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Sample records for fmiso dynamic pet

  1. Evaluation of a compartmental model for estimating tumor hypoxia via FMISO dynamic PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wenli; Nehmeh, Sadek A; O'Donoghue, Joseph; Zanzonico, Pat B; Schmidtlein, C Ross; Lee, Nancy Y; Humm, John L; Georgi, Jens-Christoph; Paulus, Timo; Narayanan, Manoj; Bal, Matthieu

    2009-01-01

    This paper systematically evaluates a pharmacokinetic compartmental model for identifying tumor hypoxia using dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 18 F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO). A generic irreversible one-plasma two-tissue compartmental model was used. A dynamic PET image dataset was simulated with three tumor regions-normoxic, hypoxic and necrotic-embedded in a normal-tissue background, and with an image-based arterial input function. Each voxelized tissue's time activity curve (TAC) was simulated with typical values of kinetic parameters, as deduced from FMISO-PET data from nine head-and-neck cancer patients. The dynamic dataset was first produced without any statistical noise to ensure that correct kinetic parameters were reproducible. Next, to investigate the stability of kinetic parameter estimation in the presence of noise, 1000 noisy samples of the dynamic dataset were generated, from which 1000 noisy estimates of kinetic parameters were calculated and used to estimate the sample mean and covariance matrix. It is found that a more peaked input function gave less variation in various kinetic parameters, and the variation of kinetic parameters could also be reduced by two region-of-interest averaging techniques. To further investigate how bias in the arterial input function affected the kinetic parameter estimation, a shift error was introduced in the peak amplitude and peak location of the input TAC, and the bias of various kinetic parameters calculated. In summary, mathematical phantom studies have been used to determine the statistical accuracy and precision of model-based kinetic analysis, which helps to validate this analysis and provides guidance in planning clinical dynamic FMISO-PET studies.

  2. Monitoring early response to chemoradiotherapy with "1"8F-FMISO dynamic PET in head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grkovski, Milan; Beattie, Bradley J.; O'Donoghue, Joseph A.; Humm, John L.; Lee, Nancy Y.; Riaz, Nadeem; Leeman, Jonathan E.; Schoeder, Heiko; Carlin, Sean D.

    2017-01-01

    There is growing recognition that biologic features of the tumor microenvironment affect the response to cancer therapies and the outcome of cancer patients. In head and neck cancer (HNC) one such feature is hypoxia. We investigated the utility of "1"8F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) dynamic positron emission tomography (dPET) for monitoring the early microenvironmental response to chemoradiotherapy in HNC. Seventy-two HNC patients underwent FMISO dPET scans in a customized immobilization mask (0-30 min dynamic acquisition, followed by 10 min static acquisitions starting at ∝95 min and ∝160 min post-injection) at baseline and early into treatment where patients have already received one cycle of chemotherapy and anywhere from five to ten fractions of 2 Gy per fraction radiation therapy. Voxelwise pharmacokinetic modeling was conducted using an irreversible one-plasma two-tissue compartment model to calculate surrogate biomarkers of tumor hypoxia (k_3 and Tumor-to-Blood Ratio (TBR)), perfusion (K_1) and FMISO distribution volume (DV). Additionally, Tumor-to-Muscle Ratios (TMR) were derived by visual inspection by an experienced nuclear medicine physician, with TMR > 1.2 defining hypoxia. One hundred and thirty-five lesions in total were analyzed. TBR, k_3 and DV decreased on early response scans, while no significant change was observed for K_1. The k_3 -TBR correlation decreased substantially from baseline scans (Pearson's r = 0.72 and 0.76 for mean intratumor and pooled voxelwise values, respectively) to early response scans (Pearson's r = 0.39 and 0.40, respectively). Both concordant and discordant examples of changes in intratumor k_3 and TBR were identified; the latter partially mediated by the change in DV. In 13 normoxic patients according to visual analysis (all having lesions with TMR = 1.2), subvolumes were identified where k_3 indicated the presence of hypoxia. Pharmacokinetic modeling of FMISO dynamic PET reveals a more detailed characterization of the

  3. Monitoring early response to chemoradiotherapy with {sup 18}F-FMISO dynamic PET in head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grkovski, Milan; Beattie, Bradley J.; O' Donoghue, Joseph A.; Humm, John L. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics, New York, NY (United States); Lee, Nancy Y.; Riaz, Nadeem; Leeman, Jonathan E. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, New York, NY (United States); Schoeder, Heiko; Carlin, Sean D. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2017-09-15

    There is growing recognition that biologic features of the tumor microenvironment affect the response to cancer therapies and the outcome of cancer patients. In head and neck cancer (HNC) one such feature is hypoxia. We investigated the utility of {sup 18}F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) dynamic positron emission tomography (dPET) for monitoring the early microenvironmental response to chemoradiotherapy in HNC. Seventy-two HNC patients underwent FMISO dPET scans in a customized immobilization mask (0-30 min dynamic acquisition, followed by 10 min static acquisitions starting at ∝95 min and ∝160 min post-injection) at baseline and early into treatment where patients have already received one cycle of chemotherapy and anywhere from five to ten fractions of 2 Gy per fraction radiation therapy. Voxelwise pharmacokinetic modeling was conducted using an irreversible one-plasma two-tissue compartment model to calculate surrogate biomarkers of tumor hypoxia (k{sub 3} and Tumor-to-Blood Ratio (TBR)), perfusion (K{sub 1}) and FMISO distribution volume (DV). Additionally, Tumor-to-Muscle Ratios (TMR) were derived by visual inspection by an experienced nuclear medicine physician, with TMR > 1.2 defining hypoxia. One hundred and thirty-five lesions in total were analyzed. TBR, k{sub 3} and DV decreased on early response scans, while no significant change was observed for K{sub 1}. The k{sub 3} -TBR correlation decreased substantially from baseline scans (Pearson's r = 0.72 and 0.76 for mean intratumor and pooled voxelwise values, respectively) to early response scans (Pearson's r = 0.39 and 0.40, respectively). Both concordant and discordant examples of changes in intratumor k{sub 3} and TBR were identified; the latter partially mediated by the change in DV. In 13 normoxic patients according to visual analysis (all having lesions with TMR = 1.2), subvolumes were identified where k{sub 3} indicated the presence of hypoxia. Pharmacokinetic modeling of FMISO dynamic PET

  4. Monitoring early response to chemoradiotherapy with 18F-FMISO dynamic PET in head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grkovski, Milan; Lee, Nancy Y; Schöder, Heiko; Carlin, Sean D; Beattie, Bradley J; Riaz, Nadeem; Leeman, Jonathan E; O'Donoghue, Joseph A; Humm, John L

    2017-09-01

    There is growing recognition that biologic features of the tumor microenvironment affect the response to cancer therapies and the outcome of cancer patients. In head and neck cancer (HNC) one such feature is hypoxia. We investigated the utility of 18 F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) dynamic positron emission tomography (dPET) for monitoring the early microenvironmental response to chemoradiotherapy in HNC. Seventy-two HNC patients underwent FMISO dPET scans in a customized immobilization mask (0-30 min dynamic acquisition, followed by 10 min static acquisitions starting at ∼95 min and ∼160 min post-injection) at baseline and early into treatment where patients have already received one cycle of chemotherapy and anywhere from five to ten fractions of 2 Gy per fraction radiation therapy. Voxelwise pharmacokinetic modeling was conducted using an irreversible one-plasma two-tissue compartment model to calculate surrogate biomarkers of tumor hypoxia (k 3 and Tumor-to-Blood Ratio (TBR)), perfusion (K 1 ) and FMISO distribution volume (DV). Additionally, Tumor-to-Muscle Ratios (TMR) were derived by visual inspection by an experienced nuclear medicine physician, with TMR > 1.2 defining hypoxia. One hundred and thirty-five lesions in total were analyzed. TBR, k 3 and DV decreased on early response scans, while no significant change was observed for K 1 . The k 3 -TBR correlation decreased substantially from baseline scans (Pearson's r = 0.72 and 0.76 for mean intratumor and pooled voxelwise values, respectively) to early response scans (Pearson's r = 0.39 and 0.40, respectively). Both concordant and discordant examples of changes in intratumor k 3 and TBR were identified; the latter partially mediated by the change in DV. In 13 normoxic patients according to visual analysis (all having lesions with TMR = 1.2), subvolumes were identified where k 3 indicated the presence of hypoxia. Pharmacokinetic modeling of FMISO dynamic PET reveals a more detailed

  5. Evaluation of hypoxic tissue dynamics with 18F-FMISO PET in a rat model of permanent cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Santiago; Herance, José Raul; Abad, Sergio; Jiménez, Xavier; Pareto, Deborah; Ruiz, Alba; Torrent, Èlia; Figueiras, Francisca P; Popota, Foteini; Fernández-Soriano, Francisco J; Planas, Anna M; Gispert, Juan D

    2011-06-01

    [¹⁸F]Fluoromisonidazole (¹⁸F-FMISO) is a nitroimidazole derivative that has been proposed as a positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer to detect hypoxic tissue in vivo. This compound accumulates in hypoxic but viable tissue and may be a good candidate for evaluating the ischemic penumbra. We evaluated the time course of ¹⁸F-FMISO uptake using PET in a rat model of permanent cerebral ischemia and the correlation with histological changes. Rats (n = 14) were subjected to permanent ischemia by intraluminal occlusion of the middle cerebral artery in order to assess by PET the uptake of ¹⁸F-FMISO at various times over 24 h following ischemia. The PET results were compared to histological changes with Nissl and 2,3,5 triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. Elevated uptake of ¹⁸F-FMISO was detected in the infarcted area up to 8 h after occlusion but was no longer detected at 24 h, a time point coincident with pan necrosis of the tissue. Our findings suggest that salvageable tissue persists for up to 8 h in this rat model of brain ischemia. We propose ¹⁸F-FMISO PET as a tool for evaluating the ischemic penumbra after cerebral ischemia.

  6. Measurement of hypoxia-related parameters in three sublines of a rat prostate carcinoma using dynamic 18F-FMISO-Pet-Ct and quantitative histology

    OpenAIRE

    Mena-Romano, Pamela; Cheng, Caixia; Glowa, Christin; Peschke, Peter; Pan, Leyun; Haberkorn, Uwe; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia; Karger, Christian P

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia is an important resistance factor in radiotherapy and measuring its spatial distribution in tumors non-invasively is therefore of major importance. This study characterizes the hypoxic conditions of three tumor sublines (AT1, HI and H) of the Dunning R3327 prostate tumor model, which differ in histology, differentiation degree, volume doubling time and androgenic sensitivity, using dynamic Fluoromisonidazole (18F-FMISO)-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (PET-CT) and his...

  7. Matching the reaction-diffusion simulation to dynamic [18F]FMISO PET measurements in tumors: extension to a flow-limited oxygen-dependent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Kuangyu; Bayer, Christine; Gaertner, Florian C; Astner, Sabrina T; Wilkens, Jan J; Nüsslin, Fridtjof; Vaupel, Peter; Ziegler, Sibylle I

    2017-02-01

    Positron-emission tomography (PET) with hypoxia specific tracers provides a noninvasive method to assess the tumor oxygenation status. Reaction-diffusion models have advantages in revealing the quantitative relation between in vivo imaging and the tumor microenvironment. However, there is no quantitative comparison of the simulation results with the real PET measurements yet. The lack of experimental support hampers further applications of computational simulation models. This study aims to compare the simulation results with a preclinical [ 18 F]FMISO PET study and to optimize the reaction-diffusion model accordingly. Nude mice with xenografted human squamous cell carcinomas (CAL33) were investigated with a 2 h dynamic [ 18 F]FMISO PET followed by immunofluorescence staining using the hypoxia marker pimonidazole and the endothelium marker CD 31. A large data pool of tumor time-activity curves (TAC) was simulated for each mouse by feeding the arterial input function (AIF) extracted from experiments into the model with different configurations of the tumor microenvironment. A measured TAC was considered to match a simulated TAC when the difference metric was below a certain, noise-dependent threshold. As an extension to the well-established Kelly model, a flow-limited oxygen-dependent (FLOD) model was developed to improve the matching between measurements and simulations. The matching rate between the simulated TACs of the Kelly model and the mouse PET data ranged from 0 to 28.1% (on average 9.8%). By modifying the Kelly model to an FLOD model, the matching rate between the simulation and the PET measurements could be improved to 41.2-84.8% (on average 64.4%). Using a simulation data pool and a matching strategy, we were able to compare the simulated temporal course of dynamic PET with in vivo measurements. By modifying the Kelly model to a FLOD model, the computational simulation was able to approach the dynamic [ 18 F]FMISO measurements in the investigated

  8. Combined use of (18)F-FDG and (18)F-FMISO in unresectable non-small cell lung cancer patients planned for radiotherapy: a dynamic PET/CT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachpekidis, Christos; Thieke, Christian; Askoxylakis, Vasileios; Nicolay, Nils H; Huber, Peter E; Thomas, Michael; Dimitrakopoulou, Georgia; Debus, Juergen; Haberkorn, Uwe; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2015-01-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate and compare, by means of dynamic and static PET/CT, the distribution patterns and pharmacokinetics of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) and of fluorine-18-fluoromisonidazole ((18)F-FMISO) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients scheduled for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Thirteen patients suffering from inoperable stage III NSCLC underwent PET/CTs with (18)F-FDG and (18)F-FMISO for tumor metabolism and hypoxia assessment accordingly. Evaluation of PET/CT studies was based on visual analysis, semi-quantitative (SUV) calculations and absolute quantitative estimations, after application of a two-tissue compartment model and a non-compartmental approach. (18)F-FDG PET/CT revealed all thirteen primary lung tumors as sites of increased (18)F-FDG uptake. Six patients demonstrated also in total 43 (18)F-FDG avid metastases; these patients were excluded from radiotherapy. (18)F-MISO PET/CT demonstrated 12/13 primary lung tumors with faint tracer uptake. Only one tumor was clearly (18)F-FMISO avid, (SUVaverage = 3.4, SUVmax = 5.0). Mean values for (18)F-FDG, as derived from dPET/CT data, were SUVaverage = 8.9, SUVmax = 15.1, K1 = 0.23, k2 = 0.53, k3 = 0.17, k4 = 0.02, influx = 0.05 and fractal dimension (FD) = 1.25 for the primary tumors. The respective values for (18)F-FMISO were SUVaverage = 1.4, SUVmax = 2.2, K1 = 0.26, k2 = 0.56, k3 = 0.06, k4 = 0.06, influx = 0.02 and FD = 1.14. No statistically significant correlation was observed between the two tracers. (18)F-FDG PET/CT changed therapy management in six patients, by excluding them from planned IMRT. (18)F-FMISO PET/CT revealed absence of significant tracer uptake in the majority of the (18)F-FDG avid NSCLCs. Lack of correlation between the two tracers' kinetics indicates that they reflect different molecular mechanisms and implies the discordance between increased glycolysis and hypoxia in the malignancy.

  9. The role of necrosis, acute hypoxia and chronic hypoxia in 18F-FMISO PET image contrast: a computational modelling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Daniel R.; Partridge, Mike

    2016-12-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using 18F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) is a promising technique for imaging tumour hypoxia, and a potential target for radiotherapy dose-painting. However, the relationship between FMISO uptake and oxygen partial pressure ({{P}{{\\text{O}2}}} ) is yet to be quantified fully. Tissue oxygenation varies over distances much smaller than clinical PET resolution (necrosis. This work develops a computational model of FMISO uptake in millimetre-scale tumour regions. Coupled partial differential equations govern the evolution of oxygen and FMISO distributions, and a dynamic vascular source map represents temporal variations in perfusion. Local FMISO binding capacity is modulated by the necrotic fraction. Outputs include spatiotemporal maps of {{P}{{\\text{O}2}}} and tracer accumulation, enabling calculation of tissue-to-blood ratios (TBRs) and time-activity curves (TACs) as a function of mean tissue oxygenation. The model is characterised using experimental data, finding half-maximal FMISO binding at local {{P}{{\\text{O}2}}} of 1.4 mmHg (95% CI: 0.3-2.6 mmHg) and half-maximal necrosis at 1.2 mmHg (0.1-4.9 mmHg). Simulations predict a non-linear non-monotonic relationship between FMISO activity (4 hr post-injection) and mean tissue {{P}{{\\text{O}2}}} : tracer uptake rises sharply from negligible levels in avascular tissue, peaking at  ˜5 mmHg and declining towards blood activity in well-oxygenated conditions. Greater temporal variation in perfusion increases peak TBRs (range 2.20-5.27) as a result of smaller predicted necrotic fraction, rather than fundamental differences in FMISO accumulation under acute hypoxia. Identical late FMISO uptake can occur in regions with differing {{P}{{\\text{O}2}}} and necrotic fraction, but simulated TACs indicate that additional early-phase information may allow discrimination of hypoxic and necrotic signals. We conclude that a robust approach to FMISO interpretation (and dose-painting prescription

  10. Automated synthesis and PET evaluation of both enantiomers of [18F]FMISO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Revunov, Evgeny V.; Jørgensen, Jesper T.; Jensen, Andreas Tue Ingemann

    2015-01-01

    performed on mice bearing FaDu tumors. Image-derived biodistribution wasobtained from micro-PET/CT scans performed at 1 and 3 hours post injection (p.i.). In addition, theuptake patterns of each enantiomer were observed using two-hour dynamic micro-PET/CT scans andthe time-activity curves from different...... organs were compared. Results: The individual (R)- and (S)-[18F]FMISO enantiomers were synthesized in one step with highenantiomeric excess (ee) > 99% and radiochemical purity > 97% using custom-made automationmodule. The dynamic micro-PET/CT scanning revealed a faster initial uptake of the (R)-[18F......]FMISOenantiomer in tumor and muscle tissues, however the difference became progressively smaller withtime. The tumor-to-muscle (T/M) and tumor-to-liver (T/L) ratios remained nearly identical for the (R)-and (S)-forms at all time points. The micro-PET/CT imaging at 1 and 3 hours p.i. did not show anysignificant...

  11. Diffusion and perfusion correlates of the {sup 18}F-MISO PET lesion in acute stroke: pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alawneh, Josef A.; Marrapu, S.T.; Jensen-Kondering, Ulf; Morris, Rhiannon S.; Jones, P.S. [University of Cambridge, Stroke Research Group, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Moustafa, Ramez R. [University of Cambridge, Stroke Research Group, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Ain Shams University, Department of Neurology, Cairo (Egypt); Aigbirhio, Franklin I.; Fryer, Tim D.; Carpenter, T.A. [University of Cambridge, Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Warburton, Elizabeth A. [University of Cambridge, Stroke Research Group, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Stroke Unit, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Baron, Jean-Claude [University of Cambridge, Stroke Research Group, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Universite Paris Descartes, INSERM U894, Centre Hospitalier Sainte-Anne, Paris (France)

    2014-04-15

    Mapping the ischaemic penumbra in acute stroke is of considerable clinical interest. For this purpose, mapping tissue hypoxia with {sup 18}F-misonidazole (FMISO) PET is attractive, and is straightforward compared to {sup 15}O PET. Given the current emphasis on penumbra imaging using diffusion/perfusion MR or CT perfusion, investigating the relationships between FMISO uptake and abnormalities with these modalities is important. According to a prospective design, three patients (age 54-81 years; admission NIH stroke scale scores 16-22) with an anterior circulation stroke and extensive penumbra on CT- or MR-based perfusion imaging successfully completed FMISO PET, diffusion-weighted imaging and MR angiography 6-26 h after stroke onset, and follow-up FLAIR to map the final infarction. All had persistent proximal occlusion and a poor outcome despite thrombolysis. Significant FMISO trapping was defined voxel-wise relative to ten age-matched controls and mapped onto coregistered maps of the penumbra and irreversibly damaged ischaemic core. FMISO trapping was present in all patients (volume range 18-119 ml) and overlapped mainly with the penumbra but also with the core in each patient. There was a significant (p ≤ 0.001) correlation in the expected direction between FMISO uptake and perfusion, with a sharp FMISO uptake bend around the expected penumbra threshold. FMISO uptake had the expected overlap with the penumbra and relationship with local perfusion. However, consistent with recent animal data, our study suggests FMISO trapping may not be specific to the penumbra. If confirmed in larger samples, this preliminary finding would have potential implications for the clinical application of FMISO PET in acute ischaemic stroke. (orig.)

  12. [18F]-FMISO PET study of hypoxia in gliomas before surgery: correlation with molecular markers of hypoxia and angiogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekaert, Lien [CHU de Caen, Department of Neurology, Caen (France); Normandie Univ, UNICAEN, CEA, CNRS, ISTCT/CERVOxy Group, Caen (France); CHU de Caen, Department of Neurosurgery, Caen (France); CHU de Caen, Service de Neurochirurgie, Caen (France); Valable, Samuel; Collet, Solene; Bordji, Karim; Petit, Edwige; Bernaudin, Myriam [Normandie Univ, UNICAEN, CEA, CNRS, ISTCT/CERVOxy Group, Caen (France); Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuele [Normandie Univ, UNICAEN, CEA, CNRS, ISTCT/CERVOxy Group, Caen (France); CHU de Caen, Department of Pathology, Caen (France); Ponte, Keven [CHU de Caen, Department of Neurosurgery, Caen (France); Normandie Univ, UNICAEN, CEA, CNRS, ISTCT/CERVOxy Group, Caen (France); Constans, Jean-Marc [Normandie Univ, UNICAEN, CEA, CNRS, ISTCT/CERVOxy Group, Caen (France); CHU de Caen, Department of Neuroradiology, Caen (France); Levallet, Guenaelle [CHU de Caen, Department of Pathology, Caen (France); Branger, Pierre [CHU de Caen, Department of Neurology, Caen (France); Emery, Evelyne [CHU de Caen, Department of Neurosurgery, Caen (France); Manrique, Alain [CHU de Caen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Caen (France); Barre, Louisa [Normandie Univ, UNICAEN, CEA, CNRS, ISTCT/LDM-TEP group, Caen (France); Guillamo, Jean-Sebastien [CHU de Caen, Department of Neurology, Caen (France); Normandie Univ, UNICAEN, CEA, CNRS, ISTCT/CERVOxy Group, Caen (France); CHU de Nimes, Department of Neurology, Nimes (France)

    2017-08-15

    Hypoxia in gliomas is associated with tumor resistance to radio- and chemotherapy. However, positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of hypoxia remains challenging, and the validation of biological markers is, therefore, of great importance. We investigated the relationship between uptake of the PET hypoxia tracer [18F]-FMISO and other markers of hypoxia and angiogenesis and with patient survival. In this prospective single center clinical study, 33 glioma patients (grade IV: n = 24, III: n = 3, and II: n = 6) underwent [18F]-FMISO PET and MRI including relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) maps before surgery. Maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) and hypoxic volume were calculated, defining two groups of patients based on the presence or absence of [18F]-FMISO uptake. After surgery, molecular quantification of CAIX, VEGF, Ang2 (rt-qPCR), and HIF-1α (immunohistochemistry) were performed on tumor specimens. [18F]-FMISO PET uptake was closely linked to tumor grade, with high uptake in glioblastomas (GB, grade IV). Expression of biomarkers of hypoxia (CAIX, HIF-1α), and angiogenesis markers (VEGF, Ang2, rCBV) were significantly higher in the [18F]-FMISO uptake group. We found correlations between the degree of hypoxia (hypoxic volume and SUVmax) and expression of HIF-1α, CAIX, VEGF, Ang2, and rCBV (p < 0.01). Patients without [18F]-FMISO uptake had a longer survival time than uptake positive patients (log-rank, p < 0.005). Tumor hypoxia as evaluated by [18F]-FMISO PET is associated with the expression of hypoxia markers on a molecular level and is related to angiogenesis. [18F]-FMISO uptake is a mark of an aggressive tumor, almost always a glioblastoma. Our results underline that [18F]-FMISO PET could be useful to guide glioma treatment, and in particular radiotherapy, since hypoxia is a well-known factor of resistance. (orig.)

  13. Advantage of FMISO-PET over FDG-PET for predicting histological response to preoperative chemotherapy in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Jun; Kitagawa, Yoshimasa; Yamazaki, Yutaka; Hata, Hironobu; Asaka, Takuya; Miyakoshi, Masaaki [Hokkaido University, Oral Diagnosis and Medicine, Department of Oral Pathobiological Science, Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Okamoto, Shozo; Shiga, Tohru; Tamaki, Nagara [Hokkaido University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Shindoh, Masanobu [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Department of Oral Pathology and Biology, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Kuge, Yuji [Hokkaido University, Central Institute of Isotope Science, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2014-11-15

    Hypoxia, a prognostic factor in many types of cancer, can be detected by {sup 18}F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) positron emission tomography (PET). It is unclear whether hypoxia reflects the response to chemotherapy in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The correlations of FMISO-PET and FDG-PET with histological response to preoperative chemotherapy were therefore assessed in patients with OSCC. This study enrolled 22 patients with OSCC undergoing preoperative chemotherapy. The T-stages were T2 in 6 patients, T3 in 3, and T4a in 13, and the N-stages were N0 in 14 patients, N1 in 3, and N2 in 5. Each patient was evaluated by both FMISO-PET and FDG-PET before surgery, and the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) of FDG- and FMISO-PET and tumor-muscle ratio (TMR) of FMISO-PET were measured. The threshold for the hypoxic volume based on TMR was set at 1.25. The histological response to preoperative chemotherapy was evaluated using operative materials. FMISO-PET and FDG-PET detected uptake by primary OSCCs in 15 (68 %) and 21 (95 %) patients, respectively, and median SUV{sub max}s of FMISO- and FDG-PET in the primary site were 2.0 (range, 1.3-3.5) and 16.0 (range, 1.0-32.2), respectively. The median of FMISO TMR was 1.5 (range, 0.99-2.96). There were five cases whose FMISO TMR was less than 1.25. Histological evaluation showed good response to preoperative chemotherapy in 7 patients (32 %) and poor response in 15 (68 %). Good response was significantly more prevalent in patients with negative than positive FMISO uptake (P < 0.001) and without the hypoxic area evaluated by FMISO-PET TMR (P = 0.04), whereas FDG uptake was not significantly correlated with response to chemotherapy response. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that FMISO uptake was an independent significant predictor of response to preoperative chemotherapy (P = 0.03, odds ratio = 0.06, 95 % confidence interval = 0.004-0.759). An advantage of FMISO-PET over FDG-PET

  14. Utility of FMISO PET in advanced head and neck cancer treated with chemoradiation incorporating a hypoxia-targeting chemotherapy agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hicks, Rodney J. [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Molecular Imaging, Melbourne (Australia); University of Melbourne, Department of Medicine, St Vincent' s Medical School, Melbourne (Australia); Rischin, Danny [University of Melbourne, Department of Medicine, St Vincent' s Medical School, Melbourne (Australia); Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Division of Haematology and Medical Oncology, Melbourne (Australia); Fisher, Richard [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Melbourne (Australia); Binns, David [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Molecular Imaging, Melbourne (Australia); Scott, Andrew M. [Austin Hospital, Centre for PET, and Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Melbourne (Australia); Peters, Lester J. [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Division of Radiation Oncology, Melbourne (Australia)

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate [{sup 18}F]fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) PET in advanced head and neck cancer during hypoxia-targeting therapy. Fifteen of 16 patients in a phase I trial of chemoradiation plus tirapazamine (specific cytotoxin for hypoxic cells) in advanced (T3/4 and/or N2/3) head and neck cancer underwent serial [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and FMISO PET. We have previously reported excellent early clinical outcome of these patients and now review FMISO PET results in the context of longer follow-up of this patient cohort. Based on blinded qualitative scoring by two readers, FMISO PET was positive in 13/15 patients at baseline: 12/15 of primary sites and 8/13 neck nodes were scored as positive. All sites of corresponding FDG and FMISO abnormality at baseline showed marked qualitative reduction of uptake within 4 weeks of commencing therapy, consistent with effective hypoxia-targeted therapy. With a median follow-up of 6.9 years, there have been only four locoregional failures, while three other patients have died of metachronous lung cancer. The 5-year overall survival was 50% (95% CI 27-73%), the 5-year failure-free survival was 44% (95% CI 22-68%) and the 5-year freedom from locoregional failure was 68% (95% CI 38-88%). The high prevalence of hypoxia demonstrated on FMISO PET imaging is consistent with the advanced disease stage of these patients and would be expected to predict an adverse prognosis. Evidence of the early resolution of FMISO abnormality during treatment, associated with excellent locoregional control in this patient cohort, supports further investigation of hypoxia-targeting agents in advanced head and neck cancer. (orig.)

  15. Utility of FMISO PET in advanced head and neck cancer treated with chemoradiation incorporating a hypoxia-targeting chemotherapy agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, Rodney J.; Rischin, Danny; Fisher, Richard; Binns, David; Scott, Andrew M.; Peters, Lester J.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate [ 18 F]fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) PET in advanced head and neck cancer during hypoxia-targeting therapy. Fifteen of 16 patients in a phase I trial of chemoradiation plus tirapazamine (specific cytotoxin for hypoxic cells) in advanced (T3/4 and/or N2/3) head and neck cancer underwent serial [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and FMISO PET. We have previously reported excellent early clinical outcome of these patients and now review FMISO PET results in the context of longer follow-up of this patient cohort. Based on blinded qualitative scoring by two readers, FMISO PET was positive in 13/15 patients at baseline: 12/15 of primary sites and 8/13 neck nodes were scored as positive. All sites of corresponding FDG and FMISO abnormality at baseline showed marked qualitative reduction of uptake within 4 weeks of commencing therapy, consistent with effective hypoxia-targeted therapy. With a median follow-up of 6.9 years, there have been only four locoregional failures, while three other patients have died of metachronous lung cancer. The 5-year overall survival was 50% (95% CI 27-73%), the 5-year failure-free survival was 44% (95% CI 22-68%) and the 5-year freedom from locoregional failure was 68% (95% CI 38-88%). The high prevalence of hypoxia demonstrated on FMISO PET imaging is consistent with the advanced disease stage of these patients and would be expected to predict an adverse prognosis. Evidence of the early resolution of FMISO abnormality during treatment, associated with excellent locoregional control in this patient cohort, supports further investigation of hypoxia-targeting agents in advanced head and neck cancer. (orig.)

  16. A robotic system for 18F-FMISO PET-guided intratumoral pO2 measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jenghwa; Wen, Bixiu; Kazanzides, Peter; Zanzonico, Pat; Finn, Ronald D; Fichtinger, Gabor; Ling, C Clifton

    2009-11-01

    An image-guided robotic system was used to measure the oxygen tension (pO2) in rodent tumor xenografts using interstitial probes guided by tumor hypoxia PET images. Rats with approximately 1 cm diameter tumors were anesthetized and immobilized in a custom-fabricated whole-body mold. Imaging was performed using a dedicated small-animal PET scanner (R4 or Focus 120 microPET) approximately 2 h after the injection of the hypoxia tracer 18F-fluoromisonidazole (18F-FMISO). The coordinate systems of the robot and PET were registered based on fiducial markers in the rodent bed visible on the PET images. Guided by the 3D microPET image set, measurements were performed at various locations in the tumor and compared to the corresponding 18F-FMISO image intensity at the respective measurement points. Experiments were performed on four tumor-bearing rats with 4 (86), 3 (80), 7 (162), and 8 (235) measurement tracks (points) for each experiment. The 18F-FMISO image intensities were inversely correlated with the measured pO2, with a Pearson coefficient ranging from -0.14 to -0.97 for the 22 measurement tracks. The cumulative scatterplots of pO2 versus image intensity yielded a hyperbolic relationship, with correlation coefficients of 0.52, 0.48, 0.64, and 0.73, respectively, for the four tumors. In conclusion, PET image-guided pO2 measurement is feasible with this robot system and, more generally, this system will permit point-by-point comparison of physiological probe measurements and image voxel values as a means of validating molecularly targeted radiotracers. Although the overall data fitting suggested that 18F-FMISO may be an effective hypoxia marker, the use of static 18F-FMISO PET postinjection scans to guide radiotherapy might be problematic due to the observed high variation in some individual data pairs from the fitted curve, indicating potential temporal fluctuation of oxygen tension in individual voxels or possible suboptimal imaging time postadministration of hypoxia

  17. Automated PET Radiotracer Manufacture on the BG75 System and Imaging Validation Studies of [18F]fluoromisonidazole ([18F]FMISO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hong; Frank, Jonathan E; Merrill, Joseph R; Hillesheim, Daniel A; Khachaturian, Mark H; Anzellotti, Atilio I

    2016-01-01

    The hypoxia PET tracer, 1-[18F]fluoro-3-(2-nitro-1Himidazol- 1-yl)-propan-2-ol ([18F]FMISO) is the first radiotracer developed for hypoxia PET imaging and has shown promising for cancer diagnosis and prognosis. However, access to [18F]FMISO radiotracer is limited due to the needed cyclotron and radiochemistry expertise. The study aimed to develop the automated production method on the [18F]FMISO radiotracer with the novel fully automated platform of the BG75 system and validate its usage on animal tumor models. [18F]FMISO was produced with the dose synthesis cartridge automatically on the BG75 system. Validation of [18F]FMISO hypoxia imaging functionality was conducted on two tumor mouse models (FaDu/U87 tumor). The distribution of [18F]FMISO within tumor was further validated by the standard hypoxia marker EF5. The average radiochemical purity was (99±1) % and the average pH was 5.5±0.2 with other quality attributes passing standard criteria (n=12). Overall biodistribution for [18F]FMISO in both tumor models was consistent with reported studies where bladder and large intestines presented highest activity at 90 min post injection. High spatial correlation was found between [18F]FMISO autoradiography and EF5 hypoxia staining, indicating high hypoxia specificity of [18MF]FMISO. This study shows that qualified [18F]FMISO can be efficiently produced on the BG75 system in an automated "dose-on-demand" mode using single dose disposable cards. The possibilities of having a low-cost, automated system manufacturing ([18F]Fluoride production + synthesis + QC) different radiotracers will greatly enhance the potential for PET technology to reach new geographical areas and underserved patient populations. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. Improved automated production of 18F-FMISO and its tumor hypoxia imaging by Micro-PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Mingwei; Zhang Yongping; Zheng Yujia; Bao Xiao; Zheng Yingjian

    2013-01-01

    Background: 1-H-1-(3-[ 18 F]fluoro-2-hydroxypropyl)-2-nitroimidazole ( 18 F-FMISO) is a specific molecular imaging probe for tumor hypoxia imaging, and its PET/CT imaging has an important clinical value for planning cancer radiotherapy target volume. Purpose: This study aimed to develop an improved, automated production of 18 F-FMISO and to perform Micro-PET/CT imaging of tumor hypoxia. Methods: Based on the labeling precursor NITTP and a simple 'one-pot' method, an upgraded Explora GN module together with Explora LC was adopted to run radiofluorination (NITTP (10 mg), MeCN (1.0 mL), 120℃, 5.0 min), hydrolysis (HCI (1.0 mol/L, 1.0 mL), 130℃, 8.0 min) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) purification to produce 18 F-FMISO automatically. Moreover, Radio-HPLC and Radio-TLC were applied for the quality control, and Micro-PET/CT scanner for hypoxia imaging of SW1990 pancreatic tumor-bearing mice. Results: As results, 18 F-FMISO was obtained with the synthesis time for about 65 min, the radiochemical yield of (30±5.0)% (no decay corrected, n=20), the radiochemical purity of above 99%, the specific activity of (2.04±0.17)x10 11 Bq·μmol -1 , plus with the enhanced chemical purity. Moreover, MicroPET/CT imaging showed that 18 F-FMISO presented whole-body distribution in SW1990 tumor-bearing mice, and the optimized time point for tumor hypoxia imaging was 3 h post injection with the uptake ratios of tumor-to-muscle of 3.00±0.08. Conclusion: In sum, we developed an improved, automated production of 18 F-FMISO with high performance liquid chromatography purification, high radiochemical yield, high specific activity and high reliability , and also verified its MicroPET/CT imaging of tumor hypoxia for providing experimental reference data. (authors)

  19. 18F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET in patients undergoing radiotherapy or chemotherapy following surgery for high-grade glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S. T.

    2009-01-01

    Full text:Background: Tumour hypoxia is associated with disease progression and resistance to therapy. High grade cerebral gliomas have a poor outcome despite advancements in chemotherapy and radiotherapy. 18F-fluoromisonidazole (18F-FMISO) concentrates in hypoxic cells and is associated with tumour grade in gliomas. The aim of this study was to compare the patterns of uptake of 18F-FDG PET and 18F-FMISO PET post-surgery with MRI and areas of recurrence post-radiotherapy. Methods: Patients with high grade cerebral glioma were recruited into this prospective study. All patients had post-surgical, pre-radiotherapy 18F-FDG, 18F-FMISO and MRI scans, which were all repeated 4-6 weeks post-completion to radiotherapy. The patients were followed-up clinically three monthly and re-imaged if indicated. Results: Ten patients were enrolled in this study, mean age 62 years (range 55-69 years), who all had pre-radiotherapy scans performed. Seven patients had scans done pre- and post-radiotherapy, with 3 patients with only pre-therapy scans. Nine patients had significant FMISO uptake and 8 patients demonstrated abnormal FDG uptake. The areas of FMISO uptake on pre-radiotherapy scans correlated with the most abnormal areas of contrast-enhancement on pre-treatment MRI and areas of locally recurrent disease on post-treatment MRI in eight patients. Nine patients had locally recurrent disease on follow-up MRI. FMISO was more predictive of tumour recurrence compared to FDG. Conclusion: Post-surgical 18F-FMISO PET in patients with cerebral glioma is more predictive of areas of recurrent disease compared to 18F-FDG PET.

  20. [{sup 18}F]FMISO and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET imaging in soft tissue sarcomas: correlation of hypoxia, metabolism and VEGF expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajendran, J.G.; Peterson, L.M.; Grierson, J.R.; Eary, J.F. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Washington Medical Center, Box 356113, WA 98195, Seattle (United States); Wilson, D.C. [Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Control Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Conrad, E.U.; Bruckner, J.D. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington (United States); Rasey, J.S.; Chin, L.K.; Hofstrand, P.D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington (United States); Krohn, K.A. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Washington Medical Center, Box 356113, WA 98195, Seattle (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington (United States)

    2003-05-01

    Hypoxia imparts resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy and also promotes a variety of changes in tumor biology through inducible promoters. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with fluorine-18 fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) in soft tissue sarcomas (STS) as a measure of hypoxia and to compare the results with those obtained using [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and other known biologic correlates. FDG evaluates energy metabolism in tumors while FMISO uptake is proportional to tissue hypoxia. FMISO uptake was compared with FDG uptake. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression was also compared with FMISO uptake. Nineteen patients with STS underwent PET scanning with quantitative determination of FMISO and FDG uptake prior to therapy (neo-adjuvant chemotherapy or surgery alone). Ten patients receiving neo-adjuvant chemotherapy were also imaged after chemotherapy but prior to surgical resection. Standardized uptake value (SUV) was used to describe FDG uptake; regional tissue to blood ratio ({>=}1.2 was considered significant) was used for FMISO uptake. Significant hypoxia was found in 76% of tumors imaged prior to therapy. No correlation was identified between pretherapy hypoxic volume (HV) and tumor grade (r=0.15) or tumor volume (r=0.03). The correlation of HV with VEGF expression was 0.39. Individual tumors showed marked heterogeneity in regional VEGF expression. The mean pixel-by-pixel correlation between FMISO and FDG uptake was 0.49 (range 0.09-0.79) pretreatment and 0.32 (range -0.46-0.72) after treatment. Most tumors showed evidence of reduced uptake of both FMISO and FDG following chemotherapy. FMISO PET demonstrates areas of significant and heterogeneous hypoxia in soft tissue sarcomas. The significant discrepancy between FDG and FMISO uptake seen in this study indicates that regional hypoxia and glucose metabolism do not always correlate. Similarly, we did not find any relationship

  1. Hypoxia imaging with [F-18] FMISO-PET in head and neck cancer: Potential for guiding intensity modulated radiation therapy in overcoming hypoxia-induced treatment resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrickson, Kristi; Phillips, Mark; Smith, Wade; Peterson, Lanell; Krohn, Kenneth; Rajendran, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with [F-18] fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) has been validated as a hypoxic tracer . Head and neck cancer exhibits hypoxia, inducing aggressive biologic traits that impart resistance to treatment. Delivery of modestly higher radiation doses to tumors with stable areas of chronic hypoxia can improve tumor control . Advanced radiation treatment planning (RTP) and delivery techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can deliver higher doses to a small volume without increasing morbidity. We investigated the utility of co-registered FMISO-PET and CT images to develop clinically feasible RTPs with higher tumor control probabilities (TCP). Materials and methods: FMISO-PET images were used to determine hypoxic sub-volumes for boost planning. Example plans were generated for 10 of the patients in the study who exhibited significant hypoxia. We created an IMRT plan for each patient with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) to the hypoxic sub-volumes. We also varied the boost for two patients. Result: A significant (mean 17%, median 15%) improvement in TCP is predicted when the modest additional boost dose to the hypoxic sub-volume is included. Conclusion: Combined FMISO-PET imaging and IMRT planning permit delivery of higher doses to hypoxic regions, increasing the predicted TCP (mean 17%) without increasing expected complications.

  2. 2D VS 3D imaging of brain tumours with 18F-Fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) and positron emission tomography (PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathmaraj, K.; Scott, A.M.; Egan, G.F.; Hannah, A.; Tauro, A.; Tochon-Danguy, A.; Sachinidis, J.; Berlangieri, S.U.; Fabinyi, G.; McKay, W.J.; Cher, L.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: 18 F-FMISO accumulates in hypoxic cells and can be used in the PET imaging of brain tumours containing viable but hypoxic cells. The limited activity (typically 130 MBq) of injected 18 F-FMISO yield poor statistics, requiring prolonged imaging in the conventional 2D mode of PET scanning. 3D (septa retracted) imaging allows for more counts to be collected over a shorter time period making it a more practical alternative. This study investigates the contrast resolution that can be obtained from 3D PET scans compared to the corresponding 2D scan. A patient recently diagnosed with brain tumour was injected with 18 -FMISO 2 hours prior to scanning and imaged supine on a 951/31R PET scanner with the head secured firmly in a head holder. The imaging protocol consisted of a 3 min emission rectilinear scan to position the brain in the FOV, a 10 min post-emission transmission scan, a 20 min 2D emission scan and a 5X10 min frames 3D emission scan. Both the 2D and 3D scans were reconstructed with filtered backprojection algorithm. The first 10 min frame of the 3D acquisition was reconstructed. The total true counts were 3 million and 6.06 million in the 2D image and 3D images respectively. The random events were 0.24 million and 0.96 million in the 2D and 3D images respectively. The Noise Equivalent Counts (NEC) were 2.2 million and 2.02 million for the 2D and 3D images respectively indicating that the 2D and 3D scans (in spite of the nominal true events being vastly different in the 2 scans) had similar Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR). Circular ROI's were defined in the tumour and the contralateral cortex in comparable transaxial slices of the 2D and 3D images. Contrast resolution of the tumour to the background was calculated as 1.4 and 1.38 in the 2D and 3D images respectively. Thus comparable contrast resolution is obtained in the brain with both 3D and 2D images, making 3D imaging a viable alternative to 2D imaging and greatly reducing imaging time. Optimum time

  3. Hypoxia imaging with [18F]-FMISO-PET for guided dose escalation with intensity-modulated radiotherapy in head-and-neck cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriques de Figueiredo, B. [Institut Bergonie, Department of Radiotherapy, Bordeaux (France); INCIA UMR-CNRS 5287, Bordeaux (France); Zacharatou, C. [Institut Bergonie, Department of Radiotherapy, Bordeaux (France); Galland-Girodet, S.; Benech, J. [Hospital Haut-Leveque, Department of Radiotherapy, CHRU Bordeaux (France); Clermont-Gallerande, H. de [Hospital Pellegrin, Department of Nuclear Medicine, CHRU Bordeaux (France); Lamare, F. [INCIA UMR-CNRS 5287, Bordeaux (France); Hospital Haut-Leveque, Department of Radiotherapy, CHRU Bordeaux (France); Hatt, M. [LaTIM INSERM U1101, Brest (France); Digue, L. [Hospital Saint-Andre, Department of Clinical Oncology, CHRU Bordeaux (France); Mones del Pujol, E. de [Department of Oto-rhino-laryngology, CHRU Bordeaux (France); Fernandez, P. [INCIA UMR-CNRS 5287, Bordeaux (France); Hospital Pellegrin, Department of Nuclear Medicine, CHRU Bordeaux (France); University Bordeaux 2, Bordeaux (France)

    2014-09-23

    Positron emission tomography (PET) with [{sup 18}F]-fluoromisonidazole ([{sup 18}F]-FMISO) provides a non-invasive assessment of hypoxia. The aim of this study is to assess the feasibility of a dose escalation with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) guided by [{sup 18}F]-FMISO-PET for head-and-neck cancers (HNC). Ten patients with inoperable stages III-IV HNC underwent [{sup 18}F]-FMISO-PET before radiotherapy. Hypoxic target volumes (HTV) were segmented automatically by using the fuzzy locally adaptive Bayesian method. Retrospectively, two VMAT plans were generated delivering 70 Gy to the gross tumour volume (GTV) defined on computed tomography simulation or 79.8 Gy to the HTV. A dosimetric comparison was performed, based on calculations of tumour control probability (TCP), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for the parotid glands and uncomplicated tumour control probability (UTCP). The mean hypoxic fraction, defined as the ratio between the HTV and the GTV, was 0.18. The mean average dose for both parotids was 22.7 Gy and 25.5 Gy without and with dose escalation respectively. FMISO-guided dose escalation led to a mean increase of TCP, NTCP for both parotids and UTCP by 18.1, 4.6 and 8 % respectively. A dose escalation up to 79.8 Gy guided by [{sup 18}F]-FMISO-PET with VMAT seems feasible with improvement of TCP and without excessive increase of NTCP for parotids. (orig.) [German] Die Positronenemissionstomographie (PET) mit [{sup 18}F]-Fluoromisonidazol ([{sup 18}F]-FMISO) ermoeglicht eine nichtinvasive Beurteilung der Hypoxie. Ziel dieser Studie ist es, die Durchfuehrbarkeit einer [{sup 18}F]-FMISO-PET-gefuehrten Dosissteigerung bei volumetrisch modulierter Arc-Therapie (VMAT) von Kopf-Hals-Tumoren (KHT) zu bewerten. Zehn Patienten mit inoperablen KHT der Stadien III-IV erhielten vor der Strahlentherapie eine [{sup 18}F]-FMISO-PET. Hypoxische Zielvolumina (HV) wurden automatisch mit Hilfe des FLAB(Fuzzy Locally Adaptive Bayesian

  4. Correlation of hypoxic cell fraction with glucose metabolic rate in gliomas with 18F-Fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) and 18F- Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tauro, A.J.; Scott, A.M.; Hannah, A.; Pathmaraj, K.; Tochon-Danguy, H.; Sachinidis, J.I.; Chan, J.D.; Berlangieri, S.U.; Egan, G.F.; Fabinyi, G.; McKay, W.J.; Cher, L.M.; Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre, Heidelberg, VIC

    1998-01-01

    Full text: FDG-PET studies of brain tumours to measure tumour activity are well established, with regions of higher grade tumour utilising more glucose compared to lower grade tumour tissue and normal tissue. FDG uptake in tumour cells may reflect anaerobic glycolysis, but this has not been proven in- vivo. FMISO is a novel positron-emitting compound that has been shown to selectively identify hypoxic but viable tissue, which may contribute to chemoradiotherapy resistance in tumour cells. Studies correlating measurements of regional hypoxia and glucose activity within brain tumours prior to therapy may help gain further insight into the relationship between hypoxic tumour tissue and resistance to chemoradiotherapy. Three patients with newly diagnosed primary brain tumours have been prospectively studied with FMISO-PET, FDG-PET and MRI, prior to surgery. Each patient presented with a suspected primary brain glioma on MRI, which were all confirmed to be high grade glioma on subsequent histology at surgery FMISO-PET, FDG-PET and MRI images of all patients were co-registered to precisely identify the areas of metabolic activity within tumour and surrounding cortical tissue. All gliomas demonstrated areas of FMISO uptake, which corresponded to areas of maximal FDG uptake, indicating a correlation between hypoxic areas within tumour with areas of increased glucose metabolic activity. This supports the hypothesis that hypoxic areas within tumour tissue may be associated with increased FDG uptake, although whether hypoxia itself increases FDG uptake remains controversial. These correlative studies characterising areas of hypoxia and glucose activity should hopefully assist in future therapeutic manipulations to improve the outcome from treatment of primary brain tumours

  5. Dose prescription and treatment planning based on FMISO-PET hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toma-Dasu, Iuliana; Antonovic, Laura; Uhrdin, Johan; Dasu, Alexandru; Nuyts, Sandra; Dirix, Piet; Haustermans, Karin; Brahme, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. The study presents the implementation of a novel method for incorporating hypoxia information from PET-CT imaging into treatment planning and estimates the efficiency of various optimization approaches. Its focuses on the feasibility of optimizing treatment plans based on the non-linear conversion of PET hypoxia images into radiosensitivity maps from the uptake properties of the tracers used. Material and methods. PET hypoxia images of seven head-and-neck cancer patients were used to determine optimal dose distributions needed to counteract the radiation resistance associated with tumor hypoxia assuming various scenarios regarding the evolution of the hypoxic compartment during the treatment. A research planning system for advanced studies has been used to optimize IMRT plans based on hypoxia information from patient PET images. These resulting plans were compared in terms of target coverage for the same fulfilled constraints regarding the organs at risk. Results. The results of a planning study indicated the clinical feasibility of the proposed method for treatment planning based on PET hypoxia. Antihypoxic strategies would lead to small improvements in all the patients, but higher effects are expected for the fraction of patients with hypoxic tumors. For these, individualization of the treatment based on hypoxia PET imaging could lead to improved treatment outcome while creating the premises for limiting the irradiation of the surrounding normal tissues. Conclusions. The proposed approach offers the possibility of improved treatment results as it takes into consideration the heterogeneity and the dynamics of the hypoxic regions. It also provides early identification of the clinical cases that might benefit from dose escalation as well as the cases that could benefit from other counter-hypoxic measures

  6. Kinetic analysis of dynamic 18F-fluoromisonidazole PET correlates with radiation treatment outcome in head-and-neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulsen Frank

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypoxia compromises local control in patients with head-and-neck cancer (HNC. In order to determine the value of [18F]-fluoromisonidazole (Fmiso with regard to tumor hypoxia, a patient study with dynamic Fmiso PET was performed. For a better understanding of tracer uptake and distribution, a kinetic model was developed to analyze dynamic Fmiso PET data. Methods For 15 HNC patients, dynamic Fmiso PET examinations were performed prior to radiotherapy (RT treatment. The data was analyzed using a two compartment model, which allows the determination of characteristic hypoxia and perfusion values. For different parameters, such as patient age, tumor size and standardized uptake value, the correlation to treatment outcome was tested using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney U-test. Statistical tests were also performed for hypoxia and perfusion parameters determined by the kinetic model and for two different metrics based on these parameters. Results The kinetic Fmiso analysis extracts local hypoxia and perfusion characteristics of a tumor tissue. These parameters are independent quantities. In this study, different types of characteristic hypoxia-perfusion patterns in tumors could be identified. The clinical verification of the results, obtained on the basis of the kinetic analysis, showed a high correlation of hypoxia-perfusion patterns and RT treatment outcome (p = 0.001 for this initial patient group. Conclusion The presented study established, that Fmiso PET scans may benefit from dynamic acquisition and analysis by a kinetic model. The pattern of distribution of perfusion and hypoxia in the tissue is correlated to local control in HNC.

  7. Modelling and simulation of [18F]fluoromisonidazole dynamics based on histology-derived microvessel maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monnich, D.; Troost, E.G.C.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Alber, M.; Thorwarth, D.

    2011-01-01

    Hypoxia can be assessed non-invasively by positron emission tomography (PET) using radiotracers such as [(18)F]fluoromisonidazole (Fmiso) accumulating in poorly oxygenated cells. Typical features of dynamic Fmiso PET data are high signal variability in the first hour after tracer administration and

  8. Pharmacokinetic Analysis of Dynamic 18F-Fluoromisonidazole PET Data in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jazmin; Grkovski, Milan; Rimner, Andreas; Schöder, Heiko; Zanzonico, Pat B; Carlin, Sean D; Staton, Kevin D; Humm, John L; Nehmeh, Sadek A

    2017-06-01

    Hypoxic tumors exhibit increased resistance to radiation, chemical, and immune therapies. 18 F-fluoromisonidazole ( 18 F-FMISO) PET is a noninvasive, quantitative imaging technique used to evaluate the magnitude and spatial distribution of tumor hypoxia. In this study, pharmacokinetic analysis (PKA) of 18 F-FMISO dynamic PET extended to 3 h after injection is reported for the first time, to our knowledge, in stage III-IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods: Sixteen patients diagnosed with NSCLC underwent 2 PET/CT scans (1-3 d apart) before radiation therapy: a 3-min static 18 F-FDG and a dynamic 18 F-FMISO scan lasting 168 ± 15 min. The latter data were acquired in 3 serial PET/CT dynamic imaging sessions, registered with each other and analyzed using pharmacokinetic modeling software. PKA was performed using a 2-tissue, 3-compartment irreversible model, and kinetic parameters were estimated for the volumes of interest determined using coregistered 18 F-FDG images for both the volume of interest-averaged and the voxelwise time-activity curves for each patient's lesions, normal lung, and muscle. Results: We derived average values of 18 F-FMISO kinetic parameters for NSCLC lesions as well as for normal lung and muscle. We also investigated the correlation between the trapping rate ( k 3 ) and delivery rate ( K 1 ), influx rate ( K i ) constants, and tissue-to-blood activity concentration ratios (TBRs) for all tissues. Lesions had trapping rates 1.6 times larger, on average, than those of normal lung and 4.4 times larger than those in muscle. Additionally, for almost all cases, k 3 and K i had a significant strong correlation for all tissue types. The TBR- k 3 correlation was less straightforward, showing a moderate to strong correlation for only 41% of lesions. Finally, K 1 - k 3 voxelwise correlations for tumors were varied, but negative for 76% of lesions, globally exhibiting a weak inverse relationship (average R = -0.23 ± 0.39). However, both

  9. Assessing Biological Response to Bevacizumab Using 18F-Fluoromisonidazole PET/MR Imaging in a Patient with Recurrent Anaplastic Astrocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon F. Barajas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present our initial experience in using single modality fluoromisonidazole (FMISO PET/MR imaging to noninvasively evaluate the biological effects induced by bevacizumab therapy in a patient treated for recurrent high grade glioma. In this index patient, bevacizumab therapy resulted in the development of nonenhancing tumor characterized by reduced diffusion and markedly decreased FMISO uptake in the setting of maintained CBF and CBV. These observations suggest that the dynamic biological interplay between tissue hypoxia and vascular normalization occurring within treated recurrent high grade glioma can be captured utilizing FMISO PET/MR imaging.

  10. Event-by-Event Continuous Respiratory Motion Correction for Dynamic PET Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yunhan; Chan, Chung; Ma, Tianyu; Liu, Yaqiang; Gallezot, Jean-Dominique; Naganawa, Mika; Kelada, Olivia J; Germino, Mary; Sinusas, Albert J; Carson, Richard E; Liu, Chi

    2016-07-01

    Existing respiratory motion-correction methods are applied only to static PET imaging. We have previously developed an event-by-event respiratory motion-correction method with correlations between internal organ motion and external respiratory signals (INTEX). This method is uniquely appropriate for dynamic imaging because it corrects motion for each time point. In this study, we applied INTEX to human dynamic PET studies with various tracers and investigated the impact on kinetic parameter estimation. The use of 3 tracers-a myocardial perfusion tracer, (82)Rb (n = 7); a pancreatic β-cell tracer, (18)F-FP(+)DTBZ (n = 4); and a tumor hypoxia tracer, (18)F-fluoromisonidazole ((18)F-FMISO) (n = 1)-was investigated in a study of 12 human subjects. Both rest and stress studies were performed for (82)Rb. The Anzai belt system was used to record respiratory motion. Three-dimensional internal organ motion in high temporal resolution was calculated by INTEX to guide event-by-event respiratory motion correction of target organs in each dynamic frame. Time-activity curves of regions of interest drawn based on end-expiration PET images were obtained. For (82)Rb studies, K1 was obtained with a 1-tissue model using a left-ventricle input function. Rest-stress myocardial blood flow (MBF) and coronary flow reserve (CFR) were determined. For (18)F-FP(+)DTBZ studies, the total volume of distribution was estimated with arterial input functions using the multilinear analysis 1 method. For the (18)F-FMISO study, the net uptake rate Ki was obtained with a 2-tissue irreversible model using a left-ventricle input function. All parameters were compared with the values derived without motion correction. With INTEX, K1 and MBF increased by 10% ± 12% and 15% ± 19%, respectively, for (82)Rb stress studies. CFR increased by 19% ± 21%. For studies with motion amplitudes greater than 8 mm (n = 3), K1, MBF, and CFR increased by 20% ± 12%, 30% ± 20%, and 34% ± 23%, respectively. For (82)Rb

  11. 18F-Fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) as a molecular marker of hypoxia in non small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathmaraj, K.; Foo, S.; Sachinidis, J.; Scott, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: FMISO is a hypoxic marker with the potential ability to predict tumour resistance to chemoradiation. We present preliminary findings from pilot studies to determine the significance of FMISO Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in NSCLC. We are currently studying 2 cohorts of patients with NSCLC and a case study will be presented from each cohort. Patients in the first cohort have surgically resectable tumours: we aim to evaluate the extent of intratumoural hypoxia preoperatively and then validate and correlate this at a molecular level. Patients in the second cohort have locally advanced disease being treated with radiotherapy and will have pretreatment and sequential FMISO-PET scans. Mr GH, a 51 year old man presented with a suspicious lesion in the right upper lobe of the lung. Biopsy was non diagnostic and a FDG-PET scan showed a hypermetabolic focus in the right upper lobe highly indicative of malignancy. The FMISO-PET scan showed a small hypoxic area in the right upper lobe of the lung. The FDG-PET and FMISO-PET images were coregistered and the hypoxic focus correlated well with the hypermetabolic FDG focus. Wedge resection demonstrated moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Mr JS was a 61-year-old male with stage III inoperable NSCLC. CT scan showed extensive disease around the left lung hilum with mediastinal lymphadenopathy. The FDG-PET scan showed metabolic findings consistent with a large necrotic malignancy in the left lung with left hilar and mediastinal nodal involvement. FMISO uptake was observed in the left lung hilum corresponding to the areas of FDG uptake. A subsequent FMISO-PET study midway through his radiotherapy showed decreased tracer concentration in the left hilar region with a suggestion of cystic changes inferiorly to the hilum. To our knowledge, there has been no correlation of FMISO-PET studies with molecular markers of hypoxia. This pilot study will be important in confirming FMISO-PET studies as a feasible non invasive

  12. Hypoxia-imaging with 18F-Misonidazole and PET: Changes of kinetics during radiotherapy of head-and-neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eschmann, Susanne Martina; Paulsen, Frank; Bedeshem, Claudia; Machulla, Hans-Juergen; Hehr, Thomas; Bamberg, Michael; Bares, Roland

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: PET with 18 F-Misonidazole (FMISO-PET) is a non-invasive method for measuring tumor hypoxia. We analysed changes of FMISO-uptake during radiotherapy and their impact on patient outcome. Materials and methods: Fourteen patients with HNC underwent repeated FMISO-PET prior to radiotherapy and after 30 Gy. Dynamic and static PET-scans (2 + 4 h p.i.) were acquired. FMISO-uptake was quantified by calculating standard uptake values (SUV) and tumor-muscle-ratios (TMR). Kinetic curve types representing tissue hypoxia were defined. Change of curve type was correlated with patient outcome. Results: The mean SUV 4 h p.i. and the TMR decreased significantly during radiotherapy. SUV decreased clearly in 12/14 patients, and increased in 2 patients. TMR decreased in 11 patients, and increased in 3 patients. Prior to radiotherapy, three different shapes of kinetic curve types indicative for the degree of hypoxia could be defined in 12/14 patients: (1) accumulation type (severe hypoxia (n = 8)) (2) intermediate type (intermediate degree of hypoxia (n = 3)), and (3) wash-out type (low degree of hypoxia (n = 1)). Curve type changed towards a lower degree of hypoxia at 30 Gy in all but 3 patients. In three patients curve type remained unchanged. Conclusions: The changes in tumor FMISO-uptake during radiotherapy indicate radio-induced reoxygenation

  13. Analysis of pairwise correlations in multi-parametric PET/MR data for biological tumor characterization and treatment individualization strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leibfarth, Sara; Moennich, David; Thorwarth, Daniela [University Hospital Tuebingen, Section for Biomedical Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Tuebingen (Germany); Simoncic, Urban [University Hospital Tuebingen, Section for Biomedical Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Tuebingen (Germany); University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Welz, Stefan; Zips, Daniel [University Hospital Tuebingen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Tuebingen (Germany); Schmidt, Holger; Schwenzer, Nina [University Hospital Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    The aim of this pilot study was to explore simultaneous functional PET/MR for biological characterization of tumors and potential future treatment adaptations. To investigate the extent of complementarity between different PET/MR-based functional datasets, a pairwise correlation analysis was performed. Functional datasets of N=15 head and neck (HN) cancer patients were evaluated. For patients of group A (N=7), combined PET/MR datasets including FDG-PET and ADC maps were available. Patients of group B (N=8) had FMISO-PET, DCE-MRI and ADC maps from combined PET/MRI, an additional dynamic FMISO-PET/CT acquired directly after FMISO tracer injection as well as an FDG-PET/CT acquired a few days earlier. From DCE-MR, parameter maps K{sup trans}, v{sub e} and v{sub p} were obtained with the extended Tofts model. Moreover, parameter maps of mean DCE enhancement, ΔS{sub DCE}, and mean FMISO signal 0-4 min p.i., anti A{sub FMISO}, were derived. Pairwise correlations were quantified using the Spearman correlation coefficient (r) on both a voxel and a regional level within the gross tumor volume. Between some pairs of functional imaging modalities moderate correlations were observed with respect to the median over all patient datasets, whereas distinct correlations were only present on an individual basis. Highest inter-modality median correlations on the voxel level were obtained for FDG/FMISO (r = 0.56), FDG/ anti A{sub FMISO} (r = 0.55), anti A{sub FMISO}/ΔS{sub DCE} (r = 0.46), and FDG/ADC (r = -0.39). Correlations on the regional level showed comparable results. The results of this study suggest that the examined functional datasets provide complementary information. However, only pairwise correlations were examined, and correlations could still exist between combinations of three or more datasets. These results might contribute to the future design of individually adapted treatment approaches based on multiparametric functional imaging.

  14. WE-AB-202-11: Radiobiological Modeling of Tumor Response During Radiotherapy Based On Pre-Treatment Dynamic PET Imaging Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crispin-Ortuzar, M; Grkovski, M; Beattie, B; Lee, N; Riaz, N; Humm, J; Jeong, J; Fontanella, A; Deasy, J [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the ability of a multiscale radiobiological model of tumor response to predict mid-treatment hypoxia images, based on pretreatment imaging of perfusion and hypoxia with [18-F]FMISO dynamic PET and glucose metabolism with [18-F]FDG PET. Methods: A mechanistic tumor control probability (TCP) radiobiological model describing the interplay between tumor cell proliferation and hypoxia (Jeong et al., PMB 2013) was extended to account for intra-tumor nutrient heterogeneity, dynamic cell migration due to nutrient gradients, and stromal cells. This extended model was tested on 10 head and neck cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy, randomly drawn from a larger MSKCC protocol involving baseline and mid-therapy dynamic PET scans. For each voxel, initial fractions of proliferative and hypoxic tumor cells were obtained by finding an approximate solution to a system of linear equations relating cell fractions to voxel-level FDG uptake, perfusion (FMISO K{sub 1}) and hypoxia (FMISO k{sub 3}). The TCP model then predicted their evolution over time up until the mid treatment scan. Finally, the linear model was reapplied to predict each lesion’s median hypoxia level (k{sub 3}[med,sim]) which in turn was compared to the FMISO k{sub 3}[med] measured at mid-therapy. Results: The average k3[med] of the tumors in pre-treatment scans was 0.0035 min{sup −1}, with an inter-tumor standard deviation of σ[pre]=0.0034 min{sup −1}. The initial simulated k{sub 3}[med,sim] of each tumor agreed with the corresponding measurements within 0.1σ[pre]. In 7 out of 10 lesions, the mid-treatment k{sub 3}[med,sim] prediction agreed with the data within 0.3σ[pre]. The remaining cases corresponded to the most extreme relative changes in k{sub 3}[med]. Conclusion: This work presents a method to personalize the prediction of a TCP model using pre-treatment kinetic imaging data, and validates the modeling of radiotherapy response by predicting changes in median hypoxia

  15. Validation of an HPLC method for determination of chemical purity of [18F]fluoromisonidazole ([18F]FMISO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, Natalia C.E.S.; Oliveira, Mércia L.; Lima, Fernando R.A.; Silveira, Marina B.; Ferreira, Soraya Z.; Silva, Juliana B.

    2017-01-01

    [ 18 F]Fluoromisonidazole ([ 18 F]FMISO) is a nitroimidazole derivative labelled with fluorine-18 that selectively binds to hypoxic cells. It has been shown to be a suitable PET tracer for imaging hypoxia in tumors as well as in noncancerous tissues. [ 18 F]FMISO was prepared using a TRACERlabMX FDG ® module (GE) with cassettes, software sequence and reagents kits from ABX. In this work, we aimed to develop and to validate a new high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for determination of chemical purity of [ 18 F]FMISO. Analyses were performed with an Agilent chromatograph equipped with radioactivity and UV detectors. [ 18 F]FMISO and impurities were separated on a C18 column by gradient elution with water and acetonitrile. Selectivity, linearity, detection limit (DL), quantification limit (LQ), precision, accuracy and robustness were assessed to demonstrate that the HPLC method is adequate for its intended purpose. The HPLC method showed a good precision, as all RSD values were lower than 5%. Robustness was evaluated considering a variation on parameters such mobile phase gradient and flow rate. Results evidenced that the HPLC method is validated and is suitable for radiochemical purity evaluation of [ 18 F]FMISO, considering operational conditions of our laboratory. As an extension of this work, other analytical methods used for [ 18 F]FMISO quality control should be evaluated, in compliance with good manufacture practice. (author)

  16. Decay correction methods in dynamic PET studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K.; Reiman, E.; Lawson, M.

    1995-01-01

    In order to reconstruct positron emission tomography (PET) images in quantitative dynamic studies, the data must be corrected for radioactive decay. One of the two commonly used methods ignores physiological processes including blood flow that occur at the same time as radioactive decay; the other makes incorrect use of time-accumulated PET counts. In simulated dynamic PET studies using 11 C-acetate and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), these methods are shown to result in biased estimates of the time-activity curve (TAC) and model parameters. New methods described in this article provide significantly improved parameter estimates in dynamic PET studies

  17. Noninvasive Multimodality Imaging of the Tumor Microenvironment: Registered Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Positron Emission Tomography Studies of a Preclinical Tumor Model of Tumor Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HyungJoon Cho

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In vivo knowledge of the spatial distribution of viable, necrotic, and hypoxic areas can provide prognostic information about the risk of developing metastases and regional radiation sensitivity and may be used potentially for localized dose escalation in radiation treatment. In this study, multimodality in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and positron emission tomography (PET imaging using stereotactic fiduciary markers in the Dunning R3327AT prostate tumor were performed, focusing on the relationship between dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE MRI using Magnevist (Gd-DTPA and dynamic 18F-fluoromisonidazole (18F-Fmiso PET. The noninvasive measurements were verified using tumor tissue sections stained for hematoxylin/eosin and pimonidazole. To further validate the relationship between 18F-Fmiso and pimonidazole uptake, 18F digital autoradiography was performed on a selected tumor and compared with the corresponding pimonidazole-stained slices. The comparison of Akep values (kep = rate constant of movement of Gd-DTPA between the interstitial space and plasma and A = amplitude in the two-compartment model (Hoffmann U, Brix G, Knopp MV, Hess T and Lorenz WJ (1995. Magn Reson Med 33, 506– 514 derived from DCE-MRI studies and from early 18F-Fmiso uptake PET studies showed that tumor vasculature is a major determinant of early 18F-Fmiso uptake. A negative correlation between the spatial map of Akep and the slope map of late (last 1 hour of the dynamic PET scan 18F-Fmiso uptake was observed. The relationships between DCE-MRI and hematoxylin/eosin slices and between 18F-Fmiso PET and pimonidazole slices confirm the validity of MRI/PET measurements to image the tumor microenvironment and to identify regions of tumor necrosis, hypoxia, and well-perfused tissue.

  18. Modelling and simulation of [18F]fluoromisonidazole dynamics based on histology-derived microvessel maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mönnich, David; Troost, Esther G. C.; Kaanders, Johannes H. A. M.; Oyen, Wim J. G.; Alber, Markus; Thorwarth, Daniela

    2011-04-01

    Hypoxia can be assessed non-invasively by positron emission tomography (PET) using radiotracers such as [18F]fluoromisonidazole (Fmiso) accumulating in poorly oxygenated cells. Typical features of dynamic Fmiso PET data are high signal variability in the first hour after tracer administration and slow formation of a consistent contrast. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether these characteristics can be explained by the current conception of the underlying microscopic processes and to identify fundamental effects. This is achieved by modelling and simulating tissue oxygenation and tracer dynamics on the microscopic scale. In simulations, vessel structures on histology-derived maps act as sources and sinks for oxygen as well as tracer molecules. Molecular distributions in the extravascular space are determined by reaction-diffusion equations, which are solved numerically using a two-dimensional finite element method. Simulated Fmiso time activity curves (TACs), though not directly comparable to PET TACs, reproduce major characteristics of clinical curves, indicating that the microscopic model and the parameter values are adequate. Evidence for dependence of the early PET signal on the vascular fraction is found. Further, possible effects leading to late contrast formation and potential implications on the quantification of Fmiso PET data are discussed.

  19. Dynamic observation by PET in epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Ishijima, Buichi; Iio, Masaaki.

    1990-01-01

    Before the era when positron emission tomography (PET) has emerged, much controversy has existed concerning regional cerebral blood flow in partial epilepsy. In 1979, PET revealed that cerebral blood flow is decreased during the interictal period, but is remarkably increased in the intraictal phase. In this paper, historical process of dynamic observation in epilepsy is reviewed. Potential use and limitations of PET in the clinical setting are discussed in view of the scanning methods and the relationships between PET and electroencephalograms, magnetic resonance imaging, and surgical treatment. (N.K.) 106 refs

  20. Validation of an HPLC method for determination of chemical purity of [{sup 18}F]fluoromisonidazole ([{sup 18}F]FMISO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Natalia C.E.S.; Oliveira, Mércia L.; Lima, Fernando R.A., E-mail: nataliafleming@hotmail.com, E-mail: mercial@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciências Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Silveira, Marina B.; Ferreira, Soraya Z.; Silva, Juliana B., E-mail: mbs@cdtn.br, E-mail: zandims@cdtn.br, E-mail: silvajb@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    [{sup 18}F]Fluoromisonidazole ([{sup 18}F]FMISO) is a nitroimidazole derivative labelled with fluorine-18 that selectively binds to hypoxic cells. It has been shown to be a suitable PET tracer for imaging hypoxia in tumors as well as in noncancerous tissues. [{sup 18}F]FMISO was prepared using a TRACERlabMX{sub FDG}® module (GE) with cassettes, software sequence and reagents kits from ABX. In this work, we aimed to develop and to validate a new high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for determination of chemical purity of [{sup 18}F]FMISO. Analyses were performed with an Agilent chromatograph equipped with radioactivity and UV detectors. [{sup 18}F]FMISO and impurities were separated on a C18 column by gradient elution with water and acetonitrile. Selectivity, linearity, detection limit (DL), quantification limit (LQ), precision, accuracy and robustness were assessed to demonstrate that the HPLC method is adequate for its intended purpose. The HPLC method showed a good precision, as all RSD values were lower than 5%. Robustness was evaluated considering a variation on parameters such mobile phase gradient and flow rate. Results evidenced that the HPLC method is validated and is suitable for radiochemical purity evaluation of [{sup 18}F]FMISO, considering operational conditions of our laboratory. As an extension of this work, other analytical methods used for [{sup 18}F]FMISO quality control should be evaluated, in compliance with good manufacture practice. (author)

  1. Dynamic neurotransmitter interactions measured with PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiffer, W.K.; Dewey, S.L.

    2001-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become a valuable interdisciplinary tool for understanding physiological, biochemical and pharmacological functions at a molecular level in living humans, whether in a healthy or diseased state. The utility of tracing chemical activity through the body transcends the fields of cardiology, oncology, neurology and psychiatry. In this, PET techniques span radiochemistry and radiopharmaceutical development to instrumentation, image analysis, anatomy and modeling. PET has made substantial contributions in each of these fields by providing a,venue for mapping dynamic functions of healthy and unhealthy human anatomy. As diverse as the disciplines it bridges, PET has provided insight into an equally significant variety of psychiatric disorders. Using the unique quantitative ability of PET, researchers are now better able to non-invasively characterize normally occurring neurotransmitter interactions in the brain. With the knowledge that these interactions provide the fundamental basis for brain response, many investigators have recently focused their efforts on an examination of the communication between these chemicals in both healthy volunteers and individuals suffering from diseases classically defined as neurotransmitter specific in nature. In addition, PET can measure the biochemical dynamics of acute and sustained drug abuse. Thus, PET studies of neurotransmitter interactions enable investigators to describe a multitude of specific functional interactions in the human brain. This information can then be applied to understanding side effects that occur in response to acute and chronic drug therapy, and to designing new drugs that target multiple systems as opposed to single receptor types. Knowledge derived from PET studies can be applied to drug discovery, research and development (for review, see (Fowler et al., 1999) and (Burns et al., 1999)). Here, we will cover the most substantial contributions of PET to understanding

  2. Dynamic neurotransmitter interactions measured with PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiffer, W.K.; Dewey, S.L.

