WorldWideScience

Sample records for flux density threshold

  1. Light flux density threshold at which protein denaturation is induced by synchrotron radiation circular dichroism beamlines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, A J; Janes, Robert W; Brown, A; Clarke, D T; Sutherland, J C; Tao, Y; Wallace, B A; Hoffmann, S V

    2008-07-01

    New high-flux synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) beamlines are providing important information for structural biology, but can potentially cause denaturation of the protein samples under investigation. This effect has been studied at the new CD1 dedicated SRCD beamline at ISA in Denmark, where radiation-induced thermal damage effects were observed, depending not only on the radiation flux but also on the focal spot size of the light. Comparisons with similar studies at other SRCD facilities worldwide has lead to the estimation of a flux density threshold under which SRCD beamlines should be operated when samples are to be exposed to low-wavelength vacuum ultraviolet radiation for extended periods of time.

  2. An electric field induced in the retina and brain at threshold magnetic flux density causing magnetophosphenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Akimasa; Takano, Yukinori; Fujiwara, Osamu; Dovan, Thanh; Kavet, Robert

    2011-07-01

    For magnetic field exposures at extremely low frequencies, the electrostimulatory response with the lowest threshold is the magnetophosphene, a response that corresponds to an adult exposed to a 20 Hz magnetic field of nominally 8.14 mT. In the IEEE standard C95.6 (2002), the corresponding in situ field in the retinal locus of an adult-sized ellipsoidal was calculated to be 53 mV m(-1). However, the associated dose in the retina and brain at a high level of resolution in anatomically correct human models is incompletely characterized. Furthermore, the dose maxima in tissue computed with voxel human models are prone to staircasing errors, particularly for the low-frequency dosimetry. In the analyses presented in this paper, analytical and quasi-static finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) solutions were first compared for a three-layer sphere exposed to a uniform 50 Hz magnetic field. Staircasing errors in the FDTD results were observed at the tissue interface, and were greatest at the skin-air boundary. The 99th percentile value was within 3% of the analytic maximum, depending on model resolution, and thus may be considered a close approximation of the analytic maximum. For the adult anatomical model, TARO, exposed to a uniform magnetic field, the differences in the 99th percentile value of in situ electric fields for 2 mm and 1 mm voxel models were at most several per cent. For various human models exposed at the magnetophosphene threshold at three orthogonal field orientations, the in situ electric field in the brain was between 10% and 70% greater than the analytical IEEE threshold of 53 mV m(-1), and in the retina was lower by roughly 50% for two horizontal orientations (anterior-posterior and lateral), and greater by about 15% for a vertically oriented field. Considering a reduction factor or safety factors of several folds applied to electrostimulatory thresholds, the 99th percentile dose to a tissue calculated with voxel human models may be used as an

  3. An electric field induced in the retina and brain at threshold magnetic flux density causing magnetophosphenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirata, Akimasa; Takano, Yukinori; Fujiwara, Osamu [Nagoya Institute of Technology, Department of Computer Science and Engineering (Japan); Dovan, Thanh [SP AusNet, Division of Network Strategy and Development (Australia); Kavet, Robert, E-mail: ahirata@nitech.ac.jp [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2011-07-07

    For magnetic field exposures at extremely low frequencies, the electrostimulatory response with the lowest threshold is the magnetophosphene, a response that corresponds to an adult exposed to a 20 Hz magnetic field of nominally 8.14 mT. In the IEEE standard C95.6 (2002), the corresponding in situ field in the retinal locus of an adult-sized ellipsoidal was calculated to be 53 mV m{sup -1}. However, the associated dose in the retina and brain at a high level of resolution in anatomically correct human models is incompletely characterized. Furthermore, the dose maxima in tissue computed with voxel human models are prone to staircasing errors, particularly for the low-frequency dosimetry. In the analyses presented in this paper, analytical and quasi-static finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) solutions were first compared for a three-layer sphere exposed to a uniform 50 Hz magnetic field. Staircasing errors in the FDTD results were observed at the tissue interface, and were greatest at the skin-air boundary. The 99th percentile value was within 3% of the analytic maximum, depending on model resolution, and thus may be considered a close approximation of the analytic maximum. For the adult anatomical model, TARO, exposed to a uniform magnetic field, the differences in the 99th percentile value of in situ electric fields for 2 mm and 1 mm voxel models were at most several per cent. For various human models exposed at the magnetophosphene threshold at three orthogonal field orientations, the in situ electric field in the brain was between 10% and 70% greater than the analytical IEEE threshold of 53 mV m{sup -1}, and in the retina was lower by roughly 50% for two horizontal orientations (anterior-posterior and lateral), and greater by about 15% for a vertically oriented field. Considering a reduction factor or safety factors of several folds applied to electrostimulatory thresholds, the 99th percentile dose to a tissue calculated with voxel human models may be used as an

  4. An electric field induced in the retina and brain at threshold magnetic flux density causing magnetophosphenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Akimasa; Takano, Yukinori; Fujiwara, Osamu; Dovan, Thanh; Kavet, Robert

    2011-07-01

    For magnetic field exposures at extremely low frequencies, the electrostimulatory response with the lowest threshold is the magnetophosphene, a response that corresponds to an adult exposed to a 20 Hz magnetic field of nominally 8.14 mT. In the IEEE standard C95.6 (2002), the corresponding in situ field in the retinal locus of an adult-sized ellipsoidal was calculated to be 53 mV m-1. However, the associated dose in the retina and brain at a high level of resolution in anatomically correct human models is incompletely characterized. Furthermore, the dose maxima in tissue computed with voxel human models are prone to staircasing errors, particularly for the low-frequency dosimetry. In the analyses presented in this paper, analytical and quasi-static finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) solutions were first compared for a three-layer sphere exposed to a uniform 50 Hz magnetic field. Staircasing errors in the FDTD results were observed at the tissue interface, and were greatest at the skin-air boundary. The 99th percentile value was within 3% of the analytic maximum, depending on model resolution, and thus may be considered a close approximation of the analytic maximum. For the adult anatomical model, TARO, exposed to a uniform magnetic field, the differences in the 99th percentile value of in situ electric fields for 2 mm and 1 mm voxel models were at most several per cent. For various human models exposed at the magnetophosphene threshold at three orthogonal field orientations, the in situ electric field in the brain was between 10% and 70% greater than the analytical IEEE threshold of 53 mV m-1, and in the retina was lower by roughly 50% for two horizontal orientations (anterior-posterior and lateral), and greater by about 15% for a vertically oriented field. Considering a reduction factor or safety factors of several folds applied to electrostimulatory thresholds, the 99th percentile dose to a tissue calculated with voxel human models may be used as an estimate of

  5. Threshold corrections in heterotic flux compactifications

    CERN Document Server

    Angelantonj, Carlo; Sarkis, Matthieu

    2016-01-01

    We compute the one-loop threshold corrections to the gauge and gravitational couplings for a large class of N=2 non-K\\"ahler heterotic compactifications with three-form flux, consisting in principal two-torus bundles over K3 surfaces. We obtain the results as sums of BPS-states contributions, depending on the topological data of the bundle. We analyse also the worldsheet non-perturbative corrections coming from instantons wrapping the torus fiber, that are mapped under S-duality to D-instanton corrections in type I flux compactifications.

  6. Threshold electric field in unconventional density waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dóra, Balázs; Virosztek, Attila; Maki, Kazumi

    2001-07-01

    As it is well known most charge-density waves (CDW's) and spin-density waves exhibit nonlinear transport with well-defined threshold electric field ET. Here we study theoretically the threshold electric field of unconventional density waves. We find that the threshold field increases monotonically with temperature without divergent behavior at Tc, unlike the one in conventional CDW. The present result in the three-dimensional weak pinning limit appears to describe rather well the threshold electric field observed recently in the low-temperature phase of α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4.

  7. Density threshold for plasma detachment in gas target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezumi, N. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Energy Engineering and Science; Mori, S. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-01 (Japan); Ohno, N. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Energy Engineering and Science; Takagi, M. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Energy Engineering and Science; Takamura, S. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Energy Engineering and Science; Suzuki, H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Nagoya 464-01 (Japan); Park, J. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)

    1997-02-01

    The simulated gas target divertor experiment has been performed to investigate the fundamental physics of plasma detachment in the linear plasma device, TPD-I, which has a high heat flux and high density plasma in steady state. The existence of a density threshold for plasma detachment was observed in our experiment. It is found that the electron-ion temperature relaxation process is a key to determine the density dependence of the plasma detachment. (orig.).

  8. About Merging Threshold and Critical Flux Concepts into a Single One: The Boundary Flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Stoller

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades much effort was put in understanding fouling phenomena on membranes. One successful approach to describe fouling issues on membranes is the critical flux theory. The possibility to measure a maximum value of the permeate flux for a given system without incurring in fouling issues was a breakthrough in membrane process design. However, in many cases critical fluxes were found to be very low, lower than the economic feasibility of the process. The knowledge of the critical flux value must be therefore considered as a good starting point for process design. In the last years, a new concept was introduced, the threshold flux, which defines the maximum permeate flow rate characterized by a low constant fouling rate regime. This concept, more than the critical flux, is a new practical tool for membrane process designers. In this paper a brief review on critical and threshold flux will be reported and analyzed. And since the concepts share many common aspects, merged into a new concept, called the boundary flux, the validation will occur by the analysis of previously collected data by the authors, during the treatment of olive vegetation wastewater by ultrafiltration and nanofiltration membranes.

  9. 47 CFR 25.208 - Power flux density limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Region 2, the single-entry equivalent power-flux density, in the space-to-Earth direction, (EPFDdown), at... in Region 1 and 12.2-12.7 GHz in Region 2, the aggregate equivalent power-flux density, in the space... power flux density levels defined below. (1) In the region of the contiguous United States,...

  10. Percolation threshold determines the optimal population density for public cooperation

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zhen; Perc, Matjaz; 10.1103/PhysRevE.85.037101

    2012-01-01

    While worldwide census data provide statistical evidence that firmly link the population density with several indicators of social welfare, the precise mechanisms underlying these observations are largely unknown. Here we study the impact of population density on the evolution of public cooperation in structured populations and find that the optimal density is uniquely related to the percolation threshold of the host graph irrespective of its topological details. We explain our observations by showing that spatial reciprocity peaks in the vicinity of the percolation threshold, when the emergence of a giant cooperative cluster is hindered neither by vacancy nor by invading defectors, thus discovering an intuitive yet universal law that links the population density with social prosperity.

  11. Critical, sustainable and threshold fluxes for membrane filtration with water industry applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Robert W; Pearce, Graeme K

    2011-05-11

    Critical flux theory evolved as a description of the upper bound in the operating envelope for controlled steady state environments such as cross-flow systems. However, in the application of UF membranes in the water industry, dead-end (direct-flow) designs are used. Direct-flow is a pseudo steady state operation with different fouling characteristics to cross-flow, and thus the critical flux concept has limited applicability. After a review of recent usage of the critical flux theory, an alternative concept for providing design guidelines for direct-flow systems namely that of the threshold flux is introduced. The concept of threshold flux can also be applicable to cross-flow systems. In more general terms the threshold flux can be taken to be the flux that divides a low fouling region from a high fouling region. This may be linked both to the critical flux concept and to the concept of a sustainable flux. The sustainable flux is the one at which a modest degree of fouling occurs, providing a compromise between capital expenditure (which is reduced by using high flux) and operating costs (which are reduced by restricting the fouling rate). Whilst the threshold flux can potentially be linked to physical phenomena alone, the sustainable flux also depends upon economic factors and is thus of a different nature to the critical and threshold fluxes. This distinction will be illustrated using some MBR data. Additionally the utility of the concept of a threshold flux will be illustrated using pilot plant data obtained for UF treatment of four sources of water. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. On column density thresholds and the star formation rate

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, Paul C

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a numerical study designed to address the question of whether there is a column density threshold for star formation within molecular clouds. We have simulated a large number of different clouds, with volume and column densities spanning a wide range of different values, using a state-of-the-art model for the coupled chemical, thermal and dynamical evolution of the gas. We show that for low-mass clouds, around 1000 solar masses and below, star formation is only possible if the mean cloud column density exceeds 10^21 cm^-2. In more massive clouds, the required mean column density is a factor of a few lower. We demonstrate that this behaviour is well-described by a simple Jeans mass argument: clouds must contain multiple Jeans masses in order to form stars, and hence star-forming clouds cannot have arbitrarily low column densities. We have also examined the question of whether there is a column density threshold for the regions within clouds where star formation occurs. We show that th...

  13. Density thresholds in and efficiencies of star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Burkert, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies by Lada et al. (2010) and Heiderman et al. (2010) have suggested that efficient star formation occurs above an approximate threshold in gas surface density Sigma of Sigma_c = 120 Msun/pc^3 (A_K=0.8). We find no precise threshold for star formation; the impression of such results from a continuous and steep power-law increase of the ratio of protostellar mass to molecular gas mass with Sigma, approaching unity at protostellar core densities, corresponding to Sigma=1000 Msun/pc^3. We argue that this increase in star formation efficiency results from the increasing importance of self-gravity with increasing density, along with the consequent decrease in evolutionary timescales. The observations are consistent with models in which regions of more diffuse molecular gas with column densities corresponding to A_V=1-2 are initially formed by converging galactic hydrodynamic flows which subsequently collapse gravitationally, producing a power-law relation between surface density and the area A spanned a...

  14. Field measurements demonstrate distinct initiation and cessation thresholds governing aeolian sediment transport flux

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Raleigh L

    2016-01-01

    Wind-blown sand and dust transport models depend sensitively on selection of the threshold wind stress. However, the coexistence of distinct "fluid" and "impact" thresholds for the respective initiation and cessation of aeolian saltation, which is suggested by laboratory and numerical experiments, produces ambiguity in wind-driven transport predictions. Based on comprehensive high-frequency field saltation measurements, we provide the first field-based demonstration of distinct fluid and impact thresholds, and we determine the respective importance of these thresholds for modeling wind-blown sediment flux. We show that statistically-determined "effective" threshold stress decreases linearly with the fraction of time that saltation is active. As saltation activity increases, potential threshold crossings are increasingly governed by impact threshold, whose value is only 80% of fluid threshold shear velocity. Though both fluid and impact thresholds are likely important for high-frequency saltation prediction, w...

  15. Neutron Flux Density Measured by Analysis of Annealing Heat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Fan; SHI; Yong-qian; ZHU; Qing-fu; LU; Jin; LI; Lai-dong

    2015-01-01

    Neutron flux density measurement by thermal analysis is a new method different from the previous.This method is first put the sample to the neutron field.Second,measure the annealingheat of the sample.Find out the suitable mixture of crystal boron and apatite to measure the neutron flux density.Then put the sample to the neutron field in

  16. Refractive Interstellar Scintillation for Flux Density Variations of Two Pulsars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周爱芝; 吴鑫基; 艾力·伊沙木丁

    2003-01-01

    The flux density structure functions of PSRs B0525+21 and B2111+46 are calculated with the refractive interstellar scintillation (RISS) theory. The theoretical curves are in good agreement with observations [Astrophys.J. 539 (2000) 300] (hereafter S2000). The spectra of the electron density fluctuations both are of Kolmogorov spectra. We suggest that the flux density variations observed for these two pulsars are attributed to refractive interstellar scintillation, not to intrinsic variability.

  17. Probability Density and CFAR Threshold Estimation for Hyperspectral Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, G A

    2004-09-21

    The work reported here shows the proof of principle (using a small data set) for a suite of algorithms designed to estimate the probability density function of hyperspectral background data and compute the appropriate Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) matched filter decision threshold for a chemical plume detector. Future work will provide a thorough demonstration of the algorithms and their performance with a large data set. The LASI (Large Aperture Search Initiative) Project involves instrumentation and image processing for hyperspectral images of chemical plumes in the atmosphere. The work reported here involves research and development on algorithms for reducing the false alarm rate in chemical plume detection and identification algorithms operating on hyperspectral image cubes. The chemical plume detection algorithms to date have used matched filters designed using generalized maximum likelihood ratio hypothesis testing algorithms [1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 12, 10, 11, 13]. One of the key challenges in hyperspectral imaging research is the high false alarm rate that often results from the plume detector [1, 2]. The overall goal of this work is to extend the classical matched filter detector to apply Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) methods to reduce the false alarm rate, or Probability of False Alarm P{sub FA} of the matched filter [4, 8, 9, 12]. A detector designer is interested in minimizing the probability of false alarm while simultaneously maximizing the probability of detection P{sub D}. This is summarized by the Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve (ROC) [10, 11], which is actually a family of curves depicting P{sub D} vs. P{sub FA}parameterized by varying levels of signal to noise (or clutter) ratio (SNR or SCR). Often, it is advantageous to be able to specify a desired P{sub FA} and develop a ROC curve (P{sub D} vs. decision threshold r{sub 0}) for that case. That is the purpose of this work. Specifically, this work develops a set of algorithms and MATLAB

  18. Injury response of Phaseolus vulgaris to ozone flux density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiro, B. D.; Gillespie, T. J.; Thurtell, G. W.

    This study describes a quantitative relationship between mean O 3 flux density and the length of exposure needed for the occurrence of visual injury to Phaseolus vulgaris L. Similar relationships were found for 14 day old and 6 week old plants using a whole leaf gas exchange cuvette system. Cultivars Seafarer (O 3 sensitive) and Gold Crop (O 3 resistant) exhibited similar responses at flux densities > 3 mg m -2 h -1 but only Seafarer was injured below this flux density. O 3 concentration and length of exposure period alone did not contain sufficient information to describe the onset of visual foliar injury. The use of O 3 concentrations in excess of normal ambient conditions compensated for low leaf conductances so that flux densities in the cuvette were similar to those found in the field.

  19. Metastable states of hydrogen: their geometric phases and flux densities

    CERN Document Server

    Gasenzer, T; Trappe, M -I

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the geometric phases and flux densities for the metastable states of hydrogen with principal quantum number n=2 being subjected to adiabatically varying external electric and magnetic fields. Convenient representations of the flux densities as complex integrals are derived. Both, parity conserving (PC) and parity violating (PV) flux densities and phases are identified. General expressions for the flux densities following from rotational invariance are derived. Specific cases of external fields are discussed. In a pure magnetic field the phases are given by the geometry of the path in magnetic field space. But for electric fields in presence of a constant magnetic field and for electric plus magnetic fields the geometric phases carry information on the atomic parameters, in particular, on the PV atomic interaction. We show that for our metastable states also the decay rates can be influenced by the geometric phases and we give a concrete example for this effect. Finally we emphasise that the general...

  20. The whistler heat flux instability: Threshold conditions in the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, S. Peter; Scime, Earl E.; Phillips, John L.; Feldman, William C.

    1994-01-01

    Solar wind electrons are observed often to consist of two components: a core and a halo. The anisotropics and relative average speeds of these components correspond to a heat flux that has the potential to excite several different electromagetic instabilities; wave-particle scattering by the resulting enhanced fluctuations can limit this heat flux. This manuscript describes theoretical studies using the linear Vlasco dispersion equation for drifting bi-Maxwellian component distributions in a homogeneous plasma to examine the threshold of the whistler heat flux instability. Expressions for this threshold are obtained from two different parametric baselines: a local model that yields scalings as functions of local dimensionless plasma paramaters, and a global model based on average electron properties observed during the in-eliptic phase of the Ulysses mission. The latter model yields an expression for the heat flux at threshold of the whistler instability as a function of helisopheric radius that scales in the same way as the average heat flux observed form Ulysses and that provides an approximate upper bound for that same quantity. This theoretical scaling is combined with the observational results to yield a semi-empirical closure relation for the average electron heat flux in the solar wind between 1 and 5 AU.

  1. Electronic Flux Density beyond the Born-Oppenheimer Approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schild, Axel; Agostini, Federica; Gross, E K U

    2016-05-19

    In the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, the electronic wave function is typically real-valued and hence the electronic flux density (current density) seems to vanish. This is unfortunate for chemistry, because it precludes the possibility to monitor the electronic motion associated with the nuclear motion during chemical rearrangements from a Born-Oppenheimer simulation of the process. We study an electronic flux density obtained from a correction to the electronic wave function. This correction is derived via nuclear velocity perturbation theory applied in the framework of the exact factorization of electrons and nuclei. To compute the correction, only the ground state potential energy surface and the electronic wave function are needed. For a model system, we demonstrate that this electronic flux density approximates the true one very well, for coherent tunneling dynamics as well as for over-the-barrier scattering, and already for mass ratios between electrons and nuclei that are much larger than the true mass ratios.

  2. Probing Microarcsecond Structure in AGN using Continuous Flux Density Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senkbeil, C.; Lovell, J.; Ellingsen, S.; Jauncey, D.; Cimò, G.

    2009-08-01

    Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) exhibit radio flux density variability on a wide range of time scales from hours to years. The rapid cm-wavelength variability on timescales from hours to days has been shown to be caused by interstellar scintillation. Interstellar scintillation implies the presence of microarcsecond scale structure in the scintillating source. We have quasi-continuously monitored the 6.7 GHz flux density of six interstellar scintillating sources since 2003 using the University of Tasmania Ceduna Radio Telescope. The launch of the VSOP 2 ASTRO-G mission will allow us to compare the microarcsecond AGN structure at 22 and 43 GHz with microarcsecond structure implied by scintillation at 5 GHz using the Hobart Interferometer, which will supersede the Ceduna flux density monitoring program in 2009.

  3. Magnetic flux density in the heliosphere through several solar cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdős, G. [Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Balogh, A., E-mail: erdos.geza@wigner.mta.hu [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-20

    We studied the magnetic flux density carried by solar wind to various locations in the heliosphere, covering a heliospheric distance range of 0.3-5.4 AU and a heliolatitudinal range from 80° south to 80° north. Distributions of the radial component of the magnetic field, B{sub R} , were determined over long intervals from the Helios, ACE, STEREO, and Ulysses missions, as well as from using the 1 AU OMNI data set. We show that at larger distances from the Sun, the fluctuations of the magnetic field around the average Parker field line distort the distribution of B{sub R} to such an extent that the determination of the unsigned, open solar magnetic flux density from the average (|B{sub R} |) is no longer justified. We analyze in detail two methods for reducing the effect of fluctuations. The two methods are tested using magnetic field and plasma velocity measurements in the OMNI database and in the Ulysses observations, normalized to 1 AU. It is shown that without such corrections for the fluctuations, the magnetic flux density measured by Ulysses around the aphelion phase of the orbit is significantly overestimated. However, the matching between the in-ecliptic magnetic flux density at 1 AU (OMNI data) and the off-ecliptic, more distant, normalized flux density by Ulysses is remarkably good if corrections are made for the fluctuations using either method. The main finding of the analysis is that the magnetic flux density in the heliosphere is fairly uniform, with no significant variations having been observed either in heliocentric distance or heliographic latitude.

  4. [Extraction of temperate vegetation phenology thresholds in North America based on flux tower observation data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing-Jing; Liu, Liang-Yun

    2013-02-01

    Flux tower method can effectively monitor the vegetation seasonal and phenological variation processes. At present, the differences in the detection and quantitative evaluation of various phenology extraction methods were not well validated and quantified. Based on the gross primary productivity (GPP) and net ecosystem productivity (NEP) data of temperate forests from 9 forest FLUXNET sites in North America, and by using the start dates (SOS) and end dates (EOS) of the temperate forest growth seasons extracted by different phenology threshold extraction methods, in combining with the forest ecosystem carbon source/sink functions, this paper analyzed the effects of different threshold standards on the extraction results of the vegetations phenology. The results showed that the effects of different threshold standards on the stability of the extracted results of deciduous broadleaved forest (DBF) phenology were smaller than those on the stability of the extracted results of evergreen needleleaved forest (ENF) phenology. Among the extracted absolute and relative thresholds of the forests GPP, the extracted threshold of the DBF daily GPP= 2 g C.m-2.d-1 had the best agreement with the DBF daily GPP = 20% maximum GPP (GPPmax) , the phenological metrics with a threshold of daily GPP = 4 g C.m-2.d-1 was close to that between daily GPP = 20% GPPmax and daily GPP = 50% GPPmax, and the start date of ecosystem carbon sink function was close to the SOS metrics between daily GPP = 4 g C.m-2.d-1 and daily GPP= 20% GPPmax. For ENF, the phenological metrics with a threshold of daily GPP = 2 g C.m-2.d-1 and daily GPP = 4 g C.m-2.d-1 had the best agreement with the daily GPP = 20% GPPmax and daily GPP = 50% GPPmax, respectively, and the start date of the ecosystem carbon sink function was close to the SOS metrics between daily GPP = 2 g C.m-2.d-1 and daily GPP= 10% GPPmax.

  5. Gradient-driven flux-tube simulations of ion temperature gradient turbulence close to the non-linear threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeters, A. G.; Rath, F.; Buchholz, R.; Grosshauser, S. R.; Strintzi, D.; Weikl, A. [Physics Department, University of Bayreuth, Universitätsstrasse 30, Bayreuth (Germany); Camenen, Y. [Aix Marseille Univ, CNRS, PIIM, UMR 7345, Marseille (France); Candy, J. [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Casson, F. J. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB, Oxon (United Kingdom); Hornsby, W. A. [Max Planck Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    It is shown that Ion Temperature Gradient turbulence close to the threshold exhibits a long time behaviour, with smaller heat fluxes at later times. This reduction is connected with the slow growth of long wave length zonal flows, and consequently, the numerical dissipation on these flows must be sufficiently small. Close to the nonlinear threshold for turbulence generation, a relatively small dissipation can maintain a turbulent state with a sizeable heat flux, through the damping of the zonal flow. Lowering the dissipation causes the turbulence, for temperature gradients close to the threshold, to be subdued. The heat flux then does not go smoothly to zero when the threshold is approached from above. Rather, a finite minimum heat flux is obtained below which no fully developed turbulent state exists. The threshold value of the temperature gradient length at which this finite heat flux is obtained is up to 30% larger compared with the threshold value obtained by extrapolating the heat flux to zero, and the cyclone base case is found to be nonlinearly stable. Transport is subdued when a fully developed staircase structure in the E × B shearing rate forms. Just above the threshold, an incomplete staircase develops, and transport is mediated by avalanche structures which propagate through the marginally stable regions.

  6. Rates, Flux Densities, and Spectral Indices of Meteor Radio Afterglows

    CERN Document Server

    Obenberger, K S; Hancock, P J; Holmes, J M; Pedersen, T R; Schinzel, F K; Taylor, G B

    2016-01-01

    Using the narrowband all-sky imager mode of the LWA1 we have now detected 30 transients at 25.6 MHz, 1 at 34 MHz, and 93 at 38.0 MHz. While we have only optically confirmed that 37 of these events are radio afterglows from meteors, evidence suggests that most, if not all, are. Using the beam-forming mode of the LWA1 we have also captured the broadband spectra between 22.0 and 55.0 MHz of four events. We compare the smooth, spectral components of these four events and fit the frequency dependent flux density to a power law, and find that the spectral index is time variable, with the spectrum steepening over time for each meteor afterglow. Using these spectral indices along with the narrow band flux density measurements of the 123 events at 25.6 and 38 MHz, we predict the expected flux densities and rates for meteor afterglows potentially observable by other low frequency radio telescopes.

  7. Flux threshold of He-ion-beam induced nano-fuzz growth on hot tungsten below and above the displacement damage threshold energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijazi, Hussein; Bannister, Mark E.; Parish, Chad M.; Meyer, Harry M., III; Meyer, Fred W.

    2014-10-01

    Measurements of nano-fuzz growth on linear plasma devices have shown that below the displacement damage energy threshold, a minimum He-ion flux is required for nano-fuzz formation. We report comparative measurements of nano-fuzz flux thresholds below and above the displacement damage energy threshold using well characterized He ion beams at the ORNL MIRF. He-ion-beam flux distributions were optimized and measured at 218 and 2000 eV prior to ion beam impact on W coupons heated to about 1000 deg. C. After exposure times ranging from 4200 to 7200 seconds, the beam spots were examined by SEM over a 0.5 mm×0.5 mm grid, which was spatially correlated to the measured flux distributions. In this manner, we were able to obtain, in a single ion beam exposure, the flux dependence of the observed surface morphology changes at each of the two energies. At 218 eV, for fluxes below 1.5×1016/cm2s, ordered surface structures are observed, with great grain-to-grain variability, together with blisters and pinholes, while above this flux value, individual grain characteristics disappear, and nano-fuzz growth is observed. At 2 keV, very similar surface morphologies are observed, but the flux threshold for nano-fuzz formation has almost doubled, to 2.5 -- 3×1016/cm2s. Possible reasons for this increase will be discussed. Research sponsored by the LDRD Program of ORNL, managed by UT Battelle, LLC, for the US DOE.

  8. Bone density threshold and other predictors of vertebral fracture in patients receiving oral glucocorticoid therapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staa, T.P. van; Laan, R.F.J.M.; Barton, I.P.; Cohen, S.; Reid, D.M.; Cooper, C.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate predictors of vertebral fractures, including a threshold for bone mineral density (BMD), in patients receiving oral glucocorticoids (GCs). METHODS: Data were obtained from 2 randomized clinical trials (prevention and treatment trials of risedronate) using similar methods, but

  9. Flux density calibration in diffuse optical tomographic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Samir Kumar; Rajan, Kanhirodan; Vasu, Ram M

    2013-02-01

    The solution of the forward equation that models the transport of light through a highly scattering tissue material in diffuse optical tomography (DOT) using the finite element method gives flux density (Φ) at the nodal points of the mesh. The experimentally measured flux (Umeasured) on the boundary over a finite surface area in a DOT system has to be corrected to account for the system transfer functions (R) of various building blocks of the measurement system. We present two methods to compensate for the perturbations caused by R and estimate true flux density (Φ) from Umeasuredcal. In the first approach, the measurement data with a homogeneous phantom (Umeasuredhomo) is used to calibrate the measurement system. The second scheme estimates the homogeneous phantom measurement using only the measurement from a heterogeneous phantom, thereby eliminating the necessity of a homogeneous phantom. This is done by statistically averaging the data (Umeasuredhetero) and redistributing it to the corresponding detector positions. The experiments carried out on tissue mimicking phantom with single and multiple inhomogeneities, human hand, and a pork tissue phantom demonstrate the robustness of the approach.

  10. High Torque Density Transverse Flux Machine without the Need to Use SMC Material for 3D Flux Paths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Kaiyuan; Wu, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new transverse flux permanent magnet machine. In a normal transverse flux machine, complicated 3-D flux paths often exist. Such 3-D flux paths would require the use of soft magnetic composites material instead of laminations for construction of the machine stator. In the new...... machine topology proposed in this paper, by advantageously utilizing the magnetic flux path provided by an additional rotor, use of laminations that allow 2-D flux paths only will be sufficient to accomplish the required 3-D flux paths. The machine also has a high torque density and is therefore...

  11. Threshold for sand mobility on Mars calibrated from seasonal variations of sand flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayoub, F.; Avouac, J.-P.; Newman, C. E.; Richardson, M. I.; Lucas, A.; Leprince, S.; Bridges, N. T.

    2014-09-01

    Coupling between surface winds and saltation is a fundamental factor governing geological activity and climate on Mars. Saltation of sand is crucial for both erosion of the surface and dust lifting into the atmosphere. Wind tunnel experiments along with measurements from surface meteorology stations and modelling of wind speeds suggest that winds should only rarely move sand on Mars. However, evidence for currently active dune migration has recently accumulated. Crucially, the frequency of sand-moving events and the implied threshold wind stresses for saltation have remained unknown. Here we present detailed measurements of Nili Patera dune field based on High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment images, demonstrating that sand motion occurs daily throughout much of the year and that the resulting sand flux is strongly seasonal. Analysis of the seasonal sand flux variation suggests an effective threshold for sand motion for application to large-scale model wind fields (1-100 km scale) of τs=0.01±0.0015 N m-2.

  12. Method for determining transport critical current densities and flux penetration depth in bulk superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israelsson, Ulf E. (Inventor); Strayer, Donald M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A contact-less method for determining transport critical current density and flux penetration depth in bulk superconductor material. A compressor having a hollow interior and a plunger for selectively reducing the free space area for distribution of the magnetic flux therein are formed of superconductor material. Analytical relationships, based upon the critical state model, Maxwell's equations and geometrical relationships define transport critical current density and flux penetration depth in terms of the initial trapped magnetic flux density and the ratio between initial and final magnetic flux densities whereby data may be reliably determined by means of the simple test apparatus for evaluating the current density and flux penetration depth.

  13. Dust Absorption and the Cosmic UV Flux Density

    CERN Document Server

    Massarotti, M; Buzzoni, A

    2001-01-01

    We study the evolution of the galaxy UV luminosity density as a function of redshift in the Hubble Deep Field North (HDF-N). We estimate the amount of energy absorbed by dust and hidden from optical observations by analyzing the HDF-N photometric data with the spectral energy distribution fitting method. According to our results, at redshifts 1 < z < 4.5, the global energy observed in the UV rest-frame at lambda=1500 A corresponds to only 7-11% of the stellar energy output, the rest of it being absorbed by dust and re-emitted in the far-IR. Our estimates of the comoving star formation rate density in the universe from the extinction-corrected UV emission are consistent with the recent results obtained with Submillimeter Common-User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) at faint sub-millimeter flux levels.

  14. Spillage and flux density on a receiver aperture lip. [of solar thermal collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, L. D.

    1985-01-01

    In a dish-type point-focusing solar thermal collector, the spillage and the flux density on the receiver aperture lip are related in a very simple way, if the aperture is circular and centered on the optical axis. Specifically, the flux density on the lip is equal to the spillage times the peak flux density in the plane of the lip.

  15. Changes in electrogustometry thresholds, tongue tip vascularization, density and form of the fungiform papillae in smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlidis, Pavlos; Gouveris, Charalampos; Kekes, Georgios; Maurer, Jan

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate differences in gustatory function in smokers of both sexes and identify any differences in the shape, density and vascularisation of the fungiform papillae (fPap) of smokers' tongue. Additional aim was to investigate any relation between the age, pack years and differences in shape, density, vascularization of fPap and sex. In 166 smokers (81 males, 85 females, age range 20-80 years), divided in age groups, electrogustometry (EGM) thresholds at the chorda tympani area, at the soft palate area and at the area of the vallate papillae were recorded bilaterally. Morphology and density of the fPap and blood vessels' density and morphology at the tip of the tongue were examined using contact endoscopy (CE). EGM thresholds of all smoking subjects tended to increase compared to the non-smoking participants. Morphology, vascularization and density of fPap were found to be worse in smokers than in non-smokers. Interestingly, some participants, despite having increased number of pack years, tended to have almost similar EGM thresholds with non-smoking subjects of the same age group. Smoking tends to affect density, morphology and vascularization of the fPap. There is a correlation between the duration of smoking (pack years) and the afore-mentioned parameters. The use of τ-Kendall criterion provided useful information about the different correlation between the EGM thresholds and vascularization, the EGM thresholds and morphology of fPap and EGM thresholds and density of fPap. The majority of smokers had elevated EGM thresholds compared to non-smokers. Smoking is an important factor which can lead to decreased taste acuity. The combination of methods, such as EGM and CE, can provide useful information about the morphology and function of taste buds. Of interest, women are less affected than men, irrespective of the age group.

  16. Factors influencing the density profiles of granular flux in a two-dimensional inclined channel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The two-dimensional dilute granular flow on a smooth incline bounded by rough sidewalls is investigated experimentally, and the transverse density profiles of granular flux (ξ = ρ v) across the channel are measured. The results show that the transverse density profiles of granular flux are symmetric about the channel center and that the density of granular flux near the boundary is clearly lower than that of the center. There is a critical width of channel Wc for the transition of the density of granular flux. The density of granular flux near the boundary decays with the increasing of inclination (sinθ ) of the channel.

  17. Factors influencing the density profiles of granular flux in a two-dimensional inclined channel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAO DeSong; ZHOU Ying; ZHANG XunSheng; TANG XiaoWei

    2009-01-01

    The two-dimensional dilute granular flow on a smooth incline bounded by rough sidewalls is investigated experimentally, and the transverse density profiles of granular flux (ξ=pv) across the channel are measured. The results show that the transverse density profiles of granular flux are symmetric about the channel center and that the density of granular flux near the boundary is clearly lower than that of the center. There is a critical width of channel Wc for the transition of the density of granular flux. The density of granular flux near the boundary decays with the increasing of inclination (sinθ) of the channel.

  18. Internal wave pressure, velocity, and energy flux from density perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Allshouse, Michael R; Morrison, Philip J; Swinney, Harry L

    2016-01-01

    Determination of energy transport is crucial for understanding the energy budget and fluid circulation in density varying fluids such as the ocean and the atmosphere. However, it is rarely possible to determine the energy flux field $\\mathbf{J} = p \\mathbf{u}$, which requires simultaneous measurements of the pressure and velocity perturbation fields, $p$ and $\\mathbf{u}$. We present a method for obtaining the instantaneous $\\mathbf{J}(x,z,t)$ from density perturbations alone: a Green's function-based calculation yields $p$, and $\\mathbf{u}$ is obtained by integrating the continuity equation and the incompressibility condition. We validate our method with results from Navier-Stokes simulations: the Green's function method is applied to the density perturbation field from the simulations, and the result for $\\mathbf{J}$ is found to agree typically to within $1\\%$ with $\\mathbf{J}$ computed directly using $p$ and $ \\mathbf{u}$ from the Navier-Stokes simulation. We also apply the Green's function method to densit...

  19. Temperature-dependence of Threshold Current Density-Length Product in Metallization Lines: A Revisit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saptono Duryat, Rahmat; Kim, Choong-Un

    2016-04-01

    One of the important phenomena in Electromigration (EM) is Blech Effect. The existence of Threshold Current Density-Length Product or EM Threshold has such fundamental and technological consequences in the design, manufacture, and testing of electronics. Temperature-dependence of Blech Product had been thermodynamically established and the real behavior of such interconnect materials have been extensively studied. The present paper reviewed the temperature-dependence of EM threshold in metallization lines of different materials and structure as found in relevant published articles. It is expected that the reader can see a big picture from the compiled data, which might be overlooked when it was examined in pieces.

  20. Vertical variation of particle speed and flux density in aeolian saltation: Measurement and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Keld R.; SøRensen, Michael

    2008-06-01

    Particle dynamics in aeolian saltation has been studied in a boundary layer wind tunnel above beds composed of quartz grains having diameters of either 242 μm or 320 μm. The cross section of the tunnel is 600 mm × 900 mm, and its thick boundary layer allows precise estimation of the fluid friction speed. Saltation is modeled using a numerical saltation model, and predicted grain speeds agree fairly well with experimental results obtained from laser-Doppler anemometry. The use of laser-Doppler anemometry to study aeolian saltation is thoroughly discussed and some pitfalls are identified. At 80 mm height the ratio between air speed and grain speed is about 1.1 and from there it increases toward the bed so that at 5 mm it is about 2.0. All grain speed profiles converge toward a common value of about 1 m/s at 2-3 mm height. Moreover, the estimated launch velocity distributions depend only very weakly on the friction speed in contrast to what has often been assumed in the literature. Flux density profiles measured with a laser-Doppler appear to be similar to most other density profiles measured with vertical array compartment traps; that is, two exponential segments will fit data between heights from a few millimeters to 100-200 mm. The experimental flux density profiles are found to agree well with model predictions. Generally, validation rates are low from 30 to 50% except at the highest level of 80 mm, where they approach 80%. When flux density profiles based on the validated data are used to estimate the total mass transport rate results are in fair agreement with measured transport rates except for conditions near threshold where as much as 50% difference is observed.

  1. Electric field and electron density thresholds for coherent auroral echo onset

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kustov, A.V.; Uspensky, M.V.; Sofko, G.J.; Koehler, J.A. (Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada)); Jones, G.O.L.; Williams, P.J.S. (University College of Wales, Aberystwyth (United Kingdom))

    1993-05-01

    The authors study the threshold dependence of electron density and electric field for the observation of coherent auroral echo onset. They make use of Polar Geophysical Institute 83 MHz auroral radar and the EISCAT facility in Scandanavia, to simultaneously get plasma parameter information and coherent scatter observations. They observe an electron density threshold of roughly 2.5[times]10[sup 11] m[sup [minus]3] for electric fields of 15 - 20 mV/m (near the Farley-Buneman instability threshold). For electric fields of 5 - 10 mV/m echos are not observed for even twice the previous electron density. Echo strength is observed to have other parametric dependences.

  2. Density threshold for Mopeia virus invasion and persistence in its host Mastomys natalensis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goyens, J.; Reijniers, J.; Borremans, B.;

    2013-01-01

    Well-established theoretical models predict host density thresholds for invasion and persistence of parasites with a density-dependent transmission. Studying such thresholds in reality, however, is not obvious because it requires long-term data for several fluctuating populations of different size...... is closely related to Lassa virus but non-pathogenic to humans so can be studied safely in the field. The simulations show that, while host density clearly is important, sharp thresholds are only to be expected for persistence (and not for invasion), since at short time-spans (as during invasion......-igniting the transmission. The model is most sensitive to the duration of the infectious stage, the size of the home range and the transmission coefficient, so these are important factors to determine experimentally in the future....

  3. Filtration behavior of casein glycomacropeptide (CGMP) in an enzymatic membrane reactor: fouling control by membrane selection and threshold flux operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Jianquan; Morthensen, Sofie Thage; Meyer, Anne S.

    2014-01-01

    . In this study, the filtration performance and fouling behavior during ultrafiltration (UF) of CGMP for the enzymatic production of 3′-sialyllactose were investigated. A 5kDa regenerated cellulose membrane with high anti-fouling performance, could retain CGMP well, permeate 3′-sialyllactose, and was found...... concentration on the threshold flux were studied based on the resistance-in-series model. Higher hydrophilicity of the membrane, elevated pH and agitation, and lower CGMP concentration were found to increase the threshold flux and decrease membrane fouling....

  4. Electromagnetic potentials basis for energy density and power flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puthoff, H. E.

    2016-09-01

    In rounding out the education of students in advanced courses in applied electromagnetics it is incumbent on us as mentors to raise issues that encourage appreciation of certain subtle aspects that are often overlooked during first exposure to the field. One of these has to do with the interplay between fields and potentials, with the latter often seen as just a convenient mathematical artifice useful in solving Maxwell’s equations. Nonetheless, to those practiced in application it is well understood that various alternatives in the use of fields and potentials are available within electromagnetic (EM) theory for the definitions of energy density, momentum transfer, EM stress-energy tensor, and so forth. Although the various options are all compatible with the basic equations of electrodynamics (e.g., Maxwell’s equations, Lorentz force law, gauge invariance), nonetheless certain alternative formulations lend themselves to being seen as preferable to others with regard to the transparency of their application to physical problems of interest. Here we argue for the transparency of an energy density/power flux option based on the EM potentials alone.

  5. Flux Loop Measurements of the Magnetic Flux Density in the CMS Magnet Yoke

    CERN Document Server

    Klyukhin, V I; Ball, A.; Curé, B.; Gaddi, A.; Gerwig, H.; Mulders, M.; Hervé, A.; Loveless, R.

    2016-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general purpose detector, designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Its distinctive features include a 4 T superconducting solenoid with 6-m-diameter by 12.5-m-length free bore, enclosed inside a 10,000-ton return yoke made of construction steel. The return yoke consists of five dodecagonal three-layered barrel wheels and four end-cap disks at each end comprised of steel blocks up to 620 mm thick, which serve as the absorber plates of the muon detection system. To measure the field in and around the steel, a system of 22 flux loops and 82 3-D Hall sensors is installed on the return yoke blocks. A TOSCA 3-D model of the CMS magnet is developed to describe the magnetic field everywhere outside the tracking volume measured with the field-mapping machine. The first attempt is made to measure the magnetic flux density in the steel blocks of the CMS magnet yoke using the standard magnet discharge with the current ramp down speed of 1.5 A/...

  6. Measurement of the atmospheric muon flux with a 4 GeV threshold in the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aguilar, J. A.; Al Samarai, I.; Albert, A.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Jesus, A. C. Assis; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J. -J.; Auer, R.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bazzotti, M.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brown, A.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Camarena, F.; Capone, A.; Carloganu, C.; Carminati, G.; Carr, J.; Castorina, E.; Cavasinni, V.; Cecchini, S.; Charvis, Ph.; Chiarusi, T.; Sen, N. Chon; Circella, M.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Cottini, N.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; De Bonis, G.; Decowski, M. P.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Ernenwein, J. -P.; Escoffier, S.; Fehr, F.; Flaminio, V.; Fratini, K.; Fritsch, U.; Fuda, J. -L.; Gay, P.; Giacomelli, G.; Gomez-Gonzalez, J. P.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernandez-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hoessl, J.; de Jong, M.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Kouchner, A.; Kretschmer, W.; Lahmann, R.; Lamare, P.; Lambard, G.; Larosa, G.; Laschinsky, H.; Lefevre, D.; Lelaizant, G.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Lucarelli, F.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martinez-Mora, J. A.; Mazure, A.; Montaruli, T.; Morganti, M.; Moscoso, L.; Motz, H.; Naumann, C.; Neff, M.; Ostasch, R.; Palioselitis, G.; Pavalas, G. E.; Payre, P.; Petrovic, J.; Piattelli, P.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Picq, C.; Pillet, R.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Racca, C.; Radu, A.; Reed, C.; Richardt, C.; Rujoiu, M.; Russo, V.; Salesa, F.; Sapienza, P.; Schoeck, F.; Schuller, J. -P.; Shanidze, R.; Simeone, F.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Tamburini, C.; Tasca, L.; Toscano, S.; Vallage, B.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vecchi, M.; Vernin, P.; Wijnker, G.; de Wolf, E.; Yepes, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zuniga, J.

    2010-01-01

    A new method for the measurement of the muon flux in the deep-sea ANTARES neutrino telescope and its dependence on the depth is presented. The method is based oil the observation of coincidence signals in adjacent storeys of the detector. This yields an energy threshold of about 4 GeV. The main sour

  7. Recovering from a bad start: rapid adaptation and tradeoffs to growth below a threshold density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Christopher J

    2012-07-04

    Bacterial growth in well-mixed culture is often assumed to be an autonomous process only depending upon the external conditions under control of the investigator. However, increasingly there is awareness that interactions between cells in culture can lead to surprising phenomena such as density-dependence in the initiation of growth. Here I report the unexpected discovery of a density threshold for growth of a strain of Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 used to inoculate eight replicate populations that were evolved in methanol. Six of these populations failed to grow to the expected full density during the first couple transfers. Remarkably, the final cell number of six populations crashed to levels 60- to 400-fold smaller than their cohorts. Five of these populations recovered to full density soon after, but one population remained an order of magnitude smaller for over one hundred generations. These variable dynamics appeared to be due to a density threshold for growth that was specific to both this particular ancestral strain and to growth on methanol. When tested at full density, this population had become less fit than its ancestor. Simply increasing the initial dilution 16-fold reversed this result, revealing that this population had more than a 3-fold advantage when tested at this lower density. As this population evolved and ultimately recovered to the same final density range as the other populations this low-density advantage waned. These results demonstrate surprisingly strong tradeoffs during adaptation to growth at low absolute densities that manifest over just a 16-fold change in density. Capturing laboratory examples of transitions to and from growth at low density may help us understand the physiological and evolutionary forces that have led to the unusual properties of natural bacteria that have specialized to low-density environments such as the open ocean.

  8. Recovering from a bad start: rapid adaptation and tradeoffs to growth below a threshold density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marx Christopher J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial growth in well-mixed culture is often assumed to be an autonomous process only depending upon the external conditions under control of the investigator. However, increasingly there is awareness that interactions between cells in culture can lead to surprising phenomena such as density-dependence in the initiation of growth. Results Here I report the unexpected discovery of a density threshold for growth of a strain of Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 used to inoculate eight replicate populations that were evolved in methanol. Six of these populations failed to grow to the expected full density during the first couple transfers. Remarkably, the final cell number of six populations crashed to levels 60- to 400-fold smaller than their cohorts. Five of these populations recovered to full density soon after, but one population remained an order of magnitude smaller for over one hundred generations. These variable dynamics appeared to be due to a density threshold for growth that was specific to both this particular ancestral strain and to growth on methanol. When tested at full density, this population had become less fit than its ancestor. Simply increasing the initial dilution 16-fold reversed this result, revealing that this population had more than a 3-fold advantage when tested at this lower density. As this population evolved and ultimately recovered to the same final density range as the other populations this low-density advantage waned. Conclusions These results demonstrate surprisingly strong tradeoffs during adaptation to growth at low absolute densities that manifest over just a 16-fold change in density. Capturing laboratory examples of transitions to and from growth at low density may help us understand the physiological and evolutionary forces that have led to the unusual properties of natural bacteria that have specialized to low-density environments such as the open ocean.

  9. Evaluation of the chronic effects of ozone on biomass loss of winter wheat based on ozone flux-response relationship with dynamical flux thresholds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Rongjun; Zheng, Youfei; Hu, Chengda

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the chronic negative effects of elevated ozone concentration on winter wheat in China, a parameterized Jarvis-type multiplicative stomatal conductance model with data collected from open-top chamber experiments on field grown wheat during four growing seasons in 2008-2011, were utilized to derive relationships between relative biomass and absorbed ozone phytotoxic dose (POD). The work introduced a variable flux threshold expressed as a function of gross photosynthesis rate (A), considered the detoxification ability for ozone damage on winter wheat, varying with time of day and growth stages of winter wheat. The results showed the linear relationships with the highest coefficient of determination (R2 = 0.8029) and intercept closer to 1 (value 1.0018) were obtained, between the PODY above a varied flux threshold Y and relative dry matter loss of wheat, compared with other fixed flux thresholds. The results demonstrated that the flux response relationship accounting for the photosynthetic ability can be used with confidence to assess and predict the damage effects of ozone on yields loss of crops across China.

  10. Magnetic field dependence of the threshold electric field in unconventional charge density waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dóra, Balázs; Virosztek, Attila; Maki, Kazumi

    2002-04-01

    Many experiments suggest that the unidentified low-temperature phase of α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4 is most likely unconventional charge density wave (UCDW). To further extend this identification we present our theoretical study of the threshold electric field of UCDW in a magnetic field. The magnetic field-temperature phase diagram is very similar to those in a d-wave superconductor. The optical conductivity shows clear features characteristic to both UDW and magnetic field. We find a rather strong field dependence of the threshold electric field, which shows qualitatively good agreement with the experimental data.

  11. Experimental energy-density flux characterization of ultrashort laser pulse filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccio, Daniele; Lotti, Antonio; Matijosius, Aidas; Bragheri, Francesca; Degiorgio, Vittorio; Couairon, Arnaud; Di Trapani, Paolo

    2009-05-11

    Visualization of the energy density flux gives a unique insight into the propagation properties of complex ultrashort pulses. This analysis, formerly relegated to numerical investigations, is here shown to be an invaluable experimental diagnostic tool. By retrieving the spatio-temporal amplitude and phase we experimentally obtain the energy density flux within complex ultrashort pulses generated by filamentation in a nonlinear Kerr medium.

  12. Sensitivity of the Meridional Overturning Circulation to the Pattern of the Surface Density Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    a better prognosis of anthropogenic climate change . Figure 1. Classical representation of the global thermohaline circulation and oceanic...modeling efforts and long-term strategy related to climate change . 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 105 14. SUBJECT TERMS Meridional Overturning Circulation ... Thermohaline Circulation , Thermocline, Residual-Mean Theory, Air-Sea Fluxes, Surface Density Flux , Mixed-Layer Density, Water-mass Transformation

  13. Distribution of Magnetic Flux Density in Soft-Contact EMCC Rectangular Mold

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lin-tao; WANG En-gang; DENG An-yuan; HE Ji-cheng

    2006-01-01

    The distribution of the magnetic flux density in a soft-contact electromagnetic continuous casting (EMCC) rectangular mold was investigated. The experimental results show that with an increase in electric power, the magnetic flux density increases. The position where the maximum magnetic flux density appears will shift up when the coil moves to the top of the mold. At the same time, the maximum magnetic flux density will increase and the effective acting range of electromagnetic pressure will widen. As a result, in practice, the coil should be placed near the top part of the mold. The meniscus should be controlled near the top part of the coil, as this not only remarkably improves the billet surface quality but also saves energy. With the same electric power input, the higher the frequency, the lower the magnetic flux density.

  14. Calibration system for measuring the radon flux density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishchenko, A; Zhukovsky, M; Bastrikov, V

    2015-06-01

    The measurement of radon flux from soil surface is the useful tool for the assessment of radon-prone areas and monitoring of radon releases from uranium mining and milling residues. The accumulation chambers with hollow headspace and chambers with activated charcoal are the most used devices for these purposes. Systematic errors of the measurements strongly depend on the geometry of the chamber and diffusion coefficient of the radon in soil. The calibration system for the attestation of devices for radon flux measurements was constructed. The calibration measurements of accumulation chambers and chambers with activated charcoal were conducted. The good agreement between the results of 2D modelling of radon flux and measurements results was observed. It was demonstrated that reliable measurements of radon flux can be obtained by chambers with activated charcoal (equivalent volume ~75 l) or by accumulation chambers with hollow headspace of ~7-10 l and volume/surface ratio (height) of >15 cm.

  15. Threshold-voltage modulated phase change heterojunction for application of high density memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Baihan; Tong, Hao, E-mail: tonghao@hust.edu.cn; Qian, Hang; Miao, Xiangshui [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); School of Optical and Electronic Information, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2015-09-28

    Phase change random access memory is one of the most important candidates for the next generation non-volatile memory technology. However, the ability to reduce its memory size is compromised by the fundamental limitations inherent in the CMOS technology. While 0T1R configuration without any additional access transistor shows great advantages in improving the storage density, the leakage current and small operation window limit its application in large-scale arrays. In this work, phase change heterojunction based on GeTe and n-Si is fabricated to address those problems. The relationship between threshold voltage and doping concentration is investigated, and energy band diagrams and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements are provided to explain the results. The threshold voltage is modulated to provide a large operational window based on this relationship. The switching performance of the heterojunction is also tested, showing a good reverse characteristic, which could effectively decrease the leakage current. Furthermore, a reliable read-write-erase function is achieved during the tests. Phase change heterojunction is proposed for high-density memory, showing some notable advantages, such as modulated threshold voltage, large operational window, and low leakage current.

  16. Knickpoint Generation and Persistence Following Base-Level Fall: An Examination of Erosional Thresholds in Sediment Flux Dependent Erosion Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, B. T.; Whipple, K. X.; Gasparini, N. M.; Wobus, C. W.

    2005-12-01

    Non-lithologic knickpoints, or discrete convexities in longitudinal river profiles, are commonly considered to be the mobile, upstream extent of a transient incisional signal. Downstream of the knickpoint, the landscape is responding to a recent change in base level, uplift rate or climatic condition, while upstream of the knickpoint, the landscape retains its relict form, relatively ignorant the transient signal. Though this model of knickpoint mobility and their capacity to communicate incisional signals throughout basins works well with standard formulations of the stream power erosion model, the recent development of sediment flux dependent erosion models contain explicit thresholds that limit the upstream extent of knickpoint-mediated fluvial adjustment. Sediment flux dependent erosion models fail to communicate incisional signals at small drainage areas as sediment and water discharges are insufficient to effectively erode the bed. As well, if knickpoint slopes increase beyond a threshold value, sediment impacts against the bed become too infrequent and too oblique to continue knickpoint propagation by fluvial mechanisms. This threshold in fluvial erosion could lead to the stagnation of incisional signals and the generation of hanging valleys. This theoretical expectation aligns with our observation that in numerous actively incising landscapes around the world, relict low drainage area basins are often found elevated high above and disconnected from the mainstem by extremely over-steepened channel reaches often composed of one or more near-vertical steps. In order to better understand how river networks respond during transient pulses of incision, we employ a numerical landscape evolution model (CHILD) to test the sensitivity of three different sediment flux dependent erosion models to different base-level fall scenarios. This technique allows us to observe the propagation of the signal throughout a fluvial network composed of tributaries of variable

  17. Theoretical Limit to the Laser Threshold Current Density in an InGaN Quantume Well Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amano, H; Chow, W W; Han, J

    1998-10-09

    This paper describes an investigation of the spontaneous emission limit to the laser threshold current density in an InGaN quantum well laser. The peak gain and spontaneous emission rate as functions of carrier density are com- puted using a microscopic laser theory. From these quantities, the minimum achievable threshold current density is determined for a given threshold gain. The dependence on quantum well width, and the effects of inhomogeneous broadening due to spatial alloy variations are discussed. Also, comparison with experiments is made.

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF THE CONTROL METHODOLOGY OF THE GIANT MAGNETOSTRICTIVE ACTUATOR BASED ON MAGNETIC FLUX DENSITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Zhenyuan; Yang Xing; Shi Chun; Guo Dongming

    2003-01-01

    According to the principle of the magnetostriction generating mechanism, the control model of giant magnetostriction material based on magnetic field and the control method with magnetic flux density are developed. Furthermore, this control method is used to develop a giant magnetostrictive micro-displacement actuator (GMA) and its driving system. Two control methods whose control variables are current intensity and magnetic flux density are compared with each other by experimental studies. Finally, effective methods on improving the linearity and control precision of micro-displacement actuator and reducing the hysteresis based on the controlling magnetic flux density are obtained.

  19. Comparative assessment of surface fluxes from different sources using probability density distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulev, Sergey; Tilinina, Natalia; Belyaev, Konstantin

    2015-04-01

    Surface turbulent heat fluxes from modern era and first generation reanalyses (NCEP-DOE, ERA-Interim, MERRA NCEP-CFSR, JRA) as well as from satellite products (SEAFLUX, IFREMER, HOAPS) were intercompared using framework of probability distributions for sensible and latent heat fluxes. For approximation of probability distributions and estimation of extreme flux values Modified Fisher-Tippett (MFT) distribution has been used. Besides mean flux values, consideration is given to the comparative analysis of (i) parameters of the MFT probability density functions (scale and location), (ii) extreme flux values corresponding high order percentiles of fluxes (e.g. 99th and higher) and (iii) fractional contribution of extreme surface flux events in the total surface turbulent fluxes integrated over months and seasons. The latter was estimated using both fractional distribution derived from MFT and empirical estimates based upon occurrence histograms. The strongest differences in the parameters of probability distributions of surface fluxes and extreme surface flux values between different reanalyses are found in the western boundary current extension regions and high latitudes, while the highest differences in the fractional contributions of surface fluxes may occur in mid ocean regions being closely associated with atmospheric synoptic dynamics. Generally, satellite surface flux products demonstrate relatively stronger extreme fluxes compared to reanalyses, even in the Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes where data assimilation input in reanalyses is quite dense compared to the Southern Ocean regions.

  20. Influence of particle flux density and temperature on surface modifications of tungsten and deuterium retention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzi, Luxherta, E-mail: l.buzi@fz-juelich.de [Ghent University, Department of Applied Physics, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); FOM Institute DIFFER-Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Edisonbaan 14, 3439 MN, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Institut für Energie und Klimaforschung – Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Leo-Brandt-Straße, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, CNRS UMR 7198, Bvd. des Aiguillettes, F-54506 Vandoeuvre (France); Temmerman, Greg De [FOM Institute DIFFER-Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Edisonbaan 14, 3439 MN, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Unterberg, Bernhard; Reinhart, Michael; Litnovsky, Andrey; Philipps, Volker [Institut für Energie und Klimaforschung – Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Leo-Brandt-Straße, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Oost, Guido Van [Ghent University, Department of Applied Physics, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Möller, Sören [Institut für Energie und Klimaforschung – Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Leo-Brandt-Straße, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Systematic study of deuterium irradiation effects on tungsten was done under ITER – relevant high particle flux density, scanning a broad surface temperature range. Polycrystalline ITER – like grade tungsten samples were exposed in linear plasma devices to two different ranges of deuterium ion flux densities (high: 3.5–7 · 10{sup 23} D{sup +}/m{sup 2} s and low: 9 · 10{sup 21} D{sup +}/m{sup 2} s). Particle fluence and ion energy, respectively 10{sup 26} D{sup +}/m{sup 2} and ∼38 eV were kept constant in all cases. The experiments were performed at three different surface temperatures 530 K, 630 K and 870 K. Experimental results concerning the deuterium retention and surface modifications of low flux exposure confirmed previous investigations. At temperatures 530 K and 630 K, deuterium retention was higher at lower flux density due to the longer exposure time (steady state plasma operation) and a consequently deeper diffusion range. At 870 K, deuterium retention was found to be higher at high flux density according to the thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) measurements. While blisters were completely absent at low flux density, small blisters of about 40–50 nm were formed at high flux density exposure. At the given conditions, a relation between deuterium retention and blister formation has been found which has to be considered in addition to deuterium trapping in defects populated by diffusion.

  1. Multispecies Density and Temperature Gradient Dependence of Quasilinear Particle and Energy Fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Rewoldt; R.V. Budny; W.M. Tang

    2004-08-09

    The variations of the normalized quasilinear particle and energy fluxes with artificial changes in the density and temperature gradients, as well as the variations of the linear growth rates and real frequencies, for ion temperature gradient and trapped-electron modes, are calculated. The quasilinear fluxes are normalized to the total energy flux, summed over all species. Here, realistic cases for tokamaks and spherical torii are considered which have two impurity species. For situations where there are substantial changes in the normalized fluxes, the ''diffusive approximation,'' in which the normalized fluxes are taken to be linear in the gradients, is seen to be inaccurate. Even in the case of small artificial changes in density or temperature gradients, changes in the fluxes of different species (''off-diagonal'') generally are significant, or even dominant, compared to those for the same species (''diagonal'').

  2. A Re-examination of Density Effects in Eddy Covariance Measurements of CO2 Fluxes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heping LIU

    2009-01-01

    Corrections of density effects resulting from air-parcel expansion/compression are important in interpreting eddy covariance fluxes of water vapor and CO2 when open-path systems are used. To account for these effects, mean vertical velocity and perturbation of the density of dry air are two critical parameters in treating those physical processes responsible for density variations. Based on various underlying assumptions, different studies have obtained different formulas for the mean vertical velocity and perturbation of the density of dry air, leading to a number of approaches to correct density effects. In this study, we re-examine physical processes related to different assumptions that are made to formulate the density effects. Specifically, we re-examine the assumptions of a zero dry air flux and a zero moist air flux in the surface layer, used for treating density variations, and their implications for correcting density effects. It is found that physical processes in relation to the assumption of a zero dry air flux account for the influence of dry air expansion/compression on density variations. Meanwhile, physical processes in relation to the assumption of a zero moist air flux account for the influence of moist air expansion/compression on density variations. In this study, we also re-examine mixing ratio issues. Our results indicate that the assumption of a zero dry air flux favors the use of the mixing ratio relative to dry air, while the assumption of a zero moist air flux favors the use of the mixing ratio relative to the total moist air. Additionally, we compare different formula for the mean vertical velocity, generated by air-parcel expansion/compression, and for density effect corrections using eddy covariance data measured over three boreal ecosystems.

