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Sample records for focal field computation

  1. Managing focal fields of vector beams with multiple polarization singularities.

    Han, Lei; Liu, Sheng; Li, Peng; Zhang, Yi; Cheng, Huachao; Gan, Xuetao; Zhao, Jianlin

    2016-11-10

    We explore the tight focusing behavior of vector beams with multiple polarization singularities, and analyze the influences of the number, position, and topological charge of the singularities on the focal fields. It is found that the ellipticity of the local polarization states at the focal plane could be determined by the spatial distribution of the polarization singularities of the vector beam. When the spatial location and topological charge of singularities have even-fold rotation symmetry, the transverse fields at the focal plane are locally linearly polarized. Otherwise, the polarization state becomes a locally hybrid one. By appropriately arranging the distribution of the polarization singularities in the vector beam, the polarization distributions of the focal fields could be altered while the intensity maintains unchanged.

  2. Hybrid Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography/Computed Tomography Sulphur Colloid Scintigraphy in Focal Nodular Hyperplasia

    Bhoil, Amit; Gayana, Shankramurthy; Sood, Ashwani; Bhattacharya, Anish; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2013-01-01

    It is important to differentiate focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH), a benign condition of liver most commonly affecting women, from other neoplasm such as hepatic adenoma and metastasis. The functional reticuloendothelial features of FNH can be demonstrated by scintigraphy. We present a case of breast cancer in whom fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (CT) showed a homogenous hyperdense lesion in liver, which on Tc99m sulfur colloid single-photon emission computed tomography/CT was found to have increased focal tracer uptake suggestive of FNH

  3. The Effect of Focal Distance, Age, and Brightness on Near-Field Augmented Reality Depth Matching

    Singh, Gujot; Ellis, Stephen R.; Swan II, J. Edward

    2017-01-01

    Many augmented reality (AR) applications operate within near-field reaching distances, and require matching the depth of a virtual object with a real object. The accuracy of this matching was measured in three experiments, which examined the effect of focal distance, age, and brightness, within distances of 33.3 to 50 cm, using a custom-built AR haploscope. Experiment I examined the effect of focal demand, at the levels of collimated (infinite focal distance), consistent with other depth cues...

  4. Three dimensional field computation

    Trowbridge, C.W.

    1981-06-01

    Recent research work carried out at Rutherford and Appleton Laboratories into the Computation of Electromagnetic Fields is summarised. The topics covered include algorithms for integral and differential methods for the solution of 3D magnetostatic fields, comparison of results with experiment and an investigation into the strengths and weaknesses of both methods for an analytic problem. The paper concludes with a brief summary of the work in progress on the solution of 3D eddy currents using differential finite elements. (author)

  5. Electric field depth-focality tradeoff in transcranial magnetic stimulation: simulation comparison of 50 coil designs.

    Deng, Zhi-De; Lisanby, Sarah H; Peterchev, Angel V

    2013-01-01

    Various transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) coil designs are available or have been proposed. However, key coil characteristics such as electric field focality and attenuation in depth have not been adequately compared. Knowledge of the coil focality and depth characteristics can help TMS researchers and clinicians with coil selection and interpretation of TMS studies. To quantify the electric field focality and depth of penetration of various TMS coils. The electric field distributions induced by 50 TMS coils were simulated in a spherical human head model using the finite element method. For each coil design, we quantified the electric field penetration by the half-value depth, d(1/2), and focality by the tangential spread, S(1/2), defined as the half-value volume (V(1/2)) divided by the half-value depth, S(1/2) = V(1/2)/d(1/2). The 50 TMS coils exhibit a wide range of electric field focality and depth, but all followed a depth-focality tradeoff: coils with larger half-value depth cannot be as focal as more superficial coils. The ranges of achievable d(1/2) are similar between coils producing circular and figure-8 electric field patterns, ranging 1.0-3.5 cm and 0.9-3.4 cm, respectively. However, figure-8 field coils are more focal, having S(1/2) as low as 5 cm(2) compared to 34 cm(2) for circular field coils. For any coil design, the ability to directly stimulate deeper brain structures is obtained at the expense of inducing wider electrical field spread. Novel coil designs should be benchmarked against comparison coils with consistent metrics such as d(1/2) and S(1/2). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison of Photopic Negative Response of Full-Field and Focal Electroretinograms in Detecting Glaucomatous Eyes

    Shigeki Machida

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To compare the photopic negative response (PhNR of the full-field electroretinogram (ERG to the PhNR of the focal ERGs in detecting glaucoma. Methods. One hundred and three eyes with glaucoma and 42 normal eyes were studied. Full-field ERGs were elicited by red stimuli on a blue background. The focal ERGs were elicited by a 15∘ white stimulus spot centered on the macula, the superotemporal or the inferotemporal areas of the macula. Results. In early glaucoma, the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs were significantly larger for the focal PhNR (0.863–0.924 than those for the full-field PhNR (0.666–0.748 (P<.05. The sensitivity was significantly higher for the focal PhNR than for the full-field PhNR in early (P<.01 and intermediate glaucoma (P<.05. In advanced glaucoma, there was no difference in the AUCs and sensitivities between the focal and full-field PhNRs. Conclusions. The focal ERG has the diagnostic ability with higher sensitivity in detecting early and intermediate glaucoma than the full-field ERG.

  7. Computed tomographic and ultrasound appearances of focal spared areas in fatty infiltration of the liver

    McKenzie, A.; Gill, G.; Hennessy, O.; Pryde, D.

    1991-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and utrasound (US) appearances of diffuse and focal fatty infiltration of the liver (FIL) are well recognized as pseudo tumours of the liver. Characteristic appearances of fat free areas in FIL which help differentiate these areas from other focal liver lesions include location in the medical segment of the left lobe of the liver, absence of mass effect on surrounding vessels and liver tissue, and presence of typical changes of FIL elsewhere in the liver on CT or US examination. 16 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs

  8. Ultrasound and computer tomography in the evaluation of focal liver disease

    Bartolozzi, C; Ciatti, S; Lucarelli, E; Villari, N; de Dominicis, R [Florence Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Radiologia

    1981-01-01

    The results of ultrasound and computer tomography in 150 patients with possible focal liver disease were compared. Ultrasound was more sensitive than CT in detecting lesions but similar information on the nature of the lesion was obtained with both methods. CT provided more complete information than US on the extent of the lesion. Thus, CT and US are supplementary in the evaluation of focal liver disease. Because of the higher sensitivity US should be the first examination, followed, if clinically indicated, by CT for confirmation and possible further information regarding the extent of the lesion.

  9. A case of alcoholic hepatitis demonstrating focal fatty infiltration of the liver on computed tomography

    Uesaka, Toshihiro; Kato, Masayoshi; Nagai, Tadayuki; Kametani, Tomio; Horigami, Tateyuki; Takimoto, Hiroaki; Tanino, Mikio

    1985-01-01

    Focal fatty infiltration of the liver is a newly recognized entity that may be confused with primary neoplasm or tumor metastasis on computed tomography. We report a 31-year-old woman with a history of chronic alcoholism. Physical examination revealed jaundice, marked hepatomegaly and ascites. Laboratory studies revealed mild elevation of bilirubin, AlP, GOT, γ-GTP and marked leukocytosis. Abdominal CT showed a large area of decreased density in the right lobe. The radionuclide scan demonstrated the area of diminished activity located in the central portion of the right lobe. Ultrasonography demonstrated high echoic mass shadows in the right lobe. The rapid disappearance of the low density area on CT was recognized. The liver biopsy specimen revealed fatty metamorphosis, alcoholic hyaline bodies, pericellular fibrosis and mild lobular disorganization. Focal fatty infiltration can mimic focal hepatic lesions and repeat CT scans are useful in diagnosis. (author)

  10. Electric field strength and focality in electroconvulsive therapy and magnetic seizure therapy: a finite element simulation study

    Deng, Zhi-De; Lisanby, Sarah H.; Peterchev, Angel V.

    2011-02-01

    We present the first computational study comparing the electric field induced by various electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and magnetic seizure therapy (MST) paradigms. Four ECT electrode configurations (bilateral, bifrontal, right unilateral, and focal electrically administered seizure therapy) and three MST coil configurations (circular, cap, and double cone) were modeled. The model incorporated a modality-specific neural activation threshold. ECT (0.3 ms pulse width) and MST induced the maximum electric field of 2.1-2.5 V cm-1 and 1.1-2.2 V cm-1 in the brain, corresponding to 6.2-7.2 times and 1.2-2.3 times the neural activation threshold, respectively. The MST electric field is more confined to the superficial cortex compared to ECT. The brain volume stimulated was much larger with ECT (up to 100%) than with MST (up to 8.2%). MST with the double-cone coil was the most focal, and bilateral ECT was the least focal. Our results suggest a possible biophysical explanation of the reduced side effects of MST compared to ECT. Our results also indicate that the conventional ECT pulse amplitude (800-900 mA) is much higher than necessary for seizure induction. Reducing the ECT pulse amplitude should be explored as a potential means of diminishing side effects.

  11. Automatic alignment device for focal spot measurements in the center of the field for mammography

    Vieira, Marcelo A.C.; Watanabe, Alex O.; Oliveira Junior, Paulo D.; Schiabel, Homero

    2010-01-01

    Some quality control procedures used for mammography, such as focal spot evaluation, requires previous alignment of the measurement equipment with the X-ray central beam. However, alignment procedures are, in general, the most difficult task and the one that needs more time to be performed. Moreover, the operator sometimes is exposed to radiation during this procedure. This work presents an automatic alignment system for mammographic equipment that allows locating the central ray of the radiation beam and, immediately, aligns with it by dislocating itself automatically along the field. The system consists on a bidirectional moving device, connected to a CCD sensor for digital radiographic image acquisition. A computational analysis of a radiographic image, acquired at any position on the field, is performed in order to determine its positioning under the X-ray beam. Finally, a mechanical system for two moving directions, electronically controlled by a microcontroller under USB communication, makes the system to align automatically with the radiation beam central ray. The alignment process is fully automatic, fast and accurate, with no operator exposure to radiation, which allows a considerable time saving for quality control procedures achievement for mammography. (author)

  12. Determining the stress field in active volcanoes using focal mechanisms

    Bruno Massa

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Stress inversion of seismological datasets became an essential tool to retrieve the stress field of active tectonics and volcanic areas. In particular, in volcanic areas, it is able to put constrains on volcano-tectonics and in general in a better understanding of the volcano dynamics. During the last decades, a wide range of stress inversion techniques has been proposed, some of them specifically conceived to manage seismological datasets. A modern technique of stress inversion, the BRTM, has been applied to seismological datasets available at three different regions of active volcanism: Mt. Somma-Vesuvius (197 Fault Plane Solutions, FPSs, Campi Flegrei (217 FPSs and Long Valley Caldera (38,000 FPSs. The key role of stress inversion techniques in the analysis of the volcano dynamics has been critically discussed. A particular emphasis was devoted to performances of the BRTM applied to volcanic areas.

  13. Innovative compact focal plane array for wide field vis and ir orbiting telescopes

    Hugot, Emmanuel; Vives, Sébastien; Ferrari, Marc; Gaeremynck, Yann; Jahn, Wilfried

    2017-11-01

    The future generation of high angular resolution space telescopes will require breakthrough technologies to combine large diameters and large focal plane arrays with compactness and lightweight mirrors and structures. Considering the allocated volume medium-size launchers, short focal lengths are mandatory, implying complex optical relays to obtain diffraction limited images on large focal planes. In this paper we present preliminary studies to obtain compact focal plane arrays (FPA) for earth observations on low earth orbits at high angular resolution. Based on the principle of image slicers, we present an optical concept to arrange a 1D FPA into a 2D FPA, allowing the use of 2D detector matrices. This solution is particularly attractive for IR imaging requiring a cryostat, which volume could be considerably reduced as well as the relay optics complexity. Enabling the use of 2D matrices for such an application offers new possibilities. Recent developments on curved FPA allows optimization without concerns on the field curvature. This innovative approach also reduces the complexity of the telescope optical combination, specifically for fast telescopes. This paper will describe the concept and optical design of an F/5 - 1.5m telescope equipped with such a FPA, the performances and the impact on the system with a comparison with an equivalent 1.5m wide field Korsch telescope.

  14. Computation of focal values and stability analysis of 4-dimensional systems

    Bo Sang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a recursive formula for computing the n-th singular point values of a class of 4-dimensional autonomous systems, and establishes the algebraic equivalence between focal values and singular point values. The formula is linear and then avoids complicated integrating operations, therefore the calculation can be carried out by computer algebra system such as Maple. As an application of the formula, bifurcation analysis is made for a quadratic system with a Hopf equilibrium, which can have three small limit cycles around an equilibrium point. The theory and methodology developed in this paper can be used for higher-dimensional systems.

  15. Relation between second-order moment radius of focal spot and near field distribution of laser beam

    Gao Xueyan; Su Yi; Ye Yidong; Guan Youguang

    2011-01-01

    In order to analyze the effect of aberration of amplitude and phase of laser beam on second-order moment radius of focal spot, based on the Fraunhofer formula for light wave scalar diffraction theory and the definition of second-order moment radius, the general expression for focal spot second-order moment radius depending on the complex amplitude of near field is derived. The second-order moment radius of the focal spot depending on intensity distribution and phase distribution of near field is derived, and its clear physical meaning is described. The second-order moment radius and the divergence angle of focal spot may be easily calculated with the second-order moment radius expression of focal spot. At last, the divergence angles of focal spots of several kinds of Gaussian laser beams are calculated directly, and the results are in accordance with those in the related references. (authors)

  16. Computers for lattice field theories

    Iwasaki, Y.

    1994-01-01

    Parallel computers dedicated to lattice field theories are reviewed with emphasis on the three recent projects, the Teraflops project in the US, the CP-PACS project in Japan and the 0.5-Teraflops project in the US. Some new commercial parallel computers are also discussed. Recent development of semiconductor technologies is briefly surveyed in relation to possible approaches toward Teraflops computers. (orig.)

  17. Polymeric flat focal field arrayed waveguide grating using electron-beam direct writing

    Lu, Si; Yan, Yingbai; Jin, Guofan; Wong, W. H.; Pun, E. Y. B.

    2004-06-01

    A four-channel 400-GHz spacing flat focal field arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) demultiplexer is designed based on polymeric optical waveguide. The waveguide core-layer material is a newly developed negative tone epoxy Novolak resin (ENR) polymer with ultravoilet (UV) cured resin Norland optical adhesive 61 (NOA61) as the cladding layer. The device is fabricated using electron-beam direct writing, which has less processing steps than the reported polymeric AWGs. The experimental result is presented.

  18. Computers in field ion microscopy

    Suvorov, A.L.; Razinkova, T.L.; Sokolov, A.G.

    1980-01-01

    A review is presented of computer applications in field ion microscopy (FIM). The following topics are discussed in detail: (1) modeling field ion images in perfect crystals, (2) a general scheme of modeling, (3) modeling of the process of field evaporation, (4) crystal structure defects, (5) alloys, and (6) automation of FIM experiments and computer-assisted processing of real images. 146 references are given

  19. Penalized maximum-likelihood sinogram restoration for dual focal spot computed tomography

    Forthmann, P; Koehler, T; Begemann, P G C; Defrise, M

    2007-01-01

    Due to various system non-idealities, the raw data generated by a computed tomography (CT) machine are not readily usable for reconstruction. Although the deterministic nature of corruption effects such as crosstalk and afterglow permits correction by deconvolution, there is a drawback because deconvolution usually amplifies noise. Methods that perform raw data correction combined with noise suppression are commonly termed sinogram restoration methods. The need for sinogram restoration arises, for example, when photon counts are low and non-statistical reconstruction algorithms such as filtered backprojection are used. Many modern CT machines offer a dual focal spot (DFS) mode, which serves the goal of increased radial sampling by alternating the focal spot between two positions on the anode plate during the scan. Although the focal spot mode does not play a role with respect to how the data are affected by the above-mentioned corruption effects, it needs to be taken into account if regularized sinogram restoration is to be applied to the data. This work points out the subtle difference in processing that sinogram restoration for DFS requires, how it is correctly employed within the penalized maximum-likelihood sinogram restoration algorithm and what impact it has on image quality

  20. Computational model of neuron-astrocyte interactions during focal seizure generation

    Davide eReato

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Empirical research in the last decade revealed that astrocytes can respond to neurotransmitters with Ca2+ elevations and generate feedback signals to neurons which modulate synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability. This discovery changed our basic understanding of brain function and provided new perspectives for how astrocytes can participate not only to information processing, but also to the genesis of brain disorders, such as epilepsy. Epilepsy is a neurological disorder characterized by recurrent seizures that can arise focally at restricted areas and propagate throughout the brain. Studies in brain slice models suggest that astrocytes contribute to epileptiform activity by increasing neuronal excitability through a Ca2+-dependent release of glutamate. The underlying mechanism remains, however, unclear. In this study, we implemented a parsimonious network model of neurons and astrocytes. The model consists of excitatory and inhibitory neurons described by Izhikevich's neuron dynamics. The experimentally observed Ca2+ change in astrocytes in response to neuronal activity was modeled with linear equations. We considered that glutamate is released from astrocytes above certain intracellular Ca2+ concentrations thus providing a non-linear positive feedback signal to neurons. Propagating seizure-like ictal discharges (IDs were reliably evoked in our computational model by repeatedly exciting a small area of the network, which replicates experimental results in a slice model of focal ID in entorhinal cortex. We found that the threshold of focal ID generation was lowered when an excitatory feedback-loop between astrocytes and neurons was included. Simulations show that astrocytes can contribute to ID generation by directly affecting the excitatory/inhibitory balance of the neuronal network. Our model can be used to obtain mechanistic insights into the distinct contributions of the different signaling pathways to the generation and

  1. Focal species candidates for pesticide risk assessment in European rice fields: A review.

    Vallon, Martin; Dietzen, Christian; Laucht, Silke; Ludwigs, Jan-Dieter

    2018-04-25

    An assessment of potential risks of pesticides on wildlife is required during the process of product registration within Europe because of the importance of agricultural landscapes as wildlife habitats. Despite their peculiarity and their specific role as artificial wetlands, rice paddies are to date pooled with cereals in guidance documents on how to conduct risk assessments for birds and mammals in Europe. Hence, the focal species currently considered in risk assessments for rice paddies are those known from cereal fields and can therefore be expected to differ significantly from the species actually occurring in the wet environments of rice paddies. We present results of a comprehensive review on bird and mammal species regularly occurring in rice paddies during a time of potential pesticide exposure to identify appropriate focal species candidates for ecotoxicological pesticide risk assessment according to the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). In addition, we present data on rice cultivation areas and agricultural practices in Europe to give background information supporting the species selection process. Our literature search identified a general scarcity of relevant data, particularly for mammals, which highlights the need for crop-specific focal species studies. However, our results clearly indicate that the relevant bird and mammal species in rice fields indeed differ strongly from the focal species used for the cereal risk assessment. They can thus be used as a baseline for more realistic wildlife risk assessments specific to rice and the development of a revised guidance document to bridge the gap for regulatory decision makers. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2018;00:000-000. © 2018 SETAC. © 2018 SETAC.

  2. Computed tomographic scanning in patients presenting with chief complaint of headache without focal neurological signs

    Halim, A.; Khalid, W.; Haq, A.U.

    2017-01-01

    To determine the frequency of positive computed tomographic (CT)scan findings in patients presenting at PNS Shifa Hospital Karachi with chief complaint of headache without focal neurological signs. Study Design: Cross sectional descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted at the Radiology department, PNS Shifa Hospital Karachi from Dec 2011 to Jun 2012. Patients and Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive study included referred patients with complaint of headache of one month duration or more without focal neurological signs. No gender restriction was considered and patients of age more than 14 years were included. Patients with headache due to other known clinical disorders such as intracranial neoplasm and stroke were excluded. Patients with focal neurological signs such as hemiparesis, cerebellar signs and cranial nerve palsies were also excluded from the study. A total of 105 patients were included in the study through non probability consecutive sampling. Informed written consent was taken from the patients by explaining all the risks and benefits of the study and use of data for research and publication. Plain CT scan brain was done by trained CT technician and reporting of CT scan was done by consultant radiologist. CT scan was done on Toshiba Scanner Aquilion-64 CT Scan machine. The imaging protocol consisted of appropriately angled continuous 5mm thick axial slices for the posterior fossa and 10 mm thick slices for the rest of brain from the base of skull to the vertex. Data was collected through a specially structured proforma. Confidentiality of the patients record was maintained. Results: Majority of the patients were between 31-40 years of age i.e. 29.52 percent (n=31) and mean and SD was calculated as 34.24 +- 8.72 years, 54.29 percent (n=57) females and 45.71 percent (n=48) male patients, frequency of positive CT scan findings in patients with chief complaint of headache without focal neurological signs was recorded as

  3. Visualizing the Computational Intelligence Field

    L. Waltman (Ludo); J.H. van den Berg (Jan); U. Kaymak (Uzay); N.J.P. van Eck (Nees Jan)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper, we visualize the structure and the evolution of the computational intelligence (CI) field. Based on our visualizations, we analyze the way in which the CI field is divided into several subfields. The visualizations provide insight into the characteristics of each subfield

  4. Tuskegee as Sacred Rhetoric: Focal Point for the Emergent Field of African American Religion and Health.

    Laws, Terri

    2018-02-01

    Scholars in African American religion engage the Tuskegee Syphilis Study as the focal point of the African American experience in institutional medicine. Seeking a way forward from this history and its intentional evil, the author proposes to position Tuskegee as a form of Lynch's culturally contextual sacred rhetoric to make use of its metaphoric value in the emerging field of African American religion and health. In this broader meaning-making frame, Tuskegee serves as a reminder that African American religious sensibility has long been an agential resource that counters abuse of the Black body. It also acknowledges the complex decisions facing African American clinical trial participants.

  5. Fine focal spot size improves image quality in computed tomography abdomen and pelvis

    Goh, Yin P.; Low, Keat; Kuganesan, Ahilan [Monash Health, Diagnostic Imaging Department, 246, Clayton Road, Clayton, Victoria (Australia); Lau, Kenneth K. [Monash Health, Diagnostic Imaging Department, 246, Clayton Road, Clayton, Victoria (Australia); Monash University, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Victoria (Australia); Buchan, Kevin [Philips Healthcare, Clinical Science, PO Box 312, Mont Albert, Victoria (Australia); Oh, Lawrence Chia Wei [Flinders Medical Centre, Division of Medical Imaging, Bedford Park South (Australia); Huynh, Minh [Swinburne University, Department of Statistics, Data Science and Epidemiology, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health, Arts and Design, Hawthorn (Australia)

    2016-12-15

    To compare the image quality between fine focal spot size (FFSS) and standard focal spot size (SFSS) in computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis (CTAP) This retrospective review included all consecutive adult patients undergoing contrast-enhanced CTAP between June and September 2014. Two blinded radiologists assessed the margin clarity of the abdominal viscera and the detected lesions using a five-point grading scale. Cohen's kappa test was used to examine the inter-observer reliability between the two reviewers for organ margin clarity. Mann-Whitney U testing was utilised to assess the statistical difference of the organ and lesion margin clarity. 100 consecutive CTAPs were recruited. 52 CTAPs were examined with SFSS of 1.1 x 1.2 mm and 48 CTAPs were examined with FFSS of 0.6 x 0.7 mm. Results showed that there was substantial agreement for organ margin clarity (mean κ = 0.759, p < 0.001) among the reviewers. FFSS produces images with clearer organ margins (U = 76194.0, p < 0.001, r = 0.523) and clearer lesion margins (U = 239, p = 0.052, r = 0.269). FFSS CTAP improves image quality in terms of better organ and lesion margin clarity. Fine focus CT scanning is a novel technique that may be applied in routine CTAP imaging. (orig.)

  6. Stress fields in the Antarctic plate inferred from focal mechanisms of intraplate earthquakes

    Atsuki Kubo

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Typical directional features of intraplate stresses are extracted from focal mechanism solutions of earthquakes in the Antarctic plate. Typical directions of stresses are obtained in the following regions, 1 Bellingshausen Sea, 2 south of Juan-Fernandez microplate, 3 Balleny Island region and 4 Kerguelen region. P axes in regions 1 and 2 have been interpreted by ridge push force. However these interpretations are based on one focal mechanism for each event and on crude physical concept of ridge push. It is difficult to explain intraplate stress fields in these regions only by the local ridge push force. The stress direction in region 3 can be interpreted by both deformation near triple junction and deformation due to deglaciation. Earthquakes near region 4 appear to be normal fault event. Because normal fault events appear only in the younger ocean floor, the stress field may be affected by thermal features such as hot spots Quantitative modeling and superposition of various stress factors are required to discriminate among stress origins. It is difficult to discuss stress directions in and around Antarctic continent, because number of the earthquakes is not enough.

  7. Irregular focal mechanisms observed at Salton Sea Geothermal Field: Possible influences of anthropogenic stress perturbations

    Crandall-Bear, Aren; Barbour, Andrew J.; Schoenball, Martin; Schoenball, Martin

    2018-01-01

    At the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF), strain accumulation is released through seismic slip and aseismic deformation. Earthquake activity at the SSGF often occurs in swarm-like clusters, some with clear migration patterns. We have identified an earthquake sequence composed entirely of focal mechanisms representing an ambiguous style of faulting, where strikes are similar but deformation occurs due to steeply-dipping normal faults with varied stress states. In order to more accurately determine the style of faulting for these events, we revisit the original waveforms and refine estimates of P and S wave arrival times and displacement amplitudes. We calculate the acceptable focal plane solutions using P-wave polarities and S/P amplitude ratios, and determine the preferred fault plane. Without constraints on local variations in stress, found by inverting the full earthquake catalog, it is difficult to explain the occurrence of such events using standard fault-mechanics and friction. Comparing these variations with the expected poroelastic effects from local production and injection of geothermal fluids suggests that anthropogenic activity could affect the style of faulting.

  8. Scintigraphic appearance of focal fatty infiltration of the liver using single-photon emission computed tomography

    Kudo, M.; Hirasa, M.; Ibuki, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Fatty infiltration of the liver had been considered to assume a uniform distribution until quite recently. However, the development of X-ray computed tomography (XCT) and the ultrasound (US) has proven that fatty infiltration of the liver may sometimes assume a nonuniform distribution (focal fatty infiltration (FFI)). This investigation was undertaken to evaluate the scintigraphic appearance of FFI using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with a GE Maxicamera 400T. Radionuclide images including SPECT were evaluated in 12 cases with FFI which were diagnosed by XCT and US. Most of them were histrogically confirmed to be positive fatty infiltration in the liver. The results were as follows. The fatty infiltrated area was visualized as a hot spot in one case, a defect in 2 cases, a low uptake in one case and a normal uptake in 8 cases. Radionuclide imaging of FFI shows a large variety of findings and it suggests that Kupffer cell function varies with the causes or stage of fatty infiltration. And one can understand the pathological state of FFI from a viewpoint of Kupffer cell function only by radionuclide imaging including SPECT, which is very useful to compare the images with XCT images

  9. Possibilities of differentiation of solitary focal liver lesions by computed tomography perfusion

    Irmina Sefić Pašić

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim To evaluate possibilities of computed tomography (CT perfusion in differentiation of solitary focal liver lesions based on their characteristic vascularization through perfusion parameters analysis. Methods Prospective study was conducted on 50 patients in the period 2009-2012. Patients were divided in two groups: benign and malignant lesions. The following CT perfusion parameters were analyzed: blood flow (BF, blood volume (BV, mean transit time (MTT, capillary permeability surface area product (PS, hepatic arterial fraction (HAF, and impulse residual function (IRF. During the study another perfusion parameter was analyzed: hepatic perfusion index (HPI. All patients were examined on Multidetector 64-slice CT machine (GE with application of perfusion protocol for liver with i.v. administration of contrast agent. Results In both groups an increase of vascularization and arterial blood flow was noticed, but there was no significant statistical difference between any of 6 analyzed parameters. Hepatic perfusion index values were increased in all lesions in comparison with normal liver parenchyma. Conclusion Computed tomography perfusion in our study did not allow differentiation of benign and malignant liver lesions based on analysis of functional perfusion parameters. Hepatic perfusion index should be investigated in further studies as a parameter for detection of possible presence of micro-metastases in visually homogeneous liver in cases with no lesions found during standard CT protocol

  10. Quantum fields on the computer

    1992-01-01

    This book provides an overview of recent progress in computer simulations of nonperturbative phenomena in quantum field theory, particularly in the context of the lattice approach. It is a collection of extensive self-contained reviews of various subtopics, including algorithms, spectroscopy, finite temperature physics, Yukawa and chiral theories, bounds on the Higgs meson mass, the renormalization group, and weak decays of hadrons.Physicists with some knowledge of lattice gauge ideas will find this book a useful and interesting source of information on the recent developments in the field.

  11. 7T MRI in focal epilepsy with unrevealing conventional field strength imaging.

    De Ciantis, Alessio; Barba, Carmen; Tassi, Laura; Cosottini, Mirco; Tosetti, Michela; Costagli, Mauro; Bramerio, Manuela; Bartolini, Emanuele; Biagi, Laura; Cossu, Massimo; Pelliccia, Veronica; Symms, Mark R; Guerrini, Renzo

    2016-03-01

    To assess the diagnostic yield of 7T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting and characterizing structural lesions in patients with intractable focal epilepsy and unrevealing conventional (1.5 or 3T) MRI. We conducted an observational clinical imaging study on 21 patients (17 adults and 4 children) with intractable focal epilepsy, exhibiting clinical and electroencephalographic features consistent with a single seizure-onset zone (SOZ) and unrevealing conventional MRI. Patients were enrolled at two tertiary epilepsy surgery centers and imaged at 7T, including whole brain (three-dimensional [3D] T1 -weighted [T1W] fast-spoiled gradient echo (FSPGR), 3D susceptibility-weighted angiography [SWAN], 3D fluid-attenuated inversion recovery [FLAIR]) and targeted imaging (2D T2*-weighted dual-echo gradient-recalled echo [GRE] and 2D gray-white matter tissue border enhancement [TBE] fast spin echo inversion recovery [FSE-IR]). MRI studies at 1.5 or 3T deemed unrevealing at the referral center were reviewed by three experts in epilepsy imaging. Reviewers were provided information regarding the suspected localization of the SOZ. The same team subsequently reviewed 7T images. Agreement in imaging interpretation was reached through consensus-based discussions based on visual identification of structural abnormalities and their likely correlation with clinical and electrographic data. 7T MRI revealed structural lesions in 6 (29%) of 21 patients. The diagnostic gain in detection was obtained using GRE and FLAIR images. Four of the six patients with abnormal 7T underwent epilepsy surgery. Histopathology revealed focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) in all. In the remaining 15 patients (71%), 7T MRI remained unrevealing; 4 of the patients underwent epilepsy surgery and histopathologic evaluation revealed gliosis. 7T MRI improves detection of epileptogenic FCD that is not visible at conventional field strengths. A dedicated protocol including whole brain FLAIR and GRE images at 7T

  12. The Focal Plane Assembly for the Athena X-Ray Integral Field Unit Instrument

    Jackson, B. D.; Van Weers, H.; van der Kuur, J.; den Hartog, R.; Akamatsu, H.; Argan, A.; Bandler, S. R.; Barbera, M.; Barret, D.; Bruijn, M. P.; hide

    2016-01-01

    This paper summarizes a preliminary design concept for the focal plane assembly of the X-ray Integral Field Unit on the Athena spacecraft, an imaging microcalorimeter that will enable high spectral resolution imaging and point-source spectroscopy. The instrument's sensor array will be a 3840-pixel transition edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeter array, with a frequency domain multiplexed SQUID readout system allowing this large-format sensor array to be operated within the thermal constraints of the instrument's cryogenic system. A second TES detector will be operated in close proximity to the sensor array to detect cosmic rays and secondary particles passing through the sensor array for off-line coincidence detection to identify and reject events caused by the in-orbit high-energy particle background. The detectors, operating at 55 mK, or less, will be thermally isolated from the instrument cryostat's 2 K stage, while shielding and filtering within the FPA will allow the instrument's sensitive sensor array to be operated in the expected environment during both on-ground testing and in-flight operation, including stray light from the cryostat environment, low-energy photons entering through the X-ray aperture, low-frequency magnetic fields, and high-frequency electric fields.

  13. Improvement of visual field defects after focal resection for occipital lobe epilepsy: case report.

    Yamamoto, Takahiro; Hamasaki, Tadashi; Nakamura, Hideo; Yamada, Kazumichi

    2018-03-01

    Improvement of visual field defects after surgical treatment for occipital lobe epilepsy is rare. Here, the authors report on a 24-year-old man with a 15-year history of refractory epilepsy that developed after he had undergone an occipital craniotomy to remove a cerebellar astrocytoma at the age of 4. His seizures started with an elementary visual aura, followed by secondary generalized tonic-clonic convulsion. Perimetry revealed left-sided incomplete hemianopia, and MRI showed an old contusion in the right occipital lobe. After evaluation with ictal video-electroencephalography, electrocorticography, and mapping of the visual cortex with subdural electrodes, the patient underwent resection of the scarred tissue, including the epileptic focus at the occipital lobe. After surgery, he became seizure free and his visual field defect improved gradually. In addition, postoperative 123 I-iomazenil (IMZ) SPECT showed partly normalized IMZ uptake in the visual cortex. This case is a practical example suggesting that neurological deficits attributable to the functional deficit zone can be remedied by successful focal resection.

  14. Determinations of directions of the mean stress field in Sichuan-Yunnan region from a number of focal mechanism solutions

    Zhong, Ji-Mao; Cheng, Wan-Zheng

    2006-07-01

    Based on the spatial orientation and slip direction of the fault plane solutions, we present the expression of corresponding mechanical axis tensor in geographic coordinate system, and then put forward a method for calculating average mechanical axis tensor and its eigenvalues, which involves solving the corresponding eigenequation. The method for deducing mean stress field from T, B, and P axes parameters of a number of focal mechanism solutions has been verified by inverting data of mean stress fields in Fuyun region and in Tangshan region with fitting method of slip direction, and both results are consistent. To study regional average stress field, we need to choose a population of focal mechanism solutions of earthquakes in the massifs where there are significant tectonic structures. According to the focal mechanism solutions of 256 moderate-strong earthquakes occurred in 13 seismic zones of Sichuan-Yunnan region, the quantitative analysis results of stress tensor in each seismic zone have been given. The algorithm of such method is simple and convenient, which makes the method for analyzing tectonic stress field with large amount of focal mechanism solution data become quantified.

  15. An efficient and novel computation method for simulating diffraction patterns from large-scale coded apertures on large-scale focal plane arrays

    Shrekenhamer, Abraham; Gottesman, Stephen R.

    2012-10-01

    A novel and memory efficient method for computing diffraction patterns produced on large-scale focal planes by largescale Coded Apertures at wavelengths where diffraction effects are significant has been developed and tested. The scheme, readily implementable on portable computers, overcomes the memory limitations of present state-of-the-art simulation codes such as Zemax. The method consists of first calculating a set of reference complex field (amplitude and phase) patterns on the focal plane produced by a single (reference) central hole, extending to twice the focal plane array size, with one such pattern for each Line-of-Sight (LOS) direction and wavelength in the scene, and with the pattern amplitude corresponding to the square-root of the spectral irradiance from each such LOS direction in the scene at selected wavelengths. Next the set of reference patterns is transformed to generate pattern sets for other holes. The transformation consists of a translational pattern shift corresponding to each hole's position offset and an electrical phase shift corresponding to each hole's position offset and incoming radiance's direction and wavelength. The set of complex patterns for each direction and wavelength is then summed coherently and squared for each detector to yield a set of power patterns unique for each direction and wavelength. Finally the set of power patterns is summed to produce the full waveband diffraction pattern from the scene. With this tool researchers can now efficiently simulate diffraction patterns produced from scenes by large-scale Coded Apertures onto large-scale focal plane arrays to support the development and optimization of coded aperture masks and image reconstruction algorithms.

  16. Computational methods for reversed-field equilibrium

    Boyd, J.K.; Auerbach, S.P.; Willmann, P.A.; Berk, H.L.; McNamara, B.

    1980-01-01

    Investigating the temporal evolution of reversed-field equilibrium caused by transport processes requires the solution of the Grad-Shafranov equation and computation of field-line-averaged quantities. The technique for field-line averaging and the computation of the Grad-Shafranov equation are presented. Application of Green's function to specify the Grad-Shafranov equation boundary condition is discussed. Hill's vortex formulas used to verify certain computations are detailed. Use of computer software to implement computational methods is described

  17. Preliminary results of very fast computation of Moment Magnitude and focal mechanism in the context of tsunami warning

    Schindelé, François; Roch, Julien; Rivera, Luis

    2015-04-01

    Various methodologies were recently developed to compute the moment magnitude and the focal mechanism, thanks to the real time access to numerous broad-band seismic data. Several methods were implemented at the CENALT, in particular the W-Phase method developed by H. Kanamori and L. Rivera. For earthquakes of magnitudes in the range 6.5-9.0, this method provides accurate results in less than 40 minutes. The context of the tsunami warning in Mediterranean, a small basin impacted in less than one hour, and with small sources but some with high tsunami potential (Boumerdes 2003), a comprehensive tsunami warning system in that region should include very fast computation of the seismic parameters. The results of the values of Mw, the focal depth and the type of fault (reverse, normal, strike-slip) are the most relevant parameters expected for the tsunami warning. Preliminary results will be presented using data in the North-eastern and Mediterranean region for the recent period 2010-2014. This work is funded by project ASTARTE - - Assessment, Strategy And Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe - FP7-ENV2013 6.4-3, Grant 603839

  18. Automatic alignment device for focal spot measurements in the center of the field for mammography; Sistema automatico de alinhamento para avaliacao do ponto focal no centro do campo de equipamentos mamograficos

    Vieira, Marcelo A.C.; Watanabe, Alex O.; Oliveira Junior, Paulo D.; Schiabel, Homero [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia. Dept. de Engenharia Eletrica], e-mail: mvieira@sc.usp.br

    2010-03-15

    Some quality control procedures used for mammography, such as focal spot evaluation, requires previous alignment of the measurement equipment with the X-ray central beam. However, alignment procedures are, in general, the most difficult task and the one that needs more time to be performed. Moreover, the operator sometimes is exposed to radiation during this procedure. This work presents an automatic alignment system for mammographic equipment that allows locating the central ray of the radiation beam and, immediately, aligns with it by dislocating itself automatically along the field. The system consists on a bidirectional moving device, connected to a CCD sensor for digital radiographic image acquisition. A computational analysis of a radiographic image, acquired at any position on the field, is performed in order to determine its positioning under the X-ray beam. Finally, a mechanical system for two moving directions, electronically controlled by a microcontroller under USB communication, makes the system to align automatically with the radiation beam central ray. The alignment process is fully automatic, fast and accurate, with no operator exposure to radiation, which allows a considerable time saving for quality control procedures achievement for mammography. (author)

  19. Field Level Computer Exploitation Package

    2007-03-01

    to take advantage of the data retrieved from the computer. Major Barge explained that if a tool could be designed that nearly anyone could use...the study of network forensics. This has become a necessity because of the constantly growing eCommerce industry and the stiff competition between...Security. One big advantage that Insert has is the fact that it is quite small compared to most bootable CDs. At only 60 megabytes it can be burned

  20. Nurturing a growing field: Computers & Geosciences

    Mariethoz, Gregoire; Pebesma, Edzer

    2017-10-01

    Computational issues are becoming increasingly critical for virtually all fields of geoscience. This includes the development of improved algorithms and models, strategies for implementing high-performance computing, or the management and visualization of the large datasets provided by an ever-growing number of environmental sensors. Such issues are central to scientific fields as diverse as geological modeling, Earth observation, geophysics or climatology, to name just a few. Related computational advances, across a range of geoscience disciplines, are the core focus of Computers & Geosciences, which is thus a truly multidisciplinary journal.

  1. Characteristics of the forerunner field of underground water regime during the Tangshan earthquake and its focal evolution process

    Wu, J.; Wang, Y.; Li, S.

    1980-03-01

    On the basis of data obtained from long-term observations of groundwater regime and taking the Tangshan earthquake as an example, the authors proposed first the principles and approaches for recognizing the precursory anomalies of earthquakes and classified the subsurface water regime into underground water, interlayer water and confined water. For the Tangshan earthquake, the forerunner field of underground water is characterized by its spatial distribution (limited to a certain quadrant), its stages of development in time and the synchronism of anomaly-changes during and after a shock. In addition, this study stresses the importance of the principles mentioned above in predicting the space, time, and magnitude of future earthquakes and discusses the relationship between the focal stress field and regional stress field and the indicator to distinguish them. It is suggested that the former develops progressively and its principal axis of compression stress changes in direction just before an earthquake, thus enabling us to divide the focal process into two basically different stages - brewing and originating stages.

  2. Inferences about the local stress field from focal mechanisms: Applications to earthquakes in the southern Great Basin of Nevada

    Harmsen, S.C.; Rogers, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    Focal mechanisms determined from regional-network earthquake data or aftershock field investigation often contain members ranging from strike slip to normal slip in extensional tectonic environments or from strike slip to thrust slip in compressional environments. Although the coexistence of normal and strike-slip faulting has suggested to some investigators that the maximum and intermediate principal stresses are of approximately equal magnitude, several have asserted that the directions of principle stresses can or must interchange to accommodate both types of mechanisms (Zoback and Zoback 1980b; Vetter and Ryall, 1983). A Coulomb-Navier criterion of slip is invoked to demonstrate that both types of mechanisms, as well as oblique members having preferred nodal-plane dips intermediate between those of the strike-slip and normal mechanisms, may be observed in a region where the stress field, resolved into principal components, is axially symmetric. The proximate coexistence of earthquakes having diverse focal mechanisms could be interpreted as evidence for an approximately axially symmetric stress field in a region where optimally oriented planes of weakness are known to exist in the host rock. 10 refs., 6 figs

  3. Electromagnetic field computation by network methods

    Felsen, Leopold B; Russer, Peter

    2009-01-01

    This monograph proposes a systematic and rigorous treatment of electromagnetic field representations in complex structures. The book presents new strong models by combining important computational methods. This is the last book of the late Leopold Felsen.

  4. Technical Data Management Center: a focal point for meteorological and other environmental transport computing technology

    McGill, B.; Maskewitz, B.F.; Trubey, D.K.

    1981-01-01

    The Technical Data Management Center, collecting, packaging, analyzing, and distributing information, computer technology and data which includes meteorological and other environmental transport work is located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, within the Engineering Physics Division. Major activities include maintaining a collection of computing technology and associated literature citations to provide capabilities for meteorological and environmental work. Details of the activities on behalf of TDMC's sponsoring agency, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, are described

  5. Focal myositis

    Kransdorf, M.J.; Temple, H.T.; Sweet, D.E.

    1998-01-01

    Focal myositis is a pseudotumor of soft tissue that typically occurs in the deep soft tissue of the extremities, and is a relatively rare lesion. There is a wide clinical spectrum, with approximately one-third of patients with focal myositis subsequently developing polymyositis, and clinical symptoms of generalized weakness, fever, myalgia, and weight loss, with elevation of creatine phosphokinase. We report the case of a patient with focal myositis who subsequently developed myositis ossificans-like features. (orig.)

  6. Focal myositis

    Galloway, H.R.; Dahlstrom, J.E.; Bennett, G.M.

    2001-01-01

    Focal myositis is a rare, benign focal inflammation of muscle. The lesion often presents as a mass that may be mistaken for a soft tissue sarcoma. This report describes the MRI and histopathological features of a case and illustrates how the diagnosis may be suspected on the basis of the MR findings. Copyright (2001) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  7. Computation within the auxiliary field approach

    Baeurle, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, the classical auxiliary field methodology has been developed as a new simulation technique for performing calculations within the framework of classical statistical mechanics. Since the approach suffers from a sign problem, a judicious choice of the sampling algorithm, allowing a fast statistical convergence and an efficient generation of field configurations, is of fundamental importance for a successful simulation. In this paper we focus on the computational aspects of this simulation methodology. We introduce two different types of algorithms, the single-move auxiliary field Metropolis Monte Carlo algorithm and two new classes of force-based algorithms, which enable multiple-move propagation. In addition, to further optimize the sampling, we describe a preconditioning scheme, which permits to treat each field degree of freedom individually with regard to the evolution through the auxiliary field configuration space. Finally, we demonstrate the validity and assess the competitiveness of these algorithms on a representative practical example. We believe that they may also provide an interesting possibility for enhancing the computational efficiency of other auxiliary field methodologies

  8. A Comparison between Deep and Shallow Stress Fields in Korea Using Earthquake Focal Mechanism Inversions and Hydraulic Fracturing Stress Measurements

    Lee, Rayeon; Chang, Chandong; Hong, Tae-kyung; Lee, Junhyung; Bae, Seong-Ho; Park, Eui-Seob; Park, Chan

    2016-04-01

    We are characterizing stress fields in Korea using two types of stress data: earthquake focal mechanism inversions (FMF) and hydraulic fracturing stress measurements (HF). The earthquake focal mechanism inversion data represent stress conditions at 2-20 km depths, whereas the hydraulic fracturing stress measurements, mostly conducted for geotechnical purposes, have been carried out at depths shallower than 1 km. We classified individual stress data based on the World Stress Map quality ranking scheme. A total of 20 FMF data were classified into A-B quality, possibly representing tectonic stress fields. A total of 83 HF data out of compiled 226 data were classified into B-C quality, which we use for shallow stress field characterization. The tectonic stress, revealed from the FMF data, is characterized by a remarkable consistency in its maximum stress (σ1) directions in and around Korea (N79±2° E), indicating a quite uniform deep stress field throughout. On the other hand, the shallow stress field, represented by HF data, exhibits local variations in σ1 directions, possibly due to effects of topography and geologic structures such as faults. Nonetheless, there is a general similarity in σ1 directions between deep and shallow stress fields. To investigate the shallow stress field statistically, we follow 'the mean orientation and wavelength analysis' suggested by Reiter et al. (2014). After the stress pattern analysis, the resulting stress points distribute sporadically over the country, not covering the entire region evenly. In the western part of Korea, the shallow σ1directions are generally uniform with their search radius reaching 100 km, where the average stress direction agrees well with those of the deep tectonic stress. We note two noticeable differences between shallow and deep stresses in the eastern part of Korea. First, the shallow σ1 orientations are markedly non-uniform in the southeastern part of Korea with their search radius less than 25 km

  9. Focal myositis

    Kransdorf, M.J. [Saint Mary`s Hospital, Richmond, VA (United States). Dept. of Radiol.]|[Department of Radiologic Pathology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, DC (United States); Temple, H.T. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States)]|[Department of Orthopedic Pathology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, DC (United States); Sweet, D.E. [Department of Orthopedic Pathology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, DC (United States)

    1998-05-01

    Focal myositis is a pseudotumor of soft tissue that typically occurs in the deep soft tissue of the extremities, and is a relatively rare lesion. There is a wide clinical spectrum, with approximately one-third of patients with focal myositis subsequently developing polymyositis, and clinical symptoms of generalized weakness, fever, myalgia, and weight loss, with elevation of creatine phosphokinase. We report the case of a patient with focal myositis who subsequently developed myositis ossificans-like features. (orig.) With 3 figs., 25 refs.

  10. Forward Field Computation with OpenMEEG

    Alexandre Gramfort

    2011-01-01

    must be computed. We present OpenMEEG, which solves the electromagnetic forward problem in the quasistatic regime, for head models with piecewise constant conductivity. The core of OpenMEEG consists of the symmetric Boundary Element Method, which is based on an extended Green Representation theorem. OpenMEEG is able to provide lead fields for four different electromagnetic forward problems: Electroencephalography (EEG, Magnetoencephalography (MEG, Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT, and intracranial electric potentials (IPs. OpenMEEG is open source and multiplatform. It can be used from Python and Matlab in conjunction with toolboxes that solve the inverse problem; its integration within FieldTrip is operational since release 2.0.

  11. Focal mechanisms in the southern Aegean from temporary seismic networks - implications for the regional stress field and ongoing deformation processes

    Friederich, W.; Brüstle, A.; Küperkoch, L.; Meier, T.; Lamara, S.; Egelados Working Group

    2014-05-01

    The lateral variation of the stress field in the southern Aegean plate and the subducting Hellenic slab is determined from recordings of seismicity obtained with the CYCNET and EGELADOS networks in the years from 2002 to 2007. First motions from 7000 well-located microearthquakes were analysed to produce 540 well-constrained focal mechanisms. They were complemented by another 140 derived by waveform matching of records from larger events. Most of these earthquakes fall into 16 distinct spatial clusters distributed over the southern Aegean region. For each cluster, a stress inversion could be carried out yielding consistent estimates of the stress field and its spatial variation. At crustal levels, the stress field is generally dominated by a steeply dipping compressional principal stress direction except in places where coupling of the subducting slab and overlying plate come into play. Tensional principal stresses are generally subhorizontal. Just behind the forearc, the crust is under arc-parallel tension whereas in the volcanic areas around Kos, Columbo and Astypalea tensional and intermediate stresses are nearly degenerate. Further west and north, in the Santorini-Amorgos graben and in the area of the islands of Mykonos, Andros and Tinos, tensional stresses are significant and point around the NW-SE direction. Very similar stress fields are observed in western Turkey with the tensional axis rotated to NNE-SSW. Intermediate-depth earthquakes below 100 km in the Nisyros region indicate that the Hellenic slab experiences slab-parallel tension at these depths. The direction of tension is close to east-west and thus deviates from the local NW-oriented slab dip presumably owing to the segmentation of the slab. Beneath the Cretan sea, at shallower levels, the slab is under NW-SE compression. Tensional principal stresses in the crust exhibit very good alignment with extensional strain rate principal axes derived from GPS velocities except in volcanic areas, where both

  12. Computed tomographic criteria for differential diagnosis between exacerbation of focal chronic pancreatitis and carcinoma located in the head of the pancreas

    Ivanov, A.; Tonchev, Z.

    1995-01-01

    A group of 126 patients with CT-finding of tumor mass in the head of the pancreas is studied. Signs of acute exacerbation of focal chronic pancreatitis are found in 28 of them. Carcinoma of the head of pancreas is diagnosed in 98 patients. Surgical and histological verification is performed in 84 (86%) patients with carcinoma of the pancreas. In 77 (92%) cases the computed tomographic diagnosis coincides with the histological one, while in the remaining 7 (8%) it fails to coincide. The morphological and densitometric changes were analyzed with respect to their frequency. On account of the nonspecific character of the computed tomographic signs a symptom constellation is developed which facilitates the differential diagnosis of the acute exacerbation of focal pancreatitis and the carcinoma. The changes in density of lesions observed after application of contrast media were found to be of significant value. 16 refs., 6 figs. (author)

  13. Single scan femtosecond laser transverse writing of depressed cladding waveguides enabled by three-dimensional focal field engineering.

    Zhang, Qian; Yang, Dong; Qi, Jia; Cheng, Ya; Gong, Qihuang; Li, Yan

    2017-06-12

    We report single scan transverse writing of depressed cladding waveguides inside ZBLAN glass with the longitudinally oriented annular ring-shaped focal intensity distribution of the femtosecond laser. The entire region of depressed cladding at the cross section, where a negative change of refraction index is induced, can be modified simultaneously with the ring-shaped focal intensity profile. The fabricated waveguides exhibit good single guided mode.

  14. A computational theory of visual receptive fields.

    Lindeberg, Tony

    2013-12-01

    A receptive field constitutes a region in the visual field where a visual cell or a visual operator responds to visual stimuli. This paper presents a theory for what types of receptive field profiles can be regarded as natural for an idealized vision system, given a set of structural requirements on the first stages of visual processing that reflect symmetry properties of the surrounding world. These symmetry properties include (i) covariance properties under scale changes, affine image deformations, and Galilean transformations of space-time as occur for real-world image data as well as specific requirements of (ii) temporal causality implying that the future cannot be accessed and (iii) a time-recursive updating mechanism of a limited temporal buffer of the past as is necessary for a genuine real-time system. Fundamental structural requirements are also imposed to ensure (iv) mutual consistency and a proper handling of internal representations at different spatial and temporal scales. It is shown how a set of families of idealized receptive field profiles can be derived by necessity regarding spatial, spatio-chromatic, and spatio-temporal receptive fields in terms of Gaussian kernels, Gaussian derivatives, or closely related operators. Such image filters have been successfully used as a basis for expressing a large number of visual operations in computer vision, regarding feature detection, feature classification, motion estimation, object recognition, spatio-temporal recognition, and shape estimation. Hence, the associated so-called scale-space theory constitutes a both theoretically well-founded and general framework for expressing visual operations. There are very close similarities between receptive field profiles predicted from this scale-space theory and receptive field profiles found by cell recordings in biological vision. Among the family of receptive field profiles derived by necessity from the assumptions, idealized models with very good qualitative

  15. Focal Stenosis in Right Upper Lobe Bronchus in a Recurrently Wheezing Child Sequentially Studied by Multidetector-row Spiral Computed Tomography and Scintigraphy

    I-Chen Chen

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Lower respiratory tract infections associated with wheezing are not uncommon in infants and young children. Among the wheezing-associated disorders, allergic etiologies are more commonly encountered than anatomic anomalies. We present a 3-year-old girl with a sudden attack of asthmatic symptoms including dyspnea, cyanosis and diffuse wheezing. Based on a history of choking, and atelectasis in the right upper lobe detected by chest films, flexible tracheobronchoscopy was arranged and incidentally detected a stenotic orifice in the right upper lobe bronchus. Multidetector-row spiral computed tomography and pulmonary scintigraphy subsequently also disclosed the focal stenosis. She suffered from recurrent wheezing, pneumonia and lung atelectasis during 1 year of follow-up. We emphasize the diagnosis, clinical course and management of focal stenosis in the right upper lobe bronchus.

  16. Focal mechanisms in the southern Aegean from temporary seismic networks – implications for the regional stress field and ongoing deformation processes

    Friederich, W.; Brüstle, A.; Küperkoch, L.; Meier, T.; Lamara, S.; Working Group, Egelados

    2014-01-01

    The lateral variation of the stress field in the southern Aegean plate and the subducting Hellenic slab is determined from recordings of seismicity obtained with the CYCNET and EGELADOS networks in the years from 2002 to 2007. First motions from 7000 well-located microearthquakes were analysed to produce 540 well-constrained focal mechanisms. They were complemented by another 140 derived by waveform matching of records from larger events. Most of these earth...

  17. Dual field theories of quantum computation

    Vanchurin, Vitaly

    2016-01-01

    Given two quantum states of N q-bits we are interested to find the shortest quantum circuit consisting of only one- and two- q-bit gates that would transfer one state into another. We call it the quantum maze problem for the reasons described in the paper. We argue that in a large N limit the quantum maze problem is equivalent to the problem of finding a semiclassical trajectory of some lattice field theory (the dual theory) on an N+1 dimensional space-time with geometrically flat, but topologically compact spatial slices. The spatial fundamental domain is an N dimensional hyper-rhombohedron, and the temporal direction describes transitions from an arbitrary initial state to an arbitrary target state and so the initial and final dual field theory conditions are described by these two quantum computational states. We first consider a complex Klein-Gordon field theory and argue that it can only be used to study the shortest quantum circuits which do not involve generators composed of tensor products of multiple Pauli Z matrices. Since such situation is not generic we call it the Z-problem. On the dual field theory side the Z-problem corresponds to massless excitations of the phase (Goldstone modes) that we attempt to fix using Higgs mechanism. The simplest dual theory which does not suffer from the massless excitation (or from the Z-problem) is the Abelian-Higgs model which we argue can be used for finding the shortest quantum circuits. Since every trajectory of the field theory is mapped directly to a quantum circuit, the shortest quantum circuits are identified with semiclassical trajectories. We also discuss the complexity of an actual algorithm that uses a dual theory prospective for solving the quantum maze problem and compare it with a geometric approach. We argue that it might be possible to solve the problem in sub-exponential time in 2 N , but for that we must consider the Klein-Gordon theory on curved spatial geometry and/or more complicated (than N

  18. Preliminary Phase Field Computational Model Development

    Li, Yulan [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hu, Shenyang Y. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xu, Ke [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Suter, Jonathan D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McCloy, John S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Johnson, Bradley R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-12-15

    This interim report presents progress towards the development of meso-scale models of magnetic behavior that incorporate microstructural information. Modeling magnetic signatures in irradiated materials with complex microstructures (such as structural steels) is a significant challenge. The complexity is addressed incrementally, using the monocrystalline Fe (i.e., ferrite) film as model systems to develop and validate initial models, followed by polycrystalline Fe films, and by more complicated and representative alloys. In addition, the modeling incrementally addresses inclusion of other major phases (e.g., martensite, austenite), minor magnetic phases (e.g., carbides, FeCr precipitates), and minor nonmagnetic phases (e.g., Cu precipitates, voids). The focus of the magnetic modeling is on phase-field models. The models are based on the numerical solution to the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. From the computational standpoint, phase-field modeling allows the simulation of large enough systems that relevant defect structures and their effects on functional properties like magnetism can be simulated. To date, two phase-field models have been generated in support of this work. First, a bulk iron model with periodic boundary conditions was generated as a proof-of-concept to investigate major loop effects of single versus polycrystalline bulk iron and effects of single non-magnetic defects. More recently, to support the experimental program herein using iron thin films, a new model was generated that uses finite boundary conditions representing surfaces and edges. This model has provided key insights into the domain structures observed in magnetic force microscopy (MFM) measurements. Simulation results for single crystal thin-film iron indicate the feasibility of the model for determining magnetic domain wall thickness and mobility in an externally applied field. Because the phase-field model dimensions are limited relative to the size of most specimens used in

  19. Field microcomputerized multichannel γ ray spectrometer based on notebook computer

    Jia Wenyi; Wei Biao; Zhou Rongsheng; Li Guodong; Tang Hong

    1996-01-01

    Currently, field γ ray spectrometry can not rapidly measure γ ray full spectrum, so a field microcomputerized multichannel γ ray spectrometer based on notebook computer is described, and the γ ray full spectrum can be rapidly measured in the field

  20. Focal mechanisms and moment magnitudes of micro-earthquakes in central Brazil by waveform inversion with quality assessment and inference of the local stress field

    Carvalho, Juraci; Barros, Lucas Vieira; Zahradník, Jiří

    2016-11-01

    This paper documents an investigation on the use of full waveform inversion to retrieve focal mechanisms of 11 micro-earthquakes (Mw 0.8 to 1.4). The events represent aftershocks of a 5.0 mb earthquake that occurred on October 8, 2010 close to the city of Mara Rosa in the state of Goiás, Brazil. The main contribution of the work lies in demonstrating the feasibility of waveform inversion of such weak events. The inversion was made possible thanks to recordings available at 8 temporary seismic stations in epicentral distances of less than 8 km, at which waveforms can be successfully modeled at relatively high frequencies (1.5-2.0 Hz). On average, the fault-plane solutions obtained are in agreement with a composite focal mechanism previously calculated from first-motion polarities. They also agree with the fault geometry inferred from precise relocation of the Mara Rosa aftershock sequence. The focal mechanisms provide an estimate of the local stress field. This paper serves as a pilot study for similar investigations in intraplate regions where the stress-field investigations are difficult due to rare earthquake occurrences, and where weak events must be studied with a detailed quality assessment.

  1. Computation of Surface Integrals of Curl Vector Fields

    Hu, Chenglie

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a way of computing a surface integral when the vector field of the integrand is a curl field. Presented in some advanced calculus textbooks such as [1], the technique, as the author experienced, is simple and applicable. The computation is based on Stokes' theorem in 3-space calculus, and thus provides not only a means to…

  2. Computational lens for the near field

    Carney, P. Scott; Franzin, Richard A.; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2004-01-01

    A method is presented to reconstruct the structure of a scattering object from data acquired with a photon scanning tunneling microscope . The data may be understood to form a Gabor type near-field hologram and are obtained at a distance from the sample where the field is defocused and normally...

  3. Entertainment computing, social transformation and the quantum field

    Rauterberg, G.W.M.; Nijholt, A.; Reidsma, D.; Hondorp, H.

    2009-01-01

    Entertainment computing is on its way getting an established academic discipline. The scope of entertainment computing is quite broad (see the scope of the international journal Entertainment Computing). One unifying idea in this diverse community of entertainment researchers and developers might be a normative position to enhance human living through social transformation. One possible option in this direction is a shared `conscious' field. Several ideas about a new kind of field based on qu...

  4. Optimal usage of computing grid network in the fields of nuclear fusion computing task

    Tenev, D.

