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Sample records for fly control involving

  1. Closed-loop response properties of a visual interneuron involved in fly optomotor control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveed eEjaz

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to methodological limitations neural function is mostly studied under open-loop conditions. Normally, however, nervous systems operate in closed-loop where sensory input is processed to generate behavioural outputs, which again change the sensory input. Here, we investigate the closed-loop responses of an identified visual interneuron, the blowfly H1-cell, that is part of a neural circuit involved in optomotor flight and gaze control. Those behaviours may be triggered by attitude changes during flight in turbulent air. The fly analyses the resulting retinal image shifts and performs compensatory body and head rotations to regain its default attitude. We developed a fly-robot interface to study H1-cell responses in a 1 degree-of-freedom image stabilization task. Image shifts, induced by externally forced rotations, modulate the cell’s spike rate that controls counter rotations of a mobile robot to minimize relative motion between the robot and its visual surroundings. A feedback controller closed the loop between neural activity and the rotation of the robot. Under these conditions we found the following H1-cell response properties: (i the peak spike rate decreases when the mean image velocity is increased, (ii the relationship between spike rate and image velocity depends on the standard deviation of the image velocities suggesting adaptive scaling of the cell’s signalling range, and (iii the cell’s gain decreases linearly with increasing image accelerations.Our results reveal a remarkable qualitative similarity between the response dynamics of the H1-cell under closed-loop conditions with those obtained in previous open-loop experiments. Finally, we show that the adaptive scaling of the H1-cell’s responses, while maximizing information on image velocity, decreases the cell’s sensitivity to image accelerations. Understanding such trade-offs in biological vision systems may advance the design of smart vision sensors for autonomous

  2. Closed-loop response properties of a visual interneuron involved in fly optomotor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejaz, Naveed; Krapp, Holger G; Tanaka, Reiko J

    2013-01-01

    Due to methodological limitations neural function is mostly studied under open-loop conditions. Normally, however, nervous systems operate in closed-loop where sensory input is processed to generate behavioral outputs, which again change the sensory input. Here, we investigate the closed-loop responses of an identified visual interneuron, the blowfly H1-cell, that is part of a neural circuit involved in optomotor flight and gaze control. Those behaviors may be triggered by attitude changes during flight in turbulent air. The fly analyses the resulting retinal image shifts and performs compensatory body and head rotations to regain its default attitude. We developed a fly robot interface to study H1-cell responses in a 1 degree-of-freedom image stabilization task. Image shifts, induced by externally forced rotations, modulate the cell's spike rate that controls counter rotations of a mobile robot to minimize relative motion between the robot and its visual surroundings. A feedback controller closed the loop between neural activity and the rotation of the robot. Under these conditions we found the following H1-cell response properties: (i) the peak spike rate decreases when the mean image velocity is increased, (ii) the relationship between spike rate and image velocity depends on the standard deviation of the image velocities suggesting adaptive scaling of the cell's signaling range, and (iii) the cell's gain decreases linearly with increasing image accelerations. Our results reveal a remarkable qualitative similarity between the response dynamics of the H1-cell under closed-loop conditions with those obtained in previous open-loop experiments. Finally, we show that the adaptive scaling of the H1-cell's responses, while maximizing information on image velocity, decreases the cell's sensitivity to image accelerations. Understanding such trade-offs in biological vision systems may advance the design of smart vision sensors for autonomous robots.

  3. Roll Control in Fruit Flies

    CERN Document Server

    Beatus, Tsevi; Cohen, Itai

    2014-01-01

    Due to aerodynamic instabilities, stabilizing flapping flight requires ever-present fast corrective actions. Here we investigate how flies control body roll angle, their most susceptible degree of freedom. We glue a magnet to each fly, apply a short magnetic pulse that rolls it in mid-air, and film the corrective maneuver. Flies correct perturbations of up to $100^{\\circ}$ within $30\\pm7\\mathrm{ms}$ by applying a stroke-amplitude asymmetry that is well described by a linear PI controller. The response latency is $\\sim5\\mathrm{ms}$, making the roll correction reflex one of the fastest in the animal kingdom.

  4. MODAL CONTROL OF PILOTLESS FLYING MACHINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Antanevich

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a problem on synthesis of lateral movement control algorithms in a pilotless flying machine which is made on the basis of a modal control method providing a required root arrangement of a characteristic closed control system polynom. Results of the modeling at stabilization of a lateral pilotless flying machine co-ordinate are presented in the paper.

  5. Flying qualities criteria and flight control design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, D. T.

    1981-01-01

    Despite the application of sophisticated design methodology, newly introduced aircraft continue to suffer from basic flying qualities deficiencies. Two recent meetings, the DOD/NASA Workshop on Highly Augmented Aircraft Criteria and the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center/Air Force Flight Test Center/AIAA Pilot Induced Oscillation Workshop, addressed this problem. An overview of these meetings is provided from the point of view of the relationship between flying qualities criteria and flight control system design. Among the items discussed are flying qualities criteria development, the role of simulation, and communication between flying qualities specialists and control system designers.

  6. Pitch Perfect: How Fruit Flies Control their Body Pitch Angle

    CERN Document Server

    Whitehead, Samuel C; Canale, Luca; Cohen, Itai

    2015-01-01

    Flapping insect flight is a complex and beautiful phenomenon that relies on fast, active control mechanisms to counter aerodynamic instability. To directly investigate how freely-flying D. melanogaster control their body pitch angle against such instability, we perturb them using impulsive mechanical torques and film their corrective maneuvers with high-speed video. Combining experimental observations and numerical simulation, we find that flies correct for pitch deflections of up to 40 degrees in 29 +/- 8 ms by bilaterally modulating their wings' front-most stroke angle in a manner well-described by a linear proportional-integral (PI) controller. Flies initiate this corrective process after only 10 +/- 2 ms, indicating that pitch stabilization involves a fast reflex response. Remarkably, flies can also correct for very large-amplitude pitch perturbations--greater than 150 degrees--providing a regime in which to probe the limits of the linear-response framework. Together with previous studies regarding yaw an...

  7. Sand Flies and Their Control Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çetin, Hüseyin; Özbel, Yusuf

    2017-06-01

    The main aim of managing arthropod vectors that carry the disease agents is interrupting the infection cycle. Therefore, the management of the disease implies that all precautions related to all elements (i.e., human, arthropod vector, and reservoir) in the infection cycle need to be taken. There are important points that need to be considered while dealing with sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae), which in many regions worldwide, particularly in tropical and subtropical areas, are vectors of diseases such as leishmaniasis and sand fly fever and are the arthropods of the infection cycle. Because the larval control of the sand flies is very difficult and almost impossible, the management is mainly conducted for the adults. The most effective strategy for reducing both sand fly fever and leishmaniasis is managing sand flies, particularly in areas where humans are located. In this review, the morphology, biology, and taxonomy of sand flies; the integrated fighting and management methods such as insecticide-impregnated bed nets and use of curtains, zooprophylaxis, indoor and outdoor residual applications, larvicides, repellents, and insecticide-impregnated dog collars; and data regarding many issues such as insecticide resistance in sand flies have been emphasized on in the review.

  8. Demo of Gaze Controlled Flying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alapetite, Alexandre; Hansen, John Paulin; Scott MacKenzie, I.

    2012-01-01

    Development of a control paradigm for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) is a new challenge to HCI. The demo explores how to use gaze as input for locomotion in 3D. A low-cost drone will be controlled by tracking user’s point of regard (gaze) on a live video stream from the UAV....

  9. Spacecraft formation flying: Dynamics, control and navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfriend, Kyle Terry; Vadali, Srinivas Rao; Gurfil, Pini; How, Jonathan; Breger, Louis S.

    2009-12-01

    Space agencies are now realizing that much of what has previously been achieved using hugely complex and costly single platform projects - large unmanned and manned satellites (including the present International Space Station) - can be replaced by a number of smaller satellites networked together. The key challenge of this approach, namely ensuring the proper formation flying of multiple craft, is the topic of this second volume in Elsevier's Astrodynamics Series, Spacecraft Formation Flying: Dynamics, control and navigation. In this unique text, authors Alfriend et al. provide a coherent discussion of spacecraft relative motion, both in the unperturbed and perturbed settings, explain the main control approaches for regulating relative satellite dynamics, using both impulsive and continuous maneuvers, and present the main constituents required for relative navigation. The early chapters provide a foundation upon which later discussions are built, making this a complete, standalone offering. Intended for graduate students, professors and academic researchers in the fields of aerospace and mechanical engineering, mathematics, astronomy and astrophysics, Spacecraft Formation Flying is a technical yet accessible, forward-thinking guide to this critical area of astrodynamics.

  10. Control of bloodsucking black fly (Simuliidae) populations in Lithuania

    OpenAIRE

    Bartninkaitė, Ilona; Bernotienė, Rasa; Pakalniškis, Saulius; Žygutienė, Milda

    2006-01-01

    The outbreak of bloodsucking black flies began in the 70s of the 20th century in the south-eastern part of Lithuania. By 1990, the biting activity of bloodsucking black flies increased and had become a serious problem. The bloodsucking insects caused losses of cattle and domestic birds and tormented holiday-makers in the Druskininkai health-resort. Biological larvicide based on Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis was used for bloodsucking black fly control in 1999–2005. The larvicide was ...

  11. Spi-1, Fli-1 and Fli-3 (miR-17-92 oncogenes contribute to a single oncogenic network controlling cell proliferation in friend erythroleukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer Kayali

    Full Text Available Clonal erythroleukemia developing in susceptible mice infected by Friend virus complex are associated with highly recurrent proviral insertions at one of three loci called Spi-1, Fli-1 or Fli-3, leading to deregulated expression of oncogenic Spi-1 or Fli-1 transcription factors or miR-17-92 miRNA cluster, respectively. Deregulated expression of each of these three oncogenes has been independently shown to contribute to cell proliferation of erythroleukemic clones. Previous studies showed a close relationship between Spi-1 and Fli-1, which belong to the same ETS family, Spi-1 activating fli-1 gene, and both Spi-1 and Fli-1 activating multiple common target genes involved in ribosome biogenesis. In this study, we demonstrated that Spi-1 and Fli-1 are also involved in direct miR-17-92 transcriptional activation through their binding to a conserved ETS binding site in its promoter. Moreover, we demonstrated that physiological re-expression of exogenous miR-17 and miR-20a are able to partially rescue the proliferation loss induced by Fli-1 knock-down and identified HBP1 as a target of these miRNA in erythroleukemic cells. These results establish that three of the most recurrently activated oncogenes in Friend erythroleukemia are actually involved in a same oncogenic network controlling cell proliferation. The putative contribution of a similar ETS-miR-17-92 network module in other normal or pathological proliferative contexts is discussed.

  12. Spi-1, Fli-1 and Fli-3 (miR-17-92) oncogenes contribute to a single oncogenic network controlling cell proliferation in friend erythroleukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayali, Samer; Giraud, Guillaume; Morlé, François; Guyot, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Clonal erythroleukemia developing in susceptible mice infected by Friend virus complex are associated with highly recurrent proviral insertions at one of three loci called Spi-1, Fli-1 or Fli-3, leading to deregulated expression of oncogenic Spi-1 or Fli-1 transcription factors or miR-17-92 miRNA cluster, respectively. Deregulated expression of each of these three oncogenes has been independently shown to contribute to cell proliferation of erythroleukemic clones. Previous studies showed a close relationship between Spi-1 and Fli-1, which belong to the same ETS family, Spi-1 activating fli-1 gene, and both Spi-1 and Fli-1 activating multiple common target genes involved in ribosome biogenesis. In this study, we demonstrated that Spi-1 and Fli-1 are also involved in direct miR-17-92 transcriptional activation through their binding to a conserved ETS binding site in its promoter. Moreover, we demonstrated that physiological re-expression of exogenous miR-17 and miR-20a are able to partially rescue the proliferation loss induced by Fli-1 knock-down and identified HBP1 as a target of these miRNA in erythroleukemic cells. These results establish that three of the most recurrently activated oncogenes in Friend erythroleukemia are actually involved in a same oncogenic network controlling cell proliferation. The putative contribution of a similar ETS-miR-17-92 network module in other normal or pathological proliferative contexts is discussed.

  13. Longitudinal control laws design for a flying wing aircraft

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Yan

    2012-01-01

    This research is concerned with the flight dynamic, pitch flight control and flying qualities assessment for the reference BWB aircraft. It aims to develop the longitudinal control laws which could satisfy the flying and handing qualities over the whole flight envelope with added consideration of centre of gravity (CG) variation. In order to achieve this goal, both the longitudinal stability augmentation system (SAS) and autopilot control laws are studied in this thesis. Usi...

  14. Longitudinal control laws design for a flying wing aircraft

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Yan

    2012-01-01

    This research is concerned with the flight dynamic, pitch flight control and flying qualities assessment for the reference BWB aircraft. It aims to develop the longitudinal control laws which could satisfy the flying and handing qualities over the whole flight envelope with added consideration of centre of gravity (CG) variation. In order to achieve this goal, both the longitudinal stability augmentation system (SAS) and autopilot control laws are studied in this thesis. Usi...

  15. Control of Phlebotomine Sand Flies in Iran: A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Yaghoobi-Ershadi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis has long been known as a significant public health challenge in many parts of Iran. Phlebotomus pa­patasi and P. sergenti are the vectors of Zoonotic Cutaneous Leishmaniasis and Anthroponotic Cutaneous Leish­maniasis respectively, and 5 species of sand flies including P. kandelakii, P. neglectus, P. perfiliewi, P. keshishiani and P. alexandri are considered as probable vectors of Zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis. A literature search was per­formed of the relevant multiple databases from 1966 to 2013 to include studies on sand flies, vector control, leish­maniasis, Phlebotomus. Sand fly control in Iran began in 1966 by Iranian researchers, and long-term evaluation of its effects was completed in the study areas of the country. Herein, a review of vector control strategies in Iran to com­bat leishmaniasis including indoor residual spraying, application of chemicals in rodent burrows, impregnation of bed nets and curtains with insecticides, the use of insect repellents, impregnation of dog collars and the susceptibility of sand fly vectors to various insecticides has been summarized thus far. The investigation of the behavioral patterns of the adults of different sand fly species, introduction of biological insecticide agents, the use of insecticidal plants and other novel strategies for the control of sand fly populations have received much attention in the areas of studies, hence should be recommended and improved since they provide optimistic results.

  16. Use of insecticide-impregnated ear tags for the control of face flies and horn-flies on pastured cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R E; Westby, E J; Hendrix, K S; Lemenager, R P

    1981-11-01

    Three studies were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of insecticide-impregnated ear tags in controlling face flies, Musca autumnalis DeGeer, and horn flies, Haematobia irritans (Linn.), on pastured beef cattle. In one 16-week trial, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) ear tags treated with stirofos (Rabon) insecticide reduced horn fly numbers by 79% (P less than .05) and face fly numbers by 30% (P less than .05). Coumaphos (Co-Ral) insecticide dust bags used in a separate herd produced an 86% (P less than .05) reduction in horn flies and an 18% (P less than .05) reduction in face flies. In the second study, 5 and 10% permethrin (Atroban), PVC-treated ear tags in a one-piece design were tested. In this 11 week trial, horn fly control averaged 95% (P less than .05) with the 10% tag and 77% (P less than .05) with the 5% tag. Face fly control averaged 49% (P less than .05) for 8 weeks with the 10% permethrin tag. No significant face fly control was achieved with the 5% permethrin tag. In a herd treated with coumaphos dust bags, horn fly control averaged 93% (P less than .05) and face fly control averaged 34% (P less than .05). The third study tested 5 and 10% permethrin, PVC-treated ear tags in a two-piece design and two-piece 5% permethrin-treated ear tags in a polyurethane matrix. Fourteen-week horn fly control averaged 88% (P less than .05) with the 10% PVC-treated tag, 83% (P less than .05) with the 5% PVC-treated tag, 71% (P less than .05) with the 5% polyurethane-treated tag and 74% (P less than .05) with coumaphos dust bags. Face fly control averaged less than 50% (P greater than .05) throughout the trial with all treatments.

  17. The Neuronal Control of Flying Prey Interception in Dragonflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-19

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0193 THE NEURONAL CONTROL OF FLYING PREY INTERCEPTION IN DRAGONFLIES Robert Olberg TRUSTEES OF UNION COLLEGE IN THE TOWN OF...OMB control number. 12-08-2014 Final 15-05-2010 to 14-05-2014 The neuronal control of flying prey interception in dragonflies FA9550-10-1-0472 Olberg...AFOSR/PKR1 DUNS143574726 Distribution A. Approved for public release Eight pairs of large descending visual neurons (TSDNs) control dragonfly prey

  18. Flying qualities - A costly lapse in flight-control design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, D. T.

    1982-01-01

    Generic problems in advanced aircraft with advanced control systems which suffer from control sensitivity, sluggish response, and pilot-induced oscillation tendencies are examined, with a view to improving techniques for eliminating the problems in the design phase. Results of two NASA and NASA/AIAA workshops reached a consensus that flying qualities criteria do not match control system development, control system designers are not relying on past experience in their field, ground-based simulation is relied on too heavily, and communications between flying qualities and control systems engineers need improvement. A summation is offered in that hardware and software have outstripped the pilot's capacity to use the capabilities which new aircraft offer. The flying qualities data base is stressed to be dynamic, and continually redefining the man/machine relationships.

  19. Direct regulation of BCL-2 by FLI-1 is involved in the survival of FLI-1-transformed erythroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Lesault, Isabelle; Tran Quang, Christine; Frampton, Jon; Ghysdael, Jacques

    2002-01-01

    Rearrangement of the FLI-1 locus with ensuing overexpression of FLI-1 is an early event in Friend murine leukemia virus-induced disease. When overexpressed in primary erythroblasts, FLI-1 blocks erythropoeitin (Epo)-induced terminal differentiation and inhibits apoptosis normally induced in response to Epo withdrawal. We show here that the survival-inducing property of FLI-1 is associated with increased transcription of BCL-2. We further show that FLI-1 binds BCL-2 promoter sequences in trans...

  20. An area wide control of fruit flies in Mauritius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sookar, P.; Permalloo, S.; Gungah, B.; Alleck, M.; Seewooruthun, S.I.; Soonnoo, A.R., E-mail: ento@intnet.m, E-mail: moa-entomology@mail.gov.m [Ministry of Agro Industry and Fisheries Reduit, Republic of Mauritius (Mauritius)

    2006-07-01

    An area-wide National Fruit Fly Control Programme (NFFCP) was initiated in 1994, funded by the European Union until 1999 and now fully financed by the Government of Mauritius. The NFFCP targets some 75,000 backyard fruit trees owners mainly. The bait application and male annihilation techniques (BAT e MAT) are currently being applied against the fruit flies attacking fleshy fruits and are targeting selected major fruit growing areas in the north, north-east, central and western parts of the island. Successful control has been achieved using these two techniques as demonstrated by trap catches and fruit samplings. The level of fruit fly damage to fruits has been reduced. Presently, the bait-insecticide mixture is being supplied free of charge to the public. The current status of the area-wide suppression programme is such that continuous use of BAT/MAT is a never ending process and as such is not viable. In this context, a TC project on Feasibility studies for integrated use of sterile insect technique for area wide tephritid fruit fly control.Studies are also being carried out on mass rearing of the peach fruit fly for small scale trials on SIT so as to eventually integrate this control method in our area-wide control programme. (author)

  1. New-type of flying control for spinning TVC vehicle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xin-jian; YUAN Tian-bao

    2008-01-01

    A new kind of problem for TVC vehicle spinning in the boost stage had been researched.The study of non-linear flying dynamics modeling and dynamic properties of TVC vehicles reveal dominant coupled factors that affect the attitude stability and attitude precision of the pitch channel and yaw channel.The paper emphasizes the inertial delay coupled effects between vehicle's pitch servo svstem and yaw servo system,which have always been neglected.An uncoupled plan and control algorithm are put forward from the standpoint of engineering implementation to provide theoretical guidance and reference for further research on this complicated flying control.

  2. GVE-Based Dynamics and Control for Formation Flying Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breger, Louis; How, Jonathan P.

    2004-01-01

    Formation flying is an enabling technology for many future space missions. This paper presents extensions to the equations of relative motion expressed in Keplerian orbital elements, including new initialization techniques for general formation configurations. A new linear time-varying form of the equations of relative motion is developed from Gauss Variational Equations and used in a model predictive controller. The linearizing assumptions for these equations are shown to be consistent with typical formation flying scenarios. Several linear, convex initialization techniques are presented, as well as a general, decentralized method for coordinating a tetrahedral formation using differential orbital elements. Control methods are validated using a commercial numerical propagator.

  3. Control of free-flying space robot manipulator systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Robert H., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    New control techniques for self contained, autonomous free flying space robots were developed and tested experimentally. Free flying robots are envisioned as a key element of any successful long term presence in space. These robots must be capable of performing the assembly, maintenance, and inspection, and repair tasks that currently require human extravehicular activity (EVA). A set of research projects were developed and carried out using lab models of satellite robots and a flexible manipulator. The second generation space robot models use air cushion vehicle (ACV) technology to simulate in 2-D the drag free, zero g conditions of space. The current work is divided into 5 major projects: Global Navigation and Control of a Free Floating Robot, Cooperative Manipulation from a Free Flying Robot, Multiple Robot Cooperation, Thrusterless Robotic Locomotion, and Dynamic Payload Manipulation. These projects are examined in detail.

  4. Laser system for identification, tracking, and control of flying insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Emma R; Rutschman, Phillip; Pegram, Nathan; Patt, Joseph M; Adamczyk, John J; Johanson, 3ric

    2016-05-30

    Flying insects are common vectors for transmission of pathogens and inflict significant harm to humans and agricultural production in many parts of the world. We present proof of principle for an optical system capable of highly specific vector control. This system utilizes a combination of optical sources, detectors, and sophisticated software to search, detect, and identify flying insects in real-time, with the capability of eradication using a lethal laser pulse. We present data on two insect species to show species distinction; Diaphorina citri, a vector of the causal agent of citrus greening disease, and Anopheles stephensi, a malaria vector.

  5. Autonomous and FliK-dependent length control of the flagellar rod in Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Noriko; Mizuno, Shino; Hirano, Takanori; Chevance, Fabienne F V; Hughes, Kelly T; Aizawa, Shin-Ichi

    2009-10-01

    Salmonella flgG point mutations produce filamentous rod structures whose lengths are determined by FliK. FliK length variants produce rods with lengths proportional to the corresponding FliK molecular size, suggesting that FliK controls the length of not only the hook but also the rod by the same molecular mechanism.

  6. Autonomous and FliK-Dependent Length Control of the Flagellar Rod in Salmonella enterica▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Noriko; Mizuno, Shino; Hirano, Takanori; Chevance, Fabienne F. V.; Hughes, Kelly T.; Aizawa, Shin-Ichi

    2009-01-01

    Salmonella flgG point mutations produce filamentous rod structures whose lengths are determined by FliK. FliK length variants produce rods with lengths proportional to the corresponding FliK molecular size, suggesting that FliK controls the length of not only the hook but also the rod by the same molecular mechanism. PMID:19666714

  7. Orbit and attitude control of spacecraft formation flying

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhi-guo; LI Jun-feng

    2008-01-01

    Formation flying is a novel concept of distributing the flmctionality of large spacecraft among several smaller, less expensive, cooperative satellites. Some applica-tions require that a controllable satellite keeps relative position and attitude to observe a specific surface of another satellite among the cluster. Specially, the target space vehi- cle is malfunctioning. The present paper focuses on the problem that how to control a chaser satellite to fly around an out-of-work target satellite closely in earth orbit and to track a specific surface. Relative attitude and first approximate relative orbital dynamics equations are presented. Control strategy is derived based on feedback linearization and Lyapunov theory of stability. Further, considering the uncertainty of inertia, an adaptive control method is developed to obtain the correct inertial ratio. The numerical simulation is given to verify the validity of proposed control scheme.

  8. Formation Flying Control of Multiple Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadaegh, F. Y.; Lau, Kenneth; Wang, P. K. C.

    1997-01-01

    The problem of coordination and control of multiple spacecraft (MS) moving in formation is considered. Here, each MS is modeled by a rigid body with fixed center of mass. First, various schemes for generating the desired formation patterns are discussed, Then, explicit control laws for formation-keeping and relative attitude alignment based on nearest neighbor-tracking are derived. The necessary data which must be communicated between the MS to achieve effective control are examined. The time-domain behavior of the feedback-controlled MS formation for typical low-Earth orbits is studied both analytically and via computer simulation. The paper concludes with a discussion of the implementation of the derived control laws, and the integration of the MS formation coordination and control system with a proposed inter-spacecraft communication/computing network.

  9. Rotor-Flying Manipulator: Modeling, Analysis, and Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Equipping multijoint manipulators on a mobile robot is a typical redesign scheme to make the latter be able to actively influence the surroundings and has been extensively used for many ground robots, underwater robots, and space robotic systems. However, the rotor-flying robot (RFR is difficult to be made such redesign. This is mainly because the motion of the manipulator will bring heavy coupling between itself and the RFR system, which makes the system model highly complicated and the controller design difficult. Thus, in this paper, the modeling, analysis, and control of the combined system, called rotor-flying multijoint manipulator (RF-MJM, are conducted. Firstly, the detailed dynamics model is constructed and analyzed. Subsequently, a full-state feedback linear quadratic regulator (LQR controller is designed through obtaining linearized model near steady state. Finally, simulations are conducted and the results are analyzed to show the basic control performance.

  10. Global warming and house fly control: direct effects and biodiversity concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House flies are major pests of human and animal health throughout the world and are among the most difficult to control. Effective fly management relies on a balance of sanitation, insecticide use, and biological control. Climate change could upset that balance in favor of the fly unless pro-activ...

  11. 9 CFR 355.16 - Control of flies, rats, mice, etc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Control of flies, rats, mice, etc. 355.16 Section 355.16 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF....16 Control of flies, rats, mice, etc. Flies, rats, mice, and other vermin shall be excluded...

  12. Control of a free-flying robot manipulator system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, H.

    1986-01-01

    The development of and test control strategies for self-contained, autonomous free flying space robots are discussed. Such a robot would perform operations in space similar to those currently handled by astronauts during extravehicular activity (EVA). Use of robots should reduce the expense and danger attending EVA both by providing assistance to astronauts and in many cases by eliminating altogether the need for human EVA, thus greatly enhancing the scope and flexibility of space assembly and repair activities. The focus of the work is to develop and carry out a program of research with a series of physical Satellite Robot Simulator Vehicles (SRSV's), two-dimensionally freely mobile laboratory models of autonomous free-flying space robots such as might perform extravehicular functions associated with operation of a space station or repair of orbiting satellites. It is planned, in a later phase, to extend the research to three dimensions by carrying out experiments in the Space Shuttle cargo bay.

  13. Efficacy of novaluron as a feed-through for control of immature horn flies, house flies, and stable flies (Diptera: Muscidae) developing in cow manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmeyer, K H; Pound, J M; Yeater, K M; May, M A

    2014-07-01

    Two rates (0.4 mg/kg body weight/d and 0.6 mg/kg body weight/d) of a daily feed-through formulation of novaluron (Novaluron 0.67% active ingredient Cattle Mix), a newer benzoylphenyl urea insecticide, were evaluated for efficacy in controlling the larval stage of horn flies, Haematobia irritans (L.), house flies, Musca domestica L., and stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.), developing in cow manure. Both rates of feed-through novaluron, delivered consecutively for 10 d, reduced adult emergence of all three species when compared with the untreated control. The presence of deformed puparia indicated that novaluron had an insect growth regulator effect on the developing fly larvae. Both of the feed-through rates evaluated resulted in 100% reduction of adult stable fly emergence after the second day of feed-through treatment. The level of control efficacy observed against these three fly species make this feed-through formulation a candidate for use in an integrated livestock pest management program, particularly in confined cattle production situations where a feed-through product could be easily administered.

  14. Flying Drosophila stabilize their vision-based velocity controller by sensing wind with their antennae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Sawyer Buckminster; Straw, Andrew D; Peek, Martin Y; Murray, Richard M; Dickinson, Michael H

    2014-04-01

    Flies and other insects use vision to regulate their groundspeed in flight, enabling them to fly in varying wind conditions. Compared with mechanosensory modalities, however, vision requires a long processing delay (~100 ms) that might introduce instability if operated at high gain. Flies also sense air motion with their antennae, but how this is used in flight control is unknown. We manipulated the antennal function of fruit flies by ablating their aristae, forcing them to rely on vision alone to regulate groundspeed. Arista-ablated flies in flight exhibited significantly greater groundspeed variability than intact flies. We then subjected them to a series of controlled impulsive wind gusts delivered by an air piston and experimentally manipulated antennae and visual feedback. The results show that an antenna-mediated response alters wing motion to cause flies to accelerate in the same direction as the gust. This response opposes flying into a headwind, but flies regularly fly upwind. To resolve this discrepancy, we obtained a dynamic model of the fly's velocity regulator by fitting parameters of candidate models to our experimental data. The model suggests that the groundspeed variability of arista-ablated flies is the result of unstable feedback oscillations caused by the delay and high gain of visual feedback. The antenna response drives active damping with a shorter delay (~20 ms) to stabilize this regulator, in exchange for increasing the effect of rapid wind disturbances. This provides insight into flies' multimodal sensory feedback architecture and constitutes a previously unknown role for the antennae.

  15. Revised irradiation doses to control melon fly, Mediterranean fruit fly, and oriental fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) and a generic dose for tephritid fruit flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follett, Peter A; Armstrong, John W

    2004-08-01

    Currently approved irradiation quarantine treatment doses for Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillet), melon fly; Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann), Mediterranean fruit fly; and Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), oriental fruit fly, infesting fruits and vegetables for export from Hawaii to the continental United States are 210, 225, and 250 Gy, respectively. Irradiation studies were initiated to determine whether these doses could be reduced to lower treatment costs, minimize any adverse effects on quality, and support a proposed generic irradiation dose of 150 Gy for fruit flies. Dose-response tests were conducted with late third instars of wild and laboratory strains of the three fruit fly species, both in diet and in fruit. After x-ray irradiation treatment, data were taken on adult emergence, and adult female fecundity and fertility. Melon fly was the most tolerant of the three species to irradiation, and oriental fruit fly was more tolerant than Mediterranean fruit fly. Laboratory and wild strains of each species were equally tolerant of irradiation, and larvae were more tolerant when irradiated in fruit compared with artificial diet. An irradiation dose of 150 Gy applied to 93,666 melon fly late third instars in papayas resulted in no survival to the adult stage, indicating that this dose is sufficient to provide quarantine security. Irradiation doses of 100 and 125 Gy applied to 31,920 Mediterranean fruit fly and 55,743 oriental fruit fly late third instars, respectively, also resulted in no survival to the adult stage. Results support a proposed generic irradiation quarantine treatment dose of 150 Gy for all tephritid fruit flies.

  16. Dynamic Control of Completely Free-Flying Space Robot System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.J. [Korea Advanced Energy Research Inst., Daeduk-Danji (Korea, Republic of). Korea Nuclear Safety Center; Xu, Y.; Kanade, T. [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Robotics Inst.

    1993-03-01

    In this paper we discuss dynamic control of a completely- free-flying space robot system where the base attitude is not controlled. We first derive the system dynamic formulations in joint space and in inertia space, based on Lagrangian dynamics and linear and angular momentum conservation laws. The properties of completely free-flying robot system dynamics are studied. The nonlinear parameterization, one of the most important properties of the system dynamics, is demonstrated in theory and by a case study. Based on the system dynamic model in inertial space, globally stable dynamics control schemes are then proposed. Two algorithms are presented for the normal regulation problem and trajectory tracking applications. The PD algorithm is simple and easy to implement. The dynamic control algorithm has a fast and accurate system response even for the system with small mass/inertia ratio of the base with respect to the robot. The effectiveness of proposed algorithms is demonstrated by simulation studies. Future research work is identified. (author). 22 refs., 10 figs.

  17. Controlling public speaking jitters: making the butterflies fly in formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Hannah; Baum, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Nearly every person who has been asked to give a speech or who has volunteered to make a presentation to a group of strangers develops fear and anxiety prior to the presentation. Most of us, the authors included, start hyperventilating, our pulse quickens, and we feel a little weak in the knees. We grab the lectern and our knuckles turn white as we hold on for dear life. This is a normal response that everyone experiences. However, this stress can be controlled and made manageable by understanding the stress response cycle and practicing a few techniques that calm those butterflies flying around in the pit of your stomach.

  18. Advanced control technology and airworthiness flying qualities requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, C. T.

    1976-01-01

    Flying quality requirements are specified in terms of the complete pilot-airframe-systems loop, the task, and the environment. Results from a study of flying qualities are reported. A review of the treatment of failure cases in various flying quality requirements is presented along with a description of the methods used and relevant lessons learned from recent Autoland certification programs.

  19. A new robust fuzzy method for unmanned flying vehicle control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mojtaba Mirzaei; Mohammad Eghtesad; Mohammad Mahdi Alishahi

    2015-01-01

    A new general robust fuzzy approach was presented to control the position and the attitude of unmanned flying vehicles (UFVs). Control of these vehicles was challenging due to their nonlinear underactuated behaviors. The proposed control system combined great advantages of generalized indirect adaptive sliding mode control (IASMC) and fuzzy control for the UFVs. An on-line adaptive tuning algorithm based on Lyapunov function and Barbalat lemma was designed, thus the stability of the system can be guaranteed. The chattering phenomenon in the sliding mode control was reduced and the steady error was also alleviated. The numerical results, for an underactuated quadcopter and a high speed underwater vehicle as case studies, indicate that the presented adaptive design of fuzzy sliding mode controller performs robustly in the presence of sensor noise and external disturbances. In addition, online unknown parameter estimation of the UFVs, such as ground effect and planing force especially in the cases with the Gaussian sensor noise with zero mean and standard deviation of 0.5 m and 0.1 rad and external disturbances with amplitude of 0.1 m/s2 and frequency of 0.2 Hz, is one of the advantages of this method. These estimated parameters are then used in the controller to improve the trajectory tracking performance.

  20. Independently controlled wing stroke patterns in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soma Chakraborty

    Full Text Available Flies achieve supreme flight maneuverability through a small set of miniscule steering muscles attached to the wing base. The fast flight maneuvers arise from precisely timed activation of the steering muscles and the resulting subtle modulation of the wing stroke. In addition, slower modulation of wing kinematics arises from changes in the activity of indirect flight muscles in the thorax. We investigated if these modulations can be described as a superposition of a limited number of elementary deformations of the wing stroke that are under independent physiological control. Using a high-speed computer vision system, we recorded the wing motion of tethered flying fruit flies for up to 12,000 consecutive wing strokes at a sampling rate of 6250 Hz. We then decomposed the joint motion pattern of both wings into components that had the minimal mutual information (a measure of statistical dependence. In 100 flight segments measured from 10 individual flies, we identified 7 distinct types of frequently occurring least-dependent components, each defining a kinematic pattern (a specific deformation of the wing stroke and the sequence of its activation from cycle to cycle. Two of these stroke deformations can be associated with the control of yaw torque and total flight force, respectively. A third deformation involves a change in the downstroke-to-upstroke duration ratio, which is expected to alter the pitch torque. A fourth kinematic pattern consists in the alteration of stroke amplitude with a period of 2 wingbeat cycles, extending for dozens of cycles. Our analysis indicates that these four elementary kinematic patterns can be activated mutually independently, and occur both in isolation and in linear superposition. The results strengthen the available evidence for independent control of yaw torque, pitch torque, and total flight force. Our computational method facilitates systematic identification of novel patterns in large kinematic datasets.

  1. Adaptive-Repetitive Visual-Servo Control of Low-Flying Aerial Robots via Uncalibrated High-Flying Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dejun; Bourne, Joseph R.; Wang, Hesheng; Yim, Woosoon; Leang, Kam K.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of an adaptive-repetitive visual-servo control system for a moving high-flying vehicle (HFV) with an uncalibrated camera to monitor, track, and precisely control the movements of a low-flying vehicle (LFV) or mobile ground robot. Applications of this control strategy include the use of high-flying unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) with computer vision for monitoring, controlling, and coordinating the movements of lower altitude agents in areas, for example, where GPS signals may be unreliable or nonexistent. When deployed, a remote operator of the HFV defines the desired trajectory for the LFV in the HFV's camera frame. Due to the circular motion of the HFV, the resulting motion trajectory of the LFV in the image frame can be periodic in time, thus an adaptive-repetitive control system is exploited for regulation and/or trajectory tracking. The adaptive control law is able to handle uncertainties in the camera's intrinsic and extrinsic parameters. The design and stability analysis of the closed-loop control system is presented, where Lyapunov stability is shown. Simulation and experimental results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method for controlling the movement of a low-flying quadcopter, demonstrating the capabilities of the visual-servo control system for localization (i.e.,, motion capturing) and trajectory tracking control. In fact, results show that the LFV can be commanded to hover in place as well as track a user-defined flower-shaped closed trajectory, while the HFV and camera system circulates above with constant angular velocity. On average, the proposed adaptive-repetitive visual-servo control system reduces the average RMS tracking error by over 77% in the image plane and over 71% in the world frame compared to using just the adaptive visual-servo control law.

  2. Reconfigurable Flight Control Design for Combat Flying Wing with Multiple Control Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lei; WANG Lixin

    2012-01-01

    With control using redundant multiple control surface arrangement and large-deflection drag rudders,a combat flying wing has a higher probability for control surface failures.Therefore,its flight control system must be able to reconfigure after such failures.Considering three types of typical control surface failures (lock-in-place (LIP),loss-of-effectiveness (LOE) and float),flight control reconfiguration characteristic and capability of such aircraft types are analyzed.Because of the control surface redundancy,the aircraft using the dynamic inversion flight control law already has a control allocation block.In this paper,its flight control configuration during the above failures is achieved by modifying this block.It is shown that such a reconfigurable flight control design is valid,through numerical simulations of flight attitude control task.Results indicate that,in the circumstances of control surface failures with limited degree and the degradation of the flying quality level,a combat flying wing adopting this flight control reconfiguration approach based on control allocation could guarantee its flight safety and perform some flight combat missions.

  3. Indigenous weaver ants and fruit fly control in Tanzanian smallholder mango production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Nina; Offenberg, Hans Joachim; Msogoya, T. J.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of weaver ant colonies can reduce fruit fly oviposition in mango production and can be effective as a fruit fly control strategy. Patrolling ants may disturb landing flies and may also deposit repellent compounds on to the fruits. This control strategy is being applied to export......, and enter the local market chain. The growers, and local traders, reported an overall 10-25% infestation of fruit fly larvae in their fruits, with significant variation possible for an individual grower or season. Infestation is higher, to a limited degree, in fruits in the market place than in those...... temperatures to lethal levels for fruit fly eggs and larvae. Direct observations showed a small, but significant reduction in fly landings on fruits previously patrolled by ants, supporting the proposed role for persistent repellents. Gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy did not identify any compounds uniquely...

  4. Description and Flight Test Results of the NASA F-8 Digital Fly-by-Wire Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    A NASA program to develop digital fly-by-wire (DFBW) technology for aircraft applications is discussed. Phase I of the program demonstrated the feasibility of using a digital fly-by-wire system for aircraft control through developing and flight testing a single channel system, which used Apollo hardware, in an F-8C airplane. The objective of Phase II of the program is to establish a technology base for designing practical DFBW systems. It will involve developing and flight testing a triplex digital fly-by-wire system using state-of-the-art airborne computers, system hardware, software, and redundancy concepts. The papers included in this report describe the Phase I system and its development and present results from the flight program. Man-rated flight software and the effects of lightning on digital flight control systems are also discussed.

  5. Formation design and nonlinear control of spacecraft formation flying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Hong

    The fundamental control challenges associated with Spacecraft Formation Flying (SFF) can be classified into two categories: (i) trajectory design and (ii) trajectory tracking. In this research, we address these challenges for several different operating environments. The first part of this research focuses on providing a trajectory generation and an adaptive control design methodology to facilitate SFF missions near the Sun-Earth L2 Lagrange point. Specifically, we create a spacecraft formation by placing a leader spacecraft on a desired Halo orbit and a follower spacecraft on a desired quasi-periodic orbit surrounding the Halo orbit. We develop the nonlinear dynamics of the leader spacecraft and the follower spacecraft relative to the leader spacecraft, wherein the leader spacecraft is assumed to be on a desired Halo orbit trajectory. Finally, we design formation maintenance controllers such that the leader and follower spacecraft track desired trajectories. In particular, we design a set of adaptive position tracking controllers for the leader and follower spacecraft in the presence of unknown spacecraft mass. The proposed control laws are simulated for the case of the leader and follower spacecraft pair and are shown to yield asymptotic convergence of the position tracking errors. The second part of this research focuses on providing nonlinear trajectory tracking control designs for SFF missions near Earth. First, we address output feedback tracking control problems for the coupled translation and attitude motion of a leader and a follower spacecraft. It is assumed that the translation and angular velocity measurements of the two spacecraft are not available for feedback. Second, we address a periodic trajectory tracking problem arising in spacecraft formation flying. In particular, the nonlinear position dynamics of a follower spacecraft relative to a leader spacecraft are utilized to develop a learning controller which learns a periodic, unknown model

  6. Laboratory evaluation for a potential birth control diet for fruit fly sterilization insect technique (SIT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A potential fruit fly steilizing diet was evaluated on fertility, mating, survival, and protein anaylsis for fruit fly species in Hawaii. Insects were continuously fed an agar diet with lufenuron(LFN) for an initial 7d after emergence and then switched to a control diet to simulate the actual field ...

  7. Biological Control of Olive Fruit Fly in California with a Parasitoid Imported from Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    The parasitoid, Psyttalia cf. concolor (Szépligeti), was imported into California from the USDA-APHIS-PPQ, Moscamed, San Miguel Petapa, Guatemala for biological control of olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae (Gmelin), in olives, Olea europaea L. The parasitoid did not develop in the seedhead fly, Cha...

  8. Three-DOF dynamic model with lubricant contact for thermal fly-height control nanotechnology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vakis, Antonis I.; Hadjicostis, Christoforos N.; Polycarpou, Andreas A.

    2012-01-01

    A three-degree-of-freedom dynamic contact model with friction and lubricant contact is introduced for thermal fly-height control of a near-contact flying slider. The proposed model addresses the issue of contact with a molecularly thin lubricant layer and includes a third degree-of-freedom, roll. Ne

  9. Recent progress in a classical biological control program for olive fruit fly in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    The olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae (Diptera: Tephritidae), causes severe damage to olive production worldwide. Control of olive fruit fly typically relies on pesticides, and under such conditions the impact of natural enemies is relatively low. About 15 years ago, the USDA-ARS European Biologic...

  10. Cyber Incidents Involving Control Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert J. Turk

    2005-10-01

    The Analysis Function of the US-CERT Control Systems Security Center (CSSC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has prepared this report to document cyber security incidents for use by the CSSC. The description and analysis of incidents reported herein support three CSSC tasks: establishing a business case; increasing security awareness and private and corporate participation related to enhanced cyber security of control systems; and providing informational material to support model development and prioritize activities for CSSC. The stated mission of CSSC is to reduce vulnerability of critical infrastructure to cyber attack on control systems. As stated in the Incident Management Tool Requirements (August 2005) ''Vulnerability reduction is promoted by risk analysis that tracks actual risk, emphasizes high risk, determines risk reduction as a function of countermeasures, tracks increase of risk due to external influence, and measures success of the vulnerability reduction program''. Process control and Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems, with their reliance on proprietary networks and hardware, have long been considered immune to the network attacks that have wreaked so much havoc on corporate information systems. New research indicates this confidence is misplaced--the move to open standards such as Ethernet, Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol, and Web technologies is allowing hackers to take advantage of the control industry's unawareness. Much of the available information about cyber incidents represents a characterization as opposed to an analysis of events. The lack of good analyses reflects an overall weakness in reporting requirements as well as the fact that to date there have been very few serious cyber attacks on control systems. Most companies prefer not to share cyber attack incident data because of potential financial repercussions. Uniform reporting requirements will do much to make this

  11. Pitch-Perfect: How Do Flies Control Their Pitch Angle During Aerial Stumbles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Samuel; Canale, Luca; Beatus, Tsevi; Cohen, Itai

    2014-11-01

    The successful flight of flapping-wing insects is contingent upon a complex and beautiful relationship between sensory input, neural response, and muscular actuation. In particular, the inherent instabilities of flapping-wing flight require insects like D. melanogaster to constantly sense, process, and adjust for in-flight stumbles. Here we present an analysis of the mechanisms for pitch control in D. melanogaster. By gluing small ferromagnetic pins to the backs of the flies and applying an external magnetic field, we induce torques along the flies' pitch axis during free flight. Using an automated hull reconstruction technique developed in the lab, we analyze these torque events and the flies' subsequent recoveries in order to characterize the flies' response to external perturbations. Ultimately, we aim to develop a reduced-order controller model that will capture the salient aspects of the flies' recovery mechanism.

  12. Experiments in Nonlinear Adaptive Control of Multi-Manipulator, Free-Flying Space Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Vincent Wei-Kang

    1992-01-01

    Sophisticated robots can greatly enhance the role of humans in space by relieving astronauts of low level, tedious assembly and maintenance chores and allowing them to concentrate on higher level tasks. Robots and astronauts can work together efficiently, as a team; but the robot must be capable of accomplishing complex operations and yet be easy to use. Multiple cooperating manipulators are essential to dexterity and can broaden greatly the types of activities the robot can achieve; adding adaptive control can ease greatly robot usage by allowing the robot to change its own controller actions, without human intervention, in response to changes in its environment. Previous work in the Aerospace Robotics Laboratory (ARL) have shown the usefulness of a space robot with cooperating manipulators. The research presented in this dissertation extends that work by adding adaptive control. To help achieve this high level of robot sophistication, this research made several advances to the field of nonlinear adaptive control of robotic systems. A nonlinear adaptive control algorithm developed originally for control of robots, but requiring joint positions as inputs, was extended here to handle the much more general case of manipulator endpoint-position commands. A new system modelling technique, called system concatenation was developed to simplify the generation of a system model for complicated systems, such as a free-flying multiple-manipulator robot system. Finally, the task-space concept was introduced wherein the operator's inputs specify only the robot's task. The robot's subsequent autonomous performance of each task still involves, of course, endpoint positions and joint configurations as subsets. The combination of these developments resulted in a new adaptive control framework that is capable of continuously providing full adaptation capability to the complex space-robot system in all modes of operation. The new adaptive control algorithm easily handles free-flying

  13. Topology Control Algorithms for Spacecraft Formation Flying Networks Under Connectivity and Time-Delay Constraints Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SSCI is proposing to develop a set of topology control algorithms for a formation flying spacecraft that can be used to design and evaluate candidate formation...

  14. Topology Control Algorithms for Spacecraft Formation Flying Networks Under Connectivity and Time-Delay Constraints Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SSCI is proposing to develop, test and deliver a set of topology control algorithms and software for a formation flying spacecraft that can be used to design and...

  15. Control of Cherry Leaf Spot and Cherry Fruit Fly at Sour Cherry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria BOROVINOVA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The investigations were made in the experimental sour cherry orchard from the Institute of Agriculture, Kyustendil, Bulgaria, during the period 2010-2014, in order to compare conventional and integrated sour cherry protection against cherry leaf spot and cherry fruit fly. Two variants were investigated, with two different treatment approaches for the control of cherry leaf spot and cherry fruit fly. Variant 1 – cherry leaf spot was controlled by protective treatments with dodin and tebuconazole + trifloxystrobin and cherry fruit fly was controlled by treatments with deltametrin and thiacloprid, independently of density. Variant 2 - cherry leaf spot was controlled by post-infection (curative treatments with tebuconazole + trifloxystrobin and cherry fruit fly was controlled by treatments based on biological threshold: 10-11 cherry fruit fly females caught in traps up to the moment for chemical treatment. It was established that Blumeriella japii can be successfully controlled by post-infection treatments and by this the number of insecticide treatments was reduced. The treatments against cherry fruit fly can be avoided or reduced when the attack control is based on the biological threshold established in the studied area.

  16. Modeling and identification of a fly-by-wire control system.

    OpenAIRE

    Fabio Luciano Demarchi

    2005-01-01

    This work investigates the system identification and modeling techniques applied to a fly-by-wire system for pitch control of a commercial jet aircraft. The objective of the work is to build a model based on system identification techniques and generic modeling of the system, therefore using the "grey box" approach. The identification data was obtained from experimental tests performed at Embraer "Iron Bird" laboratory. An overview on flight controls systems is presented, focusing on fly-by-...

  17. Laser system for identification, tracking, and control of flying insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flying insects are common vectors for transmission of pathogens and inflict significant harm on humans in large parts of the developing world. Besides the direct impact to humans, these pathogens also cause harm to crops and result in agricultural losses. Here, we present a laser-based system that c...

  18. Decentralized formation flying control in a multiple-team hierarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Joseph B; Thomas, Stephanie J

    2005-12-01

    In recent years, formation flying has been recognized as an enabling technology for a variety of mission concepts in both the scientific and defense arenas. Examples of developing missions at NASA include magnetospheric multiscale (MMS), solar imaging radio array (SIRA), and terrestrial planet finder (TPF). For each of these missions, a multiple satellite approach is required in order to accomplish the large-scale geometries imposed by the science objectives. In addition, the paradigm shift of using a multiple satellite cluster rather than a large, monolithic spacecraft has also been motivated by the expected benefits of increased robustness, greater flexibility, and reduced cost. However, the operational costs of monitoring and commanding a fleet of close-orbiting satellites is likely to be unreasonable unless the onboard software is sufficiently autonomous, robust, and scalable to large clusters. This paper presents the prototype of a system that addresses these objectives-a decentralized guidance and control system that is distributed across spacecraft using a multiple team framework. The objective is to divide large clusters into teams of "manageable" size, so that the communication and computation demands driven by N decentralized units are related to the number of satellites in a team rather than the entire cluster. The system is designed to provide a high level of autonomy, to support clusters with large numbers of satellites, to enable the number of spacecraft in the cluster to change post-launch, and to provide for on-orbit software modification. The distributed guidance and control system will be implemented in an object-oriented style using a messaging architecture for networking and threaded applications (MANTA). In this architecture, tasks may be remotely added, removed, or replaced post launch to increase mission flexibility and robustness. This built-in adaptability will allow software modifications to be made on-orbit in a robust manner. The

  19. Laboratory evaluation of insecticide-treated sugar baits for control of phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascari, T M; Foil, L D

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of boric acid, imidacloprid, ivermectin, or abamectin incorporated into sugar baits as oral toxicants for adult phlebotomine sand flies. Variable toxicity of insecticide-sugar bait solutions to adult male and female sand flies was demonstrated, based on male female median lethal concentration values of 0.10-0.08, 6.13-9.53, and 9.03-18.11 mg/liter of imidacloprid, ivermectin, and abamectin, respectively. Complete control of sand flies could not be achieved with as high as 40 g/liter of boric acid in sugar bait solution; concentrations >40 g/liter were found repellent to the sand flies. Uranine O (a fluorescent tracer dye that can be used to measure the ingestion of sugar baits by sand flies) did not interact negatively with imidacloprid, ivermectin, or abamectin when it was combined with the insecticides in a sugar bait. Also, incorporation of imidacloprid, ivermectin, or abamectin into sugar baits did not reduce the effect whether adult male and female sand flies fed on these sugar baits. We propose that imidacloprid, ivermectin, or abamectin could be used to control adult sand fly populations with targeted use of insecticide-treated sugar baits.

  20. Homologue Pairing in Flies and Mammals: Gene Regulation When Two Are Involved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manasi S. Apte

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome pairing is usually discussed in the context of meiosis. Association of homologues in germ cells enables chromosome segregation and is necessary for fertility. A few organisms, such as flies, also pair their entire genomes in somatic cells. Most others, including mammals, display little homologue pairing outside of the germline. Experimental evidence from both flies and mammals suggests that communication between homologues contributes to normal genome regulation. This paper will contrast the role of pairing in transmitting information between homologues in flies and mammals. In mammals, somatic homologue pairing is tightly regulated, occurring at specific loci and in a developmentally regulated fashion. Inappropriate pairing, or loss of normal pairing, is associated with gene misregulation in some disease states. While homologue pairing in flies is capable of influencing gene expression, the significance of this for normal expression remains unknown. The sex chromosomes pose a particularly interesting situation, as females are able to pair X chromosomes, but males cannot. The contribution of homologue pairing to the biology of the X chromosome will also be discussed.

  1. Genes Involved in the Evolution of Herbivory by a Leaf-Mining, Drosophilid Fly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whiteman, Noah K.; Gloss, Andrew D.; Sackton, Timothy B.

    2012-01-01

    Herbivorous insects are among the most successful radiations of life. However, we know little about the processes underpinning the evolution of herbivory. We examined the evolution of herbivory in the fly, Scaptomyza flava, whose larvae are leaf miners on species of Brassicaceae, including the wi...

  2. Choice of optimal biocide combination to control flies (Diptera: Muscidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Kavran

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Flies – by feeding on decaying matter, human waste and food – have been implicated in the spread of numerous animal and human diseases. Excessive fly populations are generally associated with livestock units and domestic waste due to decaying organic matter. A large number of flies cause extreme disturbance in the behavior of the host, resulting in skin irritation, lesions, wounds, and secondary infections are likely to appear. Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of combined applications of larvicide (cyromazine and adulticides (acetamiprid in formulation with pheromone and thiamethoxam on the suppression of fly populations. Materials and methods. The study was conducted on a pig farm. The piglet farms are one of the most favorable places for fly breeding. Three units were used for biocide applications and a fourth unit as the control where biocides were not applied. The monitoring of pre- and post-treatment of adult fly populations was carried out by glued cardboards. The cards were hung on metal rods above piglet’s cage. This monitoring method served as a parameter for the estimation of biological effectiveness. Results. The highest degree of fly control (88.4% mortality 8 days after treatment was achieved when a combination of cyromazine and thiamethoxam was used. A biocide based on sex pheromone (Z-9-tricosene + acetamiprid was the most effective on flies 3 days after biocide application, with a mortality rate of 69.1 %. Thiamethoxam achieved the highest reduction of flies 6 days after treatment, with 78.19% obtained mortality. Conclusion. Biological efficacy of the applied biocides in combination ciromazine + thiamethoxam and thiamethoxam alone was justified.

  3. Control of the olive fruit fly using genetics-enhanced sterile insect technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ant Thomas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae, is the major arthropod pest of commercial olive production, causing extensive damage to olive crops worldwide. Current control techniques rely on spraying of chemical insecticides. The sterile insect technique (SIT presents an alternative, environmentally friendly and species-specific method of population control. Although SIT has been very successful against other tephritid pests, previous SIT trials on olive fly have produced disappointing results. Key problems included altered diurnal mating rhythms of the laboratory-reared insects, resulting in asynchronous mating activity between the wild and released sterile populations, and low competitiveness of the radiation-sterilised mass-reared flies. Consequently, the production of competitive, male-only release cohorts is considered an essential prerequisite for successful olive fly SIT. Results We developed a set of conditional female-lethal strains of olive fly (named Release of Insects carrying a Dominant Lethal; RIDL®, providing highly penetrant female-specific lethality, dominant fluorescent marking, and genetic sterility. We found that males of the lead strain, OX3097D-Bol, 1 are strongly sexually competitive with wild olive flies, 2 display synchronous mating activity with wild females, and 3 induce appropriate refractoriness to wild female re-mating. Furthermore, we showed, through a large proof-of-principle experiment, that weekly releases of OX3097D-Bol males into stable populations of caged wild-type olive fly could cause rapid population collapse and eventual eradication. Conclusions The observed mating characteristics strongly suggest that an approach based on the release of OX3097D-Bol males will overcome the key difficulties encountered in previous olive fly SIT attempts. Although field confirmation is required, the proof-of-principle suppression and elimination of caged wild-type olive fly populations through OX3097D

  4. FLI-1 Flightless-1 and LET-60 Ras control germ line morphogenesis in C. elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dentler William L

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the C. elegans germ line, syncytial germ line nuclei are arranged at the cortex of the germ line as they exit mitosis and enter meiosis, forming a nucleus-free core of germ line cytoplasm called the rachis. Molecular mechanisms of rachis formation and germ line organization are not well understood. Results Mutations in the fli-1 gene disrupt rachis organization without affecting meiotic differentiation, a phenotype in C. elegans referred to here as the germ line morphogenesis (Glm phenotype. In fli-1 mutants, chains of meiotic germ nuclei spanned the rachis and were partially enveloped by invaginations of germ line plasma membrane, similar to nuclei at the cortex. Extensions of the somatic sheath cells that surround the germ line protruded deep inside the rachis and were associated with displaced nuclei in fli-1 mutants. fli-1 encodes a molecule with leucine-rich repeats and gelsolin repeats similar to Drosophila flightless 1 and human Fliih, which have been shown to act as cytoplasmic actin regulators as well as nuclear transcriptional regulators. Mutations in let-60 Ras, previously implicated in germ line development, were found to cause the Glm phenotype. Constitutively-active LET-60 partially rescued the fli-1 Glm phenotype, suggesting that LET-60 Ras and FLI-1 might act together to control germ line morphogenesis. Conclusion FLI-1 controls germ line morphogenesis and rachis organization, a process about which little is known at the molecular level. The LET-60 Ras GTPase might act with FLI-1 to control germ line morphogenesis.

  5. F-8 digital fly-by-wire flight test results viewed from an active controls perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalai, K. J.; Deets, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    The results of the NASA F-8 digital fly-by-wire flight test program are presented, along with the implications for active controls applications. The closed loop performance of the digital control system agreed well with the sampled-data system design predictions. The digital fly-by-wire mechanization also met pilot flying qualities requirements. The advantages of mechanizing the control laws in software became apparent during the flight program and were realized without sacrificing overall system reliability. This required strict software management. The F-8 flight test results are shown to be encouraging in light of the requirements that must be met by control systems for flight-critical active controls applications.

  6. Solar radiation pressure used for formation flying control around the Sun-Earth libration point

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng-ping GONG; Jun-feng LI; He-xi BAOYIN

    2009-01-01

    Solar radiation pressure is used to control the formation flying around the L2 libration point in the Sun-Earth system. Formation flying control around a halo orbit requires a very small thrust that cannot be satisfied by the latest thrusters. The key contribution of this paper is that the continuous low thrust is produced by solar radiation pressure to achieve the tight formation flying around the libration point. However, only certain families of formation types can be controlled by solar radiation pressure since the direction of solar radiation pressure is restricted to a certain range. Two types of feasible formations using solar radiation pressure control are designed. The conditions of feasible formations are given analytically. Simulations are presented for each case, and the results show that the formations are well controlled by solar radiation pressure.

  7. Multisensory systems integration for high-performance motor control in flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Mark A

    2010-06-01

    Engineered tracking systems 'fuse' data from disparate sensor platforms, such as radar and video, to synthesize information that is more reliable than any single input. The mammalian brain registers visual and auditory inputs to directionally localize an interesting environmental feature. For a fly, sensory perception is challenged by the extreme performance demands of high speed flight. Yet even a fruit fly can robustly track a fragmented odor plume through varying visual environments, outperforming any human engineered robot. Flies integrate disparate modalities, such as vision and olfaction, which are neither related by spatiotemporal spectra nor processed by registered neural tissue maps. Thus, the fly is motivating new conceptual frameworks for how low-level multisensory circuits and functional algorithms produce high-performance motor control.

  8. Augmentative Biological Control Using Parasitoids for Fruit Fly Management in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Flávio R M; Ricalde, Marcelo P

    2012-12-21

    The history of classical biological control of fruit flies in Brazil includes two reported attempts in the past 70 years. The first occurred in 1937 when an African species of parasitoid larvae (Tetrastichus giffardianus) was introduced to control the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata and other tephritids. The second occurred in September 1994 when the exotic parasitoid Diachasmimorpha longicaudata, originally from Gainesville, Florida, was introduced by a Brazilian agricultural corporation (EMBRAPA) to evaluate the parasitoid's potential for the biological control of Anastrepha spp. and Ceratitis capitata. Although there are numerous native Brazilian fruit fly parasitoids, mass rearing of these native species is difficult. Thus, D. longicaudata was chosen due to its specificity for the family Tephritidae and its ease of laboratory rearing. In this paper we review the literature on Brazilian fruit fly biological control and suggest that those tactics can be used on a large scale, together creating a biological barrier to the introduction of new fruit fly populations, reducing the source of outbreaks and the risk of species spread, while decreasing the use of insecticides on fruit destined for domestic and foreign markets.

  9. Augmentative Biological Control Using Parasitoids for Fruit Fly Management in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio R. M. Garcia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The history of classical biological control of fruit flies in Brazil includes two reported attempts in the past 70 years. The first occurred in 1937 when an African species of parasitoid larvae (Tetrastichus giffardianus was introduced to control the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata and other tephritids. The second occurred in September 1994 when the exotic parasitoid Diachasmimorpha longicaudata, originally from Gainesville, Florida, was introduced by a Brazilian agricultural corporation (EMBRAPA to evaluate the parasitoid’s potential for the biological control of Anastrepha spp. and Ceratitis capitata. Although there are numerous native Brazilian fruit fly parasitoids, mass rearing of these native species is difficult. Thus, D. longicaudata was chosen due to its specificity for the family Tephritidae and its ease of laboratory rearing. In this paper we review the literature on Brazilian fruit fly biological control and suggest that those tactics can be used on a large scale, together creating a biological barrier to the introduction of new fruit fly populations, reducing the source of outbreaks and the risk of species spread, while decreasing the use of insecticides on fruit destined for domestic and foreign markets.