  3. Ion channel density and threshold dynamics of repetitive firing in a cortical neuron model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arhem, Peter; Blomberg, Clas

    2007-01-01

    Modifying the density and distribution of ion channels in a neuron (by natural up- and down-regulation, by pharmacological intervention or by spontaneous mutations) changes its activity pattern. In the present investigation, we analyze how the impulse patterns are regulated by the density of voltage-gated channels in a model neuron, based on voltage clamp measurements of hippocampal interneurons. At least three distinct oscillatory patterns, associated with three distinct regions in the Na-K channel density plane, were found. A stability analysis showed that the different regions are characterized by saddle-node, double-orbit, and Hopf bifurcation threshold dynamics, respectively. Single strongly graded action potentials occur in an area outside the oscillatory regions, but less graded action potentials occur together with repetitive firing over a considerable range of channel densities. The presently found relationship between channel densities and oscillatory behavior may be relevance for understanding principal spiking patterns of cortical neurons (regular firing and fast spiking). It may also be of relevance for understanding the action of pharmacological compounds on brain oscillatory activity.

  4. Influence of particle flux density and temperature on surface modifications of tungsten and deuterium retention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buzi, L.; De Temmerman, G.; Unterberg, B.; M. Reinhart,; Litnovsky, A.; Philipps, V.; Van Oost, G.; Möller, S.

    2014-01-01

    Systematic study of deuterium irradiation effects on tungsten was done under ITER - relevant high particle flux density, scanning a broad surface temperature range. Polycrystalline ITER - like grade tungsten samples were exposed in linear plasma devices to two different ranges of deuterium ion flux

  5. [Rapid measurements of CO2 flux density and water use efficiency of crop community].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhilin; Sun, Xiaomin; Zhang, Renhua; Su, Hongbo; Tang, Xinzai

    2004-09-01

    In this paper, Eddy Correlation (EC) method was employed to measure the latent heat and CO2 flux density and to calculate Water Use Efficiency (WUE) of winter wheat community in Yucheng district, Shandong Province in 1997. The results showed that the CO2 flux density had an obvious diurnal change, with a maximum about 1.5 mg x s(-1) x m(-2), which appeared at about 9:00-10:00 am in general. The WUE of wheat community presented a fall trend from morning to afternoon, and the CO2 flux density and WUE also had an obvious seasonal change, being lower in the early and late growth stages, and higher in the middle growth stage. The ranges of daily mean CO2 flux density and WUE were 0.2-0.9 mg x s(-1) x m(-2) and 5-20 gCO2 x kg(-1) H2O, respectively.

  6. Fourier transform magnetic resonance current density imaging (FT-MRCDI) from one component of magnetic flux density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ider, Yusuf Ziya; Birgul, Ozlem; Oran, Omer Faruk; Arikan, Orhan; Hamamura, Mark J; Muftuler, L Tugan

    2010-06-01

    Fourier transform (FT)-based algorithms for magnetic resonance current density imaging (MRCDI) from one component of magnetic flux density have been developed for 2D and 3D problems. For 2D problems, where current is confined to the xy-plane and z-component of the magnetic flux density is measured also on the xy-plane inside the object, an iterative FT-MRCDI algorithm is developed by which both the current distribution inside the object and the z-component of the magnetic flux density on the xy-plane outside the object are reconstructed. The method is applied to simulated as well as actual data from phantoms. The effect of measurement error on the spatial resolution of the current density reconstruction is also investigated. For 3D objects an iterative FT-based algorithm is developed whereby the projected current is reconstructed on any slice using as data the Laplacian of the z-component of magnetic flux density measured for that slice. In an injected current MRCDI scenario, the current is not divergence free on the boundary of the object. The method developed in this study also handles this situation.

  7. The causal relation between turbulent particle flux and density gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milligen, B. Ph. van; Martín de Aguilera, A.; Hidalgo, C. [CIEMAT - Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión, Avda. Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Carreras, B. A. [BACV Solutions, 110 Mohawk Road, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); García, L.; Nicolau, J. H. [Universidad Carlos III, 28911 Leganés, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-07-15

    A technique for detecting the causal relationship between fluctuating signals is used to investigate the relation between flux and gradient in fusion plasmas. Both a resistive pressure gradient driven turbulence model and experimental Langmuir probe data from the TJ-II stellarator are studied. It is found that the maximum influence occurs at a finite time lag (non-instantaneous response) and that quasi-periodicities exist. Furthermore, the model results show very long range radial influences, extending over most of the investigated regions, possibly related to coupling effects associated with plasma self-organization. These results clearly show that transport in fusion plasmas is not local and instantaneous, as is sometimes assumed.

  8. Abnormal changes in the density of thermal neutron flux in biocenoses near the earth surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikova, N V; Smirnov, A N; Kolesnikov, M V; Semenov, D S; Frolov, V A; Lapshin, V B; Syroeshkin, A V

    2007-04-01

    We revealed an increase in the density of thermal neutron flux in forest biocenoses, which was not associated with astrogeophysical events. The maximum spike of this parameter in the biocenosis reached 10,000 n/(sec x m2). Diurnal pattern of the density of thermal neutron flux depended only on the type of biocenosis. The effects of biomodulation of corpuscular radiation for balneology are discussed.

  9. Measuring the Magnetic Flux Density in the CMS Steel Yoke

    CERN Document Server

    Klyukhin, V I; Ball, A; Curé, B; Gaddi, A; Gerwig, H; Hervé, A; Mulders, M; Loveless, R

    2012-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general purpose detector, designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Its distinctive features include a 4 T superconducting solenoid with 6-m-diameter by 12.5-m-length free bore, enclosed inside a 10000-ton return yoke made of construction steel. The return yoke consists of five dodecagonal three-layered barrel wheels and four end-cap disks at each end comprised of steel blocks up to 620 mm thick, which serve as the absorber plates of the muon detection system. Accurate characterization of the magnetic field everywhere in the CMS detector is required. To measure the field in and around the steel, a system of 22 flux-loops and 82 3-D Hall sensors is installed on the return yoke blocks. Fast discharges of the solenoid (190 s time-constant) made during the CMS magnet surface commissioning test at the solenoid central fields of 2.64, 3.16, 3.68 and 4.01 T were used to induce voltages in the flux-loops. The voltages are measured on-line a...

  10. Estimating the amount and distribution of radon flux density from the soil surface in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Weihai; Guo, Qiuju; Chen, Bo; Cheng, Guan

    2008-07-01

    Based on an idealized model, both the annual and the seasonal radon ((222)Rn) flux densities from the soil surface at 1099 sites in China were estimated by linking a database of soil (226)Ra content and a global ecosystems database. Digital maps of the (222)Rn flux density in China were constructed in a spatial resolution of 25 km x 25 km by interpolation among the estimated data. An area-weighted annual average (222)Rn flux density from the soil surface across China was estimated to be 29.7+/-9.4 mBq m(-2)s(-1). Both regional and seasonal variations in the (222)Rn flux densities are significant in China. Annual average flux densities in the southeastern and northwestern China are generally higher than those in other regions of China, because of high soil (226)Ra content in the southeastern area and high soil aridity in the northwestern one. The seasonal average flux density is generally higher in summer/spring than winter, since relatively higher soil temperature and lower soil water saturation in summer/spring than other seasons are common in China.

  11. Measuring the Magnetic Flux Density with Flux Loops and Hall Probes in the CMS Magnet Flux Return Yoke

    CERN Document Server

    Curé, B; Ball, A; Gaddi, A; Gerwig, H; Hervé, A; Klyukhin, V I; Loveless, R; Mulders, M

    2016-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general purpose detector, designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Its distinctive features include a 4 T superconducting solenoid with 6-m-diameter by 12.5-m-length free bore, enclosed inside a 10,000-ton return yoke made of construction steel. The flux return yoke consists of five dodecagonal three-layered barrel wheels and four end-cap disks at each end comprised of steel blocks up to 620 mm thick, which serve as the absorber plates of the muon detection system. To measure the field in and around the steel, a system of 22 flux loops and 82 3-D Hall sensors is installed on the return yoke blocks. A TOSCA 3-D model of the CMS magnet is developed to describe the magnetic field everywhere outside the tracking volume that was measured with the field-mapping machine. The voltages induced in the flux loops by the magnetic flux changing during the CMS magnet standard ramps down are measured with six 16-bit DAQ modules. The off-line inte...

  12. Measurement of the atmospheric muon flux with a 4 GeV threshold in the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, J. A.; Al Samarai, I.; Albert, A.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Assis Jesus, A. C.; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J.-J.; Auer, R.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bazzotti, M.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brown, A.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Camarena, F.; Capone, A.; Cârloganu, C.; Carminati, G.; Carr, J.; Castorina, E.; Cavasinni, V.; Cecchini, S.; Charvis, Ph.; Chiarusi, T.; Chon Sen, N.; Circella, M.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Cottini, N.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; de Bonis, G.; Decowski, M. P.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Escoffier, S.; Fehr, F.; Flaminio, V.; Fratini, K.; Fritsch, U.; Fuda, J.-L.; Gay, P.; Giacomelli, G.; Gómez-González, J. P.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hößl, J.; de Jong, M.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Kouchner, A.; Kretschmer, W.; Lahmann, R.; Lamare, P.; Lambard, G.; Larosa, G.; Laschinsky, H.; Lefèvre, D.; Lelaizant, G.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Lucarelli, F.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martinez-Mora, J. A.; Mazure, A.; Montaruli, T.; Morganti, M.; Moscoso, L.; Motz, H.; Naumann, C.; Neff, M.; Ostasch, R.; Palioselitis, G.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Payre, P.; Petrovic, J.; Piattelli, P.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Picq, C.; Pillet, R.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Racca, C.; Radu, A.; Reed, C.; Richardt, C.; Rujoiu, M.; Russo, V.; Salesa, F.; Sapienza, P.; Schoeck, F.; Schuller, J.-P.; Shanidze, R.; Simeone, F.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Tamburini, C.; Tasca, L.; Toscano, S.; Vallage, B.; van Elewyck, V.; Vecchi, M.; Vernin, P.; Wijnker, G.; de Wolf, E.; Yepes, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.

    2010-03-01

    A new method for the measurement of the muon flux in the deep-sea ANTARES neutrino telescope and its dependence on the depth is presented. The method is based on the observation of coincidence signals in adjacent storeys of the detector. This yields an energy threshold of about 4 GeV. The main sources of optical background are the decay of 40K and the bioluminescence in the sea water. The 40K background is used to calibrate the efficiency of the photo-multiplier tubes.

  13. Measurement of the atmospheric muon flux with a 4 GeV threshold in the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar, J A

    2009-01-01

    A new method for the measurement of the muon flux in the deep-sea ANTARES neutrino telescope and its dependence on the depth is presented. The method is based on the observation of coincidence signals in adjacent storeys of the detector. This yields an energy threshold of about 4 GeV. The main sources of optical background are the decay of 40K and the bioluminescence in the sea water. The 40K background is used to calibrate the efficiency of the photo-multiplier tubes.

  14. Maximum flux density of the gyrosynchrotron spectrum in a nonuniform source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai-Hua Zhou; Rong-Chuan Wang; Cheng-Wen Shao

    2009-01-01

    The maximum flux density of a gyrosynchrotron radiation spectrum in a mag- netic dip|oe model with self absorption and gyroresonance is calculated. Our calculations show that the maximum flux density of the gyrosynchrotron spectrum increases with in- creasing low-energy cutoff, number density, input depth of energetic electrons, magnetic field strength and viewing angle, and with decreasing energy spectral index of energetic electrons, number density and temperature of thermal electrons. It is found that there are linear correlations between the logarithms of the maximum flux density and the above eight parameters with correlation coefficients higher than 0.91 and fit accuracies better than 10%. The maximum flux density could be a good indicator of the changes of these source parameters. In addition, we find that there are very good positive linear correla- tions between the logarithms of the maximum flux density and peak frequency when the above former five parameters vary respectively. Their linear correlation coefficients are higher than 0.90 and the fit accuracies are better than 0.5%.

  15. Variations in the Galactic star formation rate and density thresholds for star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Longmore, S N; Testi, L; Purcell, C R; Walsh, A J; Bressert, E; Pestalozzi, M; Molinari, S; Ott, J; Cortese, L; Battersby, C; Murray, N; Lee, E; Kruijssen, D

    2012-01-01

    The conversion of gas into stars is a fundamental process in astrophysics and cosmology. Stars are known to form from the gravitational collapse of dense clumps in interstellar molecular clouds, and it has been proposed that the resulting star formation rate is proportional to either the amount of mass above a threshold gas surface density, or the gas volume density. These star-formation prescriptions appear to hold in nearby molecular clouds in our Milky Way Galaxy's disk as well as in distant galaxies where the star formation rates are often much larger. The inner 500 pc of our Galaxy, the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ), contains the largest concentration of dense, high-surface density molecular gas in the Milky Way, providing an environment where the validity of star-formation prescriptions can be tested. Here we show that by several measures, the current star formation rate in the CMZ is an order-of-magnitude lower than the rates predicted by the currently accepted prescriptions. In particular, the region 1...

  16. Saltation-threshold model can explain aeolian features on low-air-density planetary bodies

    CERN Document Server

    Pähtz, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the minimal fluid speeds at which sediment transport can be sustained is crucial for understanding whether underwater landscapes exposed to water streams and wind-blown loose planetary surfaces can be altered. It also tells us whether surface features, such as ripples and dunes, can evolve. Here, guided by state-of-the-art numerical simulations, we propose an analytical model predicting the minimal fluid speeds required to sustain sediment transport in a Newtonian fluid. The model results are consistent with measurements and estimates of the transport threshold in water and Earth's and Mars' atmospheres. Furthermore, it predicts reasonable wind speeds to sustain aeolian sediment transport ("saltation") on the low-air-density planetary bodies Triton, Pluto, and 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (comet). This offers an explanation for possible aeolian surface features photographed on these bodies during space missions.

  17. Flux quantum tunneling effect and its influence on the experimental critical current density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闻海虎; 赵忠贤; GriessenR.

    1995-01-01

    By using magnetic sweeping method, the temperature and magnetic field dependencies of the experimental current density and the normalized relaxation rate have been obtained. The true critical current density corresponding to the zero activation energy has been carried out based on the collective-pinning and the thermally-activated flux motion models, and therefore the influences of the quantum tunneling effect and the thermal activation effect on the experimental critical current density are distinguished. It is found that, with temperature lower than 10 K, the relaxation rate will not drop to zero when T approaches zero K because of the occurrence of the flux quantum tunneling. This additional flux motion further reduces the experimental critical current density j making it saturated with lowering temperature.

  18. 3-D density imaging with muon flux measurements from underground galleries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesparre, N.; Cabrera, J.; Marteau, J.

    2017-03-01

    Atmospheric muon flux measurements provide information on subsurface density distribution. In this study, muon flux was measured underground, in the Tournemire experimental platform (France). The objective was to image the medium between the galleries and the surface and evaluate the feasibility to detect the presence of discontinuities, for example, produced by secondary subvertical faults or by karstic networks. Measurements were performed from three different sites with a partial overlap of muon trajectories, offering the possibility to seek density variations at different depths. The conversion of the measured muon flux to average density values showed global variations further analysed through a 3-D nonlinear inversion procedure. Main results are the presence of a very low density region at the level of the upper aquifer, compatible with the presence of a karstic network hosting local cavities, and the absence of secondary faults. We discuss the validity of the present results and propose different strategies to improve the accuracy of such measurements and analysis.

  19. Testing Shelter Index and a Simple Wind Speed Parameter to Characterize Vegetation Control of Sand Transport Threshold and Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, John; Nield, Joanna; Nickling, William; Furtak-Cole, Eden

    2013-04-01

    Wind erosion and dust emissions occur in the Chihuahuan Desert surrounding Las Cruces NM from a range of surfaces with different types and amounts of vegetation. Understanding how vegetation modulates these processes remains a research challenge. One important aspect of research is to develop a relationship between a descriptor of the surface roughness that can be used to provide an indication of how susceptible the sediment transport system is to activation by wind. Here we present results from a study that examines the relationship between an index of shelter (distance from a point to the nearest upwind vegetation/vegetation height), as originally proposed by Okin (2008), and particle threshold expressed as a ratio of wind measured at 0.45 times the plant height divided by the wind speed at 17 m, and saltation flux (g cm-2 s-1). Saltation flux was measured using sediment traps positioned 15 cm above the surface and nearby optical gate sensors (Wenglor® model YH03PCT8)measuring saltation activity also placed at a height of 15 cm. The results are used to evaluate shelter index as a parameter to characterize the local winds as influenced by the vegetation and sediment transport conditions (threshold and transport). Wind speed, wind direction, saltation activity and point saltation flux were measured at 35 locations in defined test areas (~13,000 m2) in three vegetation communities: mature mesquite covered nebkha dunes, incipient nebkha dunes dominated by low mesquite plants, and a mature creosote bush area. Measurement positions represent the most open areas, and hence those places most susceptible to wind erosion among the vegetation elements. Shelter index was calculated for each measurement position for each approximately 10 degree wind direction bin using digital elevation models for each site acquired using terrestrial laser scanning.

  20. Analysis of recoverable current from one component of magnetic flux density in MREIT and MRCDI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chunjae; Lee, Byung Il; Kwon, Oh In

    2007-06-01

    Magnetic resonance current density imaging (MRCDI) provides a current density image by measuring the induced magnetic flux density within the subject with a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) has been focused on extracting some useful information of the current density and conductivity distribution in the subject Omega using measured B(z), one component of the magnetic flux density B. In this paper, we analyze the map Tau from current density vector field J to one component of magnetic flux density B(z) without any assumption on the conductivity. The map Tau provides an orthogonal decomposition J = J(P) + J(N) of the current J where J(N) belongs to the null space of the map Tau. We explicitly describe the projected current density J(P) from measured B(z). Based on the decomposition, we prove that B(z) data due to one injection current guarantee a unique determination of the isotropic conductivity under assumptions that the current is two-dimensional and the conductivity value on the surface is known. For a two-dimensional dominating current case, the projected current density J(P) provides a good approximation of the true current J without accumulating noise effects. Numerical simulations show that J(P) from measured B(z) is quite similar to the target J. Biological tissue phantom experiments compare J(P) with the reconstructed J via the reconstructed isotropic conductivity using the harmonic B(z) algorithm.

  1. Multiple-capillary measurement of RBC speed, flux, and density with optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonghwan; Wu, Weicheng; Lesage, Frederic; Boas, David A

    2013-11-01

    As capillaries exhibit heterogeneous and fluctuating dynamics even during baseline, a technique measuring red blood cell (RBC) speed and flux over many capillaries at the same time is needed. Here, we report that optical coherence tomography can capture individual RBC passage simultaneously over many capillaries located at different depths. Further, we demonstrate the ability to quantify RBC speed, flux, and linear density. This technique will provide a means to monitor microvascular flow dynamics over many capillaries at different depths at the same time.

  2. Diurnal and seasonal variability in radial distribution of sap flux density: Implications for estimating stand transpiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiora, Alessandro; Cescatti, Alessandro

    2006-09-01

    Daily and seasonal patterns in radial distribution of sap flux density were monitored in six trees differing in social position in a mixed coniferous stand dominated by silver fir (Abies alba Miller) and Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst) in the Alps of northeastern Italy. Radial distribution of sap flux was measured with arrays of 1-cm-long Granier probes. The radial profiles were either Gaussian or decreased monotonically toward the tree center, and seemed to be related to social position and crown distribution of the trees. The ratio between sap flux estimated with the most external sensor and the mean flux, weighted with the corresponding annulus areas, was used as a correction factor (CF) to express diurnal and seasonal radial variation in sap flow. During sunny days, the diurnal radial profile of sap flux changed with time and accumulated photosynthetic active radiation (PAR), with an increasing contribution of sap flux in the inner sapwood during the day. Seasonally, the contribution of sap flux in the inner xylem increased with daily cumulative PAR and the variation of CF was proportional to the tree diameter, ranging from 29% for suppressed trees up to 300% for dominant trees. Two models were developed, relating CF with PAR and tree diameter at breast height (DBH), to correct daily and seasonal estimates of whole-tree and stand sap flow obtained by assuming uniform sap flux density over the sapwood. If the variability in the radial profile of sap flux density was not accounted for, total stand transpiration would be overestimated by 32% during sunny days and 40% for the entire season.

  3. Magnetic flux density reconstruction using interleaved partial Fourier acquisitions in MREIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hee Myung; Nam, Hyun Soo; Kwon, Oh In

    2011-04-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) has been introduced as a non-invasive modality to visualize the internal conductivity and/or current density of an electrically conductive object by the injection of current. In order to measure a magnetic flux density signal in MREIT, the phase difference approach in an interleaved encoding scheme cancels the systematic artifacts accumulated in phase signals and also reduces the random noise effect. However, it is important to reduce scan duration maintaining spatial resolution and sufficient contrast, in order to allow for practical in vivo implementation of MREIT. The purpose of this paper is to develop a coupled partial Fourier strategy in the interleaved sampling in order to reduce the total imaging time for an MREIT acquisition, whilst maintaining an SNR of the measured magnetic flux density comparable to what is achieved with complete k-space data. The proposed method uses two key steps: one is to update the magnetic flux density by updating the complex densities using the partially interleaved k-space data and the other is to fill in the missing k-space data iteratively using the updated background field inhomogeneity and magnetic flux density data. Results from numerical simulations and animal experiments demonstrate that the proposed method reduces considerably the scanning time and provides resolution of the recovered B(z) comparable to what is obtained from complete k-space data.

  4. Research and Evaluation of the Energy Flux Density of the Mobile Phone Electromagnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranas Baltrėnas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses variations in the energy flux density of the electromagnetic field of 10 mobile phones depending on distance. The studies have been conducted using three modes: sending a text message, receiving a text message and connecting a mobile phone to the Internet. When text messages are received or sent from a mobile phone, the values of the energy flux density of the mobile phone electromagnetic field exceed the safe allowable limit and make 10 μW / cm². A distance of 10, 20 and 30 cm from a mobile phone is effective protection against the energy flux density of the electromagnetic field when writing texts, receiving messages or connecting to the mobile Internet.Article in Lithuanian

  5. Effect of the Heat Flux Density on the Evaporation Rate of a Distilled Water Drop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponomarev Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the experimental dependence of the evaporation rate of a nondeaerated distilled water drop from the heat flux density on the surfaces of non-ferrous metals (copper and brass. A drop was placed on a heated substrate by electronic dosing device. To obtain drop profile we use a shadow optical system; drop symmetry was controlled by a high-speed video camera. It was found that the evaporation rate of a drop on a copper substrate is greater than on a brass. The evaporation rate increases intensively with raising volume of a drop. Calculated values of the heat flux density and the corresponding evaporation rates are presented in this work. The evaporation rate is found to increase intensively on the brass substrate with raising the heat flux density.

  6. The Infrared and Radio Flux Densities of Galactic H ii regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makai, Z.; Anderson, L. D.; Mascoop, J. L.; Johnstone, B.

    2017-09-01

    We derive infrared and radio flux densities of all ∼1000 known Galactic H ii regions in the Galactic longitude range 17\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 5population is uncertain. Compared to a sample of IR color indices from star-forming galaxies, H ii regions show higher {{log}}10({F}70μ {{m}}/{F}12μ {{m}}) ratios. We find a weak trend of decreasing infrared to ∼20 cm flux density ratios with increasing R gal, in agreement with previous extragalactic results, possibly indicating a decreased dust abundance in the outer Galaxy.

  7. Adiabatic electronic flux density: a Born-Oppenheimer Broken Symmetry ansatz

    CERN Document Server

    Pohl, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    The Born-Oppenheimer approximation leads to the counterintuitive result of a vanishing electronic flux density upon vibrational dynamics in the electronic ground state. To circumvent this long known issue, we propose using pairwise anti-symmetrically translated vibronic densities to generate a symmetric electronic density that can be forced to satisfy the continuity equation approximately. The so-called Born-Oppenheimer broken symmetry ansatz yields all components of the flux density simultaneously while requiring only knowledge about the nuclear quantum dynamics on the electronic adiabatic ground state potential energy surface. The underlying minimization procedure is transparent and computationally inexpensive, and the solution can be computed from the standard output of any quantum chemistry program. Taylor series expansion reveals that the implicit electron dynamics originates from non-adiabatic coupling to the explicit Born-Oppenheimer nuclear dynamics. The new approach is applied to the ${\\rm H}_2^+$ mo...

  8. Validity of bone mineral density and WHO fracture risk assessment thresholds in hip fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahla, Ahmad

    2011-09-01

    Hip fractures are common and serious consequence of osteoporosis. Bone mineral density (BMD) measurement and the World Health Organization (WHO) fracture risk assessment tool are considered to predict the hip osteoporotic fractures. In this study, their sensitivities in hip fracture cases are evaluated. BMD and WHO probability of fracture risk were determined in 71 hip fractures ≥ 50 years of old. Totally, 65% of patients had ≤-2.5 BMD T score. 81% of patients had above the upper interventional threshold of WHO fracture risk probability model. Sensitivities were low in 50-59 year age group with progression in older age groups. Results of BMD T score and fracture risk probabilities were not significant between men and women. There were 23% and 49% sensitivities of less than or equal to -2.5 T score in the 50-59 and 60-69 year age groups with a 31% sensitivity of greater than 3% probability of hip fracture risk in the 50-59 year age group, both of which were not valid for predicting hip fracture risk.

  9. Using skin temperature gradients or skin heat flux measurements to determine thresholds of vasoconstriction and vasodilatation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, James R; Tipton, Michael J

    2002-11-01

    Forearm-fingertip skin temperature differentials (T(sk-diff)) are used to indicate vasomotor tone, vasoconstriction defined as having occurred when T(sk-diff)> or =4 degrees C (Sessler et al. 1987, 1988a, b). This study was conducted to determine whether T(sk-diff) or finger pad heat flux (HF) can be used to predict when vasoconstriction and vasodilatation occur. Seven subjects (one female) sat in water at [mean (SD)] 40.7 (0.8) degrees C until their core temperature (T(c)) increased by 1 degrees C, ensuring vasodilatation. The water was then cooled [at a rate of 0.6 (0.1) degrees C x min(-1)] until T(c) fell to 0.5 degrees C below pretesting values, causing vasoconstriction. Subjects were then rewarmed in water [41.2 (1.0) degrees C]. Skin blood flow (SkBF) was measured using laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) on the left second finger pad [immersed in water at 10.4 (1.4) degrees C as part of another experiment], and infrared plethysmography on the third finger pad of both hands. T(sk-diff) and HF were measured on the right upper limb, which remained in air. When vasodilated, the subjects had a stable T(sk-diff) and HF. During cooling, rapid-onset vasoconstriction occurred coincidental with large gradient changes in HF and T(sk-diff) (inflection points). In two subjects the original vasoconstriction definition (T(sk-diff)> or =4 degrees C) was not attained, in the other five this was achieved 31-51 min after vasoconstriction. During rewarming, the T(sk-diff) and HF inflection points less accurately reflected the onset of vasodilatation, although with one exception they were within 5 min of the LDF changes. We conclude that T(sk-diff) and HF inflection points predict vasoconstriction accurately, and better than T(sk-diff)> or =4 degrees C.

  10. Behaviour of carbon dioxide and water vapour flux densities from a disturbed raised peat bog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieveen, J.P.; Jacobs, A.F.G.

    2002-01-01

    Measurements of carbon dioxide and water vapour flux densities were carried out for a disturbed raised peat bog in the north of the Netherlands during an 18 month continuous experiment. Tussock grass (sp. Molinea caerulae) mainly dominated the vegetation of the bog area. The maximum leaf area index

  11. Measurement of induced magnetic flux density using injection current nonlinear encoding (ICNE) in MREIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chunjae; Lee, Byung Il; Kwon, Ohin; Woo, Eung Je

    2007-02-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) measures induced magnetic flux densities subject to externally injected currents in order to visualize conductivity distributions inside an electrically conducting object. Injection currents induce magnetic flux densities that appear in phase parts of acquired MR image data. In the conventional current injection method, we inject currents during the time segment between the end of the first RF pulse and the beginning of the reading gradient in order to ensure the gradient linearity. Noting that longer current injections can accumulate more phase changes, we propose a new pulse sequence called injection current nonlinear encoding (ICNE) where the duration of the injection current pulse is extended until the end of the reading gradient. Since the current injection during the reading gradient disturbs the gradient linearity, we first analyze the MR signal produced by the ICNE pulse sequence and suggest a novel algorithm to extract the induced magnetic flux density from the acquired MR signal. Numerical simulations and phantom experiments show that the new method is clearly advantageous in terms of the reduced noise level in measured magnetic flux density data. The amount of noise reduction depends on the choice of the data acquisition time and it was about 24% when we used a prolonged data acquisition time of 10.8 ms. The ICNE method will enhance the clinical applicability of the MREIT technique when it is combined with an appropriate phase artefact minimization method.

  12. Estimation of electrical conductivity distribution within the human head from magnetic flux density measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Nuo; Zhu, S A; He, Bin

    2005-06-01

    We have developed a new algorithm for magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT), which uses only one component of the magnetic flux density to reconstruct the electrical conductivity distribution within the body. The radial basis function (RBF) network and simplex method are used in the present approach to estimate the conductivity distribution by minimizing the errors between the 'measured' and model-predicted magnetic flux densities. Computer simulations were conducted in a realistic-geometry head model to test the feasibility of the proposed approach. Single-variable and three-variable simulations were performed to estimate the brain-skull conductivity ratio and the conductivity values of the brain, skull and scalp layers. When SNR = 15 for magnetic flux density measurements with the target skull-to-brain conductivity ratio being 1/15, the relative error (RE) between the target and estimated conductivity was 0.0737 +/- 0.0746 in the single-variable simulations. In the three-variable simulations, the RE was 0.1676 +/- 0.0317. Effects of electrode position uncertainty were also assessed by computer simulations. The present promising results suggest the feasibility of estimating important conductivity values within the head from noninvasive magnetic flux density measurements.

  13. Vertical foliage distribution determines the radial pattern of sap flux density in Picea abies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiora, Alessandro; Cescatti, Alessandro

    2008-09-01

    Understanding the causes determining the radial pattern of sap flux density is important both for improving knowledge of sapwood functioning and for up-scaling sap flow measurements to canopy transpiration and ecosystem water use. To investigate the anatomical connection between whorls and annual sapwood rings, pruning-induced variation in the radial pattern of sap flux density was monitored with Granier probes in a 35-year-old Picea abies (L.) Karst tree that was pruned from the crown bottom up. Modifications in the radial pattern of sap flux density were quantified by a shape index (SI), which varies with the relative contribution of the outer and inner sapwood to tree transpiration. The SI progressively diminished during bottom up pruning, indicating a significant reduction in sap flow contribution of the inner sapwood. Results suggest that the radial pattern of sap flux density depends mainly on the vertical distribution of foliage in the crown, with lower shaded branches hydraulically connected with inner sapwood and upper branches connected with the outer rings.

  14. Dynamics of photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) and estimates in coastal northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    The seasonal trends and diurnal patterns of Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR) were investigated in the San Francisco Bay Area of Northern California from March through August in 2007 and 2008. During these periods, the daily values of PAR flux density (PFD), energy loading with PAR (PARE), a...

  15. Unusual increase in the 325 MHz flux density of PSR B0655+64

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galama, TJ; deBruyn, AG; vanParadijs, J; Hanlon, L; Bennett, K

    1997-01-01

    We report on the detection of a large amplification of the flux density of PSR B0655+64 at 325 MHz (a factor of similar to 43) that lasted about one hour. To the best of our knowledge such a large amplification has not been reported before. The phenomenon is restricted to a very narrow bandwidth (50

  16. Measurements of solar flux density distribution on a plane receiver due to a flat heliostat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsayed, M.M.; Fathalah, K.A.; Al-Rabghi, O.M. [King Abdulaziz Univ., Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)

    1995-06-01

    An experimental facility is designed and manufactured to measure the solar flux density distribution on a central flat receiver due to a single flat heliostat. The tracking mechanism of the heliostat is controlled by two stepping motors, one for tilt angle control and the other for azimuth angle control. A x-y traversing mechanism is also designed and mounted on a vertical central receiver plane, where the solar flux density is to be measured. A miniature solar sensor is mounted on the platform of the traversing mechanism, where it is used to measure the solar flux density distribution on the receiver surface. The sensor is connected to a data acquisition card in a host computer. The two stepping motors of the heliostat tracking mechanism and the two stepping motors of the traversing mechanism are all connected to a controller card in the same host computer. A software `TOWER` is prepared to let the heliostat track the sun, move the platform of the traversing mechanism to the points of a preselected grid, and to measure the solar flux density distribution on the receiver plane. Measurements are carried out using rectangular flat mirrors of different dimensions at several distances from the central receiver. Two types of images were identified on the receiver plane - namely, apparent (or visible) and mirror-reflected radiation images. Comparison between measurements and a mathematical model validates the mathematical model. 13 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Modification of SOL profiles and fluctuations with line-average density and divertor flux expansion in TCV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vianello, N.; Tsui, C.; Theiler, C.

    2017-01-01

    that this modification does not influence neither the detachment density threshold, nor the development of a flat SOL density profile which instead depends strongly on the increase of the core line average density. The modification of the SOL upstream profile, with the appearance of what is generally called a density...

  18. Optimal cytoplasmatic density and flux balance model under macromolecular crowding effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Alexei

    2010-05-21

    Macromolecules occupy between 34% and 44% of the cell cytoplasm, about half the maximum packing density of spheres in three dimension. Yet, there is no clear understanding of what is special about this value. To address this fundamental question we investigate the effect of macromolecular crowding on cell metabolism. We develop a cell scale flux balance model capturing the main features of cell metabolism at different nutrient uptakes and macromolecular densities. Using this model we show there are two metabolic regimes at low and high nutrient uptakes. The latter regime is characterized by an optimal cytoplasmatic density where the increase of reaction rates by confinement and the decrease by diffusion slow-down balance. More important, the predicted optimal density is in the range of the experimentally determined density of Escherichia coli.

  19. Development of an Axial Flux MEMS BLDC Micromotor with Increased Efficiency and Power Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Ding

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a rigorous design and optimization of an axial flux microelectromechanical systems (MEMS brushless dc (BLDC micromotor with dual rotor improving both efficiency and power density with an external diameter of only around 10 mm. The stator is made of two layers of windings by MEMS technology. The rotor is developed by film permanent magnets assembled over the rotor yoke. The characteristics of the MEMS micromotor are analyzed and modeled through a 3-D magnetic equivalent circuit (MEC taking the leakage flux and fringing effect into account. Such a model yields a relatively accurate prediction of the flux in the air gap, back electromotive force (EMF and electromagnetic torque, whilst being computationally efficient. Based on 3-D MEC model the multi-objective firefly algorithm (MOFA is developed for the optimal design of this special machine. Both 3-D finite element (FE simulation and experiments are employed to validate the MEC model and MOFA optimization design.

  20. PERFORMANCE OPTIMIZATION OF LINEAR INDUCTION MOTOR BY EDDY CURRENT AND FLUX DENSITY DISTRIBUTION ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. MANNA

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of electromagnetic devices as machines, transformers, heating devices confronts the engineers with several problems. For the design of an optimized geometry and the prediction of the operational behaviour an accurate knowledge of the dependencies of the field quantities inside the magnetic circuits is necessary. This paper provides the eddy current and core flux density distribution analysis in linear induction motor. Magnetic flux in the air gap of the Linear Induction Motor (LIM is reduced to various losses such as end effects, fringes, effect, skin effects etc. The finite element based software package COMSOL Multiphysics Inc. USA is used to get the reliable and accurate computational results for optimization the performance of Linear Induction Motor (LIM. The geometrical characteristics of LIM are varied to find the optimal point of thrust and minimum flux leakage during static and dynamic conditions.

  1. Effects of LiDAR point density, sampling size and height threshold on estimation accuracy of crop biophysical parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shezhou; Chen, Jing M; Wang, Cheng; Xi, Xiaohuan; Zeng, Hongcheng; Peng, Dailiang; Li, Dong

    2016-05-30

    Vegetation leaf area index (LAI), height, and aboveground biomass are key biophysical parameters. Corn is an important and globally distributed crop, and reliable estimations of these parameters are essential for corn yield forecasting, health monitoring and ecosystem modeling. Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) is considered an effective technology for estimating vegetation biophysical parameters. However, the estimation accuracies of these parameters are affected by multiple factors. In this study, we first estimated corn LAI, height and biomass (R2 = 0.80, 0.874 and 0.838, respectively) using the original LiDAR data (7.32 points/m2), and the results showed that LiDAR data could accurately estimate these biophysical parameters. Second, comprehensive research was conducted on the effects of LiDAR point density, sampling size and height threshold on the estimation accuracy of LAI, height and biomass. Our findings indicated that LiDAR point density had an important effect on the estimation accuracy for vegetation biophysical parameters, however, high point density did not always produce highly accurate estimates, and reduced point density could deliver reasonable estimation results. Furthermore, the results showed that sampling size and height threshold were additional key factors that affect the estimation accuracy of biophysical parameters. Therefore, the optimal sampling size and the height threshold should be determined to improve the estimation accuracy of biophysical parameters. Our results also implied that a higher LiDAR point density, larger sampling size and height threshold were required to obtain accurate corn LAI estimation when compared with height and biomass estimations. In general, our results provide valuable guidance for LiDAR data acquisition and estimation of vegetation biophysical parameters using LiDAR data.

  2. Double-cavity radiometer for high-flux density solar radiation measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parretta, A; Antonini, A; Armani, M; Nenna, G; Flaminio, G; Pellegrino, M

    2007-04-20

    A radiometric method has been developed, suitable for both total power and flux density profile measurement of concentrated solar radiation. The high-flux density radiation is collected by a first optical cavity, integrated, and driven to a second optical cavity, where, attenuated, it is measured by a conventional radiometer operating under a stationary irradiation regime. The attenuation factor is regulated by properly selecting the aperture areas in the two cavities. The radiometer has been calibrated by a pulsed solar simulator at concentration levels of hundreds of suns. An optical model and a ray-tracing study have also been developed and validated, by which the potentialities of the radiometer have been largely explored.

  3. An Accurate Flux Density Scale from 50 MHz to 50 GHz

    CERN Document Server

    Perley, R A

    2016-01-01

    The flux density scale of Perley and Butler (2013) is extended downwards to ~50 MHz by utilizing recent observations with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) of 20 sources between 220 MHz and 48.1 GHz, and legacy VLA observations at 73.8 MHz. The derived spectral flux densities are placed on an absolute scale by utilizing the Baars et al. (1977) values of Cygnus A (3C405) for frequencies below 2 GHz, and the Mars-based polynomials for 3C286, 3C295, and 3C196 from Perley and Butler (2013) above 2 GHz. Polynomial expressions are presented for all 20 sources, with accuracy limited by the primary standards to 3 -- 5% over the entire frequency range. Corrections to the scales proposed by Perley and Butler (2013) and by Scaife and Heald (2012) are given.

  4. Correlation between the Flux Density and Polarization for Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fei-Peng Pi; Yong-Xiang Wang; Jing Pan

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, using the preliminary database of the University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory (UMRAO) at the radio frequencies, we calculated the weighted polarization at 8 GHz and investigated the correlation between the polarization and the flux density for 92 flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs). We found that the two observations are closely and positively correlated for FSRQs. This is perhaps from a relativistic beaming effect.

  5. Energy Flux and Density of Nonuniform Electromagnetic Waves with Total Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, N. S.

    2014-07-01

    Analytic expressions are obtained for the energy flux and density of refracted nonuniform waves produced during total reflection at the boundary between two isotropic media for the general case of elliptically polarized incident light. The average values are determined as functions of the parameters of the adjoining media and the angle of incidence. The cases of linearly and circularly polarized incident waves are examined in detail. An explicit general expression relating the energy fl ux and density of these waves for arbitrarily polarized incident light is obtained.

  6. A LOFAR census of non-recycled pulsars: average profiles, dispersion measures, flux densities, and spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Bilous, A; Kramer, M; Keane, E; Hessels, J; Stappers, B; Malofeev, V; Sobey, C; Breton, R; Cooper, S; Falcke, H; Karastergiou, A; Michilli, D; Osłowski, S; Sanidas, S; ter Veen, S; van Leeuwen, J; Verbiest, J; Weltevrede, P; Zarka, P; Grießmeier, J -M; Serylak, M; Bell, M; Broderick, J; Eislöffel, J; Markoff, S; Rowlinson, A

    2015-01-01

    We present first results from a LOFAR census of non-recycled pulsars. The census includes almost all such pulsars known (194 sources) at declinations Dec$> 8^\\circ$ and Galactic latitudes |Gb|$> 3^\\circ$, regardless of their expected flux densities and scattering times. Each pulsar was observed contiguously in the frequency range from 110$-$188 MHz and for $\\geq 20$ minutes, recording full-Stokes data. We present the dispersion measures, flux densities, and calibrated total intensity profiles for the 158 pulsars detected in the sample. The median uncertainty in census dispersion measures ($1.5 \\times 10^{-4}$ pc cm$^{-3}$) is ten times smaller, on average, than in the ATNF pulsar catalogue. We combined census flux densities with those in the literature and fitted the resulting broadband spectra with single or broken power-law functions. For 48 census pulsars such fits are being published for the first time. Typically, the choice between single and broken power-laws, as well as the location of the spectral bre...

  7. Uncertainty and Sensitivity of Alternative Rn-222 Flux Density Models Used in Performance Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greg J. Shott, Vefa Yucel, Lloyd Desotell

    2007-06-01

    Performance assessments for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site on the Nevada Test Site have used three different mathematical models to estimate Rn-222 flux density. This study describes the performance, uncertainty, and sensitivity of the three models which include the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 3.64 analytical method and two numerical methods. The uncertainty of each model was determined by Monte Carlo simulation using Latin hypercube sampling. The global sensitivity was investigated using Morris one-at-time screening method, sample-based correlation and regression methods, the variance-based extended Fourier amplitude sensitivity test, and Sobol's sensitivity indices. The models were found to produce similar estimates of the mean and median flux density, but to have different uncertainties and sensitivities. When the Rn-222 effective diffusion coefficient was estimated using five different published predictive models, the radon flux density models were found to be most sensitive to the effective diffusion coefficient model selected, the emanation coefficient, and the radionuclide inventory. Using a site-specific measured effective diffusion coefficient significantly reduced the output uncertainty. When a site-specific effective-diffusion coefficient was used, the models were most sensitive to the emanation coefficient and the radionuclide inventory.

  8. On the Spectral Index-Flux Density Relation for Large Samples of Radio Sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Zhen Zhang; W. Reich; P. Reich; R. Wielebinski

    2003-01-01

    We present new statistical results on the spectral index-flux densityrelation for large samples of radio sources using archival data of the most sensitivesurveys, such as 6C, Miyun, WENSS, B3, NVSS, GB87. Instrumental selectioneffects and the completeness of the catalogs are discussed. Based on the spec-tral indices calculated for about 200 000 sources from the WENSS (327 MHz) andNVSS (1.4 GHz) catalogs, we obtained (1) The median spectral index increases fromαmed ~ -0.9 to αmed ~ -0.8 (Sν∝να), while S327 flux densities decrease from0.1 Jy down to 25 mJy. The median spectral indices nearly show no variation withinthe error bars when the flux density is larger than 0.1 Jy. (2) A dependence of thefraction of ultra-steep spectrum sources (USS, -1.5 ≤α<-1.0), steep spectrumsources (SSS, -1.0 ≤α< -0.5) and flat spectrum sources (FSS, -0.5 ≤α≤ 0.0) ispartly responsible for the spectral flattening. Another contribution to the spectralflattening comes from the variation of αmed of steep spectrum sources (α<-0.5)themselves which increases with decreasing flux densities. (3) The spectral flatteningfor faint sources (down to S327 ~ 20 mJy) with steep spectra (α<-0.5) suggeststhat αmed is correlated with luminosity rather than redshift according to the Con-don' model. (4) A strong spectral selection effect occurs when spectral indices arecalculated from samples with a large frequency separation.

  9. Impact of a hollow density profile on turbulent particle fluxes: Gyrokinetic and fluid simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegnered, D.; Oberparleiter, M.; Strand, P.; Nordman, H.

    2017-07-01

    Hollow density profiles may occur in connection with pellet fuelling and L to H transitions. A positive density gradient could potentially stabilize the turbulence or change the relation between convective and diffusive fluxes, thereby reducing the turbulent transport of particles towards the center, making the pellet fuelling scheme inefficient. In the present work, the particle transport driven by Ion Temperature Gradient/Trapped Electron (ITG/TE) mode turbulence in hollow density profiles is studied by fluid as well as gyrokinetic simulations. The fluid model used, an extended version of the Weiland transport model, Extended Drift Wave Model (EDWM), incorporates an arbitrary number of ion species in a multi-fluid description and an extended wavelength spectrum. The fluid model, which is fast and hence suitable for use in predictive simulations, is compared to gyrokinetic simulations using the code GENE. Typical tokamak parameters are used based on the Cyclone Base Case. Parameter scans in key plasma parameters like plasma β, R/LT, and magnetic shear are investigated. In addition, the effects of a fast species are studied and global ITG simulations in a simplified physics description are performed in order to investigate nonlocal effects. It is found that β in particular, has a stabilizing effect in the negative R/Ln region. Both nonlinear GENE and EDWM simulations show a decrease in inward flux for negative R/Ln and a change in the direction from inward to outward for positive R/Ln. Moreover, the addition of fast particles was shown to decrease the inward main ion particle flux in the positive gradient region further. This might have serious consequences for pellet fuelling of high β plasmas. Additionally, the heat flux in global ITG turbulence simulations indicates that nonlocal effects can play a different role from usual in connection with pellet fuelling.

  10. Coupled-channels quantum theory of electronic flux density in electronically adiabatic processes: fundamentals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diestler, D J

    2012-03-22

    The Born-Oppenheimer (BO) description of electronically adiabatic molecular processes predicts a vanishing electronic flux density (j(e)), =1/2∫dR[Δ(b) (x;R) - Δ(a) (x;R)] even though the electrons certainly move in response to the movement of the nuclei. This article, the first of a pair, proposes a quantum-mechanical "coupled-channels" (CC) theory that allows the approximate extraction of j(e) from the electronically adiabatic BO wave function . The CC theory is detailed for H(2)(+), in which case j(e) can be resolved into components associated with two channels α (=a,b), each of which corresponds to the "collision" of an "internal" atom α (proton a or b plus electron) with the other nucleus β (proton b or a). The dynamical role of the electron, which accommodates itself instantaneously to the motion of the nuclei, is submerged in effective electronic probability (population) densities, Δ(α), associated with each channel (α). The Δ(α) densities are determined by the (time-independent) BO electronic energy eigenfunction, which depends parametrically on the configuration of the nuclei, the motion of which is governed by the usual BO nuclear Schrödinger equation. Intuitively appealing formal expressions for the electronic flux density are derived for H(2)(+).

  11. Ionisation in turbulent magnetic molecular clouds. I. Effect on density and mass-to-flux ratio structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Nicole D.; Basu, Shantanu; Caselli, Paola

    2017-05-01

    Context. Previous studies show that the physical structures and kinematics of a region depend significantly on the ionisation fraction. These studies have only considered these effects in non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations with microturbulence. The next logical step is to explore the effects of turbulence on ionised magnetic molecular clouds and then compare model predictions with observations to assess the importance of turbulence in the dynamical evolution of molecular clouds. Aims: In this paper, we extend our previous studies of the effect of ionisation fractions on star formation to clouds that include both non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics and turbulence. We aim to quantify the importance of a treatment of the ionisation fraction in turbulent magnetised media and investigate the effect of the turbulence on shaping the clouds and filaments before star formation sets in. In particular, here we investigate how the structure, mass and width of filamentary structures depend on the amount of turbulence in ionised media and the initial mass-to-flux ratio. Methods: To determine the effects of turbulence and mass-to-flux ratio on the evolution of non-ideal magnetised clouds with varying ionisation profiles, we have run two sets of simulations. The first set assumes different initial turbulent Mach values for a fixed initial mass-to-flux ratio. The second set assumes different initial mass-to-flux ratio values for a fixed initial turbulent Mach number. Both sets explore the effect of using one of two ionisation profiles: step-like (SL) or cosmic ray only (CR-only). We compare the resulting density and mass-to-flux ratio structures both qualitatively and quantitatively via filament and core masses and filament fitting techniques (Gaussian and Plummer profiles). Results: We find that even with almost no turbulence, filamentary structure still exists although at lower density contours. Comparison of simulations shows that for turbulent Mach numbers above 2, there is

  12. Emergence flux declines disproportionately to larval density along a stream metals gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Travis S; Kraus, Johanna M; Walters, David M; Wanty, Richard B

    2013-08-01

    Effects of contaminants on adult aquatic insect emergence are less well understood than effects on insect larvae. We compared responses of larval density and adult emergence along a metal contamination gradient. Nonlinear threshold responses were generally observed for larvae and emergers. Larval densities decreased significantly at low metal concentrations but precipitously at concentrations of metal mixtures above aquatic life criteria (cumulative criterion accumulation ratio (CCAR) ≥ 1). In contrast, adult emergence declined precipitously at low metal concentrations (CCAR ≤ 1), followed by a modest decline above this threshold. Adult emergence was a more sensitive indicator of the effect of low metals concentrations on aquatic insect communities compared to larvae, presumably because emergence is limited by a combination of larval survival and other factors limiting successful emergence. Thus effects of exposure to larvae are not manifest until later in life (during metamorphosis and emergence). This loss in emergence reduces prey subsidies to riparian communities at concentrations considered safe for aquatic life. Our results also challenge the widely held assumption that adult emergence is a constant proportion of larval densities in all streams.

  13. Improving sap flux density measurements by correctly determining thermal diffusivity, differentiating between bound and unbound water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandegehuchte, Maurits W; Steppe, Kathy

    2012-07-01

    Several heat-based sap flow methods, such as the heat field deformation method and the heat ratio method, include the thermal diffusivity D of the sapwood as a crucial parameter. Despite its importance, little attention has been paid to determine D in a plant physiological context. Therefore, D is mostly set as a constant, calculated during zero flow conditions or from a method of mixtures, taking into account wood density and moisture content. In this latter method, however, the meaning of the moisture content is misinterpreted, making it theoretically incorrect for D calculations in sapwood. A correction to this method, which includes the correct application of the moisture content, is proposed. This correction was tested for European and American beech and Eucalyptus caliginosa Blakely & McKie. Depending on the dry wood density and moisture content, the original approach over- or underestimates D and, hence, sap flux density by 10% and more.

  14. Long-term Longitudinal Recurrences of the Open Magnetic Flux Density in the Heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dósa, M.; Erdős, G.

    2017-04-01

    Open magnetic flux in the heliosphere is determined from the radial component of the magnetic field vector measured onboard interplanetary space probes. Previous Ulysses research has shown remarkable independence of the flux density from heliographic latitude, explained by super-radial expansion of plasma. Here we are investigating whether any longitudinal variation exists in the 50 year long OMNI magnetic data set. The heliographic longitude of origin of the plasma package was determined by applying a correction according to the solar wind travel time. Significant recurrent enhancements of the magnetic flux density were observed throughout solar cycle 23, lasting for several years. Similar, long-lasting recurring features were observed in the solar wind velocity, temperature and the deviation angle of the solar wind velocity vector from the radial direction. Each of the recurrent features has a recurrence period slightly differing from the Carrington rotation rate, although they show a common trend in time. Examining the coronal temperature data of ACE leads to the possible explanation that these long-term structures are caused by slow–fast solar wind interaction regions. A comparison with MESSENGER data measured at 0.5 au shows that these longitudinal magnetic modulations do not exist closer to the Sun, but are the result of propagation.

  15. One-point fitting of the flux density produced by a heliostat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collado, Francisco J. [Univ. Zaragoza, CPS-B, Dpto de Ingenieria Mecanica, Maria de Luna 3, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2010-04-15

    Accurate and simple models for the flux density reflected by an isolated heliostat should be one of the basic tools for the design and optimization of solar power tower systems. In this work, the ability and the accuracy of the Universidad de Zaragoza (UNIZAR) and the DLR (HFCAL) flux density models to fit actual energetic spots are checked against heliostat energetic images measured at Plataforma Solar de Almeria (PSA). Both the fully analytic models are able to acceptably fit the spot with only one-point fitting, i.e., the measured maximum flux. As a practical validation of this one-point fitting, the intercept percentage of the measured images, i.e., the percentage of the energetic spot sent by the heliostat that gets the receiver surface, is compared with the intercept calculated through the UNIZAR and HFCAL models. As main conclusions, the UNIZAR and the HFCAL models could be quite appropriate tools for the design and optimization, provided the energetic images from the heliostats to be used in the collector field were previously analyzed. Also note that the HFCAL model is much simpler and slightly more accurate than the UNIZAR model. (author)

  16. A high-resolution optical measurement system for rapid acquisition of radiation flux density maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelen, Martin; Raeder, Christian; Willsch, Christian; Dibowski, Gerd

    2017-06-01

    To identify the power and flux density of concentrated solar radiation the Institute of Solar Research at the German Aerospace Center (DLR - Deutsches Zentrum für Luft-und Raumfahrt e. V.) has used the camera-based measurement system FATMES (Flux and Temperature Measurement System) since 1995. The disadvantages of low resolution, difficult handling and poor computing power required a revision of the existing measurement system. The measurement system FMAS (Flux Mapping Acquisition system) is equipped with state-of-the-art-hardware, is compatible with computers off-the-shelf and is programmed in LabView. The expenditure of time for an image evaluation is reduced by the factor 60 compared to FATMES. The new measurement system is no longer associated with the facilities Solar Furnace and High Flux Solar Simulator at the DLR in Cologne but is also applicable as a mobile system. The data and the algorithms are transparent throughout the complete process. The measurement accuracy of FMAS is determined to at most ±3 % until now. The error of measurement of FATMES is at least 2 % higher according to the conducted comparison tests.

  17. Discrimination thresholds of normal and anomalous trichromats: Model of senescent changes in ocular media density on the Cambridge Colour Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinomori, Keizo; Panorgias, Athanasios; Werner, John S

    2016-03-01

    Age-related changes in chromatic discrimination along dichromatic confusion lines were measured with the Cambridge Colour Test (CCT). One hundred and sixty-two individuals (16 to 88 years old) with normal Rayleigh matches were the major focus of this paper. An additional 32 anomalous trichromats classified by their Rayleigh matches were also tested. All subjects were screened to rule out abnormalities of the anterior and posterior segments. Thresholds on all three chromatic vectors measured with the CCT showed age-related increases. Protan and deutan vector thresholds increased linearly with age while the tritan vector threshold was described with a bilinear model. Analysis and modeling demonstrated that the nominal vectors of the CCT are shifted by senescent changes in ocular media density, and a method for correcting the CCT vectors is demonstrated. A correction for these shifts indicates that classification among individuals of different ages is unaffected. New vector thresholds for elderly observers and for all age groups are suggested based on calculated tolerance limits.

  18. Sensing magnetic flux density of artificial neurons with a MEMS device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Jesus A; Herrera-May, Agustin L; García-Ramírez, Pedro J; Martinez-Castillo, Jaime; Figueras, Eduard; Flores, Amira; Manjarrez, Elías

    2011-04-01

    We describe a simple procedure to characterize a magnetic field sensor based on microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology, which exploits the Lorentz force principle. This sensor is designed to detect, in future applications, the spiking activity of neurons or muscle cells. This procedure is based on the well-known capability that a magnetic MEMS device can be used to sense a small magnetic flux density. In this work, an electronic neuron (FitzHugh-Nagumo) is used to generate controlled spike-like magnetic fields. We show that the magnetic flux density generated by the hardware of this neuron can be detected with a new MEMS magnetic field sensor. This microdevice has a compact resonant structure (700 × 600 × 5 μm) integrated by an array of silicon beams and p-type piezoresistive sensing elements, which need an easy fabrication process. The proposed microsensor has a resolution of 80 nT, a sensitivity of 1.2 V.T(-1), a resonant frequency of 13.87 kHz, low power consumption (2.05 mW), quality factor of 93 at atmospheric pressure, and requires a simple signal processing circuit. The importance of our study is twofold. First, because the artificial neuron can generate well-controlled magnetic flux density, we suggest it could be used to analyze the resolution and performance of different magnetic field sensors intended for neurobiological applications. Second, the introduced MEMS magnetic field sensor may be used as a prototype to develop new high-resolution biomedical microdevices to sense magnetic fields from cardiac tissue, nerves, spinal cord, or the brain.

  19. A turnkey data logger program for field-scale energy flux density measurements using eddy covariance and surface renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micrometeorological methods and ecosystem-scale energy and mass flux density measurements have become increasingly important in soil, agricultural, and environmental sciences. For many scientists without formal training in atmospheric science, these techniques are relatively inaccessible. Eddy cov...

  20. Energy flux density and angular momentum density of Pearcey-Gauss vortex beams in the far field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, K.; Lu, G.; Zhong, X.

    2017-02-01

    The longitudinal and transverse energy flux density (EFD) and angular momentum density (AMD) of a Pearcey-Gauss vortex beam in the far field are studied using the vector angular spectrum representation and stationary phase method, where the influence of topological charge, noncanonical strength and off-axis distance of the embedded optical vortex on far-field vectorial structures of the corresponding beam is emphasized. For comparison, the EFD and AMD of the Pearcey-Gauss beam with non-vortex in the far field are also discussed. The results show that the longitudinal EFDs of the Pearcey-Gauss vortex beam exhibit parabolic patterns, and the number of parabolic dark zones equals the absolute value of topological charge of the embedded optical vortex in the input plane. While for the Pearcey-Gauss beam, the dark zones are not found owing to the non-vortex in the input plane. The motion of zero-intensity spot of whole beam appears by varying the off-axis distance. Noncanonical strength and off-axis distance both can adjust the magnitudes and directions of transverse EFD and control the spatial energy distributions of longitudinal EFD, but not change the net AMD.

  1. Temperature and Magnetic Field Dependence of Critical Current Density of YBCO with Varying Flux Pinning Additions (POSTPRINT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    AFRL-RZ-WP-TP-2010-2083 TEMPERATURE AND MAGNETIC FIELD DEPENDENCE OF CRITICAL CURRENT DENSITY OF YBCO WITH VARYING FLUX PINNING ADDITIONS...MAGNETIC FIELD DEPENDENCE OF CRITICAL CURRENT DENSITY OF YBCO WITH VARYING FLUX PINNING ADDITIONS (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-house 5b...20 ‒ 77 K. Films were prepared with pulsed laser deposition by (M/ YBCO )N multilayer or ( YBCO )1-x Mx single-target methods, for different M phases

  2. On peculiarities of near-threshold initiation of powder density explosive by air shock wave and by solid impactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashkarov, AO; Ershov, AP; Pruuel, ER

    2016-10-01

    The features of near-threshold mode of initiating by gas-tight piston and high- enthalpy gas flow was evaluated for a powder density explosive PETN. Both methods lead to the development of detonation in about 10 μs time. The synchrotron radiation diagnostics have shown that the initial stages of the process were significantly different, that diversity being caused by the influence of the gas flow in the pores of the charge. In this work, the effect of the gas flow on the mode of initiation was studied experimentally.

  3. Sapflow+: a four-needle heat-pulse sap flow sensor enabling nonempirical sap flux density and water content measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandegehuchte, Maurits W; Steppe, Kathy

    2012-10-01

    • To our knowledge, to date, no nonempirical method exists to measure reverse, low or high sap flux density. Moreover, existing sap flow methods require destructive wood core measurements to determine sapwood water content, necessary to convert heat velocity to sap flux density, not only damaging the tree, but also neglecting seasonal variability in sapwood water content. • Here, we present a nonempirical heat-pulse-based method and coupled sensor which measure temperature changes around a linear heater in both axial and tangential directions after application of a heat pulse. By fitting the correct heat conduction-convection equation to the measured temperature profiles, the heat velocity and water content of the sapwood can be determined. • An identifiability analysis and validation tests on artificial and real stem segments of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) confirm the applicability of the method, leading to accurate determinations of heat velocity, water content and hence sap flux density. • The proposed method enables sap flux density measurements to be made across the entire natural occurring sap flux density range of woody plants. Moreover, the water content during low flows can be determined accurately, enabling a correct conversion from heat velocity to sap flux density without destructive core measurements. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. Computation of the electronic flux density in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diestler, D J; Kenfack, A; Manz, J; Paulus, B; Pérez-Torres, J F; Pohl, V

    2013-09-12

    A molecule in the electronic ground state described in the Born–Oppenheimer approximation (BOA) by the wave function ΨBO = Φ0χ0 (where Φ0 is the time-independent electronic energy eigenfunction and χ0 is a time-dependent nuclear wave packet) exhibits a nonzero nuclear flux density, whereas it always displays zero electronic flux density (EFD), because the electrons are in a stationary state. A hierarchical approach to the computation of the EFD within the context of the BOA, which utilizes only standard techniques of quantum chemistry (to obtain Φ0) and quantum dynamics (to describe the evolution of χ0 on the ground-state potential energy surface), provides a resolution of this puzzling, nonintuitive result. The procedure is applied to H2(+) oriented parallel with the z-axis and vibrating in the ground state (2)Σg(+). First, Φ0 and χ0 are combined by the coupled-channels technique to give the normally dominant z-component of the EFD. Imposition of the constraints of electronic continuity, cylindrical symmetry of Φ0 and two boundary conditions on the EFD through a scaling procedure yields an improved z-component, which is then used to compute the complementary orthogonal ρ-component. The resulting EFD agrees with its highly accurate counterpart furnished by a non-BOA treatment of the system.

  5. Microsystem for remote sensing of high energy radiation with associated extremely low photon flux densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, A.; Jain, V. K.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a microsystem for remote sensing of high energy radiation in extremely low flux density conditions. With wide deployment in mind, potential applications range from nuclear non-proliferation, to hospital radiation-safety. The daunting challenge is the low level of photon flux densities - emerging from a Scintillation Crystal (SC) on to a ~1 mm-square detector, which are a factor of 10000 or so lower than those acceptable to recently reported photonic chips (including `single-photon detection' chips), due to a combination of low Lux, small detector size, and short duration SC output pulses - on the order of 1 μs. These challenges are attempted to be overcome by the design of an innovative `System on a Chip' type microchip, with high detector sensitivity, and effective coupling from the SC to the photodetector. The microchip houses a tiny n+ diff p-epi photodiode (PD) as well as the associated analog amplification and other related circuitry, all fabricated in 0.5micron, 3-metal 2-poly CMOS technology. The amplification, together with pulse-shaping of the photocurrent-induced voltage signal, is achieved through a tandem of two capacitively coupled, double-cascode amplifiers. Included in the paper are theoretical estimates and experimental results.

  6. Analytical function for the flux density due to sunlight reflected from a heliostat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collado, F.J.; Gomez, A.; Turegano, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    An analytical model is presented for the flux density due to a focused heliostat over the receiver plane of a tower solar plant. The main assumptions are: spherical and continuous surface of the mirror, linear conformal transformation in the complex plane equivalent to the reflection mapping between an on-axis aligned heliostat and the objective located on the receiver at the slant range necessary to produce the minimum circle of confusion, circular Gaussian distribution of the effective sunshape and the concentration function constant on the receiver or the image plane. Under the hypotheses presented earlier an exact convolution is obtained. The result, an analytic flux density function, relatively simple and very flexible, is confronted with experimental measurements taken from four heliostat prototypes of second-generation placed at the Central Receiver Test Facility (CRTF), Albuquerque, New Mexico, and compared indirectly with the predictions of the Helios model for the same heliostats. The model is an essential tool in the problem of the determination of collector field parameters by optimization methods.