    2006-01-01

    Nowadays the nuclear power becomes the main source of energy. To make its usage more efficient, the scientists created complicated simulation models, which require powerful computers. The grid computing is the answer to powerful and accessible computing resources. The article observes, and estimates the optimal configuration of the grid environment in the fields of the complicated nuclear fusion computing tasks. (author)

  5. Computing discrete signed distance fields from triangle meshes

    Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas; Aanæs, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    A method for generating a discrete, signed 3D distance field is proposed. Distance fields are used in a number of contexts. In particular the popular level set method is usually initialized by a distance field. The main focus of our work is on simplifying the computation of the sign when generating...

  6. Effects of plant diversity on the concentration of secondary plant metabolites and the density of arthropods on focal plants in the field

    Kostenko, O.; Mulder, Patrick P. J.; Courbois, Matthijs; Bezemer, T. Martijn

    2017-01-01

    1.The diversity of the surrounding plant community can directly affect the abundance of insects on a focal plant as well as the size and quality of that focal plant. However, to what extent the effects of plant diversity on the arthropod community on a focal plant are mediated by host plant quality

  7. First results in rapid MR imaging of focal liver and spleen lesions using field echos and small angle excitation (gradient echo sequences)

    Griebel, J.; Hess, C.F.; Kurtz, B.; Klose, U.; Kueper, K.

    1987-01-01

    15 healthy subjects and 39 patients with focal liver and spleen lesions were examined via MR tomography at 1.5 tesla. Gradient field echos at small angle excitation ( 0 ) were employed. The imaging time per layer was 10 seconds so that rapid imaging could be carried out at respiratory standstill. This enabled visualisation of liver and spleen without interference by breathing artifacts and with accurate localisation. Focal lesions can be imaged best at low flip-angle pulses (liver) or low to medium-angle pulses (spleen). The primary liver cell carcinoma is visualised as an inhomogeneous structure with similar signal intensity as the surrounding tissue. All other examined liver lesions (metastases, haemangiomas, lymphatic infiltrates, echinococcus cysts, FNH, gummae) showed greater signal intensity than the remaining organ at small angle excitation. Furthermore, contrast reversals were seen at medium-angle pulses. Contrariwise, with the exception of the light-coloured spleen infarcts, spleen lesions (lymphatic infiltrate, Boeck's disease or sarcoidosis) appeared darker at all excitation angles than the surrounding tissue. (orig.) [de

  8. First results in rapid MR imaging of focal liver and spleen lesions using field echos and small angle excitation (gradient echo sequences)

    Griebel, J.; Hess, C.F.; Kurtz, B.; Klose, U.; Kueper, K.

    1987-01-01

    15 healthy subjects and 39 patients with focal liver and spleen lesions were examined via MR tomography at 1.5 tesla. Gradient field echos at small angle excitation (< 90/sup 0/) were employed. The imaging time per layer was 10 seconds so that rapid imaging could be carried out at respiratory standstill. This enabled visualisation of liver and spleen without interference by breathing artifacts and with accurate localisation. Focal lesions can be imaged best at low flip-angle pulses (liver) or low to medium-angle pulses (spleen). The primary liver cell carcinoma is visualised as an inhomogeneous structure with similar signal intensity as the surrounding tissue. All other examined liver lesions (metastases, haemangiomas, lymphatic infiltrates, echinococcus cysts, FNH, gummae) showed greater signal intensity than the remaining organ at small angle excitation. Furthermore, contrast reversals were seen at medium-angle pulses. Contrariwise, with the exception of the light-coloured spleen infarcts, spleen lesions (lymphatic infiltrate, Boeck's disease or sarcoidosis) appeared darker at all excitation angles than the surrounding tissue.

  9. Multigrid methods for the computation of propagators in gauge fields

    Kalkreuter, T.

    1992-11-01

    In the present work generalizations of multigrid methods for propagators in gauge fields are investigated. We discuss proper averaging operations for bosons and for staggered fermions. An efficient algorithm for computing C numerically is presented. The averaging kernels C can be used not only in deterministic multigrid computations, but also in multigrid Monte Carlo simulations, and for the definition of block spins and blocked gauge fields in Monte Carlo renormalization group studies of gauge theories. Actual numerical computations of kernels and propagators are performed in compact four-dimensional SU(2) gauge fields. (orig./HSI)

  10. Diagnostic imaging in focal epilepsy

    Zlatareva, D.

    2013-01-01

    Focal epilepsies account for 60% of all seizure disorders worldwide. In this review the classic and new classification system of epileptic seizures and syndromes as well as genetic forms are discussed. Magnetic resonance (MR) is the technique of choice for diagnostic imaging in focal epilepsy because of its sensitivity and high tissue contrast. The review is focused on the lack of consensus of imaging protocols and reported findings in refractory epilepsy. The most frequently encountered MRI findings in epilepsy are reported and their imaging characteristics are depicted. Diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis and malformations of cortical development as two major causes of refractory focal epilepsy is described in details. Some promising new techniques as positron emission tomography computed tomography (PET/CT) and MR and PET/CT fusion are briefly discussed. Also the relevance of adequate imaging in focal epilepsy, some practical points in imaging interpretation and differential diagnosis are highlighted. (author)

  11. Is Contrast Enhanced Ultrasonography a useful tool in a beginner's hand? How much can a Computer Assisted Diagnosis prototype help in characterizing the malignancy of focal liver lesions?

    Moga, Tudor Voicu; Popescu, Alina; Sporea, Ioan; Danila, Mirela; David, Ciprian; Gui, Vasile; Iacob, Nicoleta; Miclaus, Gratian; Sirli, Roxana

    2017-08-23

    Contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) improved the characterization of focal liver lesions (FLLs), but is an operatordependent method. The goal of this paper was to test a computer assisted diagnosis (CAD) prototype and to see its benefit in assisting a beginner in the evaluation of FLLs. Our cohort included 97 good quality CEUS videos[34% hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC), 12.3% hypervascular metastases (HiperM), 11.3% hypovascular metastases (HipoM), 24.7% hemangiomas (HMG), 17.5% focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH)] that were used to develop a CAD prototype based on an algorithm that tested a binary decision based classifier. Two young medical doctors (1 year CEUS experience), two experts and the CAD prototype, reevaluated 50 FLLs CEUS videos (diagnosis of benign vs. malignant) first blinded to clinical data, in order to evaluate the diagnostic gap beginner vs. expert. The CAD classifier managed a 75.2% overall (benign vs. malignant) correct classification rate. The overall classification rates for the evaluators, before and after clinical data were: first beginner-78%; 94%; second beginner-82%; 96%; first expert-94%; 100%; second expert-96%; 98%. For both beginners, the malignant vs. benign diagnosis significantly improved after knowing the clinical data (p=0.005; p=0,008). The expert was better than the beginner (p=0.04) and better than the CAD (p=0.001). CAD in addition to the beginner can reach the expert diagnosis. The most frequent lesions misdiagnosed at CEUS were FNH and HCC. The CAD prototype is a good comparing tool for a beginner operator that can be developed to assist the diagnosis. In order to increase the classification rate, the CAD system for FLL in CEUS must integrate the clinical data.

  12. Computer Forensics Field Triage Process Model

    Marcus K. Rogers

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available With the proliferation of digital based evidence, the need for the timely identification, analysis and interpretation of digital evidence is becoming more crucial. In many investigations critical information is required while at the scene or within a short period of time - measured in hours as opposed to days. The traditional cyber forensics approach of seizing a system(s/media, transporting it to the lab, making a forensic image(s, and then searching the entire system for potential evidence, is no longer appropriate in some circumstances. In cases such as child abductions, pedophiles, missing or exploited persons, time is of the essence. In these types of cases, investigators dealing with the suspect or crime scene need investigative leads quickly; in some cases it is the difference between life and death for the victim(s. The Cyber Forensic Field Triage Process Model (CFFTPM proposes an onsite or field approach for providing the identification, analysis and interpretation of digital evidence in a short time frame, without the requirement of having to take the system(s/media back to the lab for an in-depth examination or acquiring a complete forensic image(s. The proposed model adheres to commonly held forensic principles, and does not negate the ability that once the initial field triage is concluded, the system(s/storage media be transported back to a lab environment for a more thorough examination and analysis. The CFFTPM has been successfully used in various real world cases, and its investigative importance and pragmatic approach has been amply demonstrated. Furthermore, the derived evidence from these cases has not been challenged in the court proceedings where it has been introduced. The current article describes the CFFTPM in detail, discusses the model’s forensic soundness, investigative support capabilities and practical considerations.

  13. Field-programmable custom computing technology architectures, tools, and applications

    Luk, Wayne; Pocek, Ken

    2000-01-01

    Field-Programmable Custom Computing Technology: Architectures, Tools, and Applications brings together in one place important contributions and up-to-date research results in this fast-moving area. In seven selected chapters, the book describes the latest advances in architectures, design methods, and applications of field-programmable devices for high-performance reconfigurable systems. The contributors to this work were selected from the leading researchers and practitioners in the field. It will be valuable to anyone working or researching in the field of custom computing technology. It serves as an excellent reference, providing insight into some of the most challenging issues being examined today.

  14. Monte Carlo modeling of small photon fields: Quantifying the impact of focal spot size on source occlusion and output factors, and exploring miniphantom design for small-field measurements

    Scott, Alison J. D.; Nahum, Alan E.; Fenwick, John D.

    2009-01-01

    The accuracy with which Monte Carlo models of photon beams generated by linear accelerators (linacs) can describe small-field dose distributions depends on the modeled width of the electron beam profile incident on the linac target. It is known that the electron focal spot width affects penumbra and cross-field profiles; here, the authors explore the extent to which source occlusion reduces linac output for smaller fields and larger spot sizes. A BEAMnrc Monte Carlo linac model has been used to investigate the variation in penumbra widths and small-field output factors with electron spot size. A formalism is developed separating head scatter factors into source occlusion and flattening filter factors. Differences between head scatter factors defined in terms of in-air energy fluence, collision kerma, and terma are explored using Monte Carlo calculations. Estimates of changes in kerma-based source occlusion and flattening filter factors with field size and focal spot width are obtained by calculating doses deposited in a narrow 2 mm wide virtual ''milliphantom'' geometry. The impact of focal spot size on phantom scatter is also explored. Modeled electron spot sizes of 0.4-0.7 mm FWHM generate acceptable matches to measured penumbra widths. However the 0.5 cm field output factor is quite sensitive to electron spot width, the measured output only being matched by calculations for a 0.7 mm spot width. Because the spectra of the unscattered primary (Ψ Π ) and head-scattered (Ψ Σ ) photon energy fluences differ, miniphantom-based collision kerma measurements do not scale precisely with total in-air energy fluence Ψ=(Ψ Π +Ψ Σ ) but with (Ψ Π +1.2Ψ Σ ). For most field sizes, on-axis collision kerma is independent of the focal spot size; but for a 0.5 cm field size and 1.0 mm spot width, it is reduced by around 7% mostly due to source occlusion. The phantom scatter factor of the 0.5 cm field also shows some spot size dependence, decreasing by 6% (relative) as

  15. Asynchronous Distributed Execution of Fixpoint-Based Computational Fields

    Lluch Lafuente, Alberto; Loreti, Michele; Montanari, Ugo

    2017-01-01

    . Computational fields are a key ingredient of aggregate programming, a promising software engineering methodology particularly relevant for the Internet of Things. In our approach, space topology is represented by a fixed graph-shaped field, namely a network with attributes on both nodes and arcs, where arcs...

  16. NW transverse fault system in Southern Bogota, Colombia: New seismologic and structural evidences derived from focal mechanisms and stress field determination

    Angel Amaya, J.; Fierro Morales, J.; Ordoñez Potes, M.; Blanco, M.

    2012-12-01

    We present new seismological, morphotectonic and structural data of the Southern Bogota area. The goals of the study were to characterize the NW transverse fault system and to evaluate its effect on seismic wave's generation and propagation. The data set included epicenters of the RSNC (Red Sismologica Nacional de Colombia) catalog over the period 1993-2012, historical description of seismic events (period 1644-1921), structural field data (scale 1:100000) and remote sensors interpretation. The methodology included the structural analysis of over 476 faults having a known sense of offset by using a least squares iterative inversion outlined by Angelier (1984) to determinate the mean deviatoric principal stress tensor. Preliminary conclusions showed that both propagation medium and direction are determined by the structural and mechanic conditions of the Southern Bogota Shear Zone (SBSZ) defined by Fierro & Angel, (2008) as a NW-SE oblique-slip fault zone within sinistral and normal regimes. Based on both data sources (focal mechanism and field structural data) we attempted to reconstruct the stress field starting with a strike slip faulting stress regime (S2 vertical), the solution yielded a ENE-WSW orientation for horizontal principal stress (S1). It is hypothesized that the NW oblique-slip fault zone may generate and/or propagate seismic waves, as a local source, implying local hazard to Bogota the capital city of Colombia with over 8 million habitants.

  17. Propentofylline treatment on open field behavior in rats with focal ethidium bromide-induced demyelination in the ventral surface of the brainstem.

    Martins-Júnior, J L; Bernardi, M M; Bondan, E F

    2016-03-01

    Propentofylline (PPF) is a xanthine derivative with pharmacological effects that are distinct from those of classic methylxanthines. It depresses the activation of microglial cells and astrocytes, which is associated with neuronal damage during neural inflammation and hypoxia. Our previous studies showed that PPF improved remyelination following gliotoxic lesions that were induced by ethidium bromide (EB). In the present study, the long-term effects of PPF on open field behavior in rats with EB-induced focal demyelination were examined. The effects of PPF were first evaluated in naive rats that were not subjected to EB lesions. Behavior in the beam walking test was also evaluated during chronic PPF treatment because impairments in motor coordination can interfere with behavior in the open field. The results showed that PPF treatment in unlesioned rats decreased general activity and caused motor impairment in the beam walking test. Gliotoxic EB injections increased general activity in rats that were treated with PPF compared with rats that received saline solution. Motor incoordination was also attenuated in PPF-treated rats. These results indicate that PPF reversed the effects of EB lesions on behavior in the open field and beam walking test. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Intraosseous focal venous malformation of the mandibular body: Cone beam computed tomography planning followed by piezoelectric knife resection and free bone graft reconstruction

    Nikolić Živorad S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Intraosseous vascular malformation could be life-threatening due to uncontrolled hemorrhage after tooth extraction. According to biological behavior of this lesion, adequate diagnostic and treatment strategies are necessary in order to avoid possible complications. We reported cone beam computed tomography (CBCT planning of an urgent en bloc resection of an intraosseous venous malformation by piezoelectric knife. Case report. A 55-year-old man was submitted to CBCT planning followed by piezoelectric knife resection of an intraosseous focal venous malformation of the mandibular body. Immediate reconstruction of the defect using iliac bone free graft was performed. The surgical treatment was uneventful and a 2-year follow-up revealed no signs of recurrence. Conclusion. Piezoelectric knife could provide precise, safe and bloodless procedure which is especially important in this pathology. Advantages of this technique are: lower risk of damaging soft tissue structures, precise osteotomy and bloodless surgery. Moreover, using piezosurgery bone knife, blood transfusion and blood transmitted diseases could be avoided. This case highlights the importance of CBCT as planning tool for resection of the mandible, using piezoelectric knife as safe method to achieve bloodless surgery. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. 175075

  19. Fast magnetic field computation in fusion technology using GPU technology

    Chiariello, Andrea Gaetano [Ass. EURATOM/ENEA/CREATE, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale e dell’Informazione, Seconda Università di Napoli, Via Roma 29, Aversa (CE) (Italy); Formisano, Alessandro, E-mail: Alessandro.Formisano@unina2.it [Ass. EURATOM/ENEA/CREATE, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale e dell’Informazione, Seconda Università di Napoli, Via Roma 29, Aversa (CE) (Italy); Martone, Raffaele [Ass. EURATOM/ENEA/CREATE, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale e dell’Informazione, Seconda Università di Napoli, Via Roma 29, Aversa (CE) (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► The paper deals with high accuracy numerical simulations of high field magnets. ► The porting of existing codes of High Performance Computing architectures allowed to obtain a relevant speedup while not reducing computational accuracy. ► Some examples of applications, referred to ITER-like magnets, are reported. -- Abstract: One of the main issues in the simulation of Tokamaks functioning is the reliable and accurate computation of actual field maps in the plasma chamber. In this paper a tool able to accurately compute magnetic field maps produced by active coils of any 3D shape, wound with high number of conductors, is presented. Under linearity assumption, the coil winding is modeled by means of “sticks”, following each conductor's shape, and the contribution of each stick is computed using high speed Graphic Computing Units (GPU's). Relevant speed enhancements with respect to standard parallel computing environment are achieved in this way.

  20. Variable uptake feature of focal nodular hyperplasia in Tc-99m phytate hepatic scintigraphy/single-photon emission computed tomography-A parametric analysis.

    Hsu, Yu-Ling; Chen, Yu-Wen; Lin, Chia-Yang; Lai, Yun-Chang; Chen, Shinn-Cherng; Lin, Zu-Yau

    2015-12-01

    Tc-99m phytate hepatic scintigraphy remains the standard method for evaluating the functional features of Kupffer cells. In this study, we demonstrate the variable uptake feature of focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) in Tc-99m phytate scintigraphy. We reviewed all patients who underwent Tc-99m phytate hepatic scintigraphy between 2008 and 2012 in Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan. Cases with FNH were diagnosed on the basis of pathology or at least one or more prior imaging with a periodic clinical follow-up. All patients received a standard protocol of dynamic flow study and planar and Tc-99m phytate single-photon emission computed tomography (E. CAM; Siemens). The correlation of variable nodular radioactivity with parameters such as tumor size and localization was analyzed. In total, 15 lesions of 14 patients in the clinic were diagnosed as FNH. The tumor size was approximately 2.9-7.4 cm (mean size 4.6 cm). Four lesions were larger than 5 cm. The major anatomic distribution was in the right hepatic lobe (10 lesions), particularly in the superior segments (7 lesions). Tc-99m phytate single-photon emission computed tomography imaging for determining the functional features of Kupffer cells included cool/cold (8 lesions), isoradioactive/warm (6 lesions), and hot (1 lesion) patterns of uptake. We did not observe any statistically significant correlation between variable nodular radioactivity and tumor size (p=0.68) or localization (p=0.04). Herein, we demonstrate the variable uptake feature of FNH in Tc-99m phytate scintigraphy. In small FNH tumors (< 5 cm), increased or equal uptake still provided specificity for the differential diagnosis of hepatic solid tumors. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  1. Testing of focal plane arrays

    Merriam, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    Problems associated with the testing of focal plane arrays are briefly examined with reference to the instrumentation and measurement procedures. In particular, the approach and instrumentation used as the Naval Ocean Systems Center is presented. Most of the measurements are made with flooded illumination on the focal plane array. The array is treated as an ensemble of individual pixels, data being taken on each pixel and array averages and standard deviations computed for the entire array. Data maps are generated, showing the pixel data in the proper spatial position on the array and the array statistics

  2. Computational methods in several fields of radiation dosimetry

    Paretzke, Herwig G.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Radiation dosimetry has to cope with a wide spectrum of applications and requirements in time and size. The ubiquitous presence of various radiation fields or radionuclides in the human home, working, urban or agricultural environment can lead to various dosimetric tasks starting from radioecology, retrospective and predictive dosimetry, personal dosimetry, up to measurements of radionuclide concentrations in environmental and food product and, finally in persons and their excreta. In all these fields measurements and computational models for the interpretation or understanding of observations are employed explicitly or implicitly. In this lecture some examples of own computational models will be given from the various dosimetric fields, including a) Radioecology (e.g. with the code systems based on ECOSYS, which was developed far before the Chernobyl reactor accident, and tested thoroughly afterwards), b) Internal dosimetry (improved metabolism models based on our own data), c) External dosimetry (with the new ICRU-ICRP-Voxelphantom developed by our lab), d) Radiation therapy (with GEANT IV as applied to mixed reactor radiation incident on individualized voxel phantoms), e) Some aspects of nanodosimetric track structure computations (not dealt with in the other presentation of this author). Finally, some general remarks will be made on the high explicit or implicit importance of computational models in radiation protection and other research field dealing with large systems, as well as on good scientific practices which should generally be followed when developing and applying such computational models

  3. Experience with a distributed computing system for magnetic field analysis

    Newman, M.J.

    1978-08-01

    The development of a general purpose computer system, THESEUS, is described the initial use for which has been magnetic field analysis. The system involves several computers connected by data links. Some are small computers with interactive graphics facilities and limited analysis capabilities, and others are large computers for batch execution of analysis programs with heavy processor demands. The system is highly modular for easy extension and highly portable for transfer to different computers. It can easily be adapted for a completely different application. It provides a highly efficient and flexible interface between magnet designers and specialised analysis programs. Both the advantages and problems experienced are highlighted, together with a mention of possible future developments. (U.K.)

  4. Accurate computation of transfer maps from magnetic field data

    Venturini, Marco; Dragt, Alex J.

    1999-01-01

    Consider an arbitrary beamline magnet. Suppose one component (for example, the radial component) of the magnetic field is known on the surface of some imaginary cylinder coaxial to and contained within the magnet aperture. This information can be obtained either by direct measurement or by computation with the aid of some 3D electromagnetic code. Alternatively, suppose that the field harmonics have been measured by using a spinning coil. We describe how this information can be used to compute the exact transfer map for the beamline element. This transfer map takes into account all effects of real beamline elements including fringe-field, pseudo-multipole, and real multipole error effects. The method we describe automatically takes into account the smoothing properties of the Laplace-Green function. Consequently, it is robust against both measurement and electromagnetic code errors. As an illustration we apply the method to the field analysis of high-gradient interaction region quadrupoles in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

  5. Modeling electric fields in two dimensions using computer aided design

    Gilmore, D.W.; Giovanetti, D.

    1992-01-01

    The authors describe a method for analyzing static electric fields in two dimensions using AutoCAD. The algorithm is coded in LISP and is modeled after Coloumb's Law. The software platform allows for facile graphical manipulations of field renderings and supports a wide range of hardcopy-output and data-storage formats. More generally, this application is representative of the ability to analyze data that is the solution to known mathematical functions with computer aided design (CAD)

  6. Wide-field two-dimensional multifocal optical-resolution photoacoustic computed microscopy

    Xia, Jun; Li, Guo; Wang, Lidai; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza; Maslov, Konstantin; Engelbach, John A.; Garbow, Joel R.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) is an emerging technique that directly images optical absorption in tissue at high spatial resolution. To date, the majority of OR-PAM systems are based on single focused optical excitation and ultrasonic detection, limiting the wide-field imaging speed. While one-dimensional multifocal OR-PAM (1D-MFOR-PAM) has been developed, the potential of microlens and transducer arrays has not been fully realized. Here, we present the development of two-dimensional multifocal optical-resolution photoacoustic computed microscopy (2D-MFOR-PACM), using a 2D microlens array and a full-ring ultrasonic transducer array. The 10 × 10 mm2 microlens array generates 1800 optical foci within the focal plane of the 512-element transducer array, and raster scanning the microlens array yields optical-resolution photoacoustic images. The system has improved the in-plane resolution of a full-ring transducer array from ≥100 µm to 29 µm and achieved an imaging time of 36 seconds over a 10 × 10 mm2 field of view. In comparison, the 1D-MFOR-PAM would take more than 4 minutes to image over the same field of view. The imaging capability of the system was demonstrated on phantoms and animals both ex vivo and in vivo. PMID:24322226

  7. Focal mechanisms in the southern Aegean from temporary seismic networks – implications for the regional stress field and ongoing deformation processes

    W. Friederich

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The lateral variation of the stress field in the southern Aegean plate and the subducting Hellenic slab is determined from recordings of seismicity obtained with the CYCNET and EGELADOS networks in the years from 2002 to 2007. First motions from 7000 well-located microearthquakes were analysed to produce 540 well-constrained focal mechanisms. They were complemented by another 140 derived by waveform matching of records from larger events. Most of these earthquakes fall into 16 distinct spatial clusters distributed over the southern Aegean region. For each cluster, a stress inversion could be carried out yielding consistent estimates of the stress field and its spatial variation. At crustal levels, the stress field is generally dominated by a steeply dipping compressional principal stress direction except in places where coupling of the subducting slab and overlying plate come into play. Tensional principal stresses are generally subhorizontal. Just behind the forearc, the crust is under arc-parallel tension whereas in the volcanic areas around Kos, Columbo and Astypalea tensional and intermediate stresses are nearly degenerate. Further west and north, in the Santorini–Amorgos graben and in the area of the islands of Mykonos, Andros and Tinos, tensional stresses are significant and point around the NW–SE direction. Very similar stress fields are observed in western Turkey with the tensional axis rotated to NNE–SSW. Intermediate-depth earthquakes below 100 km in the Nisyros region indicate that the Hellenic slab experiences slab-parallel tension at these depths. The direction of tension is close to east–west and thus deviates from the local NW-oriented slab dip presumably owing to the segmentation of the slab. Beneath the Cretan sea, at shallower levels, the slab is under NW–SE compression. Tensional principal stresses in the crust exhibit very good alignment with extensional strain rate principal axes derived from GPS velocities except

  8. Probe-Hole Field Emission Microscope System Controlled by Computer

    Gong, Yunming; Zeng, Haishan

    1991-09-01

    A probe-hole field emission microscope system, controlled by an Apple II computer, has been developed and operated successfully for measuring the work function of a single crystal plane. The work functions on the clean W(100) and W(111) planes are measured to be 4.67 eV and 4.45 eV, respectively.

  9. Internal and external Field of View: computer games and cybersickness

    Vries, S.C. de; Bos, J.E.; Emmerik, M.L. van; Groen, E.L.

    2007-01-01

    In an experiment with a computer game environment, we studied the effect of Field-of-View (FOV) on cybersickness. In particular, we examined the effect of differences between the internal FOV (IFOV, the FOV which the graphics generator is using to render its images) and the external FOV (EFOV, the

  10. Magnetic field computations for ISX using GFUN-3D

    Cain, W.D.

    1977-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison between measured magnetic fields and the magnetic fields calculated by the three-dimensional computer program GFUN-3D for the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX). Several iron models are considered ranging in sophistication from 50 to 222 tetrahedra iron elements. The effects of air gaps and the efforts made to simulate effects of grain orientation and packing factor are detailed. The results obtained are compared with the measured magnetic fields, and explanations are presented to account for the variations which occur

  11. Hamiltonian lattice field theory: Computer calculations using variational methods

    Zako, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    I develop a variational method for systematic numerical computation of physical quantities -- bound state energies and scattering amplitudes -- in quantum field theory. An infinite-volume, continuum theory is approximated by a theory on a finite spatial lattice, which is amenable to numerical computation. I present an algorithm for computing approximate energy eigenvalues and eigenstates in the lattice theory and for bounding the resulting errors. I also show how to select basis states and choose variational parameters in order to minimize errors. The algorithm is based on the Rayleigh-Ritz principle and Kato's generalizations of Temple's formula. The algorithm could be adapted to systems such as atoms and molecules. I show how to compute Green's functions from energy eigenvalues and eigenstates in the lattice theory, and relate these to physical (renormalized) coupling constants, bound state energies and Green's functions. Thus one can compute approximate physical quantities in a lattice theory that approximates a quantum field theory with specified physical coupling constants. I discuss the errors in both approximations. In principle, the errors can be made arbitrarily small by increasing the size of the lattice, decreasing the lattice spacing and computing sufficiently long. Unfortunately, I do not understand the infinite-volume and continuum limits well enough to quantify errors due to the lattice approximation. Thus the method is currently incomplete. I apply the method to real scalar field theories using a Fock basis of free particle states. All needed quantities can be calculated efficiently with this basis. The generalization to more complicated theories is straightforward. I describe a computer implementation of the method and present numerical results for simple quantum mechanical systems

  12. Hamiltonian lattice field theory: Computer calculations using variational methods

    Zako, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    A variational method is developed for systematic numerical computation of physical quantities-bound state energies and scattering amplitudes-in quantum field theory. An infinite-volume, continuum theory is approximated by a theory on a finite spatial lattice, which is amenable to numerical computation. An algorithm is presented for computing approximate energy eigenvalues and eigenstates in the lattice theory and for bounding the resulting errors. It is shown how to select basis states and choose variational parameters in order to minimize errors. The algorithm is based on the Rayleigh-Ritz principle and Kato's generalizations of Temple's formula. The algorithm could be adapted to systems such as atoms and molecules. It is shown how to compute Green's functions from energy eigenvalues and eigenstates in the lattice theory, and relate these to physical (renormalized) coupling constants, bound state energies and Green's functions. Thus one can compute approximate physical quantities in a lattice theory that approximates a quantum field theory with specified physical coupling constants. The author discusses the errors in both approximations. In principle, the errors can be made arbitrarily small by increasing the size of the lattice, decreasing the lattice spacing and computing sufficiently long. Unfortunately, the author does not understand the infinite-volume and continuum limits well enough to quantify errors due to the lattice approximation. Thus the method is currently incomplete. The method is applied to real scalar field theories using a Fock basis of free particle states. All needed quantities can be calculated efficiently with this basis. The generalization to more complicated theories is straightforward. The author describes a computer implementation of the method and present numerical results for simple quantum mechanical systems

  13. Numerical computation of space shuttle orbiter flow field

    Tannehill, John C.

    1988-01-01

    A new parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) code has been developed to compute the hypersonic, viscous chemically reacting flow fields around 3-D bodies. The flow medium is assumed to be a multicomponent mixture of thermally perfect but calorically imperfect gases. The new PNS code solves the gas dynamic and species conservation equations in a coupled manner using a noniterative, implicit, approximately factored, finite difference algorithm. The space-marching method is made well-posed by special treatment of the streamwise pressure gradient term. The code has been used to compute hypersonic laminar flow of chemically reacting air over cones at angle of attack. The results of the computations are compared with the results of reacting boundary-layer computations and show excellent agreement.

  14. Early vision and focal attention

    Julesz, Bela

    1991-07-01

    At the thirty-year anniversary of the introduction of the technique of computer-generated random-dot stereograms and random-dot cinematograms into psychology, the impact of the technique on brain research and on the study of artificial intelligence is reviewed. The main finding-that stereoscopic depth perception (stereopsis), motion perception, and preattentive texture discrimination are basically bottom-up processes, which occur without the help of the top-down processes of cognition and semantic memory-greatly simplifies the study of these processes of early vision and permits the linking of human perception with monkey neurophysiology. Particularly interesting are the unexpected findings that stereopsis (assumed to be local) is a global process, while texture discrimination (assumed to be a global process, governed by statistics) is local, based on some conspicuous local features (textons). It is shown that the top-down process of "shape (depth) from shading" does not affect stereopsis, and some of the models of machine vision are evaluated. The asymmetry effect of human texture discrimination is discussed, together with recent nonlinear spatial filter models and a novel extension of the texton theory that can cope with the asymmetry problem. This didactic review attempts to introduce the physicist to the field of psychobiology and its problems-including metascientific problems of brain research, problems of scientific creativity, the state of artificial intelligence research (including connectionist neural networks) aimed at modeling brain activity, and the fundamental role of focal attention in mental events.

  15. Acoustic radiosity for computation of sound fields in diffuse environments

    Muehleisen, Ralph T.; Beamer, C. Walter

    2002-05-01

    The use of image and ray tracing methods (and variations thereof) for the computation of sound fields in rooms is relatively well developed. In their regime of validity, both methods work well for prediction in rooms with small amounts of diffraction and mostly specular reflection at the walls. While extensions to the method to include diffuse reflections and diffraction have been made, they are limited at best. In the fields of illumination and computer graphics the ray tracing and image methods are joined by another method called luminous radiative transfer or radiosity. In radiosity, an energy balance between surfaces is computed assuming diffuse reflection at the reflective surfaces. Because the interaction between surfaces is constant, much of the computation required for sound field prediction with multiple or moving source and receiver positions can be reduced. In acoustics the radiosity method has had little attention because of the problems of diffraction and specular reflection. The utility of radiosity in acoustics and an approach to a useful development of the method for acoustics will be presented. The method looks especially useful for sound level prediction in industrial and office environments. [Work supported by NSF.

  16. Finite element electromagnetic field computation on the Sequent Symmetry 81 parallel computer

    Ratnajeevan, S.; Hoole, H.

    1990-01-01

    Finite element field analysis algorithms lend themselves to parallelization and this fact is exploited in this paper to implement a finite element analysis program for electromagnetic field computation on the Sequent Symmetry 81 parallel computer with three processors. In terms of waiting time, the maximum gains are to be made in matrix solution and therefore this paper concentrates on the gains in parallelizing the solution part of finite element analysis. An outline of how parallelization could be exploited in most finite element operations is given in this paper although the actual implemention of parallelism on the Sequent Symmetry 81 parallel computer was in sparsity computation, matrix assembly and the matrix solution areas. In all cases, the algorithms were modified suit the parallel programming application rather than allowing the compiler to parallelize on existing algorithms

  17. Novel computational approaches for the analysis of cosmic magnetic fields

    Saveliev, Andrey [Universitaet Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Keldysh Institut, Moskau (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-01

    In order to give a consistent picture of cosmic, i.e. galactic and extragalactic, magnetic fields, different approaches are possible and often even necessary. Here we present three of them: First, a semianalytic analysis of the time evolution of primordial magnetic fields from which their properties and, subsequently, the nature of present-day intergalactic magnetic fields may be deduced. Second, the use of high-performance computing infrastructure by developing powerful algorithms for (magneto-)hydrodynamic simulations and applying them to astrophysical problems. We are currently developing a code which applies kinetic schemes in massive parallel computing on high performance multiprocessor systems in a new way to calculate both hydro- and electrodynamic quantities. Finally, as a third approach, astroparticle physics might be used as magnetic fields leave imprints of their properties on charged particles transversing them. Here we focus on electromagnetic cascades by developing a software based on CRPropa which simulates the propagation of particles from such cascades through the intergalactic medium in three dimensions. This may in particular be used to obtain information about the helicity of extragalactic magnetic fields.

  18. The feature of the focal mechanism solutions and tectonic stress field around the focus of Zaduo earthquake (Ms 6.3) in eastern Tibet

    Yang, Y.; Zeng, Z.; Shuang, X.; Li, X.

    2017-12-01

    On 17th October, 2016, an earthquake of Ms6.3 occurred in Zaduo County, Qinghai Province (32.9°N, 95.0°E), 159 km away from the epicenter of Yushu Ms7.3 earthquake in 2011. The earthquake is located in the eastern Tibet Plateau and the north region of Eastern Himalayan Syntaxis. Using the broadband seismic waveform data form regional networks, we determined the focal mechanism solutions (FMSs) of 83 earthquakes (M>3.5) occurred in Zaduo and its adjacent areas from 2009 to 2017. We also collected another 63 published FMSs and then inversed the current tectonic stress field in study region using the damped linear inversion method. The results show that the Zaduo earthquake is a normal oblique earthquake. The FMSs in our study region are mainly in strike-slip and normal fault patterns. The strike-slip earthquakes are mainly distributed in Yushu-Ganzi, Zaduo and Yanshiping fault zones, and the normal faulting events occurred in Nu Jiang fault zone and Nierong County and its vicinity, the south and southwest of the study areas. The tectonic stress field results indicate that the stress distribution in the north and east of the study region changes homogeneously and slowly. From west to east, the σ1 gradually changes from NNE to NE direction, and the σ3 varies from NWW to NW direction. Both the maximum (σ1) and minimum (σ3) principal stress axes in the study area are nearly horizontal, except in the Nu Jiang fault zone and its vicinity, the south of the study area, which is in a normal faulting stress regime (σ1 is vertical and σ3 is horizontal). The localized normal faulting stress field in the south area, which is almost limited in a semicircle, indicates that a high pressure and low viscosity body with low S-wave velocity and high conductivity might exists beneath the anomaly area. And there may be another semicircle abnormal area beyond the south of the study region. Waveform data for this study are provided by Data Management Centre of China National Seismic

  19. A Neural Information Field Approach to Computational Cognition

    2016-11-18

    effects of distraction during list memory . These distractions include short and long delays before recall, and continuous distraction (forced rehearsal... memory encoding and replay in hippocampus. Computational Neuroscience Society (CNS), p. 166, 2014. D. A. Pinotsis, Neural Field Coding of Short Term ...performance of children learning to count in a SPA model; proposed a new SPA model of cognitive load using the N-back task; developed a new model of the

  20. Multigrid Methods for the Computation of Propagators in Gauge Fields

    Kalkreuter, Thomas

    Multigrid methods were invented for the solution of discretized partial differential equations in order to overcome the slowness of traditional algorithms by updates on various length scales. In the present work generalizations of multigrid methods for propagators in gauge fields are investigated. Gauge fields are incorporated in algorithms in a covariant way. The kernel C of the restriction operator which averages from one grid to the next coarser grid is defined by projection on the ground-state of a local Hamiltonian. The idea behind this definition is that the appropriate notion of smoothness depends on the dynamics. The ground-state projection choice of C can be used in arbitrary dimension and for arbitrary gauge group. We discuss proper averaging operations for bosons and for staggered fermions. The kernels C can also be used in multigrid Monte Carlo simulations, and for the definition of block spins and blocked gauge fields in Monte Carlo renormalization group studies. Actual numerical computations are performed in four-dimensional SU(2) gauge fields. We prove that our proposals for block spins are “good”, using renormalization group arguments. A central result is that the multigrid method works in arbitrarily disordered gauge fields, in principle. It is proved that computations of propagators in gauge fields without critical slowing down are possible when one uses an ideal interpolation kernel. Unfortunately, the idealized algorithm is not practical, but it was important to answer questions of principle. Practical methods are able to outperform the conjugate gradient algorithm in case of bosons. The case of staggered fermions is harder. Multigrid methods give considerable speed-ups compared to conventional relaxation algorithms, but on lattices up to 184 conjugate gradient is superior.

  1. Evaluating amber force fields using computed NMR chemical shifts.

    Koes, David R; Vries, John K

    2017-10-01

    NMR chemical shifts can be computed from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using a template matching approach and a library of conformers containing chemical shifts generated from ab initio quantum calculations. This approach has potential utility for evaluating the force fields that underlie these simulations. Imperfections in force fields generate flawed atomic coordinates. Chemical shifts obtained from flawed coordinates have errors that can be traced back to these imperfections. We use this approach to evaluate a series of AMBER force fields that have been refined over the course of two decades (ff94, ff96, ff99SB, ff14SB, ff14ipq, and ff15ipq). For each force field a series of MD simulations are carried out for eight model proteins. The calculated chemical shifts for the 1 H, 15 N, and 13 C a atoms are compared with experimental values. Initial evaluations are based on root mean squared (RMS) errors at the protein level. These results are further refined based on secondary structure and the types of atoms involved in nonbonded interactions. The best chemical shift for identifying force field differences is the shift associated with peptide protons. Examination of the model proteins on a residue by residue basis reveals that force field performance is highly dependent on residue position. Examination of the time course of nonbonded interactions at these sites provides explanations for chemical shift differences at the atomic coordinate level. Results show that the newer ff14ipq and ff15ipq force fields developed with the implicitly polarized charge method perform better than the older force fields. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Focal dermal hypoplasia without focal dermal hypoplasia

    Contreras-Capetillo, Silvina N.; Lombardi, Maria Paola; Pinto-Escalante, Doris; Hennekam, Raoul C.

    2014-01-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (FDH; Goltz-Gorlin syndrome) is an X-linked dominant disorder affecting mainly tissues of ectodermal and mesodermal origin. The phenotype is characterized by hypoplastic linear skin lesions, eye malformations, hair and teeth anomalies, and multiple limbs malformations. The

  3. Numerical computation of gravitational field for general axisymmetric objects

    Fukushima, Toshio

    2016-10-01

    We developed a numerical method to compute the gravitational field of a general axisymmetric object. The method (I) numerically evaluates a double integral of the ring potential by the split quadrature method using the double exponential rules, and (II) derives the acceleration vector by numerically differentiating the numerically integrated potential by Ridder's algorithm. Numerical comparison with the analytical solutions for a finite uniform spheroid and an infinitely extended object of the Miyamoto-Nagai density distribution confirmed the 13- and 11-digit accuracy of the potential and the acceleration vector computed by the method, respectively. By using the method, we present the gravitational potential contour map and/or the rotation curve of various axisymmetric objects: (I) finite uniform objects covering rhombic spindles and circular toroids, (II) infinitely extended spheroids including Sérsic and Navarro-Frenk-White spheroids, and (III) other axisymmetric objects such as an X/peanut-shaped object like NGC 128, a power-law disc with a central hole like the protoplanetary disc of TW Hya, and a tear-drop-shaped toroid like an axisymmetric equilibrium solution of plasma charge distribution in an International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor-like tokamak. The method is directly applicable to the electrostatic field and will be easily extended for the magnetostatic field. The FORTRAN 90 programs of the new method and some test results are electronically available.

  4. Transversity results and computations in symplectic field theory

    Fabert, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    Although the definition of symplectic field theory suggests that one has to count holomorphic curves in cylindrical manifolds R x V equipped with a cylindrical almost complex structure J, it is already well-known from Gromov-Witten theory that, due to the presence of multiply-covered curves, we in general cannot achieve transversality for all moduli spaces even for generic choices of J. In this thesis we treat the transversality problem of symplectic field theory in two important cases. In the first part of this thesis we are concerned with the rational symplectic field theory of Hamiltonian mapping tori, which is also called the Floer case. For this observe that in the general geometric setup for symplectic field theory, the contact manifolds can be replaced by mapping tori M φ of symplectic manifolds (M,ω M ) with symplectomorphisms φ. While the cylindrical contact homology of M φ is given by the Floer homologies of powers of φ, the other algebraic invariants of symplectic field theory for M φ provide natural generalizations of symplectic Floer homology. For symplectically aspherical M and Hamiltonian φ we study the moduli spaces of rational curves and prove a transversality result, which does not need the polyfold theory by Hofer, Wysocki and Zehnder and allows us to compute the full contact homology of M φ ≅ S 1 x M. The second part of this thesis is devoted to the branched covers of trivial cylinders over closed Reeb orbits, which are the trivial examples of punctured holomorphic curves studied in rational symplectic field theory. Since all moduli spaces of trivial curves with virtual dimension one cannot be regular, we use obstruction bundles in order to find compact perturbations making the Cauchy-Riemann operator transversal to the zero section and show that the algebraic count of elements in the resulting regular moduli spaces is zero. Once the analytical foundations of symplectic field theory are established, our result implies that the

  5. Transversity results and computations in symplectic field theory

    Fabert, Oliver

    2008-02-21

    Although the definition of symplectic field theory suggests that one has to count holomorphic curves in cylindrical manifolds R x V equipped with a cylindrical almost complex structure J, it is already well-known from Gromov-Witten theory that, due to the presence of multiply-covered curves, we in general cannot achieve transversality for all moduli spaces even for generic choices of J. In this thesis we treat the transversality problem of symplectic field theory in two important cases. In the first part of this thesis we are concerned with the rational symplectic field theory of Hamiltonian mapping tori, which is also called the Floer case. For this observe that in the general geometric setup for symplectic field theory, the contact manifolds can be replaced by mapping tori M{sub {phi}} of symplectic manifolds (M,{omega}{sub M}) with symplectomorphisms {phi}. While the cylindrical contact homology of M{sub {phi}} is given by the Floer homologies of powers of {phi}, the other algebraic invariants of symplectic field theory for M{sub {phi}} provide natural generalizations of symplectic Floer homology. For symplectically aspherical M and Hamiltonian {phi} we study the moduli spaces of rational curves and prove a transversality result, which does not need the polyfold theory by Hofer, Wysocki and Zehnder and allows us to compute the full contact homology of M{sub {phi}} {approx_equal} S{sup 1} x M. The second part of this thesis is devoted to the branched covers of trivial cylinders over closed Reeb orbits, which are the trivial examples of punctured holomorphic curves studied in rational symplectic field theory. Since all moduli spaces of trivial curves with virtual dimension one cannot be regular, we use obstruction bundles in order to find compact perturbations making the Cauchy-Riemann operator transversal to the zero section and show that the algebraic count of elements in the resulting regular moduli spaces is zero. Once the analytical foundations of symplectic

  6. Ion transport under the effect of an electric field in porous medium: application to the separation of rare earths by focalization electrophoresis

    Vieira-Nunes, A.I.

    1999-01-01

    Trivalent ions of rare earth elements have very similar properties and their difficult separation each from another is usually carried out by liquid-liquid extraction or ion exchange. Focalization electrophoresis represents an alternative route to the usual techniques. The purpose of this work consisted of the fundamental investigation of ion transport phenomena in electrophoretic processes. Focalization electrophoresis is suitable for separation of amphoteric species such as rare earth ions, using a pH gradient in the cell and upon addition of a complexed agent e. g. EDTA. This technique relies upon the difference in iso-electrical points of the considered species, being under the form of free cation near the anode, and in the form of anionic complexed species closer to the cathode. Rare earth species are submitted to the antagonist effects of diffusion and migration, enabling their focalization to occur at the iso-electrical point, corresponding to nil value of their effective mobility. Following a literature survey on rare earth elements and electrophoresis processes, the document describes theoretical and experimental investigations of complexation equilibria of some rare earth elements, namely lanthanum, neodymium, praseodymium and cerium, depending on pH. Values for the iso-electrical points could be estimated. Transport and focalization phenomena in view of rare earth separation, are dealt in the last chapter. Investigations were first carried out without forced circulation of the electrolyte solution and the transient behavior of the system allowed operating conditions to be design and built-up of a continuous device, more suitable to separation, and provided with 42 potential and 42 temperature sensors: the results of the preliminary runs, in form of variable profiles, are presented and discussed. (author)

  7. Computer simulation of induced electric currents and fields in biological bodies by 60 Hz magnetic fields

    Xi Weiguo; Stuchly, M.A.; Gandhi, O.P.

    1993-01-01

    Possible health effects of human exposure to 60 Hz magnetic fields are a subject of increasing concern. An understanding of the coupling of electromagnetic fields to human body tissues is essential for assessment of their biological effects. A method is presented for the computerized simulation of induced electric currents and fields in bodies of men and rodents from power-line frequency magnetic fields. In the impedance method, the body is represented by a 3 dimensional impedance network. The computational model consists of several tens of thousands of cubic numerical cells and thus represented a realistic shape. The modelling for humans is performed with two models, a heterogeneous model based on cross-section anatomy and a homogeneous one using an average tissue conductivity. A summary of computed results of induced electric currents and fields is presented. It is confirmed that induced currents are lower than endangerous current levels for most environmental exposures. However, the induced current density varies greatly, with the maximum being at least 10 times larger than the average. This difference is likely to be greater when more detailed anatomy and morphology are considered. 15 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  8. Comparison between high-field magnetic resonance imaging of the liver and computed tomography. A preliminary study on 39 cases

    Demaerel, P.; Marchal, G.; Aerts, P.; Van Fraeyenhoven, L.; Baert, A.L.

    1990-01-01

    Thirty nine patients with one or more focal hepatic lesions were examined by contrast enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A variety of pulse sequences - spin echo (SE), gradient echo (GE) and inversion recovery (IR) - have been reported in the literature on MRI concerning the detection and characterization of liver tumors. Multiple studies have compared MRI at different field strenghts to CT. As controversy still exists concerning the optimal pulse sequence on MRI, CE-CT has been compared to T2 weighted SE sequence in this study. CT, as well as MRI, identified abnormalities in liver parenchyma in all patients. As far as detection of hepatic lesions is concerned, MRI and CE-CT were equal in 35 cases and MRI was superior in the other four cases. However, CT remains the examination of choice for detection of focal lesions, due to the short examination time, the low cost and the superiority in detection of extrahepatic pathology [fr

  9. Computer Based Procedures for Field Workers - FY16 Research Activities

    Oxstrand, Johanna; Bly, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    The Computer-Based Procedure (CBP) research effort is a part of the Light-Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, which provides the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. One of the primary missions of the LWRS program is to help the U.S. nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. One area that could yield tremendous savings in increased efficiency and safety is in improving procedure use. A CBP provides the opportunity to incorporate context-driven job aids, such as drawings, photos, and just-in-time training. The presentation of information in CBPs can be much more flexible and tailored to the task, actual plant condition, and operation mode. The dynamic presentation of the procedure will guide the user down the path of relevant steps, thus minimizing time spent by the field worker to evaluate plant conditions and decisions related to the applicability of each step. This dynamic presentation of the procedure also minimizes the risk of conducting steps out of order and/or incorrectly assessed applicability of steps. This report provides a summary of the main research activities conducted in the Computer-Based Procedures for Field Workers effort since 2012. The main focus of the report is on the research activities conducted in fiscal year 2016. The activities discussed are the Nuclear Electronic Work Packages - Enterprise Requirements initiative, the development of a design guidance for CBPs (which compiles all insights gained through the years of CBP research), the facilitation of vendor studies at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), a pilot study for how to enhance the plant design modification work process, the collection of feedback from a field evaluation study at Plant Vogtle, and path forward to

  10. Computer Based Procedures for Field Workers - FY16 Research Activities

    Oxstrand, Johanna [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bly, Aaron [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The Computer-Based Procedure (CBP) research effort is a part of the Light-Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, which provides the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. One of the primary missions of the LWRS program is to help the U.S. nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. One area that could yield tremendous savings in increased efficiency and safety is in improving procedure use. A CBP provides the opportunity to incorporate context-driven job aids, such as drawings, photos, and just-in-time training. The presentation of information in CBPs can be much more flexible and tailored to the task, actual plant condition, and operation mode. The dynamic presentation of the procedure will guide the user down the path of relevant steps, thus minimizing time spent by the field worker to evaluate plant conditions and decisions related to the applicability of each step. This dynamic presentation of the procedure also minimizes the risk of conducting steps out of order and/or incorrectly assessed applicability of steps. This report provides a summary of the main research activities conducted in the Computer-Based Procedures for Field Workers effort since 2012. The main focus of the report is on the research activities conducted in fiscal year 2016. The activities discussed are the Nuclear Electronic Work Packages – Enterprise Requirements initiative, the development of a design guidance for CBPs (which compiles all insights gained through the years of CBP research), the facilitation of vendor studies at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), a pilot study for how to enhance the plant design modification work process, the collection of feedback from a field evaluation study at Plant Vogtle, and path forward to

  11. Digital mammography with high-resolution storage plates (CR) versus full-field digital mammography (CCD) (DR) for microcalcifications and focal lesions - a retrospective clinical histologic analysis (n = 102)

    Schulz-Wendtland, R.; Lell, M.; Wenkel, E.; Boehner, C.; Dassel, M.S.; Bautz, W.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: to determine the diagnostic accuracy of microcalcifications and focal lesions in a retrospective clinical-histological study using high-resolution digital phosphor storage plates (hard copy) and full-field digital mammography (hard copy). Materials and methods: from May 2003 to September 2003, 102 patients underwent digital storage plate mammography (CR), using a mammography unit (Mammomat 3000 N, Siemens) in combination with a high resolution (9 lp/mm) digital storage phosphor plate system (pixel size 50 μm) (Fuji/Siemens). After diagnosis and preoperative wire localization, full-field digital mammography (CCD) (DR) was performed with the same exposure parameters. The full-field digital mammography used a CCD-detector (SenoScan) (fisher imaging) with a resolution of 10 Ip/mm and a pixel size of 50 μm. Five investigators determined the diagnosis (BI-RADS trademark I-V) retrospectively after the operation from randomly distributed mediolateral views (hard copy reading). These results were correlated with the final histology. Results: the diagnostic accuracy of digital storage plate mammography (CR) and full-field digital mammography (CCD) (DR) was 73% and 71% for all findings (n = 102), 73% and 71% for microcalcifications (n = 51), and 72% and 70% for focal lesions (n = 51). The overall results showed no difference. Conclusion: our findings indicate the equivalence of high-resolution digital phosphor storage plate mammography (CR) and full-field digital mammography (CCD) (DR). (orig.)

  12. Quantitative x-ray dark-field computed tomography

    Bech, M; Pfeiffer, F; Bunk, O; Donath, T; David, C; Feidenhans'l, R

    2010-01-01

    The basic principles of x-ray image formation in radiology have remained essentially unchanged since Roentgen first discovered x-rays over a hundred years ago. The conventional approach relies on x-ray attenuation as the sole source of contrast and draws exclusively on ray or geometrical optics to describe and interpret image formation. Phase-contrast or coherent scatter imaging techniques, which can be understood using wave optics rather than ray optics, offer ways to augment or complement the conventional approach by incorporating the wave-optical interaction of x-rays with the specimen. With a recently developed approach based on x-ray optical gratings, advanced phase-contrast and dark-field scatter imaging modalities are now in reach for routine medical imaging and non-destructive testing applications. To quantitatively assess the new potential of particularly the grating-based dark-field imaging modality, we here introduce a mathematical formalism together with a material-dependent parameter, the so-called linear diffusion coefficient and show that this description can yield quantitative dark-field computed tomography (QDFCT) images of experimental test phantoms.

  13. Parallel computation of automatic differentiation applied to magnetic field calculations

    Hinkins, R.L.; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA

    1994-09-01

    The author presents a parallelization of an accelerator physics application to simulate magnetic field in three dimensions. The problem involves the evaluation of high order derivatives with respect to two variables of a multivariate function. Automatic differentiation software had been used with some success, but the computation time was prohibitive. The implementation runs on several platforms, including a network of workstations using PVM, a MasPar using MPFortran, and a CM-5 using CMFortran. A careful examination of the code led to several optimizations that improved its serial performance by a factor of 8.7. The parallelization produced further improvements, especially on the MasPar with a speedup factor of 620. As a result a problem that took six days on a SPARC 10/41 now runs in minutes on the MasPar, making it feasible for physicists at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to simulate larger magnets

  14. Analysis of Craniofacial Images using Computational Atlases and Deformation Fields

    Ólafsdóttir, Hildur

    2008-01-01

    purposes. The basis for most of the applications is non-rigid image registration. This approach brings one image into the coordinate system of another resulting in a deformation field describing the anatomical correspondence between the two images. A computational atlas representing the average anatomy...... of asymmetry. The analyses are applied to the study of three different craniofacial anomalies. The craniofacial applications include studies of Crouzon syndrome (in mice), unicoronal synostosis plagiocephaly and deformational plagiocephaly. Using the proposed methods, the thesis reveals novel findings about...... the craniofacial morphology and asymmetry of Crouzon mice. Moreover, a method to plan and evaluate treatment of children with deformational plagiocephaly, based on asymmetry assessment, is established. Finally, asymmetry in children with unicoronal synostosis is automatically assessed, confirming previous results...

  15. Computing the scalar field couplings in 6D supergravity

    Saidi, El Hassan

    2008-11-01

    Using non-chiral supersymmetry in 6D space-time, we compute the explicit expression of the metric the scalar manifold SO(1,1)×{SO(4,20)}/{SO(4)×SO(20)} of the ten-dimensional type IIA superstring on generic K3. We consider as well the scalar field self-couplings in the general case where the non-chiral 6D supergravity multiplet is coupled to generic n vector supermultiplets with moduli space SO(1,1)×{SO(4,n)}/{SO(4)×SO(n)}. We also work out a dictionary giving a correspondence between hyper-Kähler geometry and the Kähler geometry of the Coulomb branch of 10D type IIA on Calabi-Yau threefolds. Others features are also discussed.

  16. Quantum field theory and coalgebraic logic in theoretical computer science.

    Basti, Gianfranco; Capolupo, Antonio; Vitiello, Giuseppe

    2017-11-01

    We suggest that in the framework of the Category Theory it is possible to demonstrate the mathematical and logical dual equivalence between the category of the q-deformed Hopf Coalgebras and the category of the q-deformed Hopf Algebras in quantum field theory (QFT), interpreted as a thermal field theory. Each pair algebra-coalgebra characterizes a QFT system and its mirroring thermal bath, respectively, so to model dissipative quantum systems in far-from-equilibrium conditions, with an evident significance also for biological sciences. Our study is in fact inspired by applications to neuroscience where the brain memory capacity, for instance, has been modeled by using the QFT unitarily inequivalent representations. The q-deformed Hopf Coalgebras and the q-deformed Hopf Algebras constitute two dual categories because characterized by the same functor T, related with the Bogoliubov transform, and by its contravariant application T op , respectively. The q-deformation parameter is related to the Bogoliubov angle, and it is effectively a thermal parameter. Therefore, the different values of q identify univocally, and label the vacua appearing in the foliation process of the quantum vacuum. This means that, in the framework of Universal Coalgebra, as general theory of dynamic and computing systems ("labelled state-transition systems"), the so labelled infinitely many quantum vacua can be interpreted as the Final Coalgebra of an "Infinite State Black-Box Machine". All this opens the way to the possibility of designing a new class of universal quantum computing architectures based on this coalgebraic QFT formulation, as its ability of naturally generating a Fibonacci progression demonstrates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Application of large computers for predicting the oil field production

    Philipp, W; Gunkel, W; Marsal, D

    1971-10-01

    The flank injection drive plays a dominant role in the exploitation of the BEB-oil fields. Therefore, 2-phase flow computer models were built up, adapted to a predominance of a single flow direction and combining a high accuracy of prediction with a low job time. Any case study starts with the partitioning of the reservoir into blocks. Then the statistics of the time-independent reservoir properties are analyzed by means of an IBM 360/25 unit. Using these results and the past production of oil, water and gas, a Fortran-program running on a CDC-3300 computer yields oil recoveries and the ratios of the relative permeabilities as a function of the local oil saturation for all blocks penetrated by mobile water. In order to assign kDwU/KDoU-functions to blocks not yet reached by the advancing water-front, correlation analysis is used to relate reservoir properties to kDwU/KDoU-functions. All these results are used as input into a CDC-660 Fortran program, allowing short-, medium-, and long-term forecasts as well as the handling of special problems.

  18. Focal retinal phlebitis.

    Hoang, Quan V; Freund, K Bailey; Klancnik, James M; Sorenson, John A; Cunningham, Emmett T; Yannuzzi, Lawrence A

    2012-01-01

    To report three cases of solitary, focal retinal phlebitis. An observational case series. Three eyes in three patients were noted to have unilateral decreased vision, macular edema, and a focal retinal phlebitis, which was not at an arteriovenous crossing. All three patients developed a branch retinal vein occlusion at the site of inflammation. These patients had no other evidence of intraocular inflammation, including vitritis, retinitis, retinal vasculitis, or choroiditis, nor was there any systemic disorder associated with inflammation, infection, or coagulation identified. Focal retinal phlebitis appears to be an uncommon and unique entity that produces macular edema and ultimately branch retinal vein occlusion. In our patients, the focal phlebitis and venous occlusion did not occur at an arteriovenous crossing, which is the typical site for branch retinal venous occlusive disease. This suggests that our cases represent a distinct clinical entity, which starts with a focal abnormality in the wall of a retinal venule, resulting in surrounding exudation and, ultimately, ends with branch retinal vein occlusion.

  19. Computer simulation of nonstationary thermal fields in design and operation of northern oil and gas fields

    Vaganova, N. A., E-mail: vna@imm.uran.ru [Institute of Mathematics and Mechanics of Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Filimonov, M. Yu., E-mail: fmy@imm.uran.ru [Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg, Russia and Institute of Mathematics and Mechanics of Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-30

    A mathematical model, numerical algorithm and program code for simulation and long-term forecasting of changes in permafrost as a result of operation of a multiple well pad of northern oil and gas field are presented. In the model the most significant climatic and physical factors are taken into account such as solar radiation, determined by specific geographical location, heterogeneous structure of frozen soil, thermal stabilization of soil, possible insulation of the objects, seasonal fluctuations in air temperature, and freezing and thawing of the upper soil layer. Results of computing are presented.

  20. SNAP Satellite Focal Plane Development

    Bebek, C.; Akerlof, C.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Baltay, C.; Barrelet, E.; Basa, S.; Bercovitz, J.; Bergstrom, L.; Berstein, G.P.; Bester, M.; Bohlin, R.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Campbell, M.; Carithers, W.; Commins, E.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.; DiGennaro, R.; Ealet, A.; Ellis, R.; Emmett, W.; Eriksson, M.; Fouchez, D.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Heetderks, H.; Holland, S.; Huterer, D.; Johnson, W.; Kadel, R.; Karcher, A.; Kim, A.; Kolbe, W.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureaux, J.; Lampton, M.; Lefevre, O.; Levi, M.; Levin, D.; Linder, E.; Loken, S.; Malina, R.; Mazure, A.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.; Miquel, R.; Morgan, N.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Roe, N.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Prieto, E.; Rabinowitz, D.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Schubnell, M.; Sholl, M.; Smadja, G.; Smith, R.; Smoot, G.; Snyder, J.; Spadafora, A.; Szymkowiak, A.; Tarle, G.; Taylor, K.; Tilquin, A.; Tomasch, A.; Vincent, D.; von der Lippe, H.; Walder, J-P.; Wang, G.