  10. Psyttalia cf. concolor (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) for biological control of olive fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Victoria Y; Rendón, Pedro A; Sivinski, John

    2008-06-01

    The larval parasitoid, Psyttalia cf. concolor (Szépligeti), reared on Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Weidemann), by the USDA-APHIS-PPQ, Guatemala City, Guatemala, was imported into California for biological control of olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae (Gmelin), in olives, Olea europaea L. Mean percentage parasitism of olive fruit fly third instars infesting fruit in field cages ranged from 7.0 in Grapevine to 59.7 in Santa Barbara and in free releases ranged from 0 in Grapevine to 10.6 in Santa Barbara after 4- to 6-d exposures. In the laboratory, more parasitoids developed to adults in olive fruit fly larvae that were 11-13 d old than in larvae 8-10 d old. Adult parasitoids lived significantly longer when provided with water than adults without water in environmental chambers at 5 degrees C, 85% RH; 15 degrees C, 65% RH; 25 degrees C, 25% RH; and 35 degrees C, 25% RH. Adult parasitoids lived for 48 d with honey for food and water and 32 d with food and sugar solution at 15 degrees C and 65% RH. Survival of adult parasitoids without food and water in greenhouse tests was approximately 4 d in a simulated coastal climate and 1 d in a simulated inland valley climate and was significantly increased by providing food and water. The parasitoid did not develop in the beneficial seedhead fly, Chaetorellia succinea (Costa), in yellow star thistle. The rate of parasitism of walnut husk fly, Rhagoletis completa Cresson, larvae in green walnut husks was 28.4% in laboratory no-choice tests. In choice tests, the rate of parasitism of walnut husk fly versus olive fruit fly larvae in olives was 11.5 and 24.2%, respectively.

  11. A Control Law Design Method Facilitating Control Power, Robustness, Agility, and Flying Qualities Tradeoffs: CRAFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Patrick C.; Davidson, John B.

    1998-01-01

    A multi-input, multi-output control law design methodology, named "CRAFT", is presented. CRAFT stands for the design objectives addressed, namely, Control power, Robustness, Agility, and Flying Qualities Tradeoffs. The methodology makes use of control law design metrics from each of the four design objective areas. It combines eigenspace assignment, which allows for direct specification of eigenvalues and eigenvectors, with a graphical approach for representing the metrics that captures numerous design goals in one composite illustration. Sensitivity of the metrics to eigenspace choice is clearly displayed, enabling the designer to assess the cost of design tradeoffs. This approach enhances the designer's ability to make informed design tradeoffs and to reach effective final designs. An example of the CRAFT methodology applied to an advanced experimental fighter and discussion of associated design issues are provided.

  12. Controlling free flight of a robotic fly using an onboard vision sensor inspired by insect ocelli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Sawyer B.; Karpelson, Michael; Censi, Andrea; Ma, Kevin Y.; Wood, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Scaling a flying robot down to the size of a fly or bee requires advances in manufacturing, sensing and control, and will provide insights into mechanisms used by their biological counterparts. Controlled flight at this scale has previously required external cameras to provide the feedback to regulate the continuous corrective manoeuvres necessary to keep the unstable robot from tumbling. One stabilization mechanism used by flying insects may be to sense the horizon or Sun using the ocelli, a set of three light sensors distinct from the compound eyes. Here, we present an ocelli-inspired visual sensor and use it to stabilize a fly-sized robot. We propose a feedback controller that applies torque in proportion to the angular velocity of the source of light estimated by the ocelli. We demonstrate theoretically and empirically that this is sufficient to stabilize the robot's upright orientation. This constitutes the first known use of onboard sensors at this scale. Dipteran flies use halteres to provide gyroscopic velocity feedback, but it is unknown how other insects such as honeybees stabilize flight without these sensory organs. Our results, using a vehicle of similar size and dynamics to the honeybee, suggest how the ocelli could serve this role. PMID:24942846

  13. Controlling free flight of a robotic fly using an onboard vision sensor inspired by insect ocelli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Sawyer B; Karpelson, Michael; Censi, Andrea; Ma, Kevin Y; Wood, Robert J

    2014-08-06

    Scaling a flying robot down to the size of a fly or bee requires advances in manufacturing, sensing and control, and will provide insights into mechanisms used by their biological counterparts. Controlled flight at this scale has previously required external cameras to provide the feedback to regulate the continuous corrective manoeuvres necessary to keep the unstable robot from tumbling. One stabilization mechanism used by flying insects may be to sense the horizon or Sun using the ocelli, a set of three light sensors distinct from the compound eyes. Here, we present an ocelli-inspired visual sensor and use it to stabilize a fly-sized robot. We propose a feedback controller that applies torque in proportion to the angular velocity of the source of light estimated by the ocelli. We demonstrate theoretically and empirically that this is sufficient to stabilize the robot's upright orientation. This constitutes the first known use of onboard sensors at this scale. Dipteran flies use halteres to provide gyroscopic velocity feedback, but it is unknown how other insects such as honeybees stabilize flight without these sensory organs. Our results, using a vehicle of similar size and dynamics to the honeybee, suggest how the ocelli could serve this role.

  14. Docking System Design and Self-Assembly Control of Distributed Swarm Flying Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxing Wei

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel docking system design and the distributed self‐assembly control strategy for a Distributed Swarm Flying Robot (DSFR. The DSFR is a swarm robot comprising many identical robot modules that are able to move on the ground, dock with each other and fly coordinately once self‐assembled into a robotic structure. A generalized adjacency matrix method is proposed to describe the configurations of robotic structures. Based on the docking system and the adjacency matrix, experiments are performed to demonstrate and verify the self‐assembly control strategy.

  15. The use of entomopathogenic fungi in the control of tsetse flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniania, Nguya K; Ekesi, Sunday

    2013-03-01

    Tsetse flies harbor a number of pathogens in nature; but their potential as biological control agents has not been fully exploited, especially due to the difficulty of their application in the field. Since entomopathogenic fungi infect their target organisms through the cuticle, it has been possible to develop a device that deliver and autodisseminate inoculum among tsetse in the field, resulting in population reduction, comparable to mass-trapping technology. However, the success of this technology depends on the effective horizontal transmission of the inoculum between insects. We present an overview of the prospects of entomopathogenic fungi for the control of tsetse flies and highlight the challenges.

  16. Docking System Design and Self-Assembly Control of Distributed Swarm Flying Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxing Wei

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel docking system design and the distributed self-assembly control strategy for a Distributed Swarm Flying Robot (DSFR. The DSFR is a swarm robot comprising many identical robot modules that are able to move on the ground, dock with each other and fly coordinately once self-assembled into a robotic structure. A generalized adjacency matrix method is proposed to describe the configurations of robotic structures. Based on the docking system and the adjacency matrix, experiments are performed to demonstrate and verify the self-assembly control strategy.

  17. NASA's advanced control law program for the F-8 digital fly-by-wire aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    This paper briefly describes the NASA F-8 Digital Fly-By-Wire (DFBW) and Langley Research Center's role in investigating and promoting advanced control laws for possible flight experimentation and also provides a brief description of the Phase II DFBW F-8 aircraft and its control system. Some of the advanced control law study objectives and guidelines are discussed, and some mathematical models which are useful in the control analysis problem are provided.

  18. Y-Linked markers for improved population control of the tephritid fruit fly pest, Anastrepha suspensa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insect pest control programs incorporating the sterile insect technique (SIT) rely on the mass production and release of sterilized insects to reduce the wild-type population through infertile matings. Most effective programs release only males to avoid any crop damage caused by female fruit flies o...

  19. Optimization of thermal fly-height control slider geometry for Tbit/in^2 recording

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vakis, Antonis I.; Polycarpou, Andreas A.

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic storage advances including thermal fly-height control (TFC) technology were able to reduce the clearance between the read/write elements of the slider and the disk surface to increase the recording density of hard disk drives without compromising the stability of the head–disk interface (HD

  20. Enabling Spacecraft Formation Flying through Position Determination, Control and Enhanced Automation Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, John; Bauer, Frank; Hartman, Kate; How, Jonathan

    2000-01-01

    Formation Flying is revolutionizing the way the space community conducts science missions around the Earth and in deep space. This technological revolution will provide new, innovative ways for the community to gather scientific information, share that information between space vehicles and the ground, and expedite the human exploration of space. Once fully matured, formation flying will result in numerous sciencecraft acting as virtual platforms and sensor webs, gathering significantly more and better science data than call be collected today. To achieve this goal, key technologies must be developed including those that address the following basic questions posed by the spacecraft: Where am I? Where is the rest of the fleet? Where do I need to be? What do I have to do (and what am I able to do) to get there? The answers to these questions and the means to implement those answers will depend oil the specific mission needs and formation configuration. However, certain critical technologies are common to most formations. These technologies include high-precision position and relative-position knowledge including Global Positioning System (GPS) mid celestial navigation; high degrees of spacecraft autonomy inter-spacecraft communication capabilities; targeting and control including distributed control algorithms, and high precision control thrusters and actuators. This paper provides an overview of a selection of the current activities NASA/DoD/Industry/Academia are working to develop Formation Flying technologies as quickly as possible, the hurdles that need to be overcome to achieve our formation flying vision, and the team's approach to transfer this technology to space. It will also describe several of the formation flying testbeds, such as Orion and University Nanosatellites, that are being developed to demonstrate and validate many of these innovative sensing and formation control technologies.

  1. The Role of Monoaminergic Neurotransmission for Metabolic Control in the Fruit Fly Drosophila Melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Li

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Hormones control various metabolic traits comprising fat deposition or starvation resistance. Here we show that two invertebrate neurohormones, octopamine (OA and tyramine (TA as well as their associated receptors, had a major impact on these metabolic traits. Animals devoid of the monoamine OA develop a severe obesity phenotype. Using flies defective in the expression of receptors for OA and TA, we aimed to decipher the contributions of single receptors for these metabolic phenotypes. Whereas those animals impaired in octß1r, octß2r and tar1 share the obesity phenotype of OA-deficient (tβh-deficient animals, the octß1r, octß2r deficient flies showed reduced insulin release, which is opposed to the situation found in tβh-deficient animals. On the other hand, OAMB deficient flies were leaner than controls, implying that the regulation of this phenotype is more complex than anticipated. Other phenotypes seen in tβh-deficient animals, such as the reduced ability to perform complex movements tasks can mainly be attributed to the octß2r. Tissue-specific RNAi experiments revealed a very complex interorgan communication leading to the different metabolic phenotypes observed in OA or OA and TA-deficient flies.

  2. Biological and Cultural Control of Olive Fruit Fly in California---Utilization of Parasitoids from USDA-APHIS-PPQ, Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    The parasitoid Psytallia cf. concolor (Szépligeti) was reared on sterile Mediterranean fruit fly larvae at the USDA-APHIS-PPQ, Petapa Quarantine Laboratory in Guatemala and shipped to the USDA-ARS, Parlier, for wide-spread release and biological control of olive fruit fly in California. As many as 3...

  3. Approved quarantine treatment for Hessian fly (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) in large-size bales and Hessian fly and cereal leaf beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) control by bale compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    An approved quarantine treatment using bale compression (32 kg/sq cm of pressure) and phosphine fumigation (61 g/28.2 cu m) aluminum phosphide for 7 d at 20 degrees C) was determined to control Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor (Say), in large-size, polypropylene fabric-wrapped bales exported from t...

  4. The use of bacterial larvicides in mosquito and black fly control programmes in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regis Lêda

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus spp. based larvides are increasingly replacing, with numerous advantages, chemical insecticides in programmes for controlling black fly and mosquito populations. Brazil was among the pioneers in adopting Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (B.t.i to control black flies. However, the major current mosquito control programme in Brazil, the Programme for Eradication of Aedes aegypti launched in 1997, only recently decided to replace temephos by B.t.i based larvicides, in the State of Rio de Janeiro. In the last decade, works developed by research groups in Brazilian institutions have generated a significant contribution to this subject through the isolation of B. sphaericus new strains, the development of new products and the implementation of field trials of Bacillus efficacy against mosquito species under different environmental conditions.

  5. Simulation of Guidance, Navigation, and Control Systems for Formation Flying Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Rich; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Concepts for missions of distributed spacecraft flying in formation abound. From high resolution interferometry to spatially distributed in-situ measurements, these mission concepts levy a myriad of guidance, navigation, and control (GNC) requirements on the spacecraft/formation as a single system. A critical step toward assessing and meeting these challenges lies in realistically simulating distributed spacecraft systems. The Formation Flying TestBed (FFTB) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Guidance, Navigation, and Control Center is a hardware-in-the-loop simulation and development facility focused on GNC issues relevant to formation flying systems. The FFTB provides a realistic simulation of the vehicle dynamics and control for formation flying missions in order to: (1) conduct feasibility analyses of mission requirements, (2) conduct and answer mission and spacecraft design trades, and (3) serve as a host for GNC software and hardware development and testing. The initial capabilities of the FFTB are based upon an integration of high fidelity hardware and software simulation, emulation, and test platforms developed or employed at GSFC in recent years, including a high-fidelity Global Positioning System (GPS) simulator which has been a fundamental component of the GNC Center's GPS Test Facility. The FFTB will be continuously evolving over the next several years from a tool with capabilities in GPS navigation hardware/software-in-the-loop analysis and closed loop GPS-based orbit control algorithm assessment. Eventually, it will include full capability to support all aspects of multi-sensor, absolute and relative state determination and control, in all (attitude and orbit) degrees of freedom, as well as information management for satellite clusters and constellations. A detailed description of the FFTB architecture is presented in the paper.

  6. [Intracellular signals involved in glucose control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, M; Velasco, E; Kumate, J

    2001-01-01

    Many proteins are involved in glucose control. The first step for glucose uptake is insulin receptor-binding. Stimulation of the insulin receptor results in rapid autophosphorylation and conformational changes in the beta chain and the subsequent phosphorylation of the insulin receptor substrate. This results in the docking of several SH2 domain proteins, including PI 3-kinase and other adapters. The final event is glucose transporter (GLUT) translocation to the cell surface. GLUT is in the cytosol but after insulin stimulation, several proteins are activated either in the GLUT vesicles or in the inner membrane. The role of the cytoskeleton is not well known, but it apparently participates in membrane fusion and vesicle mobilization. After glucose uptake, several hexokines metabolize the glucose to generate energy, convert the glucose in glycogen and store it. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by high glucose levels and insulin resistance. The insulin receptor is diminished on the cell surface membrane, tyrosine phosphorylation is decreased, serine and threonine phosphorylation is augmented. Apparently, the main problem with GLUT protein is in its translocation to the cell surface. At present, we know the role of many proteins involved in glucose control. However, we do not understand the significance of insulin resistance at the molecular level with type 2 diabetes.

  7. Effects of GF-120 fruit fly bait concentrations on attraction, feeding, mortality, and control of Rhagoletis indifferens (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Wee L; Chapman, Peter S

    2005-10-01

    Effects of different concentrations of GF-120 NF Naturalyte Fruit Fly Bait on attraction and feeding responses, mortality, and control of the western cherry fruit fly, Rhagoletis indifferens Curran, were determined. In the laboratory, flies that had been exposed to sugar and yeast extract and then deprived of all food for 16-20 h were attracted to 40.0% GF-120, but not to 0.6 and 4.8% GF-120 (vol:vol). Nonstarved flies were not attracted to any concentration. Flies in the field were not attracted to 55.6% GF-120 on cherry leaves, and few flies fed on the bait. In the laboratory, males fed for shorter durations on and ingested lower amounts of 0.6% than 4.8 or 40.0% GF-120, but females fed equally on all concentrations. Spinosad in GF-120 was highly toxic to flies. Lethal concentrations50 (LC50 values) of spinosad for starved flies at 1-4 d were 1.5-0.7 ppm. When gravid flies were exposed to cherries treated with 0.6, 4.8, and 40.0% GF-120, mortality was greater at each higher concentration, but none prevented oviposition. Field spray tests comparing 0.6, 4.8, and 40.0% GF-120 in 225 ml of spray per cherry tree resulted in 79-94% lower larval infestations than in controls, but no differences were seen among the concentrations. Evidence from this study indicates that fresh 40.0% GF-120 was attractive in the laboratory but that flies were not attracted to fresh GF-120 from far distances within trees, suggesting that suppression of populations is caused in large part by flies finding the bait through normal movement over large areas.

  8. Decentralized Formation Flying Control in a Multiple-Team Hierarchy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Joseph .; Thomas, Stephanie J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the prototype of a system that addresses these objectives-a decentralized guidance and control system that is distributed across spacecraft using a multiple-team framework. The objective is to divide large clusters into teams of manageable size, so that the communication and computational demands driven by N decentralized units are related to the number of satellites in a team rather than the entire cluster. The system is designed to provide a high-level of autonomy, to support clusters with large numbers of satellites, to enable the number of spacecraft in the cluster to change post-launch, and to provide for on-orbit software modification. The distributed guidance and control system will be implemented in an object-oriented style using MANTA (Messaging Architecture for Networking and Threaded Applications). In this architecture, tasks may be remotely added, removed or replaced post-launch to increase mission flexibility and robustness. This built-in adaptability will allow software modifications to be made on-orbit in a robust manner. The prototype system, which is implemented in MATLAB, emulates the object-oriented and message-passing features of the MANTA software. In this paper, the multiple-team organization of the cluster is described, and the modular software architecture is presented. The relative dynamics in eccentric reference orbits is reviewed, and families of periodic, relative trajectories are identified, expressed as sets of static geometric parameters. The guidance law design is presented, and an example reconfiguration scenario is used to illustrate the distributed process of assigning geometric goals to the cluster. Next, a decentralized maneuver planning approach is presented that utilizes linear-programming methods to enact reconfiguration and coarse formation keeping maneuvers. Finally, a method for performing online collision avoidance is discussed, and an example is provided to gauge its performance.

  9. Ivermectin as a Rodent Feed-Through Insecticide for Control of Immature Sand Flies (Diptera: Psychodidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    humidity and is protected from extreme temperatures . Adult sand flies live in close proximity to sources of blood (from the rodents living within the... temperature for 7 days and then were stored at 270uC until used. In each experiment, the body weight and daily food intake of hamsters in the 4 diet groups were...LN, Mamigonova RI, Sabatov EA. 1983. Use of D-20 aerosol insecticide smoke pots in controlling burrow sandflies . Med Parazitol Parazit Bolezni 4:78

  10. Genetic control of wiring specificity in the fly olfactory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Weizhe; Luo, Liqun

    2014-01-01

    Precise connections established between pre- and postsynaptic partners during development are essential for the proper function of the nervous system. The olfactory system detects a wide variety of odorants and processes the information in a precisely connected neural circuit. A common feature of the olfactory systems from insects to mammals is that the olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) expressing the same odorant receptor make one-to-one connections with a single class of second-order olfactory projection neurons (PNs). This represents one of the most striking examples of targeting specificity in developmental neurobiology. Recent studies have uncovered central roles of transmembrane and secreted proteins in organizing this one-to-one connection specificity in the olfactory system. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of how this wiring specificity is genetically controlled and focus on the mechanisms by which transmembrane and secreted proteins regulate different stages of the Drosophila olfactory circuit assembly in a coordinated manner. We also discuss how combinatorial coding, redundancy, and error-correcting ability could contribute to constructing a complex neural circuit in general.

  11. Oral treatment of rodents with insecticides for control of sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) and the fluorescent tracer technique (FTT) as a tool to evaluate potential sand fly control methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascari, T M; Clark, J; Gordon, S; Mitchell, M A; Rowton, E D; Stout, R; Foil, L D

    2011-03-01

    In laboratory studies, insecticides (diflubenzuron, novaluron, methoprene and, pyriproxyfen) that have been incorporated into rodent diets were effective as feed-throughs against sand fly larvae. Novaluron also was effective against sand fly larvae at low concentrations and under simulated field conditions. Ivermectin has been shown to be effective as a systemic insecticide, killing 100% of blood-feeding sand flies for up to seven d after rodents were treated. The fluorescent tracer technique (FTT) is the use of certain fluorescent dyes (rhodamine B or uranine O) as feed-through transtadial biomarkers for phlebotomine sand flies, systemic biomarkers for blood-feeding sand flies, and permanent markers for nectar-feeding sand flies. The results of these laboratory studies provide proof of concept for the FTT and indicate that the FTT could be used to delineate specific foci with rodent/sand fly associations that would be susceptible to control by using feed-through or systemic insecticides, or foci where insecticide-treated sugar baits could be used against sand flies.

  12. Adaptive Terminal Sliding Mode Control of Electromagnetic Spacecraft Formation Flying in Near-Earth Orbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingrui Zhang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available An adaptive terminal sliding mode control for six-degree-of-freedom electromagnetic spacecraft formation flying (EMFF in near-Earth orbits is presented. By using terminal sliding mode (TSM technique, the output tracking error can converge to zero in finite time, and strong robustness with respect to disturbance forces can be guaranteed. Based on a rotated frame Fr and the adaptive TSM controller, the special magnetic moment of the steerable magnetic dipole is computed. The angular momentum management strategy (AMM is implemented in a periodically switching fashion, by which the angular momentum buildup was limited. Illustrative simulations of EMFF are conducted to verify the effectiveness of the proposed controller.

  13. Characterisation of functional and insecticidal properties of a cathepsin L-like proteinase from flesh fly (Sacrophaga peregrina) involved in differentiation of imaginal discs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ScathL is a cathepsin L-like cysteine proteinase from Sacrophaga peregrina (flesh fly), which is involved in differentiation of imaginal discs. The protein has a potential insecticidal activity, since recombinant baculoviruses engineered to express ScathL have an enhanced ability to kill lepidoptera...

  14. Designing a Robust Nonlinear Dynamic Inversion Controller for Spacecraft Formation Flying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inseok Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The robust nonlinear dynamic inversion (RNDI control technique is proposed to keep the relative position of spacecrafts while formation flying. The proposed RNDI control method is based on nonlinear dynamic inversion (NDI. NDI is nonlinear control method that replaces the original dynamics into the user-selected desired dynamics. Because NDI removes nonlinearities in the model by inverting the original dynamics directly, it also eliminates the need of designing suitable controllers for each equilibrium point; that is, NDI works as self-scheduled controller. Removing the original model also provides advantages of ease to satisfy the specific requirements by simply handling desired dynamics. Therefore, NDI is simple and has many similarities to classical control. In real applications, however, it is difficult to achieve perfect cancellation of the original dynamics due to uncertainties that lead to performance degradation and even make the system unstable. This paper proposes robustness assurance method for NDI. The proposed RNDI is designed by combining NDI and sliding mode control (SMC. SMC is inherently robust using high-speed switching inputs. This paper verifies similarities of NDI and SMC, firstly. And then RNDI control method is proposed. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated by simulations applied to spacecraft formation flying problem.

  15. Relative position coordinated control for spacecraft formation flying with communication delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Dechao; Chen, Xiaoqian; Misra, Arun K.; Xiao, Bing

    2017-08-01

    This study addresses a relative position coordinated control problem for spacecraft formation flying subject to directed communication topology. Two different kinds of communication delay cases, including time-varying delays and arbitrarily bounded delays are investigated. Using the backstepping control technique, two virtual velocity control inputs are firstly designed to achieve coordinated position tracking for the kinematic subsystem. Furthermore, a hyperbolic tangent function is introduced to guarantee the boundedness of the virtual controller. Then, a finite-time control algorithm is designed for the dynamic subsystem. It can guarantee that the virtual velocity can be followed by the real velocity after finite time. It is theoretically proved that the proposed control scheme can asymptotically stabilize the closed-loop system. Numerical simulations are further presented that not only highlight closed-loop performance benefiting from the proposed control scheme, but also illustrate its superiority in comparison with conventional formation control schemes.

  16. Spacecraft Alignment Determination and Control for Dual Spacecraft Precision Formation Flying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Philip C.; Novo-Gradac, Anne-Marie; Shah, Neerav

    2017-01-01

    Many proposed formation flying missions seek to advance the state of the art in spacecraft science imaging by utilizing precision dual spacecraft formation flying to enable a virtual space telescope. Using precision dual spacecraft alignment, very long focal lengths can be achieved by locating the optics on one spacecraft and the detector on the other. Proposed science missions include astrophysics concepts with spacecraft separations from 1000 km to 25,000 km, such as the Milli-Arc-Second Structure Imager (MASSIM) and the New Worlds Observer, and Heliophysics concepts for solar coronagraphs and X-ray imaging with smaller separations (50m 500m). All of these proposed missions require advances in guidance, navigation, and control (GNC) for precision formation flying. In particular, very precise astrometric alignment control and estimation is required for precise inertial pointing of the virtual space telescope to enable science imaging orders of magnitude better than can be achieved with conventional single spacecraft instruments. This work develops design architectures, algorithms, and performance analysis of proposed GNC systems for precision dual spacecraft astrometric alignment. These systems employ a variety of GNC sensors and actuators, including laser-based alignment and ranging systems, optical imaging sensors (e.g. guide star telescope), inertial measurement units (IMU), as well as micro-thruster and precision stabilized platforms. A comprehensive GNC performance analysis is given for Heliophysics dual spacecraft PFF imaging mission concept.

  17. Sexy DEG/ENaC channels involved in gustatory detection of fruit fly pheromones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikielny, Claudio W

    2012-11-06

    Hydrocarbon pheromones on the cuticle of Drosophila melanogaster modulate the complex courtship behavior of males. Recently, three members of the degenerin/epithelial Na+ channel (DEG/ENaC) family of sodium channel subunits, Ppk25, Ppk23, and Ppk29 (also known as Nope), have been shown to function in gustatory perception of courtship-modulating contact pheromones. All three proteins are required for the activation of male courtship by female pheromones. Specific interactions between two of them have been demonstrated in cultured cells, suggesting that, in a subset of cells where they are coexpressed, these three subunits function within a common heterotrimeric DEG/ENaC channel. Such a DEG/ENaC channel may be gated by pheromones, either directly or indirectly, or alternatively may control the excitability of pheromone-sensing cells. In addition, these studies identify taste neurons that respond specifically to courtship-modulating pheromones and mediate their effects on male behavior. Two types of pheromone-sensing taste neurons, F and M cells, have been defined on the basis of their specific response to either female or male pheromones. These reports set the stage for the dissection of the molecular and cellular mechanisms that mediate gustatory detection of contact pheromones.

  18. How functional genomics will impact fruit fly pest control: the example of the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scolari, Francesca; Gomulski, Ludvik M; Gabrieli, Paolo; Manni, Mosè; Savini, Grazia; Gasperi, Giuliano; Malacrida, Anna R

    2014-01-01

    The highly invasive agricultural insect pest Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae) is the most thoroughly studied tephritid fruit fly at the genetic and molecular levels. It has become a model for the analysis of fruit fly invasions and for the development of area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) programmes based on the environmentally-friendly Sterile Insect Technique (SIT). Extensive transcriptome resources and the recently released genome sequence are making it possible to unravel several aspects of the medfly reproductive biology and behaviour, opening new opportunities for comparative genomics and barcoding for species identification. New genes, promotors and regulatory sequences are becoming available for the development/improvement of highly competitive sexing strains, for the monitoring of sterile males released in the field and for determining the mating status of wild females. The tools developed in this species have been transferred to other tephritids that are also the subject of SIT programmes.

  19. Utilization of Atikokan coal fly ash in acid rock drainage control from Musselwhite Mine tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H.L.; Shang, J.Q. [Western Ontario Univ., London, ON (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Kovac, V. [Ontario Power Generation Inc., Toronto, ON (Canada). By-products, Fuel Division; Ho, K.S. [Trow Consulting Engineers, Brampton, ON (Canada)

    2006-03-15

    Acid rock drainage (ARD) is the greatest environmental liability facing the mining industry. Mines produce acidic effluents that are generated from the chemical reaction of sulphide containing minerals and atmospheric oxygen. The effluents have a pH value as low as 2 to 4 and their movement is accompanied by heavy metals which damage the ecosystem. This paper described some of the ARD-preventing technologies that are under investigation. In particular, it examined the feasibility of using Atikokan coal fly ash (AFA) as a buffering material to control and mitigate the generation of ARD from reactive Musselwhite Mine gold mine tailings. Coal fly ash is the residue resulting from the combustion of coal at electric generating plants. It consists of organic and inorganic matter, including silica, alumina, iron and calcium oxide with various amounts of carbon. More than 40,000 tons of fly ash is generated each year from the Atikokan Generating Station located 190 km west of the mine, of which 80 per cent is used for concrete manufacturing. In this study, experiments were conducted to determine the physical, chemical and mineralogical properties of both the fly ash residue and mine tailings. Six kinetic column permeation tests were then performed to monitor the leaching properties of the fly ash and the coal fly ash-mine tailings mixtures to determine the hydraulic conductivities resulting from pozzolanic reactions. The potential impacts of the disposal of AFA and mine tailings were also assessed. The study showed that the hydraulic conductivities of high-calcium AFA and the ash-tailings mixtures were greatly reduced upon contact with ARD. The pH of the pore fluid increased from acidic to alkaline. The concentration of regulated elements in the leachate from the ash-tailings mixtures were also below the limits set by the Ontario Ministry of Environment. The results indicate that AFA could mitigate the generation of ARD from reactive Musselwhite Mine gold mine tailings. 1

  20. Toxicity of naturally occurring Bio-fly and chitosan compounds to control the Mediterranean fruit fly Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabea, E I; Nasr, H M; Badawy, M E I; El-Gendy, I R

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of five compounds of a biopolymer chitosan and Bio-fly (Beauveria bassiana fungus) as biopesticide was evaluated on Ceratitis capitata under laboratory conditions. The inhibitory effects on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and adenosinetriphosphatase (ATPase) as biochemical indicators were also determined in vivo. The results indicated that B. bassiana based Bio-fly exhibited significant toxicity against C. capitata (LC50 = 3008 and 3126 mg/L after 48 h in females and males, respectively) followed by the derivatives of chitosan, N-(4-propylbenzyl)chitosan and N-(2-nitrobenzyl)chitosan. Bio-fly displayed remarkable inhibition of AChE activity (IC50 = 2220 mg/L) while N-(2-chloro,6-flourobenzyl)chitosan, N-(4-propylbenzyl)chitosan and N-(3,4-methylenedioxybenzyl) chitosan had no significant difference in inhibitory action. In adult males, N-(2-nitrobenzyl)chitosan exhibited the highest inhibitory action (IC50 = 6569 mg/L). In addition, the toxic effects of the tested compounds on the activity of ATPase indicated that highly significant inhibition was found with N-(4-propylbenzyl)chitosan with an IC50 of 8194 and 8035 mg/L, in females and males, respectively.

  1. Finite time coordinated formation control for spacecraft formation flying under directed communication topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Dechao; Chen, Xiaoqian; Misra, Arun K.

    2017-07-01

    This paper investigates the finite time coordinated formation control problem for spacecraft formation flying (SFF) under the assumption of directed communication topology. By using the neighborhood state measurements, a robust finite time coordinated formation controller is firstly designed based on the nonsingular terminal sliding mode surface. To address the special case that the desired trajectory of the formation is only accessible to a subset of spacecraft in the formation, an adaptive finite time coordinated formation controller is also proposed by designing a novel sliding mode surface. In both cases, the external disturbances are explicitly taken into account. Rigorous theoretical analysis proves that the proposed control schemes ensure that the closed-loop system can track the desired time-varying trajectory in finite time. Numerical simulations are presented that not only highlights the closed-loop performance benefits from the proposed control algorithms, but also illustrates the effectiveness in the presence of external disturbances when compared with the existing coordinated formation control schemes.

  2. Design and control of multiple spacecraft formation flying in elliptical orbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Peng-ji; YANG Di

    2005-01-01

    Spacecraft formation flying is an attractive new concept in international aeronautic fields because of its powerful functions and low cost. In this paper, the formation design and PD closed-loop control of spacecraft formation flying in elliptical orbits are discussed. Based on two-body relative dynamics, the true anomaly is applied as independent variable instead of the variable of time. Since the apogee is considered as the starting point, the six integrating constants are calculated. Therefore, the algebraic solution is obtained for the relative motion in elliptical orbits. Moreover, the formation design is presented and both circular formation and line formation are provided in terms of an algebraic solution. This paper also discusses the PD-closed loop control for precise formation control in elliptical orbits. In this part, the error-type state equation is put forward and the linear quadratic regulator (LQR) method is used to calculate PD parameters. Though the gain matrix calculated from LQR is time-variable because the error-type state equation is time variable, the PD parameters are also considered as constants because of their small changes in simulation. Finally, taking circular formation as an example, the initial orbital elements are achieved for three secondary spacecraft. And the numerical simulation is analyzed under PD formation control with initial errors and J2 perturbation. The simulation results demonstrate the validity of PD closed-loop control scheme.

  3. Fault Tolerant Architecture For A Fly-By-Light Flight Control Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Kevin; Stipanovich, John; Smith, Brian; Reddy, Mahesh C.

    1990-02-01

    The next generation of flight control computers will utilize fiber optic technology to produce a fly-by-light flight control system. Optical transducers and optical fibers will take the place of electrical position transducers and wires, torsion bars, bell cranks, and cables. Applications for this fly-by-light technology include space launch vehicles, upperstages, space-craft, and commercial/military aircraft. Optical fibers are lighter than mechanical transmission media and unlike conven-tional wire transmissions are not susceptible to electromagnetic interference (EMI) and high energy emission sources. This paper will give an overview of a fault tolerant In-Line Monitored optical flight control system being developed at Boeing Aerospace & Electronics in Seattle, Washington. This system uses passive transducers with fiber optic interconnections which hold promises to virtually eliminate EMI threats to flight control system performance and flight safety and also provide significant weight savings. The main emphasis of this paper will be the In-Line Monitored architecture of the optical transducer system required for use in a fault tolerant flight control system.

  4. Sand Fly Surveillance and Control on Camp Ramadi, Iraq, as Part of a Leishmaniasis Control Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Santos De-Marco et al. 2002). Moon illumination and other environmental factors, such as temperature and wind speed, also affect sand fly behavior...the U.S. government as part of that person’s official duties. REFERENCES CITED Alexander, B. 2000. Sampling methods for phlebotomine sandflies . Med

  5. Nonlinear control of multiple spacecraft formation flying using the constraint forces in Lagrangian systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Getting inspiration from the constraint forces in the classical mechanics, we presented the nonlinear control method of multiple spacecraft formation flying to accurately keep the desired formation arrays. Considering nonlinearity and perturbation, we changed the question of the formation array control to the Lagrange equations with the holonomic constraints and the differential algebraic equations (DAE), and developed the nonlinear control for design of the follower spacecraft tracking control laws by solving the DAE. Because of using the idea of the constraint forces, this approach can adequately utilize the characteristic of the dynamic equations, i.e., the space natural forces, and accurately keep the arbitrary formation array. Simulation results of the circular formation keeping with the linear and nonlinear dynamical equations were included to illuminate the control performance.

  6. Neural network-based distributed attitude coordination control for spacecraft formation flying with input saturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, An-Min; Kumar, Krishna Dev

    2012-07-01

    This brief considers the attitude coordination control problem for spacecraft formation flying when only a subset of the group members has access to the common reference attitude. A quaternion-based distributed attitude coordination control scheme is proposed with consideration of the input saturation and with the aid of the sliding-mode observer, separation principle theorem, Chebyshev neural networks, smooth projection algorithm, and robust control technique. Using graph theory and a Lyapunov-based approach, it is shown that the distributed controller can guarantee the attitude of all spacecraft to converge to a common time-varying reference attitude when the reference attitude is available only to a portion of the group of spacecraft. Numerical simulations are presented to demonstrate the performance of the proposed distributed controller.

  7. Multiple simultaneous specification attitude control of a mini flying-wing unmanned aerial vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markin, Shael

    The Multiple Simultaneous Specification controller design method is an elegant means of designing a single controller to satisfy multiple convex closed loop performance specifications. In this thesis, the method is used to design pitch and roll attitude controllers for a Zagi flying-wing unmanned aerial vehicle from Procerus Technologies. A linear model of the aircraft is developed, in which the lateral and longitudinal motions of the aircraft are decoupled. The controllers are designed for this decoupled state space model. Linear simulations are performed in Simulink, and all performance specifications are satisfied by the closed loop system. Nonlinear, hardware-in-the-loop simulations are carried out using the aircraft, on-board computer, and ground station software. Flight tests are also executed to test the performance of the designed controllers. The closed loop aircraft behaviour is generally as expected, however the desired performance specifications are not strictly met in the nonlinear simulations or in the flight tests.

  8. Design of flying vehicle control system by signal to noise ratio

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Presents the new concept of ″Desired to be small″ based on thebasic function of vehicle flight control system for an optimal design of flying vehicle control system, and the definition of S/N ratio and calculation formula for ″Desired to be small″ dynamic characteristics, and the S/N ratio method established for design of velicle flight control systems, by which, an orthogrnal table is used to arrange test schemes, and error facters are used to simulate various interferences, and the use of S/N ratio as a design criterion to synthesise the design of dynamic and static characteristics for definition of an optimal scheme, the application of S/N ratio method to the design of a type of vehicle control system and the single run success abtained in design of control system, technical evaluation test and design finalization flight test.

  9. Tsetse flies: their biology and control using area-wide integrated pest management approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vreysen, Marc J B; Seck, Momar Talla; Sall, Baba; Bouyer, Jérémy

    2013-03-01

    Tsetse flies are the cyclical vectors of trypanosomes, the causative agents of 'sleeping sickness' or human African trypanosomosis (HAT) in humans and 'nagana' or African animal trypanosomosis (AAT) in livestock in Sub-saharan Africa. Many consider HAT as one of the major neglected tropical diseases and AAT as the single greatest health constraint to increased livestock production. This review provides some background information on the taxonomy of tsetse flies, their unique way of reproduction (adenotrophic viviparity) making the adult stage the only one easily accessible for control, and how their ecological affinities, their distribution and population dynamics influence and dictate control efforts. The paper likewise reviews four control tactics (sequential aerosol technique, stationary attractive devices, live bait technique and the sterile insect technique) that are currently accepted as friendly to the environment, and describes their limitations and advantages and how they can best be put to practise in an IPM context. The paper discusses the different strategies for tsetse control i.e. localised versus area-wide and focusses thereafter on the principles of area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) and the phased-conditional approach with the tsetse project in Senegal as a recent example. We argue that sustainable tsetse-free zones can be created on Africa mainland provided certain managerial and technical prerequisites are in place.

  10. Time flies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wit, Janneke

    , the LS fly might be able to spend energy more generously on different tasks. Therefor, the capacity of LS and C lines to locate resources in a natural environment was tested. It turns out that LS flies are less likely to find food than C flies in such a setting, yet that as they age, their ability...... to locate food decreases slower than that of C lines. Gene expression of 10 candidate genes for longevity was quantified in two types of C and LS lines at three different ages. One of these genes, CG32638, indeed appears to be involved in life span determination in both males and females, regardless...... of mating status. Generalising studies on ageing in D. melanogaster can be cumbersome, especially in light of discrepancy between correlated responses between studies. To elucidate which mechanisms might be conserved due to evolutionary constraints, life span of 13 species of Drosophila was determined...

  11. Approved quarantine treatment for Hessian fly (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) in large-size hay bales and Hessian fly and cereal leaf beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) control by bale compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Victoria Y

    2011-06-01

    A quarantine treatment using bale compression (32 kg/cm2 pressure) and phosphine fumigation (61 g/28.3 m3 aluminum phosphide for 7 d at 20 degrees C) was approved to control Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor (Say), in large-size, polypropylene fabric-wrapped bales exported from the western states to Japan. No Hessian fly puparia (45,366) survived to the adult stage in infested wheat, Triticum aestivum L., seedlings exposed to the treatment in a large-scale commercial test. Daily temperatures (mean +/- SEM) inside and among bales in three test freight containers were 17.8 +/- 0.2 front top, 17.0 +/- 0.2 front bottom, 17.3 +/- 0.2 middle bale, 15.7 +/- 0.3 middle air, 18.5 +/- 0.1 back top, and 18.1 +/- 0.1 degrees C back bottom, allowing the fumigation temperature to be established at > or = 20 degrees C. Mean fumigant concentrations ranged from 208 to 340 ppm during the first 3 d and ranged from 328 to 461 ppm after 7 d of fumigation. Copper plate corrosion values inside the doors, and in the middle of the large-size bales in all locations indicated moderate exposure to hydrogen phosphide (PH3). PH3 residues were below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency tolerance of 0.1 ppm in animal feeds. The research was approved by Japan and U.S. regulatory agencies, and regulations were implemented on 20 May 2005. Compression in large-size bale compressors resulted in 3-3.6 and 0% survival of Hessian fly puparia and cereal leaf beetle, Oulema melanopus (L.), respectively. Bale compression can be used as a single treatment for cereal leaf beetle and as a component in a systems approach for quarantine control of Hessian fly.

  12. Standardizing visual control devices for tsetse flies: east African Species Glossina fuscipes fuscipes and Glossina tachinoides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Oloo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Riverine species of tsetse are responsible for most human African trypanosomiasis (HAT transmission and are also important vectors of animal trypanosomiasis. This study concerns the development of visual control devices for two such species, Glossina fuscipes fuscipes and Glossina tachinoides, at the eastern limits of their continental range. The goal was to determine the most long-lasting, practical and cost-effective visually attractive device that induces the strongest landing responses in these species for use as insecticide-impregnated tools in vector population suppression.Field trials were conducted in different seasons on G. f. fuscipes in Kenya, Ethiopia and the Sudan and on G. tachinoides in Ethiopia to measure the performance of traps and 2D targets of different sizes and colours, with and without chemical baits, at different population densities and under different environmental conditions. Adhesive film was used to enumerate flies at these remote locations to compare trapping efficiencies. The findings show that targets made from black and blue fabrics (either phthalogen or turquoise covered with adhesive film render them equal to or more efficient than traps at capturing G. f. fuscipes and G. tachinoides. Biconical trap efficiency varied between 25% and 33% for the two species. Smaller 0.25 m×0.25 m phthalogen blue-black targets proved more efficient than the regular 1 m2 target for both species, by over six times for Glossina f. fuscipes and two times for G. tachinoides based on catches per m2. Overall, targets with a higher edge/surface area ratio were more efficient at capturing flies.Taking into account practical considerations and fly preferences for edges and colours, we propose a 0.5×0.75 m blue-black target as a simple cost-effective device for management of G. f. fuscipes and G. tachinoides, impregnated with insecticide for control and covered with adhesive film for population sampling.

  13. Controlled-release panel traps for the Mediterranean fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, B A; Cunningham, R T; Chambers, D L; Avery, J W; Harte, E M

    1994-10-01

    Solid, controlled-release dispensers containing 2 g of the synthetic attractant trimedlure now are used in Jackson traps to detect the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann). Panel traps consisting of trimedlure mixed in a sticky substance and spread on the surfaces of a plastic panel are used to delineate the limits of discovered insect infestations in California. We describe the development of controlled-release, polymeric panels that prolong release of trimedlure and a highly attractive analog, ceralure. Attractants were incorporated in a polyethylene matrix to form panels and in a polymer coating on cardboard panels that then were evaluated by biological and chemical assay. In addition, commercial polymer matrix panels were evaluated. Field bioassay tests conducted in Hilo, HI, using released flies and in Guatemala in a natural population showed that the polyethylene matrix panel became brittle and cracked during field exposure and that release rates of the attractants were relatively low. The coated cardboard panels were stable under field conditions and yielded high fly captures for up to 6 wk. Farma Tech commercial panels containing 12.3 and 23.4 g of trimedlure remained highly attractive throughout a 134-d test in Hawaii and appear to be a long-lasting alternative to panels coated with trimedlure in Stikem. The cost of the relatively high dose of trimedlure is offset by the prolonged active life of the panel. Commercial panels from AgriSense (10 g trimedlure and 10 g ceralure) released the attractants at a slower rate and were less attractive.

  14. Parameters Tuning Approach for Proportion Integration Differentiation Controller of Magnetorheological Fluids Brake Based on Improved Fruit Fly Optimization Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhua Liu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the response performance of a proportion integration differentiation (PID controller for magnetorheological fluids (MRF brake and to reduce the braking fluctuation rate, an improved fruit fly optimization algorithm for PID controller parameters tuning of MRF brake is proposed. A data acquisition system for MRF brake is designed and the transfer function of MRF brake is identified. Moreover, an improved fruit fly optimization algorithm (IFOA through integration of PID control strategy and cloud model algorithm is proposed to design a PID controller for MRF brake. Finally, the simulation and experiment are carried out. The results show that IFOA, with a faster response output and no overshoot, is superior to the conventional PID and fruit fly optimization algorithm (FOA PID controller.

  15. Algorithm of Attitude Control and Its Simulation of Free-Flying Space Robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Reaction wheel or reaction thruster is employed to maintain the attitude of the base of space robot fixed in attitude control of free-flying space robot.However, in this method, a large amount of fuel will be consumed, and it will shorten the on-orbit life span of space robot, it also vibrate the system and make the system unsteady.The restricted minimum disturbance map (RMDM) based algorithm of attitude control is presented to keep the attitude of the base fixed during the movement of the manipulator.In this method it is realized by planning motion trajectory of the end-effector of manipulator without using reaction wheel or reaction thruster.In order to verify the feasibility and effectiveness of the algorithm attitude control presented in this paper, computer simulation experiments have been made and the experimental results demonstrate that this algorithm is feasible.

  16. Entomopathogenic nematodes for the control of phorid and sciarid flies in mushroom crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Jesús Navarro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the efficacy of two nematodes, Steinernema feltiae and S. carpocapsae, to control mushroom flies and to evaluate the effect of these treatments on Agaricus bisporus production. Two mushroom cultivation trials were carried out in controlled conditions, in substrate previously infested with the diptera Megaselia halterata and Lycoriella auripila, with two treatments: 106infective juveniles (IJ per square meter of S. feltiae and 0.5x106IJ m-2S. feltiae + 0.5x106IJ m-2S. carpocapsae. Another experiment was carried out using the same treatments to evaluate the possible nematode effect on mushroom yield. The number of adults emerging from the substrate was evaluated for each fly species. No decrease in the population of M. halterata was detected with nematode application, whereas the number of L. auripila was reduced in both treatments, particularly in the individual treatment with S. feltiae. The application of entomopathogenic nematodes has no adverse effect on mushroom production.

  17. An Advanced Fly-By-Wire Flight Control System for the RASCAL Research Rotorcraft: Concept to Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rediess, Nicholas A.; Dones, Fernando; McManus, Bruce L.; Ulmer, Lon; Aiken, Edwin W. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Design features of a new fly-by-wire flight control system for the Rotorcraft-Aircrew Systems Concepts Airborne Laboratory (RASCAL) are described. Using a UH-60A Black Hawk helicopter as a baseline vehicle, the RASCAL will be a flying laboratory capable of supporting the research requirements of major NASA and Army guidance, control, and display research programs. The paper describes the research facility requirements of these pro-rams and the design implementation of the research flight control system (RFCS), with emphasis on safety-of-flight, adaptability to multiple requirements and performance considerations.

  18. Community involvement in social marketing: guineaworm control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieger, W R; Ramakrishna, J; Adeniyi, J D

    1986-01-01

    Social marketing as a health education strategy has the potential for encouraging the adoption of new health technologies. The focus on the individual, though, holds the risk of victim blaming. This can be overcome if the consumers/community are involved in the four major components of the marketing strategy-product design, price, distribution and promotion. The community of Idere, Nigeria, has recently been involved in marketing a monofilament nylon cloth filter to prevent the water-borne helminthic disease, guineaworm. Local tailors produced the filters. Volunteer primary health workers debated pricing, sold the product and educated each consumer. Coverage in those neighborhoods and farm settlements where primary health workers were resident was nearly double that of other sections showing the value of local action to market health changes.

  19. Biorational insecticides for control of mosquitoes and black flies in Sinaloa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cipriano García Gutiérrez

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In Sinaloa Mexico the presence of mosquitoes is a important health problem, and each spring-summer season appear several species which include: Aedes aegypti (Linneus, Anopheles albimanus (Wiedemann, Culex quinquefasciatus (Say and black flies of the Simulidae family. The control of larvae and adults of these insects are usually performed with chemical insecticides, so the use of biorational insecticides for control of these insects is novel, due to that have low environment impact. The objective of this work is to give known to the different biorational insecticides and their biological effects (inhibitor, insect repellent, larvicide, adulticide, that can be used to combat to different development stages of these insects. As well as show the progress of a study on the effectiveness of neem extracts, garlic, cinnamon, albahaca and cypermethrin at low doses (0.25,0.5 and 1ml/L, for control of larvae and adults of black flies in the unicipality of El Fuerte, Sinaloa. By the mode of action, the biorational that can doing use for the control of theseinsects were: Spinosad, and Bacillus thuringiensis (Berliner var. israeliensis for larvae control, Spinosad and Beauveria bassiana (Vuill. for adults; as well as extracts of neem, garlic, cinnamon and albahaca for both stages. The preliminary results of the study showed that the effectiveness application in tourist sites, through aerial spraying of cypermethrin at low doses and the plants extracts, allow low the index of larvae and infestation of mosquitoes and blackflies, decreasing the discomfort caused by these insects in the place of study.

  20. Oral treatment of rodents with fipronil for feed-through and systemic control of sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascari, T M; Stout, R W; Foil, L D

    2013-01-01

    The sand fly Phlebotomus papatasi Scopoli is the vector of Leishmania major (Yakimoff & Schokhor), which is maintained in populations of burrowing rodents. The purpose of this study was to conduct a laboratory study to determine the efficacy of oral treatment of rodents with fipronil for control of sand flies that feed on rodent feces as larvae or on rodent blood as adults. We determined through larval bioassays that fipronil was eliminated in feces of orally-treated hamsters at a level that was significantly toxic to sand fly larvae for 21 d after the hamsters had been withdrawn from a fipronil-treated diet. Through bloodfeeding bioassays, we also found that fipronil was present in the peripheral blood of hamsters at a concentration that was significantly toxic to bloodfeeding adult female sand flies for 49 d after the hamsters had been withdrawn from their treated diet. The results of this study suggest that fipronil acts as well as or better than feed-through or systemic insecticides that previously have been measured against sand flies, and is particularly promising because this single compound acts against both larvae and bloodfeeding adults. An area-wide approach using rodent baits containing a fipronil could suppress vector populations that originate in the vicinity of rodent reservoirs, and could be used to eliminate the most epidemiologically important part of the vector population: female sand flies that take bloodmeals on rodent reservoirs.

  1. An acetone extract of Clausena anisata may be a potential control agent for flies encountered in cutaneous myiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lillian Mukandiwa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Clausena anisata is a medicinal plant used traditionally to treat myiasis and as an insect repellent by various communities. We have previously demonstrated the effects of C. anisata extracts on blowfly feeding and development in our laboratory. The impact of C. anisata leaf extracts on populations of different fly species on farms in Mpumalanga, South Africa was investigated in this study under field conditions. Flies were exposed to liver baits treated with acetone leaf extracts of C. anisata (150 mg/mL. Fly numbers and composition on two farms, with and without C. anisata treated liver, were compared during a period of 12 weeks when fly populations were expected to be high. Observations were made on fly behaviour and development, adult sizes and numbers. The flies exposed to liver treated with the leaf extract of C. anisata had a decreased rate of development, prolonged larval period, smaller body sizes and more sluggish behaviour compared to those subjected to the control treatment. No significant differences were, however, found between the numbers and sizes of flies on the treated and on the control farm, which was most likely due to the limited nature of the baiting programme we followed. The effects of C. anisata extracts on blowfly behaviour and development observed in previous laboratory studies were confirmed in this field evaluation. Although the extracts did not have a significant effect on the overall population size in this experiment, we believe that the C. anisata leaf extract could be useful in integrated pest management based on its effect on larval development. In addition, species such as Lucilia cuprina and Chrysomya marginalis seemed to have been repelled by the C. anisata treated liver; as a result, further work should explore this aspect and how it can be used for the protection of animals.

  2. Research on the low speed stability control technology of fly-cutting machine for KDP crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dongsheng; Ji, Fang; Chen, Hua

    2014-08-01

    In the paper, The problem about stability in low speed of the air bearing stage driven by a linear motor was investigated to satisfy the ultra-precision fly-cutting of KDP crystals. First of all, the modal of the servo system with the permanent magnet synchronous linear motor was analyzed. In the system of the low speed linear motor driver, the main interferences came from cutting force f Load , the friction of chain and cable f n , the ripple thrust f ripp , and motor friction f fric . Secondly, the factors about low speed stability were analyzed: the key to improve the system's stability is to control the interference forces; Another important issue is to develop an advanced control strategy. Thirdly, some optimization experiments about low speed stability were developed as follows: the influence of feedback element, the influence of Power converter, speed optimization of damping feed-forward control, speed optimization of Spindle vibration, speed optimization based on disturbance observer. Finally the experimental results: the lowest speed of the stage can reach 0.2 mm/min; the error of the speed is less than 0.06mm/min when running between 1mm/min and 10 mm/min. The cutting experiment of KDP with the size of 330mm × 330mm × 10mm, was proceeded on the Fly-cutting machine by the feeding velocity of 1mm/min. The results about the surface roughness show that the value of Rq is 3.3nm and the value of Ra is 2.6nm.

  3. Laboratory evaluation of oral treatment of rodents with systemic insecticides for control of bloodfeeding sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascari, Thomas Michael; Stout, Rhett W; Foil, Lane D

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of oral treatment of rodents with diets containing the systemic insecticides ivermectin, abamectin, imidacloprid, or spinosad, to control bloodfeeding sand flies. We found that diets containing concentrations higher than 10 mg/kg abamectin were not palatable to rodents, and that a diet containing 10 mg/kg abamectin (a palatable concentration) did not cause 100% mortality of bloodfeeding sand flies. Treatment of rodents with imidacloprid was effective for less than 3 days post-treatment. Treatment of rodents with diets containing 20 mg/kg ivermectin or 5000 mg/kg spinosad caused 100% mortality of bloodfeeding sand flies for at least 1 week. The efficacy of ivermectin and spinosad also were not reduced when combined with the fluorescent tracer dye rhodamine B in a single diet. We also did not observe significant benefits by increasing the feeding period of the rodents from 3 to 6 or 9 days. We conclude that ivermectin and spinosad are effective as rodent systemic insecticides against bloodfeeding sand flies, and suggest that weekly treatment of wild rodent reservoirs of Leishmania major with bait containing one of these systemic insecticides could be a useful tool as part of a sand fly control program.

  4. Choice of optimal biocide combination to control flies (Diptera: Muscidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Mihaela Kavran; Marija F Zgomba; Aleksandra M Ignjatovic-Ćupina; Sanja D Lazić; Dušan V Petrić

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Flies – by feeding on decaying matter, human waste and food – have been implicated in the spread of numerous animal and human diseases. Excessive fly populations are generally associated with livestock units and domestic waste due to decaying organic matter. A large number of flies cause extreme disturbance in the behavior of the host, resulting in skin irritation, lesions, wounds, and secondary infections are likely to appear. Objective. The aim of this study was to evalu...

  5. Robust attitude control for rapid multi-target tracking in spacecraft formation flying

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A robust attitude tracking control scheme for spacecraft formation flying is presented.The leader spacecraft with a.rapid mobile antenna and a camera is modeled.While the camera is tracking the ground target,the antenna is tracking the follower spacecraft.By an angular velocity constraint and an angular constraint,two methods are proposed to compute the reference attitude profiles of the camera and antenna,respectively.To simplify the control design problem,this paper first derives the desired inverse system (DIS),which can convert the attitude tracking problem of 3D space into the regulator problem.Based on DIS and sliding mode control (SMC),a robust attitude tracking controller is developed in the presence of mass parameter uncertainties and external disturbance.By Lyapunov stability theory,the closed loop system stability can be achieved.The numerical simulations show that the proposed robust control scheme exhibits significant advantages for the multi-target attitude tracking of a two-spacecraft formation.

  6. Formation Flying Satellite Control Around the L2 Sun-Earth Libration Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Nicholas H.

    2001-12-01

    A growing interest in formation flying satellites demands development and analysis of control and estimation algorithms for station-keeping and formation maneuvering. This thesis discusses the development of a discrete linear-quadratic- regulator control algorithm for formations in the vicinity of the L2 sun-earth libration point. The development of an appropriate Kalman filter is included as well. Simulations are created for the analysis of the station-keeping and various formation maneuvers of the Stellar Imager mission. The simulations provide tracking error, estimation error, and control effort results. From the control effort, useful design parameters such as AV and propellant mass are determined. For formation maneuvering, the drone spacecraft track to within 4 meters of their desired position and within 1.3 millimeters per second of their desired zero velocity. The filter, with few exceptions, keeps the estimation errors within their three-sigma values. Without noise, the controller performs extremely well, with the drones tracking to within several micrometers. Bach drone uses around 1 to 2 grams of propellant per maneuver, depending on the circumstances.

  7. Computed torque control of a free-flying cooperat ing-arm robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koningstein, Ross; Ullman, Marc; Cannon, Robert H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The unified approach to solving free-floating space robot manipulator end-point control problems is presented using a control formulation based on an extension of computed torque. Once the desired end-point accelerations have been specified, the kinematic equations are used with momentum conservation equations to solve for the joint accelerations in any of the robot's possible configurations: fixed base or free-flying with open/closed chain grasp. The joint accelerations can then be used to calculate the arm control torques and internal forces using a recursive order N algorithm. Initial experimental verification of these techniques has been performed using a laboratory model of a two-armed space robot. This fully autonomous spacecraft system experiences the drag-free, zero G characteristics of space in two dimensions through the use of an air cushion support system. Results of these initial experiments are included which validate the correctness of the proposed methodology. The further problem of control in the large where not only the manipulator tip positions but the entire system consisting of base and arms must be controlled is also presented. The availability of a physical testbed has brought a keener insight into the subtleties of the problem at hand.

  8. Standardizing visual control devices for tsetse flies: East African species Glossina swynnertoni.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furaha Mramba

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Here we set out to standardize long-lasting, visually-attractive devices for Glossina swynnertoni, a vector of both human and animal trypanosomiasis in open savannah in Tanzania and Kenya, and in neighbouring conservation areas used by pastoralists. The goal was to determine the most practical device/material that would induce the strongest landing response in G. swynnertoni for use in area-wide population suppression of this fly with insecticide-impregnated devices. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Trials were conducted in wet and dry seasons in the Serengeti and Maasai Mara to measure the performance of traps and targets of different sizes and colours, with and without chemical baits, at different population densities and under different environmental conditions. Adhesive film was used as a simple enumerator at these remote locations to compare trapping efficiencies of devices. Independent of season or presence of chemical baits, targets in phthalogen blue or turquoise blue cloth with adhesive film were the best devices for capturing G. swynnertoni in all situations, catching up to 19 times more flies than pyramidal traps. Baiting with chemicals did not affect the relative performance of devices. Fly landings were two times higher on 1 m(2 blue-black targets as on pyramidal traps when equivalent areas of both were covered with adhesive film. Landings on 1 m(2 blue-black targets were compared to those on smaller phthalogen blue 0.5 m(2 all-blue or blue-black-blue cloth targets, and to landings on all-blue plastic 0.32-0.47 m(2 leg panels painted in phthalogen blue. These smaller targets and leg panels captured equivalent numbers of G. swynnertoni per unit area as bigger targets. CONCLUSIONS: Leg panels and 0.5 m(2 cloth targets show promise as cost effective devices for management of G. swynnertoni as they can be used for both control (insecticide-impregnated cloth and for sampling (rigid plastic with insect glue or adhesive film of

  9. Pressure Model of Control Valve Based on LS-SVM with the Fruit Fly Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Aiqin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Control valve is a kind of essential terminal control component which is hard to model by traditional methodologies because of its complexity and nonlinearity. This paper proposes a new modeling method for the upstream pressure of control valve using the least squares support vector machine (LS-SVM, which has been successfully used to identify nonlinear system. In order to improve the modeling performance, the fruit fly optimization algorithm (FOA is used to optimize two critical parameters of LS-SVM. As an example, a set of actual production data from a controlling system of chlorine in a salt chemistry industry is applied. The validity of LS-SVM modeling method using FOA is verified by comparing the predicted results with the actual data with a value of MSE 2.474 × 10−3. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the initial position of FOA does not affect its optimal ability. By comparison, simulation experiments based on PSO algorithm and the grid search method are also carried out. The results show that LS-SVM based on FOA has equal performance in prediction accuracy. However, from the respect of calculation time, FOA has a significant advantage and is more suitable for the online prediction.

  10. A distributed model predictive control (MPC) fault reconfiguration strategy for formation flying satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfahani, N. R.; Khorasani, K.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, an active distributed (also referred to as semi-decentralised) fault recovery control scheme is proposed that employs inaccurate and unreliable fault information into a model-predictive-control-based design. The objective is to compensate for the identified actuator faults that are subject to uncertainties and detection time delays, in the attitude control subsystems of formation flying satellites. The proposed distributed fault recovery scheme is developed through a two-level hierarchical framework. In the first level, or the agent level, the fault is recovered locally to maintain as much as possible the design specifications, feasibility, and tracking performance of all the agents. In the second level, or the formation level, the recovery is carried out by enhancing the entire team performance. The fault recovery performance of our proposed distributed (semi-decentralised) scheme is compared with two other alternative schemes, namely the centralised and the decentralised fault recovery schemes. It is shown that the distributed (semi-decentralised) fault recovery scheme satisfies the recovery design specifications and also imposes lower fault compensation control effort cost and communication bandwidth requirements as compared to the centralised scheme. Our proposed distributed (semi-decentralised) scheme also outperforms the achievable performance capabilities of the decentralised scheme. Simulation results corresponding to a network of four precision formation flight satellites are also provided to demonstrate and illustrate the advantages of our proposed distributed (semi-decentralised) fault recovery strategy.

  11. Design of a smart optically controlled high-power switch for fly-by-light motor actuation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadri, Prashant; Sukumaran, Deepti; Dasgupta, Samhita; Beyette, Fred R., Jr.

    2001-12-01

    In avionic systems, data integrity and high data rates are necessary for stable flight control. Unfortunately, conventional electronic control systems are susceptible to electromagnetic interference (EMI) that can reduce the clarity of flight control signals. Fly-by-Light systems that use optical signals to actuate the flight control surfaces of an aircraft have been suggested as a solution to the EMI problem in avionic systems. Fly-by-Light in avionic systems reduces electromagnetic interference hence improving the clarity of the control signals. A hybrid approach combining a silicon photoreceiver module with a SiC power transistor is proposed. The resulting device uses a 5 mW optical control signal to produce a 150 A current suitable for driving an electric motor.