  7. Flux densities of meteoroids derived from optical double-station observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koschny, D.; Drolshagen, E.; Drolshagen, S.; Kretschmer, J.; Ott, T.; Drolshagen, G.; Poppe, B.

    2017-09-01

    We have developed a new method to determine flux densities of meteoroids using optical double-station meteor observations. It is based on the assumption that the velocity distribution is constant for all mass bins. By comparing the observed velocity distribution with a model distribution we determine de-biasing factors to correct for meteors too slow to emit a detectable amount of light. We use this method to correct a dataset of about 20000 double-station meteoroids detected over a period of about 3.5 years with the Canary Island Long-Baseline Observatory (CILBO). The resulting cumulative flux density has a slope comparable to the model of Grün et al. (1985). The largest uncertainty is the luminous efficiency. Depending on which values for the luminous efficiency are assumed, the mass estimate deviates by about one to 1.5 orders of magnitude. Using the luminous efficiencies derived by Weryk et al. (2013) results in an excellent agreement of our data with the Grün data.

  8. The 30 cm radio flux as a solar proxy for thermosphere density modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudok de Wit Thierry

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The 10.7 cm radio flux (F10.7 is widely used as a proxy for solar UV forcing of the upper atmosphere. However, radio emissions at other centimetric wavelengths have been routinely monitored since the 1950 s, thereby offering prospects for building proxies that may be better tailored to space weather needs. Here we advocate the 30 cm flux (F30 as a proxy that is more sensitive than F10.7 to longer wavelengths in the UV and show that it improves the response of the thermospheric density to solar forcing, as modelled with DTM (Drag Temperature Model. In particular, the model bias drops on average by 0–20% when replacing F10.7 by F30; it is also more stable (the standard deviation of the bias is 15–40% smaller and the density variation at the the solar rotation period is reproduced with a 35–50% smaller error. We compare F30 to other solar proxies and discuss its assets and limitations.

  9. Density effect on critical current density and flux pinning properties of polycrystalline SmFeAsO1 - xFx superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Y.; Sun, Y.; Zhuang, J. C.; Cui, L. J.; Shi, Z. X.; Sumption, M. D.; Majoros, M.; Susner, M. A.; Kovacs, C. J.; Li, G. Z.; Collings, E. W.; Ren, Z. A.

    2011-12-01

    A series of polycrystalline SmFeAs1 - xOx bulks was prepared to systematically investigate the influence of sample density on flux pinning properties. Different sample densities were achieved by controlling the pelletizing pressure. The superconducting volume fraction, the critical current densities Jcm and the flux pinning force densities Fp were estimated from the magnetization measurements. Experimental results show that: (1) the superconducting volume fraction increases with the increasing of sample density; (2) the Jcm values have a similar trend except for the sample with very high density due to different connectivity and pinning mechanisms, moreover, the Jcm(B) curve develops a peak effect at approximately the same field at which the high density sample shows a kink; (3) the Fp(B) curve of the high density sample shows a low-field peak and a high-field peak at several temperatures, which can be explained by improved intergranular current, while only one peak can be observed in Fp(B) of the low density samples. Based on the scaling behaviour of flux pinning force densities, the main intragranular pinning is normal point pinning.

  10. Spatial heterogeneity of satellite derived land surface parameters and energy flux densities for LITFASS-area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tittebrand

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on satellite data in different temporal and spatial resolution, the current use of frequency distribution functions (PDF for surface parameters and energy fluxes is one of the most promising ways to describe subgrid heterogeneity of a landscape. Objective of this study is to find typical distribution patterns of parameters (albedo, NDVI for the determination of the actual latent heat flux (L.E determined from highly resolved satellite data within pixel on coarser scale.

    Landsat ETM+, Terra MODIS and NOAA-AVHRR surface temperature and spectral reflectance were used to infer further surface parameters and radiant- and energy flux densities for LITFASS-area, a 20×20 km2 heterogeneous area in Eastern Germany, mainly characterised by the land use types forest, crop, grass and water. Based on the Penman-Monteith-approach L.E, as key quantity of the hydrological cycle, is determined for each sensor in the accordant spatial resolution with an improved parametrisation. However, using three sensors, significant discrepancies between the inferred parameters can cause flux distinctions resultant from differences of the sensor filter response functions or atmospheric correction methods. The approximation of MODIS- and AVHRR- derived surface parameters to the reference parameters of ETM (via regression lines and histogram stretching, respectively, further the use of accurate land use classifications (CORINE and a new Landsat-classification, and a consistent parametrisation for the three sensors were realized to obtain a uniform base for investigations of the spatial variability.

    The analyses for 4 scenes in 2002 and 2003 showed that for forest clear distribution-patterns for NDVI and albedo are found. Grass and crop distributions show higher variability and differ significantly to each other in NDVI but only marginal in albedo. Regarding NDVI-distribution functions NDVI was found to be the key variable for L.E-determination.

  11. Spatial distributions of the energy and energy flux density of partially coherent electromagnetic beams in atmospheric turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianlong; Lü, Baida; Zhu, Shifu

    2009-07-06

    The formulas of the energy and energy flux density of partially coherent electromagnetic beams in atmospheric turbulence are derived by using Maxwell's equations. Expressions expressed by elements of electric cross spectral density matrixes of the magnetic and the mutual cross spectral density matrix are obtained for the partially coherent electromagnetic beams. Taken the partially coherent Cosh-Gaussian (ChG) electromagnetic beam as a typical example, the spatial distributions of the energy and energy flux density in atmospheric turbulence are numerically calculated. It is found that the turbulence shows a broadening effect on the spatial distributions of the energy and energy flux density. Some interesting results are obtained and explained with regard to their physical nature.

  12. THEORY OF THE THRESHOLD FIELD FOR THE DEPINNING TRANSITION OF A CHARGE-DENSITY WAVE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PIETRONERO, L; VERSTEEG, M

    1991-01-01

    The Hamiltonian of an elastic string pinned by random potentials is often used to describe the depinning transition of a charge density wave in the presence of impurity pinning. The properties of the pinned states show close analogies to those of glassy systems, while the depinning transition resemb

  13. A model of heat transfer in sapwood and implications for sap flux density measurements using thermal dissipation probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wullschleger, Stan D; Childs, Kenneth W; King, Anthony W; Hanson, Paul J

    2011-06-01

    A variety of thermal approaches are used to estimate sap flux density in stems of woody plants. Models have proved valuable tools for interpreting the behavior of heat pulse, heat balance and heat field deformation techniques, but have seldom been used to describe heat transfer dynamics for the heat dissipation method. Therefore, to better understand the behavior of heat dissipation probes, a model was developed that takes into account the thermal properties of wood, the physical dimensions and thermal characteristics of the probes, and the conductive and convective heat transfer that occurs due to water flow in the sapwood. Probes were simulated as aluminum tubes 20 mm in length and 2 mm in diameter, whereas sapwood, heartwood and bark each had a density and water fraction that determined their thermal properties. Base simulations assumed a constant sap flux density with sapwood depth and no wounding or physical disruption of xylem beyond the 2 mm diameter hole drilled for probe installation. Simulations across a range of sap flux densities showed that the dimensionless quantity k [defined as (ΔT(m) -ΔT)/ΔT, where ΔT(m) is the temperature differential (ΔT) between the heated and unheated probe under zero-flow conditions] was dependent on the thermal conductivity of the sapwood. The relationship between sap flux density and k was also sensitive to radial gradients in sap flux density and to xylem disruption near the probe. Monte Carlo analysis in which 1000 simulations were conducted while simultaneously varying thermal conductivity and wound diameter revealed that sap flux density and k showed considerable departure from the original calibration equation used with this technique. The departure was greatest for variation in sap flux density typical of ring-porous species. Depending on the specific combination of thermal conductivity and wound diameter, use of the original calibration equation resulted in an 81% under- to 48% overestimation of sap flux density

  14. Quantitative evaluation of magnetic flux density in a magnetic recording head and pseudo soft underlayer by electron holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Weixing; Hirata, Kei; Yanagisawa, Keiichi; Ishida, Yoichi; Kasai, Hiroto; Yanagiuchi, Katsuaki; Shindo, Daisuke; Tonomura, Akira

    2010-01-01

    The magnetic interaction between the pole tip of a single-pole head and a pseudo soft underlayer in perpendicular magnetic recording was observed by electron holography. The magnetic flux density inside the soft underlayer was quantitatively evaluated. The distribution of magnetic flux density was calculated using the finite element method, and the influences of the modulation of the reference wave and stray fields were investigated by comparison with experimental results. The flux density observed was found to be underestimated due to the modulation of the phase shift in reference wave. The magnetic flux measured experimentally was larger than that inside the specimen because of the relatively large stray fields above and below the specimen in the direction of the electron beam.

  15. The revised electromagnetic fields directive and worker exposure in environments with high magnetic flux densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stam, Rianne

    2014-06-01

    Some of the strongest electromagnetic fields (EMF) are found in the workplace. A European Directive sets limits to workers' exposure to EMF. This review summarizes its origin and contents and compares magnetic field exposure levels in high-risk workplaces with the limits set in the revised Directive. Pubmed, Scopus, grey literature databases, and websites of organizations involved in occupational exposure measurements were searched. The focus was on EMF with frequencies up to 10 MHz, which can cause stimulation of the nervous system. Selected studies had to provide individual maximum exposure levels at the workplace, either in terms of the external magnetic field strength or flux density or as induced electric field strength or current density. Indicative action levels and the corresponding exposure limit values for magnetic fields in the revised European Directive will be higher than those in the previous version. Nevertheless, magnetic flux densities in excess of the action levels for peripheral nerve stimulation are reported for workers involved in welding, induction heating, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The corresponding health effects exposure limit values for the electric fields in the worker's body can be exceeded for welding and MRI, but calculations for induction heating and transcranial magnetic stimulation are lacking. Since the revised European Directive conditionally exempts MRI-related activities from the exposure limits, measures to reduce exposure may be necessary for welding, induction heating, and transcranial nerve stimulation. Since such measures can be complicated, there is a clear need for exposure databases for different workplace scenarios with significant EMF exposure and guidance on good practices.

  16. Optimization of magnetic flux density measurement using multiple RF receiver coils and multi-echo in MREIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Woo Chul; Chauhan, Munish; Sajib, Saurav Z K; Kim, Hyung Joong; Serša, Igor; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic Resonance Electrical Impedance Tomography (MREIT) is an MRI method that enables mapping of internal conductivity and/or current density via measurements of magnetic flux density signals. The MREIT measures only the z-component of the induced magnetic flux density B = (Bx, By, Bz) by external current injection. The measured noise of Bz complicates recovery of magnetic flux density maps, resulting in lower quality conductivity and current-density maps. We present a new method for more accurate measurement of the spatial gradient of the magnetic flux density gradient (∇ Bz). The method relies on the use of multiple radio-frequency receiver coils and an interleaved multi-echo pulse sequence that acquires multiple sampling points within each repetition time. The noise level of the measured magnetic flux density Bz depends on the decay rate of the signal magnitude, the injection current duration, and the coil sensitivity map. The proposed method uses three key steps. The first step is to determine a representative magnetic flux density gradient from multiple receiver coils by using a weighted combination and by denoising the measured noisy data. The second step is to optimize the magnetic flux density gradient by using multi-echo magnetic flux densities at each pixel in order to reduce the noise level of ∇ Bz and the third step is to remove a random noise component from the recovered ∇ Bz by solving an elliptic partial differential equation in a region of interest. Numerical simulation experiments using a cylindrical phantom model with included regions of low MRI signal to noise ('defects') verified the proposed method. Experimental results using a real phantom experiment, that included three different kinds of anomalies, demonstrated that the proposed method reduced the noise level of the measured magnetic flux density. The quality of the recovered conductivity maps using denoised ∇ Bz data showed that the proposed method reduced the conductivity

  17. Estimating sap flux densities in date palm trees using the heat dissipation method and weighing lysimeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperling, Or; Shapira, Or; Cohen, Shabtai; Tripler, Effi; Schwartz, Amnon; Lazarovitch, Naftali

    2012-09-01

    In a world of diminishing water reservoirs and a rising demand for food, the practice and development of water stress indicators and sensors are in rapid progress. The heat dissipation method, originally established by Granier, is herein applied and modified to enable sap flow measurements in date palm trees in the southern Arava desert of Israel. A long and tough sensor was constructed to withstand insertion into the date palm's hard exterior stem. This stem is wide and fibrous, surrounded by an even tougher external non-conducting layer of dead leaf bases. Furthermore, being a monocot species, water flow does not necessarily occur through the outer part of the palm's stem, as in most trees. Therefore, it is highly important to investigate the variations of the sap flux densities and determine the preferable location for sap flow sensing within the stem. Once installed into fully grown date palm trees stationed on weighing lysimeters, sap flow as measured by the modified sensors was compared with the actual transpiration. Sap flow was found to be well correlated with transpiration, especially when using a recent calibration equation rather than the original Granier equation. Furthermore, inducing the axial variability of the sap flux densities was found to be highly important for accurate assessments of transpiration by sap flow measurements. The sensors indicated no transpiration at night, a high increase of transpiration from 06:00 to 09:00, maximum transpiration at 12:00, followed by a moderate reduction until 08:00; when transpiration ceased. These results were reinforced by the lysimeters' output. Reduced sap flux densities were detected at the stem's mantle when compared with its center. These results were reinforced by mechanistic measurements of the stem's specific hydraulic conductivity. Variance on the vertical axis was also observed, indicating an accelerated flow towards the upper parts of the tree and raising a hypothesis concerning dehydrating

  18. Quasi-classical theory of electronic flux density in electronically adiabatic molecular processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diestler, D J

    2012-11-26

    The standard Born-Oppenheimer (BO) description of electronically adiabatic molecular processes predicts a vanishing electronic flux density (EFD). A previously proposed "coupled-channels" theory permits the extraction of the EFD from the BO wave function for one-electron diatomic systems, but attempts at generalization to many-electron polyatomic systems are frustrated by technical barriers. An alternative "quasi-classical" approach, which eliminates the explicit quantum dynamics of the electrons within a classical framework, yet retains the quantum character of the nuclear motion, appears capable of yielding EFDs for arbitrarily complex systems. Quasi-classical formulas for the EFD in simple systems agree with corresponding coupled-channels formulas. Results of the application of the new quasi-classical formula for the EFD to a model triatomic system indicate the potential of the quasi-classical scheme to elucidate the dynamical role of electrons in electronically adiabatic processes in more complex multiparticle systems.

  19. Polarised radio sources : a study of luminosity, redshift and flux density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Julie Kristen

    2011-05-01

    Results of deep polarisation imaging at 1.4 GHz with the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory as part of the DRAO Planck Deep Fields project are presented. This deep extragalactic field covers 15.16 deg2 centred at a2000 = 16h14m and d2000 = 54560, has an angular resolution of 4200-6200 at the field centre, and reaches a sensitivity of 55 mJy beam-1 in Stokes I and 45 mJy beam-1 in Stokes Q and U. There are 958 radio sources in Stokes I of which 136 are detected in polarisation. The Euclidean-normalized polarised differential source counts are determined down to 400 mJy. These counts indicate that sources have a higher percentage polarisation at fainter Stokes I flux density levels than for brighter sources. The majority of the polarised sources are steep-spectrum objects with a mean spectral index of -0.77, and there is no correlation between fractional polarisation and spectral index. Of the polarised sources, 77% show structure at the arc-second scale whereas only 38% of the sources with no detectable polarisation show such structure. This indicates that polarised sources tend to have structure at arcsecond scales and that the polarised emission is most likely not beamed. This confirms that the polarised radio sources tend to be lobe-dominated radio galaxies. The median percentage polarisation for resolved sources is 6.8%, while it is 4.4% for compact objects. Radio sources in the DRAO deep field have been matched with the Spitzer Wide-Area Infrared Extragalactic survey of the European Large Area ISO Survey North 1 field. In the redshift range of 0.04 FRIIs, which are seen to populate the polarized source counts at fainter flux density levels. There is no correlation between redshift and percentage polarisation for this sample. However, there is a correlation between increasing percentage polarisation and decreasing luminosity for polarised radio sources.

  20. Frequency spectra from current vs. magnetic flux density measurements for mobile phones and other electrical appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straume, Aksel; Johnsson, Anders; Oftedal, Gunnhild; Wilén, Jonna

    2007-10-01

    The frequency spectra of electromagnetic fields have to be determined to evaluate human exposure in accordance to ICNIRP guidelines. In the literature, comparisons with magnetic field guidelines have been performed by using the frequency distribution of the current drawn from the battery. In the present study we compared the frequency spectrum in the range 217 Hz to 2.4 kHz of the magnetic flux density measured near the surface of a mobile phone with the frequency spectrum of the supply current. By using the multiple frequency rule, recommended in the ICNIRP guidelines, we estimated the magnetic field exposure in the two cases. Similar measurements and estimations were done for an electric drill, a hair dryer, and a fluorescent desk lamp. All the devices have a basic frequency of 50 Hz, and the frequency spectra were evaluated up to 550 Hz. We also mapped the magnetic field in 3D around three mobile phones. The frequency distributions obtained from the two measurement methods are not equal. The frequency content of the current leads to an overestimation of the magnetic field exposure by a factor up to 2.2 for the mobile phone. For the drill, the hair dryer, and the fluorescent lamp, the supply current signal underestimated the exposure by a factor up to 2.3. In conclusion, an accurate exposure evaluation requires the magnetic flux density spectrum of the device to be measured directly. There was no indication that the devices studied would exceed the reference levels at the working distances normally used.

  1. Tuning the conductivity threshold and carrier density of two-dimensional electron gas at oxide interfaces through interface engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Harsan Ma

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG formed at the perovskite oxides heterostructures is of great interest because of its potential applications in oxides electronics and nanoscale multifunctional devices. A canonical example is the 2DEG at the interface between a polar oxide LaAlO3 (LAO and non-polar SrTiO3 (STO. Here, the LAO polar oxide can be regarded as the modulating or doping layer and is expected to define the electronic properties of 2DEG at the LAO/STO interface. However, to practically implement the 2DEG in electronics and device design, desired properties such as tunable 2D carrier density are necessary. Here, we report the tuning of conductivity threshold, carrier density and electronic properties of 2DEG in LAO/STO heterostructures by insertion of a La0.5Sr0.5TiO3 (LSTO layer of varying thicknesses, and thus modulating the amount of polarization of the oxide over layers. Our experimental result shows an enhancement of carrier density up to a value of about five times higher than that observed at the LAO/STO interface. A complete thickness dependent metal-insulator phase diagram is obtained by varying the thickness of LAO and LSTO providing an estimate for the critical thickness needed for the metallic phase. The observations are discussed in terms of electronic reconstruction induced by polar oxides.

  2. An investigation into the torque density capabilities of flux-focusing magnetic gearboxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppalapati, Krishna Kiran

    Wind and many rotary based ocean energy conversion devices rely on a mechanical gearbox to increase their speed so as to match the requirements of the electromagnetic generator. However, mechanical gearboxes have a number of disadvantages such as the need for gear lubrication, no overload protection and the creation of acoustic noise. Frequently direct-drive generators are employed to overcome these issues, wherein the gearbox is removed and the shaft of the turbine is directly connected to the synchronous generator, either with an electrically excited or permanent magnet rotor. If the input speed to the generator is very low the torque must be very high in order to generate the necessary power. However, as the electrical loading of a synchronous generator is thermally limited, the size of the generator will become excessively large at high power levels. An alternative to these technologies is to consider replacing the mechanical gearbox with a magnetic gear. A magnetic gear can create speed change without any physical contact. It has inherent overload protection, and its non-contact operation offers the potential for high reliability. Despite significant progress, existing magnetic gear designs do not achieve torque densities that are competitive with mechanical gearboxes. This research has focused on designing a coaxial magnetic gear that can operate at a volumetric torque density that is comparable to a mechanical gearbox. A flux-focusing rotor topology also called spoke-type rotor magnet arrangement was adopted to improve the air-gap magnetic flux density which in turn improves the torque transferred between the rotors. Finite element analysis was utilized to conduct a parameter sweep analysis of the different geometric parameters of the magnetic gear. A sub-scale magnetic gear with a diameter of 110 mm and a scaled-up magnetic gear with a diameter of 228 mm was designed, constructed and experimentally evaluated. The torque and torque density of sub

  3. Correlations between the peak flux density and the position angle of inner-jet in three blazars

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, X; Liu, B -R; Li, Q -W

    2012-01-01

    We aim to investigate the relation between the long-term flux density and the position angle (PA) evolution of inner-jet in blazars. We have carried out the elliptic Gaussian model-fit to the `core' of 50 blazars from 15 GHz VLBA data, and analyzed the variability properties of three blazars from the model-fit results. Diverse correlations between the long-term peak flux density and the PA evolution of the major axis of the `core' have been found in $\\sim$ 20% of the 50 sources. Of them, three typical blazars have been analyzed, which also show quasi-periodic flux variations of a few years (T). The correlation between the peak flux density and the PA of inner-jet is positive for S5~0716+714, and negative for S4~1807+698. The two sources cannot be explained with the ballistic jet models, the non-ballistic models have been analyzed to explain the two sub-luminal blazars. A correlation between the peak flux density and the PA (with a T/4 time lag) of inner-jet is found in [HB89]~1823+568, this correlation can be...

  4. An empirical study of the wound effect on sap flux density measured with thermal dissipation probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, Andreas; Marañón-Jiménez, Sara; Rebmann, Corinna; Herbst, Mathias; Cuntz, Matthias

    2016-12-01

    The insertion of thermal dissipation (TD) sensors on tree stems for sap flux density (SFD) measurements can lead to SFD underestimations due to a wound formation close to the drill hole. However, the wound effect has not been assessed experimentally for this method yet. Here, we propose an empirical approach to investigate the effect of the wound healing on measured sap flux with TD probes. The approach was performed for both, diffuse-porous (Fagus sylvatica (Linnaeus)) and ring-porous (Quercus petraea (Lieblein)) species. Thermal dissipation probes were installed on different dates along the growing season to document the effects of the dynamic wound formation. The trees were cut in autumn and additional sensors were installed in the cut stems, therefore, without potential effects of wound development. A range of water pressures was applied to the stem segments and SFDs were simultaneously measured by TD sensors as well as gravimetrically in the laboratory. The formation of wounds around sensors installed in living tree stems led to underestimation of SFD by 21.4 ± 3 and 47.5 ± 3.8% in beech and oak, respectively. The differences between SFD underestimations of diffuse-porous beech and ring-porous oak were, however, not statistically significant. Sensors with 5-, 11- and 22-week-old wounds also showed no significant differences, which implies that the influence of wound formation on SFD estimates was completed within the first few weeks after perforation. These results were confirmed by time courses of SFD measurements in the field. Field SFD values decreased immediately after sensor installation and reached stable values after ~2 weeks with similar underestimations to the ones observed in the laboratory. We therefore propose a feasible approach to correct directly field observations of SFD for potential underestimations due to the wound effect.

  5. Both electrical stimulation thresholds and SMI-32-immunoreactive retinal ganglion cell density correlate with age in S334ter line 3 rat retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Leanne L H; Lee, Eun-Jin; Humayun, Mark S; Weiland, James D

    2011-06-01

    Electrical stimulation threshold and retinal ganglion cell density were measured in a rat model of retinal degeneration. We performed in vivo electrophysiology and morphometric analysis on normal and S334ter line 3 (RD) rats (ages 84-782 days). We stimulated the retina in anesthetized animals and recorded evoked responses in the superior colliculus. Current pulses were delivered with a platinum-iridium (Pt-Ir) electrode of 75-μm diameter positioned on the epiretinal surface. In the same animals used for electrophysiology, SMI-32 immunolabeling of the retina enabled ganglion cell counting. An increase in threshold currents positively correlated with age of RD rats. SMI-32-labeled retinal ganglion cell density negatively correlated with age of RD rats. ANOVA shows that RD postnatal day (P)100 and P300 rats have threshold and density similar to normal rats, but RD P500 and P700 rats have threshold and density statistically different from normal rats (P < 0.05). Threshold charge densities were within the safety limits of Pt for all groups and pulse configurations, except at RD P600 and RD P700, where pulses were only safe up to 1- and 0.2-ms duration, respectively. Preservation of ganglion cells may enhance the efficiency and safety of electronic retinal implants.

  6. Prey Density Threshold and Tidal Influence on Reef Manta Ray Foraging at an Aggregation Site on the Great Barrier Reef.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asia O Armstrong

    Full Text Available Large tropical and sub-tropical marine animals must meet their energetic requirements in a largely oligotrophic environment. Many planktivorous elasmobranchs, whose thermal ecologies prevent foraging in nutrient-rich polar waters, aggregate seasonally at predictable locations throughout tropical oceans where they are observed feeding. Here we investigate the foraging and oceanographic environment around Lady Elliot Island, a known aggregation site for reef manta rays Manta alfredi in the southern Great Barrier Reef. The foraging behaviour of reef manta rays was analysed in relation to zooplankton populations and local oceanography, and compared to long-term sighting records of reef manta rays from the dive operator on the island. Reef manta rays fed at Lady Elliot Island when zooplankton biomass and abundance were significantly higher than other times. The critical prey density threshold that triggered feeding was 11.2 mg m-3 while zooplankton size had no significant effect on feeding. The community composition and size structure of the zooplankton was similar when reef manta rays were feeding or not, with only the density of zooplankton changing. Higher zooplankton biomass was observed prior to low tide, and long-term (~5 years sighting data confirmed that more reef manta rays are also observed feeding during this tidal phase than other times. This is the first study to examine prey availability at an aggregation site for reef manta rays and it indicates that they feed in locations and at times of higher zooplankton biomass.

  7. Prey Density Threshold and Tidal Influence on Reef Manta Ray Foraging at an Aggregation Site on the Great Barrier Reef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Asia O; Armstrong, Amelia J; Jaine, Fabrice R A; Couturier, Lydie I E; Fiora, Kym; Uribe-Palomino, Julian; Weeks, Scarla J; Townsend, Kathy A; Bennett, Mike B; Richardson, Anthony J

    2016-01-01

    Large tropical and sub-tropical marine animals must meet their energetic requirements in a largely oligotrophic environment. Many planktivorous elasmobranchs, whose thermal ecologies prevent foraging in nutrient-rich polar waters, aggregate seasonally at predictable locations throughout tropical oceans where they are observed feeding. Here we investigate the foraging and oceanographic environment around Lady Elliot Island, a known aggregation site for reef manta rays Manta alfredi in the southern Great Barrier Reef. The foraging behaviour of reef manta rays was analysed in relation to zooplankton populations and local oceanography, and compared to long-term sighting records of reef manta rays from the dive operator on the island. Reef manta rays fed at Lady Elliot Island when zooplankton biomass and abundance were significantly higher than other times. The critical prey density threshold that triggered feeding was 11.2 mg m-3 while zooplankton size had no significant effect on feeding. The community composition and size structure of the zooplankton was similar when reef manta rays were feeding or not, with only the density of zooplankton changing. Higher zooplankton biomass was observed prior to low tide, and long-term (~5 years) sighting data confirmed that more reef manta rays are also observed feeding during this tidal phase than other times. This is the first study to examine prey availability at an aggregation site for reef manta rays and it indicates that they feed in locations and at times of higher zooplankton biomass.

  8. Influence of stem temperature changes on heat pulse sap flux density measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandegehuchte, Maurits W; Burgess, Stephen S O; Downey, Alec; Steppe, Kathy

    2015-04-01

    While natural spatial temperature gradients between measurement needles have been thoroughly investigated for continuous heat-based sap flow methods, little attention has been given to how natural changes in stem temperature impact heat pulse-based methods through temporal rather than spatial effects. By modelling the theoretical equation for both an ideal instantaneous pulse and a step pulse and applying a finite element model which included actual needle dimensions and wound effects, the influence of a varying stem temperature on heat pulse-based methods was investigated. It was shown that the heat ratio (HR) method was influenced, while for the compensation heat pulse and Tmax methods changes in stem temperatures of up to 0.002 °C s(-1) did not lead to significantly different results. For the HR method, rising stem temperatures during measurements led to lower heat pulse velocity values, while decreasing stem temperatures led to both higher and lower heat pulse velocities, and to imaginary results for high flows. These errors of up to 40% can easily be prevented by including a temperature correction in the data analysis procedure, calculating the slope of the natural temperature change based on the measured temperatures before application of the heat pulse. Results of a greenhouse and outdoor experiment on Pinus pinea L. show the influence of this correction on low and average sap flux densities.

  9. Photosynthetic photon flux density and phytochrome B interact to regulate branching in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hongwen; Abernathy, Scott D; White, Richard H; Finlayson, Scott A

    2011-11-01

    Branching is regulated by environmental signals including phytochrome B (phyB)-mediated responses to the ratio of red to far red light. While the mechanisms associated with phytochrome regulation of branching are beginning to be elucidated, there is little information regarding other light signals, including photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) and how it influences phytochrome-mediated responses. This study shows that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) branching is modified by both varying PPFD and phyB status and that significant interactions occur between these variables. While phyB deficiency decreased branching when the PPFD was low, the effect was suppressed by high PPFD and some branching aspects were actually promoted. Photosynthesis measurements showed that PPFD may influence branching in phyB-deficient plants at least partially through a specific signalling pathway rather than directly through energy effects on the shoot. The expression of various genes in unelongated buds of phyB-deficient and phyB-sufficient plants grown under high and low PPFD demonstrated potential roles for several hormones, including auxin, cytokinins and ABA, and also showed imperfect correlation between expression of the branching regulators BRC1 and BRC2 and bud fate. These results may implicate additional undiscovered bud autonomous mechanisms and/or components contributing to bud outgrowth regulation by environmental signals.

  10. Leaf photosynthetic and solar-tracking responses of mallow, Malva parviflora, to photon flux density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Dennis H; Thorpe, Michael R

    2009-10-01

    Malva parviflora L. (mallow) is a species that occupies high-light habitats as a weedy invader in orchards and vineyards. Species of the Malvaceae are known to solar track and anecdotal evidence suggests this species may also. How M. parviflora responds physiologically to light in comparison with other species within the Malvaceae remains unknown. Tracking and photosynthetic responses to photon flux density (PFD) were evaluated on plants grown in greenhouse conditions. Tracking ability was assessed in the growth conditions and by exposing leaves to specific light intensities and measuring changes in the angle of the leaf plane. Light responses were also determined by photosynthesis and chlorophyll fluorescence. Leaves followed a heliotropic response which was highly PFD-dependent, with tracking rates increasing in a curvilinear pattern. Maximum tracking rates were up to 20 degrees h(-1) and saturated for light above 1,300 micromol (photons) m(-2) s(-1). This high-light saturation, both for tracking (much higher than the other species), and for photosynthesis, confirmed mallow as a high-light demanding species. Further, because there was no photoinhibition, the leaves could capture the potential of an increased carbon gain in higher irradiance by resorting to solar tracking. Modelling suggested the tracking response could increase the annual carbon gain by as much as 25% compared with leaves that do not track the sun. The various leaf attributes associated with solar tracking, therefore, help to account for the success of this species as a weed in many locations worldwide.

  11. Excessive magnetic field flux density distribution from overhead isolated powerline conductors due to neutral line current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netzer, Moshe

    2013-06-01

    Overhead isolated powerline conductors (hereinafter: "OIPLC") are the most compact form for distributing low voltage currents. From the known physics of magnetic field emission from 3-phase power lines, it is expected that excellent symmetry of the 120° shifted phase currents and where compact configuration of the 3-phase+neutral line exist, the phase current vectorial summation of the magnetic field flux density (MFFD) is expected to be extremely low. However, despite this estimation, an unexpectedly very high MFFD was found in at least three towns in Israel. This paper explains the reasons leading to high MFFD emissions from compact OIPLC and the proper technique to fix it. Analysis and measurement results had led to the failure hypothsis of neutral line poor connection design and poor grounding design of the HV-LV utility transformers. The paper elaborates on the low MFFD exposure level setup by the Israeli Environmental Protection Office which adopted a rather conservative precaution principal exposure level (2 mG averaged over 24 h).

  12. Interstellar Scintillation of the Polarized Flux Density in Quasar, PKS 0405-385

    CERN Document Server

    Rickett, B J; Jauncey, D L; Rickett, Barney J.; Kedziora-Chudczer, Lucyna; Jauncey, David L.

    2002-01-01

    The remarkable rapid variations in radio flux density and polarization of the quasar PKS 0405-385 observed in 1996 are subject to a correlation analysis, from which characteristic time scales and amplitudes are derived. The variations are interpreted as interstellar scintillations. The cm wavelength observations are in the weak scintillation regime for which models for the various auto- and cross-correlations of the Stokes parameters are derived and fitted to the observations. These are well modelled by interstellar scintillation (ISS) of a 30 by 22 micro-as source, with about 180 degree rotation of the polarization angle along its long dimension. This success in explaining the remarkable intra-day variations (IDV)in polarization confirms that ISS gives rise to the IDV in this quasar. However, the fit requires the scintillations to be occurring much closer to the Earth than expected according to the standard model for the ionized interstellar medium (IISM). Scattering at distances in the range 3-30 parsec are...

  13. Observations of Poynting fluxes, ion temperatures and neutral densities during the March 2015 magnetic storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y.; Su, Y. J.; Huang, C. Y.; Hairston, M. R.; Sutton, E. K.

    2015-12-01

    We will present various observations regarding the geomagnetic energy input and the response of Ionosphere-Thermosphere (IT) system during the March 17, 2015 storm, the largest one in solar cycle 24. The Poynting fluxes measured by Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites (F16, F17 and F18) show significant enhancements in the auroral oval and at high latitudes poleward of the auroral oval. Moreover, the ion temperatures observed by DMSP satellites (F16, F17 and F19) at magnetic latitudes greater than 80° are higher than those in the auroral oval, and the their averaged increases are 316K in the northern hemisphere and 248 K in the southern hemisphere, respectively. In addition, the neutral density residuals measured by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite indicate the largest values at the highest orbital latitudes. The wave-like perturbations originating at high latitudes move equatorward with decreasing amplitudes along GRACE orbits, implying a source region for Traveling Atmospheric Disturbances (TADs) at polar latitudes.

  14. Chemical sputtering of graphite by low temperature nitrogen plasmas at various substrate temperatures and ion flux densities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bystrov, K.; Morgan, T. W.; Tanyeli, I.; De Temmerman, G.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,

    2013-01-01

    We report measurements of chemical sputtering yields of graphite exposed to low temperature nitrogen plasmas. The influence of surface temperature and incoming ion energy on the sputtering yields has been investigated in two distinct ion flux density regimes. Sputtering yields grow consistently with

  15. Photosynthetic photon flux density, carbon dioxide concentration, and vapor pressure deficit effects on photosynthesis in cacao seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacao (Theobroma cacao) is a shade plant, native to the under-story of the evergreen rain forest of the Amazon basin and adapted to low levels of photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD). The influence of PPFD, leaf to air water vapor pressure deficit (VPD) and external carbon dioxide concentration...

  16. The relation between radio flux density and ionizing ultra-violet flux for HII regions and supernova remnants in the Large Magellanic cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipović M.D.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a comparison between the Parkes radio surveys (Filipović et al 1995 and Vacuum Ultra-Violet (VUV surveys (Smith et al. 1987 of the Large Magellanic Clouds (LMC. We have found 72 sources in common in the LMC which are known HII regions (52 and supernova remnants (SNRs (19. Some of these radio sources are associated with two or more UV stellar associations. A comparison of the radio flux densities and ionizing UV flux for HII regions shows a very good correlation, as expected from theory. Many of the Magellanic Clouds (MCs SNRs are embedded in HII regions, so there is also a relation between radio and UV which we attribute to the surrounding HII regions.

  17. Nuclear flux densities during a model pericyclic reaction with energies well above and below the potential barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredtmann, Timm; Kono, Hirohiko; Manz, Jörn; Nakamura, Kosuke; Stemmle, Christian

    2013-05-10

    Pericyclic reactions with energies E well above the potential energy barrier B (case E>B) proceed with quantum nuclear flux densities 〈j〉 which are essentially proportional to the nuclear densities ρ in the femtosecond time domain. This corresponds to the definition of classical (cl) mechanics, j(cl)=υ(cl) ρ(cl), with almost constant velocity v(cl). For the other case Evalue close to the barrier where ρ is a minimum (in fact where ρ is close to zero). The general conclusion is that quantum mechanical nuclear flux densities may be at variance from traditional expectations based on classical trajectories. This prediction calls for experimental demonstration. The counter-intuitive proof-of-principle is demonstrated for a simple, one-dimensional model of the Cope rearrangement of semibullvalene. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Effects of virtual speaker density and room reverberation on spatiotemporal thresholds of audio-visual motion coherence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayan Sankaran

    Full Text Available The present study examined the effects of spatial sound-source density and reverberation on the spatiotemporal window for audio-visual motion coherence. Three different acoustic stimuli were generated in Virtual Auditory Space: two acoustically "dry" stimuli via the measurement of anechoic head-related impulse responses recorded at either 1° or 5° spatial intervals (Experiment 1, and a reverberant stimulus rendered from binaural room impulse responses recorded at 5° intervals in situ in order to capture reverberant acoustics in addition to head-related cues (Experiment 2. A moving visual stimulus with invariant localization cues was generated by sequentially activating LED's along the same radial path as the virtual auditory motion. Stimuli were presented at 25°/s, 50°/s and 100°/s with a random spatial offset between audition and vision. In a 2AFC task, subjects made a judgment of the leading modality (auditory or visual. No significant differences were observed in the spatial threshold based on the point of subjective equivalence (PSE or the slope of psychometric functions (β across all three acoustic conditions. Additionally, both the PSE and β did not significantly differ across velocity, suggesting a fixed spatial window of audio-visual separation. Findings suggest that there was no loss in spatial information accompanying the reduction in spatial cues and reverberation levels tested, and establish a perceptual measure for assessing the veracity of motion generated from discrete locations and in echoic environments.

  19. Variation of flux control coefficient of cytochrome c oxidase and of the other respiratory chain complexes at different values of protonmotive force occurs by a threshold mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarato, Giovanni; Piccoli, Claudia; Scrima, Rosella; Capitanio, Nazzareno

    2011-09-01

    The metabolic control analysis was applied to digitonin-permeabilized HepG2 cell line to assess the flux control exerted by cytochrome c oxidase on the mitochondrial respiration. Experimental conditions eliciting different energy/respiratory states in mitochondria were settled. The results obtained show that the mitochondrial electrochemical potential accompanies a depressing effect on the control coefficient exhibited by the cytochrome c oxidase. Both the components of the protonmotive force, i.e. the voltage (ΔΨ(m)) and the proton (ΔpH(m)) gradient, displayed a similar effect. Quantitative estimation of the ΔΨ(m) unveiled that the voltage-dependent effect on the control coefficient of cytochrome c oxidase takes place sharply in a narrow range of membrane potential from 170-180 to 200-210mV consistent with the physiologic transition from state 3 to state 4 of respiration. Extension of the metabolic flux control analysis to the NADH dehydrogenase and bc(1) complexes of the mitochondrial respiratory chain resulted in a similar effect. A mechanistic model is put forward whereby the respiratory chain complexes are proposed to exist in a voltage-mediated threshold-controlled dynamic equilibrium between supercomplexed and isolated states. 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Optimization of multiply acquired magnetic flux density B(z) using ICNE-Multiecho train in MREIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Hyun Soo; Kwon, Oh In

    2010-05-01

    The aim of magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is to visualize the electrical properties, conductivity or current density of an object by injection of current. Recently, the prolonged data acquisition time when using the injected current nonlinear encoding (ICNE) method has been advantageous for measurement of magnetic flux density data, Bz, for MREIT in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). However, the ICNE method results in undesirable side artifacts, such as blurring, chemical shift and phase artifacts, due to the long data acquisition under an inhomogeneous static field. In this paper, we apply the ICNE method to a gradient and spin echo (GRASE) multi-echo train pulse sequence in order to provide the multiple k-space lines during a single RF pulse period. We analyze the SNR of the measured multiple B(z) data using the proposed ICNE-Multiecho MR pulse sequence. By determining a weighting factor for B(z) data in each of the echoes, an optimized inversion formula for the magnetic flux density data is proposed for the ICNE-Multiecho MR sequence. Using the ICNE-Multiecho method, the quality of the measured magnetic flux density is considerably increased by the injection of a long current through the echo train length and by optimization of the voxel-by-voxel noise level of the B(z) value. Agarose-gel phantom experiments have demonstrated fewer artifacts and a better SNR using the ICNE-Multiecho method. Experimenting with the brain of an anesthetized dog, we collected valuable echoes by taking into account the noise level of each of the echoes and determined B(z) data by determining optimized weighting factors for the multiply acquired magnetic flux density data.

  1. Reverse propagation and negative angular momentum density flux of an optical nondiffracting nonparaxial fractional Bessel vortex beam of progressive waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, F G

    2016-09-01

    Energy and angular momentum flux density characteristics of an optical nondiffracting nonparaxial vector Bessel vortex beam of fractional order are examined based on the dual-field method for the generation of symmetric electric and magnetic fields. Should some conditions determined by the polarization state, the half-cone angle as well as the beam-order (or topological charge) be met, the axial energy and angular momentum flux densities vanish (representing Poynting singularities), before they become negative. These negative counterintuitive properties suggest retrograde (negative) propagation as well as a rotation reversal of the angular momentum with respect to the beam handedness. These characteristics of nondiffracting nonparaxial Bessel fractional vortex beams of progressive waves open new capabilities in optical tractor beam tweezers, optical spanners, invisibility cloaks, optically engineered metamaterials, and other applications.

  2. Effects of water salinity on the correlation scale of Root density and Evapotranspiration fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajeel, Ali; Saeed, Ali; Dragonetti, Giovanna; Comegna, Alessandro; Lamaddalena, Nicola; Coppola, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Spatial pattern and the correlation of different soil and plant parameters were examined in a green bean field experiment carried out at the Mediterranean Agronomic Institute of Bari, Italy. The experiment aimed to evaluate the role of local processes of salt accumulation and transport which mainly influences the evapotranspiration (and thus the root uptake) processes under different water salinity levels. The experiment consisted of three transects of 30m length and 4.2 m width, irrigated with three different salinity levels (1dSm-1, 3dSm-1, 6dSm-1). Soil measurements (electrical conductivity and soil water content) were monitored along transects in 24 sites, 1 m apart by using TDR probes and Diviner 2000. Water storage measured by TDR and Diviner sensor were coupled for calculating directly the evapotranspiration fluxes along the whole soil profile under the different salinity levels imposed during the experiment. In the same sites, crop monitoring involved measurements of Leaf Area Index (LAI), Osmotic Potential (OP), Leaf Water Potential (LWP), and Root length Density (RlD). Soil and plant properties were analyzed by classical statistics, geostatistics methods and spectral analysis. Results indicated moderate to large spatial variability across the field for soil and plant parameters under all salinity treatments. Furthermore, cross-semivariograms exhibited a strong positive spatial interdependence between electrical conductivity of soil solution ECw with ET and RlD in transect treated with 3dSm-1 as well as with LAI in transect treated with 6dSm-1 at all 24 monitoring sites. Spectral analysis enabled to identify the observation window to sample the soil salinity information responsible for a given plant response (ET, OP, RlD). It is also allowed a clear identification of the spatial scale at which the soil water salinity level and distribution and the crop response in terms of actual evapotranspiration ET, RlD and OP, are actually correlated. Additionally

  3. Measurement of the light flux density patterns from luminaires proposed as photon sources for photosynthesis during space travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Paul N.

    1989-01-01

    Two luminaires were evaluated to determine the light flux density pattern on a horizontal plane surface. NASA supplied both luminaires; one was made by NASA and the other is commercially available. Tests were made for three combinations of luminaire height and luminaire lens material using the NASA luminaire; only one configuration of the commercial luminaire was tested. Measurements were made using four sensors with different wavelength range capabilities. The data are presented in graphical and tabular formats.

  4. Optimizing Power Density and Efficiency of a Double-Halbach Array Permanent-Magnet Ironless Axial-Flux Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Kirsten P.

    2016-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center is investigating hybrid electric and turboelectric propulsion concepts for future aircraft to reduce fuel burn, emissions, and noise. Systems studies show that the weight and efficiency of the electric system components need to be improved for this concept to be feasible. This effort aims to identify design parameters that affect power density and efficiency for a double-Halbach array permanent-magnet ironless axial flux motor configuration. These parameters include both geometrical and higher-order parameters, including pole count, rotor speed, current density, and geometries of the magnets, windings, and air gap.

  5. Coupled-channels quantum theory of electronic flux density in electronically adiabatic processes: application to the hydrogen molecule ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diestler, D J; Kenfack, A; Manz, J; Paulus, B

    2012-03-22

    This article presents the results of the first quantum simulations of the electronic flux density (j(e)) by the "coupled-channels" (CC) theory, the fundamentals of which are presented in the previous article [Diestler, D. J. J. Phys. Chem. A 2012, DOI: 10.1021/jp207843z]. The principal advantage of the CC scheme is that it employs exclusively standard methods of quantum chemistry and quantum dynamics within the framework of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation (BOA). The CC theory goes beyond the BOA in that it yields a nonzero j(e) for electronically adiabatic processes, in contradistinction to the BOA itself, which always gives j(e) = 0. The CC is applied to oriented H(2)(+) vibrating in the electronic ground state ((2)Σ(g)(+)), for which the nuclear and electronic flux densities evolve on a common time scale of about 22 fs per vibrational period. The system is chosen as a touchstone for the CC theory, because it is the only one for which highly accurate flux densities have been calculated numerically without invoking the BOA [Barth et al, Chem. Phys. Lett. 2009, 481, 118]. Good agreement between CC and accurate results supports the CC approach, another advantage of which is that it allows a transparent interpretation of the temporal and spatial properties of j(e).

  6. A new measurement method of magnetic flux density using magnetorheological fluid characteristics and a variable resistor circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hwan-Choong; Han, Chulhee; Kim, Pyunghwa; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2015-08-01

    This work proposes a new approach with which to measure the magnetic flux density using the characteristics of magnetorheological fluid (MRF) that is integrated with a variable resistor. For convenience, it is called a magnetorheological fluid variable resistor (MRF-VR) system in this study. The mechanism of the MRF-VR is based on the interaction between ferromagnetic iron particles of the MRF due to an external magnetic field, which causes its electrical resistance to be field dependent. Using this salient principle, the proposed MRF-VR system is constructed with electrodes and MRF, and its performance is demonstrated by evaluating its electrical resistive characteristics such as dimensional influence, response time, hysteresis and frequency response. After evaluating the performance characteristics, a feedback control system with a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller is established, and resistance-trajectory control experiments are carried out. Based on this MRF-VR system, a magnetic field-sensing system is constructed using a Wheatstone bridge circuit, and a polynomial model for calculating the magnetic flux density is formulated from the measured voltage. Finally, the accuracy and effectiveness of the proposed sensing system associated with the empirical polynomial model is successfully verified by comparing the calculated values of magnetic flux density with those measured by a commercial tesla meter.

  7. Solar Modulation of Inner Trapped Belt Radiation Flux as a Function of Atmospheric Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodhi, M. A. K.

    2005-01-01

    No simple algorithm seems to exist for calculating proton fluxes and lifetimes in the Earth's inner, trapped radiation belt throughout the solar cycle. Most models of the inner trapped belt in use depend upon AP8 which only describes the radiation environment at solar maximum and solar minimum in Cycle 20. One exception is NOAAPRO which incorporates flight data from the TIROS/NOAA polar orbiting spacecraft. The present study discloses yet another, simple formulation for approximating proton fluxes at any time in a given solar cycle, in particular between solar maximum and solar minimum. It is derived from AP8 using a regression algorithm technique from nuclear physics. From flux and its time integral fluence, one can then approximate dose rate and its time integral dose.

  8. First observational application of a connectivity--based helicity flux density

    CERN Document Server

    Dalmasse, K; Valori, G; Démoulin, P; Green, L M

    2013-01-01

    Measuring the magnetic helicity distribution in the solar corona can help in understanding the trigger of solar eruptive events because magnetic helicity is believed to play a key role in solar activity due to its conservation property. A new method for computing the photospheric distribution of the helicity flux was recently developed. This method takes into account the magnetic field connectivity whereas previous methods were based on photospheric signatures only. This novel method maps the true injection of magnetic helicity in active regions. We applied this method for the first time to an observed active region, NOAA 11158, which was the source of intense flaring activity. We used high-resolution vector magnetograms from the SDO/HMI instrument to compute the photospheric flux transport velocities and to perform a nonlinear force-free magnetic field extrapolation. We determined and compared the magnetic helicity flux distribution using a purely photospheric as well as a connectivity-based method. While th...

  9. Order and creep in flux lattices and charge density wave pinned by planar defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petković, Aleksandra; Nattermann, Thomas

    2008-12-31

    The influence of randomly distributed point impurities and planar defects on the order and transport in type-II superconductors and related systems is considered theoretical. For random planar defects of identical orientation, the flux line lattice exhibits a new glassy phase with diverging shear and tilt modulus, a transverse Meissner effect, large sample to sample fluctuations of the susceptibility, and an exponential decay of translational long range order. The flux creep resistivity for currents J parallel to the defects is p(J) to approximately exp-(J0/J)mu with mu = 3/2. Strong disorder enforces an array of dislocations to relax shear

  10. Spontaneous synthesis of carbon nanowalls, nanotubes and nanotips using high flux density plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bystrov, K.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Arnas, C.; Marot, L.; Mathys, D.; Liu, F.; L.K. Xu,; X.B. Li,; A.V. Shalpegin,; De Temmerman, G.

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the formation of various carbon nanostructures using extreme plasma fluxes up to four orders of magnitude larger than in conventional plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition processing. Carbon nanowalls, multi-wall nanotubes, spherical nanoparticles and nanotips are among the

  11. The effect of a spatially heterogeneous transmural water flux on concentration polarization of low density lipoprotein in arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Peter E; Sherwin, Spencer J; Weinberg, Peter D

    2009-04-22

    Uptake of low density lipoprotein (LDL) by the arterial wall is likely to play a key role in atherogenesis. A particular process that may cause vascular scale heterogeneity in the rate of transendothelial LDL transport is the formation of a flow-dependent LDL concentration polarization layer on the luminal surface of the arterial endothelium. In this study, the effect of a spatially heterogeneous transmural water flux (that traverses the endothelium only via interendothelial cell clefts) on such concentration polarization is investigated numerically. Unlike in previous investigations, realistic intercellular cleft dimensions are used here and several values of LDL diffusivity are considered. Particular attention is paid to the spatially averaged LDL concentration adjacent to different regions of the endothelial surface, as such measures may be relevant to the rate of transendothelial LDL transport. It is demonstrated in principle that a heterogeneous transmural water flux can act to enhance such measures, and cause them to develop a shear dependence (in addition to that caused by vascular scale flow features, affecting the overall degree of LDL concentration polarization). However, it is shown that this enhancement and additional shear dependence are likely to be negligible for a physiologically realistic transmural flux velocity of 0.0439 mum s(-1) and an LDL diffusivity (in blood plasma) of 28.67 mum(2) s(-1). Hence, the results imply that vascular scale studies of LDL concentration polarization are justified in ignoring the effect of a spatially heterogeneous transmural water flux.

  12. Sap flow measurements combining sap-flux density radial profiles with punctual sap-flux density measurements in oak trees (Quercus ilex and Quercus pyrenaica) - water-use implications in a water-limited savanna-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, J. Leonardo; Lubczynski1, Maciek W.

    2010-05-01

    Sap flow measurement is a key aspect for understanding how plants use water and their impacts on the ecosystems. A variety of sensors have been developed to measure sap flow, each one with its unique characteristics. When the aim of a research is to have accurate tree water use calculations, with high temporal and spatial resolution (i.e. scaled), a sensor with high accuracy, high measurement efficiency, low signal-to-noise ratio and low price is ideal, but such has not been developed yet. Granier's thermal dissipation probes (TDP) have been widely used in many studies and various environmental conditions because of its simplicity, reliability, efficiency and low cost. However, it has two major flaws when is used in semi-arid environments and broad-stem tree species: it is often affected by high natural thermal gradients (NTG), which distorts the measurements, and it cannot measure the radial variability of sap-flux density in trees with sapwood thicker than two centimeters. The new, multi point heat field deformation sensor (HFD) is theoretically not affected by NTG, and it can measure the radial variability of the sap flow at different depths. However, its high cost is a serious limitation when simultaneous measurements are required in several trees (e.g. catchment-scale studies). The underlying challenge is to develop a monitoring schema in which HFD and TDP are combined to satisfy the needs of measurement efficiency and accuracy in water accounting. To assess the level of agreement between TDP and HFD methods in quantifying sap flow rates and temporal patterns on Quercus ilex (Q.i ) and Quercus pyrenaica trees (Q.p.), three measurement schemas: standard TDP, TDP-NTG-corrected and HFD were compared in dry season at the semi-arid Sardon area, near Salamanca in Spain in the period from June to September 2009. To correct TDP measurements with regard to radial sap flow variability, a radial sap flux density correction factor was applied and tested by adjusting TDP

  13. Optimization of Magneto-Rheological Damper for Maximizing Magnetic Flux Density in the Fluid Flow Gap Through FEA and GA Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Hemanth; Kumar, Hemantha; Gangadharan, Kalluvalappil

    2016-06-01

    A magneto rheological (MR) fluid damper offers cost effective solution for semiactive vibration control in an automobile suspension. The performance of MR damper is significantly depends on the electromagnetic circuit incorporated into it. The force developed by MR fluid damper is highly influenced by the magnetic flux density induced in the fluid flow gap. In the present work, optimization of electromagnetic circuit of an MR damper is discussed in order to maximize the magnetic flux density. The optimization procedure was proposed by genetic algorithm and design of experiments techniques. The result shows that the fluid flow gap size less than 1.12 mm cause significant increase of magnetic flux density.

  14. Optimization of Magneto-Rheological Damper for Maximizing Magnetic Flux Density in the Fluid Flow Gap Through FEA and GA Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Hemanth; Kumar, Hemantha; Gangadharan, Kalluvalappil

    2017-08-01

    A magneto rheological (MR) fluid damper offers cost effective solution for semiactive vibration control in an automobile suspension. The performance of MR damper is significantly depends on the electromagnetic circuit incorporated into it. The force developed by MR fluid damper is highly influenced by the magnetic flux density induced in the fluid flow gap. In the present work, optimization of electromagnetic circuit of an MR damper is discussed in order to maximize the magnetic flux density. The optimization procedure was proposed by genetic algorithm and design of experiments techniques. The result shows that the fluid flow gap size less than 1.12 mm cause significant increase of magnetic flux density.

  15. Demonstration of the density dependence of x-ray flux in a laser-driven hohlraum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, P E; Rosen, M D; Hammer, J H; Hsing, W S; Glendinning, S G; Turner, R E; Kirkwood, R; Schein, J; Sorce, C; Satcher, J H; Hamza, A; Reibold, R A; Hibbard, R; Landen, O; Reighard, A; McAlpin, S; Stevenson, M; Thomas, B

    2008-07-18

    Experiments have been conducted using laser-driven cylindrical hohlraums whose walls are machined from Ta2O5 foams of 100 mg/cc and 4 g/cc densities. Measurements of the radiation temperature demonstrate that the lower density walls produce higher radiation temperatures than the high density walls. This is the first experimental demonstration of the prediction that this would occur [M. D. Rosen and J. H. Hammer, Phys. Rev. E 72, 056403 (2005)10.1103/PhysRevE.72.056403]. For high density walls, the radiation front propagates subsonically, and part of the absorbed energy is wasted by the flow kinetic energy. For the lower wall density, the front velocity is supersonic and can devote almost all of the absorbed energy to heating the wall.

  16. Calibration and evaluation of CCD spectroradiometers for ground-based and airborne measurements of spectral actinic flux densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Birger; Lohse, Insa

    2017-09-01

    The properties and performance of charge-coupled device (CCD) array spectroradiometers for the measurement of atmospheric spectral actinic flux densities (280-650 nm) and photolysis frequencies were investigated. These instruments are widely used in atmospheric research and are suitable for aircraft applications because of high time resolutions and high sensitivities in the UV range. The laboratory characterization included instrument-specific properties like the wavelength accuracy, dark signal, dark noise and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Spectral sensitivities were derived from measurements with spectral irradiance standards. The calibration procedure is described in detail, and a straightforward method to minimize the influence of stray light on spectral sensitivities is introduced. From instrument dark noise, minimum detection limits ≈ 1 × 1010 cm-2 s-1 nm-1 were derived for spectral actinic flux densities at wavelengths around 300 nm (1 s integration time). As a prerequisite for the determination of stray light under field conditions, atmospheric cutoff wavelengths were defined using radiative transfer calculations as a function of the solar zenith angle (SZA) and total ozone column (TOC). The recommended analysis of field data relies on these cutoff wavelengths and is also described in detail taking data from a research flight on HALO (High Altitude and Long Range Research Aircraft) as an example. An evaluation of field data was performed by ground-based comparisons with a double-monochromator-based, highly sensitive reference spectroradiometer. Spectral actinic flux densities were compared as well as photolysis frequencies j(NO2) and j(O1D), representing UV-A and UV-B ranges, respectively. The spectra expectedly revealed increased daytime levels of stray-light-induced signals and noise below atmospheric cutoff wavelengths. The influence of instrument noise and stray-light-induced noise was found to be insignificant for j(NO2) and rather limited for j(O1D

  17. Stochastic Geomorphology: Indexing Climate Change Through Shifts in Probability Densities of Erosion, Sediment Flux, Storage and Habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benda, L. E.

    2009-12-01

    Stochastic geomorphology refers to the interaction of the stochastic field of sediment supply with hierarchically branching river networks where erosion, sediment flux and storage are described by their probability densities. The conceptual and numerical framework can generate a series of general principles (hypotheses) on how basin-scale erosion and sedimentation regimes, viewed through the lens of probability distributions, change with variations in climate, topography, geology, vegetation, basin scale, and network topology; for more detail on the general principles see AGU session EP02. The conceptual and numerical framework of stochastic geomorphology is well suited for forecasting and interpreting affects of climate change on geomorphological systems, including the habitats associated with them. Climate change involves shifts in probability distributions of precipitation (rain and snow), fires, and wind. Consequently, shifts in distributions of precipitation frequency and magnitude or wildfire frequency, intensity and size should lead to shifts in erosion, sediment flux and sedimentation distributions. Shifts could include either a greater or lesser skew of their attendant probability densities. For example, increasing the frequency of fires in a stochastic simulation model of erosion and sedimentation will lead to altered frequency and magnitude of hillslope erosion in the form of pulses of sediment through the river network. This will be reflected in shifts in the probability densities of erosion and sedimentation and also how sediment flux and storage distributions evolve downstream in river networks. Heightened erosion frequency and magnitude due to climate change can increase Hurst Effects in time series of sediment flux and thus an increase in depletion of hillslope stores of sediment can result in temporally lingering sedimentation affects throughout river networks, even if climate relaxed to pre-change conditions. Similarly, heightened hillslope

  18. A study of the effects of flux density and frequency of pulsed electromagnetic field on neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Ding, Jun; Duan, Wei

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of pulsed electromagnetic fields with various flux densities and frequencies on neurite outgrowth in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells. We have studied the percentage of neurite-bearing cells, average length of neurites and directivity of neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells cultured for 96 hours in the presence of nerve growth factor (NGF). PC12 cells were exposed to 50 Hz pulsed electromagnetic fields with a flux density of 1.37 mT, 0.19 mT and 0.016 mT respectively. The field was generated through a Helmholtz coil pair housed in one incubator and the control samples were placed in another identical incubator. It was found that exposure to both a relatively high flux density (1.37 mT) and a medium flux density (0.19 mT) inhibited the percentage of neurite-bearing cells and promoted neurite length significantly. Exposure to high flux density (1.37 mT) also resulted in nearly 20% enhancement of neurite directivity along the field direction. However, exposure to low flux density field (0.016 mT) had no detectable effect on neurite outgrowth. We also studied the effect of frequency at the constant flux density of 1.37 mT. In the range from 1 approximately 100 Hz, only 50 and 70 Hz pulse frequencies had significant effects on neurite outgrowth. Our study has shown that neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells is sensitive to flux density and frequency of pulsed electromagnetic field.

  19. Seeding magnetic fields for laser-driven flux compression in high-energy-density plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotchev, O V; Knauer, J P; Chang, P Y; Jang, N W; Shoup, M J; Meyerhofer, D D; Betti, R

    2009-04-01

    A compact, self-contained magnetic-seed-field generator (5 to 16 T) is the enabling technology for a novel laser-driven flux-compression scheme in laser-driven targets. A magnetized target is directly irradiated by a kilojoule or megajoule laser to compress the preseeded magnetic field to thousands of teslas. A fast (300 ns), 80 kA current pulse delivered by a portable pulsed-power system is discharged into a low-mass coil that surrounds the laser target. A >15 T target field has been demonstrated using a capacitor bank, a laser-triggered switch, and a low-impedance (<1 Omega) strip line. The device has been integrated into a series of magnetic-flux-compression experiments on the 60 beam, 30 kJ OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. The initial application is a novel magneto-inertial fusion approach [O. V. Gotchev et al., J. Fusion Energy 27, 25 (2008)] to inertial confinement fusion (ICF), where the amplified magnetic field can inhibit thermal conduction losses from the hot spot of a compressed target. This can lead to the ignition of massive shells imploded with low velocity-a way of reaching higher gains than is possible with conventional ICF.

  20. Influences of environmental factors on the radial profile of sap flux density in Fagus crenata growing at different elevations in the Naeba Mountains, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Mitsumasa; Tenhunen, John; Zimmerman, Reiner; Schmidt, Markus; Adiku, Samuel; Kakubari, Yoshitaka

    2005-05-01

    Sap flux density was measured continuously during the 1999 and 2000 growing seasons by the heat dissipation method in natural Fagus crenata Blume (Japanese beech) forests growing between 550 and 1600 m on the northern slope of the Kagura Peak of the Naeba Mountains, Japan. Sap flux density decreased radially toward the inner xylem and the decrease was best expressed in relation to the number of annual rings from the cambium, or in relation to the relative depth between the cambium and the trunk center, rather than as a function of absolute depth. The relative influences of radiation, vapor pressure deficit and soil water on sap flux density during the growing season were similar for the outer and inner xylem, and at all sites. Measurements of soil water content and water potential at a depth of 0.25 m demonstrated that sap flux density responded similarly and sensitively to water potential changes in this soil layer, despite large differences in rooting depth at different elevations, localizing one important control point in the functioning of this forest ecosystem. Identification of the relative influences of radiation, vapor pressure deficit and drying of the upper soil layer on sap flux density provides a framework for in-depth analysis of the control of transpiration in Japanese beech forests. In addition, the finding that the same general controls are operating on sap flux density despite climate gradients and large differences in overall forest stand structure will enhance understanding of water use by forests along elevation gradients.