    2001-04-02

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become a valuable interdisciplinary tool for understanding physiological, biochemical and pharmacological functions at a molecular level in living humans, whether in a healthy or diseased state. The utility of tracing chemical activity through the body transcends the fields of cardiology, oncology, neurology and psychiatry. In this, PET techniques span radiochemistry and radiopharmaceutical development to instrumentation, image analysis, anatomy and modeling. PET has made substantial contributions in each of these fields by providing a,venue for mapping dynamic functions of healthy and unhealthy human anatomy. As diverse as the disciplines it bridges, PET has provided insight into an equally significant variety of psychiatric disorders. Using the unique quantitative ability of PET, researchers are now better able to non-invasively characterize normally occurring neurotransmitter interactions in the brain. With the knowledge that these interactions provide the fundamental basis for brain response, many investigators have recently focused their efforts on an examination of the communication between these chemicals in both healthy volunteers and individuals suffering from diseases classically defined as neurotransmitter specific in nature. In addition, PET can measure the biochemical dynamics of acute and sustained drug abuse. Thus, PET studies of neurotransmitter interactions enable investigators to describe a multitude of specific functional interactions in the human brain. This information can then be applied to understanding side effects that occur in response to acute and chronic drug therapy, and to designing new drugs that target multiple systems as opposed to single receptor types. Knowledge derived from PET studies can be applied to drug discovery, research and development (for review, see (Fowler et al., 1999) and (Burns et al., 1999)). Here, we will cover the most substantial contributions of PET to understanding

  3. Blind source separation analysis of PET dynamic data: a simple method with exciting MR-PET applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oros-Peusquens, Ana-Maria; Silva, Nuno da [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Weiss, Carolin [Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital Cologne, 50924 Cologne (Germany); Stoffels, Gabrielle; Herzog, Hans; Langen, Karl J [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Shah, N Jon [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA) - Section JARA-Brain RWTH Aachen University, 52074 Aachen (Germany)

    2014-07-29

    Denoising of dynamic PET data improves parameter imaging by PET and is gaining momentum. This contribution describes an analysis of dynamic PET data by blind source separation methods and comparison of the results with MR-based brain properties.

  4. Effects of regularisation priors on dynamic PET Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldeira, Liliana; Scheins, Juergen; Silva, Nuno da; Gaens, Michaela; Shah, N Jon

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic PET provides temporal information about tracer uptake. However, each PET frame has usually low statistics, resulting in noisy images. The goal is to study effects of prior regularisation on dynamic PET data. Quantification and noise in image-domain and time-domain as well as impact on parametric images is assessed.

  5. TU-AB-202-11: Tumor Segmentation by Fusion of Multi-Tracer PET Images Using Copula Based Statistical Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapuyade-Lahorgue, J; Ruan, S; Li, H; Vera, P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Multi-tracer PET imaging is getting more attention in radiotherapy by providing additional tumor volume information such as glucose and oxygenation. However, automatic PET-based tumor segmentation is still a very challenging problem. We propose a statistical fusion approach to joint segment the sub-area of tumors from the two tracers FDG and FMISO PET images. Methods: Non-standardized Gamma distributions are convenient to model intensity distributions in PET. As a serious correlation exists in multi-tracer PET images, we proposed a new fusion method based on copula which is capable to represent dependency between different tracers. The Hidden Markov Field (HMF) model is used to represent spatial relationship between PET image voxels and statistical dynamics of intensities for each modality. Real PET images of five patients with FDG and FMISO are used to evaluate quantitatively and qualitatively our method. A comparison between individual and multi-tracer segmentations was conducted to show advantages of the proposed fusion method. Results: The segmentation results show that fusion with Gaussian copula can receive high Dice coefficient of 0.84 compared to that of 0.54 and 0.3 of monomodal segmentation results based on individual segmentation of FDG and FMISO PET images. In addition, high correlation coefficients (0.75 to 0.91) for the Gaussian copula for all five testing patients indicates the dependency between tumor regions in the multi-tracer PET images. Conclusion: This study shows that using multi-tracer PET imaging can efficiently improve the segmentation of tumor region where hypoxia and glucidic consumption are present at the same time. Introduction of copulas for modeling the dependency between two tracers can simultaneously take into account information from both tracers and deal with two pathological phenomena. Future work will be to consider other families of copula such as spherical and archimedian copulas, and to eliminate partial volume

  6. Synthesis of [18F]FMISO in a flow-through microfluidic reactor: Development and clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Ming-Qiang; Collier, Lee; Bois, Frederic; Kelada, Olivia J.; Hammond, Kelvin; Ropchan, Jim; Akula, Murthy R.; Carlson, David J.; Kabalka, George W.; Huang, Yiyun

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The PET radiotracer [ 18 F]FMISO has been used in the clinic to image hypoxia in tumors. The aim of the present study was to optimize the radiochemical parameters for the preparation of [ 18 F]FMISO using a microfluidic reaction system. The main parameters evaluated were (1) precursor concentration, (2) reaction temperature, and (3) flow rate through the microfluidic reactor. Optimized conditions were then applied to the batch production of [ 18 F]FMISO for clinical research use. Methods: For the determination of optimal reaction conditions within a flow-through microreactor synthesizer, 5–400 μL the precursor and dried [ 18 F]fluoride solutions in acetonitrile were simultaneously pushed through the temperature-controlled reactor (60–180 °C) with defined flow rates (20–120 μL/min). Radiochemical incorporation yields to form the intermediate species were determined using radio-TLC. Hydrolysis to remove the protecting group was performed following standard vial chemistry to afford [ 18 F]FMISO. Results: Optimum reaction parameters for the microfluidic set-up were determined as follows: 4 mg/mL of precursor, 170 °C, and 100 μL/min pump rate per reactant (200 μL/min reaction overall flow rate) to prepare the radiolabeled intermediate. The optimum hydrolysis condition was determined to be 2 N HCl for 5 min at 100 °C. Large-scale batch production using the optimized conditions gave the final, ready for human injection [ 18 F]FMISO product in 28.4 ± 3.0% radiochemical yield, specific activity of 119 ± 26 GBq/μmol, and > 99% radiochemical and chemical purity at the end of synthesis (n = 4). Conclusion: By using the NanoTek microfluidic synthesis system, [ 18 F]FMISO was successfully prepared with good specific activity and high radiochemical purity for human use. The product generated from large-scale batch production using flow chemistry is currently being used in clinical research

  7. Modelling and simulation of the influence of acute and chronic hypoxia on [18F]fluoromisonidazole PET imaging.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monnich, D.; Troost, E.G.C.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Alber, M.; Thorwarth, D.

    2012-01-01

    Tumour hypoxia can be assessed by positron emission tomography (PET) using radiotracers like [(18)F]fluoromisonidazole (Fmiso). The purpose of this work was to independently investigate the influence of chronic and acute hypoxia on the retention of Fmiso on the microscale. This was approached by

  8. Correlation of FMISO simulations with pimonidazole-stained tumor xenografts: A question of O{sub 2} consumption?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wack, L. J., E-mail: linda-jacqueline.wack@med.uni-tuebingen.de; Thorwarth, D. [Section for Biomedical Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Tübingen, Tübingen 72076 (Germany); Mönnich, D. [Section for Biomedical Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Tübingen, Tübingen 72076 (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Tübingen 72076 (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69121 (Germany); Yaromina, A. [OncoRay—National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden 01309, Germany and Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW—School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht 6229 ET (Netherlands); Zips, D. [German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Tübingen 72076 (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69121 (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Tübingen, Tübingen 72076 (Germany); and others

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: To compare a dedicated simulation model for hypoxia PET against tumor microsections stained for different parameters of the tumor microenvironment. The model can readily be adapted to a variety of conditions, such as different human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) xenograft tumors. Methods: Nine different HNSCC tumor models were transplanted subcutaneously into nude mice. Tumors were excised and immunoflourescently labeled with pimonidazole, Hoechst 33342, and CD31, providing information on hypoxia, perfusion, and vessel distribution, respectively. Hoechst and CD31 images were used to generate maps of perfused blood vessels on which tissue oxygenation and the accumulation of the hypoxia tracer FMISO were mathematically simulated. The model includes a Michaelis–Menten relation to describe the oxygen consumption inside tissue. The maximum oxygen consumption rate M{sub 0} was chosen as the parameter for a tumor-specific optimization as it strongly influences tracer distribution. M{sub 0} was optimized on each tumor slice to reach optimum correlations between FMISO concentration 4 h postinjection and pimonidazole staining intensity. Results: After optimization, high pixel-based correlations up to R{sup 2} = 0.85 were found for individual tissue sections. Experimental pimonidazole images and FMISO simulations showed good visual agreement, confirming the validity of the approach. Median correlations per tumor model varied significantly (p < 0.05), with R{sup 2} ranging from 0.20 to 0.54. The optimum maximum oxygen consumption rate M{sub 0} differed significantly (p < 0.05) between tumor models, ranging from 2.4 to 5.2 mm Hg/s. Conclusions: It is feasible to simulate FMISO distributions that match the pimonidazole retention patterns observed in vivo. Good agreement was obtained for multiple tumor models by optimizing the oxygen consumption rate, M{sub 0}, whose optimum value differed significantly between tumor models.

  9. Quantitative assessment of dynamic PET imaging data in cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzi, Mark; O'Sullivan, Finbarr; Mankoff, David A; Doot, Robert K; Pierce, Larry A; Kurland, Brenda F; Linden, Hannah M; Kinahan, Paul E

    2012-11-01

    Clinical imaging in positron emission tomography (PET) is often performed using single-time-point estimates of tracer uptake or static imaging that provides a spatial map of regional tracer concentration. However, dynamic tracer imaging can provide considerably more information about in vivo biology by delineating both the temporal and spatial pattern of tracer uptake. In addition, several potential sources of error that occur in static imaging can be mitigated. This review focuses on the application of dynamic PET imaging to measuring regional cancer biologic features and especially in using dynamic PET imaging for quantitative therapeutic response monitoring for cancer clinical trials. Dynamic PET imaging output parameters, particularly transport (flow) and overall metabolic rate, have provided imaging end points for clinical trials at single-center institutions for years. However, dynamic imaging poses many challenges for multicenter clinical trial implementations from cross-center calibration to the inadequacy of a common informatics infrastructure. Underlying principles and methodology of PET dynamic imaging are first reviewed, followed by an examination of current approaches to dynamic PET image analysis with a specific case example of dynamic fluorothymidine imaging to illustrate the approach. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Dynamic dual-tracer PET reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Liu, Huafeng; Jian, Yiqiang; Shi, Pengcheng

    2009-01-01

    Although of important medical implications, simultaneous dual-tracer positron emission tomography reconstruction remains a challenging problem, primarily because the photon measurements from dual tracers are overlapped. In this paper, we propose a simultaneous dynamic dual-tracer reconstruction of tissue activity maps based on guidance from tracer kinetics. The dual-tracer reconstruction problem is formulated in a state-space representation, where parallel compartment models serve as continuous-time system equation describing the tracer kinetic processes of dual tracers, and the imaging data is expressed as discrete sampling of the system states in measurement equation. The image reconstruction problem has therefore become a state estimation problem in a continuous-discrete hybrid paradigm, and H infinity filtering is adopted as the estimation strategy. As H infinity filtering makes no assumptions on the system and measurement statistics, robust reconstruction results can be obtained for the dual-tracer PET imaging system where the statistical properties of measurement data and system uncertainty are not available a priori, even when there are disturbances in the kinetic parameters. Experimental results on digital phantoms, Monte Carlo simulations and physical phantoms have demonstrated the superior performance.

  11. Improvement of the local control of spinal chordomas treated by surgery and targeted irradiation (CyberKnife{sup R}) on hypoxic cells marked with {sup 18}F-FMiso; Amelioration du controle local des chordomes du rachis traites par chirurgie et une irradiation (CyberKnife{sup R}) ciblee sur les cellules hypoxiques marquees au {sup 18}F-FMiso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mammar, H.; Kerrou, K.; Bondiau, P.Y.; Angellier, G.; Thariat, J.; Benezery, K.; Heroult, J.; Leysalle, A.; Gerard, J.P. [Centre Antoine-Lacassagne, Nice (France); Talbot, J.N. [Service de medecine nucleaire, Hopital Tenon, AP-HP, Paris (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report and comment the treatment of two women suffering from a recurring cervical spine chordoma. Each patient had a first PET (positron emission tomography) with {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose to assess the hyper-metabolic component and PET with {sup 18}F-FMiso to quantify the hypoxic component within the lesion. This last PET allows a non-invasive quantification of the hypoxic component which is potentially radio-resistant in cervical spine chordomas. It also allows an intelligent dose increase to improve the local control rate. Short communication

  12. Non-local means denoising of dynamic PET images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyita Dutta

    Full Text Available Dynamic positron emission tomography (PET, which reveals information about both the spatial distribution and temporal kinetics of a radiotracer, enables quantitative interpretation of PET data. Model-based interpretation of dynamic PET images by means of parametric fitting, however, is often a challenging task due to high levels of noise, thus necessitating a denoising step. The objective of this paper is to develop and characterize a denoising framework for dynamic PET based on non-local means (NLM.NLM denoising computes weighted averages of voxel intensities assigning larger weights to voxels that are similar to a given voxel in terms of their local neighborhoods or patches. We introduce three key modifications to tailor the original NLM framework to dynamic PET. Firstly, we derive similarities from less noisy later time points in a typical PET acquisition to denoise the entire time series. Secondly, we use spatiotemporal patches for robust similarity computation. Finally, we use a spatially varying smoothing parameter based on a local variance approximation over each spatiotemporal patch.To assess the performance of our denoising technique, we performed a realistic simulation on a dynamic digital phantom based on the Digimouse atlas. For experimental validation, we denoised [Formula: see text] PET images from a mouse study and a hepatocellular carcinoma patient study. We compared the performance of NLM denoising with four other denoising approaches - Gaussian filtering, PCA, HYPR, and conventional NLM based on spatial patches.The simulation study revealed significant improvement in bias-variance performance achieved using our NLM technique relative to all the other methods. The experimental data analysis revealed that our technique leads to clear improvement in contrast-to-noise ratio in Patlak parametric images generated from denoised preclinical and clinical dynamic images, indicating its ability to preserve image contrast and high

  13. Non-local means denoising of dynamic PET images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Joyita; Leahy, Richard M; Li, Quanzheng

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic positron emission tomography (PET), which reveals information about both the spatial distribution and temporal kinetics of a radiotracer, enables quantitative interpretation of PET data. Model-based interpretation of dynamic PET images by means of parametric fitting, however, is often a challenging task due to high levels of noise, thus necessitating a denoising step. The objective of this paper is to develop and characterize a denoising framework for dynamic PET based on non-local means (NLM). NLM denoising computes weighted averages of voxel intensities assigning larger weights to voxels that are similar to a given voxel in terms of their local neighborhoods or patches. We introduce three key modifications to tailor the original NLM framework to dynamic PET. Firstly, we derive similarities from less noisy later time points in a typical PET acquisition to denoise the entire time series. Secondly, we use spatiotemporal patches for robust similarity computation. Finally, we use a spatially varying smoothing parameter based on a local variance approximation over each spatiotemporal patch. To assess the performance of our denoising technique, we performed a realistic simulation on a dynamic digital phantom based on the Digimouse atlas. For experimental validation, we denoised [Formula: see text] PET images from a mouse study and a hepatocellular carcinoma patient study. We compared the performance of NLM denoising with four other denoising approaches - Gaussian filtering, PCA, HYPR, and conventional NLM based on spatial patches. The simulation study revealed significant improvement in bias-variance performance achieved using our NLM technique relative to all the other methods. The experimental data analysis revealed that our technique leads to clear improvement in contrast-to-noise ratio in Patlak parametric images generated from denoised preclinical and clinical dynamic images, indicating its ability to preserve image contrast and high intensity details while

  14. 4D PET iterative deconvolution with spatiotemporal regularization for quantitative dynamic PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilhac, Anthonin; Charil, Arnaud; Wimberley, Catriona; Angelis, Georgios; Hamze, Hasar; Callaghan, Paul; Garcia, Marie-Paule; Boisson, Frederic; Ryder, Will; Meikle, Steven R; Gregoire, Marie-Claude

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative measurements in dynamic PET imaging are usually limited by the poor counting statistics particularly in short dynamic frames and by the low spatial resolution of the detection system, resulting in partial volume effects (PVEs). In this work, we present a fast and easy to implement method for the restoration of dynamic PET images that have suffered from both PVE and noise degradation. It is based on a weighted least squares iterative deconvolution approach of the dynamic PET image with spatial and temporal regularization. Using simulated dynamic [(11)C] Raclopride PET data with controlled biological variations in the striata between scans, we showed that the restoration method provides images which exhibit less noise and better contrast between emitting structures than the original images. In addition, the method is able to recover the true time activity curve in the striata region with an error below 3% while it was underestimated by more than 20% without correction. As a result, the method improves the accuracy and reduces the variability of the kinetic parameter estimates calculated from the corrected images. More importantly it increases the accuracy (from less than 66% to more than 95%) of measured biological variations as well as their statistical detectivity. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Dynamic-compliance and viscosity of PET and PEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weick, Brian L.

    2016-01-01

    Complex dynamic-compliance and in-phase dynamic-viscosity data are presented and analyzed for PET and PEN advanced polyester substrates used for magnetic tapes. Frequency-temperature superposition is used to predict long-term behavior. Temperature and frequency ranges for the primary glass transition and secondary transitions are discussed and compared for PET and PEN. Shift factors from frequency-temperature superposition are used to determine activation energies for the transitions, and WLF parameters are determined for the polyester substrates.

  16. Dynamic-compliance and viscosity of PET and PEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weick, Brian L. [School of Engineering and Computer Science, University of the Pacific, Stockton, California, 95211 (United States)

    2016-05-18

    Complex dynamic-compliance and in-phase dynamic-viscosity data are presented and analyzed for PET and PEN advanced polyester substrates used for magnetic tapes. Frequency-temperature superposition is used to predict long-term behavior. Temperature and frequency ranges for the primary glass transition and secondary transitions are discussed and compared for PET and PEN. Shift factors from frequency-temperature superposition are used to determine activation energies for the transitions, and WLF parameters are determined for the polyester substrates.

  17. Dynamic-compliance and viscosity of PET and PEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weick, Brian L.

    2016-05-01

    Complex dynamic-compliance and in-phase dynamic-viscosity data are presented and analyzed for PET and PEN advanced polyester substrates used for magnetic tapes. Frequency-temperature superposition is used to predict long-term behavior. Temperature and frequency ranges for the primary glass transition and secondary transitions are discussed and compared for PET and PEN. Shift factors from frequency-temperature superposition are used to determine activation energies for the transitions, and WLF parameters are determined for the polyester substrates.

  18. Full Automatic synthesis of [18F]FMISO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seung Jun Oh; Se Hun Kang; Jin-Sook Ryu; Dae Hyuk Moon

    2004-01-01

    [ 18 F]FMISO is a radiopharmaceutical for hypoxia imaging. Although it was developed in 1986, there has been no report about automatic synthesis. In this experiment, we established the full automatic synthesis of [ 18 F]FMISO and evaluate the stability according to ICH guideline. Method: We used GE MicroLab MX for automatic synthesis. Sequence program was modified to control of the module as follows: [ 18 F]Fluoride drying→[ 18 F]fluorination→trapping of reaction mixture on C18 cartridge→purification-elution of reaction mixture→hydrolysis and HPLC purification. We used disposable cassette for each synthesis and discard it after synthesis. To find optimal synthesis condition, we tested 90 120 degree C as reaction temperature, 5 15 mg of 1-(2-nitro-1-imidazolyl) -2-O-tetrahtdropyranyl-3-O-toluenesulfonyl-propanediol as precursor and 5 15 min as [ 18 F]fluorination time. HPLC purification condition was EtOH:H20 = 5:95, 5ml/min with Alltech Econosil column. To check the stability of production, we performed 30 times of run. We checked the radiochemical stability until 6 hours at 25 degree C and 40% humidity condition. We also performed the stability test at 50 70 degree C with 60-80% humidity condition or under UV light for 6 hours after synthesis for acceleration test, Results: The optimal [ 18 F] fluorination condition was 10mg of precursor and 15 min incubation at 110 degree C. Hydrolysis was performed at 105 degree C for 5 min. After HPLC purification, radiochemical yields and purity were 45±2.8 and 98±1.2%, respectively. Total synthesis time was 60±5.2 min. [ 18 F]FMISO was stable until 6 hours after production with 97±2.4% of radiochemical purity. [ 18 F]FMISO was also stable in acceleration test and photochemical test with 97±2.4 and 97±2.8% of radiochemical purity, respectively. Conclusion: We established the full automatic synthesis method of [ 18 F]FMISO with reproducible high production yield. [18F]FMISO synthesized by this method was stable

  19. Early-Dynamic Positron Emission Tomography (PET)/Computed Tomography and PET Angiography for Endoleak Detection After Endovascular Aneurysm Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drescher, Robert; Gühne, Falk; Freesmeyer, Martin

    2017-06-01

    To propose a positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) protocol including early-dynamic and late-phase acquisitions to evaluate graft patency and aneurysm diameter, detect endoleaks, and rule out graft or vessel wall inflammation after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in one examination without intravenous contrast medium. Early-dynamic PET/CT of the endovascular prosthesis is performed for 180 seconds immediately after intravenous injection of F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose. Data are reconstructed in variable time frames (time periods after tracer injection) to visualize the arterial anatomy and are displayed as PET angiography or fused with CT images. Images are evaluated in view of vascular abnormalities, graft configuration, and tracer accumulation in the aneurysm sac. Whole-body PET/CT is performed 90 to 120 minutes after tracer injection. This protocol for early-dynamic PET/CT and PET angiography has the potential to evaluate vascular diseases, including the diagnosis of complications after endovascular procedures.

  20. Kinetic analysis of dynamic PET data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knittel, B.

    1983-12-01

    Our goal is to quantify regional physiological processes such as blood flow and metabolism by means of tracer kinetic modeling and positron emission tomography (PET). Compartmental models are one way of characterizing the behavior of tracers in physiological systems. This paper describes a general method of estimating compartmental model rate constants from measurements of the concentration of tracers in blood and tissue, taken at multiple time intervals. A computer program which applies the method is described, and examples are shown for simulated and actual data acquired from the Donner 280-Crystal Positron Tomograph.

  1. Kinetic analysis of dynamic PET data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knittel, B.

    1983-12-01

    Our goal is to quantify regional physiological processes such as blood flow and metabolism by means of tracer kinetic modeling and positron emission tomography (PET). Compartmental models are one way of characterizing the behavior of tracers in physiological systems. This paper describes a general method of estimating compartmental model rate constants from measurements of the concentration of tracers in blood and tissue, taken at multiple time intervals. A computer program which applies the method is described, and examples are shown for simulated and actual data acquired from the Donner 280-Crystal Positron Tomograph

  2. Spatio-temporal diffusion of dynamic PET images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tauber, C; Chalon, S; Guilloteau, D; Stute, S; Buvat, I; Chau, M; Spiteri, P

    2011-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) images are corrupted by noise. This is especially true in dynamic PET imaging where short frames are required to capture the peak of activity concentration after the radiotracer injection. High noise results in a possible bias in quantification, as the compartmental models used to estimate the kinetic parameters are sensitive to noise. This paper describes a new post-reconstruction filter to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in dynamic PET imaging. It consists in a spatio-temporal robust diffusion of the 4D image based on the time activity curve (TAC) in each voxel. It reduces the noise in homogeneous areas while preserving the distinct kinetics in regions of interest corresponding to different underlying physiological processes. Neither anatomical priors nor the kinetic model are required. We propose an automatic selection of the scale parameter involved in the diffusion process based on a robust statistical analysis of the distances between TACs. The method is evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations of brain activity distributions. We demonstrate the usefulness of the method and its superior performance over two other post-reconstruction spatial and temporal filters. Our simulations suggest that the proposed method can be used to significantly increase the signal-to-noise ratio in dynamic PET imaging.

  3. Dynamic comparison of PET imaging performance between state-of-the-art ToF-PET/CT and ToF-PET/MR scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delso, Gaspar; Deller, Tim; Khalighi, Mehdi; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Schulthess, Gustav von

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the present work was to determine the potential for dose reduction in a new clinical ToF-PET/MR scanner. This was achieved by means of long dynamic phantom acquisitions designed to provide a fair comparison of image quality and lesion detectability, as a function of activity, between the new PET/MR system and a state-of-the art PET/CT.

  4. Dynamic and gated PET. Quantitative imaging of the heart revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nekolla, S.G.

    2005-01-01

    This short overview focuses on the basic implementation as well as applications of cardiac PET studies acquired in dynamic and ECG triggered modes. Both acquisition modes are well suited for quantitative analysis and the advantages of such an approach are discussed. An outlook on the measurement of respiratory triggered studies and the new challenges this data presents is provided. In the context of modern PET/CT tomographs with the combination of high sensitivity and morphologic resolution, the promise of list mode acquisition is investigated. The before mentioned acquisition modes are ideal candidates for this technology the utility of which in a clinical setting is briefly discussed. The retrospective generation of dynamic and gated image data (and any combinations) is greatly facilitated with this approach. Finally, a novel presentation mode for the wealth of quantitative information generated by these systems is presented. (orig.)

  5. Sparse/Low Rank Constrained Reconstruction for Dynamic PET Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingjian Yu

    Full Text Available In dynamic Positron Emission Tomography (PET, an estimate of the radio activity concentration is obtained from a series of frames of sinogram data taken at ranging in duration from 10 seconds to minutes under some criteria. So far, all the well-known reconstruction algorithms require known data statistical properties. It limits the speed of data acquisition, besides, it is unable to afford the separated information about the structure and the variation of shape and rate of metabolism which play a major role in improving the visualization of contrast for some requirement of the diagnosing in application. This paper presents a novel low rank-based activity map reconstruction scheme from emission sinograms of dynamic PET, termed as SLCR representing Sparse/Low Rank Constrained Reconstruction for Dynamic PET Imaging. In this method, the stationary background is formulated as a low rank component while variations between successive frames are abstracted to the sparse. The resulting nuclear norm and l1 norm related minimization problem can also be efficiently solved by many recently developed numerical methods. In this paper, the linearized alternating direction method is applied. The effectiveness of the proposed scheme is illustrated on three data sets.

  6. Detectors for high resolution dynamic pet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derenzo, S.E.; Budinger, T.F.; Huesman, R.H.

    1983-05-01

    This report reviews the motivation for high spatial resolution in dynamic positron emission tomography of the head and the technical problems in realizing this objective. We present recent progress in using small silicon photodiodes to measure the energy deposited by 511 keV photons in small BGO crystals with an energy resolution of 9.4% full-width at half-maximum. In conjunction with a suitable phototube coupled to a group of crystals, the photodiode signal to noise ratio is sufficient for the identification of individual crystals both for conventional and time-of-flight positron tomography

  7. Automated movement correction for dynamic PET/CT images: evaluation with phantom and patient data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hu; Wong, Koon-Pong; Wardak, Mirwais; Dahlbom, Magnus; Kepe, Vladimir; Barrio, Jorge R; Nelson, Linda D; Small, Gary W; Huang, Sung-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Head movement during a dynamic brain PET/CT imaging results in mismatch between CT and dynamic PET images. It can cause artifacts in CT-based attenuation corrected PET images, thus affecting both the qualitative and quantitative aspects of the dynamic PET images and the derived parametric images. In this study, we developed an automated retrospective image-based movement correction (MC) procedure. The MC method first registered the CT image to each dynamic PET frames, then re-reconstructed the PET frames with CT-based attenuation correction, and finally re-aligned all the PET frames to the same position. We evaluated the MC method's performance on the Hoffman phantom and dynamic FDDNP and FDG PET/CT images of patients with neurodegenerative disease or with poor compliance. Dynamic FDDNP PET/CT images (65 min) were obtained from 12 patients and dynamic FDG PET/CT images (60 min) were obtained from 6 patients. Logan analysis with cerebellum as the reference region was used to generate regional distribution volume ratio (DVR) for FDDNP scan before and after MC. For FDG studies, the image derived input function was used to generate parametric image of FDG uptake constant (Ki) before and after MC. Phantom study showed high accuracy of registration between PET and CT and improved PET images after MC. In patient study, head movement was observed in all subjects, especially in late PET frames with an average displacement of 6.92 mm. The z-direction translation (average maximum = 5.32 mm) and x-axis rotation (average maximum = 5.19 degrees) occurred most frequently. Image artifacts were significantly diminished after MC. There were significant differences (Pdynamic brain FDDNP and FDG PET/CT scans could improve the qualitative and quantitative aspects of images of both tracers.

  8. Automatic extraction of forward stroke volume using dynamic PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harms, Hans; Tolbod, Lars Poulsen; Hansson, Nils Henrik Stubkjær

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to develop and validate an automated method for extracting forward stroke volume (FSV) using indicator dilution theory directly from dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) studies for two different tracers and scanners. Methods 35 subjects underwent...... a dynamic 11 C-acetate PET scan on a Siemens Biograph TruePoint-64 PET/CT (scanner I). In addition, 10 subjects underwent both dynamic 15 O-water PET and 11 C-acetate PET scans on a GE Discovery-ST PET/CT (scanner II). The left ventricular (LV)-aortic time-activity curve (TAC) was extracted automatically...... from PET data using cluster analysis. The first-pass peak was isolated by automatic extrapolation of the downslope of the TAC. FSV was calculated as the injected dose divided by the product of heart rate and the area under the curve of the first-pass peak. Gold standard FSV was measured using phase...

  9. Automatic extraction of myocardial mass and volumes using parametric images from dynamic nongated PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harms, Hendrik Johannes; Hansson, Nils Henrik Stubkjær; Tolbod, Lars Poulsen

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) is used to quantify molecular processes in vivo. However, measurements of left-ventricular (LV) mass and volumes require electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated PET data. The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility of measuring LV geometry using non......-gated dynamic cardiac PET. METHODS: Thirty-five patients with aortic-valve stenosis and 10 healthy controls (HC) underwent a 27-min 11C-acetate PET/CT scan and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR). HC were scanned twice to assess repeatability. Parametric images of uptake rate K1 and the blood pool were......LV and WT only and an overestimation for LVEF at lower values. Intra- and inter-observer correlations were >0.95 for all PET measurements. PET repeatability accuracy in HC was comparable to CMR. CONCLUSION: LV mass and volumes are accurately and automatically generated from dynamic 11C-acetate PET without...

  10. Extraction of left ventricular myocardial mass from dynamic 11C-acetate PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harms, Hans; Tolbod, Lars Poulsen; Hansson, Nils Henrik

    Background: Dynamic 11C-acetate PET is used to quantify oxygen metabolism, which is used to calculate left ventricular (LV) myocardial efficiency, an early marker of heart failure. This requires estimation of LV myocardial mass and is typically derived from a separate cardiovascular magnetic...... resonance (CMR) scan. The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility of estimating myocardial mass directly from a dynamic 11C-acetate PET scan. Methods: 21 subjects underwent a 27-min 11C-acetate PET scan on a Siemens Biograph TruePoint 64 PET/CT scanner. In addition, 10 subjects underwent a dynamic...... 11C-acetate 27-min PET scan on a GE Discovery ST PET/CT scanner. Parametric images of uptake rate K1 and both arterial (VA) and venous (VV) spillover fractions were generated using a basis function implementation of the standard single tissue compartment model using non-gated dynamic data. The LV...

  11. Pharmacokinetic Analysis of 64Cu-ATSM Dynamic PET in Human Xenograft Tumors in Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Fan; Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær; Madsen, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility to perform voxel-wise kinetic modeling on datasets obtained from tumor-bearing mice that underwent dynamic PET scans with 64Cu-ATSM and extract useful physiological parameters.METHODS: Tumor-bearing mice underwent 90-min dynamic PET scans...... relevant parameters from voxel-wise pharmacokinetic analysis to be used for preclinical validation of 64Cu-ATSM as a hypoxia-specific PET tracer....

  12. Automatic extraction of forward stroke volume using dynamic PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harms, Hans; Tolbod, Lars Poulsen; Hansson, Nils Henrik

    Background: Dynamic PET can be used to extract forward stroke volume (FSV) by the indicator dilution principle. The technique employed can be automated and is in theory independent on the tracer used and may therefore be added to any dynamic cardiac PET protocol. The aim of this study...... was to validate automated methods for extracting FSV directly from dynamic PET studies for two different tracers and to examine potential scanner hardware bias. Methods: 21 subjects underwent a dynamic 27 min 11C-acetate PET scan on a Siemens Biograph TruePoint 64 PET/CT scanner (scanner I). In addition, 8...... subjects underwent a dynamic 6 min 15O-water PET scan followed by a 27 min 11C-acetate PET scan on a GE Discovery ST PET/CT scanner (scanner II). The LV-aortic time-activity curve (TAC) was extracted automatically from dynamic PET data using cluster analysis. The first-pass peak was isolated by automatic...

  13. A linear model for estimation of neurotransmitter response profiles from dynamic PET data

    OpenAIRE

    Normandin, M.D.; Schiffer, W.K.; Morris, E.D.

    2011-01-01

    The parametric ntPET model (p-ntPET) estimates the kinetics of neurotransmitter release from dynamic PET data with receptor-ligand radiotracers. Here we introduce a linearization (lp-ntPET) that is computationally efficient and can be applied to single-scan data. lp-ntPET employs a non-invasive reference region input function and extends the LSRRM of Alpert et al. (2003) using basis functions to characterize the time course of neurotransmitter activation. In simulation studies, the temporal p...

  14. POSTEROLATERAL DEFECT OF THE NORMAL HUMAN HEART INVESTIGATED WITH NITROGEN-13-AMMONIA AND DYNAMIC PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEJONG, RM; BLANKSMA, PK; WILLEMSEN, ATM; ANTHONIO, RL; MEEDER, JG; PRUIM, J; VAALBURG, W; LIE, KI

    The posterolateral defect is a common artifact seen when static N-13-ammonia imaging with PET is used to assess myocardial perfusion. The aim of this study was to compare dynamic and static N-13-ammonia PET and to obtain more insight into the cause of the posterolateral defect. Methods: Dynamic

  15. Determination of the dynamics of tumor hypoxia during radiation therapy using biological imaging on mouse xenograft tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Maftei, Constantin Alin

    2013-01-01

    Background: Chronic, acute and hypoxemic hypoxia can lead to resistance to radiation therapy. The purpose of this thesis was to shed light on the role of these three hypoxia subtypes in radiotherapy. Methods: The amount of total hypoxia and hypoxia subtypes were assessed ex-vivo in xenograft tumors via (immuno-)fluorescence and H&E staining. For the non-invasive detection of hypoxia, tumor-bearing mice were injected with 18F-FMISO and underwent a dynamic PET/CT scan. The hypoxic fraction ...

  16. Multi-atlas attenuation correction supports full quantification of static and dynamic brain PET data in PET-MR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mérida, Inés; Reilhac, Anthonin; Redouté, Jérôme; Heckemann, Rolf A.; Costes, Nicolas; Hammers, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    In simultaneous PET-MR, attenuation maps are not directly available. Essential for absolute radioactivity quantification, they need to be derived from MR or PET data to correct for gamma photon attenuation by the imaged object. We evaluate a multi-atlas attenuation correction method for brain imaging (MaxProb) on static [18F]FDG PET and, for the first time, on dynamic PET, using the serotoninergic tracer [18F]MPPF. A database of 40 MR/CT image pairs (atlases) was used. The MaxProb method synthesises subject-specific pseudo-CTs by registering each atlas to the target subject space. Atlas CT intensities are then fused via label propagation and majority voting. Here, we compared these pseudo-CTs with the real CTs in a leave-one-out design, contrasting the MaxProb approach with a simplified single-atlas method (SingleAtlas). We evaluated the impact of pseudo-CT accuracy on reconstructed PET images, compared to PET data reconstructed with real CT, at the regional and voxel levels for the following: radioactivity images; time-activity curves; and kinetic parameters (non-displaceable binding potential, BPND). On static [18F]FDG, the mean bias for MaxProb ranged between 0 and 1% for 73 out of 84 regions assessed, and exceptionally peaked at 2.5% for only one region. Statistical parametric map analysis of MaxProb-corrected PET data showed significant differences in less than 0.02% of the brain volume, whereas SingleAtlas-corrected data showed significant differences in 20% of the brain volume. On dynamic [18F]MPPF, most regional errors on BPND ranged from -1 to  +3% (maximum bias 5%) for the MaxProb method. With SingleAtlas, errors were larger and had higher variability in most regions. PET quantification bias increased over the duration of the dynamic scan for SingleAtlas, but not for MaxProb. We show that this effect is due to the interaction of the spatial tracer-distribution heterogeneity variation over time with the degree of accuracy of the attenuation maps. This

  17. Cerebrospinal Fluid Clearance in Alzheimer Disease Measured with Dynamic PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leon, Mony J; Li, Yi; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Tsui, Wai H; Saint-Louis, Les A; Glodzik, Lidia; Osorio, Ricardo S; Fortea, Juan; Butler, Tracy; Pirraglia, Elizabeth; Fossati, Silvia; Kim, Hee-Jin; Carare, Roxana O; Nedergaard, Maiken; Benveniste, Helene; Rusinek, Henry

    2017-09-01

    Evidence supporting the hypothesis that reduced cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) clearance is involved in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer disease (AD) comes primarily from rodent models. However, unlike rodents, in which predominant extracranial CSF egress is via olfactory nerves traversing the cribriform plate, human CSF clearance pathways are not well characterized. Dynamic PET with 18 F-THK5117, a tracer for tau pathology, was used to estimate the ventricular CSF time-activity as a biomarker for CSF clearance. We tested 3 hypotheses: extracranial CSF is detected at the superior turbinates; CSF clearance is reduced in AD; and CSF clearance is inversely associated with amyloid deposition. Methods: Fifteen subjects, 8 with AD and 7 normal control volunteers, were examined with 18 F-THK5117. Ten subjects additionally underwent 11 C-Pittsburgh compound B ( 11 C-PiB) PET scanning, and 8 were 11 C-PiB-positive. Ventricular time-activity curves of 18 F-THK5117 were used to identify highly correlated time-activity curves from extracranial voxels. Results: For all subjects, the greatest density of CSF-positive extracranial voxels was in the nasal turbinates. Tracer concentration analyses validated the superior nasal turbinate CSF signal intensity. AD patients showed ventricular tracer clearance reduced by 23% and 66% fewer superior turbinate CSF egress sites. Ventricular CSF clearance was inversely associated with amyloid deposition. Conclusion: The human nasal turbinate is part of the CSF clearance system. Lateral ventricle and superior nasal turbinate CSF clearance abnormalities are found in AD. Ventricular CSF clearance reductions are associated with increased brain amyloid depositions. These data suggest that PET-measured CSF clearance is a biomarker of potential interest in AD and other neurodegenerative diseases. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  18. Enhanced Application of 18F-FDG PET/CT in Bladder Cancer by Adding Early Dynamic Acquisition to a Standard Delayed PET Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hai-Jeon; Yoo, Jang; Kim, Yemi; Lee, Dong Hyeon; Kim, Bom Sahn

    2017-10-01

    We investigated the value of early dynamic (ED) PET for the detection and characterization of bladder cancer. Fifty-two bladder cancer patients were prospectively enrolled. The study protocol was composed of ED, whole-body (WB, 60 minutes after injection), and additional delayed (AD, 120 minutes after injection) PET acquisition. Early dynamic PET was acquired for 10 minutes and reconstructed as 5 frames at 2-minute intervals. A focal radiotracer accumulation confined to the bladder wall was considered as PET positive and referred for further quantitative measurement. SUVmax on ED (SUVmax, SUVmax, SUVmax, SUVmax, and SUVmax for 5 frames), WB (SUVmax), and AD PET (SUVmax) were measured. PET results were correlated with bladder cancer pathology variables. The sensitivities of ED, WB, and AD PET for bladder cancer were 84.6%, 57.7%, and 61.2%, respectively. The sensitivity of ED PET was significantly higher than that of WB (P = 0.002) and AD PET (P = 0.008). On ED PET, SUVmax was significantly correlated with muscle invasiveness, histological grade, and pathological tumor size (P = 0.018, P = 0.030, and P = 0.030). On WB and AD PET, only pathological tumor size showed significant positive correlation with SUVmax and SUVmax (P = 0.043 and P = 0.007). Early dynamic PET can help to detect and characterize bladder cancer.

  19. Automatic extraction of forward stroke volume using dynamic 11C-acetate PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harms, Hans; Tolbod, Lars Poulsen; Hansson, Nils Henrik

    Objectives: Dynamic PET with 11C-acetate can be used to quantify myocardial blood flow and oxidative metabolism, the latter of which is used to calculate myocardial external efficiency (MEE). Calculation of MEE requires forward stroke volume (FSV) data. FSV is affected by cardiac loading conditions......, potentially introducing bias if measured with a separate modality. The aim of this study was to develop and validate methods for automatically extracting FSV directly from the dynamic PET used for measuring oxidative metabolism. Methods: 16 subjects underwent a dynamic 27 min PET scan on a Siemens Biograph...... TruePoint 64 PET/CT scanner after bolus injection of 399±27 MBq of 11C-acetate. The LV-aortic time-activity curve (TAC) was extracted automatically from dynamic PET data using cluster analysis. The first-pass peak was derived by automatic extrapolation of the down-slope of the TAC. FSV...

  20. Adapting MR-BrainPET scans for comparison with conventional PET: experiences with dynamic FET-PET in brain tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohmann, Philipp; Herzog, Hans; Kops, Elena Rota; Stoffels, Gabriele; Filss, Christian [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3,-4,-5), Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Galldiks, Norbert [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3,-4,-5), Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Department of Neurology, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Coenen, Heinrich H; Shah, N Jon; Langen, Karl-Josef [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3,-4,-5), Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany)

    2014-07-29

    Imaging results from subsequent measurements (preclinical 3T MR-BrainPET, HR+) are compared. O-(2-[{sup 18}F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (FET) may exhibit non-uniform tracer uptake in gliomas. The aim was to analyse and adapt the physical properties of the scanners and study variations of biological tumour volume (BTV) in early and late FET-PET.

  1. PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mariager, Rasmus Mølgaard; Schmidt, Regin; Heiberg, Morten Rievers

    PET handler om den hemmelige tjenestes arbejde under den kolde krig 1945-1989. Her fortæller Regin Schmidt, Rasmus Mariager og Morten Heiberg om de mest dramatiske og interessante sager fra PET's arkiv. PET er på flere måder en udemokratisk institution, der er sat til at vogte over demokratiet....... Dens virksomhed er skjult for offentligheden, den overvåger borgernes aktiviteter, og den registrerer følsomme personoplysninger. Historien om PET rejser spørgsmålet om, hvad man skal gøre, når befolkningen i et demokrati er kritisk indstillet over for overvågningen af lovlige politiske aktiviteter......, mens myndighederne mener, at det er nødvendigt for at beskytte demokratiet. PET er på en gang en fortælling om konkrete aktioner og begivenheder i PET's arbejde og et stykke Danmarkshistorie. Det handler om overvågning, spioner, politisk ekstremisme og international terrorisme.  ...

  2. Enhancement of dynamic myocardial perfusion PET images based on low-rank plus sparse decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lijun; Ma, Xiaomian; Mohy-Ud-Din, Hassan; Ma, Jianhua; Feng, Qianjin; Rahmim, Arman; Chen, Wufan

    2018-02-01

    The absolute quantification of dynamic myocardial perfusion (MP) PET imaging is challenged by the limited spatial resolution of individual frame images due to division of the data into shorter frames. This study aims to develop a method for restoration and enhancement of dynamic PET images. We propose that the image restoration model should be based on multiple constraints rather than a single constraint, given the fact that the image characteristic is hardly described by a single constraint alone. At the same time, it may be possible, but not optimal, to regularize the image with multiple constraints simultaneously. Fortunately, MP PET images can be decomposed into a superposition of background vs. dynamic components via low-rank plus sparse (L + S) decomposition. Thus, we propose an L + S decomposition based MP PET image restoration model and express it as a convex optimization problem. An iterative soft thresholding algorithm was developed to solve the problem. Using realistic dynamic 82 Rb MP PET scan data, we optimized and compared its performance with other restoration methods. The proposed method resulted in substantial visual as well as quantitative accuracy improvements in terms of noise versus bias performance, as demonstrated in extensive 82 Rb MP PET simulations. In particular, the myocardium defect in the MP PET images had improved visual as well as contrast versus noise tradeoff. The proposed algorithm was also applied on an 8-min clinical cardiac 82 Rb MP PET study performed on the GE Discovery PET/CT, and demonstrated improved quantitative accuracy (CNR and SNR) compared to other algorithms. The proposed method is effective for restoration and enhancement of dynamic PET images. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Diagnosis of glioma recurrence using multiparametric dynamic 18F-fluoroethyl-tyrosine PET-MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyka, Thomas; Hiob, Daniela; Preibisch, Christine; Gempt, Jens; Wiestler, Benedikt; Schlegel, Jürgen; Straube, Christoph; Zimmer, Claus

    2018-06-01

    To investigate the value of combined 18F-fluorethyltyrosine-(FET)-PET/MRI for differentiation between recurrence and treatment-related changes in glioma patients. 63 lesions suggestive of recurrence in 47 glioma patients were retrospectively identified. All patients had a dynamic FET scan, as well as morphologic MRI, PWI and DWI on a hybrid PET/MRI scanner. Lesions suggestive of recurrence were marked. ROC analysis was performed univariately and on parameter combination. 50 lesions were classified as recurrence, 13 as radiation necrosis. Diagnosis was based on histology in 23 and follow-up imaging in 40 cases. Sensitivities and specificities for static PET were 80 and 85%, 66% and 77% for PWI, 62 and 77% for DWI and 64 and 79% for PET time-to-peak. AUC was 0.86 (p PET, 0.73 (p = 0.013) for PWI, 0.70 (p = 0.030) for DWI and 0.73 (p dynamic PET. Multiparametric analysis resulted in an AUC of 0.89, notably yielding sensitivity of 76% vs. 56% for PET alone at 100% specificity. Simultaneous dynamic FET-PET/MRI was reliably feasible for imaging of recurrent glioma. While all modalities were able to discriminate between recurrence and treatment-related changes, multiparametric analysis added value especially when high specificity was demanded. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Dynamic PET Image reconstruction for parametric imaging using the HYPR kernel method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Benjamin; Qi, Jinyi; Badawi, Ramsey D.; Wang, Guobao

    2017-03-01

    Dynamic PET image reconstruction is a challenging problem because of the ill-conditioned nature of PET and the lowcounting statistics resulted from short time-frames in dynamic imaging. The kernel method for image reconstruction has been developed to improve image reconstruction of low-count PET data by incorporating prior information derived from high-count composite data. In contrast to most of the existing regularization-based methods, the kernel method embeds image prior information in the forward projection model and does not require an explicit regularization term in the reconstruction formula. Inspired by the existing highly constrained back-projection (HYPR) algorithm for dynamic PET image denoising, we propose in this work a new type of kernel that is simpler to implement and further improves the kernel-based dynamic PET image reconstruction. Our evaluation study using a physical phantom scan with synthetic FDG tracer kinetics has demonstrated that the new HYPR kernel-based reconstruction can achieve a better region-of-interest (ROI) bias versus standard deviation trade-off for dynamic PET parametric imaging than the post-reconstruction HYPR denoising method and the previously used nonlocal-means kernel.

  5. Automatic Extraction of Myocardial Mass and Volume Using Parametric Images from Dynamic Nongated PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Hendrik Johannes; Stubkjær Hansson, Nils Henrik; Tolbod, Lars Poulsen; Kim, Won Yong; Jakobsen, Steen; Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Wiggers, Henrik; Frøkiaer, Jørgen; Sörensen, Jens

    2016-09-01

    Dynamic cardiac PET is used to quantify molecular processes in vivo. However, measurements of left ventricular (LV) mass and volume require electrocardiogram-gated PET data. The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility of measuring LV geometry using nongated dynamic cardiac PET. Thirty-five patients with aortic-valve stenosis and 10 healthy controls underwent a 27-min (11)C-acetate PET/CT scan and cardiac MRI (CMR). The controls were scanned twice to assess repeatability. Parametric images of uptake rate K1 and the blood pool were generated from nongated dynamic data. Using software-based structure recognition, the LV wall was automatically segmented from K1 images to derive functional assessments of LV mass (mLV) and wall thickness. End-systolic and end-diastolic volumes were calculated using blood pool images and applied to obtain stroke volume and LV ejection fraction (LVEF). PET measurements were compared with CMR. High, linear correlations were found for LV mass (r = 0.95), end-systolic volume (r = 0.93), and end-diastolic volume (r = 0.90), and slightly lower correlations were found for stroke volume (r = 0.74), LVEF (r = 0.81), and thickness (r = 0.78). Bland-Altman analyses showed significant differences for mLV and thickness only and an overestimation for LVEF at lower values. Intra- and interobserver correlations were greater than 0.95 for all PET measurements. PET repeatability accuracy in the controls was comparable to CMR. LV mass and volume are accurately and automatically generated from dynamic (11)C-acetate PET without electrocardiogram gating. This method can be incorporated in a standard routine without any additional workload and can, in theory, be extended to other PET tracers. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  6. Quantitative dynamic ¹⁸FDG-PET and tracer kinetic analysis of soft tissue sarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusten, Espen; Rødal, Jan; Revheim, Mona E; Skretting, Arne; Bruland, Oyvind S; Malinen, Eirik

    2013-08-01

    To study soft tissue sarcomas using dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) with the glucose analog tracer [(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ((18)FDG), to investigate correlations between derived PET image parameters and clinical characteristics, and to discuss implications of dynamic PET acquisition (D-PET). D-PET images of 11 patients with soft tissue sarcomas were analyzed voxel-by-voxel using a compartment tracer kinetic model providing estimates of transfer rates between the vascular, non-metabolized, and metabolized compartments. Furthermore, standard uptake values (SUVs) in the early (2 min p.i.; SUVE) and late (45 min p.i.; SUVL) phases of the PET acquisition were obtained. The derived transfer rates K1, k2 and k3, along with the metabolic rate of (18)FDG (MRFDG) and the vascular fraction νp, was fused with the computed tomography (CT) images for visual interpretation. Correlations between D-PET imaging parameters and clinical parameters, i.e. tumor size, grade and clinical status, were calculated with a significance level of 0.05. The temporal uptake pattern of (18)FDG in the tumor varied considerably from patient to patient. SUVE peak was higher than SUVL peak for four patients. The images of the rate constants showed a systematic pattern, often with elevated intensity in the tumors compared to surrounding tissue. Significant correlations were found between SUVE/L and some of the rate parameters. Dynamic (18)FDG-PET may provide additional valuable information on soft tissue sarcomas not obtainable from conventional (18)FDG-PET. The prognostic role of dynamic imaging should be investigated.

  7. Dynamic {sup 18}F-fluoride small animal PET to noninvasively assess renal function in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnoeckel, Uta; Stegger, Lars; Schaefers, Klaus P.; Hermann, Sven; Schober, Otmar; Schaefers, Michael [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Muenster (Germany); Reuter, Stefan; Schlatter, Eberhard; Gabriels, Gert [Universitaetsklinikum Muenster, Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik D, Experimentelle Nephrologie, Muenster (Germany)

    2008-12-15

    Renal function can be quantified by both laboratory and scintigraphic methods. In the case of small animal diagnostics, scintigraphic image-based methods are ideal since they can assess split renal function, work noninvasively, and can be repeated. The aim of this study is to validate a {sup 18}F-PET-based method to quantify renal function in rats. Fluoride clearance was calculated from a dynamic whole body listmode acquisition of 60 min length in a small animal PET scanner following an i.v. injection of 15 MBq {sup 18}F-fluoride. Volumes of interest (VOIs) were placed in the left ventricle and the bladder as well as traced around the kidney contours. The respective time-activity curves (TAC) were calculated. The renal {sup 18}F-clearance was calculated by the ratio of the total renal excreted activity (bladder VOI) and the integral of the blood TAC. PET-derived renal function was validated by intraindividual measurements of creatinine clearance (n=23), urea clearance (n=23), and tubular excretion rate (TER-MAG3). The split renal function was derived from the injection of the clinically available radionuclide {sup 99m}Tc-mercaptotriglycine by blood sampling and planar renography (n=8). In all animals studied, PET revealed high-quality TACs. PET-derived renal fluoride clearance was linearly correlated with intraindividual laboratory measures (PET vs. creatinine: r=0.78; PET vs. urea: r=0.73; PET vs. TER-MAG3: r=0.73). Split function was comparable ({sup 18}F-PET vs. MAG3-renography: r=0.98). PET-derived measures were highly reproducible. {sup 18}F-PET is able to noninvasively assess renal function in rats and provides a significant potential for serial studies in different experimental scenarios. (orig.)

  8. Dynamic 18F-fluoride small animal PET to noninvasively assess renal function in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnoeckel, Uta; Stegger, Lars; Schaefers, Klaus P.; Hermann, Sven; Schober, Otmar; Schaefers, Michael; Reuter, Stefan; Schlatter, Eberhard; Gabriels, Gert

    2008-01-01

    Renal function can be quantified by both laboratory and scintigraphic methods. In the case of small animal diagnostics, scintigraphic image-based methods are ideal since they can assess split renal function, work noninvasively, and can be repeated. The aim of this study is to validate a 18 F-PET-based method to quantify renal function in rats. Fluoride clearance was calculated from a dynamic whole body listmode acquisition of 60 min length in a small animal PET scanner following an i.v. injection of 15 MBq 18 F-fluoride. Volumes of interest (VOIs) were placed in the left ventricle and the bladder as well as traced around the kidney contours. The respective time-activity curves (TAC) were calculated. The renal 18 F-clearance was calculated by the ratio of the total renal excreted activity (bladder VOI) and the integral of the blood TAC. PET-derived renal function was validated by intraindividual measurements of creatinine clearance (n=23), urea clearance (n=23), and tubular excretion rate (TER-MAG3). The split renal function was derived from the injection of the clinically available radionuclide 99m Tc-mercaptotriglycine by blood sampling and planar renography (n=8). In all animals studied, PET revealed high-quality TACs. PET-derived renal fluoride clearance was linearly correlated with intraindividual laboratory measures (PET vs. creatinine: r=0.78; PET vs. urea: r=0.73; PET vs. TER-MAG3: r=0.73). Split function was comparable ( 18 F-PET vs. MAG3-renography: r=0.98). PET-derived measures were highly reproducible. 18 F-PET is able to noninvasively assess renal function in rats and provides a significant potential for serial studies in different experimental scenarios. (orig.)

  9. Simultaneous acquisition of dynamic PET-MRI: arterial input function using DSC-MRI and [18F]-FET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldeira, Liliana; Yun, Seong Dae; Silva, Nuno da; Filss, Christian; Scheins, Juergen; Telmann, Lutz; Herzog, Hans; Shah, Jon [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine - 4, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

    2015-05-18

    This work focuses on the study of simultaneous dynamic MR-PET acquisition in brain tumour patients. MR-based perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) and PET [18F]-FET are dynamic methods, which allow to evaluate tumour metabolism in a quantitative way. In both methods, arterial input function (AIF) is necessary for quantification. However, the AIF estimation is a challenging task. In this work, we explore the possibilities to combine dynamic MR and PET AIF.

  10. Simultaneous acquisition of dynamic PET-MRI: arterial input function using DSC-MRI and [18F]-FET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldeira, Liliana; Yun, Seong Dae; Silva, Nuno da; Filss, Christian; Scheins, Juergen; Telmann, Lutz; Herzog, Hans; Shah, Jon

    2015-01-01

    This work focuses on the study of simultaneous dynamic MR-PET acquisition in brain tumour patients. MR-based perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) and PET [18F]-FET are dynamic methods, which allow to evaluate tumour metabolism in a quantitative way. In both methods, arterial input function (AIF) is necessary for quantification. However, the AIF estimation is a challenging task. In this work, we explore the possibilities to combine dynamic MR and PET AIF.

  11. Quantitative Evaluation of Tumor Early Response to a Vascular-Disrupting Agent with Dynamic PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ning; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Xiaomeng; Guo, Jinxia; Lang, Lixin; Kiesewetter, Dale O; Niu, Gang; Li, Quanzheng; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the early response of tumors to a vascular-disrupting agent (VDA) VEGF121/recombinant toxin gelonin (rGel) using dynamic [(18)F]FPPRGD2 positron emission tomography (PET) and kinetic parameter estimation. Two tumor xenograft models: U87MG (highly vascularized) and A549 (moderately vascularized), were selected, and both were randomized into treatment and control groups. Sixty-minute dynamic PET scans with [(18)F]FPPRGD2 that targets to integrin αvβ3 were performed at days 0 (baseline), 1, and 3 since VEGF121/rGel treatment started. Dynamic PET-derived binding potential (BPND) and parametric maps were compared with tumor uptake (%ID/g) and the static PET image at 1 h after the tracer administration. The growth of U87MG tumor was obviously delayed upon VEGF121/rGel treatment. A549 tumor was not responsive to the same treatment. BPND of treated U87MG tumors decreased significantly at day 1 (p dynamic PET with [(18)F]FPPRGD2 shows advantages in distinguishing effective from ineffective treatment during the course of VEGF121/rGel therapy at early stage and is therefore more sensitive in assessing therapy response than static PET.

  12. Fast generation of 4D PET-MR data from real dynamic MR acquisitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsoumpas, C; Buerger, C; King, A P; Schleyer, P; Schaeffter, T; Marsden, P K; Mollet, P; Keereman, V; Vandenberghe, S; Schulz, V

    2011-01-01

    We have implemented and evaluated a framework for simulating simultaneous dynamic PET-MR data using the anatomic and dynamic information from real MR acquisitions. PET radiotracer distribution is simulated by assigning typical FDG uptake values to segmented MR images with manually inserted additional virtual lesions. PET projection data and images are simulated using analytic forward projections (including attenuation and Poisson statistics) implemented within the image reconstruction package STIR. PET image reconstructions are also performed with STIR. The simulation is validated with numerical simulation based on Monte Carlo (GATE) which uses more accurate physical modelling, but has 150x slower computation time compared to the analytic method for ten respiratory positions and is 7000x slower when performing multiple realizations. Results are validated in terms of region of interest mean values and coefficients of variation for 65 million coincidences including scattered events. Although some discrepancy is observed, agreement between the two different simulation methods is good given the statistical noise in the data. In particular, the percentage difference of the mean values is 3.1% for tissue, 17% for the lungs and 18% for a small lesion. The utility of the procedure is demonstrated by simulating realistic PET-MR datasets from multiple volunteers with different breathing patterns. The usefulness of the toolkit will be shown for performance investigations of the reconstruction, motion correction and attenuation correction algorithms for dynamic PET-MR data.

  13. Extracting a respiratory signal from raw dynamic PET data that contain tracer kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleyer, P J; Thielemans, K; Marsden, P K

    2014-08-07

    Data driven gating (DDG) methods provide an alternative to hardware based respiratory gating for PET imaging. Several existing DDG approaches obtain a respiratory signal by observing the change in PET-counts within specific regions of acquired PET data. Currently, these methods do not allow for tracer kinetics which can interfere with the respiratory signal and introduce error. In this work, we produced a DDG method for dynamic PET studies that exhibit tracer kinetics. Our method is based on an existing approach that uses frequency-domain analysis to locate regions within raw PET data that are subject to respiratory motion. In the new approach, an optimised non-stationary short-time Fourier transform was used to create a time-varying 4D map of motion affected regions. Additional processing was required to ensure that the relationship between the sign of the respiratory signal and the physical direction of movement remained consistent for each temporal segment of the 4D map. The change in PET-counts within the 4D map during the PET acquisition was then used to generate a respiratory curve. Using 26 min dynamic cardiac NH3 PET acquisitions which included a hardware derived respiratory measurement, we show that tracer kinetics can severely degrade the respiratory signal generated by the original DDG method. In some cases, the transition of tracer from the liver to the lungs caused the respiratory signal to invert. The new approach successfully compensated for tracer kinetics and improved the correlation between the data-driven and hardware based signals. On average, good correlation was maintained throughout the PET acquisitions.

  14. Extracting a respiratory signal from raw dynamic PET data that contain tracer kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleyer, P J; Thielemans, K; Marsden, P K

    2014-01-01

    Data driven gating (DDG) methods provide an alternative to hardware based respiratory gating for PET imaging. Several existing DDG approaches obtain a respiratory signal by observing the change in PET-counts within specific regions of acquired PET data. Currently, these methods do not allow for tracer kinetics which can interfere with the respiratory signal and introduce error. In this work, we produced a DDG method for dynamic PET studies that exhibit tracer kinetics. Our method is based on an existing approach that uses frequency-domain analysis to locate regions within raw PET data that are subject to respiratory motion. In the new approach, an optimised non-stationary short-time Fourier transform was used to create a time-varying 4D map of motion affected regions. Additional processing was required to ensure that the relationship between the sign of the respiratory signal and the physical direction of movement remained consistent for each temporal segment of the 4D map. The change in PET-counts within the 4D map during the PET acquisition was then used to generate a respiratory curve. Using 26 min dynamic cardiac NH 3 PET acquisitions which included a hardware derived respiratory measurement, we show that tracer kinetics can severely degrade the respiratory signal generated by the original DDG method. In some cases, the transition of tracer from the liver to the lungs caused the respiratory signal to invert. The new approach successfully compensated for tracer kinetics and improved the correlation between the data-driven and hardware based signals. On average, good correlation was maintained throughout the PET acquisitions. (paper)

  15. Correlation of Dynamic PET and Gene Array Data in Patients with Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludwig G. Strauss

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The results obtained with dynamic PET (dPET were compared to gene expression data obtained in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST. The primary aim was to assess the association of the dPET results and gene expression data. Material and Methods. dPET was performed following the injection of F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG in 22 patients with GIST. All patients were examined prior to surgery for staging purpose. Compartment and noncompartment models were used for the quantitative evaluation of the dPET examinations. Gene array data were based on tumor specimen obtained by surgery after the PET examinations. Results. The data analysis revealed significant correlations for the dPET parameters and the expression of zinc finger genes (znf43, znf85, znf91, znf189. Furthermore, the transport of FDG (k1 was associated with VEGF-A. The cell cycle gene cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1C was correlated with the maximum tracer uptake (SUVmax in the tumors. Conclusions. The data demonstrate a dependency of the tracer kinetics on genes associated with prognosis in GIST. Furthermore, angiogenesis and cell proliferation have an impact on the tracer uptake.

  16. Spectral Analysis of Dynamic PET Studies: A Review of 20 Years of Method Developments and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronese, Mattia; Rizzo, Gaia; Bertoldo, Alessandra; Turkheimer, Federico E

    2016-01-01

    In Positron Emission Tomography (PET), spectral analysis (SA) allows the quantification of dynamic data by relating the radioactivity measured by the scanner in time to the underlying physiological processes of the system under investigation. Among the different approaches for the quantification of PET data, SA is based on the linear solution of the Laplace transform inversion whereas the measured arterial and tissue time-activity curves of a radiotracer are used to calculate the input response function of the tissue. In the recent years SA has been used with a large number of PET tracers in brain and nonbrain applications, demonstrating that it is a very flexible and robust method for PET data analysis. Differently from the most common PET quantification approaches that adopt standard nonlinear estimation of compartmental models or some linear simplifications, SA can be applied without defining any specific model configuration and has demonstrated very good sensitivity to the underlying kinetics. This characteristic makes it useful as an investigative tool especially for the analysis of novel PET tracers. The purpose of this work is to offer an overview of SA, to discuss advantages and limitations of the methodology, and to inform about its applications in the PET field.

  17. Estimation of radiation dose to patients from 18 FDG whole body PET/CT investigations using dynamic PET scan protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aruna Kaushik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: There is a growing concern over the radiation exposure of patients from undergoing 18FDG PET/CT (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography whole body investigations. The aim of the present study was to study the kinetics of 18FDG distributions and estimate the radiation dose received by patients undergoing 18FDG whole body PET/CT investigations. Methods: Dynamic PET scans in different regions of the body were performed in 49 patients so as to measure percentage uptake of 18FDG in brain, liver, spleen, adrenals, kidneys and stomach. The residence time in these organs was calculated and radiation dose was estimated using OLINDA software. The radiation dose from the CT component was computed using the software CT-Expo and measured using computed tomography dose index (CTDI phantom and ionization chamber. As per the clinical protocol, the patients were refrained from eating and drinking for a minimum period of 4 h prior to the study. Results: The estimated residence time in males was 0.196 h (brain, 0.09 h (liver, 0.007 h (spleen, 0.0006 h (adrenals, 0.013 h (kidneys and 0.005 h (stomach whereas it was 0.189 h (brain, 0.11 h (liver, 0.01 h (spleen, 0.0007 h (adrenals, 0.02 h (kidneys and 0.004 h (stomach in females. The effective dose was found to be 0.020 mSv/MBq in males and 0.025 mSv/MBq in females from internally administered 18FDG and 6.8 mSv in males and 7.9 mSv in females from the CT component. For an administered activity of 370 MBq of 18FDG, the effective dose from PET/CT investigations was estimated to be 14.2 mSv in males and 17.2 mSv in females. Interpretation & conclusions: The present results did not demonstrate significant difference in the kinetics of 18FDG distribution in male and female patients. The estimated PET/CT doses were found to be higher than many other conventional diagnostic radiology examinations suggesting that all efforts should be made to clinically justify and

  18. Estimation of radiation dose to patients from (18) FDG whole body PET/CT investigations using dynamic PET scan protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Aruna; Jaimini, Abhinav; Tripathi, Madhavi; D'Souza, Maria; Sharma, Rajnish; Mondal, Anupam; Mishra, Anil K; Dwarakanath, Bilikere S

    2015-12-01

    There is a growing concern over the radiation exposure of patients from undergoing 18FDG PET/CT (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography) whole body investigations. The aim of the present study was to study the kinetics of 18FDG distributions and estimate the radiation dose received by patients undergoing 18FDG whole body PET/CT investigations. Dynamic PET scans in different regions of the body were performed in 49 patients so as to measure percentage uptake of 18FDG in brain, liver, spleen, adrenals, kidneys and stomach. The residence time in these organs was calculated and radiation dose was estimated using OLINDA software. The radiation dose from the CT component was computed using the software CT-Expo and measured using computed tomography dose index (CTDI) phantom and ionization chamber. As per the clinical protocol, the patients were refrained from eating and drinking for a minimum period of 4 h prior to the study. The estimated residence time in males was 0.196 h (brain), 0.09 h (liver), 0.007 h (spleen), 0.0006 h (adrenals), 0.013 h (kidneys) and 0.005 h (stomach) whereas it was 0.189 h (brain), 0.11 h (liver), 0.01 h (spleen), 0.0007 h (adrenals), 0.02 h (kidneys) and 0.004 h (stomach) in females. The effective dose was found to be 0.020 mSv/MBq in males and 0.025 mSv/MBq in females from internally administered 18FDG and 6.8 mSv in males and 7.9 mSv in females from the CT component. For an administered activity of 370 MBq of 18FDG, the effective dose from PET/CT investigations was estimated to be 14.2 mSv in males and 17.2 mSv in females. The present results did not demonstrate significant difference in the kinetics of 18FDG distribution in male and female patients. The estimated PET/CT doses were found to be higher than many other conventional diagnostic radiology examinations suggesting that all efforts should be made to clinically justify and carefully weigh the risk-benefit ratios prior to every 18FDG whole body PET

  19. Dynamic Functional Imaging of Brain Glucose Utilization using fPET-FDG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villien, Marjorie; Wey, Hsiao-Ying; Mandeville, Joseph B.; Catana, Ciprian; Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Sander, Christin Y.; Zürcher, Nicole R.; Chonde, Daniel B.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Rosen, Bruce R.; Hooker, Jacob M.

    2014-01-01

    Glucose is the principal source of energy for the brain and yet the dynamic response of glucose utilization to changes in brain activity is still not fully understood. Positron emission tomography (PET) allows quantitative measurement of glucose metabolism using 2-[18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). However, FDG PET in its current form provides an integral (or average) of glucose consumption over tens of minutes and lacks the temporal information to capture physiological alterations associated with changes in brain activity induced by tasks or drug challenges. Traditionally, changes in glucose utilization are inferred by comparing two separate scans, which significantly limits the utility of the method. We report a novel method to track changes in FDG metabolism dynamically, with higher temporal resolution than exists to date and within a single session. Using a constant infusion of FDG, we demonstrate that our technique (termed fPET-FDG) can be used in an analysis pipeline similar to fMRI to define within-session differential metabolic responses. We use visual stimulation to demonstrate the feasibility of this method. This new method has a great potential to be used in research protocols and clinical settings since fPET-FDG imaging can be performed with most PET scanners and data acquisition and analysis is straightforward. fPET-FDG is a highly complementary technique to MRI and provides a rich new way to observe functional changes in brain metabolism. PMID:24936683

  20. Quantitative graphical analysis of simultaneous dynamic PET/MRI for assessment of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Koesters, Thomas; Vahle, Anne-Kristin; Friedman, Kent; Bartlett, Rachel M; Taneja, Samir S; Ding, Yu-Shin; Logan, Jean

    2015-04-01

    Dynamic FDG imaging for prostate cancer characterization is limited by generally small size and low uptake in prostate tumors. Our aim in this pilot study was to explore feasibility of simultaneous PET/MRI to guide localization of prostate lesions for dynamic FDG analysis using a graphical approach. Three patients with biopsy-proven prostate cancer underwent simultaneous FDG PET/MRI, incorporating dynamic prostate imaging. Histology and multiparametric MRI findings were used to localize tumors, which in turn guided identification of tumors on FDG images. Regions of interest were manually placed on tumor and benign prostate tissue. Blood activity was extracted from a region of interest placed on the femoral artery on PET images. FDG data were analyzed by graphical analysis using the influx constant Ki (Patlak analysis) when FDG binding seemed irreversible and distribution volume VT (reversible graphical analysis) when FDG binding seemed reversible given the presence of washout. Given inherent coregistration, simultaneous acquisition facilitated use of MRI data to localize small lesions on PET and subsequent graphical analysis in all cases. In 2 cases with irreversible binding, tumor had higher Ki than benign using Patlak analysis (0.023 vs 0.006 and 0.019 vs 0.008 mL/cm3 per minute). In 1 case appearing reversible, tumor had higher VT than benign using reversible graphical analysis (0.68 vs 0.52 mL/cm3). Simultaneous PET/MRI allows localization of small prostate tumors for dynamic PET analysis. By taking advantage of inclusion of the femoral arteries in the FOV, we applied advanced PET data analysis methods beyond conventional static measures and without blood sampling.

  1. Tumour oxygenation assessed by 18F-fluoromisonidazole PET and polarographic needle electrodes in human soft tissue tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, L.; Keiding, S.; Nordsmark, M.

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: The aim of the study was to identify hypoxia in human soft tissue sarcomas (STS) by PET scanning using the hypoxia marker [F-18]-fluoromisonidazole ([F-18]FMISO) and invasive oxygen sensitive probes (Eppendorf pO(2) Histograph, Germany). Materials and methods: Thirteen pat...

  2. The effect of respiratory induced density variations on non-TOF PET quantitation in the lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Beverley F.; Cuplov, Vesna; Hutton, Brian F.; Groves, Ashley M.; Thielemans, Kris

    2016-04-01

    Accurate PET quantitation requires a matched attenuation map. Obtaining matched CT attenuation maps in the thorax is difficult due to the respiratory cycle which causes both motion and density changes. Unlike with motion, little attention has been given to the effects of density changes in the lung on PET quantitation. This work aims to explore the extent of the errors caused by pulmonary density attenuation map mismatch on dynamic and static parameter estimates. Dynamic XCAT phantoms were utilised using clinically relevant 18F-FDG and 18F-FMISO time activity curves for all organs within the thorax to estimate the expected parameter errors. The simulations were then validated with PET data from 5 patients suffering from idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis who underwent PET/Cine-CT. The PET data were reconstructed with three gates obtained from the Cine-CT and the average Cine-CT. The lung TACs clearly displayed differences between true and measured curves with error depending on global activity distribution at the time of measurement. The density errors from using a mismatched attenuation map were found to have a considerable impact on PET quantitative accuracy. Maximum errors due to density mismatch were found to be as high as 25% in the XCAT simulation. Differences in patient derived kinetic parameter estimates and static concentration between the extreme gates were found to be as high as 31% and 14%, respectively. Overall our results show that respiratory associated density errors in the attenuation map affect quantitation throughout the lung, not just regions near boundaries. The extent of this error is dependent on the activity distribution in the thorax and hence on the tracer and time of acquisition. Consequently there may be a significant impact on estimated kinetic parameters throughout the lung.

