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Sample records for foam-based catalyst bed

  1. Method of Heating a Foam-Based Catalyst Bed

    Fortini, Arthur J.; Williams, Brian E.; McNeal, Shawn R.

    2009-01-01

    A method of heating a foam-based catalyst bed has been developed using silicon carbide as the catalyst support due to its readily accessible, high surface area that is oxidation-resistant and is electrically conductive. The foam support may be resistively heated by passing an electric current through it. This allows the catalyst bed to be heated directly, requiring less power to reach the desired temperature more quickly. Designed for heterogeneous catalysis, the method can be used by the petrochemical, chemical processing, and power-generating industries, as well as automotive catalytic converters. Catalyst beds must be heated to a light-off temperature before they catalyze the desired reactions. This typically is done by heating the assembly that contains the catalyst bed, which results in much of the power being wasted and/or lost to the surrounding environment. The catalyst bed is heated indirectly, thus requiring excessive power. With the electrically heated catalyst bed, virtually all of the power is used to heat the support, and only a small fraction is lost to the surroundings. Although the light-off temperature of most catalysts is only a few hundred degrees Celsius, the electrically heated foam is able to achieve temperatures of 1,200 C. Lower temperatures are achievable by supplying less electrical power to the foam. Furthermore, because of the foam s open-cell structure, the catalyst can be applied either directly to the foam ligaments or in the form of a catalyst- containing washcoat. This innovation would be very useful for heterogeneous catalysis where elevated temperatures are needed to drive the reaction.

  2. Plated nickel wire mesh makes superior catalyst bed

    Sill, M.

    1965-01-01

    Porous nickel mesh screen catalyst bed produces gas evolution in hydrogen peroxide thrust chambers used for attitude control of space vehicles. The nickel wire mesh disks in the catalyst bed are plated in rugose form with a silver-gold coating.

  3. Down-flow moving-bed gasifier with catalyst recycle

    Halow, John S.

    1999-01-01

    The gasification of coal and other carbonaceous materials by an endothermic gasification reaction is achieved in the presence of a catalyst in a down-flow, moving-bed gasifier. Catalyst is removed along with ash from the gasifier and is then sufficiently heated in a riser/burner by the combustion of residual carbon in the ash to volatilize the catalyst. This volatilized catalyst is returned to the gasifier where it uniformly contacts and condenses on the carbonaceous material. Also, the hot gaseous combustion products resulting from the combustion of the carbon in the ash along with excess air are introduced into the gasifier for providing heat energy used in the endothermic reaction.

  4. Oxidation of tritium in packed bed of noble metal catalyst for detritiation from system gases

    Nishikawa, Masabumi; Takeishi, Toshiharu; Munakata, Kenzo; Kotoh, Kenji; Enoeda, Mikio

    1985-01-01

    Catalytic oxidation rates of tritium in the bed of the noble metal catalysts are obtained and compared with the oxidation rates observed for the packed bed of spongy copper oxide or hopcalites. Use of Pt- or Pd-aluminia catalysts is recommended in this study because they give effective oxidation rates of tritium in the ambient temperature range. The adsorption performance of tritiated water in the catalyst bed is also discussed. (orig.)

  5. Additively Manufactured Monolithic Catalyst Bed for Green Propellants, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal aims to develop a low cost, high efficiency catalyst technology to address navigation and maneuver difficulties in NASA's return missions. Our approach...

  6. Deuterium exchange reaction between hydrogen and water in a trickle-bed column packed with novel catalysts

    Ahn, D. H.; Baek, S. W.; Lee, H. S.; Kim, K. R.; Kang, H. S.; Lee, S. H.; Jeong, H. S.

    1998-01-01

    The activity of a novel catalyst (Pt/SDBC) for deuterium exchange reaction between water and hydrogen streams in a trickle bed was measured. The performance of the catalyst was compared with a commercial catalyst with same metal content. The catalytic activity for the bed of wet-proofed catalyst diluted with hydrophillic packing material also measured. The Pt/SDBC catalyst shows higher activity in the liquid phase reaction than the commercial catalyst as measured in the vapor phase reaction. The performance for 50% dilution of the Pt/SDBC catalyst bed with hydrophillic packing material is better than that of the 100% bed due to more liquid holdup and better water distribution

  7. New proposition on performance evaluation of hydrophobic Pt catalyst packed in trickle bed

    Shimizu, Masami; Kitamoto, Asashi; Takashima, Yoichi.

    1983-01-01

    On the evaluation of the performance of the hydrophobic Pt catalyst packed in the trickle-bed test column, the conventionally defined (Ksub(y)a) and the newly defined (Ksub(f))sub (G) are compared with each other as a measure of the overall D-transfer coefficient. The value of (Ksub(y)a) varies in a wide range in accordance with the length of the test column. On the other hand (Ksub(f))sub (G sub (l = L)) has a finite value in the test column longer than about 0.5 m. By considering the values of ksub(g) and ksub(l) which are the constituents of (Ksub(f))sub (G), it is possible to improve the hydrophobic Pt catalyst trickle bed and to design the H 2 /H 2 O-isotopic exchange trickle-bed column packed with this catalyst. (author)

  8. Raising distillate selectivity and catalyst life time in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis by using a novel dual-bed reactor

    Tavasoli, A.; Sadaghiani, K.; Khodadadi, A. A.; Mortazavi, Y.

    2007-01-01

    In a novel dual bed reactor Fischer-Tropsch synthesis was studied by using two diff rent cobalt catalysts. An alkali-promoted cobalt catalyst was used in the first bed of a fixed-bed reactor followed by a Raiment promoted cobalt catalyst in the second bed. The activity, product selectivity and accelerated deactivation of the system were assessed and compared with a conventional single bed reactor system. The methane selectivity in the dual-bed reactor was about 18.9% less compared to that of the single-bed reactor. The C 5+ selectivity for the dual-bed reactor was 10.9% higher than that of the single-bed reactor. Accelerated deactivation of the catalysts in the dual-bed reactor was 42% lower than that of the single-bed reactor. It was revealed that the amount of catalysts activity recovery after regeneration at 400 d eg C in the dual-bed system is higher than that of the single-bed system

  9. Greater bottoms upgrading with Albemarle's e-bed catalysts

    Toshima, H.; Sedlacek, Z.; Backhouse, D.; Mayo, S.; Plantenga, F. [Albemarle Catalysts, Houston, TX (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The E-bed process is a heavy oil upgrading technology that produces near isothermal reactor conditions at a constant catalytic activity. However, E-bed conversion optimization is limited by reactor and downstream fouling problems caused by asphaltene precipitation. While asphaltene precipitation can controlled by reducing hydrogenation, high hydrogenation activity is needed for the removal of sulfur and heavy metals. This presentation described an asphaltene molecule management concept to reduce the fouling of E-bed units. Sediment reduction and high hydrogenation catalysts were used in a modified E-bed process with a variety of feeds and operating conditions. It was observed that the KF1312 catalyst achieved much higher sediment-reduction capability along with satisfactory hydrogenation activity with the different kinds of crude oil sources tested. The catalyst hydrocracked the asphaltenes into smaller molecules, which created greater asphaltene solubility. The sediment reduction capacity of the catalyst-staging technology is now being optimized. It was concluded that the technology will help to reduce fouling in E-bed processes and lead to improved conversion rates for refineries. refs., tabs., figs.

  10. Hydrogen production by biomass steam gasification in fluidized bed reactor with Co catalyst

    Kazuhiko Tasaka; Atsushi Tsutsumi; Takeshi Furusawa

    2006-01-01

    The catalytic performances of Co/MgO catalysts were investigated in steam gasification of cellulose and steam reforming of tar derived from cellulose gasification. For steam reforming of cellulose tar in a secondary fixed bed reactor, 12 wt.% Co/MgO catalyst attained more than 80% of tar reduction. The amount of produced H 2 and CO 2 increased with the presence of catalyst, and kept same level during 2 hr at 873 K. It is indicated that steam reforming of cellulose tar proceeds sufficiently over Co/MgO catalyst. For steam gasification of cellulose in a fluidized bed reactor, it was found that tar reduction increases with Co loading amount and 36 wt.% Co/MgO catalyst showed 84% of tar reduction. The amounts of produced gas kept for 2 hr indicating that 36 wt.% Co/MgO catalyst is stable during the reaction. It was concluded that these Co catalysts are promising systems for the steam gasification of cellulose and steam reforming of cellulose tar. (authors)

  11. Thermo-catalytic pyrolysis of waste polyethylene bottles in a packed bed reactor with different bed materials and catalysts

    Obeid, Farah; Zeaiter, Joseph; Al-Muhtaseb, Ala’a H.; Bouhadir, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermo-catalytic pyrolysis of waste polyethylene bottles was investigated. • The highest yield of liquid (82%) was obtained over a cement powder bed. • Acidic catalysts narrowed the carbon chain length of the paraffins to C 10 –C 28 . • Combination of cement bed with HBeta catalyst gave the highest yield of liquid. • Significant yield of aromatics was obtained mainly naphthalene and D-limonene. - Abstract: Plastic waste is an increasing economic and environmental problem as such there is a great need to process this waste and reduce its environmental impact. In this work, the pyrolysis of high density polyethylene (HDPE) waste products was investigated using both thermal and catalytic cracking techniques. The experimental work was carried out using packed bed reactor operating under an inert atmosphere at 450 °C. Different reactor bed materials, including sand, cement and white clay were used to enhance the thermal cracking of HDPE. In addition, the catalytic effect of sodium hydroxide, HUSY and HBeta zeolite catalysts on the degradation of HDPE waste was also investigated. The reactor beds were found to significantly alter the yield as well as the product composition. Products such as paraffins (⩽C 44 ), olefins (⩽C 22 ), aromatics (⩽C 14 ) and alcohols (C 16 and C 17 ) were obtained at varying rates. The highest yield of liquid (82%) was obtained over a cement powder bed with a paraffin yield of 58%. The yield of paraffins and olefins followed separate paths, for paraffins it was found to increase in the order or Cement > White clay > Silica Sand, whereas for the olefins it was in the reverse order Silica Sand > White clay > Cement. The results obtained in this work exhibited a higher P/O ratio than expected, where the amount of generated paraffins was greater than 60% in most cases. Less olefin was generated as a consequence. This indicates that the product generated is more suited to be used as a fuel rather than as a chemical

  12. Process for the exchange of hydrogen isotopes using a catalyst packed bed assembly

    Butler, J.P.; den Hartog, J.; Molson, F.W.R.

    1978-01-01

    A process for the exchange of hydrogen isotopes between streams of gaseous hydrogen and liquid water is described, wherein the streams of liquid water and gaseous hydrogen are simultaneously brought into contact with one another and a catalyst packed bed assembly while at a temperature in the range 273 0 to 573 0 K. The catalyst packed bed assembly may be composed of discrete carrier bodies of e.g. ceramics, metals, fibrous materials or synthetic plastics with catalytically active metal crystallites selected from Group VIII of the Periodic Table, partially enclosed in and bonded to the carrier bodies by a water repellent, water vapor and hydrogen gas permeable, porous, polymeric material, and discrete packing bodies having an exterior surface which is substantially hydrophilic and relatively noncatalytically active with regard to hydrogen isotope exchange between hydrogen gas and water vapor to that of the catalyst bodies

  13. The behavior of catalysts in hydrogasification of sub-bituminous coal in pressured fluidized bed

    Yan, Shuai; Bi, Jicheng; Qu, Xuan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •CCHG in a pressured fluidized bed achieved 77.3 wt.% of CH 4 yield in 30 min. •Co-Ca and Ni-Ca triggered catalytic coal pyrolysis and char hydrogasification. •The reason for better catalytic performance of 5%Co-1%Ca was elucidated. •Sintered catalyst blocked the reactive sites and suppressed coal conversion. •Co-Ca made the catalyzed coal char rich in mesopore structures and reactive sites. -- Abstract: The catalytic hydrogasification of the sub-bituminous coal was carried out in a lab-scale pressurized fluidized bed with the Co-Ca, Ni-Ca and Fe-Ca as catalysts at 850 °C and 3 MPa. The effect of different catalysts on the characteristics of gasification products was investigated, and the behavior of the catalysts was also explored by means of the X-ray diffraction (XRD), FT-Raman, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET), etc. Experiment results showed that all the catalysts promoted the carbon conversion in the coal catalytic hydrogasification (CCHG), and the catalytic activity was in the order: 5%Co-1%Ca > 5%Ni-1%Ca > 5%Fe-1%Ca. Compared with the raw coal hydrogasification, the carbon conversion increased from 43.4 wt.% to 91.3 wt.%, and the CH 4 yield increased from 23.7 wt.% to 77.3 wt.% within 30 min after adding the 5%Co-1%Ca catalyst into the coal. Co-Ca and Ni-Ca possessed catalytic effect on both processes of pyrolysis of coal and hydrogasification of coal char in CCHG, by which the graphitization of the coal was suppressed and methane formation rate was significantly accelerated. Fe/Co/Ni-Ca could penetrate into the interior of coal during CCHG, making the catalytic production of CH 4 conduct in the pore structures. The activity difference of the catalysts was owing to the different ability of rupturing the amorphous C−C bonds in coal structure. The incomplete carbon conversion of the 5%Co-1%Ca loaded coal was due to the agglomeration of the catalyst and the blockage of the reactive sites by the sintered catalyst. This work will provide

  14. An investigation of the physical and chemical changes occuring in a Fischer-Tropsch fixed bed catalyst during hydrocarbon synthesis

    Duvenhage, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    Deactivation studies: making use of fixed bed reactors, wet chemical analysis, surface area, pore volume determinations and X-ray diffraction spectrometry, scanning electron microscope spectrometry and secondary ion mass spectrometry techniques; were performed on a low temperature iron Fischer-Tropsch catalyst. It was revealed that this catalyst is mainly deactivated by sulphur poisoning, oxidation of the catalytic reactive phases, sintering of the iron crystallites and to a lesser extent deactivation through fouling of the catalytic surface by carbonaceous deposits. It was found that the top entry section of the catalyst bed deactivated relatively fast, the bottom exit section also deactivated, but not as fast as the top section. The central portion of the catalyst bed was least affected. Sulphur contaminants in the feed gas, even though present in only minute quantities, results in a loss of catalyst performance of the top section of the catalyst bed, while water, produced as a product from the Fischer-Tropsch reaction, oxidized and sintered the catalyst over the bottom section of the catalyst bed. 88 figs., 7 tabs., 224 refs

  15. The Performance of the Trickle Bed Reactor Packed with the Pt/SDBC Catalyst Mixture for the CECE Process

    Seungwoo Paek; Do-Hee Ahn; Heui-Joo Choi; Kwang-Rag Kim; Hongsuk Chung; Sung-Paal Yim; Minsoo Lee; Kyu-Min Song; Soon Hwan Sohn

    2006-01-01

    The CECE (Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange) process with a hydrophobic catalyst is a very effective method to remove small quantities of tritium from light or heavy waste water streams because of its high separation factor and mild operating conditions. The CECE process is composed of an electrolysis cell and a LPCE (Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange) column. This paper describes the experimental results of the hydrogen isotopic exchange reaction in a trickle bed reactor packed with a hydrophobic catalyst for the development of the LPCE column of the CECE process. The hydrophobic Pt/SDBC (Styrene Divinyl Benzene Copolymer) catalyst has been developed by Korean researchers for the LPCE column of WTRF (Wolsong Tritium Removal Facility). An experimental apparatus was constructed for the various experiments with the different parameters, such as hydrogen flow rate, temperature, and the structure of the mixed catalyst column. The catalyst column was packed with a mixture of hydrophobic catalyst and hydrophilic packing (Dixon gauze ring). The performance of the catalyst bed was expressed as an overall rate constant Kya. To improve the performance of the trickle bed, the modification of the catalyst bed design (changing the shape of the catalyst complex and diluting with inert) has been investigated. (author)

  16. CFD Model of HDS Catalyst Tests in Trickle-Bed Reactor

    Tukač, V.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate hydrodynamic influence on experimental HDS catalyst activity measurement carried out in pilot scale trickle-bed reactor. Hydrodynamic data were evaluated by RTD method in laboratory glass model of pilot reactor. Mathematical models of the process were formulated both like 1D pseudohomogeneou and 3D heterogeneous ones. The aim of this work was to forecast interaction between intrinsic reaction kinetic, hydrodynamics and mass transfer.

  17. Trickle bed reactor for the oxidation of phenol over active carbon catalyst

    Gabbiye, Nigus; Font Capafons, Josep; Fortuny Sanromá, Agustín; Bengoa, Christophe José; Fabregat Llangotera, Azael; Stüber, Frank Erich

    2009-01-01

    The catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol using activated carbon has been performed in a laboratory trickle bed reactor over a wide range of operating variables (PO2, T, FL and Cph,o) and hydrodynamic conditions. The influence of different start-up procedures (saturation of activated carbon) has also been tested. Further improvement of activity and stability has been checked for by using dynamic TBR operation concept or impregnated Fe/carbon catalyst. The results obtained confi...

  18. Carbon coated (carbonous) catalyst in ebullated bed reactor for production of oxygenated chemicals from syngas/CO2

    Peizheng Zhou

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes the work completed under DOE's Support of Advanced Fuel Research program, Contract No. DE-FG26-99FT40681. The contract period was October 2000 through September 2002. This R and D program investigated the modification of the mechanical strength of catalyst extrudates using Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. (HTI) carbon-coated catalyst technology so that the ebullated bed technology can be utilized to produce valuable oxygenated chemicals from syngas/CO 2 efficiently and economically. Exothermic chemical reactions benefit from the temperature control and freedom from catalyst fouling provided by the ebullated bed reactor technology. The carbon-coated extrudates prepared using these procedures had sufficient attrition resistance and surface area for use in ebullated bed operation. The low cost of carbon coating makes the carbon-coated catalysts highly competitive in the market of catalyst extrudates

  19. Synthesis of Biodiesel in Batch and Packed-Bed Reactors Using Powdered and Granular Sugar Catalyst

    Janaun, J.; Lim, P. M.; Balan, W. S.; Yaser, A. Z.; Chong, K. P.

    2017-06-01

    Increasing world production of palm oil warrants effective utilization of its waste. In particular, conversion of waste cooking oil into biodiesel has obtained global interest because of renewable energy need and reduction of CO2 emission. In this study, oleic acid used as a model compound for waste cooking oil conversion using esterification reaction catalysed by sugar catalyst (SC) in powdered (P-SC) and granular (G-SC) forms. The catalysts were synthesized via incomplete carbonization of D-glucose followed by functionalization with concentrated sulphuric acid. Catalysts characterizations were done for their physical and chemical properties using modern tools. Batch and packed-bed reactor systems were used to evaluate the reactivity of the catalysts. The results showed that G-SC had slightly higher total acidity and more porous than P-SC. The experimental conditions for batch reaction were temperature of 60°C, molar ratio of 1:20 (Oleic Acid:Methanol) and 2 wt. catalyst with respect to oleic acid. The results showed the maximum oleic acid conversion using G-SC and P-SC were 52 and 48, respectively. Whereas, the continuous reaction with varying feed flow rate as a function of retention time was studied by using 3 g of P-SC in 60 °C and 1:20 molar ratio in a packed-bed reactor. The results showed that a longer retention time which was 6.48 min and feed flow rate 1.38 ml/min, achieved higher average conversion of 9.9 and decreased with further increasing flow rate. G-SC showed a better average conversion of 10.8 at lowest feed flow rate of 1.38 ml/min in continuous reaction experiments. In a broader perspective, large scale continuous biodiesel production is feasible using granular over powdered catalyst mainly due to it lower pressure drop.

  20. Fluidized bed catalytic pyrolysis of eucalyptus over hzsm-5: effect of acid density and gallium modification on catalyst deactivation

    Catalytic fast pyrolysis of eucalyptus wood was performed on a continuous laboratory scale fluidized bed fast pyrolysis system. Catalytic activity was monitored from use of fresh catalyst up to a cumulative biomass to catalyst ratio (B/C) of 4/1 over extruded pellets of three different ZSM-5 catalys...

  1. Continuous synthesis of methanol: heterogeneous hydrogenation of ethylene carbonate over Cu/HMS catalysts in a fixed bed reactor system.

    Chen, Xi; Cui, Yuanyuan; Wen, Chao; Wang, Bin; Dai, Wei-Lin

    2015-09-18

    Continuous fixed-bed catalytic hydrogenation of ethylene carbonate (EC) to methanol and ethylene glycol (EG), an emerging synthetic process of methanol via indirect conversion of CO2, was successfully performed over Cu/HMS catalysts prepared by the ammonia evaporation (AE) method. The catalysts possessed superb performance with a conversion of 100% and a selectivity to methanol of 74%.

  2. Heat and mass transfer in a reforming catalyst bed. Analytical prediction of distributions in the catalyst bed; Kaishitsu shokubaiso ni okeru netsu oyobi busshitsu ido. Suchi kaiseki ni yoru sonai bunpu no yosoku

    Usami, Y [Tokyo Electric Power Co. Inc., Tokyo (Japan); Fukusako, S; Yamada, M [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    2000-01-25

    Heat and mass transfer characteristics within a reforming catalyst bed have been analytically investigated. A numerical analysis was carried out in a two-dimensional steady-state model of reforming catalyst layer. Reforming tube was filled with catalyst and the tube wall was uniformly heated, a mixture of steam and methane was reformed through the catalyst bed. Predicted temperature, formed gas composition, methane conversion rate, and heat transfer coefficient distributions in the catalyst layer showed good agreement with experimental data. The effects of space velocity, steam carbon molar ratio, and wall temperature on the heat transfer coefficient were analytically presented. From temperature and composition distributions simulated by two-dimensional analysis, the effects of these factors above mentioned and diffusion on the transport phenomena were qualitatively predicted. (author)

  3. Catalytic wet oxidation of phenol in a trickle bed reactor over a Pt/TiO2 catalyst.

    Maugans, Clayton B; Akgerman, Aydin

    2003-01-01

    Catalytic wet oxidation of phenol was studied in a batch and a trickle bed reactor using 4.45% Pt/TiO2 catalyst in the temperature range 150-205 degrees C. Kinetic data were obtained from batch reactor studies and used to model the reaction kinetics for phenol disappearance and for total organic carbon disappearance. Trickle bed experiments were then performed to generate data from a heterogeneous flow reactor. Catalyst deactivation was observed in the trickle bed reactor, although the exact cause was not determined. Deactivation was observed to linearly increase with the cumulative amount of phenol that had passed over the catalyst bed. Trickle bed reactor modeling was performed using a three-phase heterogeneous model. Model parameters were determined from literature correlations, batch derived kinetic data, and trickle bed derived catalyst deactivation data. The model equations were solved using orthogonal collocations on finite elements. Trickle bed performance was successfully predicted using the batch derived kinetic model and the three-phase reactor model. Thus, using the kinetics determined from limited data in the batch mode, it is possible to predict continuous flow multiphase reactor performance.

  4. Transient Effects in Fischer-Tropsch Reactor with a Fixed Bed of Catalyst Particles

    I. V. Derevich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on analysis of small temperature disturbances in the Fischer-Tropsch reactor with a fixed bed of catalyst particles various scenarios of thermal instability were investigated. There are two possible scenarios of thermal instability of the reactor. First, thermal explosion may occur due to growth of temperature disturbances inside a catalytic granule. Second scenario connected with loss of thermal stability as a result of an initial increase in temperature in the reactor volume. The boundaries of thermal stability of the reactor were estimated by solving the eigenvalue problems for spherical catalyst particles and cylindrical reactor. Processes of diffusional resistance inside the catalytic granule and heat transfer from wall of the reactor tube are taken into account. Estimation of thermal stability area is compared with the results of numerical simulation of behavior of temperature and concentration of synthesis gas.

  5. Foam Based Gas Diffusion Electrodes for Reversible Alkaline Electrolysis Cells

    Allebrod, Frank; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline electrolysis cells operated at 250 °C and 40 bar have shown to be able to convert electrical energy into hydrogen at very high efficiencies and power densities. Foam based gas diffusion electrodes and an immobilized electrolyte allow for reversible operation as electrolysis cell or fuel...... cell. In the present work we demonstrate the application of hydrophobic, porous, and electro-catalytically active gas diffusion electrodes. PTFE particles and silver nanowires as electro-catalysts were used in the gas diffusion electrodes. Impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry were performed...... to determine the cell characteristics. The thickness of the electrolyte matrix was only 200 µm, thereby achieving a serial resistance and area specific resistance of 60 mΩ cm2 and 150 mΩ cm2, respectively, at 200 °C and 20 bar. A new production method was developed to increase the cell size from lab scale (1...

  6. Reduction and Immobilization of Potassium Permanganate on Iron Oxide Catalyst by Fluidized-Bed Crystallization Technology

    Guang-Xia Li

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A manganese immobilization technology in a fluidized-bed reactor (FBR was developed by using a waste iron oxide (i.e., BT-3 as catalyst which is a by-product from the fluidized-bed Fenton reaction (FBR-Fenton. It was found that BT-3 could easily reduce potassium permanganate (KMnO4 to MnO2. Furthermore, MnO2 could accumulate on the surface of BT-3 catalyst to form a new Fe-Mn oxide. Laboratory experiments were carried out to investigate the KMnO4-reduction mechanism, including the effect of KMnO4 concentration, BT-3 dosage, and operational solution pH. The results showed that the pH solution was a significant factor in the reduction of KMnO4. At the optimum level, pHf 6, KMnO4 was virtually reduced in 10 min. A pseudo-first order reaction was employed to describe the reduction rate of KMnO4.

  7. Removal of VOCs by hybrid electron beam reactor with catalyst bed

    Kim, Jinkyu; Han, Bumsoo; Kim, Yuri; Lee, J.H.; Park, C.R.; Kim, J.C.; Kim, J.C.; Kim, K.J.

    2004-01-01

    Electron beam decomposition of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was studied in order to obtain information for developing effective treatment method of off-gases from industries. We have examined the combination of electron beam and catalyst honeycomb which is either 1% platinum based or ceramic honeycomb- based aluminum oxide, using a hybrid reactor in order to improve removal efficiency and CO 2 formation; and to suppress undesirable by-product formation e.g. O 3 , aerosol, H x C y. , and tar. The experiments were conducted using a pilot-scale treatment system (maximum capacity; 1800 N m 3 /h) that fitted the field size to scale up from the traditional laboratory scale system for VOC removal with electron beam irradiation. Toluene was selected as a typical VOC that was irradiated to investigate product formation, effect of ceramic and catalyst, and factors effecting overall efficiency of degradation. Styrene was selected as the most odorous compound among the VOCs of interest. It was found that VOCs could be destroyed more effectively using a hybrid system with catalyst bed than with electron beam irradiation only

  8. Catalytic wet air oxidation of coke-plant wastewater on ruthenium-based eggshell catalysts in a bubbling bed reactor.

    Yang, M; Sun, Y; Xu, A H; Lu, X Y; Du, H Z; Sun, C L; Li, C

    2007-07-01

    Catalytic wet air of coke-plant wastewater was studied in a bubbling bed reactor. Two types of supported Ru-based catalysts, eggshell and uniform catalysts, were employed. Compared with the results in the wet air oxidation of coke-plant wastewater, supported Ru uniform catalysts showed high activity for chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammonia/ammonium compounds (NH3-N) removal at temperature of 250 degrees C and pressure of 4.8 MPa, and it has been demonstrated that the catalytic activity of uniform catalyst depended strongly on the distribution of active sites of Ru on catalyst. Compared to the corresponding uniform catalysts with the same Ru loading (0.25 wt.% and 0.1 wt.%, respectively), the eggshell catalysts showed higher activities for CODcr removal and much higher activities for NH3-N degradation. The high activity of eggshell catalyst for treatment of coke-plant wastewater can be attributed to the higher density of active Ru sites in the shell layer than that of the corresponding uniform catalyst with the same Ru loading. It has been also evidenced that the active Ru sites in the internal core of uniform catalyst have very little or no contribution to CODcr and NH3-N removal in the total oxidation of coke-plant wastewater.

  9. Studies on the behaviour of different spent fluidized-bed catalytic cracking catalysts on Portland cement

    Soriano, L.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The fluidized-bed catalytic cracking catalyst (FCC it is a residue from the industry of the petroleum that shows a high pozzolanic reactivity and, in cementing matrix, it significantly improves their mechanical behaviour as well as durability. In this research a comparative study on residues of catalyst from different sources has been carried out, in order to know if these residues can be used jointly in an indiscriminate way or, on the contrary, it is necessary to classify them according to their characteristics. Thus, a study on five different FCC residues, supplied from different companies, has been carried out, and their physical-chemical characteristics, pozzolanic reactivity by means of thermogravimetric analysis and the evolution of the mechanical strength of mortars were studied. After analyzing all the aspects, it can be concluded that no significant differences among the different tested catalysts were found.El catalizador de craqueo catalítico (FCC es un residuo de la industria del petróleo que posee una elevada reactividad puzolánica y en matrices cementicias mejora de manera importante los aspectos mecánicos así como de durabilidad. En este trabajo se realiza un estudio comparativo sobre residuos de catalizador de distintos orígenes, para poder conocer si se pueden utilizar conjuntamente de forma indiscriminada o por el contrario hay que catalogarlos según su origen. Para ello, se realizó un estudio sobre cinco residuos de catalizador de craqueo catalítico distintos, suministrados por diferentes empresas y se estudiaron sus características fisicoquímicas, reactividad puzolánica a través de estudios termogravimétricos y la evolución de las resistencias mecánicas en morteros. Tras analizar todos los aspectos se concluye que no existen diferencias significativas entre los distintos catalizadores empleados.

  10. System Identification for Experimental Study for Polymerization Catalyst Reaction in Fluidized Bed

    Ahmmed Saadi Ibrehem

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, system identification method is used to capture the reactor characteristics of production rate of polyethylene (PE based on published experimental data. The identification method is used to measure the percentage effect on the production rate of PE by measuring the effect of input factors of temperature of reaction, hydrogen concentration, and [Al]/[Ti] molar catalyst ratio. Temperature of reaction has big effects equal 52.4 % on the output of the system and 47.6 % on interaction of the system's parameters compare to other two factors. Also, hydrogen concentration has big effect equal 45.66 % on the output of the system and 14.7 % on interaction of the system's parameters. [Al]/[Ti] molar catalyst ratio has big effect on interaction of the system equal 28.6 and 1.94 % on the output of the system but less than the reaction temperature and hydrogen concentration. All these results depend on experiment results and these results are very important in industrial plants. ©2011 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved(Received: 13rd May 2011; Revised: 27th July 2011; Accepted: 22th September 2011[How to Cite: Ahmmed S. Ibrehem. (2011. System Identification for Experimental Study for Polymerization Catalyst Reaction in Fluidized Bed. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 6 (2: 137-146. doi:10.9767/bcrec.6.2.874.137-146][How to Link / DOI: http://dx,doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.6.2.874.137-146 || or local:  http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/874 ] | View in 

  11. Stability of minoxidil in Espumil foam base.

    Geiger, Christine M; Sorenson, Bridget; Whaley, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    Minoxidil is a drug used to stimulate hair growth and to slow balding. It is marketed under a number of trade names, including Rogaine, and is available in varying strength dose forms from a number of generic manufacturers. Minoxidil is available in oral and topical forms. In topical form, it can be applied by a metered-spray or rub-on applicator. A hydroalcoholic compounding vehicle can minimize greasiness, itching, burning, and contact dermatitis where low concentrations of ethanol and propylene glycol are present. Espumil Foam Base contains low concentrations of these ingredients and also can form a foam on topical application. Espumil's unique delivery by foam-activating packaging assures simple application to difficult-to-treat areas, and it vanishes quickly after application, keeping it in place and avoiding health skin areas. The objective of this study was to determine the stability of minoxidil in Espumil Foam Base. The studied sample was compounded into a 50-mg/mL solution and stored in a plastic foam-activating bottle at room temperature conditions. Three samples were assayed at each time point out to 90 days by a stability-indicating high-performance liquid chromatography method. The method was validated for its specificity through forced-degradation studies. The beyond-use-date is at least 90 days, based on data collected when this formulation was stored at room temperature, protected from light.

  12. Deuterium exchange reaction in a trickle bed packed with a mixture of hydrophobic catalyst and hydrophilic packings

    Seungwoo Paek; Heui-Joo Choi; DO-Hee Ahn; Kwang-Rag Kim; Minsoo Lee; Sung-Paal Yim; Hongsuk Chung

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The isotopic exchange reaction between hydrogen and water on the platinum supported catalysts provides a useful step for separating hydrogen isotopes such as deuterium and tritium. The CECE (Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange) with a hydrophobic catalyst is a very effective method to remove small quantities of tritium from light or heavy waste water streams because of its high separation factor and mild operating conditions. The CECE column is composed of an electrolysis cell and a liquid phase catalytic exchange column. This paper deals with the experiments for the hydrogen isotopic exchange reaction in a trickle bed reactor packed with a hydrophobic catalyst in order to develop the catalytic column of the CECE. Hydrophobic Pt/SDBC catalyst which has been developed for the LPCE column of WTRF (Wolsong Tritium Removal Facility) was tested in a trickle bed reactor. The catalyst column was packed with a mixture of hydrophobic catalyst and hydrophilic packing (Dixon gauze ring) to improve liquid distribution and vapor/liquid transfer area. An experimental apparatus was built for the test of the catalyst at various temperatures and gas velocities. The catalyst was packed wet into the column and water was injected at the top through a liquid distributor and trickled through a catalyst mixture. Hydrogen gas passed up the column and deuterium was transferred to water stream flowing counter currently. The temperature of the column was controlled to maintain at 60 deg. C using water jackets around the reactor and equilibrator, a feed waster heater, and a circulation water heater. A metal bellows pump was used to circulate the hydrogen gas at the typical flow rate of 60 LPM.The reactor pressure was controlled to maintain at 135 kPa (abs) by a water column. Gas samples were drawn off from the top and bottom of the column. The difference in deuterium concentration between the inlet and outlet gas samples was analyzed using Gas

  13. Deuterium exchange reaction in a trickle bed packed with a mixture of hydrophobic catalyst and hydrophilic packings

    Seungwoo Paek [KAERI (Korea, Republic of); Heui-Joo Choi; DO-Hee Ahn; Kwang-Rag Kim; Minsoo Lee; Sung-Paal Yim; Hongsuk Chung

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The isotopic exchange reaction between hydrogen and water on the platinum supported catalysts provides a useful step for separating hydrogen isotopes such as deuterium and tritium. The CECE (Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange) with a hydrophobic catalyst is a very effective method to remove small quantities of tritium from light or heavy waste water streams because of its high separation factor and mild operating conditions. The CECE column is composed of an electrolysis cell and a liquid phase catalytic exchange column. This paper deals with the experiments for the hydrogen isotopic exchange reaction in a trickle bed reactor packed with a hydrophobic catalyst in order to develop the catalytic column of the CECE. Hydrophobic Pt/SDBC catalyst which has been developed for the LPCE column of WTRF (Wolsong Tritium Removal Facility) was tested in a trickle bed reactor. The catalyst column was packed with a mixture of hydrophobic catalyst and hydrophilic packing (Dixon gauze ring) to improve liquid distribution and vapor/liquid transfer area. An experimental apparatus was built for the test of the catalyst at various temperatures and gas velocities. The catalyst was packed wet into the column and water was injected at the top through a liquid distributor and trickled through a catalyst mixture. Hydrogen gas passed up the column and deuterium was transferred to water stream flowing counter currently. The temperature of the column was controlled to maintain at 60 deg. C using water jackets around the reactor and equilibrator, a feed waster heater, and a circulation water heater. A metal bellows pump was used to circulate the hydrogen gas at the typical flow rate of 60 LPM.The reactor pressure was controlled to maintain at 135 kPa (abs) by a water column. Gas samples were drawn off from the top and bottom of the column. The difference in deuterium concentration between the inlet and outlet gas samples was analyzed using Gas

  14. The performance of a trickle-bed reactor packed with a Pt/SDBC catalyst mixture for the CECE process

    Paek, Seungwoo; Ahn, Do-Hee; Choi, Heui-Joo; Kim, Kwang-Rag; Lee, Minsoo; Yim, Sung-Paal; Chung, Hongsuk; Song, Kyu-Min; Sohn, Soon Hwan

    2007-01-01

    The combined electrolysis and catalytic exchange (CECE) process with a hydrophobic catalyst is a very effective method to remove small quantities of tritium from light or heavy wastewater streams because of its high separation factor and mild operating conditions. A hydrophobic platinum/styrene-divinyl benzene copolymer (Pt/SDBC) catalyst which was developed for the liquid-phase catalytic exchange (LPCE) column of the Wolsong tritium removal facility (WTRF) has been tested in a trickle bed reactor for the design of the CECE process. An experimental apparatus has been built for the testing of the catalyst at various temperatures and gas velocities. The catalyst column was packed with a mixture of a hydrophobic catalyst and a hydrophilic packing (Dixon gauze ring) to improve the liquid distribution and vapor/liquid transfer area. Many tests have been carried out at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) to measure the activity of the catalyst, K y a (1 s -1 ), under various operating conditions. K y a increases with the hydrogen flow rates in the range of 0.4-1.6 m s -1 at STP. The height of the catalyst column was determined from these K y a values according to the reaction temperatures and hydrogen flow rates

  15. The performance of a trickle-bed reactor packed with a Pt/SDBC catalyst mixture for the CECE process

    Paek, Seungwoo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 150 Deokjin-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: swpaek@kaeri.re.kr; Ahn, Do-Hee; Choi, Heui-Joo; Kim, Kwang-Rag; Lee, Minsoo; Yim, Sung-Paal; Chung, Hongsuk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 150 Deokjin-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Kyu-Min; Sohn, Soon Hwan [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, 103-16 Munji-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-380 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-15

    The combined electrolysis and catalytic exchange (CECE) process with a hydrophobic catalyst is a very effective method to remove small quantities of tritium from light or heavy wastewater streams because of its high separation factor and mild operating conditions. A hydrophobic platinum/styrene-divinyl benzene copolymer (Pt/SDBC) catalyst which was developed for the liquid-phase catalytic exchange (LPCE) column of the Wolsong tritium removal facility (WTRF) has been tested in a trickle bed reactor for the design of the CECE process. An experimental apparatus has been built for the testing of the catalyst at various temperatures and gas velocities. The catalyst column was packed with a mixture of a hydrophobic catalyst and a hydrophilic packing (Dixon gauze ring) to improve the liquid distribution and vapor/liquid transfer area. Many tests have been carried out at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) to measure the activity of the catalyst, K{sub y}a (1 s{sup -1}), under various operating conditions. K{sub y}a increases with the hydrogen flow rates in the range of 0.4-1.6 m s{sup -1} at STP. The height of the catalyst column was determined from these K{sub y}a values according to the reaction temperatures and hydrogen flow rates.

  16. Direct Synthesis of Renewable Dodecanol and Dodecane with Methyl Isobutyl Ketone over Dual-Bed Catalyst Systems.

    Sheng, Xueru; Li, Ning; Li, Guangyi; Wang, Wentao; Wang, Aiqin; Cong, Yu; Wang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Tao

    2017-03-09

    For the first time, we demonstrated two integrated processes for the direct synthesis of dodecanol or 2,4,8-trimethylnonane (a jet fuel range C 12 -branched alkane) using methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) that can be derived from lignocellulose. The reactions were carried out in dual-bed continuous flow reactors. In the first bed, MIBK was selectively converted to a mixture of C 12 alcohol and ketone. Over the Pd-modified magnesium- aluminium hydrotalcite (Pd-MgAl-HT) catalyst, a high total carbon yield (73.0 %) of C 12 oxygenates can be achieved under mild conditions. In the second bed, the C 12 oxygenates generated in the first bed were hydrogenated to dodecanol over a Ru/C catalyst or hydrodeoxygenated to 2,4,8-trimethylnonane over a Cu/SiO 2 catalyst. The as-obtained dodecanol can be used as feedstock in the production of sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) and sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS), which are widely used as surfactants or detergents. The asobtained 2,4,8-trimethylnonane can be blended into conventional jet fuel without hydroisomerization. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Bubbling bed catalytic hydropyrolysis process utilizing larger catalyst particles and smaller biomass particles featuring an anti-slugging reactor

    Marker, Terry L; Felix, Larry G; Linck, Martin B; Roberts, Michael J

    2014-09-23

    This invention relates to a process for thermochemically transforming biomass or other oxygenated feedstocks into high quality liquid hydrocarbon fuels. In particular, a catalytic hydropyrolysis reactor, containing a deep bed of fluidized catalyst particles is utilized to accept particles of biomass or other oxygenated feedstocks that are significantly smaller than the particles of catalyst in the fluidized bed. The reactor features an insert or other structure disposed within the reactor vessel that inhibits slugging of the bed and thereby minimizes attrition of the catalyst. Within the bed, the biomass feedstock is converted into a vapor-phase product, containing hydrocarbon molecules and other process vapors, and an entrained solid char product, which is separated from the vapor stream after the vapor stream has been exhausted from the top of the reactor. When the product vapor stream is cooled to ambient temperatures, a significant proportion of the hydrocarbons in the product vapor stream can be recovered as a liquid stream of hydrophobic hydrocarbons, with properties consistent with those of gasoline, kerosene, and diesel fuel. Separate streams of gasoline, kerosene, and diesel fuel may also be obtained, either via selective condensation of each type of fuel, or via later distillation of the combined hydrocarbon liquid.

  18. Bubbling bed catalytic hydropyrolysis process utilizinig larger catalyst particles and small biomass particles featuring an anti-slugging reactor

    Marker, Terry L.; Felix, Larry G.; Linck, Martin B.; Roberts, Michael J.

    2016-12-06

    This invention relates to a process for thermochemically transforming biomass or other oxygenated feedstocks into high quality liquid hydrocarbon fuels. In particular, a catalytic hydropyrolysis reactor, containing a deep bed of fluidized catalyst particles is utilized to accept particles of biomass or other oxygenated feedstocks that are significantly smaller than the particles of catalyst in the fluidized bed. The reactor features an insert or other structure disposed within the reactor vessel that inhibits slugging of the bed and thereby minimizes attrition of the catalyst. Within the bed, the biomass feedstock is converted into a vapor-phase product, containing hydrocarbon molecules and other process vapors, and an entrained solid char product, which is separated from the vapor stream after the vapor stream has been exhausted from the top of the reactor. When the product vapor stream is cooled to ambient temperatures, a significant proportion of the hydrocarbons in the product vapor stream can be recovered as a liquid stream of hydrophobic hydrocarbons, with properties consistent with those of gasoline, kerosene, and diesel fuel. Separate streams of gasoline, kerosene, and diesel fuel may also be obtained, either via selective condensation of each type of fuel, or via later distillation of the combined hydrocarbon liquid.

  19. Effect of a Reactivation strategy based on partial bio catalyst replacement on the performance of a fungal fluidized bed bioreactor

    Ortega-Clemente, A.; Robledo-Narvaez, P.; Barrera-Cortes, J.; Poggi-Varaldo, H. M.

    2009-01-01

    The Mexican pulp and paper industry discharges approximately 12% of the annual industrial discharges and holds a second position in the ranking of main water industrial polluters in Mexico. Their wastewaters are characteristically recalcitrant and toxic. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness of two operational strategies on the performance of two fungal fluidized bed reactor (FBR) for the post-treatment of anaerobically weal black liquor systems (AP-WBL) without supplementation of soluble carbohydrates, i. e. Strategy 1 (continuous operation with the same original, fungal bio catalysts and eventual spikes of protease inhibitor and glucose), and Strategy 2 operation with partial exchange of bio catalysts. (Author)

  20. A comparison of Rh/CeO2/SiO2 catalysts with steam reforming catalysts, dolomite and inert materials as bed materials in low throughput fluidized bed gasification systems

    Asadullah, Mohammad; Miyazawa, Tomohisa; Ito, Shin-ichi; Kunimori, Kimio; Koyama, Shuntarou; Tomishige, Keiichi

    2004-01-01

    The gasification of cedar wood in the presence of Rh/CeO 2 /SiO 2 has been conducted in the laboratory scale fluidized bed reactor using air as a gasifying agent at low temperatures (823-973 K) in order to produce high-quality fuel gas for gas turbine for power generation. The performance of the Rh/CeO 2 /SiO 2 catalyst has been compared with conventional catalysts such as commercial steam reforming catalyst G-91, dolomite and noncatalyst systems by measurements of the cold gas efficiency, tar concentration, carbon conversion to gas and gas composition. The tar concentration was completely negligible in the Rh/CeO 2 /SiO 2 -catalyzed product gas whereas it was about 30, 113, and 139 g/m 3 in G-91, dolomite and noncatalyzed product gas, respectively. Since the carbon conversion to useful gas such as CO, H 2 , and CH 4 are much higher on Rh/CeO 2 /SiO 2 catalyst than others at 873 K, the cold gas efficiency is much higher (71%) in this case than others. The hydrogen content in the product gas is much higher (>24 vol%) than the specified level (>10 vol%) for efficient combustion in the gas turbine engine. The char and coke formation is also very low on Rh/CeO 2 /SiO 2 catalyst than on the conventional catalysts. Although the catalyst surface area was slightly decreased after using the same catalyst in at least 20 experiments, the deactivation problem was not severe

  1. Esterification of oleic acid in a three-phase, fixed-bed reactor packed with a cation exchange resin catalyst.

    Son, Sung Mo; Kimura, Hiroko; Kusakabe, Katsuki

    2011-01-01

    Esterification of oleic acid was performed in a three-phase fixed-bed reactor with a cation exchange resin catalyst (Amberlyst-15) at high temperature, which was varied from 80 to 120 °C. The fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) yields in the fixed-bed reactor were increased with increases in the reaction temperature, methanol flow rate and bed height. Moreover, the FAME yields were higher than those obtained using a batch reactor due to an equilibrium shift toward the product that resulted from continuous evaporation of the produced water. In addition, there was no catalyst deactivation during the esterification of oleic acid. However, addition of sunflower oil to the oleic acid reduced the FAME yield obtained from simultaneous esterification and transesterification. The FAME yield was 97.5% at a reaction temperature of 100 °C in the fixed-bed with a height of 5 cm when the methanol and oleic acid feed rates were 8.6 and 9.0 mL/h, respectively. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Investigation of hydrodynamic behavior of a pilot-scale trickle bed reactor packed with hydrophobic catalyst using radiotracer technique

    Kumar, Rajesh; Mohan, Sadhana; Pant, H.J.; Sharma, V.K.; Mahajani, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    Exchange of isotopes of hydrogen between aqueous phase and hydrogen gas is one of the most efficient methods for separation of hydrogen isotopes and is commonly used for production of heavy water or removal of tritium from tritiated water effluents. The isotope exchange reaction can be effectively executed in a counter-current trickle bed reactor (TBR) packed with a novel metal (Pt, Pd, Ni) based hydrophobic catalyst as the conventional novel metal based hydrophilic catalysts become ineffective after they come in contact with liquid effluents. The overall exchange reaction in the TBR mainly consists of a gas-liquid mass transfer process that transfers reactants from liquid to gaseous phase followed by an isotopic exchange reaction between the reactants in gaseous phase in presence of a solid hydrophobic catalyst. However, due to water repellent nature of the catalyst, poor liquid distribution in the reactor is normally observed that deteriorates the gas-liquid mass transfer. Therefore, it was thought that if a mixture of hydrophobic catalyst and a suitable hydrophilic mass transfer packing is used to fill the TBR column then, it can improve the distribution or mixing of the liquid and gas phase and thus improve the gas-liquid mass transfer and overall performance of the reactor and needs to be confirmed

  3. Propene and l-octene hydroformylation with silica-supported, ionic liquid-phase (SILP) Rh-phosphine catalysts in continuous fixed-bed mode

    Riisager, Anders; Eriksen, Kim Michael; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2003-01-01

    - and liquid-phase hydroformylation of propene and 1-octene, exhibiting TOFs up to 88 h(-1) for SILP Rh-2 catalysts, while only low selectivities up to 74% n-aldehyde (n/iso ratio of 2.8) were obtained. This is the first example of continuous fixed-bed liquid-phase hydroformylation using SILP catalysts.......Supported ionic liquid-phase (SILP) catalysts were made by immobilizing Rh-monophosphine complexes of bis(m-phenylguanidinium) phenylphosphine 1 and NORBOS 2 ligands in 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate, [BMIM] [PF6], on a silica support. The catalysts were active in continuous gas...

  4. Determination of the catalyst velocity profile along the riser of a fluidized bed reactor model by nuclear techniques

    Santos, V.A. dos; Dantas, C.C.

    1982-01-01

    A method adequated to industrial applications of flow measurements in fuidized bed reactor was developed. To measure the medium velocity of a catalyst, where the velocity is low, a radioactive tracer was used, 59 Fe and, to measure density by gamma attenuation, a standard source of 241 Am was used. The signals produced in NaI (Tl) scintilators detectors, were sent simultaneously to an electronic clock, to register the transit time, in the medium velocity measure of the catalyst whose reproductibility was 0.4%. The total estimated error for the method was a maximum of 4%. Important simplifications and pratical advantages are presented, if the method is compared to conventional measures with tracers. (E.G.) [pt

  5. Testing of downstream catalysts for tar destruction with a guard bed in a fluidised bed biomass gasifier at pilot plant scale

    Aznar, M.P.; Frances, E.; Campos, I.J.; Martin, J.A.; Gil, J. [Saragossa Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Chemistry and Environment Engineering; Corella, J. [Complutense Univ. of Madrid (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1996-12-31

    A new pilot plant for advanced gasification of biomass in a fast fluidised bed is now fully operative at University of Saragossa, Spain. It is a `3rd generation` pilot plant. It has been built up after having used two previous pilot plants for biomass gasification. The main characteristic of this pilot plant is that it has two catalytic reactors connected in series, downstream the biomass gasifier. Such reactors, of 4 cm i.d., are placed in a slip stream in a by-pass from the main gasifier exit gas. The gasification is made at atmospheric pressure, with flow rates of 3-50 kg/in, using steam + O{sub 2} mixtures as the gasifying agent. Several commercial Ni steam-reforming catalyst are being tested under a realistic raw gas composition. Tar eliminations or destructions higher than 99 % are easily achieved. (orig.) 2 refs.

  6. Testing of downstream catalysts for tar destruction with a guard bed in a fluidised bed biomass gasifier at pilot plant scale

    Aznar, M P; Frances, E; Campos, I J; Martin, J A; Gil, J [Saragossa Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Chemistry and Environment Engineering; Corella, J [Complutense Univ. of Madrid (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1997-12-31

    A new pilot plant for advanced gasification of biomass in a fast fluidised bed is now fully operative at University of Saragossa, Spain. It is a `3rd generation` pilot plant. It has been built up after having used two previous pilot plants for biomass gasification. The main characteristic of this pilot plant is that it has two catalytic reactors connected in series, downstream the biomass gasifier. Such reactors, of 4 cm i.d., are placed in a slip stream in a by-pass from the main gasifier exit gas. The gasification is made at atmospheric pressure, with flow rates of 3-50 kg/in, using steam + O{sub 2} mixtures as the gasifying agent. Several commercial Ni steam-reforming catalyst are being tested under a realistic raw gas composition. Tar eliminations or destructions higher than 99 % are easily achieved. (orig.) 2 refs.

  7. CATALYTIC WET PEROXIDE OXIDATION OF HYDROQUINONE WITH Co(II)/ACTIVE CARBON CATALYST LOADED IN STATIC BED

    2008-01-01

    Catalysts based on Co(II) supported on active carbon were prepared and loaded in static bed. The hydroquinone would be degraded completely after treated by Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation method with Co(II)/active carbon catalyst. After activate treatment, the active carbon was immerged in cobaltous nitrate solution, then put into a drying oven, Co(II) could be loaded on the micro-surface of carbon. Taking the static bed as the equipment, the absorption of active carbon and catalysis of Co(II) was used to reduce activation energy of hydroquinone. Thus hydroquinone could be drastically degraded and the effluent can be drained under the standard. Referring to Fenton reaction mechanism, experiment had been done to study the heterogeneous catalyzed oxidation mechanism of Co(II). The degradation rate of hydroquinone effluent could be achieved to 92% when treated in four columns at H2O2 concentration 10%, reaction temperature 40℃ , pH 5 and reaction time 2.5h.

  8. Hydrodesulfurization and hydrodemetalation reactions of residue oils over CoMo/aluminum borate catalysts in a trickle bed reactor

    Tsai, M.C.; Chen, Y.W.; Kang, B.C.; Wu, J.C.; Leu, L.J.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, a series of aluminum borates (AB) with various Al/B mole ratios is prepared by the precipitation method. The results indicated that the exhibited properties are dependent on the Al/B ratio of the material. The monodisperse pore size distributions of these samples simply that it is a true microcomposite structure rather than a mixture of the individual materials. Hydrodesulfurization (HDS) and hydrodemetalation (HDM) of heavy Kuwait atmospheric residuum over CoMo/AB catalysts were carried out in a bench-scale trickle bed reactor at 663 K and 7582 kPa. The weight hourly space velocity of residue oils was 1.5, and the hydrogen flow rate was kept constant at 300 mL/min (STP). The results showed that these catalysts are much more active than the conventional CoMo/Al 2 O 3 catalyst in HDS and HDM reactions. The results of desulfurization activity are mainly interpreted on the basis of difference in dispersion and the interaction of Mo species with the support. The demetalation activity was strongly influenced by the intraparticle diffusion of metal porphyrins

  9. Lignite air-steam gasification in the fluidized bed of iron-containing slag catalysts

    Kuznetsov, B.N.; Shchipko, M.L.; Golovin, Yu. [Inst. of Chemistry of Natural Organic Materials, Academgorodok, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-01

    The influence of fluidized bed of iron-containing slag particles on air-steam gasification of powdered Kansk-Achinsk lignite in entrained flow was studied in pilot installation with productivity about 60 kg per hour. Slag of Martin process and boiler slag were used as catalytic active materials until their complete mechanical attrition. Two following methods of catalytic gasification of lignite were compared: the partial gasification in stationary fluidized bed of slag particles with degree of fuel conversion 40-70% and complete gasification in circulating bed of slag particles. In the first case only the most reactive part of fuel is gasified with the simultaneously formation of porous carbon residue with good sorption ability. It was found the catalytic fluidized bed improves heat transfer from combustion to reduction zone of gas-generator and increases the rate of fuel conversion at the temperature range 900-1000{degrees}C. At these temperatures the degree of conversion is depended considerably on the duration time of fuel particles in the catalytic fluidized bed. The influence of catalytic fluidized bed height and velocity of reaction mixture on the temperature profiles in the gas-generator was studied. The optimal relationship was found between the fluidized bed height and velocity of flow which makes possible to produce the gas with higher calorific value at maximum degree of fuel conversion.

  10. Transesterification of rapeseed oil for biodiesel production in trickle-bed reactors packed with heterogeneous Ca/Al composite oxide-based alkaline catalyst.

    Meng, Yong-Lu; Tian, Song-Jiang; Li, Shu-Fen; Wang, Bo-Yang; Zhang, Min-Hua

    2013-05-01

    A conventional trickle bed reactor and its modified type both packed with Ca/Al composite oxide-based alkaline catalysts were studied for biodiesel production by transesterification of rapeseed oil and methanol. The effects of the methanol usage and oil flow rate on the FAME yield were investigated under the normal pressure and methanol boiling state. The oil flow rate had a significant effect on the FAME yield for the both reactors. The modified trickle bed reactor kept over 94.5% FAME yield under 0.6 mL/min oil flow rate and 91 mL catalyst bed volume, showing a much higher conversion and operational stability than the conventional type. With the modified trickle bed reactor, both transesterification and methanol separation could be performed simultaneously, and glycerin and methyl esters were separated additionally by gravity separation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Continuous Process for Biodiesel Production in Packed Bed Reactor from Waste Frying Oil Using Potassium Hydroxide Supported on Jatropha curcas Fruit Shell as Solid Catalyst

    Achanai Buasri

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The transesterification of waste frying oil (WFO with methanol in the presence of potassium hydroxide catalyst supported on Jatropha curcas fruit shell activated carbon (KOH/JS was studied. The catalyst systems were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and the Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET method. The effects of reaction variables such as residence time, reaction temperature, methanol/oil molar ratio and catalyst bed height in packed bed reactor (PBR on the yield of biodiesel were investigated. SEM images showed that KOH was well distributed on the catalyst support. The optimum conditions for achieving the conversion yield of 86.7% consisted of a residence time of 2 h, reaction temperature of 60 °C, methanol/oil molar ratio of 16 and catalyst bed height of 250 mm. KOH/JS could be used repeatedly five times without any activation treatment, and no significant activity loss was observed. The results confirmed that KOH/JS catalyst had a great potential to be used for industrial application in the transesterification of WFO. The fuel properties of biodiesel were also determined.

  12. Experimental, kinetic and numerical modeling of hydrogen production by catalytic reforming of crude ethanol over a commercial catalyst in packed bed tubular reactor and packed bed membrane reactor

    Aboudheir, Ahmed; Akande, Abayomi; Idem, Raphael

    2006-01-01

    The demand for hydrogen energy has increased tremendously in recent years essentially because of the increase in the word energy consumption as well as recent developments in fuel cell technologies. The energy information administration has projected that world energy consumption will increase by 59% over the next two decades, from 1999 to 2020, in which the largest share is still dominated by fossil fuels (oil, natural gas and coal). Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions resulting from the combustion of these fossil fuels currently are estimated to account for three-fourth of human-caused CO 2 emissions worldwide. Greenhouse gas emission, including CO 2 , should be limited, as recommended at the Kyoto Conference, Japan, in December 1997. In this regard, hydrogen (H 2 ) has a significant future potential as an alternative fuel that can solve the problems of CO 2 emissions as well as the emissions of other air contaminants. One of the techniques to produce hydrogen is by reforming of hydrocarbons or biomass. Crude ethanol (a form of biomass, which essentially is fermentation broth) is easy to produce, is free of sulphur, has low toxicity, and is also safe to handle, transport and store. In addition, crude ethanol consists of oxygenated hydrocarbons, such as ethanol, lactic acid, glycerol, and maltose. These oxygenated hydrocarbons can be reformed completely to H 2 and CO 2 , the latter of which could be separated from H 2 by membrane technology. This provides for CO 2 capture for eventual storage or destruction. In the case of using crude ethanol, this will result in negative CO 2 , emissions. In this paper, we conducted experimental work on production of hydrogen by the catalytic reforming of crude ethanol over a commercial promoted Ni-based catalyst in a packed bed tubular reactor as well as a packed bed membrane reactor. As well, a rigorous numerical model was developed to simulate this process in both the catalytic packed bed tubular reactor and packed bed membrane

  13. Kinetic modeling of hydrocracking reaction in a trickle-bed reactor with Pt/Y-zeolite catalysts

    Lee, BalSang; Park, Myung-June; Kim, Young-A; Park, Eun Duck [Ajou University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Han, Jeongsik [Agency for Defense Development, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Kwang-Eun; Kim, Chul-Ung; Jeong, Soon-Yong [Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology (KRICT), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    A kinetic model is developed to predict the entire distribution of hydrocarbon products for the hydrocracking reaction with Pt/Y-zeolite catalysts in a trickle-bed reactor. Operating conditions, such as temperature, pressure, and wax and H{sub 2} flow rates were varied to evaluate their effects on conversion and distribution, and kinetic parameters were estimated using the experimental data that covers the window of operating conditions. The comparison between experimental data and simulated results corroborated the validity of the developed model, and the quantitative prediction of the reactor performance was clearly demonstrated. To make evident the usefulness of the model, an optimization method, genetic algorithm (GA), was applied, and the optimal condition for the maximum production of C{sub 10}-C{sub 17} was successfully calculated.