    2003-01-01

    The proposed SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) mission will have a two-meter class telescope delivering diffraction-limited images to an instrumented 0.7 square degree field in the visible and near-infrared wavelength regime. The requirements for the instrument suite and the present configuration of the focal plane concept are presented. A two year R and D phase, largely supported by the Department of Energy, is just beginning. We describe the development activities that are taking place to advance our preparedness for mission proposal in the areas of detectors and electronics

  1. Describing of elements IO field in a testing computer program

    Igor V. Loshkov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A standard of describing the process of displaying interactive windows on a computer monitor, through which an output of questions and input of answers are implemented during computer testing, is presented in the article [11]. According to the proposed standard, the description of the process mentioned above is performed with a format line, containing element names, their parameters as well as grouping and auxiliary symbols. Program objects are described using elements of standard. The majority of objects create input and output windows on a computer monitor. The aim of our research was to develop a minimum possible set of elements of standard to perform mathematical and computer science testing.The choice of elements of the standard was conducted in parallel with the development and testing of the program that uses them. This approach made it possible to choose a sufficiently complete set of elements for testing in fields of study mentioned above. For the proposed elements, names were selected in such a way: firstly, they indicate their function and secondly, they coincide with the names of elements in other programming languages that are similar by function. Parameters, their names, their assignments and accepted values are proposed for the elements. The principle of name selection for the parameters was the same as for elements of the standard: the names should correspond to their assignments or coincide with names of similar parameters in other programming languages. The parameters define properties of objects. Particularly, while the elements of standard create windows, the parameters define object properties (location, size, appearance and the sequence in which windows are created. All elements of standard, proposed in this article are composed in a table, the columns of which have names and functions of these elements. Inside the table, the elements of standard are grouped row by row into four sets: input elements, output elements, input

  2. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation-coil design with improved focality

    Rastogi, P.; Lee, E. G.; Hadimani, R. L.; Jiles, D. C.

    2017-05-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a technique for neuromodulation that can be used as a non-invasive therapy for various neurological disorders. In TMS, a time varying magnetic field generated from an electromagnetic coil placed on the scalp is used to induce an electric field inside the brain. TMS coil geometry plays an important role in determining the focality and depth of penetration of the induced electric field responsible for stimulation. Clinicians and basic scientists are interested in stimulating a localized area of the brain, while minimizing the stimulation of surrounding neural networks. In this paper, a novel coil has been proposed, namely Quadruple Butterfly Coil (QBC) with an improved focality over the commercial Figure-8 coil. Finite element simulations were conducted with both the QBC and the conventional Figure-8 coil. The two coil's stimulation profiles were assessed with 50 anatomically realistic MRI derived head models. The coils were positioned on the vertex and the scalp over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex to stimulate the brain. Computer modeling of the coils has been done to determine the parameters of interest-volume of stimulation, maximum electric field, location of maximum electric field and area of stimulation across all 50 head models for both coils.

  3. Recurrent Bilateral Focal Myositis.

    Nagafuchi, Hiroko; Nakano, Hiromasa; Ooka, Seido; Takakuwa, Yukiko; Yamada, Hidehiro; Tadokoro, Mamoru; Shimojo, Sadatomo; Ozaki, Shoichi

    This report describes a rare case of recurrent bilateral focal myositis and its successful treatment via methotrexate. A 38-year-old man presented myalgia of the right gastrocnemius in May 2005. Magnetic resonance imaging showed very high signal intensity in the right gastrocnemius on short-tau inversion recovery images. A muscle biopsy revealed inflammatory CD4+ cell-dominant myogenic change. Focal myositis was diagnosed. The first steroid treatment was effective. Tapering of prednisolone, however, repeatedly induced myositis relapse, which progressed to multiple muscle lesions of both lower limbs. Initiation of methotrexate finally allowed successful tapering of prednisolone, with no relapse in the past 4 years.

  4. Experimental Focal Cerebral Ischemia

    Christensen, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Focal cerebral ischemia due to occlusion of a major cerebral artery is the cause of ischemic stroke which is a major reason of mortality, morbidity and disability in the populations of the developed countries. In the seven studies summarized in the thesis focal ischemia in rats induced by occlusion...... in the penumbra is recruited in the infarction process leading to a progressive growth of the infarct. The penumbra hence constitutes an important target for pharmacological treatment because of the existence of a therapeutic time window during which treatment with neuroprotective compounds may prevent...

  5. Alkali Rydberg states in electromagnetic fields: computational physics meets experiment

    Krug, A.

    2001-11-01

    We study highly excited hydrogen and alkali atoms ('Rydberg states') under the influence of a strong microwave field. As the external frequency is comparable to the highly excited electron's classical Kepler frequency, the external field induces a strong coupling of many different quantum mechanical energy levels and finally leads to the ionization of the outer electron. While periodically driven atomic hydrogen can be seen as a paradigm of quantum chaotic motion in an open (decaying) quantum system, the presence of the non-hydrogenic atomic core - which unavoidably has to be treated quantum mechanically - entails some complications. Indeed, laboratory experiments show clear differences in the ionization dynamics of microwave driven hydrogen and non-hydrogenic Rydberg states. In the first part of this thesis, a machinery is developed that allows for numerical experiments on alkali and hydrogen atoms under precisely identical laboratory conditions. Due to the high density of states in the parameter regime typically explored in laboratory experiments, such simulations are only possible with the most advanced parallel computing facilities, in combination with an efficient parallel implementation of the numerical approach. The second part of the thesis is devoted to the results of the numerical experiment. We identify and describe significant differences and surprising similarities in the ionization dynamics of atomic hydrogen as compared to alkali atoms, and give account of the relevant frequency scales that distinguish hydrogenic from non-hydrogenic ionization behavior. Our results necessitate a reinterpretation of the experimental results so far available, and solve the puzzle of a distinct ionization behavior of periodically driven hydrogen and non-hydrogenic Rydberg atoms - an unresolved question for about one decade. Finally, microwave-driven Rydberg states will be considered as prototypes of open, complex quantum systems that exhibit a complicated temporal decay

  6. Fast multifrequency focal beam analysis for 3D seismic acquisition geometry

    Wei, W.; Fu, L.; Blacquiere, G.

    2012-01-01

    A method for the efficient computation of multifrequency focal beams for 3D seismic acquisition geometry analysis has been developed. By computing them for all the frequency components of seismic data, single-frequency focal beams can be extended to multifrequency focal beams. However, this

  7. Entertainment computing, social transformation and the quantum field

    Rauterberg, G.W.M.; Nijholt, A.; Reidsma, D.; Hondorp, H.

    2009-01-01

    Entertainment computing is on its way getting an established academic discipline. The scope of entertainment computing is quite broad (see the scope of the international journal Entertainment Computing). One unifying idea in this diverse community of entertainment researchers and developers might be

  8. Multi-focal Vision and Gaze Control Improve Navigation Performance

    Kolja Kuehnlenz

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Multi-focal vision systems comprise cameras with various fields of view and measurement accuracies. This article presents a multi-focal approach to localization and mapping of mobile robots with active vision. An implementation of the novel concept is done considering a humanoid robot navigation scenario where the robot is visually guided through a structured environment with several landmarks. Various embodiments of multi-focal vision systems are investigated and the impact on navigation performance is evaluated in comparison to a conventional mono-focal stereo set-up. The comparative studies clearly show the benefits of multi-focal vision for mobile robot navigation: flexibility to assign the different available sensors optimally in each situation, enhancement of the visible field, higher localization accuracy, and, thus, better task performance, i.e. path following behavior of the mobile robot. It is shown that multi-focal vision may strongly improve navigation performance.

  9. Is CEUS (contrast enhanced ultrasonography a useful tool in a beginner’s hands? How much can CAD (computer assisted diagnosis prototype help us in the characterization of malignancy in focal lesions of the liver?

    Tudor Voicu Moga1,

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES CEUS improved the characterization of focal lesions of the liver (FLLs, but it remains an operator-dependent method. The goal of this scientific paper was to test a computer assisted diagnosis (CAD prototype. MATERIALS AND METHODS 97 CEUS videos [34% hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC, 12.3% hypervascular metastases (HiperM, 11.3% hypovascular metastases (HipoM, 24.7% hemangiomas (HMG, 17.5% focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH] were used to develop a CAD prototype based on an algorithm that tested a binary decision classifier. Two young MDs, two experts and the CAD prototype, reevaluated 50 CEUS videos (diagnosis of benign vs. malignant lesions, in order to evaluate the beginner vs. expert diagnostic gap, the first being blinded by clinical data. RESULTS I-Beginner misdiagnosed 4/10-FNH, 3/10-HCC, 2/10-HMG, 1/10-HiperM, 1/10-HipoM. After being informed about the clinical data 2/10-FNH, 1/10-HCC. II-beginner misdiagnosed: 3/10-FNH; 3/10-HCC, 2/10- HMG, 1/10-HiperM. Unblinded: 1/10-HCC, 1/10- HMG. I-Expert: only 1/10-FNH, 1/10-HCC, 1/10- HMG misdiagnosed. Unblinded: all lesions were correctly diagnosed. II-Expert: 1/10-FNH, 1/10-HCC misdiagnosed. Unblinded: only 1/10-FNH was misdiagnosed. The CAD classifier managed a 75.2% overall correct classification rate. The overall classification before and after the uncovering of clinical data was: I beginner 78 %; 94%, II 82%; 96%. I expert 94%; 100%. II 96%; 98%. CONCLUSIONS The CAD prototype can assist a beginner for a better CEUS diagnostic accuracy. The integration of clinical data in the CAD algorithm is essential. Graphical abstract: Average Intensity variation in Arterial and Late Phase with supra unitary (meaning wash in and sub unitary pattern (meaning washout. REFERENCES 1.Sugimoto K, Shiraishi J, Moriyasu F, Doi K. Computer-aided diagnosis for contrast-enhanced ultrasound in the liver. World J Gastroenterol. 2010;2:215-223. 2. Gatos I, Tsantis S, Spiliopoulos S, Skouroliakou A, Theotokas I

  10. Computation of magnetic field in DC brushless linear motors built with NdFeB magnets

    Basak, A.; Shirkoohi, G.H.

    1990-01-01

    A software package based on finite element technique has been used to compute three-dimensional magnetic fields and static forces developed in brushless d.c. linear motors. As the field flux-source two different types of permanent magnets, one of them being the high energy neodymium- iron-boron type, has been used in computer models. Motors with the same specifications as the computer models were built and experimental results obtained from them are compared with the computed results

  11. Focal splenic masses of the extramedullary hematopoiesis

    Incedayi, M.; Sivrioglu, A.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Extramedullary hematopoiesis arises from pleuripotential stem cells distributed throughout the body. It is most common in patients with congenital hemolytic anemia, such as thalassemia, sickle cell anemia and hereditary spherocytosis as a response to ineffective red blood cell formation. Although microscopic foci of Extramedullary hematopoiesis are commonly seen in the spleen and liver parenchyma, focal mass-like lesion of extramedullary hematopoiesis in the liver and spleen are rare. We report a case of intrasplenic focal extramedullary hematopoiesis lesions and the imaging features of extramedullary hematopoiesis on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Extramedullary hematopoiesis should always be considered as a diagnosis in a patient with a known hematological disorder

  12. Experimental and theoretical study of Bragg-Fresnel focalizing optical systems engraved on multi layers interferential mirrors adapted to X and X-UV fields

    Idir, M.

    1995-02-01

    This work concerns the study of a particular type of X-ray focusing optics known as Bragg-Fresnel lenses, formed through ion-etching of multilayered structures. Using the Super-ACO (LURE/Orsay) synchrotron storage ring, we tested several Bragg-Fresnel lenses having either linear or elliptical geometries (producing a line or a point focus, respectively). Diffraction profiles were first obtained for the linear lenses ion-etched on W/Si multilayers of nano-metric period. The experimental results were compared with our theoretical predictions. We next proposed and tested a solution to the problem superposing the different diffraction orders in the focal plane, that of fabricating Bragg-Fresnel lenses with an off-axis configuration, first for the linear and then the elliptical geometry. An experimental application, for an off-axis elliptical lens produced a focused X-ray spot of 5 x 10 microns 2 for the Super-ACO synchrotron source. The same lens also produced a 1/3-size X-ray image of a grid-like object at 1750 eV using the first and third diffraction orders. (author)

  13. CT appearance of focal fatty infiltration of the liver

    Halvorsen, R.A.; Korobkin, M.; Ram, P.C.; Thompson, W.M.

    1982-01-01

    Focal fatty infiltration of the liver is an entity that may be confused with liver metastasis on computed tomography (CT). The imaging results and medical records of 16 patients with CT appearance suggestive of focal fatty liver were reviewed, three of whom had the simultaneous presence of metastitic liver disease. Focal fatty liver often has a distinctive appearance with CT, usually with a nonspherical shape, absence of mass effect, and density close to water. Liver metastases are usually round or oval, and unless cystic or necrotic, they have CT attenuation values closer to normal liver parenchyma than water. A radionuclide liver scan almost always resolves any confusion about the differential diagnosis of focal fatty liver: a well defined focus of photon deficiency is due to neoplasm rather than focal fatty infiltration. Sonography sometimes helps to confirm the CT impression, but may be misleading if the diagnosis of focal or diffuse fatty infiltration is not suspected before the examination

  14. Technical Note: Computation of Electric Field Strength Necessary for ...

    Obviously, electric field is established by this charge. The effects of this field on the objects lying within its vicinity depend on its intensity. In this paper, the electric field of 33kV overhead line is considered. The aim of the paper is to determine the maximum electric field strength or potential gradient, E of the 33kV overhead ...

  15. Focal myositis: A review.

    Devic, P; Gallay, L; Streichenberger, N; Petiot, P

    2016-11-01

    Amongst the heterogeneous group of inflammatory myopathies, focal myositis stands as a rare and benign dysimmune disease. Although it can be associated with root and/or nerve lesions, traumatic muscle lesions and autoimmune diseases, its triggering factors remain poorly understood. Defined as an isolated inflammatory pseudotumour usually restricted to one skeletal muscle, clinical presentation of focal myositis is that of a rapidly growing solitary mass within a single muscle, usually in the lower limbs. Electromyography shows spontaneous activity associated with a myopathic pattern. MRI reveals a contrast enhanced enlarged muscle appearing hyper-intense on FAT-SAT T2 weighted images. Adjacent structures are spared and there are no calcifications. Serum creatine kinase (CK) levels are usually moderately augmented and biological markers of systemic inflammation are absent in most cases. Pathological histological features include marked variation in fibre size, inflammatory infiltrates mostly composed of T CD4+ lymphocytes and macrophages, degenerating/regenerating fibres and interstitial fibrosis. Differential diagnoses are numerous and include myositis of other origin with focal onset. Steroid treatment should be reserved for patients who present with major pain, nerve lesions, associated autoimmune disease, or elevated C reactive protein or CK. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Design Guidance for Computer-Based Procedures for Field Workers

    Oxstrand, Johanna [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Le Blanc, Katya [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bly, Aaron [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Nearly all activities that involve human interaction with nuclear power plant systems are guided by procedures, instructions, or checklists. Paper-based procedures (PBPs) currently used by most utilities have a demonstrated history of ensuring safety; however, improving procedure use could yield significant savings in increased efficiency, as well as improved safety through human performance gains. The nuclear industry is constantly trying to find ways to decrease human error rates, especially human error rates associated with procedure use. As a step toward the goal of improving field workers’ procedure use and adherence and hence improve human performance and overall system reliability, the U.S. Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program researchers, together with the nuclear industry, have been investigating the possibility and feasibility of replacing current paper-based procedures with computer-based procedures (CBPs). PBPs have ensured safe operation of plants for decades, but limitations in paper-based systems do not allow them to reach the full potential for procedures to prevent human errors. The environment in a nuclear power plant is constantly changing, depending on current plant status and operating mode. PBPs, which are static by nature, are being applied to a constantly changing context. This constraint often results in PBPs that are written in a manner that is intended to cover many potential operating scenarios. Hence, the procedure layout forces the operator to search through a large amount of irrelevant information to locate the pieces of information relevant for the task and situation at hand, which has potential consequences of taking up valuable time when operators must be responding to the situation, and potentially leading operators down an incorrect response path. Other challenges related to use of PBPs are management of multiple procedures, place-keeping, finding the correct procedure for a task, and relying

  17. Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced 3.0-Tesla MRI findings for the preoperative detection of focal liver lesions: Comparison with iodine-enhanced multi-detector computed tomography

    Park, Hyong-Hu; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Im, In-Chul; Lee, Jae-Seung; Kim, Moon-Jib; Kwak, Byung-Joon; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Dong, Kyung-Rae

    2012-12-01

    The safety of gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic-acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA) has been confirmed, but more study is needed to assess the diagnostic accuracy of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) for whom surgical treatment is considered or with a metastatic hepatoma. Research is also needed to examine the rate of detection of hepatic lesions compared to multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT), which is used most frequently to localize and characterize a HCC. Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI and iodine-enhanced MDCT imaging were compared for the preoperative detection of focal liver lesions. The clinical usefulness of each method was examined. The current study enrolled 79 patients with focal liver lesions who preoperatively underwent MRI and MDCT. In these patients, there was less than one month between the two diagnostic modalities. Imaging data were taken before and after contrast enhancement in both methods. To evaluate the images, we analyzed the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the lesions and the liver parenchyma. To compare the sensitivity of the two methods, we performed a quantitative analysis of the percentage signal intensity of the liver (PSIL) on a high resolution picture archiving and communication system (PACS) monitor (paired-samples t-test, p DTPA-enhanced MRI findings and the iodine-enhanced MDCT by using an adjusted x2 test. The SNRs, CNRs, and PSIL all had a greater detection rate in Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced MRI than in iodine-enhanced MDCT. Hepatocyte-selective uptake was observed 20 minutes after the injection in the focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH, 9/9), adenoma (9/10), and highly-differentiated HCC (grade G1, 27/30). Rim enhancement was detected in all metastases (30/30). During the arterial and the delayed phases, good overall agreement between the gadoxetic-acid-enhanced MR and CT was observed (x2 test, p DTPA-enhanced MRI had a higher

  18. Evolution of the stress fields in the Zagros Foreland Folded Belt using focal mechanisms and kinematic analyses: the case of the Fars salient, Iran

    Sarkarinejad, Khalil; Zafarmand, Bahareh; Oveisi, Behnam

    2018-03-01

    The NW-SE trending Zagros orogenic belt was initiated during the convergence of the Afro-Arabian continent and the Iranian microcontinent in the Late Cretaceous. Ongoing convergence is confirmed by intense seismicity related to compressional stresses collision-related in the Zagros orogenic belt by reactivation of an early extensional faulting to latter compressional segmented strike-slip and dip-slip faulting. These activities are strongly related either to the deep-seated basement fault activities (deep-seated earthquakes) underlies the sedimentary cover or gently dipping shallow-seated décollement horizon of the rheological weak rocks of the infra-Cambrian Hormuz salt. The compressional stress regimes in the different units play an important role in controlling the stress conditions between the different units within the sedimentary cover and basement. A significant set of nearly N-S trending right-lateral strike-slip faults exists throughout the study area in the Fars area in the Zagros Foreland Folded Belt. Fault-slip and focal mechanism data were analyzed using the stress inversion method to reconstruct the paleo and recent stress conditions. The results suggest that the current direction of maximum principal stress averages N19°E, with N38°E that for the past from Cretaceous to Tertiary (although a few sites on the Kar-e-Bass fault yield a different direction). The results are consistent with the collision of the Afro-Arabian continent and the Iranian microcontinent. The difference between the current and paleo-stress directions indicates an anticlockwise rotation in the maximum principle stress direction over time. This difference resulted from changes in the continental convergence path, but was also influenced by the local structural evolution, including the lateral propagation of folds and the presence of several local décollement horizons that facilitated decoupling of the deformation between the basement and the sedimentary cover. The obliquity of

  19. 25th Annual International Symposium on Field-Programmable Custom Computing Machines

    The IEEE Symposium on Field-Programmable Custom Computing Machines is the original and premier forum for presenting and discussing new research related to computing that exploits the unique features and capabilities of FPGAs and other reconfigurable hardware. Over the past two decades, FCCM has been the place to present papers on architectures, tools, and programming models for field-programmable custom computing machines as well as applications that use such systems.

  20. Computer codes for shaping the magnetic field of the JINR phasotron

    Zaplatin, N.L.; Morozov, N.A.

    1983-01-01

    The computer codes providing for the shaping the magnetic field of the JINR high current phasotron are presented. Using these codes the control for the magnetic field mapping was realized in on- or off-line regimes. Then these field parameters were calculated and ferromagnetic correcting elements and trim coils setting were chosen. Some computer codes were realised for the magnetic field horizontal component measurements. The data are presented on some codes possibilities. The codes were used on the EC-1010 and the CDC-6500 computers

  1. Systems, computer-implemented methods, and tangible computer-readable storage media for wide-field interferometry

    Lyon, Richard G. (Inventor); Leisawitz, David T. (Inventor); Rinehart, Stephen A. (Inventor); Memarsadeghi, Nargess (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Disclosed herein are systems, computer-implemented methods, and tangible computer-readable storage media for wide field imaging interferometry. The method includes for each point in a two dimensional detector array over a field of view of an image: gathering a first interferogram from a first detector and a second interferogram from a second detector, modulating a path-length for a signal from an image associated with the first interferogram in the first detector, overlaying first data from the modulated first detector and second data from the second detector, and tracking the modulating at every point in a two dimensional detector array comprising the first detector and the second detector over a field of view for the image. The method then generates a wide-field data cube based on the overlaid first data and second data for each point. The method can generate an image from the wide-field data cube.

  2. Expansive focal cemento-osseous dysplasia.

    Bulut, Emel Uzun; Acikgoz, Aydan; Ozan, Bora; Zengin, Ayse Zeynep; Gunhan, Omer

    2012-01-01

    To present a case of expansive focal cemento-osseous dysplasia and emphasize the importance of differential diagnosis. Cemento-osseous dysplasia is categorized into three subtypes on the basis of the clinical and radiographic features: Periapical, focal and florid. The focal type exhibits a single site of involvement in any tooth-bearing or edentulous area of the jaws. These lesions are usually asymptomatic; therefore, they are frequently diagnosed incidentally during routine radiographic examinations. Lesions are usually benign, show limited growth, and do not require further surgical intervention, but periodic follow-up is recommended because occasionally, this type of dysplasia progresses into florid osseous dysplasia and simple bone cysts are formed. A 24-year-old female patient was referred to our clinic for swelling in the left edentulous mandibular premolarmolar region and felt discomfort when she wore her prosthetics. She had no pain, tenderness or paresthesia. Clinical examination showed that the swelling in the posterior mandible that was firm, nonfluctuant and covered by normal mucosa. On panoramic radiography and computed tomography, a well defined lesion of approximately 1.5 cm in diameter of mixed density was observed. The swelling increased slightly in size over 2 years making it difficult to use prosthetics and, therefore, the lesion was totally excised under local anesthesia, and surgical specimens were submitted for histopathological examination. The histopathological diagnosis was focal cemento-osseous dysplasia. In the present case, because of the increasing size of the swelling making it difficult to use prosthetics, young age of the patient and localization of the lesion, in the initial examination, cemento-ossifying fibroma was suspected, and the lesion was excised surgically; the histopathological diagnosis confirmed it as focal cemento-osseous dysplasia. We present a case of expansive focal cemento-osseous dysplasia. Differential diagnosis

  3. Basics of thermal field theory a tutorial on perturbative computations

    Laine, Mikko

    2016-01-01

    This book presents thermal field theory techniques, which can be applied in both cosmology and the theoretical description of the QCD plasma generated in heavy-ion collision experiments. It focuses on gauge interactions (whether weak or strong), which are essential in both contexts. As well as the many differences in the physics questions posed and in the microscopic forces playing a central role, the authors also explain the similarities and the techniques, such as the resummations, that are needed for developing a formally consistent perturbative expansion. The formalism is developed step by step, starting from quantum mechanics; introducing scalar, fermionic and gauge fields; describing the issues of infrared divergences; resummations and effective field theories; and incorporating systems with finite chemical potentials. With this machinery in place, the important class of real-time (dynamic) observables is treated in some detail. This is followed by an overview of a number of applications, ranging from t...

  4. Computational radiation chemistry: the emergence of a new field

    Bartczak, W.M.; Kroh, J.

    1991-01-01

    The role of the computer experiment as an information source, which is complementary to the ''real'' experiment in radiation chemistry, is discussed. The discussion is followed by a brief review of some of the simulation techniques, which have been recently applied to the problems of radiation chemistry: ion recombination in spurs and tracks of ionization, electron tunnelling in low-temperature glasses, electron localization in disordered media. (author)

  5. Fast multigrid-based computation of the induced electric field for transcranial magnetic stimulation

    Laakso, Ilkka; Hirata, Akimasa

    2012-12-01

    In transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), the distribution of the induced electric field, and the affected brain areas, depends on the position of the stimulation coil and the individual geometry of the head and brain. The distribution of the induced electric field in realistic anatomies can be modelled using computational methods. However, existing computational methods for accurately determining the induced electric field in realistic anatomical models have suffered from long computation times, typically in the range of tens of minutes or longer. This paper presents a matrix-free implementation of the finite-element method with a geometric multigrid method that can potentially reduce the computation time to several seconds or less even when using an ordinary computer. The performance of the method is studied by computing the induced electric field in two anatomically realistic models. An idealized two-loop coil is used as the stimulating coil. Multiple computational grid resolutions ranging from 2 to 0.25 mm are used. The results show that, for macroscopic modelling of the electric field in an anatomically realistic model, computational grid resolutions of 1 mm or 2 mm appear to provide good numerical accuracy compared to higher resolutions. The multigrid iteration typically converges in less than ten iterations independent of the grid resolution. Even without parallelization, each iteration takes about 1.0 s or 0.1 s for the 1 and 2 mm resolutions, respectively. This suggests that calculating the electric field with sufficient accuracy in real time is feasible.

  6. Seismicity and seismogenic structures of Central Apennines (Italy): constraints on the present-day stress field from focal mechanisms - The SLAM (Seismicity of Lazio-Abruzzo and Molise) project

    Frepoli, Alberto; Battista Cimini, Giovanni; De Gori, Pasquale; De Luca, Gaetano; Marchetti, Alessandro; Montuori, Caterina; Pagliuca, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    We present new results for the microseismic activity in the Central Apennines recorded from a total of 81seismic stations. The large number of recording sites derives from the combination of temporary and permanent seismic networks operating in the study region. Between January 2009 and October 2013 we recorded 6923 earthquakes with local magnitudes ML ranging from 0.1 to 4.8. We located hypocentres by using a refined 1D crustal velocity model. The majority of the hypocenters are located beneath the axes of the Apenninic chain, while the seismic activity observed along the peri-Tyrrhenian margin is lower. The seismicity extends to a depth of 32 km; the hypocentral depth distribution exhibits a pronounced peak of seismic energy release in the depth range between 8 and 20 km. During the observation period we recorded two major seismic swarms and one seismic sequence in the Marsica-Sorano area in which we have had the largest detected magnitude (ML = 4.8). Fault plane solutions for a total of 600 earthquakes were derived from P-polarities. This new data set consists of a number of focal plane solutions that is about four times the data so far available for regional stress field study. The majority of the focal mechanisms show predominantly normal fault solutions. T-axis trends are oriented NE-SW confirming that the area is in extension. We also derived the azimuths of the principal stress axes by inverting the fault plane solutions and calculated the direction of the maximum horizontal stress, which is mainly sub-vertical oriented. The study region has been historically affected by many strong earthquakes, some of them very destructive. This work can give an important contribution to the seismic hazard assessment in an area densely populated as the city of Rome which is distant around 60 km from the main seismogenic structures of Central Apennine.

  7. Computation of wave fields and soil structure interaction

    Lysmer, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    The basic message of the lecture is that the determination of the temporal and spatial variation of the free-field motions is the most important part of any soil-structure interaction analysis. Any interaction motions may be considered as small aberrations superimposed on the free-field motions. The current definition of the soil-structure interaction problem implies that superposition must be used, directly or indirectly, in any rational method of analysis of this problem. This implies that the use of nonlinear procedures in any part of a soil-structure interaction analysis must be questioned. Currently the most important part of the soil-structure interaction analysis, the free-field problem, cannot be solved by nonlinear methods. Hence, it does not seem reasonable to spend a large effort on trying to obtain nonlinear solutions for the interaction part of the problem. Even if such solutions are obtained they cannot legally be superimposed on the free-field motions to obtain the total motions of the structure. This of course does not preclude the possibility that such an illegal procedure may lead to solutions which are close enough for engineering purposes. However, further research is required to make a decision on this issue

  8. Advances in computational methods for Quantum Field Theory calculations

    Ruijl, B.J.G.

    2017-01-01

    In this work we describe three methods to improve the performance of Quantum Field Theory calculations. First, we simplify large expressions to speed up numerical integrations. Second, we design Forcer, a program for the reduction of four-loop massless propagator integrals. Third, we extend the R*

  9. Simulation of a conductive shield plate for the focalization of transcranial magnetic stimulation in the rat.

    Gasca, Fernando; Richter, Lars; Schweikard, Achim

    2010-01-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) in the rat is a powerful tool for investigating brain function. However, the state-of-the-art experiments are considerably limited because the stimulation usually affects undesired anatomical structures. A simulation of a conductive shield plate placed between the coil stimulator and the rat brain during TMS is presented. The Finite Element (FE) method is used to obtain the 3D electric field distribution on a four-layer rat head model. The simulations show that the shield plate with a circular window can improve the focalization of stimulation, as quantitatively seen by computing the three-dimensional half power region (HPR). Focalization with the shield plate showed a clear compromise with the attenuation of the induced field. The results suggest that the shield plate can work as a helpful tool for conducting TMS rat experiments on specific targets.

  10. Computation of the magnetic field of a spectrometer in detectors region

    Zhidkov, E.P.; Yuldasheva, M.B.; Yudin, I.P.; Yuldashev, O.I.

    1995-01-01

    Computed results of the 3D magnetic field of a spectrometer intended for investigation of hadron production of charmed particles and the indication of the narrow resonances in neutron-nucleus interactions are presented. The methods used in computations: finite element method and finite element method with suggested new infinite elements are described. For accuracy control the computations were carried out on a sequence of three-dimensional meshes. Special attention is devoted to behaviour of the magnetic field in the basic detector (proportional chambers) region. The performed results can be used for the field behaviour estimate of similar spectrometer magnets. (orig.)

  11. Computation of the Magnetic Field of a Spectrometer in Detectors Region

    Zhidkov, E.P.; Yuldasheva, M.B.; Yudin, I.P.; Yuldashev, O.I.

    1994-01-01

    Computed results of the 3D magnetic field of a spectrometer intended for investigation of hadron production of charmed particles and the indication of the narrow resonances in neutron-nucleus interaction are presented. The methods, used in computations - finite element method and finite element method with suggested new infinite elements are described. For accuracy control the computations were carried out on a sequence of three-dimensional meshes. Special attention is devoted to the behaviour of the magnetic field in the basic detectors (proportional chambers) region. The performed results can be used for the field behaviour estimate of similar spectrometer magnets. 12 refs., 16 figs

  12. Focal femoral condyle resurfacing.

    Brennan, S A

    2013-03-01

    Focal femoral inlay resurfacing has been developed for the treatment of full-thickness chondral defects of the knee. This technique involves implanting a defect-sized metallic or ceramic cap that is anchored to the subchondral bone through a screw or pin. The use of these experimental caps has been advocated in middle-aged patients who have failed non-operative methods or biological repair techniques and are deemed unsuitable for conventional arthroplasty because of their age. This paper outlines the implant design, surgical technique and biomechanical principles underlying their use. Outcomes following implantation in both animal and human studies are also reviewed. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2013;95-B:301-4.

  13. Systemic focal epileptogenesis

    Remler, M.P.; Marcussen, W.H.

    1986-01-01

    Rats that receive radiation to 0.25 cc of one cerebral hemisphere are clinically and electroencephalographically normal until there is a breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) at 3 to 6 months postradiation. This BBB lesion can be detected by transient focal seizure activity produced by the BBB-excluded systemic convulsant bicuculline methiodide. In two rats the seizure activity induced by this one injection was self-sustaining. In seven of 15 other rats tested, the subsequent administration of repeated 2 mg/kg injections created a chronic focus that continued to spike with great frequency for 3 weeks or more without further administration of any convulsant. In three of eight other rats, implanted minipumps delivering 180 micrograms/h of bicuculline methiodide produced self-sustaining epileptic activity.

  14. Computational analysis of the flow field downstream of flow conditioners

    Erdal, Asbjoern

    1997-12-31

    Technological innovations are essential for maintaining the competitiveness for the gas companies and here metering technology is one important area. This thesis shows that computational fluid dynamic techniques can be a valuable tool for examination of several parameters that may affect the performance of a flow conditioner (FC). Previous design methods, such as screen theory, could not provide fundamental understanding of how a FC works. The thesis shows, among other things, that the flow pattern through a complex geometry, like a 19-hole plate FC, can be simulated with good accuracy by a k-{epsilon} turbulence model. The calculations illuminate how variations in pressure drop, overall porosity, grading of porosity across the cross-section and the number of holes affects the performance of FCs. These questions have been studied experimentally by researchers for a long time. Now an understanding of the important mechanisms behind efficient FCs emerges from the predictions. 179 ref., 110 figs., 8 tabs.

  15. A Computational Model of Cellular Response to Modulated Radiation Fields

    McMahon, Stephen J., E-mail: stephen.mcmahon@qub.ac.uk [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Butterworth, Karl T. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); McGarry, Conor K. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Radiotherapy Physics, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Trainor, Colman [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); O' Sullivan, Joe M. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Clinical Oncology, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Hounsell, Alan R. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Radiotherapy Physics, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Prise, Kevin M. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To develop a model to describe the response of cell populations to spatially modulated radiation exposures of relevance to advanced radiotherapies. Materials and Methods: A Monte Carlo model of cellular radiation response was developed. This model incorporated damage from both direct radiation and intercellular communication including bystander signaling. The predictions of this model were compared to previously measured survival curves for a normal human fibroblast line (AGO1522) and prostate tumor cells (DU145) exposed to spatially modulated fields. Results: The model was found to be able to accurately reproduce cell survival both in populations which were directly exposed to radiation and those which were outside the primary treatment field. The model predicts that the bystander effect makes a significant contribution to cell killing even in uniformly irradiated cells. The bystander effect contribution varies strongly with dose, falling from a high of 80% at low doses to 25% and 50% at 4 Gy for AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This was verified using the inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor aminoguanidine to inhibit the bystander effect in cells exposed to different doses, which showed significantly larger reductions in cell killing at lower doses. Conclusions: The model presented in this work accurately reproduces cell survival following modulated radiation exposures, both in and out of the primary treatment field, by incorporating a bystander component. In addition, the model suggests that the bystander effect is responsible for a significant portion of cell killing in uniformly irradiated cells, 50% and 70% at doses of 2 Gy in AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This description is a significant departure from accepted radiobiological models and may have a significant impact on optimization of treatment planning approaches if proven to be applicable in vivo.

  16. A Computational Model of Cellular Response to Modulated Radiation Fields

    McMahon, Stephen J.; Butterworth, Karl T.; McGarry, Conor K.; Trainor, Colman; O’Sullivan, Joe M.; Hounsell, Alan R.; Prise, Kevin M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a model to describe the response of cell populations to spatially modulated radiation exposures of relevance to advanced radiotherapies. Materials and Methods: A Monte Carlo model of cellular radiation response was developed. This model incorporated damage from both direct radiation and intercellular communication including bystander signaling. The predictions of this model were compared to previously measured survival curves for a normal human fibroblast line (AGO1522) and prostate tumor cells (DU145) exposed to spatially modulated fields. Results: The model was found to be able to accurately reproduce cell survival both in populations which were directly exposed to radiation and those which were outside the primary treatment field. The model predicts that the bystander effect makes a significant contribution to cell killing even in uniformly irradiated cells. The bystander effect contribution varies strongly with dose, falling from a high of 80% at low doses to 25% and 50% at 4 Gy for AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This was verified using the inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor aminoguanidine to inhibit the bystander effect in cells exposed to different doses, which showed significantly larger reductions in cell killing at lower doses. Conclusions: The model presented in this work accurately reproduces cell survival following modulated radiation exposures, both in and out of the primary treatment field, by incorporating a bystander component. In addition, the model suggests that the bystander effect is responsible for a significant portion of cell killing in uniformly irradiated cells, 50% and 70% at doses of 2 Gy in AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This description is a significant departure from accepted radiobiological models and may have a significant impact on optimization of treatment planning approaches if proven to be applicable in vivo.

  17. Classification of integrable two-dimensional models of relativistic field theory by means of computer

    Getmanov, B.S.

    1988-01-01

    The results of classification of two-dimensional relativistic field models (1) spinor; (2) essentially-nonlinear scalar) possessing higher conservation laws using the system of symbolic computer calculations are presented shortly

  18. Computer-aided dispatch--traffic management center field operational test : state of Utah final report

    2006-07-01

    This document provides the final report for the evaluation of the USDOT-sponsored Computer-Aided Dispatch Traffic Management Center Integration Field Operations Test in the State of Utah. The document discusses evaluation findings in the followin...

  19. Computer-aided dispatch--traffic management center field operational test : Washington State final report

    2006-05-01

    This document provides the final report for the evaluation of the USDOT-sponsored Computer-Aided Dispatch - Traffic Management Center Integration Field Operations Test in the State of Washington. The document discusses evaluation findings in the foll...

  20. Focal necrotizing pneumonia is a distinct entity from lung abscess.

    Seo, Hyewon; Cha, Seung-Ick; Shin, Kyung-Min; Lim, Jaekwang; Yoo, Seung-Soo; Lee, Jaehee; Lee, Shin-Yup; Kim, Chang-Ho; Park, Jae-Yong

    2013-10-01

    'Focal necrotizing pneumonia' was defined as a localized type of necrotizing pneumonia characterized by a single or few cavities of low density without rim enhancement on computed tomography (CT) scan. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical features and course of patients with focal necrotizing pneumonia, thereby elucidating its clinical relevance. The present study was conducted retrospectively in patients who had been interpreted as having lung abscess or necrotizing pneumonia on CT scan. Clinical and radiological characteristics were compared between the focal necrotizing pneumonia and lung abscess groups. Overall, 68 patients with focal necrotizing pneumonia (n = 35) or lung abscess (n = 33) were included in the present study. The frequency of risk factors for aspiration was significantly lower in the focal necrotizing group, compared with the lung abscess group (14.3% vs 45.5%, P = 0.005). Compared with lung abscess, focal necrotizing pneumonia was observed more commonly in non-gravity-dependent segments (66% vs 36%, P lung abscess group (31% vs 12%, P = 0.08). However, in terms of treatment outcomes, a similar high rate of success was observed in both groups: 97%, respectively. Compared to lung abscess, focal necrotizing pneumonia occurs more commonly in non-gravity-dependent segments with lower incidence of risk factors for aspiration. Similar to lung abscess, the rate of success for treatment of focal necrotizing pneumonia was high. © 2013 The Authors. Respirology © 2013 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  1. Relaxation along a fictitious field (RAFF and Z-spectroscopy using alternating-phase irradiation (ZAPI in permanent focal cerebral ischemia in rat.

    Kimmo T Jokivarsi

    Full Text Available Cerebral ischemia alters the molecular dynamics and content of water in brain tissue, which is reflected in NMR relaxation, diffusion and magnetization transfer (MT parameters. In this study, the behavior of two new MRI contrasts, Relaxation Along a Fictitious Field (RAFF and Z-spectroscopy using Alternating-Phase Irradiation (ZAPI, were quantified together with conventional relaxation parameters (T1, T2 and T1ρ and MT ratios in acute cerebral ischemia in rat. The right middle cerebral artery was permanently occluded and quantitative MRI data was acquired sequentially for the above parameters for up to 6 hours. The following conclusions were drawn: 1 Time-dependent changes in RAFF and T1ρ relaxation are not coupled to those in MT. 2 RAFF relaxation evolves more like transverse, rather than longitudinal relaxation. 3 MT measured with ZAPI is less sensitive to ischemia than conventional MT. 4 ZAPI data suggest alterations in the T2 distribution of macromolecules in acute cerebral ischemia. It was shown that both RAFF and ZAPI provide complementary MRI information from acute ischemic brain tissue. The presented multiparametric MRI data may aid in the assessment of brain tissue status early in ischemic stroke.

  2. Computation of multiphase systems with phase field models

    Badalassi, V.E.; Ceniceros, H.D.; Banerjee, S.

    2003-01-01

    Phase field models offer a systematic physical approach for investigating complex multiphase systems behaviors such as near-critical interfacial phenomena, phase separation under shear, and microstructure evolution during solidification. However, because interfaces are replaced by thin transition regions (diffuse interfaces), phase field simulations require resolution of very thin layers to capture the physics of the problems studied. This demands robust numerical methods that can efficiently achieve high resolution and accuracy, especially in three dimensions. We present here an accurate and efficient numerical method to solve the coupled Cahn-Hilliard/Navier-Stokes system, known as Model H, that constitutes a phase field model for density-matched binary fluids with variable mobility and viscosity. The numerical method is a time-split scheme that combines a novel semi-implicit discretization for the convective Cahn-Hilliard equation with an innovative application of high-resolution schemes employed for direct numerical simulations of turbulence. This new semi-implicit discretization is simple but effective since it removes the stability constraint due to the nonlinearity of the Cahn-Hilliard equation at the same cost as that of an explicit scheme. It is derived from a discretization used for diffusive problems that we further enhance to efficiently solve flow problems with variable mobility and viscosity. Moreover, we solve the Navier-Stokes equations with a robust time-discretization of the projection method that guarantees better stability properties than those for Crank-Nicolson-based projection methods. For channel geometries, the method uses a spectral discretization in the streamwise and spanwise directions and a combination of spectral and high order compact finite difference discretizations in the wall normal direction. The capabilities of the method are demonstrated with several examples including phase separation with, and without, shear in two and three

  3. Analysis of the Extremely Low Frequency Magnetic Field Emission from Laptop Computers

    Brodić Darko

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses the problem of magnetic field emission produced by the laptop computers. Although, the magnetic field is spread over the entire frequency spectrum, the most dangerous part of it to the laptop users is the frequency range from 50 to 500 Hz, commonly called the extremely low frequency magnetic field. In this frequency region the magnetic field is characterized by high peak values. To examine the influence of laptop’s magnetic field emission in the office, a specific experiment is proposed. It includes the measurement of the magnetic field at six laptop’s positions, which are in close contact to its user. The results obtained from ten different laptop computers show the extremely high emission at some positions, which are dependent on the power dissipation or bad ergonomics. Eventually, the experiment extracts these dangerous positions of magnetic field emission and suggests possible solutions.

  4. Focal midbrain tumors in children

    Vandertop, W. P.; Hoffman, H. J.; Drake, J. M.; Humphreys, R. P.; Rutka, J. T.; Amstrong, D. C.; Becker, L. E.

    1992-01-01

    The clinical and neuroradiological features of focal midbrain tumors in 12 children are described, and the results of their surgical management are presented. Patients with a focal midbrain tumor usually exhibit either symptoms and signs of raised intracranial pressure caused by an obstructive

  5. The design of LMJ focal spots for indirect drive experiments

    Le Garrec, B J; Sajer, J M

    2008-01-01

    LMJ is a 240 high power laser beam facility for achieving laser matter interaction experiments, high energy density science, including the demonstration of fusion ignition through Inertial Confinement. The Laser Integration Line (LIL) facility is currently a 4-beam prototype for LMJ. The intensity I 0 at the focal spot centre drives hydrodynamic and plasma instabilities and the intensity in the wings must be low to go through the laser entrance Hohlraum. A simple model has been developed to compute the LMJ focal spot. The model gives the intensity at the centre as a function of the focal spot area at 3% of the maximum

  6. Comparison of different approaches to the numerical calculation of the LMJ focal

    Bourgeade A.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The beam smoothing in the focal plane of high power lasers is of particular importance to laser-plasma interaction studies in order to minimize plasma parametric and hydrodynamic instabilities on the target. Here we investigate the focal spot structure in different geometrical configurations where standard paraxial hypotheses are no longer verified. We present numerical studies in the cases of single flat top square beam, LMJ quadruplet and complete ring of quads with large azimuth angle. Different calculations are made with Fresnel diffraction propagation model in the paraxial approximation and full vector Maxwell's equations. The first model is based on Fourier transform from near to far field method. The second model uses first spherical wave decomposition in plane waves with Fourier transform and propagates them to the focal spot. These two different approaches are compared with Miró [1] modeling results using paraxial or Feit and Fleck options. The methods presented here are generic for focal spot calculations. They can be used for other complex geometric configurations and various smoothing techniques. The results will be used as boundary conditions in plasma interaction computations.

  7. Numerical computation of the transport matrix in toroidal plasma with a stochastic magnetic field

    Zhu, Siqiang; Chen, Dunqiang; Dai, Zongliang; Wang, Shaojie

    2018-04-01

    A new numerical method, based on integrating along the full orbit of guiding centers, to compute the transport matrix is realized. The method is successfully applied to compute the phase-space diffusion tensor of passing electrons in a tokamak with a stochastic magnetic field. The new method also computes the Lagrangian correlation function, which can be used to evaluate the Lagrangian correlation time and the turbulence correlation length. For the case of the stochastic magnetic field, we find that the order of magnitude of the parallel correlation length can be estimated by qR0, as expected previously.

  8. 38 CFR 4.76a - Computation of average concentric contraction of visual fields.

    2010-07-01

    ... concentric contraction of visual fields. 4.76a Section 4.76a Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Organs of Special Sense § 4.76a Computation of average concentric contraction of visual fields. Table III—Normal Visual...

  9. Computing black hole entropy in loop quantum gravity from a conformal field theory perspective

    Agulló, Iván; Borja, Enrique F.; Díaz-Polo, Jacobo

    2009-01-01

    Motivated by the analogy proposed by Witten between Chern-Simons and conformal field theories, we explore an alternative way of computing the entropy of a black hole starting from the isolated horizon framework in loop quantum gravity. The consistency of the result opens a window for the interplay between conformal field theory and the description of black holes in loop quantum gravity

  10. Computer algebra in quantum field theory integration, summation and special functions

    Schneider, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    The book focuses on advanced computer algebra methods and special functions that have striking applications in the context of quantum field theory. It presents the state of the art and new methods for (infinite) multiple sums, multiple integrals, in particular Feynman integrals, difference and differential equations in the format of survey articles. The presented techniques emerge from interdisciplinary fields: mathematics, computer science and theoretical physics; the articles are written by mathematicians and physicists with the goal that both groups can learn from the other field, including

  11. Application verification research of cloud computing technology in the field of real time aerospace experiment

    Wan, Junwei; Chen, Hongyan; Zhao, Jing

    2017-08-01

    According to the requirements of real-time, reliability and safety for aerospace experiment, the single center cloud computing technology application verification platform is constructed. At the IAAS level, the feasibility of the cloud computing technology be applied to the field of aerospace experiment is tested and verified. Based on the analysis of the test results, a preliminary conclusion is obtained: Cloud computing platform can be applied to the aerospace experiment computing intensive business. For I/O intensive business, it is recommended to use the traditional physical machine.

  12. Manual cross check of computed dose times for motorised wedged fields

    Porte, J.

    2001-01-01

    If a mass of tissue equivalent material is exposed in turn to wedged and open radiation fields of the same size, for equal times, it is incorrect to assume that the resultant isodose pattern will be effectively that of a wedge having half the angle of the wedged field. Computer programs have been written to address the problem of creating an intermediate wedge field, commonly known as a motorized wedge. The total exposure time is apportioned between the open and wedged fields, to produce a beam modification equivalent to that of a wedged field of a given wedge angle. (author)

  13. Thin-section computed tomography–histopathologic comparisons of pulmonary focal interstitial fibrosis, atypical adenomatous hyperplasia, adenocarcinoma in situ, and minimally invasive adenocarcinoma with pure ground-glass opacity

    Si, Ming-Jue, E-mail: smjsh@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, No. 280, Mohe Road, Shanghai 201999 (China); Tao, Xiao-Feng, E-mail: taoxiaofeng1963@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, No. 280, Mohe Road, Shanghai 201999 (China); Du, Guang-Ye, E-mail: 715376158@qq.com [Department of Pathology, Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, No. 280, Mohe Road, Shanghai 201999 (China); Cai, Ling-Ling, E-mail: caill_00@163.com [Department of Radiology, Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, No. 280, Mohe Road, Shanghai 201999 (China); Han, Hong-Xiu, E-mail: hanhongxiu@hotmail.com [Department of Pathology, Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, No. 280, Mohe Road, Shanghai 201999 (China); Liang, Xi-Zi, E-mail: liangxizish@hotmail.com [Department of Pathology, Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, No. 280, Mohe Road, Shanghai 201999 (China); Zhao, Jiang-Min, E-mail: zhaojiangmin1962@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, No. 280, Mohe Road, Shanghai 201999 (China)

    2016-10-15

    Objective: To retrospectively compare focal interstitial fibrosis (FIF), atypical adenomatous hyperplasia (AAH), adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS), and minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (MIA) with pure ground-glass opacity (GGO) using thin-section computed tomography (CT). Materials and methods: Sixty pathologically confirmed cases were reviewed including 7 cases of FIF, 17 of AAH, 23of AIS, and 13 of MIA. All nodules kept pure ground glass appearances before surgical resection and their last time of thin-section CT imaging data before operation were collected. Differences of patient demographics and CT features were compared among these four types of lesions. Results: FIF occurred more frequently in males and smokers while the others occurred more frequently in female nonsmokers. Nodule size was significant larger in MIA (P < 0.001, cut-off value = 7.5 mm). Nodule shape (P = 0.045), margin characteristics (P < 0.001), the presence of pleural indentation (P = 0.032), and vascular ingress (P < 0.001) were significant factors that differentiated the 4 groups. A concave margin was only demonstrated in a high proportion of FIF at 85.7% (P = 0.002). There were no significant differences (all P > 0.05) in age, malignant history, attenuation value, location, and presence of bubble-like lucency. Conclusion: A nodule size >7.5 mm increases the possibility of MIA. A concave margin could be useful for differentiation of FIF from the other malignant or pre-malignant GGO nodules. The presence of spiculation or pleural indentation may preclude the diagnosis of AAH.

  14. Improved Off-Shell Scattering Amplitudes in String Field Theory and New Computational Methods

    Park, I Y; Bars, Itzhak

    2004-01-01

    We report on new results in Witten's cubic string field theory for the off-shell factor in the 4-tachyon amplitude that was not fully obtained explicitly before. This is achieved by completing the derivation of the Veneziano formula in the Moyal star formulation of Witten's string field theory (MSFT). We also demonstrate detailed agreement of MSFT with a number of on-shell and off-shell computations in other approaches to Witten's string field theory. We extend the techniques of computation in MSFT, and show that the j=0 representation of SL(2,R) generated by the Virasoro operators $L_{0},L_{\\pm1}$ is a key structure in practical computations for generating numbers. We provide more insight into the Moyal structure that simplifies string field theory, and develop techniques that could be applied more generally, including nonperturbative processes.

  15. Algorithms for Computing the Magnetic Field, Vector Potential, and Field Derivatives for a Thin Solenoid with Uniform Current Density

    Walstrom, Peter Lowell [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-07

    A numerical algorithm for computing the field components Br and Bz and their r and z derivatives with open boundaries in cylindrical coordinates for radially thin solenoids with uniform current density is described in this note. An algorithm for computing the vector potential Aθ is also described. For the convenience of the reader, derivations of the final expressions from their defining integrals are given in detail, since their derivations are not all easily found in textbooks. Numerical calculations are based on evaluation of complete elliptic integrals using the Bulirsch algorithm cel. The (apparently) new feature of the algorithms described in this note applies to cases where the field point is outside of the bore of the solenoid and the field-point radius approaches the solenoid radius. Since the elliptic integrals of the third kind normally used in computing Bz and Aθ become infinite in this region of parameter space, fields for points with the axial coordinate z outside of the ends of the solenoid and near the solenoid radius are treated by use of elliptic integrals of the third kind of modified argument, derived by use of an addition theorem. Also, the algorithms also avoid the numerical difficulties the textbook solutions have for points near the axis arising from explicit factors of 1/r or 1/r2 in the some of the expressions.

  16. Common and uncommon features of focal splenic lesions on contrast-enhanced ultrasound: a pictorial review

    Zavariz, Julia D., E-mail: julia.zavariz@hc.fm.usp.br [Universidade de São Paulo (HC/FMUSP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Hospital das Clínicas; Konstantatou, Eleni; Deganello Annamaria; Bosanac, Diana; Huang, Dean Y.; Sellars, Maria E.; Sidhu, Paul S. [Department of Radiology, King’s College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-11-15

    The characterization of focal splenic lesions by ultrasound can be quite challenging. The recent introduction of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) has come to play a valuable role in the field of imaging splenic pathologies, offering the possibility of an ionizing radiation-free investigation. Because CEUS has been incorporated into everyday clinical practice, malignant diseases such as focal lymphomatous infiltration, metastatic deposits, benign cysts, traumatic fractures, and hemangiomas can now be accurately depicted and characterized without the need for further imaging. More specifically, splenic traumatic fractures do not require additional imaging by computed tomography (with ionizing radiation exposure) for follow-up, because splenic fractures and their complications are safely imaged with CEUS. In the new era of CEUS, more patients benefit from radiation-free investigation of splenic pathologies with high diagnostic accuracy. (author)

  17. Dual-layer electrode-driven liquid crystal lens with electrically tunable focal length and focal plane

    Zhang, Y. A.; Lin, C. F.; Lin, J. P.; Zeng, X. Y.; Yan, Q.; Zhou, X. T.; Guo, T. L.

    2018-04-01

    Electric-field-driven liquid crystal (ELC) lens with tunable focal length and their depth of field has been extensively applied in 3D display and imaging systems. In this work, a dual-layer electrode-driven liquid crystal (DELC) lens with electrically tunable focal length and controllable focal plane is demonstrated. ITO-SiO2-AZO electrodes with the dual-layer staggered structure on the top substrate are used as driven electrodes within a LC cell, which permits the establishment of an alternative controllability. The focal length of the DELC lens can be adjusted from 1.41 cm to 0.29 cm when the operating voltage changes from 15 V to 40 V. Furthermore, the focal plane of the DELC lens can selectively move by changing the driving method of the applied voltage to the next driven electrodes. This work demonstrates that the DELC lens has potential applications in imaging systems because of electrically tunable focal length and controllable focal plane.

  18. The dispersion-focalization theory of sound systems

    Schwartz, Jean-Luc; Abry, Christian; Boë, Louis-Jean; Vallée, Nathalie; Ménard, Lucie

    2005-04-01

    The Dispersion-Focalization Theory states that sound systems in human languages are shaped by two major perceptual constraints: dispersion driving auditory contrast towards maximal or sufficient values [B. Lindblom, J. Phonetics 18, 135-152 (1990)] and focalization driving auditory spectra towards patterns with close neighboring formants. Dispersion is computed from the sum of the inverse squared inter-spectra distances in the (F1, F2, F3, F4) space, using a non-linear process based on the 3.5 Bark critical distance to estimate F2'. Focalization is based on the idea that close neighboring formants produce vowel spectra with marked peaks, easier to process and memorize in the auditory system. Evidence for increased stability of focal vowels in short-term memory was provided in a discrimination experiment on adult French subjects [J. L. Schwartz and P. Escudier, Speech Comm. 8, 235-259 (1989)]. A reanalysis of infant discrimination data shows that focalization could well be the responsible for recurrent discrimination asymmetries [J. L. Schwartz et al., Speech Comm. (in press)]. Recent data about children vowel production indicate that focalization seems to be part of the perceptual templates driving speech development. The Dispersion-Focalization Theory produces valid predictions for both vowel and consonant systems, in relation with available databases of human languages inventories.

  19. Joint Source Location and Focal Mechanism Inversion: efficiency, accuracy and applications

    Liang, C.; Yu, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The analysis of induced seismicity has become a common practice to evaluate the results of hydraulic fracturing treatment. Liang et al (2016) proposed a joint Source Scanning Algorithms (jSSA for short) to obtain microseismic events and focal mechanisms simultaneously. The jSSA is superior over traditional SSA in many aspects, but the computation cost is too significant to be applied in real time monitoring. In this study, we have developed several scanning schemas to reduce computation time. A multi-stage scanning schema is proved to be able to improve the efficiency significantly while also retain its accuracy. A series of tests have been carried out by using both real field data and synthetic data to evaluate the accuracy of the method and its dependence on noise level, source depths, focal mechanisms and other factors. The surface-based arrays have better constraints on horizontal location errors (0.5). For sources with varying rakes, dips, strikes and depths, the errors are mostly controlled by the partition of positive and negative polarities in different quadrants. More evenly partitioned polarities in different quadrants yield better results in both locations and focal mechanisms. Nevertheless, even with bad resolutions for some FMs, the optimized jSSA method can still improve location accuracies significantly. Based on much more densely distributed events and focal mechanisms, a gridded stress inversion is conducted to get a evenly distributed stress field. The full potential of the jSSA has yet to be explored in different directions, especially in earthquake seismology as seismic array becoming incleasingly dense.

  20. A Fixpoint-Based Calculus for Graph-Shaped Computational Fields

    Lluch Lafuente, Alberto; Loreti, Michele; Montanari, Ugo

    2015-01-01

    topology is represented by a graph-shaped field, namely a network with attributes on both nodes and arcs, where arcs represent interaction capabilities between nodes. We propose a calculus where computation is strictly synchronous and corresponds to sequential computations of fixpoints in the graph......-shaped field. Under some conditions, those fixpoints can be computed by synchronised iterations, where in each iteration the attributes of a node is updated based on the attributes of the neighbours in the previous iteration. Basic constructs are reminiscent of the semiring μ-calculus, a semiring......-valued generalisation of the modal μ-calculus, which provides a flexible mechanism to specify the neighbourhood range (according to path formulae) and the way attributes should be combined (through semiring operators). Additional control-How constructs allow one to conveniently structure the fixpoint computations. We...

  1. Study of electric and magnetic fields on transmission lines using a computer simulation program

    Robelo Mojica, Nelson

    2011-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine and reduce levels of electric and magnetic fields with different configurations used by the Instituto Costarricense de Electricidad in power transmission lines in Costa Rica. The computer simulation program PLS-CADD with EPRI algorithm has been used to obtain field values close to those actual to lines easements that have worked to date. Different configurations have been compared on equal terms and the lowest levels of electric and magnetic fields are determined. The most appropriate configuration of the tower has been obtained and therefore has decreased exposure to electromagnetic fields people, without affecting the energy demand of the population. (author) [es

  2. Using the CAVE virtual-reality environment as an aid to 3-D electromagnetic field computation

    Turner, L.R.; Levine, D.; Huang, M.; Papka, M.

    1995-01-01

    One of the major problems in three-dimensional (3-D) field computation is visualizing the resulting 3-D field distributions. A virtual-reality environment, such as the CAVE, (CAVE Automatic Virtual Environment) is helping to overcome this problem, thus making the results of computation more usable for designers and users of magnets and other electromagnetic devices. As a demonstration of the capabilities of the CAVE, the elliptical multipole wiggler (EMW), an insertion device being designed for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) now being commissioned at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), wa made visible, along with its fields and beam orbits. Other uses of the CAVE in preprocessing and postprocessing computation for electromagnetic applications are also discussed

  3. Magnetostatic fields computed using an integral equation derived from Green's theorems

    Simkin, J.; Trowbridge, C.W.

    1976-04-01

    A method of computing magnetostatic fields is described that is based on a numerical solution of the integral equation obtained from Green's Theorems. The magnetic scalar potential and its normal derivative on the surfaces of volumes are found by solving a set of linear equations. These are obtained from Green's Second Theorem and the continuity conditions at interfaces between volumes. Results from a two-dimensional computer program are presented and these show the method to be accurate and efficient. (author)

  4. THEORETICAL COMPUTATION OF A STRESS FIELD IN A CYLINDRICAL GLASS SPECIMEN

    NORBERT KREČMER

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the computation of the stress field generated in an infinitely high glass cylinder while cooling. The theory of structural relaxation is used in order to compute the heat capacity, the thermal expansion coefficient, and the viscosity. The relaxation of the stress components is solved in the frame of the Maxwell viscoelasticity model. The obtained results were verified by the sensitivity analysis and compared with some experimental data.

  5. Computation of demagnetizing fields and particle distribution in magnetic fluid with inhomogeneous density

    Pshenichnikov, A.F.

