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Sample records for fluoxetine clinical pharmacology

  1. Fluoxetine: clinical pharmacology and physiologic disposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemberger, L.; Bergstrom, R.F.; Wolen, R.L.; Farid, N.A.; Enas, G.G.; Aronoff, G.R.

    1985-03-01

    Fluoxetine (30 mg), administered for 7 days to normal volunteers, produced a 66% inhibition of tritiated serotonin uptake into platelets. Plasma concentrations of fluoxetine correlated positively with inhibition of serotonin uptake. Fluoxetine is well absorbed after oral administration in both the fed and fasted states and demonstrates dose proportionality. Fluoxetine disappears from plasma with a half-life of 1-3 days; its metabolite norfluoxetine has a plasma half-life of 7-15 days. After administration of /sup 14/C-fluoxetine, approximately 65% of the administered dose of radioactivity is recovered in urine and about 15% in feces. Fluoxetine, given as a single dose or in multiple doses over 8 days, did not produce significant effects on the plasma disappearance of warfarin, diazepam, tolbutamide, or chlorothiazide. Coadministration of fluoxetine and ethanol did not result in an increase from control values in the blood ethanol levels, nor did it produce significant changes in physiologic, psychometric, or psychomotor activity. Pharmacokinetics of fluoxetine in the elderly and normal volunteers appear to be similar. In addition, pharmacokinetic analyses in patients with varying degrees of renal impairment did not show significant differences from healthy subjects.

  2. Clinical pharmacology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    General anaesthesia should be considered for potentially difficult procedures and for those involving large wounds. RENEÉ DE WAAL, MB ChB, MFPM. MARC BLOCKMAN, BPharm,. MB ChB, Dip Int Res Ethics, MMed. (Clin Pharmacol), AFCCP. Division of Clinical Pharmacology Department of Medicine University of Cape ...

  3. CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY OF DIURETICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Soldatenko

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Clinical pharmacology of diuretics in the international system of ATC (anatomic-therapeutic-chemical is presented. Classification of this group by the action mechanism and caused effects is provided. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics features, indications and principles of diuretics usage in clinics are considered. Contraindications, side effects and interaction with other drugs of this group are discussed in detail.

  4. An integrated analysis of olanzapine/fluoxetine combination in clinical trials of treatment-resistant depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Madhukar H; Thase, Michael E; Osuntokun, Olawale; Henley, David B; Case, Michael; Watson, Susan B; Campbell, Giedra M; Corya, Sara A

    2009-03-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of olanzapine/fluoxetine combination (OFC) versus olanzapine or fluoxetine monotherapy across all clinical trials of treatment-resistant depression sponsored by Eli Lilly and Company. Efficacy and safety data from 1146 patients with a history of nonresponse during the current depressive episode who subsequently exhibited nonresponse during a 6- to 8-week antidepressant open-label lead-in phase and were randomly assigned to OFC (N = 462), fluoxetine (N = 342), or olanzapine (N = 342) for double-blind treatment were analyzed. All patients had a diagnosis of major depressive disorder as defined by DSM-III or DSM-IV criteria. The dates in which the trials were conducted ranged from May 1997 to July 2005. After 8 weeks, OFC patients demonstrated significantly greater Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale improvement (mean change = -13.0) than fluoxetine (-8.6, p or= 10% of OFC patients were weight gain, increased appetite, dry mouth, somnolence, fatigue, headache, and peripheral edema. Random glucose mean change (mg/dL) was +7.92 for the OFC group, +1.62 for the fluoxetine group (p = .020), and +9.91 for the olanzapine group (p = .485). Random cholesterol mean change (mg/dL) was +12.4 for OFC, +2.3 for fluoxetine (p or= 240 subsequently) was significantly higher for the OFC group (10.2%) than for the fluoxetine group (3.1%, p = .017) but not the olanzapine group (8.0%, p = .569). Mean weight change (kg) was +4.42 for OFC, -0.15 for fluoxetine (p or= 7% body weight (vs. olanzapine: 42.9%, p = .515; fluoxetine: 2.3%, p < .001). Results of this analysis showed that OFC-treated patients experienced significantly improved depressive symptoms compared with olanzapine- or fluoxetine-treated patients following failure of 2 or more antidepressants within the current depressive episode. Safety results for OFC were generally consistent with those for its component monotherapies. The total cholesterol increase associated with OFC was more pronounced

  5. Clinical pharmacology of deferasirox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Chiaki

    2014-08-01

    Iron accumulation is a consequence of regular red cell transfusions, and can occur as a result of ineffective erythropoiesis secondary to increased intestinal iron absorption, in patients with various anemias. Without appropriate treatment, iron overload can lead to increased morbidity and mortality. Deferasirox is an oral iron chelator effective for reduction of body iron in iron-overloaded patients with transfusion-dependent anemias and non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia, with a well-established safety profile. This review summarizes the clinical pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and drug-drug interaction profile of deferasirox, and the claims supporting once-daily dosing for effective chelation. Sustained labile plasma iron suppression is observed with no rebound between doses, protecting organs from potential tissue damage. Increased iron excretion positively correlates with increased deferasirox exposure; to optimize iron removal transfusional iron intake, body iron burden and safety parameters should also be considered. Deferasirox dispersible tablets should be taken ≥30 min before food due to an effect of food on bioavailability. Dosing is consistent across pediatric and adult patients and there is no ethnic sensitivity. Dose adjustment is required for patients with hepatic impairment and may be considered upon coadministration with strong uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase inducers or bile acid sequestrants (coadministration should be avoided where possible), and patients should be monitored upon coadministration with cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4/5, CYP2C8, or CYP1A2 substrates. Coadministration with hydroxyurea, a fetal hemoglobin modulator, does not appear to impact deferasirox pharmacokinetics. In summary, a substantial body of clinical and pharmacokinetic data are available for deferasirox to guide its optimal use in multiple patient populations and clinical circumstances.

  6. Clinical pharmacology of homoharringtonine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savaraj, N.; Lu, K.; Dimery, I.; Feun, L.G.; Burgess, M.; Keating, M.; Loo, T.L.

    1986-01-01

    Clinical pharmacokinetics of homoharringtonine (HHT) were studied in eight patients who received uniformly labeled HHT at 3-4 mg/m2 (150 mu Ci) by continuous 6-hour infusion. The drug and metabolites were quantified by radiochemical and high-performance liquid chromatographic techniques. Computerized nonlinear least-square regression and curve stripping were used to characterize HHT and total [ 3 H]HHT equivalent pharmacokinetics. Unchanged HHT in the plasma declined biphasically, with an alpha-half-life of 0.5 +/- 0.1 hours and a beta-half-life of 9.3 +/- 1.4 hours. The total clearance of HHT was 177.4 +/- 27.7 ml X hour-1 X kg-1, and the apparent volume of distribution, estimated from the area under the drug concentration versus time curve, was 2.4 +/- 0.4 L X kg-1. Correspondingly, the total [ 3 H]HHT equivalent disappeared from the plasma in a triphasic manner. Compared with the pharmacokinetic parameters of unchanged HHT, the terminal half-life of total 3 H was 67.5 +/- 7.5 hours, 7.4 times longer; the total clearance was 30.9 +/- 3.1 ml X hour-1 X kg-1, 5.5 times slower; but the volume of distribution by area was 2.7 +/- 0.1 L X kg-1, nearly the same. The 72-hour cumulative urinary excretion of total tritium was 28.2% of the administered dose and only 38.3% of this resided in unchanged HHT. Thus, urinary excretion was not a major route of elimination of HHT. Moreover, HHT underwent extensive metabolism; one major and two minor unidentified products were detected in both plasma and urine

  7. The clinical pharmacology of acamprosate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalk, Nicola J; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R

    2014-02-01

    Acamprosate is one of the few medications licensed for prevention of relapse in alcohol dependence, and over time it has proved to be significantly, if moderately, effective, safe and tolerable. Its use is now being extended into other addictions and neurodevelopmental disorders. The mechanism of action of acamprosate has been less clear, but in the decade or more that has elapsed since its licensing, a body of translational evidence has accumulated, in which preclinical findings are replicated in clinical populations. Acamprosate modulates N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor transmission and may have indirect effects on γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor transmission. It is known to decrease brain glutamate and increase β-endorphins in rodents and man. Acamprosate diminishes reinstatement in ethanolized rodents and promotes abstinence in humans. Although acamprosate has been called an anticraving drug, its subjective effects are subtle and relate to diminished arousal, anxiety and insomnia, which parallel preclinical findings of decreased withdrawal symptoms in animals treated with acamprosate. Further understanding of the pharmacology of acamprosate will allow appropriate targeting of therapy in individuals with alcohol dependence and extension of its use to other addictions. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  8. Clinical Pharmacology in Denmark in 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøsen, Kim; Andersen, Stig Ejdrup; Borregaard, Jeanett

    2016-01-01

    The Danish Society of Clinical Pharmacology was founded in 1976, and mainly thanks to the persistent efforts of the society, clinical pharmacology became an independent medical speciality in Denmark in 1996. Since then, clinical pharmacology has gone from strength to strength. In the Danish...... healthcare system, clinical pharmacology has established itself as an indispensible part of the efforts to promote the rational, safe and economic use of drugs. Clinical pharmacologists are active in drug committees both in hospitals and in the primary sector. All clinical pharmacology centres offer a local...... in the Capital Region. The Department of Clinical Pharmacology at Aarhus University Hospital works closely together with forensic toxicologists and pathologists, covering issues regarding illicit substances, forensic pharmacology, post-mortem toxicology, expert testimony and research. Therapeutic geriatric...

  9. Pharmacology Portal: An Open Database for Clinical Pharmacologic Laboratory Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen Bjånes, Tormod; Mjåset Hjertø, Espen; Lønne, Lars; Aronsen, Lena; Andsnes Berg, Jon; Bergan, Stein; Otto Berg-Hansen, Grim; Bernard, Jean-Paul; Larsen Burns, Margrete; Toralf Fosen, Jan; Frost, Joachim; Hilberg, Thor; Krabseth, Hege-Merete; Kvan, Elena; Narum, Sigrid; Austgulen Westin, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    More than 50 Norwegian public and private laboratories provide one or more analyses for therapeutic drug monitoring or testing for drugs of abuse. Practices differ among laboratories, and analytical repertoires can change rapidly as new substances become available for analysis. The Pharmacology Portal was developed to provide an overview of these activities and to standardize the practices and terminology among laboratories. The Pharmacology Portal is a modern dynamic web database comprising all available analyses within therapeutic drug monitoring and testing for drugs of abuse in Norway. Content can be retrieved by using the search engine or by scrolling through substance lists. The core content is a substance registry updated by a national editorial board of experts within the field of clinical pharmacology. This ensures quality and consistency regarding substance terminologies and classification. All laboratories publish their own repertoires in a user-friendly workflow, adding laboratory-specific details to the core information in the substance registry. The user management system ensures that laboratories are restricted from editing content in the database core or in repertoires within other laboratory subpages. The portal is for nonprofit use, and has been fully funded by the Norwegian Medical Association, the Norwegian Society of Clinical Pharmacology, and the 8 largest pharmacologic institutions in Norway. The database server runs an open-source content management system that ensures flexibility with respect to further development projects, including the potential expansion of the Pharmacology Portal to other countries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The Dutch vision of clinical pharmacology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellens, J H M; Grouls, R; Guchelaar, H J; Touw, D J; Rongen, G A; de Boer, A; Van Bortel, L M

    Recent position papers addressing the profession of clinical pharmacology have expressed concerns about the decline of interest in the field among clinicians and medical educators in the United Kingdom and other Western countries, whether clinical pharmacology is actually therapeutics, and whether

  11. Finding a VOICE for UK clinical pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, Jeffrey K

    2012-06-01

    At a James Black Conference held in Oxford on 20-22 June 2011, a group of senior clinical pharmacologists and their junior colleagues, other medical specialists, and pharmacists discussed an agenda for UK clinical pharmacology for the next 5 years, addressing the following broad questions. How should UK clinical pharmacology be further developed and delivered as a discipline in universities, the NHS, pharmaceutical companies, and regulatory authorities? How should teaching and training in UK clinical pharmacology and therapeutics be delivered and assessed? What topics should be priorities for research in UK academic clinical pharmacology? How should clinical pharmacology contribute to UK drugs policy? How should pharmacology and clinical pharmacology be further integrated, to the benefit of both? Numerous recommendations emerged, under the collective acronym VOICE, standing for Visibility, Outreach, Integration, Coverage and Emissaries. VISIBILITY: The visibility of the discipline needs to be increased. This could be done, for example, by increased activities in acute general medicine/toxicology, through activities of Medicines and Therapeutics Committees, participation in grand rounds, teaching and training, and monitoring therapeutic interventions, and by offering bolt-on training for other specialists (for example, short courses, MSc courses, and training programmes). OUTREACH: Methods of increasing outreach include roadshows in schools/medical schools, national special study modules, public education, press coverage, and social marketing. INTEGRATION: Closer collaborations with pharmacologists, clinical pharmacists, other prescribers, and pharmaceutical companies (e.g. through joint training programmes) are desirable. COVERAGE: Attention to neglected areas, such as general practice, paediatrics, obstetrics, geriatrics, anaesthetics, cancer, and immunology. EMISSARIES: Trainees to spread the word. © 2012 The Author. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology

  12. Statistical reporting of clinical pharmacology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Arne; Schall, Robert; Loke, Yoon K; Day, Simon

    2017-06-01

    Research in clinical pharmacology covers a wide range of experiments, trials and investigations: clinical trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses of drug usage after market approval, the investigation of pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationships, the search for mechanisms of action or for potential signals for efficacy and safety using biomarkers. Often these investigations are exploratory in nature, which has implications for the way the data should be analysed and presented. Here we summarize some of the statistical issues that are of particular importance in clinical pharmacology research. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  13. Nortriptyline versus fluoxetine in the treatment of major depressive disorder: a six-month, double-blind clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashemi SN

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available SN Hashemi1, HR Ghafarian Shirazi2,3, A Mohamadi4, GH Zadeh-Bagheri5, KH Noorian5, M Malekzadeh21Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, 2Research Center of Social Factors Affecting Health, Yasuj University of Medical Sciences, Yasuj, 3School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, 4Department of Psychiatry, 5School of Medicine, Yasuj University of Medical Sciences, Yasuj, IranBackground: Depression is a common psychiatric disorder worldwide, including in Iran, and is estimated to affect 10%–15% of the population. Antidepressant drugs can have multiple side effects, so a good choice of drug is important for successful treatment. This study compared the efficacy of nortriptyline with that of fluoxetine in the treatment of patients with major depressive disorder and assessed related factors, including age, gender, and level of education.Methods: The study was a double-blind, randomized clinical trial with a six-month follow-up period. Participants were 120 patients aged 15–60 years with a diagnosis of major depressive disorder based on a psychiatry interview and the Beck depression rating scale, which were performed at the beginning, middle, and end of the study. The patients were treated with nortriptyline or fluoxetine. The paired t-test, independent t-test, and the k chi-square test were used to analyze the data.Results: Twenty-three patients dropped out and 97 remained in the trial. Before intervention, the mean depression score was 32.85 ± 6.23 in the nortriptyline group and 33.12 ± 6.50 in the fluoxetine group. The results of the independent t-test showed a significant difference between depression score means before and after treatment in both groups. Changes at the end of the trial compared with baseline scores were 13.4 ± 4.68 and 16.96 ± 4.96 for nortriptyline and fluoxetine, respectively. Paired t-testing showed a significant difference in the mean depression score for both the nortriptyline and

  14. Phaeochromocytoma unearthed by fluoxetine

    OpenAIRE

    Kashyap, A

    2000-01-01

    Non-specific noradrenaline reuptake inhibition by high dose selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, along with catecholamine release from phaeochromocytoma, may lead to a hypertensive paroxysm. This may unmask a clinically silent phaeochromocytoma. Hypertensive paroxysm induced by paroxetine leading to detection of phaeochromocytoma has been reported. The first patient in whom fluoxetine unmasked a phaeochromocytoma is reported.


Keywords: selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor; fluoxetine;...

  15. Bioanalysis, metabolism & clinical pharmacology of antiretroviral drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heine, R. ter

    2009-01-01

    The aims of all studies described in this thesis were to develop new bioanalytical and more patient friendly methods for studying the clinical pharmacology of antiretroviral drugs and to ultimately improve antiretroviral treatment.

  16. Applications of stable isotopes in clinical pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellekens, Reinout C A; Stellaard, Frans; Woerdenbag, Herman J; Frijlink, Henderik W; Kosterink, Jos G W

    2011-01-01

    This review aims to present an overview of the application of stable isotope technology in clinical pharmacology. Three main categories of stable isotope technology can be distinguished in clinical pharmacology. Firstly, it is applied in the assessment of drug pharmacology to determine the pharmacokinetic profile or mode of action of a drug substance. Secondly, stable isotopes may be used for the assessment of drug products or drug delivery systems by determination of parameters such as the bioavailability or the release profile. Thirdly, patients may be assessed in relation to patient-specific drug treatment; this concept is often called personalized medicine. In this article, the application of stable isotope technology in the aforementioned three areas is reviewed, with emphasis on developments over the past 25 years. The applications are illustrated with examples from clinical studies in humans. PMID:21801197

  17. Clinical pharmacology | Blockman | Continuing Medical Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuing Medical Education. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 28, No 3 (2010) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Clinical pharmacology. M Blockman. Abstract. No Abstract ...

  18. Clinical pharmacology considerations in biologics development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liang; Ren, Tian-hua; Wang, Diane D

    2012-01-01

    Biologics, including monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and other therapeutic proteins such as cytokines and growth hormones, have unique characteristics compared to small molecules. This paper starts from an overview of the pharmacokinetics (PK) of biologics from a mechanistic perspective, the determination of a starting dose for first-in-human (FIH) studies, and dosing regimen optimisation for phase II/III clinical trials. Subsequently, typical clinical pharmacology issues along the corresponding pathways for biologics development are summarised, including drug-drug interactions, QTc prolongation, immunogenicity, and studies in specific populations. The relationships between the molecular structure of biologics, their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics, and the corresponding clinical pharmacology strategies are summarised and depicted in a schematic diagram. PMID:23001474

  19. Clinical pharmacology considerations in biologics development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liang; Ren, Tian-hua; Wang, Diane D

    2012-11-01

    Biologics, including monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and other therapeutic proteins such as cytokines and growth hormones, have unique characteristics compared to small molecules. This paper starts from an overview of the pharmacokinetics (PK) of biologics from a mechanistic perspective, the determination of a starting dose for first-in-human (FIH) studies, and dosing regimen optimisation for phase II/III clinical trials. Subsequently, typical clinical pharmacology issues along the corresponding pathways for biologics development are summarised, including drug-drug interactions, QTc prolongation, immunogenicity, and studies in specific populations. The relationships between the molecular structure of biologics, their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics, and the corresponding clinical pharmacology strategies are summarised and depicted in a schematic diagram.

  20. Pharmacologic and clinical assessment of kratom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, C Michael

    2018-03-01

    This article reviews the pharmacology, clinical utility, adverse effects, and abuse potential of kratom. The leaves of Mitragyna speciosa contain the biologically active alkaloids of kratom. Kratom exerts opioid and α-2 receptor agonistic effects as well as antiinflammatory and parasympathetic-impeding effects. There are no published human pharmacologic, pharmacokinetic, or drug interaction studies on kratom or mitragynine, making it virtually impossible to fully understand kratom's therapeutic potential and risks and the populations most likely to benefit or experience harm from its use. Kratom has been used to ameliorate opioid withdrawal symptoms but also induces withdrawal. Human pharmacologic, pharmacokinetic, and clinical data are of low quality, precluding any firm conclusions regarding safety and efficacy. Respiratory depression has not been commonly reported, but kratom does cause a host of adverse effects without clear guidance for how they should be treated. There are numerous assessments where people have been unable to stop using kratom therapy, and withdrawal signs and symptoms are problematic. Kratom does not appear in normal drug screens and, when taken with other substances of abuse, may not be recognized. Thirty-six deaths have been attributed to kratom, and the Food and Drug Administration issued a public health warning about the substance in November 2017. Kratom exerts opioid and α-2 receptor agonistic effects as well as antiinflammatory and parasympathetic-impeding effects. Human pharmacologic, pharmacokinetic, and clinical data are of low quality, precluding any firm conclusions regarding safety and efficacy. Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Electronic cigarettes and nicotine clinical pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Megan J; Hoffman, Allison C

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the available literature evaluating electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) nicotine clinical pharmacology in order to understand the potential impact of e-cigarettes on individual users, nicotine dependence and public health. Methods Literature searches were conducted between 1 October 2012 and 30 September 2013 using key terms in five electronic databases. Studies were included in the review if they were in English and publicly available; non-clinical studies, conference abstracts and studies exclusively measuring nicotine content in e-cigarette cartridges were excluded from the review. Results Nicotine yields from automated smoking machines suggest that e-cigarettes deliver less nicotine per puff than traditional cigarettes, and clinical studies indicate that e-cigarettes deliver only modest nicotine concentrations to the inexperienced e-cigarette user. However, current e-cigarette smokers are able to achieve systemic nicotine and/or cotinine concentrations similar to those produced from traditional cigarettes. Therefore, user experience is critically important for nicotine exposure, and may contribute to the products’ ability to support and maintain nicotine dependence. Conclusions Knowledge about e-cigarette nicotine pharmacology remains limited. Because a user's e-cigarette experience may significantly impact nicotine delivery, future nicotine pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies should be conducted in experienced users to accurately assess the products’ impact on public health. PMID:24732160

  2. Radioimmunoassay in basic and clinical pharmacology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patrono, C.; Peskar, B.A.

    1987-01-01

    The subject of the book is the development, validation and application of radioimmunoassay (RIA) techniques for the measurement of a variety of substances in animal and human body fluids. The book discusses methodological and conceptual issues related to the main classes of mediators of drug action and to drugs themselves, as assayed by this particular analytical technique. A number of introductory chapters provide basic information concerning production and characterization of antibodies, labeling techniques, statistical aspects and validation criteria, insight into problems related to the development and validation of RIA for the newly discovered mediator(s). In the following chapters, the emphasis is placed on the technical details relevant to each class of compounds and on specific aspects of their applications to basic and/or clinical pharmacological studies. New developments in this area, such as monoclonal antibodies and non-radioactive labeling techniques, are also covered

  3. Clinical pharmacology of atovaquone and proguanil hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beerahee, M

    1999-05-01

    Atovaquone and proguanil hydrochloride is a new antimalarial combination that is used for treatment and prophylaxis of malaria. The clinical pharmacology of atovaquone and proguanil was reviewed. Atovaquone is a highly lipophilic compound with low aqueous solubility, the absorption of which is limited by the rate and extent of dissolution. Dietary fat increases the rate and extent of atovaquone absorption, increasing AUC two- to threefold and C(max) fivefold over fasting. Proguanil is rapidly and extensively absorbed regardless of food intake. Atovaquone is highly protein bound (> 99%) but does not displace other highly protein bound drugs in vitro, indicating significant drug interactions arising from displacement are unlikely. Atovaquone is predominantly eliminated unchanged in feces, with negligible excretion in urine. Proguanil is partially metabolized and partially excreted unchanged in urine. Its principal metabolite, cycloguanil, is also excreted in urine. Metabolism of proguanil is mediated in the liver by the cytochrome P450 3A and 2C subfamilies. The elimination half-life of atovaquone is 2 to 3 days in adults and 1 to 2 days in children. The elimination half-lives of proguanil and cycloguanil are 12 to 15 hours in adults and children. Dosage adjustments based on body weight categories in children (1/4 dose for 11-20 kg, 1/2 dose for > 20-30 kg, 3/4 dose for > 30-40 kg, and full dose for > 40 kg) achieve plasma concentrations that are safe and effective during prophylaxis and treatment of malaria. No dose adjustments for race, proguanil metabolizer status, gender, or elderly patients are needed, or for patients with mild to moderately impaired renal or hepatic function. The clinical pharmacology of atovaquone and proguanil provides a rationale for the dosing regimens recommended for treatment and prophylaxis of malaria.

  4. Fluoxetine Facilitates Fear Extinction Through Amygdala Endocannabinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunduz-Cinar, Ozge; Flynn, Shaun; Brockway, Emma; Kaugars, Katherine; Baldi, Rita; Ramikie, Teniel S; Cinar, Resat; Kunos, George; Patel, Sachin; Holmes, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Pharmacologically elevating brain endocannabinoids (eCBs) share anxiolytic and fear extinction-facilitating properties with classical therapeutics, including the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine. There are also known functional interactions between the eCB and serotonin systems and preliminary evidence that antidepressants cause alterations in brain eCBs. However, the potential role of eCBs in mediating the facilitatory effects of fluoxetine on fear extinction has not been established. Here, to test for a possible mechanistic contribution of eCBs to fluoxetine's proextinction effects, we integrated biochemical, electrophysiological, pharmacological, and behavioral techniques, using the extinction-impaired 129S1/Sv1mJ mouse strain. Chronic fluoxetine treatment produced a significant and selective increase in levels of anandamide in the BLA, and an associated decrease in activity of the anandamide-catabolizing enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase. Slice electrophysiological recordings showed that fluoxetine-induced increases in anandamide were associated with the amplification of eCB-mediated tonic constraint of inhibitory, but not excitatory, transmission in the BLA. Behaviorally, chronic fluoxetine facilitated extinction retrieval in a manner that was prevented by systemic or BLA-specific blockade of CB1 receptors. In contrast to fluoxetine, citalopram treatment did not increase BLA eCBs or facilitate extinction. Taken together, these findings reveal a novel, obligatory role for amygdala eCBs in the proextinction effects of a major pharmacotherapy for trauma- and stressor-related disorders and anxiety disorders.

  5. Comparative efficacy and safety of nortriptyline and fluoxetine in the treatment of major depression: a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabre, L F; Scharf, M B; Itil, T M

    1991-06-01

    The safety and efficacy of nortriptyline and fluoxetine were compared in a double-blind, randomized, multicenter 5-week trial involving 205 outpatients with acute major depression of moderate severity. Seventy-two nortriptyline and 84 fluoxetine patients completed at least 2 weeks of medication and were included in the efficacy analysis; all patients were evaluated for side effects. Average total scores on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) for both treatment groups declined from 22-23 at baseline to 11.5 at the conclusion of the 5-week period. At Week, 5, 71% of nortriptyline patients and 65% of fluoxetine patients were much or very much improved. Fluoxetine was associated more frequently with nausea (p less than .05), while nortriptyline was associated more frequently with dry mouth (p less than .05). These results are discussed in the context of selecting between nortriptyline and fluoxetine for a particular depressed patient.

  6. Effect of comorbid tics on a clinically meaningful response to 8-week open-label trial of fluoxetine in obsessive compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husted, David S; Shapira, Nathan A; Murphy, Tanya K; Mann, Giselle D; Ward, Herbert E; Goodman, Wayne K

    2007-01-01

    Currently, there are limited published data evaluating the effects of tics on serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI) monotherapy responses in treating obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). One retrospective case-controlled analysis of OCD patients treated with SRI monotherapy showed lesser improvement in OCD symptoms in patients with tics than those without. However, more recently there were preliminary reports of OCD subjects treated with SRI monotherapy which did not demonstrate poorer response in subjects with tics or Tourette's Syndrome (TS). The specific aim of this study was to investigate whether the presence of comorbid chronic tics affected "clinically meaningful improvement" [McDougle, C.J., Goodman, W.K., Leckman, J.F., Barr, L.C., Heninger, G.R., Price, L.H., 1993. The efficacy of fluvoxamine in obsessive-compulsive disorder: effects of comorbid chronic tic disorder. Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology 13, 354-358] of OCD in an 8-week open-label trial of fluoxetine monotherapy. Seventy-four adult subjects (13 patients with comorbid chronic tics and 61 patients without tics) with a primary DSM-IV OCD diagnosis were treated with up to 40mg fluoxetine for 8 weeks and had at least one post-baseline evaluation. The results indicate that there was a significant response by time in both fluoxetine-with-tic subjects and fluoxetine-without-tic subjects. Additionally, there were 3 (23.0%) OCD subjects with tics who had clinically meaningful improvement versus 16 (26.2%) OCD subjects without tics that demonstrated similar levels of improvement. These findings indicate that OCD patients with or without chronic tic disorders did not have a differential response to an 8-week open-label trial of fluoxetine. Limitations include the relatively low number of tic subjects and the open-label nature of the study. Additional data are needed on how comorbid tics may affect SRI treatment response in OCD.

  7. Fluoxetine and aripiprazole treatment following prenatal immune activation exert longstanding effects on rat locomotor response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richtand, Neil M; Ahlbrand, Rebecca; Horn, Paul; Tambyraja, Rabindra; Grainger, Molly; Bronson, Stefanie L; McNamara, Robert K

    2012-05-15

    Studies characterizing treatment interventions in a naturalistic setting suggest that antidepressant and antipsychotic medications may be equally effective in improving clinical outcome in individuals at high risk for first-episode psychosis. Of interest, both beneficial as well as potentially adverse effects have been observed following fluoxetine treatment in a mouse prenatal immune activation model of relevance to psychosis prevention. We sought to extend those findings by examining the effects of fluoxetine, as well as the antipsychotic medication aripiprazole, in a rat prenatal immune activation model. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with poly I:C or saline on gestational day 14. Offspring of poly I:C and saline-treated dams received fluoxetine (10.0 mg/kg/d), aripiprazole (0.66 mg/kg/d), or vehicle from postnatal days 35 to 70. Locomotor responses to novelty, saline injection, and amphetamine (1 and 5 mg/kg) were determined at three months, i.e., 21 days following drug discontinuation. Both fluoxetine and aripiprazole had beneficial effects on behavioral response to amphetamine (1 mg/kg) at 3 months, ameliorating the impact of prenatal immune activation on offspring of poly I:C-treated dams. Significantly, both drugs also exerted effects in offspring of control (saline-treated) dams on locomotor response to injection. Fluoxetine and aripiprazole pretreatment of poly I:C offspring from postnatal days 35 to 70 stabilized response to amphetamine exposure persisting through 3 months of age, similar to earlier findings in mice that fluoxetine treatment following prenatal immune activation prevented altered locomotor response to amphetamine. The current data also confirm earlier findings of potential adverse behavioral effects in offspring of control dams following treatment with fluoxetine and antipsychotic medications, highlighting the potential for both therapeutic as well as safety concerns with exposure to preventive pharmacological treatments over

  8. 77 FR 1696 - Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-11

    ...] Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and... of Committee: Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology. General... committee will discuss the clinical pharmacology aspects of pediatric clinical trial design and dosing to...

  9. Impulse control disorders: clinical characteristics and pharmacological management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Jon E; Potenza, Marc N

    2004-01-01

    This article reviews the current knowledge of the clinical characteristics and pharmacological management of pathological gambling, kleptomania, and compulsive buying. Specifically, the article summarizes the phenomenology and associated psychopathology of these disorders and presents study results of the various pharmacological agents used to treat these disorders--serotonin reuptake inhibitors, opioid antagonists, mood stabilizers, and atypical antipsychotics.

  10. Evidence of a suffocation alarm system sensitive to clinically-effective treatments with the panicolytics clonazepam and fluoxetine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimitel, Fagna Giacomin; Müller, Cláudia Janaina Torres; Tufik, Sérgio; Schenberg, Luiz Carlos

    2014-12-01

    Dyspnea, 'hunger for air', and the urge to flee are the cardinal symptoms of respiratory-type panic attacks. Patients also show baseline respiratory abnormalities and a higher rate of comorbid and antecedent respiratory diseases. Panic attacks are also precipitated by both the infusion of 0.5 M sodium lactate and the inhalation of 5-7% carbon dioxide (CO2) in predisposed patients, but not in healthy volunteers nor patients without panic disorder. Further studies show that patients with panic are also hyper-responsive to hypoxia. These and other observations led Klein (1993) to suggest that clinical panic is the misfiring of a suffocation alarm system. In rats, cytotoxic hypoxia of chemoreceptor cells by intravenous injection of potassium cyanide (KCN) produces short-lasting flight behaviors reminiscent of panic attacks. KCN-induced flight behaviors are blocked both by denervation of chemoreceptor cells and lesion of dorsal periaqueductal gray matter, a likely substrate of panic. Herein, we show that KCN-evoked flight behaviors are also attenuated by both acute and chronic treatment with clonazepam (0.01-0.3 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)) and fluoxetine (1-4 mg/kg/day, i.p. for 21 days), respectively. Attenuation of KCN-evoked panic-like behaviors by clinically-effective treatment with panicolytics adds fresh evidence to the false suffocation alarm theory of panic disorder. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Clinical pharmacology of novel anticancer drug formulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuurman, F.E.

    2013-01-01

    Studies outlined in this thesis describe the impact of drug formulations on pharmacology of anticancer drugs. It consists of four parts and starts with a review describing the mechanisms of low oral bioavailability of anti-cancer drugs and strategies for improvement of the bioavailability. The

  12. Chronic Intake of the Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Fluoxetine Enhances Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rami, Martina; Guillamat-Prats, Raquel; Rinne, Petteri; Salvermoser, Melanie; Ring, Larisa; Bianchini, Mariaelvy; Blanchet, Xavier; Megens, Remco T A; Döring, Yvonne; Walzog, Barbara; Soehnlein, Oliver; Weber, Christian; Faussner, Alexander; Steffens, Sabine

    2018-03-22

    Cardiovascular diseases and depression are the leading causes of disability in Western countries. Clinical data on potential cardiovascular effects of serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), the most commonly used antidepressant drugs, are controversial. In addition to blocking serotonin reuptake transporter in the brain, SSRIs deplete the major peripheral serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) storage by inhibiting serotonin reuptake transporter-mediated uptake in platelets. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of chronic SSRI intake on the development of atherosclerosis. Treatment of apolipoprotein E-deficient mice with the SSRI fluoxetine for 2, 4, or 16 weeks increased atherosclerotic lesion formation, with most pronounced effect during early plaque development. Intravital microscopy of carotid arteries revealed enhanced myeloid cell adhesion on fluoxetine treatment. Mechanistically, we found that fluoxetine augmented vascular permeability and increased chemokine-induced integrin-binding activity of circulating leukocytes. In vitro stimulation of murine blood demonstrated that fluoxetine, but not 5-HT, could directly promote β1 and β2 integrin activation provided C-C motif chemokine ligand 5 was also present. Similar effects were observed with the SSRI escitalopram. Enhanced C-C motif chemokine ligand 5-induced integrin activation by fluoxetine was also confirmed in human neutrophil-like HL 60 cells. In contrast to the proatherogenic properties of fluoxetine, pharmacological inhibition of the peripheral 5-HT synthesizing enzyme tryptophan hydroxylase 1 did not promote atherosclerosis, suggesting that the proatherogenic effect of fluoxetine occurs independent of peripheral 5-HT depletion. SSRI intake may promote atherosclerosis and therefore potentially increase the risk for acute cardiovascular events by a mechanism that is independent of 5-HT depletion. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. 76 FR 3912 - Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-21

    ...] Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and... of Committee: Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology. General... how to optimally utilize mechanistic biomarkers and apply clinical pharmacology tools, such as...

  14. Clinical pharmacology considerations in development of gastrohepatology products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S-C; Apparaju, S; Kim, I; Estes, K; Jappar, D; Bashaw, E D

    2012-09-01

    Clinical pharmacology has a key role in advancing candidate drugs from bench to bedside. A thorough understanding of underlying pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) processes is essential to inform the next steps in any drug development program with the goal of personalized medicine. Development of gastrohepatology drug products faces unique clinical pharmacology challenges that require collaborative efforts from academia, the pharmaceutical industry, and regulatory agencies.

  15. Achieving the World Health Organization's vision for clinical pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jennifer H; Henry, David; Gray, Jean; Day, Richard; Bochner, Felix; Ferro, Albert; Pirmohamed, Munir; Mörike, Klaus; Schwab, Matthias

    2016-02-01

    Clinical pharmacology is a medical specialty whose practitioners teach, undertake research, frame policy, give information and advice about the actions and proper uses of medicines in humans and implement that knowledge in clinical practice. It involves a combination of several activities: drug discovery and development, training safe prescribers, providing objective and evidence-based therapeutic information to ethics, regulatory and pricing bodies, supporting patient care in an increasingly subspecialized arena where co-morbidities, polypharmacy, altered pharmacokinetics and drug interactions are common and developing and contributing to medicines policies for Governments. Clinical pharmacologists must advocate drug quality and they must also advocate for sustainability of the Discipline. However for this they need appropriate clinical service and training support. This Commentary discusses strategies to ensure the Discipline is supported by teaching, training and policy organizations, to communicate the full benefits of clinical pharmacology services, put a monetary value on clinical pharmacology services and to grow the clinical pharmacology workforce to support a growing clinical, academic and regulatory need. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  16. Cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of cognitive therapy, rational emotive behavioral therapy, and fluoxetine (Prozac) in treating depression: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sava, Florin A; Yates, Brian T; Lupu, Viorel; Szentagotai, Aurora; David, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of cognitive therapy (CT), rational emotive behavioral therapy (REBT), and fluoxetine (Prozac) for major depressive disorder (MDD) were compared in a randomized clinical trial with a Romanian sample of 170 clients. Each intervention was offered for 14 weeks, plus three booster sessions. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scores were obtained prior to intervention, 7 and 14 weeks following the start of intervention, and 6 months following completion of intervention. CT, REBT, and fluoxetine did not differ significantly in changes in the BDI, depression-free days (DFDs), or Quality-Adjusted Life Years (QALYs). Average BDI scores decreased from 31.1 before treatment to 9.7 six months following completion of treatment. Due to lower costs, both psychotherapies were more cost-effective, and had better cost-utility, than pharmacotherapy: median $26.44/DFD gained/month for CT and $23.77/DFD gained/month for REBT versus $34.93/DFD gained/month for pharmacotherapy, median $/QALYs=$1,638, $1,734, and $2,287 for CT, REBT, and fluoxetine (Prozac), respectively. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Citalopram versus fluoxetine for the treatment of patients with bulimia nervosa: a single-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leombruni, Paolo; Amianto, Federico; Delsedime, Nadia; Gramaglia, Carla; Abbate-Daga, Giovanni; Fassino, Secondo

    2006-01-01

    The most studied and most frequently used pharmacologic treatments in bulimia nervosa are the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), in particular, fluoxetine. Less is known about the efficacy of the other SSRIs. To compare fluoxetine with citalopram in the treatment of bulimic patients, 37 bulimic patients were randomized to receive fluoxetine (n=18) or citalopram (n=19); these patients were assessed with regard to clinical (ie, body mass index, pathologic behaviors), psychopathologic (Eating Disorder Inventory-2, Body Shape Questionnaire, Binge-Eating Scale, Beck Depression Inventory), personality (Temperament and Character Inventory), and clinical global impression measures. These measures were compared between the 2 treatment groups at baseline and at the end of treatment. Dropout rates were similar in the 2 groups. Both groups showed significant improvement in eating psychopathology, angry feelings, and clinical global impression. Patients in the fluoxetine group displayed a greater reduction in introjected anger, whereas those in the citalopram group displayed a greater reduction in depressive feelings. Both treatments showed some effect on outcome measures, but efficacy profiles did not overlap. Citalopram may be useful in depressed patients with bulimia, whereas fluoxetine is more specific for those with introjected anger and bulimia.

  18. Fosfomycin: Pharmacological, Clinical and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneke Corinne Dijkmans

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Fosfomycin is a bactericidal, low-molecular weight, broad-spectrum antibiotic, with putative activity against several bacteria, including multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, by irreversibly inhibiting an early stage in cell wall synthesis. Evidence suggests that fosfomycin has a synergistic effect when used in combination with other antimicrobial agents that act via a different mechanism of action, thereby allowing for reduced dosages and lower toxicity. Fosfomycin does not bind to plasma proteins and is cleared via the kidneys. Due to its extensive tissue penetration, fosfomycin may be indicated for infections of the CNS, soft tissues, bone, lungs, and abscesses. The oral bioavailability of fosfomycin tromethamine is <50%; therefore, oral administration of fosfomycin tromethamine is approved only as a 3-gram one-time dose for treating urinary tract infections. However, based on published PK parameters, PK/PD simulations have been performed for several multiple-dose regimens, which might lead to the future use of fosfomycin for treating complicated infections with multidrug-resistant bacteria. Because essential pharmacological information and knowledge regarding mechanisms of resistance are currently limited and/or controversial, further studies are urgently needed, and fosfomycin monotherapy should be avoided.

  19. Basic and clinical pharmacology of glucocorticosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Daniel E

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticosteroids are a product of the adrenal cortex and perform a staggering number of physiological effects essential for life. Their clinical use is largely predicated on their anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties, but they also have notable efficacy in the prophylaxis of postoperative nausea and vomiting. This article reviews the basic functions of glucocorticoids and their clinical use in dental practice.

  20. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Pharmacologically active: clinical trials and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-01-22

    Jan 22, 2008 ... There is no reliable published value of pharmaceutical industry expenditure on clinical trials. The Pharmaceutical. Manufacturers Association, on the basis of a survey of its ... To determine the scale of current pharmaceutical R&D and clinical .... African market, a relatively drug-naïve population, and a high.

  1. The internet as a tool in clinical pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castel, Josep-Maria; Figueras, Albert; Vigo, Joan-Miquel

    2006-06-01

    The invention of the internet and the world-wide web was a landmark that has affected many aspects of everyday life, but is so recent and dynamic that many of its potential uses are still being explored. Aside from its purely commercial use as a virtual pharmacy (e-commerce), the internet is useful in at least three aspects related to clinical pharmacology: communication, training and research. In this paper we briefly review several internet applications related to clinical pharmacology and describe, as an example, the logistics of a multicentre research collaboration related to the promotion of rational drug use in the prevention of postpartum haemorrhage.

  2. The internet as a tool in clinical pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castel, Josep-Maria; Figueras, Albert; Vigo, Joan-Miquel

    2006-01-01

    The invention of the internet and the world-wide web was a landmark that has affected many aspects of everyday life, but is so recent and dynamic that many of its potential uses are still being explored. Aside from its purely commercial use as a virtual pharmacy (e-commerce), the internet is useful in at least three aspects related to clinical pharmacology: communication, training and research. In this paper we briefly review several internet applications related to clinical pharmacology and describe, as an example, the logistics of a multicentre research collaboration related to the promotion of rational drug use in the prevention of postpartum haemorrhage. PMID:16722847

  3. Basic and clinical pharmacology of autonomic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Daniel E

    2012-01-01

    Autonomic drugs are used clinically to either imitate or inhibit the normal functions of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems. A large number of additional drug classes also interact with these systems to produce a stunning number of possible side effects. This article reviews the basic function of the autonomic nervous system and the various drug classes that act within these neural synapses.

  4. Clinical Pharmacology Studies in Critically Ill Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Nilay; Salerno, Sara; Hornik, Christoph P.; Gonzalez, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Developmental and physiological changes in children contribute to variation in drug disposition with age. Additionally, critically ill children suffer from various life-threatening conditions that can lead to pathophysiological alterations that further affect pharmacokinetics (PK). Some factors that can alter PK in this patient population include variability in tissue distribution caused by protein binding changes and fluid shifts, altered drug elimination due to organ dysfunction, and use of medical interventions that can affect drug disposition (e.g., extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and continuous renal replacement therapy). Performing clinical studies in critically ill children is challenging because there is large inter-subject variability in the severity and time course of organ dysfunction; some critical illnesses are rare, which can affect subject enrollment; and critically ill children usually have multiple organ failure, necessitating careful selection of a study design. As a result, drug dosing in critically ill children is often based on extrapolations from adults or non-critically ill children. Dedicated clinical studies in critically ill children are urgently needed to identify optimal dosing of drugs in this population. This review will summarize the effect of critical illness on pediatric PK, the challenges associated with performing studies in this vulnerable subpopulation, and the clinical PK studies performed to date for commonly used drugs. PMID:27585904

  5. The Pharmacologic and Clinical Effects of Illicit Synthetic Cannabinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, C Michael

    2017-03-01

    This article presents information on illicitly used synthetic cannabinoids. Synthetic cannabinoids are structurally heterogeneous and commonly used drugs of abuse that act as full agonists of the cannabinoid type-1 receptor but have a variety of additional pharmacologic effects. There are numerous cases of patient harm and death in the United States, Europe, and Australia with many psychological, neurological, cardiovascular, pulmonary, and renal adverse events. Although most users prefer using cannabis, there are convenience, legal, and cost reasons driving the utilization of synthetic cannabinoids. Clinicians should be aware of pharmacologic and clinical similarities and differences between synthetic cannabinoid and cannabis use, the limited ability to detect synthetic cannabinoids in the urine or serum, and guidance to treat adverse events. © 2016, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  6. Phytochemistry, pharmacology, toxicology, and clinical trial of Ficus racemosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rajnish Kumar; Nandy, Bankim Chandra; Maity, Siddhartha; Sarkar, Srimanta; Saha, Sudipta

    2015-01-01

    Ficus racemosa is an important medicinal plant, found in India, Australia, and Southeast Asia. It is popularly known as 'gular.' It reduces blood glucose concentration due to the presence of β-sitosterol. Many active constituents that have been isolated from various parts of this plant possess useful pharmacological activities. The literature survey proposed that it has multiple pharmacological actions that include antidiabetic, antioxidant, antidiarrhoeal, anti-inflammatory, antipyretic, antifungal, antibacterial, hypolipidemic, antifilarial, and hepatoprotection. This review article elaborately describes the traditional uses, phytochemistry, pharmacology, and toxicology of this plant. We also provide useful structures of the secondary metabolites along with their nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data. Some clinical trial data have also been provided in this review. This review would assist researchers to gather scientific information in future.

  7. Phytochemistry, pharmacology, and clinical trials of Morus alba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Eric Wei-Chiang; Lye, Phui-Yan; Wong, Siu-Kuin

    2016-01-01

    The present review is aimed at providing a comprehensive summary on the botany, utility, phytochemistry, pharmacology, and clinical trials of Morus alba (mulberry or sang shu). The mulberry foliage has remained the primary food for silkworms for centuries. Its leaves have also been used as animal feed for livestock and its fruits have been made into a variety of food products. With flavonoids as major constituents, mulberry leaves possess various biological activities, including antioxidant, antimicrobial, skin-whitening, cytotoxic, anti-diabetic, glucosidase inhibition, anti-hyperlipidemic, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-obesity, cardioprotective, and cognitive enhancement activities. Rich in anthocyanins and alkaloids, mulberry fruits have pharmacological properties, such as antioxidant, anti-diabetic, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-obesity, and hepatoprotective activities. The root bark of mulberry, containing flavonoids, alkaloids and stilbenoids, has antimicrobial, skin-whitening, cytotoxic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-hyperlipidemic properties. Other pharmacological properties of M. alba include anti-platelet, anxiolytic, anti-asthmatic, anthelmintic, antidepressant, cardioprotective, and immunomodulatory activities. Clinical trials on the efficiency of M. alba extracts in reducing blood glucose and cholesterol levels and enhancing cognitive ability have been conducted. The phytochemistry and pharmacology of the different parts of the mulberry tree confer its traditional and current uses as fodder, food, cosmetics, and medicine. Overall, M. alba is a multi-functional plant with promising medicinal properties. Copyright © 2016 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinical pharmacology: special safety considerations in drug development and pharmacovigilance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atuah, Kwame N; Hughes, Dyfrig; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2004-01-01

    The dose of a drug is a major determinant of its safety, and establishing a safe dose of a novel drug is a prime objective during clinical development. The design of pre-marketing clinical trials precludes the representation of important subpopulations such as children, the elderly and people with co-morbidities. Therefore, postmarketing surveillance (PMS) activities are required to monitor the safety profile of drugs in real clinical practice. Furthermore, individual variations in pharmacogenetic profiles, the immune system, drug metabolic pathways and drug-drug interactions are also important factors in the occurrence of adverse drug reactions. Thus, the safety of a drug is a major clinical consideration before and after it is marketed. A multidisciplinary approach is required to enhance the safety profile of drugs at all stages of development, including PMS activities. Clinical pharmacology encompasses a range of disciplines and forms the backbone of drug safety consideration during clinical drug development. In this review we give an overview of the clinical drug development process and consider its limitations. We present a discussion of several aspects of clinical pharmacology and their application to enhancing drug safety. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modelling provides a method of predicting a clinically safe dose; consideration of drug pharmacokinetics in special populations may enhance safe therapeutics in a wider spectrum of patients, while pharmacogenetics provides the possibility of genotype-specific therapeutics. Pharmacovigilance activities are also discussed. Given the complex nature and unpredictability of type B reactions, PMS activities are crucial in managing the risks drugs pose to the general population. The various aspects of clinical pharmacology discussed make a strong case for this field as the backbone of optimising and promoting safe development and use of drugs.

  9. Clinical Pharmacology Considerations for the Development of Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jennifer; Srivastava, Shivani; Sanghavi, Kinjal; Lu, Zheng; Schmidt, Brian J; Bello, Akintunde; Gupta, Manish

    2017-10-01

    Immuno-oncology works through activation of the patient's immune system against cancer, with several advantages over other treatment approaches, including cytotoxic agents and molecular-targeted therapies. The most notable feature of immuno-oncology treatments is the nature of the patient responses achieved, which can be more durable and sustained than with other modalities. Increased understanding of immune system complexity has provided a number of opportunities to advance several strategies for the development of immuno-oncology therapies. This review outlines the clinical pharmacology characteristics and development challenges for the 6 approved immunomodulatory monoclonal antibodies that target 2 immune checkpoint pathways: ipilimumab (an anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 antibody) and, more recently, nivolumab and pembrolizumab (both anti-programmed death-1 antibodies) and atezolizumab, avelumab, and durvalumab (all anti-programmed death ligand-1 antibodies). These agents have revealed much about the clinical pharmacology features of immune checkpoint inhibitors as a class, as well as the pharmacometric approaches used to support their clinical development and regulatory approval. The development experiences with these pioneering immuno-oncology agents are likely to serve as useful guides in the discovery, progression, and approval of future drugs or combination of drugs in this class. This review includes summaries of the pharmacokinetics and exposure-response of the immune checkpoint inhibitors approved to date, as well as an overview of some quantitative systems pharmacology approaches. The ability of immuno-oncology to meet its full potential will depend on overcoming development challenges, including the need for clear strategies to determine optimal dose and scheduling for monotherapy as well as combination approaches. © 2017, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  10. Trends in paediatric clinical pharmacology data in US pharmaceutical labelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samiee-Zafarghandy, Samira; Mazer-Amirshahi, Maryann; van den Anker, Johannes N

    2014-09-01

    There is often a lack of safety and efficacy data in the paediatric population at the time of drug approval. Legislative efforts have promoted clinical pharmacology research in this underserved population. We sought to determine the quantity and quality of paediatric clinical pharmacology data in US drug labelling at the time of initial approval and to evaluate trends over time. The labelling data of 213 new molecular entities approved between 2003 and 2012 were systematically reviewed. The type of paediatric pharmacology data present at the time of approval was recorded and stratified by age group. Labelling revisions were analysed for updated paediatric data. The presence of paediatric-specific black-box warnings was noted. Of the 213 drugs evaluated, 48 had adult-specific indications. Of the remaining 165 medicines, only 47 (28%) had paediatric study data at the time of initial labelling. The number of approved drugs with paediatric data was the greatest in 2005 (8, 44%) and was at its lowest point in 2012 (3, 11%). Only five medicines had neonatal data, with none of the anti-infective agents presenting neonatal information. Seven medications had a paediatric-specific black-box warning. Additional 16 medicines presented paediatric data during general labelling updates. Despite efforts to improve the quality of paediatric clinical pharmacology data, there was not a significant increase in drugs with paediatric data at the time of approval over this 10-year study period. Paediatric drug approvals and labelling revisions continue to lag behind their adult counterparts. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. Nadroparin calcium: a review of its basic and clinical pharmacology

    OpenAIRE

    Ospina-González, Diego Alexander; Universidad de los Andes; Martínez, Jairo Andrés; Universidad de los Andes; Cifuentes, Luis Fernando; Universidad de los Andes

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate critically the evidence on the basic and clinical pharmacology of nadroparin calcium. Data source: We conducted a literature review from October 1985 to September 2010 in the electronic databases: Pubmed, Cochrane, MD Cosult, Medscape, Scielo and Instituto Nacional de Vigilancia de Medicamentos y Alimentos (INVIMA).Study selection: Studies published in English, Spanish or French made in humans and animals for experimentation which reviewed the basic and clinical pharmac...