  1. A DETERMINATION OF THE FLUX DENSITY IN CORE OF DISTRIBUTION TRANSFORMERS, WHAT BUILT WITH THE COMMON USING OF GRAIN AND NON GRAIN ORIENTED MAGNETIC STEELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Pentegov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The development of calculation method to determinate the flux densities in different parts of the magnetic cores of distribution transformers, what built from different types magnetic steel (mixed core. Methodology. The method is based on the scientific positions of Theoretical Electrical Engineering – the theory of the electromagnetic field in nonlinear mediums to determine the distribution of magnetic flux in mixed core of transformer, what are using different types of steel what have the different magnetic properties. Results. The developed method gives possible to make calculation of the flux density and influence of skin effect in different parts of the magnetic cores of distribution transformer, where are used mix of grain oriented (GO and non grain oriented (NGO steels. Was determinate the general basic conditions for the calculation of flux density in the laminations from grain and non grain oriented steels of the magnetic core: the strength of magnetic field for the laminations of particular part of mixed core is the same; the sum of the magnetic fluxes in GO and NGO steels in particular part of mixed core is equal with the designed magnetic flux in this part of mixed core. Discover, the magnetic flux in mixed core of the transformer has specific distribution between magnetic steels. The flux density is higher in laminations from GO steel and smaller in laminations from the NGO steel. That is happened because for magnetic flux is easier pass through laminations from GO steel, what has better magnetic conductance than laminations from NGO steel. Originality. The common using of different types of magnetic steels in cores for distribution transformers gives possibility to make design of transformer with low level of no load losses, high efficiency and with optimal cost. Practical value. The determination of the flux density in different parts of magnetic core with GO and NGO steels gives possibility make accurate calculation of

  2. Responses of Sap Flux Density to Changing Atmospheric Humidity in Three Common Street Tree Species in Bangkok, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantana Tor-ngern

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Efficient water management in urban landscape is imperative under the projected increases in drought stress under future climate. Because different tree species have different stomatal regulations to prevent water loss under water limitation, comparative study of species-specific responses of water use to changing weather conditions will benefit selective planting of urban trees for sustainable urban greening management. Here, we performed a simple and short-term investigation of water use characteristics of three common street tree species in Bangkok, a major city in Southeast Asia. Species included Pterocarpus indicus (Pi, Swietenia macrophylla (Sm and Lagerstroemia speciosa (Ls. We used self-constructed heat dissipation probes to track water uptake rates, expressed as sap flux density (JS, in stems of potted trees and examined their diurnal variations with changing atmospheric humidity, represented by vapor pressure deficit (D. The results implied that two of the three species: Pi and Sm, may be selected for planting because their Js was less sensitive to changing D compared to Ls. The sap flux density of Ls increased more rapidly with rising D, implying higher sensitivity to drought in Ls, compared to the other two species. Nevertheless, further study on large trees and under longer period of investigation, covering both dry and wet seasons, is required to confirm this finding.

  3. Ten-year prediction of osteoporosis from baseline bone mineral density: development of prognostic thresholds in healthy postmenopausal women. The Danish Osteoporosis Prevention Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Bo; Rejnmark, Lars; Nielsen, Stig Pors;

    2006-01-01

    Osteopenia is common in healthy women examined in the first year or two following menopause. Short-term fracture risk is low, but we lack algorithms to assess long-term risk of osteoporosis. Because bone loss proceeds at only a few percent per year, we speculated that baseline bone mineral density...... (BMD) would predict a large proportion of 10-year BMD and be useful for deriving predictive thresholds. We aimed to identify prognostic thresholds associated with less than 10% risk of osteoporosis by 10 years in the individual participant, in order to allow rational osteodensitometry and intervention....... We analyzed dual energy X-ray absorptometry (DXA) of the lumbar spine (LS) and femoral neck (FN) from 872 women, who participated in the non-HRT arms of the Danish Osteoporosis Prevention Study and had remained on no HRT, bisphosphonates or raloxifene since inclusion 10 years ago. We defined...

  4. The Second Threshold Field of Charge-Density-Wave Conductor Rb0.3MoO3 in High Temperature Range

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Da-Hua; XIONG Rui; WANG Jun-Feng; LI Chang-Zhen; YIN Di; YI Fan; TANG Wu-Feng; SHI Jing

    2005-01-01

    @@ The switching and threshold properties of quasi-one-dimensional charge-density-wave conductor rubidium blue bronze Rb0.3MoO3 single crystals are investigated in a comparative high and large temperature range. Beyond the limit temperature 50 K of Littlewood's theory, even up to about 100K, typical sharp switching to negative or zero differential resistance is observed in E-I characteristic curves. Correspondingly, an obvious switching between two conducting states, from a lowly conducting state to a highly conducting state, is observed in the I-E characteristic curves in the same temperature range. Temperature dependence of the second threshold field ET2 accompanied by this kind of high field switching behaviour is firstly obtained. These new observations are discussed in the mechanism of the current inhomogeneity and redistribution due to the existence of transverse energy barriers suggested by Zhang et al. [Solid State Commun. 85 (1993) 121

  5. Laser-driven magnetic-flux compression in high-energy-density plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotchev, O V; Chang, P Y; Knauer, J P; Meyerhofer, D D; Polomarov, O; Frenje, J; Li, C K; Manuel, M J-E; Petrasso, R D; Rygg, J R; Séguin, F H; Betti, R

    2009-11-20

    The demonstration of magnetic field compression to many tens of megagauss in cylindrical implosions of inertial confinement fusion targets is reported for the first time. The OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly, Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)10.1016/S0030-4018(96)00325-2] was used to implode cylindrical CH targets filled with deuterium gas and seeded with a strong external field (>50 kG) from a specially developed magnetic pulse generator. This seed field was trapped (frozen) in the shock-heated gas fill and compressed by the imploding shell at a high implosion velocity, minimizing the effect of resistive flux diffusion. The magnetic fields in the compressed core were probed via proton deflectrometry using the fusion products from an imploding D3He target. Line-averaged magnetic fields between 30 and 40 MG were observed.

  6. A probability density function of liftoff velocities in mixed-size wind sand flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    With the discrete element method(DEM) ,employing the diameter distribution of natural sands sampled from the Tengger Desert,a mixed-size sand bed was produced and the particle-bed collision was simulated in the mixed-size wind sand movement. In the simulation,the shear wind velocity,particle diameter,incident velocity and incident angle of the impact sand particle were given the same values as the experimental results. After the particle-bed collision,we collected all the initial velocities of rising sand particles,including the liftoff angular velocities,liftoff linear velocities and their horizontal and vertical components. By the statistical analysis on the velocity sample for each velocity component,its probability density functions were obtained,and they are the functions of the shear wind velocity. The liftoff velocities and their horizontal and vertical components are distributed as an exponential density function,while the angular velocities are distributed as a normal density function.

  7. Evaluation of Growth Indices and Estimation Seed Yield Loss Threshold of Canola in Response to Various Densities of Crop and Wild Mustard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Anafjeh

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In order to study the effect of various densities of wild mustard (Sinapis arvensis L. on growth indices of Canola (Brassica napus L. in climate of Molathani, Ahvaz, an experiment was conducted in the experimental field of Ramin Agricultural and Natural Resources University, in 2006-2007. The split-plot set of treatments was arranged within randomized complete block design with four replications. Treatments included of wild mustard at five levels (0, 7, 14, 21 and 35 plants m2 and Canola at three densities (60, 80 and 100 plants m2. The results showed that the increase in mustard density rates lead to decreasing total dry matter, leaf area index, crop growth rate, relative growth rate and mean pod dry matter in three canola densities (60, 80 and 100 plants m2. Somewhat the lowest growth indices was obtained in 35 plants mustard (that is the highest mustard density. In addition damage rate of mustard decreased canola seed yield for 7, 14, 21 and 35 plants mustard up to 61, 71, 76 and 91%, respectively. Keywords: Plant density, Competition, Yield loss threshold, Growth indices, Canola, Mustard

  8. BREAST DENSITY EVALUATION: A COMPARISON BETWEEN ASSESSMENT BY A RADIOLOGIST AND THE COMPUTER-ASSISTED THRESHOLD TECHNIQUE

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, mammographic density (MD) of the breast has been assessed by a radiologist visually. This subjective evaluation requires significant experience to distinguish the relative proportions of the fibrous connective tissue and adipose tissue in the mammary gland correctly. The aim of this study is to compare the capabilities of the different methods (visual and computer-assisted) for assessing mammographic density. Our sample in this study consists of 66 patients with digital m...

  9. Variability in radial sap flux density patterns and sapwood area among seven co-occurring temperate broad-leaved tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebauer, Tobias; Horna, Viviana; Leuschner, Christoph

    2008-12-01

    Forest transpiration estimates are frequently based on xylem sap flux measurements in the outer sections of the hydro-active stem sapwood. We used Granier's constant-heating technique with heating probes at various xylem depths to analyze radial patterns of sap flux density in the sapwood of seven broad-leaved tree species differing in wood density and xylem structure. Study aims were to (1) compare radial sap flux density profiles between diffuse- and ring-porous trees and (2) analyze the relationship between hydro-active sapwood area and stem diameter. In all investigated species except the diffuse-porous beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and ring-porous ash (Fraxinus excelsior L.), sap flux density peaked at a depth of 1 to 4 cm beneath the cambium, revealing a hump-shaped curve with species-specific slopes. Beech and ash reached maximum sap flux densities immediately beneath the cambium in the youngest annual growth rings. Experiments with dyes showed that the hydro-active sapwood occupied 70 to 90% of the stem cross-sectional area in mature trees of diffuse-porous species, whereas it occupied only about 21% in ring-porous ash. Dendrochronological analyses indicated that vessels in the older sapwood may remain functional for 100 years or more in diffuse-porous species and for up to 27 years in ring-porous ash. We conclude that radial sap flux density patterns are largely dependent on tree species, which may introduce serious bias in sap-flux-derived forest transpiration estimates, if non-specific sap flux profiles are assumed.

  10. A state-space modeling approach to estimating canopy conductance and associated uncertainties from sap flux density data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, David M; Ward, Eric J; Oishi, A Christopher; Oren, Ram; Flikkema, Paul G; Clark, James S

    2015-07-01

    Uncertainties in ecophysiological responses to environment, such as the impact of atmospheric and soil moisture conditions on plant water regulation, limit our ability to estimate key inputs for ecosystem models. Advanced statistical frameworks provide coherent methodologies for relating observed data, such as stem sap flux density, to unobserved processes, such as canopy conductance and transpiration. To address this need, we developed a hierarchical Bayesian State-Space Canopy Conductance (StaCC) model linking canopy conductance and transpiration to tree sap flux density from a 4-year experiment in the North Carolina Piedmont, USA. Our model builds on existing ecophysiological knowledge, but explicitly incorporates uncertainty in canopy conductance, internal tree hydraulics and observation error to improve estimation of canopy conductance responses to atmospheric drought (i.e., vapor pressure deficit), soil drought (i.e., soil moisture) and above canopy light. Our statistical framework not only predicted sap flux observations well, but it also allowed us to simultaneously gap-fill missing data as we made inference on canopy processes, marking a substantial advance over traditional methods. The predicted and observed sap flux data were highly correlated (mean sensor-level Pearson correlation coefficient = 0.88). Variations in canopy conductance and transpiration associated with environmental variation across days to years were many times greater than the variation associated with model uncertainties. Because some variables, such as vapor pressure deficit and soil moisture, were correlated at the scale of days to weeks, canopy conductance responses to individual environmental variables were difficult to interpret in isolation. Still, our results highlight the importance of accounting for uncertainty in models of ecophysiological and ecosystem function where the process of interest, canopy conductance in this case, is not observed directly. The StaCC modeling

  11. Influence of clouds on the spectral actinic flux density in the lower troposphere (INSPECTRO: overview of the field campaigns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Thiel

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet radiation is the key factor driving tropospheric photochemistry. It is strongly modulated by clouds and aerosols. A quantitative understanding of the radiation field and its effect on photochemistry is thus only possible with a detailed knowledge of the interaction between clouds and radiation. The overall objective of the project INSPECTRO was the characterization of the three-dimensional actinic radiation field under cloudy conditions. This was achieved during two measurement campaigns in Norfolk (East Anglia, UK and Lower Bavaria (Germany combining space-based, aircraft and ground-based measurements as well as simulations with the one-dimensional radiation transfer model UVSPEC and the three-dimensional radiation transfer model MYSTIC.

    During both campaigns the spectral actinic flux density was measured at several locations at ground level and in the air by up to four different aircraft. This allows the comparison of measured and simulated actinic radiation profiles. In addition satellite data were used to complete the information of the three dimensional input data set for the simulation. A three-dimensional simulation of actinic flux density data under cloudy sky conditions requires a realistic simulation of the cloud field to be used as an input for the 3-D radiation transfer model calculations. Two different approaches were applied, to derive high- and low-resolution data sets, with a grid resolution of about 100 m and 1 km, respectively.

    The results of the measured and simulated radiation profiles as well as the results of the ground based measurements are presented in terms of photolysis rate profiles for ozone and nitrogen dioxide. During both campaigns all spectroradiometer systems agreed within ±10% if mandatory corrections e.g. stray light correction were applied. Stability changes of the systems were below 5% over the 4 week campaign periods and negligible over a few days. The J(O1D data of

  12. Influence of clouds on the spectral actinic flux density in the lower troposphere (INSPECTRO: overview of the field campaigns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Topaloglou

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet radiation is the key factor driving tropospheric photochemistry. It is strongly modulated by clouds and aerosols. A quantitative understanding of the radiation field and its effect on photochemistry is thus only possible with a detailed knowledge of the interaction between clouds and radiation. The overall objective of the project INSPECTRO was the characterization of the three-dimensional actinic radiation field under cloudy conditions. This was achieved during two measurement campaigns in Norfolk (East Anglia, UK and Lower Bavaria (Germany combining space-based, aircraft and ground-based measurements as well as simulations with the one-dimensional radiation transfer model UVSPEC and the three-dimensional radiation transfer model MYSTIC.

    During both campaigns the spectral actinic flux density was measured at several locations at ground level and in the air by up to four different aircraft. This allows the comparison of measured and simulated actinic radiation profiles. In addition satellite data were used to complete the information of the three dimensional input data set for the simulation. A three-dimensional simulation of actinic flux density data under cloudy sky conditions requires a realistic simulation of the cloud field to be used as an input for the 3-D radiation transfer model calculations. Two different approaches were applied, to derive high- and low-resolution data sets, with a grid resolution of about 100 m and 1 km, respectively.

    The results of the measured and simulated radiation profiles as well as the results of the ground based measurements are presented in terms of photolysis rate profiles for ozone and nitrogen dioxide. During both campaigns all spectroradiometer systems agreed within ±10% if mandatory corrections e.g. stray light correction were applied. Stability changes of the systems were below 5% over the 4 week campaign periods and negligible over a few days. The J(O1D data of

  13. High density flux of Co nanoparticles produced by a simple gas aggregation apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, G T; Romero, S A; Santos, A D

    2010-03-01

    Gas aggregation is a well known method used to produce clusters of different materials with good size control, reduced dispersion, and precise stoichiometry. The cost of these systems is relatively high and they are generally dedicated apparatuses. Furthermore, the usual sample production speed of these systems is not as fast as physical vapor deposition devices posing a problem when thick samples are needed. In this paper we describe the development of a multipurpose gas aggregation system constructed as an adaptation to a magnetron sputtering system. The cost of this adaptation is negligible and its installation and operation are both remarkably simple. The gas flow for flux in the range of 60-130 SCCM (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP) is able to completely collimate all the sputtered material, producing spherical nanoparticles. Co nanoparticles were produced and characterized using electron microscopy techniques and Rutherford back-scattering analysis. The size of the particles is around 10 nm with around 75 nm/min of deposition rate at the center of a Gaussian profile nanoparticle beam.

  14. High density flux of Co nanoparticles produced by a simple gas aggregation apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landi, G. T.; Romero, S. A.; Santos, A. D. [Departamento de Fisica dos Materiais e Mecanica, Laboratorio de Materiais Magneticos, Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 66318, 05314-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2010-03-15

    Gas aggregation is a well known method used to produce clusters of different materials with good size control, reduced dispersion, and precise stoichiometry. The cost of these systems is relatively high and they are generally dedicated apparatuses. Furthermore, the usual sample production speed of these systems is not as fast as physical vapor deposition devices posing a problem when thick samples are needed. In this paper we describe the development of a multipurpose gas aggregation system constructed as an adaptation to a magnetron sputtering system. The cost of this adaptation is negligible and its installation and operation are both remarkably simple. The gas flow for flux in the range of 60-130 SCCM (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP) is able to completely collimate all the sputtered material, producing spherical nanoparticles. Co nanoparticles were produced and characterized using electron microscopy techniques and Rutherford back-scattering analysis. The size of the particles is around 10 nm with around 75 nm/min of deposition rate at the center of a Gaussian profile nanoparticle beam.

  15. Convective heat flow in space cryogenics plugs - Critical and moderate He II heat flux densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, S. W. K.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1990-01-01

    Plug flow rates of entropy, heat and normal fluid in phase separators and in zero net mass flow systems are, to some extent, quite similar. A simplified analysis of critical conditions is presented in agreement with data trends. A critical temperature gradient arises on the basis of the He II two-fluid model at the stability limit constraining the thermohydrodynamics of the system. Thus, the question of critical thermodynamic fluctuations associated with nucleation versus the possibility of critical gradients in externally imposed parameters is answered in favor of the latter route toward turbulence. Furthermore, a similarity equation is presented which incorporates size dependent rates for moderate heat flow densities observed in experiments.

  16. Scanning micro-Hall probe mapping of magnetic flux distributions and current densities in YBa2Cu3O7 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, W.; Heinrich, B.; Zhou, HU; Fife, A. A.; Cragg, A. R.; Grant, P. D.

    1995-01-01

    Mapping of the magnetic flux density B(sub z) (perpendicular to the film plane) for a YBa2Cu3O7 thin-film sample was carried out using a scanning micro-Hall probe. The sheet magnetization and sheet current densities were calculated from the B(sub z) distributions. From the known sheet magnetization, the tangential (B(sub x,y)) and normal components of the flux density B were calculated in the vicinity of the film. It was found that the sheet current density was mostly determined by 2B(sub x,y)/d, where d is the film thickness. The evolution of flux penetration as a function of applied field will be shown.

  17. Scanning micro-Hall probe mapping of magnetic flux distributions and current densities in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, W.; Heinrich, B. [Simon Fraser Univ., British Columbia (Canada); Zhou, H. [CTF Systems, Inc., British Columbia (Canada)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    Mapping of the magnetic flux density B{sub z} (perpendicular to the film plane) for a YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} thin-film sample was carried out using a scanning micro-Hall probe. The sheet magnetization and sheet current densities were calculated from the B{sub z} distributions. From the known sheet magnetization, the tangential (B{sub x,y}) and normal components of the flux density B were calculated in the vicinity of the film. It was found that the sheet current density was mostly determined by 2B{sub x,y}/d, where d is the film thickness. The evolution of flux penetration as a function of applied field will be shown.

  18. Phototactic number-density flux in the localized bioconvection of Euglena gracilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Erika; Suematsu, Nobuhiko; Nishimori, Hiraku; Awazu, Akinori; Izumi, Shunsuke; Iima, Makoto

    2014-11-01

    Euglena gracilis is a unicellular phototactic flagellate; it escapes from light sources if the light intensity is higher than 200 W/m2 (negative phototaxis). When the suspension of E. gracilis is illuminated from the bottom by strong light, bioconvection patterns are generated. In the case of E. gracilis, the patterns can be spatially localized. The localization mechanism has not been clarified. We report experimental results related to the localization mechanism. In particular, we experimentally measured the strength of the phototaxis in the lateral direction as well as vertical direction. We prepared a thin container in which the suspension is included, and gave the linearly-changing light intensity. We found the number density gets a peak at a particular light intensity, which never happens if the suspension has the vertical phototaxis only. Further, we succeeded in getting the function representing lateral phototaxis. The relationship between the measured functions and the localized convection cells will be also reported.

  19. Influence of the flux density on the radiation damage of bipolar silicon transistors by protons and electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannikov, Y.; Gorin, B.; Kozhevnikov, V.; Mikhnovich, V.; Gusev, L.

    1981-11-01

    It was found experimentally that the radiation damage of bipolar n-p-n transistors increased by a factor of 8--12 when the proton flux density was reduced from 4.07 x 10/sup 10/ to 2.5 x 10/sup 7/ cm/sup -2/ sec /sup -1/. In the case of p-n-p transistors the effect was opposite: there was a reduction in the radiation damage by a factor of 2--3 when the dose rate was lowered between the same limits. A similar effect was observed for electrons but at dose rates three orders of magnitude greater. The results were attributed to the dependences of the radiation defect-forming reactions on the charge state of defects which was influenced by the formation of disordered regions in the case of proton irradiation.

  20. Yield and Water Productivity Responses to Irrigation Cut-off Strategies after Fruit Set Using Stem Water Potential Thresholds in a Super-High Density Olive Orchard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahumada-Orellana, Luis E; Ortega-Farías, Samuel; Searles, Peter S; Retamales, Jorge B

    2017-01-01

    An increase in the land area dedicated to super-high density olive orchards has occurred in Chile in recent years. Such modern orchards have high irrigation requirements, and optimizing water use is a priority. Moreover, this region presents low water availability, which makes necessary to establish irrigation strategies to improve water productivity. An experiment was conducted during four consecutive growing seasons (2010-2011 to 2013-2014) to evaluate the responses of yield and water productivity to irrigation cut-off strategies. These strategies were applied after fruit set using midday stem water potential (Ψstem) thresholds in a super-high density olive orchard (cv. Arbequina), located in the Pencahue Valley, Maule Region, Chile. The experimental design was completely randomized with four irrigation cut-off treatments based on the Ψstem thresholds and four replicate plots per treatment (five trees per plot). Similar to commercial growing conditions in our region, the Ψstem in the T1 treatment was maintained between -1.4 and -2.2 MPa (100% of actual evapotranspiration), while T2, T3 and T4 treatments did not receive irrigation from fruit set until they reached a Ψstem threshold of approximately -3.5, -5.0, and -6.0 MPa, respectively. Once the specific thresholds were reached, irrigation was restored and maintained as T1 in all treatments until fruits were harvested. Yield and its components were not significantly different between T1 and T2, but fruit yield and total oil yield, fruit weight, and fruit diameter were decreased by the T3 and T4 treatments. Moreover, yield showed a linear response with water stress integral (SΨ), which was strongly influenced by fruit load. Total oil content (%) and pulp/stone ratio were not affected by the different irrigation strategies. Also, fruit and oil water productivities were significantly greater in T1 and T2 than in the T3 and T4. Moreover, the T2, T3, and T4 treatments averaged 37, 51, and 72 days without

  1. BREAST DENSITY EVALUATION: A COMPARISON BETWEEN ASSESSMENT BY A RADIOLOGIST AND THE COMPUTER-ASSISTED THRESHOLD TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Baytchev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, mammographic density (MD of the breast has been assessed by a radiologist visually. This subjective evaluation requires significant experience to distinguish the relative proportions of the fibrous connective tissue and adipose tissue in the mammary gland correctly. The aim of this study is to compare the capabilities of the different methods (visual and computer-assisted for assessing mammographic density. Our sample in this study consists of 66 patients with digital mammography. The mammographic density has been evaluated using the four-grade scale of the American College of Radiology (ACR; visually, visually using an analog scale and semi-automated using UTHSCSA Image Tool 3.0, Image J and Adobe Photoshop CS6 software. The average mammographic density calculated using the different methods is as follows: 34.8% (from 10% to 70%; 32.1% (from 10% to 60%; 23% (from 0% to 70.9%; 22.7% (from 2.5% to 78.1% and 22.5% (from 1.5% to 72.4%. There is a strong correlation between the results obtained visually and those calculated using a computer-assisted measurement (p< 0.0001. A strong correlation was found also between the results acquired using the different semi-automated programs (p< 0.0001. Precise measurement of mammographic density is of great importance for the mammographic screening and evaluation of breast cancer risk. The semi-automated methods, used for this purpose are objective, accessible and reproducible tools and have some advantages over the subjective visual assessment.

  2. Magnetic flux density measurement with balanced steady state free precession pulse sequence for MREIT: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minhas, Atul S; Woo, Eung Je; Lee, Soo Yeol

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Electrical Impedance Tomography (MREIT) utilizes the magnetic flux density B(z), generated due to current injection, to find conductivity distribution inside an object. This B(z) can be measured from MR phase images using spin echo pulse sequence. The SNR of B(z) and the sensitivity of phase produced by B(z) in MR phase image are critical in deciding the resolution of MREIT conductivity images. The conventional spin echo based data acquisition has poor phase sensitivity to current injection. Longer scan time is needed to acquire data with higher SNR. We propose a balanced steady state free precession (b-SSFP) based pulse sequence which is highly sensitive to small off-resonance phase changes. A procedure to reconstruct B(z) from MR signal obtained with b-SSFP sequence is described. Phases for b-SSFP signals for two conductivity phantoms of TX 151 and Gelatin are simulated from the mathematical models of b-SSFP signal. It was observed that the phase changes obtained from b-SSFP pulse sequence are highly sensitive to current injection and hence would produce higher magnetic flux density. However, the b-SSFP signal is dependent on magnetic field inhomogeneity and the signal deteriorated highly for small offset from resonance frequency. The simulation results show that the b-SSFP sequence can be utilized for conductivity imaging of a local region where magnetic field inhomogeneity is small. A proper shimming of magnet is recommended before using the b-SSFP sequence.

  3. Importance of 3-D radiant flux densities for outdoor human thermal comfort on clear-sky summer days in Freiburg, Southwest Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunjung Lee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study concerns the role of short- and long-wave radiant flux densities from different directions in complex urban settings for human thermal comfort on clear-sky summer days. The aims of the investigation are to quantify the importance of the sky view factor as an urban design-dependent variable for the 3-D radiant flux densities absorbed by the standardized human-biometeorological reference person and to analyze the varying impact of the absorbed 3-D short- and long-wave radiant flux densities on the mean radiant temperature (Tmrt$T_{\\text{mrt}}$, near-surface air temperature (Ta$T_{\\text{a}}$ and physiologically equivalent temperature (PET.The results obtained by measuring campaigns and numerical simulations point to the different importance of the absorbed 3-D radiant flux densities for human thermal comfort characterized by Ta$T_{\\text{a}}$, Tmrt$T_{\\text{mrt}}$ and PET. The magnitude of Tmrt$T_{\\text{mrt}}$ is mainly determined by the total of the absorbed 3-D long-wave radiant flux densities. However, the fluctuations of Tmrt$T_{\\text{mrt}}$ are mainly governed by the total of the absorbed 3-D short-wave radiant flux densities. Their variance can be well explained by the variance of the sky view factor related to the southern part of the upper half space. Taking account of the different impact of the 3-D radiant flux densities, Tmrt$T_{\\text{mrt}}$ can be quite well estimated by a multiple regression using the total of the absorbed 3-D short-wave radiant flux densities and the absorbed long-wave radiant flux density from the lower half space as independent variables. PET can be well estimated by a multiple regression showing Tmrt$T_{\\text{mrt}}$ and Ta$T_{\\text{a}}$ as independent variables. On a hot summer day, the increase of the albedo of vertical building walls within a simple E-W oriented street canyon leads to a decrease of the surface temperature of the S-facing wall, but to an increase of Tmrt$T_{\\text{mrt}}$ and PET

  4. A common column density threshold for scattering at 3.6 mum and water-ice in molecular clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Andersen, M; Steinacker, J; Tothill, N

    2014-01-01

    Context: Observations of scattered light in the 1-5 $\\mu$m range have revealed dust grains in molecular cores with sizes larger than commonly inferred for the diffuse interstellar medium. It is currently unclear whether these grains are grown within the molecular cores or are an ubiquitous component of the interstellar medium. Aims: We investigate whether the large grains necessary for efficient scattering at 1-5 mum are associated with the abundance of water-ice within molecular clouds and cores. Methods: We combined water-ice abundance measurements for sight lines through the Lupus IV molecular cloud complex with measurements of the scattered light at 3.6 mum for the same sight lines. Results: We find that there is a similar threshold for the cores in emission in scattered light at 3.6 mum (tau_9.7=0.15pm0.05, A_K=0.4pm0.2 as water-ice (tau_9.7=0.11pm0.01, A_K=0.19pm0.04) and that the scattering efficiency increases as the relative water-ice abundance increases. The ice layer increases the average grain siz...

  5. The ionization threshold of N,N,Nscript,Nscript-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine in dense fluid ethane; effects of fluid density and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faidas, H.; Christophorou, L. G.; Datskos, P. G.; McCorkle, D. L.

    1989-06-01

    The ionization threshold IF of N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine in ethane, has been measured in the density (ρ) range 0.15-13.30 M/l and over the temperature (T) range 295-413 K, using a multiphoton ionization conductivity technique. The IF was found to be a function of both ρ and T in the ranges studied. At a fixed T (=373 K), IF was found first to decrease with increasing ρ and then to level off at densities of ˜10 M/l. For ρ≥11 M/l and T=295 K, the IF was found to increase with increasing density. At constant density (ρ=5.90 M/l ) IF decreased with increasing T between 323 and 413 K. These results are analyzed and discussed in relation to the effect of ρ and T on the electron conduction band energy V0 and the medium polarization energy P+. The changes in the IF with ρ are attributed to the dependence of V0 and P+ on ρ, while the dependence of IF on T is attributed to the effects of T on V0 rather than on P+.

  6. Compact and high-particle-flux thermal-lithium-beam probe system for measurement of two-dimensional electron density profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Y; Manabe, T; Kajita, S; Ohno, N; Takagi, M; Tsuchiya, H; Morisaki, T

    2014-09-01

    A compact and high-particle-flux thermal-lithium-beam source for two-dimensional measurement of electron density profiles has been developed. The thermal-lithium-beam oven is heated by a carbon heater. In this system, the maximum particle flux of the thermal lithium beam was ~4 × 10(19) m(-2) s(-1) when the temperature of the thermal-lithium-beam oven was 900 K. The electron density profile was evaluated in the small tokamak device HYBTOK-II. The electron density profile was reconstructed using the thermal-lithium-beam probe data and this profile was consistent with the electron density profile measured with a Langmuir electrostatic probe. We confirm that the developed thermal-lithium-beam probe can be used to measure the two-dimensional electron density profile with high time and spatial resolutions.

  7. Effects of quantum flux density of photosynthesis and chloroplast ultrastructure in tissue-cultured plantlets and seedlings of Liquidambar styraciflua L. towards improved acclimatization and field survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, N.; Wetzstein, H.Y.; Sommer, H.E.

    1985-07-01

    Liquidambar styraciflua L. seedlings and tissue-cultured plantlets were grown under high, medium, or low quantum flux densities. Net photosynthesis, chlorophyll content, and chloroplast ultrastructure of leaves differentiated from these conditions were investigated. Seedling photosynthetic rates at light saturation were positively related to light pretreatments. Cultured plantlets under all light conditions had appreciably higher photosynthetic rates than noncultured seedlings. Chlorophyll in seedlings and plantlets was significantly higher in low light-treated plants. Seedling leaves had chloroplasts with abundant starch regardless of light pretreatment. In high light, starch granules were predominant and associated with disrupted granal structure. Low light seedling chloroplasts had smaller starch grains and well-formed grana. In contrast, tissue culture-differentiated leaves were devoid of starch; grana were well organized in higher quantum flux density treatments, but disorganized at low flux densities. 29 references, 7 figures, 1 table.

  8. Joint-inversion of gravity data and cosmic ray muon flux to detect shallow subsurface density structure beneath volcanoes: Testing the method at a well-characterized site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, M.; Lewis, M.; George, N. K.; Johnson, A.; Dichter, M.; Rowe, C. A.; Guardincerri, E.

    2016-12-01

    The joint-inversion of gravity data and cosmic ray muon flux measurements has been utilized by a number of groups to image subsurface density structure in a variety of settings, including volcanic edifices. Cosmic ray muons are variably-attenuated depending upon the density structure of the material they traverse, so measuring muon flux through a region of interest provides an independent constraint on the density structure. Previous theoretical studies have argued that the primary advantage of combining gravity and muon data is enhanced resolution in regions not sampled by crossing muon trajectories, e.g. in sensing deeper structure or structure adjacent to the region sampled by muons. We test these ideas by investigating the ability of gravity data alone and the joint-inversion of gravity and muon flux to image subsurface density structure, including voids, in a well-characterized field location. Our study area is a tunnel vault located at the Los Alamos National Laboratory within Quaternary ash-flow tuffs on the Pajarito Plateau, flanking the Jemez Volcano in New Mexico. The regional geology of the area is well-characterized (with density measurements in nearby wells) and the geometry of the tunnel and the surrounding terrain is known. Gravity measurements were made using a Lacoste and Romberg D meter and the muon detector has a conical acceptance region of 45 degrees from the vertical and track resolution of several milliradians. We obtain individual and joint resolution kernels for gravity and muon flux specific to our experimental design and plan to combine measurements of gravity and muon flux both within and above the tunnel to infer density structure. We plan to compare our inferred density structure against the expected densities from the known regional hydro-geologic framework.

  9. Origin of dc voltage in type II superconducting flux pumps: field, field rate of change, and current density dependence of resistivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, J.; Matsuda, K.; Fu, L.; Fagnard, J.-F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Shen, B.; Dong, Q.; Baghdadi, M.; Coombs, T. A.

    2016-03-01

    Superconducting flux pumps are the kind of devices which can generate direct current into superconducting circuit using external magnetic field. The key point is how to induce a dc voltage across the superconducting load by ac fields. Giaever (1966 IEEE Spectr. 3 117) pointed out flux motion in superconductors will induce a dc voltage, and demonstrated a rectifier model which depended on breaking superconductivity. van de Klundert et al (1981 Cryogenics 21 195, 267) in their review(s) described various configurations for flux pumps all of which relied on inducing the normal state in at least part of the superconductor. In this letter, following their work, we reveal that a variation in the resistivity of type II superconductors is sufficient to induce a dc voltage in flux pumps and it is not necessary to break superconductivity. This variation in resistivity is due to the fact that flux flow is influenced by current density, field intensity, and field rate of change. We propose a general circuit analogy for travelling wave flux pumps, and provide a mathematical analysis to explain the dc voltage. Several existing superconducting flux pumps which rely on the use of a travelling magnetic wave can be explained using the analysis enclosed. This work can also throw light on the design and optimization of flux pumps.

  10. Wide Dynamic Range Multiband Infrared Radiometer for In-Fire Measurements of Wildland Fire Radiant Flux Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremens, R.; Dickinson, M. B.; Hardy, C.; Skowronski, N.; Ellicott, E. A.; Schroeder, W.

    2016-12-01

    We have developed a wide dynamic range (24-bit) data acquisition system for collection of radiant flux density (FRFD) data from wildland fires. The data collection subsystem was designed as an Arduino `shield' and incorporates a 24-bit analog-to-digital converter, precision voltage reference, real time clock, microSD card interface, audible annuciator and interface for various digital communication interfaces (RS232, I2C, SPI, etc.). The complete radiometer system consists of our custom-designed `shield', a commercially available Arduino MEGA computer circuit board and a thermopile sensor -amplifier daughter board. Software design and development is greatly assisted by the availability of a library of public-domain, user-implemented software. The daughter board houses a 5-band radiometer using thermopiles designed for this experiment (Dexter Research Corp., Dexter, MI) to allow determination of the total FRFD from the fire (using a wide band thermopile with a KRS-5 window, 0.1 - 30 um), the FRFD as would be received by an orbital asset like MODIS (3.95 um center wavelength (CWL) and 10.95 CWL, corresponding to MODIS bands 21/22 and 31, respectively) and wider bandpass (0.1-5.5 um and 8-14 um) corresponding to the FRFD recorded by `MWIR' and `LWIR' imaging systems. We required a very wide dynamic range system in order to be able to record the flux density from `cold' ground before the fire, through the `hot' flaming combustion stage, to the `cool' phase after passage of the fire front. The recording dynamic range required (with reasonable resolution at the lowest temperatures) is on the order of 106, which is not currently available in commercial instrumentation at a price point, size or feature set that is suitable for wildland fire investigations. The entire unit, along with rechargeable battery power supply is housed in a fireproof aluminum chassis box, which is then mounted on a mast at a height of 5 - 7 m above the fireground floor. We will report initial

  11. Beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation: a treatment of electronic flux density in electronically adiabatic molecular processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diestler, D J

    2013-06-01

    Intuition suggests that a molecular system in the electronic ground state Φ0 should exhibit an electronic flux density (EFD) in response to the motion of its nuclei. If that state is described by the Born-Oppenheimer approximation (BOA), however, a straightforward calculation of the EFD yields zero, since the electrons are in a stationary state, regardless of the state of the nuclear motion. Here an alternative pathway to a nonzero EFD from a knowledge of only the BOA ground-state wave function is proposed. Via perturbation theory a complete set of approximate vibronic eigenfunctions of the whole Hamiltonian is generated. If the complete non-BOA wave function is expressed in the basis of these vibronic eigenfunctions, the ground-state contribution to the EFD is found to involve a summation over excited states. Evaluation of this sum through the so-called "average excitation energy approximation" produces a nonzero EFD. An explicit formula for the EFD for the prototypical system, namely, oriented H2+ vibrating in the electronic ground state, is derived.

  12. [Spatiotemporal distribution pattern of photosynthetic photon flux density in forest gaps of Korean pine broadleaved mixed forest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Duan, Wen-biao; Chen, Li-xin

    2011-04-01

    Taking the forest gaps of natural Pinus koraiensis broadleaved mixed forest in Xiao Xing'an Mountains as test object, and by the method of grids, the photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) in the gaps was continuously measured during growth season, and the spatiotemporal distribution patterns of the PPFD were analyzed by fundamental statistics and geostatistics methods. In the forest gaps, the high-value region of PPFD presented an obvious diurnal change, with the maximum PPFD appeared at 12:00 and in the northern part of the gaps. The mean monthly PPFD was the highest in June, and then decreased in the sequence of July, August, and September, with the largest coefficient of variation at different locations occurred in July and the medium variability in all the months. In different months, the intensity and the scale of PPFD spatial heterogeneity in the gaps differed, with the variation degree being the highest in June and the sill and proportion being the largest in July. The complex degree of the monthly PPFD patches also differed, with the maximum located in the northeast part of the gaps. The variation sequence of the mean monthly PPFD in understory and open ground was consistent with that in gap, and the mean monthly PPFD was the highest in open ground, medium in forest gap, and the lowest in understory.

  13. Improved biomass productivity in algal biofilms through synergistic interactions between photon flux density and carbon dioxide concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnurr, Peter J; Molenda, Olivia; Edwards, Elizabeth; Espie, George S; Allen, D Grant

    2016-11-01

    Algal biofilms were grown to investigate the interaction effects of bulk medium CO2 concentration and photon flux density (PFD) on biomass productivities. When increasing the CO2 concentration from 0.04% to 2%, while maintaining a PFD of 100μmol/m(2)/s, biomass productivities increased from ∼0.5 to 2.0g/m(2)/d; however, the productivities plateaued when CO2 concentrations were incrementally increased above 2-12%. Statistical analysis demonstrates that there is a significant interaction between PFD and CO2 concentrations on biomass productivities. By simultaneously increasing PFD and CO2 concentrations, biomass productivities were significantly increased to 4.0 and 4.1g/m(2)/d in the experimental and modeled data, respectively. The second order model predicted increases in biomass productivities as both PFD and CO2 simultaneously increased yielding an optimum at 440μmol/m(2)/s and 7.1%; however, when conditions were extended to the highest end of their respective ranges, the conditions were detrimental to growth and productivities decreased.

  14. The epoxy resin variation effect on microstructure and physical properties to improve bonded NdFeB flux magnetic density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusnaeni, N.; Sarjono, Priyo; Muljadi; Noer, Nasrudin

    2016-11-01

    NdFeB magnets have been fabricated from a mixture of powder NdFeB (MPQ-B+) and epoxy resins (ER) with a variation of 0% wt, 2% wt, 4% wt and 6% wt. The pellets samples were made by pressing 4 tons of the mixture powder at room temperature before curing at 100°C for 1 hour. The SEM-EDX results showed the microstructure with ER were evenly smeared the NdFeB magnetic particles due to higher percent C and lower transition metals value. Sample with 2% wt epoxy resin was able to achieve the highest density of 5.35 g/cm3 and the highest magnetic flux of 2121 Gauss. The magnetic properties characterization using the permagraph indicates that the sample pellets with 2% wt epoxy resin has a value of remanence (Br) = 4.92 kG, coercivity (Hc) = 7.76 kOe, and energy product (Bhmax) = 4.58 MGOe. Despite low remanence value in the pellet samples, the resistance to demagnetization value was still acceptable.

  15. Enhancement of glass-forming ability of Fe-based bulk metallic glasses with high saturation magnetic flux density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxiao Zhang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of substituting Fe with Ni on thermal properties, glass-forming ability (GFA and magnetic properties of Fe76-xNixMo3.5P10C4B4Si2.5 (x = 0−30 at.% alloys were investigated in detail. The breadth of the supercooled liquid region was found to gradually increase from 42 to 55 K with increasing Ni content to 30 at.%. When x = 5 at.%, the alloy composition approached a eutectic point, resulting in an increase in GFA. As a result, FeNiMoPCBSi bulk metallic glasses with critical diameters up to 5.5 mm were successfully synthesized by copper mold casting. These glassy alloys exhibit a high saturation magnetic flux density of 0.75−1.21 T and excellent soft magnetic properties, i.e., low coercive force of 1.1−2.0 A/m, and high effective permeability of 14400−19700 at 1 kHz under a field of 1 A/m. The reasons for the high stability of the supercooled liquid, and the high GFA as well as excellent soft magnetic properties are discussed in this article.

  16. Superfluid Density and Flux-Flow Resistivity Measurements of Multiple-Band Superconductor β-PdBi2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Tatsunori; Imai, Yoshinori; Maeda, Atsutaka

    β -PdBi2 (Tcmax = 5 . 4 K) is a newcomer of the multiple-band superconductors, revealed by the specific heat and the upper critical field measurements, and the angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. In addition, authors of ref. observed the spin-polarized band dispersion and proposed that β-PdBi2 is a candidate of topological superconductor. However, there is less information on superconducting properties so far. In order to clarify the superconducting gap function, we measured the temperature (T) and magnetic field (B) dependence of microwave complex conductivity of β-PdBi2 single crystals. We found that the superfluid density exhibits the thermally activated T dependence, manifesting the absence of nodes in the superconducting gaps. We also found that the flux-flow resistivity increased with B with downward-convex shape. Based on some theories, we considered that such a behavior originated from the backflow of supercurrents around vortices reflecting rather small Ginzburg-Landau parameter (κ ~= 5). This work was supported by the JSPS KAKENHI (Grant Numbers 15K17697 and 26-9315), and the JSPS Research Fellowship for Young Scientists.

  17. Variation in photosynthetic photon flux density within a tropical seasonal rain forest of Xishuangbanna, south-western China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DOU Jun-xia; ZHANG Yi-ping; FENG Zong-wei; LIU Wen-jie

    2005-01-01

    The effects of canopy development, solar angle, and weather conditions on temporal variation in photosynthetic photon flux density(PPFD) at three heights within a tropical rain forest canopy in Xishuangbanna, China, were examined. PPFD was measured every second and stored as 10-min averages from 1 December 2002 to 30 November 2003. PPFD variability was examined at three different tempcral scales. Specific days in March, September, and December with clear and overcast sky conditions were selected to separate the effects of leaf area index(LAI) and solar angle on diumal variability. On both clear and overcast days, mean daily average PPFD was significantly different between March and September at all heights, except 10 m on clear days, suggesting that LAI directly influences PPFD. In contrast, the differences in daily average PPFD among three heights between September and December were likely due to variation in solar angle. In addition, daily average PPFD at all locations were significantly lower under overcast than clear sky conditions in March, September and December. Over the year-long study, the mean daily total PPFD at 21 m, 10 m and 4 m was 2.8, 2.7 and 0.7mean daily total PPFD occurred at the same heights among different seasons, and diurnal, day-to-day and seasonal PPFD varied at different heights within the canopy. The possible effects of light variability on physiological and morphological responses of plants are discussed.

  18. Real-time visualization of magnetic flux densities for transcranial magnetic stimulation on commodity and fully immersive VR systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalivarapu, Vijay K.; Serrate, Ciro; Hadimani, Ravi L.

    2017-05-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive procedure that uses time varying short pulses of magnetic fields to stimulate nerve cells in the brain. In this method, a magnetic field generator ("TMS coil") produces small electric fields in the region of the brain via electromagnetic induction. This technique can be used to excite or inhibit firing of neurons, which can then be used for treatment of various neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease, stroke, migraine, and depression. It is however challenging to focus the induced electric field from TMS coils to smaller regions of the brain. Since electric and magnetic fields are governed by laws of electromagnetism, it is possible to numerically simulate and visualize these fields to accurately determine the site of maximum stimulation and also to develop TMS coils that can focus the fields on the targeted regions. However, current software to compute and visualize these fields are not real-time and can work for only one position/orientation of TMS coil, severely limiting their usage. This paper describes the development of an application that computes magnetic flux densities (h-fields) and visualizes their distribution for different TMS coil position/orientations in real-time using GPU shaders. The application is developed for desktop, commodity VR (HTC Vive), and fully immersive VR CAVETM systems, for use by researchers, scientists, and medical professionals to quickly and effectively view the distribution of h-fields from MRI brain scans.

  19. Plant lighting system with five wavelength-band light-emitting diodes providing photon flux density and mixing ratio control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yano Akira

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant growth and development depend on the availability of light. Lighting systems therefore play crucial roles in plant studies. Recent advancements of light-emitting diode (LED technologies provide abundant opportunities to study various plant light responses. The LED merits include solidity, longevity, small element volume, radiant flux controllability, and monochromaticity. To apply these merits in plant light response studies, a lighting system must provide precisely controlled light spectra that are useful for inducing various plant responses. Results We have developed a plant lighting system that irradiated a 0.18 m2 area with a highly uniform distribution of photon flux density (PFD. The average photosynthetic PFD (PPFD in the irradiated area was 438 micro-mol m–2 s–1 (coefficient of variation 9.6%, which is appropriate for growing leafy vegetables. The irradiated light includes violet, blue, orange-red, red, and far-red wavelength bands created by LEDs of five types. The PFD and mixing ratio of the five wavelength-band lights are controllable using a computer and drive circuits. The phototropic response of oat coleoptiles was investigated to evaluate plant sensitivity to the light control quality of the lighting system. Oat coleoptiles irradiated for 23 h with a uniformly distributed spectral PFD (SPFD of 1 micro-mol m–2 s–1 nm–1 at every peak wavelength (405, 460, 630, 660, and 735 nm grew almost straight upwards. When they were irradiated with an SPFD gradient of blue light (460 nm peak wavelength, the coleoptiles showed a phototropic curvature in the direction of the greater SPFD of blue light. The greater SPFD gradient induced the greater curvature of coleoptiles. The relation between the phototropic curvature (deg and the blue-light SPFD gradient (micro-mol m–2 s–1 nm–1 m–1 was 2 deg per 1 micro-mol m–2 s–1 nm–1 m–1. Conclusions The plant lighting system, with a computer with a

  20. Beyond bone mineral density, FRAX-based tailor-made intervention thresholds for therapeutic decision in subjects on glucocorticoid: A nationwide osteoporosis survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shan-Fu; Chen, Jia-Feng; Chen, Yin-Chou; Lai, Han-Ming; Ko, Chi-Hua; Chiu, Wen-Chan; Su, Fu-Mei; Hsu, Chung-Yuan; Su, Ben Yu-Jih; Wu, Chih-Hsing; Cheng, Tien-Tsai

    2017-02-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIOP) is the most common cause of secondary osteoporosis and confers a substantial risk for future fractures. Several recent guidelines for GIOP management have recommended the use of intervention thresholds to direct pharmacological therapy in those at high risk of fracture. The aim of this study was to analyze the characteristics of subjects on a glucocorticoid (GC) and to implement the Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX)-based intervention threshold for therapeutic decision-making.This was a cohort substudy of a nationwide osteoporosis screening program conducted in Taiwan from 2008 to 2011. All participants were requested to complete a questionnaire including FRAX elements, and antiosteoporosis medication (AOM) history was assessed before bone mineral density (BMD) measurement. GC users were recruited as the study group. Controls comprised randomly selected age- and sex-matched non-GC users. Individual intervention threshold (IIT) was set at individual-specific FRAX probability of a major osteoporotic fracture, relative to subjects with prior fractures. The characteristics and calculated IIT of all participants were analyzed.A total of 8704 participants were enrolled, including GC users (n = 807) and controls (n = 7897). There was no significant difference in BMD between GC users and controls. Clinical fracture risks, including previous fracture, parental hip fracture, rheumatoid arthritis, and secondary osteoporosis were higher in GC users than in controls. GC users had a higher 10-year probability of either major or hip fracture than controls. The proportion of GC users with a 10-year probability of major osteoporotic fracture above IIT was higher than in controls (75.0% vs 10.6%; P controls whose fracture risk was above IIT reported taking AOM.These findings suggest that more GC users should receive active intervention based on IIT, regardless of BMD. However, less than one-fourth of GC users whose fracture

  1. Korean VLBI Network Calibrator Survey (KVNCS). 1. Source Catalog of KVN Single-dish Flux Density Measurement in the K and Q Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong Ae; Sohn, Bong Won; Jung, Taehyun; Byun, Do-Young; Lee, Jee Won

    2017-02-01

    We present the catalog of the KVN Calibrator Survey (KVNCS). This first part of the KVNCS is a single-dish radio survey simultaneously conducted at 22 (K band) and 43 GHz (Q band) using the Korean VLBI Network (KVN) from 2009 to 2011. A total of 2045 sources are selected from the VLBA Calibrator Survey with an extrapolated flux density limit of 100 mJy at the K band. The KVNCS contains 1533 sources in the K band with a flux density limit of 70 mJy and 553 sources in the Q band with a flux density limit of 120 mJy; it covers the whole sky down to ‑32.°5 in decl. We detected 513 sources simultaneously in the K and Q bands; ∼76% of them are flat-spectrum sources (‑0.5 ≤ α ≤ 0.5). From the flux–flux relationship, we anticipated that most of the radiation of many of the sources comes from the compact components. The sources listed in the KVNCS therefore are strong candidates for high-frequency VLBI calibrators.

  2. Assessing the thermal dissipation sap flux density method for monitoring cold season water transport in seasonally snow-covered forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Allison M; Bowling, David R; Phillips, Nathan

    2017-07-01

    Productivity of conifers in seasonally snow-covered forests is high before and during snowmelt when environmental conditions are optimal for photosynthesis. Climate change is altering the timing of spring in many locations, and changes in the date of transition from winter dormancy can have large impacts on annual productivity. Sap flow methods provide a promising approach to monitor tree activity during the cold season and the winter-spring and fall-winter transitions. Although sap flow techniques have been widely used, cold season results are generally not reported. Here we examine the feasibility of using the Granier thermal dissipation (TD) sap flux density method to monitor transpiration and dormancy of evergreen conifers during the cold season. We conducted a laboratory experiment which demonstrated that the TD method reliably detects xylem water transport (when it occurs) both at near freezing temperature and at low flow rate, and that the sensors can withstand repeated freeze-thaw events. However, the dependence between sensor output and water transport rate in these experiments differed from the established TD relation. In field experiments, sensors installed in two Abies forests lasted through two winters and a summer with low failure. The baseline (no-flow) sensor output varied considerably with temperature during the cold season, and a new baseline algorithm was developed to accommodate this variation. The Abies forests differed in elevation (2070 and 2620 m), and there was a clear difference in timing of initiation and cessation of transpiration between them. We conclude that the TD method can be reliably used to examine water transport during cold periods with associated low flow conditions. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Recovery from bleaching is mediated by threshold densities of background thermo-tolerant symbiont types in a reef-building coral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay, Line K; Doyle, Jason; Logan, Murray; Berkelmans, Ray

    2016-06-01

    Sensitive molecular analyses show that most corals host a complement of Symbiodinium genotypes that includes thermo-tolerant types in low abundance. While tolerant symbiont types are hypothesized to facilitate tolerance to temperature and recovery from bleaching, empirical data on their distribution and relative abundance in corals under ambient and stress conditions are still rare. We quantified visual bleaching and mortality of coral hosts, along with relative abundance of C- and D-type Symbiodinium cells in 82 Acropora millepora colonies from three locations on the Great Barrier Reef transplanted to a central inshore site over a 13 month period. Our analyses reveal dynamic change in symbiont associations within colonies and among populations over time. Coral bleaching and declines in C- but not D-type symbionts were observed in transplanted corals. Survival and recovery of 25% of corals from one population was associated with either initial D-dominance or an increase in D-type symbionts that could be predicted by a minimum pre-stress D : C ratio of 0.003. One-third of corals from this population became D dominated at the bleached stage despite no initial detection of this symbiont type, but failed to recover and died in mid to late summer. These results provide a predictive threshold minimum density of background D-type symbionts in A. millepora, above which survival following extreme thermal stress is increased.

  4. Two new methods used to simulate the circumferential solar flux density concentrated on the absorber of a parabolic trough solar collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Minghuan; Wang, Zhifeng; Sun, Feihu

    2016-05-01

    The optical efficiencies of a solar trough concentrator are important to the whole thermal performance of the solar collector, and the outer surface of the tube absorber is a key interface of energy flux. So it is necessary to simulate and analyze the concentrated solar flux density distributions on the tube absorber of a parabolic trough solar collector for various sun beam incident angles, with main optical errors considered. Since the solar trough concentrators are linear focusing, it is much of interest to investigate the solar flux density distribution on the cross-section profile of the tube absorber, rather than the flux density distribution along the focal line direction. Although a few integral approaches based on the "solar cone" concept were developed to compute the concentrated flux density for some simple trough concentrator geometries, all those integral approaches needed special integration routines, meanwhile, the optical parameters and geometrical properties of collectors also couldn't be changed conveniently. Flexible Monte Carlo ray trace (MCRT) methods are widely used to simulate the more accurate concentrated flux density distribution for compound parabolic solar trough concentrators, while generally they are quite time consuming. In this paper, we first mainly introduce a new backward ray tracing (BRT) method combined with the lumped effective solar cone, to simulate the cross-section flux density on the region of interest of the tube absorber. For BRT, bundles of rays are launched at absorber-surface points of interest, directly go through the glass cover of the absorber, strike on the uniformly sampled mirror segment centers in the close-related surface region of the parabolic reflector, and then direct to the effective solar cone around the incident sun beam direction after the virtual backward reflection. All the optical errors are convoluted into the effective solar cone. The brightness distribution of the effective solar cone is supposed

  5. Development of a vector-tensor system to measure the absolute magnetic flux density and its gradient in magnetically shielded rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, J; Knappe-Grüneberg, S; Gutkelch, D; Haueisen, J; Neuber, S; Schnabel, A; Burghoff, M

    2015-05-01

    Several experiments in fundamental physics demand an environment of very low, homogeneous, and stable magnetic fields. For the magnetic characterization of such environments, we present a portable SQUID system that measures the absolute magnetic flux density vector and the gradient tensor. This vector-tensor system contains 13 integrated low-critical temperature (LTc) superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) inside a small cylindrical liquid helium Dewar with a height of 31 cm and 37 cm in diameter. The achievable resolution depends on the flux density of the field under investigation and its temporal drift. Inside a seven-layer mu-metal shield, an accuracy better than ±23 pT for the components of the static magnetic field vector and ±2 pT/cm for each of the nine components of the gradient tensor is reached by using the shifting method.

  6. Analysis of Torque and Airgap Flux-Density Distribution in Surface Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor with q-Axis Salient Pole Core by Finite Element Method.

    OpenAIRE

    三重野, 保男; 篠原, 勝次; 実成, 義孝; 東, 義高; ミエノ, ヤスオ; シノハラ, カツジ; ミナリ, ヨシタカ; ヒガシ, ヨシタカ; MIENO, Yasuo; SHINOHARA, Katsuji; MINARI, Yoshitaka; Higashi, Yoshitaka

    1995-01-01

    The use of permanent magnet motors in variable speed drives is increasing with the development of power electronics.In the design of drive motors, an analysis of torque has always been important.In this paper, a salient-pole type rotor with a surface mounted permanent magnet is proposed, and an analysis of torque characteristics as compared to normal type surface magnet motor is made by calculationof airgap flux density distribution.

  7. Final report on P1-APMP.EM-S9: VNIIM/KRISS bilateral comparison of DC magnetic flux density by means of a transfer standard coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shifrin, V. Ya; Park, P. G.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this bilateral comparison is to check the conformance of the base quantities of magnetic measurements, DC magnetic flux density and its ratio to a current, as reproduced at VNIIM and KRISS. In these institutes adequate conditions for precise measurements in low magnetic fields are provided and the appropriate equipment for attaining a high level of accuracy is available. The results in this report cover the comparisons of two units, T/A and T, reproduced by the two institutes. The experimental comparison data show good agreement within the estimated uncertainty components of the standards. The coordinated values of the unit of DC magnetic flux density and its ratios to DC current show a standard uncertainty at the level of 1 × 10-6 to 1.2 × 10-6 (k = 1) using the value of the gyromagnetic ratio of the shielded protons γp that was recommended by CODATA in 2010, the experimental determination of the ratio (γ4He/γp) of 4He atoms to protons, and the standards of the two institutes. The results give a basis for carrying out multilateral comparisons of standard quantum magnetometers of metrological institutes in the framework of APMP with participation of geomagnetic observatories, which require the establishment of a unified standard of the unit of DC magnetic flux density. They also show the possibility of decreasing the uncertainty of the determination of the unit of DC magnetic flux density from direct comparisons of standard quantum magnetometers. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by APMP, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  8. Influence of oxygen pressure on critical current density and magnetic flux pinning structures in YBa2Cu3O7-x fabricated by chemical solution deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ding Fa-Zhu; Gu Hong-Wei; Zhang Teng; Dai Shao-Tao; Xiao Li-Ye

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of oxygen partial pressure on the fabrication of YBa2Cu3O7-x films on (00/) LaAlO3 substrates by metalorganic deposition using trifluoroacetates (TFA-MOD). As the oxygen partial pressure increases to 1500 Pa, a great increase in the superconducting properties is observed at high magnetic fields parallel to the YBCO c axis. The cross-sectional transmission electron microscope images show that a high density of stacking faults in the size range of 10-15 nm may act as flux pinning centres to enhance the critical current density of the YBCO films

  9. New insight into fat, muscle and bone relationship in women: determining the threshold at which body fat assumes negative relationship with bone mineral density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pei-Yang; Ilich, Jasminka Z; Brummel-Smith, Ken; Ghosh, Sunita

    2014-11-01

    The aim was to investigate the relationships among lean mass (LM), fat mass (FM), and bone mineral density (BMD) in women stratified by body mass index (BMI) (BMI - normal-weight, overweight, obese) and to determine threshold at which body fat assumes negative relationship with BMD. This was a cross-sectional study in 471 healthy Caucasian women, aged 18-67 years. BMD, LM, and FM were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Analysis of variance with Bonferroni corrections was used to test the BMI group differences. Linear regression was used to examine independent contributions of LM and FM on BMD of various skeletal sites (controlling for age and height). In overweight/obese women PROC LOESS plots were used to determine the inflection points at which either LM or FM relationship with BMD changes direction. Separate analyses in pre- and post-menopausal women were conducted as well. Spine and femoral neck BMD were not different among three BMI groups while total body, femur and radius BMD were statistically different (the highest in the obese group). Linear regression revealed that LM had significant positive association with BMD of various skeletal sites in all groups. FM showed a negative association with BMD of femoral neck and femur in normal-weight and spine in overweight women, but a positive association with radius in obese women. Inflection points showed that body fat between 33% and 38% assumed negative relationship with BMD for most skeletal sites in overweight and obese women. Although LM has strong positive relationship with BMD, FM above 33% in overweight/obese women is negatively related to BMD of most skeletal sites. Therefore, overweight/obesity after certain amount of FM, may not be a protective factor against osteoporosis in females. For clinical practice in women, it is important to maintain LM and keep FM accrual below ~30% body fat to maintain good skeletal health.

  10. Solar Flux Effect on the Reproducibility of Global/Local-Time Variations of Ion Density Structure at Low-Latitude Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shin-Yi

    Longitudinal/seasonal (l/s) variations of ion density structures at the 600-km low-latitude ionosphere observed by ROCSAT-1 between two similar solar activity years of 2000 and 2002 are examined at four different local-time (LT) regions. The gross feature of l/s density structure is almost identical to each other at the four LT regions examined. A complete reproducibility of density structure can be assumed, including the shape of equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA), for identical solar flux input that also implicitly affect other atmospheric components such as the neutral O/N2 ratio and neutral wind variation. The fact that the solar variability effect is thought as the ultimate driver to shape the global ionospheric structure can be confirmed with the reproduction of ROCSAT observations with the simulation results of the TIEGCM model runs using the observed solar flux inputs for various seasons. However, the EIA crestto-valley ratio or no-valley signature in this background density structure can not be used to infer the post-sunset irregularity occurrence rates because the l/s variation of the magnetic declination effect that determines the post-sunset ionospheric conductivity for the ionospheric electrodynamics can not be readily obtained from this ionospheric background structure.

  11. Molecular excitation energies to high-lying bound states from time-dependent density-functional response theory: Characterization and correction of the time-dependent local density approximation ionization threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casida, Mark E.; Jamorski, Christine; Casida, Kim C.; Salahub, Dennis R.

    1998-03-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of the performance of time-dependent density-functional response theory (TD-DFRT) for the calculation of high-lying bound electronic excitation energies of molecules. TD-DFRT excitation energies are reported for a large number of states for each of four molecules: N2, CO, CH2O, and C2H4. In contrast to the good results obtained for low-lying states within the time-dependent local density approximation (TDLDA), there is a marked deterioration of the results for high-lying bound states. This is manifested as a collapse of the states above the TDLDA ionization threshold, which is at -ɛHOMOLDA (the negative of the highest occupied molecular orbital energy in the LDA). The -ɛHOMOLDA is much lower than the true ionization potential because the LDA exchange-correlation potential has the wrong asymptotic behavior. For this reason, the excitation energies were also calculated using the asymptotically correct potential of van Leeuwen and Baerends (LB94) in the self-consistent field step. This was found to correct the collapse of the high-lying states that was observed with the LDA. Nevertheless, further improvement of the functional is desirable. For low-lying states the asymptotic behavior of the exchange-correlation potential is not critical and the LDA potential does remarkably well. We propose criteria delineating for which states the TDLDA can be expected to be used without serious impact from the incorrect asymptotic behavior of the LDA potential.

  12. Surface renewal: an advanced micrometeorological method for measuring and processing field-scale energy flux density data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElrone, Andrew J; Shapland, Thomas M; Calderon, Arturo; Fitzmaurice, Li; Paw U, Kyaw Tha; Snyder, Richard L

    2013-12-12

    Advanced micrometeorological methods have become increasingly important in soil, crop, and environmental sciences. For many scientists without formal training in atmospheric science, these techniques are relatively inaccessible. Surface renewal and other flux measurement methods require an understanding of boundary layer meteorology and extensive training in instrumentation and multiple data management programs. To improve accessibility of these techniques, we describe the underlying theory of surface renewal measurements, demonstrate how to set up a field station for surface renewal with eddy covariance calibration, and utilize our open-source turnkey data logger program to perform flux data acquisition and processing. The new turnkey program returns to the user a simple data table with the corrected fluxes and quality control parameters, and eliminates the need for researchers to shuttle between multiple processing programs to obtain the final flux data. An example of data generated from these measurements demonstrates how crop water use is measured with this technique. The output information is useful to growers for making irrigation decisions in a variety of agricultural ecosystems. These stations are currently deployed in numerous field experiments by researchers in our group and the California Department of Water Resources in the following crops: rice, wine and raisin grape vineyards, alfalfa, almond, walnut, peach, lemon, avocado, and corn.