  12. Optimal Control of Pseudoparabolic Variational Inequalities Involving State Constraint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youjun Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We establish the necessary condition of optimality for optimal control problem governed by some pseudoparabolic differential equations involving monotone graphs. Some approximating control process and examples are given.

  13. Evaluation of different insecticides and fabric types for development of treated targets for stable fly (Diptera: Muscidae) control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogsette, Jerome A; Nalli, Alyce; Foil, Lane D

    2008-06-01

    Stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.) (Diptera: Muscidae), once only a pest of pastured cattle, has become a serious pest of range cattle in the United States. Because of the difficulties associated with stable fly management under range conditions, a pesticide-impregnated cloth target is being developed as a management tool. We conducted studies to determine the influence of weather, time, fabric type, insecticide type, and insecticide concentration on the mortality of stable flies from a susceptible laboratory colony exposed for 30 s to treated cloth targets. We found that 100% of the flies exposed to trigger (Trigger-Royal Box, 65% polyester and 35% cotton) fabric targets that were treated with 0.1% h-cyhalothrin or 0.1% zeta-cypermethrin and weathered outdoors in Gainesville, FL., for up to 3 mo, were dead within 20 min after a 30-s exposure. The results of this study support the concept that treated targets can be developed for integration into stable fly control programs.

  14. Dynamics and control of spacecraft formation flying and constellation station keeping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xiaodong

    2005-11-01

    Formation flying and constellation station keeping, the innovative concept of distributing the functionality of monolithic satellites among less expensive, smaller, cooperative satellites, enables faster ground track repeats, provides higher degrees of system redundancy and, in the end, reduces the cost of the whole mission. However, the practical implementation of this concept is associated with the need to tightly design, measure, control and maintain the formation or relative distance, phasing and orientations among the participating satellites. Implementing, maintaining, and reconfiguring the cluster of satellites is so critical and complex, that it would be a big burden on the traditional ground-based orbital determination, navigation and command systems, and it also may impose stringent requirements on current control systems in terms of the energy consumption, precision, and the overall budget. The research work in this dissertation addresses the problems in two parts: the first part, which discusses mainly how to design the relative orbits for formation flying and constellation station keeping; and the second part, which is about the exploitation of possible control algorithms for maintaining the formation and constellation. Orbits are investigated for which there are no relative secular precessions or drifts due to the Earth's perturbations between the spacecraft. In this case the energy consumption could be largely decreased. A general method is introduced to establish the relationship between a given orbit relative to a reference orbit. By analyzing a set of differential equations, relationships between the orbit design and all possible relative secular drifts due to perturbations in the Earth's gravitational field, can be derived. Mathematical singularities encountered at specific orbital inclination angles, such as polar inclinations, are discussed. By using the general approach, a solution for polar inclinations is found. Two solution sets are found

  15. Chemical ecology of stable fly and its future practical applications in control

    Science.gov (United States)

    The essential oil of catnip reduced feeding of stable flies by more than 96% in an in vitro bioassay system, when compared with other sesquiterpene-rich plant oils (e.g. amyris and sandalwood). Catnip oil demonstrated strong repellency against stable flies relative to other chemicals for repelling b...

  16. Robust distributed control of spacecraft formation flying with adaptive network topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shasti, Behrouz; Alasty, Aria; Assadian, Nima

    2017-07-01

    In this study, the distributed six degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) coordinated control of spacecraft formation flying in low earth orbit (LEO) has been investigated. For this purpose, an accurate coupled translational and attitude relative dynamics model of the spacecraft with respect to the reference orbit (virtual leader) is presented by considering the most effective perturbation acceleration forces on LEO satellites, i.e. the second zonal harmonic and the atmospheric drag. Subsequently, the 6-DOF coordinated control of spacecraft in formation is studied. During the mission, the spacecraft communicate with each other through a switching network topology in which the weights of its graph Laplacian matrix change adaptively based on a distance-based connectivity function between neighboring agents. Because some of the dynamical system parameters such as spacecraft masses and moments of inertia may vary with time, an adaptive law is developed to estimate the parameter values during the mission. Furthermore, for the case that there is no knowledge of the unknown and time-varying parameters of the system, a robust controller has been developed. It is proved that the stability of the closed-loop system coupled with adaptation in network topology structure and optimality and robustness in control is guaranteed by the robust contraction analysis as an incremental stability method for multiple synchronized systems. The simulation results show the effectiveness of each control method in the presence of uncertainties and parameter variations. The adaptive and robust controllers show their superiority in reducing the state error integral as well as decreasing the control effort and settling time.

  17. The mechanics and control of pitching manoeuvres in a freely flying hawkmoth (Manduca sexta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Bo; Deng, Xinyan; Hedrick, Tyson L

    2011-12-15

    Insects produce a variety of exquisitely controlled manoeuvres during natural flight behaviour. Here we show how hawkmoths produce and control one such manoeuvre, an avoidance response consisting of rapid pitching up, rearward flight, pitching down (often past the original pitch angle), and then pitching up slowly to equilibrium. We triggered these manoeuvres via a sudden visual stimulus in front of free-flying hawkmoths (Manduca sexta) while recording the animals' body and wing movements via high-speed stereo videography. We then recreated the wing motions in a dynamically scaled model to: (1) associate wing kinematic changes with pitch torque production and (2) extract the open-loop dynamics of an uncontrolled moth. Next, we characterized the closed-loop manoeuvring dynamics from the observed flight behaviour assuming that hawkmoths use feedback control based on translational velocity, pitch angle and angular velocity, and then compared these with the open-loop dynamics to identify the control strategy used by the moth. Our analysis revealed that hawkmoths produce active pitch torque via changes in mean wing spanwise rotation angle. Additionally, body translations produce passive translational damping and pitch torque, both of which are linearly dependent on the translational velocity. Body rotations produce similar passive forces and torques, but of substantially smaller magnitudes. Our comparison of closed-loop and open-loop dynamics showed that hawkmoths rely largely on passive damping to reduce the body translation but use feedback control based on pitch angle and angular velocity to control their orientation. The resulting feedback control system remains stable with sensory delays of more than two wingbeats.

  18. Multiple impedance control of space free-flying robots via virtual linkages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastegari, Rambod; Moosavian, S. Ali A.

    2010-03-01

    Multiple impedance control (MIC) is a Model-Based algorithm that enforces a designated impedance on all cooperating manipulators, the manipulated object, and the moving base if applied on a mobile robotic system such as a space free flying robotic system. The MIC can be properly applied to manipulate a grasped object, and move it on a desired path. However, during such maneuvers, some inner forces and torques are usually produced in the object. For tuning the inner object forces, it is needed to model the inner forces/torques or their effects on the object. In this paper, a virtual linkage model is introduced to determine the inner forces using the MIC law. Also, the load distribution among the end-effectors is modeled. To this end, the MIC law is used to control both path tracking and inner forces tuning when manipulating an object. The moving object is grasped solidly with two 6 degrees of freedom (DOF) cooperating end-effectors mounted on a 6 DOF spacecraft appended with a 2 DOF antenna. An explicit dynamics model of this highly complicated 20 DOF system is derived using SPACEMAPLE, and then simulated in MATLAB. The obtained results reveal good tracking performance of the proposed MIC controller, besides tuning the object internal forces due to tension or compression forces, also torsion and bending moments.

  19. Formation flying for electric sails in displaced orbits. Part II: Distributed coordinated control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Mengali, Giovanni; Quarta, Alessandro A.; Yuan, Jianping

    2017-09-01

    We analyze a cooperative control framework for electric sail formation flying around a heliocentric displaced orbit, aiming at observing the polar region of a celestial body. The chief spacecraft is assumed to move along an elliptic displaced orbit, while each deputy spacecraft adjusts its thrust vector (that is, both its sail attitude and characteristic acceleration) in order to track a prescribed relative trajectory. The relative motion of the electric sail formation system is formulated in the chief rotating frame, where the control inputs of each deputy are the relative sail attitude angles and the relative lightness number with respect to those of the chief. The information exchange among the spacecraft, characterized by the communication topology, is represented by a weighted graph. Two typical cases, according to whether the communication graph is directed or undirected, are discussed. For each case, a distributed coordinated control law is designed in such a way that each deputy not only tracks the chief state, but also makes full use of information from its neighbors, thus increasing the redundancy and robustness of the formation system in case of failure among the communication links. Illustrative examples show the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  20. Coupled Attitude and Orbit Dynamics and Control in Formation Flying Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yun-Jun; Fitz-Coy, Norman; Mason, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Formation flying systems can range from global constellations offering extended service coverage to clusters of highly coordinated vehicles that perform distributed sensing. Recently, the use of groups of micro-satellites in the areas of near Earth explorations, deep space explorations, and military applications has received considerable attention by researchers and practitioners. To date, most proposed control strategies are based on linear models (e.g., Hill-Clohessy-Wiltshire equations) or nonlinear models that are restricted to circular reference orbits. Also, all models in the literature are uncoupled between relative position and relative attitude. In this paper, a generalized dynamic model is proposed. The reference orbit is not restricted to the circular case. In this formulation, the leader or follower satellite can be in either a circular or an elliptic orbit. In addition to maintaining a specified relative position, the satellites are also required to maintain specified relative attitudes. Thus the model presented couples vehicle attitude and orbit requirements. Orbit perturbations are also included. In particular, the J(sub 2) effects are accounted in the model. Finally, a sliding mode controller is developed and used to control the relative attitude of the formation and the simulation results are presented.

  1. Sublethal Effects in Pest Management: A Surrogate Species Perspective on Fruit Fly Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E. Banks

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Tephritid fruit flies are economically important orchard pests globally. While much effort has focused on controlling individual species with a combination of pesticides and biological control, less attention has been paid to managing assemblages of species. Although several tephritid species may co-occur in orchards/cultivated areas, especially in mixed-cropping schemes, their responses to pesticides may be highly variable. Furthermore, predictive efforts about toxicant effects are generally based on acute toxicity, with little or no regard to long-term population effects. Using a simple matrix model parameterized with life history data, we quantified the responses of several tephritid species to the sublethal effects of a toxicant acting on fecundity. Using a critical threshold to determine levels of fecundity reduction below which species are driven to local extinction, we determined that threshold levels vary widely for the three tephritid species. In particular, Bactrocera dorsalis was the most robust of the three species, followed by Ceratitis capitata, and then B. cucurbitae, suggesting individual species responses should be taken into account when planning for area-wide pest control. The rank-order of susceptibility contrasts with results from several field/lab studies testing the same species, suggesting that considering a combination of life history traits and individual species susceptibility is necessary for understanding population responses of species assemblages to toxicant exposure.

  2. DSP-based control of a high frequency three cell flying capacitor inverter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Fuentes, A. A.; Rossano-Díaz, I. O.; Peña-Eguiluz, R.; López-Callejas, R.; Mercado-Cabrera, A.; de la Piedad-Beneitez, A.; Barocio, S. R.; Valencia, R.

    2010-03-01

    The design, instrumentation and early operation results of a digitally controlled voltage source inverter (VSI) are described. This inverter has been structured from a three cell flying capacitor inverter (TCFCI). Two different inverter control modes - open-loop and closed-loop - are applied by a digital system based on a Texas Instrument TMS320C6713 digital signal processor (DSP) board. The VSI is able to generate AC voltage signals up to 120 V amplitudes at a maximal 6 A current, from ∼9 kHz to ∼60 kHz in ∼900 Hz steps in both controls by varying the signal period through the square-wave command strategy. The multi-cell structure of the inverter provides an output frequency nearly three times that of the TCFCI semiconductor commutation. The power output of the TCFCI can drive a high frequency step-up transformer which, in turn, is associated with a cylindrical reactor where dielectric barrier discharges (DBD) are conducted.

  3. THERMAL TREATMENT WITH HOT AIR IN THE CONTROL OF FRUIT FLY IN SAPOTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Vilian de Moraes Lima Marinus

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the main postharvest problems of the sapota (Achras sapota L. is caused by the fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata, affecting its quality and commercialization. With this experiment, the objective was to evaluate the effect of hot air as thermal treatment in the control of immature phases of Ceratitis capitata and the fruit quality. The research was carried out at Entomology Laboratory – Centro de Ciências Agrárias, UFPB, Areia-PB. It was made the damaging of fruits with eggs inoculation of Ceratitis capitata and after three days the fruits were treated in hot air at temperatures of 46±1°C and 50±1°C, during 30, 45, 60, 75 and 90 minutes. Hot air was injected in the chamber using an equipment of the Skill mark. It was used a randomized design, in factorial scheme of 2x5+1 (two temperatures, five times of exhibition and one control, with four replications. The treatment with hot air was efficient to control the immature phases of C. capitata during 75 and 90 minutes of exposure and didn't affect the physical and chemical qualities of the sapota fruits.

  4. Dispersal of Rhagoletis cerasi in Commercial Cherry Orchards: Efficacy of Soil Covering Nets for Cherry Fruit Fly Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Claudia; Baker, Brian

    2013-03-12

    Demand for organic cherries offers producers a premium price to improve their commercial viability. Organic standards require that producers find alternatives to pesticides. Soil treatments to control the European cherry fruit fly Rhagoletis cerasi (L.) (Diptera: Tephrididae) appear to be an attractive option. However, soil treatments can only be effective if the migration of flies is low, because mature flies may migrate from near-by trees for oviposition. To examine the general potential of soil treatments and to understand the dispersal and flight behaviour of R. cerasi within orchards, experiments using netting to cover the soil were conducted in two orchards with different pest pressure during two years. The netting reduced flight activity by 77% and fruit infestation by 91%. The data showed that the flies have a dispersal of less than 5 m within orchards, which is very low. The low thresholds for tolerance for infested fruit in the fresh market creates a strong economic incentive for control, therefore, soil covering is a promising strategy for controlling R. cerasi in commercial orchards.

  5. Chasing behaviour and optomotor following in free-flying male blowflies: flight performance and interactions of the underlying control systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Trischler

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The chasing behaviour of male blowflies after small targets belongs to the most rapid and virtuosic visually guided behaviours found in nature. Since in a structured environment any turn towards a target inevitably leads to a displacement of the entire retinal image in the opposite direction, it might evoke optomotor following responses counteracting the turn. To analyse potential interactions between the control systems underlying chasing behaviour and optomotor following, respectively, we performed behavioural experiments on male blowflies and examined the characteristics of the two flight control systems in isolation and in combination. Three findings are particularly striking. (i The characteristic saccadic flight and gaze style – a distinctive feature of blowfly cruising flights – is largely abandoned when the entire visual surroundings move around the fly; in this case flies tend to follow the moving pattern in a relatively continuous and smooth way. (ii When male flies engage in following a small target, they also employ a smooth pursuit strategy. (iii Although blowflies are reluctant to fly at high background velocities, the performance and dynamical characteristics of the chasing system are not much affected when the background moves in either the same or in the opposite direction as the target. Hence, the optomotor following response is largely suppressed by the chasing system and does not much impair chasing performance.

  6. Controlling the Focal Length and the Spot Size in Flying Optics by Dual-deformable-mirror-systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Quanzhong; CHENG Zhaogu; GAO Haijun; CHAI Xiongliang; LUO Hongxin

    2002-01-01

    The models of several dual-deformable-mirror-systems,which can control focal the length and the spot size in flying optics,were introduced and their operating principle and adjusting characteristics were analyzed.The simulation results indicate that dual-deformable-mirror-systems can control the focal length and the spot size.This research is a good guidance to engineering application of dual-deformable-mirror-systems.

  7. Efficacy of the entomopathogenic fungi Metarhizium anisopliae in the control of infestation by stable flies Stomoxys calcitrans (L.), under natural infestation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Vazquez, C; Carvajal Márquez, J; Lezama-Gutiérrez, R; Vitela-Mendoza, I; Ramos-Parra, M

    2015-09-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of an isolate of Metarhizium anisopliae applied by aspersion to control of Stomoxys calcitrans flies in dairy cattle naturally infested. Was applied by aspersion an aqueous formulation of M. anisopliae sensu lato (Ma134), at a concentration of 1×10(8)conidia/ml, four times with seven day intervals, on a group of eight Holstein cows; a control group of eight Holstein cows, received a water solution with Tween 80 (0.1%). The average number of flies per animal was estimated one day before each application, and then daily counts were done in both groups. The effectiveness of the formulation was calculated using the Abbott's formula. At the same time, defensive behaviors of stamp/kicks and tail movements were evaluated daily, estimating relative frequency per hour. The Ma134 formulation had an infestation control efficacy of 73%, taking into consideration the four study weeks. The population reduction effect was observed since the first week post-application (p<0.05), and the effect increased with the subsequent applications. Defensive behaviors were reduced beginning from the first application, reaching a reduction of 66% and 70%, respectively, during the four weeks of study. These results demonstrated the effectiveness of the formulation to control infestation by S. calcitrans, as well as reduce defensive behaviors which involves the infestation.

  8. Control of Rhagoletis indifferents using Thiamethoxam and Spinosad baits under external fly pressure and its relation to rapidity of kill and residual bait activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Control of western cherry fruit fly (Rhagoletis indifferens Curran) using thiamethoxam in sucrose bait and spinosad bait in cherry orchards under external fly pressure and its relation to rapidity of kill and residual bait activity were studied in Washington and Utah in 2010 and 2011. Thiamethoxam ...

  9. Topological structures of vortex flow on a flying wing aircraft, controlled by a nanosecond pulse discharge plasma actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hai; Shi, Zhiwei; Cheng, Keming; Wei, Dechen; Li, Zheng; Zhou, Danjie; He, Haibo; Yao, Junkai; He, Chengjun

    2016-06-01

    Vortex control is a thriving research area, particularly in relation to flying wing or delta wing aircraft. This paper presents the topological structures of vortex flow on a flying wing aircraft controlled by a nanosecond plasma dielectric barrier discharge actuator. Experiments, including oil flow visualization and two-dimensional particle image velocimetry (PIV), were conducted in a wind tunnel with a Reynolds number of 0.5 × 106. Both oil and PIV results show that the vortex can be controlled. Oil topological structures on the aircraft surface coincide with spatial PIV flow structures. Both indicate vortex convergence and enhancement when the plasma discharge is switched on, leading to a reduced region of separated flow.

  10. Use of Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae for fruit fly control: a novel approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toledo, Jorge; Liedo, Pablo, E-mail: jtoledo@ecosur.m [El Colegio de la Frontera Sur, Chiapas (Mexico). Dept. de Entomologia Tropical; Flores, Salvador; Montoya, Pablo [Secretaria de Agricultura, Ganaderia, Desarrollo Rural, Pesca y Alimentacion (SAGARPA), Chiapas (Mexico). Subdireccion de Desarrollo de Metodos; Campos, Sergio E.; Villasenor, Antonio [Secretaria de Agricultura, Ganaderia, Desarrollo Rural, Pesca y Alimentacion (SAGARPA), Chiapas (Mexico). Programa Moscamed. Direccion de Operaciones de Campo

    2006-07-01

    The potential of two species of entomopathogenic fungi, Beauveria bassiana (Bals.) and Metarhizium anisopliae (Met.) Sorokin, as practical fruit fly biocontrol agents is studied. These natural inhabitants of soil are found infecting a wide range of insect species that spend at least one stage of their life cycle in the soil. Sterile flies are used as vectors of the infection. A summary of results from different laboratory and field cage experiments is presented. (MAC)

  11. Standardising visual control devices for tsetse flies: Central and West African species Glossina palpalis palpalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dramane Kaba

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glossina palpalis palpalis (G. p. palpalis is one of the principal vectors of sleeping sickness and nagana in Africa with a geographical range stretching from Liberia in West Africa to Angola in Central Africa. It inhabits tropical rain forest but has also adapted to urban settlements. We set out to standardize a long-lasting, practical and cost-effective visually attractive device that would induce the strongest landing response by G. p. palpalis for future use as an insecticide-impregnated tool in area-wide population suppression of this fly across its range. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Trials were conducted in wet and dry seasons in the Ivory Coast, Cameroon, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Angola to measure the performance of traps (biconical, monoconical and pyramidal and targets of different sizes and colours, with and without chemical baits, at different population densities and under different environmental conditions. Adhesive film was used as a practical enumerator at these remote locations to compare landing efficiencies of devices. Independent of season and country, both phthalogen blue-black and blue-black-blue 1 m(2 targets covered with adhesive film proved to be as good as traps in phthalogen blue or turquoise blue for capturing G. p. palpalis. Trap efficiency varied (8-51%. There was no difference between the performance of blue-black and blue-black-blue 1 m(2 targets. Baiting with chemicals augmented the overall performance of targets relative to traps. Landings on smaller phthalogen blue-black 0.25 m(2 square targets were not significantly different from either 1 m(2 blue-black-blue or blue-black square targets. Three times more flies were captured per unit area on the smaller device. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Blue-black 0.25 m(2 cloth targets show promise as simple cost effective devices for management of G. p. palpalis as they can be used for both control when impregnated with insecticide and for

  12. Standardising Visual Control Devices for Tsetse Flies: Central and West African Species Glossina palpalis palpalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaba, Dramane; Zacarie, Tusevo; M'Pondi, Alexis Makumyaviri; Njiokou, Flobert; Bosson-Vanga, Henriette; Kröber, Thomas; McMullin, Andrew; Mihok, Steve; Guerin, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Glossina palpalis palpalis (G. p. palpalis) is one of the principal vectors of sleeping sickness and nagana in Africa with a geographical range stretching from Liberia in West Africa to Angola in Central Africa. It inhabits tropical rain forest but has also adapted to urban settlements. We set out to standardize a long-lasting, practical and cost-effective visually attractive device that would induce the strongest landing response by G. p. palpalis for future use as an insecticide-impregnated tool in area-wide population suppression of this fly across its range. Methodology/Principal Findings Trials were conducted in wet and dry seasons in the Ivory Coast, Cameroon, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Angola to measure the performance of traps (biconical, monoconical and pyramidal) and targets of different sizes and colours, with and without chemical baits, at different population densities and under different environmental conditions. Adhesive film was used as a practical enumerator at these remote locations to compare landing efficiencies of devices. Independent of season and country, both phthalogen blue-black and blue-black-blue 1 m2 targets covered with adhesive film proved to be as good as traps in phthalogen blue or turquoise blue for capturing G. p. palpalis. Trap efficiency varied (8–51%). There was no difference between the performance of blue-black and blue-black-blue 1 m2 targets. Baiting with chemicals augmented the overall performance of targets relative to traps. Landings on smaller phthalogen blue-black 0.25 m2 square targets were not significantly different from either 1 m2 blue-black-blue or blue-black square targets. Three times more flies were captured per unit area on the smaller device. Conclusions/Significance Blue-black 0.25 m2 cloth targets show promise as simple cost effective devices for management of G. p. palpalis as they can be used for both control when impregnated with insecticide and for population sampling when

  13. Biological control potential of entomopathogenic nematodes for management of Caribbean fruit fly, Anastrepha suspensa Loew (Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heve, William K; El-Borai, Fahiem E; Carrillo, Daniel; Duncan, Larry W

    2017-06-01

    Caribbean fruit fly (Caribfly) is a serious economic insect pest because of development of larvae that hatch from eggs oviposited into fruits by female adults. This study assessed the virulence of twelve entomopathogenic nematode (EPN) isolates to Caribfly in laboratory bioassays as a starting point toward evaluation of management strategies for the fruit-to-soil-dwelling stages of A. suspensa in fields infested by Caribfly. Inoculation of A. suspensa with 1 mL of ca 200 IJs larva(-1) killed Caribfly at either larval or pupal stage. Pupae were more resistant to EPN infections than larvae. Adult emergence from inoculated pupae in soil microcosms was significantly lower than that observed in filter paper assays. Longest or largest steinernematids suppressed emergence of more adult Caribfly from pupae in soils, whereas shorter heterorhabditids were more infectious to Caribfly larvae. The highest mortalities of A. suspensa were caused by exotic nematodes Steinernema feltiae and Heterorhabditis bacteriophora, followed by the native Heterorhabditis indica and the exotic Steinernema carpocapsae. Entomopathogenic nematodes reduced the development of Caribfly larvae and pupae to adult in our bioassays, suggesting that EPNs have potential for biological control of A. suspensa. Future work will assess management strategies, using the virulent EPNs, in orchards infested by A. suspensa. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Effectiveness of spinosad bait sprays (GF-120) in controlling mango-infesting fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) in Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayssieres, Jean-François; Sinzogan, Antonio; Korie, Sam; Ouagoussounon, Issa; Thomas-Odjo, Agnès

    2009-04-01

    Effectiveness of GF-120 (Dow Chemical) Fruit Fly Bait containing the insecticide spinosad in controlling mango-infesting fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) was assessed by comparing treated orchards with untreated orchards. Twelve mango, Mangifera indica L., plantations located in six villages (two similar orchards per village: one orchard treated and orchard untreated) scattered in the Borgou department (northern Benin) were monitored weekly with fly traps, and the fruit was sampled twice for larval infestation at the beginning and in the middle of May in both 2006 and 2007. The two main mango fruit fly pests are Ceratitis cosyra (Walker) and Bactrocera invadens Drew, Tsuruta & White, an invasive species that recently spread throughout West Africa. In both the 2006 and 2007 seasons, C. cosyra had the earliest peak of abundance, and the difference between treated and untreated orchards, in terms of mean number of flies trapped per week and per trap, was significant only in 2007. B. invadens populations quickly increased with the onset of the rains, from mid-May onward, with no significant difference between treated and untreated orchards. In 2006 and 2007, the larval infestation by B. invadens was significantly lower in plots treated with GF-120 than in untreated control plots. GF-120 provided an 81% reduction in the number of pupae per kilogram of fruit after weekly applications for 7 wk in 2006 and an 89% reduction after 10 wk of weekly applications in 2007. The possibility of integrating GF120 bait sprays in an integrated pest management package is discussed in relation to market requirements.

  15. Flyglow: Single-fly observations of simultaneous molecular and behavioural circadian oscillations in controls and an Alzheimer’s model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabirova, Eleonora; Chen, Ko-Fan; O’Neill, John S.; Crowther, Damian C.

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are essential for health and are frequently disturbed in disease. A full understanding of the causal relationships between behavioural and molecular circadian rhythms requires simultaneous longitudinal observations over time in individual organisms. Current experimental paradigms require the measurement of each rhythm separately across distinct populations of experimental organisms, rendering the comparability of the resulting datasets uncertain. We therefore developed FLYGLOW, an assay using clock gene controlled luciferase expression detected by exquisitely sensitive EM-CCD imaging, to enable simultaneous quantification of parameters including locomotor, sleep consolidation and molecular rhythms in single flies over days/weeks. FLYGLOW combines all the strengths of existing techniques, and also allows powerful multiparametric paired statistics. We found the age-related transition from rhythmicity to arrhythmicity for each parameter occurs unpredictably, with some flies showing loss of one or more rhythms during middle-age. Using single-fly correlation analysis of rhythm robustness and period we demonstrated the independence of the peripheral clock from circadian behaviours in wild type flies as well as in an Alzheimer’s model. FLYGLOW is a useful tool for investigating the deterioration of behavioural and molecular rhythms in ageing and neurodegeneration. This approach may be applied more broadly within behavioural neurogenetics research. PMID:27658441

  16. Optimal strategies for controlling riverine tsetse flies using targets: a modelling study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glyn A Vale

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Tsetse flies occur in much of sub-Saharan Africa where they transmit the trypanosomes that cause the diseases of sleeping sickness in humans and nagana in livestock. One of the most economical and effective methods of tsetse control is the use of insecticide-treated screens, called targets, that simulate hosts. Targets have been ~1 m2, but recently it was shown that those tsetse that occupy riverine situations, and which are the main vectors of sleeping sickness, respond well to targets only ~0.06 m2. The cheapness of these tiny targets suggests the need to reconsider what intensity and duration of target deployments comprise the most cost-effective strategy in various riverine habitats.A deterministic model, written in Excel spreadsheets and managed by Visual Basic for Applications, simulated the births, deaths and movement of tsetse confined to a strip of riverine vegetation composed of segments of habitat in which the tsetse population was either self-sustaining, or not sustainable unless supplemented by immigrants. Results suggested that in many situations the use of tiny targets at high density for just a few months per year would be the most cost-effective strategy for rapidly reducing tsetse densities by the ~90% expected to have a great impact on the incidence of sleeping sickness. Local elimination of tsetse becomes feasible when targets are deployed in isolated situations, or where the only invasion occurs from populations that are not self-sustaining.Seasonal use of tiny targets deserves field trials. The ability to recognise habitat that contains tsetse populations which are not self-sustaining could improve the planning of all methods of tsetse control, against any species, in riverine, savannah or forest situations. Criteria to assist such recognition are suggested.

  17. Flow Control and High-Lift Performance for Flying-Wing Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle Configurations by inserting slots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U Ali

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the present study on Unmanned Combat Air Vehicles (UCAVs are two-fold: first to control the flow by inserting leading-edge and cross-flow slots and analysing the viscous flow development over the outer panels of a flying-wing configuration to maximise the performance of the elevons control surfaces; second to predict high-lift performance particularly the maximum-lift characteristics. This is demonstrated using a variety of inviscid Vortex Lattice Method (VLM and Euler, and viscous CFD Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS methods. The computational results are validated against experiment measured in a wind tunnel. Two flying-wing planforms are considered based around a generic 40˚ edge-aligned configuration. The VLM predicts a linear variation of lift and pitching moment with incidence angle, and substantially under-predicts the induced drag. Results obtained from RANS and Euler agree well with experiment.

  18. Control of Sand Flies with Attractive Toxic Sugar Baits (ATSB) and Potential Impact on Non-Target Organisms in Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-08

    Quails eta/. Parasites & Vectors (2015) 8:87 DOI10.1186/s13071 015 0671 2 RESEARCH Open Access Control of sand flies with attractive toxic sugar...bearing countless ripe fruits) environments and three with "sugar poor" (green vegetation only suitable for plant tissue feeding) environments were...environments and three with ???sugar poor??? (green vegetation only suitable for plant tissue feeding) environments were selected to evaluate ATSB

  19. Biological and Cultural Control of Olive Fruit Fly in California---Utilization of Parasitoids from USDA-APHIS-PPQ, Guatemala and Cultural Control Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    The parasitoid Psytallia humilis = P. cf. concolor (Szépligeti) was reared on sterile Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann), larvae at the USDA, APHIS, PPQ, Moscamed biological control laboratory in San Miguel Petapa, Guatemala and shipped to the USDA, ARS, Parlier, for biological ...

  20. Mix design and pollution control potential of pervious concrete with non-compliant waste fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Pérez, Linoshka; Hwang, Sangchul

    2016-07-01

    Pervious concrete mix was optimized for the maximum compressive strength and the desired permeability at 7 mm/s with varying percentages of water-to-binder (W/B), fly ash-to-binder (FA/B), nano-iron oxide-to-binder (NI/B) and water reducer-to-binder (WR/B). The mass ratio of coarse aggregates in sizes of 4.75-9.5 mm to the binder was fixed at 4:1. Waste FA used in the study was not compliant with a standard specification for use as a mineral admixture in concrete. One optimum pervious concrete (Opt A) targeting high volume FA utilization had a 28-day compressive strength of 22.8 MPa and a permeability of 5.6 mm/s with a mix design at 36% W/B, 35% FA/B, 6% NI/B and 1.2% WR/B. The other (Opt B) targeting a less use of admixtures had a 28-day compressive strength and a permeability of 21.4 MPa and 7.6 mm/s, respectively, at 32% W/B, 10% FA/B, 0.5% NI/B and 0.8% WR/B. During 10 loads at a 2-h contact time each, the Opt A and Opt B achieved the average fecal coliform removals of 72.4% and 77.9% and phosphorus removals of 49.8% and 40.5%, respectively. Therefore, non-compliant waste FA could be utilized for a cleaner production of pervious concrete possessing a greater structural strength and compatible hydrological property and pollution control potential, compared to the ordinary pervious concrete.

  1. Indigenous weaver ants and fruit fly control in Tanzanian smallholder mango production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Nina; Offenberg, Joachim; Msogoya, Theodosy

    2016-01-01

    mango growers in Tanzania, where typical practice is to harvestmature, but not ripe, fruits for local sale. Initial interviews with growers provide an estimate of 10-25% crop losses due to fruit fly infestation and no strong perception of any significant impact of weaver ant colonisation on these losses....... However, direct observation shows a reduction in fruit fly landings on fruits in the presence of ants, confirming earlier observations, but analysis of volatile emissions from fruits using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy has not identified compounds that consistently reflect the presence of weaver...

  2. Flying Things

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cermak, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Daniel Cermak-Sassenrath. Flying Things. Installation. Kulturnatten 2016, Danish Science Ministry, Copenhagen, DK, Oct 14, 2016.......Daniel Cermak-Sassenrath. Flying Things. Installation. Kulturnatten 2016, Danish Science Ministry, Copenhagen, DK, Oct 14, 2016....

  3. Glossina hytrosavirus control strategies in tsetse fly factories: application of infectomics in virus management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kariithi, H.M.

    2013-01-01

    African trypanosomosis is a fatal zoonotic disease transmitted by tsetse flies (Diptera; Glossinidae); blood-sucking insects found only in sub-Saharan Africa. Two forms of trypanosomoses occur: the animal African trypanosomosis (AAT; nagana), and the human African trypanosomosis (HAT; sleeping sickn

  4. Biological control of olive fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) by releases of Psyttalia cf. concolor (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) in California, parasitoid longevity in presence of the host, and host status of Walnut Husk Fly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, Victoria Y., E-mail: vyokoyama@fresno.ars.usda.go [U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA/ARS/SJVASC), Parlier, CA (United States). Agricultural Research Service. Subtropical Horticulture Research Station; Rendon, Pedro A., E-mail: prendon@aphisguate.co [U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA/APHIS), Guatemala City (Guatemala). Center for Plant Health Science and Technology. Animal and Plant Health Inspection.; Sivinski, John, E-mail: jsivinski@gainesville.usda.ufl.ed [U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA/ARS/CMAVE), Gainesville, FL (United States). Agricultural Research Service. Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology

    2006-07-01

    The larval parasitoid, Psyttalia cf. concolor, collected from tephritids infesting coffee in Kenya and reared on Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata Weidemann, in Guatemala by USDA-APHIS, PPQ, was imported into California for biological control of olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae (Gmelin), in olives, Olea europaea. Free releases of the parasitoids were made in olive trees infested with olive fruit fly at a coastal and inland valley location during the fall and early winter of 2005. The relative humidity during the releases was significantly higher at the coastal location. Mean percentage parasitism ranged from 0.5 to 4 and 1.5 to 30 at the coastal and inland valley locations respectively, based on same season recovery of the F1 generation. One parasitoid was found in infested olives in the next crop of the following year in San Jose. Survival of the parasitoid in the greenhouse in the presence of olive fruit fly infested olives was not significantly different than in the presence of non-infested olives. The greatest number of progeny was produced from female parasitoids that were 12-16 d old. In laboratory tests, a few individuals of the parasitoid successfully completed one life cycle in walnut husk fly, Rhagoletis completa Cresson, infested English walnuts, Juglans regia L. (author)

  5. Chemosterilant bait stations coupled with sterile insect technique: an integrated strategy to control the Mediterranean fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Llopis, V; Vacas, S; Sanchis, J; Primo, J; Alfaro, C

    2011-10-01

    During 2008 and 2009, the efficacy of the combination of two Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Tephritidae), control techniques, sterile insect technique (SIT) and a chemosterilant bait station system (Adress), was tested in three crops: citrus (Citrus spp.), stone fruit (Prunus spp.), and persimmon (Diospyros spp.). Two thousand sterile males were released per ha each week in the whole trial area (50,000 ha, SIT area). For 3,600 ha, within the whole trial area, 24 Adress traps per ha were hung (SIT + Adress area). Ten SIT + Adress plots and 10 SIT plots in each of three different fruit crops were arranged to assess Mediterranean fruit fly population densities and fruit damage throughout the trial period. To evaluate the efficacy of each treatment, the male and female populations were each monitored from August 2008 to November 2009, and injured fruit was assessed before harvest. Results showed a significant reduction in the C. capitata population in plots treated with both techniques versus plots treated only with the SIT. Likewise, a corresponding reduction in the percentage of injured fruit was observed. These data indicate the compatibility of these techniques and suggest the possibility of using Adress coupled with SIT to reduce C. capitata populations in locations with high population densities, where SIT alone is not sufficiently effective to suppress fruit fly populations to below damaging levels.

  6. The influence of electrodialytic remediation on dioxin (PCDD/PCDF) levels in fly ash and air pollution control residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias-Ferreira, Celia; Kirkelund, Gunvor M; Jensen, Pernille E

    2016-04-01

    Fly ash and Air Pollution Control (APC) residues collected from three municipal solid waste incinerators in Denmark and Greenland were treated by electrodialytic remediation at pilot scale for 8-10 h. This work presents for the first time the effect of electrodialytic treatment on polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDF), and how these levels impact on the valorization options for fly ash and APC residue. PCDD/PCDF levels in the original residues ranged between 4.85 and 197 ng g(-1), being higher for the electrostatic precipitator fly ash. The toxic equivalent (TEQ) varied ten fold, ranging 0.18-2.0 ng g(-1) I-TEQ, with penta and hexa-homologs being most significant for toxicity. After the electrodialytic treatment PCDD/PCDF levels increased in the residues (between 1.4 and 2.0 times). This does not mean PCDD/PCDF were synthesized, but else that soluble materials dissolve, leaving behind the non-water soluble compounds, such as PCDD/PCDF. According to the Basel Convention, PCDD/PCDF levels in these materials is low (ash and APC residue could eventually be valorized, for instance as construction material, provided end-of-waste criteria are set and that a risk assessment of individual options is carried out, including the end-of-life stage when the materials become waste again.

  7. Transcriptome profiling of the testis reveals genes involved in spermatogenesis and marker discovery in the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, D; Li, H-M; Yang, W-J; Wei, D-D; Dou, W; Huang, Y; Wang, J-J

    2015-02-01

    The testis is a highly specialized tissue that plays a vital role in ensuring fertility by producing spermatozoa, which are transferred to the female during mating. Spermatogenesis is a complex process, resulting in the production of mature sperm, and involves significant structural and biochemical changes in the seminiferous epithelium of the adult testis. The identification of genes involved in spermatogenesis of Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) is critical for a better understanding of its reproductive development. In this study, we constructed a cDNA library of testes from male B. dorsalis adults at different ages, and performed de novo transcriptome sequencing to produce a comprehensive transcript data set, using Illumina sequencing technology. The analysis yielded 52 016 732 clean reads, including a total of 4.65 Gb of nucleotides. These reads were assembled into 47 677 contigs (average 443 bp) and then clustered into 30 516 unigenes (average 756 bp). Based on BLAST hits with known proteins in different databases, 20 921 unigenes were annotated with a cut-off E-value of 10(-5). The transcriptome sequences were further annotated using the Clusters of Orthologous Groups, Gene Orthology and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes databases. Functional genes involved in spermatogenesis were analysed, including cell cycle proteins, metalloproteins, actin, and ubiquitin and antihyperthermia proteins. Several testis-specific genes were also identified. The transcripts database will help us to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying spermatogenesis in B. dorsalis. Furthermore, 2913 simple sequence repeats and 151 431 single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified, which will be useful for investigating the genetic diversity of B. dorsalis in the future. © 2014 The Royal Entomological Society.

  8. 风吸式飞虫诱捕器防治斑潜蝇的效果研究%Control effect of wind-inhalation flying pest trap against leaf-miner flies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尉吉乾; 沈颖; 莫建初; 王道泽; 张莉丽; 徐文

    2012-01-01

    目的 测定风吸式飞虫诱捕器对斑潜蝇的防治效果.方法 按说明书使用要求将诱捕器安装在大棚内,定期调查诱捕器对斑潜蝇的诱杀效果.结果 在供试的方框形、喇叭形和长方形风吸式飞虫诱捕器中,喇叭形诱捕器对斑潜蝇的诱杀效果最好.用喇叭形诱捕器在芹菜地和瓜地所做的田间防治试验结果表明,喇叭形风吸式飞虫诱捕器对斑潜蝇具有良好的防治效果;与常规喷药防治区相比,诱捕器处理区芹菜和瓜苗遭受斑潜蝇危害的比率要少85%以上.结论 喇叭形风吸式飞虫诱捕器对斑潜蝇具有良好的防治效果,建议在生产上推广应用.%Objective To determine the control effect of wind-inhalation flying pest trap against leaf-miner flies. Methods Installing the trap in green houses as the specification of trap, then investigating timely the trapping effects of traps against the leaf-miner flies. Results Among the three kinds ( pane, bugle and rectangle types) of traps tested, the bugle trap had the best trapping effect against leaf-miner flies. Meanwhile, compared with the insecticide-treated fields, the percent of celery and melon damaged by leaf-miner flies was low more than 85% in the trap-treated fields. Conclusion Wind-inhalation flying pest trap has good control effect against leaf-miner flies. It is suggested for the control of leaf-miner flies in practice.

  9. Ground and flight test experience with a triple redundant digital fly by wire control system. [installed in F-8C aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, C. R.; Szalai, K. J.

    1981-01-01

    A triplex digital fly by wire flight control system was developed and installed in an F-8C aircraft to provide fail operative, full authority control. Hardware and software redundancy management techniques were designed to detect and identify failures in the system. Control functions typical of those projected for future actively controlled vehicles were implemented.

  10. A sensory-motor control model of animal flight explains why bats fly differently in light versus dark.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadav S Bar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal flight requires fine motor control. However, it is unknown how flying animals rapidly transform noisy sensory information into adequate motor commands. Here we developed a sensorimotor control model that explains vertebrate flight guidance with high fidelity. This simple model accurately reconstructed complex trajectories of bats flying in the dark. The model implies that in order to apply appropriate motor commands, bats have to estimate not only the angle-to-target, as was previously assumed, but also the angular velocity ("proportional-derivative" controller. Next, we conducted experiments in which bats flew in light conditions. When using vision, bats altered their movements, reducing the flight curvature. This change was explained by the model via reduction in sensory noise under vision versus pure echolocation. These results imply a surprising link between sensory noise and movement dynamics. We propose that this sensory-motor link is fundamental to motion control in rapidly moving animals under different sensory conditions, on land, sea, or air.

  11. Regulation for Switched Bimodal Systems with the Application to the Flying Height Control in Data Storage Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhizheng

    This paper considers a regulation problem for discrete-time switched bimodal linear systems where it is desired to achieve regulation against partially known disturbance or reference signals. First, a set of observer-based Q - parameterized stabilizing controllers for the switched system is constructed. Then a sufficient regulation condition for the switched system is obtained, and a regulator synthesis method is derived based on solving a set of properly formulated linear matrix inequalities. Finally, the proposed regulator design method is evaluated on an experimental setup motivated by the flying height regulation problem in data storage devices.

  12. The central complex of Drosophila melanogaster is involved in flight control: studies on mutants and mosaics of the gene ellipsoid body open.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilius, M; Wolf, R; Heisenberg, M

    2007-01-01

    Visual flight control is studied in three mutant alleles of the gene ellipsoid body open (ebo) of Drosophila melanogaster. In mutant ebo flies the central complex is disturbed to varying degrees. Defects range from a small opening in the ellipsoid body to the dissociation of the ring into two parts, a cleft in the fan-shaped body and hypoplasia in the protocerebral bridge. Other parts of the brain are not visibly affected. Flight behavior is normal with respect to the amplitude of the optomotor response and to the object response (single rotating stripe). A reduced amplitude in the small random oscillations of the torque trace (yaw torque activity), however, is found in all three alleles. In two of them the frequency of torque spikes is reduced. In the allele ebo(678) the dynamics of the optomotor response is altered. Upon reversal of the direction of rotation mutant flies take longer than wild type to shift their yaw torque to the new response level (optomotor reversal time). Finally, these flies also behave abnormally in the flight simulator in which their yaw torque controls the angular velocity of the panorama. Many ebo(678) flies fixate a single stripe less persistently than normal flies, some even trying to fly away from it (antifixation). In ebo(678) gynandromorphs the four behavioral phenotypes ("yaw torque activity", "torque spike frequency", "on-target-fixation" and "optomotor reversal time") are all highly correlated with the phenotype of the ellipsoid body. Yaw torque activity and torque spike frequency in addition are correlated with the phenotype of the thorax suggesting that these behavioral defects are in part caused by mutant influences on the ventral ganglion. The results support the hypothesis that the central complex is involved in the control of flight behavior.

  13. Searching for pathways involving dressed states in optimal control theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von den Hoff, Philipp; Kowalewski, Markus; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2011-01-01

    Selective population of dressed states has been proposed as an alternative control pathway in molecular reaction dynamics [Wollenhaupt et al., J. Photochem. Photobiol. A: Chem., 2006, 180, 248]. In this article we investigate if, and under which conditions, this strong field pathway is included in the search space of optimal control theory. For our calculations we used the proposed example of the potassium dimer, in which the different target states can be reached via dressed states by resonant transition. Especially, we investigate whether the optimization algorithm is able to find the route involving the dressed states although the target state lies out of resonance in the bare state picture.

  14. MicroRNA involved in inflammation: Control of eicosanoid pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meike J. Ochs

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs have emerged as important regulators in human physiological and pathological processes. Recent investigations implicated the involvement of miRNAs in the immune system development and function and demonstrated an unexpected new regulatory level. We summarize the current knowledge about miRNA control in the development of the immune system and discuss their role in the immune and inflammatory responses with a special focus on eicosanoid signaling.

  15. Hydration of fly ash cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etsuo Sakai; Shigeyoshi Miyahara; Shigenari Ohsawa; Seung-Heun Lee; Masaki Daimon [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan). Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Graduate School of Science and Engineering

    2005-06-01

    It is necessary to establish the material design system for the utilization of large amounts of fly ash as blended cement instead of disposing of it as a waste. Cement blended with fly ash is also required as a countermeasure to reduce the amount of CO{sub 2} generation. In this study, the influences of the glass content and the basicity of glass phase on the hydration of fly ash cement were clarified and hydration over a long curing time was characterized. Two kinds of fly ash with different glass content, one with 38.2% and another with 76.6%, were used. The hydration ratio of fly ash was increased by increasing the glass content in fly ash in the specimens cured for 270 days. When the glass content of fly ash is low, the basicity of glass phase tends to decrease. Reactivity of fly ash is controlled by the basicity of the glass phase in fly ash during a period from 28 to 270 days. However, at an age of 360 days, the reaction ratios of fly ash show almost identical values with different glass contents. Fly ash also affected the hydration of cement clinker minerals in fly ash cement. While the hydration of alite was accelerated, that of belite was retarded at a late stage.

  16. Strata movement controlling effect of waste and fly ash backfillings in fully mechanized coal mining with backfilling face

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jixiong; Zhang Qiang; Huang Yanli; Liu Jinwei; Zhou Nan; Zan Dongfeng

    2011-01-01

    A fully mechanized coal mining with backfilling (FMCMB) provides advantages of safety and efficiency for coal mining under buildings,railways,and water bodies.According to the field geological conditions,we analyzed the controlling effect of strata movement by the waste and fly ash backfilling in FMCMB face.Based on the key strata theory,we established the equivalent mining thickness model,and analyzed the action of the bulk factor of backfilling body to the equivalent mining thickness.In addition,we numerically simulated the controlling function of the strata movement by backfilling bodies with different strength.And the numerical simulation result show that the deformation of stratum and the subsidence of surface can be controlled by FMCMB.The result provides references to the effective execution of fully mechanized coal mining with solid waste backfilling in goal.

  17. Illusion of control: the role of personal involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarritu, Ion; Matute, Helena; Vadillo, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    The illusion of control consists of overestimating the influence that our behavior exerts over uncontrollable outcomes. Available evidence suggests that an important factor in development of this illusion is the personal involvement of participants who are trying to obtain the outcome. The dominant view assumes that this is due to social motivations and self-esteem protection. We propose that this may be due to a bias in contingency detection which occurs when the probability of the action (i.e., of the potential cause) is high. Indeed, personal involvement might have been often confounded with the probability of acting, as participants who are more involved tend to act more frequently than those for whom the outcome is irrelevant and therefore become mere observers. We tested these two variables separately. In two experiments, the outcome was always uncontrollable and we used a yoked design in which the participants of one condition were actively involved in obtaining it and the participants in the other condition observed the adventitious cause-effect pairs. The results support the latter approach: Those acting more often to obtain the outcome developed stronger illusions, and so did their yoked counterparts.

  18. An Internet-based treatment for flying phobia (NO-FEAR Airlines): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Daniel; Bretón-López, Juana; Botella, Cristina; Mira, Adriana; Castilla, Diana; Baños, Rosa; Tortella-Feliu, Miquel; Quero, Soledad

    2016-08-20

    Flying phobia (FP) is a common and disabling mental disorder. Although in vivo exposure is the treatment of choice, it is linked to a number of limitations in its implementation. Particularly important, is the limited access to the feared stimulus (i.e., plane). Moreover, the economic cost of in vivo exposure should be specially considered as well as the difficulty of applying the exposure technique in an appropriate way; controlling important variables such as the duration of the exposure or the number of sessions. ICTs could help to reduce these limitations. Computer-assisted treatments have remarkable advantages in treating FP. Furthermore, they can be delivered through the Internet, increasing their advantages and reaching more people in need. The Internet has been established as an effective way to treat a wide range of mental disorders. However, as far as we know, no controlled studies exist on FP treatment via the Internet. This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of an Internet-based treatment for FP (NO-FEAR Airlines) versus a waiting list control group. Secondary objectives will be to explore two ways of delivering NO-FEAR Airlines, with or without therapist guidance, and study the patients' acceptance of the program. This paper presents the study protocol. The study is a randomized controlled trial. A minimum of 57 participants will be randomly assigned to three conditions: a) NO-FEAR Airlines totally self-applied, b) NO-FEAR Airlines with therapist guidance, or c) a waiting list control group (6 weeks). Primary outcomes measures will be the Fear of Flying Questionnaire-II and the Fear of Flying Scale. Secondary outcomes will be included to assess other relevant clinical measures, such as the Fear and Avoidance Scales, Clinician Severity Scale, and Patient's Improvement scale. Analyses of post-treatment flights will be conducted. Treatment acceptance and preference measures will also be included. Intention-to-treat and per protocol analyses will be

  19. Flying Scared

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dal Sie, Marco; Josiassen, Alexander

    service quality expectations and fear of flying affect travellers' flight choices on long-haul flights. The study was set in Bangkok and primary data were obtained from a large sample of travelers departing from Suvarnabhumi Airport. While service quality emerged as a relevant factor, fear of flying didn......’t turn out as a variable affecting travellers’ choices....

  20. Should Ecosystem Management Involve Active Control of Species Abundances?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy E. Essington

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available We review four case studies in which there is a risk of extinction or severe reduction in highly valued species if we ignore either, or both, of two ecosystem control options. “Symptomatic control” implies direct control of extinction risk through direct harvesting or culling of competitors and predators. “Systemic control” implies treating the causes of the problem that led to an unnaturally high abundance in the first place. We demonstrate, with a discussion of historically observed population trends, how surprising trophic interactions can emerge as a result of alterations to a system. Simulation models were developed for two of the case studies as aids to adaptive policy design, to expose possible abundance changes caused by trophic interactions and to highlight key uncertainties about possible responses to ecosystem management policies involving active intervention to control abundances. With reasonable parameter values, these models predict a wide range of possible responses given available data, but do indicate a good chance that active control would reverse declines and reverse extinction risks. We find that controlling seal (Phoca vitulina populations in the Georgia Strait increases juvenile survival rates of commercial salmon (Oncorhynchus spp. species, but that commensurate increases in hake populations from decreased seal predation could be a compensatory source of predation on juvenile salmon. We also show that wolf (Canis lupus control and moose (Alces alces harvest bring about a recovery in caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou populations, where simple habitat protection policies fail to recover caribou before wolf predation causes severe declines. The results help address a common problem in disturbed ecosystems, where controlling extinction risks can mean choosing between active control of species abundance or establishing policies of protection, and allowing threatened species to recover naturally.

  1. Control Structure Impact on the Flying Performance of the Multi-Rotor VTOL Platform - Design, Analysis and Experimental Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Czyba

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to examine the different control strategies for the unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV. The control task is formulated as an angular stabilization of the four rotor platform, and also as a tracking problem of chosen state variables. The PID algorithm has been considered in three structures in respect of the optimal control signal applied to the actuators. For better performance of the quadrotor in hover mode the cascade control system has been proposed. The simulation results of attitude control with different PID controller architectures are presented, and confirm the effectiveness of the proposed control structure and theoretical expectations. Moreover, the design and the practical realization of the control architecture on the experimental aerial vehicle are described. The fast prototyping method together with Matlab/Simulink software and DAQ hardware are used for both evolution and validation of control algorithms. The capacity of the attitude stabilization system is important in the development process of more advanced functionality of autonomous flying vehicles; therefore it needs to be highlighted and taken into careful consideration.

  2. Macrochelid Mite, Macrocheles muscaedomesticae (Acarina: Macrochelidae as a Biological Control Agent Against House Fly, Musca domestica (Diptera: Muscidae in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safaa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous species of macrochelids (Acarina: Mesostigmata have shown capability to attack housefly larvae and eggs but it is presumed that only a few of them play a significant role in the control of flies in nature. Macrocheles muscaedomesticae (Scopoli is one of several mites that feeds on eggs, newly hatched and small larvae of house fly Musca domestica L. This study provide avidence that macrochelid mite is attacking not only housefly larvae and eggs but also on housefly adults. Macrocheles muscaedomesticae mite was reared in the laboratory on house fly frozen eggs and first instar of larvae at constant conditions of 28°C±1 and 90% relative humidity using sterilized artificial diet. The mean incubation period of eggs, total immatures, female longevity were 0.7, 4.0 and 25.2 days, respectively when fed on frozen eggs meanwhile means were 0.8, 7.0 and 22.6 days when fed on first instar larvae of M. domestica. The total consumption of female was 131.1 eggs/female or 82.7 larvae. Results of the present study showed that the mean mortality percentages of eggs due to predation of three levels of predator 2, 5 and 10 individuals were 57.2, 74.9 and 96.5 after 5, 4, 2 days, respectively. Also, the larval stage of M. domestica was introduced with three levels of 10, 20 and 25 individuals for each level of predatory mite 2, 5 and 10 adults, respectively. Results revealed that the best results were recorded at the level of 5 mites, where the mean mortality percentage of larvae was 100% after one day when introduced with 10 housefly’s larvae but it was 96% after two days when introduced with 20 housefly’s larvae and 76.2% after three days when introduced with 25 houseflies larvae at level of 5. In addition, the present study provide evidence that mites can consume the housefly adult stage. Our findings indicated that the best results were recorded at the level of 10 mites where the mean mortality percentages of adults were 83.55%, the fly died after

  3. Arm coordination in octopus crawling involves unique motor control strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Guy; Flash, Tamar; Hochner, Binyamin

    2015-05-04

    To cope with the exceptional computational complexity that is involved in the control of its hyper-redundant arms [1], the octopus has adopted unique motor control strategies in which the central brain activates rather autonomous motor programs in the elaborated peripheral nervous system of the arms [2, 3]. How octopuses coordinate their eight long and flexible arms in locomotion is still unknown. Here, we present the first detailed kinematic analysis of octopus arm coordination in crawling. The results are surprising in several respects: (1) despite its bilaterally symmetrical body, the octopus can crawl in any direction relative to its body orientation; (2) body and crawling orientation are monotonically and independently controlled; and (3) contrasting known animal locomotion, octopus crawling lacks any apparent rhythmical patterns in limb coordination, suggesting a unique non-rhythmical output of the octopus central controller. We show that this uncommon maneuverability is derived from the radial symmetry of the arms around the body and the simple pushing-by-elongation mechanism by which the arms create the crawling thrust. These two together enable a mechanism whereby the central controller chooses in a moment-to-moment fashion which arms to recruit for pushing the body in an instantaneous direction. Our findings suggest that the soft molluscan body has affected in an embodied way [4, 5] the emergence of the adaptive motor behavior of the octopus.

  4. Mass trapping is as effective as ground bait sprays for the control of Anastrepha (Diptera: Tephritidae) fruit flies in mango orchards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, Jorge; Flores, Salvador; Liedo, Pablo; Malo, Edi A

    2017-10-01

    Anastrepha fruit flies are considered one of the main phytosanitary problems for the fresh fruit industry in the USA, Caribbean islands and Latin America. Since 1994, the Mexican government has implemented the National Fruit Fly Program using an area-wide integrated pest management approach. In this paper, we evaluate the effectiveness of mass trapping and compare it with ground GF-120 spraying against Anastrepha obliqua and Anastrepha ludens populations in mango cv. Ataulfo orchards. Multilure® traps baited with Ceratrap® or Biolure® captured significantly more fruit flies than Captor 300 in field cage tests. Mass trapping and ground GF-120 spray significantly suppressed fruit fly populations compared with untreated plots. In Multilure traps placed in untreated plots, we captured significantly more fruit flies than in treated plots with mass trapping or GF-120 sprays. Plots treated with either mass trapping or GF-120 sprays reduced the percentage of infested fruit significantly compared with untreated plots. There was no difference between mass trapping and GF-120 ground bait spraying. Our results demonstrate that mass trapping was as effective as GF-120 ground spraying for the control of fruit flies in mango cv. Ataulfo orchards. The suppression effect of mass trapping was similar to GF-120 ground bait spraying. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Direct plantlet inoculation with soil or insect-associated fungi may control cabbage root fly maggots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razinger, Jaka; Lutz, Matthias; Schroers, Hans-Josef; Palmisano, Marilena; Wohler, Christian; Urek, Gregor; Grunder, Jürg

    2014-07-01

    A potential Delia radicum biological control strategy involving cauliflower plantlet inoculation with various fungi was investigated in a series of laboratory and glasshouse experiments. In addition to entomopathogenic fungi, fungi with a high rhizosphere competence and fungi with the ability to survive as saprotrophs in soil were tested. The following fungal species were evaluated in the experiments: Trichoderma atroviride, T. koningiopsis, T. gamsii, Beauveria bassiana, Metharhizium anisopliae, M. brunneum and Clonostachys solani. A commercial carbosulfan-based insecticide was used as a positive control. Additionally, two commercial products, one based on B. bassiana (Naturalis) and one on Bacillus thuringiensis (Delfin) were used as reference biocontrol agents. The aims were (i) to assess the pathogenicity of the selected fungal isolates to Delia radicum, (ii) to evaluate the fungal isolates' rhizosphere competence, with the emphasis on the persistence of the original inoculum on the growing roots, (iii) to assess possible endophytic plant tissue colonization, and (iv) to evaluate potential plant growth stimulating effects of the added inoculi. Significant pathogenicity of tested fungi against Delia radicum was confirmed in in vitro and glasshouse experiments. All tested fungi persisted on cauliflower rhizoplane. More importantly, the added fungi were found on thoroughly washed roots outside the original point of inoculation. This provided us with evidence that our tested fungi could be transferred via or grow with the elongating roots. In addition to colonizing the rhizoplane, some fungi were found inside the plant root or stem tissue, thus exhibiting endophytic characteristics. The importance of fungal ecology as a criterion in appropriate biological control agent selection is discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Involvement of a community in schistosomiasis control: a Kenyan experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsivo, M N; Muthami, L N; Kimani, S; Karama, M; Kingori, F

    1993-08-01

    This paper illustrates how community participation was achieved in a study that was carried out between 1983-1988 whose general objective was to reduce the transmission of schistosomiasis in a rice irrigation scheme in Kenya. A community of 2,219 people was mobilized through health education, to effect changes in behaviour regarding water contact, water use and faecal disposal. Health education, alternative water sources, latrines and mass chemotherapy with praziquantel were the schistosomiasis control strategies utilized in this study. By the end of 2 years, the canals were cleared of their thick vegetation, water, sanitation, bathing and washing facilities were constructed, water contact with infective waters was reduced, faecal contamination of water was reduced, the people's knowledge on schistosomiasis increased and the rate and intensity of schistosomiasis infection was reduced. The study demonstrated that it is possible to fully involve the community in disease control efforts.

  7. CNS structures presumably involved in vagal control of ovarian function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerendai, I; Tóth, I E; Boldogköi, Z; Medveczky, I; Halász, B

    2000-04-12

    The contribution of the vagus nerve to viral transneuronal labeling of brain structures from the ovaries demonstrated recently by us was investigated. Unilateral vagotomy was performed prior to ipsilateral intraovarian virus injection. Virus-infected neurons were visualized by immunostaining. In vagotomized rats such neurons were detected only in certain cell groups of the brain (parapyramidal nucleus, A(1), A(5) cell group, caudal raphe nuclei, hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, lateral hypothalamus). Vagotomy interfered with labeling of several structures that were labeled in controls, including area postrema, nucleus of the solitary tract, dorsal vagal complex, nucleus ambiguus, A(7) cell group, Barrington's nucleus, locus coeruleus, periaqueductal gray, dorsal hypothalamus. Findings provide a morphological basis to study the functional significance of brain structures presumably involved in the control of ovarian function and acting via the vagus or the sympathetic nerves.

  8. Virtual reality exposure therapy for the treatment of fear of flying: a controlled investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltby, Nicholas; Kirsch, Irving; Mayers, Michael; Allen, George J

    2002-10-01

    Forty-five participants who refused to fly during a screening test and who also met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders criteria for specific phobia, agoraphobia, or panic disorder with agoraphobia were randomly assigned to 5 sessions of either virtual reality exposure (VRE) or attention-placebo group treatment (GT). At posttreatment, 65% of VRE participants and 57% of GT participants flew during a test flight. Both groups showed significant improvement following treatment on standardized self-report measures of flight anxiety, with a better outcome for the VRE group on 4 of 5 of these measures. At 6-month follow-up, however, most group differences had disappeared; VRE resulted in a better outcome on only 1 of 5 standardized flight anxiety measures.

  9. Parental Behavioural Control and Academic Achievement: Striking the Balance between Control and Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Karen Z.