  14. Kinetic modeling of hydrocracking reaction in a trickle-bed reactor with Pt/Y-zeolite catalysts

    Lee, BalSang; Park, Myung-June; Kim, Young-A; Park, Eun Duck; Han, Jeongsik; Jeong, Kwang-Eun; Kim, Chul-Ung; Jeong, Soon-Yong

    2014-01-01

    A kinetic model is developed to predict the entire distribution of hydrocarbon products for the hydrocracking reaction with Pt/Y-zeolite catalysts in a trickle-bed reactor. Operating conditions, such as temperature, pressure, and wax and H 2 flow rates were varied to evaluate their effects on conversion and distribution, and kinetic parameters were estimated using the experimental data that covers the window of operating conditions. The comparison between experimental data and simulated results corroborated the validity of the developed model, and the quantitative prediction of the reactor performance was clearly demonstrated. To make evident the usefulness of the model, an optimization method, genetic algorithm (GA), was applied, and the optimal condition for the maximum production of C 10 -C 17 was successfully calculated

  15. Hydrogenation of Levulinic Acid to gamma-Valerolactone in Water Using Millimeter Sized Supported Ru Catalysts in a Packed Bed Reactor

    Piskun, A. S.; de Haan, J. E.; Wilbers, E.; de Bovenkamp, H. H. van; Tang, Z.; Heeres, Hero

    gamma-Valerolactone (GVL) has been identified as a sustainable platform chemical for the production of carbon-based chemicals. We here report an experimental study on the catalytic hydrogenation of levulinic acid (LA) in water to GVL in a packed bed reactor using supported Ru catalysts (carbon,

  16. A packed bed membrane reactor for the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane on a Ga2O3 / MoO3 based catalyst

    Kotanjac, Ž.S.; Sint Annaland, van M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative dehydrogenation of propane has been studied over a Ga2O3/MoO3 based catalyst. Using a differentially operated packed bed reactor with premixed oxygen and propane feed, the kinetic parameters for the main reaction and the consecutive and parallel reactions were experimentally determined. It

  17. Structured catalyst bed and method for conversion of feed materials to chemical products and liquid fuels

    Wang, Yong , Liu; Wei, [Richland, WA

    2012-01-24

    The present invention is a structured monolith reactor and method that provides for controlled Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis. The invention controls mass transport limitations leading to higher CO conversion and lower methane selectivity. Over 95 wt % of the total product liquid hydrocarbons obtained from the monolithic catalyst are in the carbon range of C.sub.5-C.sub.18. The reactor controls readsorption of olefins leading to desired products with a preselected chain length distribution and enhanced overall reaction rate. And, liquid product analysis shows readsorption of olefins is reduced, achieving a narrower FT product distribution.

  18. New method for the hydrogen isotope exchange reaction in a hydrophobic catalyst bed

    Asakura, Y.; Kikuchi, M.; Yusa, H.

    1982-01-01

    To improve the isotope exchange reaction efficiency between water and hydrogen, a new reactor in which water mists and hydrogen gas react cocurrently was studied. To apply this to the enrichment of tritium in heavy water, a dual temperature isotope exchange reactor which is composed of cocurrent low temperature reactors and the usual countercurrent high temperature reactor was proposed and analyzed using a McCabe-Thiele diagram. By utilizing cocurrent reactors, in combination, the necessary catalyst volume can be reduced to one-tenth as compared with the usual countercurrent low temperature reactor. 17 refs

  19. Selective phenol methylation to 2,6-dimethylphenol in a fluidized bed of iron-chromium mixed oxide catalyst with o-cresol circulation.

    Zukowski, Witold; Berkowicz, Gabriela; Baron, Jerzy; Kandefer, Stanisław; Jamanek, Dariusz; Szarlik, Stefan; Wielgosz, Zbigniew; Zielecka, Maria

    2014-01-01

    2,6-dimethylphenol (2,6-DMP) is a product of phenol methylation, especially important for the plastics industry. The process of phenol methylation in the gas phase is strongly exothermic. In order to ensure good temperature equalization in the catalyst bed, the process was carried out using a catalyst in the form of a fluidized bed - in particular, the commercial iron-chromium catalyst TZC-3/1. Synthesis of 2,6-dimethylphenol from phenol and methanol in fluidized bed of iron-chromium catalyst was carried out and the fluidization of the catalyst was examined. Stable state of fluidized bed of iron-chromium catalyst was achieved. The measured velocities allowed to determine the minimum flow of reactants, ensuring introduction of the catalyst bed in the reactor into the state of fluidization. Due to a high content of o-cresol in products of 2,6-dimethylphenol synthesis, circulation in the technological node was proposed. A series of syntheses with variable amount of o-cresol in the feedstock allowed to determine the parameters of stationary states. A stable work of technological node with o-cresol circulation is possible in the temperature range of350-380°C, and o-cresolin/phenolin molar ratio of more than 0.48. Synthesis of 2,6-DMP over the iron-chromium catalyst is characterized by more than 90% degree of phenol conversion. Moreover, the O-alkylation did not occur (which was confirmed by GC-MS analysis). By applying o-cresol circulation in the 2,6-DMP process, selectivity of more than 85% degree of 2,6-DMP was achieved. The participation levels of by-products: 2,4-DMP and 2,4,6-TMP were low. In the optimal conditions based on the highest yield of 2,6-DMP achieved in the technological node applying o-cresol circulation, there are 2%mol. of 2,4-DMP and 6%mol. of 2,4,6-TMP in the final mixture, whereas 2,4,6-TMP can be useful as a chain stopper and polymer's molar mass regulator during the polymerization of 2,6-DMP.

  20. Modeling of an axial flow, spherical packed-bed reactor for naphtha reforming process in the presence of the catalyst deactivation

    Iranshahi, D.; Pourazadi, E.; Paymooni, K.; Bahmanpour, A.M.; Rahimpour, M.R.; Shariati, A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, School of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71345 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    Improving the octane number of the aromatics' compounds has always been an important matter in refineries and lots of investigations have been made concerning this issue. In this study, an axial-flow spherical packed-bed reactor (AF-SPBR) is considered for naphtha reforming process in the presence of catalyst deactivation. Model equations are solved by the orthogonal collocation method. The AF-SPBR results are compared with the plant data of a conventional tubular packed-bed reactor (TR). The effects of some important parameters such as pressure and temperature on aromatic and hydrogen production rates and catalyst activity have been investigated. Higher production rates of aromatics can successfully be achieved in this novel reactor. Moreover, results show the capability of flow augmentation in the proposed configuration in comparison with the TR. This study shows the superiority of AF-SPBR configuration to the conventional types. (author)

  1. Dry reforming of methane via plasma-catalysis: influence of the catalyst nature supported on alumina in a packed-bed DBD configuration

    Brune, L.; Ozkan, A.; Genty, E.; Visart de Bocarmé, T.; Reniers, F.

    2018-06-01

    These days, the consideration of CO2 as a feedstock has become the subject of more interest. The reutilization of CO2 is already possible via cold plasma techniques operating at atmospheric pressure. A promising technology is the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). In most cases DBDs exhibit a low energy efficiency for CO2 conversion. However, several routes can be used to increase this efficiency and hence, the product formation. One of these routes is the packed-bed DBD configuration with porous beads inside the gap of the DBD, which also allows the coupling of plasma with catalysis. Catalysts can be introduced in such a configuration to exploit the synergistic effect between plasma and catalytically active surfaces, leading to a more efficient process. In this article, the dry reforming of methane (DRM) is studied, which aims to convert both CO2 and CH4, another greenhouse gas, at the same time. The conversions and energy costs of the DRM process are investigated and compared in both the packed-bed DBD configurations containing catalysts (Co, Cu or Ni) and the classical DBD. The change in filamentary behavior is studied in detail and correlated with the obtained conversions using gas chromatography, mass spectrometry and using an oscilloscope. A characterization of the catalysts on the beads is also carried out. Both the CO2 and CH4 conversions are clearly increased with the plasma-catalysis. Moreover, CH4 conversions as high as 90% can be obtained in certain conditions with copper catalysts.

  2. Pyrolysis of soybean oil with H-ZSM5 (Proton-exchange of Zeolite Socony Mobil 5) and MCM41 (Mobil Composition of Matter No. 41) catalysts in a fixed-bed reactor

    Ngo, Thanh-An; Kim, Jinsoo; Kim, Sun Kuk; Kim, Seung-Soo

    2010-01-01

    Soybean oil was pyrolyzed with various catalysts in a fixed-bed reactor under nitrogen flow at 420 and 450 o C. The H-ZSM5 catalysts (molar ratio SiO 2 /Al 2 O 3 = 28, 40, and 180) and 2 wt% (Ga, Al or Cu) impregnated MCM41 catalysts were used in order to investigate the effect of catalysts during the pyrolysis process. The gas products in all experiments were mainly methane, ethane and propylene. The liquid products in the presence of H-ZSM5 catalysts were mainly aromatic components while those with metal/MCM41 catalysts were a mixture of alkanes, alkenes, alkadienes, aromatic and carboxylic acids. The highest coke yield of 4.4 wt% was obtained with Ga/MCM41 catalyst at the pyrolysis temperature of 420 o C. The effect of catalysts on product yield and composition was systematically investigated.

  3. A comprehensive small and pilot-scale fixed-bed reactor approach for testing Fischer–Tropsch catalyst activity and performance on a BTL route

    Piyapong Hunpinyo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Ruthenium (Ru-based catalysts were prepared by the sol–gel technique for biomass-to-liquid (BTL operation and had their performance tested under different conditions. The catalytic study was carried out in two steps using a simple and reliable method. In the first step, the effects of reaction temperatures and inlet H2/CO molar feed ratios obtained from biomass gasification were investigated on the catalyst performance. A set of experimental results obtained in a laboratory fixed bed reactor was described and summarized. Moreover, a simplified Langmuir–Hinshelwood–Hougen–Watson (LHHW kinetic model was proposed with two promising models, where the surface decomposition of carbon monoxide was assumed as the rate determining step (RDS. In the second step, a FT pilot plant was conducted to validate the catalyst performance, especially the conversion efficiency, heat and mass transfer effects, and system controllability. The results indicated that our catalyst performances under mild conditions were not significantly different in many regards from those previously reported for a severe condition, as especially Ru-based catalyst can be performed to vary over a wide range of conditions to yield specific liquid productivity. The results in terms of the hydrocarbon product distribution obtained from the pilot scale operations were similar with that obtained from the related lab scale experiments.

  4. Photoassisted Fenton degradation of phthalocyanine dyes from wastewater of printing industry using Fe(II)/γ-Al2O3 catalyst in up-flow fluidized-bed.

    Cheng, Hsuhui; Chou, Shihjie; Chen, Shiaoshing; Yu, Chiajen

    2014-06-01

    Fe(II)/γ-Al2O3 powders synthesized using the dipping method were produced from a mixed aqueous solution containing aluminium oxide (γ-Al2O3) and iron(II)-precursor (FeSO4), and used for photo-Fenton degradation of phthalocyanine dyes (PCS) under ultraviolet (UV) irradiation in an up-flow fluidized bed. The catalysts were characterized by XRD, ESCA, BET, EDS and SEM. The results showed that Fe(2+) ion was compounded on the γ-Al2O3 carrier. The effects of different reaction parameters such as catalyst activity, dosage and solution pH on the decolorization of PCS were assessed. Results indicated that maximum decolorization (more than 95%) of PCS occurred with 20 wt% Fe(II)/γ-Al2O3 catalyst (dosage of 60 g/L) using a combination of UV irradiation and heterogeneous Fenton system. The degradation efficiency of PCS increases as pH decreases, exhibiting a maximum efficiency at pH 3.5. The recycled catalyst was capable of repeating three runs without a significant decrease in treatment efficiency, and this demonstrated the stability and reusability of catalyst. Copyright © 2014 The Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Foam-based adsorbents having high adsorption capacities for recovering dissolved metals and methods thereof

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dai, Sheng; Oyola, Yatsandra

    2015-06-02

    Foam-based adsorbents and a related method of manufacture are provided. The foam-based adsorbents include polymer foam with grafted side chains and an increased surface area per unit weight to increase the adsorption of dissolved metals, for example uranium, from aqueous solutions. A method for forming the foam-based adsorbents includes irradiating polymer foam, grafting with polymerizable reactive monomers, reacting with hydroxylamine, and conditioning with an alkaline solution. Foam-based adsorbents formed according to the present method demonstrated a significantly improved uranium adsorption capacity per unit weight over existing adsorbents.

  6. Mathematical Modelling of Catalytic Fixed-Bed Reactor for Carbon Dioxide Reforming of Methane over Rh/Al2O3 Catalyst

    New Pei Yee

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A one-dimensional mathematical model was developed to simulate the performance of catalytic fixed bedreactor for carbon dioxide reforming of methane over Rh/Al2O3 catalyst at atmospheric pressure. The reactionsinvolved in the system are carbon dioxide reforming of methane (CORM and reverse water gas shiftreaction (RWGS. The profiles of CH4 and CO2 conversions, CO and H2 yields, molar flow rate and molefraction of all species as well as reactor temperature along the axial bed of catalyst were simulated. In addition,the effects of different reactor temperature on the reactor performance were also studied. The modelscan also be applied to analyze the performances of lab-scale micro reactor as well as pilot-plant scale reactorwith certain modifications and model verification with experimental data. © 2008 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.[Received: 20 August 2008; Accepted: 25 September 2008][How to Cite: N.A.S. Amin, I. Istadi, N.P. Yee. (2008. Mathematical Modelling of Catalytic Fixed-Bed Reactor for Carbon Dioxide Reforming of Methane over Rh/Al2O3 Catalyst. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 3 (1-3: 21-29. doi:10.9767/bcrec.3.1-3.19.21-29

  7. Determination of concentration distribution and velocity of a catalyst in a model of a fluidized bed reactor using nuclear techniques

    Santos, V.A. dos.

    1981-09-01

    A simplified model of a cracking unit was construct. The gaseous phase consisted of air, the solid phase (zeolite catalyst cracking) and both the phases circulate at the ambiente temperature in the steady state with 500 g of catalyst and air flow of 1600 1/h. Measurements for the circulation time of the solid phase (catalyst), concentration and radial distribution of catalyst have been carried out. The reduced experimental model of the cracking reactor (FCC) was used and radioctive tracer and attenuation of γ-radiation techniques were employed. (E.G.) [pt

  8. Foam Based Gas Diffusion Electrodes for Reversible Alkaline Electrolysis Cells

    Allebrod, Frank; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline electrolysis cells operated at 250 °C and 40 bar have shown to be able to convert electrical energy into chemical energy in the form of hydrogen at very high efficiencies and power densities. Foam based gas diffusion electrodes and a liquid immobilized electrolyte allow the operation...... of the newly designed electrolysis cell as a fuel cell, but condensation of steam may lead to blocked pores, thereby inhibiting gas diffusion and decreasing the performance of the cell. In the here presented work we present the application of a hydrophobic, porous, and electro-catalytically active layer...... the electrochemical characteristics of the cell. The thickness of the electrolyte matrix was reduced to 200 µm, thereby achieving a serial resistance and area specific resistance as low as 60 mΩ cm2 and 150 mΩ cm2, respectively, at a temperature of 200 °C and 20 bar pressure. A new production method was developed...

  9. SELECTIVE HYDROGENOLYSIS OF GLYCEROL TO PROPYLENE GLYCOL IN A CONTINUOUS FLOW TRICKLE BED REACTOR USING COPPER CHROMITE AND Cu/Al2O3 CATALYSTS

    Jorge Sepúlveda

    Full Text Available The glycerol hydrogenolysis reaction was performed in a continuous flow trickle bed reactor using a water glycerol feed and both copper chromite and Cu/Al2O3 catalysts. The commercial copper chromite had a higher activity than the laboratory prepared Cu/Al2O3 and was used for most of the tests. Propylene glycol was the main product with both catalysts, acetol being the main by-product. It was found that temperature is the main variable influencing the conversion of glycerol. When the state of the glycerol-water reactant mixture was completely liquid, at temperatures lower than 190 ºC, conversion was low and deactivation was observed. At reaction temperatures of 210-230 ºC the conversion of glycerol was complete and the selectivity to propylene glycol was stable at about 60-80% all throughout the reaction time span of 10 h, regardless of the hydrogen pressure level (1 to 20 atm. These optimal values could not be improved significantly by using other different reaction conditions or increasing the catalyst acidity. At higher temperatures (245-250 ºC the conversion was also 100%. Under reaction conditions at which copper chromite suffered deactivation, light by-products and surface deposits were formed. The deposits could be completely burned at 250 ºC and the catalyst activity fully recovered.

  10. Catalytic wet air oxidation of bisphenol A solution in a batch-recycle trickle-bed reactor over titanate nanotube-based catalysts.

    Kaplan, Renata; Erjavec, Boštjan; Senila, Marin; Pintar, Albin

    2014-10-01

    Catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) is classified as an advanced oxidation process, which proved to be highly efficient for the removal of emerging organic pollutant bisphenol A (BPA) from water. In this study, BPA was successfully removed in a batch-recycle trickle-bed reactor over bare titanate nanotube-based catalysts at very short space time of 0.6 min gCAT g(-1). The as-prepared titanate nanotubes, which underwent heat treatment at 600 °C, showed high activity for the removal of aqueous BPA. Liquid-phase recycling (5- or 10-fold recycle) enabled complete BPA conversion already at 200 °C, together with high conversion of total organic carbon (TOC), i.e., 73 and 98 %, respectively. The catalyst was chemically stable in the given range of operating conditions for 189 h on stream.

  11. Treatment of ammonia by catalytic wet oxidation process over platinum-rhodium bimetallic catalyst in a trickle-bed reactor: effect of pH.

    Hung, Chang-Mao; Lin, Wei-Bang; Ho, Ching-Lin; Shen, Yun-Hwei; Hsia, Shao-Yi

    2010-08-01

    This work adopted aqueous solutions of ammonia for use in catalytic liquid-phase reduction in a trickle-bed reactor with a platinum-rhodium bimetallic catalyst, prepared by the co-precipitation of chloroplatinic acid (H2PtCl6) and rhodium nitrate [Rh(NO3)3]. The experimental results demonstrated that a minimal amount of ammonia was removed from the solution by wet oxidation in the absence of any catalyst, while approximately 97.0% of the ammonia was removed by wet oxidation over the platinum-rhodium bimetallic catalyst at 230 degrees C with an oxygen partial pressure of 2.0 MPa. The oxidation of ammonia has been studied as a function of pH, and the main reaction products were determined. A synergistic effect is manifest in the platinum-rhodium bimetallic structure, in which the material has the greatest capacity to reduce ammonia. The reaction pathway linked the oxidizing ammonia to nitric oxide, nitrogen, and water.

  12. A novel continuous process for synthesis of carbon nanotubes using iron floating catalyst and MgO particles for CVD of methane in a fluidized bed reactor

    Maghsoodi, Sarah; Khodadadi, Abasali [Catalysis and Nanostructured Materials Research Laboratory, School of Chemical Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mortazavi, Yadollah, E-mail: mortazav@ut.ac.ir [Nanoelectronics Centre of Excellence, University of Tehran, POB 11365-4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-02-15

    A novel continuous process is used for production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of methane on iron floating catalyst in situ deposited on MgO in a fluidized bed reactor. In the hot zone of the reactor, sublimed ferrocene vapors were contacted with MgO powder fluidized by methane feed to produce Fe/MgO catalyst in situ. An annular tube was used to enhance the ferrocene and MgO contacting efficiency. Multi-wall as well as single-wall CNTs was grown on the Fe/MgO catalyst while falling down the reactor. The CNTs were continuously collected at the bottom of the reactor, only when MgO powder was used. The annular tube enhanced the contacting efficiency and improved both the quality and quantity of CNTs. The SEM and TEM micrographs of the products reveal that the CNTs are mostly entangled bundles with diameters of about 10-20 nm. Raman spectra show that the CNTs have low amount of amorphous/defected carbon with I{sub G}/I{sub D} ratios as high as 10.2 for synthesis at 900 deg. C. The RBM Raman peaks indicate formation of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) of 1.0-1.2 nm diameter.

  13. In-situ catalytic upgrading of biomass pyrolysis vapor: Using a cascade system of various catalysts in a multi-zone fixed bed reactor

    Asadieraghi, Masoud; Wan Daud, Wan Mohd Ashri

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A cascade system of different catalysts exhibited the best performance to produce high quality bio-oil. • Meso-HZSM-5, Ga (1 wt.%)/meso-HZSM-5 and Cu (5 wt.%)/SiO 2 were employed in a cascade system. • The incorporation of the appropriate gallium amount to meso-HZSM-5 enhanced the aromatics selectivity. • Meso-HZSM-5 indicated a very good activity in bio-oil upgrading. - Abstract: The in-situ catalytic upgrading of palm kernel shell (PKS) fast pyrolysis vapors was performed over each individual meso-H-ZSM-5, Ga/meso-HZSM-5 and Cu/SiO 2 catalyst or a cascade system of them in a multi-zone fixed bed reactor. The effects of mesoporosity creation into the parent H-ZSM-5 catalyst and also gallium incorporation into mesoporous H-ZSM-5 on the produced bio-oil chemical composition and distribution were studied. Key upgrading reactions for different oxygenated compounds in pyrolysis oil (small oxygenates, lignin derived and sugar derived components), including aldol condensation, alkylation, hydrogenation, aromatization, and deoxygenation were discussed. The catalysts were characterized using SEM, XRF, XRD, N 2 adsorption and NH 3 -TPD methods. Furthermore, the produced bio-oils (catalytic and non-catalytic) were analyzed using GC–MS, FTIR, CHNS/O elemental analyzer and Karl Fischer titration. Production of the upgraded bio-oil with lower content of oxygenated compound was the main objective of this investigation. Among different catalysts, meso-H-ZSM-5 zeolite demonstrated a very good activity in aromatization and deoxygenation during the upgrading of pyrolytic vapors, although it decreased the bio-oil yield (32.6 wt.%). The gallium incorporation into the meso-HZSM-5 zeolite increased the bio-oil yield from 32.6 wt.% (meso-HZSM-5) to 35.8 wt.% (using 1.0 wt.% Ga). Furthermore, the aromatics selectivity was enhanced when the appropriate amount of gallium (1.0 wt.%) was introduced. A cascade system of various catalysts comprising meso-HZSM-5, Ga (1

  14. Continuous fixed-bed gas-phase hydroformylation using supported ionic liquid-phase (SILP) Rh catalysts

    Riisager, Anders; Wasserscheid, Peter; Van Hal, R.

    2003-01-01

    Continuous flow gas-phase hydroformylation of propene was performed using novel supported ionic liquid-phase (SILP) catalysts containing immobilized Rh complexes of the biphosphine ligand sulfoxantphos in the ionic liquids 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate and halogen-free 1-n-butyl...

  15. Bromine based mercury abatement in waste and coal combustion. Mercury retention in the catalyst bed of a tail-end-SCR

    Vosteen, Bernhard W. [Vosteen Consulting GmbH, Koeln (Germany); Kanefke, Rico; Beyer, Joachim; Bonkhofer, Theodor Gerhard [CURRENTA GmbH und Co. OHG, Leverkusen (Germany); Ullrich, Rick [WastePro Engineering Inc., Kennett Square, PA (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Observations and testing at a CURRENTA waste incineration plant and several coal fired power plants has derived the following aspects of mercury behavior in the plant's waste heat boiler and its gas cleaning train: - Hg{sub met} is oxidized to Hg{sub ion} most readily by bromine, and also by chlorine, - sulfur (SO{sub 2}) inhibit the Hg{sub met} chlorination but not the Hg{sub met} bromination, - Hg{sub met} passes through scrubbers and is adsorbed onto the catalyst bed of a tail-end SCR, slowly oxidized and finally elutes off as Hg{sub ion}, - sulfur (SO{sub 2}) impacts the reduction of molecular halogens in different ways; SO{sub 2} reduces Cl{sub 2} at elevated temperatures (boiler range), but reduces Br{sub 2} only at low temperatures (scrubber range) The operational tests and studies performed in the spring and summer of 2000 at this plant led to some specific knowledge about Hg{sub met} adsorption and also Hg{sub ion} desorption at the catalyst bed of a tail-end SCR. This knowledge, which was at that time in many respects novel, has provided more insight into the mercury oxidation behaviour. Today, process options derived from this knowledge could be implemented in hazardous waste incineration plants and also municipal solid waste incineration plants, to achieve complete mercury halogenation in the boiler flue gas, ahead of the scrubber system, at any time. This might prevent penetration of metallic mercury to the tail-end SCR and avoid the corresponding long time mercury elution. For effective prevention to be achieved in practice, it is strongly recommended to also install a continuously measuring (possibly uncalibrated) AAS mercury monitor for immediate detection of any unexpected Hg{sub met} breakthrough, for example caused by ''hidden mercury'' in the waste feed, and to initiate the rapid (preferably automized) injection of some bromine compound before even more mercury is transferred into the tail-end SCR, stored there as Hg

  16. Effect of process temperature on morphology of CNTs grown in a vertically fluidized bed reactor with Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst

    Shukrullah, Shazia, E-mail: zshukrullah@gmail.com; Mohamed, Norani Muti, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my; Shaharun, Maizatul Shima, E-mail: maizats@petronas.com.my [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are one of the most researched materials due to their exceptional mechanical and electrical properties. Among the various techniques, catalytic chemical vapor deposition in a fluidized bed reactor is the most promising technique for bulk production of CNTs. To meet the demand of good quality along with the bulk production of CNTs, the effect of reaction temperature on the micro structures, morphology, diameter, quality and quantity of CNTs was investigated in these studies. CNTs were synthesized at process temperature ranging from 700-850°C by catalytic decomposition of C{sub 2}H{sub 4} on Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst a vertical fluidized bed reactor. The microstructures of the grown CNTs at different reaction temperatures were investigated by using scanning electron microscope. The results of this study depicted a positive correlation between the average diameter of CNTs and reaction temperature. Narrow diameters (35∼40 nm) of CNTs with fewer defects were found at the low and mild temperatures, in particular 800°C. At this temperature, a dynamic equilibrium between the rate of C{sub 2}H{sub 4} decomposition and CNTs quantity was found due to maximum carbon diffusion over catalyst. The CNTs produced with Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst wer e also exhibiting high quality with relatively small mean outer diameter and fewer surface defects.

  17. Alginate foam-based three-dimensional culture to investigate drug sensitivity in primary leukaemia cells.

    Karimpoor, Mahroo; Yebra-Fernandez, Eva; Parhizkar, Maryam; Orlu, Mine; Craig, Duncan; Khorashad, Jamshid S; Edirisinghe, Mohan

    2018-04-01

    The development of assays for evaluating the sensitivity of leukaemia cells to anti-cancer agents is becoming an important aspect of personalized medicine. Conventional cell cultures lack the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the bone marrow (BM), the extracellular matrix and stromal components which are crucial for the growth and survival of leukaemia stem cells. To accurately predict the sensitivity of the leukaemia cells in an in vitro assay a culturing system containing the essential components of BM is required. In this study, we developed a porous calcium alginate foam-based scaffold to be used for 3D culture. The new 3D culture was shown to be cell compatible as it supported the proliferation of both normal haematopoietic and leukaemia cells. Our cell differential assay for myeloid markers showed that the porous foam-based 3D culture enhanced myeloid differentiation in both leukaemia and normal haematopoietic cells compared to two-dimensional culture. The foam-based scaffold reduced the sensitivity of the leukaemia cells to the tested antileukaemia agents in K562 and HL60 leukaemia cell line model and also primary myeloid leukaemia cells. This observation supports the application of calcium alginate foams as scaffold components of the 3D cultures for investigation of sensitivity to antileukaemia agents in primary myeloid cells. © 2018 The Author(s).

  18. A two-stage fixed-bed reactor for direct hydrotreatment of volatiles from the hydropyrolysis of biomass: effect of catalyst temperature, pressure and catalyst ageing time on product characteristics

    Pindoria, R.V.; Megaritis, A.; Herod, A.A.; Kandiyoti, R. [Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Chemical Technology

    1998-12-01

    This investigation involved the hydropyrolysis of biomass (eucalyptus globulus) and the immediate catalytic hydrocracking of pyrolytic oils in the second stage of the reactor. The effects of temperature, pressure and the catalyst ageing time on the final product tar have been studied using the catalyst Zeolite H-ZSM5. The catalytically hydrocracked tar/oil products were characterised and compared with the hydropyrolysis product from the first stage of the reactor to determine the effect of catalytic hydrocracking. The carbon deposition on the catalyst has been examined using thermogravimetric analysis. The tar yields after catalytic hydrocracking decreased with increasing pressure and temperature of the cracking stage. The tar yields at 10 bar pressure were greater than those at 40 bar pressure. The fresh zeolite catalyst trapped more than 40% of the product from the hydropyrolysis stage and TGA evidence indicated that this was not as carbon deposition but as volatiles trapped in the zeolite matrix. Reuse of the catalyst resulted in little more uptake of volatiles; however, extended use of the catalyst did not result in increased yields of liquid products but in increased production of light volatiles or gas. The H-ZSM5 catalyst appeared to act as a more active cracking catalyst rather than to promote hydrogenation or deoxygenation of the liquids produced in the hydropyrolysis stage. Characterisation of the liquids by SEC and UV fluorescence indicated that structural changes were relatively minor despite the significant changes in yields of liquids with process conditions. Available reaction routes do not appear to allow specific deoxygenation pathways to predominate without disintegration of parent molecules to lighter volatiles, under the conditions used here. 41 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Paraffin Alkylation Using Zeolite Catalysts in a slurry reactor: Chemical Engineering Principles to Extend Catalyst Lifetime

    Jong, K.P. de; Mesters, C.M.A.M.; Peferoen, D.G.R.; Brugge, P.T.M. van; Groot, C. de

    1996-01-01

    The alkylation of isobutane with 2-butene is carried out using a zeolitic catalyst in a well stirred slurry reactor. Whereas application of fixed bed technology using a solid acid alkylation catalyst has in the led to catalysts lifetimes in the range of minutes, in this work we report catalyst

  20. Recent progress in the use of in situ X-ray methods for the study of heterogeneous catalysts in packed-bed capillary reactors

    Jacques, S.D.M.; Leynaud, O.; Strusevich, D.; Stukas, P.; Barnes, P.; Sankar, G.; Sheehy, M.; O’Brien, M.G.; Iglesias-Juez, A.; Beale, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Synchrotron-based X-ray techniques, such as Diffraction and Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS), can be readily employed to study catalysts in action, thereby offering great potential for revealing the mechanism and behaviour of catalytic solids both during preparation and reaction. The continued

  1. Hydroprocessing catalysts utilization and regeneration schemes

    Furimsky, E.

    The catalyst reactor inventory represents an important part of the cost of hydroprocessing operation. The selection of a suitable catalyst and reactor is influenced by feedstock properties. Processes ensuring an uninterrupted operation during catalyst addition and withdrawal are preferred for processing high asphaltene and metal content feedstocks. The spent catalyst can be regenerated and returned to the operation if the extent of its deactivation is not high. The regeneration may be performed either in-situ or off-site. The former is suitable for fixed bed reactors whereas the catalyst from ebullated bed reactors must be regenerated off-site. The regeneration of spent catalysts heavily loaded with metals such as V, Ni and Fe may not be economic. Such catalysts may be suitable for metal reclamation. An environmentally safe method for catalyst disposal must be found if neither regeneration nor metal reclamation from spent catalysts can be performed.

  2. Methanol steam-reforming in a catalytic fixed bed reactor

    Duesterwald, H G; Hoehlein, B; Kraut, H; Meusinger, J; Peters, R [Research Centre Juelich (KFA) (Germany). Inst. of Energy Process Engineering; Stimming, U [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Inst. fuer Festkoerperphysik und Techn. Phys.

    1997-12-01

    Designing an appropriate methanol steam reformer requires detailed knowledge about the processes within such a reactor. Thus, the axial temperature and concentration gradients and catalyst ageing were investigated. It was found that for a fresh catalyst load, the catalyst located in the reactor entrance was most active during the experiment. The activity of this part of the catalyst bed decreased after some time of operation due to ageing. With further operation, the most active zone moved through the catalyst bed. From the results concerning hydrogen production and catalyst degradation, the necessary amount of catalyst for a mobile PEMFC-system can be estimated. (orig.)

  3. A study of the homogeneous stages in the catalytic oxidation of naphthalene, o-xylene, and benzene over a vibratory-fluidized catalyst bed

    Korneichuk, G P; Stasevich, V P; Shaprinskaya, T M; Girushtin, G G; Gritsenko, V I; Zelenchukova, T G

    1978-01-01

    To identify the conditions for minimizing homogeneous states, the reaction kinetics were studied in a vibrating gradientless quartz reactor both in the presence and absence of the catalyst. A tenfold decrease of the reactional space in the absence of catalyst inhibited the oxidation (e.g., from a 68% conversion to 10% at 500/sup 0/C for o-xylene, and from 100% to 2% at 580/sup 0/C for benzene), whereas increasing the surface-volume ratio of the reactor increased the oxidation rate for benzene, which indicated that noncatalytic oxidation follows a radical-chain mechanism and involves both homogeneous (mainly) and heterogeneous stages. Catalytic oxidation carried out in a small volume (to avoid the homogeneous states) followed a heterogeneous mechanism up to 580/sup 0/C for naphthalene and o-xylene, and up to 550/sup 0/C for benzene. At higher temperatures, however, volume oxidation of benzene to carbon oxides was detected, which was favored by intense reactor vibration (i.e., increasing free space between catalyst grains), constituted 27% at 564/sup 0/C and 40% at 584/sup 0/C, and probably followed a heterogeneous-homogeneous mechanism. The partial oxidation products (i.e., phthalic and (for benzene) maleic anhydride) formed entirely by a heterogeneous mechanism. Tables and graphs.

  4. Selection of catalysts and reactors for hydroprocessing

    Furimsky, E. [Imaf Group, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    1998-07-13

    The performance of hydroprocessing units can be influenced by the selection of the catalysts and the type of reactor to suit a particular feed. The catalysts and reactors selected for light feeds differ markedly from those selected for heavy feeds. Fixed-bed reactors have been traditionally used for light feeds. High asphaltene and high metal content feeds are successfully processed using moving-bed and/or ebullated bed reactors. Multi-reactor systems consisting of moving-bed and/or ebullated bed reactors in series with fixed-bed reactors can be used to process difficult feeds. For heavy feeds, the physical properties (e.g. porosity), shape and size of the catalyst particles become crucial parameters. Pretreatment of catalysts by presulfiding improves the performance of the units.

  5. Catalytic fast pyrolysis of white oak wood in-situ using a bubbling fluidized bed reactor

    Catalytic fast pyrolysis was performed on white oak wood using two zeolite-type catalysts as bed material in a bubbling fluidized bed reactor. The two catalysts chosen, based on a previous screening study, were Ca2+ exchanged Y54 (Ca-Y54) and a proprietary ß-zeolite type catalyst (catalyst M) both ...

  6. Axial Changes of Catalyst Structure and Temperature in a Fixed-Bed Microreactor During Noble Metal Catalysed Partial Oxidation of Methane

    Hannemann, S.; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Kimmerle, B.

    2009-01-01

    The catalytic partial oxidation of methane (CPO) over flame-made 2.5%Rh-2.5%Pt/Al2O3 and 2.5%Rh/Al2O3 in 6%CH4/3%O-2/He shows the potential of in situ studies using miniaturized fixed-bed reactors, the importance of spatially resolved studies and its combination with infrared thermography and on-...

  7. Oxidation catalyst

    Ceyer, Sylvia T.; Lahr, David L.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention generally relates to catalyst systems and methods for oxidation of carbon monoxide. The invention involves catalyst compositions which may be advantageously altered by, for example, modification of the catalyst surface to enhance catalyst performance. Catalyst systems of the present invention may be capable of performing the oxidation of carbon monoxide at relatively lower temperatures (e.g., 200 K and below) and at relatively higher reaction rates than known catalysts. Additionally, catalyst systems disclosed herein may be substantially lower in cost than current commercial catalysts. Such catalyst systems may be useful in, for example, catalytic converters, fuel cells, sensors, and the like.

  8. Bed Bugs

    Prevent, identify, and treat bed bug infestations using EPA’s step-by-step guides, based on IPM principles. Find pesticides approved for bed bug control, check out the information clearinghouse, and dispel bed bug myths.

  9. Cellular morphology of organic-inorganic hybrid foams based on alkali alumino-silicate matrix

    Verdolotti, Letizia; Liguori, Barbara; Capasso, Ilaria; Caputo, Domenico; Lavorgna, Marino; Iannace, Salvatore

    2014-05-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid foams based on an alkali alumino-silicate matrix were prepared by using different foaming methods. Initially, the synthesis of an inorganic matrix by using aluminosilicate particles, activated through a sodium silicate solution, was performed at room temperature. Subsequently the viscous paste was foamed by using three different methods. In the first method, gaseous hydrogen produced by the oxidization of Si powder in an alkaline media, was used as blowing agent to generate gas bubbles in the paste. In the second method, the porous structure was generated by mixing the paste with a "meringue" type of foam previously prepared by whipping, under vigorous stirring, a water solution containing vegetal proteins as surfactants. In the third method, a combination of these two methods was employed. The foamed systems were consolidated for 24 hours at 40°C and then characterized by FTIR, X-Ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and compression tests. Low density foams (˜500 Kg/m3) with good cellular structure and mechanical properties were obtained by combining the "meringue" approach with the use of the chemical blowing agent based on Si.

  10. Thermal Properties of Polyurethane-Polyisocyanurate Foams Based on Poly(ethylene terephthalate Waste

    Irena VITKAUSKIENĖ

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A series of polyurethane-polyisocyanurate (PU-PIR foams synthesized from PET-waste-derived aromatic polyester polyols (APP was studied using thermogravimetric analysis, Cone calorimeter and burning tests. The effect of chemical structure of the APP containing fragments of glycerol, adipic acid, poly(propylene glycol or hexanediol on thermal stability and flame resistance of the PU-PIR foams was elucidated. PU-PIR foams prepared from APP containing fragments of glycerol and/or adipic acid had higher thermal stability and lower weight loss at 330 °C. The foams based on APP derived from industrial PET waste were characterized by relatively low heat release and low smoke production. The presence of the fragments of the functional additives glycerol and/or adipic acid in the structure of APP used for production of PU-PIR foams, marginally decreased the heat release and slightly increased the smoke production.http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.17.3.588

  11. Acceleration of the OpenFOAM-based MHD solver using graphics processing units

    He, Qingyun; Chen, Hongli; Feng, Jingchao

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A 3D PISO-MHD was implemented on Kepler-class graphics processing units (GPUs) using CUDA technology. • A consistent and conservative scheme is used in the code which was validated by three basic benchmarks in a rectangular and round ducts. • Parallelized of CPU and GPU acceleration were compared relating to single core CPU in MHD problems and non-MHD problems. • Different preconditions for solving MHD solver were compared and the results showed that AMG method is better for calculations. - Abstract: The pressure-implicit with splitting of operators (PISO) magnetohydrodynamics MHD solver of the couple of Navier–Stokes equations and Maxwell equations was implemented on Kepler-class graphics processing units (GPUs) using the CUDA technology. The solver is developed on open source code OpenFOAM based on consistent and conservative scheme which is suitable for simulating MHD flow under strong magnetic field in fusion liquid metal blanket with structured or unstructured mesh. We verified the validity of the implementation on several standard cases including the benchmark I of Shercliff and Hunt's cases, benchmark II of fully developed circular pipe MHD flow cases and benchmark III of KIT experimental case. Computational performance of the GPU implementation was examined by comparing its double precision run times with those of essentially the same algorithms and meshes. The resulted showed that a GPU (GTX 770) can outperform a server-class 4-core, 8-thread CPU (Intel Core i7-4770k) by a factor of 2 at least.

  12. Acceleration of the OpenFOAM-based MHD solver using graphics processing units

    He, Qingyun; Chen, Hongli, E-mail: hlchen1@ustc.edu.cn; Feng, Jingchao

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • A 3D PISO-MHD was implemented on Kepler-class graphics processing units (GPUs) using CUDA technology. • A consistent and conservative scheme is used in the code which was validated by three basic benchmarks in a rectangular and round ducts. • Parallelized of CPU and GPU acceleration were compared relating to single core CPU in MHD problems and non-MHD problems. • Different preconditions for solving MHD solver were compared and the results showed that AMG method is better for calculations. - Abstract: The pressure-implicit with splitting of operators (PISO) magnetohydrodynamics MHD solver of the couple of Navier–Stokes equations and Maxwell equations was implemented on Kepler-class graphics processing units (GPUs) using the CUDA technology. The solver is developed on open source code OpenFOAM based on consistent and conservative scheme which is suitable for simulating MHD flow under strong magnetic field in fusion liquid metal blanket with structured or unstructured mesh. We verified the validity of the implementation on several standard cases including the benchmark I of Shercliff and Hunt's cases, benchmark II of fully developed circular pipe MHD flow cases and benchmark III of KIT experimental case. Computational performance of the GPU implementation was examined by comparing its double precision run times with those of essentially the same algorithms and meshes. The resulted showed that a GPU (GTX 770) can outperform a server-class 4-core, 8-thread CPU (Intel Core i7-4770k) by a factor of 2 at least.

  13. Comparison of the Effects of Fluidized-Bed and Fixed-Bed Reactors in Microwave-Assisted Catalytic Decomposition of TCE by Hydrogen

    Lili Ren

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Trichloroethylene (TCE decomposition by hydrogen with microwave heating under different reaction systems was investigated. The activities of a series of catalysts for microwave-assisted TCE hydrodechlorination were tested through the fixed-bed and the fluidized-bed reactor systems. This study found that the different reaction system is suitable for different catalyst type. And there is an interactive relationship between the catalyst type and the reaction bed type.

  14. Development and optimization of open cell foam-based platelet milli-reactor for the intensification and the valorisation of CO_2 methanation

    Frey, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    In response to the different international agreements to reduce the emission of greenhouse gases and limit their impact on global warming, an energy transition is in progress to increase the share of renewable energies. The Power-to-Gas concept is one of many solutions proposed to answer the need to charge and discharge this intermittent energy source. However, the methanation reaction, highly exothermal, needs a process able to efficiently evacuate the heat produced by the reaction. During this thesis, a structure milli-reactor, filled with an open cell foam coated with a catalyst (Ni/Ceria-Zirconia), was developed as an answer to this issue. The reactor was hydrodynamically and thermally characterized. The second one allowed us to evidence hot spots formation. The presence of nano-fibres allowed better control of the heat generated, limiting the deactivation of the catalyst (sintering). Catalytic tests, performed on a small scale pilot, clearly showed the advantage of structured beds compared to fixed bed, classically used in processes, with a moderate heat elevation around 25 C. (author)

  15. Studies on recycling and utilization of spent catalysts. Preparation of active hydrodemetallization catalyst compositions from spent residue hydroprocessing catalysts

    Marafi, Meena; Stanislaus, Antony [Petroleum Refining Department, Petroleum Research and Studies Center, Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, P.O. Box 24885, Safat (Kuwait)

    2007-02-15

    Spent catalysts form a major source of solid wastes in the petroleum refining industries. Due to environmental concerns, increasing emphasis has been placed on the development of recycling processes for the waste catalyst materials as much as possible. In the present study the potential reuse of spent catalysts in the preparation of active new catalysts for residual oil hydrotreating was examined. A series of catalysts were prepared by mixing and extruding spent residue hydroprocessing catalysts that contained C, V, Mo, Ni and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with boehmite in different proportions. All prepared catalysts were characterized by chemical analysis and by surface area, pore volume, pore size and crushing strength measurements. The hydrodesulfurization (HDS) and hydrodemetallization (HDM) activities of the catalysts were evaluated by testing in a high pressure fixed-bed microreactor unit using Kuwait atmospheric residue as feed. A commercial HDM catalyst was also tested under similar operating conditions and their HDS and HDM activities were compared with that of the prepared catalysts. The results revealed that catalyst prepared with addition of up to 40 wt% spent catalyst to boehmite had fairly high surface area and pore volume together with large pores. The catalyst prepared by mixing and extruding about 40 wt% spent catalyst with boehmite was relatively more active for promoting HDM and HDS reactions than a reference commercial HDM catalyst. The formation of some kind of new active sites from the metals (V, Mo and Ni) present in the spent catalyst is suggested to be responsible for the high HDM activity of the prepared catalyst. (author)

  16. Sabatier Catalyst Poisoning Investigation

    Nallette, Tim; Perry, Jay; Abney, Morgan; Knox, Jim; Goldblatt, Loel

    2013-01-01

    The Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA) on the International Space Station (ISS) has been operational since 2010. The CRA uses a Sabatier reactor to produce water and methane by reaction of the metabolic CO2 scrubbed from the cabin air and the hydrogen byproduct from the water electrolysis system used for metabolic oxygen generation. Incorporating the CRA into the overall air revitalization system has facilitated life support system loop closure on the ISS reducing resupply logistics and thereby enhancing longer term missions. The CRA utilizes CO2 which has been adsorbed in a 5A molecular sieve within the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly, CDRA. There is a potential of compounds with molecular dimensions similar to, or less than CO2 to also be adsorbed. In this fashion trace contaminants may be concentrated within the CDRA and subsequently desorbed with the CO2 to the CRA. Currently, there is no provision to remove contaminants prior to entering the Sabatier catalyst bed. The risk associated with this is potential catalyst degradation due to trace organic contaminants in the CRA carbon dioxide feed acting as catalyst poisons. To better understand this risk, United Technologies Aerospace System (UTAS) has teamed with MSFC to investigate the impact of various trace contaminants on the CRA catalyst performance at relative ISS cabin air concentrations and at about 200/400 times of ISS concentrations, representative of the potential concentrating effect of the CDRA molecular sieve. This paper summarizes our initial assessment results.

  17. Active carbon catalyst for heavy oil upgrading

    Fukuyama, Hidetsugu; Terai, Satoshi [Technology Research Center, Toyo Engineering Corporation, 1818 Azafujimi, Togo, Mobara-shi, Chiba 297-00017 (Japan); Uchida, Masayuki [Business Planning and Exploring Department, Overseas Business Development and Marketing Division, Toyo Engineering Corporation, 2-8-1 Akanehama, Narashino-shi, Chiba 275-0024 (Japan); Cano, Jose L.; Ancheyta, Jorge [Maya Crude Treatment Project, Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas No. 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico D.F. 07730 (Mexico)

    2004-11-24

    The active carbon (AC) catalyst was studied by hydrocracking of Middle Eastern vacuum residue (VR) for heavy oil upgrading. It was observed that the active carbon has the affinity to heavy hydrocarbon compounds and adsorption selectivity to asphaltenes, and exhibits better ability to restrict the coke formation during the hydrocracking reaction of VR. The mesopore of active carbon was thought to play an important role for effective conversion of heavy hydrocarbon compounds into lighter fractions restricting carbon formation. The performance of the AC catalyst was examined by continuous hydrocracking by CSTR for the removal of such impurities as sulfur and heavy metals (nickel and vanadium), which are mostly concentrated in the asphaltenes. The AC catalyst was confirmed to be very effective for the removal of heavy metals from Middle Eastern VR, Maya/Istmo VR and Maya VR. The extruded AC catalysts were produced by industrial manufacturing method. The application test of the extruded AC catalyst for ebullating-bed reactor as one of the commercially applicable reactors was carried out at the ebullating-bed pilot plant for 500h. The ebullition of the extruded AC catalyst was successfully traced and confirmed by existing {gamma}-ray density meter. The extruded AC catalyst showed stable performance with less sediment formation at an equivalent conversion by conventional alumina catalyst at commercial ebullating-bed unit. The degradation of the AC catalyst at the aging test was observed to be less than that of the conventional alumina catalyst. Thus, the AC catalyst was confirmed to be effective and suitable for upgrading of heavy oil, especially such heavy oils as Maya, which contains much heavy metals.

  18. Cobalt and molybdenum activated electrodes in foam based alkaline electrolysis cells at 150-250 °C and 40 bar

    Allebrod, Frank; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2014-01-01

    A new type of alkaline electrolysis cells with nickel foam based gas diffusion electrodes and KOH (aq) immobilized in mesoporous SrTiO3 has been developed and tested at temperatures of 150 C, 200 C and 250 C at a pressure of 40 bar. Two cells have been characterized during the 270 h long test...

  19. Communicating catalysts

    Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2018-06-01

    The beauty and activity of enzymes inspire chemists to tailor new and better non-biological catalysts. Now, a study reveals that the active sites within heterogeneous catalysts actively cooperate in a fashion phenomenologically similar to, but mechanistically distinct, from enzymes.

  20. Lagrangian Approach to Study Catalytic Fluidized Bed Reactors

    Madi, Hossein; Hossein Madi Team; Marcelo Kaufman Rechulski Collaboration; Christian Ludwig Collaboration; Tilman Schildhauer Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    Lagrangian approach of fluidized bed reactors is a method, which simulates the movement of catalyst particles (caused by the fluidization) by changing the gas composition around them. Application of such an investigation is in the analysis of the state of catalysts and surface reactions under quasi-operando conditions. The hydrodynamics of catalyst particles within a fluidized bed reactor was studied to improve a Lagrangian approach. A fluidized bed methanation employed in the production of Synthetic Natural Gas from wood was chosen as the case study. The Lagrangian perspective was modified and improved to include different particle circulation patterns, which were investigated through this study. Experiments were designed to evaluate the concepts of the model. The results indicate that the setup is able to perform the designed experiments and a good agreement between the simulation and the experimental results were observed. It has been shown that fluidized bed reactors, as opposed to fixed beds, can be used to avoid the deactivation of the methanation catalyst due to carbon deposits. Carbon deposition on the catalysts tested with the Lagrangian approach was investigated by temperature programmed oxidation (TPO) analysis of ex-situ catalyst samples. This investigation was done to identify the effects of particles velocity and their circulation patterns on the amount and type of deposited carbon on the catalyst surface. Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne(EPFL), Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI)

  1. Lunar CATALYST

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Lunar Cargo Transportation and Landing by Soft Touchdown (Lunar CATALYST) is a NASA initiative to encourage the development of U.S. private-sector robotic lunar...

  2. Oxidation of ethene in a wall-cooled packed-bed reactor

    Schouten, E.P.S.; Borman, P.C.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1994-01-01

    The selective oxidation of ethene over a silver on α-alumina catalyst was studied in a pilot plant with a wall-cooled tubular packed bed reactor. Gas and solid temperatures in the catalyst bed were measured at different axial and radial positions as well as concentrations at different axial

  3. Comparative study between fluidized bed and fixed bed reactors in methane reforming with CO2 and O2 to produce syngas

    Jing Qiangshan; Lou Hui; Mo Liuye; Zheng Xiaoming

    2006-01-01

    Reforming of methane with carbon dioxide and oxygen was investigated over Ni/MgO-SiO 2 catalysts using fixed bed and fluidized bed reactors. The conversions of CH 4 and CO 2 in a fluidized bed reactor were close to thermodynamic equilibrium. The activity and stability of the catalyst in the fixed bed reactor were lower than that in the fluidized bed reactor due to carbon deposition and nickel sintering. TGA and TEM techniques were used to characterize the spent catalysts. The results showed that a lot of whisker carbon was found on the catalyst in the rear of the fixed bed reactor, and no deposited carbon was observed on the catalysts in the fluidized bed reactor after reaction. It is suggested that this phenomenon is related to a permanent circulation of catalyst particles between the oxygen rich and oxygen free zones. That is, fluidization of the catalysts in the fluidized bed reactor favors inhibiting deposited carbon and thermal uniformity in the reactor

  4. Efficient utilization of bimetallic catalyst in low environment syngas ...

    Sonal

    2017-10-26

    Oct 26, 2017 ... Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, ... MS received 27 May 2017; revised 21 August 2017; accepted 31 ... The catalysts were tested in fixed bed reactor at industrial relevant FTS conditions.

  5. Investigation of activity and selectivity of redox catalysts in oxidative ...

    Then, the different reaction conditions on this catalyst in a fluidized bed reactor ... In transient state experiments, methane feed without the presence of oxygen in the gas ... and the speed decrease, methane conversion decreases dramatically.

  6. The development of a 3D mesoscopic model of metallic foam based on an improved watershed algorithm

    Zhang, Jinhua; Zhang, Yadong; Wang, Guikun; Fang, Qin

    2018-06-01

    The watershed algorithm has been used widely in the x-ray computed tomography (XCT) image segmentation. It provides a transformation defined on a grayscale image and finds the lines that separate adjacent images. However, distortion occurs in developing a mesoscopic model of metallic foam based on XCT image data. The cells are oversegmented at some events when the traditional watershed algorithm is used. The improved watershed algorithm presented in this paper can avoid oversegmentation and is composed of three steps. Firstly, it finds all of the connected cells and identifies the junctions of the corresponding cell walls. Secondly, the image segmentation is conducted to separate the adjacent cells. It generates the lost cell walls between the adjacent cells. Optimization is then performed on the segmentation image. Thirdly, this improved algorithm is validated when it is compared with the image of the metallic foam, which shows that it can avoid the image segmentation distortion. A mesoscopic model of metallic foam is thus formed based on the improved algorithm, and the mesoscopic characteristics of the metallic foam, such as cell size, volume and shape, are identified and analyzed.

  7. Hydrodynamics of multi-phase packed bed micro-reactors

    Márquez Luzardo, N.M.

    2010-01-01

    Why to use packed bed micro-reactors for catalyst testing? Miniaturized packed bed reactors have a large surface-to-volume ratio at the reactor and particle level that favors the heat- and mass-transfer processes at all scales (intra-particle, inter-phase and inter-particle or reactor level). If the

  8. Effect of coke and catalyst structure on oxidative regeneration of hydroprocessing catalysts

    Furimsky, E. (CANMET, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Energy Research Laboratories)

    1991-04-01

    Two industrial hydroprocessing catalysts used for upgrading an atmospheric residue and a gas oil, respectively were regenerated in a fixed bed using air and 2 vol.% O{sub 2}+N{sub 2} balance mixture. The regeneration in air resulted in a significant sintering of the catalyst's material. The surface area of catalysts regenerated in 2 vol.% O{sub 2} mixture was similar to that of fresh catalysts, whereas a significant loss of surface area was observed after regeneration in air. The X-ray diffraction pattern of catalysts regenerated in 2 vol.% O{sub 2}+N{sub 2} balance mixture was also similar to that of fresh catalysts. 22 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.

  9. Zircon Supported Copper Catalysts for the Steam Reforming of Methanol

    Widiastri, M.; Fendy, Marsih, I. N.

    2008-03-01

    Steam reforming of methanol (SRM) is known as one of the most favorable catalytic processes for producing hydrogen. Current research on zirconia, ZrO2 supported copper catalyst revealed that CuO/ZrO2 as an active catalyst for the SRM. Zircon, ZrSiO4 is available from the by-product of tin mining. In the work presented here, the catalytic properties of CuO/ZrSiO4 with various copper oxide compositions ranging from 2.70% (catalyst I), 4.12% (catalyst II), and 7.12%-mass (catalyst III), synthesized by an incipient wetness impregnation technique, were investigated to methanol conversion, selectivity towards CO formation, and effect of ZnO addition (7.83%CuO/8.01%ZnO/ZrSiO4 = catalyst V). The catalytic activity was obtained using a fixed bed reactor and the zircon supported catalyst activity was compared to those of CuO/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst (catalyst IV) and commercial Kujang LTSC catalyst. An X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) analysis was done to identify the abundant phases of the catalysts. The catalysts topography and particle diameter were measured with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and composition of the catalysts was measured by SEM-EDX, scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive using X-ray analysis. The results of this research provide information on the possibility of using zircon (ZrSiO4) as solid support for SRM catalysts.

  10. Oxidation of tritium by hopcalite bed

    Nishikawa, Masabumi; Shinnai, Kohsuke; Matsunaga, Sohichi; Kinoshita, Yoshihiko

    1984-08-01

    Oxidation by the catalyst bed with a metal oxide and subsequent adsorption to the porous dehydrative reagents is supposed to be effective process for scavenging tritium from an inert atmosphere. Use of spongy copper oxide or wires of copper oxide is not recommended to use as the metal oxide catalyst from the view point of mass transfer because of sintering and of limited effective surface area. Use of hopcalites and copper oxide-kieselguhr are examined in this study and it is concluded that hopcalites are more suitable as the metal oxide catalyst because they not only remain the oxidation power on hydrogen isotopes even at an ambient temperature, but also show a negligible drop in oxidation performances with repeated regeneration. The effective temperature is about 400/sup 0/C for hopcalites and 300-600/sup 0/C for copper oxide-kieselguhr to use as the oxidation bed of tritium.

  11. Oxidation of tritium by hopcalite bed

    Nishikawa, Masabumi; Shinnai, Kohsuke; Matsunaga, Sohichi; Kinoshita, Yoshihiko

    1984-01-01

    Oxidation by the catalyst bed with a metal oxide and subsequent adsorption to the porous dehydrative reagents is supposed to be effective process for scavenging tritium from an inert atmosphere. Use of spongy copper oxide or wires of copper oxide is not recommended to use as the metal oxide catalyst from the view point of mass transfer because of sintering and of limited effective surface area. Use of hopcalites and copper oxide-kieselguhr are examined in this study and it is concluded that hopcalites are more suitable as the metal oxide catalyst because they not only remain the oxidation power on hydrogen isotopes even at an ambient temperature, but also show a negligible drop in oxidation performances with repeated regeneration. The effective temperature is about 400 0 C for hopcalites and 300--600 0 C for copper oxide-kieselguhr to use as the oxidation bed of tritium. (author)

  12. Highly dispersed metal catalyst

    Xiao, Xin; West, William L.; Rhodes, William D.

    2016-11-08

    A supported catalyst having an atomic level single atom structure is provided such that substantially all the catalyst is available for catalytic function. A process of forming a single atom catalyst unto a porous catalyst support is also provided.