  12. Clinical pharmacology profile of vorinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Marian; Friedman, Evan J; Sandhu, Punam; Agrawal, Nancy G B; Rubin, Eric H; Wagner, John A

    2013-09-01

    Vorinostat is a histone deacetylase inhibitor that has demonstrated preclinical activity in numerous cancer models. Clinical activity has been demonstrated in patients with a variety of malignancies. Vorinostat is presently indicated for the treatment of patients with advanced cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL). Clinical investigation is ongoing for therapy of other solid tumors and hematological malignancies either as monotherapy or in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents. This review summarizes the pharmacokinetic properties of vorinostat. Monotherapy pharmacokinetic data across a number of pharmacokinetic studies were reviewed, and data are presented. In addition, literature review was performed to obtain published Phase I and II pharmacokinetic combination therapy data to identify and characterize potential drug interactions with vorinostat. Pharmacokinetic data in special populations were also reviewed. The clinical pharmacology profile of vorinostat is favorable, exhibiting dose-proportional pharmacokinetics and modest food effect. There appear to be no major differences in the pharmacokinetics of vorinostat in special populations, including varying demographics and hepatic dysfunction. Combination therapy pharmacokinetic data indicate that vorinostat has a low propensity for drug interactions. Vorinostat's favorable clinical pharmacology and drug interaction profile aid in the ease of administration of vorinostat for the treatment of advanced CTCL and will be beneficial in continued assessment for other oncologic indications. Although a number of studies have been conducted to elucidate the detailed pharmacokinetic profile of vorinostat, more rigorous assessment of vorinostat pharmacokinetics, including clinical drug interaction studies, will be informative.

  13. 75 FR 8368 - Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-24

    ...] Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and... of Committee: Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology. General... responses, both beneficial and harmful, to certain drugs; (2) a new patient-centric clinical pharmacology...

  14. 76 FR 38668 - Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    ...] Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and... of Committee: Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology. General... Clinical Pharmacology (ACPS-CP) meeting, the committee will further discuss the definition and list of NTI...

  15. Pharmacological treatment of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Marcio C; Halpern, Alfredo

    2006-04-01

    This review offers an overview of physiological agents, current therapeutics, as well as medications, which have been extensively used and those agents not currently available or non-classically considered anti-obesity drugs. As obesity - particularly that of central distribution - represents an important triggering factor for insulin resistance, its pharmacological treatment is relevant in the context of metabolic syndrome control. The authors present an extensive review on the criteria for anti-obesity management efficacy, on physiological mechanisms that regulate central and/or peripheral energy homeostasis (nutrients, monoamines, and peptides), on beta-phenethylamine pharmacological derivative agents (fenfluramine, dexfenfluramine, phentermine and sibutramine), tricyclic derivatives (mazindol), phenylpropanolamine derivatives (ephedrin, phenylpropanolamine), phenylpropanolamine oxytrifluorphenyl derivative (fluoxetine), a naftilamine derivative (sertraline) and a lipstatine derivative (orlistat). An analysis of all clinical trials - over ten-week long - is also presented for medications used in the management of obesity, as well as data about future medications, such as a the inverse cannabinoid agonist, rimonabant.

  16. Basic and clinical pharmacology contribution to extend anthelmintic molecules lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanusse, Carlos; Lifschitz, Adrian; Alvarez, Luis

    2015-08-15

    The correct use of pharmacology-based information is critical to design successful strategies for the future of parasite control in livestock animals. Integrated pharmaco-parasitological research approaches have greatly contributed to optimize drug activity. In an attempt to manage drug resistance in helminths of ruminants, combinations of two or more anthelmintics are being used or promoted, based on the fact that individual worms may have a lower degree of resistance to a multiple component formulation, when each chemical has a different mode of action compared to that observed when a single compound is used. However, as emphasized in the current review, the occurrence of potential pharmacokinetic and/or pharmacodynamic interactions between drug components highlights the need for deeper and integrated research to identify the advantages or disadvantages associated with the use of combined drug preparations. This review article provides integrated pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic and clinical pharmacology information pertinent to preserve the traditional and modern active ingredients as practical tools for parasite control. Novel pharmacological data on derquantel and monepantel, as representatives of modern anthelmintics for use in livestock, is summarized here. The article also summarizes the pharmaco-parasitological knowledge considered critical to secure and/or extend the lifespan of the recently available novel molecules. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Amphetamine, past and present--a pharmacological and clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heal, David J; Smith, Sharon L; Gosden, Jane; Nutt, David J

    2013-06-01

    Amphetamine was discovered over 100 years ago. Since then, it has transformed from a drug that was freely available without prescription as a panacea for a broad range of disorders into a highly restricted Controlled Drug with therapeutic applications restricted to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy. This review describes the relationship between chemical structure and pharmacology of amphetamine and its congeners. Amphetamine's diverse pharmacological actions translate not only into therapeutic efficacy, but also into the production of adverse events and liability for recreational abuse. Accordingly, the balance of benefit/risk is the key challenge for its clinical use. The review charts advances in pharmaceutical development from the introduction of once-daily formulations of amphetamine through to lisdexamfetamine, which is the first d-amphetamine prodrug approved for the management of ADHD in children, adolescents and adults. The unusual metabolic route for lisdexamfetamine to deliver d-amphetamine makes an important contribution to its pharmacology. How lisdexamfetamine's distinctive pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile translates into sustained efficacy as a treatment for ADHD and its reduced potential for recreational abuse is also discussed.

  18. Amphetamine, past and present – a pharmacological and clinical perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sharon L; Gosden, Jane; Nutt, David J

    2013-01-01

    Amphetamine was discovered over 100 years ago. Since then, it has transformed from a drug that was freely available without prescription as a panacea for a broad range of disorders into a highly restricted Controlled Drug with therapeutic applications restricted to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy. This review describes the relationship between chemical structure and pharmacology of amphetamine and its congeners. Amphetamine’s diverse pharmacological actions translate not only into therapeutic efficacy, but also into the production of adverse events and liability for recreational abuse. Accordingly, the balance of benefit/risk is the key challenge for its clinical use. The review charts advances in pharmaceutical development from the introduction of once-daily formulations of amphetamine through to lisdexamfetamine, which is the first d-amphetamine prodrug approved for the management of ADHD in children, adolescents and adults. The unusual metabolic route for lisdexamfetamine to deliver d-amphetamine makes an important contribution to its pharmacology. How lisdexamfetamine’s distinctive pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile translates into sustained efficacy as a treatment for ADHD and its reduced potential for recreational abuse is also discussed. PMID:23539642

  19. Role of clinical pharmacology in the development of antiplatelet drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrono, Carlo

    2014-12-01

    This review discusses the role of clinical pharmacology in the development of low-dose aspirin and other antiplatelet agents during the past 30 years, emphasizing the main determinants of several success stories as well as of complete failures in the field. The author employs personal appraisal of the literature, with emphasis on personal contributions to the field. Low-dose aspirin provides an interesting paradigm of the independent development of a "new" antiplatelet agent by the medical/scientific community. Aspirin "resistance," improved dosing regimens for personalized therapy, and chemoprevention of colorectal cancer are thoroughly discussed. The industry-driven development paradigm includes 12 mechanism-based antiplatelet agents. Of those completing Phase 3, only 6 have been approved for the acute treatment or secondary prevention of atherothrombosis. Inadequate Phase 2 studies were largely involved in Phase 3 failures. The design of mechanism-based pharmacodynamic biomarkers and sophisticated Phase 2 investigations appear as an important key to successful drug development in this field. Clinical pharmacology has an excellent track record in this endeavor, and its role needs to be expanded, as suggested by the case studies discussed in this review. Finally, the choice of appropriate platelet-dependent end points and homogeneous clinical settings for Phase 3 trials not only represent desirable objectives for an integrated scientific and regulatory discussion but also deserve proper ethical consideration by all stakeholders to avoid an unacceptable burden of drug toxicity and an unsustainable waste of financial resources. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Pharmacological effect on pyeloureteric dynamics with a clinical perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Helene U; Frimodt-Møller, Poul C; Osther, Palle J

    2006-01-01

    We searched to review experimental and clinical trials concerning the capabilities of impacting on the ureteric and pelvic activity by means of pharmacological stimulation. Ureteropyeloscopy may cause high renal pelvic pressure. The normal pressure is in the range of 5-15 mmHg whereas pressure...... an increased risk of several complications related to endourological procedures including bleeding, perforation and infection. In other words, means by which intrarenal pressure could be lowered during endourological procedures might be beneficial with respect to clinical outcomes. In vitro experiments support...... systemic side effects. In vivo human studies are necessary to clarify the exact dose-response relationship and the degree of urothelial absorption of a drug before clinical use may be adopted....

  1. Clinical pharmacology profile of care in Hepatology clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Passos, Talita Rocha; Santos, Fabiana Silva; Martins, Maria Cleusa; Pinto, Vanusa Barbosa; Carrilho, Flair José; Ono, Suzane Kioko

    2017-01-01

    Summary Since 2010, the Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology Division of the Central Institute of Hospital das Clínicas of the University of São Paulo Medical School (HC-FMUSP, in the Portuguese acronym) has been developing specialized electives assistance activities in the Outpatient Specialty Clinic, Secondary Level, in São Paulo NGA-63 Várzea do Carmo. The objective of this study was to analyze the pharmacotherapeutic profile of patients. This is a cross-sectional and retrospective stu...

  2. Clinical pharmacology profile of care in Hepatology clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talita Rocha Passos

    Full Text Available Summary Since 2010, the Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology Division of the Central Institute of Hospital das Clínicas of the University of São Paulo Medical School (HC-FMUSP, in the Portuguese acronym has been developing specialized electives assistance activities in the Outpatient Specialty Clinic, Secondary Level, in São Paulo NGA-63 Várzea do Carmo. The objective of this study was to analyze the pharmacotherapeutic profile of patients. This is a cross-sectional and retrospective study in which patients were seen at the Hepatology sector and the results were submitted to descriptive statistics. During the study period, 492 patients were treated at the clinic, with a mean age of 58.9 years and frequency of 61.2% female and 74.8% living in São Paulo. This population was served by various other medical specialties (cardiology and endocrine among others and the major liver diagnoses were: chronic hepatitis B and C and fatty liver. Comorbidities were also identified, such as diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia. Most patients took their medication in the Basic Health Units. We found that 30% of patients use of more than five medications and the most prescribed were omeprazole 208 (42.3%, metformin 132 (26.8% and losartan 80 (16.3%. Because it is an adult/elderly population, with several comorbidities and polymedication, it is important to be aware of the rational use of medication. The multidisciplinary team is important in applying correct conducts for the safe use of medicines, to reduce the burden on health spending and improving the quality of life of patients.

  3. Drug repurposing: translational pharmacology, chemistry, computers and the clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Naiem T; Byers, Stephen W; Dakshanamurthy, Sivanesan

    2013-01-01

    The process of discovering a pharmacological compound that elicits a desired clinical effect with minimal side effects is a challenge. Prior to the advent of high-performance computing and large-scale screening technologies, drug discovery was largely a serendipitous endeavor, as in the case of thalidomide for erythema nodosum leprosum or cancer drugs in general derived from flora located in far-reaching geographic locations. More recently, de novo drug discovery has become a more rationalized process where drug-target-effect hypotheses are formulated on the basis of already known compounds/protein targets and their structures. Although this approach is hypothesis-driven, the actual success has been very low, contributing to the soaring costs of research and development as well as the diminished pharmaceutical pipeline in the United States. In this review, we discuss the evolution in computational pharmacology as the next generation of successful drug discovery and implementation in the clinic where high-performance computing (HPC) is used to generate and validate drug-target-effect hypotheses completely in silico. The use of HPC would decrease development time and errors while increasing productivity prior to in vitro, animal and human testing. We highlight approaches in chemoinformatics, bioinformatics as well as network biopharmacology to illustrate potential avenues from which to design clinically efficacious drugs. We further discuss the implications of combining these approaches into an integrative methodology for high-accuracy computational predictions within the context of drug repositioning for the efficient streamlining of currently approved drugs back into clinical trials for possible new indications.

  4. Clinical pharmacology education and training at the National Institutes of Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lertora, J J L; Atkinson, A J

    2007-06-01

    In 1965, the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) established the intramural Pharmacology Research Associate Training (PRAT) program with the primary goals of providing postdoctoral training in pharmacology for individuals with or without previous pharmacology graduate training, and allowing individuals with doctoral degrees in pharmacology to obtain advanced training in other areas of science at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The program utilized research preceptors drawn from laboratories that were conducting pharmacology-related research at the NIH campus. Although primary emphasis was placed on training laboratory scientists, a number of PRAT fellows obtained training that enabled them to pursue successful careers in clinical pharmacology. A partial listing of these individuals is shown in Table 1. Eventually, a clinical pharmacology training option was formalized within the PRAT program by the appointment of a Clinical Pharmacology Program Director, but this was subsequently suspended when this individual left NIH for a position in the pharmaceutical industry.

  5. Cannabinoid receptor antagonists: pharmacological opportunities, clinical experience, and translational prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janero, David R; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2009-03-01

    The endogenous cannabinoid (CB) (endocannabinoid) signaling system is involved in a variety of (patho)physiological processes, primarily by virtue of natural, arachidonic acid-derived lipids (endocannabinoids) that activate G protein-coupled CB1 and CB2 receptors. A hyperactive endocannabinoid system appears to contribute to the etiology of several disease states that constitute significant global threats to human health. Consequently, mounting interest surrounds the design and profiling of receptor-targeted CB antagonists as pharmacotherapeutics that attenuate endocannabinoid transmission for salutary gain. Experimental and clinical evidence supports the therapeutic potential of CB1 receptor antagonists to treat overweight/obesity, obesity-related cardiometabolic disorders, and substance abuse. Laboratory data suggest that CB2 receptor antagonists might be effective immunomodulatory and, perhaps, anti-inflammatory drugs. One CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist, rimonabant, has emerged as the first-in-class drug approved outside the United States for weight control. Select follow-on agents (taranabant, otenabant, surinabant, rosonabant, SLV-319, AVE1625, V24343) have also been studied in the clinic. However, rimonabant's market withdrawal in the European Union and suspension of rimonabant's, taranabant's, and otenabant's ongoing development programs have highlighted some adverse clinical side effects (especially nausea and psychiatric disturbances) of CB1 receptor antagonists/inverse agonists. Novel CB1 receptor ligands that are peripherally directed and/or exhibit neutral antagonism (the latter not affecting constitutive CB1 receptor signaling) may optimize the benefits of CB1 receptor antagonists while minimizing any risk. Indeed, CB1 receptor-neutral antagonists appear from preclinical data to offer efficacy comparable to or better than that of prototype CB1 receptor antagonists/inverse agonists, with less propensity to induce nausea. Continued

  6. Aquatic toxicology of fluoxetine: understanding the knowns and the unknowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Adam Michael; Grossman, Leah; Nguyen, Michael; Maximino, Caio; Rosemberg, Denis Broock; Echevarria, David J; Kalueff, Allan V

    2014-11-01

    Fluoxetine is one of the most prescribed psychotropic medications, and is an agent of increasing interest for environmental toxicology. Fish and other aquatic organisms are excellent models to study neuroactive small molecules like fluoxetine. However, prone to variance due to experimental factors, data obtained in these models need to be interpreted with caution, using proper experimental protocols, study designs, validated endpoints as well as well-established models and tests. Choosing the treatment protocol and dose range for fluoxetine and other serotonergic drugs is critical for obtaining valid test results and correct data interpretation. Here we discuss the value of aquatic models to study fluoxetine effects, based on prior high-quality research, and outline the directions of future translational studies in the field. We review fluoxetine-evoked phenotypes in acute vs. chronic protocols, discussing them in the contact of complex role of serotonin in behavioral regulation. We conclude that zebrafish and other aquatic models represent a useful in-vivo tool for fluoxetine pharmacology and (eco)toxicology research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Protective effects of fluoxetine on decompression sickness in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Eric Blatteau

    Full Text Available Massive bubble formation after diving can lead to decompression sickness (DCS that can result in central nervous system disorders or even death. Bubbles alter the vascular endothelium and activate blood cells and inflammatory pathways, leading to a systemic pathophysiological process that promotes ischemic damage. Fluoxetine, a well-known antidepressant, is recognized as having anti-inflammatory properties at the systemic level, as well as in the setting of cerebral ischemia. We report a beneficial clinical effect associated with fluoxetine in experimental DCS. 91 mice were subjected to a simulated dive at 90 msw for 45 min before rapid decompression. The experimental group received 50 mg/kg of fluoxetine 18 hours before hyperbaric exposure (n = 46 while controls were not treated (n = 45. Clinical assessment took place over a period of 30 min after surfacing. At the end, blood samples were collected for blood cells counts and cytokine IL-6 detection. There were significantly fewer manifestations of DCS in the fluoxetine group than in the controls (43.5% versus 75.5%, respectively; p = 0.004. Survivors showed a better and significant neurological recovery with fluoxetine. Platelets and red cells were significantly decreased after decompression in controls but not in the treated mice. Fluoxetine reduced circulating IL-6, a relevant marker of systemic inflammation in DCS. We concluded that fluoxetine decreased the incidence of DCS and improved motor recovery, by limiting inflammation processes.

  8. CNS pharmacology and clinical therapeutic effects of oxiracetam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itil, T M; Menon, G N; Songar, A; Itil, K Z

    1986-01-01

    Oxiracetam, a new substance found to be a nootropic in experimental pharmacological studies, was tested in three clinical trials: a single rising dose tolerance and dose-finding study with quantitative pharmaco-electroencephalogram (pharmaco-EEG) and quantitative pharmacopsychology in healthy volunteers; a dose-finding study, at three dose levels for 3 months, with quantitative pharmaco-EEG in mild to moderate dementia patients; and a safety and efficacy study with increasing dosages for 12 weeks with subjective and objective tests in elderly patients with dementia. In single and repeated oral dosages up to 2,400 mg, oxiracetam is a safe compound. According to HZI Data Bank Classification Systems, oxiracetam is a vigilance-enhancing compound with some effects on spontaneous memory. The therapeutic effect of oxiracetam can be discriminated from placebo, and in comparison with piracetam, oxiracetam exhibits greater improvement in memory factor.

  9. World Antimalarial Resistance Network (WARN IV: Clinical pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gbotosho Grace O

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A World Antimalarial Resistance Network (WARN database has the potential to improve the treatment of malaria, through informing current drug selection and use and providing a prompt warning of when treatment policies need changing. This manuscript outlines the contribution and structure of the clinical pharmacology component of this database. The determinants of treatment response are multi-factorial, but clearly providing adequate blood concentrations is pivotal to curing malaria. The ability of available antimalarial pharmacokinetic data to inform optimal dosing is constrained by the small number of patients studied, with even fewer (if any studies conducted in the most vulnerable populations. There are even less data relating blood concentration data to the therapeutic response (pharmacodynamics. By pooling all available pharmacokinetic data, while paying careful attention to the analytical methodologies used, the limitations of small (and thus underpowered individual studies may be overcome and factors that contribute to inter-individual variability in pharmacokinetic parameters defined. Key variables for pharmacokinetic studies are defined in terms of patient (or study subject characteristics, the formulation and route of administration of the antimalarial studied, the sampling and assay methodology, and the approach taken to data analysis. Better defining these information needs and criteria of acceptability of pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD studies should contribute to improving the quantity, relevance and quality of these studies. A better understanding of the pharmacokinetic properties of antimalarials and a more clear definition of what constitutes "therapeutic drug levels" would allow more precise use of the term "antimalarial resistance", as it would indicate when treatment failure is not caused by intrinsic parasite resistance but is instead the result of inadequate drug levels. The clinical pharmacology component

  10. (R)-fluoxetine enhances cognitive flexibility and hippocampal cell proliferation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwari, Subhi; Dawe, Gavin S

    2018-04-01

    Fluoxetine is a clinically successful antidepressant. It is a racemic mixture of (R) and (S) stereoisomers. In preclinical studies, chronic treatment with fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) had antidepressant effects correlated with increased hippocampal cell proliferation in adult rodents. However, the contribution of the enantiomers of fluoxetine is largely unknown. We investigated the effects of treatment with (R)- and (S)-fluoxetine on cognitive behavioral paradigms and examined cell proliferation in the hippocampus of C57BL/6J female mice. In a behavioral sequencing task using the IntelliCage system in which discriminated spatial patterns of rewarded and never-rewarded corners were reversed serially, (R)-fluoxetine-treated mice showed rapid acquisition of behavioral sequencing (compared with S-fluoxetine) and cognitive flexibility in subsequent reversal stages in intra- and inter-session analysis. (R)-fluoxetine also increased cell proliferation in the hippocampus, in particular in the suprapyramidal blade of the dentate gyrus. (R)-fluoxetine had superior effects to (S)-fluoxetine in elevated plus maze, forced-swim and tail-suspension tests. These results suggest that (R)-fluoxetine, which has been reported to have a shorter half-life than (S)-fluoxetine, has superior antidepressant effects and more consistently improves spatial learning and memory. This profile offers advantages in depression treatment and may also aid management of the neurocognitive impairments associated with depression.

  11. Fluoxetine promotes remission in acute experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xi-qiu; Qiu, Guang; Liu, Xiao-jia; Liu, Shan; Wu, Yongming; Wang, Xinyu; Lu, Tianming

    2012-01-01

    This study was carried out to clarify the effects of the antidepressant fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, for its potential use in autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis in a rat model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The rat EAE model was induced by subcutaneous injection of guinea pig spinal cord homogenate. Rats received fluoxetine via daily intragastric administration, starting 2 weeks prior to immune induction (fluoxetine pretreatment). Clinical scores and pathological changes in EAE rats were analyzed. Changes in serum cytokine levels were assessed by ELISA. Fluoxetine pretreatment significantly promoted remission in EAE. Histologically, fluoxetine-induced neuroprotection was accompanied by reductions in inflammatory foci and in the degree of demyelination in the spinal cord of EAE rats. The increase in serum IFN-γ in the EAE model was also suppressed by fluoxetine administration. These findings suggest that the prophylactic use of fluoxetine can relieve symptoms during remission in the acute EAE model, and these neuroprotective effects are associated with its anti-inflammatory effects. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Clinical pharmacology and general patient care in two teaching hospitals1

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, Susan M; Turner, Paul; Vere, Duncan

    1980-01-01

    The clinical responsibilities and activities over 12-month periods of the Departments of Clinical Pharmacology of two London teaching hospitals have been analysed. The results suggest that clinical pharmacology should not be regarded only as an academic specialty but that it has an important role in patient care.

  13. Clinical pharmacology review of escitalopram for the treatment of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastoor, Devin; Gobburu, Joga

    2014-01-01

    Depression is a serious and debilitating psychiatric condition with serious societal health and economic implications. Escitalopram , the S-enantiomer of racemic citalopram, is an effective treatment for major depressive disorder. This review covers the clinical pharmacology of escitalopram, with emphasis on regulatory approval. Its pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and clinical efficacy for major depressive disorder are evaluated, along with data regarding safety and tolerability. Drug development of escitalopram was heavily guided by prior approval of citalopram. Select safety and efficacy studies for escitalopram in combination with supportive evidence from the results of prior citalopram studies allowed for regulatory approval for acute and maintenance claims in both adults and adolescents, while minimizing burden on the sponsor. Escitalopram has been shown to have better efficacy and safety profile than other selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor drugs, including racemic citalopram. The first generic escitalopram was approved in 2012, along with Abbreviated New Drug Applications. The associated cost savings have helped reduce the burden of weighing the benefits of escitalopram over less-expensive alternatives.

  14. Clinical Pharmacology of Fentanyl in Preterm Infants. A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Maria Pacifici

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid that is very important in anesthetic practice because of its relatively short time to peak analgesic effect and the rapid termination of action after small bolus doses. The objective of this survey is to review the clinical pharmacology of fentanyl in preterm infants. The bibliographic search was performed using PubMed and EMBASE databases as search engines. In addition, the books Neofax: A manual of drugs used in neonatal care and Neonatal formulary were consulted. Fentanyl is N-dealkylated by CYP3A4 into the inactive norfentanyl. Fentanyl may be administered as bolus doses or as a continuous infusion. In neonates, there is a remarkable interindividual variability in the kinetic parameters. In neonates, fentanyl half-life ranges from 317 minutes to 1266 minutes and in adults it is 222 minutes. Respiratory depression occurs when fentanyl doses are >5 μg/kg. Chest wall rigidity may occur in neonates and occasionally is associated with laryngospasm. Tolerance to fentanyl may develop after prolonged use of this drug. Significant withdrawal symptoms have been reported in infants treated with continuous infusion for 5 days or longer. Fentanyl is an extremely potent analgesic and is the opioid analgesic most frequently used in the neonatal intensive care unit.

  15. A randomized clinical trial of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR), fluoxetine, and pill placebo in the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder: treatment effects and long-term maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kolk, Bessel A; Spinazzola, Joseph; Blaustein, Margaret E; Hopper, James W; Hopper, Elizabeth K; Korn, Deborah L; Simpson, William B

    2007-01-01

    The relative short-term efficacy and long-term benefits of pharmacologic versus psychotherapeutic interventions have not been studied for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This study compared the efficacy of a selective serotonin reup-take inhibitor (SSRI), fluoxetine, with a psychotherapeutic treatment, eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR), and pill placebo and measured maintenance of treatment gains at 6-month follow-up. Eighty-eight PTSD subjects diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria were randomly assigned to EMDR, fluoxetine, or pill placebo. They received 8 weeks of treatment and were assessed by blind raters posttreatment and at 6-month follow-up. The primary outcome measure was the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale, DSM-IV version, and the secondary outcome measure was the Beck Depression Inventory-II. The study ran from July 2000 through July 2003. The psychotherapy intervention was more successful than pharmacotherapy in achieving sustained reductions in PTSD and depression symptoms, but this benefit accrued primarily for adult-onset trauma survivors. At 6-month follow-up, 75.0% of adult-onset versus 33.3% of child-onset trauma subjects receiving EMDR achieved asymptomatic end-state functioning compared with none in the fluoxetine group. For most childhood-onset trauma patients, neither treatment produced complete symptom remission. This study supports the efficacy of brief EMDR treatment to produce substantial and sustained reduction of PTSD and depression in most victims of adult-onset trauma. It suggests a role for SSRIs as a reliable first-line intervention to achieve moderate symptom relief for adult victims of childhood-onset trauma. Future research should assess the impact of lengthier intervention, combination treatments, and treatment sequencing on the resolution of PTSD in adults with childhood-onset trauma.

  16. The roles of BDNF, pCREB and Wnt3a in the latent period preceding activation of progenitor cell mitosis in the adult dentate gyrus by fluoxetine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scarlett B Pinnock

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The formation of new neurons continues into adult life in the dentate gyrus of the rat hippocampus, as in many other species. Neurogenesis itself turns out to be highly labile, and is regulated by a number of factors. One of these is the serotoninergic system: treatment with drugs (such as the SSRI fluoxetine markedly stimulates mitosis in the progenitor cells of the dentate gyrus. But this process has one remarkable feature: it takes at least 14 days of continuous treatment to be effective. This is despite the fact that the pharmacological action of fluoxetine occurs within an hour or so of first administration. This paper explores the role of BDNF in this process, using the effect of a Trk antagonist (K252a on the labelling of progenitor cells with the mitosis marker Ki67 and the associated expression of pCREB and Wnt3a. These experiments show that (i Fluoxetine increased Ki67 counts, as well as pCREB and Wnt3a expression in the dentate gyrus. The action of fluoxetine on the progenitor cells and on pCREB (but not Wnt3a depends upon Trk receptor activation, since it was prevented by icv infusion of K252a. (ii These receptors are required for both the first 7 days of fluoxetine action, during which no apparent change in progenitor mitosis occurs, as well as the second 7 days. Increased pCREB was always associated with progenitor cell mitosis, but Wnt3a expression may be necessary but not sufficient for increased progenitor cell proliferation. These results shed new light on the action of fluoxetine on neurogenesis in the adult dentate gyrus, and have both clinical and experimental interest.

  17. 77 FR 42746 - Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-N-0001] Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and... of Committee: Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology. General...

  18. 77 FR 41790 - Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-N-0001] Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and... of Committee: Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology. General...

  19. 76 FR 38188 - Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-N-0002] Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and... of Committee: Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology. General...

  20. 78 FR 58314 - Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2013-N-0001] Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and... of Committee: Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology. General...

  1. 78 FR 42966 - Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2013-N-0001] Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and... of Committee: Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology. General...

  2. 78 FR 58315 - Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2013-N-0001] Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and... of Committee: Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology. General...

  3. 75 FR 10488 - Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-N-0001] Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and... of Committee: Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology. General...

  4. Mephedrone (4-methylmethcathinone; 'meow meow'): chemical, pharmacological and clinical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schifano, Fabrizio; Albanese, Antonio; Fergus, Suzanne; Stair, Jackie L; Deluca, Paolo; Corazza, Ornella; Davey, Zoe; Corkery, John; Siemann, Holger; Scherbaum, Norbert; Farre', Magi'; Torrens, Marta; Demetrovics, Zsolt; Ghodse, A Hamid

    2011-04-01

    Recently, those substances deriving from the active ingredient of the Khat plant, cathinone, have been rising in popularity. Indeed, 4-methylmethcathinone (mephedrone; 'meow meow' and others) has been seen by some as a cheaper alternative to other classified recreational drugs. We aimed here at providing a state-of-the-art review on mephedrone history and prevalence of misuse, chemistry, pharmacology, legal status, product market appearance, clinical/management and related fatalities. Because of the limited evidence, some of the information here presented has been obtained from user reports/drug user-orientated web sites. The most common routes for mephedrone recreational use include insufflation and oral ingestion. It elicits stimulant and empathogenic effects similar to amphetamine, methylamphetamine, cocaine and MDMA. Due to its sympathomimetic actions, mephedrone may be associated with a number of both physical and psychopathological side effects. Recent preliminary analysis of recent UK data carried out in 48 related cases have provided positive results for the presence of mephedrone at postmortem. Within the UK, diffusion of mephedrone may have been associated with an unprecedented combination of a particularly aggressive online marketing policy and a decreasing availability/purity of both ecstasy and cocaine. Mephedrone has been recently classified in both the UK and in a number of other countries as a measure to control its availability. Following this, a few other research psychoactives have recently entered the online market as yet unregulated substances that may substitute for mephedrone. Only international collaborative efforts may be able to tackle the phenomenon of the regular offer of novel psychoactive drugs.

  5. Clinical Pharmacology of Cefepime in Infants and Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Maria Pacifici

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cefepime is a fourth-generation cephalosporin which is approved in Europe and in the USA. Food and Drug Administration (FDA approves cefepime in the treatment of febrile neutropenia. Cefepime is active against gram-negative microorganisms such as Escherichia coli, Haemophilus influenzae, Enterobacter, Klebsiella, Morganella, Neisseria, Serratia, and Proteus species. Cefepime is also active against gram-positive microorganisms such as Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Staphylococcus aureus. Cefepime binds to plasma proteins ≤ 20%, and it is excreted unchanged in the urine. Cefepime distributes widely in body tissues and fluids such as cerebrospinal fluid, bile, bronchial secretions, ascites fluid, and middle ear. In neonates, the half-life of cefepime ranges from 3.59+0.61 and 5.09+1.80 hours, and in adults it is 2.1 (range, 1.3 to 2.4 hours.The rank order of the top 10 pediatric pathogens was analyzed and the comparative antimicrobial potency of broad-spectrum parenteral cephalosporins was exterminated. The rank order of the top 10 pediatric pathogens was Streptococcus pneumoniae (15.5% > Haemophilus influenzae (14.6% > Staphylococcus aureus (13.8% > Moraxella catarrhalis = coagulase-negative staphylococci (8.0% > Escherichia coli (7.8% > Pseudomonas aeruginosa (5.2% > Klebsiella spp. (4.8% > Enterococcus spp. (4.7% > beta-hemolytic streptococci (4.4%. Cefepime is the most active antibiotic among β-lactams. Cefepime is active against Enterobacter species (MIC90, 2 µg/ml; 99.3% susceptible, whereas the susceptibility rates of other broad-spectrum β-lactams (ceftriaxone, ceftazidime and piperacillin-tazobactam, were significantly lower (78.4 to 81.5. Cefepime remains a very potent alternative for the treatment of contemporary pediatric infections. The aim of the present study was to review the clinical pharmacology of cefepime in infants and children.

  6. Fluoxetine Administration in Juvenile Monkeys: Implications for Pharmacotherapy in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari S. Golub

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Fluoxetine therapy has been approved for children with major depressive disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder for over 14 years and has expanded to other childhood behavior disorders. As use increases, more detail on fluoxetine effects during juvenile brain development can help maintain safe and effective use of this therapy. Here, a narrative review is provided of previously published findings from a large nonhuman primate project. Fluoxetine was administered to juvenile male rhesus monkeys for an extended period (2 years prior to puberty. Compared to controls, treated monkeys showed sleep disruption, facilitated social interaction, greater impulsivity, and impaired sustained attention during treatment. No effects on growth were seen. Metabolomics assays characterized a distinctive response to fluoxetine and demonstrated individual differences that were related to the impulsivity measure. Fluoxetine interactions with monoamine oxidase A polymorphisms that influenced behavior and metabolomics markers were an important, previously unrecognized finding of our studies. After treatment was discontinued, some behavioral effects persisted, but short-term memory and cognitive flexibility testing did not show drug effects. This detailed experimental work can contribute to clinical research and continued safe and effective fluoxetine pharmacotherapy in children.

  7. Safety and efficacy of fluoxetine in patients who receive oral contraceptive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koke, Stephanie C; Brown, Eileen B; Miner, Cherri M

    2002-09-01

    Because many women who receive pharmacologic therapy with antidepressants are also prescribed oral contraceptives, it is important to assess the risk of clinically significant drug interactions. We reviewed the United States fluoxetine clinical trial database, specifically analyzing women ages 18 to 45 years, for differences in safety, antidepressant efficacy, and unplanned pregnancies that were associated with oral contraceptive use. Data from 17 double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials in 1698 women were analyzed retrospectively. A subgroup of women with oral contraceptive use was compared with a subgroup of women with no oral contraceptive use. Differences in treatment-emergent adverse events, unplanned pregnancies, and 17-item Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD-17) scores were analyzed. The only treatment-emergent adverse events that showed a statistically significantly different odds ratio for oral contraceptive use versus no oral contraceptive use were headache, asthenia, and pain. There was not a statistically significant interaction in the incidence of unintended pregnancies (P =.111) or in the changes from baseline in HAMDD-17 scores. There is no clinical evidence that concomitant use of oral contraceptives and fluoxetine affects the safety or efficacy of either agent.

  8. Nociceptin/orphanin FQ peptide receptors: pharmacology and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, L-C; Liao, Y-Y; Fan, P-C; Kuo, P-H; Wang, C-H; Riemer, C; Prinssen, E P

    2007-01-01

    /OFQ have been reported in patients with various pain states, depression and liver diseases. This review summarizes the pharmacological characteristics of, and studies with, the available NOP receptor ligands and their possible clinical implications.

  9. A review of the pharmacology and clinical efficacy of brivaracetam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klein P

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Pavel Klein,1 Anyzeila Diaz,2 Teresa Gasalla,3 John Whitesides4 1Mid-Atlantic Epilepsy and Sleep Center, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2Neurology Patient Value Unit, UCB Pharma, Smyrna, GA, USA; 3Neurology Patient Value Unit, UCB Pharma, Monheim am Rhein, Germany; 4Asset Development, UCB Pharma, Raleigh, NC, USA Abstract: Brivaracetam (BRV; Briviact is a new antiepileptic drug (AED approved for adjunctive treatment of focal (partial-onset seizures in adults. BRV is a selective, high-affinity ligand for synaptic vesicle 2A (SV2A with 15- to 30-fold higher affinity than levetiracetam, the first AED acting on SV2A. It has high lipid solubility and rapid brain penetration, with engagement of the target molecule, SV2A, within minutes of administration. BRV has potent broad-spectrum antiepileptic activity in animal models. Phase I studies indicated BRV was well tolerated and showed a favorable pharmacokinetic profile over a wide dose range following single (10–1,000 mg and multiple (200–800 mg/day oral dosing. Three pivotal Phase III studies have demonstrated promising efficacy and a good safety and tolerability profile across doses of 50–200 mg/day in the adjunctive treatment of refractory focal seizures. Long-term data indicate that the response to BRV is sustained, with good tolerability and retention rate. BRV is highly effective in patients experiencing secondarily generalized tonic–clonic seizures. Safety data to date suggest a favorable psychiatric adverse effect profile in controlled studies, although limited postmarketing data are available. BRV is easy to use, with no titration and little drug–drug interaction. It can be initiated at target dose with no titration. Efficacy is seen on day 1 of oral use in a significant percentage of patients. Intravenous administration in a 2-minute bolus and 15-minute infusion is well tolerated. Here, we review the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, and clinical data of BRV. Keywords: brivaracetam, efficacy

  10. Fluoxetine exerts age-dependent effects on behavior and amygdala neuroplasticity in the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith R Homberg

    Full Text Available The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI Prozac® (fluoxetine is the only registered antidepressant to treat depression in children and adolescents. Yet, while the safety of SSRIs has been well established in adults, serotonin exerts neurotrophic actions in the developing brain and thereby may have harmful effects in adolescents. Here we treated adolescent and adult rats chronically with fluoxetine (12 mg/kg at postnatal day (PND 25 to 46 and from PND 67 to 88, respectively, and tested the animals 7-14 days after the last injection when (norfluoxetine in blood plasma had been washed out, as determined by HPLC. Plasma (norfluoxetine levels were also measured 5 hrs after the last fluoxetine injection, and matched clinical levels. Adolescent rats displayed increased behavioral despair in the forced swim test, which was not seen in adult fluoxetine treated rats. In addition, beneficial effects of fluoxetine on wakefulness as measured by electroencephalography in adults was not seen in adolescent rats, and age-dependent effects on the acoustic startle response and prepulse inhibition were observed. On the other hand, adolescent rats showed resilience to the anorexic effects of fluoxetine. Exploratory behavior in the open field test was not affected by fluoxetine treatment, but anxiety levels in the elevated plus maze test were increased in both adolescent and adult fluoxetine treated rats. Finally, in the amygdala, but not the dorsal raphe nucleus and medial prefrontal cortex, the number of PSA-NCAM (marker for synaptic remodeling immunoreactive neurons was increased in adolescent rats, and decreased in adult rats, as a consequence of chronic fluoxetine treatment. No fluoxetine-induced changes in 5-HT(1A receptor immunoreactivity were observed. In conclusion, we show that fluoxetine exerts both harmful and beneficial age-dependent effects on depressive behavior, body weight and wakefulness, which may relate, in part, to differential

  11. Influence of gasoline inhalation on the enantioselective pharmacokinetics of fluoxetine in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Juciane Lauren Cavalcanti; Lanchote, Vera Lucia; Pereira, Maria Paula Marques; Capela, Jorge Manuel Vieira; Lepera, José Salvador

    2013-03-01

    Fluoxetine is used clinically as a racemic mixture of (+)-(S) and (-)-(R) enantiomers for the treatment of depression. CYP2D6 catalyzes the metabolism of both fluoxetine enantiomers. We aimed to evaluate whether exposure to gasoline results in CYP2D inhibition. Male Wistar rats exposed to filtered air (n = 36; control group) or to 600 ppm of gasoline (n = 36) in a nose-only inhalation exposure chamber for 6 weeks (6 h/day, 5 days/week) received a single oral 10-mg/kg dose of racemic fluoxetine. Fluoxetine enantiomers in plasma samples were analyzed by a validated analytical method using LC-MS/MS. The separation of fluoxetine enantiomers was performed in a Chirobiotic V column using as the mobile phase a mixture of ethanol:ammonium acetate 15 mM. Higher plasma concentrations of the (+)-(S)-fluoxetine enantiomer were found in the control group (enantiomeric ratio AUC((+)-(S)/(-)-(R)) = 1.68). In animals exposed to gasoline, we observed an increase in AUC(0-∞) for both enantiomers, with a sharper increase seen for the (-)-(R)-fluoxetine enantiomer (enantiomeric ratio AUC((+)-(S)/(-)-(R)) = 1.07), resulting in a loss of enantioselectivity. Exposure to gasoline was found to result in the loss of enantioselectivity of fluoxetine, with the predominant reduction occurring in the clearance of the (-)-(R)-fluoxetine enantiomer (55% vs. 30%). Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. [Clinical-pharmacological aspects to accelerate the development process from the preclinical to the clinical phase/1st communication: The contribution of clinical pharmacology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmann, Jochen

    2004-01-01

    To improve the transition from research to development a critical evaluation of the individual project by research and disease area teams is required to include input from pharmacology, toxicology, pharmacokinetics, galenics, clinical pharmacology, clinical as well as regulatory experts and marketing. Decisions on the individual development strategy should be made prior to the start of development and all projects should be reviewed at predefined stages throughout the product development life cycle. This ensures consistency of decision-making not only during the development of individual products but throughout the entire development pipeline. Studies in the exploratory stage of drug development should be designed for decision making in contrast to later clinical trials in the confirmatory stage that require power for proof-of-safety and proof-of-efficacy. The more thorough and profound studies have been carried out during this exploratory stage of drug development, the earlier a decision can be made on the continuation or discontinuation of further development, thus saving development time and money and assessing and considerably reducing the risk for the patients and increasing the success rate of the project in the later confirmatory effectiveness trial with an adequate number of subjects receiving the new therapy under typical conditions of use. Strategies which may be helpful to improve the quality of decisions in drug discovery and drug development are: discovery experiments should be done to critically evaluate the compound, the "killer" experiments should be done as early as possible, continuous effort on preclinical disease models is necessary to improve predictability of efficacy in patients ("humanized" research): genomic technology should be used to identify novel, disease-related targets and to characterise preclinical test systems, improvement of knowledge and experience concerning the relevance of new technologies for the clinical picture; genotyping

  13. Clinical Pharmacology of Kinase Inhibitors in Oncology : Personalized and Optimzed Dosing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheijen, Remy B.

    2017-01-01

    Kinase inhibitors are an important category of molecularly targeted therapies used for cancer. Verheijen’s doctoral thesis describes several clinical pharmacological studies to optimize and personalize the treatment of cancer with kinase inhibitors, using pharmacokinetics, molecular imaging and

  14. Clinical pharmacology in the UK, c. 1950–2000: influences and institutions

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The history of clinical pharmacology in the UK over the last half of the twentieth century is largely untold. Many important new drugs were developed and brought to market in the 1950s and 1960s ensuring the need for more systematic knowledge of drug effects in humans and also providing new career opportunities in teaching, research and practice. The 30th anniversary of the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology in 2004 and the 75th anniversary of the British Pharmacological Society in 2006...

  15. Clinical pharmacology in the UK, c. 1950–2000: industry and regulation

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Clinical pharmacology in the UK in the 1950s and 1960s was an exciting profession. Many important new drugs were developed and brought to market and a more systematic knowledge of drug effects in humans was needed, as well as ensuring the safety and efficacy of new and existing drugs, especially following the unexpected problems arising from the use of thalidomide. This Witness Seminar followed an earlier meeting on the history of the general development of clinical pharmacology and focuses o...

  16. Effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy and fluoxetine on sexual function of women with obsessive compulsive disorder: A double-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabetnejad, Zahra; Assarian, Fatemeh; Omidi, Abdollah; Najarzadegan, Mohammad Reza

    2016-11-01

    Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is a mental health concern due to its various negative consequences, especially in sexual function. Therefore, the treatment of sexual dysfunction in women with OCD is important in order to improve the patient's marital function and mental health. To compare the sexual behavior and sexual and marital satisfaction in women with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) before and after treatment with fluoxetine and cognitive behavior therapy. This randomized clinical trial was conducted at psychiatric and psychological counseling centers in Kashan (Iran) from January 2, 2014, to December 29, 2014. Fifty-eight women with OCD were included in the study. In order to compare the effectiveness of pharmacological treatment (fluoxetine) and psychological treatment, cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), 58 female patients with OCD (diagnosed based on DSM-IV-T criteria) were randomized equally to either fluoxetine (at a dose of 60-80 mg daily for 3 months) or CBT (10 45-minute sessions). OCD and sexual behavior status of the patients before and after the intervention was assessed with the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) and Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) questionnaire, respectively. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 22. To compare changes between the two groups, an independent T-test was used. Finally, the effects of all potential factors on treatment outcome were analyzed using factorial ANCOVA. The mean score for OCD in the fluoxetine group was 25.6 ± 4.8 at the beginning of the experiment and 18.79 ± 4.26 at the end of the study, while in the CBT group it was 25.6 ± 4.8 and 18.79 ± 4.26, respectively. No significant differences were found between two groups regarding obsession score changes. These scores in fluoxetine group were 58.1 and 52.8, respectively (p=0.046). There was a significant difference between the two groups in terms of sexual performance (p=0.003). In this study, our findings demonstrate a

  17. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCVIII. Histamine Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chazot, Paul L.; Cowart, Marlon; Gutzmer, Ralf; Leurs, Rob; Liu, Wai L. S.; Stark, Holger; Thurmond, Robin L.; Haas, Helmut L.

    2015-01-01

    Histamine is a developmentally highly conserved autacoid found in most vertebrate tissues. Its physiological functions are mediated by four 7-transmembrane G protein–coupled receptors (H1R, H2R, H3R, H4R) that are all targets of pharmacological intervention. The receptors display molecular heterogeneity and constitutive activity. H1R antagonists are long known antiallergic and sedating drugs, whereas the H2R was identified in the 1970s and led to the development of H2R-antagonists that revolutionized stomach ulcer treatment. The crystal structure of ligand-bound H1R has rendered it possible to design new ligands with novel properties. The H3R is an autoreceptor and heteroreceptor providing negative feedback on histaminergic and inhibition on other neurons. A block of these actions promotes waking. The H4R occurs on immuncompetent cells and the development of anti-inflammatory drugs is anticipated. PMID:26084539

  18. The pharmacologic and clinical effects of medical cannabis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgelt, Laura M; Franson, Kari L; Nussbaum, Abraham M; Wang, George S

    2013-02-01

    Cannabis, or marijuana, has been used for medicinal purposes for many years. Several types of cannabinoid medicines are available in the United States and Canada. Dronabinol (schedule III), nabilone (schedule II), and nabiximols (not U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved) are cannabis-derived pharmaceuticals. Medical cannabis or medical marijuana, a leafy plant cultivated for the production of its leaves and flowering tops, is a schedule I drug, but patients obtain it through cannabis dispensaries and statewide programs. The effect that cannabinoid compounds have on the cannabinoid receptors (CB(1) and CB(2) ) found in the brain can create varying pharmacologic responses based on formulation and patient characteristics. The cannabinoid Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol has been determined to have the primary psychoactive effects; the effects of several other key cannabinoid compounds have yet to be fully elucidated. Dronabinol and nabilone are indicated for the treatment of nausea and vomiting associated with cancer chemotherapy and of anorexia associated with weight loss in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome. However, pain and muscle spasms are the most common reasons that medical cannabis is being recommended. Studies of medical cannabis show significant improvement in various types of pain and muscle spasticity. Reported adverse effects are typically not serious, with the most common being dizziness. Safety concerns regarding cannabis include the increased risk of developing schizophrenia with adolescent use, impairments in memory and cognition, accidental pediatric ingestions, and lack of safety packaging for medical cannabis formulations. This article will describe the pharmacology of cannabis, effects of various dosage formulations, therapeutics benefits and risks of cannabis for pain and muscle spasm, and safety concerns of medical cannabis use. © 2013 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  19. Development and evaluation of a computer-assisted instruction package in clinical pharmacology for nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, P R; Peterson, G M; Martin, J L; Reeve, J F

    1998-01-01

    Recent reports commissioned by the Australian Government have highlighted the need to improve medication use in both community and hospital settings. Nurses are placed ideally to promote safe and effective drug use. The aim of this project was to develop and evaluate a computer-assisted instruction package, to help undergraduate nursing students improve their knowledge of clinical pharmacology, and to enhance their ability to contribute to the quality use of medications. In a collaborative project, staff of the Tasmanian Schools of Pharmacy and Nursing have produced the program PharmaCAL, using HyperCard 2.2 for the Apple Macintosh. A wide range of clinical pharmacology units are covered extensively, concentrating on drugs in common use and based on body systems: cardiovascular pharmacology (including hypertension, cardiac failure and angina); respiratory pharmacology; alimentary tract pharmacology (including peptic ulcer, diarrhea, and constipation); central nervous system pharmacology (analgesia, anxiety and insomnia, depression, psychoses, and epilepsy); antibiotic chemotherapy; and diabetes mellitus. Many color illustrations have been included. Each unit has a set of multiple choice questions to provide feedback to students. The package was evaluated in two ways. First, a questionnaire was used to assess users' opinions of the package. Second, a validated multiple choice test on clinical pharmacology and therapeutics was administered to 24 third-year nursing students before and after a set of sessions using the package and to a control group of 28 nursing students who were not exposed to the PharmaCAL package. The package generally was well received by the nursing students. Clinical pharmacology test scores significantly improved after using the package and were significantly higher than for the control group of students. The program is a useful adjunct to the existing nursing curriculum. It also could be used in postgraduate nursing education and other health

  20. Development and optimization of fluoxetine orally disintegrating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To develop and optimise some variables that influence fluoxetine orally disintegrating tablets (ODTs) formulation. Methods: Fluoxetine ODTs tablets were prepared using direct compression method. Three-factor, 3- level Box-Behnken design was used to optimize and develop fluoxetine ODT formulation.