    2012-01-01

    Using a longitudinal US dataset (N = 6,134) we examine the relationship between parental behavioural control and academic achievement and explore the moderating role of parental involvement and parental warmth. Analyses using multiple hierarchical regression with clustering controls shows that parental behavioural control is negatively associated…

  10. 简述引诱剂在实蝇防治中的作用%Description the role of baits on the control of fruit fly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王琳; 潘志萍

    2011-01-01

    引诱剂是实蝇类害虫监测、调查和防治中最重要的手段之一,被广泛采用.本文对实蝇引诱剂的种类与诱捕范围进行了总结,并简述了引诱剂在实蝇防治中的监测与防治作用.%One of the major measures in monitoring, investigating and controlling the fruit flies, baits are extensively adopted. In this paper, the type of fruit fly baits and trap ranges were reviewed, and summarized the role of in the monitoring and control of fruit fly.

  11. Biological Control of Tephritid Fruit Flies in Argentina: Historical Review, Current Status, and Future Trends for Developing a Parasitoid Mass-Release Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio M. Ovruski

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In Argentina there are two tephritid fruit fly species of major economic and quarantine importance: the exotic Ceratitis capitata that originated from Southeast Africa and the native Anastrepha fraterculus. In recent years, the use of fruit fly parasitoids as biocontrol agents has received renewed attention. This increasing interest has recently led to the establishment of a program for the mass rearing of five million Diachasmimorpha longicaudata parasitoids per week in the BioPlanta San Juan facility, San Juan, Argentina. The first augmentative releases of D. longicaudata in Argentina are currently occurring on commercial fig crops in rural areas of San Juan as part of an integrated fruit fly management program on an area-wide basis. In this context, research is ongoing to assess the suitability of indigenous parasitoid species for successful mass rearing on larvae of either C. capitata or A. fraterculus. The purpose of this article is to provide a historical overview of the biological control of the fruit fly in Argentina, report on the strategies currently used in Argentina, present information on native parasitoids as potential biocontrol agents, and discuss the establishment of a long-term fruit fly biological control program, including augmentative and conservation modalities, in Argentina’s various fruit growing regions.

  12. PROBA-3: Precise formation flying demonstration mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorente, J. S.; Agenjo, A.; Carrascosa, C.; de Negueruela, C.; Mestreau-Garreau, A.; Cropp, A.; Santovincenzo, A.

    2013-01-01

    Formation Flying (FF) has generated a strong interest in many space applications, most of them involving a significant complexity for building for example on-board large "virtual structures or distributed observatories". The implementation of these complex formation flying missions with critical dependency on this new, advanced and critical formation technology requires a thorough verification of the system behaviour in order to provide enough guarantees for the target mission success. A significant number of conceptual or preliminary designs, analyses, simulations, and HW on-ground testing have been performed during the last years, but still the limitations of the ground verification determine that enough confidence of the behaviour of the formation flying mission will only be possible by demonstration in flight of the concept and the associated technologies. PROBA-3 is the mission under development at ESA for in-flight formation flying demonstration, dedicated to obtain that confidence and the necessary flight maturity level in the formation flying technologies for those future target missions. PROBA-3 will demonstrate technologies such as formation metrology sensors (from very coarse to highest accuracy), formation control and GNC, system operability, safety, etc. During the last years, PROBA-3 has evolved from the initial CDF study at ESA, to two parallel phase A studies, followed by a change in the industrial configuration for the Bridging step between A and B phases. Currently the SRR consolidation has been completed, and the project is in the middle of the phase B. After the phase A study SENER and GMV were responsible for the Formation Flying System, within a mission core team completed by OHB-Sweden, QinetiQ Space and CASA Espacio. In this paper an overview of the PROBA-3 mission is provided, with a more detailed description of the formation flying preliminary design and results.

  13. The trypanosome Rab-related proteins RabX1 and RabX2 play no role in intracellular trafficking but may be involved in fly infectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil Kumar A Natesan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rab GTPases constitute the largest subgroup of the Ras superfamily and are primarily involved in vesicle targeting. The full extent of Rab family function is unexplored. Several divergent Rab-like proteins are known but few have been characterized. In Trypanosoma brucei there are sixteen Rab genes, but RabX1, RabX2 and RabX3 are divergent within canonical sequence regions. Where known, trypanosome Rab functions are broadly conserved when orthologous relationships may be robustly established, but specific functions for RabX1, X2 and X3 have yet to be determined. RabX1 and RabX2 originated via tandem duplication and subcellular localization places RabX1 at the endoplasmic reticulum, while RabX2 is at the Golgi complex, suggesting distinct functions. We wished to determine whether RabX1 and RabX2 are involved in vesicle transport or other cellular processes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using comparative genomics we find that RabX1 and RabX2 are restricted to trypanosomatids. Gene knockout indicates that RabX1 and RabX2 are non-essential. Simultaneous RNAi knockdown of both RabX1 and RabX2, while partial, was also non-lethal and may suggest non-redundant function, consistent with the distinct locations of the proteins. Analysis of the knockout cell lines unexpectedly failed to uncover a defect in exocytosis, endocytosis or in the morphology or location of multiple markers for the endomembrane system, suggesting that neither RabX1 nor RabX2 has a major role in intracellular transport. However, it was apparent that RabX1 and RabX2 knockout cells displayed somewhat enhanced survival within flies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: RabX1 and RabX2, two members of the trypanosome Rab subfamily, were shown to have no major detectable role in intracellular transport, despite the localization of each gene product to highly specific endomembrane compartments. These data extend the functional scope of Rab proteins in trypanosomes to include non

  14. Predicting fruit fly's sensing rate with insect flight simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Song; Wang, Z Jane

    2014-08-01

    Without sensory feedback, flies cannot fly. Exactly how various feedback controls work in insects is a complex puzzle to solve. What do insects measure to stabilize their flight? How often and how fast must insects adjust their wings to remain stable? To gain insights into algorithms used by insects to control their dynamic instability, we develop a simulation tool to study free flight. To stabilize flight, we construct a control algorithm that modulates wing motion based on discrete measurements of the body-pitch orientation. Our simulations give theoretical bounds on both the sensing rate and the delay time between sensing and actuation. Interpreting our findings together with experimental results on fruit flies' reaction time and sensory motor reflexes, we conjecture that fruit flies sense their kinematic states every wing beat to stabilize their flight. We further propose a candidate for such a control involving the fly's haltere and first basalar motor neuron. Although we focus on fruit flies as a case study, the framework for our simulation and discrete control algorithms is applicable to studies of both natural and man-made fliers.

  15. Mechanical evaluation of asphalt-aggregate mixtures prepared with fly ash as a filler replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tapkin, T. [Anadolu Univ., Eskisehir (Turkey). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2008-01-15

    This paper examined methods of introducing fly ash waste products as a filler in asphalt concrete mixtures. A literature review of studies involving fly ash and asphalts was conducted. The effect of fly ash filler replacements on the mechanical properties of asphalt-aggregate mixtures was investigated. A dense bituminous calcareous aggregate was used as a reference mixture for a series of tests. Three types of fly ash were investigated, notably (1) portland cement; (2) lime; and (3) control specimens. Changes in elastic strain, elastic modulus, and permanent strain properties of the asphalt mixtures were determined through a series of fatigue tests. The behaviour of the asphalt concrete pavements were analyzed under applied loads. Results of the tests showed that the fatigue life of the fly ash specimens was higher than the calcareous aggregate specimens. It was concluded that fly ash can used as a filler replacement for dense-graded wearing courses. 35 refs., 17 tabs., 8 figs.

  16. Spacecraft Formation Flying near Sun-Earth L2 Lagrange Point: Trajectory Generation and Adaptive Full-State Feedback Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Hong; Kapila, Vikram

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we present a method for trajectory generation and adaptive full-state feedback control to facilitate spacecraft formation flying near the Sun-Earth L2 Lagrange point. Specifically, the dynamics of a spacecraft in the neighborhood of a Halo orbit reveals that there exist quasi-periodic orbits surrounding the Halo orbit. Thus, a spacecraft formation is created by placing a leader spacecraft on a desired Halo orbit and placing follower spacecraft on desired quasi-periodic orbits. To produce a formation maintenance controller, we first develop the nonlinear dynamics of a follower spacecraft relative to the leader spacecraft. We assume that the leader spacecraft is on a desired Halo orbit trajectory and the follower spacecraft is to track a desired quasi-periodic orbit surrounding the Halo orbit. Then, we design an adaptive, full-state feedback position tracking controller for the follower spacecraft providing an adaptive compensation for the unknown mass of the follower spacecraft. The proposed control law is simulated for the case of the leader and follower spacecraft pair and is shown to yield global, asymptotic convergence of the relative position tracking errors.

  17. A centralised remote data collection system using automated traps for managing and controlling the population of the Mediterranean (Ceratitis capitata) and olive (Dacus oleae) fruit flies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philimis, Panayiotis; Psimolophitis, Elias; Hadjiyiannis, Stavros; Giusti, Alessandro; Perelló, Josep; Serrat, Albert; Avila, Pedro

    2013-08-01

    The present paper describes the development of a novel monitoring system (e-FlyWatch system) for managing and controlling the population of two of the world's most destructive fruit pests, namely the olive fruit fly (Bactrocera oleae, Rossi - formerly Dacus oleae) and the Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata, also called medfly). The novel monitoring system consists of a) novel automated traps with optical and motion detection modules for capturing the flies, b) local stations including a GSM/GPRS module, sensors, flash memory, battery, antenna etc. and c) a central station that collects, stores and publishes the results (i.e. insect population in each field, sensor data, possible error/alarm data) via a web-based management software.The centralised data collection system provides also analysis and prediction models, end-user warning modules and historical analysis of infested areas. The e-FlyWatch system enables the SMEs-producers in the Fruit, Vegetable and Olive sectors to improve their production reduce the amount of insecticides/pesticides used and consequently the labour cost for spraying activities, and the labour cost for traps inspection.

  18. Impact of phlebotomine sand flies on U.S. Military operations at Tallil Air Base, Iraq: 1. background, military situation, and development of a "Leishmaniasis Control Program".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Russell E; Burkett, Douglas A; Putnam, John L; Sherwood, Van; Caci, Jennifer B; Jennings, Barton T; Hochberg, Lisa P; Spradling, Sharon L; Rowton, Edgar D; Blount, Keith; Ploch, John; Hopkins, Grady; Raymond, Jo-Lynne W; O'Guinn, Monica L; Lee, John S; Weina, Peter J

    2006-07-01

    One of the most significant modern day efforts to prevent and control an arthropod-borne disease during a military deployment occurred when a team of U.S. military entomologists led efforts to characterize, prevent, and control leishmaniasis at Tallil Air Base (TAB), Iraq, during Operation Iraqi Freedom. Soon after arriving at TAB on 22 March 2003, military entomologists determined that 1) high numbers of sand flies were present at TAB, 2) individual soldiers were receiving many sand fly bites in a single night, and 3) Leishmania parasites were present in 1.5% of the female sand flies as determined using a real-time (fluorogenic) Leishmania-generic polymerase chain reaction assay. The rapid determination that leishmaniasis was a specific threat in this area allowed for the establishment of a comprehensive Leishmaniasis Control Program (LCP) over 5 mo before the first case of leishmaniasis was confirmed in a U.S. soldier deployed to Iraq. The LCP had four components: 1) risk assessment, 2) enhancement of use of personal protective measures by all personnel at TAB, 3) vector and reservoir control, and 4) education of military personnel about sand flies and leishmaniasis. The establishment of the LCP at TAB before the onset of any human disease conclusively demonstrated that entomologists can play a critical role during military deployments.

  19. Orbit Control of Fly-around Satellite with Highly Eccentric Orbit Using Solar Radiation Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong-gang, Hou; Chang-yin, Zhao; Ming-jiang, Zhang; Rong-yu, Sun

    2017-01-01

    The method of controlling highly eccentric accompanying flight orbit using the solar wing is proposed in this paper. The formation is maintained by controlling the orbit of the accompanying satellite (follower). The accompanying satellite rotates around its inertial principal axis with a constant angular velocity. The control on the accompanying satellite is divided into the in-plane control and out-of-plane control. The in-plane control is superior to the out-of-plane control. The out-of-plane control force is applied when the in-plane error is eliminated or the in-plane control force can not be supplied due to some geometrical factors. By the sliding mode control method, the magnitude and direction of the control force required by the in-plane orbit control are calculated. Then accordingly, the expression of the solar wing orientation with respect to the satellite body in the control process is derived, so that by adjusting the orientation of the solar wing, the required control force can be obtained. Finally, the verification on this method is performed by numerical simulations, including the orbit adjustment, error elimination, and the orbit maintenance. It is shown that this method can keep the error less than 5 m, and it is feasible for the space formation flight.

  20. Mosquito and filth fly control in desert and temperate environments with a synergized pesticide mister and barrier treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    U.S. military operations face significant negative impacts on mission readiness from disease-vector and nuisance filth flies, mosquitoes, and sand flies. Through the Deployed War Fighter Protection Program (DWFP) we previously developed small scale 9 ft by 3 ft pesticide-treated perimeters enhanced ...

  1. Comparison of host-seeking behavior of the filth fly pupal parasitoids, Spalangia cameroni and Muscidifurax raptor (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The pupal parasitoids, Spalangia cameroni Perkins and Muscidifurax raptor Girault and Sanders, are often sold together for biological control of house flies (Musca domestica L.) and stable flies (Stomoxys calcitrans L.) (Diptera: Muscidae). Little is known about the odors involved in host-seeking b...

  2. Design Genetic Algorithm Optimization Education Software Based Fuzzy Controller for a Tricopter Fly Path Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Huu-Khoa; Chiou, Juing -Shian; Peng, Shou-Tao

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of a Genetic Algorithm Optimization (GAO) education software based Fuzzy Logic Controller (GAO-FLC) for simulating the flight motion control of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) is designed. The generated flight trajectories integrate the optimized Scaling Factors (SF) fuzzy controller gains by using GAO algorithm. The…

  3. Design Genetic Algorithm Optimization Education Software Based Fuzzy Controller for a Tricopter Fly Path Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Huu-Khoa; Chiou, Juing -Shian; Peng, Shou-Tao

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of a Genetic Algorithm Optimization (GAO) education software based Fuzzy Logic Controller (GAO-FLC) for simulating the flight motion control of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) is designed. The generated flight trajectories integrate the optimized Scaling Factors (SF) fuzzy controller gains by using GAO algorithm. The…

  4. A Memory/Immunology-Based Control Approach with Applications to Multiple Spacecraft Formation Flying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liguo Weng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the problem of formation control for multiple spacecrafts in Planetary Orbital Environment (POE. Due to the presence of diverse interferences and uncertainties in the outer space, such as the changing spacecraft mass, unavailable space parameters, and varying gravity forces, traditional control methods encounter great difficulties in this area. A new control approach inspired by human memory and immune system is proposed, and this approach is shown to be capable of learning from past control experience and current behavior to improve its performance. It demands much less system dynamic information as compared with traditional controls. Both theoretic analysis and computer simulation verify its effectiveness.

  5. Cellular and Humoral Mechanisms Involved in the Control of Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquin Zuñiga

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb infection is a major international public health problem. One-third of the world's population is thought to have latent tuberculosis, a condition where individuals are infected by the intracellular bacteria without active disease but are at risk for reactivation, if their immune system fails. Here, we discuss the role of nonspecific inflammatory responses mediated by cytokines and chemokines induced by interaction of innate receptors expressed in macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs. We also review current information regarding the importance of several cytokines including IL-17/IL-23 in the development of protective cellular and antibody-mediated protective responses against Mtb and their influence in containment of the infection. Finally, in this paper, emphasis is placed on the mechanisms of failure of Mtb control, including the immune dysregulation induced by the treatment with biological drugs in different autoimmune diseases. Further functional studies, focused on the mechanisms involved in the early host-Mtb interactions and the interplay between host innate and acquired immunity against Mtb, may be helpful to improve the understanding of protective responses in the lung and in the development of novel therapeutic and prophylactic tools in TB.

  6. Flying Cities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbelin, Bruno; Lasserre, Sebastien; Ciger, Jan

    2008-01-01

    . This cross-modal interaction not only supports our artistic messages, but also aims at providing anyone with a pleasant and stimulating feedback from her/his speech activity. As the feedback we have received when presenting Flying Cities was very positive, our objective is now to cross the bridge between art......Flying Cities is an artistic installation which generates imaginary cities from the speech of its visitors. Thanks to an original interactive process analyzing people's vocal input to create 3D graphics, a tangible correspondence between speech and visuals opens new possibilities of interaction...

  7. Dynamic Antenna Alignment Control in Microwave Air-Bridging for Sky-Net Mobile Communication Using Unmanned Flying Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin E. Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a preliminary study on establishing a mobile point-to-point (P2P microwave air-bridging (MAB between Unmanned Low Altitude Flying Platform (ULAFP and backhaul telecommunication network. The proposed Sky-Net system relays telecom signal for general mobile cellphone users via ULAFP when natural disaster sweeps off Base Transceiver Stations (BTSs. Unlike the conventional fix point microwave bridging application, the ULAFP is cruising on a predefined mission flight path to cover a wider range of service. The difficulty and challenge fall on how to maintain antenna alignment accurately in order to provide the signal strength for MAB. A dual-axis rotation mechanism with embedded controller is designed and implemented on airborne and ground units for stabilizing airborne antenna and tracking the moving ULAFP. The MAB link is established in flight tests using the proposed antenna stabilizing/tracking mechanism with correlated control method. The result supports backbone technique of the Sky-Net mobile communication and verifies the feasibility of airborne e-Cell BTS.

  8. Molecular detection of canine parvovirus in flies (Diptera) at open and closed canine facilities in the eastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagshaw, Clarence; Isdell, Allen E; Thiruvaiyaru, Dharma S; Brisbin, I Lehr; Sanchez, Susan

    2014-06-01

    More than thirty years have passed since canine parvovirus (CPV) emerged as a significant pathogen and it continues to pose a severe threat to world canine populations. Published information suggests that flies (Diptera) may play a role in spreading this virus; however, they have not been studied extensively and the degree of their involvement is not known. This investigation was directed toward evaluating the vector capacity of such flies and determining their potential role in the transmission and ecology of CPV. Molecular diagnostic methods were used in this cross-sectional study to detect the presence of CPV in flies trapped at thirty-eight canine facilities. The flies involved were identified as belonging to the house fly (Mucidae), flesh fly (Sarcophagidae) and blow/bottle fly (Calliphoridae) families. A primary surveillance location (PSL) was established at a canine facility in south-central South Carolina, USA, to identify fly-virus interaction within the canine facility environment. Flies trapped at this location were pooled monthly and assayed for CPV using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods. These insects were found to be positive for CPV every month from February through the end of November 2011. Fly vector behavior and seasonality were documented and potential environmental risk factors were evaluated. Statistical analyses were conducted to compare the mean numbers of each of the three fly families captured, and after determining fly CPV status (positive or negative), it was determined whether there were significant relationships between numbers of flies captured, seasonal numbers of CPV cases, temperature and rainfall. Flies were also sampled at thirty-seven additional canine facility surveillance locations (ASL) and at four non-canine animal industry locations serving as negative field controls. Canine facility risk factors were identified and evaluated. Statistical analyses were conducted on the number of CPV cases reported within the past year

  9. Wings and Flying in Immersive VR - Controller Type, Sound Effects and Experienced Ownership and Agency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sikström, Erik; Götzen, Amalia De; Serafin, Stefania

    An experiment investigated the subjective experiences of ownership and agency of a pair of virtual wings attached to a motion controlled avatar in an immersive virtual reality setup. A between groups comparison of two ways of controlling the movement of the wings and flight ability. One where...... their experienced embodiment of the wings on a body ownership and agency questionnaire. The results shows significant differences between the controllers in some of the questionnaire items and that adding self-produced sounds to the avatar, slightly changed the subjects evaluations....... the subjects achieved the wing motion and flight ability by using a hand-held video game controller and the other by moving the shoulder. Through four repetitions of a flight task with varying amounts of self-produced audio feedback (from the movement of the virtual limbs), the subjects evaluated...

  10. Resilience of Urban Smart Grids Involving Multiple Control Loops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob Theilgaard; Pillai, Jayakrishnan Radhakrishna; Schwefel, Hans-Peter

    2016-01-01

    Intelligent control of energy distribution grids is implemented via a hierarchy of control loops with different input values and different control targets, which also work on different time-scales. This control is enabled by a bi-directional communication flow, which can be interrupted due to ICT...

  11. ANALYSIS OF FLYING BIKE

    OpenAIRE

    Momin Irfan Ali Nasir Husain *1, Shah mohd. Rafique rahmatullah *2, Naumanulhaq Barkatullah Shaikh *3, Khatib Mohd. Azimuddin Najimuddin *4, Ansari Mohammad Naasir Shamsudduha *5, Ansari Mohammad Parvez Abdul Qayyum*6, Momin Mohammad Rayyan Mohammad Shakeel*7, Ansari Peer Mohammed Munna *8, Prof. Mohd. Musharraf Aamir

    2016-01-01

    Flying Bike vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) type machine which also follows Newton’s third law. It is thought of as a conventional type of aircraft with special features added to enable it to rise vertically during take-off and to land from a vertical descent.  It flies with two propellers located at front and back side. These propellers are having hovering abilities. The vehicle is controlled by tilting the propellers by using lever mechanism. Rotation is carried out by diffe...

  12. Flying control of small-type helicopter by detecting its in-air natural features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinthaka Premachandra

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Control of a small type helicopter is an interesting research area in unmanned aerial vehicle development. This study aims to detect a more typical helicopter unequipped with markers as a means by which to resolve the various issues of the prior studies. Accordingly, we propose a method of detecting the helicopter location and pose through using an infrastructure camera to recognize its in-air natural features such as ellipse traced by the rotation of the helicopter's propellers. A single-rotor system helicopter was used as the controlled airframe in our experiments. Here, helicopter location is measured by detecting the main rotor ellipse center and pose is measured following relationship between the main rotor ellipse and the tail rotor ellipse. Following these detection results we confirmed the hovering control possibility of the helicopter through experiments.

  13. The South African fruit fly action plan: area-wide suppression and exotic species surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Brian N., E-mail: barnesb@arc.agric.z [ARC Infruitec-Nietvoorbij Institute for Fruit, Vine and Wine, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Venter, Jan-Hendrik, E-mail: janhendrikv@nda.agric.z [Directorate Plant Health, Pretoria (South Africa)

    2006-07-01

    programme has been started, focusing on detection at ports of entry and in fruit production areas. Any detection of an exotic fruit fly will trigger a reaction plan involving a delimiting survey, a feasibility study, quarantine measures and control actions. These initiatives signal significant progress towards implementing programmes aimed at creating fruit fly-free areas and putting in place exotic fruit fly detection and action plans that will protect the valuable South African export fruit industry. (author)

  14. Reactionless camera inspection with a free-flying space robot under reaction null-space motion control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sone, Hiroki; Nenchev, Dragomir

    2016-11-01

    The possibility of implementing reactionless motion control w.r.t. base orientation of a free-flying space robot in practical tasks is addressed. It is shown that such possibility depends strongly on the kinematic/dynamic design parameters as well as on the mission task. A successful implementation of a camera inspection task is reported. The presence of kinematic redundancy and the manipulator attachment position are shown to play important roles. More specifically, for a manipulator arm with a typical seven degree-of-freedom (DoF) kinematic structure, it is shown that two motion patterns, wrist reorientation and folding/unfolding of the arm, result in almost reactionless motion. The orientation pattern is adopted as the main task for camera inspection, while the remaining four DoFs are used to ensure complete reactionless motion and to minimize the position errors. Since the composition of these tasks introduces the so-called algorithmic singularities, two methods are suggested to alleviate the problem. Furthermore, it is shown that other types of singularities may also be introduced in case of an inappropriate choice of the manipulator attachment position. At the end, numerical analysis is performed to show that reactionless motion provides an advantage in terms of kinetic energy as well.

  15. Efficacy and duration of three residual insecticides on cotton duck and vinyl tent surfaces for control of the sand fly Phlebotomus papatasi (Diptera: Psychodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayed, Abdel Baset B; Hoel, David F; Tageldin, Reham A; Fawaz, Emaldeldin Y; Furman, Barry D; Hogsette, Jerome A; Bernier, Ulrich R

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the toxicity and duration of 3 residual insecticides against the Old World sand fly, Phlebotomus papatasi, an important vector of cutaneous leishmaniasis, on 2 types of tent material used by the US military in Afghanistan and the Middle East. Vinyl and cotton duck tent surfaces were treated at maximum labeled rates of lambda-cyhalothrin (Demand CS, Zeneca Inc, Wilmington, DE), bifenthrin (Talstar P Professional, FMC Corporation, Philadelphia, PA) and permethrin (Insect Repellent, Clothing Application, 40%), then subsequently stored in indoor, shaded spaces at room temperature (60%-70% relative humidity (RH), 22°C-25°C), and under sunlight and ambient air temperatures outdoors (20%-30% RH, 29°C-44°C). Insecticide susceptible colony flies (F110) obtained from the insectary of US Naval Medical Research Unit No. 3, Cairo, Egypt, were exposed to treated tent surfaces for 30-minute periods twice monthly for up to 5 months, then once monthly thereafter, using the World Health Organization cone assay. Lambda-cyhalothrin treated cotton duck tent material stored indoors killed P. papatasi for 8 months, while the complementary sun-exposed cotton duck material killed adult flies for 1 month before the efficacy dropped to less than 80%. Sand fly mortality on permethrin- and bifenthrin-treated cotton duck decreased below 80% after 2 weeks exposure to sunlight. Shade-stored permethrin and bifenthrin cotton duck material killed more than 80% of test flies through 5 months before mortality rates decreased substantially. Vinyl tent material provided limited control (less than 50% mortality) for less than 1 month with all treatment and storage regimes. Lambda-cyhalothrin-treated cotton duck tent material provided the longest control and produced the highest overall mortalities (100% for 8 months (shaded), more than 90% for 1 month (sunlight-exposed)) of both cotton duck and vinyl tents.

  16. Tunable shear thickening: from understanding suspension thickening to controlling viscosity on the fly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Itai; Lin, Neil; Ness, Chris; Sun, Jin; Cates, Mike; Guy, Ben; Hermes, Michiel; Poon, Wilson

    2016-11-01

    Whether contact forces play a role in shear thickening of colloidal systems where hydrodynamic contributions are thought to dominate remains highly controversial. By performing shear reversal experiments on silica and latex colloidal particles, we directly measure the hydrodynamic and contact force contributions to the suspension viscosity. We find that contact forces are not only present, but dominate the shear thickening response. More importantly, this finding directly suggests a strategy for active controlling the thickening viscosities of dense suspensions. We demonstrate that by strategic imposition of a high-frequency and low-amplitude shear perturbation orthogonal to the primary shearing flow, we can largely eradicate thickening. The orthogonal shear effectively becomes a regulator for controlling thickening in the suspension, allowing the viscosity to be reduced by up to two decades on demand.

  17. On-the-Fly Massively Multitemporal Change Detection Using Statistical Quality Control Charts and Landsat Data

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    One challenge to implementing spectral change detection algorithms using multitemporal Landsat data is that key dates and periods are often missing from the record due to weather disturbances and lapses in continuous coverage. This paper presents a method that utilizes residuals from harmonic regression over years of Landsat data, in conjunction with statistical quality control charts, to signal subtle disturbances in vegetative cover. These charts are able to detect changes from both defores...

  18. Evaluation of insect associated and plant growth promoting fungi in the control of cabbage root flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razinger, Jaka; Lutz, Matthias; Schroers, Hans-Josef; Urek, Gregor; Grunder, Jürg

    2014-08-01

    Delia radicum L. or cabbage maggot is an important pest for Brassicaceous crops. There are currently no registered chemical control agents for its control in Slovenia. Fungal control agents for cabbage maggot were therefore sought among nine rhizosphere-compatible and plant growth-promoting, soil-adapted, and entomopathogenic species to cabbage maggots and were assayed in in vitro and soil laboratory bioassays. In the in vitro tests, the conidial suspensions were applied directly to cabbage maggot eggs. The soil tests mimicked pathways of natural exposure of various insect life stages to the fungal strains. Conidial concentrations used in soil tests were comparable to economic rates for in-furrow application. The following fungi were tested: Trichoderma atroviride P. Karst. (2 isolates), Trichoderma koningiopsis Samuels, C. Suárez & H.C. Evans (1), Trichoderma gamsii Samuels & Druzhin. (3), Beauveria brongniartii (Saccardo) Petch (1), Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo-Crivelli) Vuillemin (2), Metarhizium robertsii J.F. Bisch., Rehner & Humber (1), Metarhizium anisopliae (Metschn.) Sorokin (4), Purpureocillium lilacinum (Thom) Luangsa-ard, Houbraken, Hywel-Jones & Samson (2), and Clonostachys solani f. nigrovirens (J.F.H. Beyma) Schroers (2). Abbott's corrected mortality in the in vitro tests ranged from 0.0 +/- 18.9 to 47.6 +/- 9.0% and in the soil test from 2.4 +/- 13.0 to 68.2 +/- 21.5%. Seven isolates (B. bassiana [isolate 1174], C. solani [1828], M. anisopliae [1154 and 1868], T. atroviride [1872], T. koningiopsis [1874], and T. gamsii [1876]) caused significant cabbage maggot mortality in either in vitro or soil tests. The importance of fungal ecology as a criterion during the screening of potential biological control agents is discussed.

  19. Resilience of Urban Smart Grids Involving Multiple Control Loops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob Theilgaard; Pillai, Jayakrishnan Radhakrishna; Schwefel, Hans-Peter

    2016-01-01

    Intelligent control of energy distribution grids is implemented via a hierarchy of control loops with different input values and different control targets, which also work on different time-scales. This control is enabled by a bi-directional communication flow, which can be interrupted due to ICT...... attacks. It is therefore necessary to analyze and understand the emergent behavior resulting from the interplay of the different control loops and how this behavior may change under different communication scenarios. The simulation scenario considered in this paper is a medium and low voltage grid...... in island mode with a limited grid buffer capacity subjected to ICT attacks. First the interplay of four different control loops that all react to time-varying prices is analyzed. A co-simulation framework is applied to specifically investigate the sensitivity of the emergent grid behavior to extreme...

  20. Fly ash quality and utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barta, L.E.; Lachner, L.; Wenzel, G.B. [Inst. for Energy, Budapest (Hungary); Beer, M.J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The quality of fly ash is of considerable importance to fly ash utilizers. The fly ash puzzolanic activity is one of the most important properties that determines the role of fly ash as a binding agent in the cementing process. The puzzolanic activity, however is a function of fly ash particle size and chemical composition. These parameters are closely related to the process of fly ash formation in pulverized coal fired furnaces. In turn, it is essential to understand the transformation of mineral matter during coal combustion. Due to the particle-to-particle variation of coal properties and the random coalescence of mineral particles, the properties of fly ash particles e.g. size, SiO{sub 2} content, viscosity can change considerably from particle to particle. These variations can be described by the use of the probability theory. Since the mean values of these randomly changing parameters are not sufficient to describe the behavior of individual fly ash particles during the formation of concrete, therefore it is necessary to investigate the distribution of these variables. Examples of these variations were examined by the Computer Controlled Scanning Electron Microscopy (CCSEM) for particle size and chemical composition for Texas lignite and Eagel Butte mineral matter and fly ash. The effect of combustion on the variations of these properties for both the fly ash and mineral matter were studied by using a laminar flow reactor. It is shown in our paper, that there are significant variations (about 40-50% around the mean values) of the above-listed properties for both coal samples. By comparing the particle size and chemical composition distributions of the mineral matter and fly ash, it was possible to conclude that for the Texas lignite mineral matter, the combustion did not effect significantly the distribution of these properties, however, for the Eagel Butte coal the combustion had a major impact on these mineral matter parameters.

  1. Flying Cities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciger, Jan

    2006-01-01

    The Flying Cities artistic installation brings to life imaginary cities made from the speech input of visitors. In this article we describe the original interactive process generating real time 3D graphics from spectators' vocal inputs. This example of cross-modal interaction has the nice property...... of providing a tangible correspondence between the two spaces. This interaction mean has proved to suit the artistic expression well but it also aims at providing anyone with a pleasant and stimulating feedback from speech activity, a new medium for creativity and a way to visually perceive a vocal performance....... As the feedback we have received when presenting Flying Cities was very positive, our objective now is to cross the bridge between art and the potential applications to the rehabilitation of people with reduced mobility or for the treatment of language impairments....

  2. Image based control of the “PINOCCHIO” experimental free flying platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, Marco; Palmerini, Giovanni B.; Monti, Riccardo; Gasbarri, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    A free floating platform is realized with a pneumatic suspension system which enables a two-dimensional test of complex space operations, such as rendezvous and docking. The platform is equipped with a IMU and actuated via cold gas thrusters. In addition, an on-board camera is used to acquire a target and its image is processed for evaluating the control actions needed to reach it. A technique for determining the relative position and velocity with respect to target using the same visual device is proposed and realized. The novel algorithms and relevant experimental results are presented. The tested accuracy of the relative navigation system is not very high, but the guidance algorithm, which is image based and has just a weak dependence on the position information, is robust enough to perform a successful maneuver. The error between the final acquired target image and the desired final target image is of the order of one pixel, notwithstanding all the testbed disturbances.

  3. The ability of insecticidal ear-tags, collar, and pour-ons to control flies (Diptera; Musci¬dae) and to prevent Summer Mastitis in heifers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Jørgen Brøchner; Jensen, Karl-Martin Vagn

    1987-01-01

    Jespersen, J.B. and K.-M. Vagn Jensen, 1987. The ability of insectici¬dal ear-tags, collar, and pour-ons to control flies (Diptera; Musci¬dae) and to prevent Summer Mastitis in heifers. In Thomas, G., H. J. Over, U. Vecht and P. Nansen (Editor): Summer Masitits (ISBN O-89838-982-8) pp. 166-172....

  4. Analytical redundancy management mechanization and flight data analysis for the F-8 digital fly-by-wire aircraft flight control sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckert, J. C.

    1983-01-01

    The details are presented of an onboard digital computer algorithm designed to reliably detect and isolate the first failure in a duplex set of flight control sensors aboard the NASA F-8 digital fly-by-wire aircraft. The algorithm's successful flight test program is summarized, and specific examples are presented of algorithm behavior in response to software-induced signal faults, both with and without aircraft parameter modeling errors.

  5. The ability of insecticidal ear-tags, collar, and pour-ons to control flies (Diptera; Musci¬dae) and to prevent Summer Mastitis in heifers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Jørgen Brøchner; Jensen, Karl-Martin Vagn

    1987-01-01

    Jespersen, J.B. and K.-M. Vagn Jensen, 1987. The ability of insectici¬dal ear-tags, collar, and pour-ons to control flies (Diptera; Musci¬dae) and to prevent Summer Mastitis in heifers. In Thomas, G., H. J. Over, U. Vecht and P. Nansen (Editor): Summer Masitits (ISBN O-89838-982-8) pp. 166-172....

  6. Religious Involvement and Perceptions of Control: Evidence from the Miami-Dade Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoe, Anita E; Hill, Terrence D; Mossakowski, Krysia N; Johnson, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    This study uses data collected through the 2011 Miami-Dade Health Survey (n = 444) to test whether religious involvement is associated with three distinct control beliefs. Regression results suggest that people who exhibit high levels of religious involvement tend to report higher levels of the sense of control, self-control, and the health locus of control than respondents who exhibit low levels of religious involvement. Although this study suggests that religious involvement can promote perceptions of control over one's own life, this pattern is apparently concentrated at the high end of the distribution for religious involvement, indicating a threshold effect.

  7. Control and follow-up of fly ash roads - Communication and Acceptance; Kontroll och uppfoeljning av askvaegar - Kommunikation och acceptans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macsik, Josef; Edeskaer, Tommy; Hellman, Fredrik

    2011-10-15

    The report is aimed at those who perform or plan to perform stabilization of the unbound layers or terrace gravel roads or industrial areas, with binder where a major binder component is fly ash from bio-peat or coal fuel. Stabilization of unbound layers of road structures is a promising technique from technical, economical and environmental point of view. The need of demonstration projects on road sections to show the relationship of laboratory measurements and field measurements are great in order to promote this stabilization technique. Results from follow-up of several stabilized distances and industrial surfaces are presented, where the fly ash is a binder component. The results complement the guidance, Munde et al. (2006) respect to durability, environmental characteristics on several years of perspective. Our hope is that report will serve as a support for the implementation of demonstration projects of stabilized terrace or unbound layers of fly ash as binder component.

  8. Virology, Epidemiology and Pathology of Glossina Hytrosavirus, and Its Control Prospects in Laboratory Colonies of the Tsetse Fly, Glossina pallidipes (Diptera; Glossinidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew G. Parker

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Glossina hytrosavirus (family Hytrosaviridae is a double-stranded DNA virus with rod-shaped, enveloped virions. Its 190 kbp genome encodes 160 putative open reading frames. The virus replicates in the nucleus, and acquires a fragile envelope in the cell cytoplasm. Glossina hytrosavirus was first isolated from hypertrophied salivary glands of the tsetse fly, Glossina pallidipes Austen (Diptera; Glossinidae collected in Kenya in 1986. A certain proportion of laboratory G. pallidipes flies infected by Glossina hytrosavirus develop hypertrophied salivary glands and midgut epithelial cells, gonadal anomalies and distorted sex-ratios associated with reduced insemination rates, fecundity and lifespan. These symptoms are rare in wild tsetse populations. In East Africa, G. pallidipes is one of the most important vectors of African trypanosomosis, a debilitating zoonotic disease that afflicts 37 sub-Saharan African countries. There is a large arsenal of control tactics available to manage tsetse flies and the disease they transmit. The sterile insect technique (SIT is a robust control tactic that has shown to be effective in eradicating tsetse populations when integrated with other control tactics in an area-wide integrated approach. The SIT requires production of sterile male flies in large production facilities. To supply sufficient numbers of sterile males for the SIT component against G. pallidipes, strategies have to be developed that enable the management of the Glossina hytrosavirus in the colonies. This review provides a historic chronology of the emergence and biogeography of Glossina hytrosavirus, and includes researches on the infectomics (defined here as the functional and structural genomics and proteomics and pathobiology of the virus. Standard operation procedures for viral management in tsetse mass-rearing facilities are proposed and a future outlook is sketched.

  9. Nepetalactones from essential oil of Nepeta cataria represent a stable fly feeding and oviposition repellent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, J J; Berkebile, D R; Dunlap, C A; Zhang, A; Boxler, D; Tangtrakulwanich, K; Behle, R W; Baxendale, F; Brewer, G

    2012-06-01

    The stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.) (Diptera: Muscidae), is one of the most serious pests to livestock. It feeds mainly on cattle and causes significant economic losses in the cattle industry. Standard stable fly control involving insecticides and sanitation is usually costly and often has limited effectiveness. As we continue to evaluate and develop safer fly control strategies, the present study reports on the effectiveness of catnip (Nepeta cataria L.) oil and its constituent compounds, nepetalactones, as stable fly repellents. The essential oil of catnip reduced the feeding of stable flies by >96% in an in vitro bioassay system, compared with other sesquiterpene-rich plant oils (e.g. amyris and sandalwood). Catnip oil demonstrated strong repellency against stable flies relative to other chemicals for repelling biting insects, including isolongifolenone, 2-methylpiperidinyl-3-cyclohexen-1-carboxamide and (1S,2'S)-2-methylpiperidinyl-3-cyclohexen-1-carboxamide. The repellency against stable flies of the most commonly used mosquito repellent, DEET, was relatively low. In field trials, two formulations of catnip oil provided >95% protection and were effective for up to 6 h when tested on cattle. Catnip oil also acted as a strong oviposition repellent and reduced gravid stable fly oviposition by 98%. Published 2011. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  10. Comprehensive flood control involving citizens in a Japanese watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Sampei; Shimatani, Yukihiro; Watanabe, Ryoichi; Moriyama, Toshiyuki; Minagawa, Tomoko; Kakudo, Kumiko; Yamashita, Terukazu

    2013-01-01

    In July 2009, the city of Fukuoka, Japan experienced a flood disaster along the Hii River, which runs through densely populated, concrete-covered areas of the city. The drainage system was overwhelmed and the river overflowed due to heavy rainfall and rapid runoff. The event led citizens in its watershed to plan and implement comprehensive flood control. The plan aims not only to mitigate floods but also to revitalize the river environment and populated communities in urban areas. This study reports the activities led by the citizens. They organized and carried out civic forums, workshops, and fieldwork to share views as to how the flood disaster was caused, how floods in the watershed should be controlled, and how the river environment should be rehabilitated. This study illuminates how people, including the flood victims and municipal engineers, can change drastically and communicate effectively in the course of discussing and implementing the comprehensive flood control measures.

  11. Visual Features Involving Motion Seen from Airport Control Towers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Stephen R.; Liston, Dorion

    2010-01-01

    Visual motion cues are used by tower controllers to support both visual and anticipated separation. Some of these cues are tabulated as part of the overall set of visual features used in towers to separate aircraft. An initial analyses of one motion cue, landing deceleration, is provided as a basis for evaluating how controllers detect and use it for spacing aircraft on or near the surface. Understanding cues like it will help determine if they can be safely used in a remote/virtual tower in which their presentation may be visually degraded.

  12. The influence of electrodialytic remediation on dioxin (PCDD/PCDF) levels in fly ash and air pollution control residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dias-Ferreira, Celia; Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie; Jensen, Pernille Erland

    2016-01-01

    dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDF), and how these levels impact on the valorization options for fly ash and APC residue.PCDD/PCDF levels in the original residues ranged between 4.85 and 197 ng g-1, being higher for the electrostatic precipitator fly ash. The toxic equivalent...... materials dissolve, leaving behind the non-water soluble compounds, such as PCDD/PCDF. According to the Basel Convention, PCDD/PCDF levels in these materials is low (valorized, for instance as construction material, provided end...

  13. The utility of microsatellite DNA markers for the evaluation of area-wide integrated pest management using SIT for the fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), control programs in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aketarawong, Nidchaya; Chinvinijkul, Suksom; Orankanok, Watchreeporn; Guglielmino, Carmela Rosalba; Franz, Gerald; Malacrida, Anna Rodolfa; Thanaphum, Sujinda

    2011-01-01

    The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), is a key pest that causes reduction of the crop yield within the international fruit market. Fruit flies have been suppressed by two Area-Wide Integrated Pest Management programs in Thailand using Sterile Insect Technique (AW-IPM-SIT) since the late 1980s and the early 2000s. The projects' planning and evaluation usually rely on information from pest status, distribution, and fruit infestation. However, the collected data sometimes does not provide enough detail to answer management queries and public concerns, such as the long term sterilization efficacy of the released fruit fly, skepticism about insect migration or gene flow across the buffer zone, and the re-colonisation possibility of the fruit fly population within the core area. Established microsatellite DNA markers were used to generate population genetic data for the analysis of the fruit fly sampling from several control areas, and non-target areas, as well as the mass-rearing facility. The results suggested limited gene flow (m flies in the control areas and flies captured outside. In addition, no genetic admixture was revealed from the mass-reared colony flies from the flies within the control area, which supports the effectiveness of SIT. The control pests were suppressed to low density and showed weak bottleneck footprints although they still acquired a high degree of genetic variation. Potential pest resurgence from fragmented micro-habitats in mixed fruit orchards rather than pest incursion across the buffer zone has been proposed. Therefore, a suitable pest control effort, such as the SIT program, should concentrate on the hidden refuges within the target area.

  14. 22 CFR 40.21 - Crimes involving moral turpitude and controlled substance violators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Crimes involving moral turpitude and controlled... and Related Grounds-Conviction of Certain Crimes § 40.21 Crimes involving moral turpitude and controlled substance violators. (a) Crimes involving moral turpitude—(1) Acts must constitute a crime under...

  15. Predicting Fruit Fly's Sensing Rate From Insect Flight Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jane; Chang, Song

    2013-11-01

    Without sensory feedbacks, flies cannot fly. Exactly how sensory feedback controls work in flying insects is a complex puzzle to solve. What do insects measure in order to stabilize their flight? What kinds of neural computations and muscle activities are involved in order to correct their flight course or to turn? How often and how fast do animals adjust their wings to remain stable? To understand the algorithms used by insects to control their dynamic instability, we have developed a simulation tool to study flapping flight, where motions of the insect body and wings are coupled instantaneously. To stabilize the flight in the simulation, we construct a control algorithm that modulates wing motion based on discrete measurements of the body-pitch orientation. Our simulations give theoretical bounds both on the sensing rate and the delay time between sensing and actuation. Interpreting these findings together with experimental results on fruit flies' reaction time and sensory motor reflexes, we give a sharper bound on the sensing rate and further reason that fruit flies sense their kinematic states every wing-beat in order to stabilize their flight.

  16. Flying Cities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciger, Jan

    2006-01-01

    of providing a tangible correspondence between the two spaces. This interaction mean has proved to suit the artistic expression well but it also aims at providing anyone with a pleasant and stimulating feedback from speech activity, a new medium for creativity and a way to visually perceive a vocal performance......The Flying Cities artistic installation brings to life imaginary cities made from the speech input of visitors. In this article we describe the original interactive process generating real time 3D graphics from spectators' vocal inputs. This example of cross-modal interaction has the nice property...

  17. Flying Fortress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    当欧洲的年轻人想到关于德国的两种熊,一个是传统的布娃娃熊,另一个就是充满欧洲街头墙上的Teddy熊涂鸦,而这个涂鸦熊的创作者就是著名的涂鸦艺术家“Flying Fortress”,他称这些熊军队为“Teddy Tmops”。

  18. Development and laboratory verification of control algorithms for formation flying configuration with a single-input control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovchinnikov, M.; Bindel, D.; Ivanov, D.; Smirnov, G.; Theil, S.; Zaramenskikh, I.

    2010-11-01

    Once been orbited, the technological nanosatellite TNS-0 no. 1 is supposed to be used in one of the next missions for the demonstration of orbital maneuvering capability to eliminate a secular relative motion of two satellites due to the J2 harmonic of the Earth gravitational field. It is assumed that the longitudinal axis of the satellite is stabilized along the induction vector of the geomagnetic field and a thruster engine is installed along this axis. Continuous and impulsive thruster control algorithms eliminating the secular relative motion have been developed. Special equipment was developed in ZARM for demonstration and laboratory testing of the satellite motion identification and control algorithms. The facility consists of a horizontal smooth table and mobile mock-up that enables to glide over the table surface due to compressed air stored in on-board pressure tanks. Compressed air is used to control the translation and attitude motion of the mock-up equipped with a number of pulse thrusters. In this work a dynamic model for mock-up controlled motion over the table is developed. This allows us to simulate a relative motion of a pair of TNS-0 type nanosatellites in the plane of the orbit.

  19. Case-control study of pathogens involved in piglet diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Vera L A; Bersano, Josete G; Carvalho, Aline F; Catroxo, Márcia H B; Chiebao, Daniela P; Gregori, Fábio; Miyashiro, Simone; Nassar, Alessandra F C; Oliveira, Trícia M F S; Ogata, Renato A; Scarcelli, Eliana P; Tonietti, Paloma O

    2016-01-11

    Diarrhea in piglets directly affects commercial swine production. The disease results from the interaction of pathogens with the host immune system and is also affected by management procedures. Several pathogenic agents such as Campylobacter spp., Clostridium perfringens, Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., group A rotavirus (RV-A), coronaviruses (transmissible gastroenteritis virus; porcine epidemic diarrhea virus), as well as nematode and protozoan parasites, can be associated with disease cases. All bacterial, viral, protozoan, and parasitic agents here investigated, with the exception of Salmonella spp. as well as both coronaviruses, were detected in varying proportions in piglet fecal samples, and positive animals were equally distributed between case and control groups. A statistically significant difference between case and control groups was found only for Cystoisospora suis (p = 0.034) and Eimeria spp. (p = 0.047). When co-infections were evaluated, a statistically significant difference was found only for C. perfringens β2 and C. suis (p = 0.014). The presence of pathogens in piglets alone does not determine the occurrence of diarrhea episodes. Thus, the indiscriminate use of antibiotic and anthelminthic medication should be re-evaluated. This study also reinforces the importance of laboratory diagnosis and correct interpretation of results as well as the relevance of control and prophylactic measures.

  20. Molecular Networks Involved in the Immune Control of BK Polyomavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Girmanova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BK polyomavirus infection is the important cause of virus-related nephropathy following kidney transplantation. BK virus reactivates in 30%–80% of kidney transplant recipients resulting in BK virus-related nephropathy in 1%–10% of cases. Currently, the molecular processes associated with asymptomatic infections in transplant patients infected with BK virus remain unclear. In this study we evaluate intrarenal molecular processes during different stages of BKV infection. The gene expression profiles of 90 target genes known to be associated with immune response were evaluated in kidney graft biopsy material using TaqMan low density array. Three patient groups were examined: control patients with no evidence of BK virus reactivation (n=11, infected asymptomatic patients (n=9, and patients with BK virus nephropathy (n=10. Analysis of biopsies from asymptomatic viruria patients resulted in the identification of 5 differentially expressed genes (CD3E, CD68, CCR2, ICAM-1, and SKI (P<0.05, and functional analysis showed a significantly heightened presence of costimulatory signals (e.g., CD40/CD40L; P<0.05. Gene ontology analysis revealed several biological networks associated with BKV immune control in comparison to the control group. This study demonstrated that asymptomatic BK viruria is associated with a different intrarenal regulation of several genes implicating in antiviral immune response.

  1. Molecular networks involved in the immune control of BK polyomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girmanova, Eva; Brabcova, Irena; Klema, Jiri; Hribova, Petra; Wohlfartova, Mariana; Skibova, Jelena; Viklicky, Ondrej

    2012-01-01

    BK polyomavirus infection is the important cause of virus-related nephropathy following kidney transplantation. BK virus reactivates in 30%-80% of kidney transplant recipients resulting in BK virus-related nephropathy in 1%-10% of cases. Currently, the molecular processes associated with asymptomatic infections in transplant patients infected with BK virus remain unclear. In this study we evaluate intrarenal molecular processes during different stages of BKV infection. The gene expression profiles of 90 target genes known to be associated with immune response were evaluated in kidney graft biopsy material using TaqMan low density array. Three patient groups were examined: control patients with no evidence of BK virus reactivation (n = 11), infected asymptomatic patients (n = 9), and patients with BK virus nephropathy (n = 10). Analysis of biopsies from asymptomatic viruria patients resulted in the identification of 5 differentially expressed genes (CD3E, CD68, CCR2, ICAM-1, and SKI) (P < 0.05), and functional analysis showed a significantly heightened presence of costimulatory signals (e.g., CD40/CD40L; P < 0.05). Gene ontology analysis revealed several biological networks associated with BKV immune control in comparison to the control group. This study demonstrated that asymptomatic BK viruria is associated with a different intrarenal regulation of several genes implicating in antiviral immune response.

  2. Intrinsic Membrane Targeting of the Flagellar Export ATPase FliI: Interaction with Acidic Phospholipids and FliH

    OpenAIRE

    Auvray, Frédéric; Ozin, Amanda J.; Claret, Laurent; Hughes, Colin

    2002-01-01

    The specialised ATPase FliI is central to export of flagellar axial protein subunits during flagellum assembly. We establish the normal cellular location of FliI and its regulatory accessory protein FliH in motile Salmonella typhimurium, and ascertain the regions involved in FliH2/FliI heterotrimerisation. Both FliI and FliH localised to the cytoplasmic membrane in the presence and in the absence of proteins making up the flagellar export machinery and basal body. Membrane association was tig...

  3. A Novel Carbamate Insecticide with Superior Selectivity for Cattle Tick (Boophilus microplus) and Sand Fly (Phlebotomus papatasi) Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cattle tick, Boophilus microplus, and the sand fly, Phlebotomus papatasi (Pp), are vectors of infectious agents affecting cattle and humans, respectively. The purpose of this study was to characterize the inhibitor profile of acetylcholinesterases from R. microplus(BmAChE1) and Pp (PpAchE) for c...

  4. Visual acuity of fly photoreceptors in natural conditions - dependence on UV sensitizing pigment and light-controlling pupil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stavenga, DG

    2004-01-01

    The effect of the UV-absorbing sensitizing pigment fly photoreceptors on absolute, spectral and angular sensitivity was investigated with a wave-optics model for the facet lens-rhabdomere system. When sky light was used as a UV-rich light source, one sensitizing pigment molecule per rhodopsin increa

  5. Perinatal Development of the Motor Systems Involved in Postural Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Vinay

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Motor behaviors of some species, such as the rat and the human baby, are quite immature at birth. Here we review recent data on some of the mechanisms underlying the postnatal maturation of posture in the rat, in particular the development of pathways descending from the brain stem and projecting onto the lumbar enlargement of the spinal cord. A short-lasting depletion in serotonin affects both posture and the excitability of motoneurons. Here we try to extrapolate to human development and suggest that the abnormalities in motor control observed in childhood—e.g, deficits in motor coordination—might have their roots in the prenatal period, in particular serotonin depletion due to exposure to several environmental and toxicological factors during pregnancy.

  6. Perinatal development of the motor systems involved in postural control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinay, Laurent; Ben-Mabrouk, Faïza; Brocard, Frédéric; Clarac, François; Jean-Xavier, Céline; Pearlstein, Edouard; Pflieger, Jean-François

    2005-01-01

    Motor behaviors of some species, such as the rat and the human baby, are quite immature at birth. Here we review recent data on some of the mechanisms underlying the postnatal maturation of posture in the rat, in particular the development of pathways descending from the brain stem and projecting onto the lumbar enlargement of the spinal cord. A short-lasting depletion in serotonin affects both posture and the excitability of motoneurons. Here we try to extrapolate to human development and suggest that the abnormalities in motor control observed in childhood--e.g. deficits in motor coordination--might have their roots in the prenatal period, in particular serotonin depletion due to exposure to several environmental and toxicological factors during pregnancy.

  7. Chemotactic Control of the Two Flagellar Systems of Rhodobacter sphaeroides Is Mediated by Different Sets of CheY and FliM Proteins▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Campo, Ana Martínez; Ballado, Teresa; de la Mora, Javier; Poggio, Sebastian; Camarena, Laura; Dreyfus, Georges

    2007-01-01

    Rhodobacter sphaeroides expresses two different flagellar systems, a subpolar flagellum (fla1) and multiple polar flagella (fla2). These structures are encoded by different sets of flagellar genes. The chemotactic control of the subpolar flagellum (fla1) is mediated by three of the six different CheY proteins (CheY6, CheY4, or CheY3). We show evidence that CheY1, CheY2, and CheY5 control the chemotactic behavior mediated by fla2 flagella and that RSP6099 encodes the fla2 FliM protein. PMID:17890312

  8. From foraging to operant conditioning: a new computer-controlled Skinner box to study free-flying nectar gathering behavior in bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski, Michel B C; Abramson, Charles I

    2010-05-15

    The experimental study of nectar foraging behavior in free-flying bees requires the use of automated devices to control solution delivery and measure dependent variables associated with nectar gathering. We describe a new computer-controlled artificial flower and provide calibration data to measure the precision of the apparatus. Our device is similar to a "Skinner box" and we present data of an experiment where various amounts of a 50% sugar solution are presented randomly to individual bees. These data show large individual variations among subjects across several dependent variables. Finally, we discuss possible applications of our device to problems in behavioral sciences.

  9. Fly ash. Quality recycling material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomster, D.; Leisio, C.

    1996-11-01

    Imatran Voima`s coal-fired power plants not only generate power and heat but also produce fly ash which is suitable raw material for recycling. This material for recycling is produced in the flue gas cleaning process. It is economical and, thanks to close quality control, is suitable for use as a raw material in the building materials industry, in asphalt production, and in earthworks. Structures made from fly ash are also safe from an environmental point of view. (orig.)

  10. Fly ash. Quality recycling material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomster, D.; Leisio, C.

    1996-11-01

    Imatran Voima`s coal-fired power plants not only generate power and heat but also produce fly ash which is suitable raw material for recycling. This material for recycling is produced in the flue gas cleaning process. It is economical and, thanks to close quality control, is suitable for use as a raw material in the building materials industry, in asphalt production, and in earthworks. Structures made from fly ash are also safe from an environmental point of view. (orig.)

  11. Implementation of Autonomous GPS Guidance and Control for the Spacecraft Formation Flying%卫星编队飞行GPS自主导航和控制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢光谦; 休斯特·帕维斯; 戴维·福奥特

    2008-01-01

    The general relative orbit dynamics equation and GPS orbit observational equation onboard for spacecraft formation flying have been developed. The approach to the implementation of the autonomous ac-quisition control and autonomous maintenance control for formation flying using GPS code pseudoranges in-formation are presented. As a practical application of the models and method provided in this paper, the maintenance control of the Earth-Orbiter 1(EO-1)/Landsat 7 formation flying are designed and implemented by means of the discrete-time linear optimal output feedback control. For the actuator of the on/off type re-action jets, the implementation problem of the pulse-amplitude modulation is also studied. Simulation results of autonomous maintenance optimal output feedback control for 3-dimeusion orbit initial error status are shown. These simulation results certified the feasibility of the implementation of the autonomous maintenance control for EO-1/Landsat 7 formation flying by means of the discrete-time linear optimal output feedback control.%本文提出了一般相对轨道动力学方程和用于编队飞行的GPS星栽自主导航模型和算法.同时文章也提出了用GPS伪距测量信息实现卫星编队飞行的建立和保持的自主导航控制方法.其中包括用于编队飞行建立的非线性控制律和用于编队飞行保持的线性控制律.以及相应的估计器的算法.作为这些方法的一个实际应用,文章给出了EO-1/Lantlsat 7编队飞行的自主导航控制系统的设计和实现.一般情况下最优控制律的实现是需要变推力发动机的,在没有变推力发动机的情况下,本文特别给出并验证了用冲量等价的方法实现变推力发动机替代的可行性.上述设计已经过数字仿真的验证,证实了设计的正确性和实现的可行性.

  12. Difficulties in recruitment for a randomized controlled trial involving hysterosalpingography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmerhorst Frans M

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The usefulness of hysterosalpingography (HSG as routine investigation in the fertility work-up prior to laparoscopy and dye had been assessed in a randomized controlled trial. Recruiting subjects to the study was more difficult than anticipated. The objective of this study was to explore possible reasons for non-participation in the trial. Methods All newly referred subfertile women admitted to the Reproductive Medicine Clinic of Leiden University Medical Centre between 1 April 1997 and 31 December 1999, were eligible for the study. The reasons for non-participation were evaluated by scrutinizing the medical records. Results Out of 759 women, a total of 127 (17% agreed to participate in the trial. The most important reason for non-participation was because of exclusion criteria (73%. Other reasons were inattentive clinicians (3% and patient-associated reasons (24%. Patient refusal and indecisiveness to enroll in the study were the most common patient-associated reasons. The most frequently stated reason for trial refusal was reluctance to undergo laparoscopy and dye mainly due to issues related to anesthesia and scheduling of procedure. Conclusion Almost three-quarters of recruitment difficulties in this study were due to unavoidable reasons. To overcome the remaining avoidable reasons for non-participation, attention should be paid to appropriate instruction of the study protocol to the participating doctors and to provide adequate information, in layman's terms, to the patients. Reminding patients by notes or telephone calls for attending the clinic are helpful. It may be contingent upon tracing the reasons of clinicians and patients for non-participation to improve enrollment during a trial.

  13. The occurrence characteristics and integrated control measures of invasion fruit fly in Guinea-Bissau%几内亚比绍的入侵果实蝇发生特点及综合防治对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢远华; 朱穆君; 杨恒; Marcelino Waz; Julio Malam

    2012-01-01

    Guinea Bissau mango suffered serious damage from fruit flies,with invasion fruit fly being the dominant species.This paper introduces the occurrence characteristics and integrated control measures of invasion fruit fly in Guinea-Bissau.%几内亚比绍芒果遭受实蝇的严重危害,以入侵果实蝇为优势种。本文介绍了几内亚比绍的入侵果实蝇的发生危害特点及综合防治对策。

  14. Involvement of Consumer Groups in Tobacco Control: Russia and Belarus Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Yanin

    2017-05-01

    5. Cooperation of consumer organizations from Russia (KONFOP and Belarus (Belarus Consumer Society, launched to promote best Tobacco Control practices, according to FCTC provisions, is a success story of involvement of consumer groups in Tobacco Control.

  15. REAL-TIME SIGNAL PROCESSING FOR FLYING HEIGHT MEASUREMENT AND CONTROL IN HARD DRIVES SUBJECT TO SHOCK AND VIBRATION

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Amei

    2008-01-01

    Merged with duplicate record 10026.1/829 on 10.04.2017 by CS (TIS) Three readback signal detection methods are investigated for real-time flying height or head disk spacing variation measurement under vibration conditions. This is carried out by theoretical analysis, numerical simulation, and experimental study. The first method (amplitude detection) provides a simple way to study the head disk spacing change. The second method ( PW50 parameter estimation) can be used effective...

  16. Evaluation of the F-8 DFBW analytic redundancy sensor FDI algorithm using telemetry data. [Failure Detection and Identification for Digital Fly-By-Wire control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckert, J. C.; Desai, M. N.; Deyst, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    In this paper we present a reliable technique for failure detection and identification (FDI) for dual redundant flight control sensors aboard the NASA F-8 digital fly-by-wire (DFBW) aircraft, and we discuss the successful application of the technique to identifying failures injected on test flight telemetry data. The technique exploits the analytic redundancy which exists as relationships among variables being measured by dissimilar instruments. With straightforward modification the technique may be extended to provide failure monitoring of a single remaining sensor after the identified failure of its companion sensor.

  17. Evaluation of the F-8 DFBW analytic redundancy sensor FDI algorithm using telemetry data. [Failure Detection and Identification for Digital Fly-By-Wire control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckert, J. C.; Desai, M. N.; Deyst, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    In this paper we present a reliable technique for failure detection and identification (FDI) for dual redundant flight control sensors aboard the NASA F-8 digital fly-by-wire (DFBW) aircraft, and we discuss the successful application of the technique to identifying failures injected on test flight telemetry data. The technique exploits the analytic redundancy which exists as relationships among variables being measured by dissimilar instruments. With straightforward modification the technique may be extended to provide failure monitoring of a single remaining sensor after the identified failure of its companion sensor.