  13. A "test of concept" comparison of aerodynamic and mechanical resuspension mechanisms for particles deposited on field rye grass ( Secale cercele).—Part 2. Threshold mechanical energies for resuspension particle fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillette, Dale A.; Lawson, Robert E.; Thompson, Roger S.

    Kinetic energy from the oscillatory impacts of the grass stalk against a stationary object was measured with a kinetic energy measuring device. These energy inputs were measured as part of a resuspension experiment of uniform latex microspheres deposited on a single rye grass seed pod in a wind tunnel. The experiment was designed to measure resuspension from aerodynamic (viscous and turbulent) mechanisms compared to that from mechanisms from mechanical resuspension resulting from the oscillatory impact of the grass hitting a stationary object. The experiment was run for deposited spherical latex particles with diameters from 2 to 8.1 μm. Wind tunnel tests were run for wind speeds from 2 to 18.5 m s -1 and a turbulence intensity (root-mean-square fluctuation wind speed/mean wind speed) of 0.1. Our experiments showed the following: Threshold mechanical energy input rates increased from 0.04 to 0.2 μJ s -1 for resuspension of spherical polystyrene latex particles from 2 to 8.1 μm diameter. Kinetic energy flux generated by mechanical impact of the wind-driven oscillating grass was found to be highly sensitive to slightly different placements and grass morphology. The kinetic energy input by impaction of the grass against a stationary cylinder is roughly proportional to the kinetic energy flux of the wind.

  14. Adjoint-based Sensitivity Analysis for High-Energy Density Radiaitive Transfer using Flux-Limited Diffusion

    OpenAIRE

    Humbird, Kelli D.; McClarren, Ryan G.

    2016-01-01

    Uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analyses are a vital component for predictive modeling in the sciences and engineering. The adjoint approach to sensitivity analysis requires solving a primary system of equations and a mathematically related set of adjoint equations. The information contained in the equations can be combined to produce sensitivity information in a computationally efficient manner. In this work, sensitivity analyses are performed on systems described by flux-limited ...

  15. Variation in the radial patterns of sap flux density in pubescent oak (Quercus pubescens) and its implications for tree and stand transpiration measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poyatos, Rafael; Cermák, Jan; Llorens, Pilar

    2007-04-01

    Radial variation in sap flux density across the sapwood was assessed by the heat field deformation method in several trees of Quercus pubescens Wild., a ring-porous species. Sapwood depths were delimited by identifying the point of zero flow in radial patterns of sap flow, yielding tree sapwood areas that were 1.5-2 times larger than assumed based on visual examinations of wood cores. The patterns of sap flow varied both among trees and diurnally. Rates of sap flow were higher close to the cambium, although there was a significant contribution from the inner sapwood, which was greater (up to 60% of total flow) during the early morning and late in the day. Accordingly, the normalized difference between outer and inner sapwood flow was stable during the middle of the day, but showed a general decline in the afternoon. The distribution of sap flux density across the sapwood allowed us to derive correction coefficients for single-point heat dissipation sap flow measurements. We used daytime-averaged coefficients that depended on the particular shape of the radial profile and ranged between 0.45 and 1.28. Stand transpiration calculated using the new method of estimating sapwood areas and the radial correction coefficients was similar to (Year 2003), or about 25% higher than (Year 2004), previous uncorrected values, and was 20-30% of reference evapotranspiration. We demonstrated how inaccuracies in determining sapwood depths and mean sap flux density across the sapwood of ring-porous species could affect tree and stand transpiration estimates.

  16. Landscape Soil Respiration Fluxes are Related to Leaf Area Index, Stand Height and Density, and Soil Nitrogen in Rocky Mountain Subalpine Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, E.; Bradford, J. B.; Hawbaker, T. J.; Birdsey, R.; Ryan, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    There is a recent multi-agency push for accurate assessments of terrestrial carbon stocks and fluxes in the United States. Assessing the state of the carbon cycle in the US requires estimates of stocks and fluxes at large spatial scales. Such assessments are difficult, especially for soil respiration, which dominates ecosystem respiration and is notoriously highly variable over space and time. Here, we report three consecutive years of measurement of soil respiration fluxes in three 1 km2 subalpine forest landscapes: Fraser Experimental Forest (Colorado), Glacier Lakes Ecosystems Experimental Site ("GLEES", Wyoming), and Niwot Ridge (Colorado). Plots were established following the protocol of the US Forest Service's Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program. Clusters of plots were distributed across the landscape in a 0.25 km grid pattern. From 2004 through 2006, measurements of soil respiration were made once monthly during the growing season and twice during snowpack coverage for each year. Annual cumulative soil respiration was 6.10 (+/- 0.21) Mg ha-1y-1 for Fraser, 6.55 (+/- 0.27) Mg ha-1y-1 for GLEES, and 6.97 (+/- 0.20) Mg ha-1y-1 for Niwot. Variability in annual cumulative soil respiration varied by less than 20% among the three subalpine forests, despite differences in terrain, climate, disturbance history and anthropogenic nitrogen deposition. We quantified the relationship between respiration fluxes and commonly-measured forest properties and found that soil respiration was nonlinearly related to leaf area index, peaking around 2.5 m2m-2 then slowly declining. Annual litterfall (FA) was subtracted from soil respiration (FR) to calculate total belowground carbon flux (TBCF), which declined with increasing tree height, density and soil nitrogen. This landscape analysis of soil respiration confirmed experimentally-derived principles governing carbon fluxes in forests: as trees age and get taller, and in high-fertility areas, carbon flux to roots declines

  17. Rapid measurements of CO2 flux density and water use efficiency of crop community%作物群体CO2通量和水分利用效率的快速测定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱治林; 孙晓敏; 张仁华; 苏红波; 唐新斋

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, Eddy Correlation (EC) method was employed to measure the latent heat and CO2 flux density and to calculate Water Use Efficiency (WISE) of winter wheat community in Yucheng district, Shandong Province in 1997. The results showed that the CO2 flux density had an obvious diurnal change, with a maximum aboutl. 5 mg·s-1·m-2, which appeared at about 9 : 00-10 : 00 am in general. The WUE of wheat community presented a fall trend from morning to afternoon, and the CO2 flux density and WUE also had an obvious seasonal change, being lower in the early and late growth stages, and higher in the middle growth stage. The ranges of daily mean CO2 flux density and WUE were 0.2 - 0.9 mg·s-1·m-2 and 5 - 20 gCO2·kg-1 1H2O, respectively.

  18. Adjoint-based Sensitivity Analysis for High-Energy Density Radiaitive Transfer using Flux-Limited Diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Humbird, Kelli D

    2016-01-01

    Uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analyses are a vital component for predictive modeling in the sciences and engineering. The adjoint approach to sensitivity analysis requires solving a primary system of equations and a mathematically related set of adjoint equations. The information contained in the equations can be combined to produce sensitivity information in a computationally efficient manner. In this work, sensitivity analyses are performed on systems described by flux-limited radiative diffusion using the adjoint approach. The sensitivities computed are shown to agree with standard perturbation theory, and can be obtained in significantly less computational time.

  19. Effect of vertically aligned carbon nanotube density on the water flux and salt rejection in desalination membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Samarth; Alameh, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) membranes of different densities are developed and their performances are investigated. VACNT arrays of densities 5 × 10(9), 10(10), 5 × 10(10) and 10(11) tubes cm(-2), are initially grown on 1 cm × 1 cm silicon substrates using chemical vapour deposition. A VACNT membrane is realised by attaching a 300 μm-thick 1 cm × 1 cm VACNT array on silicon to a 4″ glass substrate, applying polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) through spin coating to fill the gaps between the VACNTs, and using a microtome to slice the VACNT-PDMS composite into 25-μm-thick membranes. Experimental results show that the permeability of the developed VACNT membranes increases with the density of the VACNTs, while the salt rejection is almost independent of the VACNT density. The best measured permeance is attained with a VACNT membrane having a CNT density of 10(11) tubes cm(-2) is 1203 LMH at 1 bar.

  20. ACME Stellar Spectra. I. Absolutely Calibrated, Mostly Empirical Flux Densities of 55 Cancri and its Transiting Planet

    CERN Document Server

    Crossfield, Ian J M

    2012-01-01

    The ACME Spectra project provides absolutely calibrated, mostly empirical spectra of exoplanet host stars for use in analysis of the stars and their planets. Spectra are obtained from ground-based telescopes and are tied directly to calibrated ground- and space-based photometry. The spectra remain only "mostly" empirical because of telluric absorption, but interpolation of stellar models over the gaps in wavelength coverage provides continuous stellar spectra. Among other uses, the spectra are suitable for precisely converting observed secondary eclipses (occultations) into absolute flux units with minimal recourse to models. In this letter I introduce ACME's methods and present a calibrated spectrum of the nearby, super-Earth hosting star 55 Cancri that spans the range from 0.81-5.05 micron. With this spectrum I show that the brightness temperature of the transiting planet 55 Cnc e is 1950 (+260/-190) K at 4.5 micron (cooler than previously reported), which corresponds to a planetary flux of 0.44 (+0.12/-0.0...

  1. Proposal of C-core Type Transverse Flux Motor for Ship Propulsion – Increasing Torque Density by Dense Stator Configuration –

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Yamamoto

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Electric ship propulsion system has been drawing attention as a solution for savings in energy and maintenance costs. The system is mainly composed of motor, converter and gearbox and required for high torque at low speed. In this situation, transverse flux motors (TFMs have been proposed to fulfill the low-speed high-torque characteristic due to suitable for short pole pitch and large number of poles to increase torque output. In this trend, we have proposed C-core type motors taking advantage of TFMs’ structure. In this manuscript, a simple design method based on the magnetic-circuit theory and simple modeling of the motor is proposed to search a design parameter for maximizing torque as a pre-process of numerical study. The method takes into consideration the effects of magnetic leakage flux, magnetic saturation and pole-core combination in accordance with the systematic theory. The simple modeling is conducted based on a dense armature structure in previous axial flux motors (AFMs applied to the new motor design. The validity of the method is verified by 3-D finite element analysis (FEA and relative error is at most 20%. The minimalist design is shown to be advantageous for effective use in 3-D FEA. As a detailed design by the FEA, high torque density and low cogging to output ratio can be achieved simultaneously in the proposed machine.

  2. Interaction between the spectral photon flux density distributions of light during growth and for measurements in net photosynthetic rates of cucumber leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Keach; Matsuda, Ryo; Fujiwara, Kazuhiro

    2016-10-01

    The net photosynthetic rate of a leaf becomes acclimated to the plant's environment during growth. These rates are often measured, evaluated and compared among leaves of plants grown under different light conditions. In this study, we compared net photosynthetic rates of cucumber leaves grown under white light-emitting diode (LED) light without and with supplemental far-red (FR) LED light (W- and WFR-leaves, respectively) under three different measuring light (ML) conditions: their respective growth light (GL), artificial sunlight (AS) and blue and red (BR) light. The difference in the measured photosynthetic rates between W- and WFR-leaves was greater under BR than under GL and AS. In other words, an interaction between supplemental FR light during growth and the spectral photon flux density distribution (SPD) of ML affected the measured net photosynthetic rates. We showed that the comparison and evaluation of leaf photosynthetic rates and characteristics can be biased depending on the SPD of ML, especially for plants grown under different photon flux densities in the FR waveband. We also investigated the mechanism of the interaction. We confirmed that the distribution of excitation energy between the two photosystems (PSs) changed in response to the SPD of GL, and that this change resulted in the interaction, as suggested in previous reports. However, changes in PS stoichiometry could not completely explain the adjustment in excitation energy distribution observed in this study, suggesting that other mechanisms may be involved in the interaction.

  3. Critical current density and flux pinning in Zr0.96V0.04B2 superconductor with AlB2 structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Soon-Gil; Vanacken, J.; Moshchalkov, V. V.; Renosto, S. T.; dos Santos, C. A. M.; Machado, A. J. S.; Fisk, Z.; Albino Aguiar, J.

    2013-10-01

    We have investigated the critical current density (Jc) and the flux pinning behavior in Zr0.96V0.04B2 superconductor with an AlB2 structure. V substitutions in Zr sites of non-superconducting ZrB2 system lead to superconductivity, and the 4% V-substituted Zr0.96V0.04B2 compounds show the highest superconducting transition temperature (Tc) of ˜8.7 K. The magnetic hysteresis (M-H) loops for the Zr0.96V0.04B2 demonstrate type-II superconducting behavior in a broad temperature range, and the Jc is estimated from the M-H loops using the Bean model. The analysis of the double-logarithmic Jc(H) plots indicates the dominance of collective pinning in Zr0.96V0.04B2, and that Jc(H) and magnetic field dependences of the flux pinning force density (Fp) are well fitted by the double exponential model which takes into account the existence of two superconducting gaps.

  4. Tracer kinetic studies of the low density lipoprotein metabolism in the fetal rat: An example for estimation of flux rates in the nonsteady state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plonne, D.; Schlag, B.; Winkler, L.; Dargel, R. (Friedrich Schiller Univ., Jena (German Democratic Republic))

    1990-05-01

    To get insight into the low density lipoprotein (LDL)-apoB flux in the rat fetus near term and in the early postnatal period, homologous apoE-free 125I-labeled LDL was injected into the umbilical vein of the rat fetus immediately after Caesarean section. Since the serum LDL-apoB spontaneously declined after birth, a time-dependent two-pool model was used to calculate the flux rates in the neonate from the specific activities of LDL-apoB up to 15 h post partum. An approximate value of LDL-apoB flux in the fetus at birth was obtained by extrapolation of the kinetic data to the time of injection of the tracer. The data revealed that the turnover of LDL-apoB in the fetus (18.6 micrograms LDL-apoB/h per g body weight) exceeded that in the adult rat (0.4 microgram/h per g body weight) by at least one order of magnitude. Even 15 h after delivery, the LDL-apoB influx amounted to 2.5 micrograms/h per g body weight. The fractional catabolic rate of LDL-apoB in the fetus at term (0.39, h-1) slightly exceeded that in the adult animal (0.15, h-1) and reached the adult level within the first 3 h after birth and remained constant thereafter. In the rat fetus, LDL-apoB flux greatly exceeds that of VLDL-apoB. The data support the view of a direct synthesis and secretion of LDL, most probably by the fetal membranes.

  5. Adjoint-based sensitivity analysis for high-energy density radiative transfer using flux-limited diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humbird, Kelli D.; McClarren, Ryan G.

    2017-03-01

    Uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analyses are a vital component for predictive modeling in the sciences and engineering. The adjoint approach to sensitivity analysis requires solving a primary system of equations and a mathematically related set of adjoint equations. The information contained in the equations can be combined to produce sensitivity information in a computationally efficient manner. In this work, sensitivity analyses are performed on systems described by flux-limited radiative diffusion using the adjoint approach. The sensitivities computed are shown to agree with standard perturbation theory and require significantly less computational time. The adjoint approach saves the computational cost of one forward solve per sensitivity, making the method attractive when multiple sensitivities are of interest.

  6. Effects of controlling the interface trap densities in InGaZnO thin-film transistors on their threshold voltage shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, S.-W.; Lee, J.-T.; Roh, Y.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, the threshold voltage stability characteristics of indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFT) are discussed. The IGZO TFTs were found to induce a parallel threshold voltage ( V th ) shift with changing field effect mobility ( μ FE ) or a sub-threshold gate voltage swing ( SS) due to various thermal annealing conditions. The IGZO TFT that was post-annealed in an O2 ambient was found to be more stable for use in oxide-based TFT devices and to have better performance characteristics, such as the on/off current ratio ( I on/off ), SS, and V th , than other TFTs did. The mechanism for improving the V th stability in the post-annealed IGZO TFT is a decrease in the number of trap sites for the electrons and the weak oxygen bonding in the IGZO thin films. The device's performance could be significantly affected by adjusting the annealing conditions. This mechanism is closely related to that of modulation annealing, where the number of localized trapped carriers and defect centers at the interface or in the channel layer are reduced.

  7. Volumetric breast density from full-field digital mammograms and its association with breast cancer risk factors: a comparison with a threshold method.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lokate, M.; Kallenberg, M.G.J.; Karssemeijer, N.; Bosch, M.H.J. van den; Peeters, P.H.M.; Gils, C.H. van

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Breast density, a strong breast cancer risk factor, is usually measured on the projected breast area from film screen mammograms. This is far from ideal, as breast thickness and technical characteristics are not taken into account. We investigated whether volumetric density measurement

  8. Extraction of temperate vegetation phenology thresholds in North America based on flux tower observation data%基于通量塔观测资料的北美温带植被物候阈值提取方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵晶晶; 刘良云

    2013-01-01

    通量塔方法可以有效监测植被的季节和物候变化过程.目前,不同物候提取方法间的检验和定量化评估工作还有待加深.本文选取9个北美森林通量塔站的总初级生产力(GPP)和净生态系统生产力(NEP)数据,利用阈值法提取了生长季开始日期(SOS)和结束日期(EOS),关联生态系统的碳源汇功能,分析了不同阈值标准对物候提取结果的影响.结果显示:不同阈值标准对落叶阔叶林(DBF)物候提取结果稳定性的影响较常绿针叶林(ENF)小;GPP绝对阈值和相对阈值提取结果间,DBF站点阈值为GPP=2gC.m-2·d-1的物候提取结果与20%最大GPP值(GPPmax)最接近,阈值为GPP=4 g C·m-2·d-1物候提取结果介于20% GPPmax和50% GPPmax之间,生态系统碳汇功能开始日期介于GPP=4gC·m-2 ·d-1和20% GPPmax提取的SOS之间;ENF站点与阈值为GPP=2 g C·m-2·d-1和GPP=4 g C·m-2·d-1物候提取结果最接近的分别是20% GPPmax和50% GPPmax,生态系统碳汇功能开始日期介于GPP=2 g C·m-2·d-1和10% GPPmax提取的SOS之间.%Flux tower method can effectively monitor the vegetation seasonal and phenological variation processes. At present, the differences in the detection and quantitative evaluation of various phenology extraction methods were not well validated and quantified. Based on the gross primary productivity (GPP) and net ecosystem productivity (NEP) data of temperate forests from 9 forest FLUXNET sites in North America, and by using the start dates (SOS) and end dates (EOS) of the temperate forest growth seasons extracted by different phenology threshold extraction methods, in combining with the forest ecosystem carbon source/sink functions, this paper analyzed the effects of different threshold standards on the extraction results of the vegetations phenology. The results showed that the effects of different threshold standards on the stability of the extracted results of deciduous broadleaved forest (DBF

  9. Mass transport of low density lipoprotein in reconstructed hemodynamic environments of human carotid arteries: the role of volume and solute flux through the endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungho; Giddens, Don P

    2015-04-01

    The accumulation of low density lipoprotein (LDL) in the arterial intima is a critical step in the initiation and progression of atheromatous lesions. In this study we examine subject-specific LDL transport into the intima of carotid bifurcations in three human subjects using a three-pore model for LDL mass transfer. Subject-specific carotid artery computational models were derived using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to obtain the geometry and phase-contract MRI (PC-MRI) to acquire pulsatile inflow and outflow boundary conditions for each subject. The subjects were selected to represent a wide range of anatomical configurations and different stages of atherosclerotic development from mild to moderate intimal thickening. A fluid-solid interaction (FSI) model was implemented in the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach in order to consider the effects of a compliant vessel on wall shear stress (WSS). The WSS-dependent response of the endothelium to LDL mass transfer was modeled by multiple pathways to include the contributions of leaky junctions, normal junctions, and transcytosis to LDL solute and plasma volume flux from the lumen into the intima. Time averaged WSS (TAWSS) over the cardiac cycle was computed to represent the spatial WSS distribution, and wall thickness (WTH) was determined from black blood MRI (BBMRI) so as to visualize intimal thickening patterns in the bifurcations. The regions which are exposed to low TAWSS correspond to elevated WTH and higher mass and volume flux via the leaky junctions. In all subjects, the maximum LDL solute flux was observed to be immediately downstream of the stenosis, supporting observations that existing atherosclerotic lesions tend to progress in the downstream direction of the stenosis.

  10. The synthesis of lamellar nano MgB2 grains with nanoimpurities, flux pinning centers and their significantly improved critical current density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zongqing; Liu, Yongchang; Cai, Qi

    2012-03-21

    MgB(2) superconductors with unique microstructures were rapidly fabricated at low temperatures, and exhibited significantly improved critical current density (J(c)). According to the microstructure observations, the prepared samples consisted of lamellar nano MgB(2) grains with many embedded nanoimpurities (about 10 nm). The formation of these lamellar nano MgB(2) grains is associated with the presence of a local Mg-Cu liquid at sintering temperatures as low as 575 °C. The ball milling treatment of the original powders also plays a positive role in the growth of lamellar grains. Based on an analysis of the relationship between resistivity and temperature, the lamellar nano MgB(2) grains in the prepared sample possess better grain connectivity than the typical morphology of MgB(2) samples prepared by traditional high-temperature sintering. Furthermore, the presence of many nano MgB(2) grain boundaries and nano impurities in the prepared sample can obviously increase the flux pinning centers in accordance with the analysis of flux pinning behavior. Both factors mentioned above contribute to the significant improvement in J(c) from low field to relative high field. The method developed in the present work is an effective and low-cost way to further enhance J(c) in MgB(2) superconductors across a wide range of applied magnetic fields without using expensive nanometer-sized dopants.

  11. Evaluation of flux density measurement method for concentrated solar irradiance%太阳能聚焦光斑能流密度测量方法评估

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏素; 肖君; 魏秀东; 卢振武; 王肖

    2016-01-01

    为了确定一种新型间接测量太阳能热发电系统聚焦光斑能流密度分布方法的测量误差范围,对其进行了进一步研究。从理论公式出发,分析了该测量方法的误差源;使用球面小定日镜、CCD相机、漫反射板、中性密度滤光片等设备进行了能流密度测量的实验,使用MATLAB软件对实验数据进行处理,得到了漫反射板上聚焦光斑的能流密度分布和总能量;实验时借助全站仪测量并计算了定日镜中心的光线入射角,根据定日镜的面积和反射率、太阳直射辐射值、余弦效率等计算了光斑能量的理论值,并与测量得到的聚焦光斑总能量比较,得出了实验条件下该方法测量光斑总能量以及能流密度的相对误差为3.5%。该测量误差在允许范围内,进一步证实了该能流密度测量方法的正确性和可行性。%In order to estimate its measurement error range when indirectly measuring the flux distribution on receivers of solar thermal power systems,a new method is studied.The error sources of this method are ana-lyzed based on the theoretical equation.An experiment to measure the flux density distribution of a concentrat-ed beam is implemented with a spherical heliostat,a CCD camera,a diffuse reflector,neutral density filters and other devices.The flux density distribution and total energy of the concentrated solar irradiance on the re-flector is calculated with a MATLAB program.The incident angle of rays on the center of the heliostat is meas-ured with a total station.The theoretical value of the beam energy is calculated according to area and reflectiv-ity of the heliostat,the direct normal irradiance and cosine efficiency.By comparing the theoretical value of the beam energy with the measured total energy,the relative error of the total energy and the flux density measured by this method is obtained.The measured relative error is 3.5%.This error is within permission

  12. 高磁通密度铁粉芯的研发进展%Recent developments in iron powder cores with high magnetic flux density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩志全

    2011-01-01

    综合评述了国外高磁通密度铁粉芯的性能,介绍了几种材料的制备技术,包括MgO绝缘膜及其铁粉芯的制备,耐高温树脂绝缘膜包覆铁粉芯的制备、Sr-B-P-O磷酸盐绝缘膜及其铁粉芯的制备,以及高密度成型的加热模腔润滑技术等.%The characteristics of iron powder cores with high magnetic flux density were reviewed. And their preparation technique, including the fabrication processes in the MgO insulation coating film and respective iron powder cores, in cores based on the iron powder coating by high operating temperature-resin, and in cores made by iron powder coated with phosphate glass insulator of Sr-B-P-O system, as well as high density compacting method with warm compaction-die wall lubrication, were introduced.

  13. Direct relationship between cell density and FDG uptake in asymptomatic aortic aneurysm close to surgical threshold: an in vivo and in vitro study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marini, Cecilia [CNR Institute of Bioimaging and Molecular Physiology, Milan, Genoa Section, Genoa (Italy); Oftalmologia e Genetica dell' Universita di Genova, Dipartimento di Neuroscienze, Genoa (Italy); Morbelli, Silvia; Armonino, Riccardo; Riondato, Mattia; Massollo, Michela; Augeri, Carla; Fiz, Francesco; Sambuceti, Gianmario [University of Genoa, Department Internal Medicine, Chair of Nuclear Medicine, Genoa (Italy); Spinella, Giovanni; Pane, Bianca; Palmieri, Daniela; Palombo, Domenico [San Martino University Hospital, University of Genoa, Division of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Genoa (Italy); Sarocchi, Francesca; Abete, Luca; Fulcheri, Ezio [University of Genoa, Department of Surgical and Diagnostic Sciences, Pathology, Genoa (Italy); Ghigliotti, Giorgio [University of Genoa, Department of Internal Medicine, Chair of Cardiology, Genoa (Italy); Cittadini, Giuseppe [Hospital San Martino, Department of Radiology, Genoa (Italy)

    2012-01-15

    Conflicting results have been reported about the clinical value of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) imaging in predicting the risk of rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The present study tests the hypothesis that FDG uptake is low in asymptomatic noninflammatory AAA due to the low cell density in aneurysmal walls. Positron emission tomography (PET)/CT imaging was performed in 12 consecutive candidates for AAA surgical repair and in 12 age- and sex-matched controls. At intervention, aneurysmal walls were cut into three sequential blocks. Block A was frozen to cut three 5-{mu}m slices for incubation with 2-3 MBq of FDG for 5 min. Block C was first incubated with the same tracer solution for the same time and subsequently frozen to cut three 5-{mu}m slices. Autoradiographic images were coregistered with immunohistochemical pictures of cell density, type and DNA synthesis as assessed on block B. No visible uptake in abdominal aorta occurred in any patient or control subject. Immunohistochemistry documented a severe loss of wall structure, with low numbers of cells. Tracer retention directly correlated with overall cell density and with prevalence of cells synthesizing DNA. The metabolic nature of FDG uptake was confirmed by the selective effect of preliminary freezing that decreased tracer content by 90% in regions with high cell density and only by 34% in cold acellular areas. The loss of tissue structure and the marked decrease in cell density account for the low prevalence of positive findings at FDG PET imaging, at least in asymptomatic patients bearing AAAs whose diameter is close to surgical indication. (orig.)

  14. Electrical Stimulation of Low-Threshold Proprioceptive Fibers in the Adult Rat Increases Density of Glutamatergic and Cholinergic Terminals on Ankle Extensor α-Motoneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewska-Woźniak, Olga; Grycz, Kamil; Czarkowska-Bauch, Julita; Skup, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    The effects of stimulation of low-threshold proprioceptive afferents in the tibial nerve on two types of excitatory inputs to α-motoneurons were tested. The first input is formed by glutamatergic Ia sensory afferents contacting monosynaptically α-motoneurons. The second one is the cholinergic input originating from V0c-interneurons, located in lamina X of the spinal cord, modulating activity of α-motoneurons via C-terminals. Our aim was to clarify whether enhancement of signaling to ankle extensor α-motoneurons, via direct electrical stimulation addressed predominantly to low-threshold proprioceptive fibers in the tibial nerve of awake rats, will affect Ia glutamatergic and cholinergic innervation of α-motoneurons of lateral gastrocnemius (LG). LG motoneurons were identified with True Blue tracer injected intramuscularly. Tibial nerve was stimulated for 7 days with continuous bursts of three pulses applied in four 20 min sessions daily. The Hoffmann reflex and motor responses recorded from the soleus muscle, LG synergist, allowed controlling stimulation. Ia terminals and C-terminals abutting on LG-labeled α-motoneurons were detected by immunofluorescence (IF) using input-specific anti- VGLUT1 and anti-VAChT antibodies, respectively. Quantitative analysis of confocal images revealed that the number of VGLUT1 IF and VAChT IF terminals contacting the soma of LG α-motoneurons increased after stimulation by 35% and by 26%, respectively, comparing to the sham-stimulated side. The aggregate volume of VGLUT1 IF and VAChT IF terminals increased by 35% and by 30%, respectively. Labeling intensity of boutons was also increased, suggesting an increase of signaling to LG α-motoneurons after stimulation. To conclude, one week of continuous burst stimulation of proprioceptive input to LG α-motoneurons is effective in enrichment of their direct glutamatergic but also indirect cholinergic inputs. The effectiveness of such and longer stimulation in models of injury is a

  15. Electrical Stimulation of Low-Threshold Proprioceptive Fibers in the Adult Rat Increases Density of Glutamatergic and Cholinergic Terminals on Ankle Extensor α-Motoneurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewska-Woźniak, Olga; Grycz, Kamil; Czarkowska-Bauch, Julita; Skup, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    The effects of stimulation of low-threshold proprioceptive afferents in the tibial nerve on two types of excitatory inputs to α-motoneurons were tested. The first input is formed by glutamatergic Ia sensory afferents contacting monosynaptically α-motoneurons. The second one is the cholinergic input originating from V0c—interneurons, located in lamina X of the spinal cord, modulating activity of α-motoneurons via C-terminals. Our aim was to clarify whether enhancement of signaling to ankle extensor α-motoneurons, via direct electrical stimulation addressed predominantly to low-threshold proprioceptive fibers in the tibial nerve of awake rats, will affect Ia glutamatergic and cholinergic innervation of α-motoneurons of lateral gastrocnemius (LG). LG motoneurons were identified with True Blue tracer injected intramuscularly. Tibial nerve was stimulated for 7 days with continuous bursts of three pulses applied in four 20 min sessions daily. The Hoffmann reflex and motor responses recorded from the soleus muscle, LG synergist, allowed controlling stimulation. Ia terminals and C-terminals abutting on LG-labeled α-motoneurons were detected by immunofluorescence (IF) using input-specific anti- VGLUT1 and anti-VAChT antibodies, respectively. Quantitative analysis of confocal images revealed that the number of VGLUT1 IF and VAChT IF terminals contacting the soma of LG α-motoneurons increased after stimulation by 35% and by 26%, respectively, comparing to the sham-stimulated side. The aggregate volume of VGLUT1 IF and VAChT IF terminals increased by 35% and by 30%, respectively. Labeling intensity of boutons was also increased, suggesting an increase of signaling to LG α-motoneurons after stimulation. To conclude, one week of continuous burst stimulation of proprioceptive input to LG α-motoneurons is effective in enrichment of their direct glutamatergic but also indirect cholinergic inputs. The effectiveness of such and longer stimulation in models of injury is a

  16. The H-mode power threshold in JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Start, D.F.H.; Bhatnagar, V.P.; Campbell, D.J.; Cordey, J.G.; Esch, H.P.L. de; Gormezano, C.; Hawkes, N.; Horton, L.; Jones, T.T.C.; Lomas, P.J.; Lowry, C.; Righi, E.; Rimini, F.G.; Saibene, G.; Sartori, R.; Sips, G.; Stork, D.; Thomas, P.; Thomsen, K.; Tubbing, B.J.D.; Von Hellermann, M.; Ward, D.J. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking

    1994-07-01

    New H-mode threshold data over a range of toroidal field and density values have been obtained from the present campaign. The scaling with n{sub e} B{sub t} is almost identical with that of the 91/92 period for the same discharge conditions. The scaling with toroidal field alone gives somewhat higher thresholds than the older data. The 1991/2 database shows a scaling of P{sub th} (power threshold) with n{sub e} B{sub t} which is approximately linear and agrees well with that observed on other tokamaks. For NBI and carbon target tiles the threshold power is a factor of two higher with the ion {Nu}B drift away from the target compared with the value found with the drift towards the target. The combination of ICRH and beryllium tiles appears to be beneficial for reducing P{sub th}. The power threshold is largely insensitive to plasma current, X-point height and distance between the last closed flux surface and the limiter, at least for values greater than 2 cm. (authors). 3 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Optimizing LED lighting for space plant growth unit: Joint effects of photon flux density, red to white ratios and intermittent light pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avercheva, O. V.; Berkovich, Yu. A.; Konovalova, I. O.; Radchenko, S. G.; Lapach, S. N.; Bassarskaya, E. M.; Kochetova, G. V.; Zhigalova, T. V.; Yakovleva, O. S.; Tarakanov, I. G.

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work were to choose a quantitative optimality criterion for estimating the quality of plant LED lighting regimes inside space greenhouses and to construct regression models of crop productivity and the optimality criterion depending on the level of photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD), the proportion of the red component in the light spectrum and the duration of the duty cycle (Chinese cabbage Brassica сhinensis L. as an example). The properties of the obtained models were described in the context of predicting crop dry weight and the optimality criterion behavior when varying plant lighting parameters. Results of the fractional 3-factor experiment demonstrated the share of the PPFD level participation in the crop dry weight accumulation was 84.4% at almost any combination of other lighting parameters, but when PPFD value increased up to 500 μmol m-2 s-1 the pulse light and supplemental light from red LEDs could additionally increase crop productivity. Analysis of the optimality criterion response to variation of lighting parameters showed that the maximum coordinates were the following: PPFD = 500 μmol m-2 s-1, about 70%-proportion of the red component of the light spectrum (PPFDLEDred/PPFDLEDwhite = 1.5) and the duty cycle with a period of 501 μs. Thus, LED crop lighting with these parameters was optimal for achieving high crop productivity and for efficient use of energy in the given range of lighting parameter values.

  18. Generating an AC amplitude magnetic flux density value up to 150 μT at a frequency up to 100 kHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulvr, Michal; Polonský, Jakub

    2017-05-01

    AC magnetic field analyzers with a triaxial coil probe are widely used by health and safety professionals, in manufacturing, and in service industries. For traceable calibration of these analyzers, it is important to be able to generate a stable, homogeneous reference AC magnetic flux density (MFD). In this paper, the generating of AC amplitude MFD value of 150 μT by single-layer Helmholtz type solenoid, described in previous work, was expanded up to a frequency of 100 kHz using the effect of serial resonance. A programmable capacitor array has been developed with a range of adjustable values from 50 pF to 51225 pF. In addition, the multi-layer search coil with a nominal area turns value of 1.3m2, used for adjusting AC MFD in the solenoid, has been modified by a transimpedance amplifier for use in a wider frequency range than up to 3 kHz. The possibility of using the programmable capacitor array up to 150 kHz has also been tested. An AC amplitude MFD value of 150 μT can be generated with expanded uncertainty better than 0.6% up to 100 kHz.

  19. Hidrogenionic potential (pH of the attractant, trap density and control threshold for Ceratitis capitata (DIPTERA: TEPHRITIDAE on Hamlin oranges in São Paulo central region, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Eduardo Branco Paiva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of initial pH values of 4.5, 6.5 and 8.5 of the attractant (protein bait Milhocina® and borax (sodium borate in the field, on the capture of fruit flies in McPhail traps, using 1, 2, 4 and 8 traps per hectare, in order to estimate control thresholds in a Hamlin orange grove in the central region of the state of São Paulo. The most abundant fruit fly species was Ceratitis capitata, comprising almost 99% of the fruit flies captured, of which 80% were females. The largest captures of C. capitata were found in traps baited with Milhocina® and borax at pH 8.5. Captures per trap for the four densities were similar, indicating that the population can be estimated with one trap per hectare in areas with high populations. It was found positive relationships between captures of C. capitata and the number of Hamlin oranges damaged, 2 and 3 weeks after capture. It was obtained equations that correlate captures and damage levels which can be used to estimate control thresholds. The average loss caused in Hamlin orange fruits by C. capitata was 2.5 tons per hectare or 7.5% of production.

  20. Azimuthal and radial variations in sap flux density and effects on stand-scale transpiration estimates in a Japanese cedar forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Yoshinori; Tsuruta, Kenji; Ogura, Akira; Noto, Fumikazu; Komatsu, Hikaru; Otsuki, Kyoichi; Maruyama, Toshisuke

    2013-05-01

    Understanding radial and azimuthal variation, and tree-to-tree variation, in sap flux density (Fd) as sources of uncertainty is important for estimating transpiration using sap flow techniques. In a Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica D. Don.) forest, Fd was measured at several depths and aspects for 18 trees, using heat dissipation (Granier-type) sensors. We observed considerable azimuthal variation in Fd. The coefficient of variation (CV) calculated from Fd at a depth of 0-20 mm (Fd1) and Fd at a depth of 20-40 mm (Fd2) ranged from 6.7 to 37.6% (mean = 28.3%) and from 19.6 to 62.5% (mean = 34.6%) for the -azimuthal directions. Fd at the north aspect averaged for nine trees, for which azimuthal measurements were made, was -obviously smaller than Fd at the other three aspects (i.e., west, south and east) averaged for the nine trees. Fd1 averaged for the nine trees was significantly larger than Fd2 averaged for the nine trees. The error for stand-scale transpiration (E) estimates caused by ignoring the azimuthal variation was larger than that caused by ignoring the radial variation. The error caused by ignoring tree-to-tree variation was larger than that caused by ignoring both radial and azimuthal variations. Thus, tree-to-tree variation in Fd would be more important than both radial and azimuthal variations in Fd for E estimation. However, Fd for each tree should not be measured at a consistent aspect but should be measured at various aspects to make accurate E estimates and to avoid a risk of error caused by the relationship of Fd to aspect.

  1. Light-induced systemic regulation of photosynthesis in primary and trifoliate leaves of Phaseolus vulgaris: effects of photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) versus spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, K; Matsuda, R; Fujiwara, K

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this work using Phaseolus vulgaris were to examine whether the light spectrum incident on mature primary leaves (PLs) is related to leaf-to-leaf systemic regulation of developing trifoliate leaves (TLs) in photosynthetic characteristics, and to investigate the relative importance of spectrum and photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) in light-induced systemic regulation. Systemic regulation was induced by altering PPFD and the spectrum of light incident on PLs using a shading treatment and lighting treatments including either white, blue, green or red light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Photosynthetic characteristics were evaluated by measuring the light-limited and light-saturated net photosynthetic rates and the amounts of nitrogen (N), chlorophyll (Chl) and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco; EC 4.1.1.39). Shading treatment on PLs decreased the amounts of N, Chl and Rubisco of TLs and tended to decrease the photosynthetic rates. However, we observed no systemic effects induced by the light spectrum on PLs in this study, except that a higher amount of Rubisco of TLs was observed when the PLs were irradiated with blue LEDs. Our results imply that photoreceptors in mature leaves have little influence on photosynthetic rates and amounts of N and Chl of developing leaves through systemic regulation, although the possibility of the action of blue light irradiation on the amount of Rubisco cannot be ruled out. Based on these results, we concluded that the light spectrum incident on mature leaves has little systemic effect on developing leaves in terms of photosynthetic characteristics and that the light-induced systemic regulation was largely accounted for by PPFD.

  2. Statistical relationship of the NO2 slant column densities over Stara Zagora station and the solar F10.7 flux with consideration of the QBO phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valev, D.; Werner, R.; Atanassov, A.; Kostadinov, I.; Giovanelli, G.; Ravegnani, F.; Petritoli, A.; Bortoli, D.; Palazzi, E.; Markova, T.

    2008-12-01

    By means of the GASCOD spectrometer at Stara Zagora station (42.8 N, 26.1 E), data series were obtained of monthly NO2am (at sunrise) and NO2pm (at sunset) slant column densities (SCD), covering the interval from September 1999 to the end of 2006. After removing the seasonal cycle, relationships between the NO2am and F10.7 solar flux and NO2pm and F10.7 were sought. The monthly deseasonalized NO2am show a positive statistical significant correlation with F10.7 having r = 0.41 at level p = 0.01. No statistical significant correlations were found between monthly NO2pm and F10.7 unless the QBO phase was taken into consideration. The original data series of the quasi-biennial oscillations (QBO) at the level of 30 h Pa have been used to study the relation between the NO2 and the F10.7 taking into account the QBO phase. The data have been separated into two different groups ? positive (westerly) and negative (easterly) QBO phase. As a result, during the negative QBO phase, the monthly NO2pm show a negative correlation with F10.7 (r = - 0.37 and p = 0.01). During the positive QBO phase, the monthly NO2pm show no correlation with F10.7 (r = 0.02). The separation of NO2am into two groups according to the sign of the QBO phase practically does not change the results - the correlation coefficient remains between 0.40 and 0.43 at level p = 0.01. The statistical significance of the found relationships was determined by means of Student's t-test.

  3. Optimizing LED lighting for space plant growth unit: Joint effects of photon flux density, red to white ratios and intermittent light pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avercheva, O V; Berkovich, Yu A; Konovalova, I O; Radchenko, S G; Lapach, S N; Bassarskaya, E M; Kochetova, G V; Zhigalova, T V; Yakovleva, O S; Tarakanov, I G

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work were to choose a quantitative optimality criterion for estimating the quality of plant LED lighting regimes inside space greenhouses and to construct regression models of crop productivity and the optimality criterion depending on the level of photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD), the proportion of the red component in the light spectrum and the duration of the duty cycle (Chinese cabbage Brassica сhinensis L. as an example). The properties of the obtained models were described in the context of predicting crop dry weight and the optimality criterion behavior when varying plant lighting parameters. Results of the fractional 3-factor experiment demonstrated the share of the PPFD level participation in the crop dry weight accumulation was 84.4% at almost any combination of other lighting parameters, but when PPFD value increased up to 500µmol m(-2)s(-1) the pulse light and supplemental light from red LEDs could additionally increase crop productivity. Analysis of the optimality criterion response to variation of lighting parameters showed that the maximum coordinates were the following: PPFD = 500µmol m(-2)s(-1), about 70%-proportion of the red component of the light spectrum (PPFDLEDred/PPFDLEDwhite = 1.5) and the duty cycle with a period of 501µs. Thus, LED crop lighting with these parameters was optimal for achieving high crop productivity and for efficient use of energy in the given range of lighting parameter values. Copyright © 2016 The Committee on Space Research (COSPAR). Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Temperature and CO2 dependency of the photosynthetic photon flux density responses of leaves of Vitis vinifera cvs. Chardonnay and Merlot grown in a hot climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Dennis H

    2017-02-01

    Comparisons of the photosynthetic responses to light and temperature between related cultivars are important to understand how well matched they are to the climate where they are grown. Photosynthetic light responses at a range of leaf temperatures and two CO2 concentrations were measured on leaves of two grapevine cultivars (Vitis vinifera L.) Chardonnay and Merlot vines growing in field conditions. The objective was to assess the interaction between photon flux density (PFD), leaf temperature and CO2 on photosynthesis and to compare the two cultivars. Merlot leaves maintained higher light-saturated rates of photosynthesis at all leaf temperatures compared with the Chardonnay leaves. At low temperatures, a reduced photon yield offset with a high stomatal conductance accounted for the low rates of the Chardonnay leaves. At moderate to high temperatures, photon yields, PFDs at light saturation and stomatal conductances did not account for differences between Merlot and Chardonnay leaves. At elevated CO2 (800 μmol mol(-1)) concentrations, the differences in photosynthetic performance between the cultivars were enhanced, with 30% higher light saturated rates for Merlot compared with Chardonnay leaves. Merlot berries accumulated more sugar, consistent with published data. These results demonstrate Chardonnay, unlike Merlot, appeared to be poorly matched to the hot climate. However, considering the current market and political trends, low alcoholic wines (and, thus, low sugar grapes) should be preferred. Especially in hot climates, it is always hard to obtain such kind of wines and, thus, the most interesting agronomical challenge, especially for Chardonnay vines could be interpreted in an opposite way. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Formation of stacking faults and their correlation with flux-pinning and critical current density for Sm-doped YBa2Cu3O7- films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wee, Sung Hun [ORNL; Specht, Eliot D [ORNL; Cantoni, Claudia [ORNL; Zuev, Yuri L [ORNL; Maroni, V. A. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Wong-Ng, W. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Liu, G. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Haugan, T. J. [Air Force Research Laboratory; Goyal, Amit [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    A correlation between flux-pinning characteristics and stacking faults (SFs) formed by Sm substitution on Y and Ba sites was found in Sm-doped YBa2Cu3O7- (YBCO) films. It was confirmed that 223 type SFs, Y2Ba2Cu3Ox, composed of extra Y and O planes aligned parallel to the ab-planes formed via Sm substitution on the Y site and increased in number with increasing Sm doping on the Ba site. The number density of 223 SFs is correlated strongly with the enhancement in ab-plane correlated flux-pinning, resulting in a sharpening of the H ab peak in the plot of critical current density versus magnetic field orientation.

  6. 磁通量对二维谐振子的量子能级密度的影响%Effect of a magnetic flux line on the quantum level density of a harmonic oscillator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王德华; 李红艳; 马晓光; 王美山; 杨传路

    2007-01-01

    Using the periodic orbit theory, we computed the quantum level density of a particle in the two-dimensional harmonic oscillator potential with and without the magnetic flux line for different cases. Especially discuss the influence of the magnetic flux line on the quantum level density. The results show when the frequency ratio of the two-dimensional harmonic potential is a rational number, the quantum level density is discrete. Each peak in the level density corresponds to one energy. However, when the frequency ratio is an irrational number, the level density is oscillating, when the magnetic flux is added, the amplitude of the oscillation decreased. This can be considered as a consequence of Aharonov-Bohm effect.%利用周期轨道理论,我们计算了在不同情况下,一个粒子在二维谐振子势中存在和不存在磁通量时的量子能级密度.重点讨论了磁通量对量子能级密度的影响.计算结果表明:当二维谐振子势的频率比值是有理数时,量子能级是分立的,能级密度中的每一条峰正好对应一个量子能级.然而,当频率比是无理数时,能级密度发生振荡,当加上磁通量后,振荡减小.这可以看作是Aharonov-Bohm效应的结果.

  7. Quick-low-density parity check and dynamic threshold voltage optimization in 1X nm triple-level cell NAND flash memory with comprehensive analysis of endurance, retention-time, and temperature variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Masafumi; Tokutomi, Tsukasa; Hachiya, Shogo; Kobayashi, Atsuro; Tanakamaru, Shuhei; Ning, Sheyang; Ogura Iwasaki, Tomoko; Takeuchi, Ken

    2016-08-01

    NAND flash memory’s reliability degrades with increasing endurance, retention-time and/or temperature. After a comprehensive evaluation of 1X nm triple-level cell (TLC) NAND flash, two highly reliable techniques are proposed. The first proposal, quick low-density parity check (Quick-LDPC), requires only one cell read in order to accurately estimate a bit-error rate (BER) that includes the effects of temperature, write and erase (W/E) cycles and retention-time. As a result, 83% read latency reduction is achieved compared to conventional AEP-LDPC. Also, W/E cycling is extended by 100% compared with conventional Bose-Chaudhuri-Hocquenghem (BCH) error-correcting code (ECC). The second proposal, dynamic threshold voltage optimization (DVO) has two parts, adaptive V Ref shift (AVS) and V TH space control (VSC). AVS reduces read error and latency by adaptively optimizing the reference voltage (V Ref) based on temperature, W/E cycles and retention-time. AVS stores the optimal V Ref’s in a table in order to enable one cell read. VSC further improves AVS by optimizing the voltage margins between V TH states. DVO reduces BER by 80%.

  8. A Statistical Method to Constrain Faint Radio Source Counts Below the Detection Threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Mitchell-Wynne, Ketron; Afonso, Jose; Jarvis, Matt J

    2013-01-01

    We present a statistical method based on a maximum likelihood approach to constrain the number counts of extragalactic sources below the nominal flux-density limit of continuum imaging surveys. We extract flux densities from a radio map using positional information from an auxiliary catalogue and show that we can model the number counts of this undetected population down to flux density levels well below the detection threshold of the radio survey. We demonstrate the capabilities that our method will have with future generation wide-area radio surveys by performing simulations over various sky areas with a power-law dN/dS model. We generate a simulated power-law distribution with flux densities ranging from 0.1 \\sigma to 2 \\sigma, convolve this distribution with a Gaussian noise distribution rms of 10 micro-Jy/beam, and are able to recover the counts from the noisy distribution. We then demonstrate the application of our method using data from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters survey (FI...

  9. Linking the micro and macro: L-H transition dynamics and threshold physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkov, M. A.; Diamond, P. H.; Miki, K.; Rice, J. E.; Tynan, G. R.

    2015-03-01

    The links between the microscopic dynamics and macroscopic threshold physics of the L → H transition are elucidated. Emphasis is placed on understanding the physics of power threshold scalings, and especially on understanding the minimum in the power threshold as a function of density Pthr (n). By extending a numerical 1D model to evolve both electron and ion temperatures, including collisional coupling, we find that the decrease in Pthr (n) along the low-density branch is due to the combination of an increase in collisional electron-to-ion energy transfer and an increase in the heating fraction coupled to the ions. Both processes strengthen the edge diamagnetic electric field needed to lock in the mean electric field shear for the L → H transition. The increase in Pthr (n) along the high-density branch is due to the increase with ion collisionality of damping of turbulence-driven shear flows. Turbulence driven shear flows are needed to trigger the transition by extracting energy from the turbulence. Thus, we identify the critical transition physics components of the separatrix ion heat flux and the zonal flow excitation. The model reveals a power threshold minimum in density scans as a crossover between the threshold decrease supported by an increase in heat fraction received by ions (directly or indirectly, from electrons) and a threshold increase, supported by the rise in shear flow damping. The electron/ion heating mix emerges as important to the transition, in that it, together with electron-ion coupling, regulates the edge diamagnetic electric field shear. The importance of possible collisionless electron-ion heat transfer processes is explained.

  10. The neutrino floor at ultra-low threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Strigari, Louis E

    2016-01-01

    By lowering their energy threshold direct dark matter searches can reach the neutrino floor with experimental technology now in development. The 7Be flux can be detected with $\\sim 10$ eV nuclear recoil energy threshold and 50 kg-yr exposure. The pep flux can be detected with $\\sim 3$ ton-yr exposure, and the first detection of the CNO flux is possible with similar exposure. The pp flux can be detected with threshold of $\\sim$ eV and only $\\sim$ kg-yr exposure. These can be the first pure neutral current measurements of the low-energy solar neutrino flux. Measuring this flux is important for low mass dark matter searches and for understanding the solar interior.

  11. FLUXNET: A new tool to study the temporal and spatial variability of ecosystem-scale carbon dioxide, water vapor, and energy flux densities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldocchi, D.; Falge, E.; Gu, L.

    2001-01-01

    FLUXNET is a global network of micrometeorological flux measurement site's that measure the exchanges of carbon dioxide, water vapor, and energy between the biosphere and atmosphere. At present over 140 sites are operating on a long-term and continuous basis. Vegetation under study includes tempe...

  12. Sub-threshold synchronizer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, J.; Ashouei, M.; Kinniment, D.; Huisken, J.; Russell, G.; Yakovlev, A.

    2011-01-01

    Sub-threshold operation has been proven to be very effective to reduce the power consumption of circuits when high performance is not required. Future low power systems on chip are likely to consist of many sub-systems operating at different frequencies and VDDs from super-threshold to sub-threshold

  13. Threshold Concepts in Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loertscher, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Threshold concepts can be identified for any discipline and provide a framework for linking student learning to curricular design. Threshold concepts represent a transformed understanding of a discipline, without which the learner cannot progress and are therefore pivotal in learning in a discipline. Although threshold concepts have been…

  14. Exact Threshold Circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt; Podolskii, Vladimir V.

    2010-01-01

    We initiate a systematic study of constant depth Boolean circuits built using exact threshold gates. We consider both unweighted and weighted exact threshold gates and introduce corresponding circuit classes. We next show that this gives a hierarchy of classes that seamlessly interleave with the ......We initiate a systematic study of constant depth Boolean circuits built using exact threshold gates. We consider both unweighted and weighted exact threshold gates and introduce corresponding circuit classes. We next show that this gives a hierarchy of classes that seamlessly interleave...... with the well-studied corresponding hierarchies defined using ordinary threshold gates. A major open problem in Boolean circuit complexity is to provide an explicit super-polynomial lower bound for depth two threshold circuits. We identify the class of depth two exact threshold circuits as a natural subclass...

  15. Testing the inverse-Compton catastrophe scenario in the intra-day variable blazar S5 0716+71, III. Rapid and correlated flux density variability from radio to sub-mm bands

    CERN Document Server

    Fuhrmann, L; Witzel, A; Kraus, A; Britzen, S; Bernhart, S; Impellizzeri, C M V; Agudo, I; Klare, J; Sohn, B W; Angelakis, E; Bach, U; Gab'anyi, K 'E; K"ording, E; Pagels, A; Zensus, J A; Wagner, S J; Ostorero, L; Ungerechts, H; Grewing, M; Tornikoski, M; Apponi, A J; Vila-Vilar'o, B; Ziurys, L M; Strom, R G

    2008-01-01

    The BL Lac object S5 0716+71 was observed in a global multi-frequency campaign to search for rapid and correlated flux density variability and signatures of an inverse-Compton (IC) catastrophe during the states of extreme apparent brightness temperatures. The observing campaign involved simultaneous monitoring at radio to IR/optical wavelengths centered around a 500-ks INTEGRAL pointing (November 10-17, 2003). We present the combined analysis and results of the cm- to sub-mm observations including a detailed study of the inter- to intra-day variability and spectral characteristics of 0716+714. We further constrain the variability brightness temperatures (T_B) and Doppler factors (delta) comparing the radio-bands with the hard X-ray emission (3-200 keV). 0716+714 was in an exceptionally high state (outburst) and different (slower) phase of short-term variability. The flux density variability in the cm- to mm-bands is dominated by a correlated, ~4 day time scale amplitude increase of up to ~35% systematically m...

  16. Differences in carbon density and soil CH4/N2O flux among remnant and agro-ecosystems established since European settlement in the Mornington Peninsula, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livesley, Stephen J; Idczak, Daniel; Fest, Benedikt J

    2013-11-01

    National and regional C emissions from historical land use change (LUC) and fossil fuel use are proposed as a basis to ascribe 'burden-sharing' for global emission reduction targets. Changes in non-CO2 greenhouse gas emissions as a result of LUC have not been considered, but may be considerable. We measured soil-atmosphere exchange of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) in remnant forest, pasture and viticulture systems in four seasons, as well as differences in soil C density and the C density of remnant forest vegetation. This approach enabled comparative assessment of likely changes in ecosystem C density and soil non-CO2 greenhouse gas exchange along a LUC continuum since European settlement. Soil CH4 uptake was moderate in forest soil (-27 μg C m(-2) h(-1)), and significantly different to occasionally large CH4 emissions from viticulture and pasture soils. Soil N2O emissions were small and did not significantly differ. Soil C density increased significantly with conversion from forest (5 kg m(-2)) to pasture (9 kg m(-2)), and remained high in viticulture. However, there was a net decrease in ecosystem C density with forest conversion to pasture. Concurrently, net soil non-CO2 emissions (CH4 and N2O combined) increased with conversion from forest to pasture. Since European settlement 170 years ago, it was estimated ~8114 Gg CO2-e has been released from changes in ecosystem C density in the Mornington Peninsula, whereas ~383 Gg CO2-e may have been released from changes in soil non-CO2 exchange processes. Principally, a switch from soil CH4 uptake to soil CH4 emission after forest clearing to agro-pastoral systems provided this further ~5% contribution to the historical landscape CO2-e source strength. Conserving and restoring remnant forests and establishing new tree-based systems will enhance landscape C density. Similarly, minimising anaerobic, wet conditions in pasture/viticulture soils will help reduce non-CO2 greenhouse gas emissions.

  17. Polynomial threshold functions and Boolean threshold circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt; Podolskii, Vladimir V.

    2013-01-01

    We study the complexity of computing Boolean functions on general Boolean domains by polynomial threshold functions (PTFs). A typical example of a general Boolean domain is 12n . We are mainly interested in the length (the number of monomials) of PTFs, with their degree and weight being...... of secondary interest. We show that PTFs on general Boolean domains are tightly connected to depth two threshold circuits. Our main results in regard to this connection are: PTFs of polynomial length and polynomial degree compute exactly the functions computed by THRMAJ circuits. An exponential length lower...

  18. A Phenomenological Study on Threshold Improvement via Spatial Coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Takeuchi, Keigo; Kawabata, Tsutomu

    2011-01-01

    Kudekar et al. proved an interesting result in low-density parity-check (LDPC) convolutional codes: The belief-propagation (BP) threshold is boosted to the maximum-a-posteriori (MAP) threshold. Furthermore, the authors showed that the BP threshold for code-division multiple-access (CDMA) systems is improved up to a threshold below the optimal one via spatial coupling. In this letter, a phenomenological model for elucidating the essence of these phenomenon, called threshold improvement, is proposed. The main result implies that threshold improvement occurs for spatially-coupled general graphical models.

  19. Conical electromagnetic radiation flux concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, E. R.

    1972-01-01

    Concentrator provides method of concentrating a beam of electromagnetic radiation into a smaller beam, presenting a higher flux density. Smaller beam may be made larger by sending radiation through the device in the reverse direction.

  20. Cluster-span threshold: An unbiased threshold for binarising weighted complete networks in functional connectivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Keith; Azami, Hamed; Parra, Mario A; Starr, John M; Escudero, Javier

    2015-08-01

    We propose a new unbiased threshold for network analysis named the Cluster-Span Threshold (CST). This is based on the clustering coefficient, C, following logic that a balance of `clustering' to `spanning' triples results in a useful topology for network analysis and that the product of complementing properties has a unique value only when perfectly balanced. We threshold networks by fixing C at this balanced value, rather than fixing connection density at an arbitrary value, as has been the trend. We compare results from an electroencephalogram data set of volunteers performing visual short term memory tasks of the CST alongside other thresholds, including maximum spanning trees. We find that the CST holds as a sensitive threshold for distinguishing differences in the functional connectivity between tasks. This provides a sensitive and objective method for setting a threshold on weighted complete networks which may prove influential on the future of functional connectivity research.

  1. Magnetic hysteresis of the critical current density of polycrystalline (Bi-Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductors: a fingerprint of the intragranular and intergranular flux trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muné, P.; Govea-Alcaide, E.; Jardim, R. F.

    2001-05-01

    The hysteretic behavior of the superconducting critical current density Jc( Ba) dependence under low applied magnetic fields (B apowder but subjected to different pressures ranging from 40 to 250 MPa before the last heat treatment. The samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray powder diffraction analysis. The magnetic behavior of the superconducting grains was studied by measuring magnetization versus applied magnetic field in powder samples. The Jc( Ba) data are discussed within the scenario of the three-level superconducting system.

  2. Threshold Concepts in Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine threshold concepts in the context of teaching and learning first-year university economics. It outlines some of the arguments for using threshold concepts and provides examples using opportunity cost as an exemplar in economics. Design/ Methodology/Approach: The paper provides an overview of the…

  3. 梯形磁密作用下同步发电机相电势分析%Analysis of Phase Electromotive Force for Synchronous Generator Under Trapeziform Flux Density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    饶翔; 吴旭升; 任明炜; 高嵬

    2011-01-01

    为了研究带整流负载同步发电机在梯形磁密作用下空载运行时相电势的变化规律,以便对发电机电枢绕组的参数实现优化.依据交流电机绕组设计的基本理论,采用将每极每相线圈产生的感应电势直接求和的方法,讨论了空载相电势随每极每相槽数q、极弧宽度α0及相带宽度αph等参数的变化规律.结果表明:对于整距绕组,随着每极每相槽数q的增大会使感应电势的波形和原磁密波形相比失真变大,当极弧宽度等于相带宽度时,可得到最接近正弦形的相电势;对于短距绕组情况,短距将导致感应电势波形和磁密波形相比失真进一步变大.%To investigate the changing rules of phase electromotive force for synchronous generator with rectifier loads under trapezoidal flux density is helpful to optimize the designing methods of the parameters in the generator armature coils. Based on electromagnetic induction law and the basic theory of AC generator designs , a method based on the direct sum of the induction potentials produced by the coils of every phase and every pole is adopted to investigate the laws of the slot number q of every phase and every pole , the width of pole arc ao and phase band width apb. The results show that: for the entire distance of winding, the increase of slots q per pole per phase will enhance the number of induced electric potential waveform and the original flux density wave form distortion; for short-range winding, it will further enhance short-range induction voltage waveform and the flux density waveform distortion.

  4. Nodal model for calculating the variations in neutron flux density due to stochastic vibrations of control elements of hexagonal cross section; Nodales Modell zur Berechnung der Neutronenflussdichteschwankungen infolge stochastischer Schwingungen von Regelelementen mit hexagonalem Querschnitt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollstein, F.

    1994-08-01

    Based on a three-dimensional modal geometry model for the WWER 440 reacotr, with nodes in the hexagonal z geometry, the equations for the interative calculation of the mean neutron flux density in a node and their variations due to stochastic control element vibration are shown. For modelling sources of noise, two different geometric and neutron-physics equations are used, according to the design of a control element as a spatial double pendulum with the absorber and fuel part. The neutron flux noise caused by vibration of the fuel parts is due to area sources. These are induced by material parameter variation due to control element displacement within the guide duct. The model of the `thermal black body` absorbing hollow cylinder is transferred to bodies of hexagonal crossection for the absorber part. Both sources of noise are described as disturbances for the partial neutron current densities averaged over the node surfaces in the two group diffusion approximation. The transfer of the noise signals is dealt with in the prompt response approximation. The `two group swelling nodes` are coupled to the `one group transmission nodes` on the basis of the modified one group diffusion approximation. The algorithms shown are the basis for development of a computer program for examining the transfer functions depending on location of neutron flux density variations with stochastic control element vibrations as the source of noise. (orig./HP) [Deutsch] Auf der Basis eines dreidimensionalen nodalen Geometriemodells fuer den WWER-440-Reaktor mit Nodes in Hexagonal-z-Geometrie werden die Beziehungen zur iterativen Berechnung der mittleren Neutronenflussdichte in einer Node sowie deren Schwankungen infolge stochastischer Regelelementschwingungen dargestellt. Fuer die Rauschquellenmodellierung werden entsprechend der Konstruktion eines Regelelements als raeumliches Doppelpendel mit Absorber- und Brennstoffteil zwei verschiedene geometrische und neutronenphysikalische Ansaetze

  5. Biases of CO2 Storage in Eddy Flux Measurements pertinent to Vertical Configurations of a Profile System and CO2 Density Averaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Bai [ORNL; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Riggs, Jeffery S [ORNL; Pallardy, Stephen G. [University of Missouri; Hosman, K. P. [University of Missouri; Meyers, T. P. [NOAA ATDD; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Heuer, Mark [ATDD, NOAA

    2007-01-01

    CO2 storage in a 30-minute period in a tall forest canopy often makes significant contributions to net ecosystem exchange (NEE) in the early morning and at night. When CO2 storage is properly measured and taken into account, underestimations of NEE on calm nights can be greatly reduced. Using CO2 data from a 12-level profile, we demonstrate that the lower canopy layer (below the thermal inversion) is a disproportional contributor to the total CO2 storage. This is because time derivative of CO2 density ( c/ t) generally shows increasing magnitude of mean and standard deviation with decreasing heights at night and from sunrise to 1000 hr in both growing and dormant seasons. Effects of resolution and configuration in a profiling system on the accuracy of CO2 storage estimation are evaluated by comparing subset profiles to the 12-level benchmark profile. It is demonstrated that the effectiveness of a profiling system in estimating CO2 storage is not only determined by its number of sampling levels but, more importantly, by its vertical configuration. To optimize a profile, one needs to balance the influence of two factors, c/ t and layer thickness, among all vertical sections within a forest. As a key contributor to the total CO2 storage, the lower canopy (with relatively large means and standard deviations of c/ t) requires a higher resolution in a profile system than the layers above. However, if the upper canopy is over-sparsely sampled relative to the lower canopy, the performance of a profile system might be degraded since, in such a situation, the influence of layer thickness dominates over that of c/ t. We also find that, because of different level of complexity in canopy structure, more sampling levels are necessary at our site in order to achieve the same level of accuracy as at a boreal aspen site. These results suggest that, in order to achieve an adequate accuracy in CO2 storage measurements, the number of sampling levels in a profile and its design should

  6. Methane Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Methane (CH4) flux is the net rate of methane exchange between an ecosystem and the atmosphere. Data of this variable were generated by the USGS LandCarbon project...