    2012-01-01

    A new algorithm for calculating magnetic fields in a concentrated magnetic fluid with inhomogeneous density is proposed. Inhomogeneity of the fluid is caused by magnetophoresis. In this case, the diffusion and magnetostatic parts of the problem are tightly linked together and are solved jointly. The dynamic diffusion equation is solved by the finite volume method and, to calculate the magnetic field inside the fluid, an iterative process is performed in parallel. The solution to the problem is sought in Cartesian coordinates, and the computational domain is decomposed into rectangular elements. This technique eliminates the need to solve the related boundary-value problem for magnetic fields, accelerates computations and eliminates the error caused by the finite sizes of the outer region. Formulas describing the contribution of the rectangular element to the field intensity in the case of a plane problem are given. Magnetic and concentration fields inside the magnetic fluid filling a rectangular cavity generated under the action of the uniform external filed are calculated. - Highlights: ▶ New algorithm for calculating magnetic field intense magnetic fluid with account of magnetophoresis and diffusion of particles. ▶ We do not need to solve boundary-value problem, but we accelerate computations and eliminate some errors. ▶ We solve nonlinear flow equation by the finite volume method and calculate magnetic and focus fields in the fluid for plane case.

  6. An efficient hysteresis modeling methodology and its implementation in field computation applications

    Adly, A.A., E-mail: adlyamr@gmail.com [Electrical Power and Machines Dept., Faculty of Engineering, Cairo University, Giza 12613 (Egypt); Abd-El-Hafiz, S.K. [Engineering Mathematics Department, Faculty of Engineering, Cairo University, Giza 12613 (Egypt)

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • An approach to simulate hysteresis while taking shape anisotropy into consideration. • Utilizing the ensemble of triangular sub-regions hysteresis models in field computation. • A novel tool capable of carrying out field computation while keeping track of hysteresis losses. • The approach may be extended for 3D tetra-hedra sub-volumes. - Abstract: Field computation in media exhibiting hysteresis is crucial to a variety of applications such as magnetic recording processes and accurate determination of core losses in power devices. Recently, Hopfield neural networks (HNN) have been successfully configured to construct scalar and vector hysteresis models. This paper presents an efficient hysteresis modeling methodology and its implementation in field computation applications. The methodology is based on the application of the integral equation approach on discretized triangular magnetic sub-regions. Within every triangular sub-region, hysteresis properties are realized using a 3-node HNN. Details of the approach and sample computation results are given in the paper.

  7. Advanced methods for the computation of particle beam transport and the computation of electromagnetic fields and beam-cavity interactions

    Dragt, A.J.; Gluckstern, R.L.

    1992-11-01

    The University of Maryland Dynamical Systems and Accelerator Theory Group carries out research in two broad areas: the computation of charged particle beam transport using Lie algebraic methods and advanced methods for the computation of electromagnetic fields and beam-cavity interactions. Important improvements in the state of the art are believed to be possible in both of these areas. In addition, applications of these methods are made to problems of current interest in accelerator physics including the theoretical performance of present and proposed high energy machines. The Lie algebraic method of computing and analyzing beam transport handles both linear and nonlinear beam elements. Tests show this method to be superior to the earlier matrix or numerical integration methods. It has wide application to many areas including accelerator physics, intense particle beams, ion microprobes, high resolution electron microscopy, and light optics. With regard to the area of electromagnetic fields and beam cavity interactions, work is carried out on the theory of beam breakup in single pulses. Work is also done on the analysis of the high frequency behavior of longitudinal and transverse coupling impedances, including the examination of methods which may be used to measure these impedances. Finally, work is performed on the electromagnetic analysis of coupled cavities and on the coupling of cavities to waveguides

  8. Computational strong-field quantum dynamics. Intense light-matter interactions

    Bauer, Dieter (ed.) [Rostock Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik

    2017-09-01

    This graduate textbook introduces the computational techniques to study ultra-fast quantum dynamics of matter exposed to strong laser fields. Coverage includes methods to propagate wavefunctions according to the time dependent Schroedinger, Klein-Gordon or Dirac equation, the calculation of typical observables, time-dependent density functional theory, multi configurational time-dependent Hartree-Fock, time-dependent configuration interaction singles, the strong-field approximation, and the microscopic particle-in-cell approach.

  9. Computational strong-field quantum dynamics. Intense light-matter interactions

    Bauer, Dieter

    2017-01-01

    This graduate textbook introduces the computational techniques to study ultra-fast quantum dynamics of matter exposed to strong laser fields. Coverage includes methods to propagate wavefunctions according to the time dependent Schroedinger, Klein-Gordon or Dirac equation, the calculation of typical observables, time-dependent density functional theory, multi configurational time-dependent Hartree-Fock, time-dependent configuration interaction singles, the strong-field approximation, and the microscopic particle-in-cell approach.

  10. Effects of Force Field Selection on the Computational Ranking of MOFs for CO2 Separations.

    Dokur, Derya; Keskin, Seda

    2018-02-14

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have been considered as highly promising materials for adsorption-based CO 2 separations. The number of synthesized MOFs has been increasing very rapidly. High-throughput molecular simulations are very useful to screen large numbers of MOFs in order to identify the most promising adsorbents prior to extensive experimental studies. Results of molecular simulations depend on the force field used to define the interactions between gas molecules and MOFs. Choosing the appropriate force field for MOFs is essential to make reliable predictions about the materials' performance. In this work, we performed two sets of molecular simulations using the two widely used generic force fields, Dreiding and UFF, and obtained adsorption data of CO 2 /H 2 , CO 2 /N 2 , and CO 2 /CH 4 mixtures in 100 different MOF structures. Using this adsorption data, several adsorbent evaluation metrics including selectivity, working capacity, sorbent selection parameter, and percent regenerability were computed for each MOF. MOFs were then ranked based on these evaluation metrics, and top performing materials were identified. We then examined the sensitivity of the MOF rankings to the force field type. Our results showed that although there are significant quantitative differences between some adsorbent evaluation metrics computed using different force fields, rankings of the top MOF adsorbents for CO 2 separations are generally similar: 8, 8, and 9 out of the top 10 most selective MOFs were found to be identical in the ranking for CO 2 /H 2 , CO 2 /N 2 , and CO 2 /CH 4 separations using Dreiding and UFF. We finally suggested a force field factor depending on the energy parameters of atoms present in the MOFs to quantify the robustness of the simulation results to the force field selection. This easily computable factor will be highly useful to determine whether the results are sensitive to the force field type or not prior to performing computationally demanding

  11. Computational strong-field quantum dynamics intense light-matter interactions

    2017-01-01

    This graduate textbook introduces the computational techniques to study ultra-fast quantum dynamics of matter exposed to strong laser fields. Coverage includes methods to propagate wavefunctions according to the time-dependent Schrödinger, Klein-Gordon or Dirac equation, the calculation of typical observables, time-dependent density functional theory, multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree-Fock, time-dependent configuration interaction singles, the strong-field approximation, and the microscopic particle-in-cell approach.

  12. Combined tangential-normal vector elements for computing electric and magnetic fields

    Sachdev, S.; Cendes, Z.J.

    1993-01-01

    A direct method for computing electric and magnetic fields in two dimensions is developed. This method determines both the fields and fluxes directly from Maxwell's curl and divergence equations without introducing potential functions. This allows both the curl and the divergence of the field to be set independently in all elements. The technique is based on a new type of vector finite element that simultaneously interpolates to the tangential component of the electric or the magnetic field and the normal component of the electric or magnetic flux. Continuity conditions are imposed across element edges simply by setting like variables to be the same across element edges. This guarantees the continuity of the field and flux at the mid-point of each edge and that for all edges the average value of the tangential component of the field and of the normal component of the flux is identical

  13. Characterization of LIL laser UV focal spot

    Mangeant, M.; Dubois, J.L.; Behar, G.; Arroyo, P.; Durand, V.; Lahonde, C.

    2006-01-01

    One way to get the fusion of hydrogen in laboratory consists in heating and compressing a DT fuel capsule by using a laser. To reach this aim requires a new generation of high power laser facility. Cea (French board for atomic energy) is developing for this purpose a new 240 laser line facility, the LMJ facility. The LIL which is the prototype of four LMJ laser lines is operational now. In order to confirm the technical choices, a systematic characterization of LIL was carried out. A particular effort has been provided to measure the 3ω high energy focal spot (1.5 kJ/700 ps and 5 ns for one beam) and the synchronization of laser beams onto the target, which are key issues for the plasma production. An experimental device, SAT-3ω (a 3ω laser focal spot analysis) has been designed to perform these measures. That diagnostic which is located at the end of the laser lines delivered its first results during the 2004 quadruplet qualification campaigns. The near field imaging showed no diaphony and vignetting. Low power spots allowed us to control we had no ghost. The energy measurement quality showed the photometric transfer function was perfectly known. Our caustic image are given with an average dynamic range of 800, a spatial resolution of 10 μm and diameter accuracy about 1% for 50% and 3% for 90% of encircled energy. The high energy focal spot diameters are in agreement with low and very low energy diameters. The phase plate and 14 GHz effects are similar to what we had expected. For a laser shot completed with a continuous phase plate at 14 GHz, and for an energy level of 1.5 kJ per beam at 351 nm, the focal beam diameter at 3% of the peak level is (875 ± 45) μm

  14. Computational code in atomic and nuclear quantum optics: Advanced computing multiphoton resonance parameters for atoms in a strong laser field

    Glushkov, A. V.; Gurskaya, M. Yu; Ignatenko, A. V.; Smirnov, A. V.; Serga, I. N.; Svinarenko, A. A.; Ternovsky, E. V.

    2017-10-01

    The consistent relativistic energy approach to the finite Fermi-systems (atoms and nuclei) in a strong realistic laser field is presented and applied to computing the multiphoton resonances parameters in some atoms and nuclei. The approach is based on the Gell-Mann and Low S-matrix formalism, multiphoton resonance lines moments technique and advanced Ivanov-Ivanova algorithm of calculating the Green’s function of the Dirac equation. The data for multiphoton resonance width and shift for the Cs atom and the 57Fe nucleus in dependence upon the laser intensity are listed.

  15. Enriching Elementary Quantum Mechanics with the Computer: Self-Consistent Field Problems in One Dimension

    Bolemon, Jay S.; Etzold, David J.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the use of a small computer to solve self-consistent field problems of one-dimensional systems of two or more interacting particles in an elementary quantum mechanics course. Indicates that the calculation can serve as a useful introduction to the iterative technique. (CC)

  16. Computation of magnetic fields within source regions of ionospheric and magnetospheric currents

    Engels, U.; Olsen, Nils

    1998-01-01

    A general method of computing the magnetic effect caused by a predetermined three-dimensional external current density is presented. It takes advantage of the representation of solenoidal vector fields in terms of toroidal and poloidal modes expressed by two independent series of spherical harmon...

  17. Computer-based measurement and automatizatio aplication research in nuclear technology fields

    Jiang Hongfei; Zhang Xiangyang

    2003-01-01

    This paper introduces computer-based measurement and automatization application research in nuclear technology fields. The emphasis of narration are the role of software in the development of system, and the network measurement and control software model which has optimistic application foreground. And presents the application examples of research and development. (authors)

  18. Computational study of the influence of mirror parameters on FRC (field-reversed configuration) equilibria:

    Fuentes, N.O.; Sakanaka, P.H.

    1990-01-01

    Field-reversed configuration equilibria are studied by solving the Grad-Shafranov equation. A multiple coil system (main coil and end mirrors) is considered to simulate the coil geometry of CNEA device. First results are presented for computed two-dimensional FRC equilibria produced varying the mirror coil current with two different mirror lenghts. (Author)

  19. Computer codes for tasks in the fields of isotope and radiation research

    Friedrich, K.; Gebhardt, O.

    1978-11-01

    Concise descriptions of computer codes developed for solving problems in the fields of isotope and radiation research at the Zentralinstitut fuer Isotopen- und Strahlenforschung (ZfI) are compiled. In part two the structure of the ZfI program library MABIF is outlined and a complete list of all codes available is given

  20. Infrared Testing of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Telescope Grism Using Computer Generated Holograms

    Dominguez, Margaret Z.; Content, David A.; Gong, Qian; Griesmann, Ulf; Hagopian, John G.; Marx, Catherine T; Whipple, Arthur L.

    2017-01-01

    Infrared Computer Generated Holograms (CGHs) were designed, manufactured and used to measure the performance of the grism (grating prism) prototype which includes testing Diffractive Optical Elements (DOE). The grism in the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) will allow the surveying of a large section of the sky to find bright galaxies.

  1. Three-dimensional magnetic field computation on a distributed memory parallel processor

    Barion, M.L.

    1990-01-01

    The analysis of three-dimensional magnetic fields by finite element methods frequently proves too onerous a task for the computing resource on which it is attempted. When non-linear and transient effects are included, it may become impossible to calculate the field distribution to sufficient resolution. One approach to this problem is to exploit the natural parallelism in the finite element method via parallel processing. This paper reports on an implementation of a finite element code for non-linear three-dimensional low-frequency magnetic field calculation on Intel's iPSC/2

  2. Computing Galois Groups of Eisenstein Polynomials Over P-adic Fields

    Milstead, Jonathan

    The most efficient algorithms for computing Galois groups of polynomials over global fields are based on Stauduhar's relative resolvent method. These methods are not directly generalizable to the local field case, since they require a field that contains the global field in which all roots of the polynomial can be approximated. We present splitting field-independent methods for computing the Galois group of an Eisenstein polynomial over a p-adic field. Our approach is to combine information from different disciplines. We primarily, make use of the ramification polygon of the polynomial, which is the Newton polygon of a related polynomial. This allows us to quickly calculate several invariants that serve to reduce the number of possible Galois groups. Algorithms by Greve and Pauli very efficiently return the Galois group of polynomials where the ramification polygon consists of one segment as well as information about the subfields of the stem field. Second, we look at the factorization of linear absolute resolvents to further narrow the pool of possible groups.

  3. Continuously variable focal length lens

    Adams, Bernhard W; Chollet, Matthieu C

    2013-12-17

    A material preferably in crystal form having a low atomic number such as beryllium (Z=4) provides for the focusing of x-rays in a continuously variable manner. The material is provided with plural spaced curvilinear, optically matched slots and/or recesses through which an x-ray beam is directed. The focal length of the material may be decreased or increased by increasing or decreasing, respectively, the number of slots (or recesses) through which the x-ray beam is directed, while fine tuning of the focal length is accomplished by rotation of the material so as to change the path length of the x-ray beam through the aligned cylindrical slows. X-ray analysis of a fixed point in a solid material may be performed by scanning the energy of the x-ray beam while rotating the material to maintain the beam's focal point at a fixed point in the specimen undergoing analysis.

  4. Impact of variations in fatty liver on sonographic detection of focal hepatic lesions originally identified by CT

    Wu, Size; Tu, Rong; Nan, Ruixia; Liu, Guangqing; Cui, Xiaojing; Liang, Xian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of variations in fatty liver on the ultrasonographic detection of focal liver lesions. Methods: A total of 229 patients with varying degrees of fatty liver and focal liver lesions and 200 patients with focal liver lesions but no fatty liver were randomly selected for inclusion in groups I and II, respectively. Findings of focal liver lesions identified on computed tomography were taken as the reference, and findings on ultrasonog...

  5. Quasistatic zooming of FDTD E-field computations: the impact of down-scaling techniques

    Van de Kamer, J.B.; Kroeze, H.; De Leeuw, A.A.C.; Lagendijk, J.J.W. [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2001-05-01

    Due to current computer limitations, regional hyperthermia treatment planning (HTP) is practically limited to a resolution of 1 cm, whereas a millimetre resolution is desired. Using the centimetre resolution E-vector-field distribution, computed with, for example, the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method and the millimetre resolution patient anatomy it is possible to obtain a millimetre resolution SAR distribution in a volume of interest (VOI) by means of quasistatic zooming. To compute the required low-resolution E-vector-field distribution, a low-resolution dielectric geometry is needed which is constructed by down-scaling the millimetre resolution dielectric geometry. In this study we have investigated which down-scaling technique results in a dielectric geometry that yields the best low-resolution E-vector-field distribution as input for quasistatic zooming. A segmented 2 mm resolution CT data set of a patient has been down-scaled to 1 cm resolution using three different techniques: 'winner-takes-all', 'volumetric averaging' and 'anisotropic volumetric averaging'. The E-vector-field distributions computed for those low-resolution dielectric geometries have been used as input for quasistatic zooming. The resulting zoomed-resolution SAR distributions were compared with a reference: the 2 mm resolution SAR distribution computed with the FDTD method. The E-vector-field distribution for both a simple phantom and the complex partial patient geometry down-scaled using 'anisotropic volumetric averaging' resulted in zoomed-resolution SAR distributions that best approximate the corresponding high-resolution SAR distribution (correlation 97, 96% and absolute averaged difference 6, 14% respectively). (author)

  6. The Simbol-X Focal Plane

    Laurent, P.

    2009-05-01

    The Simbol-X focal plane is designed to detect photons focused by the mirror in the 0.5 to 100 keV energy band. Composed of two detectors, it will measure the position, energy, and arrival time of each incoming X-ray. On top of it will be a collimator to shield all photons not coming from the mirror field of view. The whole system is surrounded by an active and passive shielding in order to ensure the required very low background.

  7. Computer-implemented method and apparatus for autonomous position determination using magnetic field data

    Ketchum, Eleanor A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A computer-implemented method and apparatus for determining position of a vehicle within 100 km autonomously from magnetic field measurements and attitude data without a priori knowledge of position. An inverted dipole solution of two possible position solutions for each measurement of magnetic field data are deterministically calculated by a program controlled processor solving the inverted first order spherical harmonic representation of the geomagnetic field for two unit position vectors 180 degrees apart and a vehicle distance from the center of the earth. Correction schemes such as a successive substitutions and a Newton-Raphson method are applied to each dipole. The two position solutions for each measurement are saved separately. Velocity vectors for the position solutions are calculated so that a total energy difference for each of the two resultant position paths is computed. The position path with the smaller absolute total energy difference is chosen as the true position path of the vehicle.

  8. Computer model of copper resistivity will improve the efficiency of field-compression devices

    Burgess, T.J.

    1977-01-01

    By detonating a ring of high explosive around an existing magnetic field, we can, under certain conditions, compress the field and multiply its strength tremendously. In this way, we can duplicate for a fraction of a second the extreme pressures that normally exist only in the interior of stars and planets. Under such pressures, materials may exhibit behavior that will confirm or alter current notions about the fundamental structure of matter and the ongoing processes in planetary interiors. However, we cannot design an efficient field-compression device unless we can calculate the electrical resistivity of certain basic metal components, which interact with the field. To aid in the design effort, we have developed a computer code that calculates the resistivity of copper and other metals over the wide range of temperatures and pressures found in a field-compression device

  9. Inverse-designed stretchable metalens with tunable focal distance

    Callewaert, Francois; Velev, Vesselin; Jiang, Shizhou; Sahakian, Alan Varteres; Kumar, Prem; Aydin, Koray

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we present an inverse-designed 3D-printed all-dielectric stretchable millimeter wave metalens with a tunable focal distance. A computational inverse-design method is used to design a flat metalens made of disconnected polymer building blocks with complex shapes, as opposed to conventional monolithic lenses. The proposed metalens provides better performance than a conventional Fresnel lens, using lesser amount of material and enabling larger focal distance tunability. The metalens is fabricated using a commercial 3D-printer and attached to a stretchable platform. Measurements and simulations show that the focal distance can be tuned by a factor of 4 with a stretching factor of only 75%, a nearly diffraction-limited focal spot, and with a 70% relative focusing efficiency, defined as the ratio between power focused in the focal spot and power going through the focal plane. The proposed platform can be extended for design and fabrication of multiple electromagnetic devices working from visible to microwave radiation depending on scaling of the devices.

  10. SPECT in Focal Epilepsies

    Roderick Duncan

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain perfusion changes during seizures were first observed in the 1930s. Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT was developed in the 1970s, and tracers suitable for the imaging of regional cerebral perfusion (rCP became available in the 1980s. The method was first used to study rCP in the interictal phase, and this showed areas of low perfusion in a proportion of cases, mainly in patients with temporal lobe epilepsies. However, the trapping paradigm of tracers such as hexamethyl propyleneamine oxime (HMPAO provided a practicable method of studying changes in rCP during seizures, and a literature was established in the late 1980s and early 1990s showing a typical sequence of changes during and after seizures of mesial temporal lobe origin; the ictal phase was associated with large increases in perfusion throughout the temporal lobe, with first the lateral, then the mesial temporal lobe becoming hypoperfused in the postictal phase. Activation and inhibition of other structures, such as the basal ganglia and frontal cortex, were also seen. Studies of seizures originating elsewhere in the brain have shown a variety of patterns of change, according to the structures involved. These changes have been used practically to aid the process of localisation of the epileptogenic zone so that epilepsy surgery can be planned.

  11. Quadruple Cone Coil with improved focality than Figure-8 coil in Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    Rastogi, Priyam; Lee, Erik G.; Hadimani, Ravi L.; Jiles, David C.

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive therapy which uses a time varying magnetic field to induce an electric field in the brain and to cause neuron depolarization. Magnetic coils play an important role in the TMS therapy since their coil geometry determines the focality and penetration's depth of the induced electric field in the brain. Quadruple Cone Coil (QCC) is a novel coil with an improved focality when compared to commercial Figure-8 coil. The results of this newly designed QCC coil are compared with the Figure-8 coil at two different positions of the head - vertex and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, over the 50 anatomically realistic MRI derived head models. Parameters such as volume of stimulation, maximum electric, area of stimulation and location of maximum electric field are determined with the help of computer modelling of both coils. There is a decrease in volume of brain stimulated by 11.6 % and a modest improvement of 8 % in the location of maximum electric field due to QCC in comparison to the Figure-8 coil. The Carver Charitable Trust and The Galloway Foundation.

  12. Algorithms for Computing the Magnetic Field, Vector Potential, and Field Derivatives for Circular Current Loops in Cylindrical Coordinates

    Walstrom, Peter Lowell [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-24

    A numerical algorithm for computing the field components Br and Bz and their r and z derivatives with open boundaries in cylindrical coordinates for circular current loops is described. An algorithm for computing the vector potential is also described. For the convenience of the reader, derivations of the final expressions from their defining integrals are given in detail, since their derivations (especially for the field derivatives) are not all easily found in textbooks. Numerical calculations are based on evaluation of complete elliptic integrals using the Bulirsch algorithm cel. Since cel can evaluate complete elliptic integrals of a fairly general type, in some cases the elliptic integrals can be evaluated without first reducing them to forms containing standard Legendre forms. The algorithms avoid the numerical difficulties that many of the textbook solutions have for points near the axis because of explicit factors of 1=r or 1=r2 in the some of the expressions.

  13. Graduate Enrollment Increases in Science and Engineering Fields, Especially in Engineering and Computer Sciences. InfoBrief: Science Resources Statistics.

    Burrelli, Joan S.

    This brief describes graduate enrollment increases in the science and engineering fields, especially in engineering and computer sciences. Graduate student enrollment is summarized by enrollment status, citizenship, race/ethnicity, and fields. (KHR)

  14. TBCI and URMEL - New computer codes for wake field and cavity mode calculations

    Weiland, T.

    1983-01-01

    Wake force computation is important for any study of instabilities in high current accelerators and storage rings. These forces are generated by intense bunches of charged particles passing cylindrically symmetric structures on or off axis. The adequate method for computing such forces is the time domain approach. The computer Code TBCI computes for relativistic as well as for nonrelativistic bunches of arbitrary shape longitudinal and transverse wake forces up to the octupole component. TBCI is not limited to cavity-like objects and thus applicable to bellows, beam pipes with varying cross sections and any other nonresonant structures. For the accelerating cavities one also needs to know the resonant modes and frequencies for the study of instabilities and mode couplers. The complementary code named URMEL computes these fields for any azimuthal dependence of the fields in ascending order. The mathematical procedure being used is very safe and does not miss modes. Both codes together represent a unique tool for accelerator design and are easy to use

  15. A program for computing cohomology of Lie superalgebras of vector fields

    Kornyak, V.V.

    1998-01-01

    An algorithm and its C implementation for computing the cohomology of Lie algebras and superalgebras is described. When elaborating the algorithm we paid primary attention to cohomology in trivial, adjoint and coadjoint modules for Lie algebras and superalgebras of the formal vector fields. These algebras have found many applications to modern supersymmetric models of theoretical and mathematical physics. As an example, we present 3- and 5-cocycles from the cohomology in the trivial module for the Poisson algebra Po (2), as found by computer

  16. Magnetic field computations of the magnetic circuits with permanent magnets by infinite element method

    Hahn, Song Yop

    1985-01-01

    A method employing infinite elements is described for the magnetic field computations of the magnetic circuits with permanent magnet. The system stiffness matrix is derived by a variational approach, while the interfacial boundary conditions between the finite element regions and the infinite element regions are dealt with using collocation method. The proposed method is applied to a simple linear problems, and the numerical results are compared with those of the standard finite element method and the analytic solutions. It is observed that the proposed method gives more accurate results than those of the standard finite element method under the same computing efforts. (Author)

  17. Comparison of progressive addition lenses for general purpose and for computer vision: an office field study.

    Jaschinski, Wolfgang; König, Mirjam; Mekontso, Tiofil M; Ohlendorf, Arne; Welscher, Monique

    2015-05-01

    Two types of progressive addition lenses (PALs) were compared in an office field study: 1. General purpose PALs with continuous clear vision between infinity and near reading distances and 2. Computer vision PALs with a wider zone of clear vision at the monitor and in near vision but no clear distance vision. Twenty-three presbyopic participants wore each type of lens for two weeks in a double-masked four-week quasi-experimental procedure that included an adaptation phase (Weeks 1 and 2) and a test phase (Weeks 3 and 4). Questionnaires on visual and musculoskeletal conditions as well as preferences regarding the type of lenses were administered. After eight more weeks of free use of the spectacles, the preferences were assessed again. The ergonomic conditions were analysed from photographs. Head inclination when looking at the monitor was significantly lower by 2.3 degrees with the computer vision PALs than with the general purpose PALs. Vision at the monitor was judged significantly better with computer PALs, while distance vision was judged better with general purpose PALs; however, the reported advantage of computer vision PALs differed in extent between participants. Accordingly, 61 per cent of the participants preferred the computer vision PALs, when asked without information about lens design. After full information about lens characteristics and additional eight weeks of free spectacle use, 44 per cent preferred the computer vision PALs. On average, computer vision PALs were rated significantly better with respect to vision at the monitor during the experimental part of the study. In the final forced-choice ratings, approximately half of the participants preferred either the computer vision PAL or the general purpose PAL. Individual factors seem to play a role in this preference and in the rated advantage of computer vision PALs. © 2015 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2015 Optometry Australia.

  18. Focal therapy in prostate cancer

    van den Bos, W.

    2016-01-01

    Interesting developments took place in the treatment of prostate cancer including focal therapy for less aggressive organ-confined prostate cancer. Fortunately, curative treatment is often still an option for patients suffering from the lower staged tumors. In carefully selected patients, the

  19. Gallbladder adenoma with focal adenocarcinoma.

    Ciurea, S; Matei, E; Petrisor, P; Luca, L; Boros, Mirela; Herlea, V; Popescu, I

    2008-01-01

    The majority of polypoid lesions of the gallbladder are cholesterolosis pseudopolyps. True neoplastic GB polyps are represented mainly by adenomas. The case of a 52-year old male patient with an adenomatous polyp of the GB with focal adenocarcinoma is presented.

  20. Charging as a Focal Practice

    Bødker, Mads

    This position paper reflects on Borgmann’s notion of ‘focal things’ and its applicability in the discourse about interaction with technologies in nature. Using the example of a combined cooking burner and thermoelectric 5W smartphone charger (a BioLite cook stove), this position paper gives...

  1. Focal fibrocartilaginous dysplasia and tibia vara: a case report

    Cockshott, W.P.; Martin, R.; Friedman, L.; Yuen, M.

    1994-01-01

    A 2-year-old black boy with focal fibrocartilaginous dysplasia is described with illustrations of the typical radiographic appearances supplemented by computed tomographic and magnetic resonance images. Since this rare condition is self-correcting, diagnosis is important so that surgical intervention and biopsy can be avoided and conservative management instituted. (orig.)

  2. Focal fibrocartilaginous dysplasia and tibia vara: a case report.

    Cockshott, W P; Martin, R; Friedman, L; Yuen, M

    1994-07-01

    A 2-year-old black boy with focal fibrocartilaginous dysplasia is described with illustrations of the typical radiographic appearances supplemented by computed tomographic and magnetic resonance images. Since this rare condition is self-correcting, diagnosis is important so that surgical intervention and biopsy can be avoided and conservative management instituted.

  3. Focal fibrocartilaginous dysplasia and tibia vara: a case report

    Cockshott, W.P. (Dept. of Radiology, McMaster Univ. Medical Centre, Hamilton, ON (Canada)); Martin, R. (Dept. of Orthopedics, McMaster Univ. Medical Centre, Hamilton, ON (Canada)); Friedman, L. (Dept. of Radiology, McMaster Univ. Medical Centre, Hamilton, ON (Canada)); Yuen, M. (Dept. of Radiology, McMaster Univ. Medical Centre, Hamilton, ON (Canada))

    1994-07-01

    A 2-year-old black boy with focal fibrocartilaginous dysplasia is described with illustrations of the typical radiographic appearances supplemented by computed tomographic and magnetic resonance images. Since this rare condition is self-correcting, diagnosis is important so that surgical intervention and biopsy can be avoided and conservative management instituted. (orig.)

  4. Computational physics an introduction to Monte Carlo simulations of matrix field theory

    Ydri, Badis

    2017-01-01

    This book is divided into two parts. In the first part we give an elementary introduction to computational physics consisting of 21 simulations which originated from a formal course of lectures and laboratory simulations delivered since 2010 to physics students at Annaba University. The second part is much more advanced and deals with the problem of how to set up working Monte Carlo simulations of matrix field theories which involve finite dimensional matrix regularizations of noncommutative and fuzzy field theories, fuzzy spaces and matrix geometry. The study of matrix field theory in its own right has also become very important to the proper understanding of all noncommutative, fuzzy and matrix phenomena. The second part, which consists of 9 simulations, was delivered informally to doctoral students who are working on various problems in matrix field theory. Sample codes as well as sample key solutions are also provided for convenience and completness. An appendix containing an executive arabic summary of t...

  5. Computation of 3-D magnetostatic fields using a reduced scalar potential

    Biro, O.; Preis, K.; Vrisk, G.; Richter, K.R.

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents some improvements to the finite element computation of static magnetic fields in three dimensions using a reduced magnetic scalar potential. New methods are described for obtaining an edge element representation of the rotational part of the magnetic field from a given source current distribution. In the case when the current distribution is not known in advance, a boundary value problem is set up in terms of a current vector potential. An edge element representation of the solution can be directly used in the subsequent magnetostatic calculation. The magnetic field in a D.C. arc furnace is calculated by first determining the current distribution in terms of a current vector potential. A three dimensional problem involving a permanent magnet as well as a coil is solved and the magnetic field in some points is compared with measurement results

  6. Computational Model Prediction and Biological Validation Using Simplified Mixed Field Exposures for the Development of a GCR Reference Field

    Hada, M.; Rhone, J.; Beitman, A.; Saganti, P.; Plante, I.; Ponomarev, A.; Slaba, T.; Patel, Z.

    2018-01-01

    The yield of chromosomal aberrations has been shown to increase in the lymphocytes of astronauts after long-duration missions of several months in space. Chromosome exchanges, especially translocations, are positively correlated with many cancers and are therefore a potential biomarker of cancer risk associated with radiation exposure. Although extensive studies have been carried out on the induction of chromosomal aberrations by low- and high-LET radiation in human lymphocytes, fibroblasts, and epithelial cells exposed in vitro, there is a lack of data on chromosome aberrations induced by low dose-rate chronic exposure and mixed field beams such as those expected in space. Chromosome aberration studies at NSRL will provide the biological validation needed to extend the computational models over a broader range of experimental conditions (more complicated mixed fields leading up to the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) simulator), helping to reduce uncertainties in radiation quality effects and dose-rate dependence in cancer risk models. These models can then be used to answer some of the open questions regarding requirements for a full GCR reference field, including particle type and number, energy, dose rate, and delivery order. In this study, we designed a simplified mixed field beam with a combination of proton, helium, oxygen, and iron ions with shielding or proton, helium, oxygen, and titanium without shielding. Human fibroblasts cells were irradiated with these mixed field beam as well as each single beam with acute and chronic dose rate, and chromosome aberrations (CA) were measured with 3-color fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting methods. Frequency and type of CA induced with acute dose rate and chronic dose rates with single and mixed field beam will be discussed. A computational chromosome and radiation-induced DNA damage model, BDSTRACKS (Biological Damage by Stochastic Tracks), was updated to simulate various types of CA induced by

  7. Reservoir computer predictions for the Three Meter magnetic field time evolution

    Perevalov, A.; Rojas, R.; Lathrop, D. P.; Shani, I.; Hunt, B. R.

    2017-12-01

    The source of the Earth's magnetic field is the turbulent flow of liquid metal in the outer core. Our experiment's goal is to create Earth-like dynamo, to explore the mechanisms and to understand the dynamics of the magnetic and velocity fields. Since it is a complicated system, predictions of the magnetic field is a challenging problem. We present results of mimicking the three Meter experiment by a reservoir computer deep learning algorithm. The experiment is a three-meter diameter outer sphere and a one-meter diameter inner sphere with the gap filled with liquid sodium. The spheres can rotate up to 4 and 14 Hz respectively, giving a Reynolds number near to 108. Two external electromagnets apply magnetic fields, while an array of 31 external and 2 internal Hall sensors measure the resulting induced fields. We use this magnetic probe data to train a reservoir computer to predict the 3M time evolution and mimic waves in the experiment. Surprisingly accurate predictions can be made for several magnetic dipole time scales. This shows that such a complicated MHD system's behavior can be predicted. We gratefully acknowledge support from NSF EAR-1417148.

  8. A singularity extraction technique for computation of antenna aperture fields from singular plane wave spectra

    Cappellin, Cecilia; Breinbjerg, Olav; Frandsen, Aksel

    2008-01-01

    An effective technique for extracting the singularity of plane wave spectra in the computation of antenna aperture fields is proposed. The singular spectrum is first factorized into a product of a finite function and a singular function. The finite function is inverse Fourier transformed...... numerically using the Inverse Fast Fourier Transform, while the singular function is inverse Fourier transformed analytically, using the Weyl-identity, and the two resulting spatial functions are then convolved to produce the antenna aperture field. This article formulates the theory of the singularity...

  9. Parallel computation of electrostatic potentials and fields in technical geometries on SUPRENUM

    Alef, M.

    1990-02-01

    The programs EPOTZR und EFLDZR have been developed in order to compute electrostatic potentials and the corresponding fields in technical geometries (example: Diode geometry for optimum focussing of ion beams in pulsed high-current ion diodes). The Poisson equation is discretized in a two-dimensional boundary-fitted grid in the (r,z)-plane and solved using multigrid methods. The z- and r-components of the field are determined by numerical differentiation of the potential. This report contains the user's guide of the SUPRENUM versions EPOTZR-P and EFLDZR-P. (orig./HP) [de

  10. An efficient approach for computing the geometrical optics field reflected from a numerically specified surface

    Mittra, R.; Rushdi, A.

    1979-01-01

    An approach for computing the geometrical optic fields reflected from a numerically specified surface is presented. The approach includes the step of deriving a specular point and begins with computing the reflected rays off the surface at the points where their coordinates, as well as the partial derivatives (or equivalently, the direction of the normal), are numerically specified. Then, a cluster of three adjacent rays are chosen to define a 'mean ray' and the divergence factor associated with this mean ray. Finally, the ampilitude, phase, and vector direction of the reflected field at a given observation point are derived by associating this point with the nearest mean ray and determining its position relative to such a ray.

  11. Think different: applying the old macintosh mantra to the computability of the SUSY auxiliary field problem

    Calkins, Mathew; Gates, D.E.A.; Gates, S. James Jr. [Center for String and Particle Theory, Department of Physics, University of Maryland,College Park, MD 20742-4111 (United States); Golding, William M. [Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate, US Army Research Laboratory,Adelphi, Maryland 20783 (United States)

    2015-04-13

    Starting with valise supermultiplets obtained from 0-branes plus field redefinitions, valise adinkra networks, and the “Garden Algebra,” we discuss an architecture for algorithms that (starting from on-shell theories and, through a well-defined computation procedure), search for off-shell completions. We show in one dimension how to directly attack the notorious “off-shell auxiliary field” problem of supersymmetry with algorithms in the adinkra network-world formulation.

  12. Computational model for superconducting toroidal-field magnets for a tokamak reactor

    Turner, L.R.; Abdou, M.A.

    1978-01-01

    A computational model for predicting the performance characteristics and cost of superconducting toroidal-field (TF) magnets in tokamak reactors is presented. The model can be used to compare the technical and economic merits of different approaches to the design of TF magnets for a reactor system. The model has been integrated into the ANL Systems Analysis Program. Samples of results obtainable with the model are presented

  13. Computation of Galois field expressions for quaternary logic functions on GPUs

    Gajić Dušan B.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Galois field (GF expressions are polynomials used as representations of multiple-valued logic (MVL functions. For this purpose, MVL functions are considered as functions defined over a finite (Galois field of order p - GF(p. The problem of computing these functional expressions has an important role in areas such as digital signal processing and logic design. Time needed for computing GF-expressions increases exponentially with the number of variables in MVL functions and, as a result, it often represents a limiting factor in applications. This paper proposes a method for an accelerated computation of GF(4-expressions for quaternary (four-valued logic functions using graphics processing units (GPUs. The method is based on the spectral interpretation of GF-expressions, permitting the use of fast Fourier transform (FFT-like algorithms for their computation. These algorithms are then adapted for highly parallel processing on GPUs. The performance of the proposed solutions is compared with referent C/C++ implementations of the same algorithms processed on central processing units (CPUs. Experimental results confirm that the presented approach leads to significant reduction in processing times (up to 10.86 times when compared to CPU processing. Therefore, the proposed approach widens the set of problem instances which can be efficiently handled in practice. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ON174026 i br. III44006

  14. An emergency computation model for the wind field and diffusion during accidental nuclear pollutants releases

    Yoshikawa, T.; Kimura, F.; Koide, T.; Kurita, S.

    1990-01-01

    Since 1986, a simple computation model for a nuclear accident has been operating in the emergency information center of Japan Agency for Science and Technology. It was developed by introducing the variation method for wind and a random walk particle model for diffusion in 50-100 km scale. Furthermore, we developed a new model with dynamic equations and a diffusion equation to predict more accurately the wind and diffusion, including local thermal convection. The momentum equation and the continuity equation are solved numerically in nonhydrostatic and incompressible conditions, using a finite difference technique. Then, the equation of thermal energy preservation is solved for potential temperature in the predicted wind field of every time step. The diffusion of nuclear pollutants is computed numerically in the predicted wind field, using diffusion coefficients obtained from the predictive dynamic equations. These computations were verified with meteorological surveys and gas tracer diffusion experiments over flat land, along a sea shore and over a mountainous area. Horizontal circulations and vertical convections can be computed in any mesh size from several tens of meters to several kilometers, while small vertical convections less than 1 km or so cannot be represented with the former hydrostatic circulation models. (author)

  15. Data processing system with a micro-computer for high magnetic field tokamak, TRIAM-1

    Kawasaki, Shoji; Nakamura, Kazuo; Nakamura, Yukio; Hiraki, Naoharu; Toi, Kazuo

    1981-01-01

    A data processing system was designed and constructed for the purpose of analyzing the data of the high magnetic field tokamak TRIAM-1. The system consists of a 10-channel A-D converter, a 20 K byte memory (RAM), an address bus control circuit, a data bus control circuit, a timing pulse and control signal generator, a D-A converter, a micro-computer, and a power source. The memory can be used as a CPU memory except at the time of sampling and data output. The out-put devices of the system are an X-Y recorder and an oscilloscope. The computer is composed of a CPU, a memory and an I/O part. The memory size can be extended. A cassette tape recorder is provided to keep the programs of the computer. An interface circuit between the computer and the tape recorder was designed and constructed. An electric discharge printer as an I/O device can be connected. From TRIAM-1, the signals of magnetic probes, plasma current, vertical field coil current, and one-turn loop voltage are fed into the processing system. The plasma displacement calculated from these signals is shown by one of I/O devices. The results of test run showed good performance. (Kato, T.)

  16. Data processing system with a micro-computer for high magnetic field tokamak, TRIAM-1

    Kawasaki, S; Nakamura, K; Nakamura, Y; Hiraki, N; Toi, K [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1981-02-01

    A data processing system was designed and constructed for the purpose of analyzing the data of the high magnetic field tokamak TRIAM-1. The system consists of a 10-channel A-D converter, a 20 K byte memory (RAM), an address bus control circuit, a data bus control circuit, a timing pulse and control signal generator, a D-A converter, a micro-computer, and a power source. The memory can be used as a CPU memory except at the time of sampling and data output. The out-put devices of the system are an X-Y recorder and an oscilloscope. The computer is composed of a CPU, a memory and an I/O part. The memory size can be extended. A cassette tape recorder is provided to keep the programs of the computer. An interface circuit between the computer and the tape recorder was designed and constructed. An electric discharge printer as an I/O device can be connected. From TRIAM-1, the signals of magnetic probes, plasma current, vertical field coil current, and one-turn loop voltage are fed into the processing system. The plasma displacement calculated from these signals is shown by one of I/O devices. The results of test run showed good performance.

  17. Apps for Angiosperms: The Usability of Mobile Computers and Printed Field Guides for UK Wild Flower and Winter Tree Identification

    Stagg, Bethan C.; Donkin, Maria E.

    2017-01-01

    We investigated usability of mobile computers and field guide books with adult botanical novices, for the identification of wildflowers and deciduous trees in winter. Identification accuracy was significantly higher for wildflowers using a mobile computer app than field guide books but significantly lower for deciduous trees. User preference…

  18. A computational study of the near-field generation and decay of wingtip vortices

    Craft, T.J.; Gerasimov, A.V.; Launder, B.E.; Robinson, C.M.E.

    2006-01-01

    The numerical prediction of the downstream trailing vortex shed from an aircraft wingtip is a particularly challenging CFD task because, besides predicting the development of the strong vortex itself, one needs to compute accurately the flow over the wing to resolve the boundary layer roll-up and shedding which provide the initial conditions for the free vortex. Computations are here reported of the flow over a NACA 0012 half-wing with rounded wing tip and the near-field wake as measured by [Chow, J.S., Zilliac, G., Bradshaw, P., 1997. Turbulence measurements in the near-field of a wingtip vortex. NASA Tech Mem 110418, NASA.]. The aim is to assess the performance of two turbulence models which, in principle, might be seen as capable of resolving both the three dimensional boundary layer on the wing and the generation and near-field decay of the strongly accelerated vortex that develops from the wingtip. Results using linear and non-linear eddy-viscosity models are presented, but these both exhibit a far too rapid decay of the vortex core. Only a stress-transport (or second-moment) model that satisfies the 'two-component limit', [Lumley, J.L., 1978. Computational modelling of turbulent flows. Adv. Appl. Mech. 18, 123-176.], reproduces the principal features found in the experimental measurements

  19. Magnetic-resonance-guided biopsy of focal liver lesions

    Smith, Ethan A. [University of Michigan Health System, Section of Pediatric Radiology, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Grove, Jason J. [University of Michigan Health System, Division of Interventional Radiology, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Der Spek, Abraham F.L.V. [University of Michigan Health System, Department of Anesthesiology, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Jarboe, Marcus D. [University of Michigan Health System, Division of Interventional Radiology, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); University of Michigan Health System, Section of Pediatric Surgery, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Surgery, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Image-guided biopsy techniques are widely used in clinical practice. Commonly used methods employ either ultrasound (US) or computed tomography (CT) for image guidance. In certain patients, US or CT guidance may be suboptimal, or even impossible, because of artifacts, suboptimal lesion visualization, or both. We recently began performing magnetic resonance (MR)-guided biopsy of focal liver lesions in select pediatric patients with lesions that are not well visualized by US or CT. This report describes our experience performing MR-guided biopsy of focal liver lesions, with case examples to illustrate innovative techniques and novel aspects of these procedures. (orig.)

  20. Incidental Detection of Temporary Focal FDG Retention in the Spleen

    Park, Youn Joon; Lee, Jai Hyuen; Jee, Keum Nahn; Namgung, Hwan [Dankook Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    F 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) is a valuable tool in discriminating malignancy from benign lesion. But because various false positive results reduce the diagnostic specificity, nuclear medicine physicians should be familiar with possible false positive cases. Although many cases of high FDG uptake mimicking malignancy have been reported, temporary intense focal FDG uptake of normal spleen has not been reported previously. We report herein a phenomenon of temporary intense focal FDG uptake of normal spleen without evidence of metastasis in a 46 year old woman with a history of anal cancer.

  1. Removing defocused objects from single focal plane scans of cytological slides

    David Friedrich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Virtual microscopy and automated processing of cytological slides are more challenging compared to histological slides. Since cytological slides exhibit a three-dimensional surface and the required microscope objectives with high resolution have a low depth of field, these cannot capture all objects of a single field of view in focus. One solution would be to scan multiple focal planes; however, the increase in processing time and storage requirements are often prohibitive for clinical routine. Materials and Methods: In this paper, we show that it is a reasonable trade-off to scan a single focal plane and automatically reject defocused objects from the analysis. To this end, we have developed machine learning solutions for the automated identification of defocused objects. Our approach includes creating novel features, systematically optimizing their parameters, selecting adequate classifier algorithms, and identifying the correct decision boundary between focused and defocused objects. We validated our approach for computer-assisted DNA image cytometry. Results and Conclusions: We reach an overall sensitivity of 96.08% and a specificity of 99.63% for identifying defocused objects. Applied on ninety cytological slides, the developed classifiers automatically removed 2.50% of the objects acquired during scanning, which otherwise would have interfered the examination. Even if not all objects are acquired in focus, computer-assisted DNA image cytometry still identified more diagnostically or prognostically relevant objects compared to manual DNA image cytometry. At the same time, the workload for the expert is reduced dramatically.

  2. Look back and look forward to the future of computer applications in the field of nuclear science and technology

    Yang Yanming; Dai Guiling

    1988-01-01

    All previous National Conferences on computer application in the field of nuclear science and technology sponsored by the Society of Nuclear Electronics and Detection Technology are reviewed. Surveys are geiven on the basic situations and technique levels of computer applications for each time period. Some points concerning possible developments of computer techniques are given as well

  3. Laparoscopic Partial Hepatectomy of Focal Nodular Hyperplasia

    Mayu Sakata

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Focal nodular hyperplasia is a benign liver lesion incidentally discovered with increasing frequency because of the proliferation of imaging studies. Radiographic characterization can diagnose this pathologic lesion and nonoperative therapy is the standard of care. However, surgical resection may be required for diagnostic reasons or symptomatic patients. Depending on the anatomic location of the lesion, biopsy and/or resection can be performed laparoscopically. We herein report the case of a 26-year-old Japanese woman with a hepatic tumor who required a medical examination. Her medical history was negative for alcohol abuse, oral contraceptive administration and trauma. Clinical examination showed no significant symptoms. Ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed a mass located in the left lateral segment of the liver with a diameter of about 40 mm. It was difficult to diagnose the tumor definitively from these imaging studies, so we performed laparoscopic partial hepatectomy with successive firing of endoscopic staplers. The histopathological diagnosis was focal nodular hyperplasia. Surgical procedures and postoperative course were uneventful and the patient was discharged from the hospital on postoperative day 5.

  4. On the computation of the demagnetization tensor field for an arbitrary particle shape using a Fourier space approach

    Beleggia, M.; Graef, M. de

    2003-01-01

    A method is presented to compute the demagnetization tensor field for uniformly magnetized particles of arbitrary shape. By means of a Fourier space approach it is possible to compute analytically the Fourier representation of the demagnetization tensor field for a given shape. Then, specifying the direction of the uniform magnetization, the demagnetizing field and the magnetostatic energy associated with the particle can be evaluated. In some particular cases, the real space representation is computable analytically. In general, a numerical inverse fast Fourier transform is required to perform the inversion. As an example, the demagnetization tensor field for the tetrahedron will be given

  5. Computation of Electromagnetic Fields Scattered From Dielectric Objects of Uncertain Shapes Using MLMC Center for Uncertainty

    Litvinenko, Alexander

    2015-01-05

    Simulators capable of computing scattered fields from objects of uncertain shapes are highly useful in electromagnetics and photonics, where device designs are typically subject to fabrication tolerances. Knowledge of statistical variations in scattered fields is useful in ensuring error-free functioning of devices. Oftentimes such simulators use a Monte Carlo (MC) scheme to sample the random domain, where the variables parameterize the uncertainties in the geometry. At each sample, which corresponds to a realization of the geometry, a deterministic electromagnetic solver is executed to compute the scattered fields. However, to obtain accurate statistics of the scattered fields, the number of MC samples has to be large. This significantly increases the total execution time. In this work, to address this challenge, the Multilevel MC (MLMC) scheme is used together with a (deterministic) surface integral equation solver. The MLMC achieves a higher efficiency by “balancing” the statistical errors due to sampling of the random domain and the numerical errors due to discretization of the geometry at each of these samples. Error balancing results in a smaller number of samples requiring coarser discretizations. Consequently, total execution time is significantly shortened.

  6. Computation of Electromagnetic Fields Scattered From Dielectric Objects of Uncertain Shapes Using MLMC

    Litvinenko, Alexander

    2016-01-06

    Simulators capable of computing scattered fields from objects of uncertain shapes are highly useful in electromagnetics and photonics, where device designs are typically subject to fabrication tolerances. Knowledge of statistical variations in scattered fields is useful in ensuring error-free functioning of devices. Oftentimes such simulators use a Monte Carlo (MC) scheme to sample the random domain, where the variables parameterize the uncertainties in the geometry. At each sample, which corresponds to a realization of the geometry, a deterministic electromagnetic solver is executed to compute the scattered fields. However, to obtain accurate statistics of the scattered fields, the number of MC samples has to be large. This significantly increases the total execution time. In this work, to address this challenge, the Multilevel MC (MLMC [1]) scheme is used together with a (deterministic) surface integral equation solver. The MLMC achieves a higher efficiency by balancing the statistical errors due to sampling of the random domain and the numerical errors due to discretization of the geometry at each of these samples. Error balancing results in a smaller number of samples requiring coarser discretizations. Consequently, total execution time is significantly shortened.

  7. Computation of Electromagnetic Fields Scattered From Dielectric Objects of Uncertain Shapes Using MLMC

    Litvinenko, Alexander

    2015-01-07

    Simulators capable of computing scattered fields from objects of uncertain shapes are highly useful in electromagnetics and photonics, where device designs are typically subject to fabrication tolerances. Knowledge of statistical variations in scattered fields is useful in ensuring error-free functioning of devices. Oftentimes such simulators use a Monte Carlo (MC) scheme to sample the random domain, where the variables parameterize the uncertainties in the geometry. At each sample, which corresponds to a realization of the geometry, a deterministic electromagnetic solver is executed to compute the scattered fields. However, to obtain accurate statistics of the scattered fields, the number of MC samples has to be large. This significantly increases the total execution time. In this work, to address this challenge, the Multilevel MC (MLMC [1]) scheme is used together with a (deterministic) surface integral equation solver. The MLMC achieves a higher efficiency by “balancing” the statistical errors due to sampling of the random domain and the numerical errors due to discretization of the geometry at each of these samples. Error balancing results in a smaller number of samples requiring coarser discretizations. Consequently, total execution time is significantly shortened.

  8. [Focal myositis: An unknown disease].

    Gallay, L; Streichenberger, N; Benveniste, O; Allenbach, Y

    2017-10-01

    Focal myositis are inflammatory muscle diseases of unknown origin. At the opposite from the other idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, they are restricted to a single muscle or to a muscle group. They are not associated with extramuscular manifestations, and they have a good prognosis without any treatment. They are characterized by a localized swelling affecting mostly lower limbs. The pseudo-tumor can be painful, but is not associated with a muscle weakness. Creatine kinase level is normal. Muscle MRI shows an inflammation restricted to a muscle or a muscle group. Muscle biopsy and pathological analysis remain necessary for the diagnosis, showing inflammatory infiltrates composed by macrophages and lymphocytes without any specific distribution within the muscle. Focal overexpression of HLA-1 by the muscle fibers is frequently observed. The muscle biopsy permits to rule out differential diagnosis such a malignancy (sarcoma). Spontaneous remission occurs within weeks or months after the first symptoms, relapse is unusual. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  9. Developing a framework for assessing muscle effort and postures during computer work in the field: The effect of computer activities on neck/shoulder muscle effort and postures

    Garza, J.L.B.; Eijckelhof, B.H.W.; Johnson, P.W.; Raina, S.M.; Rynell, P.; Huysmans, M.A.; Dieën, J.H. van; Beek, A.J. van der; Blatter, B.M.; Dennerlein, J.T.

    2012-01-01

    The present study, a part of the PROOF (PRedicting Occupational biomechanics in OFfice workers) study, aimed to determine whether trapezius muscle effort was different across computer activities in a field study of computer workers, and also investigated whether head and shoulder postures were

  10. Developing a framework for assessing muscle effort and postures during computer work in the field: the effect of computer activities on neck/shoulder muscle effort and postures

    Bruno-Garza, J.L.; Eijckelhof, B.H.W.; Johnson, P.W.; Raina, S.M.; Rynell, P.; Huijsmans, M.A.; van Dieen, J.H.; van der Beek, A.J.; Blatter, B.M.; Dennerlein, J.T.

    2012-01-01

    The present study, a part of the PROOF (PRedicting Occupational biomechanics in OFfice workers) study, aimed to determine whether trapezius muscle effort was different across computer activities in a field study of computer workers, and also investigated whether head and shoulder postures were

  11. Computation and analysis of backward ray-tracing in aero-optics flow fields.

    Xu, Liang; Xue, Deting; Lv, Xiaoyi

    2018-01-08

    A backward ray-tracing method is proposed for aero-optics simulation. Different from forward tracing, the backward tracing direction is from the internal sensor to the distant target. Along this direction, the tracing in turn goes through the internal gas region, the aero-optics flow field, and the freestream. The coordinate value, the density, and the refractive index are calculated at each tracing step. A stopping criterion is developed to ensure the tracing stops at the outer edge of the aero-optics flow field. As a demonstration, the analysis is carried out for a typical blunt nosed vehicle. The backward tracing method and stopping criterion greatly simplify the ray-tracing computations in the aero-optics flow field, and they can be extended to our active laser illumination aero-optics study because of the reciprocity principle.

  12. Multi-GPU Jacobian accelerated computing for soft-field tomography

    Borsic, A; Attardo, E A; Halter, R J

    2012-01-01

    Image reconstruction in soft-field tomography is based on an inverse problem formulation, where a forward model is fitted to the data. In medical applications, where the anatomy presents complex shapes, it is common to use finite element models (FEMs) to represent the volume of interest and solve a partial differential equation that models the physics of the system. Over the last decade, there has been a shifting interest from 2D modeling to 3D modeling, as the underlying physics of most problems are 3D. Although the increased computational power of modern computers allows working with much larger FEM models, the computational time required to reconstruct 3D images on a fine 3D FEM model can be significant, on the order of hours. For example, in electrical impedance tomography (EIT) applications using a dense 3D FEM mesh with half a million elements, a single reconstruction iteration takes approximately 15–20 min with optimized routines running on a modern multi-core PC. It is desirable to accelerate image reconstruction to enable researchers to more easily and rapidly explore data and reconstruction parameters. Furthermore, providing high-speed reconstructions is essential for some promising clinical application of EIT. For 3D problems, 70% of the computing time is spent building the Jacobian matrix, and 25% of the time in forward solving. In this work, we focus on accelerating the Jacobian computation by using single and multiple GPUs. First, we discuss an optimized implementation on a modern multi-core PC architecture and show how computing time is bounded by the CPU-to-memory bandwidth; this factor limits the rate at which data can be fetched by the CPU. Gains associated with the use of multiple CPU cores are minimal, since data operands cannot be fetched fast enough to saturate the processing power of even a single CPU core. GPUs have much faster memory bandwidths compared to CPUs and better parallelism. We are able to obtain acceleration factors of 20 times

  13. Multi-GPU Jacobian accelerated computing for soft-field tomography.

    Borsic, A; Attardo, E A; Halter, R J

    2012-10-01

    Image reconstruction in soft-field tomography is based on an inverse problem formulation, where a forward model is fitted to the data. In medical applications, where the anatomy presents complex shapes, it is common to use finite element models (FEMs) to represent the volume of interest and solve a partial differential equation that models the physics of the system. Over the last decade, there has been a shifting interest from 2D modeling to 3D modeling, as the underlying physics of most problems are 3D. Although the increased computational power of modern computers allows working with much larger FEM models, the computational time required to reconstruct 3D images on a fine 3D FEM model can be significant, on the order of hours. For example, in electrical impedance tomography (EIT) applications using a dense 3D FEM mesh with half a million elements, a single reconstruction iteration takes approximately 15-20 min with optimized routines running on a modern multi-core PC. It is desirable to accelerate image reconstruction to enable researchers to more easily and rapidly explore data and reconstruction parameters. Furthermore, providing high-speed reconstructions is essential for some promising clinical application of EIT. For 3D problems, 70% of the computing time is spent building the Jacobian matrix, and 25% of the time in forward solving. In this work, we focus on accelerating the Jacobian computation by using single and multiple GPUs. First, we discuss an optimized implementation on a modern multi-core PC architecture and show how computing time is bounded by the CPU-to-memory bandwidth; this factor limits the rate at which data can be fetched by the CPU. Gains associated with the use of multiple CPU cores are minimal, since data operands cannot be fetched fast enough to saturate the processing power of even a single CPU core. GPUs have much faster memory bandwidths compared to CPUs and better parallelism. We are able to obtain acceleration factors of 20

  14. A novel method for computation of the discrete Fourier transform over characteristic two finite field of even extension degree

    Fedorenko, Sergei V.

    2011-01-01

    A novel method for computation of the discrete Fourier transform over a finite field with reduced multiplicative complexity is described. If the number of multiplications is to be minimized, then the novel method for the finite field of even extension degree is the best known method of the discrete Fourier transform computation. A constructive method of constructing for a cyclic convolution over a finite field is introduced.

  15. Rotational control of computer generated holograms.

    Preece, Daryl; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2017-11-15

    We develop a basis for three-dimensional rotation of arbitrary light fields created by computer generated holograms. By adding an extra phase function into the kinoform, any light field or holographic image can be tilted in the focal plane with minimized distortion. We present two different approaches to rotate an arbitrary hologram: the Scheimpflug method and a novel coordinate transformation method. Experimental results are presented to demonstrate the validity of both proposed methods.

  16. Focal cortical dysplasia – review

    Kabat, Joanna; Król, Przemysław

    2012-01-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia is a malformation of cortical development, which is the most common cause of medically refractory epilepsy in the pediatric population and the second/third most common etiology of medically intractable seizures in adults. Both genetic and acquired factors are involved in the pathogenesis of cortical dysplasia. Numerous classifications of the complex structural abnormalities of focal cortical dysplasia have been proposed – from Taylor et al. in 1971 to the last modification of Palmini classification made by Blumcke in 2011. In general, three types of cortical dysplasia are recognized. Type I focal cortical dysplasia with mild symptomatic expression and late onset, is more often seen in adults, with changes present in the temporal lobe. Clinical symptoms are more severe in type II of cortical dysplasia usually seen in children. In this type, more extensive changes occur outside the temporal lobe with predilection for the frontal lobes. New type III is one of the above dysplasias with associated another principal lesion as hippocampal sclerosis, tumor, vascular malformation or acquired pathology during early life. Brain MRI imaging shows abnormalities in the majority of type II dysplasias and in only some of type I cortical dysplasias. The most common findings on MRI imaging include: focal cortical thickening or thinning, areas of focal brain atrophy, blurring of the gray-white junction, increased signal on T2- and FLAIR-weighted images in the gray and subcortical white matter often tapering toward the ventricle. On the basis of the MRI findings, it is possible to differentiate between type I and type II cortical dysplasia. A complete resection of the epileptogenic zone is required for seizure-free life. MRI imaging is very helpful to identify those patients who are likely to benefit from surgical treatment in a group of patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. However, in type I cortical dysplasia, MR imaging is often normal, and also in both

  17. Ultrasound elastographic techniques in focal liver lesions.

    Conti, Clara Benedetta; Cavalcoli, Federica; Fraquelli, Mirella; Conte, Dario; Massironi, Sara

    2016-03-07

    Elastographic techniques are new ultrasound-based imaging techniques developed to estimate tissue deformability/stiffness. Several ultrasound elastographic approaches have been developed, such as static elastography, transient elastography and acoustic radiation force imaging methods, which include point shear wave and shear wave imaging elastography. The application of these methods in clinical practice aims at estimating the mechanical tissues properties. One of the main settings for the application of these tools has been liver stiffness assessment in chronic liver disease, which has been studied mainly using transient elastography. Another field of application for these techniques is the assessment of focal lesions, detected by ultrasound in organs such as pancreas, prostate, breast, thyroid, lymph nodes. Considering the frequency and importance of the detection of focal liver lesions through routine ultrasound, some studies have also aimed to assess the role that elestography can play in studying the stiffness of different types of liver lesions, in order to predict their nature and thus offer valuable non-invasive methods for the diagnosis of liver masses.