  18. Family involvement, internal control and agency costs – Evidences from China's listed family firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Wangfeng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the agency costs of 314 family firms listed on Shanghai and Shenzhen Stock Exchange in China. The results show that agency costs of family firms increase significantly with the enhancement of family's ownership and the separation of ownership and control, while family involvement in management can reduce the agency costs. By including the variable proxying internal control and the interaction term between internal control and family involvement in the empirical model, we still find that the effects of family involvement on agency costs are contingent on the quality of internal control.

  19. A hybrid fly fruit algorithm for PID control parameters optimization%一种用于PID控制参数优化的混合果蝇算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋娟

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve optimization performance of fly fruit optimization algorithm( FOA),put forward an assemblage of subsection optimization of a hybrid fly fruit optimization algorithm( hybrid FOA,HFOA),which introduces steady particle swarm optimization( PSO )algorithm into FOA parameters optimization of individual flying distance and smell concentration judgement value,meanwhile,the hybrid method adopts ITAE as fitness function and is applied to a class of unstable systems in PID control. Matlab simulation verification show that HFOA algorithm has fast convergence,good stability and high precision,and it verifies that application of HFOA in PID control parameter optimization are feasible and effective.%针对果蝇优化算法( FOA)收敛速度快但寻优精度低的缺点,为了改善果蝇算法的优化性能,提出一种混合果蝇优化算法( HFOA)。HFOA采用分段优化的思想,在优化过程后期采用收敛稳定性较好的粒子群优化( PSO)算法优化果蝇算法中果蝇个体飞行距离和味道浓度的判定值,采用误差性能指标积分准则ITAE作为适应度函数,并将优化方案应用于一类不稳定系统的PID控制。Matlab仿真验证表明:HFOA计算高效,具有良好的稳定性,收敛精度高,进而验证了HFOA应用于PID控制参数优化是可行而有效的。

  20. Do climatic and physical factors affect populations of the blow fly Chrysomya megacephala and house fly Musca domestica?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngoen-klan, Ratchadawan; Moophayak, Kittikhun; Klong-klaew, Tunwadee; Irvine, Kim N; Sukontason, Kabkaew L; Prangkio, Chira; Somboon, Pradya; Sukontason, Kom

    2011-11-01

    The blow fly, Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius), and house fly, Musca domestica L., are medically and forensically important flies. The population dynamic of these flies is essential for both control and forensical aspects. The aim of this study was to investigate the climatic and physical factors affecting the population trend of both species in Chiang Mai province, northern Thailand, using the Geographic Information System (GIS). Based on systematic random sampling, 18 study sites were selected in three districts (Mueang Chiang Mai, Mae Rim, and Hang Dong). Six land use types were involved in the study sites, i.e., disturbed mixed deciduous, mixed deciduous forest, mixed orchard, lowland village, city, and paddy field. Adult flies were sampled every 2 weeks using an in-house prototype reconstructable funnel trap. Two types of bait were used--one with fresh beef viscera for luring M. domestica and the other with 1-day tainted beef viscera for luring C. megacephala. Collections were conducted from May 2009 to May 2010, and analysis of climatic factors (temperature, relative humidity, and light intensity) was carried out. Correlation bivariate analysis was performed initially to determine the relationship between climatic factors and the number of flies. Consequently, an ordinary co-kriging approach, in ArcGIS 9.2, was performed to predict the spatial distribution of flies with land use and climatic factors as co-variables. A total of 63,158 flies were captured, with C. megacephala being the most common species collected (68.37%), while only 1.3% were M. domestica, thus proving that C. megacephala was the most abundant species in several land use types. A significantly higher number of females than males was found in both species. Fly populations can be collected throughout most of the year with a peak in late summer, which shows a positive relation to temperature but negative correlation with relative humidity. C. megacephala was predicted to be abundant in every

  1. Improving the cost-effectiveness of visual devices for the control of riverine tsetse flies, the major vectors of human African trypanosomiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Esterhuizen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Control of the Riverine (Palpalis group of tsetse flies is normally achieved with stationary artificial devices such as traps or insecticide-treated targets. The efficiency of biconical traps (the standard control device, 1×1 m black targets and small 25×25 cm targets with flanking nets was compared using electrocuting sampling methods. The work was done on Glossina tachinoides and G. palpalis gambiensis (Burkina Faso, G. fuscipes quanzensis (Democratic Republic of Congo, G. f. martinii (Tanzania and G. f. fuscipes (Kenya. The killing effectiveness (measured as the catch per m(2 of cloth for small targets plus flanking nets is 5.5-15X greater than for 1 m(2 targets and 8.6-37.5X greater than for biconical traps. This has important implications for the costs of control of the Riverine group of tsetse vectors of sleeping sickness.

  2. Role of fliY gene in pathogenicity-associated chemotaxis and colonization of Campylobacter jejuni%fliY基因在空肠弯曲菌致病性相关趋化和定植中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    楼宏强; 葛玉梅; 张金良; 严杰; 赵金方

    2013-01-01

    Objective; To construct a knockout fliY gene mutant strain of Campylobacter jejuni for determining the role of FliY protein in flagellar movement related to bacterial motility, chemotaxis and colonization. Methods; The plasmid pBluescript-Ⅱ-SK was used to construct the suicide plasmid; according to homologous exchange principle, the suicide plasmid was utilized to generate fliY gene knockout mutant(fliY) in Campylobacter jejuni strain NCTC11168. The fliY mutant strain was identified by PCR, sequencing and Western blotting. The chemotactic and colonizing abilities of fliY mutant were determined by colony migration test and bacterial chemotactic test in vitro, and colonization test in jejunum of mice. Results; The fliY- mutant strain showed a growth curve in medium similar to that of wild-type strain. PCR, sequencing and Western blotting assay confirmed that the fliY gene in fliY- mutant was deleted. Compared to the wild-type strain,the colonies of fliY- mutant on semisolid plate were much smaller(P <0. 05) ,the chemotactic ability of fliY mutant towards sodium deoxycholate and bovine bile was significantly attenuated ( P <0. 05 ) ,and the number of fliY mutant(CFU) in jejunal tissue specimens of the infected mice was significantly decreased(P <0.05). Conclusion; The function of C. jejuni fliY gene refers to controlling flagellar movement,which is involved in bacterial chemotaxis and colonization.%目的:构建空肠弯曲菌(Campylobacter jejuni)鞭毛马达开关蛋白FliY编码基因(fliY)敲除突变株,了解FliY蛋白控制细菌鞭毛运动的作用及其与细菌趋化和定植的关系.方法:采用pBluescript-Ⅱ-SK质粒构建用于敲除空肠弯曲菌NCTC11168株fliy基因的自杀质粒.根据同源交换原理,利用自杀质粒构建空肠弯曲菌fliY基因敲除突变株(fliY-).采用PCR、PCR产物测序与Western Blot,对fliY-突变株进行鉴定.采用体外菌落迁徙试验、细菌趋化试验以及小鼠空肠定植试验,检测fliY-突

  3. A silica/fly ash-based technology for controlling pyrite oxidation. Semi-annual, March 1, 1996 - August 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evangelou, V.P. [USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The overall objective is to develop methodologies by which metasilicate or fly ash may produce an effective coating on pyrite surfaces for inhibiting pyrite oxidation. During the past six months, the investigators produced wet chemistry evidence demonstrating that pyrite-HCO{sub 3} complexes promote pyrite oxidation. This is an important finding for their over all strategy in controlling pyrite oxidation because it suggests that pyrite microencapsulation is important in order to control oxidation in near cirumneutral pH environments produced by addition of alkaline material, e.g., fly ash. In their previous studies, the investigators reported that pyrite microencapsulation could be carried out by reacting pyrite with a pH buffered solution and in the presence of metasilicate. The coating formed on the surface of pyrite appeared to be an amorphous iron-oxide-silicate material which inhibited pyrite oxidation. During this past six months, the investigators evaluated: the molecular mechanisms of silicate adsorption by iron oxide; the effects of silicate on the bulk and surface properties of iron oxides; and the effect of silicate on metal-cation adsorption properties by iron oxides.

  4. 大樱桃果蝇无公害防治技术浅析%Pollution-free Prevention and Control Technology of Cherry Fruit Fly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张小花; 侯攻科; 李琳娜

    2015-01-01

    Along with the increasing of the cultivated area and the increase of introduction quantity in the field, the kinds of pests and diseases of the great cherry were on the rise. In order to effectively prevent and control fruit fly, improve the yield and quality of cherry, the big cherry industry in Qinzhou district sustainable development, this paper simply introduces the control measures of the cherry fruit flies.%随着栽培面积的不断扩大和在外地引种量的增加,为害大樱桃的病虫害种类呈上升趋势,为了有效的预防和控制果蝇,提高大樱桃的产量和质量,使秦州区大樱桃产业健康可持续发展,本文简单介绍了几点大樱桃果蝇的防治措施。

  5. Social Involvement in Religious Institutions and God-Mediated Control Beliefs: A Longitudinal Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Neal M

    2007-12-07

    This study examines the relationships among race, education, formal as well as informal involvement in the church, and God-mediated control. Formal involvement in the church was assessed by the frequency of attendance at worship services, Bible study groups, and prayer groups. Informal involvement was measured with an index of spiritual support provided by fellow church members. Data from a nationwide longitudinal survey of older people suggest that both formal and informal church involvement tend to sustain feelings of God-mediated control over time. The findings further reveal that compared to older whites, older African Americans are more likely to have stronger feelings of God-mediated control at the baseline survey and older blacks are more likely to sustain their sense of God-mediated control over time. In contrast, the data suggest that education is not significantly related to feelings of God-mediated control.

  6. A genomic perspective to assessing quality of mass-reared SIT flies used in Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata) eradication in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calla, Bernarda; Hall, Brian; Hou, Shaobin; Geib, Scott M

    2014-02-05

    Temperature sensitive lethal (tsl) mutants of the tephritid C. capitata are used extensively in control programs involving sterile insect technique in California. These flies are artificially reared and treated with ionizing radiation to render males sterile for further release en masse into the field to compete with wild males and disrupt establishment of invasive populations. Recent research suggests establishment of C. capitata in California, despite the fact that over 250 million sterile flies are released weekly as part of the state's preventative program. In this project, genome-level quality assessment was performed, measured as expression differences between the Vienna-7 tsl mutants used in SIT programs and wild flies. RNA-seq was performed to provide a genome-wide map of the messenger RNA populations in C. capitata, and to investigate significant expression changes in Vienna-7 mass reared flies. Flies from the Vienna-7 colony showed a markedly reduced abundance of transcripts related to visual and chemical responses, including light stimuli, neural development and signaling pathways when compared to wild flies. In addition, genes associated with muscle development and locomotion were shown to be reduced. This suggests that the Vienna-7 line may be less competitive in mating and host plant finding where these stimuli are utilized. Irradiated flies showed several transcripts representing stress associated with irradiation. There are significant changes at the transcriptome level that likely alter the competitiveness of mass reared flies and provide justification for pursuing methods for strain improvement, increasing competitiveness of mass-reared flies, or exploring alternative SIT approaches to increase the efficiency of eradication programs.

  7. Regulation of Motility and Phenazine Pigment Production by FliA Is Cyclic-di-GMP Dependent in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Yi-Ling; Shen, Lunda; Chang, Chih-Hsuan; Bhuwan, Manish; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Chang, Hwan-You

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor FliA, also called sigma 28, is a major regulator of bacterial flagellar biosynthesis genes. Growing evidence suggest that in addition to motility, FliA is involved in controlling numerous bacterial behaviors, even though the underlying regulatory mechanism remains unclear. By using a transcriptional fusion to gfp that responds to cyclic (c)-di-GMP, this study revealed a higher c-di-GMP concentration in the fliA deletion mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa than in its wild-type strain PAO1. A comparative analysis of transcriptome profiles of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and its fliA deletion mutant revealed an altered expression of several c-di-GMP-modulating enzyme-encoding genes in the fliA deletion mutant. Moreover, the downregulation of PA4367 (bifA), a Glu-Ala-Leu motif-containing phosphodiesterase, in the fliA deletion mutant was confirmed using the β-glucuronidase reporter gene assay. FliA also altered pyocyanin and pyorubin production by modulating the c-di-GMP concentration. Complementing the fliA mutant strain with bifA restored the motility defect and pigment overproduction of the fliA mutant. Our results indicate that in addition to regulating flagellar gene transcription, FliA can modulate the c-di-GMP concentration to regulate the swarming motility and phenazine pigment production in P. aeruginosa.

  8. Regulation of Motility and Phenazine Pigment Production by FliA Is Cyclic-di-GMP Dependent in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ling Lo

    Full Text Available The transcription factor FliA, also called sigma 28, is a major regulator of bacterial flagellar biosynthesis genes. Growing evidence suggest that in addition to motility, FliA is involved in controlling numerous bacterial behaviors, even though the underlying regulatory mechanism remains unclear. By using a transcriptional fusion to gfp that responds to cyclic (c-di-GMP, this study revealed a higher c-di-GMP concentration in the fliA deletion mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa than in its wild-type strain PAO1. A comparative analysis of transcriptome profiles of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and its fliA deletion mutant revealed an altered expression of several c-di-GMP-modulating enzyme-encoding genes in the fliA deletion mutant. Moreover, the downregulation of PA4367 (bifA, a Glu-Ala-Leu motif-containing phosphodiesterase, in the fliA deletion mutant was confirmed using the β-glucuronidase reporter gene assay. FliA also altered pyocyanin and pyorubin production by modulating the c-di-GMP concentration. Complementing the fliA mutant strain with bifA restored the motility defect and pigment overproduction of the fliA mutant. Our results indicate that in addition to regulating flagellar gene transcription, FliA can modulate the c-di-GMP concentration to regulate the swarming motility and phenazine pigment production in P. aeruginosa.

  9. Estimating Orientation of Flying Fruit Flies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi En Cheng

    Full Text Available The recently growing interest in studying flight behaviours of fruit flies, Drosophila melanogaster, has highlighted the need for developing tools that acquire quantitative motion data. Despite recent advance of video tracking systems, acquiring a flying fly's orientation remains a challenge for these tools. In this paper, we present a novel method for estimating individual flying fly's orientation using image cues. Thanks to the line reconstruction algorithm in computer vision field, this work can thereby focus on the practical detail of implementation and evaluation of the orientation estimation algorithm. The orientation estimation algorithm can be incorporated into tracking algorithms. We rigorously evaluated the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed algorithm by running experiments both on simulation data and on real-world data. This work complements methods for studying the fruit fly's flight behaviours in a three-dimensional environment.

  10. Flying insects and Campylobacter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Birthe; Sommer, Helle Mølgaard; Skovgård, Henrik

    Campylobacter in flies Flies of the Muscidae family forage on all kind of faeces – various fly species have different preferences. M domestica prefer pigs, horses and cattle faeces, animals which are all known to frequently excrete Campylobacter. As a result, the insects pick up pathogenic micro...... organisms, which may collect on their bodies or survive passage through the fly gut. Campylobacter and other pathogens are then easily transferred to other surfaces, for instance peoples food – or to broiler houses where they may be swallowed by chickens or contaminate the environment. On a large material...... of several species of flies collected outside broiler houses, merely ~1% of the flies were found Campylobacter positive. However, the prevalence varied considerably with fly species, time of the year, and availability of Campylobacter sources. Influx of flies to broiler houses As the influx of flies...

  11. Flying insects and Campylobacter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Birthe; Sommer, Helle Mølgaard; Skovgård, Henrik

    to broiler houses may be counted in thousands per broiler rotation during summer periods, even a low prevalence of Campylobacter positive flies constitute a risk of introduction of Campylobacter to the chickens. M. domestica – the house fly is the most important vector fly for Campylobacter transmission...... organisms, which may collect on their bodies or survive passage through the fly gut. Campylobacter and other pathogens are then easily transferred to other surfaces, for instance peoples food – or to broiler houses where they may be swallowed by chickens or contaminate the environment. On a large material...... of several species of flies collected outside broiler houses, merely ~1% of the flies were found Campylobacter positive. However, the prevalence varied considerably with fly species, time of the year, and availability of Campylobacter sources. Influx of flies to broiler houses As the influx of flies...

  12. Effect of four commercial fungal formulations on mortality and sporulation of house flies (Musca domestica) and stable flies (Stomoxys calcitrans)

    Science.gov (United States)

    House flies (Musca domestica L.) and stable flies (Stomoxys calcitrans (L.)) (Diptera: Muscidae) are major pests of livestock. Biological control is an important tool in an integrated control framework. Increased mortality in filth flies has been documented with entomopathogenic fungi, and several s...

  13. 多操纵面飞翼构型飞机舵面故障在线诊断方法%On-line Fault Diagnosis for Control Surfaces of Multi-control Effector Flying Wings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄成涛; 王立新

    2011-01-01

    It is essential for flight control reconfiguration to obtain on-line information of the control surface failures as they will influence the controllability of an aircraft. This article provides a method to diagnose on-line the fault of multi-control effector flying wing control surfaces. The number of the control derivatives needed to be estimated in on-line fault diagnosis of such a flying wing is more than that of a conventional aircraft. Consequently, it is difficult to estimate the control derivatives of the flying wing accurately by the least square method. Based on the limited memory least square method, the control derivatives of the flying wing are identified in groups. Therefore, the number of the control derivatives needed to be estimated in each group is reduced and thus the derivatives can be estimated precisely. A method of assuming a deadlock case is presented for the characteristic of surface deadlock control, by which the control surface of the deadlock and its deflection can be identified precisely. Thus the fault information of control surfaces of different types is acquired.%舵面故障会影响飞机的操纵性,为实现飞机的控制重构需在线诊断出舵面的故障信息.针对多操纵面飞翼构型飞机,提出了一种在线诊断其舵面故障的方法.飞翼构型飞机舵面故障在线诊断需辨识的操纵导数个数较多,直接使用最小二乘法难以精确辨识得到各操纵导数.基于限定记忆最小二乘法,采用分组辨识法对飞机的操纵导数进行辨识,减少了每次辨识操纵导数的个数,使得各操纵导数可精确辨识得到.针对舵面卡死故障的特点,首次提出了假定卡死故障情形法,使得被卡死舵面及其卡死偏角均可得到精确诊断,进而可诊断出各舵面各种类型故障的信息.

  14. Interactions between Entomopathogenic Fungus, Metarhizium Anisopliae and Sublethal Doses of Spinosad for Control of House Fly, Musca Domestica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Sharififard

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Metarhizium anisopliae strain IRAN 437C is one of the most virulent fungal isolates against house fly, Musca domestica. The objective of this study was to determine the interaction of this isolate with sublethal doses of spino­sad against housefly.Methods: In adult bioassay, conidia of entomopathogenic fungus were applied as inoculated bait at 105 and 107 spore per gram and spinosad at 0.5, 1 and 1.5 µg (A.I. per gram bait. In larval bioassay, conidia were applied as combina­tion of spore with larval bedding at 106 and 108 spore per gram and spinosad at sublethals of 0.002, 0.004 and 0.006 µg (AI per gram medium. Results: Adult mortality was 48% and 72% for fungus alone but ranged from 66–87% and 89–95% in combination treat­ments of 105 and 107 spore/g with sublethal doses of spinosad respectively. The interaction between 105 spore/g with sublethals exhibited synergistic effect, but in combination of 107 spore in spite of higher mortality, the interac­tion was additive. There was significant difference in LT50 among various treatments. LT50 values in all combination treat­ments were smaller than LT50 values in alone ones. Larval mortality was 36% and 69% for fungus alone but ranged from 58%–78% and 81%–100% in combination treatments of 106 and 108 spore/g medium with sublethals of spino­sad respectively. The interaction was synergistic in all combination treatments of larvae.Conclusion: The interaction between M. anispliae and spinosad indicated a synergetic effect that increased the house fly mortality as well as reduced the lethal time.

  15. Testing for Mutagens Using Fruit Flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebl, Eric C.

    1998-01-01

    Describes a laboratory employed in undergraduate teaching that uses fruit flies to test student-selected compounds for their ability to cause mutations. Requires no prior experience with fruit flies, incorporates a student design component, and employs both rigorous controls and statistical analyses. (DDR)

  16. A fly-wheel drive with controlled-torque clutch for a reactors cooling circuit pumps; Entrainement des pompes du circuit de refrigeration d'un reacteur par volant a embrayage sous couple controle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riettini, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-10-15

    After a theoretical study on the slowing down of a centrifugal pump, the motion equations have been checked by means of experimental tests. In order to have important slowing down times (which is the case of the cooling pumps of a research reactor) it is necessary to add a fly-wheel. To prevent troubles when starting, a block pump-fly-wheel with clutch under controlled torque was developed. It is so possible to start the fly-wheel progressively without increasing too much power of the driving motor. (author) [French] Apres une etude theorique sur le mouvement de ralentissement d'une pompe centrifuge, les equations du mouvement ont ete verifiees par des essais pratiques. Pour obtenir des temps de ralentissement importants (cas des pompes de refrigeration d'un reacteur de recherche) il est necessaire d'y adjoindre un volant d'inertie. Pour eviter les inconvenients au demarrage, on a etudie un ensemble pompe-volant avec embrayage sous couple controle. Cette solution permet de lancer progressivement le volant sans augmentation appreciable de la puissance du moteur d'entrainement. (auteur)

  17. Durability of biomass fly ash concrete: Freezing and thawing and rapid chloride permeability tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuangzhen Wang; Emilio Llamazos; Larry Baxter; Fernando Fonseca [Brigham Young University, Provo, UT (USA). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2008-03-15

    Strict interpretation of ASTM C 618 excludes non-coal fly ashes, such as biomass fly ashes from addition in concrete. Biomass fly ash in this investigation includes (1) cofired fly ash from burning biomass with coal; (2) wood fly ash and (3) blended fly ash (wood fly ash mixing with coal fly ash). A set of experiments conducted on concrete from pure cement and cement with fly ash provide basic data to assess the effects of several biomass fly ashes on the performances of freezing and thawing (F-T) and rapid chloride permeability test (RCPT). The F-T tests indicate that all fly ash concrete has statistically equal or less weight loss than the pure cement concrete (control). The RCPT illustrate that all kinds of fly ash concrete have lower chloride permeability than the pure cement control concrete. 37 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Soluble components of the flagellar export apparatus, FliI, FliJ, and FliH, do not deliver flagellin, the major filament protein, from the cytosol to the export gate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajó, Ráchel; Liliom, Károly; Muskotál, Adél; Klein, Agnes; Závodszky, Péter; Vonderviszt, Ferenc; Dobó, József

    2014-11-01

    Flagella, the locomotion organelles of bacteria, extend from the cytoplasm to the cell exterior. External flagellar proteins are synthesized in the cytoplasm and exported by the flagellar type III secretion system. Soluble components of the flagellar export apparatus, FliI, FliH, and FliJ, have been implicated to carry late export substrates in complex with their cognate chaperones from the cytoplasm to the export gate. The importance of the soluble components in the delivery of the three minor late substrates FlgK, FlgL (hook-filament junction) and FliD (filament-cap) has been convincingly demonstrated, but their role in the transport of the major filament component flagellin (FliC) is still unclear. We have used continuous ATPase activity measurements and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) studies to characterize interactions between the soluble export components and flagellin or the FliC:FliS substrate-chaperone complex. As controls, interactions between soluble export component pairs were characterized providing Kd values. FliC or FliC:FliS did not influence the ATPase activity of FliI alone or in complex with FliH and/or FliJ suggesting lack of interaction in solution. Immobilized FliI, FliH, or FliJ did not interact with FliC or FliC:FliS detected by QCM. The lack of interaction in the fluid phase between FliC or FliC:FliS and the soluble export components, in particular with the ATPase FliI, suggests that cells use different mechanisms for the export of late minor substrates, and the major substrate, FliC. It seems that the abundantly produced flagellin does not require the assistance of the soluble export components to efficiently reach the export gate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Discussion on the Countermeasures for Controlling the the Flying Catkins from Blooming Willows and Poplars in Taiyuan City%太原市杨柳飞絮治理对策探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苗峰; 石红旗

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces in detail several main methods for controlling the flying catkins from blooming willows and poplars in Taiyuan City, analyzes the advantages and disadvantages of each method, and looks forward to the future development directions of the work of controlling the flying catkins from blooming willows and poplars.%详细介绍了目前太原市治理杨柳飞絮的几种主要方法,分析了每种方法的优缺点,展望了杨柳飞絮治理工作的未来发展方向。

  20. A novel Drosophila Girdin-like protein is involved in Akt pathway control of cell size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puseenam, Aekkachai [Department of Applied Biology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Insect Biomedical Research Center, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Yoshioka, Yasuhide [Department of Applied Biology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Venture Laboratory, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Nagai, Rika [Department of Applied Biology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Insect Biomedical Research Center, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Hashimoto, Reina [Department of Applied Biology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Venture Laboratory, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Suyari, Osamu [Insect Biomedical Research Center, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Itoh, Masanobu [Department of Applied Biology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Insect Biomedical Research Center, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Enomoto, Atsushi [Department of Pathology, Center for Neurological Disease and Cancer, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Showa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 466-8550 (Japan); Takahashi, Masahide [Insect Biomedical Research Center, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Department of Pathology, Center for Neurological Disease and Cancer, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Showa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 466-8550 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Masamitsu, E-mail: myamaguc@kit.ac.jp [Department of Applied Biology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Insect Biomedical Research Center, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)

    2009-11-15

    The Akt signaling pathway is well known to regulate cell proliferation and growth. Girdin, a novel substrate of Akt, plays a crucial role in organization of the actin cytoskeleton and cell motility under the control of Akt. We here identified a novel Girdin-like protein in Drosophila (dGirdin), which has two isoforms, dGirdin PA and dGirdin PB. dGirdin shows high homology with human Girdin in the N-terminal and coiled-coil domains, while diverging at the C-terminal domain. On establishment of transgenic fly lines, featuring knockdown or overexpression of dGirdin in vivo, overexpression in the wing disc cells induced ectopic apoptosis, implying a role in directing apoptosis. Knockdown of dGirdin in the Drosophila wing imaginal disc cells resulted in reduction of cell size. Furthermore, this was enhanced by half reduction of the Akt gene dose, suggesting that Akt positively regulates dGirdin. In the wing disc, cells in which dGirdin was knocked down exhibited disruption of actin filaments. From these in vivo analyses, we conclude that dGirdin is required for actin organization and regulation of appropriate cell size under control of the Akt signaling pathway.

  1. Time-optimal control of infinite order distributed parabolic systems involving time lags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.M. Bahaa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A time-optimal control problem for linear infinite order distributed parabolic systems involving constant time lags appear both in the state equation and in the boundary condition is presented. Some particular properties of the optimal control are discussed.

  2. Business unit controller involvement in management : An empirical study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rouwelaar, ten J.A. (Hans); Bots, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years there has been much debate on the new business-oriented role of management accountants, also called controllers. The purpose of this paper is to investigate to what extent the involvement of the business unit (BU) controller in the decision-making process of business units is impacte

  3. Restoration of fly ash dump through biological interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juwarkar, Asha A; Jambhulkar, Hemlata P

    2008-04-01

    Field experiment on 10 ha area of fly ash dump was conducted to restore and revegetate it using biological interventions, which involves use of organic amendment, selection of suitable plant species along with specialized nitrogen fixing strains of biofertilizer. The results of the study indicated that amendment with farm yard manure at 50 t/ha improved the physical properties of fly ash such as maximum water holding capacity from 40.0 to 62.42% while porosity improved from 56.78 to 58.45%. The nitrogen content was increased by 4.5 times due to addition of nitrogen fixing strains of Bradyrhizobium and Azotobacter species, while phosphate content was increased by 10.0 times due to addition of VAM, which helps in phosphate immobilization. Due to biofertilizer inoculation different microbial groups such as Rhizobium, Azotobacter and VAM spores, which were practically absent in fly ash improved to 7.1 x 10(7), 9.2 x 10(7) CFU/g and 35 VAM spores/10 g of fly ash, respectively. Inoculation of biofertilizer and application of FYM helped in reducing the toxicity of heavy metals such as cadmium, copper, nickel and lead which were reduced by 25, 46, 48 and 47%, respectively, due to the increased organic matter content in the fly ash which complexes the heavy metals thereby decreasing the toxicity of metals. Amendment of fly ash with FYM and biofertilizer helped in profuse root development showing 15 times higher growth in Dendrocalamus strictus plant as compared to the control. Thus amendment and biofertilizer application provided better supportive material for anchorage and growth of the plant.

  4. Disappearance of some human African trypanosomiasis transmission foci in Zambia in the absence of a tsetse fly and trypanosomiasis control program over a period of forty years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwanakasale, Victor; Songolo, Peter

    2011-03-01

    We conducted a situation analysis of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) in Zambia from January 2000 to April 2007. The aim of this survey was to identify districts in Zambia that were still recording cases of HAT. Three districts namely, Mpika, Chama, and Chipata were found to be still reporting cases of HAT and thus lay in HAT transmission foci in North Eastern Zambia. During the period under review, 24 cases of HAT were reported from these three districts. We thereafter reviewed literature on the occurrence of HAT in Zambia from the early 1960s to mid 1990s. This revealed that HAT transmission foci were widespread in Western, North Western, Lusaka, Eastern, Luapula, and Northern Provinces of Zambia during this period. In this article we have tried to give possible reasons as to why the distribution of HAT transmission foci is so different between before and after 2000 when there has been no active national tsetse fly and trypanosomiasis control program in Zambia.

  5. Full-band error control and crack-free surface fabrication techniques for ultra-precision fly cutting of large-aperture KDP crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F. H.; Wang, S. F.; An, C. H.; Wang, J.; Xu, Q.

    2017-06-01

    Large-aperture potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals are widely used in the laser path of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) systems. The most common method of manufacturing half-meter KDP crystals is ultra-precision fly cutting. When processing KDP crystals by ultra-precision fly cutting, the dynamic characteristics of the fly cutting machine and fluctuations in the fly cutting environment are translated into surface errors at different spatial frequency bands. These machining errors should be suppressed effectively to guarantee that KDP crystals meet the full-band machining accuracy specified in the evaluation index. In this study, the anisotropic machinability of KDP crystals and the causes of typical surface errors in ultra-precision fly cutting of the material are investigated. The structures of the fly cutting machine and existing processing parameters are optimized to improve the machined surface quality. The findings are theoretically and practically important in the development of high-energy laser systems in China.

  6. Proactive dairy cattle disease control in the UK: veterinary surgeons' involvement and associated characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, H. M.; Huxley, J. N.; Wapenaar, W.; Green, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    Characteristics of 94 veterinary surgeons associated with delivering preventive herd-level strategies to control mastitis, lameness and Johne's disease were investigated using two multinomial models. The response variables were ‘Gold Standard Monitoring’ (including on-going data analysis, risk assessments and laboratory testing), and a lower level of involvement called ‘Regular Control Advice’. Although the sample was biased towards those who spend the majority of their time with dairy cows, 69 per cent currently had no involvement in Gold Standard Monitoring for lameness, 60 per cent no involvement with Johne's, and 52 per cent no involvement with mastitis. The final model predicted that an assistant without a postgraduate cattle qualification, who had spent no time on dairy cattle continuous professional development (CPD) in the last year, had an 88 per cent chance of having no involvement with Gold Standard Monitoring for any disease, versus <5 per cent chance for a CPD ‘enriched’ partner with a postgraduate cattle qualification; there was <1 per cent chance this assistant would be involved with Gold Standard Monitoring of all three diseases on one or more farms, versus a 58 per cent chance for this partner. CPD and employment status were also associated with markedly different probabilities for delivering Regular Control Advice. Increased postgraduate education may further veterinary involvement of this nature. PMID:23887976

  7. How can you resist? Executive control helps romantically involved individuals to stay faithful.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronk, Tila M; Karremans, Johan C; Wigboldus, Daniël H J

    2011-05-01

    In the present research, we examined why some people have more difficulty than others in staying faithful to their romantic partners. Three studies supported our main prediction that executive control is associated with romantically involved individuals' ability to stay faithful. Study 1 showed that participants with a higher level of executive control reported less difficulty in staying faithful to their partners than did those with lower levels of executive control. In Study 2, romantically involved male participants were placed in a waiting room together with an attractive female confederate. Results showed that participants with a higher level of executive control showed less flirting behavior with the confederate than did those with lower levels of executive control. Study 3 demonstrated that a higher level of executive control was related to a lower expressed desire to meet an attractive other, but only for romantically involved participants. Together, these studies showed that executive control helps romantically involved individuals to deal with the lure of attractive alternatives. (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved.

  8. Male-specific Y-linked transgene markers to enhance biologically-based control of the Mexican fruit fly, Anastrepha ludens (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza, J Salvador; Schetelig, Marc F; Zepeda-Cisneros, C Silvia; Handler, Alfred M

    2014-01-01

    Reliable marking systems are critical to the prospective field release of transgenic insect strains. This is to unambiguously distinguish released insects from wild insects in the field that are collected in field traps, and tissue-specific markers, such as those that are sperm-specific, have particular uses such as identifying wild females that have mated with released males. For tephritid fruit flies such as the Mexican fruit fly, Anastrepha ludens, polyubiquitin-regulated fluorescent protein body markers allow transgenic fly identification, and fluorescent protein genes regulated by the spermatocyte-specific β2-tubulin promoter effectively mark sperm. For sterile male release programs, both marking systems can be made male-specific by linkage to the Y chromosome. An A. ludens wild type strain was genetically transformed with a piggyBac vector, pBXL{PUbnlsEGFP, Asβ2tub-DsRed.T3}, having the polyubiquitin-regulated EGFP body marker, and the β2-tubulin-regulated DsRed.T3 sperm-specific marker. Autosomal insertion lines effectively expressed both markers, but a single Y-linked insertion (YEGFP strain) expressed only PUbnlsEGFP. This insertion was remobilized by transposase helper injection, which resulted in three new autosomal insertion lines that expressed both markers. This indicated that the original Y-linked Asβ2tub-DsRed.T3 marker was functional, but specifically suppressed on the Y chromosome. The PUbnlsEGFP marker remained effective however, and the YEGFP strain was used to create a sexing strain by translocating the wild type allele of the black pupae (bp+) gene onto the Y, which was then introduced into the bp- mutant strain. This allows the mechanical separation of mutant female black pupae from male brown pupae, that can be identified as adults by EGFP fluorescence. A Y-linked insertion of the pBXL{PUbnlsEGFP, Asβ2tub-DsRed.T3} transformation vector in A. ludens resulted in male-specific expression of the EGFP fluorescent protein marker, and was

  9. Proactive dairy cattle disease control in the UK: veterinary surgeons' involvement and associated characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, H M; Huxley, J N; Wapenaar, W; Green, M J

    2013-09-14

    Characteristics of 94 veterinary surgeons associated with delivering preventive herd-level strategies to control mastitis, lameness and Johne's disease were investigated using two multinomial models. The response variables were 'Gold Standard Monitoring' (including on-going data analysis, risk assessments and laboratory testing), and a lower level of involvement called 'Regular Control Advice'. Although the sample was biased towards those who spend the majority of their time with dairy cows, 69 per cent currently had no involvement in Gold Standard Monitoring for lameness, 60 per cent no involvement with Johne's, and 52 per cent no involvement with mastitis. The final model predicted that an assistant without a postgraduate cattle qualification, who had spent no time on dairy cattle continuous professional development (CPD) in the last year, had an 88 per cent chance of having no involvement with Gold Standard Monitoring for any disease, versus Gold Standard Monitoring of all three diseases on one or more farms, versus a 58 per cent chance for this partner. CPD and employment status were also associated with markedly different probabilities for delivering Regular Control Advice. Increased postgraduate education may further veterinary involvement of this nature.

  10. Temporal and spatial variations in fly ash quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hower, J.C.; Trimble, A.S.; Eble, C.F.

    2001-01-01

    Fly ash quality, both as the amount of petrographically distinguishable carbons and in chemistry, varies in both time and space. Temporal variations are a function of a number of variables. Variables can include variations in the coal blend organic petrography, mineralogy, and chemistry; variations in the pulverization of the coal, both as a function of the coal's Hardgrove grindability index and as a function of the maintenance and settings of the pulverizers; and variations in the operating conditions of the boiler, including changes in the pollution control system. Spatial variation, as an instantaneous measure of fly ash characteristics, should not involve changes in the first two sets of variables listed above. Spatial variations are a function of the gas flow within the boiler and ducts, certain flow conditions leading to a tendency for segregation of the less-dense carbons in one portion of the gas stream. Caution must be applied in sampling fly ash. Samples from a single bin, or series of bins, m ay not be representative of the whole fly ash, providing a biased view of the nature of the material. Further, it is generally not possible to be certain about variation until the analysis of the ash is complete. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Chromosal rearrangements in the onion fly Hylemya antiqua (Meigen), induced and isolated for genetic insect control purposes : studies on cytogenetics and fertility, with emphasis on an X-linked translocation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemert, van C.

    1975-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to isolate structural chromosome mutations causing "semi"-sterility which can be used for genetic control of the onion fly Hylemya antiqua (Meigen). For the induction, X-rays or fast neutrons were applied in different doses on males and females. "Semi"-sterile famil

  12. Electrodialytic removal of heavy metals and chloride from municipal solid waste incineration fly ash and air pollution control residue in suspension - test of a new two compartment experimental cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie; Magro, Cátia; Guedes, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) residues such as fly ash and air pollution control (APC) residues are classified as hazardous waste and disposed of, although they contain potential resources. The most problematic elements in MSWI residues are leachable heavy metals and salts. For reuse...

  13. Dynamic Optimization Algorithm for Flying Trajectory of a Free-flying Space Robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new method of dynamic optimization for the flying trajectory of a free-flying space robot based on its flying motion characteristics is presented. The continuous flying trajectory is broken into a number of segment and the control efforts and the duration of the segment are chosen as the optimization parameters. The objective function is made by using the weighted sum of the fuel used and the time spent, and the constraint equations are selected. Finally, the internal point punishment function method is adopted in the optimization program, and the results of computer simulation are given.

  14. Evaluation of insecticides and repellents for the control of the sand fly Phlebotomus papatasi to protect deployed U.S. Military personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phlebotomine sand flies, including Phlebotomus papatasi, are important blood feeders and vectors that transmit the disease agents (Leishmania) that cause Leishmaniasis. Deployed U.S. Military Personnel in Iraq and Afghanistan suffered from sand fly bites and the disease they transmit. A USDA-DoD joi...

  15. Fly ash carbon passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

    2013-05-14

    A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most of the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.

  16. Regional Suppression of Bactrocera Fruit Flies (Diptera: Tephritidae in the Pacific through Biological Control and Prospects for Future Introductions into Other Areas of the World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger I. Vargas

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Bactrocera fruit fly species are economically important throughout the Pacific. The USDA, ARS U.S. Pacific Basin Agricultural Research Center has been a world leader in promoting biological control of Bactrocera spp. that includes classical, augmentative, conservation and IPM approaches. In Hawaii, establishment of Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillett in 1895 resulted in the introduction of the most successful parasitoid, Psyttalia fletcheri (Silvestri; similarly, establishment of Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel in 1945 resulted in the introduction of 32 natural enemies of which Fopius arisanus (Sonan, Diachasmimorpha longicaudata (Ashmead and Fopius vandenboschi (Fullaway were most successful. Hawaii has also been a source of parasitoids for fruit fly control throughout the Pacific region including Australia, Pacific Island Nations, Central and South America, not only for Bactrocera spp. but also for Ceratitis and Anastrepha spp. Most recently, in 2002, F. arisanus was introduced into French Polynesia where B. dorsalis had invaded in 1996. Establishment of D. longicaudata into the new world has been important to augmentative biological control releases against Anastrepha spp. With the rapid expansion of airline travel and global trade there has been an alarming spread of Bactrocera spp. into new areas of the world (i.e., South America and Africa. Results of studies in Hawaii and French Polynesia, support parasitoid introductions into South America and Africa, where B. carambolae and B. invadens, respectively, have become established. In addition, P. fletcheri is a candidate for biological control of B. cucurbitae in Africa. We review past and more

  17. Controle de mosca doméstica em área de disposição de resíduos sólidos no Brasil House fly control in solid waste disposal area in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adair Ferreira Motta Teixeira

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Desenvolveu-se uma metodologia de controle de Musca domestica (L. em áreas de disposição de resíduos sólidos. Dois mosquicidas à base de azametifós foram aplicados em diferentes superfícies: nas verticais, a formulação pó molhável foi aplicada com rolos de pintura e, através de pulverização, na superfície de leiras; nas horizontais, foi empregado o mosquicida na formulação granulada. O nível de infestação de moscas foi avaliado por meio do monitoramento em placas (Scudder Fly Grill. Nas áreas das leiras, reduções de 98,5% e 100% foram atingidas em 18 e 30 dias, respectivamente, após a aplicação do produto. Na estação de transferência do lixo, observaram-se reduções de 85,6% e 98,7% no mesmo período de tempo. A aplicação de azametifós em diferentes formulações mostrou ser eficiente no controle da Musca domestica por um período de 30 dias.A Musca domestica (L. control method in solid waste disposal areas was developed. Two fly control products based on azamethiphos were applied to different surfaces: on vertical surfaces, the wettable powder was used as spray or paint-on and on windrows, as spray; on horizontal surfaces granular bait was used. Fly infestation was evaluated by Scudder Fly Grills. In the windrows areas, reductions of 98,5% and 100 % were achieved 18 and 30 days respectively after application. In the waste transfer station 85,6% and 98,7 % reductions were achieved over the same period of time. Application of azamethiphos in different formulations was effective against M. domestica for 30 days.

  18. Inheritance of Resistance to Sorghum Shoot Fly, Atherigona soccata in Sorghum, Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed eRiyazaddin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Host plant resistance is one of the major components to control sorghum shoot fly, Atherigona soccata. To understand the nature of gene action for inheritance of shoot fly resistance, we evaluated 10 parents, 45 F1’s and their reciprocals in replicated trials during the rainy and postrainy seasons. Genotypes ICSV 700, Phule Anuradha, ICSV 25019, PS 35805, IS 2123, IS 2146 and IS 18551 exhibited resistance to shoot fly damage across seasons. Crosses between susceptible parents were preferred for egg laying by the shoot fly females, resulting in a susceptible reaction. ICSV 700, ICSV 25019, PS 35805, IS 2123, IS 2146 and IS 18551 exhibited significant and negative general combining ability (gca effects for oviposition, deadheart incidence, and overall resistance score. The plant morphological traits associated with expression of resistance/ susceptibility to shoot fly damage such as leaf glossiness, plant vigor, and leafsheath pigmentation also showed significant gca effects by these genotypes, suggesting the potential for use as a selection criterion to breed for resistance to shoot fly, A. soccata. ICSV 700, Phule Anuradha, IS 2146 and IS 18551 with significant positive gca effects for trichome density can also be utilised in improving sorghums for shoot fly resistance. The parents involved in hybrids with negative specific combining ability (sca effects for shoot fly resistance traits can be used in developing sorghum hybrids with adaptation to postrainy season. The significant reciprocal effects of combining abilities for oviposition, leaf glossy score and trichome density suggested the influence of cytoplasmic factors in inheritance of shoot fly resistance. Higher values of variance due to sca (σ2s, dominance variance (σ2d, and lower predictability ratios than the variance due to gca (σ2g and additive variance (σ2a for shoot fly resistance traits indicated the predominance of dominance type of gene action, whereas trichome density, leaf

  19. Locus of Control and Computer Attitude: The Effect of User Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Stephen R.

    1989-01-01

    Describes study that was conducted to investigate the relationship between locus of control and user attitude toward computer based information systems (CBIS) used at work. The impact of user involvement is examined, the hypotheses tested are described, and implications for introducing CBIS into organizations are discussed. (14 references) (LRW)

  20. How can you resist? Executive control helps romantically involved individuals to stay faithful

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pronk, T.M.; Karremans, J.C.T.M.; Wigboldus, D.H.J.

    2011-01-01

    In the present research, we examined why some people have more difficulty than others in staying faithful to their romantic partners. Three studies supported our main prediction that executive control is associated with romantically involved individuals' ability to stay faithful. Study 1 showed that

  1. Why business unit controllers bias accounting figures: Involvement in management, social pressure and Machiavellianism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, V.S.; Hartmann, F.G.H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates why some business unit controllers are more likely to deliberately bias accounting data than others. Different from the existing literature, we argue that involvement in management and social pressure are neither necessary, nor sufficient conditions for biasing behavior.

  2. Free-flying dynamics and control of an astronaut assistant robot based on fuzzy sliding mode algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qing; Liu, Jinguo; Tian, Tongtong; Li, Yangmin

    2017-09-01

    Space robots can perform some tasks in harsh environment as assistants of astronauts or substitutions of astronauts. Taking the limited working time and the arduous task of the astronauts in the space station into account, an astronaut assistant robot (AAR-2) applied in the space station is proposed and designed in this paper. The AAR-2 is achieved with some improvements on the basis of AAR-1 which was designed before. It can exploit its position and attitude sensors and control system to free flight or hover in the space cabin. And it also has a definite environmental awareness and artificial intelligence to complete some specified tasks under the control of astronauts or autonomously. In this paper, it mainly analyzes and controls the 6-DOF motion of the AAR-2. Firstly, the system configuration of AAR-2 is specifically described, and the movement principles are analyzed. Secondly, according to the physical model of the AAR-2, the Newton - Euler equation is applied in the preparation of space dynamics model of 6-DOF motion. Then, according to the mathematical model's characteristics which are nonlinear and strong coupling, a dual closed loop position and attitude controller based on fuzzy sliding mode control is proposed and designed. Finally, simulation experiments are appropriate to provide for AAR-2 control system by using Matlab/Simulink. From the simulation results it can be observed that the designed fuzzy sliding mode controller can control the 6-DOF motion of AAR-2 quickly and precisely.

  3. Mechanisms and neuronal networks involved in reactive and proactive cognitive control of interference in working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irlbacher, Kerstin; Kraft, Antje; Kehrer, Stefanie; Brandt, Stephan A

    2014-10-01

    Cognitive control can be reactive or proactive in nature. Reactive control mechanisms, which support the resolution of interference, start after its onset. Conversely, proactive control involves the anticipation and prevention of interference prior to its occurrence. The interrelation of both types of cognitive control is currently under debate: Are they mediated by different neuronal networks? Or are there neuronal structures that have the potential to act in a proactive as well as in a reactive manner? This review illustrates the way in which integrating knowledge gathered from behavioral studies, functional imaging, and human electroencephalography proves useful in answering these questions. We focus on studies that investigate interference resolution at the level of working memory representations. In summary, different mechanisms are instrumental in supporting reactive and proactive control. Distinct neuronal networks are involved, though some brain regions, especially pre-SMA, possess functions that are relevant to both control modes. Therefore, activation of these brain areas could be observed in reactive, as well as proactive control, but at different times during information processing.

  4. Formation Flying Concept Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Palkin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The term “formation flying” implies coordinated movement of at least two satellites on coplanar and non-coplanar orbits with a maximum distance between them being much less than the length of the orbit. Peculiarities of formation flying concept also include:- automatic coordination of satellites;- sub-group specialization of formation flying satellites;- equipment and data exchange technology unification in each specialized group or subgroup.Formation flying satellites can be classified according to the configuration stability level (order (array, cluster («swarm», intergroup specialization rules («central satellite», «leader», «slave», manoeuvrability («active» and «passive» satellites.Tasks of formation flying include:- experiments with payload, distributed in formation flying satellites;- various near-earth space and earth-surface research;- super-sized aperture antenna development;- land-based telescope calibration;- «space advertisement» (earth-surface observable satellite compositions of a logotype, word, etc.;- orbital satellite maintenance, etc.Main issues of formation flying satellite system design are:- development of an autonomous satellite group manoeuvring technology;- providing a sufficient characteristic velocity of formation flying satellites;- ballistic and navigation maintenance for satellite formation flying;- technical and economic assessment of formation flying orbital delivery and deployment;- standardization, unification, miniaturization and integration of equipment;- intergroup and intersatellite function redistribution.

  5. Effects of laminar flow control on the performance of a large span-distributed-load flying-wing cargo airplane concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernell, L. S.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of laminar flow control (LFC) on the performance of a large span-distributed-load flying-wing cargo airplane concept having a design payload of 2.669 MN and range of 5.93 Mm were determined. Two configurations were considered. One employed laminarized flow over the entire surfaces of the wing and vertical tails, with the exception of the estimated areas of interference due to the fuselage and engines. The other case differed only in that laminar flow was not applied to the flaps, elevons, spoilers, or rudders. The two cases are referred to as the 100 percent and 80 percent laminar configurations, respectively. The utilization of laminar flow control results in reductions in the standard day, sea level installed maximum static thrust per engine from 240 kN for the non-LFC configuration to 205 kN for the 100 percent laminar configuration and 209 kN for the 80 percent case. Weight increases due to the LFC systems cause increases in the operating empty weights of approximately 3 to 4 percent. The design takeoff gross weights decrease approximately 3 to 5 percent. The FAR-25 takeoff field distances for the LFC configurations are greater by about 6 to 7 percent. Fuel efficiencies for the respective configurations are increased 33 percent and 23 percent.

  6. A neural network controller for the path tracking control of a hopping robot involving time delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaitanya, V Sree Krishna; Reddy, M Srinivas

    2006-02-01

    In this paper a hopping robot motion with offset mass is discussed. A mathematical model has been considered and an efficient single layered neural network has been developed to suit to the dynamics of the hopping robot, which ensures guaranteed tracking performance leading to the stability of the otherwise unstable system. The neural network takes advantage of the robot regressor dynamics that expresses the highly nonlinear robot dynamics in a linear form in terms of the known and unknown robot parameters. Time delays in the control mechanism play a vital role in the motion of hopping robots. The present work also enables us to estimate the maximum time delay admissible with out losing the guaranteed tracking performance. Further this neural network does not require offline training procedures. The salient features are highlighted by appropriate simulations.

  7. Screening effective insecticides for controlling mosquito, fly and cockroach%对蚊蝇和蟑螂有效防治药剂的筛选研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庄静; 靳增军; 王志强; 王建蕊; 王向文; 李现亮

    2012-01-01

    Objective The effect of four kinds of insecticides against Culex pipiens pallens,Musca domestica and Blattella germanica were determined, in order to provide scientific data for vector control. Methods Under laboratory conditions, using soaking, topical application and residual smearing methods. Results The LC50 of delta-methrin to mosquito was 0. 009 1 mg/L, and the toxicity was the highest. The toxicity of lambda-cyhalothrin was the second and its LC50 to mosquito was 0. 012 6 mg/L. The toxicity of tetramethrin was the lowest. The LD50 of lambda-cyhalothrin was 0.008 3 礸/ ? to fly. Propoxur was the lowest toxicity. For cockroach, the KT50 of lambda-cyhalothrin, delta-methrin and fenobucarb were 10. 24,10. 85 and 12. 96 min respectively. Conclusion For fly and cockroach, the toxicity of lambda-cyhalothrin was the highest. The toxicity of delta-methrin to mosquito was the strongest. The control effect of beta-cyfluthrin was the best of them.%目的 掌握多种药剂对淡色库蚊、家蝇和德国小蠊的杀灭效果,为有效控制媒介生物提供依据.方法 在室内条件下分别采用幼虫浸渍法、微量点滴法、三角烧瓶药膜法.结果 溴氰菊酯对淡色库蚊幼虫敏感性最高,毒力最大,LC50为0.009 1 mg/L;高效氯氟氰菊酯次之,LC50为0.0126 mg/L;胺菊酯毒力较弱.家蝇对高效氯氟氰菊酯敏感性同样最高,LD50为0.008 3μg/♀,残杀威毒力最弱.高效氯氟氰菊酯、溴氰菊酯和仲丁威对德国小蠊的KT50分别为10.24、10.85和12.96 min,毒力较强.结论 家蝇、德国小蠊对高效氯氟氰菊酯的敏感性最高,淡色库蚊幼虫对溴氰菊酯的敏感性最高,但高效氯氰菊酯的杀灭效果强于其他.

  8. Does yohimbine hydrochloride facilitate fear extinction in virtual reality treatment of fear of flying? A randomized placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyerbroeker, K.; Powers, M.B.; van Stegeren, A.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Research suggests that yohimbine hydrochloride (YOH), a noradrenaline agonist, can facilitate fear extinction. It is thought that the mechanism of enhanced emotional memory is stimulated through elevated noradrenaline levels. This randomized placebo-controlled trial examined the

  9. PRISMA—A formation flying project in implementation phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Staffan; Veldman, Sytze; Bodin, Per

    2009-11-01

    The PRISMA project for autonomous formation flying and rendezvous has passed its critical design review in February-March 2007. The project comprises two satellites which are an in-orbit testbed for Guidance, Navigation and Control (GNC) algorithms and sensors for advanced formation flying and rendezvous. Several experiments involving GNC algorithms, sensors and thrusters will be performed during a 10 month mission with launch planned for the second half of 2009. The project is run by the Swedish Space Corporation (SSC) in close cooperation with the German Aerospace Center (DLR), the French Space Agency (CNES) and the Technical University of Denmark (DTU). Additionally, the project also will demonstrate flight worthiness of two novel motor technologies: one that uses environmentally clean and non-hazardous propellant, and one that consists of a microthruster system based on MEMS technology. The project will demonstrate autonomous formation flying and rendezvous based on several sensors—GPS, RF-based and vision based—with different objectives and in different combinations. The GPS-based onboard navigation system, contributed by DLR, offers relative orbit information in real-time in decimetre range. The RF-based navigation instrument intended for DARWIN, under CNES development, will be tested for the first time on PRISMA, both for instrument performance, but also in closed loop as main sensor for formation flying. Several rendezvous and proximity manoeuvre experiments will be demonstrated using only vision based sensor information coming from the modified star camera provided by DTU. Semi-autonomous operations ranging from 200 km to 1 m separation between the satellites will be demonstrated. With the project now in the verification phase particular attention is given to the specific formation flying and rendezvous functionality on instrument, GNC-software and system level.

  10. Flight test results for the F-8 digital fly-by-wire aircraft control sensor analytic redundancy management technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckert, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    This paper reviews the formulation and flight test results of an algorithm to detect and isolate the first failure of any one of twelve duplex control sensor signals being monitored. The technique uses like-signal differences for fault detection while relying upon analytic redundancy relationships among unlike quantities to isolate the faulty sensor. The fault isolation logic utilizes the modified sequential probability ratio test, which explicitly accommodates the inevitable irreducible low frequency errors present in the analytic redundancy residuals. In addition, the algorithm uses sensor output selftest, which takes advantage of the duplex sensor structure by immediately removing a highly erratic sensor from control calculations and analytic redundancy relationships while awaiting a definitive fault isolation decision via analytic redundancy. This study represents a proof of concept demonstration of a methodology that can be applied to duplex or higher flight control sensor configurations and, in addition, can monitor the health of one simplex signal per analytic redundancy relationship.

  11. Peripheral and Central Mechanisms Involved in the Hormonal Control of Male and Female Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, L M; Bentley, G E; Calandra, R S; Paredes, A H; Tesone, M; Wu, T J; Micevych, P E

    2016-07-01

    Reproduction involves the integration of hormonal signals acting across multiple systems to generate a synchronised physiological output. A critical component of reproduction is the luteinising hormone (LH) surge, which is mediated by oestradiol (E2 ) and neuroprogesterone interacting to stimulate kisspeptin release in the rostral periventricular nucleus of the third ventricle in rats. Recent evidence indicates the involvement of both classical and membrane E2 and progesterone signalling in this pathway. A metabolite of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH), GnRH-(1-5), has been shown to stimulate GnRH expression and secretion, and has a role in the regulation of lordosis. Additionally, gonadotrophin release-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) projects to and influences the activity of GnRH neurones in birds. Stress-induced changes in GnIH have been shown to alter breeding behaviour in birds, demonstrating another mechanism for the molecular control of reproduction. Peripherally, paracrine and autocrine actions within the gonad have been suggested as therapeutic targets for infertility in both males and females. Dysfunction of testicular prostaglandin synthesis is a possible cause of idiopathic male infertility. Indeed, local production of melatonin and corticotrophin-releasing hormone could influence spermatogenesis via immune pathways in the gonad. In females, vascular endothelial growth factor A has been implicated in an angiogenic process that mediates development of the corpus luteum and thus fertility via the Notch signalling pathway. Age-induced decreases in fertility involve ovarian kisspeptin and its regulation of ovarian sympathetic innervation. Finally, morphological changes in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus influence female sexual receptivity in rats. The processes mediating these morphological changes have been shown to involve the rapid effects of E2 controlling synaptogenesis in this hypothalamic nucleus. In summary, this review highlights new

  12. Flying Eyes and Hidden Controllers: A Qualitative Study of People’s Privacy Perceptions of Civilian Drones in The US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Drones are unmanned aircraft controlled remotely or operated autonomously. While the extant literature suggests that drones can in principle invade people’s privacy, little is known about how people actually think about drones. Drawing from a series of in-depth interviews conducted in the United States, we provide a novel and rich account of people’s privacy perceptions of drones for civilian uses both in general and under specific usage scenarios. Our informants raised both physical and information privacy issues against government, organization and individual use of drones. Informants’ reasoning about the acceptance of drone use was in part based on whether the drone is operating in a public or private space. However, our informants differed significantly in their definitions of public and private spaces. While our informants’ privacy concerns such as surveillance, data collection and sharing have been raised for other tracking technologies such as camera phones and closed-circuit television (CCTV, our interviews highlight two heightened issues of drones: (1 powerful yet inconspicuous data collection, (2 hidden and inaccessible drone controllers. These two aspects of drones render some of people’s existing privacy practices futile (e.g., notice recording and ask controllers to stop or delete the recording. Some informants demanded notifications of drones near them and expected drone controllers asking for their explicit permissions before recording. We discuss implications for future privacy-enhancing drone designs.

  13. [Involvement of health primary care teams in the control of tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Aline Aparecida; Gonzales, Roxana Isabel Cardozo; Palha, Pedro Fredemir; Sassaki, Cinthia Midori; Ruffino Netto, Antonio; Vendramini, Silvia Helena Figueiredo; Villa, Tereza Cristina Scatena

    2008-06-01

    This study was aimed at analyzing the involvement of Health Primary Care teams in the tuberculosis control actions in the perception of the Tuberculosis Control Program coordinators of nine priority municipalities of the State of São Paulo. It is a qualitative research whose data were collected in June of 2005 through semistructured interviews with nine coordinators. The content thematic modality was used for the analysis of the data. The results pointed out to difficulties in the implementation of the tuberculosis control actions in primary care related to quantitative and qualitative deficiencies of human resources and to a centralized and fragmented view regarding the organization of these actions in the health system. The integration of tuberculosis control activities in primary care is possible provided the system is organized according to primary care principles and a policy of human resources that ensures continuous education and capacity-building of health teams is elaborated/implemented.

  14. Ever Fly a Tetrahedron?

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Kenneth

    2004-01-01

    Few things capture the spirit of spring like flying a kite. Watching a kite dance and sail across a cloud spotted sky is not only a visually appealing experience it also provides a foundation for studies in science and mathematics. Put simply, a kite is an airfoil surface that flies when the forces of lift and thrust are greater than the forces of…

  15. NASA/RAE collaboration on nonlinear control using the F-8C digital fly-by-wire aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, G. F.; Corbin, M. J.; Mepham, S.; Stewart, J. F.; Larson, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    Design procedures are reviewed for variable integral control to optimize response (VICTOR) algorithms and results of preliminary flight tests are presented. The F-8C aircraft is operated in the remotely augmented vehicle (RAV) mode, with the control laws implemented as FORTRAN programs on a ground-based computer. Pilot commands and sensor information are telemetered to the ground, where the data are processed to form surface commands which are then telemetered back to the aircraft. The RAV mode represents a singlestring (simplex) system and is therefore vulnerable to a hardover since comparison monitoring is not possible. Hence, extensive error checking is conducted on both the ground and airborne computers to prevent the development of potentially hazardous situations. Experience with the RAV monitoring and validation procedures is described.

  16. Flying Eyes and Hidden Controllers: A Qualitative Study of People’s Privacy Perceptions of Civilian Drones in The US

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Yang; Xia Huichuan; Yao Yaxing; Huang Yun

    2016-01-01

    Drones are unmanned aircraft controlled remotely or operated autonomously. While the extant literature suggests that drones can in principle invade people’s privacy, little is known about how people actually think about drones. Drawing from a series of in-depth interviews conducted in the United States, we provide a novel and rich account of people’s privacy perceptions of drones for civilian uses both in general and under specific usage scenarios. Our informants raised both physical and info...

  17. Experimental study on fly ash capture mercury in flue gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mercedes; DíAZ-SOMOANO; Patricia; ABAD-VALLE; M.Rosa; MARTíNEZ-TARAZONA

    2010-01-01

    Systematic experiments were conducted on a fixed-bed reactor to investigate the interaction between fly ash and mercury,the results implied that fly ash can capture mercury effectively.Among different fly ashes,the unburned carbon in the FA2 and FA3 fly ashes has the highest mercury capture capacity,up to 10.3 and 9.36 μg/g,respectively,which is close to that of commercial activated carbon.There is no obvious relationship between mercury content and carbon content or BET surface area of fly ash.Petrography classification standard was applied to distinguish fly ash carbon particles.Carbon content is not the only variable that controls mercury capture on fly ash,there are likely significant differences in the mercury capture capacities of the various carbon forms.Mercury capture capacity mainly depends on the content of anisotropy carbon particles with porous network structure.

  18. Perpetual factors involved in performance of air traffic controllers using a microwave landing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershzohn, G.

    1978-01-01

    The task involved the control of two simulated aircraft targets per trial, in a 37.0 -km radius terminal area, by means of conventional radar vectoring and/or speed control. The goal was to insure that the two targets crossed the Missed Approach Point (MAP) at the runway threshold exactly 60 sec apart. The effects on controller performance of the MLS configuration under wind and no-wind conditions were examined. The data for mean separation time between targets at the MAP and the range about that mean were analyzed by appropriate analyses of variance. Significant effects were found for mean separation times as a result of the configuration of the MLS and for interaction between the configuration and wind conditions. The analysis of variance for range indicated significantly poorer performance under the wind condition. These findings are believed to be a result of certain perceptual factors involved in radar air traffic control (ATC) using the MLS with separation of targets in time.