  13. Experimental comparison of biomass chars with other catalysts for tar reduction

    Abu El-Rub, Ziad; Bramer, Eduard A.; Brem, Gerrit

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the potential of using biomass char as a catalyst for tar reduction is discussed. Biomass char is compared with other known catalysts used for tar conversion. Model tar compounds, phenol and naphthalene, were used to test char and other catalysts. Tests were carried out in a fixed bed

  14. Enhanced E-bed bottoms upgrading using latest catalytic technology

    Toshima, H.; Mayo, S.; Sedlacek, Z.; Hughes, T.; De Wind, M. [Albermarle Corp., Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-07-01

    The profitability of refineries depends on heavy oil upgrading in terms of price, conversion, yields and quality of the product. The Ebullated-bed process represents a solution for the effective primary upgrading of heavy oils. Since the 1970s, Albemarle has commercialized several E-bed catalysts to upgrade the bottoms in low sediment and high hydrogenation operations. Although an E-bed is used to maximize the conversion of vacuum residuum (VR), it is often limited by fouling caused by sediment in the product. In order to reduce sedimentation in the product, Albemarle developed an improved E-bed catalytic technology by characterizing the asphaltenes and sediments in order to better understand the oil chemistry and compatibility. The most recent development involves the patented catalyst-staging technology and the improved single catalyst application. Both achieve very low sediment or higher hydrodesulphurization (HDS) and Conradson carbon (CCR) removal for improved bottom upgrading. tabs., figs.

  15. Novel catalysts for isotopic exchange between hydrogen and liquid water

    Butler, J.P.; Rolston, J.H.; Stevens, W.H.

    1978-01-01

    Catalytic isotopic exchange between hydrogen and liquid water offers many inherent potential advantages for the separation of hydrogen isotopes which is of great importance in the Canadian nuclear program. Active catalysts for isotopic exchange between hydrogen and water vapor have long been available, but these catalysts are essentially inactive in the presence of liquid water. New, water-repellent platinum catalysts have been prepared by: (1) treating supported catalysts with silicone, (2) depositing platinum on inherently hydrophobic polymeric supports, and (3) treating platinized carbon with Teflon and bonding to a carrier. The activity of these catalysts for isotopic exchange between countercurrent streams of liquid water and hydrogen saturated with water vapor has been measured in a packed trickle bed integral reactor. The performance of these hydrophobic catalysts is compared with nonwetproofed catalysts. The mechanism of the overall exchange reaction is briefly discussed. 6 figures

  16. Sputtered catalysts

    Tyerman, W.J.R.

    1978-01-01

    A method is described for preparing a supported catalyst by a sputtering process. A material that is catalytic, or which is a component of a catalytic system, is sputtered on to the surface of refractory oxide particles that are compatible with the sputtered material and the sputtered particles are consolidated into aggregate form. The oxide particles before sputtering should have a diameter in the range 1000A to 50μ and a porosity less than 0.4 ml/g, and may comprise MgO, Al 2 O 3 or SiO 2 or mixtures of these oxides, including hydraulic cement. The particles may possess catalytic activity by themselves or in combination with the catalytic material deposited on them. Sputtering may be effected epitaxially and consolidation may be effected by compaction pelleting, extrusion or spray drying of a slurry. Examples of the use of such catalysts are given. (U.K.)

  17. Steam Reforming of Acetic Acid over Co-Supported Catalysts: Coupling Ketonization for Greater Stability

    Davidson, Stephen D. [Energy and Environmental; Spies, Kurt A. [Energy and Environmental; Mei, Donghai [Energy and Environmental; Kovarik, Libor [Energy and Environmental; Kutnyakov, Igor [Energy and Environmental; Li, Xiaohong S. [Energy and Environmental; Lebarbier Dagle, Vanessa [Energy and Environmental; Albrecht, Karl O. [Energy and Environmental; Dagle, Robert A. [Energy and Environmental

    2017-09-11

    We report on the markedly improved stability of a novel 2-bed catalytic system, as compared to a conventional 1-bed steam reforming catalyst, for the production of H2 from acetic acid. The 2-bed catalytic system comprises of i) a basic oxide ketonization catalyst for the conversion of acetic acid to acetone, and a ii) Co-based steam reforming catalyst, both catalytic beds placed in sequence within the same unit operation. Steam reforming catalysts are particularly prone to catalytic deactivation when steam reforming acetic acid, used here as a model compound for the aqueous fraction of bio-oil. Catalysts comprising MgAl2O4, ZnO, CeO2, and activated carbon (AC) both with and without Co-addition were evaluated for conversion of acetic acid and acetone, its ketonization product, in the presence of steam. It was found that over the bare oxide support only ketonization activity was observed and coke deposition was minimal. With addition of Co to the oxide support steam reforming activity was facilitated and coke deposition was significantly increased. Acetone steam reforming over the same Co-supported catalysts demonstrated more stable performance and with less coke deposition than with acetic acid feedstock. DFT analysis suggests that over Co surface CHxCOO species are more favorably formed from acetic acid versus acetone. These CHxCOO species are strongly bound to the Co catalyst surface and could explain the higher propensity for coke formation from acetic acid. Based on these findings, in order to enhance stability of the steam reforming catalyst a dual-bed (2-bed) catalyst system was implemented. Comparing the 2-bed and 1-bed (Co-supported catalyst only) systems under otherwise identical reaction conditions the 2-bed demonstrated significantly improved stability and coke deposition was decreased by a factor of 4.

  18. Separation of deuterium by H2/H2O reaction with hydrophobic platinum catalyst

    Kitamoto, A.; Takashima, Y.; Shimizu, M.

    The separation performance of a trickle bed exchange column packed with a hydrophobic or waterproof catalyst is related to operating conditions such as hydrogen surface velocity, water flow rate, and temperature. The optimum carrier type and catalyst platinum content were determined. The continuous injection of roughly 10 3 ppm O 2 regenerates the catalyst effectively. The ratio of hydrophobic catalyst to hydrophilic packing is an important factor in increasing the exchange rate in deuterium extraction

  19. Hydrophobic catalyst mixture for the isotopic exchange reaction between hydrogen and water

    Paek, S.; Ahn, D. H.; Choi, H. J.; Kim, K. R.; Lee, M.; Yim, S. P.; Chung, H. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-11-15

    Pt/SDBC catalyst, which is used for the hydrogen-water isotopic exchange reaction, was prepared. The various properties of the catalyst, such as the thermal stability, pore structure and the platinum dispersion, were investigated. A hydrophobic Pt/SDBC catalyst which has been developed for the LPCE column of the WTRF (Wolsong Tritium Removal Facility) was tested in a trickle bed reactor. An experimental apparatus was built for the test of the catalyst at various temperatures and gas velocities.

  20. Hydrophobic catalyst mixture for the isotopic exchange reaction between hydrogen and water

    Paek, S.; Ahn, D. H.; Choi, H. J.; Kim, K. R.; Lee, M.; Yim, S. P.; Chung, H.

    2005-01-01

    Pt/SDBC catalyst, which is used for the hydrogen-water isotopic exchange reaction, was prepared. The various properties of the catalyst, such as the thermal stability, pore structure and the platinum dispersion, were investigated. A hydrophobic Pt/SDBC catalyst which has been developed for the LPCE column of the WTRF (Wolsong Tritium Removal Facility) was tested in a trickle bed reactor. An experimental apparatus was built for the test of the catalyst at various temperatures and gas velocities

  1. Highly sensitive silicon microreactor for catalyst testing

    Henriksen, Toke Riishøj; Olsen, Jakob Lind; Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard

    2009-01-01

    by directing the entire gas flow through the catalyst bed to a mass spectrometer, thus ensuring that nearly all reaction products are present in the analyzed gas flow. Although the device can be employed for testing a wide range of catalysts, the primary aim of the design is to allow characterization of model...... catalysts which can only be obtained in small quantities. Such measurements are of significant fundamental interest but are challenging because of the low surface areas involved. The relationship between the reaction zone gas flow and the pressure in the reaction zone is investigated experimentally......, it is found that platinum catalysts with areas as small as 15 mu m(2) are conveniently characterized with the device. (C) 2009 American Institute of Physics. [doi:10.1063/1.3270191]...

  2. Effect of Electric Discharge on Properties of Nano-Particulate Catalyst for Plasma-Catalysis.

    Lee, Chung Jun; Kim, Jip; Kim, Taegyu

    2016-02-01

    Heterogeneous catalytic processes have been used to produce hydrogen from hydrocarbons. However, high reforming temperature caused serious catalyst deteriorations and low energy efficiency. Recently, a plasma-catalyst hybrid process was used to reduce the reforming temperature and to improve the stability and durability of reforming catalysts. Effect of electric discharges on properties of nanoparticulate catalysts for plasma-catalysis was investigated in the present study. Catalyst-bed porosity was varied by packing catalyst beads with the different size in a reactor. Discharge power and onset voltage of the plasma were measured as the catalyst-bed porosity was varied. The effect of discharge voltage, frequency and voltage waveforms such as the sine, pulse and square was investigated. We found that the optimal porosity of the catalyst-bed exists to maximize the electric discharge. At a low porosity, the electric discharge was unstable to be sustained because the space between catalysts got narrow nearly close to the sheath region. On the other hand, at a high porosity, the electric discharge became weak because the plasma was not sufficient to interact with the surface of catalysts. The discharge power increased as the discharge voltage and frequency increased. The square waveform was more efficient than the sine and pulse one. At a high porosity, however, the effect of the voltage waveform was not considerable because the space between catalysts was too large for plasma to interact with the surface of catalysts.

  3. An introduction to catalyst

    Jeon, Hak Je

    1988-11-01

    This book explains basic conception of catalyst such as definition, velocity of chemical reaction and velocity of catalyst reaction, absorption with absorption energy and chemical absorption, pore structure with the role of pore and measurement of pore structure, catalyst activity on solid structure, electrical property on catalyst activity, choice and design of catalyst, catalytic reaction with reaction velocity and chemical equilibrium and reaction velocity model, measurement of reaction velocity and material analysis, catalyst for mixed compound, catalyst for solid acid and catalyst for supported metal.

  4. Hydrogen isotopic exchange reaction in a trickle-bed

    Paek, Seung Woo; Ahn, Do Hee; Kim, Kwang Rag; Lee, Min Soo; Yim, Sung Paal; Chung, Hong Suk

    2005-01-01

    The CECE (Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange) with a hydrophobic catalyst is ideally suited for extracting tritium from water because of its high separation factor and mild operating conditions. This process for different hydrogen isotope applications has been developed by AECL. A laboratory scale CECE was built and operated at Mound Laboratory. Belgium and Japan have also developed independently similar processes which are based on a hydrophobic catalyst. The CECE column is composed of an electrolysis cell and a liquid phase catalytic exchange column. The liquid phase catalytic exchange columns having various structures were developed; and it has been recognized that a multistage type and a trickle-bed type are promising. The multistage type gave more successful results than the trickle-bed type. However, the structure of the column is complicated. The trickle-bed type has a significant advantage in that the structure of the column is quite simple: the hydrophobic catalysts or the catalysts and packings are packed within the column. This structure would lead us to a smaller column height than the multistage type. This paper deals with the experiment for the hydrogen isotope exchange in a trickle-bed reactor packed with a hydrophobic catalyst and the design of the catalytic column for the CECE to tritium recovery from light water

  5. Hydrogen isotopic exchange reaction in a trickle-bed

    Paek, Seung Woo; Ahn, Do Hee; Kim, Kwang Rag; Lee, Min Soo; Yim, Sung Paal; Chung, Hong Suk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    The CECE (Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange) with a hydrophobic catalyst is ideally suited for extracting tritium from water because of its high separation factor and mild operating conditions. This process for different hydrogen isotope applications has been developed by AECL. A laboratory scale CECE was built and operated at Mound Laboratory. Belgium and Japan have also developed independently similar processes which are based on a hydrophobic catalyst. The CECE column is composed of an electrolysis cell and a liquid phase catalytic exchange column. The liquid phase catalytic exchange columns having various structures were developed; and it has been recognized that a multistage type and a trickle-bed type are promising. The multistage type gave more successful results than the trickle-bed type. However, the structure of the column is complicated. The trickle-bed type has a significant advantage in that the structure of the column is quite simple: the hydrophobic catalysts or the catalysts and packings are packed within the column. This structure would lead us to a smaller column height than the multistage type. This paper deals with the experiment for the hydrogen isotope exchange in a trickle-bed reactor packed with a hydrophobic catalyst and the design of the catalytic column for the CECE to tritium recovery from light water.

  6. Staged fluidized-bed combustion and filter system

    Mei, J.S.; Halow, J.S.

    1994-01-01

    A staged fluidized-bed combustion and filter system are described for substantially reducing the quantity of waste through the complete combustion into ash-type solids and gaseous products. The device has two fluidized-bed portions, the first primarily as a combustor/pyrolyzer bed, and the second as a combustor/filter bed. The two portions each have internal baffles to define stages so that material moving therein as fluidized beds travel in an extended route through those stages. Fluidization and movement is achieved by the introduction of gases into each stage through a directional nozzle. Gases produced in the combustor/pyrolyzer bed are permitted to travel into corresponding stages of the combustor/filter bed through screen filters that permit gas flow but inhibit solids flow. Any catalyst used in the combustor/filter bed is recycled. The two beds share a common wall to minimize total volume of the system. A slightly modified embodiment can be used for hot gas desulfurization and sorbent regeneration. Either side-by-side rectangular beds or concentric beds can be used. The system is particularly suited to the processing of radioactive and chemically hazardous waste. 10 figures

  7. Numerical modeling of first experiments on PbLi MHD flows in a rectangular duct with foam-based SiC flow channel insert

    Smolentsev, S., E-mail: sergey@fusion.ucla.edu [University of California, Los Angeles (United States); Courtessole, C.; Abdou, M.; Sharafat, S. [University of California, Los Angeles (United States); Sahu, S. [Institute of Plasma Research (India); Sketchley, T. [University of California, Los Angeles (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Numerical studies were performed as a pre-experimental analysis to the experiment on MHD PbLi flows in a rectangular duct with a flow channel insert (FCI). • Dynamic testing of foam-based SiC foam-based CVD coated FCI has been performed using MaPLE facility at UCLA. • Two physical models were proposed to explain the experimental results and 3D and 2D computations performed using COMSOL, HIMAG and UCLA codes. • The obtained results suggest that more work on FCI development, fabrication and testing has to be done to assure good hermetic properties before the implementation in a fusion device. - Abstract: A flow channel insert (FCI) is the key element of the DCLL blanket concept. The FCI serves as electrical and thermal insulator to reduce the MHD pressure drop and to decouple the temperature-limited ferritic structure from the flowing hot lead-lithium (PbLi) alloy. The main focus of the paper is on numerical computations to simulate MHD flows in the first experiments on PbLi flows in a stainless steel rectangular duct with a foam-based silicon carbide (SiC) FCI. A single uninterrupted long-term (∼6500 h) test has recently been performed on a CVD coated FCI sample in the flowing PbLi in a magnetic field up to 1.5 T at the PbLi temperature of 300 °C using the MaPLE loop at UCLA. An unexpectedly high MHD pressure drop measured in this experiment suggests that a PbLi ingress into the FCI occurred in the course of the experiment, resulting in degradation of electroinsulating FCI properties. The ingress through the protective CVD layer was further confirmed by the post-experimental microscopic analysis of the FCI. The numerical modeling included 2D and 3D computations using HIMAG, COMSOL and a UCLA research code to address important flow features associated with the FCI finite length, fringing magnetic field, rounded FCI corners and also to predict changes in the MHD pressure drop in the unwanted event of a PbLi ingress. Two physical

  8. Material analyses of foam-based SiC FCI after dynamic testing in PbLi in MaPLE loop at UCLA

    Gonzalez, Maria, E-mail: maria.gonzalez@ciemat.es [LNF-CIEMAT, Avda Complutense, 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Rapisarda, David; Ibarra, Angel [LNF-CIEMAT, Avda Complutense, 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Courtessole, Cyril; Smolentsev, Sergey; Abdou, Mohamed [Fusion Science and Technology Center, UCLA (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Samples from foam-based SiC FCI were analyzed by looking at their SEM microstructure and elemental composition. • After finishing dynamic experiments in the flowing hot PbLi, the liquid metal ingress has been confirmed due to infiltration through local defects in the protective inner CVD layer. • No direct evidences of corrosion/erosion were observed; these defects could be related to the manufacturing process. - Abstract: Foam-based SiC flow channel inserts (FCIs) developed and manufactured by Ultramet, USA are currently under testing in the flowing hot lead-lithium (PbLi) alloy in the MaPLE loop at UCLA to address chemical/physical compatibility and to access the MHD pressure drop reduction. UCLA has finished the first experimental series, where a single uninterrupted long-term (∼6500 h) test was performed on a 30-cm FCI segment in a magnetic field up to 1.8 T at the temperature of 300 °C and maximum flow velocities of ∼ 15 cm/s. After finishing the experiments, the FCI sample was extracted from the host stainless steel duct and cut into slices. Few of them have been analyzed at CIEMAT as a part of the joint collaborative effort on the development of the DCLL blanket concept in the EU and the US. The initial inspection of the slices using optical microscopic analysis at UCLA showed significant PbLi ingress into the bulk FCI material that resulted in degradation of insulating properties of the FCI. Current material analyses at CIEMAT are based on advanced techniques, including characterization of FCI samples by FESEM to study PbLi ingress, imaging of cross sections, composition analysis by EDX and crack inspection. These analyses suggest that the ingress was caused by local defects in the protective inner CVD layer that might be originally present in the FCI or occurred during testing.

  9. Design of heterogeneous catalysts

    Frey, Anne Mette

    was inspired by a computational screening, suggesting that alloys such as Ni-Fe, Co-Ni, and Co-Fe should show superior activity to the industrially used nickel catalyst. Especially the Ni-Fe system was considered to be interesting, since such alloy catalysts should be both more active and cheaper than the Ni...... catalyst. The results from the screening were experimentally verified for CO hydrogenation, CO2 hydrogenation, and simultaneous CO and CO2 hydrogenation by bimetallic Ni-Fe catalysts. These catalysts were found to be highly active and selective. The Co-Ni and Co-Fe systems were investigated for CO...... well, and the best catalyst prepared had a C5+ yield almost a factor of two higher than a standard air calcined Co catalyst. In the NH3-SCR reaction it is desirable to develop an active and stable catalyst for NOx removal in automotive applications, since the traditionally used vanadium-based catalyst...

  10. NOx and N2O emission control with catalyst's

    Hiltunen, M.

    1994-01-01

    Due to the increasingly stringent emission regulations, new technologies are needed to be developed for improving emission control in circulating fluidized-bed boilers. The objective of this project is to test the concept of using catalysts for NO x and N 2 O emission control. N 2 O emission is in the range of 30 - 100 ppm from fluidized bed combustors burning coal. Since it is a greenhouse gas an effective means of controlling N 2 O emission is needed

  11. 57Fe Moessbauer Studies in Mo-Fe Supported Catalysts

    Castelao-Dias, M.; Costa, B. F. O.; Quinta-Ferreira, R. M.

    2001-01-01

    Industrially, the Mo-Fe catalysts used in the selective oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde can rapidly deactivate. The use of support materials may reduce the high temperatures in the catalytic bed and/or increase thermal and mechanical resistance. However, during the preparation of these catalysts, or even during reaction conditions, the active species may react with the support material losing their catalytic activity. In this work silica, silicium carbide and titania were studied as supported catalysts by Moessbauer spectroscopy which proved to be a useful technique in the choice of supported materials

  12. The Performance of Structured Packings in Trickle-Bed Reactors

    Frank, M.J.W.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Versteeg, G.F.; Swaaij, W.P.M. van

    1999-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to investigate whether the use of structured packings might improve the mass transfer characteristics and the catalyst effectiveness of a trickle-bed reactor. Therefore, the performances of a structured packing, consisting of KATAPAK elements, and a dumped

  13. Practice Hospital Bed Safety

    ... Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Practice Hospital Bed Safety Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... It depends on the complexity of the bed." Safety Tips CDRH offers the following safety tips for ...

  14. Bed Bugs and Schools

    Bed bugs have long been a pest – feeding on blood, causing itchy bites and generally irritating their human hosts. They are successful hitchhikers, and can move from an infested site to furniture, bedding, baggage, boxes, and clothing.

  15. Lits fluidisés pour l'industrie chimique. Extrapolation et amélioration des catalyseurs. Première partie : Etudes et modèles. Enseignements issus des pilotes Fluidized Beds in Chemical Industry. Scale Up and Catalysts Improvement. First Part: Studies, Models, Learning from Pilot Plants

    Botton R.

    2006-12-01

    est intitulée Études théoriques, réalités expérimentales, suggestions . Les bulles des lits fluidisés ont fait l'objet de très nombreux travaux, dont les résultats sont très souvent explicités sous la forme de modèles mécanistiques à un paramètre qui est le diamètre des bulles. Pour confronter ces modèles à l'expérience, une relation est établie entre le diamètre des bulles et la vitesse minimum de fluidisation de comportement. Des suggestions sont alors faites pour améliorer les modèles, et l'on propose des conclusions générales sur les lits fluidisés. The firsts catalytic fluidized beds appear near 1942 in petroleum industry and near 1960 in chemical industry. We only consider very high performances chemical fluidized bed reactors (> 99%. In the past, they were developed through the use of very expensive pilot plants of about 0. 5 m diameter and 10 in high. We will demonstrate that direct scale up from laboratory data is possible. This possibility gives also a simple method to improve catalysts used into operating units and opens fluidized bed technique to products that need only low production. Presentation is made with three articles:- In the first, Studies, Models, Learning from Pilot Plants : after a description of the major scale-up problems, studies to solve then are summarized. Then scale-up works of two processes with the use of about 0. 5 m diameter pilot plant are given. From the results it is deduced the possible performances of a catalytic fluidized bed and how to operate to obtain then. - In the second*, Scale up with Only Laboratory Data , it is experimentally demonstrated that the information's scale-up can be obtained in a laboratory. A strategy to obtain them is suggested. An another result of theses experimental studies is that all physical properties of catalytic fluidized bed depends of only one parameter. It is called comportment incipient fluidization velocity . - In the third*, Theoretical Studies, Experimental

  16. Glycerol valorization: dehydration to acrolein over silica-supported niobia catalysts

    Shiju, N.R.; Brown, D.R.; Wilson, K.; Rothenberg, G.

    2010-01-01

    The catalytic dehydration of glycerol to acrolein is investigated over silica-supported niobia catalysts in a continuous fixed-bed gas-phase reactor. Various supported niobia catalysts are prepared and characterized using surface analysis and spectroscopic methods (XRD, UV-Vis, XPS, N2 adsorption),

  17. Performance Testing of Hydrodesulfurization Catalysts Using a Single-Pellet-String Reactor

    Moonen, Roel; Ras, Erik Jan; Harvey, Clare; Alles, Jeroen; Moulijn, J.A.

    2017-01-01

    Small-scale parallel trickle-bed reactors were used to evaluate the performance of a commercial hydrodesulfurization catalyst under industrially relevant conditions. Catalyst extrudates were loaded as a single string in reactor tubes. It is demonstrated that product sulfur levels and densities

  18. Catalysts and conditions for the highly efficient, selective and stable heterogeneous oligomerisation of ethylene

    Heveling, J

    1998-10-11

    Full Text Available The oligomerisation of ethylene into products in the C-4-C-20 range over heterogeneous nickel catalysts in a fixed-bed reactor at low temperature and high pressure (LT-HP) is reported. The catalysts were obtained by Ni (II) exchange or impregnation...

  19. Diethyl Ether Production Process with Various Catalyst Type

    Widayat Widayat

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Several H-zeolite and HZSM-5 catalysts was preparated and their characters have also been investigated. H-zeolit Catalyst was preparated from Natural Zeolite that obtained from Malang District and Gunung Kidul District. Diethyl ether was produced by Ethanol with concentration of 95%. This research use fixed bed reactor that 1 gram of catalyst as bed catalyst, atmospheric pressure and temperature 140oC as the operating condition. Ethanol vapor from vaporization tank was driven by 200 ml/min Nitrogen stream. The responds in this research is liquid product concentration; diethyl ether, ethanol, methanol and water concentration. The results showed that the largest ethanol conversion was produced by the use of 56.44% HZSM-5 and the largest yield of diethyl ether diethyl was produced by the use of alumina and H-zeolite catalyst. The larger ratio between natural zeolite with HCl solvent will produce the larger surface area of catalyst and ethanol conversion. The largest ethanol conversion was produced at reactan ratio 1:20. [Keywords:  catalyst; ethanol conversion; dehydration process; yield of diethyl ether; natural zeolite].

  20. Co-Production of Electricity and Hydrogen Using a Novel Iron-based Catalyst

    Hilaly, Ahmad; Georgas, Adam; Leboreiro, Jose; Arora, Salil; Head, Megann; Trembly, Jason; Turk, Brian; Gupta, Raghubir

    2011-09-30

    The primary objective of this project was to develop a hydrogen production technology for gasification applications based on a circulating fluid-bed reactor and an attrition resistant iron catalyst. The work towards achieving this objective consisted of three key activities: Development of an iron-based catalyst suitable for a circulating fluid-bed reactor; Design, construction, and operation of a bench-scale circulating fluid-bed reactor system for hydrogen production; Techno-economic analysis of the steam-iron and the pressure swing adsorption hydrogen production processes. This report describes the work completed in each of these activities during this project. The catalyst development and testing program prepared and iron-based catalysts using different support and promoters to identify catalysts that had sufficient activity for cyclic reduction with syngas and steam oxidation and attrition resistance to enable use in a circulating fluid-bed reactor system. The best performing catalyst from this catalyst development program was produced by a commercial catalyst toll manufacturer to support the bench-scale testing activities. The reactor testing systems used during material development evaluated catalysts in a single fluid-bed reactor by cycling between reduction with syngas and oxidation with steam. The prototype SIP reactor system (PSRS) consisted of two circulating fluid-bed reactors with the iron catalyst being transferred between the two reactors. This design enabled demonstration of the technical feasibility of the combination of the circulating fluid-bed reactor system and the iron-based catalyst for commercial hydrogen production. The specific activities associated with this bench-scale circulating fluid-bed reactor systems that were completed in this project included design, construction, commissioning, and operation. The experimental portion of this project focused on technical demonstration of the performance of an iron-based catalyst and a

  1. Attrition Resistant Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts Based on FCC Supports

    Adeyiga, Adeyinka

    2010-02-05

    Commercial spent fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts provided by Engelhard and Albemarle were used as supports for Fe-based catalysts with the goal of improving the attrition resistance of typical F-T catalysts. Catalysts with the Ruhrchemie composition (100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/25 spent FCC on mass basis) were prepared by wet impregnation. XRD and XANES analysis showed the presence of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} in calcined catalysts. FeC{sub x} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} were present in the activated catalysts. The metal composition of the catalysts was analyzed by ICP-MS. F-T activity of the catalysts activated in situ in CO at the same conditions as used prior to the attrition tests was measured using a fixed bed reactor at T = 573 K, P = 1.38 MPa and H{sub 2}:CO ratio of 0.67. Cu and K promoted Fe supported over Engelhard provided spent FCC catalyst shows relatively good attrition resistance (8.2 wt% fines lost), high CO conversion (81%) and C{sub 5}+ hydrocarbons selectivity (18.3%).

  2. Stability and resistance of nickel catalysts for hydrodeoxygenation

    Mortensen, Peter Mølgaard; Gardini, Diego; de Carvalho, Hudson W. P.

    2014-01-01

    The long term stability and resistance toward carbon deposition, sulfur, chlorine, and potassium of Ni/ZrO2 as a catalyst for the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of guaiacol in 1-octanol (as a model compound system for bio-oil) has been investigated at 250 degrees C and 100 bar in a trickle bed reactor...

  3. Scalable synthesis of palladium nanoparticle catalysts by atomic layer deposition

    Liang Xinhua; Lyon, Lauren B.; Jiang Yingbing; Weimer, Alan W.

    2012-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used to produce Pd/Al 2 O 3 catalysts using sequential exposures of Pd(II) hexafluoroacetylacetonate and formalin at 200 °C in a fluidized bed reactor. The ALD-prepared Pd/alumina catalysts were characterized by various methods including hydrogen chemisorption, XPS, and TEM, and compared with a commercially available 1 wt% Pd/alumina catalyst, which was also characterized. The content of Pd on alumina support and the size of Pd nanoparticles can be controlled by the number of ALD-coating cycles and the dose time of the Pd precursor. One layer of organic component from the Pd precursor remained on the Pd particle surface. The ALD 0.9 wt% Pd/alumina had greater active metal surface area and percent metal dispersion than the commercial 1 wt% Pd/alumina catalyst. The ALD and commercial catalysts were subjected to catalytic testing to determine their relative activities for glucose oxidation to gluconic acid in aqueous solution. The ALD 0.9 wt% Pd/alumina catalyst had comparable activity as compared to the commercial 1 wt% Pd catalyst. No noticeable amount of Pd leaching was observed for the ALD-prepared catalysts during the vigorously stirred reaction.

  4. Bimetallic catalysts for continuous catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol.

    Fortuny, A; Bengoa, C; Font, J; Fabregat, A

    1999-01-29

    Catalytic wet oxidation has proved to be effective at eliminating hazardous organic compounds, such as phenol, from waste waters. However, the lack of active long-life oxidation catalysts which can perform in aqueous phase is its main drawback. This study explores the ability of bimetallic supported catalysts to oxidize aqueous phenol solutions using air as oxidant. Combinations of 2% of CoO, Fe2O3, MnO or ZnO with 10% CuO were supported on gamma-alumina by pore filling, calcined and later tested. The oxidation was carried out in a packed bed reactor operating in trickle flow regime at 140 degrees C and 900 kPa of oxygen partial pressure. Lifetime tests were conducted for 8 days. The pH of the feed solution was also varied. The results show that all the catalysts tested undergo severe deactivation during the first 2 days of operation. Later, the catalysts present steady activity until the end of the test. The highest residual phenol conversion was obtained for the ZnO-CuO, which was significantly higher than that obtained with the 10% CuO catalyst used as reference. The catalyst deactivation is related to the dissolution of the metal oxides from the catalyst surface due to the acidic reaction conditions. Generally, the performance of the catalysts was better when the pH of the feed solution was increased.

  5. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes by CCVD of natural gas using hydrotreating catalysts

    Ahmed E. Awadallah

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes have been successfully synthesized using the catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD technique over typical refining hydrotreating catalysts (hydrodesulfurization and hydrodenitrogenation containing Ni–Mo and Co–Mo supported on Al2O3 catalysts at 700°C in a fixed bed horizontal reactor using natural gas as a carbon source. The catalysts and the as-grown CNTs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, HRTEM, X-ray diffraction patterns, EDX and TGA–DTG. The obtained data clarified that the Ni–Mo catalyst gives higher yield, higher purity and selectivity for CNTs compared to Co–Mo catalyst. XRD, TEM and TGA reveal also that the Ni–Mo catalyst produces mostly CNTs with different diameters whereas the Co–Mo catalyst produces largely amorphous carbon.

  6. Gaming control using a wearable and wireless EEG-based brain-computer interface device with novel dry foam-based sensors

    2012-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) is a communication system that can help users interact with the outside environment by translating brain signals into machine commands. The use of electroencephalographic (EEG) signals has become the most common approach for a BCI because of their usability and strong reliability. Many EEG-based BCI devices have been developed with traditional wet- or micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS)-type EEG sensors. However, those traditional sensors have uncomfortable disadvantage and require conductive gel and skin preparation on the part of the user. Therefore, acquiring the EEG signals in a comfortable and convenient manner is an important factor that should be incorporated into a novel BCI device. In the present study, a wearable, wireless and portable EEG-based BCI device with dry foam-based EEG sensors was developed and was demonstrated using a gaming control application. The dry EEG sensors operated without conductive gel; however, they were able to provide good conductivity and were able to acquire EEG signals effectively by adapting to irregular skin surfaces and by maintaining proper skin-sensor impedance on the forehead site. We have also demonstrated a real-time cognitive stage detection application of gaming control using the proposed portable device. The results of the present study indicate that using this portable EEG-based BCI device to conveniently and effectively control the outside world provides an approach for researching rehabilitation engineering. PMID:22284235

  7. Effectiveness of foam-based and traditional green roofs in reducing nitrogen, phosphorus, organic carbon and suspended solids in urban installations

    MacAvoy, S. E.; Mucha, S.; Williamson, G.

    2017-12-01

    While green roofs have well understood benefits for retaining runoff, there is less of a consensus regarding the potential for retaining and absorbing nutrients or suspended solids from roof runoff that would otherwise travel to waterways. Additionally, there are numerous designs, materials and maintenance plans associated with "green" roofs/surfaces that may greatly impact not only their hydrological benefit but also their pollution mitigation potential. Here we examine the NO3, NH4, total organic carbon (TOC), total phosphorus (TP) and total suspended solids (TSS) retention potential from planted and unplanted foam roofs and traditional soil roofs. Direct precipitation, untreated runoff and throughflow from the different roof types were collected for 3 to 11 rain events over a year (depending on roof). Unplanted and traditional roofs reduced TSS by 80% or better relative to runoff. Traditional roofs showed 50% lower TP than runoff or other roof types. TOC was higher than direct precipitation for all treatments, although there were no differences among the treatments themselves. Taken as averages over the 11 events, NO3 and NH4 concentrations were highly variable for runoff and treatments and significant differences were not detected. Preliminary analysis suggests there were no differences between performance of traditional versus foam-based roofs, although a greater sample size is required to be definitive.

  8. A Novel Method for Preparing Auxetic Foam from Closed-cell Polymer Foam Based on Steam Penetration and Condensation (SPC) Process.

    Fan, Donglei; Li, Minggang; Qiu, Jian; Xing, Haiping; Jiang, Zhiwei; Tang, Tao

    2018-05-31

    Auxetic materials are a class of materials possessing negative Poisson's ratio. Here we establish a novel method for preparing auxetic foam from closed-cell polymer foam based on steam penetration and condensation (SPC) process. Using polyethylene (PE) closed-cell foam as an example, the resultant foams treated by SPC process present negative Poisson's ratio during stretching and compression testing. The effect of steam-treated temperature and time on the conversion efficiency of negative Poisson's ratio foam is investigated, and the mechanism of SPC method for forming re-entrant structure is discussed. The results indicate that the presence of enough steam within the cells is a critical factor for the negative Poisson's ratio conversion in the SPC process. The pressure difference caused by steam condensation is the driving force for the conversion from conventional closed-cell foam to the negative Poisson's ratio foam. Furthermore, the applicability of SPC process for fabricating auxetic foam is studied by replacing PE foam by polyvinyl chloride (PVC) foam with closed-cell structure or replacing water steam by ethanol steam. The results verify the universality of SPC process for fabricating auxetic foams from conventional foams with closed-cell structure. In addition, we explored potential application of the obtained auxetic foams by SPC process in the fabrication of shape memory polymer materials.

  9. Adding complex terrain and stable atmospheric condition capability to the OpenFOAM-based flow solver of the simulator for on/offshore wind farm applications (SOWFA

    Churchfield Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Simulator for On/Offshore Wind Farm Applications contains an OpenFOAM-based flow solver for performing large-eddy simulation of flow through wind plants. The solver computes the atmospheric boundary layer flow and models turbines with actuator lines. Until recently, the solver was limited to flows over flat terrain and could only use the standard Smagorinsky subgrid-scale model. In this work, we present our improvements to the flow solver that enable us to 1 use any OpenFOAM-standard subgrid-scale model and 2 simulate flow over complex terrain. We used the flow solver to compute a stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer using both the standard and the Lagrangian-averaged scale-independent dynamic Smagorinsky models. Surprisingly, the results using the standard Smagorinsky model compare well to other researchers' results of the same case, although it is often said that the standard Smagorinsky model is too dissipative for accurate stable stratification calculations. The scale-independent dynamic subgrid-scale model produced poor results, probably due to the spikes in model constant with values as high as 4.6. We applied a simple bounding of the model constant to remove these spikes, which caused the model to produce results much more in line with other researchers' results. We also computed flow over a simple hilly terrain and performed some basic qualitative analysis to verify the proper operation of the terrain-local surface stress model we employed.

  10. Diethyl Ether Production Process with Various Catalyst Type

    Widayat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Several H-zeolite and HZSM-5 catalysts was preparated and their characters have also been investigated. H-zeolit Catalyst was preparated from Natural Zeolite that obtained from Malang District and Gunung Kidul District. Diethyl ether was produced by Ethanol with concentration of 95%. This research use fixed bed reactor that 1 gram of catalyst as bed catalyst, atmospheric pressure and temperature 140oC as the operating condition. Ethanol vapor from vaporization tank was driven by 200 ml/min Nitrogen stream. The responds in this research is liquid product concentration; diethyl ether, ethanol, methanol and water concentration. The results showed that the largest ethanol conversion was produced by the use of 56.44% HZSM-5 and the largest yield of diethyl ether diethyl was produced by the use of alumina and H-zeolite catalyst. The larger ratio between natural zeolite with HCl solvent will produce the larger surface area of catalyst and ethanol conversion. The largest ethanol conversion was produced at reactan ratio 1:20.

  11. Fluid-bed combustion

    Hunt, G.; Schoebotham, N.

    1981-02-01

    In Energy Equipment Company's two-stage fluidized bed system, partial combustion in a fluidized bed is followed by burn-off of the generated gases above the bed. The system can be retrofitted to existing boilers, and can burn small, high ash coal efficiently. It has advantages when used as a hot gas generator for process drying. Tests on a boiler at a Cadbury Schweppes plant are reported.

  12. Fluidised bed combustion system

    McKenzie, E.C.

    1976-01-01

    Fluidized bed combustion systems that facilitates the maintenance of the depth of the bed are described. A discharge pipe projects upwardly into the bed so that bed material can flow into its upper end and escape downwardly. The end of the pipe is surrounded by an enclosure and air is discharged into the enclosure so that material will enter the pipe from within the enclosure and have been cooled in the enclosure by the air discharged into it. The walls of the enclosure may themselves be cooled

  13. Methods of making textured catalysts

    Werpy, Todd [West Richland, WA; Frye, Jr., John G.; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Zacher, Alan H [Kennewick, WA

    2010-08-17

    A textured catalyst having a hydrothermally-stable support, a metal oxide and a catalyst component is described. Methods of conducting aqueous phase reactions that are catalyzed by a textured catalyst are also described. The invention also provides methods of making textured catalysts and methods of making chemical products using a textured catalyst.

  14. Preparation of Pt-SDB hydrophobic catalyst used in H2-H2O isotope exchange reaction

    Li Junhua; Kang Yi; Ruan Hao; Dou Qincheng; Han Yande; Hu Shilin

    2001-01-01

    The preparation of Pt-SDB hydrophobic catalyst is studied, in which platinum as active metal and polystyrene divinylbenzene (SDB) as the carrier. Hydrogen isotope exchange reaction is carried out with Pt-SDB catalyst in counter-current in the trickle bed. The effect of preparing condition on the activity of catalyst is discussed. The results show that the excellent catalyst is obtained by reduced at the temperature of 200 degree C over 8 hours. Hydrophobic catalyst is high activity and stability as the amount of platinum content is 3%, the platinum can reach the economic use with the content of (1-2)%

  15. Alloy catalyst material

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel alloy catalyst material for use in the synthesis of hydrogen peroxide from oxygen and hydrogen, or from oxygen and water. The present invention also relates to a cathode and an electrochemical cell comprising the novel catalyst material, and the process use...... of the novel catalyst material for synthesising hydrogen peroxide from oxygen and hydrogen, or from oxygen and water....

  16. Metal catalysts fight back

    George Marsh

    1998-01-01

    In recent years organometallic catalysts, especially metallocenes, have been a major focus of attention in terms of polymerisation chemistry. But the news earlier this year of a family of iron-based catalysts able to rival the effectiveness of both conventional and metallocene catalysts in the polymerisation of ethylene has excited the plastics industry. Because of the impact of this discovery and its potential as a route to lower-priced commodity plastics in the future, it may be useful at t...

  17. The use of niobium based catalysts for liquid fuel production

    Reguera Frank Martin

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic properties of niobium based catalysts were investigated in the conversion of oleic acid to liquid fuels at atmospheric pressure and at 623 K. The catalytic tests were performed in a fixed bed and continuous flow reactor using an acid to catalyst ratio equal to 4 and N2 as carrier gas. The reaction products were analyzed by gas chromatography and acidity measurements. NH3 temperature programmed desorption, N2 adsorption-desorption (BET method and Xray diffraction were also performed in order to determine the structural and acidic properties of the catalysts. From the catalytic tests, it was detected the formation of compounds in the range of gasoline, diesel and lubricant oils. Higher catalytic activity and selectivity for diesel fuel were observed for the catalysts NbOPO4 and H3PO4/Nb2O5 that possesses higher acidities and surface areas.

  18. Regeneration of a deactivated USY alkylation catalyst using supercritical isobutane

    Daniel M. Ginosar; David N. Ghompson; Kyle C. Burch

    2005-01-01

    Off-line, in-situ alkylation activity recovery from a completely deactivated solid acid catalyst was examined in a continuous-flow reaction system employing supercritical isobutane. A USY zeolite catalyst was initially deactivated during the liquid phase alkylation of butene with isobutane in a single-pass reactor and then varying amounts of alkylation activity were recovered by passing supercritical isobutane over the catalyst bed at different reactivation conditions. Temperature, pressure and regeneration time were found to play important roles in the supercritical isobutane regeneration process when applied to a completely deactivated USY zeolite alkylation catalyst. Manipulation of the variables that influence solvent strength, diffusivity, surface desorption, hydride transfer rates, and coke aging, strongly influence regeneration effectiveness.

  19. Fluidized bed incinerator development

    Ziegler, D.L.; Johnson, A.J.

    1976-01-01

    A fluidized bed incinerator is being developed for burning rad contaminated solid and liquid waste materials. In situ neutralization of acid gases by the bed material, catalytic afterburning, and gas filtration are used to produce a clean flue gas without the use of aqueous scrubbing

  20. Development of polymer catalyst manufacturing technology

    Chung, Heung Seok; Kim, Yong Ik; Lee, Han Soo; Kang, Hui Seok; Seong, Ki Ung; Na, Jeong Won; An, Do Hui; Kim, Kwang Rak; Cho, Young Hyeon; Baek, Seung Uh; Jeong, Yong Won

    1993-01-01

    Heavy water is used as moderator and coolant in Pressurized Heavy Water Power Plants. According to the governmental long-term plan for power supply, Korea is scheduled to construct new six pressurized heavy water power plants till the year 2006. Total heavy water demand for these plants would be 3892 Mg during the period 1992-2006. Reformed hydrogen processes are considered best suited to Korea. Hydrophobic catalysts for this process were manufactured and the performance of hydrogen isotope exchance was investigated. The overall mass transfer coefficients varied between 0.004 and 2.295 m 3 HD/m 3 Bed.sec. and heavy water separation processes using the catalysts were optimized. (Author)

  1. Application and Discussion of Dual Fluidized Bed Reactor in Biomass Energy Utilization

    Guan, Haibin; Fan, Xiaoxu; Zhao, Baofeng; Yang, Liguo; Sun, Rongfeng

    2018-01-01

    As an important clean and renewable energy, biomass has a broad market prospect. The dual fluidized bed is widely used in biomass gasification technology, and has become an important way of biomass high-value utilization. This paper describes the basic principle of dual fluidized bed gasification, from the gas composition, tar content and thermal efficiency of the system point of view, analyzes and summarizes several typical dual fluidized bed biomass gasification technologies, points out the existence of gas mixing, the external heat source, catalyst development problems on gas. Finally, it is clear that the gasification of biomass in dual fluidized bed is of great industrial application and development prospect.

  2. Hydroxide catalysts for lignin depolymerization

    Beckham, Gregg T.; Biddy, Mary J.; Chmely, Stephen C.; Sturgeon, Matthew

    2017-04-25

    Solid base catalysts and their use for the base-catalyzed depolymerization (BCD) of lignin to compounds such as aromatics are presented herein. Exemplary catalysts include layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as recyclable, heterogeneous catalysts for BCD of lignin.

  3. Hydroxide catalysts for lignin depolymerization

    Beckham, Gregg T; Biddy, Mary J.; Kruger, Jacob S.; Chmely, Stephen C.; Sturgeon, Matthew

    2017-10-17

    Solid base catalysts and their use for the base-catalyzed depolymerization (BCD) of lignin to compounds such as aromatics are presented herein. Exemplary catalysts include layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as recyclable, heterogeneous catalysts for BCD of lignin.

  4. Distributed secondary gas injection via a fractal injector : A nature-inspired approach to improving conversion in fluidized bed reactors

    Christensen, D.O.

    2008-01-01

    The conversion in bubbling fluidized bed reactors is suppressed because the interphase mass transfer and gas-solid contact in bubbling fluidized bed reactors are often poor. Most of the gas is present in the form of bubbles, which have low surface-to-volume ratios and are nearly devoid of catalyst

  5. Structured reactors as alternative to pellets catalyst for propane oxidative steam reforming

    Vita, A.; Pino, L.; Cipiti, F.; Lagana, M.; Recupero, V. [CNR - Institute for Advanced Energy Technologies ' ' Nicola Giordano' ' , Via Salita S. Lucia sopra Contesse n. 5, 98126 Messina (Italy)

    2010-09-15

    The performance of a Pt/CeO{sub 2} catalyst as packed bed, coated on monolith and as self-structured bed has been evaluated during C{sub 3}H{sub 8} oxidative steam reforming. Structured bed, prepared by a new aqueous tape casting method, combining high total porosity (80%) with a self-supported channel structure, offers a better and more efficient control of heat and mass transfer along the catalytic bed, showing, especially at high gas hourly space velocity (30 x 10{sup 4} h{sup -1}), better performance in terms of fuel conversion, hydrogen production and low by-products formation coupled with an economy of the catalyst of about to 43% with respect to the traditional packed bed system. (author)

  6. Hydroprocessing catalyst development

    Boorman, P.M.; Kydd, R.A.; Sorensen, T.S.; Chong, K.; Lewis, J.

    1992-08-01

    Co-Mo and Ni-Mo hydroprocessing catalysts were examined for their activity in removal of sulfur from thiophene in model compounds, and in the cracking and hydrocracking of cumene. Three types of support materials were examined: carbon, modified carbon, and carbon covered alumina. The objective of the study was to examine the correlation between catalyst activity in the hydrodenitrogenation of model compounds, and the resistance of the catalyst to nitrogen poisoning during use in the hydroprocessing of gas oils. The use of model compound testing provided information on the individual catalytic reactions promoted by those materials. Infrared spectroscopy was used to study surface species on the catalysts and to explain many of the trends in activity observed, revealing the role of fluoride and phosphorus as a secondary promoter. Testing of the catalysts in hydrotreating of gas oils allowed comparison of model compound results with those from a real feedstock. The gas oil was also spiked with a model nitrogen compound and the results from catalytic hydrotreating of this material were compared with those from unspiked material. A key finding was that the carbon supported catalysts were the most effective in treating high-nitrogen feeds. The very favorable deactivation properties of carbon and carbon-covered alumina supported catalysts make these promising from an industrial point of view where catalyst deactivation is a limiting factor. 171 refs., 25 figs., 43 tabs.

  7. Catalyst for hydrocarbon conversion

    Duhaut, P.; Miquel, J.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given for a catalyst and process for hydrocarbon conversions, e.g., reforming. The catalyst contains an alumina carrier, platinum, iridium, at least one metal selected from uranium, vanadium, and gallium, and optionally halogen in the form of metal halide of one of the aforesaid components. (U.S.)

  8. Catalyst for Ammonia Oxidation

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation, a method for producing a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation and a method for tuning the catalytic activity of a transition metal. By depositing an overlayer of less catalytic active metal onto a more catalytic...

  9. Magnetic catalyst bodies

    Teunissen, Wendy; Bol, A.A.; Geus, John W.

    1999-01-01

    After a discussion about the importance of the size of the catalyst bodies with reactions in the liquid-phase with a suspended catalyst, the possibilities of magnetic separation are dealt with. Deficiencies of the usual ferromagnetic particles are the reactivity and the clustering of the

  10. Reducible oxide based catalysts

    Thompson, Levi T.; Kim, Chang Hwan; Bej, Shyamal K.

    2010-04-06

    A catalyst is disclosed herein. The catalyst includes a reducible oxide support and at least one noble metal fixed on the reducible oxide support. The noble metal(s) is loaded on the support at a substantially constant temperature and pH.

  11. Preparation of hydrophobic Pt-catalysts for decontamination of nuclear effluents

    Ionita, Gh.; Popescu, I.; Retegan, T.; Stefanescu, I.

    2005-01-01

    Based on the long experience of the authors, in the preparation, testing and evaluation of the performances of hydrophobic catalysts, and based on the reviewed references, this paper presents up-to-date R and D activities on the preparation methods and applications of the hydrophobic catalysts, in deuterium and tritium separation. The objectives of the paper are: (1) to provide a database for selection of the most appropriate catalyst and catalytic packing for above mentioned processes, (2) to evaluate the potentiality of hydrophobic Pt-catalysts in the deuterium and tritium separation (3) to asses and to find a new procedure for preparation a new improved hydrophobic catalyst. The merits of the hydrophobic catalysts are shown in comparison to hydrophilic catalysts. As results of the review some general conclusions about the applications of hydrophobic catalysts in environmental field are as follow: (1) the hydrophobic Pt-catalysts packed in the trickle bed reactors showed a high catalytic activity and long stability; (2) the utilization of the hydrophobic Pt-catalysts for tritium removal from liquid and gaseous effluent in nuclear field was entirely confirmed on industrial scale; (3) the extension of the utilization of the hydrophobic Pt-catalysts in other new processes, which take place in presence of liquid water or high humidity are subjected to testing. (author)

  12. The deuterium-exchange reaction between water and hydrogen with the thin-film hydrophobic catalyst

    Yamashita, Hisao; Mizumoto, Mamoru; Matsuda, Shimpei

    1985-01-01

    The deuterium-exchange reaction between water and hydrogen with a hydrophobic catalyst was studied. The hydrophobic catalyst was composed of platinum as an active component and porous poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) as a support. The PTFE support was in two forms, i.e., (a) a pellet and (b) a thin-film with the thickness of 50 μm. The primary purpose of the thin film hydrophobic catalyst was to reduce the platinum usage in the reactor. The activity of the catalyst was measured in a trickle bed reactor at atmospheric pressure and temperature of 20 ∼ 70 deg C. It has been found that the employment of the thin-film catalyst reduced the platinum usage to 1/5 of the reactor in the case of using a conventional catalyst. Platinum particles on the thin-film catalyst work efficiently because the reactants were easily diffused to the active sites. It has also been found that the isotopic exchange rate with the thin-film catalyst increased with the increase in the ratio of liquid/gas and increased with the rise of the reaction temperature. It was found from an endurance test that the activity of the thin-film catalyst decreased gradually due to the condensation of water vapor in the catalyst, but was regenarated by heating the catalyst to remove the condensed water. (author)

  13. Preparation of hydrophobic Pt-catalysts for decontamination of nuclear effluents

    Ionita, Gh.; Popescu, I.; Retegan, T.; Stefanescu, I.

    2004-01-01

    Based on the long experience of the authors, in the preparation, testing and evaluation of the performances of hydrophobic catalysts, and based on the reviewed references, this paper presents up-to-date R and D activities on the preparation methods and applications of the hydrophobic catalysts, in deuterium and tritium separation. The objectives of the paper are: - to provide a database for selection of the most appropriate catalyst and catalytic packing for above mentioned processes; - to evaluate the potentiality of hydrophobic Pt-catalysts in the deuterium and tritium separation; - to assess and to find a new procedure for preparation a new improved hydrophobic catalyst. The merits of the hydrophobic catalysts are shown in comparison to hydrophilic catalysts. As results of the review some general conclusions about the applications of hydrophobic catalysts in environmental field are as follows: - the hydrophobic Pt-catalysts packed in the trickle bed reactors showed a high catalytic activity and long stability; - the utilization of the hydrophobic Pt-catalysts for tritium removal from liquid and gaseous effluent in nuclear field was entirely confirmed on industrial scale; - the extension of the utilization of the hydrophobic Pt-catalysts in other new processes, which take place in presence of liquid water or high humidity are subject to testing. (authors)

  14. Current status for applications of hydrophobic platinum catalysts in tritium removal from nuclear effluents

    Vagner, Irina; Ionita, Gheorghe; Varlam, Carmen

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Based on the long experience of the authors, in the preparation, testing and evaluation of the performances of hydrophobic catalysts, and based on the reviewed references, this paper presents up-to-date R and D results on the preparation methods and applications of the hydrophobic catalysts, in deuterium and tritium separation. The objectives of the paper are: 1. to provide a database for selection of the most appropriate catalyst and catalytic packing for above mentioned processes; 2. to evaluate the potentiality of hydrophobic Pt-catalysts in the deuterium and tritium separation; 3. to assess and find a new procedure for preparation of a new improved hydrophobic catalyst. The merits of the hydrophobic catalysts are shown in comparison to hydrophilic catalysts. As results of the review some general conclusions about the applications of hydrophobic catalysts in environmental field are as follow: 1. the hydrophobic Pt-catalysts packed in the trickle bed reactors showed a high catalytic activity and long stability; 2. the utilization of the hydrophobic Pt-catalysts for tritium removal from liquid and gaseous effluent in nuclear field was entirely confirmed on industrial scale; 3. the extension of the utilization of the hydrophobic Pt-catalysts to other new processes, which take place in presence of liquid water or high humidity, like VOCs oxidation from wastewater or H 2 -O 2 catalytic recombination, are subject to testing

  15. Influence of Steam Reforming Catalyst Geometry on the Performance of Tubular Reformer – Simulation Calculations

    Franczyk Ewelina

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A proper selection of steam reforming catalyst geometry has a direct effect on the efficiency and economy of hydrogen production from natural gas and is a very important technological and engineering issue in terms of process optimisation. This paper determines the influence of widely used seven-hole grain diameter (ranging from 11 to 21 mm, h/d (height/diameter ratio of catalyst grain and Sh/St (hole surface/total cylinder surface in cross-section ratio (ranging from 0.13 to 0.37 on the gas load of catalyst bed, gas flow resistance, maximum wall temperature and the risk of catalyst coking. Calculations were based on the one-dimensional pseudo-homogeneous model of a steam reforming tubular reactor, with catalyst parameters derived from our investigations. The process analysis shows that it is advantageous, along the whole reformer tube length, to apply catalyst forms of h/d = 1 ratio, relatively large dimensions, possibly high bed porosity and Sh/St ≈ 0.30-0.37 ratio. It enables a considerable process intensification and the processing of more natural gas at the same flow resistance, despite lower bed activity, without catalyst coking risk. Alternatively, plant pressure drop can be reduced maintaining the same gas load, which translates directly into diminishing the operating costs as a result of lowering power consumption for gas compression.

  16. Bed Bugs FAQs

    ... Europe. Bed bugs have been found in five-star hotels and resorts and their presence is not ... Health – Division of Parasitic Diseases Email Recommend Tweet YouTube Instagram Listen Watch RSS ABOUT About CDC Jobs ...

  17. Bed Bug Information Clearinghouse

    Its purpose is to help states, communities, and consumers in efforts to prevent and control bed bug infestations. Currently includes only reviewed material from federal/state/local government agencies, extension services, and universities.

  18. Particle fuel bed tests

    Horn, F.L.; Powell, J.R.; Savino, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Gas-cooled reactors, using packed beds of small diameter coated fuel particles have been proposed for compact, high-power systems. The particulate fuel used in the tests was 800 microns in diameter, consisting of a thoria kernel coated with 200 microns of pyrocarbon. Typically, the bed of fuel particles was contained in a ceramic cylinder with porous metallic frits at each end. A dc voltage was applied to the metallic frits and the resulting electric current heated the bed. Heat was removed by passing coolant (helium or hydrogen) through the bed. Candidate frit materials, rhenium, nickel, zirconium carbide, and zirconium oxide were unaffected, while tungsten and tungsten-rhenium lost weight and strength. Zirconium-carbide particles were tested at 2000 K in H 2 for 12 hours with no visible reaction or weight loss

  19. Catalysts, methods of making catalysts, and methods of use

    Renard, Laetitia; El Eter, Mohamad; Caps, Valerie; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for catalysts, methods of making catalysts, methods of using catalysts, and the like. In an embodiment, the method of making the catalysts can be performed in a single step with a metal nanoparticle precursor and a metal oxide precursor, where a separate stabilizing agent is not needed.

  20. Catalysts, methods of making catalysts, and methods of use

    Renard, Laetitia

    2014-03-06

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for catalysts, methods of making catalysts, methods of using catalysts, and the like. In an embodiment, the method of making the catalysts can be performed in a single step with a metal nanoparticle precursor and a metal oxide precursor, where a separate stabilizing agent is not needed.

  1. An assessment on preparation methods and applications of hydrophobic Pt-catalyst in nuclear and environmental field

    Ionita, Gh.; Stefanescu, I.; Varlam, Carmen

    2001-01-01

    Based on the long experience of the authors in the preparation, testing and evaluation of the performances of hydrophobic catalysts and based on the reviewed references, this paper presents up-to-date R and D activities on the preparation and application of hydrophobic catalysts for use in nuclear and environmental fields. Unlike the conventional hydrophilic catalysts, the hydrophobic catalysts repel the liquid water and allow the transport of the gaseous reactants and reaction products to and from catalytic active centers. For deuterium and tritium separation, over one hundred hydrophobic catalyst types have been prepared in different experimental conditions and by a large diversity of wet proofing methods. The influence of about twenty parameters on catalytic activity have been also studied. The purpose of this paper is: (1) to provide a database for preparation and selection of he most appropriate method for preparing an active hydrophobic catalyst, (2) to show how to use the hydrophobic catalyst and how to operate efficiently the reactor packed with hydrophobic catalyst, (3) to evaluate the performances and potentiality of hydrophobic catalysts in nuclear and environmental field, (4) evaluation of applications of hydrophobic catalysts in nuclear and environmental fields. As result, the following categories are shown: (1) the hydrophobic catalysts based on platinum and Teflon as wet-proofing proved to have the highest activity and the longest stability, (2) the utilization of hydrophobic catalyst as ordered mixed catalytic packing in the trickle bed or separated bed reactors is more efficient and has been entirely proved on industrial scale for tritium separation process, (3) the extension of the applications of hydrophobic catalysts for other processes which take place in the presence of saturated humidity or liquid water in environmental protection field. The merits of hydrophobic Pt-catalysts for tritium separation are discussed in comparison to other

  2. Catalyst in Basic Oleochemicals

    Eva Suyenty

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Currently Indonesia is the world largest palm oil producer with production volume reaching 16 million tones per annum. The high crude oil and ethylene prices in the last 3 – 4 years contribute to the healthy demand growth for basic oleochemicals: fatty acids and fatty alcohols. Oleochemicals are starting to replace crude oil derived products in various applications. As widely practiced in petrochemical industry, catalyst plays a very important role in the production of basic oleochemicals. Catalytic reactions are abound in the production of oleochemicals: Nickel based catalysts are used in the hydrogenation of unsaturated fatty acids; sodium methylate catalyst in the transesterification of triglycerides; sulfonic based polystyrene resin catalyst in esterification of fatty acids; and copper chromite/copper zinc catalyst in the high pressure hydrogenation of methyl esters or fatty acids to produce fatty alcohols. To maintain long catalyst life, it is crucial to ensure the absence of catalyst poisons and inhibitors in the feed. The preparation methods of nickel and copper chromite catalysts are as follows: precipitation, filtration, drying, and calcinations. Sodium methylate is derived from direct reaction of sodium metal and methanol under inert gas. The sulfonic based polystyrene resin is derived from sulfonation of polystyrene crosslinked with di-vinyl-benzene. © 2007 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.[Presented at Symposium and Congress of MKICS 2007, 18-19 April 2007, Semarang, Indonesia][How to Cite: E. Suyenty, H. Sentosa, M. Agustine, S. Anwar, A. Lie, E. Sutanto. (2007. Catalyst in Basic Oleochemicals. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 2 (2-3: 22-31.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.2.2-3.6.22-31][How to Link/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.2.2-3.6.22-31 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/6

  3. ALKALI RESISTANT CATALYST

    2008-01-01

    The present invention concerns the selective removal of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from gasses. In particular, the invention concerns a process, a catalyst and the use of a catalyst for the selective removal of nitrogen oxides in the presence of ammonia from gases containing a significant amount...... of alkali metal and/or alkali-earth compounds which process comprises using a catalyst combined of (i) a formed porous superacidic support, said superacidic support having an Hammett acidity stronger than Ho=-12, and (ii) a metal oxide catalytic component deposited on said superacidic support selected from...