  1. Effect of electrostatic interaction between fluoxetine and lipid membranes on the partitioning of fluoxetine investigated using second derivative spectrophotometry and FTIR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Tien T T; Dao, Uyen P N; Bui, Huong T; Nguyen, Trang T

    2017-10-01

    The interaction between a drug molecule and lipid bilayers is highly important regarding the pharmaceutical activity of the drug. In this study, the interaction of fluoxetine, a well-known selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressant and lipid bilayers composed of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'-rac-glycerol) (DPPG) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) was studied from the aspect of electrostatics using second derivative spectrophotometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) in order to provide insights into the drug behavior. Changing pH from 7.4 to 9.5 to increases the neutral state of fluoxetine, the partitioning of fluoxetine into the zwitterionic DPPC large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) was increased whereas it was reduced into the negatively charged DPPG LUVs. Fluoxetine was found to exhibit a disordering effect on the acyl chains of DPPC and DPPG bilayers upon its partitioning. In addition, increasing concentration of NaCl lessened the binding of fluoxetine into DPPG bilayers due to the reduction in electrostatic attraction between positively charged fluoxetine and negatively charged DPPG LUVs. In addition, the FTIR study revealed that increasing the NaCl concentration could trigger the shift to higher frequency of the CH 2 stretching as well as the notable blue shift in the PO 2 - regions of DPPG, indicating that fluoxetine had deeper penetration into DPPG LUVs. The differences in the NaCl concentration showed a negligible effect on the incorporation of fluoxetine into the zwitterionic DPPC LUVs. In summary, the electrostatic interaction plays an important role on the partitioning of a cationic amphiphilic SSIR drug into the lipid bilayers and the drug partitioning induces the lipids' conformational change. These imply a possible influence on the drug pharmacology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical pharmacology in leishmaniasis: treatment optimization of a neglected disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorlo, T.P.C.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis presents various novel applications of clinical pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in the treatment of leishmaniasis, by which diverse clinically relevant issues, mainly related to the efficacy and safety of miltefosine, could be elucidated. Throughout this thesis, the added value of

  3. Pharmacology, Systematic Review and Recent Clinical Trials of Metadoxine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Miceli, Mathieu; Gronier, Benjamin

    2018-02-26

    Background Metadoxine is composed of pyroglutamic acid and vitamin B6. Administrations of metadoxine are indicated in cases of acute alcohol intoxication or in chronic alcoholism. Objectives To reference all available clinical trials investigating the effects of metadoxine on humans. A focus was put on alcohol intoxication and chronic alcoholism, alcohol abstinence and survival rates. Adverse events were also taken into consideration. Finally, potential roles of metadoxine in treating disorders of the central nervous system will be assessed. Methods PRISMA guidelines were followed. Computerised literature searches were performed in July 2017 to retrieve all clinical trials investigating metadoxine from the MEDLINE®, the European Union Clinical Trials Register and the ClinicalTrials.gov databases, using the following equation: "metadoxine". Inclusion criteria were all published clinical trials investigating metadoxine in humans, regardless of outcome measures. Exclusion criteria were articles not abstracted, in vitro studies, studies in rodents, retrospective studies and reviews. Results Sixteen studies were included. Evidence suggest that metadoxine appears safe to use, as it rarely induced adverse events (reported in 7 out of the 7 studies measuring safety/tolerability). Moreover, metadoxine seems efficient in treating acute alcohol intoxication (2/2 studies) as well as improving liver functions following chronic alcoholism (4/5 studies). Finally, currently on-going clinical trials will reveal if metadoxine could be indicated in attention deficit and hyperactivity disorders as well as fragile X syndrome. Conclusion Metadoxine appears safe to use and seems efficient to improve liver functions following alcohol-related diseases. Further clinical trials will be necessary to determine if metadoxine can be promising for treating brain disorders. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42017072964. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Integrating historical clinical and financial data for pharmacological research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deshmukh Vikrant G

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retrospective research requires longitudinal data, and repositories derived from electronic health records (EHR can be sources of such data. With Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH Act meaningful use provisions, many institutions are expected to adopt EHRs, but may be left with large amounts of financial and historical clinical data, which can differ significantly from data obtained from newer systems, due to lack or inconsistent use of controlled medical terminologies (CMT in older systems. We examined different approaches for semantic enrichment of financial data with CMT, and integration of clinical data from disparate historical and current sources for research. Methods Snapshots of financial data from 1999, 2004 and 2009 were mapped automatically to the current inpatient pharmacy catalog, and enriched with RxNorm. Administrative metadata from financial and dispensing systems, RxNorm and two commercial pharmacy vocabularies were used to integrate data from current and historical inpatient pharmacy modules, and the outpatient EHR. Data integration approaches were compared using percentages of automated matches, and effects on cohort size of a retrospective study. Results During 1999-2009, 71.52%-90.08% of items in use from the financial catalog were enriched using RxNorm; 64.95%-70.37% of items in use from the historical inpatient system were integrated using RxNorm, 85.96%-91.67% using a commercial vocabulary, 87.19%-94.23% using financial metadata, and 77.20%-94.68% using dispensing metadata. During 1999-2009, 48.01%-30.72% of items in use from the outpatient catalog were integrated using RxNorm, and 79.27%-48.60% using a commercial vocabulary. In a cohort of 16304 inpatients obtained from clinical systems, 4172 (25.58% were found exclusively through integration of historical clinical data, while 15978 (98% could be identified using semantically enriched financial data. Conclusions

  5. Fluoxetin-induced pulmonary granulomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kerviler, E; Trédaniel, J; Revlon, G; Groussard, O; Zalcman, G; Ortoli, J M; Espié, M; Hirsch, A; Frija, J

    1996-03-01

    A patient treated with fluoxetin for a manic depressive disorder developed pulmonary inflammatory nodules with noncaseating giant cell granulomas, interstitial pneumonia and non-necrotizing vasculitis, whilst remaining asymptomatic. A progressive resolution of pulmonary nodules occurred after withdrawal of the offending agent, and the chest radiograph returned to normal in 9 months. The diagnosis was assessed by an open lung biopsy.

  6. Remimazolam: Pharmacologic Considerations and Clinical Role in Anesthesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesolowski, Alexandra M; Zaccagnino, Michael P; Malapero, Raymond J; Kaye, Alan D; Urman, Richard D

    2016-09-01

    Midazolam, fentanyl, and propofol are commonly used for sedation in modern anesthesia practice. These agents possess characteristics that have afforded various anesthetics to be delivered and produce relatively safe and effective outcomes. However, each agent has certain drawbacks in clinical practice. Remimazolam, a novel benzodiazepine created out of so-called soft drug development, is an ultrashort-acting intravenous sedative-hypnotic currently being investigated in clinical trials. In this review, we evaluate the recent literature on the use of remimazolam in clinical practice as compared with current sedative agents, and we describe its potential roles for use in sedation. A literature search of the Medline database (2012-May 2016) was performed. Additional references were identified from a review of literature citations, manufacturer reports, and professional meeting abstracts. All premarket studies involving remimazolam as the primary study drug were evaluated. Literature describing the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of remimazolam, propofol, and midazolam was also included. Phase I and II studies in the United States have shown remimazolam to be a safe and effective option for procedural sedation. Unlike midazolam and propofol, remimazolam undergoes organ-independent metabolism to an inactive metabolite. Because remimazolam follows first-order pharmacokinetics, prolonged infusions or higher doses are unlikely to result in accumulation and extended effect, making it favorable for use as an intravenous anesthetic and for sedation in the intensive care unit. It is expected that phase III trials will further describe the niche that remimazolam may be able to occupy in clinical practice. Postmarket cost-benefit analyses will need to be performed. © 2016 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  7. New Hypnotic Drug Development and Pharmacologic Considerations for Clinical Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanious, Mariah Kincaid; Beutler, Sascha S; Kaye, Alan D; Urman, Richard D

    2017-06-01

    Since the public demonstration of ether as a novel, viable anesthetic for surgery in 1846, the field of anesthesia has continually sought the ideal anesthetic-rapid onset, potent sedation-hypnosis with a high therapeutic ratio of toxic dose to minimally effective dose, predictable clearance to inactive metabolites, and minimal side effects. This article aims to review current progress of novel induction agent development and provide an update on the most promising drugs poised to enter clinical practice. In addition, the authors describe trends in novel agent development, implications for health care costs, and implications for perioperative care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinical, molecular, and pharmacological aspects of FMR1 related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugin, A; Faundes, V; Santa María, L; Curotto, B; Aliaga, S; Salas, I; Soto, P; Bravo, P; Peña, M I; Alliende, M A

    2017-05-01

    Fragile X syndrome, the most common inherited cause of intellectual disability, is associated with a broad spectrum of disorders across different generations of a single family. This study reviews the clinical manifestations of fragile X-associated disorders as well as the spectrum of mutations of the fragile X mental retardation 1 gene (FMR1) and the neurobiology of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), and also provides an overview of the potential therapeutic targets and genetic counselling. This disorder is caused by expansion of the CGG repeat (>200 repeats) in the 5 prime untranslated region of FMR1, resulting in a deficit or absence of FMRP. FMRP is an RNA-binding protein that regulates the translation of several genes that are important in synaptic plasticity and dendritic maturation. It is believed that CGG repeat expansions in the premutation range (55 to 200 repeats) elicit an increase in mRNA levels of FMR1, which may cause neuronal toxicity. These changes manifest clinically as developmental problems such as autism and learning disabilities as well as neurodegenerative diseases including fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS). Advances in identifying the molecular basis of fragile X syndrome may help us understand the causes of neuropsychiatric disorders, and they will probably contribute to development of new and specific treatments. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. A Canadian multicenter, double-blind study of paroxetine and fluoxetine in major depressive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chouinard, G; Saxena, B; Belanger, MC; Ravindran, A; Bakish, D; Beauclair, L; Morris, P; Nair, NPV; Manchanda, R; Reesal, R; Remick, R; O'Neill, MC

    Background: Recent studies have suggested clinical differences among selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. In a 12-week randomized, multicenter, double-blind trial, the antidepressant and anxiolytic efficacy of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors paroxetine and fluoxetine was compared in

  10. Pharmacological basis and clinical evidence of dabigatran therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redondo Santiago

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dabigatran is an emerging oral anticoagulant which is a direct inhibitor of thrombin activity. It has been approved in the European Union and the United States of America for the prevention of thrombosis after major orthopedic surgery. It has also been approved by the American Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for the prevention of stroke in chronic atrial fibrillation. Dabigatran provides a stable anticoagulation effect without any need to perform periodical laboratory controls. Of note, there is a growing amount of clinical evidence which shows its safety and efficacy. For these reasons, dabigatran may suppose a revolution in oral anticoagulation. However, two important limitations remain. First, it is contraindicated in patients with end-stage renal disease. Second, there is no evidence of the prevention of thrombosis in mechanical heart valves.

  11. Chaste tree (Vitex agnus-castus)--pharmacology and clinical indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuttke, W; Jarry, H; Christoffel, V; Spengler, B; Seidlová-Wuttke, D

    2003-05-01

    Extracts of the fruits of chaste tree (Vitex agnus castus = AC) are widely used to treat premenstrual symptoms. Double-blind placebo-controlled studies indicate that one of the most common premenstrual symptoms, i.e. premenstrual mastodynia (mastalgia) is beneficially influenced by an AC extract. In addition, numerous less rigidly controlled studies indicate that AC extracts have also beneficial effects on other psychic and somatic symptoms of the PMS. Premenstrual mastodynia is most likely due to a latent hyperprolactinemia, i.e. patients release more than physiologic amounts of prolactin in response to stressful situations and during deep sleep phases which appear to stimulate the mammary gland. Premenstrually this unphysiological prolactin release is so high that the serum prolactin levels often approach heights which are misinterpreted as prolactinomas. Since AC extracts were shown to have beneficial effects on premenstrual mastodynia serum prolactin levels in such patients were also studied in one double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study. Serum prolactin levels were indeed reduced in the patients treated with the extract. The search for the prolactin-suppressive principle(s) yielded a number of compounds with dopaminergic properties: they bound to recombinant DA2-receptor protein and suppressed prolactin release from cultivated lactotrophs as well as in animal experiments. The search for the chemical identity of the dopaminergic compounds resulted in isolation of a number of diterpenes of which some clerodadienols were most important for the prolactin-suppressive effects. They were almost identical in their prolactin-suppressive properties than dopamine itself. Hence, it is concluded that dopaminergic compounds present in Vitex agnus castus are clinically the important compounds which improve premenstrual mastodynia and possibly also other symptoms of the premenstrual syndrome.

  12. North-south collaboration in clinical pharmacological research of HIV treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L'homme, Rafaëlla Francisca Anna

    2008-01-01

    This thesis presents the first output of a North-South (Europe-Africa) collaboration in clinical pharmacological research of HIV treatment. Pharmacokinetics of antiretroviral drugs are highly variable in the paediatric population as children mature and grow rapidly and individually until they are

  13. [Cardiovascular effects of insulin therapy: from pharmacology to clinical trials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannucci, Edoardo

    2016-03-01

    Insulin has direct effects on vascular walls which, depending on experimental models, can be either predominantly antiatherogenic or proatherogenic. In observational studies, insulin therapy is usually associated with an increase in the incidence of major cardiovascular events. However, this result is probably determined by the effect of confounders. In clinical trials performed in the acute phase of coronary syndromes, the benefits observed with insulin therapy are probably due to the improvement of glycemic control, rather than to direct effects of insulin on the cardiovascular system. In long-term trials for primary or secondary prevention such as UKPDS and ORIGIN insulin has no relevant effects on major cardiovascular events beyond those determined by the improvement of metabolic control. On the other hand, severe hypoglycemia, which is a possible side effect of insulin therapy, is associated with a worse prognosis of cardiovascular disease. The availability of new long-acting insulin analogs, which reduce the incidence of hypoglycemia for similar levels of glycemic control, makes insulin therapy easier and potentially safer for the cardiovascular system.

  14. Review of the pharmacology and clinical studies of micafungin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison M Bormann

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Alison M Bormann1, Vicki A Morrison21Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 2Division of Hematology/Oncology and Infectious Disease, Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN, USAAbstract: Micafungin, like other members of the echinocandin class, has a unique mechanism of action that inhibits the synthesis of 1,3-β-D glucans in the fungal cell wall. It has been approved for treatment of esophageal candidiasis, invasive candidiasis including candidemia, and for prophylaxis of Candida infections in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Although efficacy and safety have also been demonstrated in pediatric populations, micafungin is approved for this indication in Europe and Japan, but not in the United States. It has demonstrated activity against Candida spp. including those that are azole-resistant as well as Aspergillus and a few other clinically important molds. It is administered intravenously as a once daily infusion and does not require dose adjustments for renal or moderate hepatic dysfunction. Its safety record, favorable tolerability profile, and few drug interactions make it an important agent for the treatment of invasive fungal infections.Keywords: micafungin, antifungal therapy, echinocandins, fungal infections, Candida, Aspergillus

  15. Enhancing value of clinical pharmacodynamics in oncology drug development: An alliance between quantitative pharmacology and translational science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatakrishnan, K; Ecsedy, J A

    2017-01-01

    Clinical pharmacodynamic evaluation is a key component of the "pharmacologic audit trail" in oncology drug development. We posit that its value can and should be greatly enhanced via application of a robust quantitative pharmacology framework informed by biologically mechanistic considerations. Herein, we illustrate examples of intersectional blindspots across the disciplines of quantitative pharmacology and translational science and offer a roadmap aimed at enhancing the caliber of clinical pharmacodynamic research in the development of oncology therapeutics. © 2016 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  16. Are neurocognitive, clinical and social dysfunctions in schizotaxia reversible pharmacologically?: Results from the Changsha study

    OpenAIRE

    Stone, William S.; Hsi, Xiaolu; Giuliano, Anthony J.; Tan, Liwen; Zhu, Shaochun; Li, Lingjiang; Seidman, Larry J.; Tsuang, Ming T.

    2012-01-01

    The Changsha study identifies adult, non-psychotic relatives of patients with schizophrenia who show deficits in neurocognitive, social, clinical and other dimensions, and who meet provisional criteria for a liability syndrome for schizophrenia (‘schizotaxia’). In this study, we investigated whether negative symptoms, neurocognitive deficits, or other measures of clinical and social function in subjects who met our research criteria for schizotaxia were amenable to pharmacological remediation...

  17. A Blended Learning Course Design in Clinical Pharmacology for Post-graduate Dental Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Paul-Erik Lillholm; Mikalsen, Øyvind; Lygre, Henning; Solheim, Einar; Schjøtt, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Postgraduate courses in clinical pharmacology are important for dentists to be updated on drug therapy and information related to their clinical practice, as well as knowledge of relevant adverse effects and interactions. A traditional approach with classroom delivery as the only method to teaching and learning has shortcomings regarding flexibility, individual learning preferences, and problem based learning (PBL) activities compared to online environments. This study examines a five week postgraduate course in clinical pharmacology with 15 hours of lectures and online learning activities, i.e. blended course design. Six postgraduate dental students participated and at the end of the course they were interviewed. Our findings emphasize that a blended learning course design can be successfully used in postgraduate dental education. Key matters for discussion were time flexibility and location convenience, change in teacher’s role, rein-forced learning strategies towards professional needs, scarcity in online communication, and proposed future utilization of e-learning components. PMID:23248716

  18. Serum Sodium Changes in Fluoxetine Users at Different Age Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil Talaeizadeh

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available "n Objective: Fluoxetine, a widely used antidepressant, can affect the serum sodium level. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare changes in the serum sodium level of depressive patients taking fluoxetine according to age. "n Methods:This quasi-experimental study was conducted on 126 patients with depression, dividing the patients into two age groups of 15 to 35 years, and above 55 years, who referred to psychiatric clinics of the Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. Serum sodium level was measured prior to fluoxetine therapy and at the first and third week after; adverse symptoms were recorded. Serum sodium level, hyponatremia, and other adverse effects were compared between the two age groups. Results: There was a significant decrease in serum sodium levels in the older patients at the first and third week after the therapy; but the serum sodium levels decreased only after the third week of therapy in the younger patients (p < 0.05. Serum sodium level was significantly lower in older than in younger patients at the third week of the therapy (140.8±2.26 vs. 135.2±2.06; p < 0.05, and hyponatremia was detected only in the older patients after the first and third week of therapy, 4.7% and 15.8%, respectively. Conclusions: Using fluoxetine can decrease serum sodium level, which is more frequent, more severe, and more clinically manifested in older than younger patients. Monitoring serum sodium level is recommended in early weeks of fluoxetine therapy especially for patients older than 55 years of age.

  19. Development and validation of evaluation tools of nursing students' clinical pharmacology unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navabi, Nasrin; Ghaffari, Fatemeh; Shamsalinia, Abbas; Faghani, Safieh

    2016-01-01

    The need for valid, reliable, and objective tools has always been emphasized in studies related to the clinical assessment of nursing students. The aims of this study were to develop and assess the validity and reliability of the tools used to evaluate the clinical pharmacology unit. This study was a methodological one, conducted in 2016. An item pool was developed based on the literature review and personal interviews with faculty members. The tool's validity was determined through assessment of face validity, content validity, and construct validity, using exploratory factor analysis on the data provided by 264 second- and third-semester nursing students of the Islamic Azad University of Babol University of Medical Sciences. Reliability was determined through internal and external consistency, using a Cronbach's coefficient of the correlation between classes. Based on the exploratory factor analysis, all items with a special value of >1 were grouped into six factors: 1) professional behavior; 2) effective communication; 3) recognition of medical terminology; 4) nursing actions before administering medicine; 5) nursing actions while administering medicine; and 6) nursing actions after administering medicine. These factors explained 77% of the total variance of the concept of assessment of the clinical pharmacology unit. In this study, reliability was demonstrated by a Cronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.96; the correlation coefficient between floors for the total tool was 0.91, ranging from 0.64 to 0.89 in its dimensions. The evaluation tool of the clinical pharmacology unit has an acceptable construct validity and satisfactory reliability and validity. Therefore, it can be used to evaluate the clinical pharmacology unit in the nursing education system in Iran.

  20. Genetic, clinical and pharmacological determinants of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blom, M T; van Hoeijen, D A; Bardai, A

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a major public health problem. Recognising the complexity of the underlying causes of OHCA in the community, we aimed to establish the clinical, pharmacological, environmental and genetic factors and their interactions that may cause OHCA...... victims since June 2005, we prospectively collect medical history (through hospital and general practitioner), and current and previous medication use (through community pharmacy). In addition, we include DNA samples from OHCA victims with documented ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation during...

  1. Non-clinical models: validation, study design and statistical consideration in safety pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugsley, M K; Towart, R; Authier, S; Gallacher, D J; Curtis, M J

    2010-01-01

    The current issue of the Journal of Pharmacological and Toxicological Methods (JPTM) focuses exclusively on safety pharmacology methods. This is the 7th year the Journal has published on this topic. Methods and models that specifically relate to methods relating to the assessment of the safety profile of a new chemical entity (NCE) prior to first in human (FIH) studies are described. Since the Journal started publishing on this topic there has been a major effort by safety pharmacologists, toxicologists and regulatory scientists within Industry (both large and small Pharma as well as Biotechnology companies) and also from Contract Research Organizations (CRO) to publish the surgical details of the non-clinical methods utilized but also provide important details related to standard and non-standard (or integrated) study models and designs. These details from core battery and secondary (or ancillary) drug safety assessment methods used in drug development programs have been the focus of these special issues and have been an attempt to provide validation of methods. Similarly, the safety pharmacology issues of the Journal provide the most relevant forum for scientists to present novel and modified methods with direct applicability to determination of drug safety-directly to the safety pharmacology scientific community. The content of the manuscripts in this issue includes the introduction of additional important surgical methods, novel data capture and data analysis methods, improved study design and effects of positive control compounds with known activity in the model. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Fluoxetine treatment affects the inflammatory response and microglial function according to the quality of the living environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alboni, Silvia; Poggini, Silvia; Garofalo, Stefano; Milior, Giampaolo; El Hajj, Hassan; Lecours, Cynthia; Girard, Isabelle; Gagnon, Steven; Boisjoly-Villeneuve, Samuel; Brunello, Nicoletta; Wolfer, David P; Limatola, Cristina; Tremblay, Marie-Ève; Maggi, Laura; Branchi, Igor

    2016-11-01

    It has been hypothesized that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), the most common treatment for major depression, affect mood through changes in immune function. However, the effects of SSRIs on inflammatory response are contradictory since these act either as anti- or pro-inflammatory drugs. Previous experimental and clinical studies showed that the quality of the living environment moderates the outcome of antidepressant treatment. Therefore, we hypothesized that the interplay between SSRIs and the environment may, at least partially, explain the apparent incongruence regarding the effects of SSRI treatment on the inflammatory response. In order to investigate such interplay, we exposed C57BL/6 mice to chronic stress to induce a depression-like phenotype and, subsequently, to fluoxetine treatment or vehicle (21days) while being exposed to either an enriched or a stressful condition. At the end of treatment, we measured the expression levels of several anti- and pro-inflammatory cytokines and inflammatory mediators in the whole hippocampus and in isolated microglia. We also determined microglial density, distribution, and morphology to investigate their surveillance state. Results show that the effects of fluoxetine treatment on inflammation and microglial function, as compared to vehicle, were dependent on the quality of the living environment. In particular, fluoxetine administered in the enriched condition increased the expression of pro-inflammatory markers compared to vehicle, while treatment in a stressful condition produced anti-inflammatory effects. These findings provide new insights regarding the effects of SSRIs on inflammation, which may be crucial to devise pharmacological strategies aimed at enhancing antidepressant efficacy by means of controlling environmental conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Key Learning Outcomes for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics Education in Europe: A Modified Delphi Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, David J; Tichelaar, Jelle; Mokkink, Lidwine B; Christiaens, Thierry; Likic, Robert; Maciulaitis, Romaldas; Costa, Joao; Sanz, Emilio J; Maxwell, Simon R; Richir, Milan C; van Agtmael, Michiel A

    2017-12-05

    Harmonizing clinical pharmacology and therapeutics (CPT) education in Europe is necessary to ensure that the prescribing competency of future doctors is of a uniform high standard. As there are currently no uniform requirements, our aim was to achieve consensus on key learning outcomes for undergraduate CPT education in Europe. We used a modified Delphi method consisting of three questionnaire rounds and a panel meeting. A total of 129 experts from 27 European countries were asked to rate 307 learning outcomes. In all, 92 experts (71%) completed all three questionnaire rounds, and 33 experts (26%) attended the meeting. 232 learning outcomes from the original list, 15 newly suggested and 5 rephrased outcomes were included. These 252 learning outcomes should be included in undergraduate CPT curricula to ensure that European graduates are able to prescribe safely and effectively. We provide a blueprint of a European core curriculum describing when and how the learning outcomes might be acquired. © 2017 The Authors. Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  4. Analysis of the Chemical, Pharmacological and Clinical Applications of Polygonum Cuspidatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chenyang; Bai, Ming; Miao, Mingsan; Miao, Yanyan

    2018-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine Polygonum cuspidatum widely used, the larger production, and in the clinical application of more, but the role played by the role of different roles are also different. By reviewing the relevant literatures in recent years, the chemical constituents and pharmacological effects of Polygonum cuspidatum were sorted and summarized, and the role of Polygonum cuspidatum was analyzed, and the function of Polygonum cuspidatum was explored to find out the role of Polygonum cuspidatum in compatibility. Application law. Which can not only study the medicinal mechanism of Polygonum cuspidatum, but also provide the theoretical basis for the medicinal development, clinical treatment and comprehensive utilization of Polygonum cuspidatum.

  5. Fluoxetine elevates allopregnanolone in female rat brain but inhibits a steroid microsomal dehydrogenase rather than activating an aldo-keto reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, J P; Li, K Y; Devall, A J; Cockcroft, S; Honour, J W; Lovick, T A

    2014-12-01

    Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, elevates brain concentrations of the neuroactive progesterone metabolite allopregnanolone, an effect suggested to underlie its use in the treatment of premenstrual dysphoria. One report showed fluoxetine to activate the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) component of 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3α-HSD), which catalyses production of allopregnanolone from 5α-dihydroprogesterone. However, this action was not observed by others. The present study sought to clarify the site of action for fluoxetine in elevating brain allopregnanolone. Adult male rats and female rats in dioestrus were treated with fluoxetine and their brains assayed for allopregnanolone and its precursors, progesterone and 5α-dihydroprogesterone. Subcellular fractions of rat brain were also used to investigate the actions of fluoxetine on 3α-HSD activity in both the reductive direction, producing allopregnanolone from 5α-dihydroprogesterone, and the reverse oxidative direction. Fluoxetine was also tested on these recombinant enzyme activities expressed in HEK cells. Short-term treatment with fluoxetine increased brain allopregnanolone concentrations in female, but not male, rats. Enzyme assays on native rat brain fractions and on activities expressed in HEK cells showed fluoxetine did not affect the AKR producing allopregnanolone from 5α-dihydroprogesterone but did inhibit the microsomal dehydrogenase oxidizing allopregnanolone to 5α-dihydroprogesterone. Fluoxetine elevated allopregnanolone in female rat brain by inhibiting its oxidation to 5α-dihydroprogesterone by a microsomal dehydrogenase. This is a novel site of action for fluoxetine, with implications for the development of new agents and/or dosing regimens to raise brain allopregnanolone. © 2014 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The British Pharmacological Society.

  6. Effects of Fluoxetine on Human Embryo Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaihola, Helena; Yaldir, Fatma G; Hreinsson, Julius; Hörnaeus, Katarina; Bergquist, Jonas; Olivier, Jocelien D A; Åkerud, Helena; Sundström-Poromaa, Inger

    2016-01-01

    The use of antidepressant treatment during pregnancy is increasing, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most widely prescribed antidepressants in pregnant women. Serotonin plays a role in embryogenesis, and serotonin transporters are expressed in two-cell mouse embryos. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate whether fluoxetine, one of the most prescribed SSRI antidepressant world-wide, exposure influences the timing of different embryo developmental stages, and furthermore, to analyze what protein, and protein networks, are affected by fluoxetine in the early embryo development. Human embryos (n = 48) were randomly assigned to treatment with 0.25 or 0.5 μM fluoxetine in culture medium. Embryo development was evaluated by time-lapse monitoring. The fluoxetine-induced human embryo proteome was analyzed by shotgun mass spectrometry. Protein secretion from fluoxetine-exposed human embryos was analyzed by use of high-multiplex immunoassay. The lower dose of fluoxetine had no influence on embryo development. A trend toward reduced time between thawing and start of cavitation was noted in embryos treated with 0.5 μM fluoxetine (p = 0.065). Protein analysis by shotgun mass spectrometry detected 45 proteins that were uniquely expressed in fluoxetine-treated embryos. These proteins are involved in cell growth, survival, proliferation, and inflammatory response. Culturing with 0.5 μM, but not 0.25 μM fluoxetine, caused a significant increase in urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) in the culture medium. In conclusion, fluoxetine has marginal effects on the timing of developmental stages in embryos, but induces expression and secretion of several proteins in a manner that depends on dose. For these reasons, and in line with current guidelines, the lowest possible dose of SSRI should be used in pregnant women who need to continue treatment.

  7. Factors Influencing Response to Pharmacologic Treatment of Migraine in a Pediatric Headache Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus, Tal Eidlitz; Moad, Bder; Haimi-Cohen, Yishai; Zeharia, Avraham

    2016-07-01

    The responses of different patients to the same drug may vary as a consequence of biologic, psychosocial, and genetic differences. The aim of this study was to identify clinical factors associated with a response to pharmacologic treatment in pediatric patients with migraine. The medical files of patients with migraine attending the headache clinic of a tertiary pediatric medical center in 2010-2015 were reviewed. The children and parents (or only the parents if the child was very young) completed the International Headache Society-based questionnaire. Patients were treated with at least one of the following medications: propranolol, amitriptyline, topiramate. Response to treatment was rated as no change in migraine pattern (grade 1) or a decrease in migraine attack frequency per month by at least 50% (grade 2) or at least 75% (grade 3). The highest-grade response to any pharmacologic treatment was defined as the best clinical response. The study group included 248 patients of mean age 12.71 ± 3.04 years. A grade 3 best clinical response was significantly associated with a positive maternal history of migraine, younger age at treatment onset, lower frequency of headache attacks per month, postpubertal children had a significantly lower rate of grade 3 response than prepubertal children (P pediatric headache clinic setting should consider these factors before initiating a treatment program. © 2016 American Headache Society.

  8. Fluoxetin Upregulates Connexin 43 Expression in Astrocyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Mostafavi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recent studies have shown that astrocytes play major roles in normal and disease condition of the central nervous system including multiple sclerosis (MS. Molecular target therapy studies in MS have revealed that connexin-43 (Cx43 and Aquaporin-4 (AQP4 contents of astrocytes undergo expression alteration. Fluoxetine had some effects in MS patients unrelated to its known antidepressant effects. Some of fluoxetine effects were attributed to its capability of cAMP signaling pathway stimulation. This study aimed to investigate possible acute effects of fluoxetine on Cx43 and AQP4 expression in astrocyte.  Methods: Astrocytoma cells were treated for 24 hours with fluoxetine (10 and 20 &mug/ml with or without adenyl cyclase (AC and protein kinase A (PKA inhibition. Cx43 expression at both mRNA and protein levels and AQP4 expression at mRNA level were evaluated.  Results: Acquired results showed that fluoxetine with and without AC and PKA inhibition resulted in Cx43 up-regulation both in mRNA and protein levels, whereas AQP4 expression have not changed.  Discussion: In conclusion, data showed that fluoxetine alone and in the absence of serotonin acutely up-regulated Cx43 expression in astrocytes that can be assumed in molecular target therapy of MS patients. It seems that cAMP involvement in fluoxetine effects need more researches.

  9. Ethynilestradiol 20 mcg plus Levonorgestrel 100 mcg: Clinical Pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Lello

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Estroprogestins (EPs are combinations of estrogen and progestin with several actions on women’s health. The different pharmacological composition of EPs is responsible for different clinical effects. One of the most used low-dose EP associations is ethinylestradiol 20 mcg plus levonorgestrel 100 mcg in monophasic regimen (EE20/LNG100. This review summarizes clinical pharmacology, cycle control, and effects on lipid and glucose metabolism, coagulation, body weight/body composition, acne, and sexuality of EE20/LNG100. Overall, EE20/LNG100 combination is safe and well tolerated, and in several studies the incidence of adverse events in the treated group was comparable to that of the placebo group. Cycle control was effective and body weight/body composition did not vary among treated and untreated groups in most studies. The EE20/LNG100 combination shows mild or no effect on lipid and glucose metabolism. Lastly, EE20/LNG100 is associated with a low risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE. In conclusion, in the process of decision making for the individualization of EPs choice, EE20/LNG100 should be considered for its favorable clinical profile.

  10. Ethynilestradiol 20 mcg plus Levonorgestrel 100 mcg: Clinical Pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lello, Stefano; Cavani, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Estroprogestins (EPs) are combinations of estrogen and progestin with several actions on women's health. The different pharmacological composition of EPs is responsible for different clinical effects. One of the most used low-dose EP associations is ethinylestradiol 20 mcg plus levonorgestrel 100 mcg in monophasic regimen (EE20/LNG100). This review summarizes clinical pharmacology, cycle control, and effects on lipid and glucose metabolism, coagulation, body weight/body composition, acne, and sexuality of EE20/LNG100. Overall, EE20/LNG100 combination is safe and well tolerated, and in several studies the incidence of adverse events in the treated group was comparable to that of the placebo group. Cycle control was effective and body weight/body composition did not vary among treated and untreated groups in most studies. The EE20/LNG100 combination shows mild or no effect on lipid and glucose metabolism. Lastly, EE20/LNG100 is associated with a low risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). In conclusion, in the process of decision making for the individualization of EPs choice, EE20/LNG100 should be considered for its favorable clinical profile.

  11. Have the Findings from Clinical Risk Prediction and Trials Any Key Messages for Safety Pharmacology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jem D. Lane

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Anti-arrhythmic drugs are a mainstay in the management of symptoms related to arrhythmias, and are adjuncts in prevention and treatment of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. However, they also have the potential for pro-arrhythmia and thus the prediction of arrhythmia predisposition and drug response are critical issues. Clinical trials are the latter stages in the safety testing and efficacy process prior to market release, and as such serve as a critical safeguard. In this review, we look at some of the lessons to be learned from approaches to arrhythmia prediction in patients, clinical trials of drugs used in the treatment of arrhythmias, and the implications for the design of pre-clinical safety pharmacology testing.

  12. Fluoxetine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in U.S., Zagam); amphetamines such as amphetamine (in Adderall), dextroamphetamine (Dexedrine, Dextrostat, in Adderall), and methamphetamine (Desoxyn); anticoagulants ('blood thinners') such as ...

  13. A Review of Pharmacologic Treatment for Compulsive Buying Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Célia; Fernandes, Natália; Morgado, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    At present, no treatment recommendations can be made for compulsive buying disorder. Recent studies have found evidence for the efficacy of psychotherapeutic options, but less is known regarding the best pharmacologic treatment. The purpose of this review is to present and analyze the available published evidence on the pharmacological treatment of compulsive buying disorder. To achieve this, we conducted a review of studies focusing on the pharmacological treatment of compulsive buying by searching the PubMed/MEDLINE database. Selection criteria were applied, and 21 studies were identified. Pharmacological classes reported included antidepressants, mood stabilizers, opioid antagonists, second-generation antipsychotics, and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists. We found only placebo-controlled trials for fluvoxamine; none showed effectiveness against placebo. Three open-label trials reported clinical improvement with citalopram; one was followed by a double-blind discontinuation. Escitalopram was effective in an open-label trial but did not show efficacy in the double-blind phase. Memantine was identified as effective in a pilot open-label study. Fluoxetine, bupropion, nortriptyline, clomipramine, topiramate and naltrexone were only reported to be effective in clinical cases. According to the available literature, there is no evidence to propose a specific pharmacologic agent for compulsive buying disorder. Future research is required for a better understanding of both pathogenesis and treatment of this disorder.

  14. Efficacy and safety of olanzapine/fluoxetine combination vs fluoxetine monotherapy following successful combination therapy of treatment-resistant major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Elizabeth; Tohen, Mauricio; Osuntokun, Olawale; Landry, John; Thase, Michael E

    2014-10-01

    This study assessed prevention of relapse in patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD) taking olanzapine/fluoxetine combination (OFC). Patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) who failed to satisfactorily respond to ≥ 2 different antidepressants for ≥ 6 weeks within the current MDD episode were acutely treated for 6-8 weeks, followed by stabilization (12 weeks) on OFC. Those who remained stable were randomized to OFC or fluoxetine for up to 27 weeks. Time-to-relapse was the primary efficacy outcome defined as 50% increase in Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale score with Clinical Global Impressions-Severity of Depression score of ≥ 4; hospitalization for depression or suicidality; or discontinuation for lack of efficacy or worsening of depression or suicidality. A total of 444 patients were randomized 1:1 to OFC (N=221) or fluoxetine (N=223). Time-to-relapse was significantly longer in OFC-treated patients compared with fluoxetine-treated patients (pserious adverse events. We believe this is the first controlled relapse-prevention study in subjects with TRD that supports continued use of a second-generation antipsychotic beyond stabilization. A thorough assessment of benefits and risks (in particular metabolic changes) associated with continuing treatment with OFC or fluoxetine must be done based on individual patient needs.

  15. Differential clinical pharmacology of rolapitant in delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashad N

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Noha Rashad,1 Omar Abdel-Rahman2 1Medical Oncology Department, Maadi Armed Forces Hospital, 2Clinical Oncology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt Abstract: Rolapitant is a highly selective neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist, orally administered for a single dose of 180 mg before chemotherapy with granisetron D1, dexamethasone 8 mg BID on day 2–4. It has a unique pharmacological characteristic of a long plasma half-life (between 163 and 183 hours; this long half-life makes a single use sufficient to cover the delayed emesis risk period. No major drug–drug interactions between rolapitant and dexamethasone or other cytochrome P450 inducers or inhibitors were observed. The clinical efficacy of rolapitant was studied in two phase III trials in highly emetogenic chemotherapy and in one clinical trial in moderately emetogenic chemotherapy. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients achieving a complete response (defined as no emesis or use of rescue medication in the delayed phase (>24–120 hours after chemotherapy. In comparison to granisetron (10 µg/kg intravenously and dexamethasone (20 mg orally on day 1, and dexamethasone (8 mg orally twice daily on days 2–4 and placebo, rolapitant showed superior efficacy in the control of delayed and overall emesis. This review aims at revising the pharmacological characteristics of rolapitant, offering an updated review of the available clinical efficacy and safety data of rolapitant in different clinical settings, highlighting the place of rolapitant in the management of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV among currently available guidelines, and exploring the future directions of CINV management. Keywords: nausea, vomiting, chemotherapy, rolapitant, CINV

  16. Pharmacologic Comparison of Clinical Neutral Endopeptidase Inhibitors in a Rat Model of Acute Secretory Diarrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinsen, Michael J.; Oliva, Jonathan; Campbell, Mary A.; Arnett, Stacy D.; Tajfirouz, Deena; Ruminski, Peter G.; Yu, Ying; Bond, Brian R.; Ji, Yuhua; Neckermann, Georg; Choy, Robert K. M.; de Hostos, Eugenio; Meyers, Marvin J.

    2016-01-01

    Racecadotril (acetorphan) is a neutral endopeptidase (NEP) inhibitor with known antidiarrheal activity in animals and humans; however, in humans, it suffers from shortcomings that might be improved with newer drugs in this class that have progressed to the clinic for nonenteric disease indications. To identify potentially superior NEP inhibitors with immediate clinical utility for diarrhea treatment, we compared their efficacy and pharmacologic properties in a rat intestinal hypersecretion model. Racecadotril and seven other clinical-stage inhibitors of NEP were obtained or synthesized. Enzyme potency and specificity were compared using purified peptidases. Compounds were orally administered to rats before administration of castor oil to induce diarrhea. Stool weight was recorded over 4 hours. To assess other pharmacologic properties, select compounds were orally administered to normal or castor oil–treated rats, blood and tissue samples collected at multiple time points, and active compound concentrations determined by mass spectroscopy. NEP enzyme activity was measured in tissue homogenates. Three previously untested clinical NEP inhibitors delayed diarrhea onset and reduced total stool output, with little or no effect on intestinal motility assessed by the charcoal meal test. Each was shown to be a potent, highly specific inhibitor of NEP. Each exhibited greater suppression of NEP activity in intestinal and nonintestinal tissues than did racecadotril and sustained this inhibition longer. These results suggest that newer clinical-stage NEP inhibitors originally developed for other indications may be directly repositioned for treatment of acute secretory diarrhea and offer advantages over racecadotril, such as less frequent dosing and potentially improved efficacy. PMID:26907621

  17. Clinical pharmacology quality assurance program: models for longitudinal analysis of antiretroviral proficiency testing for international laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiFrancesco, Robin; Rosenkranz, Susan L; Taylor, Charlene R; Pande, Poonam G; Siminski, Suzanne M; Jenny, Richard W; Morse, Gene D

    2013-10-01

    Among National Institutes of Health HIV Research Networks conducting multicenter trials, samples from protocols that span several years are analyzed at multiple clinical pharmacology laboratories (CPLs) for multiple antiretrovirals. Drug assay data are, in turn, entered into study-specific data sets that are used for pharmacokinetic analyses, merged to conduct cross-protocol pharmacokinetic analysis, and integrated with pharmacogenomics research to investigate pharmacokinetic-pharmacogenetic associations. The CPLs participate in a semiannual proficiency testing (PT) program implemented by the Clinical Pharmacology Quality Assurance program. Using results from multiple PT rounds, longitudinal analyses of recovery are reflective of accuracy and precision within/across laboratories. The objectives of this longitudinal analysis of PT across multiple CPLs were to develop and test statistical models that longitudinally: (1) assess the precision and accuracy of concentrations reported by individual CPLs and (2) determine factors associated with round-specific and long-term assay accuracy, precision, and bias using a new regression model. A measure of absolute recovery is explored as a simultaneous measure of accuracy and precision. Overall, the analysis outcomes assured 97% accuracy (±20% of the final target concentration of all (21) drug concentration results reported for clinical trial samples by multiple CPLs). Using the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Act acceptance of meeting criteria for ≥2/3 consecutive rounds, all 10 laboratories that participated in 3 or more rounds per analyte maintained Clinical Laboratory Improvement Act proficiency. Significant associations were present between magnitude of error and CPL (Kruskal-Wallis P < 0.001) and antiretroviral (Kruskal-Wallis P < 0.001).

  18. Applied clinical pharmacology and public health in rural Asia – preventing deaths from organophosphorus pesticide and yellow oleander poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddleston, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Self-poisoning with pesticides or plants is a major clinical problem in rural Asia, killing several hundred thousand people every year. Over the last 17 years, our clinical toxicology and pharmacology group has carried out clinical studies in the North Central Province of Sri Lanka to improve treatment and reduce deaths. Studies have looked at the effectiveness of anti-digoxin Fab in cardiac glycoside plant poisoning, multiple dose activated charcoal in all poisoning, and pralidoxime in moderate toxicity organophosphorus insecticide poisoning. More recently, using a Haddon matrix as a guide, we have started conducting public health and animal studies to find strategies that may work outside of the hospital. Based on the 2009 GSK Research in Clinical Pharmacology prize lecture, this review shows the evolution of the group's research from a clinical pharmacology approach to one that studies possible interventions at multiple levels, including the patient, the community and government legislation. PMID:22943579

  19. The mollusks in zootherapy: traditional medicine and clinical-pharmacological importance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eraldo Medeiros Costa Neto

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of animals as sources of medicines is a cross-cultural phenomenon that is historically ancient and geographically widespread. This article reviews the use of mollusks in traditional medicine and discusses the clinical and pharmacological importance of these invertebrates. The roles that mollusks play in folk practices related to the healing and/or prevention of illnesses have been recorded in different social-cultural contexts worldwide. The clinical and therapeutic use of compounds coming from different species of mollusks is recorded in the literature. The chemistry of natural products provided by oysters, mussels, clams, sluggards, and snails has been substantially investigated, but the majority of these studies have focused on the subclasses Opistobranchia and Prosobranchia. Research into the knowledge and practices of folk medicine makes possible a better understanding of the interaction between human beings and the environment, in addition to allowing the elaboration of suitable strategies for the conservation of natural resources.

  20. CLINICAL AND PHARMACOLOGICAL PECULIARITIES OF CETIRIZINE USE FOR THE THERAPY OF ALLERGIC DISEASES IN CHILDREN

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    Yu. G. Levina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The review is dedicated to treatment of allergic diseases in children, particularly to the use of the 2nd generation antihistamine. It demonstrates that mediator histamine has the crucial role in pathophysiology of the allergic reaction. Antihistamines block histamine action aimed at H1 receptors by way of competitive inhibition. The 2nd generation antihistamines are the drugs of choice for the treatment of allergic diseases due to the absence of sedative effect. The review presents clinical and pharmacological description of the selective 2nd generation antihistamine cetirizine, efficacy and safety of which have been appraised in numerous long-term clinical studies in children with allergic rhinitis, urticaria and atopic dermatitis. 

  1. Clinical pharmacology of CAR-T cells: Linking cellular pharmacodynamics to pharmacokinetics and antitumor effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norelli, M; Casucci, M; Bonini, C; Bondanza, A

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive cell transfer of T cells genetically modified with tumor-reactive chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is a rapidly emerging field in oncology, which in preliminary clinical trials has already shown striking antitumor efficacy. Despite these premises, there are still a number of open issues related to CAR-T cells, spanning from their exact mechanism of action (pharmacodynamics), to the factors associated with their in vivo persistence (pharmacokinetics), and, finally, to the relative contribution of each of the two in determining the antitumor effects and accompanying toxicities. In light of the unprecedented curative potential of CAR-T cells and of their predicted wide availability in the next few years, in this review we will summarize the current knowledge on the clinical pharmacology aspects of what is anticipated to be a brand new class of biopharmaceuticals to join the therapeutic armamentarium of cancer doctors. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Fluoxetine versus Vitex agnus castus extract in the treatment of premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmaca, Murad; Kumru, Selahattin; Tezcan, Ertan

    2003-04-01

    Clinical trials have demonstrated that serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) and the extract of Vitex agnus castus are effective for the treatment of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). However, to the best of our knowledge, there has been no study comparing the efficacy of the SRIs with Vitex agnus castus (AC) extract. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), with that of the AC extract, a natural choice. After a period of 2 screening months to screen the patients for suitability, 41 patients with PMDD according to DSM-IV were recruited into the study. The patients were randomized to fluoxetine or AC for 2 months of single-blind, rater- blinded and prospective treatment period. The outcome measures included the Penn daily symptom report (DSR), the Hamilton depression rating scale (HAM-D), and the clinical global impression-severity of illness (CGI-SI) and -improvement (CGI-I) scales. At endpoint, using the clinical criterion for improvement, a similar percentage of patients responded to fluoxetine (68.4%, n = 13) and AC (57.9%, n = 11). There was no statistically significant difference between the groups with respect to the rate of responders. This preliminary study suggests that patients with PMDD respond well to treatment with both fluoxetine and AC. However, fluoxetine was more effective for psychological symptoms while the extract diminished the physical symptoms. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Olanzapine and fluoxetine administration and coadministration increase rat hippocampal pregnenolone, allopregnanolone and peripheral deoxycorticosterone: implications for therapeutic actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Christine E; Shampine, Lawrence J; Khisti, Rahul T; Trost, William T; Bradford, Daniel W; Grobin, A Chistina; Massing, Mark W; Madison, Roger D; Butterfield, Marian I; Lieberman, Jeffrey A; Morrow, A Leslie

    2006-08-01

    Olanzapine and fluoxetine elevate the GABAergic neuroactive steroid allopregnanolone to physiologically relevant concentrations in rodent cerebral cortex. It is unknown if these agents also alter pregnenolone or deoxycorticosterone. Since olanzapine and fluoxetine in combination have clinical utility and may demonstrate synergistic effects, we investigated neuroactive steroid alterations following olanzapine, fluoxetine or coadministration. Male rats received IP vehicle, olanzapine, fluoxetine or the combination of both agents in higher-dose (0, 10, 20 or 10/20 mg/kg, respectively) and lower-dose (0, 5, 10 or 5/10 mg/kg, respectively) experiments. Pregnenolone and allopregnanolone levels in hippocampus were determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Peripheral deoxycorticosterone and other steroid levels were determined by radioimmunoassay. Olanzapine, fluoxetine or the combination increased hippocampal pregnenolone and serum deoxycorticosterone in both higher- and lower-dose experiments, and elevated hippocampal allopregnanolone in higher-dose conditions. No synergistic effects on pregnenolone or allopregnanolone were observed following olanzapine and fluoxetine coadministration compared to either compound alone. Pregnenolone and its sulfate enhance learning and memory in rodent models, and therefore pregnenolone elevations may be relevant to cognitive changes in psychotic and affective disorders. Since pregnenolone decreases have been linked to depression, it is possible that olanzapine- and fluoxetine-induced pregnenolone elevations may contribute to the antidepressant actions of these agents.

  4. Review of Clinical Pharmacology of Aloe vera L. in the Treatment of Psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miroddi, Marco; Navarra, Michele; Calapai, Fabrizio; Mancari, Ferdinando; Giofrè, Salvatore Vincenzo; Gangemi, Sebastiano; Calapai, Gioacchino

    2015-05-01

    Aloe vera L., is a plant used worldwide as folk remedy for the treatment of various ailments, including skin disorders. Its gel is present in cosmetics, medicinal products and food supplements. Psoriasis, an immune-mediated chronic inflammatory disease, involving mainly the skin, affects about the 2-3% of general population. Conventional pharmacological treatments for psoriasis can have limited effectiveness and can cause adverse reactions. For this reason often psoriatic patients look for alternative treatments based on natural products containing Aloe vera. We conducted a systematic review of clinical trials assessing effectiveness and safety of aloe for the treatment of psoriasis. Clinical studies published in English were considered; a total of four clinical trials met inclusion criteria. Studies were also evaluated by using the Jadad scale and Consort Statement in Reporting Clinical trials of Herbal Medicine Intervention. Quality and methodological accuracy of considered studies varied considerably, and some crucial information to reproduce clinical results was missing. We conclude that administration of aloe as cutaneous treatment is generally well tolerated, as no serious side effects were reported. Results on the effectiveness of Aloe vera are contradictory; our analysis reveals the presence of methodological gaps preventing to reach final conclusions. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Carthami flos: a review of its ethnopharmacology, pharmacology and clinical applications

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    Yanhua Tu

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTCarthami flos, the dried floret of Carthamus tinctorius L., Asteraceae (safflower, has been widely used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat a broad range of ailments, such as coronary heart disease, angina pectoris, gynecologic disease, stroke, and hypertension. However, although several studies on Carthami flos have been done consecutively, the results are usually scattered across various documents. This review aims to provide up-to-date information on the traditional uses, pharmacology, clinical applications, and toxicology of Carthami flos in China and thereby to provide a basis for further investigation of its use to treat dissimilar diseases. Various ethnomedical uses of Carthami flos have been documented in many ancient Chinese books. Crude extracts and isolated compounds from Carthami flos show a broad range of pharmacological properties, such as protective effects on brain tissue, on osteoblasts, and in myocardial ischemia, as well as anti-inflammatory, antithrombotic, antitumor, and antidiabetic activities. To date, safflower and safflor yellow injections have been used to treat coronary heart disease, chronic pulmonary heart disease, cerebrovascular diseases, orthopedic diseases, and diabetes mellitus. Regarding the toxicology of Carthami flos, among the side effects that have been observed are allergic reaction, spermatogenetic failure, fatty liver, and nephrotoxicity.

  6. Methamphetamine: An Update on Epidemiology, Pharmacology, Clinical Phenomenology, and Treatment Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Kelly E.; Ray, Lara A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite initial reports of a decline in use in the early 2000s, methamphetamine remains a significant public health concern with known neurotoxic and neurocognitive effects to the user. The goal of this review is to update the literature on methamphetamine use and addiction since its assent to peak popularity in 1990s. Methods Specifically, we first review recent epidemiological reports with a focus on methamphetamine accessibility, changes in use and disorder prevalence rates over time, and accurate estimates of the associated burden of care to the individual and society. Second, we review methamphetamine pharmacology literature with emphasis on the structural and functional neurotoxic effects associated with repeated use of the drug. Third, we briefly outline the findings on methamphetamine-related neurocognitive deficits as assessed via behavioral and neuroimaging paradigms. Lastly, we review the clinical presentation of methamphetamine addiction and the evidence supporting the available psychosocial and pharmacological treatments within the context of an addiction biology framework. Conclusion Taken together, this review provides a broad-based update of the available literature covering methamphetamine research over the past two decades and concludes with recommendations for future research. PMID:25176528

  7. Methamphetamine: an update on epidemiology, pharmacology, clinical phenomenology, and treatment literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Kelly E; Ray, Lara A

    2014-10-01

    Despite initial reports of a decline in use in the early 2000s, methamphetamine remains a significant public health concern with known neurotoxic and neurocognitive effects to the user. The goal of this review is to update the literature on methamphetamine use and addiction since its assent to peak popularity in 1990s. We first review recent epidemiological reports with a focus on methamphetamine accessibility, changes in use and disorder prevalence rates over time, and accurate estimates of the associated burden of care to the individual and society. Second, we review methamphetamine pharmacology literature with emphasis on the structural and functional neurotoxic effects associated with repeated use of the drug. Third, we briefly outline the findings on methamphetamine-related neurocognitive deficits as assessed via behavioral and neuroimaging paradigms. Lastly, we review the clinical presentation of methamphetamine addiction and the evidence supporting the available psychosocial and pharmacological treatments within the context of an addiction biology framework. Taken together, this review provides a broad-based update of the available literature covering methamphetamine research over the past two decades and concludes with recommendations for future research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Bupropion for the treatment of fluoxetine non-responsive trichotillomania: a case report

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    Bipeta Rajshekhar

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Trichotillomania, classified as an impulse control disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, is characterized by the recurrent pulling out of one's hair, resulting in noticeable hair loss. The condition has a varied etiology. Specific serotonin reuptake inhibitors are considered the treatment of choice; however some patients fail to respond to this class of drugs. A few older reports suggest possible benefit from treatment with bupropion. Case presentation A 23-year-old Asian woman with fluoxetine non- responsive trichotillomania was treated with sustained release bupropion (up to 450 mg/day and cognitive behavior therapy. She demonstrated clinically significant improvement on the Clinical Global Impression - Improvement scale by week 13. The improvement persisted throughout the 12-month follow-up period. Conclusions The present case report may be of interest to psychiatrists and dermatologists. Apart from the serotonergic pathway, others, such as the mesolimbic pathway, also appear to be involved in the causation of trichotillomania. Bupropion may be considered as an alternative pharmacological treatment for patients who do not respond to specific serotonin reuptake inhibitors. However, this initial finding needs to be confirmed by well designed double-blind placebo controlled trials.