  19. Protective method of flying control system under high altitude nuclear detonation%高空核爆环境下飞行控制系统的防护方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林金永; 张春侠; 周春梅; 马继峰; 董文杰

    2012-01-01

    Strong electromagnetic radiation under high altitude nuclear detonation can cause the instantaneous and permanent degradation or failure of (he functions of spacecraft control system. The latent threat and damage effects on spacecraft flying control system under strong electromagnetic radiation environments are firstly analyzed, then the relevant protective concepts and methods for flying control system under strong electromagnetic pulse and strong radiation environments are investigated. The ability resisting strong electromagnetic radiation damage of spacecraft will be significantly improved when the protective method is applied to flying control system for radiation hardening design.%针对高空核爆引起的强电磁辐射使空间飞行器控制系统发生瞬时和持续的功能降级以及失效的问题,分析了强电磁辐射对空间飞行器飞行控制系统的潜在威胁和损伤效应,提出了强电磁脉冲辐射和强射线辐射环境下飞行控制系统的一些防护概念和方法.这些方法应用于飞行控制系统抗辐射加固设计,可显著提高空间飞行器抗强电磁辐射损伤能力.

  20. The effect of parental involvement laws on teen birth control use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabia, Joseph J; Anderson, D Mark

    2016-01-01

    In Volume 32, Issue 5 of this journal, Colman, Dee, and Joyce (CDJ) used data from the National Youth Risk Behavior Surveys (NYRBS) and found that parental involvement (PI) laws had no effect on the probability that minors abstain from sex or use contraception. We re-examine this question, augmenting the NYRBS with data from the State Youth Risk Behavior Surveys (SYRBS), and use a variety of identification strategies to control for state-level time-varying unmeasured heterogeneity. Consistent with CDJ, we find that PI laws have no effect on minor teen females' abstinence decisions. However, when we exploit additional state policy variation unavailable to CDJ and use non-minor teens as a within-state control group, we find evidence to suggest that PI laws are associated with an increase in the probability that sexually active minor teen females use birth control. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Architectural Issues of a Location-Aware System Applied in Fruit Fly E-Monitoring and Spraying Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Tsiligiridis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper we describe an e-monitoring location-aware system, based on a real-time Wireless Multimedia Sensor Network (WMSN, integrated with a semi-automatic trapping and insect counting, based on existing traps, able to acquire and transmit data to a remote server, and a Decision Support System (DSS that will perform the final optimization of the control treatments. In spite the tremendous technological advances in recent years, WSNs cannot meet all the requirements of ubiquitous intelligent environment mainly because scalar data such as temperature, air humidity, air pressure, etc., are not able to detect all environmental events, like insect detection. For this reasons the efforts are concentrated on the design issues of a WMSN platform, able to collect and integrate multimedia data from the field. Further, a flexible architecture needs to be adopted for integration of a WMSN to the cloud for multimedia sensor data collection and sharing using Web services.

  2. Use of electroporation as an option to transform the Horn Fly, Haematobia irritans: a species recalcitrant to microinjection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn flies are serious pests of cattle in North America and control of these flies has primarily relied on insecticides. However, the heavy use of insecticides has led to the development of resistance in horn flies and novel methods of fly control are greatly needed. The use of transformation techno...

  3. The effective eradication and control strategies for tsetse and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trypanosomiasis is a zoonotic disease transmitted mainly by tsetse flies, ... Trypanosomes are protozoan blood parasites that cause animal and human ... Parasite control which involves chemotherapy (use of trypanocidal drugs) to kill the ...

  4. NOF1 encodes an Arabidopsis protein involved in the control of rRNA expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwana Harscoët

    Full Text Available The control of ribosomal RNA biogenesis is essential for the regulation of protein synthesis in eukaryotic cells. Here, we report the characterization of NOF1 that encodes a putative nucleolar protein involved in the control of rRNA expression in Arabidopsis. The gene has been isolated by T-DNA tagging and its function verified by the characterization of a second allele and genetic complementation of the mutants. The nof1 mutants are affected in female gametogenesis and embryo development. This result is consistent with the detection of NOF1 mRNA in all tissues throughout plant life's cycle, and preferentially in differentiating cells. Interestingly, the closely related proteins from zebra fish and yeast are also necessary for cell division and differentiation. We showed that the nof1-1 mutant displays higher rRNA expression and hypomethylation of rRNA promoter. Taken together, the results presented here demonstrated that NOF1 is an Arabidopsis gene involved in the control of rRNA expression, and suggested that it encodes a putative nucleolar protein, the function of which may be conserved in eukaryotes.

  5. Rapid Automatized Naming in Children with Dyslexia: Is Inhibitory Control Involved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bexkens, Anika; van den Wildenberg, Wery P M; Tijms, Jurgen

    2015-08-01

    Rapid automatized naming (RAN) is widely seen as an important indicator of dyslexia. The nature of the cognitive processes involved in rapid naming is however still a topic of controversy. We hypothesized that in addition to the involvement of phonological processes and processing speed, RAN is a function of inhibition processes, in particular of interference control. A total 86 children with dyslexia and 31 normal readers were recruited. Our results revealed that in addition to phonological processing and processing speed, interference control predicts rapid naming in dyslexia, but in contrast to these other two cognitive processes, inhibition is not significantly associated with their reading and spelling skills. After variance in reading and spelling associated with processing speed, interference control and phonological processing was partialled out, naming speed was no longer consistently associated with the reading and spelling skills of children with dyslexia. Finally, dyslexic children differed from normal readers on naming speed, literacy skills, phonological processing and processing speed, but not on inhibition processes. Both theoretical and clinical interpretations of these results are discussed.

  6. Optimizing the colour and fabric of targets for the control of the tsetse fly Glossina fuscipes fuscipes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny M Lindh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most cases of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT start with a bite from one of the subspecies of Glossina fuscipes. Tsetse use a range of olfactory and visual stimuli to locate their hosts and this response can be exploited to lure tsetse to insecticide-treated targets thereby reducing transmission. To provide a rational basis for cost-effective designs of target, we undertook studies to identify the optimal target colour. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: On the Chamaunga islands of Lake Victoria , Kenya, studies were made of the numbers of G. fuscipes fuscipes attracted to targets consisting of a panel (25 cm square of various coloured fabrics flanked by a panel (also 25 cm square of fine black netting. Both panels were covered with an electrocuting grid to catch tsetse as they contacted the target. The reflectances of the 37 different-coloured cloth panels utilised in the study were measured spectrophotometrically. Catch was positively correlated with percentage reflectance at the blue (460 nm wavelength and negatively correlated with reflectance at UV (360 nm and green (520 nm wavelengths. The best target was subjectively blue, with percentage reflectances of 3%, 29%, and 20% at 360 nm, 460 nm and 520 nm respectively. The worst target was also, subjectively, blue, but with high reflectances at UV (35% reflectance at 360 nm wavelengths as well as blue (36% reflectance at 460 nm; the best low UV-reflecting blue caught 3× more tsetse than the high UV-reflecting blue. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Insecticide-treated targets to control G. f. fuscipes should be blue with low reflectance in both the UV and green bands of the spectrum. Targets that are subjectively blue will perform poorly if they also reflect UV strongly. The selection of fabrics for targets should be guided by spectral analysis of the cloth across both the spectrum visible to humans and the UV region.

  7. Sensory-motor networks involved in speech production and motor control: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behroozmand, Roozbeh; Shebek, Rachel; Hansen, Daniel R; Oya, Hiroyuki; Robin, Donald A; Howard, Matthew A; Greenlee, Jeremy D W

    2015-04-01

    Speaking is one of the most complex motor behaviors developed to facilitate human communication. The underlying neural mechanisms of speech involve sensory-motor interactions that incorporate feedback information for online monitoring and control of produced speech sounds. In the present study, we adopted an auditory feedback pitch perturbation paradigm and combined it with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) recordings in order to identify brain areas involved in speech production and motor control. Subjects underwent fMRI scanning while they produced a steady vowel sound /a/ (speaking) or listened to the playback of their own vowel production (playback). During each condition, the auditory feedback from vowel production was either normal (no perturbation) or perturbed by an upward (+600 cents) pitch-shift stimulus randomly. Analysis of BOLD responses during speaking (with and without shift) vs. rest revealed activation of a complex network including bilateral superior temporal gyrus (STG), Heschl's gyrus, precentral gyrus, supplementary motor area (SMA), Rolandic operculum, postcentral gyrus and right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). Performance correlation analysis showed that the subjects produced compensatory vocal responses that significantly correlated with BOLD response increases in bilateral STG and left precentral gyrus. However, during playback, the activation network was limited to cortical auditory areas including bilateral STG and Heschl's gyrus. Moreover, the contrast between speaking vs. playback highlighted a distinct functional network that included bilateral precentral gyrus, SMA, IFG, postcentral gyrus and insula. These findings suggest that speech motor control involves feedback error detection in sensory (e.g. auditory) cortices that subsequently activate motor-related areas for the adjustment of speech parameters during speaking. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Systematic Integrated Process Design and Control of Reactive Distillation Processes Involving Multi-elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansouri, Seyed Soheil; Sales-Cruz, Mauricio; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted

    2016-01-01

    In this work, integrated process design and control of reactive distillation processes that involve multiple elements (more than two) is addressed through a computer-aided hierarchical decomposition-based framework. Multiple elements are encountered for reactive systems when four or more compounds...... (including inert compounds) are encountered. The reactive distillation design methods and tools which are similar in concept to design of binary non-reactive distillations and binary reactive distillations are used for design of multi-element reactive distillation processes, such as driving force approach...

  9. Flying and Your Child's Ears

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Media Flying and Your Child's Ears KidsHealth > For Parents > Flying and Your Child's Ears Print A A A What's in this article? Flying's Effects on Ears Tips for Easing Ear Pain en español Como cuidar los oídos de su hijo(a) cuando vuele en avión Flying's Effects on ...

  10. Flying in North America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaromír Procházka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Flying all over the world is very challenging and demanding. Although ICAO is covering every specific detail by rules, there are some personal experiences which cannot be substituted. Some of them are point out in the article.

  11. Investigation of Fly Ash and Activated Carbon Obtained from Pulverized Coal Boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward K. Levy; Christopher Kiely; Zheng Yao

    2006-08-31

    One of the techniques for Hg capture in coal-fired boilers involves injection of activated carbon (AC) into the boiler downstream of the air preheater. Hg is adsorbed onto the AC particles and fly ash, which are then both removed in an electrostatic precipitator or baghouse. This project addressed the issues of Hg on activated carbon and on fly ash from a materials re-use point of view. It also addressed the possible connection between SCR reactors, fly ash properties and Hg capture. The project has determined the feasibility of separating AC from fly ash in a fluidized bed and of regenerating the separated AC by heating the AC to elevated temperatures in a fluidized bed. The temperatures needed to drive off the Hg from the ash in a fluidized bed have also been determined. Finally, samples of fly ash from power plants with SCR reactors for NO{sub x} control have been analyzed in an effort to determine the effects of SCR on the ash.

  12. The Fly Printer - Extended

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beloff, Laura; Klaus, Malena

    2016-01-01

    Artist talk / Work-in-progress What is the purpose of a machine or an artifact, like the Fly Printer, that is dislocated, that produces images that have no meaning, no instrumentality, that depict nothing in the world? The biological and the cultural are reunited in this apparatus as a possibilit...... the results. The extended version of the Fly Printer containing the technological perception and DNNs is a collaboration between Laura Beloff and Malene Theres Klaus...

  13. [Involvement of cyclic adenosine monophosphate in the control of motile behavior of Physarum polycephalum plasmodium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveeva, N B; Teplov, V A; Nezvetskiĭ, A R; Orlova, T G; Beĭlina, S I

    2012-01-01

    Possible involvement of autocrine factors into the control of motile behavior via a receptor-mediated mechanism was investigated in Physarum polycephalum plasmodium, a multinuclear amoeboid cell with the auto-oscillatory mode of motility. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and extracellular cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase, its involvement into the control of plasmodium motile behavior was proved by action of its strong inhibitor, were regarded as putative autocrine factors. It was shown that the plasmodium secreted cAMP. When it was introduced into agar support, 0,1-1 mM cAMP induced a delay of the plasmodium spreading and its transition to migration. When locally applied, cAMP at the same concentrations induced typical for attractant action the increase in oscillation frequency and the decrease of ectoplasm elasticity. The ability to exhibit positive chemotaxis in cAMP gradient and the dependence of its realization were shown to depend on the plasmodium state. Chemotaxis test specimens obtained from the migrating plasmodium, unlike those obtained from growing culture, generate alternative fronts which compete effectively with fronts oriented towards the attractant increment. The results obtained support our supposition stated earlier that advance of the Physarum polycephalum plasmodium leading edge is determined by local extracellular cAMP gradients arising from a time delay between secretion and hydrolysis of the nucleotide.

  14. NLP is a novel transcription regulator involved in VSG expression site control in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Mani Shankar; Kushwaha, Manish; Ersfeld, Klaus; Fullbrook, Alexander; Stanne, Tara M; Rudenko, Gloria

    2011-03-01

    Trypanosoma brucei mono-allelically expresses one of approximately 1500 variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes while multiplying in the mammalian bloodstream. The active VSG is transcribed by RNA polymerase I in one of approximately 15 telomeric VSG expression sites (ESs). T. brucei is unusual in controlling gene expression predominantly post-transcriptionally, and how ESs are mono-allelically controlled remains a mystery. Here we identify a novel transcription regulator, which resembles a nucleoplasmin-like protein (NLP) with an AT-hook motif. NLP is key for ES control in bloodstream form T. brucei, as NLP knockdown results in 45- to 65-fold derepression of the silent VSG221 ES. NLP is also involved in repression of transcription in the inactive VSG Basic Copy arrays, minichromosomes and procyclin loci. NLP is shown to be enriched on the 177- and 50-bp simple sequence repeats, the non-transcribed regions around rDNA and procyclin, and both active and silent ESs. Blocking NLP synthesis leads to downregulation of the active ES, indicating that NLP plays a role in regulating appropriate levels of transcription of ESs in both their active and silent state. Discovery of the unusual transcription regulator NLP provides new insight into the factors that are critical for ES control.

  15. Private Practitioners’ Perspectives on Their Involvement With the Tuberculosis Control Programme in a Southern Indian State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon Salve

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Public and private health sectors both play a crucial role in the health systems of low- and middleincome countries (LMICs. The tuberculosis (TB control strategy in India encourages the public sector to actively partner with private practitioners (PPs to improve the quality of front line service delivery. However, ensuring effective and sustainable involvement of PPs constitutes a major challenge. This paper reports the findings from an empirical study focusing on the perspectives and experiences of PPs towards their involvement in TB control programme in India. Methods The study was carried out between November 2010 and December 2011 in a district of a Southern Indian State and utilised qualitative methodologies, combining observations and in-depth interviews with 21 PPs from different medical systems. The collected data was coded and analysed using thematic analysis. Results PPs perceived themselves to be crucial healthcare providers, with different roles within the public-private mix (PPM TB policy. Despite this, PPs felt neglected and undervalued in the actual process of implementation of the PPM-TB policy. The entire process was considered to be government driven and their professional skills and knowledge of different medical systems remained unrecognised at the policy level, and weakened their relationship and bond with the policy and with the programme. PPs had contrasting perceptions about the different components of the TB programme that demonstrated the public sector’s dominance in the overall implementation of the DOTS strategy. Although PPs felt responsible for their TB patients, they found it difficult to perceive themselves as ‘partners with the TB programme.’ Conclusion Public-private partnerships (PPPs are increasingly utilized as a public health strategy to strengthen health systems. These policies will fail if the concerns of the PPs are neglected. To ensure their long-term involvement in the programme the

  16. 水泥粉煤灰稳定碎石基层施工和质量控制的分析%Analysis on the Fly Ash Cement Stabilized Macadam Base Construction and Quality Control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾爱军

    2015-01-01

    水泥粉煤灰稳定碎石基层有着施工操作性能较好、早期强度较高的优点,能够满足当前路面设计的要求和规范。文章立足于施工实践,对水泥粉煤灰稳定碎石基层的施工工艺流程以及质量控制的要点,进行了详细的探讨。%Fly ash cement stabilized gravel base has good operation performance , the advantages of high early strength, can meet the requirements of the current pavement design and specifications. Based on the construction practice, the main points of the construction process and quality control of the fly ash cement stabilized gravel base is discussed concretely in the paper.

  17. FliZ is a global regulatory protein affecting the expression of flagellar and virulence genes in individual Xenorhabdus nematophila bacterial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégory Jubelin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneity in the expression of various bacterial genes has been shown to result in the presence of individuals with different phenotypes within clonal bacterial populations. The genes specifying motility and flagellar functions are coordinately regulated and form a complex regulon, the flagellar regulon. Complex interplay has recently been demonstrated in the regulation of flagellar and virulence gene expression in many bacterial pathogens. We show here that FliZ, a DNA-binding protein, plays a key role in the insect pathogen, Xenorhabdus nematophila, affecting not only hemolysin production and virulence in insects, but efficient swimming motility. RNA-Seq analysis identified FliZ as a global regulatory protein controlling the expression of 278 Xenorhabdus genes either directly or indirectly. FliZ is required for the efficient expression of all flagellar genes, probably through its positive feedback loop, which controls expression of the flhDC operon, the master regulator of the flagellar circuit. FliZ also up- or downregulates the expression of numerous genes encoding non-flagellar proteins potentially involved in key steps of the Xenorhabdus lifecycle. Single-cell analysis revealed the bimodal expression of six identified markers of the FliZ regulon during exponential growth of the bacterial population. In addition, a combination of fluorescence-activated cell sorting and RT-qPCR quantification showed that this bimodality generated a mixed population of cells either expressing ("ON state" or not expressing ("OFF state" FliZ-dependent genes. Moreover, studies of a bacterial population exposed to a graded series of FliZ concentrations showed that FliZ functioned as a rheostat, controlling the rate of transition between the "OFF" and "ON" states in individuals. FliZ thus plays a key role in cell fate decisions, by transiently creating individuals with different potentials for motility and host interactions.

  18. 粉煤灰作为廉价吸附剂控制污染物排放的研究进展%Research development of controlling air pollutions using fly ash as a low cost adsorbent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈彦广; 陆佳; 韩洪晶; 陈颖; 宋华

    2013-01-01

    Fly ash is a solid pollutant generated during coal combustion. Utilization of fly ash would help reduce the environmental burden and enhance economic benefit. This paper reviewed the mechanism of fly ash formation in coal combustion,physical and chemical changes at high temperature. The composition,structure and morphology of fly ash were analyzed and the applications of fly ash were also discussed. Fly ash has been used as a low-cost adsorbent for adsorption of NOx,SOx,Hg, gaseous organic compounds and CO2 in flue gas,and heavy metals,P,F,organic compounds in waste water. The unburned carbon played an important role in the adsorption process and the adsorption capacity of fly ash can be remarkably increased with physical and chemical modifications. Fly ash has been proven to be a promising and high efficient adsorbent for the removal of various pollutants. Future research on fly ash for preparing molecular sieve applications in pollution control was proposed.%  能源转化过程中煤炭燃烧产生大量粉煤灰,如何通过减少其对生态环境造成的负担和提高其经济效益实现粉煤灰资源化利用,已成为了国内外研究的热点。本文综述了煤粉在高温燃烧过程中经过物理和化学变化形成粉煤灰的原理,分析了粉煤灰组成、结构和形貌,阐述了其主要利用途径。重点介绍了粉煤灰作为廉价吸附剂,在脱除烟气中SOx、NOx、Hg、有机气体、CO2以及脱除废水中重金属离子、P和F及有机化合物(如酚类、农药、染料、石油烃类有机污染物)等应用。许多研究证实粉煤灰中未燃烧的炭在吸附污染物过程中起到重要作用,通过物理和化学处理改性后可明显提高粉煤灰的吸附性能。粉煤灰在烟气和废水污染物控制方面应用前景良好,利用粉煤灰制备分子筛进行污染物处理将是今后粉煤灰发展的重要方向。

  19. Efficacy and duration of three residual insecticides on cotton duck and vinyl tent surfaces for control of the sand fly Phlebotomus papatasi (Diptera: Psychodidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many military tents are made of vinyl and cotton duck. Because it is useful to treat exterior tent surfaces to manage phlebotomine sand flies, DoD and ARS scientists evaluated the efficacy of 3 residual insecticides on both tent fabrics. P. papatasi was effectively killed by shade-stored and sun-exp...

  20. Evaluation of Cuelure and Methyl Eugenol solid lure and insecticide dispensers for fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) monitoring and control in Tahiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Performance of solid male lure (cuelure (C-L)/raspberry ketone (RK) - against Bactrocera tyroni (Froggatt), and methyl eugenol (ME) - against oriental fruit fly, B. dorsalis (Hendel) and insecticide formulations, were evaluated in Tahiti Island (French Polynesia), as alternatives to current monitori...

  1. An integrated approach to consumer representation and involvement in a multicentre randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langston, Anne L; McCallum, Marilyn; Campbell, Marion K; Robertson, Clare; Ralston, Stuart H

    2005-01-01

    Although, consumer involvement in individual studies is often limited, their involvement in guiding health research is generally considered to be beneficial. This paper outlines our experiences of an integrated relationship between the organisers of a clinical trial and a consumer organisation. The PRISM trial is a UK multicentre, randomized controlled trial comparing treatment strategies for Paget's disease of the bone. The National Association for the Relief of Paget's Disease (NARPD) is the only UK support group for sufferers of Paget's disease and has worked closely with the PRISM team from the outset. NARPD involvement is integral to the conduct of the trial and specific roles have included: peer-review; trial steering committee membership; provision of advice to participants, and promotion of the trial amongst Paget's disease patients. The integrated relationship has yielded benefits to both the trial and the consumer organisation. The benefits for the trial have included: recruitment of participants via NARPD contacts; well-informed participants; unsolicited patient advocacy of the trial; and interested and pro-active collaborators. For the NARPD and Paget's disease sufferers, benefits have included: increased awareness of Paget's disease; increased access to relevant health research; increased awareness of the NARPD services; and wider transfer of diagnosis and management knowledge to/from health care professionals. Our experience has shown that an integrated approach between a trial team and a consumer organisation is worthwhile. Adoption of such an approach in other trials may yield significant improvements in recruitment and quality of participant information flow. There are, however, resource implications for both parties.

  2. Scientists and public involvement: a consultation on the relation between malaria, vector control and transgenic mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boëte, Christophe

    2011-12-01

    Among the hopes for vector-based malaria control, the use of transgenic mosquitoes able to kill malaria parasites is seen as a potential way to interrupt malaria transmission. While this potential solution is gaining some support, the ethical and social aspects related to this high-tech method remain largely unexplored and underestimated. Related to those latter points, the aim of the present survey is to determine how scientists working on malaria and its vector mosquitoes perceive public opinion and how they evaluate public consultations on their research. This study has been performed through a questionnaire addressing questions related to the type of research, the location, the nationality and the perception of the public involvement by scientists. The results suggest that even if malaria researchers agree to interact with a non-scientific audience, they (especially the ones from the global North) remain quite reluctant to have their research project submitted in a jargon-free version to the evaluation and the prior-agreement by a group of non-specialists. The study, by interrogating the links between the scientific community and the public from the perspective of the scientists, reveals the importance of fostering structures and processes that could lead to a better involvement of a non specialist public in the actual debates linking scientific, technological and public health issues in Africa.

  3. Changes of Sand Fly Populations and Leishmania infantum Infection Rates in an Irrigated Village Located in Arid Central Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barhoumi, Walid; Fares, Wasfi; Cherni, Saifedine; Derbali, Mohamed; Dachraoui, Khalil; Chelbi, Ifhem; Ramalho-Ortigao, Marcelo; Beier, John C; Zhioua, Elyes

    2016-03-16

    The current spread of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis (ZVL) throughout arid areas of Central Tunisia is a major public health concern. The main objective of this study is to investigate whether the development of irrigation in arid bio-geographical areas in Central Tunisia have led to the establishment of a stable cycle involving sand flies of the subgenus Larroussius and Leishmania infantum, and subsequently to the emergence of ZVL. Sand flies were collected from the village of Saddaguia, a highly irrigated zone located within an arid bio-geographical area of Central Tunisia by using modified Centers for Diseases Control (CDC) light traps. Morphological keys were used to identify sand flies. Collected sand flies were pooled with up to 30 specimens per pool according to date and tested by nested Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) DNA sequencing from positive pools was used to identify Leishmania spp. A total of 4915 sand flies (2422 females and 2493 males) were collected from Saddaguia in September and in October 2014. Morphological identification confirmed sand flies of the subgenus Larroussius to be predominant. PCR analysis followed by DNA sequencing indicated that 15 pools were infected with L. infantum yielding an overall infection rate of 0.6%. The majority of the infected pools were of sand fly species belonging to subgenus Larroussius. Intense irrigation applied to the arid bio-geographical areas in Central Tunisia is at the origin of the development of an environment capable of sustaining important populations of sand flies of the subgenus Larroussius. This has led to the establishment of stable transmission cycles of L. infantum and subsequently to the emergence of ZVL.

  4. Clinical Significance of Auditive Involvement in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Laura; Gutierrez-Farfan, Ileana; Peña-Ayala, Angelica; Perez-Bastidas, Maria-Esther; Espinosa, Rolando

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) can involve the incudomalleolar or incudostapedial articulations. Objective. To know the punctual prevalence of audiological alterations in patients with RA. Patients and Methods. RA patients and their controls (Cs), were evaluated by Tonal Audiometry (AU); if there were alterations in the air conduction (AC), bone conduction (BC), Logoaudiometry (LG), and Tympanometry (T) were performed. Results. 45 RA patients and 45 Cs were evaluated. RA patients had 40% of bilateral and 17.8% unilateral alteration versus Cs with 22.2% bilateral and 4.4% unilateral alteration versus Cs with 22.2% bilateral and 4.4% unilateral in AC audiometry. In conventional T (CT) As-type curves in patients with RA, there were 22 LE (48.8%) and 26 RE (57.7%) versus Cs, there were16 RE (35.5%) and 20 LE (44.4%). In High-frequency T (HFT): the 3B1G pattern in RA more frequent versus Controls (Cs) in RE (P = .002 and LE (P = .01). There were no differences according to RA activity or RA disease evolution. Conclusions. There is a greater tendency of auditive loss of As curves in CT (rigidity in ossicular chain) and of the 3B1G pattern in HFT in RA. PMID:22482066

  5. Neuronal systems and circuits involved in the control of food intake and adaptive thermogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Alexandre; Richard, Denis

    2017-03-01

    With the still-growing prevalence of obesity worldwide, major efforts are made to understand the various behavioral, environmental, and genetic factors that promote excess fat gain. Obesity results from an imbalance between energy intake and energy expenditure, which emphasizes the importance of deciphering the mechanisms behind energy balance regulation to understand its physiopathology. The control of energy balance is assured by brain systems/circuits capable of generating adequate ingestive and thermogenic responses to maintain the stability of energy reserves, which implies a proper integration of the homeostatic signals that inform about the status of the energy stores. In this article, we overview the organization and functionality of key neuronal circuits or pathways involved in the control of food intake and energy expenditure. We review the role of the corticolimbic (executive and reward) and autonomic systems that integrate their activities to regulate energy balance. We also describe the mechanisms and pathways whereby homeostatic sensing is achieved in response to variations of homeostatic hormones, such as leptin, insulin, and ghrelin, while putting some emphasis on the prominent importance of the mechanistic target of the rapamycin signaling pathway in coordinating the homeostatic sensing process. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  6. Longitudinal investigation on learned helplessness tested under negative and positive reinforcement involving stimulus control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Emileane C; Hunziker, Maria Helena

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we investigated whether (a) animals demonstrating the learned helplessness effect during an escape contingency also show learning deficits under positive reinforcement contingencies involving stimulus control and (b) the exposure to positive reinforcement contingencies eliminates the learned helplessness effect under an escape contingency. Rats were initially exposed to controllable (C), uncontrollable (U) or no (N) shocks. After 24h, they were exposed to 60 escapable shocks delivered in a shuttlebox. In the following phase, we selected from each group the four subjects that presented the most typical group pattern: no escape learning (learned helplessness effect) in Group U and escape learning in Groups C and N. All subjects were then exposed to two phases, the (1) positive reinforcement for lever pressing under a multiple FR/Extinction schedule and (2) a re-test under negative reinforcement (escape). A fourth group (n=4) was exposed only to the positive reinforcement sessions. All subjects showed discrimination learning under multiple schedule. In the escape re-test, the learned helplessness effect was maintained for three of the animals in Group U. These results suggest that the learned helplessness effect did not extend to discriminative behavior that is positively reinforced and that the learned helplessness effect did not revert for most subjects after exposure to positive reinforcement. We discuss some theoretical implications as related to learned helplessness as an effect restricted to aversive contingencies and to the absence of reversion after positive reinforcement. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: insert SI title.

  7. Gemin5: A Multitasking RNA-Binding Protein Involved in Translation Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Piñeiro

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Gemin5 is a RNA-binding protein (RBP that was first identified as a peripheral component of the survival of motor neurons (SMN complex. This predominantly cytoplasmic protein recognises the small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs through its WD repeat domains, allowing assembly of the SMN complex into small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs. Additionally, the amino-terminal end of the protein has been reported to possess cap-binding capacity and to interact with the eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E. Gemin5 was also shown to downregulate translation, to be a substrate of the picornavirus L protease and to interact with viral internal ribosome entry site (IRES elements via a bipartite non-canonical RNA-binding site located at its carboxy-terminal end. These features link Gemin5 with translation control events. Thus, beyond its role in snRNPs biogenesis, Gemin5 appears to be a multitasking protein cooperating in various RNA-guided processes. In this review, we will summarise current knowledge of Gemin5 functions. We will discuss the involvement of the protein on translation control and propose a model to explain how the proteolysis fragments of this RBP in picornavirus-infected cells could modulate protein synthesis.

  8. Using Entomopathogenic Nematodes for Control of Mushroom Fly, Bifronsina bifrons (Stenhammar) (Diptera: Sphaeroceridae)%利用昆虫病原线虫防治草菇双额岩小粪蝇

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘桂清; 徐洁莲; 欧剑峰; 吴华; 黄鸿

    2012-01-01

    草菇双额岩小粪蝇Bifronsina bifrons是当前草菇生产中的重要害虫。本文测定了5个线虫品系在(30±0.5)℃下对草菇双额岩小粪蝇的致死率和LT50。结果表明,各线虫品系在浓度4000 IJs mL 1下的LT50范围为2.13~4.71 d,其中夜蛾斯氏线虫Steinernema feltiae SN品系对双额岩小粪蝇的毒力最大,LT50为2.13 d,侵染5 d后的致死率达86.67%。菇房施用4×106IJs.m 2S.feltiae SN品系和嗜菌异小杆线虫Heterorhabditisbacteriophora H06品系悬浮液于培养基表面6 d后,对双额岩小粪蝇的防治效果分别达到70.37%和45.68%,SN线虫对双额岩小粪蝇的防效与阿维菌素相当。%Mushroom fly,Bifronsina bifrons,is an important insect pest in straw mushroom production in South China.Virulence of five strains of Steinernema and Heterorhabditis to the fly was bioassayed at(30±0.5) ℃ in laboratory.Results showed that LT50values of the five strains to the mushroom fly ranged from 2.13 d to 4.71 d.S.feltiae SN strain was a potential biocontrol agent against the mushroom fly with LT50value of 2.13 d and 86.67% of lethality at the concentration of 4000 IJs mL 1at 5 d after treatment.Field trails demonstrated that when nematode suspensions containing 4×106IJs m 2 were sprayed onto the mushroom beds the day before inoculation,control efficacy of S.feltiae SN strain and H.bacteriophora H06 strain against the mushroom fly at 6 d after treatment was 70.37% and 45.68%,respectively,and the control efficacy of S.feltiae SN strain was almost the same as that of avermectins.

  9. Assessment of sand fly (Diptera, Psychodidae) control using cypermethrin in an endemic area for visceral leishmaniasis, Montes Claros, Minas Gerais State, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barata, Ricardo Andrade; Michalsky, Erika Monteiro; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio; França-Silva, João Carlos; Rocha, Marília Fonseca; Dias, Edelberto Santos

    2011-11-01

    Montes Claros in Minas Gerais State, Brazil, was considered an intense transmission area for visceral leishmaniasis. This study evaluated sand fly fauna after insecticide application. Captures were performed in 10 districts from September 2005 to August 2006 with CDC light traps inside and outside each residence. Cypermethrin was sprayed in two cycles during November/2005 and May/2006. The 636 specimens collected, belonging to 10 species, were predominantly Lutzomyia longipalpis (79%), and most frequently males (70%). The highest percentage of specimens were captured in areas surrounding domiciles (85.8%). The main species were observed to be sensitive to treatment with the insecticide. The results showed a reduction in the number of sand flies collected after use of cypermethrin in homes and annexes, and with residual effect lasting from two to four months.

  10. Assessing Transmission of Salmonella to Bovine Peripheral Lymph Nodes upon Horn Fly Feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olafson, Pia Untalan; Brown, Tyson R; Lohmeyer, Kimberly H; Harvey, Roger B; Nisbet, David J; Loneragan, Guy H; Edrington, Thomas S

    2016-07-01

    Biting arthropods are implicated in the transdermal transmission of Salmonella to bovine peripheral lymph nodes, and such contamination can contribute to increased Salmonella prevalence in processed beef. Since horn flies can acquire Salmonella and then excrete the bacteria in their feces, on-animal fly infestations were conducted in this study to assess whether horn flies have a role in this bacterial transmission. Three Salmonella serotypes were used to assess fly acquisition from and excretion onto cattle. The results indicated that flies can acquire Salmonella from the hide, as assessed by recovery from homogenates of surfacesterilized flies, and that Salmonella persists for at least 5 days in the fly. Fly fecal excreta serves as a bacterial contaminant on the hide, and the overall mean probable estimate of the quantity shed was ≈10(5) most probable number per fly cage area. In 5 days, no transmission of the bacteria to bovine peripheral lymph nodes was evident, prompting an assessment of the effects of prolonged horn fly feeding on transmission. Three groups of animals were infested with flies that had consumed a blood meal containing Salmonella Senftenberg. After 5 days, the study was either terminated or the flies were removed and the cages replenished with unfed flies either once or twice over the course of an 11- or 19-day fly exposure period, respectively. A microlancet-inoculated positive-control animal was included in each group for comparison. The impact of prolonged horn fly feeding was evident, as 8% of lymph nodes cultured were positive from the 5-day exposure, whereas 50 and 42% were positive from 11- and 19-day exposures, respectively. Higher concentrations of Salmonella were recovered from fly-infested animals than from the microlancet-inoculated control, likely a result of repeated inoculations over time by flies versus a single introduction. The data described provide new insights into the transmission dynamics of Salmonella in cattle

  11. 小型飞翼布局无人机控制律设计与试飞验证%Flight Control Law Design and Flight Test for Small Flying Wing Aircraft

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马雯; 张宁; 马蓉; 陈小龙; 张奕煊

    2015-01-01

    For a due to the cancellation of the vertical tail and horizontal tail result in decreased stability, especially unstable heading for flying-wing. We design the flight control law for the full process base on the scaled flying-wing aircraft. Taking certain type shrinkage ratio aircraft of flying-wing as the control object, analysis aerodynamic characteristics of the aircraft longitudinal and lateral directional, and using eigenstructure assignment method, respectively, the longitudinal and lateral directional add stability design. The simulation results and actual test data show that, the control law can track a desired trajectory effectively, inhibit the gust disturbance, and has great practical significance.%针对无尾飞翼布局的无人机由于取消了水平尾翼和垂直尾翼,导致纵向、横航向的稳定下降,特别是横航向变为静不安定的问题,设计一种小型飞翼布局无人机全流程飞行控制律。以某型飞翼布局飞机的缩比飞机为控制对象,分析该飞机纵向与横航向的气动特性,采用特征结构配置方式,分别对纵向与横航向进行增稳设计。仿真与实际试飞结果表明:该控制律能够很好地跟踪期望的轨迹,并能有效地抑制侧风扰动,具有良好的工程应用价值。

  12. Kite-Flying Fun

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    China’s kite capital welcomes flying enthusiasts from across the world to its annual carnival Tens of thousands of kite enthusiast from all over the world gathered under the growing swarm of brightly colored kites. Some of the floating and billowing forms had been fashioned into

  13. Fiber optics that fly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Michael J.; Thelen, Donald C., Jr.

    1996-11-01

    The need for autonomous systems to work under unanticipated conditions requires the use of smart sensors. High resolution systems develop tremendous computational loads. Inspiration from animal vision systems can guide us in developing preprocessing approaches implementable in real time with high resolution and deduced computational load. Given a high quality optical path and a 2D array of photodetectors, the resolution of a digital image is determined by the density of photodetectors sampling the image. In order to reconstruct an image, resolution is limited by the distance between adjacent detectors. However, animal eyes resolve images 10-100 times better than either the acceptance angle of a single photodetector or the center-to-center distance between neighboring photodetectors. A new model of the fly's visual system emulates this improved performance, offering a different approach to subpixel resolution. That an animal without a cortex is capable of this performance suggests that high level computation is not involved. The model takes advantage of a photoreceptor cell's internal structure for capturing light. This organelle is a waveguide. Neurocircuitry exploits the waveguide's optical nonlinearities, namely in the shoulder region of its gaussian sensitivity-profile, to extract high resolution information from the visual scene. The receptive fields of optically disparate inputs overlap in space. Photoreceptor input is continuous rather than discretely sampled. The output of the integrating module is a signal proportional to the position of the target within the detector array. For tracking a point source, resolution is 10 times better than the detector spacing. For locating absolute position and orientation of an edge, the model performs similarly. Analog processing is used throughout. Each element is an independent processor of local luminance. Information processing is in real time with continuous update. This processing principle will be reproduced in an

  14. Integrated supply chain inventory model with quality improvement involving controllable lead time and backorder price discount

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Jindal

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available For the past four decades the integrated vendor and buyer supply chain inventory model has been an interesting topic, but quality improvement of defective items in the integrated inventory model with backorder price discount involving controllable lead time has been rarely discussed. The aim of this paper is to minimize the total related cost in the continuous review model by considering the order quantity, reorder point, lead time, process quality, backorder price discount and number of shipment as decision variables. Moreover, we assume that an investment function is used to improve the process quality. The lead time demand follows a normal distribution. In addition, the buyer offers backorder price discount to motivate the customers for possible backorders. There are some defective items in the arrival lot, so its treatment is also taken in account in this paper. We develop an iterative procedure for finding the optimal values of decision variables and numerical example is presented to illustrate the solution procedure. Additionally, sensitivity analysis with respect to major parameters is also carried out.

  15. Community Involvement in Enhancing the Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) Controlled Vocabularies (Keywords)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, T.; Ritz, S.; Aleman, A.; Genazzio, M.; Morahan, M.; Wharton, S.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) develops and expands a hierarchical set of controlled vocabularies (keywords) covering the Earth sciences and associated information (data centers, projects, platforms, instruments, etc.). The purpose of the keywords is to describe Earth science data and services in a consistent and comprehensive manner, allowing for the precise searching of metadata and subsequent retrieval of data and services. The keywords are accessible in a standardized SKOSRDFOWL representation and are used as an authoritative taxonomy, as a source for developing ontologies, and to search and access Earth Science data within online metadata catalogues. The keyword development approach involves: (1) receiving community suggestions, (2) triaging community suggestions, (3) evaluating the keywords against a set of criteria coordinated by the NASA ESDIS Standards Office, and (4) publication/notification of the keyword changes. This approach emphasizes community input, which helps ensure a high quality, normalized, and relevant keyword structure that will evolve with users changing needs. The Keyword Community Forum, which promotes a responsive, open, and transparent processes, is an area where users can discuss keyword topics and make suggestions for new keywords. The formalized approach could potentially be used as a model for keyword development.

  16. Social attraction mediated by fruit flies' microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venu, Isvarya; Durisko, Zachary; Xu, Jianping; Dukas, Reuven

    2014-04-15

    Larval and adult fruit flies are attracted to volatiles emanating from food substrates that have been occupied by larvae. We tested whether such volatiles are emitted by the larval gut bacteria by conducting tests under bacteria-free (axenic) conditions. We also tested attraction to two bacteria species, Lactobacillus brevis, which we cultured from larvae in our lab, and L. plantarum, a common constituent of fruit flies' microbiome in other laboratory populations and in wild fruit flies. Neither larvae nor adults showed attraction to axenic food that had been occupied by axenic larvae, but both showed the previously reported attraction to standard food that had been occupied by larvae with an intact microbiome. Larvae also showed significant attraction to volatiles from axenic food and larvae to which we added only either L. brevis or L. plantarum, and volatiles from L. brevis reared on its optimal growth medium. Controlled learning experiments indicated that larvae experienced with both standard and axenic used food do not perceive either as superior, while focal larvae experienced with simulated used food, which contains burrows, perceive it as superior to unused food. Our results suggest that flies rely on microbiome-derived volatiles for long-distance attraction to suitable food patches. Under natural settings, fruits often contain harmful fungi and bacteria, and both L. brevis and L. plantarum produce compounds that suppress the growth of some antagonistic fungi and bacteria. The larval microbiome volatiles may therefore lead prospective fruit flies towards substrates with a hospitable microbial environment.

  17. A FLYING WIRE SYSTEM IN THE AGS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HUANG,H.; BUXTON,W.; MAHLER,G.; MARUSIC,A.; ROSER,T.; SMITH,G.; SYPHERS,M.; WILLIAMS,N.; WITKOVER,R.

    1999-03-29

    As the AGS prepares to serve as the injector for RHIC, monitoring and control of the beam transverse emittance become a major and important topic. Before the installation of the flying wire system, the emittance was measured with ionization profile monitors in the AGS, which require correction for space charge effects. It is desirable to have a second means of measuring profile that is less depend on intensity. A flying wire system has been installed in the AGS recently to perform this task. This paper discusses the hardware and software setup and the capabilities of the system.

  18. Endoplasmic reticulum quality control is involved in the mechanism of endoglin-mediated hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassam R Ali

    Full Text Available Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT is an autosomal dominant genetic condition affecting the vascular system and is characterised by epistaxis, arteriovenous malformations and mucocutaneous and gastrointestinal telangiectases. This disorder affects approximately 1 in 8,000 people worldwide. Significant morbidity is associated with this condition in affected individuals, and anaemia can be a consequence of repeated haemorrhages from telangiectasia in the gut and nose. In the majority of the cases reported, the condition is caused by mutations in either ACVRL1 or endoglin genes, which encode components of the TGF-beta signalling pathway. Numerous missense mutations in endoglin have been reported as causative defects for HHT but the exact underlying cellular mechanisms caused by these mutations have not been fully established despite data supporting a role for the endoplasmic reticulum (ER quality control machinery. For this reason, we examined the subcellular trafficking of twenty-five endoglin disease-causing missense mutations. The mutant proteins were expressed in HeLa and HEK293 cell lines, and their subcellular localizations were established by confocal fluorescence microscopy alongside the analysis of their N-glycosylation profiles. ER quality control was found to be responsible in eight (L32R, V49F, C53R, V125D, A160D, P165L, I271N and A308D out of eleven mutants located on the orphan extracellular domain in addition to two (C363Y and C382W out of thirteen mutants in the Zona Pellucida (ZP domain. In addition, a single intracellular domain missense mutant was examined and found to traffic predominantly to the plasma membrane. These findings support the notion of the involvement of the ER's quality control in the mechanism of a significant number, but not all, missense endoglin mutants found in HHT type 1 patients. Other mechanisms including loss of interactions with signalling partners as well as adverse effects on functional

  19. Learning to fight a fly : developing citrus IPM in Bhutan

    OpenAIRE

    Schoubroeck, van, F.H.J.

    1999-01-01

    The chinese citrus fly is one of the key pests in Bhutanese mandarin orchards that lays eggs in developing fruit that cause pre-mature fruit drop. In this study it is used as a "model subject" to explore the integration of technical, social and administrative domains of knowledge. The confinement of the study to control of the fly leads to the study addressing a broad set of issues that are linked through their relevance to control the pest. Citrus fly control and its consequent doub...

  20. A full-scale study on thermal degradation of polychlorinated dibenzo- p-dioxins and dibenzofurans in municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash and its secondary air pollution control in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xingbao; Ji, Bingjing; Yan, Dahai; Huang, Qifei; Zhu, Xuemei

    2017-04-01

    Degradation of polychlorinated dibenzo- p-dioxins and dibenzofurans in municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash is beneficial to its risk control. Fly ash was treated in a full-scale thermal degradation system (capacity 1 t d(-1)) to remove polychlorinated dibenzo- p-dioxins and dibenzofurans. Apart from the confirmation of the polychlorinated dibenzo- p-dioxin and dibenzofuran decomposition efficiency, we focused on two major issues that are the major obstacles for commercialising this decomposition technology in China, desorption and regeneration of dioxins and control of secondary air pollution. The toxic equivalent quantity values of polychlorinated dibenzo- p-dioxins and dibenzofurans decreased to pollution control system. The degradation furnace released relatively large amounts of cadmium, lead and polychlorinated dibenzo- p-dioxins and dibenzofurans compared with the municipal solid waste incinerator, but the amounts emitted to the atmosphere did not exceed the Chinese national emission limits. Thermal degradation can therefore be used as a polychlorinated dibenzo- p-dioxin and dibenzofuran abatement method for municipal solid waste incinerator source in China.

  1. Genes Expressed Differentially in Hessian Fly Larvae Feeding in Resistant and Susceptible Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor, is a destructive pest of wheat worldwide and mainly controlled by deploying resistant cultivars. Hessian fly larvae manipulate susceptible plants extensively, but are unable to manipulate resistant plants and thus die in them. The mechanisms for Hessian fly l...

  2. Transcriptome of the egg parasitoid Fopius arisanus, an important biocontrol tool for Tephritid fruit fly suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background The Braconoid wasp Fopius arisanus (Sonan) has been utilized for biological control of the Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata), and the oriental fruit fly (Bactrocera dorsalis), both phytophagous fruit flies pest of economic importance in Hawaii. We have sequenced and assembled t...

  3. Modern trends of aircraft fly-by-wire systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    С. С. Юцкевич

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Specifics of civil aviation modern transport aircraft fly-by-wire control systems are described. A comparison of the systems-level hardware and software, expressed through modes of guidance, provision of aircraft Airbus A-320, Boeing B-777, Tupolev Tu-214, Sukhoi Superjet SSJ-100 are carried out. The possibility of transition from mechanical control wiring to control through fly-by-wire system in the backup channel is shown.

  4. TrackFly: virtual reality for a behavioral system analysis in free-flying fruit flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Steven N; Rohrseitz, Nicola; Straw, Andrew D; Dickinson, Michael H

    2008-06-15

    Modern neuroscience and the interest in biomimetic control design demand increasingly sophisticated experimental techniques that can be applied in freely moving animals under realistic behavioral conditions. To explore sensorimotor flight control mechanisms in free-flying fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster), we equipped a wind tunnel with a Virtual Reality (VR) display system based on standard digital hardware and a 3D path tracking system. We demonstrate the experimental power of this approach by example of a 'one-parameter open loop' testing paradigm. It provided (1) a straightforward measure of transient responses in presence of open loop visual stimulation; (2) high data throughput and standardized measurement conditions from process automation; and (3) simplified data analysis due to well-defined testing conditions. Being based on standard hardware and software techniques, our methods provide an affordable, easy to replicate and general solution for a broad range of behavioral applications in freely moving animals. Particular relevance for advanced behavioral research tools originates from the need to perform detailed behavioral analyses in genetically modified organisms and animal models for disease research.

  5. An annotated checklist of the horse flies, deer flies, and yellow flies (Diptera: Tabanidae) of Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    The family Tabanidae includes the horse flies, deer flies, and yellow flies and is considered a significant pest of livestock throughout the United States, including Florida. Tabanids can easily become a major pest of man, especially salt marsh species which are known to readily feed on humans and o...

  6. Assessment of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis Strain AM65-52 aqueous suspension for the control of black fly populations, (Simulium spp.) in northern Italy

    OpenAIRE

    P. Radeghieri; Santi, F.; Maini, S.

    2013-01-01

    Four field trials were conducted in Mantua province in northern Italy to evaluate the effect of the Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis Strain AM65-52 based VectoBac® 12 AS larvicide on black flies. Our objective was to examine and compare the efficacy of different concentrations of this microbial larvicide in small plain streams. Larvicidal activity was exhibited in all trials. VectoBac® 12 AS at 2.5 ppm/min rate generated larval mortality from the treatment point to 500 meters downstr...

  7. A network architecture for precision formation flying using the IEEE 802.11 MAC Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clare, Loren P.; Gao, Jay L.; Jennings, Esther H.; Okino, Clayton

    2005-01-01

    Precision Formation Flying missions involve the tracking and maintenance of spacecraft in a desired geometric formation. The strong coupling of spacecraft in formation flying control requires inter-spacecraft communication to exchange information. In this paper, we present a network architecture that supports PFF control, from the initial random deployment phase to the final formation. We show that a suitable MAC layer for the application protocol is IEEE's 802.11 MAC protocol. IEEE 802.11 MAC has two modes of operations: DCF and PCF. We show that DCF is suitable for the initial deployment phase while switching to PCF when the spacecraft are in formation improves jitter and throughput. We also consider the effect of routing on protocol performance and suggest when it is profitable to turn off route discovery to achieve better network performance.

  8. Wireless stimulation of antennal muscles in freely flying hawkmoths leads to flight path changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin J Hinterwirth

    Full Text Available Insect antennae are sensory organs involved in a variety of behaviors, sensing many different stimulus modalities. As mechanosensors, they are crucial for flight control in the hawkmoth Manduca sexta. One of their roles is to mediate compensatory reflexes of the abdomen in response to rotations of the body in the pitch axis. Abdominal motions, in turn, are a component of the steering mechanism for flying insects. Using a radio controlled, programmable, miniature stimulator, we show that ultra-low-current electrical stimulation of antennal muscles in freely-flying hawkmoths leads to repeatable, transient changes in the animals' pitch angle, as well as less predictable changes in flight speed and flight altitude. We postulate that by deflecting the antennae we indirectly stimulate mechanoreceptors at the base, which drive compensatory reflexes leading to changes in pitch attitude.

  9. Multiple immune factors are involved in controlling acute and chronic chikungunya virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yee Suan Poo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent epidemic of the arthritogenic alphavirus, chikungunya virus (CHIKV has prompted a quest to understand the correlates of protection against virus and disease in order to inform development of new interventions. Herein we highlight the propensity of CHIKV infections to persist long term, both as persistent, steady-state, viraemias in multiple B cell deficient mouse strains, and as persistent RNA (including negative-strand RNA in wild-type mice. The knockout mouse studies provided evidence for a role for T cells (but not NK cells in viraemia suppression, and confirmed the role of T cells in arthritis promotion, with vaccine-induced T cells also shown to be arthritogenic in the absence of antibody responses. However, MHC class II-restricted T cells were not required for production of anti-viral IgG2c responses post CHIKV infection. The anti-viral cytokines, TNF and IFNγ, were persistently elevated in persistently infected B and T cell deficient mice, with adoptive transfer of anti-CHIKV antibodies unable to clear permanently the viraemia from these, or B cell deficient, mice. The NOD background increased viraemia and promoted arthritis, with B, T and NK deficient NOD mice showing high-levels of persistent viraemia and ultimately succumbing to encephalitic disease. In wild-type mice persistent CHIKV RNA and negative strand RNA (detected for up to 100 days post infection was associated with persistence of cellular infiltrates, CHIKV antigen and stimulation of IFNα/β and T cell responses. These studies highlight that, secondary to antibodies, several factors are involved in virus control, and suggest that chronic arthritic disease is a consequence of persistent, replicating and transcriptionally active CHIKV RNA.

  10. Involvement of β3-adrenergic receptors in the control of food intake in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Kanzler

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the food intake changes evoked by intracerebroventricular (icv injection of a selective agonist (BRL37344, 2 and 20 nmol or antagonist (SR59230A, 10 and 50 nmol of β3-adrenergic receptors in 24-h fasted rats (adult male Wistar rats, 200-350 g, N = 6/treatment. The animals were also pretreated with saline icv (SAL or SR59230A (50 nmol followed by BRL37344 (20 nmol or SAL in order to determine the selectivity of the effects evoked by BRL37344 on food intake or the selectivity of the effects evoked by SR59230A on risk assessment (RA behavior. The highest dose of BRL37344 (N = 7 decreased food intake 1 h after the treatment (6.4 ± 0.5 g in SAL-treated vs 4.2 ± 0.8 g in drug-treated rats. While both doses of SR59230A failed to affect food intake (5.1 ± 1.1 g for 10 nmol and 6.0 ± 1.8 g for 50 nmol, this treatment reduced the RA frequency (number/30 min (4 ± 2 for SAL-treated vs 1 ± 1 for 10 nmol and 0.5 ± 1 for 50 nmol SR59230A-treated rats, an ethological parameter related to anxiety. While pretreatment with SR59230A (7.0 ± 0.5 g abolished the hypophagia induced by BRL37344 (3.6 ± 0.9 g, BRL37344 suppressed the reduction in RA frequency caused by SR59230A. These results show that the hypophagia caused by BRL37344 is selectively mediated by β3-adrenergic receptors within the central nervous system. Moreover, they suggest the involvement of these receptors in the control of anxiety.

  11. Obesity: a systematic review on parental involvement in long-term European childhood weight control interventions with a nutritional focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kruk, J J; Kortekaas, F; Lucas, C; Jager-Wittenaar, H

    2013-09-01

    In Europe, about 20% of children are overweight. Focus on parental responsibility is an effective method in weight control interventions in children. In this systematic review we describe the intensity of parental involvement and behaviour change aimed at parents in long-term European childhood weight control interventions. We include European Union studies targeting parents in order to improve children's weight status in multi-component (parental, behaviour change and nutrition) health promotion or lifestyle interventions. The included studies have at least one objectively measured anthropometric outcome in the weight status of the child. Parental involvement was described and categorized based on the intensity of parental involvement and coded using a validated behaviour change taxonomy specific to childhood obesity. Twenty-four studies were analysed. In effective long-term treatment studies, medium and high intensity parental involvement were identified most frequently; whereas in prevention studies low intensity parental involvement was identified most frequently. Parenting skills, generic and specific to lifestyle behaviour, scored frequently in effective weight control interventions. To list parental skills in generic and specific to lifestyle, descriptions of the included studies were summarized. We conclude that intensity of parental involvement and behaviour change techniques are important issues in the effectiveness of long-term childhood weight control interventions. © 2013 The Authors. obesity reviews © 2013 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  12. Density surveillance and effect of control measures on mosquitoes and flies in Quzhou city%衢州市蚊蝇密度监测及防治效果分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余樟有; 王小林; 胡晓龙

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate effect of control measures on mosquito and fly populationsin urban Quzhou based on the monitoring of their species and density. Methods The mosquito and fly density was monitored using lamp traps and cage traps, respectively. Results There were 4 species and 3 genera of mosquitoes in urban areas, predominated by Culex pipiens pollens, which accounted for 96.82% of the total population. The annual average adult density was 5.28 per lamp-hour, which peaked from June to August. There were 6 genera and 4 families of flies in this area, predominated by Lucilia and Musca, which accounted for 68.22% and 23.82%, respectively. The annual average adult density was 39.74 per cage, which peaked from June to August. Conclusion As a result of comprehensive control strategies, diminishing breeding grounds in the city have lead to a significant decrease in mosquito and fly population densities.%目的 通过对衢州市城区蚊、蝇种群和密度监测,分析衢州市蚊、蝇防治效果.方法 采用诱蚊灯法监测蚊密度,笼诱法监测蝇密度.结果 衢州市城区蚊类有3属4种,淡色库蚊为优势种,占捕蚊总数的96.82%,年平均成蚊密度为5.28只/(灯·h),6-8月为高峰期.城区蝇类有4科6属,绿蝇属和家蝇属为优势种群,分别占68.22%和23.82%,年平均蝇密度39.74只/笼,蝇密度高峰在6-8月.结论 2005-2010年衢州市城区采用综合防治措施,有效地控制了蚊、蝇孳生地,密度指数明显下降,达到预期效果.

  13. UTILIZATION OF THE BEFENTHRIN IN CHEMICAL CONTROL OF WHITE FLY (Bemisia tabaci, Genn. 1889 IN BEAN CROPS AVALIAÇÃO DO BEFENTHRIN NO CONTROLE DA MOSCA BRANCA (Bemisia tabaci, Genn. 1889 EM FEIJOEIRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demétrio Martinez Palhares

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    The white fly (Bemisia tabaci, an important pest of bean crops, is known as vector of golden-yellow-mosaic virus in many regions in Brazil. In order to determine the efficiency of the befenthrin to control the white fly, a field experiment was carried out in Goiânia, State of Goiás, Brazil. The treatments and dosage in grams of active ingredient by ha were: befenthrin (2.5; 3.75; 5.0 and 6.25, metamidophós (420.0 and 600.0 and untreated check. Results obtained by this test permitted to conclude that befenthrin at experimented doses, presented similarity of control to the other used compound in different estimations realized, with control average superior to 96.0%.

    Com o objetivo de avaliar a eficiência do Befenthrin 25 CE, nas dosagens de 2,5 ; 3,75; 5,00 e 6,25g i.a/ha, no controle químico da mosca branca (Bemisia tabaci Genn., 1889 em feijoeiro, foi conduzido um experimento no Campo Experimental da Escola de Agronomia da Universidade Federal de Goiás - Goiânia, safra 91/92, utilizando como produto padrão o Metamidophós 600 BR nas dosagens de 420 e 600g i.a/ha. As pulverizações foram realizadas nos 7°, 14°, 21° e 28° dias após a emergência das plântulas, utilizando-se um pulverizador costal a CO2 com bico D3 gastando-se 250 litros de calda por ha. Dois dias após a última pulverização foi realizada a avaliação de eficiência, contando-se o número de ninfas vivas em 10 folíolos/parcela e, 10 dias após, fez-se a contagem do número de plantas com sintomas de “mosaico dourado” por parcela. Pelos resultados obtidos, conclui-se que o Befenthrin nas dosagens de 5,0 e 6,25g i.a./ha controlou eficientemente a praga, igualando-se ao metamidophós na dosagem de 600g i.a/ha, com a vantagem de menor toxicidade para mamíferos e também sob o ponto de vista ecol

  14. Functional genomics of the horn fly, Haematobia irritans (Linnaeus, 1758

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quiroz-Romero Héctor

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The horn fly, Haematobia irritans (Linnaeus, 1758 (Diptera: Muscidae is one of the most important ectoparasites of pastured cattle. Horn flies infestations reduce cattle weight gain and milk production. Additionally, horn flies are mechanical vectors of different pathogens that cause disease in cattle. The aim of this study was to conduct a functional genomics study in female horn flies using Expressed Sequence Tags (EST analysis and RNA interference (RNAi. Results A cDNA library was made from whole abdominal tissues collected from partially fed adult female horn flies. High quality horn fly ESTs (2,160 were sequenced and assembled into 992 unigenes (178 contigs and 814 singlets representing molecular functions such as serine proteases, cell metabolism, mitochondrial function, transcription and translation, transport, chromatin structure, vitellogenesis, cytoskeleton, DNA replication, cell response to stress and infection, cell proliferation and cell-cell interactions, intracellular trafficking and secretion, and development. Functional analyses were conducted using RNAi for the first time in horn flies. Gene knockdown by RNAi resulted in higher horn fly mortality (protease inhibitor functional group, reduced oviposition (vitellogenin, ferritin and vATPase groups or both (immune response and 5'-NUC groups when compared to controls. Silencing of ubiquitination ESTs did not affect horn fly mortality and ovisposition while gene knockdown in the ferritin and vATPse functional groups reduced mortality when compared to controls. Conclusions These results advanced the molecular characterization of this important ectoparasite and suggested candidate protective antigens for the development of vaccines for the control of horn fly infestations.