  4. Effects of the gas-liquid ratio on the optimum catalyst quantity for the CECE process with a homogeneously packed LPCE column

    Sugiyama, T.; Ushida, A.; Yamamoto, I.

    2008-01-01

    In order to improve the separative performance of a combined electrolysis catalytic exchange (CECE) process, we have carried out experimental studies on hydrogen isotope separation by a CECE process using a liquid phase catalytic exchange (LPCE) column of trickle-type packed beds. Two types of trickle beds were tested in our previous study. One was the layered bed, where layers of Kogel catalysts and Dixon gauze rings were alternately filled in the column. The other was the homogeneous bed, where Kogel catalysts and Dixon gauze rings were homogeneously mixed and filled in the column. We found that (1) the homogeneously packed bed was more efficient than the layered packed bed, and (2) the catalyst quantity was optimal, which resulted in the highest separative performance. In this study, the effect of the gas-liquid ratio (G/L) on the optimum catalyst quantity was studied experimentally in a homogeneously packed bed. When the value of G/L was 1.7, total separation factors were relatively small and the optimum catalyst quantity could not be determined. On the other hand, when the values of G/L were 0.9 and 0.7, the values of the total separation factors had maximums and the optimal quantities of the catalyst were clearly obtained

  5. Advanced Catalysis Technologies: Lanthanum Cerium Manganese Hexaaluminate Combustion Catalysts for Flat Plate Reactor for Compact Steam Reformers

    2008-12-01

    packed-bed steam reformer reactor using an open-flame or radiant burner as the heat source, the rate of heat transfer is limited by wall film and bed...resistances. Heat transfer can be effectively improved by replacing the burner /packed-bed system with parallel channels containing metal foam...combustion reactor was tested using the hexaaluminate catalyst in pellets and supported on FeCrAlloy metal foam. Both tests burned propane and JP-8

  6. Shouldn't catalysts shape up?

    Kreutzer, Michiel T.; Kapteijn, Freek; Moulijn, Jacob A. [Reactor and Catalysis Engineering, DelftChemTech, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 136, 2628 BL Delft (Netherlands)

    2006-01-15

    In this paper, the advantage of structuring catalytic reactors is discussed. In structured systems, the exact shape of all column internals is determined by design rather than chance. This results in two advantages for the engineer in charge of designing a reactor: (1) the structuring introduces additional characteristic length scales, leading to new degrees of freedom that allow decoupling of phenomena that otherwise would need a sub-optimal compromise and (2) full control over the entire geometry results in higher precision. Taking full control over the geometry boosts performance, especially if the catalyst is tailored to the reactor design. The monolith structure is the best-known example of a structured catalyst. We discuss the industrial benefits and practical pitfalls of this honeycomb of parallel capillaries that allows the advantages of microfluidics to be applied on an enormous scale. In this paper it is argued that the monolith is most suitable for processes that are (1) stable enough for packed-bed operation and (2) need better mass transfer than can be obtained in any conventional reactor, including the trickle bed and the stirred tank reactor. This includes several large-scale processes such as HDS. Fine chemical synthesis, where the objective of robust scale-up and predictability will never be met using stirred tanks, may equally benefit from the scalable ultra-high mass transfer that is obtained in monoliths.

  7. Catalysts at work: From integral to spatially resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Kimmerle, B.; Baiker, A.

    2009-01-01

    available techniques, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a well-suited tool for this purpose as the different selected examples highlight. Two different techniques, scanning and full-field X-ray microscopy/tomography, are described and compared. At first, the tomographic structure of impregnated alumina...... pellets is presented using full-field transmission microtomography and compared to the results obtained with a scanning X-ray microbeam technique to analyse the catalyst bed inside a catalytic quartz glass reactor. On the other hand, by using XAS in scanning microtomography, the structure...... metal-based catalysts. In order to obtain spectroscopic information on the spatial variation of the oxidation state of the catalyst inside the reactor XAS spectra were recorded by scanning with a micro-focussed beam along the catalyst bed. Alternatively, full-field transmission imaging was used...

  8. Catalyst for microelectromechanical systems microreactors

    Morse, Jeffrey D [Martinez, CA; Sopchak, David A [Livermore, CA; Upadhye, Ravindra S [Pleasanton, CA; Reynolds, John G [San Ramon, CA; Satcher, Joseph H [Patterson, CA; Gash, Alex E [Brentwood, CA

    2010-06-29

    A microreactor comprising a silicon wafer, a multiplicity of microchannels in the silicon wafer, and a catalyst coating the microchannels. In one embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a nanostructured material. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises an aerogel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a solgel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises carbon nanotubes.

  9. Epoxidation catalyst and process

    Linic, Suljo; Christopher, Phillip

    2010-10-26

    Disclosed herein is a catalytic method of converting alkenes to epoxides. This method generally includes reacting alkenes with oxygen in the presence of a specific silver catalyst under conditions suitable to produce a yield of the epoxides. The specific silver catalyst is a silver nanocrystal having a plurality of surface planes, a substantial portion of which is defined by Miller indices of (100). The reaction is performed by charging a suitable reactor with this silver catalyst and then feeding the reactants to the reactor under conditions to carry out the reaction. The reaction may be performed in batch, or as a continuous process that employs a recycle of any unreacted alkenes. The specific silver catalyst has unexpectedly high selectivity for epoxide products. Consequently, this general method (and its various embodiments) will result in extraordinarily high epoxide yields heretofore unattainable.

  10. Catalytic combustion of particulate matter Catalysts of alkaline nitrates supported on hydrous zirconium

    Galdeano, N.F.; Carrascull, A.L.; Ponzi, M.I.; Lick, I.D.; Ponzi, E.N.

    2004-01-01

    In order to explore a method to remove particulate matter, catalysts of different alkaline nitrates (Li, K and Cs) supported on hydrous zirconium were prepared by the method of incipient humidity and tested as catalysts for particulate matter combustion. The catalytic activity was determined by using the temperature programmed oxidation technique (TPO), utilizing two equipments, a thermogravimetric reactor and other of fixed bed. In the first case the particulate matter/catalyst mixture was milled carefully in a mortar (tight contact) while in the second case more realistic operative conditions were used, particulate matter/catalyst mixture was made with a spatula (loose contact). All prepared catalysts showed good activity for the particulate matter combustion. The cesium catalyst was the one that presented higher activity, decreasing the combustion temperature between 200 and 250 deg. C with respect to the combustion without catalyst. The catalyst with lithium nitrate became active at higher temperature than its melting point and the same occurred with the potassium catalyst. This did not occur for the catalyst containing cesium nitrate that melts at 407 deg. C and became active from 350 deg. C

  11. Pebble-bed reactor

    Lohnert, G.; Mueller-Frank, U.; Heil, J.

    1976-01-01

    A pebble-bed nuclear reactor of large power rating comprises a container having a funnel-shaped bottom forming a pebble run-out having a centrally positioned outlet. A bed of downwardly-flowing substantially spherical nuclear fuel pebbles is positioned in the container and forms a reactive nuclear core maintained by feeding unused pebbles to the bed's top surface while used or burned-out pebbles run out and discharge through the outlet. A substantially conical body with its apex pointing upwardly and its periphery spaced from the periphery of the container spreads the bottom of the bed outwardly to provide an annular flow down the funnel-shaped bottom forming the runout, to the discharge outlet. This provides a largely constant downward velocity of the spheres throughout the diameter of the bed throughout a substantial portion of the down travel, so that all spheres reach about the same burned-out condition when they leave the core, after a single pass through the core area

  12. Fluidised bed heat exchangers

    Elliott, D.E.; Healey, E.M.; Roberts, A.G.

    1974-01-01

    Problems that have arisen during the initial stages of development of fluidised bed boilers in which heat transfer surfaces are immersed in fluidised solids are discussed. The very high heat transfer coefficients that are obtained under these conditions can be exploited to reduce the total heat transfer surface to a fraction of that in normal boilers. However, with the high heat flux levels involved, tube stressing becomes more important and it is advantageous to use smaller diameter tubes. One of the initial problems was that the pumping power absorbed by the fluidised bed appeared to be high. The relative influence of the fluidising velocity (and the corresponding bed area), tube diameter, tube spacing, heat transfer coefficient and bed temperature on pumping power and overall cost was determined. This showed the importance of close tube packing and research was undertaken to see if this would adversely affect the heat transfer coefficient. Pressure operation also reduces the pumping power. Fouling and corrosion tests in beds burning coal suggest that higher temperatures could be reached reliably and cost studies show that, provided the better refractory metals are used, the cost of achieving higher temperatures is not unduly high. It now remains to demonstrate at large scale that the proposed systems are viable and that the methods incorporated to overcome start up and part lead running problems are satisfactory. The promising role of these heat transfer techniques in other applications is briefly discussed

  13. Application of hydrophobic Pt catalysts in hydrogen isotopes separation from nuclear effluents

    Ionita, G.; Popescu, I.; Stefanescu, I.; Retegan, T. [National Institute of Cryogenics and Isotopic Separation (Romania)

    2003-09-01

    According to reviewed references and to tests effected by authors the platinum/carbon/teflon is the most active and the most stable catalyst for removal of tritium from nuclear effluents by isotopic exchange between hydrogen and liquid water. To improve the performances of process it is recommended to use the catalyst as ordered or random mixed catalytic packing in a trickle bed reactor. (O.M.)

  14. Radioisotopic investigations of catalyst motion in the process of fluidal catalytic cracking

    Dalecki, W.; Bazaniak, Z.; Palige, J.; Michalik, J.

    1981-01-01

    By radioisotopic method the dynamic characteristics of reactor and regenerator of fluidal mode of catalytic cracking have been determined. Average times of catalyst staying, distribution of residence times, mass of catalyst circulating in installation, mass intensity of flow and height of fluidal bed have been estimated. It has been found a considerable participation of process of ideal mixing in the operation of both aggregates, what is particularly disadvantageous in the case of regenerator. (author)

  15. Preparation, characterization and testing of SiC-based catalytic sponges as structured catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    Baudry, A.; Schaub, G. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). Engler-Bunte-Inst.

    2011-07-01

    Solid sponges (open-cell foams) may be used as catalyst support, due to favorable thermal properties and low pressure drop. As an example, they may lead to improved temperature control in Fischer-Tropsch applications, if compared to fixed beds of catalyst particles. The aim of this study was to develop and test a wet method for impregnating ceramic foam materials with a CoRe/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. Defined catalyst layers were generated on 20 ppi SiC-sponges. Resulting catalytic activities are nearly identical to those of the corresponding powder catalyst material. The difference observed can be explained by either mass transfer limitation or backmixing in the fixed bed configuration used. (orig.)

  16. Chemisorption of oxygen by coke deposited on catalyst surface

    Furimsky, E.; Duguay, D.G.; Houle, J.

    1988-02-01

    Chemisorption of oxygen by nickel molybdate catalyst used for hydrotreating heavy oils was shown to increase with increasing temperature and reached a maximum at about 270 degrees C. Yields of CO/sub 2/, CO and SO/sub 2/ formed during isothermal chemisorption were estimated by using a fixed-bed reactor. Experimental observations were interpreted in terms of a hydrocarbon autoxidation mechanism. 11 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Development of Molecular Catalysts to Bridge the Gap between Heterogeneous and Homogeneous Catalysts

    Ye, Rong

    Catalysts, heterogeneous, homogeneous, and enzymatic, are comprised of nanometer-sized inorganic and/or organic components. They share molecular factors including charge, coordination, interatomic distance, bonding, and orientation of catalytically active atoms. By controlling the governing catalytic components and molecular factors, catalytic processes of a multichannel and multiproduct nature could be run in all three catalytic platforms to create unique end-products. Unifying the fields of catalysis is the key to achieving the goal of 100% selectivity in catalysis. Recyclable catalysts, especially those that display selective reactivity, are vital for the development of sustainable chemical processes. Among available catalyst platforms, heterogeneous catalysts are particularly well-disposed toward separation from the reaction mixture via filtration methods, which renders them readily recyclable. Furthermore, heterogeneous catalysts offer numerous handles - some without homogeneous analogues - for performance and selectivity optimization. These handles include nanoparticle size, pore profile of porous supports, surface ligands and interface with oxide supports, and flow rate through a solid catalyst bed. Despite these available handles, however, conventional heterogeneous catalysts are themselves often structurally heterogeneous compared to homogeneous catalysts, which complicates efforts to optimize and expand the scope of their reactivity and selectivity. Ongoing efforts are aimed to address the above challenge by heterogenizing homogeneous catalysts, which can be defined as the modification of homogeneous catalysts to render them in a separable (solid) phase from the starting materials and products. Specifically, we grow the small nanoclusters in dendrimers, a class of uniform polymers with the connectivity of fractal trees and generally radial symmetry. Thanks to their dense multivalency, shape persistence and structural uniformity, dendrimers have proven to

  18. in Spouted Bed

    Bronislaw Buczek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Samples of active coke, fresh and spent after cleaning flue gases from communal waste incinerators, were investigated. The outer layers of both coke particles were separately removed by comminution in a spouted bed. The samples of both active cokes were analysed by means of densities, mercury porosimetry, and adsorption technique. Remaining cores were examined to determine the degree of consumption of coke by the sorption of hazardous emissions (SO2, HCl, and heavy metals through its bed. Differences in contamination levels within the porous structure of the particles were estimated. The study demonstrated the effectiveness of commercial active coke in the cleaning of flue gases.

  19. The Safety of Hospital Beds

    Gervais, Pierre; Pooler, Charlotte; Merryweather, Andrew; Doig, Alexa K.; Bloswick, Donald

    2015-01-01

    To explore the safety of the standard and the low hospital bed, we report on a microanalysis of 15 patients’ ability to ingress, move about the bed, and egress. The 15 participants were purposefully selected with various disabilities. Bed conditions were randomized with side rails up or down and one low bed with side rails down. We explored the patients’ use of the side rails, bed height, ability to lift their legs onto the mattress, and ability to turn, egress, and walk back to the chair. The standard bed was too high for some participants, both for ingress and egress. Side rails were used by most participants when entering, turning in bed, and exiting. We recommend that side rails be reconsidered as a means to facilitate in-bed movement, ingress, and egress. Furthermore, single deck height settings for all patients are not optimal. Low beds as a safety measure must be re-evaluated. PMID:28462302

  20. Method of working thick beds

    Giezynski, A; Bialasik, A; Krawiec, A; Wylenzek, A

    1981-12-30

    The patented method of working thick coal beds in layers consists of creating in the collapsed rocks or from the fill material a bearing rock plate by strengthening these rocks with a hardening composition made of wastes of raw material, resin and water injected into the rock through wells. The difference in the suggestion is that through boreholes drilled in the lower part of the rock roofing on a previously calculated network, a solution is regularly injected which consists of dust wastes obtained in electric filters during production of clinker from mineral raw material in a quantity of 60-70% by volume, wastes of open-hearth production in a quantity of 15-20% and natural sand in a quantity of 15-20%, and water in a quantity of 35-55% of the volume of mineral components. In the second variant, the injected compostion contains: wastes from production of clinker 55-57%, open-hearth wastes 20-23%, natural sand 12-14%, asbestos fine particles 7-8% and water 38-45% of the volume of mineral components. In addition, the difference is that in the boreholes drilled in the coal block directly under the roofing, a composition is injected which consists of natural sand and catalyst in the form of powder and individually supplied liquid synthetic resin in a quantity of 3-5% by weight in relation to the sand. The hardening time with normal temperature is 1-1.5 h, after which strength is reached of 80 kg-f/cm/sup 2/.

  1. Apparatus for controlling fluidized beds

    Rehmat, A.G.; Patel, J.G.

    1987-05-12

    An apparatus and process are disclosed for control and maintenance of fluidized beds under non-steady state conditions. An ash removal conduit is provided for removing solid particulates from a fluidized bed separate from an ash discharge conduit in the lower portion of the grate supporting such a bed. The apparatus and process of this invention is particularly suitable for use in ash agglomerating fluidized beds and provides control of the fluidized bed before ash agglomeration is initiated and during upset conditions resulting in stable, sinter-free fluidized bed maintenance. 2 figs.

  2. Fluidized bed calciner

    Sheely, W.F.

    1986-01-01

    A unique way to convert radioactive scrap into useful nuclear fuel products was developed for the Department of Energy at Hanford. An advanced, fluidized bed calciner is used to convert metallic nitrate scrap or waste solutions into benign, solid and gaseous products. There are broad potential applications of this concept beyond those in the nuclear industry

  3. Nail Bed Injuries

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Nail Bed Injuries Email to a friend * required ...

  4. Bed Bug Myths

    Learn the truth about bed bugs, such as how easy they are to see with the naked eye, their preferred habitat, whether they transmit diseases, their public health effects, and whether pesticides are the best way to deal with an infestation.

  5. Removal of carbonaceous deposits from the surface of cobalt-molybdate catalyst via oxidative regeneration

    Yoshimura, Y.; Furimsky, E.

    1986-10-01

    The oxidative regeneration of cobalt-molybdate catalyst used during the hydrodeoxygenation of a phenol solution and for hydrotreatment of Athabasca bitumen was carried out in a fixed-bed reactor. SO/sub 2/, CO and CO/sub 2/ were analysed as the major products. The surface area of the spent catalysts was the main factor influencing the initial rate of regeneration, i.e. the greater the surface area the higher the initial rate. A mechanism proposed includes 12 reactions which may play an important role in the overall burn-off of hydrotreatment catalysts. 10 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Selectivity and Activity of Iron Molybdate Catalysts in Oxidation of Methanol

    Khalid Khazzal Hummadi; Karim H. Hassan; Phillip C.H. Mitchell

    2009-01-01

    The selectivity and activity of iron molybdate catalysts prepared by different methods are compared with those of a commercial catalyst in the oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde in a continuous tubular bed reactor at 200-350 oC (473-623 oK), 10 atm (1013 kPa), with a methanol-oxygen mixture fixed at 5.5% by volume methanol: air ratio. The iron(III) molybdate catalyst prepared by co-precipitation and filtration had a selectivity towards formaldehyde in methanol oxidation comparable with a c...

  7. Correlation between Fischer-Tropsch catalytic activity and composition of catalysts

    Subbarao Duvvuri

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper presents the synthesis and characterization of monometallic and bimetallic cobalt and iron nanoparticles supported on alumina. The catalysts were prepared by a wet impregnation method. Samples were characterized using temperature-programmed reduction (TPR, temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO, CO-chemisorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM-EDX and N2-adsorption analysis. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS was carried out in a fixed-bed microreactor at 543 K and 1 atm, with H2/CO = 2 v/v and space velocity, SV = 12L/g.h. The physicochemical properties and the FTS activity of the bimetallic catalysts were analyzed and compared with those of monometallic cobalt and iron catalysts at similar operating conditions. H2-TPR analysis of cobalt catalyst indicated three temperature regions at 506°C (low, 650°C (medium and 731°C (high. The incorporation of iron up to 30% into cobalt catalysts increased the reduction, CO chemisorption and number of cobalt active sites of the catalyst while an opposite trend was observed for the iron-riched bimetallic catalysts. The CO conversion was 6.3% and 4.6%, over the monometallic cobalt and iron catalysts, respectively. Bimetallic catalysts enhanced the CO conversion. Amongst the catalysts studied, bimetallic catalyst with the composition of 70Co30Fe showed the highest CO conversion (8.1% while exhibiting the same product selectivity as that of monometallic Co catalyst. Monometallic iron catalyst showed the lowest selectivity for C5+ hydrocarbons (1.6%.

  8. 7 CFR 2902.15 - Bedding, bed linens, and towels.

    2010-01-01

    ... PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 2902.15 Bedding, bed linens, and towels. (a) Definition. (1) Bedding is that... minimum biobased content is 12 percent and shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in..., and silk are not qualifying biobased feedstocks for the purpose of determining the biobased content of...

  9. Niobium, catalyst repair kit

    Tanabe, K.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that niobium oxides, when small amounts are added to known catalysts, enhance catalytic activity and selectivity and prolong catalyst life. Moreover, niobium oxides exhibit a pronounced effect as supports of metal or metal oxide catalysts. Recently we found that the surface acidity of hydrated niobium pentoxide, niobic acid (Nb 2 O 5 · nH 2 O), corresponds to the acidity of 70% sulfuric acid and exhibits high catalytic activity, selectivity, and stability for acid-catalyzed reactions in which water molecules participate. Although there are few differences in electronegativity and ionic radius between niobium and its neighbors in the periodic table, it is interesting that the promoter effect, support effect, and acidic nature of niobium compounds are quite different from those of compounds of the surrounding elements. Here we review what's known of niobium compounds from the viewpoint of their pronounced catalytic behavior

  10. Nature and characteristics of pulsing flow in trickle-bed reactors

    Boelhouwer, J.G.; Piepers, H.W.; Drinkenburg, A.A.H.

    2002-01-01

    Pulsing flow is well known for its advantages in terms of an increase in mass and heat transfer rates, complete catalyst wetting and a decrease in axial dispersion compared to trickle flow. The operation of a trickle-bed reactor in the pulsing flow regime is favorable in terms of a capacity increase

  11. VA National Bed Control System

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The VA National Bed Control System records the levels of operating, unavailable and authorized beds at each VAMC, and it tracks requests for changes in these levels....

  12. Getting Rid of Bed Bugs

    ... Directory Planning, Budget and Results Jobs and Internships Headquarters Offices Regional Offices Labs and Research Centers Bed ... to be careful in how you select a company. Related Information Collaborative Strategy on Bed Bugs - highlights ...

  13. Performance characterization of hydrogen isotope exchange and recombination catalysts for tritium processing

    Suppiah, S.; Ryland, D.; Marcinkowska, K.; Boniface, H.; Everatt, A.

    2010-01-01

    AECL's hydrogen isotope exchange catalyst and recombination catalysts have been successfully applied to a wide range of industrial tritium-removal applications. The catalysts are used for Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange (LPCE) and for gas-phase and trickle-bed recombination of hydrogen isotopes and have led to process simplification, improved safety and operational advantages. Catalyst performance design equations derived from laboratory testing of these catalysts have been validated against performance under industrial conditions. In a Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange (CECE) demonstration plant analyses of LPCE and recombiner efficiency were carried out as a function of catalyst activity over a wide range of operation. A steady-state process simulation used to model and design the hydrogen-water isotopic exchange processes, such as the CECE detritiation plant, was validated using the results of this demonstration. Catalyst development for isotope-exchange and recombination applications has continued over the last decade. As a result, significant improvements in catalyst performance have been achieved for these applications. This paper outlines the uniqueness of AECL's specialized catalysts and process designs for these applications with examples from laboratory and industrial case studies.

  14. Dynamics of Catalyst Nanoparticles

    Hansen, Thomas Willum; Cavalca, Filippo; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    and pharmaceuticals, and the cleanup of exhaust from automobiles and stationary power plants. Sintering, or thermal deactivation, is an important mechanism for the loss of catalyst activity. In order to initiate a systematic study of the dynamics and sintering of nanoparticles, various catalytic systems have been...... under gas exposure, dynamic phenomena such as sintering and growth can be observed with sub-Ångstrøm resolution. Metal nanoparticles contain the active sites in heterogeneous catalysts, which are important for many industrial applications including the production of clean fuels, chemicals...

  15. Fuel cell catalyst degradation

    Arenz, Matthias; Zana, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Fuel cells are an important piece in our quest for a sustainable energy supply. Although there are several different types of fuel cells, the by far most popular is the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Among its many favorable properties are a short start up time and a high power density...... increasing focus. Activity of the catalyst is important, but stability is essential. In the presented perspective paper, we review recent efforts to investigate fuel cell catalysts ex-situ in electrochemical half-cell measurements. Due to the amount of different studies, this review has no intention to give...

  16. Using atomic layer deposited tungsten to increase thermal conductivity of a packed bed

    Van Norman, Staci A.; Falconer, John L.; Weimer, Alan W., E-mail: alan.weimer@colorado.edu [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Colorado, UCB 596, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0596 (United States); Tringe, Joseph W.; Sain, John D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Yang, Ronggui [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado, UCB 427, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0427 (United States)

    2015-04-13

    This study investigated the effective thermal conductivity (k{sub eff}) of packed-beds that contained porous particles with nanoscale tungsten (W) films of different thicknesses formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD). A continuous film on the particles is vital towards increasing k{sub eff} of the packed beds. For example, the k{sub eff} of an alumina packed bed was increased by three times after an ∼8-nm continuous W film with 20 cycles of W ALD, whereas k{sub eff} was decreased on a polymer packed bed with discontinuous, evenly dispersed W-islands due to nanoparticle scattering of phonons. For catalysts, understanding the thermal properties of these packed beds is essential for developing thermally conductive supports as alternatives to structured supports.

  17. Evaluation of a commercial packed bed flow hydrogenator for reaction screening, optimization, and synthesis

    Marian C. Bryan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The performance of the ThalesNano H-Cube®, a commercial packed bed flow hydrogenator, was evaluated in the context of small scale reaction screening and optimization. A model reaction, the reduction of styrene to ethylbenzene through a 10% Pd/C catalyst bed, was used to examine performance at various pressure settings, over sequential runs, and with commercial catalyst cartridges. In addition, the consistency of the hydrogen flow was indirectly measured by in-line UV spectroscopy. Finally, system contamination due to catalyst leaching, and the resolution of this issue, is described. The impact of these factors on the run-to-run reproducibility of the H-Cube® reactor for screening and reaction optimization is discussed.

  18. Use of hydrophobic Pt-catalysts in tritium removal from effluents

    Gheorghe, Ionita; Popescu, Irina; Stefanescu, Ioan; Steflea, Dumitru; Varlam, Carmen

    2002-01-01

    Based on the long experience of the authors, in the preparation, testing and evaluation of the performances of hydrophobic catalysts, and based on the reviewed references, this paper presents up-to-date R and D activities on the application of the hydrophobic catalysts in tritium removal from nuclear effluents. Tritium removal from the heavy water reactor and nuclear reprocessing plant, the cleanup of atmosphere and gaseous effluents by hydrogen-oxygen recombination, removal of oxygen dissolved in water are presented and discussed. Unlike the conventional hydrophilic catalysts, the hydrophobic catalysts keep a high catalytic activity and stability, even under the direct contact to liquid water or in presence of saturated humidity. A large diversity of catalyst types (over 100 catalysts) was prepared and tested in order to make them feasible for such processes. The objectives of the review are: - to provide a database for selection of the most appropriate catalyst and catalytic packing for above mentioned processes; - the designing and operation of reactor packed with hydrophobic catalysts; - to evaluate the potentiality of hydrophobic Pt-catalysts in the present and future applications. The most important results are the following: - the hydrophobic Pt-catalysts packed in the trickle bed or separated bed reactors, showed a high catalytic activity and long stability; - the utilization of the hydrophobic Pt-catalysts for the hydrogen isotopes (tritium and deuterium) separation and for hydrogen-oxygen recombination in nuclear field was entirely confirmed on industrial scale; - the improvement of the inner geometry of the reactors and of the composition of mixed catalytic packing as well as the evaluation of performances of separation processes constitute a major contribution of the authors; - the extension of the utilization of the hydrophobic Pt-catalysts in the oxidation of volatile organic compounds from wastewater; - the removal of dissolved oxygen, and deuterium

  19. Deactivation-resistant catalyst for selective catalyst reduction of NOx

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to a catalyst for selective catalytic reduction of NOx in alkali metal containing flue gas using ammonia as reductant, the catalyst comprising a surface with catalytically active sites, wherein the surface is at least partly coated with a coating comprising at least...... one metal oxide. In another aspect the present invention relates to the use of said catalyst and to a method of producing said catalyst. In addition, the present invention relates to a method of treating an catalyst for conferring thereon an improved resistance to alkali poisoning....

  20. Geomechanics of bedded salt

    Serata, S.; Milnor, S.W.

    1979-01-01

    Creep data from the literature search is reinterpreted by SGI, resulting in a better understanding of the temperature and stress state dependence of the octahedral creep rate and the octahedral shear strength. The concept of a transition strength between the elastic and the plastic states is in agreement with the data. The elastic and rheological properties of salt are described, and a set of constitutive equations is presented. The dependence of material properties on parameters such as temperature is considered. Findings on the permeability of salt are summarized, and the in-situ behavior of openings in bedded salt is described based on extensive engineering experience. A stress measuring system utilizing a finite element computer code is discussed. Geological factors affecting the stability of salt openings are considered, and the Stress Control Technique for designing stable openings in bedded salt formations is explained

  1. Bimetallic Catalysts Containing Gold and Palladium for Environmentally Important Reactions

    Ahmad Alshammari

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Supported bimetallic nanoparticles (SBN are extensively used as efficient redox catalysts. This kind of catalysis particularly using SBN has attracted immense research interest compared to their parent metals due to their unique physico-chemical properties. The primary objective of this contribution is to provide comprehensive overview about SBN and their application as promising catalysts. The present review contains four sections in total. Section 1 starts with a general introduction, recent progress, and brief summary of the application of SBN as promising catalysts for different applications. Section 2 reviews the preparation and characterization methods of SBN for a wide range of catalytic reactions. Section 3 concentrates on our own results related to the application of SBN in heterogeneous catalysis. In this section, the oxidation of cyclohexane to adipic acid (an eco-friendly and novel approach will be discussed. In addition, the application of bimetallic Pd catalysts for vapor phase toluene acetoxylation in a fixed bed reactor will also be highlighted. Acetoxylation of toluene to benzyl acetate is another green route to synthesize benzyl acetate in one step. Finally, Section 4 describes the summary of the main points and also presents an outlook on the application of SBN as promising catalysts for the production of valuable products.

  2. Catalytic Cracking of Palm Oil Over Zeolite Catalysts: Statistical Approach

    F. A. A. Twaiq and S. Bhatia

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic cracking of palm oil was conducted in a fixed bed micro-reactor over HZSM-5, zeolite ? and ultrastable Y (USY zeolite catalysts. The objective of the present investigation was to study the effect of cracking reaction variables such as temperature, weight hourly space velocity, catalyst pore size and type of palm oil feed of different molecular weight on the conversion, yield of hydrocarbons in gasoline boiling range and BTX aromatics in the organic liquid product.  Statistical Design of Experiment (DOE with 24 full factorial design was used in experimentation at the first stage.  The nonlinear model and Response Surface Methodology (RSM were utilized in the second stage of experimentation to obtain the optimum values of the variables for maximum yields of hydrocarbons in gasoline boiling range and aromatics.  The HZSM-5 showed the best performance amongst the three catalysts tested.  At 623 K and WHSV of 1 h-1, the highest experimental yields of gasoline and aromatics were 28.3 wt.% and 27 wt.%, respectively over the HZSM-5 catalyst.  For the same catalyst, the statistical model predicted that the optimum yield of gasoline was 28.1 wt.% at WHSV of 1.75 h-1 and 623 K.  The predicted optimum yield of gasoline was 25.5 wt.% at 623 K and WHSV of 1 h-1.KEY WORDS: Catalytic Cracking, Palm Oil, Zeolite, Design Of Experiment, Response Surface Methodology.

  3. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  4. Heterogeneous chromium catalysts

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heterogeneous chromium catalyst system for the polymerisation of ethylene and/or alpha olefins prepared by the steps of: (a) providing a silica-containing support, (b) treating the silica-containing support with a chromium compound to form a chromium-based

  5. Catalysts for Environmental Remediation

    Abrams, B. L.; Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard

    2013-01-01

    The properties of catalysts used in environmental remediation are described here through specific examples in heterogeneous catalysis and photocatalysis. In the area of heterogeneous catalysis, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx was used as an example reaction with vanadia and tungsta...

  6. Catalyst support structure, catalyst including the structure, reactor including a catalyst, and methods of forming same

    Van Norman, Staci A.; Aston, Victoria J.; Weimer, Alan W.

    2017-05-09

    Structures, catalysts, and reactors suitable for use for a variety of applications, including gas-to-liquid and coal-to-liquid processes and methods of forming the structures, catalysts, and reactors are disclosed. The catalyst material can be deposited onto an inner wall of a microtubular reactor and/or onto porous tungsten support structures using atomic layer deposition techniques.

  7. Iron Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts Prepared by Solvent-Deficient Precipitation (SDP: Effects of Washing, Promoter Addition Step, and Drying Temperature

    Kyle M. Brunner

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A novel, solvent-deficient precipitation (SDP method for catalyst preparation in general and for preparation of iron FT catalysts in particular is reported. Eight catalysts using a 23 factorial design of experiments to identify the key preparation variables were prepared. The catalysts were characterized by electron microprobe, N2 adsorption, TEM, XRD, and ICP. Results show that the morphology of the catalysts, i.e., surface area, pore volume, pore size distribution, crystallite sizes, and promoter distribution are significantly influenced by (1 whether or not the precursor catalyst is washed, (2 the promoter addition step, and (3 the drying condition (temperature. Consequently, the activity, selectivity, and stability of the catalysts determined from fixed-bed testing are also affected by these three variables. Unwashed catalysts prepared by a one-step method and dried at 100 °C produced the most active catalysts for FT synthesis. The catalysts of this study prepared by SDP compared favorably in activity, productivity, and stability with Fe FT catalysts reported in the literature. It is believed that this facile SDP approach has promise for development of future FT catalysts, and also offers a potential alternate route for the preparation of other catalysts for various other applications.

  8. Computational fluid dynamic modeling of fluidized-bed polymerization reactors

    Rokkam, Ram [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Polyethylene is one of the most widely used plastics, and over 60 million tons are produced worldwide every year. Polyethylene is obtained by the catalytic polymerization of ethylene in gas and liquid phase reactors. The gas phase processes are more advantageous, and use fluidized-bed reactors for production of polyethylene. Since they operate so close to the melting point of the polymer, agglomeration is an operational concern in all slurry and gas polymerization processes. Electrostatics and hot spot formation are the main factors that contribute to agglomeration in gas-phase processes. Electrostatic charges in gas phase polymerization fluidized bed reactors are known to influence the bed hydrodynamics, particle elutriation, bubble size, bubble shape etc. Accumulation of electrostatic charges in the fluidized-bed can lead to operational issues. In this work a first-principles electrostatic model is developed and coupled with a multi-fluid computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model to understand the effect of electrostatics on the dynamics of a fluidized-bed. The multi-fluid CFD model for gas-particle flow is based on the kinetic theory of granular flows closures. The electrostatic model is developed based on a fixed, size-dependent charge for each type of particle (catalyst, polymer, polymer fines) phase. The combined CFD model is first verified using simple test cases, validated with experiments and applied to a pilot-scale polymerization fluidized-bed reactor. The CFD model reproduced qualitative trends in particle segregation and entrainment due to electrostatic charges observed in experiments. For the scale up of fluidized bed reactor, filtered models are developed and implemented on pilot scale reactor.

  9. Deactivation of Zeolite Catalyst H-ZSM-5 during Conversion of Methanol to Gasoline: Operando Time- and Space-Resolved X-ray Diffraction.

    Rojo-Gama, Daniel; Mentel, Lukasz; Kalantzopoulos, Georgios N; Pappas, Dimitrios K; Dovgaliuk, Iurii; Olsbye, Unni; Lillerud, Karl Petter; Beato, Pablo; Lundegaard, Lars F; Wragg, David S; Svelle, Stian

    2018-03-15

    The deactivation of zeolite catalyst H-ZSM-5 by coking during the conversion of methanol to hydrocarbons was monitored by high-energy space- and time-resolved operando X-ray diffraction (XRD) . Space resolution was achieved by continuous scanning along the axial length of a capillary fixed bed reactor with a time resolution of 10 s per scan. Using real structural parameters obtained from XRD, we can track the development of coke at different points in the reactor and link this to a kinetic model to correlate catalyst deactivation with structural changes occurring in the material. The "burning cigar" model of catalyst bed deactivation is directly observed in real time.

  10. Kinetics of toluene alkylation with methanol catalyzed by pure and hybridized HZSM-5 catalysts

    Alabi, Wahab; Atanda, Luqman; Jermy, Rabindran; Al-Khattaf, Sulaiman

    2012-01-01

    fluidized bed reactor at temperatures of 300, 350 and 400 °C and reaction times of 3, 5, 7, 10, 13, 15 and 20. s. The rate of toluene methylation and toluene disproportionation were studied on the three catalysts (toluene alkylation is usually accompanied

  11. Hydrodeoxygenation and coupling of aqueous phenolics over bifunctional zeolite-supported metal catalysts.

    Hong, Do-Young; Miller, Stephen J; Agrawal, Pradeep K; Jones, Christopher W

    2010-02-21

    Pt supported on HY zeolite is successfully used as a bifunctional catalyst for phenol hydrodeoxygenation in a fixed-bed configuration at elevated hydrogen pressures, leading to hydrogenation-hydrogenolysis ring-coupling reactions producing hydrocarbons, some with enhanced molecular weight.

  12. Catalysts for synthetic liquid fuels

    Bruce, L.A.; Turney, T.W.

    1987-12-01

    Fischer-Tropsch catalysts have been designed, characterized and tested for the selective production of hydrocarbons suitable as synthetic liquid transport fuels from synthesis gas (i.e., by the reduction of carbon monoxide with hydrogen). It was found that hydrocarbons in the middle distillate range, or suitable for conversion to that range, could be produced over several of the new catalyst systems. The various catalysts examined included: (1) synthetic cobalt clays, mainly cobalt chlorites; (2) cobalt hydrotalcites; (3) ruthenium metal supported on rare earth oxides of high surface area; and (4) a novel promoted cobalt catalyst. Active and selective catalysts have been obtained, in each category. With the exception of the clays, reproducibility of catalyst performance has been good. Catalysts in groups 2 and 4 have exhibited very high activity, with long lifetimes and easy regeneration.

  13. Vibration measurements of automobile catalyst

    Aatola, Seppo

    1994-09-01

    Vibration of catalyst cell, which is inside the casing of the catalyst, is difficult to measure with usual measuring instrumentation. When catalyst is in use, there is hot exhaust gas flow though the catalyst cell and temperature of the cell is approximately +900 degree(s)C. Therefore non-contact Laser- Doppler-Vibrometer was used to measure vibration velocity of the catalyst cell. The laser beam was directed towards the cell through pipe which was put through and welded to the casing of the catalyst. The outer end of the pipe was screw down with a tempered class to prevent exhaust gas flow from the pipe. The inner end of the pipe was open and few millimeters away from the measuring point. Catalyst was attached to the engine with two ways, rigidly close to the engine and flexible under the engine. The engine was running in test bench under controlled conditions. Vibration measurements were carried out during constant running speeds of the engine. Vibration signals were captured and analyzed with FFT-analyzer. Vibration of catalyst cell was strongest at running speed of 5000 rpm, from 10 to 20 g (1 g equals 9.81 ms-2), when catalyst was attached rigidly close to the engine. At running speed of 3000 rpm, vibration of catalyst cell was from 2 to 3 g in most cases, when catalyst was attached either rigidly or flexible to the engine. It is estimated that in real life, i.e. when catalyst is attached to car with same engine, vibration of catalyst cell at running speed of 5000 rpm is somewhere between 1 and 10 g. At running speed of 3000 rpm, which may be more often used when driving car (car speed approximately 100 kmh-1), vibration of catalyst cell is probably few g's.

  14. Survey report for fiscal 2000 on survey of high-efficiency gasification technology of catalyst utilization type; 2000 nendo chosa hokokusho. Shokubai riyo gata kokoritsu gas ka gijutsu chosa

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    Survey and experimental research have been carried out on coal gasification using a pressurized internal circulation fluidized bed, spouted bed hydrogenation pyrolysis, supercritical water gasification, and a possibility of efficiency improvement by utilization of catalyst in chemical raw material production spouted bed gasification system. In the coal gasification using the pressurized internal circulation fluidized bed, an experiment was performed by using active alumina and Ni catalyst, where outstanding effect was identified. In the spouted bed hydrogenation pyrolysis, an experiment was executed by using iron hydroxide catalyst, but no noticeable effect was recognized. In the supercritical water gasification, an experiment was carried out by using Na{sub 2}CO2 and K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} catalysts, where it was found that the effect of the catalysts is little in the supercritical gasification reaction area of 800 degrees C. The power generation system composite with the chemical raw material production spouted bed gasification is a one-path system in which coal is gasified by the spouted bed gasification furnace, catalyst and steam are put into a heat exchanger to perform DME synthesis, and non-reacted gas is supplied as gas turbine fuel. Estimation was made on the possibility by an on-the-desk study, which requires experiments in the future. (NEDO)

  15. Why does the Conductivity of a Nickel Catalyst Increase during Sulfidation? An Exemplary Study Using an In Operando Sensor Device.

    Fremerey, Peter; Jess, Andreas; Moos, Ralf

    2015-10-23

    In order to study the sulfidation of a catalyst fixed bed, an in operando single pellet sensor was designed. A catalyst pellet from the fixed bed was electrically contacted and its electrical response was correlated with the catalyst behavior. For the sulfidation tests, a nickel catalyst was used and was sulfidized with H₂S. This catalyst had a very low conductivity in the reduced state. During sulfidation, the conductivity of the catalyst increased by decades. A reaction from nickel to nickel sulfide occurred. This conductivity increase by decades during sulfidation had not been expected since both nickel and nickel sulfides behave metallic. Only by assuming a percolation phenomenon that originates from a volume increase of the nickel contacts when reacting to nickel sulfides, this effect can be explained. This assumption was supported by sulfidation tests with differently nickel loaded catalysts and it was quantitatively estimated by a general effective media theory. The single pellet sensor device for in operando investigation of sulfidation can be considered as a valuable tool to get further insights into catalysts under reaction conditions.

  16. Catalytic decomposition of tar derived from wood waste pyrolysis using Indonesian low grade iron ore as catalyst

    Wicakso, Doni Rahmat [Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Lambung Mangkurat University, Jalan A. Yani KM. 36 Banjarbaru, 70714, South Kalimantan (Indonesia); Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Gadjah Mada University, Jalan Grafika No. 2 Bulaksumur, Yogyakarta, 55281 (Indonesia); Sutijan; Rochmadi [Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Gadjah Mada University, Jalan Grafika No. 2 Bulaksumur, Yogyakarta, 55281 (Indonesia); Budiman, Arief, E-mail: abudiman@ugm.ac.id [Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Gadjah Mada University, Jalan Grafika No. 2 Bulaksumur, Yogyakarta, 55281 (Indonesia); Center for Energy Studies, Gadjah Mada University, Sekip K1A, Yogyakarta, 55281 (Indonesia)

    2016-06-03

    Low grade iron ore can be used as an alternative catalyst for bio-tar decomposition. Compared to other catalysts, such as Ni, Rd, Ru, Pd and Pt, iron ore is cheaper. The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of using low grade iron ore as catalyst for tar catalytic decomposition in fixed bed reactor. Tar used in this experiment was pyrolysis product of wood waste while the catalyst was Indonesian low grade iron ore. The variables studied were temperatures between 500 – 600 °C and catalyst weight between 0 – 40 gram. The first step, tar was evaporated at 450 °C to produce tar vapor. Then, tar vapor was flowed to fixed bed reactor filled low grade iron ore. Gas and tar vapor from reactor was cooled, then the liquid and uncondensable gas were analyzed by GC/MS. The catalyst, after experiment, was weighed to calculate total carbon deposited into catalyst pores. The results showed that the tar components that were heavy and light hydrocarbon were decomposed and cracked within the iron ore pores to from gases, light hydrocarbon (bio-oil) and carbon, thus decreasing content tar in bio-oil and increasing the total gas product. In conclusion, the more low grade iron ore used as catalyst, the tar content in the liquid decrease, the H{sup 2} productivity increased and calorimetric value of bio-oil increased.

  17. Why does the Conductivity of a Nickel Catalyst Increase during Sulfidation? An Exemplary Study Using an In Operando Sensor Device

    Peter Fremerey

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the sulfidation of a catalyst fixed bed, an in operando single pellet sensor was designed. A catalyst pellet from the fixed bed was electrically contacted and its electrical response was correlated with the catalyst behavior. For the sulfidation tests, a nickel catalyst was used and was sulfidized with H2S. This catalyst had a very low conductivity in the reduced state. During sulfidation, the conductivity of the catalyst increased by decades. A reaction from nickel to nickel sulfide occurred. This conductivity increase by decades during sulfidation had not been expected since both nickel and nickel sulfides behave metallic. Only by assuming a percolation phenomenon that originates from a volume increase of the nickel contacts when reacting to nickel sulfides, this effect can be explained. This assumption was supported by sulfidation tests with differently nickel loaded catalysts and it was quantitatively estimated by a general effective media theory. The single pellet sensor device for in operando investigation of sulfidation can be considered as a valuable tool to get further insights into catalysts under reaction conditions.

  18. Coal Bed Methane Primer

    Dan Arthur; Bruce Langhus; Jon Seekins

    2005-05-25

    During the second half of the 1990's Coal Bed Methane (CBM) production increased dramatically nationwide to represent a significant new source of income and natural gas for many independent and established producers. Matching these soaring production rates during this period was a heightened public awareness of environmental concerns. These concerns left unexplained and under-addressed have created a significant growth in public involvement generating literally thousands of unfocused project comments for various regional NEPA efforts resulting in the delayed development of public and fee lands. The accelerating interest in CBM development coupled to the growth in public involvement has prompted the conceptualization of this project for the development of a CBM Primer. The Primer is designed to serve as a summary document, which introduces and encapsulates information pertinent to the development of Coal Bed Methane (CBM), including focused discussions of coal deposits, methane as a natural formed gas, split mineral estates, development techniques, operational issues, producing methods, applicable regulatory frameworks, land and resource management, mitigation measures, preparation of project plans, data availability, Indian Trust issues and relevant environmental technologies. An important aspect of gaining access to federal, state, tribal, or fee lands involves education of a broad array of stakeholders, including land and mineral owners, regulators, conservationists, tribal governments, special interest groups, and numerous others that could be impacted by the development of coal bed methane. Perhaps the most crucial aspect of successfully developing CBM resources is stakeholder education. Currently, an inconsistent picture of CBM exists. There is a significant lack of understanding on the parts of nearly all stakeholders, including industry, government, special interest groups, and land owners. It is envisioned the Primer would being used by a variety of

  19. Infant's bed climate and bedding in the Japanese home.

    Nakamura Ikeda, Rie; Fukai, Kiyoko; Okamoto Mizuno, Kazue

    2012-06-01

    to assess the bed climate of infants in their homes in Japan. descriptive, exploratory, non-experimental research design. the data were collected at the participants' homes under normal circumstances. nineteen healthy infants between the ages of two and five months. Their mothers, who joined a parenting class organised by a maternity clinic in Okayama, Japan, consented to participate in this study. we visited the infants' homes and interviewed their mothers concerning the types and use of bedding. The temperature and relative humidity of the bed climate at the back and foot of the bedding, and in the room were measured every minute for four consecutive days. Differences among the bed climates measured during three seasons (spring, summer, and autumn) were assessed by one-way analysis of variance. The bed temperature was higher for infants than for adults. No significant difference in temperature was noted among the three seasons. The bed temperature was about 36.0°C when waterproof sheets and futon mattresses for children or adult were used. The average relative humidity of the bed climate at the back was highest in summer, followed by that in spring and autumn; the differences were significant. The use of waterproof sheets and futon mattresses for children in summer increased the relative humidity to 80% or more. The use of infant beds, sunoko drainboards, and cotton futon mattresses in summer was effective in reducing the bed humidity. these results suggest that nurse-midwives should advise the parents on comfortable bed climates for their infants, as well as how to select and use bedding for them. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Particle bed reactor modeling

    Sapyta, Joe; Reid, Hank; Walton, Lew

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: particle bed reactor (PBR) core cross section; PBR bleed cycle; fuel and moderator flow paths; PBR modeling requirements; characteristics of PBR and nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) modeling; challenges for PBR and NTP modeling; thermal hydraulic computer codes; capabilities for PBR/reactor application; thermal/hydralic codes; limitations; physical correlations; comparison of predicted friction factor and experimental data; frit pressure drop testing; cold frit mask factor; decay heat flow rate; startup transient simulation; and philosophy of systems modeling.

  1. Fluidised bed cereal cooking

    Jenkins, Simon Anthony

    2002-01-01

    Man has been cooking food for thousands of years for a number of reasons: to improve flavour and palatability, sterilise, increase digestibility, improve texture and colour. Increasingly more advanced techniques are employed today in food production plants to engineer foods with many different properties. With this in mind manufacturers are constantly seeking to improve processing techniques and apply new or different technologies (such as microwaves, RF and extrusion) to develop foods with new properties (like puffed texture starches) and to increase process efficiencies (energy efficiency, water reduction). This thesis reports on work undertaken to demonstrate the potential to achieve high temperature starch conversion of whole wheat grains in a fluidised bed, thereby reducing the amount of water required and processing time. Specifically, wheat from the farm at 14% water content is cooked in a fluidised bed. The fluidised bed heats the wheat quickly by convective heating. In addition, energy can be delivered directly to the grain by microwave heating during fluidisation. Degree of starch conversion is determined by measuring the reduction in size of endotherm of reaction as observed by Differential Scanning Calorimetry. The fluidising gas, processing temperature and starting moisture content were varied in order to investigate their effect on the cooking process. A mathematical model based on energy and species concentration equations was developed to help understand the internal grain processes. The model coupled the thermal energy equation with water diffusion. The effect of water evaporation was represented as a thermal sink in the energy equation. Popular kinetic models from literature were adapted to predict the degree of starch conversion. The model gives solutions consistent with experimental data and physical intuition. A commercial computational fluid dynamics package was used to study simple airflow and particle tracks in the fluidisation column. A

  2. Promising SiC support for Pd catalyst in selective hydrogenation of acetylene to ethylene

    Guo, Zhanglong; Liu, Yuefeng; Liu, Yan; Chu, Wei

    2018-06-01

    In this study, SiC supported Pd nanoparticles were found to be an efficient catalyst in acetylene selective hydrogenation reaction. The ethylene selectivity can be about 20% higher than that on Pd/TiO2 catalyst at the same acetylene conversion at 90%. Moreover, Pd/SiC catalyst showed a stable catalytic life at 65 °C with 80% ethylene selectivity. With the detailed characterization using temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), N2 adsorption/desorption analysis, CO-chemisorption and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), it was found that SiC owns a lower surface area (22.9 m2/g) and a broad distribution of meso-/macro-porosity (from 5 to 65 nm), which enhanced the mass transfer during the chemical process at high reaction rate and decreased the residence time of ethylene on catalyst surface. Importantly, SiC support has the high thermal conductivity, which favored the rapid temperature homogenization through the catalyst bed and inhabited the over-hydrogenation of acetylene. The surface electronic density of Pd on Pd/SiC catalyst was higher than that on Pd/TiO2, which could promote desorption of ethylene from surface of the catalyst. TGA results confirmed a much less coke deposition on Pd/SiC catalyst.

  3. Direct dimethyl-ether (DME) synthesis by spatial patterned catalyst arrangement. A modeling and simulation study

    McBride, K.; Turek, T.; Guettel, R. [Clausthal Univ. of Technology (Germany). Inst. of Chemical Process Engineering

    2011-07-01

    The effect of spatially patterned catalyst beds was investigated for direct DME synthesis from synthesis gas as an example. A layered arrangement of methanol synthesis and dehydration catalyst was chosen and studied by numerical simulation under typical operating conditions for single-step DME synthesis. It was revealed that catalyst layers significantly influence the DME productivity. With an increasing number of layers from 2 to 40, an increase in DME productivity was observed approaching the performance of a physical catalyst mixture for an infinite number of layers. The results prove that a physical mixture of methanol synthesis and dehydration catalyst achieves the highest DME productivity under operating conditions chosen in this study. This can be explained by the higher average methanol concentration for the layered catalyst arrangement and thus stronger equilibrium constraints for the methanol synthesis reaction. Essentially, the layered catalyst arrangement is comparable to a cascade model of the two-step process, which is less efficient in terms of DME yield than the single-step process. However, since a significant effect was found, the layered catalyst arrangement could be beneficial for other reaction systems. (orig.)

  4. A Catalyst for Change

    Lønsmann, Dorte

    2017-01-01

    This case study of a team in an international workplace investigates processes of language socialization in a transient multilingual setting. Using interview and observational data, the analysis shows how social and linguistic norms are negotiated, with the newcomer positioned as a catalyst...... for changing language practices toward more English, with the ultimate aim of creating a 'global mindset' in the organization. Language socialization in a transient multilingual setting is shown to focus on and assign positive value to new linguistic norms that experienced members are socialized...... into in a process that hinges on new members functioning as tools for management to bring about the desired change. The article shows that while the newcomer is used as a catalyst for increased use of English and for the creation of a 'global mindset,' she is at the same time socialized into the existing Danish...

  5. Photo catalyst; Ko shokubai

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    While titanium oxide is excited by the light, electrons of titanium oxide are taken away by the light energy to form positive holes. Water will be decomposed into hydrogen ion and hydroxy radical (OH) by these positive holes. This hydroxy radical is a strong reactive substance called active oxygen, it decomposes organisms. Besides this photo- catalyst function, the titanium oxide can also make surface of a substance superhydrophilic. The super hydrophilicity results in not forming water drops on the glass surface but spreading all over the surface to prevent a covering of fog on the glass surface. The published patents concerning the photo catalysts were 593 from Jan. 1998 to Jan. 1999. The applicant order is the first TOTO 143, the second Daikin Industry 19, the third Toshiba Raitech, Nitto Denko, Hitachi 17 respectively. (NEDO)

  6. The international symposium on 'chemical engineering of gas-liquid-solid catalyst reactions'

    Hammer, H

    1978-06-01

    A report on the International Symposium on ''Chemical Engineering of Gas-Liquid-Solid Catalyst Reactions'', sponsored by the University of Liege (3/2-3/78), covers papers on the hydrodynamics, modeling and simulation, operating behavior, and chemical kinetics of trickle-bed reactors; scale-up of a trickle-bed reactor for hydrotreating Kuwait vacuum distillate; experimental results obtained in trickle-bed reactors for hydroprocessing atmospheric residua, hydrogenation of methylstyrene, hydrogenation of butanone, and hydrodemetallization of petroleum residua; advantages and disadvantages of various three-phase reactor types (e.g., for the liquid-phase hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to benzene, SNG, or methanol) and hydrodynamics, mass and heat transfer, and modeling of bubble columns with suspended catalysts (slurry reactors), and their applications (e.g., in SNG and fermentation processes).

  7. [Synergetic effects of silicon carbide and molecular sieve loaded catalyst on microwave assisted catalytic oxidation of toluene].

    Wang, Xiao-Hui; Bo, Long-Li; Liu, Hai-Nan; Zhang, Hao; Sun, Jian-Yu; Yang, Li; Cai, Li-Dong

    2013-06-01

    Molecular sieve loaded catalyst was prepared by impregnation method, microwave-absorbing material silicon carbide and the catalyst were investigated for catalytic oxidation of toluene by microwave irradiation. Research work examined effects of silicon carbide and molecular sieve loading Cu-V catalyst's mixture ratio as well as mixed approach changes on degradation of toluene, and characteristics of catalyst were measured through scanning electron microscope, specific surface area test and X-ray diffraction analysis. The result showed that the fixed bed reactor had advantages of both thermal storage property and low-temperature catalytic oxidation when 20% silicon carbide was filled at the bottom of the reactor, and this could effectively improve the utilization of microwave energy as well as catalytic oxidation efficiency of toluene. Under microwave power of 75 W and 47 W, complete-combustion temperatures of molecular sieve loaded Cu-V catalyst and Cu-V-Ce catalyst to toluene were 325 degrees C and 160 degrees C, respectively. Characteristics of the catalysts showed that mixture of rare-earth element Ce increased the dispersion of active components in the surface of catalyst, micropore structure of catalyst effectively guaranteed high adsorption capacity for toluene, while amorphous phase of Cu and V oxides increased the activity of catalyst greatly.

  8. High-Activity Dealloyed Catalysts

    Kongkanand, Anusorn [General Motors LLC, Pontiac, MI (United States)

    2014-09-30

    Reduction of costly Pt usage in proton exchange membrane fuel cell electrodes is one of the major challenges towards development and commercialization of fuel cell vehicles. Although few have met the initial-kinetic activity requirements in a realistic fuel cell device, no catalyst material has ever met the demanding fuel cell durability targets set by DOE. In this project, a team of 4 universities and 2 companies came together to investigate a concept that appeared promising in preliminary non-fuel cell tests then to further develop the catalyst to a mature level ready for vehicle implementation. The team consists of academia with technical leadership in their respective areas, a catalyst supplier, and a fuel cell system integrator.The tightly collaborative project enabled development of a highly active and durable catalyst with performance that significantly exceeds that of previous catalysts and meets the DOE targets for the first time (Figure 1A). The catalyst was then further evaluated in full-active-area stack in a realistic vehicle operating condition (Figure 1B). This is the first public demonstration that one can realize the performance benefit and Pt cost reduction over a conventional pure Pt catalyst in a long-term realistic PEMFC system. Furthermore, systematic analyses of a range of catalysts with different performance after fuel cell testing allowed for correlation between catalyst microstructure and its electrocatalytic activity and durability. This will in turn aid future catalyst development.