  18. Structure of receptive fields in a computational model of area 3b of primary sensory cortex.

    Detorakis, Georgios Is; Rougier, Nicolas P

    2014-01-01

    In a previous work, we introduced a computational model of area 3b which is built upon the neural field theory and receives input from a simplified model of the index distal finger pad populated by a random set of touch receptors (Merkell cells). This model has been shown to be able to self-organize following the random stimulation of the finger pad model and to cope, to some extent, with cortical or skin lesions. The main hypothesis of the model is that learning of skin representations occurs at the thalamo-cortical level while cortico-cortical connections serve a stereotyped competition mechanism that shapes the receptive fields. To further assess this hypothesis and the validity of the model, we reproduced in this article the exact experimental protocol of DiCarlo et al. that has been used to examine the structure of receptive fields in area 3b of the primary somatosensory cortex. Using the same analysis toolset, the model yields consistent results, having most of the receptive fields to contain a single region of excitation and one to several regions of inhibition. We further proceeded our study using a dynamic competition that deeply influences the formation of the receptive fields. We hypothesized this dynamic competition to correspond to some form of somatosensory attention that may help to precisely shape the receptive fields. To test this hypothesis, we designed a protocol where an arbitrary region of interest is delineated on the index distal finger pad and we either (1) instructed explicitly the model to attend to this region (simulating an attentional signal) (2) preferentially trained the model on this region or (3) combined the two aforementioned protocols simultaneously. Results tend to confirm that dynamic competition leads to shrunken receptive fields and its joint interaction with intensive training promotes a massive receptive fields migration and shrinkage.

  19. Structure of Receptive Fields in a Computational Model of Area 3b of Primary Sensory Cortex

    Georgios eDetorakis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In a previous work, we introduced a computational model of area 3b which is built upon the neural field theory and receives input from a simplified model of the index distal finger pad populated by a random set of touch receptors(Merkell cells. This model has been shown to be able to self-organize following the random stimulation of the finger pad model and to cope, to some extent, with cortical or skin lesions. The main hypothesis of the model is that learning of skin representations occurs at the thalamo-cortical level while cortico-cortical connections serve a stereotyped competition mechanism that shapes the receptive fields. To further assess this hypothesis and the validity of the model, we reproduced in this article the exact experimental protocol of DiCarlo et al. that has been used to examine the structure of receptive fields in area 3b of the primary somatosensory cortex. Using the same analysis toolset, the model yields consistent results, having most of the receptive fields to contain a single region of excitation and one to severalregions of inhibition. We further proceeded our study using a dynamic competition that deeply influences the formation of the receptive fields. We hypothesized this dynamic competition to correspond to some form of somatosensory attention that may help to precisely shape the receptive fields. To test this hypothesis, we designed a protocol where an arbitrary region of interest is delineated on the index distal finger pad and we either (1 instructed explicitly the model to attend to this region (simulating an attentional signal (2 preferentially trained the model on this region or (3combined the two aforementioned protocols simultaneously. Results tend to confirm that dynamic competition leads to shrunken receptive fields and its joint interaction with intensive training promotes a massive receptive fields migration and shrinkage.

  20. Portable, remotely operated, computer-controlled, quadrupole mass spectrometer for field use

    Friesen, R.D.; Newton, J.C.; Smith, C.F.

    1982-04-01

    A portable, remote-controlled mass spectrometer was required at the Nevada Test Site to analyze prompt post-event gas from the nuclear cavity in support of the underground testing program. A Balzers QMG-511 quadrupole was chosen for its ability to be interfaced to a DEC LSI-11 computer and to withstand the ground movement caused by this field environment. The inlet system valves, the pumps, the pressure and temperature transducers, and the quadrupole mass spectrometer are controlled by a read-only-memory-based DEC LSI-11/2 with a high-speed microwave link to the control point which is typically 30 miles away. The computer at the control point is a DEC LSI-11/23 running the RSX-11 operating system. The instrument was automated as much as possible because the system is run by inexperienced operators at times. The mass spectrometer has been used on an initial field event with excellent performance. The gas analysis system is described, including automation by a novel computer control method which reduces operator errors and allows dynamic access to the system parameters

  1. Infrared detectors and focal plane arrays; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 18, 19, 1990

    Dereniak, Eustace L.; Sampson, Robert E.

    1990-09-01

    The papers contained in this volume provide an overview of recent advances and the current state of developments in the field of infrared detectors and focal plane arrays. Topics discussed include nickel silicide Schottky-barrier detectors for short-wavelength infrared applications; high performance PtSi linear and focal plane arrays; and multispectral band Schottky-barrier IRSSD for remote-sensing applications. Papers are also presented on the performance of an Insi hybrid focal array; characterization of IR focal plane test stations; GaAs CCD readout for engineered bandgap detectors; and fire detection system for aircraft cargo bays.

  2. Field computation for two-dimensional array transducers with limited diffraction array beams.

    Lu, Jian-Yu; Cheng, Jiqi

    2005-10-01

    A method is developed for calculating fields produced with a two-dimensional (2D) array transducer. This method decomposes an arbitrary 2D aperture weighting function into a set of limited diffraction array beams. Using the analytical expressions of limited diffraction beams, arbitrary continuous wave (cw) or pulse wave (pw) fields of 2D arrays can be obtained with a simple superposition of these beams. In addition, this method can be simplified and applied to a 1D array transducer of a finite or infinite elevation height. For beams produced with axially symmetric aperture weighting functions, this method can be reduced to the Fourier-Bessel method studied previously where an annular array transducer can be used. The advantage of the method is that it is accurate and computationally efficient, especially in regions that are not far from the surface of the transducer (near field), where it is important for medical imaging. Both computer simulations and a synthetic array experiment are carried out to verify the method. Results (Bessel beam, focused Gaussian beam, X wave and asymmetric array beams) show that the method is accurate as compared to that using the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction formula and agrees well with the experiment.

  3. THE CHALLENGE OF THE PERFORMANCE CONCEPT WITHIN THE SUSTAINABILITY AND COMPUTATIONAL DESIGN FIELD

    Marcio Nisenbaum

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the notion of performance and its appropriation within the research fields related to sustainability and computational design, focusing on the design processes of the architectural and urban fields. Recently, terms such as “performance oriented design” or “performance driven architecture”, especially when related to sustainability, have been used by many authors and professionals as an attempt to engender project guidelines based on simulation processes and systematic use of digital tools. In this context, the notion of performance has basically been understood as the way in which an action is fulfilled, agreeing to contemporary discourses of efficiency and optimization – in this circumstance it is considered that a building or urban area “performs” if it fulfills certain objective sustainability evaluation criteria, reduced to mathematical parameters. This paper intends to broaden this understanding by exploring new theoretical interpretations, referring to etymological investigation, historical research, and literature review, based on authors from different areas and on the case study of the solar houses academic competition, Solar Decathlon. This initial analysis is expected to contribute to the emergence of new forms of interpretation of the performance concept, relativizing the notion of the “body” that “performs” in different manners, thus enhancing its appropriation and use within the fields of sustainability and computational design.

  4. Experimental and computational investigation of the NASA low-speed centrifugal compressor flow field

    Hathaway, Michael D.; Chriss, Randall M.; Wood, Jerry R.; Strazisar, Anthony J.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental and computational investigation of the NASA Lewis Research Center's low-speed centrifugal compressor (LSCC) flow field was conducted using laser anemometry and Dawes' three-dimensional viscous code. The experimental configuration consisted of a backswept impeller followed by a vaneless diffuser. Measurements of the three-dimensional velocity field were acquired at several measurement planes through the compressor. The measurements describe both the throughflow and secondary velocity field along each measurement plane. In several cases the measurements provide details of the flow within the blade boundary layers. Insight into the complex flow physics within centrifugal compressors is provided by the computational fluid dynamics analysis (CFD), and assessment of the CFD predictions is provided by comparison with the measurements. Five-hole probe and hot-wire surveys at the inlet and exit to the impeller as well as surface flow visualization along the impeller blade surfaces provided independent confirmation of the laser measurement technique. The results clearly document the development of the throughflow velocity wake that is characteristic of unshrouded centrifugal compressors.

  5. Application research of computational mass-transfer differential equation in MBR concentration field simulation.

    Li, Chunqing; Tie, Xiaobo; Liang, Kai; Ji, Chanjuan

    2016-01-01

    After conducting the intensive research on the distribution of fluid's velocity and biochemical reactions in the membrane bioreactor (MBR), this paper introduces the use of the mass-transfer differential equation to simulate the distribution of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentration in MBR membrane pool. The solutions are as follows: first, use computational fluid dynamics to establish a flow control equation model of the fluid in MBR membrane pool; second, calculate this model by adopting direct numerical simulation to get the velocity field of the fluid in membrane pool; third, combine the data of velocity field to establish mass-transfer differential equation model for the concentration field in MBR membrane pool, and use Seidel iteration method to solve the equation model; last but not least, substitute the real factory data into the velocity and concentration field model to calculate simulation results, and use visualization software Tecplot to display the results. Finally by analyzing the nephogram of COD concentration distribution, it can be found that the simulation result conforms the distribution rule of the COD's concentration in real membrane pool, and the mass-transfer phenomenon can be affected by the velocity field of the fluid in membrane pool. The simulation results of this paper have certain reference value for the design optimization of the real MBR system.

  6. Systems considerations in mosaic focal planes

    White, K. P., III

    1983-08-01

    Two key reasons for pursuing the development of mosaic focal planes are reviewed and it is shown that rapid frame repetition rate is the only requirement that can be solved no other way than through mosaic focal planes. With the view that spaceborne mosaic focal plane sensors are necessarily 'smart sensors' requiring a lot of onboard processing just to function, it is pointed out that various artificial intelligence techniques may be the most appropriate to incorporate in the data processing. Finally, a novel mosaic focal plane design is proposed, termed a virtual mosaic focal plane, in response to other system constraints.

  7. TRIM15 is a focal adhesion protein that regulates focal adhesion disassembly

    Uchil, Pradeep D.; Pawliczek, Tobias; Reynolds, Tracy D.; Ding, Siyuan; Hinz, Angelika; Munro, James B.; Huang, Fang; Floyd, Robert W.; Yang, Haitao; Hamilton, William L.; Bewersdorf, Joerg; Xiong, Yong; Calderwood, David A.; Mothes, Walther

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Focal adhesions are macromolecular complexes that connect the actin cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix. Dynamic turnover of focal adhesions is crucial for cell migration. Paxillin is a multi-adaptor protein that plays an important role in regulating focal adhesion dynamics. Here, we identify TRIM15, a member of the tripartite motif protein family, as a paxillin-interacting factor and a component of focal adhesions. TRIM15 localizes to focal contacts in a myosin-II-independent manner by an interaction between its coiled-coil domain and the LD2 motif of paxillin. Unlike other focal adhesion proteins, TRIM15 is a stable focal adhesion component with restricted mobility due to its ability to form oligomers. TRIM15-depleted cells display impaired cell migration and reduced focal adhesion disassembly rates, in addition to enlarged focal adhesions. Thus, our studies demonstrate a cellular function for TRIM15 as a regulatory component of focal adhesion turnover and cell migration. PMID:25015296

  8. Quantum perceptron over a field and neural network architecture selection in a quantum computer.

    da Silva, Adenilton José; Ludermir, Teresa Bernarda; de Oliveira, Wilson Rosa

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we propose a quantum neural network named quantum perceptron over a field (QPF). Quantum computers are not yet a reality and the models and algorithms proposed in this work cannot be simulated in actual (or classical) computers. QPF is a direct generalization of a classical perceptron and solves some drawbacks found in previous models of quantum perceptrons. We also present a learning algorithm named Superposition based Architecture Learning algorithm (SAL) that optimizes the neural network weights and architectures. SAL searches for the best architecture in a finite set of neural network architectures with linear time over the number of patterns in the training set. SAL is the first learning algorithm to determine neural network architectures in polynomial time. This speedup is obtained by the use of quantum parallelism and a non-linear quantum operator. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Computationally efficient near-field source localization using third-order moments

    Chen, Jian; Liu, Guohong; Sun, Xiaoying

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, a third-order moment-based estimation of signal parameters via rotational invariance techniques (ESPRIT) algorithm is proposed for passive localization of near-field sources. By properly choosing sensor outputs of the symmetric uniform linear array, two special third-order moment matrices are constructed, in which the steering matrix is the function of electric angle γ, while the rotational factor is the function of electric angles γ and ϕ. With the singular value decomposition (SVD) operation, all direction-of-arrivals (DOAs) are estimated from a polynomial rooting version. After substituting the DOA information into the steering matrix, the rotational factor is determined via the total least squares (TLS) version, and the related range estimations are performed. Compared with the high-order ESPRIT method, the proposed algorithm requires a lower computational burden, and it avoids the parameter-match procedure. Computer simulations are carried out to demonstrate the performance of the proposed algorithm.

  10. The Risks of Cloud Computing in Accounting Field and the Solution Offers: The Case of Turkey

    Serap Özdemir

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cloud is the system that maintains common information sharing among the information devices. It is known that there are always risks and that hundred per cent safety is not available in the environments of information technology. Service providers that operate in accounting sector and utilize the cloud technology are responsible for keeping and preserving the digital financial data that are vitally important for the companies. Service providers need to take all the necessary technical measures, so that the digital data are not damaged, lost and possessed by the malicious third parties. The establishments that provide service for accounting systems by utilizing the cloud computing opportunities in accounting field need to consider the general and co untry-specific risks of cloud computing technology. Therefore, they need to build the necessary technical infrastructure and models in order to run the system flawlessly and to preserve the digital data of the establishments in a secure environment.

  11. Approach and tool for computer animation of fields in electrical apparatus

    Miltchev, Radoslav; Yatchev, Ivan S.; Ritchie, Ewen

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents a technical approach and post-processing tool for creating and displaying computer animation. The approach enables handling of two- and three-dimensional physical field phenomena results obtained from finite element software or to display movement processes in electrical apparatus simulations. The main goal of this work is to extend auxiliary features built in general-purpose CAD software working in the Windows environment. Different storage techniques were examined and the one employing image capturing was chosen. The developed tool provides benefits of independent visualisation, creating scenarios and facilities for exporting animations in common file fon-nats for distribution on different computer platforms. It also provides a valuable educational tool.(Author)

  12. Focal depth measurement of scanning helium ion microscope

    Guo, Hongxuan; Itoh, Hiroshi; Wang, Chunmei; Zhang, Han; Fujita, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    When facing the challenges of critical dimension measurement of complicated nanostructures, such as of the three dimension integrated circuit, characterization of the focal depth of microscopes is important. In this Letter, we developed a method for characterizing the focal depth of a scanning helium ion microscope (HIM) by using an atomic force microscope tip characterizer (ATC). The ATC was tilted in a sample chamber at an angle to the scanning plan. Secondary electron images (SEIs) were obtained at different positions of the ATC. The edge resolution of the SEIs shows the nominal diameters of the helium ion beam at different focal levels. With this method, the nominal shapes of the helium ion beams were obtained with different apertures. Our results show that a small aperture is necessary to get a high spatial resolution and high depth of field images with HIM. This work provides a method for characterizing and improving the performance of HIM.

  13. Supplemental computational phantoms to estimate out-of-field absorbed dose in photon radiotherapy

    Gallagher, Kyle J.; Tannous, Jaad; Nabha, Racile; Feghali, Joelle Ann; Ayoub, Zeina; Jalbout, Wassim; Youssef, Bassem; Taddei, Phillip J.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a straightforward method of supplementing patient anatomy and estimating out-of-field absorbed dose for a cohort of pediatric radiotherapy patients with limited recorded anatomy. A cohort of nine children, aged 2-14 years, who received 3D conformal radiotherapy for low-grade localized brain tumors (LBTs), were randomly selected for this study. The extent of these patients’ computed tomography simulation image sets were cranial only. To approximate their missing anatomy, we supplemented the LBT patients’ image sets with computed tomography images of patients in a previous study with larger extents of matched sex, height, and mass and for whom contours of organs at risk for radiogenic cancer had already been delineated. Rigid fusion was performed between the LBT patients’ data and that of the supplemental computational phantoms using commercial software and in-house codes. In-field dose was calculated with a clinically commissioned treatment planning system, and out-of-field dose was estimated with a previously developed analytical model that was re-fit with parameters based on new measurements for intracranial radiotherapy. Mean doses greater than 1 Gy were found in the red bone marrow, remainder, thyroid, and skin of the patients in this study. Mean organ doses between 150 mGy and 1 Gy were observed in the breast tissue of the girls and lungs of all patients. Distant organs, i.e. prostate, bladder, uterus, and colon, received mean organ doses less than 150 mGy. The mean organ doses of the younger, smaller LBT patients (0-4 years old) were a factor of 2.4 greater than those of the older, larger patients (8-12 years old). Our findings demonstrated the feasibility of a straightforward method of applying supplemental computational phantoms and dose-calculation models to estimate absorbed dose for a set of children of various ages who received radiotherapy and for whom anatomies were largely missing in their original

  14. Image reconstruction using three-dimensional compound Gauss-Markov random field in emission computed tomography

    Watanabe, Shuichi; Kudo, Hiroyuki; Saito, Tsuneo

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new reconstruction algorithm based on MAP (maximum a posteriori probability) estimation principle for emission tomography. To improve noise suppression properties of the conventional ML-EM (maximum likelihood expectation maximization) algorithm, direct three-dimensional reconstruction that utilizes intensity correlations between adjacent transaxial slices is introduced. Moreover, to avoid oversmoothing of edges, a priori knowledge of RI (radioisotope) distribution is represented by using a doubly-stochastic image model called the compound Gauss-Markov random field. The a posteriori probability is maximized by using the iterative GEM (generalized EM) algorithm. Computer simulation results are shown to demonstrate validity of the proposed algorithm. (author)

  15. Field programmable gate array-assigned complex-valued computation and its limits

    Bernard-Schwarz, Maria, E-mail: maria.bernardschwarz@ni.com [National Instruments, Ganghoferstrasse 70b, 80339 Munich (Germany); Institute of Applied Physics, TU Wien, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8, 1040 Wien (Austria); Zwick, Wolfgang; Klier, Jochen [National Instruments, Ganghoferstrasse 70b, 80339 Munich (Germany); Wenzel, Lothar [National Instruments, 11500 N MOPac Expy, Austin, Texas 78759 (United States); Gröschl, Martin [Institute of Applied Physics, TU Wien, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8, 1040 Wien (Austria)

    2014-09-15

    We discuss how leveraging Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) technology as part of a high performance computing platform reduces latency to meet the demanding real time constraints of a quantum optics simulation. Implementations of complex-valued operations using fixed point numeric on a Virtex-5 FPGA compare favorably to more conventional solutions on a central processing unit. Our investigation explores the performance of multiple fixed point options along with a traditional 64 bits floating point version. With this information, the lowest execution times can be estimated. Relative error is examined to ensure simulation accuracy is maintained.

  16. MHD computation of feedback of resistive-shell instabilities in the reversed field pinch

    Zita, E.J.; Prager, S.C.

    1992-05-01

    MHD computation demonstrates that feedback can sustain reversal and reduce loop voltage in resistive-shell reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas. Edge feedback on ∼2R/a tearing modes resonant near axis is found to restore plasma parameters to nearly their levels with a close-fitting conducting shell. When original dynamo modes are stabilized, neighboring tearing modes grow to maintain the RFP dynamo more efficiently. This suggests that experimentally observed limits on RFP pulselengths to the order of the shell time can be overcome by applying feedback to a few helical modes

  17. Heterogeneity of Focal Adhesions and Focal Contacts in Motile Fibroblasts.

    Gladkikh, Aleena; Kovaleva, Anastasia; Tvorogova, Anna; Vorobjev, Ivan A

    2018-01-01

    Cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesion is an important property of virtually all cells in multicellular organisms. Cell-ECM adhesion studies, therefore, are very significant both for biology and medicine. Over the last three decades, biomedical studies resulted in a tremendous advance in our understanding of the molecular basis and functions of cell-ECM adhesion. Based on morphological and molecular criteria, several different types of model cell-ECM adhesion structures including focal adhesions, focal complexes, fibrillar adhesions, podosomes, and three-dimensional matrix adhesions have been described. All the subcellular structures that mediate cell-ECM adhesion are quite heterogeneous, often varying in size, shape, distribution, dynamics, and, to a certain extent, molecular constituents. The morphological "plasticity" of cell-ECM adhesion perhaps reflects the needs of cells to sense, adapt, and respond to a variety of extracellular environments. In addition, cell type (e.g., differentiation status, oncogenic transformation, etc.) often exerts marked influence on the structure of cell-ECM adhesions. Although molecular, genetic, biochemical, and structural studies provide important maps or "snapshots" of cell-ECM adhesions, the area of research that is equally valuable is to study the heterogeneity of FA subpopulations within cells. Recently time-lapse observations on the FA dynamics become feasible, and behavior of individual FA gives additional information on cell-ECM interactions. Here we describe a robust method of labeling of FA using plasmids with fluorescent markers for paxillin and vinculin and quantifying the morphological and dynamical parameters of FA.

  18. Three dimensional field computation software package DE3D and its applications

    Fan Mingwu; Zhang Tianjue; Yan Weili

    1992-07-01

    A software package, DE3D that can be run on PC for three dimensional electrostatic and magnetostatic field analysis has been developed in CIAE (China Institute of Atomic Energy). Two scalar potential method and special numerical techniques have made the code with high precision. It can be used for electrostatic and magnetostatic fields computations with complex boundary conditions. In the most cases, the result accuracy is better than 1% comparing with the measured. In some situations, the results are more acceptable than the other codes because some tricks are used for the current integral. Typical examples, design of a cyclotron magnet and magnetic elements on its beam transport line, given in the paper show how the program helps the designer to improve the design of the product. The software package could bring advantages to the producers and designers

  19. TE/TM scheme for computation of electromagnetic fields in accelerators

    Zagorodnov, Igor; Weiland, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    We propose a new two-level economical conservative scheme for short-range wake field calculation in three dimensions. The scheme does not have dispersion in the longitudinal direction and is staircase free (second order convergent). Unlike the finite-difference time domain method (FDTD), it is based on a TE/TM like splitting of the field components in time. Additionally, it uses an enhanced alternating direction splitting of the transverse space operator that makes the scheme computationally as effective as the conventional FDTD method. Unlike the FDTD ADI and low-order Strang methods, the splitting error in our scheme is only of fourth order. As numerical examples show, the new scheme is much more accurate on the long-time scale than the conventional FDTD approach

  20. Color fields of the static pentaquark system computed in SU(3) lattice QCD

    Cardoso, Nuno; Bicudo, Pedro

    2013-02-01

    We compute the color fields of SU(3) lattice QCD created by static pentaquark systems, in a 243×48 lattice at β=6.2 corresponding to a lattice spacing a=0.07261(85)fm. We find that the pentaquark color fields are well described by a multi-Y-type shaped flux tube. The flux tube junction points are compatible with Fermat-Steiner points minimizing the total flux tube length. We also compare the pentaquark flux tube profile with the diquark-diantiquark central flux tube profile in the tetraquark and the quark-antiquark fundamental flux tube profile in the meson, and they match, thus showing that the pentaquark flux tubes are composed of fundamental flux tubes.

  1. Color fields computed in SU(3) lattice QCD for the static tetraquark system

    Cardoso, Nuno; Cardoso, Marco; Bicudo, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    The color fields created by the static tetraquark system are computed in quenched SU(3) lattice QCD, in a 24 3 x48 lattice at β=6.2 corresponding to a lattice spacing a=0.07261(85) fm. We find that the tetraquark color fields are well described by a double-Y, or butterfly, shaped flux tube. The two flux-tube junction points are compatible with Fermat points minimizing the total flux-tube length. We also compare the diquark-diantiquark central flux-tube profile in the tetraquark with the quark-antiquark fundamental flux-tube profile in the meson, and they match, thus showing that the tetraquark flux tubes are composed of fundamental flux tubes.

  2. Computation of the velocity field and mass balance in the finite-element modeling of groundwater flow

    Yeh, G.T.

    1980-01-01

    Darcian velocity has been conventionally calculated in the finite-element modeling of groundwater flow by taking the derivatives of the computed pressure field. This results in discontinuities in the velocity field at nodal points and element boundaries. Discontinuities become enormous when the computed pressure field is far from a linear distribution. It is proposed in this paper that the finite element procedure that is used to simulate the pressure field or the moisture content field also be applied to Darcy's law with the derivatives of the computed pressure field as the load function. The problem of discontinuity is then eliminated, and the error of mass balance over the region of interest is much reduced. The reduction is from 23.8 to 2.2% by one numerical scheme and from 29.7 to -3.6% by another for a transient problem

  3. Field load and displacement boundary condition computer program used for the finite element analysis and design of toroidal field coils in a tokamak

    Smith, R.A.

    1975-06-01

    The design evaluation of toroidal field coils on the Princeton Large Torus (PLT), the Poloidal Diverter Experiment (PDX) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has been performed by structural analysis with the finite element method. The technique employed has been simplified with supplementary computer programs that are used to generate the input data for the finite element computer program. Significant automation has been provided by computer codes in three areas of data input. These are the definition of coil geometry by a mesh of node points, the definition of finite elements via the node points and the definition of the node point force/displacement boundary conditions. The computer programs by name that have been used to perform the above functions are PDXNODE, ELEMENT and PDXFORC. The geometric finite element modeling options for toroidal field coils provided by PDXNODE include one-fourth or one-half symmetric sections of circular coils, oval shaped coils or dee-shaped coils with or without a beveled wedging surface. The program ELEMENT which defines the finite elements for input to the finite element computer code can provide considerable time and labor savings when defining the model of coils of non-uniform cross-section or when defining the model of coils whose material properties are different in the R and THETA directions due to the laminations of alternate epoxy and copper windings. The modeling features provided by the program ELEMENT have been used to analyze the PLT and the TFTR toroidal field coils with integral support structures. The computer program named PDXFORC is described. It computes the node point forces in a model of a toroidal field coil from the vector crossproduct of the coil current and the magnetic field. The model can be of one-half or one-fourth symmetry to be consistent with the node model defined by PDXNODE, and the magnetic field is computed from toroidal or poloidal coils

  4. Interferon Induced Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis

    Yusuf Kayar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Behçet’s disease is an inflammatory disease of unknown etiology which involves recurring oral and genital aphthous ulcers and ocular lesions as well as articular, vascular, and nervous system involvement. Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS is usually seen in viral infections, immune deficiency syndrome, sickle cell anemia, and hyperfiltration and secondary to interferon therapy. Here, we present a case of FSGS identified with kidney biopsy in a patient who had been diagnosed with Behçet’s disease and received interferon-alpha treatment for uveitis and presented with acute renal failure and nephrotic syndrome associated with interferon.

  5. Focal nodular hyperplasia: imaging findings

    Kehagias, D.; Moulopoulos, L.; Antoniou, A.; Hatziioannou, A.; Smyrniotis, V.; Trakadas, S.; Lahanis, S.; Vlahos, L. [Dept. of Radiology, University of Athens (Greece)

    2001-02-01

    Focal nodular hyperplasia is an uncommon benign hepatic tumor that continues to pose diagnostic dilemmas. Imaging techniques are of great value in diagnosis of this tumor. In this article we present the US, CT, MR imaging, scintigraphy, and angiography findings. The demonstration of a central vascular scar is very helpful. Although the radiologic features may be diagnostic, many atypical cases must be differentiated from other benign or malignant hepatic tumors. In these cases excisional biopsy and histopathologic examination are necessary to determine a definite diagnosis. (orig.)

  6. Focal nodular hyperplasia: imaging findings

    Kehagias, D.; Moulopoulos, L.; Antoniou, A.; Hatziioannou, A.; Smyrniotis, V.; Trakadas, S.; Lahanis, S.; Vlahos, L.

    2001-01-01

    Focal nodular hyperplasia is an uncommon benign hepatic tumor that continues to pose diagnostic dilemmas. Imaging techniques are of great value in diagnosis of this tumor. In this article we present the US, CT, MR imaging, scintigraphy, and angiography findings. The demonstration of a central vascular scar is very helpful. Although the radiologic features may be diagnostic, many atypical cases must be differentiated from other benign or malignant hepatic tumors. In these cases excisional biopsy and histopathologic examination are necessary to determine a definite diagnosis. (orig.)

  7. MRI of focal cortical dysplasia

    Lee, B.C.P.; Hatfield, G.A.; Bourgeois, B.; Park, T.S.

    1998-01-01

    We studied nine cases of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) by MRI, with surface-rendered 3D reconstructions. One case was also examined using single-voxel proton MR spectroscopy (MRS). The histological features were reviewed and correlated with the MRI findings. The gyri affected by FCD were enlarged and the signal of the cortex was slightly increased on T1-weighted images. The gray-white junction was indistinct. Signal from the subcortical white matter was decreased on T1- and increased on T2-weighted images in most cases. Contrast enhancement was seen in two cases. Proton MRS showed a spectrum identical to that of normal brain. (orig.) (orig.)

  8. Some exact computations on the twisted butterfly state in string field theory

    Okawa, Yuji

    2004-01-01

    The twisted butterfly state solves the equation of motion of vacuum string field theory in the singular limit. The finiteness of the energy density of the solution is an important issue, but possible conformal anomaly resulting from the twisting has prevented us from addressing this problem. We present a description of the twisted regulated butterfly state in terms of a conformal field theory with a vanishing central charge which consists of the ordinary bc ghosts and a matter system with c=26. Various quantities relevant to vacuum string field theory are computed exactly using this description. We find that the energy density of the solution can be finite in the limit, but the finiteness depends on the sub leading structure of vacuum string field theory. We further argue, contrary to our previous expectation, that contributions from sub leading terms in the kinetic term to the energy density can be of the same order as the contribution from the leading term which consists of the midpoint ghost insertion. (author)

  9. Computed tomographic simulation of craniospinal fields in pediatric patients: improved treatment accuracy and patient comfort.

    Mah, K; Danjoux, C E; Manship, S; Makhani, N; Cardoso, M; Sixel, K E

    1998-07-15

    To reduce the time required for planning and simulating craniospinal fields through the use of a computed tomography (CT) simulator and virtual simulation, and to improve the accuracy of field and shielding placement. A CT simulation planning technique was developed. Localization of critical anatomic features such as the eyes, cribriform plate region, and caudal extent of the thecal sac are enhanced by this technique. Over a 2-month period, nine consecutive pediatric patients were simulated and planned for craniospinal irradiation. Four patients underwent both conventional simulation and CT simulation. Five were planned using CT simulation only. The accuracy of CT simulation was assessed by comparing digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) to portal films for all patients and to conventional simulation films as well in the first four patients. Time spent by patients in the CT simulation suite was 20 min on average and 40 min maximally for those who were noncompliant. Image acquisition time was absence of the patient, virtual simulation of all fields took 20 min. The DRRs were in agreement with portal and/or simulation films to within 5 mm in five of the eight cases. Discrepancies of > or =5 mm in the positioning of the inferior border of the cranial fields in the first three patients were due to a systematic error in CT scan acquisition and marker contouring which was corrected by modifying the technique after the fourth patient. In one patient, the facial shield had to be moved 0.75 cm inferiorly owing to an error in shield construction. Our analysis showed that CT simulation of craniospinal fields was accurate. It resulted in a significant reduction in the time the patient must be immobilized during the planning process. This technique can improve accuracy in field placement and shielding by using three-dimensional CT-aided localization of critical and target structures. Overall, it has improved staff efficiency and resource utilization.

  10. Computed tomographic simulation of craniospinal fields in pediatric patients: improved treatment accuracy and patient comfort

    Mah, Katherine; Danjoux, Cyril E.; Manship, Sharan; Makhani, Nadiya; Cardoso, Marlene; Sixel, Katharina E.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the time required for planning and simulating craniospinal fields through the use of a computed tomography (CT) simulator and virtual simulation, and to improve the accuracy of field and shielding placement. Methods and Materials: A CT simulation planning technique was developed. Localization of critical anatomic features such as the eyes, cribriform plate region, and caudal extent of the thecal sac are enhanced by this technique. Over a 2-month period, nine consecutive pediatric patients were simulated and planned for craniospinal irradiation. Four patients underwent both conventional simulation and CT simulation. Five were planned using CT simulation only. The accuracy of CT simulation was assessed by comparing digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) to portal films for all patients and to conventional simulation films as well in the first four patients. Results: Time spent by patients in the CT simulation suite was 20 min on average and 40 min maximally for those who were noncompliant. Image acquisition time was <10 min in all cases. In the absence of the patient, virtual simulation of all fields took 20 min. The DRRs were in agreement with portal and/or simulation films to within 5 mm in five of the eight cases. Discrepancies of ≥5 mm in the positioning of the inferior border of the cranial fields in the first three patients were due to a systematic error in CT scan acquisition and marker contouring which was corrected by modifying the technique after the fourth patient. In one patient, the facial shield had to be moved 0.75 cm inferiorly owing to an error in shield construction. Conclusions: Our analysis showed that CT simulation of craniospinal fields was accurate. It resulted in a significant reduction in the time the patient must be immobilized during the planning process. This technique can improve accuracy in field placement and shielding by using three-dimensional CT-aided localization of critical and target structures. Overall

  11. VELOCITY FIELD COMPUTATION IN VIBRATED GRANULAR MEDIA USING AN OPTICAL FLOW BASED MULTISCALE IMAGE ANALYSIS METHOD

    Johan Debayle

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available An image analysis method has been developed in order to compute the velocity field of a granular medium (sand grains, mean diameter 600 μm submitted to different kinds of mechanical stresses. The differential method based on optical flow conservation consists in describing a dense motion field with vectors associated to each pixel. A multiscale, coarse-to-fine, analytical approach through tailor sized windows yields the best compromise between accuracy and robustness of the results, while enabling an acceptable computation time. The corresponding algorithmis presented and its validation discussed through different tests. The results of the validation tests of the proposed approach show that the method is satisfactory when attributing specific values to parameters in association with the size of the image analysis window. An application in the case of vibrated sand has been studied. An instrumented laboratory device provides sinusoidal vibrations and enables external optical observations of sand motion in 3D transparent boxes. At 50 Hz, by increasing the relative acceleration G, the onset and development of two convective rolls can be observed. An ultra fast camera records the grain avalanches, and several pairs of images are analysed by the proposed method. The vertical velocity profiles are deduced and allow to precisely quantify the dimensions of the fluidized region as a function of G.

  12. Computer-aided dispatch--traffic management center field operational test final detailed test plan : WSDOT deployment

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to expand upon the evaluation components presented in "Computer-aided dispatch--traffic management center field operational test final evaluation plan : WSDOT deployment". This document defines the objective, approach,...

  13. Computer-aided dispatch--traffic management center field operational test final test plans : state of Utah

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to expand upon the evaluation components presented in "Computer-aided dispatch--traffic management center field operational test final evaluation plan : state of Utah". This document defines the objective, approach, an...

  14. Pathogenesis of Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis

    Beom Jin Lim

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS is characterized by focal and segmental obliteration of glomerular capillary tufts with increased matrix. FSGS is classified as collapsing, tip, cellular, perihilar and not otherwise specified variants according to the location and character of the sclerotic lesion. Primary or idiopathic FSGS is considered to be related to podocyte injury, and the pathogenesis of podocyte injury has been actively investigated. Several circulating factors affecting podocyte permeability barrier have been proposed, but not proven to cause FSGS. FSGS may also be caused by genetic alterations. These genes are mainly those regulating slit diaphragm structure, actin cytoskeleton of podocytes, and foot process structure. The mode of inheritance and age of onset are different according to the gene involved. Recently, the role of parietal epithelial cells (PECs has been highlighted. Podocytes and PECs have common mesenchymal progenitors, therefore, PECs could be a source of podocyte repopulation after podocyte injury. Activated PECs migrate along adhesion to the glomerular tuft and may also contribute to the progression of sclerosis. Markers of activated PECs, including CD44, could be used to distinguish FSGS from minimal change disease. The pathogenesis of FSGS is very complex; however, understanding basic mechanisms of podocyte injury is important not only for basic research, but also for daily diagnostic pathology practice.

  15. A fast point-cloud computing method based on spatial symmetry of Fresnel field

    Wang, Xiangxiang; Zhang, Kai; Shen, Chuan; Zhu, Wenliang; Wei, Sui

    2017-10-01

    Aiming at the great challenge for Computer Generated Hologram (CGH) duo to the production of high spatial-bandwidth product (SBP) is required in the real-time holographic video display systems. The paper is based on point-cloud method and it takes advantage of the propagating reversibility of Fresnel diffraction in the propagating direction and the fringe pattern of a point source, known as Gabor zone plate has spatial symmetry, so it can be used as a basis for fast calculation of diffraction field in CGH. A fast Fresnel CGH method based on the novel look-up table (N-LUT) method is proposed, the principle fringe patterns (PFPs) at the virtual plane is pre-calculated by the acceleration algorithm and be stored. Secondly, the Fresnel diffraction fringe pattern at dummy plane can be obtained. Finally, the Fresnel propagation from dummy plan to hologram plane. The simulation experiments and optical experiments based on Liquid Crystal On Silicon (LCOS) is setup to demonstrate the validity of the proposed method under the premise of ensuring the quality of 3D reconstruction the method proposed in the paper can be applied to shorten the computational time and improve computational efficiency.

  16. Review on the applications of the very high speed computing technique to atomic energy field

    Hoshino, Tsutomu

    1981-01-01

    The demand of calculation in atomic energy field is enormous, and the physical and technological knowledge obtained by experiments are summarized into mathematical models, and accumulated as the computer programs for design, safety analysis of operational management. These calculation code systems are classified into reactor physics, reactor technology, operational management and nuclear fusion. In this paper, the demand of calculation speed in the diffusion and transport of neutrons, shielding, technological safety, core control and particle simulation is explained as the typical calculation. These calculations are divided into two models, the one is fluid model which regards physical systems as continuum, and the other is particle model which regards physical systems as composed of finite number of particles. The speed of computers in present state is too slow, and the capability 1000 to 10000 times as much as the present general purpose machines is desirable. The calculation techniques of pipeline system and parallel processor system are described. As an example of the practical system, the computer network OCTOPUS in the Lorence Livermore Laboratory is shown. Also, the CHI system in UCLA is introduced. (Kako, I.)

  17. Quantum control with noisy fields: computational complexity versus sensitivity to noise

    Kallush, S; Khasin, M; Kosloff, R

    2014-01-01

    A closed quantum system is defined as completely controllable if an arbitrary unitary transformation can be executed using the available controls. In practice, control fields are a source of unavoidable noise, which has to be suppressed to retain controllability. Can one design control fields such that the effect of noise is negligible on the time-scale of the transformation? This question is intimately related to the fundamental problem of a connection between the computational complexity of the control problem and the sensitivity of the controlled system to noise. The present study considers a paradigm of control, where the Lie-algebraic structure of the control Hamiltonian is fixed, while the size of the system increases with the dimension of the Hilbert space representation of the algebra. We find two types of control tasks, easy and hard. Easy tasks are characterized by a small variance of the evolving state with respect to the operators of the control operators. They are relatively immune to noise and the control field is easy to find. Hard tasks have a large variance, are sensitive to noise and the control field is hard to find. The influence of noise increases with the size of the system, which is measured by the scaling factor N of the largest weight of the representation. For fixed time and control field the ability to control degrades as O(N) for easy tasks and as O(N 2 ) for hard tasks. As a consequence, even in the most favorable estimate, for large quantum systems, generic noise in the controls dominates for a typical class of target transformations, i.e. complete controllability is destroyed by noise. (paper)

  18. Rigorous bounds on survival times in circular accelerators and efficient computation of fringe-field transfer maps

    Hoffstaetter, G.H.

    1994-12-01

    Analyzing stability of particle motion in storage rings contributes to the general field of stability analysis in weakly nonlinear motion. A method which we call pseudo invariant estimation (PIE) is used to compute lower bounds on the survival time in circular accelerators. The pseudeo invariants needed for this approach are computed via nonlinear perturbative normal form theory and the required global maxima of the highly complicated multivariate functions could only be rigorously bound with an extension of interval arithmetic. The bounds on the survival times are large enough to the relevant; the same is true for the lower bounds on dynamical aperatures, which can be computed. The PIE method can lead to novel design criteria with the objective of maximizing the survival time. A major effort in the direction of rigourous predictions only makes sense if accurate models of accelerators are available. Fringe fields often have a significant influence on optical properties, but the computation of fringe-field maps by DA based integration is slower by several orders of magnitude than DA evaluation of the propagator for main-field maps. A novel computation of fringe-field effects called symplectic scaling (SYSCA) is introduced. It exploits the advantages of Lie transformations, generating functions, and scaling properties and is extremely accurate. The computation of fringe-field maps is typically made nearly two orders of magnitude faster. (orig.)

  19. Computer usage and national energy consumption: Results from a field-metering study

    Desroches, Louis-Benoit [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Analysis & Environmental Impacts Dept., Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Fuchs, Heidi [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Analysis & Environmental Impacts Dept., Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Greenblatt, Jeffery [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Analysis & Environmental Impacts Dept., Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Pratt, Stacy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Analysis & Environmental Impacts Dept., Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Willem, Henry [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Analysis & Environmental Impacts Dept., Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Claybaugh, Erin [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Analysis & Environmental Impacts Dept., Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Beraki, Bereket [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Analysis & Environmental Impacts Dept., Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Nagaraju, Mythri [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Analysis & Environmental Impacts Dept., Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Price, Sarah [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Analysis & Environmental Impacts Dept., Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Young, Scott [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Analysis & Environmental Impacts Dept., Environmental Energy Technologies Division

    2014-12-01

    The electricity consumption of miscellaneous electronic loads (MELs) in the home has grown in recent years, and is expected to continue rising. Consumer electronics, in particular, are characterized by swift technological innovation, with varying impacts on energy use. Desktop and laptop computers make up a significant share of MELs electricity consumption, but their national energy use is difficult to estimate, given uncertainties around shifting user behavior. This report analyzes usage data from 64 computers (45 desktop, 11 laptop, and 8 unknown) collected in 2012 as part of a larger field monitoring effort of 880 households in the San Francisco Bay Area, and compares our results to recent values from the literature. We find that desktop computers are used for an average of 7.3 hours per day (median = 4.2 h/d), while laptops are used for a mean 4.8 hours per day (median = 2.1 h/d). The results for laptops are likely underestimated since they can be charged in other, unmetered outlets. Average unit annual energy consumption (AEC) for desktops is estimated to be 194 kWh/yr (median = 125 kWh/yr), and for laptops 75 kWh/yr (median = 31 kWh/yr). We estimate national annual energy consumption for desktop computers to be 20 TWh. National annual energy use for laptops is estimated to be 11 TWh, markedly higher than previous estimates, likely reflective of laptops drawing more power in On mode in addition to greater market penetration. This result for laptops, however, carries relatively higher uncertainty compared to desktops. Different study methodologies and definitions, changing usage patterns, and uncertainty about how consumers use computers must be considered when interpreting our results with respect to existing analyses. Finally, as energy consumption in On mode is predominant, we outline several energy savings opportunities: improved power management (defaulting to low-power modes after periods of inactivity as well as power scaling), matching the rated power

  20. Stable Computation of the Vertical Gradient of Potential Field Data Based on Incorporating the Smoothing Filters

    Baniamerian, Jamaledin; Liu, Shuang; Abbas, Mahmoud Ahmed

    2018-04-01

    The vertical gradient is an essential tool in interpretation algorithms. It is also the primary enhancement technique to improve the resolution of measured gravity and magnetic field data, since it has higher sensitivity to changes in physical properties (density or susceptibility) of the subsurface structures than the measured field. If the field derivatives are not directly measured with the gradiometers, they can be calculated from the collected gravity or magnetic data using numerical methods such as those based on fast Fourier transform technique. The gradients behave similar to high-pass filters and enhance the short-wavelength anomalies which may be associated with either small-shallow sources or high-frequency noise content in data, and their numerical computation is susceptible to suffer from amplification of noise. This behaviour can adversely affect the stability of the derivatives in the presence of even a small level of the noise and consequently limit their application to interpretation methods. Adding a smoothing term to the conventional formulation of calculating the vertical gradient in Fourier domain can improve the stability of numerical differentiation of the field. In this paper, we propose a strategy in which the overall efficiency of the classical algorithm in Fourier domain is improved by incorporating two different smoothing filters. For smoothing term, a simple qualitative procedure based on the upward continuation of the field to a higher altitude is introduced to estimate the related parameters which are called regularization parameter and cut-off wavenumber in the corresponding filters. The efficiency of these new approaches is validated by computing the first- and second-order derivatives of noise-corrupted synthetic data sets and then comparing the results with the true ones. The filtered and unfiltered vertical gradients are incorporated into the extended Euler deconvolution to estimate the depth and structural index of a magnetic

  1. Integrated Design of Superconducting Magnets with the CERN Field Computation Program ROXIE

    Russenschuck, Stephan; Bazan, M; Lucas, J; Ramberger, S; Völlinger, Christine

    2000-01-01

    The program package ROXIE has been developed at CERN for the field computation of superconducting accelerator magnets and is used as an approach towards the integrated design of such magnets. It is also an example of fruitful international collaborations in software development.The integrated design of magnets includes feature based geometry generation, conceptual design using genetic optimization algorithms, optimization of the iron yoke (both in 2d and 3d) using deterministic methods, end-spacer design and inverse field calculation.The paper describes the version 8.0 of ROXIE which comprises an automatic mesh generator, an hysteresis model for the magnetization in superconducting filaments, the BEM-FEM coupling method for the 3d field calculation, a routine for the calculation of the peak temperature during a quench and neural network approximations of the objective function for the speed-up of optimization algorithms, amongst others.New results of the magnet design work for the LHC are given as examples.

  2. RTG diagnostics of dental focal infection

    Petrasova, A.; Ondrasovicova, J.; Cecctkova, A.

    2008-01-01

    The theory of focal infection has always been and still is a controversial issue for many dentists and scientists. Even though the focal infection does not occupy the first place in modern medicine, its understanding is imperative. The authors summarized the knowledge about dental focal infection and its relationship to systemic the diseases of the whole body in their publication and they also focused on the radiodiagnostics of this disease. (authors)

  3. Periodontitis in patients with focal tuberculosis

    Alexandrova Е.А.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The research goal is to investigate the mechanisms of formation and peculiarities of periodontitis in patients with focal tuberculosis. Patients with periodontitis and focal tuberculosis are proved to develop local inflammatory reaction with increased infection and activation of proinflammatory cytokines in parodontal pockets fluid. The main risk factor of frequent and durable recurrence of parodontal pathology in case of focal tuberculosis was the development of pathologic process as a cause of disbalance of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant system, endotoxicosis syndrome

  4. A computationally efficient tool for assessing the depth resolution in large-scale potential-field inversion

    Paoletti, Valeria; Hansen, Per Christian; Hansen, Mads Friis

    2014-01-01

    In potential-field inversion, careful management of singular value decomposition components is crucial for obtaining information about the source distribution with respect to depth. In principle, the depth-resolution plot provides a convenient visual tool for this analysis, but its computational...... on memory and computing time. We used the ApproxDRP to study retrievable depth resolution in inversion of the gravity field of the Neapolitan Volcanic Area. Our main contribution is the combined use of the Lanczos bidiagonalization algorithm, established in the scientific computing community, and the depth...

  5. Focal thyroid incidentalomas identified with whole-body FDG-PET warrant further investigation.

    Prichard, R S

    2012-02-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) whole body positron emission computed tomography (PET-CT) detects clinically occult malignancy. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and significance of focal thyroid 18F - fluorodeoxyglucose uptake. A retrospective review of all patients who had FDG PET-CT examinations, in a single tertiary referral centre was performed. PET scan findings and the final pathological diagnosis were collated. 2105 scans were reviewed. Focal uptake was identified in 35 (1.66%) patients. Final surgical histology was available on eight patients, which confirmed papillary carcinoma in four (20%) patients and lymphoma and metastatic disease in two patients respectively. This gave an overall malignancy rate in focal thyroid uptake of at least 33%. Thyroid incidentalomas occurred with a frequency of 2.13%, with an associated malignancy rate of at least 33% in focal thyroid uptake. The high malignancy rate associated with focal thyroid uptake mandates further investigation in medically fit patients.

  6. Fractal vector optical fields.

    Pan, Yue; Gao, Xu-Zhen; Cai, Meng-Qiang; Zhang, Guan-Lin; Li, Yongnan; Tu, Chenghou; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2016-07-15

    We introduce the concept of a fractal, which provides an alternative approach for flexibly engineering the optical fields and their focal fields. We propose, design, and create a new family of optical fields-fractal vector optical fields, which build a bridge between the fractal and vector optical fields. The fractal vector optical fields have polarization states exhibiting fractal geometry, and may also involve the phase and/or amplitude simultaneously. The results reveal that the focal fields exhibit self-similarity, and the hierarchy of the fractal has the "weeding" role. The fractal can be used to engineer the focal field.

  7. Flux dynamics in ultrasensitive superconducting focal planes

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The performance of superconducting focal planes will drive the achievable specifications of ultrasensitive instruments for NASA astrophysics missions, yet they have...

  8. Game Movement as Enactive Focalization

    Yotam Shibolet

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper integrates thought on game narrative and embodied cognition, in order to consider the significance of movement to the embodied narrative experience of games. If games are a mode of ‘environmental storytelling’, determining the player’s mobile situatedness within the gamespace is of crucial importance. The metaphor of game design as narrative architecture should be expanded to include te the design of movement dynamics, alongside geographical gamespace. I suggest a theoretical infrastructure that aims to enable further analysis of movement design’s role in this scope. The theory of enactive perception asserts that all perception is inherently negotiated through embodied understanding of moving within environment. According to this model, by giving meaning to perception, movement is also directly related to the structure of consciousness and thought. Cognitive definitions of ‘narrative’ that integrate embodiment are applied to argue it can relevantly account for part of thought’s role in enactive perception. Mieke Bal’s concept of focalization (1997 broaches narrative perspective by underscoring the constant “movement of the look”. For enactive perception, such mobility should be understood as inseparable from the movement of the body even when perspective could appear detached from embodiment. Therefore, I offer the supplementary concept of “enactive focalization” – narrative perception as interpreted through the interconnected dynamics or perspectival and physical movement. To exemplify my ideas and the potential of future research in this scope, I discuss the uniquely effective and affective movement dynamic design of Journey. This paper concludes by reflecting on enactive focalization in light of the increased utilization of embodiment in the contemporary digital media landscape.

  9. CosmoTransitions: Computing cosmological phase transition temperatures and bubble profiles with multiple fields

    Wainwright, Carroll L.

    2012-09-01

    I present a numerical package (CosmoTransitions) for analyzing finite-temperature cosmological phase transitions driven by single or multiple scalar fields. The package analyzes the different vacua of a theory to determine their critical temperatures (where the vacuum energy levels are degenerate), their supercooling temperatures, and the bubble wall profiles which separate the phases and describe their tunneling dynamics. I introduce a new method of path deformation to find the profiles of both thin- and thick-walled bubbles. CosmoTransitions is freely available for public use.Program summaryProgram Title: CosmoTransitionsCatalogue identifier: AEML_v1_0Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEML_v1_0.htmlProgram obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. IrelandLicensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.htmlNo. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 8775No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 621096Distribution format: tar.gzProgramming language: Python.Computer: Developed on a 2009 MacBook Pro. No computer-specific optimization was performed.Operating system: Designed and tested on Mac OS X 10.6.8. Compatible with any OS with Python installed.RAM: Approximately 50 MB, mostly for loading plotting packages.Classification: 1.9, 11.1.External routines: SciPy, NumPy, matplotLibNature of problem: I describe a program to analyze early-Universe finite-temperature phase transitions with multiple scalar fields. The goal is to analyze the phase structure of an input theory, determine the amount of supercooling at each phase transition, and find the bubble-wall profiles of the nucleated bubbles that drive the transitions.Solution method: To find the bubble-wall profile, the program assumes that tunneling happens along a fixed path in field space. This reduces the equations of motion to one dimension, which can then be solved using the overshoot

  10. Continuous contour phase plates for tailoring the focal plane irradiance profile

    Dixit, S.N.; Rushford, M.C.; Thomas, I.M.; Perry, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    We present fully continuous phase screens for producing super-Gaussian focal-plane irradiance profiles. Such phase screens are constructed with the assumption of either circular symmetric near-field and far-field profiles or a separable phase screen in Cartesian co-ordinates. In each case, the phase screen is only a few waves deep. Under illumination by coherent light, such phase screens produce high order super-Gaussian profiles in the focal plane with high energy content effects of beam aberrations on the focal profiles and their energy content are also discussed

  11. Computational studies of the effect of magnetic field ''ripple'' on neutral beam heating of ZEPHYR

    Lister, G.G.; Gruber, O.

    1981-01-01

    The results of computations to estimate the heating efficiency of neutral injection in the proposed ZEPHYR experiment are presented. A suitably modified version of the Monte-Carlo neutral deposition and orbit following code FREYA was used for these calculations, in which particular emphasis has been placed on the effects of toroidal field ripple. We find that the ripple associated with the preliminary design of the experiment (+-6%) would result in intolerable energy losses due to ''ripple trapping'' of the fast ions produced by the neutral beam and insufficient heating of the central plasma. The necessary conditions for ignition can be obtained with a total heating power of 25 MW provided the ripple can be reduced to +-1%, in which case energy losses could be kept below 30%. These results are compatible with those found from transport code calculations of the losses to be expected due to ripple enhanced thermal conduction in the plasma

  12. Algorithms for computing solvents of unilateral second-order matrix polynomials over prime finite fields using lambda-matrices

    Burtyka, Filipp

    2018-01-01

    The paper considers algorithms for finding diagonalizable and non-diagonalizable roots (so called solvents) of monic arbitrary unilateral second-order matrix polynomial over prime finite field. These algorithms are based on polynomial matrices (lambda-matrices). This is an extension of existing general methods for computing solvents of matrix polynomials over field of complex numbers. We analyze how techniques for complex numbers can be adapted for finite field and estimate asymptotic complexity of the obtained algorithms.

  13. Stable pseudoanalytical computation of electromagnetic fields from arbitrarily-oriented dipoles in cylindrically stratified media

    Moon, Haksu; Teixeira, Fernando L.; Donderici, Burkay

    2014-09-01

    Computation of electromagnetic fields due to point sources (Hertzian dipoles) in cylindrically stratified media is a classical problem for which analytical expressions of the associated tensor Green's function have been long known. However, under finite-precision arithmetic, direct numerical computations based on the application of such analytical (canonical) expressions invariably lead to underflow and overflow problems related to the poor scaling of the eigenfunctions (cylindrical Bessel and Hankel functions) for extreme arguments and/or high-order, as well as convergence problems related to the numerical integration over the spectral wavenumber and to the truncation of the infinite series over the azimuth mode number. These problems are exacerbated when a disparate range of values is to be considered for the layers' thicknesses and material properties (resistivities, permittivities, and permeabilities), the transverse and longitudinal distances between source and observation points, as well as the source frequency. To overcome these challenges in a systematic fashion, we introduce herein different sets of range-conditioned, modified cylindrical functions (in lieu of standard cylindrical eigenfunctions), each associated with nonoverlapped subdomains of (numerical) evaluation to allow for stable computations under any range of physical parameters. In addition, adaptively-chosen integration contours are employed in the complex spectral wavenumber plane to ensure convergent numerical integration in all cases. We illustrate the application of the algorithm to problems of geophysical interest involving layer resistivities ranging from 1000 Ω m to 10-8 Ω m, frequencies of operation ranging from 10 MHz down to the low magnetotelluric range of 0.01 Hz, and for various combinations of layer thicknesses.

  14. Comparison of Experimental Surface and Flow Field Measurements to Computational Results of the Juncture Flow Model

    Roozeboom, Nettie H.; Lee, Henry C.; Simurda, Laura J.; Zilliac, Gregory G.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    Wing-body juncture flow fields on commercial aircraft configurations are challenging to compute accurately. The NASA Advanced Air Vehicle Program's juncture flow committee is designing an experiment to provide data to improve Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling in the juncture flow region. Preliminary design of the model was done using CFD, yet CFD tends to over-predict the separation in the juncture flow region. Risk reduction wind tunnel tests were requisitioned by the committee to obtain a better understanding of the flow characteristics of the designed models. NASA Ames Research Center's Fluid Mechanics Lab performed one of the risk reduction tests. The results of one case, accompanied by CFD simulations, are presented in this paper. Experimental results suggest the wall mounted wind tunnel model produces a thicker boundary layer on the fuselage than the CFD predictions, resulting in a larger wing horseshoe vortex suppressing the side of body separation in the juncture flow region. Compared to experimental results, CFD predicts a thinner boundary layer on the fuselage generates a weaker wing horseshoe vortex resulting in a larger side of body separation.

  15. Relativistic force field: parametric computations of proton-proton coupling constants in (1)H NMR spectra.

    Kutateladze, Andrei G; Mukhina, Olga A

    2014-09-05

    Spin-spin coupling constants in (1)H NMR carry a wealth of structural information and offer a powerful tool for deciphering molecular structures. However, accurate ab initio or DFT calculations of spin-spin coupling constants have been very challenging and expensive. Scaling of (easy) Fermi contacts, fc, especially in the context of recent findings by Bally and Rablen (Bally, T.; Rablen, P. R. J. Org. Chem. 2011, 76, 4818), offers a framework for achieving practical evaluation of spin-spin coupling constants. We report a faster and more precise parametrization approach utilizing a new basis set for hydrogen atoms optimized in conjunction with (i) inexpensive B3LYP/6-31G(d) molecular geometries, (ii) inexpensive 4-31G basis set for carbon atoms in fc calculations, and (iii) individual parametrization for different atom types/hybridizations, not unlike a force field in molecular mechanics, but designed for the fc's. With the training set of 608 experimental constants we achieved rmsd <0.19 Hz. The methodology performs very well as we illustrate with a set of complex organic natural products, including strychnine (rmsd 0.19 Hz), morphine (rmsd 0.24 Hz), etc. This precision is achieved with much shorter computational times: accurate spin-spin coupling constants for the two conformers of strychnine were computed in parallel on two 16-core nodes of a Linux cluster within 10 min.

  16. Elucidation of complicated phenomena in nuclear power field by computation science techniques

    Takahashi, Ryoichi

    1996-01-01

    In this crossover research, the complicated phenomena treated in nuclear power field are elucidated, and for connecting them to engineering application research, the development of high speed computer utilization technology and the large scale numerical simulation utilizing it are carried out. As the scale of calculation, it is aimed at to realize the three-dimensional numerical simulation of the largest scale in the world of about 100 million mesh and to develop the results into engineering research. In the nuclear power plants of next generation, the further improvement of economical efficiency is demanded together with securing safety, and it is important that the design window is large. The work of confirming quantitatively the size of design window is not easy, and it is very difficult to separate observed phenomena into elementary events. As the method of forecasting and reproducing complicated phenomena and quantifying design window, large scale numerical simulation is promising. The roles of theory, experiment and computation science are discussed. The system of executing this crossover research is described. (K.I.)

  17. Infinities in Quantum Field Theory and in Classical Computing: Renormalization Program

    Manin, Yuri I.

    Introduction. The main observable quantities in Quantum Field Theory, correlation functions, are expressed by the celebrated Feynman path integrals. A mathematical definition of them involving a measure and actual integration is still lacking. Instead, it is replaced by a series of ad hoc but highly efficient and suggestive heuristic formulas such as perturbation formalism. The latter interprets such an integral as a formal series of finite-dimensional but divergent integrals, indexed by Feynman graphs, the list of which is determined by the Lagrangian of the theory. Renormalization is a prescription that allows one to systematically "subtract infinities" from these divergent terms producing an asymptotic series for quantum correlation functions. On the other hand, graphs treated as "flowcharts", also form a combinatorial skeleton of the abstract computation theory. Partial recursive functions that according to Church's thesis exhaust the universe of (semi)computable maps are generally not everywhere defined due to potentially infinite searches and loops. In this paper I argue that such infinities can be addressed in the same way as Feynman divergences. More details can be found in [9,10].