  7. 线性菲涅耳反射聚光器聚焦光斑能流密度分布的计算%Calculation of Flux Density Distribution on Focal Plane in Linear Fresnel Reflector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵金龙; 李林; 崔正军; 陈洪晶; 熊勇刚; 马晓辉; 刘国军

    2012-01-01

    The spot flux-density distribution on the focal plane of linear Fresnel reflecting (LFR) concentrators is calculated with Matlab program by the ray-tracing method, with the shape of the sun, cosine loss, shading and blocking loss, taken into account in the process. Three-dimensional optical geometric model is established and the spot flux-density distribution is calculated with Matlab program. The model is demonstrated and justified by comparing simulation results of this Matlab program with that of SolTrace software developed by the U. S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The effects of different mirror shapes for LFR are also compared in order to obtain the higher efficiency of concentrator field.%利用光线追迹的方法,考虑太阳形状、余弦损失、阴影及遮挡损失的影响,建立线性菲涅耳反射(LFR)聚光器的三维光学几何模型,给出其光斑能流密度分布的计算式,采用Matlab软件编程实现该算法.将计算结果与美国国家可再生能源实验室(NREL)开发的SolTrace软件仿真结果相对比,光斑能流密度分布曲线基本吻合,证明了该算法的正确性.为了获得更高的镜场聚光效率,对比了不同反射镜面型对LFR聚光器的影响.

  8. Universal threshold enhancement

    CERN Document Server

    Patkós, András; Szépfalusy, P; Szep, Zs.

    2003-01-01

    By assuming certain analytic properties of the propagator, it is shown that universal features of the spectral function including threshold enhancement arise if a pole describing a particle at high temperature approaches in the complex energy plane the threshold position of its two-body decay with the variation of T. The case is considered, when one can disregard any other decay processes. The quality of the proposed description is demonstrated by comparing it with the detailed large N solution of the linear sigma model around the pole-threshold coincidence.

  9. Threshold learning dynamics in social networks

    CERN Document Server

    González-Avella, J C; Marsili, M; Vega-Redondo, F; Miguel, M San

    2010-01-01

    Social learning is defined as the ability of a population to aggregate information, a process which must crucially depend on the mechanisms of social interaction. Consumers choosing which product to buy, or voters deciding which option to take respect to an important issues, typically confront external signals to the information gathered from their contacts. Received economic models typically predict that correct social learning occurs in large populations unless some individuals display unbounded influence. We challenge this conclusion by showing that an intuitive threshold process of individual adjustment does not always lead to such social learning. We find, specifically, that three generic regimes exist. And only in one of them, where the threshold is within a suitable intermediate range, the population learns the correct information. In the other two, where the threshold is either too high or too low, the system either freezes or enters into persistent flux, respectively. These regimes are generally obse...

  10. Interpreting Flux from Broadband Photometry

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Peter J; Roming, Peter W A; Siegel, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the transformation of observed photometry into flux for the creation of spectral energy distributions and the computation of bolometric luminosities. We do this in the context of supernova studies, particularly as observed with the Swift spacecraft, but the concepts and techniques should be applicable to many other types of sources and wavelength regimes. Traditional methods of converting observed magnitudes to flux densities are not very accurate when applied to UV photometry. Common methods for extinction and the integration of pseudo-bolometric fluxes can also lead to inaccurate results. The sources of inaccuracy, though, also apply to other wavelengths. Because of the complicated nature of translating broad-band photometry into monochromatic flux densities, comparison between observed photometry and a spectroscopic model is best done by comparing in the natural units of the observations. We recommend that integrated flux measurements be made using a spectrum or spectral energy distribution whic...

  11. Quantum threshold group signature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In most situations, the signer is generally a single person. However, when the message is written on behalf of an organization, a valid message may require the approval or consent of several persons. Threshold signature is a solution to this problem. Generally speaking, as an authority which can be trusted by all members does not exist, a threshold signature scheme without a trusted party appears more attractive. Following some ideas of the classical Shamir’s threshold signature scheme, a quantum threshold group signature one is proposed. In the proposed scheme, only t or more of n persons in the group can generate the group signature and any t-1 or fewer ones cannot do that. In the verification phase, any t or more of n signature receivers can verify the message and any t-1 or fewer receivers cannot verify the validity of the signature.

  12. Efficient circular thresholding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yu-Kun; Rosin, Paul L

    2014-03-01

    Otsu's algorithm for thresholding images is widely used, and the computational complexity of determining the threshold from the histogram is O(N) where N is the number of histogram bins. When the algorithm is adapted to circular rather than linear histograms then two thresholds are required for binary thresholding. We show that, surprisingly, it is still possible to determine the optimal threshold in O(N) time. The efficient optimal algorithm is over 300 times faster than traditional approaches for typical histograms and is thus particularly suitable for real-time applications. We further demonstrate the usefulness of circular thresholding using the adapted Otsu criterion for various applications, including analysis of optical flow data, indoor/outdoor image classification, and non-photorealistic rendering. In particular, by combining circular Otsu feature with other colour/texture features, a 96.9% correct rate is obtained for indoor/outdoor classification on the well known IITM-SCID2 data set, outperforming the state-of-the-art result by 4.3%.

  13. Critical currents of superconducting BiPbSrCaCuO tapes in the magnetic flux density range 0--19. 75 T at 4. 2, 15, and 20 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, K.; Hikata, T. (Osaka Research Laboratories, Sumitomo Electric Industries, Osaka (Japan)); Iwasa, Y. (Francis Bitter National Magnet Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (USA))

    1990-10-29

    Critical currents of superconducting silver-sheathed tapes of Bi{sub 1.8}Pb{sub 0.4}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2.2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub {ital x}} have been measured in the magnetic flux density range 0--19.75 T at 4.2, 15, and 20 K. One tape achieved a critical current of 60.6 A at 19.75 T and 20 K; the corresponding critical current density is 551 A/mm{sup 2}. In the same field, the tape has critical currents of 72.3 A (657 A/mm{sup 2}) at 15 K and 94.2 A (856 A/mm{sup 2}) at 4.2 K. At 77 K and in zero field, the tape carries 32.9 A (299 A/mm{sup 2}). These results indicate that high {ital T}{sub {ital c}}'' superconducting magnets of engineering interest may soon be feasible.

  14. Hydrodynamics of sediment threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sk Zeeshan; Dey, Subhasish

    2016-07-01

    A novel hydrodynamic model for the threshold of cohesionless sediment particle motion under a steady unidirectional streamflow is presented. The hydrodynamic forces (drag and lift) acting on a solitary sediment particle resting over a closely packed bed formed by the identical sediment particles are the primary motivating forces. The drag force comprises of the form drag and form induced drag. The lift force includes the Saffman lift, Magnus lift, centrifugal lift, and turbulent lift. The points of action of the force system are appropriately obtained, for the first time, from the basics of micro-mechanics. The sediment threshold is envisioned as the rolling mode, which is the plausible mode to initiate a particle motion on the bed. The moment balance of the force system on the solitary particle about the pivoting point of rolling yields the governing equation. The conditions of sediment threshold under the hydraulically smooth, transitional, and rough flow regimes are examined. The effects of velocity fluctuations are addressed by applying the statistical theory of turbulence. This study shows that for a hindrance coefficient of 0.3, the threshold curve (threshold Shields parameter versus shear Reynolds number) has an excellent agreement with the experimental data of uniform sediments. However, most of the experimental data are bounded by the upper and lower limiting threshold curves, corresponding to the hindrance coefficients of 0.2 and 0.4, respectively. The threshold curve of this study is compared with those of previous researchers. The present model also agrees satisfactorily with the experimental data of nonuniform sediments.

  15. Flux pinning in superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Matsushita, Teruo

    2014-01-01

    The book covers the flux pinning mechanisms and properties and the electromagnetic phenomena caused by the flux pinning common for metallic, high-Tc and MgB2 superconductors. The condensation energy interaction known for normal precipitates or grain boundaries and the kinetic energy interaction proposed for artificial Nb pins in Nb-Ti, etc., are introduced for the pinning mechanism. Summation theories to derive the critical current density are discussed in detail. Irreversible magnetization and AC loss caused by the flux pinning are also discussed. The loss originally stems from the ohmic dissipation of normal electrons in the normal core driven by the electric field induced by the flux motion. The readers will learn why the resultant loss is of hysteresis type in spite of such mechanism. The influence of the flux pinning on the vortex phase diagram in high Tc superconductors is discussed, and the dependencies of the irreversibility field are also described on other quantities such as anisotropy of supercondu...

  16. Flux Pinning in Superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Matsushita, Teruo

    2007-01-01

    The book covers the flux pinning mechanisms and properties and the electromagnetic phenomena caused by the flux pinning common for metallic, high-Tc and MgB2 superconductors. The condensation energy interaction known for normal precipitates or grain boundaries and the kinetic energy interaction proposed for artificial Nb pins in Nb-Ti, etc., are introduced for the pinning mechanism. Summation theories to derive the critical current density are discussed in detail. Irreversible magnetization and AC loss caused by the flux pinning are also discussed. The loss originally stems from the ohmic dissipation of normal electrons in the normal core driven by the electric field induced by the flux motion. The readers will learn why the resultant loss is of hysteresis type in spite of such mechanism. The influence of the flux pinning on the vortex phase diagram in high Tc superconductors is discussed, and the dependencies of the irreversibility field are also described on other quantities such as anisotropy of supercondu...

  17. Interpreting Flux from Broadband Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Peter J.; Breeveld, Alice; Roming, Peter W. A.; Siegel, Michael

    2016-10-01

    We discuss the transformation of observed photometry into flux for the creation of spectral energy distributions (SED) and the computation of bolometric luminosities. We do this in the context of supernova studies, particularly as observed with the Swift spacecraft, but the concepts and techniques should be applicable to many other types of sources and wavelength regimes. Traditional methods of converting observed magnitudes to flux densities are not very accurate when applied to UV photometry. Common methods for extinction and the integration of pseudo-bolometric fluxes can also lead to inaccurate results. The sources of inaccuracy, though, also apply to other wavelengths. Because of the complicated nature of translating broadband photometry into monochromatic flux densities, comparison between observed photometry and a spectroscopic model is best done by forward modeling the spectrum into the count rates or magnitudes of the observations. We recommend that integrated flux measurements be made using a spectrum or SED which is consistent with the multi-band photometry rather than converting individual photometric measurements to flux densities, linearly interpolating between the points, and integrating. We also highlight some specific areas where the UV flux can be mischaracterized.

  18. Polynomial threshold functions and Boolean threshold circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt; Podolskii, Vladimir V.

    2013-01-01

    of secondary interest. We show that PTFs on general Boolean domains are tightly connected to depth two threshold circuits. Our main results in regard to this connection are: PTFs of polynomial length and polynomial degree compute exactly the functions computed by THRMAJ circuits. An exponential length lower...... bound for PTFs that holds regardless of degree, thereby extending known lower bounds for THRMAJ circuits. We generalize two-party unbounded error communication complexity to the multi-party number-on-the-forehead setting, and show that communication lower bounds for 3-player protocols would yield size...... lower bounds for THRTHR circuits. We obtain several other results about PTFs. These include relationships between weight and degree of PTFs, and a degree lower bound for PTFs of constant length. We also consider a variant of PTFs over the max-plus algebra. We show that they are connected to PTFs over...

  19. Force sensor using changes in magnetic flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickens, Herman L. (Inventor); Richard, James A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A force sensor includes a magnetostrictive material and a magnetic field generator positioned in proximity thereto. A magnetic field is induced in and surrounding the magnetostrictive material such that lines of magnetic flux pass through the magnetostrictive material. A sensor positioned in the vicinity of the magnetostrictive material measures changes in one of flux angle and flux density when the magnetostrictive material experiences an applied force that is aligned with the lines of magnetic flux.

  20. High luminous flux from single crystal phosphor-converted laser-based white lighting system

    KAUST Repository

    Cantore, Michael

    2015-12-14

    The efficiency droop of light emitting diodes (LEDs) with increasing current density limits the amount of light emitted per wafer area. Since low current densities are required for high efficiency operation, many LED die are needed for high power white light illumination systems. In contrast, the carrier density of laser diodes (LDs) clamps at threshold, so the efficiency of LDs does not droop above threshold and high efficiencies can be achieved at very high current densities. The use of a high power blue GaN-based LD coupled with a single crystal Ce-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG:Ce) sample was investigated for white light illumination applications. Under CW operation, a single phosphor-converted LD (pc-LD) die produced a peak luminous efficacy of 86.7 lm/W at 1.4 A and 4.24 V and a peak luminous flux of 1100 lm at 3.0 A and 4.85 V with a luminous efficacy of 75.6 lm/W. Simulations of a pc-LD confirm that the single crystal YAG:Ce sample did not experience thermal quenching at peak LD operating efficiency. These results show that a single pc-LD die is capable of emitting enough luminous flux for use in a high power white light illumination system.

  1. Simulation Study of Double Values Dynamic Matrix Control of the Nuclear Reactor Neutron Flux Density%核反应堆中子通量密度的双值动态矩阵控制仿真研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史小平; 伞冶

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, a sort of non-parameter model is constructed with the unit step response of the nuclear reactor neutron kinetics system. Furthermore, a sort of constant neutron flux density control law is presented using the double values dynamic matrix control principle. In contrast to the other control methods based on the accurate model, the method presented in this paper has good tracking performance and robustness. It can work despite the existence of un-measurable disturbances. The simulation experiment testifies the correctness and effectiveness of the method.%利用核反应堆中子动力学系统的单位阶跃响应数据,获得了该系统的非参数模型,且提出了一种中子通量密度恒值问题的双值动态矩阵控制新方法。与基于精确模型的控制方法相比,此方法不必苛求模型的具体形式,且实时控制的计算量小、跟踪调节性能好、鲁棒性强、能消除不可测干扰。仿真结果验证了这种控制律的有效性和优越性。

  2. On the role of precursor powder composition in controlling microstructure, flux pinning, and the critical current density of Ag/Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pei; Naderi, Golsa; Schwartz, Justin; Shen, Tengming

    2017-03-01

    Precursor powder composition is known to strongly affect the critical current density (J c) of Ag/Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox (Bi-2212) wires. However, reasons for such J c dependence have not yet been fully understood, compromising our ability to achieve further optimization. We systematically examined superconducting properties, microstructural evolution and phase transformation, and grain boundaries of Bi-2212 conductors fabricated from precursor powders with a range of compositions using a combination of transport-current measurements, a quench technique to freeze microstructures at high temperatures during heat treatment, and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Samples include both dip-coated tapes and round wires, among which a commercial round wire carries a high J c of 7600 A mm-2 at 4.2 K, self-field and 2600 A mm-2 at 4.2 K, 20 T, respectively. In the melt, this high-J c conductor, made using a composition of Bi2.17Sr1.94Ca0.89Cu2Ox, contains a uniform dispersion of fine alkaline-earth cuprate (AEC) and copper-free solid phases, whereas several low-J c conductors contain large AEC particles. Such significant differences in the phase morphologies in the melt are accompanied by a drastic difference in the formation kinetics of Bi-2212 during recrystallization cooling. STEM studies show that Bi-2212 grain colonies in the high-J c conductors have a high density of Bi2Sr2CuO y (Bi-2201) intergrowths, whereas a low-J c conductor, made using Bi2.14Sr1.66Ca1.24Cu1.96O x , is nearly free of them. STEM investigation shows grain boundaries in low-J c conductors are often insulated with a Bi-rich amorphous phase. High-J c conductors also show higher flux-pinning strength, which we ascribe to their higher Bi-2201 intergrowth density.

  3. Efficient Threshold Signature Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sattar J Aboud

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce a new threshold signature RSA-typed scheme. The proposed scheme has the characteristics of un-forgeable and robustness in random oracle model. Also, signature generation and verification is entirely non-interactive. In addition, the length of the entity signature participate is restricted by a steady times of the length of the RSA signature modulus. Also, the signing process of the proposed scheme is more efficient in terms of time complexity and interaction.

  4. Theoretical and experimental analysis of the sedimentation kinetics of concentrated red cell suspensions in a centrifugal field: determination of the aggregation and deformation of RBC by flux density and viscosity functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerche, D; Frömer, D

    2001-01-01

    The flow properties of blood are mostly determined using various viscometric approaches, and described in terms of a shear rate or shear stress dependent apparent viscosity. The interpretation of results are rather difficult, especially at low shear rates when particle sedimentation and migration within the viscometer gap are significant. By contrast, analysing the separation process in concentrated RBC suspensions in a centrifugal field also yields information about the viscosity function, including particle-particle interaction and deformation parameters. In this paper, the sedimentation process is approached by means of the theory of kinematic waves and theoretically described by solving the corresponding one-dimensional quasi-linear partial differential equation based on viscosity/flow function as a function of volume concentration. The sedimentation kinetics of rigid spherical RBC suspended in saline and normal RBC suspended in Dx-saline solutions were investigated by means of a separation analyser (LUMiFuge 114). The instrument detects the light transmission over the total length of the cell containing the suspension. During centrifugation the analyser automatically determines the position of the particle free fluid/suspension interface or the sediment by means of a special algorithm. The data obtained with sedimentation of rigid spherical RBC at different volume concentrations demonstrate that, in the case of suspensions rotated in containers of constant cross section, there is good agreement between the theory of kinematic waves developed by Anestis and Schneider (1983) and the results of the experiments. Such good agreement was obtained even though a restrictive one-dimensional model was used to obtain the theoretically derived sedimentation time course. In addition, we describe an algorithm enabling the experimental determination of the viscosity and related flux density function to be made for any suspension. Through this approach, we investigated in

  5. Threshold ratios for molecular lasers with optical pumping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuntsevich, B.F.; Churakou, U.V.

    1976-01-01

    A series of relationships was obtained for threshold characteristics of high pressure molecular lasers with optical pumping. The threshold pumping density increases in proportion to the square of the active medium's pressure. The minimum value of threshold pumping corresponds to the maximum of the Boltzmann distribution function for rotating sublevels both in the pumping channel and in generation. A weak or strong relationship was observed between the threshold impulse energy and the pressure that is caused by fluctuative relaxation of the upper laser level for various relationships between the intensity of the pumping impulse, pressure and loss coefficient.

  6. Critical flux determination by flux-stepping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Søren; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    2010-01-01

    In membrane filtration related scientific literature, often step-by-step determined critical fluxes are reported. Using a dynamic microfiltration device, it is shown that critical fluxes determined from two different flux-stepping methods are dependent upon operational parameters such as step......, such values are more or less useless in itself as critical flux predictors, and constant flux verification experiments have to be conducted to check if the determined critical fluxes call predict sustainable flux regimes. However, it is shown that using the step-by-step predicted critical fluxes as start...

  7. Threshold properties of a microcavity laser with submicroampere threshold current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choquette, K.D.; Hou, H.Q.; Lear, K.L.; Chow, W.W.; Mar, A.; Geib, K.M.; Hammons, B.E.

    1996-02-01

    We report the threshold characteristics of small oxide-confined vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers. Abrupt threshold transitions 105 times the spontaneous emission background are obtained at injection currents as low as 470 nanoampere.

  8. MEASUREMENTS FOR TRAPPED FLUX DENSITY OF HIGH TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTOR BULKS%块状高温超导体俘获磁通密度实验测试方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐克西; 郑明辉; 刘宜平; 焦玉磊; 肖玲

    2015-01-01

    块状单畴高温超导体的重要特性参数之一“俘获磁通密度”决定了单畴超导体能够冻结住的最大磁通俘获场,实际用户在设计装置时必须了解这些参数.然而,这些数值强烈地依赖于测试方法.随着国内块状单畴超导体的研究、生产、应用的不断发展,市场规模的不断扩大以及国际贸易的开展,迫切需要建立一个与国际接轨的测试标准,统一材料提供方与用户之间对单畴块材性能的表征过程.经国家标准化管理委员会批准,2013年全国超导标准化技术委员会将IEC 61788-9国际标准《SUPERCONDUCTIVITY-Measurements for bulk high temperature superconductors-Trapped flux density of large grain bulk oxide superconductors》(《超导电性:块状高温超导体的测量—大晶粒氧化物超导体的俘获磁通密度》)转化为国家标准,本文主要介绍有关“标准”的转化实施过程.

  9. Tissue damage thresholds during therapeutic electrical stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogan, Stuart F.; Ludwig, Kip A.; Welle, Cristin G.; Takmakov, Pavel

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Recent initiatives in bioelectronic modulation of the nervous system by the NIH (SPARC), DARPA (ElectRx, SUBNETS) and the GlaxoSmithKline Bioelectronic Medicines effort are ushering in a new era of therapeutic electrical stimulation. These novel therapies are prompting a re-evaluation of established electrical thresholds for stimulation-induced tissue damage. Approach. In this review, we explore what is known and unknown in published literature regarding tissue damage from electrical stimulation. Main results. For macroelectrodes, the potential for tissue damage is often assessed by comparing the intensity of stimulation, characterized by the charge density and charge per phase of a stimulus pulse, with a damage threshold identified through histological evidence from in vivo experiments as described by the Shannon equation. While the Shannon equation has proved useful in assessing the likely occurrence of tissue damage, the analysis is limited by the experimental parameters of the original studies. Tissue damage is influenced by factors not explicitly incorporated into the Shannon equation, including pulse frequency, duty cycle, current density, and electrode size. Microelectrodes in particular do not follow the charge per phase and charge density co-dependence reflected in the Shannon equation. The relevance of these factors to tissue damage is framed in the context of available reports from modeling and in vivo studies. Significance. It is apparent that emerging applications, especially with microelectrodes, will require clinical charge densities that exceed traditional damage thresholds. Experimental data show that stimulation at higher charge densities can be achieved without causing tissue damage, suggesting that safety parameters for microelectrodes might be distinct from those defined for macroelectrodes. However, these increased charge densities may need to be justified by bench, non-clinical or clinical testing to provide evidence of device

  10. Hadron production near threshold

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B K Jain; N G Kelkar; K P Khmemchandani

    2006-04-01

    Final state interaction effects in → + and → 3He reactions are explored near threshold to study the sensitivity of the cross-sections to the potential and the scattering matrix. The final state scattering wave functions between and and and 3He are described rigorously. The production is described by the exchange of one pion and a -meson between two protons in the incident channel. The production is described by a two-step model, where in the first step a pion is produced. This pion then produces an by interacting with another nucleon.

  11. Threshold foraging behavior of baleen whales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatt, John F.; Methven, David A.

    1992-01-01

    We conducted hydroacoustic surveys for capelin Mallotus villosus in Witless Bay, Newfoundland, Canada, on 61 days during the summers of 1983 to 1985. On 32 of those days in whlch capelin surveys were conducted, we observed a total of 129 baleen whales - Including 93 humpback Megaptera novaeangliae, 31 minke Balaenoptera acutorostrata and 5 fin whales B. phvsalus. Although a few whales were observed when capelin schools were scarce, the majority (96%) of whales were observed when mean daily capelin densities exceeded 5 schools per linear km surveyed (range of means over 3 yr: 0.0 to 14.0 schools km-1). Plots of daily whale abundance (no. h-1 surveyed) vs daily capelin school density (mean no. schools km-1 surveyed) in each summer revealed that baleen whales have a threshold foraging response to capelin density. Thresholds were estimated using a simple itterative step-function model. Foraging thresholds of baleen whales (7.3, 5.0, and 5.8 schools km-1) varied between years in relation to the overall abundance of capelin schools in the study area during summer (means of 7.2, 3.3, and 5.3 schools km-1, respectively).

  12. Threshold Generation of Signcryption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGFutai; JIDongyao; WANGYumin

    2003-01-01

    Signcryption is a new cryptographic primitive wiich simultaneously fulfills both the functions of digital signature and public key encryption in a logically singlestep,and with a cost significantly lower than that required by "signature followed by encryption".It has many applications in such areas as electronic cash payment systems,secure and authenticated key establishment,secure multicasting over the Internet,authenticated key recovery,etc..In secure and authenticated group communication there is a need for threshold generation of signcryption.In this paper,we propose a protocol for threshold generation of signcryption using the techniques of verifiable secret sharing(VSS)and secure multi-party computation (MPC).In the protocol,any t or more honest members can efficiently generate valid signcryption text of a given message,while the adversary whole corrupts up to t-1 group members cannot forge any valid signcryption text.The protocol of computing reciprocals of secrets presented by R.Gennaro,S.Jarecki,H.Krawczyk,and T.Rabin is also modified so that the efficiency is improved.

  13. Coloring geographical threshold graphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradonjic, Milan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Percus, Allon [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Muller, Tobias [EINDHOVEN UNIV. OF TECH

    2008-01-01

    We propose a coloring algorithm for sparse random graphs generated by the geographical threshold graph (GTG) model, a generalization of random geometric graphs (RGG). In a GTG, nodes are distributed in a Euclidean space, and edges are assigned according to a threshold function involving the distance between nodes as well as randomly chosen node weights. The motivation for analyzing this model is that many real networks (e.g., wireless networks, the Internet, etc.) need to be studied by using a 'richer' stochastic model (which in this case includes both a distance between nodes and weights on the nodes). Here, we analyze the GTG coloring algorithm together with the graph's clique number, showing formally that in spite of the differences in structure between GTG and RGG, the asymptotic behavior of the chromatic number is identical: {chi}1n 1n n / 1n n (1 + {omicron}(1)). Finally, we consider the leading corrections to this expression, again using the coloring algorithm and clique number to provide bounds on the chromatic number. We show that the gap between the lower and upper bound is within C 1n n / (1n 1n n){sup 2}, and specify the constant C.

  14. Exponentially tapered Josephson flux-flow oscillator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benabdallah, A.; Caputo, J. G.; Scott, Alwyn C.

    1996-01-01

    We introduce an exponentially tapered Josephson flux-flow oscillator that is tuned by applying a bias current to the larger end of the junction. Numerical and analytical studies show that above a threshold level of bias current the static solution becomes unstable and gives rise to a train of flu......, and (iv) better impedance matching to a load....

  15. Self-induced metabolic state switching by a tunable cell density sensor for microbial isopropanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soma, Yuki; Hanai, Taizo

    2015-07-01

    Chemicals production by engineered microorganisms often requires induction of target gene expression at an appropriate cell density to reduce conflict with cell growth. The lux system in Vibrio fischeri is a well-characterized model for cell density-dependent regulation of gene expression termed quorum sensing (QS). However, there are currently no reports for application of the lux system to microbial chemical production. Here, we constructed a synthetic lux system as a tunable cell density sensor-regulator using a synthetic lux promoter and a positive feedback loop in Escherichia coli. In this system, self-induction of a target gene expression is driven by QS-signal, and its threshold cell density can be changed depending on the concentration of a chemical inducer. We demonstrate auto-redirection of metabolic flux from central metabolic pathways toward a synthetic isopropanol pathway at a desired cell density resulting in a significant increase in isopropanol production.

  16. Threshold photoionization and density functional theory studies of the niobium carbide clusters Nb3C(n) (n = 1-4) and Nb4C(n) (n = 1-6).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryza, Viktoras; Addicoat, Matthew A; Gascooke, Jason R; Buntine, Mark A; Metha, Gregory F

    2008-06-26

    We have used photoionization efficiency spectroscopy to determine ionization potentials (IP) of the niobium-carbide clusters, Nb3C(n) (n = 1-4) and Nb4C(n) (n = 1-6). The Nb3C2 and Nb4C4 clusters exhibit the lowest IPs for the two series, respectively. For clusters containing up to four carbon atoms, excellent agreement is found with relative IPs calculated using density functional theory. The lowest energy isomers are mostly consistent with the development of a 2 x 2 x 2 face-centered cubic structure of Nb4C4. However, for Nb3C4 a low-lying isomer containing a molecular C2 unit is assigned to the experimental IP rather than the depleted 2 x 2 x 2 nanocrystal isomer. For Nb4C5 and Nb4C6, interpretation is less straightforward, but results indicate isomers containing molecular C2 units are the lowest in energy, suggesting that carbon-carbon bonding is preferred when the number of carbon atoms exceeds the number of metal atoms. A double IP onset is observed for Nb4C3, which is attributed to ionization from the both the lowest energy singlet state and a meta-stable triplet state. This work further supports the notion that IPs can be used as a reliable validation for the geometries of metal-carbide clusters calculated by theory.

  17. T-cell triggering thresholds are modulated by the number of antigen within individual T-cell receptor clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manz, Boryana N. [Howard Hughes Medical Inst., Chevy Chase, MD (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Jackson, Bryan L. [Howard Hughes Medical Inst., Chevy Chase, MD (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Petit, Rebecca S. [Howard Hughes Medical Inst., Chevy Chase, MD (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Dustin, Michael L. [New York School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Groves, Jay [Howard Hughes Medical Inst., Chevy Chase, MD (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-05-31

    T cells react to extremely small numbers of activating agonist peptides. Spatial organization of T-cell receptors (TCR) and their peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) ligands into microclusters is correlated with T-cell activation. In this study, we have designed an experimental strategy that enables control over the number of agonist peptides per TCR cluster, without altering the total number engaged by the cell. Supported membranes, partitioned with grids of barriers to lateral mobility, provide an effective way of limiting the total number of pMHC ligands that may be assembled within a single TCR cluster. Observations directly reveal that restriction of pMHC content within individual TCR clusters can decrease T-cell sensitivity for triggering initial calcium flux at fixed total pMHC density. Further analysis suggests that triggering thresholds are determined by the number of activating ligands available to individual TCR clusters, not by the total number encountered by the cell. Results from a series of experiments in which the overall agonist density and the maximum number of agonist per TCR cluster are independently varied in primary T cells indicate that the most probable minimal triggering unit for calcium signaling is at least four pMHC in a single cluster for this system. In conclusion, this threshold is unchanged by inclusion of coagonist pMHC, but costimulation of CD28 by CD80 can modulate the threshold lower.

  18. Whistler mode waves and the electron heat flux in the solar wind: cluster observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacombe, C.; Alexandrova, O.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Mangeney, A.; De Conchy, Y.; Maksimovic, M. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, PSL Research University, CNRS, UPMC Université Paris 06, Université Paris-Diderot, 5 Place Jules Janssen, F-92190 Meudon (France); Matteini, L. [Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Santolík, O. [Institute of Atmospheric Physics ASCR, 141 31 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2014-11-20

    The nature of the magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind between the ion and electron scales is still under debate. Using the Cluster/STAFF instrument, we make a survey of the power spectral density and of the polarization of these fluctuations at frequencies f in [1, 400] Hz, during five years (2001-2005), when Cluster was in the free solar wind. In ∼10% of the selected data, we observe narrowband, right-handed, circularly polarized fluctuations, with wave vectors quasi-parallel to the mean magnetic field, superimposed on the spectrum of the permanent background turbulence. We interpret these coherent fluctuations as whistler mode waves. The lifetime of these waves varies between a few seconds and several hours. Here, we present, for the first time, an analysis of long-lived whistler waves, i.e., lasting more than five minutes. We find several necessary (but not sufficient) conditions for the observation of whistler waves, mainly a low level of background turbulence, a slow wind, a relatively large electron heat flux, and a low electron collision frequency. When the electron parallel beta factor β {sub e∥} is larger than 3, the whistler waves are seen along the heat flux threshold of the whistler heat flux instability. The presence of such whistler waves confirms that the whistler heat flux instability contributes to the regulation of the solar wind heat flux, at least for β {sub e∥} ≥ 3, in slow wind at 1 AU.

  19. Oscillatory threshold logic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borresen, Jon; Lynch, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In the 1940s, the first generation of modern computers used vacuum tube oscillators as their principle components, however, with the development of the transistor, such oscillator based computers quickly became obsolete. As the demand for faster and lower power computers continues, transistors are themselves approaching their theoretical limit and emerging technologies must eventually supersede them. With the development of optical oscillators and Josephson junction technology, we are again presented with the possibility of using oscillators as the basic components of computers, and it is possible that the next generation of computers will be composed almost entirely of oscillatory devices. Here, we demonstrate how coupled threshold oscillators may be used to perform binary logic in a manner entirely consistent with modern computer architectures. We describe a variety of computational circuitry and demonstrate working oscillator models of both computation and memory.

  20. $\\eta'$ photoproduction near threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Q

    2000-01-01

    In this work, the $\\eta^\\prime$ meson photoproduction near threshold is studied in the quark model framework. A pseudovector effective Lagrangian is introduced for the $\\eta^\\prime NN$ coupling and the newly published data from the SAPHIR Collaboration provide good constraints to this parameter. Corrections of order $O(1/m_q^2)$ for the electromagnetic interaction vertex are taken into account, which produce corrections of order $O(1/m_q^3)$ to the transition amplitude for $\\gamma p\\to \\eta^\\prime p$. Some low-lying resonances, $S_{11}(1535)$, $P_{13}(1720)$, and $P_{13}(1900)$ are found to have significant contributions. A bump structure around $E_\\gamma\\approx$ 2 GeV is found arising from the $n=3$ terms in the harmonic oscillator basis. The beam polarization asymmetries are predicted and can be tested against the forthcoming data from GRAAL.

  1. Threshold learning dynamics in social networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos González-Avella

    Full Text Available Social learning is defined as the ability of a population to aggregate information, a process which must crucially depend on the mechanisms of social interaction. Consumers choosing which product to buy, or voters deciding which option to take with respect to an important issue, typically confront external signals to the information gathered from their contacts. Economic models typically predict that correct social learning occurs in large populations unless some individuals display unbounded influence. We challenge this conclusion by showing that an intuitive threshold process of individual adjustment does not always lead to such social learning. We find, specifically, that three generic regimes exist separated by sharp discontinuous transitions. And only in one of them, where the threshold is within a suitable intermediate range, the population learns the correct information. In the other two, where the threshold is either too high or too low, the system either freezes or enters into persistent flux, respectively. These regimes are generally observed in different social networks (both complex or regular, but limited interaction is found to promote correct learning by enlarging the parameter region where it occurs.

  2. Quasi-one-dimensional intermittent flux behavior in superconducting films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qviller, A. J.; Yurchenko, V. V.; Galperin, Y. M.

    2012-01-01

    . The intermittent behavior shows no threshold value in the applied field, in contrast to conventional flux jumping. The results strongly suggest that the quasi-one-dimensional flux jumps are of a different nature than the thermomagnetic dendritic (branching) avalanches that are commonly found in superconducting...

  3. [Spatiotempaoral distribution patterns of photosynthetic photon flux density, air temperature, and relative air humidity in forest gap of Pinus koraiensis-dominated broadleaved mixed forest in Xi-ao Xing' an Mountains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Duan, Wen-biao; Chen, Li-xin

    2009-12-01

    A continuous measurement of photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD), air temperature, and relative air humidity was made in the forest gap in primary Pinus koraiensis-dominated broadleaved mixed forest in Xiao Xing' an Mountains to compare the spatiotemporal distribution patterns of the parameters. The diurnal maximum PPFD in the forest gap appeared between 11:00 and 13:00 on sunny and overcast days. On sunny days, the maximum PPFD during various time periods did not locate in fixed locations, the diurnal maximum PPFD occurred in the canopy edge of northern part of the gap; while on overcast days, it always occurred in the center of the gap. The mean monthly PPFD in the gap was the highest in June and the lowest in September, with the largest range observed in July. The maximum air temperature happened between 9:00 and 15:00 on sunny days, between 15:00 and 19:00 on overcast days, the locations were 8 m in the southern part of gap center both on sunny and overcast days. From 5:00 to 9:00, the air temperature at measured positions in the gap was higher on overcast days than on sunny days; but from 9:00 to 19:00, it was opposite. The mean monthly air temperature was the highest in June, and the lowest in September. The maximum relative humidity appeared between 5:00 and 9:00 on sunny and overcast days, and occurred in the canopy border of western part of the gap, with the relative air humidity on overcast days being always higher than that on sunny days. The mean monthly relative humidity was the highest in July, and the lowest in June. The heterogeneity of PPFD was higher on sunny days than on overcast days, but the heterogeneities of air temperature and relative humidity were not obvious. The maximum PPFD, air temperature, and relative humidity were not located in the same positions among different months during growing season. For mean monthly PPFD and air temperature, their variation gradient was higher in and around the center of gap; while for mean monthly

  4. Influences of non-uniformities and anisotropies on the flux avalanche behaviors of type-II superconducting films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Ze; Yong, Huadong; Zhou, Youhe

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the anisotropic flux avalanche processes in thin square-shaped type-II superconducting films are numerically investigated by solving the coupled nonlinear Maxwell’s equations and the thermal diffusion equations. Influences of the non-uniformities and intrinsic critical current density anisotropies originate from the manufacturing process are considered in the simulation. In addition, we also studied the effect of the extrinsic anisotropy induced by the in-plane magnetic field. The results demonstrate that the non-uniformities and anisotropies of the critical current density play significant roles in the flux avalanche process of the thin film superconductors. Slight anisotropy (either intrinsic or extrinsic) can dramatically change the propagation direction of avalanches in the superconducting film, which is consistent with the experimental results. Simulations on the thin square-shaped isotropic superconducting films show that the threshold magnetic field for the flux avalanches increases with the angle between the applied field and the superconducting film-plane. In addition, the flux avalanche patterns change with the angular variation of the in-plane component of external magnetic field. When the in-plane magnetic field component is along the diagonal lines of the superconducting square, symmetric flux avalanche penetration patterns occur to the film.

  5. Optimising threshold levels for information transmission in binary threshold networks: Independent multiplicative noise on each threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bingchang; McDonnell, Mark D.

    2015-02-01

    The problem of optimising the threshold levels in multilevel threshold system subject to multiplicative Gaussian and uniform noise is considered. Similar to previous results for additive noise, we find a bifurcation phenomenon in the optimal threshold values, as the noise intensity changes. This occurs when the number of threshold units is greater than one. We also study the optimal thresholds for combined additive and multiplicative Gaussian noise, and find that all threshold levels need to be identical to optimise the system when the additive noise intensity is a constant. However, this identical value is not equal to the signal mean, unlike the case of additive noise. When the multiplicative noise intensity is instead held constant, the optimal threshold levels are not all identical for small additive noise intensity but are all equal to zero for large additive noise intensity. The model and our results are potentially relevant for sensor network design and understanding neurobiological sensory neurons such as in the peripheral auditory system.

  6. Flux-P: Automating Metabolic Flux Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ebert, Birgitta E.; Anna-Lena Lamprecht; Bernhard Steffen; Blank, Lars M.

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative knowledge of intracellular fluxes in metabolic networks is invaluable for inferring metabolic system behavior and the design principles of biological systems. However, intracellular reaction rates can not often be calculated directly but have to be estimated; for instance, via 13C-based metabolic flux analysis, a model-based interpretation of stable carbon isotope patterns in intermediates of metabolism. Existing software such as FiatFlux, OpenFLUX or 13CFLUX supports experts in ...

  7. Neutrino Fluxes from NUHM LSP Annihilations in the Sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olive, Keith

    2011-08-12

    We extend our previous studies of the neutrino fluxes expected from neutralino LSP annihilations inside the Sun to include variants of the minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM) with squark, slepton and gaugino masses constrained to be universal at the GUT scale, but allowing one or two non-universal supersymmetry-breaking parameters contributing to the Higgs masses (NUHM1,2). As in the constrained MSSM (CMSSM) with universal Higgs masses, there are large regions of the NUHM parameter space where the LSP density inside the Sun is not in equilibrium, so that the annihilation rate may be far below the capture rate, and there are also large regions where the capture rate is not dominated by spin-dependent LSP-proton scattering. The spectra possible in the NUHM are qualitatively similar to those in the CMSSM. We calculate neutrino-induced muon fluxes above a threshold energy of 10 GeV, appropriate for the IceCube/DeepCore detector, for points where the NUHM yields the correct cosmological relic density for representative choices of the NUHM parameters. We find that the IceCube/DeepCore detector can probe regions of the NUHM parameter space in addition to analogues of the focus-point strip and the tip of the coannihilation strip familiar from the CMSSM. These include regions with enhanced Higgsino-gaugino mixing in the LSP composition, that occurs where neutralino mass eigenstates cross over. On the other hand, rapid-annihilation funnel regions in general yield neutrino fluxes that are unobservably small.

  8. Lower Hearing Threshold by Noise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龙长才; 邵峰; 张燕萍; 秦佑国

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate that noise can be a benefit factor that enables us to hear weaker signals. We measured the hearing thresholds of subjects for pure tone in different noise levels. The results show that pure tone thresholds with noise of some levels are lower than that without noise. The largest down-shift of the threshold by noise among the examined subjects is 5. 7dB, and the smallest is 1.7dB.

  9. MD 751: Train Instability Threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Carver, Lee Robert; Metral, Elias; Salvant, Benoit; Levens, Tom; Nisbet, David; Zobov, M; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this MD is to measure the octupole current thresholds for stability for a single bunch, and then make an immediate comparison (with the same operational settings) for a train of 72 bunches separated by 25ns. From theory, the expected thresholds should be similar. Any discrepancy between the two cases will be of great interest as it could indicate the presence of additional mechanisms that contribute to the instability threshold, for example electron cloud.

  10. Albania - Thresholds I and II

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — From 2006 to 2011, the government of Albania (GOA) received two Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC) Threshold Programs totaling $29.6 million. Albania received...

  11. Fast Quasi-Threshold Editing

    CERN Document Server

    Brandes, Ulrik; Strasser, Ben; Wagner, Dorothea

    2015-01-01

    We introduce Quasi-Threshold Mover (QTM), an algorithm to solve the quasi-threshold (also called trivially perfect) graph editing problem with edge insertion and deletion. Given a graph it computes a quasi-threshold graph which is close in terms of edit count. This edit problem is NP-hard. We present an extensive experimental study, in which we show that QTM is the first algorithm that is able to scale to large real-world graphs in practice. As a side result we further present a simple linear-time algorithm for the quasi-threshold recognition problem.

  12. Room Temperature Ultralow Threshold GaN Nanowire Polariton Laser

    KAUST Repository

    Das, Ayan

    2011-08-01

    We report ultralow threshold polariton lasing from a single GaN nanowire strongly coupled to a large-area dielectric microcavity. The threshold carrier density is 3 orders of magnitude lower than that of photon lasing observed in the same device, and 2 orders of magnitude lower than any existing room-temperature polariton devices. Spectral, polarization, and coherence properties of the emission were measured to confirm polariton lasing. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  13. Threshold expansion of Feynman diagrams within a configuration space technique

    CERN Document Server

    Groote, S

    2000-01-01

    The near threshold expansion of generalized sunset-type (water melon) diagrams with arbitrary masses is constructed by using a configuration space technique. We present analytical expressions for the expansion of the spectral density near threshold and compare it with the exact expression obtained earlier using the method of the Hankel transform. We formulate a generalized threshold expansion with partial resummation of the small mass corrections for the strongly asymmetric case where one particle in the intermediate state is much lighter than the others.

  14. Ecohydrology on the Threshold?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainwright, John

    2013-04-01

    This presentation suggests that there are three major limitations to the development of ecohydrology as a coherent disciplinary area. One of the principal controls and feedbacks on patterns of plants and water in the environment is the form of the landscape and landscape-forming processes. Yet (eco)geomorphology is typically overlooked as a topic for ecohydrological investigation. Thus, the process domains used to explain patterns is typically overly restricted. As surface change controls the connectivity of other process, this restriction is significant. However, even when surface change is incorporated, there is often an emphasis on subdisciplinary areas, so that the investigation of patterns across process domains is not carried out in a holistic way. For example, studies of the feedbacks of vegetation on flow resistance are carried out significantly differently when considering wind and water flows (and indeed differently for water flows on hillslopes compared to in channels). Human action is the most important global control on ecohydrology, either from a top-down perspective through climate change, or from a bottom-up perspective through land use and land-use change. The actions of people on ecohydrological and ecogeomorphic processes, though, are typically considered in a static way. Techniques of agent-based modelling are being developed to overcome this limitation, but there need to be parallel developments in field techniques to address the data requirements and empirical underpinnings of such approaches. I argue that to cross the threshold into becoming a more mature discipline ecohydrology/ecogeomorphology needs to take on board the limitations of representations of process, pattern and people. Using examples from studies of land degradation in drylands, as well as from more temperate settings, I will suggest how progress may start to be made.

  15. Life below the threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, C

    1991-01-01

    This article explains that malnutrition, poor health, and limited educational opportunities plague Philippine children -- especially female children -- from families living below the poverty threshold. Nearly 70% of households in the Philippines do not meet the required daily level of nutritional intake. Because it is often -- and incorrectly -- assumed that women's nutritional requirements are lower than men's, women suffer higher rates of malnutrition and poor health. A 1987 study revealed that 11.7% of all elementary students were underweight and 13.9% had stunted growths. Among elementary-school girls, 17% were malnourished and 40% suffered from anemia (among lactating mothers, more than 1/2 are anemic). A 1988 Program for Decentralized Educational Development study showed that grade VI students learn only about 1/2 of what they are supposed to learn. 30% of the children enrolled in grade school drop out before they reach their senior year. The Department of Education, Culture and Sports estimates that some 2.56 million students dropped out of school in l989. That same year, some 3.7 million children were counted as part of the labor force. In Manila alone, some 60,000 children work the streets, whether doing odd jobs or begging, or turning to crime or prostitution. the article tells the story of a 12 year-old girl named Ging, a 4th grader at a public school and the oldest child in a poor family of 6 children. The undernourished Ging dreams of a good future for her family and sees education as a way out of poverty; unfortunately, her time after school is spend working in the streets or looking after her family. She considers herself luckier than many of the other children working in the streets, since she at least has a family.

  16. Braneworld Flux Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Kanno, S; Wands, D; Kanno, Sugumi; Soda, Jiro; Wands, David

    2005-01-01

    We propose a geometrical model of brane inflation where inflation is driven by the flux generated by opposing brane charges and terminated by the collision of the branes, with charge annihilation. We assume the collision process is completely inelastic and the kinetic energy is transformed into the thermal energy after collision. Thereafter the two branes coalesce together and behave as a single brane universe with zero effective cosmological constant. In the Einstein frame, the 4-dimensional effective theory changes abruptly at the collision point. Therefore, our inflationary model is necessarily 5-dimensional in nature. As the collision process has no singularity in 5-dimensional gravity, we can follow the evolution of fluctuations during the whole history of the universe. It turns out that the radion field fluctuations have a steeply tilted, red spectrum, while the primordial gravitational waves have a flat spectrum. Instead, primordial density perturbations could be generated by a curvaton mechanism.

  17. Second threshold in weak interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, M.J.G.

    1977-01-01

    The point of view that weak interactions must have a second threshold below 300 – 600 GeV is developed. Above this threshold new physics must come in. This new physics may be the Higgs system, or some other nonperturbative system possibly having some similarities to the Higgs system. The limit of la

  18. Threshold Concepts and Information Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Lori; Brunetti, Korey; Hofer, Amy R.

    2011-01-01

    What do we teach when we teach information literacy in higher education? This paper describes a pedagogical approach to information literacy that helps instructors focus content around transformative learning thresholds. The threshold concept framework holds promise for librarians because it grounds the instructor in the big ideas and underlying…

  19. Threshold Concepts and Information Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Lori; Brunetti, Korey; Hofer, Amy R.

    2011-01-01

    What do we teach when we teach information literacy in higher education? This paper describes a pedagogical approach to information literacy that helps instructors focus content around transformative learning thresholds. The threshold concept framework holds promise for librarians because it grounds the instructor in the big ideas and underlying…

  20. A Reconnecting Flux Rope Dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Baggaley, Andrew W; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-01-01

    We develop a new model of the fluctuation dynamo in which the magnetic field is confined in thin flux ropes advected by a multi-scale flow modeling turbulence. Magnetic dissipation occurs only via reconnection of the flux ropes. We investigate the kinetic energy release into heat, mediated by the dynamo action, both in our model and by solving the induction equation with the same flow. We find that a flux rope dynamo is an order of magnitude more efficient at converting mechanical energy into heat. The probability density of the magnetic energy release in reconnections has a power-law form with the slope -3, consistent with the Solar corona heating by nanoflares.

  1. Reconnecting flux-rope dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggaley, Andrew W.; Barenghi, Carlo F.; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-11-01

    We develop a model of the fluctuation dynamo in which the magnetic field is confined to thin flux ropes advected by a multiscale model of turbulence. Magnetic dissipation occurs only via reconnection of the flux ropes. This model can be viewed as an implementation of the asymptotic limit Rm→∞ for a continuous magnetic field, where magnetic dissipation is strongly localized to small regions of strong-field gradients. We investigate the kinetic-energy release into heat mediated by the dynamo action, both in our model and by solving the induction equation with the same flow. We find that a flux-rope dynamo is an order of magnitude more efficient at converting mechanical energy into heat. The probability density of the magnetic energy release in reconnections has a power-law form with the slope -3 , consistent with the solar corona heating by nanoflares.

  2. Reconnecting flux-rope dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggaley, Andrew W; Barenghi, Carlo F; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-11-01

    We develop a model of the fluctuation dynamo in which the magnetic field is confined to thin flux ropes advected by a multiscale model of turbulence. Magnetic dissipation occurs only via reconnection of the flux ropes. This model can be viewed as an implementation of the asymptotic limit R_{m}-->infinity for a continuous magnetic field, where magnetic dissipation is strongly localized to small regions of strong-field gradients. We investigate the kinetic-energy release into heat mediated by the dynamo action, both in our model and by solving the induction equation with the same flow. We find that a flux-rope dynamo is an order of magnitude more efficient at converting mechanical energy into heat. The probability density of the magnetic energy release in reconnections has a power-law form with the slope -3 , consistent with the solar corona heating by nanoflares.

  3. Compatibility of separatrix density scaling for divertor detachment with H-mode pedestal operation in DIII-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, A. W.; McLean, A. G.; Makowski, M. A.; Stangeby, P. C.

    2017-08-01

    The midplane separatrix density is characterized in response to variations in upstream parallel heat flux density and central density through deuterium gas injection. The midplane density is determined from a high spatial resolution Thomson scattering diagnostic at the midplane with power balance analysis to determine the separatrix location. The heat flux density is varied by scans of three parameters, auxiliary heating, toroidal field with fixed plasma current, and plasma current with fixed safety factor, q 95. The separatrix density just before divertor detachment onset is found to scale consistent with the two-point model when radiative dissipation is taken into account. The ratio of separatrix to pedestal density, n e,sep/n e,ped varies from  ⩽30% to  ⩾60% over the dataset, helping to resolve the conflicting scaling of core plasma density limit and divertor detachment onset. The scaling of the separatrix density at detachment onset is combined with H-mode power threshold scaling to obtain a scaling ratio of minimum n e,sep/n e,ped expected in future devices.

  4. Latent and sensible heat fluxes overestimated and net heat flux underestimated in Lake Victoria

    CERN Document Server

    Verburg, Piet

    2014-01-01

    Cozar et al. (2012) used remotely-sensed data to link phytoplankton growth to the net heat flux in both the northern and southern parts of Lake Victoria. However, the latent and sensible heat fluxes were overestimated by ~26% by assuming a constant air density of 1.3 kg m-3. As a result, the net heat flux was underestimated, bringing into question conclusions regarding the convective circulation.

  5. Large scale dynamics in flux driven gyrokinetic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarazin, Y.; Grandgirard, V.; Abiteboul, J.; Allfrey, S.; Garbet, X.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Latu, G.; Strugarek, A.; Dif-Pradalier, G.

    2010-05-01

    The turbulent transport governed by the toroidal ion temperature gradient driven instability is analysed with the full-f global gyrokinetic code GYSELA (Grandgirard et al 2007 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 49 B173) when the system is driven by a prescribed heat source. Weak, yet finite, collisionality governs a neoclassical ion heat flux that can compete with the turbulent driven transport. In turn, the ratio of turbulent to neoclassical transport increases with the source magnitude, resulting in the degradation of confinement with additional power. The turbulent flux exhibits avalanche-like events, characterized by intermittent outbursts which propagate ballistically roughly at the diamagnetic velocity. Locally, the temperature gradient can drop well below the linear stability threshold. Large outbursts are found to correlate with streamer-like structures of the convection cells albeit their Fourier spectrum departs significantly from that of the most unstable linear modes. Last, the poloidal rotation of turbulent eddies is essentially governed by the radial electric field at moderate density gradient.

  6. Design Considerations of Permanent Magnet Transverse Flux Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Kaiyuan; Rasmussen, Peter Omand; Ritchie, Ewen

    2011-01-01

    Permanent magnet transverse flux machine (PMTFM) is well known for its high torque density and is interested in various direct-drive applications. Due to its complicated 3-D flux components, design and design optimization of a PMTFM is more difficult and time consuming than for radial flux...

  7. Determination of laser energy density threshold leading to glare-induced blindness by pattern visual evoked potential in guinea pigs%图形视觉诱发电位在豚鼠眩光致盲激光能量密度阈值检测中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李振峰; 熊聪; 殷浩; 夏峰; 安晶; 张磊; 张作明

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the application of pattern visual evoked potential (PVEP) in examination of energy density threshold of laser beam that may lead to glare-induced blindness in guinea pigs. Methods Stainless steel bolts (5mm in length, 1.2mm in diameter), as reference electrode and recording electrode for the PVEP measurement, were implanted into skulls of 27 guinea pigs, located in 6mm proximal to bregma and 10mm distal to bregma. These guinea pigs were randomly divided into three groups with 9(18 eyes) for each group, and they were exposed to laser beam at wave length of 63Snm, 660nm and 690nm, respectively. The PVEP was recorded in each group before and immediately after laser irradiation, and also on day 2 and day 4 after laser irradiation in guinea pigs blinded immediately after laser exposure. The latency and amplitude of P wave in PVEP before irradiation was considered as control value for each group. When PVEP could not be recorded instantly after laser irradiatibn, the intensity of electric current applied at that time was considered as threshold value of each laser beam. The power of electricity(P) values was then calculated, and energy density threshold that led to glare-induced blindness was figured out according to current-power curve (P-I curve). On day 2 and day 4 after irradiation, PVEP was additionally recorded, and latency and amplitude of Pwave were compared with that of control values to examine the recovery of visual function of the blind guinea pigs. Results The energy density thresholds of the three laser beams at wave length of 635nm, 660nm, 690nm respectively were 356.36×10-9J/cm2, 349.58×10-9 J/cm and 343.93 x 10 J/cm . In guinea pigs became blind after exposure to laser beams at wave length of 635nm, 660nm, 690nm, the latencies of P wave recorded 2 days after blindness were not significantly different with control value of each group(t= -0.356, P=0.729;t=0.492, P=0.633; t= - 0.445, P=0.666), while the difference in amplitudes was

  8. Flux tubes at Finite Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Bicudo, Pedro; Cardoso, Marco

    2016-01-01

    We show the flux tubes produced by static quark-antiquark, quark-quark and quark-gluon charges at finite temperature. The sources are placed in the lattice with fundamental and adjoint Polyakov loops. We compute the square densities of the chromomagnetic and chromoelectric fields above and below the phase transition. Our results are gauge invariant and produced in pure gauge SU(3). The codes are written in CUDA and the computations are performed with GPUs.

  9. In depth fusion flame spreading with a deuterium-tritium plane fuel density profile for plasma block ignition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.Malekynia; S.S.Razavipour

    2012-01-01

    Solid-state fuel ignition was given by Chu and Bobin according to the hydrodynamic theory at x =0 qualitatively.A high threshold energy flux density,i.e.,E* =4.3 x 1012 J/m2,has been reached.Recently,fast ignition by employing clean petawatt-picosecond laser pulses was performed.The anomalous phenomena were observed to be based on suppression of prepulses.The accelerated plasma block was used to ignite deuterium-tritium fuel at solid-state density.The detailed analysis of the thermonuclear wave propagation was investigated.Also the fusion conditions at x ≠ 0 layers were clarified by exactly solving hydrodynamic equations for plasma block ignition.In this paper,the applied physical mechanisms are determined for nonlinear force laser driven plasma blocks,thermonuclear reaction,heat transfer,electron-ion equilibration,stopping power of alpha particles,bremsstrahlung,expansion,density dependence,and fluid dynamics.New ignition conditions may be obtained by using temperature equations,including thc dcnsity profile that is obtained by the continuity equation and expansion velocity.The density is only a function of x and independent of time.The ignition energy flux density,E*t,for the x ≠ 0 layers is 1.95 × 1012 J/m2.Thus threshold ignition energy in comparison with that at x =0 layers would be reduced to less than 50 percent.

  10. Music effect on pain threshold evaluated with current perception threshold

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    AIM: Music relieves anxiety and psychotic tension. This effect of music is applied to surgical operation in the hospital and dental office. It is still unclear whether this music effect is only limited to the psychological aspect but not to the physical aspect or whether its music effect is influenced by the mood or emotion of audience. To elucidate these issues, we evaluated the music effect on pain threshold by current perception threshold (CPT) and profile of mood states (POMC) test. METHODS: Healthy 30 subjects (12 men, 18 women, 25-49 years old, mean age 34.9) were tested. (1)After POMC test, all subjects were evaluated pain threshold with CPT by Neurometer (Radionics, USA) under 6 conditions, silence, listening to the slow tempo classic music, nursery music, hard rock music, classic paino music and relaxation music with 30 seconds interval. (2)After Stroop color word test as the stresser, pain threshold was evaluated with CPT under 2 conditions, silence and listening to the slow tempo classic music. RESULTS: Under litening to the music, CPT sores increased, especially 2 000 Hz level related with compression, warm and pain sensation. Type of music, preference of music and stress also affected CPT score. CONCLUSION: The present study demonstrated that the concentration on the music raise the pain threshold and that stress and mood influence the music effect on pain threshold.

  11. Effect of Electron Seeding on Experimentally Measured Multipactor Discharge Threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noland, Jonathan; Graves, Timothy; Lemon, Colby; Looper, Mark; Farkas, Alex

    2012-10-01

    Multipactor is a vacuum phenomenon in which electrons, moving in resonance with an externally applied electric field, impact material surfaces. If the number of secondary electrons created per primary electron impact averages more than unity, the resonant interaction can lead to an electron avalanche. Multipactor is a generally undesirable phenomenon, as it can cause local heating, absorb power, or cause detuning of RF circuits. In order to increase the probability of multipactor initiation, test facilities often employ various seeding sources such as radioactive sources (Cesium 137, Strontium 90), electron guns, or photon sources. Even with these sources, the voltage for multipactor initiation is not certain as parameters such as material type, RF pulse length, and device wall thickness can all affect seed electron flux and energy in critical gap regions, and hence the measured voltage threshold. This study investigates the effects of seed electron source type (e.g., photons versus beta particles), material type, gap size, and RF pulse length variation on multipactor threshold. In addition to the experimental work, GEANT4 simulations will be used to estimate the production rate of low energy electrons (< 5 keV) by high energy electrons and photons. A comparison of the experimental fluxes to the typical energetic photon and particle fluxes experienced by spacecraft in various orbits will also be made. Initial results indicate that for a simple, parallel plate device made of aluminum, there is no threshold variation (with seed electrons versus with no seed electrons) under continuous-wave RF exposure.

  12. Stabilization of electron-scale turbulence by electron density gradient in national spherical torus experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz Ruiz, J.; White, A. E. [MIT-Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Ren, Y.; Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; Leblanc, B. P.; Mazzucato, E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Lee, K. C. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Domier, C. W. [University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Smith, D. R. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Yuh, H. [Nova Photonics, Inc., Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Theory and experiments have shown that electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence on the electron gyro-scale, k{sub ⊥}ρ{sub e} ≲ 1, can be responsible for anomalous electron thermal transport in NSTX. Electron scale (high-k) turbulence is diagnosed in NSTX with a high-k microwave scattering system [D. R. Smith et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 123501 (2008)]. Here we report on stabilization effects of the electron density gradient on electron-scale density fluctuations in a set of neutral beam injection heated H-mode plasmas. We found that the absence of high-k density fluctuations from measurements is correlated with large equilibrium density gradient, which is shown to be consistent with linear stabilization of ETG modes due to the density gradient using the analytical ETG linear threshold in F. Jenko et al. [Phys. Plasmas 8, 4096 (2001)] and linear gyrokinetic simulations with GS2 [M. Kotschenreuther et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 88, 128 (1995)]. We also found that the observed power of electron-scale turbulence (when it exists) is anti-correlated with the equilibrium density gradient, suggesting density gradient as a nonlinear stabilizing mechanism. Higher density gradients give rise to lower values of the plasma frame frequency, calculated based on the Doppler shift of the measured density fluctuations. Linear gyrokinetic simulations show that higher values of the electron density gradient reduce the value of the real frequency, in agreement with experimental observation. Nonlinear electron-scale gyrokinetic simulations show that high electron density gradient reduces electron heat flux and stiffness, and increases the ETG nonlinear threshold, consistent with experimental observations.

  13. Parton distributions with threshold resummation

    CERN Document Server

    Bonvini, Marco; Rojo, Juan; Rottoli, Luca; Ubiali, Maria; Ball, Richard D; Bertone, Valerio; Carrazza, Stefano; Hartland, Nathan P

    2015-01-01

    We construct a set of parton distribution functions (PDFs) in which fixed-order NLO and NNLO calculations are supplemented with soft-gluon (threshold) resummation up to NLL and NNLL accuracy respectively, suitable for use in conjunction with any QCD calculation in which threshold resummation is included at the level of partonic cross sections. These resummed PDF sets, based on the NNPDF3.0 analysis, are extracted from deep-inelastic scattering, Drell-Yan, and top quark pair production data, for which resummed calculations can be consistently used. We find that, close to threshold, the inclusion of resummed PDFs can partially compensate the enhancement in resummed matrix elements, leading to resummed hadronic cross-sections closer to the fixed-order calculation. On the other hand, far from threshold, resummed PDFs reduce to their fixed-order counterparts. Our results demonstrate the need for a consistent use of resummed PDFs in resummed calculations.

