WorldWideScience

Sample records for flux quantum pulses

  1. Pulsed neural networks consisting of single-flux-quantum spiking neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, T.; Asai, T.; Amemiya, Y.

    2007-01-01

    An inhibitory pulsed neural network was developed for brain-like information processing, by using single-flux-quantum (SFQ) circuits. It consists of spiking neuron devices that are coupled to each other through all-to-all inhibitory connections. The network selects neural activity. The operation of the neural network was confirmed by computer simulation. SFQ neuron devices can imitate the operation of the inhibition phenomenon of neural networks

  2. Pulse power applications of flux compression generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, C.M.; Caird, R.S.; Erickson, D.J.; Freeman, B.L.

    1981-01-01

    Characteristics are presented for two different types of explosive driven flux compression generators and a megavolt pulse transformer. Status reports are given for rail gun and plasma focus programs for which the generators serve as power sources

  3. Geneva University - Superconducting flux quantum bits: fabricated quantum objects

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Ecole de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Lundi 29 janvier 2007 COLLOQUE DE LA SECTION DE PHYSIQUE 17 heures - Auditoire Stueckelberg Superconducting flux quantum bits: fabricated quantum objects Prof. Hans Mooij / Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology The quantum conjugate variables of a superconductor are the charge or number of Cooper pairs, and the phase of the order parameter. In circuits that contain small Josephson junctions, these quantum properties can be brought forward. In Delft we study so-called flux qubits, superconducting rings that contain three small Josephson junctions. When a magnetic flux of half a flux quantum is applied to the loop, there are two states with opposite circulating current. For suitable junction parameters, a quantum superposition of those macroscopic states is possible. Transitions can be driven with resonant microwaves. These quantum ...

  4. Flux qubits on semiconducting quantum ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szopa, M; Zipper, E

    2010-01-01

    The ability to control the quantum state of a single electrons in a quantum ring made of a semiconductor is at the heart of recent developments towards a scalable quantum computer. A peculiar dispersion relation of quantum rings allows to steer the ground state properties by the magnetic flux and offers spin and orbital degrees of freedom for quantum manipulations. We show that such ring can be effectively reduced to the two-state system forming a qubit on orbital or spin degrees of freedom.

  5. Coherent pulse position modulation quantum cipher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohma, Masaki; Hirota, Osamu [Quantum ICT Research Institute, Tamagawa University, 6-1-1 Tamagawa-gakuen, Machida, Tokyo 194-8610 (Japan)

    2014-12-04

    On the basis of fundamental idea of Yuen, we present a new type of quantum random cipher, where pulse position modulated signals are encrypted in the picture of quantum Gaussian wave form. We discuss the security of our proposed system with a phase mask encryption.

  6. Plastic scintillator detector for pulsed flux measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadilin, V. V.; Kaplun, A. A.; Taraskin, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    A neutron detector, providing charged particle detection capability, has been designed. The main purpose of the detector is to measure pulsed fluxes of both charged particles and neutrons during scientific experiments. The detector consists of commonly used neutron-sensitive ZnS(Ag) / 6LiF scintillator screens wrapping a layer of polystyrene based scintillator (BC-454, EJ-254 or equivalent boron loaded plastic). This type of detector design is able to log a spatial distribution of events and may be scaled to any size. Different variations of the design were considered and modelled in specialized toolkits. The article presents a review of the detector design features as well as simulation results.

  7. Plastic scintillator detector for pulsed flux measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadilin, V V; Kaplun, A A; Taraskin, A A

    2017-01-01

    A neutron detector, providing charged particle detection capability, has been designed. The main purpose of the detector is to measure pulsed fluxes of both charged particles and neutrons during scientific experiments. The detector consists of commonly used neutron-sensitive ZnS(Ag) / 6 LiF scintillator screens wrapping a layer of polystyrene based scintillator (BC-454, EJ-254 or equivalent boron loaded plastic). This type of detector design is able to log a spatial distribution of events and may be scaled to any size. Different variations of the design were considered and modelled in specialized toolkits. The article presents a review of the detector design features as well as simulation results. (paper)

  8. Spiking neuron devices consisting of single-flux-quantum circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Tetsuya; Asai, Tetsuya; Amemiya, Yoshihito

    2006-01-01

    Single-flux-quantum (SFQ) circuits can be used for making spiking neuron devices, which are useful elements for constructing intelligent, brain-like computers. The device we propose is based on the leaky integrate-and-fire neuron (IFN) model and uses a SFQ pulse as an action signal or a spike of neurons. The operation of the neuron device is confirmed by computer simulator. It can operate with a short delay of 100 ps or less and is the highest-speed neuron device ever reported

  9. Quantum information storage using tunable flux qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steffen, Matthias; Brito, Frederico; DiVincenzo, David; Farinelli, Matthew; Keefe, George; Ketchen, Mark; Kumar, Shwetank; Milliken, Frank; Rothwell, Mary Beth; Rozen, Jim; Koch, Roger H, E-mail: msteffe@us.ibm.co [IBM Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States)

    2010-02-10

    We present details and results for a superconducting quantum bit (qubit) design in which a tunable flux qubit is coupled strongly to a transmission line. Quantum information storage in the transmission line is demonstrated with a dephasing time of T{sub 2}approx2.5 mus. However, energy lifetimes of the qubit are found to be short (approx10 ns) and not consistent with predictions. Several design and material changes do not affect qubit coherence times. In order to determine the cause of these short coherence times, we fabricated standard flux qubits based on a design which was previously successfully used by others. Initial results show significantly improved coherence times, possibly implicating losses associated with the large size of our qubit. (topical review)

  10. Quantum state engineering with flux-biased Josephson phase qubits by rapid adiabatic passages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, W.; Huang, J. S.; Shi, X.; Wei, L. F.

    2010-09-01

    In this article, the scheme of quantum computing based on the Stark-chirped rapid adiabatic passage (SCRAP) technique [L. F. Wei, J. R. Johansson, L. X. Cen, S. Ashhab, and F. Nori, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.100.113601 100, 113601 (2008)] is extensively applied to implement quantum state manipulations in flux-biased Josephson phase qubits. The broken-parity symmetries of bound states in flux-biased Josephson junctions are utilized to conveniently generate the desirable Stark shifts. Then, assisted by various transition pulses, universal quantum logic gates as well as arbitrary quantum state preparations can be implemented. Compared with the usual π-pulse operations widely used in experiments, the adiabatic population passages proposed here are insensitive to the details of the applied pulses and thus the desirable population transfers can be satisfyingly implemented. The experimental feasibility of the proposal is also discussed.

  11. Quantum state engineering with flux-biased Josephson phase qubits by rapid adiabatic passages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nie, W.; Huang, J. S.; Shi, X.; Wei, L. F.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the scheme of quantum computing based on the Stark-chirped rapid adiabatic passage (SCRAP) technique [L. F. Wei, J. R. Johansson, L. X. Cen, S. Ashhab, and F. Nori, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 113601 (2008)] is extensively applied to implement quantum state manipulations in flux-biased Josephson phase qubits. The broken-parity symmetries of bound states in flux-biased Josephson junctions are utilized to conveniently generate the desirable Stark shifts. Then, assisted by various transition pulses, universal quantum logic gates as well as arbitrary quantum state preparations can be implemented. Compared with the usual π-pulse operations widely used in experiments, the adiabatic population passages proposed here are insensitive to the details of the applied pulses and thus the desirable population transfers can be satisfyingly implemented. The experimental feasibility of the proposal is also discussed.

  12. Quantum Computation with Ultrafast Laser Pulse Shaping

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 6. Quantum Computation with Ultrafast Laser Pulse Shaping. Debabrata Goswami. General Article Volume 10 Issue 6 June 2005 pp 8-14. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  13. Superconducting Qubit with Integrated Single Flux Quantum Controller Part II: Experimental Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Edward, Jr.; Beck, Matthew; Thorbeck, Ted; Zhu, Shaojiang; Howington, Caleb; Nelson, Jj; Plourde, Britton; McDermott, Robert

    We describe the characterization of a single flux quantum (SFQ) pulse generator cofabricated with a superconducting quantum circuit on a single chip. Resonant trains of SFQ pulses are used to induce coherent qubit rotations on the Bloch sphere. We describe the SFQ drive characteristics of the qubit at the fundamental transition frequency and at subharmonics (ω01 / n , n = 2 , 3 , 4 , ⋯). We address the issue of quasiparticle poisoning due to the proximal SFQ pulse generator, and we characterize the fidelity of SFQ-based rotations using randomized benchmarking. Present address: IBM T.J. Watson Research Center.

  14. Quantum routing of single optical photons with a superconducting flux qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Keyu; Jelezko, Fedor; Twamley, Jason

    2018-05-01

    Interconnecting optical photons with superconducting circuits is a challenging problem but essential for building long-range superconducting quantum networks. We propose a hybrid quantum interface between the microwave and optical domains where the propagation of a single-photon pulse along a nanowaveguide is controlled in a coherent way by tuning the electromagnetically induced transparency window with the quantum state of a flux qubit mediated by the spin in a nanodiamond. The qubit can route a single-photon pulse using the nanodiamond into a quantum superposition of paths without the aid of an optical cavity—simplifying the setup. By preparing the flux qubit in a superposition state our cavityless scheme creates a hybrid state-path entanglement between a flying single optical photon and a static superconducting qubit.

  15. Superconducting Qubit with Integrated Single Flux Quantum Controller Part I: Theory and Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Matthew; Leonard, Edward, Jr.; Thorbeck, Ted; Zhu, Shaojiang; Howington, Caleb; Nelson, Jj; Plourde, Britton; McDermott, Robert

    As the size of quantum processors grow, so do the classical control requirements. The single flux quantum (SFQ) Josephson digital logic family offers an attractive route to proximal classical control of multi-qubit processors. Here we describe coherent control of qubits via trains of SFQ pulses. We discuss the fabrication of an SFQ-based pulse generator and a superconducting transmon qubit on a single chip. Sources of excess microwave loss stemming from the complex multilayer fabrication of the SFQ circuit are discussed. We show how to mitigate this loss through judicious choice of process workflow and appropriate use of sacrificial protection layers. Present address: IBM T.J. Watson Research Center.

  16. Blind quantum computing with weak coherent pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunjko, Vedran; Kashefi, Elham; Leverrier, Anthony

    2012-05-18

    The universal blind quantum computation (UBQC) protocol [A. Broadbent, J. Fitzsimons, and E. Kashefi, in Proceedings of the 50th Annual IEEE Symposiumon Foundations of Computer Science (IEEE Computer Society, Los Alamitos, CA, USA, 2009), pp. 517-526.] allows a client to perform quantum computation on a remote server. In an ideal setting, perfect privacy is guaranteed if the client is capable of producing specific, randomly chosen single qubit states. While from a theoretical point of view, this may constitute the lowest possible quantum requirement, from a pragmatic point of view, generation of such states to be sent along long distances can never be achieved perfectly. We introduce the concept of ϵ blindness for UBQC, in analogy to the concept of ϵ security developed for other cryptographic protocols, allowing us to characterize the robustness and security properties of the protocol under possible imperfections. We also present a remote blind single qubit preparation protocol with weak coherent pulses for the client to prepare, in a delegated fashion, quantum states arbitrarily close to perfect random single qubit states. This allows us to efficiently achieve ϵ-blind UBQC for any ϵ>0, even if the channel between the client and the server is arbitrarily lossy.

  17. Blind Quantum Computing with Weak Coherent Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunjko, Vedran; Kashefi, Elham; Leverrier, Anthony

    2012-05-01

    The universal blind quantum computation (UBQC) protocol [A. Broadbent, J. Fitzsimons, and E. Kashefi, in Proceedings of the 50th Annual IEEE Symposiumon Foundations of Computer Science (IEEE Computer Society, Los Alamitos, CA, USA, 2009), pp. 517-526.] allows a client to perform quantum computation on a remote server. In an ideal setting, perfect privacy is guaranteed if the client is capable of producing specific, randomly chosen single qubit states. While from a theoretical point of view, this may constitute the lowest possible quantum requirement, from a pragmatic point of view, generation of such states to be sent along long distances can never be achieved perfectly. We introduce the concept of ɛ blindness for UBQC, in analogy to the concept of ɛ security developed for other cryptographic protocols, allowing us to characterize the robustness and security properties of the protocol under possible imperfections. We also present a remote blind single qubit preparation protocol with weak coherent pulses for the client to prepare, in a delegated fashion, quantum states arbitrarily close to perfect random single qubit states. This allows us to efficiently achieve ɛ-blind UBQC for any ɛ>0, even if the channel between the client and the server is arbitrarily lossy.

  18. Observation of quantum Zeno effect in a superconducting flux qubit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakuyanagi, K; Baba, T; Matsuzaki, Y; Nakano, H; Saito, S; Semba, K

    2015-01-01

    When a quantum state is subjected to frequent measurements, the time evolution of the quantum state is frozen. This is called the quantum Zeno effect. Here, we observe such an effect by performing frequent discrete measurements in a macroscopic quantum system, a superconducting quantum bit. The quantum Zeno effect induced by discrete measurements is similar to the original idea of the quantum Zeno effect. By using a Josephson bifurcation amplifier pulse readout, we have experimentally suppressed the time evolution of Rabi oscillation using projective measurements, and also observed the enhancement of the quantum state holding time by shortening the measurement period time. This is a crucial step to realize quantum information processing using the quantum Zeno effect. (papers)

  19. Quantum transport in coupled resonators enclosed synthetic magnetic flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, L.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum transport properties are instrumental to understanding quantum coherent transport processes. Potential applications of quantum transport are widespread, in areas ranging from quantum information science to quantum engineering, and not restricted to quantum state transfer, control and manipulation. Here, we study light transport in a ring array of coupled resonators enclosed synthetic magnetic flux. The ring configuration, with an arbitrary number of resonators embedded, forms a two-arm Aharonov–Bohm interferometer. The influence of magnetic flux on light transport is investigated. Tuning the magnetic flux can lead to resonant transmission, while half-integer magnetic flux quantum leads to completely destructive interference and transmission zeros in an interferometer with two equal arms. -- Highlights: •The light transport is investigated through ring array of coupled resonators enclosed synthetic magnetic field. •Aharonov–Bohm ring interferometer of arbitrary configuration is investigated. •The half-integer magnetic flux quantum leads to destructive interference and transmission zeros for two-arm at equal length. •Complete transmission is available via tuning synthetic magnetic flux.

  20. Electromagnetic pulse compression and energy localization in quantum plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hefferon, Gareth; Sharma, Ashutosh; Kourakis, Ioannis

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of the intensity of a relativistic laser beam propagating through a dense quantum plasma is investigated, by considering different plasma regimes. A cold quantum fluid plasma and then a thermal quantum description(s) is (are) adopted, in comparison with the classical case of reference. Considering a Gaussian beam cross-section, we investigate both the longitudinal compression and lateral/longitudinal localization of the intensity of a finite-radius electromagnetic pulse. By employing a quantum plasma fluid model in combination with Maxwell's equations, we rely on earlier results on the quantum dielectric response, to model beam-plasma interaction. We present an extensive parametric investigation of the dependence of the longitudinal pulse compression mechanism on the electron density in cold quantum plasmas, and also study the role of the Fermi temperature in thermal quantum plasmas. Our numerical results show pulse localization through a series of successive compression cycles, as the pulse propagates through the plasma. A pulse of 100 fs propagating through cold quantum plasma is compressed to a temporal size of ∼1.35 attosecond and a spatial size of ∼1.08.10 -3 cm. Incorporating Fermi pressure via a thermal quantum plasma model is shown to enhance localization effects. A 100 fs pulse propagating through quantum plasma with a Fermi temperature of 350 K is compressed to a temporal size of ∼0.6 attosecond and a spatial size of ∼2.4.10 -3 cm.

  1. Pulsed homodyne Gaussian quantum tomography with low detection efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, M.; Benatti, F.; Floreanini, R.; Olivares, S.; Randi, F.; Titimbo, K.; Pividori, M.; Novelli, F.; Cilento, F.; Parmigiani, F.; Fausti, D.

    2014-04-01

    Pulsed homodyne quantum tomography usually requires a high detection efficiency, limiting its applicability in quantum optics. Here, it is shown that the presence of low detection efficiency (<50%) does not prevent the tomographic reconstruction of quantum states of light, specifically, of Gaussian states. This result is obtained by applying the so-called ‘minimax’ adaptive reconstruction of the Wigner function to pulsed homodyne detection. In particular, we prove, by both numerical and real experiments, that an effective discrimination of different Gaussian quantum states can be achieved. Our finding paves the way to a more extensive use of quantum tomographic methods, even in physical situations in which high detection efficiency is unattainable.

  2. Pulsed homodyne Gaussian quantum tomography with low detection efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, M; Benatti, F; Randi, F; Titimbo, K; Pividori, M; Parmigiani, F; Fausti, D; Floreanini, R; Olivares, S; Novelli, F; Cilento, F

    2014-01-01

    Pulsed homodyne quantum tomography usually requires a high detection efficiency, limiting its applicability in quantum optics. Here, it is shown that the presence of low detection efficiency (<50) does not prevent the tomographic reconstruction of quantum states of light, specifically, of Gaussian states. This result is obtained by applying the so-called ‘minimax’ adaptive reconstruction of the Wigner function to pulsed homodyne detection. In particular, we prove, by both numerical and real experiments, that an effective discrimination of different Gaussian quantum states can be achieved. Our finding paves the way to a more extensive use of quantum tomographic methods, even in physical situations in which high detection efficiency is unattainable

  3. Quantum depinning of flux lines from columnar defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chudnovsky, E.M.; Ferrera, A.; Vilenkin, A.

    1995-01-01

    The depinning of a flux line from a columnar defect is studied within the path-integral approach. Instantons of the quantum field theory in 1+1 dimensions are computed for the flux line whose dynamics is dominated by the Magnus force. The universal temperature dependence of the decay rate in the proximity of the critical current is obtained. This problem provides an example of macroscopic quantum tunneling, which is accessible to the direct comparison between theory and experiment

  4. Electromagnetic pulse-driven spin-dependent currents in semiconductor quantum rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhen-Gang; Berakdar, Jamal

    2009-04-08

    We investigate the non-equilibrium charge and spin-dependent currents in a quantum ring with a Rashba spin-orbit interaction (SOI) driven by two asymmetric picosecond electromagnetic pulses. The equilibrium persistent charge and persistent spin-dependent currents are investigated as well. It is shown that the dynamical charge and the dynamical spin-dependent currents vary smoothly with a static external magnetic flux and the SOI provides a SU(2) effective flux that changes the phases of the dynamic charge and the dynamic spin-dependent currents. The period of the oscillation of the total charge current with the delay time between the pulses is larger in a quantum ring with a larger radius. The parameters of the pulse fields control to a certain extent the total charge and the total spin-dependent currents. The calculations are applicable to nanometre rings fabricated in heterojunctions of III-V and II-VI semiconductors containing several hundreds of electrons.

  5. Single flux pulses affecting the ensemble of superconducting qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisenko, M. V.; Klenov, N. V.; Satanin, A. M.

    2018-02-01

    The present study is devoted to development of a technique for numerical simulation of the wave function dynamics the single Josephson qubits and arrays of noninteracting qubits controlled by ultra-short pulses. We wish to demonstrate the feasibility of a new principle of basic logical operations on the picosecond timescale. The influence of the unipolar pulse ("fluxon") form on the evolution of the state during the execution of the quantum one-qubit operations - "NOT", "READ" and " √{N O T } " - is investigated in the presence of decoherence. In the array of non interacting qubits, the question of the influence of the spread of their energy parameters (tunnel constants) is studied. It is shown that a single unipolar pulse can control a huge array of artificial atoms with 10% spread of geometric parameters in the array.

  6. Non-commutative flux representation for loop quantum gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratin, A.; Dittrich, B.; Oriti, D.; Tambornino, J.

    2011-09-01

    The Hilbert space of loop quantum gravity is usually described in terms of cylindrical functionals of the gauge connection, the electric fluxes acting as non-commuting derivation operators. It has long been believed that this non-commutativity prevents a dual flux (or triad) representation of loop quantum gravity to exist. We show here, instead, that such a representation can be explicitly defined, by means of a non-commutative Fourier transform defined on the loop gravity state space. In this dual representation, flux operators act by sstarf-multiplication and holonomy operators act by translation. We describe the gauge invariant dual states and discuss their geometrical meaning. Finally, we apply the construction to the simpler case of a U(1) gauge group and compare the resulting flux representation with the triad representation used in loop quantum cosmology.

  7. Control of trapped-ion quantum states with optical pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangan, C.; Monroe, C.; Bucksbaum, P.H.; Bloch, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    We present new results on the quantum control of systems with infinitely large Hilbert spaces. A control-theoretic analysis of the control of trapped-ion quantum states via optical pulses is performed. We demonstrate how resonant bichromatic fields can be applied in two contrasting ways--one that makes the system completely uncontrollable and the other that makes the system controllable. In some interesting cases, the Hilbert space of the qubit-harmonic oscillator can be made finite, and the Schroedinger equation controllable via bichromatic resonant pulses. Extending this analysis to the quantum states of two ions, a new scheme for producing entangled qubits is discovered

  8. Dynamics of a pulsed continuous-variable quantum memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dantan, Aurelien Romain; Cviklinski, Jean; Pinard, Michel

    2006-01-01

    We study the transfer dynamics of nonclassical fluctuations of light to the ground-state collective spin components of an atomic ensemble during a pulsed quantum memory sequence, and evaluate the relevant physical quantities to be measured in order to characterize such a quantum memory. We show...... in particular that the fluctuations stored into the atoms are emitted in temporal modes which are always different from those of the readout pulse, but which can nevertheless be retrieved efficiently using a suitable temporal mode-matching technique. We give a simple toy model—a cavity with variable...... transmission—that accounts for the behavior of the atomic quantum memory....

  9. Quantum theory of NMR adiabatic pulses and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ke, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Recently explosive developments of in vivo NMR spectroscopy (NMRS) and imaging (NMRI) in biological and medical sciences have resulted in the establishment of NMR as one of the most advanced major technique in life sciences. These developments have created huge demands for a variety of NMR adiabatic pulses with play a very important role in NMR experiments in vivo. In order to develop new NMR adiabatic pulses, a rigorous systematical quantum theory for this kind of pulses is greatly needed. Providing such a theory is one of the important goals of this dissertation. Quantum density matrix theory and product operator method have been used throughout this dissertation. Another goal, which is the major goal of this thesis research, is to use the quantum theory as a guide to develop new NMR adiabatic pulses and their applications. To fill this goal, a technique to construct a new type of adiabatic pulses, narrow band selective adiabatic pulses, has been invented, which is described through the example of constructing an adiabatic DANTE inversion pulse. This new adiabatic pulse is the first narrow band selective adiabatic pulses: Adiabatic homonuclear and heteronuclear spectral editing sequences. Unique to the first pulse sequence is a B 1 -field filter which is built by using two non-refocusing adiabatic full passage pulses to refocus the wanted signal and dephase unwanted signals. This extra filter greatly enhance the editing efficiency. Unlike commonly used heteronuclear spectral editing sequences which depend on the polarization transfer or spectral subtraction by phase cycling techniques, the second pulse sequences accomplishes the editing of heteronuclear J-coupled signals based on the fact that this sequence is transparent to the uncoupled spins and is equivalent a 90 degrees excitation pulse to the heteronuclear J-coupled spins. Experimental results have confirmed the ability of spectral editing with these two new sequences

  10. Controllable conditional quantum oscillations and quantum gate operations in superconducting flux qubits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Aimin; Cho Samyoung

    2011-01-01

    Conditional quantum oscillations are investigated for quantum gate operations in superconducting flux qubits. We present an effective Hamiltonian which describes a conditional quantum oscillation in two-qubit systems. Rabi-type quantum oscillations are discussed in implementing conditional quantum oscillations to quantum gate operations. Two conditional quantum oscillations depending on the states of control qubit can be synchronized to perform controlled-gate operations by varying system parameters. It is shown that the conditional quantum oscillations with their frequency synchronization make it possible to operate the controlled-NOT and -U gates with a very accurate gate performance rate in interacting qubit systems. Further, this scheme can be applicable to realize a controlled multi-qubit operation in various solid-state qubit systems. (author)

  11. Rapid single flux quantum logic in high temperature superconductor technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shunmugavel, K.

    2006-01-01

    A Josephson junction is the basic element of rapid single flux quantum logic (RSFQ) circuits. A high operating speed and low power consumption are the main advantages of RSFQ logic over semiconductor electronic circuits. To realize complex RSFQ circuits in HTS technology one needs a reproducible

  12. Experimental quantum fingerprinting with weak coherent pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feihu; Arrazola, Juan Miguel; Wei, Kejin; Wang, Wenyuan; Palacios-Avila, Pablo; Feng, Chen; Sajeed, Shihan; Lütkenhaus, Norbert; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-10-01

    Quantum communication holds the promise of creating disruptive technologies that will play an essential role in future communication networks. For example, the study of quantum communication complexity has shown that quantum communication allows exponential reductions in the information that must be transmitted to solve distributed computational tasks. Recently, protocols that realize this advantage using optical implementations have been proposed. Here we report a proof-of-concept experimental demonstration of a quantum fingerprinting system that is capable of transmitting less information than the best-known classical protocol. Our implementation is based on a modified version of a commercial quantum key distribution system using off-the-shelf optical components over telecom wavelengths, and is practical for messages as large as 100 Mbits, even in the presence of experimental imperfections. Our results provide a first step in the development of experimental quantum communication complexity.

  13. Experimental quantum fingerprinting with weak coherent pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feihu; Arrazola, Juan Miguel; Wei, Kejin; Wang, Wenyuan; Palacios-Avila, Pablo; Feng, Chen; Sajeed, Shihan; Lütkenhaus, Norbert; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication holds the promise of creating disruptive technologies that will play an essential role in future communication networks. For example, the study of quantum communication complexity has shown that quantum communication allows exponential reductions in the information that must be transmitted to solve distributed computational tasks. Recently, protocols that realize this advantage using optical implementations have been proposed. Here we report a proof-of-concept experimental demonstration of a quantum fingerprinting system that is capable of transmitting less information than the best-known classical protocol. Our implementation is based on a modified version of a commercial quantum key distribution system using off-the-shelf optical components over telecom wavelengths, and is practical for messages as large as 100 Mbits, even in the presence of experimental imperfections. Our results provide a first step in the development of experimental quantum communication complexity. PMID:26515586

  14. Quantum coherence in photo-ionisation with tailored XUV pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlström, Stefanos; Mauritsson, Johan; Schafer, Kenneth J.; L'Huillier, Anne; Gisselbrecht, Mathieu

    2018-01-01

    Ionisation with ultrashort pulses in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) regime can be used to prepare an ion in a superposition of spin-orbit substates. In this work, we study the coherence properties of such a superposition, created by ionising xenon atoms using two phase-locked XUV pulses at different frequencies. In general, if the duration of the driving pulse exceeds the quantum beat period, dephasing will occur. If however, the frequency difference of the two pulses matches the spin-orbit splitting, the coherence can be efficiently increased and dephasing does not occur.

  15. Comment on 'Realism and quantum flux tunneling'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggett, A. J.; Garg, Anupam

    1987-01-01

    A reply is presented to Ballentine's (1987) critique of the Legett and Garg (1985) experiment to discriminate between the experimental predictions of quantum mechanics (QM) and those of a class of macrorealistic theories. Legett and Garg uphold their earlier conclusions on the basis of the fact that the present critique refers to an experiment which was not in fact proposed. It is stressed that the original work involved an analysis according to macrorealism, while the calculations of Ballentine only demonstrate the internal consistency of the formalism of QM when applied to three consecutive actually performed experiments.

  16. Quantum Computation with Ultrafast Laser Pulse Shaping

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    level quantum systems or 'qubits' that follow the laws of quantum ... physics. Feynman was among the first to attempt to provide an answer to this question by producing an abstract model in 1982 that ... Law was reformulated to mean that rate.

  17. Practical system for the generation of pulsed quantum frequency combs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roztocki, Piotr; Kues, Michael; Reimer, Christian; Wetzel, Benjamin; Sciara, Stefania; Zhang, Yanbing; Cino, Alfonso; Little, Brent E; Chu, Sai T; Moss, David J; Morandotti, Roberto

    2017-08-07

    The on-chip generation of large and complex optical quantum states will enable low-cost and accessible advances for quantum technologies, such as secure communications and quantum computation. Integrated frequency combs are on-chip light sources with a broad spectrum of evenly-spaced frequency modes, commonly generated by four-wave mixing in optically-excited nonlinear micro-cavities, whose recent use for quantum state generation has provided a solution for scalable and multi-mode quantum light sources. Pulsed quantum frequency combs are of particular interest, since they allow the generation of single-frequency-mode photons, required for scaling state complexity towards, e.g., multi-photon states, and for quantum information applications. However, generation schemes for such pulsed combs have, to date, relied on micro-cavity excitation via lasers external to the sources, being neither versatile nor power-efficient, and impractical for scalable realizations of quantum technologies. Here, we introduce an actively-modulated, nested-cavity configuration that exploits the resonance pass-band characteristic of the micro-cavity to enable a mode-locked and energy-efficient excitation. We demonstrate that the scheme allows the generation of high-purity photons at large coincidence-to-accidental ratios (CAR). Furthermore, by increasing the repetition rate of the excitation field via harmonic mode-locking (i.e. driving the cavity modulation at harmonics of the fundamental repetition rate), we managed to increase the pair production rates (i.e. source efficiency), while maintaining a high CAR and photon purity. Our approach represents a significant step towards the realization of fully on-chip, stable, and versatile sources of pulsed quantum frequency combs, crucial for the development of accessible quantum technologies.

  18. Supersymmetric quantum mechanics of the flux tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belitsky, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    The Operator Product Expansion approach to scattering amplitudes in maximally supersymmetric gauge theory operates in terms of pentagon transitions for excitations propagating on a color flux tube. These obey a set of axioms which allow one to determine them to all orders in 't Hooft coupling and confront against explicit calculations. One of the simplifying features of the formalism is the factorizability of multiparticle transitions in terms of single-particle ones. In this paper we extend an earlier consideration of a sector populated by one kind of excitations to the case of a system with fermionic as well as bosonic degrees of freedom to address the origin of the factorization. While the purely bosonic case was analyzed within an integrable noncompact open-spin chain model, the current case is solved in the framework of a supersymmetric sl (2 | 1) magnet. We find the eigenfunctions for the multiparticle system making use of the R-matrix approach. Constructing resulting pentagon transitions, we prove their factorized form. The discussion corresponds to leading order of perturbation theory.

  19. Novel latch for adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron logic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Naoki; Yamanashi, Yuki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki; Ortlepp, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We herein propose the quantum-flux-latch (QFL) as a novel latch for adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron (AQFP) logic. A QFL is very compact and compatible with AQFP logic gates and can be read out in one clock cycle. Simulation results revealed that the QFL operates at 5 GHz with wide parameter margins of more than ±22%. The calculated energy dissipation was only ∼0.1 aJ/bit, which yields a small energy delay product of 20 aJ·ps. We also designed shift registers using QFLs to demonstrate more complex circuits with QFLs. Finally, we experimentally demonstrated correct operations of the QFL and a 1-bit shift register (a D flip-flop)

  20. Optimal control of quantum rings by terahertz laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räsänen, E; Castro, A; Werschnik, J; Rubio, A; Gross, E K U

    2007-04-13

    Complete control of single-electron states in a two-dimensional semiconductor quantum-ring model is established, opening a path into coherent laser-driven single-gate qubits. The control scheme is developed in the framework of optimal-control theory for laser pulses of two-component polarization. In terms of pulse lengths and target-state occupations, the scheme is shown to be superior to conventional control methods that exploit Rabi oscillations generated by uniform circularly polarized pulses. Current-carrying states in a quantum ring can be used to manipulate a two-level subsystem at the ring center. Combining our results, we propose a realistic approach to construct a laser-driven single-gate qubit that has switching times in the terahertz regime.

  1. Analysis of the neutron flux in an annular pulsed reactor by using finite volume method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Mário A.B. da; Narain, Rajendra; Bezerra, Jair de L., E-mail: mabs500@gmail.com, E-mail: narain@ufpe.br, E-mail: jairbezerra@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia e Geociências. Departamento de Energia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    Production of very intense neutron sources is important for basic nuclear physics and for material testing and isotope production. Nuclear reactors have been used as sources of intense neutron fluxes, although the achievement of such levels is limited by the inability to remove fission heat. Periodic pulsed reactors provide very intense fluxes by a rotating modulator near a subcritical core. A concept for the production of very intense neutron fluxes that combines features of periodic pulsed reactors and steady state reactors was proposed by Narain (1997). Such a concept is known as Very Intense Continuous High Flux Pulsed Reactor (VICHFPR) and was analyzed by using diffusion equation with moving boundary conditions and Finite Difference Method with Crank-Nicolson formalism. This research aims to analyze the flux distribution in the Very Intense Continuous Flux High Pulsed Reactor (VICHFPR) by using the Finite Volume Method and compares its results with those obtained by the previous computational method. (author)

  2. Analysis of the neutron flux in an annular pulsed reactor by using finite volume method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Mário A.B. da; Narain, Rajendra; Bezerra, Jair de L.

    2017-01-01

    Production of very intense neutron sources is important for basic nuclear physics and for material testing and isotope production. Nuclear reactors have been used as sources of intense neutron fluxes, although the achievement of such levels is limited by the inability to remove fission heat. Periodic pulsed reactors provide very intense fluxes by a rotating modulator near a subcritical core. A concept for the production of very intense neutron fluxes that combines features of periodic pulsed reactors and steady state reactors was proposed by Narain (1997). Such a concept is known as Very Intense Continuous High Flux Pulsed Reactor (VICHFPR) and was analyzed by using diffusion equation with moving boundary conditions and Finite Difference Method with Crank-Nicolson formalism. This research aims to analyze the flux distribution in the Very Intense Continuous Flux High Pulsed Reactor (VICHFPR) by using the Finite Volume Method and compares its results with those obtained by the previous computational method. (author)

  3. Dynamic behavior of superconducting flux qubit excited by a series of electromagnetic pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyko, A.S.; Omelyanchouk, A.N.; Shevchenko, S.N.

    2007-01-01

    We study theoretically the behavior of the superconducting flux qubit subjected to a series of electromagnetic pulses. The possibility of controlling system state via changing the parameters of the pulse is studied. We calculated the phase shift in a tank circuit weakly coupled to the qubit which can be measured by the impedance measurement technique. For the flux qubit we consider the possibility of estimating the relaxation rate from the impedance measurements by varying the delay time between the pulses

  4. Pulse interactions in a quantum dot waveguide in the regime of electromagnetically Induced transparency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per; Nielsen, Henri; Mørk, Jesper

    2006-01-01

    The interaction of optical pulses in a quantum dot waveguide in the slow-light regime is investigated. Dipole oscillations lead to strong interactions between the two pulses, implying a minimum pulse separation for optical buffer applications.......The interaction of optical pulses in a quantum dot waveguide in the slow-light regime is investigated. Dipole oscillations lead to strong interactions between the two pulses, implying a minimum pulse separation for optical buffer applications....

  5. Nonadiabatic effect on the quantum heat flux control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Chikako

    2014-05-01

    We provide a general formula of quantum transfer that includes the nonadiabatic effect under periodic environmental modulation by using full counting statistics in Hilbert-Schmidt space. Applying the formula to an anharmonic junction model that interacts with two bosonic environments within the Markovian approximation, we find that the quantum transfer is divided into the adiabatic (dynamical and geometrical phases) and nonadiabatic contributions. This extension shows the dependence of quantum transfer on the initial condition of the anharmonic junction just before the modulation, as well as the characteristic environmental parameters such as interaction strength and cut-off frequency of spectral density. We show that the nonadiabatic contribution represents the reminiscent effect of past modulation including the transition from the initial condition of the anharmonic junction to a steady state determined by the very beginning of the modulation. This enables us to tune the frequency range of modulation, whereby we can obtain the quantum flux corresponding to the geometrical phase by setting the initial condition of the anharmonic junction.

  6. Single-flux-quantum circuit technology for superconducting radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimaki, Akira; Onogi, Masashi; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Tanaka, Masamitsu; Sekiya, Akito; Hayakawa, Hisao; Yorozu, Shinichi; Terai, Hirotaka; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the application of the single-flux-quantum (SFQ) logic circuits to multi superconducting radiation detectors system. The SFQ-based analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) have the advantage in current sensitivity, which can reach less than 10 nA in a well-tuned ADC. We have also developed the design technology of the SFQ circuits. We demonstrate high-speed operation of large-scale integrated circuits such as a 2x2 cross/bar switch, arithmetic logic unit, indicating that our present SFQ technology is applicable to the multi radiation detectors system. (author)

  7. Robust quantum gates between trapped ions using shaped pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Ping, E-mail: zouping@m.scnu.edu.cn; Zhang, Zhi-Ming, E-mail: zmzhang@scnu.edu.cn

    2015-12-18

    We improve two existing entangling gate schemes between trapped ion qubits immersed in a large linear crystal. Based on the existing two-qubit gate schemes by applying segmented forces on the individually addressed qubits, we present a systematic method to optimize the shapes of the forces to suppress the dominant source of infidelity. The spin-dependent forces in the scheme can be from periodic photon kicks or from continuous optical pulses. The entangling gates are fast, robust, and have high fidelity. They can be used to implement scalable quantum computation and quantum simulation. - Highlights: • We present a systematic method to optimize the shape of the pulses to decouple qubits from intermediary motional modes. • Our optimized scheme can be applied to both the ultrafast gate and fast gate. • Our optimized scheme can suppress the dominant source of infidelity to arbitrary order. • When the number of trapped ions increase, the number of needed segments increases slowly.

  8. Excess quantum noise in optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification

    OpenAIRE

    Manzoni, C.; Moses, J.; Kärtner, F. X.; Cerullo, G.

    2011-01-01

    Noise evolution in an optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier (OPCPA) differs essentially from that of an optical parametric or a conventional laser amplifier, in that an incoherent pedestal is produced by superfluorescence that can overwhelm the signal under strong saturation. Using a model for the nonlinear dynamics consistent with quantum mechanics, we numerically study the evolution of excess noise in an OPCPA. The observed dynamics explain the macroscopic characteristics seen previous...

  9. Quantum-classical interface based on single flux quantum digital logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, R.; Vavilov, M. G.; Plourde, B. L. T.; Wilhelm, F. K.; Liebermann, P. J.; Mukhanov, O. A.; Ohki, T. A.

    2018-04-01

    We describe an approach to the integrated control and measurement of a large-scale superconducting multiqubit array comprising up to 108 physical qubits using a proximal coprocessor based on the Single Flux Quantum (SFQ) digital logic family. Coherent control is realized by irradiating the qubits directly with classical bitstreams derived from optimal control theory. Qubit measurement is performed by a Josephson photon counter, which provides access to the classical result of projective quantum measurement at the millikelvin stage. We analyze the power budget and physical footprint of the SFQ coprocessor and discuss challenges and opportunities associated with this approach.

  10. Improvement of the superconducting magnetic levitation system for the determination of the magnetic flux quantum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, T.; Sakamoto, Y.; Shiota, F.; Nakayama, K.; Nezu, Y.; Kikuzawa, M.; Hara, K.

    1989-01-01

    The authors describe an improvement of the preliminary superconducting magnetic levitation system in progress for the absolute determination of the magnetic flux quantum. This improvement includes the development of the flux-up method to determine the flux in terms of the Josephson voltage. The improvement is essential for the determination of the magnetic flux quantum as well as of the coil current in terms of the Josephson voltage and quantized Hall resistance

  11. Heat flux and quantum correlations in dissipative cascaded systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Salvatore; Farace, Alessandro; Ciccarello, Francesco; Palma, G. Massimo; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2015-02-01

    We study the dynamics of heat flux in the thermalization process of a pair of identical quantum systems that interact dissipatively with a reservoir in a cascaded fashion. Despite that the open dynamics of the bipartite system S is globally Lindbladian, one of the subsystems "sees" the reservoir in a state modified by the interaction with the other subsystem and hence it undergoes a non-Markovian dynamics. As a consequence, the heat flow exhibits a nonexponential time behavior which can greatly deviate from the case where each party is independently coupled to the reservoir. We investigate both thermal and correlated initial states of S and show that the presence of correlations at the beginning can considerably affect the heat-flux rate. We carry out our study in two paradigmatic cases—a pair of harmonic oscillators with a reservoir of bosonic modes and two qubits with a reservoir of fermionic modes—and compare the corresponding behaviors. In the case of qubits and for initial thermal states, we find that the trace distance discord is at any time interpretable as the correlated contribution to the total heat flux.

  12. Adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron cell library adopting minimalist design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Naoki, E-mail: takeuchi-naoki-kx@ynu.jp [Institute of Advanced Sciences, Yokohama National University, 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan); Yamanashi, Yuki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki [Institute of Advanced Sciences, Yokohama National University, 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Yokohama National University, 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan)

    2015-05-07

    We herein build an adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron (AQFP) cell library adopting minimalist design and a symmetric layout. In the proposed minimalist design, every logic cell is designed by arraying four types of building block cells: buffer, NOT, constant, and branch cells. Therefore, minimalist design enables us to effectively build and customize an AQFP cell library. The symmetric layout reduces unwanted parasitic magnetic coupling and ensures a large mutual inductance in an output transformer, which enables very long wiring between logic cells. We design and fabricate several logic circuits using the minimal AQFP cell library so as to test logic cells in the library. Moreover, we experimentally investigate the maximum wiring length between logic cells. Finally, we present an experimental demonstration of an 8-bit carry look-ahead adder designed using the minimal AQFP cell library and demonstrate that the proposed cell library is sufficiently robust to realize large-scale digital circuits.

  13. Proposal of unilateral single-flux-quantum logic gate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikaye, H.; Fukaya, N.; Okabe, Y.; Sugamo, T.

    1985-01-01

    A new type of single flux quantum logic gate is proposed, which can perform unilateral propagation of signal without using three-phase clock. This gate is designed to be built with bridge-type Josephson junctions. A basic logic gate consists of two one-junction interferometers coupled by superconducting interconnecting lines, and the logical states are represented by zero or one quantized fluxoid in one of one-junction interferometers. The bias current of the unequal magnitude to each of the two one-junction interferometers results in unilateral signal flow. By adjusting design parameters such as the ratio of the critical current of Josephson junctions and the inductances, circuits with the noise immunity of greater than 50% with respect to the bias current have been designed. Three cascaded gates were modeled and simulated on a computer, and the unilateral signal flow was confirmed. The simulation also shows that a switching delay about 2 picoseconds is feasible

  14. Mixed quantum-classical equilibrium in global flux surface hopping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sifain, Andrew E.; Wang, Linjun; Prezhdo, Oleg V.

    2015-01-01

    Global flux surface hopping (GFSH) generalizes fewest switches surface hopping (FSSH)—one of the most popular approaches to nonadiabatic molecular dynamics—for processes exhibiting superexchange. We show that GFSH satisfies detailed balance and leads to thermodynamic equilibrium with accuracy similar to FSSH. This feature is particularly important when studying electron-vibrational relaxation and phonon-assisted transport. By studying the dynamics in a three-level quantum system coupled to a classical atom in contact with a classical bath, we demonstrate that both FSSH and GFSH achieve the Boltzmann state populations. Thermal equilibrium is attained significantly faster with GFSH, since it accurately represents the superexchange process. GFSH converges closer to the Boltzmann averages than FSSH and exhibits significantly smaller statistical errors

  15. Adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron cell library adopting minimalist design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Naoki; Yamanashi, Yuki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    We herein build an adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron (AQFP) cell library adopting minimalist design and a symmetric layout. In the proposed minimalist design, every logic cell is designed by arraying four types of building block cells: buffer, NOT, constant, and branch cells. Therefore, minimalist design enables us to effectively build and customize an AQFP cell library. The symmetric layout reduces unwanted parasitic magnetic coupling and ensures a large mutual inductance in an output transformer, which enables very long wiring between logic cells. We design and fabricate several logic circuits using the minimal AQFP cell library so as to test logic cells in the library. Moreover, we experimentally investigate the maximum wiring length between logic cells. Finally, we present an experimental demonstration of an 8-bit carry look-ahead adder designed using the minimal AQFP cell library and demonstrate that the proposed cell library is sufficiently robust to realize large-scale digital circuits

  16. Quantum Logic with Composite Pulse Sequences on Sr^+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewmon, Ruth; Labaziewicz, Jaroslaw; Ge, Yufei; Wang, Shannon; Chuang, Isaac L.

    2008-03-01

    The optical 5S1/2->4D1/2 transition in Sr^+ is an attractive qubit because it can be addressed by diode lasers, which are relatively inexpensive and easy to operate. We characterize single-qubit rotations as well as a CNOT gate on a Sr^+ ion in a surface electrode Paul trap. To improve these operations, the frequency of the clock laser is stabilized to a high-finesse optical cavity. The resulting linewidth of the laser is approximately 300Hz. Composite pulse sequences, a technique adapted from NMR, have been shown to reduce the effects of systematic errors in a variety of quantum systems. We demonstrate several composite sequences that improve the fidelity of quantum logic operations on Sr^+.

  17. Nonresonant interaction of ultrashort electromagnetic pulses with multilevel quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belenov, E.; Isakov, V.; Nazarkin, A.

    1994-01-01

    Some features of the excitation of multilevel quantum systems under the action of electromagnetic pulses which are shorter than the inverse frequency of interlevel transitions are considered. It is shown that the interaction is characterized by a specific type of selectivity which is not connected with the resonant absorption of radiation. The simplest three-level model displays the inverse population of upper levels. The effect of an ultrashort laser pulse on a multilevel molecule was regarded as an instant reception of the oscillation velocity by the oscillator and this approach showed an effective excitation and dissociation of the molecule. The estimations testify to the fact that these effects can be observed using modern femtosecond lasers.

  18. Fast gas spectroscopy using pulsed quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, T.; Braun, M.; Lambrecht, A.

    2003-03-01

    Laser spectroscopy has found many industrial applications, e.g., control of automotive exhaust and process monitoring. The midinfrared region is of special interest because it has stronger absorption lines compared to the near infrared (NIR). However, in the NIR high quality reliable laser sources, detectors, and passive optical components are available. A quantum cascade laser could change this situation if fundamental advantages can be exploited with compact and reliable systems. It will be shown that, using pulsed lasers and available fast detectors, lower residual sensitivity levels than in corresponding NIR systems can be achieved. The stability is sufficient for industrial applications.

  19. Quantum Noise Reduction with Pulsed Light in Optical Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Keren

    Optical fibers offer considerable advantages over bulk nonlinear media for the generation of squeezed states. This thesis reports on experimental investigations of reducing quantum noise by means of squeezing in nonlinear fiber optic interferometers. Fibers have low insertion loss which allows for long interaction lengths. High field intensities are easily achieved in the small cores of single mode fibers. Additionally, the nonlinear process employed is self phase modulation or the Kerr effect, whose broad band nature requires no phase matching and can be exploited with ultra-short pulses of high peak intensity. All these advantageous features of fibers result in easily obtained large nonlinear phase shifts and subsequently large squeezing parameters. By the self phase modulation process a correlation is produced between the phase and amplitude fluctuations of the optical field. The attenuated or squeezed quadrature has a lower noise level than the initial level associated with the coherent state field before propagation. The resulting reduced quantum noise quadrature can be utilized to improve the sensitivity of a phase measuring instrument such as an interferometer. Because the Kerr nonlinearity is a degenerate self pumping process, the squeezed noise is at the same frequency as the pump field. Classical pump noise can therefore interfere with the desired measurement of the quantum noise reduction. The most severe noise process is the phase noise caused by thermally induced index modulation of the fiber. This noise termed Guided Acoustic Wave Brillouin Scattering, or GAWBS, by previous researchers is studied and analyzed. Experiments performed to overcome GAWBS successfully with several schemes are described. An experimental demonstration of an interferometric measurement with better sensitivity than the standard quantum limit is described. The results lead to new understandings into the limitations of quantum noise reduction that can be achieved in the

  20. Theoretical investigations of quantum correlations in NMR multiple-pulse spin-locking experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasev, S. A.; Fedorova, A. V.; Fel'dman, E. B.; Kuznetsova, E. I.

    2018-04-01

    Quantum correlations are investigated theoretically in a two-spin system with the dipole-dipole interactions in the NMR multiple-pulse spin-locking experiments. We consider two schemes of the multiple-pulse spin-locking. The first scheme consists of π /2-pulses only and the delays between the pulses can differ. The second scheme contains φ-pulses (0Quantum discord is obtained for the first scheme of the multiple-pulse spin-locking experiment at different temperatures.

  1. Implementing quantum logic gates with gradient ascent pulse engineering: principles and practicalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Benjamin; Jones, Jonathan A

    2012-10-13

    We briefly describe the use of gradient ascent pulse engineering (GRAPE) pulses to implement quantum logic gates in nuclear magnetic resonance quantum computers, and discuss a range of simple extensions to the core technique. We then consider a range of difficulties that can arise in practical implementations of GRAPE sequences, reflecting non-idealities in the experimental systems used.

  2. Periodic dark pulse emission induced by delayed feedback in a quantum well semiconductor laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Li

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the experimental observation of periodic dark pulse emission in a quantum-well semiconductor laser with delayed optical feedback. We found that under appropriate operation conditions the laser can also emit a stable train of dark pulses. The repetition frequency of the dark pulse is determined by the external cavity length. Splitting of the dark pulse was also observed. We speculate that the observed dark pulse is a kind of temporal cavity soliton formed in the laser.

  3. Band-selective shaped pulse for high fidelity quantum control in diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Yan-Chun; Xing, Jian; Liu, Gang-Qin; Jiang, Qian-Qing; Li, Wu-Xia; Zhang, Fei-Hao; Gu, Chang-Zhi; Pan, Xin-Yu; Long, Gui-Lu

    2014-01-01

    High fidelity quantum control of qubits is crucially important for realistic quantum computing, and it becomes more challenging when there are inevitable interactions between qubits. We introduce a band-selective shaped pulse, refocusing BURP (REBURP) pulse, to cope with the problems. The electron spin of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond is flipped with high fidelity by the REBURP pulse. In contrast with traditional rectangular pulses, the shaped pulse has almost equal excitation effect in a sharply edged region (in frequency domain). So the three sublevels of host 14 N nuclear spin can be flipped accurately simultaneously, while unwanted excitations of other sublevels (e.g., of a nearby 13 C nuclear spin) is well suppressed. Our scheme can be used for various applications such as quantum metrology, quantum sensing, and quantum information process.

  4. Band-selective shaped pulse for high fidelity quantum control in diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yan-Chun; Xing, Jian; Liu, Gang-Qin; Jiang, Qian-Qing; Li, Wu-Xia [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhang, Fei-Hao [Tsinghua National Laboratory for Information Science and Technology, Beijing 100084 (China); State Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Physics and Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Gu, Chang-Zhi; Pan, Xin-Yu, E-mail: xypan@aphy.iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100871 (China); Long, Gui-Lu [Tsinghua National Laboratory for Information Science and Technology, Beijing 100084 (China); State Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Physics and Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-06-30

    High fidelity quantum control of qubits is crucially important for realistic quantum computing, and it becomes more challenging when there are inevitable interactions between qubits. We introduce a band-selective shaped pulse, refocusing BURP (REBURP) pulse, to cope with the problems. The electron spin of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond is flipped with high fidelity by the REBURP pulse. In contrast with traditional rectangular pulses, the shaped pulse has almost equal excitation effect in a sharply edged region (in frequency domain). So the three sublevels of host {sup 14}N nuclear spin can be flipped accurately simultaneously, while unwanted excitations of other sublevels (e.g., of a nearby {sup 13}C nuclear spin) is well suppressed. Our scheme can be used for various applications such as quantum metrology, quantum sensing, and quantum information process.

  5. Vision for single flux quantum very large scale integrated technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, Arnold; Bunyk, Paul; Kleinsasser, Alan; Spargo, John

    2006-01-01

    Single flux quantum (SFQ) electronics is extremely fast and has very low on-chip power dissipation. SFQ VLSI is an excellent candidate for high-performance computing and other applications requiring extremely high-speed signal processing. Despite this, SFQ technology has generally not been accepted for system implementation. We argue that this is due, at least in part, to the use of outdated tools to produce SFQ circuits and chips. Assuming the use of tools equivalent to those employed in the semiconductor industry, we estimate the density of Josephson junctions, circuit speed, and power dissipation that could be achieved with SFQ technology. Today, CMOS lithography is at 90-65 nm with about 20 layers. Assuming equivalent technology, aggressively increasing the current density above 100 kA cm -2 to achieve junction speeds approximately 1000 GHz, and reducing device footprints by converting device profiles from planar to vertical, one could expect to integrate about 250 M Josephson junctions cm -2 into SFQ digital circuits. This should enable circuit operation with clock frequencies above 200 GHz and place approximately 20 K gates within a radius of one clock period. As a result, complete microprocessors, including integrated memory registers, could be fabricated on a single chip

  6. Vision for single flux quantum very large scale integrated technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silver, Arnold [Northrop Grumman Space Technology, One Space Park, Redondo Beach, CA 90278 (United States); Bunyk, Paul [Northrop Grumman Space Technology, One Space Park, Redondo Beach, CA 90278 (United States); Kleinsasser, Alan [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 (United States); Spargo, John [Northrop Grumman Space Technology, One Space Park, Redondo Beach, CA 90278 (United States)

    2006-05-15

    Single flux quantum (SFQ) electronics is extremely fast and has very low on-chip power dissipation. SFQ VLSI is an excellent candidate for high-performance computing and other applications requiring extremely high-speed signal processing. Despite this, SFQ technology has generally not been accepted for system implementation. We argue that this is due, at least in part, to the use of outdated tools to produce SFQ circuits and chips. Assuming the use of tools equivalent to those employed in the semiconductor industry, we estimate the density of Josephson junctions, circuit speed, and power dissipation that could be achieved with SFQ technology. Today, CMOS lithography is at 90-65 nm with about 20 layers. Assuming equivalent technology, aggressively increasing the current density above 100 kA cm{sup -2} to achieve junction speeds approximately 1000 GHz, and reducing device footprints by converting device profiles from planar to vertical, one could expect to integrate about 250 M Josephson junctions cm{sup -2} into SFQ digital circuits. This should enable circuit operation with clock frequencies above 200 GHz and place approximately 20 K gates within a radius of one clock period. As a result, complete microprocessors, including integrated memory registers, could be fabricated on a single chip.

  7. Self-slowdown and -advancement of fs pulses in a quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poel, Mike van der; Mørk, Jesper; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate changes in the propagation time of 180 femtosecond pulses in a quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifier as function of pulse input power and bias current. The results interpreted as a result of pulse reshaping by gain saturation but are also analogous to coherent population osci...

  8. Controllable delay of ultrashort pulses in a quantum dot optical amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poel, Mike van der; Mørk, Jesper; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2005-01-01

    Optical and electrical tuning of the propagation time of 170 fs pulses in a quantum dot semiconductor amplifier at room temperature is demonstrated. Both pulse slowdown and advancement is possible and we achieve fractional delays (delay divided with pulse duration) of up to 40%. The results...