  3. The effect of respiratory induced density variations on non-TOF PET quantitation in the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, Beverley F; Cuplov, Vesna; Hutton, Brian F; Groves, Ashley M; Thielemans, Kris

    2016-01-01

    Accurate PET quantitation requires a matched attenuation map. Obtaining matched CT attenuation maps in the thorax is difficult due to the respiratory cycle which causes both motion and density changes. Unlike with motion, little attention has been given to the effects of density changes in the lung on PET quantitation. This work aims to explore the extent of the errors caused by pulmonary density attenuation map mismatch on dynamic and static parameter estimates. Dynamic XCAT phantoms were utilised using clinically relevant 18 F-FDG and 18 F-FMISO time activity curves for all organs within the thorax to estimate the expected parameter errors. The simulations were then validated with PET data from 5 patients suffering from idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis who underwent PET/Cine-CT. The PET data were reconstructed with three gates obtained from the Cine-CT and the average Cine-CT. The lung TACs clearly displayed differences between true and measured curves with error depending on global activity distribution at the time of measurement. The density errors from using a mismatched attenuation map were found to have a considerable impact on PET quantitative accuracy. Maximum errors due to density mismatch were found to be as high as 25% in the XCAT simulation. Differences in patient derived kinetic parameter estimates and static concentration between the extreme gates were found to be as high as 31% and 14%, respectively. Overall our results show that respiratory associated density errors in the attenuation map affect quantitation throughout the lung, not just regions near boundaries. The extent of this error is dependent on the activity distribution in the thorax and hence on the tracer and time of acquisition. Consequently there may be a significant impact on estimated kinetic parameters throughout the lung. (paper)

  4. Dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging: II. Task-oriented statistical estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Lodge, Martin A; Zhou, Y; Wahl, Richard L; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-10-21

    In the context of oncology, dynamic PET imaging coupled with standard graphical linear analysis has been previously employed to enable quantitative estimation of tracer kinetic parameters of physiological interest at the voxel level, thus, enabling quantitative PET parametric imaging. However, dynamic PET acquisition protocols have been confined to the limited axial field-of-view (~15-20 cm) of a single-bed position and have not been translated to the whole-body clinical imaging domain. On the contrary, standardized uptake value (SUV) PET imaging, considered as the routine approach in clinical oncology, commonly involves multi-bed acquisitions, but is performed statically, thus not allowing for dynamic tracking of the tracer distribution. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. In a companion study, we presented a novel clinically feasible dynamic (4D) multi-bed PET acquisition protocol as well as the concept of whole-body PET parametric imaging employing Patlak ordinary least squares (OLS) regression to estimate the quantitative parameters of tracer uptake rate Ki and total blood distribution volume V. In the present study, we propose an advanced hybrid linear regression framework, driven by Patlak kinetic voxel correlations, to achieve superior trade-off between contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and mean squared error (MSE) than provided by OLS for the final Ki parametric images, enabling task-based performance optimization. Overall, whether the observer's task is to detect a tumor or quantitatively assess treatment response, the proposed statistical estimation framework can be adapted to satisfy the specific task performance criteria, by adjusting the Patlak correlation-coefficient (WR) reference value. The multi-bed dynamic acquisition protocol, as optimized in the preceding companion study

  5. Dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging: II. Task-oriented statistical estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Lodge, Martin A; Zhou, Y; Wahl, Richard L; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-01-01

    In the context of oncology, dynamic PET imaging coupled with standard graphical linear analysis has been previously employed to enable quantitative estimation of tracer kinetic parameters of physiological interest at the voxel level, thus, enabling quantitative PET parametric imaging. However, dynamic PET acquisition protocols have been confined to the limited axial field-of-view (∼15–20 cm) of a single-bed position and have not been translated to the whole-body clinical imaging domain. On the contrary, standardized uptake value (SUV) PET imaging, considered as the routine approach in clinical oncology, commonly involves multi-bed acquisitions, but is performed statically, thus not allowing for dynamic tracking of the tracer distribution. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. In a companion study, we presented a novel clinically feasible dynamic (4D) multi-bed PET acquisition protocol as well as the concept of whole-body PET parametric imaging employing Patlak ordinary least squares (OLS) regression to estimate the quantitative parameters of tracer uptake rate K i and total blood distribution volume V. In the present study, we propose an advanced hybrid linear regression framework, driven by Patlak kinetic voxel correlations, to achieve superior trade-off between contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and mean squared error (MSE) than provided by OLS for the final K i parametric images, enabling task-based performance optimization. Overall, whether the observer's task is to detect a tumor or quantitatively assess treatment response, the proposed statistical estimation framework can be adapted to satisfy the specific task performance criteria, by adjusting the Patlak correlation-coefficient (WR) reference value. The multi-bed dynamic acquisition protocol, as optimized in the preceding companion

  6. 68Ga-PSMA-11 Dynamic PET/CT Imaging in Primary Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachpekidis, Christos; Kopka, Klaus; Eder, Matthias; Hadaschik, Boris A; Freitag, Martin T; Pan, Leyun; Haberkorn, Uwe; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2016-11-01

    The aim of our study is to assess the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of Ga-PSMA-11 in patients suffering from primary prostate cancer (PC) by means of dynamic and whole-body PET/CT. Twenty-four patients with primary, previously untreated PC were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent dynamic PET/CT (dPET/CT) scanning of the pelvis and whole-body PET/CT studies with Ga-PSMA-11. The evaluation of dPET/CT studies was based on qualitative evaluation, SUV calculation, and quantitative analysis based on two-tissue compartment modeling and a noncompartmental approach leading to the extraction of fractal dimension (FD). A total of 23/24 patients (95.8%) were Ga-PSMA-11 positive. In 9/24 patients (37.5%), metastatic lesions were detected. PC-associated lesions demonstrated the following mean values: SUVaverage = 14.3, SUVmax = 23.4, K1 = 0.24 (1/min), k3 = 0.34 (1/min), influx = 0.15 (1/min), and FD = 1.27. The parameters SUVaverage, SUVmax, k3, influx, and FD derived from PC-associated lesions were significantly higher than respective values derived from reference prostate tissue. Time-activity curves derived from PC-associated lesions revealed an increasing Ga-PSMA-11 accumulation during dynamic PET acquisition. Correlation analysis revealed a moderate but significant correlation between PSA levels and SUVaverage (r = 0.60) and SUVmax (r = 0.57), and a weak but significant correlation between Gleason score and SUVaverage (r = 0.33) and SUVmax (r = 0.28). Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT confirmed its capacity in detecting primary PC with a detection rate of 95.8%. Dynamic PET/CT studies of the pelvis revealed an increase in tracer uptake in PC-associated lesions during the 60 minutes of dynamic PET acquisition, a finding with potential applications in anti-PSMA approaches.

  7. Maximum a posteriori reconstruction of the Patlak parametric image from sinograms in dynamic PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guobao; Fu Lin; Qi Jinyi

    2008-01-01

    Parametric imaging using the Patlak graphical method has been widely used to analyze dynamic PET data. Conventionally a Patlak parametric image is generated by reconstructing a sequence of dynamic images first and then performing Patlak graphical analysis on the time-activity curves pixel-by-pixel. However, because it is rather difficult to model the noise distribution in reconstructed images, the spatially variant noise correlation is simply ignored in the Patlak analysis, which leads to sub-optimal results. In this paper we present a Bayesian method for reconstructing Patlak parametric images directly from raw sinogram data by incorporating the Patlak plot model into the image reconstruction procedure. A preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm is used to find the maximum a posteriori solution. The proposed direct method is statistically more efficient than the conventional indirect approach because the Poisson noise distribution in PET data can be accurately modeled in the direct reconstruction. The computation cost of the direct method is similar to reconstruction time of two dynamic frames. Therefore, when more than two dynamic frames are used in the Patlak analysis, the direct method is faster than the conventional indirect approach. We conduct computer simulations to validate the proposed direct method. Comparisons with the conventional indirect approach show that the proposed method results in a more accurate estimate of the parametric image. The proposed method has been applied to dynamic fully 3D PET data from a microPET scanner

  8. Statistical dynamic imaging of RI-labeled tracer from list-mode PET data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanimoto, Michiaki; Kuroda, Yoshihiro; Oshiro, Osamu; Watabe, Hiroshi; Kuroda, Tomohiro

    2009-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) can be used in physiological analysis to illustrate physiological states by visualizing the accumulation of radioisotope (RI)-labeled tracer in specific organs or tissues. PET obtains spatio-temporal statistics in the form of list-mode data. However, conventional imaging techniques, which sum up list-mode data over a given time period, cannot depict detailed temporal dynamics of the RI-labeled tracer. In this study, a spatio-temporal analysis approach was employed to visualize the temporal flow dynamics of RI-labeled tracer from the obtained list-mode data. Experiments to assess the visualization of simulated RI-labeled tracer dynamics as well as RI-labeled tracer dynamics in a vascular phantom showed that the proposed method successfully depicted detailed temporal flow dynamics that could not be visualized using conventional methods. (author)

  9. Contrast between hypervascularized liver lesions and hepatic parenchyma. Early dynamic PET versus contrast-enhanced CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freesmeyer, M.; Winkens, T.; Schierz, J.-H.

    2014-01-01

    To detect hypervascularized liver lesions, early dynamic (ED) 18 F-FDG PET may be an alternative when contrast-enhanced (CE) imaging is infeasible. This retrospective pilot analysis compared contrast between such lesions and liver parenchyma, an important objective image quality variable, in ED PET versus CE CT. Twenty-eight hypervascularized liver lesions detected by CE CT [21 (75%) hepatocellular carcinomas; mean (range) diameter 4.9 ± 3.5 (1-14) cm] in 20 patients were scanned with ED PET. Using regions of interest, maximum and mean lesional and parenchymal signals at baseline, arterial and venous phases were calculated for ED PET and CE CT. Lesional/parenchymal signal ratio was significantly higher (P < 0.005) with ED PET versus CE CT at the arterial phase and similar between the methods at the venous phase. In liver imaging, ED PET generates greater lesional-parenchymal contrast during the arterial phase than does CE CT; these observations should be formally, prospectively evaluated. (author)

  10. Evaluation of acetazolamine response in patients with cerebellar ataxia using dynamic quantitative F-18-FDG PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. K.; Lee, D. S.; Lee, J. S.; Kim, M. H.; Lee, K. M.; Yeo, J. S.; Chung, J. K.; Lee, M. C.

    2001-01-01

    Cerebellar Ataxia (CA) usually shows dramatic response to acetazolamide treatment. But few cases of acetazolamide unresponse CA were reported recently. Using dynamic FDG PET, we tried to evaluate the metabolic abnormality and its drug response in CA. Quantitative F-18-FDG PET was performed prior and after treatment of acetazolamide (250 mg qid for 10 days) in two patient suspected episodic cerebellar ataxia. Using Model-based clustering method, the regional cerebral glucose metabolic rate (rCMRglu) was calculated. Two patients showed different treatment response to acetazolamide. In one patient who showed markedly reduced frequency of the ataxic attack after treatment. FDG PET showed that mean cerebellar glucose metabolism was increased after treatment (ΔrCMRglu:9%). However, in the other who showed poor response to acetazolamide, FDG PET showed the more decrease metabolism in cerebellar metabolism after treatment (ΔrCMRglu:-17%). The change of the cerebellar glucose metabolism on FDG PET reflected the symptomatic improvement after acetazolamide in these two CA patients. We could expected that FDG PET might be a very useful tool to quantitatively predict the treatment response in CA and other neurologic disorder

  11. Clinical role of early dynamic FDG-PET/CT for the evaluation of renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Reiko; Abe, Koichiro; Kondo, Tsunenori; Tanabe, Kazunari; Sakai, Shuji

    2016-06-01

    We studied the usefulness of early dynamic (ED) and whole-body (WB) FDG-PET/CT for the evaluation of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). One hundred patients with 107 tumours underwent kidney ED and WB FDG-PET/CT. We visually and semiquantitatively evaluated the FDG accumulation in RCCs in the ED and WB phases, and compared the accumulation values with regard to histological type (clear cell carcinoma [CCC] vs. non-clear cell carcinoma [N-CCC]), the TNM stage (high stage [3-4] vs. low stage [1-2]), the Fuhrman grade (high grade [3-4] vs. low grade [1-2]) and presence versus absence of venous (V) and lymphatic (Ly) invasion. In the ED phase, visual evaluation revealed no significant differences in FDG accumulation in terms of each item. However, the maximum standardized uptake value and tumour-to-normal tissue ratios were significantly higher in the CCCs compared to the N-CCCs (p PET/CT is a useful tool for the evaluation of RCCs. • ED and WB FDG-PET/ CT helps to assess patients with RCC • ED FDG-PET/CT enabled differentiation between CCC and N-CCC • FDG accumulation in the WB phase reflects tumour aggressiveness • Management of RCC is improved by ED and WB FDG-PET/CT.

  12. Dynamic respiratory gated 18FDG-PET of lung tumors - a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skjei Knudtsen, Ingerid; Skretting, Arne; Roedal, Jan; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Helland, Aaslaug; Malinen, Eirik

    2011-01-01

    Background. 18 FDG-PET/CT imaging is well established for diagnosis and staging of lung tumors. However, more detailed information regarding the distribution of FDG within the tumor, also as a function of time after injection may be relevant. In this study we explore the feasibility of a combined dynamic and respiratory gated (DR) PET protocol. Material and methods. A DR FDG-PET protocol for a Siemens Biograph 16 PET/CT scanner was set up, allowing data acquisition from the time of FDG injection. Breath-hold (BH) respiratory gating was performed at four intervals over a total acquisition time of 50 minutes. Thus, the PET protocol provides both motion-free images and a spatiotemporal characterization of the glucose distribution in lung tumors. Software tools were developed in-house for tentative tumor segmentation and for extracting standard uptake values (SUVs) voxel by voxel, tumor volumes and SUV gradients in all directions. Results. Four pilot patients have been investigated with the DR PET protocol. The procedure was well tolerated by the patients. The BH images appeared sharper, and SUV max /SUV mean was higher, compared to free breathing (FB) images. Also, SUV gradients in the periphery of the tumor in the BH images were in general greater than or equal to the gradients in the FB PET images. Conclusion. The DR FDG-PET protocol is feasible and the BH images have a superior quality compared to the FB images. The protocol may also provide information of relevance for radiotherapy planning and follow-up. A patient trial is needed for assessing the clinical value of the imaging protocol

  13. Direct Parametric Reconstruction With Joint Motion Estimation/Correction for Dynamic Brain PET Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Jieqing; Bousse, Alexandre; Thielemans, Kris; Burgos, Ninon; Weston, Philip S J; Schott, Jonathan M; Atkinson, David; Arridge, Simon R; Hutton, Brian F; Markiewicz, Pawel; Ourselin, Sebastien

    2017-01-01

    Direct reconstruction of parametric images from raw photon counts has been shown to improve the quantitative analysis of dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) data. However it suffers from subject motion which is inevitable during the typical acquisition time of 1-2 hours. In this work we propose a framework to jointly estimate subject head motion and reconstruct the motion-corrected parametric images directly from raw PET data, so that the effects of distorted tissue-to-voxel mapping due to subject motion can be reduced in reconstructing the parametric images with motion-compensated attenuation correction and spatially aligned temporal PET data. The proposed approach is formulated within the maximum likelihood framework, and efficient solutions are derived for estimating subject motion and kinetic parameters from raw PET photon count data. Results from evaluations on simulated [ 11 C]raclopride data using the Zubal brain phantom and real clinical [ 18 F]florbetapir data of a patient with Alzheimer's disease show that the proposed joint direct parametric reconstruction motion correction approach can improve the accuracy of quantifying dynamic PET data with large subject motion.

  14. Individual radiation response of parotid glands investigated by dynamic 11C-methionine PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buus, Simon; Grau, Cai; Munk, Ole Lajord; Rodell, Anders; Jensen, Kenneth; Mouridsen, Kim; Keiding, Susanne

    2006-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Previously, we showed that the net metabolic clearance of 11 C-methionine of the parotid gland, K, calculated from dynamic 11 C-methionine PET, can be used as a measure of parotid gland function. The aim of this study was to investigate by dynamic 11 C-methionine PET the individual radiation dose response relationship of parotid glands in head and neck cancer patients. Patients and methods: Twelve head and neck cancer patients were examined by dynamic 11 C-methionine PET after radiotherapy. Parametric images of K were generated, co-registered and compared voxel-by-voxel with the 3D radiation dose plan within the parotid gland to assess the individual radiation dose-function relationship. Results: In each patient, voxel-values of K decreased with increasing radiation dose. Population based analysis showed a sigmoid dose response relationship of parotid gland, from which we estimated a threshold radiation dose of 16 Gy and a mean TD 5 of 30 Gy. TD 5 ranged from 7 to 50 Gy in the group of patients. Conclusions: Individual radiation dose response of parotid glands can be measured by dynamic 11 C-methionine PET. The dose response analysis revealed a sigmoid relationship, a threshold radiation dose of 16 Gy, and a mean TD 5 of 30 Gy

  15. Astrocytic tracer dynamics estimated from [1-11C]-acetate PET measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnold, Andrea; Calvetti, Daniela; Gjedde, Albert

    2015-01-01

    We address the problem of estimating the unknown parameters of a model of tracer kinetics from sequences of positron emission tomography (PET) scan data using a statistical sequential algorithm for the inference of magnitudes of dynamic parameters. The method, based on Bayesian statistical...... inference, is a modification of a recently proposed particle filtering and sequential Monte Carlo algorithm, where instead of preassigning the accuracy in the propagation of each particle, we fix the time step and account for the numerical errors in the innovation term. We apply the algorithm to PET images...

  16. Integrated analysis of dynamic FET PET/CT parameters, histology, and methylation profiling of 44 gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhrich, Manuel; Huang, Kristin; Schrimpf, Daniel; Albert, Nathalie L; Hielscher, Thomas; von Deimling, Andreas; Schüller, Ulrich; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia; Haberkorn, Uwe

    2018-05-07

    Dynamic 18 F-FET PET/CT is a powerful tool for the diagnosis of gliomas. 18 F-FET PET time-activity curves (TAC) allow differentiation between histological low-grade gliomas (LGG) and high-grade gliomas (HGG). Molecular methods such as epigenetic profiling are of rising importance for glioma grading and subclassification. Here, we analysed dynamic 18 F-FET PET data, and the histological and epigenetic features of 44 gliomas. Dynamic 18 F-FET PET was performed in 44 patients with newly diagnosed, untreated glioma: 10 WHO grade II glioma, 13 WHO grade III glioma and 21 glioblastoma (GBM). All patients underwent stereotactic biopsy or tumour resection after 18 F-FET PET imaging. As well as histological analysis of tissue samples, DNA was subjected to epigenetic analysis using the Illumina 850 K methylation array. TACs, standardized uptake values corrected for background uptake in healthy tissue (SUVmax/BG), time to peak (TTP) and kinetic modelling parameters were correlated with histological diagnoses and with epigenetic signatures. Multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of 18 F-FET PET in relation to the tumour groups identified by histological and methylation-based analysis. Epigenetic profiling led to substantial tumour reclassification, with six grade II/III gliomas reclassified as GBM. Overlap of HGG-typical TACs and LGG-typical TACs was dramatically reduced when tumours were clustered on the basis of their methylation profile. SUVmax/BG values of GBM were higher than those of LGGs following both histological diagnosis and methylation-based diagnosis. The differences in TTP between GBMs and grade II/III gliomas were greater following methylation-based diagnosis than following histological diagnosis. Kinetic modeling showed that relative K1 and fractal dimension (FD) values significantly differed in histology- and methylation-based GBM and grade II/III glioma between those diagnosed histologically and those diagnosed by

  17. Metabolic 19F MRI an dynamic 18F PET for chemotherapy monitoring in experimental tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brix, G.; Haberkorn, U.; Bellemann, M.E.

    1999-01-01

    The efficient clinical use of chemotherapeutic agents requires the assessment of the uptake and metabolism of the drugs in the tumor as well as in the various organs of the body by using noninvasive imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET). In this overview, we present different metabolic 19 F MRI and dynamic 18 F PET techniques for noninvasive monitoring of fluorine-containing anticancer drugs and evaluate their potentials and limitations within the framework of experimental animal studies. (orig.) [de

  18. Improved resolution and reliability in dynamic PET using Bayesian regularization of MRTM2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agn, Mikael; Svarer, Claus; Frokjaer, Vibe G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model that regularizes dynamic PET data by using a Bayesian framework. We base the model on the well known two-parameter multilinear reference tissue method MRTM2 and regularize on the assumption that spatially close regions have similar parameters. The developed...... model is compared to the conventional approach of improving the low signal-to-noise ratio of PET data, i.e., spatial filtering of each time frame independently by a Gaussian kernel. We show that the model handles high levels of noise better than the conventional approach, while at the same time...

  19. Dynamic PET and Optical Imaging and Compartment Modeling using a Dual-labeled Cyclic RGD Peptide Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lei; Guo, Ning; Li, Quanzheng; Ma, Ying; Jacboson, Orit; Lee, Seulki; Choi, Hak Soo; Mansfield, James R; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine if dynamic optical imaging could provide comparable kinetic parameters to that of dynamic PET imaging by a near-infrared dye/(64)Cu dual-labeled cyclic RGD peptide. The integrin α(v)β(3) binding RGD peptide was conjugated with a macrocyclic chelator 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) for copper labeling and PET imaging and a near-infrared dye ZW-1 for optical imaging. The in vitro biological activity of RGD-C(DOTA)-ZW-1 was characterized by cell staining and receptor binding assay. Sixty-min dynamic PET and optical imaging were acquired on a MDA-MB-435 tumor model. Singular value decomposition (SVD) method was applied to compute the dynamic optical signal from the two-dimensional optical projection images. Compartment models were used to quantitatively analyze and compare the dynamic optical and PET data. The dual-labeled probe (64)Cu-RGD-C(DOTA)-ZW-1 showed integrin specific binding in vitro and in vivo. The binding potential (Bp) derived from dynamic optical imaging (1.762 ± 0.020) is comparable to that from dynamic PET (1.752 ± 0.026). The signal un-mixing process using SVD improved the accuracy of kinetic modeling of 2D dynamic optical data. Our results demonstrate that 2D dynamic optical imaging with SVD analysis could achieve comparable quantitative results as dynamic PET imaging in preclinical xenograft models.

  20. A robust state-space kinetics-guided framework for dynamic PET image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, S; Alessio, A M; Kinahan, P E; Liu, H; Shi, P

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic PET image reconstruction is a challenging issue due to the low SNR and the large quantity of spatio-temporal data. We propose a robust state-space image reconstruction (SSIR) framework for activity reconstruction in dynamic PET. Unlike statistically-based frame-by-frame methods, tracer kinetic modeling is incorporated to provide physiological guidance for the reconstruction, harnessing the temporal information of the dynamic data. Dynamic reconstruction is formulated in a state-space representation, where a compartmental model describes the kinetic processes in a continuous-time system equation, and the imaging data are expressed in a discrete measurement equation. Tracer activity concentrations are treated as the state variables, and are estimated from the dynamic data. Sampled-data H ∞ filtering is adopted for robust estimation. H ∞ filtering makes no assumptions on the system and measurement statistics, and guarantees bounded estimation error for finite-energy disturbances, leading to robust performance for dynamic data with low SNR and/or errors. This alternative reconstruction approach could help us to deal with unpredictable situations in imaging (e.g. data corruption from failed detector blocks) or inaccurate noise models. Experiments on synthetic phantom and patient PET data are performed to demonstrate feasibility of the SSIR framework, and to explore its potential advantages over frame-by-frame statistical reconstruction approaches.

  1. On the fractal nature of dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, A.; Strauss, L.G.; Mikolajczyk, K.; Burger, C.; Lehnert, T.; Bernd, L.; Ewerbeck, V.

    2003-01-01

    Quantification of dynamic PET Studies is generally based on compartmental methods. This is a report about the implementation and assessment of a new non-compartmental method, the fractal dimension (FD), a parameter based on the box counting (BC) procedure of the chaos theory for the analysis of dynamic PET data. The evaluation included 200 malignant lesions in 159 patients with different tumour entities as well as 57 benign lesions for comparison. 101/200 malignant lesions were treated with chemotherapy, whereas 99/200 malignant lesions as well as all 57 benign lesions were untreated within the last six months prior to the PET study with F-18-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). The evaluation of the FDG kinetics was performed using the BC based FD for the time-activity data. Visual assessment demonstrated generally different FDG uptake patterns in the conventional images and the parametric images of FD. FD estimates depended on the number of boxes and the maximum cut-off value used for calculation. Based on the discriminant analysis for benign and malignant lesions, FD demonstrated an accuracy of 76.65% for all patients, 67.7% for the untreated patients and 83.44% for the treated group. The use of the BC based FD is a reliable, new method for the quantification of dynamic PET studies and seems to be in particular helpful for the evaluation of treated malignant lesions. (author)

  2. Direct parametric reconstruction in dynamic PET myocardial perfusion imaging: in vivo studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petibon, Yoann; Rakvongthai, Yothin; El Fakhri, Georges; Ouyang, Jinsong

    2017-05-01

    Dynamic PET myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) used in conjunction with tracer kinetic modeling enables the quantification of absolute myocardial blood flow (MBF). However, MBF maps computed using the traditional indirect method (i.e. post-reconstruction voxel-wise fitting of kinetic model to PET time-activity-curves-TACs) suffer from poor signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Direct reconstruction of kinetic parameters from raw PET projection data has been shown to offer parametric images with higher SNR compared to the indirect method. The aim of this study was to extend and evaluate the performance of a direct parametric reconstruction method using in vivo dynamic PET MPI data for the purpose of quantifying MBF. Dynamic PET MPI studies were performed on two healthy pigs using a Siemens Biograph mMR scanner. List-mode PET data for each animal were acquired following a bolus injection of ~7-8 mCi of 18F-flurpiridaz, a myocardial perfusion agent. Fully-3D dynamic PET sinograms were obtained by sorting the coincidence events into 16 temporal frames covering ~5 min after radiotracer administration. Additionally, eight independent noise realizations of both scans—each containing 1/8th of the total number of events—were generated from the original list-mode data. Dynamic sinograms were then used to compute parametric maps using the conventional indirect method and the proposed direct method. For both methods, a one-tissue compartment model accounting for spillover from the left and right ventricle blood-pools was used to describe the kinetics of 18F-flurpiridaz. An image-derived arterial input function obtained from a TAC taken in the left ventricle cavity was used for tracer kinetic analysis. For the indirect method, frame-by-frame images were estimated using two fully-3D reconstruction techniques: the standard ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) reconstruction algorithm on one side, and the one-step late maximum a posteriori (OSL-MAP) algorithm on the other

  3. Direct parametric reconstruction in dynamic PET myocardial perfusion imaging: in-vivo studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petibon, Yoann; Rakvongthai, Yothin; Fakhri, Georges El; Ouyang, Jinsong

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic PET myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) used in conjunction with tracer kinetic modeling enables the quantification of absolute myocardial blood flow (MBF). However, MBF maps computed using the traditional indirect method (i.e. post-reconstruction voxel-wise fitting of kinetic model to PET time-activity-curves -TACs) suffer from poor signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Direct reconstruction of kinetic parameters from raw PET projection data has been shown to offer parametric images with higher SNR compared to the indirect method. The aim of this study was to extend and evaluate the performance of a direct parametric reconstruction method using in-vivo dynamic PET MPI data for the purpose of quantifying MBF. Dynamic PET MPI studies were performed on two healthy pigs using a Siemens Biograph mMR scanner. List-mode PET data for each animal were acquired following a bolus injection of ~7-8 mCi of 18F-flurpiridaz, a myocardial perfusion agent. Fully-3D dynamic PET sinograms were obtained by sorting the coincidence events into 16 temporal frames covering ~5 min after radiotracer administration. Additionally, eight independent noise realizations of both scans - each containing 1/8th of the total number of events - were generated from the original list-mode data. Dynamic sinograms were then used to compute parametric maps using the conventional indirect method and the proposed direct method. For both methods, a one-tissue compartment model accounting for spillover from the left and right ventricle blood-pools was used to describe the kinetics of 18F-flurpiridaz. An image-derived arterial input function obtained from a TAC taken in the left ventricle cavity was used for tracer kinetic analysis. For the indirect method, frame-by-frame images were estimated using two fully-3D reconstruction techniques: the standard Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization (OSEM) reconstruction algorithm on one side, and the One-Step Late Maximum a Posteriori (OSL-MAP) algorithm on the other

  4. Radiolabelling and evaluation of a novel sulfoxide as a PET imaging agent for tumor hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurens, Evelyn; Yeoh, Shinn Dee; Rigopoulos, Angela; Cao, Diana; Cartwright, Glenn A.; O'Keefe, Graeme J.; Tochon-Danguy, Henri J.; White, Jonathan M.; Scott, Andrew M.; Ackermann, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    [ 18 F]FMISO is the most widely validated PET radiotracer for imaging hypoxic tissue. However, as a result of the pharmacokinetics of [ 18 F]FMISO a 2 h wait between tracer administration and patient scanning is required for optimal image acquisition. In order to develop hypoxia imaging agents with faster kinetics, we have synthesised and evaluated several F-18 labelled anilino sulfoxides. In this manuscript we report on the synthesis, in vitro and in vivo evaluation of a novel fluoroethyltriazolyl propargyl anilino sulfoxide. The radiolabelling of the novel tracer was achieved via 2-[ 18 F]fluoroethyl azide click chemistry. Radiochemical yields were 23 ± 4% based on 2-[ 18 F]fluoroethyl azide and 7 ± 2% based on K[ 18 F]F. The radiotracer did not undergo metabolism or defluorination in an in vitro assay using S9 liver fractions. Imaging studies using SK-RC-52 tumors in BALB/c nude mice have indicated that the tracer may have a higher pO 2 threshold than [ 18 F]FMISO for uptake in hypoxic tumors. Although clearance from muscle was faster than [ 18 F]FMISO, uptake in hypoxic tumors was slower. The average tumor to muscle ratio at 2 h post injection in large, hypoxic tumors with a volume greater than 686 mm 3 was 1.7, which was similar to the observed ratio of 1.75 for [ 18 F]FMISO. Although the new tracer showed improved pharmacokinetics when compared with the previously synthesised sulfoxides, further modifications to the chemical structure need to be made in order to offer significant in vivo imaging advantages over [ 18 F]FMISO

  5. (68)Ga-PSMA-11 dynamic PET/CT imaging in biochemical relapse of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachpekidis, C; Eder, M; Kopka, K; Mier, W; Hadaschik, B A; Haberkorn, U; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, A

    2016-07-01

    We aim to investigate the pharmacokinetics and distribution of the recently clinically introduced radioligand (68)Ga-PSMA-11 in men with recurrent prostate cancer (PC) by means of dynamic and whole-body PET/CT. The correlation between PSA levels and (68)Ga-PSMA-11 PET parameters is also investigated. 31 patients with biochemical failure after primary PC treatment with curative intent (median age 71.0 years) were enrolled in the analysis. The median PSA value was 2.0 ng/mL (range = 0.1 - 130.0 ng/mL) and the median Gleason score was 7 (range = 5 - 9). 8/31 (25.8 %) of the included patients had a PSA value dynamic PET/CT (dPET/CT) scanning (60 min) of the pelvis and lower abdomen as well as whole-body PET/CT with (68)Ga-PSMA-11. dPET/CT assessment was based on qualitative evaluation, SUV calculation, and quantitative analysis based on a two-tissue compartment model and a non-compartmental approach leading to the extraction of fractal dimension (FD). 22/31 patients (71.0 %) were (68)Ga-PSMA-11-positive, while 9/31 (29.0 %) patients were (68)Ga-PSMA-11-negative. The median PSA value in the (68)Ga-PSMA-11-positive group was significantly higher (median = 2.35 ng/mL; range = 0.19 - 130.0 ng/mL) than in the (68)Ga-PSMA-11-negative group (median value: 0.34 ng/mL; range = 0.10 - 4.20 ng/mL). A total of 76 lesions were semi-quantitatively evaluated. PC recurrence-associated lesions demonstrated a mean SUVaverage = 12.4 (median = 9.0; range = 2.2 - 84.5) and mean SUVmax = 18.8 (median = 14.1; range = 3.1 - 120.3). Dynamic PET/CT studies of the pelvis revealed the following mean values for the PC recurrence-suspicious lesions: K1 = 0.26, k3 = 0.30, influx = 0.14 and FD = 1.24. Time-activity curves derived from PC-recurrence indicative lesions revealed an increasing (68)Ga-PSMA-11 accumulation during dynamic PET acquisition. Correlation analysis revealed a moderate, but significant, correlation between PSA

  6. Role of FDG-PET/MRI, FDG-PET/CT, and Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Perfusion MRI in Differentiating Radiation Necrosis from Tumor Recurrence in Glioblastomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojjati, Mojgan; Badve, Chaitra; Garg, Vasant; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Rogers, Lisa; Sloan, Andrew; Faulhaber, Peter; Ros, Pablo R; Wolansky, Leo J

    2018-01-01

    To compare the utility of quantitative PET/MRI, dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion MRI (pMRI), and PET/CT in differentiating radiation necrosis (RN) from tumor recurrence (TR) in patients with treated glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The study included 24 patients with GBM treated with surgery, radiotherapy, and temozolomide who presented with progression on imaging follow-up. All patients underwent PET/MRI and pMRI during a single examination. Additionally, 19 of 24 patients underwent PET/CT on the same day. Diagnosis was established by pathology in 17 of 24 and by clinical/radiologic consensus in 7 of 24. For the quantitative PET/MRI and PET/CT analysis, a region of interest (ROI) was drawn around each lesion and within the contralateral white matter. Lesion to contralateral white matter ratios for relative maximum, mean, and median were calculated. For pMRI, lesion ROI was drawn on the cerebral blood volume (CBV) maps and histogram metrics were calculated. Diagnostic performance for each metric was assessed using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis and area under curve (AUC) was calculated. In 24 patients, 28 lesions were identified. For PET/MRI, relative mean ≥ 1.31 resulted in AUC of .94 with both sensitivity and negative predictive values (NPVs) of 100%. For pMRI, CBV max ≥3.32 yielded an AUC of .94 with both sensitivity and NPV measuring 100%. The joint model utilizing r-mean (PET/MRI) and CBV mode (pMRI) resulted in AUC of 1.0. Our study demonstrates that quantitative PET/MRI parameters in combination with DSC pMRI provide the best diagnostic utility in distinguishing RN from TR in treated GBMs. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Neuroimaging published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society of Neuroimaging.

  7. Direct Patlak Reconstruction From Dynamic PET Data Using the Kernel Method With MRI Information Based on Structural Similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Kuang; Cheng-Liao, Jinxiu; Wang, Guobao; Chen, Kevin T; Catana, Ciprian; Qi, Jinyi

    2018-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a functional imaging modality widely used in oncology, cardiology, and neuroscience. It is highly sensitive, but suffers from relatively poor spatial resolution, as compared with anatomical imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). With the recent development of combined PET/MR systems, we can improve the PET image quality by incorporating MR information into image reconstruction. Previously, kernel learning has been successfully embedded into static and dynamic PET image reconstruction using either PET temporal or MRI information. Here, we combine both PET temporal and MRI information adaptively to improve the quality of direct Patlak reconstruction. We examined different approaches to combine the PET and MRI information in kernel learning to address the issue of potential mismatches between MRI and PET signals. Computer simulations and hybrid real-patient data acquired on a simultaneous PET/MR scanner were used to evaluate the proposed methods. Results show that the method that combines PET temporal information and MRI spatial information adaptively based on the structure similarity index has the best performance in terms of noise reduction and resolution improvement.

  8. Dynamic whole body PET parametric imaging: I. Concept, acquisition protocol optimization and clinical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A.; Lodge, Martin A.; Tahari, Abdel K.; Zhou, Y.; Wahl, Richard L.; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-01-01

    Static whole body PET/CT, employing the standardized uptake value (SUV), is considered the standard clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment response monitoring for a wide range of oncologic malignancies. Alternative PET protocols involving dynamic acquisition of temporal images have been implemented in the research setting, allowing quantification of tracer dynamics, an important capability for tumor characterization and treatment response monitoring. Nonetheless, dynamic protocols have been confined to single bed-coverage limiting the axial field-of-view to ~15–20 cm, and have not been translated to the routine clinical context of whole-body PET imaging for the inspection of disseminated disease. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. We investigate solutions to address the challenges of: (i) long acquisitions, (ii) small number of dynamic frames per bed, and (iii) non-invasive quantification of kinetics in the plasma. In the present study, a novel dynamic (4D) whole body PET acquisition protocol of ~45min total length is presented, composed of (i) an initial 6-min dynamic PET scan (24 frames) over the heart, followed by (ii) a sequence of multi-pass multi-bed PET scans (6 passes x 7 bed positions, each scanned for 45sec). Standard Patlak linear graphical analysis modeling was employed, coupled with image-derived plasma input function measurements. Ordinary least squares (OLS) Patlak estimation was used as the baseline regression method to quantify the physiological parameters of tracer uptake rate Ki and total blood distribution volume V on an individual voxel basis. Extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies, using a wide set of published kinetic FDG parameters and GATE and XCAT platforms, were conducted to optimize the acquisition protocol from a range of 10 different clinically

  9. Dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging: I. Concept, acquisition protocol optimization and clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Lodge, Martin A; Tahari, Abdel K; Zhou, Y; Wahl, Richard L; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-10-21

    Static whole-body PET/CT, employing the standardized uptake value (SUV), is considered the standard clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment response monitoring for a wide range of oncologic malignancies. Alternative PET protocols involving dynamic acquisition of temporal images have been implemented in the research setting, allowing quantification of tracer dynamics, an important capability for tumor characterization and treatment response monitoring. Nonetheless, dynamic protocols have been confined to single-bed-coverage limiting the axial field-of-view to ~15-20 cm, and have not been translated to the routine clinical context of whole-body PET imaging for the inspection of disseminated disease. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. We investigate solutions to address the challenges of: (i) long acquisitions, (ii) small number of dynamic frames per bed, and (iii) non-invasive quantification of kinetics in the plasma. In the present study, a novel dynamic (4D) whole-body PET acquisition protocol of ~45 min total length is presented, composed of (i) an initial 6 min dynamic PET scan (24 frames) over the heart, followed by (ii) a sequence of multi-pass multi-bed PET scans (six passes × seven bed positions, each scanned for 45 s). Standard Patlak linear graphical analysis modeling was employed, coupled with image-derived plasma input function measurements. Ordinary least squares Patlak estimation was used as the baseline regression method to quantify the physiological parameters of tracer uptake rate Ki and total blood distribution volume V on an individual voxel basis. Extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies, using a wide set of published kinetic FDG parameters and GATE and XCAT platforms, were conducted to optimize the acquisition protocol from a range of ten different clinically

  10. Dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging: I. Concept, acquisition protocol optimization and clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Lodge, Martin A; Tahari, Abdel K; Zhou, Y; Wahl, Richard L; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-01-01

    Static whole-body PET/CT, employing the standardized uptake value (SUV), is considered the standard clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment response monitoring for a wide range of oncologic malignancies. Alternative PET protocols involving dynamic acquisition of temporal images have been implemented in the research setting, allowing quantification of tracer dynamics, an important capability for tumor characterization and treatment response monitoring. Nonetheless, dynamic protocols have been confined to single-bed-coverage limiting the axial field-of-view to ∼15–20 cm, and have not been translated to the routine clinical context of whole-body PET imaging for the inspection of disseminated disease. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. We investigate solutions to address the challenges of: (i) long acquisitions, (ii) small number of dynamic frames per bed, and (iii) non-invasive quantification of kinetics in the plasma. In the present study, a novel dynamic (4D) whole-body PET acquisition protocol of ∼45 min total length is presented, composed of (i) an initial 6 min dynamic PET scan (24 frames) over the heart, followed by (ii) a sequence of multi-pass multi-bed PET scans (six passes × seven bed positions, each scanned for 45 s). Standard Patlak linear graphical analysis modeling was employed, coupled with image-derived plasma input function measurements. Ordinary least squares Patlak estimation was used as the baseline regression method to quantify the physiological parameters of tracer uptake rate K i and total blood distribution volume V on an individual voxel basis. Extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies, using a wide set of published kinetic FDG parameters and GATE and XCAT platforms, were conducted to optimize the acquisition protocol from a range of ten different

  11. Dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging: I. Concept, acquisition protocol optimization and clinical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A.; Lodge, Martin A.; Tahari, Abdel K.; Zhou, Y.; Wahl, Richard L.; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-10-01

    Static whole-body PET/CT, employing the standardized uptake value (SUV), is considered the standard clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment response monitoring for a wide range of oncologic malignancies. Alternative PET protocols involving dynamic acquisition of temporal images have been implemented in the research setting, allowing quantification of tracer dynamics, an important capability for tumor characterization and treatment response monitoring. Nonetheless, dynamic protocols have been confined to single-bed-coverage limiting the axial field-of-view to ˜15-20 cm, and have not been translated to the routine clinical context of whole-body PET imaging for the inspection of disseminated disease. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. We investigate solutions to address the challenges of: (i) long acquisitions, (ii) small number of dynamic frames per bed, and (iii) non-invasive quantification of kinetics in the plasma. In the present study, a novel dynamic (4D) whole-body PET acquisition protocol of ˜45 min total length is presented, composed of (i) an initial 6 min dynamic PET scan (24 frames) over the heart, followed by (ii) a sequence of multi-pass multi-bed PET scans (six passes × seven bed positions, each scanned for 45 s). Standard Patlak linear graphical analysis modeling was employed, coupled with image-derived plasma input function measurements. Ordinary least squares Patlak estimation was used as the baseline regression method to quantify the physiological parameters of tracer uptake rate Ki and total blood distribution volume V on an individual voxel basis. Extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies, using a wide set of published kinetic FDG parameters and GATE and XCAT platforms, were conducted to optimize the acquisition protocol from a range of ten different clinically

  12. Simultaneous determination of dynamic cardiac metabolism and function using PET/MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Gregory P; Vildberg, Lauren; Goss, Kara; Aggarwal, Niti; Eldridge, Marlowe; McMillan, Alan B

    2018-05-01

    Cardiac metabolic changes in heart disease precede overt contractile dysfunction. However, metabolism and function are not typically assessed together in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to develop a cardiac positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) stress test to assess the dynamic relationship between contractile function and metabolism in a preclinical model. Following an overnight fast, healthy pigs (45-50 kg) were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated. 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) solution was administered intravenously at a constant rate of 0.01 mL/s for 60 minutes. A cardiac PET/MR stress test was performed using normoxic gas (F I O 2  = .209) and hypoxic gas (F I O 2  = .12). Simultaneous cardiac imaging was performed on an integrated 3T PET/MR scanner. Hypoxic stress induced a significant increase in heart rate, cardiac output, left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF), and peak torsion. There was a significant decline in arterial SpO 2 , LV end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes in hypoxia. Increased LV systolic function was coupled with an increase in myocardial FDG uptake (Ki) during hypoxic stress. PET/MR with continuous FDG infusion captures dynamic changes in both cardiac metabolism and contractile function. This technique warrants evaluation in human cardiac disease for assessment of subtle functional and metabolic abnormalities.

  13. Diagnostic value of kinetic analysis using dynamic FDG PET in immunocompetent patients with primary CNS lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiyama, Yoshihiro; Yamamoto, Yuka; Monden, Toshihide; Sasakawa, Yasuhiro; Satoh, Katashi; Ohkawa, Motoomi; Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the accumulation of FDG in immunocompetent patients with primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma using qualitative and quantitative PET images and to compare baseline with follow-up PET after therapy. Twelve immunocompetent patients with CNS lymphoma were examined. Dynamic emission data were acquired for 60 min immediately following injection of FDG. In seven patients, repeated PET studies were performed after treatment. Applying a three-compartment five-parameter model, K 1 , k 2 , k 3 , k 4 , vascular fraction (V B ) and cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMR Glc ) were obtained. We evaluated the FDG uptake visually using qualitative and parametric images and quantitatively using parametric images. A total of 12 lesions were identified in ten patients with newly diagnosed CNS lymphoma. On visual analysis, ten lesions showed an increase on qualitative images, eight showed an increase on K 1 images, 12 showed an increase on k 3 images and ten showed an increase on CMR Glc images. On quantitative analysis, k 2 , k 3 and CMR Glc values of the lesion were significantly different from those of the normal grey matter (p 3 and CMR Glc images. The K 1 , k 2 , k 3 and CMR Glc values after treatment were significantly different from those obtained before treatment (p 3 , using dynamic FDG PET might be helpful for diagnosis of CNS lymphoma and for monitoring therapeutic assessment. (orig.)

  14. 3.5D dynamic PET image reconstruction incorporating kinetics-based clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Lijun; Chen Wufan; Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Rahmim, Arman; Tang Jing

    2012-01-01

    Standard 3D dynamic positron emission tomographic (PET) imaging consists of independent image reconstructions of individual frames followed by application of appropriate kinetic model to the time activity curves at the voxel or region-of-interest (ROI). The emerging field of 4D PET reconstruction, by contrast, seeks to move beyond this scheme and incorporate information from multiple frames within the image reconstruction task. Here we propose a novel reconstruction framework aiming to enhance quantitative accuracy of parametric images via introduction of priors based on voxel kinetics, as generated via clustering of preliminary reconstructed dynamic images to define clustered neighborhoods of voxels with similar kinetics. This is then followed by straightforward maximum a posteriori (MAP) 3D PET reconstruction as applied to individual frames; and as such the method is labeled ‘3.5D’ image reconstruction. The use of cluster-based priors has the advantage of further enhancing quantitative performance in dynamic PET imaging, because: (a) there are typically more voxels in clusters than in conventional local neighborhoods, and (b) neighboring voxels with distinct kinetics are less likely to be clustered together. Using realistic simulated 11 C-raclopride dynamic PET data, the quantitative performance of the proposed method was investigated. Parametric distribution-volume (DV) and DV ratio (DVR) images were estimated from dynamic image reconstructions using (a) maximum-likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM), and MAP reconstructions using (b) the quadratic prior (QP-MAP), (c) the Green prior (GP-MAP) and (d, e) two proposed cluster-based priors (CP-U-MAP and CP-W-MAP), followed by graphical modeling, and were qualitatively and quantitatively compared for 11 ROIs. Overall, the proposed dynamic PET reconstruction methodology resulted in substantial visual as well as quantitative accuracy improvements (in terms of noise versus bias performance) for parametric DV

  15. High throughput static and dynamic small animal imaging using clinical PET/CT: potential preclinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aide, Nicolas; Desmonts, Cedric; Agostini, Denis; Bardet, Stephane; Bouvard, Gerard; Beauregard, Jean-Mathieu; Roselt, Peter; Neels, Oliver; Beyer, Thomas; Kinross, Kathryn; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate state-of-the-art clinical PET/CT technology in performing static and dynamic imaging of several mice simultaneously. A mouse-sized phantom was imaged mimicking simultaneous imaging of three mice with computation of recovery coefficients (RCs) and spillover ratios (SORs). Fifteen mice harbouring abdominal or subcutaneous tumours were imaged on clinical PET/CT with point spread function (PSF) reconstruction after injection of [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose or [18F]fluorothymidine. Three of these mice were imaged alone and simultaneously at radial positions -5, 0 and 5 cm. The remaining 12 tumour-bearing mice were imaged in groups of 3 to establish the quantitative accuracy of PET data using ex vivo gamma counting as the reference. Finally, a dynamic scan was performed in three mice simultaneously after the injection of 68 Ga-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). For typical lesion sizes of 7-8 mm phantom experiments indicated RCs of 0.42 and 0.76 for ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) and PSF reconstruction, respectively. For PSF reconstruction, SOR air and SOR water were 5.3 and 7.5%, respectively. A strong correlation (r 2 = 0.97, p 2 = 0.98; slope = 0.89, p 2 = 0.96; slope = 0.62, p 68 Ga-EDTA dynamic acquisition. New generation clinical PET/CT can be used for simultaneous imaging of multiple small animals in experiments requiring high throughput and where a dedicated small animal PET system is not available. (orig.)

  16. Dynamic PET simulator via tomographic emission projection for kinetic modeling and parametric image studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häggström, Ida; Beattie, Bradley J; Schmidtlein, C Ross

    2016-06-01

    To develop and evaluate a fast and simple tool called dpetstep (Dynamic PET Simulator of Tracers via Emission Projection), for dynamic PET simulations as an alternative to Monte Carlo (MC), useful for educational purposes and evaluation of the effects of the clinical environment, postprocessing choices, etc., on dynamic and parametric images. The tool was developed in matlab using both new and previously reported modules of petstep (PET Simulator of Tracers via Emission Projection). Time activity curves are generated for each voxel of the input parametric image, whereby effects of imaging system blurring, counting noise, scatters, randoms, and attenuation are simulated for each frame. Each frame is then reconstructed into images according to the user specified method, settings, and corrections. Reconstructed images were compared to MC data, and simple Gaussian noised time activity curves (GAUSS). dpetstep was 8000 times faster than MC. Dynamic images from dpetstep had a root mean square error that was within 4% on average of that of MC images, whereas the GAUSS images were within 11%. The average bias in dpetstep and MC images was the same, while GAUSS differed by 3% points. Noise profiles in dpetstep images conformed well to MC images, confirmed visually by scatter plot histograms, and statistically by tumor region of interest histogram comparisons that showed no significant differences (p dynamic PET and parametric images, and demonstrated that it generates both images and subsequent parametric images with very similar noise properties to those of MC images, in a fraction of the time. They believe dpetstep to be very useful for generating fast, simple, and realistic results, however since it uses simple scatter and random models it may not be suitable for studies investigating these phenomena. dpetstep can be downloaded free of cost from https://github.com/CRossSchmidtlein/dPETSTEP.

  17. Dynamic PET image reconstruction integrating temporal regularization associated with respiratory motion correction for applications in oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlin, Thibaut; Visvikis, Dimitris; Fernandez, Philippe; Lamare, Frédéric

    2018-02-01

    Respiratory motion reduces both the qualitative and quantitative accuracy of PET images in oncology. This impact is more significant for quantitative applications based on kinetic modeling, where dynamic acquisitions are associated with limited statistics due to the necessity of enhanced temporal resolution. The aim of this study is to address these drawbacks, by combining a respiratory motion correction approach with temporal regularization in a unique reconstruction algorithm for dynamic PET imaging. Elastic transformation parameters for the motion correction are estimated from the non-attenuation-corrected PET images. The derived displacement matrices are subsequently used in a list-mode based OSEM reconstruction algorithm integrating a temporal regularization between the 3D dynamic PET frames, based on temporal basis functions. These functions are simultaneously estimated at each iteration, along with their relative coefficients for each image voxel. Quantitative evaluation has been performed using dynamic FDG PET/CT acquisitions of lung cancer patients acquired on a GE DRX system. The performance of the proposed method is compared with that of a standard multi-frame OSEM reconstruction algorithm. The proposed method achieved substantial improvements in terms of noise reduction while accounting for loss of contrast due to respiratory motion. Results on simulated data showed that the proposed 4D algorithms led to bias reduction values up to 40% in both tumor and blood regions for similar standard deviation levels, in comparison with a standard 3D reconstruction. Patlak parameter estimations on reconstructed images with the proposed reconstruction methods resulted in 30% and 40% bias reduction in the tumor and lung region respectively for the Patlak slope, and a 30% bias reduction for the intercept in the tumor region (a similar Patlak intercept was achieved in the lung area). Incorporation of the respiratory motion correction using an elastic model along with a

  18. Targeted microbubbles for imaging tumor angiogenesis: assessment of whole-body biodistribution with dynamic micro-PET in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willmann, Jürgen K; Cheng, Zhen; Davis, Corrine

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate in vivo whole-body biodistribution of microbubbles (MBs) targeted to tumor angiogenesis-related vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor 2 (VEGFR2) by using dynamic micro-positron emission tomography (PET) in living mice.......To evaluate in vivo whole-body biodistribution of microbubbles (MBs) targeted to tumor angiogenesis-related vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor 2 (VEGFR2) by using dynamic micro-positron emission tomography (PET) in living mice....

  19. Estimation of Input Function from Dynamic PET Brain Data Using Bayesian Blind Source Separation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tichý, Ondřej; Šmídl, Václav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 4 (2015), s. 1273-1287 ISSN 1820-0214 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-29225S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : blind source separation * Variational Bayes method * dynamic PET * input function * deconvolution Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 0.623, year: 2015 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2015/AS/tichy-0450509.pdf

  20. Quantification of renal cortical blood flow using factor analysis of O-15 water dynamic PET images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Kang Jun; Ahn, Ji Young; Lee, Jae Sung; Paeng, Jin Chul; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lee, Dong Soo; Noh, Tae Won; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul

    2000-01-01

    To obtain spatial distribution of renal factor images, input function, and regional tissue time-activity curve (TAC) from O-15 water dynamic PET images non-invasively, factor analysis (FA) was used. O-15 water dynamic PET scans were performed on 3 normal dogs (22 ∼ 29 kg) with the bolus injection of O-15 water (555 ∼ 740 Mbq). We performed FA on the masked dynamic images and obtained the pure TACs and the corresponding factor images. Microsphere experiment also was performed. 37MBq of microsphere labeled with Sc-46 was injected into the left ventricle. Arterial input functions derived from the PET images using FA were compared with the invasively derived arterial blood samples. The renal cortical blood flow using the TACs by FA was within the normal range of 1.23 ∼ 2.46 ml/min/g. In microsphere study, the renal cortical blood flow of left kidney by FA was 2.49±0.47 ml/min/g (1.81∼2.90 ml/min/g) and by microsphere was 2.52 ±0.19 ml/min/g (2.34 ∼2.68 ml/min/g). In right kidney, flow by FA was 2.02 ±0.32 ml/min/g (1.82∼2.49 ml/min/g) and by microsphere was 2.49 ±0.27 ml/min/g (2.02∼2.7). FA is a useful and robust method to extract input functions and tissue TACs from O-15 dynamic renal PET. Renal cortical blood flow can be estimated non-invasively using FA and it will be helpful for the assessment of renal functional disease

  1. Dynamic {sup 11}C-methionine PET analysis has an additional value for differentiating malignant tumors from granulomas: an experimental study using small animal PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Songji; Zhao, Yan [Hokkaido University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Hokkaido University, Department of Tracer Kinetics and Bioanalysis, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Kuge, Yuji; Hatano, Toshiyuki [Hokkaido University, Central Institute of Isotope Science, Sapporo (Japan); Yi, Min; Kohanawa, Masashi [Hokkaido University, Department of Advanced Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Magota, Keiichi; Tamaki, Nagara [Hokkaido University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Nishijima, Ken-ichi [Hokkaido University, Department of Molecular Imaging, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)

    2011-10-15

    We evaluated whether the dynamic profile of L-{sup 11}C-methionine ({sup 11}C-MET) may have an additional value in differentiating malignant tumors from granulomas in experimental rat models by small animal positron emission tomography (PET). Rhodococcus aurantiacus and allogenic rat C6 glioma cells were inoculated, respectively, into the right and left calf muscles to generate a rat model bearing both granulomas and tumors (n = 6). Ten days after the inoculations, dynamic {sup 11}C-MET PET was performed by small animal PET up to 120 min after injection of {sup 11}C-MET. The next day, after overnight fasting, the rats were injected with {sup 18}F-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose ({sup 18}F-FDG), and dynamic {sup 18}F-FDG PET was performed up to 180 min. The time-activity curves, static images, and mean standardized uptake value (SUV) in the lesions were calculated. {sup 11}C-MET uptake in the granuloma showed a slow exponential clearance after an initial distribution, while the uptake in the tumor gradually increased with time. The dynamic pattern of {sup 11}C-MET uptake in the granuloma was significantly different from that in the tumor (p < 0.001). In the static analysis of {sup 11}C-MET, visual assessment and SUV analysis could not differentiate the tumor from the granuloma in all cases, although the mean SUV in the granuloma (1.48 {+-} 0.09) was significantly lower than that in the tumor (1.72 {+-} 0.18, p < 0.01). The dynamic patterns, static images, and mean SUVs of {sup 18}F-FDG in the granuloma were similar to those in the tumor (p = NS). Dynamic {sup 11}C-MET PET has an additional value for differentiating malignant tumors from granulomatous lesions, which deserves further elucidation in clinical settings. (orig.)

  2. Correlation of biological aggressiveness assessed by 11C-methionine PET and hypoxic burden assessed by 18F-fluoromisonidazole PET in newly diagnosed glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Nobuyuki; Miyake, Keisuke; Okada, Masaki; Tamiya, Takashi; Maeda, Yukito; Yamamoto, Yuka; Nishiyama, Yoshihiro; Kudomi, Nobuyuki

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is characterized by tissue hypoxia associated with resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. To clarify the biological link between hypoxia and tumour-induced neovascularization and tumour aggressiveness, we analysed detailed volumetric and spatial information of viable hypoxic tissue assessed by 18 F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) PET relative to neovascularization in Gd-enhanced MRI and tumour aggressiveness by L-methyl- 11 C-methionine (MET) PET in newly diagnosed GBMs. Ten patients with newly diagnosed GBMs were investigated with FMISO PET, MET PET and Gd-enhanced MRI before surgery. Tumour volumes were calculated by performing a three-dimensional threshold-based volume of interest (VOI) analysis for metabolically active volume on MET PET (MET uptake indices of ≥1.3 and ≥1.5) and Gd-enhanced volume on MRI. FMISO PET was scaled to the blood FMISO activity to create tumour to blood (T/B) images. The hypoxic volume (HV) was defined as the region with T/B greater than 1.2. PET and MR images of each patient were coregistered to analyse the spatial location of viable hypoxic tissue relative to neovascularization and active tumour extension. Metabolically active tumour volumes defined using MET uptake indices of ≥1.3 and ≥1.5 and the volumes of Gd enhancement showed a strong correlation (r = 0.86, p < 0.01 for an index of ≥1.3 and r = 0.77, p < 0.05 for an index of ≥1.5). The HVs were also excellently correlated with the volumes of Gd enhancement (r = 0.94, p < 0.01). The metabolically active tumour volumes as defined by a MET uptake index of ≥1.3 and the HVs exhibited a strong correlation (r = 0.87, p < 0.01). On superimposed images, the metabolically active area on MET PET defined by a MET uptake index of ≥1.3 was usually larger than the area of the Gd enhancement and about 20-30% of the MET area extended outside the area of the enhancement. On the other hand, the surface area of viable hypoxic tissue with a T/B cutoff of

  3. Dynamic 11C-methionine PET analysis has an additional value for differentiating malignant tumors from granulomas: an experimental study using small animal PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Songji; Zhao, Yan; Kuge, Yuji; Hatano, Toshiyuki; Yi, Min; Kohanawa, Masashi; Magota, Keiichi; Tamaki, Nagara; Nishijima, Ken-ichi

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated whether the dynamic profile of L- 11 C-methionine ( 11 C-MET) may have an additional value in differentiating malignant tumors from granulomas in experimental rat models by small animal positron emission tomography (PET). Rhodococcus aurantiacus and allogenic rat C6 glioma cells were inoculated, respectively, into the right and left calf muscles to generate a rat model bearing both granulomas and tumors (n = 6). Ten days after the inoculations, dynamic 11 C-MET PET was performed by small animal PET up to 120 min after injection of 11 C-MET. The next day, after overnight fasting, the rats were injected with 18 F-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose ( 18 F-FDG), and dynamic 18 F-FDG PET was performed up to 180 min. The time-activity curves, static images, and mean standardized uptake value (SUV) in the lesions were calculated. 11 C-MET uptake in the granuloma showed a slow exponential clearance after an initial distribution, while the uptake in the tumor gradually increased with time. The dynamic pattern of 11 C-MET uptake in the granuloma was significantly different from that in the tumor (p 11 C-MET, visual assessment and SUV analysis could not differentiate the tumor from the granuloma in all cases, although the mean SUV in the granuloma (1.48 ± 0.09) was significantly lower than that in the tumor (1.72 ± 0.18, p 18 F-FDG in the granuloma were similar to those in the tumor (p = NS). Dynamic 11 C-MET PET has an additional value for differentiating malignant tumors from granulomatous lesions, which deserves further elucidation in clinical settings. (orig.)

  4. Combined early dynamic (18)F-FDG PET/CT and conventional whole-body (18)F-FDG PET/CT provide one-stop imaging for detecting hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shao-Bo; Wu, Hu-Bing; Wang, Quan-Shi; Zhou, Wen-Lan; Tian, Ying; Li, Hong-Sheng; Ji, Yun-Hai; Lv, Liang

    2015-06-01

    It is widely accepted that conventional (18)F-FDG PET/CT (whole-body static (18)F-FDG PET/CT, WB (18)F-FDG PET/CT) has a low detection rate for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We prospectively assessed the role of early dynamic (18)F-FDG PET/CT (ED (18)F-FDG PET/CT) and WB (18)F-FDG PET/CT in detecting HCC, and we quantified the added value of ED (18)F-FDG PET/CT to WB (18)F-FDG PET/CT. Twenty-two patients with 37 HCC tumors (HCCs) who underwent both a liver ED (18)F-FDG PET/CT (performed simultaneously with a 5.5 MBq/kg (18)F-FDG bolus injection and continued for 240 s) and a WB (18)F-FDG PET/CT were enrolled in the study. The WB (18)F-FDG PET/CT and ED (18)F-FDG PET/CT scans were positive in 56.7% (21/37) and 78.4% (29/37) HCCs, respectively (PPET/CT in conjunction with WB (18)F-FDG PET/CT (one-stop (18)F-FDG PET/CT) improved the positive detection rates of WB and ED (18)F-FDG PET/CT alone from 56.7% and 78.4% to 91.9% (34/37) (P0.05, respectively). One-stop (18)F-FDG PET/CT appears to be useful to improve WB (18)F-FDG PET/CT for HCC detection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Correlation between {sup 18}F-fluoromisonidazole PET and expression of HIF-1α and VEGF in newly diagnosed and recurrent malignant gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawai, Nobuyuki; Ogawa, Daisuke; Miyake, Keisuke; Tamiya, Takashi [Kagawa University, Department of Neurological Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa (Japan); Lin, Wei [Kagawa University, Department of Neurological Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa (Japan); Fourth Military Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, Xijing Hospital, Xi' an (China); Cao, Wei-Dong [Fourth Military Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, Xijing Hospital, Xi' an (China); Haba, Reiji [Kagawa University, Department of Diagnostic Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa (Japan); Maeda, Yukito; Yamamoto, Yuka; Nishiyama, Yoshihiro [Kagawa University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    Hypoxia and its consequences at the molecular level promote tumour progression and affect patient prognosis. One of the main early cellular events evoked by hypoxia is induction of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) and subsequent upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). In this study we sought to determine whether hypoxia detected by {sup 18}F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) PET accurately reflects the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF in the tumour and can be used as a biomarker of antiangiogenic treatment and as a prognostic factor in newly diagnosed and recurrent malignant gliomas. Enrolled in this study were 32 patients with newly diagnosed glioma and 16 with recurrent glioma of grade III or grade IV. All the patients had undergone FMISO PET preoperatively. The maximum tumour-to-blood FMISO activity ratio (T/B{sub max}) was used to evaluate the degree of tumour hypoxia and the hypoxic volume (HV) was calculated using a tumour-to-blood FMISO uptake ratio of ≥1.2. Immunohistochemical expressions of HIF-1α and VEGF were evaluated semiquantitatively using the immunoreactivity score (IRS, scores 0 to 12) and the correlation was examined between IRS of HIF-1α or VEGF and FMISO uptake of the tumour (SUV{sub tumour}) using navigation-based sampling. Survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method in relation to the T/B{sub max} and the HV. The T/B{sub max} and the HV in grade IV gliomas were significantly higher than in grade III gliomas (P < 0.01 and P < 0.01, respectively). Moderate to strong HIF-1α and VEGF expression was observed in the majority of malignant gliomas. The IRS of HIF-1α and VEGF in the tumour were not significantly different between grade III and grade IV gliomas. The IRS of HIF-1α in the tumour did not correlate with the SUV{sub tumour} of FMISO in either newly diagnosed or recurrent glioma. There was a significant but weak correlation between the IRS of VEGF and the SUV{sub tumour} of FMISO in newly diagnosed glioma, but not

  6. Static and dynamic (18) FDG-PET in normal hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Marcy J; Wall, Jonathan S; Stuckey, Alan; Daniel, Gregory B

    2011-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is often used to stage and monitor human cancer and has recently been used in a similar fashion in veterinary medicine. The most commonly used radiopharmaceutical is 2-Deoxy-2-[(18) F]-Fluoro-d-glucose ((18) F-FDG), which is concentrated and trapped within cells that use glucose as their energy substrate. We characterized the normal distribution of (18) F-FDG in 10 healthy Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis) by performing whole body PET scans at steady state, 60min after injection. Significant variability was found in the intestinal activity. Avian species are known to reflux fluid and electrolytes from their cloaca into their colon. To evaluate reflux as the cause of variability in intestinal distribution of (18) F-FDG, dynamic PET scans were performed on the coelomic cavity of six Hispaniolan Amazon parrots from time 0 to 60min postinjection of radiotracer. Reflux of radioactive material from the cloaca into the colon occurred in all birds to varying degrees and occurred before 60min. To evaluate the intestinal tract of clinical avian patients, dynamic scans must be performed starting immediately after injection so that increased radioactivity due to metabolism or hypermetabolic lesions such as cancer can be differentiated from increased radioactivity due to reflux of fluid from the cloaca. © 2010 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  7. 13N-NH3 PET dynamic imaging in the diagnosis of hypopituitarism: preliminary result

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiangsong; He Zuoxiang; Tang Anwu; Qiao Suixian

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of diagnosing hypopituitarism with 13N-NH3 PET dynamic imaging. Methods: Eight volunteers (2 male, 6 female, age from 23 to 53 years old) for control and 7 patients (6 female, 20-42 years old, 1 male, 21 year old) were enrolled in this study. 13N-NH3 PET dynamic imaging was performed under 3-D acquisition on the ECAT HR+ PET scanner (Siemens/CTI) with 5-minute transmission scan. The emission protocol was a 20-minute dynamic scan (10s x 12, 30s x 6, 900s x 1) triggered simultaneously with a bolus injection of 444 to 592 MBq of 13N-NH3. The radioactivity - time curves of pituitary and internal carotid artery were generated by setting regions of interest (ROIs) on the transaxial planes of the frames of 13N-NH3 PET sequences. The first-pass uptake rate of 13N-NH3 (R) and standard uptake, rate (SUV) in pituitary on the last frame were calculated. Results: In control studies, the radioactivity in pituitary demonstrated within 10 seconds after the internal carotid artery showed up, and the pituitary highly uptake 13N-NH3, the size of pituitary was (1.07±0.17) cm x (1.09±0.15) cm x (1.14 ± 0.17) cm, SUV was 3.84 ± 1.75, R was 0.75 ± 0.13. In hypopituitarism studies, the radioactivity in pituitary showed up slowly, the pituitary did not show up in two cases with serious hypopituitarism, the size of pituitary was (0.82±0.07) cm x (0.81±0.05) cm x(0.91±0.07) cm, SUV was 1.25±0.08, R was 0.35±0.09. Conclusion: 13N-NH3 PET dynamic imaging is valuable in the diagnosis of hypopituitarism. (authors)

  8. An open tool for input function estimation and quantification of dynamic PET FDG brain scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrán, Martín; Martínez, Natalia; Carbajal, Guillermo; Fernández, Alicia; Gómez, Álvaro

    2016-08-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) analysis of clinical studies is mostly restricted to qualitative evaluation. Quantitative analysis of PET studies is highly desirable to be able to compute an objective measurement of the process of interest in order to evaluate treatment response and/or compare patient data. But implementation of quantitative analysis generally requires the determination of the input function: the arterial blood or plasma activity which indicates how much tracer is available for uptake in the brain. The purpose of our work was to share with the community an open software tool that can assist in the estimation of this input function, and the derivation of a quantitative map from the dynamic PET study. Arterial blood sampling during the PET study is the gold standard method to get the input function, but is uncomfortable and risky for the patient so it is rarely used in routine studies. To overcome the lack of a direct input function, different alternatives have been devised and are available in the literature. These alternatives derive the input function from the PET image itself (image-derived input function) or from data gathered from previous similar studies (population-based input function). In this article, we present ongoing work that includes the development of a software tool that integrates several methods with novel strategies for the segmentation of blood pools and parameter estimation. The tool is available as an extension to the 3D Slicer software. Tests on phantoms were conducted in order to validate the implemented methods. We evaluated the segmentation algorithms over a range of acquisition conditions and vasculature size. Input function estimation algorithms were evaluated against ground truth of the phantoms, as well as on their impact over the final quantification map. End-to-end use of the tool yields quantification maps with [Formula: see text] relative error in the estimated influx versus ground truth on phantoms. The main

  9. Automated synthesis with HPLC purification of 18F-FMISO as specific molecular imaging probe of tumor hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Mingwei; Zhang Yingjian; Zhang Yongping

    2012-01-01

    An improved automated synthesis of 1-H-1-(3-[ 18 F] fluoro-2-hydroxypropyl)-2-nitro-imidazole ( 18 F-FMISO), a specific molecular imaging probe of tumor hypoxia, was developed using an upgraded Explora GN module integrated with Explora LC for HPLC purification in this study. The radiochemical synthesis of 18 F-FMISO was started with precursor 1-( 2'-nitro-1'-imidazolyl)-2-O-tetrahydropyranyl-3-O-tosyl-propanediol (NITTP) and included nucleophilic [ 18 F] radio-fluorination at 120℃ for 5 min and hydrolysis at 130℃ for 8 min. The automated synthesis of 18 F-FMISO, presenting fast, reliable and multi-run features, could be completed with the total synthesis time of less than 65 min and radiochemical yield of 25%∼35% (without decay correction). The quality control of 18 F-FMISO was identical with the radiopharmaceutical requirements, especially the radiochemical purity of greater than 99% and high chemical purity and specific activity own to HPLC purification. (authors)

  10. Dynamic PET and Optical Imaging and Compartment Modeling using a Dual-labeled Cyclic RGD Peptide Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhu, Ning Guo, Quanzheng Li, Ying Ma, Orit Jacboson, Seulki Lee, Hak Soo Choi, James R. Mansfield, Gang Niu, Xiaoyuan Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study is to determine if dynamic optical imaging could provide comparable kinetic parameters to that of dynamic PET imaging by a near-infrared dye/64Cu dual-labeled cyclic RGD peptide.Methods: The integrin αvβ3 binding RGD peptide was conjugated with a macrocyclic chelator 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA for copper labeling and PET imaging and a near-infrared dye ZW-1 for optical imaging. The in vitro biological activity of RGD-C(DOTA-ZW-1 was characterized by cell staining and receptor binding assay. Sixty-min dynamic PET and optical imaging were acquired on a MDA-MB-435 tumor model. Singular value decomposition (SVD method was applied to compute the dynamic optical signal from the two-dimensional optical projection images. Compartment models were used to quantitatively analyze and compare the dynamic optical and PET data.Results: The dual-labeled probe 64Cu-RGD-C(DOTA-ZW-1 showed integrin specific binding in vitro and in vivo. The binding potential (Bp derived from dynamic optical imaging (1.762 ± 0.020 is comparable to that from dynamic PET (1.752 ± 0.026.Conclusion: The signal un-mixing process using SVD improved the accuracy of kinetic modeling of 2D dynamic optical data. Our results demonstrate that 2D dynamic optical imaging with SVD analysis could achieve comparable quantitative results as dynamic PET imaging in preclinical xenograft models.

  11. Reconstruction of an input function from a dynamic PET water image using multiple tissue curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudomi, Nobuyuki; Maeda, Yukito; Yamamoto, Yuka; Nishiyama, Yoshihiro

    2016-08-01

    Quantification of cerebral blood flow (CBF) is important for the understanding of normal and pathologic brain physiology. When CBF is assessed using PET with {{\\text{H}}2} 15O or C15O2, its calculation requires an arterial input function, which generally requires invasive arterial blood sampling. The aim of the present study was to develop a new technique to reconstruct an image derived input function (IDIF) from a dynamic {{\\text{H}}2} 15O PET image as a completely non-invasive approach. Our technique consisted of using a formula to express the input using tissue curve with rate constant parameter. For multiple tissue curves extracted from the dynamic image, the rate constants were estimated so as to minimize the sum of the differences of the reproduced inputs expressed by the extracted tissue curves. The estimated rates were used to express the inputs and the mean of the estimated inputs was used as an IDIF. The method was tested in human subjects (n  =  29) and was compared to the blood sampling method. Simulation studies were performed to examine the magnitude of potential biases in CBF and to optimize the number of multiple tissue curves used for the input reconstruction. In the PET study, the estimated IDIFs were well reproduced against the measured ones. The difference between the calculated CBF values obtained using the two methods was small as around  PET imaging. This suggests the possibility of using a completely non-invasive technique to assess CBF in patho-physiological studies.

  12. 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI as imaging biomarkers in malignant pleural mesothelioma

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, D. O.; Hooper, C. E.; Searle, J.; Darby, M.; White, P.; Harvey, J. E.; Braybrooke, J. P.; Maskell, N. A.; Masani, V.; Lyburn, I. D.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose\\ud \\ud The purpose of this study was to compare the use of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET with computed tomography (CT) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI to predict prognosis and monitor treatment in malignant pleural mesothelioma.\\ud \\ud Patients and methods\\ud \\ud 18F-FDG PET/CT and DCE-MRI studies carried out as part of the South West Area Mesothelioma Pemetrexed trial were used. 18F-FDG PET/CT and DCE-MRI studies were carried out before treatment, and after two...