  9. Reduction and Analysis of Low Temperature Shift Heterogeneous Catalyst for Water Gas Reaction in Ammonia Production

    Zečević, N.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to obtain additional quantities of hydrogen after the reforming reactions of natural gas and protect the ammonia synthesis catalyst, it is crucial to achieve and maintain maximum possible activity, selectivity and stability of the low temperature shift catalyst for conversion of water gas reaction during its lifetime. Whereas the heterogeneous catalyst comes in oxidized form, it is of the utmost importance to conduct the reduction procedure properly. The proper reduction procedure and continuous analysis of its performance would ensure the required activity, selectivity and stability throughout the catalyst’s service time. For the proper reduction procedure ofthe low temperature shift catalyst, in addition to process equipment, also necessary is a reliable and realistic system for temperature measurements, which will be effective for monitoring the exothermal temperature curves through all catalyst bed layers. For efficiency evaluation of low shift temperature catalyst reduction and its optimization, it is necessary to determine at regular time intervals the temperature approach to equilibrium and temperature profiles of individual layers by means of "S" and "die off" temperature exothermal curves. Based on the obtained data, the optimum inlet temperature could be determined, in order to maximally extend the service life of the heterogeneous catalyst as much as possible, and achieve the optimum equilibrium for conversion of the water gas. This paper presents the methodology for in situ reduction of the low temperature shift heterogeneous catalyst and the developed system for monitoring its individual layers to achieve the minimum possible content of carbon monoxide at the exit of the reactor. The developed system for temperature monitoring through heterogeneous catalyst layers provides the proper procedure for reduction and adjustment of optimum process working conditions for the catalyst by the continuous increase of reactor inlet

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF ATTRITION RESISTANT IRON-BASED FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    Adeyinka A. Adeyiga

    2001-01-01

    The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction provides a way of converting coal-derived synthesis gas (CO+H 2 ) to liquid fuels. Since the reaction is highly exothermic, one of the major problems in control of the reaction is heat removal. Recent work has shown that the use of slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) can largely solve this problem. The use of iron-based catalysts is attractive not only due to their low cost and ready availability, but also due to their high water-gas shift activity which makes it possible to use these catalysts with low H 2 /CO ratios. However, a serious problem with use of Fe catalysts in a SBCR is their tendency to undergo attrition. This can cause fouling/plugging of downstream filters and equipment, makes the separation of catalyst from the oil/wax product very difficult if not impossible, and results in a steady loss of catalyst from the reactor. Recently, fundamental understanding of physical attrition is being addressed by incorporating suitable binders into the catalyst recipe. This has resulted in the preparation of a spray dried Fe-based catalyst having aps of 70 mm with high attrition resistance. This Fe-based attrition resistant, active and selective catalyst gave 95% CO conversion through 125 hours of testing in a fixed-bed at 270 C, 1.48 MPa, H 2 /CO=0.67 and 2.0 NL/g-cat/h with C 5 + selectivity of >78% and methane selectivity of <5%. However, further development of the catalyst is needed to address the chemical attrition due to phase changes that any Fe-catalyst goes through potentially causing internal stresses within the particle and resulting in weakening, spalling or cracking. The objective of this research is to develop robust iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that have suitable activity, selectivity and stability to be used in the slurry bubble column reactor. Specifically we aim to develop to: (i) improve the performance and preparation procedure of the high activity, high attrition resistant, high alpha iron

  11. Operation of Packed-Bed Reactors Studied in Microgravity

    Motil, Brian J.; Balakotaiah, Vemuri

    2004-01-01

    The operation of a packed bed reactor (PBR) involves gas and liquid flowing simultaneously through a fixed-bed of solid particles. Depending on the application, the particles can be various shapes and sizes but are generally designed to force the two fluid phases through a tortuous route of narrow channels connecting the interstitial space. The PBR is the most common type of reactor in industry because it provides for intimate contact and high rates of transport between the phases needed to sustain chemical or biological reactions. The packing may also serve as either a catalyst or as a support for growing biological material. Furthermore, this type of reactor is relatively compact and requires minimal power to operate. This makes it an excellent candidate for unit operations in support of long-duration human space activities.

  12. Steam reforming of heptane in a fluidized bed membrane reactor

    Rakib, Mohammad A.; Grace, John R.; Lim, C. Jim; Elnashaie, Said S. E. H.

    n-Heptane served as a model compound to study steam reforming of naphtha as an alternative feedstock to natural gas for production of pure hydrogen in a fluidized bed membrane reactor. Selective removal of hydrogen using Pd 77Ag 23 membrane panels shifted the equilibrium-limited reactions to greater conversion of the hydrocarbons and lower yields of methane, an intermediate product. Experiments were conducted with no membranes, with one membrane panel, and with six panels along the height of the reactor to understand the performance improvement due to hydrogen removal in a reactor where catalyst particles were fluidized. Results indicate that a fluidized bed membrane reactor (FBMR) can provide a compact reformer for pure hydrogen production from a liquid hydrocarbon feedstock at moderate temperatures (475-550 °C). Under the experimental conditions investigated, the maximum achieved yield of pure hydrogen was 14.7 moles of pure hydrogen per mole of heptane fed.

  13. Effects of the gas-liquid ratio on the optimal quantity of the catalyst for the CECE process with a homogeneously packed LPCE column

    Ushida, A.; Sugiyama, T.; Yamamoto, I.

    2007-01-01

    In order to improve the separative performance of a CECE (Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange) process we have been carried out experimental studies on hydrogen isotope separation by a CECE process using with a LPCE (Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange) column of trickle-type bed. Two types of trickle beds were tested in our previous study. One was the layered bed where layers of Kogel catalysts and that of Dixon gauze rings were filled in the column alternately. The other was the homogeneous bed where Kogel catalysts and Dixon gauze rings were mixed and filled in the column homogeneously. We found two major points: 1) the homogeneous bed was more efficient than the layered bed and 2) there was an optimal quantity of the catalyst for both types of beds to obtain the largest separation factor. The optimal quantity of the catalyst is affected by various factors such as catalytic activity, flow rates of fluid, temperature and so on. In this study we focused on an effect of the gasliquid ratio. The purpose of the present study is to investigate experimentally the effect of the gas-liquid ratio on the optimal quantity of the catalyst using with a homogeneous bed. The column is a Pyrex glass tube with 25 mm internal diameter and 60 cm length. The column is filled with Kogel catalysts (1.0 wt% Pt deposited) and Dixon gauze rings. A catalyst packed-ratio is defined as a ratio of the grain-volume of catalyst to the grain volume of the whole packings, where grain volumes mean the volume of a sphere with average diameter of the Kogel catalyst and the volume of a cylinder which has the outer shape same as a Dixon gauze ring. Hydrogen-deuterium isotope separation with the CECE equipment was performed at 101 kPa, 343 K for various values of the catalyst packed-ratio and for various values of the gas-liquid ratio. Hydrogen gas was generated by the Solid Polymer Electrolysis (SPE) electrolyzer. Maximum production rate and purity of hydrogen gas are 1 m3/h and 99.99%. The

  14. Fluidized bed boiler feed system

    Jones, Brian C.

    1981-01-01

    A fluidized bed boiler feed system for the combustion of pulverized coal. Coal is first screened to separate large from small particles. Large particles of coal are fed directly to the top of the fluidized bed while fine particles are first mixed with recycled char, preheated, and then fed into the interior of the fluidized bed to promote char burnout and to avoid elutriation and carryover.

  15. Usability of ECT for quantitative and qualitative characterization of trickle-bed flow dynamics experiencing filtration conditions

    Tibirna, C.; Fortin, A. [Laval Univ., Quebec City, PQ (Canada). GIREF; Edouard, D.; Larachi, F. [Laval Univ., Quebec City, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2006-07-01

    The feasibility of using electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) as an imaging method for trickle-bed reaction processes was examined in this study. In particular, the advantages and disadvantages of using ECT to characterize the flow dynamics in a four-phase trickle bed reactor were investigated. This work was part of a larger study to extend the service life of catalyst beds used during the hydrotreatment of some oil fractions, such as Athabasca bitumen. A better understanding of the flow dynamics and clogging physics in trickle-bed reactors is needed in order to prevent clogging in the catalyst bed. This study focused on several aspects of the ECT as a non-intrusive imaging method for such processes. This paper described the experimental setup in detail. The ECT equipment allowed for up to 100 tomograms per second to be recorded. The clogging experiments lasted about 30 hours from a completely clean catalyst bed to a stable, non-filtering clogging state. A series of algorithms for ECT image reconstruction were presented. Truncated and filtered single value decomposition (SVD) and Landweber methods were found to be the most appropriate. ECT was shown to be faster and less expensive than nuclear ionizing, non-ionizing and other tomography methods. However, the main advantage of ECT was its non-intrusive attributes. It was also suggested that the complex technologies involved in ECT still require further refinement and better calibration methods. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Non-PGM cell catalysts

    Colon-Mercado, H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Elvington, M. [Savannah River Consulting, Aiken, SC (United States); Ganesan, P. [Savannah River Consulting, Aiken, SC (United States)

    2017-09-27

    A unique approach has been developed to probe the non-PGM catalyst active site for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR) for PEMFCs. Iron based functionalities have been engineered into a variety of catalysts to evaluate their impact on activity for the ORR. A series of high surface area catalysts were synthesized and the impact of the chemical structure on the electrochemical and electrocatalytic properties was investigated. Elemental and surface analyses of the prepared catalysts reveal the incorporation of iron in a targeted and controlled manner. A high surface area framework catalyst was prepared that shows exceptional activity, comparable to state-of-the-art materials. The results of this research project provided critical seed data for the newly awarded ElectroCat project, which focuses on rationally designed framework catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction.

  17. Management bedding : vrijloopstal met composterende bedding van houtsnippers

    Boer, de H.C.; Wiersma, M.; Galama, P.J.; Szanto, G.L.

    2015-01-01

    In de vrijloopstal liggen de koeien meestal op een organische bedding en scheiden daar mest (feces en urine) uit. Om de bedding voldoende droog en schoon te houden wordt er regelmatig nieuw strooisel aangevoerd en wordt de toplaag bewerkt. Op basis van onderzoek- en praktijkervaringen tot nu toe

  18. Oxygen-reducing catalyst layer

    O'Brien, Dennis P [Maplewood, MN; Schmoeckel, Alison K [Stillwater, MN; Vernstrom, George D [Cottage Grove, MN; Atanasoski, Radoslav [Edina, MN; Wood, Thomas E [Stillwater, MN; Yang, Ruizhi [Halifax, CA; Easton, E Bradley [Halifax, CA; Dahn, Jeffrey R [Hubley, CA; O'Neill, David G [Lake Elmo, MN

    2011-03-22

    An oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, and a method of making the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, where the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer includes a catalytic material film disposed on a substrate with the use of physical vapor deposition and thermal treatment. The catalytic material film includes a transition metal that is substantially free of platinum. At least one of the physical vapor deposition and the thermal treatment is performed in a processing environment comprising a nitrogen-containing gas.

  19. Catalyst systems and uses thereof

    Ozkan, Umit S [Worthington, OH; Holmgreen, Erik M [Columbus, OH; Yung, Matthew M [Columbus, OH

    2012-07-24

    A method of carbon monoxide (CO) removal comprises providing an oxidation catalyst comprising cobalt supported on an inorganic oxide. The method further comprises feeding a gaseous stream comprising CO, and oxygen (O.sub.2) to the catalyst system, and removing CO from the gaseous stream by oxidizing the CO to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) in the presence of the oxidation catalyst at a temperature between about 20 to about 200.degree. C.

  20. Development of GREET Catalyst Module

    Wang, Zhichao [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Benavides, Pahola T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dunn, Jennifer B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cronauer, Donald C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-09-01

    In this report, we develop energy and material flows for the production of five different catalysts (tar reforming, alcohol synthesis, Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 [ZSM-5], Mo/Co/ γ-Al2O3, and Pt/ γ-Al2O3) and two chemicals (olivine, dimethyl ether of polyethylene glycol [DEPG]). These compounds and catalysts are now included in the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET™) catalyst module.

  1. Reuse of Hydrotreating Spent Catalyst

    Habib, A.M.; Menoufy, M.F.; Amhed, S.H.

    2004-01-01

    All hydro treating catalysts used in petroleum refining processes gradually lose activity through coking, poisoning by metal, sulfur or halides or lose surface area from sintering at high process temperatures. Waste hydrotreating catalyst, which have been used in re-refining of waste lube oil at Alexandria Petroleum Company (after 5 years lifetime) compared with the same fresh catalyst were used in the present work. Studies are conducted on partial extraction of the active metals of spent catalyst (Mo and Ni) using three leaching solvents,4% oxidized oxalic acid, 10% aqueous sodium hydroxide and 10% citric acid. The leaching experiments are conducting on the de coked extrude [un crushed] spent catalyst samples. These steps are carried out in order to rejuvenate the spent catalyst to be reused in other reactions. The results indicated that 4% oxidized oxalic acid leaching solution gave total metal removal 45.6 for de coked catalyst samples while NaOH gave 35% and citric acid gave 31.9 % The oxidized leaching agent was the most efficient leaching solvent to facilitate the metal removal, and the rejuvenated catalyst was characterized by the unchanged crystalline phase The rejuvenated catalyst was applied for hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of vacuum gas oil as a feedstock, under different hydrogen pressure 20-80 bar in order to compare its HDS activity

  2. Structure of alumina supported vanadia catalysts for oxidative dehydrogenation of propane prepared by flame spray pyrolysis

    Høj, Martin; Jensen, Anker Degn; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk

    2013-01-01

    .%. The catalysts were subsequently characterized by BET surface area, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman, UV–vis diffuse reflectance and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) as well as measurement of the catalytic performance. The catalysts had specific surface areas from 143 to 169 m2/g corresponding to average......A series of five vanadia on alumina catalysts for oxidative dehydrogenation of propane to propene were synthesized by flame spray pyrolysis (FSP) using vanadium(III)acetylacetonate and aluminium(III)acetylacetonate dissolved in toluene as precursors. The vanadium loading was 2, 3, 5, 7.5 and 10wt...... X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy showed that the vanadia can be reduced when operating at low oxygen concentrations. The catalyst performance was determined in fixed bed reactors with an inlet gas composition of C3H8/O2/N2=5/25/70. The main products were propene, CO and CO2...

  3. Activity of Cu-activated carbon fiber catalyst in wet oxidation of ammonia solution.

    Hung, Chang-Mao

    2009-07-30

    Aqueous solutions of 200-1000 mg/L of ammonia were oxidized in a trickle-bed reactor using Cu-activated carbon fiber (ACF) catalysts, which were prepared by incipient wet impregnation with aqueous solutions of copper nitrate that was deposited on ACF substrates. The results reveal that the conversion of ammonia by wet oxidation in the presence of Cu-ACF catalysts was a function of the metal loading weight ratio of the catalyst. The total conversion efficiency of ammonia was 95% during wet oxidation over the catalyst at 463 K at an oxygen partial pressure of 3.0 MPa. Moreover, the effect of the initial concentration of ammonia and the reaction temperature on the removal of ammonia from the effluent streams was also studied at a liquid space velocity of less than 3.0 h(-1).

  4. Activity of Cu-activated carbon fiber catalyst in wet oxidation of ammonia solution

    Hung, Chang-Mao, E-mail: hungcm1031@gmail.com [Department of Industry Engineering and Management, Yung-Ta Institute of Technology and Commerce, 316 Chung-shan Road, Linlo, Pingtung 909, Taiwan (China)

    2009-07-30

    Aqueous solutions of 200-1000 mg/L of ammonia were oxidized in a trickle-bed reactor using Cu-activated carbon fiber (ACF) catalysts, which were prepared by incipient wet impregnation with aqueous solutions of copper nitrate that was deposited on ACF substrates. The results reveal that the conversion of ammonia by wet oxidation in the presence of Cu-ACF catalysts was a function of the metal loading weight ratio of the catalyst. The total conversion efficiency of ammonia was 95% during wet oxidation over the catalyst at 463 K at an oxygen partial pressure of 3.0 MPa. Moreover, the effect of the initial concentration of ammonia and the reaction temperature on the removal of ammonia from the effluent streams was also studied at a liquid space velocity of less than 3.0 h{sup -1}.

  5. Activity of Cu-activated carbon fiber catalyst in wet oxidation of ammonia solution

    Hung, Chang-Mao

    2009-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of 200-1000 mg/L of ammonia were oxidized in a trickle-bed reactor using Cu-activated carbon fiber (ACF) catalysts, which were prepared by incipient wet impregnation with aqueous solutions of copper nitrate that was deposited on ACF substrates. The results reveal that the conversion of ammonia by wet oxidation in the presence of Cu-ACF catalysts was a function of the metal loading weight ratio of the catalyst. The total conversion efficiency of ammonia was 95% during wet oxidation over the catalyst at 463 K at an oxygen partial pressure of 3.0 MPa. Moreover, the effect of the initial concentration of ammonia and the reaction temperature on the removal of ammonia from the effluent streams was also studied at a liquid space velocity of less than 3.0 h -1 .

  6. Effect of Si/Al{sub 2} Ratio on 2-butanol Dehydration over HY Zeolite Catalysts

    Jung, Euna; Choi, Hyeonhee; Jeon, Jong-Ki [Kongju National University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Synthesis of butenes through dehydration of 2-butanol was investigated over HY zeolite catalysts. 2-Butanol dehydration reaction was carried out in a fixed bed catalytic reactor. 2-Butanol conversion was increased with increase of Si/Al{sub 2} ratio of HY zeolite catalysts, which can be ascribed to increase of acid strength with increase of Si/Al{sub 2} ratio. Selectivities to 1-butene, trans-2-butene, and cis-2-butene were not greatly influenced by the change of the Si/Al{sub 2} ratio of HY zeolite. As a result, it was advantageous to use a HY zeolite catalyst with 60 Si/Al{sub 2} ratio for maximizing the yield of 1-butene in the dehydration of 2-butanol. The optimal reaction temperature for maximizing the yield of 1-butene was 250 .deg. C over HY (60) catalyst.

  7. Effect of Si/Al2 Ratio on 2-butanol Dehydration over HY Zeolite Catalysts

    Jung, Euna; Choi, Hyeonhee; Jeon, Jong-Ki

    2015-01-01

    Synthesis of butenes through dehydration of 2-butanol was investigated over HY zeolite catalysts. 2-Butanol dehydration reaction was carried out in a fixed bed catalytic reactor. 2-Butanol conversion was increased with increase of Si/Al 2 ratio of HY zeolite catalysts, which can be ascribed to increase of acid strength with increase of Si/Al 2 ratio. Selectivities to 1-butene, trans-2-butene, and cis-2-butene were not greatly influenced by the change of the Si/Al 2 ratio of HY zeolite. As a result, it was advantageous to use a HY zeolite catalyst with 60 Si/Al 2 ratio for maximizing the yield of 1-butene in the dehydration of 2-butanol. The optimal reaction temperature for maximizing the yield of 1-butene was 250 .deg. C over HY (60) catalyst

  8. Pyrolysis of plastic waste using alumina-pumice as catalyst

    Warnijati, S.; Agra, I.B.; Wibowo, W.

    2000-01-01

    Efforts to convert plastic waste to liquid fuel have been carried out, but the yield was not so promising yet. Various catalysts have been studied to drive the product more to the liquid fuel. In this study, alumina-pumice produced from cheap local materials, was used as catalyst. Solid polyethylene plastic waste was melted in a feed compartment surrounding the tube reactor, and the vapor flowed downward through the catalyst bed which was supported by small glass marbles. Air and water coolers were used to cool and condense the product. Liquid and uncondensable gas were collected in receivers and bottle filled with brine, respectively. The physical properties of a specific liquid product were tested according to the ASTM methods. Liquid and gas products increased with time and temperature, and the rate of liquid and gas formations followed first order reaction. Using 100 g of plastic waste and 40 g of catalyst, the favorable time and temperature of pyrolysis were 105 minutes and 653-673 K, respectively. Under this condition, 86 - 87 % of liquid, 45 - 53 mL/g of gas, and 1% of solid residue were obtained. The quantity of liquid product was higher than the previous work (which was just 70-75 %) and its physical properties were between those of kerosene and diesel oil. The gross heating value of the liquid was 49 796.03 J/g, and the gas burnt with yellow flame and some soot. (Author)

  9. Water detritiation: better catalysts for liquid phase catalytic exchange

    Braet, J.

    2005-01-01

    Fusion reactors are our hope for a clean nuclear energy. But as they shall handle huge amounts of tritium, 1.5 10 19 Bq GWth -1 a -1 or about 50 000 times more tritium than light water fission reactors, they need detritiation. Most tritium losses can be trapped as or can easily be transformed into tritiated water. Water detritiation is preferably based on the multiplication of the large equilibrium isotope effect during the exchange reaction of tritium between hydrogen gas and liquid water in a counter current trickle bed reactor. Such LPCE (Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange) requires an efficient hydrophobic catalyst. SCK-CEN invented and developed such a catalyst in the past. In combination with an appropriate packing, different batches of this catalyst performed very well during years of extensive testing, allowing to develop the ELEX process for water detritiation at inland reprocessing plants. The main objectives of this study were to reproduce and possibly improve the SCK-CEN catalyst for tritium exchange between hydrogen and liquid water; and to demonstrate the high overall exchange rate and thus high detritiation factors that can be realized with it in a small and simple LPCE column under typical but conservative operating conditions

  10. Deactivation by carbon of iron catalysts for indirect liquefaction

    Bartholomew, C.H.

    1990-10-11

    This report describes recent progress in a fundamental, three-year investigation of carbon formation and its effects on the activity and selectivity of promoted iron catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis, the objectives of which are: determine rates and mechanisms of carbon deactivation of unsupported Fe and Fe/K catalysts during CO hydrogenation over a range of CO concentrations, CO:H{sub 2} ratios, and temperatures; model the rates of deactivation of the same catalysts in fixed-bed reactors. During the thirteenth quarter design of software for a computer-automated reactor system to be used in the kinetic and deactivation studies was continued. Further progress was made toward the completion of the control language, control routines, and software for operating this system. Progress was also made on the testing of the system hardware and software. H{sub 2} chemisorption capacities and activity selectivity data were also measured for three iron catalysts promoted with 1% alumina. 47 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  11. A study on the polymer catalyst manufacturing technology

    Chung, Heung Seok; Lee, Han Soo; Kang, Hee Seok; Paek, Seung Uh; Kim, Kwang Rak; Koo, Jee Hyu; Chung, Yong Won; Sung, Ki Ung; Na, Jeong Won; Hwang, Seong Tae; Kim, Yong Ik; Choi, Yoon Dong

    1994-01-01

    Heavy water is used as moderator and coolant in Pressurized Heavy Water Power Plants. According to the governmental long-term plan for power supply, Korea is scheduled to construct new four pressurized heavy water power plants till the year 2006. Total heavy water demand for these plants would be 1988 Mg during the period 1992-2006. Reformed hydrogen processes is considered best suited to Korea. Hydrophobic catalysts for this process were manufactured and the performance of hydrogen isotope exchance was investigated. The overall mass transfer coefficients varied between 0.004 and 2.295 m 3 HD/m 3 Bed.sec. and heavy water separation processes using the catalysts were optimized. (Author)

  12. Thiophene hydrodesulfurization over CoMo/Al2O3-CuY catalysts: Temperature effect study

    Boukoberine, Yamina; Hamada, Boudjema

    2016-01-01

    CoMo/γ-Al2O3-CuY catalysts are prepared by physically mixing CoMo/γ-Al2O3 catalyst with Cu-exchanged Y zeolite. The CuY zeolite is prepared by the solid state ion exchange technique. The thiophene hydrodesulfurization is performed in a fixed bed reactor at high temperature and atmospheric pressure. The results show that the presence of CuY zeolite particles in CoMo/Al2O3 catalyst can have a noticeable effect on both the conversion and product selectivities. An increasing zeolite loading in ca...

  13. Effectiveness of Bed Bug Pesticides

    Before EPA allows a bed bug claim on a label, the product must be supported by data showing it will kill bed bugs when applied according to the label. Also consider factors such as extent of infestation, site preparation, and insect life stages.

  14. Novel Reforming Catalysts

    Pfefferle, Lisa D; Haller, Gary L

    2012-10-16

    Aqueous phase reforming is useful for processing oxygenated hydrocarbons to hydrogen and other more useful products. Current processing is hampered by the fact that oxide based catalysts are not stable under high temperature hydrothermal conditions. Silica in the form of structured MCM-41 is thermally a more stable support for Co and Ni than conventional high surface area amorphous silica but hydrothermal stability is not demonstrated. Carbon nanotube supports, in contrast, are highly stable under hydrothermal reaction conditions. In this project we show that carbon nanotubes are stable high activity/selectivity supports for the conversion of ethylene glycol to hydrogen.

  15. Catalysts for petroleum desulfurization

    Mueller, A.; Diemann, E.; Baumann, F.W.

    1988-01-01

    In order to obtain marketable products from low-quality oils, efficient hydrogenation processes are required for removing sulfur (hydrodesulfurization, HDS), nitrogen (hydrodenitrification, HDN), and oxygen (hydrodeoxygenation, HDO), which would poison the noble metal catalysts of the downstream petrochemical processes. Hydrogenation will produce low-sulfur, low-nitrogen fuels and thus contribute to the reduction of SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ emissions which is long overdue from the ecological point of view (forest decline, acidification of surface bodies of water, etc.).

  16. Does Pelletizing Catalysts Influence the Efficiency Number of Activity Measurements? Spectrochemical Engineering Considerations for an Accurate Operando Study

    Rasmussen, Søren Birk; Perez-Ferreras, Susana; Banares, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    of, for example, support oxides might take place, which in turn affects the pore size distribution and the porosity of the catalyst, leading to the observation of lower activity values due to decreased catalyst efficiency. This phenomenon can also apply to conventional activity measurements......, in the cases that pelletizing and recrushing of samples are performed to obtain adequate particle size fractions for the catalytic bed. A case study of an operand investigation of a V2O3-WO3/TiO2-sepiolite catalyst is used as an example, and simple calculations of the influence of catalyst activity...... and internal pore diffusion properties are considered in this paper for the evaluation of catalyst performance in, for example, operando reactors. Thus, it is demonstrated that with a pelletizing pressure of...

  17. Direct synthesis of ethanol from dimethyl ether and syngas over combined H-Mordenite and Cu/ZnO catalysts.

    Li, Xingang; San, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Yi; Ichii, Takashi; Meng, Ming; Tan, Yisheng; Tsubaki, Noritatsu

    2010-10-25

    Ethanol was directly synthesized from dimethyl ether (DME) and syngas with the combined H-Mordenite and Cu/ZnO catalysts that were separately loaded in a dual-catalyst bed reactor. Methyl acetate (MA) was formed by DME carbonylation over the H-Mordenite catalyst. Thereafter, ethanol and methanol were produced by MA hydrogenation over the Cu/ZnO catalyst. With the reactant gas containing 1.0% DME, the optimized temperature for the reaction was at 493 K to reach 100% conversion. In the products, the yield of methanol and ethanol could reach 46.3% and 42.2%, respectively, with a small amount of MA, ethyl acetate, and CO(2). This process is environmentally friendly as the main byproduct methanol can be recycled to DME by a dehydration reaction. In contrast, for the physically mixed catalysts, the low conversion of DME and high selectivity of methanol were observed.

  18. Design of slurry bubble column reactors: novel technique for optimum catalyst size selection contractual origin of the invention

    Gamwo, Isaac K [Murrysville, PA; Gidaspow, Dimitri [Northbrook, IL; Jung, Jonghwun [Naperville, IL

    2009-11-17

    A method for determining optimum catalyst particle size for a gas-solid, liquid-solid, or gas-liquid-solid fluidized bed reactor such as a slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) for converting synthesis gas into liquid fuels considers the complete granular temperature balance based on the kinetic theory of granular flow, the effect of a volumetric mass transfer coefficient between the liquid and the gas, and the water gas shift reaction. The granular temperature of the catalyst particles representing the kinetic energy of the catalyst particles is measured and the volumetric mass transfer coefficient between the gas and liquid phases is calculated using the granular temperature. Catalyst particle size is varied from 20 .mu.m to 120 .mu.m and a maximum mass transfer coefficient corresponding to optimum liquid hydrocarbon fuel production is determined. Optimum catalyst particle size for maximum methanol production in a SBCR was determined to be in the range of 60-70 .mu.m.

  19. In-situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts

    Rodriguez, Jose A; Chupas, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Helps researchers develop new catalysts for sustainable fuel and chemical production Reviewing the latest developments in the field, this book explores the in-situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts, enabling readers to take full advantage of the sophisticated techniques used to study heterogeneous catalysts and reaction mechanisms. In using these techniques, readers can learn to improve the selectivity and the performance of catalysts and how to prepare catalysts as efficiently as possible, with minimum waste. In-situ Characterization of Heterogeneous Catalysts feat

  20. Characteristics of mordenite-type zeolite catalysts deactivated by SO{sub 2} for the reduction of NO with hydrocarbons

    Kim, M.H.; Nam, I.S.; Kim, Y.G. [Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology/Research Inst. of Industrial Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-10-25

    The deactivation of mordenite-type zeolite catalysts for the selective reduction of NO by hydrocarbons in the presence of SO{sub 2} was examined in a packed-bed flow reactor system. The physicochemical properties of the deactivated catalysts by SO{sub 2} were extensively characterized by TGA, TPSR, XPS, Raman, XANES, the measurements of surface area and elemental analysis. Not only the surface area and sulfur content of the deactivated catalysts, but their TGA and TPSR patterns strongly suggest the formation of a sulfur species as a deactivating agent on the catalyst surface. It is also observed that the sulfur species exists in the form of sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}) by XPS and Raman. It mainly causes the loss of NO removal activity of the catalysts. The sulfate species formed on the deactivated catalysts by SO{sub 2} did not significantly alter the chemical environment of the copper ions contained in the zeolite catalysts such as CuHM and CuNZA. It does not exist in the form of cupric sulfate pentahydrate on the catalyst surface as revealed by Cu K-edge absorption spectra of the catalysts.

  1. Catalytic performance of activated carbon supported cobalt catalyst for CO2 reforming of CH4.

    Zhang, Guojie; Su, Aiting; Du, Yannian; Qu, Jiangwen; Xu, Ying

    2014-11-01

    Syngas production by CO2 reforming of CH4 in a fixed bed reactor was investigated over a series of activated carbon (AC) supported Co catalysts as a function of Co loading (between 15 and 30wt.%) and calcination temperature (Tc=300, 400 or 500°C). The catalytic performance was assessed through CH4 and CO2 conversions and long-term stability. XRD and SEM were used to characterize the catalysts. It was found that the stability of Co/AC catalysts was strongly dependent on the Co loading and calcination temperature. For the loadings (25wt.% for Tc=300°C), stable activities have been achieved. The loading of excess Co (>wt.% 25) causes negative effects not only on the performance of the catalysts but also on the support surface properties. In addition, the experiment showed that ultrasound can enhance and promote dispersion of the active metal on the carrier, thus improving the catalytic performance of the catalyst. The catalyst activity can be long-term stably maintained, and no obvious deactivation has been observed in the first 2700min. After analyzing the characteristics, a reaction mechanism for CO2 reforming of CH4 over Co/AC catalyst was proposed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of support on the activity of MoVCeZr catalyst for propane ammoxidation reaction

    Anita Ramli; Farinaa Md Jamil; Ishak Ahmad

    2010-01-01

    Mixed metal oxide catalysts based on Mo-V have been known as the most active and selective in the ammoxidation of propane to ACN. A series of MoVCeZr (5 % wt/ wt) supported with MOR, TiO 2 and MgO have been prepared by incipient wetness impregnation method for propane ammoxidation reaction to ACN. The catalyst was calcined in a two step calcination process in static air between 350 - 600 degree Celsius for 10 hour. The surface area and pore size of these catalysts were measured using physical adsorption of nitrogen following Brunauer, Emmet and Teller (BET) equation. The textural and morphological of these catalysts were determined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). The activities of all catalysts were tested using a fixed-bed reactor with online gas chromatography (GC) at 420 degree Celsius and atmospheric pressure in the presence of 0.5 ml catalyst with composition consisting of 5.8:7:17.4 (propane: ammonia: air) and helium as carrier to give a total flow of 120 ml. Result shows that MoVCeZr support gives a better conversion due to the surface area and pore size characteristic of the catalyst. (author)

  3. Activating catalysts with mechanical force

    Piermattei, A.; Karthikeyan, S.; Sijbesma, R.P.

    2009-01-01

    Homogeneously catalysed reactions can be ‘switched on’ by activating latent catalysts. Usually, activation is brought about by heat or an external chemical agent. However, activation of homogeneous catalysts with a mechanical trigger has not been demonstrated. Here, we introduce a general method to

  4. Effects of catalyst-bed’s structure parameters on decomposition and combustion characteristics of an ammonium dinitramide (ADN)-based thruster

    Yu, Yu-Song; Li, Guo-Xiu; Zhang, Tao; Chen, Jun; Wang, Meng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The decomposition and combustion process is investigated by numerical method. • Heat transfer in catalyst bed is modeled using non-isothermal and radiation model. • The wall heat transfer can impact on the distribution of temperature and species. • The value of catalyst bed length, diameter and wall thickness are optimized. - Abstract: The present investigation numerically studies the evolutions of decomposition and combustion within an ADN-based thruster, and the effects of the catalyst-bed’s three structure parameters (length, diameter, and wall thickness) on the general performance of ADN-based thruster have been systematically investigated. Based upon the calculated results, it can be known that the distribution of temperature gives a Gaussian manner at the exits of the catalyst-bed and the combustion chamber, and the temperature can be obviously effected by each the three structure parameters of the catalyst-bed. With the rise of each the three structure parameter, the temperature will first increases and decreases, and there exists an optimal design value making the temperature be the highest. Via the comparison on the maximal temperature at combustion chamber’s exit and the specific impulse, it can be obtained that the wall thickness plays an important role in the influences on the general performance of ADN-based thruster while the catalyst-bed’s length has the weak effects on the general performance among the three structure parameters.

  5. Protecting Your Home from Bed Bugs

    ... your home: Inspect the luggage rack in your hotel room for bed bugs. Check secondhand furniture, beds, ... with Bed Bug Problems Discover. Accessibility EPA Administrator Budget & Performance Contracting Grants January 19, 2017 Web Snapshot ...

  6. Tritium removal by hydrogen isotopic exchange between hydrogen gas and water on hydrophobic catalyst

    Morishita, T.; Isomura, S.; Izawa, H.; Nakane, R.

    1980-01-01

    Many kinds of the hydrophobic catalysts for hydrogen isotopic exchange between hydrogen gas and water have been prepared. The carriers are the hydrophobic organic materials such as polytetrafluoroethylene(PTFE), monofluorocarbon-PTFE mixture(PTFE-FC), and styrene-divinylbenzene copolymer(SDB). 0.1 to 2 wt % Pt is deposited on the carriers. The Pt/SDB catalyst has much higher activity than the Pt/PTFE catalyst and the Pt/PTFE-FC catalyst shows the intermediate value of catalytic activity. The observation of electron microscope shows that the degrees of dispersion of Pt particles on the hydrophobic carriers result in the difference of catalytic activities. A gas-liquid separated type column containing ten stages is constructed. Each stage is composed of both the hydrophobic catalyst bed for the hydrogen gas/water vapor isotopic exchange and the packed column type bed for the water vapor/liquid water isotopic exchange. In the column hydrogen gas and water flow countercurrently and hydrogen isotopes are separated

  7. Gas fluidized bed reactor

    Bernardelli, H. da C.

    1976-03-01

    The equations of motion for both gas and particles in a gas fluidised system are stablished through general assumptions which are generally accepted on physical grounds. The resulting model is used to study the velocity fields of each phase in the case of an isolated bubble rising close to the flat distributor plate. A well posed problem results for the solution of Laplace's equation of the potential flow of the particles when consideration is given to the presence of the distributor as a boundary condition. The corresponding stream functions are also obtained which enable the drawing of the motion patterns using numerical techniques. The following two dimensional cases are analysed: S/b=1; S/b=1,5; S/b=2,5; S/b=5 and the limiting case S/b→αinfinite. The results for the interphase exchange between bubbles and particulate phases are applied to a gas fluidised bed reactor and its effect on the chemical conversion is studied for the simplest cases of piston flow and perfect mixing in the particulate phase [pt

  8. Chaotic hydrodynamics of fluidized beds

    Van der Stappen, M.L.M. [Unit Process and Systems Engineering, Advanced Manufacturing Technology Group, Unilever Research Laboratorium, Vlaardingen (Netherlands)

    1996-12-31

    The major goals of this thesis are: (1) to develop and evaluate an analysis method based on techniques from non-linear chaos theory to characterize the nonlinear hydrodynamics of gas-solids fluidized beds quantitatively; and (2) to determine the dependence of the chaotic invariants on the operating conditions and investigate how the chaos analysis method can be profitably applied to improve scale-up and design of gas-solids fluidized bed reactors. Chaos theory is introduced in chapter 2 with emphasis on analysis techniques for (experimental) time series, known from literature at the start of this work (1990-1991). In chapter 3, the testing of existing and newly developed techniques on both model and fluidized bed data is described. This leads to the development of the chaos analysis method to analyze measured pressure fluctuations time series of a fluidized bed. Following, in chapter 4, this method is tested and all choices for the parameters are evaluated. The influence of the experimental parameters and external disturbances on the measurements and analysis results is discussed and quantified. The result is a chaos measurement and analysis protocol, which is further used in this work. In chapter 5, the applications to fluidized beds are discussed. It is shown that the entropy is a good measure for the characterization of the dynamical behavior of gas-solids bubbling/slugging fluidized beds. Entropy is applied to characterize the influence of the operating conditions, to assess regime transitions and to analyze dimensionless similar beds of different scale. Quantitative design correlations that relate entropy to the operating parameters (including the bed diameter) are described. Finally, it is discussed how the results of this work might be used in scaling up the chaotic dynamics of fluidized beds. The overall conclusions and outlook from this work are presented in chapter 6. 182 refs.

  9. Bed retained products in swept fixed bed (SFB) coal hydropyrolysis

    Mastral, A.M.; Perez-Surio, M.J. [CSIC, Zaragosa (Spain). Inst. de Carboquimica

    1997-12-31

    The hydropyrolysis of a low rank coal in a swept fixed bed (SFB) reactor is carried out by fixing the hydrogen pressure (40 kg/cm{sup 2}), the hydrogen flow (2 l/min) and the residence time (10 min) at increasing temperatures (400 C, 500 C and 600 C) and coal bed heights (h, 1.5h, 2h, 2.5h and 3h). It is shown that the percentages of tars and char directly depend on the coal bed height and that there is not only a quantitative dependence, but also the height of the coal bed is very important and plays a relevant role on the nature of the conversion products. (orig.)

  10. Bed diameter effects and incipient slugging in gas fluidized beds

    Agarwal, P.K.

    1986-01-01

    The coalescence and growth of bubble swarms formed at the distributor of a fluidized bed gives rise to lateral as well as vertical distributions of bubble properties. However, existing models employ average bubble properties obtained largely from semi-empirical considerations. In a recent Paper, the author developed a bubble growth model based on a population balance approach. Analytical expressions were derived for the bubble characteristic distributions and averages. However, the model, developed for unconstrained growth, did not take into account the effect of the bed diameter and the possibility of slugging. In this Paper, the model is extended to take these aspects into account. A slugging criterion is also developed which is expected to be valid for the regime where incipient slugging depends on the bed height as well as the region where bed height does not significantly affect minimum slugging conditions

  11. Catalytic Conversion of Biomass Pyrolysis Vapours over Sodium-Based Catalyst; A Study on teh State of Sodium on the Catalyst

    Nguyen, T.S.; Lefferts, Leonardus; Gupta, K.B. Sai Sankar; Seshan, Kulathuiyer

    2015-01-01

    In situ upgrading of biomass pyrolysis vapours over Na2CO3/γ-Al2O3 catalysts was studied in a laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactor at 500 °C. Catalytic oil exhibits a significant improvement over its non-catalytic counterpart, such as lower oxygen content (12.3 wt % compared to 42.1 wt %), higher

  12. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMER MONOLITH FORMATION

    Jantzen, C

    2006-01-01

    Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as an alternative technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of aqueous high sodium containing radioactive wastes at various DOE facilities in the United States. The addition of clay, charcoal, and a catalyst as co-reactants converts aqueous Low Activity Wastes (LAW) to a granular or ''mineralized'' waste form while converting organic components to CO 2 and steam, and nitrate/nitrite components, if any, to N 2 . The waste form produced is a multiphase mineral assemblage of Na-Al-Si (NAS) feldspathoid minerals with cage-like structures that atomically bond radionuclides like Tc-99 and anions such as SO 4 , I, F, and Cl. The granular product has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Shallow land burial requires that the mineralized waste form be able to sustain the weight of soil overburden and potential intrusion by future generations. The strength requirement necessitates binding the granular product into a monolith. FBSR mineral products were formulated into a variety of monoliths including various cements, Ceramicrete, and hydroceramics. All but one of the nine monoliths tested met the 2 durability specification for Na and Re (simulant for Tc-99) when tested using the Product Consistency Test (PCT; ASTM C1285). Of the nine monoliths tested the cements produced with 80-87 wt% FBSR product, the Ceramicrete, and the hydroceramic produced with 83.3 wt% FBSR product, met the compressive strength and durability requirements for an LAW waste form

  13. Modeling a Packed Bed Reactor Utilizing the Sabatier Process

    Shah, Malay G.; Meier, Anne J.; Hintze, Paul E.

    2017-01-01

    A numerical model is being developed using Python which characterizes the conversion and temperature profiles of a packed bed reactor (PBR) that utilizes the Sabatier process; the reaction produces methane and water from carbon dioxide and hydrogen. While the specific kinetics of the Sabatier reaction on the RuAl2O3 catalyst pellets are unknown, an empirical reaction rate equation1 is used for the overall reaction. As this reaction is highly exothermic, proper thermal control is of the utmost importance to ensure maximum conversion and to avoid reactor runaway. It is therefore necessary to determine what wall temperature profile will ensure safe and efficient operation of the reactor. This wall temperature will be maintained by active thermal controls on the outer surface of the reactor. Two cylindrical PBRs are currently being tested experimentally and will be used for validation of the Python model. They are similar in design except one of them is larger and incorporates a preheat loop by feeding the reactant gas through a pipe along the center of the catalyst bed. The further complexity of adding a preheat pipe to the model to mimic the larger reactor is yet to be implemented and validated; preliminary validation is done using the smaller PBR with no reactant preheating. When mapping experimental values of the wall temperature from the smaller PBR into the Python model, a good approximation of the total conversion and temperature profile has been achieved. A separate CFD model incorporates more complex three-dimensional effects by including the solid catalyst pellets within the domain. The goal is to improve the Python model to the point where the results of other reactor geometry can be reasonably predicted relatively quickly when compared to the much more computationally expensive CFD approach. Once a reactor size is narrowed down using the Python approach, CFD will be used to generate a more thorough prediction of the reactors performance.

  14. Using multiple bed load measurements: Toward the identification of bed dilation and contraction in gravel-bed rivers

    Marquis, G. A.; Roy, A. G.

    2012-02-01

    This study examines bed load transport processes in a small gravel-bed river (Béard Creek, Québec) using three complementary methods: bed elevation changes between successive floods, bed activity surveys using tags inserted into the bed, and bed load transport rates from bed load traps. The analysis of 20 flood events capable of mobilizing bed material led to the identification of divergent results among the methods. In particular, bed elevation changes were not consistent with the bed activity surveys. In many cases, bed elevation changes were significant (1 to 2 times the D50) even if the bed surface had not been activated during the flood, leading to the identification of processes of bed dilation and contraction that occurred over 10% to 40% of the bed surface. These dynamics of the river bed prevent accurate derivation of bed load transport rates from topographic changes, especially for low magnitude floods. This paper discusses the mechanisms that could explain the dilation and contraction of particles within the bed and their implications in fluvial dynamics. Bed contraction seems to be the result of the winnowing of the fine sediments under very low gravel transport. Bed dilation seems to occur on patches of the bed at the threshold of motion where various processes such as fine sediment infiltration lead to the maintenance of a larger sediment framework volume. Both processes are also influenced by flood history and the initial local bed state and in turn may have a significant impact on sediment transport and morphological changes in gravel-bed rivers.

  15. Immobilized glucose oxidase--catalase and their deactivation in a differential-bed loop reactor.

    Prenosil, J E

    1979-01-01

    Glucose oxidase containing catalase was immobilized with a copolymer of phenylenediamine and glutaraldehyde on pumice and titania carrier to study the enzymatic oxidation of glucose in a differential-bed loop reactor. The reaction rate was found to be first order with respect to the concentration of limiting oxygen substrate, suggesting a strong external mass-transfer resistance for all the flow rates used. The partial pressure of oxygen was varied from 21.3 up to 202.6 kPa. The use of a differential-bed loop reactor for the determination of the active enzyme concentration in the catalyst with negligible internal pore diffusion resistance is shown. Catalyst deactivation was studied, especially with respect to the presence of catalase. It is believed that the hydrogen peroxide formed in the oxidation reaction deactivates catalase first; if an excess of catalase is present, the deactivation of glucose oxidase remains small. The mathematical model subsequently developed adequately describes the experimental results.

  16. Characterization of VPO ammoxidation catalysts by in situ methods

    Martin, A.; Luecke, B.; Brueckner, A.; Steinike, U. [Institut fuer Angewandte Chemie Berlin-Adlershof e.V., Berlin (Germany); Brzezinka, K.W. [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung (BAM), Berlin (Germany); Meisel, M. [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Chemie

    1998-12-31

    In-situ methods are well known as powerful tools in studying catalyst formation processes, their solid state properties under working conditions and the interaction with the feed, intermediates and products to reveal reaction mechanisms. This paper gives a short overview on results of intense studies using in-situ techniques to reveal VPO catalyst generation processes, interaction of educts, intermediates and products with VPO catalyst surfaces and mechanistic insights. Catalytic data of the ammoxidation of toluene on different VPOs complete these findings. The precursor-catalyst transformation processes were preferently investigated by in-situ XRD, in-situ Raman and in-situ ESR spectroscopy. The interaction of aromatic molecules and intermediates, resp., and VPO solid surfaces was followed by in-situ ESR and in-situ FTIR spectroscopy. Mechanistic information was mainly obtained using in-situ FTIR spectroscopy and the temporal-analysis-of-products (TAP) technique. Catalytic studies were carried out in a fixed-bed microreactor on pure (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}(VO){sub 3}(P{sub 2}O{sub 7}){sub 2}, generated [(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}(VO{sub 3})(P{sub 2}O{sub 7}){sub 2}+V{sub x}O{sub y}] catalysts, having different V{sub x}O{sub y} proportions by use of VOHPO{sub 4} x 1/2H{sub 2}O (V/P=1) and recently studied (VO){sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} x 7 H{sub 2}O (V/P=1.5) precursors; the well-known (VO){sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} was used for comparison. (orig.)

  17. Better backs by better beds?

    Bergholdt, Kim; Fabricius, Rasmus N; Bendix, Tom

    2008-01-01

    mattresses have a positive effect on LBP, and especially a hard mattress is commonly believed to have a positive effect. METHODS: One hundred sixty CLBP patients were randomized to 1 of 3 groups, having a mattress/bed mounted in their sleeping room for 1 month. The beds were: (1) waterbed (Akva), (2) body......-conforming foam mattress (Tempur), and (3) a hard mattress (Innovation Futon). At baseline and after 4 weeks, a blinded observer interviewed the patients on LBP levels (0-10), daily function (activities of daily living, 0-30), and on the amount of sleeping hours/night. RESULTS: Because of dropout of 19 patients...... using the probably most relevant "worst case" data. There were no relevant difference between the effects of the water bed and the foam bed. CONCLUSION: The Waterbed and foam mattress' did influence back symptoms, function and sleep more positively as apposed to the hard mattress, but the differences...

  18. Top Ten Bed Bug Tips

    ... Directory Planning, Budget and Results Jobs and Internships Headquarters Offices Regional Offices Labs and Research Centers Bed ... you hire an expert, be sure it’s a company with a good reputation and request that it ...

  19. Torsion testing of bed joints

    Hansen, Klavs Feilberg; Pedersen, Carsten Mørk

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a simple test method for determining the torsion strength of a single bed joint between two bricks and presents results from testing using this test method. The setup for the torsion test is well defined, require minimal preparation of the test specimen and the test can...... be carried out directly in a normal testing machine. The torsion strength is believed to be the most important parameter in out-of-plane resistance of masonry walls subjected to bending about an axis perpendicular to the bed joints. The paper also contains a few test results from bending of small walls about...... an axis perpendicular to the bed joints, which indicate the close connection between these results and results from torsion tests. These characteristics make the torsion strength well suited to act as substitute parameter for the bending strength of masonry about an axis perpendicular to the bed joints....

  20. Sea bed mapping and inspection

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    The conference has 24 presentations on the topics: Sea bed mapping, inspection, positioning, hydrography, marine archaeology, remote operation vehicles and computerized simulation technologies, oil field activities and plans, technological experiences and problems. (tk)

  1. Ni–Sn-Supported ZrO2 Catalysts Modified by Indium for Selective CO2 Hydrogenation to Methanol

    Hengne, Amol Mahalingappa; Samal, Akshaya Kumar; Enakonda, Linga Reddy; Harb, Moussab; Gevers, Lieven; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Hedhili, Mohamed N.; Saih, Youssef; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2018-01-01

    Ni and NiSn supported on zirconia (ZrO2) and on indium (In)-incorporated zirconia (InZrO2) catalysts were prepared by a wet chemical reduction route and tested for hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol in a fixed-bed isothermal flow reactor at 250 °C

  2. Development of GREET Catalyst Module

    Wang, Zhichao [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division; Dunn, Jennifer B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division; Cronauer, Donald C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division

    2014-09-01

    Catalysts are critical inputs for many pathways that convert biomass into biofuels. Energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions during the production of catalysts and chemical inputs influence the life-cycle energy consumption, and GHG emissions of biofuels and need to be considered in biofuel life-cycle analysis (LCA). In this report, we develop energy and material flows for the production of three different catalysts (tar reforming, alcohol synthesis, Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 [ZSM-5]) and two chemicals (olivine, dimethyl ether of polyethylene glycol [DEPG]). These compounds and catalysts are now included in the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET™) catalyst module. They were selected because they are consumed in existing U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) analyses of biofuel processes. For example, a thermochemical ethanol production pathway (indirect gasification and mixed alcohol synthesis) developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) uses olivine, DEPG, and tar reforming and alcohol synthesis catalysts (Dutta et al., 2011). ZSM-5 can be used in biofuel production pathways such as catalytic upgrading of sugars into hydrocarbons (Biddy and Jones, 2013). Other uses for these compounds and catalysts are certainly possible. In this report, we document the data sources and methodology we used to develop material and energy flows for the catalysts and compounds in the GREET catalyst module. In Section 2 we focus on compounds used in the model Dutta et al. (2011) developed. In Section 3, we report material and energy flows associated with ZSM-5 production. Finally, in Section 4, we report results.

  3. Engineering New Catalysts for In-Process Elimination of Tars

    Felix, Larry G. [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    2012-09-30

    The key objective of this project was to develop a new and more efficient methodology for engineering and economically producing optimized robust catalysts for the reduction or elimination of tars in biomass gasification. Whereas current catalyst technology typically disposes thin layers of catalytically-active material onto rigid supports via wet chemistry-based methods, this project investigated novel thermal methods for directly incorporating catalytically active materials onto robust supports as well as novel approaches for incorporating catalytically active materials on and/or within an otherwise inert refractory support material which is then subsequently formed and processed to create a catalytically-active material on all exposed surfaces. Specifically, the focus of this engineered catalyst development was on materials which were derived from, or otherwise related to, olivine-like minerals, due to the inherent attrition resistance and moderate catalytic properties exhibited by natural olivine when used in a fluidized bed biomass gasifier. Task 1 of this project successfully demonstrated the direct thermal impregnation of catalytically-active materials onto an olivine substrate, with the production of a Ni-olivine catalyst. Nickel and nickel oxide were thermally impregnated onto an olivine substrate and when reduced were shown to demonstrate improved catalytic activity over the baseline olivine material and equal the tar-decomposing performance of Ni-olivine catalysts prepared by conventional wet impregnation. Task 2 involved coordination with our subcontracted project partners to further develop and characterize catalyst formulations and to optimize activity and production methods. Within this task, several significant new materials were developed. NexTech Materials developed a sintered ceramic nickel-magnesium-silicate catalyst that demonstrated superb catalytic activity and high resistance to deactivation by H2S. Alfred University developed both supported

  4. Gasification of Biomass with CO2 and H2O Mixtures in a Catalytic Fluidised Bed.

    Jeremiáš, Michal; Pohořelý, Michael; Svoboda, Karel; Manovic, V.; Anthony, E.J.; Skoblia, S.; Beňo, Z.; Šyc, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 210, DEC 15 (2017), s. 605-610 ISSN 0016-2361 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC14-09692J Grant - others:NSC(TW) 103-2923-E-042A-001-MY3 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : fluidised bed * gasification * catalyst Subject RIV: JE - Non-nuclear Energetics, Energy Consumption ; Use OBOR OECD: Energy and fuels Impact factor: 4.601, year: 2016

  5. Gasification of Biomass with CO2 and H2O Mixtures in a Catalytic Fluidised Bed.

    Jeremiáš, Michal; Pohořelý, Michael; Svoboda, Karel; Manovic, V.; Anthony, E.J.; Skoblia, S.; Beňo, Z.; Šyc, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 210, DEC 15 (2017), s. 605-610 ISSN 0016-2361 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC14-09692J Grant - others:NSC(TW) 103-2923-E-042A-001-MY3 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : fluidised bed * gasification * catalyst Subject RIV: JE - Non-nuclear Energetics, Energy Consumption ; Use OBOR OECD: Energy and fuel s Impact factor: 4.601, year: 2016

  6. Fluid-bed methane proposed

    1981-05-01

    The first full scale plant for the production of methane from organic waste could be built in the next few years believes M.J. Nyns of the University of Louvain, Belgium, utilizing either expanded bed or fluidised bed systems, with more than one stage, in a continuous flow arrangement. Up to 8.0 m cubed gas/m cubed digester/day could be produced with residence times reduced to 34 hours.

  7. Dispersion of Bed Load Particles

    SAWAI, Kenji

    1987-01-01

    The motion of bed load particles is so irregular that they disperse remarkably with time.In this study, some flume tests using painted tracer particles were carried out, in which thedispersive property of tracers changed variously with sediment feed rate.In analysing this process, a stochastic simulation model is proposed where it is discussedabout the degree of exposure of individual particle near the bed surface and about the variationof its pick up rate. The exponential distribution of ste...

  8. Deactivation and regeneration of refinery catalysts

    Furimsky, E.

    1979-08-01

    A discussion covers the mechanisms of catalyst aging, poisoning, coke deposition, and metals deposition; feedstock pretreatment to extend catalyst life; the effects of operating conditions; the effects of catalyst composition and structure on its stability; nonchemical deactivation processes; and methods of catalyst regeneration, including coke burn-off and solvent extraction.

  9. Increasing the lifetime of fuel cell catalysts

    Latsuzbaia, R.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, I discuss a novel idea of fuel cell catalyst regeneration to increase lifetime of the PEM fuel cell electrode/catalyst operation and, therefore, reduce the catalyst costs. As many of the catalyst degradation mechanisms are difficult to avoid, the regeneration is alternative option to

  10. Impeded solid state reactions and transformations in ceramic catalysts supports and catalysts

    Ernő E. Kiss

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Impeded chemical reactions and impeded polymorphous transformation in materials are discussed, as desired effects, for stabilization of ceramic catalyst supports and ceramic based catalysts. This paper gives a short overview about the possibilities of slowing down the aging processes in ceramic catalyst supports and catalysts. Special attention is given to alumina and titania based catalysts.

  11. Barriers to high conversion operations in an ebullated bed unit -- Relationship between sedimentation and operability

    Sherwood, D. [Criterion Catalysts Company L.P., Houston, TX (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Ebullated-Bed (EB) catalytic processes are high temperature, high pressure residue hydrocrackers, which transform sour feeds into light, sweet products. EB processes typically involve one or more trains, with one, two, or three EB reactors in series. The key to operating any EB process is to control the 'sediment' which tends to increase with increasing level of conversion. Sediment problems are generally attributed to the catalyst. While this is true in some cases, there are certain problems that occur regardless of the catalyst used, whereas in some situations sediments from the EB process can actually be controlled by the catalyst. This paper describes two typical sedimentation patterns; one in which the sediment increases, and another in which sediment decreases as the EB products move through the recovery section. The benefits of sediment control are illustrated for the latter sedimentation pattern.

  12. Catalytic pyrolysis of woody biomass in a fluidized bed reactor: influence of the zeolite structure

    A. Aho; N. Kumar; K. Eranen; T. Salmi; M. Hupa; D.Yu. Murzin [Aabo Akademi University, Aabo/Turku (Finland). Process Chemistry Centre, Laboratory of Industrial Chemistry and Reaction Engineering

    2008-09-15

    Catalytic pyrolysis of biomass from pine wood was carried out in a fluidized bed reactor at 450{sup o}C. Different structures of acidic zeolite catalysts were used as bed material in the reactor. Proton forms of Beta, Y, ZSM-5, and Mordenite were tested as catalysts in the pyrolysis of pine, while quartz sand was used as a reference material in the non-catalytic pyrolysis experiments. The yield of the pyrolysis product phases was only slightly influenced by the structures, at the same time the chemical composition of the bio-oil was dependent on the structure of acidic zeolite catalysts. Ketones and phenols were the dominating groups of compounds in the bio-oil. The formation of ketones was higher over ZSM-5 and the amount of acids and alcohols lower than over the other bed materials tested. Mordenite and quartz sand produced smaller quantities of polyaromatic hydrocarbons than the other materials tested. It was possible to successfully regenerate the spent zeolites without changing the structure of the zeolite. 12 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Rare earth metals for automotive exhaust catalysts

    Shinjoh, Hirohumi

    2006-01-01

    The usage of rare earth metals for automotive exhaust catalysts is demonstrated in this paper. Rare earth metals have been widely used in automotive catalysts. In particular, three-way catalysts require the use of ceria compounds as oxygen storage materials, and lanthana as both a stabilizer of alumina and a promoter. The application for diesel catalysts is also illustrated. Effects of inclusion of rare earth metals in automotive catalysts are discussed

  14. Biomass processing over gold catalysts

    Simakova, Olga A; Murzin, Dmitry Yu

    2014-01-01

    The book describes the valorization of biomass-derived compounds over gold catalysts. Since biomass is a rich renewable feedstock for diverse platform molecules, including those currently derived from petroleum, the interest in various transformation routes has become intense. Catalytic conversion of biomass is one of the main approaches to improving the economic viability of biorefineries.  In addition, Gold catalysts were found to have outstanding activity and selectivity in many key reactions. This book collects information about transformations of the most promising and important compounds derived from cellulose, hemicelluloses, and woody biomass extractives. Since gold catalysts possess high stability under oxidative conditions, selective oxidation reactions were discussed more thoroughly than other critical reactions such as partial hydrogenation, acetalization, and isomerization. The influence of reaction conditions, the role of the catalyst, and the advantages and disadvantages of using gold are pre...

  15. Development of an enzyme fluidized bed reactor equipped with static mixers: application to lactose hydrolysis in whey

    Fauquex, P F; Flaschel, E; Renken, A

    1984-01-01

    Reactor operation with immobilized enzymes in fixed bed arrangement is often impaired due to the presence of finely divided solid matter, adsorbing substances or gas. The fluidized bed reactor would be applied in such cases owing to a limited pressure drop, a controlled voidage, and the avoidance of perforated plates for catalyst retention. Since enzymic reactions are often slow processes, catalysts of high external surface area should be provided together with sufficient time. However, classical fluidized beds suffer from hydrodynamic instability under these conditions. Therefore, a new reactor design was developed which used motionless mixers as internals. Fluidized bed reactors equipped with internals exhibit an outstanding hydrodynamic stability accompanied by an increase of the operating range in terms of flow rate by a factor of 4 compared to the classical fluidized bed. Results are presented, with emphasis on the backmixing and expansion characteristics. Various motionless mixers were investigated in columns of 39 and 150 mm in diameter. The fluidized bed equipped with internals was used for lactose hydrolysis in partially deproteinized whey. The lactase from Aspergillus niger immobilized on silica gel particles of 125-160 molm had a half-life of approximately 1 mo.