  9. The Neutron-Gamma Pulse Shape Discrimination Method for Neutron Flux Detection in the ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xiufeng; Li Shiping; Cao Hongrui; Yin Zejie; Yuan Guoliang; Yang Qingwei

    2013-01-01

    The neutron flux monitor (NFM), as a significant diagnostic system in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), will play an important role in the readings of a series of key parameters in the fusion reaction process. As the core of the main electronic system of the NFM, the neutron-gamma pulse shape discrimination (n-γ PSD) can distinguish the neutron pulse from the gamma pulse and other disturbing pulses according to the thresholds of the rising time and the amplitude pre-installed on the board, the double timing point CFD method is used to get the rising time of the pulse. The n-γ PSD can provide an accurate neutron count. (magnetically confined plasma)

  10. Quantum Hooke's Law to Classify Pulse Laser Induced Ultrafast Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hao; Ding, Hepeng; Liu, Feng

    2015-02-01

    Ultrafast crystal-to-liquid phase transition induced by femtosecond pulse laser excitation is an interesting material's behavior manifesting the complexity of light-matter interaction. There exist two types of such phase transitions: one occurs at a time scale shorter than a picosecond via a nonthermal process mediated by electron-hole plasma formation; the other at a longer time scale via a thermal melting process mediated by electron-phonon interaction. However, it remains unclear what material would undergo which process and why? Here, by exploiting the property of quantum electronic stress (QES) governed by quantum Hooke's law, we classify the transitions by two distinct classes of materials: the faster nonthermal process can only occur in materials like ice having an anomalous phase diagram characterized with dTm/dP < 0, where Tm is the melting temperature and P is pressure, above a high threshold laser fluence; while the slower thermal process may occur in all materials. Especially, the nonthermal transition is shown to be induced by the QES, acting like a negative internal pressure, which drives the crystal into a ``super pressing'' state to spontaneously transform into a higher-density liquid phase. Our findings significantly advance fundamental understanding of ultrafast crystal-to-liquid phase transitions, enabling quantitative a priori predictions.

  11. The quantum flux in quasis one-dimensional conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventura, J.

    1989-01-01

    A method is presented which quantizes electromagnetic fluxes directly in flux space. It is based on the commutation law [φ B , φ E ] = i, where φ B is the magnetic flux, and φ E the longitudinal electric flux of a quasi one-dimensional conductor. The relevance of such a method for the description of the quantized Hall plateaus is discussed. In a second step, the polarization electric flux is introduced, together with a method for quantization of hybrid variables formed with pure electromagnetic fluxes plus electronic variables. (author) [pt

  12. Population Transfer between Two Quantum States by Piecewise Chirping of Femtosecond Pulses: Theory and Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhdanovich, S.; Shapiro, E. A.; Shapiro, M.; Hepburn, J. W.; Milner, V.

    2008-01-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate the method of population transfer by piecewise adiabatic passage between two quantum states. Coherent excitation of a two-level system with a train of ultrashort laser pulses is shown to reproduce the effect of an adiabatic passage, conventionally achieved with a single frequency-chirped pulse. By properly adjusting the amplitudes and phases of the pulses in the excitation pulse train, we achieve complete and robust population transfer to the target state. The piecewise nature of the process suggests a possibility for the selective population transfer in complex quantum systems

  13. Laboratory transferability of optimally shaped laser pulses for quantum control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore Tibbetts, Katharine; Xing, Xi; Rabitz, Herschel

    2014-01-01

    Optimal control experiments can readily identify effective shaped laser pulses, or “photonic reagents,” that achieve a wide variety of objectives. An important additional practical desire is for photonic reagent prescriptions to produce good, if not optimal, objective yields when transferred to a different system or laboratory. Building on general experience in chemistry, the hope is that transferred photonic reagent prescriptions may remain functional even though all features of a shaped pulse profile at the sample typically cannot be reproduced exactly. As a specific example, we assess the potential for transferring optimal photonic reagents for the objective of optimizing a ratio of photoproduct ions from a family of halomethanes through three related experiments. First, applying the same set of photonic reagents with systematically varying second- and third-order chirp on both laser systems generated similar shapes of the associated control landscape (i.e., relation between the objective yield and the variables describing the photonic reagents). Second, optimal photonic reagents obtained from the first laser system were found to still produce near optimal yields on the second laser system. Third, transferring a collection of photonic reagents optimized on the first laser system to the second laser system reproduced systematic trends in photoproduct yields upon interaction with the homologous chemical family. These three transfers of photonic reagents are demonstrated to be successful upon paying reasonable attention to overall laser system characteristics. The ability to transfer photonic reagents from one laser system to another is analogous to well-established utilitarian operating procedures with traditional chemical reagents. The practical implications of the present results for experimental quantum control are discussed

  14. Modelling and characterization of colliding-pulse mode-locked (CPM) quantum well lasers. [MPS1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bischoff, Svend; Brorson, S.D.; Franck, T.

    1996-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of passive colliding pulse mode-locked quantum well lasers is presented. The theoretical model for the gain dynamics is based on semi-classical density matrixequations. The gain dynamics are characterized exp...

  15. Free space relativistic quantum cryptography with faint laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molotkov, S N; Potapova, T A

    2013-01-01

    A new protocol for quantum key distribution through empty space is proposed. Apart from the quantum mechanical restrictions on distinguishability of non-orthogonal states, the protocol employs additional restrictions imposed by special relativity. The protocol ensures generation of a secure key even for the source generating non-strictly single-photon quantum states and for arbitrary losses in quantum communication channel. (letter)

  16. An optimization study of peak thermal neutron flux in moderators of advanced repetitive pulse reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asaoka, Takumi; Watanabe, N.

    1976-01-01

    In achieving a high peak thermal neutron flux in hydrogenous moderators installed in repetitive pulse reactors, the core-moderator arrangement can play as much an important role as the moderator design itself. However, the effect of the former has not been adequately emphasized to date, while a rather extensive study has been made on the latter. The present study concerns with a core-moderator system parameter optimization for a repetitive accelerator pulsed fast reactor. The results have shown that small differences in the arrangement resulting from the optimizations of various parameters are significant and the effects can be summed up to give an increase in the peak thermal flux by a factor of about two. (auth.)

  17. Quantum ring states in magnetic field and delayed half-cycle pulses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-07-19

    Jul 19, 2016 ... A very important aspect of the present work is the persistent current generation in a quantum ring in the presence ... quantum effects and their energy spectra are discrete. They are in many .... small with respect to its rotational time period, hence .... of delayed half-cycle pulse pair of the electric field. E0 = 1.0 ...

  18. Half-integer flux quantum effect in cuprate superconductors - a probe of pairing symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuei, C.C.; Kirtley, J.R.; Gupta, A.; Sun, J.Z.; Moler, K.A.; Wang, J.H.

    1996-01-01

    Based on macroscopic quantum coherence effects arising from pair tunneling and flux quantization, a series of tricrystal experiments have been designed and carried out to test the order parameter symmetry in high-T c cuprate superconductors. By using a scanning SQUID microscope, we have directly and non-invasively observed the spontaneously generated half-integer flux quantum effect in controlled-orientation tricrystal cuprate superconducting systems. The presence or absence of the half-integer flux quantum effect as a function of the tricrystal geometry allows us to prove that the order parameter symmetry in the YBCO and Tl2201 systems is consistent with that of the d x 2 -y 2 pair state. (orig.)

  19. Effect of laser pulse shaping parameters on the fidelity of quantum logic gates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaari, Ryan R; Brown, Alex

    2012-09-14

    The effect of varying parameters specific to laser pulse shaping instruments on resulting fidelities for the ACNOT(1), NOT(2), and Hadamard(2) quantum logic gates are studied for the diatomic molecule (12)C(16)O. These parameters include varying the frequency resolution, adjusting the number of frequency components and also varying the amplitude and phase at each frequency component. A time domain analytic form of the original discretized frequency domain laser pulse function is derived, providing a useful means to infer the resulting pulse shape through variations to the aforementioned parameters. We show that amplitude variation at each frequency component is a crucial requirement for optimal laser pulse shaping, whereas phase variation provides minimal contribution. We also show that high fidelity laser pulses are dependent upon the frequency resolution and increasing the number of frequency components provides only a small incremental improvement to quantum gate fidelity. Analysis through use of the pulse area theorem confirms the resulting population dynamics for one or two frequency high fidelity laser pulses and implies similar dynamics for more complex laser pulse shapes. The ability to produce high fidelity laser pulses that provide both population control and global phase alignment is attributed greatly to the natural evolution phase alignment of the qubits involved within the quantum logic gate operation.

  20. Insufficiency of avoided crossings for witnessing large-scale quantum coherence in flux qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröwis, Florian; Yadin, Benjamin; Gisin, Nicolas

    2018-04-01

    Do experiments based on superconducting loops segmented with Josephson junctions (e.g., flux qubits) show macroscopic quantum behavior in the sense of Schrödinger's cat example? Various arguments based on microscopic and phenomenological models were recently adduced in this debate. We approach this problem by adapting (to flux qubits) the framework of large-scale quantum coherence, which was already successfully applied to spin ensembles and photonic systems. We show that contemporary experiments might show quantum coherence more than 100 times larger than experiments in the classical regime. However, we argue that the often-used demonstration of an avoided crossing in the energy spectrum is not sufficient to make a conclusion about the presence of large-scale quantum coherence. Alternative, rigorous witnesses are proposed.

  1. Microwave testing of high-Tc based direct current to a single flux quantum converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaplunenko, V. K.; Fischer, Gerd Michael; Ivanov, Z. G.

    1994-01-01

    Design, simulation, and experimental investigations of a direct current to a single flux quantum converter loaded with a Josephson transmission line and driven by an external 70 GHz microwave oscillator are reported. The test circuit includes nine YBaCuO Josephson junctions aligned on the grain...... boundary of a 0°–32° asymmetric Y-ZrO2 bicrystal substrate. The performance of such converters is important for the development of the fast Josephson samplers required for testing of high-Tc rapid single flux quantum circuits in high-speed digital superconducting electronics. Journal of Applied Physics...

  2. Storage of multiple single-photon pulses emitted from a quantum dot in a solid-state quantum memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jian-Shun; Zhou, Zong-Quan; Wang, Yi-Tao; Li, Yu-Long; Liu, Xiao; Hua, Yi-Lin; Zou, Yang; Wang, Shuang; He, De-Yong; Chen, Geng; Sun, Yong-Nan; Yu, Ying; Li, Mi-Feng; Zha, Guo-Wei; Ni, Hai-Qiao; Niu, Zhi-Chuan; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2015-01-01

    Quantum repeaters are critical components for distributing entanglement over long distances in presence of unavoidable optical losses during transmission. Stimulated by the Duan–Lukin–Cirac–Zoller protocol, many improved quantum repeater protocols based on quantum memories have been proposed, which commonly focus on the entanglement-distribution rate. Among these protocols, the elimination of multiple photons (or multiple photon-pairs) and the use of multimode quantum memory are demonstrated to have the ability to greatly improve the entanglement-distribution rate. Here, we demonstrate the storage of deterministic single photons emitted from a quantum dot in a polarization-maintaining solid-state quantum memory; in addition, multi-temporal-mode memory with 1, 20 and 100 narrow single-photon pulses is also demonstrated. Multi-photons are eliminated, and only one photon at most is contained in each pulse. Moreover, the solid-state properties of both sub-systems make this configuration more stable and easier to be scalable. Our work will be helpful in the construction of efficient quantum repeaters based on all-solid-state devices. PMID:26468996

  3. Ultra-fast quantum randomness generation by accelerated phase diffusion in a pulsed laser diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abellán, C; Amaya, W; Jofre, M; Curty, M; Acín, A; Capmany, J; Pruneri, V; Mitchell, M W

    2014-01-27

    We demonstrate a high bit-rate quantum random number generator by interferometric detection of phase diffusion in a gain-switched DFB laser diode. Gain switching at few-GHz frequencies produces a train of bright pulses with nearly equal amplitudes and random phases. An unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer is used to interfere subsequent pulses and thereby generate strong random-amplitude pulses, which are detected and digitized to produce a high-rate random bit string. Using established models of semiconductor laser field dynamics, we predict a regime of high visibility interference and nearly complete vacuum-fluctuation-induced phase diffusion between pulses. These are confirmed by measurement of pulse power statistics at the output of the interferometer. Using a 5.825 GHz excitation rate and 14-bit digitization, we observe 43 Gbps quantum randomness generation.

  4. Fast neutron flux analyzer with real-time digital pulse shape discrimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanova, A.A., E-mail: a.a.ivanova@inp.nsk.su [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Zubarev, P.V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, 630092 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Ivanenko, S.V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Khilchenko, A.D. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, 630092 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Kotelnikov, A.I. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Polosatkin, S.V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, 630092 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Puryga, E.A.; Shvyrev, V.G. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, 630092 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Sulyaev, Yu.S. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-11

    Investigation of subthermonuclear plasma confinement and heating in magnetic fusion devices such as GOL–3 and GDT at the Budker Institute (Novosibirsk, Russia) requires sophisticated equipment for neutron-, gamma- diagnostics and upgrading data acquisition systems with online data processing. Measurement of fast neutron flux with stilbene scintillation detectors raised the problem of discrimination of the neutrons (n) from background cosmic particles (muons) and neutron-induced gamma rays (γ). This paper describes a fast neutron flux analyzer with real-time digital pulse-shape discrimination (DPSD) algorithm FPGA-implemented for the GOL–3 and GDT devices. This analyzer was tested and calibrated with the help of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 252}Cf radiation sources. The Figures of Merit (FOM) calculated for different energy cuts are presented. - Highlights: • Electronic equipment for measurement of fast neutron flux with stilbene scintillator is presented. • FPGA-implemented digital pulse-shape discrimination algorithm by charge comparison method is shown. • Calibration of analyzer was carried out with {sup 137}Cs and {sup 252}Cf. • Figures of Merit (FOM) values for energy cuts from 1/8 Cs to 2 Cs are from 1.264 to 2.34 respectively.

  5. Statistical analysis of error rate of large-scale single flux quantum logic circuit by considering fluctuation of timing parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanashi, Yuki; Masubuchi, Kota; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between the timing margin and the error rate of the large-scale single flux quantum logic circuits is quantitatively investigated to establish a timing design guideline. We observed that the fluctuation in the set-up/hold time of single flux quantum logic gates caused by thermal noises is the most probable origin of the logical error of the large-scale single flux quantum circuit. The appropriate timing margin for stable operation of the large-scale logic circuit is discussed by taking the fluctuation of setup/hold time and the timing jitter in the single flux quantum circuits. As a case study, the dependence of the error rate of the 1-million-bit single flux quantum shift register on the timing margin is statistically analyzed. The result indicates that adjustment of timing margin and the bias voltage is important for stable operation of a large-scale SFQ logic circuit.

  6. Statistical analysis of error rate of large-scale single flux quantum logic circuit by considering fluctuation of timing parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanashi, Yuki, E-mail: yamanasi@ynu.ac.jp [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Yokohama National University, Tokiwadai 79-5, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan); Masubuchi, Kota; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Yokohama National University, Tokiwadai 79-5, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    The relationship between the timing margin and the error rate of the large-scale single flux quantum logic circuits is quantitatively investigated to establish a timing design guideline. We observed that the fluctuation in the set-up/hold time of single flux quantum logic gates caused by thermal noises is the most probable origin of the logical error of the large-scale single flux quantum circuit. The appropriate timing margin for stable operation of the large-scale logic circuit is discussed by taking the fluctuation of setup/hold time and the timing jitter in the single flux quantum circuits. As a case study, the dependence of the error rate of the 1-million-bit single flux quantum shift register on the timing margin is statistically analyzed. The result indicates that adjustment of timing margin and the bias voltage is important for stable operation of a large-scale SFQ logic circuit.

  7. Flux motion in Y-Ba-Cu-O bulk superconductors during pulse field magnetization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizawa, K; Nariki, S; Sakai, N; Murakami, M; Hirabayasi, I; Takizawa, T

    2004-01-01

    We have studied the relationship between the magnetization and temperature change in Y-Ba-Cu-O bulk superconductor during pulse field magnetization (PFM). The flux motion was monitored using both Hall sensors and pick-up coils that are placed on a surface of a Y-Ba-Cu-O disc having dimensions of 15 mm in diameter and 0.95 mm in thickness. The peak value of the field was varied from 0.2 to 0.8 T. The effect of the static bias field was also studied in the range of 0-3 T. The temperature of the sample surface was measured using a resistance temperature sensor. The temperature increased with the magnitude of the applied pulsed magnetic field, and the amount of temperature rise decreased with increasing static bias field

  8. Analytical evaluation of neutron diffusion equation for the geometry of very intense continuous high flux pulsed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narain, Rajendra

    1995-01-01

    Using the concept of Very Intense Continuous High Flux Pulsed Reactor to obtain a rotating high flux pulse in an annular core an analytical treatment for the quasi-static solution with a moving reflector is presented. Under quasi-static situation, time averaged values for important parameters like multiplication factor, flux, leakage do not change with time. As a result the instantaneous solution can be considered to be separable in time and space after correcting for the coordinates for the motion of the pulser. The space behaviour of the pulser is considered as exp(-αx 2 ). Movement of delayed neutron precursors is also taken into account. (author). 4 refs

  9. Quantum computer based on activated dielectric nanoparticles selectively interacting with short optical pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadomskii, Oleg N; Kharitonov, Yu Ya

    2004-01-01

    The operation principle of a quantum computer is proposed based on a system of dielectric nanoparticles activated with two-level atoms - cubits, in which electric dipole transitions are excited by short intense optical pulses. It is proved that the logical operation (logical operator) CNOT (controlled NOT) is performed by means of time-dependent transfer of quantum information over 'long' (of the order of 10 4 nm) distances between spherical nanoparticles owing to the delayed interaction between them in the optical radiation field. It is shown that one-cubit and two-cubit logical operators required for quantum calculations can be realised by selectively exciting dielectric particles with short optical pulses. (quantum calculations)

  10. Coherent dynamics and terahertz emission in an asymmetric quantum well coupled to broadband infrared pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, B H; Cao, J C

    2004-01-01

    A selected intersubband transition in the asymmetric quantum well is theoretically proposed by using the superposition of two identical time delayed and phase shifted broadband pulses. Three conduction subbands in the semiconductor quantum well structure are optically coupled with the ultrafast infrared pulses. By adjusting the delay between these two pulses, the carriers at ground level can be selectively pumped to one of the upper levels, while the other upper level remains unoccupied. Thus selective transitions in the three level model can be manipulated by optical interference. At the same time, terahertz radiation will be emitted by coherent controlled charge oscillations. The phase and amplitude of THz radiation is found to be sensitive to the optical interference of the coupling pulses

  11. Quantum computers based on electron spins controlled by ultrafast off-resonant single optical pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Susan M; Fu, Kai-Mei C; Ladd, Thaddeus D; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2007-07-27

    We describe a fast quantum computer based on optically controlled electron spins in charged quantum dots that are coupled to microcavities. This scheme uses broadband optical pulses to rotate electron spins and provide the clock signal to the system. Nonlocal two-qubit gates are performed by phase shifts induced by electron spins on laser pulses propagating along a shared waveguide. Numerical simulations of this scheme demonstrate high-fidelity single-qubit and two-qubit gates with operation times comparable to the inverse Zeeman frequency.

  12. Pulsed magnetic flux leakage method for hairline crack detection and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okolo, Chukwunonso K.; Meydan, Turgut

    2018-04-01

    The Magnetic Flux leakage (MFL) method is a well-established branch of electromagnetic Non-Destructive Testing (NDT), extensively used for evaluating defects both on the surface and far-surface of pipeline structures. However the conventional techniques are not capable of estimating their approximate size, location and orientation, hence an additional transducer is required to provide the extra information needed. This research is aimed at solving the inevitable problem of granular bond separation which occurs during manufacturing, leaving pipeline structures with miniature cracks. It reports on a quantitative approach based on the Pulsed Magnetic Flux Leakage (PMFL) method, for the detection and characterization of the signals produced by tangentially oriented rectangular surface and far-surface hairline cracks. This was achieved through visualization and 3D imaging of the leakage field. The investigation compared finite element numerical simulation with experimental data. Experiments were carried out using a 10mm thick low carbon steel plate containing artificial hairline cracks with various depth sizes, and different features were extracted from the transient signal. The influence of sensor lift-off and pulse width variation on the magnetic field distribution which affects the detection capability of various hairline cracks located at different depths in the specimen is explored. The findings show that the proposed technique can be used to classify both surface and far-surface hairline cracks and can form the basis for an enhanced hairline crack detection and characterization for pipeline health monitoring.

  13. Quantum state population transfer of lithium atoms induced by frequency-chirped laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Huanqiang; Zhang Xianzhou; Jia Guangrui; Zhang Yonghui; Jiang Lijuan

    2011-01-01

    Using the time-dependent multilevel approach (TDMA) and B-splines function, we have calculated the five quantum state population transfer of rydberg lithium atoms. We also analyse the influence of the four major parameters of the frequency-chirped laser pulses field on transition. The result shows that the population can be completely transferred to the target state by changing the parameters of the laser pulse and achieve manual controls to a certain degree. (authors)

  14. Quantum processes: probability fluxes, transition probabilities in unit time and vacuum vibrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oleinik, V.P.; Arepjev, Ju D.

    1989-01-01

    Transition probabilities in unit time and probability fluxes are compared in studying the elementary quantum processes -the decay of a bound state under the action of time-varying and constant electric fields. It is shown that the difference between these quantities may be considerable, and so the use of transition probabilities W instead of probability fluxes Π, in calculating the particle fluxes, may lead to serious errors. The quantity W represents the rate of change with time of the population of the energy levels relating partly to the real states and partly to the virtual ones, and it cannot be directly measured in experiment. The vacuum background is shown to be continuously distorted when a perturbation acts on a system. Because of this the viewpoint of an observer on the physical properties of real particles continuously varies with time. This fact is not taken into consideration in the conventional theory of quantum transitions based on using the notion of probability amplitude. As a result, the probability amplitudes lose their physical meaning. All the physical information on quantum dynamics of a system is contained in the mean values of physical quantities. The existence of considerable differences between the quantities W and Π permits one in principle to make a choice of the correct theory of quantum transitions on the basis of experimental data. (author)

  15. Quantum switching of π-electron rotations in a nonplanar chiral molecule by using linearly polarized UV laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineo, Hirobumi; Yamaki, Masahiro; Teranishi, Yoshiaki; Hayashi, Michitoshi; Lin, Sheng Hsien; Fujimura, Yuichi

    2012-09-05

    Nonplanar chiral aromatic molecules are candidates for use as building blocks of multidimensional switching devices because the π electrons can generate ring currents with a variety of directions. We employed (P)-2,2'-biphenol because four patterns of π-electron rotations along the two phenol rings are possible and theoretically determine how quantum switching of the π-electron rotations can be realized. We found that each rotational pattern can be driven by a coherent excitation of two electronic states under two conditions: one is the symmetry of the electronic states and the other is their relative phase. On the basis of the results of quantum dynamics simulations, we propose a quantum control method for sequential switching among the four rotational patterns that can be performed by using ultrashort overlapped pump and dump pulses with properly selected relative phases and photon polarization directions. The results serve as a theoretical basis for the design of confined ultrafast switching of ring currents of nonplanar molecules and further current-induced magnetic fluxes of more sophisticated systems.

  16. Optical pulse dynamics for quantum-dot logic operations in a photonic-crystal waveguide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Xun; John, Sajeev [Department of Physics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 1A7 Canada (Canada)

    2011-11-15

    We numerically demonstrate all-optical logic operations with quantum dots (QDs) embedded in a bimodal photonic-crystal waveguide using Maxwell-Bloch equations in a slowly varying envelope approximation (SVEA). The two-level QD excitation level is controlled by one or more femtojoule optical driving pulses passing through the waveguide. Specific logic operations depend on the relative pulse strengths and their detunings from an inhomogeneouslly broadened (about 1% for QD transitions centered at 1.5 {mu}m) QD transition. This excitation controlled two-level medium then determines passage of subsequent probe optical pulses. Envelope equations for electromagnetic waves in the linear dispersion and cutoff waveguide modes are derived to simplify solution of the coupled Maxwell-Bloch equations in the waveguide. These determine the quantum mechanical evolution of the QD excitation and its polarization, driven by classical electromagnetic (EM) pulses near a sharp discontinuity in the EM density of states of the bimodal waveguide. Different configurations of the driving pulses lead to distinctive relations between driving pulse strength and probe pulse passage, representing all-optical logic and, or, and not operations. Simulation results demonstrate that such operations can be done on picosecond time scales and within a waveguide length of about 10 {mu}m in a photonic-band-gap (PBG) optical microchip.

  17. Quantum tunneling of massive flux lines in a high-T{sub c} superconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaber, M.W.; Achar, B.N.N. [Memphis Univ., TN (United States)

    1999-02-01

    We have investigated the quantum tunneling of damped flux lines of finite mass at T = 0 by extending our previous study of tunneling around T{sub 0}, the transition temperature. In the case of a cubic pinning potential, considered here, the action could be evaluated in a closed form for a flux line of finite length. The tunneling rate reaches a finite limit at T = 0, although it is temperature dependent and exhibits a 1/T variation near T{sub 0}. (orig.) 21 refs.

  18. Quantum interference metrology at deep-UV wavelengths using phase-controlled ultrashort laser pulses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zinkstok, R. Th; Witte, S.; Ubachs, W.; Hogervorst, W.; Eikema, K. S E

    2005-01-01

    High-resolution metrology at wavelengths shorter than ultraviolet is in general hampered by a limited availability of appropriate laser sources. It is demonstrated that this limitation can be overcome by quantum-interference metrology with frequency up-converted ultrafast laser pulses. The required

  19. Thermodynamic description of non-Markovian information flux of nonequilibrium open quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong-Bin; Chen, Guang-Yin; Chen, Yueh-Nan

    2017-12-01

    One of the fundamental issues in the field of open quantum systems is the classification and quantification of non-Markovianity. In the contest of quantity-based measures of non-Markovianity, the intuition of non-Markovianity in terms of information backflow is widely discussed. However, it is not easy to characterize the information flux for a given system state and show its connection to non-Markovianity. Here, by using the concepts from thermodynamics and information theory, we discuss a potential definition of information flux of an open quantum system, valid for static environments. We present a simple protocol to show how a system attempts to share information with its environment and how it builds up system-environment correlations. We also show that the information returned from the correlations characterizes the non-Markovianity and a hierarchy of indivisibility of the system dynamics.

  20. Quantum energy duplication using super high output pulse laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugisaki, Kiwamu; Koyama, Kazuyoshi; Tanimoto, Mitsumori; Saito, Naoaki

    2000-01-01

    This study aims at elucidation on phenomena induced by strong electric field of super high output ultra short laser pulse to carry out development of basic technology required for promotion of a study on generation of high energy particle and photon using them, in order to contribute to application of super high output ultra short laser pulse and high energy plasma formed by it. In 1998 fiscal year of the last fiscal year in this study, by intending to increase the output by narrowing pulse width of the super high output laser, some basic experiments such as verification due to experiment on relativity theoretical self-convergence, generation of high energy particles, and so forth were carried out to establish a forecasting on future application. And, by conducting plasma generation experiment, self-guide and high energy particle formation experiment in plasma of super high intensity laser pulse important for its applications, and so forth, various technologies constituting foundation of future developments were developed, and more results could be obtained than those at proposal of this study. (G.K.)

  1. Optimal control of quantum systems by chirped pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amstrup, Bjarne; Doll, J. D.; Sauerbrey, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    treated are pulsed population inversion between electronic levels, and optimization of vibronic excitation in the presence of another electronic level. In the problem of population inversion effective potentials of displaced harmonic oscillators are used. For optimizing vibronic excitation the CsI model...

  2. Theory of Pulse Train Amplification Without Patterning Effects in Quantum Dot Semiconductor Optical Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uskov, Alexander V.; Berg, Tommy Winther; Mørk, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    A theory for pulse amplification and saturation in quantum dot (QD) semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) is developed. In particular, the maximum bit rate at which a data stream of pulses can be amplified without significant patterning effects is investigated. Simple expressions are derived th...... energies of 0.2–0.4 pJ. The superiority of QD SOAs is based on: 1) the faster achievement of the regime of maximum gain in QD SOAs compared to QW and bulk SOAs and 2) the lower effective cross section of photon-carrier interaction in QDs....... that clearly show the dependence of the maximum bit rate on material and device parameters. A comparative analysis of QD, quantum well (QW), and bulk SOAs shows that QD SOAs may have superior properties; calculations predict patterning-free amplification up to bit rates of 150–200 Gb/s with pulse output...

  3. Current measurement system utilizing cryogenic techniques for the absolute measurement of the magnetic flux quantum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, T.; Murayama, Y.; Sakamoto, Y.; Sakuraba, T.; Shiota, F.

    1989-01-01

    A series of systems composed of cryogenic devices such as a Josephson potentiometer and a cryogenic current comparator has been proposed and developed to precisely measure a current with any value up to 1 A. These systems will be used to measure the injected electrical energy with an uncertainty of the order of 0.01 ppm or less in the absolute measurement of the magnetic flux quantum by superconducting magnetic levitation. Some preliminary experiments are described

  4. Efficient amplitude-modulated pulses for triple- to single-quantum coherence conversion in MQMAS NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colaux, Henri; Dawson, Daniel M; Ashbrook, Sharon E

    2014-08-07

    The conversion between multiple- and single-quantum coherences is integral to many nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments of quadrupolar nuclei. This conversion is relatively inefficient when effected by a single pulse, and many composite pulse schemes have been developed to improve this efficiency. To provide the maximum improvement, such schemes typically require time-consuming experimental optimization. Here, we demonstrate an approach for generating amplitude-modulated pulses to enhance the efficiency of the triple- to single-quantum conversion. The optimization is performed using the SIMPSON and MATLAB packages and results in efficient pulses that can be used without experimental reoptimisation. Most significant signal enhancements are obtained when good estimates of the inherent radio-frequency nutation rate and the magnitude of the quadrupolar coupling are used as input to the optimization, but the pulses appear robust to reasonable variations in either parameter, producing significant enhancements compared to a single-pulse conversion, and also comparable or improved efficiency over other commonly used approaches. In all cases, the ease of implementation of our method is advantageous, particularly for cases with low sensitivity, where the improvement is most needed (e.g., low gyromagnetic ratio or high quadrupolar coupling). Our approach offers the potential to routinely improve the sensitivity of high-resolution NMR spectra of nuclei and systems that would, perhaps, otherwise be deemed "too challenging".

  5. Quantum entanglement and teleportation in pulsed cavity optomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofer, Sebastian G. [Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 5, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Institute for Theoretical Physics, Institute for Gravitational Physics, Leibniz University Hannover, Callinstrasse 38, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Wieczorek, Witlef; Aspelmeyer, Markus [Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 5, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Hammerer, Klemens [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Institute for Gravitational Physics, Leibniz University Hannover, Callinstrasse 38, 30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    Entangling a mechanical oscillator with an optical mode is an enticing and yet a very challenging goal in cavity optomechanics. Here we consider a pulsed scheme to create Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-type entanglement between a traveling-wave light pulse and a mechanical oscillator. The entanglement can be verified unambiguously by a pump-probe sequence of pulses. In contrast to schemes that work in a steady-state regime under a continuous-wave drive, this protocol is not subject to stability requirements that normally limit the strength of achievable entanglement. We investigate the protocol's performance under realistic conditions, including mechanical decoherence, in full detail. We discuss the relevance of a high mechanical Qf product for entanglement creation and provide a quantitative statement on which magnitude of the Qf product is necessary for a successful realization of the scheme. We determine the optimal parameter regime for its operation and show it to work in current state-of-the-art systems.

  6. A new quantum flux parametron logic gate with large input margin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hioe, W.; Hosoya, M.; Goto, E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the Quantum Flux Parametron (QFP) which is a flux transfer, flux activated Josephson logic device which realizes much lower power dissipation than other Josephson logic devices. Being a two-terminal device its correct operation may be affected by coupling to other QFPs. The problems include backcoupling from active QFPs through inactive QFPs (relay noise), coupling between QFPs activated at different times because of clock skew (homophase noise), and interaction between active QFPs (reaction hazard). Previous QFP circuits worked by wired-majority, which being a linear input logic, has low input margin. A new logic gate (D-gate) using a QFP to perform logic operations has been analyzed and tested by computer simulation. Relay noise, homophase noise and reaction hazard are substantially reduced. Moreover, the input have little interaction hence input margin is greatly improved

  7. Sensitive detection of acrolein and acrylonitrile with a pulsed quantum-cascade laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manne, J.; Lim, A.; Tulip, J.; Jäger, W.

    2012-05-01

    We report on spectroscopic measurements of acrolein and acrylonitrile at atmospheric pressure using a pulsed distributed feedback quantum-cascade laser in combination with intra- and inter-pulse techniques and compare the results. The measurements were done in the frequency region around 957 cm-1. In the inter-pulse technique, the laser is excited with short current pulses (5-10 ns), and the pulse amplitude is modulated with an external current ramp resulting in a ˜2.3 cm-1 frequency scan. In the intra-pulse technique, a linear frequency down-chirp during the pulse is used for sweeping across the absorption line. Long current pulses up to 500 ns were used for these measurements which resulted in a spectral window of ˜2.2 cm-1 during the down-chirp. These comparatively wide spectral windows facilitated the measurements of the relatively broad absorption lines (˜1 cm-1) of acrolein and acrylonitrile. The use of a room-temperature mercury-cadmium-telluride detector resulted in a completely cryogen-free spectrometer. We demonstrate ppb level detection limits within a data acquisition time of ˜10 s with these methodologies.

  8. Manifestations of classical physics in the quantum evolution of correlated spin states in pulsed NMR experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligare, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Multiple-pulse NMR experiments are a powerful tool for the investigation of molecules with coupled nuclear spins. The product operator formalism provides a way to understand the quantum evolution of an ensemble of weakly coupled spins in such experiments using some of the more intuitive concepts of classical physics and semi-classical vector representations. In this paper I present a new way in which to interpret the quantum evolution of an ensemble of spins. I recast the quantum problem in terms of mixtures of pure states of two spins whose expectation values evolve identically to those of classical moments. Pictorial representations of these classically evolving states provide a way to calculate the time evolution of ensembles of weakly coupled spins without the full machinery of quantum mechanics, offering insight to anyone who understands precession of magnetic moments in magnetic fields.

  9. Detection of acrolein and acrylonitrile with a pulsed room temperature quantum cascade laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manne, J.; Jäger, W.; Tulip, J.

    2010-06-01

    We investigated the use of a pulsed, distributed feedback quantum cascade laser centered at 957 cm-1 in combination with an astigmatic Herriot cell with 250 m path length for the detection of acrolein and acrylonitrile. These molecules have been identified as hazardous air-pollutants because of their adverse health effects. The spectrometer utilizes the intra-pulse method, where a linear frequency down-chirp, that is induced when a top-hat current pulse is applied to the laser, is used for sweeping across the absorption line. Up to 450 ns long pulses were used for these measurements which resulted in a spectral window of ~2.2 cm-1. A room temperature mercury-cadmium-telluride detector was used, resulting in a completely cryogen free spectrometer. We demonstrated detection limits of ~3 ppb for acrylonitrile and ~6 ppb for acrolein with ~10 s averaging time. Laser characterization and optimization of the operational parameters for sensitivity improvement are discussed.

  10. Implementing and diagnosing magnetic flux compression on the Z pulsed power accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McBride, Ryan D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bliss, David E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gomez, Matthew R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hansen, Stephanie B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Martin, Matthew R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jennings, Christopher Ashley [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Slutz, Stephen A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rovang, Dean C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Knapp, Patrick F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schmit, Paul F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Awe, Thomas James [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hess, M. H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lemke, Raymond W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dolan, D. H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lamppa, Derek C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jobe, Marc Ronald Lee [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fang, Lu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hahn, Kelly D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Chandler, Gordon A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cooper, Gary Wayne [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ruiz, Carlos L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Maurer, A. J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Robertson, Grafton Kincannon [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cuneo, Michael E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sinars, Daniel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Tomlinson, Kurt [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Smith, Gary [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Paguio, Reny [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Intrator, Tom [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Weber, Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Greenly, John [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2015-11-01

    We report on the progress made to date for a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project aimed at diagnosing magnetic flux compression on the Z pulsed-power accelerator (0-20 MA in 100 ns). Each experiment consisted of an initially solid Be or Al liner (cylindrical tube), which was imploded using the Z accelerator's drive current (0-20 MA in 100 ns). The imploding liner compresses a 10-T axial seed field, B z ( 0 ) , supplied by an independently driven Helmholtz coil pair. Assuming perfect flux conservation, the axial field amplification should be well described by B z ( t ) = B z ( 0 ) x [ R ( 0 ) / R ( t )] 2 , where R is the liner's inner surface radius. With perfect flux conservation, B z ( t ) and dB z / dt values exceeding 10 4 T and 10 12 T/s, respectively, are expected. These large values, the diminishing liner volume, and the harsh environment on Z, make it particularly challenging to measure these fields. We report on our latest efforts to do so using three primary techniques: (1) micro B-dot probes to measure the fringe fields associated with flux compression, (2) streaked visible Zeeman absorption spectroscopy, and (3) fiber-based Faraday rotation. We also mention two new techniques that make use of the neutron diagnostics suite on Z. These techniques were not developed under this LDRD, but they could influence how we prioritize our efforts to diagnose magnetic flux compression on Z in the future. The first technique is based on the yield ratio of secondary DT to primary DD reactions. The second technique makes use of the secondary DT neutron time-of-flight energy spectra. Both of these techniques have been used successfully to infer the degree of magnetization at stagnation in fully integrated Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) experiments on Z [P. F. Schmit et al. , Phys. Rev. Lett. 113 , 155004 (2014); P. F. Knapp et al. , Phys. Plasmas, 22 , 056312 (2015)]. Finally, we present some recent developments for designing

  11. Simulating quantum search algorithm using vibronic states of I2 manipulated by optimally designed gate pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtsuki, Yukiyoshi

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, molecular quantum computation is numerically studied with the quantum search algorithm (Grover's algorithm) by means of optimal control simulation. Qubits are implemented in the vibronic states of I 2 , while gate operations are realized by optimally designed laser pulses. The methodological aspects of the simulation are discussed in detail. We show that the algorithm for solving a gate pulse-design problem has the same mathematical form as a state-to-state control problem in the density matrix formalism, which provides monotonically convergent algorithms as an alternative to the Krotov method. The sequential irradiation of separately designed gate pulses leads to the population distribution predicted by Grover's algorithm. The computational accuracy is reduced by the imperfect quality of the pulse design and by the electronic decoherence processes that are modeled by the non-Markovian master equation. However, as long as we focus on the population distribution of the vibronic qubits, we can search a target state with high probability without introducing error-correction processes during the computation. A generalized gate pulse-design scheme to explicitly include decoherence effects is outlined, in which we propose a new objective functional together with its solution algorithm that guarantees monotonic convergence.

  12. Recrystallization and grain growth behavior of rolled tungsten under VDE-like short pulse high heat flux loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Y.; Greuner, H.; Böswirth, B.; Krieger, K.; Luo, G.-N.; Xu, H. Y.; Fu, B. Q.; Li, M.; Liu, W.

    2013-02-01

    Short pulse heat loads expected for vertical displacement events (VDEs) in ITER were applied in the high heat flux (HHF) test facility GLADIS at IPP-Garching onto samples of rolled W. Pulsed neutral beams with the central heat flux of 23 MW/m2 were applied for 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 s, respectively. Rapid recrystallization of the adiabatically loaded 3 mm thick samples was observed when the pulse duration was up to 1.0 s. Grains grew markedly following recrystallization with increasing pulse length. The recrystallization temperature and temperature dependence of the recrystallized grain size were also investigated. The results showed that the recrystallization temperature of the W grade was around 2480 °C under the applied heat loading condition, which was nearly 1150 °C higher than the conventional recrystallization temperature, and the grains were much finer. A linear relationship between the logarithm of average grain size (ln d) and the inverse of maximum surface temperature (1/Tmax) was found and accordingly the activation energy for grain growth in temperature evolution up to Tmax in 1.5 s of the short pulse HHF load was deduced to be 4.1 eV. This provided an effective clue to predict the structure evolution under short pulse HHF loads.

  13. Flux transfer events at the dayside magnetopause: Transient reconnection or magnetosheath dynamic pressure pulses?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockwood, M.

    1991-01-01

    The suggestion is discussed that characteristic particle and field signatures at the dayside magnetopause, termed flux transfer events, are, in at least some cases, due to transient solar wind and/or magnetosheath dynamic pressure increases, rather than time-dependent magnetic reconnection. It is found that most individual cases of FTEs observed by a single spacecraft can, at least qualitatively, be explained by the pressure pulse model, provided a few rather unsatisfactory features of the predictions are explained in terms of measurement uncertainties. The most notable exceptions to this are some two-regime observations made by two satellites simultaneously, one on either side of the magnetopause. However, this configuration has not been frequently achieved for sufficient time, such observations are rare, and the relevant tests are still not conclusive. The strongest evidence that FTEs are produced by magnetic reconnection is the dependence of their occurence on the north-south component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) or of the magnetosheath field. The pressure pulse model provides an explanation for this dependence in the case of magnetosheath FTEs, but does not apply to magnetosphere FTEs. The only surveys of magnetosphere FTEs have not employed the simultaneous IMF, but have shown that their occurence is strongly dependent on the north-south component of the magnetosheath field, as observed earlier/later on the same magnetopause crossing. This paper employs statistics on the variability of the IMF orientation to investigate the effects of IMF changes between the times of the magnetosheath and FTE observations. It is shown that the previously published results are consistent with magnetospheric FTEs being entirely absent when the magentosheath field is northward

  14. Sapflow+: a four-needle heat-pulse sap flow sensor enabling nonempirical sap flux density and water content measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandegehuchte, Maurits W; Steppe, Kathy

    2012-10-01

    • To our knowledge, to date, no nonempirical method exists to measure reverse, low or high sap flux density. Moreover, existing sap flow methods require destructive wood core measurements to determine sapwood water content, necessary to convert heat velocity to sap flux density, not only damaging the tree, but also neglecting seasonal variability in sapwood water content. • Here, we present a nonempirical heat-pulse-based method and coupled sensor which measure temperature changes around a linear heater in both axial and tangential directions after application of a heat pulse. By fitting the correct heat conduction-convection equation to the measured temperature profiles, the heat velocity and water content of the sapwood can be determined. • An identifiability analysis and validation tests on artificial and real stem segments of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) confirm the applicability of the method, leading to accurate determinations of heat velocity, water content and hence sap flux density. • The proposed method enables sap flux density measurements to be made across the entire natural occurring sap flux density range of woody plants. Moreover, the water content during low flows can be determined accurately, enabling a correct conversion from heat velocity to sap flux density without destructive core measurements. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  15. Controlled release of stored pulses in a double-quantum-well structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carreno, F; Anton, M A

    2009-01-01

    We show that an asymmetric double-quantum-well structure can operate as an optical memory. The double quantum wells are modelled like an atomic ensemble of four-level atoms in the Λ-V-type configuration with vacuum-induced coherence arising from resonant tunnelling through the ultra-thin potential energy barrier between the wells. A weak quantum field connects the ground level with the two upper levels and an auxiliary classical control field connects the intermediate level with the upper levels. The quantum field can be mapped into two channels. One channel results from the adiabatic change of the control field which maps the incoming quantum field into the coherence of the two lower levels like in a Λ-type atomic ensemble. The other channel results from the mapping of the quantum field into a combination of coherences between the two upper levels and the ground level, and it is allowed by the adiabatic change of the upper level splitting via an external voltage. The possibility of releasing multiple pulses from the medium resulting from the existence of a non-evolving component of the two-channel memory is shown. A physical picture has been developed providing an explanation of the performance of the device.

  16. Femtosecond pulsed laser ablation in microfluidics for synthesis of photoluminescent ZnSe quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Chao, E-mail: chaoyangscu@gmail.com [College of Electronics and Information Engineering, Sichuan University, No. 24 South Section 1, 1st Ring Road, Chengdu 610064 (China); Feng, Guoying, E-mail: guoing_feng@scu.edu.cn [College of Electronics and Information Engineering, Sichuan University, No. 24 South Section 1, 1st Ring Road, Chengdu 610064 (China); Dai, Shenyu, E-mail: 232127079@qq.com [College of Electronics and Information Engineering, Sichuan University, No. 24 South Section 1, 1st Ring Road, Chengdu 610064 (China); Wang, Shutong, E-mail: wangshutong.scu@gmail.com [College of Electronics and Information Engineering, Sichuan University, No. 24 South Section 1, 1st Ring Road, Chengdu 610064 (China); Li, Guang, E-mail: 632524844@qq.com [College of Electronics and Information Engineering, Sichuan University, No. 24 South Section 1, 1st Ring Road, Chengdu 610064 (China); Zhang, Hua [College of Electronics and Information Engineering, Sichuan University, No. 24 South Section 1, 1st Ring Road, Chengdu 610064 (China); Zhou, Shouhuan, E-mail: zhoush@scu.edu.cn [College of Electronics and Information Engineering, Sichuan University, No. 24 South Section 1, 1st Ring Road, Chengdu 610064 (China); North China Research Institute of Electro-Optics, 4 Jiuxianqiao Street, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100015 (China)

    2017-08-31

    Highlights: • A novel method for synthesis and coating of quantum dots by ultrafast laser pulses. • Mild and “green” synthesis method without toxic chemicals. • Enhanced bright green light emission without doped transition metal ions. • Ultrafast laser and coating layer enhanced the emission originated from defects. - Abstract: A simple but new toxic chemical free method, Femtosecond Laser Ablation in Microfluidics (FLAM) was proposed for the first time. ZnSe quantum dots of 4–6 nm were synthesized and with the use of hyperbranched Polyethyleneimine (PEI) as both structural and functional coated layer. These aqueous nanosized micelles consisting of quantum dots exhibit deep defect states emission of bright green light centered at 500 nm. A possible mechanism for the enhanced board band emission was discussed. The properties of toxic matters free and enhanced photoluminescence without doped transition metal ions demonstrate an application potential for biomedical imaging.

  17. Femtosecond pulsed laser ablation in microfluidics for synthesis of photoluminescent ZnSe quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Chao; Feng, Guoying; Dai, Shenyu; Wang, Shutong; Li, Guang; Zhang, Hua; Zhou, Shouhuan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel method for synthesis and coating of quantum dots by ultrafast laser pulses. • Mild and “green” synthesis method without toxic chemicals. • Enhanced bright green light emission without doped transition metal ions. • Ultrafast laser and coating layer enhanced the emission originated from defects. - Abstract: A simple but new toxic chemical free method, Femtosecond Laser Ablation in Microfluidics (FLAM) was proposed for the first time. ZnSe quantum dots of 4–6 nm were synthesized and with the use of hyperbranched Polyethyleneimine (PEI) as both structural and functional coated layer. These aqueous nanosized micelles consisting of quantum dots exhibit deep defect states emission of bright green light centered at 500 nm. A possible mechanism for the enhanced board band emission was discussed. The properties of toxic matters free and enhanced photoluminescence without doped transition metal ions demonstrate an application potential for biomedical imaging.

  18. Single-flux-quantum logic circuits exploiting collision-based fusion gates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asai, T.; Yamada, K.; Amemiya, Y.

    2008-01-01

    We propose a single-flux-quantum (SFQ) logic circuit based on the fusion computing systems--collision-based and reaction-diffusion fusion computers. A fusion computing system consists of regularly arrayed unit cells (fusion gates), where each unit has two input arms and two output arms and is connected to its neighboring cells with the arms. We designed functional SFQ circuits that implemented the fusion computation. The unit cell was able to be made with ten Josephson junctions. Circuit simulation with standard Nb/Al-AlOx/Nb 2.5-kA/cm 2 process parameters showed that the SFQ fusion computing systems could operate at 10 GHz clock

  19. Flux quantization and quantum mechanics on Riemann surfaces in an external magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolte, J.; Steiner, F.

    1990-10-01

    We investigate the possibility to apply an external constant magnetic field to a quantum mechanical system consisting of a particle moving on a compact or non-compact two-dimensional manifold of constant negative Gaussian curvature and of finite volume. For the motion on compact Riemann surfaces we find that a consistent formulation is only possible if the magnetic flux is quantized, as it is proportional to the (integrated) first Chern class of a certain complex line bundle over the manifold. In the case of non-compact surfaces of finite volume we obtain the striking result that the magnetic flux has to vanish identically due to the theorem that any holomorphic line bundle over a non-compact Riemann surface is holomorphically trivial. (orig.)

  20. Attosecond electron pulse trains and quantum state reconstruction in ultrafast transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priebe, Katharina E.; Rathje, Christopher; Yalunin, Sergey V.; Hohage, Thorsten; Feist, Armin; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2017-12-01

    Ultrafast electron and X-ray imaging and spectroscopy are the basis for an ongoing revolution in the understanding of dynamical atomic-scale processes in matter. The underlying technology relies heavily on laser science for the generation and characterization of ever shorter pulses. Recent findings suggest that ultrafast electron microscopy with attosecond-structured wavefunctions may be feasible. However, such future technologies call for means to both prepare and fully analyse the corresponding free-electron quantum states. Here, we introduce a framework for the preparation, coherent manipulation and characterization of free-electron quantum states, experimentally demonstrating attosecond electron pulse trains. Phase-locked optical fields coherently control the electron wavefunction along the beam direction. We establish a new variant of quantum state tomography—`SQUIRRELS'—for free-electron ensembles. The ability to tailor and quantitatively map electron quantum states will promote the nanoscale study of electron-matter entanglement and new forms of ultrafast electron microscopy down to the attosecond regime.

  1. Recrystallization and grain growth behavior of rolled tungsten under VDE-like short pulse high heat flux loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Y.; Greuner, H.; Böswirth, B.; Krieger, K.; Luo, G.-N.; Xu, H.Y.; Fu, B.Q.; Li, M.; Liu, W.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Recrystallization temperature of a rolled W was ∼2480 °C under applied HHF loads. ► Fine grains were obtained under HHF loads with appropriate short pulse length. ► With increasing pulse length, the recrystallized grains significantly grew larger. ► A linear relationship between ln d and 1/T max was found. ► Activation energy for grain growth in T evolution up to T max in 1.5 s was obtained. -- Abstract: Short pulse heat loads expected for vertical displacement events (VDEs) in ITER were applied in the high heat flux (HHF) test facility GLADIS at IPP-Garching onto samples of rolled W. Pulsed neutral beams with the central heat flux of 23 MW/m 2 were applied for 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 s, respectively. Rapid recrystallization of the adiabatically loaded 3 mm thick samples was observed when the pulse duration was up to 1.0 s. Grains grew markedly following recrystallization with increasing pulse length. The recrystallization temperature and temperature dependence of the recrystallized grain size were also investigated. The results showed that the recrystallization temperature of the W grade was around 2480 °C under the applied heat loading condition, which was nearly 1150 °C higher than the conventional recrystallization temperature, and the grains were much finer. A linear relationship between the logarithm of average grain size (ln d) and the inverse of maximum surface temperature (1/T max ) was found and accordingly the activation energy for grain growth in temperature evolution up to T max in 1.5 s of the short pulse HHF load was deduced to be 4.1 eV. This provided an effective clue to predict the structure evolution under short pulse HHF loads

  2. Luminous flux improvement of xenon fluorescent lamps by applying synchronized high-voltage pulse to the auxiliary external electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motomura, Hideki; Oka, Kojiro; Sogabe, Toru; Jinno, Masafumi, E-mail: hmoto@mayu.ee.ehime-u.ac.jp [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Ehime University 3 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8577 (Japan)

    2011-06-08

    As the environmental awareness of people becomes stronger, the demand for mercury-free light sources also becomes stronger. The authors have been developing cold cathode fluorescent lamps in which xenon gas is filled as an ultraviolet radiator instead of mercury. Previously the authors reported the luminous flux enhancement method using a grounded auxiliary external electrode (AEE). In this paper, in order to improve the luminous flux much more, a positive voltage pulse which was synchronized to the main driving negative voltage pulse was applied to the AEE. As a result, the maximum input power increased under which the positive column did not constrict and the luminous flux improved by 70% at the xenon filling pressure of 6.7 kPa. It is proved that the positive voltage pulse application to the AEE with the amplitude of more than 2 kV expands the positive column in the radial direction. It is attributed to the phenomenon that the residual ions and electrons, which are generated by dielectric barrier discharge between the AEE and the anode during the falling edge of the negative pulse to the cathode, spread the discharge path from the anode towards the AEE during the cold cathode discharge mode. By increasing the xenon filling pressure, luminous efficacy was improved to 25 lm W{sup -1}.

  3. Plasmon-enhanced terahertz emission in self-assembled quantum dots by femtosecond pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carreño, F., E-mail: ferpo@fis.ucm.es; Antón, M. A., E-mail: antonm@fis.ucm.es; Melle, Sonia, E-mail: smelle@fis.ucm.es; Calderón, Oscar G., E-mail: oscargc@fis.ucm.es; Cabrera-Granado, E., E-mail: ecabrera@fis.ucm.es [Facultad de Óptica y Optometría, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, C/ Arcos de Jalón 118, 28037 Madrid (Spain); Cox, Joel, E-mail: jcox27@uwo.ca; Singh, Mahi R., E-mail: msingh@uwo.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, London N6A 3K7 (Canada); Egatz-Gómez, A., E-mail: Ana.Egatz-Gomez.1@nd.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Notre Dame, South Bend, Indiana 46556 (United States)

    2014-02-14

    A scheme for terahertz (THz) generation from intraband transition in a self-assembled quantum dot (QD) molecule coupled to a metallic nanoparticle (MNP) is analyzed. The QD structure is described as a three-level atom-like system using the density matrix formalism. The MNP with spherical geometry is considered in the quasistatic approximation. A femtosecond laser pulse creates a coherent superposition of two subbands in the quantum dots and produces localized surface plasmons in the nanoparticle which act back upon the QD molecule via dipole-dipole interaction. As a result, coherent THz radiation with a frequency corresponding to the interlevel spacing can be obtained, which is strongly modified by the presence of the MNP. The peak value of the terahertz signal is analyzed as a function of nanoparticle's size, the MNP to QD distance, and the area of the applied laser field. In addition, we theoretically demonstrate that the terahertz pulse generation can be effectively controlled by making use of a train of femtosecond laser pulses. We show that by a proper choice of the parameters characterizing the pulse train a huge enhancement of the terahertz signal is obtained.

  4. Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox and quantum steering in pulsed optomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Q. Y.; Reid, M. D.

    2013-11-01

    We describe how to generate an Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) paradox between a mesoscopic mechanical oscillator and an optical pulse. We find two types of paradox, defined by whether it is the oscillator or the pulse that shows the effect Schrödinger called “steering”. Only the oscillator paradox addresses the question of mesoscopic local reality for a massive system. In that case, EPR's “elements of reality” are defined for the oscillator, and it is these elements of reality that are falsified (if quantum mechanics is complete). For this sort of paradox, we show that a thermal barrier exists, meaning that a threshold level of pulse-oscillator interaction is required for a given thermal occupation n0 of the oscillator. We find there is no equivalent thermal barrier for the entanglement of the pulse with the oscillator or for the EPR paradox that addresses the local reality of the optical system. Finally, we examine the possibility of an EPR paradox between two entangled oscillators. Our work highlights the asymmetrical effect of thermal noise on quantum nonlocality.

  5. Dropout dynamics in pulsed quantum dot lasers due to mode jumping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolovskii, G. S.; Dudelev, V. V.; Deryagin, A. G.; Novikov, I. I.; Maximov, M. V.; Ustinov, V. M.; Kuchinskii, V. I. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Viktorov, E. A. [National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Optique Nonlinéaire Théorique, Campus Plaine CP 231, 1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Applied Physics Research Group (APHY), Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Abusaa, M. [Applied Physics Research Group (APHY), Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Arab American University, Jenin, Palestine (Country Unknown); Danckaert, J. [Applied Physics Research Group (APHY), Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Kolykhalova, E. D. [St. Petersburg State Electrotechnical University “LETI,” St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Soboleva, K. K. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Zhukov, A. E. [Academic University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Sibbett, W. [University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews (United Kingdom); Rafailov, E. U. [Aston Institute of Photonic Technologies, Aston University, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Erneux, T. [Optique Nonlinéaire Théorique, Campus Plaine CP 231, 1050 Bruxelles (Belgium)

    2015-06-29

    We examine the response of a pulse pumped quantum dot laser both experimentally and numerically. As the maximum of the pump pulse comes closer to the excited-state threshold, the output pulse shape becomes unstable and leads to dropouts. We conjecture that these instabilities result from an increase of the linewidth enhancement factor α as the pump parameter comes close to the excitated state threshold. In order to analyze the dynamical mechanism of the dropout, we consider two cases for which the laser exhibits either a jump to a different single mode or a jump to fast intensity oscillations. The origin of these two instabilities is clarified by a combined analytical and numerical bifurcation diagram of the steady state intensity modes.