  13. Patient motion effects on the quantification of regional myocardial blood flow with dynamic PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Chad R R N; Klein, Ran; Beanlands, Rob S; deKemp, Robert A

    2016-04-01

    Patient motion is a common problem during dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) scans for quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF). The purpose of this study was to quantify the prevalence of body motion in a clinical setting and evaluate with realistic phantoms the effects of motion on blood flow quantification, including CT attenuation correction (CTAC) artifacts that result from PET-CT misalignment. A cohort of 236 sequential patients was analyzed for patient motion under resting and peak stress conditions by two independent observers. The presence of motion, affected time-frames, and direction of motion was recorded; discrepancy between observers was resolved by consensus review. Based on these results, patient body motion effects on MBF quantification were characterized using the digital NURBS-based cardiac-torso phantom, with characteristic time activity curves (TACs) assigned to the heart wall (myocardium) and blood regions. Simulated projection data were corrected for attenuation and reconstructed using filtered back-projection. All simulations were performed without noise added, and a single CT image was used for attenuation correction and aligned to the early- or late-frame PET images. In the patient cohort, mild motion of 0.5 ± 0.1 cm occurred in 24% and moderate motion of 1.0 ± 0.3 cm occurred in 38% of patients. Motion in the superior/inferior direction accounted for 45% of all detected motion, with 30% in the superior direction. Anterior/posterior motion was predominant (29%) in the posterior direction. Left/right motion occurred in 24% of cases, with similar proportions in the left and right directions. Computer simulation studies indicated that errors in MBF can approach 500% for scans with severe patient motion (up to 2 cm). The largest errors occurred when the heart wall was shifted left toward the adjacent lung region, resulting in a severe undercorrection for attenuation of the heart wall. Simulations also indicated that the

  14. Calculation of left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction from dynamic cardiac-gated 15O-water PET/CT: 5D-PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordström, Jonny; Kero, Tanja; Harms, Hendrik Johannes; Widström, Charles; Flachskampf, Frank A; Sörensen, Jens; Lubberink, Mark

    2017-11-14

    Quantitative measurement of myocardial blood flow (MBF) is of increasing interest in the clinical assessment of patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). 15 O-water positron emission tomography (PET) is considered the gold standard for non-invasive MBF measurements. However, calculation of left ventricular (LV) volumes and ejection fraction (EF) is not possible from standard 15 O-water uptake images. The purpose of the present work was to investigate the possibility of calculating LV volumes and LVEF from cardiac-gated parametric blood volume (V B ) 15 O-water images and from first pass (FP) images. Sixteen patients with mitral or aortic regurgitation underwent an eight-gate dynamic cardiac-gated 15 O-water PET/CT scan and cardiac MRI. V B and FP images were generated for each gate. Calculations of end-systolic volume (ESV), end-diastolic volume (EDV), stroke volume (SV) and LVEF were performed with automatic segmentation of V B and FP images, using commercially available software. LV volumes and LVEF were calculated with surface-, count-, and volume-based methods, and the results were compared with gold standard MRI. Using V B images, high correlations between PET and MRI ESV (r = 0.89, p  0.86, p dynamic 15 O-water PET is feasible and shows good correlation with MRI. However, the analysis method is laborious, and future work is needed for more automation to make the method more easily applicable in a clinical setting.

  15. Segmentation of rodent whole-body dynamic PET images: an unsupervised method based on voxel dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maroy, Renaud; Boisgard, Raphaël; Comtat, Claude

    2008-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a useful tool for pharmacokinetics studies in rodents during the preclinical phase of drug and tracer development. However, rodent organs are small as compared to the scanner's intrinsic resolution and are affected by physiological movements. We present a new...... method for the segmentation of rodent whole-body PET images that takes these two difficulties into account by estimating the pharmacokinetics far from organ borders. The segmentation method proved efficient on whole-body numerical rat phantom simulations, including 3-14 organs, together...

  16. Dynamic PET of human liver inflammation: impact of kinetic modeling with optimization-derived dual-blood input function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guobao; Corwin, Michael T; Olson, Kristin A; Badawi, Ramsey D; Sarkar, Souvik

    2018-05-30

    The hallmark of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis is hepatocellular inflammation and injury in the setting of hepatic steatosis. Recent work has indicated that dynamic 18F-FDG PET with kinetic modeling has the potential to assess hepatic inflammation noninvasively, while static FDG-PET did not show a promise. Because the liver has dual blood supplies, kinetic modeling of dynamic liver PET data is challenging in human studies. The objective of this study is to evaluate and identify a dual-input kinetic modeling approach for dynamic FDG-PET of human liver inflammation. Fourteen human patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease were included in the study. Each patient underwent one-hour dynamic FDG-PET/CT scan and had liver biopsy within six weeks. Three models were tested for kinetic analysis: traditional two-tissue compartmental model with an image-derived single-blood input function (SBIF), model with population-based dual-blood input function (DBIF), and modified model with optimization-derived DBIF through a joint estimation framework. The three models were compared using Akaike information criterion (AIC), F test and histopathologic inflammation reference. The results showed that the optimization-derived DBIF model improved the fitting of liver time activity curves and achieved lower AIC values and higher F values than the SBIF and population-based DBIF models in all patients. The optimization-derived model significantly increased FDG K1 estimates by 101% and 27% as compared with traditional SBIF and population-based DBIF. K1 by the optimization-derived model was significantly associated with histopathologic grades of liver inflammation while the other two models did not provide a statistical significance. In conclusion, modeling of DBIF is critical for kinetic analysis of dynamic liver FDG-PET data in human studies. The optimization-derived DBIF model is more appropriate than SBIF and population-based DBIF for dynamic FDG-PET of liver inflammation. © 2018

  17. Dynamic tensile test of single PET textile cables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasco F.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The tyres conception involves for certain applications, the use of textile cables as reinforcement. During its use, the tyre undergoes temperatures variations and dynamic loading rates. The consideration of these conditions during the numeric simulations requires the knowledge of the sensitivity of the mechanical behaviour to loading rate and temperature. In this paper, we developed an experimental methodology for testing textile cable up to high strain rate. The main difficulty of testing cables is the optimization of cable fixing on the machine. For that purpose, we adapted the solution of fixing by progressive binding already used in quasi-static, while taking into account constraints inherent to high strain tests. Firstly, the mass of grips was decreased in order to get force signal less sensitive to grips inertia. The method was developed on a high speed hydraulic machine equipped with a thermal enclosure. The investigated temperatures and strain rates range from room temperature to 373 ∘K (100 ∘C and from 0,01 to 100/s, respectively. In addition, the hydraulic machine was equipped with a high speed video camera. The obtained images were analysed by a tracking technique to measure the average strain in the cable (from 50 to 20000 f/s.

  18. Dynamic PET simulator via tomographic emission projection for kinetic modeling and parametric image studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Häggström, Ida, E-mail: haeggsti@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 and Department of Radiation Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå 90187 (Sweden); Beattie, Bradley J.; Schmidtlein, C. Ross [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a fast and simple tool called dPETSTEP (Dynamic PET Simulator of Tracers via Emission Projection), for dynamic PET simulations as an alternative to Monte Carlo (MC), useful for educational purposes and evaluation of the effects of the clinical environment, postprocessing choices, etc., on dynamic and parametric images. Methods: The tool was developed in MATLAB using both new and previously reported modules of PETSTEP (PET Simulator of Tracers via Emission Projection). Time activity curves are generated for each voxel of the input parametric image, whereby effects of imaging system blurring, counting noise, scatters, randoms, and attenuation are simulated for each frame. Each frame is then reconstructed into images according to the user specified method, settings, and corrections. Reconstructed images were compared to MC data, and simple Gaussian noised time activity curves (GAUSS). Results: dPETSTEP was 8000 times faster than MC. Dynamic images from dPETSTEP had a root mean square error that was within 4% on average of that of MC images, whereas the GAUSS images were within 11%. The average bias in dPETSTEP and MC images was the same, while GAUSS differed by 3% points. Noise profiles in dPETSTEP images conformed well to MC images, confirmed visually by scatter plot histograms, and statistically by tumor region of interest histogram comparisons that showed no significant differences (p < 0.01). Compared to GAUSS, dPETSTEP images and noise properties agreed better with MC. Conclusions: The authors have developed a fast and easy one-stop solution for simulations of dynamic PET and parametric images, and demonstrated that it generates both images and subsequent parametric images with very similar noise properties to those of MC images, in a fraction of the time. They believe dPETSTEP to be very useful for generating fast, simple, and realistic results, however since it uses simple scatter and random models it may not be suitable for

  19. Quantitative evaluation of skeletal tumors with dynamic 18F-FDG PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Hua; Heichel, T.O.; Lehner, B.; Bernd, L.; Ewerbeck, V.; Burger, C.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate bone lesions using fluorodeoxyglucose (FIX;) PET and explore if dynamic and quantitative PET data may help to differentiate benign lesions from malignant masses. Methods: A group of forty patients with primary bone lesions were studied. The final diagnosis was confirmed with histopathology. A dynamic acquisition of FDG PET with the duration over 60 min was undertaken in all subjects. From the dynamic PET images the indexes such as average and maximal standardized uptake value ( SUV ), tumor SUV-to-muscle SUV ratios ( T/M ), and SUV at 60 min-to-SUV at 30 min ratio (SUV aver60/30main and SUV max60/30min ) were produced. Patlak graphical analysis were used to obtain influx constant ( K i ) and metabolic rate of FDG (MR-FDG) was thus calculated. Based on the receiver operation characteristic curve the sensitivity and specificity for each parameter in differentiation between malignant and benign lesions was evaluated. Results: The histologic results revealed there were 21 cases with malignant tumors and 19 with benign lesions in this group. The MRFDG and SUV indexes in malignant lesions were significantly higher than those in benign lesions. However, each index showed a considerable overlap between benign and malignant type. Average SUV positively correlated with MR-FDG (r = 0.67). When use of a 1.8 cutoff for average SUV, the sensitivity and specificity for discrimination of malignancy from benignity were 85.0% and 82.4%, respectively. MRFDG showed a similar sensitivity (82.4%) and a better specificity (92.9%). When evaluated with a cutoff from the combination of average SUV (1.8) and SUV aver60/3Omin (1.1), the specificity was improved to 93.3% with a small reduction of sensitivity (81.3%) compared with using SUV exclusively. Conclusions: The results indicate that detectable difference in glucose metabolism exists between malignant and benign skeletal lesions. It may not be feasible to use exclusively the static FDG uptake indexes to achieve a

  20. Dynamic PET simulator via tomographic emission projection for kinetic modeling and parametric image studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Häggström, Ida; Beattie, Bradley J.; Schmidtlein, C. Ross

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a fast and simple tool called dPETSTEP (Dynamic PET Simulator of Tracers via Emission Projection), for dynamic PET simulations as an alternative to Monte Carlo (MC), useful for educational purposes and evaluation of the effects of the clinical environment, postprocessing choices, etc., on dynamic and parametric images. Methods: The tool was developed in MATLAB using both new and previously reported modules of PETSTEP (PET Simulator of Tracers via Emission Projection). Time activity curves are generated for each voxel of the input parametric image, whereby effects of imaging system blurring, counting noise, scatters, randoms, and attenuation are simulated for each frame. Each frame is then reconstructed into images according to the user specified method, settings, and corrections. Reconstructed images were compared to MC data, and simple Gaussian noised time activity curves (GAUSS). Results: dPETSTEP was 8000 times faster than MC. Dynamic images from dPETSTEP had a root mean square error that was within 4% on average of that of MC images, whereas the GAUSS images were within 11%. The average bias in dPETSTEP and MC images was the same, while GAUSS differed by 3% points. Noise profiles in dPETSTEP images conformed well to MC images, confirmed visually by scatter plot histograms, and statistically by tumor region of interest histogram comparisons that showed no significant differences (p < 0.01). Compared to GAUSS, dPETSTEP images and noise properties agreed better with MC. Conclusions: The authors have developed a fast and easy one-stop solution for simulations of dynamic PET and parametric images, and demonstrated that it generates both images and subsequent parametric images with very similar noise properties to those of MC images, in a fraction of the time. They believe dPETSTEP to be very useful for generating fast, simple, and realistic results, however since it uses simple scatter and random models it may not be suitable for

  1. Theoretical Analysis of Penalized Maximum-Likelihood Patlak Parametric Image Reconstruction in Dynamic PET for Lesion Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Wang, Guobao; Qi, Jinyi

    2016-04-01

    Detecting cancerous lesions is a major clinical application of emission tomography. In a previous work, we studied penalized maximum-likelihood (PML) image reconstruction for lesion detection in static PET. Here we extend our theoretical analysis of static PET reconstruction to dynamic PET. We study both the conventional indirect reconstruction and direct reconstruction for Patlak parametric image estimation. In indirect reconstruction, Patlak parametric images are generated by first reconstructing a sequence of dynamic PET images, and then performing Patlak analysis on the time activity curves (TACs) pixel-by-pixel. In direct reconstruction, Patlak parametric images are estimated directly from raw sinogram data by incorporating the Patlak model into the image reconstruction procedure. PML reconstruction is used in both the indirect and direct reconstruction methods. We use a channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) to assess lesion detectability in Patlak parametric images. Simplified expressions for evaluating the lesion detectability have been derived and applied to the selection of the regularization parameter value to maximize detection performance. The proposed method is validated using computer-based Monte Carlo simulations. Good agreements between the theoretical predictions and the Monte Carlo results are observed. Both theoretical predictions and Monte Carlo simulation results show the benefit of the indirect and direct methods under optimized regularization parameters in dynamic PET reconstruction for lesion detection, when compared with the conventional static PET reconstruction.

  2. Clinical role of early dynamic FDG-PET/CT for the evaluation of renal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Reiko; Abe, Koichiro; Sakai, Shuji [Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Kondo, Tsunenori; Tanabe, Kazunari [Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Department of Urology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    We studied the usefulness of early dynamic (ED) and whole-body (WB) FDG-PET/CT for the evaluation of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). One hundred patients with 107 tumours underwent kidney ED and WB FDG-PET/CT. We visually and semiquantitatively evaluated the FDG accumulation in RCCs in the ED and WB phases, and compared the accumulation values with regard to histological type (clear cell carcinoma [CCC] vs. non-clear cell carcinoma [N-CCC]), the TNM stage (high stage [3-4] vs. low stage [1-2]), the Fuhrman grade (high grade [3-4] vs. low grade [1-2]) and presence versus absence of venous (V) and lymphatic (Ly) invasion. In the ED phase, visual evaluation revealed no significant differences in FDG accumulation in terms of each item. However, the maximum standardized uptake value and tumour-to-normal tissue ratios were significantly higher in the CCCs compared to the N-CCCs (p < 0.001). In the WB phase, in contrast, significantly higher FDG accumulation (p < 0.001) was found in RCCs with a higher TNM stage, higher Furman grade, and the presence of V and Ly invasion in both the visual and the semiquantitative evaluations. ED and WB FDG-PET/CT is a useful tool for the evaluation of RCCs. (orig.)

  3. Dynamic PET scanning and compartmental model analysis to determine cellular level radiotracer distribution in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.T.; Hubner, K.F.; Goodman, M.M.; Stubbs, J.B.

    1992-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has been used to measure tissue radiotracer concentration in vivo. Radiochemical distribution can be determined with compartmental model analysis. A two compartment model describes the kinetics of N-13 ammonia ( 13 NH 3 ) in the myocardium. The model consists of a vascular space, Q 1 and a space for 13 NH 3 bound within the tissue, Q 2 . Differential equations for the model can be written: X(t) = AX(t) + BU( t), Y(t)= CX(t)+ DU(t) (1) where X(t) is a column vector [Q 1 (t); Q 2 (t)], U(t) is the arterial input activity measured from the left ventricular blood pool, and Y(t) is the measured tissue activity using PET. Matrices A, B, C, and D are dependent on physiological parameters describing the kinetics of 13 NH 3 in the myocardium. Estimated parameter matrices in Equation 1 have been validated in dog experiments by measuring myocardial perfusion with dynamic PET scanning and intravenous injection of 13 NH 3 . Tracer concentrations for each compartment can be calculated by direct integration of Equation 1. If the cellular level distribution of each compartment is known, the concentration of tracer within the intracellular and extracellular space can be determined. Applications of this type of modeling include parameter estimation for measurement of physiological processes, organ level dosimetry, and determination of cellular radiotracer distribution

  4. Model-independent plot of dynamic PET data facilitates data interpretation and model selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munk, Ole Lajord

    2012-02-21

    When testing new PET radiotracers or new applications of existing tracers, the blood-tissue exchange and the metabolism need to be examined. However, conventional plots of measured time-activity curves from dynamic PET do not reveal the inherent kinetic information. A novel model-independent volume-influx plot (vi-plot) was developed and validated. The new vi-plot shows the time course of the instantaneous distribution volume and the instantaneous influx rate. The vi-plot visualises physiological information that facilitates model selection and it reveals when a quasi-steady state is reached, which is a prerequisite for the use of the graphical analyses by Logan and Gjedde-Patlak. Both axes of the vi-plot have direct physiological interpretation, and the plot shows kinetic parameter in close agreement with estimates obtained by non-linear kinetic modelling. The vi-plot is equally useful for analyses of PET data based on a plasma input function or a reference region input function. The vi-plot is a model-independent and informative plot for data exploration that facilitates the selection of an appropriate method for data analysis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Statistical dynamic image reconstruction in state-of-the-art high-resolution PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahmim, Arman; Cheng, J-C; Blinder, Stephan; Camborde, Maurie-Laure; Sossi, Vesna

    2005-01-01

    Modern high-resolution PET is now more than ever in need of scrutiny into the nature and limitations of the imaging modality itself as well as image reconstruction techniques. In this work, we have reviewed, analysed and addressed the following three considerations within the particular context of state-of-the-art dynamic PET imaging: (i) the typical average numbers of events per line-of-response (LOR) are now (much) less than unity (ii) due to the physical and biological decay of the activity distribution, one requires robust and efficient reconstruction algorithms applicable to a wide range of statistics and (iii) the computational considerations in dynamic imaging are much enhanced (i.e., more frames to be stored and reconstructed). Within the framework of statistical image reconstruction, we have argued theoretically and shown experimentally that the sinogram non-negativity constraint (when using the delayed-coincidence and/or scatter-subtraction techniques) is especially expected to result in an overestimation bias. Subsequently, two schemes are considered: (a) subtraction techniques in which an image non-negativity constraint has been imposed and (b) implementation of random and scatter estimates inside the reconstruction algorithms, thus enabling direct processing of Poisson-distributed prompts. Both techniques are able to remove the aforementioned bias, while the latter, being better conditioned theoretically, is able to exhibit superior noise characteristics. We have also elaborated upon and verified the applicability of the accelerated list-mode image reconstruction method as a powerful solution for accurate, robust and efficient dynamic reconstructions of high-resolution data (as well as a number of additional benefits in the context of state-of-the-art PET)

  6. Estimation of the pulmonary input function in dynamic whole body PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho-Shon, K.; Buchen, P.; Meikle, S.R.; Fulham, M.J.; University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Dynamic data acquisition in Whole Body PET (WB-PET) has the potential to measure the metabolic rate of glucose (MRGlc) in tissue in-vivo. Estimation of changes in tumoral MRGlc may be a valuable tool in cancer by providing an quantitative index of response to treatment. A necessary requirement is an input function (IF) that can be obtained from arterial, 'arterialised' venous or pulmonary arterial blood in the case of lung tumours. Our aim was to extract the pulmonary input function from dynamic WB-PET data using Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Factor Analysis (FA) and Maximum Entropy (ME) for the evaluation of patients undergoing induction chemotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer. PCA is first used as a method of dimension reduction to obtain a signal space, defined by an optimal metric and a set of vectors. FA is used together with a ME constraint to rotate these vectors to obtain 'physiological' factors. A form of entropy function that does not require normalised data was used. This enabled the introduction of a penalty function based on the blood concentration at the last time point which provides an additional constraint. Tissue functions from 10 planes through normal lung were simulated. The model was a linear combination of an IF and a tissue time activity curve (TAC). The proportion of the IF to TAC was varied over the planes to simulate the apical to basal gradient in vascularity of the lung and pseudo Poisson noise was added. The method accurately extracted the IF at noise levels spanning the expected range for dynamic ROI data acquired with the interplane septa extended. Our method is minimally invasive because it requires only 1 late venous blood sample and is applicable to a wide range of tracers since it does not assume a particular compartmental model. Pilot data from 2 patients have been collected enabling comparison of the estimated IF with direct blood sampling from the pulmonary artery

  7. Prediction of time-integrated activity coefficients in PRRT using simulated dynamic PET and a pharmacokinetic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardiansyah, Deni; Attarwala, Ali Asgar; Kletting, Peter; Mottaghy, Felix M; Glatting, Gerhard

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the accuracy of predicted time-integrated activity coefficients (TIACs) in peptide-receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) using simulated dynamic PET data and a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. PBPK parameters were estimated using biokinetic data of 15 patients after injection of (152±15)MBq of 111 In-DTPAOC (total peptide amount (5.78±0.25)nmol). True mathematical phantoms of patients (MPPs) were the PBPK model with the estimated parameters. Dynamic PET measurements were simulated as being done after bolus injection of 150MBq 68 Ga-DOTATATE using the true MPPs. Dynamic PET scans around 35min p.i. (P 1 ), 4h p.i. (P 2 ) and the combination of P 1 and P 2 (P 3 ) were simulated. Each measurement was simulated with four frames of 5min each and 2 bed positions. PBPK parameters were fitted to the PET data to derive the PET-predicted MPPs. Therapy was simulated assuming an infusion of 5.1GBq of 90 Y-DOTATATE over 30min in both true and PET-predicted MPPs. TIACs of simulated therapy were calculated, true MPPs (true TIACs) and predicted MPPs (predicted TIACs) followed by the calculation of variabilities v. For P 1 and P 2 the population variabilities of kidneys, liver and spleen were acceptable (v10%). Treatment planning of PRRT based on dynamic PET data seems possible for the kidneys, liver and spleen using a PBPK model and patient specific information. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Value of fusion of PET and MRI for staging of endometrial cancer: Comparison with {sup 18}F-FDG contrast-enhanced PET/CT and dynamic contrast-enhanced pelvic MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitajima, Kazuhiro, E-mail: kitajima@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Kobe University School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Suenaga, Yuko; Ueno, Yoshiko [Department of Radiology, Kobe University School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Kanda, Tomonori [Department of Obsterics and Gynecology of Kobe University School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Department of Radiology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Hyogo (Japan); Maeda, Tetsuo; Takahashi, Satoru [Department of Radiology, Kobe University School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Ebina, Yasuhiko; Miyahara, Yoshiya; Yamada, Hideto [Department of Obsterics and Gynecology of Kobe University School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Department of Radiology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Hyogo (Japan); Sugimura, Kazuro [Department of Radiology, Kobe University School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate the diagnostic value of retrospective fusion of pelvic MRI and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) PET images for assessment of locoregional extension and nodal staging of endometrial cancer. Materials and methods: Thirty patients with biopsy-proven endometrial cancer underwent preoperative contrast-enhanced PET/CT (PET/ceCT) and pelvic dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for initial staging. Diagnostic performance of PET/ceCT, contrast-enhanced MRI, and retrospective image fusion from PET and MRI (fused PET/MRI) for assessing the extent of the primary tumor (T stage) and metastasis to regional LNs (N stage) was evaluated by two experienced readers. Histopathological and follow-up imaging results were used as the gold standard. The McNemar test was employed for statistical analysis. Results: Fused PET/MRI and MRI detected 96.7% of the primary tumors, whereas PET/ceCT detected 93.3%. Accuracy for T status was 80.0% for fused PET/MRI, and MRI proved significantly more accurate than PET/ceCT, which had an accuracy of 60.0% (p = 0.041). Patient-based sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for detecting pelvic nodal metastasis were 100%, 96.3% and 96.7% for both fused PET/MRI and PET/ceCT, and 66.7%, 100% and 96.7% for MRI, respectively. These three parameters were not statistically significant (p = 1). Conclusion: Fused PET/MRI, which complements the individual advantages of MRI and PET, is a valuable technique for assessment of the primary tumor and nodal staging in patients with endometrial cancer.

  9. Value of fusion of PET and MRI for staging of endometrial cancer: Comparison with 18F-FDG contrast-enhanced PET/CT and dynamic contrast-enhanced pelvic MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Suenaga, Yuko; Ueno, Yoshiko; Kanda, Tomonori; Maeda, Tetsuo; Takahashi, Satoru; Ebina, Yasuhiko; Miyahara, Yoshiya; Yamada, Hideto; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the diagnostic value of retrospective fusion of pelvic MRI and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) PET images for assessment of locoregional extension and nodal staging of endometrial cancer. Materials and methods: Thirty patients with biopsy-proven endometrial cancer underwent preoperative contrast-enhanced PET/CT (PET/ceCT) and pelvic dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for initial staging. Diagnostic performance of PET/ceCT, contrast-enhanced MRI, and retrospective image fusion from PET and MRI (fused PET/MRI) for assessing the extent of the primary tumor (T stage) and metastasis to regional LNs (N stage) was evaluated by two experienced readers. Histopathological and follow-up imaging results were used as the gold standard. The McNemar test was employed for statistical analysis. Results: Fused PET/MRI and MRI detected 96.7% of the primary tumors, whereas PET/ceCT detected 93.3%. Accuracy for T status was 80.0% for fused PET/MRI, and MRI proved significantly more accurate than PET/ceCT, which had an accuracy of 60.0% (p = 0.041). Patient-based sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for detecting pelvic nodal metastasis were 100%, 96.3% and 96.7% for both fused PET/MRI and PET/ceCT, and 66.7%, 100% and 96.7% for MRI, respectively. These three parameters were not statistically significant (p = 1). Conclusion: Fused PET/MRI, which complements the individual advantages of MRI and PET, is a valuable technique for assessment of the primary tumor and nodal staging in patients with endometrial cancer

  10. 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI as imaging biomarkers in malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, David O; Hooper, Clare E; Searle, Julie; Darby, Michael; White, Paul; Harvey, John E; Braybrooke, Jeremy P; Maskell, Nick A; Masani, Vidan; Lyburn, Iain D

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the use of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-FDG) PET with computed tomography (CT) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI to predict prognosis and monitor treatment in malignant pleural mesothelioma. F-FDG PET/CT and DCE-MRI studies carried out as part of the South West Area Mesothelioma Pemetrexed trial were used. F-FDG PET/CT and DCE-MRI studies were carried out before treatment, and after two cycles of chemotherapy, on patients treated with pemetrexed and cisplatin. A total of 73 patients were recruited, of whom 65 had PET/CT and DCE-MRI scans. Baseline measurements from F-FDG PET/CT (maximum standardized uptake value, metabolic tumour volume and total lesion glycolysis) and DCE-MRI (integrated area under the first 90s of the curve and washout slope) were compared with overall survival (OS) using Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses, and changes in imaging measurements were compared with disease progression. PET/CT and DCE-MRI measurements were not correlated with each other. Maximum standardized uptake value, metabolic tumour volume and total lesion glycolysis were significantly related to OS with Cox regression analysis and Kaplan-Meir analysis, and DCE-MRI washout curve shape was significantly related to OS. DCE-MRI curve shape can be combined with F-FDG PET/CT to give additional prognostic information. Changes in measurements were not related to progression-free survival. F-FDG PET/CT and DCE-MRI give prognostic information in malignant pleural mesothelioma. Neither PET/CT nor DCE-MRI is useful for monitoring disease progression.

  11. Dynamic PET and Optical Imaging and Compartment Modeling using a Dual-labeled Cyclic RGD Peptide Probe

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Lei; Guo, Ning; Li, Quanzheng; Ma, Ying; Jacboson, Orit; Lee, Seulki; Choi, Hak Soo; Mansfield, James R.; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to determine if dynamic optical imaging could provide comparable kinetic parameters to that of dynamic PET imaging by a near-infrared dye/64Cu dual-labeled cyclic RGD peptide. Methods: The integrin αvβ3 binding RGD peptide was conjugated with a macrocyclic chelator 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) for copper labeling and PET imaging and a near-infrared dye ZW-1 for optical imaging. The in vitro biological activity of RGD-C(DOTA)...

  12. Patient motion effects on the quantification of regional myocardial blood flow with dynamic PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, Chad R. R. N.; Kemp, Robert A. de, E-mail: RAdeKemp@ottawaheart.ca [Physics Department, Room 3302 Herzberg Laboratories, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6, Canada and Cardiac Imaging, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, 40 Ruskin Street, Ottawa, Ontario K1Y 4W7 (Canada); Klein, Ran [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ottawa Hospital, Civic Campus, 1053 Carling Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario K1Y 4E9 (Canada); Beanlands, Rob S. [Cardiac Imaging, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, 40 Ruskin Street, Ottawa, Ontario K1Y 4W7 (Canada)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: Patient motion is a common problem during dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) scans for quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF). The purpose of this study was to quantify the prevalence of body motion in a clinical setting and evaluate with realistic phantoms the effects of motion on blood flow quantification, including CT attenuation correction (CTAC) artifacts that result from PET–CT misalignment. Methods: A cohort of 236 sequential patients was analyzed for patient motion under resting and peak stress conditions by two independent observers. The presence of motion, affected time-frames, and direction of motion was recorded; discrepancy between observers was resolved by consensus review. Based on these results, patient body motion effects on MBF quantification were characterized using the digital NURBS-based cardiac-torso phantom, with characteristic time activity curves (TACs) assigned to the heart wall (myocardium) and blood regions. Simulated projection data were corrected for attenuation and reconstructed using filtered back-projection. All simulations were performed without noise added, and a single CT image was used for attenuation correction and aligned to the early- or late-frame PET images. Results: In the patient cohort, mild motion of 0.5 ± 0.1 cm occurred in 24% and moderate motion of 1.0 ± 0.3 cm occurred in 38% of patients. Motion in the superior/inferior direction accounted for 45% of all detected motion, with 30% in the superior direction. Anterior/posterior motion was predominant (29%) in the posterior direction. Left/right motion occurred in 24% of cases, with similar proportions in the left and right directions. Computer simulation studies indicated that errors in MBF can approach 500% for scans with severe patient motion (up to 2 cm). The largest errors occurred when the heart wall was shifted left toward the adjacent lung region, resulting in a severe undercorrection for attenuation of the heart wall. Simulations

  13. Patient motion effects on the quantification of regional myocardial blood flow with dynamic PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, Chad R. R. N.; Kemp, Robert A. de; Klein, Ran; Beanlands, Rob S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Patient motion is a common problem during dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) scans for quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF). The purpose of this study was to quantify the prevalence of body motion in a clinical setting and evaluate with realistic phantoms the effects of motion on blood flow quantification, including CT attenuation correction (CTAC) artifacts that result from PET–CT misalignment. Methods: A cohort of 236 sequential patients was analyzed for patient motion under resting and peak stress conditions by two independent observers. The presence of motion, affected time-frames, and direction of motion was recorded; discrepancy between observers was resolved by consensus review. Based on these results, patient body motion effects on MBF quantification were characterized using the digital NURBS-based cardiac-torso phantom, with characteristic time activity curves (TACs) assigned to the heart wall (myocardium) and blood regions. Simulated projection data were corrected for attenuation and reconstructed using filtered back-projection. All simulations were performed without noise added, and a single CT image was used for attenuation correction and aligned to the early- or late-frame PET images. Results: In the patient cohort, mild motion of 0.5 ± 0.1 cm occurred in 24% and moderate motion of 1.0 ± 0.3 cm occurred in 38% of patients. Motion in the superior/inferior direction accounted for 45% of all detected motion, with 30% in the superior direction. Anterior/posterior motion was predominant (29%) in the posterior direction. Left/right motion occurred in 24% of cases, with similar proportions in the left and right directions. Computer simulation studies indicated that errors in MBF can approach 500% for scans with severe patient motion (up to 2 cm). The largest errors occurred when the heart wall was shifted left toward the adjacent lung region, resulting in a severe undercorrection for attenuation of the heart wall. Simulations

  14. MR-guided dynamic PET reconstruction with the kernel method and spectral temporal basis functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novosad, Philip; Reader, Andrew J.

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) reconstruction have demonstrated that it is possible to achieve markedly improved end-point kinetic parameter maps by incorporating a temporal model of the radiotracer directly into the reconstruction algorithm. In this work we have developed a highly constrained, fully dynamic PET reconstruction algorithm incorporating both spectral analysis temporal basis functions and spatial basis functions derived from the kernel method applied to a co-registered T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) image. The dynamic PET image is modelled as a linear combination of spatial and temporal basis functions, and a maximum likelihood estimate for the coefficients can be found using the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. Following reconstruction, kinetic fitting using any temporal model of interest can be applied. Based on a BrainWeb T1-weighted MR phantom, we performed a realistic dynamic [18F]FDG simulation study with two noise levels, and investigated the quantitative performance of the proposed reconstruction algorithm, comparing it with reconstructions incorporating either spectral analysis temporal basis functions alone or kernel spatial basis functions alone, as well as with conventional frame-independent reconstruction. Compared to the other reconstruction algorithms, the proposed algorithm achieved superior performance, offering a decrease in spatially averaged pixel-level root-mean-square-error on post-reconstruction kinetic parametric maps in the grey/white matter, as well as in the tumours when they were present on the co-registered MR image. When the tumours were not visible in the MR image, reconstruction with the proposed algorithm performed similarly to reconstruction with spectral temporal basis functions and was superior to both conventional frame-independent reconstruction and frame-independent reconstruction with kernel spatial basis functions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that a joint spectral

  15. High-resolution dynamic imaging and quantitative analysis of lung cancer xenografts in nude mice using clinical PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying Yi; Wang, Kai; Xu, Zuo Yu; Song, Yan; Wang, Chu Nan; Zhang, Chong Qing; Sun, Xi Lin; Shen, Bao Zhong

    2017-08-08

    Considering the general application of dedicated small-animal positron emission tomography/computed tomography is limited, an acceptable alternative in many situations might be clinical PET/CT. To estimate the feasibility of using clinical PET/CT with [F-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose for high-resolution dynamic imaging and quantitative analysis of cancer xenografts in nude mice. Dynamic clinical PET/CT scans were performed on xenografts for 60 min after injection with [F-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Scans were reconstructed with or without SharpIR method in two phases. And mice were sacrificed to extracting major organs and tumors, using ex vivo γ-counting as a reference. Strikingly, we observed that the image quality and the correlation between the all quantitive data from clinical PET/CT and the ex vivo counting was better with the SharpIR reconstructions than without. Our data demonstrate that clinical PET/CT scanner with SharpIR reconstruction is a valuable tool for imaging small animals in preclinical cancer research, offering dynamic imaging parameters, good image quality and accurate data quatification.

  16. {sup 89}Zr-Onartuzumab PET imaging of c-MET receptor dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pool, Martin; Kol, Arjan; Giesen, Danique; Vries, Elisabeth G.E. de [University of Groningen, Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Terwisscha van Scheltinga, Anton G.T. [University of Groningen, Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn N. [University of Groningen, Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); University of Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2017-08-15

    c-MET and its ligand hepatocyte growth factor are often dysregulated in human cancers. Dynamic changes in c-MET expression occur and might predict drug efficacy or emergence of resistance. Noninvasive visualization of c-MET dynamics could therefore potentially guide c-MET-directed therapies. We investigated the feasibility of {sup 89}Zr-labelled one-armed c-MET antibody onartuzumab PET for detecting relevant changes in c-MET levels induced by c-MET-mediated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib resistance or heat shock protein-90 (HSP90) inhibitor NVP-AUY-922 treatment in human non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) xenografts. In vitro membrane c-MET levels were determined by flow cytometry. HCC827ErlRes, an erlotinib-resistant clone with c-MET upregulation, was generated from the exon-19 EGFR-mutant human NSCLC cell line HCC827. Mice bearing HCC827 and HCC827ErlRes tumours in opposite flanks underwent {sup 89}Zr-onartuzumab PET scans. The HCC827-xenografted mice underwent {sup 89}Zr-onartuzumab PET scans before treatment and while receiving biweekly intraperitoneal injections of 100 mg/kg NVP-AUY-922 or vehicle. Ex vivo, tumour c-MET immunohistochemistry was correlated with the imaging results. In vitro, membrane c-MET was upregulated in HCC827ErlRes tumours by 213 ± 44% in relation to the level in HCC827 tumours, while c-MET was downregulated by 69 ± 9% in HCC827 tumours following treatment with NVP-AUY-922. In vivo, {sup 89}Zr-onartuzumab uptake was 26% higher (P < 0.05) in erlotinib-resistant HCC827ErlRes than in HCC827 xenografts, while HCC827 tumour uptake was 33% lower (P < 0.001) following NVP-AUY-922 treatment. The results show that {sup 89}Zr-onartuzumab PET effectively discriminates relevant changes in c-MET levels and could potentially be used clinically to monitor c-MET status. (orig.)

  17. Impact of time-of-flight on indirect 3D and direct 4D parametric image reconstruction in the presence of inconsistent dynamic PET data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kotasidis, F. A.; Mehranian, A.; Zaidi, H.

    2016-01-01

    Kinetic parameter estimation in dynamic PET suffers from reduced accuracy and precision when parametric maps are estimated using kinetic modelling following image reconstruction of the dynamic data. Direct approaches to parameter estimation attempt to directly estimate the kinetic parameters from

  18. WE-G-BRF-06: Positron Emission Tomography (PET)-Guided Dynamic Lung Tumor Tracking for Cancer Radiotherapy: First Patient Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, J; Loo, B; Graves, E; Yamamoto, T; Keall, P

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: PET-guided dynamic tumor tracking is a novel concept of biologically targeted image guidance for radiotherapy. A dynamic tumor tracking algorithm based on list-mode PET data has been developed and previously tested on dynamic phantom data. In this study, we investigate if dynamic tumor tracking is clinically feasible by applying the method to lung cancer patient PET data. Methods: PET-guided tumor tracking estimates the target position of a segmented volume in PET images reconstructed continuously from accumulated coincidence events correlated with external respiratory motion, simulating real-time applications, i.e., only data up to the current time point is used to estimate the target position. A target volume is segmented with a 50% threshold, consistently, of the maximum intensity in the predetermined volume of interest. Through this algorithm, the PET-estimated trajectories are quantified from four lung cancer patients who have distinct tumor location and size. The accuracy of the PET-estimated trajectories is evaluated by comparing to external respiratory motion because the ground-truth of tumor motion is not known in patients; however, previous phantom studies demonstrated sub-2mm accuracy using clinically derived 3D tumor motion. Results: The overall similarity of motion patterns between the PET-estimated trajectories and the external respiratory traces implies that the PET-guided tracking algorithm can provide an acceptable level of targeting accuracy. However, there are variations in the tracking accuracy between tumors due to the quality of the segmentation which depends on target-to-background ratio, tumor location and size. Conclusion: For the first time, a dynamic tumor tracking algorithm has been applied to lung cancer patient PET data, demonstrating clinical feasibility of real-time tumor tracking for integrated PET-linacs. The target-to-background ratio is a significant factor determining accuracy: screening during treatment planning would

  19. Dynamic 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT and static image in NET patients. Correlation of parameters during PRRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Binnebeek, Sofie; Koole, Michel; Terwinghe, Christelle; Baete, Kristof; Vanbilloen, Bert; Haustermans, Karine; Clement, Paul M; Bogaerts, Kris; Verbruggen, Alfons; Nackaerts, Kris; Van Cutsem, Eric; Verslype, Chris; Mottaghy, Felix M; Deroose, Christophe M

    2016-06-28

    To investigate the relationship between the dynamic parameters (Ki) and static image-derived parameters of 68Ga-DOTATOC-PET, to determine which static parameter best reflects underlying somatostatin-receptor-expression (SSR) levels on neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). 20 patients with metastasized NETs underwent a dynamic and static 68Ga-DOTATOC-PET before PRRT and at 7 and 40 weeks after the first administration of 90Y-DOTATOC (in total 4 cycles were planned); 175 lesions were defined and analyzed on the dynamic as well as static scans. Quantitative analysis was performed using the software PMOD. One to five target lesions per patient were chosen and delineated manually on the baseline dynamic scan and further, on the corresponding static 68Ga-DOTATOC-PET and the dynamic and static 68Ga-DOTATOC-PET at the other time-points; SUVmax and SUVmean of the lesions was assessed on the other six scans. The input function was retrieved from the abdominal aorta on the images. Further on, Ki was calculated using the Patlak-Plot. At last, 5 reference regions for normalization of SUVtumour were delineated on the static scans resulting in 5 ratios (SUVratio). SUVmax and SUVmean of the tumoural lesions on the dynamic 68Ga-DOTATOC-PET had a very strong correlation with the corresponding parameters in the static scan (R²: 0.94 and 0.95 respectively). SUVmax, SUVmean and Ki of the lesions showed a good linear correlation; the SUVratios correlated poorly with Ki. A significantly better correlation was noticed between Ki and SUVtumour(max and mean) (p dynamic parameter Ki correlates best with the absolute SUVtumour, SUVtumour best reflects underlying SSR-levels in NETs.

  20. Calculation of left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction from dynamic cardiac-gated 15O-water PET/CT: 5D-PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonny Nordström

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative measurement of myocardial blood flow (MBF is of increasing interest in the clinical assessment of patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD. 15O-water positron emission tomography (PET is considered the gold standard for non-invasive MBF measurements. However, calculation of left ventricular (LV volumes and ejection fraction (EF is not possible from standard 15O-water uptake images. The purpose of the present work was to investigate the possibility of calculating LV volumes and LVEF from cardiac-gated parametric blood volume (V B 15O-water images and from first pass (FP images. Sixteen patients with mitral or aortic regurgitation underwent an eight-gate dynamic cardiac-gated 15O-water PET/CT scan and cardiac MRI. V B and FP images were generated for each gate. Calculations of end-systolic volume (ESV, end-diastolic volume (EDV, stroke volume (SV and LVEF were performed with automatic segmentation of V B and FP images, using commercially available software. LV volumes and LVEF were calculated with surface-, count-, and volume-based methods, and the results were compared with gold standard MRI. Results Using V B images, high correlations between PET and MRI ESV (r = 0.89, p  0.86, p < 0.001. Conclusion Calculation of LV volumes and LVEF from dynamic 15O-water PET is feasible and shows good correlation with MRI. However, the analysis method is laborious, and future work is needed for more automation to make the method more easily applicable in a clinical setting.

  1. Multimodality functional imaging of spontaneous canine tumors using 64CU-ATSM and 18FDG PET/CT and dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders E; Kristensen, Annemarie T; Law, Ian

    2012-01-01

    To compare the distribution and uptake of the hypoxia tracer (64)Cu-diacetyl-bis(N(4)-methylthiosemicarbazone) ((64)Cu-ATSM) PET/CT, FDG PET/CT and dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion CT (DCE-pCT) in spontaneous canine tumors. In addition (64)Cu-ATSM distribution over time was evaluated.......To compare the distribution and uptake of the hypoxia tracer (64)Cu-diacetyl-bis(N(4)-methylthiosemicarbazone) ((64)Cu-ATSM) PET/CT, FDG PET/CT and dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion CT (DCE-pCT) in spontaneous canine tumors. In addition (64)Cu-ATSM distribution over time was evaluated....

  2. Multimodal correlation of dynamic [18F]-AV-1451 perfusion PET and neuronal hypometabolism in [18F]-FDG PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammes, Jochen; Leuwer, Isabel; Bischof, Gérard N; Drzezga, Alexander; van Eimeren, Thilo

    2017-12-01

    Cerebral glucose metabolism measured with [18F]-FDG PET is a well established marker of neuronal dysfunction in neurodegeneration. The tau-protein tracer [18F]-AV-1451 PET is currently under evaluation and shows promising results. Here, we assess the feasibility of early perfusion imaging with AV-1451 as a substite for FDG PET in assessing neuronal injury. Twenty patients with suspected neurodegeneration underwent FDG and early phase AV-1451 PET imaging. Ten one-minute timeframes were acquired after application of 200 MBq AV-1451. FDG images were acquired on a different date according to clinical protocol. Early AV-1451 timeframes were coregistered to individual FDG-scans and spatially normalized. Voxel-wise intermodal correlations were calculated on within-subject level for every possible time window. The window with highest pooled correlation was considered optimal. Z-transformed deviation maps (ZMs) were created from both FDG and early AV-1451 images, comparing against FDG images of healthy controls. Regional patterns and extent of perfusion deficits were highly comparable to metabolic deficits. Best results were observed in a time window from 60 to 360 s (r = 0.86). Correlation strength ranged from r = 0.96 (subcortical gray matter) to 0.83 (frontal lobe) in regional analysis. ZMs of early AV-1451 and FDG images were highly similar. Perfusion imaging with AV-1451 is a valid biomarker for assessment of neuronal dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases. Radiation exposure and complexity of the diagnostic workup could be reduced significantly by routine acquisition of early AV-1451 images, sparing additional FDG PET.

  3. Multimodal correlation of dynamic [18F]-AV-1451 perfusion PET and neuronal hypometabolism in [18F]-FDG PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammes, Jochen; Leuwer, Isabel; Bischof, Gerard N.; Drzezga, Alexander; Eimeren, Thilo van

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral glucose metabolism measured with [18F]-FDG PET is a well established marker of neuronal dysfunction in neurodegeneration. The tau-protein tracer [18F]-AV-1451 PET is currently under evaluation and shows promising results. Here, we assess the feasibility of early perfusion imaging with AV-1451 as a substite for FDG PET in assessing neuronal injury. Twenty patients with suspected neurodegeneration underwent FDG and early phase AV-1451 PET imaging. Ten one-minute timeframes were acquired after application of 200 MBq AV-1451. FDG images were acquired on a different date according to clinical protocol. Early AV-1451 timeframes were coregistered to individual FDG-scans and spatially normalized. Voxel-wise intermodal correlations were calculated on within-subject level for every possible time window. The window with highest pooled correlation was considered optimal. Z-transformed deviation maps (ZMs) were created from both FDG and early AV-1451 images, comparing against FDG images of healthy controls. Regional patterns and extent of perfusion deficits were highly comparable to metabolic deficits. Best results were observed in a time window from 60 to 360 s (r = 0.86). Correlation strength ranged from r = 0.96 (subcortical gray matter) to 0.83 (frontal lobe) in regional analysis. ZMs of early AV-1451 and FDG images were highly similar. Perfusion imaging with AV-1451 is a valid biomarker for assessment of neuronal dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases. Radiation exposure and complexity of the diagnostic workup could be reduced significantly by routine acquisition of early AV-1451 images, sparing additional FDG PET. (orig.)

  4. Validation of a Multimodality Flow Phantom and Its Application for Assessment of Dynamic SPECT and PET Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrani-Juma, Hanif; Clarkin, Owen J; Pourmoghaddas, Amir; Driscoll, Brandon; Wells, R Glenn; deKemp, Robert A; Klein, Ran

    2017-01-01

    Simple and robust techniques are lacking to assess performance of flow quantification using dynamic imaging. We therefore developed a method to qualify flow quantification technologies using a physical compartment exchange phantom and image analysis tool. We validate and demonstrate utility of this method using dynamic PET and SPECT. Dynamic image sequences were acquired on two PET/CT and a cardiac dedicated SPECT (with and without attenuation and scatter corrections) systems. A two-compartment exchange model was fit to image derived time-activity curves to quantify flow rates. Flowmeter measured flow rates (20-300 mL/min) were set prior to imaging and were used as reference truth to which image derived flow rates were compared. Both PET cameras had excellent agreement with truth ( [Formula: see text]). High-end PET had no significant bias (p > 0.05) while lower-end PET had minimal slope bias (wash-in and wash-out slopes were 1.02 and 1.01) but no significant reduction in precision relative to high-end PET ( 0.3). SPECT (without scatter and attenuation corrections) slope biases were noted (0.85 and 1.32) and attributed to camera saturation in early time frames. Analysis of wash-out rates from non-saturated, late time frames resulted in excellent agreement with truth ( [Formula: see text], slope = 0.97). Attenuation and scatter corrections did not significantly impact SPECT performance. The proposed phantom, software and quality assurance paradigm can be used to qualify imaging instrumentation and protocols for quantification of kinetic rate parameters using dynamic imaging.

  5. Segmentation of rodent whole-body dynamic PET images: an unsupervised method based on voxel dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maroy, R.; Boisgard, R.; Comtat, C.; Dolle, F.; Trebossen, R.; Tavitian, B.; Frouin, V.; Cathier, P.; Duchesnay, E.; D; Nielsen, P.E.

    2008-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a useful tool for pharmacokinetics studies in rodents during the preclinical phase of drug and tracer development. However, rodent organs are small as compared to the scanner's intrinsic resolution and are affected by physiological movements. We present a new method for the segmentation of rodent whole-body PET images that takes these two difficulties into account by estimating the pharmacokinetics far from organ borders. The segmentation method proved efficient on whole-body numerical rat phantom simulations, including 3-14 organs, together with physiological movements (heart beating, breathing, and bladder filling). The method was resistant to spillover and physiological movements, while other methods failed to obtain a correct segmentation. The radioactivity concentrations calculated with this method also showed an excellent correlation with the manual delineation of organs in a large set of preclinical images. In addition, it was faster, detected more organs, and extracted organs' mean time activity curves with a better confidence on the measure than manual delineation. (authors)

  6. Motion detection and correction for dynamic 15O-water myocardial perfusion PET studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naum, Alexandru; Laaksonen, Marko S.; Oikonen, Vesa; Teraes, Mika; Jaervisalo, Mikko J.; Knuuti, Juhani; Tuunanen, Helena; Nuutila, Pirjo; Kemppainen, Jukka

    2005-01-01

    Patient motion during dynamic PET studies is a well-documented source of errors. The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence of frame-to-frame motion in dynamic 15 O-water myocardial perfusion PET studies, to test the efficacy of motion correction methods and to study whether implementation of motion correction would have an impact on the perfusion results. We developed a motion detection procedure using external radioactive skin markers and frame-to-frame alignment. To evaluate motion, marker coordinates inside the field of view were determined in each frame for each study. The highest number of frames with identical spatial coordinates during the study were defined as ''non-moved''. Movement was considered present if even one marker changed position, by one pixel/frame compared with reference, in one axis, and such frames were defined as ''moved''. We tested manual, in-house-developed motion correction software and an automatic motion correction using a rigid body point model implemented in MIPAV (Medical Image Processing, Analysis and Visualisation) software. After motion correction, remaining motion was re-analysed. Myocardial blood flow (MBF) values were calculated for both non-corrected and motion-corrected datasets. At rest, patient motion was found in 18% of the frames, but during pharmacological stress the fraction increased to 45% and during physical exercise it rose to 80%. Both motion correction algorithms significantly decreased (p<0.006) the number of moved frames and the amplitude of motion (p<0.04). Motion correction significantly increased MBF results during bicycle exercise (p<0.02). At rest or during adenosine infusion, the motion correction had no significant effects on MBF values. Significant motion is a common phenomenon in dynamic cardiac studies during adenosine infusion but especially during exercise. Applying motion correction for the data acquired during exercise clearly changed the MBF results, indicating that motion

  7. The preliminary study of the blood perfusion and ammonia metabolism of pituitary using dynamic 13N-NH3 PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiangsong; Tang Anwu; Qiao Suixian; Chen Liguang; Luo Yaowu; Liu Bin; Xu Weiping

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To preliminarily study the blood perfusion and ammonia metabolism of pituitary using dynamic 13 N-NH 3 PET imaging. Methods: 13 N-NH 3 PET imaging was performed on 21 subjects without pituitary diseases, 6 of them underwent dynamic PET imaging, and 8 of them underwent brain MRI in addition to PET. PET images were registered with MRI. Results: The pituitary could be clearly seen in 13 N-NH 3 PET images, and being confirmed by PET/MRI image fusion. The size of pituitary was (1.07 +- 0.17) cm x (1.09 +- 0.15) cm x (1.14 +- 0.17) cm, the standard uptake value (SUV) was 3.84 +- 1.75, and the radioactivity ratio of pituitary to thalamus was 1.35 +- 0.63. Pituitary image was seen at 10 s after the internal carotid was seen in dynamic 13 N-NH 3 PET imaging. 13 N-NH 3 was retained in pituitary, and was hardly cleaned out within 20 min. The radioactivity ratio of pituitary to internal carotid was 0.75 +- 0.13 when the radioactivity of internal carotid was at its highest level. Conclusions: The blood flow and ammonia metabolism of pituitary can be observed with dynamic 13 N-NH 3 PET imaging. Ammonia is highly extracted by pituitary, and metabolized in pituitary cells

  8. A new dynamic myocardial phantom for evaluation of SPECT and PET quantitation in systolic and diastolic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreuille, O. de; Bendriem, B.; Riddell, C.

    1996-01-01

    We present a new dynamic myocardial phantom designed to evaluate SPECT and PET imaging in systolic and diastolic conditions. The phantom includes a thoracic attenuating media and the myocardial wall thickness varying during the scan can be performed. In this study the phantom was used with three different wall thickness characteristic of a systolic, end-diastolic and pathologic end-diastolic condition. The myocardium was filled with 99m Tc, 18 F and Gd and imaged by SPECT, PET and MRI. SPECT attenuation correction was performed using a modified PET transmission. A bull's eyes image was obtained for all data and wall ROI were then drawn for analysis. Using MRI as a reference, error from PET, SPECT and attenuation corrected SPECT were calculated. Systolic PET performances agree with MRI. Quantitation loss due to wall thickness reduction compared to the systole. Attenuation correction in SPECT leads to significant decrease of the error both in systole (from 29% to 14%) and diastole (35% to 22%). This is particularly sensitive for septum and inferior walls. SPECT residual errors (14% in systole and 22% in pathologic end-diastole) are likely caused by scatter, noise and depth dependent resolution effect. The results obtained with this dynamical phantom demonstrate the quantitation improvement achieved in SPECT with attenuation correction and also reinforce the need for variable resolution correction in addition to attenuation correction

  9. Reduction of motion artifacts for PET imaging by respiratory correlated dynamic scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, K.-S.; Chen, T.-J.; Chang, C.-C.; Wu, J.; Chen, S.; Wu, L.-C.; Liu, R.-S.

    2006-01-01

    Organ motion caused by respiration is a major challenge in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. This work proposes a technique to reduce smearing in PET imaging caused by respiratory motion. Dynamic scanning at 1 frame/s is used. A point source, used as a marker, is attached to the object's abdomen during the scan. The source position in the projection view moves with respiratory motion and can be used to represent the respiratory phase within the time interval in which each frame data are acquired. One hundred and twenty frames are obtained for each study. The range of the positions of the marker is divided into four groups, representing different respiratory phases. The frames in which the organ positions (phases) are the same summed to produce a static sub-sinogram. Each sub-sinogram then undergoes regular image reconstruction to yield a motion-free image. The technique is applied to one volunteer under both free and coached breathing conditions. A parameter called the volume reduction factor is adopted to evaluate the effectiveness of this motion-reduction technique. The preliminary results indicate that the proposed technique effectively reduces motion artifacts in the image. Coached breathing yields better results than free breathing condition. The advantages of this method are that (1) the scanning time remains the same; (2) free breathing is allowed during the acquisition of the image; and (3) no user intervention is required

  10. The preliminary results of the diagnosis of pituitary diseases using 13N-NH3 PET dynamic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiangsong; Chen Hongmei; Yang Huazhang; Tang Anwu; Qiao Suixian

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To preliminarily evaluate the value of 13 N-NH 3 PET dynamic imaging for the diagnosis of pituitary diseases. Methods: The 13 N-NH 3 PET dynamic imaging was performed on 2 patients with pituitary microadenoma and one patient with hypopituitarism, the diagnoses were confirmed by MRI, levels of relative endocrine hormones in blood and clinical presentations. Results: In 2 patients with pituitary microadenoma, the pituitaries were seen in 20 and 30 s after the internal carotid was seen in the dynamic PET images, the upper margins of pituitaries were convex, the heights were 1.75 cm and 1.62 cm, the standard uptake values (SUVs) of pituitaries were 3.96 and 3.28, and the radioactivity ratio of pituitary to thalamus were 1.58 and 1.27. In the patient with hypopituitarism, the pituitary was seen at 3 min after the image of the internal carotid, the image of pituitary was smaller than the normal ones (0.82 cm x 0.83 cm x 1.03 cm), the SUV of pituitary was 1.48, and the radioactivity ratio of pituitary to thalamus was 0.64. Conclusion: The 13 N-NH 3 PET dynamic imaging is useful in diagnosing pituitary microadenoma and hypopituitarism

  11. Characteristics of time-activity curves obtained from dynamic 11C-methionine PET in common primary brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Yuichi; Asano, Yoshitaka; Shinoda, Jun; Yano, Hirohito; Ikegame, Yuka; Kawasaki, Tomohiro; Nakayama, Noriyuki; Maruyama, Takashi; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Iwama, Toru

    2018-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether dynamic PET with 11 C-methionine (MET) (MET-PET) is useful in the diagnosis of brain tumors. One hundred sixty patients with brain tumors (139 gliomas, 9 meningiomas, 4 hemangioblastomas and 8 primary central nervous system lymphomas [PCNSL]) underwent dynamic MET-PET with a 3-dimensional acquisition mode, and the maximum tumor MET-standardized uptake value (MET-SUV) was measured consecutively to construct a time-activity curve (TAC). Furthermore, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated from the time-to-peak (TTP) and the slope of the curve in the late phase (SLOPE). The TAC patterns of MET-SUVs (MET-TACs) could be divided into four characteristic types when MET dynamics were analyzed by dividing the MET-TAC into three phases. MET-SUVs were significantly higher in early and late phases in glioblastoma compared to anaplastic astrocytoma, diffuse astrocytoma and the normal frontal cortex (P dynamic MET-PET study could be helpful in the non-invasive discrimination of brain tumor subtypes, in particular gliomas.

  12. Early dynamic 18F-FDG PET to detect hyperperfusion in hepatocellular carcinoma liver lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schierz, Jan-Henning; Opfermann, Thomas; Steenbeck, Jörg; Lopatta, Eric; Settmacher, Utz; Stallmach, Andreas; Marlowe, Robert J; Freesmeyer, Martin

    2013-06-01

    In addition to angiographic data on vascularity and vascular access, demonstration of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) liver nodule hypervascularization is a prerequisite for certain intrahepatic antitumor therapies. Early dynamic (ED) (18)F-FDG PET/CT could serve this purpose when the current standard method, contrast-enhanced (CE) CT, or other CE morphologic imaging modalities are unsuitable. A recent study showed ED (18)F-FDG PET/CT efficacy in this setting but applied a larger-than-standard (18)F-FDG activity and an elaborate protocol likely to hinder routine use. We developed a simplified protocol using standard activities and easily generated visual and descriptive or quantitative endpoints. This pilot study assessed the ability of these endpoints to detect HCC hyperperfusion and, thereby, evaluated the suitability in of the protocol everyday practice. Twenty-seven patients with 34 HCCs (diameter ≥ 1.5 cm) with hypervascularization on 3-phase CE CT underwent liver ED (18)F-FDG PET for 240 s, starting with (18)F-FDG (250-MBq bolus injection). Four frames at 15-s intervals, followed by 3 frames at 60-s intervals were reconstructed. Endpoints included focal tracer accumulation in the first 4 frames (60 s), subsequent focal washout, and visual and quantitative differences between tumor and liver regions of interest in maximum and mean ED standardized uptake value (ED SUVmax and ED SUVmean, respectively) 240-s time-activity curves. All 34 lesions were identified by early focal (18)F-FDG accumulation and faster time-to-peak ED SUVmax or ED SUVmean than in nontumor tissue. Tumor peak ED SUVmax and ED SUVmean exceeded liver levels in 85% and 53%, respectively, of lesions. Nadir tumor signal showed no consistent pattern relative to nontumor signal. HCC had a significantly shorter time to peak and significantly faster rate to peak for both ED SUVmax and ED SUVmean curves and a significantly higher peak ED SUVmax but not peak ED SUVmean than the liver. This pilot study

  13. Improved UTE-based attenuation correction for cranial PET-MR using dynamic magnetic field monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aitken, A. P.; Giese, D.; Tsoumpas, C.; Schleyer, P.; Kozerke, S.; Prieto, C.; Schaeffter, T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Ultrashort echo time (UTE) MRI has been proposed as a way to produce segmented attenuation maps for PET, as it provides contrast between bone, air, and soft tissue. However, UTE sequences require samples to be acquired during rapidly changing gradient fields, which makes the resulting images prone to eddy current artifacts. In this work it is demonstrated that this can lead to misclassification of tissues in segmented attenuation maps (AC maps) and that these effects can be corrected for by measuring the true k-space trajectories using a magnetic field camera. Methods: The k-space trajectories during a dual echo UTE sequence were measured using a dynamic magnetic field camera. UTE images were reconstructed using nominal trajectories and again using the measured trajectories. A numerical phantom was used to demonstrate the effect of reconstructing with incorrect trajectories. Images of an ovine leg phantom were reconstructed and segmented and the resulting attenuation maps were compared to a segmented map derived from a CT scan of the same phantom, using the Dice similarity measure. The feasibility of the proposed method was demonstrated inin vivo cranial imaging in five healthy volunteers. Simulated PET data were generated for one volunteer to show the impact of misclassifications on the PET reconstruction. Results: Images of the numerical phantom exhibited blurring and edge artifacts on the bone–tissue and air–tissue interfaces when nominal k-space trajectories were used, leading to misclassification of soft tissue as bone and misclassification of bone as air. Images of the tissue phantom and thein vivo cranial images exhibited the same artifacts. The artifacts were greatly reduced when the measured trajectories were used. For the tissue phantom, the Dice coefficient for bone in MR relative to CT was 0.616 using the nominal trajectories and 0.814 using the measured trajectories. The Dice coefficients for soft tissue were 0.933 and 0.934 for the

  14. Effect of motion-induced PET-CT misalignment on cardiac function and myocardial blood flow measured using dynamic 15O-water PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lubberink, Mark; Ebrahimi, M; Harms, Hans

    -CT misalignment on MBF, transmural MBF (MBFt), perfusable tissue fraction (PTF), cardiac output (CO), stroke volume (SV) and left-ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) based on dynamic 15O-water scans. Methods: 10 patients underwent 6 min PET scans after injection of 400 MBq 15O-water at rest and during adenosine......Aim: Motion-induced PET-CT misalignment artifacts are common in myocardial blood flow (MBF) measurements with 82Rb and 13N-ammonia. For 15O-water, MBF is based on the clearance rate rather than uptake of the tracer. The clearance rate is determined by the shape of the time-activity curve, not its...... amplitude, and is thus not affected by attenuation correction errors. Hence, misalignment is hypothesized not to affect 15O-water-based MBF to any large extent, but it may affect cardiac function measures derived from 15O-water scans. The aim of the present work was to assess the effect of PET...

  15. Dynamic 18F-FET PET in newly diagnosed astrocytic low-grade glioma identifies high-risk patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Nathalie L; Suchorska, Bogdana; Wenter, Vera; Eigenbrod, Sabina; Schmid-Tannwald, Christine; Zwergal, Andreas; Niyazi, Maximilian; Drexler, Mark; Bartenstein, Peter; Schnell, Oliver; Tonn, Jörg-Christian; Thon, Niklas; Kreth, Friedrich-Wilhelm; la Fougère, Christian

    2014-02-01

    Because the clinical course of low-grade gliomas in the individual adult patient varies considerably and is unpredictable, we investigated the prognostic value of dynamic (18)F-fluorethyltyrosine ((18)F-FET) PET in the early diagnosis of astrocytic low-grade glioma (World Health Organization grade II). Fifty-nine patients with newly diagnosed low-grade glioma and dynamic (18)F-FET PET before histopathologic assessment were retrospectively investigated. (18)F-FET PET analysis comprised a qualitative visual classification of lesions; assessment of the semiquantitative parameters maximal, mean, and total standardized uptake value as ratio to background and biologic tumor volume; and dynamic analysis of intratumoral (18)F-FET uptake over time (increasing vs. decreasing time-activity curves). The correlation between PET parameters and progression-free survival, overall survival, and time to malignant transformation was investigated. (18)F-FET uptake greater than the background level was found in 34 of 59 tumors. Dynamic (18)F-FET uptake analysis was available for 30 of these 34 patients. Increasing and decreasing time-activity curves were found in 18 and 12 patients, respectively. Neither the qualitative factor presence or absence of (18)F-FET uptake nor any of the semiquantitative uptake parameters significantly influenced clinical outcome. In contrast, decreasing time-activity curves in the kinetic analysis were highly prognostic for shorter progression-free survival and time to malignant transformation (P dynamic (18)F-FET PET constitute an unfavorable prognostic factor in astrocytic low-grade glioma and, by identifying high-risk patients, may ease treatment decisions.

  16. Dual-Tracer PET Using Generalized Factor Analysis of Dynamic Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhri, Georges El; Trott, Cathryn M.; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Bonab, Ali; Alpert, Nathaniel M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose With single-photon emission computed tomography, simultaneous imaging of two physiological processes relies on discrimination of the energy of the emitted gamma rays, whereas the application of dual-tracer imaging to positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been limited by the characteristic 511-keV emissions. Procedures To address this limitation, we developed a novel approach based on generalized factor analysis of dynamic sequences (GFADS) that exploits spatio-temporal differences between radiotracers and applied it to near-simultaneous imaging of 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) (brain metabolism) and 11C-raclopride (D2) with simulated human data and experimental rhesus monkey data. We show theoretically and verify by simulation and measurement that GFADS can separate FDG and raclopride measurements that are made nearly simultaneously. Results The theoretical development shows that GFADS can decompose the studies at several levels: (1) It decomposes the FDG and raclopride study so that they can be analyzed as though they were obtained separately. (2) If additional physiologic/anatomic constraints can be imposed, further decomposition is possible. (3) For the example of raclopride, specific and nonspecific binding can be determined on a pixel-by-pixel basis. We found good agreement between the estimated GFADS factors and the simulated ground truth time activity curves (TACs), and between the GFADS factor images and the corresponding ground truth activity distributions with errors less than 7.3±1.3 %. Biases in estimation of specific D2 binding and relative metabolism activity were within 5.9±3.6 % compared to the ground truth values. We also evaluated our approach in simultaneous dual-isotope brain PET studies in a rhesus monkey and obtained accuracy of better than 6 % in a mid-striatal volume, for striatal activity estimation. Conclusions Dynamic image sequences acquired following near-simultaneous injection of two PET radiopharmaceuticals

  17. Short dynamic FDG-PET imaging protocol for patients with lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torizuka, Tatsuo; Nobezawa, Shuji; Kanno, Toshihiko; Ouchi, Yasuomi; Momiki, Shigeru; Kasamatsu, Norio; Yoshikawa, Etsuji; Futatsubashi, Masami; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2000-01-01

    This positron emission tomography (PET) study was designed to compare 2-[fluorine-18]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) kinetic parameters of tumours derived from imaging frames of 0-60 min post FDG injection with those derived from shorter imaging frames of 0-30 min. Dynamic FDG-PET scans were performed on 20 patients with primary lung cancers for 1 h after intravenous injection of FDG. Images were reconstructed with attenuation correction using transmission images obtained with a germanium-68 ring source immediately before FDG injection. A region of interest (ROI) was placed on the plane of the maximal tumour FDG uptake. Arterial input function was estimated from an ROI defined in the left atrium. Based on the standard three-compartment metabolic model, we calculated the rate constants (K 1 -k 3 ) and influx constant K i = K 1 k 3 /(k 2 +k 3 ) using the imaging frames for 60 min and 30 min post FDG injection. The standardized uptake value (SUV) of tumour was measured using the imaging frame of 50-60 min post injection. High correlations were observed between kinetic parameters (K 1 , k 2 , k 3 and K i ) derived from imaging frames of 0-60 min and 0-30 min [0.231±0.114 vs 0.260±0.174 (r=0.958), 1.149±1.038 vs 1.565±2.027 (r=0.968), 0.259±0.154 vs 0.311±0.194 (r=0.886) and 0.044±0.022 vs 0.048±0.023 (r=0.961), respectively, P i showed an excellent agreement between the two methods (y=-0.0041+0.09831x). Mean SUV of the lung cancers was 6.58±2.85. It is concluded that the briefer 30-min acquisition may yield essentially the same results as the standard 60-min imaging protocol, thus offering a time saving in dynamic PET studies in which the model parameters are desired. (orig.)

  18. Tumor aggressiveness and patient outcome in cancer of the pancreas assessed by dynamic 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epelbaum, Ron; Frenkel, Alex; Haddad, Riad; Sikorski, Natalia; Strauss, Ludwig G; Israel, Ora; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the role of a quantitative dynamic PET model in pancreatic cancer as a potential index of tumor aggressiveness and predictor of survival. Seventy-one patients with (18)F-FDG-avid adenocarcinoma of the pancreas before treatment were recruited, including 27 with localized tumors (11 underwent pancreatectomy, and 16 had localized nonresectable tumors) and 44 with metastatic disease. Dynamic (18)F-FDG PET images were acquired over a 60-min period, followed by a whole-body PET/CT study. Quantitative data measurements were based on a 2-compartment model, and the following variables were calculated: VB (fractional blood volume in target area), K(1) and k(2) (kinetic membrane transport parameters), k(3) and k(4) (intracellular (18)F-FDG phosphorylation and dephosphorylation parameters, respectively), and (18)F-FDG INF (global (18)F-FDG influx). The single significant variable for overall survival (OS) in patients with localized disease was (18)F-FDG INF. Patients with a high (18)F-FDG INF (>0.033 min(-1)) had a median OS of 6 and 5 mo for nonresectable and resected tumors, respectively, versus 15 and 19 mo for a low (18)F-FDG INF in nonresectable and resected tumors, respectively (P measured by dynamic PET in newly diagnosed pancreatic cancer correlated with the aggressiveness of disease. The (18)F-FDG INF was the single most significant variable for OS in patients with localized disease, whether resectable or not.