  9. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCVII. G Protein–Coupled Estrogen Receptor and Its Pharmacologic Modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Estrogens are critical mediators of multiple and diverse physiologic effects throughout the body in both sexes, including the reproductive, cardiovascular, endocrine, nervous, and immune systems. As such, alterations in estrogen function play important roles in many diseases and pathophysiological conditions (including cancer), exemplified by the lower prevalence of many diseases in premenopausal women. Estrogens mediate their effects through multiple cellular receptors, including the nuclear receptor family (ERα and ERβ) and the G protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) family (GPR30/G protein–coupled estrogen receptor [GPER]). Although both receptor families can initiate rapid cell signaling and transcriptional regulation, the nuclear receptors are traditionally associated with regulating gene expression, whereas GPCRs are recognized as mediating rapid cellular signaling. Estrogen-activated pathways are not only the target of multiple therapeutic agents (e.g., tamoxifen, fulvestrant, raloxifene, and aromatase inhibitors) but are also affected by a plethora of phyto- and xeno-estrogens (e.g., genistein, coumestrol, bisphenol A, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane). Because of the existence of multiple estrogen receptors with overlapping ligand specificities, expression patterns, and signaling pathways, the roles of the individual receptors with respect to the diverse array of endogenous and exogenous ligands have been challenging to ascertain. The identification of GPER-selective ligands however has led to a much greater understanding of the roles of this receptor in normal physiology and disease as well as its interactions with the classic estrogen receptors ERα and ERβ and their signaling pathways. In this review, we describe the history and characterization of GPER over the past 15 years focusing on the pharmacology of steroidal and nonsteroidal compounds that have been employed to unravel the biology of this most recently recognized estrogen receptor. PMID

  10. Clinical Pharmacology Considerations for Development of β Lactamase Inhibitor Combination with Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, Nuggehally R

    2018-04-09

    The shrinking drug pipeline for antibacterial drugs has made it very precious to discover and develop novel drugs in this space. In this context, the recent approvals of β lactamase inhibitors with either cephalosporin or penem as combination drugs are welcome news to the community. There are number of β lactamase inhibitors with suggested partnered drugs that are currently in various stages of drug development. The focus of this manuscript is to provide some perspectives on clinical pharmacology considerations that may aid in the successful development of such combination drugs. In this regard, a broad framework which includes pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD) and PK/PD guided surrogate strategies are provided to enable an informed dosing decision of the combination agent. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. An Updated Review on the Phytochemistry, Pharmacology, and Clinical Trials ofSalacia oblonga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushwaha, Priya Singh; Singh, Ashok K; Keshari, Amit K; Maity, Siddhartha; Saha, Sudipta

    2016-01-01

    Salacia oblonga ( S. oblonga ), a perennial herb, has been used for thousands of years in ayurvedic medicine and is closely associated with prevention, treatment, and cure of various human ailments such as obesity and diabetes. A vast and wide range of chemical compounds such as polyphenols, friedelane-type triterpenes, norfriedelane-type triterpenes, eudesmane-type sesquiterpenes including various glycosides had been isolated from this plant. This review is aimed to survey the literature covering the phytochemistry and pharmacology of S. oblonga and to review the scientific data including active components and their multi-targeted mechanisms of action against various metabolic syndromes. We also included clinical trials related to this plant in this review. The overview would assist researchers to gather scientific information related to S. oblonga in future.

  12. Anti-inflammatory properties of desipramine and fluoxetine

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    Portet Karine

    2007-05-01

    , neutrophils and eosinophils, while desipramine diminished only the number of macrophages and lymphocytes. However, antidepressants as opposed to prednisolone did not attenuate bronchial hyperreactivity. In vitro, desipramine and fluoxetine dose-dependently inhibited the release of TNF-α from LPS-treated monocytes. In lung epithelial cells, these compounds decreased TNF-α-induced RANTES expression as well as the activity of nuclear factor-κB and activator protein-1. Conclusion Desipramine and fluoxetine reduce the inflammatory reaction in two animal models of human diseases. These antidepressants act directly on relevant peripheral cell types to decrease expression of inflammatory mediators probably by affecting their gene transcription. Clinical implications of these observations are discussed.

  13. Non-pharmacological care for patients with generalized osteoarthritis: design of a randomized clinical trial

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    Cornelissen Jessica

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-pharmacological treatment (NPT is a useful treatment option in the management of hip or knee osteoarthritis. To our knowledge however, no studies have investigated the effect of NPT in patients with generalized osteoarthritis (GOA. The primary aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of two currently existing health care programs with different intensity and mode of delivery on daily functioning in patients with GOA. The secondary objective is to compare the cost-effectiveness of both interventions. Methods/Design In this randomized, single blind, clinical trial with active controls, we aim to include 170 patients with GOA. The experimental intervention consist of six self-management group sessions provided by a multi-disciplinary team (occupational therapist, physiotherapist, dietician and specialized nurse. The active control group consists of two group sessions and four sessions by telephone, provided by a specialized nurse and physiotherapist. Both therapies last six weeks. Main study outcome is daily functioning during the first year after the treatment, assessed on the Health Assessment Questionnaire. Secondary outcomes are health related quality of life, specific complaints, fatigue, and costs. Illness cognitions, global perceived effect and self-efficacy, will also be assessed for a responder analysis. Outcome assessments are performed directly after the intervention, after 26 weeks and after 52 weeks. Discussion This article describes the design of a randomized, single blind, clinical trial with a one year follow up to compare the costs and effectiveness of two non-pharmacological interventions with different modes of delivery for patients with GOA. Trial registration Dutch Trial Register NTR2137

  14. Effect of fluoxetine on the pharmacokinetics of lansoprazole: a two-treatment period study in healthy male subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlase, Laurian; Popa, Adina; Neag, Maria; Muntean, Dana; Leucuta, Sorin E

    2011-10-01

    Fluoxetine is an inhibitor of the main metabolizing enzymes of lansoprazole and could influence the pharmacokinetics of lansoprazole. The changes in lansoprazole pharmacokinetics could have clinical significance concerning the safety of the therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic interaction between fluoxetine and lansoprazole in healthy subjects. A dose of lansoprazole 30 mg, alone or in combination with fluoxetine 60 mg, was administered to 18 healthy male subjects in a two-treatment study design, separated by an 8-day period in which fluoxetine alone was administered as a single oral daily dose. Plasma concentrations of lansoprazole were determined during a 12-hour period following drug administration. Lansoprazole plasma concentrations were determined by a validated liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method. The pharmacokinetic parameters of lansoprazole were calculated using non-compartmental analysis. In the two periods of treatment, the mean maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) values were 817 ng/mL (lansoprazole alone) and 1370 ng/mL (lansoprazole in combination with fluoxetine after pre-treatment with fluoxetine for 8 days) [p lansoprazole and suggest that the observed interaction may be clinically significant, although its clinical relevance has yet to be confirmed.

  15. Anoectochilus roxburghii: A review of its phytochemistry, pharmacology, and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shenyi; Shao, Qingsong; Zhang, Ailian

    2017-09-14

    Anoectochilus roxburghii (Orchidaceae), also known as Jinxianlian (Simplified Chinese: ) and Jinxianlan (Simplified Chinese: ), is valued in many Asian countries, where this plant species is used for medicinal, culinary, and ornamental purposes. As a food, A. roxburghii is widely used as a treatment booster and medicine because of its various beneficial properties; these include, most notably, the curative effects of heat dissipation and cooling of blood, elimination of dampness, detoxification, and immunity enhancement. This review aims to provide up-to-date information on the phytochemistry, pharmacology, and clinical applications of A. roxburghii. Relevant information on A. roxburghii was obtained by an online search of worldwide-accepted scientific databases (Web of Science, ScienceDirect, Elsevier, Springer, NCBI, ACS Publications, CNKI, and Wanfang data). Phytochemical investigations have revealed that the major chemical constituents of A. roxburghii are polysaccharides, flavonoids, glycosides, organic acids, volatile compounds, steroids, triterpenes, alkaloids, and nucleosides. These compounds have been proven to be the main bioactive substances responsible for pharmacological activities such as antidiabetic, antilipemic, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, liver protective, renal protective, immunomodulatory, abirritant, sedative, and antineoplastic effects. A variety of dosage forms of A. roxburghii are currently being applied to patients suffering from hyperuricemia, type 2 diabetes mellitus, chronic hepatitis B, Helicobacter pylori infection, cough-variant asthma, and other conditions. Nevertheless, further research is needed to clarify A. roxburghii absorption, distribution, metabolic, and excretion pathways. Moreover, the toxicology in A. roxburghii and A. formosanus are also in urgent need of research, especially long-term in vivo chronic toxicity tests need to be carried out. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. N-Desmethylclozapine, Fluoxetine, and Salmeterol Inhibit Postentry Stages of the Dengue Virus Life Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medigeshi, Guruprasad R; Kumar, Rinki; Dhamija, Ekta; Agrawal, Tanvi; Kar, Meenakshi

    2016-11-01

    Around 10,000 people die each year due to severe dengue disease, and two-thirds of the world population lives in a region where dengue disease is endemic. There has been remarkable progress in dengue virus vaccine development; however, there are no licensed antivirals for dengue disease, and none appear to be in clinical trials. We took the approach of repositioning approved drugs for anti-dengue virus activity by screening a library of pharmacologically active compounds. We identified N-desmethylclozapine, fluoxetine hydrochloride, and salmeterol xinafoate as dengue virus inhibitors based on reductions in the numbers of infected cells and viral titers. Dengue virus RNA levels were diminished in inhibitor-treated cells, and this effect was specific to dengue virus, as other flaviviruses, such as Japanese encephalitis virus and West Nile virus, or other RNA viruses, such as respiratory syncytial virus and rotavirus, were not affected by these inhibitors. All three inhibitors specifically inhibited dengue virus replication with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC 50 s) in the high-nanomolar range. Estimation of negative-strand RNA intermediates and time-of-addition experiments indicated that inhibition was occurring at a postentry stage, most probably at the initiation of viral RNA replication. Finally, we show that inhibition is most likely due to the modulation of the endolysosomal pathway and induction of autophagy. Copyright © 2016 Medigeshi et al.

  17. Pharmacologic treatments effective in both generalized anxiety disorder and major depressive disorder: clinical and theoretical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casacalenda, N; Boulenger, J P

    1998-09-01

    To review the efficacy of anxiolytics (alprazolam and azapirones) in major depressive disorder (MDD) and that of antidepressants in generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), thereby exploring the possible theoretical and clinical implications of this efficacy. A Medline literature search was performed for the period January 1980 to September 1997 of randomized, double-blind comparison studies between anxiolytics and antidepressants in the acute treatment of adult patients with either MDD or GAD. Alprazolam, at doses double those generally recommended for anxiety disorders, appears to be as effective as tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) in the acute treatment of mild to moderate MDD. Alprazolam was also found to have a more rapid onset of action than to TCAs, particularly for the improvement of anxiety, somatization, and insomnia. Two azapirones (buspirone and gepirone) also have demonstrated a modest acute antidepressant effect in preliminary studies, albeit only in a depressed outpatient sample with considerable anxiety at baseline. Finally, various antidepressant drugs (imipramine, trazodone, paroxetine) were shown to have, at the least, comparable efficacy to benzodiazepines (BZDs) in the acute treatment of GAD. The nonspecificity of treatment response suggests that GAD and MDD are 1) different expressions of a similar disorder with a common neurobiological substrate, 2) discrete diagnostic entities that respond to independent pharmacological effects of the same drugs, or 3) a combination of the two (heterogeneity hypothesis). The most relevant clinical finding is the efficacy of antidepressants in the acute treatment of GAD.

  18. Clinically Relevant Pharmacological Strategies That Reverse MDMA-Induced Brain Hyperthermia Potentiated by Social Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Ren, Suelynn; Wakabayashi, Ken T; Baumann, Michael H; Shaham, Yavin

    2016-01-01

    MDMA-induced hyperthermia is highly variable, unpredictable, and greatly potentiated by the social and environmental conditions of recreational drug use. Current strategies to treat pathological MDMA-induced hyperthermia in humans are palliative and marginally effective, and there are no specific pharmacological treatments to counteract this potentially life-threatening condition. Here, we tested the efficacy of mixed adrenoceptor blockers carvedilol and labetalol, and the atypical antipsychotic clozapine, in reversing MDMA-induced brain and body hyperthermia. We injected rats with a moderate non-toxic dose of MDMA (9 mg/kg) during social interaction, and we administered potential treatment drugs after the development of robust hyperthermia (>2.5 °C), thus mimicking the clinical situation of acute MDMA intoxication. Brain temperature was our primary focus, but we also simultaneously recorded temperatures from the deep temporal muscle and skin, allowing us to determine the basic physiological mechanisms of the treatment drug action. Carvedilol was modestly effective in attenuating MDMA-induced hyperthermia by moderately inhibiting skin vasoconstriction, and labetalol was ineffective. In contrast, clozapine induced a marked and immediate reversal of MDMA-induced hyperthermia via inhibition of brain metabolic activation and blockade of skin vasoconstriction. Our findings suggest that clozapine, and related centrally acting drugs, might be highly effective for reversing MDMA-induced brain and body hyperthermia in emergency clinical situations, with possible life-saving results.

  19. Clinical pharmacology and clinical trials of ribonucleotide reductase inhibitors: is it a viable cancer therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannargudi, Mukundan Baskar; Deb, Subrata

    2017-08-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RR) enzymes (RR1 and RR2) play an important role in the reduction of ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides which is involved in DNA replication and repair. Augmented RR activity has been ascribed to uncontrolled cell growth and tumorigenic transformation. This review mainly focuses on several biological and chemical RR inhibitors (e.g., siRNA, GTI-2040, GTI-2501, triapine, gemcitabine, and clofarabine) that have been evaluated in clinical trials with promising anticancer activity from 1960's till 2016. A summary on whether their monotherapy or combination is still effective for further use is discussed. Among the RR2 inhibitors evaluated, GTI-2040, siRNA, gallium nitrate and didox were more efficacious as a monotherapy, whereas triapine was found to be more efficacious as combination agent. Hydroxyurea is currently used more in combination therapy, even though it is efficacious as a monotherapy. Gallium nitrate showed mixed results in combination therapy, while the combination activity of didox is yet to be evaluated. RR1 inhibitors that have long been used in chemotherapy such as gemcitabine, cladribine, fludarabine and clofarabine are currently used mostly as a combination therapy, but are equally efficacious as a monotherapy, except tezacitabine which did not progress beyond phase I trials. Based on the results of clinical trials, we conclude that RR inhibitors are viable treatment options, either as a monotherapy or as a combination in cancer chemotherapy. With the recent advances made in cancer biology, further development of RR inhibitors with improved efficacy and reduced toxicity is possible for treatment of variety of cancers.

  20. Fluoxetine for motor recovery after acute ischaemic stroke (FLAME): a randomised placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chollet, François; Tardy, Jean; Albucher, Jean-François; Thalamas, Claire; Berard, Emilie; Lamy, Catherine; Bejot, Yannick; Deltour, Sandrine; Jaillard, Assia; Niclot, Philippe; Guillon, Benoit; Moulin, Thierry; Marque, Philippe; Pariente, Jérémie; Arnaud, Catherine; Loubinoux, Isabelle

    2011-02-01

    Hemiplegia and hemiparesis are the most common deficits caused by stroke. A few small clinical trials suggest that fluoxetine enhances motor recovery but its clinical efficacy is unknown. We therefore aimed to investigate whether fluoxetine would enhance motor recovery if given soon after an ischaemic stroke to patients who have motor deficits. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, patients from nine stroke centres in France who had ischaemic stroke and hemiplegia or hemiparesis, had Fugl-Meyer motor scale (FMMS) scores of 55 or less, and were aged between 18 years and 85 years were eligible for inclusion. Patients were randomly assigned, using a computer random-number generator, in a 1:1 ratio to fluoxetine (20 mg once per day, orally) or placebo for 3 months starting 5-10 days after the onset of stroke. All patients had physiotherapy. The primary outcome measure was the change on the FMMS between day 0 and day 90 after the start of the study drug. Participants, carers, and physicians assessing the outcome were masked to group assignment. Analysis was of all patients for whom data were available (full analysis set). This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00657163. 118 patients were randomly assigned to fluoxetine (n=59) or placebo (n=59), and 113 were included in the analysis (57 in the fluoxetine group and 56 in the placebo group). Two patients died before day 90 and three withdrew from the study. FMMS improvement at day 90 was significantly greater in the fluoxetine group (adjusted mean 34·0 points [95% CI 29·7-38·4]) than in the placebo group (24·3 points [19·9-28·7]; p=0·003). The main adverse events in the fluoxetine and placebo groups were hyponatraemia (two [4%] vs two [4%]), transient digestive disorders including nausea, diarrhoea, and abdominal pain (14 [25%] vs six [11%]), hepatic enzyme disorders (five [9%] vs ten [18%]), psychiatric disorders (three [5%] vs four [7%]), insomnia (19 [33%] vs 20 [36%]), and partial

  1. Physiological modes of action of fluoxetine and its human metabolites in algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuwoehner, Judith; Fenner, Kathrin; Escher, Beate I

    2009-09-01

    Fluoxetine, the active ingredient of many antidepressants, was identified as specifically toxic toward algae in a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis with literature data for algae, daphnia, and fish. The goal of this study was to elucidate the mode of action in algae and to evaluate the toxicity of the major human metabolites of fluoxetine using two different algae tests. The time dependence and sensitivity of thedifferenteffectendpointsyield information on the physiological mode of action. Baseline toxicity was predicted with QSARs based on measured liposome-water partition coefficients. The ratio of predicted baseline toxicity to experimental toxicity (toxic ratio TR) gives information on the intrinsic potency (extent of specificity of effect). The metabolite p-trifluoromethylphenol was classified to act as baseline toxicant Fluoxetine (TR 60-150) and its pharmacologically active metabolite norfluoxetine (TR 10-80) exhibited specific toxicity. By comparison with reference compounds we conclude that fluoxetine and norfluoxetine have an effect on the energy budget of algal cells since the time pattern of these two compounds is most similar to that observed for norflurazon, but they act less specifically as indicated by lower TR values and the similarity of the effect pattern to baseline toxicants. The mixture toxicity of fluoxetine and its human metabolites norfluoxetine and p-TFMP can be predicted using the model of concentration addition for practical purposes of risk assessment despite small deviations from this model for the specific endpoints like PSII inhibition because the integrative endpoints like growth rate and reproduction in all cases gave agreement with the predictions for concentration addition.

  2. Pharmacological profile of β3-adrenoceptor agonists in clinical development for the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Igawa, Yasuhiko; Michel, Martin C.

    2013-01-01

    β(3)-Adrenoceptor agonists are an emerging drug class for the treatment of the overactive bladder syndrome, and clinical proof-of-concept data have been obtained for three representatives of this class, mirabegron, ritobegron, and solabegron. We review here the pharmacological profile of these three

  3. European clinical guidelines for Tourette syndrome and other tic disorders. Part II: pharmacological treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roessner, Veit; Plessen, Kerstin J; Rothenberger, Aribert

    2011-01-01

    provide the first comprehensive overview of all reports on pharmacological treatment options for TS through a MEDLINE, PubMed, and EMBASE search for all studies that document the effect of pharmacological treatment of TS and other tic disorders between 1970 and November 2010. We present a summary...

  4. Advancing pharmacometrics and systems pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, S A; Terzic, A

    2012-11-01

    Pharmacometrics and systems pharmacology are emerging as principal quantitative sciences within drug development and experimental therapeutics. In recognition of the importance of pharmacometrics and systems pharmacology to the discipline of clinical pharmacology, the American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics (ASCPT), in collaboration with Nature Publishing Group and Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics, has established CPT: Pharmacometrics & Systems Pharmacology to inform the field and shape the discipline.

  5. Are neurocognitive, clinical and social dysfunctions in schizotaxia reversible pharmacologically?: Results from the Changsha study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, William S; Hsi, Xiaolu; Giuliano, Anthony J; Tan, Liwen; Zhu, Shaochun; Li, Lingjiang; Seidman, Larry J; Tsuang, Ming T

    2012-03-01

    The Changsha study identifies adult, non-psychotic relatives of patients with schizophrenia who show deficits in neurocognitive, social, clinical and other dimensions, and who meet provisional criteria for a liability syndrome for schizophrenia ('schizotaxia'). In this study, we investigated whether negative symptoms, neurocognitive deficits, or other measures of clinical and social function in subjects who met our research criteria for schizotaxia were amenable to pharmacological remediation with a low dose (2.0 mg) of risperidone, a second generation antipsychotic medication. One hundred eighty nine relatives were assessed at the Mental Health Institute, Second Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Changsha (Hunan Province, China), between 12/06 - 12/08. Eighty six of these individuals met modified criteria for schizotaxia, and 36 agreed to enter a 6-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled protocol. ANCOVAs using age and gender as covariates showed significant improvement in the risperidone group (n=20) on neurocognitive function (Wisconsin Card Sorting Test Total Errors and Perseverative Errors) and on a self-report measure of social function (Social Adjustment Scale), compared to the placebo-control group (n=16). Effect sizes were small to medium. Notably, risperidone effect sizes were larger (medium to large) in a subset of subjects (risperidone=15; placebo=10) whose membership in the schizotaxic group was supported empirically by cluster analysis. Negative symptoms did not change significantly in either analysis. The results are generally consistent with previous open-label investigations of risperidone administration in subjects with schizotaxia, and provide evidence that some neurocognitive and clinical problems are amenable to remediation in non-psychotic relatives of people with schizophrenia.

  6. Guanidino-containing drugs in cancer chemotherapy: biochemical and clinical pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekelund, S; Nygren, P; Larsson, R

    2001-05-15

    The pharmacology and clinical application of three guanidino-containing compounds are reviewed in this commentary with special focus on a new member of this group of drugs, CHS 828 [N-(6-(4-chlorophenoxy)hexyl)-N'-cyano-N"-4-pyridylguanidine]. m-Iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) and methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) have been extensively studied, preclinically as well as clinically, and have established use as anticancer agents. MIBG has structural similarities to the neurotransmitter, norepinephrine, and MGBG is a structural analog of the natural polyamine spermidine. CHS 828 is a pyridyl cyanoguanidine newly recognized as having cytotoxic effects when screening antihypertensive compounds. Apart from having the guanidino groups in common, there are many differences between these drugs in both structure and their mechanisms of action. However, they all inhibit mitochondrial function, a seemingly unique feature among chemotherapeutic drugs. In vitro in various cell lines and primary cultures of patient tumor cells and in vivo in various tumor models, CHS 828 has cytotoxic properties unlike any of the standard cytotoxic drugs with which it has been compared. Among these are non-cross-resistance to standard drugs and pronounced activity in tumor models acknowledged to be highly drug-resistant. Similar to MIBG, CHS 828 induces an early increase in extracellular acidification, due to stimulation of the glycolytic flux. Furthermore, ATP levels decrease, and the syntheses of DNA and protein are shut off after approximately 30 hr of exposure, indicating active cell death. CHS 828 is now in early clinical trials, the results of which are eagerly awaited.

  7. Single dose of fluoxetine increases muscle activation in chronic stroke patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Genderen, Hanneke Irene; Nijlant, Juliette M.M.; van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria; Movig, Kris L.L.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: This pilot study explores the influence of a single dose of fluoxetine (20 mg) on the muscle activation patterns and functional ability of the muscles in the lower part of the arm in chronic stroke patients. Methods: A crossover, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted in 10

  8. Differential pharmacology and clinical utility of rolapitant in chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapoport BL

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Bernardo Leon Rapoport The Medical Oncology Centre of Rosebank, Johannesburg, South Africa Abstract: Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV is a debilitating side effect of many cytotoxic chemotherapy regimens. CINV typically manifests during two well-defined time periods (acute and delayed phases. The acute phase is the first 24 hours after chemotherapy and is largely managed with 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor antagonists. The delayed phase, a 5-day at-risk period during which patients are not often in direct contact with their health care provider, remains a significant unmet medical need. Neurokinin-1 (NK-1 receptor antagonists have demonstrated protection against acute and delayed CINV in patients treated with highly emetogenic chemotherapy and moderately emetogenic chemotherapy when used in combination with a 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor antagonist and dexamethasone. Furthermore, recent data indicate that this protection is maintained over multiple treatment cycles. Rolapitant, a selective and long-acting NK-1 receptor antagonist, is approved as oral formulation for the prevention of delayed CINV in adults. This review discusses the differential pharmacology and clinical utility of rolapitant in preventing CINV compared with other NK-1 receptor antagonists. Keywords: antiemetics, highly emetogenic chemotherapy, moderately emetogenic chemotherapy, delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, emesis, neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists

  9. A Systemic Review on Aloe arborescens Pharmacological Profile: Biological Activities and Pilot Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singab, Abdel-Naser B; El-Hefnawy, Hala M; Esmat, Ahmed; Gad, Haidy A; Nazeam, Jilan A

    2015-12-01

    Since ancient times, plants and herbal preparations have been used as medicine. Research carried out in the last few decades has verified several such claims. Aloe arborescens Miller, belonging to the Aloe genus (Family Asphodelaceae), is one of the main varieties of Aloe used worldwide. The popularity of the plant in traditional medicine for several ailments (antitumor, immunomodulatory, antiinflammatory, antiulcer, antimicrobial and antifungal activity) focused the investigator's interest on this plant. Most importantly, the reported studies have shown the plant effectiveness on various cancer types such as liver, colon, duodenal, skin, pancreatic, intestinal, lung and kidney types. These multiple biological actions make Aloe an important resource for developing new natural therapies. However, the biological activities of isolated compounds such as glycoprotein, polysaccharides, enzyme and phenolics were insufficient. Considering all these, this contribution provides a systematic review outlining the evidence on the biological efficacy of the plant including the pharmacology and the related mechanisms of action, with specific attention to the various safety precautions, and preclinical and clinical studies, indicating the future research prospects of this plant. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Evaluation of impact of teaching clinical pharmacology and rational therapeutics to medical undergraduates and interns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Mira K; Panchal, Jigar R; Shah, Samdih; Iyer, Geetha

    2016-01-01

    To find out the impact of teaching clinical pharmacology and rational therapeutics (CPT) to medical undergraduates (UGs) and interns. This cross-sectional, prospective study was conducted on three UGs batches and interns using two pretested validated structured questionnaires, modified from the work of Tobaiqy et al. The study was approved by the Institutional Ethics Committee. ANOVA and Chi-square test were used for statistical analysis. The value of P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. A total of 379 UGs and 96 interns participated in this study. Mean knowledge score of interns was significantly reduced as compared to UGs (P < 0.0001). A significant increase in confidence for unsupervised prescribing of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (99%), oral rehydration salt, iron salts was perceived among interns as compared to UGs (P < 0.05). However, 63.5% confessed problems in selection of drugs, drug-drug interactions, prescribing in special patient population. Although they were confident prescribing fixed dose combination for adult patients (89.5%), majority were hesitant to prescribe opioids (77%), steroids (76%), vaccines (75%), and antihypertensives (62%). The theoretical CPT teaching transfers knowledge to UGs; however, it is not retained in internship and does not adequately prepare interns to prescribe safe and rational drugs.

  11. Fluoxetine ameliorates atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in BALB/c mice through reducing psychological stress and inflammatory response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanxi Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a common chronic inflammatory skin disorder, and patients with AD suffer from severe psychological stress, which markedly increases the prevalence rate of depression and anxiety disorders in later life. Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, has recently been reported to exert anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects. However, it is unclear whether fluoxetine is effective in the treatment of AD through reducing psychological stress and inflammatory reaction. Here, we reported that a BALB/c mouse model of AD was induced by application of 2,4‑dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB onto hairless dorsal skin. Chronic fluoxetine treatment (10 mg/kg per day, i.p. significantly attenuated AD-like symptoms, as reflected by a dramatic decrease in scratching bouts, as well as a decrease in anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors. Furthermore, these behavioral changes were accompanied by a significant decrease in epidermal thickness, the number of mast cells in skin tissue, mRNA levels of interleukin-4 (IL-4 and IL-13 in the spleen, as well as serum immunoglobulin E (IgE in the DNCB-treated mice by treatment with fluoxetine. Taken together, these results indicate that fluoxetine may suppress psychological stress and inflammatory response during AD development, and subsequently ameliorate AD symptoms, suggesting that fluoxetine may be a potential therapeutic agent against AD in clinic.

  12. Therapeutic potential of fluoxetine in neurological disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mostert, Jop P.; Koch, Marcus W.; Heerings, Marco; Heersema, Dorothea J.; De Keyser, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine, which is registered for a variety of psychiatric disorders, has been found to stimulate the cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB), increase the production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BNDF) and the neurotrophic peptide

  13. 21 CFR 520.980 - Fluoxetine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fluoxetine. 520.980 Section 520.980 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS.... 000986 in § 510.600 of this chapter. (c) Conditions of use in dogs—(1) Amount. 1 to 2 mg per kilogram...

  14. Policosanol: clinical pharmacology and therapeutic significance of a new lipid-lowering agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouni-Berthold, Ioanna; Berthold, Heiner K

    2002-02-01

    Policosanol is a mixture of higher primary aliphatic alcohols isolated from sugar cane wax, whose main component is octacosanol. The mixture has been shown to lower cholesterol in animal models, healthy volunteers, and patients with type II hypercholesterolemia. We reviewed the literature on placebo-controlled lipid-lowering studies using policosanol published in peer-reviewed journals as well as studies investigating its mechanism of action and its clinical pharmacology. At doses of 10 to 20 mg per day, policosanol lowers total cholesterol by 17% to 21% and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol by 21% to 29% and raises high-density lipoprotein cholesterol by 8% to 15%. Because higher doses have not been tested up to now, it cannot be excluded that effectiveness may be even greater. Daily doses of 10 mg of policosanol have been shown to be equally effective in lowering total or LDL cholesterol as the same dose of simvastatin or pravastatin. Triglyceride levels are not influenced by policosanol. At dosages of up to 20 mg per day, policosanol is safe and well tolerated, as studies of >3 years of therapy indicate. There is evidence from in vitro studies that policosanol may inhibit hepatic cholesterol synthesis at a step before mevalonate generation, but direct inhibition of the hydroxy-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase is unlikely. Animal studies suggest that LDL catabolism may be enhanced, possibly through receptor-mediated mechanisms, but the precise mechanism of action is not understood yet. Policosanol has additional beneficial properties such as effects on smooth muscle cell proliferation, platelet aggregation, and LDL peroxidation. Data on efficacy determined by clinical end points such as rates of cardiac events or cardiac mortality are lacking. Policosanol seems to be a very promising phytochemical alternative to classic lipid-lowering agents such as the statins and deserves further evaluation.

  15. Developing a Competency-based Curriculum in Basic and Clinical Pharmacology--A Delphi Study among Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midlöv, Patrik; Höglund, Peter; Eriksson, Tommy; Diehl, Annika; Edgren, Gudrun

    2015-12-01

    A new curriculum is planned for the medical school at Lund University, Sweden. Pharmacology, in a broad sense, has been identified as a subject that needs to be strengthened based on needs in the healthcare system. The aim was to identify the competencies in basic and clinical pharmacology that a newly qualified physician needs. Using a modified three-round Delphi technique, 31 physicians were invited to list necessary competencies (round 1). After content analysis, these panel members classified the list by importance on two occasions (rounds 2 and 3) using a 4-point scale (4 = necessary, 3 = desirable, 2 = useful, 1 = not necessary). Competencies with the highest ranks based on necessity were retained. Thirty physicians accepted the invitation and 25 (83%) of them completed all three rounds. Round 1 resulted in 258 suggestions, which were subsequently reduced to 95 competencies. Of these 95 competencies, 40 were considered necessary by at least 75% of the panel members. The degree of consensus increased between round 2 and round 3. Using a modified Delphi technique, we identified 40 competencies that could be transferred to learning outcomes for a new curriculum in basic and clinical pharmacology at medical school. © 2015 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  16. Pharmacological versus microvascular decompression approaches for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia: clinical outcomes and direct costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida A

    2011-08-01

    therapies, while after MDV surgery several patients showed important side effects. Data reinforce that, (1 TN patients should be carefully evaluated before choosing therapy for pain control, (2 different pharmacological approaches are available to initiate pain control at low costs, and (3 criteria for surgical interventions should be clearly defined due to important side effects, with the initial higher costs being strongly reduced with time.Keywords: trigeminal neuralgia, carbamazepine, gabapentin associated with ropivacaine, microvascular decompression, clinical outcomes, direct costs 

  17. A new generation of antipsychotics: pharmacology and clinical utility of cariprazine in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caccia S

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Silvio Caccia, Roberto William Invernizzi, Alessandro Nobili, Luca Pasina IRCCS-Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Milan, Italy Abstract: Cariprazine is a potential antipsychotic awaiting approval from the US Food and Drug Administration. It is a dopamine D2- and D3-receptor partial agonist, with higher affinity for D3 receptors, as opposed to the D2 antagonism of most older antipsychotic agents. Like most lipophilic antipsychotics, it undergoes extensive hepatic metabolism by cytochrome P450 (CYP, mainly the highly variable 3A4, with the formation of active metabolites. However, the parent compound – particularly its active didesmethyl derivative – is cleared very slowly, with elimination half-lives in schizophrenic patients ranging from 2–5 days for cariprazine to 2–3 weeks for didesmethyl-cariprazine. Exposure to the latter was several times that for cariprazine, although didesmethyl-cariprazine did not reach steady state within the 3 weeks of 12.5 mg/day dosing. Preliminary information on its therapeutic role comes from press releases and a few abstracts presented at scientific meetings. In short-term controlled trials, it was more effective than placebo in reducing positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia, with an effective dose range of 1.5–12 mg/day. Although cariprazine was associated with a higher incidence of akathisia and extrapyramidal side effects than placebo, it did not cause weight gain, metabolic abnormalities, prolactin increase, or corrected QT prolongation. Similarly, cariprazine's efficacy and tolerability for the treatment of bipolar disorder (manic/mixed and depressive episodes was established in the dose range of 3–12 mg/day, although again no long-term data are available. Well-designed clinical trials, mainly direct "head-to-head" comparisons with other second-generation antipsychotic agents, are needed to define the therapeutic role and safety profile of cariprazine in schizophrenia and

  18. Using team-based learning to teach clinical pharmacology in medical school: student satisfaction and improved performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zgheib, N K; Simaan, J A; Sabra, R

    2011-07-01

    Formal teaching in clinical pharmacology was never part of the curriculum at the American University of Beirut Faculty of Medicine. Based on feedback from students and on recommendations of academic bodies, we have introduced, since June 2008, twice-monthly "rational prescribing" sessions during the required internal medicine rotation in year 4 of medical school. All sessions were designed according to the innovative Team-based Learning format and concluded by having the students practice prescription writing and personal formulary development based on the World Health Organization criteria. Our 18-month experience showed that students were very satisfied with the course and the teaching approach, and that their performance on prescription writing and formulary development had improved. Although further studies are needed to explore the impact of team-based learning on additional performance measures, we recommend it as an effective alternative for teaching clinical pharmacology in medical schools.

  19. Use of bedaquiline and delamanid in diabetes patients: clinical and pharmacological considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu MH

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Minhui Hu,1 Chunlan Zheng,1 Feng Gao2 1Department of Internal Medicine – Section 5, Wuhan Pulmonary Hospital (Wuhan Tuberculosis Control Institute, 2Department of Endocrinology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Antituberculosis (anti-TB treatment may be affected by both diabetes and hypoglycemic agents in patients with these 2 comorbidities. However, data supporting this conclusion relate only to standard anti-TB therapies. Sirturo® (bedaquiline and Deltyba® (delamanid, novel drugs for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB, are recommended for diabetes patients when another effective treatment regimen cannot be provided. Currently, there are no clinical data related to the use of these agents in diabetes patients. Possible alterations in the pharmacokinetics of these novel drugs induced by changes in subcutaneous adipose blood flow, gastric emptying, or nephropathy in diabetes patients, and possible drug–drug interactions with hypoglycemic agents, are of special interest, since the efficacy of bedaquiline and delamanid is concentration dependent. Moreover, it is of fundamental importance to avoid possible additive or synergistic effects of adverse drug reactions in this already vulnerable patient group. We reviewed clinical particularities related to the use of bedaquiline and delamanid in patients with type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus (DM, as well as pharmacological aspects of the concurrent use of these agents with oral and injectable hypoglycemic agents. Bedaquiline shares liver metabolic pathways with several oral hypoglycemic agents, whereas delamanid may compete with several oral hypoglycemic agents and insulin analogs at protein-binding sites. Special concern exists regarding the use of bedaquiline and delamanid in diabetes patients aged >65 years and patients with severe renal or hepatic impairment or electrolyte disturbances

  20. Challenges and Opportunities for Quantitative Clinical Pharmacology in Cancer Immunotherapy: Something Old, Something New, Something Borrowed, and Something Blue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroh, M; Carlile, D J; Li, C-C; Wagg, J; Ribba, B; Ramanujan, S; Jin, J; Xu, J; Charoin, J-E; Xhu, Z-X; Morcos, P N; Davis, J D; Phipps, A

    2015-09-01

    Cancer immunotherapy (CIT) initiates or enhances the host immune response against cancer. Following decades of development, patients with previously few therapeutic options may now benefit from CIT. Although the quantitative clinical pharmacology (qCP) of previous classes of anticancer drugs has matured during this time, application to CIT may not be straightforward since CIT acts via the immune system. Here we discuss where qCP approaches might best borrow or start anew for CIT.

  1. Pharmacological Treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in Children and Adolescents: Clinical Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna C. Shier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is a common neurobehavioral disorder of childhood that can result in significant functional impairment, and if not adequately treated can lead to impaired quality of life. Pharmacotherapy is considered the first-line treatment for ADHD in children and adolescents. We review both recent literature and seminal studies regarding the pharmacological treatment of ADHD in children and adolescents. There is ample evidence for the efficacy and safety of both stimulants and non-stimulants in the treatment of ADHD. We review important aspects of evaluation and assessment and discuss first-line pharmacological treatments and as well as when to consider using alternative pharmacological agents. Treatment approaches to manage frequently seen comorbid disorders with ADHD are also covered.

  2. Pharmacological and clinical dilemmas of prescribing in co-morbid adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez de los Cobos, José; Siñol, Núria; Pérez, Víctor; Trujols, Joan

    2014-01-01

    The present article reviews whether available efficacy and safety data support the pharmacological treatment of adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in patients with concurrent substance use disorders (SUD). Arguments for and against treating adult ADHD with active SUD are discussed. Findings from 19 large open studies and controlled clinical trials show that the use of atomoxetine or extended-release methylphenidate formulations, together with psychological therapy, yield promising though inconclusive results about short term efficacy of these drugs in the treatment of adult ADHD in patients with SUD and no other severe mental disorders. However, the efficacy of these drugs is scant or lacking for treating concurrent SUD. No serious safety issues have been associated with these drugs in patients with co-morbid SUD-ADHD, given their low risk of abuse and favourable side effect and drug–drug interaction profile. The decision to treat adult ADHD in the context of active SUD depends on various factors, some directly related to SUD-ADHD co-morbidity (e.g. degree of diagnostic uncertainty for ADHD) and other factors related to the clinical expertise of the medical staff and availability of adequate resources (e.g. the means to monitor compliance with pharmacological treatment). Our recommendation is that clinical decisions be individualized and based on a careful analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of pharmacological treatment for ADHD on a case-by-case basis in the context of active SUD. PMID:23216449

  3. Comparison of pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment strategies in promotion of infertility self-efficacy scale in infertile women: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajar Pasha

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The infertility is associated with psychological consequence including depression, and lack of self-efficacy. Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the pharmacological and no pharmacological strategies in promotion of self-efficacy of infertile women. Materials and Methods: A randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted on 89 infertile women who were recruited from Fatemeh Zahra Infertility and Reproductive Health Research Center and were randomized into three groups; cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT, antidepressant therapy with flouxetine 20 mg daily for 3 month, and a control group. All participants completed Infertility Self-efficacy Inventory (ISE and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI at the beginning and end of the study. Results: The means ISE scores among the CBT, fluoxetine, and control groups at the beginning and end of the study were 6.1±1.6 vs. 7.2±0.9, 6.4±1.4 vs. 6.9±1.3 and 6.1±1.1 vs. 5.9±1.4 respectively. Both CBT and fluoxetine increased the mean of ISE scores more than control group after intervention (p<0.0001, p=0.033; respectively, but increase in the CBT group was significantly greater than flouxetine group. Finally, there was evidence of high infertility self-efficacy for women exposed to the intervention compared with those in the control group. Also, there was an improvement in depression. Both fluoxetine and CBT decreased significantly the mean of BDI scores more than the control group; decrease in the CBT group was significantly more than that in the fluoxetine group. Conclusion: CBT can serve as an effective psychosocial intervention for promoting self-efficacy of infertile women

  4. Fluoxetine modulates sex steroid levels in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    LUPU, DIANA; SJÖDIN, MARCUS O. D.; VARSHNEY, MUKESH; LINDBERG, JOHAN; LOGHIN, FELICIA; RÜEGG, JOËLLE

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are antidepressants increasingly prescribed against depression during and after pregnancy. However, these compounds cross the placenta and are found in breast milk, thus reaching, and possibly affecting, the fetus and infant during critical developmental stages. Fluoxetine (FLX), a widely used SSRI, can interfere with estrogen signaling, which is important for the development of female sex organs and certain brain areas, amon...

  5. Fluoxetine effect on gestation and fetal development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ösz Bianca Eugenia

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The prenatal exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs is very controversial. There is no conclusive evidence for increased risk of malformations after SSRI use in pregnancy. The aim of the study was to determine how fluoxetine is affecting gestation and fetal development in rats. Twenty sexually mature female Wistar rats weighting between 250-260 g received 20 mg/kg body weight fluoxetine from the first day of gestation and during the entire gestation period.The drug was administered by oral route. Healthy, primipareus animals were selected along with 20 female Wistar rats, as control group. Mature males were caged with virgin females for an entire week. Rat’s behaviour during gestation, after birth and rats body weight was examined. The number of healthy pups was also noted. The females not giving birth after 21 days to any pup were anesthetized (halothane through gas scavenging apparatus untilled death and the gravid uterus were dissected out and examined. Compared to the controlled group, in which weight gain was more significant, the animals from the experimental group had a slight increase in body weight. The weight gain normally induced by gestation, is less significant in fluoxetine treated rats due to the increase serotonin levels in the brain. The uteri examination of pregnant rats showed an increase in the number of dead and resorbed rat embryos. Preclinical studies suggest that the inclusion of fluoxetine in pregnancy category C is justified and the appropriateness of its administration in pregnancy is still an unresolved issue.

  6. The effects of fluoxetine on several neurophysiological variables in patients with premature ejaculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, U; Tatlişen, A; Turan, H; Arman, F; Ekmekçioğlu, O

    1999-01-01

    Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor, has been shown to increase the intravaginal latency of patients with premature ejaculation. We demonstrated the effects of fluoxetine on intravaginal latency, penile sensory threshold, and variables of sacral evoked response and cortical somatosensorial evoked potential in patients with premature ejaculation. Of 48 patients 40 who presented to our clinic with premature ejaculation met the study criteria, gave written or oral consent, and were divided randomly in a double-blind fashion into 2 groups of 20 patients. The study group received 20 mg. fluoxetine daily and the control group received placebo for 1 month. The patients were evaluated during visits before and after treatment for intravaginal latency, penile sensory threshold values, and the variables of sacral evoked response and cortical somatosensory evoked potential tests. Patient ages, intravaginal latencies, penile sensory threshold values, and amplitudes and latencies of sacral evoked response and cortical somatosensory evoked potential tests in both groups were not significantly different at the beginning of treatment (p >0.05). At the end of treatment intravaginal latencies and penile sensory threshold values were increased in the study group compared to before treatment and the control group (p 0.05). These findings suggest that fluoxetine is effective treatment for premature ejaculation probably due to its effect of increasing the penile sensory threshold, without changing the amplitudes and latencies of sacral evoked response and cortical somatosensory evoked potential.

  7. Fluoxetine increases suicide ideation less than placebo during treatment of adults with minor depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garlow, Steven J; Kinkead, Becky; Thase, Michael E; Judd, Lewis L; Rush, A John; Yonkers, Kimberly A; Kupfer, David J; Frank, Ellen; Schettler, Pamela J; Rapaport, Mark Hyman

    2013-09-01

    Some reports suggest an increase in suicide ideations and behaviors in patients treated with antidepressants. This is an analysis of the impact of fluoxetine on suicide ideations in outpatients with minor depressive disorder. Research subjects were adult outpatients with minor depressive disorder (N = 162), who received fluoxetine or placebo in a prospective, 12-week, double-blind randomized trial. The research participants were evaluated weekly with standard rating scales that included four suicide-related items: item 3 of the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD), item 18 of Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS-C), and items 15 and 59 of the Hopkins Symptom Checklist (SCL-90). Clinically significant intensification of suicide ideation was defined as an increase of ≥2 points on any of these items. Overall 60/162 subjects (37%) had an increase of ≥1 point during treatment and 17/162 (10.5%) of ≥2 points on at least one suicide item, with 12/81 (14.8%) placebo and 5/81 (6.2%) fluoxetine-treated subjects having a ≥2 point gain. Of the study participants with baseline suicide ideation, 9/22 (40.9%) placebo and 3/24 (12.5%) fluoxetine treated had ≥2 point increase (p = 0.04). Survival analysis revealed that subjects on placebo were significantly more likely (p = 0.050) to experience a ≥2 point increase on one or more item, a difference that emerged early and continued throughout the 12-week trial. Compared to placebo, fluoxetine was not associated with a clinically significant increase in suicide ideation among adults with minor depressive disorder during 12 weeks of treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Dual effects of fluoxetine on mouse early embryonic development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang-Woon [Department of Physiology and Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Jinju 660-751 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Samsung Changwon Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University, Changwon 630-723 (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Changyong [National Institute of Animal Science, RDA, Cheonan 330-801 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun-Jin [Department of Physiology and Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Jinju 660-751 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae-Ik [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Jinju 660-702 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sook-Young [Fertility Center of CHA Gangnam Medical Center, CHA University, Seoul 135-081 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Young-Woo; Han, Sunkyu; Tak, Hyun-Min; Han, Jaehee [Department of Physiology and Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Jinju 660-751 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Dawon, E-mail: dawon@gnu.ac.kr [Department of Physiology and Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Jinju 660-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, regulates a variety of physiological processes, such as cell proliferation and apoptosis, in mammalian cells. Little is known about the role of fluoxetine in early embryonic development. This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of fluoxetine during mouse early embryonic development. Late two-cell stage embryos (2-cells) were cultured in the presence of various concentrations of fluoxetine (1 to 50 μM) for different durations. When late 2-cells were incubated with 5 μM fluoxetine for 6 h, the percentage that developed into blastocysts increased compared to the control value. However, late 2-cells exposed to fluoxetine (5 μM) over 24 h showed a reduction in blastocyst formation. The addition of fluoxetine (5 μM) together with KN93 or KN62 (calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) inhibitors) failed to increase blastocyst formation. Fluoxetine treatment inhibited TREK-1 and TREK-2, members of the two-pore domain K{sup +} channel family expressed in mouse embryos, activities, indicating that fluoxetine-induced membrane depolarization in late 2-cells might have resulted from TREK inhibition. In addition, long-term exposure to fluoxetine altered the TREK mRNA expression levels. Furthermore, injection of siRNA targeting TREKs significantly decreased blastocyst formation by ∼ 30% compared to injection of scrambled siRNA. Long-term exposure of fluoxetine had no effect on blastocyst formation of TREK deficient embryos. These results indicate that low-dose and short-term exposures of late 2-cells to fluoxetine probably increase blastocyst formation through activation of CaMKII-dependent signal transduction pathways, whereas long-term exposure decreases mouse early embryonic development through inhibition of TREK channel gating. Highlights: ► Short-term exposure of 2-cells to fluoxetine enhances mouse blastocyst formation. ► The enhancive effect of fluoxetine is resulted from Ca

  9. Incretin-based therapies– review of the physiology, pharmacology and emerging clinical experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, JH; Deacon, Carolyn F.; Gorrell, MD

    2011-01-01

    in type 2 diabetes, leading to development of strategies aimed at redressing this abnormality. These strategies include pharmacological inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase-4, the enzyme responsible for the short half-life of endogenous incretins, and administration of long-acting dipeptidyl peptidase-4...

  10. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCIV. Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamann, Jörg; Aust, Gabriela; Araç, Demet

    2015-01-01

    The Adhesion family forms a large branch of the pharmacologically important superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). As Adhesion GPCRs increasingly receive attention from a wide spectrum of biomedical fields, the Adhesion GPCR Consortium, together with the International Union of Basic...

  11. Blended learning for reinforcing dental pharmacology in the clinical years: A qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eachempati, Prashanti; Kiran Kumar, K S; Sumanth, K N

    2016-10-01

    Blended learning has become the method of choice in educational institutions because of its systematic integration of traditional classroom teaching and online components. This study aims to analyze student's reflection regarding blended learning in dental pharmacology. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Faculty of Dentistry, Melaka-Manipal Medical College among 3 rd and 4 th year BDS students. A total of 145 dental students, who consented, participate in the study. Students were divided into 14 groups. Nine online sessions followed by nine face-to-face discussions were held. Each session addressed topics related to oral lesions and orofacial pain with pharmacological applications. After each week, students were asked to reflect on blended learning. On completion of 9 weeks, reflections were collected and analyzed. Qualitative analysis was done using thematic analysis model suggested by Braun and Clarke. The four main themes were identified, namely, merits of blended learning, skill in writing prescription for oral diseases, dosages of drugs, and identification of strengths and weakness. In general, the participants had a positive feedback regarding blended learning. Students felt more confident in drug selection and prescription writing. They could recollect the doses better after the online and face-to-face sessions. Most interestingly, the students reflected that they are able to identify their strength and weakness after the blended learning sessions. Blended learning module was successfully implemented for reinforcing dental pharmacology. The results obtained in this study enable us to plan future comparative studies to know the effectiveness of blended learning in dental pharmacology.

  12. European clinical guidelines for Tourette syndrome and other tic disorders. Part II : pharmacological treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roessner, Veit; Plessen, Kerstin J.; Rothenberger, Aribert; Ludolph, Andrea G.; Rizzo, Renata; Skov, Liselotte; Strand, Gerd; Stern, Jeremy S.; Termine, Cristiano; Hoekstra, Pieter J.