  6. Dropout dynamics in pulsed quantum dot lasers due to mode jumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolovskii, G. S.; Dudelev, V. V.; Deryagin, A. G.; Novikov, I. I.; Maximov, M. V.; Ustinov, V. M.; Kuchinskii, V. I.; Viktorov, E. A.; Abusaa, M.; Danckaert, J.; Kolykhalova, E. D.; Soboleva, K. K.; Zhukov, A. E.; Sibbett, W.; Rafailov, E. U.; Erneux, T.

    2015-01-01

    We examine the response of a pulse pumped quantum dot laser both experimentally and numerically. As the maximum of the pump pulse comes closer to the excited-state threshold, the output pulse shape becomes unstable and leads to dropouts. We conjecture that these instabilities result from an increase of the linewidth enhancement factor α as the pump parameter comes close to the excitated state threshold. In order to analyze the dynamical mechanism of the dropout, we consider two cases for which the laser exhibits either a jump to a different single mode or a jump to fast intensity oscillations. The origin of these two instabilities is clarified by a combined analytical and numerical bifurcation diagram of the steady state intensity modes

  7. Electron flux during pericyclic reactions in the tunneling limit: Quantum simulation for cyclooctatetraene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hege, Hans-Christian; Manz, Joern; Marquardt, Falko; Paulus, Beate; Schild, Axel

    2010-01-01

    Graphical abstract: In the limit of coherent tunneling, double bond shifting (DBS) of cyclooctatetraene from a reactant (R) to a product (P) is associated with pericyclic electron fluxes from double to single bonds, corresponding to a pincer-motion-type set of arrows in the Lewis structures, each representing a transfer of 0.19 electrons. - Abstract: Pericyclic rearrangement of cyclooctatetraene proceeds from equivalent sets of two reactants to two products. In the ideal limit of coherent tunneling, these reactants and products may tunnel to each other by ring inversions and by double bond shifting (DBS). We derive simple cosinusoidal or sinusoidal time evolutions of the bond-to-bond electron fluxes and yields during DBS, for the tunneling scenario. These overall yields and fluxes may be decomposed into various contributions for electrons in so called pericyclic, other valence, and core orbitals. Pericyclic orbitals are defined as the subset of valence orbitals which describe the changes of Lewis structures during the pericyclic reaction. The quantum dynamical results are compared with the traditional scheme of fluxes of electrons in pericyclic orbitals, as provided by arrows in Lewis structures.

  8. Optimal and robust control of quantum state transfer by shaping the spectral phase of ultrafast laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yu; Dong, Daoyi; Shu, Chuan-Cun

    2018-04-04

    Achieving fast and efficient quantum state transfer is a fundamental task in physics, chemistry and quantum information science. However, the successful implementation of the perfect quantum state transfer also requires robustness under practically inevitable perturbative defects. Here, we demonstrate how an optimal and robust quantum state transfer can be achieved by shaping the spectral phase of an ultrafast laser pulse in the framework of frequency domain quantum optimal control theory. Our numerical simulations of the single dibenzoterrylene molecule as well as in atomic rubidium show that optimal and robust quantum state transfer via spectral phase modulated laser pulses can be achieved by incorporating a filtering function of the frequency into the optimization algorithm, which in turn has potential applications for ultrafast robust control of photochemical reactions.

  9. Storage of laser pulses in a Fabry-Perot optical cavity for high flux x-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takezawa, K.; Honda, Y.; Sasao, N.; Araki, S.; Higashi, Y.; Taniguchi, T.; Urakawa, J.; Nomura, M.; Sakai, H.

    2004-01-01

    We have a plan to produce a high flux x-ray for medical use by using a Fabry-Perot optical cavity in which the lower pulses from a mode-locked laser are stored and enhanced. In this plan, the X-ray is produced from the Compton scattering of electrons in a storage ring with the laser light in the optical cavity. In order to increase X-ray flux, high power laser light is necessary. We show the enhancement of the laser power from the model locked laser with a Fabry-Perot optical cavity. (author)

  10. Single-nitrogen-vacancy-center quantum memory for a superconducting flux qubit mediated by a ferromagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yen-Yu; Lin, Guin-Dar; Twamley, Jason; Goan, Hsi-Sheng

    2018-05-01

    We propose a quantum memory scheme to transfer and store the quantum state of a superconducting flux qubit (FQ) into the electron spin of a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond via yttrium iron garnet (YIG), a ferromagnet. Unlike an ensemble of NV centers, the YIG moderator can enhance the effective FQ-NV-center coupling strength without introducing additional appreciable decoherence. We derive the effective interaction between the FQ and the NV center by tracing out the degrees of freedom of the collective mode of the YIG spins. We demonstrate the transfer, storage, and retrieval procedures, taking into account the effects of spontaneous decay and pure dephasing. Using realistic experimental parameters for the FQ, NV center and YIG, we find that a combined transfer, storage, and retrieval fidelity higher than 0.9, with a long storage time of 10 ms, can be achieved. This hybrid system not only acts as a promising quantum memory, but also provides an example of enhanced coupling between various systems through collective degrees of freedom.

  11. Study of the mechanisms of flux enhancement through hairless mouse skin by pulsed DC iontophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pikal, M.J.; Shah, S.

    1991-01-01

    Enhanced iontophoretic transport using pulsed DC is usually explained by citing the observed decrease in skin resistance caused by an increase in AC pulse frequency at very small currents. Alternately, it has been suggested that the on-to-off nature of pulsed DC imparts an impact energy to the fluid, thereby increasing transport. This report provides a test of these mechanisms for enhanced delivery via pulsed iontophoresis. The DC resistance of hairless mouse skin during continuous and pulsed DC iontophoresis is measured as a function of time for selected pulse frequencies and duty cycles using current densities ranging from 0.1 to 1.0 mA/cm2. As a test of the impact energy mechanism, the iontophoretic transport of 14C-glucose measured with pulsed DC is compared with similar data obtained previously using continuous DC. It is suggested that pulsed current can yield lower resistance and enhanced drug delivery provided that (a) the steady-state current during the on phase of the pulse is very small and (b) the frequency is low enough to allow depolarization of the skin during the off phase of the pulse. The glucose transport results suggest that the impact energy concept does not apply to iontophoresis

  12. Eddy covariance carbonyl sulfide flux measurements with a quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Gerdel

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The trace gas carbonyl sulfide (COS has lately received growing interest from the eddy covariance (EC community due to its potential to serve as an independent approach for constraining gross primary production and canopy stomatal conductance. Thanks to recent developments of fast-response high-precision trace gas analysers (e.g. quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometers, QCLAS, a handful of EC COS flux measurements have been published since 2013. To date, however, a thorough methodological characterisation of QCLAS with regard to the requirements of the EC technique and the necessary processing steps has not been conducted. The objective of this study is to present a detailed characterisation of the COS measurement with the Aerodyne QCLAS in the context of the EC technique and to recommend best EC processing practices for those measurements. Data were collected from May to October 2015 at a temperate mountain grassland in Tyrol, Austria. Analysis of the Allan variance of high-frequency concentration measurements revealed the occurrence of sensor drift under field conditions after an averaging time of around 50 s. We thus explored the use of two high-pass filtering approaches (linear detrending and recursive filtering as opposed to block averaging and linear interpolation of regular background measurements for covariance computation. Experimental low-pass filtering correction factors were derived from a detailed cospectral analysis. The CO2 and H2O flux measurements obtained with the QCLAS were compared with those obtained with a closed-path infrared gas analyser. Overall, our results suggest small, but systematic differences between the various high-pass filtering scenarios with regard to the fraction of data retained in the quality control and flux magnitudes. When COS and CO2 fluxes are combined in the ecosystem relative uptake rate, systematic differences between the high-pass filtering scenarios largely cancel out, suggesting that

  13. Eddy covariance carbonyl sulphide flux measurements with a quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdel, Katharina; Spielmann, Felix Maximilian; Hammerle, Albin; Wohlfahrt, Georg

    2017-09-26

    The trace gas carbonyl sulphide (COS) has lately received growing interest in the eddy covariance (EC) community due to its potential to serve as an independent approach for constraining gross primary production and canopy stomatal conductance. Thanks to recent developments of fast-response high-precision trace gas analysers (e.g. quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometers (QCLAS)), a handful of EC COS flux measurements have been published since 2013. To date, however, a thorough methodological characterisation of QCLAS with regard to the requirements of the EC technique and the necessary processing steps has not been conducted. The objective of this study is to present a detailed characterization of the COS measurement with the Aerodyne QCLAS in the context of the EC technique, and to recommend best EC processing practices for those measurements. Data were collected from May to October 2015 at a temperate mountain grassland in Tyrol, Austria. Analysis of the Allan variance of high-frequency concentration measurements revealed sensor drift to occur under field conditions after an averaging time of around 50 s. We thus explored the use of two high-pass filtering approaches (linear detrending and recursive filtering) as opposed to block averaging and linear interpolation of regular background measurements for covariance computation. Experimental low-pass filtering correction factors were derived from a detailed cospectral analysis. The CO 2 and H 2 O flux measurements obtained with the QCLAS were compared against those obtained with a closed-path infrared gas analyser. Overall, our results suggest small, but systematic differences between the various high-pass filtering scenarios with regard to the fraction of data retained in the quality control and flux magnitudes. When COS and CO 2 fluxes are combined in the so-called ecosystem relative uptake rate, systematic differences between the high-pass filtering scenarios largely cancel out, suggesting that this

  14. δ2H isotopic flux partitioning of evapotranspiration over a grass field following a water pulse and subsequent dry down

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Stephen P.; Soderberg, Keir; Guan, Kaiyu; King, Elizabeth G.; Scanlon, Todd M.; Caylor, Kelly K.

    2014-02-01

    The partitioning of surface vapor flux (FET) into evaporation (FE) and transpiration (FT) is theoretically possible because of distinct differences in end-member stable isotope composition. In this study, we combine high-frequency laser spectroscopy with eddy covariance techniques to critically evaluate isotope flux partitioning of FET over a grass field during a 15 day experiment. Following the application of a 30 mm water pulse, green grass coverage at the study site increased from 0 to 10% of ground surface area after 6 days and then began to senesce. Using isotope flux partitioning, transpiration increased as a fraction of total vapor flux from 0% to 40% during the green-up phase, after which this ratio decreased while exhibiting hysteresis with respect to green grass coverage. Daily daytime leaf-level gas exchange measurements compare well with daily isotope flux partitioning averages (RMSE = 0.0018 g m-2 s-1). Overall the average ratio of FT to FET was 29%, where uncertainties in Keeling plot intercepts and transpiration composition resulted in an average of uncertainty of ˜5% in our isotopic partitioning of FET. Flux-variance similarity partitioning was partially consistent with the isotope-based approach, with divergence occurring after rainfall and when the grass was stressed. Over the average diurnal cycle, local meteorological conditions, particularly net radiation and relative humidity, are shown to control partitioning. At longer time scales, green leaf area and available soil water control FT/FET. Finally, we demonstrate the feasibility of combining isotope flux partitioning and flux-variance similarity theory to estimate water use efficiency at the landscape scale.

  15. Efficient optical trapping of CdTe quantum dots by femtosecond laser pulses

    KAUST Repository

    Chiang, Weiyi

    2014-12-11

    The development in optical trapping and manipulation has been showing rapid progress, most of it is in the small particle sizes in nanometer scales, substituting the conventional continuous-wave lasers with high-repetition-rate ultrashort laser pulse train and nonlinear optical effects. Here, we evaluate two-photon absorption in optical trapping of 2.7 nm-sized CdTe quantum dots (QDs) with high-repetition-rate femtosecond pulse train by probing laser intensity dependence of both Rayleigh scattering image and the two-photon-induced luminescence spectrum of the optically trapped QDs. The Rayleigh scattering imaging indicates that the two-photon absorption (TPA) process enhances trapping ability of the QDs. Similarly, a nonlinear increase of the two-photon-induced luminescence with the incident laser intensity fairly indicates the existence of the TPA process.

  16. Passive measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with orbital angular momentum and pulse position modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lian; Zhou, Yuan-yuan; Zhou, Xue-jun; Chen, Xiao

    2018-03-01

    Based on the orbital angular momentum and pulse position modulation, we present a novel passive measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) scheme with the two-mode source. Combining with the tight bounds of the yield and error rate of single-photon pairs given in our paper, we conduct performance analysis on the scheme with heralded single-photon source. The numerical simulations show that the performance of our scheme is significantly superior to the traditional MDI-QKD in the error rate, key generation rate and secure transmission distance, since the application of orbital angular momentum and pulse position modulation can exclude the basis-dependent flaw and increase the information content for each single photon. Moreover, the performance is improved with the rise of the frame length. Therefore, our scheme, without intensity modulation, avoids the source side channels and enhances the key generation rate. It has greatly utility value in the MDI-QKD setups.

  17. Pulse-amplitude modulation of optical injection-locked quantum-dot lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yue-Guang; Wang, Cheng

    2018-02-01

    This work theoretically investigates the four-level pulse-amplitude modulation characteristics of quantum dot lasers subject to optical injection. The rate equation model takes into account carrier dynamics in the carrier reservoir, in the excited state, and in the ground state, as well as photon dynamics and phase dynamics of the electric field. It is found that the optical injection significantly improves the eye diagram quality through suppressing the relaxation oscillation, while the extinction ratio is reduced as well. In addition, both the adiabatic chirp and the transient chirp of the signal are substantially suppressed.

  18. Control quantum evolution speed of a single dephasing qubit for arbitrary initial states via periodic dynamical decoupling pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ya-Ju; Tan, Qing-Shou; Kuang, Le-Man

    2017-03-08

    We investigate the possibility to control quantum evolution speed of a single dephasing qubit for arbitrary initial states by the use of periodic dynamical decoupling (PDD) pulses. It is indicated that the quantum speed limit time (QSLT) is determined by initial and final quantum coherence of the qubit, as well as the non-Markovianity of the system under consideration during the evolution when the qubit is subjected to a zero-temperature Ohmic-like dephasing reservoir. It is shown that final quantum coherence of the qubit and the non-Markovianity of the system can be modulated by PDD pulses. Our results show that for arbitrary initial states of the dephasing qubit with non-vanishing quantum coherence, PDD pulses can be used to induce potential acceleration of the quantum evolution in the short-time regime, while PDD pulses can lead to potential speedup and slow down in the long-time regime. We demonstrate that the effect of PDD on the QSLT for the Ohmic or sub-Ohmic spectrum (Markovian reservoir) is much different from that for the super-Ohmic spectrum (non-Markovian reservoir).

  19. Mode-Selective Photon Counting Via Quantum Frequency Conversion Using Spectrally-Engineered Pump Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manurkar, Paritosh

    Most of the existing protocols for quantum communication operate in a two-dimensional Hilbert space where their manipulation and measurement have been routinely investigated. Moving to higher-dimensional Hilbert spaces is desirable because of advantages in terms of longer distance communication capabilities, higher channel capacity and better information security. We can exploit the spatio-temporal degrees of freedom for the quantum optical signals to provide the higher-dimensional signals. But this necessitates the need for measurement and manipulation of multidimensional quantum states. To that end, there have been significant theoretical studies based on quantum frequency conversion (QFC) in recent years even though the experimental progress has been limited. QFC is a process that allows preservation of the quantum information while changing the frequency of the input quantum state. It has deservedly garnered a lot of attention because it serves as the connecting bridge between the communications band (C-band near 1550 nm) where the fiber-optic infrastructure is already established and the visible spectrum where high efficiency single-photon detectors and optical memories have been demonstrated. In this experimental work, we demonstrate mode-selective frequency conversion as a means to measure and manipulate photonic signals occupying d -dimensional Hilbert spaces where d=2 and 4. In the d=2 case, we demonstrate mode contrast between two temporal modes (TMs) which serves as the proof-of-concept demonstration. In the d=4 version, we employ six different TMs for our detailed experimental study. These TMs also include superposition modes which are a crucial component in many quantum key distribution protocols. Our method is based on producing pump pulses which allow us to upconvert the TM of interest while ideally preserving the other modes. We use MATLAB simulations to determine the pump pulse shapes which are subsequently produced by controlling the amplitude and

  20. Two-photon interference of weak coherent laser pulses recalled from separate solid-state quantum memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jeongwan; Slater, Joshua A.; Saglamyurek, Erhan; Sinclair, Neil; George, Mathew; Ricken, Raimund; Oblak, Daniel; Sohler, Wolfgang; Tittel, Wolfgang

    2013-08-01

    Quantum memories allowing reversible transfer of quantum states between light and matter are central to quantum repeaters, quantum networks and linear optics quantum computing. Significant progress regarding the faithful transfer of quantum information has been reported in recent years. However, none of these demonstrations confirm that the re-emitted photons remain suitable for two-photon interference measurements, such as C-NOT gates and Bell-state measurements, which constitute another key ingredient for all aforementioned applications. Here, using pairs of laser pulses at the single-photon level, we demonstrate two-photon interference and Bell-state measurements after either none, one or both pulses have been reversibly mapped to separate thulium-doped lithium niobate waveguides. As the interference is always near the theoretical maximum, we conclude that our solid-state quantum memories, in addition to faithfully mapping quantum information, also preserve the entire photonic wavefunction. Hence, our memories are generally suitable for future applications of quantum information processing that require two-photon interference.

  1. Two-photon interference of weak coherent laser pulses recalled from separate solid-state quantum memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jeongwan; Slater, Joshua A; Saglamyurek, Erhan; Sinclair, Neil; George, Mathew; Ricken, Raimund; Oblak, Daniel; Sohler, Wolfgang; Tittel, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Quantum memories allowing reversible transfer of quantum states between light and matter are central to quantum repeaters, quantum networks and linear optics quantum computing. Significant progress regarding the faithful transfer of quantum information has been reported in recent years. However, none of these demonstrations confirm that the re-emitted photons remain suitable for two-photon interference measurements, such as C-NOT gates and Bell-state measurements, which constitute another key ingredient for all aforementioned applications. Here, using pairs of laser pulses at the single-photon level, we demonstrate two-photon interference and Bell-state measurements after either none, one or both pulses have been reversibly mapped to separate thulium-doped lithium niobate waveguides. As the interference is always near the theoretical maximum, we conclude that our solid-state quantum memories, in addition to faithfully mapping quantum information, also preserve the entire photonic wavefunction. Hence, our memories are generally suitable for future applications of quantum information processing that require two-photon interference.

  2. A high frequency test bench for rapid single-flux-quantum circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engseth, H; Intiso, S; Rafique, M R; Tolkacheva, E; Kidiyarova-Shevchenko, A

    2006-01-01

    We have designed and experimentally verified a test bench for high frequency testing of rapid single-flux-quantum (RSFQ) circuits. This test bench uses an external tunable clock signal that is stable in amplitude, phase and frequency. The high frequency external clock reads out the clock pattern stored in a long shift register. The clock pattern is consequently shifted out at high speed and split to feed both the circuit under test and an additional shift register in the test bench for later verification at low speed. This method can be employed for reliable high speed verification of RSFQ circuit operation, with use of only low speed read-out electronics. The test bench consists of 158 Josephson junctions and the occupied area is 3300 x 660 μm 2 . It was experimentally verified up to 33 GHz with ± 21.7% margins on the global bias supply current

  3. Design and demonstration of adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron logic circuits with superconductor magnetic shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Kenta; Narama, Tatsuya; Yamanashi, Yuki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki; Takeuchi, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron (AQFP) logic is an energy-efficient superconductor logic with zero static power and very small dynamic power due to adiabatic switching operations. In order to build large-scale digital circuits, we built AQFP logic cells using superconductor magnetic shields, which are necessary in order to avoid unwanted magnetic couplings between the cells and excitation currents. In preliminary experimental tests, we confirmed that the unwanted coupling became negligibly small thanks to the superconductor shields. As a demonstration, we designed a four-to-one multiplexor and a 16-junction full adder using the shielded logic cells. In both circuits, we confirmed correct logic operations with wide operation margins of excitation currents. These results indicate that large-scale AQFP digital circuits can be realized using the shielded logic cells. (paper)

  4. 10-bit rapid single flux quantum digital-to-analog converter for ac voltage standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maezawa, M; Hirayama, F

    2008-01-01

    Digital-to-analog (D/A) converters based on rapid single flux quantum (RSFQ) technology are under development for ac voltage standard applications. We present design and test results on a prototype 10-bit version integrated on a single chip. The 10-bit chip includes over 6000 Josephson junctions and consumes a bias current exceeding 1 A. To reduce the effects of the high bias current on circuit operation, a custom design method was employed in part and large circuit blocks were divided into smaller ones. The 10-bit chips were fabricated and tested at low speed. The test results suggested that our design approach could manage large bias currents on the order of 1 A per chip

  5. Flux-flow noise driven by quantum fluctuations in a thick amorphous film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuma, S. [Research Center for Low Temperature Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ohokayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)]. E-mail: sokuma@o.cc.titech.ac.jp; Kainuma, K. [Research Center for Low Temperature Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ohokayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Kishimoto, T. [Research Center for Low Temperature Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ohokayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Kohara, M. [Research Center for Low Temperature Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ohokayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)

    2006-10-01

    We measure the voltage-noise spectrum S {sub V}(f) (where f is a frequency) as well as the time (t)-dependent component {delta}V(t) of the flux-flow voltage in the low temperature liquid phase of a thick amorphous Mo {sub x}Si{sub 1-x} film. In the quantum-liquid phase both the amplitude vertical bar {delta}V vertical bar of voltage fluctuations and the asymmetry of the probability distribution of {delta}V(t) show an anomalous increase; the spectral shape of S {sub V}(f) is of a Lorentzian type, suggesting the shot-noise-like vortex motion with a large 'vortex-bundle size' and short characteristic time.

  6. Heat Fluxes and Evaporation Measurements by Multi-Function Heat Pulse Probe: a Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, V.; Ciocca, F.; Hopmans, J. W.; Kamai, T.; Lunati, I.; Parlange, M. B.

    2012-04-01

    Multi Functional Heat Pulse Probes (MFHPP) are multi-needles probes developed in the last years able to measure temperature, thermal properties such as thermal diffusivity and volumetric heat capacity, from which soil moisture is directly retrieved, and electric conductivity (through a Wenner array). They allow the simultaneous measurement of coupled heat, water and solute transport in porous media, then. The use of only one instrument to estimate different quantities in the same volume and almost at the same time significantly reduces the need to interpolate different measurement types in space and time, increasing the ability to study the interdependencies characterizing the coupled transports, especially of water and heat, and water and solute. A three steps laboratory experiment is realized at EPFL to investigate the effectiveness and reliability of the MFHPP responses in a loamy soil from Conthey, Switzerland. In the first step specific calibration curves of volumetric heat capacity and thermal conductivity as function of known volumetric water content are obtained placing the MFHPP in small samplers filled with the soil homogeneously packed at different saturation degrees. The results are compared with literature values. In the second stage the ability of the MFHPP to measure heat fluxes is tested within a homemade thermally insulated calibration box and results are matched with those by two self-calibrating Heatflux plates (from Huxseflux), placed in the same box. In the last step the MFHPP are used to estimate the cumulative subsurface evaporation inside a small column (30 centimeters height per 8 centimeters inner diameter), placed on a scale, filled with the same loamy soil (homogeneously packed and then saturated) and equipped with a vertical array of four MFHPP inserted close to the surface. The subsurface evaporation is calculated from the difference between the net sensible heat and the net heat storage in the volume scanned by the probes, and the

  7. Linearity of high-Tc dc superconducting quantum interference device operated in a flux-locked loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, D.G.; Dantsker, E.; Kleiner, R.; Mueck, M.; Clarke, J.

    1996-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the linearity of a high transition temperature dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) operated at 77 K with 130 kHz flux modulation in a flux-locked loop. The degree of nonlinearity was determined from harmonic generation. A sinusoidal magnetic flux with harmonic content less than -130 dB was applied to the SQUID, which was cooled in a magnetic field below 10 -7 T, and the harmonics at the output of the flux-locked loop were measured with a spectrum analyzer. For input signals at frequencies up to 248 Hz and amplitudes up to 20Φ 0 rms (Φ 0 is the flux quantum), the second, third, and fourth harmonics were each at least 115 dB below the fundamental. At higher frequencies the harmonic content began to increase because of the reduction in the open-loop gain of the flux-locked loop. The magnitude of the harmonics was not measurably changed when the SQUID was cooled in a field of 100 μT. The amplitudes of the even harmonics depended critically on the amplitude of the 130 kHz flux modulation, and became zero when its peak-to-peak value was precisely Φ 0 /2. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  8. Quantum phase amplification for temporal pulse shaping and super-resolution in remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yanchun

    The use of nonlinear optical interactions to perform nonclassical transformations of electromagnetic field is an area of considerable interest. Quantum phase amplification (QPA) has been previously proposed as a method to perform nonclassical manipulation of coherent light, which can be experimentally realized by use of nonlinear optical mixing processes, of which phase-sensitive three-wave mixing (PSTWM) is one convenient choice. QPA occurs when PSTWM is operated in the photon number deamplification mode, i.e., when the energy is coherently transferred among the low-frequency signal and idler waves and the high-frequency pump wave. The final state is nonclassical, with the field amplitude squeezed and the phase anti-squeezed. In the temporal domain, the use of QPA has been studied to facilitate nonlinear pulse shaping. This novel method directly shapes the temporal electric field amplitude and phase using the PSTWM in a degenerate and collinear configuration, which has been analyzed using a numerical model. Several representative pulse shaping capabilities of this technique have been identified, which can augment the performance of common passive pulse shaping methods operating in the Fourier domain. The analysis indicates that a simple quadratic variation of temporal phase facilitates pulse compression and self-steepening, with features significantly shorter than the original transform-limited pulse. Thus, PSTWM can act as a direct pulse compressor based on the combined effects of phase amplification and group velocity mismatch, even without the subsequent linear phase compensation. Furthermore, it is shown numerically that pulse doublets and pulse trains can be produced at the pump frequency by utilizing the residual linear phase of the signal. Such pulse shaping capabilities are found to be within reach of this technique in common nonlinear optical crystals pumped by pulses available from compact femtosecond chirped-pulse amplification laser systems. The use of

  9. Fieldable computer system for determining gamma-ray pulse-height distributions, flux spectra, and dose rates from Little Boy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, C.E.; Lucas, M.C.; Tisinger, E.W.; Hamm, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    Our system consists of a LeCroy 3500 data acquisition system with a built-in CAMAC crate and eight bismuth-germanate detectors 7.62 cm in diameter and 7.62 cm long. Gamma-ray pulse-height distributions are acquired simultaneously for up to eight positions. The system was very carefully calibrated and characterized from 0.1 to 8.3 MeV using gamma-ray spectra from a variety of radioactive sources. By fitting the pulse-height distributions from the sources with a function containing 17 parameters, we determined theoretical repsonse functions. We use these response functions to unfold the distributions to obtain flux spectra. A flux-to-dose-rate conversion curve based on the work of Dimbylow and Francis is then used to obtain dose rates. Direct use of measured spectra and flux-to-dose-rate curves to obtain dose rates avoids the errors that can arise from spectrum dependence in simple gamma-ray dosimeter instruments. We present some gamma-ray doses for the Little Boy assembly operated at low power. These results can be used to determine the exposures of the Hiroshima survivors and thus aid in the establishment of radation exposure limits for the nuclear industry

  10. A quantum dynamics study of the benzopyran ring opening guided by laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saab, Mohamad; Doriol, Loïc Joubert; Lasorne, Benjamin; Guérin, Stéphane; Gatti, Fabien

    2014-10-01

    The ring-opening photoisomerization of benzopyran, which occurs via a photochemical route involving a conical intersection, has been studied with quantum dynamics calculations using the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method (MCTDH). We introduce a mechanistic strategy to control the conversion of benzopyran to merocyanine with laser pulses. We use a six-dimensional model developed in a previous work for the potential energy surfaces (PES) based on an extension of the vibronic-coupling Hamiltonian model (diabatization method by ansatz), which depends on the most active degrees of freedom. The main objective of these quantum dynamics simulations is to provide a set of strategies that could help experimentalists to control the photoreactivity vs. photostability ratio (selectivity). In this work we present: (i) a pump-dump technique used to control the photostability, (ii) a two-step strategy to enhance the reactivity of the system: first, a pure vibrational excitation in the electronic ground state that prepares the system and, second, an ultraviolet excitation that brings the system to the first adiabatic electronic state; (iii) finally the effect of a non-resonant pulse (Stark effect) on the dynamics.

  11. Dynamical model of coherent circularly polarized optical pulse interactions with two-level quantum systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slavcheva, G.; Hess, O.

    2005-01-01

    We propose and develop a method for theoretical description of circularly (elliptically) polarized optical pulse resonant coherent interactions with two-level atoms. The method is based on the time-evolution equations of a two-level quantum system in the presence of a time-dependent dipole perturbation for electric dipole transitions between states with total angular-momentum projection difference (ΔJ z =±1) excited by a circularly polarized electromagnetic field [Feynman et al., J. Appl. Phys. 28, 49 (1957)]. The adopted real-vector representation approach allows for coupling with the vectorial Maxwell's equations for the optical wave propagation and thus the resulting Maxwell pseudospin equations can be numerically solved in the time domain without any approximations. The model permits a more exact study of the ultrafast coherent pulse propagation effects taking into account the vector nature of the electromagnetic field and hence the polarization state of the optical excitation. We demonstrate self-induced transparency effects and formation of polarized solitons. The model represents a qualitative extension of the well-known optical Maxwell-Bloch equations valid for linearly polarized light and a tool for studying coherent quantum control mechanisms

  12. Flux

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ib

    . FLUX betegner en flyden eller strømmen, dvs. dynamik. Forstår man livet som proces og udvikling i stedet for som ting og mekanik, får man et andet billede af det gode liv end det, som den velkendte vestlige mekanicisme lægger op til. Dynamisk forstået indebærer det gode liv den bedst mulige...... kanalisering af den flux eller energi, der strømmer igennem os og giver sig til kende i vore daglige aktiviteter. Skal vores tanker, handlinger, arbejde, samvær og politiske liv organiseres efter stramme og faste regelsæt, uden slinger i valsen? Eller skal de tværtimod forløbe ganske uhindret af regler og bånd...

  13. Calculation of the dependence on the Moon and Mars γ-quantum flux on the relief and distance to the surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surkov, Yu.A.; Noskaleva, L.P.; Manvelyan, O.S.

    1978-01-01

    The dependence of the gamma quantum flux on height over a planet, area over which the gamma radiation is ''collected'', and surface relief is calculated. The effect of the planet atmosphere on detected gamma radiation is considered. If the specific power of gamma-quantum sources is known, the results obtained allow to determine for any height over a planet the gamma-quantum flux due to the planet rock and its atmosphere radiations, as well as the detector spatial resolution

  14. Generation of picosecond pulses and frequency combs in actively mode locked external ring cavity quantum cascade lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wójcik, Aleksander K.; Belyanin, Alexey; Malara, Pietro; Blanchard, Romain; Mansuripur, Tobias S.; Capasso, Federico

    2013-01-01

    We propose a robust and reliable method of active mode locking of mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers and develop its theoretical description. Its key element is the use of an external ring cavity, which circumvents fundamental issues undermining the stability of mode locking in quantum cascade lasers. We show that active mode locking can give rise to the generation of picosecond pulses and phase-locked frequency combs containing thousands of the ring cavity modes

  15. Monte Carlo simulations of the pulsed thermal neutron flux in two-region hydrogenous systems (using standard MCNP data libraries)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiacek, U.; Krynicka, E.

    2005-02-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of the pulsed neutron experiment in two- region systems (two concentric spheres and two coaxial finite cylinders) are presented. The MCNP code is used. Aqueous solutions of H 3 BO 3 or KCl are used in the inner region. The outer region is the moderator of Plexiglas. Standard data libraries of the thermal neutron scattering cross-sections of hydrogen in hydrogenous substances are used. The time-dependent thermal neutron transport is simulated when the inner region has a constant size and the external size of the surrounding outer region is variable. The time decay constant of the thermal neutron flux in the system is found in each simulation. The results of the simulations are compared with results of real pulsed neutron experiments on the corresponding systems. (author)

  16. Interband optical pulse injection locking of quantum dot mode-locked semiconductor laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jimyung; Delfyett, Peter J

    2008-07-21

    We experimentally demonstrate optical clock recovery from quantum dot mode-locked semiconductor lasers by interband optical pulse injection locking. The passively mode-locked slave laser oscillating on the ground state or the first excited state transition is locked through the injection of optical pulses generated via the opposite transition bands, i.e. the first excited state or the ground state transition from the hybridly mode-locked master laser, respectively. When an optical pulse train generated via the first excited state from the master laser is injected to the slave laser oscillating via ground state, the slave laser shows an asymmetric locking bandwidth around the nominal repetition rate of the slave laser. In the reverse injection case of, i.e. the ground state (master laser) to the first excited state (slave laser), the slave laser does not lock even though both lasers oscillate at the same cavity frequency. In this case, the slave laser only locks to higher injection rates as compared to its own nominal repetition rate, and also shows a large locking bandwidth of 6.7 MHz.

  17. Homogeneous spectral broadening of pulsed terahertz quantum cascade lasers by radio frequency modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, W J; Li, H; Cao, J C

    2018-01-22

    The authors present an experimental investigation of radio frequency modulation on pulsed terahertz quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) emitting around 4.3 THz. The QCL chip used in this work is based on a resonant phonon design which is able to generate a 1.2 W peak power at 10 K from a 400-µm-wide and 4-mm-long laser with a single plasmon waveguide. To enhance the radio frequency modulation efficiency and significantly broaden the terahertz spectra, the QCLs are also processed into a double-metal waveguide geometry with a Silicon lens out-coupler to improve the far-field beam quality. The measured beam patterns of the double-metal QCL show a record low divergence of 2.6° in vertical direction and 2.4° in horizontal direction. Finally we perform the inter-mode beat note and terahertz spectra measurements for both single plasmon and double-metal QCLs working in pulsed mode. Since the double-metal waveguide is more suitable for microwave signal transmission, the radio frequency modulation shows stronger effects on the spectral broadening for the double-metal QCL. Although we are not able to achieve comb operation in this work for the pulsed lasers due to the large phase noise, the homogeneous spectral broadening resulted from the radio frequency modulation can be potentially used for spectroscopic applications.

  18. High quantum efficiency annular backside silicon photodiodes for reflectance pulse oximetry in wearable wireless body sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duun, Sune; Haahr, Rasmus G; Hansen, Ole; Birkelund, Karen; Thomsen, Erik V

    2010-01-01

    The development of annular photodiodes for use in a reflectance pulse oximetry sensor is presented. Wearable and wireless body sensor systems for long-term monitoring require sensors that minimize power consumption. We have fabricated large area 2D ring-shaped silicon photodiodes optimized for minimizing the optical power needed in reflectance pulse oximetry. To simplify packaging, backside photodiodes are made which are compatible with assembly using surface mounting technology without pre-packaging. Quantum efficiencies up to 95% and area-specific noise equivalent powers down to 30 fW Hz -1/2 cm -1 are achieved. The photodiodes are incorporated into a wireless pulse oximetry sensor system embedded in an adhesive patch presented elsewhere as 'The Electronic Patch'. The annular photodiodes are fabricated using two masked diffusions of first boron and subsequently phosphor. The surface is passivated with a layer of silicon nitride also serving as an optical filter. As the final process, after metallization, a hole in the center of the photodiode is etched using deep reactive ion etch.

  19. A search for upstream pressure pulses associated with flux transfer events: An AMPTE/ISEE case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elphic, R. C.; Baumjohann, W.; Cattell, C. A.; Luehr, H.; Smith, M. F.

    1994-01-01

    On September 19, 1984, the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracers Explorers (AMPTE) United Kingdom Satellite (UKS) and Ion Release Module (IRM) and International Sun Earth Explorers (ISEE) 1 and 2 spacecraft passed outbound through the dayside magnetopause at about the same time. The AMPTE spacecraft pair crossed first and were in the near-subsolar magnetosheath for more than an hour. Meanwhile the ISEE pair, about 5 R(sub E) to the south, observed flux transfer event (FTE) signatures. We use the AMPTE UKS and IRM plasma and field observations of magnetosheath conditions directly upstream of the subsolar magnetopause to check whether pressure pulses are responsible for the FTE signatures seen at ISEE. Pulses in both the ion thermal pressure and the dynamic pressure are observed in the magnetosheath early on when IRM and UKS are close to the magnetopause, but not later. These large pulses appear to be related to reconnection going on at the magnetopause nearby. AMPTE magnetosheath data far from the magnetopause do not show a pressure pulse correlation with FTEs at ISEE. Moreover, the magnetic pressure and tension effects seen in the ISEE FTEs are much larger than any pressure effects seen in the magnetosheath. A superposed epoch analysis based on small-amplitude peaks in the AMPTE magnetosheath total static pressure (nkT + B(exp 2)/2 mu(sub 0)) hint at some boundary effects, less than 5 nT peak-to-peak variations in the ISEE 1 and 2 B(sub N) signature starting about 1 min after the pressure peak epoch. However, these variations are much smaller than the standard deviations of the B(sub N) field component. Thus the evidence from this case study suggests that upstream magnetosheath pressure pulses do not give rise to FTEs, but may produce very small amplitude signatures in the magnetic field at the magnetopause.

  20. Time-resolved study of a pulsed dc discharge using quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy : NO and gas temperature kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welzel, S.; Gatilova, L.; Röpcke, J.; Rousseau, A.

    2007-01-01

    In a pulsed dc discharge of an Ar–N2 mixture containing 0.91% of NO the kinetics of the destruction of NO has been studied under static and flowing conditions, i.e. in a closed and open discharge tube (p = 266 Pa). For this purpose quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS) in the

  1. NO kinetics in pulsed low-pressure nitrogen plasmas studied by time resolved quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welzel, S.; Guaitella, O.; Lazzaroni, C.; Pintassilgo, C.; Rousseau, A.; Röpcke, J.

    2011-01-01

    Time-resolved quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy at 1897 cm-1 (5.27 µm) has been applied to study the NO(X) kinetics on the micro- and millisecond time scale in pulsed low-pressure N2/NO dc discharges. Experiments have been performed under flowing and static gas conditions to infer the

  2. Gradient ascent pulse engineering approach to CNOT gates in donor electron spin quantum computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, D.-B.; Goan, H.-S.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate how gradient ascent pulse engineering (GRAPE) optimal control methods can be implemented on donor electron spin qubits in semiconductors with an architecture complementary to the original Kane's proposal. We focus on the high fidelity controlled-NOT (CNOT) gate and we explicitly find the digitized control sequences for a controlled-NOT gate by optimizing its fidelity using the effective, reduced donor electron spin Hamiltonian with external controls over the hyperfine A and exchange J interactions. We then simulate the CNOT-gate sequence with the full spin Hamiltonian and find that it has an error of 10 -6 that is below the error threshold of 10 -4 required for fault-tolerant quantum computation. Also the CNOT gate operation time of 100 ns is 3 times faster than 297 ns of the proposed global control scheme.

  3. Reversal of Flux Closure States in Cobalt Nanoparticle Rings With Coaxial Magnetic Pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasama, T; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Scheinfein, MR

    2008-01-01

    Bistable flux closure (FC) states in Co nanoparticle rings can be switched reversibly by applying a coaxial magnetic field (H-z). The FC switching phenomena can be reproduced by micromagnetics simulations, which also reveal novel magnetic states at intermediate applied field strengths.......Bistable flux closure (FC) states in Co nanoparticle rings can be switched reversibly by applying a coaxial magnetic field (H-z). The FC switching phenomena can be reproduced by micromagnetics simulations, which also reveal novel magnetic states at intermediate applied field strengths....

  4. Measurement of angular distribution of neutron flux for the 6 MeV race-track microtron based pulsed neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patil, B.J., E-mail: bjp@physics.unipune.ernet.i [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India); Chavan, S.T.; Pethe, S.N.; Krishnan, R. [SAMEER, IIT Powai Campus, Mumbai 400 076 (India); Dhole, S.D., E-mail: sanjay@physics.unipune.ernet.i [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India)

    2010-09-15

    The 6 MeV race track microtron based pulsed neutron source has been designed specifically for the elemental analysis of short lived activation products, where the low neutron flux requirement is desirable. Electrons impinges on a e-{gamma} target to generate bremsstrahlung radiations, which further produces neutrons by photonuclear reaction in {gamma}-n target. The optimisation of these targets along with their spectra were estimated using FLUKA code. The measurement of neutron flux was carried out by activation of vanadium at different scattering angles. Angular distribution of neutron flux indicates that the flux decreases with increase in the angle and are in good agreement with the FLUKA simulation.

  5. A new design approach for control circuits of pipelined single-flux-quantum microprocessors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanashi, Y; Akimoto, A; Yoshikawa, N; Tanaka, M; Kawamoto, T; Kamiya, Y; Fujimaki, A; Terai, H; Yorozu, S

    2006-01-01

    A novel method of design for controllers of pipelined microprocessors using single-flux-quantum (SFQ) logic has been proposed. The proposed design approach is based on one hot encoding and is very suitable for designing a finite state machine using SFQ logic circuits, where each internal state of the microprocessor is represented by a flip-flop. In this approach, decoding of the internal state can be performed instantaneously, in contrast to the case in the conventional method using a binary state register. Moreover, pipelining is effectively implemented without increasing the circuit size because no pipeline registers are required in the one hot encoding. By using this method, we have designed a controller for our new SFQ microprocessors, which employs pipelining. The number of Josephson junctions of the newly designed controller is 1067, while the previous version without pipelining contains 1721 Josephson junctions. These results indicate that the proposed design approach is very effective for pipelined SFQ microprocessors. We have implemented a new controller using the NEC 2.5 kA cm -2 Nb standard process and confirmed its correct operation experimentally

  6. Graphene quantum dot synthesis using nanosecond laser pulses and its comparison to Methylene Blue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholikov, Khomidkhodza; Thomas, Zachary; Seyitliyev, Dovletgeldi; Smith, Skylar

    A biocompatible photodynamic therapy agent that generates a high amount of singlet oxygen with high water dispersibility and excellent photostability is desirable. In this work, a graphene based biomaterial which is a promising alternative to a standard photosensitizers was produced. Methylene blue was used as a reference photosensitizer. Bacteria deactivation by methylene blue was shown to be inhibited inside human blood due to protein binding. Graphene quantum dots (GQD) were synthesized by irradiating benzene and nickel oxide mixture using nanosecond laser pulses. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) were used for characterization of GQDs. Initial results show graphene quantum dots whose size less than 5 nm were successfully obtained. UV-VIS spectra shows absorption peak around 310 nm. The results of these studies can potentially be used to develop therapies for the eradication of pathogens in open wounds, burns, or skin cancers. New therapies for these conditions are particularly needed when antibiotic-resistant infections are present. NIH KBRIN.

  7. Influence of the nuclear Zeeman effect on mode locking in pulsed semiconductor quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beugeling, Wouter; Uhrig, Götz S.; Anders, Frithjof B.

    2017-09-01

    The coherence of the electron spin in a semiconductor quantum dot is strongly enhanced by mode locking through nuclear focusing, where the synchronization of the electron spin to periodic pulsing is slowly transferred to the nuclear spins of the semiconductor material, mediated by the hyperfine interaction between these. The external magnetic field that drives the Larmor oscillations of the electron spin also subjects the nuclear spins to a Zeeman-like coupling, albeit a much weaker one. For typical magnetic fields used in experiments, the energy scale of the nuclear Zeeman effect is comparable to that of the hyperfine interaction, so that it is not negligible. In this work, we analyze the influence of the nuclear Zeeman effect on mode locking quantitatively. Within a perturbative framework, we calculate the Overhauser-field distribution after a prolonged period of pulsing. We find that the nuclear Zeeman effect can exchange resonant and nonresonant frequencies. We distinguish between models with a single type and with multiple types of nuclei. For the latter case, the positions of the resonances depend on the individual g factors, rather than on the average value.

  8. Dynamics of tripartite quantum correlations and decoherence in flux qubit systems under local and non-local static noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Tsamouo Tsokeng; Martin, Tchoffo; Fai, Lukong Cornelius

    2018-06-01

    We investigate the dynamics of entanglement, decoherence and quantum discord in a system of three non-interacting superconducting flux qubits (fqubits) initially prepared in a Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state and subject to static noise in different, bipartite and common environments, since it is recognized that different noise configurations generally lead to completely different dynamical behavior of physical systems. The noise is modeled by randomizing the single fqubit transition amplitude. Decoherence and quantum correlations dynamics are strongly affected by the purity of the initial state, type of system-environment interaction and the system-environment coupling strength. Specifically, quantum correlations can persist when the fqubits are commonly coupled to a noise source, and reaches a saturation value respective to the purity of the initial state. As the number of decoherence channels increases (bipartite and different environments), decoherence becomes stronger against quantum correlations that decay faster, exhibiting sudden death and revival phenomena. The residual entanglement can be successfully detected by means of suitable entanglement witness, and we derive a necessary condition for entanglement detection related to the tunable and non-degenerated energy levels of fqubits. In accordance with the current literature, our results further suggest the efficiency of fqubits over ordinary ones, as far as the preservation of quantum correlations needed for quantum processing purposes is concerned.

  9. A Ku band pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer using an arbitrary waveform generator for quantum control experiments at millikelvin temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, Yung Szen, E-mail: yungszen@utm.my [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka-shi, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Tabuchi, Yutaka [Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology (RCAST), The University of Tokyo, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8904 (Japan); Negoro, Makoto; Kagawa, Akinori; Kitagawa, Masahiro, E-mail: kitagawa@ee.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka-shi, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    We present a 17 GHz (Ku band) arbitrary waveform pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer for experiments down to millikelvin temperatures. The spectrometer is located at room temperature, while the resonator is placed either in a room temperature magnet or inside a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator; the operating temperature range of the dilution unit is from ca. 10 mK to 8 K. This combination provides the opportunity to perform quantum control experiments on electron spins in the pure-state regime. At 0.6 T, spin echo experiments were carried out using γ-irradiated quartz glass from 1 K to 12.3 mK. With decreasing temperatures, we observed an increase in spin echo signal intensities due to increasing spin polarizations, in accordance with theoretical predictions. Through experimental data fitting, thermal spin polarization at 100 mK was estimated to be at least 99%, which was almost pure state. Next, to demonstrate the ability to create arbitrary waveform pulses, we generate a shaped pulse by superposing three Gaussian pulses of different frequencies. The resulting pulse was able to selectively and coherently excite three different spin packets simultaneously—a useful ability for analyzing multi-spin system and for controlling a multi-qubit quantum computer. By applying this pulse to the inhomogeneously broadened sample, we obtain three well-resolved excitations at 8 K, 1 K, and 14 mK.

  10. Comparisons of a Quantum Annealing and Classical Computer Neural Net Approach for Inferring Global Annual CO2 Fluxes over Land

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halem, M.; Radov, A.; Singh, D.

    2017-12-01

    Investigations of mid to high latitude atmospheric CO2 show growing amplitudes in seasonal variations over the past several decades. Recent high-resolution satellite measurements of CO2 concentration are now available for three years from the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program of DOE has been making long-term CO2-flux measurements (in addition to CO2 concentration and an array of other meteorological quantities) at several towers and mobile sites located around the globe at half-hour frequencies. Recent papers have shown CO2 fluxes inferred by assimilating CO2 observations into ecosystem models are largely inconsistent with station observations. An investigation of how the biosphere has reacted to changes in atmospheric CO2 is essential to our understanding of potential climate-vegetation feedbacks. Thus, new approaches for calculating CO2-flux for assimilation into land surface models are necessary for improving the prediction of annual carbon uptake. In this study, we calculate and compare the predicted CO2 fluxes results employing a Feed Forward Backward Propagation Neural Network model on two architectures, (i) an IBM Minsky Computer node and (ii) a hybrid version of the ARC D-Wave quantum annealing computer. We compare the neural net results of predictions of CO2 flux from ARM station data for three different DOE ecosystem sites; an arid plains near Oklahoma City, a northern arctic site at Barrows AL, and a tropical rainforest site in the Amazon. Training times and predictive results for the calculating annual CO2 flux for the two architectures for each of the three sites are presented. Comparative results of predictions as measured by RMSE and MAE are discussed. Plots and correlations of observed vs predicted CO2 flux are also presented for all three sites. We show the estimated training times for quantum and classical calculations when extended to calculating global annual Carbon Uptake over land. We also

  11. Quantum mechanics versus macroscopic realism: Is the flux there when nobody looks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leggett, A.J.; Garg, A.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that, in the contect of an idealized ''macroscopic quantum coherence'' experiment, the prediction of quantum mechanics are incompattible with the conjunction of two general assimptions which are designated ''macroscopic realism'' and ''noninvasive measurability at the macroscopiclevel.'' The conditions under which quantum mechanics can be tested against these assumptions in a realistic experiment are discussed

  12. Status and trends of short pulse generation using mode-locked lasers based on advanced quantum-dot active media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, L W; Chen, Y H; Xu, B; Wang, Z C; Jiao, Y H; Wang, Z G

    2007-01-01

    In this review, the potential of mode-locked lasers based on advanced quantum-dot (QD) active media to generate short optical pulses is analysed. A comprehensive review of experimental and theoretical work on related aspects is provided, including monolithic-cavity mode-locked QD lasers and external-cavity mode-locked QD lasers, as well as mode-locked solid-state and fibre lasers based on QD semiconductor saturable absorber mirrors. Performance comparisons are made for state-of-the-art experiments. Various methods for improving important characteristics of mode-locked pulses such as pulse duration, repetition rate, pulse power, and timing jitter through optimization of device design parameters or mode-locking methods are addressed. In addition, gain switching and self-pulsation of QD lasers are also briefly reviewed, concluding with the summary and prospects. (topical review)

  13. High heat flux experiment on isotropic graphite using pulsed laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kizaki, Hiroshi; Tokunaga, Kazutoshi; Fukuda, Shigehisa; Yoshida, Naoaki; Muroga, Takeo.

    1989-01-01

    In order to examine the plasma-withstanding behavior of isotropic graphite which is the leading favorite material for the first wall of nuclear fusion reactors, the pulsed thermal loading experiment was carried out by using a laser. As the result of analyzing the gas which was emitted during the pulsed thermal loading, together with the formation and release of various hydrocarbon gases, also the formation of carbon clusters due to the sublimation of carbon was observed. The vacuum characteristics and the dependence on thermal loading condition and surface treatment condition of these released gases were determined, and the problems and the way of improvement in its application to nuclear fusion reactors were elucidated. Since the isotropic graphite is of low atomic number, the radiation loss in plasma is small, and the improvement of the plasma parameters can be expected. Besides, the heat resistance and high temperature stability in vacuum are good, and the induced radioactivity is low. On the other hand, the quantity of gas occlusion is much, various hydrocarbon gases are formed at high temperature, and the wear due to sublimation arises by very high thermal loading. The experimental method, the observation of graphite surface by SEM, and the effect of carbon coating due to thermal decomposition are reported. (K.I.)

  14. Pulsed Electrical Spin Injection into InGaAs Quantum Dots: Studies of the Electroluminescence Polarization Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asshoff, P.; Loeffler, W.; Fluegge, H.; Zimmer, J.; Mueller, J.; Westenfelder, B.; Hu, D. Z.; Schaadt, D. M.; Kalt, H.; Hetterich, M.

    2010-01-01

    We present time-resolved studies of the spin polarization dynamics during and after initialization through pulsed electrical spin injection into InGaAs quantum dots embedded in a p-i-n-type spin-injection light-emitting diode. Experiments are performed with pulse widths in the nanosecond range and a time-resolved single photon counting setup is used to detect the subsequent electroluminescence. We find evidence that the achieved spin polarization shows an unexpected temporal behavior, attributed mainly to many-carrier and non-equilibrium effects in the device.

  15. Formation of plasmon pulses in the cooperative decay of excitons of quantum dots near a metal surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shesterikov, A. B.; Gubin, M. Yu. [Vladimir State University (Russian Federation); Gladush, M. G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Spectroscopy (Russian Federation); Prokhorov, A. V., E-mail: avprokhorov33@mail.ru [Vladimir State University (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    The formation of pulses of surface electromagnetic waves at a metal–dielectric boundary is considered in the process of cooperative decay of excitons of quantum dots distributed near a metal surface in a dielectric layer. It is shown that the efficiency of exciton energy transfer to excited plasmons can, in principle, be increased by selecting the dielectric material with specified values of the complex permittivity. It is found that in the mean field approximation, the semiclassical model of formation of plasmon pulses in the system under study is reduced to the pendulum equation with the additional term of nonlinear losses.

  16. Flux balance modeling to predict bacterial survival during pulsed-activity events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Nicholas A.; Lau, Rebecca; Swenson, Tami L.; Klitgord, Niels; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran; Bowen, Benjamin P.; Baran, Richard; Northen, Trent R.

    2018-04-01

    Desert biological soil crusts (BSCs) are cyanobacteria-dominated surface soil microbial communities common to plant interspaces in arid environments. The capability to significantly dampen their metabolism allows them to exist for extended periods in a desiccated dormant state that is highly robust to environmental stresses. However, within minutes of wetting, metabolic functions reboot, maximizing activity during infrequent permissive periods. Microcoleus vaginatus, a primary producer within the crust ecosystem and an early colonizer, initiates crust formation by binding particles in the upper layer of soil via exopolysaccharides, making microbial dominated biological soil crusts highly dependent on the viability of this organism. Previous studies have suggested that biopolymers play a central role in the survival of this organism by powering resuscitation, rapidly forming compatible solutes, and fueling metabolic activity in dark, hydrated conditions. To elucidate the mechanism of this phenomenon and provide a basis for future modeling of BSCs, we developed a manually curated, genome-scale metabolic model of Microcoleus vaginatus (iNJ1153). To validate this model, gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LC-MS) were used to characterize the rate of biopolymer accumulation and depletion in in hydrated Microcoleus vaginatus under light and dark conditions. Constraint-based flux balance analysis showed agreement between model predictions and experimental reaction fluxes. A significant amount of consumed carbon and light energy is invested into storage molecules glycogen and polyphosphate, while β-polyhydroxybutyrate may function as a secondary resource. Pseudo-steady-state modeling suggests that glycogen, the primary carbon source with the fastest depletion rate, will be exhausted if M. vaginatus experiences dark wetting events 4 times longer than light wetting events.

  17. Intercept-resend attacks in the Bennett-Brassard 1984 quantum-key-distribution protocol with weak coherent pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curty, Marcos; Luetkenhaus, Norbert

    2005-01-01

    Unconditional security proofs of the Bennett-Brassard 1984 protocol of quantum key distribution have been obtained recently. These proofs cover also practical implementations that utilize weak coherent pulses in the four signal polarizations. Proven secure rates leave open the possibility that new proofs or new public discussion protocols will obtain larger rates over increased distance. In this paper we investigate limits to the error rate and signal losses that can be tolerated by future protocols and proofs

  18. Finite-key analysis for quantum key distribution with weak coherent pulses based on Bernoulli sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Shun; Sasaki, Toshihiko; Koashi, Masato

    2017-07-01

    An essential step in quantum key distribution is the estimation of parameters related to the leaked amount of information, which is usually done by sampling of the communication data. When the data size is finite, the final key rate depends on how the estimation process handles statistical fluctuations. Many of the present security analyses are based on the method with simple random sampling, where hypergeometric distribution or its known bounds are used for the estimation. Here we propose a concise method based on Bernoulli sampling, which is related to binomial distribution. Our method is suitable for the Bennett-Brassard 1984 (BB84) protocol with weak coherent pulses [C. H. Bennett and G. Brassard, Proceedings of the IEEE Conference on Computers, Systems and Signal Processing (IEEE, New York, 1984), Vol. 175], reducing the number of estimated parameters to achieve a higher key generation rate compared to the method with simple random sampling. We also apply the method to prove the security of the differential-quadrature-phase-shift (DQPS) protocol in the finite-key regime. The result indicates that the advantage of the DQPS protocol over the phase-encoding BB84 protocol in terms of the key rate, which was previously confirmed in the asymptotic regime, persists in the finite-key regime.

