endometrium (the lining of the uterus) and the ovaries. Transvaginal ultrasound also evaluates the ...

  20. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of the prostate ... ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of the body's ...

  1. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Pelvis Ultrasound imaging of the ... ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of the body's ...

  2. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... special ultrasound technique that allows the physician to see and evaluate blood flow through arteries and veins ... development of an embryo or fetus during pregnancy. See the Obstetrical Ultrasound page for more information . Ultrasound ...

  3. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... What are the limitations of Pelvic Ultrasound Imaging? What is Pelvic Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound is safe and ... as the liver or kidneys. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? In ...

  4. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... What are the limitations of Prostate Ultrasound Imaging? What is Ultrasound Imaging of the Prostate? Ultrasound is ... in front of the rectum. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A ...

  5. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... three types of pelvic ultrasound: abdominal, vaginal (for women), and rectal (for men). These exams are frequently ... pelvic ultrasound: abdominal ( transabdominal ) vaginal ( transvaginal / endovaginal ) for women rectal ( transrectal ) for men A Doppler ultrasound exam ...

  6. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... a pelvic ultrasound examination. Doppler ultrasound , also called color Doppler ultrasonography, is a special ultrasound technique that ... and processes the sounds and creates graphs or color pictures that represent the flow of blood through ...

  7. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... insertion. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... Abdomen Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding Ovarian Cancer Images related to ...

  8. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. There are three types of pelvic ultrasound: ...

  9. ROLE OF ULTRASOUND IN EVALUATION OF BREAST DISEASES (WITH FOCUS ON BI-RADS 1-3 VS. BI-RADS 4-5: A STUDY OF 131 CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Sharma

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Ultrasound is a radiation free, readily available imaging modality that is routinely used for evaluation of breast. The patient usually are for routine checkup to nonspecific symptoms with few showing specific signs and symptoms. In this study, an attempt has been made to understand the role of ultrasound in diagnosing benign lesions with a drawback focused on early malignant lesion. Also, the differentiation of solid and cystic lesions can reduce biopsy. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study was done retrospectively evaluating 131 consecutive patients. The ultrasound study included evaluation of mainly female patients with few male cases. RESULTS Most common lesions were benign lesions. Among these benign lesions, fibroadenomas and fibrocystic disease were the commonest. However, there were no early malignant lesion seen in this study. CONCLUSION Breast ultrasound is choice of investigation in benign breast diseases. Also, such lesions can be easily followed up at primary level. However, there is a limited role in detecting early malignant lesions, which will require additional workup at a higher level especially in high-risk groups.

  10. Design of patient-specific focused ultrasound arrays for non-invasive brain therapy with increased trans-skull transmission and steering range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Alec; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2017-09-01

    The use of a phased array of ultrasound transducer elements to sonicate through the skull has opened the way for new treatments and the delivery of therapeutics beyond the blood-brain barrier. The limited steering range of current clinical devices, particularly at higher frequencies, limits the regions of the brain that are considered treatable by ultrasound. A new array design is introduced that allows for high levels of beam steering and increased transmission throughout the brain. These improvements are achieved using concave transducers normal to the outer-skull surface in a patient-specific configuration to target within the skull, so that the far-field of each beam is within the brain. It is shown that by using pulsed ultrasound waves timed to arrive in-phase at the desired target, sufficient levels of acoustic energy are delivered for blood-brain barrier opening throughout the brain.

  11. Perfusion volume correlates, percentage of involution, and clinical efficacy at diverse follow-up survey times after MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery in uterine fibroids: first report in a Mexican mestizo population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrasco-Choque, Ana Luz; Fernandez-de Lara, Yeni; Vivas-Bonilla, Ingrid; Romero-Trejo, Cecilia [Medica Sur Clinic and Foundation, Magnetic Resonance Unit, Mexico City (Mexico); Villa, Antonio R. [UNAM, Division de Investigacion, Facultad de Medicina, Mexico City (Mexico); Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto [Medica Sur Clinic and Foundation, Magnetic Resonance Unit, Mexico City (Mexico); Medica Sur Clinic and Foundation, Coordination of Research and Innovation, Magnetic Resonance Unit, Mexico City (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy of magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery in a Mexican mestizo population. This retrospective study included 159 women (mean age 37 ± 6.4 years, range 22-53 years) from 2008 to 2010. Two hundred sixty-eight symptomatic uterine fibroids were treated using MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery. Parameters included initial perfused volume, final perfused volume, non-perfused volume (NPV), and treated volume ratio (TVR). Follow-up up to 15 months assessed treatment efficacy and symptomatic relief. Non-parametric statistics and the Kaplan-Meier method were performed. T{sub 2}-weighted hypointense fibroids showed a frequency of 93.6 %; isointense and hyperintense fibroids had frequencies of 5.60 and 1.1 %. There was a negative correlation between NPV and age (r = -0.083, p = 0.307) and treatment time (r = -0.253, p = 0.001). Median TVR was 96.0 % in small fibroids and 76.5 % in large fibroids. Involution of 50 % and 80 % was achieved at months 6-7 and month 11, respectively. Relief of symptoms was significant (p < 0.05). Our data show that higher TVR attained immediately post-treatment of MRgFUS favours higher involution percentages at follow-up; however, careful patient selection and use of pretreatment imaging are important components for predicting success using MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery. (orig.)