  18. Determination of strain fields in porous shape memory alloys using micro-computed tomography

    Bormann, Therese; Friess, Sebastian; de Wild, Michael; Schumacher, Ralf; Schulz, Georg; Müller, Bert

    2010-09-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) belong to 'intelligent' materials since the metal alloy can change its macroscopic shape as the result of the temperature-induced, reversible martensite-austenite phase transition. SMAs are often applied for medical applications such as stents, hinge-less instruments, artificial muscles, and dental braces. Rapid prototyping techniques, including selective laser melting (SLM), allow fabricating complex porous SMA microstructures. In the present study, the macroscopic shape changes of the SMA test structures fabricated by SLM have been investigated by means of micro computed tomography (μCT). For this purpose, the SMA structures are placed into the heating stage of the μCT system SkyScan 1172™ (SkyScan, Kontich, Belgium) to acquire three-dimensional datasets above and below the transition temperature, i.e. at room temperature and at about 80°C, respectively. The two datasets were registered on the basis of an affine registration algorithm with nine independent parameters - three for the translation, three for the rotation and three for the scaling in orthogonal directions. Essentially, the scaling parameters characterize the macroscopic deformation of the SMA structure of interest. Furthermore, applying the non-rigid registration algorithm, the three-dimensional strain field of the SMA structure on the micrometer scale comes to light. The strain fields obtained will serve for the optimization of the SLM-process and, more important, of the design of the complex shaped SMA structures for tissue engineering and medical implants.

  19. Application of a computer model to the study of the geothermic field of Mofete, Italy

    Giannone, G.; Turriani, C; Pistellie, E

    1984-01-01

    The aim of the study was to develop a reliable and comprehensive reservoir simulation package for a better understanding of ''in-situ'' processes pertinent to geothermal reservoir hydrodynamics and thermodynamics, and to enable an assessment of optimum reservoir management strategies as to production and reinjection policies. The study consists of four parts: The first deals with the computer programme. This is based on a programme called ''CHARG''developed in the US. Some adaptation was necessary. The second part concerns the fall-off and pit-tests of the geothermal well close to Naples ''Mofete 2''. This has been a crucial test for the CHARG model using asymmetric cylindrical coordinates and 14 different layers. Part three deals with predictions about longevity of the geothermal field of Mofete. The area is divided into 2500 blocs distibuted over 14 layers. Several configurations (various numbers of production and reinjection wells) have been tested. The last chapter delas with a comparison between the ISMES reservoir model, based on the finite elements approach and the AGIP model (finite differences). Both models give nearly the same results when applied to the geothermal field of Travale.

  20. Improvement of portable computed tomography system for on-field applications

    Sukrod, K.; Khoonkamjorn, P.; Tippayakul, C.

    2015-05-01

    In 2010, Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology (TINT) received a portable Computed Tomography (CT) system from the IAEA as part of the Regional Cooperative Agreement (RCA) program. This portable CT system has been used as the prototype for development of portable CT system intended for industrial applications since then. This paper discusses the improvements in the attempt to utilize the CT system for on-field applications. The system is foreseen to visualize the amount of agarwood in the live tree trunk. The experiments adopting Am-241 as the radiation source were conducted. The Am-241 source was selected since it emits low energy gamma which should better distinguish small density differences of wood types. Test specimens made of timbers with different densities were prepared and used in the experiments. The cross sectional views of the test specimens were obtained from the CT system using different scanning parameters. It is found from the experiments that the results are promising as the picture can clearly differentiate wood types according to their densities. Also, the optimum scanning parameters were determined from the experiments. The results from this work encourage the research team to advance into the next phase which is to experiment with the real tree on the field.

  1. Inversion of potential field data using the finite element method on parallel computers

    Gross, L.; Altinay, C.; Shaw, S.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we present a formulation of the joint inversion of potential field anomaly data as an optimization problem with partial differential equation (PDE) constraints. The problem is solved using the iterative Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (BFGS) method with the Hessian operator of the regularization and cross-gradient component of the cost function as preconditioner. We will show that each iterative step requires the solution of several PDEs namely for the potential fields, for the adjoint defects and for the application of the preconditioner. In extension to the traditional discrete formulation the BFGS method is applied to continuous descriptions of the unknown physical properties in combination with an appropriate integral form of the dot product. The PDEs can easily be solved using standard conforming finite element methods (FEMs) with potentially different resolutions. For two examples we demonstrate that the number of PDE solutions required to reach a given tolerance in the BFGS iteration is controlled by weighting regularization and cross-gradient but is independent of the resolution of PDE discretization and that as a consequence the method is weakly scalable with the number of cells on parallel computers. We also show a comparison with the UBC-GIF GRAV3D code.

  2. Grating-based X-ray Dark-field Computed Tomography of Living Mice.

    Velroyen, A; Yaroshenko, A; Hahn, D; Fehringer, A; Tapfer, A; Müller, M; Noël, P B; Pauwels, B; Sasov, A; Yildirim, A Ö; Eickelberg, O; Hellbach, K; Auweter, S D; Meinel, F G; Reiser, M F; Bech, M; Pfeiffer, F

    2015-10-01

    Changes in x-ray attenuating tissue caused by lung disorders like emphysema or fibrosis are subtle and thus only resolved by high-resolution computed tomography (CT). The structural reorganization, however, is of strong influence for lung function. Dark-field CT (DFCT), based on small-angle scattering of x-rays, reveals such structural changes even at resolutions coarser than the pulmonary network and thus provides access to their anatomical distribution. In this proof-of-concept study we present x-ray in vivo DFCTs of lungs of a healthy, an emphysematous and a fibrotic mouse. The tomographies show excellent depiction of the distribution of structural - and thus indirectly functional - changes in lung parenchyma, on single-modality slices in dark field as well as on multimodal fusion images. Therefore, we anticipate numerous applications of DFCT in diagnostic lung imaging. We introduce a scatter-based Hounsfield Unit (sHU) scale to facilitate comparability of scans. In this newly defined sHU scale, the pathophysiological changes by emphysema and fibrosis cause a shift towards lower numbers, compared to healthy lung tissue.

  3. Improvement of Portable Computed Tomography System for On-field Applications

    Sukrod, K.; Khoonkamjorn, P.; Tippayakul, C.

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology (TINT) received a portable Computed Tomography (CT) system from IAEA as part of the Regional Cooperative Agreement (RCA) program. This portable CT system has been used as the prototype for development of portable CT system intended for industrial applications since then. This paper discusses the improvements in the attempt to utilize the CT system for on-field applications. The system is foreseen to visualize the amount of agarwood in the live tree trunk. The experiments adopting Am-241 as the radiation source were conducted. The Am-241 source was selected since it emits low energy gamma which should better distinguish small density differences of wood types. Test specimens made of timbers with different densities were prepared and used in the experiments. The cross sectional views of the test specimens were obtained from the CT system using different scanning parameters. It is found from the experiments that the results are promising as the picture can clearly differentiate wood types according to their densities. Also, the optimum scanning parameters were determined from the experiments. The results from this work encourage the research team to advance into the next phase which is to experiment with the real tree on the field.

  4. Improvement of portable computed tomography system for on-field applications

    Sukrod, K; Khoonkamjorn, P; Tippayakul, C

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology (TINT) received a portable Computed Tomography (CT) system from the IAEA as part of the Regional Cooperative Agreement (RCA) program. This portable CT system has been used as the prototype for development of portable CT system intended for industrial applications since then. This paper discusses the improvements in the attempt to utilize the CT system for on-field applications. The system is foreseen to visualize the amount of agarwood in the live tree trunk. The experiments adopting Am-241 as the radiation source were conducted. The Am-241 source was selected since it emits low energy gamma which should better distinguish small density differences of wood types. Test specimens made of timbers with different densities were prepared and used in the experiments. The cross sectional views of the test specimens were obtained from the CT system using different scanning parameters. It is found from the experiments that the results are promising as the picture can clearly differentiate wood types according to their densities. Also, the optimum scanning parameters were determined from the experiments. The results from this work encourage the research team to advance into the next phase which is to experiment with the real tree on the field. (paper)

  5. Use of time space Green's functions in the computation of transient eddy current fields

    Davey, K.; Turner, L.

    1988-01-01

    The utility of integral equations to solve eddy current problems has been borne out by numerous computations in the past few years, principally in sinusoidal steady-state problems. This paper attempts to examine the applicability of the integral approaches in both time and space for the more generic transient problem. The basic formulation for the time space Green's function approach is laid out. A technique employing Gauss-Laguerre integration is employed to realize the temporal solution, while Gauss--Legendre integration is used to resolve the spatial field character. The technique is then applied to the fusion electromagnetic induction experiments (FELIX) cylinder experiments in both two and three dimensions. It is found that quite accurate solutions can be obtained using rather coarse time steps and very few unknowns; the three-dimensional field solution worked out in this context used basically only four unknowns. The solution appears to be somewhat sensitive to the choice of time step, a consequence of a numerical instability imbedded in the Green's function near the origin

  6. SUPPORTING THE INDUSTRY BY DEVELOPING A DESIGN GUIDANCE FOR COMPUTER-BASED PROCEDURES FOR FIELD WORKERS

    Oxstrand, Johanna; LeBlanc, Katya

    2017-06-01

    The paper-based procedures currently used for nearly all activities in the commercial nuclear power industry have a long history of ensuring safe operation of the plants. However, there is potential to greatly increase efficiency and safety by improving how the human interacts with the procedures, which can be achieved through the use of computer-based procedures (CBPs). A CBP system offers a vast variety of improvements, such as context driven job aids, integrated human performance tools and dynamic step presentation. As a step toward the goal of improving procedure use performance, the U.S. Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program researchers, together with the nuclear industry, have been investigating the possibility and feasibility of replacing current paper-based procedures with CBPs. The main purpose of the CBP research conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory was to provide design guidance to the nuclear industry to be used by both utilities and vendors. After studying existing design guidance for CBP systems, the researchers concluded that the majority of the existing guidance is intended for control room CBP systems, and does not necessarily address the challenges of designing CBP systems for instructions carried out in the field. Further, the guidance is often presented on a high level, which leaves the designer to interpret what is meant by the guidance and how to specifically implement it. The authors developed a design guidance to provide guidance specifically tailored to instructions that are carried out in the field based.

  7. Position sensitive proportional counters as focal plane detectors

    Ford, J.L.C. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The rise time and charge division techniques for position decoding with RC-line proportional counters are reviewed. The advantages that these detectors offer as focal plane counters for nuclear spectroscopy performed with magnetic spectrographs are discussed. The theory of operation of proportional counters as position sensing devices is summarized, as well as practical aspects affecting their application. Factors limiting the position and energy resolutions obtainable with a focal plane proportional counter are evaluated and measured position and energy loss values are presented for comparison. Detector systems capable of the multiparameter measurements required for particle identification, background suppression and ray-tracing are described in order to illustrate the wide applicability of proportional counters within complex focal plane systems. Examples of the use of these counters other than with magnetic spectrographs are given in order to demonstrate their usefulness in not only nuclear physics but also in fields such as solid state physics, biology, and medicine. The influence of the new focal plane detector systems on future magnetic spectrograph designs is discussed. (Auth.)

  8. Transient attenuation of visual evoked potentials during focal status epilepticus in a patient with occipital lobe epilepsy.

    Tsai, Meng-Han; Hsu, Shih-Pin; Huang, Chi-Ren; Chang, Chen-Sheng; Chuang, Yao-Chung

    2010-06-01

    Seizures originating in the occipital areas are relatively uncommon. They are usually characterized by visual hallucinations and illusions or other symptoms related to the eyes and vision. In a 54-year-old woman with occipital lobe epilepsy, complex visual hallucinations, illusions, and migraine-like headache constitute the major clinical manifestations. During focal status epilepticus, ictal electroencephalography revealed rhythmic focal spikes in the right occipital region, rapidly propagating to the right parietal and contralateral occipital areas. Ictal brain single-photon emission computed topography revealed hyperperfusion of the right occipital region. Using a full-field pattern-shift visual evoked potential (VEP) study, we found that the P100 responses on both sides were markedly attenuated in amplitude during occipital focal status epilepticus, whereas the latencies of the VEPs were normal. The amplitude and morphology of P100 responses on both sides, however, returned to the normal range 7 days after cessation of the seizures. In addition to clinical seizure semiology, scalp EEG, SPECT and neuroimaging studies, VEP studies may be used as a supplementary examination tool to provide further information in the patients with occipital lobe seizures or epilepsies.

  9. Prenatal sonographic diagnosis of focal musculoskeletal anomalies

    Ryu, Jung Kyu; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Lee, Young Ho; Kim, Ei Jeong; Chun, Yi Kyeong [Samsung Cheil Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-09-15

    Focal musculoskeletal anomalies are various and may be an isolated finding or may be found in conjunction with numerous associations, including genetic syndromes, Karyotype abnormals, central nervous system anomalies and other general musculoskeletal disorders. Early prenatal diagnosis of these focal musculoskeletal anomalies nor only affects prenatal care and postnatal outcome but also helps in approaching other numerous associated anomalies.

  10. Prenatal sonographic diagnosis of focal musculoskeletal anomalies

    Ryu, Jung Kyu; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Lee, Young Ho; Kim, Ei Jeong; Chun, Yi Kyeong

    2002-01-01

    Focal musculoskeletal anomalies are various and may be an isolated finding or may be found in conjunction with numerous associations, including genetic syndromes, Karyotype abnormals, central nervous system anomalies and other general musculoskeletal disorders. Early prenatal diagnosis of these focal musculoskeletal anomalies nor only affects prenatal care and postnatal outcome but also helps in approaching other numerous associated anomalies.

  11. Finite element and node point generation computer programs used for the design of toroidal field coils in tokamak fusion devices

    Smith, R.A.

    1975-06-01

    The structural analysis of toroidal field coils in Tokamak fusion machines can be performed with the finite element method. This technique has been employed for design evaluations of toroidal field coils on the Princeton Large Torus (PLT), the Poloidal Diverter Experiment (PDX), and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The application of the finite element method can be simplified with computer programs that are used to generate the input data for the finite element code. There are three areas of data input where significant automation can be provided by supplementary computer codes. These concern the definition of geometry by a node point mesh, the definition of the finite elements from the geometric node points, and the definition of the node point force/displacement boundary conditions. The node point forces in a model of a toroidal field coil are computed from the vector cross product of the coil current and the magnetic field. The computer programs named PDXNODE and ELEMENT are described. The program PDXNODE generates the geometric node points of a finite element model for a toroidal field coil. The program ELEMENT defines the finite elements of the model from the node points and from material property considerations. The program descriptions include input requirements, the output, the program logic, the methods of generating complex geometries with multiple runs, computational time and computer compatibility. The output format of PDXNODE and ELEMENT make them compatible with PDXFORC and two general purpose finite element computer codes: (ANSYS) the Engineering Analysis System written by the Swanson Analysis Systems, Inc., and (WECAN) the Westinghouse Electric Computer Analysis general purpose finite element program. The Fortran listings of PDXNODE and ELEMENT are provided

  12. A modeling approach to predict acoustic nonlinear field generated by a transmitter with an aluminum lens.

    Fan, Tingbo; Liu, Zhenbo; Chen, Tao; Li, Faqi; Zhang, Dong

    2011-09-01

    In this work, the authors propose a modeling approach to compute the nonlinear acoustic field generated by a flat piston transmitter with an attached aluminum lens. In this approach, the geometrical parameters (radius and focal length) of a virtual source are initially determined by Snell's refraction law and then adjusted based on the Rayleigh integral result in the linear case. Then, this virtual source is used with the nonlinear spheroidal beam equation (SBE) model to predict the nonlinear acoustic field in the focal region. To examine the validity of this approach, the calculated nonlinear result is compared with those from the Westervelt and (Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov) KZK equations for a focal intensity of 7 kW/cm(2). Results indicate that this approach could accurately describe the nonlinear acoustic field in the focal region with less computation time. The proposed modeling approach is shown to accurately describe the nonlinear acoustic field in the focal region. Compared with the Westervelt equation, the computation time of this approach is significantly reduced. It might also be applicable for the widely used concave focused transmitter with a large aperture angle.

  13. Focal hepatic lesions with peripheral eosinophilia: imaging features of various disease

    Seo, Joon Beom; Han, Joon Koo; Kim, Tae Kyoung; Choi, Byung Ihn; Han, Man Chung [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Chi Sung [Seoul City Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-01-01

    Due to the recent advent of various imaging modalities such as ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, as well as knowledge of the characteristic imaging features of hepatic lesions, radiologic examination plays a major role in the differential diagnosis of focal hepatic lesions. However, various 'nonspecific' or 'unusual' imaging features of focal hepatic lesions are occasionally encountered, and this makes correct diagnosis difficult. In such a situation, the presence of peripheral eosinophilia helps narrow the differential diagnoses. The aim of this pictorial essay is to describe the imaging features of various disease entities which cause focal hepatic lesions and peripheral eosinophilia.

  14. Focal spot motion of linear accelerators and its effect on portal image analysis

    Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Brand, Bob; Herk, Marcel van

    2003-01-01

    The focal spot of a linear accelerator is often considered to have a fully stable position. In practice, however, the beam control loop of a linear accelerator needs to stabilize after the beam is turned on. As a result, some motion of the focal spot might occur during the start-up phase of irradiation. When acquiring portal images, this motion will affect the projected position of anatomy and field edges, especially when low exposures are used. In this paper, the motion of the focal spot and the effect of this motion on portal image analysis are quantified. A slightly tilted narrow slit phantom was placed at the isocenter of several linear accelerators and images were acquired (3.5 frames per second) by means of an amorphous silicon flat panel imager positioned ∼0.7 m below the isocenter. The motion of the focal spot was determined by converting the tilted slit images to subpixel accurate line spread functions. The error in portal image analysis due to focal spot motion was estimated by a subtraction of the relative displacement of the projected slit from the relative displacement of the field edges. It was found that the motion of the focal spot depends on the control system and design of the accelerator. The shift of the focal spot at the start of irradiation ranges between 0.05-0.7 mm in the gun-target (GT) direction. In the left-right (AB) direction the shift is generally smaller. The resulting error in portal image analysis due to focal spot motion ranges between 0.05-1.1 mm for a dose corresponding to two monitor units (MUs). For 20 MUs, the effect of the focal spot motion reduces to 0.01-0.3 mm. The error in portal image analysis due to focal spot motion can be reduced by reducing the applied dose rate

  15. Focal fatty infiltration of the liver: demonstration by magnetic resonance imaging

    Wenker, J.C.; Baker, M.K.; Ellis, J.H.; Glant, M.D.

    1984-01-01

    Focal fatty infiltration of the liver is a recently recognized yet poorly understood entity, which has become more apparent since the onset of widespread computed tomographic (CT) scanning. Recent reports have suggested that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may not be sensitive in the evaluation of diffuse fatty liver. A case is presented in which MRI was as sensitive as CT and sonography in the demonstration of focal fatty change within the liver

  16. Rapid phenotyping of crop root systems in undisturbed field soils using X-ray computed tomography.

    Pfeifer, Johannes; Kirchgessner, Norbert; Colombi, Tino; Walter, Achim

    2015-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) has become a powerful tool for root phenotyping. Compared to rather classical, destructive methods, CT encompasses various advantages. In pot experiments the growth and development of the same individual root can be followed over time and in addition the unaltered configuration of the 3D root system architecture (RSA) interacting with a real field soil matrix can be studied. Yet, the throughput, which is essential for a more widespread application of CT for basic research or breeding programs, suffers from the bottleneck of rapid and standardized segmentation methods to extract root structures. Using available methods, root segmentation is done to a large extent manually, as it requires a lot of interactive parameter optimization and interpretation and therefore needs a lot of time. Based on commercially available software, this paper presents a protocol that is faster, more standardized and more versatile compared to existing segmentation methods, particularly if used to analyse field samples collected in situ. To the knowledge of the authors this is the first study approaching to develop a comprehensive segmentation method suitable for comparatively large columns sampled in situ which contain complex, not necessarily connected root systems from multiple plants grown in undisturbed field soil. Root systems from several crops were sampled in situ and CT-volumes determined with the presented method were compared to root dry matter of washed root samples. A highly significant (P < 0.01) and strong correlation (R(2) = 0.84) was found, demonstrating the value of the presented method in the context of field research. Subsequent to segmentation, a method for the measurement of root thickness distribution has been used. Root thickness is a central RSA trait for various physiological research questions such as root growth in compacted soil or under oxygen deficient soil conditions, but hardly assessable in high throughput until today, due

  17. Computing the Local Field Potential (LFP) from Integrate-and-Fire Network Models

    Cuntz, Hermann; Lansner, Anders; Panzeri, Stefano; Einevoll, Gaute T.

    2015-01-01

    Leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) network models are commonly used to study how the spiking dynamics of neural networks changes with stimuli, tasks or dynamic network states. However, neurophysiological studies in vivo often rather measure the mass activity of neuronal microcircuits with the local field potential (LFP). Given that LFPs are generated by spatially separated currents across the neuronal membrane, they cannot be computed directly from quantities defined in models of point-like LIF neurons. Here, we explore the best approximation for predicting the LFP based on standard output from point-neuron LIF networks. To search for this best “LFP proxy”, we compared LFP predictions from candidate proxies based on LIF network output (e.g, firing rates, membrane potentials, synaptic currents) with “ground-truth” LFP obtained when the LIF network synaptic input currents were injected into an analogous three-dimensional (3D) network model of multi-compartmental neurons with realistic morphology, spatial distributions of somata and synapses. We found that a specific fixed linear combination of the LIF synaptic currents provided an accurate LFP proxy, accounting for most of the variance of the LFP time course observed in the 3D network for all recording locations. This proxy performed well over a broad set of conditions, including substantial variations of the neuronal morphologies. Our results provide a simple formula for estimating the time course of the LFP from LIF network simulations in cases where a single pyramidal population dominates the LFP generation, and thereby facilitate quantitative comparison between computational models and experimental LFP recordings in vivo. PMID:26657024

  18. Computing the Local Field Potential (LFP from Integrate-and-Fire Network Models.

    Alberto Mazzoni

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF network models are commonly used to study how the spiking dynamics of neural networks changes with stimuli, tasks or dynamic network states. However, neurophysiological studies in vivo often rather measure the mass activity of neuronal microcircuits with the local field potential (LFP. Given that LFPs are generated by spatially separated currents across the neuronal membrane, they cannot be computed directly from quantities defined in models of point-like LIF neurons. Here, we explore the best approximation for predicting the LFP based on standard output from point-neuron LIF networks. To search for this best "LFP proxy", we compared LFP predictions from candidate proxies based on LIF network output (e.g, firing rates, membrane potentials, synaptic currents with "ground-truth" LFP obtained when the LIF network synaptic input currents were injected into an analogous three-dimensional (3D network model of multi-compartmental neurons with realistic morphology, spatial distributions of somata and synapses. We found that a specific fixed linear combination of the LIF synaptic currents provided an accurate LFP proxy, accounting for most of the variance of the LFP time course observed in the 3D network for all recording locations. This proxy performed well over a broad set of conditions, including substantial variations of the neuronal morphologies. Our results provide a simple formula for estimating the time course of the LFP from LIF network simulations in cases where a single pyramidal population dominates the LFP generation, and thereby facilitate quantitative comparison between computational models and experimental LFP recordings in vivo.

  19. Solar magnetic field - 1976 through 1985: an atlas of photospheric magnetic field observations and computed coronal magnetic fields from the John M. Wilcox Solar Observatory at Stanford, 1976-1985

    Hoeksema, J.T.; Scherrer, P.H.

    1986-01-01

    Daily magnetogram observations of the large-scale photospheric magnetic field have been made at the John M. Wilcox Solar Observatory at Stanford since May of 1976. These measurements provide a homogeneous record of the changing solar field through most of Solar Cycle 21. Using the photospheric data, the configuration of the coronal and heliospheric fields can be calculated using a Potential Field -- Source Surface model. This provides a 3-dimensional picture of the heliospheric field-evolution during the solar cycle. In this report the authors present the complete set of synoptic charts of the measured photospheric magnetic field, the computed field at the source surface, and the coefficients of the multipole expansion of the coronal field. The general underlying structure of the solar and heliospheric fields, which determine the environment for solar - terrestrial relations and provide the context within which solar-activity-related events occur, can be approximated from these data

  20. Ensemble of Neural Network Conditional Random Fields for Self-Paced Brain Computer Interfaces

    Hossein Bashashati

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Classification of EEG signals in self-paced Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI is an extremely challenging task. The main difficulty stems from the fact that start time of a control task is not defined. Therefore it is imperative to exploit the characteristics of the EEG data to the extent possible. In sensory motor self-paced BCIs, while performing the mental task, the user’s brain goes through several well-defined internal state changes. Applying appropriate classifiers that can capture these state changes and exploit the temporal correlation in EEG data can enhance the performance of the BCI. In this paper, we propose an ensemble learning approach for self-paced BCIs. We use Bayesian optimization to train several different classifiers on different parts of the BCI hyper- parameter space. We call each of these classifiers Neural Network Conditional Random Field (NNCRF. NNCRF is a combination of a neural network and conditional random field (CRF. As in the standard CRF, NNCRF is able to model the correlation between adjacent EEG samples. However, NNCRF can also model the nonlinear dependencies between the input and the output, which makes it more powerful than the standard CRF. We compare the performance of our algorithm to those of three popular sequence labeling algorithms (Hidden Markov Models, Hidden Markov Support Vector Machines and CRF, and to two classical classifiers (Logistic Regression and Support Vector Machines. The classifiers are compared for the two cases: when the ensemble learning approach is not used and when it is. The data used in our studies are those from the BCI competition IV and the SM2 dataset. We show that our algorithm is considerably superior to the other approaches in terms of the Area Under the Curve (AUC of the BCI system.

  1. Solution of Poisson equations for 3-dimensional grid generations. [computations of a flow field over a thin delta wing

    Fujii, K.

    1983-01-01

    A method for generating three dimensional, finite difference grids about complicated geometries by using Poisson equations is developed. The inhomogenous terms are automatically chosen such that orthogonality and spacing restrictions at the body surface are satisfied. Spherical variables are used to avoid the axis singularity, and an alternating-direction-implicit (ADI) solution scheme is used to accelerate the computations. Computed results are presented that show the capability of the method. Since most of the results presented have been used as grids for flow-field computations, this is indicative that the method is a useful tool for generating three-dimensional grids about complicated geometries.

  2. Significance of focal relaxation times in head injury

    Inao, Suguru; Furuse, Masahiro; Saso, Katsuyoshi; Yoshida, Kazuo; Motegi, Yoshimasa; Kaneoke, Yoshiki; Izawa, Akira

    1987-11-01

    Serial examinations by nuclear magnetic resonance-computed tomography were carried out in 35 head-injured patients aged 7 to 77 years. The injuries were classified as cerebral contusion (nine cases), acute epidural hematoma (eight cases), acute cerebral swelling (two cases), and chronic subdural hematoma (16 cases). The results of 92 measurements were divided into two groups: acute stage (within 3 days of injury) and chronic stage (2 weeks or longer after injury). The spin-lattice relaxation times (T/sub 1/) of brain tissue adjacent to chronic subdural hematoma were evaluated pre- and postoperatively. A Fonar QED 80-alpha system was used for magnetic resonance imaging and measurement of focal T/sub 1/. The T/sub 1/ values at the region of interest were measured 3 to 5 times by the field focusing technique (468 gauss in the focused spot), and the mean value was used for evaluation. The standard T/sub 1/ values obtained from healthy subjects were 290 +- 41 msec in the cerebral cortex and 230 +- 34 msec in the white matter. Prolongation of T/sub 1/ in perifocal brain gradually shortened over time and normalized in the chronic stage. The degree of contusional edema may have been reflected in alterations in T/sub 1/. In contrast, parenchymal injury resulted in a progressive T/sub 1/ elevation, which far exceeded 500 msec in the chronic stage. Such time courses of T/sub 1/ may indicate irreversible tissue damage. There were no noticeable changes in tissue T/sub 1/ over time in patients with acute diffuse cerebral swelling or those who underwent evacuation of acute epidural or chronic subdural hematomas. The underlying pathophysiology in such situations seems to be not brain edema but cerebral hyperemia. In the presence of ischemia, the T/sub 1/ value was prolonged in the early stage, reflecting progression of is chemic edema. (Abstract Truncated)

  3. Computation of Ground-State Properties in Molecular Systems: Back-Propagation with Auxiliary-Field Quantum Monte Carlo.

    Motta, Mario; Zhang, Shiwei

    2017-11-14

    We address the computation of ground-state properties of chemical systems and realistic materials within the auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo method. The phase constraint to control the Fermion phase problem requires the random walks in Slater determinant space to be open-ended with branching. This in turn makes it necessary to use back-propagation (BP) to compute averages and correlation functions of operators that do not commute with the Hamiltonian. Several BP schemes are investigated, and their optimization with respect to the phaseless constraint is considered. We propose a modified BP method for the computation of observables in electronic systems, discuss its numerical stability and computational complexity, and assess its performance by computing ground-state properties in several molecular systems, including small organic molecules.

  4. Homogenization of linear viscoelastic three phase media: internal variable formulation versus full-field computation

    Blanc, V.; Barbie, L.; Masson, R.

    2011-01-01

    Homogenization of linear viscoelastic heterogeneous media is here extended from two phase inclusion-matrix media to three phase inclusion-matrix media. Each phase obeying to a compressible Maxwellian behaviour, this analytic method leads to an equivalent elastic homogenization problem in the Laplace-Carson space. For some particular microstructures, such as the Hashin composite sphere assemblage, an exact solution is obtained. The inversion of the Laplace-Carson transforms of the overall stress-strain behaviour gives in such cases an internal variable formulation. As expected, the number of these internal variables and their evolution laws are modified to take into account the third phase. Moreover, evolution laws of averaged stresses and strains per phase can still be derived for three phase media. Results of this model are compared to full fields computations of representative volume elements using finite element method, for various concentrations and sizes of inclusion. Relaxation and creep test cases are performed in order to compare predictions of the effective response. The internal variable formulation is shown to yield accurate prediction in both cases. (authors)

  5. Current state of standardization in the field of dimensional computed tomography

    Bartscher, Markus; Härtig, Frank; Neuschaefer-Rube, Ulrich; Sato, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    Industrial x-ray computed tomography (CT) is a well-established non-destructive testing (NDT) technology and has been in use for decades. Moreover, CT has also started to become an important technology for dimensional metrology. But the requirements on dimensional CTs, i.e., on performing coordinate measurements with CT, are different from NDT. For dimensional measurements, the position of interfaces or surfaces is of importance, while this is often less critical in NDT. Standardization plays an important role here as it can create trust in new measurement technologies as is the case for dimensional CT. At the international standardization level, the ISO TC 213 WG 10 is working on specifications for dimensional CT. This paper highlights the demands on international standards in the field of dimensional CT and describes the current developments from the viewpoint of representatives of national and international standardization committees. Key aspects of the discussion are the material influence on the length measurement error E and how E can best be measured. A respective study was performed on hole plates as new reference standards for error testing of length measurements incorporating the material influence. We performed corresponding measurement data analysis and present a further elaborated hole plate design. The authors also comment on different approaches currently pursued and give an outlook on upcoming developments as far as they can be foreseen. (paper)

  6. System of operative computer control of power distribution fields in the Beloyarsk nuclear power plant

    Kulikov, N.Ya.; Snitko, Eh.I.; Rasputnis, A.M.; Solodov, V.P.

    1976-01-01

    Describes the system of intrareactor control over the reactors of the Byeloyarskaya Atomic Station. In the second block of the station, use is made of direct charge emission detectors installed in the central apertures of the superheater channels and operating reliably at temperatures up to 750 deg C. The detectors of the first and the second block are connected to the computer which sends the results of processing the signals to the printer, while the signals for deviations go to the mnemonic tablaux of the reactors. The good working order of the detectors is checked by comparison with zero as well as with the mean detector current for the reactor concerned. The application of the intrareactor control system has allowed the stable thermal power to be increased from 480-500 to 530 Mw and makes it possible to control and maintain the neutron field formed with a relative error of 3-4%. The structural scheme of the system of intrareactor control is given

  7. Do focal colors look particularly "colorful"?

    Witzel, Christoph; Franklin, Anna

    2014-04-01

    If the most typical red, yellow, green, and blue were particularly colorful (i.e., saturated), they would "jump out to the eye." This would explain why even fundamentally different languages have distinct color terms for these focal colors, and why unique hues play a prominent role in subjective color appearance. In this study, the subjective saturation of 10 colors around each of these focal colors was measured through a pairwise matching task. Results show that subjective saturation changes systematically across hues in a way that is strongly correlated to the visual gamut, and exponentially related to sensitivity but not to focal colors.

  8. Discrete Calderon’s projections on parallelepipeds and their application to computing exterior magnetic fields for FRC plasmas

    Kansa, E.; Shumlak, U.; Tsynkov, S.

    2013-01-01

    Confining dense plasma in a field reversed configuration (FRC) is considered a promising approach to fusion. Numerical simulation of this process requires setting artificial boundary conditions (ABCs) for the magnetic field because whereas the plasma itself occupies a bounded region (within the FRC coils), the field extends from this region all the way to infinity. If the plasma is modeled using single fluid magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), then the exterior magnetic field can be considered quasi-static. This field has a scalar potential governed by the Laplace equation. The quasi-static ABC for the magnetic field is obtained using the method of difference potentials, in the form of a discrete Calderon boundary equation with projection on the artificial boundary shaped as a parallelepiped. The Calderon projection itself is computed by convolution with the discrete fundamental solution on the three-dimensional Cartesian grid.

  9. Focal pancreatic enlargement: differentiation between pancreatic adenocarcinoma and focal pancreatitis on CT and ERCP

    Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Ki Whang; Lee, Jong Tae; Kim, Hee Soo; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Yu, Jeong Sik; Yoon, Sang Wook

    1995-01-01

    To differentiate the pancreatic adenocarcinoma from focal pancreatitis on CT and ERCP in cases of focal pancreatic enlargement. We analysed CT findings of 66 patients of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (n = 45) or focal pancreatitis (n = 21) with respect to size, density, calcification, pancreatic or biliary duct dilatation, fat plane obliteration around the vessels, direction of retroperitoneal extension, lymphadenopathy, pseudocyst formation and atrophy of pancreas. ERCP available in 48 patients were analysed in respect to morphologic appearance of CBD and pancreatic duct, and distance between the two ducts. The patients in focal pancreatitis were younger with more common history of alcohol drinking. There was no statistical difference in calcifications of the mass (18% in the adenocarcinoma, 33% in the focal pancreatitis), but a tendency of denser, larger number of calcifications was noted in focal pancreatitis. The finding of fat plane obliteration around the vessels were more common in pancreatic adenocarcinoma, and fascial thickenings were more prominent in focal pancreatitis, although not statistically significant. On ERCP, there were no differential points of CBD, pancreatic duct morphology, but distance between the two ducts at the lesion center was more wider in focal pancreatitis. Differentiating focal pancreatitis from pancreatic adenocarcinoma is difficult. However, we should consider the possibility of focal pancreatitis in cases of patients with young age, having alcoholic history in association with CT findings of large numbers of and dense calcifications, and ERCP findings of prominent separation of two duct at the lesion center

  10. Computational analysis of 'dose/collision kerma' relationship and lateral boundary in stereotactic circular fields using EGSNRC

    Leao Junior, Reginaldo G.; Oliveira, Arno H. de; Mourao, Arnaldo P. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departmento de Engenharia Nuclear; Sousa, Romulo V. de [Sao Joao de Deus Hospital, Divinopolis, MG (Brazil); Silva, Hugo L.L. [Santa Casa Hospital, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Objectives: This work aimed to obtain data from small fields of X-rays that evidence of the hypotheses cited as cause of difficulties for the dosimetry of these. For this purpose, the verification of compatibility between the dosimetric boundary of field and the geometric size of field, was performed. Also, the verification of kerma dose according to the expected relationship for conventional fields was made. Materials and Methods: Computer simulations of smaller fields 5 x 5 cm² were performed, using the Monte Carlo method by egs{sub c}hamber application, this derived from EGSnrc radiation transport code. As particulate sources were used phase space files of a Clinac 2100 head model coupled to cones Stereotactic Radiosurgery. Results: The simulations suggested the existence of a plateau in discrepancies between the dose FWHM and the nominal diameter of the field close to 8%. These simulations also indicated a decrease of these values for fields with diameters smaller than 12 mm and larger than 36 mm. Simultaneously, the dose kerma differences in depth reached values higher than 14% in the case where the phenomenon is more significant. Conclusion: The data showed that in fact the behavior of small fields clashes with that expected for conventional fields, and that the traditional dosimetric conventions do not apply to such fields requiring a specialized approach to the techniques that employ them. Furthermore, the existence of the aforementioned plateau of discrepancies, along with the decrease thereof in less than 15 mm diameter fields constitute a remarkable finding. (author)

  11. Angle dependent focal spot size of a conical X-ray target

    Saeed Raza, Hamid; Jin Kim, Hyun; Nam Kim, Hyun; Oh Cho, Sung

    2015-01-01

    Misaligned phantoms may severely affect the focal spot calculations. A method is proposed to determine the geometry of the X-ray target and the position of the image radiograph around the X-ray target to get a relatively smaller focal spot size. Results reveal that the focal spot size is not always isotropic around the target but it decreases as the point of observation shifts radially away from the center line of the conical X-ray target. This research will help in producing high quality X-ray images in multi-directions by properly aligning the phantoms and the radiograph tallies. - Highlights: • Misaligned phantoms may severely affect the focal spot calculations. • The aim of this research is to analyze systematically the angle dependent behavior of the focal spot size around a conical shaped X-ray target. • A general purpose Monte Carlo (MCNP5) computer code is used to achieve a relatively small focal spot size. • Angular distribution of the X-ray focal spot size mainly depends on the angular orientation of the phantom and its aligned FIR tally. • This research will help in producing high quality X-ray images in multi-directions

  12. Application of fluence field modulation to proton computed tomography for proton therapy imaging.

    Dedes, G; De Angelis, L; Rit, S; Hansen, D; Belka, C; Bashkirov, V; Johnson, R P; Coutrakon, G; Schubert, K E; Schulte, R W; Parodi, K; Landry, G

    2017-07-12

    This simulation study presents the application of fluence field modulated computed tomography, initially developed for x-ray CT, to proton computed tomography (pCT). By using pencil beam (PB) scanning, fluence modulated pCT (FMpCT) may achieve variable image quality in a pCT image and imaging dose reduction. Three virtual phantoms, a uniform cylinder and two patients, were studied using Monte Carlo simulations of an ideal list-mode pCT scanner. Regions of interest (ROI) were selected for high image quality and only PBs intercepting them preserved full fluence (FF). Image quality was investigated in terms of accuracy (mean) and noise (standard deviation) of the reconstructed proton relative stopping power compared to reference values. Dose calculation accuracy on FMpCT images was evaluated in terms of dose volume histograms (DVH), range difference (RD) for beam-eye-view (BEV) dose profiles and gamma evaluation. Pseudo FMpCT scans were created from broad beam experimental data acquired with a list-mode pCT prototype. FMpCT noise in ROIs was equivalent to FF images and accuracy better than  -1.3%(-0.7%) by using 1% of FF for the cylinder (patients). Integral imaging dose reduction of 37% and 56% was achieved for the two patients for that level of modulation. Corresponding DVHs from proton dose calculation on FMpCT images agreed to those from reference images and 96% of BEV profiles had RD below 2 mm, compared to only 1% for uniform 1% of FF. Gamma pass rates (2%, 2 mm) were 98% for FMpCT while for uniform 1% of FF they were as low as 59%. Applying FMpCT to preliminary experimental data showed that low noise levels and accuracy could be preserved in a ROI, down to 30% modulation. We have shown, using both virtual and experimental pCT scans, that FMpCT is potentially feasible and may allow a means of imaging dose reduction for a pCT scanner operating in PB scanning mode. This may be of particular importance to proton therapy given the low integral dose found

  13. Scheimpflug with computational imaging to extend the depth of field of iris recognition systems

    Sinharoy, Indranil

    Despite the enormous success of iris recognition in close-range and well-regulated spaces for biometric authentication, it has hitherto failed to gain wide-scale adoption in less controlled, public environments. The problem arises from a limitation in imaging called the depth of field (DOF): the limited range of distances beyond which subjects appear blurry in the image. The loss of spatial details in the iris image outside the small DOF limits the iris image capture to a small volume-the capture volume. Existing techniques to extend the capture volume are usually expensive, computationally intensive, or afflicted by noise. Is there a way to combine the classical Scheimpflug principle with the modern computational imaging techniques to extend the capture volume? The solution we found is, surprisingly, simple; yet, it provides several key advantages over existing approaches. Our method, called Angular Focus Stacking (AFS), consists of capturing a set of images while rotating the lens, followed by registration, and blending of the in-focus regions from the images in the stack. The theoretical underpinnings of AFS arose from a pair of new and general imaging models we developed for Scheimpflug imaging that directly incorporates the pupil parameters. The model revealed that we could register the images in the stack analytically if we pivot the lens at the center of its entrance pupil, rendering the registration process exact. Additionally, we found that a specific lens design further reduces the complexity of image registration making AFS suitable for real-time performance. We have demonstrated up to an order of magnitude improvement in the axial capture volume over conventional image capture without sacrificing optical resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. The total time required for capturing the set of images for AFS is less than the time needed for a single-exposure, conventional image for the same DOF and brightness level. The net reduction in capture time can

  14. COMPUTING

    M. Kasemann

    Overview In autumn the main focus was to process and handle CRAFT data and to perform the Summer08 MC production. The operational aspects were well covered by regular Computing Shifts, experts on duty and Computing Run Coordination. At the Computing Resource Board (CRB) in October a model to account for service work at Tier 2s was approved. The computing resources for 2009 were reviewed for presentation at the C-RRB. The quarterly resource monitoring is continuing. Facilities/Infrastructure operations Operations during CRAFT data taking ran fine. This proved to be a very valuable experience for T0 workflows and operations. The transfers of custodial data to most T1s went smoothly. A first round of reprocessing started at the Tier-1 centers end of November; it will take about two weeks. The Computing Shifts procedure was tested full scale during this period and proved to be very efficient: 30 Computing Shifts Persons (CSP) and 10 Computing Resources Coordinators (CRC). The shift program for the shut down w...

  15. Focal skin defect, limb anomalies and microphthalmia.

    Jackson, K.E.; Andersson, H.C.

    2004-01-01

    We describe two unrelated female patients with congenital single focal skin defects, unilateral microphthalmia and limb anomalies. Growth and psychomotor development were normal and no brain malformation was detected. Although eye and limb anomalies are commonly associated, clinical anophthalmia and

  16. Focal adhesions and cell-matrix interactions

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    1988-01-01

    Focal adhesions are areas of cell surfaces where specializations of cytoskeletal, membrane and extracellular components combine to produce stable cell-matrix interactions. The morphology of these adhesions and the components identified in them are discussed together with possible mechanisms...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: focal dermal hypoplasia

    ... in people with focal dermal hypoplasia is an omphalocele , which is an opening in the wall of ... Dermal Hypoplasia MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Ectodermal dysplasia MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Omphalocele General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests ...

  18. Computation of the Arnol close-quote d web for the hydrogen atom in crossed electric and magnetic fields

    von Milczewski, J.; Diercksen, G.H.; Uzer, T.

    1996-01-01

    A Rydberg atom placed in crossed static electric and magnetic fields is presented as a new testbed for phenomena not possible in two degrees of freedom. We compute the Arnol close-quote d web for this system and explore the time scale and the physical consequences of diffusion along this web. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  19. The Effects of CBI Lesson Sequence Type and Field Dependence on Learning from Computer-Based Cooperative Instruction in Web

    Ipek, Ismail

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of CBI lesson sequence type and cognitive style of field dependence on learning from Computer-Based Cooperative Instruction (CBCI) in WEB on the dependent measures, achievement, reading comprehension and reading rate. Eighty-seven college undergraduate students were randomly assigned to…

  20. Digital imaging of root traits (DIRT): a high-throughput computing and collaboration platform for field-based root phenomics.

    Das, Abhiram; Schneider, Hannah; Burridge, James; Ascanio, Ana Karine Martinez; Wojciechowski, Tobias; Topp, Christopher N; Lynch, Jonathan P; Weitz, Joshua S; Bucksch, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Plant root systems are key drivers of plant function and yield. They are also under-explored targets to meet global food and energy demands. Many new technologies have been developed to characterize crop root system architecture (CRSA). These technologies have the potential to accelerate the progress in understanding the genetic control and environmental response of CRSA. Putting this potential into practice requires new methods and algorithms to analyze CRSA in digital images. Most prior approaches have solely focused on the estimation of root traits from images, yet no integrated platform exists that allows easy and intuitive access to trait extraction and analysis methods from images combined with storage solutions linked to metadata. Automated high-throughput phenotyping methods are increasingly used in laboratory-based efforts to link plant genotype with phenotype, whereas similar field-based studies remain predominantly manual low-throughput. Here, we present an open-source phenomics platform "DIRT", as a means to integrate scalable supercomputing architectures into field experiments and analysis pipelines. DIRT is an online platform that enables researchers to store images of plant roots, measure dicot and monocot root traits under field conditions, and share data and results within collaborative teams and the broader community. The DIRT platform seamlessly connects end-users with large-scale compute "commons" enabling the estimation and analysis of root phenotypes from field experiments of unprecedented size. DIRT is an automated high-throughput computing and collaboration platform for field based crop root phenomics. The platform is accessible at http://www.dirt.iplantcollaborative.org/ and hosted on the iPlant cyber-infrastructure using high-throughput grid computing resources of the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC). DIRT is a high volume central depository and high-throughput RSA trait computation platform for plant scientists working on crop roots

  1. Computation of fields in an arbitrarily shaped heterogeneous dielectric or biological body by an iterative conjugate gradient method

    Wang, J.J.H.; Dubberley, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) fields in a three-dimensional, arbitrarily shaped heterogeneous dielectric or biological body illuminated by a plane wave are computed by an iterative conjugate gradient method. The method is a generalized method of moments applied to the volume integral equation. Because no matrix is explicitly involved or stored, the present iterative method is capable of computing EM fields in objects an order of magnitude larger than those that can be handled by the conventional method of moments. Excellent numerical convergence is achieved. Perfect convergence to the result of the conventional moment method using the same basis and weighted with delta functions is consistently achieved in all the cases computed, indicating that these two algorithms (direct and interactive) are equivalent

  2. Parallel computers and three-dimensional computational electromagnetics

    Madsen, N.K.

    1994-01-01

    The authors have continued to enhance their ability to use new massively parallel processing computers to solve time-domain electromagnetic problems. New vectorization techniques have improved the performance of their code DSI3D by factors of 5 to 15, depending on the computer used. New radiation boundary conditions and far-field transformations now allow the computation of radar cross-section values for complex objects. A new parallel-data extraction code has been developed that allows the extraction of data subsets from large problems, which have been run on parallel computers, for subsequent post-processing on workstations with enhanced graphics capabilities. A new charged-particle-pushing version of DSI3D is under development. Finally, DSI3D has become a focal point for several new Cooperative Research and Development Agreement activities with industrial companies such as Lockheed Advanced Development Company, Varian, Hughes Electron Dynamics Division, General Atomic, and Cray

  3. Focal lesions in the central nervous system

    Fabrikant, J.I.; Budinger, T.F.; Tobias, C.A.; Born, J.L.

    1980-01-01

    This report reviews the animal and human studies currently in progress at LBL with heavy-ion beams to induce focal lesions in the central nervous system, and discusses the potential future prospects of fundamental and applied brain research with heavy-ion beams. Methods are being developed for producing discrete focal lesions in the central nervous system using the Bragg ionization peak to investigate nerve pathways and neuroendocrine responses, and for treating pathological disorders of the brain

  4. COMPUTING

    I. Fisk

    2011-01-01

    Introduction CMS distributed computing system performed well during the 2011 start-up. The events in 2011 have more pile-up and are more complex than last year; this results in longer reconstruction times and harder events to simulate. Significant increases in computing capacity were delivered in April for all computing tiers, and the utilisation and load is close to the planning predictions. All computing centre tiers performed their expected functionalities. Heavy-Ion Programme The CMS Heavy-Ion Programme had a very strong showing at the Quark Matter conference. A large number of analyses were shown. The dedicated heavy-ion reconstruction facility at the Vanderbilt Tier-2 is still involved in some commissioning activities, but is available for processing and analysis. Facilities and Infrastructure Operations Facility and Infrastructure operations have been active with operations and several important deployment tasks. Facilities participated in the testing and deployment of WMAgent and WorkQueue+Request...

  5. COMPUTING

    P. McBride

    The Computing Project is preparing for a busy year where the primary emphasis of the project moves towards steady operations. Following the very successful completion of Computing Software and Analysis challenge, CSA06, last fall, we have reorganized and established four groups in computing area: Commissioning, User Support, Facility/Infrastructure Operations and Data Operations. These groups work closely together with groups from the Offline Project in planning for data processing and operations. Monte Carlo production has continued since CSA06, with about 30M events produced each month to be used for HLT studies and physics validation. Monte Carlo production will continue throughout the year in the preparation of large samples for physics and detector studies ramping to 50 M events/month for CSA07. Commissioning of the full CMS computing system is a major goal for 2007. Site monitoring is an important commissioning component and work is ongoing to devise CMS specific tests to be included in Service Availa...

  6. COMPUTING

    M. Kasemann

    Overview During the past three months activities were focused on data operations, testing and re-enforcing shift and operational procedures for data production and transfer, MC production and on user support. Planning of the computing resources in view of the new LHC calendar in ongoing. Two new task forces were created for supporting the integration work: Site Commissioning, which develops tools helping distributed sites to monitor job and data workflows, and Analysis Support, collecting the user experience and feedback during analysis activities and developing tools to increase efficiency. The development plan for DMWM for 2009/2011 was developed at the beginning of the year, based on the requirements from the Physics, Computing and Offline groups (see Offline section). The Computing management meeting at FermiLab on February 19th and 20th was an excellent opportunity discussing the impact and for addressing issues and solutions to the main challenges facing CMS computing. The lack of manpower is particul...

  7. Computer-aided detection system applied to full-field digital mammograms

    Vega Bolivar, Alfonso; Sanchez Gomez, Sonia; Merino, Paula; Alonso-Bartolome, Pilar; Ortega Garcia, Estrella; Munoz Cacho, Pedro; Hoffmeister, Jeffrey W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Although mammography remains the mainstay for breast cancer screening, it is an imperfect examination with a sensitivity of 75-92% for breast cancer. Computer-aided detection (CAD) has been developed to improve mammographic detection of breast cancer. Purpose: To retrospectively estimate CAD sensitivity and false-positive rate with full-field digital mammograms (FFDMs). Material and Methods: CAD was used to evaluate 151 cases of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) (n=48) and invasive breast cancer (n=103) detected with FFDM. Retrospectively, CAD sensitivity was estimated based on breast density, mammographic presentation, histopathology type, and lesion size. CAD false-positive rate was estimated with screening FFDMs from 200 women. Results: CAD detected 93% (141/151) of cancer cases: 97% (28/29) in fatty breasts, 94% (81/86) in breasts containing scattered fibroglandular densities, 90% (28/31) in heterogeneously dense breasts, and 80% (4/5) in extremely dense breasts. CAD detected 98% (54/55) of cancers manifesting as calcifications, 89% (74/83) as masses, and 100% (13/13) as mixed masses and calcifications. CAD detected 92% (73/79) of invasive ductal carcinomas, 89% (8/9) of invasive lobular carcinomas, 93% (14/15) of other invasive carcinomas, and 96% (46/48) of DCIS. CAD sensitivity for cancers 1-10 mm was 87% (47/54); 11-20 mm, 99% (70/71); 21-30 mm, 86% (12/14); and larger than 30 mm, 100% (12/12). The CAD false-positive rate was 2.5 marks per case. Conclusion: CAD with FFDM showed a high sensitivity in identifying cancers manifesting as calcifications or masses. CAD sensitivity was maintained in small lesions (1-20 mm) and invasive lobular carcinomas, which have lower mammographic sensitivity

  8. Population coding and decoding in a neural field: a computational study.

    Wu, Si; Amari, Shun-Ichi; Nakahara, Hiroyuki

    2002-05-01

    This study uses a neural field model to investigate computational aspects of population coding and decoding when the stimulus is a single variable. A general prototype model for the encoding process is proposed, in which neural responses are correlated, with strength specified by a gaussian function of their difference in preferred stimuli. Based on the model, we study the effect of correlation on the Fisher information, compare the performances of three decoding methods that differ in the amount of encoding information being used, and investigate the implementation of the three methods by using a recurrent network. This study not only rediscovers main results in existing literatures in a unified way, but also reveals important new features, especially when the neural correlation is strong. As the neural correlation of firing becomes larger, the Fisher information decreases drastically. We confirm that as the width of correlation increases, the Fisher information saturates and no longer increases in proportion to the number of neurons. However, we prove that as the width increases further--wider than (sqrt)2 times the effective width of the turning function--the Fisher information increases again, and it increases without limit in proportion to the number of neurons. Furthermore, we clarify the asymptotic efficiency of the maximum likelihood inference (MLI) type of decoding methods for correlated neural signals. It shows that when the correlation covers a nonlocal range of population (excepting the uniform correlation and when the noise is extremely small), the MLI type of method, whose decoding error satisfies the Cauchy-type distribution, is not asymptotically efficient. This implies that the variance is no longer adequate to measure decoding accuracy.

  9. Full field image reconstruction is suitable for high-pitch dual-source computed tomography.

    Mahnken, Andreas H; Allmendinger, Thomas; Sedlmair, Martin; Tamm, Miriam; Reinartz, Sebastian D; Flohr, Thomas

    2012-11-01

    The field of view (FOV) in high-pitch dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) is limited by the size of the second detector. The goal of this study was to develop and evaluate a full FOV image reconstruction technique for high-pitch DSCT. For reconstruction beyond the FOV of the second detector, raw data of the second system were extended to the full dimensions of the first system, using the partly existing data of the first system in combination with a very smooth transition weight function. During the weighted filtered backprojection, the data of the second system were applied with an additional weighting factor. This method was tested for different pitch values from 1.5 to 3.5 on a simulated phantom and on 25 high-pitch DSCT data sets acquired at pitch values of 1.6, 2.0, 2.5, 2.8, and 3.0. Images were reconstructed with FOV sizes of 260 × 260 and 500 × 500 mm. Image quality was assessed by 2 radiologists using a 5-point Likert scale and analyzed with repeated-measure analysis of variance. In phantom and patient data, full FOV image quality depended on pitch. Where complete projection data from both tube-detector systems were available, image quality was unaffected by pitch changes. Full FOV image quality was not compromised at pitch values of 1.6 and remained fully diagnostic up to a pitch of 2.0. At higher pitch values, there was an increasing difference in image quality between limited and full FOV images (P = 0.0097). With this new image reconstruction technique, full FOV image reconstruction can be used up to a pitch of 2.0.

  10. Full-field digital mammography versus computed radiology mammography: comparison in image quality and radiation dose

    Zhao Yongxia; Song Shaojuan; Liu Chuanya; Qi Hengtao; Qin Weichang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the differences in image quality and radiation dose between full- field digital mammography (FFDM) system and compute radiology mammography (CRM) system. Methods: The ALVIM mammographic phantom was exposed by FFDM system with automatic exposure control (AEC) and then exposed by CRM system with the unique imaging plank on the same condition. The FFDM system applied the same kV value and the different mAs values (14, 16, 18, 22 and 24 mAs), and the emission skin dose (ESD) and the average gland dose (AGD) were recorded for the above-mentioned exposure factors. All images were read by five experienced radiologists under the same condition and judged based on 5-point scales. And then receive operating characteristic (ROC) curve was drawn and the probability (P det ) values were calculated. The data were statistically processed with ANOVA. Results: The P det values of calcifications and lesion lump were higher with FFDM system than with CRM system at the same dose (1.36 mGy). Especially, for microcalcifications and lesion lump, the largest difference of the P det value was 0.215, and that of lesion lump was 0.245. In comparison with CRM system, the radiation dose of FFDM system could be reduced at the same P det value. The ESD value was reduced by 26%, and the ACD value was reduced by 41%. When the mAs value exceed AEC value, the P det value almost had no change, though the radiation dose was increased. Conclusions: The detection rates of microcalcifications and lesion lump with FFDM system are proven to be superior to CRM system at the same dose. The radiation dose of FFDM system was less than CRM system for the same image quality. (authors)

  11. Clinical Correlates of Computationally Derived Visual Field Defect Archetypes in Patients from a Glaucoma Clinic.

    Cai, Sophie; Elze, Tobias; Bex, Peter J; Wiggs, Janey L; Pasquale, Louis R; Shen, Lucy Q

    2017-04-01

    To assess the clinical validity of visual field (VF) archetypal analysis, a previously developed machine learning method for decomposing any Humphrey VF (24-2) into a weighted sum of clinically recognizable VF loss patterns. For each of 16 previously identified VF loss patterns ("archetypes," denoted AT1 through AT16), we screened 30,995 reliable VFs to select 10-20 representative patients whose VFs had the highest decomposition coefficients for each archetype. VF global indices and patient ocular and demographic features were extracted retrospectively. Based on resemblances between VF archetypes and clinically observed VF patterns, hypotheses were generated for associations between certain VF archetypes and clinical features, such as an association between AT6 (central island, representing severe VF loss) and large cup-to-disk ratio (CDR). Distributions of the selected clinical features were compared between representative eyes of certain archetypes and all other eyes using the two-tailed t-test or Fisher exact test. 243 eyes from 243 patients were included, representative of AT1 through AT16. CDR was more often ≥ 0.7 among eyes representative of AT6 (central island; p = 0.002), AT10 (inferior arcuate defect; p = 0.048), AT14 (superior paracentral defect; p = 0.016), and AT16 (inferior paracentral defect; p = 0.016) than other eyes. CDR was more often 6D (p = 0.069). Shared clinical features between computationally derived VF archetypes and clinically observed VF patterns support the clinical validity of VF archetypal analysis.

  12. Small field dose delivery evaluations using cone beam optical computed tomography-based polymer gel dosimetry

    Timothy Olding

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the combination of cone beam optical computed tomography with an N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM-based polymer gel dosimeter for three-dimensional dose imaging of small field deliveries. Initial investigations indicate that cone beam optical imaging of polymer gels is complicated by scattered stray light perturbation. This can lead to significant dosimetry failures in comparison to dose readout by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. For example, only 60% of the voxels from an optical CT dose readout of a 1 l dosimeter passed a two-dimensional Low′s gamma test (at a 3%, 3 mm criteria, relative to a treatment plan for a well-characterized pencil beam delivery. When the same dosimeter was probed by MRI, a 93% pass rate was observed. The optical dose measurement was improved after modifications to the dosimeter preparation, matching its performance with the imaging capabilities of the scanner. With the new dosimeter preparation, 99.7% of the optical CT voxels passed a Low′s gamma test at the 3%, 3 mm criteria and 92.7% at a 2%, 2 mm criteria. The fitted interjar dose responses of a small sample set of modified dosimeters prepared (a from the same gel batch and (b from different gel batches prepared on the same day were found to be in agreement to within 3.6% and 3.8%, respectively, over the full dose range. Without drawing any statistical conclusions, this experiment gives a preliminary indication that intrabatch or interbatch NIPAM dosimeters prepared on the same day should be suitable for dose sensitivity calibration.