  16. The advanced CECE process for enriching tritium by the chemical exchange method with a hydrophobic catalyst

    Kitamoto, Asashi; Shimizu, Masami; Masui, Takashi.

    1992-01-01

    The monothermal chemical exchange process with electrolysis, i.e., CECE process, was an effective method for enriching and removing tritium from tritiated water with low to middle level activity. The purpose of this study is to propose the theoretical background of the two-parameter evaluation method, which is based on a two-step isotope exchange reaction between hydrogen gas and liquid water, for improvement of the performance of a hydrophobic catalyst by a trickle bed-type column. Finally, a two-parameter method could attain the highest performance of isotope separation and the lowest liquid holdup for a trickle bed-type column. Therefore, this method will present some effective and practical procedures in scaling up a tritium enrichment process. The main aspect of the CECE process in engineering design and system evaluation was to develop the isotope exchange column with a high performance catalyst. (author)

  17. Selective Ring Opening of 1-Methylnaphthalene Over NiW-Supported Catalyst Using Dealuminated Beta Zeolite.

    Kim, Eun-Sang; Lee, You-Jin; Kim, Jeong-Rang; Kim, Joo-Wan; Kim, Tae-Wan; Chae, Ho-Jeong; Kim, Chul-Ung; Lee, Chang-Ha; Jeong, Soon-Yong

    2016-02-01

    Nanoporous Beta zeolite was dealuminated by weak acid treatment for reducing the acidity. Bi-functional catalysts were prepared using commercial Beta zeolites and the dealuminated zeolites for acidic function, NiW for metallic function. 1-Methylnaphthalene was selected as a model compound for multi-ring aromatics in heavy oil, and its selective ring opening reaction has been investigated using the prepared bi-functional catalysts with different acidity in fixed bed reaction system. The dealuminated Beta zeolites, which crystal structure and nanoporosity were maintained, showed the higher SiO2/Al2O3 ratio and smaller acidity than their original zeolite. NiW-supported catalyst using the dealuminated Beta zeolite with SiO2/Al203 mole ratio of 55 showed the highest performance for the selective ring opening. The acidity of catalyst seemed to play an important role as active sites for the selective ring opening of 1-methylnaphthalene but there should be some optimum catalyst acidity for the reaction. The acidity of Beta zeolite could be controlled by the acid treatment and the catalyst with the optimum acidity for the selective ring opening could be prepared.

  18. N2O Decomposition over Cu–Zn/γ–Al2O3 Catalysts

    Runhu Zhang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cu–Zn/γ–Al2O3 catalysts were prepared by the impregnation method. Catalytic activity was evaluated for N2O decomposition in a fixed bed reactor. The fresh and used catalysts were characterized by several techniques such as BET surface area, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The Cu–Zn/γ–Al2O3 catalysts exhibit high activity and stability for N2O decomposition in mixtures simulating real gas from adipic acid production, containing N2O, O2, NO, CO2, and CO. Over the Cu–Zn/γ–Al2O3 catalysts, 100% of N2O conversion was obtained at about 601 °C at a gas hourly space velocity (GHSV of 7200 h−1. Cu–Zn/γ–Al2O3 catalysts also exhibited considerably good durability, and no obvious activity loss was observed in the 100 h stability test. The Cu–Zn/γ–Al2O3 catalysts are promising for the abatement of this powerful greenhouse gas in the chemical industry, particularly in adipic acid production.

  19. Effects of K and Pt promoters on the performance of cobalt catalyst supported on CNTs

    Zabidi, Noor Asmawati Mohd; Ali, Sardar; Subbarao, Duvvuri

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a comparative study on the effects of incorporation of potassium (K) and platinum (Pt) as promoters on the physicochemical properties of cobalt catalyst. The catalyst was prepared by a wet impregnation method on a CNTs support. Samples were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), H 2 -temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) was carried out in a fixed-bed microreactor at 543 K and 1 atm, with H 2 /CO = 2v/v and space velocity, SV of 12 L/g.h for 5 hours. The K-promoted and Pt-promoted Co catalysts have different physicochemical properties and catalytic performances compared to that of the un-promoted Co catalyst. XPS analysis revealed that K and Pt promoters induced electronic modifications as exhibited by the shifts in the Co binding energies. Incorporation of 0.06 wt% K and 0.06 wt% Pt in Co/CNTs catalyst resulted in an increase in the CO conversion and C 5+ selectivity and a decrease in methane selectivity. Potassium was found to be a better promoter for Co/CNTs catalyst compared to platinum

  20. Effects of K and Pt promoters on the performance of cobalt catalyst supported on CNTs

    Zabidi, Noor Asmawati Mohd, E-mail: noorasmawati-mzabidi@petronas.com.my [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia); Ali, Sardar, E-mail: alikhan-635@yahoo.com [Centralized Analytical Laboratory, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia); Subbarao, Duvvuri, E-mail: duvvuri-subbarao@petronas.com.my [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24

    This paper presents a comparative study on the effects of incorporation of potassium (K) and platinum (Pt) as promoters on the physicochemical properties of cobalt catalyst. The catalyst was prepared by a wet impregnation method on a CNTs support. Samples were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), H{sub 2}-temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) was carried out in a fixed-bed microreactor at 543 K and 1 atm, with H{sub 2}/CO = 2v/v and space velocity, SV of 12 L/g.h for 5 hours. The K-promoted and Pt-promoted Co catalysts have different physicochemical properties and catalytic performances compared to that of the un-promoted Co catalyst. XPS analysis revealed that K and Pt promoters induced electronic modifications as exhibited by the shifts in the Co binding energies. Incorporation of 0.06 wt% K and 0.06 wt% Pt in Co/CNTs catalyst resulted in an increase in the CO conversion and C{sub 5+} selectivity and a decrease in methane selectivity. Potassium was found to be a better promoter for Co/CNTs catalyst compared to platinum.

  1. Fischer-Tropsch Cobalt Catalyst Activation and Handling Through Wax Enclosure Methods

    Klettlinger, Jennifer L. S.; Yen, Chia H.; Nakley, Leah M.; Surgenor, Angela D.

    2016-01-01

    Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis is considered a gas to liquid process which converts syn-gas, a gaseous mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide, into liquids of various hydrocarbon chain length and product distributions. Cobalt based catalysts are used in F-T synthesis and are the focus of this paper. One key concern with handling cobalt based catalysts is that the active form of catalyst is in a reduced state, metallic cobalt, which oxidizes readily in air. In laboratory experiments, the precursor cobalt oxide catalyst is activated in a fixed bed at 350 ?C then transferred into a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) with inert gas. NASA has developed a process which involves the enclosure of active cobalt catalyst in a wax mold to prevent oxidation during storage and handling. This improved method allows for precise catalyst loading and delivery into a CSTR. Preliminary results indicate similar activity levels in the F-T reaction in comparison to the direct injection method. The work in this paper was supported by the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Subsonics Fixed Wing Project.

  2. Bimetallic catalysts for HI decomposition in the iodine-sulfur thermochemical cycle

    Wang Laijun; Hu Songzhi; Xu Lufei; Li Daocai; Han Qi; Chen Songzhe; Zhang Ping; Xu Jingming

    2014-01-01

    Among the different kinds of thermochemical water-splitting cycles, the iodine-sulfur (IS) cycle has attracted more and more interest because it is one of the promising candidates for economical and massive hydrogen production. However, there still exist some science and technical problems to be solved before industrialization of the IS process. One such problem is the catalytic decomposition of hydrogen iodide. Although the active carbon supported platinum has been verified to present the excellent performance for HI decomposition, it is very expensive and easy to agglomerate under the harsh condition. In order to decrease the cost and increase the stability of the catalysts for HI decomposition, a series of bimetallic catalysts were prepared and studied at INET. This paper summarized our present research advances on the bimetallic catalysts (Pt-Pd, Pd-Ir and Pt-Ir) for HI decomposition. In the course of the study, the physical properties, structure, and morphology of the catalysts were characterized by specific surface area, X-ray diffractometer; and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. The catalytic activity for HI decomposition was investigated in a fixed bed reactor under atmospheric pressure. The results show that due to the higher activity and better stability, the active carbon supported bimetallic catalyst is more potential candidate than mono metallic Pt catalyst for HI decomposition in the IS thermochemical cycle. (author)

  3. The effect of zirconium on cobalt catalyst in fischer-tropsch synthesis

    Moradi, GH.R.; Mahbob Basir, M.; Taeb, A.

    2003-01-01

    A series of 10 wt % Co/SiO 2 catalysts with different loading ratios of zirconia (0, 5, 10, 15, 20) has been prepared through an original pseudo sol-gel method. All catalysts were characterized by BET, XRD, SEM, and TPR experiments. The catalytic performance of the catalysts for the so-called fischer- tropsch synthesis was examined under H 2 /CO=2 at 230 d ig C and 8 bar in a fixed bed microreactor. By increasing zirconia, the Co-SiO 2 interaction decreases and is replaced by Co-Zr interaction which favours reduction of the catalyst at lower temperatures. While it leads to a higher degree of reduction and as increase in the metallic cobalt atoms on the surface. The activity of the promoted catalysts increases with the addition of zirconia (max. by a factor 2.5). The C 1 0 + selectivity increased with the addition of zirconia (from 42.3% in unpromoted catalyst to 68.8 % in the 20 % ZrO 2 promoted. This can be attributed to the higher amount of the surface Cobalt metal present and to the larger Cobalt particle size

  4. Monitoring catalyst flow rate in a FCC cold pilot unity by gamma ray transmission measurements

    Brito, Marcio F.P.; Netto, Wilson F.S.; Miranda, Marcia V.F.E.S.; Junior, Isacc A.S.; Dantas, Carlos C.; Melo, Silvio B.; Lima, Emerson A.O.

    2013-01-01

    A model for monitoring catalyst mass flow in riser of Fluid Catalytic Cracking - FCC, pilot unity as a function of air flow and solid injection is proposed. The fluidized FCC- catalyst bed system is investigated in an experimental setup the Cold Pilot Unity - CPU by means of gamma ray transmission measurements. Riser in CPU simulates the reactor in FCC process. By automation control air flow is instrumentally measured in riser and the solid injection is manually controlled by valve adjusting. Keeping a constant solid injection, catalyst level at the return column was measured by gamma transmission for several air flow values in riser. The operational condition reached a steady state regime before given to setup a new air flow value. A calibration of catalyst level as a function of air flow in riser is calculated, therefore, a model for solid feed rate is derived. Recent published work evaluates solid concentration in riser of the CPU by means of gamma ray transmission, and a correlation with air velocity is obtained. In this work, the model for solid feed rate was further investigated by carrying out experiments to measure catalyst concentration at the same air flow values. These experiments lead to a model for monitoring catalyst flow in riser as function of solid feed rate and air flow. Simulation with random numbers produced with Matlab software allows to define validation criteria for the model parameters. (author)

  5. Naphthenic acid removal from HVGO by alkaline earth metal catalysts

    Ding, L.; Rahimi, P.; Hawkins, R.; Bhatt, S.; Shi, Y. [National Centre for Upgrading Technology, Devon, AB (Canada); Natural Resources Canada, Devon, AB (Canada). CanmetENERGY

    2009-07-01

    This poster highlighted a study that investigated naphthenic acid removal from bitumen-derived heavy vacuum gas oil (HVGO) by thermal cracking and catalytic decarboxylation over alkaline earth-metal oxides and ZnO catalysts in a batch reactor and a continuous fixed-bed reactor. X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA) temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}-TPD), and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the fresh and spent catalysts. With MgO and ZnO, naphthenic acid removal proceeded via catalytic decarboxylation. No crystalline phase changes were observed after reaction. With CaO, multiple pathways such as catalytic decarboxylation, neutralization, and thermal cracking were responsible for naphthenic acid conversion. The spent catalysts contained Ca(OH){sub 2} and CaCO{sub 3}. With BaO, naphthenic acid conversion occurred through neutralization. All BaO was converted to Ba(OH){sub 2} during the reaction. tabs., figs.

  6. Utility of Recycled Bedding for Laboratory Rodents

    Miyamoto, Toru; Li, Zhixia; Kibushi, Tomomi; Okano, Shinya; Yamasaki, Nakamichi; Kasai, Noriyuki

    2009-01-01

    Animal facilities generate a large amount of used bedding containing excrement as medical waste. We developed a recycling system for used bedding that involves soft hydrothermal processing. In this study, we examined the effects of bedding type on growth, hematologic and serum biochemical values, and organ weights of female and male mice reared on either recycled or fresh bedding from 3 to 33 wk of age. Neither growth nor physiology differed between mice housed on recycled bedding compared wi...

  7. Fluid bed porosity equation for an inverse fluidized bed bioreactor with particles growing biofilm

    Campos-Diaz, K. E.; Limas-Ballesteros, R.

    2009-01-01

    Fluid Bed Bioreactor performance is strongly affected by bed void fraction or bed porosity fluctuations. Particle size enlargement due to biofilm growth is an important factor that is involved in these variations and until now there are no mathematical equations that consider biofilm growth. In this work a mathematical equation is proposed to calculate bed void fraction in an inverse fluid bed bioreactor. (Author)

  8. The innovation catalysts.

    Martin, Roger L

    2011-06-01

    A few years ago the software development company Intuit realized that it needed a new approach to galvanizing customers. The company's Net Promoter Score was faltering, and customer recommendations of new products were especially disappointing. Intuit decided to hold a two-day, off-site meeting for the company's top 300 managers with a focus on the role of design in innovation. One of the days was dedicated to a program called Design for Delight. The centerpiece of the day was a PowerPoint presentation by Intuit founder Scott Cook, who realized midway through that he was no Steve Jobs: The managers listened dutifully, but there was little energy in the room. By contrast, a subsequent exercise in which the participants worked through a design challenge by creating prototypes, getting feedback, iterating, and refining, had them mesmerized. The eventual result was the creation of a team of nine design-thinking coaches--"innovation catalysts"--from across Intuit who were made available to help any work group create prototypes, run experiments, and learn from customers. The process includes a "painstorm" (to determine the customer's greatest pain point), a "soljam" (to generate and then winnow possible solutions), and a "code-jam" (to write code "good enough" to take to customers within two weeks). Design for Delight has enabled employees throughout Intuit to move from satisfying customers to delighting them.

  9. Clinical physiology of bed rest

    Greenleaf, John E.

    1993-01-01

    Maintenance of optimal health in humans requires the proper balance between exercise, rest, and sleep as well as time in the upright position. About one-third of a lifetime is spent sleeping; and it is no coincidence that sleeping is performed in the horizontal position, the position in which gravitational influence on the body is minimal. Although enforced bed rest is necessary for the treatment of some ailments, in some cases it has probably been used unwisely. In addition to the lower hydrostatic pressure with the normally dependent regions of the cardiovascular system, body fuid compartments during bed rest in the horizontal body position, and virtual elimination of compression on the long bones of the skeletal system during bed rest (hypogravia), there is often reduction in energy metabolism due to the relative confinement (hypodynamia) and alteration of ambulatory circadian variations in metabolism, body temperature, and many hormonal systems. If patients are also moved to unfamiliar surroundings, they probably experience some feelings of anxiety and some sociopsychological problems. Adaptive physiological responses during bed rest are normal for that environment. They are attempts by the body to reduce unnecessary energy expenditure, to optimize its function, and to enhance its survival potential. Many of the deconditioning responses begin within the first day or two of bed rest; these early responses have prompted physicians to insist upon early resumption of the upright posture and ambulation of bedridden patients.

  10. Particle Bed Reactor scaling relationships

    Slovik, G.; Araj, K.; Horn, F.L.; Ludewig, H.; Benenati, R.

    1987-01-01

    Scaling relationships for Particle Bed Reactors (PBRs) are discussed. The particular applications are short duration systems, i.e., for propulsion or burst power. Particle Bed Reactors can use a wide selection of different moderators and reflectors and be designed for such a wide range of power and bed power densities. Additional design considerations include the effect of varying the number of fuel elements, outlet Mach number in hot gas channel, etc. All of these variables and options result in a wide range of reactor weights and performance. Extremely light weight reactors (approximately 1 kg/MW) are possible with the appropriate choice of moderator/reflector and power density. Such systems are very attractive for propulsion systems where parasitic weight has to be minimized

  11. Fluidized-bed nuclear reactor

    Grimmett, E.S.; Kunze, J.F.

    1975-01-01

    A reactor vessel containing a fluidized-bed region of particulate material including both a neutron-moderating and a fertile substance is described. A gas flow including fissile material passes through the vessel at a sufficient rate to fluidize the particulate material and at a sufficient density to support a thermal fission reaction within the fluidized-bed region. The high-temperature portion of a heat transfer system is located within the fluidized-bed region of the reactor vessel in direct contact with the fluidized particles. Heat released by fission is thereby transferred at an enhanced rate to a coolant circulating within the heat transfer system. Fission products are continuously removed from the gas flow and supplemental fissile material added during the reactor operation. (U.S.)

  12. Preparation of Pt-PTFE hydrophobic catalyst for hydrogen-water isotope exchange

    Li Junhua; Kang Yi; Han Yande; Ruan Hao; Dou Qincheng; Hu Shilin

    2001-01-01

    The hydrophobic catalyst used in the hydrogen-water isotope exchange is prepared with Pt as the active metal, PTFE as the hydrophobic material, active carbon or silicon dioxide as the support. The isotope catalytic exchange reaction between hydrogen and water is carried out in the trickle bed and the effects of different carriers, mass fraction of Pt and PTFE on the catalytic activity are discussed. The experimental results show that the activity of Pt-C-PTFE hydrophobic catalyst with the ratio between PTFE and Pt-C from 1 to 2 is higher than other kinds of catalysts and the overall volume transfer coefficient is increased with the increasing of the hydrogen flow rate and reaction temperature

  13. Development of nuclear methods for determining fluid-dynamic parameters in fluid catalyst cracking reactors

    Santos, V.A. dos; Dantas, C.C.

    1986-01-01

    Flow parameters of circulating fluidized bed in a simulated Fluid Catalyst Cracking reactor were determined by means of nuclear methods. The parameters were: residence time, density, inventory, circulation rate and radial distribution, for the catalyst; residence time for the gaseous phase. The nuclear methods where the gamma attenuation and the radiotracer. Two tracer techniques were developed, one for tagging of the catalyst by the 59 Fe as intrinsic tracer and another for tagging of the gaseous phase by the CH 3 82 Br as tracer. A detailed description of each measuring technique for all the investigated parameters is included. To carry out the determination for some of parameters a combination of the two methods was also applied. The results and the nuclear data are given in a table. (Author) [pt

  14. Thiophene hydrodesulfurization over CoMo/Al2O3-CuY catalysts: Temperature effect study

    Yamina Boukoberine

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available CoMo/γ-Al2O3-CuY catalysts are prepared by physically mixing CoMo/γ-Al2O3 catalyst with Cu-exchanged Y zeolite. The CuY zeolite is prepared by the solid state ion exchange technique. The thiophene hydrodesulfurization is performed in a fixed bed reactor at high temperature and atmospheric pressure. The results show that the presence of CuY zeolite particles in CoMo/Al2O3 catalyst can have a noticeable effect on both the conversion and product selectivities. An increasing zeolite loading in catalyst results in a decrease of the thiophene HDS activity. This decrease is probably caused by the formation of heavy compounds and the deactivation of the zeolite at high temperatures.

  15. In-line localized monitoring of catalyst activity in selective catalytic NO.sub.x reduction systems

    Muzio, Lawrence J [Laguna Niguel, CA; Smith, Randall A [Huntington Beach, CA

    2009-12-22

    Localized catalyst activity in an SCR unit for controlling emissions from a boiler, power plant, or any facility that generates NO.sub.x-containing flue gases is monitored by one or more modules that operate on-line without disrupting the normal operation of the facility. Each module is positioned over a designated lateral area of one of the catalyst beds in the SCR unit, and supplies ammonia, urea, or other suitable reductant to the catalyst in the designated area at a rate that produces an excess of the reductant over NO.sub.x on a molar basis through the designated area. Sampling probes upstream and downstream of the designated area draw samples of the gas stream for NO.sub.x analysis, and the catalyst activity is determined from the difference in NO.sub.x levels between the two probes.

  16. Prediction of bed level variations in nonuniform sediment bed channel

    B R Andharia

    2018-04-12

    Apr 12, 2018 ... A fully-coupled 1D mobile-bed model (CAR-. ICHAR) was introduced ...... for sediment trap, water level sensor, tail gate operated by lever arm at .... materials were brought back to upstream to feed the same through sediment ...

  17. Catalytic pyrolysis of Tetraselmis and Isochrysis microalgae by nickel ceria based catalysts for hydrocarbon production

    Aysu, Tevfik; Abd Rahman, Nur Adilah; Sanna, Aimaro

    2016-01-01

    The catalytic pyrolysis of Tetraselmis sp. and Isochrysis sp. was carried out over ceria based catalysts in a fixed bed reactor. There was a clear effect of the catalysts on the product yields and quality, with the catalysts able to recover a large fraction of the starting microalgae energy (67–77%) in the bio-oils. Bio-oil yield was found to be higher in presence of Ni–Ce/Al_2O_3 and Ni–Ce/ZrO_2 (26 wt.%). The produced bio-oils had HHVs (higher heating values) of 34–35 MJ/kg and suffered strong deoxygenation, with O level decreased from 40–41% in the starting microalgae to 9–15%. Also, 15–20% N removal was obtained using the ceria based catalysts. The oxygen contents in the bio-oils were remarkably lower than those previously obtained using ZSM-5 (25%) and other species without catalyst (17–24%). "1H NMR and GC–MS analysis showed that the bio-oils were enriched in aliphatics and depleted in N-compounds and water using the ceria based catalysts. - Highlights: • Nickel-ceria based catalysts were evaluated for the in-situ conversion of Tetraselmis and Isochrysis microalgae. • Catalysts recovered 72–77% of the starting microalgae energy in bio-oils. • Bio-oils suffered strong deoxygenation, with O level decreased from 40–41% in the starting microalgae to 9–15%. • Bio-oils were enriched in aliphatics and depleted in N-compounds.

  18. Application in industry and energy production of active carbon/cobalt catalyst for nitrogen oxide neutralization

    Mekhandzhiev, D.; Nikolov, R.; Lyutskanov, L.; Dushanov, D.; Lakov, L.

    1997-01-01

    A new material for neutralization of nitrogen oxides is presented. Two or three metals containing catalysts with a good activity and selectivity towards NO x have been obtained. Preparation of carbon catalysts by deposition of the active phase precursor on the initial carbon material prior to activation is considered as the most promising method. An active carbon-based catalyst (AC/Co) has been synthesized Apricot shells preliminary impregnated with a water-alcohol solution of Co nitrate have been used as initial carbon material. after drying they have been subjected to one-phase steam pyrolysis using a fix-bed reactor. The catalyst thus obtained has a specific surface area (BET) of 53 m 2 g -1 , a favorable mesopore volume/total volume ratio (about 0.85) determined by nitrogen adsorption, a suitable mesopore distribution, about 70% of the mesopores being characterized by r p larger than 25 A and a high dispersion of the Co oxide phase. In addition the catalyst possesses the necessary mechanical resistance. The catalyst has exhibited a high activity with respect to NO x reduction with CO at low temperatures (at 150-250 o C which are the temperatures of industrial flue gases, nO conversion up to 60-95% occurs) and a high selectivity. No presence of H 2 O has been established over the whole temperature range (100-300 o C). An additional advantage of the catalyst is the fact that the amount of CO above 150 o C is lower than the stoichiometric which indicates parallel participation in the process of both the active phase and the support (active carbon) It is also important that the presented catalyst has a low price due to the use of waste products from agriculture and the elimination of special thermal treatment of the supported Co nitrate. There are possibilities of using of other organic wastes from agriculture as well as wastes obtained during flotation of coal. (author)

  19. HZSM-5 Catalyst for Cracking Palm Oil to Gasoline: A Comparative Study with and without Impregnation

    Achmad Roesyadi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available It is important to develop a renewable source of energy to overcome a limited source fossil energy. Palm oil is a potential alternative and environmental friendly energy resource in Indonesia due to high production capacity of this vegetable oil. The research studied effect of catalyst to selectivity of biofuel product from cracking of palm oil. The catalyst consisted of HZSM-5 catalyst with or without impregnation. The research was conducted in two steps, namely catalyst synthesized and catalytic cracking process. HZSM-5 was synthesized using Plank methods. The characterization of the synthesized catalysts used AAS (Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and BET (Brunaueur Emmet Teller. The cracking was carried out in a fixed bed microreactor with diameter of 1 cm and length of 16 cm which was filled with 0.6 gram catalyst. The Zn/HZSM-5 catalyst was recommended for cracking palm oil for the high selectivity to gasoline. © 2013 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.(Selected Paper from International Conference on Chemical and Material Engineering (ICCME 2012Received: 28th September 2012; Revised: 19th November 2012; Accepted: 20th December 2012[How to Cite: A. Roesyadi, D. Hariprajitno, N. Nurjannah, S.D. Savitri, (2013. HZSM-5 Catalyst for Cracking Palm Oil to Gasoline: A Comparative Study with and without Impregnation. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 7 (3: 185-190.(doi:10.9767/bcrec.7.3.4045.185-190][Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.7.3.4045.185-190 ] View in  |

  20. Carbon nanotubes shynthesis in fluidized bed reactor equipped with a cyclone

    Setyopratomo, P.; Sudibandriyo, M.; Wulan, P. P. D. K.

    2018-03-01

    This work aimed to observe the performance of a fluidized bed reactor which was equipped with a cyclone in the synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNT) by chemical vapor deposition. Liquefied petroleum gas with a constant volumetric flow rate of 1940 cm3/minutes was fed to the reactor as a carbon source, while a combination of metal components of Fe-Co-Mo supported on MgO was used as catalyst. The CNT synthesis was carried out at a reaction temperature which was maintained at around 800 – 850 °C for 1 hour. The CNT yield was decreased sharply when the catalyst feed was increased. The carbon efficiency is directly proportional to the mass of catalyst fed. It was found from the experiment that the mass of as-grown CNT increased in proportion to the increase of the catalyst mass fed. A sharp increase of the mass percentage of carbon nanotubes entrainment happened when the catalyst feed was raised from 3 to 7 grams. Agglomerates of carbon nanotubes have been formed. The agglomerates composed of mutually entangled carbon nanotubes which have an outer diameter range 8 – 14 nm and an inner diameter range 4 – 10 nm, which confirmed that the multi-walled carbon nanotubes were formed in this synthesis. It was found that the mesopores dominate the pore structure of the CNT product and contribute more than 90 % of the total pore volume.

  1. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMER MONOLITH FORMATION

    Jantzen, C

    2006-12-22

    Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as an alternative technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of aqueous high sodium containing radioactive wastes at various DOE facilities in the United States. The addition of clay, charcoal, and a catalyst as co-reactants converts aqueous Low Activity Wastes (LAW) to a granular or ''mineralized'' waste form while converting organic components to CO{sub 2} and steam, and nitrate/nitrite components, if any, to N{sub 2}. The waste form produced is a multiphase mineral assemblage of Na-Al-Si (NAS) feldspathoid minerals with cage-like structures that atomically bond radionuclides like Tc-99 and anions such as SO{sub 4}, I, F, and Cl. The granular product has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Shallow land burial requires that the mineralized waste form be able to sustain the weight of soil overburden and potential intrusion by future generations. The strength requirement necessitates binding the granular product into a monolith. FBSR mineral products were formulated into a variety of monoliths including various cements, Ceramicrete, and hydroceramics. All but one of the nine monoliths tested met the <2g/m{sup 2} durability specification for Na and Re (simulant for Tc-99) when tested using the Product Consistency Test (PCT; ASTM C1285). Of the nine monoliths tested the cements produced with 80-87 wt% FBSR product, the Ceramicrete, and the hydroceramic produced with 83.3 wt% FBSR product, met the compressive strength and durability requirements for an LAW waste form.

  2. High throughput experimentation for the discovery of new catalysts

    Thomson, S.; Hoffmann, C.; Johann, T.; Wolf, A.; Schmidt, H.-W.; Farrusseng, D.; Schueth, F.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The use of combinatorial chemistry to obtain new materials has been developed extensively by the pharmaceutical and biochemical industries, but such approaches have been slow to impact on the field of heterogeneous catalysis. The reasons for this lie in with difficulties associated in the synthesis, characterisation and determination of catalytic properties of such materials. In many synthetic and catalytic reactions, the conditions used are difficult to emulate using High Throughput Experimentation (HTE). Furthermore, the ability to screen these catalysts simultaneously in real time, requires the development and/or modification of characterisation methods. Clearly, there is a need for both high throughput synthesis and screening of new and novel reactions, and we describe several new concepts that help to achieve these goals. Although such problems have impeded the development of combinatorial catalysis, the fact remains that many highly attractive processes still exist for which no suitable catalysts have been developed. The ability to decrease the tiFme needed to evaluate catalyst is therefore essential and this makes the use of high throughput techniques highly desirable. In this presentation we will describe the synthesis, catalytic testing, and novel screening methods developed at the Max Planck Institute. Automated synthesis procedures, performed by the use of a modified Gilson pipette robot, will be described, as will the development of two 16 and 49 sample fixed bed reactors and two 25 and 29 sample three phase reactors for catalytic testing. We will also present new techniques for the characterisation of catalysts and catalytic products using standard IR microscopy and infrared focal plane array detection, respectively

  3. Apparatus and process for controlling fluidized beds

    Rehmat, Amirali G.; Patel, Jitendra G.

    1985-10-01

    An apparatus and process for control and maintenance of fluidized beds under non-steady state conditions. An ash removal conduit is provided for removing solid particulates from a fluidized bed separate from an ash discharge conduit in the lower portion of the grate supporting such a bed. The apparatus and process of this invention is particularly suitable for use in ash agglomerating fluidized beds and provides control of the fluidized bed before ash agglomeration is initiated and during upset conditions resulting in stable, sinter-free fluidized bed maintenance.

  4. Development of Water Detritiation Process Using the Hydrophobic Platinum Catalyst

    Ahn, D.H.; Paek, S.; Choi, H.J.; Kim, K.R.; Chung, H.; Yim, S.P.; Lee, M.S.

    2006-01-01

    reaction in a trickle bed reactor packed with a mixture of hydrophobic catalyst and hydrophilic packing to improve liquid distribution and vapor/liquid transfer area. The overall rate constant K y a (m 3 (STP)s -1 m -3 ) increased as the increase of the hydrogen flow rate in the range of 0.4 to 1.6 m/s at STP. (authors)

  5. Sixtieth Anniversary of Ziegler-Natta Catalysts and Stereospecific Polymerization

    Janović Z.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This review article highlights the history of the discoveries of organometallic catalysts and stereospecific polymerization of α-olefins, dienes and a number of vinyl monomers by Karl Ziegler and Giulio Natta sixty years ago, their developments and recent progress. As one of the most important achievements in the field of catalysis, macromolecular science and polymer materials, their inventors were awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1963 “for their discoveries in the field of chemistry and technology of high polymers”. These discoveries have stimulated an intensive, both basic and applied research all over the world, up to the present times, leading to great development of the polymer industry. The important biographical data and scientific advancements of K. Ziegler and G. Natta are presented as well. Karl Ziegler, a German scientist, Director of Max Planck Institute for Coal Research in Mülheim, besides many scientific achievements, in 1953 discovered a new process for the polymerization of ethylene into linear polyethylene under mild conditions by using titanium chloride and alkyl aluminium catalytic system that was superior to all existing polymerization. Giulio Natta, an Italian scientist, Director of the Department of Industrial Chemistry at Polytechnic, University of Milan, besides many achievements in petrochemical processes, in 1954 obtained for the first time isotactic polypropylene and Montecatini Co. started its production already in 1958. He conducted pioneering studies on the chain microstructure of synthetic organic polymers and postulated the mechanisms of stereospecific polymerizations. Since the discovery of the Zeigler-Natta catalyst, stereospecific polymerization and processes, significant developments have occurred. The breakthrough in polymerization processes such as fluid bed, liquid phase loop reactor and reactor granule technology led to significant development and growth of polyolefin production. In the 1980s

  6. Physiology Of Prolonged Bed Rest

    Greenleaf, John E.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes physiological effects of prolonged bed rest. Rest for periods of 24 hours or longer deconditions body to some extent; healing proceeds simultaneously with deconditioning. Report provides details on shifts in fluid electrolytes and loss of lean body mass, which comprises everything in body besides fat - that is, water, muscle, and bone. Based on published research.

  7. How to Find Bed Bugs

    Find and correctly identify an infestation early before it becomes widespread. Look for rusty or reddish stains and pinpoint dark spots on bed sheets or mattresses, and search for bugs near the piping, seams and tags of the mattress and box spring.

  8. Regeneration of Hydrotreating and FCC Catalysts

    CM Wai; JG Frye; JL Fulton; LE Bowman; LJ Silva; MA Gerber

    1999-09-30

    Hydrotreating, hydrocracking, and fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts are important components of petroleum refining processes. Hydrotreating and hydrocracking catalysts are used to improve the yield of high-quality light oil fractions from heavier crude oil and petroleum feedstocks containing high levels of impurities. FCC catalysts improve the yield of higher octane gasoline from crude oil. Residuum hydrotreating and cracking catalysts are susceptible to irreversible deactivation caused by adsorption of sulfur and by metals impurities, such as vanadium and nickel. The gradual buildup of these impurities in a hydrotreating catalyst eventually plugs the pores and deactivates it. Nickel and vanadium adversely affect the behavior of cracking catalysts, reducing product yield and quality. Replacing deactivated catalysts represents a significant cost in petroleum refining. Equally important are the costs and potential liabilities associated with treating and disposing spent catalysts. For example, recent US Environmental Protection Agency rulings have listed spent hydrotreating and hydrorefining catalysts as hazardous wastes. FCC catalysts, though more easily disposed of as road-base or as filler in asphalt and cement, are still an economic concern mainly because of the large volumes of spent catalysts generated. New processes are being considered to increase the useful life of catalysts or for meeting more stringent disposal requirements for spent catalysts containing metals. This report discusses a collaborative effort between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Phillips Petroleum, Inc., to identify promising chemical processes for removing metals adhered to spent hydrodesulfurization (HDS, a type of hydrotreating catalyst) and FCC catalysts. This study, conducted by PNNL, was funded by the US Department of Energy's Bartlesville Project Office. Fresh and spent catalysts were provided by Phillips Petroleum. The FCC catalyst was a rare

  9. Macrodynamic study and catalytic reduction of NO by ammonia under mild conditions over Pt-La-Ce-O/Al2O3 catalysts

    Wang, Yanhui; Zhu, Jingli; Ma, Runyu

    2007-01-01

    Catalytic reduction of NO using ammonia upon series prepared catalysts under 423-573 K in a fixed bed reactor was investigated. Results showed that the performance of supported platinum catalyst could be improved by addition of La and Ce to it. Experimental studies indicated that the suitable molar ratio of Pt:La:Ce would be 1.0:3.78:3.56, Pt-La-Ce (c). Results also found Pt-La-Ce (c) catalyst had good stability and tolerance to certain amounts of sulfur compounds under the used experimental conditions. Characterization for the fresh and used catalysts showed the Pt-La-Ce (c) catalyst had a stable structure. In addition, based on experimental data and using a nonlinear regression algorithm method, an empirical macrodynamic equation was obtained in this study

  10. Coking of residue hydroprocessing catalysts

    Gray, M.R.; Zhao, Y.X. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; McKnight, C.A. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Komar, D.A.; Carruthers, J.D. [Cytec Industries Inc., Stamford, CT (United States)

    1997-11-01

    One of the major causes of deactivation of Ni/Mo and Co/Mo sulfide catalysts for hydroprocessing of heavy petroleum and bitumen fractions is coke deposition. The composition and amount of coke deposited on residue hydroprocessing catalysts depends on the composition of the liquid phase of the reactor. In the Athabasca bitumen, the high molecular weight components encourage coke deposition at temperatures of 430 to 440 degrees C and at pressures of 10 to 20 MPa hydrogen pressure. A study was conducted to determine which components in the heavy residual oil fraction were responsible for coking of catalysts. Seven samples of Athabasca vacuum residue were prepared by supercritical fluid extraction with pentane before being placed in the reactor. Carbon content and hydrodesulfurization activity was measured. It was concluded that the deposition of coke depended on the presence of asphaltenes and not on other compositional variables such as content of nitrogen, aromatic carbon or vanadium.

  11. Catalyst containing oxygen transport membrane

    Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie Robyn; van Hassel, Bart Antonie

    2012-12-04

    A composite oxygen transport membrane having a dense layer, a porous support layer and an intermediate porous layer located between the dense layer and the porous support layer. Both the dense layer and the intermediate porous layer are formed from an ionic conductive material to conduct oxygen ions and an electrically conductive material to conduct electrons. The porous support layer has a high permeability, high porosity, and a high average pore diameter and the intermediate porous layer has a lower permeability and lower pore diameter than the porous support layer. Catalyst particles selected to promote oxidation of a combustible substance are located in the intermediate porous layer and in the porous support adjacent to the intermediate porous layer. The catalyst particles can be formed by wicking a solution of catalyst precursors through the porous support toward the intermediate porous layer.

  12. Radioisotope tracer study in a pilot-scale trickle bed reactor

    Pant, H.J.; Pendharkar, A.S. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Isotope Applications Div, Bombay (India); Prasad, J.S.; Maiti, R.N.; Chawla, R.; Lahri, R.N.; Ram Babu, D. [Engineers India Limited, Gurgaon, Haryana (India); Berne, Ph. [CEA Grenoble, DTEN/SAT, 38 (France)

    2001-07-01

    Trickle bed reactor (TBR) is a reactor in which a liquid and a gas phase flow concurrently downwards through a fixed bed of catalyst particles while the reaction takes place. The trickle bed reactors find a number of applications in petroleum refining, chemical. petro-chemical and bio-chemical processes due to their suitability for hydro-processing operations.The knowledge of radial distribution, mean residence time (MRT). liquid holdup and degree of axial mixing is a basic requirement to evaluate the reactor performance of a TBR, its optimal size, the physical and chemical interactions and the pumping requirements. Measurement and analysis of residence time distribution (RTD) of liquid phase facilitate the determination of these parameters. This paper describes the measurement of RTD of liquid phase in a pilot-scale trickle bed reactor operating at high pressure. Kerosene and nitrogen were used as liquid and gas phase, respectively. Porous alumina catalyst particles were used as packing. Bromine-82 as para-di-bromo benzene was used as a tracer to measure RTD of organic liquid phase. The RTD of kerosene was measured as a function of liquid and gas flow rates and pressure. The axial dispersion model with exchange between active and dead zones was proposed and used to simulate the measured RTD data and model parameters i.e mean residence time ({tau}), Peclet Number (Pe), dynamic fraction of the liquid ({phi}) and the number of transfer units (N) were obtained. The results of the simulations indicated intermediate degree of axial mixing of liquid phase. The RTD predicted by the axial dispersion model with exchange between active and dead zones fits well to the experimentally measured RTD data and thus is a suitable model to describe the dynamics of the liquid phase in TBRs filled with porous catalyst particles. (authors)

  13. The NASA Bed Rest Project

    Rhodes, Bradley; Meck, Janice

    2005-01-01

    NASA s National Vision for Space Exploration includes human travel beyond low earth orbit and the ultimate safe return of the crews. Crucial to fulfilling the vision is the successful and timely development of countermeasures for the adverse physiological effects on human systems caused by long term exposure to the microgravity environment. Limited access to in-flight resources for the foreseeable future increases NASA s reliance on ground-based analogs to simulate these effects of microgravity. The primary analog for human based research will be head-down bed rest. By this approach NASA will be able to evaluate countermeasures in large sample sizes, perform preliminary evaluations of proposed in-flight protocols and assess the utility of individual or combined strategies before flight resources are requested. In response to this critical need, NASA has created the Bed Rest Project at the Johnson Space Center. The Project establishes the infrastructure and processes to provide a long term capability for standardized domestic bed rest studies and countermeasure development. The Bed Rest Project design takes a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, integrated approach that reduces the resource overhead of one investigator for one campaign. In addition to integrating studies operationally relevant for exploration, the Project addresses other new Vision objectives, namely: 1) interagency cooperation with the NIH allows for Clinical Research Center (CRC) facility sharing to the benefit of both agencies, 2) collaboration with our International Partners expands countermeasure development opportunities for foreign and domestic investigators as well as promotes consistency in approach and results, 3) to the greatest degree possible, the Project also advances research by clinicians and academia alike to encourage return to earth benefits. This paper will describe the Project s top level goals, organization and relationship to other Exploration Vision Projects, implementation

  14. Pyrolysis of marine biomass to produce bio-oil and its upgrading using a novel multi-metal catalyst prepared from the spent car catalytic converter.

    Sabegh, Mahzad Yaghmaei; Norouzi, Omid; Jafarian, Sajedeh; Khosh, Akram Ghanbari; Tavasoli, Ahmad

    2018-02-01

    In order to reduce the economic and environmental consequences caused by spent car catalyst, we herein report for the first time a novel promising multi-metal catalyst prepared from spent car catalytic converters to upgrade the pyrolysis bio-oils. The physico-chemical properties of prepared catalyst were characterized by XRD, EDS, FESEM, and FT-IR analyses. The thermal stability of the multi-metal catalyst was studied with TGA. To investigate the activity of the catalyst, Conversion of Cladophora glomerata (C. glomerata) into bio-products was carried out via a fixed bed reactor with and without catalyst at the temperature of 500°C. Although the catalyst didn't catalyze the gasification reaction, bio-oil was upgraded over the catalyst. The main effect of the catalyst on the bio-oil components is deoxygenating of nitrogen compounds and promotion the ketonization reaction, which converts acid to ketone and declines the corrosive nature of bio-oil. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. An XPS [x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy] study of the sulfidation-regeneration cycle of a hydroprocessing catalyst

    Shang, D.Y.; Adnot, A.; Kaliaguine, S. (Laval Univ., Ste-Foy, PQ (Canada)); Chmielowiec, J. (Petro Canada Products Co., Mississauga, ON (Canada))

    1993-10-01

    The formation of sulfates in an industrial Ni-W hydroprocessing (HP) catalyst was investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A small fluidized bed test unit with on-line sampling device was constructed to simulate industrial sulfidation and oxyregeneration processes of HP catalysts. The results obtained show that the sulfates observed on the surface of sulfided catalysts are not formed during the sulfidation process. Two oxidation processes seem to be responsible for the formation of sulfates: one happens when the catalyst is exposed to air before it is properly cooled and the other is a slow conversion at ambient temperature. The two different processes might be associated to different sulfidic species formed during the sulfidation processes, with the sulfides in the bulk of catalyst particles being more easily oxidized than the ones on the external surface of the catalyst particles. The sulfate formed during the air oxidation of sulfided catalysts, as well as that after oxyregeneration, is not aluminum sulfate but nickel sulfate in both cases. XPS results also indicate that oxygenates in the feedstock are not directly involved in the sulfate formation. 18 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. Development of Hydrotalcite Based Cobalt Catalyst by Hydrothermal and Co-precipitation Method for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis

    Muhammad Faizan Shareef

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the effect of a synthesis method for cobalt catalyst supported on hydrotalcite material for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The hydrotalcite supported cobalt (HT-Co catalysts were synthesized by co-precipitation and hydrothermal method. The prepared catalysts were characterized by using various techniques like BET (Brunauer–Emmett–Teller, SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy, TGA (Thermal Gravimetric Analysis, XRD (X-ray diffraction spectroscopy, and FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. Fixed bed micro reactor was used to test the catalytic activity of prepared catalysts. The catalytic testing results demonstrated the performance of hydrotalcite based cobalt catalyst in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis with high selectivity for liquid products. The effect of synthesis method on the activity and selectivity of catalyst was also discussed. Copyright © 2017 BCREC Group. All rights reserved Received: 3rd November 2016; Revised: 26th February 2017; Accepted: 9th March 2017; Available online: 27th October 2017; Published regularly: December 2017 How to Cite: Sharif, M.S., Arslan, M., Iqbal, N., Ahmad, N., Noor, T. (2017. Development of Hydrotalcite Based Cobalt Catalyst by Hydrothermal and Co-precipitation Method for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 12(3: 357-363 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.12.3.762.357-363

  17. Controllable synthesis in a continuous mode of unsupported molybdenum catalysts with micro/nano size for heavy oil upgrading

    Wang, J.; Hill, J.M.; Pereira Almao, P.R. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Heavy oils contain significant amounts of impurities compared to conventional oils, thereby posing a challenge for hydroprocessing operations at refineries. Hydrodesulfurization is one of the important reactions involved in hydroprocessing. Transition metal sulfides have excellent properties in terms of sulphur removal. Molybdenum based catalysts have been used extensively in the petroleum industry for hydrotreating heavy oil fractions. Supported molybdenum based catalysts suffer strong deactivation in the traditional hydrotreating process due to the deposition of carbonaceous components on the surface of the catalyst when they are used in conventional fixed bed reactors. Unsupported catalysts have higher catalytic activity with better metal dispersion. Laboratory experiments were conducted in which micro/nano size unsupported molybdenum catalysts were synthesized from a water/oil emulsion. The catalysts were prepared in a continuous mode for online application to hydroprocessing or in situ upgrading. Dispersed molybdenum catalysts are more suitable for processing heavier feeds because they are less prone to deactivation. Also, their submicron size ensure high activities due to a large specific surface area. They are also sufficiently small to be readily dispersed in the residual oil. 4 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  18. exchanged Mg-Al hydrotalcite catalyst

    ) catalysts, ... The catalyst can be easily separated by simple filtration ... surface area by the single-point N2 adsorption method ... concentration of carbonate anions (by treating the cat- .... hydrotalcite phase along with copper hydroxide and.

  19. Use of lanthanide catalysts in air electrodes

    Souza Parente, L.T. de

    1982-01-01

    A review on the lanthanide catalysts suitable for the reduction catalysis of oxygen in air electrodes is presented. The kinds of lanthanide indicated to be used as catalysts of oxygen reduction are shown. (A.R.H.) [pt

  20. Catalyst for Decomposition of Nitrogen Oxides

    Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Akyurtlu, Ates (Inventor); Akyurtlu, Jale (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    This invention relates generally to a platinized tin oxide-based catalyst. It relates particularly to an improved platinized tin oxide-based catalyst able to decompose nitric oxide to nitrogen and oxygen without the necessity of a reducing gas.

  1. Polymer-bound rhodium hydroformylation catalysts

    Jongsma, Tjeerd

    1992-01-01

    Homogeneous catalysts are superior in activity, selectivity as well as specificity, but heterogeneous catalyst are often preferred in industrial processes, because of their good recoverability and their applicability in continuous flow reactors. It would be of great environmental, commercial and

  2. Novel Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. [DOE patent

    Vollhardt, K.P.C.; Perkins, P.

    Novel compounds are described which are used as improved Fischer-Tropsch catalysts particularly for the conversion of CO + H/sub 2/ to gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons at milder conditions than with prior catalysts.

  3. A novel magnetically recyclable heterogeneous catalyst

    propanesultone. 1. Introduction ... O. Scheme 2. The reaction of benzaldehyde with 1-phenyl-3- ... (2 mmol), catalyst (2 mol%, except for entries 7 and 9), room temperature. bCatalyst = 1 .... The electronic supporting information can be seen in.

  4. Rhenium Nanochemistry for Catalyst Preparation

    Vadim G. Kessler

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The review presents synthetic approaches to modern rhenium-based catalysts. Creation of an active center is considered as a process of obtaining a nanoparticle or a molecule, immobilized within a matrix of the substrate. Selective chemical routes to preparation of particles of rhenium alloys, rhenium oxides and the molecules of alkyltrioxorhenium, and their insertion into porous structure of zeolites, ordered mesoporous MCM matrices, anodic mesoporous alumina, and porous transition metal oxides are considered. Structure-property relationships are traced for these catalysts in relation to such processes as alkylation and isomerization, olefin metathesis, selective oxidation of olefins, methanol to formaldehyde conversion, etc.

  5. Hydrothermal performance of catalyst supports

    Elam, Jeffrey W.; Marshall, Christopher L.; Libera, Joseph A.; Dumesic, James A.; Pagan-Torres, Yomaira J.

    2018-04-10

    A high surface area catalyst with a mesoporous support structure and a thin conformal coating over the surface of the support structure. The high surface area catalyst support is adapted for carrying out a reaction in a reaction environment where the thin conformal coating protects the support structure within the reaction environment. In various embodiments, the support structure is a mesoporous silica catalytic support and the thin conformal coating comprises a layer of metal oxide resistant to the reaction environment which may be a hydrothermal environment.

  6. Quick Guide to Flash Catalyst

    Elmansy, Rafiq

    2011-01-01

    How do you transform user interface designs created in Photoshop or Illustrator into interactive web pages? It's easier than you think. This guide shows you how to use Adobe Flash Catalyst to create interactive UIs and website wireframes for Rich Internet Applications-without writing a single line of code. Ideal for web designers, this book introduces Flash Catalyst basics with detailed step-by-step instructions and screenshots that illustrate every part of the process. You'll learn hands-on how to turn your static design or artwork into working user interfaces that can be implemented in Fla

  7. Preparation of inorganic hydrophobic catalysts

    Yang, Yong; Wang, Heyi; Du, Yang

    2009-04-01

    In order to catalyse the oxidation of tritium gas, two inorganic hydrophobic catalysts are prepared. Under room temperature, the catalysed oxidation ratio of 0.3%-1% (V/V) hydrogen gas in air is higher than 95%. Pt-II inorganic hydrophobic catalysts has obviously better catalysing ability than Pt-PTFE and lower ability than Pt-SDB in H 2 -HTO isotopic exchange, because the pressure resistence of Pt-II is much higher than Pt-SDB, it can be used to the CECE cell of heavy water detritium system. (authors)

  8. Rare behaviour of a catalyst pellet catalyst dynamics

    Westerterp, K.R.; Loonen, R.A.; Martens, A.

    1986-01-01

    Temperature overshoots and undershoots were found for a Pd on alumina catalyst pellet in its course towards a new steady state after a change in concentration of one of the reactants ethylene or hydrogen. When cooling the pellet, after heat-up by reaction, with pure hydrogen a sudden temperature

  9. Colloidal nanoparticles as catalysts and catalyst precursors for nitrite hydrogenation

    Zhao, Yingnan

    2015-01-01

    The most distinguished advantage to use colloidal methods for catalyst preparation is that the size and the shape of nanoparticles can be manipulated easily under good control, which is normally difficult to achieve by using traditional methods, such as impregnation and precipitation. This

  10. Process Optimization for Ethyl Ester Production in Fixed Bed Reactor Using Calcium Oxide Impregnated Palm Shell Activated Carbon (CaO/PSAC

    A Buasri

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available : The continuous production of ethyl ester was studied by using a steady-state fixed bed reactor (FBR. Transesterification of palm stearin (PS and waste cooking palm oil (WCPO with ethanol in the presence of calcium oxide impregnated palm shell activated carbon (CaO/PSAC solid catalyst was investigated. This work was determined the optimum conditions for the production of ethyl ester from PS and WCPO in order to obtain fatty acid ethyl ester (FAEE with the highest yield. The effects of reaction variables such as residence time, ethanol/oil molar ratio, reaction temperature, catalyst bed height and reusability of catalyst in a reactor system on the yield of biodiesel were considered. The optimum conditions were the residence time 2-3 h, ethanol/oil molar ratio 16-20, reaction temperature at 800C, and catalyst bed height 300 mm which yielded 89.46% and 83.32% of the PS and WCPO conversion, respectively. CaO/PSAC could be used repeatedly for 4 times without any activation treatment and no obvious activity loss was observed. It has potential for industrial application in the transesterification of triglyceride (TG. The fuel properties of biodiesel were determined. Keywords: biodiesel, calcium oxide, ethyl ester, fixed bed reactor, palm shell activated carbon

  11. Adult Bed-Wetting: A Concern?

    Adult bed-wetting: A concern? My 24-year-old husband has started to wet the bed at ... of Privacy Practices Notice of Nondiscrimination Manage Cookies Advertising Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization ...

  12. Find a Bed Bug Pesticide Product

    Introduces the Bed Bug Product Search Tool, to help consumers find EPA-registered pesticides for bed bug infestation control. Inclusion in this database is not an endorsement. Always follow label directions carefully.

  13. EPA-Registered Bed Bug Products

    ... rest or hide in hampers, bed frames, even furniture); Failing to treat adjacent areas where bed bugs ... to work (some pesticides, such as desiccators or growth regulators, may be very effective but take some ...

  14. Bed Bug Guidance for School Nurses

    School nurses are often called upon to provide vital information to students, parents, teachers, and administrators. These tips on identifying, managing and preventing bed bugs will help you to effectively respond if bed bugs appear in your school.

  15. Bacillus cereus in free-stall bedding.

    Magnusson, M; Svensson, B; Kolstrup, C; Christiansson, A

    2007-12-01

    To increase the understanding of how different factors affect the bacterial growth in deep sawdust beds for dairy cattle, the microbiological status of Bacillus cereus and coliforms in deep sawdust-bedded free stalls was investigated over two 14-d periods on one farm. High counts of B. cereus and coliforms were found in the entire beds. On average, 4.1 log(10) B. cereus spores, 5.5 log(10) B. cereus, and 6.7 log(10) coliforms per gram of bedding could be found in the upper layers of the sawdust likely to be in contact with the cows' udders. The highest counts of B. cereus spores, B. cereus, and coliforms were found in the bedding before fresh bedding was added, and the lowest immediately afterwards. Different factors of importance for the growth of B. cereus in the bedding material were explored in laboratory tests. These were found to be the type of bedding, pH, and the type and availability of nutrients. Alternative bedding material such as peat and mixtures of peat and sawdust inhibited the bacterial growth of B. cereus. The extent of growth of B. cereus in the sawdust was increased in a dose-dependent manner by the availability of feces. Urine added to different bedding material raised the pH and also led to bacterial growth of B. cereus in the peat. In sawdust, a dry matter content greater than 70% was needed to lower the water activity to 0.95, which is needed to inhibit the growth of B. cereus. In an attempt to reduce the bacterial growth of B. cereus and coliforms in deep sawdust beds on the farm, the effect of giving bedding daily or a full replacement of the beds was studied. The spore count of B. cereus in the back part of the free stalls before fresh bedding was added was 0.9 log units lower in stalls given daily bedding than in stalls given bedding twice weekly. No effect on coliform counts was found. Replacement of the entire sawdust bedding had an effect for a short period, but by 1 to 2 mo after replacement, the counts of B. cereus spores in the

  16. Enhanced activity and stability of La-doped CeO2 monolithic catalysts for lean-oxygen methane combustion.

    Zhu, Wenjun; Jin, Jianhui; Chen, Xiao; Li, Chuang; Wang, Tonghua; Tsang, Chi-Wing; Liang, Changhai

    2018-02-01

    Effective utilization of coal bed methane is very significant for energy utilization and environment protection. Catalytic combustion of methane is a promising way to eliminate trace amounts of oxygen in the coal bed methane and the key to this technology is the development of high-efficiency catalysts. Herein, we report a series of Ce 1-x La x O 2-δ (x = 0-0.8) monolithic catalysts for the catalytic combustion of methane, which are prepared by citric acid method. The structural characterization shows that the substitution of La enhance the oxygen vacancy concentration and reducibility of the supports and promote the migration of the surface oxygen, as a result improve the catalytic activity of CeO 2 . M-Ce 0.8 La 0.2 O 2-δ (monolithic catalyst, Ce 0.8 La 0.2 O 2-δ coated on cordierite honeycomb) exhibits outstanding activity for methane combustion, and the temperature for 10 and 90% methane conversion are 495 and 580 °C, respectively. Additionally, Ce 0.8 La 0.2 O 2-δ monolithic catalyst presents excellent stability at high temperature. These Ce 1-x La x O 2-δ monolithic materials with a small amount of La incorporation therefore show promises as highly efficient solid solution catalysts for lean-oxygen methane combustion. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  17. Catalysts and methods of using the same

    Slowing, Igor Ivan; Kandel, Kapil

    2017-02-14

    The present invention provides a catalyst including a mesoporous silica nanoparticle and a catalytic material comprising iron. In various embodiments, the present invention provides methods of using and making the catalyst. In some examples, the catalyst can be used to hydrotreat fatty acids or to selectively remove fatty acids from feedstocks.

  18. Novel non-platinum metal catalyst material

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel non-platinum metal catalyst material for use in low temperature fuel cells and electrolysers and to fuel cells and electrolysers comprising the novel non-platinum metal catalyst material. The present invention also relates to a novel method for synthesizing...... the novel non-platinum metal catalyst material....

  19. Efficient epoxidation of propene using molecular catalysts

    Markovits, Iulius I. E.; Anthofer, Michael H.; Kolding, Helene

    2014-01-01

    The epoxidation of propene is performed in homogeneous phase using various molecular catalysts and H2O2 or tert-butyl hydroperoxide as oxidants. A comparison between some molybdenum catalysts and methyltrioxorhenium (MTO) shows that the well known Re catalyst is the best among the examined...

  20. The Stability of Supported Gold Catalysts

    Masoud, Nazila

    2018-01-01

    Gold has supreme cultural and financial value and, in form of nanoparticles smaller than 10 nm, is a unique catalyst for different industrially relevant reactions. Intriguing properties of the gold catalysts have spurred demand in the chemical industry for Au catalysts, the application of which

  1. Low platinum catalyst and method of preparation

    Liu, Di-Jia; Chong, Lina

    2017-11-21

    A low platinum catalyst and method for making same. The catalyst comprises platinum-transition metal bimetallic alloy microcrystallites over a transition metal-nitrogen-carbon composite. A method of making a catalyst comprises preparation of transition metal organic frameworks, infusion of platinum, thermal treatment, and reduction to form the microcrystallites and composite.

  2. Fluidization quality analyzer for fluidized beds

    Daw, C.S.; Hawk, J.A.

    1995-07-25

    A control loop and fluidization quality analyzer for a fluidized bed utilizes time varying pressure drop measurements. A fast-response pressure transducer measures the overall bed pressure drop, or over some segment of the bed, and the pressure drop signal is processed to produce an output voltage which changes with the degree of fluidization turbulence. 9 figs.

  3. Fluidized bed dry dense medium coal beneficiation

    North, Brian C

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available medium beneficiation using a fluidized bed was investigated. Bed materials of sand, magnetite and ilmenite were used in a laboratory sized cylindrical fluidized bed. The materials were individually tested, as were mixes of sand and heavy minerals. Coal...