  19. Quantum key distribution with an efficient countermeasure against correlated intensity fluctuations in optical pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Ken-ichiro; Fujiwara, Mikio; Nakata, Kensuke; Sumiya, Tatsuya; Sasaki, Toshihiko; Takeoka, Masahiro; Sasaki, Masahide; Tajima, Akio; Koashi, Masato; Tomita, Akihisa

    2018-03-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) allows two distant parties to share secret keys with the proven security even in the presence of an eavesdropper with unbounded computational power. Recently, GHz-clock decoy QKD systems have been realized by employing ultrafast optical communication devices. However, security loopholes of high-speed systems have not been fully explored yet. Here we point out a security loophole at the transmitter of the GHz-clock QKD, which is a common problem in high-speed QKD systems using practical band-width limited devices. We experimentally observe the inter-pulse intensity correlation and modulation pattern-dependent intensity deviation in a practical high-speed QKD system. Such correlation violates the assumption of most security theories. We also provide its countermeasure which does not require significant changes of hardware and can generate keys secure over 100 km fiber transmission. Our countermeasure is simple, effective and applicable to wide range of high-speed QKD systems, and thus paves the way to realize ultrafast and security-certified commercial QKD systems.

  20. Decay of the pulsed thermal neutron flux in two-zone hydrogenous systems - Monte Carlo simulations using MCNP standard data libraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiacek, Urszula; Krynicka, Ewa

    2006-01-01

    Pulsed neutron experiments in two-zone spherical and cylindrical geometry has been simulated using the MCNP code. The systems are built of hydrogenous materials. The inner zone is filled with aqueous solutions of absorbers (H 3 BO 3 or KCl). It is surrounded by the outer zone built of Plexiglas. The system is irradiated with the pulsed thermal neutron flux and the thermal neutron decay in time is observed. Standard data libraries of the thermal neutron scattering cross-sections of hydrogen in hydrogenous substances have been used to simulate the neutron transport. The time decay constant of the fundamental mode of the thermal neutron flux determined in each simulation has been compared with the corresponding result of the real pulsed neutron experiment

  1. Ultra-short pulse, ultra-high intensity laser improvement techniques for laser-driven quantum beam science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiriyama, Hiromitsu; Kando, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    Recent development activities of the Quantum Beam Research Team in JAEA are reported. The downsized, petawatt and femtosecond pulse laser is described at first. The process of the system development and utilization effort of so-called J-KAREN is explained with its time and space control system. For high contrast, OPCPA (Optical Parametric Chirped Pulse Amplification) preamplifier is adopted by using the titanium-sapphire laser system in which only the seed light pulses can be amplified. In addition, high contrast is obtained by adopting the high energy seed light to the amplifier. The system configuration of J-KAREN laser is illustrated. Typical spectra with and without OPCPA, as well as the spectra with OPCPA adjustment and without one are shown. The result of the recompressed pulses is shown in which the pulse width of 29.5 femtoseconds is close to the theoretical limit. Considering the throughput of the pulse compressor is 64 percent it is possible to generate high power laser beam of about 600 terawatts. In the supplementary budget of 2012, it has been approved to cope with the aging or obsoleteness of the system and at the same time to further sophisticate the laser using system. The upgraded laser system is named as J-KAREN-P in which the repetition rate is improved and another booster amplifier is added to increase the power. The system configuration of J-KAREN-P after the upgrading is illustrated. (S. Funahashi)

  2. Half-integer flux quantum effect in tricrystal Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirtley, J.R.; Tsuei, C.C.; Raffy, H.; Sun, J.Z.; Megtert, S.

    1996-01-01

    We have used a scanning SQUID microscope to directly observe the half-integer flux quantum effect, in epitaxial films of Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+δ , at the meeting point of a tricrystal substrate of SrTiO 3 in a geometry chosen to show this effect for a d-wave superconductor. This observation, when considered along with recent photoemission results, proves that the in-plane order parameter for this high-T c cuprate superconductor closely follows d x 2 -y 2 symmetry. (orig.)

  3. Quantum control of a chiral molecular motor driven by femtosecond laser pulses: Mechanisms of regular and reverse rotations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaki, M.; Hoki, K.; Kono, H.; Fujimura, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Rotational mechanisms of a chiral molecular motor driven by femtosecond laser pulses were investigated on the basis of results of a quantum control simulation. A chiral molecule, (R)-2-methyl-cyclopenta-2,4-dienecarboaldehyde, was treated as a molecular motor within a one-dimensional model. It was assumed that the motor is fixed on a surface and driven in the low temperature limit. Electric fields of femtosecond laser pulses driving both regular rotation of the molecular motor with a plus angular momentum and reverse rotation with a minus one were designed by using a global control method. The mechanism of the regular rotation is similar to that obtained by a conventional pump-dump pulse method: the direction of rotation is the same as that of the initial wave packet propagation on the potential surface of the first singlet (nπ*) excited state S 1 . A new control mechanism has been proposed for the reverse rotation that cannot be driven by a simple pump-dump pulse method. In this mechanism, a coherent Stokes pulse creates a wave packet localized on the ground state potential surface in the right hand side. The wave packet has a negative angular momentum to drive reverse rotation at an early time

  4. Femtosecond pulse with THz repetition frequency based on the coupling between quantum emitters and a plasmonic resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shilei; Ding, Yinxing; Jiao, Rongzhen; Duan, Gaoyan; Yu, Li

    2018-03-01

    Nanoscale pulsed light is highly desirable in nano-integrated optics. In this paper, we obtained femtosecond pulses with THz repetition frequency via the coupling between quantum emitters (QEs) and plasmonic resonators. Our structure consists of a V -groove (VG) plasmonic resonator and a nanowire embedded with two-level QEs. The influences of the incident light intensity and QE number density on the transmission response for this hybrid system are investigated through semiclassical theory and simulation. The results show that the transmission response can be modulated to the pulse form. And the repetition frequency and extinction ratio of the pulses can be controlled by the incident light intensity and QE number density. The reason is that the coupling causes the output power of nanowire to behave as an oscillating form, the oscillating output power in turn causes the field amplitude in the resonator to oscillate over time. A feedback system is formed between the plasmonic resonator and the QEs in the nanowire. This provides a method for generating narrow pulsed lasers with ultrahigh repetition frequencies in plasmonic systems using a continuous wave input, which has potential applications in generating optical clock signals at the nanoscale.

  5. A note on the Poisson bracket of 2d smeared fluxes in loop quantum gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Alberto S.; Perez, Alejandro

    2017-05-01

    We show that the non-Abelian nature of geometric fluxes—the corner-stone in the definition of quantum geometry in the framework of loop quantum gravity (LQG)—follows directly form the continuum canonical commutations relations of gravity in connection variables and the validity of the Gauss law. The present treatment simplifies previous formulations and thus identifies more clearly the root of the discreteness of geometric operators in LQG. Our statement generalizes to arbitrary gauge theories and relies only on the validity of the Gauss law.

  6. Two-stage crossover from thermal to quantum flux creep of dilute vortex ensembles in various high-Tc superconducting thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akerman, Johan J.; Venturini, E. L.; Siegal, M. P.; Yun, S. H.; Karlsson, U. O.; Rao, K. V.

    2001-01-01

    The thermal-to-quantum flux creep crossover at low vortex densities has been studied in YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 , TlBa 2 CaCu 2 O 7-δ , and HgBa 2 CaCu 2 O 6+δ thin films using ac susceptibility. The crossover temperatures T cr are 10--11, 17, and 30 K, respectively. Both thermal and quantum flux creep is suppressed as the vortex density is decreased. We observe a two-stage nature in the crossover behavior which appears to be a general property of all the three materials studied

  7. Energy flux correlations and moving mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, L.H.; Roman, Thomas A.

    2004-01-01

    We study the quantum stress tensor correlation function for a massless scalar field in a flat two-dimensional spacetime containing a moving mirror. We construct the correlation functions for right-moving and left-moving fluxes for an arbitrary trajectory, and then specialize them to the case of a mirror trajectory for which the expectation value of the stress tensor describes a pair of delta-function pulses, one of negative energy and one of positive energy. The flux correlation function describes the fluctuations around this mean stress tensor, and reveals subtle changes in the correlations between regions where the mean flux vanishes

  8. Quantum transition probabilities during a perturbing pulse: Differences between the nonadiabatic results and Fermi's golden rule forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Anirban; Hunt, Katharine L. C.

    2018-05-01

    For a perturbed quantum system initially in the ground state, the coefficient ck(t) of excited state k in the time-dependent wave function separates into adiabatic and nonadiabatic terms. The adiabatic term ak(t) accounts for the adjustment of the original ground state to form the new ground state of the instantaneous Hamiltonian H(t), by incorporating excited states of the unperturbed Hamiltonian H0 without transitions; ak(t) follows the adiabatic theorem of Born and Fock. The nonadiabatic term bk(t) describes excitation into another quantum state k; bk(t) is obtained as an integral containing the time derivative of the perturbation. The true transition probability is given by |bk(t)|2, as first stated by Landau and Lifshitz. In this work, we contrast |bk(t)|2 and |ck(t)|2. The latter is the norm-square of the entire excited-state coefficient which is used for the transition probability within Fermi's golden rule. Calculations are performed for a perturbing pulse consisting of a cosine or sine wave in a Gaussian envelope. When the transition frequency ωk0 is on resonance with the frequency ω of the cosine wave, |bk(t)|2 and |ck(t)|2 rise almost monotonically to the same final value; the two are intertwined, but they are out of phase with each other. Off resonance (when ωk0 ≠ ω), |bk(t)|2 and |ck(t)|2 differ significantly during the pulse. They oscillate out of phase and reach different maxima but then fall off to equal final values after the pulse has ended, when ak(t) ≡ 0. If ωk0 ω. While the transition probability is rising, the midpoints between successive maxima and minima fit Gaussian functions of the form a exp[-b(t - d)2]. To our knowledge, this is the first analysis of nonadiabatic transition probabilities during a perturbing pulse.

  9. Pulsed voltage deposited lead selenide thin film as efficient counter electrode for quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Bin Bin [Key Laboratory of Macromolecular Science of Shaanxi Province & School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710062 (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, Institute of Chemical Industry, Shaanxi Institute of Technology, Xi’an 710300 (China); Wang, Ye Feng [Key Laboratory of Macromolecular Science of Shaanxi Province & School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710062 (China); Wang, Xue Qing [Faculty of Chemical, Environmental and Biological Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zeng, Jing Hui, E-mail: jhzeng@ustc.edu [Key Laboratory of Macromolecular Science of Shaanxi Province & School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710062 (China)

    2016-04-30

    Highlights: • PbSe thin film is deposited on FTO glass by a pulse voltage electrodeposition method. • The thin film is used as counter electrode (CE) in quantum dot-sensitized solar cell. • Superior electrocatalytic activity and stability in the polysulfide electrolyte is received. • The narrow band gap characteristics and p-type conductivity enhances the cell efficiency. • An efficiency of 4.67% is received for the CdS/CdSe co-sensitized solar cells. - Abstract: Lead selenide (PbSe) thin films were deposited on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) glass by a facile one-step pulse voltage electrodeposition method, and used as counter electrode (CE) in CdS/CdSe quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs). A power conversion efficiency of 4.67% is received for the CdS/CdSe co-sensitized solar cells, which is much better than that of 2.39% received using Pt CEs. The enhanced performance is attributed to the extended absorption in the near infrared region, superior electrocatalytic activity and p-type conductivity with a reflection of the incident light at the back electrode in addition. The physical and chemical properties were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), reflectance spectra, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and Tafel polarization measurements. The present work provides a facile pathway to an efficient CE in the QDSSCs.

  10. Oscillations of the energy, magnetic moment, and current with a period equal to the normal or superconducting flux quantum in cyclic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svirskii, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    Oscillations with a period equal to the normal or superconducting flux quantum occur in the current density and the orbital parts of the energy and the magnetic moment in cyclic systems. Transitions between these regimes can be induced by changing the number of electrons or by switching between states with different energies

  11. The density of states for the Bi-dimensional Anderson model in the presence of a magnetic field with quantum plaque flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehl, N.M.

    1987-01-01

    The regularity properties of the integrated density of states and the state density of the Anderson bidimensional tight-binding model, in the presence of a uniform magnetic field, perpendicular to the plane of the system by means of quantum flux with plaques, are studied. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  12. Graphene oxide quantum dots disrupt autophagic flux by inhibiting lysosome activity in GC-2 and TM4 cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Xiaoli; Xu, Bo; Yao, Mengmeng; Mao, Zhilei; Zhang, Yuqing; Xu, Guofeng; Tang, Qiusha; Wang, Xinru; Xia, Yankai

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide quantum dots (GOQDs) have broad application prospects in many areas including bioimaging, drug delivery, DNA cleavage system, sensors and photocatalyst. Recently, increasing concerns have been raised about their biocompatibility, but studies about the effects of GOQDs on male reproductive system are still lacking. In this work, we explored the effects and molecular mechanisms of GOQDs on GC-2 and TM4 cells. We found autophagosome accumulation in GC-2 and TM4 cells after GOQDs treatment. Both LC3-II/LC3-I ratio and p62 levels increased, and the chloroquine-induced accumulation of LC3-II didn’t enhance in the presence of GOQDs, which indicated that GOQDs blocked autophagic flux. Further studies found that the fusion between autophagosome and lysosome was not inhibited by GOQDs, but the proteolytic capacity of lysosome was weakened and both the expression and activity of cathepsin B reduced. Taken together, these results suggested that GOQDs blocked autophagic flux by decreasing the amount and enzymatic activity of cathepsin B and inhibiting lysosome proteolytic capacity in GC-2 and TM4 cells, which might have a potential hazard to male reproduction.

  13. Suitability of quantum cascade laser spectroscopy for CH4 and N2O eddy covariance flux measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Vermeulen

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A quantum cascade laser spectrometer was evaluated for eddy covariance flux measurements of CH4 and N2O using three months of continuous measurements at a field site. The required criteria for eddy covariance flux measurements including continuity, sampling frequency, precision and stationarity were examined. The system operated continuously at a dairy farm on peat grassland in the Netherlands from 17 August to 6 November 2006. An automatic liquid nitrogen filling system for the infrared detector was employed to provide unattended operation of the system. The electronic sampling frequency was 10 Hz, however, the flow response time was 0.08 s, which corresponds to a bandwidth of 2 Hz. A precision of 2.9 and 0.5 ppb Hz−1/2 was obtained for CH4 and N2O, respectively. Accuracy was assured by frequent calibrations using low and high standard additions. Drifts in the system were compensated by using a 120 s running mean filter. The average CH4 and N2O exchange was 512 ngC m−2 s−1 (2.46 mg m−2 hr−1 and 52 ngN m−2 s−1 (0.29 mg m−2 hr−1. Given that 40% of the total N2O emission was due to a fertilizing event.

  14. 35 GHz passive mode-locking of InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot lasers at 1.3 μm with Fourier-limited pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuntz, M.; Fiol, G.; Laemmlin, M.

    2004-01-01

    We report 35 GHz passive mode-locking and 20 GHz hybrid mode-locking of quantum dot (QD) lasers at 1.3 ìm. Our investigations show ultrafast absorber recovery times and for the first time transform-limited mode-locked pulses.......We report 35 GHz passive mode-locking and 20 GHz hybrid mode-locking of quantum dot (QD) lasers at 1.3 ìm. Our investigations show ultrafast absorber recovery times and for the first time transform-limited mode-locked pulses....

  15. Study on quantum beam science by using ultra short electron pulse, FEL, and slow positron beam at ISIR (Institute of Science and Industrial Research), Osaka University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Y.; Tagawa, S.; Okuda, S.; Honda, Y.; Kimura, N.; Yamamoto, T.; Isoyama, G.

    1995-01-01

    Three projects for quantum beam science, an ultra fast electron pulse, a free electron laser, and a slow positron beam, has been started by using 38 MeV L-band and 150 MeV S-band linacs at ISIR in Osaka University. Both study on the production of three beams and study on quantum material science by using three beams will play an important role in the beam science. (author)

  16. Patterning effects in quantum dot amplifiers characterized through pump probe spectroscopy using two pump pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Tommy Winther; Poel, Mike van der; Laemmlin, M.

    2004-01-01

    Patterning effects at ultrahigh bitrates in quantum dot amplifiers are investigated by a novel experimental technique. Slow carrier dynamics in the excited states and wetting layer are found to limit the potential for ultrahigh-speed signal processing....

  17. Time-resolved measurement of the quantum states of photons using two-photon interference with short-time reference pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Changliang; Hofmann, Holger F.

    2011-01-01

    To fully utilize the energy-time degree of freedom of photons for optical quantum-information processes, it is necessary to control and characterize the temporal quantum states of the photons at extremely short time scales. For measurements of the temporal coherence of the quantum states beyond the time resolution of available detectors, two-photon interference with a photon in a short-time reference pulse may be a viable alternative. In this paper, we derive the temporal measurement operators for the bunching statistics of a single-photon input state with a photon from a weak coherent reference pulse. It is shown that the effects of the pulse shape of the reference pulse can be expressed in terms of a spectral filter selecting the bandwidth within which the measurement can be treated as an ideal projection on eigenstates of time. For full quantum tomography, temporal coherence can be determined by using superpositions of reference pulses at two different times. Moreover, energy-time entanglement can be evaluated based on the two-by-two entanglement observed in the coherences between pairs of detection times.

  18. Influence of O2 Flux on Compositions and Properties of ITO Films Deposited at Room Temperature by Direct-Current Pulse Magnetron Sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hua-Lin; Ding Wan-Yu; Liu Chao-Qian; Chai Wei-Ping

    2010-01-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) films were deposited on glass substrates at room temperature by dc pulse magnetron sputtering. Varying O 2 flux, ITO films with different properties are obtained. Both x-ray diffractometer and x-ray photoelectron spectrometer are used to study the change of crystalline structures and bonding structures of ITO films, respectively. Electrical properties are measured by four-point probe measurements. The results indicate that the chemical structures and compositions of ITO films strongly depend on the O 2 flux. With increasing O 2 flux, ITO films display better crystallization, which could decrease the resistivity of films. On the contrary, ITO films contain less O vacancies with increasing O 2 flux, which could worsen the conductive properties of films. Without any heat treatment onto the samples, the resistivity of the ITO film could reach 6.0 × 10 −4 Ω ·cm, with the optimal deposition parameter of 0.2 sccm O 2 flux. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  19. 4th meeting on advanced pulsed-neutron research on quantum functions in nano-scale materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-07-01

    Toward the worldwide realization of high-intensity pulsed neutron source, KEK (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization) proceeds the research by composing 6 research groups as neutron science initiation base to initiate new neutron science. The papers generalizing the researches for 2 years were presented at this meeting. KENS (Neutron Science Laboratory, KEK) shut down on March 22nd in 2006, and KEK will continue the research utilizing the pulsed neutron by using foreign facilities until the completion of J-PARC from now on. At international session in this meeting, the accomplishments and future prospects about the Japan-United Kingdom science and technology collaboration project, and about the research collaboration projects with IPNS (Intense Pulsed Neutron Source, ANL) and LANSCE (Los Alamos Neutron Science Center) were presented. Especially in the latter projects, the first accomplishment was reported under the present agreement. In addition, Meeting on structural study of proteins in aqueous solutions' and 'Meeting on hydrogen quantum atomics study' were held as satellite meetings. (J.P.N)

  20. Modification of the quantum mechanical flux formula for electron-hydrogen ionization through Bohm's velocity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randazzo, J. M.; Ancarani, L. U.

    2015-12-01

    For the single differential cross section (SDCS) for hydrogen ionization by electron impact (e -H problem), we propose a correction to the flux formula given by R. Peterkop [Theory of Ionization of Atoms by Electron Impact (Colorado Associated University Press, Boulder, 1977)]. The modification is based on an alternative way of defining the kinetic energy fraction, using Bohm's definition of velocities instead of the usual asymptotic kinematical, or geometrical, approximation. It turns out that the solution-dependent, modified energy fraction is equally related to the components of the probability flux. Compared to what is usually observed, the correction yields a finite and well-behaved SDCS value in the asymmetrical situation where one of the continuum electrons carries all the energy while the other has zero energy. We also discuss, within the S -wave model of the e -H ionization process, the continuity of the SDCS derivative at the equal energy sharing point, a property not so clearly observed in published benchmark results obtained with integral and S -matrix formulas with unequal final states.

  1. Deep tissue optical imaging of upconverting nanoparticles enabled by exploiting higher intrinsic quantum yield through use of millisecond single pulse excitation with high peak power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Haichun; Xu, Can T.; Dumlupinar, Gökhan

    2013-01-01

    We have accomplished deep tissue optical imaging of upconverting nanoparticles at 800 nm, using millisecond single pulse excitation with high peak power. This is achieved by carefully choosing the pulse parameters, derived from time-resolved rate-equation analysis, which result in higher intrinsic...... quantum yield that is utilized by upconverting nanoparticles for generating this near infrared upconversion emission. The pulsed excitation approach thus promises previously unreachable imaging depths and shorter data acquisition times compared with continuous wave excitation, while simultaneously keeping...... therapy and remote activation of biomolecules in deep tissues....

  2. Decoy state method for quantum cryptography based on phase coding into faint laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, S. P.; Molotkov, S. N.

    2017-12-01

    We discuss the photon number splitting attack (PNS) in systems of quantum cryptography with phase coding. It is shown that this attack, as well as the structural equations for the PNS attack for phase encoding, differs physically from the analogous attack applied to the polarization coding. As far as we know, in practice, in all works to date processing of experimental data has been done for phase coding, but using formulas for polarization coding. This can lead to inadequate results for the length of the secret key. These calculations are important for the correct interpretation of the results, especially if it concerns the criterion of secrecy in quantum cryptography.

  3. A study of enhanced diffusion during high dose high flux pulsed metal ion implantation into steel and aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Tonghe; Ji Chengzhou; Shen Jinghua; Chen Jun

    1992-01-01

    The depth profiles of metal ions implanted into steel and aluminium were measured by Rutherford backscattering (RBS). The ions of Mo, W and Y, produced by a metal vapour vacuum are ion source (MEVVA) were implanted at an energy range from 25 to 50 keV for doses of (2-5)x10 17 cm -2 into H13 steel and aluminium. Beam currents were from 0.5 to 1.0 A. The beam flux is in the range of 25 to 75 μAcm -2 . In order to simulate the profiles, a formula which includes the sputtering yield, diffusion coefficients and reaction rate was obtained. The results demonstrate that the penetration depth and retained dose increase with increasing beam flux for Mo implanted into aluminium. The peak concentration of Mo implanted H13 steel increases with increasing ion flux. In contrast to this for Y implantation into steel, the peak concentration of Y decreases with increasing ion flux. For an ion flux of 25 μAcm -2 for Mo, Y and W implantation into steel, the penetration depth and retained dose are 3-5 times greater than the theoretical values. The diffusion coefficients are about 10 -16 to 10 -15 s -1 . If the ion flux is greater than 47 μAcm -2 , the penetration depth and retained dose are 5 to 10 times greater than the theoretical values for Mo implanted aluminium. The diffusion coefficients increase with increasing ion flux for Mo implanted aluminium. The diffusion coefficients hardly change with increasing ion flux for Y and Mo implanted H13 steel. The retained dose increases 0.43 to 1.16 times for Y implanted steel for an ion flux of 25 μAcm -2 . Finally, the influence of phases precipitates, reaction rate and diffusion on retained dose, diffusion coefficient and penetration depth are discussed. (orig.)

  4. Quantum dynamics of an electric charge in an oscillating pulsed magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, I.S.; Guimaraes, A.P.; Silva, X.A. da

    1996-11-01

    The motion of a charged particle under the action of a time-dependent oscillating magnetic field has been investigated. For one and two magnetic pulses were obtained analytical expressions for the free current decay and current echo in agreement with a recently proposed classical description of electrical current in fields E and B. When the resonance condition is achieved, the axis of quantization is turned over by 90 degrees. The results suggest a magnetic pulsed resonant method to separate charged particles in a beam. (author). 12 refs

  5. High quantum efficiency annular backside silicon photodiodes for reflectance pulse oximetry in wearable wireless body sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duun, Sune Bro; Haahr, Rasmus Grønbek; Hansen, Ole

    2010-01-01

    The development of annular photodiodes for use in a reflectance pulse oximetry sensor is presented. Wearable and wireless body sensor systems for long-term monitoring require sensors that minimize power consumption. We have fabricated large area 2D ring-shaped silicon photodiodes optimized...

  6. Time-Resolved Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectroscopy of Pulsed Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition Processes Containing BCl3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Norbert; Hempel, Frank; Strämke, Siegfried; Röpcke, Jürgen

    2011-08-01

    In situ measurements are reported giving insight into the plasma chemical conversion of the precursor BCl3 in industrial applications of boriding plasmas. For the online monitoring of its ground state concentration, quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS) in the mid-infrared spectral range was applied in a plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (PACVD) reactor. A compact quantum cascade laser measurement and control system (Q-MACS) was developed to allow a flexible and completely dust-sealed optical coupling to the reactor chamber of an industrial plasma surface modification system. The process under the study was a pulsed DC plasma with periodically injected BCl3 at 200 Pa. A synchronization of the Q-MACS with the process control unit enabled an insight into individual process cycles with a sensitivity of 10-6 cm-1·Hz-1/2. Different fragmentation rates of the precursor were found during an individual process cycle. The detected BCl3 concentrations were in the order of 1014 molecules·cm-3. The reported results of in situ monitoring with QCLAS demonstrate the potential for effective optimization procedures in industrial PACVD processes.

  7. Numerical investigation of drag and heat flux reduction mechanism of the pulsed counterflowing jet on a blunt body in supersonic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui-rui; Huang, Wei; Yan, Li; Li, Lang-quan; Li, Shi-bin; Moradi, R.

    2018-05-01

    To design a kind of aerospace vehicle, the drag and heat flux reduction are the most important factors. In the current study, the counterflowing jet, one of the effective drag and heat flux reduction concepts, is investigated numerically by the two-dimensional axisymmetric Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the SST k-ω turbulence model. An axisymmetric numerical simulation mode of the counterflowing jet on the supersonic vehicle nose-tip is established, and the numerical method employed is validated by the experimental schlieren images and experimental data in the open literature. A pulsed counterflowing jet scheme is proposed, and it uses a sinusoidal function to control the total and static pressures of the counterflowing jet. The obtained results show that the long penetration mode does not exist in the whole turnaround, even in a relatively small range of the jet total and static pressures, and this is different from the phenomenon obtained under the steady condition in the open literature. At the same time, it is observed that the variation of the physical parameters, such as the Stanton number induced by the pulsed jet, has an obvious periodicity and hysteresis phenomenon.

  8. Quantum matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buechler, Hans Peter; Calcarco, Tommaso; Dressel, Martin

    2008-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Artificial atoms and molecules, tailored from solids, fractional flux quanta, molecular magnets, controlled interaction in quantum gases, the theory of quantum correlations in mott matter, cold gases, and mesoscopic systems, Bose-Einstein condensates on the chip, on the route to the quantum computer, a quantum computer in diamond. (HSI)

  9. Two-stage crossover from thermal to quantum flux creep of dilute vortex ensembles in various high-T{sub c} superconducting thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akerman, Johan J.; Venturini, E. L.; Siegal, M. P.; Yun, S. H.; Karlsson, U. O.; Rao, K. V.

    2001-09-01

    The thermal-to-quantum flux creep crossover at low vortex densities has been studied in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}, TlBa{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 7-{delta}}, and HgBa{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 6+{delta}} thin films using ac susceptibility. The crossover temperatures T{sub cr} are 10--11, 17, and 30 K, respectively. Both thermal and quantum flux creep is suppressed as the vortex density is decreased. We observe a two-stage nature in the crossover behavior which appears to be a general property of all the three materials studied.

  10. The asynchronous rapid single-flux quantum electronics ─ a promising alternative for the development of high-performance digital circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Terzieva

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate the application of the asynchronous logic approach for the realization of ultra high-speed digital electronics with high complexity. We evaluate the possible physical, technological, and schematical origins of restrictions limiting such an application, and propose solutions for their overcoming. Although our considerations are based on the rapid single-flux quantum technique, the conclusions derived can be generalized about any type of digital information coding.

  11. ECF2: A pulsed power generator based on magnetic flux compression for K-shell radiation production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L'Eplattenier, P.; Lassalle, F.; Mangeant, C.; Hamann, F.; Bavay, M.; Bayol, F.; Huet, D.; Morell, A.; Monjaux, P.; Avrillaud, G.; Lalle, B.

    2002-01-01

    The 3 MJ energy stored ECF2 generator is developed at Centre d'Etudes de Gramat, France, for K-shell radiation production. This generator is based on microsecond LTD stages as primary generators, and on the magnetic flux compression scheme for power amplification from the microsecond to the 100ns regime. This paper presents a general overview of the ECF2 generator. The flux compression stage, a key component, will be studied in details. We will present its advantages and drawbacks. We will then present the first experimental and numerical results which show the improvements that have already been made on this scheme

  12. Conductivity of ion dielectrics during the mean flux-density electron- and X-ray pulse radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vajsburd, D.I.; Mesyats, G.A.; Naminov, V.L.; Tavanov, Eh.G.

    1982-01-01

    Conductivity of ion dielectrics under electron and X-ray pulse radiation is investigated. Investigations have been conducted in the range of average beam densities in which extinction of low-energy conductivity takes place. Thin plates of alkali-halogen crystals have been used as samples. Small-dimensional accelerator with controlled beam parameters: 1-20 ns, 0.1-2000 A/cm 2 , 0.3-0.5 MeV has been used for radiation. Temperature dependence of conductivity current pulse is determined. Time resolution of 10 - 10 s is achieved. In the 70-300 K range it practically coincides with radiation pulse. An essential inertial constituent is observed below 300 K. It is shown that at average beam densities a comparable contribution into fast conductivity is made by intracentre conductivity independent of temperature and high-temperature conductivity which decreases with temperature with activation energy equal to the energy of short-wave background. That is why amplitude of fast constituent decreases with temperature slower than high-energy conductivity

  13. Quantum coherent π-electron rotations in a non-planar chiral molecule induced by using a linearly polarized UV laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineo, Hirobumi; Fujimura, Yuichi

    2015-06-01

    We propose an ultrafast quantum switching method of π-electron rotations, which are switched among four rotational patterns in a nonplanar chiral aromatic molecule (P)-2,2’- biphenol and perform the sequential switching among four rotational patterns which are performed by the overlapped pump-dump laser pulses. Coherent π-electron dynamics are generated by applying the linearly polarized UV pulse laser to create a pair of coherent quasidegenerated excited states. We also plot the time-dependent π-electron ring current, and discussed ring current transfer between two aromatic rings.

  14. A new design of pulsed laser diode driver system for multistate quantum key distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, M. S.; Jamaludin, M. Z.; Witjaksono, G.; Mokhtar, M. H. H.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we describe a new design of laser diode driver system based on MOSFET current mirror and digital signal controller (DSC). The system is designed to emit stream pairs of photons from three semiconductor laser diodes. The DSC is able to switch between the three laser diodes at constant rate. The duty cycle is maintained at 1% in order to reduce its thermal effect and thus prolong the laser diodes' life cycles. The MOSFET current mirror circuits are capable of delivering constant modulation current with peak current up to 58 mA to each laser diode. This laser driver system will allow the generating biphotons automatically with qubit rate around 8-13% for μ less than or equal to 1, thus making it practical for six-states quantum key distribution implementation.

  15. Experimental observation of pulse delay and speed-up in cascaded quantum well gain and absorber media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Lunnemann; Poel, Mike van der; Yvind, Kresten

    2008-01-01

    Slow-down and speed-up of 180 fs pulses in semiconductor waveguides beyond the existing models is obseved. Cascaded gain and absorbing sections is shown to provide significant temporal pulse shifting at near constant output pulse energy.......Slow-down and speed-up of 180 fs pulses in semiconductor waveguides beyond the existing models is obseved. Cascaded gain and absorbing sections is shown to provide significant temporal pulse shifting at near constant output pulse energy....

  16. The properties of Ge quantum rings deposited by pulsed laser deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiying

    2010-07-01

    SiGe ring-shape nanostructures have attracted much research interest because of the interesting morphology, mechanical, and electromagnetic properties. In this paper, we present the planar Ge nanorings with well-defined sharp edges self-assembled on Si (100) matrix prepared with pulsed laser deposition (PLD) in the present of Ar gas. The transforming mechanism of the droplets is discussed, which a dynamic deformation model has been developed to simulate the self-transforming process of the droplets. The rings were found to be formed in two steps: from droplets to cones and from cones to rings via an elastic self-deforming process, which were likely to be driven by the lateral strain of Ge/Si layers and the surface tension.

  17. Tracing explosive in solvent using quantum cascade laser with pulsed electric discharge system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seong-Wook; Tian, Chao; Martini, Rainer, E-mail: rmartini@stevens.edu [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Stevens Institute of Technology, 1 Castle Point on Hudson, Hoboken, New Jersey 07030 (United States); Chen, Gang [School of Optoelectronic Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Chen, I-chun Anderson [Newport Corporation/Oriel Instruments, 150 Long Beach Boulevard, Stratford, Connecticut 06615 (United States)

    2014-11-03

    We demonstrated highly sensitive detection of explosive dissolved in solvent with a portable spectroscopy system (Q-MACS) by tracing the explosive byproduct, N{sub 2}O, in combination with a pulsed electric discharge system for safe explosive decomposition. Using Octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX), the gas was monitored and analyzed by Q-MACS and the presence of the dissolved explosive clearly detected. While HMX presence could be identified directly in the air above the solutions even without plasma, much better results were achieved under the decomposition. The experiment results give an estimated detection limit of 10 ppb, which corresponds to a 15 pg of HMX.

  18. Tracing explosive in solvent using quantum cascade laser with pulsed electric discharge system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seong-Wook; Tian, Chao; Martini, Rainer; Chen, Gang; Chen, I-chun Anderson

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrated highly sensitive detection of explosive dissolved in solvent with a portable spectroscopy system (Q-MACS) by tracing the explosive byproduct, N 2 O, in combination with a pulsed electric discharge system for safe explosive decomposition. Using Octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX), the gas was monitored and analyzed by Q-MACS and the presence of the dissolved explosive clearly detected. While HMX presence could be identified directly in the air above the solutions even without plasma, much better results were achieved under the decomposition. The experiment results give an estimated detection limit of 10 ppb, which corresponds to a 15 pg of HMX

  19. Injection current dependences of electroluminescence transition energy in InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells light emitting diodes under pulsed current conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Feng; Ikeda, Masao, E-mail: mikeda2013@sinano.ac.cn; Liu, Jianping; Zhang, Shuming [Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Suzhou 215123 (China); Key Lab of Nanodevices and Applications, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Suzhou 215123 (China); Zhou, Kun; Yang, Hui [Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Suzhou 215123 (China); Key Lab of Nanodevices and Applications, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Suzhou 215123 (China); Institute of Semiconductors (CAS), Beijing 100083 (China); Liu, Zongshun [Institute of Semiconductors (CAS), Beijing 100083 (China)

    2015-07-21

    Injection current dependences of electroluminescence transition energy in blue InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells light emitting diodes (LEDs) with different quantum barrier thicknesses under pulsed current conditions have been analyzed taking into account the related effects including deformation caused by lattice strain, quantum confined Stark effects due to polarization field partly screened by carriers, band gap renormalization, Stokes-like shift due to compositional fluctuations which are supposed to be random alloy fluctuations in the sub-nanometer scale, band filling effect (Burstein-Moss shift), and quantum levels in finite triangular wells. The bandgap renormalization and band filling effect occurring at high concentrations oppose one another, however, the renormalization effect dominates in the concentration range studied, since the band filling effect arising from the filling in the tail states in the valence band of quantum wells is much smaller than the case in the bulk materials. In order to correlate the carrier densities with current densities, the nonradiative recombination rates were deduced experimentally by curve-fitting to the external quantum efficiencies. The transition energies in LEDs both with 15 nm quantum barriers and 5 nm quantum barriers, calculated using full strengths of theoretical macroscopic polarization given by Barnardini and Fiorentini [Phys. Status Solidi B 216, 391 (1999)] are in excellent accordance with experimental results. The LED with 5 nm barriers has been shown to exhibit a higher transition energy and a smaller blue shift than those of LED with 15 nm barriers, which is mainly caused by the smaller internal polarization field in the quantum wells.

  20. Quantum

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Khalili, Jim

    2003-01-01

    In this lively look at quantum science, a physicist takes you on an entertaining and enlightening journey through the basics of subatomic physics. Along the way, he examines the paradox of quantum mechanics--beautifully mathematical in theory but confoundingly unpredictable in the real world. Marvel at the Dual Slit experiment as a tiny atom passes through two separate openings at the same time. Ponder the peculiar communication of quantum particles, which can remain in touch no matter how far apart. Join the genius jewel thief as he carries out a quantum measurement on a diamond without ever touching the object in question. Baffle yourself with the bizzareness of quantum tunneling, the equivalent of traveling partway up a hill, only to disappear then reappear traveling down the opposite side. With its clean, colorful layout and conversational tone, this text will hook you into the conundrum that is quantum mechanics.

  1. Time-dependent flux from pulsed neutrons revealed by superconducting Nb current-biased kinetic inductance detector with "1"0B converter operated at 4 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyajima, Shigeyuki; Narukami, Yoshito; Shishido, Hiroaki; Yoshioka, Naohito; Ishida, Takekazu; Fujimaki, Akira; Hidaka, Mutsuo; Oikawa, Kenichi; Harada, Masahide; Oku, Takayuki; Arai, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    We have demonstrated a new superconducting detector for a neutron based on Nb superconductor meanderline with a "1"0B conversion layer. We use a current-biased kinetic inductance detector (CB-KID), which is composed of a meanderline, for detection of a neutron with high spatial resolution and fast response. The thickness of Nb meanderlines is 40 nm and widths are 3 μm, 1 μm, and 0.6 μm. The CB-KIDs are fabricated at the center of the Si chip of the size 22 mm × 22 mm and the total area of CB-KIDs covers 8 mm × 8 mm. The chip was cooled to a temperature lower than 4 K below the transition temperature of Nb using a Gifford-McMahon (GM) cryocooler. The Nb CB-KIDs with a "1"0B conversion layer output the voltage by irradiating pulsed neutrons at the material life science experimental facility (MLF) of Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) center. The response time of CB-KIDs is about a few tens ns. We have also obtained the time dependence of neutron flux generated from pulsed neutrons using a CB-KID. Experimental results were in good agreement with the simulated results. (author)

  2. Instantaneous coherent destruction of tunneling and fast quantum state preparation for strongly pulsed spin qubits in diamond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wubs, Martijn

    2010-01-01

    Qubits driven by resonant strong pulses are studied and a parameter regime is explored in which the dynamics can be solved in closed form. Instantaneous coherent destruction of tunneling can be seen for longer pulses, whereas shorter pulses allow a fast preparation of the qubit state. Results...... are compared with recent experiments of pulsed nitrogen-vacancy center spin qubits in diamond....

  3. Creative scientific research international session of 2nd meeting on advanced pulsed-neutron research on quantum functions in nano-scale materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Shinichi

    2005-06-01

    1 MW-class pulsed-neutron sources will be constructed in Japan, United State and United Kingdom in a few years. Now is the time for a challenge to innovate on neutron science and extend new science fields. Toward the new era, we develop new pulsed-neutron technologies as well as new neutron devices under the international collaborations with existing pulsed-neutron facilities, such as the UK-Japan collaboration program on neutron scattering. At the same time, the new era will bring international competitions to neutron researchers. We aim to create new neutron science toward the new pulsed-neutron era by introducing the new technologies developed here. For this purpose, we have started the research project, 'Advanced pulsed-neutron research on quantum functions in nano-scale materials,' in the duration between JFY2004 and JFY2008. The 2nd meeting of this project was held on 22-24 February 2005 to summarize activities in FY2004 and to propose research projects in the coming new fiscal year. In this international session as a part of this meeting, the scientific results and research plans on the UK-Japan collaboration program, the research plans on the collaboration between IPNS (Intense Pulsed Neutron Source, Argonne National Laboratory) and KENS (Neutron Science Laboratory, KEK), also the recent scientific results arisen form this project were presented. (author)

  4. Control of quantum paths of high-order harmonics and attosecond pulse generation in the presence of a static electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong Weiyi; Lu Peixiang; Cao Wei; Lan Pengfei; Wang Xinlin

    2007-01-01

    The time-frequency properties of high-order harmonic generation in the presence of a static electric field are investigated. It is found that the quantum paths contributing to the harmonics can be controlled by adding a static electric field. The highest photon energies of harmonics emitted in the adjacent half-cycles of the laser field are modulated by the static electric field, and then an attosecond pulse train with one burst per optical cycle can be extracted. For the ratio between the laser and the static field of 0.39, the harmonic spectrum is extended to I p + 9.1U p , and the harmonics above I p + 0.7U p are emitted almost in phase. The phase-locked harmonics covered by a broad bandwidth are produced, and then a regular attosecond pulse train with a pulse duration of 80 as is generated

  5. Field-free molecular orientation induced by single-cycle THz pulses: the role of resonance and quantum interference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shu, Chuan-Cun; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2013-01-01

    distributions of the pulses at the rotational resonance frequencies play an important role. Furthermore, we investigate the interference between multiple rotational excitation pathways following prealignment with a nonresonant 800-nm femtosecond pulse. It is shown that such interference can lead...

  6. Reduction of the jitter of single-flux-quantum time-to-digital converters for time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, K.; Muramatsu, Y.; Yamanashi, Y.; Yoshikawa, N.; Zen, N.; Ohkubo, M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We proposed single-flux-quantum (SFQ) time-to-digital converters (TDCs) for TOF-MS. • SFQ TDC can measure time intervals between multiple signals with high-resolution. • SFQ TDC can directly convert the time intervals into binary data. • We designed two types of SFQ TDCs to reduce the jitter. • The jitter is reduced to less than 100 ps. - Abstract: We have been developing a high-resolution superconducting time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) system, which utilizes a superconducting strip ion detector (SSID) and a single-flux-quantum (SFQ) time-to-digital converter (TDC). The SFQ TDC can measure time intervals between multiple input signals and directly convert them into binary data. In our previous study, 24-bit SFQ TDC with a 3 × 24-bit First-In First-Out (FIFO) buffer was designed and implemented using the AIST Nb standard process 2 (STP2), whose time resolution and dynamic range are 100 ps and 1.6 ms, respectively. In this study we reduce the jitter of the TDC by using two different approaches: one uses an on-chip clock generator with an on-chip low-pass filter for reducing the noise in the bias current, and the other uses a low-jitter external clock source at room temperature. We confirmed that the jitter is reduced to less than 100 ps in the latter approach

  7. Reduction of the jitter of single-flux-quantum time-to-digital converters for time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sano, K., E-mail: sano-kyosuke-cw@ynu.jp [Department Electrical and Computer Engineering, Yokohama National University, 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan); Muramatsu, Y.; Yamanashi, Y.; Yoshikawa, N. [Department Electrical and Computer Engineering, Yokohama National University, 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan); Zen, N.; Ohkubo, M. [Research Institute of Instrumentation Frontier, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • We proposed single-flux-quantum (SFQ) time-to-digital converters (TDCs) for TOF-MS. • SFQ TDC can measure time intervals between multiple signals with high-resolution. • SFQ TDC can directly convert the time intervals into binary data. • We designed two types of SFQ TDCs to reduce the jitter. • The jitter is reduced to less than 100 ps. - Abstract: We have been developing a high-resolution superconducting time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) system, which utilizes a superconducting strip ion detector (SSID) and a single-flux-quantum (SFQ) time-to-digital converter (TDC). The SFQ TDC can measure time intervals between multiple input signals and directly convert them into binary data. In our previous study, 24-bit SFQ TDC with a 3 × 24-bit First-In First-Out (FIFO) buffer was designed and implemented using the AIST Nb standard process 2 (STP2), whose time resolution and dynamic range are 100 ps and 1.6 ms, respectively. In this study we reduce the jitter of the TDC by using two different approaches: one uses an on-chip clock generator with an on-chip low-pass filter for reducing the noise in the bias current, and the other uses a low-jitter external clock source at room temperature. We confirmed that the jitter is reduced to less than 100 ps in the latter approach.

  8. Na2 Vibrating in the Double-Well Potential of State 2 1Σu+ (JM = 00): A Pulsating "Quantum Bubble" with Antagonistic Electronic Flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diestler, D J; Jia, D; Manz, J; Yang, Y

    2018-03-01

    The theory of concerted electronic and nuclear flux densities associated with the vibration and dissociation of a multielectron nonrotating homonuclear diatomic molecule (or ion) in an electronic state 2S+1 Σ g,u + (JM = 00) is presented. The electronic population density, nuclear probability density, and nuclear flux density are isotropic. A theorem of Barth , presented in this issue, shows that the electronic flux density (EFD) is also isotropic. Hence, the evolving system appears as a pulsating, or exploding, "quantum bubble". Application of the theory to Na 2 vibrating in the double-minimum potential of the 2   1 Σ u + (JM = 00) excited state reveals that the EFD consists of two antagonistic components. One arises from electrons that flow essentially coherently with the nuclei. The other, which is oppositely directed (i.e., antagonistic) and more intense, is due to the transition in electronic structure from "Rydberg" to "ionic" type as the nuclei traverse the potential barrier between inner and outer potential wells. This "transition" component of the EFD rises and falls sharply as the nuclei cross the barrier.

  9. Gas chromatography vs. quantum cascade laser-based N2O flux measurements using a novel chamber design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruemmer, Christian; Lyshede, Bjarne; Lempio, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    automated chamber system against a conventional gas chromatography (GC) approach using the same chambers plus an automated gas sampling unit with septum capped vials and subsequent laboratory GC analysis. Through its high precision and time resolution, data of the QCL system were used for quantifying...... as natural as possible. Further, applying linear regression to a 3 min data window with rejecting the first 2 min after closure and a sampling time of every 5 s proved to be sufficient for robust flux determination while ensuring that standard errors of N2O fluxes were still on a relatively low level...... spot from unintended shading and minimizes disturbance of throughfall, thereby complying with high quality requirements of long-term observation studies and research infrastructures....

  10. The renormalization-group flux of the conformally reduced quantum gravity; Der Renormierungsgruppen-Fluss der konform-reduzierten Quantengravitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weyer, Holger

    2010-12-17

    We analyze the conceptual role of background independence in the application of the effective average action to quantum gravity. Insisting on a background independent nonperturbative renormalization group (RG) flow the coarse graining operation must be defined in terms of an unspecified variable metric since no rigid metric of a fixed background spacetime is available. This leads to an extra field dependence in the functional RG equation and a significantly different RG ow in comparison to the standard flow equation with a rigid metric in the mode cutoff. The background independent RG flow can possess a non-Gaussian fixed point, for instance, even though the corresponding standard one does not. We demonstrate the importance of this universal, essentially kinematical effect by computing the RG flow of Quantum Einstein Gravity (QEG) in the ''conformally reduced'' theory which discards all degrees of freedom contained in the metric except the conformal one. The conformally reduced Einstein-Hilbert approximation has exactly the same qualitative properties as in the full Einstein-Hilbert truncation. In particular it possesses the non-Gaussian fixed point which is necessary for asymptotic safety. Without the extra field dependence the resulting RG flow is that of a simple {phi}{sup 4}-theory. We employ the Local Potential Approximation for the conformal factor to generalize the RG flow on an infinite dimensional theory space. Again we find a Gaussian as well as a non-Gaussian fixed point which provides further evidence for the viability of the asymptotic safety scenario. The analog of the invariant cubic in the curvature which spoils perturbative renormalizability is seen to be unproblematic for the asymptotic safety of the conformally reduced theory. The scaling fields and dimensions of both fixed points are obtained explicitly and possible implications for the predictivity of the theory are discussed. Since the RG flow depends on the topology of the

  11. [Sap flux density in response to rainfall pulses for Pinus tabuliformis and Hippophae rhamnoides from mixed plantation in hilly Loess Plateau].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Sen Bao; Chen, Yun Ming; Tang, Ya Kun; Wu, Xu; Wen, Jie

    2017-11-01

    Thermal dissipation probe (TDP) was used to continuously measure the sap flux density (F d ) of Pinus tabuliformis and Hippophae rhamnoides individuals in hilly Loess Plateau, from June to October 2015, and the environmental factors, i.e., photosynthetic active radiation (PAR), water vapor pressure deficit (VPD), and soil water content (SWC), were simultaneously monitored to clarify the difference of rainfall utilization between the two tree species in a mixed plantation. Using the methods of a Threshold-delay model, stepwise multiple regression analyses, and partial correlation analyses, this paper studied the process of F d in these two species in response to the rainfall pulses and then determined the effects of environmental factors on F d . The results showed that, with the increase of rainfall, the response percentages of F d in both P. tabuliformis and H. rhamnoides increased at first but then decreased; specifically, in the range of 0-1 mm rainfall, the F d of P. tabuliformis (-16.3%) and H. rhamnoides (-6.3%) clearly decreased; in the range of 1-5 mm rainfall, the F d of P. tabuliformis decreased (-0.4%), whereas that of H. rhamnoides significantly increased (9.0%). The lower rainfall thresholds (R L ) of F d for P. tabuliformis and H. rhamnoides were 6.4 and 1.9 mm, respectively, with a corresponding time-lag (τ) of 1.96 and 1.67 days. In the pre-rainfall period, the peak time of F d of P. tabuliformis converged upon 12:00-12:30 (70%), while the F d of H. rhamnoides peaked twice, between 10:30 and 12:00 (48%) and again between 16:00 and 16:30 (30%). In the post-rainfall period, the peak time of F d of P. tabuliformis converged upon 11:00-13:00 (40%), while that of H. rhamnoides peaked twice, between 12:00 and 13:00 (52%) and again between 16:30 and 17:00 (24%). Among the environmental factors, the rank order of factors associated with the F d of both P. tabuliformis and H. rhamnoides was PAR>VPD, before rainfall. However, the rank order of factors

  12. A new time-frequency method to reveal quantum dynamics of atomic hydrogen in intense laser pulses: Synchrosqueezing transform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheu, Yae-lin; Hsu, Liang-Yan; Wu, Hau-tieng; Li, Peng-Cheng; Chu, Shih-I

    2014-01-01

    This study introduces a new adaptive time-frequency (TF) analysis technique, the synchrosqueezing transform (SST), to explore the dynamics of a laser-driven hydrogen atom at an ab initio level, upon which we have demonstrated its versatility as a new viable venue for further exploring quantum dynamics. For a signal composed of oscillatory components which can be characterized by instantaneous frequency, the SST enables rendering the decomposed signal based on the phase information inherited in the linear TF representation with mathematical support. Compared with the classical type of TF methods, the SST clearly depicts several intrinsic quantum dynamical processes such as selection rules, AC Stark effects, and high harmonic generation

  13. Optimal quantum control of Bose-Einstein condensates in magnetic microtraps: Comparison of gradient-ascent-pulse-engineering and Krotov optimization schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, Georg; Reich, Daniel M.; Goerz, Michael H.; Koch, Christiane P.; Hohenester, Ulrich

    2014-09-01

    We study optimal quantum control of the dynamics of trapped Bose-Einstein condensates: The targets are to split a condensate, residing initially in a single well, into a double well, without inducing excitation, and to excite a condensate from the ground state to the first-excited state of a single well. The condensate is described in the mean-field approximation of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. We compare two optimization approaches in terms of their performance and ease of use; namely, gradient-ascent pulse engineering (GRAPE) and Krotov's method. Both approaches are derived from the variational principle but differ in the way the control is updated, additional costs are accounted for, and second-order-derivative information can be included. We find that GRAPE produces smoother control fields and works in a black-box manner, whereas Krotov with a suitably chosen step-size parameter converges faster but can produce sharp features in the control fields.

  14. Ultrafast dynamics of laser-pulse excited semiconductors: non-Markovian quantum kinetic equations with nonequilibrium correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V.Ignatyuk

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-Markovian kinetic equations in the second Born approximation are derived for a two-zone semiconductor excited by a short laser pulse. Both collision dynamics and running nonequilibrium correlations are taken into consideration. The energy balance and relaxation of the system to equilibrium are discussed. Results of numerical solution of the kinetic equations for carriers and phonons are presented.

  15. Continuous-flux MOVPE growth of position-controlled N-face GaN nanorods and embedded InGaN quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergbauer, W; Strassburg, M; Koelper, Ch; Linder, N [Osram Opto Semiconductors GmbH, Leibnizstrasse 4, D-93055 Regensburg (Germany); Roder, C; Laehnemann, J; Trampert, A [Paul-Drude-Institut fuer Festkoerperelektronik, Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, D-10117 Berlin (Germany); Fuendling, S; Li, S F; Wehmann, H-H; Waag, A, E-mail: werner.bergbauer@osram-os.com [Institut fuer Halbleitertechnik, TU Braunschweig, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 66, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2010-07-30

    We demonstrate the fabrication of N-face GaN nanorods by metal organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE), using continuous-flux conditions. This is in contrast to other approaches reported so far, which have been based on growth modes far off the conventional growth regimes. For position control of nanorods an SiO{sub 2} masking layer with a dense hole pattern on a c-plane sapphire substrate was used. Nanorods with InGaN/GaN heterostructures have been grown catalyst-free. High growth rates up to 25 {mu}m h{sup -1} were observed and a well-adjusted carrier gas mixture between hydrogen and nitrogen enabled homogeneous nanorod diameters down to 220 nm with aspect ratios of approximately 8:1. The structural quality and defect progression within nanorods were determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Different emission energies for InGaN quantum wells (QWs) could be assigned to different side facets by room temperature cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements.

  16. Continuous-flux MOVPE growth of position-controlled N-face GaN nanorods and embedded InGaN quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergbauer, W.; Strassburg, M.; Kölper, Ch; Linder, N.; Roder, C.; Lähnemann, J.; Trampert, A.; Fündling, S.; Li, S. F.; Wehmann, H.-H.; Waag, A.

    2010-07-01

    We demonstrate the fabrication of N-face GaN nanorods by metal organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE), using continuous-flux conditions. This is in contrast to other approaches reported so far, which have been based on growth modes far off the conventional growth regimes. For position control of nanorods an SiO2 masking layer with a dense hole pattern on a c-plane sapphire substrate was used. Nanorods with InGaN/GaN heterostructures have been grown catalyst-free. High growth rates up to 25 µm h - 1 were observed and a well-adjusted carrier gas mixture between hydrogen and nitrogen enabled homogeneous nanorod diameters down to 220 nm with aspect ratios of approximately 8:1. The structural quality and defect progression within nanorods were determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Different emission energies for InGaN quantum wells (QWs) could be assigned to different side facets by room temperature cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements.

  17. Continuous-flux MOVPE growth of position-controlled N-face GaN nanorods and embedded InGaN quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergbauer, W; Strassburg, M; Koelper, Ch; Linder, N; Roder, C; Laehnemann, J; Trampert, A; Fuendling, S; Li, S F; Wehmann, H-H; Waag, A

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the fabrication of N-face GaN nanorods by metal organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE), using continuous-flux conditions. This is in contrast to other approaches reported so far, which have been based on growth modes far off the conventional growth regimes. For position control of nanorods an SiO 2 masking layer with a dense hole pattern on a c-plane sapphire substrate was used. Nanorods with InGaN/GaN heterostructures have been grown catalyst-free. High growth rates up to 25 μm h -1 were observed and a well-adjusted carrier gas mixture between hydrogen and nitrogen enabled homogeneous nanorod diameters down to 220 nm with aspect ratios of approximately 8:1. The structural quality and defect progression within nanorods were determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Different emission energies for InGaN quantum wells (QWs) could be assigned to different side facets by room temperature cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements.