  19. First experience with early dynamic 18F-NaF-PET/CT in patients with chronic osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freesmeyer, M.; Stecker, F.F.; Schierz, J.-H.; Winkens, T.; Hofmann, G.O.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates whether early dynamic positron emission tomography/computed tomography (ed-PET/CT) using 18 F-sodium fluoride-( 18 F-NaF) is feasible in depicting early phases of radiotracer distribution in patients with chronic osteomyelitis (COM). A total of 12 ed 18 F-NaF-PET/CT examinations were performed on 11 consecutive patients (2 female, 9 male; age 53 ± 12 years) in list mode over 5 min starting with radiopharmaceutical injection before standard late 18 F-NaF-PET/CT. Eight consecutive time intervals (frames) were reconstructed for each patient: four 15 s, then four 60 s. Several volumes of interest (VOI) were selected, representing the affected area as well as different reference areas within the bone and soft tissue. Maximum and mean ed standardized uptake values (edSUV max , edSUV mean , respectively) were calculated in each VOI during each frame to measure early fluoride influx and accumulation. Results were compared between affected and non-affected (contralateral) bones. Starting in the 31-45 s frame, the affected bone area showed significantly higher edSUV max and edSUV mean compared to the healthy contralateral region. The affected bone areas also significantly differed from non-affected contralateral regions in conventional late 18 F-NaF-PET/CT. This pilot study suggests that, in patients with COM, ed 18 F-NaF-PET offers additional information about early radiotracer distribution to standard 18 F-NaF-PET/CT, similar to a three-phase bone scan. The results should be validated in larger trials which directly compare ed 18 F-NaF-PET to a three-phase bone scan. (author)

  20. Characterization of tumor heterogeneity using dynamic contrast enhanced CT and FDG-PET in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmpt, Wouter van; Das, Marco; Hüllner, Martin; Sharifi, Hoda; Zegers, Catharina M.L.; Reymen, Bart; Lambin, Philippe; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Troost, Esther G.C.; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; De Ruysscher, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Dynamic contrast-enhanced CT (DCE-CT) quantifies vasculature properties of tumors, whereas static FDG-PET/CT defines metabolic activity. Both imaging modalities are capable of showing intra-tumor heterogeneity. We investigated differences in vasculature properties within primary non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors measured by DCE-CT and metabolic activity from FDG-PET/CT. Methods: Thirty three NSCLC patients were analyzed prior to treatment. FDG-PET/CT and DCE-CT were co-registered. The tumor was delineated and metabolic activity was segmented on the FDG-PET/CT in two regions: low (<50% maximum SUV) and high (⩾50% maximum SUV) metabolic uptake. Blood flow, blood volume and permeability were calculated using a maximum slope, deconvolution algorithm and a Patlak model. Correlations were assessed between perfusion parameters for the regions of interest. Results: DCE-CT provided additional information on vasculature and tumor heterogeneity that was not correlated to metabolic tumor activity. There was no significant difference between low and high metabolic active regions for any of the DCE-CT parameters. Furthermore, only moderate correlations between maximum SUV and DCE-CT parameters were observed. Conclusions: No direct correlation was observed between FDG-uptake and parameters extracted from DCE-CT. DCE-CT may provide complementary information to the characterization of primary NSCLC tumors over FDG-PET/CT imaging

  1. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 dynamic PET/CT imaging in biochemical relapse of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachpekidis, C. [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center, Medical PET Group-Biological Imaging, Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Eder, M. [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Heidelberg (Germany); Kopka, K. [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg (Germany); Mier, W. [University of Heidelberg, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Hadaschik, B.A. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Urology, Heidelberg (Germany); Haberkorn, U. [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg (Germany); University of Heidelberg, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, A. [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    We aim to investigate the pharmacokinetics and distribution of the recently clinically introduced radioligand {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 in men with recurrent prostate cancer (PC) by means of dynamic and whole-body PET/CT. The correlation between PSA levels and {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 PET parameters is also investigated. 31 patients with biochemical failure after primary PC treatment with curative intent (median age 71.0 years) were enrolled in the analysis. The median PSA value was 2.0 ng/mL (range = 0.1 - 130.0 ng/mL) and the median Gleason score was 7 (range = 5 - 9). 8/31 (25.8 %) of the included patients had a PSA value < 0.5 ng/ml. All patients underwent dynamic PET/CT (dPET/CT) scanning (60 min) of the pelvis and lower abdomen as well as whole-body PET/CT with {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11. dPET/CT assessment was based on qualitative evaluation, SUV calculation, and quantitative analysis based on a two-tissue compartment model and a non-compartmental approach leading to the extraction of fractal dimension (FD). 22/31 patients (71.0 %) were {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11-positive, while 9/31 (29.0 %) patients were {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11-negative. The median PSA value in the {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11-positive group was significantly higher (median = 2.35 ng/mL; range = 0.19 - 130.0 ng/mL) than in the {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11-negative group (median value: 0.34 ng/mL; range = 0.10 - 4.20 ng/mL). A total of 76 lesions were semi-quantitatively evaluated. PC recurrence-associated lesions demonstrated a mean SUV{sub average} = 12.4 (median = 9.0; range = 2.2 - 84.5) and mean SUV{sub max} = 18.8 (median = 14.1; range = 3.1 - 120.3). Dynamic PET/CT studies of the pelvis revealed the following mean values for the PC recurrence-suspicious lesions: K{sub 1} = 0.26, k{sub 3} = 0.30, influx = 0.14 and FD = 1.24. Time-activity curves derived from PC-recurrence indicative lesions revealed an increasing {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 accumulation during dynamic PET acquisition. Correlation analysis revealed a moderate, but significant

  2. Metabolically active tumour volume segmentation from dynamic [(18)F]FLT PET studies in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyng, Lieke L; Frings, Virginie; Hoekstra, Otto S; Kenny, Laura M; Aboagye, Eric O; Boellaard, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) with (18)F-3'-deoxy-3'-fluorothymidine ([(18)F]FLT) can be used to assess tumour proliferation. A kinetic-filtering (KF) classification algorithm has been suggested for segmentation of tumours in dynamic [(18)F]FLT PET data. The aim of the present study was to evaluate KF segmentation and its test-retest performance in [(18)F]FLT PET in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Nine NSCLC patients underwent two 60-min dynamic [(18)F]FLT PET scans within 7 days prior to treatment. Dynamic scans were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) as well as with ordered subsets expectation maximisation (OSEM). Twenty-eight lesions were identified by an experienced physician. Segmentation was performed using KF applied to the dynamic data set and a source-to-background corrected 50% threshold (A50%) was applied to the sum image of the last three frames (45- to 60-min p.i.). Furthermore, several adaptations of KF were tested. Both for KF and A50% test-retest (TRT) variability of metabolically active tumour volume and standard uptake value (SUV) were evaluated. KF performed better on OSEM- than on FBP-reconstructed PET images. The original KF implementation segmented 15 out of 28 lesions, whereas A50% segmented each lesion. Adapted KF versions, however, were able to segment 26 out of 28 lesions. In the best performing adapted versions, metabolically active tumour volume and SUV TRT variability was similar to those of A50%. KF misclassified certain tumour areas as vertebrae or liver tissue, which was shown to be related to heterogeneous [(18)F]FLT uptake areas within the tumour. For [(18)F]FLT PET studies in NSCLC patients, KF and A50% show comparable tumour volume segmentation performance. The KF method needs, however, a site-specific optimisation. The A50% is therefore a good alternative for tumour segmentation in NSCLC [(18)F]FLT PET studies in multicentre studies. Yet, it was observed that KF has the potential to subsegment

  3. Dynamic PET/CT measurements of induced positron activity in a prostate cancer patient after 50-MV photon radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janek Strååt, Sara; Jacobsson, Hans; Noz, Marilyn E; Andreassen, Björn; Näslund, Ingemar; Jonsson, Cathrine

    2013-01-23

    The purpose of this work was to reveal the research interest value of positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in visualizing the induced tissue activity post high-energy photon radiation treatment. More specifically, the focus was on the possibility of retrieving data such as tissue composition and physical half-lives from dynamic PET acquisitions, as positron-emitting radionuclides such as 15O, 11C, and 13N are produced in vivo during radiation treatment with high-energy photons (>15 MeV). The type, amount, and distribution of induced positron-emitting radionuclides depend on the irradiated tissue cross section, the photon spectrum, and the possible perfusion-driven washout. A 62-year-old man diagnosed with prostate cancer was referred for palliative radiation treatment of the pelvis minor. A total dose of 8 Gy was given using high-energy photon beams (50 MV) with a racetrack microtron, and 7 min after the end of irradiation, the patient was positioned in a PET/computed tomography (CT) camera, and a list-mode acquisition was performed for 30 min. Two volumes of interests (VOIs) were positioned on the dynamic PET/CT images, one in the urinary bladder and the other in the subcutaneous fat. Analysis of the measured relative count rate was performed in order to compute the tissue compositions and physical half-lives in the two regions. Dynamic analysis from the two VOIs showed that the decay constants of activated oxygen and carbon could be deduced. Calculation of tissue composition from analyzing the VOI containing subcutaneous fat only moderately agreed with that of the tabulated International Commission on Radiation Units & Measurements (ICRU) data of the adipose tissue. However, the same analysis for the bladder showed a good agreement with that of the tabulated ICRU data. PET can be used in visualizing the induced activity post high-energy photon radiation treatment. Despite the very low count rate in this specific application, wherein 7 min after treatment

  4. Comparison of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI and PET/CT in the Evaluation of Laryngeal Cancer After Inadequate CT Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Citil, Serdal; Dogan, Serap; Atilgan, Hasan Ikbal; Menzilcioglu, Mehmet Sait; Sahin, Tuna; Abdulrezzak, Ummuhan; Duymus, Mahmut; Ozturk, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the diagnostic value of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for laryngeal cancers after inadequate CT results. The study comprised 45 patients investigated for primary laryngeal cancer or recurrence-residue in which CT was considered inadequate. A mass was found in 20 patients. Dynamic MRI and PET/CT were compared for diagnosis of mass, lymph node involvement, recurrence and residue. The dynamic curves formed in dynamic MRI were investigated for diagnostic contributions. The sensitivity and specificity of the dynamic MRI, for supraglottic, glottic and subglottic location, was 100%, 80%, and 92%; 100%, 85%, and 100%, respectively. In PET/CT the sensitivity and specificity were 100% for all of those localizations. For lymph node involvement, the sensitivity of dynamic MRI and PET/CT was 100%, the specificity was 100% and 93%, respectively. For recurrence-residue, the sensitivity and specificity of dynamic MRI were 86% and 67%, respectively, with 100% sensitivity and specificity in PET/CT. The sensitivity of type A curve for detection of malignancy was 40%, and specificity was 100%. When type A and B curves were included, the sensitivity was 100%. For patients investigated for laryngeal cancer in which CT is considered inadequate, dynamic MRI or PET/CT is useful

  5. Comparison of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI and PET/CT in the Evaluation of Laryngeal Cancer After Inadequate CT Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citil, Serdal; Dogan, Serap; Atilgan, Hasan Ikbal; Menzilcioglu, Mehmet Sait; Sahin, Tuna; Abdulrezzak, Ummuhan; Duymus, Mahmut; Ozturk, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the diagnostic value of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for laryngeal cancers after inadequate CT results. The study comprised 45 patients investigated for primary laryngeal cancer or recurrence-residue in which CT was considered inadequate. A mass was found in 20 patients. Dynamic MRI and PET/CT were compared for diagnosis of mass, lymph node involvement, recurrence and residue. The dynamic curves formed in dynamic MRI were investigated for diagnostic contributions. The sensitivity and specificity of the dynamic MRI, for supraglottic, glottic and subglottic location, was 100%, 80%, and 92%; 100%, 85%, and 100%, respectively. In PET/CT the sensitivity and specificity were 100% for all of those localizations. For lymph node involvement, the sensitivity of dynamic MRI and PET/CT was 100%, the specificity was 100% and 93%, respectively. For recurrence-residue, the sensitivity and specificity of dynamic MRI were 86% and 67%, respectively, with 100% sensitivity and specificity in PET/CT. The sensitivity of type A curve for detection of malignancy was 40%, and specificity was 100%. When type A and B curves were included, the sensitivity was 100%. For patients investigated for laryngeal cancer in which CT is considered inadequate, dynamic MRI or PET/CT is useful.

  6. Biologic targets identified from dynamic 18FDG-PET and implications for image-guided therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusten, Espen; Malinen, Eirik; Roedal, Jan; Bruland, Oeyvind S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The outcome of biologic image-guided radiotherapy depends on the definition of the biologic target. The purpose of the current work was to extract hyper perfused and hypermetabolic regions from dynamic positron emission tomography (D-PET) images, to dose escalate either region and to discuss implications of such image guided strategies. Methods: Eleven patients with soft tissue sarcomas were investigated with D-PET. The images were analyzed using a two-compartment model producing parametric maps of perfusion and metabolic rate. The two image series were segmented and exported to a treatment planning system, and biological target volumes BTV per and BTV met (perfusion and metabolism, respectively) were generated. Dice's similarity coefficient was used to compare the two biologic targets. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans were generated for a dose painting by contours regime, where planning target volume (PTV) was planned to 60 Gy and BTV to 70 Gy. Thus, two separate plans were created for each patient with dose escalation of either BTV per or BTV met . Results: BTV per was somewhat smaller than BTV met (209 ±170 cm 3 against 243 ±143 cm 3 , respectively; population-based mean and s.d.). Dice's coefficient depended on the applied margin, and was 0.72 ±0.10 for a margin of 10 mm. Boosting BTV per resulted in mean dose of 69 ±1.0 Gy to this region, while BTV met received 67 ±3.2 Gy. Boosting BTV met gave smaller dose differences between the respective non-boost DVHs (such as D 98 ). Conclusions: Dose escalation of one of the BTVs results in a partial dose escalation of the other BTV as well. If tumor aggressiveness is equally pronounced in hyper perfused and hypermetabolic regions, this should be taken into account in the treatment planning

  7. Dynamic FDG PET for assessing early effects of cerebral hypoxia and resuscitation in new-born pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, Charlotte de; Malinen, Eirik; Qu, Hong; Johnsrud, Kjersti; Skretting, Arne; Saugstad, Ola Didrik; Munkeby, Berit H.

    2012-01-01

    Changes in cerebral glucose metabolism may be an early prognostic indicator of perinatal hypoxic-ischaemic injury. In this study dynamic 18 F-FDG PET was used to evaluate cerebral glucose metabolism in piglets after global perinatal hypoxia and the impact of the resuscitation strategy using room air or hyperoxia. New-born piglets (n = 16) underwent 60 min of global hypoxia followed by 30 min of resuscitation with a fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO 2 ) of 0.21 or 1.0. Dynamic FDG PET, using a microPET system, was performed at baseline and repeated at the end of resuscitation under stabilized haemodynamic conditions. MRI at 3 T was performed for anatomic correlation. Global and regional cerebral metabolic rates of glucose (CMR gl ) were assessed by Patlak analysis for the two time-points and resuscitation groups. Global hypoxia was found to cause an immediate decrease in cerebral glucose metabolism from a baseline level (mean ± SD) of 21.2 ± 7.9 to 12.6 ± 4.7 μmol/min/100 g (p gl but no significant differences in global or regional CMR gl between the resuscitation groups were found. Dynamic FDG PET detected decreased cerebral glucose metabolism early after perinatal hypoxia in piglets. The decrease in CMR gl may indicate early changes of mild cerebral hypoxia-ischaemia. No significant effect of hyperoxic resuscitation on the degree of hypometabolism was found in this early phase after hypoxia. Cerebral FDG PET can provide new insights into mechanisms of perinatal hypoxic-ischaemic injury where early detection plays an important role in instituting therapy. (orig.)

  8. Comprehensive Study on Thermal and Dynamic Mechanical Behavior of PET/PEN Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossien Ali Khonakdar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The effects of interchange reactions on the crystallization, melting, and dynamic mechanical thermal behavior of poly(ethylene terephthalate/poly(ethylene naphthalate (PET/PEN blends prepared by melt mixing have been investigated. The occurrence of interchange reactions has been verified by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA were used to study the effect of transesterification reaction on crystallinity, melting and dynamic mechanical properties of the blends. It was found that by extension of transesterification, the miscibility of the blend increased. Time and temperature of mixing were most important parameters affecting the transesterification level. On blending, the melt crystallinity of poly(ethylene terephthalate was reduced and in contrast that of poly(ethylene naphthalate was increased; where melt crystallization temperatures of both phases were depressed. A single composition-dependent glass transition peak, which was indicative of miscibility, was detected in second heating thermograms of the blends. It was observed that cold crystallization of poly(ethylene terephthalate phase decreases while that of poly(ethylene naphthalate was suppressed on blending. It was found that each phase crystallized individually and a melting point depression which was an indication of compatibility was evident at the same time. Dynamic mechanical analysis confirmed the proton nuclear magnetic resonance and differential scanning calorimetry results. The secondary viscoelastic transitions of each phase in blend samples were also probed. Increment of peak area in the loss factor has implied the miscibility of blend due to formation of poly(ethylene terephthalate/poly(ethylene naphthalate random copolymer.

  9. Quantitative accuracy of denoising techniques applied to dynamic 82Rb myocardial blood flow PET/CT scans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harms, Hans; Tolbod, Lars Poulsen; Bouchelouche, Kirsten

    with suspected ischemic heart disease underwent a dynamic 7 minute 82Rb scan under resting and adenosine induced hyperaemic conditions after injection of 1100 MBq of 82Rb on a GE Discovery 690 PET/CT. Dynamic images were filtered using HighlY constrained backPRojection (HYPR) and a Hotelling filter of which...... the latter was evaluated using a range of 4 to 7 included factors and for both 2D and 3D filtering. Data were analyzed using Cardiac VUer and obtained MBF values were compared with those obtained when no denoising of the dynamic data was performed. Results: Both HYPR and Hotelling denoising could...

  10. Evaluation of data reduction methods for dynamic PET series based on Monte Carlo techniques and the NCAT phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thireou, Trias; Rubio Guivernau, Jose Luis; Atlamazoglou, Vassilis; Ledesma, Maria Jesus; Pavlopoulos, Sotiris; Santos, Andres; Kontaxakis, George

    2006-01-01

    A realistic dynamic positron-emission tomography (PET) thoracic study was generated, using the 4D NURBS-based (non-uniform rational B-splines) cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom and a sophisticated model of the PET imaging process, simulating two solitary pulmonary nodules. Three data reduction and blind source separation methods were applied to the simulated data: principal component analysis, independent component analysis and similarity mapping. All methods reduced the initial amount of image data to a smaller, comprehensive and easily managed set of parametric images, where structures were separated based on their different kinetic characteristics and the lesions were readily identified. The results indicate that the above-mentioned methods can provide an accurate tool for the support of both visual inspection and subsequent detailed kinetic analysis of the dynamic series via compartmental or non-compartmental models

  11. Assessing the kidney function parameters glomerular filtration rate and effective renal plasma flow with dynamic FDG-PET/MRI in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Barbara K; Baltzer, Pascal; Fueger, Barbara; Hamboeck, Martina; Nakuz, Thomas; Papp, Laszlo; Rasul, Sazan; Sundar, Lalith Kumar Shiyam; Hacker, Marcus; Staudenherz, Anton

    2018-05-09

    A method was developed to assess the kidney parameters glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) from 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) concentration behavior in kidneys, measured with positron emission tomography (PET) scans. Twenty-four healthy adult subjects prospectively underwent dynamic simultaneous PET/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination. Time activity curves (TACs) were obtained from the dynamic PET series, with the guidance of MR information. Patlak analysis was performed to determine the GFR, and based on integrals, ERPF was calculated. Results were compared to intra-individually obtained reference values determined from venous blood samples. Total kidney GFR and ERPF as estimated by dynamic PET/MRI were highly correlated to their reference values (r = 0.88/p dynamic FDG PET/MRI scans in healthy kidneys. This has advantages for patients getting a routine scan, where additional examinations for kidney function estimation could be avoided. Further studies are required for transferring this PET/MRI method to PET/CT applications.

  12. Metabolic liver function measured in vivo by dynamic (18)F-FDGal PET/CT without arterial blood sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsager, Jacob; Munk, Ole Lajord; Sørensen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic liver function can be measured by dynamic PET/CT with the radio-labelled galactose-analogue 2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-galactose ((18)F-FDGal) in terms of hepatic systemic clearance of (18)F-FDGal (K, ml blood/ml liver tissue/min). The method requires arterial blood sampling from a radial artery (arterial input function), and the aim of this study was to develop a method for extracting an image-derived, non-invasive input function from a volume of interest (VOI). Dynamic (18)F-FDGal PET/CT data from 16 subjects without liver disease (healthy subjects) and 16 patients with liver cirrhosis were included in the study. Five different input VOIs were tested: four in the abdominal aorta and one in the left ventricle of the heart. Arterial input function from manual blood sampling was available for all subjects. K*-values were calculated using time-activity curves (TACs) from each VOI as input and compared to the K-value calculated using arterial blood samples as input. Each input VOI was tested on PET data reconstructed with and without resolution modelling. All five image-derived input VOIs yielded K*-values that correlated significantly with K calculated using arterial blood samples. Furthermore, TACs from two different VOIs yielded K*-values that did not statistically deviate from K calculated using arterial blood samples. A semicircle drawn in the posterior part of the abdominal aorta was the only VOI that was successful for both healthy subjects and patients as well as for PET data reconstructed with and without resolution modelling. Metabolic liver function using (18)F-FDGal PET/CT can be measured without arterial blood samples by using input data from a semicircle VOI drawn in the posterior part of the abdominal aorta.

  13. Recovery coefficients for the quantification of the arterial input function from dynamic pet measurements: experimental and theoretical determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brix, G.; Bellemann, M.E.; Hauser, H.; Doll, J.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: For kinetic modelling of dynamic PET data, the arterial input function can be determined directly from the PET scans if a large artery is visualized on the images. It was the purpose of this study to experimentally and theoretically determine recovery coefficients for cylinders as a function of the diameter and level of background activity. Methods: The measurements were performed using a phantom with seven cylinder inserts (φ = 5-46 mm). The cylinders were filled with an aqueous 68 Ga solution while the main chamber was filled with a 18 F solution in order to obtain a varying concentration ratio between the cylinders and the background due to the different isotope half lives. After iterative image reconstruction, the activity concentrations were measured in the center of the cylinders and the recovery coefficients were calculated as a function of the diameter and the background activity. Based on the imaging properties of the PET system, we also developed a model for the quantitative assessment of recovery coefficients. Results: The functional dependence of the measured recovery data from the cylinder diameter and the concentration ratio is well described by our model. For dynamic PET measurements, the recovery correction must take into account the decreasing concentration ratio between the blood vessel and the surrounding tissue. Under the realized measurement and data analysis conditions, a recovery correction is required for vessels with a diameter of up to 25 mm. Conclusions: Based on the experimentally verified model, the activity concentration in large arteries can be calculated from the measured activity concentration in the blood vessel and the background activity. The presented approach offers the possibility to determine the arterial input function for pharmacokinetic PET studies non-invasively from large arteries (especially the aorta). (orig.) [de

  14. Preclinical dynamic 18F-FDG PET - tumor characterization and radiotherapy response assessment by kinetic compartment analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roee, Kathrine; Aleksandersen, Thomas B.; Nilsen, Line B.; Hong Qu; Ree, Anne H.; Malinen, Eirik; Kristian, Alexandr; Seierstad, Therese; Olsen, Dag R.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Non-invasive visualization of tumor biological and molecular processes of importance to diagnosis and treatment response is likely to be critical in individualized cancer therapy. Since conventional static 18 F-FDG PET with calculation of the semi-quantitative parameter standardized uptake value (SUV) may be subject to many sources of variability, we here present an approach of quantifying the 18 F-FDG uptake by analytic two-tissue compartment modeling, extracting kinetic tumor parameters from dynamic 18 F-FDG PET. Further, we evaluate the potential of such parameters in radiotherapy response assessment. Material and methods. Male, athymic mice with prostate carcinoma xenografts were subjected to dynamic PET either untreated (n=8) or 24 h post-irradiation (7.5 Gy single dose, n=8). After 10 h of fasting, intravenous bolus injections of 10-15 MBq 18 F-FDG were administered and a 1 h dynamic PET scan was performed. 4D emission data were reconstructed using OSEM-MAP, before remote post-processing. Individual arterial input functions were extracted from the image series. Subsequently, tumor 18 F-FDG uptake was fitted voxel-by-voxel to a compartment model, producing kinetic parameter maps. Results. The kinetic model separated the 18 F-FDG uptake into free and bound tracer and quantified three parameters; forward tracer diffusion (k1), backward tracer diffusion (k2), and rate of 18 F-FDG phosphorylation, i.e. the glucose metabolism (k3). The fitted kinetic model gave a goodness of fit (r2) to the observed data ranging from 0.91 to 0.99, and produced parametrical images of all tumors included in the study. Untreated tumors showed homogeneous intra-group median values of all three parameters (k1, k2 and k3), whereas the parameters significantly increased in the tumors irradiated 24 h prior to 18 F-FDG PET. Conclusions. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a two-tissue compartment kinetic analysis of dynamic 18 F-FDG PET images. If validated, extracted

  15. Quantification of myocardial blood flow using dynamic 320-row multi-detector CT as compared with ¹⁵O-H₂O PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Yasuka; Oyama-Manabe, Noriko; Naya, Masanao; Manabe, Osamu; Tomiyama, Yuuki; Sasaki, Tsukasa; Katoh, Chietsugu; Kudo, Kohsuke; Tamaki, Nagara; Shirato, Hiroki

    2014-07-01

    This study introduces a method to calculate myocardium blood flow (MBF) and coronary flow reserve (CFR) using the relatively low-dose dynamic 320-row multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT), validates the method against (15)O-H₂O positron-emission tomography (PET) and assesses the CFRs of coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. Thirty-two subjects underwent both dynamic CT perfusion (CTP) and PET perfusion imaging at rest and during pharmacological stress. In 12 normal subjects (pilot group), the calculation method for MBF and CFR was established. In the other 13 normal subjects (validation group), MBF and CFR obtained by dynamic CTP and PET were compared. Finally, the CFRs obtained by dynamic CTP and PET were compared between the validation group and CAD patients (n = 7). Correlation between MBF of MDCT and PET was strong (r = 0.95, P dynamic CTP and PET (r = 0.67, P = 0.0126). CFRCT in the CAD group (2.3 ± 0.8) was significantly lower than that in the validation group (5.2 ± 1.8) (P = 0.0011). We established a method for measuring MBF and CFR with the relatively low-dose dynamic MDCT. Lower CFR was well demonstrated in CAD patients by dynamic CTP. • MBF and CFR can be calculated using dynamic CTP with 320-row MDCT. • MBF and CFR showed good correlation between dynamic CTP and PET. • Lower CFR was well demonstrated in CAD patients by dynamic CTP.

  16. Functional segmentation of dynamic PET studies: Open source implementation and validation of a leader-follower-based algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos-Pérez, José María; Soto-Montenegro, María Luisa; Peña-Zalbidea, Santiago; Desco, Manuel; Vaquero, Juan José

    2016-02-01

    We present a novel segmentation algorithm for dynamic PET studies that groups pixels according to the similarity of their time-activity curves. Sixteen mice bearing a human tumor cell line xenograft (CH-157MN) were imaged with three different (68)Ga-DOTA-peptides (DOTANOC, DOTATATE, DOTATOC) using a small animal PET-CT scanner. Regional activities (input function and tumor) were obtained after manual delineation of regions of interest over the image. The algorithm was implemented under the jClustering framework and used to extract the same regional activities as in the manual approach. The volume of distribution in the tumor was computed using the Logan linear method. A Kruskal-Wallis test was used to investigate significant differences between the manually and automatically obtained volumes of distribution. The algorithm successfully segmented all the studies. No significant differences were found for the same tracer across different segmentation methods. Manual delineation revealed significant differences between DOTANOC and the other two tracers (DOTANOC - DOTATATE, p=0.020; DOTANOC - DOTATOC, p=0.033). Similar differences were found using the leader-follower algorithm. An open implementation of a novel segmentation method for dynamic PET studies is presented and validated in rodent studies. It successfully replicated the manual results obtained in small-animal studies, thus making it a reliable substitute for this task and, potentially, for other dynamic segmentation procedures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The 3-D alignment of objects in dynamic PET scans using filtered sinusoidal trajectories of sinogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostopoulos, Aristotelis E.; Happonen, Antti P.; Ruotsalainen, Ulla

    2006-01-01

    In this study, our goal is to employ a novel 3-D alignment method for dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) scans. Because the acquired data (i.e. sinograms) often contain noise considerably, filtering of the data prior to the alignment presumably improves the final results. In this study, we utilized a novel 3-D stackgram domain approach. In the stackgram domain, the signals along the sinusoidal trajectory signals of the sinogram can be processed separately. In this work, we performed angular stackgram domain filtering by employing well known 1-D filters: the Gaussian low-pass filter and the median filter. In addition, we employed two wavelet de-noising techniques. After filtering we performed alignment of objects in the stackgram domain. The local alignment technique we used is based on similarity comparisons between locus vectors (i.e. the signals along the sinusoidal trajectories of the sinogram) in a 3-D neighborhood of sequences of the stackgrams. Aligned stackgrams can be transformed back to sinograms (Method 1), or alternatively directly to filtered back-projected images (Method 2). In order to evaluate the alignment process, simulated data with different kinds of additive noises were used. The results indicated that the filtering prior to the alignment can be important concerning the accuracy

  18. Dynamic PET evaluation of elevated FLT level after sorafenib treatment in mice bearing human renal cell carcinoma xenograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukon, Naoyuki; Zhao, Songji; Yu, Wenwen; Shimizu, Yoichi; Nishijima, Ken-Ichi; Kubo, Naoki; Kitagawa, Yoshimasa; Tamaki, Nagara; Higashikawa, Kei; Yasui, Hironobu; Kuge, Yuji

    2016-12-01

    Sorafenib, an oral multikinase inhibitor, has anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic activities and is therapeutically effective against renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Recently, we have evaluated the tumor responses to sorafenib treatment in a RCC xenograft using [Methyl- 3 H(N)]-3'-fluoro-3'-deoxythythymidine ([ 3 H]FLT). Contrary to our expectation, the FLT level in the tumor significantly increased after the treatment. In this study, to clarify the reason for the elevated FLT level, dynamic 3'-[ 18 F]fluoro-3'-deoxythymidine ([ 18 F]FLT) positron emission tomography (PET) and kinetic studies were performed in mice bearing a RCC xenograft (A498). The A498 xenograft was established in nude mice, and the mice were assigned to the control (n = 5) and treatment (n = 5) groups. The mice in the treatment group were orally given sorafenib (20 mg/kg/day p.o.) once daily for 3 days. Twenty-four hours after the treatment, dynamic [ 18 F]FLT PET was performed by small-animal PET. Three-dimensional regions of interest (ROIs) were manually defined for the tumors. A three-compartment model fitting was carried out to estimate four rate constants using the time activity curve (TAC) in the tumor and the blood clearance rate of [ 18 F]FLT. The dynamic pattern of [ 18 F]FLT levels in the tumor significantly changed after the treatment. The rate constant of [ 18 F]FLT phosphorylation (k 3 ) was significantly higher in the treatment group (0.111 ± 0.027 [1/min]) than in the control group (0.082 ± 0.009 [1/min]). No significant changes were observed in the distribution volume, the ratio of [ 18 F]FLT forward transport (K 1 ) to reverse transport (k 2 ), between the two groups (0.556 ± 0.073 and 0.641 ± 0.052 [mL/g] in the control group). Our dynamic PET studies indicated that the increase in FLT level may be caused by the phosphorylation of FLT in the tumor after the sorafenib treatment in the mice bearing a RCC xenograft. Dynamic PET studies with kinetic

  19. Quantification of myocardial blood flow using dynamic 320-row multi-detector CT as compared with 15O-H2O PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Yasuka; Oyama-Manabe, Noriko; Kudo, Kohsuke; Naya, Masanao; Manabe, Osamu; Tomiyama, Yuuki; Tamaki, Nagara; Sasaki, Tsukasa; Katoh, Chietsugu; Shirato, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    This study introduces a method to calculate myocardium blood flow (MBF) and coronary flow reserve (CFR) using the relatively low-dose dynamic 320-row multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT), validates the method against 15 O-H 2 O positron-emission tomography (PET) and assesses the CFRs of coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. Thirty-two subjects underwent both dynamic CT perfusion (CTP) and PET perfusion imaging at rest and during pharmacological stress. In 12 normal subjects (pilot group), the calculation method for MBF and CFR was established. In the other 13 normal subjects (validation group), MBF and CFR obtained by dynamic CTP and PET were compared. Finally, the CFRs obtained by dynamic CTP and PET were compared between the validation group and CAD patients (n = 7). Correlation between MBF of MDCT and PET was strong (r = 0.95, P CT in the CAD group (2.3 ± 0.8) was significantly lower than that in the validation group (5.2 ± 1.8) (P = 0.0011). We established a method for measuring MBF and CFR with the relatively low-dose dynamic MDCT. Lower CFR was well demonstrated in CAD patients by dynamic CTP. (orig.)

  20. ECAT III: A new PET system for heart and whole body dynamic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, E.J.; Phelps, M.E.; Huang, S.C.; Collard, P.E.; Bidaut, L.M.; Schwab, R.L.; Schwaiger, M.; Schelbert, H.R.

    1985-01-01

    A new whole body PET system has been developed and is being evaluated. The ECAT III consists of 1 to 4 rings of 512-5.6 x 29 x 30 mm BGO detectors per 100 cm diameter ring. The system has a unique data collection scheme in which all events are buffered in a 512 by 32 data matrix. The 512 dimension corresponds to detector number and the 32 dimension corresponds to 8 nsec time bins. A dedicated microprocessor searches the array (1) to determine which detectors had events simultaneously +- 8 nsec to establish coincidences, (2) to determine accidentals by determining the probability of off-time events, which can be determined with a statistical accuracy improvement of a factor of 10 by using a larger ''software'' time window, and (3) to determine and distinguish between adjacent detector crosstalk and random triple events. System can process 500 K coincident events/sec/per image plane. Data are collected in list mode and scan parameter information, such as time, wobble position and occurrence of gating signals are inserted in data. Wobble position is divided in 1000 parts per rotation, minimizing positioning error in binning events, timing information allows retrospective choice of time frame for dynamic studies and cardiac gate data allows retrospective choice of framing. ECAT III has an image resolution of 4.5 mm when system is wobbled and 7.2 mm when system is stationary. Loss of efficiency due to nearest neighbor cross talk is 8 to 12%. Axial resolution is selectable with remotely driven side shielding, and interchangeable interplane sept allow different configurations to accomodate a variety of imaging conditions

  1. Early Dynamic 68Ga-DOTA-D-Phe1-Tyr3-Octreotide PET/CT in Patients With Hepatic Metastases of Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sänger, Philipp Wilhelm; Freesmeyer, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Whole-body PET with Ga-DOTA-D-Phe-Tyr-octreotide (Ga-DOTATOC) and contrast-enhanced CT (ceCT) are considered a standard for the staging of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). This study sought to verify whether early dynamic (ed) Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT can reliably detect liver metastases of NETs (hypervascular, nonhypervascular; positive or negative for somatostatin receptors) and to verify if the receptor positivity has a significant impact on the detection of tumor hypervascularization. Twenty-seven patients with NET were studied by ceCT and standard whole-body PET according to established Ga-DOTATOC protocols. In addition, edPET data were obtained by continuous scanning during the first 300 seconds after bolus injections of the radiotracer. Early dynamic PET required an additional low-dose, native CT image of the liver for the purpose of attenuation correction. Time-activity and time-contrast curves were obtained, the latter being calculated by the difference between tumor and reference regions. Early dynamic PET/CT proved comparable with ceCT in readily identifying hypervascular lesions, irrespective of the receptor status, with activities rising within 16 to 40 seconds. Early dynamic PET/CT also readily identified nonhypervascular, receptor-positive lesions. Positive image contrasts were obtained for hypervascular, receptor-positive lesions, whereas early negative contrasts were obtained for nonhypervascular, receptor-negative lesions. The high image contrast of hypervascular NET metastases in early arterial phases suggests that edPET/CT can become a useful alternative in patients with contraindications to ceCT. The high density of somatostatin receptors did not seem to interfere with the detection of the lesion's hypervascularization.

  2. Automatic extraction of forward stroke volume using dynamic PET/CT: a dual-tracer and dual-scanner validation in patients with heart valve disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Hendrik Johannes; Tolbod, Lars Poulsen; Hansson, Nils Henrik Stubkjær; Kero, Tanja; Orndahl, Lovisa Holm; Kim, Won Yong; Bjerner, Tomas; Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Wiggers, Henrik; Frøkiær, Jørgen; Sörensen, Jens

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and validate an automated method for extracting forward stroke volume (FSV) using indicator dilution theory directly from dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) studies for two different tracers and scanners. 35 subjects underwent a dynamic (11)C-acetate PET scan on a Siemens Biograph TruePoint-64 PET/CT (scanner I). In addition, 10 subjects underwent both dynamic (15)O-water PET and (11)C-acetate PET scans on a GE Discovery-ST PET/CT (scanner II). The left ventricular (LV)-aortic time-activity curve (TAC) was extracted automatically from PET data using cluster analysis. The first-pass peak was isolated by automatic extrapolation of the downslope of the TAC. FSV was calculated as the injected dose divided by the product of heart rate and the area under the curve of the first-pass peak. Gold standard FSV was measured using phase-contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). FSVPET correlated highly with FSVCMR (r = 0.87, slope = 0.90 for scanner I, r = 0.87, slope = 1.65, and r = 0.85, slope = 1.69 for scanner II for (15)O-water and (11)C-acetate, respectively) although a systematic bias was observed for both scanners (p dynamic PET/CT and cluster analysis. Results are almost identical for (11)C-acetate and (15)O-water. A scanner-dependent bias was observed, and a scanner calibration factor is required for multi-scanner studies. Generalization of the method to other tracers and scanners requires further validation.

  3. Development of quantification methods for the myocardial blood flow using ensemble independent component analysis for dynamic H215O PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byeong Il; Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Dong Soo; Kang, Won Jun; Lee, Jong Jin; Kim, Soo Jin; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Choi, Seung Jin

    2004-01-01

    Factor analysis and independent component analysis (lCA) has been used for handling dynamic image sequences. Theoretical advantages of a newly suggested ICA method, ensemble ICA, leaded us to consider applying this method to the analysis of dynamic myocardial H 2 15 O PET data. In this study, we quantified patients, blood flow using the ensemble ICA method. Twenty subjects underwent H 2 15 O PET scans using ECAT EXACT 47 scanner and myocardial perfusion SPECT using Vertex scanner. After transmission scanning, dynamic emission scans were initiated simultaneously with the injection of 555∼740 MBq H 2 15 O. Hidden independent components can be extracted from the observed mixed data (PET image) by means of ICA algorithms. Ensemble learning is a variational Bayesian method that provides an analytical approximation to the parameter posterior using a tractable distribution. Variational approximation forms a lower bound on the ensemble likelihood and the maximization of the lower bound is achieved through minimizing the Kullback-Leibler divergence between the true posterior and the variational posterior. In this study, posterior pdf was approximated by a rectified Gaussian distribution to incorporate non-negativity constraint, which is suitable to dynamic images in nuclear medicine. Blood flow was measured in 9 regions - apex, four areas in mid wall, and four areas in base wall. Myocardial perfusion SPECT score and angiography results were compared with the regional blood flow. Major cardiac components were separated successfully by the ensemble ICA method and blood flow could be estimated in 15 among 20 patients. Mean myocardial blood flow was 1.2±0.40 ml/min/g in rest, 1.85±1.12 ml/min/g in stress state. Blood flow values obtained by an operator in two different occasion were highly correlated (r=0.99). In myocardium component image, the image contrast between left ventricle and myocardium was 1:2.7 in average. Perfusion reserve was significantly different between

  4. Longitudinal studies of the 18F-FDG kinetics after ipilimumab treatment in metastatic melanoma patients based on dynamic FDG PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachpekidis, Christos; Anwar, Hoda; Winkler, Julia K; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Larribere, Lionel; Haberkorn, Uwe; Hassel, Jessica C; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2018-06-05

    Immunotherapy has raised the issue of appropriate treatment response evaluation, due to the unique mechanism of action of the immunotherapeutic agents. Aim of this analysis is to evaluate the potential role of quantitative analysis of 2-deoxy-2-( 18 F)fluoro-D-glucose ( 18 F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) data in monitoring of patients with metastatic melanoma undergoing ipilimumab therapy. 25 patients with unresectable metastatic melanoma underwent dynamic PET/CT (dPET/CT) of the thorax and upper abdomen as well as static, whole body PET/CT with 18 F-FDG before the start of ipilimumab treatment (baseline PET/CT), after two cycles of treatment (interim PET/CT) and at the end of treatment after four cycles (late PET/CT). The evaluation of dPET/CT studies was based on semi-quantitative (standardized uptake value, SUV) calculation as well as quantitative analysis, based on two-tissue compartment modeling and a fractal approach. Patients' best clinical response, assessed at a mean of 59 weeks, was used as reference. According to their best clinical response, patients were dichotomized in those demonstrating clinical benefit (CB, n = 16 patients) and those demonstrating no clinical benefit (no-CB, n = 9 patients). No statistically significant differences were observed between CB and no-CB regarding either semi-quantitative or quantitative parameters in all scans. On contrary, the application of the recently introduced PET response evaluation criteria for immunotherapy (PERCIMT) led to a correct classification rate of 84% (21/25 patients). Quantitative analysis of 18 F-FDG PET data does not provide additional information in treatment response evaluation of metastatic melanoma patients receiving ipilimumab. PERCIMT criteria correlated better with clinical response.

  5. Radioembolization and the dynamic role of 90Y PET/CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander S Pasciak

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Before the advent of tomographic imaging, it was postulated that decay of 90Y to the 0+ excited state of 90Zr may result in emission of a positron-electron pair. While the branching ratio for pair production is small (~32x10-6, PET has been successfully used to image 90Y in numerous recent patient and phantom studies. 90Y PET imaging has been performed on a variety of PET/CT systems, with and without time-of-flight (TOF and/or resolution recovery capabilities as well as on both BGO and L(YSO based scanners. On all systems, resolution and contrast superior to bremsstrahlung SPECT has been reported. The intrinsic radioactivity present in L(YSO-based PET scanners is a potential limitation associated with accurate quantification of 90Y. However, intrinsic radioactivity has been shown to have a negligible effect at the high activity concentrations common in 90Y radioembolization. Accurate quantification is possible on a variety of PET scanner models, with or without TOF, although TOF improves accuracy at lower activity concentrations. Quantitative 90Y PET images can be transformed into 3D maps of absorbed dose based on the premise that the 90Y activity distribution does not change after infusion. This transformation has been accomplished primarily with the use of 3D dose point-kernel convolution. From a clinical standpoint, 90Y PET provides a superior post-infusion evaluation of treatment technical success owing to its improved resolution. Absorbed dose maps generated from quantitative PET data can be used to predict treatment efficacy and manage patient follow-up. For patients who receive multiple treatments, this information can also be used to provide patient-specific treatment planning for successive therapies, potentially improving response. The broad utilization of 90Y PET has the potential to provide a wealth of dose-response information, which may lead to development of improved radioembolization treatment-planning models in the future.

  6. A virtual clinical trial comparing static versus dynamic PET imaging in measuring response to breast cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangerin, Kristen A.; Muzi, Mark; Peterson, Lanell M.; Linden, Hannah M.; Novakova, Alena; Mankoff, David A.; E Kinahan, Paul

    2017-05-01

    We developed a method to evaluate variations in the PET imaging process in order to characterize the relative ability of static and dynamic metrics to measure breast cancer response to therapy in a clinical trial setting. We performed a virtual clinical trial by generating 540 independent and identically distributed PET imaging study realizations for each of 22 original dynamic fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) breast cancer patient studies pre- and post-therapy. Each noise realization accounted for known sources of uncertainty in the imaging process, such as biological variability and SUV uptake time. Four definitions of SUV were analyzed, which were SUVmax, SUVmean, SUVpeak, and SUV50%. We performed a ROC analysis on the resulting SUV and kinetic parameter uncertainty distributions to assess the impact of the variability on the measurement capabilities of each metric. The kinetic macro parameter, K i , showed more variability than SUV (mean CV K i   =  17%, SUV  =  13%), but K i pre- and post-therapy distributions also showed increased separation compared to the SUV pre- and post-therapy distributions (mean normalized difference K i   =  0.54, SUV  =  0.27). For the patients who did not show perfect separation between the pre- and post-therapy parameter uncertainty distributions (ROC AUC  dynamic imaging outperformed SUV in distinguishing metabolic change in response to therapy, ranging from 12 to 14 of 16 patients over all SUV definitions and uptake time scenarios (p  PET imaging.

  7. Prediction of chemotherapy outcome in patients with metastatic soft tissue sarcomas based on dynamic FDG PET (dPET) and a multiparameter analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia; Strauss, Ludwig G.; Vasamiliette, Julie; Egerer, Gerlinde; Schmitt, Thomas; Kasper, Bernd; Haberkorn, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic PET studies with 18 F-FDG were performed in patients with metastatic soft tissue sarcomas who received conventional chemotherapy with doxorubicin hydrochloride (Adriamycin) and ifosfamide (AI-G). The goal of the study was to evaluate the impact of full kinetic analysis and assess its value with regard to the therapy outcome based on survival data. The evaluation included 17 patients with 29 metastatic lesions of soft tissue sarcomas, who were treated with chemotherapy consisting of an AI-G regimen prior to high-dose chemotherapy and peripheral blood stem cell transplantation where applicable. Patients were examined prior to onset of therapy and after completion of the first cycle of AI-G. Restaging data (n = 17) based on Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors were available. Survival data (n = 14) served for reference. The following parameters were retrieved from the dynamic PET studies: standardized uptake value (SUV), fractal dimension, two-compartment model with computation of k1, k2, k3, k4 (unit: 1/min), the fractional blood volume and the FDG influx calculated according to Patlak. The mean SUV was 6.9 prior to therapy and 4.7 after one cycle. The mean influx was 0.066 prior to therapy in comparison to 0.058 after one cycle. We dichotomized the patients according to the median survival time of 320 days into response (n = 6) and non-response (n = 8). The mean SUV was 7.6 in the group of responders and 5.4 in the group of non-responders prior to therapy. Responders revealed a mean SUV of 3.8 after therapy as compared to 5.0 SUV for non-responders. We used discriminant analysis to classify the patients into the two response groups. The classification of the non-responders was generally higher (negative predictive value > 61%) than for the responders. Finally, the combined use of the four predictor variables, namely mean SUV and k1 of both studies led to the highest accuracy of 90% for both groups. The data demonstrate that only a multiparameter

  8. Dynamic FDG-PET Imaging to Differentiate Malignancies from Inflammation in Subcutaneous and In Situ Mouse Model for Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen; Zan, Yunlong; Zheng, Xiujuan; Hai, Wangxi; Chen, Kewei; Huang, Qiu; Xu, Yuhong; Peng, Jinliang

    2015-01-01

    [18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has been widely used in oncologic procedures such as tumor diagnosis and staging. However, false-positive rates have been high, unacceptable and mainly caused by inflammatory lesions. Misinterpretations take place especially when non-subcutaneous inflammations appear at the tumor site, for instance in the lung. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the use of dynamic PET imaging procedure to differentiate in situ and subcutaneous non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) from inflammation, and estimate the kinetics of inflammations in various locations. Dynamic FDG-PET was performed on 33 female mice inoculated with tumor and/or inflammation subcutaneously or inside the lung. Standardized Uptake Values (SUVs) from static imaging (SUVmax) as well as values of influx rate constant (Ki) of compartmental modeling from dynamic imaging were obtained. Static and kinetic data from different lesions (tumor and inflammations) or different locations (subcutaneous, in situ and spontaneous group) were compared. Values of SUVmax showed significant difference in subcutaneous tumor and inflammation (pPET based SUVmax, both subcutaneous and in situ inflammations and malignancies can be differentiated via dynamic FDG-PET based Ki. Moreover, Values of influx rate constant Ki from compartmental modeling can offer an assessment for inflammations at different locations of the body, which also implies further validation is necessary before the replacement of in situ inflammation with its subcutaneous counterpart in animal experiments.

  9. Effects of hyperoxia on 18F-fluoro-misonidazole brain uptake and tissue oxygen tension following middle cerebral artery occlusion in rodents: Pilot studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim D Fryer

    Full Text Available Mapping brain hypoxia is a major goal for stroke diagnosis, pathophysiology and treatment monitoring. 18F-fluoro-misonidazole (FMISO positron emission tomography (PET is the gold standard hypoxia imaging method. Normobaric hyperoxia (NBO is a promising therapy in acute stroke. In this pilot study, we tested the straightforward hypothesis that NBO would markedly reduce FMISO uptake in ischemic brain in Wistar and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs, two rat strains with distinct vulnerability to brain ischemia, mimicking clinical heterogeneity.Thirteen adult male rats were randomized to distal middle cerebral artery occlusion under either 30% O2 or 100% O2. FMISO was administered intravenously and PET data acquired dynamically for 3hrs, after which magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and tetrazolium chloride (TTC staining were carried out to map the ischemic lesion. Both FMISO tissue uptake at 2-3hrs and FMISO kinetic rate constants, determined based on previously published kinetic modelling, were obtained for the hypoxic area. In a separate group (n = 9, tissue oxygen partial pressure (PtO2 was measured in the ischemic tissue during both control and NBO conditions.As expected, the FMISO PET, MRI and TTC lesion volumes were much larger in SHRs than Wistar rats in both the control and NBO conditions. NBO did not appear to substantially reduce FMISO lesion size, nor affect the FMISO kinetic rate constants in either strain. Likewise, MRI and TTC lesion volumes were unaffected. The parallel study showed the expected increases in ischemic cortex PtO2 under NBO, although these were small in some SHRs with very low baseline PtO2.Despite small samples, the apparent lack of marked effects of NBO on FMISO uptake suggests that in permanent ischemia the cellular mechanisms underlying FMISO trapping in hypoxic cells may be disjointed from PtO2. Better understanding of FMISO trapping processes will be important for future applications of FMISO imaging.

  10. Assessment of regional tumor hypoxia using 18F-fluoromisonidazole and 64Cu(II)-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) positron emission tomography: Comparative study featuring microPET imaging, PO2 probe measurement, autoradiography, and fluorescent microscopy in the R3327-AT and FaDu rat tumor models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Donoghue, Joseph A.; Zanzonico, Pat; Pugachev, Andrei; Wen Bixiu; Smith-Jones, Peter; Cai Shangde; Burnazi, Eva; Finn, Ronald D.; Burgman, Paul; Ruan, Shutian; Lewis, Jason S.; Welch, Michael J.; Ling, C. Clifton; Humm, John L.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To compare two potential positron emission tomography (PET) tracers of tumor hypoxia in an animal model. Methods and Materials: The purported hypoxia imaging agents 18 F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) and 64 Cu(II)-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-ATSM) were compared by serial microPET imaging of Fisher-Copenhagen rats bearing the R3327-AT anaplastic rat prostate tumor. Probe measurements of intratumoral PO 2 were compared with the image data. At the microscopic level, the relationship between the spatial distributions of 64 Cu (assessed by digital autoradiography) and tumor hypoxia (assessed by immunofluorescent detection of pimonidazole) was examined. 18 F-FMISO and 64 Cu-ATSM microPET images were also acquired in nude rats bearing xenografts derived from the human squamous cell carcinoma cell line, FaDu. Results: In R3327-AT tumors, the intratumoral distribution of 18 F-FMISO remained relatively constant 1-4 h after injection. However, that of 64 Cu-ATSM displayed a significant temporal evolution for 0.5-20 h after injection in most tumors. In general, only when 64 Cu-ATSM was imaged at later times (16-20 h after injection) did it correspond to the distribution of 18 F-FMISO. Oxygen probe measurements were broadly consistent with 18 F-FMISO and late 64 Cu-ATSM images but not with early 64 Cu-ATSM images. At the microscopic level, a negative correlation was found between tumor hypoxia and 64 Cu distribution when assessed at early times and a positive correlation when assessed at later times. For the FaDu tumor model, the early and late 64 Cu-ATSM microPET images were similar and were in general concordance with the 18 F-FMISO scans. Conclusion: The difference in behavior between the R3327-AT and FaDu tumor models suggests a tumor-specific dependence of Cu-ATSM uptake and retention under hypoxic conditions

  11. Machine learning-based kinetic modeling: a robust and reproducible solution for quantitative analysis of dynamic PET data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Leyun; Cheng, Caixia; Haberkorn, Uwe; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2017-05-07

    A variety of compartment models are used for the quantitative analysis of dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) data. Traditionally, these models use an iterative fitting (IF) method to find the least squares between the measured and calculated values over time, which may encounter some problems such as the overfitting of model parameters and a lack of reproducibility, especially when handling noisy data or error data. In this paper, a machine learning (ML) based kinetic modeling method is introduced, which can fully utilize a historical reference database to build a moderate kinetic model directly dealing with noisy data but not trying to smooth the noise in the image. Also, due to the database, the presented method is capable of automatically adjusting the models using a multi-thread grid parameter searching technique. Furthermore, a candidate competition concept is proposed to combine the advantages of the ML and IF modeling methods, which could find a balance between fitting to historical data and to the unseen target curve. The machine learning based method provides a robust and reproducible solution that is user-independent for VOI-based and pixel-wise quantitative analysis of dynamic PET data.

  12. Machine learning-based kinetic modeling: a robust and reproducible solution for quantitative analysis of dynamic PET data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Leyun; Cheng, Caixia; Haberkorn, Uwe; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2017-05-01

    A variety of compartment models are used for the quantitative analysis of dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) data. Traditionally, these models use an iterative fitting (IF) method to find the least squares between the measured and calculated values over time, which may encounter some problems such as the overfitting of model parameters and a lack of reproducibility, especially when handling noisy data or error data. In this paper, a machine learning (ML) based kinetic modeling method is introduced, which can fully utilize a historical reference database to build a moderate kinetic model directly dealing with noisy data but not trying to smooth the noise in the image. Also, due to the database, the presented method is capable of automatically adjusting the models using a multi-thread grid parameter searching technique. Furthermore, a candidate competition concept is proposed to combine the advantages of the ML and IF modeling methods, which could find a balance between fitting to historical data and to the unseen target curve. The machine learning based method provides a robust and reproducible solution that is user-independent for VOI-based and pixel-wise quantitative analysis of dynamic PET data.

  13. Joint reconstruction of dynamic PET activity and kinetic parametric images using total variation constrained dictionary sparse coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haiqing; Chen, Shuhang; Chen, Yunmei; Liu, Huafeng

    2017-05-01

    Dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) is capable of providing both spatial and temporal information of radio tracers in vivo. In this paper, we present a novel joint estimation framework to reconstruct temporal sequences of dynamic PET images and the coefficients characterizing the system impulse response function, from which the associated parametric images of the system macro parameters for tracer kinetics can be estimated. The proposed algorithm, which combines statistical data measurement and tracer kinetic models, integrates a dictionary sparse coding (DSC) into a total variational minimization based algorithm for simultaneous reconstruction of the activity distribution and parametric map from measured emission sinograms. DSC, based on the compartmental theory, provides biologically meaningful regularization, and total variation regularization is incorporated to provide edge-preserving guidance. We rely on techniques from minimization algorithms (the alternating direction method of multipliers) to first generate the estimated activity distributions with sub-optimal kinetic parameter estimates, and then recover the parametric maps given these activity estimates. These coupled iterative steps are repeated as necessary until convergence. Experiments with synthetic, Monte Carlo generated data, and real patient data have been conducted, and the results are very promising.

  14. The use of dynamic O-(2-18F-fluoroethyl)-l-tyrosine PET in the diagnosis of patients with progressive and recurrent glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galldiks, Norbert; Stoffels, Gabriele; Filss, Christian; Rapp, Marion; Blau, Tobias; Tscherpel, Caroline; Ceccon, Garry; Dunkl, Veronika; Weinzierl, Martin; Stoffel, Michael; Sabel, Michael; Fink, Gereon R; Shah, Nadim J; Langen, Karl-Josef

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated the diagnostic value of static and dynamic O-(2-[(18)F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine ((18)F-FET) PET parameters in patients with progressive or recurrent glioma. We retrospectively analyzed 132 dynamic (18)F-FET PET and conventional MRI scans of 124 glioma patients (primary World Health Organization grade II, n = 55; grade III, n = 19; grade IV, n = 50; mean age, 52 ± 14 y). Patients had been referred for PET assessment with clinical signs and/or MRI findings suggestive of tumor progression or recurrence based on Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology criteria. Maximum and mean tumor/brain ratios of (18)F-FET uptake were determined (20-40 min post-injection) as well as tracer uptake kinetics (ie, time to peak and patterns of the time-activity curves). Diagnoses were confirmed histologically (95%) or by clinical follow-up (5%). Diagnostic accuracies of PET and MR parameters for the detection of tumor progression or recurrence were evaluated by receiver operating characteristic analyses/chi-square test. Tumor progression or recurrence could be diagnosed in 121 of 132 cases (92%). MRI and (18)F-FET PET findings were concordant in 84% and discordant in 16%. Compared with the diagnostic accuracy of conventional MRI to diagnose tumor progression or recurrence (85%), a higher accuracy (93%) was achieved by (18)F-FET PET when a mean tumor/brain ratio ≥2.0 or time to peak dynamic (18)F-FET PET parameters differentiate progressive or recurrent glioma from treatment-related nonneoplastic changes with higher accuracy than conventional MRI. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Solitary pulmonary nodules: Comparison of dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced perfusion area-detector CT, dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced MR imaging, and FDG PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Nishio, Mizuho; Koyama, Hisanobu; Seki, Shinichiro; Tsubakimoto, Maho; Fujisawa, Yasuko; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Sumiaki; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2015-02-01

    To prospectively compare the capabilities of dynamic perfusion area-detector computed tomography (CT), dynamic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and positron emission tomography (PET) combined with CT (PET/CT) with use of fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) for the diagnosis of solitary pulmonary nodules. The institutional review board approved this study, and written informed consent was obtained from each subject. A total of 198 consecutive patients with 218 nodules prospectively underwent dynamic perfusion area-detector CT, dynamic MR imaging, FDG PET/CT, and microbacterial and/or pathologic examinations. Nodules were classified into three groups: malignant nodules (n = 133) and benign nodules with low (n = 53) or high (n = 32) biologic activity. Total perfusion was determined with dual-input maximum slope models at area-detector CT, maximum and slope of enhancement ratio at MR imaging, and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) at PET/CT. Next, all indexes for malignant and benign nodules were compared with the Tukey honest significant difference test. Then, receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed for each index. Finally, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were compared with the McNemar test. All indexes showed significant differences between malignant nodules and benign nodules with low biologic activity (P Dynamic perfusion area-detector CT is more specific and accurate than dynamic MR imaging and FDG PET/CT in the diagnosis of solitary pulmonary nodules in routine clinical practice. © RSNA, 2014.

  16. Intra-lesional spatial correlation of static and dynamic FET-PET parameters with MRI-based cerebral blood volume in patients with untreated glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goettler, Jens; Preibisch, Christine [TU Muenchen, Department of Neuroradiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); TU Muenchen, TUM Neuroimaging Center (TUM-NIC), Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Lukas, Mathias; Mustafa, Mona; Schwaiger, Markus; Pyka, Thomas [TU Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Kluge, Anne; Kaczmarz, Stephan; Zimmer, Claus [TU Muenchen, Department of Neuroradiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Gempt, Jens; Ringel, Florian; Meyer, Bernhard [TU Muenchen, Department of Neurosurgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Foerster, Stefan [TU Muenchen, TUM Neuroimaging Center (TUM-NIC), Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); TU Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Klinikum Bayreuth, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bayreuth (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    {sup 18}F-fluorethyltyrosine-(FET)-PET and MRI-based relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) have both been used to characterize gliomas. Recently, inter-individual correlations between peak static FET-uptake and rCBV have been reported. Herein, we assess the local intra-lesional relation between FET-PET parameters and rCBV. Thirty untreated glioma patients (27 high-grade) underwent simultaneous PET/MRI on a 3 T hybrid scanner obtaining structural and dynamic susceptibility contrast sequences. Static FET-uptake and dynamic FET-slope were correlated with rCBV within tumour hotspots across patients and intra-lesionally using a mixed-effects model to account for inter-individual variation. Furthermore, maximal congruency of tumour volumes defined by FET-uptake and rCBV was determined. While the inter-individual relationship between peak static FET-uptake and rCBV could be confirmed, our intra-lesional, voxel-wise analysis revealed significant positive correlations (median r = 0.374, p < 0.0001). Similarly, significant inter- and intra-individual correlations were observed between FET-slope and rCBV. However, rCBV explained only 12% of the static and 5% of the dynamic FET-PET variance and maximal overlap of respective tumour volumes was 37% on average. Our results show that the relation between peak values of MR-based rCBV and static FET-uptake can also be observed intra-individually on a voxel basis and also applies to a dynamic FET parameter, possibly determining hotspots of higher biological malignancy. However, just a small part of the FET-PET signal variance is explained by rCBV and tumour volumes determined by the two modalities showed only moderate overlap. These findings indicate that FET-PET and MR-based rCBV provide both congruent and complimentary information on glioma biology. (orig.)

  17. Intra-lesional spatial correlation of static and dynamic FET-PET parameters with MRI-based cerebral blood volume in patients with untreated glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göttler, Jens; Lukas, Mathias; Kluge, Anne; Kaczmarz, Stephan; Gempt, Jens; Ringel, Florian; Mustafa, Mona; Meyer, Bernhard; Zimmer, Claus; Schwaiger, Markus; Förster, Stefan; Preibisch, Christine; Pyka, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    18 F-fluorethyltyrosine-(FET)-PET and MRI-based relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) have both been used to characterize gliomas. Recently, inter-individual correlations between peak static FET-uptake and rCBV have been reported. Herein, we assess the local intra-lesional relation between FET-PET parameters and rCBV. Thirty untreated glioma patients (27 high-grade) underwent simultaneous PET/MRI on a 3 T hybrid scanner obtaining structural and dynamic susceptibility contrast sequences. Static FET-uptake and dynamic FET-slope were correlated with rCBV within tumour hotspots across patients and intra-lesionally using a mixed-effects model to account for inter-individual variation. Furthermore, maximal congruency of tumour volumes defined by FET-uptake and rCBV was determined. While the inter-individual relationship between peak static FET-uptake and rCBV could be confirmed, our intra-lesional, voxel-wise analysis revealed significant positive correlations (median r = 0.374, p dynamic FET-PET variance and maximal overlap of respective tumour volumes was 37% on average. Our results show that the relation between peak values of MR-based rCBV and static FET-uptake can also be observed intra-individually on a voxel basis and also applies to a dynamic FET parameter, possibly determining hotspots of higher biological malignancy. However, just a small part of the FET-PET signal variance is explained by rCBV and tumour volumes determined by the two modalities showed only moderate overlap. These findings indicate that FET-PET and MR-based rCBV provide both congruent and complimentary information on glioma biology.

  18. Design and utilisation of protocols to characterise dynamic PET uptake of two tracers using basis pursuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Christopher; Puttick, Simon; Rose, Stephen; Smith, Jye; Thomas, Paul; Dowson, Nicholas

    2017-06-01

    Imaging using more than one biological process using PET could be of great utility, but despite previously proposed approaches to dual-tracer imaging, it is seldom performed. The alternative of performing multiple scans is often infeasible for clinical practice or even in research studies. Dual-tracer PET scanning allows for multiple PET radiotracers to be imaged within the same imaging session. In this paper we describe our approach to utilise the basis pursuit method to aid in the design of dual-tracer PET imaging experiments, and later in separation of the signals. The advantage of this approach is that it does not require a compartment model architecture to be specified or even that both signals are distinguishable in all cases. This means the method for separating dual-tracer signals can be used for many feasible and useful combinations of biology or radiotracer, once an appropriate scanning protocol has been decided upon. Following a demonstration in separating the signals from two consecutively injected radionuclides in a controlled experiment, phantom and list-mode mouse experiments demonstrated the ability to test the feasibility of dual-tracer imaging protocols for multiple injection delays. Increases in variances predicted for kinetic macro-parameters V D and K I in brain and tumoral tissue were obtained when separating the synthetically combined data. These experiments confirmed previous work using other approaches that injections delays of 10-20 min ensured increases in variance were kept minimal for the test tracers used. On this basis, an actual dual-tracer experiment using a 20 min delay was performed using these radio tracers, with the kinetic parameters (V D and K I) extracted for each tracer in agreement with the literature. This study supports previous work that dual-tracer PET imaging can be accomplished provided certain constraints are adhered to. The utilisation of basis pursuit techniques, with its removed need to specify a model

  19. Cardiac-gated parametric images from 82 Rb PET from dynamic frames and direct 4D reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germino, Mary; Carson, Richard E

    2018-02-01

    Cardiac perfusion PET data can be reconstructed as a dynamic sequence and kinetic modeling performed to quantify myocardial blood flow, or reconstructed as static gated images to quantify function. Parametric images from dynamic PET are conventionally not gated, to allow use of all events with lower noise. An alternative method for dynamic PET is to incorporate the kinetic model into the reconstruction algorithm itself, bypassing the generation of a time series of emission images and directly producing parametric images. So-called "direct reconstruction" can produce parametric images with lower noise than the conventional method because the noise distribution is more easily modeled in projection space than in image space. In this work, we develop direct reconstruction of cardiac-gated parametric images for 82 Rb PET with an extension of the Parametric Motion compensation OSEM List mode Algorithm for Resolution-recovery reconstruction for the one tissue model (PMOLAR-1T). PMOLAR-1T was extended to accommodate model terms to account for spillover from the left and right ventricles into the myocardium. The algorithm was evaluated on a 4D simulated 82 Rb dataset, including a perfusion defect, as well as a human 82 Rb list mode acquisition. The simulated list mode was subsampled into replicates, each with counts comparable to one gate of a gated acquisition. Parametric images were produced by the indirect (separate reconstructions and modeling) and direct methods for each of eight low-count and eight normal-count replicates of the simulated data, and each of eight cardiac gates for the human data. For the direct method, two initialization schemes were tested: uniform initialization, and initialization with the filtered iteration 1 result of the indirect method. For the human dataset, event-by-event respiratory motion compensation was included. The indirect and direct methods were compared for the simulated dataset in terms of bias and coefficient of variation as a

  20. Impact of respiratory motion correction and spatial resolution on lesion detection in PET: a simulation study based on real MR dynamic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polycarpou, Irene; Tsoumpas, Charalampos; King, Andrew P.; Marsden, Paul K.

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of respiratory motion correction and spatial resolution on lesion detectability in PET as a function of lesion size and tracer uptake. Real respiratory signals describing different breathing types are combined with a motion model formed from real dynamic MR data to simulate multiple dynamic PET datasets acquired from a continuously moving subject. Lung and liver lesions were simulated with diameters ranging from 6 to 12 mm and lesion to background ratio ranging from 3:1 to 6:1. Projection data for 6 and 3 mm PET scanner resolution were generated using analytic simulations and reconstructed without and with motion correction. Motion correction was achieved using motion compensated image reconstruction. The detectability performance was quantified by a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis obtained using a channelized Hotelling observer and the area under the ROC curve (AUC) was calculated as the figure of merit. The results indicate that respiratory motion limits the detectability of lung and liver lesions, depending on the variation of the breathing cycle length and amplitude. Patients with large quiescent periods had a greater AUC than patients with regular breathing cycles and patients with long-term variability in respiratory cycle or higher motion amplitude. In addition, small (less than 10 mm diameter) or low contrast (3:1) lesions showed the greatest improvement in AUC as a result of applying motion correction. In particular, after applying motion correction the AUC is improved by up to 42% with current PET resolution (i.e. 6 mm) and up to 51% for higher PET resolution (i.e. 3 mm). Finally, the benefit of increasing the scanner resolution is small unless motion correction is applied. This investigation indicates high impact of respiratory motion correction on lesion detectability in PET and highlights the importance of motion correction in order to benefit from the increased resolution of future

  1. Impact of respiratory motion correction and spatial resolution on lesion detection in PET: a simulation study based on real MR dynamic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycarpou, Irene; Tsoumpas, Charalampos; King, Andrew P; Marsden, Paul K

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of respiratory motion correction and spatial resolution on lesion detectability in PET as a function of lesion size and tracer uptake. Real respiratory signals describing different breathing types are combined with a motion model formed from real dynamic MR data to simulate multiple dynamic PET datasets acquired from a continuously moving subject. Lung and liver lesions were simulated with diameters ranging from 6 to 12 mm and lesion to background ratio ranging from 3:1 to 6:1. Projection data for 6 and 3 mm PET scanner resolution were generated using analytic simulations and reconstructed without and with motion correction. Motion correction was achieved using motion compensated image reconstruction. The detectability performance was quantified by a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis obtained using a channelized Hotelling observer and the area under the ROC curve (AUC) was calculated as the figure of merit. The results indicate that respiratory motion limits the detectability of lung and liver lesions, depending on the variation of the breathing cycle length and amplitude. Patients with large quiescent periods had a greater AUC than patients with regular breathing cycles and patients with long-term variability in respiratory cycle or higher motion amplitude. In addition, small (less than 10 mm diameter) or low contrast (3:1) lesions showed the greatest improvement in AUC as a result of applying motion correction. In particular, after applying motion correction the AUC is improved by up to 42% with current PET resolution (i.e. 6 mm) and up to 51% for higher PET resolution (i.e. 3 mm). Finally, the benefit of increasing the scanner resolution is small unless motion correction is applied. This investigation indicates high impact of respiratory motion correction on lesion detectability in PET and highlights the importance of motion correction in order to benefit from the increased resolution of future

  2. 18F-FDG PET imaging of rheumatoid knee synovitis correlates with dynamic magnetic resonance and sonographic assessments as well as with the serum level of metalloproteinase-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckers, Catherine; Foidart, Jacqueline; Hustinx, Roland; Jeukens, Xavier; Marcelis, Stefaan; Ribbens, Clio; Andre, Beatrice; Leclercq, Philippe; Kaiser, Marie-Joelle; Malaise, Michel G.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovitis with positron emission tomography (PET) and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) in comparison with dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography (US). Sixteen knees in 16 patients with active RA were assessed with PET, MRI and US at baseline and 4 weeks after initiation of anti-TNF-α treatment. All studies were performed within 4 days. Visual and semi-quantitative (standardised uptake value, SUV) analyses of the synovial uptake of FDG were performed. The dynamic enhancement rate and the static enhancement were measured after i.v. gadolinium injection and the synovial thickness was measured in the medial, lateral patellar and suprapatellar recesses by US. Serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) were also measured. PET was positive in 69% of knees while MRI and US were positive in 69% and 75%. Positivity on one imaging technique was strongly associated with positivity on the other two. PET-positive knees exhibited significantly higher SUVs, higher MRI parameters and greater synovial thickness compared with PET-negative knees, whereas serum CRP and MMP-3 levels were not significantly different. SUVs were significantly correlated with all MRI parameters, with synovial thickness and with serum CRP and MMP-3 levels at baseline. Changes in SUVs after 4 weeks were also correlated with changes in MRI parameters and in serum CRP and MMP-3 levels, but not with changes in synovial thickness. (orig.)

  3. Tumor Delineation and Quantitative Assessment of Glucose Metabolic Rate within Histologic Subtypes of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer by Using Dynamic 18F Fluorodeoxyglucose PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Tineke W H; de Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee; Visser, Eric P; Oyen, Wim J G; Looijen-Salamon, Monika G; Visvikis, Dimitris; Verhagen, Ad F T M; Bussink, Johan; Vriens, Dennis

    2017-05-01

    Purpose To assess whether dynamic fluorine 18 ( 18 F) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) has added value over static 18 F-FDG PET for tumor delineation in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) radiation therapy planning by using pathology volumes as the reference standard and to compare pharmacokinetic rate constants of 18 F-FDG metabolism, including regional variation, between NSCLC histologic subtypes. Materials and Methods The study was approved by the institutional review board. Patients gave written informed consent. In this prospective observational study, 1-hour dynamic 18 F-FDG PET/computed tomographic examinations were performed in 35 patients (36 resectable NSCLCs) between 2009 and 2014. Static and parametric images of glucose metabolic rate were obtained to determine lesion volumes by using three delineation strategies. Pathology volume was calculated from three orthogonal dimensions (n = 32). Whole tumor and regional rate constants and blood volume fraction (V B ) were computed by using compartment modeling. Results Pathology volumes were larger than PET volumes (median difference, 8.7-25.2 cm 3 ; Wilcoxon signed rank test, P PET images is in best agreement with pathology volume and could be useful for NSCLC autocontouring. Differences in glycolytic rate and V B between SCC and AC are relevant for research in targeting agents and radiation therapy dose escalation. © RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  4. MO-AB-BRA-06: Dynamic FLT PET for Investigating Potential Synergistic Therapeutic Targets During Anti-Angiogenic Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarpelli, M; Perlman, S; Liu, G [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Simoncic, U [Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jeraj, R [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Novel treatment strategies for metastatic cancer patients involve synergistically combining treatments with the hope of improving outcomes. This study investigated changes in tumor proliferative and vascular characteristics derived from dynamic [F-18]FLT PET during antiangiogenic treatment with the goal of identifying synergistic treatment opportunities. Methods: Patients with various solid cancers underwent continuous three-week cycles of anti-angiogenic treatment with intermittent dosing (two-weeks-on/one-week-off). Patients received up to six dynamic FLT PET/CT scans (days 0, 14, and 21 of cycle 1 (C1) and cycle 3 (C3)). Tumor proliferative (Kflt, net uptake rate) and vascular parameters (K1 blood-to-tissue transfer; Vb, vascular fraction) were calculated using a two-tissue compartment four-rate parameter kinetic model. Relative changes in these parameters, from day 0 to 14 (TxResp) and day 14 to 21 (offTxResp), were calculated. Significant differences were tested using Wilcoxon signed-rank test and significant correlations were tested using Spearman correlation. Results: Thirty patients were evaluable for C1 offTxResp with median values for Kflt, K1, and Vb of +30%, +35% and +30%, respectively. The fractions of patients with positive C1 offTxResp were: 21/30 for Ki, 24/30 for K1, 21/30 for Vb, and 12/30 had positive offTxResp for all three kinetic parameters. The offTxResp in C3 was not significantly different from C1 for any of the kinetic parameters. Significant correlations were found between TxResp and offTxResp in C1 for Kflt (ρ=-0.52, p=0.014), K1 (ρ=−0.61, p=0.003) and Vb (ρ=−0.80, p<0.001). Similar correlations were found for Kflt (ρ=-1, p=0.017) and K1 (ρ=−1, p=0.017) for the five patients evaluable in C3. Conclusion: Dynamic FLT PET showed evidence of distinct vascular and proliferative increases during off treatment weeks that could potentially be targeted with synergistic therapy. Early changes in kinetic parameters were

  5. Multiple Time-Point 68Ga-PSMA I&T PET/CT for Characterization of Primary Prostate Cancer: Value of Early Dynamic and Delayed Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmuck, Sebastian; Mamach, Martin; Wilke, Florian; von Klot, Christoph A; Henkenberens, Christoph; Thackeray, James T; Sohns, Jan M; Geworski, Lilli; Ross, Tobias L; Wester, Hans-Juergen; Christiansen, Hans; Bengel, Frank M; Derlin, Thorsten

    2017-06-01

    The aims of this study were to gain mechanistic insights into prostate cancer biology using dynamic imaging and to evaluate the usefulness of multiple time-point Ga-prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) I&T PET/CT for the assessment of primary prostate cancer before prostatectomy. Twenty patients with prostate cancer underwent Ga-PSMA I&T PET/CT before prostatectomy. The PET protocol consisted of early dynamic pelvic imaging, followed by static scans at 60 and 180 minutes postinjection (p.i.). SUVs, time-activity curves, quantitative analysis based on a 2-tissue compartment model, Patlak analysis, histopathology, and Gleason grading were compared between prostate cancer and benign prostate gland. Primary tumors were identified on both early dynamic and delayed imaging in 95% of patients. Tracer uptake was significantly higher in prostate cancer compared with benign prostate tissue at any time point (P ≤ 0.0003) and increased over time. Consequently, the tumor-to-nontumor ratio within the prostate gland improved over time (2.8 at 10 minutes vs 17.1 at 180 minutes p.i.). Tracer uptake at both 60 and 180 minutes p.i. was significantly higher in patients with higher Gleason scores (P dynamic and static delayed Ga-PSMA ligand PET images. The tumor-to-nontumor ratio in the prostate gland improves over time, supporting a role of delayed imaging for optimal visualization of prostate cancer.

  6. Static and dynamic 18F-FET PET for the characterization of gliomas defined by IDH and 1p/19q status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verger, Antoine; Stoffels, Gabriele; Bauer, Elena K; Lohmann, Philipp; Blau, Tobias; Fink, Gereon R; Neumaier, Bernd; Shah, Nadim J; Langen, Karl-Josef; Galldiks, Norbert

    2018-03-01

    The molecular features isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutation and 1p/19q co-deletion have gained major importance for both glioma typing and prognosis and have, therefore, been integrated in the World Health Organization (WHO) classification in 2016. The aim of this study was to characterize static and dynamic O-(2- 18 F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine ( 18 F-FET) PET parameters in gliomas with or without IDH mutation or 1p/19q co-deletion. Ninety patients with newly diagnosed and untreated gliomas with a static and dynamic 18 F-FET PET scan prior to evaluation of tumor tissue according to the 2016 WHO classification were identified retrospectively. Mean and maximum tumor-to-brain ratios (TBR mean/max ), as well as dynamic parameters (time-to-peak and slope) of 18 F-FET uptake were calculated. Sixteen (18%) oligodendrogliomas (IDH mutated, 1p/19q co-deleted), 27 (30%) astrocytomas (IDH mutated only), and 47 (52%) glioblastomas (IDH wild type only) were identified. TBR mean , TBR max , TTP and slope discriminated between IDH mutated astrocytomas and IDH wild type glioblastomas (P dynamic 18 F-FET PET parameters may allow determining non-invasively the IDH mutation status. However, IDH mutated and 1p/19q co-deleted oligodendrogliomas cannot be differentiated from glioblastomas and astrocytomas by 18 F-FET PET.