  12. Magnetic Resonance–Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (MRgHIFU) Treatment of Symptomatic Uterine Fibroids: An Evidence-Based Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pron, G

    2015-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance–guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) is a noninvasive uterine-preserving treatment alternative to hysterectomy for women with symptomatic uterine leiomyomas (fibroids). Uterine fibroids commonly occur, have a broad impact on women's health and lifestyle, continue to be the main indication for hysterectomy, and represent a costly public health burden. Objectives The objectives of the analysis were to evaluate patients’ eligibility for MRgHIFU treatment of symptomatic uterine fibroids and the technical success, safety, effectiveness, and durability of this treatment. The review also compared the safety and effectiveness of MRgHIFU with other minimally invasive uterine-preserving treatments and surgeries for uterine fibroids. Methods A literature search was performed on March 27, 2014, using Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid EMBASE, EBSCO Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and EBM Reviews, for studies published from January 1, 2000, to March 27, 2014. Results The evidence review identified 2 systematic reviews, 2 RCTs, 45 cohort study reports, and 19 case reports involving HIFU treatment of symptomatic uterine fibroids. Eligibility for MRgHIFU treatment was variable, ranging from 14% to 74%. In clinical cohort studies involving 1,594 patients, 26 major complications (1.6%) were reported. MRgHIFU resulted in statistically and clinically significant reductions in fibroid-related symptoms in studies conducted in 10 countries, although few involved follow-up longer than 1 year. Retreatment rates following MRgHIFU were higher in early clinical studies involving regulated restrictions in the extent of fibroid ablation than in later reports involving near-complete ablation. Emergent interventions, however, were rare. Although a desire for fertility was an exclusion criteria for treatment, spontaneous term pregnancies did occur following HIFU. There were no

  13. Magnetic Resonance-Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (MRgHIFU) Treatment of Symptomatic Uterine Fibroids: An Evidence-Based Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pron, G

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) is a noninvasive uterine-preserving treatment alternative to hysterectomy for women with symptomatic uterine leiomyomas (fibroids). Uterine fibroids commonly occur, have a broad impact on women's health and lifestyle, continue to be the main indication for hysterectomy, and represent a costly public health burden. The objectives of the analysis were to evaluate patients' eligibility for MRgHIFU treatment of symptomatic uterine fibroids and the technical success, safety, effectiveness, and durability of this treatment. The review also compared the safety and effectiveness of MRgHIFU with other minimally invasive uterine-preserving treatments and surgeries for uterine fibroids. A literature search was performed on March 27, 2014, using Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid EMBASE, EBSCO Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and EBM Reviews, for studies published from January 1, 2000, to March 27, 2014. The evidence review identified 2 systematic reviews, 2 RCTs, 45 cohort study reports, and 19 case reports involving HIFU treatment of symptomatic uterine fibroids. Eligibility for MRgHIFU treatment was variable, ranging from 14% to 74%. In clinical cohort studies involving 1,594 patients, 26 major complications (1.6%) were reported. MRgHIFU resulted in statistically and clinically significant reductions in fibroid-related symptoms in studies conducted in 10 countries, although few involved follow-up longer than 1 year. Retreatment rates following MRgHIFU were higher in early clinical studies involving regulated restrictions in the extent of fibroid ablation than in later reports involving near-complete ablation. Emergent interventions, however, were rare. Although a desire for fertility was an exclusion criteria for treatment, spontaneous term pregnancies did occur following HIFU. There were no randomized trials comparing MRgHIFU and

  14. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... Radiation Therapy for Gynecologic Cancers Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top of page This page was reviewed on ... Abdomen Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder ... Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored by Please ...

  15. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... women, a pelvic ultrasound exam can help identify: kidney stones bladder tumors other disorders of the urinary bladder ... Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding Ovarian Cancer Images related to ...

  16. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... endometrial polyps fibroids cancer, especially in patients with abnormal uterine bleeding Some physicians also use 3-D ultrasound or ... Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding Ovarian Cancer Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored ...

  17. Reliability of laser Doppler, near-infrared spectroscopy and Doppler ultrasound for peripheral blood flow measurements during and after exercise in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Hui C; Nosaka, Kazunori; Peiffer, Jeremiah J; Ihsan, Mohammed; Yeo, Chow C; Abbiss, Chris R

    2017-09-01

    This study examined the test-retest reliability of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) and Doppler ultrasound to assess exercise-induced haemodynamics. Nine men completed two identical trials consisting of 25-min submaximal cycling at first ventilatory threshold followed by repeated 30-s bouts of high-intensity (90% of peak power) cycling in 32.8 ± 0.4°C and 32 ± 5% relative humidity (RH). NIRS (tissue oxygenation index [TOI] and total haemoglobin [tHb]) and LDF (perfusion units [PU]) signals were monitored continuously during exercise, and leg blood flow was assessed by Doppler ultrasound at baseline and after exercise. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC; PU/mean arterial pressure (MAP)) was expressed as the percentage change from baseline (%CVC BL ). Coefficients of variation (CVs) as indicators of absolute reliability were 18.7-28.4%, 20.2-33.1%, 42.5-59.8%, 7.8-12.4% and 22.2-30.3% for PU, CVC, %CVC BL , TOI and tHb, respectively. CVs for these variables improved as exercise continued beyond 10 min. CVs for baseline and post-exercise leg blood flow were 17.8% and 10.5%, respectively. CVs for PU, tHb (r 2  = 0.062) and TOI (r 2  = 0.002) were not correlated (P > 0.05). Most variables demonstrated CVs lower than the expected changes (35%) induced by training or heat stress; however, minimum of 10 min exercise is recommended for more reliable measurements.

  18. Effect of ultrasound treatment on the wet heating Maillard reaction between mung bean [Vigna radiate (L.)] protein isolates and glucose and on structural and physico-chemical properties of conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongjiang; Han, Feifei; Sui, Xiaonan; Qi, Baokun; Yang, Yong; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Rui; Li, Yang; Jiang, Lianzhou