  14. Quench thresholds in operational superconducting magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allinger, J; Danby, G; Foelsche, H; Jackson, J; Lowenstein, D; Prodell, A; Weng, W

    1978-01-01

    Superconducting magnets exposed to intense primary proton beams in high energy physics applications are subject to potentially extreme heat deposition. The beam power density, its duration and spatial distribution, the current density in the superconductor and, potentially, in the normal metal substrate, as well as the construction and cooling details of the magnet, are all relevant parameters. An extension of some earlier work is discussed in which 28.5 GeV/c proton beams with up to 50 k joules of energy were targeted upstream from a 4 m long, 4 T dipole magnet used to deflect the protons through an angle of 8/sup 0/. Quench thresholds much greater than the enthalpy limit of the magnet materials were observed. In the beam exposure experiment described, intense beams of 1.5 GeV/c protons have been deflected directly into the magnet coil at relatively steep angles of incidence. The magnet quench threshold was studied by varying the beam currents and beam sizes.

  15. Evaluation of surface renewal and flux-variance methods above agricultural and forest surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, M.; Katul, G. G.; Noormets, A.; Poznikova, G.; Domec, J. C.; Trnka, M.; King, J. S.

    2016-12-01

    Measurements of turbulent surface energy fluxes are of high interest in agriculture and forest research. During last decades, eddy covariance (EC), has been adopted as the most commonly used micrometeorological method for measuring fluxes of greenhouse gases, energy and other scalars at the surface-atmosphere interface. Despite its robustness and accuracy, the costs of EC hinder its deployment at some research experiments and in practice like e.g. for irrigation scheduling. Therefore, testing and development of other cost-effective methods is of high interest. In our study, we tested performance of surface renewal (SR) and flux variance method (FV) for estimates of sensible heat flux density. Surface renewal method is based on the concept of non-random transport of scalars via so-called coherent structures which if accurately identified can be used for the computing of associated flux. Flux variance method predicts the flux from the scalar variance following the surface-layer similarity theory. We tested SR and FV against EC in three types of ecosystem with very distinct aerodynamic properties. First site was represented by agricultural wheat field in the Czech Republic. The second site was a 20-m tall mixed deciduous wetland forest on the coast of North Carolina, USA. The third site was represented by pine-switchgrass intercropping agro-forestry system located in coastal plain of North Carolina, USA. Apart from solving the coherent structures in a SR framework from the structure functions (representing the most common approach), we applied ramp wavelet detection scheme to test the hypothesis that the duration and amplitudes of the coherent structures are normally distributed within the particular 30-minutes time intervals and so just the estimates of their averages is sufficient for the accurate flux determination. Further, we tested whether the orthonormal wavelet thresholding can be used for isolating of the coherent structure scales which are associated with

  16. Flux-P: Automating Metabolic Flux Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitta E. Ebert

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative knowledge of intracellular fluxes in metabolic networks is invaluable for inferring metabolic system behavior and the design principles of biological systems. However, intracellular reaction rates can not often be calculated directly but have to be estimated; for instance, via 13C-based metabolic flux analysis, a model-based interpretation of stable carbon isotope patterns in intermediates of metabolism. Existing software such as FiatFlux, OpenFLUX or 13CFLUX supports experts in this complex analysis, but requires several steps that have to be carried out manually, hence restricting the use of this software for data interpretation to a rather small number of experiments. In this paper, we present Flux-P as an approach to automate and standardize 13C-based metabolic flux analysis, using the Bio-jETI workflow framework. Exemplarily based on the FiatFlux software, it demonstrates how services can be created that carry out the different analysis steps autonomously and how these can subsequently be assembled into software workflows that perform automated, high-throughput intracellular flux analysis of high quality and reproducibility. Besides significant acceleration and standardization of the data analysis, the agile workflow-based realization supports flexible changes of the analysis workflows on the user level, making it easy to perform custom analyses.

  17. Dependence of Core and Extended Flux on Core Dominance Parameter for Radio Sources

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. J. Nie; J. H. Yang

    2014-09-01

    Based on two extragalactic radio source samples, the core dominance parameter is calculated, and the correlations between the core/extended flux density and core dominance parameter are investigated. When the core dominance parameter is lower than unity, it is linearly correlated with the core flux density, but it is not correlated with the extended flux density. When the core dominance parameter is higher than unity, it is not correlated with the core flux density, but it is linearly correlated with the extended flux density. Therefore, there are different results from different samples. The results can be explained using a relativistic beaming model.

  18. Gelation threshold of cross-linked polymer brushes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Max; Lang, Michael; Sommer, Jens-Uwe

    2011-02-01

    The cross-linking of polymer brushes is studied using the bond-fluctuation model. By mapping the cross-linking process into a two-dimensional (2D) percolation problem within the lattice of grafting points, we investigate the gelation transition in detail. We show that the particular properties of cross-linked polymer brushes can be reduced to the distribution of bonds which are formed between the grafted chains, and we propose scaling arguments to relate the gelation threshold to the chain length and the grafting density. The gelation threshold is lower than the percolation threshold for 2D bond percolation because of the longer range and broad distribution of bonds formed by the cross-linking process. We term this type of percolation problem star percolation. We observe a broad crossover from mean-field to critical percolation behavior by analyzing the cluster size distribution near the gelation threshold.

  19. Double threshold behavior in a resonance-controlled ZnO random laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niyuki, Ryo; Fujiwara, Hideki; Nakamura, Toshihiro; Ishikawa, Yoshie; Koshizaki, Naoto; Tsuji, Takeshi; Sasaki, Keiji

    2017-03-01

    We observed unusual lasing characteristics, such as double thresholds and blue-shift of lasing peak, in a resonance-controlled ZnO random laser. From the analysis of lasing threshold carrier density, we found that the lasing at 1st and 2nd thresholds possibly arises from different mechanisms; the lasing at 1st threshold involves exciton recombination, whereas the lasing at 2nd threshold is caused by electron-hole plasma recombination, which is the typical origin of conventional random lasers. These phenomena are very similar to the transition from polariton lasing to photon lasing observed in a well-defined cavity laser.

  20. Double threshold behavior in a resonance-controlled ZnO random laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Niyuki

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We observed unusual lasing characteristics, such as double thresholds and blue-shift of lasing peak, in a resonance-controlled ZnO random laser. From the analysis of lasing threshold carrier density, we found that the lasing at 1st and 2nd thresholds possibly arises from different mechanisms; the lasing at 1st threshold involves exciton recombination, whereas the lasing at 2nd threshold is caused by electron-hole plasma recombination, which is the typical origin of conventional random lasers. These phenomena are very similar to the transition from polariton lasing to photon lasing observed in a well-defined cavity laser.

  1. The effect of ion beam flux density on the nitride layer of 304 austenitic stainless steel by RF-ICP method%RF-ICP等离子体氮化304不锈钢过程中离子束流密度对氮化层的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李海玲; 王庆

    2014-01-01

    The significant effect of ion beam flux density during the nitriding of 304 austenitic stainless steel was studied in a radio frequency inductively-coupled plasma ( RF-ICP ) reactor into which a sample with negative bias was inserted . Use a milliammeter to detect the current of ions which collide with the sample and use an optical emission spectroscopy to discern the reactive species included in the nitrogen plasma . The X-ray diffraction datas reveal that ion beam flux density strongly affects nitriding of stainless steel owing to a finding of the expanded multiphase microstructure inside nitrided layer . The increase in density of ion flux results in an ascent in intensity of the expanded peak and simultaneously decline in intensity ofγ austenite peak . The evolution trend of ion beam flux density and OES intensity as a function of operating pressure , bias voltage was disclosed . A reasonable nitriding region was , consequently , suggested after comparing this work with previous researches by other groups .%研究了射频电感耦合等离子体RF-ICP低温氮化304奥氏体不锈钢过程中离子束流的重要作用。带有负偏压的不锈钢样片被插入到射频电感耦合等离子体反应器中。氮离子束流密度和等离子体成分分别用毫安表和一个等离子体光发射谱仪来实时监测。 XRD测试结果发现在不锈钢的表层出现了明显的多组分的氮化物微结构,这说明不锈钢成功地被氮化。系统地研究了离子流密度变化显著的影响不锈钢的氮化效果。随着离子束流密度的增加氮化物成分增加同时γ相奥氏体成分减少。同时也研究了氮离子流密度及等离子体发射谱线强度随操作压力、偏压的演变过程。通过实验数据分析提出了利用射频等离子体氮化304不锈钢的合理的氮化区。

  2. Flux line depinning in a magnet-superconductor levitation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terentiev, A. N.; Hull, J. R.; De Long, L. E.

    The AC loss characteristics of a magnet-superconductor system were studied with the magnet fixed to the free end of an oscillating cantilever located near a stationary melt-textured YBCO pellet. Below a threshold AC field amplitude ≈2 Oe, the dissipation of the oscillator is amplitude-independent, characteristic of a linear, non-hysteretic regime. Above threshold, dissipation increases with amplitude, reflecting the depinning and hysteretic motion of flux lines. The threshold AC field is an order of magnitude higher than that measured for the same YBCO material via AC susceptometry in a uniform DC magnetic field. A partial lock-in of flux lines between YBCO ab planes is proposed as the mechanism for the substantial increase of the depinning threshold.

  3. Connectivity Threshold of Random Geometric Graphs with Cantor Distributed Vertices

    OpenAIRE

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar; Sajadi, Farkhondeh

    2012-01-01

    For connectivity of \\emph{random geometric graphs}, where there is no density for underlying distribution of the vertices, we consider $n$ i.i.d. \\emph{Cantor} distributed points on $[0,1]$. We show that for this random geometric graph, the connectivity threshold $R_{n}$, converges almost surely to a constant $1-2\\phi$ where $0 ...

  4. Channel size influence on the heat flux density at zero net mass flow in the non-linear transport regime between 1.2 and 2.1 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederking, T. H. K.; Yuan, S. W. K.; Lee, J. M.; Sun, G. S.

    1987-01-01

    Porous media and narrow ducts of simple shape at zero net mass flow (ZNMF) are used to investigate the influence of pore size on the entropy/heat convection rate at ZNMF. The study is relevant to the development of specific types of phase separators. Previous work on heat transport by convection is extended to porous media without mass loss. The experimental results show the influence of pore size on heat flux for permeabilities between 10 to the -8th and 10 to the -6th sq cm. ZNMF plug data are found to be similar to results obtained for vapor liquid phase separation.

  5. Higher-than-predicted saltation threshold wind speeds on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burr, Devon M.; Bridges, Nathan T.; Marshall, John R.; Smith, James K.; White, Bruce R.; Emery, Joshua P.

    2015-01-01

    Titan, the largest satellite of Saturn, exhibits extensive aeolian, that is, wind-formed, dunes, features previously identified exclusively on Earth, Mars and Venus. Wind tunnel data collected under ambient and planetary-analogue conditions inform our models of aeolian processes on the terrestrial planets. However, the accuracy of these widely used formulations in predicting the threshold wind speeds required to move sand by saltation, or by short bounces, has not been tested under conditions relevant for non-terrestrial planets. Here we derive saltation threshold wind speeds under the thick-atmosphere, low-gravity and low-sediment-density conditions on Titan, using a high-pressure wind tunnel refurbished to simulate the appropriate kinematic viscosity for the near-surface atmosphere of Titan. The experimentally derived saltation threshold wind speeds are higher than those predicted by models based on terrestrial-analogue experiments, indicating the limitations of these models for such extreme conditions. The models can be reconciled with the experimental results by inclusion of the extremely low ratio of particle density to fluid density on Titan. Whereas the density ratio term enables accurate modelling of aeolian entrainment in thick atmospheres, such as those inferred for some extrasolar planets, our results also indicate that for environments with high density ratios, such as in jets on icy satellites or in tenuous atmospheres or exospheres, the correction for low-density-ratio conditions is not required.

  6. Synthesis and stabilization of oxide-based colloidal suspensions in organic media: application in the preparation of hybrids organic-inorganic materials for very high laser damage threshold coatings; Synthese et stabilisation de suspensions colloidales d'oxydes en milieu organique: application a la preparation de materiaux hybrides organiques-inorganiques pour des revetements a tres haute tenue au flux laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchet, N.

    2008-02-15

    Multilayer coatings are widely used in optic and particular in the field of high power laser on the components of laser chains. The development of a highly reflective coating with a laser damage resistance requires the fine-tuning of a multilayer stack constituted by a succession alternated by materials with low and high refractive index. In order to limit the number of layers in the stack, refractive indexes must be optimized. To do it, an original approach consists in synthesizing new organic-inorganic hybrid materials satisfying the criteria of laser damage resistance and optimized refractive index. These hybrid materials are constituted by nano-particles of metal oxides synthesized by sol-gel process and dispersed in an organic polymer with high laser damage threshold. Nevertheless, this composite system requires returning both compatible phases between them by chemical grafting of alc-oxy-silanes or carboxylic acids. We showed that it was so possible to disperse in a homogeneous way these functionalized nano-particles in non-polar, aprotic solvent containing solubilized organic polymers, to obtain time-stable nano-composite solutions. From these organic-inorganic hybrid solutions, thin films with optical quality and high laser damage threshold were obtained. These promising results have permitted to realize highly reflective stacks, constituted by 7 pairs with optical properties in agreement with the theoretical models and high laser damage threshold. (author)

  7. Study on the processing method of nighttime CO2 eddy covariance flux data in ChinaFLUX

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    <正>At present, using Eddy Covariance (EC) method to estimate the "true value" of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystem arrests more attention. However, one issue is how to solve the uncertainty of observations (especially the nighttime CO2 flux data) appearing in post-processing CO2 flux data. The ratio of effective and reliable nighttime EC CO2 flux data to all nighttime data is relatively low (commonly, less than 50%) for all the long-term and continuous observation stations in the world. Thus, the processing method of nighttime CO2 flux data and its effect analysis on estimating CO2 flux annual sums are very important. In this paper, the authors analyze and discuss the reasons for underestimating nighttime CO2 flux using EC method, and introduce the general theory and method for processing nighttime CO2 flux data. By analyzing the relationship between nighttime CO2 flux and air fraction velocity u., we present an alternate method, Average Values Test (AVT), to determine the thresholds of fraction velocity (u.c) for screening the effective nighttime CO2 flux data. Meanwhile, taking the data observed in Yucheng and Changbai Mountains stations for an example, we analyze and discuss the effects of different methods or parameters on nighttime CO2 flux estimations. Finally, based on the data of part ChinaFLUX stations and related literatures, empirical models of nighttime respiration at different sites in ChinaFLUX are summarized.

  8. Clustering of Emerging Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzmaikin, A.

    1997-01-01

    Observations show that newly emerging flux tends to appear on the Solar surface at sites where there is flux already. This results in clustering of solar activity. Standard dynamo theories do not predict this effect.

  9. Threshold proxy quantum signature scheme with threshold shared verification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A threshold proxy quantum signature scheme with threshold shared verification is proposed. An original signer could authorize a group as its proxy signers. Then only t or more of n persons in the proxy group can generate the proxy signature on behalf of the original signer and any t-1 or fewer ones cannot do that. When the proxy signature needs to be verified,any t or more of n persons belonging to the verification group can verify the message and any t-1 or fewer ones cannot verify the validity of the proxy signature.

  10. The abundance threshold for plague as a critical percolation phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, S; Trapman, P; Leirs, H; Begon, M; Heesterbeek, J A P

    2008-07-31

    Percolation theory is most commonly associated with the slow flow of liquid through a porous medium, with applications to the physical sciences. Epidemiological applications have been anticipated for disease systems where the host is a plant or volume of soil, and hence is fixed in space. However, no natural examples have been reported. The central question of interest in percolation theory, the possibility of an infinite connected cluster, corresponds in infectious disease to a positive probability of an epidemic. Archived records of plague (infection with Yersinia pestis) in populations of great gerbils (Rhombomys opimus) in Kazakhstan have been used to show that epizootics only occur when more than about 0.33 of the burrow systems built by the host are occupied by family groups. The underlying mechanism for this abundance threshold is unknown. Here we present evidence that it is a percolation threshold, which arises from the difference in scale between the movements that transport infectious fleas between family groups and the vast size of contiguous landscapes colonized by gerbils. Conventional theory predicts that abundance thresholds for the spread of infectious disease arise when transmission between hosts is density dependent such that the basic reproduction number (R(0)) increases with abundance, attaining 1 at the threshold. Percolation thresholds, however, are separate, spatially explicit thresholds that indicate long-range connectivity in a system and do not coincide with R(0) = 1. Abundance thresholds are the theoretical basis for attempts to manage infectious disease by reducing the abundance of susceptibles, including vaccination and the culling of wildlife. This first natural example of a percolation threshold in a disease system invites a re-appraisal of other invasion thresholds, such as those for epidemic viral infections in African lions (Panthera leo), and of other disease systems such as bovine tuberculosis (caused by Mycobacterium bovis) in

  11. Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System (ECOR) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, DR

    2011-01-31

    The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration.

  12. Black branes in flux compactifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torroba, Gonzalo; Wang, Huajia

    2013-10-01

    We construct charged black branes in type IIA flux compactifications that are dual to (2 + 1)-dimensional field theories at finite density. The internal space is a general Calabi-Yau manifold with fluxes, with internal dimensions much smaller than the AdS radius. Gauge fields descend from the 3-form RR potential evaluated on harmonic forms of the Calabi-Yau, and Kaluza-Klein modes decouple. Black branes are described by a four-dimensional effective field theory that includes only a few light fields and is valid over a parametrically large range of scales. This effective theory determines the low energy dynamics, stability and thermodynamic properties. Tools from flux compactifications are also used to construct holographic CFTs with no relevant scalar operators, that can lead to symmetric phases of condensed matter systems stable to very low temperatures. The general formalism is illustrated with simple examples such as toroidal compactifications and manifolds with a single size modulus. We initiate the classification of holographic phases of matter described by flux compactifications, which include generalized Reissner-Nordstrom branes, nonsupersymmetric AdS2×R2 and hyperscaling violating solutions.

  13. Inclusive distributions near kinematic thresholds

    CERN Document Server

    Gardi, E

    2006-01-01

    The main challenge in computing inclusive cross sections and decay spectra in QCD is posed by kinematic thresholds. The threshold region is characterized by stringent phase-space constraints that are reflected in large perturbative corrections due to soft and collinear radiation as well as large non-perturbative effects. Major progress in addressing this problem was made in recent years by Dressed Gluon Exponentiation (DGE), a formalism that combines Sudakov and renormalon resummation in moment space. DGE has proven effective in extending the range of applicability of perturbation theory well into the threshold region and in identifying the relevant non-perturbative corrections. Here we review the method from a general perspective using examples from deep inelastic structure functions, event-shape distributions, heavy-quark fragmentation and inclusive decay spectra. A special discussion is devoted to the applications of DGE to radiative and semileptonic B decays that have proven valuable for the interpretatio...

  14. Threshold concepts in dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinchin, I M; Cabot, L B; Kobus, M; Woolford, M

    2011-11-01

    The paper presents a conceptual framework to inform dental education. Drawing from a vast body of research into student learning, the simple model presented here has an explanatory value in describing what is currently observed to happen and a predictive value in guiding future teaching practices. We introduce to dental education the application of threshold concepts that have a transformative role in offering a new vision of the curriculum that helps to move away from the medieval transmission model of higher education towards a dual processing model that better reflects the way in which professionals operate within the discipline. Threshold concepts give a role for the student voice in offering a novice perspective which is paradoxically something that is out of reach of the subject expert. Finally, the application of threshold concepts highlights some of the weaknesses in the competency-based training model of clinical teaching. 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. FLUXES FOR MECHANIZED ELECTRIC WELDING,

    Science.gov (United States)

    WELDING FLUXES, WELDING ), (* WELDING , WELDING FLUXES), ARC WELDING , WELDS, STABILITY, POROSITY, WELDING RODS, STEEL, CERAMIC MATERIALS, FLUXES(FUSION), TITANIUM ALLOYS, ALUMINUM ALLOYS, COPPER ALLOYS, ELECTRODEPOSITION

  16. Baryon Form Factors at Threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldini Ferroli, Rinaldo [Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche ' E. Fermi' , Rome (Italy); INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Pacetti, Simone [INFN and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Perugia, Perugia (Italy)

    2012-04-15

    An extensive study of the e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}pp{sup Macron }BABAR cross section data is presented. Two unexpected outcomes have been found: the modulus of the proton form factor is normalized to one at threshold, i.e.: |G{sup p}(4M{sub p}{sup 2})|=1, as a pointlike fermion, and the resummation factor in the Sommerfeld formula is not needed. Other e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} baryon-antibaryon cross sections show a similar behavior near threshold.

  17. On computational Gestalt detection thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grompone von Gioi, Rafael; Jakubowicz, Jérémie

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show some recent developments of computational Gestalt theory, as pioneered by Desolneux, Moisan and Morel. The new results allow to predict much more accurately the detection thresholds. This step is unavoidable if one wants to analyze visual detection thresholds in the light of computational Gestalt theory. The paper first recalls the main elements of computational Gestalt theory. It points out a precision issue in this theory, essentially due to the use of discrete probability distributions. It then proposes to overcome this issue by using continuous probability distributions and illustrates it on the meaningful alignment detector of Desolneux et al.

  18. Methodology for determination of two new sensory thresholds: Compromised acceptance threshold and rejection threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima Filho, Tarcísio; Minim, Valéria Paula Rodrigues; Silva, Rita de Cássia Dos Santos Navarro da; Della Lucia, Suzana Maria; Minim, Luis Antônio

    2015-10-01

    The existing methodologies for determining thresholds generate unreliable estimates of the point at which the intensity of a stimulus begins to compromise acceptance or result in sensory rejection of a product. Thus, a new methodology was proposed for determination of two new sensory thresholds: the compromised acceptance threshold (CAT) and the rejection threshold (RT). In this new methodology, increasing or decreasing series of stimulus intensity are measured together with a standard stimulus (control sample) by means of acceptance tests. In the present study, the CAT and RT were determined for sucrose concentrations in grape nectar, demonstrating that when reducing the sucrose concentration of grape nectar form 9.00% (w/v) to 6.87% there begins to occur impairment of product acceptance (CAT), and when reducing the sucrose concentration from 9.00% to 3.83% there begins to occur sensory rejection (RT) of the product. When compared to existing threshold determination methodologies, the proposed methodology permitted for calculating, with greater reliability, the points at which compromise of acceptance (CAT) and sensory rejection (RT) of the product begin to occur. In addition to the case study presented, the proposed methodology has a wide range of applications in science and in the food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Patterns of Flux Emergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Title, A.; Cheung, M.

    2008-05-01

    The high spatial resolution and high cadence of the Solar Optical Telescope on the JAXA Hinode spacecraft have allowed capturing many examples of magnetic flux emergence from the scale of granulation to active regions. The observed patterns of emergence are quite similar. Flux emerges as a array of small bipoles on scales from 1 to 5 arc seconds throughout the region that the flux eventually condenses. Because the fields emerging from the underlying flux rope my appear many in small segments and the total flux (absolute sum) is not a conserved quantity the amount of total flux on the surface may vary significantly during the emergence process. Numerical simulations of flux emergence exhibit patterns similar to observations. Movies of both observations and numerical simulations will be presented.

  20. Topographical distribution of pinprick and warmth thresholds to CO2 laser stimulation on the human skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agostino, R.; Cruccu, G.; Iannetti, G.

    2000-01-01

    We studied the topographical distribution of laser sensory thresholds on the human hairy skin, using a small laser beam for pinprick and a large beam for warmth sensations. The threshold for pinprick sensation correlated positively with the distance from the brain, suggesting that A delta....... Possibly because of a diffuse low density of warmth receptors, laser warmth thresholds showed no trend. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved....

  1. The Nature of Psychological Thresholds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rouder, Jeffrey N.; Morey, Richard D.

    Following G. T. Fechner (1966), thresholds have been conceptualized as the amount of intensity needed to transition between mental states, such as between a states of unconsciousness and consciousness. With the advent of the theory of signal detection, however, discrete-state theory and the

  2. Weights of Exact Threshold Functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babai, László; Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt; Podolskii, Vladimir V.

    2010-01-01

    We consider Boolean exact threshold functions defined by linear equations, and in general degree d polynomials. We give upper and lower bounds on the maximum magnitude (absolute value) of the coefficients required to represent such functions. These bounds are very close and in the linear case...

  3. Threshold enhancement of diphoton resonances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoife Bharucha

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We revisit a mechanism to enhance the decay width of (pseudo-scalar resonances to photon pairs when the process is mediated by loops of charged fermions produced near threshold. Motivated by the recent LHC data, indicating the presence of an excess in the diphoton spectrum at approximately 750 GeV, we illustrate this threshold enhancement mechanism in the case of a 750 GeV pseudoscalar boson A with a two-photon decay mediated by a charged and uncolored fermion having a mass at the 12MA threshold and a small decay width, <1 MeV. The implications of such a threshold enhancement are discussed in two explicit scenarios: i the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model in which the A state is produced via the top quark mediated gluon fusion process and decays into photons predominantly through loops of charginos with masses close to 12MA and ii a two Higgs doublet model in which A is again produced by gluon fusion but decays into photons through loops of vector-like charged heavy leptons. In both these scenarios, while the mass of the charged fermion has to be adjusted to be extremely close to half of the A resonance mass, the small total widths are naturally obtained if only suppressed three-body decay channels occur. Finally, the implications of some of these scenarios for dark matter are discussed.

  4. Threshold Concepts and Pedagogic Representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jan H. F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present a brief exposure to the development of the threshold concepts framework (TCF), the intention being to illuminate for interested readers a broader landscape of research activity than that perhaps conveyed by the individual contributions to this special edition. Design/Methodology/Approach: There is…

  5. 老年骨质疏松性骨折不同部位BMD及骨折阈值分析%Determination of bone mineral density at different regions and analysis of threshold value of fracture for elderly patients with osteoporostic fractures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阮彩莲; 侯海斌

    2014-01-01

    目的:分析不同性别、年龄老年骨质疏松性骨折患者不同部位的骨密度(BMD)及骨折阈值。方法选取2010年10月至2013年10月在延安大学附属医院骨科门诊就诊的180例老年骨质疏松性骨折患者作为研究对象。男90例,其中60~69岁45例、70~79岁45例;女90例,其中60~69岁45例、70~79岁45例。比较不同性别、不同年龄段患者股骨颈、Ward三角、L2~L4及大粗隆等部位的BMD;采用ROC曲线计算不同部位的骨折阈值。结果70~79岁股骨颈、Ward三角、大粗隆部位BMD明显低于60~69岁组(P<0.05);老年女性患者股骨颈、Ward三角、L2~L4、大粗隆部位BMD均低于老年男性患者(P<0.05)。老年男性和女性患者股骨颈、Ward三角、L2~L4、大粗隆等部位骨折阈值分别为0.77、0.68、0.81、0.74 g/cm3和0.74、0.65、0.78、0.71 g/cm3。结论不同性别和年龄的老年骨质疏松性骨折患者不同部位BMD及骨折阈值均有所不同,年龄和绝经是影响BMD的重要因素。%Objective To determine bone mineral density (BMD) at different regions, and to analyze the threshold of fracture for elderly patients suffered from osteoporostic fractures. Methods From October 2010 to October 2013, 108 elderly patients with osteoporostic fractures from outpatient clinic in the affiliated Hospital of Yan'an University were collected and divided into two gender groups, 90 male and 90 female, in which 45 of them were 60-69 years old and 45 of them were 70-79 years old. BMD at femoral neck, Ward's triangle, L2-L4 and great trochanter were determined and compared respectively among groups with different ages and different gender, threshold value of fracture in different regions was calculated by ROC curve. Results Compared with 60-69 year-old group, BMD at femoral neck, ward's triangle and great trochanter were lower in 70-79 year-old group (P <0.05); For female patients, BMD at the above 4 regions were

  6. A Secure Threshold Group Signature Scheme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xiaoming; Fu Fangwei

    2003-01-01

    The threshold group signature is an important kind of signature. So far, many threshold group signature schemes have been proposed, but most of them suffer from conspiracy attack and are insecure. In this paper, a secure threshold group signature scheme is proposed. It can not only satisfy the properties of the threshold group signature, but also withstand the conspiracy attack

  7. Stochastic calculus application to dynamic bifurcations and threshold crossings

    CERN Document Server

    Jansons, K M; Jansons, Kalvis M.

    1997-01-01

    For the dynamic pitchfork bifurcation in the presence of white noise, the statistics of the last time at zero are calculated as a function of the noise level and the rate of change of the parameter. The threshold crossing problem used, for example, to model the firing of a single cortical neuron is considered, concentrating on quantities that may be experimentally measurable but have so far received little attention. Expressions for the statistics of pre-threshold excursions, occupation density and last crossing time of zero are compared with results from numerical generation of paths.

  8. Neutrino fluxes from constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model lightest supersymmetric particle annihilations in the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John; Savage, Christopher; Spanos, Vassilis C

    2010-01-01

    We evaluate the neutrino fluxes to be expected from neutralino LSP annihilations inside the Sun, within the minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model with supersymmetry-breaking scalar and gaugino masses constrained to be universal at the GUT scale (the CMSSM). We find that there are large regions of typical CMSSM $(m_{1/2}, m_0)$ planes where the LSP density inside the Sun is not in equilibrium, so that the annihilation rate may be far below the capture rate. We show that neutrino fluxes are dependent on the solar model at the 20% level, and adopt the AGSS09 model of Serenelli et al. for our detailed studies. We find that there are large regions of the CMSSM $(m_{1/2}, m_0)$ planes where the capture rate is not dominated by spin-dependent LSP-proton scattering, e.g., at large $m_{1/2}$ along the CMSSM coannihilation strip. We calculate neutrino fluxes above various threshold energies for points along the coannihilation/rapid-annihilation and focus-point strips where the CMSSM yields the correct ...

  9. 宽量程中子通量密度测量数字化处理系统设计%Design of Wide Range Digital Processing System for Neutron Flux Density Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁超; 黄跃峰; 李勇平

    2015-01-01

    The real-time and accurate measurement of reactor neutron flux is directly related to safe operation of the reactor.Neutron flux measurement system with fission chamber based on the analog technology had some shortage, a fission chamber of digital output signal processing system was designed.The combination of two kinds of fission chamber working mode which is pulse and Campbell were applied in this system.Using high-speed ADC digitalized signal from the fission chamber, FPGA could be used in a variety of digital signal pro-cessing algorithms.And using MATLAB simulated output pulse signal of the fission chamber, which imported arbitrary waveform signal generator as neutron source, to be used in a preliminary validation of the algorithm. Test results showed that the digital processing system had good linearity and good performance.%实时准确地测量反应堆的中子通量变化状况,对于确保反应堆的安全运行有着重要意义。基于模拟测量系统存在的一些不足,设计一种数字化的宽量程裂变室输出信号处理系统。该数字化信号处理系统将裂变室的脉冲和坎贝尔两种工作模式相结合,利用高速ADC对裂变室输出脉冲信号数字化,在FPGA中运用数字信号处理算法实现两种工作模式的信号处理,并仿真了裂变室的输出脉冲信号导入任意波形信号发生器模拟中子信号源,用于对处理算法的初步验证。测试结果表明数字化处理系统线性度和性能良好。

  10. Near Threshold Coincident Electrofission of Uranium -238.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowell, David Harry

    Using the 100% duty cycle electron beam from the University of Illinois MUSL-2 accelerator, inelastic electron scattering form factors have been measured in coincidence with the fission decay of ('238)U. Data was taken at effective elastic momentum transfers of .36, .41 .45 and .59 fm(' -1) and electron-fission fragment angular correlations were measured perpendicular to and along the momentum transfer axis. The beam energies used were 67.11, 56.91 and 46.49 MeV, with the outgoing electron detected at 60(DEGREES) and 80(DEGREES), relative to the beam direction. The electron energy resolution was .1% and the form factors were measured for excitation energies from 2 to 12 MeV. Thin films of scintillator plastic (.5 mg/cm('2)) were used to detect the fission fragments from a 1 mg/cm('2) UF(,4) target evaporated onto a .240 mg/cm('2) aluminum backing. A prominent, anisotropic threshold peak is seen in the coincident form factors. An analysis of the q-dependence of the data and of the angular correlation indicates the observed strength is E2. Fission threshold for this E2 strength is about 5.7 MeV as compared with 6 MeV for E1 decays. The peak itself is due to the onset of neutron competition at 6.15 MeV. The threshold region, when analyzed using a Gaussian K-distribution to describe the statistical density of K -states near the fission barrier, exhibits a step-like change in the value of K(,0)('2) at .7 MeV above threshold. This indicates a possible energy gap in the E2 transition states. The decay is isotropic above 7.5 MeV excitation energy. From 7 to 11.7 MeV, the distribution of E2/EO strength is relatively flat with the total strength in this region exhausting approximately 10% of an energy weighted sum rule. A comparison with hadron scattering experiments suggests that some of the strength near 11.5 MeV is due to the fission decay of the giant monopole resonance with a fission probability similar to that of E2 transitions.

  11. Prompt atmospheric neutrino flux

    CERN Document Server

    Jeong, Yu Seon; Enberg, Rikard; Kim, C S; Reno, Mary Hall; Sarcevic, Ina; Stasto, Anna

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate the prompt atmospheric neutrino flux including nuclear correction and $B$ hadron contribution in the different frameworks: NLO perturbative QCD and dipole models. The nuclear effect is larger in the prompt neutrino flux than in the total charm production cross section, and it reduces the fluxes by $10\\% - 30\\%$ depending on the model. We also investigate the uncertainty using the QCD scales allowed by the charm cross section data from RHIC and LHC experiments.

  12. Flux pinning in superconductors. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushita, Teruo [Kyushu Institute of Technology, Iizuka, Fukuoka (Japan). Dept. of Computer Science and Electronics

    2014-04-01

    Ideal for graduate students studying superconductivity and experts alike. Written by a researcher with more than 30 years experience in the field. All chapters are completely revised. The book covers the flux pinning mechanisms and properties and the electromagnetic phenomena caused by the flux pinning common for metallic, high-Tc and MgB2 superconductors. The condensation energy interaction known for normal precipitates or grain boundaries and the kinetic energy interaction proposed for artificial Nb pins in Nb-Ti, etc., are introduced for the pinning mechanism. Summation theories to derive the critical current density are discussed in detail. Irreversible magnetization and AC loss caused by the flux pinning are also discussed. The loss originally stems from the ohmic dissipation of normal electrons in the normal core driven by the electric field induced by the flux motion. The readers will learn why the resultant loss is of hysteresis type in spite of such mechanism. The influence of the flux pinning on the vortex phase diagram in high Tc superconductors is discussed, and the dependencies of the irreversibility field are also described on other quantities such as anisotropy of superconductor, specimen size and electric field strength. Recent developments of critical current properties in various high-Tc superconductors and MgB2 are introduced. Other topics are: singularity in the case of transport current in a parallel magnetic field such as deviation from the Josephson relation, reversible flux motion inside pinning potentials which causes deviation from the critical state model prediction, the concept of the minimization of energy dissipation in the flux pinning phenomena which gives the basis for the critical state model, etc. Significant reduction in the AC loss in AC wires with very fine filaments originates from the reversible flux motion which is dominant in the two-dimensional pinning. The concept of minimum energy dissipation explains also the behavior

  13. Analytical Calculation for Air Gap Flux Density of Multi-Pole Permanent Magnetic Brushless DC Motor%多极永磁无刷直流电动机瓦形磁钢气隙磁通密度的解析计算

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟光伟; 李槐树

    2011-01-01

    利用永磁体的等效面电流法,求得多极平行充磁内外圆弧不同圆心不同半径瓦形永磁体在电机定子内表面产生的径向磁通密度的解析计算公式。通过对一台多相无刷直流电动机的解析计算结果与反电动势的实测值比较,验证了电磁场解析计算公式的有效性和正确性。推导给出的内外圆弧不同半径、不同圆心平行充磁瓦形磁钢产生气隙磁场的解析计算公式,解决了平行充磁瓦形磁钢难以获取平顶反电势波形的问题,提高了解析法计算永磁电机气隙磁场和参数的精度,为多极式无刷直流电动机优化设计及性能分析奠定了理论基础。%In this paper,based on equivalent surface current method,analytical formulas for air gap radial flux density of multi-pole brushless DC motor(BLDCM) in stator inner surface is obtained,when magnetic tile model magnetized in parallel is different centers and different radii.By means of comparison of the detecting back EMF waveform of the multi-phase prototype motor,the analytical formula is effective and accurate.The analytical formula of air gap flux density generated by permanent magnet whose shape is different radii and centres is deduced,solving the problem that flat-roofed back EMF waveform is difficult to obtain by magnetic tile model magnetized in parallel,improving the precision of air gap flux density and parameter calculation.All these provide important theory basis for accurately designing and analysing about multi-pole BLDCM.

  14. No evidence of persisting unrepaired nuclear DNA single strand breaks in distinct types of cells in the brain, kidney, and liver of adult mice after continuous eight-week 50 Hz magnetic field exposure with flux density of 0.1 mT or 1.0 mT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubert Korr

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has been hypothesized in the literature that exposure to extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (50 or 60 Hz may lead to human health effects such as childhood leukemia or brain tumors. In a previous study investigating multiple types of cells from brain and kidney of the mouse (Acta Neuropathologica 2004; 107: 257-264, we found increased unrepaired nuclear DNA single strand breaks (nDNA SSB only in epithelial cells of the choroid plexus in the brain using autoradiographic methods after a continuous eight-week 50 Hz magnetic field (MF exposure of adult mice with flux density of 1.5 mT. METHODS: In the present study we tested the hypothesis that MF exposure with lower flux densities (0.1 mT, i.e., the actual exposure limit for the population in most European countries, and 1.0 mT shows similar results to those in the previous study. Experiments and data analysis were carried out in a similar way as in our previous study. RESULTS: Continuous eight-week 50 Hz MF exposure with 0.1 mT or 1.0 mT did not result in increased persisting unrepaired nDNA SSB in distinct types of cells in the brain, kidney, and liver of adult mice. MF exposure with 1.0 mT led to reduced unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS in epithelial cells in the choroid plexus of the fourth ventricle in the brain (EC-CP and epithelial cells of the cortical collecting duct in the kidney, as well as to reduced mtDNA synthesis in neurons of the caudate nucleus in the brain and in EC-CP. CONCLUSION: No evidence was found for increased persisting unrepaired nDNA SSB in distinct types of cells in the brain, kidney, and liver of adult mice after continuous eight-week 50 Hz magnetic field exposure with flux density of 0.1 mT or 1.0 mT.

  15. A correlation consistency based multivariate alarm thresholds optimization approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Huihui; Liu, Feifei; Zhu, Qunxiong

    2016-11-01

    Different alarm thresholds could generate different alarm data, resulting in different correlations. A new multivariate alarm thresholds optimization methodology based on the correlation consistency between process data and alarm data is proposed in this paper. The interpretative structural modeling is adopted to select the key variables. For the key variables, the correlation coefficients of process data are calculated by the Pearson correlation analysis, while the correlation coefficients of alarm data are calculated by kernel density estimation. To ensure the correlation consistency, the objective function is established as the sum of the absolute differences between these two types of correlations. The optimal thresholds are obtained using particle swarm optimization algorithm. Case study of Tennessee Eastman process is given to demonstrate the effectiveness of proposed method.

  16. On the Taxonomy of Flux Vacua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giryavets, Alexander

    2004-04-25

    We investigate several predictions about the properties of IIB flux vacua on Calabi-Yau orientifolds, by constructing and characterizing a very large set of vacua in a specific example, an orientifold of the Calabi-Yau hypersurface in WP{sub 1,1,1,1,4}{sup 4}. We find support for the prediction of Ashok and Douglas that the density of vacua on moduli space is governed by det(-R-{omega}) where R and {omega} are curvature and Kaehler forms on the moduli space. The conifold point {psi} = 1 on moduli space therefore serves as an attractor, with a significant fraction of the flux vacua contained in a small neighborhood surrounding {psi} = 1. We also study the functional dependence of the number of flux vacua on the D3 charge in the fluxes, finding simple power law growth.

  17. Elicitation threshold of cobalt chloride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Louise A; Johansen, Jeanne D; Voelund, Aage

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cobalt is a strong skin sensitizer (grade 5 of 5 in the guinea-pig maximization test) that is used in various industrial and consumer applications. To prevent sensitization to cobalt and elicitation of allergic cobalt dermatitis, information about the elicitation threshold level...... of cobalt is important. OBJECTIVE: To identify the dermatitis elicitation threshold levels in cobalt-allergic individuals. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Published patch test dose-response studies were reviewed to determine the elicitation dose (ED) levels in dermatitis patients with a previous positive patch test...... reaction to cobalt. A logistic dose-response model was applied to data collected from the published literature to estimate ED values. The 95% confidence interval (CI) for the ratio of mean doses that can elicit a reaction in 10% (ED(10)) of a population was calculated with Fieller's method. RESULTS...

  18. Threshold electrodisintegration of 3He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, R. S.; Hotta, A.; Churchwell, S.; Jiang, X.; Peterson, G. A.; Shaw, J.; Asavapibhop, B.; Berisso, M. C.; Bosted, P. E.; Burchesky, K.; Miskimen, R. A.; Rock, S. E.; Nakagawa, I.; Tamae, T.; Suda, T.; Golak, J.; Skibiński, R.; Witała, H.; Casagrande, F.; Turchinetz, W.; Cichocki, A.; Wang, K.; Glöckle, W.; Kamada, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Nogga, A.

    2003-06-01

    Cross sections were measured for the near-threshold electrodisintegration of 3He at momentum transfer values of q=2.4, 4.4, and 4.7 fm-1. From these and prior measurements the transverse and longitudinal response functions RT and RL were deduced. Comparisons are made against previously published and new nonrelativistic A=3 calculations using the best available nucleon-nucleon NN potentials. In general, for q<2 fm-1 these calculations accurately predict the threshold electrodisintegration of 3He. Agreement at increasing q demands consideration of two-body terms, but discrepancies still appear at the highest momentum transfers probed, perhaps due to the neglect of relativistic dynamics, or to the underestimation of high-momentum wave-function components.

  19. Magnetic Flux Controllers for Induction Heating Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Valentin Nemkov; Robert Goldstein; Robert Ruffini

    2004-01-01

    Application of magnetic flux controllers/concentrators to induction heating coils can drastically improve the process efficiency and heat pattern control. Presentation includes: benefits provided by flux controllers, materials available for controllers, application techniques, computer assisted design of induction coils with concentrators, examples of applications. Depending on induction system design, magnetic flux controllers can concentrate heating in a specified area,change heat source distribution and shield a particular part zone or external area preventing unintended eddy current heating.Besides of the coil efficiency improvement and optimal power distribution, magnetic flux controllers reduce the coil current demand from a supplying circuitry thus strongly reducing losses in busswork, cables, transformers and inverter components.Improvement that can be achieved due to magnetic flux controllers is case dependable. 2D and 3D computer simulation allows the designer to predict accurately effect of controllers on the coil parameters and temperature distribution and optimize the whole electromagnetic system. Special attention in presentation is paid to new magnetodielectric materials optimized for induction heating conditions. These materials have high magnetic permeability and saturation flux density,excellent machinability, good chemical and temperature resistance. Concentrators from these materials can work in a wide range of frequencies and specific powers. Examples of magnetic flux controller application include surface hardening of shafts and gears, induction surface hardfacing and brazing.

  20. Threshold enhancement of diphoton resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharucha, Aoife; Djouadi, Abdelhak; Goudelis, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    We revisit a mechanism to enhance the decay width of (pseudo-)scalar resonances to photon pairs when the process is mediated by loops of charged fermions produced near threshold. Motivated by the recent LHC data, indicating the presence of an excess in the diphoton spectrum at approximately 750 GeV, we illustrate this threshold enhancement mechanism in the case of a 750 GeV pseudoscalar boson A with a two-photon decay mediated by a charged and uncolored fermion having a mass at the 1/2MA threshold and a small decay width, photons predominantly through loops of charginos with masses close to 1/2MA and ii) a two Higgs doublet model in which A is again produced by gluon fusion but decays into photons through loops of vector-like charged heavy leptons. In both these scenarios, while the mass of the charged fermion has to be adjusted to be extremely close to half of the A resonance mass, the small total widths are naturally obtained if only suppressed three-body decay channels occur. Finally, the implications of some of these scenarios for dark matter are discussed.

  1. Characterization of ion fluxes and heat fluxes for PMI relevant conditions on Proto-MPEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beers, Clyde; Shaw, Guinevere; Biewer, Theodore; Rapp, Juergen

    2016-10-01

    Plasma characterization, in particular, particle flux and electron and ion temperature distributions nearest to an exposed target, are critical to quantifying Plasma Surface Interaction (PSI). In the Proto-Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (Proto-MPEX), the ion fluxes and heat fluxes are derived from double Langmuir Probes (DLP) and Thomson Scattering in front of the target assuming Bohm conditions at the sheath entrance. Power fluxes derived from ne and Te measurements are compared to heat fluxes measured with IR thermography. The comparison will allow conclusions on the sheath heat transmission coefficient to be made experimentally. Different experimental conditions (low and high density plasmas (0.5 - 6 x 1019 m-3) with different magnetic configuration are compared. This work was supported by the U.S. D.O.E. contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  2. Video Meteor Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell-Brown, M. D.; Braid, D.

    2011-01-01

    The flux of meteoroids, or number of meteoroids per unit area per unit time, is critical for calibrating models of meteoroid stream formation and for estimating the hazard to spacecraft from shower and sporadic meteors. Although observations of meteors in the millimetre to centimetre size range are common, flux measurements (particularly for sporadic meteors, which make up the majority of meteoroid flux) are less so. It is necessary to know the collecting area and collection time for a given set of observations, and to correct for observing biases and the sensitivity of the system. Previous measurements of sporadic fluxes are summarized in Figure 1; the values are given as a total number of meteoroids striking the earth in one year to a given limiting mass. The Gr n et al. (1985) flux model is included in the figure for reference. Fluxes for sporadic meteoroids impacting the Earth have been calculated for objects in the centimeter size range using Super-Schmidt observations (Hawkins & Upton, 1958); this study used about 300 meteors, and used only the physical area of overlap of the cameras at 90 km to calculate the flux, corrected for angular speed of meteors, since a large angular speed reduces the maximum brightness of the meteor on the film, and radiant elevation, which takes into account the geometric reduction in flux when the meteors are not perpendicular to the horizontal. They bring up corrections for both partial trails (which tends to increase the collecting area) and incomplete overlap at heights other than 90 km (which tends to decrease it) as effects that will affect the flux, but estimated that the two effects cancelled one another. Halliday et al. (1984) calculated the flux of meteorite-dropping fireballs with fragment masses greater than 50 g, over the physical area of sky accessible to the MORP fireball cameras, counting only observations in clear weather. In the micron size range, LDEF measurements of small craters on spacecraft have been used to

  3. Modeling of microscale variations in methane fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kettunen, A.

    2002-07-01

    The current study analyzes the different modes of variation in methane fluxes from different microsites of a boreal mire. The results emphasize the importance of microsite characteristics, water table and vegetation cover for methane fluxes. Water level affects the moisture and oxygen profiles in peat matrix which are reflected to methane production and oxidation rates and the corresponding microbial populations. Vascular plants promote methane production by providing substrates in the form of root exudates and fine root litter, enhance methane oxidation by transporting oxygen to water saturated peat layers and accelerate methane transport by liberating methane from peat to the atmosphere via the aerenchymous tissue. The model presented in this study connects the methane fluxes to the seasonal photosynthetic cycle of plants at the microsite level while the thermal and hydrological conditions in peat are used as an operational framework. Overall, the model dynamically combines the microbial processes in peat to changing environmental factors in the level of peatland ecosystem. Sensitivity analysis of the model reveals the importance of substrate supply to methane fluxes. Furthermore, the model outcome is sensitive to increased capability of the vascular plants to transport oxygen downwards. Lack of oxygen and partly methane keep methane oxidation at a very low level. Any changes in model parameters or environmental conditions that compensate for these lacks have a remarkable decreasing effect on simulated flux. Simulated methane flux decreases considerably if the duration of simulated dry period increases, threshold for a dramatic change lying between 4 and 6 weeks of drought. Increase in air temperature enhances methane flux especially if the effect of increased temperature on gross primary production is taken into account. (orig.)

  4. Magnetic flux biasing of magnetostrictive sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhangxian; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2017-05-01

    The performance of magnetostrictive materials, especially those with high initial magnetic permeability and associated low magnetic reluctance, is sensitive to not just the amount of magnetic bias but also how the bias is applied. Terfenol-D and Galfenol have been characterized under constant magnetic field and constant magnetomotive force, which require active control. The application of a magnetic flux bias utilizing permanent magnets allows for robust magnetostrictive systems that require no active control. However, this biasing configuration has not been thoroughly investigated. This study presents flux density versus stress major loops of Terfenol-D and Galfenol at various magnetic flux biases. A new piezomagnetic coefficient {d}33φ is defined as the locally-averaged slope of flux density versus stress. Considering the materials alone, the maximum {d}33φ is 18.42 T GPa-1 and 19.53 T GPa-1 for Terfenol-D and Galfenol, respectively. Compared with the peak piezomagnetic coefficient {d}33* measured under controlled magnetic fields, the piezomagnetic coefficient {d}33φ is 26% and 74% smaller for Terfenol-D and Galfenol, respectively. This study shows that adding parallel magnetic flux paths to low-reluctance magnetostrictive components can partially compensate for the performance loss. With a low carbon steel flux path in parallel to the Galfenol specimen, the maximum {d}33φ increased to 28.33 T GPa-1 corresponding to a 45% improvement compared with the case without a flux path. Due to its low magnetic permeability, Terfenol-D does not benefit from the addition of a parallel flux path.

  5. Threshold resonance and controlled filtering in quantum star graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Turek, Ondřej

    2011-01-01

    We design two simple quantum devices applicable as an adjustable quantum spectral filter and as a flux controller. Their function is based upon the threshold resonance in a F\\"ul\\"op-Tsutsui type star graph with an external potential added on one of the lines. Adjustment of the potential strength directly controls the quantum flow from the input to the output line. This is the first example to date in which the quantum flow control is achieved by addition of an external field not on the channel itself, but on other lines connected to the channel at a vertex.

  6. Electron heat flux instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Sundas; Sarfraz, M.; Yoon, P. H.; Lazar, M.; Qureshi, M. N. S.

    2017-02-01

    The heat flux instability is an electromagnetic mode excited by a relative drift between the protons and two-component core-halo electrons. The most prominent application may be in association with the solar wind where drifting electron velocity distributions are observed. The heat flux instability is somewhat analogous to the electrostatic Buneman or ion-acoustic instability driven by the net drift between the protons and bulk electrons, except that the heat flux instability operates in magnetized plasmas and possesses transverse electromagnetic polarization. The heat flux instability is also distinct from the electrostatic counterpart in that it requires two electron species with relative drifts with each other. In the literature, the heat flux instability is often called the 'whistler' heat flux instability, but it is actually polarized in the opposite sense to the whistler wave. This paper elucidates all of these fundamental plasma physical properties associated with the heat flux instability starting from a simple model, and gradually building up more complexity towards a solar wind-like distribution functions. It is found that the essential properties of the instability are already present in the cold counter-streaming electron model, and that the instability is absent if the protons are ignored. These instability characteristics are highly reminiscent of the electron firehose instability driven by excessive parallel temperature anisotropy, propagating in parallel direction with respect to the ambient magnetic field, except that the free energy source for the heat flux instability resides in the effective parallel pressure provided by the counter-streaming electrons.

  7. Weighted-noise threshold based channel estimation for OFDM systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pallaviram Sure; Chandra Mohan Bhuma

    2015-10-01

    Orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) technology is the key to evolving telecommunication standards including 3GPP-LTE Advanced and WiMAX. Reliability of any OFDM system increases with improvedmean square error performance (MSE) of its channel estimator (CE). Particularly, a least squares (LS) based CE incorporating a time-domain denoising threshold, enables better MSE performance, while avoiding the need for a-priori knowledge of channel statistics (KCS). Existing optimal time-domain thresholds exhibit suboptimal behavior for completely unavailable KCS environments. This is because they involve consistent estimation of one or more KCS parameters, and corresponding estimation errors introduce severe degradation in MSE performance of the CE. To overcome the MSE degradation, this paper proposes a weighted-noise threshold, by introducing a modified hypothesis-testing-problem (HTP) interpretation. Derivation of resulting analytical MSE expression is also provided. Results of OFDM system simulations carried out in rayleigh faded ITU-TU6 and WiMAX-SUI4 channel environments with U-shaped power spectral densities, are presented. The performance results show that, compared to many of the existing thresholds, the proposed threshold renders better MSE performance to the CE and higher reliability to the OFDM system in terms of better bit error rate (BER) performance.

  8. Handling of BLM abort thresholds in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Nebot Del Busto, E; Holzer, EB; Zamantzas, C; Kruk, G; Nordt, A; Sapinski, M; Nemcic, M; Orecka, A; Jackson, S; Roderick, C; Skaugen, A

    2011-01-01

    The Beam Loss Monitoring system (BLM) for the LHC consists of about 3600 Ionization Chambers (IC) located around the ring. Its main purpose is to request a beam abort when the measured losses exceed a certain threshold. The BLM detectors integrate the measured signals in 12 different time intervals (running from 40us to 83.8s) enabling for a different set of abort thresholds depending on the duration of the beam loss. Furthermore, 32 energy levels running from 450GeV to 7TeV account for the fact that the energy density of a particle shower increases with the energy of the primary particle, i.e. the beam energy. Thus, a set of ! 3600 × 12 × 32 = 1.3 · 106 thresholds must be handled. These thresholds are highly critical for the safety of the machine and depend to a large part on human judgment, which cannot be replaced by automatic test procedures. The BLM team has defined well established procedures to compute, set and check new BLM thresholds, in order to avoid and/or find non-conformities due to manipulat...

  9. Road density

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Road density is generally highly correlated with amount of developed land cover. High road densities usually indicate high levels of ecological disturbance. More...

  10. Non-Gaussian properties of global momentum and particle fluxes in a cylindrical laboratory plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagashima, Yoshihiko; Yamada, Takuma [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8561 (Japan); Itoh Research Center for Plasma Turbulence, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Itoh, Sanae-I.; Inagaki, Shigeru; Fujisawa, Akihide; Yagi, Masatoshi [Itoh Research Center for Plasma Turbulence, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Arakawa, Hiroyuki [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Kasuya, Naohiro; Itoh, Kimitaka [Itoh Research Center for Plasma Turbulence, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Kamataki, Kunihiro [Center for Research and Advancement in Higher Education, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Shinohara, Shunjiro [Institute of Engineering, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei 184-8588 (Japan); Oldenbuerger, Stella [Itoh Research Center for Plasma Turbulence, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Takase, Yuichi [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8561 (Japan); Diamond, Patrick H. [Itoh Research Center for Plasma Turbulence, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Non-Gaussian statistical properties of the azimuthally averaged momentum and particle fluxes driven by turbulence have been simultaneously observed in inhomogeneous magnetized plasmas for the first time. We identified the stretched Gaussian distribution of the both fluxes and the transition from the point-wise distribution to averaged ones was confirmed. The change of the particle flux precedes that of the momentum flux, demonstrating that the momentum flux is induced by the relaxation of density gradient.

  11. The Topology of Canonical Flux Tubes in Flared Jet Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander Lavine, Eric; You, Setthivoine

    2017-01-01

    Magnetized plasma jets are generally modeled as magnetic flux tubes filled with flowing plasma governed by magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). We outline here a more fundamental approach based on flux tubes of canonical vorticity, where canonical vorticity is defined as the circulation of the species’ canonical momentum. This approach extends the concept of magnetic flux tube evolution to include the effects of finite particle momentum and enables visualization of the topology of plasma jets in regimes beyond MHD. A flared, current-carrying magnetic flux tube in an ion-electron plasma with finite ion momentum is thus equivalent to either a pair of electron and ion flow flux tubes, a pair of electron and ion canonical momentum flux tubes, or a pair of electron and ion canonical vorticity flux tubes. We examine the morphology of all these flux tubes for increasing electrical currents, different radial current profiles, different electron Mach numbers, and a fixed, flared, axisymmetric magnetic geometry. Calculations of gauge-invariant relative canonical helicities track the evolution of magnetic, cross, and kinetic helicities in the system, and show that ion flow fields can unwind to compensate for an increasing magnetic twist. The results demonstrate that including a species’ finite momentum can result in a very long collimated canonical vorticity flux tube even if the magnetic flux tube is flared. With finite momentum, particle density gradients must be normal to canonical vorticities, not to magnetic fields, so observations of collimated astrophysical jets could be images of canonical vorticity flux tubes instead of magnetic flux tubes.

  12. 40 CFR 98.361 - Reporting threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Manure Management § 98.361 Reporting threshold. Livestock facilities must report GHG emissions under this subpart if the facility meets the reporting threshold as defined in...

  13. String instantons, fluxes and moduli stabilization

    CERN Document Server

    Camara, P G; Maillard, T; Pradisi, G

    2007-01-01

    We analyze a class of dual pairs of heterotic and type I models based on freely-acting $\\mathbb{Z}_2 \\times \\mathbb{Z}_2$ orbifolds in four dimensions. Using the adiabatic argument, it is possible to calculate non-perturbative contributions to the gauge coupling threshold corrections on the type I side by exploiting perturbative calculations on the heterotic side, without the drawbacks due to twisted moduli. The instanton effects can then be combined with closed-string fluxes to stabilize most of the moduli fields of the internal manifold, and also the dilaton, in a racetrack realization of the type I model.

  14. Threshold Effects And Perturbative Unification

    CERN Document Server

    Bastero-Gil, M; Pérez-Mercader, J

    1995-01-01

    We discuss the effect of the renormalization procedure in the computation of the unification point for running coupling constants. We explore the effects of threshold--crossing on the $\\beta$--functions. We compute the running of the coupling constants of the Standard Model, between $m_Z$ and $M_P$, using a mass dependent subtraction procedure, and then compare the results with $\\bar{MS}$, and with the $\\theta$-- function approximation. We also do this for the Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model. In the latter, the bounds on susy masses that one obtains by requiring perturbative unification are dependent, to some extent, on the procedure.

  15. Circular threshold quantum secret sharing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Yu-Guang; Wen Qiao-Yan

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a circular threshold quantum secret sharing (TQSS) scheme with polarized single photons.A polarized single photon sequence runs circularly among any t or more of n parties and any t or more of n parties can reconstruct the secret key when they collaborate.It shows that entanglement is not necessary for quantum secret sharing.Moreover,the theoretic efficiency is improved to approach 100% as the single photons carrying the secret key are deterministically forwarded among any t or more of n parties,and each photon can carry one bit of information without quantum storage.This protocol is feasible with current technology.

  16. Ultra-low threshold polariton condensation

    CERN Document Server

    Steger, Mark; Alberi, Kirstin; Mascarenhas, Angelo; Snoke, David W; Pfeiffer, Loren N; West, Ken

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate condensation of microcavity polaritons with a very sharp threshold occuring at two orders of magnitude lower pump intensity than previous demonstrations of condensation. The long cavity-lifetime and trapping and pumping geometries are crucial to the realization of this low threshold. Polariton condensation, or "polariton lasing" has long been proposed as a promising source of coherent light at lower threshold than traditional lasing, and these results suggest methods to bring this threshold even lower.

  17. Phased arrays: A strategy to lower the energy threshold for neutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wissel Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In-ice radio arrays are optimized for detecting the highest energy, cosmogenic neutrinos expected to be produced though cosmic ray interactions with background photons. However, there are two expected populations of high energy neutrinos: the astrophysical flux observed by IceCube (~1 PeV and the cosmogenic flux (~ 1017 eV or 100 PeV. Typical radio arrays employ a noise-riding trigger, which limits their minimum energy threshold based on the background noise temperature of the ice. Phased radio arrays could lower the energy threshold by combining the signals from several channels before triggering, thereby improving the signal-to-noise at the trigger level. Reducing the energy threshold would allow radio experiments to more efficiently overlap with optical Cherenkov neutrino telescopes as well as for more efficient searches for cosmogenic neutrinos. We discuss the proposed technique and prototypical phased arrays deployed in an anechoic chamber and at Greenland’s Summit Station.

  18. Magnetic contrast in threshold photoemission electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veghel, Marinus Godefridus Adrianus van

    2004-01-01

    In threshold photoemission electron microscopy (threshold PEEM), photoelectrons are excited by UV photons with an energy just above the photoemission threshold. The lateral intensity distribution of these electrons is then imaged by an electrostatic lens system. In this thesis, the possibilities o

  19. Threshold Concepts in Finance: Student Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoadley, Susan; Kyng, Tim; Tickle, Leonie; Wood, Leigh N.

    2015-01-01

    Finance threshold concepts are the essential conceptual knowledge that underpin well-developed financial capabilities and are central to the mastery of finance. In this paper we investigate threshold concepts in finance from the point of view of students, by establishing the extent to which students are aware of threshold concepts identified by…

  20. Threshold Concepts in Finance: Student Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoadley, Susan; Kyng, Tim; Tickle, Leonie; Wood, Leigh N.

    2015-01-01

    Finance threshold concepts are the essential conceptual knowledge that underpin well-developed financial capabilities and are central to the mastery of finance. In this paper we investigate threshold concepts in finance from the point of view of students, by establishing the extent to which students are aware of threshold concepts identified by…

  1. Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, D. R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration. The instruments used are: • a fast-response, three-dimensional (3D) wind sensor (sonic anemometer) to obtain the orthogonal wind components and the speed of sound (SOS) (used to derive the air temperature) • an open-path infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) to obtain the water vapor density and the CO2 concentration, and • an open-path infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) to obtain methane density and methane flux at one SGP EF and at the NSA CF. The ECOR systems are deployed at the locations where other methods for surface flux measurements (e.g., energy balance Bowen ratio [EBBR] systems) are difficult to employ, primarily at the north edge of a field of crops. A Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) has been installed collocated with each deployed ECOR system in SGP, NSA, Tropical Western Pacific (TWP), ARM Mobile Facility 1 (AMF1), and ARM Mobile Facility 2 (AMF2). The surface energy balance system consists of upwelling and downwelling solar and infrared radiometers within one net radiometer, a wetness sensor, and soil measurements. The SEBS measurements allow the comparison of ECOR sensible and latent heat fluxes with the energy balance determined from the SEBS and provide information on wetting of the sensors for data quality purposes. The SEBS at one SGP and one NSA site also support upwelling and downwelling PAR measurements to qualify those two locations as Ameriflux sites.

  2. Magnetic flux concentration and zonal flows in magnetorotational instability turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Xue-Ning [Institute for Theory and Computation, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-51, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Stone, James M., E-mail: xbai@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2014-11-20

    Accretion disks are likely threaded by external vertical magnetic flux, which enhances the level of turbulence via the magnetorotational instability (MRI). Using shearing-box simulations, we find that such external magnetic flux also strongly enhances the amplitude of banded radial density variations known as zonal flows. Moreover, we report that vertical magnetic flux is strongly concentrated toward low-density regions of the zonal flow. Mean vertical magnetic field can be more than doubled in low-density regions, and reduced to nearly zero in high-density regions in some cases. In ideal MHD, the scale on which magnetic flux concentrates can reach a few disk scale heights. In the non-ideal MHD regime with strong ambipolar diffusion, magnetic flux is concentrated into thin axisymmetric shells at some enhanced level, whose size is typically less than half a scale height. We show that magnetic flux concentration is closely related to the fact that the turbulent diffusivity of the MRI turbulence is anisotropic. In addition to a conventional Ohmic-like turbulent resistivity, we find that there is a correlation between the vertical velocity and horizontal magnetic field fluctuations that produces a mean electric field that acts to anti-diffuse the vertical magnetic flux. The anisotropic turbulent diffusivity has analogies to the Hall effect, and may have important implications for magnetic flux transport in accretion disks. The physical origin of magnetic flux concentration may be related to the development of channel flows followed by magnetic reconnection, which acts to decrease the mass-to-flux ratio in localized regions. The association of enhanced zonal flows with magnetic flux concentration may lead to global pressure bumps in protoplanetary disks that helps trap dust particles and facilitates planet formation.