  7. Quantification of myocardial blood flow with 11C-hydroxyephedrine dynamic PET: comparison with 15O-H2O PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroshima, Yuji; Manabe, Osamu; Naya, Masanao; Tomiyama, Yuuki; Magota, Keiichi; Obara, Masahiko; Aikawa, Tadao; Oyama-Manabe, Noriko; Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Hirata, Kenji; Kroenke, Markus; Tamaki, Nagara; Katoh, Chietsugu

    2017-12-21

    11 C-hydroxyephedrine (HED) PET has been used to evaluate the myocardial sympathetic nervous system (SNS). Here we sought to establish a simultaneous approach for quantifying both myocardial blood flow (MBF) and the SNS from a single HED PET scan. Ten controls and 13 patients with suspected cardiac disease were enrolled. The inflow rate of 11 C-HED (K1) was obtained using a one-tissue-compartment model. We compared this rate with the MBF derived from 15 O-H 2 O PET. In the controls, the relationship between K 1 from 11 C-HED PET and the MBF from 15 O-H 2 O PET was linked by the Renkin-Crone model. The relationship between K 1 from 11 C-HED PET and the MBF from 15 O-H 2 O PET from the controls' data was approximated as follows: K 1   =  (1 - 0.891 * exp(- 0.146/MBF)) * MBF. In the validation set, the correlation coefficient demonstrated a significantly high relationship for both the whole left ventricle (r = 0.95, P < 0.001) and three coronary territories (left anterior descending artery: r = 0.96, left circumflex artery: r = 0.81, right coronary artery: r =  0.86; P < 0.001, respectively). 11 C-HED can simultaneously estimate MBF and sympathetic nervous function without requiring an additional MBF scan for assessing mismatch areas between MBF and SNS.

  8. Hybrid image and blood sampling input function for quantification of small animal dynamic PET data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoghi, Kooresh I.; Welch, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    We describe and validate a hybrid image and blood sampling (HIBS) method to derive the input function for quantification of microPET mice data. The HIBS algorithm derives the peak of the input function from the image, which is corrected for recovery, while the tail is derived from 5 to 6 optimally placed blood sampling points. A Bezier interpolation algorithm is used to link the rightmost image peak data point to the leftmost blood sampling point. To assess the performance of HIBS, 4 mice underwent 60-min microPET imaging sessions following a 0.40-0.50-mCi bolus administration of 18 FDG. In total, 21 blood samples (blood-sampled plasma time-activity curve, bsPTAC) were obtained throughout the imaging session to compare against the proposed HIBS method. MicroPET images were reconstructed using filtered back projection with a zoom of 2.75 on the heart. Volumetric regions of interest (ROIs) were composed by drawing circular ROIs 3 pixels in diameter on 3-4 transverse planes of the left ventricle. Performance was characterized by kinetic simulations in terms of bias in parameter estimates when bsPTAC and HIBS are used as input functions. The peak of the bsPTAC curve was distorted in comparison to the HIBS-derived curve due to temporal limitations and delay in blood sampling, which affected the rates of bidirectional exchange between plasma and tissue. The results highlight limitations in using bsPTAC. The HIBS method, however, yields consistent results, and thus, is a substitute for bsPTAC

  9. Dynamic PET reconstruction using temporal patch-based low rank penalty for ROI-based brain kinetic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyungsang; Ye, Jong Chul; Son, Young Don; Cho, Zang Hee; Bresler, Yoram; Ra, Jong Beom

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) is widely used to measure changes in the bio-distribution of radiopharmaceuticals within particular organs of interest over time. However, to retain sufficient temporal resolution, the number of photon counts in each time frame must be limited. Therefore, conventional reconstruction algorithms such as the ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) produce noisy reconstruction images, thus degrading the quality of the extracted time activity curves (TACs). To address this issue, many advanced reconstruction algorithms have been developed using various spatio-temporal regularizations. In this paper, we extend earlier results and develop a novel temporal regularization, which exploits the self-similarity of patches that are collected in dynamic images. The main contribution of this paper is to demonstrate that the correlation of patches can be exploited using a low-rank constraint that is insensitive to global intensity variations. The resulting optimization framework is, however, non-Lipschitz and non-convex due to the Poisson log-likelihood and low-rank penalty terms. Direct application of the conventional Poisson image deconvolution by an augmented Lagrangian (PIDAL) algorithm is, however, problematic due to its large memory requirements, which prevents its parallelization. Thus, we propose a novel optimization framework using the concave-convex procedure (CCCP) by exploiting the Legendre–Fenchel transform, which is computationally efficient and parallelizable. In computer simulation and a real in vivo experiment using a high-resolution research tomograph (HRRT) scanner, we confirm that the proposed algorithm can improve image quality while also extracting more accurate region of interests (ROI) based kinetic parameters. Furthermore, we show that the total reconstruction time for HRRT PET is significantly accelerated using our GPU implementation, which makes the algorithm very practical in clinical environments

  10. Quantification of myocardial blood flow with dynamic perfusion 3.0 Tesla MRI: Validation with (15) O-water PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomiyama, Yuuki; Manabe, Osamu; Oyama-Manabe, Noriko; Naya, Masanao; Sugimori, Hiroyuki; Hirata, Kenji; Mori, Yuki; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki; Kudo, Kohsuke; Tamaki, Nagara; Katoh, Chietsugu

    2015-09-01

    To develop and validate a method for quantifying myocardial blood flow (MBF) using dynamic perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MBFMRI ) at 3.0 Tesla (T) and compare the findings with those of (15) O-water positron emission tomography (MBFPET ). Twenty healthy male volunteers underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and (15) O-water positron emission tomography (PET) at rest and during adenosine triphosphate infusion. The single-tissue compartment model was used to estimate the inflow rate constant (K1). We estimated the extraction fraction of Gd-DTPA using K1 and MBF values obtained from (15) O-water PET for the first 10 subjects. For validation, we calculated MBFMRI values for the remaining 10 subjects and compared them with the MBFPET values. In addition, we compared MBFMRI values of 10 patients with coronary artery disease with those of healthy subjects. The mean resting and stress MBFMRI values were 0.76 ± 0.10 and 3.04 ± 0.82 mL/min/g, respectively, and showed excellent correlation with the mean MBFPET values (r = 0.96, P < 0.01). The mean stress MBFMRI value was significantly lower for the patients (1.92 ± 0.37) than for the healthy subjects (P < 0.001). The use of dynamic perfusion MRI at 3T is useful for estimating MBF and can be applied for patients with coronary artery disease. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Radiotherapy volume delineation using dynamic [18F]-FDG PET/CT imaging in patients with oropharyngeal cancer: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvoniemi, Antti; Din, Mueez U; Suilamo, Sami; Shepherd, Tony; Minn, Heikki

    2016-11-01

    Delineation of gross tumour volume in 3D is a critical step in the radiotherapy (RT) treatment planning for oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Static [ 18 F]-FDG PET/CT imaging has been suggested as a method to improve the reproducibility of tumour delineation, but it suffers from low specificity. We undertook this pilot study in which dynamic features in time-activity curves (TACs) of [ 18 F]-FDG PET/CT images were applied to help the discrimination of tumour from inflammation and adjacent normal tissue. Five patients with OPC underwent dynamic [ 18 F]-FDG PET/CT imaging in treatment position. Voxel-by-voxel analysis was performed to evaluate seven dynamic features developed with the knowledge of differences in glucose metabolism in different tissue types and visual inspection of TACs. The Gaussian mixture model and K-means algorithms were used to evaluate the performance of the dynamic features in discriminating tumour voxels compared to the performance of standardized uptake values obtained from static imaging. Some dynamic features showed a trend towards discrimination of different metabolic areas but lack of consistency means that clinical application is not recommended based on these results alone. Impact of inflammatory tissue remains a problem for volume delineation in RT of OPC, but a simple dynamic imaging protocol proved practicable and enabled simple data analysis techniques that show promise for complementing the information in static uptake values.

  12. Radiation injury vs. recurrent brain metastasis: combining textural feature radiomics analysis and standard parameters may increase {sup 18}F-FET PET accuracy without dynamic scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohmann, Philipp; Stoffels, Gabriele; Stegmayr, Carina; Neumaier, Bernd [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Juelich (Germany); Ceccon, Garry [University of Cologne, Department of Neurology, Cologne (Germany); Rapp, Marion; Sabel, Michael; Kamp, Marcel A. [Heinrich Heine University Duesseldorf, Department of Neurosurgery, Duesseldorf (Germany); Filss, Christian P. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Juelich (Germany); RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Shah, Nadim J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Juelich (Germany); RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Aachen (Germany); Juelich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA) - Section JARA-Brain, Department of Neurology, Juelich (Germany); Langen, Karl-Josef [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Juelich (Germany); RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Juelich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA) - Section JARA-Brain, Department of Neurology, Juelich (Germany); Galldiks, Norbert [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Juelich (Germany); University of Cologne, Department of Neurology, Cologne (Germany); University of Cologne, Center of Integrated Oncology (CIO), Cologne (Germany)

    2017-07-15

    We investigated the potential of textural feature analysis of O-(2-[{sup 18}F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine ({sup 18}F-FET) PET to differentiate radiation injury from brain metastasis recurrence. Forty-seven patients with contrast-enhancing brain lesions (n = 54) on MRI after radiotherapy of brain metastases underwent dynamic {sup 18}F-FET PET. Tumour-to-brain ratios (TBRs) of {sup 18}F-FET uptake and 62 textural parameters were determined on summed images 20-40 min post-injection. Tracer uptake kinetics, i.e., time-to-peak (TTP) and patterns of time-activity curves (TAC) were evaluated on dynamic PET data from 0-50 min post-injection. Diagnostic accuracy of investigated parameters and combinations thereof to discriminate between brain metastasis recurrence and radiation injury was compared. Diagnostic accuracy increased from 81 % for TBR{sub mean} alone to 85 % when combined with the textural parameter Coarseness or Short-zone emphasis. The accuracy of TBR{sub max} alone was 83 % and increased to 85 % after combination with the textural parameters Coarseness, Short-zone emphasis, or Correlation. Analysis of TACs resulted in an accuracy of 70 % for kinetic pattern alone and increased to 83 % when combined with TBR{sub max}. Textural feature analysis in combination with TBRs may have the potential to increase diagnostic accuracy for discrimination between brain metastasis recurrence and radiation injury, without the need for dynamic {sup 18}F-FET PET scans. (orig.)

  13. Photochromic dynamics of organic-inorganic hybrids supported on transparent and flexible recycled PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, R. P.; Nalin, M.; Ribeiro, S. J. L.; Molina, C.

    2017-04-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrids (OIH) synthesized by sol gel process containing phosphotungstic acid (PWA) entrapped have been attracted much attention for ultraviolet sensitive materials. However, the limitations for practical photochromic application of these materials are the poor interaction with flexible polymer substrates such as Poly(ethyleneterephthalate) (PET) and also photo response under ultraviolet radiation. This paper describes the use of the d-ureasil HOI, based on siliceous network grafted through linkages to both ends of polymer chain containing 2.5 poly(oxyethylene) units with PWA entrapped prepared as films on recycled PET. Films were characterized by IR-ATR, XRD, TG/DTG, UV-Vis and Contact angle. XRD patterns showed that both pristine hybrid matrix and those containing PWA are amorphous. IR showed that PWA structure is preserved in the matrix and interactions between them occur by intermolecular forces. Films are thermally stable up to 325 °C and contact angle of 25.1° showed a good wettability between substrate and hybrid matrix. Furthermore, films showed fast photochromic response after 1 min of ultraviolet exposure time. The bleaching process revealed that the relaxation process is dependent of the temperature and the activation energy of 47.2 kJ mol-1 was determined. The properties of these films make them potential candidates for applications in flexible photochromic materials.

  14. Imaging with PET system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, B.K.; Noreen Norfaraheen Lee Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    PET deals with biochemistry and metabolic changes that occur at molecular level. Hence, PET differs fundamentally from other imaging modalities. CT imaging is based on tissue density, whereas MRI conveys anatomic information based on proton density and proton relaxation dynamics. CT and MRI are useful in clinical diagnosis only when disease process has caused significant anatomic alterations. However, in most disease conditions chemical changes precede anatomic changes, that can be detected by PET technology. Thus, PET can provide earliest and unique information about ongoing disease process long before anatomic or structural changes take place. There is no other modality available at present that can replace PET technology. Although PET produces cross-sectional images like that obtained in MRI or CT, they represent circulation, function and metabolism, and not anatomic structure. PET is extremely sensitive measuring quantitatively concentration of tracers in nano to pico-molar range. Thus, PET enables merger of biochemistry and biology in medicine giving birth to molecular medicine that focuses on identifying the molecular errors of disease leading to developing molecular corrections including gene therapy. Molecular imaging with PET has been playing a role in examining the biological nature of a disease condition and its characterization to guide selection and evaluation of treatment. (author)

  15. Regional cerebral perfusion measurements: a comparative study of xenon-enhanced CT and C15O2 build-up using dynamic PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    St Lawrence, K.S.; Bews, J.; Dunscombe, P.B.

    1992-01-01

    Regional cerebral perfusion can be determined by monitoring the uptake of a diffusable tracer concurrently in cerebral tissue and arterial blood. Two techniques based on this methodology are xenon-enhanced computed tomography (Xe CT) and C 15 O 2 build-up using dynamic positron emission tomography (C 15 O 2 PET). Serial images are used by both Xe CT and C 15 O 2 PET to characterize the uptake of the tracer in cerebral tissue. The noise present in these images will reduce the precision of the perfusion measurements obtained by either technique. Using Monte Carlo type computer simulations, the precision of the two techniques as a function of image noise has been examined. On the basis of their results, they conclude that the precision of the Xe CT technique is comparable to the precision of C 15 O 2 PET when realistic clinical protocols are employed for both. (author)

  16. A scatter-corrected list-mode reconstruction and a practical scatter/random approximation technique for dynamic PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, J-C; Rahmim, Arman; Blinder, Stephan; Camborde, Marie-Laure; Raywood, Kelvin; Sossi, Vesna

    2007-01-01

    We describe an ordinary Poisson list-mode expectation maximization (OP-LMEM) algorithm with a sinogram-based scatter correction method based on the single scatter simulation (SSS) technique and a random correction method based on the variance-reduced delayed-coincidence technique. We also describe a practical approximate scatter and random-estimation approach for dynamic PET studies based on a time-averaged scatter and random estimate followed by scaling according to the global numbers of true coincidences and randoms for each temporal frame. The quantitative accuracy achieved using OP-LMEM was compared to that obtained using the histogram-mode 3D ordinary Poisson ordered subset expectation maximization (3D-OP) algorithm with similar scatter and random correction methods, and they showed excellent agreement. The accuracy of the approximated scatter and random estimates was tested by comparing time activity curves (TACs) as well as the spatial scatter distribution from dynamic non-human primate studies obtained from the conventional (frame-based) approach and those obtained from the approximate approach. An excellent agreement was found, and the time required for the calculation of scatter and random estimates in the dynamic studies became much less dependent on the number of frames (we achieved a nearly four times faster performance on the scatter and random estimates by applying the proposed method). The precision of the scatter fraction was also demonstrated for the conventional and the approximate approach using phantom studies

  17. Radiation injury vs. recurrent brain metastasis: combining textural feature radiomics analysis and standard parameters may increase 18F-FET PET accuracy without dynamic scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, Philipp; Stoffels, Gabriele; Ceccon, Garry; Rapp, Marion; Sabel, Michael; Filss, Christian P; Kamp, Marcel A; Stegmayr, Carina; Neumaier, Bernd; Shah, Nadim J; Langen, Karl-Josef; Galldiks, Norbert

    2017-07-01

    We investigated the potential of textural feature analysis of O-(2-[ 18 F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine ( 18 F-FET) PET to differentiate radiation injury from brain metastasis recurrence. Forty-seven patients with contrast-enhancing brain lesions (n = 54) on MRI after radiotherapy of brain metastases underwent dynamic 18 F-FET PET. Tumour-to-brain ratios (TBRs) of 18 F-FET uptake and 62 textural parameters were determined on summed images 20-40 min post-injection. Tracer uptake kinetics, i.e., time-to-peak (TTP) and patterns of time-activity curves (TAC) were evaluated on dynamic PET data from 0-50 min post-injection. Diagnostic accuracy of investigated parameters and combinations thereof to discriminate between brain metastasis recurrence and radiation injury was compared. Diagnostic accuracy increased from 81 % for TBR mean alone to 85 % when combined with the textural parameter Coarseness or Short-zone emphasis. The accuracy of TBR max alone was 83 % and increased to 85 % after combination with the textural parameters Coarseness, Short-zone emphasis, or Correlation. Analysis of TACs resulted in an accuracy of 70 % for kinetic pattern alone and increased to 83 % when combined with TBR max . Textural feature analysis in combination with TBRs may have the potential to increase diagnostic accuracy for discrimination between brain metastasis recurrence and radiation injury, without the need for dynamic 18 F-FET PET scans. • Textural feature analysis provides quantitative information about tumour heterogeneity • Textural features help improve discrimination between brain metastasis recurrence and radiation injury • Textural features might be helpful to further understand tumour heterogeneity • Analysis does not require a more time consuming dynamic PET acquisition.

  18. Multimodal correlation of dynamic [{sup 18}F]-AV-1451 perfusion PET and neuronal hypometabolism in [{sup 18}F]-FDG PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammes, Jochen; Leuwer, Isabel [University Hospital Cologne, Multimodal Neuroimaging Group, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cologne (Germany); Bischof, Gerard N. [University Hospital Cologne, Multimodal Neuroimaging Group, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cologne (Germany); INM-3, Research Center Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Drzezga, Alexander [University Hospital Cologne, Multimodal Neuroimaging Group, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cologne (Germany); German Center for Neurodegeneration (DZNE), Berlin (Germany); Eimeren, Thilo van [University Hospital Cologne, Multimodal Neuroimaging Group, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cologne (Germany); INM-3, Research Center Juelich, Juelich (Germany); German Center for Neurodegeneration (DZNE), Berlin (Germany)

    2017-12-15

    Cerebral glucose metabolism measured with [18F]-FDG PET is a well established marker of neuronal dysfunction in neurodegeneration. The tau-protein tracer [18F]-AV-1451 PET is currently under evaluation and shows promising results. Here, we assess the feasibility of early perfusion imaging with AV-1451 as a substite for FDG PET in assessing neuronal injury. Twenty patients with suspected neurodegeneration underwent FDG and early phase AV-1451 PET imaging. Ten one-minute timeframes were acquired after application of 200 MBq AV-1451. FDG images were acquired on a different date according to clinical protocol. Early AV-1451 timeframes were coregistered to individual FDG-scans and spatially normalized. Voxel-wise intermodal correlations were calculated on within-subject level for every possible time window. The window with highest pooled correlation was considered optimal. Z-transformed deviation maps (ZMs) were created from both FDG and early AV-1451 images, comparing against FDG images of healthy controls. Regional patterns and extent of perfusion deficits were highly comparable to metabolic deficits. Best results were observed in a time window from 60 to 360 s (r = 0.86). Correlation strength ranged from r = 0.96 (subcortical gray matter) to 0.83 (frontal lobe) in regional analysis. ZMs of early AV-1451 and FDG images were highly similar. Perfusion imaging with AV-1451 is a valid biomarker for assessment of neuronal dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases. Radiation exposure and complexity of the diagnostic workup could be reduced significantly by routine acquisition of early AV-1451 images, sparing additional FDG PET. (orig.)

  19. IMPROVED DERIVATION OF INPUT FUNCTION IN DYNAMIC MOUSE [18F]FDG PET USING BLADDER RADIOACTIVITY KINETICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Koon-Pong; Zhang, Xiaoli; Huang, Sung-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Accurate determination of the plasma input function (IF) is essential for absolute quantification of physiological parameters in positron emission tomography (PET). However, it requires an invasive and tedious procedure of arterial blood sampling that is challenging in mice because of the limited blood volume. In this study, a hybrid modeling approach is proposed to estimate the plasma IF of 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose ([18F]FDG) in mice using accumulated radioactivity in urinary bladder together with a single late-time blood sample measurement. Methods Dynamic PET scans were performed on nine isoflurane-anesthetized male C57BL/6 mice after a bolus injection of [18F]FDG at the lateral caudal vein. During a 60- or 90-min scan, serial blood samples were taken from the femoral artery. Image data were reconstructed using filtered backprojection with CT-based attenuation correction. Total accumulated radioactivity in the urinary bladder was fitted to a renal compartmental model with the last blood sample and a 1-exponential function that described the [18F]FDG clearance in blood. Multiple late-time blood sample estimates were calculated by the blood [18F]FDG clearance equation. A sum of 4-exponentials was assumed for the plasma IF that served as a forcing function to all tissues. The estimated plasma IF was obtained by simultaneously fitting the [18F]FDG model to the time-activity curves (TACs) of liver and muscle and the forcing function to early (0–1 min) left-ventricle data (corrected for delay, dispersion, partial-volume effects and erythrocytes uptake) and the late-time blood estimates. Using only the blood sample acquired at the end of the study to estimate the IF and the use of liver TAC as an alternative IF were also investigated. Results The area under the plasma TACs calculated for all studies using the hybrid approach was not significantly different from that using all blood samples. [18F]FDG uptake constants in brain, myocardium, skeletal

  20. Quantification of Single- and Multi-Phase Hydrodynamic Dispersion in Rocks Using Dynamic 3D PET Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, R.; Vandehey, N. T.; O'Neil, J.; Benson, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    We report results of an experimental investigation into the effects of small-scale (mm-cm) heterogeneities and hydrodynamic dispersion on miscible and immiscible displacements in a Berea Sandstone core. Pulse-radiotracer tests were carried out by measuring breakthrough curves at distinct flow rates and gas/water saturation ratios, while simultaneously imaging the internal displacement of the radioactive solution by [11C]PET. Dynamic multidimensional maps of the tracer concentration in the rock sample have been obtained with a spatial resolution of about 10 mm3 and provide evidence for significant macrodispersion effects caused by the presence of heterogeneities at the same scale. The numerical solution of the classic Advection-Dispersion Equation (ADE) applied in 1D form fails to describe the measured breakthrough curves and significantly overestimates longitudinal dispersivity. An excellent agreement with the experiments is attained by explicitly accounting for permeability heterogeneity, while reducing the contribution of "Fickian" dispersivity. Heterogeneity was introduced in the model by discretising the rock sample into independent parallel streamlines, which were generated based on a previously determined 3D permeability map, and by solving the 1D ADE for each of them. The use of streamlines is supported by direct quantitative observations from the PET scans; remarkably, this approach leads to an accurate representation of both the temporal behaviour and spatial distribution of the tracer concentration in the sample. It is shown that when the length-scale of permeability variations is similar in order as the size of the sample, the effect of the former can be as significant as hydrodynamic dispersion. The presence of a second immiscible fluid phase further complicates the flow field and, accordingly, the interpretation of the experiments. The ability to decouple these effects leads to the estimation of dispersion coefficients that aren't sample specific and

  1. Radiolabelling and evaluation of novel haloethylsulfoxides as PET imaging agents for tumor hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurens, Evelyn; Yeoh, Shinn Dee; Rigopoulos, Angela; Cao, Diana; Cartwright, Glenn A.; O'Keefe, Graeme J.; Tochon-Danguy, Henri J.; White, Jonathan M.; Scott, Andrew M.; Ackermann, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    The significance of imaging hypoxia with the PET ligand [ 18 F]FMISO has been demonstrated in a variety of cancers. However, the slow kinetics of [ 18 F]FMISO require a 2-h delay between tracer administration and patient scanning. Labelled chloroethyl sulfoxides have shown faster kinetics and higher contrast than [ 18 F]FMISO in a rat model of ischemic stroke. However, these nitrogen mustard analogues are unsuitable for routine production and use in humans. Here we report on the synthesis and in vitro and in vivo evaluation of two novel sulfoxides which we synthesised from a single precursor molecule via either 2-[ 18 F]fluoroethyl azide click chemistry or conventional nucleophilic displacement of a chloride leaving group. The yields of the click chemistry approach were 90±5% of [ 18 F] based on 2-[ 18 F]fluoroethyl azide, and the yields for the S N reaction were 15±5% of [ 18 F] based on K[ 18 F]F. Both radiotracers underwent metabolism in an in vitro assay using S9 liver fractions with biological half-lives of 32.39 and 43.32 min, respectively. Imaging studies using an SK-RC-52 tumor model in BALB/c nude mice have revealed that only [ 18 F] is retained in hypoxic tumors, whereas [ 18 F] is cleared from those tumors at a rate similar to that of muscle tissue. [ 18 F] has emerged as a promising new lead structure for further development of sulfoxide-based hypoxia imaging agents. In particular, the mechanism of uptake needs to be elucidated and changes to the chemical structure need to be made in order to reduce metabolism and improve radiotracer kinetics.

  2. Early dynamic imaging in {sup 68}Ga- PSMA-11 PET/CT allows discrimination of urinary bladder activity and prostate cancer lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uprimny, Christian; Kroiss, Alexander Stephan; Decristoforo, Clemens; Warwitz, Boris; Scarpa, Lorenza; Roig, Llanos Geraldo; Kendler, Dorota; Guggenberg, Elisabeth von; Virgolini, Irene Johanna [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Fritz, Josef [Medical University Innsbruck, Department for Medical Statistics, Informatics and Health Economics, Innsbruck (Austria); Bektic, Jasmin; Horninger, Wolfgang [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Urology, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2017-05-15

    PET/CT with {sup 68}Ga-labelled prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-ligands has been proven to establish a promising imaging modality in the work-up of prostate cancer (PC) patients with biochemical relapse. Despite a high overall detection rate, the visualisation of local recurrence may be hampered by high physiologic tracer accumulation in the urinary bladder on whole body imaging, usually starting 60 min after injection. This study sought to verify whether early dynamic {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 (HBED-CC)PET/CT can differentiate pathologic PC-related tracer uptake from physiologic tracer accumulation in the urinary bladder. Eighty consecutive PC patients referred to {sup 68}Ga -PSMA-11 PET/CT were included in this retrospective analysis (biochemical relapse: n = 64; primary staging: n = 8; evaluation of therapy response/restaging: n = 8). In addition to whole-body PET/CT acquisition 60 min post injection early dynamic imaging of the pelvis in the first 8 min after tracer injection was performed. SUV{sub max} of pathologic lesions was calculated and time-activity curves were generated and compared to those of urinary bladder and areas of physiologic tracer uptake. A total of 55 lesions consistent with malignancy on 60 min whole body imaging exhibited also pathologic {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 uptake during early dynamic imaging (prostatic bed/prostate gland: n = 27; lymph nodes: n = 12; bone: n = 16). All pathologic lesions showed tracer uptake within the first 3 min, whereas urinary bladder activity was absent within the first 3 min of dynamic imaging in all patients. Suv{sub max} was significantly higher in PC lesions in the first 6 min compared to urinary bladder accumulation (p < 0.001). In the subgroup of PC patients with biochemical relapse the detection rate of local recurrence could be increased from 20.3 to 29.7%. Early dynamic imaging in {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT reliably enables the differentiation of pathologic tracer uptake in PC lesions from physiologic

  3. Early dynamic imaging in 68Ga- PSMA-11 PET/CT allows discrimination of urinary bladder activity and prostate cancer lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uprimny, Christian; Kroiss, Alexander Stephan; Decristoforo, Clemens; Fritz, Josef; Warwitz, Boris; Scarpa, Lorenza; Roig, Llanos Geraldo; Kendler, Dorota; von Guggenberg, Elisabeth; Bektic, Jasmin; Horninger, Wolfgang; Virgolini, Irene Johanna

    2017-05-01

    PET/CT with 68 Ga-labelled prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-ligands has been proven to establish a promising imaging modality in the work-up of prostate cancer (PC) patients with biochemical relapse. Despite a high overall detection rate, the visualisation of local recurrence may be hampered by high physiologic tracer accumulation in the urinary bladder on whole body imaging, usually starting 60 min after injection. This study sought to verify whether early dynamic 68 Ga-PSMA-11 (HBED-CC)PET/CT can differentiate pathologic PC-related tracer uptake from physiologic tracer accumulation in the urinary bladder. Eighty consecutive PC patients referred to 68 Ga -PSMA-11 PET/CT were included in this retrospective analysis (biochemical relapse: n = 64; primary staging: n = 8; evaluation of therapy response/restaging: n = 8). In addition to whole-body PET/CT acquisition 60 min post injection early dynamic imaging of the pelvis in the first 8 min after tracer injection was performed. SUV max of pathologic lesions was calculated and time-activity curves were generated and compared to those of urinary bladder and areas of physiologic tracer uptake. A total of 55 lesions consistent with malignancy on 60 min whole body imaging exhibited also pathologic 68 Ga-PSMA-11 uptake during early dynamic imaging (prostatic bed/prostate gland: n = 27; lymph nodes: n = 12; bone: n = 16). All pathologic lesions showed tracer uptake within the first 3 min, whereas urinary bladder activity was absent within the first 3 min of dynamic imaging in all patients. Suv max was significantly higher in PC lesions in the first 6 min compared to urinary bladder accumulation (p dynamic imaging in 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT reliably enables the differentiation of pathologic tracer uptake in PC lesions from physiologic bladder accumulation. Performance of early dynamic imaging in addition to whole body imaging 60 min after tracer injection might improve the detection rate

  4. Early dynamic imaging in "6"8Ga- PSMA-11 PET/CT allows discrimination of urinary bladder activity and prostate cancer lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uprimny, Christian; Kroiss, Alexander Stephan; Decristoforo, Clemens; Warwitz, Boris; Scarpa, Lorenza; Roig, Llanos Geraldo; Kendler, Dorota; Guggenberg, Elisabeth von; Virgolini, Irene Johanna; Fritz, Josef; Bektic, Jasmin; Horninger, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    PET/CT with "6"8Ga-labelled prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-ligands has been proven to establish a promising imaging modality in the work-up of prostate cancer (PC) patients with biochemical relapse. Despite a high overall detection rate, the visualisation of local recurrence may be hampered by high physiologic tracer accumulation in the urinary bladder on whole body imaging, usually starting 60 min after injection. This study sought to verify whether early dynamic "6"8Ga-PSMA-11 (HBED-CC)PET/CT can differentiate pathologic PC-related tracer uptake from physiologic tracer accumulation in the urinary bladder. Eighty consecutive PC patients referred to "6"8Ga -PSMA-11 PET/CT were included in this retrospective analysis (biochemical relapse: n = 64; primary staging: n = 8; evaluation of therapy response/restaging: n = 8). In addition to whole-body PET/CT acquisition 60 min post injection early dynamic imaging of the pelvis in the first 8 min after tracer injection was performed. SUV_m_a_x of pathologic lesions was calculated and time-activity curves were generated and compared to those of urinary bladder and areas of physiologic tracer uptake. A total of 55 lesions consistent with malignancy on 60 min whole body imaging exhibited also pathologic "6"8Ga-PSMA-11 uptake during early dynamic imaging (prostatic bed/prostate gland: n = 27; lymph nodes: n = 12; bone: n = 16). All pathologic lesions showed tracer uptake within the first 3 min, whereas urinary bladder activity was absent within the first 3 min of dynamic imaging in all patients. Suv_m_a_x was significantly higher in PC lesions in the first 6 min compared to urinary bladder accumulation (p < 0.001). In the subgroup of PC patients with biochemical relapse the detection rate of local recurrence could be increased from 20.3 to 29.7%. Early dynamic imaging in "6"8Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT reliably enables the differentiation of pathologic tracer uptake in PC lesions from physiologic bladder accumulation

  5. Non-invasive grading of brain tumours using dynamic amino acid PET imaging: does it work for 11C-Methionine?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulin-Romsee, Gerard; D'Hondt, Eduard; Mortelmans, Luc; Laere, Koen van; Groot, Tjibbe de; Goffin, Jan; Sciot, Raf; Menten, Johan; Bormans, Guy

    2007-01-01

    Static imaging of amino acids does not allow differentiation of low versus high grade brain tumours. It has been shown that dynamic imaging of the amino acid analogue 18 F-fluoroethyltyrosine (FET) can achieve this goal. In many centres, 11 C-methionine (MET) is used for tumour imaging, but no clinical studies on the use of dynamic scanning for grading have been performed. Thirty-four patients with primary brain glioma and histopathological confirmation were retrospectively studied using 40 min dynamic MET-PET with 220 MBq 11C-methionine. In relation to histopathological grading, various metabolic indices and temporal parameters as documented by Poepperl et al. (JNM 2006;47:393-403) were analyzed. None of the evaluated static or temporal parameters allowed discrimination between high and low grade tumours. On average, low grade tumours showed washout after the initial uptake maximum, while both increases and decreases were seen for high grade tumours. Only the relative early versus late uptake ratio showed a trend towards significance (-0.16 ± 0.17 for low grade versus 0.01 ± 0.25 for high grade; p = 0.07). Unlike FET-PET, the uptake characteristics of MET-PET do not allow classification of low and high grade tumours on an individual patient basis. Since literature data indicate that both tracers have a similar performance regarding biopsy location, tumour delineation, and detection of recurrence, FET-PET should be advocated over MET-PET as its uptake mechanism also allows noninvasive grading in glioma. (orig.)

  6. Predicting tumor hypoxia in non-small cell lung cancer by combining CT, FDG PET and dynamic contrast-enhanced CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even, Aniek J G; Reymen, Bart; La Fontaine, Matthew D; Das, Marco; Jochems, Arthur; Mottaghy, Felix M; Belderbos, José S A; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Lambin, Philippe; van Elmpt, Wouter

    2017-11-01

    Most solid tumors contain inadequately oxygenated (i.e., hypoxic) regions, which tend to be more aggressive and treatment resistant. Hypoxia PET allows visualization of hypoxia and may enable treatment adaptation. However, hypoxia PET imaging is expensive, time-consuming and not widely available. We aimed to predict hypoxia levels in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) using more easily available imaging modalities: FDG-PET/CT and dynamic contrast-enhanced CT (DCE-CT). For 34 NSCLC patients, included in two clinical trials, hypoxia HX4-PET/CT, planning FDG-PET/CT and DCE-CT scans were acquired before radiotherapy. Scans were non-rigidly registered to the planning CT. Tumor blood flow (BF) and blood volume (BV) were calculated by kinetic analysis of DCE-CT images. Within the gross tumor volume, independent clusters, i.e., supervoxels, were created based on FDG-PET/CT. For each supervoxel, tumor-to-background ratios (TBR) were calculated (median SUV/aorta SUV mean ) for HX4-PET/CT and supervoxel features (median, SD, entropy) for the other modalities. Two random forest models (cross-validated: 10 folds, five repeats) were trained to predict the hypoxia TBR; one based on CT, FDG, BF and BV, and one with only CT and FDG features. Patients were split in a training (trial NCT01024829) and independent test set (trial NCT01210378). For each patient, predicted, and observed hypoxic volumes (HV) (TBR > 1.2) were compared. Fifteen patients (3291 supervoxels) were used for training and 19 patients (1502 supervoxels) for testing. The model with all features (RMSE training: 0.19 ± 0.01, test: 0.27) outperformed the model with only CT and FDG-PET features (RMSE training: 0.20 ± 0.01, test: 0.29). All tumors of the test set were correctly classified as normoxic or hypoxic (HV > 1 cm 3 ) by the best performing model. We created a data-driven methodology to predict hypoxia levels and hypoxia spatial patterns using CT, FDG-PET and DCE-CT features in NSCLC. The

  7. Imaging and dosimetric errors in 4D PET/CT-guided radiotherapy from patient-specific respiratory patterns: a dynamic motion phantom end-to-end study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, S R; Nyflot, M J; Herrmann, C; Groh, C M; Meyer, J; Wollenweber, S D; Stearns, C W; Kinahan, P E; Sandison, G A

    2015-05-07

    of errors was comparable during PET/CT imaging and treatment delivery without motion compensation. Errors were moderately mitigated during PET/CT imaging and significantly mitigated during RT delivery with motion compensation. This dynamic motion phantom end-to-end workflow provides a method for quality assurance of 4D PET/CT-guided radiotherapy, including evaluation of respiratory motion compensation methods during imaging and treatment delivery.

  8. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer: prediction of pathologic response with PET/CT and dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging--prospective assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateishi, Ukihide; Miyake, Mototaka; Nagaoka, Tomoaki; Terauchi, Takashi; Kubota, Kazunori; Kinoshita, Takayuki; Daisaki, Hiromitsu; Macapinlac, Homer A

    2012-04-01

    To clarify whether fluorine 18 ((18)F) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging performed after two cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) can be used to predict pathologic response in breast cancer. Institutional human research committee approval and written informed consent were obtained. Accuracy after two cycles of NAC for predicting pathologic complete response (pCR) was examined in 142 women (mean age, 57 years: range, 43-72 years) with histologically proved breast cancer between December 2005 and February 2009. Quantitative PET/CT and DCE MR imaging were performed at baseline and after two cycles of NAC. Parameters of PET/CT and of blood flow and microvascular permeability at DCE MR were compared with pathologic response. Patients were also evaluated after NAC by using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.1 based on DCE MR measurements and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) criteria and PET Response Criteria in Solid Tumors (PERCIST) 1.0 based on PET/CT measurements. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to examine continuous variables at PET/CT and DCE MR to predict pCR, and diagnostic accuracies were compared with the McNemar test. Significant decrease from baseline of all parameters at PET/CT and DCE MR was observed after NAC. Therapeutic response was obtained in 24 patients (17%) with pCR and 118 (83%) without pCR. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy to predict pCR were 45.5%, 85.5%, and 82.4%, respectively, with RECIST and 70.4%, 95.7%, and 90.8%, respectively, with EORTC and PERCIST. Multiple logistic regression revealed three significant independent predictors of pCR: percentage maximum standardized uptake value (%SUV(max)) (odds ratio [OR], 1.22; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.11, 1.34; P PET/CT is superior to DCE MR for the prediction of pCR (%SUV(max) [90.1%] vs %κ

  9. Imaging and dosimetric errors in 4D PET/CT-guided radiotherapy from patient-specific respiratory patterns: a dynamic motion phantom end-to-end study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, S R; Nyflot, M J; Meyer, J; Sandison, G A; Herrmann, C; Groh, C M; Wollenweber, S D; Stearns, C W; Kinahan, P E

    2015-01-01

    planning, and RT delivery under a dose painting paradigm is feasible within an integrated respiratory motion phantom workflow. For a limited set of cases, the magnitude of errors was comparable during PET/CT imaging and treatment delivery without motion compensation. Errors were moderately mitigated during PET/CT imaging and significantly mitigated during RT delivery with motion compensation. This dynamic motion phantom end-to-end workflow provides a method for quality assurance of 4D PET/CT-guided radiotherapy, including evaluation of respiratory motion compensation methods during imaging and treatment delivery. (paper)

  10. Imaging and dosimetric errors in 4D PET/CT-guided radiotherapy from patient-specific respiratory patterns: a dynamic motion phantom end-to-end study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, S R; Nyflot, M J; Hermann, C; Groh, C; Meyer, J; Wollenweber, S D; Stearns, C W; Kinahan, P E; Sandison, G A

    2015-01-01

    magnitude of errors was comparable during PET/CT imaging and treatment delivery without motion compensation. Errors were moderately mitigated during PET/CT imaging and significantly mitigated during RT delivery with motion compensation. This dynamic motion phantom end-to-end workflow provides a method for quality assurance of 4D PET/CT-guided radiotherapy, including evaluation of respiratory motion compensation methods during imaging and treatment delivery. PMID:25884892

  11. (18)F-FDG dynamic PET/CT in patients with multiple myeloma: patterns of tracer uptake and correlation with bone marrow plasma cell infiltration rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachpekidis, Christos; Mai, Elias K; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Hillengass, Jens; Hose, Dirk; Pan, Leyun; Haberkorn, Uwe; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2015-06-01

    The value of F-FDG PET in the diagnostic approach of multiple myeloma (MM) remains incompletely elicited. Little is known about the kinetics of F-FDG in the bone marrow and extramedullary sites in MM. This study aimed to evaluate quantitative data on kinetics and distribution patterns of F-FDG in MM patients with regard to pelvic bone marrow plasma cell infiltration. The study included 40 patients with primary MM. Dynamic PET/CT scanning of the lower lumbar spine and pelvis was performed after the administration of F-FDG. Whole-body PET/CT studies were performed. Sites of focal increased tracer uptake were considered as highly suggestive of myelomatous involvement after taking into account the patient history and CT findings. Bone marrow of the os ilium without pathologic tracer accumulation served as reference. The evaluation of dynamic PET/CT studies was based in addition to the conventional visual (qualitative) assessment, on semiquantitative (SUV) calculations, as well as on absolute quantitative estimations after application of a 2-tissue compartment model and a noncompartmental approach. F-FDG quantitative information and corresponding distribution patterns were correlated with pelvic bone marrow plasma cell infiltration. Fifty-two myelomatous lesions were detected in the pelvis. All parameters in suspected MM lesions ranged in significantly higher levels than in reference tissue (P PET/CT imaging demonstrated 4 patterns of tracer uptake; these are as follows: negative, focal, diffuse, and mixed (focal/diffuse) tracer uptake. Patients with a mixed pattern of radiotracer uptake had the highest mean plasma cell infiltration rate in their bone marrow, whereas those with negative PET/CT scans demonstrated the lowest bone marrow plasma cell infiltration. In total, 265 focal myeloma-indicative F-FDG-avid lesions were detected, 129 of which correlated with low-dose CT osteolytic findings. No significant correlation between the number of focal lesions detected in PET

  12. Nonlinear spatio-temporal filtering of dynamic PET data using a four-dimensional Gaussian filter and expectation-maximization deconvolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floberg, J M; Holden, J E

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a method for denoising dynamic PET data, spatio-temporal expectation-maximization (STEM) filtering, that combines four-dimensional Gaussian filtering with EM deconvolution. The initial Gaussian filter suppresses noise at a broad range of spatial and temporal frequencies and EM deconvolution quickly restores the frequencies most important to the signal. We aim to demonstrate that STEM filtering can improve variance in both individual time frames and in parametric images without introducing significant bias. We evaluate STEM filtering with a dynamic phantom study, and with simulated and human dynamic PET studies of a tracer with reversible binding behaviour, [C-11]raclopride, and a tracer with irreversible binding behaviour, [F-18]FDOPA. STEM filtering is compared to a number of established three and four-dimensional denoising methods. STEM filtering provides substantial improvements in variance in both individual time frames and in parametric images generated with a number of kinetic analysis techniques while introducing little bias. STEM filtering does bias early frames, but this does not affect quantitative parameter estimates. STEM filtering is shown to be superior to the other simple denoising methods studied. STEM filtering is a simple and effective denoising method that could be valuable for a wide range of dynamic PET applications. (paper)

  13. Non-invasive breast biopsy method using GD-DTPA contrast enhanced MRI series and F-18-FDG PET/CT dynamic image series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magri, Alphonso William

    This study was undertaken to develop a nonsurgical breast biopsy from Gd-DTPA Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance (CE-MR) images and F-18-FDG PET/CT dynamic image series. A five-step process was developed to accomplish this. (1) Dynamic PET series were nonrigidly registered to the initial frame using a finite element method (FEM) based registration that requires fiducial skin markers to sample the displacement field between image frames. A commercial FEM package (ANSYS) was used for meshing and FEM calculations. Dynamic PET image series registrations were evaluated using similarity measurements SAVD and NCC. (2) Dynamic CE-MR series were nonrigidly registered to the initial frame using two registration methods: a multi-resolution free-form deformation (FFD) registration driven by normalized mutual information, and a FEM-based registration method. Dynamic CE-MR image series registrations were evaluated using similarity measurements, localization measurements, and qualitative comparison of motion artifacts. FFD registration was found to be superior to FEM-based registration. (3) Nonlinear curve fitting was performed for each voxel of the PET/CT volume of activity versus time, based on a realistic two-compartmental Patlak model. Three parameters for this model were fitted; two of them describe the activity levels in the blood and in the cellular compartment, while the third characterizes the washout rate of F-18-FDG from the cellular compartment. (4) Nonlinear curve fitting was performed for each voxel of the MR volume of signal intensity versus time, based on a realistic two-compartment Brix model. Three parameters for this model were fitted: rate of Gd exiting the compartment, representing the extracellular space of a lesion; rate of Gd exiting a blood compartment; and a parameter that characterizes the strength of signal intensities. Curve fitting used for PET/CT and MR series was accomplished by application of the Levenburg-Marquardt nonlinear regression

  14. Correlation between arterial spin labeling MRI and dynamic FDG on PET-MR in Alzheimer’s disease and non-Alzhiemer’s disease patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas, David; Goubran, Maged; Wilson, Eugene; Xu, Guofan; Tripathi, Pragya; Holley, Dawn; Chao, Steven; Wintermark, Max; Quon, Andrew; Zeineh, Michael; Vasanawala, Minal; Zaharchuk, Greg [Stanford University, California (United States)

    2015-05-18

    Regional hypoperfusion on Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) MRI and corresponding regions of hypometabolism on FDG PET have been reported in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). To our knowledge these correlations have not been studied under simultaneous acquisition. The purpose of this study is to investigate the correlation of ASL with FDG PET under simultaneous acquisition on PET-MR and to explore this correlation as a possible biomarker for AD. Dynamic FDG and ASL imaging was performed using a simultaneous TOF-enabled PET-MR scanner in 7 subjects without AD and 3 subjects with AD. Average age was 68±5 years. Automated atlas-based segmentation was performed using T2 MRI using the Talairach atlas. Quantitative analysis of ASL and FDG (delayed 45-75 minute scan) was performed in five regions using the pons as a reference region for both perfusion and metabolism. Statistical analyses included Spearman’s correlation and student’s t-test. Significant correlation of relative perfusion and metabolism was found in two of the five brain regions including the putamen (p = 0.018) and the hippocampus (p = 0.031). In addition, there was significant difference between the relative perfusion and metabolism of the thalamus (p = 0.04). No difference was seen between the AD and non-AD groups. Simultaneous PET-MR demonstrates a positive correlation of perfusion of ASL with metabolism on FDG PET in the hippocampus and putamen. The putamen correlation has previously been reported in the literature on a non-simultaneous ASL and FDG imaging. The thalamus was noted to have a difference in the relative perfusion and metabolism representing a perfusion-metabolism mismatch. Future studies should explore the correlation in additional brain regions and the meaning of perfusion-metabolism mismatches as potential imaging biomarkers for patients with and without AD.

  15. Calculation of left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction from dynamic cardiac-gated 15O-water PET/CT: 5D-PET

    OpenAIRE

    Jonny Nordström; Tanja Kero; Hendrik Johannes Harms; Charles Widström; Frank A. Flachskampf; Jens Sörensen; Mark Lubberink

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Quantitative measurement of myocardial blood flow (MBF) is of increasing interest in the clinical assessment of patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). (15)O-water positron emission tomography (PET) is considered the gold standard for non-invasive MBF measurements. However, calculation of left ventricular (LV) volumes and ejection fraction (EF) is not possible from standard (15)O-water uptake images. The purpose of the present work was to investigate the possibility...

  16. Novel tracer for radiation treatment planning; Welche neuen PET-Tracer braucht die Strahlentherapie?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarzenboeck, S.; Krause, B.J. [Rostock Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Herrmann, K.; Gaertner, F.; Souvatzoglou, M. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Klaesner, B. [Klinikum Bogenhausen, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin

    2011-07-15

    PET and PET/CT with innovative tracers gain increasing importance in diagnosis and therapy management, and radiation treatment planning in radio-oncology besides the widely established FDG. The introduction of [{sup 18}F]Fluorothymidine ([{sup 18}F]FLT) as marker of proliferation, [{sup 18}F]Fluoromisonidazole ([{sup 18}F]FMISO) and [{sup 18}F]Fluoroazomycin-Arabinoside ([{sup 18}F]FAZA) as tracer of hypoxia, [{sup 18}F]Fluoroethyltyrosine ([{sup 18}F]FET) and [{sup 11}C]Methionine for brain tumour imaging, [{sup 68}Ga]DOTATOC for somatostatin receptor imaging, [{sup 18}F]FDOPA for dopamine synthesis and radioactively labeled choline derivatives for imaging phospholipid metabolism have opened novel approaches to tumour imaging. Some of these tracers have already been implemented into radio-oncology: Amino acid PET and PET/CT have the potential to optimise radiation treatment planning of brain tumours through accurate delineation of tumour tissue from normal tissue, necrosis and edema. Hypoxia represents a major therapeutic problem in radiation therapy. Hypoxia imaging is very attractive as it may allow to increase the dose in hypoxic tumours potentially allowing for a better tumour control. Advances in hybrid imaging, i.e. the introduction of MR/PET, may also have an impact in radio-oncology through synergies related to the combination of molecular signals of PET and a high soft tissue contrast of MRI as well as functional MRI capabilities. (orig.)

  17. A consistent and efficient graphical analysis method to improve the quantification of reversible tracer binding in radioligand receptor dynamic PET studies

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Yun; Ye, Weiguo; Brašić, James R.; Crabb, Andrew H.; Hilton, John; Wong, Dean F.

    2008-01-01

    The widely used Logan plot in radioligand receptor dynamic PET studies produces marked noise-induced negative biases in the estimates of total distribution volume (DVT) and binding potential (BP). To avoid the inconsistencies in the estimates from the Logan plot, a new graphical analysis method was proposed and characterized in this study. The new plot with plasma input and with reference tissue input was first derived to estimate DVT and BP. A condition was provided to ensure that the estima...

  18. Static and dynamic 18F-FET PET for the characterization of gliomas defined by IDH and 1p/19q status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verger, Antoine; Stoffels, Gabriele; Lohmann, Philipp; Neumaier, Bernd; Bauer, Elena K.; Blau, Tobias; Fink, Gereon R.; Shah, Nadim J.; Langen, Karl-Josef; Galldiks, Norbert

    2018-01-01

    The molecular features isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutation and 1p/19q co-deletion have gained major importance for both glioma typing and prognosis and have, therefore, been integrated in the World Health Organization (WHO) classification in 2016. The aim of this study was to characterize static and dynamic O-(2- 18 F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine ( 18 F-FET) PET parameters in gliomas with or without IDH mutation or 1p/19q co-deletion. Ninety patients with newly diagnosed and untreated gliomas with a static and dynamic 18 F-FET PET scan prior to evaluation of tumor tissue according to the 2016 WHO classification were identified retrospectively. Mean and maximum tumor-to-brain ratios (TBR mean/max ), as well as dynamic parameters (time-to-peak and slope) of 18 F-FET uptake were calculated. Sixteen (18%) oligodendrogliomas (IDH mutated, 1p/19q co-deleted), 27 (30%) astrocytomas (IDH mutated only), and 47 (52%) glioblastomas (IDH wild type only) were identified. TBR mean , TBR max , TTP and slope discriminated between IDH mutated astrocytomas and IDH wild type glioblastomas (P < 0.01). TBR mean showed the best diagnostic performance (cut-off 1.95; sensitivity, 89%; specificity, 67%; accuracy, 81%). None of the parameters discriminated between oligodendrogliomas (IDH mutated, 1p/19q co-deleted) and glioblastomas or astrocytomas. Furthermore, TBR mean , TBR max , TTP, and slope discriminated between gliomas with and without IDH mutation (p < 0.01). The best diagnostic performance was obtained for the combination of TTP with TBR max or slope (accuracy, 73%). Data suggest that static and dynamic 18 F-FET PET parameters may allow determining non-invasively the IDH mutation status. However, IDH mutated and 1p/19q co-deleted oligodendrogliomas cannot be differentiated from glioblastomas and astrocytomas by 18 F-FET PET. (orig.)

  19. Quantitative analysis of 18F-NaF dynamic PET/CT cannot differentiate malignant from benign lesions in multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachpekidis, Christos; Hillengass, Jens; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Anwar, Hoda; Haberkorn, Uwe; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2017-01-01

    A renewed interest has been recently developed for the highly sensitive bone-seeking radiopharmaceutical 18 F-NaF. Aim of the present study is to evaluate the potential utility of quantitative analysis of 18 F-NaF dynamic PET/CT data in differentiating malignant from benign degenerative lesions in multiple myeloma (MM). 80 MM patients underwent whole-body PET/CT and dynamic PET/CT scanning of the pelvis with 18 F-NaF. PET/CT data evaluation was based on visual (qualitative) assessment, semi-quantitative (SUV) calculations, and absolute quantitative estimations after application of a 2-tissue compartment model and a non-compartmental approach leading to the extraction of fractal dimension (FD). In total 263 MM lesions were demonstrated on 18 F-NaF PET/CT. Semi-quantitative and quantitative evaluations were performed for 25 MM lesions as well as for 25 benign, degenerative and traumatic lesions. Mean SUV average for MM lesions was 11.9 and mean SUV max was 23.2. Respectively, SUV average and SUV max for degenerative lesions were 13.5 and 20.2. Kinetic analysis of 18 F-NaF revealed the following mean values for MM lesions: K 1 = 0.248 (1/min), k 3 = 0.359 (1/min), influx (K i ) = 0.107 (1/min), FD = 1.382, while the respective values for degenerative lesions were: K 1 = 0.169 (1/min), k 3 = 0.422 (1/min), influx (K i ) = 0.095 (1/min), FD = 1. 411. No statistically significant differences between MM and benign degenerative disease regarding SUV average , SUV max , K 1 , k 3 and influx (K i ) were demonstrated. FD was significantly higher in degenerative than in malignant lesions. The present findings show that quantitative analysis of 18 F-NaF PET data cannot differentiate malignant from benign degenerative lesions in MM patients, supporting previously published results, which reflect the limited role of 18 F-NaF PET/CT in the diagnostic workup of MM.

  20. Quantitative PET image reconstruction employing nested expectation-maximization deconvolution for motion compensation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A.; Tsoumpas, Charalampos; Zaidi, Habib

    Bulk body motion may randomly occur during PET acquisitions introducing blurring, attenuation emission mismatches and, in dynamic PET, discontinuities in the measured time activity curves between consecutive frames. Meanwhile, dynamic PET scans are longer, thus increasing the probability of bulk

  1. PET Imaging on Dynamic Metabolic Changes after Combination Therapy of Paclitaxel and the Traditional Chinese Medicine in Breast Cancer-Bearing Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yao; Wang, Ling; Liu, Hao; Song, Fahuan; Xu, Caiyun; Zhang, Kai; Chen, Qing; Wu, Shuang; Zhu, Yunqi; Dong, Ying; Zhou, Min; Zhang, Hong; Tian, Mei

    2018-04-01

    The aim of the study was to non-invasively evaluate the anticancer activity of a traditional Chinese medicine-Huaier, combined with paclitaxel (PTX) in breast cancer bearing mice by detecting dynamic metabolic changes with positron emission tomography (PET). Balb/c nude mice were randomly divided into one of the four groups: Huaier, PTX, PTX + Huaier, or the control. PET imaging with 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]fluoro-D-glucose ([ 18 F]FDG) was performed to monitor the metabolic changes in BT474 (luminal B) and MDA-MB-231 (triple-negative) breast cancer xenografts. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) study was performed immediately after the final PET scan to assess the expressions of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), phospho-AKT (p-AKT), caspase-3, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Compared to the control group, [ 18 F]FDG accumulation demonstrated a significant decrease in PTX + Huaier (p PET imaging could be a potential non-invasive approach to assess the metabolic changes after chemotherapy combined with traditional Chinese medicine in the breast cancer.

  2. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI versus 18F-FDG PET/CT: Which is better in differentiation between malignant and benign solitary pulmonary nodules?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Feng; Qiang, Fulin; Shen, Aijun; Shi, Donghui; Fu, Aiyan; Li, Haiming; Zhang, Mingzhu; Xia, Ganlin; Cao, Peng

    2018-02-01

    To prospectively compare the discriminative capacity of dynamic contrast enhanced-magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) with that of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in the differentiation of malignant and benign solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs). Forty-nine patients with SPNs were included in this prospective study. Thirty-two of the patients had malignant SPNs, while the other 17 had benign SPNs. All these patients underwent DCE-MRI and 18 F-FDG PET/CT examinations. The quantitative MRI pharmacokinetic parameters, including the trans-endothelial transfer constant (K trans ), redistribution rate constant (K ep ), and fractional volume (V e ), were calculated using the Extended-Tofts Linear two-compartment model. The 18 F-FDG PET/CT parameter, maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ), was also measured. Spearman's correlations were calculated between the MRI pharmacokinetic parameters and the SUV max of each SPN. These parameters were statistically compared between the malignant and benign nodules. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses were used to compare the diagnostic capability between the DCE-MRI and 18 F-FDG PET/CT indexes. Positive correlations were found between K trans and SUV max , and between K ep and SUV max (P0.05). DCE-MRI can be used to differentiate between benign and malignant SPNs and has the advantage of being radiation free.

  3. Response assessment of stereotactic body radiation therapy using dynamic contrast-enhanced integrated MR-PET in non-small cell lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Sen; Chen, Jenny Ling-Yu; Hsu, Feng-Ming; Huang, Jei-Yie; Ko, Wei-Chun; Chen, Yi-Chang; Jaw, Fu-Shan; Yen, Ruoh-Fang; Chang, Yeun-Chung

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the response in patients undergoing SBRT using dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) integrated magnetic resonance positron emission tomography (MR-PET). Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is efficacious as a front-line local treatment for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We prospectively enrolled 19 lung tumors in 17 nonmetastatic NSCLC patients who were receiving SBRT as a primary treatment. They underwent DCE-integrated 3T MR-PET before and 6 weeks after SBRT. The following image parameters were analyzed: tumor size, standardized uptake value (SUV), apparent diffusion coefficient, K trans , k ep , v e , v p , and iAUC 60 . Chest computed tomography (CT) was performed at 3 months after SBRT. SBRT treatment led to tumor changes including significant decreases in the SUV max (-61%, P PET SUV max was correlated with the MR k ep mean (P = 0.002) and k ep SD (P 10 (P = 0.083). In patients with NSCLC who are receiving SBRT, DCE-integrated MR-PET can be used to evaluate the response after SBRT and to predict the local treatment outcome. 2 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018;47:191-199. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  4. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI versus 18F-FDG PET/CT: Which is better in differentiation between malignant and benign solitary pulmonary nodules?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Feng; Qiang, Fulin; Shen, Aijun; Shi, Donghui; Fu, Aiyan; Li, Haiming; Zhang, Mingzhu; Xia, Ganlin; Cao, Peng

    2018-01-01

    Objective To prospectively compare the discriminative capacity of dynamic contrast enhanced-magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) with that of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in the differentiation of malignant and benign solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs). Methods Forty-nine patients with SPNs were included in this prospective study. Thirty-two of the patients had malignant SPNs, while the other 17 had benign SPNs. All these patients underwent DCE-MRI and 18F-FDG PET/CT examinations. The quantitative MRI pharmacokinetic parameters, including the trans-endothelial transfer constant (Ktrans), redistribution rate constant (Kep), and fractional volume (Ve), were calculated using the Extended-Tofts Linear two-compartment model. The 18F-FDG PET/CT parameter, maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), was also measured. Spearman’s correlations were calculated between the MRI pharmacokinetic parameters and the SUVmax of each SPN. These parameters were statistically compared between the malignant and benign nodules. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses were used to compare the diagnostic capability between the DCE-MRI and 18F-FDG PET/CT indexes. Results Positive correlations were found between Ktrans and SUVmax, and between Kep and SUVmax (P0.05). Conclusions DCE-MRI can be used to differentiate between benign and malignant SPNs and has the advantage of being radiation free. PMID:29545716

  5. Assessment of input function distortions on kinetic model parameters in simulated dynamic 82Rb PET perfusion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Carsten; Peligrad, Dragos-Nicolae; Weibrecht, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Cardiac 82 rubidium dynamic PET studies allow quantifying absolute myocardial perfusion by using tracer kinetic modeling. Here, the accurate measurement of the input function, i.e. the tracer concentration in blood plasma, is a major challenge. This measurement is deteriorated by inappropriate temporal sampling, spillover, etc. Such effects may influence the measured input peak value and the measured blood pool clearance. The aim of our study is to evaluate the effect of input function distortions on the myocardial perfusion as estimated by the model. To this end, we simulate noise-free myocardium time activity curves (TACs) with a two-compartment kinetic model. The input function to the model is a generic analytical function. Distortions of this function have been introduced by varying its parameters. Using the distorted input function, the compartment model has been fitted to the simulated myocardium TAC. This analysis has been performed for various sets of model parameters covering a physiologically relevant range. The evaluation shows that ±10% error in the input peak value can easily lead to ±10-25% error in the model parameter K 1 , which relates to myocardial perfusion. Variations in the input function tail are generally less relevant. We conclude that an accurate estimation especially of the plasma input peak is crucial for a reliable kinetic analysis and blood flow estimation

  6. Complementary frame reconstruction: a low-biased dynamic PET technique for low count density data in projection space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Inki; Cho, Sanghee; Michel, Christian J; Casey, Michael E; Schaefferkoetter, Joshua D

    2014-01-01

    A new data handling method is presented for improving the image noise distribution and reducing bias when reconstructing very short frames from low count dynamic PET acquisition. The new method termed ‘Complementary Frame Reconstruction’ (CFR) involves the indirect formation of a count-limited emission image in a short frame through subtraction of two frames with longer acquisition time, where the short time frame data is excluded from the second long frame data before the reconstruction. This approach can be regarded as an alternative to the AML algorithm recently proposed by Nuyts et al, as a method to reduce the bias for the maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) reconstruction of count limited data. CFR uses long scan emission data to stabilize the reconstruction and avoids modification of algorithms such as MLEM. The subtraction between two long frame images, naturally allows negative voxel values and significantly reduces bias introduced in the final image. Simulations based on phantom and clinical data were used to evaluate the accuracy of the reconstructed images to represent the true activity distribution. Applicability to determine the arterial input function in human and small animal studies is also explored. In situations with limited count rate, e.g. pediatric applications, gated abdominal, cardiac studies, etc., or when using limited doses of short-lived isotopes such as 15 O-water, the proposed method will likely be preferred over independent frame reconstruction to address bias and noise issues. (paper)

  7. Pet Overpopulation: An Economic Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen Coate; Brian Knight

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of pet overpopulation. It develops a tractable dynamic model whose positive predictions square well with key features of the current U.S. market for pets. The model is used to understand, from a welfare economic perspective, the sense in which there is \\overpopulation" of pets and the underlying causes of the problem. The paper also employs the model to consider what policies might be implemented to deal with the problem. A calibrated example is developed to i...

  8. The 2D Hotelling filter - a quantitative noise-reducing principal-component filter for dynamic PET data, with applications in patient dose reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axelsson, Jan; Sörensen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we apply the principal-component analysis filter (Hotelling filter) to reduce noise from dynamic positron-emission tomography (PET) patient data, for a number of different radio-tracer molecules. We furthermore show how preprocessing images with this filter improves parametric images created from such dynamic sequence. We use zero-mean unit variance normalization, prior to performing a Hotelling filter on the slices of a dynamic time-series. The Scree-plot technique was used to determine which principal components to be rejected in the filter process. This filter was applied to [ 11 C]-acetate on heart and head-neck tumors, [ 18 F]-FDG on liver tumors and brain, and [ 11 C]-Raclopride on brain. Simulations of blood and tissue regions with noise properties matched to real PET data, was used to analyze how quantitation and resolution is affected by the Hotelling filter. Summing varying parts of a 90-frame [ 18 F]-FDG brain scan, we created 9-frame dynamic scans with image statistics comparable to 20 MBq, 60 MBq and 200 MBq injected activity. Hotelling filter performed on slices (2D) and on volumes (3D) were compared. The 2D Hotelling filter reduces noise in the tissue uptake drastically, so that it becomes simple to manually pick out regions-of-interest from noisy data. 2D Hotelling filter introduces less bias than 3D Hotelling filter in focal Raclopride uptake. Simulations show that the Hotelling filter is sensitive to typical blood peak in PET prior to tissue uptake have commenced, introducing a negative bias in early tissue uptake. Quantitation on real dynamic data is reliable. Two examples clearly show that pre-filtering the dynamic sequence with the Hotelling filter prior to Patlak-slope calculations gives clearly improved parametric image quality. We also show that a dramatic dose reduction can be achieved for Patlak slope images without changing image quality or quantitation. The 2D Hotelling-filtering of dynamic PET data is a computer

  9. Multimodality functional imaging of spontaneous canine tumors using 64Cu-ATSM and 18FDG PET/CT and dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, Anders E.; Kristensen, Annemarie T.; Law, Ian; McEvoy, Fintan J.; Kjær, Andreas; Engelholm, Svend A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the distribution and uptake of the hypoxia tracer 64 Cu-diacetyl-bis(N 4 -methylthiosemicarbazone) ( 64 Cu-ATSM) PET/CT, FDG PET/CT and dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion CT (DCE-pCT) in spontaneous canine tumors. In addition 64 Cu-ATSM distribution over time was evaluated. Methods and materials: Nine spontaneous cancer-bearing dogs were prospectively enrolled. FDG (1 h pi.) and 64 Cu-ATSM (3 and 24 h pi.) PET/CT were performed over three consecutive days. DCE-pCT was performed on day 2. Tumor uptake of FDG and 64 Cu-ATSM was assessed semi-quantitatively and the distribution of FDG, 64 Cu-ATSM and CT perfusion parameters correlated. Results: 64 Cu-ATSM distribution on scans performed 24 h apart displayed moderate to strong correlation; however, temporal changes were observed. The spatial distribution pattern of 64 Cu-ATSM between scans was moderately to strongly positively correlated to FDG, whereas the correlation of CT perfusion parameters to FDG and to 64 Cu-ATSM yielded more varying results. Conclusions: 64 Cu-ATSM uptake was positively correlated to FDG. 64 Cu-ATSM was found to be relatively stable between PET scans performed at different time points, important temporal changes were however observed in hypo-perfused regions. These findings potentially indicate that prolonged uptake periods for 64 Cu-ATSM imaging may be needed. Although a moderate to strong correlation between 64 Cu-ATSM and FDG PET/CT is observed, the two tracers provide different biological information with an overlapping spatial distribution.

  10. 18 F-FDG PET/CT早期动态显像的应用研究%Value of early dynamic 18 F-FDG PET/CT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王绍波; 王全师; 季云海

    2017-01-01

    The early dynamic 18 F⁃FDG PET/CT can reflect perfusion, bio⁃distribution, uptake and excretion of 18 F⁃FDG in certain organs ( or lesions) in the early phase post injection. This imaging technique could be used to evaluate the organ ( or lesion) perfusion and to serve as a supplement for conventional 18 F⁃FDG PET/CT in the evaluation of glucose metabolism. This review summarizes the basic principle, imaging methods and clinical application of early dynamic 18 F⁃FDG PET/CT.%18 F⁃FDG PET/CT早期动态显像可反映18 F⁃FDG进入体内后随血流运行的最初时间段内被脏器(或病变组织)摄取及排泄的情况,其可作为18 F⁃FDG PET/CT常规显像的有益补充,用于评估脏器(或病灶组织)的血流灌注。笔者对18 F⁃FDG PET/CT早期动态显像的基本原理、显像方法及其临床应用进行综述。

  11. Effects of motion correction for dynamic [{sup 11}C]Raclopride brain PET data on the evaluation of endogenous dopamine release in striatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Sung; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Cho, Sang Soo; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Yearn Seong [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Eun Joo [Kangwon University, Chunchon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-10-15

    Neuroreceptor PET studies require 60-120 minutes to complete and head motion of the subject during the PET scan increases the uncertainty in measured activity. In this study, we investigated the effects of the data-driven head motion correction on the evaluation of endogenous dopamine release (DAR) in the striatum during the motor task which might have caused significant head motion artifact. [{sup 11}C]raclopride PET scans on 4 normal volunteers acquired with bolus plus constant infusion protocol were retrospectively analyzed. Following the 50 min resting period, the participants played a video game with a momentary reward for 40 min. Dynamic frames acquired during the equilibrium condition (pre-task: 30-50 min, task: 70-90 min, post-task:110-120 min) were realigned to the first frame in pre-task condition. Intra-condition registrations between the frames were performed, and average image for each condition was created and registered to the pre-task image (inter-condition registration). Pre-task PET image was then co-registered to own MRI of each participant and transformation parameters were reapplied to the others. Volumes of interest (VOI) for dorsal putamen (PU) and caudate (CA), ventral striatum (VS), and cerebellum were defined on the MRI. Binding potential (BP) was measured and DAR was calculated as the percent change of BP during and after the task. SPM analyses on the BP parametric images were also performed to explore the regional difference in the effects of head motion on BP and DAR estimation. Changes in position and orientation of the striatum during the PET scans were observed before the head motion correction. BP values at pre-task condition were not changed significantly after the intra-condition registration. However, the BP values during and after the task and DAR were significantly changed after the correction. SPM analysis also showed that the extent and significance of the BP differences were significantly changed by the head motion

  12. Effects of motion correction for dynamic [11C]Raclopride brain PET data on the evaluation of endogenous dopamine release in striatum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Sung; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Cho, Sang Soo; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Kim, Sang Eun; Choe, Yearn Seong; Kang, Eun Joo

    2005-01-01

    Neuroreceptor PET studies require 60-120 minutes to complete and head motion of the subject during the PET scan increases the uncertainty in measured activity. In this study, we investigated the effects of the data-driven head motion correction on the evaluation of endogenous dopamine release (DAR) in the striatum during the motor task which might have caused significant head motion artifact. [ 11 C]raclopride PET scans on 4 normal volunteers acquired with bolus plus constant infusion protocol were retrospectively analyzed. Following the 50 min resting period, the participants played a video game with a momentary reward for 40 min. Dynamic frames acquired during the equilibrium condition (pre-task: 30-50 min, task: 70-90 min, post-task:110-120 min) were realigned to the first frame in pre-task condition. Intra-condition registrations between the frames were performed, and average image for each condition was created and registered to the pre-task image (inter-condition registration). Pre-task PET image was then co-registered to own MRI of each participant and transformation parameters were reapplied to the others. Volumes of interest (VOI) for dorsal putamen (PU) and caudate (CA), ventral striatum (VS), and cerebellum were defined on the MRI. Binding potential (BP) was measured and DAR was calculated as the percent change of BP during and after the task. SPM analyses on the BP parametric images were also performed to explore the regional difference in the effects of head motion on BP and DAR estimation. Changes in position and orientation of the striatum during the PET scans were observed before the head motion correction. BP values at pre-task condition were not changed significantly after the intra-condition registration. However, the BP values during and after the task and DAR were significantly changed after the correction. SPM analysis also showed that the extent and significance of the BP differences were significantly changed by the head motion correction

  13. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT imaging versus dynamic contrast-enhanced CT for staging and prognosis of inflammatory breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Champion, Laurence; Edeline, Veronique; Giraudet, Anne-Laure; Wartski, Myriam [Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Saint-Cloud (France); Lerebours, Florence [Service d' Oncologie Medicale, Saint-Cloud (France); Cherel, Pascal [Institut Curie, Hopital Rene Huguenin, Service de Radiologie, Saint-Cloud (France); Bellet, Dominique [Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Saint-Cloud (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Pharmacologie Chimique et Genetique and Imagerie, Inserm U1022 CNRS UMR 8151, Faculte des sciences pharmaceutiques et biologiques, Paris (France); Alberini, Jean-Louis [Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Saint-Cloud (France); Universite Versailles Saint-Quentin, Faculte de medecine, Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines (France)

    2013-08-15

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most aggressive type of breast cancer with a poor prognosis. Locoregional staging is based on dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) CT or MRI. The aim of this study was to compare the performances of FDG PET/CT and DCE CT in locoregional staging of IBC and to assess their respective prognostic values. The study group comprised 50 women (median age: 51 {+-} 11 years) followed in our institution for IBC who underwent FDG PET/CT and DCE CT scans (median interval 5 {+-} 9 days). CT enhancement parameters were net maximal enhancement, net early enhancement and perfusion. The PET/CT scans showed intense FDG uptake in all primary tumours. Concordance rate between PET/CT and DCE CT for breast tumour localization was 92 %. No significant correlation was found between SUVmax and CT enhancement parameters in primary tumours (p > 0.6). PET/CT and DCE CT results were poorly correlated for skin infiltration (kappa = 0.19). Ipsilateral foci of increased axillary FDG uptake were found in 47 patients (median SUV: 7.9 {+-} 5.4), whereas enlarged axillary lymph nodes were observed on DCE CT in 43 patients. Results for axillary node involvement were fairly well correlated (kappa = 0.55). Nineteen patients (38 %) were found to be metastatic on PET/CT scan with a significant shorter progression-free survival than patients without distant lesions (p = 0.01). In the primary tumour, no statistically significant difference was observed between high and moderate tumour FDG uptake on survival, using an SUVmax cut-off of 5 (p = 0.7 and 0.9), or between high and low tumour enhancement on DCE CT (p > 0.8). FDG PET/CT imaging provided additional information concerning locoregional involvement to that provided by DCE CT on and allowed detection of distant metastases in the same whole-body procedure. Tumour FDG uptake or CT enhancement parameters were not correlated and were not found to have any prognostic value. (orig.)

  14. Assessment of Lymph Nodes and Prostate Status Using Early Dynamic Curves with (18)F-Choline PET/CT in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Cédric; Ferrer, Ludovic; Carlier, Thomas; Colombié, Mathilde; Rusu, Daniela; Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise; Campion, Loic; Rousseau, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic image acquisition with (18)F-Choline [fluorocholine (FCH)] PET/CT in prostate cancer is mostly used to overcome the bladder repletion, which could obstruct the loco-regional analysis. The aim of our study was to analyze early dynamic FCH acquisitions to define pelvic lymph node or prostate pathological status. Retrospective analysis was performed on 39 patients for initial staging (n = 18), or after initial treatment (n = 21). Patients underwent 10-min dynamic acquisitions centered on the pelvis, after injection of 3-4 MBq/kg of FCH. Whole-body images were acquired about 1 h after injection using a PET/CT GE Discovery LS (GE-LS) or Siemens Biograph mCT (mCT). Maximum and mean SUV according to time were measured on nodal and prostatic lesions. SUVmean was corrected for partial volume effect (PVEC) with suitable recovery coefficients. The status of each lesion was based on histological results or patient follow-up (>6 months). A Mann-Whitney test and ANOVA were used to compare mean and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. The median PSA was 8.46 ng/mL and the median Gleason score was 3 + 4. Ninety-two lesions (43 lymph nodes and 49 prostate lesions) were analyzed, including 63 malignant lesions. In early dynamic acquisitions, the maximum and mean SUV were significantly higher, respectively, on mCT and GE-LS, in malignant versus benign lesions (p dynamic imaging using PET/CT FCH allowed prostate cancer detection in situations where proof of malignancy is difficult to obtain.