    2016-03-30

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of ultrasound treatment on the wet heating Maillard reaction between mung bean protein isolates (MBPIs) and glucose, and on structural and physico-chemical properties of the conjugates. The degree of glycosylation of MBPI-glucose conjugates treated by ultrasound treatment and wet heating (MBPI-GUH) was higher than that of MBPI-glucose conjugates only treated by wet heating (MBPI-GH). Solubility, emulsification activity, emulsification stability and surface hydrophobicity of MBPI-GUH were higher than that of MBPI-GH. Grafted MBPIs had a lower content of α-helix and unordered coil, but a higher content of β-sheet and β-turn structure than MBPIs. No significant structural changes were observed in β-turn and random coil structure of MBPI-GUH, while α-helix content increased with ultrasonic time, and decreased at 300 W ultrasonic power with the increase of β-sheet. MBPI-GUH had a less compact tertiary structure compared to MBPI-GH and MBPI. Grafting MBPIs with glucose formed conjugates of higher molecular weight, while no significant changes were observed in electrophoresis profiles of MBPI-GUH. Ultrasound-assisted wet heating Maillard reaction between MBPIs and glucose could be a promising way to improve functional properties of MBPIs. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Non-Invasive Targeted Peripheral Nerve Ablation Using 3D MR Neurography and MRI-Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (MR-HIFU): Pilot Study in a Swine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisman, Merel; Staruch, Robert M; Ladouceur-Wodzak, Michelle; van den Bosch, Maurice A; Burns, Dennis K; Chhabra, Avneesh; Chopra, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound (US)-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been proposed for noninvasive treatment of neuropathic pain and has been investigated in in-vivo studies. However, ultrasound has important limitations regarding treatment guidance and temperature monitoring. Magnetic resonance (MR)-imaging guidance may overcome these limitations and MR-guided HIFU (MR-HIFU) has been used successfully for other clinical indications. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing 3D MR neurography to identify and guide ablation of peripheral nerves using a clinical MR-HIFU system. Volumetric MR-HIFU was used to induce lesions in the peripheral nerves of the lower limbs in three pigs. Diffusion-prep MR neurography and T1-weighted images were utilized to identify the target, plan treatment and immediate post-treatment evaluation. For each treatment, one 8 or 12 mm diameter treatment cell was used (sonication duration 20 s and 36 s, power 160-300 W). Peripheral nerves were extracted < 3 hours after treatment. Ablation dimensions were calculated from thermal maps, post-contrast MRI and macroscopy. Histological analysis included standard H&E staining, Masson's trichrome and toluidine blue staining. All targeted peripheral nerves were identifiable on MR neurography and T1-weighted images and could be accurately ablated with a single exposure of focused ultrasound, with peak temperatures of 60.3 to 85.7°C. The lesion dimensions as measured on MR neurography were similar to the lesion dimensions as measured on CE-T1, thermal dose maps, and macroscopy. Histology indicated major hyperacute peripheral nerve damage, mostly confined to the location targeted for ablation. Our preliminary results indicate that targeted peripheral nerve ablation is feasible with MR-HIFU. Diffusion-prep 3D MR neurography has potential for guiding therapy procedures where either nerve targeting or avoidance is desired, and may also have potential for post

  20. Complete Inhibition Of Ultrasound Induced Cytolysis In The Presence Of Inertial Cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sostaric, Joe Z.; Miyoshi, Norio; Riesz, Peter; De Graff, William G.; Mitchell, James B.

    2006-05-01

    The investigation of ultrasound for biotechnological applications including non-invasive surgery (HIFU), drug/gene delivery to cells (sonoporation) or through the skin (sonophoresis) and ultrasound assisted bioreactors has focused mainly on the physical effects of ultrasound. The beneficial effects of ultrasound rely on a number of application-dependent mechanisms, and may include tissue heating, acoustic streaming or cavitation. Although acoustic cavitation is necessary in some systems, cavitation bubbles simultaneously result in uncontrollable cell damage and cytolysis. Thus, the development of a number of biotechnological uses of ultrasound has been hampered by the necessity to constrain exposure parameters in order to prevent the occurrence of acoustic cavitation or to at least limit the detrimental effects of cavitation. The current study shows that non-toxic concentrations of specific n-alkyl solutes completely inhibit ultrasound induced cytolysis of in vitro suspensions of human leukemia cells (HL-60). Protection of the whole cell population from cytolysis is achieved even under extreme ultrasound exposure conditions that result in cytolysis of 100 % of the cell population in the absence of the n-alkyl solutes. Furthermore, the n-alkyl solutes did not hinder the process of inertial cavitation. This method may allow utilization of beneficial effects of ultrasound and cavitation while protecting cells from cavitation induced cytolysis and thereby presents new possibilities for ultrasound in medicine and biology.

  1. Calibration and Evaluation of Ultrasound Thermography Using Infrared Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yi-Sing; Deng, Cheri X

    2016-02-01

    Real-time monitoring of the spatiotemporal evolution of tissue temperature is important to ensure safe and effective treatment in thermal therapies including hyperthermia and thermal ablation. Ultrasound thermography has been proposed as a non-invasive technique for temperature measurement, and accurate calibration of the temperature-dependent ultrasound signal changes against temperature is required. Here we report a method that uses infrared thermography for calibration and validation of ultrasound thermography. Using phantoms and cardiac tissue specimens subjected to high-intensity focused ultrasound heating, we simultaneously acquired ultrasound and infrared imaging data from the same surface plane of a sample. The commonly used echo time shift-based method was chosen to compute ultrasound thermometry. We first correlated the ultrasound echo time shifts with infrared-measured temperatures for material-dependent calibration and found that the calibration coefficient was positive for fat-mimicking phantom (1.49 ± 0.27) but negative for tissue-mimicking phantom (-0.59 ± 0.08) and cardiac tissue (-0.69 ± 0.18°C-mm/ns). We then obtained the estimation error of the ultrasound thermometry by comparing against the infrared-measured temperature and revealed that the error increased with decreased size of the heated region. Consistent with previous findings, the echo time shifts were no longer linearly dependent on temperature beyond 45°C-50°C in cardiac tissues. Unlike previous studies in which thermocouples or water bath techniques were used to evaluate the performance of ultrasound thermography, our results indicate that high-resolution infrared thermography is a useful tool that can be applied to evaluate and understand the limitations of ultrasound thermography methods. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Heat

    CERN Document Server

    Lawrence, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Is it possible to make heat by rubbing your hands together? Why does an ice cube melt when you hold it? In this title, students will conduct experiments to help them understand what heat is. Kids will also investigate concepts such as which materials are good at conducting heat and which are the best insulators. Using everyday items that can easily be found around the house, students will transform into scientists as they carry out step-by-step experiments to answer interesting questions. Along the way, children will pick up important scientific skills. Heat includes seven experiments with detailed, age-appropriate instructions, surprising facts and background information, a "conclusions" section to pull all the concepts in the book together, and a glossary of science words. Colorful, dynamic designs and images truly put the FUN into FUN-damental Experiments.