  18. The Use of Ultrashort Picosecond Laser Pulses to Generate Quantum Optical Properties of Single Molecules in Biophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Sonny

    Generation of quantum optical states from ultrashort laser-molecule interactions have led to fascinating discoveries in physics and chemistry. In recent years, these interactions have been extended to probe phenomena in single molecule biophysics. Photons emitted from a single fluorescent molecule contains important properties about how the molecule behave and function in that particular environment. Analysis of the second order coherence function through fluorescence correlation spectroscopy plays a pivotal role in quantum optics. At very short nanosecond timescales, the coherence function predicts photon antibunching, a purely quantum optical phenomena which states that a single molecule can only emit one photon at a time. Photon antibunching is the only direct proof of single molecule emission. From the nanosecond to microsecond timescale, the coherence function gives information about rotational diffusion coefficients, and at longer millisecond timescales, gives information regarding the translational diffusion coefficients. In addition, energy transfer between molecules from dipole-dipole interaction results in FRET, a highly sensitive method to probe conformational dynamics at nanometer distances. Here I apply the quantum optical techniques of photon antibunching, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and FRET to probe how lipid nanodiscs form and function at the single molecule level. Lipid nanodiscs are particles that contain two apolipoprotein (apo) A-I circumventing a lipid bilayer in a belt conformation. From a technological point of view, nanodiscs mimics a patch of cell membrane that have recently been used to reconstitute a variety of membrane proteins including cytochrome P450 and bacteriorhodopsin. They are also potential drug transport vehicles due to its small and stable 10nm diameter size. Biologically, nanodiscs resemble to high degree, high density lipoproteins (HDL) in our body and provides a model platform to study lipid-protein interactions

  19. Evaluation of flux-based logic schemes for high-Tc applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleishman, J.; Feld, D.; Xiao, P.; Van Dazer, T.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents analyses of three digital logic families that can be made using nonhysteretic Josephson junctions, potentially the only kind of Josephson device realizable with superconductors having high transition temperatures. These logic families utilize magnetic flux-transfer and are characterized by very low power dissipation. Rapid Single Flux Quantum (RSFQ) and Phase Mode logic are both based on pulse propagation. The Quantum Flux Parametron (QFP) logic family is based on current latching. Simulations of RSFQ, Phase-Mode, and QFP logic families using high-T c junction parameters are presented to demonstrate the compatibility of these logic families with the new perovskite superconductors. The operation of these logic families is analyzed and the advantages and disadvantages of each are discussed

  20. Preliminary design of the advanced quantum beam source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Cheol; Lee, Jong Min; Jeong, Young Uk; Cho, Sung Oh; Yoo, Jae Gwon; Park, Seong Hee

    2000-07-01

    The preliminary design of the advanced quantum beam source based on a superconducting electron accelerator is presented. The advanced quantum beams include: high power free electron lasers, monochromatic X-rays and {gamma}-rays, high-power medium-energy electrons, high-flux pulsed neutrons, and high-flux monochromatic slow positron beam. The AQBS system is being re-designed, assuming that the SPS superconducting RF cavities used for LEP at CERN will revived as a main accelerator of the AQBS system at KAERI, after the decommissioning of LEP at the end of 2000. Technical issues of using the SPS superconducting RF cavities for the AQBS project are discussed in this report. The advanced quantum beams will be used for advanced researches in science and industries.

  1. Preliminary design of the advanced quantum beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Cheol; Lee, Jong Min; Jeong, Young Uk; Cho, Sung Oh; Yoo, Jae Gwon; Park, Seong Hee

    2000-07-01

    The preliminary design of the advanced quantum beam source based on a superconducting electron accelerator is presented. The advanced quantum beams include: high power free electron lasers, monochromatic X-rays and γ-rays, high-power medium-energy electrons, high-flux pulsed neutrons, and high-flux monochromatic slow positron beam. The AQBS system is being re-designed, assuming that the SPS superconducting RF cavities used for LEP at CERN will revived as a main accelerator of the AQBS system at KAERI, after the decommissioning of LEP at the end of 2000. Technical issues of using the SPS superconducting RF cavities for the AQBS project are discussed in this report. The advanced quantum beams will be used for advanced researches in science and industries

  2. Pulsed laser induced optical nonlinearities in undoped, copper doped and chromium doped CdS quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Dimple; Malik, B. P.; Gaur, Arun

    2015-04-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) of CdS, Cu doped and Cr doped CdS were synthesized through chemical co- precipitation method. The synthesized QDs have been characterized by x-ray diffraction, ultraviolet visible absorption spectroscopy. The diameters of QDs were calculated using Debye-Scherrer’s formula and Brus equation. They are found to be in 3.5-3.8 nm range. The nonlinear properties has been studied by the open and closed aperture Z-scan technique using frequency double Nd:YAG laser. The nonlinear refractive index (n2), nonlinear absorption coefficient (β), third order nonlinear susceptibilities (χ3) of QDs has been calculated. It has been found that the values of nonlinear parameters are higher for doped QDs than undoped CdS QDs. Hence they can be regarded as potential material for the development of optoelectronics and photonics devices.

  3. Flux flow and flux creep in thick films of YBCO. [Y-Ba-Cu-O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rickets, J.; Vinen, W.F.; Abell, J.S.; Shields, T.C. (Superconductivity Research Group, Univ. of Birmingham (United Kingdom))

    1991-12-01

    The results are described of new experiments designed to study flux creep and flux flow along a single flux percolation path in thick films of YBCO. The flux flow regime is studied by a four-point resistive technique using pulsed currents, and the flux creep regime by observing the rate at which flux enters a superconducting loop in parallel with the resistance that is associated with the flux percolation path. (orig.).

  4. Ultrashort Laser Pulse Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Diels, Jean-Claude

    2006-01-01

    Ultrashort Laser Pulse Phenomena, 2e serves as an introduction to the phenomena of ultra short laser pulses and describes how this technology can be used to examine problems in areas such as electromagnetism, optics, and quantum mechanics. Ultrashort Laser Pulse Phenomena combines theoretical backgrounds and experimental techniques and will serve as a manual on designing and constructing femtosecond (""faster than electronics"") systems or experiments from scratch. Beyond the simple optical system, the various sources of ultrashort pulses are presented, again with emphasis on the basic

  5. Design and test of component circuits of an integrated quantum voltage noise source for Johnson noise thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takahiro; Maezawa, Masaaki; Urano, Chiharu

    2015-11-01

    We present design and testing of a pseudo-random number generator (PRNG) and a variable pulse number multiplier (VPNM) which are digital circuit subsystems in an integrated quantum voltage noise source for Jonson noise thermometry. Well-defined, calculable pseudo-random patterns of single flux quantum pulses are synthesized with the PRNG and multiplied digitally with the VPNM. The circuit implementation on rapid single flux quantum technology required practical circuit scales and bias currents, 279 junctions and 33 mA for the PRNG, and 1677 junctions and 218 mA for the VPNM. We confirmed the circuit operation with sufficiently wide margins, 80-120%, with respect to the designed bias currents.

  6. Quantum Theory of Conducting Matter Superconductivity and Quantum Hall Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Fujita, Shigeji; Godoy, Salvador

    2009-01-01

    Explains major superconducting properties including zero resistance, Meissner effect, sharp phase change, flux quantization, excitation energy gap, and Josephson effects using quantum statistical mechanical calculations. This book covers the 2D superconductivity and the quantum Hall effects

  7. An investigation of pulsed phase thermography for detection of disbonds in HIP-bonded beryllium tiles in ITER normal heat flux first wall (NHF FW) components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bushell, J., E-mail: joe.bushell@amec.com [AMEC Foster Wheeler, Booths Hall, Chelford Road, Knutsford, Cheshire WA16 8QZ, England (United Kingdom); Sherlock, P. [AMEC Foster Wheeler, Booths Hall, Chelford Road, Knutsford, Cheshire WA16 8QZ, England (United Kingdom); Mummery, P. [School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, University of Manchester, England (United Kingdom); Bellin, B.; Zacchia, F. [Fusion for Energy, Josep Pla 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Pulsed phase thermography was trialled on Be-tiled plasma facing components. • Two components, one with known disbonds, one intact, were inspected and compared. • Finite element analysis was used to verify experimental observations. • PPT successfully detected disbonds in the failed component. • Good agreement found with ultrasonic test, though defect geometry was uncertain. - Abstract: Pulsed phase thermography (PPT) is a non destructive examination (NDE) technique, traditionally used in the Aerospace Industry for inspection of composite structures, which combines characteristics and benefits of flash thermography and lock-in thermography into a single, rapid inspection technique. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness of PPT as a means of inspection for the bond between the beryllium (Be) tiles and the copper alloy (CuCrZr) heatsink of the ITER NHF FW components. This is a critical area dictating the functional integrity of these components, as single tile detachment in service could result in cascade failure. PPT has advantages over existing thermography techniques using heated water which stress the component, and the non-invasive, non-contact nature presents advantages over existing ultrasonic methods. The rapid and non-contact nature of PPT also gives potential for in-service inspections as well as a quality measure for as-manufactured components. The technique has been appraised via experimental trials using ITER first wall mockups with pre-existing disbonds confirmed via ultrasonic tests, partnered with finite element simulations to verify experimental observations. This paper will present the results of the investigation.

  8. An investigation of pulsed phase thermography for detection of disbonds in HIP-bonded beryllium tiles in ITER normal heat flux first wall (NHF FW) components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushell, J.; Sherlock, P.; Mummery, P.; Bellin, B.; Zacchia, F.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Pulsed phase thermography was trialled on Be-tiled plasma facing components. • Two components, one with known disbonds, one intact, were inspected and compared. • Finite element analysis was used to verify experimental observations. • PPT successfully detected disbonds in the failed component. • Good agreement found with ultrasonic test, though defect geometry was uncertain. - Abstract: Pulsed phase thermography (PPT) is a non destructive examination (NDE) technique, traditionally used in the Aerospace Industry for inspection of composite structures, which combines characteristics and benefits of flash thermography and lock-in thermography into a single, rapid inspection technique. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness of PPT as a means of inspection for the bond between the beryllium (Be) tiles and the copper alloy (CuCrZr) heatsink of the ITER NHF FW components. This is a critical area dictating the functional integrity of these components, as single tile detachment in service could result in cascade failure. PPT has advantages over existing thermography techniques using heated water which stress the component, and the non-invasive, non-contact nature presents advantages over existing ultrasonic methods. The rapid and non-contact nature of PPT also gives potential for in-service inspections as well as a quality measure for as-manufactured components. The technique has been appraised via experimental trials using ITER first wall mockups with pre-existing disbonds confirmed via ultrasonic tests, partnered with finite element simulations to verify experimental observations. This paper will present the results of the investigation.

  9. Two-dimensional turning of thermal flux from normal to lateral propagation in thin metal film irradiated by femtosecond laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepelev, V. V.; Inogamov, N. A.

    2018-01-01

    There are various geometrical variants of laser illumination and target design. Important direction of investigations is connected with tightly focused action (spot size may be less than micron) onto a thin metal film: thickness of a film is just few skin-layer depths. Duration of a pulse is τ L ˜ 0.1 ps. In these conditions energy absorbed in a skin layer first propagates normally to a surface: gradient ∂Te /∂x dominates, here and below x and y are normal and lateral directions. This process in 1-2 ps homogenizes electron temperature T e along thickness of a film. We consider conditions when a film or is supported by weakly conducting substrate, or is free standing. Therefore all absorbed energy is confined inside the film. At the next stage the internal energy begin to flow along the lateral direction—thus direction of energy expansion is changed from x to y because of the heat non-penetrating boundary condition imposed on the rear-side of the film. At the short two-temperature stage of lateral expansion the thermal conductivity κ is high. After that electron and ion temperatures equilibrates and later on the heat propagates with usual value of κ. Lateral expansion cools down the hot spot on long time scales and finally the molten spot recrystallizes. Two-dimensional approach allows us to consider all these stages from propagation in x direction (normal to a film) to propagation in y direction (along a film).

  10. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pines, A.

    1988-08-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 32 refs., 56 figs

  11. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pines, A.

    1986-09-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 55 figs

  12. Scalable optical quantum computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manykin, E A; Mel' nichenko, E V [Institute for Superconductivity and Solid-State Physics, Russian Research Centre ' Kurchatov Institute' , Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-31

    A way of designing a scalable optical quantum computer based on the photon echo effect is proposed. Individual rare earth ions Pr{sup 3+}, regularly located in the lattice of the orthosilicate (Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}) crystal, are suggested to be used as optical qubits. Operations with qubits are performed using coherent and incoherent laser pulses. The operation protocol includes both the method of measurement-based quantum computations and the technique of optical computations. Modern hybrid photon echo protocols, which provide a sufficient quantum efficiency when reading recorded states, are considered as most promising for quantum computations and communications. (quantum computer)

  13. Scalable optical quantum computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manykin, E A; Mel'nichenko, E V

    2014-01-01

    A way of designing a scalable optical quantum computer based on the photon echo effect is proposed. Individual rare earth ions Pr 3+ , regularly located in the lattice of the orthosilicate (Y 2 SiO 5 ) crystal, are suggested to be used as optical qubits. Operations with qubits are performed using coherent and incoherent laser pulses. The operation protocol includes both the method of measurement-based quantum computations and the technique of optical computations. Modern hybrid photon echo protocols, which provide a sufficient quantum efficiency when reading recorded states, are considered as most promising for quantum computations and communications. (quantum computer)

  14. LASER APPLICATIONS AND OTHER TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Pulsed formation and readout of dynamic holograms in a photorefractive GaAs:Cr crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, N. P.; Barashkov, M. S.; Bel'dyugin, Igor'M.; Kruzhilin, Yu I.; Petnikova, V. M.; Umnov, A. F.; Kharchenko, M. A.; Shuvalov, Vladimir V.

    1989-12-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the energy (diffraction efficiency) and time (formation, storage, readout) parameters of four-wave mixing in GaAs:Cr. An investigation of the dynamics of the leading edge of a nonlinear response pulse could become an effective method for pulsed spectroscopy of photorefractive materials.

  15. Ionization of Rydberg atoms by the kicks of half-cycle pulses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rydberg atom; half-cycle pulses; ionization; quantum mechanical model. ... packet which represents a non-stationary quantum state formed by coherent ...... Wetzels, Impulsive interactions of half cycle pulse radiation with Rydberg atoms, Ph.D.

  16. Tunable, Flexible, and Efficient Optimization of Control Pulses for Practical Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machnes, Shai; Assémat, Elie; Tannor, David; Wilhelm, Frank K.

    2018-04-01

    Quantum computation places very stringent demands on gate fidelities, and experimental implementations require both the controls and the resultant dynamics to conform to hardware-specific constraints. Superconducting qubits present the additional requirement that pulses must have simple parameterizations, so they can be further calibrated in the experiment, to compensate for uncertainties in system parameters. Other quantum technologies, such as sensing, require extremely high fidelities. We present a novel, conceptually simple and easy-to-implement gradient-based optimal control technique named gradient optimization of analytic controls (GOAT), which satisfies all the above requirements, unlike previous approaches. To demonstrate GOAT's capabilities, with emphasis on flexibility and ease of subsequent calibration, we optimize fast coherence-limited pulses for two leading superconducting qubits architectures—flux-tunable transmons and fixed-frequency transmons with tunable couplers.

  17. Quantum communication with photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tittel, W.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The discovery that transmission of information encoded into single quantum systems enables new forms of communication let to the emergence of the domain of quantum communication. During the last ten years, various key experiments based on photons as carrier of the quantum information have been realized. Today, quantum cryptography systems based on faint laser pulses can be purchased commercially, bi-partite entanglement has been distributed over long distances and has been used for quantum key distribution, and quantum purification, teleportation and entanglement swapping have been demonstrated. I will give a general introduction into this fascinating field and will review experimental achievements in the domain of quantum communication with discrete two-level quantum systems (qubits) encoded into photons. (author)

  18. p-Adic quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimirov, V.S.; Volovich, I.V.

    1988-01-01

    Quantum mechanics above the field of p-adic numbers is constructed. Three formulations of p-adic quantum mechanics are considered: 1) quantum mechanics with complex-valued wave functions and p-adic coordinates and pulses; an approach based on Weyl representation is suggested; 2) the probability (Euclidean) formulation; 3) the secondary quantization representation (Fock representation) with p-adic wave functions

  19. Wide range neutron flux monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Yorimasa; Fukushima, Toshiki.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a wide range neutron-flux monitor adapted such that the flux monitoring function and alarming function can automatically by shifted from pulse counting system to cambel method system. Constitution: A wide range neutron-flux monitor comprises (la) pulse counting system and (lb) cambel-method system for inputting detection signals from neutron detectors and separating them into signals for the pulse measuring system and the cambel measuring system, (2) overlap detection and calculation circuit for detecting the existence of the overlap of two output signals from the (la) and (lb) systems, and (3) trip circuit for judging the abnormal state of neutron detectors upon input of the detection signals. (Seki, T.)

  20. Neutron flux monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Yasushi; Mitsubori, Minehisa; Ohashi, Kazunori.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a neutron flux monitoring device for preventing occurrence of erroneous reactor scram caused by the elevation of the indication of a start region monitor (SRM) due to a factor different from actual increase of neutron fluxes. Namely, judgement based on measured values obtained by a pulse counting method and a judgment based on measured values obtained by a Cambel method are combined. A logic of switching neutron flux measuring method to be used for monitoring, namely, switching to an intermediate region when both of the judgements are valid is adopted. Then, even if the indication value is elevated based on the Cambel method with no increase of the counter rate in a neutron source region, the switching to the intermediate region is not conducted. As a result, erroneous reactor scram such as 'shorter reactor period' can be avoided. (I.S.)

  1. Quantum Nonlinear Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Hanamura, Eiichi; Yamanaka, Akio

    2007-01-01

    This graduate-level textbook gives an introductory overview of the fundamentals of quantum nonlinear optics. Based on the quantum theory of radiation, Quantum Nonlinear Optics incorporates the exciting developments in novel nonlinear responses of materials (plus laser oscillation and superradiance) developed over the past decade. It deals with the organization of radiation field, interaction between electronic system and radiation field, statistics of light, mutual manipulation of light and matter, laser oscillation, dynamics of light, nonlinear optical response, and nonlinear spectroscopy, as well as ultrashort and ultrastrong laser pulse. Also considered are Q-switching, mode locking and pulse compression. Experimental and theoretical aspects are intertwined throughout.

  2. LASER APPLICATIONS AND OTHER TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Dynamics of splashing of molten metals during irradiation with single CO2 laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutyunyan, R. V.; Baranov, V. Yu; Bol'shov, Leonid A.; Dolgov, V. A.; Malyuta, D. D.; Mezhevov, V. S.; Semak, V. V.

    1988-03-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the dynamics of the loss of the melt as a result of interaction with single-mode CO2 laser radiation pulses of 5-35 μs duration. The dynamics of splashing of the melt during irradiation with short pulses characterized by a Gaussian intensity distribution differed from that predicted by models in which the distribution of the vapor pressure was assumed to be radially homogeneous.

  3. Tunable, Flexible and Efficient Optimization of Control Pulses for Superconducting Qubits, part II - Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    AsséMat, Elie; Machnes, Shai; Tannor, David; Wilhelm-Mauch, Frank

    In part I, we presented the theoretic foundations of the GOAT algorithm for the optimal control of quantum systems. Here in part II, we focus on several applications of GOAT to superconducting qubits architecture. First, we consider a control-Z gate on Xmons qubits with an Erf parametrization of the optimal pulse. We show that a fast and accurate gate can be obtained with only 16 parameters, as compared to hundreds of parameters required in other algorithms. We present numerical evidences that such parametrization should allow an efficient in-situ calibration of the pulse. Next, we consider the flux-tunable coupler by IBM. We show optimization can be carried out in a more realistic model of the system than was employed in the original study, which is expected to further simplify the calibration process. Moreover, GOAT reduced the complexity of the optimal pulse to only 6 Fourier components, composed with analytic wrappers.

  4. Pulse Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Lawrence (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An apparatus and a computer-implemented method for generating pulses synchronized to a rising edge of a tachometer signal from rotating machinery are disclosed. For example, in one embodiment, a pulse state machine may be configured to generate a plurality of pulses, and a period state machine may be configured to determine a period for each of the plurality of pulses.

  5. From quantum gravity to quantum field theory via noncommutative geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aastrup, Johannes; Grimstrup, Jesper Møller

    2014-01-01

    A link between canonical quantum gravity and fermionic quantum field theory is established in this paper. From a spectral triple construction, which encodes the kinematics of quantum gravity, we construct semi-classical states which, in a semi-classical limit, give a system of interacting fermions in an ambient gravitational field. The emergent interaction involves flux tubes of the gravitational field. In the additional limit, where all gravitational degrees of freedom are turned off, a free fermionic quantum field theory emerges. (paper)

  6. Design and test of component circuits of an integrated quantum voltage noise source for Johnson noise thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Takahiro; Maezawa, Masaaki; Urano, Chiharu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We demonstrated RSFQ digital components of a new quantum voltage noise source. • A pseudo-random number generator and variable pulse number multiplier are designed. • Fabrication process is based on four Nb wiring layers and Nb/AlOx/Nb junctions. • The circuits successfully operated with wide dc bias current margins, 80–120%. - Abstract: We present design and testing of a pseudo-random number generator (PRNG) and a variable pulse number multiplier (VPNM) which are digital circuit subsystems in an integrated quantum voltage noise source for Jonson noise thermometry. Well-defined, calculable pseudo-random patterns of single flux quantum pulses are synthesized with the PRNG and multiplied digitally with the VPNM. The circuit implementation on rapid single flux quantum technology required practical circuit scales and bias currents, 279 junctions and 33 mA for the PRNG, and 1677 junctions and 218 mA for the VPNM. We confirmed the circuit operation with sufficiently wide margins, 80–120%, with respect to the designed bias currents.

  7. Design and test of component circuits of an integrated quantum voltage noise source for Johnson noise thermometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Takahiro, E-mail: yamada-takahiro@aist.go.jp [Nanoelectronics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Central 2, Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Maezawa, Masaaki [Nanoelectronics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Central 2, Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Urano, Chiharu [National Metrology Institute of Japan, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Central 3, Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8563 (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • We demonstrated RSFQ digital components of a new quantum voltage noise source. • A pseudo-random number generator and variable pulse number multiplier are designed. • Fabrication process is based on four Nb wiring layers and Nb/AlOx/Nb junctions. • The circuits successfully operated with wide dc bias current margins, 80–120%. - Abstract: We present design and testing of a pseudo-random number generator (PRNG) and a variable pulse number multiplier (VPNM) which are digital circuit subsystems in an integrated quantum voltage noise source for Jonson noise thermometry. Well-defined, calculable pseudo-random patterns of single flux quantum pulses are synthesized with the PRNG and multiplied digitally with the VPNM. The circuit implementation on rapid single flux quantum technology required practical circuit scales and bias currents, 279 junctions and 33 mA for the PRNG, and 1677 junctions and 218 mA for the VPNM. We confirmed the circuit operation with sufficiently wide margins, 80–120%, with respect to the designed bias currents.

  8. Femtosecond pulse shaping using the geometric phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökce, Bilal; Li, Yanming; Escuti, Michael J; Gundogdu, Kenan

    2014-03-15

    We demonstrate a femtosecond pulse shaper that utilizes polarization gratings to manipulate the geometric phase of an optical pulse. This unique approach enables circular polarization-dependent shaping of femtosecond pulses. As a result, it is possible to create coherent pulse pairs with orthogonal polarizations in a 4f pulse shaper setup, something until now that, to our knowledge, was only achieved via much more complex configurations. This approach could be used to greatly simplify and enhance the functionality of multidimensional spectroscopy and coherent control experiments, in which multiple coherent pulses are used to manipulate quantum states in materials of interest.

  9. Broadband Near-Infrared Quantum Cutting in Metal-Ion Codoped Y3Al5O12 Thin Films Grown by Pulsed-Laser Deposition for Solar Cell Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Kwan Lau

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have deposited thin films of yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG doped with Ce3+ and Yb3+ on quartz and silicon substrates by pulsed laser deposition. Near-infrared (NIR quantum cutting which involves the emission of NIR photons through the downconversion from Ce3+ to Yb3+ is realized. Upon the broadband excitation of Ce3+ ions with a visible photon at the peak wavelength of 450 nm, NIR photons are generated by Yb3+ ions, with an emission wavelength centered at 1030 nm. The luminescent decay curves of Ce3+ were recorded as a supporting evidence corresponding to the energy transfer. This work offers a better and more convenient approach compatible with crystalline silicon solar cell compared to conventional bulk phosphors.

  10. Quantum optics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Agarwal, G. S

    2013-01-01

    .... Focusing on applications of quantum optics, the textbook covers recent developments such as engineering of quantum states, quantum optics on a chip, nano-mechanical mirrors, quantum entanglement...

  11. Quantum electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhiezer, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    Basic ideas of quantum electrodynamics history of its origination and its importance are outlined. It is shown low the notion of the field for each kind of particles and the notion of vacuum for such field had originated and been affirmed how a new language of the Feynman diagrams had appeared without which it is quite impossible to described complex processes of particle scattering and mutual transformation. The main problem of the quantum electrodynamics is to find a scattering matrix, which solution comes to the determination of the Green electrodynamic functions. A review is given of papers on clarifying the asymptotic behaviour of the Green electrodynamic functions in the range of high pulses, on studying the Compton effect, bremsstrahlung irradiation Raman light scattering elastic scattering during channeling of charged particles in a crystal

  12. Quantum solitons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abram, I [Centre National d' Etudes des Telecommunications (CNET), 196 Avenue Henri Ravera, F-92220 Bagneux (France)

    1999-02-01

    Two of the most remarkable properties of light - squeezing and solitons - are being combined in a new generation of experiments that could revolutionize optics and communications. One area of application concerns the transmission and processing of classical (binary) information, in which the presence or absence of a soliton in a time-window corresponds to a ''1'' or ''0'', as in traditional optical-fibre communications. However, since solitons occur at fixed power levels, we do not have the luxury of being able to crank up the input power to improve the signal-to-noise ratio at the receiving end. Nevertheless, the exploitation of quantum effects such as squeezing could help to reduce noise and improve fidelity. In long-distance communications, where the signal is amplified every 50-100 kilometres or so, the soliton pulse is strongest just after the amplifier. Luckily this is where the bulk of the nonlinear interaction needed to maintain the soliton shape occurs. However, the pulse gets weaker as it propagates along the fibre, so the nonlinear interaction also becomes weakerand weaker. This means that dispersive effects become dominant until the next stage of amplification, where the nonlinearity takes over again. One problem is that quantum fluctuations in the amplifiers lead to random jumps in the central wavelength of the individual solitons, and this results in a random variation of the speed of individual solitons in the fibre. Several schemes have been devised to remove this excess noise and bring the train of solitons back to the orderly behaviour characteristic of a stable coherent state (e.g. the solitons could be passed through a spectral filter). Photon-number squeezing could also play a key role in solving this problem. For example, if the solitons are number-squeezed immediately after amplification, there will be a smaller uncertainty in the nonlinearity that keeps the soliton in shape and, therefore, there will also be less noise in the soliton. This

  13. Attosecond pulse trains from long laser-gas interaction targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauri, C.P.; Lopez-Martens, R.; Varju, K.; Ruchon, T.; Gustafsson, E.; L'Huillier, A.

    2006-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. Many experiments in attosecond physics require high XUV photon flux as well as a clean attosecond pulse train (APT) temporal structure. Temporal characterization of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in long interaction targets is thus of high interest. HHG being a very inefficient process, a large effort has been made to increase the amount of XUV photons emitted per infrared laser pulse. Besides quasi phase-matching in a modulated capillary, loose driving laser focusing conditions and subsequent self-channeling have shown to significantly increase the conversion efficiency. We characterized the temporal structure of APTs generated during the self-channeling of an intense IR driving laser pulse. Our first results indicate, however, that the temporal structure of the APT generated during the HHG process might be affected by quantum path interference and spectral phase distortion due to the self-channeling process itself. In particular, our measurements show that the relative spectral phase between consecutive harmonics can strongly vary depending on the target length and the position of the laser focus with respect to the target. In general for short gas targets, no clean APT structure can be expected since the individual attosecond pulses carry significant chirp. For longer targets, however, we observe a flattening of the harmonic spectral phase, resulting in near-transform-limited attosecond pulse trains. A complete analysis of the process is complex and involves detailed knowledge of the spatial and temporal evolution of the self-channeling driver laser pulse throughout the gas target.

  14. Autocompensating quantum cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bethune, Donald S.; Risk, William P.

    2002-01-01

    Quantum cryptographic key distribution (QKD) uses extremely faint light pulses to carry quantum information between two parties (Alice and Bob), allowing them to generate a shared, secret cryptographic key. Autocompensating QKD systems automatically and passively compensate for uncontrolled time-dependent variations of the optical fibre properties by coding the information as a differential phase between orthogonally polarized components of a light pulse sent on a round trip through the fibre, reflected at mid-course using a Faraday mirror. We have built a prototype system based on standard telecom technology that achieves a privacy-amplified bit generation rate of ∼1000 bits s -1 over a 10 km optical fibre link. Quantum cryptography is an example of an application that, by using quantum states of individual particles to represent information, accomplishes a practical task that is impossible using classical means. (author)

  15. Efficient one- and two-qubit pulsed gates for an oscillator-stabilized Josephson qubit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, Frederico; DiVincenzo, David P; Koch, Roger H; Steffen, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    We present theoretical schemes for performing high-fidelity one- and two-qubit pulsed gates for a superconducting flux qubit. The 'IBM qubit' consists of three Josephson junctions, three loops and a superconducting transmission line. Assuming a fixed inductive qubit-qubit coupling, we show that the effective qubit-qubit interaction is tunable by changing the applied fluxes, and can be made negligible, allowing one to perform high-fidelity single qubit gates. Our schemes are tailored to alleviate errors due to 1/f noise; we find gates with only 1% loss of fidelity due to this source, for pulse times in the range of 20-30 ns for one-qubit gates (Z rotations, Hadamard) and 60 ns for a two-qubit gate (controlled-Z). Our relaxation and dephasing time estimates indicate a comparable loss of fidelity from this source. The control of leakage plays an important role in the design of our shaped pulses, preventing shorter pulse times. However, we have found that imprecision in the control of the quantum phase plays a major role in the limitation of the fidelity of our gates

  16. Spectroscopy and coherent manipulation of single and coupled flux qubits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yu-Lin; Deng Hui; Huang Ke-Qiang; Tian Ye; Yu Hai-Feng; Xue Guang-Ming; Jin Yi-Rong; Li Jie; Zhao Shi-Ping; Zheng Dong-Ning

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of three-junction flux qubits, both single flux qubits and coupled flux qubits, using a coupled direct current superconducting quantum interference device (dc-SQUID) for readout are reported. The measurement procedure is described in detail. We performed spectroscopy measurements and coherent manipulations of the qubit states on a single flux qubit, demonstrating quantum energy levels and Rabi oscillations, with Rabi oscillation decay time T Rabi = 78 ns and energy relaxation time T 1 = 315 ns. We found that the value of T Rabi depends strongly on the mutual inductance between the qubit and the magnetic coil. We also performed spectroscopy measurements on inductively coupled flux qubits. (general)

  17. Two-quantum Doppler-free induced gamma emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zadernovsky, A.A.

    1999-01-01

    Reported here is a theoretical study of an alternative way to remove the pernicious influence of chaotic motion of free nuclei by means of external ignition of two-quantum IGE process in counter-propagating intense photon beams. The performed analysis reveals the main advantages and drawbacks of this method. The following conclusions are underlined: 1. in contrast to single-quantum emission in an ensemble of nuclei with Doppler-broadened gain line, this method involves all nuclei regardless of there individual velocities; 2. a specific dynamic distributed feedback is in this case established in absence of any reflecting structures; 3. because of non-linearity of the feedback, with a coefficient proportional to the photon flux density of the igniting beam, the excitation of nuclei is released in an avalanche-like manner, which result in emission of a giant pulse of gamma quanta; 4. at present, the implementation of such a process is impeded by the absence of a source of igniting gamma quanta, with the sufficient photon flux density. Therefore the advantage of the propose technique may manifests themselves only in designing a final stage of a source of gamma quanta (e.g., in X-ray or gamma-ray laser, relativistic undulator, free electron laser, etc.) for production of short giant pulse of coherent gamma photons. (author)

  18. Quantum Erasure: Quantum Interference Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Walborn, Stephen P.; Cunha, Marcelo O. Terra; Pádua, Sebastião; Monken, Carlos H.

    2005-01-01

    Recent experiments in quantum optics have shed light on the foundations of quantum physics. Quantum erasers - modified quantum interference experiments - show that quantum entanglement is responsible for the complementarity principle.

  19. Quantum kinetic theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bonitz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This book presents quantum kinetic theory in a comprehensive way. The focus is on density operator methods and on non-equilibrium Green functions. The theory allows to rigorously treat nonequilibrium dynamics in quantum many-body systems. Of particular interest are ultrafast processes in plasmas, condensed matter and trapped atoms that are stimulated by rapidly developing experiments with short pulse lasers and free electron lasers. To describe these experiments theoretically, the most powerful approach is given by non-Markovian quantum kinetic equations that are discussed in detail, including computational aspects.

  20. Sensitive measurement of nonlinear absorption and optical limiting in undoped and Fe-doped ZnO quantum dots using pulsed laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, D.; Malik, B. P.; Gaur, A.

    2016-11-01

    Zinc oxide quantum dots (QDs) with Fe-doping at different concentrations were prepared by chemical co-precipitation method. The prepared QDs were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Z-scan technique. The sizes of QDs were found to be within 4.6-6.6 nm range. The nonlinear parameters viz. two-photon absorption coefficient (βTPA) and two-photon absorption cross-section (σTPA) were extracted with the help of open aperture Z-scan technique using nanosecond Nd:YAG laser operating at wavelength 532 nm. Higher values of βTPA and σTPA for Fe doped ZnO implied that they were potential materials for development of photonics devices and sensor protection applications. Fe doped sample (3 % by wt) was found to be the best optical limiter with limiting threshold intensity of 0.64 TW/cm2.

  1. Phase-space quantum control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fechner, Susanne

    2008-01-01

    The von Neumann-representation introduced in this thesis describes each laser pulse in a one-to-one manner as a sum of bandwidth-limited, Gaussian laser pulses centered around different points in phase space. These pulses can be regarded as elementary building blocks from which every single laser pulse can be constructed. The von Neumann-representation combines different useful properties for applications in quantum control. First, it is a one-to-one map between the degrees of freedom of the pulse shaper and the phase-space representation of the corresponding shaped laser pulse. In other words: Every possible choice of pulse shaper parameters corresponds to exactly one von Neumann-representation and vice versa. Moreover, since temporal and spectral structures become immediately sizable, the von Neumann-representation, as well as the Husimi- or the Wigner-representations, allows for an intuitive interpretation of the represented laser pulse. (orig.)

  2. Separate observation of ballistic and scattered photons in the propagation of short laser pulses through a strongly scattering medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tereshchenko, Sergei A; Podgaetskii, Vitalii M; Vorob'ev, Nikolai S; Smirnov, A V

    1998-01-01

    The conditions are identified for simultaneous observation of the peaks of scattered and unscattered (ballistic) photons in a narrow pulsed laser beam crossing a strongly scattering medium. The experimental results are explained on the basis of a nonstationary two-flux model of radiation transport. An analytic expression is given for the contribution of ballistic photons to the transmitted radiation, as a function of the characteristics of the scattering medium. It is shown that the ballistic photon contribution can be increased by the use of high-contrast substances which alter selectively the absorption and scattering coefficients of the medium. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  3. Pulsed neutron sources at Dubna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabalin, E.P.

    1991-01-01

    In 1960 the first world repetitively pulsed reactor IBR was put into operation. It was the beginning of the story how fission based pulsed neutron sources at Dubna have survived. The engineers involved have experienced many successes and failures in the course of new sources upgrading to finally come to possess the world's brightest neutron source - IBR-2. The details are being reviewed through the paper. The fission based pulsed neutron sources did not reach their final state as yet- the conceptual views of IBR prospects are being discussed with the goal to double the thermal neutron peak flux (up to 2x10 16 ) and to enhance the cold neutron flux by 10 times (with the present one being as high that of the ISIS cold moderator). (author)

  4. Complex Nanostructures by Pulsed Droplet Epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noboyuki Koguchi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available What makes three dimensional semiconductor quantum nanostructures so attractive is the possibility to tune their electronic properties by careful design of their size and composition. These parameters set the confinement potential of electrons and holes, thus determining the electronic and optical properties of the nanostructure. An often overlooked parameter, which has an even more relevant effect on the electronic properties of the nanostructure, is shape. Gaining a strong control over the electronic properties via shape tuning is the key to access subtle electronic design possibilities. The Pulsed Dropled Epitaxy is an innovative growth method for the fabrication of quantum nanostructures with highly designable shapes and complex morphologies. With Pulsed Dropled Epitaxy it is possible to combine different nanostructures, namely quantum dots, quantum rings and quantum disks, with tunable sizes and densities, into a single multi-function nanostructure, thus allowing an unprecedented control over electronic properties.

  5. Quadra-Quantum Dots and Related Patterns of Quantum Dot Molecules: Basic Nanostructures for Quantum Dot Cellular Automata Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somsak Panyakeow

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Laterally close-packed quantum dots (QDs called quantum dot molecules (QDMs are grown by modified molecular beam epitaxy (MBE. Quantum dots could be aligned and cross hatched. Quantum rings (QRs created from quantum dot transformation during thin or partial capping are used as templates for the formations of bi-quantum dot molecules (Bi-QDMs and quantum dot rings (QDRs. Preferable quantum dot nanostructure for quantum computation based on quantum dot cellular automata (QCA is laterally close-packed quantum dot molecules having four quantum dots at the corners of square configuration. These four quantum dot sets are called quadra-quantum dots (QQDs. Aligned quadra-quantum dots with two electron confinements work like a wire for digital information transmission by Coulomb repulsion force, which is fast and consumes little power. Combination of quadra-quantum dots in line and their cross-over works as logic gates and memory bits. Molecular Beam Epitaxial growth technique called 'Droplet Epitaxy' has been developed for several quantum nanostructures such as quantum rings and quantum dot rings. Quantum rings are prepared by using 20 ML In-Ga (15:85 droplets deposited on a GaAs substrate at 390'C with a droplet growth rate of 1ML/s. Arsenic flux (7'8'10-6Torr is then exposed for InGaAs crystallization at 200'C for 5 min. During droplet epitaxy at a high droplet thickness and high temperature, out-diffusion from the centre of droplets occurs under anisotropic strain. This leads to quantum ring structures having non-uniform ring stripes and deep square-shaped nanoholes. Using these peculiar quantum rings as templates, four quantum dots situated at the corners of a square shape are regrown. Two of these four quantum dots are aligned either or, which are preferable crystallographic directions of quantum dot alignment in general.

  6. Optimal control and quantum simulations in superconducting quantum devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egger, Daniel J.

    2014-10-31

    Quantum optimal control theory is the science of steering quantum systems. In this thesis we show how to overcome the obstacles in implementing optimal control for superconducting quantum bits, a promising candidate for the creation of a quantum computer. Building such a device will require the tools of optimal control. We develop pulse shapes to solve a frequency crowding problem and create controlled-Z gates. A methodology is developed for the optimisation towards a target non-unitary process. We show how to tune-up control pulses for a generic quantum system in an automated way using a combination of open- and closed-loop optimal control. This will help scaling of quantum technologies since algorithms can calibrate control pulses far more efficiently than humans. Additionally we show how circuit QED can be brought to the novel regime of multi-mode ultrastrong coupling using a left-handed transmission line coupled to a right-handed one. We then propose to use this system as an analogue quantum simulator for the Spin-Boson model to show how dissipation arises in quantum systems.

  7. Quantum random-number generator based on a photon-number-resolving detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Min; Wu, E; Liang Yan; Jian Yi; Wu Guang; Zeng Heping

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrated a high-efficiency quantum random number generator which takes inherent advantage of the photon number distribution randomness of a coherent light source. This scheme was realized by comparing the photon flux of consecutive pulses with a photon number resolving detector. The random bit generation rate could reach 2.4 MHz with a system clock of 6.0 MHz, corresponding to a random bit generation efficiency as high as 40%. The random number files passed all the stringent statistical tests.

  8. Flux frequency analysis of seasonally dry ecosystem fluxes in two unique biomes of Sonora Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verduzco, V. S.; Yepez, E. A.; Robles-Morua, A.; Garatuza, J.; Rodriguez, J. C.; Watts, C.

    2013-05-01

    Complex dynamics from the interactions of ecosystems processes makes difficult to model the behavior of ecosystems fluxes of carbon and water in response to the variation of environmental and biological drivers. Although process oriented ecosystem models are critical tools for studying land-atmosphere fluxes, its validity depends on the appropriate parameterization of equations describing temporal and spatial changes of model state variables and their interactions. This constraint often leads to discrepancies between model simulations and observed data that reduce models reliability especially in arid and semiarid ecosystems. In the semiarid north western Mexico, ecosystem processes are fundamentally controlled by the seasonality of water and the intermittence of rain pulses which are conditions that require calibration of specific fitting functions to describe the response of ecosystem variables (i.e. NEE, GPP, ET, respiration) to these wetting and drying periods. The goal is to find functions that describe the magnitude of ecosystem fluxes during individual rain pulses and the seasonality of the ecosystem. Relaying on five years of eddy covariance flux data of a tropical dry forest and a subtropical shrubland we present a flux frequency analysis that describe the variation of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2 to highlight the relevance of pulse driven dynamics controlling this flux. Preliminary results of flux frequency analysis of NEE indicate that these ecosystems are strongly controlled by the frequency distribution of rain. Also, the output of fitting functions for NEE, GPP, ET and respiration using semi-empirical functions applied at specific rain pulses compared with season-long statistically generated simulations do not agree. Seasonality and the intrinsic nature of individual pulses have different effects on ecosystem flux responses. This suggests that relationships between the nature of seasonality and individual pulses can help improve the

  9. Quantum optics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Agarwal, G. S

    2013-01-01

    ..., quantum metrology, spin squeezing, control of decoherence and many other key topics. Readers are guided through the principles of quantum optics and their uses in a wide variety of areas including quantum information science and quantum mechanics...

  10. Controllability of multi-partite quantum systems and selective excitation of quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schirmer, S G; Pullen, I C H; Solomon, A I

    2005-01-01

    We consider the degrees of controllability of multi-partite quantum systems, as well as necessary and sufficient criteria for each case. The results are applied to the problem of simultaneous control of an ensemble of quantum dots with a single laser pulse. Finally, we apply optimal control techniques to demonstrate selective excitation of individual dots for a simultaneously controllable ensemble of quantum dots

  11. Vertical Josephson Interferometer for Tunable Flux Qubit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granata, C [Istituto di Cibernetica ' E. Caianiello' del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, I- 80078, Pozzuoli (Italy); Vettoliere, A [Istituto di Cibernetica ' E. Caianiello' del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, I- 80078, Pozzuoli (Italy); Lisitskiy, M [Istituto di Cibernetica ' E. Caianiello' del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, I- 80078, Pozzuoli (Italy); Rombetto, S [Istituto di Cibernetica ' E. Caianiello' del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, I- 80078, Pozzuoli (Italy); Russo, M [Istituto di Cibernetica ' E. Caianiello' del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, I- 80078, Pozzuoli (Italy); Ruggiero, B [Istituto di Cibernetica ' E. Caianiello' del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, I- 80078, Pozzuoli (Italy); Corato, V [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Seconda Universita di Napoli, I-8 1031, Aversa (Italy) and Istituto di Cibernetica ' E. Caianiello' del CNR, I-80078, Pozzuoli (Italy); Russo, R [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Seconda Universita di Napoli, I-8 1031, Aversa (Italy) and Istituto di Cibernetica ' E. Caianiello' del CNR, I-80078, Pozzuoli (Italy); Silvestrini, P [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Seconda Universita di Napoli, I-8 1031, Aversa (Italy) and Istituto di Cibernetica ' E. Caianiello' del CNR, I-80078, Pozzuoli (Italy)

    2006-06-01

    We present a niobium-based Josephson device as prototype for quantum computation with flux qubits. The most interesting feature of this device is the use of a Josephson vertical interferometer to tune the flux qubit allowing the control of the off-diagonal Hamiltonian terms of the system. In the vertical interferometer, the Josephson current is precisely modulated from a maximum to zero with fine control by a small transversal magnetic field parallel to the rf superconducting loop plane.

  12. Rotating flux compressor for energy conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhuri, P.; Linton, T.W.; Phillips, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    The rotating flux compressor (RFC) converts rotational kinetic energy into an electrical output pulse which would have higher energy than the electrical energy initially stored in the compressor. An RFC has been designed in which wedge-shaped rotor blades pass through the air gaps between successive turns of a solenoid, the stator. Magnetic flux is generated by pulsing the stator solenoids when the inductance is a maximum, i.e., when the flux fills the stator-solenoid volume. Connecting the solenoid across a load conserves the flux which is compressed within the small volume surrounding the stator periphery when the rotor blades cut into the free space between the stator plates, creating a minimum-inductance condition. The unique features of this design are: (1) no electrical connections (brushes) to the rotor; (2) no conventional windings; and (3) no maintenance. The device has been tested up to 5000 rpm of rotor speed

  13. Frequency-tuned microwave photon counter based on a superconductive quantum interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shnyrkov, V. I.; Yangcao, Wu; Soroka, A. A.; Turutanov, O. G.; Lyakhno, V. Yu.

    2018-03-01

    Various types of single-photon counters operating in infrared, ultraviolet, and optical wavelength ranges are successfully used to study electromagnetic fields, analyze radiation sources, and solve problems in quantum informatics. However, their operating principles become ineffective at millimeter band, S-band, and ultra-high frequency bands of wavelengths due to the decrease in quantum energy by 4-5 orders of magnitude. Josephson circuits with discrete Hamiltonians and qubits are a good foundation for the construction of single-photon counters at these frequencies. This paper presents a frequency-tuned microwave photon counter based on a single-junction superconducting quantum interferometer and flux qutrit. The control pulse converts the interferometer into a two-level system for resonance absorption of photons. Decay of the photon-induced excited state changes the magnetic flux in the interferometer, which is measured by a SQUID magnetometer. Schemes for recording the magnetic flux using a DC SQUID or ideal parametric detector, based on a qutrit with high-frequency excitation, are discussed. It is shown that the counter consisting of an interferometer with a Josephson junction and a parametric detector demonstrates high performance and is capable of detecting single photons in a microwave band.

  14. A wheel-shaped single-molecule magnet of [MnII 3MnIII 4]: quantum tunneling of magnetization under static and pulse magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Satoshi; Nihei, Masayuki; Shiga, Takuya; Nakano, Motohiro; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Bircher, Roland; Waldmann, Oliver; Ochsenbein, Stefan T; Güdel, Hans U; Fernandez-Alonso, Felix; Oshio, Hiroki

    2007-01-01

    The reaction of N-(2-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzyl)iminodiethanol (=H3(5-NO2-hbide)) with Mn(OAc)2* 4 H2O in methanol, followed by recrystallization from 1,2-dichloroethane, yielded a wheel-shaped single-molecule magnet (SMM) of [MnII 3MnIII 4(5-NO2-hbide)6].5 C2H4Cl2 (1). In 1, seven manganese ions are linked by six tri-anionic ligands and form the wheel in which the two manganese ions on the rim and the one in the center are MnII and the other four manganese ions are MnIII ions. Powder magnetic susceptibility measurements showed a gradual increase with chimT values as the temperature was lowered, reaching a maximum value of 53.9 emu mol(-1) K. Analyses of magnetic susceptibility data suggested a spin ground state of S=19/2. The zero-field splitting parameters of D and B 0 4 were estimated to be -0.283(1) K and -1.64(1)x10(-5) K, respectively, by high-field EPR measurements (HF-EPR). The anisotropic parameters agreed with those estimated from magnetization and inelastic neutron scattering experiments. AC magnetic susceptibility measurements showed frequency-dependent in- and out-of-phase signals, characteristic data for an SMM, and an Arrhenius plot of the relaxation time gave a re-orientation energy barrier (DeltaE) of 18.1 K and a pre-exponential factor of 1.63x10(-7) s. Magnetization experiments on aligned single crystals below 0.7 K showed a stepped hysteresis loop, confirming the occurrence of quantum tunneling of the on magnetization (QTM). QTM was, on the other hand, suppressed by rapid sweeps of the magnetic field even at 0.5 K. The sweep-rate dependence of the spin flips can be understood by considering the Landau-Zener-Stückelberg (LZS) model.

  15. Quantum Instantons and Quantum Chaos

    OpenAIRE

    Jirari, H.; Kröger, H.; Luo, X. Q.; Moriarty, K. J. M.; Rubin, S. G.

    1999-01-01

    Based on a closed form expression for the path integral of quantum transition amplitudes, we suggest rigorous definitions of both, quantum instantons and quantum chaos. As an example we compute the quantum instanton of the double well potential.

  16. Quantum metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang Guo-Yong; Guo Guang-Can

    2013-01-01

    The statistical error is ineluctable in any measurement. Quantum techniques, especially with the development of quantum information, can help us squeeze the statistical error and enhance the precision of measurement. In a quantum system, there are some quantum parameters, such as the quantum state, quantum operator, and quantum dimension, which have no classical counterparts. So quantum metrology deals with not only the traditional parameters, but also the quantum parameters. Quantum metrology includes two important parts: measuring the physical parameters with a precision beating the classical physics limit and measuring the quantum parameters precisely. In this review, we will introduce how quantum characters (e.g., squeezed state and quantum entanglement) yield a higher precision, what the research areas are scientists most interesting in, and what the development status of quantum metrology and its perspectives are. (topical review - quantum information)

  17. Neutron flux monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Eiji; Tai, Ichiro.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To maintain the measuring accuracy and the reponse time within an allowable range in accordance with the change of neutron fluxes in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. Constitution: Neutron fluxes within a nuclear reactor pressure vessel are detected by detectors, converted into pulse signals and amplified in a range switching amplifier. The amplified signals are further converted through an A/D converter and digital signals from the converter are subjected to a square operation in an square operation circuit. The output from the circuit is inputted into an integration circuit to selectively accumulate the constant of 1/2n, 1 - 1/2n (n is a positive integer) respectively for two continuing signals to perform weighing. Then, the addition is carried out to calculate the integrated value and the addition number is changed by the chane in the number n to vary the integrating time. The integrated value is inputted into a control circuit to control the value of n so that the fluctuation and the calculation time for the integrated value are within a predetermined range and, at the same time, the gain of the range switching amplifier is controlled. (Seki, T.)

  18. Quantum Distinction: Quantum Distinctiones!

    OpenAIRE

    Zeps, Dainis

    2009-01-01

    10 pages; How many distinctions, in Latin, quantum distinctiones. We suggest approach of anthropic principle based on anthropic reference system which should be applied equally both in theoretical physics and in mathematics. We come to principle that within reference system of life subject of mathematics (that of thinking) should be equated with subject of physics (that of nature). For this reason we enter notions of series of distinctions, quantum distinction, and argue that quantum distinct...

  19. Fractional statistics and quantum theory

    CERN Document Server

    Khare, Avinash

    1997-01-01

    This book explains the subtleties of quantum statistical mechanics in lower dimensions and their possible ramifications in quantum theory. The discussion is at a pedagogical level and is addressed to both graduate students and advanced research workers with a reasonable background in quantum and statistical mechanics. The main emphasis will be on explaining new concepts. Topics in the first part of the book includes the flux tube model of anyons, the braid group and quantum and statistical mechanics of noninteracting anyon gas. The second part of the book provides a detailed discussion about f

  20. Critical flux determination by flux-stepping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Søren; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    2010-01-01

    In membrane filtration related scientific literature, often step-by-step determined critical fluxes are reported. Using a dynamic microfiltration device, it is shown that critical fluxes determined from two different flux-stepping methods are dependent upon operational parameters such as step...... length, step height, and.flux start level. Filtrating 8 kg/m(3) yeast cell suspensions by a vibrating 0.45 x 10(-6) m pore size microfiltration hollow fiber module, critical fluxes from 5.6 x 10(-6) to 1.2 x 10(-5) m/s have been measured using various step lengths from 300 to 1200 seconds. Thus......, such values are more or less useless in itself as critical flux predictors, and constant flux verification experiments have to be conducted to check if the determined critical fluxes call predict sustainable flux regimes. However, it is shown that using the step-by-step predicted critical fluxes as start...

  1. Quantum beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uesaka, Mitsuru

    2003-01-01

    Present state and future prospect are described on quantum beams for medical use. Efforts for compactness of linac for advanced cancer therapy have brought about the production of machines like Accuray's CyberKnife and TOMOTHERAPY (Tomo Therapy Inc.) where the acceleration frequency of X-band (9-11 GHz) is used. For cervical vein angiography by the X-band linac, a compact hard X-ray source is developed which is based on the (reverse) Compton scattering through laser-electron collision. More intense beam and laser are necessary at present. A compact machine generating the particle beam of 10 MeV-1 GeV (laser-plasma accelerator) for cancer therapy is also developed using the recent compression technique (chirped-pulse amplification) to generate laser of >10 TW. Tokyo University is studying for the electron beam with energy of GeV order, for the laser-based synchrotron X-ray, and for imaging by the short pulse ion beam. Development of advanced compact accelerators is globally attempted. In Japan, a virtual laboratory by National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), a working group of universities and research facilities through the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, started in 2001 for practical manufacturing of the above-mentioned machines for cancer therapy and for angiography. Virtual Factory (Inc.), a business venture, is to be stood in future. (N.I.)

  2. Compulsator, a high power compensated pulsed alternator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weldon, W.F.; Bird, W.L.; Driga, M.D.; Rylander, H.G.; Tolk, K.M.; Woodson, H.H.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter describes a pulsed power supply utilizing inertial energy storage as a possible replacement for large capacitor banks. The compulsator overcomes many of the limitations of the pulsed homopolar generators previously developed by the Center for Electromechanics and elsewhere in that it offers high voltage (10's of kV) and consequently higher pulse rise times, is self commutating, and offers the possibility of generating repetitive pulses. The compulsator converts rotational inertial energy directly into electrical energy utilizing the principles of both magnetic induction and flux compression. The theory of operation, a prototype compulsator design, and advanced compulsator designs are discussed

  3. Interaction of attosecond electromagnetic pulses with atoms: The exactly solvable model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, Yu. V.; Kouzakov, K. A.; Vinitsky, S. I.; Gusev, A. A.

    2007-01-01

    We consider the exactly solvable model of interaction of zero-duration electromagnetic pulses with an atom. The model has a number of peculiar properties which are outlined in the cases of a single pulse and two opposite pulses. In perspective, it can be useful in different fields of physics involving interaction of attosecond laser pulses with quantum systems

  4. Thermality of the Hawking flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, Matt [School of Mathematics, Statistics, and Operations Research,Victoria University of Wellington, PO Box 600, Wellington 6140 (New Zealand)

    2015-07-03

    Is the Hawking flux “thermal”? Unfortunately, the answer to this seemingly innocent question depends on a number of often unstated, but quite crucial, technical assumptions built into modern (mis-)interpretations of the word “thermal”. The original 1850’s notions of thermality — based on classical thermodynamic reasoning applied to idealized “black bodies” or “lamp black surfaces” — when supplemented by specific basic quantum ideas from the early 1900’s, immediately led to the notion of the black-body spectrum, (the Planck-shaped spectrum), but without any specific assumptions or conclusions regarding correlations between the quanta. Many (not all) modern authors (often implicitly and unintentionally) add an extra, quite unnecessary, assumption that there are no correlations in the black-body radiation; but such usage is profoundly ahistorical and dangerously misleading. Specifically, the Hawking flux from an evaporating black hole, (just like the radiation flux from a leaky furnace or a burning lump of coal), is only approximately Planck-shaped over an explicitly bounded range of frequencies. Standard physics (phase space and adiabaticity effects) explicitly bound the frequency range over which the Hawking flux is approximately Planck-shaped from both above and below — the Hawking flux is certainly not exactly Planckian, and there is no compelling physics reason to assume the Hawking photons are uncorrelated.