  15. Lung PET scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chest PET scan; Lung positron emission tomography; PET - chest; PET - lung; PET - tumor imaging; ... Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  16. An investigation of temporal regularization techniques for dynamic PET reconstructions using temporal splines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhaeghe, Jeroen; D'Asseler, Yves; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Staelens, Steven; Lemahieu, Ignace

    2007-01-01

    The use of a temporal B-spline basis for the reconstruction of dynamic positron emission tomography data was investigated. Maximum likelihood (ML) reconstructions using an expectation maximization framework and maximum A-posteriori (MAP) reconstructions using the generalized expectation maximization framework were evaluated. Different parameters of the B-spline basis of such as order, number of basis functions and knot placing were investigated in a reconstruction task using simulated dynamic list-mode data. We found that a higher order basis reduced both the bias and variance. Using a higher number of basis functions in the modeling of the time activity curves (TACs) allowed the algorithm to model faster changes of the TACs, however, the TACs became noisier. We have compared ML, Gaussian postsmoothed ML and MAP reconstructions. The noise level in the ML reconstructions was controlled by varying the number of basis functions. The MAP algorithm penalized the integrated squared curvature of the reconstructed TAC. The postsmoothed ML was always outperformed in terms of bias and variance properties by the MAP and ML reconstructions. A simple adaptive knot placing strategy was also developed and evaluated. It is based on an arc length redistribution scheme during the reconstruction. The free knot reconstruction allowed a more accurate reconstruction while reducing the noise level especially for fast changing TACs such as blood input functions. Limiting the number of temporal basis functions combined with the adaptive knot placing strategy is in this case advantageous for regularization purposes when compared to the other regularization techniques

  17. Spatiotemporal PET Imaging of Dynamic Metabolic Changes After Therapeutic Approaches of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells, Neuronal Stem Cells, and a Chinese Patent Medicine in Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Song, Fahuan; Xu, Caiyun; Liu, Hao; Wang, Zefeng; Li, Jinhui; Wu, Shuang; YehuaShen; Chen, Yao; Zhu, Yunqi; Du, Ruili; Tian, Mei

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to use spatiotemporal PET imaging to investigate the dynamic metabolic changes after a combined therapeutic approach of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), neuronal stem cells (NSCs), and Chinese patent medicine in a rat model of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. Cerebral ischemia was established by the middle cerebral artery occlusion approach. Thirty-six male rats were randomly assigned to 1 of the 6 groups: control phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), Chinese patent medicine (Qing-kai-ling [QKL]), induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), combination of iPSCs and QKL, neuronal stem cells (NSCs), and combination of NSCs and QKL. Serial (18)F-FDG small-animal PET imaging and neurofunctional tests were performed weekly. Autoradiographic imaging and immunohistochemical and immunofluorescent analyses were performed at 4 wk after stem cell transplantation. Compared with the PBS control group, significantly higher (18)F-FDG accumulations in the ipsilateral cerebral infarction were observed in 5 treatment groups from weeks 1-4. Interestingly, the most intensive (18)F-FDG accumulation was found in the NSCs + QKL group at week 1 but in the iPSCs + QKL group at week 4. The neurofunctional scores in the 5 treatment groups were significantly higher than that of the PBS group from week 3 to 4. In addition, there was a significant correlation between the PET imaging findings and neurofunctional recovery (P PET imaging with (18)F-FDG demonstrated dynamic metabolic and functional recovery after iPSCs or NSCs combined with QKL in a rat model of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. iPSCs or NSCs combined with Chinese medicine QKL seemed to be a better therapeutic approach than these stem cells used individually. © 2015 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  18. Identification of time-to-peak on dynamic 18F-FET-PET as a prognostic marker specifically in IDH1/2 mutant diffuse astrocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchorska, Bogdana; Giese, Armin; Biczok, Annamaria; Unterrainer, Marcus; Weller, Michael; Drexler, Mark; Bartenstein, Peter; Schüller, Ulrich; Tonn, Jörg-Christian; Albert, Nathalie L

    2018-01-22

    Stratification of glioma according to isocitrate dehydrogenase 1/2 (IDH1/2) mutation and 1p/19q codeletion status has gained major importance in the new World Health Organization (WHO) classification. Parameters derived from uptake dynamics of 18F-fluoro-ethyl-tyrosine PET (18F-FET-PET) such as minimal time-to-peak (TTPmin) allow discrimination between different prognostic glioma subgroups, too. The present study is aimed at exploring whether TTPmin analysis provides prognostic information beyond the WHO classification. Three hundred patients with newly diagnosed WHO 2007 grades II-IV gliomas with 18F-FET-PET imaging at diagnosis were grouped into 4 subgroups (IDH1/2 mut-1p/19q codel; IDH1/2 mut-1p/19q non-codel; IDH1/2 wildtype WHO grade II and III tumors; and glioblastoma). Clinical and imaging factors such as age, Karnofsky performance score, treatment, TTPmin, and maximal tumor-to-brain ratio (TBRmax) were analyzed with regard to progression-free and overall survival (PFS and OS) via univariate and multivariate regression analysis. PFS and OS were longest in the IDH1/2 mut-1p/19q codel subgroup, followed by IDH1/2 mut-1p/19q non-codel, IDH1/2 wildtype, and GBM (P 17.5 minutes (P PET-derived dynamic analysis defines prognostically distinct subgroups of IDH1/2 mutant-1p/19q non-codel gliomas which cannot be distinguished as yet by molecular marker analysis. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  19. The impact of prompt gamma compensation on myocardial blood flow measurements with rubidium-82 dynamic PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Ian S; Memmott, Matthew J; Tonge, Christine M; Arumugam, Parthiban

    2018-04-01

    Rubidium-82 myocardial perfusion imaging is a well-established technique for assessing myocardial ischemia. With continuing interest on myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial flow reserve (MFR) measurements, there is a requirement to fully appreciate the impact of technical aspects of the process. One such factor for rubidium-82 is prompt gamma compensation (PGC). This study aims to assess the impact of PGC on MBF and MFR calculated from dynamic Rb-82 data. Dynamic rest and stress images were acquired on a Siemens Biograph mCT and reconstructed with and without PGC in 50 patients (29 male). MBF and MFR were measured in the three main coronary territories as well as globally. With PGC, statistically significant reductions in MBF were observed in LAD (-6.9%), LCx (-4.8%), and globally (-6.5%) but only in obese patients. Significant increases in MBF were observed in RCA (+6.4%) in only nonobese patients. In very obese patients, differences of up to 40% in MBF were observed between PGC and non-PGC images. In nearly all cases, similar PGC differences were observed at stress and rest so there were no significant differences in MFR; however, in a small number of very obese patients, differences in excess of 20% were observed. PGC results in statistically significant changes in MBF, with the greatest reductions observed in the LAD and LCx territories of obese patients. In most cases, the impact on stress and rest data is of similar relative magnitudes and changes to MFR are small.

  20. Comparison of quantitatively analyzed dynamic area-detector CT using various mathematic methods with FDG PET/CT in management of solitary pulmonary nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Nishio, Mizuho; Koyama, Hisanobu; Fujisawa, Yasuko; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Sumiaki; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2013-06-01

    The objective of our study was to prospectively compare the capability of dynamic area-detector CT analyzed with different mathematic methods and PET/CT in the management of pulmonary nodules. Fifty-two consecutive patients with 96 pulmonary nodules underwent dynamic area-detector CT, PET/CT, and microbacterial or pathologic examinations. All nodules were classified into the following groups: malignant nodules (n = 57), benign nodules with low biologic activity (n = 15), and benign nodules with high biologic activity (n = 24). On dynamic area-detector CT, the total, pulmonary arterial, and systemic arterial perfusions were calculated using the dual-input maximum slope method; perfusion was calculated using the single-input maximum slope method; and extraction fraction and blood volume (BV) were calculated using the Patlak plot method. All indexes were statistically compared among the three nodule groups. Then, receiver operating characteristic analyses were used to compare the diagnostic capabilities of the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) and each perfusion parameter having a significant difference between malignant and benign nodules. Finally, the diagnostic performances of the indexes were compared by means of the McNemar test. No adverse effects were observed in this study. All indexes except extraction fraction and BV, both of which were calculated using the Patlak plot method, showed significant differences among the three groups (p method, pulmonary arterial perfusion calculated using the dual-input method, and perfusion calculated using the single-input method were significantly larger than that of SUVmax (p method (69.8%, p method has better potential for the diagnosis of pulmonary nodules than dynamic area-detector CT analyzed using other methods and than PET/CT.

  1. Analysis and interpretation of dynamic FDG PET oncological studies using data reduction techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Andres

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dynamic positron emission tomography studies produce a large amount of image data, from which clinically useful parametric information can be extracted using tracer kinetic methods. Data reduction methods can facilitate the initial interpretation and visual analysis of these large image sequences and at the same time can preserve important information and allow for basic feature characterization. Methods We have applied principal component analysis to provide high-contrast parametric image sets of lower dimensions than the original data set separating structures based on their kinetic characteristics. Our method has the potential to constitute an alternative quantification method, independent of any kinetic model, and is particularly useful when the retrieval of the arterial input function is complicated. In independent component analysis images, structures that have different kinetic characteristics are assigned opposite values, and are readily discriminated. Furthermore, novel similarity mapping techniques are proposed, which can summarize in a single image the temporal properties of the entire image sequence according to a reference region. Results Using our new cubed sum coefficient similarity measure, we have shown that structures with similar time activity curves can be identified, thus facilitating the detection of lesions that are not easily discriminated using the conventional method employing standardized uptake values.

  2. Physical performance evaluation of GE DST PET-CT and evaluation of characteristics in dynamic image acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B. I.; Kim, J. Y.; Min, J. J.; Song, H. C.; Bom, H. S.; Kim, J. S.; Lee, J. S.

    2005-01-01

    As a new standard for performance measurement, NEMA NU2-2001 was presented recently. In this study, we investigated the spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction, and noise equivalent count ratio (NECR) in order to know the information of physical characteristics and system performance. Bismuth germinate crystals (6 X 6 array, 6.3mm X 6.3mm X 30mm) were used in discovery ST (energy window: 375-650 keV, coincidence window: 11.7 nsec). To measure the sensitivity, five aluminum sleeves (Data Spectrum Corp., Chapel Hill, NC., USA, thickness:1.25 mm) -NEMA sensitivity phantom- filled with F-18 solution were used. Spatial resolution was estimated using a point source (F-18, 0.1 mCi). Data were acquired while the count reaches at 100,000 and another experiment was performed at a distance of one-fourth the axial extent of the FOV. Scatter fraction and NECR was tested. Dynamic data were acquired for 7 half-lives. And true to background ratio was averaged at last three frames when the random rate was as small as ignorable for the calculation of scatter fraction. Sensitivity was 1.79 cps/kBq (2D) and 9.84 cps/kBq (3D) at the center and 1.78 cps/kBq (2D) and 9.60 cps/kBq (3D) at 10 cm off from the center. Spatial resolution at center was 6.15 mm (2D), 6.16 mm (3D) transverse direction and 5.77 mm (2D) and 5.93 mm (3D) at axial direction. At 10 cm radius, resolution of transverse radial was 7.19 mm (2D) and 7.16 mm (3D) and transverse tangential was 6.81 mm (2D) and 6.80mm (3D). Scatter fraction was 45.1% in 3D mode. Peak true rate and NECR were 325.1 kcps at 30.1 kBq/cc and 59.3 kcps at 13.7 kBq/cc. Dynamic image acquisition and gating image acquisition were acquired successfully. The physical characteristics of PET-CT were investigated. The sensitivity of installed system in 3D mode was better than the result of published study. We anticipate this overall evaluated results could be used for the quantification and optimized image acquisition for clinical research

  3. Static and dynamic {sup 18}F-FET PET for the characterization of gliomas defined by IDH and 1p/19q status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verger, Antoine [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3, INM-4, INM-5), Juelich (Germany); Lorraine University, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Nancyclotep Imaging Platform, CHRU Nancy, Nancy (France); Lorraine University, IADI, INSERM, UMR 947, Nancy (France); Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Stoffels, Gabriele; Lohmann, Philipp; Neumaier, Bernd [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3, INM-4, INM-5), Juelich (Germany); Bauer, Elena K. [University Hospital Cologne, Department of Neurology, Cologne (Germany); Blau, Tobias [University Hospital Cologne, Department of Neuropathology, Cologne (Germany); Fink, Gereon R. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3, INM-4, INM-5), Juelich (Germany); University Hospital Cologne, Department of Neurology, Cologne (Germany); Shah, Nadim J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3, INM-4, INM-5), Juelich (Germany); RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Aachen (Germany); Section JARA-Brain, Juelich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), Juelich (Germany); Langen, Karl-Josef [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3, INM-4, INM-5), Juelich (Germany); Section JARA-Brain, Juelich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), Juelich (Germany); RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Galldiks, Norbert [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3, INM-4, INM-5), Juelich (Germany); University Hospital Cologne, Department of Neurology, Cologne (Germany); Universities of Cologne and Bonn, Center of Integrated Oncology (CIO), Cologne (Germany)

    2018-03-15

    The molecular features isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutation and 1p/19q co-deletion have gained major importance for both glioma typing and prognosis and have, therefore, been integrated in the World Health Organization (WHO) classification in 2016. The aim of this study was to characterize static and dynamic O-(2-{sup 18}F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine ({sup 18}F-FET) PET parameters in gliomas with or without IDH mutation or 1p/19q co-deletion. Ninety patients with newly diagnosed and untreated gliomas with a static and dynamic {sup 18}F-FET PET scan prior to evaluation of tumor tissue according to the 2016 WHO classification were identified retrospectively. Mean and maximum tumor-to-brain ratios (TBR{sub mean/max}), as well as dynamic parameters (time-to-peak and slope) of {sup 18}F-FET uptake were calculated. Sixteen (18%) oligodendrogliomas (IDH mutated, 1p/19q co-deleted), 27 (30%) astrocytomas (IDH mutated only), and 47 (52%) glioblastomas (IDH wild type only) were identified. TBR{sub mean}, TBR{sub max}, TTP and slope discriminated between IDH mutated astrocytomas and IDH wild type glioblastomas (P < 0.01). TBR{sub mean} showed the best diagnostic performance (cut-off 1.95; sensitivity, 89%; specificity, 67%; accuracy, 81%). None of the parameters discriminated between oligodendrogliomas (IDH mutated, 1p/19q co-deleted) and glioblastomas or astrocytomas. Furthermore, TBR{sub mean}, TBR{sub max}, TTP, and slope discriminated between gliomas with and without IDH mutation (p < 0.01). The best diagnostic performance was obtained for the combination of TTP with TBR{sub max} or slope (accuracy, 73%). Data suggest that static and dynamic {sup 18}F-FET PET parameters may allow determining non-invasively the IDH mutation status. However, IDH mutated and 1p/19q co-deleted oligodendrogliomas cannot be differentiated from glioblastomas and astrocytomas by {sup 18}F-FET PET. (orig.)

  4. Evaluation of a short dynamic 18F-fluoride PET/CT scanning method to assess bone metabolic activity in spinal orthopedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Marloes J M; Wierts, Roel; Jutten, Elisabeth M C; Halders, Servé G E A; Willems, Paul C P H; Brans, Boudewijn

    2015-11-01

    A complication after spinal fusion surgery is pseudarthrosis, but its radiological diagnosis is of limited value. (18)F-fluoride PET with its ability to assess bone metabolism activity could be of value. The goal of this study was to assess the clinical feasibility of calculating the static standardized uptake value (SUV) from a short dynamic scan without the use of blood sampling, thereby obtaining all dynamic and static parameters in a scan of only 30 min. This approach was tested on a retrospective patient population with persisting pain after spinal fusion surgery. In 16 patients, SUVs (SUV max, SUV mean) and kinetic parameters (K 1, k 2, k 3, v b, K i,NLR, K 1/k 2, k 3/(k 2 + k 3), K i,patlak) were derived from static and dynamic PET/CT scans of operated and control regions of the spine, after intravenous administration of 156-214 MBq (18)F-fluoride. Parameter differences between control and operated regions, as well as between pseudarthrosis and fused segments were evaluated. SUVmean at 30 and 60 min was calculated from kinetic parameters obtained from the dynamic data set (SUV mean,2TCM). Agreement between measured and calculated SUVs was evaluated through Bland-Altman plots. Overall, statistically significant differences between control and operated regions were observed for SUV max, SUV mean, K i,NLR, K i,patlak, K 1/k 2 and k 3/(k 2 + k 3). Diagnostic CT showed pseudarthrosis in 6/16 patients, while in 10/16 patients, segments were fused. Of all parameters, only those regarding the incorporation of bone [K i,NLR, K i,patlak, k 3/(k 2 + k 3)] differed statistically significant in the intervertebral disc space between the pseudarthrosis and fused patients group. The mean values of the patient-specific blood clearance rate [Formula: see text] differed statistically significant between the pseudarthrosis and the fusion group, with a p value of 0.011. This may correspond with the lack of statistical significance of the SUV values between pseudarthrosis and

  5. SU-E-QI-03: Compartment Modeling of Dynamic Brain PET - The Effect of Scatter and Random Corrections On Parameter Errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Häggström, I; Karlsson, M; Larsson, A; Schmidtlein, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of corrections for random and scattered coincidences on kinetic parameters in brain tumors, by using ten Monte Carlo (MC) simulated dynamic FLT-PET brain scans. Methods: The GATE MC software was used to simulate ten repetitions of a 1 hour dynamic FLT-PET scan of a voxelized head phantom. The phantom comprised six normal head tissues, plus inserted regions for blood and tumor tissue. Different time-activity-curves (TACs) for all eight tissue types were used in the simulation and were generated in Matlab using a 2-tissue model with preset parameter values (K1,k2,k3,k4,Va,Ki). The PET data was reconstructed into 28 frames by both ordered-subset expectation maximization (OSEM) and 3D filtered back-projection (3DFBP). Five image sets were reconstructed, all with normalization and different additional corrections C (A=attenuation, R=random, S=scatter): Trues (AC), trues+randoms (ARC), trues+scatters (ASC), total counts (ARSC) and total counts (AC). Corrections for randoms and scatters were based on real random and scatter sinograms that were back-projected, blurred and then forward projected and scaled to match the real counts. Weighted non-linearleast- squares fitting of TACs from the blood and tumor regions was used to obtain parameter estimates. Results: The bias was not significantly different for trues (AC), trues+randoms (ARC), trues+scatters (ASC) and total counts (ARSC) for either 3DFBP or OSEM (p<0.05). Total counts with only AC stood out however, with an up to 160% larger bias. In general, there was no difference in bias found between 3DFBP and OSEM, except in parameter Va and Ki. Conclusion: According to our results, the methodology of correcting the PET data for randoms and scatters performed well for the dynamic images where frames have much lower counts compared to static images. Generally, no bias was introduced by the corrections and their importance was emphasized since omitting them increased bias extensively

  6. Corrections of arterial input function for dynamic H215O PET to assess perfusion of pelvic tumours: arterial blood sampling versus image extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luedemann, L; Sreenivasa, G; Michel, R; Rosner, C; Plotkin, M; Felix, R; Wust, P; Amthauer, H

    2006-01-01

    Assessment of perfusion with 15 O-labelled water (H 2 15 O) requires measurement of the arterial input function (AIF). The arterial time activity curve (TAC) measured using the peripheral sampling scheme requires corrections for delay and dispersion. In this study, parametrizations with and without arterial spillover correction for fitting of the tissue curve are evaluated. Additionally, a completely noninvasive method for generation of the AIF from a dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) acquisition is applied to assess perfusion of pelvic tumours. This method uses a volume of interest (VOI) to extract the TAC from the femoral artery. The VOI TAC is corrected for spillover using a separate tissue TAC and for recovery by determining the recovery coefficient on a coregistered CT data set. The techniques were applied in five patients with pelvic tumours who underwent a total of 11 examinations. Delay and dispersion correction of the blood TAC without arterial spillover correction yielded in seven examinations solutions inconsistent with physiology. Correction of arterial spillover increased the fitting accuracy and yielded consistent results in all patients. Generation of an AIF from PET image data was investigated as an alternative to arterial blood sampling and was shown to have an intrinsic potential to determine the AIF noninvasively and reproducibly. The AIF extracted from a VOI in a dynamic PET scan was similar in shape to the blood AIF but yielded significantly higher tissue perfusion values (mean of 104.0 ± 52.0%) and lower partition coefficients (-31.6 ± 24.2%). The perfusion values and partition coefficients determined with the VOI technique have to be corrected in order to compare the results with those of studies using a blood AIF

  7. Temporal dynamics of cortical and subcortical responses to apomorphine in Parkinson disease: an H2(15)O PET study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosey, Lara A.; Thompson, Jennifer L. W.; Metman, Leonard Verhagen; van den Munckhof, Pepyn; Braun, Allen R.

    2005-01-01

    H2(15)O positron emission tomography (PET) was used to study the temporal course of central nervous system (CNS) responses to apomorphine in patients with idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD). Agonist-induced changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were evaluated within

  8. Kinetic modeling in PET imaging of hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Fan; Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær; Hansen, Anders E

    2014-01-01

    be used for non-invasive mapping of tissue oxygenation in vivo and several hypoxia specific PET tracers have been developed. Evaluation of PET data in the clinic is commonly based on visual assessment together with semiquantitative measurements e.g. standard uptake value (SUV). However, dynamic PET......Tumor hypoxia is associated with increased therapeutic resistance leading to poor treatment outcome. Therefore the ability to detect and quantify intratumoral oxygenation could play an important role in future individual personalized treatment strategies. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) can...... analysis for PET imaging of hypoxia....

  9. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) Combined with Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography (PET-CT) and Video-Electroencephalography (VEEG) Have Excellent Diagnostic Value in Preoperative Localization of Epileptic Foci in Children with Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gui-Bin; Long, Wei; Li, Xiao-Dong; Xu, Guang-Yin; Lu, Ji-Xiang

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND To investigate the effect that dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has on surgical decision making relative to video-electroencephalography (VEEG) and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT), and if the differences in these variables translates to differences in surgical outcomes. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 166 children with epilepsy undergoing preoperative DCE-MRI, VEEG, and PET-CT examinations, surgical resection of epileptic foci, and intraoperative electrocorticography (ECoG) monitoring were enrolled. All children were followed up for 12 months and grouped by Engles prognostic classification for epilepsy. Based on intraoperative ECoG as gold standard, the diagnostic values of DCE-MRI, VEEG, PET-CT, DCE-MRI combined with VEEG, DCE-MRI combined with PET-CT, and combined application of DCE-MRI, VEEG, and PET-CT in preoperative localization for epileptic foci were evaluated. RESULTS The sensitivity of DCE-MRI, VEEG, and PET-CT was 59.64%, 76.51%, and 93.98%, respectively; the accuracy of DCE-MRI, VEEG, PET-CT, DCE-MRI combined with VEEG, and DCE-MRI combined with PET-CT was 57.58%, 67.72%, 91.03%, 91.23%, and 96.49%, respectively. Localization accuracy rate of the combination of DCE-MRI, VEEG, and PET-CT was 98.25% (56/57), which was higher than that of DCE-MRI combined with VEEG and of DCE-MRI combined with PET-CT. No statistical difference was found in the accuracy rate of localization between these three combined techniques. During the 12-month follow-up, children were grouped into Engles grade I (n=106), II (n=31), III (n=21), and IV (n=8) according to postoperative conditions. CONCLUSIONS All DCE-MRI combined with VEEG, DCE-MRI combined with PET-CT, and DCE-MRI combined with VEEG and PET-CT examinations have excellent accuracy in preoperative localization of epileptic foci and present excellent postoperative efficiency, suggesting that these combined imaging methods are suitable for serving as the

  10. 18F-FET PET prior to recurrent high-grade glioma re-irradiation-additional prognostic value of dynamic time-to-peak analysis and early static summation images?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischmann, Daniel F; Unterrainer, Marcus; Bartenstein, Peter; Belka, Claus; Albert, Nathalie L; Niyazi, Maximilian

    2017-04-01

    Most high-grade gliomas (HGG) recur after initial multimodal therapy and re-irradiation (Re-RT) has been shown to be a valuable re-treatment option in selected patients. We evaluated the prognostic value of dynamic time-to-peak analysis and early static summation images in O-(2- 18 F-fluoroethyl)-l-tyrosine ( 18 F-FET) PET for patients treated with Re-RT ± concomitant bevacizumab. We retrospectively analyzed 72 patients suffering from recurrent HGG with 18 F-FET PET prior to Re-RT. PET analysis revealed the maximal tumor-to-background-ratio (TBR max ), the biological tumor volume, the number of PET-foci and pattern of time-activity-curves (TACs; increasing vs. decreasing). Furthermore, the novel PET parameters early TBR max (at 5-15 min post-injection) and minimal time-to-peak (TTP min ) were evaluated. Additional analysis was performed for gender, age, KPS, O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase methylation status, isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutational status, WHO grade and concomitant bevacizumab therapy. The influence of PET and clinical parameters on post-recurrence survival (PRS) was investigated. Shorter TTP min was related to shorter PRS after Re-RT with 6 months for TTP min  25 min (p = 0.027). TTP min had a significant impact on PRS both on univariate (p = 0.027; continuous) and multivariate analysis (p = 0.011; continuous). Other factors significantly related to PRS on multivariate analysis were increasing vs. decreasing TACs (p = 0.008) and Karnofsky Performance Score (p = 0.015; PET parameters were not significantly related to PRS on univariate analysis. Dynamic 18 F-FET PET with TTP min provides a high prognostic value for recurrent HGG prior to Re-RT, whereas early TBR max does not. Dynamic 18 F-FET PET using TTP min might help to personalize Re-RT treatment regimens in future through voxelwise TTP min analysis for dose painting purposes and PET-guided dose escalation.

  11. Spectral Clustering Predicts Tumor Tissue Heterogeneity Using Dynamic 18F-FDG PET: A Complement to the Standard Compartmental Modeling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katiyar, Prateek; Divine, Mathew R; Kohlhofer, Ursula; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Schölkopf, Bernhard; Pichler, Bernd J; Disselhorst, Jonathan A

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we described and validated an unsupervised segmentation algorithm for the assessment of tumor heterogeneity using dynamic 18 F-FDG PET. The aim of our study was to objectively evaluate the proposed method and make comparisons with compartmental modeling parametric maps and SUV segmentations using simulations of clinically relevant tumor tissue types. Methods: An irreversible 2-tissue-compartmental model was implemented to simulate clinical and preclinical 18 F-FDG PET time-activity curves using population-based arterial input functions (80 clinical and 12 preclinical) and the kinetic parameter values of 3 tumor tissue types. The simulated time-activity curves were corrupted with different levels of noise and used to calculate the tissue-type misclassification errors of spectral clustering (SC), parametric maps, and SUV segmentation. The utility of the inverse noise variance- and Laplacian score-derived frame weighting schemes before SC was also investigated. Finally, the SC scheme with the best results was tested on a dynamic 18 F-FDG measurement of a mouse bearing subcutaneous colon cancer and validated using histology. Results: In the preclinical setup, the inverse noise variance-weighted SC exhibited the lowest misclassification errors (8.09%-28.53%) at all noise levels in contrast to the Laplacian score-weighted SC (16.12%-31.23%), unweighted SC (25.73%-40.03%), parametric maps (28.02%-61.45%), and SUV (45.49%-45.63%) segmentation. The classification efficacy of both weighted SC schemes in the clinical case was comparable to the unweighted SC. When applied to the dynamic 18 F-FDG measurement of colon cancer, the proposed algorithm accurately identified densely vascularized regions from the rest of the tumor. In addition, the segmented regions and clusterwise average time-activity curves showed excellent correlation with the tumor histology. Conclusion: The promising results of SC mark its position as a robust tool for quantification of tumor

  12. Practical synthesis of 1-(2-Nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)-3-(tosyloxy)propan-2-yl acetate for the radiosynthesis of [{sup 18}F]-FMISO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Young Do; Lim, Seok Tae; Sohn, Myung Hee; Kim, Hee Kwon [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Molecular Imaging and Therapeutic Medicine Rese arch Center, CyclotronResearch Center, Biomedica l Research Institute, Chonbuk National University Medical School and Hospital,Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Seol, Eun Taek; Lee, Seung Jae [Dept. of Chemistry and Research Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chonbuk National University,Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Yong Ju [Dept. of Chemistry Chemical Engineering, Korea University of Technology and Education (KOREATECH),Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Hypoxia is related with many tumors due to a decreased oxygen condition. Novel synthesis for 1-(2-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)-3-(tosyloxy)propan-2-yl acetate for the radiosynthesis of the [{sup 18}F]-Flouromisonidazole ([{sup 18}F]-FMISO), a hypoxia imaging marker used in positron emission tomography, from the readily available starting material is described. In this approach, one-pot two-step syntheses were used for the preparation of the [{sup 18}F]-FMISO precursors that contain acetyl group. The mild reaction conditions and easy treatments are attractive features in this synthesis. This new synthetic route provides alternative choices for the preparation of hypoxia imaging marker.

  13. Quantitative PET of liver functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiding, Susanne; Sørensen, Michael; Frisch, Kim; Gormsen, Lars C; Munk, Ole Lajord

    2018-01-01

    Improved understanding of liver physiology and pathophysiology is urgently needed to assist the choice of new and upcoming therapeutic modalities for patients with liver diseases. In this review, we focus on functional PET of the liver: 1) Dynamic PET with 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]fluoro- D -galactose ( 18 F-FDGal) provides quantitative images of the hepatic metabolic clearance K met (mL blood/min/mL liver tissue) of regional and whole-liver hepatic metabolic function. Standard-uptake-value ( SUV ) from a static liver 18 F-FDGal PET/CT scan can replace K met and is currently used clinically. 2) Dynamic liver PET/CT in humans with 11 C-palmitate and with the conjugated bile acid tracer [ N -methyl- 11 C]cholylsarcosine ( 11 C-CSar) can distinguish between individual intrahepatic transport steps in hepatic lipid metabolism and in hepatic transport of bile acid from blood to bile, respectively, showing diagnostic potential for individual patients. 3) Standard compartment analysis of dynamic PET data can lead to physiological inconsistencies, such as a unidirectional hepatic clearance of tracer from blood ( K 1 ; mL blood/min/mL liver tissue) greater than the hepatic blood perfusion. We developed a new microvascular compartment model with more physiology, by including tracer uptake into the hepatocytes from the blood flowing through the sinusoids, backflux from hepatocytes into the sinusoidal blood, and re-uptake along the sinusoidal path. Dynamic PET data include information on liver physiology which cannot be extracted using a standard compartment model. In conclusion , SUV of non-invasive static PET with 18 F-FDGal provides a clinically useful measurement of regional and whole-liver hepatic metabolic function. Secondly, assessment of individual intrahepatic transport steps is a notable feature of dynamic liver PET.

  14. Quantitative PET of liver functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiding, Susanne; Sørensen, Michael; Frisch, Kim; Gormsen, Lars C; Munk, Ole Lajord

    2018-01-01

    Improved understanding of liver physiology and pathophysiology is urgently needed to assist the choice of new and upcoming therapeutic modalities for patients with liver diseases. In this review, we focus on functional PET of the liver: 1) Dynamic PET with 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-galactose (18F-FDGal) provides quantitative images of the hepatic metabolic clearance K met (mL blood/min/mL liver tissue) of regional and whole-liver hepatic metabolic function. Standard-uptake-value (SUV) from a static liver 18F-FDGal PET/CT scan can replace K met and is currently used clinically. 2) Dynamic liver PET/CT in humans with 11C-palmitate and with the conjugated bile acid tracer [N-methyl-11C]cholylsarcosine (11C-CSar) can distinguish between individual intrahepatic transport steps in hepatic lipid metabolism and in hepatic transport of bile acid from blood to bile, respectively, showing diagnostic potential for individual patients. 3) Standard compartment analysis of dynamic PET data can lead to physiological inconsistencies, such as a unidirectional hepatic clearance of tracer from blood (K 1; mL blood/min/mL liver tissue) greater than the hepatic blood perfusion. We developed a new microvascular compartment model with more physiology, by including tracer uptake into the hepatocytes from the blood flowing through the sinusoids, backflux from hepatocytes into the sinusoidal blood, and re-uptake along the sinusoidal path. Dynamic PET data include information on liver physiology which cannot be extracted using a standard compartment model. In conclusion, SUV of non-invasive static PET with 18F-FDGal provides a clinically useful measurement of regional and whole-liver hepatic metabolic function. Secondly, assessment of individual intrahepatic transport steps is a notable feature of dynamic liver PET. PMID:29755841

  15. Impact of time-of-flight on indirect 3D and direct 4D parametric image reconstruction in the presence of inconsistent dynamic PET data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotasidis, F. A.; Mehranian, A.; Zaidi, H.

    2016-05-01

    Kinetic parameter estimation in dynamic PET suffers from reduced accuracy and precision when parametric maps are estimated using kinetic modelling following image reconstruction of the dynamic data. Direct approaches to parameter estimation attempt to directly estimate the kinetic parameters from the measured dynamic data within a unified framework. Such image reconstruction methods have been shown to generate parametric maps of improved precision and accuracy in dynamic PET. However, due to the interleaving between the tomographic and kinetic modelling steps, any tomographic or kinetic modelling errors in certain regions or frames, tend to spatially or temporally propagate. This results in biased kinetic parameters and thus limits the benefits of such direct methods. Kinetic modelling errors originate from the inability to construct a common single kinetic model for the entire field-of-view, and such errors in erroneously modelled regions could spatially propagate. Adaptive models have been used within 4D image reconstruction to mitigate the problem, though they are complex and difficult to optimize. Tomographic errors in dynamic imaging on the other hand, can originate from involuntary patient motion between dynamic frames, as well as from emission/transmission mismatch. Motion correction schemes can be used, however, if residual errors exist or motion correction is not included in the study protocol, errors in the affected dynamic frames could potentially propagate either temporally, to other frames during the kinetic modelling step or spatially, during the tomographic step. In this work, we demonstrate a new strategy to minimize such error propagation in direct 4D image reconstruction, focusing on the tomographic step rather than the kinetic modelling step, by incorporating time-of-flight (TOF) within a direct 4D reconstruction framework. Using ever improving TOF resolutions (580 ps, 440 ps, 300 ps and 160 ps), we demonstrate that direct 4D TOF image

  16. Novel system using microliter order sample volume for measuring arterial radioactivity concentrations in whole blood and plasma for mouse PET dynamic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yuichi; Seki, Chie; Hashizume, Nobuya; Yamada, Takashi; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Nishimoto, Takahiro; Hatano, Kentaro; Kitamura, Keishi; Toyama, Hiroshi; Kanno, Iwao

    2013-11-21

    This study aimed to develop a new system, named CD-Well, for mouse PET dynamic study. CD-Well allows the determination of time-activity curves (TACs) for arterial whole blood and plasma using 2-3 µL of blood per sample; the minute sample size is ideal for studies in small animals. The system has the following merits: (1) measures volume and radioactivity of whole blood and plasma separately; (2) allows measurements at 10 s intervals to capture initial rapid changes in the TAC; and (3) is compact and easy to handle, minimizes blood loss from sampling, and delay and dispersion of the TAC. CD-Well has 36 U-shaped channels. A drop of blood is sampled into the opening of the channel and stored there. After serial sampling is completed, CD-Well is centrifuged and scanned using a flatbed scanner to define the regions of plasma and blood cells. The length measured is converted to volume because the channels have a precise and uniform cross section. Then, CD-Well is exposed to an imaging plate to measure radioactivity. Finally, radioactivity concentrations are computed. We evaluated the performance of CD-Well in in vitro measurement and in vivo (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose and [(11)C]2-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-fluorophenyl) tropane studies. In in vitro evaluation, per cent differences (mean±SE) from manual measurement were 4.4±3.6% for whole blood and 4.0±3.5% for plasma across the typical range of radioactivity measured in mouse dynamic study. In in vivo studies, reasonable TACs were obtained. The peaks were captured well, and the time courses coincided well with the TAC derived from PET imaging of the heart chamber. The total blood loss was less than 200 µL, which had no physiological effect on the mice. CD-Well demonstrates satisfactory performance, and is useful for mouse PET dynamic study.

  17. Pet Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... companionship and a feeling of safety to your life. Before getting a pet, think carefully about which ... Gaining or losing a lot of weight quickly Strange behavior Being sluggish and tired Trouble getting up ...

  18. A quantum dynamical study of the rotation of the dihydrogen ligand in the Fe(H)2(H2)(PEtPh2)3 coordination complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Megan E.; Eckert, Juergen; Aquino, Adelia J. A.; Poirier, Bill

    2018-04-01

    Progress in the hydrogen fuel field requires a clear understanding and characterization of how materials of interest interact with hydrogen. Due to the inherently quantum mechanical nature of hydrogen nuclei, any theoretical studies of these systems must be treated quantum dynamically. One class of material that has been examined in this context are dihydrogen complexes. Since their discovery by Kubas in 1984, many such complexes have been studied both experimentally and theoretically. This particular study examines the rotational dynamics of the dihydrogen ligand in the Fe(H)2(H2)(PEtPh2)3 complex, allowing for full motion in both the rotational degrees of freedom and treating the quantum dynamics (QD) explicitly. A "gas-phase" global potential energy surface is first constructed using density functional theory with the Becke, 3-parameter, Lee-Yang-Parr functional; this is followed by an exact QD calculation of the corresponding rotation/libration states. The results provide insight into the dynamical correlation of the two rotation angles as well as a comprehensive analysis of both ground- and excited-state librational tunneling splittings. The latter was computed to be 6.914 cm-1—in excellent agreement with the experimental value of 6.4 cm-1. This work represents the first full-dimensional ab initio exact QD calculation ever performed for dihydrogen ligand rotation in a coordination complex.

  19. Pet Allergy Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatments ▸ Allergies ▸ Pet Allergy ▸ Pet Allergy Quiz Share | Pet Allergy Quiz More than half of U.S. households ... cat family. Yet, millions of people suffer from pet allergies. Take this quiz to test your knowledge ...

  20. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs

  1. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs.

  2. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

  3. Competitive advantage of PET/MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jadvar, Hossein, E-mail: jadvar@usc.edu; Colletti, Patrick M.

    2014-01-15

    Multimodality imaging has made great strides in the imaging evaluation of patients with a variety of diseases. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is now established as the imaging modality of choice in many clinical conditions, particularly in oncology. While the initial development of combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) was in the preclinical arena, hybrid PET/MR scanners are now available for clinical use. PET/MRI combines the unique features of MRI including excellent soft tissue contrast, diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, fMRI and other specialized sequences as well as MR spectroscopy with the quantitative physiologic information that is provided by PET. Most evidence for the potential clinical utility of PET/MRI is based on studies performed with side-by-side comparison or software-fused MRI and PET images. Data on distinctive utility of hybrid PET/MRI are rapidly emerging. There are potential competitive advantages of PET/MRI over PET/CT. In general, PET/MRI may be preferred over PET/CT where the unique features of MRI provide more robust imaging evaluation in certain clinical settings. The exact role and potential utility of simultaneous data acquisition in specific research and clinical settings will need to be defined. It may be that simultaneous PET/MRI will be best suited for clinical situations that are disease-specific, organ-specific, related to diseases of the children or in those patients undergoing repeated imaging for whom cumulative radiation dose must be kept as low as reasonably achievable. PET/MRI also offers interesting opportunities for use of dual modality probes. Upon clear definition of clinical utility, other important and practical issues related to business operational model, clinical workflow and reimbursement will also be resolved.

  4. Competitive advantage of PET/MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadvar, Hossein; Colletti, Patrick M

    2014-01-01

    Multimodality imaging has made great strides in the imaging evaluation of patients with a variety of diseases. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is now established as the imaging modality of choice in many clinical conditions, particularly in oncology. While the initial development of combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) was in the preclinical arena, hybrid PET/MR scanners are now available for clinical use. PET/MRI combines the unique features of MRI including excellent soft tissue contrast, diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, fMRI and other specialized sequences as well as MR spectroscopy with the quantitative physiologic information that is provided by PET. Most evidence for the potential clinical utility of PET/MRI is based on studies performed with side-by-side comparison or software-fused MRI and PET images. Data on distinctive utility of hybrid PET/MRI are rapidly emerging. There are potential competitive advantages of PET/MRI over PET/CT. In general, PET/MRI may be preferred over PET/CT where the unique features of MRI provide more robust imaging evaluation in certain clinical settings. The exact role and potential utility of simultaneous data acquisition in specific research and clinical settings will need to be defined. It may be that simultaneous PET/MRI will be best suited for clinical situations that are disease-specific, organ-specific, related to diseases of the children or in those patients undergoing repeated imaging for whom cumulative radiation dose must be kept as low as reasonably achievable. PET/MRI also offers interesting opportunities for use of dual modality probes. Upon clear definition of clinical utility, other important and practical issues related to business operational model, clinical workflow and reimbursement will also be resolved. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Competitive advantage of PET/MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jadvar, Hossein; Colletti, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Multimodality imaging has made great strides in the imaging evaluation of patients with a variety of diseases. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is now established as the imaging modality of choice in many clinical conditions, particularly in oncology. While the initial development of combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) was in the preclinical arena, hybrid PET/MR scanners are now available for clinical use. PET/MRI combines the unique features of MRI including excellent soft tissue contrast, diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, fMRI and other specialized sequences as well as MR spectroscopy with the quantitative physiologic information that is provided by PET. Most evidence for the potential clinical utility of PET/MRI is based on studies performed with side-by-side comparison or software-fused MRI and PET images. Data on distinctive utility of hybrid PET/MRI are rapidly emerging. There are potential competitive advantages of PET/MRI over PET/CT. In general, PET/MRI may be preferred over PET/CT where the unique features of MRI provide more robust imaging evaluation in certain clinical settings. The exact role and potential utility of simultaneous data acquisition in specific research and clinical settings will need to be defined. It may be that simultaneous PET/MRI will be best suited for clinical situations that are disease-specific, organ-specific, related to diseases of the children or in those patients undergoing repeated imaging for whom cumulative radiation dose must be kept as low as reasonably achievable. PET/MRI also offers interesting opportunities for use of dual modality probes. Upon clear definition of clinical utility, other important and practical issues related to business operational model, clinical workflow and reimbursement will also be resolved

  6. Influence of the partial volume correction method on (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose brain kinetic modelling from dynamic PET images reconstructed with resolution model based OSEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Spencer L; Byars, Larry G; Michel, Christian J; Chonde, Daniel B; Catana, Ciprian

    2013-10-21

    Kinetic parameters estimated from dynamic (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) PET acquisitions have been used frequently to assess brain function in humans. Neglecting partial volume correction (PVC) for a dynamic series has been shown to produce significant bias in model estimates. Accurate PVC requires a space-variant model describing the reconstructed image spatial point spread function (PSF) that accounts for resolution limitations, including non-uniformities across the field of view due to the parallax effect. For ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM), image resolution convergence is local and influenced significantly by the number of iterations, the count density, and background-to-target ratio. As both count density and background-to-target values for a brain structure can change during a dynamic scan, the local image resolution may also concurrently vary. When PVC is applied post-reconstruction the kinetic parameter estimates may be biased when neglecting the frame-dependent resolution. We explored the influence of the PVC method and implementation on kinetic parameters estimated by fitting (18)F-FDG dynamic data acquired on a dedicated brain PET scanner and reconstructed with and without PSF modelling in the OSEM algorithm. The performance of several PVC algorithms was quantified with a phantom experiment, an anthropomorphic Monte Carlo simulation, and a patient scan. Using the last frame reconstructed image only for regional spread function (RSF) generation, as opposed to computing RSFs for each frame independently, and applying perturbation geometric transfer matrix PVC with PSF based OSEM produced the lowest magnitude bias kinetic parameter estimates in most instances, although at the cost of increased noise compared to the PVC methods utilizing conventional OSEM. Use of the last frame RSFs for PVC with no PSF modelling in the OSEM algorithm produced the lowest bias in cerebral metabolic rate of glucose estimates, although by less than 5% in

  7. (18)F-alfatide II and (18)F-FDG dual-tracer dynamic PET for parametric, early prediction of tumor response to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jinxia; Guo, Ning; Lang, Lixin; Kiesewetter, Dale O; Xie, Qingguo; Li, Quanzheng; Eden, Henry S; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    A single dynamic PET acquisition using multiple tracers administered closely in time could provide valuable complementary information about a tumor's status under quasiconstant conditions. This study aimed to investigate the utility of dual-tracer dynamic PET imaging with (18)F-alfatide II ((18)F-AlF-NOTA-E[PEG4-c(RGDfk)]2) and (18)F-FDG for parametric monitoring of tumor responses to therapy. We administered doxorubicin to one group of athymic nude mice with U87MG tumors and paclitaxel protein-bound particles to another group of mice with MDA-MB-435 tumors. To monitor therapeutic responses, we performed dual-tracer dynamic imaging, in sessions that lasted 90 min, starting with injection via the tail vein catheters with (18)F-alfatide II, followed 40 min later by (18)F-FDG. To achieve signal separation of the 2 tracers, we fit a 3-compartment reversible model to the time-activity curve of (18)F-alfatide II for the 40 min before (18)F-FDG injection and then extrapolated to 90 min. The (18)F-FDG tumor time-activity curve was isolated from the 90-min dual-tracer tumor time-activity curve by subtracting the fitted (18)F-alfatide II tumor time-activity curve. With separated tumor time-activity curves, the (18)F-alfatide II binding potential (Bp = k3/k4) and volume of distribution (VD) and (18)F-FDG influx rate ((K1 × k3)/(k2 + k3)) based on the Patlak method were calculated to validate the signal recovery in a comparison with 60-min single-tracer imaging and to monitor therapeutic response. The transport and binding rate parameters K1-k3 of (18)F-alfatide II, calculated from the first 40 min of the dual-tracer dynamic scan, as well as Bp and VD correlated well with the parameters from the 60-min single-tracer scan (R(2) > 0.95). Compared with the results of single-tracer PET imaging, (18)F-FDG tumor uptake and influx were recovered well from dual-tracer imaging. On doxorubicin treatment, whereas no significant changes in static tracer uptake values of (18)F-alfatide II

  8. Characterization of 4-[18F]-ADAM as an imaging agent for SERT in non-human primate brain using PET: a dynamic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yu-An; Huang, Wen-Sheng; Lin, Yaoh-Shiang; Cheng, Cheng-Yi; Liu, Ren-Shyan; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Li, I-Hsun; Huang, San-Yuan; Shiue, Chyng-Yann; Chen, Cheng-Yu; Ma, Kuo-Hsing

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Serotonin transporter (SERT) has been associated with many psychiatric diseases. This study investigated the biodistribution of a serotonin transporter imaging agent, N,N-dimethyl-2-(2-amino-4- 18 F-fluorophenylthio)benzylamine (4-[ 18 F]-ADAM), in nonhuman primate brain using positron emission tomography (PET). Methods: Six and four Macaca cyclopis monkeys were used to determine the transit time (i.e., time necessary to reach biodistribution equilibrium) and the reproducibility of 4-[ 18 F]-ADAM biodistribution in the brain, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of 4-[ 18 F]-ADAM binding to SERT were evaluated in one monkey challenged with different doses of fluoxetine and one monkey treated with 3,4-methylendioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). Dynamic PET imaging was performed for 3 h after 4-[ 18 F]-ADAM intravenous bolus injection. The specific uptake ratios (SURs) in the midbrain (MB), thalamus (TH), striatum (ST) and frontal cortex (FC) were calculated. Results: The distribution of 4-[ 18 F]-ADAM reached equilibrium 120–150 min after injection. The mean SURs were 2.49±0.13 in MB, 1.59±0.17 in TH, 1.35±0.06 in ST and 0.34±0.03 in FC, and the minimum variability was shown 120–150 min after 4-[ 18 F]-ADAM injection. Using SURs and intraclass coefficient of correlation, the test/retest variability was under 8% and above 0.8, respectively, in SERT-rich areas. Challenge with fluoxetin (0.75–2 mg) dose-dependently inhibited the SURs in various brain regions. 4-[ 18 F]-ADAM binding was markedly reduced in the brain of an MDMA-treated monkey compared to that in brains of normal controls. Conclusion: 4-[ 18 F]-ADAM appears to be a highly selective radioligand for imaging SERT in monkey brain.

  9. Vegetation dynamics of the Guatemalan lowlands from MIS7 to MIS5: Evidence from Lake Petén-Itzá

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Silva, E.; Correa-Metrio, A.; Bush, M. B.

    2013-05-01

    Reconstructing vegetation patterns of past warm climatic stages is critical for understanding modern processes that affect diversity and climate. Tropical lowlands are of special interest because of the high biodiversity they foster and the risks they face under a scenario of rapid climate change. With a basal age of more that 191,000 years, core PI-1 from Lake Petén-Itzá, Guatemalan lowlands, offer an exceptional opportunity to investigate the dynamics of the vegetation of the area during climatic stages that might be analogous to today. Pollen analysis of the lower part of this sedimentary record shows a sequence of five different climatic stages of alternating warm and cold conditions. According to our interpretation, tropical forests extended in the area during MIS7 and MIS5, with the former characterized by drier conditions than the latter. Apparently forest dynamics closely followed global climatic changes that were recorded in the Antarctic and the Marine Stack records. Our results confirm that vegetation of the Peninsula, although highly resilient, has been very sensitive to global climatic changes.

  10. Test-retest repeatability of myocardial oxidative metabolism and efficiency using standalone dynamic 11C-acetate PET and multimodality approaches in healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Nils Henrik; Harms, Hendrik Johannes; Kim, Won Yong; Nielsen, Roni; Tolbod, Lars P; Frøkiær, Jørgen; Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Poulsen, Steen Hvitfeldt; Wiggers, Henrik; Parner, Erik Thorlund; Sörensen, Jens

    2018-05-31

    Myocardial efficiency measured by 11 C-acetate positron emission tomography (PET) has successfully been used in clinical research to quantify mechanoenergetic coupling. The objective of this study was to establish the repeatability of myocardial external efficiency (MEE) and work metabolic index (WMI) by non-invasive concepts. Ten healthy volunteers (63 ± 4 years) were examined twice, one week apart, using 11 C-acetate PET, cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR), and echocardiography. Myocardial oxygen consumption from PET was combined with stroke work data from CMR, echocardiography, or PET to obtain MEE and WMI for each modality. Repeatability was estimated as the coefficient of variation (CV) between test and retest. MEE CMR , MEE Echo , and MEE PET values were 21.9 ± 2.7%, 16.4 ± 3.7%, and 23.8 ± 4.9%, respectively, P PET values were 4.42 ± 0.90, 4.07 ± 0.63, and 4.58 ± 1.13 mmHg × mL/m 2  × 10 6 , respectively, P = .45. Repeatability for MEE CMR was superior compared with MEE Echo but did not differ significantly compared with MEE PET (6.3% vs 12.9% and 9.4%, P = .04 and .25). CV values for WMI CMR , WMI Echo , and WMI PET were 10.0%, 14.8%, and 12.0%, respectively, (P = .53). Non-invasive measurements of MEE using 11 C-acetate PET are highly repeatable. A PET-only approach did not differ significantly from CMR/PET and might facilitate further clinical research due to lower costs and broader applicability.

  11. 11C-L-methyl methionine dynamic PET/CT of skeletal muscle: response to protein supplementation compared to L-[ring 13C6] phenylalanine infusion with serial muscle biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arentson-Lantz, Emily J; Saeed, Isra H; Frassetto, Lynda A; Masharani, Umesh; Harnish, Roy J; Seo, Youngho; VanBrocklin, Henry F; Hawkins, Randall A; Mari-Aparici, Carina; Pampaloni, Miguel H; Slater, James; Paddon-Jones, Douglas; Lang, Thomas F

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if clinical dynamic PET/CT imaging with 11 C-L-methyl-methionine ( 11 C-MET) in healthy older women can provide an estimate of tissue-level post-absorptive and post-prandial skeletal muscle protein synthesis that is consistent with the more traditional method of calculating fractional synthesis rate (FSR) of muscle protein synthesis from skeletal muscle biopsies obtained during an infusion of L-[ring 13 C 6 ] phenylalanine ( 13 C 6 -Phe). Healthy older women (73 ± 5 years) completed both dynamic PET/CT imaging with 11 C-MET and a stable isotope infusion of 13 C 6 -Phe with biopsies to measure the skeletal muscle protein synthetic response to 25 g of a whey protein supplement. Graphical estimation of the Patlak coefficient K i from analysis of the dynamic PET/CT images was employed as a measure of incorporation of 11 C-MET in the mid-thigh muscle bundle. Post-prandial values [mean ± standard error of the mean (SEM)] were higher than post-absorptive values for both K i (0.0095 ± 0.001 vs. 0.00785 ± 0.001 min -1 , p Dynamic PET/CT imaging with 11 C-MET provides an estimate of the post-prandial anabolic response that is consistent with a traditional, invasive stable isotope, and muscle biopsy approach. These results support the potential future use of 11 C-MET imaging as a non-invasive method for assessing conditions affecting skeletal muscle protein synthesis.

  12. Healthy Pets and People

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prevent the spread of germs between pets and people. Keep pets and their supplies out of the kitchen, and ... a local wildlife rehabilitation facility. More Information Healthy Pets Healthy People Clean Hands Save Lives! Stay Healthy at Animal ...

  13. 18F Fluorocholine Dynamic Time-of-Flight PET/MR Imaging in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Intermediate- to High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Initial Clinical-Pathologic Comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Joon Young; Yang, Jaewon; Noworolski, Susan M; Behr, Spencer; Chang, Albert J; Simko, Jeffry P; Nguyen, Hao G; Carroll, Peter R; Kurhanewicz, John; Seo, Youngho

    2017-02-01

    Purpose To investigate the initial clinical value of fluorine 18 ( 18 F) fluorocholine (FCH) dynamic positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance (MR) imaging by comparing its parameters with clinical-pathologic findings in patients with newly diagnosed intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer (PCa) who plan to undergo radical prostatectomy. Materials and Methods The institutional review board approved the study protocol, and informed written consent was obtained from all subjects for this HIPAA-compliant study. Twelve men (mean age ± standard deviation, 61.7 years ± 8.4; range, 46-74 years) with untreated intermediate- to high-risk PCa characterized according to Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment (CAPRA) underwent preoperative FCH dynamic PET/MR imaging followed by radical prostatectomy between April and November 2015. PET/MR imaging parameters including average and maximum K1 (delivery rate constant) and standardized uptake values (SUVs) and Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) version 2 scores were measured and compared with clinical-pathologic characteristics. For statistical analysis, the Spearman rank correlation and Mann-Whitney U tests were performed. Results Of the PET parameters, maximum SUV of primary tumors showed significant correlations with several clinical-pathologic parameters including serum prostate-specific antigen level (ρ = 0.71, P = .01), pathologic stage (ρ = 0.59, P = .043), and postsurgical CAPRA score (ρ = 0.72, P = .008). The overall PI-RADS score showed significant correlations with pathologic tumor volume (ρ = 0.81, P PET and MR imaging showed improved sensitivity (88%) for prediction of pathologic extraprostatic extension compared with that with MR imaging (50%) and PET (75%) performed separately. Conclusion Maximum SUVs and PI-RADS scores from FCH PET/MR imaging show good correlation with clinical-pathologic characteristics, such as postsurgical CAPRA score, which are related to prognosis in

  14. Myocardial perfusion quantification using simultaneously acquired 13 NH3 -ammonia PET and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in patients at rest and stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunze, Karl P; Nekolla, Stephan G; Rischpler, Christoph; Zhang, Shelley HuaLei; Hayes, Carmel; Langwieser, Nicolas; Ibrahim, Tareq; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Schwaiger, Markus

    2018-04-19

    Systematic differences with respect to myocardial perfusion quantification exist between DCE-MRI and PET. Using the potential of integrated PET/MRI, this study was conceived to compare perfusion quantification on the basis of simultaneously acquired 13 NH 3 -ammonia PET and DCE-MRI data in patients at rest and stress. Twenty-nine patients were examined on a 3T PET/MRI scanner. DCE-MRI was implemented in dual-sequence design and additional T 1 mapping for signal normalization. Four different deconvolution methods including a modified version of the Fermi technique were compared against 13 NH 3 -ammonia results. Cohort-average flow comparison yielded higher resting flows for DCE-MRI than for PET and, therefore, significantly lower DCE-MRI perfusion ratios under the common assumption of equal arterial and tissue hematocrit. Absolute flow values were strongly correlated in both slice-average (R 2  = 0.82) and regional (R 2  = 0.7) evaluations. Different DCE-MRI deconvolution methods yielded similar flow result with exception of an unconstrained Fermi method exhibiting outliers at high flows when compared with PET. Thresholds for Ischemia classification may not be directly tradable between PET and MRI flow values. Differences in perfusion ratios between PET and DCE-MRI may be lifted by using stress/rest-specific hematocrit conversion. Proper physiological constraints are advised in model-constrained deconvolution. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  15. Effect of selecting a fixed dephosphorylation rate on the estimation of rate constants and rCMRGlu from dynamic [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose/PET data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhawan, V.; Moeller, J.R.; Strother, S.C.; Evans, A.C.; Rottenberg, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    Several publications have discussed the estimation and physiologic significance of regional [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) rate constants and metabolic rates. Most of these studies analyzed dynamic data collected over 45-60 min; three rate constants (k1-k3) and blood volume (Vb) were estimated and the regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRGlu) was subsequently derived using the measured blood glucose value and a regionally invariant value of the lumped constant (LC). The dephosphorylation rate constant (k4) was either neglected, or a fixed value was used in the estimation procedure to obtain the remaining parameters. To compare the rate constants obtained by different authors using different values of k4 is impossible without knowledge of the effect of selecting different fixed values of k4 (including zero) on the estimated rate constants and rCMRGlu. Based on our analysis of FDG/PET data from nine normal volunteer subjects, we conclude that inclusion of a fixed value for k4, in spite of a scaling effect on the absolute values of model parameters, has no effect on the coefficient of variation (CV) of within- and between-subject parameter estimates and glucose metabolic rates

  16. Myocardial oxygen extraction fraction measured using bolus inhalation of 15O-oxygen gas and dynamic PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubberink, Mark; Wong, YY; Raijmakers, P. G.; Huisman, Marc C.; Schuit, Robert C.; Luurtsema, Geert; Boellaard, Ronald; Knaapen, P; Vonk-Noordegraaf, Anton; Lammertsma, Adriaan A.

    Abstract The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) measurements using a dynamic scan protocol after bolus inhalation of 15O2. The method of analysis was optimized by investigating potential reuse of myocardial blood flow (MBF), perfusable tissue

  17. Dynamic PET and SPECT imaging with radioiodinated, amyloid-reactive peptide p5 in mice: a positive role for peptide dehalogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Emily B; Kennel, Stephen J; Richey, Tina; Wooliver, Craig; Osborne, Dustin; Williams, Angela; Stuckey, Alan; Wall, Jonathan S

    2014-10-01

    Dynamic molecular imaging provides bio-kinetic data that is used to characterize novel radiolabeled tracers for the detection of disease. Amyloidosis is a rare protein misfolding disease that can affect many organs. It is characterized by extracellular deposits composed principally of fibrillar proteins and hypersulfated proteoglycans. We have previously described a peptide, p5, which binds preferentially to amyloid deposits in a murine model of reactive (AA) amyloidosis. We have determined the whole body distribution of amyloid by molecular imaging techniques using radioiodinated p5. The loss of radioiodide from imaging probes due to enzymatic reaction has plagued the use of radioiodinated peptides and antibodies. Therefore, we studied iodine-124-labeled p5 by using dynamic PET imaging of both amyloid-laden and healthy mice to assess the rates of amyloid binding, the relevance of dehalogenation and the fate of the radiolabeled peptide. Rates of blood pool clearance, tissue accumulation and dehalogenation of the peptide were estimated from the images. Comparisons of these properties between the amyloid-laden and healthy mice provided kinetic profiles whose differences may prove to be indicative of the disease state. Additionally, we performed longitudinal SPECT/CT imaging with iodine-125-labeled p5 up to 72h post injection to determine the stability of the radioiodinated peptide when bound to the extracellular amyloid. Our data show that amyloid-associated peptide, in contrast to the unbound peptide, is resistant to dehalogenation resulting in enhanced amyloid-specific imaging. These data further support the utility of this peptide for detecting amyloidosis and monitoring potential therapeutic strategies in patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Tumor Metabolism and Perfusion in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Pretreatment Multimodality Imaging With 1H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI, and [18F]FDG-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, Jacobus F.A.; Schöder, Heiko; Lee, Nancy Y.; Stambuk, Hilda E.; Wang Ya; Fury, Matthew G.; Patel, Senehal G.; Pfister, David G.; Shah, Jatin P.; Koutcher, Jason A.; Shukla-Dave, Amita

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To correlate proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS), dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), and 18 F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([ 18 F]FDG PET) of nodal metastases in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) for assessment of tumor biology. Additionally, pretreatment multimodality imaging was evaluated for its efficacy in predicting short-term response to treatment. Methods and Materials: Metastatic neck nodes were imaged with 1 H-MRS, DCE-MRI, and [ 18 F]FDG PET in 16 patients with newly diagnosed HNSCC, before treatment. Short-term patient radiological response was evaluated at 3 to 4 months. Correlations among 1 H-MRS (choline concentration relative to water [Cho/W]), DCE-MRI (volume transfer constant [K trans ]; volume fraction of the extravascular extracellular space [v e ]; and redistribution rate constant [k ep ]), and [ 18 F]FDG PET (standard uptake value [SUV] and total lesion glycolysis [TLG]) were calculated using nonparametric Spearman rank correlation. To predict short-term responses, logistic regression analysis was performed. Results: A significant positive correlation was found between Cho/W and TLG (ρ = 0.599; p = 0.031). Cho/W correlated negatively with heterogeneity measures of standard deviation std(v e ) (ρ = −0.691; p = 0.004) and std(k ep ) (ρ = −0.704; p = 0.003). Maximum SUV (SUVmax) values correlated strongly with MRI tumor volume (ρ = 0.643; p = 0.007). Logistic regression indicated that std(K trans ) and SUVmean were significant predictors of short-term response (p 1 H-MRS, DCE-MRI, and [ 18 F]FDG PET is feasible in HNSCC patients with nodal metastases. Additionally, combined DCE-MRI and [ 18 F]FDG PET parameters were predictive of short-term response to treatment.

  19. Pet Problems at Home: Pet Problems in the Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltow, Willow

    1984-01-01

    Discusses problems of pets in the community, examining the community's role related to disruptive pets and pet overpopulation. Also discusses pet problems at home, offering advice on selecting a pet, meeting a pet's needs, and disciplining pets. Includes a list of books, films/filmstrips, teaching materials, and various instructional strategies.…

  20. 18F-Fluorocholine PET/CT Complementing the Role of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI for Providing Comprehensive Diagnostic Workup in Prostate Cancer Patients With Suspected Relapse Following Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadi, Shelvin Kumar; Singh, Baljinder; Basher, Rajender K; Watts, Ankit; Sood, Ashwani K; Lal, Anupam; Kakkar, Nandita; Singh, S K

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic performance of F-fluorocholine (FCH) PET/CT and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) of pelvis in restaging prostate cancer (PC) patients with biochemical recurrence (BCR) following radical prostatectomy (RP). Twenty PC patients who had undergone RP and had BCR were recruited in this study. All the patients underwent whole-body FCH PET/CT and DCE-MRI of the pelvis. An overall pattern of recurrent disease was analyzed, and diagnostic accuracy for the detection of pelvic disease recurrence by the 2 modalities was evaluated by taking histopathologic analysis as the criterion standard. The whole-body FCH PET/CT images were also analyzed separately for the presence of any extra lesion(s). The initial mean Gleason score was 6.3 ± 1.53 (range, 4-9). The mean prostate-specific antigen levels at the time of relapse were 1.9 ± 2.87 ng/mL (range, 0.24-13.2 ng/mL). MRI findings were positive for primary tumor recurrence in the prostate bed in 6 patients (6/20 [30.0%]), pelvic lymph node metastases in 4 patients (4/20 [20.0%]), and for pelvic skeletal metastases in 2 patients (2/20 [10.0%]), respectively. On the other hand, FCH PET/CT results were positive in the corresponding sites in 7 (7/20 [35.0%]), 9 (9/20 [45.0%]), and 2 patients (2/20 [10.0%]), respectively. F-fluorocholine PET/CT and MRI showed comparable results in terms of sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for PC characterization. The whole-body FCH PET/CT was found to be useful in identifying unknown distant metastases in a significant proportion of patients. The correlative whole-body FCH PET/CT and pelvic DCE-MRI offer a complementary and comprehensive diagnostic workup for better management of PC patients with BCR following RP.

  1. Utility of early dynamic and delayed post-diuretic 18F-FDG PET/CT SUVmax in predicting tumour grade and T-stage of urinary bladder carcinoma: results from a prospective single centre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Abhishek; Mete, Uttam K; Sood, Ashwani; Kakkar, Nandita; Gorla, Arun K R; Mittal, Bhagwant R

    2017-04-01

    Accurate pre-treatment grading and staging of bladder cancer are vital for better therapeutic decision and prognosis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the correlation between maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ) calculated during early dynamic and post-diuretic fluorine-18 fludeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT studies with grade and pT-stage of bladder cancer. 39 patients with suspected/proven bladder carcinoma underwent 10-min early dynamic pelvic imaging and delayed post-diuretic whole-body FDG PET/CT imaging. SUV max of the lesions derived from both studies was compared with grade and pT-stage. Relationship of SUV max with grade and pT-stage was analyzed using independent sample t-test and analysis of variance. SUV max of the early dynamic imaging showing tumour perfusion was independent from the SUV max of delayed imaging. High-grade tumours showed higher SUV max than low-grade tumours in the early dynamic imaging (5.4 ± 1.4 vs 4.7 ± 1.6; p-value 0.144) with statistically significant higher value in Stage pT1 tumours (6.8 ± 0.8 vs 5.5 ± 1.2; p-value 0.04). Non-invasive pTa tumours had significantly less SUV max than higher stage tumours during early dynamic imaging [F(4,29) = 6.860, p 0.001]. Early dynamic imaging may have a role in predicting the grade and aggressiveness of the bladder tumours and thus can help in treatment planning and prognostication. Advances in knowledge: Dynamic PET/CT is a limitedly explored imaging technique. This prospective pilot study demonstrates the utility of this modality as a potential adjunct to standard FDG PET/CT imaging in predicting the grade and aggressiveness of the bladder tumours and thus can impact the patient management.

  2. Brain PET scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... results on a PET scan. Blood sugar or insulin levels may affect the test results in people with diabetes . PET scans may be done along with a CT scan. This combination scan is called a PET/CT. Alternative Names Brain positron emission tomography; PET scan - brain References Chernecky ...

  3. Kinetic modeling in PET imaging of hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fan; Joergensen, Jesper T; Hansen, Anders E; Kjaer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is associated with increased therapeutic resistance leading to poor treatment outcome. Therefore the ability to detect and quantify intratumoral oxygenation could play an important role in future individual personalized treatment strategies. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) can be used for non-invasive mapping of tissue oxygenation in vivo and several hypoxia specific PET tracers have been developed. Evaluation of PET data in the clinic is commonly based on visual assessment together with semiquantitative measurements e.g. standard uptake value (SUV). However, dynamic PET contains additional valuable information on the temporal changes in tracer distribution. Kinetic modeling can be used to extract relevant pharmacokinetic parameters of tracer behavior in vivo that reflects relevant physiological processes. In this paper, we review the potential contribution of kinetic analysis for PET imaging of hypoxia. PMID:25250200

  4. Doses to medical workers operating in a PET/CT department after the use of new dynamic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalianis, K; Kollias, G; Malamitsi, J; Euthimiadou, R; Andreou, J; Georgiou, E; Prassopoulos, V

    2015-01-01

    Since new radiopharmaceuticals are used like [18F]-fluoro-3'-deoxy-3'-L- fluorothymidine and 18F fluoromethylcholine, also new dynamic techniques of imaging are used, measurements concerning the doses to medical staff are needed. The aim of this study was to measure the effective whole body dose of the personnel and compare them with the oldest. Estimation of equivalent dose for all members of the staff was monitored with the use of TLDs badges and electronic dosimeters. The duration of the study was year 2011 (983 patients).Concerning the nurses, we measured 10% increase in the wholebody doses and that is due to the longer time they spent near the patient (dynamic protocol). For technologist we measure 15-21% increase for they come near the patient immediately after administration. We can observe that there is an increase of the doses for technologists and nurses the numbers are significantly lower than the recommended annual dose limit by Euratrom 97/43. (paper)

  5. Doses to medical workers operating in a PET/CT department after the use of new dynamic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalianis, K.; Kollias, G.; Malamitsi, J.; Euthimiadou, R.; Andreou, J.; Georgiou, E.; Prassopoulos, V.

    2015-09-01

    Since new radiopharmaceuticals are used like [18F]-fluoro-3'-deoxy-3'-L- fluorothymidine and 18F fluoromethylcholine, also new dynamic techniques of imaging are used, measurements concerning the doses to medical staff are needed. The aim of this study was to measure the effective whole body dose of the personnel and compare them with the oldest. Estimation of equivalent dose for all members of the staff was monitored with the use of TLDs badges and electronic dosimeters. The duration of the study was year 2011 (983 patients).Concerning the nurses, we measured 10% increase in the wholebody doses and that is due to the longer time they spent near the patient (dynamic protocol). For technologist we measure 15-21% increase for they come near the patient immediately after administration. We can observe that there is an increase of the doses for technologists and nurses the numbers are significantly lower than the recommended annual dose limit by Euratrom 97/43.

  6. PET reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Sullivan, F.; Pawitan, Y.; Harrison, R.L.; Lewellen, T.K.

    1990-01-01

    In statistical terms, filtered backprojection can be viewed as smoothed Least Squares (LS). In this paper, the authors report on improvement in LS resolution by: incorporating locally adaptive smoothers, imposing positivity and using statistical methods for optimal selection of the resolution parameter. The resulting algorithm has high computational efficiency relative to more elaborate Maximum Likelihood (ML) type techniques (i.e. EM with sieves). Practical aspects of the procedure are discussed in the context of PET and illustrations with computer simulated and real tomograph data are presented. The relative recovery coefficients for a 9mm sphere in a computer simulated hot-spot phantom range from .3 to .6 when the number of counts ranges from 10,000 to 640,000 respectively. The authors will also present results illustrating the relative efficacy of ML and LS reconstruction techniques

  7. Imaging and PET - PET/CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Schulthess, G.K.; Hany, Th.F.

    2008-01-01

    PET/CT has grown because the lack of anatomic landmarks in PET makes 'hardware-fusion' to anatomic cross-sectional data extremely useful. Addition of CT to PET improves specificity, but also sensitivity, and adding PET to CT adds sensitivity and specificity in tumor imaging. The synergistic advantage of adding CT is that the attenuation correction needed for PET data can also be derived from the CT data. This makes PET-CT 25-30% faster than PET alone, leading to higher patient throughput and a more comfortable examination for patients typically lasting 20 minutes or less. FDG-PET-CT appears to provide relevant information in the staging and therapy monitoring of many tumors, such as lung carcinoma, colorectal cancer, lymphoma, gynaecological cancers, melanoma and many others, with the notable exception of prostatic cancer. for this cancer, choline derivatives may possibly become useful radiopharmaceuticals. The published literature on the applications of FDG-PET-CT in oncology is still limited but several designed studies have demonstrated the benefits of PET-CT. (authors)

  8. Bringing Physiology into PET of the Liver

    OpenAIRE

    Keiding, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Several physiologic features make interpretation of PET studies of liver physiology an exciting challenge. As with other organs, hepatic tracer kinetics using PET is quantified by dynamic recording of the liver after the administration of a radioactive tracer, with measurements of time–activity curves in the blood supply. However, the liver receives blood from both the portal vein and the hepatic artery, with the peak of the portal vein time–activity curve being delayed and dispersed compared...

  9. Dynamic contrast-enhanced perfusion area-detector CT assessed with various mathematical models: Its capability for therapeutic outcome prediction for non-small cell lung cancer patients with chemoradiotherapy as compared with that of FDG-PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, Yoshiharu, E-mail: yosirad@kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Fujisawa, Yasuko [Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation, Otawara (Japan); Koyama, Hisanobu; Kishida, Yuji; Seki, Shinichiro [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Sugihara, Naoki [Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation, Otawara (Japan); Yoshikawa, Takeshi [Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan)

    2017-01-15

    Purpose: To directly compare the capability of dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced (CE-) perfusion area-detector CT (ADCT) and PET/CT for early prediction of treatment response, disease progression and overall survival of non-small cell carcinoma (NSCLC) patients treated with chemoradiotherapy. Materials and methods: Fifty-three consecutive Stage IIIB NSCLC patients who had undergone PET/CT, dynamic first-pass CE-perfusion ADCT, chemoradiotherapy, and follow-up examination were enrolled in this study. They were divided into two groups: 1) complete or partial response (CR + PR) and 2) stable or progressive disease (SD + PD). Pulmonary arterial and systemic arterial perfusions and total perfusion were assessed at targeted lesions with the dual-input maximum slope method, permeability surface and distribution volume with the Patlak plot method, tumor perfusion with the single-input maximum slope method, and SUV{sub max}, and results were averaged to determine final values for each patient. Next, step-wise regression analysis was used to determine which indices were the most useful for predicting therapeutic effect. Finally, overall survival of responders and non-responders assessed by using the indices that had a significant effect on prediction of therapeutic outcome was statistically compared. Results: The step-wise regression test showed that therapeutic effect (r{sup 2} = 0.63, p = 0.01) was significantly affected by the following three factors in order of magnitude of impact: systemic arterial perfusion, total perfusion, and SUV{sub max}. Mean overall survival showed a significant difference for total perfusion (p = 0.003) and systemic arterial perfusion (p = 0.04). Conclusion: Dynamic first-pass CE-perfusion ADCT as well as PET/CT are useful for treatment response prediction in NSCLC patients treated with chemoradiotherapy.