  3. Poly(4-vinylpyridinium)hydrogen sulfate: a novel and efficient catalyst for the synthesis of 14-aryl-14H-dibenzo[a,j]xanthenes under conventional heating and ultrasound irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaligh, Nader Ghaffari

    2012-07-01

    A simple and convenient procedure for the synthesis of 14-aryl-14H-dibenzo[a,j]xanthenes is described through a one-pot condensation of 2-naphthol with aryl aldehydes in the presence of poly(4-vinylpyridinium)hydrogen sulfate as an efficient, cheap, readily synthesized and eco-friendly catalyst in a solvent free media using conventional heating and ultrasound irradiation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Focus on Bioenergy in the electricity and heat market. Project results 2015-2016; Focus on Bioenergie im Strom- und Waermemarkt. Projektergebnisse 2015-2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thraen, Daniela; Pfeiffer, Diana (eds.)

    2017-08-01

    The report covers the following contributions: DeHoGas - sustainable local wood gasification plant with coupled micro gas turbine; SEVERA - sensor technique for efficient fermentation og biogenic residuals and wastes; FuelBand - extension of the fuel band of modern biomass combustion; REPOWERING - measures for efficiency improvement for the existing plants; PROKOSYS - processes, components and systems for flexible operation of biogas plants using biogenic residuals and wastes; Carola - electrostatic finest particle separator for flexible adaptation to biomass vessels; HydoCon - hydrolysis container - flexible plant components for substrate usage improvement in biogas plants; EFFIGEST - efficiency improvement in poultry manure fermentation using modified straw fractions and process integrated production of marketable fertilizer; FLUHKE - dry low-temperature entrained flow gasification with bio-coals from hydrothermal carbonization for local electricity and heat production with motor-cogeneration; REMISBIO - measures for emissions reduction of bio gas plants - catalyst test; Mini-bio-cogeneration - readiness of prototype for decentralized gasification of residual pellets for serial production; IbeKEt - innovative communal demand-adaptive energy carrier concept; Regiobalance - flexible bioenergy as regional compensation option in the German electricity market; FLEXHKW - flexible operation of cogeneration plants.

  5. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as ... bowel (rectum) removed during prior surgery are not good candidates for ultrasound of the prostate gland because ...

  6. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. A follow-up examination may also be necessary ... to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging uses no ionizing radiation. Ultrasound scanning ...

  7. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... the patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement ... blood test result. difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides real-time images, it also can be used to ...

  8. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... performed to evaluate the: uterus cervix ovaries fallopian tubes bladder Pelvic ultrasound exams are also used to ... tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound is the preferred imaging modality for ...

  9. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound: abdominal, vaginal (for women), and rectal (for men). These exams are frequently used to evaluate the ... vaginal ( transvaginal / endovaginal ) for women rectal ( transrectal ) for men A Doppler ultrasound exam may be part of ...

  10. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... as detailed as with the transrectal probe. An MRI of the pelvis may be obtained as an ... Enlargement of the Prostate) Prostate Cancer Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy Images related to Ultrasound - Prostate ...

  11. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... and produces pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound ... from the probe through the gel into the body. The transducer collects the sounds that bounce back ...

  12. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... and produces pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound ... from the probe through the gel into the body. The transducer collects the sounds that bounce back ...

  13. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... for more information . Ultrasound examinations can help diagnose symptoms experienced by women such as: pelvic pain abnormal ... Ultrasound is the preferred imaging modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn ...

  14. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... your knees toward your chest. To obtain high-quality images, an ultrasound transducer – a plastic cylinder about ... standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the ...

  15. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... the procedure? In women, a pelvic ultrasound is most often performed to evaluate the: uterus cervix ovaries ... page How is the procedure performed? Transabdominal: For most ultrasound exams, you will be positioned lying face- ...

  16. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... ovarian cysts and uterine fibroids ovarian or uterine cancers A transvaginal ultrasound is usually performed to view the endometrium (the lining of the uterus) and the ovaries. Transvaginal ultrasound also evaluates the ...

  17. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... right in front of the rectum. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A ... ultrasound to clean out the bowel. top of page What does the equipment look like? Ultrasound scanners consist ...

  18. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. There are three types of pelvic ultrasound: abdominal ( transabdominal ) vaginal ( transvaginal / endovaginal ) ...

  19. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound is safe, noninvasive and does not use ionizing radiation. This procedure requires little to no special preparation. ... create an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is ...

  20. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound is safe, noninvasive, and does not use ionizing radiation. This procedure requires little to no special preparation. ... create an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is ...

  1. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... insertion. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound provides real-time ...

  2. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... depth investigation of the uterine cavity . Three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound permits evaluation of the uterus and ovaries ... with abnormal uterine bleeding Some physicians also use 3-D ultrasound or sonohysterography for patients with infertility. In ...

  3. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... kidneys. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? In women, a pelvic ultrasound ... patients with abnormal uterine bleeding Some physicians also use 3-D ultrasound or sonohysterography for patients with ...

  4. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? Ultrasound exams in which the transducer ... in the sperm or urine following the procedure. After an ultrasound examination, you should be able to ...

  5. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... obtain high-quality images, an ultrasound transducer – a plastic cylinder about the size of a finger – is ... end of their bowel (rectum) removed during prior surgery are not good candidates for ultrasound of the ...

  6. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... insertion. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Sonohysterography Ultrasound - ...

  7. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Sonohysterography Ultrasound - Abdomen Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - ... facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments ...

  8. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... records tiny changes in the sound's pitch and direction. These signature waves are instantly measured and displayed ... ultrasound, a special application of ultrasound, measures the direction and speed of blood cells as they move ...

  9. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... by women such as: pelvic pain abnormal vaginal bleeding other menstrual problems Ultrasound exams also help identify: ... fibroids cancer, especially in patients with abnormal uterine bleeding Some physicians also use 3-D ultrasound or ...