    To develop a European guideline on pharmacologic treatment of Tourette syndrome (TS) the available literature was thoroughly screened and extensively discussed by a working group of the European Society for the Study of Tourette syndrome (ESSTS). Although there are many more studies on

  13. β3-Adrenoceptor agonists for overactive bladder syndrome: Role of translational pharmacology in a repositioning clinical drug development project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Martin C; Korstanje, Cees

    2016-03-01

    β3-Adrenoceptor agonists were originally considered as a promising drug class for the treatment of obesity and/or type 2 diabetes. When these development efforts failed, they were repositioned for the treatment of the overactive bladder syndrome. Based on the example of the β3-adrenoceptor agonist mirabegron, but also taking into consideration evidence obtained with ritobegron and solabegron, we discuss challenges facing a translational pharmacology program accompanying clinical drug development for a first-in-class molecule. Challenges included generic ones such as ligand selectivity, species differences and drug target gene polymorphisms. Challenges that are more specific included changing concepts of the underlying pathophysiology of the target condition while clinical development was under way; moreover, a paucity of public domain tools for the study of the drug target and aspects of receptor agonists as drugs had to be addressed. Nonetheless, a successful first-in-class launch was accomplished. Looking back at this translational pharmacology program, we conclude that a specifically tailored and highly flexible approach is required. However, several of the lessons learned may also be applicable to translational pharmacology programs in other indications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Prescribing and the core curriculum for tomorrow's doctors: BPS curriculum in clinical pharmacology and prescribing for medical students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Sarah; Maxwell, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Prescribing is one of the commonest tasks expected of new doctors and is a complex process involving a mixture of knowledge, judgement and skills. Preparing graduates to be prescribers is one of the greatest challenges of modern undergraduate medical education and there is some evidence to suggest that training could be improved. The aims of this article are (i) to review some of the challenges of delivering effective prescribing education, (ii) to provide a clear statement of the learning outcomes in clinical pharmacology and prescribing that should be expected of all medical graduates and (iii) to describe a curriculum that might enable students to achieve these outcomes. We build on the previous curriculum recommendations of the British Pharmacological Society and take into account those of other key bodies, notably the General Medical Council. We have also reviewed relevant evidence from the literature and set our work in the context of recent trends in medical education. We divide our recommended learning objectives into four sections: principles of clinical pharmacology, essential drugs, essential therapeutic problems and prescribing skills. Although these will not necessarily be accepted universally we believe that they will help those who design and map undergraduate curricula to explore potential gaps and identify improvements. PMID:22288524

  15. Is there a place for drug combination strategies using clinical pharmacology attributes?--review of current trends in research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, Nuggehally R

    2009-09-01

    Drug discovery is the main flag ship of the pharmaceutical industry in order to ensure that innovations constantly occur in the identification and development of novel therapeutic options for the management of diseases. Recently, research trends that take advantage of the safety and efficacy of marketed products by combining such products with other agents to influence certain clinical pharmacology attribute(s) have emerged. The focus of the review is to evaluate ongoing research trends that have considered leveraging on certain clinical pharmacology attributes in the areas of viral infection (HIV and influenza) and oncology. Case studies discussed in this review include: a) the use of probenecid to block the organic anion renal transport of oseltamivir carboxylate (a key active metabolite of oseltamivir phosphate) to reduce the oral dose of oseltamivir phosphate; b) the use of rifampicin to induce the CYP2C19 enzyme and thereby, promote the formation of a potent active metabolite M8 (nelfinavir hydroxyl-t-butylamide) and achieve sustained blood levels to combat HIV infection along with ritonavir; c) the use of CYP3A4 inhibitors such as ketoconazole, cyclosporin A, ritonavir etc to overcome the extensive presystemic metabolism of docetaxel and enhance the oral bioavailability of docetaxel. Along with the case studies, several hurdles for drug development such as dose selection, frequency of dosing, and duration of the clinical studies, picking the right surrogate(s) for efficacy, evaluation of drug-drug interaction potential with other co-substrates have been discussed in line with the current day requirements for a sound clinical and regulatory strategy. In summary, based on the collated information, a pragmatic approach would render feasibility for a balanced therapy management using combined clinical pharmacology attributes of drugs.

  16. A role of Yueju in fast-onset antidepressant action on major depressive disorder and serum BDNF expression: a randomly double-blind, fluoxetine-adjunct, placebo-controlled, pilot clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu R

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ruyan Wu,1,* Dandan Zhu,1,* Youchun Xia,2,* Haosen Wang,2 Weiwei Tao,1 Wenda Xue,1 Baomei Xia,1 Li Ren,1 Xin Zhou,1 Guochun Li,3 Gang Chen1 1Center for Translational Systems Biology and Neuroscience, Key Laboratory of Integrative Biomedicine of Brain Diseases, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China; 2The Fourth People’s Hospital of Taizhou, Taizhou, People’s Republic of China; 3School of Basic Chinese Medicine, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Introduction: Conventional antidepressants, including fluoxetine, have a major disadvantage in delayed onset of efficacy. Yueju, an herbal medicine used to treat mood disorders was recently found to exhibit rapid antidepressant effects. The present study was conducted to evaluate the role of Yueju in rapidly acting on major depressive disorder (MDD.Methods: Participants were MDD patients with scores of 24-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-24 ≥20 and without history of antidepressant use. They randomly received daily oral doses of Yueju (23 g/day plus fluoxetine (20 mg/day (experimental group or placebo plus fluoxetine (control group for 7 days. HDRS-24 was used as the primary outcome measurement at baseline, and on days 1, 3, 5, and 7. Concentrations of serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF were assessed at baseline and on days 1 and 7.Results: In all, 18 participants met the criteria for data analysis. Compared to baseline level, only experimental group showed significant decrease of HDRS-24 score from day 3 to day 7 (P<0.05. Experimental group also showed significant improvement compared with control group from day 3 to day 7 (P<0.05. No correlation between treatment outcomes with serum BDNF levels was observed. However, experimental group showed significant correlation for serum BDNF level on day 1 with day 7 (r=0.721, P=0.028, whereas the control

  17. Pharmacological relapse prevention in alcohol dependence: from animal models to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boening, J A; Lesch, O M; Spanagel, R; Wolffgramm, J; Narita, M; Sinclair, D; Mason, B J; Wiesbeck, G A

    2001-05-01

    This article represents the proceedings of a symposium at the 2000 ISBRA Meeting in Yokohama, Japan. The chairs were Jobst August-Ludwig Boening and Otto Michel Lesch. The presentations were (1) Pharmacological validation of a new animal model of alcoholism, by Rainer Spanagel; (2) Persisting loss of control as main criterion for alcohol addiction in rats and mice, by Jochen Wolffgramm; (3) Role of NMDA receptor subunits associated with protein kinase C in the prevention of alcohol dependence, by Minoru Narita; (4) Long-term follow up of continued naltrexone treatment, by David Sinclair; (5) Pharmacological treatment trials with dopaminergic and serotonergic substances: Myths or facts? by Gerhard A. Wiesbeck; and (6) Methodology and behavioral therapy of the U.S. acamprosate study, by Barbara J. Mason.

  18. Evidence for pretreatment LICI deficits among depressed children and adolescents with nonresponse to fluoxetine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croarkin, Paul E; Nakonezny, Paul A; Husain, Mustafa M; Port, John D; Melton, Tabatha; Kennard, Betsy D; Emslie, Graham J; Kozel, F Andrew; Daskalakis, Zafiris J

    2014-01-01

    Research suggests that alterations in gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor functioning have a role in depression. Paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) paradigms are noninvasive measures of cortical inhibitory and excitatory circuits. The present study examined pretreatment short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI), long-interval cortical inhibition (LICI), and intracortical facilitation (ICF) in children and adolescents with major depressive disorder who were initiating fluoxetine treatment. The primary objective was to examine the relationship of these measures with subsequent treatment response. It was hypothesized that alterations in pretreatment GABA and glutamate mediated neurotransmission, would be associated with fluoxetine nonresponse. Sixteen children and adolescents with major depressive disorder underwent paired-pulse TMS testing before beginning fluoxetine treatment. Response was prospectively characterized by scores of 1 or 2 on the Clinical Global Impression Scale and less than 40 on the Children's Depression Rating Scale-Revised after 6 weeks of fluoxetine treatment (20-40 mg/day). Eight patients responded to treatment. Least-squares mean LICI values were consistently higher bilaterally for treatment nonresponders. Higher LICI values indicate less inhibition and impaired GABAB functioning. There was no significant effect of treatment response on the measures of SICI and ICF. Our findings suggest that deficits in pretreatment GABAB may be related to fluoxetine nonresponse in depressed youth. This is congruent with prior work demonstrating that GABAB interneurons have serotonergic input and antidepressants modulate GABAB receptors. These findings also show that TMS paradigms have utility in studying the neurophysiology and treatment of childhood mood disorders. Cortical Excitability and Inhibition in Children and Adolescents With Major Depressive Disorder, http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00896090?term

  19. Fluoxetine and the mitochondria: A review of the toxicological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Marcos Roberto

    2016-09-06

    Fluoxetine (a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)) is used as an antidepressant by modulating the levels of serotonin in the synaptic cleft. Nevertheless, fluoxetine also induces undesirable effects, such as anxiety, sexual dysfunction, sleep disturbances, and gastrointestinal impairments. Fluoxetine has been viewed as an agent that may interfere with cell fate by triggering apoptosis. On the other hand, fluoxetine intake has been associated with increased cancer risk. Nonetheless, data remain contradictory and no conclusions were taken. Several studies demonstrated that fluoxetine interacts with mitochondria triggering apoptosis and/or altering mitochondrial function by modulating the activity of respiratory chain components and enzymes of the Krebs cycle. Furthermore, fluoxetine affects mitochondria-related redox parameters in different experimental models. In this review, data demonstrating the effects of fluoxetine upon mammalian mitochondria are described and discussed, as well as several unsolved questions in this field of research are addressed. A separate section deals with future needs regarding the research involving the impact of fluoxetine treatment upon mitochondria and mitochondria-related signaling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Chronic fluoxetine dissociates contextual from auditory fear memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Jeff; Mayford, Mark

    2016-10-06

    Fluoxetine is a medication used to treat Major Depressive Disorder and other psychiatric conditions. These experiments studied the effects of chronic fluoxetine treatment on the contextual versus auditory fear memory of mice. We found that chronic fluoxetine treatment of adult mice impaired their contextual fear memory, but spared auditory fear memory. Hippocampal perineuronal nets, which are involved in contextual fear memory plasticity, were unaltered by fluoxetine treatment. These data point to a selective inability to form contextual fear memory as a result of fluoxetine treatment, and they suggest that a blunting of hippocampal-mediated aversive memory may be a therapeutic action for this medication. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Fluoxetine modulates sex steroid levels in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupu, Diana; Sjödin, Marcus O D; Varshney, Mukesh; Lindberg, Johan; Loghin, Felicia; Rüegg, Joëlle

    2017-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are antidepressants increasingly prescribed against depression during and after pregnancy. However, these compounds cross the placenta and are found in breast milk, thus reaching, and possibly affecting, the fetus and infant during critical developmental stages. Fluoxetine (FLX), a widely used SSRI, can interfere with estrogen signaling, which is important for the development of female sex organs and certain brain areas, among others. Interference with estrogen signaling can take place on different levels, e.g., by affecting receptor activity or hormone levels. FLX has previously been shown to induce estrogen receptor-dependent transcription in vitro at high concentrations. In this study we set out to assess effects of FLX on estradiol levels in vitro. FLX was tested using the OECD recommended H295R model, a human adrenocortical carcinoma cell line that is able to produce all steroid hormones found in the gonads and adrenal glands, including estradiol and testosterone. H295R cells were incubated with different doses of FLX for 48h. Subsequently, concentrations of these two steroids were measured in cell culture medium after FLX exposure, using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. Aromatase mRNA expression was assessed using qPCR. Fluoxetine significantly increased estradiol secretion in H295R cells after a 48h exposure at low, submicromolar concentrations, but showed no effects on testosterone levels or aromatase mRNA expression. Fluoxetine has the potential to interfere with estrogenic signaling by increasing estradiol secretion at low concentrations, which are relevant for fetal and adult human exposure.

  2. New advances in pharmacological mechanism of silymarin and re-investigation of its clinical values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Qingquan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Silymarin is a traditional hepatoprotective herb for the adjuvant therapy of liver diseases, which shows marked pharmacological activities such as antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. This paper introduces the action mechanism of silymarin in regulating liver function, ameliorating hepatic fibrosis, protecting pancreatic cells, suppressing the growth of tumor cells, and inhibiting the replication of hepatitis C virus. Silymarin is considered to be a natural medicine with little toxic or side effect at a high dose. It holds promise for anti-tumor, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiviral application.

  3. Treatment of depression. New pharmacologic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, J R; Markovitz, P J

    1991-06-01

    Recurrent major depression is an underdiagnosed, undertreated mood disorder that affects approximately 10 million Americans. Although the tricyclic antidepressants are the oldest and best studied class of antidepressant medications available, their use is routinely compromised by unsatisfactory pharmacokinetic and side-effect profiles. The newer antidepressant medications have longer half-lives and are less likely to produce side effects. The prototypes of the newer antidepressants are bupropion (Wellbutrin) and fluoxetine (Prozac). Fluoxetine distinguishes itself in that its half-life is 2 to 3 days, whereas the mean half-life of buproprion and the tricyclics are 10 to 14 hours. For this reason, fluoxetine is routinely administered once daily in the morning. Both of these agents bind to the cholinergic, histaminergic, and alpha-1 adrenergic receptors with minimal affinity, and are less likely to yield clinically significant side effects. The use of the newer antidepressants has led to improved patient compliance and physician acceptance.

  4. Quantitative cross-species extrapolation between humans and fish: the case of the anti-depressant fluoxetine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Margiotta-Casaluci

    Full Text Available Fish are an important model for the pharmacological and toxicological characterization of human pharmaceuticals in drug discovery, drug safety assessment and environmental toxicology. However, do fish respond to pharmaceuticals as humans do? To address this question, we provide a novel quantitative cross-species extrapolation approach (qCSE based on the hypothesis that similar plasma concentrations of pharmaceuticals cause comparable target-mediated effects in both humans and fish at similar level of biological organization (Read-Across Hypothesis. To validate this hypothesis, the behavioural effects of the anti-depressant drug fluoxetine on the fish model fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas were used as test case. Fish were exposed for 28 days to a range of measured water concentrations of fluoxetine (0.1, 1.0, 8.0, 16, 32, 64 µg/L to produce plasma concentrations below, equal and above the range of Human Therapeutic Plasma Concentrations (H(TPCs. Fluoxetine and its metabolite, norfluoxetine, were quantified in the plasma of individual fish and linked to behavioural anxiety-related endpoints. The minimum drug plasma concentrations that elicited anxiolytic responses in fish were above the upper value of the H(TPC range, whereas no effects were observed at plasma concentrations below the H(TPCs. In vivo metabolism of fluoxetine in humans and fish was similar, and displayed bi-phasic concentration-dependent kinetics driven by the auto-inhibitory dynamics and saturation of the enzymes that convert fluoxetine into norfluoxetine. The sensitivity of fish to fluoxetine was not so dissimilar from that of patients affected by general anxiety disorders. These results represent the first direct evidence of measured internal dose response effect of a pharmaceutical in fish, hence validating the Read-Across hypothesis applied to fluoxetine. Overall, this study demonstrates that the qCSE approach, anchored to internal drug concentrations, is a powerful tool

  5. Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology of Andrographis paniculata and Its Major Bioactive Phytoconstituent Andrographolide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanasekaran Jayakumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Andrographis paniculata (Burm. F Nees, generally known as “king of bitters,” is an herbaceous plant in the family Acanthaceae. In China, India, Thailand, and Malaysia, this plant has been widely used for treating sore throat, flu, and upper respiratory tract infections. Andrographolide, a major bioactive chemical constituent of the plant, has shown anticancer potential in various investigations. Andrographolide and its derivatives have anti-inflammatory effects in experimental models asthma, stroke, and arthritis. In recent years, pharmaceutical chemists have synthesized numerous andrographolide derivatives, which exhibit essential pharmacological activities such as those that are anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antitumor, antidiabetic, anti-HIV, antifeedant, and antiviral. However, what is noteworthy about this paper is summarizing the effects of andrographolide against cardiovascular disease, platelet activation, infertility, and NF-κB activation. Therefore, this paper is intended to provide evidence reported in relevant literature on qualitative research to assist scientists in isolating and characterizing bioactive compounds.

  6. A Brief Review of the Pharmacology of Amitriptyline and Clinical Outcomes in Treating Fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Lawson

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia is a complex chronic condition characterized by pain, physical fatigue, sleep disorder and cognitive impairment. Evidence-based guidelines recommend antidepressants as treatments of fibromyalgia where tricyclics are often considered to have the greatest efficacy, with amitriptyline often being a first-line treatment. Amitriptyline evokes a preferential reduction in pain and fatigue of fibromyalgia, and in the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ score, which is a quality of life assessment. The multimodal profile of the mechanisms of action of amitriptyline include monoamine reuptake inhibition, receptor modulation and ion channel modulation. Several of the actions of amitriptyline on multiple nociceptive and sensory processes at central and peripheral locations have the potential to act cumulatively to suppress the characteristic symptoms of fibromyalgia. Greater understanding of the role of these mechanisms of action of amitriptyline could provide further clues to the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia and to a preferable pharmacological profile for future drug development.

  7. Teaching clinical pharmacology using team-based learning: a comparison between third- and fourth-year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou Akl, Imad; Ghaddar, Fatima; Sabra, Ramzi; Parmelee, Dean; Simaan, Joseph A; Kanafani, Zeina A; Zgheib, Nathalie K

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to formulate evidence-based recommendations on whether to deliver the team-based learning (TBL)-designed clinical pharmacology course at the American University of Beirut Faculty of Medicine (AUBFM) during the third year instead of the fourth and final year of the medical curriculum. Between June 2010 and May 2011, AUBFM offered the course to both classes simultaneously to compare their performance. The findings of this endeavor supported the introduction of the course during the third year, first because fourth-year students did not outperform third-year students despite having the advantage of an additional year of clinical experience, and second, third-year teams seemed more likely to develop into better functioning teams. The findings also suggested that simultaneous delivery of TBL sessions to both third- and fourth-year teams was less favorably recommended because of the varying learning pace of both student groups.

  8. Evaluation of a filmed clinical scenario as a teaching resource for an introductory pharmacology unit for undergraduate health students: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    East, Leah; Hutchinson, Marie

    2015-12-01

    Simulation is frequently being used as a learning and teaching resource for both undergraduate and postgraduate students, however reporting of the effectiveness of simulation particularly within the pharmacology context is scant. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate a filmed simulated pharmacological clinical scenario as a teaching resource in an undergraduate pharmacological unit. Pilot cross-sectional quantitative survey. An Australian university. 32 undergraduate students completing a healthcare degree including nursing, midwifery, clinical science, health science, naturopathy, and osteopathy. As a part of an undergraduate online pharmacology unit, students were required to watch a filmed simulated pharmacological clinical scenario. To evaluate student learning, a measurement instrument developed from Bloom's cognitive domains (knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis and evaluation) was employed to assess pharmacological knowledge conceptualisation and knowledge application within the following fields: medication errors; medication adverse effects; medication interactions; and, general pharmacology. The majority of participants were enrolled in an undergraduate nursing or midwifery programme (72%). Results demonstrated that the majority of nursing and midwifery students (56.52%) found the teaching resource complementary or more useful compared to a lecture although less so compared to a tutorial. Students' self-assessment of learning according to Bloom's cognitive domains indicated that the filmed scenario was a valuable learning tool. Analysis of variance indicated that health science students reported higher levels of learning compared to midwifery and nursing. Students' self-report of the learning benefits of a filmed simulated clinical scenario as a teaching resource suggest enhanced critical thinking skills and knowledge conceptualisation regarding pharmacology, in addition to being useful and complementary to other teaching and

  9. Duloxetine compared with fluoxetine and venlafaxine: use of meta-regression analysis for indirect comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lançon Christophe

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Data comparing duloxetine with existing antidepressant treatments is limited. A comparison of duloxetine with fluoxetine has been performed but no comparison with venlafaxine, the other antidepressant in the same therapeutic class with a significant market share, has been undertaken. In the absence of relevant data to assess the place that duloxetine should occupy in the therapeutic arsenal, indirect comparisons are the most rigorous way to go. We conducted a systematic review of the efficacy of duloxetine, fluoxetine and venlafaxine versus placebo in the treatment of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD, and performed indirect comparisons through meta-regressions. Methods The bibliography of the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research and the CENTRAL, Medline, and Embase databases were interrogated using advanced search strategies based on a combination of text and index terms. The search focused on randomized placebo-controlled clinical trials involving adult patients treated for acute phase Major Depressive Disorder. All outcomes were derived to take account for varying placebo responses throughout studies. Primary outcome was treatment efficacy as measured by Hedge's g effect size. Secondary outcomes were response and dropout rates as measured by log odds ratios. Meta-regressions were run to indirectly compare the drugs. Sensitivity analysis, assessing the influence of individual studies over the results, and the influence of patients' characteristics were run. Results 22 studies involving fluoxetine, 9 involving duloxetine and 8 involving venlafaxine were selected. Using indirect comparison methodology, estimated effect sizes for efficacy compared with duloxetine were 0.11 [-0.14;0.36] for fluoxetine and 0.22 [0.06;0.38] for venlafaxine. Response log odds ratios were -0.21 [-0.44;0.03], 0.70 [0.26;1.14]. Dropout log odds ratios were -0.02 [-0.33;0.29], 0.21 [-0.13;0.55]. Sensitivity analyses showed that results were

  10. FDG PET in non-pharmacological therapy in Alzheimer's disease; cerebral metabolic increase correlates with clinical improvement after cognitive therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Hae Ri; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Park, Seong Min; Lee, Seung Hyun; Park, Eun Kyung; Lee, Jung Seok; Kim, Sang Yun; Kim, Sang Eun

    2007-01-01

    In management of AD, pharmacological treatment alone using acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (AChEI) is general consensus, and provides beneficial effect to prolong their progression. Combined non-pharmacological therapy, especially cognitive therapy is recently having attention with expectation of improvement in cognitive ability. This study examined the effect of combined cognitive therapy in AD patients who were maintaining AChEI using FDG PET. Four patients (689 yrs) who diagnosed as probable Alzheimer's disease based on the NINCDS-ADRDA criteria participated in this study. 12-week cognitive therapy comprised seven fields to enhance orientation, memory, recall, visuo-motor organization, categorization and behavior modification/sequencing. They received 45-minute sessions twice per week with maintaining their previous medication. Clinical improvement was assessed by comprehensive neuropsychological tests. Two FDG PET studies were performed before cognitive therapy and in the middle of the therapy, and compared to evaluate the effect of cognitive therapy to cerebral metabolism. Two of 4 patients whose initial cognitive impairment was milder had clinical improvement after 12 weeks, the rest who were more severely impaired failed to have clinical improvement. Regional cerebral hypometabolism on initial PET was correlated with their functional status. Follow up PET of two responders demonstrated the increases in regional metabolism in the temporal and/or frontal cortex, which was associated their functional improvement. Cerebral metabolism in poor responders were minimally increased or no changed. This preliminary data suggests that cognitive therapy is potentially useful to stabilize or improve cognitive and functional performance in AD patients with relatively mild cognitive dysfunction. And FDG PET could demonstrate possible candidates for cognitive therapy and the effect of the therapy

  11. Differential pharmacology and clinical utility of empagliflozin in type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munir KM

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Kashif M Munir,1 Stephen N Davis2 1Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Nutrition, Center for Diabetes and Endocrinology, 2Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: With rates of obesity and diabetes rising across the world, effective therapies to treat hyperglycemia and its associated comorbidities continue to be in demand. Empagliflozin is a highly selective sodium glucose transporter-2 inhibitor that improves serum glucose levels by inducing glucosuria. Taken orally, it is rapidly absorbed with linear pharmacokinetics consistent in Asian and Caucasian populations. Empagliflozin treatment demonstrates consistent reductions in hemoglobin A1c, fasting plasma glucose, body weight, and blood pressure in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Improvements in glycemic control and metabolic end points are evident with empagliflozin monotherapy, as add-on to oral hypoglycemics or add-on to insulin. The nonglycemic effects of empagliflozin with consistent improvements in blood pressure, body weight, and waist circumference provide additional rationale for use in patients with type 2 diabetes. Moreover, treatment with empagliflozin has recently shown significant reductions in both microvascular and macrovascular complications of diabetes. Keywords: empagliflozin, type 2 diabetes, pharmacology, blood pressure, body weight, hemoglobin A1c, glucose

  12. [Clinical-pharmacological aspects to accelerate the development process from the preclinical to the clinical phase/2nd communication: promising strategies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmann, Jochen

    2004-01-01

    To improve the transition from research to development a critical evaluation of the individual project by research and disease area teams is required to include input from pharmacology, toxicology, pharmacokinetics, galenics, clinical pharmacology, clinical as well as regulatory experts and marketing. Decisions on the individual development strategy should be made prior to the start of development and all projects should be reviewed at predefined stages throughout the product development life cycle. This ensures consistency of decision-making not only during the development of individual products but throughout the entire development pipeline. Studies in the exploratory stage of drug development should be designed for decision making in contrast to later clinical trials in the confirmatory stage that require power for proof-of-safety and proof-of-efficacy. The more thorough and profound studies have been carried out during this exploratory stage of drug development, the earlier a decision can be made on the continuation or discontinuation of further development, thus saving development time and money and assessing and considerably reducing the risk for the patients and increasing the success rate of the project in the later confirmatory effectiveness trial with an adequate number of subjects receiving the new therapy under typical conditions of use. Strategies which may be helpful to improve the quality of decisions in drug discovery and drug development are: discovery experiments should be done to critically evaluate the compound, the "killer" experiments should be done as early as possible, continuous effort on preclinical disease models is necessary to improve predictability of efficacy in patients ("humanized" research): genomic technology should be used to identify novel, disease-related targets and to characterise preclinical test systems, improvement of knowledge and experience concerning the relevance of new technologies for the clinical picture, genotyping

  13. Pharmacologic Evidence to Support Clinical Decision Making for Peripartum Methadone Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogen, D. L.; Perel, J. M.; Helsel, J. C.; Hanusa, B. H.; Romkes, M.; Nukui, T.; Friedman, C. R.; Wisner, K. L.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Limited pharmacological data are available to guide methadone treatment during pregnancy and postpartum. Objectives Study goals were to: 1) Characterize changes in methadone dose across childbearing, 2) Determine enantiomer-specific methadone withdrawal kinetics from steady-state during late pregnancy, 3) Assess enantiomer-specific changes in methadone level/dose (L/D) ratios across childbearing, and 4) Explore relationships between CYP2B6, CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 single nucleotide polymorphisms and maternal dose, plasma concentration and L/D. Methods Methadone dose changes and timed plasma samples were obtained for women on methadone (n=25) followed prospectively from third trimester of pregnancy to three months postpartum. Results Participants were primarily white, Medicaid insured and multiparous. All women increased their dose from first to end of second trimester (mean peak increase=23 mg/day); 71% of women increased from second trimester to delivery (mean peak increase=19 mg/day). Half took a higher dose 3 months postpartum than at delivery despite significantly larger clearance during late pregnancy. Third trimester enantiomer-specific methadone half-lives (range R-methadone 14.7-24.9 hours; S-methadone 8.02-18.9 hours) were about half of those reported in non-pregnant populations. In 3 women with weekly 24-hour methadone levels after delivery, L/D increased within 1-2 weeks after delivery. Women with the CYP2B6 Q172 variant GT genotype have consistently higher L/D values for S-methadone across both pregnancy and postpartum. Conclusions Most women require increases in methadone dose across pregnancy. Given the shorter half-life and larger clearances during pregnancy, many pregnant women may benefit from split methadone dosing. L/D increases quickly after delivery and doses should be lowered rapidly after delivery. PMID:22926004

  14. Perspectives in Drug Development and Clinical Pharmacology: The Discovery of Histamine H1 and H2 Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alan Wayne

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge about the history and development of therapeutic agents holds a central position in the education and training of pharmacists and pharmacologists. Students enjoy learning about the discovery of drugs, including details about the pioneer workers involved (apothecaries, organic chemists, pharmacologists, and physiologists) and the role played by serendipity. The treatment of people suffering from allergies and the development of drugs that block the actions of histamine at H1 and H2 receptors are the subject of this review. Pharmaceutical products that block H1 receptors are widely used as prophylactic treatment for seasonal allergies that plague millions of people worldwide. The development of H2 receptor antagonists revolutionized treatment of gastric hyperacidity, the principal cause of peptic ulcers. Antihistamine research has changed focus toward the development of drugs that block the action of histamine at H3 and H4 receptors and the therapeutic potential is gradually being appreciated. © 2015, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  15. Prescribing knowledge in the light of undergraduate clinical pharmacology and therapeutics teaching in India: views of first-year postgraduate students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upadhyaya P

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Prerna Upadhyaya,1 Vikas Seth,2 Monika Sharma,1 Mushtaq Ahmed,1 Vijay Vasant Moghe,1 Zafar Yab Khan,1 Vinay Kumar Gupta,1 Shipra Vikram Jain,1 Utkarsh Soni,1 Manohar Bhatia,1 Kumar Abhijit,1 Jaswant Goyal11Department of Pharmacology, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College, Jaipur, 2Department of Pharmacology, Hind Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, IndiaObjectives: The study aimed to review the prescribing knowledge of first-year postgraduate doctors in a medical college in India, using the principles of good prescribing, to suggest strategies to improve rational prescribing, and to recommend what curriculum planners can do to accomplish this objective.Methods: Fifty first-year postgraduate doctors were asked to fill in a structured questionnaire that sought information regarding their undergraduate training in clinical pharmacology and therapeutics, prescribing habits, and commonly consulted drug information sources. Also, the questionnaire assessed any perceived deficiencies in their undergraduate clinical pharmacology teaching and sought feedback regarding improvement in the teaching.Results: Eighty-eight percent of residents said that they were taught prescription writing in undergraduate pharmacology teaching; 48% of residents rated their prescribing knowledge at graduation as average, 28% good, 4% excellent, 14% poor, and 4% very poor; 58% felt that their undergraduate training did not prepare them to prescribe safely, and 62% felt that their training did not prepare them to prescribe rationally. Fifty-eight percent of residents felt that they had some specific problems with writing a prescription during their internship training, while 92% thought that undergraduate teaching should be improved. Their suggestions for improving teaching methods were recorded.Conclusions: This study concludes that efforts are needed to develop a curriculum that encompasses important aspects of clinical pharmacology and therapeutics along with incorporation of

  16. Effect of pharmacological enhancement on the cognitive and clinical psychomotor performance of sleep-deprived doctors: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugden, Colin; Housden, Charlotte R; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Sahakian, Barbara J; Darzi, Ara

    2012-02-01

    To investigate the effect of modafinil 200 mg on the performance of a cohort of healthy male doctors after 1 night of supervised sleep deprivation. Sleep-deprived and fatigued doctors pose a safety risk to themselves and their patients. Yet, because of the around-the-clock nature of medical practice, doctors frequently care for patients after periods of extended wakefulness or during circadian troughs. Studies suggest that a group of substances may be capable of safely and effectively reversing the effects of fatigue. However, little work has been done to investigate their role within our profession. We conducted a parallel, double-blind, randomized, and placebo-controlled study to investigate the effect of pharmacological enhancement on performance doctors. Thirty-nine healthy male resident doctors received either lactose placebo (n = 19) or modafinil 200 mg (n = 20) after 1 night of sleep deprivation. A selection of CANTAB neuropsychological tests was used to assess higher cognitive function. Clinical psychomotor performance was assessed using the Minimally Invasive Surgical Trainer Virtual Reality. Assessments were carried out between 6.00 AM and approximately 8.00 AM. Modafinil improved performance on tests of higher cognitive function; participants in the modafinil group worked more efficiently when solving working memory (F1,38 = 5.24, P = 0.028) and planning (F1,38 = 4.34, P = 0.04) problems, were less-impulsive decision makers (F1,37 = 6.76, P = 0.01), and were more able to flexibly redirect their attention (F1,38 = 4.64, P = 0.038). In contrast, no improvement was seen in tests of clinical psychomotor performance. Our results suggest that fatigued doctors might benefit from pharmacological enhancement in situations that require efficient information processing, flexible thinking, and decision making under time pressure. However, no improvement is likely to be seen in the performance of basic procedural tasks.

  17. Fluoxetine and diazepam acutely modulate stress induced-behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomini, Ana Cristina V V; Abreu, Murilo S; Giacomini, Luidia V; Siebel, Anna M; Zimerman, Fernanda F; Rambo, Cassiano L; Mocelin, Ricieri; Bonan, Carla D; Piato, Angelo L; Barcellos, Leonardo J G

    2016-01-01

    Drug residue contamination in aquatic ecosystems has been studied extensively, but the behavioral effects exerted by the presence of these drugs are not well known. Here, we investigated the effects of acute stress on anxiety, memory, social interaction, and aggressiveness in zebrafish exposed to fluoxetine and diazepam at concentrations that disrupt the hypothalamic-pituitary-interrenal (HPI) axis. Stress increased the locomotor activity and time spent in the bottom area of the tank (novel tank). Fluoxetine and diazepam prevented these behaviors. We also observed that stress and fluoxetine and diazepam exposures decreased social interaction. Stress also increased aggressive behavior, which was not reversed by fluoxetine or diazepam. These data suggest that the presence of these drugs in aquatic ecosystems causes significant behavioral alterations in fish. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Developmental exposure to fluoxetine modulates the serotonin system in hypothalamus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Berg

    Full Text Available The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI fluoxetine (FLU, Prozac® is commonly prescribed for depression in pregnant women. This results in SSRI exposure of the developing fetus. However, there are knowledge gaps regarding the impact of SSRI exposure during development. Given the role of serotonin in brain development and its cross-talk with sex hormone function, we investigated effects of developmental exposure to pharmacologically relevant concentrations of FLU (3 and 30 nM (measured on brain neurotransmitter levels, gonadal differentiation, aromatase activity in brain and gonads, and the thyroid system, using the Xenopus tropicalis model. Tadpoles were chronically exposed (8 weeks until metamorphosis. At metamorphosis brains were cryosectioned and levels of serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, and their metabolites 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, and homovanillic acid were measured in discrete regions (telencephalon, hypothalamus and the reticular formation of the cryosections using high-performance liquid chromatography. Exposure to 30 nM FLU increased the concentration of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in hypothalamus compared with controls. FLU exposure did not affect survival, time to metamorphosis, thyroid histology, gonadal sex differentiation, or aromatase activity implying that the effect on the serotonergic neurotransmitter system in the hypothalamus region was specific. The FLU concentration that impacted the serotonin system is lower than the concentration measured in umbilical cord serum, suggesting that the serotonin system of the developing brain is highly sensitive to in utero exposure to FLU. To our knowledge this is the first study showing effects of developmental FLU exposure on brain neurochemistry. Given that SSRIs are present in the aquatic environment the current results warrant further investigation into the neurobehavioral effects of SSRIs in aquatic wildlife.

  19. An exploratory study of adolescent response to fluoxetine using psychological and biological predictors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ada H. Zohar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Not enough is known about predicting therapeutic response to serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitors, and specifically to fluoxetine. This exploratory study used psychological and biological markers for (retrospective prediction of treatment-response to fluoxetine in depressed and/or anxious adolescents. Methods Forty-one consecutive adolescent outpatients with a primary diagnosis of severe affective and/or anxiety disorders were assessed and treated with an open-label 8-week trial of fluoxetine. Type D personality was assessed with the 14-item questionnaire, the DS14. In addition, TNFα, IL-6, and IL-1b were measured pre- and post-treatment. Results There was an elevation of Type D personality in patients, compared to the adolescent population rate. Post-treatment, 44% of patients were classified as non-responders; the relative risk of non-response for Type D personality patients was 2.8. Binary logistic regression predicting response vs. non-response showed a contribution of initial TNFα levels as well as Type D personality to non-response. Conclusions In this exploratory study, the most significant contributor to non-response was Type D personality. However, the measurement of Type D was not prospective, and thus may be confounded with psychiatric morbidity. The measurement of personality in psychiatric settings may contribute to the understanding of treatment response and have clinical utility.

  20. [Cerebral hemorrhage induced by low-dose streptokinase: a pharmacologic paradox? Report of a clinical case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedeli, F; Skouse, D; Messina, A

    1997-01-01

    A case of an important intracranial hemorrhage after a low dose (approx. 500,000 UI) of streptokinase in a 60 year-old woman suffering from myocardial infarction is presented. Clinical, electrocardiographic, echocardiographic, lab and tomographic findings are described. The authors suggest a pharmacokinetic mechanism which could be responsible of a "paradox effect" (a powerful and dangerous effect of the drug when given in low dose) and they wonder whether in case of allergic reactions should it be better not to stop the infusion of the thrombolytic drug and be more liberal with the "symptomatic" drugs. Tha patient is still alive and the clinical conditions slowly progressing.

  1. Chronic fluoxetine treatment alters cardiovascular functions in unanesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crestani, Carlos C; Tavares, Rodrigo F; Guimarães, Franscisco S; Correa, Fernando M A; Joca, Sâmia R L; Resstel, Leonardo B M

    2011-11-30

    In the present study, we investigated the effects induced by fluoxetine treatment (10 mg/kg) for either 1 or 21 consecutive days on arterial pressure and heart rate basal levels, baroreflex activity, hemodynamic responses to vasoactive agents and cardiovascular responses to acute restraint stress. Mild hypertension was observed after 21 days of treatment, but not after administration for 1 day. Moreover, chronic treatment affected the baroreflex control of heart rate, which was characterized by a reduced reflex tachycardia and an enhanced bradycardiac baroreflex response. The pressor responses to systemic administration of the selective α(1)-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine, as well as the depressor responses to systemic infusion of the nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside, were reduced after chronic fluoxetine treatment. Fluoxetine treatment for 21 days reduced both the pressor and tachycardiac responses evoked by acute restraint stress. In conclusion, the results indicate the development of mild hypertension after chronic fluoxetine treatment. This effect was followed by changes in the baroreflex control of heart rate and altered vascular responsiveness to pressor and depressor agents, which may explain, at least in part, the increase in arterial pressure. Chronic fluoxetine treatment also affected cardiovascular responses to restraint stress, thus indicating that fluoxetine may affect cardiovascular adaptation under conditions of stress. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Systematic review of clinical trials assessing pharmacological properties of Salvia species on memory, cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miroddi, Marco; Navarra, Michele; Quattropani, Maria C; Calapai, Fabrizio; Gangemi, Sebastiano; Calapai, Gioacchino

    2014-06-01

    Salvia officinalis L. and Salvia lavandulaefolia L. have a longstanding use as traditional herbal remedies that can enhance memory and improve cognitive functions. Pharmacological actions of S. officinalis and S. lavandulaefolia on healthy subjects and on patients suffering of cognitive decline have been investigated. Aim of this review was to summarize published clinical trials assessing effectiveness and safety of S. officinalis and S. lavandulaefolia in the enhancement of cognitive performance in healthy subjects and neurodegenerative illnesses. Furthermore, to purchase a more complete view on safety of S. officinalis and S. lavandulaefolia, we collected and discussed articles regarding toxicity and adverse reactions. Eight clinical studies investigating on acute effects of S. officinalis on healthy subjects were included in the review. Six studies investigated on the effects of S. officinalis and S. lavandaeluaefolia on cognitive performance in healthy subjects. The two remaining were carried out to study the effects of sage on Azheimer's disease. Our review shows that S. officinalis and S. lavandulaefolia exert beneficial effects by enhancing cognitive performance both in healthy subjects and patients with dementia or cognitive impairment and is safe for this indication. Unfortunately, promising beneficial effects are debased by methodological issues, use of different herbal preparations (extracts, essential oil, use of raw material), lack of details on herbal products used. We believe that sage promising effects need further higher methodological standard clinical trials. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Clinical Pharmacology Research Internships at the Interface between Academia and Industry : Students' Perceptions and Scientific Output

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goulooze, S.C.; Franson, K.; Cohen, A.F.; Rissmann, R.

    2017-01-01

    The Centre for Human Drug Research (CHDR) is a non-profit clinical research institute at the interface between academia and the pharmaceutical industry. CHDR hosts a research internship programme for undergraduate (bio)medical students. The aim of this study was (i) to investigate the student

  4. Mifepristone: pharmacology and clinical impact in reproductive medicine, endocrinology and oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Annie; Appleman, Leonard J

    2010-02-01

    Mifepristone is a synthetic selective progesterone-receptor modulator (SPRM) that is widely used around the globe in the field of reproductive medicine. At present mifepristone is approved in a number of countries for early termination of pregnancy (TOP), cervical dilatation before surgical TOP, and management of early embryonic loss or fetal death. A number of new clinical applications are being developed in gynecology, endocrinology and oncology. Mifepristone has also served as an invaluable tool in the study of steroid hormone biology. Current indications for mifepristone are reviewed. New applications for mifepristone under clinical investigation are discussed. In addition, the unique molecular and cellular effects of mifepristone are described. The reader will understand the mechanisms of action of mifepristone and the underlying steroid hormone biology. The reader will know the approved clinical indications for mifepristone and appreciate the ongoing basic and clinical research into new applications. Mifepristone is the first-discovered and still most widely used antiprogestin. It has several indications in reproductive medicine and is under investigation for a variety of potential applications in other fields of medicine. The molecular and cellular effects of mifepristone illuminate important aspects of steroid hormone biology.

  5. Clinical pharmacology and therapeutic potential of artemisinin and its derivatives in the treatment of malaria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, P. J.; Dien, T. K.

    1996-01-01

    Artemisinin and its derivatives are renowned for their potent antimalarial activity. They have found their way into clinical use in many areas where malaria is endemic. The in vitro concentration at which artemisinin can inhibit 50% of the growth of Plasmodium falciparum ranges from 3 to 30

  6. Thuja occidentalis (Arbor vitae): A Review of its Pharmaceutical, Pharmacological and Clinical Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Naser, Belal; Bodinet, Cornelia; Tegtmeier, Martin; Lindequist, Ulrike

    2005-01-01

    Arbor vitae (Thuja occidentalis L.) is a native European tree widely used in homeopathy and evidence-based phytotherapy. Many reviews and monographs have been published on the herbal substance's description, mode of action and clinical use. However, no comprehensive evidence-based review is available. Therefore, our aim was to search MEDLINE databases and survey manufacturers for further details or unpublished data. This review presents the botany, ethnobotany and phytochemistry, especial...

  7. Pediatric Clinical Pharmacology of Voriconazole: Role of Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modeling in Pharmacotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadam, Rajendra S; Van Den Anker, Johannes N

    2016-09-01

    Voriconazole is a potent antifungal agent used for the treatment of invasive fungal infections caused by Aspergillus and Candida species in adult and pediatric patients. Voriconazole has a narrow therapeutic index and a large intra- and inter-individual pharmacokinetics (PK) variability. Several factors including non-linear PK, age, body weight, cytochrome P450 2C19 genotype, concomitant drugs, liver function, and food are responsible for the large variability in voriconazole PK. A combination of a narrow therapeutic index with a large PK variability results in treatment failure in many patients at clinically recommended doses. There is an urgent need to establish an optimal dosing regimen for pediatric patients 60 %) treatment failure rates. Therapeutic drug monitoring is commonly used in clinical practice to optimize the voriconazole dosing regimens in pediatric patients, but it is associated with several practical limitations. Implementation of a PK model-guided individualized dose selection will help in reducing the PK variability and will improve therapeutic outcomes. In this review, we have summarized the covariates influencing the PK of voriconazole in adult and pediatric patients, emphasizing that the clearance of voriconazole is significantly different between adult and pediatric patients owing to developmental changes in the major clearance pathways. Moreover, we have provided the limitations of the current dosing regimens and have proposed a new dosing method using a PK model-guided dose individualization of voriconazole in pediatric patients.

  8. Improving the Clinical Pharmacologic Assessment of Abuse Potential: Part 1: Regulatory Context and Risk Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Edward M

    2018-02-01

    This article brings to the attention of drug developers the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) recent final Guidance to Industry on Assessment of Abuse Potential and provides practical suggestions about compliance with the Guidance. The Guidance areas are reviewed, analyzed, and placed in the context of current scientific knowledge and best practices to mitigate regulatory risk. The Guidance provides substantial new detail on what needs to be done at all stages of drug development for central nervous system-active drugs. However, because many psychopharmacologic agents have unique preclinical and clinical features, the plan for each agent needs to be not only carefully prepared but also reviewed and approved by the FDA. Examples are provided where assumptions about interpretation of the Guidance can delay development. If the expertise and experience needed for assessing abuse potential during drug development do not exist within a company, external preclinical and clinical expert should be involved. Consultation with the FDA is encouraged and important because the specific requirements for each drug will vary.

  9. Thuja occidentalis (Arbor vitae): A Review of its Pharmaceutical, Pharmacological and Clinical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naser, Belal; Bodinet, Cornelia; Tegtmeier, Martin; Lindequist, Ulrike

    2005-03-01

    Arbor vitae (Thuja occidentalis L.) is a native European tree widely used in homeopathy and evidence-based phytotherapy. Many reviews and monographs have been published on the herbal substance's description, mode of action and clinical use. However, no comprehensive evidence-based review is available. Therefore, our aim was to search MEDLINE databases and survey manufacturers for further details or unpublished data. This review presents the botany, ethnobotany and phytochemistry, especially the different contents of essential oil (Thujone) in relation to different extraction procedures of this medicinal plant. Thuja's antiviral action and immunopharmacological potential, such as stimulatory and co-stimulatory effects on cytokine and antibody production and activation of macrophages and other immunocompetent cells, have been evaluated in numerous in vitro and in vivo investigations. Although no controlled trials have been conducted on Thuja occ alone, many clinical studies have been performed with a herbal medicinal product containing a special extract of Thuja occ and other immunostimulants, demonstrating its therapeutic efficacy and safety in respiratory tract infections.

  10. Thuja occidentalis (Arbor vitae: A Review of its Pharmaceutical, Pharmacological and Clinical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belal Naser

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Arbor vitae (Thuja occidentalis L. is a native European tree widely used in homeopathy and evidence-based phytotherapy. Many reviews and monographs have been published on the herbal substance's description, mode of action and clinical use. However, no comprehensive evidence-based review is available. Therefore, our aim was to search MEDLINE databases and survey manufacturers for further details or unpublished data. This review presents the botany, ethnobotany and phytochemistry, especially the different contents of essential oil (Thujone in relation to different extraction procedures of this medicinal plant. Thuja's antiviral action and immunopharmacological potential, such as stimulatory and co-stimulatory effects on cytokine and antibody production and activation of macrophages and other immunocompetent cells, have been evaluated in numerous in vitro and in vivo investigations. Although no controlled trials have been conducted on Thuja occ alone, many clinical studies have been performed with a herbal medicinal product containing a special extract of Thuja occ and other immunostimulants, demonstrating its therapeutic efficacy and safety in respiratory tract infections.

  11. Epoetin zeta in the management of anemia associated with chronic kidney disease, differential pharmacology and clinical utility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis-Ajami ML

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mary Lynn Davis-Ajami,1 Jun Wu,2 Katherine Downton,3 Emilie Ludeman,3 Virginia Noxon4 1Organizational Systems and Adult Health, University of Maryland School of Nursing, Baltimore, MD, USA; 2South Carolina College of Pharmacy, University of South Carolina, Greenville, SC, USA; 3Health Sciences and Human Services Library, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD, USA; 4Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Outcomes Science, South Carolina College of Pharmacy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA Abstract: Epoetin zeta was granted marketing authorization in October 2007 by the European Medicines Agency as a recombinant human erythropoietin erythropoiesis-stimulating agent to treat symptomatic anemia of renal origin in adult and pediatric patients on hemodialysis and adults on peritoneal dialysis, as well as for symptomatic renal anemia in adult patients with renal insufficiency not yet on dialysis. Currently, epoetin zeta can be administered either subcutaneously or intravenously to correct for hemoglobin concentrations ≤10 g/dL (6.2 mmol/L or with dose adjustment to maintain hemoglobin levels at desired levels not in excess of 12 g/dL (7.5 mmol/L. This review article focuses on epoetin zeta indications in chronic kidney disease, its use in managing anemia of renal origin, and discusses its pharmacology and clinical utility. Keywords: biosimilar, chronic kidney disease, epoetin alfa, erythropoiesis, renal anemia, Retacrit®

  12. Recommendations for pharmacological clinical trials in children with irritable bowel syndrome: the Rome foundation pediatric subcommittee on clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saps, M; van Tilburg, M A L; Lavigne, J V; Miranda, A; Benninga, M A; Taminiau, J A; Di Lorenzo, C

    2016-11-01

    There is little published evidence of efficacy for the most commonly used treatments. Thus, there is an urgent need to conduct clinical trials on existing and novel therapies. In order to address these issues the Rome Foundation and members of the Pediatric Committee of the European Medicines Agency formed a subcommittee on clinical trials to develop guidelines for the design of clinical trials in children with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The following recommendations are based on evidence from published data when available and expert opinion. The subcommittee recommends randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, clinical trials to assess the efficacy of new drugs. The combined endpoints for abdominal pain are a decrease in intensity of at least 30% compared with baseline and to meet or exceed the Reliable Change Index (RCI) for the sample. Stool consistency is measured with the Bristol Stool Scale Form (BSFS). The subcommittee recommends as entry criteria for abdominal pain a weekly average of worst abdominal pain in past 24 h of at least 3.0 on a 0-10 point scale or at least 30 mm in 100 mm Visual Analog Scale. For stool endpoints the committee recommends an average stool consistency lower than 3 in the BSFS during the run-in period for clinical trials on IBS-C and an average stool consistency greater than 5 in the BSFS during the run-in period for clinical trials on IBS-D. Changes in stool consistency are the primary endpoints for both IBS with diarrhea (IBS-D) and IBS with constipation (IBS-C). © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The matching quality of experimental and control interventions in blinded pharmacological randomised clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bello, Segun; Wei, Maoling; Hilden, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    to systematically identify and analyse studies of matching quality in drug trials. Our primary objective was to assess the proportion of studies that concluded that the matching was inadequate; our secondary objective was to describe mechanisms for inadequate matching. Methods: Systematic review. We searched Pub......Med, Google Scholar and Web of Science Citation Index for studies that assessed whether supposedly indistinguishable interventions (experimental and control) in randomized clinical drug trials could be distinguished based on physical properties (e.g. appearance or smell). Two persons decided on study...... eligibility and extracted data independently. Our primary analysis was based on the conclusions of each study. In supportive analyses, we defined a low and a high threshold for inadequate matching. We summarised results qualitatively. Results: We included studies of 36 trials, of which 28 (78 %) were...

  14. Epidemiological, clinical and pharmacological aspects of headache in a university undergraduate population in Palestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweileh, W M; Sawalha, A F; Zyoud, S H; Al-Jabi, S W; Shamseh, F F B; Khalaf, H S

    2010-04-01

    Headache is one of the most common complaints in clinical practice. Few studies regarding headache in university students have been conducted in the Middle East. The objective of this study was to explore the prevalence, clinical characteristics, triggering factors and treatment options of headaches in university undergraduate students in Palestine/Middle East. Data were collected by interviewing a sample of 1900 students. The Headache Assessment Quiz was used to measure quality and severity of headache and to collect data on triggering factors and symptom management. A total of 1808 (95.2%) reported having at least one headache episode in the previous year. A positive family history of headache was found in 40% of students. The prevalence rate of frequent headache (tow or more episodes/month) was found in 1096 (60.9%) students; 613 women (55.9%). Of those having frequent headaches, 228 (20.8%) experienced moderate to severe episodes, 341 (31.2%) had pulsating, throbbing and pounding pain, and 274 (25%) had unilateral pain. The most common triggering factors among students with frequent headaches were: tension/stress (78.2%) and sleep deprivation (75.4%). Less than 5% of students sought medical assistance during headache episodes. Most students (79.1%) reported self-therapy with a single analgesic (53.4%), herbs (10.2%) or combination (15.5%), while 20.9% reported using no medication of any type to decrease pain. Paracetamol (48.5%) followed by ibuprofen (4.9%) were the most commonly used non-prescription analgesic drugs. Headache is a prevalent symptom in the college age population. Further research is needed to determine the prevalence of specific types of headaches. Healthcare providers are required to educate this population as well as to assist students in properly diagnosing and treating headache types.

  15. Recommendations for pharmacological clinical trials in children with irritable bowel syndrome: the Rome foundation pediatric subcommittee on clinical trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saps, M.; van Tilburg, M. A. L.; Lavigne, J. V.; Miranda, A.; Benninga, M. A.; Taminiau, J. A.; Di Lorenzo, C.

    2016-01-01

    There is little published evidence of efficacy for the most commonly used treatments. Thus, there is an urgent need to conduct clinical trials on existing and novel therapies. In order to address these issues the Rome Foundation and members of the Pediatric Committee of the European Medicines Agency

  16. Effective use of real-life events as tools for teaching-learning clinical pharmacology in a problem-based learning curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Henry; Al Khaja, Khalid A; Sequeira, Reginald P

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes how in a problem-based learning (PBL) medical curriculum, having identified the learning outcomes, problems can be developed from real-life events for teaching-learning clinical pharmacology topics for which PBL cases might be inadequate. Such problems can be very interesting and educational. Using the story of the development and withdrawal of rofecoxib (Vioxx(®)), we developed a problem for undergraduate medical students to address important issues related to clinical pharmacology and therapeutics such as new drug development, preclinical testing, clinical trials, adverse drug reactions, professionalism, and critical appraisal of literature. These topics would otherwise be difficult to address in patient-based problems. The evaluation of the problem based on pooled feedback from 57 tutorial groups, each comprising 8-10 students, collected over 5 years, supported the effectiveness of the problem. A systematic approach described in this paper can be used for the development and validation of educational material for introducing focal topics of pharmacology/clinical pharmacology integrated with other disciplines in innovative medical (and other health profession) curricula.