  13. Computer-aided detection system applied to full-field digital mammograms

    Vega Bolivar, Alfonso; Sanchez Gomez, Sonia; Merino, Paula; Alonso-Bartolome, Pilar; Ortega Garcia, Estrella (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Marques of Valdecilla Hospital, Santander (Spain)), e-mail: avegab@telefonica.net; Munoz Cacho, Pedro (Dept. of Statistics, Univ. Marques of Valdecilla Hospital, Santander (Spain)); Hoffmeister, Jeffrey W. (iCAD, Inc., Nashua, NH (United States))

    2010-12-15

    Background: Although mammography remains the mainstay for breast cancer screening, it is an imperfect examination with a sensitivity of 75-92% for breast cancer. Computer-aided detection (CAD) has been developed to improve mammographic detection of breast cancer. Purpose: To retrospectively estimate CAD sensitivity and false-positive rate with full-field digital mammograms (FFDMs). Material and Methods: CAD was used to evaluate 151 cases of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) (n=48) and invasive breast cancer (n=103) detected with FFDM. Retrospectively, CAD sensitivity was estimated based on breast density, mammographic presentation, histopathology type, and lesion size. CAD false-positive rate was estimated with screening FFDMs from 200 women. Results: CAD detected 93% (141/151) of cancer cases: 97% (28/29) in fatty breasts, 94% (81/86) in breasts containing scattered fibroglandular densities, 90% (28/31) in heterogeneously dense breasts, and 80% (4/5) in extremely dense breasts. CAD detected 98% (54/55) of cancers manifesting as calcifications, 89% (74/83) as masses, and 100% (13/13) as mixed masses and calcifications. CAD detected 92% (73/79) of invasive ductal carcinomas, 89% (8/9) of invasive lobular carcinomas, 93% (14/15) of other invasive carcinomas, and 96% (46/48) of DCIS. CAD sensitivity for cancers 1-10 mm was 87% (47/54); 11-20 mm, 99% (70/71); 21-30 mm, 86% (12/14); and larger than 30 mm, 100% (12/12). The CAD false-positive rate was 2.5 marks per case. Conclusion: CAD with FFDM showed a high sensitivity in identifying cancers manifesting as calcifications or masses. CAD sensitivity was maintained in small lesions (1-20 mm) and invasive lobular carcinomas, which have lower mammographic sensitivity

  14. Single-lens computed tomography imaging spectrometer and method of capturing spatial and spectral information

    Wilson, Daniel W. (Inventor); Johnson, William R. (Inventor); Bearman, Gregory H. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomography imaging spectrometers ("CTISs") employing a single lens are provided. The CTISs may be either transmissive or reflective, and the single lens is either configured to transmit and receive uncollimated light (in transmissive systems), or is configured to reflect and receive uncollimated light (in reflective systems). An exemplary transmissive CTIS includes a focal plane array detector, a single lens configured to transmit and receive uncollimated light, a two-dimensional grating, and a field stop aperture. An exemplary reflective CTIS includes a focal plane array detector, a single mirror configured to reflect and receive uncollimated light, a two-dimensional grating, and a field stop aperture.

  15. High-speed algorithm for calculating the neutron field in a reactor when working in dialog mode with a computer

    Afanas'ev, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    The large-scale construction of atomic power stations results in a need for trainers to instruct power-station personnel. The present work considers one problem of developing training computer software, associated with the development of a high-speed algorithm for calculating the neutron field after control-rod (CR) shift by the operator. The case considered here is that in which training units are developed on the basis of small computers of SM-2 type, which fall significantly short of the BESM-6 and EC-type computers used for the design calculations, in terms of speed and memory capacity. Depending on the apparatus for solving the criticality problem, in a two-dimensional single-group approximation, the physical-calculation programs require ∼ 1 min of machine time on a BESM-6 computer, which translates to ∼ 10 min on an SM-2 machine. In practice, this time is even longer, since ultimately it is necessary to determine not the effective multiplication factor K/sub ef/, but rather the local perturbations of the emergency-control (EC) system (to reach criticality) and change in the neutron field on shifting the CR and the EC rods. This long time means that it is very problematic to use physical-calculation programs to work in dialog mode with a computer. The algorithm presented below allows the neutron field following shift of the CR and EC rods to be calculated in a few seconds on a BESM-6 computer (tens of second on an SM-2 machine. This high speed may be achieved as a result of the preliminary calculation of the influence function (IF) for each CR. The IF may be calculated at high speed on a computer. Then it is stored in the external memory (EM) and, where necessary, used as the initial information

  16. Evaluation of the optimum region for mammographic system using computer simulation to study modulation transfer functions

    Oliveira, Isaura N. Sombra; Schiable, Homero; Porcel, Naider T.; Frere, Annie F.; Marques, Paulo M.A.

    1996-01-01

    An investigation of the 'optimum region' of the radiation field considering mammographic systems is studied. Such a region was defined in previous works as the field range where the system has its best performance and sharpest images. This study is based on a correlation of two methods for evaluating radiologic imaging systems, both using computer simulation in order to determine modulation transfer functions (MTFs) due to the X-ray tube focal spot in several field orientation and locations

  17. Sighting optics including an optical element having a first focal length and a second focal length

    Crandall, David Lynn [Idaho Falls, ID

    2011-08-01

    One embodiment of sighting optics according to the teachings provided herein may include a front sight and a rear sight positioned in spaced-apart relation. The rear sight includes an optical element having a first focal length and a second focal length. The first focal length is selected so that it is about equal to a distance separating the optical element and the front sight and the second focal length is selected so that it is about equal to a target distance. The optical element thus brings into simultaneous focus, for a user, images of the front sight and the target.

  18. Natural-focal diseases: mapping experience in Russia.

    Malkhazova, Svetlana M; Mironova, Varvara A; Kotova, Tatiana V; Shartova, Natalia V; Orlov, Dmitry S

    2014-06-14

    Natural-focal diseases constitute a serious hazard for human health. Agents and vectors of such diseases belong to natural landscapes. The aim of this study is to identify the diversity and geography of natural-focal diseases in Russia and to develop cartographic approaches for their mapping, including mathematical-cartographical modeling. Russian medico-geographical mapping of natural-focal diseases is highly developed regionally and locally but extremely limited at the national level. To solve this problem, a scientific team of the Faculty of Geography at Lomonosov Moscow State University has developed and implemented a project of a medico-geographical Atlas of Russia "Natural-Focal Diseases". The mapping is based on medical statistics data. The Atlas contains a series of maps on disease incidence, long-term dynamics of disease morbidity, etc. In addition, other materials available to the authors were used: mapping of the natural environment, field data, archival materials, analyzed satellite images, etc. The maps are processed using ArcGIS (ESRI) software application. Different methods of rendering of mapped phenomena are used (geographical ranges, diagrams, choropleth maps etc.). A series of analytical, integrated, and synthetic maps shows disease incidence in the population at both the national and regional levels for the last 15 years. Maps of the mean annual morbidity of certain infections and maps of morbidity dynamics and nosological profiles allow for a detailed analysis of the situation for each of 83 administrative units of the Russian Federation. The degree of epidemic hazard in Russia by natural-focal diseases is reflected in a synthetic medico-geographical map that shows the degree of epidemic risks due to such diseases in Russia and allows one to estimate the risk of disease manifestation in a given region. This is the first attempt at aggregation and public presentation of diverse and multifaceted information about natural-focal diseases in Russia

  19. Radiofrequency Ablation Effectively Treated Focal Recurrence of Mesothelioma.

    Nakamura, Akifumi; Takuwa, Teruhisa; Hashimoto, Masaki; Kondo, Nobuyuki; Takaki, Haruyuki; Fujiwara, Masayuki; Yamakado, Koichiro; Hasegawa, Seiki

    2018-02-01

    A 55-year-old man with malignant pleural mesothelioma underwent multimodality treatment comprising induction chemotherapy followed by extrapleural pneumonectomy and radiation therapy. After 2.5 years, focal recurrence occurred, with computed tomography revealing a tumor in the left cardiophrenic angle. Surgery was considered a problem for the patient because of the previous extrapleural pneumonectomy and difficult tumor location. Radiofrequency ablation was thus performed; the course was uneventful, and there was no recurrence. Radiofrequency ablation should be considered an option to treat recurrence of malignant pleural mesothelioma. Copyright © 2018 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. COMPUTING

    I. Fisk

    2013-01-01

    Computing activity had ramped down after the completion of the reprocessing of the 2012 data and parked data, but is increasing with new simulation samples for analysis and upgrade studies. Much of the Computing effort is currently involved in activities to improve the computing system in preparation for 2015. Operations Office Since the beginning of 2013, the Computing Operations team successfully re-processed the 2012 data in record time, not only by using opportunistic resources like the San Diego Supercomputer Center which was accessible, to re-process the primary datasets HTMHT and MultiJet in Run2012D much earlier than planned. The Heavy-Ion data-taking period was successfully concluded in February collecting almost 500 T. Figure 3: Number of events per month (data) In LS1, our emphasis is to increase efficiency and flexibility of the infrastructure and operation. Computing Operations is working on separating disk and tape at the Tier-1 sites and the full implementation of the xrootd federation ...

  1. Using fluence separation to account for energy spectra dependence in computing dosimetric a-Si EPID images for IMRT fields

    Li Weidong; Siebers, Jeffrey V.; Moore, Joseph A.

    2006-01-01

    This study develops a method to improve the dosimetric accuracy of computed images for an amorphous silicon flat-panel imager. Radially dependent kernels derived from Monte Carlo simulations are convolved with the treatment-planning system's energy fluence. Multileaf collimator (MLC) beam hardening is accounted for by having separate kernels for open and blocked portions of MLC fields. Field-size-dependent output factors are used to account for the field-size dependence of scatter within the imager. Gamma analysis was used to evaluate open and sliding window test fields and intensity modulated patient fields. For each tested field, at least 99.6% of the points had γ<1 with a 3%, 3-mm criteria. With a 2%, 2-mm criteria, between 81% and 100% of points had γ<1. Patient intensity modulated test fields had 94%-100% of the points with γ<1 with a 2%, 2-mm criteria for all six fields tested. This study demonstrates that including the dependencies of kernel and fluence on radius and beam hardening in the convolution improves its accuracy compared with the use of radial and beam-hardening independent kernels; it also demonstrates that the resultant accuracy of the convolution method is sufficient for pretreatment, intensity modulated patient field verification

  2. Field-scale multi-phase LNAPL remediation: Validating a new computational framework against sequential field pilot trials.

    Sookhak Lari, Kaveh; Johnston, Colin D; Rayner, John L; Davis, Greg B

    2018-03-05

    Remediation of subsurface systems, including groundwater, soil and soil gas, contaminated with light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) is challenging. Field-scale pilot trials of multi-phase remediation were undertaken at a site to determine the effectiveness of recovery options. Sequential LNAPL skimming and vacuum-enhanced skimming, with and without water table drawdown were trialled over 78days; in total extracting over 5m 3 of LNAPL. For the first time, a multi-component simulation framework (including the multi-phase multi-component code TMVOC-MP and processing codes) was developed and applied to simulate the broad range of multi-phase remediation and recovery methods used in the field trials. This framework was validated against the sequential pilot trials by comparing predicted and measured LNAPL mass removal rates and compositional changes. The framework was tested on both a Cray supercomputer and a cluster. Simulations mimicked trends in LNAPL recovery rates (from 0.14 to 3mL/s) across all remediation techniques each operating over periods of 4-14days over the 78day trial. The code also approximated order of magnitude compositional changes of hazardous chemical concentrations in extracted gas during vacuum-enhanced recovery. The verified framework enables longer term prediction of the effectiveness of remediation approaches allowing better determination of remediation endpoints and long-term risks. Copyright © 2017 Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. [A case of focal epilepsy manifesting multiple psychiatric auras].

    Ezura, Michinori; Kakisaka, Yosuke; Jin, Kazutaka; Kato, Kazuhiro; Iwasaki, Masaki; Fujikawa, Mayu; Aoki, Masashi; Nakasato, Nobukazu

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of epilepsy with multiple types of focal seizures that were misdiagnosed as psychiatric disorders. A 20-year-old female patient presented with a variety of episodes, including loss of consciousness, deja vu, fear, delusion of possession, violent movements, and generalized convulsions. Each of these symptoms appeared in a stereotypic manner. She was initially diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder and treated with psychoactive medications, which had no effect. Long-term video electroencephalography revealed that her episodes of violent movement with impaired consciousness and secondarily generalized seizure were epileptic events originating in the right hemisphere. High-field brain magnetic resonance imaging for detecting subtle lesions revealed bilateral lesions from periventricular nodular heterotopia. Her final diagnosis was right hemispheric focal epilepsy. Carbamazepine administration was started, which successfully controlled all seizures. The present case demonstrates the pitfall of diagnosing focal epilepsy when it presents with multiple types of psychiatric aura. Epilepsy should thus be included in differential diagnoses, considering the stereotypic nature of symptoms, to avoid misdiagnosis.

  4. Logging into the Field—Methodological Reflections on Ethnographic Research in a Pluri-Local and Computer-Mediated Field

    Heike Mónika Greschke

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to introduce an ethnic group inhabiting a common virtual space in the World Wide Web (WWW, while being physically located in different socio-geographical contexts. Potentially global in its geographical extent, this social formation is constituted by means of interrelating virtual-global dimensions with physically grounded parts of the actors' lifeworlds. In addition, the communities' social life relies on specific communicative practices joining mediated forms of communication with co-presence based encounters. Ethnographic research in a pluri-local and computer-mediated field poses a set of problems which demand thorough reflection as well as a search for creative solutions. How can the boundaries of the field be determined? What does "being there" signify in such a case? Is it possible to enter the field while sitting at my own desk, just by visiting the respective site in the WWW, simply observing the communication going on without even being noticed by the subjects in the field? Or does "being in the field" imply that I ought to turn into a member of the studied community? Am I supposed to effectively live with the others for a while? And then, what can "living together" actually mean in that case? Will I learn enough about the field simply by participating in its virtual activities? Or do I have to account for the physically grounded dimensions of the actors' lifeworlds, as well? Ethnographic research in a pluri-local and computer-mediated field in practice raises a lot of questions regarding the ways of entering the field and being in the field. Some of them will be discussed in this paper by means of reflecting research experiences gained in the context of a recently concluded case study. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0703321

  5. Ultrasonographic detection of focal liver lesions: increased sensitivity and specificity with microbubble contrast agents

    Hohmann, J.; Albrecht, T.; Hoffmann, C.W.; Wolf, K.-J.

    2003-01-01

    Ultrasonography (US) is the first choice for screening patients with suspected liver lesions. However, due to a lack of contrast agents, US used to be less sensitive and specific compared with computed tomography (CT) and magnet resonance imaging (MRI). The advent of microbubble contrast agents increased both sensitivity and specificity dramatically. Rapid developments of the contrast agents as well as of special imaging techniques were made in recent years. Today numerous different US imaging methods exist which based either on Doppler or on harmonic imaging. They are using the particular behaviour of microbubbles in a sound field which varies depending on the energy of insonation (low/high mechanical index, MI) as well as on the properties of the agent themselves. Apart from just blood pool enhancement some agents have a hepatosplenic specific late phase. US imaging during this late phase using relatively high MI in phase inversion mode (harmonic imaging) or stimulated acoustic emission (SAE; Doppler method) markedly improves the detection of focal liver lesions and is also very helpful for lesion characterisation. With regards to detection, contrast enhanced US performs similarly to CT as shown by recent studies. Early results of studies using low MI imaging and the newer perfluor agents are also showing promising results for lesion detection. Low MI imaging with these agents has the advantage of real time imaging and is particularly helpful for characterisation of focal lesions based on their dynamic contrast behaviour. Apart from the techniques which based on the morphology of liver lesions there were some attempts for the detection of occult metastases or micrometastases by means of liver blood flow changes. Also in this field the use of US contrast agents appears to have advantages over formerly used non contrast-enhanced methods although no conclusive results are available yet

  6. Transparent meta-analysis: does aging spare prospective memory with focal vs. non-focal cues?

    Bob Uttl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prospective memory (ProM is the ability to become aware of a previously-formed plan at the right time and place. For over twenty years, researchers have been debating whether prospective memory declines with aging or whether it is spared by aging and, most recently, whether aging spares prospective memory with focal vs. non-focal cues. Two recent meta-analyses examining these claims did not include all relevant studies and ignored prevalent ceiling effects, age confounds, and did not distinguish between prospective memory subdomains (e.g., ProM proper, vigilance, habitual ProM (see Uttl, 2008, PLoS ONE. The present meta-analysis focuses on the following questions: Does prospective memory decline with aging? Does prospective memory with focal vs. non-focal cues decline with aging? Does the size of age-related declines with focal vs. non-focal cues vary across ProM subdomains? And are age-related declines in ProM smaller than age-related declines in retrospective memory? METHODS AND FINDINGS: A meta-analysis of event-cued ProM using data visualization and modeling, robust count methods, and conventional meta-analysis techniques revealed that first, the size of age-related declines in ProM with both focal and non-focal cues are large. Second, age-related declines in ProM with focal cues are larger in ProM proper and smaller in vigilance. Third, age-related declines in ProM proper with focal cues are as large as age-related declines in recall measures of retrospective memory. CONCLUSIONS: The results are consistent with Craik's (1983 proposal that age-related declines on ProM tasks are generally large, support the distinction between ProM proper vs. vigilance, and directly contradict widespread claims that ProM, with or without focal cues, is spared by aging.

  7. Focal thyroid inferno” on color Doppler ultrasonography: A specific feature of focal Hashimoto's thyroiditis

    Fu, Xianshui; Guo, Limei; Zhang, Huabin; Ran, Weiqiang; Fu, Peng; Li, Zhiqiang; Chen, Wen; Jiang, Ling; Wang, Jinrui; Jia, Jianwen

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate color-Doppler features predictive of focal Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Materials and methods: A total of 521 patients with 561 thyroid nodules that underwent surgeries or gun biopsies were included in this study. These nodules were divided into three groups: focal Hashimoto's thyroiditis (104 nodules in 101 patients), benignity other than focal Hashimoto's thyroiditis (73 nodules in 70 patients), and malignancy (358 nodules in 350 patients). On color Doppler sonography, four vascularity types were determined as: hypovascularity, marked internal flow, marked peripheral flow and focal thyroid inferno. The χ 2 test was performed to seek the potential vascularity type with the predictive ability of certain thyroid pathology. Furthermore, the gray-scale features of each nodule were also studied. Results: The vascularity type I (hypovascularity) was more often seen in focal Hashimoto's thyroiditis than other benignity and malignancy (46% vs. 20.5% and 19%). While the type II (marked internal flow) showed the opposite tendency (26.9% [focal Hashimoto's thyroiditis] vs. 45.2% [other benignity] and 52.8% [malignancy]). However, type III (marked peripheral flow) was unable to predict any thyroid pathology. Importantly, type IV (focal thyroid inferno) was exclusive to focal Hashimoto's thyroiditis. All 8 type IV nodules appeared to be solid, hypoechoic, and well-defined. Using “focal thyroid inferno” as an indicator of FHT, the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were 7.7% and 100% respectively. Conclusions: The vascularity type of “focal thyroid inferno” is specific for focal Hashimoto thyroiditis. Recognition of this particular feature may avoid unnecessary interventional procedures for some solid hypoechoic thyroid nodules suspicious of malignancy.

  8. Beyond mean-field approximations for accurate and computationally efficient models of on-lattice chemical kinetics

    Pineda, M.; Stamatakis, M.

    2017-07-01

    Modeling the kinetics of surface catalyzed reactions is essential for the design of reactors and chemical processes. The majority of microkinetic models employ mean-field approximations, which lead to an approximate description of catalytic kinetics by assuming spatially uncorrelated adsorbates. On the other hand, kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) methods provide a discrete-space continuous-time stochastic formulation that enables an accurate treatment of spatial correlations in the adlayer, but at a significant computation cost. In this work, we use the so-called cluster mean-field approach to develop higher order approximations that systematically increase the accuracy of kinetic models by treating spatial correlations at a progressively higher level of detail. We further demonstrate our approach on a reduced model for NO oxidation incorporating first nearest-neighbor lateral interactions and construct a sequence of approximations of increasingly higher accuracy, which we compare with KMC and mean-field. The latter is found to perform rather poorly, overestimating the turnover frequency by several orders of magnitude for this system. On the other hand, our approximations, while more computationally intense than the traditional mean-field treatment, still achieve tremendous computational savings compared to KMC simulations, thereby opening the way for employing them in multiscale modeling frameworks.

  9. A Computational Model for Real-Time Calculation of Electric Field due to Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Clinics

    Alessandra Paffi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to propose an approach for an accurate and fast (real-time computation of the electric field induced inside the whole brain volume during a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS procedure. The numerical solution implements the admittance method for a discretized realistic brain model derived from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI. Results are in a good agreement with those obtained using commercial codes and require much less computational time. An integration of the developed code with neuronavigation tools will permit real-time evaluation of the stimulated brain regions during the TMS delivery, thus improving the efficacy of clinical applications.

  10. Computer aided detection of clusters of microcalcifications on full field digital mammograms

    Ge Jun; Sahiner, Berkman; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Chan, H.-P.; Wei Jun; Helvie, Mark A.; Zhou Chuan

    2006-01-01

    We are developing a computer-aided detection (CAD) system to identify microcalcification clusters (MCCs) automatically on full field digital mammograms (FFDMs). The CAD system includes six stages: preprocessing; image enhancement; segmentation of microcalcification candidates; false positive (FP) reduction for individual microcalcifications; regional clustering; and FP reduction for clustered microcalcifications. At the stage of FP reduction for individual microcalcifications, a truncated sum-of-squares error function was used to improve the efficiency and robustness of the training of an artificial neural network in our CAD system for FFDMs. At the stage of FP reduction for clustered microcalcifications, morphological features and features derived from the artificial neural network outputs were extracted from each cluster. Stepwise linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was used to select the features. An LDA classifier was then used to differentiate clustered microcalcifications from FPs. A data set of 96 cases with 192 images was collected at the University of Michigan. This data set contained 96 MCCs, of which 28 clusters were proven by biopsy to be malignant and 68 were proven to be benign. The data set was separated into two independent data sets for training and testing of the CAD system in a cross-validation scheme. When one data set was used to train and validate the convolution neural network (CNN) in our CAD system, the other data set was used to evaluate the detection performance. With the use of a truncated error metric, the training of CNN could be accelerated and the classification performance was improved. The CNN in combination with an LDA classifier could substantially reduce FPs with a small tradeoff in sensitivity. By using the free-response receiver operating characteristic methodology, it was found that our CAD system can achieve a cluster-based sensitivity of 70, 80, and 90 % at 0.21, 0.61, and 1.49 FPs/image, respectively. For case

  11. COMPUTING

    I. Fisk

    2010-01-01

    Introduction It has been a very active quarter in Computing with interesting progress in all areas. The activity level at the computing facilities, driven by both organised processing from data operations and user analysis, has been steadily increasing. The large-scale production of simulated events that has been progressing throughout the fall is wrapping-up and reprocessing with pile-up will continue. A large reprocessing of all the proton-proton data has just been released and another will follow shortly. The number of analysis jobs by users each day, that was already hitting the computing model expectations at the time of ICHEP, is now 33% higher. We are expecting a busy holiday break to ensure samples are ready in time for the winter conferences. Heavy Ion An activity that is still in progress is computing for the heavy-ion program. The heavy-ion events are collected without zero suppression, so the event size is much large at roughly 11 MB per event of RAW. The central collisions are more complex and...

  12. COMPUTING

    M. Kasemann P. McBride Edited by M-C. Sawley with contributions from: P. Kreuzer D. Bonacorsi S. Belforte F. Wuerthwein L. Bauerdick K. Lassila-Perini M-C. Sawley

    Introduction More than seventy CMS collaborators attended the Computing and Offline Workshop in San Diego, California, April 20-24th to discuss the state of readiness of software and computing for collisions. Focus and priority were given to preparations for data taking and providing room for ample dialog between groups involved in Commissioning, Data Operations, Analysis and MC Production. Throughout the workshop, aspects of software, operating procedures and issues addressing all parts of the computing model were discussed. Plans for the CMS participation in STEP’09, the combined scale testing for all four experiments due in June 2009, were refined. The article in CMS Times by Frank Wuerthwein gave a good recap of the highly collaborative atmosphere of the workshop. Many thanks to UCSD and to the organizers for taking care of this workshop, which resulted in a long list of action items and was definitely a success. A considerable amount of effort and care is invested in the estimate of the comput...

  13. Applications of field portable computers to NDE of nuclear power plant steam turbine/generator rotors, discs, and retaining rings

    Reinhart, E.R.; Leon-Salamanca, T.

    2004-01-01

    The new generation of compact, powerful portable computers have been incorporated into a number of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) systems used to inspect critical areas of the steam turbine and generator units of nuclear power plants. Due to the complex geometry of turbine rotors, generator rotors, retaining rings, and shrunk-on turbine discs, the computers are needed to rapidly calculate the optimum position of an ultrasonic transducer or eddy current probe in order to detect defects at several critical areas. Examples where computers have been used to overcome problems in nondestructive evaluation include; analysis of large numbers of closely spaced near-bore ultrasonic reflectors to determine their potential for link-up in turbine and generator rotor bores, distinguishing ultrasonic crack signals from other reflectors such as the shrink-fit form reflector detected during ultrasonic scanning of shrunk-on generator retaining rings, and detection and recording of eddy current and ultrasonic signals from defects that could be missed by data acquisition systems with inadequate response. The computers are also used to control scanners to insure total inspection coverage. To facilitate the use of data from detected discontinuities in conjunction with stress and fracture mechanics analysis programs, the computers provide presentations of flaws in color and in three dimensions. The field computers have been instrumental in allowing the inspectors to develop on-site reports that enable the owner/operator to rapidly make run/repair/replace decisions. Examples of recent experiences using field portable computers in NDE systems will be presented along with anticipated future developments. (author)

  14. Advanced methods for the computation of particle beam transport and the computation of electromagnetic fields and beam-cavity interactions. Progress report, July 1993--August 1994

    Dragt, A.J.; Gluckstern, R.L.

    1994-08-01

    The University of Maryland Dynamical Systems and Accelerator Theory Group has been carrying out long-term research work in the general area of Dynamical Systems with a particular emphasis on applications to Accelerator Physics. This work is broadly divided into two tasks: the computation of charged particle beam transport and the computation of electromagnetic fields and beam-cavity interactions. Each of these tasks is described briefly. Work is devoted both to the development of new methods and the application of these methods to problems of current interest in accelerator physics including the theoretical performance of present and proposed high energy machines. In addition to its research effort, the Dynamical Systems and Accelerator Theory Group is actively engaged in the education of students and postdoctoral research associates. Substantial progress in research has been made during the past year. These achievements are summarized in the following report

  15. Autoblocking dose-limiting normal structures within a radiation treatment field: 3-D computer optimization of 'unconventional' field arrangements

    Bates, Brian A.; Cullip, Timothy J.; Rosenman, Julian G.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To demonstrate that one can obtain a homogeneous dose distribution within a specified gross tumor volume (GTV) while severely limiting the dose to a structure surrounded by that tumor volume. We present three clinical examples below. Materials and Methods: Using planning CT scans from previously treated patients, we designed variety of radiation treatment plans in which the dose-critical normal structure was blocked, even if it meant blocking some of the tumor. To deal with the resulting dose inhomogeneities within the tumor, we introduced 3D compensation. Examples presented here include (1) blocking the spinal cord segment while treating an entire vertebral body, (2) blocking both kidneys while treating the entire peritoneal cavity, and (3) blocking one parotid gland while treating the oropharynx in its entirety along with regional nodes. A series of multiple planar and non-coplanar beam templates with automatic anatomic blocking and field shaping were designed for each scenario. Three-dimensional compensators were designed that gave the most homogeneous dose-distribution for the GTV. For each beam, rays were cast from the beam source through a 2D compensator grid and out through the tumor. The average tumor dose along each ray was then used to adjust the compensator thickness over successive iterations to achieve a uniform average dose. DVH calculations for the GTV, normal structures, and the 'auto-blocked' structure were made and used for inter-plan comparisons. Results: These optimized treatment plans successfully decreased dose to the dose-limiting structure while at the same time preserving or even improving the dose distribution to the tumor volume as compared to traditional treatment plans. Conclusion: The use of 3D compensation allows one to obtain dose distributions that are, theoretically, at least, far superior to those in common clinical use. Sensible beam templates, auto-blocking, auto-field shaping, and 3D compensators form a

  16. Enhancing predicted efficacy of tumor treating fields therapy of glioblastoma using targeted surgical craniectomy: A computer modeling study

    Korshoej, Anders Rosendal; Saturnino, Guilherme Bicalho; Rasmussen, Line Kirkegaard

    2016-01-01

    the potential of the intervention to improve the clinical efficacy of TTFields therapy of brain cancer. Methods: We used finite element analysis to calculate the electrical field distribution in realistic head models based on MRI data from two patients: One with left cortical/subcortical glioblastoma and one......Objective: The present work proposes a new clinical approach to TTFields therapy of glioblastoma. The approach combines targeted surgical skull removal (craniectomy) with TTFields therapy to enhance the induced electrical field in the underlying tumor tissue. Using computer simulations, we explore...... with deeply seated right thalamic anaplastic astrocytoma. Field strength was assessed in the tumor regions before and after virtual removal of bone areas of varying shape and size (10 to 100 mm) immediately above the tumor. Field strength was evaluated before and after tumor resection to assess realistic...

  17. Prenatal sonographic diagnosis of focal musculoskeletal anomalies

    Ryu, Jung-Kyu; Cho, Jeong-Yeon; Choi, Jong-Sun

    2003-01-01

    Focal musculoskeletal anomalies vary, and can manifest as part of a syndrome or be accompanied by numerous other conditions such as genetic disorders, karyotype abnormalities, central nervous system anomalies and other skeletal anomalies, lsolated focal musculoskeletal anomaly does, however, also occur; its early prenatal diagnosis is important in deciding prenatal care, and also helps in counseling parents about the postnatal effects of numerous possible associated anomalies. We have encountered 50 cases involving focal musculoskeletal anomalies, including total limb dysplasia [radial ray abnormality (n=3), mesomelic dysplasia (n=1)]; anomalies of the hand [polydactyly (n=8), syndactyly (n=3), ectrodactyly (n=1), clinodactyly (n=6), clenched hand (n=5)]; anomalies of the foot [clubfoot (n=10), rockerbottom foot (n=5), sandal gap deformity (n=1), curly toe (n=2)]; amniotic band syndrome (n=3); and anomalies of the focal spine [block vertebra (n=1), hemivertebra (n=1)]. Among these 50 cases, five [polydactyly (n=1), syndactyly (n=2) and curly toe (n=2) were confirmed by postnatal physical evaluation, two (focal spine anomalies) were diagnosed after postnatal radiologic examination, and the remaining 43 were proven at autopsy. For each condition, we describe the prenatal sonographic findings, and include a brief review

  18. Prenatal sonographic diagnosis of focal musculoskeletal anomalies

    Ryu, Jung-Kyu; Cho, Jeong-Yeon; Choi, Jong-Sun [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-15

    Focal musculoskeletal anomalies vary, and can manifest as part of a syndrome or be accompanied by numerous other conditions such as genetic disorders, karyotype abnormalities, central nervous system anomalies and other skeletal anomalies, lsolated focal musculoskeletal anomaly does, however, also occur; its early prenatal diagnosis is important in deciding prenatal care, and also helps in counseling parents about the postnatal effects of numerous possible associated anomalies. We have encountered 50 cases involving focal musculoskeletal anomalies, including total limb dysplasia [radial ray abnormality (n=3), mesomelic dysplasia (n=1)]; anomalies of the hand [polydactyly (n=8), syndactyly (n=3), ectrodactyly (n=1), clinodactyly (n=6), clenched hand (n=5)]; anomalies of the foot [clubfoot (n=10), rockerbottom foot (n=5), sandal gap deformity (n=1), curly toe (n=2)]; amniotic band syndrome (n=3); and anomalies of the focal spine [block vertebra (n=1), hemivertebra (n=1)]. Among these 50 cases, five [polydactyly (n=1), syndactyly (n=2) and curly toe (n=2) were confirmed by postnatal physical evaluation, two (focal spine anomalies) were diagnosed after postnatal radiologic examination, and the remaining 43 were proven at autopsy. For each condition, we describe the prenatal sonographic findings, and include a brief review.

  19. The Adoption of Cloud Computing in the Field of Genomics Research: The Influence of Ethical and Legal Issues.

    Charlebois, Kathleen; Palmour, Nicole; Knoppers, Bartha Maria

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to understand the influence of the ethical and legal issues on cloud computing adoption in the field of genomics research. To do so, we adapted Diffusion of Innovation (DoI) theory to enable understanding of how key stakeholders manage the various ethical and legal issues they encounter when adopting cloud computing. Twenty semi-structured interviews were conducted with genomics researchers, patient advocates and cloud service providers. Thematic analysis generated five major themes: 1) Getting comfortable with cloud computing; 2) Weighing the advantages and the risks of cloud computing; 3) Reconciling cloud computing with data privacy; 4) Maintaining trust and 5) Anticipating the cloud by creating the conditions for cloud adoption. Our analysis highlights the tendency among genomics researchers to gradually adopt cloud technology. Efforts made by cloud service providers to promote cloud computing adoption are confronted by researchers' perpetual cost and security concerns, along with a lack of familiarity with the technology. Further underlying those fears are researchers' legal responsibility with respect to the data that is stored on the cloud. Alternative consent mechanisms aimed at increasing patients' control over the use of their data also provide a means to circumvent various institutional and jurisdictional hurdles that restrict access by creating siloed databases. However, the risk of creating new, cloud-based silos may run counter to the goal in genomics research to increase data sharing on a global scale.

  20. The Adoption of Cloud Computing in the Field of Genomics Research: The Influence of Ethical and Legal Issues.

    Kathleen Charlebois

    Full Text Available This study aims to understand the influence of the ethical and legal issues on cloud computing adoption in the field of genomics research. To do so, we adapted Diffusion of Innovation (DoI theory to enable understanding of how key stakeholders manage the various ethical and legal issues they encounter when adopting cloud computing. Twenty semi-structured interviews were conducted with genomics researchers, patient advocates and cloud service providers. Thematic analysis generated five major themes: 1 Getting comfortable with cloud computing; 2 Weighing the advantages and the risks of cloud computing; 3 Reconciling cloud computing with data privacy; 4 Maintaining trust and 5 Anticipating the cloud by creating the conditions for cloud adoption. Our analysis highlights the tendency among genomics researchers to gradually adopt cloud technology. Efforts made by cloud service providers to promote cloud computing adoption are confronted by researchers' perpetual cost and security concerns, along with a lack of familiarity with the technology. Further underlying those fears are researchers' legal responsibility with respect to the data that is stored on the cloud. Alternative consent mechanisms aimed at increasing patients' control over the use of their data also provide a means to circumvent various institutional and jurisdictional hurdles that restrict access by creating siloed databases. However, the risk of creating new, cloud-based silos may run counter to the goal in genomics research to increase data sharing on a global scale.

  1. The Adoption of Cloud Computing in the Field of Genomics Research: The Influence of Ethical and Legal Issues

    Charlebois, Kathleen; Palmour, Nicole; Knoppers, Bartha Maria

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to understand the influence of the ethical and legal issues on cloud computing adoption in the field of genomics research. To do so, we adapted Diffusion of Innovation (DoI) theory to enable understanding of how key stakeholders manage the various ethical and legal issues they encounter when adopting cloud computing. Twenty semi-structured interviews were conducted with genomics researchers, patient advocates and cloud service providers. Thematic analysis generated five major themes: 1) Getting comfortable with cloud computing; 2) Weighing the advantages and the risks of cloud computing; 3) Reconciling cloud computing with data privacy; 4) Maintaining trust and 5) Anticipating the cloud by creating the conditions for cloud adoption. Our analysis highlights the tendency among genomics researchers to gradually adopt cloud technology. Efforts made by cloud service providers to promote cloud computing adoption are confronted by researchers’ perpetual cost and security concerns, along with a lack of familiarity with the technology. Further underlying those fears are researchers’ legal responsibility with respect to the data that is stored on the cloud. Alternative consent mechanisms aimed at increasing patients’ control over the use of their data also provide a means to circumvent various institutional and jurisdictional hurdles that restrict access by creating siloed databases. However, the risk of creating new, cloud-based silos may run counter to the goal in genomics research to increase data sharing on a global scale. PMID:27755563

  2. Seven tesla MRI improves detection of focal cortical dysplasia in patients with refractory focal epilepsy

    Veersema, Tim J; Ferrier, Cyrille H; van Eijsden, Pieter; Gosselaar, Peter H; Aronica, Eleonora; Visser, Fredy; Zwanenburg, Jaco M; de Kort, Gerard A P; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Luijten, Peter R; Braun, Kees P J

    Objective: The aim of this study is to determine whether the use of 7 tesla (T) MRI in clinical practice leads to higher detection rates of focal cortical dysplasias in possible candidates for epilepsy surgery. Methods: In our center patients are referred for 7 T MRI if lesional focal epilepsy is

  3. Spatial Processing of Urban Acoustic Wave Fields from High-Performance Computations

    Ketcham, Stephen A; Wilson, D. K; Cudney, Harley H; Parker, Michael W

    2007-01-01

    .... The objective of this work is to develop spatial processing techniques for acoustic wave propagation data from three-dimensional high-performance computations to quantify scattering due to urban...

  4. Prospects for the applications of computer in the field of domestic nuclear medicinal instrument

    Zhao Changhe

    1993-01-01

    The current situation and prospects about domestic nuclear medical instrument, as well as the comparisons of computer application in nuclear medical instruments with in other medical instruments from various points of view have all been described in the paper

  5. On the Computation of Degenerate Hopf Bifurcations for n-Dimensional Multiparameter Vector Fields

    Michail P. Markakis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The restriction of an n-dimensional nonlinear parametric system on the center manifold is treated via a new proper symbolic form and analytical expressions of the involved quantities are obtained as functions of the parameters by lengthy algebraic manipulations combined with computer assisted calculations. Normal forms regarding degenerate Hopf bifurcations up to codimension 3, as well as the corresponding Lyapunov coefficients and bifurcation portraits, can be easily computed for any system under consideration.

  6. Computer-assisted training experiment used in the field of thermal energy production (EDF)

    Felgines, R.

    1982-01-01

    In 1981, the EDF carried out an experiment with computer-assisted training (EAO). This new approach, which continued until June 1982, involved about 700 employees all of whom operated nuclear power stations. The different stages of this experiment and the lessons which can be drawn from it are given the lessons were of a positive nature and make it possible to envisage complete coverage of all nuclear power stations by computer-assisted training within a very short space of time [fr

  7. Two interacting spins in external fields and application to quantum computation

    Baldiotti, M.C.; Gitman, D.M.; Bagrov, V.G.

    2009-01-01

    We study the four-level system given by two quantum dots immersed in a time-dependent magnetic field, which are coupled to each other by an effective Heisenberg-type interaction. We describe the construction of the corresponding evolution operator in a special case of different time-dependent parallel external magnetic fields. We find a relation between the external field and the effective interaction function. The obtained results are used to analyze the theoretical implementation of a universal quantum gate

  8. Determination of stimulation focality in heterogeneous head models during transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)

    Lee, Erik; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2015-03-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is an increasingly popular tool used by both the scientific and medical community to understand and treat the brain. TMS has the potential to help people with a wide range of diseases such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and PTSD, while currently being used to treat people with chronic, drug-resistant depression. Through computer simulations, we are able to see the electric field that TMS induces in anatomical human models, but there is no measure to quantify this electric field in a way that relates to a specific patient undergoing TMS therapy. We propose a way to quantify the focality of the induced electric field in a heterogeneous head model during TMS by relating the surface area of the brain being stimulated to the total volume of the brain being stimulated. This figure would be obtained by conducting finite element analysis (FEA) simulations of TMS therapy on a patient specific head model. Using this figure to assist in TMS therapy will allow clinicians and researchers to more accurately stimulate the desired region of a patient's brain and be more equipped to do comparative studies on the effects of TMS across different patients. This work was funded by the Carver Charitable Trust.

  9. COMPUTING

    P. McBride

    It has been a very active year for the computing project with strong contributions from members of the global community. The project has focused on site preparation and Monte Carlo production. The operations group has begun processing data from P5 as part of the global data commissioning. Improvements in transfer rates and site availability have been seen as computing sites across the globe prepare for large scale production and analysis as part of CSA07. Preparations for the upcoming Computing Software and Analysis Challenge CSA07 are progressing. Ian Fisk and Neil Geddes have been appointed as coordinators for the challenge. CSA07 will include production tests of the Tier-0 production system, reprocessing at the Tier-1 sites and Monte Carlo production at the Tier-2 sites. At the same time there will be a large analysis exercise at the Tier-2 centres. Pre-production simulation of the Monte Carlo events for the challenge is beginning. Scale tests of the Tier-0 will begin in mid-July and the challenge it...

  10. COMPUTING

    M. Kasemann

    Introduction During the past six months, Computing participated in the STEP09 exercise, had a major involvement in the October exercise and has been working with CMS sites on improving open issues relevant for data taking. At the same time operations for MC production, real data reconstruction and re-reconstructions and data transfers at large scales were performed. STEP09 was successfully conducted in June as a joint exercise with ATLAS and the other experiments. It gave good indication about the readiness of the WLCG infrastructure with the two major LHC experiments stressing the reading, writing and processing of physics data. The October Exercise, in contrast, was conducted as an all-CMS exercise, where Physics, Computing and Offline worked on a common plan to exercise all steps to efficiently access and analyze data. As one of the major results, the CMS Tier-2s demonstrated to be fully capable for performing data analysis. In recent weeks, efforts were devoted to CMS Computing readiness. All th...

  11. COMPUTING

    I. Fisk

    2011-01-01

    Introduction It has been a very active quarter in Computing with interesting progress in all areas. The activity level at the computing facilities, driven by both organised processing from data operations and user analysis, has been steadily increasing. The large-scale production of simulated events that has been progressing throughout the fall is wrapping-up and reprocessing with pile-up will continue. A large reprocessing of all the proton-proton data has just been released and another will follow shortly. The number of analysis jobs by users each day, that was already hitting the computing model expectations at the time of ICHEP, is now 33% higher. We are expecting a busy holiday break to ensure samples are ready in time for the winter conferences. Heavy Ion The Tier 0 infrastructure was able to repack and promptly reconstruct heavy-ion collision data. Two copies were made of the data at CERN using a large CASTOR disk pool, and the core physics sample was replicated ...

  12. COMPUTING

    I. Fisk

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Computing continued with a high level of activity over the winter in preparation for conferences and the start of the 2012 run. 2012 brings new challenges with a new energy, more complex events, and the need to make the best use of the available time before the Long Shutdown. We expect to be resource constrained on all tiers of the computing system in 2012 and are working to ensure the high-priority goals of CMS are not impacted. Heavy ions After a successful 2011 heavy-ion run, the programme is moving to analysis. During the run, the CAF resources were well used for prompt analysis. Since then in 2012 on average 200 job slots have been used continuously at Vanderbilt for analysis workflows. Operations Office As of 2012, the Computing Project emphasis has moved from commissioning to operation of the various systems. This is reflected in the new organisation structure where the Facilities and Data Operations tasks have been merged into a common Operations Office, which now covers everything ...

  13. COMPUTING

    M. Kasemann

    CCRC’08 challenges and CSA08 During the February campaign of the Common Computing readiness challenges (CCRC’08), the CMS computing team had achieved very good results. The link between the detector site and the Tier0 was tested by gradually increasing the number of parallel transfer streams well beyond the target. Tests covered the global robustness at the Tier0, processing a massive number of very large files and with a high writing speed to tapes.  Other tests covered the links between the different Tiers of the distributed infrastructure and the pre-staging and reprocessing capacity of the Tier1’s: response time, data transfer rate and success rate for Tape to Buffer staging of files kept exclusively on Tape were measured. In all cases, coordination with the sites was efficient and no serious problem was found. These successful preparations prepared the ground for the second phase of the CCRC’08 campaign, in May. The Computing Software and Analysis challen...

  14. COMPUTING

    I. Fisk

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The first data taking period of November produced a first scientific paper, and this is a very satisfactory step for Computing. It also gave the invaluable opportunity to learn and debrief from this first, intense period, and make the necessary adaptations. The alarm procedures between different groups (DAQ, Physics, T0 processing, Alignment/calibration, T1 and T2 communications) have been reinforced. A major effort has also been invested into remodeling and optimizing operator tasks in all activities in Computing, in parallel with the recruitment of new Cat A operators. The teams are being completed and by mid year the new tasks will have been assigned. CRB (Computing Resource Board) The Board met twice since last CMS week. In December it reviewed the experience of the November data-taking period and could measure the positive improvements made for the site readiness. It also reviewed the policy under which Tier-2 are associated with Physics Groups. Such associations are decided twice per ye...

  15. COMPUTING

    M. Kasemann

    Introduction More than seventy CMS collaborators attended the Computing and Offline Workshop in San Diego, California, April 20-24th to discuss the state of readiness of software and computing for collisions. Focus and priority were given to preparations for data taking and providing room for ample dialog between groups involved in Commissioning, Data Operations, Analysis and MC Production. Throughout the workshop, aspects of software, operating procedures and issues addressing all parts of the computing model were discussed. Plans for the CMS participation in STEP’09, the combined scale testing for all four experiments due in June 2009, were refined. The article in CMS Times by Frank Wuerthwein gave a good recap of the highly collaborative atmosphere of the workshop. Many thanks to UCSD and to the organizers for taking care of this workshop, which resulted in a long list of action items and was definitely a success. A considerable amount of effort and care is invested in the estimate of the co...

  16. Electrophysiological and pathological study of focal cortical dysplasia

    Hodozuka, Akira; Hashizume, Kiyotaka; Hayashi, Yoshimitsu; Tanaka, Tatsuya

    2008-01-01

    Clinical and experimental studies on focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) were carried out. For the experimental study, an experimental FCD model of rats was developed. Twenty Wistar rats at 0-2 days after birth were used for the study. Kainic acid (KA) solution was injected stereotaxically into medial and lateral sites of the sensori-motor cortex. Bipolar electrodes were inserted. The behavior of the rats and electroencephalography (EEG) were recorded using a digital video-EEG monitoring system. After observation periods of 1, 2 and 6 months, the rats were perfused for pathological study. FCD was observed adjacent to the site of KA injection in all rats more than one month after the injection. EEG recording demonstrated focal spike discharges in and around the site of injection. However, clinical seizure was not observed. Pathological studies showed decrease in gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA)-A receptors and increase in GABA-B receptors not only in the lesion but also in perilesional areas. Fifteen surgical cases of FCD with intractable epilepsy were included in the clinical study. Neuro-imaging studies including high-resolution MRI and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) were performed. Conventional EEG studies demonstrated focal EEG abnormalities with epileptic phenomena. At surgery, intraoperative electrocorticography (ECoG) was performed in order to localize epileptic foci under neuroleptanalgesia. Fourteen patients showed epileptiform discharges on preresection ECoG. All foci in non-eloquent areas were resected. Pathological studies including immunohistochemical staining were performed, and characteristics of the FCD in relation to EEG findings were analyzed. Electrophysiological examination revealed epileptogenecity not only in the lesions but also in perilesional areas. In the lesions, immunohistochemical studies showed decrease in GABA-A receptors and increase in GABA-B receptors in both the lesions and perilesional areas, but N

  17. Do Mendeley reader counts reflect the scholarly impact of conference papers? An investigation of Computer Science and Engineering fields

    Aduku, K.J.; Thelwall, M.; Kousha, K.

    2016-07-01

    Counts of Mendeley readers may give useful evidence about the impact of research. Although several studies have indicated that there are significant positive correlations between counts of Mendeley readers and citation counts for journal articles, it is not known how the pattern of association may vary between journal articles and conference papers. To fill this gap, Mendeley readership data and Scopus citation counts were extracted for both journal articles and conference papers published in 2011 in four fields for which conferences are important; Computer Science Applications, Computer Software, Building & Construction Engineering and Industrial & Manufacturing Engineering. Mendeley readership counts were found to correlate moderately with citation counts for both journal articles and conference papers in Computer Science Applications and Computer Software. Nevertheless, the correlations were much lower between Mendeley readers and citation counts for conference papers than for journal articles in Building & Construction Engineering and Industrial & Manufacturing Engineering. Hence, there seems to be disciplinary differences in the usefulness of Mendeley readership counts as impact indicators for conference papers, even between fields for which conferences are important. (Author)

  18. Energy law preserving C0 finite element schemes for phase field models in two-phase flow computations

    Hua Jinsong; Lin Ping; Liu Chun; Wang Qi

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We study phase-field models for multi-phase flow computation. → We develop an energy-law preserving C0 FEM. → We show that the energy-law preserving method work better. → We overcome unphysical oscillation associated with the Cahn-Hilliard model. - Abstract: We use the idea in to develop the energy law preserving method and compute the diffusive interface (phase-field) models of Allen-Cahn and Cahn-Hilliard type, respectively, governing the motion of two-phase incompressible flows. We discretize these two models using a C 0 finite element in space and a modified midpoint scheme in time. To increase the stability in the pressure variable we treat the divergence free condition by a penalty formulation, under which the discrete energy law can still be derived for these diffusive interface models. Through an example we demonstrate that the energy law preserving method is beneficial for computing these multi-phase flow models. We also demonstrate that when applying the energy law preserving method to the model of Cahn-Hilliard type, un-physical interfacial oscillations may occur. We examine the source of such oscillations and a remedy is presented to eliminate the oscillations. A few two-phase incompressible flow examples are computed to show the good performance of our method.

  19. Comparison of different methods for determining the size of a focal spot of microfocus X-ray tubes

    Salamon, M.; Hanke, R.; Krueger, P.; Sukowski, F.; Uhlmann, N.; Voland, V.

    2008-01-01

    The EN 12543-5 describes a method for determining the focal spot size of microfocus X-ray tubes up to a minimum spot size of 5 μm. The wide application of X-ray tubes with even smaller focal spot sizes in computed tomography and radioscopy applications requires the evaluation of existing methods for focal spot sizes below 5 μm. In addition, new methods and conditions for determining submicron focal spot sizes have to be developed. For the evaluation and extension of the present methods to smaller focal spot sizes, different procedures in comparison with the existing EN 12543-5 were analyzed and applied, and the results are presented

  20. Accurate three dimensional characterization of ultrasonic sound fields (by computer controlled rotational scanning)

    Gundtoft, H.E.; Nielsen, T.

    1981-07-01

    A rotational scanning system has recently been developed at Risoe National Laboratory. It allows sound fields from ultrasonic transducers to be examined in 3 dimensions. Using different calculation and plotting programs, any section in the sound field can be plotted. Results from examination of transducers for automatic inspection are presented. (author)

  1. Extensive Focal Epithelial Hyperplasia: A Case Report.

    Mansouri, Zahra; Bakhtiari, Sedigheh; Noormohamadi, Robab

    2015-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) or Heck's disease is a rare viral infection of the oral mucosa caused by human papilloma virus especially subtypes 13 or 32. The frequency of this disease varies widely from one geographic region and ethnic groups to another. This paper reports an Iranian case of extensive focal epithelial hyperplasia. A 35-year-old man with FEH is described, in whom the lesions had persisted for more than 25 years. The lesion was diagnosed according to both clinical and histopathological features. Dental practitioner should be aware of these types of lesions and histopathological examination together and a careful clinical observation should be carried out for a definitive diagnosis.

  2. Rasmussen's encephalitis presenting as focal cortical dysplasia

    D.J. O'Rourke

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rasmussen's encephalitis is a rare syndrome characterized by intractable seizures, often associated with epilepsia partialis continua and symptoms of progressive hemispheric dysfunction. Seizures are usually the hallmark of presentation, but antiepileptic drug treatment fails in most patients and is ineffective against epilepsia partialis continua, which often requires surgical intervention. Co-occurrence of focal cortical dysplasia has only rarely been described and may have implications regarding pathophysiology and management. We describe a rare case of dual pathology of Rasmussen's encephalitis presenting as a focal cortical dysplasia (FCD and discuss the literature on this topic.

  3. Rasmussen's encephalitis presenting as focal cortical dysplasia

    O'Rourke, D.J.; Bergin, A.; Rotenberg, A.; Peters, J.; Gorman, M.; Poduri, A.; Cryan, J.; Lidov, H.; Madsen, J.; Harini, C.

    2014-01-01

    Rasmussen's encephalitis is a rare syndrome characterized by intractable seizures, often associated with epilepsia partialis continua and symptoms of progressive hemispheric dysfunction. Seizures are usually the hallmark of presentation, but antiepileptic drug treatment fails in most patients and is ineffective against epilepsia partialis continua, which often requires surgical intervention. Co-occurrence of focal cortical dysplasia has only rarely been described and may have implications regarding pathophysiology and management. We describe a rare case of dual pathology of Rasmussen's encephalitis presenting as a focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) and discuss the literature on this topic. PMID:25667877

  4. Actinic Granuloma with Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis

    Ruedee Phasukthaworn

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Actinic granuloma is an uncommon granulomatous disease, characterized by annular erythematous plaque with central clearing predominately located on sun-damaged skin. The pathogenesis is not well understood, ultraviolet radiation is recognized as precipitating factor. We report a case of a 52-year-old woman who presented with asymptomatic annular erythematous plaques on the forehead and both cheeks persisting for 2 years. The clinical presentation and histopathologic findings support the diagnosis of actinic granuloma. During that period of time, she also developed focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. The association between actinic granuloma and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis needs to be clarified by further studies.

  5. Analytical and computational study of magnetization switching in kinetic Ising systems with demagnetizing fields

    Richards, H.L.; Rikvold, P.A.

    1996-01-01

    particularly promising as materials for high-density magnetic recording media. In this paper we use analytic arguments and Monte Carlo simulations to quantitatively study the effects of the demagnetizing field on the dynamics of magnetization switching in two-dimensional, single-domain, kinetic Ising systems....... For systems in the weak-field ''stochastic region,'' where magnetization switching is on average effected by the nucleation and growth of a single droplet, the simulation results can be explained by a simple model in which the free energy is a function only of magnetization. In the intermediate......-field ''multidroplet region,'' a generalization of Avrami's law involving a magnetization-dependent effective magnetic field gives good agreement with the simulations. The effects of the demagnetizing field do not qualitatively change the droplet-theoretical picture of magnetization switching in highly anisotropic...

  6. Portable computing - A fielded interactive scientific application in a small off-the-shelf package

    Groleau, Nicolas; Hazelton, Lyman; Frainier, Rich; Compton, Michael; Colombano, Silvano; Szolovits, Peter

    1993-01-01

    Experience with the design and implementation of a portable computing system for STS crew-conducted science is discussed. Principal-Investigator-in-a-Box (PI) will help the SLS-2 astronauts perform vestibular (human orientation system) experiments in flight. PI is an interactive system that provides data acquisition and analysis, experiment step rescheduling, and various other forms of reasoning to astronaut users. The hardware architecture of PI consists of a computer and an analog interface box. 'Off-the-shelf' equipment is employed in the system wherever possible in an effort to use widely available tools and then to add custom functionality and application codes to them. Other projects which can help prospective teams to learn more about portable computing in space are also discussed.

  7. Program system for computation of the terrestrial gamma-radiation field

    Kirkegaard, P.; Loevborg, L.

    1979-02-01

    A system of computer programs intended for solution of the plane one-dimensional photon transport equation in the case of two adjacent media is described, and user's guides for the programs are given. One medium represents a natural ground with uniformly distributed potassium, uranium, and thorium gamma-ray emitters. The other medium is usually air with no radioactive contaminants. The solution method is the double-P 1 approximation with logarithmic energy spacing. The complete data-processing system GB contains the transport-theory code GAMP1, the code GFX for computation of scalar flux and dose rate, and a number of auxiliary programs and data files. (author)

  8. COMPUTING

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Just two months after the “LHC First Physics” event of 30th March, the analysis of the O(200) million 7 TeV collision events in CMS accumulated during the first 60 days is well under way. The consistency of the CMS computing model has been confirmed during these first weeks of data taking. This model is based on a hierarchy of use-cases deployed between the different tiers and, in particular, the distribution of RECO data to T1s, who then serve data on request to T2s, along a topology known as “fat tree”. Indeed, during this period this model was further extended by almost full “mesh” commissioning, meaning that RECO data were shipped to T2s whenever possible, enabling additional physics analyses compared with the “fat tree” model. Computing activities at the CMS Analysis Facility (CAF) have been marked by a good time response for a load almost evenly shared between ALCA (Alignment and Calibration tasks - highest p...

  9. COMPUTING

    Contributions from I. Fisk

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The start of the 2012 run has been busy for Computing. We have reconstructed, archived, and served a larger sample of new data than in 2011, and we are in the process of producing an even larger new sample of simulations at 8 TeV. The running conditions and system performance are largely what was anticipated in the plan, thanks to the hard work and preparation of many people. Heavy ions Heavy Ions has been actively analysing data and preparing for conferences.  Operations Office Figure 6: Transfers from all sites in the last 90 days For ICHEP and the Upgrade efforts, we needed to produce and process record amounts of MC samples while supporting the very successful data-taking. This was a large burden, especially on the team members. Nevertheless the last three months were very successful and the total output was phenomenal, thanks to our dedicated site admins who keep the sites operational and the computing project members who spend countless hours nursing the...

  10. COMPUTING

    M. Kasemann

    Introduction A large fraction of the effort was focused during the last period into the preparation and monitoring of the February tests of Common VO Computing Readiness Challenge 08. CCRC08 is being run by the WLCG collaboration in two phases, between the centres and all experiments. The February test is dedicated to functionality tests, while the May challenge will consist of running at all centres and with full workflows. For this first period, a number of functionality checks of the computing power, data repositories and archives as well as network links are planned. This will help assess the reliability of the systems under a variety of loads, and identifying possible bottlenecks. Many tests are scheduled together with other VOs, allowing the full scale stress test. The data rates (writing, accessing and transfer¬ring) are being checked under a variety of loads and operating conditions, as well as the reliability and transfer rates of the links between Tier-0 and Tier-1s. In addition, the capa...

  11. COMPUTING

    Matthias Kasemann

    Overview The main focus during the summer was to handle data coming from the detector and to perform Monte Carlo production. The lessons learned during the CCRC and CSA08 challenges in May were addressed by dedicated PADA campaigns lead by the Integration team. Big improvements were achieved in the stability and reliability of the CMS Tier1 and Tier2 centres by regular and systematic follow-up of faults and errors with the help of the Savannah bug tracking system. In preparation for data taking the roles of a Computing Run Coordinator and regular computing shifts monitoring the services and infrastructure as well as interfacing to the data operations tasks are being defined. The shift plan until the end of 2008 is being put together. User support worked on documentation and organized several training sessions. The ECoM task force delivered the report on “Use Cases for Start-up of pp Data-Taking” with recommendations and a set of tests to be performed for trigger rates much higher than the ...

  12. COMPUTING

    P. MacBride

    The Computing Software and Analysis Challenge CSA07 has been the main focus of the Computing Project for the past few months. Activities began over the summer with the preparation of the Monte Carlo data sets for the challenge and tests of the new production system at the Tier-0 at CERN. The pre-challenge Monte Carlo production was done in several steps: physics generation, detector simulation, digitization, conversion to RAW format and the samples were run through the High Level Trigger (HLT). The data was then merged into three "Soups": Chowder (ALPGEN), Stew (Filtered Pythia) and Gumbo (Pythia). The challenge officially started when the first Chowder events were reconstructed on the Tier-0 on October 3rd. The data operations teams were very busy during the the challenge period. The MC production teams continued with signal production and processing while the Tier-0 and Tier-1 teams worked on splitting the Soups into Primary Data Sets (PDS), reconstruction and skimming. The storage sys...

  13. COMPUTING

    I. Fisk

    2013-01-01

    Computing operation has been lower as the Run 1 samples are completing and smaller samples for upgrades and preparations are ramping up. Much of the computing activity is focusing on preparations for Run 2 and improvements in data access and flexibility of using resources. Operations Office Data processing was slow in the second half of 2013 with only the legacy re-reconstruction pass of 2011 data being processed at the sites.   Figure 1: MC production and processing was more in demand with a peak of over 750 Million GEN-SIM events in a single month.   Figure 2: The transfer system worked reliably and efficiently and transferred on average close to 520 TB per week with peaks at close to 1.2 PB.   Figure 3: The volume of data moved between CMS sites in the last six months   The tape utilisation was a focus for the operation teams with frequent deletion campaigns from deprecated 7 TeV MC GEN-SIM samples to INVALID datasets, which could be cleaned up...

  14. COMPUTING

    I. Fisk

    2012-01-01

      Introduction Computing activity has been running at a sustained, high rate as we collect data at high luminosity, process simulation, and begin to process the parked data. The system is functional, though a number of improvements are planned during LS1. Many of the changes will impact users, we hope only in positive ways. We are trying to improve the distributed analysis tools as well as the ability to access more data samples more transparently.  Operations Office Figure 2: Number of events per month, for 2012 Since the June CMS Week, Computing Operations teams successfully completed data re-reconstruction passes and finished the CMSSW_53X MC campaign with over three billion events available in AOD format. Recorded data was successfully processed in parallel, exceeding 1.2 billion raw physics events per month for the first time in October 2012 due to the increase in data-parking rate. In parallel, large efforts were dedicated to WMAgent development and integrati...