  10. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... diagnose symptoms experienced by women such as: pelvic pain abnormal vaginal bleeding other menstrual problems Ultrasound exams ... pelvic ultrasound can help evaluate: pelvic masses pelvic pain ambiguous genitalia and anomalies of pelvic organs early ...

  11. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... abnormal growth within the prostate. help diagnose the cause of a man's infertility. A transrectal ultrasound of ... show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound causes no health problems and may be repeated as ...

  12. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of ... help to distract the child and make the time pass quickly. The ultrasound exam room may have ...

  13. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of ... test result. difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides real-time images, it also can be used to guide ...

  14. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? In women, a pelvic ultrasound is most ... child's favorite channel. top of page What does the equipment look like? Ultrasound scanners consist of a ...

  15. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... extract a sample of cells from organs for laboratory testing. Doppler ultrasound images can help the physician ... Ultrasound is the preferred imaging modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn ...

  16. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... needles are used to extract a sample of cells from organs for laboratory testing. Doppler ultrasound images ... ultrasound, measures the direction and speed of blood cells as they move through vessels. The movement of ...

  17. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... Transvaginal ultrasound is performed very much like a gynecologic exam and involves the insertion of the transducer ... with your feet in stirrups similar to a gynecologic exam. Transrectal: For a transrectal ultrasound, a protective ...

  18. Nanoparticles Formed by Acoustic Destruction of Microbubbles and Their Utilization for Imaging and Effects on Therapy by High Intensity Focused Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Nicholas T; Yildirim, Adem; Chattaraj, Rajarshi; Goodwin, Andrew P

    2017-01-01

    This work reports that when PEG-lipid-shelled microbubbles with fluorocarbon interior (C 4 F 10 , C 5 F 12 , or C 6 F 14 ) are subjected to ultrasound pulses, they produce metastable, fluid-filled nanoparticles that can be re-imaged upon administration of HIFU. The nanoparticles produced by destruction of the microbubbles (MBNPs) are of 150 nm average diameter and can be re-imaged for up to an hour after creation for C 4 F 10 , and for at least one day for C 5 F 12 . The active species were found to be fluid (gas or liquid) filled nanoparticles rather than lipid debris. The acoustic droplet vaporization threshold of the nanoparticles was found to vary with the vapor pressure of the encapsulated fluorocarbon, and integrated image brightness was found to increase dramatically when the temperature was raised above the normal boiling point of the fluorocarbon. Finally, the vaporization threshold decreases in serum as compared to buffer, and administration of HIFU to the nanoparticles caused breast cancer cells to completely detach from their culture substrate. This work demonstrates a new functionality of microbubbles that could serve as a platform technology for ultrasound-based theranostics.

  19. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... if a finding is stable or changed over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Ultrasound is widely available, easy-to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging uses no ionizing radiation. Ultrasound scanning ...

  20. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... transducer sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of Pelvic Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound waves are ...

  1. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Ultrasound is widely available, easy-to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging uses no ionizing radiation. Ultrasound scanning may be able to give a ...

  2. Circumferential lesion formation around the pulmonary veins in the left atrium with focused ultrasound using a 2D-array endoesophageal device: a numerical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichardo, Samuel; Hynynen, Kullervo [Imaging Research-Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Room C713, Toronto, ON M4N 3M5 (Canada)

    2007-08-21

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most frequently sustained cardiac arrhythmia affecting humans. The electrical isolation by ablation of the pulmonary veins (PVs) in the left atrium (LA) of the heart has been proven as an effective cure of AF. The ablation consists mainly in the formation of a localized circumferential thermal coagulation of the cardiac tissue surrounding the PVs. In the present numerical study, the feasibility of producing the required circumferential lesion with an endoesophageal ultrasound probe is investigated. The probe operates at 1 MHz and consists of a 2D array with enough elements (114 x 20) to steer the acoustic field electronically in a volume comparable to the LA. Realistic anatomical conditions of the thorax were considered from the segmentation of histological images of the thorax. The cardiac muscle and the blood-filled cavities in the heart were identified and considered in the sound propagation and thermal models. The influence of different conditions of the thermal sinking in the LA chamber was also studied. The circumferential ablation of the PVs was achieved by the sum of individual lesions induced with the proposed device. Different scenarios of lesion formation were considered where ultrasound exposures (1, 2, 5 and 10 s) were combined with maximal peak temperatures (60, 70 and 80 {sup 0}C). The results of this numerical study allowed identifying the limits and best conditions for controlled lesion formation in the LA using the proposed device. A controlled situation for the lesion formation surrounding the PVs was obtained when the targets were located within a distance from the device in the range of 26 {+-} 7 mm. When combined with a maximal temperature of 70 {sup 0}C and an exposure time between 5 and 10 s, this distance ensured preservation of the esophageal structures, controlled lesion formation and delivery of an acoustic intensity at the transducer surface that is compatible with existing materials. With a peak

  3. Non-invasive synergistic treatment of brain tumors by targeted chemotherapeutic delivery and amplified focused ultrasound-hyperthermia using magnetic nanographene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hung-Wei; Hua, Mu-Yi; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Lin, Kun-Ju; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Tsai, Rung-Ywan; Ma, Chen-Chi M; Hsu, Po-Hung; Wey, Shiaw-Pyng; Hsu, Peng-Wei; Chen, Pin-Yuan; Huang, Yin-Cheng; Lu, Yu-Jen; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Feng, Li-Ying; Lin, Chih-Wen; Liu, Hao-Li; Wei, Kuo-Chen

    2013-07-12

    The combination of chemo-thermal therapy is the best strategy to ablate tumors, but how to heat deep tumor tissues effectively without side-damage is a challenge. Here, a systemically delivered nanocarrier is designed with multiple advantages, including superior heat absorption, highly efficient hyperthermia, high drug capacity, specific targeting ability, and molecular imaging, to achieve both high antitumor efficacy and effective amplification of hyperthermia with minimal side effects. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Enhancing ablation effects of a microbubble-enhancing contrast agent ("SonoVue") in the treatment of uterine fibroids with high-intensity focused ultrasound: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nan; Xie, Bin; Zhang, Xin; He, Min; Li, Kequan; Bai, Jin; Wang, Zhibiao; He, Jia; Zhang, Lian