  15. Protocol for Communication Networking for Formation Flying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Esther; Okino, Clayton; Gao, Jay; Clare, Loren

    2009-01-01

    An application-layer protocol and a network architecture have been proposed for data communications among multiple autonomous spacecraft that are required to fly in a precise formation in order to perform scientific observations. The protocol could also be applied to other autonomous vehicles operating in formation, including robotic aircraft, robotic land vehicles, and robotic underwater vehicles. A group of spacecraft or other vehicles to which the protocol applies could be characterized as a precision-formation- flying (PFF) network, and each vehicle could be characterized as a node in the PFF network. In order to support precise formation flying, it would be necessary to establish a corresponding communication network, through which the vehicles could exchange position and orientation data and formation-control commands. The communication network must enable communication during early phases of a mission, when little positional knowledge is available. Particularly during early mission phases, the distances among vehicles may be so large that communication could be achieved only by relaying across multiple links. The large distances and need for omnidirectional coverage would limit communication links to operation at low bandwidth during these mission phases. Once the vehicles were in formation and distances were shorter, the communication network would be required to provide high-bandwidth, low-jitter service to support tight formation-control loops. The proposed protocol and architecture, intended to satisfy the aforementioned and other requirements, are based on a standard layered-reference-model concept. The proposed application protocol would be used in conjunction with conventional network, data-link, and physical-layer protocols. The proposed protocol includes the ubiquitous Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 802.11 medium access control (MAC) protocol to be used in the datalink layer. In addition to its widespread and proven use in

  16. Flagellin FliC Phosphorylation Affects Type 2 Protease Secretion and Biofilm Dispersal in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suriyanarayanan, Tanujaa; Periasamy, Saravanan; Lin, Miao-Hsia; Ishihama, Yasushi; Swarup, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation has a major role in controlling the life-cycle and infection stages of bacteria. Proteome-wide occurrence of S/T/Y phosphorylation has been reported for many prokaryotic systems. Previously, we reported the phosphoproteome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida. In this study, we show the role of S/T phosphorylation of one motility protein, FliC, in regulating multiple surface-associated phenomena of P. aeruginosa PAO1. This is the first report of occurrence of phosphorylation in the flagellar protein, flagellin FliC in its highly conserved N-terminal NDO domain across several Gram negative bacteria. This phosphorylation is likely a well-regulated phenomenon as it is growth phase dependent in planktonic cells. The absence of phosphorylation in the conserved T27 and S28 residues of FliC, interestingly, did not affect swimming motility, but affected the secretome of type 2 secretion system (T2SS) and biofilm formation of PAO1. FliC phosphomutants had increased levels and activities of type 2 secretome proteins. The secretion efficiency of T2SS machinery is associated with flagellin phosphorylation. FliC phosphomutants also formed reduced biofilms at 24 h under static conditions and had delayed biofilm dispersal under dynamic flow conditions, respectively. The levels of type 2 secretome and biofilm formation under static conditions had an inverse correlation. Hence, increase in type 2 secretome levels was accompanied by reduced biofilm formation in the FliC phosphomutants. As T2SS is involved in nutrient acquisition and biofilm dispersal during survival and spread of P. aeruginosa, we propose that FliC phosphorylation has a role in ecological adaptation of this opportunistic environmental pathogen. Altogether, we found a system of phosphorylation that affects key surface related processes such as proteases secretion by T2SS, biofilm formation and dispersal. PMID:27701473

  17. An unusual promoter controls cell-cycle regulation and dependence on DNA replication of the Caulobacter fliLM early flagellar operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, C M; Shapiro, L

    1993-09-01

    Transcription of flagellar genes in Caulobacter crecentus is programmed to occur during the predivisional stage of the cell cycle. The mechanism of activation of Class II flagellar genes, the highest identified genes in the Caulobacter flagellar hierarchy, is unknown. As a step toward understanding this process, we have defined cis-acting sequences necessary for expression of a Class II flagellar operon, fliLM. Deletion analysis indicated that a 55 bp DNA fragment was sufficient for normal, temporally regulated promoter activity. Transcription from this promoter-containing fragment was severely reduced when chromosomal DNA replication was inhibited. Extensive mutational analysis of the promoter region from -42 to -5 identified functionally important nucleotides at -36 and -35, between -29 and -22, and at -12, which correlates well with sequences conserved between fliLM and the analogous regions of two other Class II flagellar operons. The promoter sequence does not resemble that recognized by any known bacterial sigma factor. Models for regulation of Caulobacter early flagellar promoters are discussed in which RNA polymerase containing a novel sigma subunit interacts with an activation factor bound to the central region of the promoter.

  18. Diet modification and metformin have a beneficial effect in a fly model of obesity and mucormycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, Fazal; Farmakiotis, Dimitrios; Yan, Yuanqing; Albert, Nathaniel; Do, Kim-Anh; Kim-Anh, Do; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2014-01-01

    In an experimental model of obesity and hyperglycemia in Drosophila melanogaster we studied the effect of diet modification and administration of metformin on systemic infection with Rhizopus, a common cause of mucormycosis in diabetic patients. Female Wt-type Drosophila flies were fed regular (RF) or high-fat diet (HFD; 30% coconut oil) food with or without metformin for 48 h and then injected with R. oryzae. Survival rates, glucose and triglyceride levels were compared between 1) normal-weight flies (RF), 2) obese flies (HFD), 3) obese flies fed with RF, 4) flies continuously fed on HFD + metformin, 5) flies fed on HFD + metformin, then transferred to RF, and 6) obese flies administered metformin after infection [corrected].Glucose levels were compared across groups of non-infected flies and across groups of infected flies. Survival was significantly decreased (P = 0.003) in obese flies, while post-infection glucose levels were significantly increased (P = 0.0001), compared to normal-weight flies. Diet and administration of metformin led to weight loss, normalized glucose levels during infection, and were associated with decreased mortality and tissue fungal burden. In conclusion, diet and metformin help control infection-associated hyperglycemia and improve survival in Drosophila flies with mucormycosis. Fly models of obesity bear intriguing similarities to the pathophysiology of insulin resistance and diabetes in humans, and can provide new insights into the pathogenesis and treatment of infections in obese and diabetic patients.

  19. Diet modification and metformin have a beneficial effect in a fly model of obesity and mucormycosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazal Shirazi

    Full Text Available In an experimental model of obesity and hyperglycemia in Drosophila melanogaster we studied the effect of diet modification and administration of metformin on systemic infection with Rhizopus, a common cause of mucormycosis in diabetic patients. Female Wt-type Drosophila flies were fed regular (RF or high-fat diet (HFD; 30% coconut oil food with or without metformin for 48 h and then injected with R. oryzae. Survival rates, glucose and triglyceride levels were compared between 1 normal-weight flies (RF, 2 obese flies (HFD, 3 obese flies fed with RF, 4 flies continuously fed on HFD + metformin, 5 flies fed on HFD + metformin, then transferred to RF, and 6 obese flies administered metformin after infection [corrected].Glucose levels were compared across groups of non-infected flies and across groups of infected flies. Survival was significantly decreased (P = 0.003 in obese flies, while post-infection glucose levels were significantly increased (P = 0.0001, compared to normal-weight flies. Diet and administration of metformin led to weight loss, normalized glucose levels during infection, and were associated with decreased mortality and tissue fungal burden. In conclusion, diet and metformin help control infection-associated hyperglycemia and improve survival in Drosophila flies with mucormycosis. Fly models of obesity bear intriguing similarities to the pathophysiology of insulin resistance and diabetes in humans, and can provide new insights into the pathogenesis and treatment of infections in obese and diabetic patients.

  20. Flying Saucer? Aliens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1961-01-01

    No, it's not a flying saucer, it is the domed top to a 70 foot long vacuum tank at the Lewis Research Center's Electric Propulsion Laboratory, Cleveland, Ohio. The three technicians shown here in protective clothing had just emerged from within the tank where they had been cleaning in the toxic mercury atmosphere, left after ion engine testing in the tank. Lewis has since been renamed the John H. Glenn Research Center.

  1. Toxicity induced by Prasiola crispa to fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and cockroach Nauphoeta cinerea: evidence for bioinsecticide action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemolin, Ana Paula Pegoraro; Cruz, Litiele Cezar; Paula, Mariane Trindade; Pereira, Betina Kappel; Albuquerque, Margelli Pereira; Victoria, Filipe Carvalho; Pereira, Antônio Batista; Posser, Thaís; Franco, Jeferson Luis

    2014-01-01

    The adverse effects of the alga Prasiola crispa extract (PcE) were investigated in a fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) and cockroach (Nauphoeta cinerea) model. In flies, toxicity was assessed as mortality and biochemical alterations including acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and oxidative stress markers. The cardiotoxic action of PcE was also examined in a model of semi-isolated cockroach heart. The administration of PcE (2 mg/ml) to flies for 24 h resulted in a marked increase in mortality rate (7.6-fold rise compared to control). AChE activity, glutathione (GSH) levels, and hydroperoxide formation remained unchanged. Fly glutathione S-transferase (GST) and catalase (CAT) activity were significantly altered after PcE treatment. Fraction III (ethyl acetate) of PcE was significantly more toxic to flies compared to fractions I (methanol) and II (ethanol). A significant decrease was noted in cockroach semi-isolated heart function. The addition of 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid (DTNB), an oxidizing agent, concomitant with the extract significantly blocked this effect, suggesting that reduced compounds may be involved in the cardiotoxic action produced by PcE. Our results show for the first time the adverse effects of PcE in two insect models, Drosophila melanogaster and Nauphoetacinerea. The insecticidal properties of PcE may be related to changes in important antioxidant/detoxifying systems, as well as to changes in insect cardiac function.

  2. Mushroom body defect, a gene involved in the control of neuroblast proliferation in Drosophila, encodes a coiled–coil protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zhonghui; Prado, Antonio; Melzig, Jörg; Heisenberg, Martin; Nash, Howard A.; Raabe, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Neurogenesis relies on the establishment of the proper number and precisely controlled proliferation of neuroblasts, the neuronal precursor cells. A role for the mushroom body defect (mud) gene in both of these aspects of neuroblast behavior, as well as possible roles in other aspects of fruit fly biology, is implied by phenotypes associated with mud mutations. We have localized mud by determining the sequence change in one point mutant, identifying a predicted ORF affected by the mutation, and showing that an appropriate segment of the genome rescues mud mutant phenotypes. An analysis of mud cDNAs and a survey of mud transcripts by Northern blotting indicate that the gene is subject to differential splicing and is expressed primarily during embryogenesis but also, at lower levels, during subsequent developmental stages in a sexually dimorphic manner. The gene is predicted to encode a polypeptide without obvious homologs but with two prominent structural features, a long coiled coil that constitutes the central core of the protein and a carboxyl-terminal transmembrane domain. PMID:10884435

  3. Comparison of Anastrepha ludens (Diptera: Tephritidae) Bisexual and Genetic Sexing (Tapachula-7) Strains: Effect of Hypoxia, Fly Density, Chilling Period, and Food Type on Fly Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arredondo, José; Ruiz, Lía; Hernández, Emilio; Montoya, Pablo; Díaz-Fleischer, Francisco

    2016-04-01

    The use of genetic sexing strain (GSS) insects in the sterile insect technique (SIT) makes necessary the revision of quality parameters of some stressful steps used during the packing process for aerial release because of possible differences in tolerance between fly strains. Here, we determined the effect of three periods of hypoxia (12, 24, and 36 h at pupal stage), three cage densities (1.0, 1.3, and 1.5 flies/cm2), two different foods (protein/sugar (1/24) and Mubarqui), and three chilling times (20 min [control], 90, and 180 min) on the quality parameters of flies of two Anastrepha ludens (Loew) strains (bisexual and GSS Tapachula-7). In general, the response to stressful conditions of both fly strains was qualitatively equivalent but quantitatively different, as flies of both strains responded equally to the stressful factors; however, flies of Tapachula-7 exhibited lower quality parameters than the control flies. Thus, hypoxia affected the flying ability but not the emergence or longevity of flies. The food type affected the adult weight; protein/sugar produced heavier flies that also survived longer and had a greater mating propensity. Flies under the lowest density were better fliers that those at the other two densities. Increasing chilling time reduced flight ability but not longevity or mating propensity. The implications of these findings for the use of A. ludens GSS in SIT programs are discussed herein.

  4. Autonomous Supervisory Engine for Multi-Spacecraft Formation Flying Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall goal of this project is to develop an onboard, autonomous Multi-spacecraft Supervisory Engine (MSE) for formation-flying guidance, navigation and control...

  5. Flies selected for longevity retain a young gene expression profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarup, Pernille Merete; Sørensen, Peter; Loeschcke, Volker

    2011-01-01

    differentially expressed between selected and control flies when measured at the same chronological age. The longevity-selected flies consistently showed expression profiles more similar to control flies one age class younger than control flies of the same age. This finding is in accordance with a younger gene...... the physiological age as the level of cumulative mortality. Eighty-four genes were differentially expressed between the control and longevity-selected lines at the same physiological age, and the overlap between the same chronological and physiological age gene lists included 40 candidate genes for increased...... longevity. Among these candidates were genes with roles in starvation resistance, immune response regulation, and several that have not yet been linked to longevity. Investigating these genes would provide new knowledge of the pathways that affect life span in invertebrates and, potentially, mammals....

  6. The role of FLI-1-EWS, a fusion gene reciprocal to EWS-FLI-1, in Ewing sarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Elzi, David J.; Song, Meihua; Houghton, Peter J.; Chen, Yidong; Shiio, Yuzuru

    2015-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma is a cancer of bone and soft tissue in children that is characterized by a chromosomal translocation involving EWS and an Ets family transcription factor, most commonly FLI-1. The EWS-FLI-1 fusion oncogene is widely believed to play a central role in Ewing sarcoma. The EWS-FLI-1 gene product regulates the expression of a number of genes important for cancer progression, can transform mouse cells such as NIH3T3 and C3H10T1/2, and is necessary for proliferation and tumorigenicity ...

  7. Trapping tsetse flies on water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laveissière C.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Riverine tsetse flies such as Glossina palpalis gambiensis and G. tachinoides are the vectors of human and animal trypanosomoses in West Africa. Despite intimate links between tsetse and water, to our knowledge there has never been any attempt to design trapping devices that would catch tsetse on water. In mangrove (Guinea one challenging issue is the tide, because height above the ground for a trap is a key factor affecting tsetse catches. The trap was mounted on the remains of an old wooden dugout, and attached with rope to nearby branches, thereby allowing it to rise and fall with the tide. Catches showed a very high density of 93.9 flies/”water-trap”/day, which was significantly higher (p < 0.05 than all the catches from other habitats where the classical trap had been used. In savannah, on the Comoe river of South Burkina Faso, the biconical trap was mounted on a small wooden raft anchored to a stone, and catches were compared with the classical biconical trap put on the shores. G. p. gambiensis and G. tachinoides densities were not significantly different from those from the classical biconical one. The adaptations described here have allowed to efficiently catch tsetse on the water, which to our knowledge is reported here for the first time. This represents a great progress and opens new opportunities to undertake studies on the vectors of trypanosomoses in mangrove areas of Guinea, which are currently the areas showing the highest prevalences of sleeping sickness in West Africa. It also has huge potential for tsetse control using insecticide impregnated traps in savannah areas where traps become less efficient in rainy season. The Guinean National control programme has already expressed its willingness to use such modified traps in its control campaigns in Guinea, as has the national PATTEC programme in Burkina Faso during rainy season.

  8. Backstepping and dynamic control-allocation for attitude maneuver of spacecraft with redundant reaction fly-wheels%基于反步法与动态控制分配的航天器姿态机动控制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李波; 胡庆雷; 石忠; 马广富

    2012-01-01

    We develop a robust adaptive controller based on the backstepping method for the attitude maneuver of the spacecraft with unknown rotational inertia and unknown external disturbances. The stability of the closed-loop system is validated by using Lyapunov analysis. In considering the redundancy of the actuators-the reaction fly-wheels, we propose a dynamic allocation algorithm based on the constrained optimal quadratic programming for distributing the control command to the proper fly-wheel. This eliminates the physical restrictions on the fly-wheel characteristics and the limitation of the maximal torque, which are required in the conventional pseudo-inverse method. In addition, it also effectively suppresses the measurement noises and rejects the abnormal data from attitude sensors, improving the smoothness of the control torque. The proposed scheme has been applied to control the attitude maneuver of a wheel-control rigid spacecraft. Simulation results validate the efficacy of the proposed method.%针对存在未知转动惯量与外部干扰的航天器姿态机动控制问题,提出了一类基于反步法的鲁棒自适应控制器,并利用Lyapunov方法分析了系统的稳定性;考虑到作为执行机构的反作用飞轮存在冗余性,进一步提出了一种基于约束最优二次规划的动态控制分配算法来实现指令到期望飞轮的指令分配,克服传统伪逆法难以考虑飞轮动态特性、最大力矩等物理约束,并能有效的抑制姿态敏感器的测量噪声和测量异常值,实现控制力矩的平稳性.最后,将本文提出的控制方案应用于某型轮控刚体航天器的姿态机动任务中,仿真结果验证了本文提出方法的可行性、有效性.

  9. FLI1 polymorphism affects susceptibility to cutaneous leishmaniasis in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Castellucci, L; Jamieson, SE; Miller, EN; de Almeida, LF; J. Oliveira; Magalhães, A.; Guimarães, LH; LESSA, M.; E. Lago; Jesus,AR de; Carvalho, EM; Blackwell, JM

    2011-01-01

    Mapping murine genes controlling cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) identified Fli1 as a candidate influencing resistance to L. major and enhanced wound healing. We examine FLI1 as a gene controlling CL and mucosal leishmaniasis (ML) caused by L. braziliensis in humans. Intron 1 single nucleotide polymorphisms tagging promoter and enhancer elements were analysed in 168 nuclear families (250 CL; 87 ML cases) and replicated in 157 families (402 CL; 39 ML cases). Robust case-pseudocontrol logistic reg...

  10. Self-control training in children: a review of interventions for anxiety and depression and the role of parental involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Sarah E; Mezo, Peter G; Fung, Stephanie L

    2012-01-01

    This review critically evaluates self-control skills interventions in the treatment of childhood anxiety and depression, outlining conditions under which these interventions are successful and the specific role of parents. Findings indicated that self-control skills interventions are successful with both children and adolescents, in the context of other cognitive behavioral techniques and as the primary treatment component, and with and without parental involvement. However, despite consistent evidence of success in both pre-post and waitlist control designs, self-control skills treatments have not demonstrated superior efficacy when compared to other active treatments. Continued application and evaluation of these interventions amongst children and adolescents are recommended.

  11. Assessment of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis Strain AM65-52 aqueous suspension for the control of black fly populations, (Simulium spp. in northern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Radeghieri

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Four field trials were conducted in Mantua province in northern Italy to evaluate the effect of the Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis Strain AM65-52 based VectoBac® 12 AS larvicide on black flies. Our objective was to examine and compare the efficacy of different concentrations of this microbial larvicide in small plain streams. Larvicidal activity was exhibited in all trials. VectoBac® 12 AS at 2.5 ppm/min rate generated larval mortality from the treatment point to 500 meters downstream. Larvae mortality (over 80% was observed for 3500 meters downstream of the application site when a concentration of 40 ppm/min was applied.

  12. Facilitation handlings induce increase in electromyographic activity of muscles involved in head control of cerebral palsy children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Anelise de Saldanha; do Pinho, Alexandre Severo; Grazziotin Dos Santos, Camila; Pagnussat, Aline de Souza

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the electromyographic (EMG) activation of the main cervical muscles involved in the head control during two postures widely used for the facilitation of head control in children with Cerebral Palsy (CP). A crossover trial involving 31 children with clinical diagnosis of CP and spastic quadriplegia was conducted. Electromyography was used to measure muscular activity in randomized postures. Three positions were at rest: (a) lateral decubitus, (b) ventral decubitus on the floor and (c) ventral decubitus on the wedge. Handlings for facilitating the head control were performed using the hip joint as key point of control in two postures: (a) lateral decubitus and (b) ventral decubitus on wedge. All children underwent standardized handlings, performed by the same researcher with experience in the neurodevelopmental treatment. EMG signal was recorded from muscles involved in the head control (paraspinal and sternocleidomastoid muscles) in sagittal, frontal and transverse planes, at the fourth cervical vertebra (C4), tenth thoracic vertebra (T10) and sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) levels. The results showed a significant increase in muscle activation when handling was performed in the lateral decubitus at C4 (Pcontrol, as evaluated by the activity of cervical and upper trunk muscles. Handling performed in lateral decubitus may induce a slightly better facilitation of head control. These findings contribute to evidence-based physiotherapy practice for the rehabilitation of severely spastic quadriplegic CP children.

  13. A fly larva (Syrphidae: Ocyptamus that preys on adult flies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onanchi Ureña

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Predatory syrphid larvae feed on relatively immobile prey, but here we report the first case (as far as we are aware of obligatory predation on very mobile prey. Larvae of an undescribed species of Ocyptamus (Diptera: Syrphidae were found in whitefly (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae aggregations on the undersides of citrus leaves. However, instead of preying on the whitefly nymphs (as would be expected, the larvae preyed on adult flies (Diptera that were attracted to the honeydew. In the laboratory, larvae captured significantly more flies on whitefly infested leaves than on washed leaves, and generally abandoned leaves that lacked whiteflies. Most cases of successful prey capture involved flies that probed the anterior part of the larva’s body with its proboscis (as if it were honeydew. The syrphid larva lashed out at the fly and entangled it in sticky oral secretion. The prey did not recover when they were removed from the larva, suggesting that this new predatory species also employs venom to subdue its prey. Although the larvae consumed some honeydew, they were unable to complete their development on this diet. Two parasitoids were reared from Ocyptamus puparia, Proaspicera sp. (Hymenoptera: Figitidae and Paracarotomus sp. (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae, both of which are endoparasitic koinobionts. Rev. Biol. Trop. 58 (4: 1157-1163. Epub 2010 December 01.Las larvas depredadoras de Syrphidae se alimentan de presas relativamente inmóviles, pero aquí reportamos el primer caso (hasta ahora conocido de la depredación obligatoria en presas muy móviles. Se encontraron las larvas de una especie no descrita de Ocyptamus (Diptera: Syrphidae juntas con ninfas de mosca blanca (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae en el envés de las hojas de cítricos. Sin embargo, en vez de alimentarse de las ninfas de mosca blanca (como debería esperarse, las larvas se alimentaron de moscas adultas (Diptera que fueron atraídas a las excreciones azucaradas de la mosca blanca. En el

  14. Ghrelin and other gastrointestinal peptides involved in the control of food intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassone, F; Broglio, F; Gianotti, L; Arvat, E; Ghigo, E; Maccario, M

    2007-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of obesity has triggered intense research on its pharmacotherapy. Besides central neuroendocrine pathways, many peripheral endocrino-metabolic signals have been investigated, but only few are probably of some utility in weight loss. This review reports about ghrelin and other gastrointestinal peptides involved in hunger and satiety.

  15. Legal considerations involving chemical control of iron and other deficiencies in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, A; Samman, Y. S.

    1981-01-01

    Four cases of lawsuits involving use of chelating agents in plant nutrition are discussed. Three of them involved use of iron. One concerned addition of FeDTPA to nursery trees in containers. One case involved foliar application of FeHEDTA to potatoes in July by airplane. Another case not involving iron chelate was with ZnEDTA and MnEDTA with Fe as FeSO/sub 4/ later as a foliar spray. The Zn and MnEDTA were applied as a band 8 inches (20 cm) on both sides of nursery tree rows just as the buds that had been placed in the fall began growing in the spring. In the fourth case, many tomato transplants died when the transplanting was done with about 120 ml per plant of transplant solution containing besides N, P and K, about 19 mg Zn as ZnEDTA, 14 mg Mn as MnEDTA and 7 mg Fe as FeHEDTA. Cases such as these will probably discourage use of chelating agents in plant nutrition even if the chelating agents were not the damaging agent. Not enough developmental work was done on the potential toxicities from metal chelates. This trend to lawsuits makes it even more important to solve iron chlorosis problems via plant breeding.

  16. An Example of Discovery Research Involving the Transfer of Stimulus Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiger, Jeffrey H.; Hanley, Gregory P.

    2005-01-01

    The initial purpose of the present study was to replicate procedures for teaching preschool children to recruit attention at appropriate times by having an experimenter signal the availability and unavailability of attention (i.e., arrange a multiple schedule involving reinforcement and extinction; Tiger & Hanley, 2004). Following the development…

  17. Dielectric properties of fly ash

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S C Raghavendra; R L Raibagkar; A B Kulkarni

    2002-02-01

    This paper reports the dielectric properties of fly ash. The dielectric measurements were performed as a function of frequency and temperature. The sample of fly ash shows almost similar behaviour in the frequency and temperature range studied. The large value of dielectric constant in the typical frequency range is because of orientation polarization and tight binding force between the ions or atoms in the fly ash. The sample of fly ash is of great scientific and technological interest because of its high value of dielectric constant (104).

  18. Early Elementary School Adjustment of Maltreated Children in Foster Care: The Roles of Inhibitory Control and Caregiver Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pears, Katherine C.; Fisher, Philip A.; Bruce, Jacqueline; Kim, Hyoun K.; Yoerger, Karen

    2010-01-01

    In this study, 85 maltreated foster children and 56 nonmaltreated community children (M age = 3-6 years) were assessed across kindergarten and first grade to examine the hypothesis that inhibitory control and caregiver involvement mediate associations between a history of maltreatment and foster placement and early school adjustment. Specifically,…

  19. Obesity: a systematic review on parental involvement in long-term European childhood weight control interventions with a nutritional focus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruk, J.J. van der; Kortekaas, F.; Lucas, C.; Jager-Wittenaar, H.

    2013-01-01

    n Europe, about 20% of children are overweight. Focus on parental responsibility is an effective method in weight control interventions in children. In this systematic review we describe the intensity of parental involvement and behaviour change aimed at parents in long-term European childhood weigh

  20. Obesity: a systematic review on parental involvement in long-term European childhood weight control interventions with a nutritional focus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. van der Kruk; C. Lucas; F. Kortekaas; Dr Harriët Jager-Wittenaar

    2013-01-01

    n Europe, about 20% of children are overweight. Focus on parental responsibility is an effective method in weight control interventions in children. In this systematic review we describe the intensity of parental involvement and behaviour change aimed at parents in long-term European childhood

  1. Getting It Together--The Co-Production, Involving Planning, Coordinating and Control, of a Multimedia Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumi, Jack

    1992-01-01

    Explains activities involved in the production of a multimedia course at the Open University (United Kingdom) and suggests that similar concerns arise with coproduction projects. Highlights include the need for planning; production schedules for different media; controlling quality, quantity, and cost; collection and dissemination of information;…

  2. Do Permethrin-Treated Screens Repel Sand Flies from Entering Houses ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basimike, M.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of permethrin-treated screens on sand flies entering treated houses were evaluated in Marigat area of Baringo District, Kenya. Screens treated with 0.50 g/m2 a. i. of permethrin 20 % E.C. were fitted inside houses and retreated every 6 months from January 1992 to December 1993. In the treated village, 40.62 % sand flies were caught inside while 67.34 % sand flies were collected outside houses. In the control village, 32.66 % sand flies were collected inside while 59.38 % sand flies were caught outside houses. The number of sand flies collected outside houses in the treated village was higher than those collected inside houses in the same village (X2 = 30.97, df = 11, P = 0.001. Twelve species of sand flies were collected in the area, of which nine species of the Sergentomyia and three species of the Phlebotomus genera. Phlebotomus martini and P. duboscqi, vecfors of visceral and cutaneous leishmaniasis respectively were collected inside houses in both treated and control villages. Permethrin-treated screens fitted inside houses were effective against sand flies as they reduced the number of flies entering houses. However, the treated screens did not seem to have any effect on sand fly species composition. Permethrin-treated screens are an important tool for controlling sand flies in the communities.

  3. Effectiveness of "Primary Bereavement Care" for Widows: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial Involving Family Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Jesus A.; Landa, Victor; Grandes, Gonzalo; Pombo, Haizea; Mauriz, Amaia

    2013-01-01

    Thirty-one family physicians, from 19 primary care teams in Biscay (Spain), were randomly assigned to intervention or control group. The 15 intervention family physicians, after training in primary bereavement care, saw 43 widows for 7 sessions, from the 4th to 13th month after their loss. The 16 control family physicians, without primary…

  4. Modeling Psychological Empowerment among Youth Involved in Local Tobacco Control Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Debra J.; Evans, W. Douglas; Hinnant, Laurie W.; Messeri, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The American Legacy Foundation funded 13 state health departments for their Statewide Youth Movement Against Tobacco Use in September 2000. Its goal was to create statewide tobacco control initiatives implemented with youth leadership. The underlying theory behind these initiatives was that tobacco control efforts can best be accomplished by…

  5. Flying over decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeller, Judith; Issler, Mena; Imamoglu, Atac

    Levy flights haven been extensively used in the past three decades to describe non-Brownian motion of particles. In this presentation I give an overview on how Levy flights have been used across several disciplines, ranging from biology to finance to physics. In our publication we describe how a single electron spin 'flies' when captured in quantum dot using the central spin model. At last I motivate the use of Levy flights for the description of anomalous diffusion in modern experiments, concretely to describe the lifetimes of quasi-particles in Josephson junctions. Finished PhD at ETH in Spring 2015.

  6. Vision in flying insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egelhaaf, Martin; Kern, Roland

    2002-12-01

    Vision guides flight behaviour in numerous insects. Despite their small brain, insects easily outperform current man-made autonomous vehicles in many respects. Examples are the virtuosic chasing manoeuvres male flies perform as part of their mating behaviour and the ability of bees to assess, on the basis of visual motion cues, the distance travelled in a novel environment. Analyses at both the behavioural and neuronal levels are beginning to unveil reasons for such extraordinary capabilities of insects. One recipe for their success is the adaptation of visual information processing to the specific requirements of the behavioural tasks and to the specific spatiotemporal properties of the natural input.

  7. Health-related quality of life and metabolic control in adolescents with diabetes: the role of parental care, control, and involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graue, Marit; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore; Hanestad, Berit Rokne; Søvik, Oddmund

    2005-10-01

    This questionnaire-based study explored the role of parenting in health-related quality of life in a population of 115 adolescents with type 1 diabetes (aged 11-18 years, 48% girls). Healthy adolescents (n = 9,345) and physically disabled adolescents (n = 291) were included as controls. The adolescents with diabetes reported their parents as being more controlling and involved than did adolescents in the 2 other groups. In multiple regression analyses, age, gender, and a higher degree of parental care and involvement explained 46% of the variation in mental health. Age, gender, a higher degree of parental care and involvement, and a lower perception of parental control explained 52% of the variation in diabetes life-satisfaction. Neither glycosylated hemoglobin nor the other clinical variables studied were significantly related to the perception of health-related quality of life. Family support should be provided to facilitate coping with everyday management and demands of diabetes.

  8. Performance of fly ash concretes in accelerated and natural chloride exposure regimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorn, V.; Oshiro, T.; Yamada, Y. [Ryukyus Univ., Okinawa (Japan). Dept. of Civil Engineering and Architecture; Sugiyama, T. [Gunma Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Matsufuji, Y. [Kyusyu Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Architecture

    2001-07-01

    Serious effort has been made in Japan to make use of the huge quantity of fly ash that is generated each year by coal-based thermal power plants. The produced fly ash contains unburned carbon, rendering it a low quality material classified as Japan Industrial Standard A 6201 class 3. The most efficient use of this kind of fly ash is to use it in concrete, where fly ash is added to the concrete without a corresponding reduction in the quantity of cement. A study was conducted to examine the penetrating characteristics of chloride ions into fly ash concrete and the corrosion of steel reinforcement in concrete, where portions of fine and coarse aggregates were replaced by fly ash. Compressive strength tests were conducted along with chloride penetration tests. Corrosion diagnosis of steel reinforcements was also performed. The physical properties and durability of fly ash concrete against aggressive environments was studied. It was determined that fly ash concretes have higher compressive strength than the control concrete. The strength development of fly ash concrete is very large, particularly on high-volume fly ash concretes. Chloride diffusion coefficients of fly ash concretes derived from the rapid chloride permeability test were found to decrease according to the volume of fly ash added. Chloride penetration of fly ash concretes also decreases with an increase in the volume of fly ash added. Corrosion diagnosis of steel reinforcement in concrete was shown to be effective for evaluating corrosive behaviour of steel reinforcement in fly ash concretes. The values of half-cell potential and polarization resistance measured on fly ash concretes become higher, suggesting no corrosion on steel reinforcement. 6 refs., 4 tabs., 10 figs.

  9. Vision in Flies: Measuring the Attention Span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Sebastian; Wolf, Reinhard; Heisenberg, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A visual stimulus at a particular location of the visual field may elicit a behavior while at the same time equally salient stimuli in other parts do not. This property of visual systems is known as selective visual attention (SVA). The animal is said to have a focus of attention (FoA) which it has shifted to a particular location. Visual attention normally involves an attention span at the location to which the FoA has been shifted. Here the attention span is measured in Drosophila. The fly is tethered and hence has its eyes fixed in space. It can shift its FoA internally. This shift is revealed using two simultaneous test stimuli with characteristic responses at their particular locations. In tethered flight a wild type fly keeps its FoA at a certain location for up to 4s. Flies with a mutation in the radish gene, that has been suggested to be involved in attention-like mechanisms, display a reduced attention span of only 1s.

  10. Vision in Flies: Measuring the Attention Span.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Koenig

    Full Text Available A visual stimulus at a particular location of the visual field may elicit a behavior while at the same time equally salient stimuli in other parts do not. This property of visual systems is known as selective visual attention (SVA. The animal is said to have a focus of attention (FoA which it has shifted to a particular location. Visual attention normally involves an attention span at the location to which the FoA has been shifted. Here the attention span is measured in Drosophila. The fly is tethered and hence has its eyes fixed in space. It can shift its FoA internally. This shift is revealed using two simultaneous test stimuli with characteristic responses at their particular locations. In tethered flight a wild type fly keeps its FoA at a certain location for up to 4s. Flies with a mutation in the radish gene, that has been suggested to be involved in attention-like mechanisms, display a reduced attention span of only 1s.

  11. Insecticide resistance in the sand fly, Phlebotomus papatasi from Khartoum State, Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Mo'awia

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phlebotomus papatasi the vector of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL is the most widely spread sand fly in Sudan. No data has previously been collected on insecticide susceptibility and/or resistance of this vector, and a first study to establish a baseline data is reported here. Methods Sand flies were collected from Surogia village, (Khartoum State, Rahad Game Reserve (eastern Sudan and White Nile area (Central Sudan using light traps. Sand flies were reared in the Tropical Medicine Research Institute laboratory. The insecticide susceptibility status of first progeny (F1 of P. papatasi of each population was tested using WHO insecticide kits. Also, P. papatasi specimens from Surogia village and Rahad Game Reserve were assayed for activities of enzyme systems involved in insecticide resistance (acetylcholinesterase (AChE, non-specific carboxylesterases (EST, glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs and cytochrome p450 monooxygenases (Cyt p450. Results Populations of P. papatasi from White Nile and Rahad Game Reserve were sensitive to dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT, permethrin, malathion, and propoxur. However, the P. papatasi population from Surogia village was sensitive to DDT and permethrin but highly resistant to malathion and propoxur. Furthermore, P. papatasi of Surogia village had significantly higher insecticide detoxification enzyme activity than of those of Rahad Game Reserve. The sand fly population in Surogia displayed high AChE activity and only three specimens had elevated levels for EST and GST. Conclusions The study provided evidence for malathion and propoxur resistance in the sand fly population of Surogia village, which probably resulted from anti-malarial control activities carried out in the area during the past 50 years.

  12. Control of an anthropomorphic manipulator involved in physical human-robot interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Vu, Hung Mai

    2012-01-01

    Dissertação de mestrado em Engenharia Mecânica The objective of the dissertation is to flexibly control the end effector velocity of a redundant 7-DOF manipulator by using a differential kinematics approach, while ensuring the safety of the robotic arm from exceeding the physical limits of joints in terms of position, velocity and acceleration. The thesis also contributes with a real-time obstacle avoidance strategy for controlling anthropomorphic robotic arms in dynamic obstac...

  13. Influence of locus of control on interpersonal attraction and affective reactions in situations involving reward and punishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, D S; Jackson, T H

    1975-01-01

    Ninety-six subjects with either high or low I-E Scale scores participated in individual discussions with an experimental who either (a) rewarded and then punished, (b) punished and then rewarded, or (c) gave no evaluative feedback after the subject's responses. Because previous research has suggested that internally controlled subjects attend primarily to rewards while externally controlled subjects attend primarily to punishments, it was hypothesized (a) that the internally controlled subjects, as compared to externally controlled subjects, would be more attracted to the experimenter in the conditions involving rewards and punishments regardless of the sequencing and (b) that the reverse would be true in the nonevaluative control condition. The prediction was consistently supported and subjects' feelings of anger and anxiety during the discussions generally complemented the attention and attraction hypotheses. The results indicate that individual differences influence attraction in situations involving rewards and punishments and they offer a prescription for developing interpersonal attraction and minimizing anger: Offer rewards to internally controlled persons and remain neutral with externally controlled persons.

  14. Exact solutions to robust control problems involving scalar hyperbolic conservation laws using Mixed Integer Linear Programming

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yanning

    2013-10-01

    This article presents a new robust control framework for transportation problems in which the state is modeled by a first order scalar conservation law. Using an equivalent formulation based on a Hamilton-Jacobi equation, we pose the problem of controlling the state of the system on a network link, using boundary flow control, as a Linear Program. Unlike many previously investigated transportation control schemes, this method yields a globally optimal solution and is capable of handling shocks (i.e. discontinuities in the state of the system). We also demonstrate that the same framework can handle robust control problems, in which the uncontrollable components of the initial and boundary conditions are encoded in intervals on the right hand side of inequalities in the linear program. The lower bound of the interval which defines the smallest feasible solution set is used to solve the robust LP (or MILP if the objective function depends on boolean variables). Since this framework leverages the intrinsic properties of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation used to model the state of the system, it is extremely fast. Several examples are given to demonstrate the performance of the robust control solution and the trade-off between the robustness and the optimality. © 2013 IEEE.

  15. Physics of flying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetrone, Jim

    2015-05-01

    Column editor's note: As the school year comes to a close, it is important to start thinking about next year. One area that you want to consider is field trips. Many institutions require that teachers plan for a field trip well in advance. Keeping that in mind, I asked Jim Vetrone to write an article about the fantastic field trip he takes his AP Physics students on. I had the awesome opportunity to attend a professional development day that Jim arranged at iFLY in the Chicago suburbs. The experience of "flying" in a wind tunnel was fabulous. Equally fun was watching the other physics teachers come up with experiments to have the professional "flyers" perform in the tube. I could envision my students being similarly excited about the experience and about the development of their own experiments. After I returned to school, I immediately began the process of trying to get this field trip approved for the 2015-16 school year. I suggest that you start your process as well if you hope to try a new field trip next year. The key to getting the approval, in my experience, is submitting a proposal early that includes supporting documentation from sources. Often I use NGSS or state standards as justifications for my field trips. I have also quoted College Board expectations for AP Physics 1 and 2 in my documents when requesting an unusual field trip.quote>

  16. Imaging beneath the skin of large tropical rivers: Clay controls on system morphodynamics revealed by novel CHIRP sub-surface sonar and deep coring along the Fly and Strickland Rivers, Papua New Guinea (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalto, R. E.; Grenfell, M.; Lauer, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    , where the channel traverses a clay bed, with minimal evident bedforms and giant scour holes carved 35m deep into clay at INNER apexes of the peculiar dog-leg meander bends; 3) Hard (old) clay ridges & an intervening channel network buried ~15m below the current bed of Lake Murray, indicating a ~10m rise in the Strickland River near that location; 4) A survey up newly formed rapids through a head-cut crevasse splay (though a recently buried forest) joining the Mamboi River to the middle Strickland River, the pathway for a pending avulsion; 5) The prevalence of clay in many of our deep cores throughout the Strickland, Fly, and Lake Murray floodplains; and 6) an example of the rapid infilling of a recent oxbow cutoff by clay deposition. It appears that clay (and peat) units dominate the floodplains and large portions of the channel bed. Furthermore, this clay often appears to control the morphodynamics of the channel, from the head-cut clay knick points of the pending avulsion, to many frozen meander bends, to the unusual dog-leg meanders of the lower Middle Fly River. We conclude with a synthesis of how clay deposition can potentially play a major role in orchestrating the channel morphodynamics of large tropical rivers.

  17. Assessment of attractiveness of plants as roosting sites for the melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae, and oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuate, Grant T; Vargas, Roger I

    2007-01-01

    The use of toxic protein bait sprays to suppress melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillett) (Diptera: Tephritidae), populations typically involves application to vegetation bordering agricultural host areas where the adults seek shelter ("roost"). Although bait spray applications for suppression of oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), populations have traditionally been applied to the host crop, rather than to crop borders, roosting by oriental fruit flies in borders of some crop species, such as papaya, Carica papaya L. (Brassicales: Caricaceae), suggests that bait spray applications to crop borders could also help in suppression of B. dorsalis populations. In order to develop improved recommendations for application of bait sprays to border plants for suppression of melon fly and oriental fruit fly populations, the relative attractiveness of a range of plant species, in a vegetative (non-flowering) stage, was tested to wild melon fly and oriental fruit fly populations established in a papaya orchard in Hawaii. A total of 20 plant species were evaluated, divided into four categories: 1) border plants, including corn, Zea mays L. (Poales: Poaceae), windbreaks and broad-leaved ornamentals, 7 species; 2) weed plants commonly found in agricultural fields in Hawaii, 6 species; 3) host crop plants, 1 species- zucchini, Cucurbita pepo L. (Violales: Curcurbitaceae), and 4) locally grown fruit trees, 6 species. Plants were established in pots and placed in an open field, in clusters encircling protein bait traps, 20 m away from the papaya orchard. Castor bean, Ricinus communis L. (Euphorbiales: Euphorbiaceae), panax, Polyscias guilfoylei (Bull) Bailey (Apiales: Araliaceae), tiger's claw, Erythnna variegata L. (Fabales: Fabaceae), and guava, Psidium guajava L. (Myrtales: Myrtaceae) were identified as preferred roosting hosts for the melon fly, and tiger's claw, panax, castor bean, Canada cocklebur, Xanthium strumarium L. (Asterales: Asteraceae), Brazilian

  18. Extraction of vanadium from athabasca tar sands fly ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Bueno, C. O.; Spink, D. R.; Rempel, G. L.

    1981-06-01

    The production of refinery grade oil from the Alberta tar sands deposits as currently practiced by Suncor (formally Great Canadian Oil Sands Ltd.—GCOS) generates a substantial amount of petroleum coke fly ash which contains appreciable amounts of valuable metals such as vanadium, nickel and titanium. Although the recovery of vanadium from petroleum ash is a well established commercial practice, it is shown in the present work that such processes are not suitable for recovery of vanadium from the GCOS fly ash. The fact that the GCOS fly ash behaves so differently when compared to other petroleum fly ash is attributed to its high silicon and aluminum contents which tie up the metal values in a silica-alumina matrix. Results of experiments carried out in this investigation indicate that such matrices can be broken down by application of a sodium chloride/water roast of the carbon-free fly ash. Based on results from a series of preliminary studies, a detailed investigation was undertaken in order to define optimum conditions for a vanadium extraction process. The process developed involves a high temperature (875 to 950 °C) roasting of the fly ash in the presence of sodium chloride and water vapor carried out in a rotary screw kiln, followed by dilute sodium hydroxide atmosphereic leaching (98 °C) to solublize about 85 pet of the vanadium originally present in the fly ash. It was found that the salt roasting operation, besides enhancing vanadium recovery, also inhibits silicon dissolution during the subsequent leaching step. The salt roasting treatment is found to improve vanadium recovery significantly when the fly ash is fully oxidized. This is easily achieved by burning off the carbon present in the “as received” fly ash under excess air. The basic leaching used in the new process selectively dissolves vanadium from the roasted ash, leaving nickel and titanium untouched.

  19. Bartonella species in bat flies (Diptera: Nycteribiidae) from western Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billeter, S A; Hayman, D T S; Peel, A J; Baker, K; Wood, J L N; Cunningham, A; Suu-Ire, R; Dittmar, K; Kosoy, M Y

    2012-03-01

    Bat flies are obligate ectoparasites of bats and it has been hypothesized that they may be involved in the transmission of Bartonella species between bats. A survey was conducted to identify whether Cyclopodia greefi greefi (Diptera: Nycteribiidae) collected from Ghana and 2 islands in the Gulf of Guinea harbour Bartonella. In total, 137 adult flies removed from Eidolon helvum, the straw-coloured fruit bat, were screened for the presence of Bartonella by culture and PCR analysis. Bartonella DNA was detected in 91 (66·4%) of the specimens examined and 1 strain of a Bartonella sp., initially identified in E. helvum blood from Kenya, was obtained from a bat fly collected in Ghana. This is the first study, to our knowledge, to report the identification and isolation of Bartonella in bat flies from western Africa.

  20. Temporal regulation of proteome profile in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Perumal; Jayapalan, Jaime J; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri S; Arumugam, Manjula; Hashim, Onn H

    2016-01-01

    Background. Diurnal rhythms of protein synthesis controlled by the biological clock underlie the rhythmic physiology in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. In this study, we conducted a proteome-wide investigation of rhythmic protein accumulation in D. melanogaster. Materials and Methods. Total protein collected from fly samples harvested at 4 h intervals over the 24 h period were subjected to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, trypsin digestion and MS/MS analysis. Protein spots/clusters were identified with MASCOT search engine and Swiss-Prot database. Expression of proteins was documented as percentage of volume contribution using the Image Master 2D Platinum software. Results. A total of 124 protein spots/clusters were identified using MS/MS analysis. Significant variation in the expression of 88 proteins over the 24-h period was observed. A relatively higher number of proteins was upregulated during the night compared to the daytime. The complexity of temporal regulation of the D. melanogaster proteome was further reflected from functional annotations of the differently expressed proteins, with those that were upregulated at night being restricted to the heat shock proteins and proteins involved in metabolism, muscle activity, protein synthesis/folding/degradation and apoptosis, whilst those that were overexpressed in the daytime were apparently involved in metabolism, muscle activity, ion-channel/cellular transport, protein synthesis/folding/degradation, redox homeostasis, development and transcription. Conclusion. Our data suggests that a wide range of proteins synthesized by the fruit fly, D. melanogaster, is under the regulation of the biological clock.

  1. Difference resonances in a controlled van der Pol-Duffing oscillator involving time delay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, J.C. [Faculty of Engineering, University of Technology, Sydney, Level 20, Building 1, PO Box 123, Broadway, NSW 2007 (Australia)], E-mail: jin.ji@uts.edu.au; Zhang, N.; Gao Wei [Faculty of Engineering, University of Technology, Sydney, Level 20, Building 1, PO Box 123, Broadway, NSW 2007 (Australia)

    2009-10-30

    A non-resonant interaction of two Hopf bifurcations may appear after the trivial solution of a controlled van der Pol-Duffing oscillator without external excitation loses its stability, when two critical time delays corresponding to two Hopf bifurcations have the same value. In the vicinity of the non-resonant Hopf bifurcations, the presence of a periodic excitation in the controlled oscillator can induce difference resonances in the forced response, when the forcing frequency and the frequencies of the two Hopf bifurcations satisfy certain relationships. It is found that the frequency response curves of the controlled system under difference resonances are an isolated closed curve. The difference resonance response may admit two stable motions on a three-dimensional torus consisting of three frequencies. Illustrative examples are given to show the quasi-periodic motions.

  2. Refractive Index of Fly Rhabdomeres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stavenga, D.G.

    1974-01-01

    The refractive index reported previously for the rhabdomeres of flies (1.349) has been corrected for waveguide effects. The presented correction method has yielded n1 = 1.365 ± 0.006. It is argued that an acceptable estimate for the refractive index of the inhomogeneous surroundings of fly

  3. Involvement of the corticospinal tract in the control of human gait

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthélemy, Dorothy; Grey, Michael James; Nielsen, Jens Bo;

    2011-01-01

    Given the inherent mechanical complexity of human bipedal locomotion, and that complete spinal cord lesions in human leads to paralysis with no recovery of gait, it is often suggested that the corticospinal tract (CST) has a more predominant role in the control of walking in humans than in other...... animals. However, what do we actually know about the contribution of the CST to the control of gait? This chapter will provide an overview of this topic based on the premise that a better understanding of the role of the CST in gait will be essential for the design of evidence-based approaches...

  4. Specification and Estimation of Production Functions Involving Damage Control Inputs: A Two-Stage, Semiparametric Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuosmanen, T.K.; Pemsl, D.; Wesseler, J.H.H.

    2006-01-01

    Productivity assessment of damage control inputs (such as pesticides) is complicated because their effect depends on the exposure to damage agents (such as pests). We discuss some open specification and estimation issues. The contribution is threefold. First, we elaborate the separability conditions

  5. Functional imaging of structures involved in neural control of the lower urinary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Derek

    2015-01-01

    Recent functional brain imaging studies, building on earlier observations, suggest a working model of brain control of the lower urinary tract. It comprises a few cerebral neural circuits that, during the storage phase, act on the midbrain periaqueductal gray to inhibit the long-loop, spinobulbospinal voiding reflex, thus promoting continence. Circuit 1, centered on the medial prefrontal cortex, appears to be concerned with conscious control of both continence and voiding. Circuit 2, centered on the dorsal anterior cingulate (midcingulate) and supplementary motor area, is concerned with emotional aspects of bladder control: desire to void or urgency with concomitant urethral sphincter activation to delay leakage. A subcortical circuit 3 has been less well studied. Circuit 1 is bilateral with a right-sided preference. Scattered studies of the connectivity of the control network suggest that white-matter damage may contribute to urinary incontinence. A few studies confirm that isolated cerebral lesions, if in the medial prefrontal cortex or its connecting pathways, may lead to incontinence. Lower urinary tract dysfunction in other neurologic diseases (normal-pressure hydrocephalus, Parkinson's disease, and multiple systems atrophy) appears consistent with the working model, and even spinal or peripheral lesions have central effects. However, this model omits the contributions of brain regions already observed in some imaging studies and therefore is certainly oversimplified.

  6. NECESSARY CONDITIONS FOR OPTIMAL CONTROLS OF SEMILINEAR ELLIPTIC VARIATIONAL INEQUALITIES INVOLVING STATE CONSTRAINT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Gengsheng

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with maximum principle for some optimal control problem governed by some elliptic variational inequalities. Some state constraints are discussed.The basic techniques used here are based on those in [1] and a new penalty functional defined in this paper.

  7. Parental Warmth, Control, and Involvement in Schooling: Predicting Academic Achievement among Korean American Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoungho; Rohner, Ronald P.

    2002-01-01

    Explored the relationship between parenting style and academic achievement of Korean American adolescents, investigating the influence of perceived parental warmth and control and improvement in schooling. Survey data indicated that authoritative paternal parenting related to optimal academic achievement. Differences in maternal parenting styles…

  8. Structures of two exonucleases involved in controlled RNA turnover in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonstrup, Anette Thyssen; Midtgaard, Søren Fuglsang; Van, Lan Bich

    2p is a catalytic subunit of the cytoplasmic deadenylase complex [2], which removes the poly(A) tail in the 3'-end of mRNA, the first and rate-limiting step of controlled mRNA turnover in the general eukaryotic mRNA degradation pathway [3]. The crystal structure of the central part of S. cerevisiae...

  9. Parental Warmth, Control, and Involvement in Schooling: Predicting Academic Achievement among Korean American Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoungho; Rohner, Ronald P.

    2002-01-01

    Explored the relationship between parenting style and academic achievement of Korean American adolescents, investigating the influence of perceived parental warmth and control and improvement in schooling. Survey data indicated that authoritative paternal parenting related to optimal academic achievement. Differences in maternal parenting styles…

  10. Motivationally significant self-control: enhanced action withholding involves the right inferior frontal junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, David A; Upton, Daniel J; Moore, Jennifer; Hester, Robert

    2015-01-01

    In everyday life, people use self-control to withhold actions. This ability is particularly important when the consequences of action withholding have an impact on the individual's well-being. Despite its importance, it is unclear as to how the neural nodes implicated in action withholding contribute to this real-world type of self-control. By modifying an action withholding paradigm, the go/no-go task, we examined how the brain exerts self-control during a scenario in which the implications of withholding an action are meaningful and motivationally significant. A successfully withheld response contributed to long-term monetary rewards, whereas failure to withhold a response incurred an immediate monetary punishment. Compared with neutral action withholding, participants significantly improved their performance when these contingencies were applied. Crucially, although the right IFG and pre-SMA were found to promote overall action withholding, the enhancement in behavioral performance relative to a neutral condition was only reflected by a physiological change in a region encompassing the right inferior frontal junction and precentral gyrus. We speculate that the ability to flexibly modulate attention to goal-relevant stimuli is crucial to enhanced, motivationally driven action withholding and that this ability is subserved by the right inferior frontal junction. These findings suggest that control-modulating factors, rather than action withholding processes per se, can be critical to improving motivationally significant action withholding outcomes.

  11. Parasarcophaga (Liopygia) ruficornis (Diptera:Sarcophagidae): a flesh fly species of medical importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwannayod, S; Sanit, S; Sukontason, K; Sukontason, K L

    2013-06-01

    Parasarcophaga (Liopygia) ruficornis is a well-known flesh fly species of medical importance, both as a myiasis-producing agent and fly seen in a forensic entomology context. This study performed a comprehensive literature review of this fly species, dealing with morphology, bionomics and medical involvement. Important characteristics used to identify P. ruficornis have been provided for both its third instar and adult for identification purpose in the future.

  12. Classical olfactory conditioning in the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia Li; Chen, Xiao Yan; Zeng, Xin Nian

    2015-01-01

    The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, is a serious pest of fruits and vegetables. Methyl eugenol (ME), a male attractant, is used to against this fly by mass trapping. Control effect may be influenced by learning, which could modify the olfactory response of the fly to this attractant. To collect the behavioral evidence, studies on the capability of this fly for olfactory learning are necessary. We investigated olfactory learning in male flies with a classical olfactory conditioning procedure using restrained individuals under laboratory conditions. The acquisition of the proboscis extension reflex was used as the criterion for conditioning. A high conditioned response level was found in oriental fruit flies when an odor was presented in paired association with a sucrose reward but not when the odor and sucrose were presented unpaired. We also found that the conditioning performance was influenced by the odor concentration, intertrial interval, and starvation time. A slight sensitization elicited by imbibing sucrose was observed. These results indicate that oriental fruit flies have a high capacity to form an olfactory memory as a result of classical conditioning.

  13. Suggestion for aircraft flying qualities requirements of a short-range air combat mission

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lixin; Youguang GUO; Zhang, Qi; Yue, Ting

    2017-01-01

    Owing to the lack of a direct link with the operations in short-range air combat, conventional aircraft flying qualities criteria are inappropriate to guide the design of a task-tailored flight control law. By applying the mission-oriented flying qualities evaluation approach, various aircraft with different control law parameters are evaluated on a ground-based simulator. This paper compares the evaluation results with several conventional flying qualities criteria, and discusses the appropr...

  14. Anticonvulsants Teratogenic Mechanism Involves Alteration of Bioelectrically-controlled Processes in the Embryo. A hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Díaz, Sonia; Levin, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Maternal use of anticonvulsants during the first trimester of pregnancy has been associated with an elevated risk of major congenital malformations in the offspring. Whether the increased risk is caused by the specific pharmacological mechanisms of certain anticonvulsants, the underlying epilepsy, or common genetic or environmental risk factors shared by epilepsy and malformations is controversial. We hypothesize that anticonvulsant therapies during pregnancy that attain more successful inhibition of neurotransmission might lead to both better seizure control in the mother and stronger alteration of bioelectrically-controlled processes in the embryo that result in structural malformations. If our theory were correct, development of pharmaceuticals that do not alter cell resting transmembrane voltage levels could result in safer drugs. PMID:24815983

  15. Fauna and relative frequency of synanthropic flies in the biggest Persian Gulf Island, Qeshm, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Khoobdel

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the diversity and relative abundance of medically important species of synanthropic flies and their seasonal activity on Qeshm Island in Persian Gulf, Iran. Methods: Flies collection was performed during March 2011 to February 2012 in all different areas of the island by using the common fly trap and plastic water bottle fly trap, reverse-cone model, containing tainted lamb or beef meat as bait. The captured flies were identified by using valid flies systematic keys, checklists and species description. The relative abundances and seasonal activity of flies were estimated by means of flies captured per trap in every month. Results: In this study a total number of 11 species of medically important flies in three families including Calliphoridae, Sarcophagidae and Muscidae, were collected. The relative mean abundance of flies was estimated to be 6.3 ± 1.1 per trap. The most abundance was seen in rural areas in the south of Qeshm Island with 10.1 ± 1.5 per trap. In this island, medically impotent flies had two peaks of activity in early spring and early autumn, during April and October. Flies activity decreased in July and August due to the high increase of temperature and humidity of the weather. In February, the relative decrease in air temperature reduced the activity of the flies. Conclusions: Diversity and abundance of flies in spring and early autumn were higher than other seasons, especially in rural areas of Southern Qeshm Island. Insect control measures should be conducted during the peak of flies activity.

  16. Fauna and relative frequency of synanthropic flies in the biggest Persian Gulf Island, Qeshm, Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mehdi Khoobdel; Kamran Akbarzadeh; Javad Rafinejad

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify the diversity and relative abundance of medically important species of synanthropic flies and their seasonal activity on Qeshm Island in Persian Gulf, Iran. Methods: Flies collection was performed during March 2011 to February 2012 in all different areas of the island by using the common fly trap and plastic water bottle fly trap, reverse-cone model, containing tainted lamb or beef meat as bait. The captured flies were identified by using valid flies systematic keys, checklists and species description. The relative abundances and seasonal activity of flies were estimated by means of flies captured per trap in every month. Results: In this study a total number of 11 species of medically important flies in three families including Calliphoridae, Sarcophagidae and Muscidae, were collected. The relative mean abundance of flies was estimated to be 6.3 ± 1.1 per trap. The most abundance was seen in rural areas in the south of Qeshm Island with 10.1 ± 1.5 per trap. In this island, medically impotent flies had two peaks of activity in early spring and early autumn, during April and October. Flies activity decreased in July and August due to the high increase of temperature and humidity of the weather. In February, the relative decrease in air temperature reduced the activity of the flies. Conclusions: Diversity and abundance of flies in spring and early autumn were higher than other seasons, especially in rural areas of Southern Qeshm Island. Insect control measures should be conducted during the peak of flies activity.

  17. 污泥和粉煤灰覆盖煤矸石山防治污染的模拟试验研究%Simulation Experiment on Control of Coal Gangue Pollution Using Sewage-sludge and Fly Ash Covering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马保国; 胡振琪

    2014-01-01

    采用3个柱淋溶模拟试验,研究污泥和粉煤灰覆盖煤矸石降低酸性排水污染的效果。试验结果表明:污泥和粉煤灰覆盖煤矸石后其淋溶液pH值由2.0升至7.5左右,Eh值分别降低到50、200 mV以下,EC值均降低到2.0 mS·cm-1,重金属镉、铜、铅、镍和锌的浓度降到0.002 mg·L-1以下,硫酸盐和铁的污染得到有效控制。这主要因为污泥和粉煤灰的碱性、吸附作用及其中硫酸盐还原菌的作用促进了Fe等氢氧化物沉淀和多种重金属硫化物及碳酸盐的沉淀固定,pH值呈中性或微碱性能够阻止嗜酸硫氧化细菌对黄铁矿的微生物催化氧化。污泥和粉煤灰覆盖煤矸石可以明显地抑制煤矸石中硫化物氧化产生的酸和重金属污染,其中污泥覆盖5 cm的修复效果更好。%Column leaching tests were conducted to explore the effects of sewage-sludge and fly ash covering on controlling acid and heavy metal contamination from coal gangues. Covering with sewage-sludge and fly ash significantly increased pH values but decreased Eh, EC, Fe and SO 2-4 concentrations in the drainage, thus reducing concentrations of heavy metals profoundly. Concentrations of cadmium, copper, iron,lead, nickel and zinc were all lower than 0.002 mg·L-1. Additions of sewage-sludge and fly ash prevented the oxidation of sulfide in coal gangues, increased the alkalinity and adsorption, decreased the population of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, thus enhancing immobilization of heavy metals via precipitation of sulfide and carbonate through biological (SRB)sulfate reduction, and reducing the oxidation process of sulfide through iron coating on the surface of sulfide. The results indicate that sewage-sludge and fly ash could effectively prevent acid-mine drainage and heavy metal contamination from coal gangues in situ treatment systems, and that covering with 5 cm thick sludge shows the greatest controlling effects.

  18. Understanding involvement in surgical orthopaedic randomized controlled trials: A qualitative study of patient and health professional views and experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwood, Jeremy; Johnson, Emma; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael

    2016-01-01

    Background Factors influencing patients' motivations for enrolling in, and their experiences of, orthopaedic randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are not fully understood. Less is known about healthcare professionals' (HCP) experiences of RCT involvement. Aim This study investigates patients' and HCPs' views and experiences of RCT participation and delivery to inform the planning of future RCTs. Methods Total hip or knee replacement patients (n = 24) participating in the single-center double-blind APEX RCTs of an intra-operative anesthetic intervention and HCPs (n = 15) involved in trial delivery were interviewed. Data were audio-recorded, transcribed, anonymized and thematically analyzed. Results Although altruistic reasons for RCT participation were common, patients also weighed up demands of the RCT with the potential benefits of taking part, demonstrating the complex and conditional nature of trial participation. HCPs were interested in RCT involvement as a means of contributing towards advances in medical knowledge and also considered the costs and benefits of RCT involvement. Conclusion Patients and HCPs value involvement in RCTs that they see as relevant and of value, while imposing minimum burden. These findings have important implications for the design of methods to recruit patients to RCTs and for planning how an RCT might best interface with HCP clinical commitments. PMID:26772763

  19. Potassium channel and NKCC cotransporter involvement in ocular refractive control mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila G Crewther

    Full Text Available Myopia affects well over 30% of adult humans globally. However, the underlying physiological mechanism is little understood. This study tested the hypothesis that ocular growth and refractive compensation to optical defocus can be controlled by manipulation of potassium and chloride ion-driven transretinal fluid movements to the choroid. Chicks were raised with +/-10D or zero power optical defocus rendering the focal plane of the eye in front of, behind, or at the level of the retinal photoreceptors respectively. Intravitreal injections of barium chloride, a non-specific inhibitor of potassium channels in the retina and RPE or bumetanide, a selective inhibitor of the sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter were made, targeting fluid control mechanisms. Comparison of refractive compensation to 5 mM Ba(2+ and 10(-5 M bumetanide compared with control saline injected eyes shows significant change for both positive and negative lens defocus for Ba(2+ but significant change only for negative lens defocus with bumetanide (Rx(SAL(-10D = -8.6 +/- .9 D; Rx(Ba2+(-10D = -2.9 +/- .9 D; Rx(Bum(-10D = -2.9 +/- .9 D; Rx(SAL(+10D = +8.2 +/- .9 D; Rx(Ba2+(+10D = +2.8 +/- 1.3 D; Rx(Bum(+10D = +8.0 +/- .7 D. Vitreous chamber depths showed a main effect for drug conditions with less depth change in response to defocus shown for Ba(2+ relative to Saline, while bumetanide injected eyes showed a trend to increased depth without a significant interaction with applied defocus. The results indicate that both K channels and the NKCC cotransporter play a role in refractive compensation with NKCC blockade showing far more specificity for negative, compared with positive, lens defocus. Probable sites of action relevant to refractive control include the apical retinal pigment epithelium membrane and the photoreceptor/ON bipolar synapse. The similarities between the biometric effects of NKCC inhibition and biometric reports of the blockade of the retinal ON response, suggest a

  20. Oviposition Deterrence and Immature Survival of Filth Flies (Diptera: Muscidae) When Exposed to Commercial Fungal Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machtinger, E.T.; Weeks, E.N.I.; Geden, C. J.