  5. Thermality of the Hawking flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Is the Hawking flux “thermal”? Unfortunately, the answer to this seemingly innocent question depends on a number of often unstated, but quite crucial, technical assumptions built into modern (mis-)interpretations of the word “thermal”. The original 1850’s notions of thermality — based on classical thermodynamic reasoning applied to idealized “black bodies” or “lamp black surfaces” — when supplemented by specific basic quantum ideas from the early 1900’s, immediately led to the notion of the black-body spectrum, (the Planck-shaped spectrum), but without any specific assumptions or conclusions regarding correlations between the quanta. Many (not all) modern authors (often implicitly and unintentionally) add an extra, quite unnecessary, assumption that there are no correlations in the black-body radiation; but such usage is profoundly ahistorical and dangerously misleading. Specifically, the Hawking flux from an evaporating black hole, (just like the radiation flux from a leaky furnace or a burning lump of coal), is only approximately Planck-shaped over an explicitly bounded range of frequencies. Standard physics (phase space and adiabaticity effects) explicitly bound the frequency range over which the Hawking flux is approximately Planck-shaped from both above and below — the Hawking flux is certainly not exactly Planckian, and there is no compelling physics reason to assume the Hawking photons are uncorrelated.

  6. Pulse Compression of Phase-matched High Harmonic Pulses from a Time-Delay Compensated Monochromator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ito Motohiko

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Pulse compression of single 32.6-eV high harmonic pulses from a time-delay compensated monochromator was demonstrated down to 11±3 fs by compensating the pulse front tilt. The photon flux was intensified up to 5.7×109 photons/s on target by implementing high harmonic generation under a phase matching condition in a hollow fiber used for increasing the interaction length.

  7. Quadra-quantum Dots and Related Patterns of Quantum Dot Molecules:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somsak Panyakeow

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Laterally close-packed quantum dots (QDs called quantum dot molecules (QDMs are grown by modified molecular beam epitaxy (MBE. Quantum dots could be aligned and cross hatched. Quantum rings (QRs created from quantum dot transformation during thin or partial capping are used as templates for the formations of bi-quantum dot molecules (Bi-QDMs and quantum dot rings (QDRs. Preferable quantum dot nanostructure for quantum computation based on quantum dot cellular automata (QCA is laterally close-packed quantum dot molecules having four quantum dots at the corners of square configuration. These four quantum dot sets are called quadra-quantum dots (QQDs. Aligned quadra-quantum dots with two electron confinements work like a wire for digital information transmission by Coulomb repulsion force, which is fast and consumes little power. Combination of quadra-quantum dots in line and their cross-over works as logic gates and memory bits. Molecular Beam Epitaxial growth technique called ‘‘Droplet Epitaxy” has been developed for several quantum nanostructures such as quantum rings and quantum dot rings. Quantum rings are prepared by using 20 ML In-Ga (15:85 droplets deposited on a GaAs substrate at 390°C with a droplet growth rate of 1ML/s. Arsenic flux (7–8×10-6Torr is then exposed for InGaAs crystallization at 200°C for 5 min. During droplet epitaxy at a high droplet thickness and high temperature, out-diffusion from the centre of droplets occurs under anisotropic strain. This leads to quantum ring structures having non-uniform ring stripes and deep square-shaped nanoholes. Using these peculiar quantum rings as templates, four quantum dots situated at the corners of a square shape are regrown. Two of these four quantum dots are aligned either or , which are preferable crystallographic directions of quantum dot alignment in general.

  8. Pulse plating

    CERN Document Server

    Hansal, Wolfgang E G; Green, Todd; Leisner, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The electrodeposition of metals using pulsed current has achieved practical importance in recent years. Although it has long been known that changes in potential, with or without polarity reversal, can significantly affect the deposition process, the practical application of this has been slow to be adopted. This can largely be explained in terms of the complex relationship between the current regime and its effect on the electrodeposition process. In order to harness these effects, an understanding of the anodic and cathodic electrochemical processes is necessary, together with the effects of polarity reversal and the rate of such reversals. In this new monograph, the basics of metal electrodeposition from solution are laid out in great detail in seven distinct chapters. With this knowledge, the reader is able to predict how a given pulse train profile can be adopted to achieve a desired outcome. Equally important is the choice of a suitable rectifier and the ancillary control circuits to enable pulse platin...

  9. Quantum walks, quantum gates, and quantum computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hines, Andrew P.; Stamp, P. C. E.

    2007-01-01

    The physics of quantum walks on graphs is formulated in Hamiltonian language, both for simple quantum walks and for composite walks, where extra discrete degrees of freedom live at each node of the graph. It is shown how to map between quantum walk Hamiltonians and Hamiltonians for qubit systems and quantum circuits; this is done for both single-excitation and multiexcitation encodings. Specific examples of spin chains, as well as static and dynamic systems of qubits, are mapped to quantum walks, and walks on hyperlattices and hypercubes are mapped to various gate systems. We also show how to map a quantum circuit performing the quantum Fourier transform, the key element of Shor's algorithm, to a quantum walk system doing the same. The results herein are an essential preliminary to a Hamiltonian formulation of quantum walks in which coupling to a dynamic quantum environment is included

  10. Flux qubit to a transmission line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haeberlein, Max; Baust, Alexander; Zhong, Ling; Gross, Rudolf [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), Muenchen (Germany); Anderson, Gustav; Wang, Lujun; Eder, Peter; Fischer, Michael; Goetz, Jan; Xie, Edwar; Schwarz, Manuel; Wulschner, Karl Friedrich; Deppe, Frank; Fedorov, Kirill; Huebl, Hans; Menzel, Edwin [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Marx, Achim [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Within the last decade, superconducting qubits coupled to microwave resonators have been extensively studied within the framework of quantum electrodynamics. Ultimately, quantum computing seems within reach in such architectures. However, error correction schemes are necessary to achieve the required fidelity in multi-qubit operations, drastically increasing the number of qubits involved. In this work, we couple a flux qubit to a transmission line where it interacts with itinerant microwave photons granting access to all-optical quantum computing. In this approach, travelling photons generate entanglement between two waveguides, containing the qubit information. In this presentation, we show experimental data on flux qubits coupled to transmission lines. Furthermore, we will discuss entanglement generation between two separate paths.

  11. Integrated digital superconducting logic circuits for the quantum synthesizer. Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchholz, F.I.; Kohlmann, J.; Khabipov, M.; Brandt, C.M.; Hagedorn, D.; Balashov, D.; Maibaum, F.; Tolkacheva, E.; Niemeyer, J.

    2006-11-01

    This report presents the results, which were reached in the framework of the BMBF cooperative plan ''Quantum Synthesizer'' in the partial plan ''Integrated Digital Superconducting Logic Circuits''. As essential goal of the plan a novel instrument on the base of quantum-coherent superconducting circuits should be developed. which allows to generate praxis-relevant wave forms with quantum accuracy, the quantum synthesizer. The main topics of development of the reported partial plan lied at the one hand in the development of integrated, digital, superconducting circuit in rapid-single-flux (RSFQ) quantum logics for the pattern generator of the quantum synthesizer, at the other hand in the further development of the fabrication technology for the aiming of high circuit complexity. In order to fulfil these requirements at the PTB a new design system was implemented, based on the software of Cadence. Together with the required RSFQ extensions for the design of digital superconducting circuits was a platform generated, on which the reachable circuit complexity is exclusively limited by the technology parameters of the available fabrication technology: Physical simulations are with PSCAN up to a complexity of more than 1000 circuit elements possible; furthermore VHDL allows the verification of arbitrarily large circuit architectures. In accordance for this the production line at the PTB was brought to a level, which allows in Nb/Al-Al x O y /Nb SIS technology implementation the fabrication of highly integrable RSFQ circuit architectures. The developed and fabricated basic circuits of the pattern generator have proved correct functionality and reliability in the measuring operation. Thereby for the circular RSFQ shift registers a key role as local memories in the construction of the pattern generator is devolved upon. The registers were realized with the aimed bit lengths up to 128 bit and with reachable signal-processing speeds of above 10 GHz. At the interface RSFQ

  12. Quantum memory Quantum memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gouët, Jean-Louis; Moiseev, Sergey

    2012-06-01

    Interaction of quantum radiation with multi-particle ensembles has sparked off intense research efforts during the past decade. Emblematic of this field is the quantum memory scheme, where a quantum state of light is mapped onto an ensemble of atoms and then recovered in its original shape. While opening new access to the basics of light-atom interaction, quantum memory also appears as a key element for information processing applications, such as linear optics quantum computation and long-distance quantum communication via quantum repeaters. Not surprisingly, it is far from trivial to practically recover a stored quantum state of light and, although impressive progress has already been accomplished, researchers are still struggling to reach this ambitious objective. This special issue provides an account of the state-of-the-art in a fast-moving research area that makes physicists, engineers and chemists work together at the forefront of their discipline, involving quantum fields and atoms in different media, magnetic resonance techniques and material science. Various strategies have been considered to store and retrieve quantum light. The explored designs belong to three main—while still overlapping—classes. In architectures derived from photon echo, information is mapped over the spectral components of inhomogeneously broadened absorption bands, such as those encountered in rare earth ion doped crystals and atomic gases in external gradient magnetic field. Protocols based on electromagnetic induced transparency also rely on resonant excitation and are ideally suited to the homogeneous absorption lines offered by laser cooled atomic clouds or ion Coulomb crystals. Finally off-resonance approaches are illustrated by Faraday and Raman processes. Coupling with an optical cavity may enhance the storage process, even for negligibly small atom number. Multiple scattering is also proposed as a way to enlarge the quantum interaction distance of light with matter. The

  13. Fractional flux quanta in Josephson junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldobin, E.; Buckenmaier, K.; Gaber, T.; Kemmler, M.; Pfeiffer, J.; Koelle, D.; Kleiner, R. [Physikalisches Inst. - Experimentalphysik II, Univ. Tuebingen (Germany); Weides, M.; Kohlstedt, H. [Center of Nanoelectronic Systems for Information Technology (CNI), Research Centre Juelich (Germany); Siegel, M. [Inst. fuer Mikro- und Nanoelektronische Systeme, Univ. Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Fractional Josephson vortices may appear in the so-called 0-{kappa} Josephson junctions ({kappa} is an arbitrary number) and carry magnetic flux {phi}, which is a fraction of the magnetic flux quantum {phi}{sub 0}{approx}2.07 x 10{sup -15} Wb. Their properties are very different from the usual integer fluxons: they are pinned, and often represent the ground state of the system with spontaneous circulating supercurrent. They behave as well controlled macroscopic spins and can be used to construct bits, qubits, tunable photonic crystals and to study the (quantum) physics of spin systems. In this talk we discuss recent advances in 0-{pi} junction technology and present recent experimental results: evidence of the spontaneous flux in the ground state, spectroscopy of the fractional vortex eigenfrequencies and observation of dynamics effects related to the flipping of the fractional vortices. (orig.)

  14. Nonlinear Michelson interferometer for improved quantum metrology

    OpenAIRE

    Luis, Alfredo; Rivas, Ángel

    2015-01-01

    We examine quantum detection via a Michelson interferometer embedded in a gas with Kerr nonlinearity. This nonlinear interferometer is illuminated by pulses of classical light. This strategy combines the robustness against practical imperfections of classical light with the improvement provided by nonlinear processes. Regarding ultimate quantum limits, we stress that, as a difference with linear schemes, the nonlinearity introduces pulse duration as a new variable into play along with the ene...

  15. Weak point disorder in strongly fluctuating flux-line liquids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We consider the effect of weak uncorrelated quenched disorder (point defects) on a strongly fluctuating flux-line liquid. We use a hydrodynamic model which is based on mapping the flux-line system onto a quantum liquid of relativistic charged bosons in 2 + 1 dimensions [P Benetatos and M C Marchetti, Phys. Rev. B64 ...

  16. Generalized flux states of the t-J model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nori, F.; Abrahams, E.; Zimanyi, G.T.

    1990-01-01

    We investigate certain generalized flux phases arising in a mean-field approach to the t-J model. First, we establish that the energy of noninteracting electrons moving in a uniform magnetic field has an absolute minimum as a function of the flux at exactly one flux quantum per particle. Using this result, we show that if the hard-core nature of the hole bosons is taken into account, then the slave-boson mean-field approximation for the t-J Hamiltonian allows for a solution where both the spinons and the holons experience an average flux of one flux quantum per particle. This enables them to achieve the lowest possible energy within the manifold of spatially uniform flux states. In the case of the continuum model, this is possible only for certain fractional fillings and we speculate that the system may react to this frustration effect by phase separation

  17. Free-Space Quantum Communication with a Portable Quantum Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namazi, Mehdi; Vallone, Giuseppe; Jordaan, Bertus; Goham, Connor; Shahrokhshahi, Reihaneh; Villoresi, Paolo; Figueroa, Eden

    2017-12-01

    The realization of an elementary quantum network that is intrinsically secure and operates over long distances requires the interconnection of several quantum modules performing different tasks. In this work, we report the realization of a communication network functioning in a quantum regime, consisting of four different quantum modules: (i) a random polarization qubit generator, (ii) a free-space quantum-communication channel, (iii) an ultralow-noise portable quantum memory, and (iv) a qubit decoder, in a functional elementary quantum network possessing all capabilities needed for quantum-information distribution protocols. We create weak coherent pulses at the single-photon level encoding polarization states |H ⟩ , |V ⟩, |D ⟩, and |A ⟩ in a randomized sequence. The random qubits are sent over a free-space link and coupled into a dual-rail room-temperature quantum memory and after storage and retrieval are analyzed in a four-detector polarization analysis akin to the requirements of the BB84 protocol. We also show ultralow noise and fully portable operation, paving the way towards memory-assisted all-environment free-space quantum cryptographic networks.

  18. Framework for Flux Qubit Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fei; Kamal, Archana; Krantz, Philip; Campbell, Daniel; Kim, David; Yoder, Jonilyn; Orlando, Terry; Gustavsson, Simon; Oliver, William; Engineering Quantum Systems Team

    A qubit design for higher performance relies on the understanding of how various qubit properties are related to design parameters. We construct a framework for understanding the qubit design in the flux regime. We explore different parameter regimes, looking for features desirable for certain purpose in the context of quantum computing. This research was funded by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) via MIT Lincoln Laboratory under Air Force Contract No. FA8721-05-C-0002.

  19. Superconducting flux flow digital circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martens, J.S.; Zipperian, T.E.; Hietala, V.M.; Ginley, D.S.; Tigges, C.P.; Phillips, J.M.; Siegal, M.P.

    1993-01-01

    The authors have developed a family of digital logic circuits based on superconducting flux flow transistors that show high speed, reasonable signal levels, large fan-out, and large noise margins. The circuits are made from high-temperature superconductors (HTS) and have been shown to operate at over 90 K. NOR gates have been demonstrated with fan-outs of more than 5 and fully loaded switching times less than a fixture-limited 50 ps. Ring-oscillator data suggest inverter delay times of about 40ps when using a 3-μm linewidths. Simple flip-flops have also been demonstrated showing large noise margins, response times of less than 30 ps, and static power dissipation on the order of 30 nW. Among other uses, this logic family is appropriate as an interface between logic families such as single flux quantum and conventional semiconductor logic

  20. Quantum effects in warp drives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finazzi Stefano

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Warp drives are interesting configurations that, at least theoretically, provide a way to travel at superluminal speed. Unfortunately, several issues seem to forbid their realization. First, a huge amount of exotic matter is required to build them. Second, the presence of quantum fields propagating in superluminal warp-drive geometries makes them semiclassically unstable. Indeed, a Hawking-like high-temperature flux of particles is generated inside the warp-drive bubble, which causes an exponential growth of the energy density measured at the front wall of the bubble by freely falling observers. Moreover, superluminal warp drives remain unstable even if the Lorentz symmetry is broken by the introduction of regulating higher order terms in the Lagrangian of the quantum field. If the dispersion relation of the quantum field is subluminal, a black-hole laser phenomenon yields an exponential amplification of the emitted flux. If it is superluminal, infrared effects cause a linear growth of this flux.

  1. Quantum stochastics

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Mou-Hsiung

    2015-01-01

    The classical probability theory initiated by Kolmogorov and its quantum counterpart, pioneered by von Neumann, were created at about the same time in the 1930s, but development of the quantum theory has trailed far behind. Although highly appealing, the quantum theory has a steep learning curve, requiring tools from both probability and analysis and a facility for combining the two viewpoints. This book is a systematic, self-contained account of the core of quantum probability and quantum stochastic processes for graduate students and researchers. The only assumed background is knowledge of the basic theory of Hilbert spaces, bounded linear operators, and classical Markov processes. From there, the book introduces additional tools from analysis, and then builds the quantum probability framework needed to support applications to quantum control and quantum information and communication. These include quantum noise, quantum stochastic calculus, stochastic quantum differential equations, quantum Markov semigrou...

  2. Stabilization of classic and quantum systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buts, V.A.

    2012-01-01

    It is shown that the mechanism of quantum whirligig can be successfully used for stabilization of classical systems. In particular, the conditions for stabilization of charged particles and radiation fluxes in plasma are found.

  3. Practical quantum coin flipping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pappa, Anna; Diamanti, Eleni; Chailloux, Andre; Kerenidis, Iordanis

    2011-01-01

    We show that in the unconditional security model, a single quantum strong coin flip with security guarantees that are strictly better than in any classical protocol is possible to implement with current technology. Our protocol takes into account all aspects of an experimental implementation, including losses, multiphoton pulses emitted by practical photon sources, channel noise, detector dark counts, and finite quantum efficiency. We calculate the abort probability when both players are honest, as well as the probability of one player forcing his desired outcome. For a channel length up to 21 km and commonly used parameter values, we can achieve honest abort and cheating probabilities that are better than in any classical protocol. Our protocol is, in principle, implementable using attenuated laser pulses, with no need for entangled photons or any other specific resources.

  4. Quantum Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Scarani, Valerio

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to explain what quantum computing is. The information for the thesis was gathered from books, scientific publications, and news articles. The analysis of the information revealed that quantum computing can be broken down to three areas: theories behind quantum computing explaining the structure of a quantum computer, known quantum algorithms, and the actual physical realizations of a quantum computer. The thesis reveals that moving from classical memor...

  5. Quantum Malware

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Lian-Ao; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2005-01-01

    When quantum communication networks proliferate they will likely be subject to a new type of attack: by hackers, virus makers, and other malicious intruders. Here we introduce the concept of "quantum malware" to describe such human-made intrusions. We offer a simple solution for storage of quantum information in a manner which protects quantum networks from quantum malware. This solution involves swapping the quantum information at random times between the network and isolated, distributed an...

  6. Technical design study. BESSY VSR. Variable pulse length Storage Ring. Upgrade of BESSY II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-06-01

    BESSY-VSR is a novel approach to create in the Storage Ring BESSY II long and short photon pulses simultaneously for all beam lines through a pair of superconducting bunch compression cavities. Pulse-picking schemes will allow each individual user to freely switch between high average flux for X-ray spectroscopy, microscopy and scattering and picosecond pulses up to 500 MHz repetition rate for dynamic studies. Thus BESSY-VSR preserves the present average brilliance of BESSY II and adds the new capability of user accessible picosecond pulses at high repetition rate. In addition, high intensities for THz radiation with intrinsic synchronization of THz and X-ray pulses can be extracted from BESSY-VSR. For the scientific challenges of quantum materials for energy, future information technologies and basic energy science BESSY-VSR is the multi-user Synchrotron Radiation facility that allows with the flexible switching between high repetition rate for picosecond dynamics and high average brightness to move classical 3rd generation Synchrotron Radiation science from the observation of static properties and their quantum mechanical description towards the function and the control of materials properties, technologically relevant switching processes and chemical dynamics and kinetics on the picosecond time scale. Strategic relevance of BESSY-VSR for science with photons BESSY-VSR creates for the highly productive Synchrotron Radiation community a uniquely attractive multi user storage ring adding the soft X-ray picosecond dynamics at MHz repetition rate. In particular investigations on reversible dynamics and switching in molecular systems and materials are accessible in a non destructive way. The investigations with X-rays from BESSY-VSR are highly complementary and compatible to dynamic studies conducted by users with optical lasers at their home universities and laboratories. Technologically, the employed superconducting bunch compression cavities in BESSY-VSR are a

  7. Technical design study. BESSY VSR. Variable pulse length Storage Ring. Upgrade of BESSY II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    BESSY-VSR is a novel approach to create in the Storage Ring BESSY II long and short photon pulses simultaneously for all beam lines through a pair of superconducting bunch compression cavities. Pulse-picking schemes will allow each individual user to freely switch between high average flux for X-ray spectroscopy, microscopy and scattering and picosecond pulses up to 500 MHz repetition rate for dynamic studies. Thus BESSY-VSR preserves the present average brilliance of BESSY II and adds the new capability of user accessible picosecond pulses at high repetition rate. In addition, high intensities for THz radiation with intrinsic synchronization of THz and X-ray pulses can be extracted from BESSY-VSR. For the scientific challenges of quantum materials for energy, future information technologies and basic energy science BESSY-VSR is the multi-user Synchrotron Radiation facility that allows with the flexible switching between high repetition rate for picosecond dynamics and high average brightness to move classical 3rd generation Synchrotron Radiation science from the observation of static properties and their quantum mechanical description towards the function and the control of materials properties, technologically relevant switching processes and chemical dynamics and kinetics on the picosecond time scale. Strategic relevance of BESSY-VSR for science with photons BESSY-VSR creates for the highly productive Synchrotron Radiation community a uniquely attractive multi user storage ring adding the soft X-ray picosecond dynamics at MHz repetition rate. In particular investigations on reversible dynamics and switching in molecular systems and materials are accessible in a non destructive way. The investigations with X-rays from BESSY-VSR are highly complementary and compatible to dynamic studies conducted by users with optical lasers at their home universities and laboratories. Technologically, the employed superconducting bunch compression cavities in BESSY-VSR are a

  8. Coherent Coupled Qubits for Quantum Annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Steven J.; Samach, Gabriel O.; Hover, David; Gustavsson, Simon; Kim, David K.; Melville, Alexander; Rosenberg, Danna; Sears, Adam P.; Yan, Fei; Yoder, Jonilyn L.; Oliver, William D.; Kerman, Andrew J.

    2017-07-01

    Quantum annealing is an optimization technique which potentially leverages quantum tunneling to enhance computational performance. Existing quantum annealers use superconducting flux qubits with short coherence times limited primarily by the use of large persistent currents Ip. Here, we examine an alternative approach using qubits with smaller Ip and longer coherence times. We demonstrate tunable coupling, a basic building block for quantum annealing, between two flux qubits with small (approximately 50-nA) persistent currents. Furthermore, we characterize qubit coherence as a function of coupler setting and investigate the effect of flux noise in the coupler loop on qubit coherence. Our results provide insight into the available design space for next-generation quantum annealers with improved coherence.

  9. Quantumness beyond quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanz, Ángel S

    2012-01-01

    Bohmian mechanics allows us to understand quantum systems in the light of other quantum traits than the well-known ones (coherence, diffraction, interference, tunnelling, discreteness, entanglement, etc.). Here the discussion focusses precisely on two of these interesting aspects, which arise when quantum mechanics is thought within this theoretical framework: the non-crossing property, which allows for distinguishability without erasing interference patterns, and the possibility to define quantum probability tubes, along which the probability remains constant all the way. Furthermore, taking into account this hydrodynamic-like description as a link, it is also shown how this knowledge (concepts and ideas) can be straightforwardly transferred to other fields of physics (for example, the transmission of light along waveguides).

  10. Qubit lattice coherence induced by electromagnetic pulses in superconducting metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivić, Z; Lazarides, N; Tsironis, G P

    2016-07-12

    Quantum bits (qubits) are at the heart of quantum information processing schemes. Currently, solid-state qubits, and in particular the superconducting ones, seem to satisfy the requirements for being the building blocks of viable quantum computers, since they exhibit relatively long coherence times, extremely low dissipation, and scalability. The possibility of achieving quantum coherence in macroscopic circuits comprising Josephson junctions, envisioned by Legett in the 1980's, was demonstrated for the first time in a charge qubit; since then, the exploitation of macroscopic quantum effects in low-capacitance Josephson junction circuits allowed for the realization of several kinds of superconducting qubits. Furthermore, coupling between qubits has been successfully achieved that was followed by the construction of multiple-qubit logic gates and the implementation of several algorithms. Here it is demonstrated that induced qubit lattice coherence as well as two remarkable quantum coherent optical phenomena, i.e., self-induced transparency and Dicke-type superradiance, may occur during light-pulse propagation in quantum metamaterials comprising superconducting charge qubits. The generated qubit lattice pulse forms a compound "quantum breather" that propagates in synchrony with the electromagnetic pulse. The experimental confirmation of such effects in superconducting quantum metamaterials may open a new pathway to potentially powerful quantum computing.

  11. Nonlinear Dynamics In Quantum Physics -- Quantum Chaos and Quantum Instantons

    OpenAIRE

    Kröger, H.

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the recently proposed quantum action - its interpretation, its motivation, its mathematical properties and its use in physics: quantum mechanical tunneling, quantum instantons and quantum chaos.

  12. Controllable Quantum States Mesoscopic Superconductivity and Spintronics (MS+S2006)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayanagi, Hideaki; Nitta, Junsaku; Nakano, Hayato

    2008-10-01

    Mesoscopic effects in superconductors. Tunneling measurements of charge imbalance of non-equilibrium superconductors / R. Yagi. Influence of magnetic impurities on Josephson current in SNS junctions / T. Yokoyama. Nonlinear response and observable signatures of equilibrium entanglement / A. M. Zagoskin. Stimulated Raman adiabatic passage with a Cooper pair box / Giuseppe Falci. Crossed Andreev reflection-induced giant negative magnetoresistance / Francesco Giazotto -- Quantum modulation of superconducting junctions. Adiabatic pumping through a Josephson weak link / Fabio Taddei. Squeezing of superconducting qubits / Kazutomu Shiokawa. Detection of Berrys phases in flux qubits with coherent pulses / D. N. Zheng. Probing entanglement in the system of coupled Josephson qubits / A. S. Kiyko. Josephson junction with tunable damping using quasi-particle injection / Ryuta Yagi. Macroscopic quantum coherence in rf-SQUIDs / Alexey V. Ustinov. Bloch oscillations in a Josephson circuit / D. Esteve. Manipulation of magnetization in nonequilibrium superconducting nanostructures / F. Giazotto -- Superconducting qubits. Decoherence and Rabi oscillations in a qubit coupled to a quantum two-level system / Sahel Ashhab. Phase-coupled flux qubits: CNOT operation, controllable coupling and entanglement / Mun Dae Kim. Characteristics of a switchable superconducting flux transformer with a DC-SQUID / Yoshihiro Shimazu. Characterization of adiabatic noise in charge-based coherent nanodevices / E. Paladino -- Unconventional superconductors. Threshold temperatures of zero-bias conductance peak and zero-bias conductance dip in diffusive normal metal/superconductor junctions / Iduru Shigeta. Tunneling conductance in 2DEG/S junctions in the presence of Rashba spin-orbit coupling / T. Yokoyama. Theory of charge transport in diffusive ferromagnet/p-wave superconductor junctions / T. Yokoyama. Theory of enhanced proximity effect by the exchange field in FS bilayers / T. Yokoyama. Theory of

  13. Robust dynamical decoupling for quantum computing and quantum memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Alexandre M; Alvarez, Gonzalo A; Suter, Dieter

    2011-06-17

    Dynamical decoupling (DD) is a popular technique for protecting qubits from the environment. However, unless special care is taken, experimental errors in the control pulses used in this technique can destroy the quantum information instead of preserving it. Here, we investigate techniques for making DD sequences robust against different types of experimental errors while retaining good decoupling efficiency in a fluctuating environment. We present experimental data from solid-state nuclear spin qubits and introduce a new DD sequence that is suitable for quantum computing and quantum memory.

  14. Flux quench in a system of interacting spinless fermions in one dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Yuya O.; Misguich, Grégoire; Oshikawa, Masaki

    2016-05-01

    We study a quantum quench in a one-dimensional spinless fermion model (equivalent to the XXZ spin chain), where a magnetic flux is suddenly switched off. This quench is equivalent to imposing a pulse of electric field and therefore generates an initial particle current. This current is not a conserved quantity in the presence of a lattice and interactions, and we investigate numerically its time evolution after the quench, using the infinite time-evolving block decimation method. For repulsive interactions or large initial flux, we find oscillations that are governed by excitations deep inside the Fermi sea. At long times we observe that the current remains nonvanishing in the gapless cases, whereas it decays to zero in the gapped cases. Although the linear response theory (valid for a weak flux) predicts the same long-time limit of the current for repulsive and attractive interactions (relation with the zero-temperature Drude weight), larger nonlinearities are observed in the case of repulsive interactions compared with that of the attractive case.

  15. Pulsed power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The key element of our pulsed power program is concentration of power in time and space by suppression of breakdown in dielectrics and in vacuum. Magnetically insulated vacuum transmission lines and magnetic suppression of insulator flashover have continued as the main reserch directions. Vacuum insulated line studies at Physics International have been expanded and a test bed at Sandia, called MITE (Magnetically Insulated Transmission Experiment), is under development. The choice for the baseline EBFA design will depend on the outcome of these studies and should be made in July 1977. The slow and intermediate speed pulsed power approaches to EBFA will be based on Proto I and Proto II results and several of the projected EBFA subsystems are presently being tested in Proto II. A further stage of power concentration, within the vacuum diode itself, would considerably ease the burden on dielectrics; methods of power multiplication involving magnetically imploded plasmas are being considered and tests have begun using the Ripple III apparatus

  16. Nonlinear optics quantum computing with circuit QED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Prabin; Hafezi, Mohammad; Taylor, J M

    2013-02-08

    One approach to quantum information processing is to use photons as quantum bits and rely on linear optical elements for most operations. However, some optical nonlinearity is necessary to enable universal quantum computing. Here, we suggest a circuit-QED approach to nonlinear optics quantum computing in the microwave regime, including a deterministic two-photon phase gate. Our specific example uses a hybrid quantum system comprising a LC resonator coupled to a superconducting flux qubit to implement a nonlinear coupling. Compared to the self-Kerr nonlinearity, we find that our approach has improved tolerance to noise in the qubit while maintaining fast operation.

  17. Tackling systematic errors in quantum logic gates with composite rotations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummins, Holly K.; Llewellyn, Gavin; Jones, Jonathan A.

    2003-01-01

    We describe the use of composite rotations to combat systematic errors in single-qubit quantum logic gates and discuss three families of composite rotations which can be used to correct off-resonance and pulse length errors. Although developed and described within the context of nuclear magnetic resonance quantum computing, these sequences should be applicable to any implementation of quantum computation

  18. D branes in background fluxes and Nielsen-Olesen instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, Jorge G.

    2016-01-01

    In quantum field theory, charged particles with spin ≥1 may become tachyonic in the present of magnetic fluxes above some critical field, signaling an instability of the vacuum. The phenomenon is generic, in particular, similar instabilities are known to exist in open and closed string theory, where a spinning string state can become tachyonic above a critical field. In compactifications involving RR fluxes F_p_+_2, the quantum states which could become tachyonic by the same Nielsen-Olesen mechanism are Dp branes. By constructing an appropriate background with RR magnetic flux that takes into account back-reaction, we identify the possible tachyonic Dp brane states and compute the formula for the energy spectrum in a sector. More generally, we argue that in any background RR magnetic flux, there are high spin Dp quantum states which become very light at critical fields.

  19. D branes in background fluxes and Nielsen-Olesen instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Jorge G. [Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA),Pg. Lluis Companys, 23, 08010 Barcelona (Spain); Department de Fisica Cuantica i Astrofisica and Institut de Ciències del Cosmos,Universitat de Barcelona, Martí Franquès, 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-06-06

    In quantum field theory, charged particles with spin ≥1 may become tachyonic in the present of magnetic fluxes above some critical field, signaling an instability of the vacuum. The phenomenon is generic, in particular, similar instabilities are known to exist in open and closed string theory, where a spinning string state can become tachyonic above a critical field. In compactifications involving RR fluxes F{sub p+2}, the quantum states which could become tachyonic by the same Nielsen-Olesen mechanism are Dp branes. By constructing an appropriate background with RR magnetic flux that takes into account back-reaction, we identify the possible tachyonic Dp brane states and compute the formula for the energy spectrum in a sector. More generally, we argue that in any background RR magnetic flux, there are high spin Dp quantum states which become very light at critical fields.

  20. Quantum control with NMR methods: Application to quantum simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negrevergne, Camille

    2002-01-01

    Manipulating information according to quantum laws allows improvements in the efficiency of the way we treat certain problems. Liquid state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance methods allow us to initialize, manipulate and read the quantum state of a system of coupled spins. These methods have been used to realize an experimental small Quantum Information Processor (QIP) able to process information through around hundred elementary operations. One of the main themes of this work was to design, optimize and validate reliable RF-pulse sequences used to 'program' the QIP. Such techniques have been used to run a quantum simulation algorithm for anionic systems. Some experimental results have been obtained on the determination of Eigen energies and correlation function for a toy problem consisting of fermions on a lattice, showing an experimental proof of principle for such quantum simulations. (author) [fr

  1. Pulsed neutron sources for epithermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windsor, C.G.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown how accelerator based neutron sources, giving a fast neutron pulse of short duration compared to the neutron moderation time, promise to open up a new field of epithermal neutron scattering. The three principal methods of fast neutron production: electrons, protons and fission boosters will be compared. Pulsed reactors are less suitable for epithermal neutrons and will only be briefly mentioned. The design principle of the target producing fast neutrons, the moderator and reflector to slow them down to epithermal energies, and the cell with its beam tubes and shielding will all be described with examples taken from the new Harwell electron linac to be commissioned in 1978. A general comparison of pulsed neutron performance with reactors is fraught with difficulties but has been attempted. Calculation of the new pulsed source fluxes and pulse widths is now being performed but we have taken the practical course of basing all comparisons on extrapolations from measurements on the old 1958 Harwell electron linac. Comparisons for time-of-flight and crystal monochromator experiments show reactors to be at their best at long wavelengths, at coarse resolution, and for experiments needing a specific incident wavelength. Even existing pulsed sources are shown to compete with the high flux reactors in experiments where the hot neutron flux and the time-of-flight methods can be best exploited. The sources under construction can open a new field of inelastic neutron scattering based on energy transfer up to an electron volt and beyond

  2. Quantum random number generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soubusta, Jan; Haderka, Ondrej; Hendrych, Martin

    2001-03-01

    Since reflection or transmission of a quantum particle on a beamsplitter is inherently random quantum process, a device built on this principle does not suffer from drawbacks of neither pseudo-random computer generators or classical noise sources. Nevertheless, a number of physical conditions necessary for high quality random numbers generation must be satisfied. Luckily, in quantum optics realization they can be well controlled. We present an easy random number generator based on the division of weak light pulses on a beamsplitter. The randomness of the generated bit stream is supported by passing the data through series of 15 statistical test. The device generates at a rate of 109.7 kbit/s.

  3. On quantum quadrupole radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonda, L.; Mankoc-Borstnik, N.

    1981-02-01

    In this paper it is shown that for the electromagnetic decay of a quantum system in a coherent rotational state the total quadrupole radiation is proportional to (d 5 Q/dt 5 )(dQ/dt)sup(*)+c.c. For the radiation flux out of a sphere of large radius a different quantity, closer to the classical expression (d 3 Q/dt 3 ) 2 , is found. (author)

  4. Quantum manipulation of two-color stationary light: Quantum wavelength conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moiseev, S. A.; Ham, B. S.

    2006-01-01

    We present a quantum manipulation of a traveling light pulse using electromagnetically induced transparency-based slow light phenomenon for the generation of two-color stationary light. We theoretically discuss the two-color stationary light for the quantum wavelength conversion process in terms of pulse area, energy transfer, and propagation directions. The condition of the two-color stationary light pulse generation has been found and the quantum light dynamics has been studied analytically in the adiabatic limit. The quantum frequency conversion rate of the traveling light is dependent on the spatial spreading of the two-color stationary light pulse and can be near unity in an optically dense medium for the optimal frequencies of the control laser fields

  5. Slow light and pulse propagation in semiconductor waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Lunnemann

    This thesis concerns the propagation of optical pulses in semiconductor waveguide structures with particular focus on methods for achieving slow light or signal delays. Experimental pulse propagation measurements of pulses with a duration of 180 fs, transmitted through quantum well based waveguide...... structures, are presented. Simultaneous measurements of the pulse transmission and delay are measured as a function of input pulse energy for various applied electrical potentials. Electrically controlled pulse delay and advancement are demonstrated and compared with a theoretical model. The limits...... of the model as well as the underlying physical mechanisms are analysed and discussed. A method to achieve slow light by electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in an inhomogeneously broadened quantum dot medium is proposed. The basic principles of EIT are assessed and the main dissimilarities between...

  6. Holograms made with a pulsed dye laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Guasti, M.; Iturbe-Castillo, D.; Silva-Perez, A.; Gil-Villegas, A.; Gonzalez-Torres, H.; Lopez-Guerrero, R.

    1989-01-01

    We report the obtention of holograms with a nitrogen pumped dye laser, whose source is inherently pulsed. We review the advantages and posibilities of holograms of moving objects which are impossible to make with CW lasers. The lasers used in these experiments were designed and built in the quantum optics laboratory at the Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa. (Author)

  7. Quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The book is on quantum mechanics. The emphasis is on the basic concepts and the methodology. The chapters include: Breakdown of classical concepts; Quantum mechanical concepts; Basic postulates of quantum mechanics; solution of problems in quantum mechanics; Simple harmonic oscillator; and Angular Momentum

  8. Quantum fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynaud, S.; Giacobino, S.; Zinn-Justin, J.

    1997-01-01

    This course is dedicated to present in a pedagogical manner the recent developments in peculiar fields concerned by quantum fluctuations: quantum noise in optics, light propagation through dielectric media, sub-Poissonian light generated by lasers and masers, quantum non-demolition measurements, quantum electrodynamics applied to cavities and electrical circuits involving superconducting tunnel junctions. (A.C.)

  9. Quantum circuit behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulton, D.

    1989-09-01

    Single electron tunnelling in multiply connected weak link systems is considered. Using a second quantised approach the tunnel current, in both normal and superconducting systems, using perturbation theory, is derived. The tunnel currents are determined as a function of an Aharanov-Bohm phase (acquired by the electrons). Using these results, the multiply connected system is then discussed when coupled to a resonant LC circuit. The resulting dynamics of this composite system are then determined. In the superconducting case the results are compared and contrasted with flux mode behaviour seen in large superconducting weak link rings. Systems in which the predicted dynamics may be seen are also discussed. In analogy to the electron tunnelling analysis, the tunnelling of magnetic flux quanta through the weak link is also considered. Here, the voltage across the weak link, due to flux tunnelling, is determined as a function of an externally applied current. This is done for both singly and multiply connected flux systems. The results are compared and contrasted with charge mode behaviour seen in superconducting weak link systems. Finally, the behaviour of simple quantum fluids is considered when subject to an external rotation. Using a microscopic analysis it is found that the microscopic quantum behaviour of the particles is manifest on a macroscopic level. Results are derived for bosonic, fermionic and BCS pair-type systems. The connection between flux quantisation in electromagnetic systems is also made. Using these results, the dynamics of such a quantum fluid is considered when coupled to a rotating torsional oscillator. The results are compared with those found in SQUID devices. A model is also presented which discusses the possible excited state dynamics of such a fluid. (author)

  10. Graphene quantum interference photodetector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahbub Alam

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a graphene quantum interference (QI photodetector was simulated in two regimes of operation. The structure consists of a graphene nanoribbon, Mach–Zehnder interferometer (MZI, which exhibits a strongly resonant transmission of electrons of specific energies. In the first regime of operation (that of a linear photodetector, low intensity light couples two resonant energy levels, resulting in scattering and differential transmission of current with an external quantum efficiency of up to 5.2%. In the second regime of operation, full current switching is caused by the phase decoherence of the current due to a strong photon flux in one or both of the interferometer arms in the same MZI structure. Graphene QI photodetectors have several distinct advantages: they are of very small size, they do not require p- and n-doped regions, and they exhibit a high external quantum efficiency.

  11. Magnetic-flux pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, A. F.; Elleman, D. D.; Whitmore, F. C. (Inventor)

    1966-01-01

    A magnetic flux pump is described for increasing the intensity of a magnetic field by transferring flux from one location to the magnetic field. The device includes a pair of communicating cavities formed in a block of superconducting material, and a piston for displacing the trapped magnetic flux into the secondary cavity producing a field having an intense flux density.

  12. Radon flux measurement methodologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielson, K.K.; Rogers, V.C.

    1984-01-01

    Five methods for measuring radon fluxes are evaluated: the accumulator can, a small charcoal sampler, a large-area charcoal sampler, the ''Big Louie'' charcoal sampler, and the charcoal tent sampler. An experimental comparison of the five flux measurement techniques was also conducted. Excellent agreement was obtained between the measured radon fluxes and fluxes predicted from radium and emanation measurements

  13. Quantum radar

    CERN Document Server

    Lanzagorta, Marco

    2011-01-01

    This book offers a concise review of quantum radar theory. Our approach is pedagogical, making emphasis on the physics behind the operation of a hypothetical quantum radar. We concentrate our discussion on the two major models proposed to date: interferometric quantum radar and quantum illumination. In addition, this book offers some new results, including an analytical study of quantum interferometry in the X-band radar region with a variety of atmospheric conditions, a derivation of a quantum radar equation, and a discussion of quantum radar jamming.This book assumes the reader is familiar w

  14. Pulsed TRIGA reactor as substitute for long pulse spallation neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittemore, W.L.

    1999-01-01

    TRIGA reactor cores have been used to demonstrate various pulsing applications. The TRIGA reactor fuel (U-ZrH x ) is very robust especially in pulsing applications. The features required to produce 50 pulses per second have been successfully demonstrated individually, including pulse tests with small diameter fuel rods. A partially optimized core has been evaluated for pulses at 50 Hz with peak pulsed power up to 100 MW and an average power up to 10 MW. Depending on the design, the full width at half power of the individual pulses can range between 2000 μsec to 3000 μsec. Until recently, the relatively long pulses (2000 μsec to 3000 μsec) from a pulsed thermal reactor or a long pulse spallation source (LPSS) have been considered unsuitable for time-of-flight measurements of neutron scattering. More recently considerable attention has been devoted to evaluating the performance of long pulse (1000 to 4000 μs) spallation sources for the same type of neutron measurements originally performed only with short pulses from spallation sources (SPSS). Adequate information is available to permit meaningful comparisons between CW, SPSS, and LPSS neutron sources. Except where extremely high resolution is required (fraction of a percent), which does require short pulses, it is demonstrated that the LPSS source with a 1000 msec or longer pulse length and a repetition rate of 50 to 60 Hz gives results comparable to those from the 60 MW ILL (CW) source. For many of these applications the shorter pulse is not necessarily a disadvantage, but it is not an advantage over the long pulse system. In one study, the conclusion is that a 5 MW 2000 μsec LPSS source improves the capability for structural biology studies of macromolecules by at least a factor of 5 over that achievable with a high flux reactor. Recent studies have identified the advantages and usefulness of long pulse neutron sources. It is evident that the multiple pulse TRIGA reactor can produce pulses comparable to

  15. From reactors to long pulse sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezei, F.

    1995-01-01

    We will show, that by using an adapted instrumentation concept, the performance of a continuous source can be emulated by one switch on in long pulses for only about 10% of the total time. This 10 fold gain in neutron economy opens up the way for building reactor like sources with an order of magnitude higher flux than the present technological limits. Linac accelerator driven spallation lends itself favorably for the realization of this kind of long pulse sources, which will be complementary to short pulse spallation sources, the same way continuous reactor sources are

  16. Quantum information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilin, Sergei Ya

    1999-01-01

    A new research direction known as quantum information is a multidisciplinary subject which involves quantum mechanics, optics, information theory, programming, discrete mathematics, laser physics and spectroscopy, and depends heavily on contributions from such areas as quantum computing, quantum teleportation and quantum cryptography, decoherence studies, and single-molecule and impurity spectroscopy. Some new results achieved in this rapidly growing field are discussed. (reviews of topical problems)

  17. Quantum information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilin, Sergei Ya [B.I. Stepanov Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Minsk (Belarus)

    1999-05-31

    A new research direction known as quantum information is a multidisciplinary subject which involves quantum mechanics, optics, information theory, programming, discrete mathematics, laser physics and spectroscopy, and depends heavily on contributions from such areas as quantum computing, quantum teleportation and quantum cryptography, decoherence studies, and single-molecule and impurity spectroscopy. Some new results achieved in this rapidly growing field are discussed. (reviews of topical problems)

  18. Quantum ontologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stapp, H.P.

    1988-12-01

    Quantum ontologies are conceptions of the constitution of the universe that are compatible with quantum theory. The ontological orientation is contrasted to the pragmatic orientation of science, and reasons are given for considering quantum ontologies both within science, and in broader contexts. The principal quantum ontologies are described and evaluated. Invited paper at conference: Bell's Theorem, Quantum Theory, and Conceptions of the Universe, George Mason University, October 20-21, 1988. 16 refs

  19. PULSE COLUMN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimmett, E.S.

    1964-01-01

    This patent covers a continuous countercurrent liquidsolids contactor column having a number of contactor states each comprising a perforated plate, a layer of balls, and a downcomer tube; a liquid-pulsing piston; and a solids discharger formed of a conical section at the bottom of the column, and a tubular extension on the lowest downcomer terminating in the conical section. Between the conical section and the downcomer extension is formed a small annular opening, through which solids fall coming through the perforated plate of the lowest contactor stage. This annular opening is small enough that the pressure drop thereacross is greater than the pressure drop upward through the lowest contactor stage. (AEC)

  20. Pulse radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenshields, H.; Seddon, W.A.

    1982-03-01

    This supplement to two bibliographies published in 1970 and 1972 lists 734 references to the literature of pulse radiolysis, arranged under eight broad subject headings. The references were compiled by searching Biological Abstracts, Chemical Abstracts, Nuclear Science Abstracts and the Weekly List of Papers in Radiation Chemistry issued by the Radiation Chemistry Data Center of Notre Dame University. Full bibliographic data is given for papers published in the period 1971 to 1974. A personal author index listing more than 600 authors and a similar number of co-authors is included

  1. Experimental study on performance of pulsed liquid jet pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Weihui; Gao Chuanchang; Qin Haixia

    2010-01-01

    The device performance characteristics of transformer type pulsed liquid pump device were experimentally studied. The effects of the area ratio, work pressure and pulse parameters on the performance of the pulsed liquid jet pump device were performed in the tests. The potency of pulsed jet on improving the performance of the liquid jet pump device was also studied through the comparison with invariable jet pump at the same conditions. The results show that the pulsed jet can significantly improve the performance of transformer type jet pump devices. Area ratio and pulse parameters are the critical factors to the performance of the pulsed liquid jet pump device. The jet pump device performances are significantly improved by reducing the area ratio or by increasing the pulsed frequency. The flux characteristics of the pulsed liquid jet pump device presents the typical negative linear,the potency of pulsed jet in improving the performance of jet pump device with small area ratio can be more significant. The efficiency curve of pulsed liquid jet pump is similar to the parabola. At higher pulsed frequency, the top efficiency point of the pulsed jet pump moves to the higher flow ratio. The high efficiency area of the pulsed jet pump also is widened with the increase of the pulsed frequency. (authors)

  2. Changes in luminescence emission induced by proton irradiation: InGaAs/GaAs quantum wells and quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, R.; Swift, G. M.; Magness, B.; Taylor, W. A.; Tang, Y. S.; Wang, K. L.; Dowd, P.; Zhang, Y. H.

    2000-01-01

    The photoluminescence emission from InGaAs/GaAs quantum-well and quantum-dot (QD) structures are compared after controlled irradiation with 1.5 MeV proton fluxes. Results presented here show a significant enhancement in radiation tolerance with three-dimensional quantum confinement.

  3. Quantum Computer Games: Quantum Minesweeper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2010-01-01

    The computer game of quantum minesweeper is introduced as a quantum extension of the well-known classical minesweeper. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. Quantum minesweeper demonstrates the effects of superposition, entanglement and their non-local characteristics. While in the classical…

  4. Quantum revolution

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    The turn of the XXth century witnessed a revolution in physics comparable to Isaac Newton’s discovery of the universal laws of mechanics and of gravitation three centuries earlier. The world required to be described in novel terms, as the immutable, deterministic view of our familiar universe had given way to a new world picture, one which featured chance, flux, and an incessant upsurge of waves of matter. Such a worldview was so radically new and counterintuitive that it gave rise to strong debates, to the effect that Albert Einstein himself tried to oppose it on the grounds that “God does not play dice”. In spite of the intense debates that accompanied its emergence, quantum mechanics quickly proved an incredibly efficacious new tool to understand and to predict a wide array of new phenomena. It was so successful that in no time it broke free from the environment of research labs to become part of daily life, making it possible, for example, to understand why some materials...

  5. Pulse pile-up. I: Short pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, D.H.

    1990-07-01

    The search for rare large pulses against an intense background of smaller ones involves consideration of pulse pile-up. Approximate methods are presented, based on ruin theory, by which the probability of such pile-up may be estimated for pulses of arbitrary form and of arbitrary pulse-height distribution. These methods are checked against cases for which exact solutions are available. The present paper is concerned chiefly with short pulses of finite total duration. (Author) (5 refs., 24 figs.)

  6. Focus on Quantum Cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwiat, Paul G.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In our modern era of telecommunications and the Internet, information has become a valuable commodity. Sometimes it must therefore be protected against theft - in this case, loss of secret information to an eavesdropper. Most of today's transactions are protected using encryption unproven to be secure against a computational attack by a classical computer and, in fact, the standardly used encryption algorithms are provably vulnerable to the mind-boggling parallelism of a quantum computer, should one ever be physically realized. Enter quantum cryptography. Underlying nearly all forms of encryption is the necessity for a truly secret key, a random string of zeros and ones; the basic notion of quantum cryptography is to employ single photon transmissions (or the closest attainable approximation to these) to distribute the random key material, while removing the threat of an undetected eavesdropper. Now, nearly twenty years since the seminal quantum cryptography paper by Bennett and Brassard (Bennett C H and Brassard G 1984 Proc. IEEE Int. Conf. on Computers, Systems, and Signal Processing (Bangalore) (New York: IEEE) pp 175-9), we take a look at several state-of-the-art implementations, and glimpse how future quantum cryptosystems might look. We start with papers from three of the world's leading experimental quantum cryptography efforts: Stucki et al and Bethune and Risk describe working systems for quantum key distribution (QKD) over telecommunications fibres (at 1550 nanometres and 1300 nanometres, respectively). The former's achievement of quantum key exchange over 67 kilometres of optical fibre is a world record, as is the experimental demonstration by Hughes et al of daylight free-space QKD over a 10 km atmospheric range. Next, Luetkenhaus and Jahma explore the possible vulnerabilities of such systems (which employ attenuated laser pulses instead of actual single photon states) to conceivable future eavesdropping technologies. Enzer et al have

  7. Temporal compression of quantum-information-carrying photons using a photon-echo quantum memory approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moiseev, S. A.; Tittel, W.

    2010-01-01

    We study quantum compression and decompression of light pulses that carry quantum information using a photon-echo quantum memory technique with controllable inhomogeneous broadening of an isolated atomic absorption line. We investigate media with differently broadened absorption profiles, transverse and longitudinal, finding that the recall efficiency can be as large as unity and that the quantum information encoded into the photonic qubits can remain unperturbed. Our results provide insight into reversible light-atom interaction and are interesting in view of future quantum communication networks, where pulse compression and decompression may play an important role in increasing the qubit rate or in mapping quantum information from photonic carriers with large optical bandwidth into atomic memories with smaller bandwidth.

  8. Neutron flux measurement utilizing Campbell technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kropik, M.

    2000-01-01

    Application of the Campbell technique for the neutron flux measurement is described in the contribution. This technique utilizes the AC component (noise) of a neutron chamber signal rather than a usually used DC component. The Campbell theorem, originally discovered to describe noise behaviour of valves, explains that the root mean square of the AC component of the chamber signal is proportional to the neutron flux (reactor power). The quadratic dependence of the reactor power on the root mean square value usually permits to accomplish the whole current power range of the neutron flux measurement by only one channel. Further advantage of the Campbell technique is that large pulses of the response to neutrons are favoured over small pulses of the response to gamma rays in the ratio of their mean square charge transfer and thus, the Campbell technique provides an excellent gamma rays discrimination in the current operational range of a neutron chamber. The neutron flux measurement channel using state of the art components was designed and put into operation. Its linearity, accuracy, dynamic range, time response and gamma discrimination were tested on the VR-1 nuclear reactor in Prague, and behaviour under high neutron flux (accident conditions) was tested on the TRIGA nuclear reactor in Vienna. (author)

  9. Optimal control of quantum measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egger, Daniel; Wilhelm, Frank [Theoretical Physics, Saarland University, 66123 Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Pulses to steer the time evolution of quantum systems can be designed with optimal control theory. In most cases it is the coherent processes that can be controlled and one optimizes the time evolution towards a target unitary process, sometimes also in the presence of non-controllable incoherent processes. Here we show how to extend the GRAPE algorithm in the case where the incoherent processes are controllable and the target time evolution is a non-unitary quantum channel. We perform a gradient search on a fidelity measure based on Choi matrices. We illustrate our algorithm by optimizing a measurement pulse for superconducting phase qubits. We show how this technique can lead to large measurement contrast close to 99%. We also show, within the validity of our model, that this algorithm can produce short 1.4 ns pulses with 98.2% contrast.

  10. Macroscopic quantum systems and gravitational phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pikovski, I.

    2014-01-01

    Low-energy quantum systems are studied theoretically in light of possible experiments to test the interplay between quantum theory and general relativity. The research focus in this thesis is on quantum systems which can be controlled with very high precision and which allow for tests of quantum theory at novel scales in terms of mass and size. The pulsed regime of opto-mechanics is explored and it is shown how short optical pulses can be used to prepare and characterize quantum states of a massive mechanical resonator, and how some phenomenological models of quantum gravity can be probed. In addition, quantum interferometry with photons and matter-waves in the presence of gravitational time dilation is considered. It is shown that time dilation causes entanglement between internal states and the center-of-mass position and that it leads to decoherence of all composite quantum systems. The results of the thesis show that the interplay between quantum theory and general relativity affects even low-energy quantum systems and that it offers novel phenomena which can be probed in experiments. (author) [de

  11. Analytical optimal pulse shapes obtained with the aid of genetic algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero, Rubén D.; Arango, Carlos A.; Reyes, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    We propose a methodology to design optimal pulses for achieving quantum optimal control on molecular systems. Our approach constrains pulse shapes to linear combinations of a fixed number of experimentally relevant pulse functions. Quantum optimal control is obtained by maximizing a multi-target fitness function using genetic algorithms. As a first application of the methodology, we generated an optimal pulse that successfully maximized the yield on a selected dissociation channel of a diatomic molecule. Our pulse is obtained as a linear combination of linearly chirped pulse functions. Data recorded along the evolution of the genetic algorithm contained important information regarding the interplay between radiative and diabatic processes. We performed a principal component analysis on these data to retrieve the most relevant processes along the optimal path. Our proposed methodology could be useful for performing quantum optimal control on more complex systems by employing a wider variety of pulse shape functions

  12. Analytical optimal pulse shapes obtained with the aid of genetic algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero, Rubén D., E-mail: rdguerrerom@unal.edu.co [Department of Physics, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia); Arango, Carlos A. [Department of Chemical Sciences, Universidad Icesi, Cali (Colombia); Reyes, Andrés [Department of Chemistry, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia)

    2015-09-28

    We propose a methodology to design optimal pulses for achieving quantum optimal control on molecular systems. Our approach constrains pulse shapes to linear combinations of a fixed number of experimentally relevant pulse functions. Quantum optimal control is obtained by maximizing a multi-target fitness function using genetic algorithms. As a first application of the methodology, we generated an optimal pulse that successfully maximized the yield on a selected dissociation channel of a diatomic molecule. Our pulse is obtained as a linear combination of linearly chirped pulse functions. Data recorded along the evolution of the genetic algorithm contained important information regarding the interplay between radiative and diabatic processes. We performed a principal component analysis on these data to retrieve the most relevant processes along the optimal path. Our proposed methodology could be useful for performing quantum optimal control on more complex systems by employing a wider variety of pulse shape functions.