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the role of the ultrasound contrast agent SonoVue in enhancing the ablation effects of ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) on uterine fibroids. Eighty patients with solitary uterine fibroids at a single center were randomly assigned to a control or SonoVue group. Of these, 40 were treated using HIFU alone; 40 who were pretreated with SonoVue received a bolus before the HIFU procedure. All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan before and after HIFU treatment. The post-HIFU MRI showed the nonperfused volume (NPV) in all of the treated uterine fibroids; the mean fractional ablation (NPV ratio) was 90.4 ± 8.3 % (range 66.4-100 %) in the SonoVue group and 82.8 ± 13.3 % (range 53.4-100 %) in the control group. The frequency of massive gray-scale changes that occurred during HIFU was greater in the group that received SonoVue than the group that did not. The average sonication time to reach massive gray-scale changes was significantly shorter in the group receiving SonoVue than the group without SonoVue. The acoustic energy for treating 1 mm(3) of uterine fibroid was less in the SonoVue group than the control group. No any major complication occurred in this study. Based on the results of this randomized controlled trial, SonoVue could be safely used to enhance the effects of HIFU treatment for uterine fibroids.

  5. Verification of Pre-Monsoon Temperature Forecasts over India during 2016 with focus on Heat Wave Prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Harvir; Arora, Kopal; Ashrit, Raghvendra; Rajagopal, En

    2016-01-01

    The operational medium-range weather forecasting based on Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models are complemented by the forecast products based on Ensemble Prediction Systems (EPS). This change has been recognized as an essentially useful tool for the medium range forecasting and is now finding its place in forecasting the extreme events. Here we investigate the extreme events (Heat waves) using a high-resolution numerical weather prediction and its ensemble forecast in union with the c...

  6. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  7. High energy density matter generation using a focused soft-X-ray laser for volumetric heating of thin foils

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rus, Bedřich; Mocek, Tomáš; Kozlová, Michaela; Polan, Jiří; Homer, Pavel; Fajardo, M.; Foord, M.E.; Chung, H.; Moon, S.J.; Lee, R. W.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 1 (2011), s. 11-16 ISSN 1574-1818 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/05/2316 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M100100911 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : laboratory X-ray lasers * volumetric heating * aluminum transmission * polyimide transmission * warm dense matter Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.595, year: 2011 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1574181810000406

  8. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... inserted into a man's rectum to view the prostate. Transvaginal ultrasound. The transducer is inserted into a ... Stenting Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Biopsies - Overview Images related to General Ultrasound Videos ...

  9. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z General Ultrasound Ultrasound imaging uses sound waves to produce ... the limitations of General Ultrasound Imaging? What is General Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and ...

  10. Crystallization of glycine with ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Louhi-Kultanen, Marjatta; Karjalainen, Milja; Rantanen, Jukka

    2006-01-01

    Sonocrystallization has proved to be an efficient tool to influence the external appearance and structure of a crystalline product obtained by various crystallization methods. The present work focuses on high intensity sonocrystallization of glycine by varying amplitude of ultrasound with an ultr......Sonocrystallization has proved to be an efficient tool to influence the external appearance and structure of a crystalline product obtained by various crystallization methods. The present work focuses on high intensity sonocrystallization of glycine by varying amplitude of ultrasound...... with an ultrasound frequency of 20kHz at two temperature ranges 40-50 and 20-30 degrees C in a jacketed 250-ml cooling crystallizer equipped with a stirrer. The polymorph composition of the obtained crystals was analyzed with a temperature variable X-ray powder diffractometer (XRPD). XRPD results showed that...... ultrasound power. This study also showed, the higher the ultrasound amplitude the smaller the crystals obtained....

  11. Study on the effects of heating of virgin olive oil blended with mildly deodorized olive oil: focus on the hydrolytic and oxidative state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendini, Alessandra; Valli, Enrico; Cerretani, Lorenzo; Chiavaro, Emma; Lercker, Giovanni

    2009-11-11

    In this study, mildly deodorized olive oil (DEO) and its admixtures with extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) have been analyzed after heating treatments by microwave and conventional oven. Different patterns in oxidative and hydrolytic degradation of lipids in genuine and sophisticated olive oils have been evaluated by chromatographic and spectroscopic methods and related to heating treatments. The experimental plan focused on the assessment of the (a) hydrolytic degree of the samples by the free acidity and the 1,2- and 1,3-diacylglycerols (DAG) determinations; (b) oxidative status of the samples by the assessment of the peroxide value (POV) and oxidized fatty acid (OFA), the specific absorption at 270 nm (k(270)), the accelerated aging test (OSI) and volatile compounds. In general, the thermal treatment by conventional oven led to a higher content of 1,3-DAG and secondary oxidation products than microwave heating. A duo-trio sensory test was also performed: tasters were not able to discriminate between EVOO and DEO heated by conventional oven whereas they were when oils were microwaved.

  12. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of ...

  13. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Pelvis Ultrasound imaging ...

  14. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... well on x-ray images. Ultrasound causes no health problems and may be repeated as often as is necessary if medically indicated. Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as ...

  15. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... transducer sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of Prostate Ultrasound Imaging? Men who have ...

  16. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Pelvis Ultrasound imaging of the pelvis uses sound waves to ...

  17. Ultrasound -- Vascular

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... waves from passing into your body. The sonographer (ultrasound technologist) or radiologist then places the transducer on the ... is specialized and is best performed by a technologist and physician with experience in vascular ultrasound imaging. top of page Additional Information and Resources ...