  4. Catalytic wet air oxidation of aniline with nanocasted Mn-Ce-oxide catalyst.

    Levi, R; Milman, M; Landau, M V; Brenner, A; Herskowitz, M

    2008-07-15

    The catalytic wet air oxidation of aqueous solution containing 1000 ppm aniline was conducted in a trickle-bed reactor packed with a novel nanocasted Mn-Ce-oxide catalyst (surface area of 300 m2/g) prepared using SBA-15 silica as a hard template. A range of liquid hourly space velocities (5-20 h(-1)) and temperatures (110-140 degrees C) at 10 bar of oxygen were tested. The experiments were conducted to provide the intrinsic performance of the catalysts. Complete aniline conversion, 90% TOC conversion, and 80% nitrogen mineralization were achieved at 140 degrees C and 5 h(-1). Blank experiments yielded relatively low homogeneous aniline (<35%) and negligible TOC conversions. Fast deactivation of the catalysts was experienced due to leaching caused by complexation with aniline. Acidification of the solution with HCI (molar HCI to aniline ratio of 1.2) was necessary to avoid colloidization and leaching of the nanoparticulate catalyst components. The catalyst displayed stable performance for over 200 h on stream.

  5. Effect of Gas Flowrate on Nucleation Mechanism of MWCNTs for a Compound Catalyst

    S. Shukrullah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the catalyst particles during a CVD process can be anticipated from the carbon feeding rate. In this study, Fe2O3/Al2O3 catalyst was synthesized with uniformly dispersed iron over alumina support for onward production of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs in a fluidized bed chemical CVD reactor. The effect of the ethylene flowrate on catalytic activity of the compound catalyst and morphology of the as-grown MWCNTs was also investigated in this study. The dispersed active phases of the catalyst and optimized gas flowrate helped in improving the tube morphology and prevented the aggregation of the as-grown MWCNTs. The flowrates, below 100 sccm, did not provide sufficient reactants to interact with the catalyst for production of defect-free CNT structures. Above 100 sccm, concentration of the carbon precursor did not show notable influence on decomposition rate of the gas molecules. The most promising results on growth and structural properties of MWCNTs were gained at ethylene flowrate of 100 sccm. At this flowrate, the ratio of G and D intensity peaks (IG/ID was deliberated about 1.40, which indicates the growth of graphitic structures of MWCNTs.

  6. Selective Hydrodeoxygenation of 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural to 2,5-Dimethylfuran over Heterogeneous Iron Catalysts.

    Li, Jiang; Liu, Jun-Ling; Liu, He-Yang; Xu, Guang-Yue; Zhang, Jun-Jie; Liu, Jia-Xing; Zhou, Guang-Lin; Li, Qin; Xu, Zhi-Hao; Fu, Yao

    2017-04-10

    This work provided the first example of selective hydrodeoxygenation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) to 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF) over heterogeneous Fe catalysts. A catalyst prepared by the pyrolysis of an Fe-phenanthroline complex on activated carbon at 800 °C was demonstrated to be the most active heterogeneous Fe catalyst. Under the optimal reaction conditions, complete conversion of HMF was achieved with 86.2 % selectivity to DMF. The reaction pathway was investigated thoroughly, and the hydrogenation of the C=O bond in HMF was demonstrated to be the rate-determining step during the hydrodeoxygenation, which could be accelerated greatly by using alcohol solvents as additional H-donors. The excellent stability of the Fe catalyst, which was probably a result of the well-preserved active species and the pore structure of the Fe catalyst in the presence of H 2 , was demonstrated in batch and continuous flow fixed-bed reactors. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Perovskite catalysts for oxidative coupling

    Campbell, Kenneth D.

    1991-01-01

    Perovskites of the structure A.sub.2 B.sub.2 C.sub.3 O.sub.10 are useful as catalysts for the oxidative coupling of lower alkane to heavier hydrocarbons. A is alkali metal; B is lanthanide or lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, samarium, praseodymium, gadolinium or dysprosium; and C is titanium.

  8. Review of acute cancer beds.

    Evans, D S

    2012-01-01

    A review of admissions to cancer services at University Hospital Galway (UHG) was undertaken to assess the appropriateness of hospital usage. All cancer specialty patients admitted from 26-28 May 2009 were reviewed (n = 82). Chi square tests, Exact tests, and One-way ANOVA were utilised to analyse key issues emerging from the data. Fifty (61%) were classified as emergencies. Twenty three (67%) occupied a designated cancer bed with 24 (30%) in outlying non-oncology wards. The mean length of stay was 29.3 days. Possible alternatives to admission were identified for 15 (19%) patients. There was no evidence of discharge planning for 50 (60%) admissions. There is considerable potential to make more appropriate utilisation of UHG for cancer patients, particularly in terms of reducing bed days and length of stay and the proportion of emergency cancer admissions, and further developing integrated systems of discharge planning.

  9. Designing a CR Test bed

    Cattoni, Andrea Fabio; Buthler, Jakob Lindbjerg; Tonelli, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    with their own set up, since the potential costs and efforts could not pay back in term of expected research results. Software Defined Radio solutions offer an easy way to communication researchers for the development of customized research test beds. While several hardware products are commercially available......, an overview on common research-oriented software products for SDR development, namely GNU Radio, Iris, and ASGARD, will be provided, including how to practically start the software development of simple applications. Finally, best practices and examples of all the software platforms will be provided, giving...... they are up and running in generating results. With this chapter we would like to provide a tutorial guide, based on direct experience, on how to enter in the world of test bed-based research, providing both insight on the issues encountered in every day development, and practical solutions. Finally...

  10. THE BAUXITES AND JELAR - BEDS

    Krešimir Sakač

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available Minor bauxite deposits and occurrences were formed in technically disturbed environments in the middle part of the Adriatic geotectonic unit in Dinarides, contemporary with the clastic Jelar-beds in the Late Lutetian time. Uneven chemical composition of these Eocene bauxites, their sporadic occurrences in developed paleorelief as well as characteristic petrographic composition of the immediate overlying rocks point out at different genetical conditions (the paper is published in Croatian.

  11. Tungsten effect over co-hydrotalcite catalysts to produce hydrogen from bio-ethanol

    Contreras, J.L.; Ortiz, M.A.; Luna, R.; Nuno, L. [Univ. Autonoma Metropolitana-Azcapozalco, Mexico City (Mexico). Dept. de Energia; Fuentes, G.A. [Univ. Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Mexico City (Mexico). Dept. de IPH; Salmones, J.; Zeifert, B. [Inst. Politecnico Nacional, Mexico City (Mexico); Vazquez, A. [Inst. Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico City (Mexico)

    2010-07-15

    The use of bioethanol has been considered for generating hydrogen via catalytic reforming. The reaction of ethanol with stream is strongly endothermic and produces hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). However, undesirable products such as carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH{sub 4}) may also form during the reaction. This paper reported on the newly found stabilization effect of tungsten over the Co-hydrotalcite catalysts to produce H{sub 2} from ethanol in steam reforming. The catalysts were characterized by nitrogen (N{sub 2}) physisorption (BET area), X-ray diffraction, Infrared, Raman and UV-vis spectroscopies. Catalytic evaluations were determined using a fixed bed reactor with a water/ethanol mol ratio of 4 at 450 degrees C. The tungsten concentration studied was from 0.5 to 3 wt percent. The intensity of crystalline reflections of the Co-hydrotalcite catalysts decreased as tungsten concentration increased. Infrared spectroscopy was used to determine the superficial chemical groups, notably -OH, H{sub 2}O, Al-OH, Mg-OH, W-O-W and CO{sub 3}{sup 2.} The highest H{sub 2} production and the best catalytic stability was found in catalysts with low tungsten. The smallest pore volume of this catalyst could be related with long residence times of ethanol in the pores. Tungsten promoted the conversion for the Co-hydrotalcite catalysts. The reaction products were H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}CHO, CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and the catalysts did not produce CO. 33 refs., 2 tabs., 10 figs.

  12. Advances in fluidized bed technologies

    Mutanen, K.

    1992-01-01

    Atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (AFBC) has advanced into industrial cogeneration and utility-scale electric generation. During the 1980's AFBC became the dominant technology in the United States for power generation systems fired with solid fuels. Development of pressurized fluidized bed combustion/gasification (PFB/G) has grown rapidly from small bench-scale rigs to large pilot and demonstration plants. AFBC as large as 160 MWe in capacity are now in operation, while pressurized combustion systems generating 80 MWe have started up two years ago. The major driving forces behind development of fluidized bed technologies are all the time strictening emission control regulations, need for fuel flexibility, repowering of older power plants and need for higher efficiency in electricity generation. Independent power producers (IPP) and cogenerators were the first ones in the United States who accepted AFBC for wide commercial use. Their role will be dominant in the markets of the 1990's also. Developers of AFBC systems are working on designs that reduce investment costs, decrease emissions and offer even higher reliability and availability in utility-scale applications while developers of PFBC/G work on designs that increase plant efficiencies, allow modular construction, decrease emissions further and reduce the cost of generating power. This paper presents technological background, commercial status, boiler performance, emissions and future developments for both AFBC and PFBC/G systems

  13. Acetylene and carbon monoxide oxidation over a Pt/Rh/CeO2/γ-Al2O3 automotive exhaust gas catalyst: kinetic modelling of transient experiments

    Harmsen, J.M.A.; Hoebink, J.H.B.J.; Schouten, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    The transient kinetics of acetylene (C2H2) conversion by oxygen over a commercial Pt/Rh/CeO2/¿-Al2O3 three-way catalyst have been modelled. Experiments to validate the model were carried out in a fixed-bed reactor with two separate inlets, enabling alternate feeding of acetylene and oxygen.

  14. Bed agglomeration characteristics of palm shell and corncob combustion in fluidized bed

    Chaivatamaset, Pawin; Sricharoon, Panchan; Tia, Suvit

    2011-01-01

    Bed particle agglomeration was studied experimentally in an atmospheric laboratory scale fluidized bed combustor using quartz sand as bed material. Palm shell and corncob were tested. The objectives of the study were (i) to describe the contributions of the biomass ash properties and the operating conditions on the bed agglomeration tendency in term of the bed defluidization time (t def ) and the extent of potassium accumulation in the bed (K/Bed) and (ii) to further elucidate the ash inorganic behaviors and the governing bed agglomeration mechanisms. Defluidization caused by the bed agglomeration was experienced in all experiments during combustion of these biomasses, as a consequence of the presence of potassium in biomass. The experimental results indicated that biomass ash characteristics were the significant influence on the bed agglomeration. The increasing bed temperature, bed particle size and static bed height and the decreasing fluidizing air velocity enhanced the bed agglomeration tendency. The SEM/EDS analyses on the agglomerates confirmed that the agglomeration was attributed to the formation of potassium silicate liquid enriched on the surface of quartz sand particles in conjunction with the high surface temperature of the burning biomass char particles. Thermodynamic examination based on the phase diagram analysis confirmed that the molten phase formation was responsible for the agglomeration. In this study, the high molten ash fraction resulting from the high potassium content in biomass promoted the agglomeration and thus defluidization. - Highlights: → Palm shell and corncob of Thailand are tested their bed agglomeration behaviors during fluidized bed combustion. → The increase of bed temperature, bed particle size and static bed height and the decrease of air velocity enhance bed agglomeration. → The formation of ash derived potassium silicate melts enriched on sand surface is the key process. → The collision between char and sand

  15. The characteristics of bed agglomeration during fluidized bed combustion of eucalyptus bark

    Chaivatamaset, Pawin; Tia, Suvit

    2015-01-01

    The bed agglomeration behaviors were investigated experimentally when eucalyptus bark was burning tested in a laboratory scale fluidized bed reactor. The focuses of this work were the influences of operating conditions and bed materials on the bed agglomeration tendency and the elucidation in the behaviors of fuel inorganic elements and the governing mode of the agglomeration. It was found that the defluidization caused by the bed agglomeration was clearly detectable from the decrease in measured bed pressure. The growth of bed particle and accumulation of agglomerates during combustion provided the partial to complete defluidization. The defluidization was promoted by the increase of bed temperature and bed particle size, and the decrease of fluidizing air velocity. The SEM-EDS analyses revealed that the bed agglomeration was mainly attributed to the formation of potassium silicate compounds as liquid phase during the combustion. This was initiated by the chemical reaction between the bed particle and the released ash constituents. In this study, the inorganic migration from fuel particle to bed particle was likely dominated by the condensation/reaction. The thermodynamic examination by ternary phase diagram analysis corroborated that the liquid phase formation of the ash derived materials controlled the agglomeration. The alumina sand prevented the bed agglomeration since it was inactive in the formation of viscous molten substances during combustion at the observed temperatures. - Highlights: • The behaviors of bed agglomeration were studied during the fluidized bed combustion of eucalyptus bark. • The increase in bed temperature and sand size, and the decrease of air velocity promoted bed defluidization. • The formation of molten potassium silicate compounds conduced to the bed agglomeration. • Condensation/reaction was the dominant inorganic migration mechanism from fuel particle to bed particle. • The alumina sand prevented effectively the bed

  16. Method and apparatus for a combination moving bed thermal treatment reactor and moving bed filter

    Badger, Phillip C.; Dunn, Jr., Kenneth J.

    2015-09-01

    A moving bed gasification/thermal treatment reactor includes a geometry in which moving bed reactor particles serve as both a moving bed filter and a heat carrier to provide thermal energy for thermal treatment reactions, such that the moving bed filter and the heat carrier are one and the same to remove solid particulates or droplets generated by thermal treatment processes or injected into the moving bed filter from other sources.

  17. A study on the polymer catalyst process technology

    Chung, H.; Lee, H. S.; Ahn, D. H.; Kim, K. R.; Kang, H. S.; Paek, S. W.; Lee, S. H.; Sung, K. W.

    1997-06-01

    Heavy water is used as moderator and coolant in Pressurized Heavy Water Power Plants. According to the governmental long-term plan for power supply Korea is scheduled to construct and operate total four pressurized heavy water power plant till the year 1999. Total heavy water make-up for these plants would be 18 Mg/a from the year 1999. Reformed hydrogen processes is considered best suited to Korea. Polymer catalysts for this process were manufactured and the performance of hydrogen isotope exchange was investigated. The overall mass transfer coefficients varied between 0.004 and 2.295 m{sup 3}.HD/m{sup 3} Bed.sec. and heavy water separation process using the catalysis were optimized. (author). 102 refs., 134 tabs., 65 figs.

  18. A study on the polymer catalyst process technology

    Chung, H.; Lee, H. S.; Ahn, D. H.; Kim, K. R.; Kang, H. S.; Paek, S. W.; Lee, S. H.; Sung, K. W.

    1997-06-01

    Heavy water is used as moderator and coolant in Pressurized Heavy Water Power Plants. According to the governmental long-term plan for power supply Korea is scheduled to construct and operate total four pressurized heavy water power plant till the year 1999. Total heavy water make-up for these plants would be 18 Mg/a from the year 1999. Reformed hydrogen processes is considered best suited to Korea. Polymer catalysts for this process were manufactured and the performance of hydrogen isotope exchange was investigated. The overall mass transfer coefficients varied between 0.004 and 2.295 m 3 .HD/m 3 Bed.sec. and heavy water separation process using the catalysis were optimized. (author). 102 refs., 134 tabs., 65 figs

  19. Automotive Catalyst State Diagnosis Using Microwaves

    Moos Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The state of catalysts plays a key role in automotive exhaust gas aftertreatment. The soot or ash loading of Diesel particulate filters, the oxygen loading degree in three-way catalysts, the amount of stored ammonia in SCR catalysts, or the NOx loading degree in NOx storage catalysts are important parameters that are today determined indirectly and in a model-based manner with gas sensors installed upstream and/or downstream of the catalysts. This contribution gives an overview on a novel approach to determine the catalyst state directly by a microwave-based technique. The method exploits the fact that the catalyst housing acts as a microwave cavity resonator. As “sensing” elements, one or two simple antennas are mounted inside the catalyst canning. The electrical properties of the catalyst device (ceramic honeycomb plus coating and storage material can be measured. Preferably, the resonance characteristics, e.g., the resonance frequencies, of selected cavity modes are observed. The information on the catalyst interior obtained in such a contactless manner is very well correlated with the catalyst state as will be demonstrated for different exhaust gas aftertreatment systems.

  20. Rejuvenation of the SCR catalyst at Mehrum

    Nagai, Y.; Inatsume, Y.; Morita, I.; Kato, Y.; Yokoyama, K.; Ito, K. [Babcock Hitachi K.K., Kure-shi, Hiroshima-ken (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Babcock Hitachi K.K. (BHK) received the contract of the rejuvenation of the SCR catalyst at the 750 MW coal-fired Mehrum Power Station (in Hohenhameln, Germany) in March 2003. The contractual coverage was 160 m{sup 3} of the entire catalyst layer. The catalyst, which had been in operation for 16 years since 1987, was originally supplied by BHK. The rejuvenation process developed for the Mehrum project consisted of two major steps: the first is to dust off the catalyst and remove the catalyst poison, and the second step is to add active material to enhance the catalyst activity. The catalyst must be dried after each washing. In order to minimize transportation cost and time, the rejuvenation work was done at the Mehrum station site. The scope of the rejuvenation work was shared between the owner and BHK. It took about one and a half months to complete the (total) on-site rejuvenation worked. The performance of the rejuvenated catalyst was superior to show the same level of activity as the unused catalyst and maintain the same SO{sub 2} conversion rate as the spent catalyst. This paper gives the details of the spent coal-fired SCR catalyst rejuvenation work. 13 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Reversible deactivation model of hydrocracker catalyst

    Aoyagi, K.; McCaffrey, W.C.; Gray, M. [Alberta Univ., Dept. of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Adjaye, J.; Yui, S. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Ishida, K.

    1999-07-01

    Various feed sources for hydrocrackers include those from straight-run heavy gas oils (HGO), HGOs produced in residuum upgrading processes such as coker gas oils, and those from oil sands. With the increasing complexity of the various feeds there is a greater need to comprehend the relationship between feed properties and hydrocracker operation. Using series-flow type fixed bed reactors, tests were conducted in the straight-run hydrocracking of HGOs and coker HGOs, derived from middle-east crude oils and Athabasca oil sands, at a temperature of 380 degrees C, a pressure of 2,000 psig, and a range of space velocities of feeds of 0.1 to 0.3 kg of feed/cubic m of catalyst. The first reactor was a hydrotreater (HT), and the second a hydrocracker, and various kinds of HGOs were feed continuously into the apparatus. The results were: first order kinetics described the the HGO crackability; a modified Langmuir-Hinshellwood model described the rate constants, which depends on sulfur and basic nitrogen (BN) content, average boiling point, and viscosity at 100 percent of feeds; reversible adsorption occurred of BN organic compounds on the catalytic acid sites; the crackability of HGOs during the change of feeds was described by a simple delay model due to desorption of BN; and the desorption rate of the BN organic compounds was dependent on the BM amount adsorbed but the adsorption rates were almost constant. The assumption was made that if the amount of BN adsorbed was low that there was an equilibrium between the desorption and adsorption rates of the BN compounds, and there was a reasonable agreement between computed and actual kinetic constants applying the hydrocracking model to different feeds. (Abstract only).

  2. Hydroprocessing using regenerated spent heavy hydrocarbon catalyst

    Clark, F.T.; Hensley, A.L. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a process for hydroprocessing a hydrocarbon feedstock. It comprises: contacting the feedstock with hydrogen under hydroprocessing conditions with a hydroprocessing catalyst wherein the hydroprocessing catalyst contains a total contaminant metals build-up of greater than about 4 wt. % nickel plus vanadium, a hydrogenation component selected from the group consisting of Group VIB metals and Group VIII metals and is regenerated spent hydroprocessing catalyst regenerated by a process comprising the steps: partially decoking the spent catalyst in an initial coke-burning step; impregnating the partially decoked catalyst with a Group IIA metal-containing impregnation solution; and decoking the impregnated catalyst in a final coke-burning step wherein the impregnated catalyst is contacted with an oxygen-containing gas at a temperature of about 600 degrees F to about 1400 degrees F

  3. Autothermal reforming catalyst having perovskite structure

    Krumpel, Michael [Naperville, IL; Liu, Di-Jia [Naperville, IL

    2009-03-24

    The invention addressed two critical issues in fuel processing for fuel cell application, i.e. catalyst cost and operating stability. The existing state-of-the-art fuel reforming catalyst uses Rh and platinum supported over refractory oxide which add significant cost to the fuel cell system. Supported metals agglomerate under elevated temperature during reforming and decrease the catalyst activity. The catalyst is a perovskite oxide or a Ruddlesden-Popper type oxide containing rare-earth elements, catalytically active firs row transition metal elements, and stabilizing elements, such that the catalyst is a single phase in high temperature oxidizing conditions and maintains a primarily perovskite or Ruddlesden-Popper structure under high temperature reducing conditions. The catalyst can also contain alkaline earth dopants, which enhance the catalytic activity of the catalyst, but do not compromise the stability of the perovskite structure.

  4. Isotope exchange in oxide-containing catalyst

    Brown, Kenneth G. (Inventor); Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Hess, Robert V. (Inventor); Miller, Irvin M. (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Sidney, Barry D. (Inventor); Wood, George M. (Inventor); Hoyt, Ronald F. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A method of exchanging rare-isotope oxygen for common-isotope oxygen in the top several layers of an oxide-containing catalyst is disclosed. A sample of an oxide-containing catalyst is exposed to a flowing stream of reducing gas in an inert carrier gas at a temperature suitable for the removal of the reactive common-isotope oxygen atoms from the surface layer or layers of the catalyst without damaging the catalyst structure. The reduction temperature must be higher than any at which the catalyst will subsequently operate. Sufficient reducing gas is used to allow removal of all the reactive common-isotope oxygen atoms in the top several layers of the catalyst. The catalyst is then reoxidized with the desired rare-isotope oxygen in sufficient quantity to replace all of the common-isotope oxygen that was removed.

  5. Clinical evaluation of an automated turning bed.

    Melland, H I; Langemo, D; Hanson, D; Olson, B; Hunter, S

    1999-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to assess client comfort and sleep quality, client physiologic response (skin and respiratory status), the effect on the need for caregiver assistance, and cost when using an automated turning bed. Nonexperimental, evaluative study. Twenty-four adult home or long-term care resident subjects who had a degenerative disease, spinal cord injury, stroke, cerebral palsy, or back surgery. Each subject agreed to use the automated turning bed for four weeks. Researchers completed a demographic survey and skin assessment, and assessed each subject for pressure ulcer risk and for the need of assistance of a care giver for turning before and after the four weeks of using the turning bed. Subjects rated the turning bed in terms of comfort and sleep quality. Subjects rated the turning bed as more comfortable than their own bed and expressed satisfaction at the pain relief attained when on the turning bed. While using the turning bed, there was a significant improvement in sleep quality. No skin breakdown or deterioration in respiratory status occurred. Fewer subjects required the assistance of a caregiver for turning when on the turning bed. This automated turning bed shows great promise in meeting a need for patients with limited mobility whether they are homebound or in a residential community. Future studies that further investigate use of the turning bed for postoperative back patients while still in the acute care setting are indicated. Replicative studies with a larger sample size are also indicated.

  6. High-BTU gas production from tar-bearing hot coke oven gas over iron catalyst

    L.Y. Li; K. Morishita; T. Takarada [Gunma University, Gunma (Japan). Department of Biological and Chemical Engineering

    2005-07-01

    To utilize the tar-bearing hot coke oven gas (the by-product of coke making process) more effectively, a process was developed by converting the hot coke oven gas into a methane rich high-BTU gas over iron-bearing catalysts. The catalytic behaviour of Indonesian limonite ore was mainly discussed. For a reference, a conventional nickel catalyst (Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) was employed. Laboratory scale tests were carried out in a two-stage fixed-bed reactor at ambient pressure. A bituminous coal sample was heated at first stage, the volatiles was carried by feed gas and decomposed at second stage. The limonite promoted hydropyrolysis of coal volatiles similar to Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. High yields of total product gas and methane were obtained at 50 vol.% hydrogen atmosphere with a feed gas of 60 ml min{sup -1} hydrogen and 60 ml min{sup -1} nitrogen. After experiments, hydrocarbons heavier than ethane were not observed. Also that, carbon balance was more than 99.8% in coal char, product gases and carbon deposits. It was considered that coal volatiles converted into light gases and carbon almost completely in catalyst bed. Yields of product gas and methane depended upon catalytic temperature. At 923 K, the maximum yield of product gas was achieved at 74.3% for limonite catalyst on carbon balance with methane 83.2 vol.% of the carbonaceous gas products. Comparing with limonite, Fe/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and BOF dust samples showed low activities on coal volatiles catalytic decomposition. 21 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Catalyst for Carbon Monoxide Oxidation

    Davis, Patricia; Brown, Kenneth; VanNorman, John; Brown, David; Upchurch, Billy; Schryer, David; Miller, Irvin

    2010-01-01

    In many applications, it is highly desirable to operate a CO2 laser in a sealed condition, for in an open system the laser requires a continuous flow of laser gas to remove the dissociation products that occur in the discharge zone of the laser, in order to maintain a stable power output. This adds to the operating cost of the laser, and in airborne or space applications, it also adds to the weight penalty of the laser. In a sealed CO2 laser, a small amount of CO2 gas is decomposed in the electrical discharge zone into corresponding quantities of CO and O2. As the laser continues to operate, the concentration of CO2 decreases, while the concentrations of CO and O2 correspondingly increase. The increasing concentration of O2 reduces laser power, because O2 scavenges electrons in the electrical discharge, thereby causing arcing in the electric discharge and a loss of the energetic electrons required to boost CO2 molecules to lasing energy levels. As a result, laser power decreases rapidly. The primary object of this invention is to provide a catalyst that, by composition of matter alone, contains chemisorbed water within and upon its structure. Such bound moisture renders the catalyst highly active and very long-lived, such that only a small quantity of it needs to be used with a CO2 laser under ambient operating conditions. This object is achieved by a catalyst that consists essentially of about 1 to 40 percent by weight of one or more platinum group metals (Pt, Pd, Rh, Ir, Ru, Os, Pt being preferred); about 1 to 90 percent by weight of one or more oxides of reducible metals having multiple valence states (such as Sn, Ti, Mn, Cu, and Ce, with SnO2 being preferred); and about 1 to 90 percent by weight of a compound that can bind water to its structure (such as silica gel, calcium chloride, magnesium sulfate, hydrated alumina, and magnesium perchlorate, with silica gel being preferred). Especially beneficial results are obtained when platinum is present in the

  8. Reduction of light cycle oil in catalytic cracking of bitumen-derived crude HGOs through catalyst selection

    Ding, Fuchen; Xu, Chunming [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum Beijing, 102200 (China); Ng, Siauw H. [National Centre for Upgrading Technology, 1 Oil Patch Drive, Suite A202, Devon, Alberta (Canada); Yui, Sok [Syncrude Research Centre, 9421-17 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2007-09-15

    In an attempt to reduce the production of light cycle oil (LCO), a non-premium fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) product in North America, a large-pore catalyst containing rare-earth-exchanged Y (REY) zeolite, was used to crack two Canadian bitumen-derived crude heavy gas oils (HGOs) hydrotreated to different extents. For comparison, a regular equilibrium FCC catalyst with ultra-stable Y (USY) zeolite and a conventional western Canadian crude HGO were also included in the study. Cracking experiments were conducted in a fixed-bed microactivity test (MAT) reactor at 510 C, 30 s oil injection time, and varying catalyst-to-oil ratios for different conversions. The results show that pre-cracking of heavy molecules with wide-pore matrix, followed by zeolite cracking, enhanced conversion at the expense of light and heavy cycle oils at a constant catalyst-to-oil ratio, giving improved product selectivities (e.g., higher gasoline and lower dry gas, LCO, and coke yields, in general, at a given conversion). To systematically assess the benefits of employing the specialty catalyst over the regular catalyst in cracking Canadian HGOs, individual product yields were compared at common bases, including constant catalyst-to-oil ratios, conversions, and coke yields for three feeds, and at maximum gasoline yield for one feed. In most cases, the preferred choice of large-pore zeolite-rich catalyst over its counterpart was evident. The observed cracking phenomena were explained based on properties of catalysts and characterization data of feedstocks, including their hydrocarbon type analyses by gas chromatograph with a mass-selective detector (GC-MSD). (author)

  9. A study on the deactivation and stability of hydrophobic catalyst for hydrogen isotope exchange

    Sohn, Soon Hwan

    2006-02-01

    . However, the catalytic rate constants decreased remarkably with the progress of impurity poisoning at a large Thiele modulus because of the severe mass transfer resistance at the outer fouled layer. At ξc = 0.94, the catalytic activities with Thiele modulus=20 after 3 years and 10 years of operation were estimated about 16% and 12% of the initial activity, respectively, while the catalytic activities with Thiele modulus=100 were of about 12% and 9%, respectively. With the catalyst bed height of 15 cm, the catalyst bed efficiency decreased from 93% to 81% as the catalytic rate constant changed from 2.4 x 10 -4 mole/s·g to 1.6 x 10 -4 mole/s·g. Assuming no impurity poisoning, the WTRF LPCE column has been designed to meet the tritium removal requirement of detritiation factor=35 by 40 years of operation. Although the long-term uniform poisoning and the mild impurity poisoning (ξ c >0.7) in the LPCE column are simultaneously occurred, it would be practicable to meet the detritiation requirement over 10 years of operation without regeneration of the catalysts. If the whole catalysts in the LPCE column experience the severe impurity poisoning (ξ c <0.7), however, it is impossible to meet the above detritiation requirement. It has been found that an impurity control in the streams is essential to success in the WTRF LPCE column operation because the Pt/SDBC catalyst has a large diffusion resistance

  10. Thermal Behavior and Hydrogen Production of Methanol Autothermal Reforming Performed Using Oxygen Enrichment and Cu/ZnO/Al2O3/Cr2O3/CeO2 Catalyst

    Donny Lesmana

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A fixed-bed reactor designed for the autothermal reforming (ATR of methanol under adiabatic conditions was constructed to experimentally determine the profile of temperature and catalyst activity generated using the Cu/ZnO/Al2O3/Cr2O3/CeO2 catalyst. The effect of oxygen enrichment in this experiment was investigated, and the experimental results showed that an increase in oxygen concentration correlated with an increase in the temperature of the catalytic bed; by contrast, this increase in oxygen concentration resulted in a reduction of the startup time of the catalyst. Moreover, the reaction temperature was determined to vary with the position within the catalytic fixed bed. © 2015 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 29th August 2014; Revised: 19th March 2015; Accepted: 19th March 2015

  11. Circulating fluidized bed reformer-regenerator system for hydrogen production from methane. Paper no. IGEC-1-092

    Prasad, P.; Elnashaie, S.S.E.H.

    2005-01-01

    Steam reforming is presently the principal route for large-scale hydrogen production from natural gas. This paper proposes a novel concept of a reactor-regenerator type circulating fluidized bed (Prasad and Elnashaie, 2002) for efficient production of hydrogen. Carbon is optimally allowed to form on the catalyst in the reactor section through methane cracking and Boudouard coking reactions, and the deactivated catalyst is regenerated in the regenerator by burning off the carbon. This concept of carbon formation and burning cannot be used in a fixed bed configuration but is possible in the proposed novel Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) configuration, which employs a reactor-regenerator type of configuration. Allowing both carbon formation and steam reforming to occur simultaneously by introducing steam as part of the feed, gives more than 3 moles hydrogen per mole of methane at almost zero energy consumption. The steam can be fed as water at room temperature, and the hot catalyst returning from the regenerator can be used to vaporize it into steam. This route is the most efficient from both hydrogen yield and energy consumption points of view. This CFB configuration exhibits the bifurcation behavior and the present paper reports an investigation of its static bifurcation characteristics through a rigorous mathematical model. (author)

  12. The Effect of Time dealumination and Solvent Concentration in Synthesis of Zeolite Catalyst and Catalytic Test for DiEthyl Ether Production Process

    Widayat; Roesyadi, A.; Rachimoellah, M.

    2009-01-01

    Ethanol is an alternative energy, but its has three distinct disadvantages as a transportation fuel. Its availability is currently limited, and it has a lower volumetric heating value and a lower Reid vapour pressure (RVP) than gasoline. This paper focuses for this disadvantages and to solve this problem can do with converts ethanol to DiEthyl Ether product. This research produced DiEthyl Ether by ethanol dehydration process with zeolite as catalyst. The catalyst synthesis from natural material from District Gunung Kidul, Indonesia. The catalyst produced with dealumination, neutralization, drying and calcination processes. The zeolite catalyst was analysed of Si/Al, X-ray Diffraction and specific surface area. The catalyst product then used for ethanol dehydration to produce DiEthyl Ether. The results shown the biggest surface area is 184,52 m 2 /gram at catalyst production at 10 hours for time dealumination. The crystallite of catalyst product is similar like shown at diffractogram of XRD analysis. The ratio Si/Al biggest is 313.7 that obtaining at catalyst production with 7 hours for time dealumination. The catalytic test use fixed bed reactor with 1 inci diameter and ethanol fermentation both as feed. The operation condition is 150 deg. C at temperature and atmosphere pressure. The compounds product in liquid phase are diethyl ether, methanol and water.

  13. MASS TRANSFER IN PORE STRUCTURES OF SUPPORTED CATALYSTS

    F.R.C. Silva

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of gas-solid interaction and mass transfer in fixed-bed systems of supported catalysts were analyzed for g -Al2O3 (support and Cu/g -Al2O3 (catalyst systems. Evaluations of the mass transfer coefficients in the macropores and of the diffusivity in the micropores, as formed by the crystallite agglomerates of the metallic phases, were obtained. Dynamic experiments with gaseous tracers permitted the quantification of the parameters based on models for these two pore structures. With a flow in a range of 18 cm3 s-1 to 39.98 cm3 s-1 at 45oC, 65oC and 100oC, mass transfer coefficients km =4.33x10-4 m s-1 to 7.38x10-4 m s-1 for macropore structures and diffusivities Dm =1.29x10-11 m2 s-1 to 5.35x10-11 m2 s-1 for micropore structures were estimated

  14. Steam reforming of ethanol over nickel-tungsten catalyst

    Hernandez, I.P.; Fernandez, A.M. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Privada Xochicalco S/N, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico); Gochi-Ponce, Y. [Instituto Tecnologico de Oaxaca, Division de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigacion, Ave. Ing. Victor Bravo Ahuja, esq. Ave. Tecnologico No. 120, Col. Centro. Oaxaca, Oax (Mexico); Contreras Larios, J.L. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana Azcapotzalco, CBI., Energia, Av. Sn. Pablo 180, Col. Reynosa, C.P. 02200, Mexico D.F (Mexico)

    2010-11-15

    Ni-W/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts were synthesized, characterized and tested for the steam reforming of ethanol from 300 to 600 C. Addition of Ni and W on the alumina, decreased the surface area and increased the pore volume of the mesoporous materials synthesized. The reaction products obtained were: H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, CO and CH{sub 3}CHO. A promoting effect of Ni-W was observed in the conversion of ethanol to H{sub 2} from 15 to 30 wt.% Ni and 1 wt.% W. The selectivity to H{sub 2} on the alumina with Ni-W, was between 66.53 and 68.53% at 550 C, appearing some undesirable products, with low ratio of CO/CO{sub 2}. Reaction was studied on a fixed bed reactor at atmospheric pressure with an ethanol/water molar ratio of 1:4, from 300 to 600 C. The catalysts were characterized by the thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA)-Differential thermal analysis (DTA), N{sub 2} physisorption (BET and BJH methods), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), these techniques were used for characterization, before and after of the steam reforming. (author)

  15. Mass transfer in liquid phase catalytic exchange column of trickle bed type

    Yamanishi, Toshihiko; Iwai, Yasunori; Okuno, Kenji

    1995-09-01

    The mechanism of mass transfer in a liquid phase catalytic exchange column was discussed for a trickle bed type. A new model has been proposed on the basis of this mass transfer mechanism; and several problems for the previous reported models were pointed out in the derivation of the model. An overall rate equation was first derived from the vapor-hydrogen exchange in the model. The mass transfer for the vapor-hydrogen exchange was decomposed to the following three steps: the mass transfer in a gas boundary layer on a catalyst particle; the mass transfer within the pores in the catalyst; and the chemical reaction on the surface of the catalyst. The water-vapor scrubbing process was considered as a series of the mass transfers in gas and liquid boundary layers on the wetted surfaces of the catalyst and packings or wall of the column. Significant subjects to be studied were proposed from the viewpoint of the validity of the model and the optimization of the column. (author)

  16. The Safety of Hospital Beds: Ingress, Egress, and In-Bed Mobility.

    Morse, Janice M; Gervais, Pierre; Pooler, Charlotte; Merryweather, Andrew; Doig, Alexa K; Bloswick, Donald

    2015-01-01

    To explore the safety of the standard and the low hospital bed, we report on a microanalysis of 15 patients' ability to ingress, move about the bed, and egress. The 15 participants were purposefully selected with various disabilities. Bed conditions were randomized with side rails up or down and one low bed with side rails down. We explored the patients' use of the side rails, bed height, ability to lift their legs onto the mattress, and ability to turn, egress, and walk back to the chair. The standard bed was too high for some participants, both for ingress and egress. Side rails were used by most participants when entering, turning in bed, and exiting. We recommend that side rails be reconsidered as a means to facilitate in-bed movement, ingress, and egress. Furthermore, single deck height settings for all patients are not optimal. Low beds as a safety measure must be re-evaluated.

  17. Oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane to ethylene using vanadia based catalysts

    Qiao, Ailing; Kalevaru, V.N. [Univ. Rostock e.V., Rostock (Germany). Leibniz-Inst. fuer Katalyse; Humar, A.S.; Lingaiah, N.; Sai Prasad, P.S.; Martin, A. [Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Hyderabad (India). Inorganic and Physical Chemistry Div.

    2011-07-01

    In this work, we describe the application of V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} catalysts for the oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of ethane to ethylene. A series of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} supported V{sub 2}O{sub 5} catalysts were prepared by impregnation technique. NH{sub 4}VO{sub 3} was used as a precursor for V{sub 2}O{sub 5}. The content of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} is varied in the range from 5 to 20 wt%. Catalytic tests were carried out in a fixed bed quartz reactor in the temperature range from 500 to 600 C. The conversion of ethane has been increased from ca. 20 to 35 % with increase in temperature from 500 to 600 C, while the yield of ethylene is increased from about 5 to 12 % only. CO and CO{sub 2} are the only major by-products of the reaction. The activity tests were performed at low O{sub 2} concentration in the feed and hence low conversions were achieved. Furthermore, the conversion of ethane is found to increase continuously with increase in V{sub 2}O{sub 5} loading while the yield of C{sub 2}H{sub 4} increased only up to 10wt% V{sub 2}O{sub 5} and then decreased. Results revealed that the catalytic activity and selectivity is found to depend on the V{sub 2}O{sub 5} loading. Among all, 10wt% V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} catalyst has displayed the superior performance. (orig.)

  18. Recombination Catalysts for Hypersonic Fuels

    Chinitz, W.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of commercially-viable access to space will require technologies that reduce propulsion system weight and complexity, while extracting maximum energy from the products of combustion. This work is directed toward developing effective nozzle recombination catalysts for the supersonic and hypersonic aeropropulsion engines used to provide such access to space. Effective nozzle recombination will significantly reduce rk=le length (hence, propulsion system weight) and reduce fuel requirements, further decreasing the vehicle's gross lift-off weight. Two such catalysts have been identified in this work, barium and antimony compounds, by developing chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms for these materials and determining the engine performance enhancement for a typical flight trajectory. Significant performance improvements are indicated, using only 2% (mole or mass) of these compounds in the combustor product gas.

  19. Deuterium exchange between hydrogen and water in a trickle bed reactor

    Enright, J.T.; Chuang, T.T.

    1978-01-01

    The catalyzed exchange of deuterium between hydrogen and liquid water has been studied as the basis for a heavy water production process. Platinum catalyst which had been waterproofed with Teflon was tested in a 0.2 m diameter trickle bed reactor at pressures and temperatures up to 6 MPa and 440 K. Extensive experimental data were used to test a model of the system which was developed from fundamental principles. It was found that mass transfer plays a very important role in the overall exchange and the conventional theory of vapour/liquid mass transfer does not adequately describe the absorption process. Modelling of the data has resulted in the postulation of a second method of mass transfer whereby HDO transfers directly from the catalyst to the bulk liquid phase. (author)

  20. Fixed-bed hydrogen pyrolysis of rapeseed: product yields and compositions

    Onay, O.; Kockar, O.M.; Gaines, A.F.; Snape, C.E.

    2006-01-01

    The fixed-bed hydro pyrolysis tests have been conducted on a sample of rapeseed to investigate the effect of hydro pyrolysis on the yields and chemical structures of bio-oils, with a view to improving overall product quality. A ammonium dioxydithiomolybdenate catalyst has been used in some tests to further increase conversion. The maximum bio-oil yield of 84% was obtained in hydrogen atmosphere (with catalyst) at hydrogen pressure of 15 MPa, hydrogen flow rate of 10 dm 3 min -1 , hydro pyrolysis temperature of 520 degree C, and heating rate of 5 o Cmin -1 . Then this bio-oil was characterized by elemental analysis and some spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques. And finally, this bio-oil yield and chemical composition compared with oil obtained from fast pyrolysis condition

  1. Catalyst for Expanding Human Spaceflight

    Lueders, Kathryn L.

    2014-01-01

    History supplies us with many models of how and how not to commercialize an industry. This presentation draws parallels between industries with government roots, like the railroad, air transport, communications and the internet, and NASAs Commercial Crew Program. In these examples, government served as a catalyst for what became a booming industry. The building block approach the Commercial Crew Program is taking is very simple -- establish a need, laying the groundwork, enabling industry and legal framework.

  2. Photosystem Inspired Peptide Hybrid Catalysts

    2017-06-07

    materials defined at the molecular level. We propose a novel way to make hybrid catalyst composed of inorganic nanomaterials and peptides. The...Distribution approved for public release. AF Office Of Scientific Research (AFOSR)/ IOA Arlington, Virginia 22203 Air Force Research Laboratory Air...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) SEOUL NATIONAL UNIVERSITY SNUR&DB FOUNDATION RESEARCH PARK CENTER SEOUL, 151742 KR 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT

  3. Alternative alkali resistant deNOx catalysts

    Putluru, Siva Sankar Reddy; Kristensen, Steffen Buus; Due-Hansen, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    by onepot sol–gel method. All catalysts were characterized by BET, XRPD and NH3-TPD. Initial SCR activities of 8 out of 9 catalysts showed higher NO conversion at least at one temperature in the temperature range 300–500 ◦C compared to the conventional V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalyst. After potassium poisoning (100......Alternative alkali resistant deNOx catalysts were prepared using three different supports ZrO2, TiO2 and Mordenite zeolite. The majority of the catalysts were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation of a commercial support, with vanadium, copper or iron precursor, one catalyst was prepared......–130 µmol of K/g of catalyst) the relative drop in SCR activity and acidity was lower for all the alternative catalysts compared to the industrial V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalyst. Furthermore, Cu/MOR and Nano-V2O5/Sul-TiO2 catalysts showed 8–16 times higher SCR activities than the conventional even after high...

  4. Catalytic para-xylene maximization. Part X: Toluene disproportionation on HF promoted H-ZSM-5 catalysts

    Ahmed K. Aboul-Gheit

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available H-ZSM-5 zeolite catalysts were doped with 2%, 3% and 4%HF to be used for investigating their activities and selectivities for xylenes production and for para-xylene maximization at temperatures of 300–500 °C via toluene disproportionation. This doping caused pore size modification of the H-ZSM-5 catalyst. The reaction was carried out in a fixed bed flow type reactor. The ratio of produced para-xylene relative to its thermodynamic composition reached as high as 3.29 at 300 °C on the 4%HF doped H-ZSM-5 catalyst although this catalyst possessed the lowest amount of the largest pores (3.0–5.7 nm and the smallest pores (0.4–1.7 nm. The overall activities of the catalysts were decreased with an increase in HF doping because of diffusion restriction. The kinetics of the reaction were simply treated and found to give Ea and ΔS∗ values compatible with the characterization data of the catalysts.

  5. [Special beds. Pulmonary therapy system].

    Calixto Rodríguez, Joaquín; Rodríguez Martínez, Xavier; Marín i Vivó, Gemma; Paunellas Albert, Josep

    2008-10-01

    To be bedridden reduces one's capacity to move and produces muscular debility that affects the respiratory system leading to a decreased effectiveness in expectoration, the ability to spit up sputum. The pulmonary therapy system integrated in a bed is the result of applying motorized elements to the articulation points of the bad in order to achieve safe positions at therapeutic angles, which improve the breathing-perfusion (blood flow) relationship. This system also makes it possible to apply vibration waves to the patient which favor the elimination of bronchial-pulmonary secretions, the rehabilitation of the bedridden patient and decrease the work load for nursing personnel.

  6. Particle bed reactor scaling relationships

    Slovik, G.; Araj, K.; Horn, F. L.; Ludewig, H.; Benenati, R.

    The Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) concept can be used in several applications both as part of a power generating system or as a direct propulsion unit. In order to carry out optimization studies of systems involving a PBR, it is necessary to know the variation of the critical mass with pertinent system parameters such as weight, size, power level and thrust level. A parametric study is presented for all the practical combinations of fuel and moderating material. The PBR is described, the practical combinations of materials and dimensions are discussed, and an example is presented.

  7. Investigations on a new internally-heated tubular packed-bed methanol–steam reformer

    Nehe, Prashant

    2015-05-01

    Small-scale reformers for hydrogen production through steam reforming of methanol can provide an alternative solution to the demand of continuous supply of hydrogen gas for the operation of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFCs). A packed-bed type reformer is one of the potential designs for such purpose. An externally heated reformer has issues of adverse lower temperature in the core of the reformer and significant heat loss to the environment thus impacting its performance. Experimental and numerical studies on a new concept of internally heated tubular packed-bed methanol-steam reformer have been reported in this paper with improved performance in terms of higher methanol conversion and reduced heat losses to surroundings. CuO/ZnO/Al2O3 is used as the catalyst for the methanol-steam reforming reaction and a rod-type electric heater at the center of the reactor is used for supplying necessary heat for endothermic steam reforming reaction. The vaporizer and the reformer unit with a constant volume catalyst bed are integrated in the annular section of a tubular reformer unit. The performance of the reformer was investigated at various operating conditions like feed rate of water-methanol mixture, mass of the catalyst and reforming temperature. The experimental and numerical results show that the methanol conversion and CO concentration increase with internal heating for a wide range of operating conditions. The developed reformer unit generates 50-80W (based on lower heating value) of hydrogen gas for applications in PEMFCs. For optimized design and operating conditions, the reformer unit produced 298sccm reformed gas containing 70% H2, 27% CO2 and 3% CO at 200-240°C which can produce a power output of 25-32W assuming 60% fuel cell efficiency and 80% of hydrogen utilization in a PEMFC. © 2015 Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC.

  8. Phenol oxidation by a sequential CWPO-CWAO treatment with a Fe/AC catalyst.

    Quintanilla, A; Fraile, A F; Casas, J A; Rodríguez, J J

    2007-07-31

    Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) of phenol with a homemade Fe/activated carbon (Fe/AC) catalyst has been studied in a stainless steel fixed-bed reactor at different operating conditions (T=23-100 degrees C, P(T)=1-8atm, W=0-2.5g, and tau=20-320g(CAT)h/g(Phenol)). The results show that, thanks to the incorporation of Fe on the activated carbon, phenol conversion improved dramatically, reaching a 90% at 65 degrees C, 2atm, and 40g(CAT)h/g(Phenol). However, TOC conversion values remain fairly low, (around 5% at 40g(CAT)h/g(Phenol)), and no improvement was obtained with the inclusion of Fe. The presence of Fe seems to promote the nondesirable coupling reactions that take place in CWPO of phenol due to the condensation of the ring intermediates (the primary phenol oxidation products). These condensation products are quite refractory to CWPO at the conditions employed. Taking advantage of the high phenol conversions in CWPO and the high phenol mineralization in CWAO, along with the good stability of the Fe/AC catalyst, a CWPO-CWAO sequential treatment has been successfully performed by using a fixed-bed and trickle-bed reactor in series. A CWPO treatment at ambient conditions followed by a CWAO treatment at mild conditions (100 degrees C and 8atm) is presented as high efficiency process for the decontamination of phenolic wastewaters.

  9. Phenol oxidation by a sequential CWPO-CWAO treatment with a Fe/AC catalyst

    Quintanilla, A.; Fraile, A.F.; Casas, J.A.; Rodriguez, J.J.

    2007-01-01

    Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) of phenol with a homemade Fe/activated carbon (Fe/AC) catalyst has been studied in a stainless steel fixed-bed reactor at different operating conditions (T = 23-100 deg. C, P T = 1-8 atm, W = 0-2.5 g, and τ = 20-320 g CAT h/g Phenol ). The results show that, thanks to the incorporation of Fe on the activated carbon, phenol conversion improved dramatically, reaching a 90% at 65 deg. C, 2 atm, and 40 g CAT h/g Phenol . However, TOC conversion values remain fairly low, (around 5% at 40 g CAT h/g Phenol ), and no improvement was obtained with the inclusion of Fe. The presence of Fe seems to promote the nondesirable coupling reactions that take place in CWPO of phenol due to the condensation of the ring intermediates (the primary phenol oxidation products). These condensation products are quite refractory to CWPO at the conditions employed. Taking advantage of the high phenol conversions in CWPO and the high phenol mineralization in CWAO, along with the good stability of the Fe/AC catalyst, a CWPO-CWAO sequential treatment has been successfully performed by using a fixed-bed and trickle-bed reactor in series. A CWPO treatment at ambient conditions followed by a CWAO treatment at mild conditions (100 deg. C and 8 atm) is presented as high efficiency process for the decontamination of phenolic wastewaters

  10. Hydrogen production by methanol steam reforming carried out in membrane reactor on Cu/Zn/Mg-based catalyst

    Basile, A.; Parmaliana, A.; Tosti, S.; Iulianelli, A.; Gallucci, F.; Espro, C.; Spooren, J.

    2008-01-01

    The methanol steam reforming (MSR) reaction was studied by using both a dense Pd-Ag membrane reactor (MR) and a fixed bed reactor (FBR). Both the FBR and the MR were packed with a new catalyst based on CuOAl2O3ZnOMgO, having an upper temperature limit of around 350 °C. A constant sweep gas flow rate

  11. Catalysis Science Initiative: Catalyst Design by Discovery Informatics

    Delgass, William Nicholas [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Abu-Omar, Mahdi [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States) Department of Chemistry; Caruthers, James [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Ribeiro, Fabio [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Thomson, Kendall [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Schneider, William [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    2016-07-08

    Catalysts selectively enhance the rates of chemical reactions toward desired products. Such reactions provide great benefit to society in major commercial sectors such as energy production, protecting the environment, and polymer products and thereby contribute heavily to the country’s gross national product. Our premise is that the level of fundamental understanding of catalytic events at the atomic and molecular scale has reached the point that more predictive methods can be developed to shorten the cycle time to new processes. The field of catalysis can be divided into two regimes: heterogeneous and homogeneous. For the heterogeneous catalysis regime, we have used the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction (CO + H2O + CO2 + H2O) over supported metals as a test bed. Detailed analysis and strong coupling of theory with experiment have led to the following conclusions: • The sequence of elementary steps goes through a COOH intermediate • The CO binding energy is a strong function of coverage of CO adsorbed on the surface in many systems • In the case of Au catalysts, the CO adsorption is generally too weak on surface with close atomic packing, but the enhanced binding at corner atoms (which are missing bonding partners) of cubo-octahedral nanoparticles increases the energy to a near optimal value and produces very active catalysts. • Reaction on the metal alone cannot account for the experimental results. The reaction is dual functional with water activation occurring at the metal-support interface. It is clear from our work that the theory component is essential, not only for prediction of new systems, but also for reconciling data and testing hypotheses regarding potential descriptors. Particularly important is the finding that the interface between nano-sized metal particles and the oxides that are used to support them represent a new state of matter in the sense that the interfacial bonding perturbs the chemical state of both metals atoms and the support

  12. Fluid-bed process for SYNROC production

    Ackerman, F.J.; Grens, J.Z.; Ryerson, F.J.; Hoenig, C.L.; Bazan, F.; Peters, P.E.; Smith, R.; Campbell, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    SYNROC is a titanate-based ceramic waste developed for the immobilization of high-level nuclear reactor waste. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has investigated a fluid-bed technique for the large-scale production of SYNROC precursor powders. Making SYNROC in a fluid bed permits slurry drying, calcination and reduction-oxidation reactions to be carried out in a single unit. We present the results of SYNROC fluid-bed studies from two fluid-bed units 10 cm in diameter: an internally heated fluid-bed unit developed by Exxon Idaho and an externally heated unit constructed at LLNL. Bed operation over a range of temperatures, feed rates, fluidizing rates, and redox conditions indicate that SYNROC powders of a high density and a uniform particle size can be produced. These powders facilitate the densification step and yield dense ceramics (greater than 95% theoretical density) with well-developed phases and low leaching rates

  13. On partial fluidization in rotating fluidized beds

    Kao, J.; Pfeffer, R.; Tardos, G.I.

    1987-01-01

    In a rotating fluidized bed, unlike in a conventional fluidized bed, the granules are fluidized layer by layer from the (inner) free surface outward at increasing radius as the gas velocity is increased. This is a very significant and interesting phenomenon and is extremely important in the design of these fluidized beds. The phenomenon was first suggested in a theoretical analysis and recently verified experimentally in the authors' laboratory. However, in the first paper, the equations presented are too cumbersome and the influence of bed thickness is not clearly stated. In this note the authors present simplified equations, based on that paper, for the pressure drop and the minimum fluidizing velocities in a rotating fluidized bed. Experimental data are also shown and compared with the theoretical model, and the effect of bed thickness is shown. Furthermore, an explanation for the observation of a maximum in the pressure drop vs. velocity curve instead of the plateau derived by Chen is proposed

  14. MIT pebble bed reactor project

    Kadak, Andrew C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States)

    2007-03-15

    The conceptual design of the MIT modular pebble bed reactor is described. This reactor plant is a 250 Mwth, 120 Mwe indirect cycle plant that is designed to be deployed in the near term using demonstrated helium system components. The primary system is a conventional pebble bed reactor with a dynamic central column with an outlet temperature of 900 C providing helium to an intermediate helium to helium heat exchanger (IHX). The outlet of the IHX is input to a three shaft horizontal Brayton Cycle power conversion system. The design constraint used in sizing the plant is based on a factory modularity principle which allows the plant to be assembled 'Lego' style instead of constructed piece by piece. This principle employs space frames which contain the power conversion system that permits the Lego-like modules to be shipped by truck or train to sites. This paper also describes the research that has been conducted at MIT since 1998 on fuel modeling, silver leakage from coated fuel particles, dynamic simulation, MCNP reactor physics modeling and air ingress analysis.

  15. MIT pebble bed reactor project

    Kadak, Andrew C.

    2007-01-01

    The conceptual design of the MIT modular pebble bed reactor is described. This reactor plant is a 250 Mwth, 120 Mwe indirect cycle plant that is designed to be deployed in the near term using demonstrated helium system components. The primary system is a conventional pebble bed reactor with a dynamic central column with an outlet temperature of 900 C providing helium to an intermediate helium to helium heat exchanger (IHX). The outlet of the IHX is input to a three shaft horizontal Brayton Cycle power conversion system. The design constraint used in sizing the plant is based on a factory modularity principle which allows the plant to be assembled 'Lego' style instead of constructed piece by piece. This principle employs space frames which contain the power conversion system that permits the Lego-like modules to be shipped by truck or train to sites. This paper also describes the research that has been conducted at MIT since 1998 on fuel modeling, silver leakage from coated fuel particles, dynamic simulation, MCNP reactor physics modeling and air ingress analysis

  16. A biphasic oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes and ketones using a simplified packed-bed microreactor

    Andrew Bogdan

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the preparation and characterization of a simplified packed-bed microreactor using an immobilized TEMPO catalyst shown to oxidize primary and secondary alcohols via the biphasic Anelli-Montanari protocol. Oxidations occurred in high yields with great stability over time. We observed that plugs of aqueous oxidant and organic alcohol entered the reactor as plugs but merged into an emulsion on the packed-bed. The emulsion coalesced into larger plugs upon exiting the reactor, leaving the organic product separate from the aqueous by-products. Furthermore, the microreactor oxidized a wide range of alcohols and remained active in excess of 100 trials without showing any loss of catalytic activity.

  17. Carbonaceous deposits on naptha reforming catalysts

    Redwan, D.S.

    1999-01-01

    Carbonaceous deposits on naphtha reforming catalysts play a decisive role in limiting process performance. The deposits negatively after catalyst activity, selectivity and the production cycle of a semi regenerative reformer. The magnitude of negative effect of those deposits is directly proportional to their amounts and complexity. Investigations on used reforming catalysts samples reveal that the amount and type (complexity of the chemical nature) of carbonaceous deposits are directly proportional to the catalysts life on stream and the severity of operating conditions. In addition, the combustibility behavior of carbonaceous deposits on the catalyst samples taken from different reformers are found to be different. Optimal carbon removal, for in situ catalyst regeneration, requires the specific conditions be developed, based on the results of well designed and properly performed investigations of the amount and type of carbonaceous deposits. (author)

  18. Hydrous titanium oxide-supported catalysts

    Dosch, R.G.; Stohl, F.V.; Richardson, J.T.

    1990-01-01

    Catalysts were prepared on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO) supports by ion exchange of an active metal for Na + ions incorporated in the HTO support during preparation by reaction with the parent Ti alkoxide. Strong active metal-HTO interactions as a result of the ion exchange reaction can require significantly different conditions for activation as compared to catalysts prepared by more widely used incipient wetness methods. The latter catalysts typically involve conversion or while the HTO catalysts require the alteration of electrostatic bonds between the metal and support with subsequent alteration of the support itself. In this paper, the authors discuss the activation, via sulfidation or reduction, of catalysts consisting of Co, Mo, or Ni-Mo dispersed on HTO supports by ion exchange. Correlations between the activation process and the hydrogenation, hydrodeoxygenation, and hydrodesulfurization activities of the catalysts are presented

  19. Optimization of catalyst system reaps economic benefits

    Le Roy, C.F.; Hanshaw, M.J.; Fischer, S.M.; Malik, T.; Kooiman, R.R.

    1991-01-01

    Champlin Refining and Chemicals Inc. is learning to optimize its catalyst systems for hydrotreating Venezuelan gas oils through a program of research, pilot plant testing, and commercial unit operation. The economic results of this project have been evaluated, and the benefits are most evident in improvements in product yields and qualities. The project has involved six commercial test runs, to date (Runs 10-15), with a seventh run planned. A summary of the different types of catalyst systems used in the test runs, and the catalyst philosophy that developed is given. Runs 10 and 11 used standard CoMo and NiMo catalysts for heavy gas oils hydrotreating. These catalysts had small pore sizes and suffered high deactivation rates because of metals contamination. When it was discovered that metals contamination was a problem, catalyst options were reviewed

  20. Gas distributor for fluidized bed coal gasifier

    Worley, Arthur C.; Zboray, James A.