  17. Experience-based teaching of therapeutics and clinical pharmacology of antiepileptic drugs. Sudden unexplained death in epilepsy: do antiepileptic drugs have a role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathers, C M; Schraeder, P L

    1995-06-01

    The contents of this paper have been written to be used in a teaching program specifically designed for medical postgraduate education of resident physicians and fellows in training interested in the clinical pharmacology of antiepileptic drugs and their role in the treatment of epilepsy and/or in the prevention of sudden unexpected death associated with this disease. With some modifications, such as a specific lecture to provide an overview of the numerous concepts presented in the text, the article could be used when teaching fourth-year medical students. The format of the paper is a combination of didactic review and eight case reports in a self-learning format. A quiz for self-assessment is included at the end of the article (see Appendix). This material was covered in part in the 1992 Board Review Course for Clinical Pharmacology sponsored by the American College of Clinical Pharmacology. The format or setting of instruction for this material could include small learning groups composed of 10 to 15 students. When used in combination with other topics prepared in similar formats, this could become a take home course for those preparing to take the Boards in Clinical Pharmacology. Each instructor could select specific publications from the reference list for assigned readings depending upon the material emphasized by the instructor. The questions included at the end of the text could be used as either a closed or an open book quiz to assess student learning.

  18. Recent developments in the clinical pharmacology of rolapitant: subanalyses in specific populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapoport BL

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Bernardo Leon Rapoport,1 Matti Aapro,2 Martin R Chasen,3 Karin Jordan,4 Rudolph M Navari,5 Ian Schnadig,6 Lee Schwartzberg7 1The Medical Oncology Centre of Rosebank, Johannesburg, South Africa; 2Breast Center, Genolier Cancer Center, Genolier, Switzerland; 3Palliative Care, William Osler Health Services, Brampton, ON, Canada; 4Department of Medicine V, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; 5Division of Hematology Oncology, University of Alabama School of Medicine, Birmingham, AL, USA; 6Compass Oncology, US Oncology Research, Tualatin, OR, USA; 7West Clinic, Memphis, TN, USA Abstract: Knowledge of the involvement of the neurokinin substance P in emesis has led to the development of the neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists (NK-1 RAs for control of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV, in combination with serotonin type 3 receptor antagonists and corticosteroids. The NK-1 RA rolapitant, recently approved in oral formulation, has nanomolar affinity for the NK-1 receptor, as do the other commercially available NK-1 RAs, aprepitant and netupitant. Rolapitant is rapidly absorbed and has a long half-life in comparison to aprepitant and netupitant. All three NK-1 RAs undergo metabolism by cytochrome P450 (CYP 3A4, necessitating caution with the concomitant use of CYP3A4 inhibitors, but in contrast to aprepitant and netupitant, rolapitant does not inhibit or induce CYP3A4. However, rolapitant is a moderate inhibitor of CYP2D6, and concomitant use with CYP2D6 substrates with narrow therapeutic indices should be avoided. Aprepitant, netupitant, and rolapitant have all demonstrated efficacy in the control of delayed CINV in patients receiving moderately and highly emetogenic chemotherapy in randomized controlled trials, including over multiple cycles of chemotherapy. We reviewed recent post hoc analyses of clinical trial data demonstrating that rolapitant is efficacious in the control of CINV in patient populations with specific tumor types

  19. Differential pharmacology and clinical utility of sonidegib in advanced basal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahid M

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mohd Wahid, Arshad Jawed, Sajad Ahmad Dar, Raju K Mandal, Shafiul Haque Research and Scientific Studies Unit, College of Nursing and Allied Health Sciences, Jazan University, Jazan, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Abstract: Patients suffering from advanced basal cell carcinoma (BCC have very limited treatment options. Sonidegib selectively inhibits the growth of Hedgehog pathway-dependent tumors and can treat locally advanced BCC patients who are not candidates for surgery or radiation therapy. The BOLT clinical trials were conducted to evaluate the efficacy/potency of sonidegib in the treatment of advanced BCC or metastatic BCC. The patients were randomized in 1:2 ratios to receive 200 or 800 mg oral sonidegib daily, stratified by disease, histological subtype and geographical region. The primary efficacy analyses showed that 18 patients in the 200 mg group and 35 patients in the 800 mg group show an objective response (Central Review Committee that corresponds to 43% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 28–59 and 38% (95% CI: 28–48 in their respective categories. Disease control was found in 93% (39 patients and 80% (74 patients of the patients administered 200 and 800 mg sonidegib, respectively. The adverse events were assessed by the Central Review Committee as well as the investigator review team as per the guidelines of National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.03. The most frequently found adverse events reported in BOLT trials were muscle spasms, alopecia, dysgeusia (taste disturbance, nausea, elevated blood creatine kinase and fatigue. Comparatively, the patients administered 200 mg sonidegib showed fewer adverse events than those in the 800 mg sonidegib category. Thus, the benefit of using the 200 mg dose of sonidegib outweighs the associated risks and it can be inferred that it would be judicious to choose doses of lesser strength. Keywords: locally advanced basal cell carcinoma, metastatic basal

  20. Medicinal Chemistry, Pharmacology, and Clinical Implications of TRPV1 Receptor Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghazadeh Tabrizi, Mojgan; Baraldi, Pier Giovanni; Baraldi, Stefania; Gessi, Stefania; Merighi, Stefania; Borea, Pier Andrea

    2017-07-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is an ion channel expressed on sensory neurons triggering an influx of cations. TRPV1 receptors function as homotetramers responsive to heat, proinflammatory substances, lipoxygenase products, resiniferatoxin, endocannabinoids, protons, and peptide toxins. Its phosphorylation increases sensitivity to both chemical and thermal stimuli, while desensitization involves a calcium-dependent mechanism resulting in receptor dephosphorylation. TRPV1 functions as a sensor of noxious stimuli and may represent a target to avoid pain and injury. TRPV1 activation has been associated to chronic inflammatory pain and peripheral neuropathy. Its expression is also detected in nonneuronal areas such as bladder, lungs, and cochlea where TRPV1 activation is responsible for pathology development of cystitis, asthma, and hearing loss. This review offers a comprehensive overview about TRPV1 receptor in the pathophysiology of chronic pain, epilepsy, cough, bladder disorders, diabetes, obesity, and hearing loss, highlighting how drug development targeting this channel could have a clinical therapeutic potential. Furthermore, it summarizes the advances of medicinal chemistry research leading to the identification of highly selective TRPV1 antagonists and their analysis of structure-activity relationships (SARs) focusing on new strategies to target this channel. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Behavioral and pharmacological treatment methods for pregnant smokers: issues for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windsor, R; Oncken, C; Henningfield, J; Hartmann, K; Edwards, N

    2000-01-01

    Active and passive exposure to tobacco smoke are the most serious and preventable causes of poor maternal, fetal, and infant outcomes in the United States. Unfortunately, the majority of pregnant smokers do not quit smoking before or during pregnancy or after childbirth. We describe a standardized behavioral counseling model and discuss issues to consider in recommending the use of pharmacotherapy during pregnancy. Although the Food and Drug Administration no longer classifies nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) as contraindicated during pregnancy, precautions should be carefully considered for use in this population. This paper provides a synopsis of the risks of exposure to tobacco smoke during pregnancy and the postpartum; estimates the population at risk and the potential for increased cessation if effective health education methods during pregnancy were routinely provided; presents a meta-analysis of "best practice" patient education methods for pregnant smokers; and estimates the number of pregnant heavy smokers who might be eligible for NRT. We suggest five issues for the physician to consider before recommending NRT medications to pregnant patients who are heavy smokers. The judicious use of NRT medications may significantly reduce harm to the infants of heavy smokers. More evidence derived from large population-based research, however, is needed to provide guidance to the physician about NRT eligibility, dose, scheduling, and effectiveness in clinical practice.

  2. Challenging clinically unresponsive medullary thyroid cancer: Discovery and pharmacological activity of novel RET inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Pietra, Valeria; Sartini, Stefania; Botta, Lorenzo; Antonelli, Alessandro; Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Fallahi, Poupak; Moriconi, Alessio; Coviello, Vito; Quattrini, Luca; Ke, Yi-Yu; Hsing-Pang, Hsieh; Da Settimo, Federico; Novellino, Ettore; La Motta, Concettina; Marinelli, Luciana

    2018-03-02

    It is now known that "gain of function" mutations of RET (REarranged during Transfection) kinase are specific and key oncogenic events in the onset of thyroid gland cancers such as the Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma (MTC). Although a number of RET inhibitors exist and are capable of inhibiting RET variants, in which mutations are outside the enzyme active site, the majority becomes dramatically ineffective when mutations are within the protein active site (V804L and V804M). Pursuing a receptor-based virtual screening against the kinase domain of RET, we found that compound 5 is able to inhibit efficiently both wild type and V804L mutant RET. Compound 5 was able to significantly reduce proliferation of both commercially available TT cell lines and surgical thyroid tissues obtained from patients with MTC and displayed a suitable drug-like profile, thus standing out as a promising candidate for further development towards the treatment of clinically unresponsive MTC. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Delafloxacin: Place in Therapy and Review of Microbiologic, Clinical and Pharmacologic Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Sarah C J; Mercuro, Nicholas J; Davis, Susan L; Rybak, Michael J

    2018-03-31

    Delafloxacin (formerly WQ-3034, ABT492, RX-3341) is a novel fluoroquinolone chemically distinct from currently marketed fluoroquinolones with the absence of a protonatable substituent conferring a weakly acidic character to the molecule. This property results in increased intracellular penetration and enhanced bactericidal activity under acidic conditions that characterize the infectious milieu at a number of sites. The enhanced potency and penetration in low pH environments contrast what has been observed for other zwitterionic fluoroquinolones, which tend to lose antibacterial potency under acidic conditions, and may be particularly advantageous against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, for which the significance of the intracellular mode of survival is increasingly being recognized. Delafloxacin is also unique in its balanced target enzyme inhibition, a property that likely explains the very low frequencies of spontaneous mutations in vitro. Delafloxacin recently received US Food and Drug Administration approval for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections and is currently being evaluated in a phase 3 trial among patients with community-acquired pneumonia. In the current era of a heightened awareness pertaining to collateral ecologic damage, safety issues and antimicrobial stewardship principles, it is critical to describe the unique properties of delafloxacin and define its potential role in therapy. The purpose of this article is to review available data pertaining to delafloxacin's biochemistry, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamics characteristics, in vitro activity and potential for resistance selection as well as current progress in clinical trials to ultimately assist clinicians in selecting patients who will benefit most from the distinctive properties of this agent.

  4. Recent developments in the clinical pharmacology of rolapitant: subanalyses in specific populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapoport, Bernardo Leon; Aapro, Matti; Chasen, Martin R; Jordan, Karin; Navari, Rudolph M; Schnadig, Ian; Schwartzberg, Lee

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of the involvement of the neurokinin substance P in emesis has led to the development of the neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists (NK-1 RAs) for control of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV), in combination with serotonin type 3 receptor antagonists and corticosteroids. The NK-1 RA rolapitant, recently approved in oral formulation, has nanomolar affinity for the NK-1 receptor, as do the other commercially available NK-1 RAs, aprepitant and netupitant. Rolapitant is rapidly absorbed and has a long half-life in comparison to aprepitant and netupitant. All three NK-1 RAs undergo metabolism by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4, necessitating caution with the concomitant use of CYP3A4 inhibitors, but in contrast to aprepitant and netupitant, rolapitant does not inhibit or induce CYP3A4. However, rolapitant is a moderate inhibitor of CYP2D6, and concomitant use with CYP2D6 substrates with narrow therapeutic indices should be avoided. Aprepitant, netupitant, and rolapitant have all demonstrated efficacy in the control of delayed CINV in patients receiving moderately and highly emetogenic chemotherapy in randomized controlled trials, including over multiple cycles of chemotherapy. We reviewed recent post hoc analyses of clinical trial data demonstrating that rolapitant is efficacious in the control of CINV in patient populations with specific tumor types, namely, breast cancers, gastrointestinal/colorectal cancers, and lung cancers. In addition, we show that rolapitant has efficacy in the control of CINV in specific age groups of patients receiving chemotherapy (<65 and ≥65 years of age). Overall, the safety profile of rolapitant in these specific patient populations was consistent with that observed in primary analyses of phase 3 trials.

  5. Pharmacological and clinical evidence of nevirapine immediate- and extended-release formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ena J

    2012-11-01

    extended release, efficacy, safety, resistance, clinical practice

  6. Modafinil : A Review of its Pharmacology and Clinical Efficacy in the Management of Narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, K J; Spencer, C M

    1998-04-01

    Modafinil promotes wakefulness through an as yet unknown mechanism of action. It significantly increases daytime sleep latency and reduces excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) compared with placebo in patients with narcolepsy. However, the drug does not suppress cataplexy. Although direct comparative data are lacking, modafinil offers advantages over amphetamines and methylphenidate in patients with narcolepsy because of its lack of rebound phenomena after treatment withdrawal and its low abuse potential. Clinical trials have shown modafinil to be well tolerated in patients with narcolepsy. Except for headache, which was reported with a significantly greater frequency in modafinil recipients, the tolerability profile of modafinil 200 to 400 mg/day was similar to that of placebo in patients treated for 9 weeks. Preliminary data suggest that the tolerability of modafinil is maintained long term (40 weeks). Thus, modafinil is effective in the treatment of EDS in patients with narcolepsy, although it is not effective against cataplexy. Preliminary findings indicate that, unlike other psychostimulants, the drug is unlikely to be abused and is not associated with withdrawal phenomena. Therefore, modafinil is likely to be an effective therapeutic option for the treatment of EDS in patients with narcolepsy. The mechanism of action of modafinil has not been clearly established. However, it may indirectly increase wakefulness, at least in part, through inhibition of cortical γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release via serotonergic mechanisms. Modafinil induces wakefulness and increases locomotor activity in a variety of animal species without causing stereotyped behaviour. In rhesus monkeys, the effects of oral modafinil were not associated with changes in blood pressure or heart rate. In contrast to dexamphetamine 20mg, single night-time doses of modafinil 100 or 200mg had no significant effects on objective sleep variables or sleep structure in young or elderly healthy

  7. Comparing the effects of fluoxetine and imipramine on total cholesterol, triglyceride, and weight in patients with major depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahsavand Ananloo Esmaeil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are some reports on the effects of antidepressants on metabolic syndrome. However, our search in the previously published literature showed a lack of information on the comparison of the effects of different classes of antidepressants on lipid profile. Therefore, this study was aimed to compare the effects of fluoxetine and imipramine on serum total cholesterol (TC and triglyceride (TG as well as body weight (BW in patients with major depressive disorder. Methods Fifty one patients, 18 to 70 years of age, with major depressive disorder complied with the criteria of this preliminary, open-label clinical trial. Subjects received either imipramine (75–200 mg/day or fluoxetine (20–40 mg/day for 8 weeks. Total cholesterol and TG levels, as well as BW were compared at baseline with those at weeks 4 and 8. Data was analyzed by SPSS software version 16.0. Results In the fluoxetine group, TC levels decreased from 165.71 mg/dL to 156.71 mg/dL at week 4 (P = 0.07, and to 143.94 mg/dL at week 8 (P = 0.16; TG levels decreased from 129.35 mg/dL to 115.88 mg/dL at week 4 (P Repeated measures ANOVA showed significant effects on both TC and TG levels as well as on BW in all patients receiving imipramine. However, in patients on fluoxetine, repeated measures ANOVA showed significant effects of this medication only on TC levels in males. Conclusions Monitoring TC and TG and BW is recommended before starting imipramine in depressed patients with increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Fluoxetine may be the preferred agent in those with high or borderline high lipid levels.

  8. Development of innovative teaching materials: clinical pharmacology problem-solving (CPPS) units: comparison with patient-oriented problem-solving units and problem-based learning--a 10-year review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathers, Claire M; Smith, Cedric M

    2002-05-01

    The First Teaching Clinic in Clinical Pharmacology, sponsored by the American College of Clinical Pharmacology in September 1992, was designed for the preparation and development of new clinical pharmacology problem-solving (CPPS) units. CPPS units are case histories that illustrate pertinent principles in clinical pharmacology. Each unit consists of the following sections: introduction, learning objectives, pretest, four clinical pharmacology scenarios, posttest, answers to pre- and posttest questions, and selected references. The clinical pharmacology content of the CPPS units place greater emphasis on clinical information, drug selection, and risk/benefit analyses, and thus they complement the basic pharmacology presented in the patient-oriented problem-solving (POPS) units. In general, the CPPS units are intended for use by students more advanced in clinical pharmacology than first- and second-year medical students. The CPPS unit "Clinical Pharmacology of Antiepileptic Drug Use: Clinical Pearls about the Perils of Patty" was developed for use by third- and fourth-year medical students doing rotations in neurology or clinical pharmacology; advanced pharmacy students; residents in neurology, pediatrics, internal medicine, and family practice; fellows in clinical pharmacology, and those taking the board examination in clinical pharmacology. The CPPS unit titled "Geriatric Clinical Psychopharmacology" was written for third- and fourth-year medical students; residents in psychiatry, family practice, and internal medicine;fellows in clinical pharmacology; and those studying for boards in clinical pharmacology. The CPPS unit "Anisocoria and Glaucoma" was written for more advanced students of clinical pharmacology. The CPPS unit titled "Antiepileptic Drugs" was intended for second-year medical students. The second teaching clinic was held in November 1993 and focused on the development and editing of the CPPS units and their evaluations by faculty and students from

  9. Clinical and Pharmacological Investigation of Myotoxicity in Sri Lankan Russell's Viper (Daboia russelii Envenoming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjana Silva

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sri Lankan Russell's viper (Daboia russelii envenoming is reported to cause myotoxicity and neurotoxicity, which are different to the effects of envenoming by most other populations of Russell's vipers. This study aimed to investigate evidence of myotoxicity in Russell's viper envenoming, response to antivenom and the toxins responsible for myotoxicity.Clinical features of myotoxicity were assessed in authenticated Russell's viper bite patients admitted to a Sri Lankan teaching hospital. Toxins were isolated using high-performance liquid chromatography. In-vitro myotoxicity of the venom and toxins was investigated in chick biventer nerve-muscle preparations. Of 245 enrolled patients, 177 (72.2% had local myalgia and 173 (70.6% had local muscle tenderness. Generalized myalgia and muscle tenderness were present in 35 (14.2% and 29 (11.8% patients, respectively. Thirty-seven patients had high (>300 U/l serum creatine kinase (CK concentrations in samples 24h post-bite (median: 666 U/l; maximum: 1066 U/l. Peak venom and 24h CK concentrations were not associated (Spearman's correlation; p = 0.48. The 24h CK concentrations differed in patients without myotoxicity (median 58 U/l, compared to those with local (137 U/l and generalised signs/symptoms of myotoxicity (107 U/l; p = 0.049. Venom caused concentration-dependent inhibition of direct twitches in the chick biventer cervicis nerve-muscle preparation, without completely abolishing direct twitches after 3 h even at 80 μg/ml. Indian polyvalent antivenom did not prevent in-vitro myotoxicity at recommended concentrations. Two phospholipase A2 toxins with molecular weights of 13kDa, U1-viperitoxin-Dr1a (19.2% of venom and U1-viperitoxin-Dr1b (22.7% of venom, concentration dependently inhibited direct twitches in the chick biventer cervicis nerve-muscle preparation. At 3 μM, U1-viperitoxin-Dr1a abolished twitches, while U1-viperitoxin-Dr1b caused 70% inhibition of twitch force after 3h. Removal of both

  10. Comparison of the pharmacologic and clinical profiles of new combined oral contraceptives containing estradiol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen JT

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey T Jensen,1 Johannes Bitzer,2 Marco Serrani3 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USA; 2Department of Social Medicine and Psychosomatics, Women’s Hospital, University Hospital of Basel, Basel, Switzerland; 3Global Medical Affairs, Women’s Healthcare, Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, Berlin, Germany Abstract: Three estradiol (E2-containing oral contraceptives, estradiol valerate/cyproterone acetate (E2V/CPA, Femilar®, estradiol valerate/dienogest (E2V/DNG, Qlaira®/Natazia™, and estradiol/nomegestrol acetate (E2/NOMAC; Zoely®, have received approval for use in general practice. Only Finnish women currently have access to all three E2-based formulations. E2/NOMAC is currently approved only in Europe, while E2V/DNG is approved globally. To assist clinicians counseling women considering use of one of these formulations, we conducted a review of the published information about the current E2-containing oral contraceptives. A literature search was conducted using the Ovid interface and a combination of free search terms relevant to estradiol and oral contraception to identify suitable articles for inclusion in this review. The available data show that E2V/DNG, E2/NOMAC, and E2V/CPA are all effective oral contraceptives. While direct comparisons are lacking, indirect evidence suggests that E2V/DNG and E2/NOMAC may have better bleeding profiles than E2V/CPA. E2V/DNG is also approved for the treatment of heavy menstrual bleeding. Both E2V/DNG and E2/NOMAC have minimal influence on hemostatic, lipid, and carbohydrate metabolism parameters, or induce less change in these parameters relative to ethinylestradiol-based oral contraceptives. However, the predictive value of these surrogate parameters is a matter of debate, and whether these differences can be translated into meaningful clinical outcomes needs to be established in large-scale, post-marketing, prospective, Phase IV cohort

  11. Clinical pharmacology of neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists for the treatment of nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapoport, Bernardo; Smit, Teresa

    2017-06-01

    Five NK-1 RA formulations are commercially available to treat the delayed phase of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) occurring between days 2-5 post chemotherapy (aprepitant oral capsule and suspension, fosaprepitant intravenous infusion, netupitant/palonosetron capsules and rolapitant tablet) but no direct comparative studies have been conducted to determine their relative clinical utility. Areas covered: Information on pharmacology and safety of the NK-1 RAs derived from PubMed showed that all bind the NK-1 receptor with high affinity and selectivity. There is substantial variation in the disposition and time course in the body of NK-1 RAs because of the differential effects of hepatic metabolism. Unlike netupitant and rolapitant, aprepitant is metabolized extensively by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4. Aprepitant and netupitant also both inhibit CYP3A4. Consequently, aprepitant not only has a much shorter elimination half-life than netupitant and rolapitant but also a more prolific drug interaction profile. All of the NK-1 RAs are efficacious and safe, and are suitable for use in a range of different patient populations, including those with mild or moderate hepatic or renal impairment. Expert opinion: While discovery of NK-1 RAs represents a major breakthrough in CINV control, further work is needed to improve control of chemotherapy-induced nausea.

  12. Chronic Treatment with Fluoxetine Induces Sex-Dependent Analgesic Effects and Modulates HDAC2 and mGlu2 Expression in Female Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Zammataro

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Gender and sex differences in pain recognition and drug responses have been reported in clinical trials and experimental models of pain. Among antidepressants, contradictory results have been observed in patients treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs. This study evaluated sex differences in response to the SSRI fluoxetine after chronic administration in the mouse formalin test. Adult male and female CD1 mice were intraperitoneally injected with fluoxetine (10 mg/kg for 21 days and subjected to pain assessment. Fluoxetine treatment reduced the second phase of the formalin test only in female mice without producing behavioral changes in males. We also observed that fluoxetine was able to specifically increase the expression of metabotropic glutamate receptor type-2 (mGlu2 in females. Also a reduced expression of the epigenetic modifying enzyme, histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2, in dorsal root ganglia (DRG and dorsal horn (DH together with an increase histone 3 acetylation (H3 level was observed in females but not in males. With this study we provide evidence that fluoxetine induces sex specific changes in HDAC2 and mGlu2 expression in the DH of the spinal cord and in DRGs and suggests a molecular explanation for the analgesic effects in female mice.

  13. 12-Month Follow-Up of Fluoxetine and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Binge Eating Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilo, Carlos M.; Crosby, Ross D.; Wilson, G. Terence; Masheb, Robin M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The longer term efficacy of medication treatments for binge-eating disorder (BED) remains unknown. This study examined the longer term effects of fluoxetine and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) either with fluoxetine (CBT + fluoxetine) or with placebo (CBT + placebo) for BED through 12-month follow-up after completing treatments.…

  14. The impact of comorbid body dysmorphic disorder on the response to sequential pharmacological trials for obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Juliana B; Costa, Daniel Lc; Cassab, Raony Cc; Pereira, Carlos Ab; Miguel, Euripedes C; Shavitt, Roseli G

    2014-06-01

    Our aim was to investigate the impact of comorbid body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) on the response to sequential pharmacological trials in adult obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) patients. The sequential trial initially involved fluoxetine monotherapy followed by one of three randomized, add-on strategies: placebo, clomipramine or quetiapine. We included 138 patients in the initial phase of fluoxetine, up to 80 mg or the maximum tolerated dosage, for 12 weeks. We invited 70 non-responders to participate in the add-on trial; as 54 accepted, we allocated 18 to each treatment group and followed them for an additional 12 weeks. To evaluate the combined effects of sex, age, age at onset, initial severity, type of augmentation and BDD on the response to sequential treatments, we constructed a model using generalized estimating equations (GEE). Of the 39 patients who completed the study (OCD-BDD, n = 13; OCD-non-BDD, n = 26), the OCD-BDD patients were less likely to be classified as responders than the OCD-non-BDD patients (Pearson Chi-Square = 4.4; p = 0.036). In the GEE model, BDD was not significantly associated with a worse response to sequential treatments (z-robust = 1.77; p = 0.07). The predictive potential of BDD regarding sequential treatment strategies for OCD did not survive when the analyses were controlled for other clinical characteristics. © The Author(s) 2013.

  15. Interns' knowledge of clinical pharmacology and therapeutics after undergraduate and on-going internship training in Nigeria: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshikoya, Kazeem A; Senbanjo, Idowu O; Amole, Olufemi O

    2009-01-01

    Background A sound knowledge of pathophysiology of a disease and clinical pharmacology and therapeutics (CPT) of a drug is required for safe and rational prescribing. The aim of this study was therefore to assess how adequately the undergraduate CPT teaching had prepared interns in Nigeria for safe and rational prescribing and retrospectively, to know how they wanted the undergraduate curriculum to be modified so as to improve appropriate prescribing. The effect of internship training on the prescribing ability of the interns was also sought. Methods A total of 100 interns were randomly selected from the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital (LASUTH), Ikeja; Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH), Idiaraba; General Hospital Lagos (GHL); the EKO Hospital, Ikeja; and Havana Specialist Hospital, Surulere. A structured questionnaire was the instrument of study. The questionnaire sought information about the demographics of the interns, their undergraduate CPT teaching, experience of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and drug interactions since starting work, confidence in drug usage and, in retrospect; any perceived deficiencies in their undergraduate CPT teaching. Results The response rate was 81%. All the respondents graduated from universities in Nigeria. The ability of the interns to prescribe rationally (66, 81.4%) and safely (47, 58%) was provided by undergraduate CPT teaching. Forty two (51.8%) respondents had problems with prescription writing. The interns would likely prescribe antibiotics (71, 87.6%), nonsteroidal analgesics (66, 81.4%), diuretics (55, 67.9%), sedatives (52, 62.9%), and insulin and oral hypoglycaemics (43, 53%) with confidence and unsupervised. The higher the numbers of clinical rotations done, the more confident were the respondents to prescribe unsupervised (χ2 = 19.98, P < 0.001). Similarly, respondents who had rotated through the four major clinical rotations and at least a special posting (χ2 = 11.57, P < 0.001) or four major

  16. Flupirtine : Clinical pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Harish

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Flupirtine is neither an opioid nor a non steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID producing its analgesic action through blockade of glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor. It is devoid of adverse effects of routinely used analgesic drugs, but is equally efficacious in reducing pain sensation. It has a distinctive mechanism of action, exerting a dual therapeutic effect with both analgesic and muscle relaxant properties that has utility in the treatment of pain, including that associated with muscle tension.

  17. An improved method for preparing tritium labeled fluoxetine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsi, R.S.P.; Stolle, W.T. [Pharmacia and Upjohn Inc., Kalamazoo, MI (United States)

    1996-12-01

    Palladium-on-charcoal catalyzed reduction of N-methyl-3-(3-bromo) phenyl-3-(4-trifluoromethyl)phenoxypropylamine (1) with tritium gas produces a mixture of the debrominated product [{sup 3}H]fluoxetine (2) and N-methyl-3-[3-{sup 3}H]phenylpropylamine (3), which results from cleavage of the benzylic carbon-oxygen bond. Carrying out this reaction in the presence of pyridine eliminates hydrogenolysis and produces [{sup 3}H]fluoxetine as the sole product. (author).

  18. Pharmacology and clinical efficacy of dimethyl fumarate (BG-12 for treatment of relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruggieri S

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Serena Ruggieri,1 Carla Tortorella,2 Claudio Gasperini31Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Sapienza University of Rome “Sapienza”, Rome, Italy; 2Department of Basic Sciences, Neurosciences and Sense Organs, University of Bari, Bari, Italy; 3Department of Neurosciences, S Camillo Forlanini Hospital, Rome, ItalyAbstract: The last two decades have seen the introduction of several therapies for multiple sclerosis (MS. These therapies are intended to work at different levels of the disease, typically targeting direct symptom management, brief corticosteroid administration for acute exacerbations, and the regular use of disease-modifying drugs. Nevertheless, in clinical practice, disease-modifying drugs or immunosuppressive treatments are frequently associated with suboptimal response in terms of efficacy and several side effects leading to poor patient adherence, so the proportion of relapsing–remitting MS patients not adequately responding to disease-modifying therapy have been reported to range from 7% to 49%. Natalizumab and fingolimod are the newest US Food and Drug Administration-approved agents that have been added to the MS treatment armamentarium, but their use is limited by a less known safety profile and recognized specific risk. Thus, there is an important need for new therapeutic strategies, especially those that may offer greater patient satisfaction and safer risk profile in order to optimize therapeutic outcomes. A number of potential therapies for MS are now in late-stage development. Effective, safe, and well-tolerated therapies may improve compliance and empower patients with a level of independence not presently possible. To meet these characteristics, most of these therapies are oral compounds. Herein, we review the pharmacology and efficacy of dimethyl fumarate (BG-12 to date and its role in the evolving marketplace.Keywords: disease-modifying drugs, nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2 (E2-related factor, Nrf2

  19. Trace analysis of fluoxetine and its metabolite norfluoxetine. Part I: development of a chiral liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for wastewater samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, Victoria K H; Tyrefors, Niklas L; Johansson, I Monika; Pettersson, Curt E

    2011-08-19

    An enantioselective method for the determination of fluoxetine (a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) and its pharmacologically active metabolite norfluoxetine has been developed for raw and treated wastewater samples. The stable isotope-labeled fluoxetine and norfluoxetine were used in an extended way for extraction recovery calculations at trace level concentrations in wastewater. Wastewater samples were enriched by solid phase extraction (SPE) with Evolute CX-50 extraction cartridges. The obtained extraction recoveries ranged between 65 and 82% in raw and treated wastewater at a trace level concentration of 50 pM (15-16 ng L⁻¹). The target compounds were identified by the use of chiral liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. The enantiomers were successfully resolved on a chiral α₁-acid glycoprotein column (chiral AGP) with acetonitrile and 10 mM ammonium acetate buffer at pH 4.4 (3/97, v/v) as the mobile phase. The effects of pH, amount of organic modifier and buffer concentration in the mobile phase were investigated on the enantiomeric resolution (R(s)) of the target compounds. Enantiomeric R(s)-values above 2.0 (1.03 RSD%, n=3) were achieved for the enantiomers of fluoxetine and norfluoxetine in all mobile phases investigated. The method was validated by assessing parameters such as cross-contamination and carryover during SPE and during LC analysis. Cross-talk effects were examined during the detection of the analytes in SRM mode. In addition, the isotopic purity of fluoxetine-d₅ and norfluoxetine-d₅ were assessed to exclude the possibility of self-contamination. The interassay precision of the chromatographic separation was excellent, with relative standard deviations (RSD) equal to or lower than 0.56 and 0.81% in raw and treated wastewaters, respectively. The method detection and quantification limits (respectively, MDL and MQL) were determined by the use of fluoxetine-d₅ and

  20. Anesthetic pharmacology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Evers, Alex S; Maze, M; Kharasch, Evan D

    2011-01-01

    ...: Section 1 introduces the principles of drug action, Section 2 presents the molecular, cellular and integrated physiology of the target organ/functional system and Section 3 reviews the pharmacology...

  1. Effect of Agomelatine and Fluoxetine on HAM-D Score, Serum Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor, and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Level in Patients With Major Depressive Disorder With Severe Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Keshav; Gupta, Rachna; Bhatia, M S; Tripathi, A K; Gupta, Lalit K

    2017-12-01

    Evidence suggests that neurotrophic factors, inflammatory markers, and circadian rhythm dysfunctions could be involved in pathophysiology of major depressive disorder. This study evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of agomelatine, a melatonergic drug, and fluoxetine (positive comparator) and their effect on serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α level in patients having major depressive disorder with severe depression. In the present study, we chose TNF-α and BDNF because reduction of TNF-α and rise in BDNF levels are linked with improvement in major depressive disorder. Patients with Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) score ≥25 were treated with agomelatine or fluoxetine and followed up for 12 weeks. In the agomelatine group, the HAM-D score, BDNF level, and TNF-α level at the start of treatment were 31.1 ± 1.88 ng/mL, 2.44 ± 0.38 ng/mL, and 512.5 ± 86.2 pg/mL, respectively, which significantly changed to 13.67 ± 2.22 ng/mL, 2.87 ± 0.44 ng/mL, and 391.64 ± 104.8 pg/mL, respectively (P biomarkers contribute to circuitry dysregulation in depression. Trophic factors repair dysfunctional circuits in depression. Both treatments were found to be safe and well tolerated. © 2017, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  2. The pharmacology of neuroplasticity induced by non-invasive brain stimulation: building models for the clinical use of CNS active drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsche, Michael A; Müller-Dahlhaus, Florian; Paulus, Walter; Ziemann, Ulf

    2012-01-01

    The term neuroplasticity encompasses structural and functional modifications of neuronal connectivity. Abnormal neuroplasticity is involved in various neuropsychiatric diseases, such as dystonia, epilepsy, migraine, Alzheimer's disease, fronto-temporal degeneration, schizophrenia, and post cerebral stroke. Drugs affecting neuroplasticity are increasingly used as therapeutics in these conditions. Neuroplasticity was first discovered and explored in animal experimentation. However, non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) has enabled researchers recently to induce and study similar processes in the intact human brain. Plasticity induced by NIBS can be modulated by pharmacological interventions, targeting ion channels, or neurotransmitters. Importantly, abnormalities of plasticity as studied by NIBS are directly related to clinical symptoms in neuropsychiatric diseases. Therefore, a core theme of this review is the hypothesis that NIBS-induced plasticity can explore and potentially predict the therapeutic efficacy of CNS-acting drugs in neuropsychiatric diseases. We will (a) review the basics of neuroplasticity, as explored in animal experimentation, and relate these to our knowledge about neuroplasticity induced in humans by NIBS techniques. We will then (b) discuss pharmacological modulation of plasticity in animals and humans. Finally, we will (c) review abnormalities of plasticity in neuropsychiatric diseases, and discuss how the combination of NIBS with pharmacological intervention may improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of abnormal plasticity in these diseases and their purposeful pharmacological treatment. PMID:22869014

  3. The pharmacology of neuroplasticity induced by non-invasive brain stimulation: building models for the clinical use of CNS active drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsche, Michael A; Müller-Dahlhaus, Florian; Paulus, Walter; Ziemann, Ulf

    2012-10-01

    The term neuroplasticity encompasses structural and functional modifications of neuronal connectivity. Abnormal neuroplasticity is involved in various neuropsychiatric diseases, such as dystonia, epilepsy, migraine, Alzheimer's disease, fronto-temporal degeneration, schizophrenia, and post cerebral stroke. Drugs affecting neuroplasticity are increasingly used as therapeutics in these conditions. Neuroplasticity was first discovered and explored in animal experimentation. However, non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) has enabled researchers recently to induce and study similar processes in the intact human brain. Plasticity induced by NIBS can be modulated by pharmacological interventions, targeting ion channels, or neurotransmitters. Importantly, abnormalities of plasticity as studied by NIBS are directly related to clinical symptoms in neuropsychiatric diseases. Therefore, a core theme of this review is the hypothesis that NIBS-induced plasticity can explore and potentially predict the therapeutic efficacy of CNS-acting drugs in neuropsychiatric diseases. We will (a) review the basics of neuroplasticity, as explored in animal experimentation, and relate these to our knowledge about neuroplasticity induced in humans by NIBS techniques. We will then (b) discuss pharmacological modulation of plasticity in animals and humans. Finally, we will (c) review abnormalities of plasticity in neuropsychiatric diseases, and discuss how the combination of NIBS with pharmacological intervention may improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of abnormal plasticity in these diseases and their purposeful pharmacological treatment.

  4. Fluoxetine as a treatment for emotional lability after brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, R L; Brown, K W; Pentland, B

    1992-01-01

    Emotional lability or emotionalism is a relatively common phenomenon and frequently occurs following vascular or traumatic brain injury. It is distressing and embarrassing to sufferers and their families, and often interferes with rehabilitation. At present there is no satisfactory or reliable treatment for this condition. We describe an open trial using fluoxetine, a newer antidepressant with a specific serotonergic action, in the treatment of emotional lability due to brain injury. Six consecutive cases of emotional lability attending a rehabilitation unit were studied (five cases of cerebrovascular accident and one of traumatic brain injury). Response to treatment was measured using a modification of the scale described by Lawson and MacLeod [1]. All showed a marked improvement within one week of commencing fluoxetine and the drug was well tolerated with no reported side-effects. The speed of onset and degree of improvement suggest that fluoxetine may be a useful agent in the treatment of emotional lability due to brain injury. Our observations indicate that further investigation of the role of fluoxetine in the treatment of emotional lability is warranted.

  5. Fast simultaneous electrochemical detection of tetracycline and fluoxetine in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ardelean, Magdalena; Pode, Rodica; Schoonman, J.; Pop, Aniela; Manea, Florica

    2017-01-01

    The electrochemical methods-based protocol for simultaneous detection of tetracycline (TC) from antibiotics class and fluoxetine (FXT) from anti-depressive pharmaceuticals class, which belongs to emerging pollutants from water, was developed in this study using carbon nanofiber-epoxy composite

  6. Methamphetamine and fluoxetine treatment of a child with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussing, R; Levin, G M

    1993-01-01

    ABSTRACT An 11-year-old child with obsessive-compulsive disorder, major depression, and attentiondeficit hyperactivity disorder was successfully treated with a combination of fluoxetine (mean 30 mg daily) and methamphetamine (sustained release 10 mg daily). Methamphetamine was selected because of the desirability of avoiding stimulants whose commercial formulations contain food dyes (this child appeared sensitive to tartrazine in dextroamphetamine and other agents), whose effects on hepatic metabolism were minimal (unlike methylphenidate) and whose mechanism of action is reliably rapid (unlike pemoline). Although methamphetamine carries the stigma of an abusable drug and has been implicated in neurotoxicity in animals when used at extremely high doses, methamphetamine may have certain advantages over other psychostimulants in some clinical situations. The combined use of fluoxetine and methamphetamine did not appear to be associated with significant adverse effects.

  7. Is the Comparison between Exercise and Pharmacologic Treatment of Depression in the Clinical Practice Guideline of the American College of Physicians Evidence-Based?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael Netz

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Major depression disorder is most commonly treated with antidepressants. However, due to their side effects clinicians seek non-pharmacologic options, and one of these is exercise. The literature on the benefits of exercise for depression is extensive. Nevertheless, two recent reviews focusing on antidepressants vs. other therapies as a basis for clinical practice guidelines recommended mainly antidepressants, excluding exercise as a viable choice for treatment of depression. The aim of this perspective is to analyze the literature exploring the reasons for this discrepancy. Two categories of publications were examined: randomized controlled trials (RCTs and meta-analyses or systematic reviews. Based on this reassessment, RCTs comparing exercise to antidepressants reported that exercise and antidepressants were equally effective. RCTs comparing exercise combined with antidepressants to antidepressants only reported a significant improvement in depression following exercise as an adjunctive treatment. Almost all the reviews examining exercise vs. other treatments of depression, including antidepressants, support the use of exercise in the treatment of depression, at least as an adjunctive therapy. The two reviews examining pharmacologic vs. non-pharmacologic therapies as a basis for clinical practice guidelines examined limited evidence on exercise vs. antidepressants. In addition, it is possible that academics and health care practitioners are skeptical of viewing exercise as medicine. Maybe, there is a reluctance to accept that changes in lifestyle as opposed to pharmacological treatment can alter biological mechanisms. Longitudinal studies are needed for assessing the effectiveness of exercise in real clinical settings, as well as studies exploring dose-response relationship between exercise and depression.

  8. Clinical Practice Guideline for the Pharmacologic Treatment of Chronic Insomnia in Adults: An American Academy of Sleep Medicine Clinical Practice Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sateia, Michael J; Buysse, Daniel J; Krystal, Andrew D; Neubauer, David N; Heald, Jonathan L

    2017-02-15

    The purpose of this guideline is to establish clinical practice recommendations for the pharmacologic treatment of chronic insomnia in adults, when such treatment is clinically indicated. Unlike previous meta-analyses, which focused on broad classes of drugs, this guideline focuses on individual drugs commonly used to treat insomnia. It includes drugs that are FDA-approved for the treatment of insomnia, as well as several drugs commonly used to treat insomnia without an FDA indication for this condition. This guideline should be used in conjunction with other AASM guidelines on the evaluation and treatment of chronic insomnia in adults. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine commissioned a task force of four experts in sleep medicine. A systematic review was conducted to identify randomized controlled trials, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) process was used to assess the evidence. The task force developed recommendations and assigned strengths based on the quality of evidence, the balance of benefits and harms, and patient values and preferences. Literature reviews are provided for those pharmacologic agents for which sufficient evidence was available to establish recommendations. The AASM Board of Directors approved the final recommendations. The following recommendations are intended as a guideline for clinicians in choosing a specific pharmacological agent for treatment of chronic insomnia in adults, when such treatment is indicated. Under GRADE, a STRONG recommendation is one that clinicians should, under most circumstances, follow. A WEAK recommendation reflects a lower degree of certainty in the outcome and appropriateness of the patient-care strategy for all patients, but should not be construed as an indication of ineffectiveness. GRADE recommendation strengths do not refer to the magnitude of treatment effects in a particular patient, but rather, to the strength of evidence in published data. Downgrading

  9. Lifestyle-oriented non-pharmacological treatments for fibromyalgia: a clinical overview and applications with home-based technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedberg F

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Fred Friedberg,1 David A Williams,2 William Collinge31Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York; 2Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 3Collinge and Associates, Kittery, Maine, USAAbstract: Fibromyalgia (FM is a persistent and disabling widespread pain condition often accompanied by chronic fatigue, cognitive problems, sleep disturbance, depression, anxiety, and headache. To date, the most thoroughly studied non-pharmacological approaches to managing FM are those with a focus on changing patient activities and beliefs that affect the illness. These interventions are intended to facilitate enduring improvement in pain and functional status. Lifestyle-oriented treatments include patient education, aerobic or other physical exercise, and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT. These interventions in FM can be delivered in medical or behavioral health care settings by trained professionals, through patient-oriented treatment manuals, or via remote-access technologies. Non-pharmacological treatments, in particular exercise and CBT, have yielded effect sizes and cost–benefit ratios comparable to medications. This paper describes lifestyle-oriented non-pharmacological treatments for FM and highlights selected literature reviews of these interventions. In addition, behavioral and practical issues are addressed that may affect these non-pharmacological treatments, including patient expectations, participant burden, and treatment availability. Recommendations are made to facilitate these interventions and potentially improve outcomes. In particular, the increasing availability of convenient home-based mobile technologies to deliver these non-pharmacological treatments is described.Keywords: cognitive-behavior therapy, exercise, education, mobile technology

  10. Effect of Early-Life Fluoxetine on Anxiety-Like Behaviors in BDNF Val66Met Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dincheva, Iva; Yang, Jianmin; Li, Anfei; Marinic, Tina; Freilingsdorf, Helena; Huang, Chienchun; Casey, B J; Hempstead, Barbara; Glatt, Charles E; Lee, Francis S; Bath, Kevin G; Jing, Deqiang

    2017-12-01

    Adolescence is a developmental stage in which the incidence of psychiatric disorders, such as anxiety disorders, peaks. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the main class of agents used to treat anxiety disorders. However, the impact of SSRIs on the developing brain during adolescence remains unknown. The authors assessed the impact of developmentally timed SSRI administration in a genetic mouse model displaying elevated anxiety-like behaviors. Knock-in mice containing a common human single-nucleotide polymorphism (Val66Met; rs6265) in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a growth factor implicated in the mechanism of action of SSRIs, were studied based on their established phenotype of increased anxiety-like behavior. Timed administration of fluoxetine was delivered during one of three developmental periods (postnatal days 21-42, 40-61, or 60-81), spanning the transition from childhood to adulthood. Neurochemical and anxiety-like behavioral analyses were performed. We identified a "sensitive period" during periadolescence (postnatal days 21-42) in which developmentally timed fluoxetine administration rescued anxiety-like phenotypes in BDNF Val66Met mice in adulthood. Compared with littermate controls, BDNF Met/Met mice exhibited diminished maturation of serotonergic fibers projecting particularly to the prefrontal cortex, as well as decreased expression of the serotonergic trophic factor S100B in the dorsal raphe. Interestingly, deficient serotonergic innervation, as well as S100B levels, were rescued with fluoxetine administration during periadolescence. These findings suggest that SSRI administration during a "sensitive period" during periadolescence leads to long-lasting anxiolytic effects in a genetic mouse model of elevated anxiety-like behaviors. These persistent effects highlight the role of BDNF in the maturation of the serotonin system and the capacity to enhance its development through a pharmacological intervention.

  11. Clinical Policy Recommendations from the VHA State-of-the-Art Conference on Non-Pharmacological Approaches to Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kligler, Benjamin; Bair, Matthew J; Banerjea, Ranjana; DeBar, Lynn; Ezeji-Okoye, Stephen; Lisi, Anthony; Murphy, Jennifer L; Sandbrink, Friedhelm; Cherkin, Daniel C

    2018-05-01

    As a large national healthcare system, Veterans Health Administration (VHA) is ideally suited to build on its work to date and develop a safe, evidence-based, and comprehensive approach to the care of chronic musculoskeletal pain conditions that de-emphasizes opioid use and emphasizes non-pharmacological strategies. The VHA Office of Health Services Research and Development (HSR&D) held a state-of-the-art (SOTA) conference titled "Non-pharmacological Approaches to Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain Management" in November 2016. Goals of the conference were (1) to establish consensus on the current state of evidence regarding non-pharmacological approaches to chronic musculoskeletal pain to inform VHA policy in this area and (2) to begin to identify priorities for the future VHA research agenda. Workgroups were established and asked to reach consensus recommendations on clinical and research priorities for the following treatment strategies: psychological/behavioral therapies, exercise/movement therapies, manual therapies, and models for delivering multimodal pain care. Participants in the SOTA identified nine non-pharmacological therapies with sufficient evidence to be implemented across the VHA system as part of pain care. Participants further recommended that effective integration of these non-pharmacological approaches across the VHA and especially into VHA primary care, pain care, and mental health settings should be a priority, and that these treatments should be offered early in the course of pain treatment and delivered in a team-based, multimodal treatment setting concurrently with active self-care and self-management approaches. In addition, we recommend that VHA leadership and policy makers systematically address the barriers to implementation of these approaches by expanding opportunities for clinician and veteran education on the effectiveness of these strategies; supporting and funding further research to determine optimal dosage, duration, sequencing

  12. Treatment of depression in older adults beyond fluoxetine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Arantes Wagner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This review aimed to discuss the importance of the comprehensive treatment of depression among older adults in Brazil. The abuse of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, including fluoxetine hydrochloride, as antidepressants has been considered a serious public health problem, particularly among older adults. Despite the consensus on the need for a comprehensive treatment of depression in this population, Brazil is still unprepared. The interface between pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy is limited due to the lack of healthcare services, specialized professionals, and effective healthcare planning. Fluoxetine has been used among older adults as an all-purpose drug for the treatment of depressive disorders because of psychosocial adversities, lack of social support, and limited access to adequate healthcare services for the treatment of this disorder. Preparing health professionals is a sine qua non for the reversal of the age pyramid, but this is not happening yet.

  13. Treatment of depression in older adults beyond fluoxetine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Gabriela Arantes

    2015-01-01

    This review aimed to discuss the importance of the comprehensive treatment of depression among older adults in Brazil. The abuse of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, including fluoxetine hydrochloride, as antidepressants has been considered a serious public health problem, particularly among older adults. Despite the consensus on the need for a comprehensive treatment of depression in this population, Brazil is still unprepared. The interface between pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy is limited due to the lack of healthcare services, specialized professionals, and effective healthcare planning. Fluoxetine has been used among older adults as an all-purpose drug for the treatment of depressive disorders because of psychosocial adversities, lack of social support, and limited access to adequate healthcare services for the treatment of this disorder. Preparing health professionals is a sine qua non for the reversal of the age pyramid, but this is not happening yet. PMID:25830872

  14. Desvenlafaxine Versus Placebo in a Fluoxetine-Referenced Study of Children and Adolescents with Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weihs, Karen L; Murphy, William; Abbas, Richat; Chiles, Deborah; England, Richard D; Ramaker, Sara; Wajsbrot, Dalia B

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate the short-term efficacy and safety of desvenlafaxine (25-50 mg/d) compared with placebo in children and adolescents with major depressive disorder (MDD). Outpatient children (7-11 years) and adolescents (12-17 years) who met DSM-IV-TR criteria for MDD and had screening and baseline Children's Depression Rating Scale-Revised (CDRS-R) total scores >40 were randomly assigned to 8-week treatment with placebo, desvenlafaxine (25, 35, or 50 mg/d based on baseline weight), or fluoxetine (20 mg/d). The primary efficacy endpoint was change from baseline in CDRS-R total score at week 8, analyzed using a mixed-effects model for repeated measures. Secondary efficacy endpoints included week 8 Clinical Global Impressions-Severity, Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement (CGI-I), and response (CGI-I ≤ 2). Safety assessments included adverse events, physical and vital sign measurements, laboratory evaluations, electrocardiogram, and the Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale. The safety population included 339 patients (children, n = 130; adolescents, n = 209). The primary endpoint, change from baseline in CDRS-R total score at week 8, did not statistically separate from placebo, for either desvenlafaxine (adjusted mean [standard error] change, -22.6 [1.17]) or fluoxetine (-24.8 [1.17]; placebo, -23.1 [1.18]). Week 8 CGI-I response rates were significantly greater for fluoxetine (78.2%; p = 0.017) than for placebo (62.6%); desvenlafaxine (68.7%) did not differ from placebo. Other secondary outcomes were consistent with those obtained with CDRS-R. Rates of treatment-emergent adverse events were comparable among treatment groups (desvenlafaxine, 60.0%; placebo, 70.5%; and fluoxetine, 64.3%). Desvenlafaxine did not demonstrate efficacy for treating MDD in children and adolescents in this trial. Because neither desvenlafaxine nor the reference medication, fluoxetine, demonstrated a statistically significant difference from placebo on the primary

  15. Fluoxetine impairs GABAergic signaling in hippocampal slices from neonatal rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico eCherubini

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Fluoxetine (Prozac, an antidepressant known to selectively inhibit serotonin reuptake, is widely used to treat mood disorders in women suffering from depression during pregnancy and postpartum period. Several lines of evidence suggest that this drug, which crosses the human placenta and is secreted into milk during lactation, exerts its action not only by interfering with serotoninergic but also with GABAergic transmission. GABA is known to play a crucial role in the construction of neuronal circuits early in postnatal development. The immature hippocampus is characterized by an early type of network activity, the so-called Giant Depolarizing Potentials (GDPs, generated by the synergistic action of glutamate and GABA, both depolarizing and excitatory. Here we tested the hypothesis that fluoxetine may interfere with GABAergic signaling during the first postnatal week, thus producing harmful effects on brain development. At micromolar concentrations fluoxetine severely depressed GDPs frequency (IC50 22 M in a reversible manner and independently of its action on serotonin reuptake. This effect was dependent on a reduced GABAergic (but not glutamatergic drive to principal cells most probably from parvalbumin-positive fast spiking neurons. Cholecystokinin-positive GABAergic interneurons were not involved since the effects of the drug persisted when cannabinoid receptors were occluded with WIN55,212-2, a CB1/CB2 receptor agonist. Fluoxetine effects on GABAergic transmission were associated with a reduced firing rate of both principal cells and interneurons further suggesting that changes in network excitability account for GDPs disruption. This may have critical consequences on the functional organization and stabilization of neuronal circuits early in postnatal development.