  13. Intrinsic Dynamics of Quantum-Dash Lasers

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Cheng; Djie, Hery Susanto; Hwang, James C. M.; Koch, Thomas L.; Lester, Luke F.; Ooi, Boon S.; Wang, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Temperature-dependent intrinsic modulation response of InAs/InAlGaAs quantum-dash lasers was investigated by using pulse optical injection modulation to minimize the effects of parasitics and self-heating. Compared to typical quantum-well lasers, the quantum-dash lasers were found to have comparable differential gain but approximately twice the gain compression factor, probably due to carrier heating by free-carrier absorption, as opposed to stimulated transition. Therefore, the narrower modulation bandwidth of the quantum-dash lasers than that of quantum-well lasers was attributed to their higher gain compression factor. In addition, as expected, quantum-dash lasers with relatively long and uniform dashes exhibit higher temperature stability than quantum-well lasers. However, the lasers with relatively short and nonuniform dashes exhibit stronger temperature dependence, probably due to their higher surface-to-volume ratio and nonuniform dash sizes. © 2011 IEEE.

  14. Intrinsic Dynamics of Quantum-Dash Lasers

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Cheng

    2011-10-01

    Temperature-dependent intrinsic modulation response of InAs/InAlGaAs quantum-dash lasers was investigated by using pulse optical injection modulation to minimize the effects of parasitics and self-heating. Compared to typical quantum-well lasers, the quantum-dash lasers were found to have comparable differential gain but approximately twice the gain compression factor, probably due to carrier heating by free-carrier absorption, as opposed to stimulated transition. Therefore, the narrower modulation bandwidth of the quantum-dash lasers than that of quantum-well lasers was attributed to their higher gain compression factor. In addition, as expected, quantum-dash lasers with relatively long and uniform dashes exhibit higher temperature stability than quantum-well lasers. However, the lasers with relatively short and nonuniform dashes exhibit stronger temperature dependence, probably due to their higher surface-to-volume ratio and nonuniform dash sizes. © 2011 IEEE.

  15. Quantum key distribution with two-segment quantum repeaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kampermann, Hermann; Abruzzo, Silvestre; Bruss, Dagmar [Theoretische Physik III, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Quantum repeaters represent one possible way to achieve long-distance quantum key distribution. One way of improving the repeater rate and decreasing the memory coherence time is the usage of multiplexing. Motivated by the experimental fact that long-range connections are practically demanding, we extend the analysis of the quantum repeater multiplexing protocol to the case of short-range connections. We derive formulas for the repeater rate and we show that short-range connections lead to most of the benefits of a full-range multiplexing protocol. A less demanding QKD-protocol without quantum memories was recently introduced by Lo et al. We generalize this measurement-device-independent quantum key Distribution protocol to the scenario where the repeater Station contains also heralded quantum memories. We assume either single-photon sources or weak coherent pulse sources plus decay states. We show that it is possible to significantly outperform the original proposal, even in presence of decoherence of the quantum memory. We give formulas in terms of device imperfections i.e., the quantum bit error rate and the repeater rate.

  16. Quantum optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drummond, P D [University of Queensland, St. Lucia, QLD (Australia).Physics Department

    1999-07-01

    Full text: Quantum optics in Australia has been an active research field for some years. I shall focus on recent developments in quantum and atom optics. Generally, the field as a whole is becoming more and more diverse, as technological developments drive experiments into new areas, and theorists either attempt to explain the new features, or else develop models for even more exotic ideas. The recent developments include quantum solitons, quantum computing, Bose-Einstein condensation, atom lasers, quantum cryptography, and novel tests of quantum mechanics. The talk will briefly cover current progress and outstanding problems in each of these areas. Copyright (1999) Australian Optical Society.

  17. Pulsed energy conversion with a dc superconducting magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, M.; Cnare, E.C.; Leisher, W.B.; Tucker, W.K.; Wessenberg, D.L.

    1976-01-01

    A generator system for pulsed power is described which employs a dc superconducting magnet in a magnetic flux compression scheme. Experience with a small-scale generator together with projections of numerical models indicate potential applications to fusion research and commercial power generation. When the system is large enough pulse energy can exceed that stored in the magnet and pulse rise time can range from several microseconds to tens of milliseconds. (author)

  18. Pulse Phase Dependence of the Magnetar Bursts Chetana Jain ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gamma rays: bursts—neutron stars, magnetars: individual. (SGR 1806–20 ... the pulse profiles and pulsed and unpulsed X-ray flux are known to vary with time. ... that can be modeled by thermal emission of kT ∼0.5 keV along with a power law ... detection of the bursts is expected to be dependent on the pulse phase. 2.

  19. Steering population transfer of the Na2 molecule by an ultrashort pulse train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Dong-Hua; Wang, Shuo; Zhan, Wei-Shen; Tao, Hong-Cai; Wang, Si-Qi

    2018-05-01

    We theoretically investigate the complete population transfer among quantum states of the Na2 molecule using ultrashort pulse trains using the time-dependent wave packet method. The population accumulation of the target state can be steered by controlling the laser parameters, such as the variable pulse pairs, the different pulse widths, the time delays and the repetition period between two contiguous pulses; in particular, the pulse pairs and the pulse widths have a great effect on the population transfer. The calculations show that the ultrashort pulse train is a feasible solution, which can steer the population transfer from the initial state to the target state efficiently with lower peak intensities.

  20. Quantum entanglement and quantum teleportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, Y.H.

    2001-01-01

    One of the most surprising consequences of quantum mechanics is the entanglement of two or more distance particles. The ''ghost'' interference and the ''ghost'' image experiments demonstrated the astonishing nonlocal behavior of an entangled photon pair. Even though we still have questions in regard to fundamental issues of the entangled quantum systems, quantum entanglement has started to play important roles in quantum information and quantum computation. Quantum teleportation is one of the hot topics. We have demonstrated a quantum teleportation experiment recently. The experimental results proved the working principle of irreversibly teleporting an unknown arbitrary quantum state from one system to another distant system by disassembling into and then later reconstructing from purely classical information and nonclassical EPR correlations. The distinct feature of this experiment is that the complete set of Bell states can be distinguished in the Bell state measurement. Teleportation of a quantum state can thus occur with certainty in principle. (orig.)

  1. Repeated interactions in open quantum systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruneau, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.bruneau@u-cergy.fr [Laboratoire AGM, Université de Cergy-Pontoise, Site Saint-Martin, BP 222, 95302 Cergy-Pontoise (France); Joye, Alain, E-mail: Alain.Joye@ujf-grenoble.fr [Institut Fourier, UMR 5582, CNRS-Université Grenoble I, BP 74, 38402 Saint-Martin d’Hères (France); Merkli, Marco, E-mail: merkli@mun.ca [Department of Mathematics and Statistics Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John' s, NL Canada A1C 5S7 (Canada)

    2014-07-15

    Analyzing the dynamics of open quantum systems has a long history in mathematics and physics. Depending on the system at hand, basic physical phenomena that one would like to explain are, for example, convergence to equilibrium, the dynamics of quantum coherences (decoherence) and quantum correlations (entanglement), or the emergence of heat and particle fluxes in non-equilibrium situations. From the mathematical physics perspective, one of the main challenges is to derive the irreversible dynamics of the open system, starting from a unitary dynamics of the system and its environment. The repeated interactions systems considered in these notes are models of non-equilibrium quantum statistical mechanics. They are relevant in quantum optics, and more generally, serve as a relatively well treatable approximation of a more difficult quantum dynamics. In particular, the repeated interaction models allow to determine the large time (stationary) asymptotics of quantum systems out of equilibrium.

  2. Coupled quantum dot-ring structures by droplet epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somaschini, C; Bietti, S; Koguchi, N; Sanguinetti, S

    2011-01-01

    The fabrication, by pure self-assembly, of GaAs/AlGaAs dot-ring quantum nanostructures is presented. The growth is performed via droplet epitaxy, which allows for the fine control, through As flux and substrate temperature, of the crystallization kinetics of nanometer scale metallic Ga reservoirs deposited on the surface. Such a procedure permits the combination of quantum dots and quantum rings into a single, multi-functional, complex quantum nanostructure.

  3. Quantum robots and quantum computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benioff, P.

    1998-07-01

    Validation of a presumably universal theory, such as quantum mechanics, requires a quantum mechanical description of systems that carry out theoretical calculations and systems that carry out experiments. The description of quantum computers is under active development. No description of systems to carry out experiments has been given. A small step in this direction is taken here by giving a description of quantum robots as mobile systems with on board quantum computers that interact with different environments. Some properties of these systems are discussed. A specific model based on the literature descriptions of quantum Turing machines is presented.

  4. Quantum computers and quantum computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valiev, Kamil' A

    2005-01-01

    This review outlines the principles of operation of quantum computers and their elements. The theory of ideal computers that do not interact with the environment and are immune to quantum decohering processes is presented. Decohering processes in quantum computers are investigated. The review considers methods for correcting quantum computing errors arising from the decoherence of the state of the quantum computer, as well as possible methods for the suppression of the decohering processes. A brief enumeration of proposed quantum computer realizations concludes the review. (reviews of topical problems)

  5. Clustering of Emerging Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzmaikin, A.

    1997-01-01

    Observations show that newly emerging flux tends to appear on the Solar surface at sites where there is flux already. This results in clustering of solar activity. Standard dynamo theories do not predict this effect.

  6. A single-atom quantum memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Holger P; Nölleke, Christian; Reiserer, Andreas; Uphoff, Manuel; Figueroa, Eden; Ritter, Stephan; Rempe, Gerhard

    2011-05-12

    The faithful storage of a quantum bit (qubit) of light is essential for long-distance quantum communication, quantum networking and distributed quantum computing. The required optical quantum memory must be able to receive and recreate the photonic qubit; additionally, it must store an unknown quantum state of light better than any classical device. So far, these two requirements have been met only by ensembles of material particles that store the information in collective excitations. Recent developments, however, have paved the way for an approach in which the information exchange occurs between single quanta of light and matter. This single-particle approach allows the material qubit to be addressed, which has fundamental advantages for realistic implementations. First, it enables a heralding mechanism that signals the successful storage of a photon by means of state detection; this can be used to combat inevitable losses and finite efficiencies. Second, it allows for individual qubit manipulations, opening up avenues for in situ processing of the stored quantum information. Here we demonstrate the most fundamental implementation of such a quantum memory, by mapping arbitrary polarization states of light into and out of a single atom trapped inside an optical cavity. The memory performance is tested with weak coherent pulses and analysed using full quantum process tomography. The average fidelity is measured to be 93%, and low decoherence rates result in qubit coherence times exceeding 180  microseconds. This makes our system a versatile quantum node with excellent prospects for applications in optical quantum gates and quantum repeaters.

  7. Multiparty Quantum Secret Sharing of Quantum States Using Entanglement States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ying, Guo; Da-Zu, Huang; Gui-Hua, Zeng; Ho, Lee Moon

    2008-01-01

    A multi-partite-controlled quantum secret sharing scheme using several non-orthogonal entanglement states is presented with unconditional security. In this scheme, the participants share the secret quantum state by exchanging the secret polarization angles of the disordered travel particles. The security of the secret quantum state is also guaranteed by the non-orthogonal multi-partite-controlled entanglement states, the participants' secret polarizations, and the disorder of the travelling particles. Moreover, the present scheme is secure against the particle-number splitting attack and the intercept-and-resend attack. It may be still secure even if the distributed quantum state is embedded in a not-so-weak coherent-state pulse

  8. Preservation of quantum states via a super-Zeno effect on ensemble quantum computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ting-Ting, Ren; Jun, Luo; Xian-Ping, Sun; Ming-Sheng, Zhan

    2009-01-01

    Following a recent proposal by Dhar et al (2006 Phys. Rev. Lett. 96 100405), we demonstrate experimentally the preservation of quantum states in a two-qubit system based on a super-Zeno effect using liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. Using inverting radiofrequency pulses and delicately selecting time intervals between two pulses, we suppress the effect of decoherence of quantum states. We observe that preservation of the quantum state |11) with the super-Zeno effect is three times more efficient than the ordinary one with the standard Zeno effect. (general)

  9. Quantum mystery

    CERN Document Server

    Chanda, Rajat

    1997-01-01

    The book discusses the laws of quantum mechanics, several amazing quantum phenomena and some recent progress in understanding the connection between the quantum and the classical worlds. We show how paradoxes arise and how to resolve them. The significance of Bell's theorem and the remarkable experimental results on particle correlations are described in some detail. Finally, the current status of our understanding of quantum theory is summerised.

  10. Quantum criticality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Piers; Schofield, Andrew J

    2005-01-20

    As we mark the centenary of Albert Einstein's seminal contribution to both quantum mechanics and special relativity, we approach another anniversary--that of Einstein's foundation of the quantum theory of solids. But 100 years on, the same experimental measurement that puzzled Einstein and his contemporaries is forcing us to question our understanding of how quantum matter transforms at ultra-low temperatures.

  11. Quantum Computing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the first part of this article, we had looked at how quantum physics can be harnessed to make the building blocks of a quantum computer. In this concluding part, we look at algorithms which can exploit the power of this computational device, and some practical difficulties in building such a device. Quantum Algorithms.

  12. I, Quantum Robot: Quantum Mind control on a Quantum Computer

    OpenAIRE

    Zizzi, Paola

    2008-01-01

    The logic which describes quantum robots is not orthodox quantum logic, but a deductive calculus which reproduces the quantum tasks (computational processes, and actions) taking into account quantum superposition and quantum entanglement. A way toward the realization of intelligent quantum robots is to adopt a quantum metalanguage to control quantum robots. A physical implementation of a quantum metalanguage might be the use of coherent states in brain signals.

  13. Design and characterization of a 64 channels ASIC front-end electronics for high-flux particle beam detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fausti, F.; Mazza, G.; Attili, A.; Mazinani, M. Fadavi; Giordanengo, S.; Lavagno, M.; Manganaro, L.; Marchetto, F.; Monaco, V.; Sacchi, R.; Vignati, A.; Cirio, R.

    2017-09-01

    A new wide-input range 64-channels current-to-frequency converter ASIC has been developed and characterized for applications in beam monitoring of therapeutic particle beams. This chip, named TERA09, has been designed to extend the input current range, compared to the previous versions of the chip, for dealing with high-flux pulsed beams. A particular care was devoted in achieving a good conversion linearity over a wide bipolar input current range. Using a charge quantum of 200 fC, a linearity within ±2% for an input current range between 3 nA and 12 μA is obtained for individual channels, with a gain spread among the channels of about 3%. By connecting all the 64 channels of the chip to a common input, the current range can be increased 64 times preserving a linearity within ±3% in the range between and 20 μA and 750 μA.

  14. Topological quantum numbers in nonrelativistic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Thouless, David James

    1998-01-01

    Topological quantum numbers are distinguished from quantum numbers based on symmetry because they are insensitive to the imperfections of the systems in which they are observed. They have become very important in precision measurements in recent years, and provide the best measurements of voltage and electrical resistance. This book describes the theory of such quantum numbers, starting with Dirac's argument for the quantization of electric charge, and continuing with discussions on the helium superfluids, flux quantization and the Josephson effect in superconductors, the quantum Hall effect,

  15. Quantum Logic and Quantum Reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Stairs, Allen

    2015-01-01

    Quantum logic understood as a reconstruction program had real successes and genuine limitations. This paper offers a synopsis of both and suggests a way of seeing quantum logic in a larger, still thriving context.

  16. Quantum dynamics of quantum bits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Bich Ha

    2011-01-01

    The theory of coherent oscillations of the matrix elements of the density matrix of the two-state system as a quantum bit is presented. Different calculation methods are elaborated in the case of a free quantum bit. Then the most appropriate methods are applied to the study of the density matrices of the quantum bits interacting with a classical pumping radiation field as well as with the quantum electromagnetic field in a single-mode microcavity. The theory of decoherence of a quantum bit in Markovian approximation is presented. The decoherence of a quantum bit interacting with monoenergetic photons in a microcavity is also discussed. The content of the present work can be considered as an introduction to the study of the quantum dynamics of quantum bits. (review)

  17. Synthetic magnetic fluxes on the honeycomb lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorecka, Agnieszka [Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 2, Singapore 117543 (Singapore); Gremaud, Benoit [Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 2, Singapore 117543 (Singapore); Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, Ecole Normale Superieure, CNRS, UPMC, 4 Place Jussieu, FR-75005 Paris (France); Miniatura, Christian [Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 2, Singapore 117543 (Singapore); Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Institut Non Lineaire de Nice, UMR 6618, UNS, CNRS, 1361 Route des Lucioles, FR-06560 Valbonne (France); Institute of Advanced Studies, Nanyang Technological university, 60 Nanyang View, Singapore 639673 (Singapore)

    2011-08-15

    We devise experimental schemes that are able to mimic uniform and staggered magnetic fluxes acting on ultracold two-electron atoms, such as ytterbium atoms, propagating in a honeycomb lattice. The atoms are first trapped into two independent state-selective triangular lattices and then further exposed to a suitable configuration of resonant Raman laser beams. These beams induce hops between the two triangular lattices and make atoms move in a honeycomb lattice. Atoms traveling around each unit cell of this honeycomb lattice pick up a nonzero phase. In the uniform case, the artificial magnetic flux sustained by each cell can reach about two flux quanta, thereby realizing a cold-atom analog of the Harper model with its notorious Hofstadter's butterfly structure. Different condensed-matter phenomena such as the relativistic integer and fractional quantum Hall effects, as observed in graphene samples, could be targeted with this scheme.

  18. Realizing Controllable Quantum States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayanagi, Hideaki; Nitta, Junsaku

    -- 4. Mesoscopic superconductivity with unconventional superconductor or ferromagnet. Ultraefficient microrefrigerators realized with ferromagnet-superconductor junctions / F. Giazotto et al. Anomalous charge transport in triplet superconductor junctions by the synergy effect of the proximity effect and the mid gap Andreev resonant states / Y. Tanaka and S. Kashiwaya. Paramagnetic and glass states in superconductive YBa[symbol]Cu[symbol]O[symbol] ceramics of sub-micron scale grains / H. Deguchi et al. Quantum properties of single-domain triplet superconductors / A. M. Gulian and K. S. Wood. A numerical study of Josephson current in p wave superconducting junctions / Y. Asano et al. Tilted bi-crystal sapphire substrates improve properties of grain boundary YBa[symbol]Cu[symbol]O[symbol] junctions and extend their Josephson response to THZ frequencies / E. Stepantsov et al. Circuit theory analysis of AB-plane tunnel junctions of unconventional superconductor Bi[symbol]Sr[symbol]Ca[symbol]Cu[symbol]O[symbol] / I. Shigeta et al. Transport properties of normal metal/anisotropic superconductor junctions in the eutectic system Sr[symbol]RuO[symbol]Ru / M. Kawamura et al. Macroscopic quantum tunneling in d-wave superconductor Josephson / S. Kawabata et al. Quasiparticle states of high-T[symbol] oxides observed by a Zeeman magnetic field response / S. Kashiwaya et al. Experimentally realizable devices for controlling the motion of magnetic flux quanta in anisotropic superconductors: vortex lenses, vortex diodes and vortex pumps / S. Savel'ev and F. Nori. Stability of vortex-antivortex "molecules" in mesoscopic superconducting triangles / V. R. Misko et al. Superconducting network with magnetic decoration - Hofstadter butterfly in spatially modulated magnetic field / Y. Iye et al. Observation of paramagnetic supercurrent in mesoscopic superconducting rings and disks using multiple-small-tunnel-junction method / A. Kanda et al. Guidance of vortices in high

  19. Propagation delay of femtosecond pulses in an optical amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poel, Mike van der; Mørk, Jesper; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    of 2.6 THz, through a quantum-dot (QD) semiconductor amplifier (SOA) at room temperature. This extremely large bandwidth, on the other hand, is at the cost of a rather small group index change of ?ng=4*10-3. We have performed two types of femtosecond pulse slow-down and advancement experiments....... In the first experiment, we prepare a narrow peak or dip in the SOA gain spectrum by injection of a strong pump pulse4. The resulting dispersion feature is then probed by a weak pulse. In the second experiment, we measure self-slowdown or advancement as pulse energy isincreased5. In both cases, we perform...

  20. Quantum frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Matthew J.

    2014-02-01

    The framework of quantum frames can help unravel some of the interpretive difficulties i the foundation of quantum mechanics. In this paper, I begin by tracing the origins of this concept in Bohr's discussion of quantum theory and his theory of complementarity. Engaging with various interpreters and followers of Bohr, I argue that the correct account of quantum frames must be extended beyond literal space-time reference frames to frames defined by relations between a quantum system and the exosystem or external physical frame, of which measurement contexts are a particularly important example. This approach provides superior solutions to key EPR-type measurement and locality paradoxes.

  1. Quantum Darwinism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurek, Wojciech Hubert

    2009-03-01

    Quantum Darwinism describes the proliferation, in the environment, of multiple records of selected states of a quantum system. It explains how the quantum fragility of a state of a single quantum system can lead to the classical robustness of states in their correlated multitude; shows how effective `wave-packet collapse' arises as a result of the proliferation throughout the environment of imprints of the state of the system; and provides a framework for the derivation of Born's rule, which relates the probabilities of detecting states to their amplitudes. Taken together, these three advances mark considerable progress towards settling the quantum measurement problem.

  2. Trapped magnetic field measurements on HTS bulk by peak controlled pulsed field magnetization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, Tetsuya; Watasaki, Masahiro; Kimura, Yosuke; Miki, Motohiro; Izumi, Mitsuru

    2010-01-01

    For the past several years, we have studied the high-temperature superconducting (HTS) synchronous motor assembled with melt-textured Gd-Ba-Cu-O bulk magnets. If the single pulse field magnetizes a bulk effectively, size of electrical motor will become small for the strong magnetic field of the HTS magnets without reducing output power of motor. In the previous study, we showed that the HTS bulk was magnetized to excellent cone-shape magnetic field distribution by using the waveform control pulse magnetization (WCPM) method. The WCPM technique made possible the active control of the waveform on which magnetic flux motion depended. We generated the pulse waveform with controlled risetime for HTS bulk magnetization to suppress the magnetic flux motion which decreases magnetization efficiency. The pulsed maximum magnetic flux density with slow risetime is not beyond the maximum magnetic flux density which is trapped by the static field magnetization. But, as for applying the pulse which has fast risetime, the magnetic flux which exceed greatly the threshold penetrates the bulk and causes the disorder of the trapped magnetic distribution. This fact suggests the possibility that the threshold at pulsed magnetization influences the dynamic magnetic flux motion. In this study, Gd-Ba-Cu-O bulk is magnetized by the controlled arbitrary trapezoidal shape pulse, of which the maximum magnetic flux density is controlled not to exceed the threshold. We will present the trapped magnetic characteristics and the technique to generate the controlled pulsed field.

  3. Emergent quantum mechanics without wavefunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa Pascasio, J.; Fussy, S.; Schwabl, H.; Grössing, G.

    2016-03-01

    We present our model of an Emergent Quantum Mechanics which can be characterized by “realism without pre-determination”. This is illustrated by our analytic description and corresponding computer simulations of Bohmian-like “surreal” trajectories, which are obtained classically, i.e. without the use of any quantum mechanical tool such as wavefunctions. However, these trajectories do not necessarily represent ontological paths of particles but rather mappings of the probability density flux in a hydrodynamical sense. Modelling emergent quantum mechanics in a high-low intesity double slit scenario gives rise to the “quantum sweeper effect” with a characteristic intensity pattern. This phenomenon should be experimentally testable via weak measurement techniques.

  4. Emergent quantum mechanics without wavefunctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascasio, J Mesa; Fussy, S; Schwabl, H; Grössing, G

    2016-01-01

    We present our model of an Emergent Quantum Mechanics which can be characterized by “realism without pre-determination”. This is illustrated by our analytic description and corresponding computer simulations of Bohmian-like “surreal” trajectories, which are obtained classically, i.e. without the use of any quantum mechanical tool such as wavefunctions. However, these trajectories do not necessarily represent ontological paths of particles but rather mappings of the probability density flux in a hydrodynamical sense. Modelling emergent quantum mechanics in a high-low intesity double slit scenario gives rise to the “quantum sweeper effect” with a characteristic intensity pattern. This phenomenon should be experimentally testable via weak measurement techniques. (paper)

  5. Quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouwenhoven, L.; Marcus, C.

    1998-01-01

    Quantum dots are man-made ''droplets'' of charge that can contain anything from a single electron to a collection of several thousand. Their typical dimensions range from nanometres to a few microns, and their size, shape and interactions can be precisely controlled through the use of advanced nanofabrication technology. The physics of quantum dots shows many parallels with the behaviour of naturally occurring quantum systems in atomic and nuclear physics. Indeed, quantum dots exemplify an important trend in condensed-matter physics in which researchers study man-made objects rather than real atoms or nuclei. As in an atom, the energy levels in a quantum dot become quantized due to the confinement of electrons. With quantum dots, however, an experimentalist can scan through the entire periodic table by simply changing a voltage. In this article the authors describe how quantum dots make it possible to explore new physics in regimes that cannot otherwise be accessed in the laboratory. (UK)

  6. Nuclear transmutation by flux compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifritz, W.

    2001-01-01

    A new idea for the transmutation of minor actinides, long (and even short) lived fission products is presented. It is based an the property of neutron flux compression in nuclear (fast and/or thermal) reactors possessing spatially non-stationary critical masses. An advantage factor for the burn-up fluence of the elements to be transmuted in the order of magnitude of 100 and more is obtainable compared with the classical way of transmutation. Three typical examples of such transmuters (a subcritical ringreactor with a rotating reflector, a sub-critical ring reactor with a rotating spallation source, the socalled ''pulsed energy amplifier'', and a fast burn-wave reactor) are presented and analysed with regard to this purpose. (orig.) [de

  7. Electromagnetically induced transparency with matched pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, S.E.

    1993-01-01

    In the last several years there have been studies and experiments showing how, by applying an additional laser beam, optically-thick transitions may be rendered nearly transparent to probing radiation. This transparency results from a quantum interference, very much like a Fano interference, which is established by the additional laser. This talk describes the difference between the quantum interference as exhibited by an independent atom and by an optically-thick ensemble of atoms. We find that an ensemble of atoms establishes transparency through a strong nonlinear interaction which, for a lambda system, tends to generate a matching temporal envelope on the complementary transition. For a ladder system, phase conjugate pulses are generated and, after a characteristic distance, establish transparency. The transparency of an optically-thick medium is therefore not a Beer's law superposition of the independent atom response. To transmit a pulse through an otherwise opaque media, the front edge of the complementary pulse should lead, in the manner of open-quotes counter-intuitiveclose quotes adiabatic transfer, the front edge of the pulse which is to be rendered transparent. Thereafter the pulses should be matched or, for a ladder system, phase-conjugately matched

  8. Quantum information. Teleporation - cryptography - quantum computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breuer, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Reality in the test house, quantum teleportation, 100 years of quantum theory, the reality of quanta, interactionless quantum measurement, rules for quantum computers, quantum computers with ions, spintronics with diamond, the limits of the quantum computers, a view into the future of quantum optics. (HSI)

  9. Quantum symmetry in quantum theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schomerus, V.

    1993-02-01

    Symmetry concepts have always been of great importance for physical problems like explicit calculations, classification or model building. More recently, new 'quantum symmetries' ((quasi) quantum groups) attracted much interest in quantum theory. It is shown that all these quantum symmetries permit a conventional formulation as symmetry in quantum mechanics. Symmetry transformations can act on the Hilbert space H of physical states such that the ground state is invariant and field operators transform covariantly. Models show that one must allow for 'truncation' in the tensor product of representations of a quantum symmetry. This means that the dimension of the tensor product of two representations of dimension σ 1 and σ 2 may be strictly smaller than σ 1 σ 2 . Consistency of the transformation law of field operators local braid relations leads us to expect, that (weak) quasi quantum groups are the most general symmetries in local quantum theory. The elements of the R-matrix which appears in these local braid relations turn out to be operators on H in general. It will be explained in detail how examples of field algebras with weak quasi quantum group symmetry can be obtained. Given a set of observable field with a finite number of superselection sectors, a quantum symmetry together with a complete set of covariant field operators which obey local braid relations are constructed. A covariant transformation law for adjoint fields is not automatic but will follow when the existence of an appropriate antipode is assumed. At the example of the chiral critical Ising model, non-uniqueness of the quantum symmetry will be demonstrated. Generalized quantum symmetries yield examples of gauge symmetries in non-commutative geometry. Quasi-quantum planes are introduced as the simplest examples of quasi-associative differential geometry. (Weak) quasi quantum groups can act on them by generalized derivations much as quantum groups do in non-commutative (differential-) geometry

  10. Spin gymnastics with selective radiofrequency pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, R.; Kupce, E. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom)

    1994-12-31

    Although high resolution NMR spectra are normally excited with short intense radiofrequency pulses, there is an entire family of new experiments that can be performed with frequency-selective or ``soft`` pulses. Time-consuming two-dimensional spectroscopy may be reduced to a much shorter one-dimensional version with much finer digitization in the frequency domain. A large number of soft pulses can be combined to form a ``polychromatic pulse`` that has uniform excitation over the entire range of proton shifts except for a rejection notch at the water frequency. Polychromatic pulses can also be used to create antiphase magnetization in preparation for a coherence transfer or double-quantum experiment. An excitation profile can be designed in the form of a ``template`` that exactly matches the spectrum of a given chemical compound but has zero excitation elsewhere. This is achieved by using the information in the experimental free induction decay to construct a suitable array of soft pulses that has the required excitation pattern. In this manner, interpenetrating spectra can be separated into the spectra of the pure components, for example those of a and b glucose. Selective Hartmann-Hahn coherence transfer experiments employ similar soft pulse techniques. If several such transfers are concatenated, the method may be used as a test to see whether a group of protons is linked in an unbroken chain by scalar spin-spin interactions. (authors). 24 refs., 18 figs.

  11. Simultaneous deterministic control of distant qubits in two semiconductor quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamouras, A; Mathew, R; Freisem, S; Deppe, D G; Hall, K C

    2013-10-09

    In optimal quantum control (OQC), a target quantum state of matter is achieved by tailoring the phase and amplitude of the control Hamiltonian through femtosecond pulse-shaping techniques and powerful adaptive feedback algorithms. Motivated by recent applications of OQC in quantum information science as an approach to optimizing quantum gates in atomic and molecular systems, here we report the experimental implementation of OQC in a solid-state system consisting of distinguishable semiconductor quantum dots. We demonstrate simultaneous high-fidelity π and 2π single qubit gates in two different quantum dots using a single engineered infrared femtosecond pulse. These experiments enhance the scalability of semiconductor-based quantum hardware and lay the foundation for applications of pulse shaping to optimize quantum gates in other solid-state systems.

  12. Quantum random number generator based on quantum tunneling effect

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Haihan; Li, Junlin; Pan, Dong; Zhang, Weixing; Long, Guilu

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we proposed an experimental implementation of quantum random number generator(QRNG) with inherent randomness of quantum tunneling effect of electrons. We exploited InGaAs/InP diodes, whose valance band and conduction band shared a quasi-constant energy barrier. We applied a bias voltage on the InGaAs/InP avalanche diode, which made the diode works under Geiger mode, and triggered the tunneling events with a periodic pulse. Finally, after data collection and post-processing, our...

  13. Reconfigurable optical implementation of quantum complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokkala, J.; Arzani, F.; Galve, F.; Zambrini, R.; Maniscalco, S.; Piilo, J.; Treps, N.; Parigi, V.

    2018-05-01

    Network theory has played a dominant role in understanding the structure of complex systems and their dynamics. Recently, quantum complex networks, i.e. collections of quantum systems arranged in a non-regular topology, have been theoretically explored leading to significant progress in a multitude of diverse contexts including, e.g., quantum transport, open quantum systems, quantum communication, extreme violation of local realism, and quantum gravity theories. Despite important progress in several quantum platforms, the implementation of complex networks with arbitrary topology in quantum experiments is still a demanding task, especially if we require both a significant size of the network and the capability of generating arbitrary topology—from regular to any kind of non-trivial structure—in a single setup. Here we propose an all optical and reconfigurable implementation of quantum complex networks. The experimental proposal is based on optical frequency combs, parametric processes, pulse shaping and multimode measurements allowing the arbitrary control of the number of the nodes (optical modes) and topology of the links (interactions between the modes) within the network. Moreover, we also show how to simulate quantum dynamics within the network combined with the ability to address its individual nodes. To demonstrate the versatility of these features, we discuss the implementation of two recently proposed probing techniques for quantum complex networks and structured environments.

  14. Practical free space quantum cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt-Manderbach, T.; Weier, H.; Regner, N.; Kurtsiefer, C.; Weinfurter, H.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Quantum cryptography, the secure key distribution between two parties, is the first practical application of quantum information technology. By encoding digital information into different polarization states of single photons, a string of key bits can be established between two parties, where laws of quantum mechanics ensure that a possible eavesdropper has negligible knowledge of. Having shown the feasibility of a long distance quantum key distribution scheme, the emphasis of this work is to incorporate the previously developed compact sender and receiver modules into a quantum cryptography system suitable for every-day use in metropolitan areas. The permanent installation with automatic alignment allows to investigate in detail the sensitivity of the free space optical link to weather conditions and air turbulences commonly encountered in urban areas. We report on a successful free space quantum cryptography experiment over a distance of 500 m between the rooftops of two university buildings using the BB84 protocol. The obtained bit error rates in first runs of this experiment using faint coherent pulses with an average photon number ranging from 0.1 to 1.0 was measured to be below 3 percent for experiments carried out during night, leading to average raw key rates (before error correction and privacy amplification) of 50 kBits per second. Thanks to its simplicity of implementation, our experiment brings free space quantum key distribution a big step closer to practical usability in metropolitan networks and on a level with fibre-based quantum cryptography that up to now offers the only ready-to-use systems available. Compact and automated free space hardware is also a prerequisite for a possible earth-satellite quantum key distribution system in order to break the distance limit of about 100 km of current quantum cryptography schemes. (author)

  15. Quantum information to the home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Iris; Young, Robert J.; Townsend, Paul D.

    2011-06-01

    Information encoded on individual quanta will play an important role in our future lives, much as classically encoded digital information does today. Combining quantum information carried by single photons with classical signals encoded on strong laser pulses in modern fibre-to-the-home (FTTH) networks is a significant challenge, the solution to which will facilitate the global distribution of quantum information to the home and with it a quantum internet [1]. In real-world networks, spontaneous Raman scattering in the optical fibre would induce crosstalk between the high-power classical channels and a single-photon quantum channel, such that the latter is unable to operate. Here, we show that the integration of quantum and classical information on an FTTH network is possible by performing quantum key distribution (QKD) on a network while simultaneously transferring realistic levels of classical data. Our novel scheme involves synchronously interleaving a channel of quantum data with the Raman scattered photons from a classical channel, exploiting the periodic minima in the instantaneous crosstalk and thereby enabling secure QKD to be performed.

  16. Quantum information to the home

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Iris; Young, Robert J; Townsend, Paul D, E-mail: paul.townsend@tyndall.ie [Photonic Systems Group, Tyndall National Institute and Department of Physics, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland)

    2011-06-15

    Information encoded on individual quanta will play an important role in our future lives, much as classically encoded digital information does today. Combining quantum information carried by single photons with classical signals encoded on strong laser pulses in modern fibre-to-the-home (FTTH) networks is a significant challenge, the solution to which will facilitate the global distribution of quantum information to the home and with it a quantum internet. In real-world networks, spontaneous Raman scattering in the optical fibre would induce crosstalk between the high-power classical channels and a single-photon quantum channel, such that the latter is unable to operate. Here, we show that the integration of quantum and classical information on an FTTH network is possible by performing quantum key distribution (QKD) on a network while simultaneously transferring realistic levels of classical data. Our novel scheme involves synchronously interleaving a channel of quantum data with the Raman scattered photons from a classical channel, exploiting the periodic minima in the instantaneous crosstalk and thereby enabling secure QKD to be performed.

  17. Quantum information to the home

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Iris; Young, Robert J; Townsend, Paul D

    2011-01-01

    Information encoded on individual quanta will play an important role in our future lives, much as classically encoded digital information does today. Combining quantum information carried by single photons with classical signals encoded on strong laser pulses in modern fibre-to-the-home (FTTH) networks is a significant challenge, the solution to which will facilitate the global distribution of quantum information to the home and with it a quantum internet. In real-world networks, spontaneous Raman scattering in the optical fibre would induce crosstalk between the high-power classical channels and a single-photon quantum channel, such that the latter is unable to operate. Here, we show that the integration of quantum and classical information on an FTTH network is possible by performing quantum key distribution (QKD) on a network while simultaneously transferring realistic levels of classical data. Our novel scheme involves synchronously interleaving a channel of quantum data with the Raman scattered photons from a classical channel, exploiting the periodic minima in the instantaneous crosstalk and thereby enabling secure QKD to be performed.

  18. Dynamics of photoionization from molecular electronic wavepacket states in intense pulse laser fields: A nonadiabatic electron wavepacket study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Takahide; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2017-04-07

    A theory for dynamics of molecular photoionization from nonadiabatic electron wavepackets driven by intense pulse lasers is proposed. Time evolution of photoelectron distribution is evaluated in terms of out-going electron flux (current of the probability density of electrons) that has kinetic energy high enough to recede from the molecular system. The relevant electron flux is in turn evaluated with the complex-valued electronic wavefunctions that are time evolved in nonadiabatic electron wavepacket dynamics in laser fields. To uniquely rebuild such wavefunctions with its electronic population being lost by ionization, we adopt the complex-valued natural orbitals emerging from the electron density as building blocks of the total wavefunction. The method has been implemented into a quantum chemistry code, which is based on configuration state mixing for polyatomic molecules. Some of the practical aspects needed for its application will be presented. As a first illustrative example, we show the results of hydrogen molecule and its isotope substitutes (HD and DD), which are photoionized by a two-cycle pulse laser. Photon emission spectrum associated with above threshold ionization is also shown. Another example is taken from photoionization dynamics from an excited state of a water molecule. Qualitatively significant effects of nonadiabatic interaction on the photoelectron spectrum are demonstrated.

  19. Modeling and prototyping of a flux concentrator for positron capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, W.; Gai, W.; Wang, H.; Wong, T.

    2008-01-01

    An adiabatic matching device (AMD) generates a tapered high-strength magnetic field to capture positrons emitted from a positron target to a downstream accelerating structure. The AMD is a key component of a positron source and represents a technical challenge. The International Linear Collider collaboration is proposing to employ a pulsed, normal-conducting, flux-concentrator to generate a 5 Tesla initial magnetic field. The flux-concentrator structure itself and the interactions between the flux-concentrator and the external power supply circuits give rise to a nontrivial system. In this paper, we present a recently developed equivalent circuit model for a flux concentrator, along with the characteristics of a prototype fabricated for validating the model. Using the model, we can obtain the transient response of the pulsed magnetic field and the field profile. Calculations based on the model and the results of measurements made on the prototype are in good agreement.

  20. Speeding up transmissions of unknown quantum information along Ising-type quantum channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo W J; Wei L F

    2017-01-01

    Quantum teleportation with entanglement channels and a series of two-qubit SWAP gates between the nearest-neighbor qubits are usually utilized to achieve the transfers of unknown quantum state from the sender to the distant receiver. In this paper, by simplifying the usual SWAP gates we propose an approach to speed up the transmissions of unknown quantum information, specifically including the single-qubit unknown state and two-qubit unknown entangled ones, by a series of entangling and disentangling operations between the remote qubits with distant interactions. The generic proposal is demonstrated specifically with experimentally-existing Ising-type quantum channels without transverse interaction; liquid NMR-molecules driven by global radio frequency electromagnetic pulses and capacitively-coupled Josephson circuits driven by local microwave pulses. The proposal should be particularly useful to set up the connections between the distant qubits in a chip of quantum computing. (paper)

  1. Efficient networks for quantum factoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckman, D.; Chari, A.N.; Devabhaktuni, S.; Preskill, J.

    1996-01-01

    We consider how to optimize memory use and computation time in operating a quantum computer. In particular, we estimate the number of memory quantum bits (qubits) and the number of operations required to perform factorization, using the algorithm suggested by Shor [in Proceedings of the 35th Annual Symposium on Foundations of Computer Science, edited by S. Goldwasser (IEEE Computer Society, Los Alamitos, CA, 1994), p. 124]. A K-bit number can be factored in time of order K 3 using a machine capable of storing 5K+1 qubits. Evaluation of the modular exponential function (the bottleneck of Shor close-quote s algorithm) could be achieved with about 72K 3 elementary quantum gates; implementation using a linear ion trap would require about 396K 3 laser pulses. A proof-of-principle demonstration of quantum factoring (factorization of 15) could be performed with only 6 trapped ions and 38 laser pulses. Though the ion trap may never be a useful computer, it will be a powerful device for exploring experimentally the properties of entangled quantum states. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  2. A quantum-rovibrational-state-selected study of the proton-transfer reaction H2+(X2Σ: v+ = 1-3; N+ = 0-3) + Ne → NeH+ + H using the pulsed field ionization-photoion method: observation of the rotational effect near the reaction threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Bo; Chang, Yih-Chung; Ng, Cheuk-Yiu

    2017-07-19

    Using the sequential electric field pulsing scheme for vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser pulsed field ionization-photoion (PFI-PI) detection, we have successfully prepared H 2 + (X 2 Σ: v + = 1-3; N + = 0-5) ions in the form of an ion beam in single quantum-rovibrational-states with high purity, high intensity, and narrow laboratory kinetic energy spread (ΔE lab ≈ 0.05 eV). This VUV-PFI-PI ion source, when coupled with the double-quadrupole double-octupole ion-molecule reaction apparatus, has made possible a systematic examination of the vibrational- as well as rotational-state effects on the proton transfer reaction of H 2 + (X 2 Σ: v + ; N + ) + Ne. Here, we present the integral cross sections [σ(v + ; N + )'s] for the H 2 + (v + = 1-3; N + = 0-3) + Ne → NeH + + H reaction observed in the center-of-mass kinetic energy (E cm ) range of 0.05-2.00 eV. The σ(v + = 1, N + = 1) exhibits a distinct E cm onset, which is found to agree with the endothermicity of 0.27 eV for the proton transfer process after taking into account of experimental uncertainties. Strong v + -vibrational enhancements are observed for σ(v + = 1-3, N + ) in the E cm range of 0.05-2.00 eV. While rotational excitations appear to have little effect on σ(v + = 3, N + ), a careful search leads to the observation of moderate N + -rotational enhancements at v + = 2: σ(v + = 2; N + = 0) quantum dynamics predictions. We hope that these new experimental results would further motivate more rigorous theoretical calculations on the dynamics of this prototypical ion-molecule reaction.

  3. Random pulse generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Ya'nan; Jin Dapeng; Zhao Dixin; Liu Zhen'an; Qiao Qiao; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing

    2007-01-01

    Due to the randomness of radioactive decay and nuclear reaction, the signals from detectors are random in time. But normal pulse generator generates periodical pulses. To measure the performances of nuclear electronic devices under random inputs, a random generator is necessary. Types of random pulse generator are reviewed, 2 digital random pulse generators are introduced. (authors)

  4. Complex characterization of short-pulse propagation through InAs/InP quantum-dash optical amplifiers: From the quasi-linear to the two-photon-dominated regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capua, Amir; Saal, Abigael; Karni, Ouri

    2012-01-01

    We describe direct measurements at a high temporal resolution of the changes experienced by the phase and amplitude of an ultra-short pulse upon propagation through an inhomogenously broadened semiconductor nanostructured optical gain medium. Using a cross frequency-resolved optical gating techni...

  5. Programmable pulse generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Zhihua; Lou Binqiao; Duan Xiaohui

    2002-01-01

    The author introduces the design of programmable pulse generator that is based on a micro-controller and controlled by RS232 interface of personal computer. The whole system has good stability. The pulse generator can produce TTL pulse and analog pulse. The pulse frequency can be selected by EPLD. The voltage amplitude and pulse width of analog pulse can be adjusted by analog switches and digitally-controlled potentiometers. The software development tools of computer is National Instruments LabView5.1. The front panel of this virtual instrumentation is intuitive and easy-to-use. Parameters can be selected and changed conveniently by knob and slide

  6. Quantum games as quantum types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbecque, Yannick

    In this thesis, we present a new model for higher-order quantum programming languages. The proposed model is an adaptation of the probabilistic game semantics developed by Danos and Harmer [DH02]: we expand it with quantum strategies which enable one to represent quantum states and quantum operations. Some of the basic properties of these strategies are established and then used to construct denotational semantics for three quantum programming languages. The first of these languages is a formalisation of the measurement calculus proposed by Danos et al. [DKP07]. The other two are new: they are higher-order quantum programming languages. Previous attempts to define a denotational semantics for higher-order quantum programming languages have failed. We identify some of the key reasons for this and base the design of our higher-order languages on these observations. The game semantics proposed in this thesis is the first denotational semantics for a lambda-calculus equipped with quantum types and with extra operations which allow one to program quantum algorithms. The results presented validate the two different approaches used in the design of these two new higher-order languages: a first one where quantum states are used through references and a second one where they are introduced as constants in the language. The quantum strategies presented in this thesis allow one to understand the constraints that must be imposed on quantum type systems with higher-order types. The most significant constraint is the fact that abstraction over part of the tensor product of many unknown quantum states must not be allowed. Quantum strategies are a new mathematical model which describes the interaction between classical and quantum data using system-environment dialogues. The interactions between the different parts of a quantum system are described using the rich structure generated by composition of strategies. This approach has enough generality to be put in relation with other

  7. Cryosurgery with pulsed electric fields.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte S Daniels

    Full Text Available This study explores the hypothesis that combining the minimally invasive surgical techniques of cryosurgery and pulsed electric fields will eliminate some of the major disadvantages of these techniques while retaining their advantages. Cryosurgery, tissue ablation by freezing, is a well-established minimally invasive surgical technique. One disadvantage of cryosurgery concerns the mechanism of cell death; cells at high subzero temperature on the outer rim of the frozen lesion can survive. Pulsed electric fields (PEF are another minimally invasive surgical technique in which high strength and very rapid electric pulses are delivered across cells to permeabilize the cell membrane for applications such as gene delivery, electrochemotherapy and irreversible electroporation. The very short time scale of the electric pulses is disadvantageous because it does not facilitate real time control over the procedure. We hypothesize that applying the electric pulses during the cryosurgical procedure in such a way that the electric field vector is parallel to the heat flux vector will have the effect of confining the electric fields to the frozen/cold region of tissue, thereby ablating the cells that survive freezing while facilitating controlled use of the PEF in the cold confined region. A finite element analysis of the electric field and heat conduction equations during simultaneous tissue treatment with cryosurgery and PEF (cryosurgery/PEF was used to study the effect of tissue freezing on electric fields. The study yielded motivating results. Because of decreased electrical conductivity in the frozen/cooled tissue, it experienced temperature induced magnified electric fields in comparison to PEF delivered to the unfrozen tissue control. This suggests that freezing/cooling confines and magnifies the electric fields to those regions; a targeting capability unattainable in traditional PEF. This analysis shows how temperature induced magnified and focused

  8. Cryosurgery with Pulsed Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Charlotte S.; Rubinsky, Boris

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the hypothesis that combining the minimally invasive surgical techniques of cryosurgery and pulsed electric fields will eliminate some of the major disadvantages of these techniques while retaining their advantages. Cryosurgery, tissue ablation by freezing, is a well-established minimally invasive surgical technique. One disadvantage of cryosurgery concerns the mechanism of cell death; cells at high subzero temperature on the outer rim of the frozen lesion can survive. Pulsed electric fields (PEF) are another minimally invasive surgical technique in which high strength and very rapid electric pulses are delivered across cells to permeabilize the cell membrane for applications such as gene delivery, electrochemotherapy and irreversible electroporation. The very short time scale of the electric pulses is disadvantageous because it does not facilitate real time control over the procedure. We hypothesize that applying the electric pulses during the cryosurgical procedure in such a way that the electric field vector is parallel to the heat flux vector will have the effect of confining the electric fields to the frozen/cold region of tissue, thereby ablating the cells that survive freezing while facilitating controlled use of the PEF in the cold confined region. A finite element analysis of the electric field and heat conduction equations during simultaneous tissue treatment with cryosurgery and PEF (cryosurgery/PEF) was used to study the effect of tissue freezing on electric fields. The study yielded motivating results. Because of decreased electrical conductivity in the frozen/cooled tissue, it experienced temperature induced magnified electric fields in comparison to PEF delivered to the unfrozen tissue control. This suggests that freezing/cooling confines and magnifies the electric fields to those regions; a targeting capability unattainable in traditional PEF. This analysis shows how temperature induced magnified and focused PEFs could be used to

  9. Electron emitter pulsed-type cylindrical IEC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, G.H.; Gu, Y.; Stubbers, R.; Zich, R.; Anderl, R.; Hartwell, J.

    1997-01-01

    A cylindrical version of the single grid Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) device (termed the C-device) has been developed for use as a 2.5-MeV D-D fusion neutron source for neutron activation analysis. The C-device employs a hollow-tube type cathode with similar anodes backed up by ''reflector'' dishes. The resulting discharge differs from a conventional hollow cathode discharge, by creating an explicit ion beam which is ''pinched'' in the cathode region. Resulting fusion reactions generate ∼10 6 neutron/s. A pulsed version is under development for applications requiring higher fluxes. Several pulsing techniques are under study, including an electron emitter (e-emitter) assisted discharge in a thorated tungsten wire emitter located behind a slotted area in the reflector dishes. Pulsing is initiated after establishing a low power steady-state discharge by pulsing the e-emitter current using a capacitor switch type circuit. The resulting electron jet, coupled with the discharge by the biased slot array, creates a strong pulse in the pinched ion beam. The pulse length/repetition rate are controlled by the e-emitter pulse circuit. Typical parameters in present studies are ∼30micros, 10Hz and 1-amp ion current. Corresponding neutron measurements are an In-foil type activation counter for time averaged rates. Results for a wide variety of operating conditions are presented

  10. Upconversion-based receivers for quantum hacking-resistant quantum key distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Nitin; Kanter, Gregory S.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a novel upconversion (sum frequency generation)-based quantum-optical system design that can be employed as a receiver (Bob) in practical quantum key distribution systems. The pump governing the upconversion process is produced and utilized inside the physical receiver, making its access or control unrealistic for an external adversary (Eve). This pump facilitates several properties which permit Bob to define and control the modes that can participate in the quantum measurement. Furthermore, by manipulating and monitoring the characteristics of the pump pulses, Bob can detect a wide range of quantum hacking attacks launched by Eve.

  11. Manipulating Quantum Coherence in Solid State Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Flatté, Michael E; The NATO Advanced Study Institute "Manipulating Quantum Coherence in Solid State Systems"

    2007-01-01

    The NATO Advanced Study Institute "Manipulating Quantum Coherence in Solid State Systems", in Cluj-Napoca, Romania, August 29-September 9, 2005, presented a fundamental introduction to solid-state approaches to achieving quantum computation. This proceedings volume describes the properties of quantum coherence in semiconductor spin-based systems and the behavior of quantum coherence in superconducting systems. Semiconductor spin-based approaches to quantum computation have made tremendous advances in the past several years. Coherent populations of spins can be oriented, manipulated and detected experimentally. Rapid progress has been made towards performing the same tasks on individual spins (nuclear, ionic, or electronic) with all-electrical means. Superconducting approaches to quantum computation have demonstrated single qubits based on charge eigenstates as well as flux eigenstates. These topics have been presented in a pedagogical fashion by leading researchers in the fields of semiconductor-spin-based qu...

  12. Superconducting Qubits as Mechanical Quantum Engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachtleben, Kewin; Mazon, Kahio T; Rego, Luis G C

    2017-09-01

    We propose the equivalence of superconducting qubits with a pistonlike mechanical quantum engine. The work reports a study on the nature of the nonequilibrium work exchanged with the quantum-nonadiabatic working medium, which is modeled as a multilevel coupled quantum well system subject to an external control parameter. The quantum dynamics is solved for arbitrary control protocols. It is shown that the work output has two components: one that depends instantaneously on the level populations and another that is due to the quantum coherences built in the system. The nonadiabatic coherent dynamics of the quantum engine gives rise to a resistance (friction) force that decreases the work output. We consider the functional equivalence of such a device and a rf-SQUID flux qubit.

  13. Quantum measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Busch, Paul; Pellonpää, Juha-Pekka; Ylinen, Kari

    2016-01-01

    This is a book about the Hilbert space formulation of quantum mechanics and its measurement theory. It contains a synopsis of what became of the Mathematical Foundations of Quantum Mechanics since von Neumann’s classic treatise with this title. Fundamental non-classical features of quantum mechanics—indeterminacy and incompatibility of observables, unavoidable measurement disturbance, entanglement, nonlocality—are explicated and analysed using the tools of operational quantum theory. The book is divided into four parts: 1. Mathematics provides a systematic exposition of the Hilbert space and operator theoretic tools and relevant measure and integration theory leading to the Naimark and Stinespring dilation theorems; 2. Elements develops the basic concepts of quantum mechanics and measurement theory with a focus on the notion of approximate joint measurability; 3. Realisations offers in-depth studies of the fundamental observables of quantum mechanics and some of their measurement implementations; and 4....

  14. Quantum Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Walls, D F

    2007-01-01

    Quantum Optics gives a comprehensive coverage of developments in quantum optics over the past years. In the early chapters the formalism of quantum optics is elucidated and the main techniques are introduced. These are applied in the later chapters to problems such as squeezed states of light, resonance fluorescence, laser theory, quantum theory of four-wave mixing, quantum non-demolition measurements, Bell's inequalities, and atom optics. Experimental results are used to illustrate the theory throughout. This yields the most comprehensive and up-to-date coverage of experiment and theory in quantum optics in any textbook. More than 40 exercises helps readers test their understanding and provide practice in quantitative problem solving.