  18. Ultrasound imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, E.G.; Doherty, F.J.

    1986-01-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound was used as early as 1950 in attempts to detect malignant tumors within the human breast and brain. In the years following, however, little attention was paid to this method of imaging by the radiologic community. Extensive work with this technique was not begun until the 1960s, when bistable ultrasound enabled sonographers to display organ outlines for the first time. Prior to the development of bistable ultrasound, sonographic images were limited to A-mode displays, which were merely a series of amplitude spikes on a graph. Over the past 20 or so years, major advances in ultrasound technology have gradually taken us from the simple graphic A-mode display, through bistable organ outlines, to gray-scale images with excellent parenchymal detail, and finally to real-time ultrasound

  19. Ultrasound diagnostics of thyroid diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharchenko, Vladimir P. [Russian Radiology Research Center, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kotlyarov, Peter M. [Russian Center of Roentgenradiology, Moscow (Russian Federation); Mogutov, Mikhail S.; Sencha, Alexander N.; Patrunov, Yury N.; Belyaev, Denis V. [Yaroslavl Railway Clinic (Russian Federation); Alexandrov, Yury K. [State Medical Academy, Yaroslavl (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-01

    This book is based on the authors' extensive practical experience in the use of modern ultrasound, and other radiological methods, in the diagnosis of thyroid diseases. The authors have analyzed more than 100,000 ultrasound examinations performed between 1995 and 2008 in patients with thyroid and parathyroid disease, as well as many thousands of diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound-guided minimally invasive procedures. The opening chapters include discussion of current ultrasound techniques, pitfalls, and the specifics of ultrasound examination of the thyroid in children. Detailed attention is then devoted to findings in the normal thyroid and in the presence of diffuse and focal changes. Further chapters focus on such topics as ultrasound examination after thyroid surgery and ultrasound diagnosis of parathyroid disease, recurrent goiter, and neck masses. Ultrasound-guided minimally invasive techniques, such as fine-needle aspiration biopsy, percutaneous laser ablation, and ethanol and glucocorticoid injections, are considered in depth. This up-to-date and richly illustrated book will interest and assist specialists in ultrasound diagnostics, radiologists, endocrinologists, and neck surgeons. (orig.)

  20. Ultrasound diagnostics of thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharchenko, Vladimir P.; Kotlyarov, Peter M.; Mogutov, Mikhail S.; Sencha, Alexander N.; Patrunov, Yury N.; Belyaev, Denis V.; Alexandrov, Yury K.

    2010-01-01

    This book is based on the authors' extensive practical experience in the use of modern ultrasound, and other radiological methods, in the diagnosis of thyroid diseases. The authors have analyzed more than 100,000 ultrasound examinations performed between 1995 and 2008 in patients with thyroid and parathyroid disease, as well as many thousands of diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound-guided minimally invasive procedures. The opening chapters include discussion of current ultrasound techniques, pitfalls, and the specifics of ultrasound examination of the thyroid in children. Detailed attention is then devoted to findings in the normal thyroid and in the presence of diffuse and focal changes. Further chapters focus on such topics as ultrasound examination after thyroid surgery and ultrasound diagnosis of parathyroid disease, recurrent goiter, and neck masses. Ultrasound-guided minimally invasive techniques, such as fine-needle aspiration biopsy, percutaneous laser ablation, and ethanol and glucocorticoid injections, are considered in depth. This up-to-date and richly illustrated book will interest and assist specialists in ultrasound diagnostics, radiologists, endocrinologists, and neck surgeons. (orig.)

  1. Cranial Ultrasound/Head Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... waves from passing into the body. The sonographer (ultrasound technologist) or radiologist then gently presses the transducer against ... performed on an infant, a nurse or radiologic technologist may assist with keeping the ... procedure? Ultrasound examinations are painless and easily tolerated by most ...

  2. Trauma Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongwaisayawan, Sirote; Suwannanon, Ruedeekorn; Prachanukool, Thidathit; Sricharoen, Pungkava; Saksobhavivat, Nitima; Kaewlai, Rathachai

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasound plays a pivotal role in the evaluation of acute trauma patients through the use of multi-site scanning encompassing abdominal, cardiothoracic, vascular and skeletal scans. In a high-speed polytrauma setting, because exsanguinations are the primary cause of trauma morbidity and mortality, ultrasound is used for quick and accurate detection of hemorrhages in the pericardial, pleural, and peritoneal cavities during the primary Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) survey. Volume status can be assessed non-invasively with ultrasound of the inferior vena cava (IVC), which is a useful tool in the initial phase and follow-up evaluations. Pneumothorax can also be quickly detected with ultrasound. During the secondary survey and in patients sustaining low-speed or localized trauma, ultrasound can be used to help detect abdominal organ injuries. This is particularly helpful in patients in whom hemoperitoneum is not identified on an initial scan because findings of organ injuries will expedite the next test, often computed tomography (CT). Moreover, ultrasound can assist in detection of fractures easily obscured on radiography, such as rib and sternal fractures. Copyright © 2015 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Noninvasive pulsed focused ultrasound allows spatiotemporal control of targeted homing for multiple stem cell types in murine skeletal muscle and the magnitude of cell homing can be increased through repeated applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, Scott R; Ziadloo, Ali; Kim, Saejeong J; Nguyen, Ben A; Frank, Joseph A

    2013-11-01

    Stem cells are promising therapeutics for cardiovascular diseases, and i.v. injection is the most desirable route of administration clinically. Subsequent homing of exogenous stem cells to pathological loci is frequently required for therapeutic efficacy and is mediated by chemoattractants (cell adhesion molecules, cytokines, and growth factors). Homing processes are inefficient and depend on short-lived pathological inflammation that limits the window of opportunity for cell injections. Noninvasive pulsed focused ultrasound (pFUS), which emphasizes mechanical ultrasound-tissue interactions, can be precisely targeted in the body and is a promising approach to target and maximize stem cell delivery by stimulating chemoattractant expression in pFUS-treated tissue prior to cell infusions. We demonstrate that pFUS is nondestructive to murine skeletal muscle tissue (no necrosis, hemorrhage, or muscle stem cell activation) and initiates a largely M2-type macrophage response. We also demonstrate that local upregulation of chemoattractants in pFUS-treated skeletal muscle leads to enhance homing, permeability, and retention of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and human endothelial precursor cells (EPC). Furthermore, the magnitude of MSC or EPC homing was increased when pFUS treatments and cell infusions were repeated daily. This study demonstrates that pFUS defines transient "molecular zip codes" of elevated chemoattractants in targeted muscle tissue, which effectively provides spatiotemporal control and tunability of the homing process for multiple stem cell types. pFUS is a clinically translatable modality that may ultimately improve homing efficiency and flexibility of cell therapies for cardiovascular diseases. © AlphaMed Press.