  16. Increased Trichotillomania Symptoms in a Child With Fluoxetine Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yektaş, Çiğdem; Tufan, Ali Evren

    Trichotillomania (TTM) is a mental disorder characterized by uncontrolled and impulsive hair pulling leading to hair loss, distress, and disordered functioning. Treatment choices include behavioral therapy (especially habit reversal training) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. However, randomized controlled trials conducted with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have led to controversial results of effectiveness for TTM. Here, we report a female patient whose TTM symptoms increased after fluoxetine use.

  17. Fluoxetine effects on periodontogenesis: histomorphometrical and immunohistochemical analyses in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Silva REGUEIRA

    Full Text Available Abstract Reports have indicated that serotonin plays an important role in cell migration and differentiation during the organogenesis of several tissues, including the oral types. Administration of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI drugs during pregnancy could affect the delivery of serotonin to embryonic tissues altering its development. Objective This study aimed to assess the effects of fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, on the formation of the periodontal ligament during pregnancy and lactation in rat pups. Material and Methods Twelve pregnant rats of Wistar lineage were divided into four study groups. In the control group, 0.9% sodium chloride solution was administered orally, throughout the entire period of the 21 days of pregnancy (CG group and in the CGL group, it was administrated during pregnancy and lactation (from day 1 of pregnancy to the 21st day after birth. Fluoxetine was administered orally at the dose of 20 mg/kg in a group treated during pregnancy only (FG group, and during pregnancy and lactation (FGL group. Histometrical, histochemical and immunohistochemical analysis of the maxillary first molar periodontium region of the 24 rat pups was made under light microscopy, and periodontal ligament collagen was qualitatively evaluated under a polarizing light microscope. Results The quantity of fibroblasts (p=0.006, osteoblasts (p=0.027 and cementoblasts (p=0.001 was reduced in pups from the rats that received fluoxetine during pregnancy and lactation. No alterations were seen in the collagen fibers. Conclusion These findings suggest that periodontal tissue may be sensitive to fluoxetine, and its interference in reducing periodontal cells depends on exposure time during lactation.

  18. Chronic fluoxetine treatment alters cardiovascular functions in unanesthetized rats

    OpenAIRE

    Crestani, Carlos Cesar [UNESP; Tavares, Rodrigo F.; Guimaraes, Franscisco S.; Correa, Fernando M. A.; Joca, Samia R. L.; Resstel, Leonardo B. M.

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects induced by fluoxetine treatment (10 mg/kg) for either 1 or 21 consecutive days on arterial pressure and heart rate basal levels, baroreflex activity, hemodynamic responses to vasoactive agents and cardiovascular responses to acute restraint stress. Mild hypertension was observed after 21 days of treatment, but not after administration for 1 day. Moreover, chronic treatment affected the baroreflex control of heart rate, which was characterized ...

  19. [The combined effect of psychotherapy and fluoxetine on obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resch, M; Jákó, P; Sidó, Z; Haász, P

    1999-10-03

    Obesity as psychosomatic disease is a mass phenomenon. The number of obese males (BMI > 30) became doubled in the last ten years. In the etiology of obesity play an important role the reactive obesity. In the background of "yo-yo syndrome" often could be found depression, or other psychotic disorder. The low self-esteem, body dissatisfaction, tension, anxiety disorders is well-known in a slimming diet. Obese subjects (n = 29) who were admitted on their request with a view to losing weight were examined (Hamilton Depressive Scala, Hamilton Anxietas Scala, Eating Attitude Test) Physical Conditioning and internal Medicine Department of National Sports Medicine Institute, Budapest. Among obesities with mild and severe depression as treatment of somatic complications was used fluoxetine, in severe cases and depression with severe anxiety was associated with supportive or cognitive-behavioral treatment. The prevalence of binge eating disorders were at 57% and bulimia nervosa was at 3% in using population (n = 29). Decreasing of anxiety and grade of depression significantly correlated with body mass index (p < 0.023, F = 1.997, p < 0.034, F = 3.131). The treatment of fluoxetine significantly correlated with body mass index (T1: p < 0.023, T2: p < 0.03, T3: p < 0.004). The patients indicated their well being as fluoxetine reduced eating, satiety and lower binges.

  20. Pharmacologic Treatment of Insomnia Disorder: An Evidence Report for a Clinical Practice Guideline by the American College of Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilt, Timothy J; MacDonald, Roderick; Brasure, Michelle; Olson, Carin M; Carlyle, Maureen; Fuchs, Erika; Khawaja, Imran S; Diem, Susan; Koffel, Erin; Ouellette, Jeannine; Butler, Mary; Kane, Robert L

    2016-07-19

    Pharmacologic interventions are often prescribed for insomnia disorder. To assess the benefits, harms, and comparative effectiveness of pharmacologic treatments for adults with insomnia disorder. Several electronic databases (2004-September 2015), reference lists, and U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) documents. 35 randomized, controlled trials of at least 4 weeks' duration that evaluated pharmacotherapies available in the United States and that reported global or sleep outcomes; 11 long-term observational studies that reported harm information; FDA review data for nonbenzodiazepine hypnotics and orexin receptor antagonists; and product labels for all agents. Data extraction by single investigator confirmed by a second reviewer; dual-investigator assessment of risk of bias; consensus determination of strength of evidence. Eszopiclone, zolpidem, and suvorexant improved short-term global and sleep outcomes compared with placebo, although absolute effect sizes were small (low- to moderate-strength evidence). Evidence for benzodiazepine hypnotics, melatonin agonists, and antidepressants, and for most pharmacologic interventions in older adults, was insufficient or low strength. Evidence was also insufficient to compare efficacy within or across pharmacotherapy classes or versus behavioral therapy. Harms evidence reported in trials was judged insufficient or low strength; observational studies suggested that use of hypnotics for insomnia was associated with increased risk for dementia, fractures, and major injury. The FDA documents reported that most pharmacotherapies had risks for cognitive and behavioral changes, including driving impairment, and other adverse effects, and they advised dose reduction in women and in older adults. Most trials were small and short term and enrolled individuals meeting stringent criteria. Minimum important differences in outcomes were often not established or reported. Data were scant for many treatments. Eszopiclone, zolpidem, and

  1. The Distribution of Fluoxetine and Norfluoxetine in Postmortem Fluids and Tissues

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lewis, Russell J; Johnson, Robert D; Angier, Mike K

    2007-01-01

    During aviation accident investigations, postmortem specimens from the flight crews are submitted to the Federal Aviation Administration's Civil Aerospace Medical Institute for toxicological analysis. Fluoxetine (Prozac...

  2. Fluoxetine Decreases the Proliferation and Adipogenic Differentiation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Kyung Sun

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Fluoxetine was originally developed as an antidepressant, but it has also been used to treat obesity. Although the anti-appetite effect of fluoxetine is well-documented, its potential effects on human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs or mature adipocytes have not been investigated. Therefore, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effects of fluoxetine on the proliferation of ASCs. We also investigated its inhibitory effect on adipogenic differentiation. Fluoxetine significantly decreased ASC proliferation, and signal transduction PCR array analysis showed that it increased expression of autophagy-related genes. In addition, fluoxetine up-regulated SQSTM1 and LC3B protein expression as detected by western blotting and immunofluorescence. The autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine (3-MA, significantly attenuated fluoxetine-mediated effects on ASC proliferation and SQSTM1/LC3B expression. In addition, 3-MA decreased the mRNA expression of two autophagy-related genes, beclin-1 and Atg7, in ASCs. Fluoxetine also significantly inhibited lipid accumulation and down-regulated the levels of PPAR-γ and C/EBP-α in ASCs. Collectively, these results indicate that fluoxetine decreases ASC proliferation and adipogenic differentiation. This is the first in vitro evidence that fluoxetine can reduce fat accumulation by inhibiting ASC proliferation and differentiation.

  3. Relationship of cortisol levels and genetic polymorphisms to antidepressant response to placebo and fluoxetine in patients with major depressive disorder: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura-Juncá, Raúl; Symon, Adriana; López, Pamela; Fiedler, Jenny L; Rojas, Graciela; Heskia, Cristóbal; Lara, Pamela; Marín, Felipe; Guajardo, Viviana; Araya, A Verónica; Sasso, Jaime; Herrera, Luisa

    2014-08-03

    polymorphisms was observed. These results support the clinical relevance of low salivary cortisol levels as a predictor of antidepressant response, either to placebo or to fluoxetine. Only one polymorphism in the CRHR1 gene was associated with the early response. Other factors may be involved in antidepressant response, although further studies are needed to identify them.

  4. Antenatal exposure to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine leads to postnatal metabolic and endocrine changes associated with type 2 diabetes in Wistar rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Long, Nicole E.; Barry, Eric J. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1 (Canada); Pinelli, Christopher; Wood, Geoffrey A. [Department of Pathobiology, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1 (Canada); Hardy, Daniel B. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Western, London, ON N6A 3K6 (Canada); Morrison, Katherine M. [Department of Pediatrics, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1 (Canada); Taylor, Valerie H. [Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 1A1 (Canada); Gerstein, Hertzel C. [Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1 (Canada); Holloway, Alison C., E-mail: hollow@mcmaster.ca [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1 (Canada)

    2015-05-15

    Hypothesis: 10–15% of women take antidepressant medications during pregnancy. A recent clinical study reported that the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants during pregnancy is linked with an increased risk of postnatal obesity. While obesity is often associated with fatty liver, dyslipidemia and inflammation, to date, the effects of perinatal exposure to SSRIs on these outcomes are unknown. Methods: Female nulliparous Wistar rats were given vehicle (N = 15) or fluoxetine hydrochloride (FLX 10 mg/kg/d; N = 15) orally for 2 weeks prior to mating until weaning. We assessed glucometabolic changes and hepatic pathophysiology in the offspring. Results: Fluoxetine exposed offspring demonstrated altered glucose homeostasis without any alterations to beta cell mass. FLX-exposed offspring had a significant increase in the number of offspring with mild to moderate NASH and dyslipidemia. There was also increased inflammation of the liver in FLX-exposed offspring; males had significant elevations in TNFα, IL6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP1), while female offspring had higher expression of TNFα, and increased macrophage infiltration (MCP1). Limitations: This is an animal study. Further research examining the metabolic outcomes of children exposed to antidepressants in utero are required, given the increase in childhood obesity and psychiatric medication use during pregnancy. Conclusion: These data demonstrate that fetal and neonatal exposure to FLX results in evidence of increased adiposity, fatty liver and abnormal glycemic control. Since these are all hallmarks of the metabolic syndrome, this raises concerns regarding the long term metabolic sequelae of fetal exposure to SSRIs in human populations. - Highlights: • Antenatal exposure to fluoxetine results in postnatal adiposity in the offspring. • Offspring exposed to fluoxetine have abnormal glycemic control in adulthood. • Maternal exposure to fluoxetine causes fatty liver in

  5. Antenatal exposure to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine leads to postnatal metabolic and endocrine changes associated with type 2 diabetes in Wistar rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Long, Nicole E.; Barry, Eric J.; Pinelli, Christopher; Wood, Geoffrey A.; Hardy, Daniel B.; Morrison, Katherine M.; Taylor, Valerie H.; Gerstein, Hertzel C.; Holloway, Alison C.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothesis: 10–15% of women take antidepressant medications during pregnancy. A recent clinical study reported that the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants during pregnancy is linked with an increased risk of postnatal obesity. While obesity is often associated with fatty liver, dyslipidemia and inflammation, to date, the effects of perinatal exposure to SSRIs on these outcomes are unknown. Methods: Female nulliparous Wistar rats were given vehicle (N = 15) or fluoxetine hydrochloride (FLX 10 mg/kg/d; N = 15) orally for 2 weeks prior to mating until weaning. We assessed glucometabolic changes and hepatic pathophysiology in the offspring. Results: Fluoxetine exposed offspring demonstrated altered glucose homeostasis without any alterations to beta cell mass. FLX-exposed offspring had a significant increase in the number of offspring with mild to moderate NASH and dyslipidemia. There was also increased inflammation of the liver in FLX-exposed offspring; males had significant elevations in TNFα, IL6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP1), while female offspring had higher expression of TNFα, and increased macrophage infiltration (MCP1). Limitations: This is an animal study. Further research examining the metabolic outcomes of children exposed to antidepressants in utero are required, given the increase in childhood obesity and psychiatric medication use during pregnancy. Conclusion: These data demonstrate that fetal and neonatal exposure to FLX results in evidence of increased adiposity, fatty liver and abnormal glycemic control. Since these are all hallmarks of the metabolic syndrome, this raises concerns regarding the long term metabolic sequelae of fetal exposure to SSRIs in human populations. - Highlights: • Antenatal exposure to fluoxetine results in postnatal adiposity in the offspring. • Offspring exposed to fluoxetine have abnormal glycemic control in adulthood. • Maternal exposure to fluoxetine causes fatty liver in

  6. 2013 Pharmacology Risk SRP Status Review Comments to Chief Scientist. The Risk of Clinically Relevant Unpredicted Effects of Medication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    On December 5, 2013, the Pharmacology Risk SRP, participants from the JSC, HQ, the NSBRI, and NRESS participated in a WebEx/teleconference. The purpose of the call (as stated in the Statement of Task) was to allow the SRP members to: 1. Receive an update by the HRP Chief Scientist or Deputy Chief Scientist on the status of NASA's current and future exploration plans and the impact these will have on the HRP. 2. Receive an update on any changes within the HRP since the 2012 SRP meeting. 3. Receive an update by the Element or Project Scientist(s) on progress since the 2012 SRP meeting. 4. Participate in a discussion with the HRP Chief Scientist, Deputy Chief Scientist, and the Element regarding possible topics to be addressed at the next SRP meeting.

  7. Differential effects of chronic fluoxetine on the behavior of dominant and subordinate naked mole-rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongillo, Daniel L; Kosyachkova, Ekaterina A; Nguyen, Tam M; Holmes, Melissa M

    2014-01-01

    Naked mole-rats are eusocial rodents that live in large subterranean colonies with a strict reproductive and social hierarchy. The breeding female (referred to as the queen) and 1 to 3 breeding males are the only reproductive members of the colony. Breeders are socially dominant and all other colony members are non-reproductive subordinates. The effects of manipulating the serotonergic neurotransmitter system on aggression and dominance behaviors are well studied in many species, but not in eusocial rodents like the naked mole-rat. The current study investigated how the serotonergic system influences aggressive/dominant behaviors in this species. To do this, two separate but related experiments were conducted: the effects of fluoxetine hydrochloride (FLX) on status-specific behaviors of subordinates (Experiment 1) and dominant queens (Experiment 2) were evaluated both in-colony and in a social-pairing paradigm. In accordance with our main hypothesis, chronic treatment of FLX attenuated the frequency and duration of aggression in queens, but not subordinates, when paired with an unfamiliar conspecific. Further exploration of pharmacological manipulation on status-specific behaviors of this eusocial species may elucidate the neurobiological mechanisms underlying their unique and rigid social hierarchy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular basis for selective serotonin reuptake inhibition by the antidepressant agent fluoxetine (Prozac)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jacob; Stuhr-Hansen, Nicolai; Zachariassen, Linda Grønborg

    2014-01-01

    , and computational methods to decipher the molecular basis for high-affinity recognition in SERT and selectivity over NET for the prototypical antidepressant drug fluoxetine (Prozac; Eli Lilly, Indianapolis, IN). We show that fluoxetine binds within the central substrate site of human SERT, in agreement with recent...

  9. Diagnosis and Fluoxetine Treatment of Compulsive Behavior Disorder of Adults with Mental Retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodfish, James W.; Madison, James T.

    1993-01-01

    Ten adults with compulsive behavior disorder and six comparison subjects, all with mental retardation, were treated using the medication fluoxetine. Seven of the 10 experimental subjects responded favorably to fluoxetine treatment; none of the comparison subjects responded favorably to the medication. There appeared to be a relation between…

  10. Distinctive behavioral and cellular responses to fluoxetine in the mouse model for Fragile X syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko eUutela

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Fluoxetine is used as a therapeutic agent for autism spectrum disorder (ASD, including Fragile X syndrome (FXS. The treatment often associates with disruptive behaviors such as agitation and disinhibited behaviors in FXS. To identify mechanisms that increase the risk to poor treatment outcome, we investigated the behavioral and cellular effects of fluoxetine on adult Fmr1 knockout (KO mice, a mouse model for FXS. We found that fluoxetine reduced anxiety-like behavior of both wild type and Fmr1 KO mice seen as shortened latency to enter the center area in the open field test. In Fmr1 KO mice, fluoxetine normalized locomotor hyperactivity but abnormally increased exploratory activity. Reduced Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and increased TrkB receptor expression levels in the hippocampus of Fmr1 KO mice associated with inappropriate coping responses under stressful condition and abolished antidepressant activity of fluoxetine. Fluoxetine response in the cell proliferation was also missing in the hippocampus of Fmr1 KO mice when compared with wild type controls. The postnatal expression of serotonin transporter was reduced in the thalamic nuclei of Fmr1 KO mice during the time of transient innervation of somatosensory neurons suggesting that developmental changes of serotonin transporter (SERT expression were involved in the differential cellular and behavioral responses to fluoxetine in wild type and Fmr1 mice. The results indicate that changes of BDNF/TrkB signaling contribute to differential behavioral responses to fluoxetine among individuals with ASD.

  11. SET-C versus Fluoxetine in the Treatment of Childhood Social Phobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beidel, Deborah C.; Turner, Samuel M.; Ammerman, Robert T.; Sallee, Floyd R.; Crosby, Lori A.; Pathak, Sanjeev

    2007-01-01

    A study examines the effectiveness of fluoxetine, pill placebo and Social Effectiveness Therapy for Children (SET-C) for children and adolescents with social phobia. The results conclude that both fluoxetine and SET-C are effective for social phobia but SET-C is better for enhancing social skills.

  12. Fluoxetine Dose and Administration Method Differentially Affect Hippocampal Plasticity in Adult Female Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodi L. Pawluski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor medications are one of the most common treatments for mood disorders. In humans, these medications are taken orally, usually once per day. Unfortunately, administration of antidepressant medications in rodent models is often through injection, oral gavage, or minipump implant, all relatively stressful procedures. The aim of the present study was to investigate how administration of the commonly used SSRI, fluoxetine, via a wafer cookie, compares to fluoxetine administration using an osmotic minipump, with regards to serum drug levels and hippocampal plasticity. For this experiment, adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided over the two administration methods: (1 cookie and (2 osmotic minipump and three fluoxetine treatment doses: 0, 5, or 10 mg/kg/day. Results show that a fluoxetine dose of 5 mg/kg/day, but not 10 mg/kg/day, results in comparable serum levels of fluoxetine and its active metabolite norfluoxetine between the two administration methods. Furthermore, minipump administration of fluoxetine resulted in higher levels of cell proliferation in the granule cell layer (GCL at a 5 mg dose compared to a 10 mg dose. Synaptophysin expression in the GCL, but not CA3, was significantly lower after fluoxetine treatment, regardless of administration method. These data suggest that the administration method and dose of fluoxetine can differentially affect hippocampal plasticity in the adult female rat.

  13. Long-term administration of fluoxetine to improve motor recovery after stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berends, Hanneke I.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Movig, Kris L.L.; van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation of: Chollet F. Tardy J., Albucher J.F. et al. Fluoxetine for motor recovery after acute ischaemic stroke (FLAME): a randomised placebo-controlled trial. Lancet Neurol. 10(2), 123–130 (2011). In this study, the authors examined the effects of administration of fluoxetine for 90 days on the

  14. A 1 year retrospective audit of quality indicators of clinical pharmacological advice for personalized linezolid dosing: one stone for two birds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pea, Federico; Cojutti, Piergiorgio; Dose, Lucia; Baraldo, Massimo

    2016-02-01

    This study explored the clinical and economic impact of clinical pharmacological advice (CPA) (based on therapeutic drug monitoring [TDM] results, and on patients' characteristics and co-medications) on personalized linezolid therapy in a tertiary care hospital. A 1 year retrospective analysis of quality indicators of CPA (clinicians' adherence rate to CPA, pre-post rate of linezolid trough concentrations within the desired range and cost balance analysis) was conducted. Five hundred and forty-four CPAs were provided to clinicians during 2014 for personalizing linezolid therapy in 168 patients. Clinicians' adherence to CPAs was very high (94.7%). The pre-post rate of linezolid Cmin distribution showed a favourable impact of CPA on patient care (pre-post ratio of Cmin within the desired range + 23.4%, pre, 51.2% vs. post, 74.6%). Overall, linezolid dosage was mainly reduced (56.9% of cases), whereas dose augmentation was needed only in a minority of cases (7.7%). Cost balance analysis showed that overall 1258 standard doses of linezolid (unitary dose 600 mg) were spared for treating 168 patients with a personalized dosage for a median duration of 11 days (range 3-128 days) with a cost saving of 60038.05 €. Active computerized advice elaborated by the clinical pharmacologist on the basis of TDM results and of patient's pathophysiological data and co-medications may be cost-effective for personalizing linezolid treatment. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  15. A Pooled Analysis of Clinical Pharmacology Trials Investigating the Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Characteristics of Fast-Acting Insulin Aspart in Adults with Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heise, Tim; Pieber, Thomas R; Danne, Thomas; Erichsen, Lars; Haahr, Hanne

    2017-05-01

    Fast-acting insulin aspart (faster aspart) is insulin aspart (IAsp) in a new formulation aiming to mimic the fast endogenous prandial insulin release more closely than currently available insulin products. In a post hoc analysis of pooled data from six clinical pharmacology trials, the pharmacological characteristics of faster aspart and IAsp were compared. The analysis included 218 adult subjects with type 1 diabetes from six randomised, double-blind, crossover trials in the faster aspart clinical development programme. Subjects received subcutaneous dosing (0.2 U/kg) of faster aspart and IAsp. In three trials, a 12-h euglycaemic clamp was performed (target 5.5 mmol/L; 100 mg/dL) to assess pharmacodynamics. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles were left-shifted for faster aspart versus IAsp. Onset of appearance occurred 4.9 min earlier (95% confidence interval [CI] faster aspart-IAsp: [-5.3 to -4.4], p IAsp,0-30min ) was two times greater (estimated ratio faster aspart/IAsp 2.01 [1.87-2.17], p IAsp. Accordingly, onset of action occurred 4.9 min earlier [-6.9 to -3.0] (p IAsp. Total exposure and total glucose-lowering effect did not differ significantly between treatments. Faster aspart has the potential to better mimic the physiologic prandial insulin secretion and thereby to improve postprandial glucose control compared with IAsp. ClinicalTrials.gov identifiers: NCT02035371, NCT01924637, NCT02131246, NCT02033239, NCT02003677, NCT01618188.

  16. Fluoxetine administration to pregnant rats increases anxiety-related behavior in the offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Jocelien D A; Vallès, A; van Heesch, Floor; Afrasiab-Middelman, Anthonieke; Roelofs, Janneke J P M; Jonkers, Marloes; Peeters, Elke Joan; Korte-Bouws, Gerdien A H; Dederen, Jos P; Kiliaan, Amanda J; Martens, Gerard J; Schubert, Dirk; Homberg, Judith R

    2011-10-01

    Fluoxetine (Prozac®) is the most frequently prescribed drug to battle depression in pregnant women, but its safety in the unborn child has not yet been established. Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, crosses the placenta, leading to increased extracellular serotonin levels and potentially neurodevelopmental changes in the fetus. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the long-term consequences of prenatal fluoxetine in rats. Pregnant rats were injected daily with 12 mg/kg fluoxetine or vehicle from gestational day 11 until birth, and the behavior of the offspring was monitored. Plasma fluoxetine transfer from mother to pup was 83%, and high levels of fluoxetine (13.0 μg/g) were detected in the pup brain 5 h after the last injection. Fluoxetine-treated dams gave birth to litters 15% smaller than usual and to pups of reduced weight (until postnatal day 7). Furthermore, prenatal fluoxetine exposure significantly increased anxiety in the novelty-suppressed feeding test, the footshock-induced conditioned place aversion test, and the elevated plus maze test (following footshock pre-exposure) during adulthood, and also significantly decreased components of social play behavior at 4 weeks of age, and a strong tendency for increased self-grooming and making less contact in adults. Behavioral despair, anhedonia, and sexual behavior were not different between treatment groups. Finally, the hypothermic response to the 5-HT(1A) agonist flesinoxan was observed at a lower dose in prenatally fluoxetine-exposed rats than in controls. Prenatal fluoxetine exposure in rats leads to detrimental behavioral outcomes in later life, which may partly be due to altered 5-HT(1A) receptor signaling.

  17. Information technology in veterinary pharmacology instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochevar, Deborah T

    2003-01-01

    Veterinary clinical pharmacology encompasses all interactions between drugs and animals and applies basic and clinical knowledge to improve rational drug use and patient outcomes. Veterinary pharmacology instructors set educational goals and objectives that, when mastered by students, lead to improved animal health. The special needs of pharmacology instruction include establishing a functional interface between basic and clinical knowledge, managing a large quantity of information, and mastering quantitative skills essential to successful drug administration and analysis of drug action. In the present study, a survey was conducted to determine the extent to which veterinary pharmacology instructors utilize information technology (IT) in their teaching. Several IT categories were investigated, including Web-based instructional aids, stand-alone pharmacology software, interactive videoconferencing, databases, personal digital assistants (PDAs), and e-book applications. Currently IT plays a largely ancillary role in pharmacology instruction. IT use is being expanded primarily through the efforts of two veterinary professional pharmacology groups, the American College of Veterinary Clinical Pharmacology (ACVCP) and the American Academy of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics (AAVPT). The long-term outcome of improved IT use in pharmacology instruction should be to support the larger educational mission of active learning and problem solving. Creation of high-quality IT resources that promote this goal has the potential to improve veterinary pharmacology instruction within and across institutions.

  18. The pharmacology of regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, George J; Saul, Justin M; Furth, Mark E; Andersson, Karl-Erik

    2013-07-01

    Regenerative medicine is a rapidly evolving multidisciplinary, translational research enterprise whose explicit purpose is to advance technologies for the repair and replacement of damaged cells, tissues, and organs. Scientific progress in the field has been steady and expectations for its robust clinical application continue to rise. The major thesis of this review is that the pharmacological sciences will contribute critically to the accelerated translational progress and clinical utility of regenerative medicine technologies. In 2007, we coined the phrase "regenerative pharmacology" to describe the enormous possibilities that could occur at the interface between pharmacology, regenerative medicine, and tissue engineering. The operational definition of regenerative pharmacology is "the application of pharmacological sciences to accelerate, optimize, and characterize (either in vitro or in vivo) the development, maturation, and function of bioengineered and regenerating tissues." As such, regenerative pharmacology seeks to cure disease through restoration of tissue/organ function. This strategy is distinct from standard pharmacotherapy, which is often limited to the amelioration of symptoms. Our goal here is to get pharmacologists more involved in this field of research by exposing them to the tools, opportunities, challenges, and interdisciplinary expertise that will be required to ensure awareness and galvanize involvement. To this end, we illustrate ways in which the pharmacological sciences can drive future innovations in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering and thus help to revolutionize the discovery of curative therapeutics. Hopefully, the broad foundational knowledge provided herein will spark sustained conversations among experts in diverse fields of scientific research to the benefit of all.

  19. Fluoxetine effects on molecular, cellular and behavioral endophenotypes of depression are driven by the living environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alboni, S; van Dijk, R M; Poggini, S; Milior, G; Perrotta, M; Drenth, T; Brunello, N; Wolfer, D P; Limatola, C; Amrein, I; Cirulli, F; Maggi, L; Branchi, I

    2017-04-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) represent the most common treatment for major depression. However, their efficacy is variable and incomplete. In order to elucidate the cause of such incomplete efficacy, we explored the hypothesis positing that SSRIs may not affect mood per se but, by enhancing neural plasticity, render the individual more susceptible to the influence of the environment. Consequently, SSRI administration in a favorable environment promotes a reduction of symptoms, whereas in a stressful environment leads to a worse prognosis. To test such hypothesis, we exposed C57BL/6 mice to chronic stress in order to induce a depression-like phenotype and, subsequently, to fluoxetine treatment (21 days), while being exposed to either an enriched or a stressful condition. We measured the most commonly investigated molecular, cellular and behavioral endophenotypes of depression and SSRI outcome, including depression-like behavior, neurogenesis, brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity and long-term potentiation. Results showed that, in line with our hypothesis, the endophenotypes investigated were affected by the treatment according to the quality of the living environment. In particular, mice treated with fluoxetine in an enriched condition overall improved their depression-like phenotype compared with controls, whereas those treated in a stressful condition showed a distinct worsening. Our findings suggest that the effects of SSRI on the depression- like phenotype is not determined by the drug per se but is induced by the drug and driven by the environment. These findings may be helpful to explain variable effects of SSRI found in clinical practice and to device strategies aimed at enhancing their efficacy by means of controlling environmental conditions.

  20. Sequential treatment with fluoxetine and relapse--prevention CBT to improve outcomes in pediatric depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennard, Betsy D; Emslie, Graham J; Mayes, Taryn L; Nakonezny, Paul A; Jones, Jessica M; Foxwell, Aleksandra A; King, Jessica

    2014-10-01

    The authors evaluated a sequential treatment strategy of fluoxetine and relapse-prevention cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) to determine effects on remission and relapse in youths with major depressive disorder. Youths 8-17 years of age with major depression were treated openly with fluoxetine for 6 weeks. Those with an adequate response (defined as a reduction of 50% or more on the Children's Depression Rating Scale-Revised [CDRS-R]) were randomly assigned to receive continued medication management alone or continued medication management plus CBT for an additional 6 months. The CBT was modified to address residual symptoms and was supplemented by well-being therapy. Primary outcome measures were time to remission (with remission defined as a CDRS-R score of 28 or less) and rate of relapse (with relapse defined as either a CDRS-R score of 40 or more with a history of 2 weeks of symptom worsening, or clinical deterioration). Of the 200 participants enrolled in acute-phase treatment, 144 were assigned to continuation treatment with medication management alone (N=69) or medication management plus CBT (N=75). During the 30-week continuation treatment period, time to remission did not differ significantly between treatment groups (hazard ratio=1.26, 95% CI=0.87, 1.82). However, the medication management plus CBT group had a significantly lower risk of relapse than the medication management only group (hazard ratio=0.31, 95% CI=0.13, 0.75). The estimated probability of relapse by week 30 was lower with medication management plus CBT than with medication management only (9% compared with 26.5%). Continuation-phase relapse-prevention CBT was effective in reducing the risk of relapse but not in accelerating time to remission in children and adolescents with major depressive disorder.

  1. Targeting poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase1 in neurological diseases: A promising trove for new pharmacological interventions to enter clinical translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriram, Chandra Shekhar; Jangra, Ashok; Kasala, Eshvendar Reddy; Bodduluru, Lakshmi Narendra; Bezbaruah, Babul Kumar

    2014-10-01

    The highly conserved abundant nuclear protein poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase1 (PARP1) functions at the center of cellular stress response and is mainly implied in DNA damage repair mechanism. Apart from its involvement in DNA damage repair, it does sway multiple vital cellular processes such as cell death pathways, cell aging, insulator function, chromatin modification, transcription and mitotic apparatus function. Since brain is the principal organ vulnerable to oxidative stress and inflammatory responses, upon stress encounters robust DNA damage can occur and intense PARP1 activation may result that will lead to various CNS diseases. In the context of soaring interest towards PARP1 as a therapeutic target for newer pharmacological interventions, here in the present review, we are attempting to give a silhouette of the role of PARP1 in the neurological diseases and the potential of its inhibitors to enter clinical translation, along with its structural and functional aspects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Chiral high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis of fluoxetine and norfluoxetine in rabbit plasma, urine, and vitreous humor using an acetylated beta-cyclodextrin column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, L; Wong, S H; Skrinska, V A

    2000-10-01

    Fluoxetine (Prozac) is a potent selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor used for the treatment of major depression. Both fluoxetine (F) and its demethylated metabolite, norfluoxetine (NF), are racemic. S-Fluoxetine (SF) and S-norfluoxetine (SNF) are more potent inhibitors of serotonin reuptake than R-fluoxetine (RF) and R-norfluoxetine (RNF). Quantitation of individual enantiomers may provide a greater understanding of pharmacokinetic properties. The objective of this study was to perform a limited chiral selectivity study using rabbit plasma, urine, and vitreous humor analyzed by a solid-phase extraction protocol and a newly developed chiral analysis with an acetylated beta-cyclodextrin (CD) column. Liquid chromatographic parameters for CD were as follows: a mobile phase composition of methanol/0.3% triethylamine buffer, pH 5.6, (30:70), a flow rate of 1 mL/min, detection at 214 nm, and a temperature of 40 degrees C. Elution order was SNF, SF, RNF, and RF with capacity factors of 6, 7, 8, and 9, respectively. The corresponding resolution factors were as follows: R1,2 = 0.8, R2,3 = 1.2, and R3,4 = 0.9. The conditions for solid-phase extraction were optimized for Varian Bond Elut Certify columns. Following sample application, the column was rinsed with water, acetic acid, and then with methanol. Drug enantiomers were eluted with methylene chloride, isopropanol, and ammonium hydroxide (78:20:2). After extract evaporation, the extract residue was reconstituted for high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis. To investigate chiral pharmacology, a biodistribution study was performed by administering 2 mg/kg of F to five rabbits. Blood, urine, and vitreous specimens were collected. Plasma samples collected 45 min postinjection showed nearly equal concentrations of RF and SE After 24 h, the only metabolite detected in plasma was RNF. Drugs were not detectable in vitreous humor. Urine concentrations of SNF, SF, RNF, and RF were 51, 76, 34, and 8 microg/L, respectively

  3. Pharmacology of Reye syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pranzatelli, M R; De Vivo, D C

    1987-04-01

    Reye syndrome, a reversible metabolic encephalopathy and hepatopathy, offers a unique opportunity to investigate the pharmacologic mechanisms by which a toxic-metabolic insult to mitochondria is translated into neurochemical and neurologic dysfunction. Similarity of some clinical and metabolic abnormalities between certain inborn errors of organic acid, ammonia, and carbohydrate metabolism and Reye syndrome suggests a common pathophysiologic mechanism at some level. The primary metabolic aberration in Reye syndrome is unknown. Viral, drug, and toxic precipitants in a conductive host alter glial and neuronal function, possibly by direct toxic effects or by altered transmitter metabolism and signal transduction. These events translate into a rather stereotyped progression of the clinical syndrome. Increased ICP, which is a life-threatening epiphenomenon, is the focus of conventional therapy. Investigational treatments, still in preliminary stages, are aimed at early correction of instigating metabolic abnormalities or correction of their consequences on central neurotransmission. Our fragmentary knowledge of neurotransmitter abnormalities in this disorder, which have suggested disparate interpretations, does not allow a cohesive pharmacologic theory of Reye syndrome. The greatest difficulties in interpretation of possible central mechanisms from existing data, which derive largely from peripheral tissues, is in the differentiation of primary from compensatory changes. The unitarian notion that a single pharmacologic disturbance is the source of the encephalopathy is perhaps too simplistic. It is hoped that future studies of disorders such as Reye syndrome will elucidate the intricate relationships between biochemical pathways and neurotransmitter metabolism.

  4. Mapping the evidence on pharmacological interventions for non-affective psychosis in humanitarian non-specialised settings: a UNHCR clinical guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostuzzi, Giovanni; Barbui, Corrado; Hanlon, Charlotte; Chatterjee, Sudipto; Eaton, Julian; Jones, Lynne; Silove, Derrick; Ventevogel, Peter

    2017-12-11

    Populations exposed to humanitarian emergencies are particularly vulnerable to mental health problems, including new onset, relapse and deterioration of psychotic disorders. Inadequate care for this group may lead to human rights abuses and even premature death. The WHO Mental Health Gap Action Programme Intervention Guide (mhGAP-IG), and its adaptation for humanitarian settings (mhGAP-HIG), provides guidance for management of mental health conditions by non-specialised healthcare professionals. However, the pharmacological treatment of people with non-affective psychosis who do not improve with mhGAP first-line antipsychotic treatments is not addressed. In order to fill this gap, UNHCR has formulated specific guidance on the second-line pharmacological treatment of non-affective psychosis in humanitarian, non-specialised settings. Following the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology, a group of international experts performed an extensive search and retrieval of evidence on the basis of four scoping questions. Available data were critically appraised and summarised. Clinical guidance was produced by integrating this evidence base with context-related feasibility issues, preferences, values and resource-use considerations. When first-line treatments recommended by mhGAP (namely haloperidol and chlorpromazine) are not effective, no other first-generation antipsychotics are likely to provide clinically meaningful improvements. Risperidone or olanzapine may represent beneficial second-line options. However, if these second-line medications do not produce clinically significant beneficial effects, there are two possibilities. First, to switch to the alternative (olanzapine to risperidone or vice versa) or, second, to consider clozapine, provided that specialist supervision and regular laboratory monitoring are available in the long term. If clinically relevant depressive, cognitive or negative symptoms occur, the use of a

  5. miR-16 and Fluoxetine Both Reverse Autophagic and Apoptotic Change in Chronic Unpredictable Mild Stress Model Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In the clinic selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs, like Fluoxetine, remain the primary treatment for major depression. It has been suggested that miR-16 regulates serotonin transporters (SERT via raphe nuclei and hippocampal responses to antidepressants. However, the underlying mechanism and regulatory pathways are still obtuse. Here, a chronic unpredicted mild stress (CUMS depression model in rats was established, and then raphe nuclei miR-16 and intragastric Fluoxetine injections were administered for a duration of 3 weeks. An open field test and sucrose preference quantification displayed a significant decrease in the CUMS groups when compare to the control groups, however these changes were attenuated by both miR-16 and Fluoxetine treatments. A dual-luciferase reporter assay system verified that hsa-miR-16 inhibitory effects involve the targeting of 3′UTR on the 5-HTT gene. Expression levels of miR-16 and BDNF in the hippocampus were examined with RT-PCR, and it was found that increased 5-HT2a receptor expression induced by CUMS can be decreased by miR-16 and Fluoxetine administration. Immunofluorescence showed that expression levels of neuron NeuN and MAP-2 in CUMS rats were lower. Apoptosis and autophagy levels were evaluated separately through relative expression of Bcl-2, Caspase-3, Beclin-1, and LC3II. Furthermore, CUMS was found to decrease levels of hippocampal mTOR, PI3K, and AKT. These findings indicate that apoptosis and autophagy related pathways could be involved in the effectiveness of antidepressants, in which miR-16 participates in the regulation of, and is likely to help integrate rapid therapeutic strategies to alleviate depression clinically. These findings indicate that miR-16 participates in the regulation of apoptosis and autophagy and could account for some part of the therapeutic effect of SSRIs. This discovery has the potential to further the understanding of SSRIs and accelerate the development of new

  6. Impact of Federal Regulatory Changes on Clinical Pharmacology and Drug Development: the Common Rule and the 21st Century Cures Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burris, James F; Puglisi, J Thomas

    2017-10-05

    The Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects, generally referred to as the "Common Rule," is the basis for the human research protection policies of 16 signatory federal agencies and governs virtually all federally funded research involving humans. The Common Rule was originally published in 1991. It has been recognized that changes to the Common Rule are needed to accommodate changes in the research environment and advances in information technology. The Department of Health & Human Services (HHS) issued an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking in the Federal Register in 2011 and a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking in 2015. The final rule was published on January 19, 2017, just prior to the change in presidential administrations. The long gestation of the new Common Rule reflects the difficulty of obtaining consensus on a number of controversial issues. HHS received more than 2100 public comments on the proposed rule. The revised rule introduces important changes that may be particularly relevant to clinical pharmacology research and drug development. These include: (1) revised informed consent requirements, (2) procedures for "broad consent" to facilitate secondary research use of identifiable private information and/or biological specimens, (3) a mandate to promote review by a single institutional review board (IRB) for oversight of federally funded domestic cooperative research involving multiple institutions, (4) expansion of the categories of exempt research, and (5) removal of the requirement for annual continuing IRB review of research in which the remaining activities are limited to data analysis or accessing clinical follow-up data. Also noteworthy are proposed revisions not included in the final rule, including one to extend the Common Rule to multicenter studies that are not federally funded and one to require informed consent for research use of de-identified biological specimens. Major changes could also be coming for approval of new drugs by

  7. Placebo versus Best-Available-Therapy Control Group in Clinical Trials for Pharmacologic Therapies: Which Is Better?

    OpenAIRE

    Castro, Mario

    2007-01-01

    There are valid scientific and ethical considerations for using a control group in a clinical trial. Placebo-controlled trials are justifiable when they are supported by sound methodologic consideration and when their use does not expose research participants to excessive risk of harm. Consideration should be given to “best available therapy” control groups in the evaluation of a new therapy or intervention over an existing therapy. Investigators should keep in mind that one should not sacrif...

  8. Nosocomial methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) pneumonia: linezolid or vancomycin? - comparison of pharmacology and clinical efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Pletz Mathias W; Burkhardt Olaf; Welte Tobias

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The incidence of nosocomial pneumonia involving methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains (MRSA) is on the rise worldwide. For years, vancomycin has been used as the drug of choice in the treatment of MRSA infections and was recommended as such by clinical guidelines. There is growing evidence that vancomycin, despite low resistance rates is a suboptimal therapeutic option in critically ill patients, particularly in patients with pneumonia. Disadvantages of vancomycin are i...

  9. Systematic Review of Randomized Clinical Trials on Safety and Efficacy of Pharmacological and Nonpharmacological Treatments for Retinitis Pigmentosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Sacchetti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. Several treatments have been proposed to slow down progression of Retinitis pigmentosa (RP, a hereditary retinal degenerative condition leading to severe visual impairment. The aim of this study is to systematically review data from randomized clinical trials (RCTs evaluating safety and efficacy of medical interventions for the treatment of RP. Methods. Randomized clinical trials on medical treatments for syndromic and nonsyndromic RP published up to December 2014 were included in the review. Visual acuity, visual field, electroretinogram, and adverse events were used as outcome measures. Results. The 19 RCTs included in this systematic review included trials on hyperbaric oxygen delivery, topical brimonidine tartrate, vitamins, docosahexaenoic acid, gangliosides, lutein, oral nilvadipine, ciliary neurotrophic factor, and valproic acid. All treatments proved safe but did not show significant benefit on visual function. Long term supplementation with vitamin A showed a significantly slower decline rate in electroretinogram amplitude. Conclusions. Although all medical treatments for RP appear safe, evidence emerging from RCTs is limited since they do not present comparable results suitable for quantitative statistical analysis. The limited number of RCTs, the poor clinical results, and the heterogeneity among studies negatively influence the strength of recommendations for the long term management of RP patients.

  10. Nosocomial methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA pneumonia: linezolid or vancomycin? - comparison of pharmacology and clinical efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pletz Mathias W

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The incidence of nosocomial pneumonia involving methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains (MRSA is on the rise worldwide. For years, vancomycin has been used as the drug of choice in the treatment of MRSA infections and was recommended as such by clinical guidelines. There is growing evidence that vancomycin, despite low resistance rates is a suboptimal therapeutic option in critically ill patients, particularly in patients with pneumonia. Disadvantages of vancomycin are i slow bactericide action, ii poor penetration into pulmonary tissue, iii the globally slowly increasing vancomycin MICs ("creep" that result in increased clinical failure despite being susceptible according to defined break points and iv nephrotoxicity. In contrast to other novel antibiotics with MRSA activity, Linezolid is currently approved for the treatment of nosocomial pneumonia in the USA and Europe. Several studies have compared vancomycin with linezolid for nosocomial pneumonia with conflicting results. This review compares both substances regarding pharmacodynamics, resistance, safety and clinical efficacy and discusses preliminary data of the ZEPHyR study. This study compared linezolid versus vancomycin in patients with proven MRSA pneumonia and was the largest trial ever conducted in this population.

  11. Nosocomial methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) pneumonia: linezolid or vancomycin? - Comparison of pharmacology and clinical efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletz, Mathias W; Burkhardt, O; Welte, T

    2010-11-30

    The incidence of nosocomial pneumonia involving methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains (MRSA) is on the rise worldwide. For years, vancomycin has been used as the drug of choice in the treatment of MRSA infections and was recommended as such by clinical guidelines. There is growing evidence that vancomycin, despite low resistance rates is a suboptimal therapeutic option in critically ill patients, particularly in patients with pneumonia. Disadvantages of vancomycin are i) slow bactericide action, ii) poor penetration into pulmonary tissue, iii) the globally slowly increasing vancomycin MICs ("creep") that result in increased clinical failure despite being susceptible according to defined break points and iv) nephrotoxicity. In contrast to other novel antibiotics with MRSA activity, Linezolid is currently approved for the treatment of nosocomial pneumonia in the USA and Europe. Several studies have compared vancomycin with linezolid for nosocomial pneumonia with conflicting results. This review compares both substances regarding pharmacodynamics, resistance, safety and clinical efficacy and discusses preliminary data of the ZEPHyR study. This study compared linezolid versus vancomycin in patients with proven MRSA pneumonia and was the largest trial ever conducted in this population.

  12. Quality management of pharmacology and safety pharmacology studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spindler, Per; Seiler, Jürg P

    2002-04-01

    Pharmacology has traditionally been excluded from the mandatory application of good laboratory practice (GLP) principles. Consensus has been reached through the process of the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH, Topic S7A) with regard to the definitions of the different types of pharmacology studies (ICH S7A): primary pharmacodynamic, secondary pharmacodynamic and safety pharmacology studies, and guidance on the quality standards (expectations for GLP conformity) for these study types have been provided. Primary pharmacodynamic studies are the only study types that are fully exempt from GLP requirements. Secondary pharmacodynamic and safety pharmacology studies are expected to be conducted to GLP quality standards -- preferably to full, formal GLP compliance, when results are used for human safety assessment. At the present time, regulatory authorities will most likely be prepared to exercise flexibility in their requirement for GLP compliance, however, if non-clinical studies used in human safety assessment are not formally in compliance with the principles of GLP, regulatory acceptance may not be guaranteed. Historically, the application of formal GLP standards in safety pharmacology studies appears to vary between test facilities, and a number of study components in safety pharmacology studies, e.g. ECG monitoring, may not always conform to formal GLP standards. Apparently, however, formal GLP standards for these study components can be implemented for a relatively low additional cost. Based on the guidance given in the ICH S7A guideline, it thus appears logical to recommend that test facilities and sponsors consider their organisation of safety pharmacology studies in view of sound study management and formal implementation of GLP, where needed. Organisation of study management should facilitate collaboration across scientific disciplines because a plethora of data, originating from basic pharmacodynamics, toxicology, kinetics, and metabolism, as

  13. Vernakalant (RSD1235) in the management of atrial fibrillation: a review of pharmacological properties, clinical efficacy and safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weeke, Peter; Andersson, Charlotte; Brendorp, Bente

    2008-01-01

    Vernakalant (RSD1235) is a novel antiarrhythmic agent for conversion of rapid onset atrial fibrillation (AF). It is an atria-selective multichannel ion blocker (blocks I(Kur), I(Na), I(Ca, L), I(to) and I(Kr)), with a small effect on ventricular repolarization. In clinical Phase II and III studie...... effect, with no reported cases of torsades de pointes in direct relation to vernakalant administration in Phase II and III studies. Overall, there are few reported serious adverse events....

  14. Social Pharmacology: Expanding horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Rituparna; Alloza, José Luis

    2014-01-01

    In the current modern and global society, social changes are in constant evolution due to scientific progress (technology, culture, customs, and hygiene) and produce the freedom in individuals to take decisions by themselves or with their doctors toward drug consumption. In the arena of marketed drug products which includes society, individual, administration, and pharmaceutical industry, the young discipline emerged is social pharmacology or sociopharmacology. This science arises from clinical pharmacology, and deals with different parameters, which are important in creating knowledge on marketed drugs. However, the scope of “social pharmacology” is not covered by the so-called “Phase IV” alone, but it is the science that handles the postmarketing knowledge of drugs. The social pharmacology studies the “life cycle” of any marketed pharmaceutical product in the social terrain, and evaluates the effects of the real environment under circumstances totally different in the drug development process. Therefore, there are far-reaching horizons, plural, and shared predictions among health professionals and other, for beneficial use of a drug, toward maximizing the benefits of therapy, while minimizing negative social consequences. PMID:24987168

  15. Pharmacological interactions of vasoconstrictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Moreno, Gerardo; Guardia, Javier; Cutando, Antonio; Calvo-Guirado, José Luis

    2009-01-01

    This article is the first of a series on pharmacological interactions involving medicaments commonly prescribed and/or used in odontology: vasoconstrictors in local anaesthetics and anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial analgesics. The necessity for the odontologist to be aware of adverse reactions as a result of the pharmacological interactions is due to the increase in medicament consumption by the general population. There is a demographic change with greater life expectancy and patients have increased chronic health problems and therefore have increased medicament intake. The presence of adrenaline (epinephrine) and other vasoconstrictors in local odontological anaesthetics is beneficial in relation to the duration and depth of anaesthesia and reduces bleeding and systemic toxicity of the local anaesthetic. However, it might produce pharmacological interactions between the injected vasoconstrictors and the local anaesthetic and adrenergic medicament administered exogenically which the odontologist should be aware of, especially because of the risk of consequent adverse reactions. Therefore the importance of conducting a detailed clinical history of the general state of health and include all medicaments, legal as well as illegal, taken by the patient.

  16. Pharmacological interventions for borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffers, Jutta; Völlm, Birgit A; Rücker, Gerta; Timmer, Antje; Huband, Nick; Lieb, Klaus

    2010-06-16

    , sedation and changes in haemogram parameters with olanzapine. A significant decrease in body weight was observed with topiramate treatment. All drugs were well tolerated in terms of attrition.Direct drug comparisons comprised two first-generation antipsychotics (loxapine versus chlorpromazine), first-generation antipsychotic against antidepressant (haloperidol versus amitriptyline; haloperidol versus phenelzine sulfate), and second-generation antipsychotic against antidepressant (olanzapine versus fluoxetine). Data indicated better outcomes for phenelzine sulfate but no significant differences in the other comparisons, except olanzapine which showed more weight gain and sedation than fluoxetine. The only trial testing single versus combined drug treatment (olanzapine versus olanzapine plus fluoxetine; fluoxetine versus fluoxetine plus olanzapine) yielded no significant differences in outcomes. The available evidence indicates some beneficial effects with second-generation antipsychotics, mood stabilisers, and dietary supplementation by omega-3 fatty acids. However, these are mostly based on single study effect estimates. Antidepressants are not widely supported for BPD treatment, but may be helpful in the presence of comorbid conditions. Total BPD severity was not significantly influenced by any drug. No promising results are available for the core BPD symptoms of chronic feelings of emptiness, identity disturbance and abandonment. Conclusions have to be drawn carefully in the light of several limitations of the RCT evidence that constrain applicability to everyday clinical settings (among others, patients' characteristics and duration of interventions and observation periods).

  17. Rupatadine: a new selective histamine H1 receptor and platelet-activating factor (PAF) antagonist. A review of pharmacological profile and clinical management of allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo, Iñaki; Merlos, Manuel; García-Rafanell, Julián

    2003-06-01

    Rupatadine is a new agent for the management of diseases with allergic inflammatory conditions, such as seasonal and perennial rhinitis. The pharmacological profile of rupatadine offers particular benefits in terms of a strong antagonist activity towards both histamine H1 receptors and platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptors. Rupatadine has a rapid onset of action, and its long-lasting effect (>24 h) permits once-daily dosing. Rupatadine should not be used in combination with the cytochrome P450 inhibitors, such as erythromycin or ketoconazole, due to an increase in AUC and Cmax for rupatadine, although no clinically relevant adverse events have been reported. In addition, rupatadine, at the recommended dose of 10 mg, has been shown to be free of sedative effects and not to cause significant changes in the corrected QT interval in special populations, including the elderly, nor when coadministered with erythromycin or ketoconazole. Preclinical data have also shown that rupatadine and its main active metabolites did not interfere with cloned human HERG channel and did not affect in vitro isolated dog Purkinje fibers at concentrations at least 2000 times greater than those obtained with therapeutic doses in humans. Rupatadine is clinically effective in relieving symptoms in patients with seasonal and perennial allergic rhinitis. Newly published data on its efficacy and safety suggest that this compound may improve the nasal and non-nasal symptoms in comparison to other currently available second generation H1 receptor antihistamines. 2003 Prous Science. All rights reserved.