    1980-01-01

    A gas distributor for distributing high temperature reaction gases to a fluidized bed of coal particles in a coal gasification process. The distributor includes a pipe with a refractory reinforced lining and a plurality of openings in the lining through which gas is fed into the bed. These feed openings have an expanding tapered shape in the downstream or exhaust direction which aids in reducing the velocity of the gas jets as they enter the bed.

  1. Dynamical and technological consequences of multiple isolas of steady states in a catalytic fluidised-bed reactor

    Bizon Katarzyna

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Steady-state characteristics of a catalytic fluidised bed reactor and its dynamical consequences are analyzed. The occurrence of an untypical steady-state structure manifesting in a form of multiple isolas is described. A two-phase bubbling bed model is used for a quantitative description of the bed of catalyst. The influence of heat exchange intensity and a fluidisation ratio onto the generation of isolated solution branches is presented for two kinetic schemes. Dynamical consequences of the coexistence of such untypical branches of steady states are presented. The impact of linear growth of the fluidisation ratio and step change of the cooling medium temperature onto the desired product yield is analyzed. The results presented in this study confirm that the identification of a region of the occurrence of multiple isolas is important due to their strong impact both on the process start-up and its control.

  2. Molecular catalysts structure and functional design

    Gade, Lutz H

    2014-01-01

    Highlighting the key aspects and latest advances in the rapidly developing field of molecular catalysis, this book covers new strategies to investigate reaction mechanisms, the enhancement of the catalysts' selectivity and efficiency, as well as the rational design of well-defined molecular catalysts. The interdisciplinary author team with an excellent reputation within the community discusses experimental and theoretical studies, along with examples of improved catalysts, and their application in organic synthesis, biocatalysis, and supported organometallic catalysis. As a result, readers wil

  3. Oxidation catalysts on alkaline earth supports

    Mohajeri, Nahid

    2017-03-21

    An oxidation catalyst includes a support including particles of an alkaline earth salt, and first particles including a palladium compound on the support. The oxidation catalyst can also include precious metal group (PMG) metal particles in addition to the first particles intermixed together on the support. A gas permeable polymer that provides a continuous phase can completely encapsulate the particles and the support. The oxidation catalyst may be used as a gas sensor, where the first particles are chemochromic particles.

  4. HDS, HDN and HDA activities of nickel-molybdenum catalysts supported on alumina

    Dominguez-Crespo, M.A. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Tratamiento de Crudo Maya. Avenida Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas No.152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, 07730, Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada (CICATA-Altamira, IPN) Km 14.5 Carretera Tampico-puerto Industrial 89600, Altamira, Tamaulipas (Mexico); Torres-Huerta, A.M.; Ramirez-Meneses, E. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada (CICATA-Altamira, IPN) Km 14.5 Carretera Tampico-puerto Industrial 89600, Altamira, Tamaulipas (Mexico); Diaz-Garcia, L. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Tratamiento de Crudo Maya. Avenida Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas No.152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, 07730, Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Arce-Estrada, E.M. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Departamento de Metalurgia y Materiales. A.P. 75-876, 07300 Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    2008-08-15

    In this work, NiMo-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts were prepared by using different alumina precursors. The supports were impregnated by means of the spray at incipient wetness technique in both basic and acid media. Both the supports and fresh catalysts were characterized by the adsorption-desorption isotherms, Temperature-Programmed Reduction (TPR), Thermal Pyridine Adsorption-Desorption (TPD) and X-Ray Diffraction analyses (XRD). After sulfidation, the NiMoS metallic particles were characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The initial analyses were performed in a trickle-bed reactor by using a real feedstock (Mexican heavy gas oil) and performing hydrotreating reactions (HDS, HDN and HDA) at three different temperatures: 613, 633 and 653 K; and 54 kg cm{sup -} {sup 2}. The catalytic activities are discussed in relation to the physicochemical properties of the NiMo catalysts, alumina phase and pH of the impregnating solution. The catalytic results show an increase in the conversion profiles with temperature. The sulfur conversion was increased from 89 to 99.25%, 91-99%, 90.8-97%, 83-95% and 78-96% when the crystal size of the support varied from 3 to 20 nm, respectively. The nitrogen and aromatic conversions were also increased in the range of 23-45 wt.%. It was found that the {gamma} phase reached a higher catalytic performance than the {eta} phase. The NiMo catalysts synthesized in a basic medium showed a better catalytic performance than that obtained with those prepared in acid solutions. The significance of the kinetic data to compare the catalysts is discussed. The maximum value of the catalytic activity was reached with the catalysts with the smallest particle sizes. (author)

  5. Polymer nanocomposite membranes with hierarchically structured catalysts for high throughput dehalogenation

    Crock, Christopher A.

    Halogenated organics are categorized as primary pollutants by the Environmental Protection Agency. Trichloroethylene (TCE), which had broad industrial use in the past, shows persistence in the environment because of its chemical stability. The large scale use and poor control of TCE resulted in its prolonged release into the environment before the carcinogenic risk associated with TCE was fully understood. TCE pollution stemmed from industrial effluents and improper disposal of solvent waste. Membrane reactors are promising technology for treating TCE polluted groundwater because of the high throughput, relatively low cost of membrane fabrication and facile retrofitting of existing membrane based water treatment facilities with catalytic membrane reactors. Compared to catalytic fluidized or fixed bed reactors, catalytic membrane reactors feature minimal diffusional limitation. Additionally, embedding catalyst within the membrane avoids the need for catalyst recovery and can prevent aggregation of catalytic nanoparticles. In this work, Pd/xGnP, Pd-Au/xGnP, and commercial Pd/Al2O3 nanoparticles were employed in batch and flow-through membrane reactors to catalyze the dehalogenation of TCE in the presence of dissolved H2. Bimetallic Pd-Au/xGnP catalysts were shown to be more active than monometallic Pd/xGnP or commercial Pd/Al 2O3 catalysts. In addition to synthesizing nanocomposite membranes for high-throughput TCE dehalogenation, the membrane based dehalogenation process was designed to minimize the detrimental impact of common catalyst poisons (S2-, HS-, and H2S -) by concurrent oxidation of sulfide species to gypsum in the presence of Ca2+ and removal of gypsum through membrane filtration. The engineered membrane dehalogenation process demonstrated that bimetallic Pd-Au/xGnP catalysts resisted deactivation by residual sulfide species after oxidation, and showed complete removal of gypsum during membrane filtration.

  6. Low temperature incineration of mixed wastes using bulk metal oxide catalysts

    Gordon, M.J.; Gaur, S.; Kelkar, S.; Baldwin, R.M.

    1996-01-01

    Volume reduction of low-level mixed wastes from former nuclear weapons facilities is a significant environmental problem. Processing of these materials presents unique scientific and engineering problems due to the presence of minute quantities of radionuclides which must be contained and concentrated for later safe disposal. Low-temperature catalytic incineration is one option that has been utilized at the Rocky Flats facility for this purpose. This paper presents results of research regarding evaluation of bulk metal oxides as catalysts for low-temperature incineration of carbonaceous residues which are typical by-products of fluidized bed combustion of mixed wastes under oxygen-lean conditions. A series of 14 metal oxides were screened in a thermogravimetric analyzer, using on-line mass spectrometry for speciation of reaction product gases. Catalyst evaluation criteria focused on the thermal-redox activity of the metals using both carbon black and PVC char as surrogate waste materials. Results indicated that metal oxides which were P-type semiconductor materials were suitable as catalysts for this application. Oxides of cobalt, molybdenum, vanadium, and manganese were found to be particularly stable and active catalysts under conditions specific to this process (T<650C, low oxygen partial pressures). Bench-scale evaluation of these metal oxides with respect to stability to chlorine (HCl) attack was carried out at 550C using a TG/MS system. Cobalt oxide was found to be resistant to metal loss in a HCl/He gaseous environment while metal loss from Mo, Mn, and V-based catalysts was moderate to severe. XRD and SEM/EDX analysis of spent Co catalysts indicated the formation of non-stoichiometric cobalt chlorides. Regeneration of chlorinated cobalt was found to successfully restore the low-temperature combustion activity to that of the fresh metal oxide

  7. Fluidized Bed Reactor as Solid State Fermenter

    Krishnaiah, K.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Various reactors such as tray, packed bed, rotating drum can be used for solid-state fermentation. In this paper the possibility of fluidized bed reactor as solid-state fermenter is considered. The design parameters, which affect the performances are identified and discussed. This information, in general can be used in the design and the development of an efficient fluidized bed solid-state fermenter. However, the objective here is to develop fluidized bed solid-state fermenter for palm kernel cake conversion into enriched animal and poultry feed.

  8. Selectivity and Activity of Iron Molybdate Catalysts in Oxidation of Methanol

    Khalid Khazzal Hummadi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The selectivity and activity of iron molybdate catalysts prepared by different methods are compared with those of a commercial catalyst in the oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde in a continuous tubular bed reactor at 200-350 oC (473-623 oK, 10 atm (1013 kPa, with a methanol-oxygen mixture fixed at 5.5% by volume methanol: air ratio. The iron(III molybdate catalyst prepared by co-precipitation and filtration had a selectivity towards formaldehyde in methanol oxidation comparable with a commercial catalyst; maximum selectivity (82.3% was obtained at 573oK when the conversion was 59.7%. Catalysts prepared by reacting iron (III and molybdate by kneading or precipitation followed by evaporation, omitting a filtration stage, were less active and less selective. The selectivity-activity relationships of these catalysts as a function of temperature were discussed in relation to the method of preparation, surface areas and composition. By combing this catalytic data with data from the patent literature we demonstrate a synergy between iron and molybdenum in regard to methanol oxidation to formaldehyde; the optimum composition corresponded to an iron mole fraction 0.2-0.3. The selectivity to formaldehyde was practically constant up to an iron mole fraction 0.3 and then decreased at higher iron concentrations. The iron component can be regarded as the activity promoter. The iron molybdate catalysts can thus be related to other two-component MoO3-based selective oxidation catalysts, e.g. bismuth and cobalt molybdates. The iron oxide functions as a relatively basic oxide abstracting, in the rate-controlling step, a proton from the methyl of a bound methoxy group of chemisorbed methanol. It was proposed that a crucial feature of the sought after iron(III molybdate catalyst is the presence of -O-Mo-O-Fe-O-Mo-O- groups as found in the compound Fe2(MoO43 and for Fe3+ well dispersed in MoO3 generally. At the higher iron(III concentrations the loss of

  9. Polyfunctional catalyst for processiing benzene fractions

    G. Byakov; B.D. Zubitskii; B.G. Tryasunov; I.Ya. Petrov [Kuznetsk Basin State Technical University, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

    2009-05-15

    A by-product of the coke industry is a raw benzene fraction benzene- 1 which may serve as for catalytic processes. The paper reports a study on the influence of the composition and temperatures on the activity and selectivity of NiO-V{sub 2}O{sub 6}-MoO{sub 3}/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts and the corresponding binary and tertiary subsystems are studied by a pulse method in model reactions; the hydrodealkylating of toluene and the hydrodesulfurizing of thioprhene. The optimal catalyst composition is established. The new catalyst is compared with industrial catalysts.

  10. Nanoparticular metal oxide/anatase catalysts

    2010-01-01

    The present invention concerns a method of preparation of nanoparticular metal oxide catalysts having a narrow particle size distribution. In particular, the invention concerns preparation of nanoparticular metal oxide catalyst precursors comprising combustible crystallization seeds upon which...... the catalyst metai oxide is co-precipitated with the carrier metal oxide, which crystallization seeds are removed by combustion in a final calcining step. The present invention also concerns processes wherein the nanoparticular metal oxide catalysts of the invention are used, such as SCR (deNOx) reactions...

  11. Bifunctional cobalt F-T catalysts

    Miller, J.G.; Coughlin, P.K.; Yang, C.L.; Rabo, J.A.

    1986-03-01

    Results on the catalytic screening of Fischer-Tropsch catalysts containing shape selective components are reported. Catalysts consist of promoted cobalt intimately contacted with Union Carbide molecular sieves and were tested using a Berty type internally recycled reactor. Methods of preparation, promoters and shape selective components were varied and aimed at improving catalyst performance. Catalysts were developed demonstrating high C/sub 5/ + yields with high olefin content and low methane production while maintaining stability under both low and high H/sub 2/:CO ratio conditions.

  12. Nitrogen oxides storage catalysts containing cobalt

    Lauterbach, Jochen; Snively, Christopher M.; Vijay, Rohit; Hendershot, Reed; Feist, Ben

    2010-10-12

    Nitrogen oxides (NO.sub.x) storage catalysts comprising cobalt and barium with a lean NO.sub.x storage ratio of 1.3 or greater. The NO.sub.x storage catalysts can be used to reduce NO.sub.x emissions from diesel or gas combustion engines by contacting the catalysts with the exhaust gas from the engines. The NO.sub.x storage catalysts can be one of the active components of a catalytic converter, which is used to treat exhaust gas from such engines.

  13. Development of an Innovative XRD-DRIFTS Prototype Allowing Operando Characterizations during Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis over Cobalt-Based Catalysts under Representative Conditions

    Scalbert Julien

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available An original system combining both X-Ray Diffraction and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy was developed with the aim to characterize Fischer-Tropsch catalysts in relevant reaction conditions. The catalytic properties of a model PtCo/silica catalyst tested with this prototype have shown to be in the same range of those obtained in similar conditions with classical fixed-bed reactors. No bulk cobalt oxidation nor sintering were observed on operando XRD patterns. The formation of linear carbonyls and adsorbed hydrocarbons species at the surface of the catalyst was observed on operando DRIFT spectra. The surface of the catalyst was also suspected to be covered with carbon species inducing unfavorable changes in selectivity.

  14. Fungi solubilisation of low rank coal: performances of stirred tank, fluidised bed and packed bed reactors

    Oboirien, BO

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Coal biosolubilisation was investigated in stirred tank reactor, fluidised bed and fixed bed bioreactors with a view to highlight the advantages and shortcomings of each of these reactor configurations. The stirred aerated bioreactor and fluidised...

  15. Visualization of bed material movement in a simulated fluidized bed heat exchanger by neutron radiography

    Umekawa, Hisashi; Ozawa, Mamoru; Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Matsubayashi, Masahito

    1999-01-01

    The bulk movement of fluidized bed material was visualized by neutron radiography by introducing tracers into the bed materials. The simulated fluidized bed consisted of aluminum plates, and the bed material was sand of 99.7% SiO 2 (mean diameter: 0.218 mm, density: 2555 kg/m 3 ). Both materials were almost transparent to neutrons. Then the sand was colored by the contamination of the sand coated by CdSO 4 . Tracer particles of about 2 mm diameter were made by the B 4 C, bonded by the vinyl resin. The tracer was about ten times as large as the particle of fluidized bed material, but the traceability was enough to observe the bed-material bulk movement owing to the large effective viscosity of the fluidized bed. The visualized images indicated that the bubbles and/or wakes were important mechanism of the behavior of the fluidized bed movement

  16. Low-temperature upgrading of low-calorific biogas for CO2 mitigation using DBD-catalyst hybrid reactor

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Tsukijihara, Hiroyuki; Fukui, Wataru; Okazaki, Ken

    2006-10-01

    Although huge amounts of biogas, which consists of 20-60% of CH4 in CO2/N2, can be obtained from landfills, coal mines, and agricultural residues, most of them are simply flared and wasted: because global warming potential of biogas is 5-15 times as potent as CO2. Poor combustibility of such biogas makes it difficult to utilize in conventional energy system. The purpose of this project is to promote the profitable recovery of methane from poor biogas via non-thermal plasma technology. We propose low-temperature steam reforming of biogas using DBD generated in catalyst beds. Methane is partially converted into hydrogen, and then fed into internal combustion engines for improved ignition stability as well as efficient operation. Low-temperature steam reforming is beneficial because exhaust gas from an engine can be used to activate catalyst beds. Space velocity (3600-15000 hr-1), reaction temperature (300-650^oC), and energy cost (30-150 kJ per mol CH4) have been investigated with simulated biogas (20-60% CH4 in mixtures of CO2/N2). The DBD enhances reaction rate of CH4 by a factor of ten at given catalyst temperatures, which is a rate-determining step of methane steam reforming, while species concentration of upgraded biogas was governed by thermodynamic equilibrium in the presence of catalyst.

  17. Experimental Study on Pressure Drop and Flow Dispersion in Packed Bed of Natural Zeolite

    Ruya Petric Marc

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of conventional correlation for pressure drop and dispersion coefficient calculation may result in inaccurate values for zeolite packed bed as the correlations are generally developed for regularly shaped and uniformly sized particles. To support the research on the application of modified natural zeolite as tar cracking catalyst, the research on the hydrodynamic behaviour of zeolite packed bed has been conducted. Experiments were carried out using a glass column with diameter of 37.8 mm. Natural zeolite with particle size of about 2.91 to 6.4 mm was applied as packing material in the column, and the bed height was varied at 9, 19 and 29 cm. Air was used as the fluid that flows through the bed and nitrogen was used as a tracer for residence time distribution determination. Air flow rates were in the range of 20 to 100 mL/s which correspond to the laminar-transitional flow regime. The pressure drops through the bed were in the range of 1.7 to 95.6 Pa, depending on the air flow rate and bed height. From these values, the parameters in the Ergun equation were estimated, taking into account the contribution by wall effect when the ratio of column to particle diameter is low. The viscous and inertial term constants in the Ergun equation calculated ranges from 179 to 199 and 1.41 to 1.47 respectively while the particle sphericity ranges from 0.56 to 0.59. The reactor Peclet number were determined to range from 5.2 to 5.5, which indicated significant deviation from a plug flow condition.

  18. Mn-Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}. An industrial catalyst for methane coupling?

    Yildiz, M.; Arndt, S.; Otremba, T.; Thomas, A.; Schomaeker, R. [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Chemistry; Simon, U.; Berthold, A.; Goerke, O.; Schubert, H. [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Materials Science; Aksu, Y. [Akdeniz Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Material Science and Engineering

    2012-07-01

    The oxidative coupling of methane (OCM) is one of the best reactions for the direct conversion of methane. Despite all efforts, a suitable OCM process has not been put into practice yet, due to a lack of active, selective and stable catalyst. Mn-Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2} has attracted great interest because of its proven long term stability and its highly suitable catalytic performance. In spite of the large number of studies on this catalyst, structural characterizations are very difficult due to its complex trimetallic and multiphase nature. Previously, we studied a broad variety of support materials for the Mn-Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2} catalyst, e.g. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2} and MgO. We found that SiO{sub 2} is the most suitable support material. A variation of the SiO{sub 2} materials showed that the catalytic performance does not differ substantially. However, the performance of SBA-15 supported Mn-Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4} catalyst was outstanding in comparison to all other silica supported catalysts. The reason of this substantial increase in the activity could be the ordered mesoporous structure of its support material. To understand the reaction mechanism, the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) with CD{sub 4} over Mn-Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2} was studied, we found that the consecutive oxidation of the C{sub 2} products is an important constraint as described in the literature for other catalysts. In order to apply this catalyst in a miniplant, we developed an upscaled preparation procedure via a fluidized bed granulation, allowing the preparation of large amounts of this catalyst. (orig.)

  19. RESEARCH ON THE INFLUENCE OF TEMPERATURE ON THE ACTIVATION OF SELECTED POROUS MNO2 BEDS

    Iwona Skoczko

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Rising demands concerning water treatment and conservation make it necessary to search for more effective as well as cheap and ecologically safe solutions. During the filtration process quartz sand is replaced by filter materials which also have a strong effect on account of reactions taking place on a bed’s surface. Today’s technologies for groundwater and seepage water treatment in rapid filters make use of oxidation beds. They are able to effectively remove manganese (II and iron (II compounds based on heterogeneous oxidation catalysis. The main catalyst of the manganese removal process in terms of its catalytic oxidation in filtration beds is manganese dioxide. This compound is used as an oxidizing agent in many processes. The research conducted as part of this paper was aimed at creating a product with the qualities similar to a popular Greensand bed protected by patent. The authors tested washed quartz sand varying in granulation which was subject to activation in 10% KMnO4 solution. Grains of quartz sand after covering them with a permanent coat of manganese oxide developed the superficial oxidation layer. While performing the tests, a temperature of the process served as a variable. The beds produced as a result of the experiment enable the removal of iron and manganese from water without prior alkylation. Furthermore, they are an effective method of purifying water of organic pollutants and ammoniacal nitrogen. They function as oxidizing and filtering masses.

  20. Synthesis of cracked Calophyllum inophyllum oil using fly ash catalyst for diesel engine application

    Muthukumaran, N.

    2015-04-16

    In this study, production of hydrocarbon fuel from Calophyllum inophyllum oil has been characterized for diesel engine application, by appraising essential fuel processing parameters. As opposed to traditional trans-esterification process, the reported oil was cracked using a catalyst, as the latter improves the fuel properties better than the former. In a bid to make the production process economically viable, a waste and cheap catalyst, RFA (raw fly ash), has been capitalized for the cracking process as against the conventional zeolite catalyst. The fuel production process, which is performed in a fixed bed catalytic reactor, was done methodologically after comprehensively studying the characteristics of fly ash catalyst. Significantly, fly ash characterization was realized using SEM and EDS, which demarcated the surface and internal structures of fly ash particles before and after cracking. After the production of hydrocarbon fuel from C. inophyllum oil, the performed compositional analysis in GC-MS revealed the presence of esters, parfins and olefins. Followed by the characterization of catalytically cracked C. inophyllum oil, suitable blends of it with diesel were tested in a single cylinder diesel engine. From the engine experimental results, BTE (brake thermal efficiency) of the engine for B25 (25% cracked C. inophyllum oil and 75% diesel) was observed to be closer to diesel, while it decreased for higher blends. On the other hand, emissions such as HC (hydrocarbon), CO (carbon monoxide) and smoke were found to be comparable for B25 with diesel. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Kinetics of toluene alkylation with methanol catalyzed by pure and hybridized HZSM-5 catalysts

    Alabi, Wahab

    2012-07-01

    A kinetic study of toluene alkylation with methanol was performed over pure HZSM-5, mordenite/ZSM-5 (hybrid of mordenite and HZSM-5), and ZM13 (composite mixture of HZSM-5 and MCM-41 at pH 13). Experimental runs were conducted using a batch fluidized bed reactor at temperatures of 300, 350 and 400 °C and reaction times of 3, 5, 7, 10, 13, 15 and 20. s. The rate of toluene methylation and toluene disproportionation were studied on the three catalysts (toluene alkylation is usually accompanied by toluene disproportionation on acid catalyst). Based on the results obtained, a simplified power law kinetic model consisting of three reactions was developed to estimate the activation energies of toluene methylation and disproportionation simultaneously. Coke formation on catalysts was accounted for using both reaction time and reactant conversion decay functions. All parameters were estimated based on quasi-steady state approximation. Estimated kinetic parameters were in good agreement with experimental results. The order of alkylation ability of the catalysts was found to be ZM13 > HZSM-5 > mordenite/ZSM-5, while the reverse is for toluene disproportionation (mordenite/ZSM-5 > HZSM-5 > ZM13). Thus, alkylation of toluene is most favorable on ZM13 due to combined effect of mesoporosity induced through its synthetic route and acid content. Toluene/MeOH molar ratio of 1:1 was most suitable for toluene alkylation reaction. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  2. Stepwise mechanism of oxidative ammonolysis of propane to acrylonitrile over gallium-antimony oxide catalysts

    Osipova, Z.G.; Sokolovskii, V.D.

    1979-03-01

    The stepwise mechanism of oxidative ammonolysis of propane to acrylonitrile over gallium-antimony oxide catalysts GaSb/sub 19/O/sub x/, GaSb/sub 3/Ni/sub 1.5/0/sub x/, and GaSb/sub 2.5/Ni/sub 1.5/PW/sub 0//sub 0.25/O/sub x/ was studied at 450/sup 0/ and 550/sup 0/C by introducing alternating pulses of 0.5Vertical Bar3< propane/0.6Vertical Bar3< ammonia/helium (to reduce the steady-state catalytic surface) and 0.5Vertical Bar3< propane/0.6Vertical Bar3< ammonia/1.86Vertical Bar3< oxygen/helium mixtures into a fluidized-bed catalytic reactor. Over all the catalysts studied, the rates of acrylonitrile formation during the two types of pulses were very similar, but carbon dioxide was formed much faster during the reducing pulses, particularly at 450/sup 0/C. These findings suggested that acrylonitrile is formed by a stepwise redox mechanism involving consecutive interaction of propane and ammonia with the surface oxygen of the catalysts and oxidation of the reduced catalyst surface by gas-phase oxygen. The formation of carbon dioxide proceeds by both stepwise and associative mechanisms, the latter being more important at higher temperatures. The results are similar to published results for ammoxidation of propylene and olefins.

  3. Synopses/physical significance of complex-valued catalyst parameters in heterogeneous catalysis

    Hesse, D

    1979-08-01

    An independent parameter was used to describe the local values of the interdependent thermodynamic variables of the coupled effects of transfer, sorption, and surface reaction at steady state in a packed bed of porous catalyst. A system reduction yielded a generalized concept of the pore effectiveness factor, H, which was unity or a real or imaginary complex number when the coupled diffusion and reaction processes do not affect, inhibit, or enhance conversion, respectively. These concepts are illustrated by ethylene hydrogenation on platinum, a process in which ethylene adsorbs much more strongly than hydrogen, but diffuses more slowly; as the rate is proportional to the product of hydrogen and ethylene surface coverage and the more strongly adsorbed ethylene occupies the majority of the available sites, a decrease in gas-phase ethylene concentration would increase the conversion rate. The reaction rate also increases with decreasing distance from the catalyst particle core.

  4. Development of the advanced nuclear materials -A study on the polymer catalyst process technology-

    Kook, Il Hyun; Jung, Heung Suk; Lee, Han Soo; An, Doh Heui; Kang, Heui Suk; Baek, Seung Woo; Lee, Sung Hoh; Sung, Kee Woong; Kim, Kwang Lak; Kim, Jong Hoh; Koo, Je Hyoo; Park, Tae Keun; Kim, Sang Hwan; Yoo, Ryong; Song, Myung Jae; Son, Soon Hwan; Choi, Jung Kil; Lee, Jae Choon; Jung, Moon Kyoo

    1995-07-01

    Heavy water is used as moderator and coolant in pressurized heavy water power plants. According to the governmental long-term plan for power supply, Korea is scheduled to construct new four pressurized heavy water power plants till the year 2006. Total heavy water make-up for these plants would be 22 Mg/a from the year 2006. Reformed hydrogen processes is considered best suited to Korea. Hydrophobic catalysts for this process were manufactured and the performance of hydrogen isotope exchange was investigated. The overall mass transfer coefficients varied between 0.004 and 2.295 m3 HD/m3 Bed.sec. and heavy water separation processes using the catalysts were optimized. 66 figs, 62 tabs, 19 refs. (Author)

  5. Origin of low temperature deactivation of Ni5Ga3 nanoparticles as catalyst for methanol synthesis

    Gardini, Diego; Sharafutdinov, Irek; Damsgaard, Christian Danvad

    that the highest methanol yield is obtained with a Ni5Ga3 alloy exposed to a 25% CO2 – 75% H2 reaction mixture at 210 °C [2]. Under these experimental conditions, the catalyst is found to lose 35% of its activity after 20 hours of continuous testing at both 1 and 5 Bars. Although in situ XRD and EXAFS studies [3......In an effort to find alternative energy sources capable to compete with fossil fuels, methanol synthesis could represent a realistic solution to store “green” hydrogen produced from electrolysis or photo-induced water splitting. Recently, density functional theory (DFT) calculations [1] proposed Ni......-Ga alloys as active catalysts for methanol production from syngas mixtures and Ni-Ga nanoparticles supported on highly porous silica have been prepared using an incipient wetness impregnation technique from a solution of nickel and gallium nitrates [2]. Tests conducted in a fixed-bed reactor showed...

  6. Development of the advanced nuclear materials -A study on the polymer catalyst process technology-

    Kook, Il Hyun; Jung, Heung Suk; Lee, Han Soo; An, Doh Heui; Kang, Heui Suk; Baek, Seung Woo; Lee, Sung Hoh; Sung, Kee Woong; Kim, Kwang Lak; Kim, Jong Hoh; Koo, Je Hyoo; Park, Tae Keun; Kim, Sang Hwan; Yoo, Ryong; Song, Myung Jae; Son, Soon Hwan; Choi, Jung Kil; Lee, Jae Choon; Jung, Moon Kyoo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    Heavy water is used as moderator and coolant in pressurized heavy water power plants. According to the governmental long-term plan for power supply, Korea is scheduled to construct new four pressurized heavy water power plants till the year 2006. Total heavy water make-up for these plants would be 22 Mg/a from the year 2006. Reformed hydrogen processes is considered best suited to Korea. Hydrophobic catalysts for this process were manufactured and the performance of hydrogen isotope exchange was investigated. The overall mass transfer coefficients varied between 0.004 and 2.295 m3 HD/m3 Bed.sec. and heavy water separation processes using the catalysts were optimized. 66 figs, 62 tabs, 19 refs. (Author).

  7. Metabolic Resistance in Bed Bugs

    Omprakash Mittapalli

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Blood-feeding insects have evolved resistance to various insecticides (organochlorines, pyrethroids, carbamates, etc. through gene mutations and increased metabolism. Bed bugs (Cimex lectularius are hematophagous ectoparasites that are poised to become one of the major pests in households throughout the United States. Currently, C. lectularius has attained a high global impact status due to its sudden and rampant resurgence. Resistance to pesticides is one factor implicated in this phenomenon. Although much emphasis has been placed on target sensitivity, little to no knowledge is available on the role of key metabolic players (e.g., cytochrome P450s and glutathione S-transferases towards pesticide resistance in C. lectularius. In this review, we discuss different modes of resistance (target sensitivity, penetration resistance, behavioral resistance, and metabolic resistance with more emphasis on metabolic resistance.

  8. Debridement and wound bed preparation.

    Falabella, Anna F

    2006-01-01

    Debridement can play a vital role in wound bed preparation and the removal of barriers that impair wound healing. In accordance with the TIME principles, debridement can help remove nonviable tissue, control inflammation or infection, decrease excess moisture, and stimulate a nonadvancing wound edge. There are many types of debridement, each with a set of advantages and disadvantages that must be clearly understood by the healthcare team. Failure to use the correct debridement method for a given type of wound may lead to further delays in healing, increase patient suffering, and unnecessarily increase the cost of care. This review article discusses the various methods of debridement, describes currently available debriding agents, evaluates the clinical data regarding their efficacy and safety, and describes strategies for the management of problematic nonhealing wounds.

  9. Particle Bed Reactor engine technology

    Sandler, S.; Feddersen, R.

    1992-03-01

    This paper discusses the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) based propulsion system being developed under the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program. A PBR engine is a light weight, compact propulsion system which offers significant improvement over current technology systems. Current performance goals are a system thrust of 75,000 pounds at an Isp of 1000 sec. A target thrust to weight ratio (T/W) of 30 has been established for an unshielded engine. The functionality of the PBR, its pertinent technology issues and the systems required to make up a propulsion system are described herein. Accomplishments to date which include hardware development and tests for the PBR engine are also discussed. This paper is intended to provide information on and describe the current state-of-the-art of PBR technology.

  10. Particle Bed Reactor engine technology

    Sandler, S.; Feddersen, R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) based propulsion system being developed under the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program. A PBR engine is a light weight, compact propulsion system which offers significant improvement over current technology systems. Current performance goals are a system thrust of 75,000 pounds at an Isp of 1000 sec. A target thrust to weight ratio (T/W) of 30 has been established for an unshielded engine. The functionality of the PBR, its pertinent technology issues and the systems required to make up a propulsion system are described herein. Accomplishments to date which include hardware development and tests for the PBR engine are also discussed. This paper is intended to provide information on and describe the current state-of-the-art of PBR technology. 4 refs

  11. Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustion

    1989-11-01

    In order to verify the technical feasibility of the MTCI Pulsed Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustor technology, a laboratory-scale system was designed, built and tested. Important aspects of the operational and performance parameters of the system were established experimentally. A considerable amount of the effort was invested in the initial task of constructing an AFBC that would represent a reasonable baseline against which the performance of the PAFBC could be compared. A summary comparison of the performance and emissions data from the MTCI 2 ft {times} 2 ft facility (AFBC and PAFBC modes) with those from conventional BFBC (taller freeboard and recycle operation) and circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) units is given in Table ES-1. The comparison is for typical high-volatile bituminous coals and sorbents of average reactivity. The values indicated for BFBC and CFBC were based on published information. The AFBC unit that was designed to act as a baseline for the comparison was indeed representative of the larger units even at the smaller scale for which it was designed. The PAFBC mode exhibited superior performance in relation to the AFBC mode. The higher combustion efficiency translates into reduced coal consumption and lower system operating cost; the improvement in sulfur capture implies less sorbent requirement and waste generation and in turn lower operating cost; lower NO{sub x} and CO emissions mean ease of site permitting; and greater steam-generation rate translates into less heat exchange surface area and reduced capital cost. Also, the PAFBC performance generally surpasses those of conventional BFBC, is comparable to CFBC in combustion and NO{sub x} emissions, and is better than CFBC in sulfur capture and CO emissions even at the scaled-down size used for the experimental feasibility tests.

  12. New Trends in Gold Catalysts

    Leonarda F. Liotta

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Gold is an element that has fascinated mankind for millennia. The catalytic properties of gold have been a source of debate, due to its complete chemical inertness when in a bulk form, while it can oxidize CO at temperatures as low as ~200 K when in a nanocrystalline state, as discovered by Haruta in the late 1980s [1]. Since then, extensive activity in both applied and fundamental research on gold has been initiated. The importance of the catalysis by gold represents one of the fasted growing fields in science and is proven by the promising applications in several fields, such as green chemistry and environmental catalysis, in the synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes, as modifiers of Ni catalysts for methane steam and dry reforming reactions and in biological and electrochemistry applications. The range of reactions catalyzed by gold, as well as the suitability of different supports and the influence of the preparation conditions have been widely explored and optimized in applied research [2]. Gold catalysts appeared to be very different from the other noble metal-based catalysts, due to their marked dependence on the preparation method, which is crucial for the genesis of the catalytic activity. Several methods, including deposition-precipitation, chemical vapor deposition and cation adsorption, have been applied for the preparation of gold catalysts over reducible oxides, like TiO2. Among these methods, deposition-precipitation has been the most frequently employed method for Au loading, and it involves the use of tetrachloroauric (III acid as a precursor. On the other hand, the number of articles dealing with Au-loaded acidic supports is smaller than that on basic supports, possibly because the deposition of [AuCl4]− or [AuOHxCl4−x]− species on acidic supports is difficult, due to their very low point of zero charge. Despite this challenge, several groups have reported the use of acidic zeolites as supports for gold. Zeolites

  13. Highly Stable and Active Catalyst for Sabatier Reactions

    Hu, Jianli; Brooks, Kriston P.

    2012-01-01

    Highly active Ru/TiO2 catalysts for Sabatier reaction have been developed. The catalysts have shown to be stable under repeated shutting down/startup conditions. When the Ru/TiO2 catalyst is coated on the engineered substrate Fe-CrAlY felt, activity enhancement is more than doubled when compared with an identically prepared engineered catalyst made from commercial Degussa catalyst. Also, bimetallic Ru-Rh/TiO2 catalysts show high activity at high throughput.

  14. Bedømmelsesformer inden for AMU

    Helms, Niels Henrik; Løfgreen, Lars Bo

    Sigtet med denne rapport om bedømmelse i AMU-regi er dels at indsamle dokumentation fra praksiserfaringer baseret på udvalgte TUP-projekter, og dels at beskrive national og international forskning på bedømmelses- og evalueringsområdet. Denne indsamling og beskrivelse vil lægge op til en diskussio...

  15. Bed-levelling experiments with suspended load

    Talmon, A.M.; De Graaff, J.

    1991-01-01

    Bed-levelling experiments are conducted in a straight laboratory channel. The experiments involve a significant fraction of suspended sediment transport. The purpose of the experiments is to provide data for modelling of the direction of sediment transport on a transverse sloping alluvial river bed,

  16. Flue Gas Emissions from Fluidized Bed Combustion

    Bramer, E.A.; Valk, M.

    1995-01-01

    During the past decades fluidized bed coal combustion was developed as a technology for burning coal in an effective way meeting the standards for pollution control. During the earlier years of research on fluidized bed combustion, the potential for limiting the S02 emission by adding limestone to

  17. Multiphase flow in spout fluidized bed granulators

    Buijtenen, van M.S.

    2011-01-01

    Spout fluidized beds are frequently used for the production of granules or particles through granulation, which are widely applied, for example, in the production of detergents, pharmaceuticals, food and fertilizers (M¨orl et al. 2007). Spout fluidized beds have a number of advantageous properties,

  18. 1 The Effect of Camber Bed Drainage

    User

    The Effect of Camber Bed Drainage Landforms on Soil. Nutrient Distribution and Grain Yield of Maize on the Vertisols ... The Vertisols of the Accra Plains of Ghana are water logged after significant rainfall ... Excess application of 15-15-15 NPK and sulphate of ammonia fertilizers (150% .... beds, before planting and nutrient.

  19. Print a Bed Bug Card - (Single Cards)

    Two sets of business-card-sized lists of tips for recognizing bed bugs and the signs of an infestation, including a photo of bed bugs to assist identification. One card is for general use around home or office, the other for travelers.

  20. Uranium bed oxidation vacuum process system

    McLeland, H.L.

    1977-01-01

    Deuterium and tritium gases are occluded in uranium powder for release into neutron generator tubes. The uranium powder is contained in stainless steel bottles, termed ''beds.'' If these beds become damaged, the gases must be removed and the uranium oxidized in order not to be flammable before shipment to ERDA disposal grounds. This paper describes the system and methods designed for the controlled degassing and oxidation process. The system utilizes sputter-ion, cryo-sorption and bellows pumps for removing the gases from the heated source bed. Removing the tritium gas is complicated by the shielding effect of helium-3, a byproduct of tritium decay. This effect is minimized by incremental pressure changes, or ''batch'' processing. To prevent runaway exothermic reaction, oxidation of the uranium bed is also done incrementally, or by ''batch'' processing, rather than by continuous flow. The paper discusses in detail the helium-3 shielding effect, leak checks that must be made during processing, bed oxidation, degree of gas depletion, purity of gases sorbed from beds, radioactivity of beds, bed disposal and system renovation

  1. Measurement of the bed material of gravel-bed rivers

    Milhous, R.T.; ,

    2002-01-01

    The measurement of the physical properties of a gravel-bed river is important in the calculation of sediment transport and physical habitat values for aquatic animals. These properties are not always easy to measure. One recent report on flushing of fines from the Klamath River did not contain information on one location because the grain size distribution of the armour could not be measured on a dry river bar. The grain size distribution could have been measured using a barrel sampler and converting the measurements to the same as would have been measured if a dry bar existed at the site. In another recent paper the porosity was calculated from an average value relation from the literature. The results of that paper may be sensitive to the actual value of porosity. Using the bulk density sampling technique based on a water displacement process presented in this paper the porosity could have been calculated from the measured bulk density. The principle topics of this paper are the measurement of the size distribution of the armour, and measurement of the porosity of the substrate. The 'standard' method of sampling of the armour is to do a Wolman-type count of the armour on a dry section of the river bed. When a dry bar does not exist the armour in an area of the wet streambed is to sample and the measurements transformed analytically to the same type of results that would have been obtained from the standard Wolman procedure. A comparison of the results for the San Miguel River in Colorado shows significant differences in the median size of the armour. The method use to determine the porosity is not 'high-tech' and there is a need improve knowledge of the porosity because of the importance of porosity in the aquatic ecosystem. The technique is to measure the in-situ volume of a substrate sample by measuring the volume of a frame over the substrate and then repeated the volume measurement after the sample is obtained from within the frame. The difference in the

  2. Al2O3-Cact-(CuO, Cr2O3, Co3O4 Adsorbents-Catalysts: Preparation and Characterization

    Gitana DABRILAITĖ-KUDŽMIENĖ

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Al2O3-Cact-(CuO, Cr2O3 Co3O4 adsorbents-catalysts were prepared using Al2O3-Cact (alumina gel–activated carbon adsorbent and different amount of CuO, Cr2O3 and Co3O4. The active components were incorporated into wet alumina gel–carbon mixture using different conditions (by sol-gel method and mixing a milled metal oxides. Equilibrium adsorptive capacity measurements of alcohol vapours were carried out in order to determine the influence of preparation conditions on the stability of prepared adsorbents–catalysts. Specific surface area of the prepared adsorbents-catalysts were measured by BET method. It was established that for adsorbent-catalyst produced by sol-gel method SBET = 244.7 m2/g. Surface area SBET = 29.32 m2/g was obtained for adsorbent-catalyst with metal oxides. On the basis of these results it was assumed that active carbon was lost in this adsorbent-catalyst during the preparation process. Sol-gel derived adsorbent–catalyst was tested for the oxidation of methanol vapours. Catalytic oxidation was carried out in fixed-bed reactor. Experimental data indicate that adsorptive capacity of the adsorbent–catalyst is (3.232 – 3.259 mg/m3 CH3OH at relative air humidity is 40 % – 50 %. During a fast heating of CH3OH – saturated adsorbent-catalyst a part of adsorbate is converted to CO2 and H2O. Methanol conversion increases with increasing of adsorbent-catalyst heating rate.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.1.3832

  3. Hydrogen-Rich Gas Production by Sorption Enhanced Steam Reforming of Woodgas Containing TAR over a Commercial Ni Catalyst and Calcined Dolomite as CO2 Sorbent

    Vincenzo Naso

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was the evaluation of the catalytic steam reforming of a gaseous fuel obtained by steam biomass gasification to convert topping atmosphere residue (TAR and CH4 and to produce pure H2 by means of a CO2 sorbent. This experimental work deals with the demonstration of the practical feasibility of such concepts, using a real woodgas obtained from fluidized bed steam gasification of hazelnut shells. This study evaluates the use of a commercial Ni catalyst and calcined dolomite (CaO/MgO. The bed material simultaneously acts as reforming catalyst and CO2 sorbent. The experimental investigations have been carried out in a fixed bed micro-reactor rig using a slipstream from the gasifier to evaluate gas cleaning and upgrading options. The reforming/sorption tests were carried out at 650 °C while regeneration of the sorbent was carried out at 850 °C in a nitrogen environment. Both combinations of catalyst and sorbent are very effective in TAR and CH4 removal, with conversions near 100%, while the simultaneous CO2 sorption effectively enhances the water gas shift reaction producing a gas with a hydrogen volume fraction of over 90%. Multicycle tests of reforming/CO2 capture and regeneration were performed to verify the stability of the catalysts and sorbents to remove TAR and capture CO2 during the duty cycle.

  4. Synergistic effects of non-thermal plasma-assisted catalyst and ultrasound on toluene removal.

    Sun, Yongli; Zhou, Libo; Zhang, Luhong; Sui, Hong

    2012-01-01

    A wire-mesh catalyst coated by La0.8Sr0.2MnO3 was combined with a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor for toluene removal at atmospheric pressure. It was found that toluene removal efficiency and carbon dioxide selectivity were enhanced in the catalytic packed-bed reactor. In addition, ozone and nitrogen monoxide from the gas effluent byproducts decreased. This is the first time that ultrasound combined with plasma has been used for toluene removal. A synergistic effect on toluene removal was observed in the plasma-assisted ultrasound system. At the same time, the system increased toluene conversion and reduced ozone emission.

  5. Comparison of product selectivity during hydroprocessing of bitumen derived gas oil in the presence of NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst containing boron and phosphorus

    D. Ferdous; A.K. Dalai; J. Adjaye [University of Saskatchewan, SK (Canada). Catalysis and Chemical Reactor Engineering Laboratories, Department of Chemical Engineering

    2006-06-15

    A detailed experimental study was performed in a trickle-bed reactor using bitumen derived gas oil. The objective of this work was to compare the activity of NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst containing boron or phosphorus for the hydrotreating and mild hydrocracking of bitumen derived gas oil. Experiments were performed at the temperature and LHSV of 340-420{sup o}C and 0.5-2 h{sup -1}, respectively, using NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts containing 1.7 wt% boron or 2.7 wt% phosphorus. In the temperature range of 340-390{sup o}C, higher nitrogen conversion was observed from boron containing catalyst than that from phosphorus containing catalyst whereas in the same temperature range, phosphorus containing catalyst gave higher relative removal of sulfur than boron containing catalyst. Phosphorus containing catalyst showed excellent hydrocracking and mild hydrocracking activities at all operating conditions. Higher naphtha yield and selectivity were obtained using phosphorus containing catalyst at all operating conditions. Maximum gasoline selectivity of {approximately}45 wt% was obtained at the temperature, pressure, and LHSV of 400{sup o}C, 9.4 MPa and 0.5 h{sup -1}, respectively, using catalyst containing 2.7 wt% phosphorus. 40 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Oxidative regeneration of Ni-Mo-gamma-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts used for hydrotreatment of coal-derived oil

    Yoshimura, Yuji; Furimsky, Edward; Sato, Toshio; Shimada, Hiromichi; Matsubayashi, Nobuyuki; Nishijima, Akio

    1986-10-23

    In order to easily find the oxidative reaction characteristics of carbonaceous materials and sulfur deposited on the catalysts used for hydrogenation, oxidative regeneration behavior as studied with a fixed bed reactor, and the surfaces of the spent catalysts were analyzed by XPS to find the changes in form of active metals and sulfur on the catalysts. Ni-Mo-gamma-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts were used for hydrotreatment of primary coal-derived oil from Morwell coal. The spent catalysts were extracted by THF, dried and crushed into 100-200 mesh powder. The relation between catalyst regeneration temperature and CO/sub 2/ or SO/sub 2/, the relation between generated gas compositions and temperature in regeneration, and the activation energy of carbon and sulfur in the catalysts for oxidative reaction were indicated with data. As a result, it was found that a part of the active metals turned to sulfates by hydrotreatment and the residual sulfur existed in form of sulfate. ( 6 figs, 2 tabs, 4 refs )

  7. Continuous hydrogenation of ethyl levulinate to γ-valerolactone and 2-methyl tetrahydrofuran over alumina doped Cu/SiO2 catalyst: the potential of commercialization

    Zheng, Junlin; Zhu, Junhua; Xu, Xuan; Wang, Wanmin; Li, Jiwen; Zhao, Yan; Tang, Kangjian; Song, Qi; Qi, Xiaolan; Kong, Dejin; Tang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogenation of levulinic acid (LA) and its esters to produce γ-valerolactone (GVL) and 2-methyl tetrahydrofuran (2-MTHF) is a key step for the utilization of cellulose derived LA. Aiming to develop a commercially feasible base metal catalyst for the production of GVL from LA, with satisfactory activity, selectivity, and stability, Al2O3 doped Cu/SiO2 and Cu/SiO2 catalysts were fabricated by co-precipitation routes in parallel. The diverse physio-chemical properties of these two catalysts were characterized by XRD, TEM, dissociative N2O chemisorptions, and Py-IR methods. The catalytic properties of these two catalysts were systematically assessed in the continuous hydrogenation of ethyl levulinate (EL) in a fixed-bed reactor. The effect of acidic property of the SiO2 substrate on the catalytic properties was investigated. To justify the potential of its commercialization, significant attention was paid on the initial activity, proper operation window, by-products control, selectivity, and stability of the catalyst. The effect of reaction conditions, such as temperature and pressure, on the performance of the catalyst was also thoroughly studied. The development of alumina doped Cu/SiO2 catalyst strengthened the value-chain from cellulose to industrially important chemicals via LA and GVL. PMID:27377401

  8. Effect of Metal Addition and Silica/Alumina Ratio of Zeolite on the Ethanol-to-Aromatics by Using Metal Supported ZSM-5 Catalyst

    Kim, Han-Gyu; Yang, Yoon-Cheol; Jeong, Kwang-Eun; Kim, Tae-Wan; Jeong, Soon-Yong; Kim, Chul-Ung; Jhung, Sung Hwa; Lee, Kwan-Young

    2013-01-01

    The catalytic conversion of ethanol to aromatic compounds ETA was studied over ZSM-5 heterogeneous catalysts. The effect of reaction temperature, weight hourly space velocity (WHSV), and addition of water and methanol, which are the potential impurities of bio-ethanol, on the catalytic performance was investigated in a fixed bed reactor. Commercial ZSM-5 catalysts having different Si/Al 2 ratios of 23 to 280 and modified ZSM-5 catalysts by addition of metal (Zn, La, Cu, and Ga) were used for the activity and stability tests in ETA reaction. The catalysts were characterized with ammonia temperature programmed desorption (NH3-TPD) and nitrogen adsorption-desorption techniques. The results of catalytic performance revealed that the optimal Si/Al 2 ratio of ZSM-5 is about 50-80 and the selectivity to aromatic compounds decreases in the order of Zn/La > Zn > La > Cu > Ga for the modified ZSM-5 catalysts. Among these catalysts from the ETA reaction, Zn-La/ZSM-5 showed the best catalytic performance for the ETA reaction. The selectivity to aromatic compounds was 72% initially and 56% after 30 h over the catalysts at reaction temperature of 437 .deg. C and WHSV of 0.8 h −1

  9. Microwave-assisted Extraction of Rare Earth Elements from Petroleum Refining Catalysts and Ambient Fine Aerosols Prior to Inductively Coupled Plasma - Mass Spectrometry

    Mittlefehldt, David W.; Kulkarni, Pranav; Chellam, Shankar

    2006-01-01

    In the absence of a certified reference material, a robust microwave-assisted acid digestion procedure followed by inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was developed to quantify rare earth elements (REEs) in fluidized-bed catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts and atmospheric fine particulate matter (PM2.5). High temperature (200 C), high pressure (200 psig), acid digestion (HNO3, HF, and H3BO3) with 20 minute dwell time effectively solubilized REEs from six fresh catalysts, a spent catalyst, and PM2.5. This method was also employed to measure 27 non-REEs including Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Zr, Mo, Cd, Cs, Ba, Pb, and U. Complete extraction of several REEs (Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Tb, Dy, and Er) required HF indicating that they were closely associated with the aluminosilicate structure of the zeolite FCC catalysts. Internal standardization using 115In quantitatively corrected non-spectral interferences in the catalyst digestate matrix. Inter-laboratory comparison using ICP-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) demonstrated the applicability of the newly developed analytical method for accurate analysis of REEs in FCC catalysts. The method developed for FCC catalysts was also successfully implemented to measure trace to ultra-trace concentrations of La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Eu, and Dy in ambient PM2.5 in an industrial area of Houston, TX.

  10. Microwave-assisted extraction of rare earth elements from petroleum refining catalysts and ambient fine aerosols prior to inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    Kulkarni, Pranav; Chellam, Shankararaman; Mittlefehldt, David W.

    2007-01-01

    A robust microwave-assisted acid digestion procedure followed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was developed to quantify rare earth elements (REEs) in fluidized-bed catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts and atmospheric fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ). High temperature (200 deg. C), high pressure (200 psig), acid digestion (HNO 3 , HF and H 3 BO 3 ) with 20 min dwell time effectively solubilized REEs from six fresh catalysts, a spent catalyst and PM 2.5 . This method was also employed to measure 27 non-REEs including Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Zr, Mo, Cd, Cs, Ba, Pb and U. Complete extraction of several REEs (Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Tb, Dy and Er) required HF indicating that they were closely associated with the aluminosilicate structure of the zeolite FCC catalysts. Internal standardization using 115 In quantitatively corrected non-spectral interferences in the catalyst digestate matrix. Inter-laboratory comparison using ICP-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) demonstrated the applicability of the newly developed analytical method for accurate analysis of REEs in FCC catalysts. The method developed for FCC catalysts was also successfully implemented to measure trace to ultra-trace concentrations of La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Eu and Dy in ambient PM 2.5 in an industrial area of Houston, TX

  11. Continuous austempering fluidized bed furnace. Final report

    Srinivasan, M.N. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1997-09-23

    The intended objective of this project was to show the benefits of using a fluidized bed furnace for austenitizing and austempering of steel castings in a continuous manner. The division of responsibilities was as follows: (1) design of the fluidized bed furnace--Kemp Development Corporation; (2) fabrication of the fluidized bed furnace--Quality Electric Steel, Inc.; (3) procedure for austempering of steel castings, analysis of the results after austempering--Texas A and M University (Texas Engineering Experiment Station). The Department of Energy provided funding to Texas A and M University and Kemp Development Corporation. The responsibility of Quality Electric Steel was to fabricate the fluidized bed, make test castings and perform austempering of the steel castings in the fluidized bed, at their own expense. The project goals had to be reviewed several times due to financial constraints and technical difficulties encountered during the course of the project. The modifications made and the associated events are listed in chronological order.

  12. Does Bedding Affect the Airway and Allergy?

    RW Siebers

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Various cross-sectional and longitudinal studies have suggested that synthetic bedding is associated with asthma, allergic rhinitis and eczema while feather bedding seems to be protective. Synthetic bedding items have higher house dust mite allergen levels than feather bedding items. This is possibly the mechanism involved although fungal and bacterial proinflammatory compounds and volatile organic compounds may play a role. In this review we present and discuss the epidemiological evidence and suggest possible mechanisms. Primary intervention studies are required to show whether feather bedding is protective for the development of childhood asthma and allergic diseases while secondary intervention studies are required to potentially reduce symptoms and medication use in subjects with established disease.

  13. Does bedding affect the airway and allergy?

    Siebers, R W; Crane, J

    2011-04-01

    Various cross-sectional and longitudinal studies have suggested that synthetic bedding is associated with asthma, allergic rhinitis and eczema while feather bedding seems to be protective. Synthetic bedding items have higher house dust mite allergen levels than feather bedding items. This is possibly the mechanism involved although fungal and bacterial proinflammatory compounds and volatile organic compounds may play a role. In this review we present and discuss the epidemiological evidence and suggest possible mechanisms. Primary intervention studies are required to show whether feather bedding is protective for the development of childhood asthma and allergic diseases while secondary intervention studies are required to potentially reduce symptoms and medication use in subjects with established disease.

  14. Novel metalloporphyrin catalysts for the oxidation of hydrocarbons

    Showalter, M.C.; Nenoff, T.M.; Shelnutt, J.A.

    1996-11-01

    Work was done for developing biomimetic oxidation catalysts. Two classes of metalloporphyrin catalysts were studied. The first class of catalysts studied were a novel series of highly substituted metalloporphyrins, the fluorinated iron dodecaphenylporphyrins. These homogeneous metalloporphyrin catalysts were screened for activity as catalysts in the oxidation of hydrocarbons by dioxygen. Results are discussed with respect to catalyst structural features. The second type of catalysts studied were heterogeneous catalysts consisting of metalloporphyrins applied to inorganic supports. Preliminary catalytic testing results with these materials are presented.

  15. European workshop on spent catalysts. Book of abstracts

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    In 1999 and 2002 two well attended workshops on recycling, regeneration, reuse and disposal of spent catalysts took place in Frankfurt. This series has been continued in Berlin. The workshop was organized in collaboration with DGMK, the German Society for Petroleum and Coal Science and Technology. Contributions were in the following areas of catalyst deactivation: recycling of spent catalysts in chemical and petrochemical industry, recycling of precious metal catalysts and heterogenous base metal catalysts, legal aspects of transboundary movements, catalyst regeneration, quality control, slurry catalysts, commercial reactivation of hydrotreating catalysts. (uke)

  16. Transmission electron microscopy on live catalysts

    Bremmer, G.M.

    2017-01-01

    The dissertation describes TEM experiments on heterogeneous catalysts. Starting with characterization of (Ni/Co)MoS2 on Alumina and the effect of oxidation, and sequential resulfidation. After that, Co-based catalysts are used for high-resolution (S)TEM/EDX caracterization studies, and in situ

  17. Chemical engineering design of CO oxidation catalysts

    Herz, Richard K.

    1987-01-01

    How a chemical reaction engineer would approach the challenge of designing a CO oxidation catalyst for pulsed CO2 lasers is described. CO oxidation catalysts have a long history of application, of course, so it is instructive to first consider the special requirements of the laser application and then to compare them to the characteristics of existing processes which utilize CO oxidation catalysts. All CO2 laser applications require a CO oxidation catalyst with the following characteristics: (1) active at stoichiometric ratios of O2 and CO, (2) no inhibition by CO2 or other components of the laser environment, (3) releases no particulates during vibration or thermal cycling, and (4) long lifetime with a stable activity. In all applications, low consumption of power is desirable, a characteristic especially critical in aerospace applications and, thus, catalyst activity at low temperatures is highly desirable. High power lasers with high pulse repetition rates inherently require circulation of the gas mixture and this forced circulation is available for moving gas past the catalyst. Low repetition rate lasers, however, do not inherently require gas circulation, so a catalyst that did not require such circulation would be favorable from the standpoint of minimum power consumption. Lasers designed for atmospheric penetration of their infrared radiation utilize CO2 formed from rare isotopes of oxygen and this application has the additional constraint that normal abundance oxygen isotopes in the catalyst must not exchange with rare isotopes in the gas mixture.

  18. Carbons and carbon supported catalysts in hydroprocessing

    Furimsky, Edward

    2009-07-01

    This book is a comprehensive summary of recent research in the field and covers all areas of carbons and carbon materials. The potential application of carbon supports, particularly those of carbon black (CB) and activated carbon (AC) in hydroprocessing catalysis are covered. Novel carbon materials such as carbon fibers and carbon nano tubes (CNT) are also covered, including the more recent developments in the use of fullerenes in hydroprocessing applications. Although the primary focus of this book is on carbons and carbon supported catalysts, it also identifies the difference in the effect of carbon supports compared with the oxidic supports, particularly that of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The difference in catalyst activity and stability was estimated using both model compounds and real feeds under variable conditions. The conditions applied during the preparation of carbon supported catalysts are also comprehensively covered and include various methods of pretreatment of carbon supports to enhance catalyst performance. The model compounds results consistently show higher hydrodesulfurization and hydrodeoxygenation activities of carbon supported catalysts than that of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} supported catalysts. Also, the deactivation of the former catalysts by coke deposition was much less evident. Chapter 6.3.1.3 is on carbon-supported catalysts: coal-derived liquids.

  19. Ligand iron catalysts for selective hydrogenation

    Casey, Charles P.; Guan, Hairong

    2010-11-16

    Disclosed are iron ligand catalysts for selective hydrogenation of aldehydes, ketones and imines. A catalyst such as dicarbonyl iron hydride hydroxycyclopentadiene) complex uses the OH on the five member ring and hydrogen linked to the iron to facilitate hydrogenation reactions, particularly in the presence of hydrogen gas.

  20. The strange case of the "oscillating" catalysts

    Busico, [No Value; Cipullo, R; Kretschmer, W; Talarico, G; Vacatello, M; Castelli, VV

    The field of stereoselective propene polymerization has been dramatically innovated by the discovery of homogeneous metallocene-based catalysts with well-defined and tunable molecular structure. Of all, "oscillating" metallocenes are probably the most ingenious and challenging example of catalyst