  4. Mechanics of ultrasound elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guo-Yang

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound elastography enables in vivo measurement of the mechanical properties of living soft tissues in a non-destructive and non-invasive manner and has attracted considerable interest for clinical use in recent years. Continuum mechanics plays an essential role in understanding and improving ultrasound-based elastography methods and is the main focus of this review. In particular, the mechanics theories involved in both static and dynamic elastography methods are surveyed. They may help understand the challenges in and opportunities for the practical applications of various ultrasound elastography methods to characterize the linear elastic, viscoelastic, anisotropic elastic and hyperelastic properties of both bulk and thin-walled soft materials, especially the in vivo characterization of biological soft tissues. PMID:28413350

  5. Ultrasound-enhanced electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, Heikki J; Laidmäe, Ivo; Salmi, Ari; Rauhala, Timo; Paulin, Tor; Heinämäki, Jyrki; Hæggström, Edward

    2018-03-13

    Electrospinning is commonly used to produce polymeric nanofibers. Potential applications for such fibers include novel drug delivery systems, tissue engineering scaffolds, and filters. Electrospinning, however, has shortcomings such as needle clogging and limited ability to control the fiber-properties in a non-chemical manner. This study reports on an orifice-less technique that employs high-intensity focused ultrasound, i.e. ultrasound-enhanced electrospinning. Ultrasound bursts were used to generate a liquid protrusion with a Taylor cone from the surface of a polymer solution of polyethylene oxide. When the polymer was charged with a high negative voltage, nanofibers jetted off from the tip of the protrusion landed on an electrically grounded target held at a constant distance from the tip. Controlling the ultrasound characteristics permitted physical modification of the nanofiber topography at will without using supplemental chemical intervention. Possible applications of tailor-made fibers generated by ultrasound-enhanced electrospinning include pharmaceutical controlled-release applications and biomedical scaffolds with spatial gradients in fiber thickness and mechanical properties.

  6. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... whether the object is solid or filled with fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is used to detect changes ... As the sound waves bounce off internal organs, fluids and tissues, the sensitive receiver in the transducer ...

  7. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... whether the object is solid or filled with fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is used to detect changes ... As the sound waves bounce off internal organs, fluids and tissues, the sensitive receiver in the transducer ...

  8. Transvaginal ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bleeding and menstrual problems Certain types of infertility Ectopic pregnancy Pelvic pain Transvaginal ultrasound is also used during ... any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for ...

  9. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or within various body organs such as the ... tumors other disorders of the urinary bladder In children, pelvic ultrasound can help evaluate: pelvic masses pelvic ...

  10. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... patient consultation. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Sonohysterography Ultrasound - Abdomen Children's ( ...

  11. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the reflected sound waves (called the Doppler effect). A computer collects and processes the sounds and ... standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the ...

  12. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a transducer that ... the preferred imaging modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound ...

  13. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... a nodule found during a rectal exam, detect abnormalities, and determine whether the gland is enlarged. Ultrasound ... follow-up exam is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a ...

  14. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the body's internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test ... that allows the physician to see and evaluate blood flow through arteries and veins in the abdomen, ...

  15. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... called color Doppler ultrasonography, is a special ultrasound technique that allows the physician to see and evaluate ... evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. A follow-up examination may also be necessary ...

  16. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... the patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement ... by a computer, which in turn creates a real-time picture on the monitor. One or more ...

  17. Ultrasound imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, P.N.T.

    1983-01-01

    Ultrasound is a form of energy which consists of mechanical vibrations the frequencies of which are so high that they are above the range of human hearing. The lower frequency limit of the ultrasonic spectrum may generally be taken to be about 20 kHz. Most biomedical applications of ultrasound employ frequencies in the range 1-15 MHz. At these frequencies, the wavelength is in the range 1.5 - 0.1 mm in soft tissues, and narrow beams of ultrasound can be generated which propagate through such tissues without excessive attenuation. This chapter begins with brief reviews of the physics of diagnostic ultrasound pulse-echo imaging methods and Doppler imaging methods. The remainder of the chapter is a resume of the applications of ultrasonic imaging to physiological measurement

  18. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... uses sound waves to produce pictures of a man’s prostate gland and to help diagnose symptoms such ... also called transrectal ultrasound, provides images of a man's prostate gland and surrounding tissue. The exam typically ...

  19. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... Images related to Ultrasound - Prostate Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  20. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  1. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... quickly. The ultrasound exam room may have a television. Feel free to ask for your child's favorite ... display screen that looks like a computer or television monitor. The image is created based on the ...

  2. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... tip of the transducer is smaller than the standard speculum used when performing a Pap test . A ... both sexes without x-ray exposure. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects ...

  3. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... echoes from the tissues in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and ... work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles involved in the sonar used by bats, ships ...

  4. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... echoes from the tissues in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and ... work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles involved in the sonar used by bats, ships ...

  5. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... performed to detect: uterine anomalies uterine scars endometrial polyps fibroids cancer, especially in patients with abnormal uterine ... tumors other disorders of the urinary bladder In children, pelvic ultrasound can help evaluate: pelvic masses pelvic ...

  6. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... be turned to either side to improve the quality of the images. After you are positioned on ... standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the ...

  7. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... than 20 minutes. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? Ultrasound exams in which the transducer is inserted into an opening of the body may produce minimal discomfort. If no biopsy is ...

  8. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects ...

  9. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... insertion. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... called the Doppler effect). A computer collects and processes the sounds and creates graphs or color pictures ...

  10. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... a more in-depth investigation of the uterine cavity . Three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound permits evaluation of ... are sometimes the best way to see if treatment is working or if a finding is stable ...

  11. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... such as the liver or kidneys. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? In ... ask for your child's favorite channel. top of page What does the equipment look like? Ultrasound scanners consist ...

  12. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and submarines. The ultrasound image ... based on the same principles involved in the sonar used by bats, ships and fishermen. When a ...

  13. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medli