  10. Dynamic contrast-enhanced perfusion area-detector CT assessed with various mathematical models: Its capability for therapeutic outcome prediction for non-small cell lung cancer patients with chemoradiotherapy as compared with that of FDG-PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Fujisawa, Yasuko; Koyama, Hisanobu; Kishida, Yuji; Seki, Shinichiro; Sugihara, Naoki; Yoshikawa, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To directly compare the capability of dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced (CE-) perfusion area-detector CT (ADCT) and PET/CT for early prediction of treatment response, disease progression and overall survival of non-small cell carcinoma (NSCLC) patients treated with chemoradiotherapy. Materials and methods: Fifty-three consecutive Stage IIIB NSCLC patients who had undergone PET/CT, dynamic first-pass CE-perfusion ADCT, chemoradiotherapy, and follow-up examination were enrolled in this study. They were divided into two groups: 1) complete or partial response (CR + PR) and 2) stable or progressive disease (SD + PD). Pulmonary arterial and systemic arterial perfusions and total perfusion were assessed at targeted lesions with the dual-input maximum slope method, permeability surface and distribution volume with the Patlak plot method, tumor perfusion with the single-input maximum slope method, and SUV max , and results were averaged to determine final values for each patient. Next, step-wise regression analysis was used to determine which indices were the most useful for predicting therapeutic effect. Finally, overall survival of responders and non-responders assessed by using the indices that had a significant effect on prediction of therapeutic outcome was statistically compared. Results: The step-wise regression test showed that therapeutic effect (r 2 = 0.63, p = 0.01) was significantly affected by the following three factors in order of magnitude of impact: systemic arterial perfusion, total perfusion, and SUV max . Mean overall survival showed a significant difference for total perfusion (p = 0.003) and systemic arterial perfusion (p = 0.04). Conclusion: Dynamic first-pass CE-perfusion ADCT as well as PET/CT are useful for treatment response prediction in NSCLC patients treated with chemoradiotherapy.

  11. Dynamic contrast-enhanced perfusion area-detector CT assessed with various mathematical models: Its capability for therapeutic outcome prediction for non-small cell lung cancer patients with chemoradiotherapy as compared with that of FDG-PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Fujisawa, Yasuko; Koyama, Hisanobu; Kishida, Yuji; Seki, Shinichiro; Sugihara, Naoki; Yoshikawa, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    To directly compare the capability of dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced (CE-) perfusion area-detector CT (ADCT) and PET/CT for early prediction of treatment response, disease progression and overall survival of non-small cell carcinoma (NSCLC) patients treated with chemoradiotherapy. Fifty-three consecutive Stage IIIB NSCLC patients who had undergone PET/CT, dynamic first-pass CE-perfusion ADCT, chemoradiotherapy, and follow-up examination were enrolled in this study. They were divided into two groups: 1) complete or partial response (CR+PR) and 2) stable or progressive disease (SD+PD). Pulmonary arterial and systemic arterial perfusions and total perfusion were assessed at targeted lesions with the dual-input maximum slope method, permeability surface and distribution volume with the Patlak plot method, tumor perfusion with the single-input maximum slope method, and SUV max , and results were averaged to determine final values for each patient. Next, step-wise regression analysis was used to determine which indices were the most useful for predicting therapeutic effect. Finally, overall survival of responders and non-responders assessed by using the indices that had a significant effect on prediction of therapeutic outcome was statistically compared. The step-wise regression test showed that therapeutic effect (r 2 =0.63, p=0.01) was significantly affected by the following three factors in order of magnitude of impact: systemic arterial perfusion, total perfusion, and SUV max . Mean overall survival showed a significant difference for total perfusion (p=0.003) and systemic arterial perfusion (p=0.04). Dynamic first-pass CE-perfusion ADCT as well as PET/CT are useful for treatment response prediction in NSCLC patients treated with chemoradiotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Perfusion Area-Detector CT: Preliminary Comparison of Diagnostic Performance for N Stage Assessment With FDG PET/CT in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Fujisawa, Yasuko; Sugihara, Naoki; Kishida, Yuji; Seki, Shinichiro; Koyama, Hisanobu; Yoshikawa, Takeshi

    2017-11-01

    The objective of our study was to directly compare the capability of dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced (CE) perfusion area-detector CT (ADCT) and FDG PET/CT for differentiation of metastatic from nonmetastatic lymph nodes and assessment of N stage in patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Seventy-seven consecutive patients, 45 men (mean age ± SD, 70.4 ± 5.9 years) and 32 women (71.2 ± 7.7 years), underwent dynamic first-pass CE-perfusion ADCT at two or three different positions for covering the entire thorax, FDG PET/CT, surgical treatment, and pathologic examination. From all ADCT data for each of the subjects, a whole-chest perfusion map was computationally generated using the dual- and single-input maximum slope and Patlak plot methods. For quantitative N stage assessment, perfusion parameters and the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ) for each lymph node were determined by measuring the relevant ROI. ROC curve analyses were performed for comparing the diagnostic capability of each of the methods on a per-node basis. N stages evaluated by each of the indexes were then statistically compared with the final pathologic diagnosis by means of chi-square and kappa statistics. The area under the ROC curve (A z ) values of systemic arterial perfusion (A z = 0.89), permeability surface (A z = 0.78), and SUV max (A z = 0.85) were significantly larger than the A z values of total perfusion (A z = 0.70, p Dynamic first-pass CE-perfusion ADCT is as useful as FDG PET/CT for the differentiation of metastatic from nonmetastatic lymph nodes and assessment of N stage in patients with NSCLC.

  13. TH-E-202-00: PET for Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    PET/CT is a very important imaging tool in the management of oncology patients. PET/CT has been applied for treatment planning and response evaluation in radiation therapy. This educational session will discuss: Pitfalls and remedies in PET/CT imaging for RT planning The use of hypoxia PET imaging for radiotherapy PET for tumor response evaluation The first presentation will address the issue of mis-registration between the CT and PET images in the thorax and the abdomen. We will discuss the challenges of respiratory gating and introduce an average CT technique to improve the registration for dose calculation and image-guidance in radiation therapy. The second presentation will discuss the use of hypoxia PET Imaging for radiation therapy. We will discuss various hypoxia radiotracers, the choice of clinical acquisition protocol (in particular a single late static acquisition versus a dynamic acquisition), and the compartmental modeling with different transfer rate constants explained. We will demonstrate applications of hypoxia imaging for dose escalation/de-escalation in clinical trials. The last presentation will discuss the use of PET/CT for tumor response evaluation. We will discuss anatomic response assessment vs. metabolic response assessment, visual evaluation and semi-quantitative evaluation, and limitations of current PET/CT assessment. We will summarize clinical trials using PET response in guiding adaptive radiotherapy. Finally, we will summarize recent advancements in PET/CT radiomics and non-FDG PET tracers for response assessment. Learning Objectives: Identify the causes of mis-registration of CT and PET images in PET/CT, and review the strategies to remedy the issue. Understand the basics of PET imaging of tumor hypoxia (radiotracers, how PET measures the hypoxia selective uptake, imaging protocols, applications in chemo-radiation therapy). Understand the basics of dynamic PET imaging, compartmental modeling and parametric images. Understand the

  14. TH-E-202-00: PET for Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    PET/CT is a very important imaging tool in the management of oncology patients. PET/CT has been applied for treatment planning and response evaluation in radiation therapy. This educational session will discuss: Pitfalls and remedies in PET/CT imaging for RT planning The use of hypoxia PET imaging for radiotherapy PET for tumor response evaluation The first presentation will address the issue of mis-registration between the CT and PET images in the thorax and the abdomen. We will discuss the challenges of respiratory gating and introduce an average CT technique to improve the registration for dose calculation and image-guidance in radiation therapy. The second presentation will discuss the use of hypoxia PET Imaging for radiation therapy. We will discuss various hypoxia radiotracers, the choice of clinical acquisition protocol (in particular a single late static acquisition versus a dynamic acquisition), and the compartmental modeling with different transfer rate constants explained. We will demonstrate applications of hypoxia imaging for dose escalation/de-escalation in clinical trials. The last presentation will discuss the use of PET/CT for tumor response evaluation. We will discuss anatomic response assessment vs. metabolic response assessment, visual evaluation and semi-quantitative evaluation, and limitations of current PET/CT assessment. We will summarize clinical trials using PET response in guiding adaptive radiotherapy. Finally, we will summarize recent advancements in PET/CT radiomics and non-FDG PET tracers for response assessment. Learning Objectives: Identify the causes of mis-registration of CT and PET images in PET/CT, and review the strategies to remedy the issue. Understand the basics of PET imaging of tumor hypoxia (radiotracers, how PET measures the hypoxia selective uptake, imaging protocols, applications in chemo-radiation therapy). Understand the basics of dynamic PET imaging, compartmental modeling and parametric images. Understand the

  15. Trends in PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, William W.

    2000-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging is a well established method for obtaining information on the status of certain organs within the human body or in animals. This paper presents an overview of recent trends PET instrumentation. Significant effort is being expended to develop new PET detector modules, especially those capable of measuring depth of interaction. This is aided by recent advances in scintillator and pixellated photodetector technology. The other significant area of effort is development of special purpose PET cameras (such as for imaging breast cancer or small animals) or cameras that have the ability to image in more than one modality (such as PET / SPECT or PET / X-Ray CT)

  16. PET / MRI vs. PET / CT. Indications Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliva González, Juan P.

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid techniques in Nuclear Medicine is currently a field in full development for diagnosis and treatment of various medical conditions. With the recent advent of PET / MRI much it speculated about whether or not it is superior to PET / CT especially in oncology. The Conference seeks to clarify this situation by dealing issues such as: State of the art technology PET / MRI; Indications Oncology; Some clinical cases. It concludes by explaining the oncological indications of both the real and current situation of the PET / MRI. (author)

  17. Interest of FDG-PET for lung cancer radiotherapy; Interet de la TEP au FDG pour la radiotherapie des cancers bronchiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thureau, S.; Mezzani-Saillard, S.; Dubray, B. [Departement de radiotherapie et de physique medicale et QuantIF - Litis, EA 4108, CRLCC Henri-Becquerel, 1, rue d' Amiens, 76038 Rouen (France); Modzelewski, R.; Edet-Sanson, A.; Vera, P. [Departement de medecine nucleaire et QuantIF - Litis, EA 4108, CRLCC Henri-Becquerel, 1, rue d' Amiens, 76038 Rouen (France)

    2011-10-15

    The recent advances in medical imaging have profoundly altered the radiotherapy of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). A meta-analysis has confirmed the superiority of FDG PET-CT over CT for initial staging. FDG PET-CT improves the reproducibility of target volume delineation, especially close to the mediastinum or in the presence of atelectasis. Although not formally validated by a randomized trial, the reduction of the mediastinal target volume, by restricting the irradiation to FDG-avid nodes, is widely accepted. The optimal method of delineation still remains to be defined. The role of FDGPET-CT in monitoring tumor response during radiotherapy is under investigation, potentially opening the way to adapting the treatment modalities to tumor radiation sensitivity. Other tracers, such as F-miso (hypoxia), are also under clinical investigation. To avoid excessive delays, the integration of PET-CT in routine practice requires quick access to the imaging equipment, technical support (fusion and image processing) and multidisciplinary delineation of target volumes. (authors)

  18. Pets and Parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... good news is that this rarely happens. Most pet-to-people diseases can be avoided by following a few ... your doctor Can a parasite cause death in people and pets? Can human disease from a parasite be treated ...

  19. Heart PET scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nuclear medicine scan; Heart positron emission tomography; Myocardial PET scan ... A PET scan requires a small amount of radioactive material (tracer). This tracer is given through a vein (IV), ...

  20. [Principles of PET].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuthien-Baumann, B

    2018-05-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a procedure in nuclear medicine, which is applied predominantly in oncological diagnostics. In the form of modern hybrid machines, such as PET computed tomography (PET/CT) and PET magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) it has found wide acceptance and availability. The PET procedure is more than just another imaging technique, but a functional method with the capability for quantification in addition to the distribution pattern of the radiopharmaceutical, the results of which are used for therapeutic decisions. A profound knowledge of the principles of PET including the correct indications, patient preparation, and possible artifacts is mandatory for the correct interpretation of PET results.

  1. Parametric Method Performance for Dynamic 3'-Deoxy-3'-18F-Fluorothymidine PET/CT in Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Mutated Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Patients Before and During Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Gerbrand Maria; Frings, Virginie; Heijtel, Dennis; Smit, E F; Hoekstra, Otto S; Boellaard, Ronald

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this study was to validate several parametric methods for quantification of 3'-deoxy-3'- 18 F-fluorothymidine ( 18 F-FLT) PET in advanced-stage non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) patients with an activating epidermal growth factor receptor mutation who were treated with gefitinib or erlotinib. Furthermore, we evaluated the impact of noise on accuracy and precision of the parametric analyses of dynamic 18 F-FLT PET/CT to assess the robustness of these methods. Methods : Ten NSCLC patients underwent dynamic 18 F-FLT PET/CT at baseline and 7 and 28 d after the start of treatment. Parametric images were generated using plasma input Logan graphic analysis and 2 basis functions-based methods: a 2-tissue-compartment basis function model (BFM) and spectral analysis (SA). Whole-tumor-averaged parametric pharmacokinetic parameters were compared with those obtained by nonlinear regression of the tumor time-activity curve using a reversible 2-tissue-compartment model with blood volume fraction. In addition, 2 statistically equivalent datasets were generated by countwise splitting the original list-mode data, each containing 50% of the total counts. Both new datasets were reconstructed, and parametric pharmacokinetic parameters were compared between the 2 replicates and the original data. Results: After the settings of each parametric method were optimized, distribution volumes (V T ) obtained with Logan graphic analysis, BFM, and SA all correlated well with those derived using nonlinear regression at baseline and during therapy ( R 2 ≥ 0.94; intraclass correlation coefficient > 0.97). SA-based V T images were most robust to increased noise on a voxel-level (repeatability coefficient, 16% vs. >26%). Yet BFM generated the most accurate K 1 values ( R 2 = 0.94; intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.96). Parametric K 1 data showed a larger variability in general; however, no differences were found in robustness between methods (repeatability coefficient, 80

  2. Imaging corn plants with PhytoPET, a modular PET system for plant biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.; Kross, B.; McKisson, J.; McKisson, J. E.; Weisenberger, A. G.; Xi, W.; Zorn, C.; Bonito, G.; Howell, C. R.; Reid, C. D.; Crowell, A.; Cumberbatch, L. C.; Topp, C.; Smith, M. F.

    2013-11-01

    PhytoPET is a modular positron emission tomography (PET) system designed specifically for plant imaging. The PhytoPET design allows flexible arrangements of PET detectors based on individual standalone detector modules built from single Hamamatsu H8500 position sensitive photomultiplier tubes and pixelated LYSO arrays. We have used the PhytoPET system to perform preliminary corn plant imaging studies at the Duke University Biology Department Phytotron. Initial evaluation of the PhytoPET system to image the biodistribution of the positron emitting tracer {sup 11}C in corn plants is presented. {sup 11}CO{sub 2} is loaded into corn seedlings by a leaf-labeling cuvette and translocation of {sup 11}C-sugars is imaged by a flexible arrangement of PhytoPET modules on each side. The PhytoPET system successfully images {sup 11}C within corn plants and allows for the dynamic measurement of {sup 11}C-sugar translocation from the leaf to the roots.

  3. PET motion correction in context of integrated PET/MR: Current techniques, limitations, and future projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillman, Ashley; Smith, Jye; Thomas, Paul; Rose, Stephen; Dowson, Nicholas

    2017-12-01

    Patient motion is an important consideration in modern PET image reconstruction. Advances in PET technology mean motion has an increasingly important influence on resulting image quality. Motion-induced artifacts can have adverse effects on clinical outcomes, including missed diagnoses and oversized radiotherapy treatment volumes. This review aims to summarize the wide variety of motion correction techniques available in PET and combined PET/CT and PET/MR, with a focus on the latter. A general framework for the motion correction of PET images is presented, consisting of acquisition, modeling, and correction stages. Methods for measuring, modeling, and correcting motion and associated artifacts, both in literature and commercially available, are presented, and their relative merits are contrasted. Identified limitations of current methods include modeling of aperiodic and/or unpredictable motion, attaining adequate temporal resolution for motion correction in dynamic kinetic modeling acquisitions, and maintaining availability of the MR in PET/MR scans for diagnostic acquisitions. Finally, avenues for future investigation are discussed, with a focus on improvements that could improve PET image quality, and that are practical in the clinical environment. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  4. Dynamic Changes in Striatal mGluR1 But Not mGluR5 during Pathological Progression of Parkinson's Disease in Human Alpha-Synuclein A53T Transgenic Rats: A Multi-PET Imaging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Tomoteru; Fujinaga, Masayuki; Kawamura, Kazunori; Furutsuka, Kenji; Nengaki, Nobuki; Shimoda, Yoko; Shiomi, Satoshi; Takei, Makoto; Hashimoto, Hiroki; Yui, Joji; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Hatori, Akiko; Xie, Lin; Kumata, Katsushi; Zhang, Ming-Rong

    2016-01-13

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a prevalent degenerative disorder affecting the CNS that is primarily characterized by resting tremor and movement deficits. Group I metabotropic glutamate receptor subtypes 1 and 5 (mGluR1 and mGluR5, respectively) are important targets for investigation in several CNS disorders. In the present study, we investigated the in vivo roles of mGluR1 and mGluR5 in chronic PD pathology by performing longitudinal positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in A53T transgenic (A53T-Tg) rats expressing an abnormal human α-synuclein (ASN) gene. A53T-Tg rats showed a dramatic decline in general motor activities with age, along with abnormal ASN aggregation and striatal neuron degeneration. In longitudinal PET imaging, striatal nondisplaceable binding potential (BPND) values for [(11)C]ITDM (N-[4-[6-(isopropylamino) pyrimidin-4-yl]-1,3-thiazol-2-yl]-N-methyl-4-[(11)C]methylbenzamide), a selective PET ligand for mGluR1, temporarily increased before PD symptom onset and dramatically decreased afterward with age. However, striatal BPND values for (E)-[(11)C]ABP688 [3-(6-methylpyridin-2-ylethynyl)-cyclohex-2-enone-(E)-O-[(11)C]methyloxime], a specific PET ligand for mGluR5, remained constant during experimental terms. The dynamic changes in striatal mGluR1 BPND values also showed a high correlation in pathological decreases in general motor activities. Furthermore, declines in mGluR1 BPND values were correlated with decreases in BPND values for [(18)F]FE-PE2I [(E)-N-(3-iodoprop-2E-enyl)-2β-carbo-[(18)F]fluoroethoxy-3β-(4-methylphenyl) nortropane], a specific PET ligand for the dopamine transporter, a biomarker for dopaminergic neurons. In conclusion, our results have demonstrated for the first time that dynamic changes occur in mGluR1, but not mGluR5, that accompany pathological progression in a PD animal model. Synaptic signaling by glutamate, the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, is modulated by group I metabotropic glutamate

  5. Deep-inspiration breath-hold PET/CT versus free breathing PET/CT and respiratory gating PET for reference. Evaluation in 95 patients with lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Tsuyoshi; Ohtake, Eiji; Inoue, Tomio

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to define the factors that correlate with differences in maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ) in deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) and free breathing (FB) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT admixed with respiratory gating (RG) PET for reference. Patients (n=95) with pulmonary lesions were evaluated at one facility over 33 months. After undergoing whole-body PET/CT, a RG PET and FB PET/CT scans were obtained, followed by a DIBH PET/CT scan. All scans were recorded using a list-mode dynamic collection method with respiratory gating. The RG PET was reconstructed using phase gating without attenuation correction; the FB PET was reconstructed from the RG PET sinogram datasets with attenuation correction. Respiratory motion distance, breathing cycle speed, and waveform of RG PET were recorded. The SUV max of FB PET/CT and DIBH PET/CT were recorded: the percent difference in SUV max between the FB and DIBH scans was defined as the %BH-index. The %BH-index was significantly higher for lesions in the lower lung area than in the upper lung area. Respiratory motion distance was significantly higher in the lower lung area than in the upper lung area. A significant relationship was observed between the %BH-index and respiratory motion distance. Waveforms without steady end-expiration tended to show a high %BH-index. Significant inverse relationships were observed between %BH-index and cycle speed, and between respiratory motion distance and cycle speed. Decrease in SUV max of FB PET/CT was due to tumor size, distribution of lower lung, long respiratory movement at slow breathing cycle speeds, and respiratory waveforms without steady end-expiration. (author)

  6. PET/MR synchronization by detection of switching gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissler, Bjoern; Gebhardt, Pierre; Lerche, Christoph W; Soultanidis, Georgios; Wehner, Jakob; Heberling, Dirk; Schulz, Volkmar

    2014-01-01

    The full potential of simultaneous PET and MRI image acquisition, such as dynamic studies or motion compensation, can only be explored if the data of both modalities are temporally synchronized. These hybrid imaging systems are often realized as custom made PET inserts for commercially available MRI scanner. Unfortunately, the standard MRIs do not always offer easily programmable synchronization outputs, nor can they be modified.

  7. New findings on cerebral ammonia uptake in HE using functional (13)N-ammonia PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Michael; Keiding, Susanne

    2007-01-01

    PET is a functional imaging technique suitable for studies of brain ammonia metabolism. Dynamic (13)N-ammonia PET yields time-courses of radioactivity concentrations in brain (PET camera) and blood (samples). Ahl et al. (Hepatology 40:73-79, 2004) and Keiding et al. (Hepatology 43:42-50, 2006...

  8. Software for biokinetic modeling of the radiopharmaceuticals used in PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordeiro, Leanderson P.; Vieira, Igor F.; Lima, Fernando R.A. de; Vieira, Jose W.

    2013-01-01

    In this work will be presented the current state of software in development to estimate the dose from PET images. Will be given the main biokinetic models used in PET, as well as the general features of a tool in development, whose current features allow quantitative analysis of compartmental models. Further, the tool allows display images 2D PET (in DICOM format) and quantify the intensity map of regions of interest in counts per second coincidence events. The next step is to insert in the same tool to estimate the activity concentration for ROI and estimate dose from PET images static and / or dynamic

  9. The usefulness of dynamic O-(2-18F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine PET in the clinical evaluation of brain tumors in children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dunkl, Veronika; Cleff, Corvin; Stoffels, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Experience regarding O-(2-(18)F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine ((18)F-FET) PET in children and adolescents with brain tumors is limited. METHODS: Sixty-nine (18)F-FET PET scans of 48 children and adolescents (median age, 13 y; range, 1-18 y) were analyzed retrospectively. Twenty-six scans...... to assess newly diagnosed cerebral lesions, 24 scans for diagnosing tumor progression or recurrence, 8 scans for monitoring of chemotherapy effects, and 11 scans for the detection of residual tumor after resection were obtained. Maximum and mean tumor-to-brain ratios (TBRs) were determined at 20-40 min...... after injection, and time-activity curves of (18)F-FET uptake were assigned to 3 different patterns: constant increase; peak at greater than 20-40 min after injection, followed by a plateau; and early peak (≤ 20 min), followed by a constant descent. The diagnostic accuracy of (18)F-FET PET was assessed...

  10. Selecting Safe Pets (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... supplies (pet bowls, pet bed, leash, etc.) as gifts, then selecting the pet as a family. That way, everyone has time to really think about whether your family is ready for a pet. Key Questions Before adopting or purchasing any pet, talk to all family members, discuss ...

  11. Pet-Related Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Michael J

    2016-11-15

    Physicians and veterinarians have many opportunities to partner in promoting the well-being of people and their pets, especially by addressing zoonotic diseases that may be transmitted between a pet and a human family member. Common cutaneous pet-acquired zoonoses are dermatophytosis (ringworm) and sarcoptic mange (scabies), which are both readily treated. Toxoplasmosis can be acquired from exposure to cat feces, but appropriate hygienic measures can minimize the risk to pregnant women. Persons who work with animals are at increased risk of acquiring bartonellosis (e.g., cat-scratch disease); control of cat fleas is essential to minimize the risk of these infections. People and their pets share a range of tick-borne diseases, and exposure risk can be minimized with use of tick repellent, prompt tick removal, and appropriate tick control measures for pets. Pets such as reptiles, amphibians, and backyard poultry pose a risk of transmitting Salmonella species and are becoming more popular. Personal hygiene after interacting with these pets is crucial to prevent Salmonella infections. Leptospirosis is more often acquired from wildlife than infected dogs, but at-risk dogs can be protected with vaccination. The clinical history in the primary care office should routinely include questions about pets and occupational or other exposure to pet animals. Control and prevention of zoonoses are best achieved by enhancing communication between physicians and veterinarians to ensure patients know the risks of and how to prevent zoonoses in themselves, their pets, and other people.

  12. Multimodal hypoxia imaging and intensity modulated radiation therapy for unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer: the HIL trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Askoxylakis Vasileios

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiotherapy, preferably combined with chemotherapy, is the treatment standard for locally advanced, unresectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The tumor response to different therapy protocols is variable, with hypoxia known to be a major factor that negatively influences treatment effectiveness. Visualisation of tumor hypoxia prior to the use of modern radiation therapy strategies, such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, might allow optimized dose applications to the target volume, leading to improvement of therapy outcome. 18 F-fluoromisonidazole dynamic positron emission tomography and computed tomography (18 F-FMISO dPET-CT and functional magnetic resonance imaging (functional MRI are attractive options for imaging tumor hypoxia. Methods/design The HIL trial is a single centre study combining multimodal hypoxia imaging with 18 F-FMISO dPET-CT and functional MRI, with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT in patients with inoperable stage III NSCLC. 15 patients will be recruited in the study. All patients undergo initial FDG PET-CT and serial 18 F-FMISO dPET-CT and functional MRI before treatment, at week 5 of radiotherapy and 6 weeks post treatment. Radiation therapy is performed as inversely planned IMRT based on 4D-CT. Discussion Primary objectives of the trial are to characterize the correlation of 18 F-FMISO dPET-CT and functional MRI for tumor hypoxia imaging in NSCLC and evaluate possible effects of radiation therapy on tumor re-oxygenation. Further objectives include the generation of data regarding the prognostic value of 18 F-FMISO dPET-CT and functional MRI for locoregional control, progression free survival and overall survival of NSCLC treated with IMRT, which will form the basis for larger clinical trials focusing on possible interactions between tumor oxygenation and radiotherapy outcome. Trial registration The ClinicalTrials.gov protocol ID is NCT01617980

  13. Pets and the immunocompromised person

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... marrow transplant patients and pets; Chemotherapy patients and pets ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Healthy pets healthy people. www.cdc.gov/healthypets . Updated July 19, 2016. ...

  14. Sensory analysis of pet foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppel, Kadri

    2014-08-01

    Pet food palatability depends first and foremost on the pet and is related to the pet food sensory properties such as aroma, texture and flavor. Sensory analysis of pet foods may be conducted by humans via descriptive or hedonic analysis, pets via acceptance or preference tests, and through a number of instrumental analysis methods. Sensory analysis of pet foods provides additional information on reasons behind palatable and unpalatable foods as pets lack linguistic capabilities. Furthermore, sensory analysis may be combined with other types of information such as personality and environment factors to increase understanding of acceptable pet foods. Most pet food flavor research is proprietary and, thus, there are a limited number of publications available. Funding opportunities for pet food studies would increase research and publications and this would help raise public awareness of pet food related issues. This mini-review addresses current pet food sensory analysis literature and discusses future challenges and possibilities. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Clinical PET application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sang Moo; Hong, Song W.; Choi, Chang W.; Yang, Seong Dae [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea)

    1997-12-01

    PET gives various methabolic images, and is very important, new diagnostic modality in clinical oncology. In Korea Cancer Center Hospital, PET is installed as a research tool of long-mid-term atomic research project. For the efficient use of PET for clinical and research projects, income from the patients should be managed to get the raw material, equipment, manpower, and also for the clinical PET research. 1. Support the clinical application of PET in oncology. 2. Budgetary management of income, costs for raw material, equipment, manpower, and the clinical PET research project. In this year, 250 cases of PET images were obtained, which resulted total income of 180,000,000 won. 50,000,000 won was deposited for the 1998 PET clinical research. Second year PET clinical research should be managed under unified project. Increased demand for {sup 18}FDG in and outside KCCH need more than 2 times production of {sup 18}FDG in a day purchase of HPLC pump and {sup 68}Ga pin source which was delayed due to economic crisis, should be done early in 1998. (author). 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Evaluation of PET Scanner Performance in PET/MR and PET/CT Systems: NEMA Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa Demir; Türkay Toklu; Mohammad Abuqbeitah; Hüseyin Çetin; H. Sezer Sezgin; Nami Yeyin; Kerim Sönmezoğlu

    2018-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to compare the performance of positron emission tomography (PET) component of PET/computed tomography (CT) with new emerging PET/magnetic resonance (MR) of the same vendor. Methods: According to National Electrical Manufacturers Association NU2-07, five separate experimental tests were performed to evaluate the performance of PET scanner of General Electric GE company; SIGNATM model PET/MR and GE Discovery 710 model PET/CT. The main investigated...

  17. Evaluation of PET Scanner Performance in PET/MR and PET/CT Systems: NEMA Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Demir, Mustafa; Toklu, Türkay; Abuqbeitah, Mohammad; Çetin, Hüseyin; Sezgin, H. Sezer; Yeyin, Nami; Sönmezoğlu, Kerim

    2018-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to compare the performance of positron emission tomography (PET) component of PET/computed tomography (CT) with new emerging PET/magnetic resonance (MR) of the same vendor. Methods: According to National Electrical Manufacturers Association NU2-07, five separate experimental tests were performed to evaluate the performance of PET scanner of General Electric GE company; SIGNATM model PET/MR and GE Discovery 710 model PET/CT. The main investigated asp...

  18. Multimodality Functional Imaging in Radiation Therapy Planning: Relationships between Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI, Diffusion-Weighted MRI, and 18F-FDG PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moisés Mera Iglesias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Biologically guided radiotherapy needs an understanding of how different functional imaging techniques interact and link together. We analyse three functional imaging techniques that can be useful tools for achieving this objective. Materials and Methods. The three different imaging modalities from one selected patient are ADC maps, DCE-MRI, and 18F-FDG PET/CT, because they are widely used and give a great amount of complementary information. We show the relationship between these three datasets and evaluate them as markers for tumour response or hypoxia marker. Thus, vascularization measured using DCE-MRI parameters can determine tumour hypoxia, and ADC maps can be used for evaluating tumour response. Results. ADC and DCE-MRI include information from 18F-FDG, as glucose metabolism is associated with hypoxia and tumour cell density, although 18F-FDG includes more information about the malignancy of the tumour. The main disadvantage of ADC maps is the distortion, and we used only low distorted regions, and extracellular volume calculated from DCE-MRI can be considered equivalent to ADC in well-vascularized areas. Conclusion. A dataset for achieving the biologically guided radiotherapy must include a tumour density study and a hypoxia marker. This information can be achieved using only MRI data or only PET/CT studies or mixing both datasets.

  19. Reproducibility of Quantitative Brain Imaging Using a PET-Only and a Combined PET/MR System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin L. Lassen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of migrating a quantitative brain imaging protocol from a positron emission tomography (PET-only system to an integrated PET/MR system. Potential differences in both absolute radiotracer concentration as well as in the derived kinetic parameters as a function of PET system choice have been investigated. Five healthy volunteers underwent dynamic (R-[11C]verapamil imaging on the same day using a GE-Advance (PET-only and a Siemens Biograph mMR system (PET/MR. PET-emission data were reconstructed using a transmission-based attenuation correction (AC map (PET-only, whereas a standard MR-DIXON as well as a low-dose CT AC map was applied to PET/MR emission data. Kinetic modeling based on arterial blood sampling was performed using a 1-tissue-2-rate constant compartment model, yielding kinetic parameters (K1 and k2 and distribution volume (VT. Differences for parametric values obtained in the PET-only and the PET/MR systems were analyzed using a 2-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA. Comparison of DIXON-based AC (PET/MR with emission data derived from the PET-only system revealed average inter-system differences of −33 ± 14% (p < 0.05 for the K1 parameter and −19 ± 9% (p < 0.05 for k2. Using a CT-based AC for PET/MR resulted in slightly lower systematic differences of −16 ± 18% for K1 and −9 ± 10% for k2. The average differences in VT were −18 ± 10% (p < 0.05 for DIXON- and −8 ± 13% for CT-based AC. Significant systematic differences were observed for kinetic parameters derived from emission data obtained from PET/MR and PET-only imaging due to different standard AC methods employed. Therefore, a transfer of imaging protocols from PET-only to PET/MR systems is not straightforward without application of proper correction methods.Clinical Trial Registration:www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu, identifier 2013-001724-19

  20. Birds Kept as Pets

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your pet’s health Visit a veterinarian who has experience with pet birds for routine check-ups to keep your bird healthy and prevent infectious diseases. If your bird becomes sick or dies within a month after purchase or adoption: Contact your veterinarian. Inform the pet ...

  1. Model PET Scan Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunk, Amber; Gazdovich, Jennifer; Redouté, Oriane; Reverte, Juan Manuel; Shelley, Samantha; Todorova, Vesela

    2018-05-01

    This paper provides a brief introduction to antimatter and how it, along with other modern physics topics, is utilized in positron emission tomography (PET) scans. It further describes a hands-on activity for students to help them gain an understanding of how PET scans assist in detecting cancer. Modern physics topics provide an exciting way to introduce students to current applications of physics.

  2. Usage of Recycled Pet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ebru Tayyar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing industrialization, urbanization and the technological development have caused to increase depletion of the natural resources and environmental pollution's problem. Especially, for the countries which have not enough space recycling of the waste eliminating waste on regular basis or decreasing the amount and volume of waste have provided the important advantages. There are lots of studies and projects to develop both protect resources and prevent environmental pollution. PET bottles are commonly used in beverage industry and can be reused after physical and chemical recycling processes. Usage areas of recycled PET have been developed rapidly. Although recycled PET is used in plastic industry, composite industry also provides usage alternatives of recycled PET. Textile is a suitable sector for recycling of some plastics made of polymers too. In this study, the recycling technologies and applications of waste PET bottles have been investigated and scientific works in this area have been summarized.

  3. Oncology PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inubushi, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    At the beginning of this article, likening medical images to 'Where is Waldo?' I indicate the concept of diagnostic process of PET/CT imaging, so that medical physics specialists could understand the role of each imaging modality and infer our distress for image diagnosis. Then, I state the present situation of PET imaging and the basics (e.g. health insurance coverage, clinical significance, principle, protocol, and pitfall) of oncology FDG-PET imaging which accounts for more than 99% of all clinical PET examinations in Japan. Finally, I would like to give a wishful prospect of oncology PET that will expand to be more cancer-specific in order to assess therapeutic effects of emerging molecular targeted drugs targeting the 'hallmarks of cancer'. (author)

  4. Bringing physiology into PET of the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiding, Susanne

    2012-03-01

    Several physiologic features make interpretation of PET studies of liver physiology an exciting challenge. As with other organs, hepatic tracer kinetics using PET is quantified by dynamic recording of the liver after the administration of a radioactive tracer, with measurements of time-activity curves in the blood supply. However, the liver receives blood from both the portal vein and the hepatic artery, with the peak of the portal vein time-activity curve being delayed and dispersed compared with that of the hepatic artery. The use of a flow-weighted dual-input time-activity curve is of importance for the estimation of hepatic blood perfusion through initial dynamic PET recording. The portal vein is inaccessible in humans, and methods of estimating the dual-input time-activity curve without portal vein measurements are being developed. Such methods are used to estimate regional hepatic blood perfusion, for example, by means of the initial part of a dynamic (18)F-FDG PET/CT recording. Later, steady-state hepatic metabolism can be assessed using only the arterial input, provided that neither the tracer nor its metabolites are irreversibly trapped in the prehepatic splanchnic area within the acquisition period. This is used in studies of regulation of hepatic metabolism of, for example, (18)F-FDG and (11)C-palmitate.

  5. Imaging Alzheimer's disease pathophysiology with PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Porcello Schilling

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Alzheimer's disease (AD has been reconceptualised as a dynamic pathophysiological process characterized by preclinical, mild cognitive impairment (MCI, and dementia stages. Positron emission tomography (PET associated with various molecular imaging agents reveals numerous aspects of dementia pathophysiology, such as brain amyloidosis, tau accumulation, neuroreceptor changes, metabolism abnormalities and neuroinflammation in dementia patients. In the context of a growing shift toward presymptomatic early diagnosis and disease-modifying interventions, PET molecular imaging agents provide an unprecedented means of quantifying the AD pathophysiological process, monitoring disease progression, ascertaining whether therapies engage their respective brain molecular targets, as well as quantifying pharmacological responses. In the present study, we highlight the most important contributions of PET in describing brain molecular abnormalities in AD.

  6. Technology challenges in small animal PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecomte, Roger

    2004-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a non-invasive nuclear imaging modality allowing biochemical processes to be investigated in vivo with sensitivity in the picomolar range. For this reason, PET has the potential to play a major role in the emerging field of molecular imaging by enabling the study of molecular pathways and genetic processes in living animals non-invasively. The challenge is to obtain a spatial resolution that is appropriate for rat and mouse imaging, the preferred animal models for research in biology, while achieving a sensitivity adequate for real-time measurement of rapid dynamic processes in vivo without violating tracer kinetic principles. An overview of the current state of development of dedicated small animal PET scanners is given, and selected applications are reported and discussed with respect to performance and significance to research in biology

  7. Properties of PET/PLA Electrospun Blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kevin; Cebe, Peggy

    2012-02-01

    Electrospun membranes were fabricated from poly(ethylene terephthalate), PET, co-spun with poly(lactic acid), PLA. The PLA contained 2% of the D-isomer, which served to limit the overall degree of crystallinity. Membranes were deposited from blended solutions of PET/PLA in hexafluoroisopropanol. The PET/PLA composition ranged from 0/100, 75/25, 50/50, 25/75, and 100/0. Electrospun membranes were made using either a static flat plate or a rotating wheel as the counter electrode, yielding unoriented mats or highly oriented tapes, respectively. We report on our investigation of the crystallinity, crystal perfection, and mechanical properties of these materials using differential scanning calorimetry, wide and small angle X-ray scattering, and dynamic mechanical analysis. In particular, we study the ability of one blend component (PET) to crystallize in the presence of existing crystals of the second blend component (PLA) which crystallizes first and at a lower temperature than PET.

  8. SU-F-E-03: PET/CT Guided Dose Boost to Hypoxic Sub-Volume in Nasopharyngeal Carcinomas Using Self-Optimizing Non-Uniform VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, J; Zheng, X; Liu, H; Chen, B; Zhuo, W [FuDan University HuaDong Hospital, Institute of Radiation Medicine Fudan University Shanghai, Shanghai (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: This study is to evaluate the feasibility of simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) to hypoxic subvolume (HTV) in nasopharyngeal carcinomas under the guidance of 18F-Fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) PET/CT using a novel non-uniform volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT)technique. Methods: Eight nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients treated with conventional uniform VMAT were retrospectively analyzed. For each treatment, actual conventional uniform VMAT plan with two or more arcs (2–2.5 arcs, totally rotating angle < 1000o) was designed with dose boost to hopxic subvolume (total dose, 84Gy) in the gross tumor volme (GTV) under the guidance of 18F- FMISO PET/CT. Based on the same dataset, experimental single arc non-uniform VAMT plans were generated with the same dose prescription using customized software tools. Dosimetric parameters, quality assurance and the efficiency of the treatment delivery were compared between the uniform and non-uniform VMAT plans. Results: To develop the non-uniform VMAT technique, a specific optimization model was successfully established. Both techniques generate high-quality plans with pass rate (>98%) with the 3mm, 3% criterion. HTV received dose of 84.1±0.75Gy and 84.1±1.2Gy from uniform and non-uniform VMAT plans, respectively. In terms of target coverage and dose homogeneity, there was no significant statistical difference between actual and experimental plans for each case. However, for critical organs at risk (OAR), including the parotids, oral cavity and larynx, dosimetric difference was significant with better dose sparing form experimental plans. Regarding plan implementation efficiency, the average machine time was 3.5 minutes for the actual VMAT plans and 3.7 minutes for the experimental nonuniform VMAT plans (p>0.050). Conclusion: Compared to conventional VMAT technique, the proposed non-uniform VMAT technique has the potential to produce efficient and safe treatment plans, especially in cases with complicated anatomical

  9. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for the prediction of survival in oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma treated with chemoradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Shu-Hang [Chang Gung University, Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kueishan, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kueishan, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung University, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kueishan, Taoyuan (China); Liao, Chun-Ta [Chang Gung University, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kueishan, Taoyuan (China); Lin, Chien-Yu; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Fan, Kang-Hsing [Chang Gung University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kueishan, Taoyuan (China); Chan, Sheng-Chieh; Yen, Tzu-Chen [Chang Gung University, Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kueishan, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kueishan, Taoyuan (China); Lin, Yu-Chun [Chang Gung University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kueishan, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung University, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kueishan, Taoyuan (China); Ko, Sheung-Fat [Chang Gung University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kueishan, Taoyuan (China); Wang, Hung-Ming [Chang Gung University, Department of Medical Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kueishan, Taoyuan (China); Yang, Lan-Yan [Chang Gung University, Biostatistics and Informatics Unit, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kueishan, Taoyuan (China); Wang, Jiun-Jie [Chang Gung University, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kueishan, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Neuroscience Research Center, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Keelung (China); Chang Gung University / Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Medical Imaging Research Center, Institute for Radiological Research, Taoyuan (China)

    2016-11-15

    We prospectively investigated the roles of pretreatment dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI), diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET)/CT for predicting survival of oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OHSCC) patients treated with chemoradiation. Patients with histologically proven OHSCC and neck nodal metastases scheduled for chemoradiation were eligible. Clinical variables as well as DCE-MRI-, DWI- and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT-derived parameters of the primary tumours and metastatic neck nodes were analysed in relation to 3-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates. Eighty-six patients were available for analysis. Multivariate analysis identified the efflux rate constant (K{sub ep})-tumour < 3.79 min{sup -1} (P = 0.001), relative volume of extracellular extravascular space (V{sub e})-node < 0.23 (P = 0.004) and SUV{sub max}-tumour > 19.44 (P = 0.025) as independent risk factors for both PFS and OS. A scoring system based upon the sum of each of the three imaging parameters allowed stratification of our patients into three groups (patients with 0/1 factor, patients with 2 factors and patients with 3 factors, respectively) with distinct PFS (3-year rates = 72 %, 38 % and 0 %, P < 0.0001) and OS (3-year rates = 81 %, 46 % and 20 %, P < 0.0001). K{sub ep}-tumour, V{sub e}-node and SUV{sub max}-tumour were independent prognosticators for OHSCC treated with chemoradiation. Their combination helped survival stratification. (orig.)

  10. First validation of myocardial flow reserve assessed by dynamic 99mTc-sestamibi CZT-SPECT camera: head to head comparison with 15O-water PET and fractional flow reserve in patients with suspected coronary artery disease. The WATERDAY study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, Denis; Roule, Vincent; Nganoa, Catherine; Roth, Nathaniel; Baavour, Raphael; Parienti, Jean-Jacques; Beygui, Farzin; Manrique, Alain

    2018-07-01

    We assessed the feasibility of myocardial blood flow (MBF) and flow reserve (MFR) estimation using dynamic SPECT with a novel CZT camera in patients with stable CAD, in comparison with 15 O-water PET and fractional flow reserve (FFR). Thirty patients were prospectively included and underwent FFR measurements in the main coronary arteries (LAD, LCx, RCA). A stenosis ≥50% was considered obstructive and a FFR abnormal if ≤0.8. All patients underwent a dynamic rest/stress 99m Tc-sestamibi CZT-SPECT and 15 O-water PET for MBF and MFR calculation. Net retention kinetic modeling was applied to SPECT data to estimate global uptake values, and MBF was derived using Leppo correction. Ischemia by PET and CZT-SPECT was considered present if MFR was lower than 2 and 2.1, respectively. CZT-SPECT yielded higher stress and rest MBF compared to PET for global and LAD and LCx territories, but not in RCA territory. MFR was similar in global and each vessel territory for both modalities. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive value of CZT-SPECT were, respectively, 83.3, 95.8, 93.3, 100 and 85.7% for the detection of ischemia and 58.3, 84.6, 81.1, 36.8 and 93% for the detection of hemodynamically significant stenosis (FFR ≤ 0.8). Dynamic 99m Tc-sestamibi CZT-SPECT was technically feasible and provided similar MFR compared to 15 O-water PET and high diagnostic value for detecting impaired MFR and abnormal FFR in patients with stable CAD.

  11. Evaluation of PET Scanner Performance in PET/MR and PET/CT Systems: NEMA Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Mustafa; Toklu, Türkay; Abuqbeitah, Mohammad; Çetin, Hüseyin; Sezgin, H Sezer; Yeyin, Nami; Sönmezoğlu, Kerim

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the performance of positron emission tomography (PET) component of PET/computed tomography (CT) with new emerging PET/magnetic resonance (MR) of the same vendor. According to National Electrical Manufacturers Association NU2-07, five separate experimental tests were performed to evaluate the performance of PET scanner of General Electric GE company; SIGNATM model PET/MR and GE Discovery 710 model PET/CT. The main investigated aspects were spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction, count rate performance, image quality, count loss and random events correction accuracy. The findings of this study demonstrated superior sensitivity (~ 4 folds) of PET scanner in PET/MR compared to PET/CT system. Image quality test exhibited higher contrast in PET/MR (~ 9%) compared with PET/CT. The scatter fraction of PET/MR was 43.4% at noise equivalent count rate (NECR) peak of 218 kcps and the corresponding activity concentration was 17.7 kBq/cc. Whereas the scatter fraction of PET/CT was found as 39.2% at NECR peak of 72 kcps and activity concentration of 24.3 kBq/cc. The percentage error of the random event correction accuracy was 3.4% and 3.1% in PET/MR and PET/CT, respectively. It was concluded that PET/MR system is about 4 times more sensitive than PET/CT, and the contrast of hot lesions in PET/MR was ~ 9% higher than PET/CT. These outcomes also emphasize the possibility to achieve excellent clinical PET images with low administered dose and/or a short acquisition time in PET/MR.

  12. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollo, F.D.; Hines, H.

    2001-01-01

    ADAC Laboratories has two main imaging strengths: PET and Gamma Cameras. PET's three-dimensional imaging of metabolic function is used in oncology, with emerging opportunties in cardiology, genetic mapping and pharmaceuticals research. In oncology, PET imaging can provide comprehensive and accurate staging information which is not available from CT or MRI. In some cases, this information can lead to modification of treatment, for example from an aggressive approach to one of palliation. The SKYLight is the world's first and only gantry-free camera. It is a dual-detector variable angle camera designed for high throughput, with unsurpassed openness and patient access. (orig.)

  13. Policies on pets for healthy cities: a conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Melanie J; Adams, Cindy L; Degeling, Chris; Massolo, Alessandro; McCormack, Gavin R

    2015-12-01

    Drawing on the One Health concept, and integrating a dual focus on public policy and practices of caring from the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion, we outline a conceptual framework to help guide the development and assessment of local governments' policies on pets. This framework emphasizes well-being in human populations, while recognizing that these outcomes relate to the well-being of non-human animals. Five intersecting spheres of activity, each associated with local governments' jurisdiction over pets, are presented: (i) preventing threats and nuisances from pets, (ii) meeting pets' emotional and physical needs, (iii) procuring pets ethically, (iv) providing pets with veterinary services and (v) licensing and identifying pets. This conceptual framework acknowledges the tenets of previous health promotion frameworks, including overlapping and intersecting influences. At the same time, this framework proposes to advance our understanding of health promotion and, more broadly, population health by underscoring interdependence between people and pets as well as the dynamism of urbanized ecologies. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Simultaneous functional imaging using fPET and fMRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villien, Marjorie [CERMEP (France)

    2015-05-18

    Brain mapping of task-associated changes in metabolism with PET has been accomplished by subtracting scans acquired during two distinct static states. We have demonstrated that PET can provide truly dynamic information on cerebral energy metabolism using constant infusion of FDG and multiple stimuli in a single experiment. We demonstrate here that the functional PET (fPET-FDG) method accomplished simultaneously with fMRI, can enable the first direct comparisons in time, space and magnitude of hemodynamics and oxygen and glucose consumption. The imaging studies were performed on a 3T Tim-Trio MR scanner modified to support an MR-compatible BrainPET insert. Ten healthy subjects were included. The total PET acquisition and infusion time was 90 minutes. We did 3 blocks of right hand fingers tapping for 10 minutes at 30, 50 and 70 minutes after the beginning of the PET acquisition. ASL and BOLD imaging were acquired simultaneously during the motor paradigm. Changes in glucose utilization are easily observed as changes in the TAC slope of the PET data (FDG utilization rate) and in the derivative signal during motor stimuli in the activated voxels. PET and MRI (ASL, and BOLD) activations are largely colocalized but with very different statistical significance and temporal dynamic, especially in the ipsilateral side of the stimuli. This study demonstrated that motor activation can be measured dynamically during a single FDG PET scan. The complementary nature of fPET-FDG to fMRI capitalizes on the emerging technology of hybrid MR-PET scanners. fPET-FDG, combined with quantitative fMRI methods, allow us to simultaneously measure dynamic changes in glucose utilization and hemodynamic, addressing vital questions about neurovascular coupling.

  15. Simultaneous functional imaging using fPET and fMRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villien, Marjorie

    2015-01-01

    Brain mapping of task-associated changes in metabolism with PET has been accomplished by subtracting scans acquired during two distinct static states. We have demonstrated that PET can provide truly dynamic information on cerebral energy metabolism using constant infusion of FDG and multiple stimuli in a single experiment. We demonstrate here that the functional PET (fPET-FDG) method accomplished simultaneously with fMRI, can enable the first direct comparisons in time, space and magnitude of hemodynamics and oxygen and glucose consumption. The imaging studies were performed on a 3T Tim-Trio MR scanner modified to support an MR-compatible BrainPET insert. Ten healthy subjects were included. The total PET acquisition and infusion time was 90 minutes. We did 3 blocks of right hand fingers tapping for 10 minutes at 30, 50 and 70 minutes after the beginning of the PET acquisition. ASL and BOLD imaging were acquired simultaneously during the motor paradigm. Changes in glucose utilization are easily observed as changes in the TAC slope of the PET data (FDG utilization rate) and in the derivative signal during motor stimuli in the activated voxels. PET and MRI (ASL, and BOLD) activations are largely colocalized but with very different statistical significance and temporal dynamic, especially in the ipsilateral side of the stimuli. This study demonstrated that motor activation can be measured dynamically during a single FDG PET scan. The complementary nature of fPET-FDG to fMRI capitalizes on the emerging technology of hybrid MR-PET scanners. fPET-FDG, combined with quantitative fMRI methods, allow us to simultaneously measure dynamic changes in glucose utilization and hemodynamic, addressing vital questions about neurovascular coupling.

  16. PET studies in epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarikaya, Ismet

    2015-01-01

    Various PET studies, such as measurements of glucose, serotonin and oxygen metabolism, cerebral blood flow and receptor bindings are availabe for epilepsy. 18Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET imaging of brain glucose metabolism is a well established and widely available technique. Studies have demonstrated that the sensitivity of interictal FDG-PET is higher than interictal SPECT and similar to ictal SPECT for the lateralization and localization of epileptogenic foci in presurgical patients refractory to medical treatments who have noncontributory EEG and MRI. In addition to localizing epileptogenic focus, FDG-PET provide additional important information on the functional status of the rest of the brain. The main limitation of interictal FDG-PET is that it cannot precisely define the surgical margin as the area of hypometabolism usually extends beyond the epileptogenic zone. Various neurotransmitters (GABA, glutamate, opiates, serotonin, dopamine, acethylcholine, and adenosine) and receptor subtypes are involved in epilepsy. PET receptor imaging studies performed in limited centers help to understand the role of neurotransmitters in epileptogenesis, identify epileptic foci and investigate new treatment approaches. PET receptor imaging studies have demonstrated reduced 11C-flumazenil (GABAA-cBDZ) and 18F-MPPF (5-HT1A serotonin) and increased 11C-cerfentanil (mu opiate) and 11C-MeNTI (delta opiate) bindings in the area of seizure. 11C-flumazenil has been reported to be more sensitive than FDG-PET for identifying epileptic foci. The area of abnormality on GABAAcBDZ and opiate receptor images is usually smaller and more circumscribed than the area of hypometabolism on FDG images. Studies have demonstrated that 11C-alpha-methyl-L-tryptophan PET (to study synthesis of serotonin) can detect the epileptic focus within malformations of cortical development and helps in differentiating epileptogenic from non-epileptogenic tubers in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex

  17. Dual gated PET/CT imaging of small targets of the heart: method description and testing with a dynamic heart phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokki, Tommi; Sipilä, Hannu T; Teräs, Mika; Noponen, Tommi; Durand-Schaefer, Nicolas; Klén, Riku; Knuuti, Juhani

    2010-01-01

    In PET imaging respiratory and cardiac contraction motions interfere the imaging of heart. The aim was to develop and evaluate dual gating method for improving the detection of small targets of the heart. The method utilizes two independent triggers which are sent periodically into list mode data based on respiratory and ECG cycles. An algorithm for generating dual gated segments from list mode data was developed. The test measurements showed that rotational and axial movements of point source can be separated spatially to different segments with well-defined borders. The effect of dual gating on detection of small moving targets was tested with a moving heart phantom. Dual gated images showed 51% elimination (3.6 mm out of 7.0 mm) of contraction motion of hot spot (diameter 3 mm) and 70% elimination (14 mm out of 20 mm) of respiratory motion. Averaged activity value of hot spot increases by 89% when comparing to non-gated images. Patient study of suspected cardiac sarcoidosis shows sharper spatial myocardial uptake profile and improved detection of small myocardial structures such as papillary muscles. The dual gating method improves detection of small moving targets in a phantom and it is feasible in clinical situations.

  18. PET and Recycling

    OpenAIRE

    Funda Sevencan; Songul A. Vaizoglu

    2007-01-01

    This review aims to clarify the need of decreasing the environmental effects caused by human and draw attention to the increasing environmental effects of plastics wastes. Plastics consist of organic molecules with high density molecules or polymers. Main resources of plastics are the residue of oil rafineries. Several advantages of plastics, have increased the usage continuously. Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) is the most commonly used plastics. PET is used to protect food, drinking water,...

  19. TH-E-202-02: The Use of Hypoxia PET Imaging for Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humm, J.

    2016-01-01

    PET/CT is a very important imaging tool in the management of oncology patients. PET/CT has been applied for treatment planning and response evaluation in radiation therapy. This educational session will discuss: Pitfalls and remedies in PET/CT imaging for RT planning The use of hypoxia PET imaging for radiotherapy PET for tumor response evaluation The first presentation will address the issue of mis-registration between the CT and PET images in the thorax and the abdomen. We will discuss the challenges of respiratory gating and introduce an average CT technique to improve the registration for dose calculation and image-guidance in radiation therapy. The second presentation will discuss the use of hypoxia PET Imaging for radiation therapy. We will discuss various hypoxia radiotracers, the choice of clinical acquisition protocol (in particular a single late static acquisition versus a dynamic acquisition), and the compartmental modeling with different transfer rate constants explained. We will demonstrate applications of hypoxia imaging for dose escalation/de-escalation in clinical trials. The last presentation will discuss the use of PET/CT for tumor response evaluation. We will discuss anatomic response assessment vs. metabolic response assessment, visual evaluation and semi-quantitative evaluation, and limitations of current PET/CT assessment. We will summarize clinical trials using PET response in guiding adaptive radiotherapy. Finally, we will summarize recent advancements in PET/CT radiomics and non-FDG PET tracers for response assessment. Learning Objectives: Identify the causes of mis-registration of CT and PET images in PET/CT, and review the strategies to remedy the issue. Understand the basics of PET imaging of tumor hypoxia (radiotracers, how PET measures the hypoxia selective uptake, imaging protocols, applications in chemo-radiation therapy). Understand the basics of dynamic PET imaging, compartmental modeling and parametric images. Understand the

  20. TH-E-202-03: PET for Tumor Response Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, W.

    2016-01-01

    PET/CT is a very important imaging tool in the management of oncology patients. PET/CT has been applied for treatment planning and response evaluation in radiation therapy. This educational session will discuss: Pitfalls and remedies in PET/CT imaging for RT planning The use of hypoxia PET imaging for radiotherapy PET for tumor response evaluation The first presentation will address the issue of mis-registration between the CT and PET images in the thorax and the abdomen. We will discuss the challenges of respiratory gating and introduce an average CT technique to improve the registration for dose calculation and image-guidance in radiation therapy. The second presentation will discuss the use of hypoxia PET Imaging for radiation therapy. We will discuss various hypoxia radiotracers, the choice of clinical acquisition protocol (in particular a single late static acquisition versus a dynamic acquisition), and the compartmental modeling with different transfer rate constants explained. We will demonstrate applications of hypoxia imaging for dose escalation/de-escalation in clinical trials. The last presentation will discuss the use of PET/CT for tumor response evaluation. We will discuss anatomic response assessment vs. metabolic response assessment, visual evaluation and semi-quantitative evaluation, and limitations of current PET/CT assessment. We will summarize clinical trials using PET response in guiding adaptive radiotherapy. Finally, we will summarize recent advancements in PET/CT radiomics and non-FDG PET tracers for response assessment. Learning Objectives: Identify the causes of mis-registration of CT and PET images in PET/CT, and review the strategies to remedy the issue. Understand the basics of PET imaging of tumor hypoxia (radiotracers, how PET measures the hypoxia selective uptake, imaging protocols, applications in chemo-radiation therapy). Understand the basics of dynamic PET imaging, compartmental modeling and parametric images. Understand the

  1. TH-E-202-02: The Use of Hypoxia PET Imaging for Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humm, J. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    PET/CT is a very important imaging tool in the management of oncology patients. PET/CT has been applied for treatment planning and response evaluation in radiation therapy. This educational session will discuss: Pitfalls and remedies in PET/CT imaging for RT planning The use of hypoxia PET imaging for radiotherapy PET for tumor response evaluation The first presentation will address the issue of mis-registration between the CT and PET images in the thorax and the abdomen. We will discuss the challenges of respiratory gating and introduce an average CT technique to improve the registration for dose calculation and image-guidance in radiation therapy. The second presentation will discuss the use of hypoxia PET Imaging for radiation therapy. We will discuss various hypoxia radiotracers, the choice of clinical acquisition protocol (in particular a single late static acquisition versus a dynamic acquisition), and the compartmental modeling with different transfer rate constants explained. We will demonstrate applications of hypoxia imaging for dose escalation/de-escalation in clinical trials. The last presentation will discuss the use of PET/CT for tumor response evaluation. We will discuss anatomic response assessment vs. metabolic response assessment, visual evaluation and semi-quantitative evaluation, and limitations of current PET/CT assessment. We will summarize clinical trials using PET response in guiding adaptive radiotherapy. Finally, we will summarize recent advancements in PET/CT radiomics and non-FDG PET tracers for response assessment. Learning Objectives: Identify the causes of mis-registration of CT and PET images in PET/CT, and review the strategies to remedy the issue. Understand the basics of PET imaging of tumor hypoxia (radiotracers, how PET measures the hypoxia selective uptake, imaging protocols, applications in chemo-radiation therapy). Understand the basics of dynamic PET imaging, compartmental modeling and parametric images. Understand the

  2. TH-E-202-03: PET for Tumor Response Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, W. [University of Maryland School of Medicine (United States)

    2016-06-15

    PET/CT is a very important imaging tool in the management of oncology patients. PET/CT has been applied for treatment planning and response evaluation in radiation therapy. This educational session will discuss: Pitfalls and remedies in PET/CT imaging for RT planning The use of hypoxia PET imaging for radiotherapy PET for tumor response evaluation The first presentation will address the issue of mis-registration between the CT and PET images in the thorax and the abdomen. We will discuss the challenges of respiratory gating and introduce an average CT technique to improve the registration for dose calculation and image-guidance in radiation therapy. The second presentation will discuss the use of hypoxia PET Imaging for radiation therapy. We will discuss various hypoxia radiotracers, the choice of clinical acquisition protocol (in particular a single late static acquisition versus a dynamic acquisition), and the compartmental modeling with different transfer rate constants explained. We will demonstrate applications of hypoxia imaging for dose escalation/de-escalation in clinical trials. The last presentation will discuss the use of PET/CT for tumor response evaluation. We will discuss anatomic response assessment vs. metabolic response assessment, visual evaluation and semi-quantitative evaluation, and limitations of current PET/CT assessment. We will summarize clinical trials using PET response in guiding adaptive radiotherapy. Finally, we will summarize recent advancements in PET/CT radiomics and non-FDG PET tracers for response assessment. Learning Objectives: Identify the causes of mis-registration of CT and PET images in PET/CT, and review the strategies to remedy the issue. Understand the basics of PET imaging of tumor hypoxia (radiotracers, how PET measures the hypoxia selective uptake, imaging protocols, applications in chemo-radiation therapy). Understand the basics of dynamic PET imaging, compartmental modeling and parametric images. Understand the

  3. Motion compensation for fully 4D PET reconstruction using PET superset data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verhaeghe, J; Gravel, P; Mio, R; Fukasawa, R; Rosa-Neto, P; Soucy, J-P; Thompson, C J; Reader, A J, E-mail: jeroen.verhaeghe@mcgill.c [Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal (Canada)

    2010-07-21

    Fully 4D PET image reconstruction is receiving increasing research interest due to its ability to significantly reduce spatiotemporal noise in dynamic PET imaging. However, thus far in the literature, the important issue of correcting for subject head motion has not been considered. Specifically, as a direct consequence of using temporally extensive basis functions, a single instance of movement propagates to impair the reconstruction of multiple time frames, even if no further movement occurs in those frames. Existing 3D motion compensation strategies have not yet been adapted to 4D reconstruction, and as such the benefits of 4D algorithms have not yet been reaped in a clinical setting where head movement undoubtedly occurs. This work addresses this need, developing a motion compensation method suitable for fully 4D reconstruction methods which exploits an optical tracking system to measure the head motion along with PET superset data to store the motion compensated data. List-mode events are histogrammed as PET superset data according to the measured motion, and a specially devised normalization scheme for motion compensated reconstruction from the superset data is required. This work proceeds to propose the corresponding time-dependent normalization modifications which are required for a major class of fully 4D image reconstruction algorithms (those which use linear combinations of temporal basis functions). Using realistically simulated as well as real high-resolution PET data from the HRRT, we demonstrate both the detrimental impact of subject head motion in fully 4D PET reconstruction and the efficacy of our proposed modifications to 4D algorithms. Benefits are shown both for the individual PET image frames as well as for parametric images of tracer uptake and volume of distribution for {sup 18}F-FDG obtained from Patlak analysis.

  4. Medical application of PET technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Sang Moo; Choi, C. W.; An, S. H.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Yang, S. D.; Jun, G. S. and others

    1999-04-01

    We performed following studies using PET technology: 1. Clinical usefulness of [ 18 F]FDG whole body PET in malignant disease 2. Clinical usefulness of quantitative evaluation of F-18-FDG 3. Pilot study of C-11 methionine PET in brain tumor 4. PET study in patients with Parkinson's disease 5. A study on the clinical myocardial PET image. PET gives various metabolic information for the living human body, and is very important, new diagnostic modality. The PET study will give us the information of cancer patients such as early detection of cancer, staging, recurrence detection and characterization of cancer. The quantitative analysis using PET could be applied to evaluate the pathophysiology of various diseases and develop new drugs and develop new radiopharmaceuticals

  5. PET in neuro-oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelcke, U; Leenders, K.L.

    This article reviews possible clinical applications of positron emission tomography (PET) in brain tumor patients. PET allows quantitative assessment of brain tumor pathophysiology and biochemistry. It therefore provides different information about tumors when compared to histological or

  6. Take Care with Pet Reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... young children. [775 KB] Animals and Health Healthy Pets Healthy People : CDC website with helpful resources and information on health benefits of pets and disease risks Safe Handling Tips for Reptiles ...

  7. Medical application of PET technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sang Moo; Choi, C. W.; An, S. H.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Yang, S. D.; Jun, G. S. and others

    1999-04-01

    We performed following studies using PET technology: 1. Clinical usefulness of [{sup 18}F]FDG whole body PET in malignant disease 2. Clinical usefulness of quantitative evaluation of F-18-FDG 3. Pilot study of C-11 methionine PET in brain tumor 4. PET study in patients with Parkinson's disease 5. A study on the clinical myocardial PET image. PET gives various metabolic information for the living human body, and is very important, new diagnostic modality. The PET study will give us the information of cancer patients such as early detection of cancer, staging, recurrence detection and characterization of cancer. The quantitative analysis using PET could be applied to evaluate the pathophysiology of various diseases and develop new drugs and develop new radiopharmaceuticals.

  8. PET applications in pediatrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shulkin, B. L. [Ann Arbor, Univ. of Michigan Medical Center (United States). Pediatric Nuclear Medicine Section

    1997-12-01

    This article summarizes the major PET studies which have been performed in pediatric patients to elucidate and characterize diseases and normal development. Issues special for the application of the technique in children, such as dosimetry, patient preparation, and image acquisition are discussed. Studies of central nervous system (CNS) development and pathology, including epilepsy, intraventricular hemorrhage, neonatal asphyxia, tumors, and effects on the CNS from treatment of other tumors are reviewed. These have contributed information fundamental to their understanding of CNS development and pathology. PET investigations into the pathophysiology of congenital heart disease have begun and hold great promise to aid their understanding of these conditions. The second major area in which PET has been applied is the study of non CNS neoplasms. Neuroblastoma has been investigated with tracers which explore basic biochemical features which characterize this tumor, as well as with tracers which explore biochemical events relatively specific for this malignancy. Other common and uncommon tumors of childhood are discussed. The PET technique has been shown useful for answering questions of clinical relevance for the management of these uncommon neoplasms. PET is likely to continue to aid their understanding of many pediatric diseases and may gain more widespread clinical acceptance as the technology continues to disseminate rapidly.

  9. Combined PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, D L; Pichler, B J; Gückel, B

    2018-01-01

    The 6th annual meeting to address key issues in positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was held again in Tübingen, Germany, from March 27 to 29, 2017. Over three days of invited plenary lectures, round table discussions and dialogue board deliberations, participants c...... of response to pharmacological interventions and therapies. As such, PET/MRI is a key to advancing medicine and patient care.......The 6th annual meeting to address key issues in positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was held again in Tübingen, Germany, from March 27 to 29, 2017. Over three days of invited plenary lectures, round table discussions and dialogue board deliberations, participants...... critically assessed the current state of PET/MRI, both clinically and as a research tool, and attempted to chart future directions. The meeting addressed the use of PET/MRI and workflows in oncology, neurosciences, infection, inflammation and chronic pain syndromes, as well as deeper discussions about how...

  10. Poster — Thur Eve — 03: Application of the non-negative matrix factorization technique to [{sup 11}C]-DTBZ dynamic PET data for the early detection of Parkinson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong-Chang [CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Jans, Hans; McEwan, Sandy; Riauka, Terence [Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Cross Cancer Institute, Alberta Health Services, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Martin, Wayne; Wieler, Marguerite [Division of Neurology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    In this work, a class of non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) technique known as alternating non-negative least squares, combined with the projected gradient method, is used to analyze twenty-five [{sup 11}C]-DTBZ dynamic PET/CT brain data. For each subject, a two-factor model is assumed and two factors representing the striatum (factor 1) and the non-striatum (factor 2) tissues are extracted using the proposed NMF technique and commercially available factor analysis software “Pixies”. The extracted factor 1 and 2 curves represent the binding site of the radiotracer and describe the uptake and clearance of the radiotracer by soft tissues in the brain, respectively. The proposed NMF technique uses prior information about the dynamic data to obtain sample time-activity curves representing the striatum and the non-striatum tissues. These curves are then used for “warm” starting the optimization. Factor solutions from the two methods are compared graphically and quantitatively. In healthy subjects, radiotracer uptake by factors 1 and 2 are approximately 35–40% and 60–65%, respectively. The solutions are also used to develop a factor-based metric for the detection of early, untreated Parkinson's disease. The metric stratifies healthy subjects from suspected Parkinson's patients (based on the graphical method). The analysis shows that both techniques produce comparable results with similar computational time. The “semi-automatic” approach used by the NMF technique allows clinicians to manually set a starting condition for “warm” starting the optimization in order to facilitate control and efficient interaction with the data.

  11. PET imaging in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faria, Daniele de Paula; Copray, Sjef; Buchpiguel, Carlos; Dierckx, Rudi; de Vries, Erik

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a non-invasive technique for quantitative imaging of biochemical and physiological processes in animals and humans. PET uses probes labeled with a radioactive isotope, called PET tracers, which can bind to or be converted by a specific biological target and thus

  12. Image-derived input function in dynamic human PET/CT: methodology and validation with 11C-acetate and 18F-fluorothioheptadecanoic acid in muscle and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose in brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croteau, Etienne; Lavallee, Eric; Hubert, Laurent; Rousseau, Jacques A.; Lecomte, Roger; Labbe, Sebastien M.; Carpentier, Andre C.; Pifferi, Fabien; Cunnane, Stephen C.; Benard, Francois

    2010-01-01

    Despite current advances in PET/CT systems, blood sampling still remains the standard method to obtain the radiotracer input function for tracer kinetic modelling. The purpose of this study was to validate the use of image-derived input functions (IDIF) of the carotid and femoral arteries to measure the arterial input function (AIF) in PET imaging. The data were obtained from two different research studies, one using 18 F-FDG for brain imaging and the other using 11 C-acetate and 18 F-fluoro-6-thioheptadecanoic acid ( 18 F-FTHA) in femoral muscles. The method was validated with two phantom systems. First, a static phantom consisting of syringes of different diameters containing radioactivity was used to determine the recovery coefficient (RC) and spill-in factors. Second, a dynamic phantom built to model bolus injection and clearance of tracers was used to establish the correlation between blood sampling, AIF and IDIF. The RC was then applied to the femoral artery data from PET imaging studies with 11 C-acetate and 18 F-FTHA and to carotid artery data from brain imaging with 18 F-FDG. These IDIF data were then compared to actual AIFs from patients. With 11 C-acetate, the perfusion index in the femoral muscle was 0.34±0.18 min -1 when estimated from the actual time-activity blood curve, 0.29±0.15 min -1 when estimated from the corrected IDIF, and 0.66±0.41 min -1 when the IDIF data were not corrected for RC. A one-way repeated measures (ANOVA) and Tukey's test showed a statistically significant difference for the IDIF not corrected for RC (p 18 F-FTHA there was a strong correlation between Patlak slopes, the plasma to tissue transfer rate calculated using the true plasma radioactivity content and the corrected IDIF for the femoral muscles (vastus lateralis r=0.86, p=0.027; biceps femoris r=0.90, p=0.017). On the other hand, there was no correlation between the values derived using the AIF and those derived using the uncorrected IDIF. Finally, in the brain imaging

  13. PET imaging of inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buscombe, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory diseases are common place and often chronic. Most inflammatory cells have increased uptake of glucose which is enhanced in the presence of local cytokines. Therefore, imaging glucose metabolism by the means of 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) holds significant promise in imaging focal inflammation. Most of the work published involved small series of patients with either vasculitis, sarcoid or rheumatoid arthritis. It would appear that FDG PET is a simple and effective technique to identify inflammatory tissue in these conditions. There is even some work to suggest that by comparing baseline and early post therapy scans clinical outcome can be predicted. This would appear to be true with vasculitis as well as retroperitoneal fibrosis. The number of patients in each study is small but the evidence is compelling enough to recommend FDG PET imaging in the routine care of these patients.

  14. Pet in Clinical oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunsche, A.; Grossman, G.; Santana, M.; Santana, C.; Halkar, R.; Garcia, E.

    2003-01-01

    The utility of the PET (positron emission tomography in clinical oncology has been recognized for more than two decades, locating it as a sensible technique for the diagnosis and the prognosis stratification of the oncology patients. The sensitivity and specificity of the PET in comparation to other image studies have demonstrated to be greater. For some years, there was a restriction of PET because of the high cost of the equipment and the cyclotrons. Nevertheless, the relation of cost/benefits is considered as a priority as this technique offers important clinical information. In this article the results observed when using it in diverse types of cancer, as well as the effectiveness shown in the pre-operating evaluation, the evaluation of residual disease, diagnosis of recurrences, pursuit and prognosis stratification of the patients with cancer. (The author)

  15. Metabolic imaging using PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    There is growing evidence that myocardial metabolism plays a key role not only in ischaemic heart disease but also in a variety of diseases which involve myocardium globally, such as heart failure and diabetes mellitus. Understanding myocardial metabolism in such diseases helps to elucidate the pathophysiology and assists in making therapeutic decisions. As well as providing information on regional changes, PET can deliver quantitative information about both regional and global changes in metabolism. This capability of quantitative measurement is one of the major advantages of PET along with physiological positron tracers, especially relevant in evaluating diseases which involve the whole myocardium. This review discusses major PET tracers for metabolic imaging and their clinical applications and contributions to research regarding ischaemic heart disease and other diseases such as heart failure and diabetic heart disease. Future applications of positron metabolic tracers for the detection of vulnerable plaque are also highlighted briefly. (orig.)

  16. Novel PET sensors