  15. Impact of the displacement current on low-frequency electromagnetic fields computed using high-resolution anatomy models

    Barchanski, A; Gersem, H de; Gjonaj, E; Weiland, T

    2005-01-01

    We present a comparison of simulated low-frequency electromagnetic fields in the human body, calculated by means of the electro-quasistatic formulation. The geometrical data in these simulations were provided by an anatomically realistic, high-resolution human body model, while the dielectric properties of the various body tissues were modelled by the parametric Cole-Cole equation. The model was examined under two different excitation sources and various spatial resolutions in a frequency range from 10 Hz to 1 MHz. An analysis of the differences in the computed fields resulting from a neglect of the permittivity was carried out. On this basis, an estimation of the impact of the displacement current on the simulated low-frequency electromagnetic fields in the human body is obtained. (note)

  16. Parotid gland sparing effect by computed tomography-based modified lower field margin in whole brain radiotherapy

    Cho, Oyeon; Chun, Mi Son; Oh, Young Taek; Kim, Mi Hwa; Park, Hae Jin; Nam, Sang Soo; Heo, Jae Sung; Noh, O Kyu; Park, Sung Ho

    2013-01-01

    Parotid gland can be considered as a risk organ in whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the parotid gland sparing effect of computed tomography (CT)-based WBRT compared to 2-dimensional plan with conventional field margin. From January 2008 to April 2011, 53 patients underwent WBRT using CT-based simulation. Bilateral two-field arrangement was used and the prescribed dose was 30 Gy in 10 fractions. We compared the parotid dose between 2 radiotherapy plans using different lower field margins: conventional field to the lower level of the atlas (CF) and modified field fitted to the brain tissue (MF). Averages of mean parotid dose of the 2 protocols with CF and MF were 17.4 Gy and 8.7 Gy, respectively (p 98% of prescribed dose were 99.7% for CF and 99.5% for MF. Compared to WBRT with CF, CT-based lower field margin modification is a simple and effective technique for sparing the parotid gland, while providing similar dose coverage of the whole brain.

  17. A Randomized Field Trial of the Fast ForWord Language Computer-Based Training Program

    Borman, Geoffrey D.; Benson, James G.; Overman, Laura

    2009-01-01

    This article describes an independent assessment of the Fast ForWord Language computer-based training program developed by Scientific Learning Corporation. Previous laboratory research involving children with language-based learning impairments showed strong effects on their abilities to recognize brief and fast sequences of nonspeech and speech…

  18. Computational Methods for Inviscid and Viscous Two-and-Three-Dimensional Flow Fields.

    1975-01-01

    Difference Equations Over a Network, Watson Sei. Comput. Lab. Report, 19U9. 173- Isaacson, E. and Keller, H. B., Analaysis of Numerical Methods...element method has given a new impulse to the old mathematical theory of multivariate interpolation. We first study the one-dimensional case, which

  19. A Stochastic Approach for Blurred Image Restoration and Optical Flow Computation on Field Image Sequence

    高文; 陈熙霖

    1997-01-01

    The blur in target images caused by camera vibration due to robot motion or hand shaking and by object(s) moving in the background scene is different to deal with in the computer vision system.In this paper,the authors study the relation model between motion and blur in the case of object motion existing in video image sequence,and work on a practical computation algorithm for both motion analysis and blut image restoration.Combining the general optical flow and stochastic process,the paper presents and approach by which the motion velocity can be calculated from blurred images.On the other hand,the blurred image can also be restored using the obtained motion information.For solving a problem with small motion limitation on the general optical flow computation,a multiresolution optical flow algoritm based on MAP estimation is proposed. For restoring the blurred image ,an iteration algorithm and the obtained motion velocity are used.The experiment shows that the proposed approach for both motion velocity computation and blurred image restoration works well.

  20. Phenomenography and Grounded Theory as Research Methods in Computing Education Research Field

    Kinnunen, Paivi; Simon, Beth

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses two qualitative research methods, phenomenography and grounded theory. We introduce both methods' data collection and analysis processes and the type or results you may get at the end by using examples from computing education research. We highlight some of the similarities and differences between the aim, data collection and…

  1. Relativity in a Rock Field: A Study of Physics Learning with a Computer Game

    Carr, David; Bossomaier, Terry

    2011-01-01

    The "Theory of Special Relativity" is widely regarded as a difficult topic for learners in physics to grasp, as it reformulates fundamental conceptions of space, time and motion, and predominantly deals with situations outside of everyday experience. In this paper, we describe embedding the physics of relativity into a computer game, and…

  2. Evaluation of focused ultrasound algorithms: Issues for reducing pre-focal heating and treatment time.

    Yiannakou, Marinos; Trimikliniotis, Michael; Yiallouras, Christos; Damianou, Christakis

    2016-02-01

    Due to the heating in the pre-focal field the delay between successive movements in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) are sometimes as long as 60s, resulting to treatment time in the order of 2-3h. Because there is generally a requirement to reduce treatment time, we were motivated to explore alternative transducer motion algorithms in order to reduce pre-focal heating and treatment time. A 1 MHz single element transducer with 4 cm diameter and 10 cm focal length was used. A simulation model was developed that estimates the temperature, thermal dose and lesion development in the pre-focal field. The simulated temperature history that was combined with the motion algorithms produced thermal maps in the pre-focal region. Polyacrylimde gel phantom was used to evaluate the induced pre-focal heating for each motion algorithm used, and also was used to assess the accuracy of the simulation model. Three out of the six algorithms having successive steps close to each other, exhibited severe heating in the pre-focal field. Minimal heating was produced with the algorithms having successive steps apart from each other (square, square spiral and random). The last three algorithms were improved further (with small cost in time), thus eliminating completely the pre-focal heating and reducing substantially the treatment time as compared to traditional algorithms. Out of the six algorithms, 3 were successful in eliminating the pre-focal heating completely. Because these 3 algorithms required no delay between successive movements (except in the last part of the motion), the treatment time was reduced by 93%. Therefore, it will be possible in the future, to achieve treatment time of focused ultrasound therapies shorter than 30 min. The rate of ablated volume achieved with one of the proposed algorithms was 71 cm(3)/h. The intention of this pilot study was to demonstrate that the navigation algorithms play the most important role in reducing pre-focal heating. By evaluating in

  3. Focal plane detector for QDD spectrography in Institute of Nuclear Study and detector for SMART 2nd focal plane in RIKEN

    Fuchi, Yoshihide [Tokyo Univ., Tanashi (Japan). Inst. for Nuclear Study

    1996-09-01

    The focal plane detector for QDD spectrography in Institute of Nuclear Study was composed of drift space and a proportional counter tube, and the latter is composed of position detector and two delta E detector for recognizing the particles. In this detector, a uniform parallel electric field can be obtained by placing a guard plate at the same height as that of a drift plate outer place of the detector. On the other hand, the detector for SMART 2nd focal plate in RIKEN is composed of drift space and a single wire proportional counter, and has two cathode read out single wire drift counters set so as to hold the focal plane. (G.K.)

  4. Infrared MUSIC from Z technology focal planes

    Waters, C.R.; Sommese, A.; Johnston, D.; Landau, H.

    1989-01-01

    Presented is the Multiple Signal Classification (MUSIC) algorithm which uses the high frequency differences in sensed time signals to discriminate, count, and accurately locate closely spaced targets. Z technology focal planes allow the implementation of this algorithm and the trade-off between finer spatial resolution systems and systems with coarser resolution but higher sampling rates

  5. Focal dermal hypoplasia: A rare case report

    Sahana M Srinivas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Focal dermal hypoplasia (Goltz syndrome is a rare genetic multisystem disorder primarily involving the skin, skeletal system, eyes, and face. We report the case of an eight-month-old female child who presented with multiple hypopigmented atrophic macules along the lines of blaschko, skeletal anomalies, umbilical hernia, developmental delay, hypoplastic nails, syndactyly, and lobster claw deformity characteristic of Goltz syndrome.

  6. COMPUTING

    I. Fisk

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The Computing Team successfully completed the storage, initial processing, and distribution for analysis of proton-proton data in 2011. There are still a variety of activities ongoing to support winter conference activities and preparations for 2012. Heavy ions The heavy-ion run for 2011 started in early November and has already demonstrated good machine performance and success of some of the more advanced workflows planned for 2011. Data collection will continue until early December. Facilities and Infrastructure Operations Operational and deployment support for WMAgent and WorkQueue+Request Manager components, routinely used in production by Data Operations, are provided. The GlideInWMS and components installation are now deployed at CERN, which is added to the GlideInWMS factory placed in the US. There has been new operational collaboration between the CERN team and the UCSD GlideIn factory operators, covering each others time zones by monitoring/debugging pilot jobs sent from the facto...

  7. An unified approach for the design of focal-plane arrays in satellite communication

    Zamanifekri, A.; Smolders, A.B.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a hybrid approach for designing focal plane arrays using commercially available software, considering the fact that the main trade-off in the EM simulation is the accuracy versus computational power. The presented approach is hybrid method based on FDTD/PO. The

  8. Taxonomy of multi-focal nematode image stacks by a CNN based image fusion approach.

    Liu, Min; Wang, Xueping; Zhang, Hongzhong

    2018-03-01

    In the biomedical field, digital multi-focal images are very important for documentation and communication of specimen data, because the morphological information for a transparent specimen can be captured in form of a stack of high-quality images. Given biomedical image stacks containing multi-focal images, how to efficiently extract effective features from all layers to classify the image stacks is still an open question. We present to use a deep convolutional neural network (CNN) image fusion based multilinear approach for the taxonomy of multi-focal image stacks. A deep CNN based image fusion technique is used to combine relevant information of multi-focal images within a given image stack into a single image, which is more informative and complete than any single image in the given stack. Besides, multi-focal images within a stack are fused along 3 orthogonal directions, and multiple features extracted from the fused images along different directions are combined by canonical correlation analysis (CCA). Because multi-focal image stacks represent the effect of different factors - texture, shape, different instances within the same class and different classes of objects, we embed the deep CNN based image fusion method within a multilinear framework to propose an image fusion based multilinear classifier. The experimental results on nematode multi-focal image stacks demonstrated that the deep CNN image fusion based multilinear classifier can reach a higher classification rate (95.7%) than that by the previous multilinear based approach (88.7%), even we only use the texture feature instead of the combination of texture and shape features as in the previous work. The proposed deep CNN image fusion based multilinear approach shows great potential in building an automated nematode taxonomy system for nematologists. It is effective to classify multi-focal image stacks. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Application of computer picture processing to dynamic strain measurement under electromagnetic field

    Yagawa, G.; Soneda, N.

    1987-01-01

    For the structural design of fusion reactors, it is very important to ensure the structural integrity of components under various dynamic loading conditions due to a solid-electromagnetic field interaction, an earthquake, MHD effects and so on. As one of the experimental approaches to assess the dynamic fracture, we consider the strain measurement near a crack tip under a transient electromagnetic field, which in general involves several experimental difficulties. The authors have developed a strain measurement method using a picture processing technique. In this method, locations of marks printed on a surface of specimen are determined by the picture processing. The displacement field is interpolated using the mark displacements and finite elements. Finally the strain distribution is calculated by differentiating the displacement field. In the present study, the method is improved and automated apply to the measurement of dynamic strain distribution under an electromagnetic field. Then the effects of dynamic loading on the strain distribution are investigated by comparing the dynamic results with the static ones. (orig./GL)

  10. Computer analysis of multicircuit shells of revolution by the field method

    Cohen, G.A.

    1975-01-01

    The method of analysis developed which has been termed the 'field method' converts the boundary-value problem into two successive initial-value problems. In the first initial-value problem, a forward integration over the shell meridian is made for the 'field functions', which may be interpreted physically as influence functions (plus additional functions to account for external loading) of the structure. The second initial-value problem consists of a backward integration (i.e., in the reverse direction) for the physical force and displacement functions, the differential equations for which are dependent on the already calculated field functions. In this method, no artificial subdivision of the meridian is necessary since both initial-value problems are numerically stable. Also, because the physical response functions are obtained directly from the backward integration, their storage points may be chosen automatically during execution to obtain a uniformly 'dense' description of these functions. Studies comparing the efficiency (i.e., execution time) of the field method with that of a conventional superposition (Zarghamee) method have been made, for the simple case of the linear static response of a clamped cylindrical shell. The field method has been presented previously for shells of revolution with open branched meridians. This work is now extended to the case of meridians which contain circuits. Also, a new method for the treatment of arbitrary kinematic constraints is presented

  11. Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) in the Field of Interventional Oncology of the Liver

    Bapst, Blanche, E-mail: blanchebapst@hotmail.com; Lagadec, Matthieu, E-mail: matthieu.lagadec@bjn.aphp.fr [Beaujon Hospital, University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Beaujon, Department of Radiology (France); Breguet, Romain, E-mail: romain.breguet@hcuge.ch [University Hospital of Geneva (Switzerland); Vilgrain, Valérie, E-mail: Valerie.vilgrain@bjn.aphp.fr; Ronot, Maxime, E-mail: maxime.ronot@bjn.aphp.fr [Beaujon Hospital, University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Beaujon, Department of Radiology (France)

    2016-01-15

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an imaging modality that provides computed tomographic images using a rotational C-arm equipped with a flat panel detector as part of the Angiography suite. The aim of this technique is to provide additional information to conventional 2D imaging to improve the performance of interventional liver oncology procedures (intraarterial treatments such as chemoembolization or selective internal radiation therapy, and percutaneous tumor ablation). CBCT provides accurate tumor detection and targeting, periprocedural guidance, and post-procedural evaluation of treatment success. This technique can be performed during intraarterial or intravenous contrast agent administration with various acquisition protocols to highlight liver tumors, liver vessels, or the liver parenchyma. The purpose of this review is to present an extensive overview of published data on CBCT in interventional oncology of the liver, for both percutaneous ablation and intraarterial procedures.

  12. Kalman Filter for Calibrating a Telescope Focal Plane

    Kang, Bryan; Bayard, David

    2006-01-01

    The instrument-pointing frame (IPF) Kalman filter, and an algorithm that implements this filter, have been devised for calibrating the focal plane of a telescope. As used here, calibration signifies, more specifically, a combination of measurements and calculations directed toward ensuring accuracy in aiming the telescope and determining the locations of objects imaged in various arrays of photodetectors in instruments located on the focal plane. The IPF Kalman filter was originally intended for application to a spaceborne infrared astronomical telescope, but can also be applied to other spaceborne and ground-based telescopes. In the traditional approach to calibration of a telescope, (1) one team of experts concentrates on estimating parameters (e.g., pointing alignments and gyroscope drifts) that are classified as being of primarily an engineering nature, (2) another team of experts concentrates on estimating calibration parameters (e.g., plate scales and optical distortions) that are classified as being primarily of a scientific nature, and (3) the two teams repeatedly exchange data in an iterative process in which each team refines its estimates with the help of the data provided by the other team. This iterative process is inefficient and uneconomical because it is time-consuming and entails the maintenance of two survey teams and the development of computer programs specific to the requirements of each team. Moreover, theoretical analysis reveals that the engineering/ science iterative approach is not optimal in that it does not yield the best estimates of focal-plane parameters and, depending on the application, may not even enable convergence toward a set of estimates.

  13. Electric field computation and measurements in the electroporation of inhomogeneous samples

    Bernardis, Alessia; Bullo, Marco; Campana, Luca Giovanni; Di Barba, Paolo; Dughiero, Fabrizio; Forzan, Michele; Mognaschi, Maria Evelina; Sgarbossa, Paolo; Sieni, Elisabetta

    2017-12-01

    In clinical treatments of a class of tumors, e.g. skin tumors, the drug uptake of tumor tissue is helped by means of a pulsed electric field, which permeabilizes the cell membranes. This technique, which is called electroporation, exploits the conductivity of the tissues: however, the tumor tissue could be characterized by inhomogeneous areas, eventually causing a non-uniform distribution of current. In this paper, the authors propose a field model to predict the effect of tissue inhomogeneity, which can affect the current density distribution. In particular, finite-element simulations, considering non-linear conductivity against field relationship, are developed. Measurements on a set of samples subject to controlled inhomogeneity make it possible to assess the numerical model in view of identifying the equivalent resistance between pairs of electrodes.

  14. Accurate Computation of Electric Field Enhancement Factors for Metallic Nanoparticles Using the Discrete Dipole Approximation

    DePrince A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We model the response of nanoscale Ag prolate spheroids to an external uniform static electric field using simulations based on the discrete dipole approximation, in which the spheroid is represented as a collection of polarizable subunits. We compare the results of simulations that employ subunit polarizabilities derived from the Clausius–Mossotti relation with those of simulations that employ polarizabilities that include a local environmental correction for subunits near the spheroid’s surface [Rahmani et al. Opt Lett 27: 2118 (2002]. The simulations that employ corrected polarizabilities give predictions in very good agreement with exact results obtained by solving Laplace’s equation. In contrast, simulations that employ uncorrected Clausius–Mossotti polarizabilities substantially underestimate the extent of the electric field “hot spot” near the spheroid’s sharp tip, and give predictions for the field enhancement factor near the tip that are 30 to 50% too small.

  15. Accurate Computation of Electric Field Enhancement Factors for Metallic Nanoparticles Using the Discrete Dipole Approximation

    2010-01-01

    We model the response of nanoscale Ag prolate spheroids to an external uniform static electric field using simulations based on the discrete dipole approximation, in which the spheroid is represented as a collection of polarizable subunits. We compare the results of simulations that employ subunit polarizabilities derived from the Clausius–Mossotti relation with those of simulations that employ polarizabilities that include a local environmental correction for subunits near the spheroid’s surface [Rahmani et al. Opt Lett 27: 2118 (2002)]. The simulations that employ corrected polarizabilities give predictions in very good agreement with exact results obtained by solving Laplace’s equation. In contrast, simulations that employ uncorrected Clausius–Mossotti polarizabilities substantially underestimate the extent of the electric field “hot spot” near the spheroid’s sharp tip, and give predictions for the field enhancement factor near the tip that are 30 to 50% too small. PMID:20672062

  16. Cranial radiotherapy guided by computed tomography with or without fields conformation in pediatric

    Fernandez, Diego; Caussa, Lucas; Murina, Patricia; Zunino, Silvia

    2007-01-01

    Many malignancies in children can be cured by radiotherapy, acute toxicity and the significant effect of delayed treatment are worrying for the patient, family and society. Therefore, the end of the pediatric radiotherapy is to maintain or improve the cure rate of cancer, diminishing the aftermath of treatment. The goal of this study is to measure differences in doses to the healthy tissue of the central nervous system with two radiotherapy techniques, both guided by computed tomography [es

  17. Computing the Local Field Potential (LFP) from Integrate-and-Fire Network Models

    Mazzoni, Alberto; Linden, Henrik; Cuntz, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) network models are commonly used to study how the spiking dynamics of neural networks changes with stimuli, tasks or dynamic network states. However, neurophysiological studies in vivo often rather measure the mass activity of neuronal microcircuits with the local f...... in cases where a single pyramidal population dominates the LFP generation, and thereby facilitate quantitative comparison between computational models and experimental LFP recordings in vivo....

  18. A Comparison of Different Engineering Models for Computation of Lightning Magnetic Field of Negative First Strokes

    V. Javor

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A comparison of different engineering models results for a lightning magnetic field of negative first strokes is presented in this paper. A new function for representing double-peaked channel-base current is used for lightning stroke modeling. This function includes the initial and subsidiary peak in a current waveform. For experimentally measured currents, a magnetic field is calculated for the three engineering models: transmission line (TL model, TL model with linear decay (MTLL, and TL model with exponential decay (MTLE.

  19. COMPUTING

    M. Kasemann

    CMS relies on a well functioning, distributed computing infrastructure. The Site Availability Monitoring (SAM) and the Job Robot submission have been very instrumental for site commissioning in order to increase availability of more sites such that they are available to participate in CSA07 and are ready to be used for analysis. The commissioning process has been further developed, including "lessons learned" documentation via the CMS twiki. Recently the visualization, presentation and summarizing of SAM tests for sites has been redesigned, it is now developed by the central ARDA project of WLCG. Work to test the new gLite Workload Management System was performed; a 4 times increase in throughput with respect to LCG Resource Broker is observed. CMS has designed and launched a new-generation traffic load generator called "LoadTest" to commission and to keep exercised all data transfer routes in the CMS PhE-DEx topology. Since mid-February, a transfer volume of about 12 P...

  20. EFTofPNG: a package for high precision computation with the effective field theory of post-Newtonian gravity

    Levi, Michele; Steinhoff, Jan

    2017-12-01

    We present a novel public package ‘EFTofPNG’ for high precision computation in the effective field theory of post-Newtonian (PN) gravity, including spins. We created this package in view of the timely need to publicly share automated computation tools, which integrate the various types of physics manifested in the expected increasing influx of gravitational wave (GW) data. Hence, we created a free and open source package, which is self-contained, modular, all-inclusive, and accessible to the classical gravity community. The ‘EFTofPNG’ Mathematica package also uses the power of the ‘xTensor’ package, suited for complicated tensor computation, where our coding also strategically approaches the generic generation of Feynman contractions, which is universal to all perturbation theories in physics, by efficiently treating n-point functions as tensors of rank n. The package currently contains four independent units, which serve as subsidiaries to the main one. Its final unit serves as a pipeline chain for the obtainment of the final GW templates, and provides the full computation of derivatives and physical observables of interest. The upcoming ‘EFTofPNG’ package version 1.0 should cover the point mass sector, and all the spin sectors, up to the fourth PN order, and the two-loop level. We expect and strongly encourage public development of the package to improve its efficiency, and to extend it to further PN sectors, and observables useful for the waveform modelling.

  1. Numerical study and ex vivo assessment of HIFU treatment time reduction through optimization of focal point trajectory

    Grisey, A.; Yon, S.; Pechoux, T.; Letort, V.; Lafitte, P.

    2017-03-01

    Treatment time reduction is a key issue to expand the use of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) surgery, especially for benign pathologies. This study aims at quantitatively assessing the potential reduction of the treatment time arising from moving the focal point during long pulses. In this context, the optimization of the focal point trajectory is crucial to achieve a uniform thermal dose repartition and avoid boiling. At first, a numerical optimization algorithm was used to generate efficient trajectories. Thermal conduction was simulated in 3D with a finite difference code and damages to the tissue were modeled using the thermal dose formula. Given an initial trajectory, the thermal dose field was first computed, then, making use of Pontryagin's maximum principle, the trajectory was iteratively refined. Several initial trajectories were tested. Then, an ex vivo study was conducted in order to validate the efficicency of the resulting optimized strategies. Single pulses were performed at 3MHz on fresh veal liver samples with an Echopulse and the size of each unitary lesion was assessed by cutting each sample along three orthogonal planes and measuring the dimension of the whitened area based on photographs. We propose a promising approach to significantly shorten HIFU treatment time: the numerical optimization algorithm was shown to provide a reliable insight on trajectories that can improve treatment strategies. The model must now be improved in order to take in vivo conditions into account and extensively validated.

  2. A new automated quantification algorithm for the detection and evaluation of focal liver lesions with contrast-enhanced ultrasound.

    Gatos, Ilias; Tsantis, Stavros; Spiliopoulos, Stavros; Skouroliakou, Aikaterini; Theotokas, Ioannis; Zoumpoulis, Pavlos; Hazle, John D; Kagadis, George C

    2015-07-01

    Detect and classify focal liver lesions (FLLs) from contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) imaging by means of an automated quantification algorithm. The proposed algorithm employs a sophisticated segmentation method to detect and contour focal lesions from 52 CEUS video sequences (30 benign and 22 malignant). Lesion detection involves wavelet transform zero crossings utilization as an initialization step to the Markov random field model toward the lesion contour extraction. After FLL detection across frames, time intensity curve (TIC) is computed which provides the contrast agents' behavior at all vascular phases with respect to adjacent parenchyma for each patient. From each TIC, eight features were automatically calculated and employed into the support vector machines (SVMs) classification algorithm in the design of the image analysis model. With regard to FLLs detection accuracy, all lesions detected had an average overlap value of 0.89 ± 0.16 with manual segmentations for all CEUS frame-subsets included in the study. Highest classification accuracy from the SVM model was 90.3%, misdiagnosing three benign and two malignant FLLs with sensitivity and specificity values of 93.1% and 86.9%, respectively. The proposed quantification system that employs FLLs detection and classification algorithms may be of value to physicians as a second opinion tool for avoiding unnecessary invasive procedures.

  3. Three-dimensional computation of magnetic fields and Lorentz forces of an LHC dipole magnet

    Daum, C.; Avest, D. ter

    1989-07-01

    Magnetic fields and Lorentz forces of an LHC dipole magnet are calculated using the method of image currents to represent the effect of the iron shield. The calculation is performed for coils of finite length using a parametrization for coil heads of constant perimeter. A comparison with calculations based on POISSON and TOSCA is made. (author). 5 refs.; 31 figs.; 6 tabs

  4. Effect of non-uniform mean flow field on acoustic propagation problems in computational aeroacoustics

    Si, Haiqing; Shen, Wen Zhong; Zhu, Wei Jun

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic propagation in the presence of a non-uniform mean flow is studied numerically by using two different acoustic propagating models, which solve linearized Euler equations (LEE) and acoustic perturbation equations (APE). As noise induced by turbulent flows often propagates from near field t...

  5. Computer analysis of multicircuit shells of revolution by the field method

    Cohen, G.A.

    1975-01-01

    The field method has been presented previously for shells of revolution with open branched meridians. The main purpose of the present paper is to extend this work to the case of meridians which contain circuits. Also, a new method for the treatment of arbitrary kinematic constraints is presented. (Auth.)

  6. COMPUTATIONAL MODELING AND SIMULATION IN BIOLOGY TEACHING: A MINIMALLY EXPLORED FIELD OF STUDY WITH A LOT OF POTENTIAL

    Sonia López

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study is part of a research project that aims to characterize the epistemological, psychological and didactic presuppositions of science teachers (Biology, Physics, Chemistry that implement Computational Modeling and Simulation (CMS activities as a part of their teaching practice. We present here a synthesis of a literature review on the subject, evidencing how in the last two decades this form of computer usage for science teaching has boomed in disciplines such as Physics and Chemistry, but in a lesser degree in Biology. Additionally, in the works that dwell on the use of CMS in Biology, we identified a lack of theoretical bases that support their epistemological, psychological and/or didactic postures. Accordingly, this generates significant considerations for the fields of research and teacher instruction in Science Education.

  7. Verification and validation of predictive computer programs describing the near and far-field chemistry of radioactive waste disposal systems

    Read, D.; Broyd, T.W.

    1988-01-01

    This paper provides an introduction to CHEMVAL, an international project concerned with establishing the applicability of chemical speciation and coupled transport models to the simulation of realistic waste disposal situations. The project aims to validate computer-based models quantitatively by comparison with laboratory and field experiments. Verification of the various computer programs employed by research organisations within the European Community is ensured through close inter-laboratory collaboration. The compilation and review of thermodynamic data forms an essential aspect of this work and has led to the production of an internally consistent standard CHEMVAL database. The sensitivity of results to variation in fundamental constants is being monitored at each stage of the project and, where feasible, complementary laboratory studies are used to improve the data set. Currently, thirteen organisations from five countries are participating in CHEMVAL which forms part of the Commission of European Communities' MIRAGE 2 programme of research. (orig.)

  8. Distinguished hyperbolic trajectories in time-dependent fluid flows: analytical and computational approach for velocity fields defined as data sets

    K. Ide

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we develop analytical and numerical methods for finding special hyperbolic trajectories that govern geometry of Lagrangian structures in time-dependent vector fields. The vector fields (or velocity fields may have arbitrary time dependence and be realized only as data sets over finite time intervals, where space and time are discretized. While the notion of a hyperbolic trajectory is central to dynamical systems theory, much of the theoretical developments for Lagrangian transport proceed under the assumption that such a special hyperbolic trajectory exists. This brings in new mathematical issues that must be addressed in order for Lagrangian transport theory to be applicable in practice, i.e. how to determine whether or not such a trajectory exists and, if it does exist, how to identify it in a sequence of instantaneous velocity fields. We address these issues by developing the notion of a distinguished hyperbolic trajectory (DHT. We develop an existence criteria for certain classes of DHTs in general time-dependent velocity fields, based on the time evolution of Eulerian structures that are observed in individual instantaneous fields over the entire time interval of the data set. We demonstrate the concept of DHTs in inhomogeneous (or "forced" time-dependent linear systems and develop a theory and analytical formula for computing DHTs. Throughout this work the notion of linearization is very important. This is not surprising since hyperbolicity is a "linearized" notion. To extend the analytical formula to more general nonlinear time-dependent velocity fields, we develop a series of coordinate transforms including a type of linearization that is not typically used in dynamical systems theory. We refer to it as Eulerian linearization, which is related to the frame independence of DHTs, as opposed to the Lagrangian linearization, which is typical in dynamical systems theory, which is used in the computation of Lyapunov exponents. We

  9. Effect of field-of-view size on gray values derived from cone-beam computed tomography compared with the Hounsfield unit values from multidetector computed tomography scans.

    Shokri, Abbas; Ramezani, Leila; Bidgoli, Mohsen; Akbarzadeh, Mahdi; Ghazikhanlu-Sani, Karim; Fallahi-Sichani, Hamed

    2018-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of field-of-view (FOV) size on the gray values derived from conebeam computed tomography (CBCT) compared with the Hounsfield unit values from multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scans as the gold standard. A radiographic phantom was designed with 4 acrylic cylinders. One cylinder was filled with distilled water, and the other 3 were filled with 3 types of bone substitute: namely, Nanobone, Cenobone, and Cerabone. The phantom was scanned with 2 CBCT systems using 2 different FOV sizes, and 1 MDCT system was used as the gold standard. The mean gray values (MGVs) of each cylinder were calculated in each imaging protocol. In both CBCT systems, significant differences were noted in the MGVs of all materials between the 2 FOV sizes ( P <.05) except for Cerabone in the Cranex3D system. Significant differences were found in the MGVs of each material compared with the others in both FOV sizes for each CBCT system. No significant difference was seen between the Cranex3D CBCT system and the MDCT system in the MGVs of bone substitutes on images obtained with a small FOV. The size of the FOV significantly changed the MGVs of all bone substitutes, except for Cerabone in the Cranex3D system. Both CBCT systems had the ability to distinguish the 3 types of bone substitutes based on a comparison of their MGVs. The Cranex3D CBCT system used with a small FOV had a significant correlation with MDCT results.

  10. Focal Colonic FDG Activity with PET/CT: Guidelines for Recommendation of Colonoscopy

    Liu, Tianye; Behr, Spencer; Khan, Sana; Osterhoff, Robert; Aparici, Carina Mari

    2015-01-01

    Focal 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) colonic activity can be incidentally seen in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scans. Its clinical significance is still unclear. The purpose of this study was to assess the significance of focal FDG activity in PET/CT scans by correlating the imaging findings to colonoscopy results, and come up with some guidelines for recommendation of follow-up colonoscopy. A total of 133 patients who underwent both 18F-FDG PET/CT for different onc...

  11. DESI focal plate mechanical integration and cooling

    Lambert, A. R.; Besuner, R. W.; Claybaugh, T. M.; Silber, J. H.

    2016-08-01

    The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) is under construction to measure the expansion history of the Universe using the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation technique[1]. The spectra of 40 million galaxies over 14000 sq. deg will be measured during the life of the experiment. A new prime focus corrector for the KPNO Mayall telescope will deliver light to 5000 fiber optic positioners. The fibers in turn feed ten broad-band spectrographs. This paper describes the mechanical integration of the DESI focal plate and the thermal system design. The DESI focal plate is comprised of ten identical petal assemblies. Each petal contains 500 robotic fiber positioners. Each petal is a complete, self-contained unit, independent from the others, with integrated power supply, controllers, fiber routing, and cooling services. The major advantages of this scheme are: (1) supports installation and removal of complete petal assemblies in-situ, without disturbing the others, (2) component production, assembly stations, and test procedures are repeated and parallelizable, (3) a complete, full-scale prototype can be built and tested at an early date, (4) each production petal can be surveyed and tested as a complete unit, prior to integration, from the fiber tip at the focal surface to the fiber slit at the spectrograph. The ten petal assemblies will be installed in a single integration ring, which is mounted to the DESI corrector. The aluminum integration ring attaches to the steel corrector barrel via a flexured steel adapter, isolating the focal plate from differential thermal expansions. The plate scale will be kept stable by conductive cooling of the petal assembly. The guider and wavefront sensors (one per petal) will be convectively cooled by forced flow of air. Heat will be removed from the system at ten liquid-cooled cold plates, one per petal, operating at ambient temperature. The entire focal plate structure is enclosed in an insulating shroud, which serves as a thermal barrier

  12. Analysis of steam turbine boresonic NDE data using a field portable computer

    Leon-Salamanca, T.; Reinhart, E.R.

    2004-01-01

    Due to the high combined stress caused by thermal and rotational loading, the highest stress in the hollow rotor forging of typical nuclear power steam turbine and generator units is in the region at or near the bore. Material discontinuities aligned along the axis of the rotor centerline, with depth in the radial plane of the rotor, have the highest probability of becoming flaws of concern to the integrity of the rotor. Due to the nature of the casting/forging process a great number of material discontinuities can be found near the rotor bore. During the ultrasonic examination of rotors with a large number of discontinuities, the engineer must determine if these discontinuities are ultrasonic reflectors caused by fabrication anomalies, reflectors that are probably fabrication discontinuities but in such close proximity that they may link up and form a defect of concern to future operation, or reflectors that have significant size and are real growing flaws, but may appear as separated indications. Until recently, plotting of ultrasonic data to determine the significance of closely spaced indications was time consuming and required special 3-D analysis methods to determine if indications were isolated or linked to form larger discontinuities. To overcome this problem, a software program, compatible with portable personal computers, was written to define a parameter necessary for determining if a group of indications detected from nondestructive ultrasonic testing of turbine and generator rotors could combine to form larger ones. The approach involved using a computer algorithm to model each indication as a three dimensional sphere with a diameter equal to the ultrasonic signal amplitude from an equivalent flat bottom hole reflector and setting a minimum gap distance between spheres necessary for a link up. The program was implemented following a commonly used data format accepted by industry recognized computer codes. The gap distance and link up parameters were

  13. Overview of the assessment of the french in-field tritium experiment with computer codes

    Crabol, B.; Graziani, G.; Edlund, O.

    1989-01-01

    In the framework of the international cooperation settled for the realization of the French tritium experiment, an expert group for the assessment of computer codes, including the Joint Research Center of Ispra (European Communities), Studsvik (Sweden) and the Atomic Energy Commission (France), has been organized. The aim of the group was as follows: - to help the design of the experiment by evaluating beforehand the consequences of the release, - to interpret the results of the experiment. This paper describes the last task and gives the main conclusions drawn from the work

  14. Image quality assessment of three limited field-of-view cone-beam computed tomography devices in endodontics

    Tran, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Since the beginning of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) in dento-maxillo-facial radiology, many CBCT devices with different technical aspects and characteristics were produced. Technical variations between CBCT and acquisition settings could involve image quality differences. In order to compare the performance of three limited field-of-view CBCT devices, an objective and subjective evaluation of image quality was carried out using an ex-vivo phantom, which combines both diagnostic and technical features. A significant difference in image quality was found between the five acquisition protocols of the study. (author) [fr

  15. Automated Computer-Based Facility for Measurement of Near-Field Structure of Microwave Radiators and Scatterers

    Mishra, Shantnu R.;; Pavlasek, Tomas J. F.;; Muresan, Letitia V.

    1980-01-01

    An automatic facility for measuring the three-dimensional structure of the near fields of microwave radiators and scatterers is described. The amplitude and phase for different polarization components can be recorded in analog and digital form using a microprocessor-based system. The stored data...... are transferred to a large high-speed computer for bulk processing and for the production of isophot and equiphase contour maps or profiles. The performance of the system is demonstrated through results for a single conical horn, for interacting rectangular horns, for multiple cylindrical scatterers...

  16. New Research Perspectives in the Emerging Field of Computational Intelligence to Economic Modeling

    Vasile MAZILESCU

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational Intelligence (CI is a new development paradigm of intelligentsystems which has resulted from a synergy between fuzzy sets, artificial neuralnetworks, evolutionary computation, machine learning, etc., broadeningcomputer science, physics, economics, engineering, mathematics, statistics. It isimperative to know why these tools can be potentially relevant and effective toeconomic and financial modeling. This paper presents, after a synergic newparadigm of intelligent systems, as a practical case study the fuzzy and temporalproperties of knowledge formalism embedded in an Intelligent Control System(ICS, based on FT-algorithm. We are not dealing high with level reasoningmethods, because we think that real-time problems can only be solved by ratherlow-level reasoning. Most of the overall run-time of fuzzy expert systems isused in the match phase. To achieve a fast reasoning the number of fuzzy setoperations must be reduced. For this, we use a fuzzy compiled structure ofknowledge, like Rete, because it is required for real-time responses. Solving thematch-time predictability problem would allow us to built much more powerfulreasoning techniques.

  17. Effects of magmatic processes on the potential Yucca Mountain repository: Field and computational studies

    Valentine, G.A.; Groves, K.R.; Gable, C.W.; Perry, F.V.; Crowe, B.M.

    1993-01-01

    Assessing the risk of future magmatic activity at a potential Yucca Mountain radioactive waste repository requires, in addition to event probabilities, some knowledge of the consequences of such activity. Magmatic consequences are divided into an eruptive component, which pertains to the possibility of radioactive waste being erupted onto the surface of Yucca Mountain, and a subsurface component, which occurs whether there is an accompanying eruption or not. The subsurface component pertains to a suite of processes such as hydrothermal activity, changes in country rock properties, and long term alteration of the hydrologic flow field which change the waste isolation system. This paper is the second in a series describing progress on studies of the effects of magmatic activity. We describe initial results of field analog studies at small volume basaltic centers where detailed measurements are being conducted of the amount of wall rock debris that can be erupted as a function of depth in the volcanic plumbing system. Constraints from field evidence of wall rock entrainment mechanisms are also discussed. Evidence is described for a mechanism of producing subhorizontal sills versus subvertical dikes, an issue that is important for assessing subsurface effects. Finally, new modeling techniques, which are being developed in order to capture the three dimensional complexities of real geologic situations in subsurface effects, are described

  18. Volcanomagnetic anomalies: a review and the computation of the piezomagnetic field expected at Vulcano (Aeolian Islands, Italy

    F. Ferricci

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available he volcanic area of Vulcano experienced major unrest, which brought the fumarolic field temperatures from slightly less than 300 °C to ca. 700 °C between 1988-1993. The structure underlying the crater, investigated by drillings and by different geophysical techniques, is relatively well-known. This led us to attempt modelling the magnetic anomaly which could be generated by sudden pressure variations in the magma chamber at shallow depth. The rocks embedding the intrusive rock penetrated by drill-holes to a depth of ca. 2000 m are characterized by high susceptibility, which points to the possibility of obtaining significant magnetic anomalies with acceptably weak pressure pulses. The model for straightforward computing of the anomalous field was drawn accounting for (1 the inferred geometry of the Curie isotherrn, (2 presence of a spherical magma reservoir, 2 km wide and centred at a depth of 3.5 km, overlain by (3 a 0.5 km wide and 1.5 km high cylinder simulating the intrusion first revealed by drillings. The model elements (2 and (3 behave as a single source zone and are assumed to lie beyond the Curie point, the contribution to the piezomagnetic effect being provided by the surrounding medium. Under such conditions, a 10 MPa pressure pulse applied within the sourcezone provides a 4 nT piezomagnetic anomaly, compatible with the amplitude of the anomalies observed at those volcanoes of the world where magnetic surveillance is routinely carried out. The analytical method used for computation of the magnetic field generated by mechanical stress is extensively discussed, and the contribution of piezomagnetism to rapid variations of the magnetic field is compared to other types of magnetic anomalies likely to occur at active volcanoes.

  19. The Next Step in Deployment of Computer Based Procedures For Field Workers: Insights And Results From Field Evaluations at Nuclear Power Plants

    Oxstrand, Johanna; Le Blanc, Katya L.; Bly, Aaron

    2015-02-01

    The paper-based procedures currently used for nearly all activities in the commercial nuclear power industry have a long history of ensuring safe operation of the plants. However, there is potential to greatly increase efficiency and safety by improving how the human operator interacts with the procedures. One way to achieve these improvements is through the use of computer-based procedures (CBPs). A CBP system offers a vast variety of improvements, such as context driven job aids, integrated human performance tools (e.g., placekeeping, correct component verification, etc.), and dynamic step presentation. The latter means that the CBP system could only display relevant steps based on operating mode, plant status, and the task at hand. A dynamic presentation of the procedure (also known as context-sensitive procedures) will guide the operator down the path of relevant steps based on the current conditions. This feature will reduce the operator’s workload and inherently reduce the risk of incorrectly marking a step as not applicable and the risk of incorrectly performing a step that should be marked as not applicable. The research team at the Idaho National Laboratory has developed a prototype CBP system for field workers, which has been evaluated from a human factors and usability perspective in four laboratory studies. Based on the results from each study revisions were made to the CBP system. However, a crucial step to get the end users' (e.g., auxiliary operators, maintenance technicians, etc.) acceptance is to put the system in their hands and let them use it as a part of their everyday work activities. In the spring 2014 the first field evaluation of the INL CBP system was conducted at a nuclear power plant. Auxiliary operators conduct a functional test of one out of three backup air compressors each week. During the field evaluation activity, one auxiliary operator conducted the test with the paper-based procedure while a second auxiliary operator

  20. Focal Colonic FDG Activity with PET/CT: Guidelines for Recommendation of Colonoscopy

    Liu, Tianye; Behr, Spencer; Khan, Sana; Osterhoff, Robert; Aparici, Carina Mari

    2015-01-01

    Focal 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) colonic activity can be incidentally seen in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scans. Its clinical significance is still unclear. The purpose of this study was to assess the significance of focal FDG activity in PET/CT scans by correlating the imaging findings to colonoscopy results, and come up with some guidelines for recommendation of follow-up colonoscopy. A total of 133 patients who underwent both 18 F-FDG PET/CT for different oncological indications and colonoscopy within 3 months were retrospectively studied. Imaging, colonoscopy and pathology results were analyzed. Of the 133 FDG-PET/CT scans, 109/133 (82%) did not show focal colonic FDG activity, and 24/133 (18%) did. Of the 109/133 PET/CTs without focal colonic FDG activity, 109/109 (100%) did not have evidence of colon cancer after colonoscopy and histology. Of the 24/133 PET/CTs with focal colonic FDG activity, 10/24 (42%) had pathologic confirmation of colon cancer and 14/24 (58%) did not have evidence of colon cancer after colonoscopy and histological analysis. Sensitivity was 10/10 (100%), specificity 109/123 (89%), positive predictive value (PPV) 10/24 (42%) and negative predictive value (NPV) 109/109 (100%). Incidental focal 18 FDG activity in PET/CT imaging shows a high sensitivity, specificity and NPV for malignancy, with a not so high PPV of 42%. Although some people would argue that a 42% chance of malignancy justifies colonoscopy, this maybe is not possible in all cases. However, the high sensitivity of the test does not allow these studies to be overlooked. We provide our recommendations as per when to send patients with focal FDG colonic activity to have further characterization with colonoscopy

  1. Radiopneumographic characteristics of focal pneumonia in children

    Smirnova, A.A.

    1980-01-01

    Zonal ventilation and blood flow were studied by the radiopneumography method in 50 children of school age with lower-lobe-of-the lung focal pneumonia (26 with left-side and 24 with right-side). It is established that during right-side localization of pneumonic focus preserved was the predomination of ventilation of right lung relative to left. Complete normalization of common and regional indexes of ventilation and blood flow was established by the 21st day from the beginning of treatment during right-side focal pneumonias. In case of left-side localization of pneumonic focus only partial reduction of external respiration and perfusion comes. Therefore, compensatory and reducing capabilities of right lung are preferrable

  2. Membership Functions for Fuzzy Focal Elements

    Porębski Sebastian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a study on data-driven diagnostic rules, which are easy to interpret by human experts. To this end, the Dempster-Shafer theory extended for fuzzy focal elements is used. Premises of the rules (fuzzy focal elements are provided by membership functions which shapes are changing according to input symptoms. The main aim of the present study is to evaluate common membership function shapes and to introduce a rule elimination algorithm. Proposed methods are first illustrated with the popular Iris data set. Next experiments with five medical benchmark databases are performed. Results of the experiments show that various membership function shapes provide different inference efficiency but the extracted rule sets are close to each other. Thus indications for determining rules with possible heuristic interpretation can be formulated.

  3. Focal epilepsy in the Belgian shepherd

    Berendt, Mette; Gulløv, Christina Hedal; Fredholm, Merete

    2009-01-01

    and deceased) were ascertained through a telephone interview using a standardised questionnaire regarding seizure history and phenomenology. Living dogs were invited to a detailed clinical evaluation. Litters more than five years of age, or where epilepsy was present in all offspring before the age of five......, were included in the calculations of inheritance. results: Out of 199 family members, 66 dogs suffered from epilepsy. The prevalence of epilepsy in the family was 33%. Fifty-five dogs experienced focal seizures with or without secondary generalisation, while four dogs experienced primary generalised...... seizures. In seven dogs, seizures could not be classified. The mode of inheritance of epilepsy was simple Mendelian. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: This study identified that the Belgian shepherd suffers from genetically transmitted focal epilepsy. The seizure phenomenology expressed by family members have...

  4. Chest pain in focal musculoskeletal disorders

    Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Christensen, Henrik Wulff

    2010-01-01

    overlapping conditions and syndromes of focal disorders, including Tietze syndrome, costochondritis, chest wall syndrome, muscle tenderness, slipping rib, cervical angina, and segmental dysfunction of the cervical and thoracic spine, have been reported to cause pain. For most of these syndromes, evidence......The musculoskeletal system is a recognized source of chest pain. However, despite the apparently benign origin, patients with musculoskeletal chest pain remain under-diagnosed, untreated, and potentially continuously disabled in terms of anxiety, depression, and activities of daily living. Several...... arises mainly from case stories and empiric knowledge. For segmental dysfunction, clinical features of musculoskeletal chest pain have been characterized in a few clinical trials. This article summarizes the most commonly encountered syndromes of focal musculoskeletal disorders in clinical practice....

  5. Computer-simulation movie of ionospheric electric fields and currents for a magnetospheric substorm life cycle. Technical note

    Kamide, Y.; Matsushita, S.

    1980-07-01

    Numerical solution of the current conservation equation gives the distributions of electric fields and currents in the global ionosphere produced by the field-aligned currents. By altering ionospheric conductivity distributions as well as the field-aligned current densities and configurations to simulate a magnetospheric substorm life cycle, which is assumed to last for five hours, various patterns of electric fields and currents are computed for every 30-second interval in the life cycle. The simulated results are compiled in the form of a color movie, where variations of electric equi-potential curves are the first sequence, electric current-vector changes are the second, and fluctuations of the electric current system are the third. The movie compresses real time by a factor of 1/180, taking 1.7 minutes of running time for one sequence. One of the most striking features of this simulation is the clear demonstration of rapid and large scale interactions between the auroral zone and middle-low latitudes during the substorm sequences. This technical note provides an outline of the numerical scheme and world-wide contour maps of the electric potential, ionospheric current vectors, and the equivalent ionospheric current system at 5-minute intervals as an aid in viewing the movie and to further detailed study of the 'model' substorms

  6. Proximal focal femoral deficiency: A case report

    Shashank Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Proximal focal femoral deficiency (PFFD is a rare congenital anomaly resulting in limb shortening and disability in young. The exact cause of the disease is not known and it may present as varying grades of affection involving the proximal femur and the acetabulum. Recognition of this rare abnormality on radiographs can help manage these cases better since early institution of therapy may help in achieving adequate growth of the femur.

  7. Syndecan-4 and focal adhesion function

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    2001-01-01

    Two groups have now reported the viability of mice that lack syndecan-4. These mice have wound healing/angiogenesis problems, and fibroblasts from these animals differ in adhesion and migration from normal. This is consistent with recent in vitro data indicating a need for signaling via syndecan-4...... for focal adhesion formation, and reports that overexpression of proteins that bind syndecan-4 can modify cell adhesion and migration....

  8. FDTD computation of temperature elevation in the elderly for far-field RF exposures

    Nomura, Tomoki; Laakso, Ilkka; Hirata, Akimasa

    2014-01-01

    Core temperature elevation and perspiration in younger and older adults is investigated for plane-wave exposure at whole-body averaged specific absorption rate of 0.4 W kg -1 . Numeric Japanese male model is considered together with a thermo-regulatory response formula proposed in the authors' previous study. The frequencies considered were at 65 MHz and 2 GHz where the total power absorption in humans becomes maximal for the allowable power density prescribed in the international guidelines. From the computational results used here, the core temperature elevation in the older adult model was larger than that in the younger one at both frequencies. The reason for this difference is attributable to the difference of sweating, which is originated from the difference in the threshold activating the sweating and the decline in sweating in the legs. (authors)

  9. Flow field measurements using LDA and numerical computation for rod bundle of reactor fuel assembly

    Hu Jun; Zou Zunyu

    1995-02-01

    Local mean velocity and turbulence intensity measurements were obtained with DANTEC 55 X two-dimensional Laser Dopper Anemometry (LDA) for rod bundle of reactor fuel assembly test model which was a 4 x 4 rod bundle. The data were obtained from different experimental cross-sections both upstream and downstream of the model support plate. Measurements performed at test Reynolds numbers of 1.8 x 10 4 ∼3.6 x 10 4 . The results described the local and gross effects of the support plate on upstream and downstream flow distributions. A numerical computation was also given, the experimental results are in good agreement with the numerical one and the others in references. Finally, a few suggestions were proposed for how to use the LDA system well. (11 figs.)

  10. Artificial Intelligence - A New Field of Computer Science Which Any Business Should Consider

    Oprișan Oana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Anyone can remember what it meant for business IT solutions a few years ago. On themarket there is a clear segmentation between ERP, CRM, Document Management, BI, and so on. Asegmentation that has gradually added other elements, such as Analytics, and, more recently, BigData, with its leading corollary, Cognitive Computing. Technological developments, and especiallybusiness developments, marked by the growing need for real-time, real-world information fromgrowing data volumes, have made such a segmentation on the business solutions market start tofade Clear boundaries. Obviously, we can not speak at present about an integrative solution thatincludes all the sub-segments of this market. Such a fully integrated solution would be extremelyexpensive and perhaps too rigid to meet the needs of all market players.

  11. FDTD computation of temperature elevation in the elderly for far-field RF exposures.

    Nomura, Tomoki; Laakso, Ilkka; Hirata, Akimasa

    2014-03-01

    Core temperature elevation and perspiration in younger and older adults is investigated for plane-wave exposure at whole-body averaged specific absorption rate of 0.4 W kg(-1). Numeric Japanese male model is considered together with a thermoregulatory response formula proposed in the authors' previous study. The frequencies considered were at 65 MHz and 2 GHz where the total power absorption in humans becomes maximal for the allowable power density prescribed in the international guidelines. From the computational results used here, the core temperature elevation in the older adult model was larger than that in the younger one at both frequencies. The reason for this difference is attributable to the difference of sweating, which is originated from the difference in the threshold activating the sweating and the decline in sweating in the legs.

  12. A novel potential/viscous flow coupling technique for computing helicopter flow fields

    Summa, J. Michael; Strash, Daniel J.; Yoo, Sungyul

    1993-01-01

    The primary objective of this work was to demonstrate the feasibility of a new potential/viscous flow coupling procedure for reducing computational effort while maintaining solution accuracy. This closed-loop, overlapped velocity-coupling concept has been developed in a new two-dimensional code, ZAP2D (Zonal Aerodynamics Program - 2D), a three-dimensional code for wing analysis, ZAP3D (Zonal Aerodynamics Program - 3D), and a three-dimensional code for isolated helicopter rotors in hover, ZAPR3D (Zonal Aerodynamics Program for Rotors - 3D). Comparisons with large domain ARC3D solutions and with experimental data for a NACA 0012 airfoil have shown that the required domain size can be reduced to a few tenths of a percent chord for the low Mach and low angle of attack cases and to less than 2-5 chords for the high Mach and high angle of attack cases while maintaining solution accuracies to within a few percent. This represents CPU time reductions by a factor of 2-4 compared with ARC2D. The current ZAP3D calculation for a rectangular plan-form wing of aspect ratio 5 with an outer domain radius of about 1.2 chords represents a speed-up in CPU time over the ARC3D large domain calculation by about a factor of 2.5 while maintaining solution accuracies to within a few percent. A ZAPR3D simulation for a two-bladed rotor in hover with a reduced grid domain of about two chord lengths was able to capture the wake effects and compared accurately with the experimental pressure data. Further development is required in order to substantiate the promise of computational improvements due to the ZAPR3D coupling concept.

  13. Focal adhesions, stress fibers and mechanical tension

    Burridge, Keith, E-mail: Keith_Burridge@med.unc.edu [Department of Cell Biology and Physiology, and Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, 12-016 Lineberger, CB#7295, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Guilluy, Christophe, E-mail: christophe.guilluy@univ-nantes.fr [Inserm UMR-S1087, CNRS UMR-C6291, L' institut du Thorax, and Université de Nantes, Nantes (France)

    2016-04-10

    Stress fibers and focal adhesions are complex protein arrays that produce, transmit and sense mechanical tension. Evidence accumulated over many years led to the conclusion that mechanical tension generated within stress fibers contributes to the assembly of both stress fibers themselves and their associated focal adhesions. However, several lines of evidence have recently been presented against this model. Here we discuss the evidence for and against the role of mechanical tension in driving the assembly of these structures. We also consider how their assembly is influenced by the rigidity of the substratum to which cells are adhering. Finally, we discuss the recently identified connections between stress fibers and the nucleus, and the roles that these may play, both in cell migration and regulating nuclear function. - Highlights: • The different types of stress fiber and focal adhesion are described. • We discuss the controversy about tension and assembly of these structures. • We describe the different models used to investigate assembly of these structures. • The influence of substratum rigidity is discussed. • Stress fiber connections to the nucleus are reviewed.

  14. Focal plane scanner with reciprocating spatial window

    Mao, Chengye (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A focal plane scanner having a front objective lens, a spatial window for selectively passing a portion of the image therethrough, and a CCD array for receiving the passed portion of the image. All embodiments have a common feature whereby the spatial window and CCD array are mounted for simultaneous relative reciprocating movement with respect to the front objective lens, and the spatial window is mounted within the focal plane of the front objective. In a first embodiment, the spatial window is a slit and the CCD array is one-dimensional, and successive rows of the image in the focal plane of the front objective lens are passed to the CCD array by an image relay lens interposed between the slit and the CCD array. In a second embodiment, the spatial window is a slit, the CCD array is two-dimensional, and a prism-grating-prism optical spectrometer is interposed between the slit and the CCD array so as to cause the scanned row to be split into a plurality of spectral separations onto the CCD array. In a third embodiment, the CCD array is two-dimensional and the spatial window is a rectangular linear variable filter (LVF) window, so as to cause the scanned rows impinging on the LVF to be bandpass filtered into spectral components onto the CCD array through an image relay lens interposed between the LVF and the CCD array.

  15. Auxiliary fields as a tool for computing analytical solutions of the Schroedinger equation

    Silvestre-Brac, Bernard; Semay, Claude; Buisseret, Fabien

    2008-01-01

    We propose a new method to obtain approximate solutions for the Schroedinger equation with an arbitrary potential that possesses bound states. This method, relying on the auxiliary field technique, allows to find in many cases, analytical solutions. It offers a convenient way to study the qualitative features of the energy spectrum of bound states in any potential. In particular, we illustrate our method by solving the case of central potentials with power-law form and with logarithmic form. For these types of potentials, we propose very accurate analytical energy formulae which greatly improves the corresponding formulae that can be found in the literature

  16. Auxiliary fields as a tool for computing analytical solutions of the Schroedinger equation

    Silvestre-Brac, Bernard [LPSC Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Institut Polytechnique de Grenoble, Avenue des Martyrs 53, F-38026 Grenoble-Cedex (France); Semay, Claude; Buisseret, Fabien [Groupe de Physique Nucleaire Theorique, Universite de Mons-Hainaut, Academie universitaire Wallonie-Bruxelles, Place du Parc 20, B-7000 Mons (Belgium)], E-mail: silvestre@lpsc.in2p3.fr, E-mail: claude.semay@umh.ac.be, E-mail: fabien.buisseret@umh.ac.be

    2008-07-11

    We propose a new method to obtain approximate solutions for the Schroedinger equation with an arbitrary potential that possesses bound states. This method, relying on the auxiliary field technique, allows to find in many cases, analytical solutions. It offers a convenient way to study the qualitative features of the energy spectrum of bound states in any potential. In particular, we illustrate our method by solving the case of central potentials with power-law form and with logarithmic form. For these types of potentials, we propose very accurate analytical energy formulae which greatly improves the corresponding formulae that can be found in the literature.

  17. Classification of Focal and Non Focal Epileptic Seizures Using Multi-Features and SVM Classifier.

    Sriraam, N; Raghu, S

    2017-09-02

    Identifying epileptogenic zones prior to surgery is an essential and crucial step in treating patients having pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy. Electroencephalogram (EEG) is a significant measurement benchmark to assess patients suffering from epilepsy. This paper investigates the application of multi-features derived from different domains to recognize the focal and non focal epileptic seizures obtained from pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy patients from Bern Barcelona database. From the dataset, five different classification tasks were formed. Total 26 features were extracted from focal and non focal EEG. Significant features were selected using Wilcoxon rank sum test by setting p-value (p z > 1.96) at 95% significance interval. Hypothesis was made that the effect of removing outliers improves the classification accuracy. Turkey's range test was adopted for pruning outliers from feature set. Finally, 21 features were classified using optimized support vector machine (SVM) classifier with 10-fold cross validation. Bayesian optimization technique was adopted to minimize the cross-validation loss. From the simulation results, it was inferred that the highest sensitivity, specificity, and classification accuracy of 94.56%, 89.74%, and 92.15% achieved respectively and found to be better than the state-of-the-art approaches. Further, it was observed that the classification accuracy improved from 80.2% with outliers to 92.15% without outliers. The classifier performance metrics ensures the suitability of the proposed multi-features with optimized SVM classifier. It can be concluded that the proposed approach can be applied for recognition of focal EEG signals to localize epileptogenic zones.

  18. Multispectral linear array (MLA) focal plane mechanical and thermal design

    Mitchell, A. S.; Kaminski, E. F.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanical and thermal design of an integrated focal plane subsystem of a Multispectral Linear Array (MLA) instrument is discussed in terms of focal-plane alignment, thermoelastic performance, and thermal requirements. The modular construction and thermal control of the focal plane array are discussed.

  19. A Backward Pyramid Oriented Optical Flow Field Computing Method for Aerial Image

    LI Jiatian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aerial image optical flow field is the foundation for detecting moving objects at low altitude and obtaining change information. In general,the image pyramid structure is embedded in numerical procedure in order to enhance the convergence globally. However,more often than not,the pyramid structure is constructed using a bottom-up approach progressively,ignoring the geometry imaging process.In particular,when the ground objects moving it will lead to miss optical flow or the optical flow too small that could hardly sustain the subsequent modeling and analyzing issues. So a backward pyramid structure is proposed on the foundation of top-level standard image. Firstly,down sampled factors of top-level image are calculated quantitatively through central projection,which making the optical flow in top-level image represent the shifting threshold of the set ground target. Secondly,combining top-level image with its original,the down sampled factors in middle layer are confirmed in a constant proportion way. Finally,the image of middle layer is achieved by Gaussian smoothing and image interpolation,and meanwhile the pyramid is formed. The comparative experiments and analysis illustrate that the backward pyramid can calculate the optic flow field in aerial image accurately,and it has advantages in restraining small ground displacement.

  20. fields

    Brad J. Arnold

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Surface irrigation, such as flood or furrow, is the predominant form of irrigation in California for agronomic crops. Compared to other irrigation methods, however, it is inefficient in terms of water use; large quantities of water, instead of being used for crop production, are lost to excess deep percolation and tail runoff. In surface-irrigated fields, irrigators commonly cut off the inflow of water when the water advance reaches a familiar or convenient location downfield, but this experience-based strategy has not been very successful in reducing the tail runoff water. Our study compared conventional cutoff practices to a retroactively applied model-based cutoff method in four commercially producing alfalfa fields in Northern California, and evaluated the model using a simple sensor system for practical application in typical alfalfa fields. These field tests illustrated that the model can be used to reduce tail runoff in typical surface-irrigated fields, and using it with a wireless sensor system saves time and labor as well as water.