  3. Threshold temperature optical fibre sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasiewicz, K. A.; Musial, J. E.

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a new approach to manufacture a threshold temperature sensor based on a biconical optical fibre taper. The presented sensor employs the influence of variable state of concentration of some isotropic materials like wax or paraffin. Application of the above- mentioned materials is an attempt to prove that there is a possibility to obtain a low-cost, repeatable and smart sensor working as an in-line element. Optical fibre taper was obtained from a standard single mode fibre (SMF28®) by using a low pressure gas burner technique. The diameter of the manufactured tapers was 6.0 ± 0.5 μm with the length of elongation equal to 30.50 ± 0.16 mm. The applied technology allowed to produce tapers with the losses of 0.183 ± 0.015 dB. Application of materials with different temperature transition points made it possible to obtain the threshold work at the temperatures connected directly with their conversion temperature. External materials at the temperatures above their melting points do not influence the propagation losses. For each of them two types of the protection area and position of the optical fibre taper were applied.

  4. Net Ecosystem Carbon Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Net Ecosystem Carbon Flux is defined as the year-over-year change in Total Ecosystem Carbon Stock, or the net rate of carbon exchange between an ecosystem and the...

  5. Aeronet Solar Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SolRad-Net (Solar Radiation Network) is an established network of ground-based sensors providing high-frequency solar flux measurements in quasi-realtime to the...

  6. Flux in Tallinn

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    Rahvusvahelise elektroonilise kunsti sümpoosioni ISEA2004 klubiõhtu "Flux in Tallinn" klubis Bon Bon. Eestit esindasid Ropotator, Ars Intel Inc., Urmas Puhkan, Joel Tammik, Taavi Tulev (pseud. Wochtzchee). Klubiõhtu koordinaator Andres Lõo

  7. Flux in Tallinn

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    Rahvusvahelise elektroonilise kunsti sümpoosioni ISEA2004 klubiõhtu "Flux in Tallinn" klubis Bon Bon. Eestit esindasid Ropotator, Ars Intel Inc., Urmas Puhkan, Joel Tammik, Taavi Tulev (pseud. Wochtzchee). Klubiõhtu koordinaator Andres Lõo

  8. Nitrous Oxide Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Nitrous Oxide (N20) flux is the net rate of nitrous oxide exchange between an ecosystem and the atmosphere. Data of this variable were generated by the USGS...

  9. Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory — The Southern Great Plains (SGP) carbon dioxide flux (CO2 flux) measurement systems provide half-hour average fluxes of CO2, H2O (latent heat), and sensible heat. The...

  10. Flux Emergence (Theory)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Mark C. M.; Isobe, Hiroaki

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic flux emergence from the solar convection zone into the overlying atmosphere is the driver of a diverse range of phenomena associated with solar activity. In this article, we introduce theoretical concepts central to the study of flux emergence and discuss how the inclusion of different physical effects (e.g., magnetic buoyancy, magnetoconvection, reconnection, magnetic twist, interaction with ambient field) in models impact the evolution of the emerging field and plasma.

  11. Theoretical magnetic flux emergence

    OpenAIRE

    MacTaggart, David

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic flux emergence is the subject of how magnetic fields from the solar interior can rise and expand into the atmosphere to produce active regions. It is the link that joins dynamics in the convection zone with dynamics in the atmosphere. In this thesis, we study many aspects of magnetic flux emergence through mathematical modelling and computer simulations. Our primary aim is to understand the key physical processes that lie behind emergence. The first chapter intro...

  12. Flux Emergence (Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark C. M. Cheung

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic flux emergence from the solar convection zone into the overlying atmosphere is the driver of a diverse range of phenomena associated with solar activity. In this article, we introduce theoretical concepts central to the study of flux emergence and discuss how the inclusion of different physical effects (e.g., magnetic buoyancy, magnetoconvection, reconnection, magnetic twist, interaction with ambient field in models impact the evolution of the emerging field and plasma.

  13. Lung density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garnett, E S; Webber, C E; Coates, G

    1977-01-01

    The density of a defined volume of the human lung can be measured in vivo by a new noninvasive technique. A beam of gamma-rays is directed at the lung and, by measuring the scattered gamma-rays, lung density is calculated. The density in the lower lobe of the right lung in normal man during quiet...... breathing in the sitting position ranged from 0.25 to 0.37 g.cm-3. Subnormal values were found in patients with emphsema. In patients with pulmonary congestion and edema, lung density values ranged from 0.33 to 0.93 g.cm-3. The lung density measurement correlated well with the findings in chest radiographs...... but the lung density values were more sensitive indices. This was particularly evident in serial observations of individual patients....

  14. Orientability thresholds for random hypergraphs

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Pu

    2010-01-01

    Let $h>w>0$ be two fixed integers. Let $\\orH$ be a random hypergraph whose hyperedges are all of cardinality $h$. To {\\em $w$-orient} a hyperedge, we assign exactly $w$ of its vertices positive signs with respect to the hyperedge, and the rest negative. A $(w,k)$-orientation of $\\orH$ consists of a $w$-orientation of all hyperedges of $\\orH$, such that each vertex receives at most $k$ positive signs from its incident hyperedges. When $k$ is large enough, we determine the threshold of the existence of a $(w,k)$-orientation of a random hypergraph. The $(w,k)$-orientation of hypergraphs is strongly related to a general version of the off-line load balancing problem. The graph case, when $h=2$ and $w=1$, was solved recently by Cain, Sanders and Wormald and independently by Fernholz and Ramachandran, which settled a conjecture of Karp and Saks.

  15. Connectivity threshold for Bluetooth graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Broutin, Nicolas; Fraiman, Nicolas; Lugosi, Gábor

    2011-01-01

    We study the connectivity properties of random Bluetooth graphs that model certain "ad hoc" wireless networks. The graphs are obtained as "irrigation subgraphs" of the well-known random geometric graph model. There are two parameters that control the model: the radius $r$ that determines the "visible neighbors" of each node and the number of edges $c$ that each node is allowed to send to these. The randomness comes from the underlying distribution of data points in space and from the choices of each vertex. We prove that no connectivity can take place with high probability for a range of parameters $r, c$ and completely characterize the connectivity threshold (in $c$) for values of $r$ close the critical value for connectivity in the underlying random geometric graph.

  16. Sesame allergy threshold dose distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dano, D; Remington, B C; Astier, C; Baumert, J L; Kruizinga, A G; Bihain, B E; Taylor, S L; Kanny, G

    2015-09-01

    Sesame is a relevant food allergen in France. Compared to other allergens there is a lack of food challenge data and more data could help sesame allergy risk management. The aim of this study is to collect more sesame challenge data and investigate the most efficient food challenge method for future studies. Records of patients at University Hospital in Nancy (France) with objective symptoms to sesame challenges were collected and combined with previously published data. An estimation of the sesame allergy population threshold was calculated based on individual NOAELs and LOAELs. Clinical dosing schemes at Nancy were investigated to see if the optimal protocol for sesame is currently used. Fourteen patients (10 M/4 F, 22 ± 14.85 years old) with objective symptoms were added to previously published data making a total of 35 sesame allergic patients. The most sensitive patient reacted to the first dose at challenge of 1.02 mg sesame protein. The ED05 ranges between 1.2 and 4.0 mg of sesame protein (Log-Normal, Log-Logistic, and Weibull models) and the ED10 between 4.2 and 6.2 mg. The optimal food challenge dosing scheme for sesame follows semi-log dose increases from 0.3 to 3000 mg protein. This article provides a valuable update to the existing clinical literature regarding sesame NOAELs and LOAELs. Establishment of a population threshold for sesame could help in increasing the credibility of precautionary labelling and decrease the costs associated with unexpected allergic reactions. Also, the use of an optimal dosing scheme would decrease time spent on diagnostic and thereafter on the economic burden of sesame allergy diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. New evidence for flux cutting in type II superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, David

    New evidence is presented for cross flow and cutting of nonparallel flux lines in type-II superconductors. A dramatic reversal is observed in the evolution of the axial flux density in the cavity of a hollow cylinder when the magnitude of a helical magnetic field is increased or decreased along the cylinder surfaces. Measurements of the concurrent evolution of the axial flux density threading the cylinder wall complement the above data. These two phenomena are explained, based on the ideas of two way traffic of sublattices of nonparallel flux lines traversing each other via flux line cutting processes. The classical critical state concept is reviewed and the essential features of the flux cutting process, cross traversal of flux line sheets, and attendant breathing modes are outlined. A generalized critical state model incorporating a phenomenological framework based on Maxwell's equations, standard physical constraints, and two separate energy dissipation mechanisms is summarized. Data curves are presented and it is shown in qualitative detail that the observed behavior demonstrates that flux line cutting occurs and associated breathing in and out of nonparallel flux lines takes places across the surface of type-II superconductors subjected to a varying helical magnetic field.

  18. Design of a Modular E-Core Flux Concentrating Axial Flux Machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husain, Tausif; Sozer, Yilmaz; Husain, Iqbal; Muljadi, Eduard

    2015-09-02

    In this paper a novel E-Core axial flux machine is proposed. The machine has a double stator-single rotor configuration with flux concentrating ferrite magnets, and pole windings across each leg of an E-Core stator. E-Core stators with the proposed flux-concentrating rotor arrangement result in better magnet utilization and higher torque density. The machine also has a modular structure facilitating simpler construction. This paper presents a single phase and a three-phase version of the E-Core machine. Case study for a 1.1 kW, 400 rpm machine for both the single phase and three-phase axial flux machine is presented. The results are verified through 3D finite element analysis.

  19. Density-Gradient-Driven trapped-electron-modes in improved-confinement RFP plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, James

    2016-10-01

    Short wavelength density fluctuations in improved-confinement MST plasmas exhibit multiple features characteristic of the trapped-electron-mode (TEM), strong evidence that drift wave turbulence emerges in RFP plasmas when transport associated with MHD tearing is reduced. Core transport in the RFP is normally governed by magnetic stochasticity stemming from long wavelength tearing modes that arise from current profile peaking. Using inductive control, the tearing modes are reduced and global confinement is increased to values expected for a comparable tokamak plasma. The improved confinement is associated with a large increase in the pressure gradient that can destabilize drift waves. The measured density fluctuations have frequencies >50 kHz, wavenumbers k_phi*rho_sglobal tearing modes. Their amplitude increases with the local density gradient, and they exhibit a density-gradient threshold at R/L_n 15, higher than in tokamak plasmas by R/a. the GENE code, modified for RFP equilibria, predicts the onset of microinstability for these strong-gradient plasma conditions. The density-gradient-driven TEM is the dominant instability in the region where the measured density fluctuations are largest, and the experimental threshold-gradient is close to the predicted critical gradient for linear stability. While nonlinear analysis shows a large Dimits shift associated with predicted strong zonal flows, the inclusion of residual magnetic fluctuations causes a collapse of the zonal flows and an increase in the predicted transport to a level close to the experimentally measured heat flux. Similar circumstances could occur in the edge region of tokamak plasmas when resonant magnetic perturbations are applied for the control of ELMs. Work supported by US DOE.

  20. Basal magnetic flux and the local solar dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Stenflo, J O

    2012-01-01

    The average unsigned magnetic flux density in magnetograms of the quiet Sun is generally dominated by instrumental noise. Due to the entirely different scaling behavior of the noise and the solar magnetic pattern it has been possible to determine the standard deviation of the Gaussian noise distribution and remove the noise contribution from the average unsigned flux density for the whole 15-yr SOHO/MDI data set and for a selection of SDO/HMI magnetograms. There is a very close correlation between the MDI disk-averaged unsigned vertical flux density and the sunspot number, and regression analysis gives a residual level of 2.7 G when the sunspot number is zero. The selected set of HMI magnetograms, which spans the most quiet phase of solar activity, has a lower limit of 3.0 G to the noise-corrected average flux density. These apparently cycle-independent levels may be identified as a basal flux density, which represents an upper limit to the possible flux contribution from a local dynamo, but not evidence for ...

  1. Flux-Feedback Magnetic-Suspension Actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groom, Nelson J.

    1990-01-01

    Flux-feedback magnetic-suspension actuator provides magnetic suspension and control forces having linear transfer characteristics between force command and force output over large range of gaps. Hall-effect devices used as sensors for electronic feedback circuit controlling currents flowing in electromagnetic windings to maintain flux linking suspended element at substantially constant value independent of changes in length of gap. Technique provides effective method for maintenance of constant flux density in gap and simpler than previous methods. Applications include magnetic actuators for control of shapes and figures of antennas and of precise segmented reflectors, magnetic suspensions in devices for storage of angular momentum and/or kinetic energy, and systems for control, pointing, and isolation of instruments.

  2. Density perturbations with relativistic thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Maartens, R

    1997-01-01

    We investigate cosmological density perturbations in a covariant and gauge- invariant formalism, incorporating relativistic causal thermodynamics to give a self-consistent description. The gradient of density inhomogeneities splits covariantly into a scalar part, a rotational vector part that is determined by the vorticity, and a tensor part that describes the shape. We give the evolution equations for these parts in the general dissipative case. Causal thermodynamics gives evolution equations for viswcous stress and heat flux, which are coupled to the density perturbation equation and to the entropy and temperature perturbation equations. We give the full coupled system in the general dissipative case, and simplify the system in certain cases.

  3. 密度修正对冬小麦/夏玉米轮作田潜热、CO2通量及其能量闭合度的影响%Influence of density correction on latent heat, CO2 flux and energy balance closure in winter wheat/summer maize rotation fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王娟; 曹元元; 张志广; 姜永超; 王建林

    2016-01-01

    Demonstration Farm of Qingdao Agricultural University. The CO2, water vapor and heat fluxes were measured during both winter wheat and summer maize growing seasons using the eddy covariance method and the values corrected by two density correction methods (WPL correction and Liu correction), and then the difference between the two methods compared. An energy balance closure was also computed during bare and vegetation cover periods of both winter wheat and summer maize based on the two density correction methods. It was found that both of the two methods (WPL correction and Liu correction) increased the amount of latent heat flux. WPL correction method increased latent heat flux by about 6%for summer maize season and 2%for winter wheat season, while Liu correction method increased latent heat flux by less than 1%for summer maize season and about 2%for winter wheat season. WPL correction method reduced the amount of CO2 flux by less than 3%for summer maize and 4%for winter wheat. Also the Liu correction method reduced the amount of CO2 by about 2%for summer maize and 3%for winter wheat. There was little difference (about 1%) between the two correction methods for the correction of both latent heat and CO2 fluxes. The two correction methods had the potential to increase energy balance closure. WPL correction obviously increased energy balance closure by about 2.53%-9.76%for bare soil, by 4.05%for summer maize and by 1.35%for winter wheat. Then Liu correction increased energy balance closure by less than 2.53% for bare soil and 1.35% for both summer maize and winter wheat seasons. This suggested that the degree of correction by WPL method was greater than that by Liu method. Energy balance closure during bare soil period was obviously higher than that during vegetation cover period. The order of the energy balance closure was: bare soilⅠ(before maize seed emergency)>bare soil Ⅱ (before winter wheat seed emergency)>summer maize vegetation period>winter wheat vegetation period.

  4. Flux avalanches in Nb superconducting shifted strip arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Y.; Mawatari, Y.; Ibuka, J.; Tada, S.; Pyon, S.; Nagasawa, S.; Hidaka, M.; Maezawa, M.; Tamegai, T.

    2013-09-01

    Flux penetrations into three-dimensional Nb superconducting strip arrays, where two layers of strip arrays are stacked by shifting a half period, are studied using a magneto-optical imaging method. Flux avalanches are observed when the overlap between the top and bottom layers is large even if the width of each strip is well below the threshold value. In addition, anomalous linear avalanches perpendicular to the strip are observed in the shifted strip array when the overlap is very large and the thickness of the superconductor is greater than the penetration depth. We discuss possible origins for the flux avalanches, including linear ones, by considering flux penetration calculated by the Campbell method assuming the Bean model.

  5. The Flux-Flux Correlation Function for Anharmonic Barriers

    CERN Document Server

    Goussev, Arseni; Waalkens, Holger; Wiggins, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    The flux-flux correlation function formalism is a standard and widely used approach for the computation of reaction rates. In this paper we introduce a method to compute the classical and quantum flux-flux correlation functions for anharmonic barriers essentially analytically through the use of the classical and quantum normal forms. In the quantum case we show that the quantum normal form reduces the computation of the flux-flux correlation function to that of an effective one dimensional anharmonic barrier. The example of the computation of the quantum flux-flux correlation function for a fourth order anharmonic barrier is worked out in detail, and we present an analytical expression for the quantum mechanical microcanonical flux-flux correlation function. We then give a discussion of the short-time and harmonic limits.

  6. Molecular crowding defines a common origin for the Warburg effect in proliferating cells and the lactate threshold in muscle physiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexei Vazquez

    Full Text Available Aerobic glycolysis is a seemingly wasteful mode of ATP production that is seen both in rapidly proliferating mammalian cells and highly active contracting muscles, but whether there is a common origin for its presence in these widely different systems is unknown. To study this issue, here we develop a model of human central metabolism that incorporates a solvent capacity constraint of metabolic enzymes and mitochondria, accounting for their occupied volume densities, while assuming glucose and/or fatty acid utilization. The model demonstrates that activation of aerobic glycolysis is favored above a threshold metabolic rate in both rapidly proliferating cells and heavily contracting muscles, because it provides higher ATP yield per volume density than mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. In the case of muscle physiology, the model also predicts that before the lactate switch, fatty acid oxidation increases, reaches a maximum, and then decreases to zero with concomitant increase in glucose utilization, in agreement with the empirical evidence. These results are further corroborated by a larger scale model, including biosynthesis of major cell biomass components. The larger scale model also predicts that in proliferating cells the lactate switch is accompanied by activation of glutaminolysis, another distinctive feature of the Warburg effect. In conclusion, intracellular molecular crowding is a fundamental constraint for cell metabolism in both rapidly proliferating- and non-proliferating cells with high metabolic demand. Addition of this constraint to metabolic flux balance models can explain several observations of mammalian cell metabolism under steady state conditions.

  7. Flux pinning characteristics and irreversibility line in high temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, T.; Ihara, N.; Kiuchi, M.

    1995-01-01

    The flux pinning properties in high temperature superconductors are strongly influenced by thermally activated flux motion. The scaling relation of the pinning force density and the irreversibility line in various high temperature superconductors are numerically analyzed in terms of the flux creep model. The effect of two factors, i.e., the flux pinning strength and the dimensionality of the material, on these properties are investigated. It is speculated that the irreversibility line in Bi-2212 superconductors is one order of magnitude smaller than that in Y-123, even if the flux pinning strength in Bi-2212 is improved up to the level of Y-123. It is concluded that these two factors are equally important in determination of the flux pinning characteristics at high temperatures.

  8. Imperfect nesting in unconventional density waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dóra, Balázs; Virosztek, Attila; Maki, Kazumi

    2002-03-01

    Recently, we have shown that unconventional charge density wave (UCDW) is the most likely candidate for the unidentified low-temperature phase (LTP) in α-(ET)2 salts. In particular, UCDW describes reasonably well the temperature dependence of the threshold electric field of LTP in α-(ET)2KHg(SCN)4. Here, we shall show that the imperfect nesting in UCDW is crucial to further improve the theoretical description of the threshold electric field.

  9. Protected Flux Pairing Qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Matthew; Zhang, Wenyuan; Ioffe, Lev; Gershenson, Michael

    2014-03-01

    We have studied the coherent flux tunneling in a qubit containing two submicron Josephson junctions shunted by a superinductor (a dissipationless inductor with an impedance much greater than the resistance quantum). The two low energy quantum states of this device, " open="|"> 0 and " open="|"> 1, are represented by even and odd number of fluxes in the loop, respectively. This device is dual to the charge pairing Josephson rhombi qubit. The spectrum of the device, studied by microwave spectroscopy, reflects the interference between coherent quantum phase slips in the two junctions (the Aharonov-Casher effect). The time domain measurements demonstrate the suppression of the qubit's energy relaxation in the protected regime, which illustrates the potential of this flux pairing device as a protected quantum circuit. Templeton Foundation, NSF, and ARO.

  10. Synchronized flux limiting for gas dynamics variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, Christoph; Kuzmin, Dmitri

    2016-12-01

    This work addresses the design of failsafe flux limiters for systems of conserved quantities and derived variables in numerical schemes for the equations of gas dynamics. Building on Zalesak's multidimensional flux-corrected transport (FCT) algorithm, we construct a new positivity-preserving limiter for the density, total energy, and pressure. The bounds for the underlying inequality constraints are designed to enforce local maximum principles in regions of strong density variations and become less restrictive in smooth regions. The proposed approach leads to closed-form expressions for the synchronized correction factors without the need to solve inequality-constrained optimization problems. A numerical study is performed for the compressible Euler equations discretized using a finite element based FCT scheme.

  11. Solar Magnetic Flux Ropes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Boris Filippov; Olesya Martsenyuk; Abhishek K. Srivastava; Wahab Uddin

    2015-03-01

    In the early 1990s, it was found that the strongest disturbances of the space–weather were associated with huge ejections of plasma from the solar corona, which took the form of magnetic clouds when moved from the Sun. It is the collisions of the magnetic clouds with the Earth's magnetosphere that lead to strong, sometimes catastrophic changes in space–weather. The onset of a coronal mass ejection (CME) is sudden and no reliable forerunners of CMEs have been found till date. The CME prediction methodologies are less developed compared to the methods developed for the prediction of solar flares. The most probable initial magnetic configuration of a CME is a flux rope consisting of twisted field lines which fill the whole volume of a dark coronal cavity. The flux ropes can be in stable equilibrium in the coronal magnetic field for weeks and even months, but suddenly they lose their stability and erupt with high speed. Their transition to the unstable phase depends on the parameters of the flux rope (i.e., total electric current, twist, mass loading, etc.), as well as on the properties of the ambient coronal magnetic field. One of the major governing factors is the vertical gradient of the coronal magnetic field, which is estimated as decay index (). Cold dense prominence material can be collected in the lower parts of the helical flux tubes. Filaments are, therefore, good tracers of the flux ropes in the corona, which become visible long before the beginning of the eruption. The perspectives of the filament eruptions and following CMEs can be estimated by a comparison of observed filament heights with calculated decay index distributions. The present paper reviews the formation of magnetic flux ropes, their stable and unstable phases, eruption conditions, and also discusses their physical implications in the solar corona.

  12. Image Segmentation by Using Threshold Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Al-amri, Salem Saleh; D., Khamitkar S

    2010-01-01

    This paper attempts to undertake the study of segmentation image techniques by using five threshold methods as Mean method, P-tile method, Histogram Dependent Technique (HDT), Edge Maximization Technique (EMT) and visual Technique and they are compared with one another so as to choose the best technique for threshold segmentation techniques image. These techniques applied on three satellite images to choose base guesses for threshold segmentation image.

  13. Effect of Grain Size on the Threshold Voltage for Double-Gate Polycrystaline Silicon MOSFET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alka Panwar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of grain size (D on the threshold voltage (Vth for double gate polycrystalline silicon MOSFET is investigated theoretically in terms of grain boundary trap states (NT. It is found that the threshold voltage (Vth increases non-linearly with increasing silicon-oxide thickness (tox for all values of grain size (D. However the threshold voltage is seen to have smaller values for same tox for the larger grains. This may be attributed to the reduction in the number of trap states in the depletion regions on either side of a grain boundary. Finally the dependence of threshold voltage (Vth on various parameters such as the doping concentration, interface trap state density and field penetration from drain to source are explored out. The results of these findings are in good agreement with those available in the literature. For large grain poly silicon MOSFET the threshold voltage is seen to approach the single crystal value.

  14. Reduction of Decoherence in the Flux Qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-08

    110.147002 J. Aumentado, K. W. Murch, L. Friedland, I. Siddiqi, R. Vijay, I. Barth, O. Naaman. Quantum fluctuations in the chirped pendulum , Nature...from the reversal of spins on the upper and lower surfaces of the superconducting films. Flux noise has a spectral density that scales as 1/f...fα noise via spin reversals with a broad range of time constants. The temperature dependent exponent α(T) approaches unity as the temperature is

  15. Models of Flux Tubes from Constrained Relaxation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Α. Mangalam; V. Krishan

    2000-09-01

    We study the relaxation of a compressible plasma to an equilibrium with flow. The constraints of conservation of mass, energy, angular momentum, cross-helicity and relative magnetic helicity are imposed. Equilibria corresponding to the energy extrema while conserving these invariants for parallel flows yield three classes of solutions and one of them with an increasing radial density profile, relevant to solar flux tubes is presented.

  16. Flux dependence of deuterium retention in single crystal tungsten

    CERN Document Server

    Poon, M; Davis, J W; Haasz, A A

    2002-01-01

    The retention of deuterium in single crystal tungsten has been measured as a function of the incident ion flux in the range of 1x10 sup 1 sup 7 -5x10 sup 1 sup 9 D sup + /m sup 2 s at 300 K. Incident D sub 3 sup + ions were implanted to fluences of 10 sup 2 sup 1 , 10 sup 2 sup 2 , and 10 sup 2 sup 3 D sup + /m sup 2 with ion energies (500 eV/D sup +) below the threshold energy for elastic collision damage. Above 3x10 sup 1 sup 8 D sup + /m sup 2 s, little or no flux dependence is seen. However, a rapid decrease in retention is seen for incident fluxes below 10 sup 1 sup 8 D sup + /m sup 2 s at the 10 sup 2 sup 1 D sup + /m sup 2 fluence, suggesting a threshold value below which retention is strongly reduced. Flux dependence at the higher fluences show a smaller decrease in retention with decreasing flux. The observed results are consistent with trapping and trap evolution by cluster and cavity formation. The effect of specimen surface preparation has proved to be very significant, especially for the lower fl...

  17. Experimental level densities of atomic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guttormsen, M.; Bello Garrote, F.L.; Eriksen, T.K.; Giacoppo, F.; Goergen, A.; Hagen, T.W.; Klintefjord, M.; Larsen, A.C.; Nyhus, H.T.; Renstroem, T.; Rose, S.J.; Sahin, E.; Siem, S.; Tornyi, T.G.; Tveten, G.M. [University of Oslo, Department of Physics, Oslo (Norway); Aiche, M.; Ducasse, Q.; Jurado, B. [University of Bordeaux, CENBG, CNRS/IN2P3, B.P. 120, Gradignan (France); Bernstein, L.A.; Bleuel, D.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Byun, Y.; Voinov, A. [Ohio University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Athens, Ohio (United States); Gunsing, F. [CEA Saclay, DSM/Irfu/SPhN, Cedex (France); Lebois, L.; Leniau, B.; Wilson, J. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire d' Orsay, Orsay Cedex (France); Wiedeking, M. [iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West (South Africa)

    2015-12-15

    It is almost 80 years since Hans Bethe described the level density as a non-interacting gas of protons and neutrons. In all these years, experimental data were interpreted within this picture of a fermionic gas. However, the renewed interest of measuring level density using various techniques calls for a revision of this description. In particular, the wealth of nuclear level densities measured with the Oslo method favors the constant-temperature level density over the Fermi-gas picture. From the basis of experimental data, we demonstrate that nuclei exhibit a constant-temperature level density behavior for all mass regions and at least up to the neutron threshold. (orig.)

  18. Experimental level densities of atomic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Guttormsen, M; Garrote, F L Bello; Bernstein, L A; Bleuel, D L; Byun, Y; Ducasse, Q; Eriksen, T K; Giacoppo, F; Görgen, A; Gunsing, F; Hagen, T W; Jurado, B; Klintefjord, M; Larsen, A C; Lebois, L; Leniau, B; Nyhus, H T; Renstrøm, T; Rose, S J; Sahin, E; Siem, S; Tornyi, T G; Tveten, G M; Voinov, A; Wiedeking, M; Wilson, J

    2015-01-01

    It is almost 80 years since Hans Bethe described the level density as a non-interacting gas of protons and neutrons. In all these years, experimental data were interpreted within this picture of a fermionic gas. However, the renewed interest of measuring level density using various techniques calls for a revision of this description. In particular, the wealth of nuclear level densities measured with the Oslo method favors the constant-temperature level density over the Fermi-gas picture. From the basis of experimental data, we demonstrate that nuclei exhibit a constant-temperature level density behavior for all mass regions and at least up to the neutron threshold.

  19. Finance, growth and threshold effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allegret Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we test the existence of financial development threshold effects, firstly, between financial development and long-term growth, and, secondly, between financial development and long-term GDP. We also ask whether such effects may explain the link financial development - convergence/ divergence to the advanced countries’ growth. Our work builds on that of Aghion, Howitt, and Mayer-Foulkes (2004. It differs from previous work about assumptions and methodology. Estimates are performed with GMM dynamic panel data techniques for 112 emerging and developing countries from 1975 to 2007. The results show a positive but vanishing effect of financial development on steady-state GDP, from a critical (an average level of financial development. They do not validate, however, the assumption that the marginal impact of financial development on the steady-state growth rate is more favorable than the degree of financial development is low. We support only partially the role that the financial development could play in the acceleration of the convergence of emerging and developing economies towards the world frontier growth.

  20. Flux Cancellation Leading to CME Filament Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Roxana M.; Panesar, Navdeep K.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2016-01-01

    Solar filaments are strands of relatively cool, dense plasma magnetically suspended in the lower density hotter solar corona. They trace magnetic polarity inversion lines (PILs) in the photosphere below, and are supported against gravity at heights of up to approx.100 Mm above the chromosphere by the magnetic field in and around them. This field erupts when it is rendered unstable, often by magnetic flux cancellation or emergence at or near the PIL. We have studied the evolution of photospheric magnetic flux leading to ten observed filament eruptions. Specifically, we look for gradual magnetic changes in the neighborhood of the PIL prior to and during eruption. We use Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), and magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI), both on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), to study filament eruptions and their photospheric magnetic fields. We examine whether flux cancellation or/and emergence leads to filament eruptions. We find that continuous flux cancellation was present at the PIL for many hours prior to each eruption. We present two CME-producing eruptions in detail and find the following: (a) the pre-eruption filament-holding core field is highly sheared and appears in the shape of a sigmoid above the PIL; (b) at the start of the eruption the opposite arms of the sigmoid reconnect in the middle above the site of (tether-cutting) flux cancellation at the PIL; (c) the filaments first show a slow-rise, followed by a fast-rise as they erupt. We conclude that these two filament eruptions result from flux cancellation in the middle of the sheared field, and thereafter evolve in agreement with the standard model for a CME/flare filament eruption from a closed bipolar magnetic field [flux cancellation (van Ballegooijen and Martens 1989 and Moore and Roumelrotis 1992) and runaway tether-cutting (Moore et. al 2001)].

  1. Enhance Confidentiality of Threshold Signature for MANET

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Wei; XIONG Zhongwei

    2006-01-01

    The participating wireless mobile node that mobile ad hoc network (MANET) communications need to forward may be malicious. That means not only adversary might be able to acquire some sensitive information of the threshold signatures from the compromised node, but also the partial signatures may be fabricated by malicious node, the advantages of threshold signatures would disappear. Signing and encrypting the sensitive information of the threshold signatures, and only the specified receiver can recover it, which will improve the confidentiality of threshold signatures. The security analysis shows the method is suitable for the secure characteristic of MANET that has the malicious nodes, and the message transmission is secure can against the attack.

  2. Thresholds for Correcting Errors, Erasures, and Faulty Syndrome Measurements in Degenerate Quantum Codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumer, Ilya; Kovalev, Alexey A; Pryadko, Leonid P

    2015-07-31

    We suggest a technique for constructing lower (existence) bounds for the fault-tolerant threshold to scalable quantum computation applicable to degenerate quantum codes with sublinear distance scaling. We give explicit analytic expressions combining probabilities of erasures, depolarizing errors, and phenomenological syndrome measurement errors for quantum low-density parity-check codes with logarithmic or larger distances. These threshold estimates are parametrically better than the existing analytical bound based on percolation.

  3. Divertor Heat Flux Mitigation in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soukhanovskii, V A; Maingi, R; Gates, D A; Menard, J E; Paul, S F; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Bell, M G; Bell, R E; Boedo, J A; Bush, C E; Kaita, R; Kugel, H W; LeBlanc, B P; Mueller, D

    2008-08-04

    Steady-state handling of divertor heat flux is a critical issue for both ITER and spherical torus-based devices with compact high power density divertors. Significant reduction of heat flux to the divertor plate has been achieved simultaneously with favorable core and pedestal confinement and stability properties in a highly-shaped lower single null configuration in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 2000] using high magnetic flux expansion at the divertor strike point and the radiative divertor technique. A partial detachment of the outer strike point was achieved with divertor deuterium injection leading to peak flux reduction from 4-6 MW m{sup -2} to 0.5-2 MW m{sup -2} in small-ELM 0.8-1.0 MA, 4-6 MW neutral beam injection-heated H-mode discharges. A self-consistent picture of outer strike point partial detachment was evident from divertor heat flux profiles and recombination, particle flux and neutral pressure measurements. Analytic scrape-off layer parallel transport models were used for interpretation of NSTX detachment experiments. The modeling showed that the observed peak heat flux reduction and detachment are possible with high radiated power and momentum loss fractions, achievable with divertor gas injection, and nearly impossible to achieve with main electron density, divertor neutral density or recombination increases alone.

  4. New Titan Saltation Threshold Experiments: Investigating Current and Past Climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, N.; Burr, D. M.; Marshall, J.; Smith, J. K.; Emery, J. P.; Horst, S. M.; Nield, E.; Yu, X.

    2015-12-01

    Titan exhibits aeolian sand dunes that cover ~20% of its surface, attesting to significant sediment transport by the wind. Recent experiments in the Titan Wind Tunnel (TWT) at NASA Ames Research Center [1,2] found that the threshold friction speed needed to detach Titanian "sand" is about 50% higher than previous estimates based on theory alone [3], a result that might be explained by the low ratio of particle to fluid density on the body [1]. Following the successful completion of the initial Titan threshold tests, we are conducting new experiments that expand the pressure range above and below current Titan values. The basic experimental techniques are described in [1], with minor updates to the instrumentation as described in [2]. To reproduce the kinematic viscosity and particle friction Reynolds number equivalent to that expected for Titan's nitrogen atmosphere at 1.4 bars and 94 K requires that TWT be pressurized to 12.5 bars for air at 293K. In addition to running experiments at this pressure to reproduce previous results [1] and investigate low density (high density ratio) materials, TWT pressures of 3 and 8 bars are in the experimental matrix to understand threshold under past Titan conditions when the atmospheric pressure may have been lower [4]. Higher pressures, at 15 and 20 bars in TWT, are also being run to understand the putative effects of low density ratio conditions. Our experimental matrix for this follow-on work uses some of the same materials as previously used, including walnut shells, basalt, quartz, glass spheres, and various low density materials to better simulate the gravity-equivalent weight of Titan sand. For these experiments, the TWT is now equipped with a new high pressure Tavis transducer with sufficient sensitivity to measure freestream speeds of less than 0.5 m s-1 at 12.5 bars. New techniques include video documentation of the experiments. We are also investigating methods of measuring humidity of the wind tunnel environment and

  5. Muon and neutrino fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, P. G.; Protheroe, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The result of a new calculation of the atmospheric muon and neutrino fluxes and the energy spectrum of muon-neutrinos produced in individual extensive air showers (EAS) initiated by proton and gamma-ray primaries is reported. Also explained is the possibility of detecting atmospheric nu sub mu's due to gamma-rays from these sources.

  6. Coupled superconducting flux qubits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantenberg, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents results of theoretical and experimental work on superconducting persistent-current quantum bits. These qubits offer an attractive route towards scalable solid-state quantum computing. The focus of this work is on the gradiometer flux qubit which has a special geometric design, t

  7. Generic flux coupling analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reimers, A.C.; Goldstein, Y.; Bockmayr, A.

    2015-01-01

    Flux coupling analysis (FCA) has become a useful tool for aiding metabolic reconstructions and guiding genetic manipulations. Originally, it was introduced for constraint-based models of metabolic networks that are based on the steady-state assumption. Recently, we have shown that the steady-state a

  8. Lobotomy of flux compactifications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dibitetto, Giuseppe; Guarino, Adolfo; Roest, Diederik

    2014-01-01

    We provide the dictionary between four-dimensional gauged supergravity and type II compactifications on (6) with metric and gauge fluxes in the absence of supersymmetry breaking sources, such as branes and orientifold planes. Secondly, we prove that there is a unique isotropic compactification

  9. Disconnecting Solar Magnetic Flux

    CERN Document Server

    DeForest, C E; McComas, D J

    2011-01-01

    Disconnection of open magnetic flux by reconnection is required to balance the injection of open flux by CMEs and other eruptive events. Making use of recent advances in heliospheric background subtraction, we have imaged many abrupt disconnection events. These events produce dense plasma clouds whose distinctie shape can now be traced from the corona across the inner solar system via heliospheric imaging. The morphology of each initial event is characteristic of magnetic reconnection across a current sheet, and the newly-disconnected flux takes the form of a "U"-shaped loop that moves outward, accreting coronal and solar wind material. We analyzed one such event on 2008 December 18 as it formed and accelerated at 20 m/s^2 to 320 km/s, expanding self-similarly until it exited our field of view 1.2 AU from the Sun. From acceleration and photometric mass estimates we derive the coronal magnetic field strength to be 8uT, 6 Rs above the photosphere, and the entrained flux to be 1.6x10^11 Wb (1.6x10^19 Mx). We mod...

  10. Coupled superconducting flux qubits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantenberg, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents results of theoretical and experimental work on superconducting persistent-current quantum bits. These qubits offer an attractive route towards scalable solid-state quantum computing. The focus of this work is on the gradiometer flux qubit which has a special geometric design, t

  11. Efeito da densidade do fluxo e da presença de aditivos na soldagem ATIG de aço inoxidável austenítico Effect of flux density and addictive presence on ATIG welding of austenitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo J. Modenesi

    2013-06-01

    explain the effect of flux. The most accepted ones consider the arc contraction by negative ions vaporized from the flux and liquid metal flow alterations in the weld pool caused by changes the surface tension values. This paper evaluates the effect of one component (Cr2O3 flux concentration and additions of KClO4 and Al2O3 on ATIG welding bead shape. Three sets of bead-on-plate weld tests were performed on 5 mm thick AISI 304 steel plates. Electric current and voltage were measured during each welding trial and the resulting bead geometry was evaluated in cross sections of the weld. Results indicated only minor variations in voltage during the transition from TIG to ATIG welding. Surface flux concentration affected weld bead penetration, and maximum penetration was obtained with flux densities between 15 and 60 g/m². On the other hand, the addition of KCLO4, despite this being a strong oxidizer, reduced weld penetration. A similar effect was linked to additions of Al2O3 to the flux.

  12. Filippov Ratio-Dependent Prey-Predator Model with Threshold Policy Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianghong Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Filippov ratio-dependent prey-predator model with economic threshold is proposed and studied. In particular, the sliding mode domain, sliding mode dynamics, and the existence of four types of equilibria and tangent points are investigated firstly. Further, the stability of pseudoequilibrium is addressed by using theoretical and numerical methods, and also the local sliding bifurcations including regular/virtual equilibrium bifurcations and boundary node bifurcations are studied. Finally, some global sliding bifurcations are addressed numerically. The globally stable touching cycle indicates that the density of pest population can be successfully maintained below the economic threshold level by designing suitable threshold policy strategies.

  13. Detectability thresholds of general modular graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Kawamoto, Tatsuro

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the detectability thresholds of various modular structures in the stochastic block model. Our analysis reveals how the detectability threshold is related to the details of the modular pattern, including the hierarchy of the clusters. We show that certain planted structures are impossible to infer regardless of their fuzziness.

  14. Thresholding magnetic resonance images of human brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-mao HU; Wieslaw L NOWINSKI

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, methods are proposed and validated to determine low and high thresholds to segment out gray matter and white matter for MR images of different pulse sequences of human brain. First, a two-dimensional reference image is determined to represent the intensity characteristics of the original three-dimensional data. Then a region of interest of the reference image is determined where brain tissues are present. The non-supervised fuzzy c-means clustering is employed to determine: the threshold for obtaining head mask, the low threshold for T2-weighted and PD-weighted images, and the high threshold for T1-weighted, SPGR and FLAIR images. Supervised range-constrained thresholding is employed to determine the low threshold for T1-weighted, SPGR and FLAIR images. Thresholding based on pairs of boundary pixels is proposed to determine the high threshold for T2- and PD-weighted images. Quantification against public data sets with various noise and inhomogeneity levels shows that the proposed methods can yield segmentation robust to noise and intensity inhomogeneity. Qualitatively the proposed methods work well with real clinical data.

  15. Voting on Thresholds for Public Goods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rauchdobler, Julian; Sausgruber, Rupert; Tyran, Jean-Robert

    Introducing a threshold in the sense of a minimal project size transforms a public goods game with an inefficient equilibrium into a coordination game with a set of Pareto-superior equilibria. Thresholds may therefore improve efficiency in the voluntary provision of public goods. In our one...

  16. Thresholds for odor and nasal pungency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cometto-Muñiz, J E; Cain, W S

    1990-11-01

    Detection thresholds were measured repeatedly for 11 chemicals in normosmic and anosmic subjects. The stimuli comprised the first eight members of the series of n-aliphatic alcohols, phenyl ethyl alcohol, pyridine, and menthol. Results showed that anosmics could detect, via pungency, all but phenyl ethyl alcohol reliably. In the aliphatic series, both odor and pungency thresholds declined with chain length in a way that implied dependence of both in part on phase distribution in the mucosa. Odor thresholds, however, declined more rapidly than pungency thresholds: the ratio of anosmics threshold/normosmics threshold increased from 23 for methanol to 10,000 for 1-octanol. The outcome of a scaling experiment employing normosmic subjects indicated that, with the exception of methanol and ethanol, pungency arose when perceived intensity reached a narrowly tuned criterion level. When thresholds were expressed as percentages of saturated vapor, an index of thermodynamic activity, thereby accounting for differences in solubility and in phase distribution in the mucosa among the various stimuli, both odor and pungency thresholds depicted a striking constancy across stimuli.

  17. Mesopic visual efficiency I: Detection threshold measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eloholma, M.; Ketomaki, J; Halonen, L.; Walkey, H.; Goodman, T.; Alferdinck, J.W.A.M.; Bodrogi, P.

    2007-01-01

    Achromatic thresholds are measured at three sites to investigate the effects of light spectrum on achromatic detection thresholds in the mesopic region. The results of measurements using quasi-monochromatic targets reveal spectral sensitivity functions with two or three peaks, a so-called ‘chromatic

  18. Applying Threshold Concepts to Finance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoadley, Susan; Wood, Leigh N.; Tickle, Leonie; Kyng, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate and identify threshold concepts that are the essential conceptual content of finance programmes. Design/Methodology/Approach: Conducted in three stages with finance academics and students, the study uses threshold concepts as both a theoretical framework and a research methodology. Findings: The…

  19. Threshold Concepts, Systems and Learning for Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandri, Orana Jade

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for understanding the role that systems theory might play in education for sustainability (EfS). It offers a sketch and critique of Land and Meyer's notion of a "threshold concept", to argue that seeing systems as a threshold concept for sustainability is useful for understanding the processes of…

  20. Vector Broadcast Channels: Optimal Threshold Selection Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Samarasinghe, Tharaka; Evans, Jamie

    2011-01-01

    Threshold feedback policies are well known and provably rate-wise optimal selective feedback techniques for communication systems requiring partial channel state information (CSI). However, optimal selection of thresholds at mobile users to maximize information theoretic data rates subject to feedback constraints is an open problem. In this paper, we focus on the optimal threshold selection problem, and provide a solution for this problem for finite feedback systems. Rather surprisingly, we show that using the same threshold values at all mobile users is not always a rate-wise optimal feedback strategy, even for a system with identical users experiencing statistically the same channel conditions. By utilizing the theory of majorization, we identify an underlying Schur-concave structure in the rate function and obtain sufficient conditions for a homogenous threshold feedback policy to be optimal. Our results hold for most fading channel models, and we illustrate an application of our results to familiar Raylei...

  1. Provably secure robust threshold partial blind signature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Zhenfu; ZHU Haojin; LU Rongxing

    2006-01-01

    Threshold digital signature and blind signature are playing important roles in cryptography as well as in practical applications such as e-cash and e-voting systems.Over the past few years, many cryptographic researchers have made considerable headway in this field. However, to our knowledge, most of existing threshold blind signature schemes are based on the discrete logarithm problem. In this paper, we propose a new robust threshold partial blind signature scheme based on improved RSA cryptosystem.This scheme is the first threshold partial blind signature scheme based on factoring, and the robustness of threshold partial blind signature is also introduced. Moreover, in practical application, the proposed scheme will be especially suitable for blind signature-based voting systems with multiple administrators and secure electronic cash systems to prevent their abuse.

  2. Evaporation and Vapor Shielding of CFC Targets Exposed to Plasma Heat Fluxes Relevant to ITER ELMs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronov, V.; Arkhipov, N.I.; Toporkov, D.A.; Zhitlukhin, A.M. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research, TRINITI, Kostromskaya, 12A, 79, RU-142092 Troitsk, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Landman, I. [FZK-Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Association Euratom-FZK, Technik und Umwelt, Postfach 3640, D-7602l Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Carbon-fibre composite (CFC) is foreseen presently as armour material for the divertor target in ITER. During the transient processes such as instabilities of Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) the target as anticipated will be exposed to the plasma heat loads of a few MJ/m{sup 2} on the time scale of a fraction of ms, which causes an intense evaporation at the target surface and contaminates tokamak plasma by evaporated carbon. The ITER transient loads are not achievable at existing tokamaks therefore for testing divertor armour materials other facilities, in particular plasma guns are employed. In the present work the CFC targets have been tested for ITER at the plasma gun facility MK- 200 UG in Troitsk by ELM relevant heat fluxes. The targets in the applied magnetic field up to 2 T were irradiated by hydrogen plasma streams of diameter 6 - 8 cm, impact ion energy 2 - 3 keV, pulse duration 0.05 ms and energy density varying in the range 0.05 - 1 MJ/m{sup 2}. Primary attention has been focused on the measurement of evaporation threshold and investigation of carbon vapor properties. Fast infrared pyrometer, optical and VUV spectrometers, framing cameras and plasma calorimeters were applied as diagnostics. The paper reports the results obtained on the evaporation threshold of CFC, the evaporation rate of the carbon fibers oriented parallel and perpendicular to the exposed target surface, the velocity of carbon vapor motion along and across the magnetic field lines, and the parameters of carbon plasma such as temperature, density and ionization state measured up to the distance 15 cm at varying plasma load. First experimental results on investigation of the vapor shield onset conditions are presented also. (authors)

  3. A crossflow filtration system for constant permeate flux membrane fouling characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Daniel J.; Paul, Donald R.; Freeman, Benny D.

    2013-03-01

    Membrane fouling is often characterized using a crossflow filtration apparatus. Typically, the transmembrane pressure (TMP) difference is fixed, and the flux is allowed to decline as the membrane fouls and the resistance to mass transfer increases. However, as flux varies, so too does the rate at which foulants are brought to the membrane surface, so the observed fouling behavior is not solely the result of membrane/foulant interactions. Constant flux experiments, where the permeate flux is fixed and the TMP difference varies, minimize such variations in the hydrodynamic conditions at the membrane surface, but constant TMP difference experiments dominate the fouling literature because they are more straightforward to execute than constant flux experiments. Additionally, most industrial water purification membrane installations operate at constant flux rather than at constant TMP. Here, we describe the construction and operation of a constant flux crossflow fouling apparatus. System measurement accuracy was validated by comparison of pure water permeance measurements to values specified by the membrane manufacturer, reported elsewhere, and measured by another technique. Fouling experiments were performed with two membrane/foulant systems: polysulfone ultrafiltration membranes with a soybean oil emulsion foulant and PVDF microfiltration membranes with a polystyrene latex bead suspension foulant. Automatic permeate flux control facilitated flux stepping experiments, which are commonly used to determine the threshold flux or critical flux of a membrane/foulant pair. Comparison of a flux stepping experiment with a literature report yielded good agreement.

  4. Novel Transverse Flux Machine for Vehicle Traction Applications: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Z.; Ahmed, A.; Husain, I.; Muljadi, E.

    2015-04-02

    A novel transverse flux machine topology for electric vehicle traction applications using ferrite magnets is presented in this paper. The proposed transverse flux topology utilizes novel magnet arrangements in the rotor that are similar to the Halbach array to boost flux linkage; on the stator side, cores are alternately arranged around a pair of ring windings in each phase to make use of the entire rotor flux that eliminates end windings. Analytical design considerations and finite-element methods are used for an optimized design of a scooter in-wheel motor. Simulation results from finite element analysis (FEA) show that the motor achieved comparable torque density to conventional rare-earth permanent magnet (PM) machines. This machine is a viable candidate for direct-drive applications with low cost and high torque density.

  5. Slow Rise and Partial Eruption of a Double-Decker Filament. II. Modeling by a Double Flux Rope Equilibrium

    CERN Document Server

    Kliem, Bernhard; Titov, Viacheslav S; Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A; Liu, Rui; Liu, Chang; Wang, Haimin

    2014-01-01

    Force-free equilibria containing two vertically arranged magnetic flux ropes of like chirality and current direction are considered as a model for split filaments/prominences and filament-sigmoid systems. Such equilibria are constructed analytically through an extension of the methods developed in Titov & D\\'emoulin (1999) and numerically through an evolutionary sequence including shear flows, flux emergence, and flux cancellation in the photospheric boundary. It is demonstrated that the analytical equilibria are stable if an external toroidal (shear) field component exceeding a threshold value is included. If this component decreases sufficiently, then both flux ropes turn unstable for conditions typical of solar active regions, with the lower rope typically being unstable first. Either both flux ropes erupt upward, or only the upper rope erupts while the lower rope reconnects with the ambient flux low in the corona and is destroyed. However, for shear field strengths staying somewhat above the threshold...

  6. Dynamics of vapor emissions at wire explosion threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belony, Paul A; Kim, Yong W

    2010-10-01

    X-pinch plasmas have been actively studied in the recent years. Numerical simulation of the ramp-up of metallic vapor emissions from wire specimens shows that under impulsive Ohmic heating the wire core invariably reaches a supercritical state before explosion. The heating rate depends sensitively on the local wire resistance, leading to highly variable vapor emission flux along the wire. To examine the vapor emission process, we have visualized nickel wire explosions by means of shock formation in air. In a single explosion as captured by shadowgraphy, there usually appear several shocks with spherical or cylindrical wave front originating from different parts of the wire. Growth of various shock fronts in time is well characterized by a power-law scaling in one form or another. Continuum emission spectra are obtained and calibrated to measure temperature near the explosion threshold. Shock front structures and vapor plume temperature are examined.

  7. Solar neutrino physics with low-threshold dark matter detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Billard, J; Figueroa-Feliciano, E

    2014-01-01

    Dark matter detectors will soon be sensitive to Solar neutrinos via two distinct channels: coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering and neutrino electron elastic scattering. We establish an analysis method for extracting Solar model properties and neutrino properties from these measurements, including the possible effects of sterile neutrinos which have been hinted at by some reactor experiments and cosmological measurements. Even including sterile neutrinos, through the coherent scattering channel a 1 ton-year exposure with a low-threshold Germanium detector could improve on the current measurement of the normalization of the $^8$B Solar neutrino flux down to 3% or less. Combining with the elastic scattering data will provide constraints on both the high and low energy survival probability, and will improve on the uncertainty on the active-to-sterile mixing angle by a factor of two. This sensitivity to active-to-sterile transitions is competitive and complementary to forthcoming dedicated short baseline sterile ...

  8. Triples, Fluxes, and Strings

    CERN Document Server

    De Boer, J; Hori, K; Keurentjes, A; Morgan, J; Morrison, Douglas Robert Ogston; Sethi, S K; Boer, Jan de; Dijkgraaf, Robbert; Hori, Kentaro; Keurentjes, Arjan; Morgan, John; Morrison, David R.; Sethi, Savdeep

    2002-01-01

    We study string compactifications with sixteen supersymmetries. The moduli space for these compactifications becomes quite intricate in lower dimensions, partly because there are many different irreducible components. We focus primarily, but not exclusively, on compactifications to seven or more dimensions. These vacua can be realized in a number ways: the perturbative constructions we study include toroidal compactifications of the heterotic/type I strings, asymmetric orbifolds, and orientifolds. In addition, we describe less conventional M and F theory compactifications on smooth spaces. The last class of vacua considered are compactifications on singular spaces with non-trivial discrete fluxes. We find a number of new components in the string moduli space. Contained in some of these components are M theory compactifications with novel kinds of ``frozen'' singularities. We are naturally led to conjecture the existence of new dualities relating spaces with different singular geometries and fluxes. As our stu...

  9. Atmospheric lepton fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaisser Thomas K.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This review of atmospheric muons and neutrinos emphasizes the high energy range relevant for backgrounds to high-energy neutrinos of astrophysical origin. After a brief historical introduction, the main distinguishing features of atmospheric νμ and νe are discussed, along with the implications of the muon charge ratio for the νµ / ν̅µ ratio. Methods to account for effects of the knee in the primary cosmic-ray spectrum and the energy-dependence of hadronic interactions on the neutrino fluxes are discussed and illustrated in the context of recent results from IceCube. A simple numerical/analytic method is proposed for systematic investigation of uncertainties in neutrino fluxes arising from uncertainties in the primary cosmic-ray spectrum/composition and hadronic interactions.

  10. Lobotomy of flux compactifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibitetto, Giuseppe; Guarino, Adolfo; Roest, Diederik

    2014-05-01

    We provide the dictionary between four-dimensional gauged supergravity and type II compactifications on 6 with metric and gauge fluxes in the absence of supersymmetry breaking sources, such as branes and orientifold planes. Secondly, we prove that there is a unique isotropic compactification allowing for critical points. It corresponds to a type IIA background given by a product of two 3-tori with SO(3) twists and results in a unique theory (gauging) with a non-semisimple gauge algebra. Besides the known four AdS solutions surviving the orientifold projection to = 4 induced by O6-planes, this theory contains a novel AdS solution that requires non-trivial orientifold-odd fluxes, hence being a genuine critical point of the = 8 theory.

  11. Lobotomy of flux compactifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dibitetto, Giuseppe [Institutionen för fysik och astronomi, University of Uppsala,Box 803, SE-751 08 Uppsala (Sweden); Guarino, Adolfo [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Institute for Theoretical Physics,Bern University, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Roest, Diederik [Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen,Nijenborgh 4 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands)

    2014-05-15

    We provide the dictionary between four-dimensional gauged supergravity and type II compactifications on T{sup 6} with metric and gauge fluxes in the absence of supersymmetry breaking sources, such as branes and orientifold planes. Secondly, we prove that there is a unique isotropic compactification allowing for critical points. It corresponds to a type IIA background given by a product of two 3-tori with SO(3) twists and results in a unique theory (gauging) with a non-semisimple gauge algebra. Besides the known four AdS solutions surviving the orientifold projection to N=4 induced by O6-planes, this theory contains a novel AdS solution that requires non-trivial orientifold-odd fluxes, hence being a genuine critical point of the N=8 theory.

  12. High Flux Calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-05-05

    These approaches are based on proven principles which have served the thermal test community well for years. Other concepts hold promise of being able to...8217. --......- - ... .... - - The thermal test community has developed instrumentation which is quite suitable for the moderate, and relatively constant, flux...on the maximum phase II system fluence of 400 cal/cm2 . Second, the present thermal test community will have confidence in the performance of an

  13. Lobotomy of Flux Compactifications

    OpenAIRE

    Giuseppe Dibitetto; Adolfo Guarino(Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Bern University, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland); Diederik Roest

    2014-01-01

    We provide the dictionary between four-dimensional gauged supergravity and type II compactifications on $ \\mathbb{T} $ 6 with metric and gauge fluxes in the absence of supersymmetry breaking sources, such as branes and orientifold planes. Secondly, we prove that there is a unique isotropic compactification allowing for critical points. It corresponds to a type IIA background given by a product of two 3-tori with SO(3) twists and results in a unique theory (gauging) with a non-semisimple gauge...

  14. Monocular and binocular depth discrimination thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, S B; Siddiqui, A; Ward, A; Noonan, C; Fisher, A C; Green, J R; Brown, M C; Wareing, P A; Watt, P

    1999-11-01

    Measurement of stereoacuity at varying distances, by real or simulated depth stereoacuity tests, is helpful in the evaluation of patients with binocular imbalance or strabismus. Although the cue of binocular disparity underpins stereoacuity tests, there may be variable amounts of other binocular and monocular cues inherent in a stereoacuity test. In such circumstances, a combined monocular and binocular threshold of depth discrimination may be measured--stereoacuity conventionally referring to the situation where binocular disparity giving rise to retinal disparity is the only cue present. A child-friendly variable distance stereoacuity test (VDS) was developed, with a method for determining the binocular depth threshold from the combined monocular and binocular threshold of depth of discrimination (CT). Subjects with normal binocular function, reduced binocular function, and apparently absent binocularity were included. To measure the threshold of depth discrimination, subjects were required by means of a hand control to align two electronically controlled spheres at viewing distances of 1, 3, and 6m. Stereoacuity was also measured using the TNO, Frisby, and Titmus stereoacuity tests. BTs were calculated according to the function BT= arctan (1/tan alphaC - 1/tan alphaM)(-1), where alphaC and alphaM are the angles subtended at the nodal points by objects situated at the monocular threshold (alphaM) and the combined monocular-binocular threshold (alphaC) of discrimination. In subjects with good binocularity, BTs were similar to their combined thresholds, whereas subjects with reduced and apparently absent binocularity had binocular thresholds 4 and 10 times higher than their combined thresholds (CT). The VDS binocular thresholds showed significantly higher correlation and agreement with the TNO test and the binocular thresholds of the Frisby and Titmus tests, than the corresponding combined thresholds (p = 0.0019). The VDS was found to be an easy to use real depth

  15. Correlations Between Magnetic Flux and Levitation Force of HTS Bulk Above a Permanent Magnet Guideway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huan; Zheng, Jun; Zheng, Botian; Qian, Nan; Li, Haitao; Li, Jipeng; Deng, Zigang

    2017-06-01

    In order to clarify the correlations between magnetic flux and levitation force of the high-temperature superconducting (HTS) bulk, we measured the magnetic flux density on bottom and top surfaces of a bulk superconductor while vertically moving above a permanent magnet guideway (PMG). The levitation force of the bulk superconductor was measured simultaneously. In this study, the HTS bulk was moved down and up for three times between field-cooling position and working position above the PMG, followed by a relaxation measurement of 300 s at the minimum height position. During the whole processes, the magnetic flux density and levitation force of the bulk superconductor were recorded and collected by a multipoint magnetic field measurement platform and a self-developed maglev measurement system, respectively. The magnetic flux density on the bottom surface reflected the induced field in the superconductor bulk, while on the top, it reveals the penetrated magnetic flux. The results show that the magnetic flux density and levitation force of the bulk superconductor are in direct correlation from the viewpoint of inner supercurrent. In general, this work is instructive for understanding the connection of the magnetic flux density, the inner current density and the levitation behavior of HTS bulk employed in a maglev system. Meanwhile, this magnetic flux density measurement method has enriched present experimental evaluation methods of maglev system.

  16. Fast Theoretical Simulation for Design of Helical Flux Compression Generators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xian-Jun; DONG Zhi-Wei

    2006-01-01

    A theoretical scheme is derived to achieve the numerical simulation of helical flux compression generator (HFCG) design, by which not only any physical approximation is not made, but also numerical simulation can be fast obtained. In particular, an analytic formula to calculate the inductance is deduced, which is extremely close to the experimental results. The physical process of relevant interesting physical quantity, such as inductance, enlarging current, and magnetic flux density, can be calculated to compare with the experimentally quantitative results.

  17. Stop of magnetic flux movement in levitating superconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smolyak, B.M., E-mail: b-smolyak@yandex.ru; Zakharov, M.S., E-mail: maksim.s.zakharov@gmail.com

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • A direct experimental study of magnetic flux creep in the levitating superconductor. • When a levitating object is in a fixed position, magnetic flux movement is observed. • Levitation stops flux creep process. - Abstract: A phenomenon of magnetic relaxation stopping in a levitating superconductor was studied. It was experimentally shown that magnetic flux creep (diffusion of flux lines to regions with lower vortex density) is absent in magnetic suspension of the superconductor. Magnetic relaxation arises, when a rigid constraint that fixes a position of the superconductor relative to a magnet is imposed on a levitating object. It is assumed that oscillations of magnetic structure, which is due to free oscillations of the levitating superconductor, stop magnetic relaxation.

  18. Flux-limitation of the Nernst effect in magnetized ICF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgers, Christopher; Barrois, Rion; Wengraf, Joshua; Bissell, John; Brodrick, Jonathan; Kingham, Robert; Read, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Magnetized ICF is a promising scheme which combines the advantages of magnetic and inertial confinement fusion. In the relevant high-energy density plasmas magnetic field evolution is often controlled by the Nernst effect where the magnetic field advects with the electron heat flow. It is well known that non-local thermal transport necessitates a flux-limiter on the heat flow. This suggests that a flux-limiter should also be applied to the Nernst effect. We have shown that this is the case using Vlasov-Fokker-Planck simulations and that the flux-limter is not the same as that required for the heat flow itself, for example when a NIF-relevant flux-limiter of 0.15 is required to limit the heat flow a Nernst flux limiter of 0.08 is required. We acknowledge support from EPSRC Grant No. EPM011372/1.

  19. Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory — The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat,...

  20. Hyper-arousal decreases human visual thresholds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam J Woods

    Full Text Available Arousal has long been known to influence behavior and serves as an underlying component of cognition and consciousness. However, the consequences of hyper-arousal for visual perception remain unclear. The present study evaluates the impact of hyper-arousal on two aspects of visual sensitivity: visual stereoacuity and contrast thresholds. Sixty-eight participants participated in two experiments. Thirty-four participants were randomly divided into two groups in each experiment: Arousal Stimulation or Sham Control. The Arousal Stimulation group underwent a 50-second cold pressor stimulation (immersing the foot in 0-2° C water, a technique known to increase arousal. In contrast, the Sham Control group immersed their foot in room temperature water. Stereoacuity thresholds (Experiment 1 and contrast thresholds (Experiment 2 were measured before and after stimulation. The Arousal Stimulation groups demonstrated significantly lower stereoacuity and contrast thresholds following cold pressor stimulation, whereas the Sham Control groups showed no difference in thresholds. These results provide the first evidence that hyper-arousal from sensory stimulation can lower visual thresholds. Hyper-arousal's ability to decrease visual thresholds has important implications for survival, sports, and everyday life.