    2016-01-01

    Filth flies are pests of livestock, and can transmit pathogens that cause disease to animals and their caretakers. Studies have shown successful infection of adult filth flies following exposure to different strains and formulations of entomopathogenic fungi. This study aimed to examine the effects of commercial formulations of Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo) (Moniliales: Moniliaceae) (i.e., BotaniGard ES, Mycotrol O, balEnce), and Metarhizium brunneum (Metsch.) (Ascomycota: Hypocreales) (i.e., Met52 EC), on filth fly oviposition and immature fly survival after exposure. House flies, Musca domestica L., laid significantly fewer eggs on Met52 EC-treated surfaces than on surfaces treated with all other products and the control. Similar numbers of eggs were laid on surfaces treated with all B. bassiana products, but egg production was half of the control. Stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.), laid the fewest eggs on Met52 EC- and Mycotrol O-treated surfaces. This species did not distinguish between the remaining products and the control. In a second experiment, house fly eggs were placed on treated cloths so that hatched larvae contacted the treatment prior to development. Met52 EC had the greatest effect on immature survival with a significant reduction in recovered pupae at the medium and high doses of fungi. Overall, Met52 EC, containing M. brunneum, had the greatest effect on house fly and stable fly oviposition deterrence and immature development of house flies. Management implications are discussed. PMID:27302955

  1. Impact of house fly salivary gland hypertrophy virus (MdSGHV) on a heterologous host, Stomoxys calcitrans

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of Musca domestica salivary gland hypertrophy virus (MdSGHV) on selected fitness parameters of stable flies (Stomoxys calcitrans [L.]) was examined in the laboratory. Virus-injected stable flies of both genders suffered substantially higher mortality than control flies. By day 9, female...

  2. Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction in the Horn Fly: Detection of Pyrethroid, Organophosphate and Cyclodiene Target Site Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    The horn fly, Haematobia irritans irritans, is an important pest to the livestock industry that causes economic losses of approximately US$1 billion in the U.S. and a similar value in Latin America. Horn fly control efforts still relies mainly on direct application of insecticides although horn fly ...

  3. Whole genome sequencing of the Braconid parasitoid wasp Fopius arisanus, an important biocontrol agent of pest Tepritid fruit flies

    Science.gov (United States)

    The braconid wasp Fopius arisanus (Sonan) is an important biological control agent of tropical and subtropical pest fruit flies including two important global pests, the Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata), and the oriental fruit fly (Bactrocera dorsalis}). The goal of this study was to dev...

  4. Paracrine mechanisms involved in the control of early stages of mammalian spermatogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pellegrino eRossi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Within the testis, Sertoli cell is the primary target of pituitary FSH. Several growth factors have been described to be produced specifically by Sertoli cells and modulate male germ cell development through paracrine mechanisms. Some have been shown to act directly on spermatogonia such as GDNF, which acts on self-renewal of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs while inhibiting their differentiation; BMP4, which has both a proliferative and differentiative effect on these cells, and KL, which stimulates the KIT tyrosine-kinase receptor expressed by differentiating spermatogonia (but not by SSCs. KL not only controls the proliferative cycles of KIT positive spermatogonia, but it also stimulates the expression of genes that are specific of the early phases of meiosis, whereas the expression of typical spermatogonial markers is down-regulated. On the contrary, FGF9 acts as a meiotic inhibiting substance both in fetal gonocytes and in post-natal spermatogonia through the induction of the RNA-binding protein NANOS2. Vitamin A, which is metabolized to Retinoic Acid in Sertoli cells, controls both SSCs differentiation through KIT induction and NANOS2 inhibition, and meiotic entry of differentiating spermatogonia through STRA8 upregulation.

  5. Exercise and self-esteem in menopausal women: a randomized controlled trial involving walking and yoga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elavsky, Steriani; McAuley, Edward

    2007-01-01

    To examine the effects of walking and yoga on multidimensional self-esteem and roles played by self-efficacy, body composition, and physical activity (PA) in changes in esteem. Four-month randomized controlled exercise trial with three arms: walking, yoga, and control. Previously low-active middle-aged women (n=164; M age = 49.9; SD = 3.6). Structured and supervised walking program meeting three times per week for I hour and supervised yoga program meeting twice per week for 90 minutes. Body composition, fitness assessment, and battery of psychologic measures. Panel analysis within a structural equation modeling framework using Mplus 3.0. The walking and yoga interventions failed to enhance global or physical self-esteem but improved subdomain esteem relative to physical condition and strength (for walking) and body attractiveness (for both walking and yoga). Over time the effects of PA, self-efficacy, and body fat on changes in physical self-esteem and global esteem were mediated by changes in physical condition and body attractiveness subdomain esteem. Women reporting greater levels of self-efficacy and PA with lower body fat also reported greater enhancements in subdomain esteem. These results provide support for the hierarchic and multidimensional nature of self-esteem and indicate that middle-aged women may enhance certain aspects of physical self-esteem by participating in PA.

  6. Assessment of hardened characteristics of raw fly ash blended self-compacting concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Mahalingam

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Fly ash is widely used as a supplementary cementitious material in concrete. Due to the implementation of new thermal power plants as a consequence of electricity demand, generation of fly ash is noticeably increased. In addition to pozzolana blended cement production, it is very imperative to use raw fly ash in concrete. Earlier research studies investigated the performance of processed fly ash in blended cement production as well as in concrete. In general, ground fly ash is used in blended cement production. A comprehensive study on the performance evaluation of raw fly ash in self-compacting concrete is not available in the existing literature. Moreover, utilization of raw fly ash in special concrete such as self-compacting concrete is essential to comprehend the performance of raw fly ash blended concrete compared to ordinary Portland concrete. Additionally, it will help to achieve maximum utilization of raw fly ash as a supplementary cementitious material rather than disposal as a waste, which eventually leads to several environmental issues. In the study, raw fly ash was collected and is directly used in development of self-compacting concrete. Two mixes were cast and hardened characteristics of blended concrete were investigated. Results from the study showed comparable performance with control concrete. Furthermore, significant reduction in chloride permeability was observed for raw fly ash blended concrete.

  7. Swarming mechanisms in the yellow fever mosquito: aggregation pheromones involved in the mating behavior of Aedes aegypti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquitoes of various species mate in swarms comprised of tens to thousands flying males. Yet little information is known about mosquito swarming mechanism. Discovering chemical cues involved in mosquito biology leads to better adaptation of disease control interventions. In this study, we aimed ...

  8. Nutrition-parasite interactions in goats: is immunoregulation involved in the control of gastrointestinal nematodes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoste, H; Torres-Acosta, J F J; Aguilar-Caballero, A J

    2008-02-01

    Compared to sheep, goats seem to develop a low immune response against the parasitic nematodes of the gastrointestinal tract. Nevertheless, some variability in the host response has been observed either at the individual level or depending on internal (genetic) or external (physiological status, nutrition) factors suggesting the possibility to exploit and manipulate this response. There is good evidence from field studies to suggest that a better plane of nutrition might contribute to improve goat resilience. However, the effects on immunoregulation and host resistance remain less clear. Due to their peculiarities in feeding behaviour ('intermediate browser'), goats represent a valuable model to explore the relationships between the three possible strategies to control nematode infection through nutrition: (i) by increasing the immune response; (ii) by avoiding the infective larvae; and (iii) by selecting plants with direct anthelmintic properties (self medication).

  9. Unpredictable Variable Prenatal Stress Programs Expression of Genes Involved in Appetite Control and Energy Expenditure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, E. L.; Al-Shayeb, B.; Baer, L. A.; Ronca, A. E.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to stress in the womb shapes neurobiological and physiological outcomes of offspring in later life, including body weight regulation and metabolic profiles. Our previous work utilizing a centrifugation-induced hyper-gravity demonstrated significantly increased (8-15%) body mass in male, but not female, rats exposed throughout gestation to chronic 2-g from conception to birth. We reported a similar outcome in adult offspring exposed throughout gestation to Unpredictable Variable Prenatal Stress (UVPS). Here we examine gene expression changes and the plasma of animals treated with our UVPS model to identify a potential role for prenatal stress in this hypergravity programming effect. Specifically we focused on appetite control and energy expenditure pathways in prenatally stressed adult (90-day-old) male Sprague-Dawley rats.

  10. Lack of involvement of medical writers and the pharmaceutical industry in publications retracted for misconduct: a systematic, controlled, retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, Karen L; Lew, Rebecca A; Stretton, Serina; Ely, Julie A; Bramich, Narelle J; Keys, Janelle R; Monk, Julie A; Woolley, Mark J

    2011-06-01

    The primary objective of this study was to quantify how many publications retracted because of misconduct involved declared medical writers (i.e., not ghostwriters) or declared pharmaceutical industry support. The secondary objective was to investigate factors associated with misconduct retractions. A systematic, controlled, retrospective, bibliometric study. Retracted publications dataset in the MEDLINE database. PubMed was searched (Limits: English, human, January 1966 - February 2008) to identify publications retracted because of misconduct. Publications retracted because of mistake served as the control group. Standardized definitions and data collection tools were used, and data were analyzed by an independent academic statistician. Of the 463 retracted publications retrieved, 213 (46%) were retracted because of misconduct. Publications retracted because of misconduct rarely involved declared medical writers (3/213; 1.4%) or declared pharmaceutical industry support (8/213; 3.8%); no misconduct retractions involved both declared medical writers and the industry. Retraction because of misconduct, rather than mistake, was significantly associated with: absence of declared medical writers (odds ratio: 0.16; 95% confidence interval: 0.05-0.57); absence of declared industry involvement (0.25; 0.11-0.58); single authorship (2.04; 1.01-4.12); first author having at least one other retraction (2.05; 1.35-3.11); and first author affiliated with a low/middle income country (2.34; 1.18-4.63). The main limitations of this study were restricting the search to English-language and human research articles. Publications retracted because of misconduct rarely involved declared medical writers or declared pharmaceutical industry support. Increased attention should focus on factors that are associated with misconduct retractions.

  11. The Development of the CONDUIT Advanced Control System Design and Evaluation Interface with a Case Study Application to an Advanced Fly by Wire Helicopter Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbourne, Jason

    1999-01-01

    This report details the development and use of CONDUIT (Control Designer's Unified Interface). CONDUIT is a design tool created at Ames Research Center for the purpose of evaluating and optimizing aircraft control systems against handling qualities. Three detailed design problems addressing the RASCAL UH-60A Black Hawk are included in this report to show the application of CONDUIT to helicopter control system design.

  12. Insulating brick from fly ash of thermal power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, S.N.; Majumdar, A.; Majumdar, S.K.

    1986-04-01

    Disposal of fly ash, a major byproduct of thermal power stations burning high ash pulverized fuel, has posed a serious problem of storage space required on one hand and the cost involved on the other. Fly ash possesses pozzolanic property. R and D work on utilization of fly ash in the form of sand-lime brick or cellular concrete has been already done. Other avenues of utilization are cement and concrete industry. All these are based on pozzolanic property of fly ash which decreases with the increase of unburnt carbon content in the same. The overall present consumption of fly ash is barely 5-7 per cent of the total production. A process has been developed to utilize fly ash with comparatively higher amount of carbonaceous matter in particular, to make insulating/semi-insulating bricks of standard size through use of other normal ingredients like clay (a plastic material), sulphite lye, molasses, etc. as binder along with some propertion of saw dust. The bricks made so far have been tested for their normal properties and these conform to a product of semi-insulating type. 21 refs., 2 tabs.

  13. A plant-specific cyclin-dependent kinase is involved in the control of G2/M progression in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porceddu, A; Stals, H; Reichheld, J P; Segers, G; De Veylder, L; Barroco, R P; Casteels, P; Van Montagu, M; Inzé, D; Mironov, V

    2001-09-28

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) control the key transitions in the eukaryotic cell cycle. All the CDKs known to control G(2)/M progression in yeast and animals are distinguished by the characteristic PSTAIRE motif in their cyclin-binding domain and are closely related. Higher plants contain in addition a number of more divergent non-PSTAIRE CDKs with still obscure functions. We show that a plant-specific type of non-PSTAIRE CDKs is involved in the control of the G(2)/M progression. In synchronized tobacco BY-2 cells, the corresponding protein, accumulated in a cell cycle-regulated fashion, peaking at the G(2)/M transition. The associated histone H1 kinase activity reached a maximum in mitosis and required a yet unidentified subunit to be fully active. Down-regulation of the associated kinase activity in transgenic tobacco plants using a dominant-negative mutation delayed G(2)/M transition. These results provide the first evidence that non-PSTAIRE CDKs are involved in the control of the G(2)/M progression in plants.

  14. Moving from rational to normative ideologies of control over public involvement: A case of continued managerial dominance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, Charlotte; Currie, Graeme; Staniszewska, Sophie

    2016-08-01

    Public Involvement (PI) is a strategic priority in global healthcare settings, yet can be seen as peripheral during decision making processes. Whilst extant research acknowledges variations in how policy is translated into practice, the majority attribute it to the limiting influence of professional hierarchies on the perceived 'legitimacy' of PI. Drawing on examples of three commissioning organisations within the English NHS, we outline how the variance in policy implementation for PI can be attributed to influence from the managers rather than professionals. In doing so we explore how rational ideologies of managerial control negatively impact PI. However, we also illustrate how PI alluded to in policy can be more successfully realised when organisational managers enact normative ideologies of control. Notwithstanding this assertion, we argue managerial domination exists even in the case of normative ideologies of control, to the detriment of more radical PI in service development.

  15. A new yeast poly(A polymerase complex involved in RNA quality control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepánka Vanácová

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells contain several unconventional poly(A polymerases in addition to the canonical enzymes responsible for the synthesis of poly(A tails of nuclear messenger RNA precursors. The yeast protein Trf4p has been implicated in a quality control pathway that leads to the polyadenylation and subsequent exosome-mediated degradation of hypomethylated initiator tRNAMet (tRNAiMet. Here we show that Trf4p is the catalytic subunit of a new poly(A polymerase complex that contains Air1p or Air2p as potential RNA-binding subunits, as well as the putative RNA helicase Mtr4p. Comparison of native tRNAiMet with its in vitro transcribed unmodified counterpart revealed that the unmodified RNA was preferentially polyadenylated by affinity-purified Trf4 complex from yeast, as well as by complexes reconstituted from recombinant components. These results and additional experiments with other tRNA substrates suggested that the Trf4 complex can discriminate between native tRNAs and molecules that are incorrectly folded. Moreover, the polyadenylation activity of the Trf4 complex stimulated the degradation of unmodified tRNAiMet by nuclear exosome fractions in vitro. Degradation was most efficient when coupled to the polyadenylation activity of the Trf4 complex, indicating that the poly(A tails serve as signals for the recruitment of the exosome. This polyadenylation-mediated RNA surveillance resembles the role of polyadenylation in bacterial RNA turnover.

  16. A New Yeast Poly(A Polymerase Complex Involved in RNA Quality Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanácová Stepánka

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells contain several unconventional poly(A polymerases in addition to the canonical enzymes responsible for the synthesis of poly(A tails of nuclear messenger RNA precursors. The yeast protein Trf4p has been implicated in a quality control pathway that leads to the polyadenylation and subsequent exosome-mediated degradation of hypomethylated initiator tRNAMet (tRNAiMet. Here we show that Trf4p is the catalytic subunit of a new poly(A polymerase complex that contains Air1p or Air2p as potential RNA-binding subunits, as well as the putative RNA helicase Mtr4p. Comparison of native tRNAiMet with its in vitro transcribed unmodified counterpart revealed that the unmodified RNA was preferentially polyadenylated by affinity-purified Trf4 complex from yeast, as well as by complexes reconstituted from recombinant components. These results and additional experiments with other tRNA substrates suggested that the Trf4 complex can discriminate between native tRNAs and molecules that are incorrectly folded. Moreover, the polyadenylation activity of the Trf4 complex stimulated the degradation of unmodified tRNAiMet by nuclear exosome fractions in vitro. Degradation was most efficient when coupled to the polyadenylation activity of the Trf4 complex, indicating that the poly(A tails serve as signals for the recruitment of the exosome. This polyadenylation-mediated RNA surveillance resembles the role of polyadenylation in bacterial RNA turnover.

  17. Cerebellar Neural Circuits Involving Executive Control Network Predict Response to Group Cognitive Behavior Therapy in Social Anxiety Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MinlanYuan; Meng, Yajing; Zhang, Yan; Nie, Xiaojing; Ren, Zhengjia; Zhu, Hongru; Li, Yuchen; Lui, Su; Gong, Qiyong; Qiu, Changjian; Zhang, Wei

    2017-02-02

    Some intrinsic connectivity networks including the default mode network (DMN) and executive control network (ECN) may underlie social anxiety disorder (SAD). Although the cerebellum has been implicated in the pathophysiology of SAD and several networks relevant to higher-order cognition, it remains unknown whether cerebellar areas involved in DMN and ECN exhibit altered resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) with cortical networks in SAD. Forty-six patients with SAD and 64 healthy controls (HC) were included and submitted to the baseline resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Seventeen SAD patients who completed post-treatment clinical assessments were included after group cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). RsFC of three cerebellar subregions in both groups was assessed respectively in a voxel-wise way, and these rsFC maps were compared by two-sample t tests between groups. Whole-brain voxel-wise regression was performed to examine whether cerebellar connectivity networks can predict response to CBT. Lower rsFC circuits of cerebellar subregions compared with HC at baseline (p circuits involving DMN and ECN are possible neuropathologic mechanisms of SAD. Stronger pretreatment cerebellar rsFC circuits involving ECN suggest potential neural markers to predict CBT response.

  18. OBTAINING A PERMIT-TO-FLY FOR A HALE-UAV IN BELGIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Everaerts

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ever since 2000, VITO has been working on the Pegasus project. This involves a solar High Altitude Long Endurance Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (HALE-UAV as a stratospheric platform for Earth Observation. This aircraft, called Mercator, is designed to fly for prolonged duration at altitudes up to 20 km. The technology has been proven by the aircraft’s manufacturer, QinetiQ (UK by a series of test flights over the past years, culminating in a world record flight in duration of over 14 days duration. All test flights, however, were conducted in test ranges, where other air traffic does not pose a concern. Pegasus aims to demonstrate the viability of stratospheric Earth Observation in Belgium, as a proof of concept for other areas around the world. The Belgian air space is completely different from a test range. More than 1 million aircraft movements take place over Belgium and Luxembourg every year, with routes to Amsterdam, Paris, Frankfurt, and London. Although Pegasus will usually be flying above this dense traffic, it does interfere with it during ascent and landing, and needs to be monitored during the cruise phase for safety reasons. Air traffic management in Belgium is a shared responsibility of Air Navigation Service Providers (ANSPs Belgocontrol (civil, ATCC (military and Eurocontrol MUAC (high altitude. In 2010, VITO applied for a permit-to-fly for a test flight of one day duration. Although the Belgian Civil Aviation Authority (CAA had issued a regulation on UAVs in 2007, it was the first application for a permit to fly in controlled airspace. The Belgian CAA decided to use it as a test for the procedures as well. A prerequisite for flying in controlled airspace was that the aircraft has to carry a mode-S transponder and navigation lights. During first half of 2010, the ANSPs collaborated on a Temporary Operations Instruction and studied the safety impact of this flight on their operations. As an outcome, they decided that the Pegasus

  19. Raspberry Ketone Trifluoroacetate, a New Attractant for the Queensland Fruit Fly, Bactrocera Tryoni (Froggatt).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siderhurst, Matthew S; Park, Soo J; Buller, Caitlyn N; Jamie, Ian M; Manoukis, Nicholas C; Jang, Eric B; Taylor, Phillip W

    2016-02-01

    Queensland fruit fly, Bactrocera tryoni (Q-fly), is a major pest of horticultural crops in eastern Australia. Lures that attract male Q-fly are important for detection of incursions and outbreaks, monitoring of populations, and control by mass trapping and male annihilation. Cuelure, an analog of naturally occurring raspberry ketone, is the standard Q-fly lure, but it has limited efficacy compared with lures that are available for some other fruit flies such as methyl eugenol for B. dorsalis. Melolure is a more recently developed raspberry ketone analog that has shown better attraction than cuelure in some field studies but not in others. A novel fluorinated analog of raspberry ketone, raspberry ketone trifluoroacetate (RKTA), has been developed as a potential improvement on cuelure and melolure. RKTA placed on laboratory cages containing 2-week-old Q-flies elicited strong behavioral responses from males. Quantification of Q-fly responses in these cages, using digital images to estimate numbers of flies aggregated near different lures, showed RKTA attracted and arrested significantly more flies than did cuelure or melolure. RKTA shows good potential as a new lure for improved surveillance and control of Q-fly.

  20. Description and theory of operation of the computer by-pass system for the NASA F-8 digital fly-by-wire control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    A triplex digital flight control system was installed in a NASA F-8C airplane to provide fail operate, full authority control. The triplex digital computers and interface circuitry process the pilot commands and aircraft motion feedback parameters according to the selected control laws, and they output the surface commands as an analog signal to the servoelectronics for position control of the aircraft's power actuators. The system and theory of operation of the computer by pass and servoelectronics are described and an automated ground test for each axis is included.

  1. Trap capture of three economically important fruit fly species (Diptera: Tephritidae): evaluation of a solid formulation containing multiple male lures in a Hawaiian coffee field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelly, Todd; Nishimoto, Jon; Kurashima, Rick

    2012-08-01

    Invasive fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) pose a global threat to agriculture through direct damage to food crops and the accompanying trade restrictions that often result. Early detection is vital to controlling fruit flies, because it increases the probability of limiting the growth and spread of the invasive population and thus may greatly reduce the monetary costs required for eradication or suppression. Male-specific lures are an important component of fruit fly detection, and three such lures are used widely: trimedlure (TML), cue lure (CL), and methyl eugenol (ME), attractive to Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann); melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillett); and oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), respectively. In California, Florida, and Texas, the two Bactrocera lures are applied to separate species-specific traps as liquids (with a small amount of the insecticide naled added), whereas TML is delivered as a solid plug in another set of traps. Thus, the detection protocol involves considerable handling time as well as potential contact with a pesticide. The purpose of this study was to compare trap capture between liquid male lures and "trilure" wafers that contain TML, ME, raspberry ketone (RK, the hydroxy equivalent of CL), and the toxicant DDVP embedded within a solid matrix. Field studies were conducted in a Hawaiian coffee (Coffea arabica L.) field where the three aforementioned species co-occur, showed that the wafer captured at least as many flies as the liquid baits for all three species. This same result was obtained in comparisons using both fresh and aged (6-wk) baits. Moreover, the wafers performed as well as the single-lure traps in an ancillary experiment in which TML plugs were substituted for liquid TML. Additional experiments demonstrated explicitly that the presence of ME and RK had no effect on captures of C. capitata males and similarly that the presence of TML had no effect on the capture of B

  2. Managing the Fruit Fly Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeszenszky, Arleen W.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a sophisticated version of the fruit fly experiment for teaching concepts about genetics to biology students. Provides students with the opportunity to work with live animals over an extended period. (JRH)

  3. Quantitative proteomics on the fly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gouw, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    The development of multicellular organisms is characterized by complex processes that progressively transform essentially a single cell into a creature with complicated structures and highly specialized functions. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster provides an excellent model system to investigat

  4. Subtropical Fruit Fly Invasions into Temperate Fruit Fly Territory in California's San Joaquin Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subtropical fruit fly species including peach fruit fly, Bactrocera zonata (Saunders); melon fly, B. cucurbitae (Coquillett); oriental fruit fly, B. dorsalis (Hendel); and Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata Weidemann, have been detected in the past decade in the San Joaquin Valley of Califo...

  5. Involvement of DNA methylation in the control of cell growth during heat stress in tobacco BY-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centomani, Isabella; Sgobba, Alessandra; D'Addabbo, Pietro; Dipierro, Nunzio; Paradiso, Annalisa; De Gara, Laura; Dipierro, Silvio; Viggiano, Luigi; de Pinto, Maria Concetta

    2015-11-01

    The alteration of growth patterns, through the adjustment of cell division and expansion, is a characteristic response of plants to environmental stress. In order to study this response in more depth, the effect of heat stress on growth was investigated in tobacco BY-2 cells. The results indicate that heat stress inhibited cell division, by slowing cell cycle progression. Cells were stopped in the pre-mitotic phases, as shown by the increased expression of CycD3-1 and by the decrease in the NtCycA13, NtCyc29 and CDKB1-1 transcripts. The decrease in cell length and the reduced expression of Nt-EXPA5 indicated that cell expansion was also inhibited. Since DNA methylation plays a key role in controlling gene expression, the possibility that the altered expression of genes involved in the control of cell growth, observed during heat stress, could be due to changes in the methylation state of their promoters was investigated. The results show that the altered expression of CycD3-1 and Nt-EXPA5 was consistent with changes in the methylation state of the upstream region of these genes. These results suggest that DNA methylation, controlling the expression of genes involved in plant development, contributes to growth alteration occurring in response to environmental changes.

  6. Control Law of Fly-Wing UAVs Based on Angular Acceleration%基于角加速度的飞翼无人机的控制律设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵塞峰; 李秀娟; 李春涛

    2016-01-01

    The fly-wing UAVs have large individual difference, a large number of control surfaces, short longitudinal control lever and static instable heading. To solve the problems, this paper presents a direct allocation method from angular acceleration to the control surface, and a control law taking angular acceleration as the control instruction. First of all, the angular acceleration is directly allocated to the control surfaces that have been graded in discrete state. Taking the angular acceleration as control instruction, a longitudinal Robustness Servomechanism Linear Quadratic Regulator ( RSLQR ) control law, and a lateral stabilization control law, are designed. The simulation results for the sample UAV under nonlinear condition show that:1 ) The angular acceleration allocated to the control surface satisfies the distributed precision requirement;and 2 ) The control law with the angular acceleration as control instruction has high tracking accuracy and satisfies the speed requirement.%针对飞翼布局无人机个体差异大、操纵面数量多、纵向操纵力臂短以及航向静不稳定等问题,提出角加速度到操纵面的直接分配策略,以及以角加速度为控制指令的控制律。首先在离散状态下将角加速度直接分配到操纵效率分级后的各操纵面上,最终以角加速度为控制指令设计纵向鲁棒伺服LQR控制律和横侧向增稳控制律。样例无人机非线性仿真结果表明,角加速度到操纵面的直接分配满足分配精度要求,以角加速度为控制指令的控制律满足飞翼无人机的快速、高精度要求。

  7. Flying in Two Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Prakash, Manu

    2011-01-01

    Diversity and specialization of behavior in insects is unmatched. Insects hop, walk, run, jump, row, swim, glide and fly to propel themselves in a variety of environments. We have uncovered an unusual mode of propulsion of aerodynamic flight in two dimensions in Waterlilly Beetles \\emph{(Galerucella)}. The adult beetles, often found in water lilly ponds, propel themselves strictly in a two-dimensional plane on the surface of water via flapping wing flight. Here we analyze the aerodynamics of this peculiar flight mode with respect to forces exerted on the organism during flight. The complexity of 2-D flight is captured by accounting for additional forces beyond gravitational, thrust, lift and drag, exerted on the insect body in 3D flight. Understanding this constrained propulsion mode requires accounting for viscous drag, surface tension, buoyancy force, and capillary-wave drag. Moreover, dramatic differences exist in the magnitude of the resultant forces in 2D vs. 3D flight. Here, in this fluid dynamics video...

  8. Pyrosequencing-Based Analysis of the Microbiome Associated with the Horn Fly, Haematobia irritans

    OpenAIRE

    Azhahianambi Palavesam; Guerrero, Felix D.; Heekin, Andrew M.; Ju Wang; Scot E. Dowd; Yan Sun; Foil, Lane D.; PÉREZ DE LEÓN, ADALBERTO A.

    2012-01-01

    The horn fly, Haematobia irritans, is one of the most economically important pests of cattle. Insecticides have been a major element of horn fly management programs. Growing concerns with insecticide resistance, insecticide residues on farm products, and non-availability of new generation insecticides, are serious issues for the livestock industry. Alternative horn fly control methods offer the promise to decrease the use of insecticides and reduce the amount of insecticide residues on livest...

  9. Design, aerodynamics and autonomy of the DelFly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Croon, G C H E; Groen, M A; De Wagter, C; Remes, B; Ruijsink, R; van Oudheusden, B W

    2012-06-01

    One of the major challenges in robotics is to develop a fly-like robot that can autonomously fly around in unknown environments. In this paper, we discuss the current state of the DelFly project, in which we follow a top-down approach to ever smaller and more autonomous ornithopters. The presented findings concerning the design, aerodynamics and autonomy of the DelFly illustrate some of the properties of the top-down approach, which allows the identification and resolution of issues that also play a role at smaller scales. A parametric variation of the wing stiffener layout produced a 5% more power-efficient wing. An experimental aerodynamic investigation revealed that this could be associated with an improved stiffness of the wing, while further providing evidence of the vortex development during the flap cycle. The presented experiments resulted in an improvement in the generated lift, allowing the inclusion of a yaw rate gyro, pressure sensor and microcontroller onboard the DelFly. The autonomy of the DelFly is expanded by achieving (1) an improved turning logic to obtain better vision-based obstacle avoidance performance in environments with varying texture and (2) successful onboard height control based on the pressure sensor.

  10. Recyclability of Concrete Pavement Incorporating High Volume of Fly Ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshitake, Isamu; Ishida, Takeo; Fukumoto, Sunao

    2015-08-21

    Recyclable concrete pavement was made from fly ash and crushed limestone sand and gravel as aggregates so that the concrete pavement could be recycled to raw materials for cement production. With the aim to use as much fly ash as possible for the sustainable development of society, while achieving adequate strength development, pavement concrete having a cement-replacement ratio of 40% by mass was experimentally investigated, focusing on the strength development at an early age. Limestone powder was added to improve the early strength; flexural strength at two days reached 3.5 MPa, the minimum strength for traffic service in Japan. The matured fly ash concrete made with a cement content of 200 kg/m3 achieved a flexural strength almost equal to that of the control concrete without fly ash. Additionally, Portland cement made from the tested fly ash concrete was tested to confirm recyclability, with the cement quality meeting the Japanese classification of ordinary Portland cement. Limestone-based recyclable fly ash concrete pavement is, thus, a preferred material in terms of sustainability.

  11. Recyclability of Concrete Pavement Incorporating High Volume of Fly Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isamu Yoshitake

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Recyclable concrete pavement was made from fly ash and crushed limestone sand and gravel as aggregates so that the concrete pavement could be recycled to raw materials for cement production. With the aim to use as much fly ash as possible for the sustainable development of society, while achieving adequate strength development, pavement concrete having a cement-replacement ratio of 40% by mass was experimentally investigated, focusing on the strength development at an early age. Limestone powder was added to improve the early strength; flexural strength at two days reached 3.5 MPa, the minimum strength for traffic service in Japan. The matured fly ash concrete made with a cement content of 200 kg/m3 achieved a flexural strength almost equal to that of the control concrete without fly ash. Additionally, Portland cement made from the tested fly ash concrete was tested to confirm recyclability, with the cement quality meeting the Japanese classification of ordinary Portland cement. Limestone-based recyclable fly ash concrete pavement is, thus, a preferred material in terms of sustainability.

  12. Relative utility of arrhenotokous and Wolbachia-associated thelytokous Odontosema anastrephae figitid fruit fly parasitoids for mass rearing and biological control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelytokous parasitoid strains are theoretically advantageous when utilized for biological control, as the absence of males should reduce production costs and potentially increase field efficacy. The maternally inherited intracellular bacterium, Wolbachia pipientis, is capable of inducing reproducti...

  13. A new enzyme involved in the control of the stereochemistry in the decalin formation during equisetin biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Naoki; Nogawa, Toshihiko; Hirota, Hiroshi; Jang, Jae-Hyuk; Takahashi, Shunji; Ahn, Jong Seog; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2015-05-01

    Tetramic acid containing a decalin ring such as equisetin and phomasetin is one of the characteristic scaffolds found in fungal bioactive secondary metabolites. Polyketide (PKS)-nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) hybrid enzyme is responsible for the synthesis of the polyketide scaffold conjugated with an amino acid. PKS-NRPS hybrid complex programs to create structural diversity in the polyketide backbone have begun to be investigated, yet mechanism of control of the stereochemistry in a decalin formation via a Diels-Alder cycloaddition remains uncertain. Here, we demonstrate that fsa2, which showed no homology to genes encoding proteins of known function, in the fsa cluster responsible for equisetin and fusarisetin A biosynthesis in Fusarium sp. FN080326, is involved in the control of stereochemistry in decalin formation via a Diels-Alder reaction in the equisetin biosynthetic pathway.

  14. Hypothalamic Integration of Metabolic, Endocrine, and Circadian Signals in Fish: Involvement in the Control of Food Intake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, María J.; Cerdá-Reverter, José M.; Soengas, José L.

    2017-01-01

    The regulation of food intake in fish is a complex process carried out through several different mechanisms in the central nervous system (CNS) with hypothalamus being the main regulatory center. As in mammals, a complex hypothalamic circuit including two populations of neurons: one co-expressing neuropeptide Y (NPY) and Agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and the second one population co-expressing pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) is involved in the integration of information relating to food intake control. The production and release of these peptides control food intake, and the production results from the integration of information of different nature such as levels of nutrients and hormones as well as circadian signals. The present review summarizes the knowledge and recent findings about the presence and functioning of these mechanisms in fish and their differences vs. the known mammalian model. PMID:28694769

  15. Dynamic Analysis of a Predator-Prey (Pest Model with Disease in Prey and Involving an Impulsive Control Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Zhao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic behaviors of a predator-prey (pest model with disease in prey and involving an impulsive control strategy to release infected prey at fixed times are investigated for the purpose of integrated pest management. Mathematical theoretical works have been pursuing the investigation of the local asymptotical stability and global attractivity for the semitrivial periodic solution and population persistent, which depicts the threshold expression of some critical parameters for carrying out integrated pest management. Numerical analysis indicates that the impulsive control strategy has a strong effect on the dynamical complexity and population persistent using bifurcation diagrams and power spectra diagrams. These results show that if the release amount of infective prey can satisfy some critical conditions, then all biological populations will coexist. All these results are expected to be of use in the study of the dynamic complexity of ecosystems.

  16. Pathogen-inducible CaUGT1 is involved in resistance response against TMV infection by controlling salicylic acid accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Boo-Ja; Kim, Sung-Kyu; Choi, Soo Bok; Bae, Jungdon; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Kim, Young-Jin; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2009-07-07

    Capsicum annuum L. Bugang exhibits a hypersensitive response against Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) P(0) infection. The C. annuumUDP-glucosyltransferase 1 (CaUGT1) gene was upregulated during resistance response to TMV and by salicylic acid, ethephon, methyl viologen, and sodium nitroprusside treatment. When the gene was downregulated by virus-induced gene silencing, a delayed HR was observed. In addition, free and total SA concentrations in the CaUGT1-downregulated hot pepper were decreased by 52% and 48% compared to that of the control plants, respectively. This suggested that the CaUGT1 gene was involved in resistance response against TMV infection by controlling the accumulation of SA.

  17. KINETICS OF FLY ASH BENEFICIATION BY CARBON BURNOUT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Joseph N.D. Dodoo; Dr. Joseph M. Okoh

    2000-11-01

    Surface area analyses performed on fly ash samples reveal that the surface area is controlled by carbon content. The higher surface areas found in large particles are due to the presence of highly porous carbonaceous particles. Adsorption-desorption isotherms and t-plots of fly ash samples indicate that fly ash is porous. BJH Adsorption/Desorption pore size analysis reveal that pore diameters are independent of sieve size. They appear to be dependent only on the nature of the material which confers porosity. Based on the results of Brown and Dykstra (41) it is reasonable to assume that calculations of reaction rates at temperatures above 550 C were confounded by weight losses from processes other than carbon oxidation and, therefore, are not useful in determination of the temperature dependence of carbon oxidation in fly ash. The results of the present study indicate that temperatures below 550 C should be used for future studies in order to satisfactorily assess the temperature dependence of carbon oxidation in fly ash. Furthermore, it is also advisable that percent carbon determinations be performed on fly ash samples after the oxidation reactions to determine whether all carbon present in fly ash is oxidized. This will ensure that reaction rates are representative of the complete oxidation of carbon. An inverse relationship was determined between reaction rates and oxygen concentration for this study. As discussed, this may be due to volatilization of volatiles from fly ash and ease of transport of products away from the reaction sites by the action of the vacuum applied to the samples. A more accurate determination of oxygen dependence of carbon oxidation can be accomplished by the use of specialty gases containing different concentrations of oxygen which could eliminate the need to apply vacuum to the samples.

  18. DMPD: The involvement of the interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinases (IRAKs) incellular signaling networks controlling inflammation. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18249132 The involvement of the interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinases (IRAKs) i...2008 Jan 30. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show The involvement of the interleukin-1 receptor-associated kin...ases (IRAKs) incellular signaling networks controlling inflammation. PubmedID 18249132 Title The... involvement of the interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinases (IRAKs) incellular signaling ne

  19. Preparation and characterization of the porous ceramics from fly ash

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Xiang-jun; ZHANG Xue-bin; MENG Guang-yao; LIU Xing-qin

    2007-01-01

    Porous ceramics was made from coal fly ash,and the microstructure and other properties were characterized as a function of the amount of the pore-forming agent and firing temperature.The results indicated that the proper sintering temperature for the useful ceramic materials is 1250 ℃.and a liquid-phase was involved in the dansification process.

  20. Acidification of calf bedding reduces fly development and bacterial abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, M S; Gerry, A C; McGarvey, J A; Armitage, T L; Mitloehner, F M

    2010-03-01

    Environmental stressors, such as high fly density, can affect calf well-being. Sodium bisulfate (SBS) is an acidifier that reduces the pH of flooring and bedding, creating a medium that neither bacteria nor immature flies (also known as larvae or maggots) can thrive in. Two experiments were conducted to investigate the application of SBS to a mixture of rice hull calf bedding and calf slurry (BED) to reduce house fly (Musca domestica L.) larval density and the abundance of bacteria. In experiment 1, dish pans containing 1L of BED and 3,000 house fly eggs were treated with SBS at concentrations of 0, 8.9, 17.7, and 26.5g of SBS/0.05m(2) of BED (CON, LOW, MED, and HIGH, respectively), with each SBS concentration applied to 4 individual pans (16 pans total). Reapplication of the same SBS concentrations in each pan occurred 3 times/wk throughout the 23-d trial. Larval house fly survival was significantly reduced in all pans with SBS relative to CON pans, with lowest survival rates in the MED and HIGH pans (99% and 100% reduction, respectively). The mean pH for each treatment was inversely related to the SBS concentration. In experiment 2, pans containing 1L of BED and 3,000 house fly eggs were treated with either 0g of SBS (CON), 8.9g of SBS/0.05m(2) of BED with reapplication of the acidifier 3 times/wk (SB3x), or 8.9g of SBS/0.05m(2) of BED applied only once at 48h before the end of the 8 d-trial (SB48). Larval house fly survival and bacterial concentrations were reduced (90% larval reduction and 68% bacterial reduction) in the SB3x treatment relative to the CON. Mean pH was also reduced in SB3x pans relative to CON or SB48 pans. Overall, acidification of calf BED using the acidifier SBS resulted in a reduction of bacteria and house fly larval survival. This form of fly control might be expected to reduce adult fly production and, therefore, fly-related stress in calves.

  1. Efficacy of Permethrin Treated Bed Nets Against Leishmania major Infected Sand Flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Tobin; Davidson, Silas A; Kobylinski, Kevin; Menses, Claudio; Rowton, Edgar

    2015-01-01

    Insecticide treated nets (ITNs) are a potential tool to help control sand flies and prevent Leishmaniasis. However, little is currently known about the response of Leishmania infected sand flies to ITNs. In this study, Phlebotomus duboscqi sand flies were infected with the parasite Leishmania major. Infected and noninfected sand flies were then evaluated against permethrin treated and untreated bed nets in a laboratory assay that required sand flies to pass through suspended netting material to feed on a mouse serving as an attractive host. The number of sand flies passing through the nets and blood feeding was recorded. There was not a significant difference in the ability of infected or noninfected sand flies to move through treated or untreated nets. Fewer sand flies entered the permethrin treated nets compared to the untreated nets, indicating that permethrin creates an effective barrier. The results show that in addition to reducing the nuisance bites of noninfected sand flies, ITNs also protect against Leishmania infected sand flies and therefore can play in key role in reducing the rates of Leishmaniasis. This study is important to the Department of Defense as it continues to develop and field new bed nets to protect service members.

  2. Spatiotemporally controlled and multifactor involved assay of neuronal compartment regeneration after chemical injury in an integrated microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Ren, Li; Liu, Wenming; Wang, Jian-Chun; Wang, Yaolei; Tu, Qin; Xu, Juan; Liu, Rui; Zhang, Yanrong; Yuan, Mao-Sen; Li, Tianbao; Wang, Jinyi

    2012-08-07

    Studies on the degeneration and regeneration of neurons as individual compartments of axons or somata can provide critical information for the clinical therapy of nervous system diseases. A controllable in vitro platform for multiple purposes is key to such studies. In the present study, we describe an integrated microfluidic device designed for achieving localized stimulation to neuronal axons or somata. We observed neuronal compartment degeneration after localized chemical stimulation and regeneration under the accessorial function of an interesting compound treatment or coculture with desired cells in controllable chambers. In a spatiotemporally controlled manner, this device was used to investigate hippocampal neuronal soma and axon degeneration after acrylamide stimulation, as well as subsequent regeneration after treatment with the monosialoganglioside GM1 or with cocultured glial cells (astrocytes or Schwann cells). To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms that mediate neuronal injury and regeneration, as well as to investigate whether acrylamide stimulation to neurons induces changes in Ca(2+) concentrations, the related neuronal genes and real-time Ca(2+) signal in neurons were also analyzed. The results showed that neuronal axons were more resistant to acrylamide injury than neuronal somata. Under localized stimulation, axons had self-destruct programs different from somata, and somatic injury caused the secondary response of axon collapse. This study provides a foundation for future in-depth analyses of spatiotemporally controlled and multifactor neuronal compartment regeneration after various injuries. The microfluidic device is also useful in evaluating potential therapeutic strategies to treat chemical injuries involving the central nervous system.

  3. Optimal torque coordinating control of the launching with twin clutches simultaneously involved for dry dual-clutch transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Z. G.; Chen, H. J.; Zhen, Z. X.; Yang, Y. Y.

    2014-06-01

    As for the self-developed six-speed dry dual-clutch transmission (DCT), the optimal torque-coordinated control strategy between engine and dual clutches is proposed to resolve the problem of launching with twin clutches simultaneously involved based on the minimum value principle. Focusing on the sliding friction phase of the launching process, dynamics equations of dry DCT with two intermediate shafts are firstly established, and then the optimal transmitting torque variation rate and the driven plate's rotating speed of dual clutches are deduced by using the minimum value principle, in which the jerk intensity and friction work are taken as the performance indexes, and the terminal constraints of state variables are determined according to the driver's launching intention. Besides, the separating conditions of non-target gear clutch and the torque distributing relations of twin clutches are derived from the launching control targets that guarantee the approximately equal friction extent of two clutches and no power cycle. After the synchronisation of driving and driven plates of on-coming clutch, the output torque of engine is smoothly switched to the driver's demand level. Furthermore, launching the simulation model of the dry DCT vehicle is set up on the Matlab/Simulink platform. Simulation results indicate that the proposed launching control strategy not only can effectively reflect the driver's intention and extend the life span of twin clutches, but also obtain an excellent launching quality. Finally, the torque control laws of two clutches obtained through the simulation are transformed into clutch position control laws for the future realisation in the real car, and the closed-loop position controls of twin clutches in the launching process are conducted on the test bench with two sets of clutch actuator, obtaining preferable tracking effects.

  4. Fate of pharmaceuticals and pesticides in fly larvae composting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalander, C., E-mail: cecilia.lalander@slu.se [Department of Energy and Technology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (Sweden); Senecal, J.; Gros Calvo, M. [Department of Energy and Technology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (Sweden); Ahrens, L.; Josefsson, S.; Wiberg, K. [Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (Sweden); Vinnerås, B. [Department of Energy and Technology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (Sweden)

    2016-09-15

    A novel and efficient organic waste management strategy currently gaining great attention is fly larvae composting. High resource recovery efficiency can be achieved in this closed-looped system, but pharmaceuticals and pesticides in waste could potentially accumulate in every loop of the treatment system and spread to the environment. This study evaluated the fate of three pharmaceuticals (carbamazepine, roxithromycin, trimethoprim) and two pesticides (azoxystrobin, propiconazole) in a fly larvae composting system and in a control treatment with no larvae. It was found that the half-life of all five substances was shorter in the fly larvae compost (< 10% of control) and no bioaccumulation was detected in the larvae. Fly larvae composting could thus impede the spread of pharmaceuticals and pesticides into the environment. - Highlights: • Degradation of pharmaceuticals and pesticides in fly larvae composting (FLC). • Half-life considerably shorter in FLC than in control with no larvae. • Half-life of carbamazepine was less than two days in FLC. • No bioaccumulation in larvae detected. • FLC could impede the spreading of pharmaceuticals and pesticide in the environment.

  5. Sensitivity analysis of the physical dynamics of the Fly River plume in Torres Strait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanfang; Martins, Flavio; Wolanski, Eric

    2017-07-01

    The intrusion in the Torres Strait of the Fly River plume polluted by mine tailings is an international water issue. To investigate the physical mechanisms involved in the intrusion process, numerical simulations were conducted to assess the relative influence of the bathymetry and the external forcing, namely the tides, the mean sea level slope across the strait, river runoff and wind forcing. The wind data from Horn Island, the only long-term wind station in the Torres Strait, is shown to be unreliable due to orographic effects. Mean sea level data from altimetry compare well with those from tide gauges in these shallow, reef-studded waters. The wind has a dominant effect on the mean sea level at seasonal and inter-annual periods. The resulting mean sea level difference across the strait fluctuated seasonally and strongly influenced the intrusion of the Fly River plume in the Torres Strait. The 3D finite-volume MOHID model reproduced the observation that the river plume starts by being stratified in the Gulf of Papua where it originates, and it mixes vertically when it enters the Torres Strait. The MOHID and the SLIM models were applied with different resolution to the Torres Strait and responded similarly to the external forcings. The predicted and observed Fly River plume intrusion in the eastern Torres Strait agreed well with each other, including the formation of patches due to flow reversals. However, the two models predicted a widely different Fly River plume in its far field in the western Torres Strait, the differences were attributed to the different bathymetry in the Australian and British-US bathymetry data for these poorly charted waters, which demonstrated the importance of the details of the bathymetry in controlling the extent of plume intrusion.

  6. Addition of fly ash to reduce lime and energy requirements in the production of sand-lime bricks. Moeglichkeiten zur Reduzierung des Kalk- und Energiebedarfes bei der Kalksandsteinherstellung durch den Zusatz von Flugasche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittneben, U.

    1988-01-01

    The author studies fly ashes and their possible use as additives in the sand-lime brick production in terms of cost-effectiveness achievable in SL brick technology and the effects of fly ash additives on major brick properties. Studies involved 14 black-coal fly ashes from different power plants and 2 brown-coal fly ashes. The effects achievable by fly ash additives strongly depend from the properties of fly ash and from the grain structure of the sand additive. The brown-coal fly ashes included in this study were found to be unsuitable for S-L bricks due to their lack of volume stability.

  7. A comparison of bioinsecticide, Spinosad, the semi-synthetic insecticide, Spinetoram and synthetic insecticides as soil drenches for control of Tephritid fruit flies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eight insecticides, including the natural bioinsecticide spinosad and the semi-synthetic insecticide spinetoram, as well as two synthetic pyrethroids, an insect growth regulator, an anthranilic diamide, and an organophosphate were evaluated as soil drench treatments for control of three economically...

  8. Commensal Bacteria Aid Mate-selection in the Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodaram, Kamala Jayanthi Pagadala; Ayyasamy, Arthikirubha; Kempraj, Vivek

    2016-10-01

    Commensal bacteria influence many aspects of an organism's behaviour. However, studies on the influence of commensal bacteria in insect mate-selection are scarce. Here, we present empirical evidence that commensal bacteria mediate mate-selection in the Oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis. Male flies were attracted to female flies, but this attraction was abolished when female flies were fed with antibiotics, suggesting the role of the fly's microbiota in mediating mate-selection. We show that male flies were attracted to and ejaculated more sperm into females harbouring the microbiota. Using culturing and 16S rDNA sequencing, we isolated and identified different commensal bacteria, with Klebsiella oxytoca being the most abundant bacterial species. This preliminary study will enhance our understanding of the influence of commensal bacteria on mate-selection behaviour of B. dorsalis and may find use in devising control operations against this devastating pest.

  9. Relationship between Structural Characteristics of Fly Ash and Reactivity under Autoclave Curing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The reactivity of autoclaved materials is conventionally estimated by their chemical composition. In this paper, after determining the chemical composition of various types of fly ash, a series of new tests which included X-ray Diffraction (XRD), infrared spectral analysis (IR) and bound water testing, were applied to investigate the performance of autoclaved fly ash products. The relationship between the infrared spectral analysis of Si-O wavenumber (about 1 100 cm-1) and its autoclaved chemical reactivity, and compressive strength of its autoclaved samples, is analyzed. The results show that fly ash with a lower wavenumber will have stronger autoclaved chemical reactivity and higher compressive strength for its autoclaved sample. Thus, the Si-O stretching vibration wavelength can be used to estimate autoclaved chemical reactivity of fly ash, so as to control the quality of fly ash to be autoclaved, and to predict the compressive strength of autoclaved fly ash products.

  10. Laboratory evaluation of rubidium as a long-lasting marker for bloodfeeding sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascari, T M; Stout, R W; Foil, L D

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of the trace element rubidium (Rb) as a long-lasting systemic biomarker for bloodfeeding females of the sand fly Phlebotomus papatasi Scopoli. Baits containing Rb chloride were found to be palatable to hamsters in this study. We were able to detect Rb using a portable X-ray fluorescence analyzer in all sand flies that fed on Rb-treated hamsters for at least 14 d postbloodmeal. We also detected Rb in sand flies that took a bloodmeal from hamsters up to 10 d after the hamsters were withdrawn from a Rb-treated diet. Results of this study constitute proof of concept for the incorporation of Rb chloride into rodent baits for marking bloodfeeding sand flies, and suggest that Rb marking could be used as a technique for evaluating rodent-targeted sand fly control methods and in ecological studies on sand flies.

  11. Hardware-in-the-Loop Simulation for Spacecraft Formation Flying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinjun Shan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a hardware-in-the-loop (HITL simulation approach for multiple spacecraft formation flying. Considering a leader-follower formation flying configuration, a Fuzzy Logic controller is developed first to maintain the desired formation shape under external perturbations and the initial position offsets. Cold-gas on/off thrusters are developed to be introduced to the simulation loop, and the HITL simulations are conducted to validate the effectiveness of the proposed simulation configuration and Fuzzy Logic control.

  12. Metallothionein response in earthworms Lampito mauritii (Kinberg) exposed to fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maity, S.; Hattacharya, S.; Chaudhury, S. [Visva Bharati, Santini Ketan (India)

    2009-10-15

    Among pollutants, the coal fly ash occupies a significant position in industrial wastes. The fly ash matrix is a complex mixture of various organic (polyhalogenated compounds) and inorganic (Si, Al, Fe, As, Cd, Bi, Hg, etc.) chemicals. The application of fly ash for agricultural purposes and as landfills may lead to the contamination of the land with some of the toxic chemical compounds present in fly ash. Thus prior to the application of fly ash for developmental activities, it requires bio-monitoring and risk characterization. In order to achieve this objective adult Lampito mauritii were exposed to different proportions of fly ash in soil for 30 d and the concentrations of metallothionein in earthworm were assessed. The results revealed that up to 50% of fly ash amendment does not apparently harm the earthworm in respect of their survival and growth. A significant increase in tissue metallothionein level was recorded in L mauritii exposed to fly ash amended soil without tissue metal accumulation indicating that metallothionein is involved in scavenging of free radicals and reactive oxygen species metabolites. It is concluded that this biochemical response observed in L mauritii exposed to fly ash amended soil could be used in ecotoxicological field monitoring.

  13. Fly-in/Fly-out: Implications for Community Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Storey

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available “Fly-in/fly-out” is a form of work organization that has become the standard model for new mining, petroleum and other types of resource development in remote areas. In many places this “no town” model has replaced that of the “new town.” The work system has both beneficial and adverse implications for the sustainability of both existing communities near new resource developments and for the more distant communities from which workers are drawn. This paper explores these outcomes drawing upon examples from North America and Australia.

  14. Immunolocalization of UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase indicates involvement of pre-Golgi intermediates in protein quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber, C; Fan, J Y; Guhl, B; Parodi, A; Fessler, J H; Parker, C; Roth, J

    2001-09-11

    The UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase (GT) is a protein folding sensor and glycosyltransferase that constitutes an important component of the protein quality control machinery. With the use of quantitative immunogold electron microscopy, we established the subcellular distribution of GT in rat liver and pancreas and Drosophila melanogaster salivary gland as well as cell lines and correlated it with that of glucosidase II, calreticulin, and pre-Golgi intermediate markers. Labeling for GT, as well as for glucosidase II and calreticulin, was found in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), including nuclear envelope and pre-Golgi intermediates located between ER and Golgi apparatus, and in the cell periphery. In the rough ER, labeling for GT was inhomogeneous, with variously sized labeled and unlabeled cisternal regions alternating, indicative of a meshwork of quality control checkpoints. Notably, labeling intensity for GT was highest in pre-Golgi intermediates, corresponding to twice that of rough ER, whereas the Golgi apparatus exhibited no specific labeling. These results suggest that protein quality control is not restricted to the ER and that the pre-Golgi intermediates, by virtue of the presence of GT, glucosidase II, and calreticulin, are involved in this fundamental cellular process.

  15. 飞翼无人机的一种鲁棒自适应控制律设计方法%A Robust Adaptive Control Law Design Method for Flying-Wing UAV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李卫星; 李秀娟; 李春涛; 杨艺

    2014-01-01

    针对飞翼无人机纵向全包线飞行时非线性特性明显和操纵效率变化显著的问题,采用鲁棒伺服 LQR ( RSLQR)与L1自适应相结合的综合自适应控制方法( RSLQR-L1),以C倡(加速度、角速率)为被控变量,设计了飞翼无人机纵向飞行控制系统。结合无人机实际飞行控制品质需求,采用RSLQR方法,设计无人机纵向主控制器;在RSLQR控制器的基本结构上扩展设计L1自适应输出反馈补偿控制器。在系统阐述RSLQR-L1综合自适应控制原理和设计方法的基础上,通过数值仿真验证了控制结构的先进性和鲁棒性,满足了飞翼无人机的控制要求。%To solve the problems of nonlinearity and obviously changed manipulating efficiency in flight of UAV,a longitudinal control law is designed for a Flying-wing UAV,which is the integrating of Robustness Servomechanism Linear Quadratic Regulator ( RSLQR ) and L1 adaptive control method .The controlled variable is chosen as C*,which is a combination of longitudinal acceleration and pitch rate .The baseline controller is based on RSLQR method to fit the control requirement of the UAV .The controller is augmented by L1 adaptive output feedback structure to maintain the desired close-loop system characteristics in the presence of the aerodynamic uncertainties and the significant change of the elevator coefficient caused by the transformation of flight state .This paper summarizes the theory,the design,simulation testing and flight test results using a RSLQR-L1 method,which validates the performance and the robustness of the designed control system.

  16. Escherichia coli fliAZY operon.

    OpenAIRE

    Mytelka, D S; Chamberlin, M J

    1996-01-01

    We have cloned the Escherichia coli fliAZY operon, which contains the fliA gene (the alternative sigma factor sigma F) and two novel genes, fliZ and fliY. Transcriptional mapping of this operon shows two start sites, one of which is preceded by a canonical E sigma F-dependent consensus and is dependent on sigma F for expression in vivo and in vitro. We have overexpressed and purified sigma F and demonstrated that it can direct core polymerase to E sigma F-dependent promoters. FliZ and FliY ar...

  17. Practical Results of a Five-level Flying Capacitor Inverter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Sivkov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the realization of a five-level Flying Capacitor Inverter. After a brief description of general Power Electronic Converters and an introduction to the advantages of Multilevel Inverters over conventional two-level Inverters the main focus is on the five-level Flying Capacitor Inverter. The Flying Capacitor Multilevel Inverter (FCMI is a Multilevel Inverter (MI where the capacitor voltage can be balanced using only a control strategy for any number of levels. After a general description of five-level FCMI topology, the simulation and experimental results are presented. The capacitor voltage is stabilized here with various output voltage amplitude values. The simulation and experimental results of five-level FCMI show that the voltage is stabilized on capacitors using the control strategy. A single-phase five-level FCMI model is currently being developed and constructed in the laboratory. Some of the experimental results are available.

  18. Light-controlled propulsion, aggregation and separation of water-fuelled TiO2/Pt Janus submicromotors and their ``on-the-fly'' photocatalytic activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Fangzhi; Kong, Lei; Chen, Chuanrui; Chen, Zhihong; Xu, Leilei; Guan, Jianguo

    2016-02-01

    In this work, water-fuelled TiO2/Pt Janus submicromotors with light-controlled motions have been developed by utilizing the asymmetrical photocatalytic water redox reaction over TiO2/Pt Janus submicrospheres under UV irradiation. The motion state, speed, aggregation and separation behaviors of the TiO2/Pt Janus submicromotor can be reversibly, wirelessly and remotely controlled at will by regulating the ``on/off'' switch, intensity and pulsed/continuous irradiation mode of UV light. The motion of the water-fuelled TiO2/Pt Janus submicromotor is governed by light-induced self-electrophoresis under the local electrical field generated by the asymmetrical water oxidation and reduction reactions on its surface. The TiO2/Pt Janus submicromotors can interact with each other through the light-switchable electrostatic forces, and hence continuous and pulsed UV irradiation can make the TiO2/Pt Janus submicromotors aggregate and separate at will, respectively. Because of the enhanced mass exchange between the environment and active submicromotors, the separated TiO2/Pt Janus submicromotors powered by the pulsed UV irradiation show a much higher activity for the photocatalytic degradation of the organic dye than the aggregated TiO2/Pt submicromotors. The water-fuelled TiO2/Pt Janus submicromotors developed here have some outstanding advantages as ``swimming'' photocatalysts for organic pollutant remediation in the macro or microenvironment (microchannels and microwells in microchips) because of their small size, long-term stability, wirelessly controllable motion behaviors and long life span.In this work, water-fuelled TiO2/Pt Janus submicromotors with light-controlled motions have been developed by utilizing the asymmetrical photocatalytic water redox reaction over TiO2/Pt Janus submicrospheres under UV irradiation. The motion state, speed, aggregation and separation behaviors of the TiO2/Pt Janus submicromotor can be reversibly, wirelessly and remotely controlled at will by

  19. Keeping your eyes continuously on the ball while running for catchable and uncatchable fly balls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dees B W Postma

    Full Text Available When faced with a fly ball approaching along the sagittal plane, fielders need information for the control of their running to the interception location. This information could be available in the initial part of the ball trajectory, such that the interception location can be predicted from its initial conditions. Alternatively, such predictive information is not available, and running to the interception location involves continuous visual guidance. The latter type of control would predict that fielders keep looking at the approaching ball for most of its flight, whereas the former type of control would fit with looking at the ball during the early part of the ball's flight; keeping the eyes on the ball during the remainder of its trajectory would not be necessary when the interception location can be inferred from the first part of the ball trajectory. The present contribution studied visual tracking of approaching fly balls. Participants were equipped with a mobile eye tracker. They were confronted with tennis balls approaching from about 20 m, and projected in such a way that some balls were catchable and others were not. In all situations, participants almost exclusively tracked the ball with their gaze until just before the catch or until they indicated that a ball was uncatchable. This continuous tracking of the ball, even when running close to their maximum speeds, suggests that participants employed continuous visual control rather than running to an interception location known from looking at the early part of the ball flight.

  20. Fire ant alarm pheromone and venom alkaloids act in concert to attract parasitic phorid flies, Pseudacteon spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Kavita R; Fadamiro, Henry Y

    2013-11-01

    Pseudacteon tricuspis, Pseudacteon obtusus and Pseudacteon curvatus are three species of parasitic phorid flies (Diptera: Phoridae), which have been introduced as classical biological control agents of imported, Solenopsis fire ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in the southern USA. Previous studies demonstrated the behavioral response of P. tricuspis to the venom alkaloids and alarm pheromone of the fire ant, S. invicta. In the present study, we compared the responses of P. tricuspis, P. obtusus and P. curvatus to Solenopsis invicta alarm pheromone, venom alkaloids, or a mixture of both chemicals in four-choice olfactometer bioassays. The main hypothesis tested was that the fire ant alarm pheromone and venom alkaloids act in concert to attract Pseudacteon phorid flies. Both sexes of all three Pseudacteon species were attracted to low doses of the fire ant alarm pheromone or venom alkaloids (i.e. 1 ant worker equivalent) alone. However, the flies were significantly more attracted to a mixture of both chemicals (i.e., 1:1 mixture of alarm pheromone+alkaloids) than to either chemical. The results suggest an additive rather than a synergistic effect of combining both chemicals. Comparing the fly species, P. tricuspis showed relatively greater attraction to cis alkaloids, whereas the alkaloid mixture (cis+trans) was preferred by P. obtusus and P. curvatus. In general, no key sexual differences were recorded, although females of P. tricuspis and P. obtusus showed slightly higher response than conspecific males to lower doses of the alarm pheromone. The ecological significance of these findings is discussed, and a host location model is proposed for parasitic phorid flies involving the use of fire ant alarm pheromone and venom alkaloids as long range and short range attractants, respectively.