  15. Quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markov, M.A.; West, P.C.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses the state of the art of quantum gravity, quantum effects in cosmology, quantum black-hole physics, recent developments in supergravity, and quantum gauge theories. Topics considered include the problems of general relativity, pregeometry, complete cosmological theories, quantum fluctuations in cosmology and galaxy formation, a new inflationary universe scenario, grand unified phase transitions and the early Universe, the generalized second law of thermodynamics, vacuum polarization near black holes, the relativity of vacuum, black hole evaporations and their cosmological consequences, currents in supersymmetric theories, the Kaluza-Klein theories, gauge algebra and quantization, and twistor theory. This volume constitutes the proceedings of the Second Seminar on Quantum Gravity held in Moscow in 1981

  16. Synchronization in Quantum Key Distribution Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Pljonkin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In the description of quantum key distribution systems, much attention is paid to the operation of quantum cryptography protocols. The main problem is the insufficient study of the synchronization process of quantum key distribution systems. This paper contains a general description of quantum cryptography principles. A two-line fiber-optic quantum key distribution system with phase coding of photon states in transceiver and coding station synchronization mode was examined. A quantum key distribution system was built on the basis of the scheme with automatic compensation of polarization mode distortions. Single-photon avalanche diodes were used as optical radiation detecting devices. It was estimated how the parameters used in quantum key distribution systems of optical detectors affect the detection of the time frame with attenuated optical pulse in synchronization mode with respect to its probabilistic and time-domain characteristics. A design method was given for the process that detects the time frame that includes an optical pulse during synchronization. This paper describes the main quantum communication channel attack methods by removing a portion of optical emission. This paper describes the developed synchronization algorithm that takes into account the time required to restore the photodetector’s operation state after the photon has been registered during synchronization. The computer simulation results of the developed synchronization algorithm were analyzed. The efficiency of the developed algorithm with respect to synchronization process protection from unauthorized gathering of optical emission is demonstrated herein.

  17. Superadiabatic holonomic quantum computation in cavity QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bao-Jie; Huang, Zhen-Hua; Xue, Zheng-Yuan; Zhang, Xin-Ding

    2017-06-01

    Adiabatic quantum control is a powerful tool for quantum engineering and a key component in some quantum computation models, where accurate control over the timing of the involved pulses is not needed. However, the adiabatic condition requires that the process be very slow and thus limits its application in quantum computation, where quantum gates are preferred to be fast due to the limited coherent times of the quantum systems. Here, we propose a feasible scheme to implement universal holonomic quantum computation based on non-Abelian geometric phases with superadiabatic quantum control, where the adiabatic manipulation is sped up while retaining its robustness against errors in the timing control. Consolidating the advantages of both strategies, our proposal is thus both robust and fast. The cavity QED system is adopted as a typical example to illustrate the merits where the proposed scheme can be realized in a tripod configuration by appropriately controlling the pulse shapes and their relative strength. To demonstrate the distinct performance of our proposal, we also compare our scheme with the conventional adiabatic strategy.

  18. Compact neutron flux monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhavi, V.; Phatak, P.R.; Bahadur, C.; Bayala, A.K.; Jakati, R.K.; Sathian, V.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: A compact size neutron flux monitor has been developed incorporating standard boards developed for smart radiation monitors. The sensitivity of the monitors is 0.4cps/nV. It has been tested up to 2075 nV flux with standard neutron sources. It shows convincing results even in high flux areas like 6m away from the accelerator in RMC (Parel) for 106/107 nV. These monitors have a focal and remote display, alarm function with potential free contacts for centralized control and additional provision of connectivity via RS485/Ethernet. This paper describes the construction, working and results of the above flux monitor

  19. Intercomparison of six fast-response sensors for the eddy-covariance flux measurement of nitrous oxide over agricultural grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemitz, Eiko; Famulari, Daniela; Ibrom, Andreas; Vermeulen, Alex; Hensen, Arjan; van den Bulk, Pim; Loubet, Benjamin; Laville, Patricia; Mammarella, Ivan; Haapanala, Sami; Lohila, Annalea; Laurila, Tuomas; Eva, Rabot; Laborde, Marie; Cowan, Nicholas; Anderson, Margaret; Helfter, Carole

    2015-04-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is the third most important greenhouse gas and its terrestrial budget remains poorly constraint, with bottom up and top down estimates of country emissions often disagreeing by more than a factor of two. Whilst the measurements of the biosphere / atmosphere exchange of CO2 with micrometeorological methods is commonplace, emissions of CH4 and N2O are more commonly measured with enclosure techniques due to limitations in fast-response sensors with good signal-to-noise characteristics. Recent years have seen the development of a range of instruments based on optical spectroscopy. This started in the early 1990s with instruments based on lead salt lasers, which had temperamental long-term characteristics. More recent developments in quantum cascade lasers has lead to increasingly stable instruments, initially based on pulsed, later on continuous wave lasers. Within the context of the European FP7 Infrastructure Project InGOS ('Integrated non-CO2 Greenhouse gas Observing System'), we conducted an intercomparison of six fast response sensors for N2O: three more or less identical instruments based on off-axis Integrated Cavity Optical Spectrocopy (ICOS) (Los Gatos Research Inc.) and three instruments based on quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometry (Aerodyne Research Inc.): one older generation pulsed instrument (p-QCL) and two of the latest generation of compact continuous wave instruments (cw-QCL), operating at two different wavelengths. One of the ICOS instruments was operated with an inlet drier. In addition, the campaign was joined by a relaxed eddy-accumulation system linked to a FTIR spectrometer (Ecotech), a gradient system based on a home-built slower QCL (INRA Orleans) and a fast chamber system. Here we present the results of the study and a detailed examination of the various corrections and errors of the different instruments. Overall, with the exception of the older generation QCL, the average fluxes based on the different fast

  20. Quantum Locality?

    OpenAIRE

    Stapp, Henry P.

    2011-01-01

    Robert Griffiths has recently addressed, within the framework of a 'consistent quantum theory' that he has developed, the issue of whether, as is often claimed, quantum mechanics entails a need for faster-than-light transfers of information over long distances. He argues that the putative proofs of this property that involve hidden variables include in their premises some essentially classical-physics-type assumptions that are fundamentally incompatible with the precepts of quantum physics. O...

  1. Quantum ratchets

    OpenAIRE

    Grifoni, Milena

    1997-01-01

    In this thesis, ratchet systems operating in the quantum regime are investigated. Ratchet systems, also known as Brownian motors, are periodic systems presenting an intrinsic asymmetry which can be exploited to extract work out of unbiased forces. As a model for ratchet systems, we consider the motion of a particle in a one-dimensional periodic and asymmetric potential, interacting with a thermal environment, and subject to an unbiased driving force. In quantum ratchets, intrinsic quantum flu...

  2. Quantum space and quantum completeness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurić, Tajron

    2018-05-01

    Motivated by the question whether quantum gravity can "smear out" the classical singularity we analyze a certain quantum space and its quantum-mechanical completeness. Classical singularity is understood as a geodesic incompleteness, while quantum completeness requires a unique unitary time evolution for test fields propagating on an underlying background. Here the crucial point is that quantum completeness renders the Hamiltonian (or spatial part of the wave operator) to be essentially self-adjoint in order to generate a unique time evolution. We examine a model of quantum space which consists of a noncommutative BTZ black hole probed by a test scalar field. We show that the quantum gravity (noncommutative) effect is to enlarge the domain of BTZ parameters for which the relevant wave operator is essentially self-adjoint. This means that the corresponding quantum space is quantum complete for a larger range of BTZ parameters rendering the conclusion that in the quantum space one observes the effect of "smearing out" the singularity.

  3. Quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basdevant, J.L.; Dalibard, J.; Joffre, M.

    2008-01-01

    All physics is quantum from elementary particles to stars and to the big-bang via semi-conductors and chemistry. This theory is very subtle and we are not able to explain it without the help of mathematic tools. This book presents the principles of quantum mechanics and describes its mathematical formalism (wave function, Schroedinger equation, quantum operators, spin, Hamiltonians, collisions,..). We find numerous applications in the fields of new technologies (maser, quantum computer, cryptography,..) and in astrophysics. A series of about 90 exercises with their answers is included. This book is based on a physics course at a graduate level. (A.C.)

  4. Quantum information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, P.

    1998-01-01

    There is more to information than a string of ones and zeroes the ability of ''quantum bits'' to be in two states at the same time could revolutionize information technology. In the mid-1930s two influential but seemingly unrelated papers were published. In 1935 Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen proposed the famous EPR paradox that has come to symbolize the mysteries of quantum mechanics. Two years later, Alan Turing introduced the universal Turing machine in an enigmatically titled paper, On computable numbers, and laid the foundations of the computer industry one of the biggest industries in the world today. Although quantum physics is essential to understand the operation of transistors and other solid-state devices in computers, computation itself has remained a resolutely classical process. Indeed it seems only natural that computation and quantum theory should be kept as far apart as possible surely the uncertainty associated with quantum theory is anathema to the reliability expected from computers? Wrong. In 1985 David Deutsch introduced the universal quantum computer and showed that quantum theory can actually allow computers to do more rather than less. The ability of particles to be in a superposition of more than one quantum state naturally introduces a form of parallelism that can, in principle, perform some traditional computing tasks faster than is possible with classical computers. Moreover, quantum computers are capable of other tasks that are not conceivable with their classical counterparts. Similar breakthroughs in cryptography and communication followed. (author)

  5. Quantum information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, P

    1998-03-01

    There is more to information than a string of ones and zeroes the ability of ''quantum bits'' to be in two states at the same time could revolutionize information technology. In the mid-1930s two influential but seemingly unrelated papers were published. In 1935 Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen proposed the famous EPR paradox that has come to symbolize the mysteries of quantum mechanics. Two years later, Alan Turing introduced the universal Turing machine in an enigmatically titled paper, On computable numbers, and laid the foundations of the computer industry one of the biggest industries in the world today. Although quantum physics is essential to understand the operation of transistors and other solid-state devices in computers, computation itself has remained a resolutely classical process. Indeed it seems only natural that computation and quantum theory should be kept as far apart as possible surely the uncertainty associated with quantum theory is anathema to the reliability expected from computers? Wrong. In 1985 David Deutsch introduced the universal quantum computer and showed that quantum theory can actually allow computers to do more rather than less. The ability of particles to be in a superposition of more than one quantum state naturally introduces a form of parallelism that can, in principle, perform some traditional computing tasks faster than is possible with classical computers. Moreover, quantum computers are capable of other tasks that are not conceivable with their classical counterparts. Similar breakthroughs in cryptography and communication followed. (author)

  6. Quantum Integers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khrennikov, Andrei; Klein, Moshe; Mor, Tal

    2010-01-01

    In number theory, a partition of a positive integer n is a way of writing n as a sum of positive integers. The number of partitions of n is given by the partition function p(n). Inspired by quantum information processing, we extend the concept of partitions in number theory as follows: for an integer n, we treat each partition as a basis state of a quantum system representing that number n, so that the Hilbert-space that corresponds to that integer n is of dimension p(n); the 'classical integer' n can thus be generalized into a (pure) quantum state ||ψ(n) > which is a superposition of the partitions of n, in the same way that a quantum bit (qubit) is a generalization of a classical bit. More generally, ρ(n) is a density matrix in that same Hilbert-space (a probability distribution over pure states). Inspired by the notion of quantum numbers in quantum theory (such as in Bohr's model of the atom), we then try to go beyond the partitions, by defining (via recursion) the notion of 'sub-partitions' in number theory. Combining the two notions mentioned above, sub-partitions and quantum integers, we finally provide an alternative definition of the quantum integers [the pure-state |ψ'(n)> and the mixed-state ρ'(n),] this time using the sub-partitions as the basis states instead of the partitions, for describing the quantum number that corresponds to the integer n.

  7. Quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, D.

    1992-01-01

    As computers become ever more complex, they inevitably become smaller. This leads to a need for components which are fabricated and operate on increasingly smaller size scales. Quantum theory is already taken into account in microelectronics design. This article explores how quantum theory will need to be incorporated into computers in future in order to give them their components functionality. Computation tasks which depend on quantum effects will become possible. Physicists may have to reconsider their perspective on computation in the light of understanding developed in connection with universal quantum computers. (UK)

  8. Quantum information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, P

    1998-03-01

    There is more to information than a string of ones and zeroes the ability of ''quantum bits'' to be in two states at the same time could revolutionize information technology. In the mid-1930s two influential but seemingly unrelated papers were published. In 1935 Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen proposed the famous EPR paradox that has come to symbolize the mysteries of quantum mechanics. Two years later, Alan Turing introduced the universal Turing machine in an enigmatically titled paper, On computable numbers, and laid the foundations of the computer industry one of the biggest industries in the world today. Although quantum physics is essential to understand the operation of transistors and other solid-state devices in computers, computation itself has remained a resolutely classical process. Indeed it seems only natural that computation and quantum theory should be kept as far apart as possible surely the uncertainty associated with quantum theory is anathema to the reliability expected from computers? Wrong. In 1985 David Deutsch introduced the universal quantum computer and showed that quantum theory can actually allow computers to do more rather than less. The ability of particles to be in a superposition of more than one quantum state naturally introduces a form of parallelism that can, in principle, perform some traditional computing tasks faster than is possible with classical computers. Moreover, quantum computers are capable of other tasks that are not conceivable with their classical counterparts. Similar breakthroughs in cryptography and communication followed. (author)

  9. Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartakovskii, Alexander

    2012-07-01

    Part I. Nanostructure Design and Structural Properties of Epitaxially Grown Quantum Dots and Nanowires: 1. Growth of III/V semiconductor quantum dots C. Schneider, S. Hofling and A. Forchel; 2. Single semiconductor quantum dots in nanowires: growth, optics, and devices M. E. Reimer, N. Akopian, M. Barkelid, G. Bulgarini, R. Heeres, M. Hocevar, B. J. Witek, E. Bakkers and V. Zwiller; 3. Atomic scale analysis of self-assembled quantum dots by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and atom probe tomography J. G. Keizer and P. M. Koenraad; Part II. Manipulation of Individual Quantum States in Quantum Dots Using Optical Techniques: 4. Studies of the hole spin in self-assembled quantum dots using optical techniques B. D. Gerardot and R. J. Warburton; 5. Resonance fluorescence from a single quantum dot A. N. Vamivakas, C. Matthiesen, Y. Zhao, C.-Y. Lu and M. Atature; 6. Coherent control of quantum dot excitons using ultra-fast optical techniques A. J. Ramsay and A. M. Fox; 7. Optical probing of holes in quantum dot molecules: structure, symmetry, and spin M. F. Doty and J. I. Climente; Part III. Optical Properties of Quantum Dots in Photonic Cavities and Plasmon-Coupled Dots: 8. Deterministic light-matter coupling using single quantum dots P. Senellart; 9. Quantum dots in photonic crystal cavities A. Faraon, D. Englund, I. Fushman, A. Majumdar and J. Vukovic; 10. Photon statistics in quantum dot micropillar emission M. Asmann and M. Bayer; 11. Nanoplasmonics with colloidal quantum dots V. Temnov and U. Woggon; Part IV. Quantum Dot Nano-Laboratory: Magnetic Ions and Nuclear Spins in a Dot: 12. Dynamics and optical control of an individual Mn spin in a quantum dot L. Besombes, C. Le Gall, H. Boukari and H. Mariette; 13. Optical spectroscopy of InAs/GaAs quantum dots doped with a single Mn atom O. Krebs and A. Lemaitre; 14. Nuclear spin effects in quantum dot optics B. Urbaszek, B. Eble, T. Amand and X. Marie; Part V. Electron Transport in Quantum Dots Fabricated by

  10. Pulsed water jet generated by pulse multiplication

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dvorský, R.; Sitek, Libor; Sochor, T.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 4 (2016), s. 959-967 ISSN 1330-3651 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1406; GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : high- pressure pulses * pulse intensifier * pulsed water jet * water hammer effect Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 0.723, year: 2016 http://hrcak.srce.hr/163752?lang=en

  11. Pulsed Field Waveforms for Magnetization of HTS Gd-Ba-Cu-O Bulk Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, T; Matsuzaki, H; Morita, E; Sakashita, H; Harada, T; Ogata, H; Kimura, Y; Miki, M; Kitano, M; Izumi, M

    2006-01-01

    Progress in pulse magnetization technique for high-temperature superconductor bulks of melt-textured RE-Ba-Cu-O with large diameter is important for the realization of power applications. We studied the pulsed power source and pulsed field waveforms to enhance to improve the magnetization properties for Gd-Ba-Cu-O bulk. The risetime and duration of pulse waveform effectively varied distribution of magnetic flux

  12. Vector pulsing soliton of self-induced transparency in waveguide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamashvili, G.T.

    2015-01-01

    A theory of an optical resonance vector pulsing soliton in waveguide is developed. A thin transition layer containing semiconductor quantum dots forms the boundary between the waveguide and one of the connected media. Analytical and numerical solutions for the optical vector pulsing soliton in waveguide are obtained. The vector pulsing soliton in the presence of excitonic and bi-excitonic excitations is compared with the soliton for waveguide TM-modes with parameters that can be used in modern optical experiments. It is shown that these nonlinear waves have significantly different parameters and shapes. - Highlights: • An optical vector pulsing soliton in a planar waveguide is presented. • Explicit form of the optical vector pulsing soliton are obtained. • The vector pulsing soliton and the soliton have different parameters and profiles

  13. Laser-pulsed relativistic electron gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, N.K.

    1986-01-01

    A relativistic (β ≅ 0.8) electron gun with good emittance and subnanosecond pulse duration which can be synchronized to picosecond laser pulses is being developed at NRC for use in studies of particle acceleration by lasers. Bursts of electron pulses exceeding 280 keV in energy have been extracted into air form a laser-driven vacuum photodiode. Trains of 5 ps pulses of ultraviolet UV light illuminate a magnesium cathode. Photoelectrons emitted from the cathode are accelerated in a graded electrostatic potential set up by a 360 kV Marx-generator. The UV pulses are obtained by doubling the frequency of a 606 nm dye laser modelocked at 160 MHz. Electron energies were measured by residual range in an echelon of Al foils. Total charge per burst was measured by picoammeter. Time structure of the bursts has been examined with plastic scintillator and a fast photomultiplier. Tests on a low voltage photodiode achieved a current density of 180 A/cm/sup 2/ from an Mg cathode, with quantum efficiency of 2.4 x 10/sup -6/ electron per UV photon. The brevity and intensity of the laser pulses cause the electric charge collected per pulse to increase linearly with bias voltage rather than according to the Langmuir-Child law. Gun emittance is about 150 mm-msr and beam brightness is about 1A/cm/sup 2/-sr. Estimated duration of individual electron pulses of a burst is about 400 ps with instantaneous current of about 0.1 mA. Energy spread within one pulse is expected to be about 15%. This gun has the potential to be a useful source of relativistic electrons for laser acceleration studies

  14. Towards a Quantum Computer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellac, Michel Le

    2014-11-01

    In everyday life, practically all the information which is processed, exchanged or stored is coded in the form of discrete entities called bits, which take two values only, by convention 0 and 1. With the present technology for computers and optical fibers, bits are carried by electrical currents and electromagnetic waves corresponding to macroscopic fluxes of electrons and photons, and they are stored in memories of various kinds, for example, magnetic memories. Although quantum physics is the basic physics which underlies the operation of a transistor (Chapter 6) or of a laser (Chapter 4), each exchanged or processed bit corresponds to a large number of elementary quantum systems, and its behavior can be described classically due to the strong interaction with the environment (Chapter 9). For about thirty years, physicists have learned to manipulate with great accuracy individual quantum systems: photons, electrons, neutrons, atoms, and so forth, which opens the way to using two-state quantum systems, such as the polarization states of a photon (Chapter 2) or the two energy levels of an atom or an ion (Chapter 4) in order to process, exchange or store information. In § 2.3.2, we used the two polarization states of a photon, vertical (V) and horizontal (H), to represent the values 0 and 1 of a bit and to exchange information. In what follows, it will be convenient to use Dirac's notation (see Appendix A.2.2 for more details), where a vertical polarization state is denoted by |V> or |0> and a horizontal one by |H> or |1>, while a state with arbitrary polarization will be denoted by |ψ>. The polarization states of a photon give one possible realization of a quantum bit, or for short a qubit. Thanks to the properties of quantum physics, quantum computers using qubits, if they ever exist, would outperform classical computers for some specific, but very important, problems. In Sections 8.1 and 8.2, we describe some typical quantum algorithms and, in order to do so

  15. High efficiency detection technology on quantum action using radiation excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okubo, Masataka; Ukibe, Masahiro; Sakamoto, Isao; Hayashi, Nobuyuki; Shoji, Akira; Kobayashi, Naoto

    2000-01-01

    In 1998 fiscal year, as a local quasi particle loss process, it was elucidated that there was a quasi particle loss induced with magnetic flux quantum trapped by a detector on its cooling. Hitherto, it was reported that action of a tunnel junction detector was different by its magnetic history. That is, the detector had unstability such as variation of its action on its cooling. Therefore, the quasi particle loss induced by magnetic flux quantum forming cause of the unstability was quantitatively evaluated. As a result, it was elucidated that output of the detector was reduced half only by trapping the magnetic flux quantum with numbers corresponding to weak magnetic field like geomagnetism. And, this phenomenon was also described by using a model concept with quasi particle trapping due to the magnetic flux quantum. (G.K.)

  16. Spin-polarization dependent carrier recombination dynamics and spin relaxation mechanism in asymmetrically doped (110) n-GaAs quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Lihua; Jiang, Tianran; Wang, Xia; Lai, Tianshu

    2018-05-01

    Carrier recombination and electron spin relaxation dynamics in asymmetric n-doped (110) GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells are investigated with time-resolved pump-probe spectroscopy. The experiment results reveal that the measured carrier recombination time depends strongly on the polarization of pump pulse. With the same pump photon flux densities, the recombination time of spin-polarized carriers is always longer than that of the spin-balanced carriers except at low pump photon flux densities, this anomaly originates from the polarization-sensitive nonlinear absorption effect. Differing from the traditional views, in the low carrier density regime, the D'yakonov-Perel' (DP) mechanism can be more important than the Bir-Aronov-Pikus (BAP) mechanism, since the DP mechanism takes effect, the spin relaxation time in (110) GaAs QWs is shortened obviously via asymmetric doping.

  17. Application of quantum key distribution for mutual identification - experimental realization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dusek, M.; Haderka, O.; Hendrych, M.

    1998-01-01

    A secure quantum identification system combining a classical identification procedure and quantum key distribution is proposed. Each identification sequence is always used just once and new sequences are 're fuelled' from a shared secret key transferred over a quantum channel. The question of authentication of information sent over a public channel is discussed. An apparatus using two unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometers has been built, and quantum key distribution and 'quantum identification' have been successfully tested through a single-mode optical fibre at 830 nm, employing low intensity coherent states (below 0,1 photons per pulse). (author)

  18. Practical pulse engineering: Gradient ascent without matrix exponentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhole, Gaurav; Jones, Jonathan A.

    2018-06-01

    Since 2005, there has been a huge growth in the use of engineered control pulses to perform desired quantum operations in systems such as nuclear magnetic resonance quantum information processors. These approaches, which build on the original gradient ascent pulse engineering algorithm, remain computationally intensive because of the need to calculate matrix exponentials for each time step in the control pulse. In this study, we discuss how the propagators for each time step can be approximated using the Trotter-Suzuki formula, and a further speedup achieved by avoiding unnecessary operations. The resulting procedure can provide substantial speed gain with negligible costs in the propagator error, providing a more practical approach to pulse engineering.

  19. General solution to inhomogeneous dephasing and smooth pulse dynamical decoupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Junkai; Deng, Xiu-Hao; Russo, Antonio; Barnes, Edwin

    2018-03-01

    In order to achieve the high-fidelity quantum control needed for a broad range of quantum information technologies, reducing the effects of noise and system inhomogeneities is an essential task. It is well known that a system can be decoupled from noise or made insensitive to inhomogeneous dephasing dynamically by using carefully designed pulse sequences based on square or delta-function waveforms such as Hahn spin echo or CPMG. However, such ideal pulses are often challenging to implement experimentally with high fidelity. Here, we uncover a new geometrical framework for visualizing all possible driving fields, which enables one to generate an unlimited number of smooth, experimentally feasible pulses that perform dynamical decoupling or dynamically corrected gates to arbitrarily high order. We demonstrate that this scheme can significantly enhance the fidelity of single-qubit operations in the presence of noise and when realistic limitations on pulse rise times and amplitudes are taken into account.

  20. Quantum group and quantum symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Zhe.

    1994-05-01

    This is a self-contained review on the theory of quantum group and its applications to modern physics. A brief introduction is given to the Yang-Baxter equation in integrable quantum field theory and lattice statistical physics. The quantum group is primarily introduced as a systematic method for solving the Yang-Baxter equation. Quantum group theory is presented within the framework of quantum double through quantizing Lie bi-algebra. Both the highest weight and the cyclic representations are investigated for the quantum group and emphasis is laid on the new features of representations for q being a root of unity. Quantum symmetries are explored in selected topics of modern physics. For a Hamiltonian system the quantum symmetry is an enlarged symmetry that maintains invariance of equations of motion and allows a deformation of the Hamiltonian and symplectic form. The configuration space of the integrable lattice model is analyzed in terms of the representation theory of quantum group. By means of constructing the Young operators of quantum group, the Schroedinger equation of the model is transformed to be a set of coupled linear equations that can be solved by the standard method. Quantum symmetry of the minimal model and the WZNW model in conformal field theory is a hidden symmetry expressed in terms of screened vertex operators, and has a deep interplay with the Virasoro algebra. In quantum group approach a complete description for vibrating and rotating diatomic molecules is given. The exact selection rules and wave functions are obtained. The Taylor expansion of the analytic formulas of the approach reproduces the famous Dunham expansion. (author). 133 refs, 20 figs

  1. Primary cosmic ray flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanev, Todor

    2001-05-01

    We discuss the primary cosmic ray flux from the point of view of particle interactions and production of atmospheric neutrinos. The overall normalization of the cosmic ray flux and its time variations and site dependence are major ingredients of the atmospheric neutrino predictions and the basis for the derivation of the neutrino oscillation parameters.

  2. Flux cutting in superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, A M

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes experiments and theories of flux cutting in superconductors. The use of the flux line picture in free space is discussed. In superconductors cutting can either be by means of flux at an angle to other layers of flux, as in longitudinal current experiments, or due to shearing of the vortex lattice as in grain boundaries in YBCO. Experiments on longitudinal currents can be interpreted in terms of flux rings penetrating axial lines. More physical models of flux cutting are discussed but all predict much larger flux cutting forces than are observed. Also, cutting is occurring at angles between vortices of about one millidegree which is hard to explain. The double critical state model and its developments are discussed in relation to experiments on crossed and rotating fields. A new experiment suggested by Clem gives more direct information. It shows that an elliptical yield surface of the critical state works well, but none of the theoretical proposals for determining the direction of E are universally applicable. It appears that, as soon as any flux flow takes place, cutting also occurs. The conclusion is that new theories are required. (perspective)

  3. Quantum information. Teleportation - cryptography - quantum computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenneker, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Reality in the test facility, quantum teleportation, the reality of quanta, interaction-free quantum measurement, rules for quantum computers, quantum computers with ions, spintronics with diamond, the limits of the quantum computers, a view in the future of quantum optics. (HSI)

  4. Experimental complex for high flux-materials interaction research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagen-Torn, V.K.; Kirillov, I.R.; Komarov, V.L.; Litunovsky, V.N.; Mazul, I.V.; Ovchinnikov, I.B.; Prokofjev, Yu.G.; Saksagansky, G.L.; Titov, V.A.

    1995-01-01

    The experimental complex for high heat flux testing of divertor materials and bumper mock-ups under conditions close to both ITER stationary and plasma disruption PFC heat loads is described. High power plasma and electron beams are using as high heat flux sources. The former are applied to disruption simulation experiments. The values of pulsed plasma heat flux load up to 110 MJ/m 2 and stationary e-beam load up to 15 MW/m 2 can obtained on these facilities. (orig.)

  5. Interaction between two stopped light pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yi-Hsin, E-mail: yhchen920@gmail.com; Lee, Meng-Jung, E-mail: yhchen920@gmail.com; Hung, Weilun, E-mail: yhchen920@gmail.com; Yu, Ite A., E-mail: yu@phys.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Physics and Frontier Research Center on Fundamental and Applied Sciences of Matters, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Chen, Ying-Cheng [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan and Department of Physics and Frontier Research Center on Fundamental and Applied Sciences of Matters, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yong-Fan [Department of Physics, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)

    2014-03-05

    The efficiency of a nonlinear optical process is proportional to the interaction time. We report a scheme of all-optical switching based on two motionless light pulses via the effect of electromagnetically induced transparency. One pulse was stopped as the stationary light pulse (SLP) and the other was stopped as stored light. The time of their interaction via the medium can be prolonged and, hence, the optical nonlinearity is greatly enhanced. Using a large optical density (OD) of 190, we achieved a very long interaction time of 6.9 μs. This can be analogous to the scheme of trapping light pulses by an optical cavity with a Q factor of 8×10{sup 9}. With the approach of using moving light pulses in the best situation, a switch can only be activated at 2 photons per atomic absorption cross section. With the approach of employing a SLP and a stored light pulse, a switch at only 0.56 photons was achieved and the efficiency is significantly improved. Moreover, the simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental data and show that the efficiency can be further improved by increasing the OD of the medium. Our work advances the technology in quantum information manipulation utilizing photons.

  6. Interaction between two stopped light pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yi-Hsin; Lee, Meng-Jung; Hung, Weilun; Yu, Ite A.; Chen, Ying-Cheng; Chen, Yong-Fan

    2014-01-01

    The efficiency of a nonlinear optical process is proportional to the interaction time. We report a scheme of all-optical switching based on two motionless light pulses via the effect of electromagnetically induced transparency. One pulse was stopped as the stationary light pulse (SLP) and the other was stopped as stored light. The time of their interaction via the medium can be prolonged and, hence, the optical nonlinearity is greatly enhanced. Using a large optical density (OD) of 190, we achieved a very long interaction time of 6.9 μs. This can be analogous to the scheme of trapping light pulses by an optical cavity with a Q factor of 8×10 9 . With the approach of using moving light pulses in the best situation, a switch can only be activated at 2 photons per atomic absorption cross section. With the approach of employing a SLP and a stored light pulse, a switch at only 0.56 photons was achieved and the efficiency is significantly improved. Moreover, the simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental data and show that the efficiency can be further improved by increasing the OD of the medium. Our work advances the technology in quantum information manipulation utilizing photons

  7. Quantum ensembles of quantum classifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuld, Maria; Petruccione, Francesco

    2018-02-09

    Quantum machine learning witnesses an increasing amount of quantum algorithms for data-driven decision making, a problem with potential applications ranging from automated image recognition to medical diagnosis. Many of those algorithms are implementations of quantum classifiers, or models for the classification of data inputs with a quantum computer. Following the success of collective decision making with ensembles in classical machine learning, this paper introduces the concept of quantum ensembles of quantum classifiers. Creating the ensemble corresponds to a state preparation routine, after which the quantum classifiers are evaluated in parallel and their combined decision is accessed by a single-qubit measurement. This framework naturally allows for exponentially large ensembles in which - similar to Bayesian learning - the individual classifiers do not have to be trained. As an example, we analyse an exponentially large quantum ensemble in which each classifier is weighed according to its performance in classifying the training data, leading to new results for quantum as well as classical machine learning.

  8. Quantum computer games: quantum minesweeper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2010-07-01

    The computer game of quantum minesweeper is introduced as a quantum extension of the well-known classical minesweeper. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. Quantum minesweeper demonstrates the effects of superposition, entanglement and their non-local characteristics. While in the classical minesweeper the goal of the game is to discover all the mines laid out on a board without triggering them, in the quantum version there are several classical boards in superposition. The goal is to know the exact quantum state, i.e. the precise layout of all the mines in all the superposed classical boards. The player can perform three types of measurement: a classical measurement that probabilistically collapses the superposition; a quantum interaction-free measurement that can detect a mine without triggering it; and an entanglement measurement that provides non-local information. The application of the concepts taught by quantum minesweeper to one-way quantum computing are also presented.

  9. Quantum Physics Without Quantum Philosophy

    CERN Document Server

    Dürr, Detlef; Zanghì, Nino

    2013-01-01

    It has often been claimed that without drastic conceptual innovations a genuine explanation of quantum interference effects and quantum randomness is impossible. This book concerns Bohmian mechanics, a simple particle theory that is a counterexample to such claims. The gentle introduction and other contributions collected here show how the phenomena of non-relativistic quantum mechanics, from Heisenberg's uncertainty principle to non-commuting observables, emerge from the Bohmian motion of particles, the natural particle motion associated with Schrödinger's equation. This book will be of value to all students and researchers in physics with an interest in the meaning of quantum theory as well as to philosophers of science.

  10. Quantum measurement in quantum optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimble, H.J.

    1993-01-01

    Recent progress in the generation and application of manifestly quantum or nonclassical states of the electromagnetic field is reviewed with emphasis on the research of the Quantum Optics Group at Caltech. In particular, the possibilities for spectroscopy with non-classical light are discussed both in terms of improved quantitative measurement capabilities and for the fundamental alteration of atomic radiative processes. Quantum correlations for spatially extended systems are investigated in a variety of experiments which utilize nondegenerate parametric down conversion. Finally, the prospects for measurement of the position of a free mass with precision beyond the standard quantum limit are briefly considered. (author). 38 refs., 1 fig

  11. Decoherence of Flux Qubits Coupled to Electronic Circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilhelm, F.K.; Storcz, M.J.; van der Wal, C.H.; Harmans, C.J.P.M.; Mooij, J.E.

    2003-01-01

    On the way to solid-state quantum computing, overcoming decoherence is the central issue. In this contribution, we discuss the modeling of decoherence of a superonducting flux qubit coupled to dissipative electronic circuitry. We discuss its impact on single qubit decoherence rates and on the

  12. Heat flux microsensor measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrell, J. P.; Hager, J. M.; Onishi, S.; Diller, T. E.

    1992-01-01

    A thin-film heat flux sensor has been fabricated on a stainless steel substrate. The thermocouple elements of the heat flux sensor were nickel and nichrome, and the temperature resistance sensor was platinum. The completed heat flux microsensor was calibrated at the AEDC radiation facility. The gage output was linear with heat flux with no apparent temperature effect on sensitivity. The gage was used for heat flux measurements at the NASA Langley Vitiated Air Test Facility. Vitiated air was expanded to Mach 3.0 and hydrogen fuel was injected. Measurements were made on the wall of a diverging duct downstream of the injector during all stages of the hydrogen combustion tests. Because the wall and the gage were not actively cooled, the wall temperature reached over 1000 C (1900 F) during the most severe test.

  13. Laser pulse stacking method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, E.I.

    1992-12-01

    A laser pulse stacking method is disclosed. A problem with the prior art has been the generation of a series of laser beam pulses where the outer and inner regions of the beams are generated so as to form radially non-synchronous pulses. Such pulses thus have a non-uniform cross-sectional area with respect to the outer and inner edges of the pulses. The present invention provides a solution by combining the temporally non-uniform pulses in a stacking effect to thus provide a more uniform temporal synchronism over the beam diameter. 2 figs.

  14. Quantum control of light using electromagnetically induced transparency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andre, A; Eisaman, M D; Walsworth, R L; Zibrov, A S; Lukin, M D

    2005-01-01

    We present an overview of recent theoretical and experimental work on the control of the propagation and quantum properties of light using electromagnetically induced transparency in atomic ensembles. Specifically, we discuss techniques for the generation and storage of few-photon quantum-mechanical states of light as well as novel approaches to manipulate weak pulses of light via enhanced nonlinear optical processes

  15. Rydberg atoms ionization by microwave field and electromagnetic pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaulakys, B.; Vilutis, G.

    1995-01-01

    A simple theory of the Rydberg atoms ionization by electromagnetic pulses and microwave field is presented. The analysis is based on the scale transformation which reduces the number of parameters and reveals the functional dependencies of the processes. It is shown that the observed ionization of Rydberg atoms by subpicosecond electromagnetic pulses scale classically. The threshold electric field required to ionise a Rydberg state may be simply evaluated in the photonic basis approach for the quantum dynamics or from the multiphoton ionization theory

  16. Quantum Computing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 9. Quantum Computing - Building Blocks of a Quantum Computer. C S Vijay Vishal Gupta. General Article Volume 5 Issue 9 September 2000 pp 69-81. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  17. Quantum spacetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doplicher, S.

    1996-01-01

    We review some recent result and work in progress on the quantum structure of spacetime at scales comparable with the Planck length; the models discussed here are operationally motivated by the limitations in the accuracy of localization of events in spacetime imposed by the interplay between quantum mechanics and classical general relativity. (orig.)

  18. Pulse to pulse klystron diagnosis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowak, J.; Davidson, V.; Genova, L.; Johnson, R.; Reagan, D.

    1981-03-01

    This report describes a system used to study the behavior of SLAC high powered klystrons operating with a twice normal pulse width of 5 μs. At present, up to eight of the klystrons installed along the accelerator can be operated with long pulses and monitored by this system. The report will also discuss some of the recent findings and investigations

  19. Laser coherent control of quantum dynamics at the CSIR: NLC

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botha, L

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available reaction channels. The principle used is controlled interference of the quantum wave functions via time domain shaped ultra-short pulses. The time/frequency product of a pulse is a constant, determined by Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle, therefore, a...

  20. Decoherence control in quantum computing with simple chirped ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We show how the use of optimally shaped pulses to guide the time evolution of a system ('coherent control') can be an effective approach towards quantum computation logic. We demonstrate this with selective control of decoherence for a multilevel system with a simple linearly chirped pulse. We use a multiphoton ...

  1. Quantum photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Pearsall, Thomas P

    2017-01-01

    This textbook employs a pedagogical approach that facilitates access to the fundamentals of Quantum Photonics. It contains an introductory description of the quantum properties of photons through the second quantization of the electromagnetic field, introducing stimulated and spontaneous emission of photons at the quantum level. Schrödinger’s equation is used to describe the behavior of electrons in a one-dimensional potential. Tunneling through a barrier is used to introduce the concept of non­locality of an electron at the quantum level, which is closely-related to quantum confinement tunneling, resonant tunneling, and the origin of energy bands in both periodic (crystalline) and aperiodic (non-crystalline) materials. Introducing the concepts of reciprocal space, Brillouin zones, and Bloch’s theorem, the determination of electronic band structure using the pseudopotential method is presented, allowing direct computation of the band structures of most group IV, group III-V, and group II-VI semiconducto...

  2. Quantum cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawking, S.W.

    1984-01-01

    The subject of these lectures is quantum effects in cosmology. The author deals first with situations in which the gravitational field can be treated as a classical, unquantized background on which the quantum matter fields propagate. This is the case with inflation at the GUT era. Nevertheless the curvature of spacetime can have important effects on the behaviour of the quantum fields and on the development of long-range correlations. He then turns to the question of the quantization of the gravitational field itself. The plan of these lectures is as follows: Euclidean approach to quantum field theory in flat space; the extension of techniques to quantum fields on a curved background with the four-sphere, the Euclidean version of De Sitter space as a particular example; the GUT era; quantization of the gravitational field by Euclidean path integrals; mini superspace model. (Auth.)

  3. Quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Rae, Alastair I M

    2016-01-01

    A Thorough Update of One of the Most Highly Regarded Textbooks on Quantum Mechanics Continuing to offer an exceptionally clear, up-to-date treatment of the subject, Quantum Mechanics, Sixth Edition explains the concepts of quantum mechanics for undergraduate students in physics and related disciplines and provides the foundation necessary for other specialized courses. This sixth edition builds on its highly praised predecessors to make the text even more accessible to a wider audience. It is now divided into five parts that separately cover broad topics suitable for any general course on quantum mechanics. New to the Sixth Edition * Three chapters that review prerequisite physics and mathematics, laying out the notation, formalism, and physical basis necessary for the rest of the book * Short descriptions of numerous applications relevant to the physics discussed, giving students a brief look at what quantum mechanics has made possible industrially and scientifically * Additional end-of-chapter problems with...

  4. Quantum magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Richter, Johannes; Farnell, Damian; Bishop, Raymod

    2004-01-01

    The investigation of magnetic systems where quantum effects play a dominant role has become a very active branch of solid-state-physics research in its own right. The first three chapters of the "Quantum Magnetism" survey conceptual problems and provide insights into the classes of systems considered, namely one-dimensional, two-dimensional and molecular magnets. The following chapters introduce the methods used in the field of quantum magnetism, including spin wave analysis, exact diagonalization, quantum field theory, coupled cluster methods and the Bethe ansatz. The book closes with a chapter on quantum phase transitions and a contribution that puts the wealth of phenomena into the context of experimental solid-state physics. Closing a gap in the literature, this volume is intended both as an introductory text at postgraduate level and as a modern, comprehensive reference for researchers in the field.

  5. Improvements in or relating to pulsed X-ray units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bichenkov, E.I.; Klypin, V.V.; Palchikov, E.I.

    1983-01-01

    A pulsed X-ray unit comprises a pulsed X-ray tube connected to a discharge capacitor. The discharge capacitor comprises two coaxially arranged cylinders. One cylinder of the discharge capacitor is connected to the X-ray tube and to the high-voltage end of the secondary winding of the pulsed transformer which is shaped as a truncated cone, and is arranged internally of this winding coaxially therewith. The other cylinder of the discharge capacitor is also connected to the X-ray tube and to the low-voltage end of the secondary winding of the pulsed transformer, and is arranged intermediate this winding and the primary winding of the pulsed transformer which is shaped as a hollow cylinder, and connected to the charging device. The cylinders of the discharge capacitor have ports made therein for the passage therethrough of the magnetic flux produced by the windings of the pulsed transformer. (author)

  6. Quantum computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steane, Andrew

    1998-01-01

    The subject of quantum computing brings together ideas from classical information theory, computer science, and quantum physics. This review aims to summarize not just quantum computing, but the whole subject of quantum information theory. Information can be identified as the most general thing which must propagate from a cause to an effect. It therefore has a fundamentally important role in the science of physics. However, the mathematical treatment of information, especially information processing, is quite recent, dating from the mid-20th century. This has meant that the full significance of information as a basic concept in physics is only now being discovered. This is especially true in quantum mechanics. The theory of quantum information and computing puts this significance on a firm footing, and has led to some profound and exciting new insights into the natural world. Among these are the use of quantum states to permit the secure transmission of classical information (quantum cryptography), the use of quantum entanglement to permit reliable transmission of quantum states (teleportation), the possibility of preserving quantum coherence in the presence of irreversible noise processes (quantum error correction), and the use of controlled quantum evolution for efficient computation (quantum computation). The common theme of all these insights is the use of quantum entanglement as a computational resource. It turns out that information theory and quantum mechanics fit together very well. In order to explain their relationship, this review begins with an introduction to classical information theory and computer science, including Shannon's theorem, error correcting codes, Turing machines and computational complexity. The principles of quantum mechanics are then outlined, and the Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen (EPR) experiment described. The EPR-Bell correlations, and quantum entanglement in general, form the essential new ingredient which distinguishes quantum from

  7. Quantum computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steane, Andrew [Department of Atomic and Laser Physics, University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    1998-02-01

    The subject of quantum computing brings together ideas from classical information theory, computer science, and quantum physics. This review aims to summarize not just quantum computing, but the whole subject of quantum information theory. Information can be identified as the most general thing which must propagate from a cause to an effect. It therefore has a fundamentally important role in the science of physics. However, the mathematical treatment of information, especially information processing, is quite recent, dating from the mid-20th century. This has meant that the full significance of information as a basic concept in physics is only now being discovered. This is especially true in quantum mechanics. The theory of quantum information and computing puts this significance on a firm footing, and has led to some profound and exciting new insights into the natural world. Among these are the use of quantum states to permit the secure transmission of classical information (quantum cryptography), the use of quantum entanglement to permit reliable transmission of quantum states (teleportation), the possibility of preserving quantum coherence in the presence of irreversible noise processes (quantum error correction), and the use of controlled quantum evolution for efficient computation (quantum computation). The common theme of all these insights is the use of quantum entanglement as a computational resource. It turns out that information theory and quantum mechanics fit together very well. In order to explain their relationship, this review begins with an introduction to classical information theory and computer science, including Shannon's theorem, error correcting codes, Turing machines and computational complexity. The principles of quantum mechanics are then outlined, and the Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen (EPR) experiment described. The EPR-Bell correlations, and quantum entanglement in general, form the essential new ingredient which distinguishes quantum from

  8. Quantum condensation from a tailored exciton population in a microcavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eastham, P. R.; Phillips, R. T.

    2009-01-01

    An experiment is proposed on the coherent quantum dynamics of a semiconductor microcavity containing quantum dots. Modeling the experiment using a generalized Dicke model, we show that a tailored excitation pulse can create an energy-dependent population of excitons, which subsequently evolves to a quantum condensate of excitons and photons. The population is created by a generalization of adiabatic rapid passage and then condenses due to a dynamical analog of the BCS instability.

  9. Effect of laser pulse parameters on the size and fluorescence of nanodiamonds formed upon pulsed-laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Peikang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, North University of China, Taiyuan 030051 (China); Hu, Shengliang, E-mail: hsliang@yeah.net [Key Laboratory of Instrumentation Science and Dynamic Measurement (North University of China), Ministry of Education, National Key Laboratory Science and Technology on Electronic Test and Measurement, Taiyuan 030051 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, North University of China, Taiyuan 030051 (China); Zhang, Taiping; Sun, Jing [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Cao, Shirui [School of Materials Science and Engineering, North University of China, Taiyuan 030051 (China)

    2010-07-15

    The size of nanodiamonds formed upon laser irradiation could be easily controlled over simply adjusting laser pulse parameters. The stable size and structure of nanodiamonds were mostly determined by laser power density and pulse width. Both large nanodiamonds with multiply twinning structure (MTS) and small nanodiamonds with single crystalline structure (SCS) emitted strong visible light after surface passivation, and their fluorescence quantum yield (QY) was 4.6% and 7.1%, respectively.

  10. Effect of laser pulse parameters on the size and fluorescence of nanodiamonds formed upon pulsed-laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Peikang; Hu, Shengliang; Zhang, Taiping; Sun, Jing; Cao, Shirui

    2010-01-01

    The size of nanodiamonds formed upon laser irradiation could be easily controlled over simply adjusting laser pulse parameters. The stable size and structure of nanodiamonds were mostly determined by laser power density and pulse width. Both large nanodiamonds with multiply twinning structure (MTS) and small nanodiamonds with single crystalline structure (SCS) emitted strong visible light after surface passivation, and their fluorescence quantum yield (QY) was 4.6% and 7.1%, respectively.

  11. Information-flux approach to multiple-spin dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Franco, C.; Paternostro, M.; Kim, M. S.; Palma, G. M.

    2007-01-01

    We introduce and formalize the concept of information flux in a many-body register as the influence that the dynamics of a specific element receive from any other element of the register. By quantifying the information flux in a protocol, we can design the most appropriate initial state of the system and, noticeably, the distribution of coupling strengths among the parts of the register itself. The intuitive nature of this tool and its flexibility, which allow for easily manageable numerical approaches when analytic expressions are not straightforward, are greatly useful in interacting many-body systems such as quantum spin chains. We illustrate the use of this concept in quantum cloning and quantum state transfer and we also sketch its extension to nonunitary dynamics

  12. Universal dephasing control during quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, Goren; Kurizki, Gershon

    2007-01-01

    Dephasing is a ubiquitous phenomenon that leads to the loss of coherence in quantum systems and the corruption of quantum information. We present a universal dynamical control approach to combat dephasing during all stages of quantum computation, namely, storage and single- and two-qubit operators. We show that (a) tailoring multifrequency gate pulses to the dephasing dynamics can increase fidelity; (b) cross-dephasing, introduced by entanglement, can be eliminated by appropriate control fields; (c) counterintuitively and contrary to previous schemes, one can increase the gate duration, while simultaneously increasing the total gate fidelity

  13. Gradiometric tunable-gap flux qubits in a circuit QED architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, Manuel Johannes

    2015-01-01

    In circuit quantum electrodynamics or quantum simulation experiments, superconducting quantum bits with long coherence time, high in situ tunability and usually large anharmonicity are required. In contrast to the popular transmon, the gradiometric tunable-gap flux qubit meets all these requirements. We fabricate and characterize such a qubit and demonstrate its first implementation into a transmission line resonator. We show spectroscopy and first time domain results.

  14. Design and characterisation of a pulsed neutron interrogation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favalli, A.; Pedersen, B.

    2007-01-01

    The Joint Research Centre recently obtained a license to operate a new experimental device intended for research in the field of nuclear safeguards. The research projects currently being planned for the new device includes mass determination of fissile materials in matrices and detection of contraband non-nuclear materials. The device incorporates a commercial pulsed neutron generator and a large graphite mantle surrounding the sample cavity. In this configuration, a relatively high thermal neutron flux with a long lifetime is achieved inside the sample cavity. By pulsing the neutron generator, a sample may be interrogated by a pure thermal neutron flux during repeated time periods. The paper reports on the design of the new device and the pulsed fast and thermal neutron source. The thermal neutron flux caused by the neutron generator and the graphite structure has been characterised by foil activation, fission chamber and 3 He proportional counter measurements. (authors)

  15. Magneto-optical and cyclotron resonance studies of semiconductors and their nanostructures in pulsed high magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, N.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: We present a review on the recent advances in physics of magneto-optical spectroscopy in the visible range and of infrared cyclotron resonance in pulsed high magnetic fields, which are produced by electromagnetic flux compression up to 500T, by the single-turn coil technique up to 200T or by conventional non-destructive long pulse magnets up to 50T. We discuss the recent results on the spectroscopy of low dimensional excitons in quantum wells and short period superlattices. In very high fields up to 500T, we observed anomalous field dependence of the exciton absorption lines and the 2D - 3D cross-over effects in GaAs/AlAs quantum wells. In GaP/AlP short period superlattices, it was found that the exciton photoluminescence intensity shows a dramatic decrease and the diamagnetic shift was negative when high magnetic fields were applied parallel to the growth direction. We observed also remarkable effects of uniaxial stress, which are ascribed to the cross-over effect between the two inequivalent valleys at the X points. Cyclotron resonance was measured by using various molecular gas lasers as radiation sources in the range 5 - 119 m . We present the results of cyclotron resonance in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells with tilted magnetic fields from the growth direction. It was found that the resonant field and the peak intensity show many different features depending on the extent of the Landau level-subband coupling and on the relation between the photon energy and the barrier height. A large hysteresis was observed between the rising and the falling sweeps of the magnetic field, when the cyclotron resonance energy became comparable with the subband spacing. In a diluted magnetic semiconductor CdFeS, we observed anomalous temperature dependence of the effective mass, suggestive of the magnetic polaron effect

  16. An integrated processor for photonic quantum states using a broadband light–matter interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saglamyurek, E; Sinclair, N; Slater, J A; Heshami, K; Oblak, D; Tittel, W

    2014-01-01

    Faithful storage and coherent manipulation of quantum optical pulses are key for long distance quantum communications and quantum computing. Combining these functions in a light–matter interface that can be integrated on-chip with other photonic quantum technologies, e.g. sources of entangled photons, is an important step towards these applications. To date there have only been a few demonstrations of coherent pulse manipulation utilizing optical storage devices compatible with quantum states, and that only in atomic gas media (making integration difficult) and with limited capabilities. Here we describe how a broadband waveguide quantum memory based on the atomic frequency comb (AFC) protocol can be used as a programmable processor for essentially arbitrary spectral and temporal manipulations of individual quantum optical pulses. Using weak coherent optical pulses at the few photon level, we experimentally demonstrate sequencing, time-to-frequency multiplexing and demultiplexing, splitting, interfering, temporal and spectral filtering, compressing and stretching as well as selective delaying. Our integrated light–matter interface offers high-rate, robust and easily configurable manipulation of quantum optical pulses and brings fully practical optical quantum devices one step closer to reality. Furthermore, as the AFC protocol is suitable for storage of intense light pulses, our processor may also find applications in classical communications. (paper)

  17. Short pulse generation in a passively mode-locked photonic crystal semiconductor laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heuck, Mikkel; Blaaberg, Søren; Mørk, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    We present a new type of passively mode-locked laser with quantum wells embedded in photonic crystal waveguides operating in the slow light regime, which is capable of emitting sub picosecond pulses with widely controllable properties......We present a new type of passively mode-locked laser with quantum wells embedded in photonic crystal waveguides operating in the slow light regime, which is capable of emitting sub picosecond pulses with widely controllable properties...

  18. SINGLE-PULSE RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF THE GALACTIC CENTER MAGNETAR PSR J1745–2900

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Zhen; Shen, Zhi-Qiang; Wu, Ya-Jun; Zhao, Rong-Bing; Fan, Qing-Yuan; Hong, Xiao-Yu; Jiang, Dong-Rong; Li, Bin; Liang, Shi-Guang; Ling, Quan-Bao; Liu, Qing-Hui; Qian, Zhi-Han; Zhang, Xiu-Zhong; Zhong, Wei-Ye; Ye, Shu-Hua [Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200030 (China); Wu, Xin-Ji [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Manchester, R. N. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Weltevrede, P. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Yuan, Jian-Ping [Key Laboratory of Radio Astronomy, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Lee, Ke-Jia, E-mail: yanzhen@shao.ac.cn [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-11-20

    In this paper, we report radio observations of the Galactic Center magnetar PSR J1745–2900 at six epochs between 2014 June and October. These observations were carried out using the new Shanghai Tian Ma Radio Telescope at a frequency of 8.6 GHz. Both the flux density and integrated profile of PSR J1745–2900 show dramatic changes from epoch to epoch, showing that the pulsar was in its “erratic” phase. On MJD 56836, the flux density of this magnetar was about 8.7 mJy, which was 10 times larger than that reported at the time of discovery, enabling a single-pulse analysis. The emission is dominated by narrow “spiky” pulses that follow a log-normal distribution in peak flux density. From 1913 pulses, we detected 53 pulses whose peak flux densities are 10 times greater than that of the integrated profile. They are concentrated in pulse phase at the peaks of the integrated profile. The pulse widths at the 50% level of these bright pulses were between 0.°2 and 0.°9, much narrower than that of the integrated profile (∼12°). The observed pulse widths may be limited by interstellar scattering. No clear correlation was found between the widths and peak flux density of these pulses and no evidence was found for subpulse drifting. Relatively strong spiky pulses are also detected in the other five epochs of observation, showing the same properties as those detected in MJD 56836. These strong spiky pulses cannot be classified as “giant” pulses but are more closely related to normal pulse emission.

  19. Flux and Hall states in ABJM with dynamical flavors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bea, Yago [Departamento de Física de Partículas and Instituto Galego de Física de Altas Enerxías,Universidade de Santiago de Compostela,E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Jokela, Niko [Department of Physics and Helsinki Institute of Physics, University of Helsinki,P.O. Box 64, FIN-00014 (Finland); Lippert, Matthew [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Amsterdam,1098XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); Ramallo, Alfonso V. [Departamento de Física de Partículas and Instituto Galego de Física de Altas Enerxías,Universidade de Santiago de Compostela,E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Zoakos, Dimitrios [Centro de Física do Porto and Departamento de Física e Astronomia,Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto,Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal)

    2015-03-02

    We study the physics of probe D6-branes with quantized internal worldvolume flux in the ABJM background with unquenched massless flavors. This flux breaks parity in the (2+1)-dimensional gauge theory and allows quantum Hall states. Parity breaking is also explicitly demonstrated via the helicity dependence of the meson spectrum. We obtain general expressions for the conductivities, both in the gapped Minkowski embeddings and in the compressible black hole ones. These conductivities depend on the flux and contain a contribution from the dynamical flavors which can be regarded as an effect of intrinsic disorder due to quantum fluctuations of the fundamentals. We present an explicit, analytic family of supersymmetric solutions with nonzero charge density, electric, and magnetic fields.

  20. Flux and Hall states in ABJM with dynamical flavors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bea, Yago; Jokela, Niko; Lippert, Matthew; Ramallo, Alfonso V.; Zoakos, Dimitrios

    2015-03-01

    We study the physics of probe D6-branes with quantized internal worldvolume flux in the ABJM background with unquenched massless flavors. This flux breaks parity in the (2+1)-dimensional gauge theory and allows quantum Hall states. Parity breaking is also explicitly demonstrated via the helicity dependence of the meson spectrum. We obtain general expressions for the conductivities, both in the gapped Minkowski embeddings and in the compressible black hole ones. These conductivities depend on the flux and contain a contribution from the dynamical flavors which can be regarded as an effect of intrinsic disorder due to quantum fluctuations of the fundamentals. We present an explicit, analytic family of supersymmetric solutions with nonzero charge density, electric, and magnetic fields.