  18. Tumor necrosis factor-α monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease: clinical practice pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Thomas W; Fedorak, Richard N

    2010-09-01

    In the last 10 years, anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α therapy has become a cornerstone in the management of autoimmune diseases. Clinical trial data have consistently found that infliximab, adalimumab, and recently certolizumab pegol offer therapeutic benefits to patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis). Recent understanding on how these monoclonal antibodies evoke changes at the physiological and molecular levels have provided insights into disease pathogenesis and helped to identify new targets for future drug therapy. With increased experience in the use of these anti-TNF-α antibodies the long-term safety data, use in pregnancy have become available. This article provides an overview of the current knowledge regarding anti-TNF-α therapies for clinicians caring for patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Pharmacological and clinical properties of calcimimetics: calcium receptor activators that afford an innovative approach to controlling hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Nobuo

    2006-03-01

    Circulating levels of calcium ion (Ca2+) are maintained within a narrow physiological range mainly by the action of parathyroid hormone (PTH) secreted from parathyroid gland (PTG) cells. PTG cells can sense small fluctuations in plasma Ca2+ levels by virtue of a cell surface Ca2+ receptor (CaR) that belongs to the superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). Compounds that activate the CaR and inhibit PTH secretion are termed 'calcimimetics' because they mimic or potentiate the effects of extracellular Ca2+ on PTG cell function. Preclinical studies with NPS R-568, a first generation calcimimetic compound that acts as a positive allosteric modulator of the CaR, have demonstrated that oral administration decreases serum levels of PTH and calcium, with a leftward shift in the set-point for calcium-regulated PTH secretion in normal rats. NPS R-568 also suppresses the elevation of serum PTH levels and PTG hyperplasia and can improve bone mineral density (BMD) and strength in rats with chronic renal insufficiency (CRI). Clinical trials with cinacalcet hydrochloride (cinacalcet), a compound with an improved metabolic profile, have shown that long-term treatment continues to suppress the elevation of serum levels of calcium and PTH in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (1HPT). Furthermore, clinical trials in patients with uncontrolled secondary hyperparathyroidism (2HPT) have demonstrated that cinacalcet not only lowers serum PTH levels, but also the serum phosphorus and calcium x phosphorus product; these are a hallmark of an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality in dialysis patients with end-stage renal disease. Indeed, cinacalcet has already been approved for marketing in several countries. Calcimimetic compounds like cinacalcet have great potential as an innovative medical approach to manage 1HPT and 2HPT.

  20. Phase I clinical and pharmacological study of suppression of human antimouse antibody response to monoclonal antibody L6 by deoxyspergualin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhingra, K; Fritsche, H; Murray, J L; LoBuglio, A F; Khazaeli, M B; Kelley, S; Tepper, M A; Grasela, D; Buzdar, A; Valero, V

    1995-07-15

    Development of human antimouse antibody (HAMA) is a major limiting factor in the application of murine mAb for clinical use. A novel immunomodulatory drug, deoxyspergualin (DSG), has shown potential to suppress antimouse antibody response in preclinical model systems. We conducted a Phase I trial to determine the effect of DSG on HAMA response to murine mAb L6 administered to patients with advanced cancers (in previous trials, this antibody elicited HAMA in two-thirds of the treated patients). L6 mAb was administered at a fixed dose of 200 mg/m2 on days 1-5. DSG was administered at doses of 50 mg/m2 [dose level (dl) 1] or 150 mg/m2 (dls II and III) on days 1-7. Treatment courses were repeated every 6 weeks (dls I and II) or every 3 weeks (dl III). HAMAs were quantitated by a commercially available ELISA assay (ImmuSTRIP; anti-isotypic antibodies) and a radiometric assay (antiisotypic and anti-idiotypic antibodies). Pharmacokinetics of L6 and DSG was also studied in all consenting patients. Among 24 evaluable patients, 2 patients developed detectable HAMAs using the ELISA (one each at dls I and II) after a median follow-up of 122 days (P = 0.0001 as compared to historical controls). Even in the two patients who developed HAMA, the HAMA levels were quite low (160 and 181 ng/ml; historical experience, 70-38,744 ng/ml). The radiometric assay detected anti-L6 antibodies in 13 patients (4, 6, and 3 at dls I-III, respectively) after a median of 82 days. The median highest anti-L6 antibody level was 129 ng/ml (range, 21-2150). The highest anti-L6 antibody level at dl III was only 44 ng/ml. The results suggest suppression of anti-idiotypic response also. No clinical antitumor activity was observed, and no significant changes in T4/T8 subsets or immunoglobulins occurred (suggesting a lack of generalized immunosuppression). We conclude that DSG can suppress HAMA response to L6. A starting dose of 150 mg/m2/day is recommended for Phase II trials to confirm this observation.

  1. Effects of chronic fluoxetine treatment on neurogenesis and tryptophan hydroxylase expression in adolescent and adult rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klomp, Anne; Václavů, Lena; Meerhoff, Gideon F.; Reneman, Liesbeth; Lucassen, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    The antidepressant drug fluoxetine (Prozac) has been increasingly prescribed to children and adolescents with depressive disorders despite a lack of thorough understanding of its therapeutic effects in the paediatric population and of its putative neurodevelopmental effects. Within the framework of

  2. Role of anti-depressant fluoxetine in the puva treatment of psoriasis vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra A

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Severity of Psoriasis Vulgaris is known to be modified by psychological stress. The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of Fluoxetine in the PUVA treatment of Psoriasis. Twenty patients with progressive disease having more than thirty per cent body area involvement were included in a randomized, double blinded, placebo-controlled, age and sex matched study. All patients were on PUVAtreatment; half of the patients were given Fluoxetine 20 mgms daily whereas the other ten were given placebo. Assessment was done by Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI scoring after every 5 exposures of PUVA treatment till 20 treatments. All ten patients who took Fluoxetine along with PUVA treatment showed better response and quicker remission. Fluoxetine may be used as an adjuvant in PUVA treatment of Psoriasis.

  3. Comparison of neurogenic effects of fluoxetine, duloxetine and running in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marlatt, M.W.; Lucassen, P.J.; van Praag, H.

    2010-01-01

    Hippocampal neurogenesis can be regulated by extrinsic factors, such as exercise and antidepressants. While there is evidence that the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine enhances neurogenesis, the new dual serotonergic-noradrenergic reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) duloxetine has not

  4. Role of anti-depressant fluoxetine in the puva treatment of psoriasis vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra A

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Severity of psoriasis vulgaris is known to be modified by psychological stress. The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of fluoxetine in the PU VA treatment of psoriasis. Twenty patients with progressive disease having more than thirty per cent body area involvement were included in a randomized, double blinded, placebo- controlled, age and sex matched study. All patients were on PUVA treatment, half of patients were given fluoxetine 20 mgs daily whereas the ten were given placebo. Assessment was done by Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI scoring after every 5 exposures of PUVA treatment till 20 treatments. All ten patients who took fluoxetine along with PUVA treatment showed better response and quicker remission. Fluoxetine may be used as an adjuvant in PUVA treatment of psoriasis.

  5. A concise total synthesis of (R)-fluoxetine, a potent and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatima, Angelo de; Lapis, Alexandre Augusto M.; Pilli, Ronaldo A. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica]. E-mail: pilli@iqm.unicamp.br

    2005-05-15

    (R)-Fluoxetine, potent and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, has been synthesized in six steps, 50% overall yield and 99% ee from benzaldehyde via catalytic asymmetric allylation with Maruoka's catalyst. (author)

  6. Transient Serotonin Toxicity Evoked by Combination of Electroconvulsive Therapy and Fluoxetine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Klysner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The serotonin syndrome has been described only in rare instances for electroconvulsive therapy combined with an antidepressant medication. We describe a case of serotonin toxicity induced by electroconvulsive therapy in combination with fluoxetine.

  7. The effect of subchronic fluoxetine treatment on learning and memory in adolescent rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sass, Amdi; Wörtwein, Gitta

    2012-01-01

    . In adolescent rats fluoxetine treatment impaired water-maze probe trial performance and object recognition at intertrial intervals of 15 and 60min, while leaving object-in-place recognition memory unaffected. In the open field the fluoxetine treated animals displayed reduced exploratory activity and higher......Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors are increasingly used for the treatment of adolescents with behavioural disorders. However, the effect of this class of drugs during this sensitive period of brain development has not been extensively investigated. In this study we examine the effect...... of subchronic treatment with the selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor, fluoxetine (10mg/kg/day, i.p.) throughout adolescence (postnatal day 28-60) on learning and memory in the rat. Learning and memory were assessed at two time points: during adolescence, while the animals were being treated with fluoxetine...

  8. PHARMACOLOGICAL IN VITRO MODELS IN PRE-CLINICAL DRUG TESTING - EXAMPLE OF hSERT TRANSFECTED HUMAN EMBRYONIC KIDNEY CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihajlo Jakovljević

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Preclinical drug testing should be considered an important stage during examinations of its efficiency and safety in any likely indication observed. Purpose of the process is acquisition of substantial amount of particular drug-related data before approaching clinical trials in humans. Historical preclinical testing relied on available testing in microbe cultures and animal models. During recent decades laboratory techniques of human cell lines cultivation have been developed and improved. These provide unique possibility of drug acting mechanism testing in a simplified environment lacking basic homeostatic mechanisms. Some examples of these are measuring drug impact to biochemical transport, signaling or anabolic processes. Humane cell lines of embrional kidney 293 are an example of easy-to-grow and disseminate and quite endurable cell line. This methodological article notices some of the details of HEK293 cells cultivation and breading. We took transfection as an example of in vitro model creation for drug testing. Transfection refers to gene introduction into HEK293 cellular genome in order to achieve membrane expression of coded protein. In our case it would be human serotonin transporter. Article contains description of one particular methodological approach in measuring human serotonin transporter expression. The role and importance of serotonin pump in affective disorders genesis was already widely recognized. Aim of the paper was to emphasize feasibility of cell cultivation and its advantages in comparison with alternative traditional methods.

  9. Pharmacological Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder in Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel L. Farley

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Major depressive disorder (MDD affects a significant number of adolescents today. Its consequences (including social isolation, failure to achieve crucial developmental milestones, and suicide mandate close attention in clinical practice. While tricyclics and monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs have been used infrequently and with questionable efficacy, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs, particularly fluoxetine, consistently have been shown to be of benefit in treating outpatient adolescents with MDD. Despite some success with other drugs in its class, fluoxetine remains the only SSRI that is FDA approved for treatment of children and adolescents with depression. A review of recent studies is presented, including the controversy regarding the relationship of antidepressants and suicidal behavior in this patient population.

  10. Anxiogenic-like effect of acute and chronic fluoxetine on rats tested on the elevated plus-maze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.T.A. Silva

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine (FLX is widely prescribed for depression and anxiety-related disorders. On the other hand, enhanced serotonergic transmission is known to be classically related to anxiety. In this study, the effects of acute (5.0 mg/kg and chronic (5.0 mg/kg, 22 days FLX were investigated in both food-deprived and non-deprived rats tested in the elevated plus-maze. Significant main effects of the three factors (drug, food condition and administration regimen were observed, but no interaction between them. The administration of either acute or chronic FLX resulted in an anxiogenic effect, as detected by a significant reduction in the percentage of time spent in the open arms and in the percentage of open arm entries. Food deprivation yielded an anxiolytic-like profile, probably related to changes in locomotor activity. The administration regimen resulted in an anxiolytic profile in chronically treated rats, as would be expected after 22 days of regular handling. The anxiogenic action of acute FLX is consistent with both its neurochemical and clinical profile. The discrepancy between the anxiogenic profile of chronic FLX and its therapeutic uses is discussed in terms of possible differences between the type of anxiety that is measured in the plus-maze and the types of human anxiety that are alleviated by fluoxetine.

  11. Association between repeated unpredictable chronic mild stress (UCMS procedures with a high fat diet: a model of fluoxetine resistance in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Isingrini

    Full Text Available Major depressive disorder is a debilitating disease. Unfortunately, treatment with antidepressants (ADs has limited therapeutic efficacy since resistance to AD is common. Research in this field is hampered by the lack of a reliable natural animal model of AD resistance. Depression resistance is related to various factors, including the attendance of cardiovascular risk factors and past depressive episodes. We aimed to design a rodent model of depression resistance to ADs, associating cardiovascular risk factors with repeated unpredicted chronic mild stress (UCMS. Male BALB/c mice were given either a regular (4% fat or a high fat diet (45% fat and subjected to two 7-week periods of UCMS separated by 6 weeks. From the second week of each UCMS procedure, vehicle or fluoxetine (10 mg/kg, i.p. was administrated daily. The effects of the UCMS and fluoxetine in both diet conditions were assessed using physical (coat state and body weight and behavioural tests (the reward maze test and the splash test. The results demonstrate that during the second procedure, UCMS induced behavioural changes, including coat state degradation, disturbances in self-care behaviour (splash test and anhedonia (reward maze test and these were reversed by fluoxetine in the regular diet condition. In contrast, the high-fat diet regimen prevented the AD fluoxetine from abolishing the UCMS-induced changes. In conclusion, by associating UCMS-an already validated animal model of depression-with high-fat diet regimen, we designed a naturalistic animal model of AD resistance related to a sub-nosographic clinical entity of depression.

  12. Pharmacological levels of Withaferin A (Withania somnifera) trigger clinically relevant anticancer effects specific to triple negative breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szarc vel Szic, Katarzyna; Op de Beeck, Ken; Ratman, Dariusz; Wouters, An; Beck, Ilse M; Declerck, Ken; Heyninck, Karen; Fransen, Erik; Bracke, Marc; De Bosscher, Karolien; Lardon, Filip; Van Camp, Guy; Vanden Berghe, Wim

    2014-01-01

    -resistant triple negative breast cancer, WA-based therapeutic strategies targeting the uPA pathway hold promise for further (pre)clinical development to defeat aggressive metastatic breast cancer.

  13. Sumatriptan transdermal iontophoretic patch (NP101-Zelrix™: review of pharmacology, clinical efficacy, and safety in the acute treatment of migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikelis M

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Michail Vikelis,1 Dimos D Mitsikostas,2 Alan M Rapoport31Glyfada Headache Center, Glyfada, Greece; 2Neurology Department, Athens Naval Hospital, Athens, Greece; 3The David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: Migraine is a chronic, painful, and often disabling primary headache disorder, typically presenting with recurrent attacks that may be accompanied by a variety of neurological, gastrointestinal, and autonomic symptoms. Gastrointestinal symptoms in association with migraine including, nausea, vomiting, and gastroparesis, affect a large proportion of migraine sufferers. These symptoms may result in delays or inconsistencies in the absorption of oral treatments. Hence, the necessity for an innovative, non-invasive, parenteral delivery formulation for quick and effective treatment of migraine attacks is evident. Iontophoresis utilizes minimal amounts of electrical potential to support the fast transfer of ionized medication transdermally and into the general circulation. Two pharmacokinetic clinical trials have shown that iontophoretic delivery of sumatriptan through the skin produces quick and reproducible therapeutic plasma concentrations. A randomized, double-blind, multicenter, phase III study demonstrated superior efficacy versus placebo and excellent tolerability, with no triptan-related adverse events. The proportion of patients that were pain-free at 2 h post-treatment was 18% for the sumatriptan patch vs 9% for placebo (P = 0.0092; number needed to treat = 11.1. Upon approval from the Food and Drug Administration and other regulatory authorities, the iontophoretic transdermal delivery of sumatriptan will be a good choice for patients experiencing poor absorption of oral medication often associated with migraine and/or for those with intolerable triptan-related adverse events.Keywords: iontophoretic patch, migraine, migraine treatment, sumatriptan, transdermal patch

  14. Peer social interaction is facilitated in juvenile rhesus monkeys treated with fluoxetine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, Mari S; Hogrefe, Casey E; Bulleri, Alicia M

    2016-06-01

    Fluoxetine improves social interactions in children with autism, social anxiety and social phobia. It is not known whether this effect is mediated directly or indirectly by correcting the underlying pathology. Genetics may also influence the drug effect. Polymorphisms of the MAOA (monoamine oxidase A) gene interact with fluoxetine to influence metabolic profiles in juvenile monkeys. Juvenile nonhuman primates provide an appropriate model for studying fluoxetine effects and drug*gene interactions in children. Male rhesus monkeys 1-3 years of age living in permanent social pairs were treated daily with a therapeutic dose of fluoxetine or vehicle (n = 16/group). Both members of each social pair were assigned to the same treatment group. They were observed for social interactions with their familiar cagemate over a 2-year dosing period. Subjects were genotyped for MAOA variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) polymorphisms categorized for high or low transcription rates (hi-MAOA, low-MAOA). Fluoxetine-treated animals spent 30% more time in social interaction than vehicle controls. Fluoxetine significantly increased the duration of quiet interactions, the most common type of interaction, and also of immature sexual behavior typical of rhesus in this age group. Specific behaviors affected depended on MAOA genotype of the animal and its social partner. When given fluoxetine, hi-MOAO monkeys had more social invitation and initiation behaviors and low-MAOA subjects with low-MAOA partners had more grooming and an increased frequency of some facial and vocal expressive behaviors. Fluoxetine may facilitate social interaction in children independent of remediation of psychopathology. Common genetic variants may modify this effect. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Teratogenic Effects of Coadministration of Fluoxetine and Olanzapine on Rat Fetuses

    OpenAIRE

    Bakhtiarian, Azam; Takzare, Nasrin; Sheykhi, Mehdi; Sistany, Narges; Jazaeri, Farahnaz; Giorgi, Mario; Nikoui, Vahid

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Depression during pregnancy is a relatively common problem. Since little is known about the teratogenic effects of concomitant administration of fluoxetine and olanzapine during the organogenesis period, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the teratogenic effects of coadministration of fluoxetine and olanzapine on rat fetuses. Method. Forty-two pregnant rats were divided into seven groups, randomly. The first group received 0.5 mL of normal saline as the control. The secon...

  16. Fluoxetine and all other SSRIs are 5-HT2B Agonists - Importance for their Therapeutic Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Liang; Gu, Li; Li, Baoman; Hertz, Leif

    2014-01-01

    Fluoxetine and other serotonin-specific re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are generally thought to owe their therapeutic potency to inhibition of the serotonin transporter (SERT). However, research in our laboratory showed that it affects, with relatively high affinity the 5-HT2B receptor in cultured astrocytes; this finding was confirmed by independent observations showing that fluoxetine loses its ability to elicit SSRI-like responses in behavioral assays in mice in which the 5-HT2B receptor was...

  17. Transient Serotonin Toxicity Evoked by Combination of Electroconvulsive Therapy and Fluoxetine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klysner, René; Bjerg Bendsen, Birgitte; Hansen, Maja Soon

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin syndrome has been described only in rare instances for electroconvulsive therapy combined with an antidepressant medication. We describe a case of serotonin toxicity induced by electroconvulsive therapy in combination with fluoxetine.......The serotonin syndrome has been described only in rare instances for electroconvulsive therapy combined with an antidepressant medication. We describe a case of serotonin toxicity induced by electroconvulsive therapy in combination with fluoxetine....

  18. On the interaction between fluoxetine and lipid membranes: Effect of the lipid composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Vy T.; Nguyen, Trinh Q.; Dao, Uyen P. N.; Nguyen, Trang T.

    2018-02-01

    Molecular interaction between the antidepressant fluoxetine and lipid bilayers was investigated in order to provide insights into the drug's incorporation to lipid membranes. In particular, the effects of lipid's unsaturation degree and cholesterol content on the partitioning of fluoxetine into large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) comprised of unsaturated 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) and saturated 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) were evaluated using second derivative spectrophotometry and Attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). It was found that fluoxetine partitioned to a greater extent into the liquid-crystalline DOPC LUVs than into the solid-gel DPPC LUVs. The lipid physical state dependence of drug partitioning was verified by increasing the temperature in which the partition coefficient of fluoxetine significantly increased upon the change of the lipid phase from solid-gel to liquid-crystalline. The incorporation of 28 mol% cholesterol into the LUVs exerted a significant influence on the drug partitioning into both DOPC and DPPC LUVs. The ATR-FTIR study revealed that fluoxetine perturbed the conformation of DOPC more strongly than that of DPPC due to the cis-double bonds in the lipid acyl chains. Fluoxetine possibly bound to the carbonyl moiety of the lipids through the hydrogen bonding formation while displaced some water molecules surrounding the PO2- regions of the lipid head groups. Cholesterol, however, could lessen the interaction between fluoxetine and the carbonyl groups of both DOPC and DPPC LUVs. These findings provided a better understanding of the role of lipid structure and cholesterol on the interaction between fluoxetine and lipid membranes, shedding more light into the drug's therapeutic action.

  19. Antidepressants and protein kinases: inhibition of Ca2+-regulated myosin phosphorylation by fluoxetine and iprindole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, P J; Sigg, E B; Moyer, J A

    1986-02-11

    The effects of several antidepressant and antipsychotic agents on Ca2+-calmodulin-regulated myosin light chain phosphorylation were evaluated. At a concentration of 100 microM, the antidepressant agents buproprion, mianserin and maprotiline were ineffective; zimelidine, desipramine and imipramine produced 40-50% inhibition; and iprindole and fluoxetine produced 75-90% inhibition. The efficacies of iprindole and fluoxetine were similar to the phenothiazine antipsychotics chlorpromazine and trifluoperazine. Clozapine, an atypical antipsychotic and the butyrophenone haloperidol were relatively ineffective as myosin light chain phosphorylation inhibitors. IC50 values of the most effective agents were: trifluoperazine 16 microM, fluoxetine 28 microM, chlorpromazine and iprindole 56 microM. As with trifluoperazine, inhibition of myosin phosphorylation by iprindole was completely attenuated in the presence of exogenous calmodulin. However, a significant component (30%) of the inhibitory effect of fluoxetine was not reversible with calmodulin. These results show that some antidepressant agents, most notably iprindole and fluoxetine, are capable of antagonizing a calmodulin-regulated protein kinase through calmodulin inhibition; and in the case of fluoxetine, through an additional calmodulin-independent mechanism.

  20. Impacts of the antidepressant fluoxetine on the anti-predator behaviours of wild guppies (Poecilia reticulata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saaristo, Minna; McLennan, Alisha; Johnstone, Christopher P; Clarke, Bradley O; Wong, Bob B M

    2017-02-01

    Chemical pollution from pharmaceuticals is increasingly recognised as a major threat to aquatic communities. One compound of great concern is fluoxetine, which is one of the most widely prescribed psychoactive drugs in the world and frequently detected in the environment. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of 28-d fluoxetine exposure at two environmentally relevant levels (measured concentrations: 4ng/L and 16ng/L) on anti-predator behaviour in wild guppies (Poecilia reticulata). This was achieved by subjecting fluoxetine-exposed and unexposed guppies to a simulated bird strike and recording their subsequent behavioural responses. We found that exposure to fluoxetine affected the anti-predator behaviour of guppies, with exposed fish remaining stationary for longer (i.e. 'freezing' behaviour) after the simulated strike and also spending more time under plant cover. By contrast, control fish were significantly more active and explored the tank more, as indicated by the distance covered per minute over the period fish spent swimming. Furthermore, behavioural shifts were sex-dependent, with evidence of a non-monotonic dose-response among the fluoxetine-exposed fish. This is one of the first studies to show that exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of fluoxetine can alter the anti-predator behaviour of adult fish. In addition to the obvious repercussions for survival, impaired anti-predator behaviour can have direct impacts on fitness and influence the overall population dynamics of species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Research Design Characteristics of Published Pharmacologic Randomized Clinical Trials for Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Chronic Pelvic Pain Conditions: An ACTTION Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gewandter, Jennifer S; Chaudari, Jenna; Iwan, Katarzyna B; Kitt, Rachel; As-Sanie, Sawsan; Bachmann, Gloria; Clemens, Quentin; Lai, H Henry; Tu, Frank; Verne, G Nicholas; Vincent, Katy; Wesselmann, Ursula; Zhou, QiQi; Turk, Dennis C; Dworkin, Robert H; Smith, Shannon M

    2018-02-02

    Chronic pain conditions occurring in the lower abdomen and pelvis are common, often challenging to manage, and can negatively affect health-related quality of life. Methodological challenges in designing randomized clinical trials (RCTs) for these conditions likely contributes to the limited number of available treatments. The goal of this systematic review of RCTs of pharmacologic treatments for irritable bowel syndrome and 3 common chronic pelvic pain conditions are to: 1) summarize the primary end points and entry criteria, and 2) evaluate the clarity of reporting of important methodological details. In total, 127 RCTs were included in the analysis. The most common inclusion criteria were a minimum pain duration (81%), fulfilling an established diagnostic criteria (61%), and reporting a minimum pain intensity (42%). Primary end points were identified for only 57% of trials. These end points, summarized in this article, were highly variable. The results of this systematic review can be used to inform future research to optimize the entry criteria and outcome measures for pain conditions occurring in the lower abdomen and pelvis, to increase transparency in reporting to allow for proper interpretation of RCT results for clinical and policy applications, and to facilitate the aggregation of data in meta-analyses. This article summarizes entry criteria and outcome measures and the clarity of reporting of these important design features in RCTs of irritable bowel syndrome and 3 common chronic pelvic pain conditions. These results can be used to improve design of future trials of these largely unaddressed pain conditions. Copyright © 2018 The American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Echinacea species (Echinacea angustifolia (DC.) Hell., Echinacea pallida (Nutt.) Nutt.,Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench): a review of their chemistry, pharmacology and clinical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Joanne; Anderson, Linda A; Gibbons, Simon; Phillipson, J David

    2005-08-01

    This paper reviews the chemistry, pharmacology and clinical properties of Echinacea species used medicinally. The Echinacea species Echinacea angustifolia, Echinacea pallida and Echinacea purpurea have a long history of medicinal use for a variety of conditions, particularly infections, and today echinacea products are among the best-selling herbal preparations in several developed countries. Modern interest in echinacea is focused on its immunomodulatory effects, particularly in the prevention and treatment of upper respiratory tract infections. The chemistry of Echinacea species is well documented, and several groups of constituents, including alkamides and caffeic acid derivatives, are considered important for activity. There are, however, differences in the constituent profile of the three species. Commercial echinacea samples and marketed echinacea products may contain one or more of the three species, and analysis of samples of raw material and products has shown that some do not meet recognized standards for pharmaceutical quality. Evidence from preclinical studies supports some of the traditional and modern uses for echinacea, particularly the reputed immunostimulant (or immunomodulatory) properties. Several, but not all, clinical trials of echinacea preparations have reported effects superior to those of placebo in the prevention and treatment of upper respiratory tract infections. However, evidence of efficacy is not definitive as studies have included different patient groups and tested various different preparations and dosage regimens of echinacea. On the basis of the available limited safety data, echinacea appears to be well tolerated. However, further investigation and surveillance are required to establish the safety profiles of different echinacea preparations. Safety issues include the possibility of allergic reactions, the use of echinacea by patients with autoimmune diseases and the potential for echinacea preparations to interact with

  3. Pharmacological approach to acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Ulrich-Christian; Semb, Synne; Nojgaard, Camilla

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present review is to summarize the current knowledge regarding pharmacological prevention and treatment of acute pancreatitis (AP) based on experimental animal models and clinical trials. Somatostatin (SS) and octreotide inhibit the exocrine production of pancreatic enzymes and may...

  4. Ethnomedicinal uses, phytochemistry and pharmacological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pharmacological properties of the genus, Kirkia. Alfred Maroyi. Department of Botany, University of Fort Hare, Private Bag X1314, Alice 5700, South Africa ... extracts and their isolates are potential sources of modern medicines following future detailed studies to elucidate their mechanisms of action, toxicity and clinical trials.

  5. The clinical pharmacology of acamprosate

    OpenAIRE

    Kalk, Nicola J; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R

    2014-01-01

    Acamprosate is one of the few medications licensed for prevention of relapse in alcohol dependence, and over time it has proved to be significantly, if moderately, effective, safe and tolerable. Its use is now being extended into other addictions and neurodevelopmental disorders. The mechanism of action of acamprosate has been less clear, but in the decade or more that has elapsed since its licensing, a body of translational evidence has accumulated, in which preclinical findings are replicat...

  6. Phase I Clinical Pharmacology Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-28

    Luagent to tra fteumct ’s~~j. citArin.L saymptrauns wiletoon. of even o disecte irdctin. Children I - tOE0 pneumonia To find a dose that uouid provede...RSV) Isolates 5tWmYAW .0 AbTINN.1.NE111119kMXt. 21MJ. frog a study of Nosocosial Infection. CA PWC)•NQ. Un~tv0yTesin~edaeli d dSeyltlO ef Storchc C5

  7. Disruption of NF-κB signaling by fluoxetine attenuates MGMT expression in glioma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song T

    2015-08-01

    -κB/p65 activity, reduced MGMT expression, and suppressed in vivo tumor growth in the murine subcutaneous xenograft model.Conclusion: Our findings demonstrated that FLT attenuated MGMT expression by disrupting NF-κB signaling and sensitized glioma cells to TMZ, which may warrant further investigation toward possible clinical application in MGMT-expressing glioma. Keywords: glioma, fluoxetine, MGMT

  8. Antianxiety medications for the treatment of complex agoraphobia: pharmacological interventions for a behavioral condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perna G

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Giampaolo Perna1-3, Silvia Daccò2, Roberta Menotti2, Daniela Caldirola21Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, University of Maastricht, Maastricht, the Netherlands; 2Department of Clinical Neuroscience, San Benedetto Hospital, Hermanas Hospitalarias, Albese con Cassano, Como, Italy; 3Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Leonard M Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USABackground: Although there are controversial issues (the "American view" and the "European view" regarding the construct and definition of agoraphobia (AG, this syndrome is well recognized and it is a burden in the lives of millions of people worldwide. To better clarify the role of drug therapy in AG, the authors summarized and discussed recent evidence on pharmacological treatments, based on clinical trials available from 2000, with the aim of highlighting pharmacotherapies that may improve this complex syndrome.Methods: A systematic review of the literature regarding the pharmacological treatment of AG was carried out using MEDLINE, EBSCO, and Cochrane databases, with keywords individuated by MeSH research. Only randomized, placebo-controlled studies or comparative clinical trials were included.Results: After selection, 25 studies were included. All the selected studies included patients with AG associated with panic disorder. Effective compounds included selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, selective noradrenergic reuptake inhibitors, and benzodiazepines. Paroxetine, sertraline, citalopram, escitalopram, and clomipramine showed the most consistent results, while fluvoxamine, fluoxetine, and imipramine showed limited efficacy. Preliminary results suggested the potential efficacy of inositol; D-cycloserine showed mixed results for its ability to improve the outcome of exposure-based cognitive behavioral therapy

  9. Quality management of pharmacology and safety pharmacology studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Per; Seiler, Jürg P

    2002-01-01

    Pharmacology has traditionally been excluded from the mandatory application of good laboratory practice (GLP) principles. Consensus has been reached through the process of the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH, Topic S7A) with regard to the definitions of the different types of pharm......Pharmacology has traditionally been excluded from the mandatory application of good laboratory practice (GLP) principles. Consensus has been reached through the process of the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH, Topic S7A) with regard to the definitions of the different types...... management should facilitate collaboration across scientific disciplines because a plethora of data, originating from basic pharmacodynamics, toxicology, kinetics, and metabolism, as well as from clinical investigations, are involved in a safety pharmacology assessment. Applying formal GLP standards...

  10. Pharmacological modulation of SK3 channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunnet, M; Jespersen, Thomas; Angelo, K

    2001-01-01

    -frequency adaptation, pharmacological modulation of SK channels may be of significant clinical importance. Here we report the functional expression of SK3 in HEK293 and demonstrate a broad pharmacological profile for these channels. Brain slice studies commonly employ 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) to block voltage...

  11. Fluoxetine ameliorates cartilage degradation in osteoarthritis by inhibiting Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Miyamoto

    Full Text Available Abnormal activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling is implicated in the osteoarthritis (OA pathology. We searched for a pre-approved drug that suppresses abnormally activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling and has a potency to reduce joint pathology in OA. We introduced the TOPFlash reporter plasmid into HCS-2/8 human chondrosarcoma cells to estimate the Wnt/β-catenin activity in the presence of 10 μM each compound in a panel of pre-approved drugs. We found that fluoxetine, an antidepressant in the class of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI, down-regulated Wnt/β-catenin signaling in human chondrosarcoma cells. Fluoxetine inhibited both Wnt3A- and LiCl-induced loss of proteoglycans in chondrogenically differentiated ATDC5 cells. Fluoxetine increased expression of Sox9 (the chondrogenic master regulator, and decreased expressions of Axin2 (a marker for Wnt/β-catenin signaling and Mmp13 (matrix metalloproteinase 13. Fluoxetine suppressed a LiCl-induced increase of total β-catenin and a LiCl-induced decrease of phosphorylated β-catenin in a dose-dependent manner. An in vitro protein-binding assay showed that fluoxetine enhanced binding of β-catenin with Axin1, which is a scaffold protein forming the degradation complex for β-catenin. Fluoxetine suppressed LiCl-induced β-catenin accumulation in human OA chondrocytes. Intraarticular injection of fluoxetine in a rat OA model ameliorated OA progression and suppressed β-catenin accumulation.

  12. Fluoxetine improves functional work capacity in women with premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, M; Brown, E; Trzepacz, P; Dillon, J; Berger, C; Carter, D; Reid, R; Stewart, D

    2003-02-01

    Interference with social and occupational functioning is a key criterion for premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) and distinguishes it from the less severe premenstrual syndrome (PMS). We conducted a post hoc analysis of the results of a previously reported study evaluating the efficacy of fluoxetine in the management of PMDD, to determine the extent to which women with PMDD perceived impairment in their functional work capacity during the luteal phase of their menstrual cycle. The effects of two doses of fluoxetine vs placebo in alleviating PMDD symptoms and restoring normal work capacity during this period were assessed. We measured baseline follicular vs luteal phase presence of 8 patient-rated functional work capacity-related symptoms on the Premenstrual Tension Scale-Self Rated in 320 women who met diagnostic criteria for late luteal phase dysphoric disorder, now known as PMDD. Women were then randomized to double-blind treatment with either fluoxetine 20 mg/d, fluoxetine 60 mg/d, or placebo daily for 6 menstrual cycles. All 8 work capacity-related symptoms were more likely to be present in the baseline luteal phase than in the baseline follicular phase. A statistically significant improvement from baseline to the average treatment score for the work capacity subscale was detected for both fluoxetine groups compared to the placebo group. This beneficial response to fluoxetine was evident by the first cycle of treatment. Our results demonstrate that fluoxetine at a relatively low dose of 20 mg/d quickly reduced symptoms that negatively affect work capacity and was well tolerated.

  13. Serotonin and histamine mediate gastroprotective effect of fluoxetine against experimentally-induced ulcers in rats.

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    Salem Sokar, Samia; Elsayed Elsayad, Mageda; Sabri Ali, Hend

    2016-09-01

    Research in the treatment of gastric ulcer has involved the investigation of new alternatives, such as anti-depressant drugs. The present study was designed to investigate the gastroprotective effects of fluoxetine against indomethacin and alcohol induced gastric ulcers in rats and the potential mechanisms of that effect. Fluoxetine (20 mg/kg) was administered IP for 14 days. For comparative purposes, other rats were treated with ranitidine (30 mg/kg). Thereafter, after 24 h of fasting, INDO (100 mg/kg) or absolute alcohol (5 ml/kg) was administered to all rats (saline was administered to naïve controls) and rats in each group were sacrificed 5 h (for INDO rats) or 1 h (for alcohol rats) later. Macroscopic examination revealed that both fluoxetine and ranitidine decreased ulcer scores in variable ratios, which was supported by microscopic histopathological examination. Biochemical analysis of fluoxetine- or ranitidine-pre-treated host tissues demonstrated reductions in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels and concomitant increases in gastric pH, nitric oxide (NO) and reduced glutathione (GSH) contents. Fluoxetine, more than ranitidine, also resulted in serotonin and histamine levels nearest to control values. Moreover, immuno-histochemical analysis showed that fluoxetine markedly enhanced expression of cyclo-oxygenases COX-1 and COX-2 in both models; in comparison, ranitidine did not affect COX-1 expression in either ulcer model but caused moderate increases in COX-2 expression in INDO-induced hosts and high expression in alcohol-induced hosts. The results here indicated fluoxetine exhibited better gastroprotective effects than ranitidine and this could be due to anti-secretory, anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-histaminic effects of the drug, as well as a stabilization of gastric serotonin levels.

  14. Behavioral interactions of simvastatin and fluoxetine in tests of anxiety and depression

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    Santos T

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Tainaê Santos,1 Monaliza Marizete Baungratz,1 Suellen Priscila Haskel,2 Daniela Delwing de Lima,3 Júlia Niehues da Cruz,4 Débora Delwing Dal Magro,5 José Geraldo Pereira da Cruz51Department of Medicine, 2Department of Physiotherapy, Regional University of Blumenau, Santa Catarina, Brazil; 3Department of Pharmacy, University of Joinville Region, Santa Catarina, Brazil; 4Department of Medicine, University of the Extreme South of Santa Catarina, Santa Catarina, Brazil; 5Department of Natural Sciences, Regional University of Blumenau, Santa Catarina, BrazilAbstract: Simvastatin inhibits 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway, and is widely used to control plasma cholesterol levels and prevent cardiovascular disease. However, emerging evidence indicates that the beneficial effects of simvastatin extend to the central nervous system. The effects of simvastatin combined with fluoxetine provide an exciting and potential paradigm to decreased anxiety and depression. Thus, the present paper investigates the possibility of synergistic interactions between simvastatin and fluoxetine in models of anxiety and depression. We investigated the effects of subchronically administered simvastatin (1 or 10 mg/kg/day combined with fluoxetine (2 or 10 mg/kg at 24, 5, and 1 hour on adult rats before conducting behavioral tests. The results indicate that simvastatin and/or fluoxetine treatment reduces anxiety-like behaviors in the elevated plus-maze and open-field tests. Our results showed that simvastatin and/or fluoxetine induced a significant increase in the swimming activity during the forced swimming test (antidepressant effect, with a concomitant increase in climbing time in simvastatin-treated animals only (noradrenergic activation. We hypothesize that anxiolytic and antidepressant effects of simvastatin and/or fluoxetine produce their behavioral effects through similar mechanisms and provide

  15. Essential Segmental Myoclonus Responding Well To Fluoxetine A case Report

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    Bhattacharyya K B

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of essential segmental myoclonus a 10 year old girl who presented with continuing movement of both the shoulder girdle muscles for 6 months. The movements were exacerbated with the hands raised above the head or in the outstretched posture and were persisting during sleep. There was no abnormal palatal movement. Additionally there was a rhythmical clicking sound arising from the shoulders that could be felt and ausculated with the stethoscope. CT scan of brain and MRI of cervical spine were non-contributory, EMG showed muscle activates at about 50 per second in the shoulder girdle muscles. Cine-radiography of shoulder joints showed the head of humerus hitting against the spine of the scapula rhythmically. Spinal tap was non-contributory. The diagnosis or essential segmental myoclonus was entertained and the subject with fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor with remarkable response. The possible mechanism of action of agents modulating the serotonergic system in the brain for the management of myoclonus has been reviewed and their role suggested.

  16. The Pharmacology of Regenerative Medicine

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    Saul, Justin M.; Furth, Mark E.; Andersson, Karl-Erik

    2013-01-01

    Regenerative medicine is a rapidly evolving multidisciplinary, translational research enterprise whose explicit purpose is to advance technologies for the repair and replacement of damaged cells, tissues, and organs. Scientific progress in the field has been steady and expectations for its robust clinical application continue to rise. The major thesis of this review is that the pharmacological sciences will contribute critically to the accelerated translational progress and clinical utility of regenerative medicine technologies. In 2007, we coined the phrase “regenerative pharmacology” to describe the enormous possibilities that could occur at the interface between pharmacology, regenerative medicine, and tissue engineering. The operational definition of regenerative pharmacology is “the application of pharmacological sciences to accelerate, optimize, and characterize (either in vitro or in vivo) the development, maturation, and function of bioengineered and regenerating tissues.” As such, regenerative pharmacology seeks to cure disease through restoration of tissue/organ function. This strategy is distinct from standard pharmacotherapy, which is often limited to the amelioration of symptoms. Our goal here is to get pharmacologists more involved in this field of research by exposing them to the tools, opportunities, challenges, and interdisciplinary expertise that will be required to ensure awareness and galvanize involvement. To this end, we illustrate ways in which the pharmacological sciences can drive future innovations in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering and thus help to revolutionize the discovery of curative therapeutics. Hopefully, the broad foundational knowledge provided herein will spark sustained conversations among experts in diverse fields of scientific research to the benefit of all. PMID:23818131

  17. Teratogenic Effects of Coadministration of Fluoxetine and Olanzapine on Rat Fetuses

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    Azam Bakhtiarian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Depression during pregnancy is a relatively common problem. Since little is known about the teratogenic effects of concomitant administration of fluoxetine and olanzapine during the organogenesis period, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the teratogenic effects of coadministration of fluoxetine and olanzapine on rat fetuses. Method. Forty-two pregnant rats were divided into seven groups, randomly. The first group received 0.5 mL of normal saline as the control. The second and third groups received fluoxetine at doses of 9 mg/kg and 18 mg/kg, respectively. Olanzapine was injected at 3 mg/kg and 6 mg/kg to the fourth and fifth groups, respectively. The sixth group received 9 mg/kg fluoxetine and 3 mg/kg olanzapine. Finally, the seventh group was administrated with fluoxetine and olanzapine at 18 mg/kg and 6 mg/kg, respectively. Drugs were injected intraperitoneally between day eight and day 15 of the pregnancy. On the 17th day of pregnancy, the fetuses were removed and micro-/macroscopically studied. Results. Fetuses of rats receiving high doses of these drugs showed a significant rate of cleft palate development, premature eyelid opening and torsion anomalies, compared to the control group (P≤0.01. It is concluded that these drugs can lead to teratogenicity, so their concomitant use during pregnancy should be avoided, or if necessary their doses must be decreased.

  18. In vitro adsorption study of fluoxetine in activated carbons and activated carbon fibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabais, J.M. Valente; Mouquinho, A.; Galacho, C.; Carrott, P.J.M.; Ribeiro Carrott, M.M.L. [Centro de Quimica de Evora e Departamento de Quimica da Universidade de Evora, Rua Romao Ramalho no. 59, 7000-671 Evora (Portugal)

    2008-05-15

    We study the in vitro adsorption of fluoxetine hydrochloride by different adsorbents in simulated gastric and intestinal fluid, pH 1.2 and 7.5, respectively. The tested materials were two commercial activated carbons, carbomix and maxsorb MSC30, one activated carbon fibre produced in our laboratory and also three MCM-41 samples, also produced by us. Selected samples were modified by liquid phase oxidation and thermal treatment in order to change the surface chemistry without significant modifications to the porous characteristics. The fluoxetine adsorption follows the Langmuir model. The calculated Q{sub 0} values range from 54 to 1112 mg/g. A different adsorption mechanism was found for the adsorption of fluoxetine in activated carbon fibres and activated carbons. In the first case the most relevant factors are the molecular sieving effect and the dispersive interactions whereas in the activated carbons the mechanism seams to be based on the electrostatic interactions between the fluoxetine molecules and the charged carbon surface. Despite the different behaviours most of the materials tested have potential for treating potential fluoxetine intoxications. (author)

  19. Chronic administration of fluoxetine and pro-inflammatory cytokine change in a rat model of depression.

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    Yanxia Lu

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the chronic effects of fluoxetine, a commonly prescribed SSRI antidepressant, on the peripheral and central levels of inflammatory cytokines including IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and IL-17 over a 4-interval in a rat model of chronic mild stress (CMS which resembles the human experience of depression. Twenty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to CMS+vehicle (n = 9, CMS+fluoxetine (n = 9 and the control (n = 6 groups. Sucrose preference and forced swim tests were performed to assess behavioral change. Blood samples were collected on day 0, 60, 90 and 120 for measurement of cytokine levels in plasma. On day 120, the brain was harvested and central level of cytokines was tested using Luminex. Four months of fluoxetine treatment resulted in changes in the sucrose preference and immobility time measurements, commensurate with antidepressant effects. The CMS+vehicle group exhibited elevated plasma levels of IL-1β, IL-17, and TNF-α on day 60 or 120. Rats treated with fluoxetine demonstrated lower IL-1β in plasma and brain after 90 and 120-day treatment respectively (p<0.05. There was a trend of reduction of IL-6 and TNF-α concentration. This study revealed the potential therapeutic effects of fluoxetine by reducing central and peripheral levels of IL-1β in the alleviation of depressive symptoms.

  20. Treatment of Chronic Enterovirus Encephalitis With Fluoxetine in a Patient With X-Linked Agammaglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gofshteyn, Jacqueline; Cárdenas, Ana María; Bearden, David

    2016-11-01

    Enterovirus may result in a devastating chronic encephalitis in immunocompromised patients, particularly in patients with X-linked agammaglobulinemia. Prognosis for patients with chronic enterovirus encephalitis is poor, almost invariably resulting in mortality without specific treatment. There are currently no approved antiviral agents for enterovirus, but the antidepressant drug fluoxetine has been identified through library-based compound screening as a potential anti-enteroviral agent in vitro. However, use of fluoxetine has not previously been studied in humans with enteroviral disease. A five year old boy with X-linked agammaglobulinemia presented with progressive neurological deterioration and was found to have chronic enterovirus encephalitis by brain biopsy. He failed to respond to standard treatment with high dose intravenous immunoglobulin, but showed stabilization and improvement following treatment with fluoxetine. This is the first report to describe the use of fluoxetine as a potential therapy for chronic enterovirus infection. Further investigation of fluoxetine as a treatment option for chronic enterovirus encephalitis is necessary. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Enantioselective analysis of fluoxetine in pharmaceutical formulations by capillary zone electrophoresis

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    Melania Cârcu-Dobrin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Fluoxetine is an antidepressant, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI used primarily in the treatment of major depression, panic disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder. Chiral separation of racemic fluoxetine is necessary due to its enantioselective metabolism. In order to develop a suitable method for chiral separation of fluoxetine, cyclodextrin (CD modified capillary electrophoresis (CE was employed. A large number of native and derivatized, neutral and ionized CD derivatives were screened to find the optimal chiral selector. As a result of this process, heptakis(2,3,6-tri-O-methyl-β-CD (TRIMEB was selected for enantiomeric discrimination. A factorial analysis study was performed by orthogonal experimental design in which several factors are varied at the same time to optimize the separation method. The optimized method (50 mM phosphate buffer, pH = 5.0, 10 mM TRIMEB, 15 °C, + 20 kV, 50 mbar/1 s, detection at 230 nm was successful for baseline separation of fluoxetine enantiomers within 5 min. Our method was validated according to ICH guidelines and proved to be sensitive, linear, accurate and precise for the chiral separation of fluoxetine.

  2. Long-term consequences of chronic fluoxetine exposure on the expression of myelination-related genes in the rat hippocampus.

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    Kroeze, Y; Peeters, D; Boulle, F; Pawluski, J L; van den Hove, D L A; van Bokhoven, H; Zhou, H; Homberg, J R

    2015-09-22

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine is widely prescribed for the treatment of symptoms related to a variety of psychiatric disorders. After chronic SSRI treatment, some symptoms remediate on the long term, but the underlying mechanisms are not yet well understood. Here we studied the long-term consequences (40 days after treatment) of chronic fluoxetine exposure on genome-wide gene expression. During the treatment period, we measured body weight; and 1 week after treatment, cessation behavior in an SSRI-sensitive anxiety test was assessed. Gene expression was assessed in hippocampal tissue of adult rats using transcriptome analysis and several differentially expressed genes were validated in independent samples. Gene ontology analysis showed that upregulated genes induced by chronic fluoxetine exposure were significantly enriched for genes involved in myelination. We also investigated the expression of myelination-related genes in adult rats exposed to fluoxetine at early life and found two myelination-related genes (Transferrin (Tf) and Ciliary neurotrophic factor (Cntf)) that were downregulated by chronic fluoxetine exposure. Cntf, a neurotrophic factor involved in myelination, showed regulation in opposite direction in the adult versus neonatally fluoxetine-exposed groups. Expression of myelination-related genes correlated negatively with anxiety-like behavior in both adult and neonatally fluoxetine-exposed rats. In conclusion, our data reveal that chronic fluoxetine exposure causes on the long-term changes in expression of genes involved in myelination, a process that shapes brain connectivity and contributes to symptoms of psychiatric disorders.

  3. An evaluation of behavioural endpoints: The pharmaceutical pollutant fluoxetine decreases aggression across multiple contexts in round goby (Neogobius melanostomus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallum, Erin S; Bose, Aneesh P H; Warriner, Theresa R; Balshine, Sigal

    2017-05-01

    Fluoxetine (Prozac™) is designed to alter human behaviour; however, because many physiological pathways are conserved across vertebrates, this drug may affect the behaviour of fish living in fluoxetine-polluted environments. Although a number of studies have used behaviour to document the sub-lethal effects of fluoxetine, the repeatability of these effects across experiments, across behavioural contexts, and over different exposure durations are rarely considered. Here, we conducted two experiments and assessed how fluoxetine exposure affected a range of fitness-related behaviours in wild round goby (Neogobius melanostomus). We found that fluoxetine impacts round goby behaviour at high (40 μg/l) doses, but not at environmentally relevant low doses (1 μg/l). In both experiments, an acute 3-day exposure to fluoxetine reduced round goby aggression in multiple behavioural contexts, but had no detectable effect on overall activity or social affiliative behaviour. While a chronic 28-day exposure to fluoxetine exposure still reduced aggression, this reduction was only detectable in one behavioural context. Our findings demonstrate the importance of repeated behavioural testing (both between and within experiments) and contribute to a growing body of literature evaluating the effects of fluoxetine and other pharmaceuticals on animal behaviour. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of serotonin re-uptake inhibition by fluoxetine on body weight and spontaneous food choice in obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijl, H; Koppeschaar, H P; Willekens, F L; Op de Kamp, I; Veldhuis, H D; Meinders, A E

    The effect of fluoxetine on body weight and spontaneous food choice was studied in twenty-three healthy, non-depressed, obese females on an outpatient basis. After a one week placebo run-in period, subjects were randomized to receive either fluoxetine (FXT) 60 mg daily (n = 11) or placebo (P) (n =

  5. The effect of Sertraline, Paroxetine, Fluoxetine and Escitalopram on testicular tissue and oxidative stress parameters in rats

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    Fikret Erdemir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs on testicular tissue and serum malondialdehyde (MDA levels in rats. Materials and methods: A total of 40 male Wistar albino rats, 5.5-6 months old, were equally divided at random into five groups: group 1 was the control group, group 2 received sertraline 10mg/kg (p.o, group 3 was administered fluoxetine 10mg/kg (p.o, group 4 received escitalopram 10mg/kg (p.o, and group 5 (n = 8 was administered paroxetine 20mg/kg. Each dose was administered orally for two months. Johnsen’s criteria were used to categorize spermatogenesis. Johnsen’s method assigns a score of 1 to 10 to each tubule cross-section examined. In this system, a Johnsen score of 9 and 10 indicates normal histology. Serum luteinizing hormone (LH, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH, and testosterone levels were evaluated. Serum MDA levels were also measured. Results: The mean Johnsen scores were 9.36 ± 0.33, 9.29 ± 0.32, 8.86 ± 0.48, 9.10 ± 0.56, and 8.33 ± 0.90 in control group, sertraline group, fluoxetine group, escitalopram group, and paroxetine group, respectively. The Johnsen score was significantly lower for paroxetine group compared with the control group (p < 0.05. The mean FSH level increased only in the sertraline group. With the exception of the fluoxetine group, the testosterone levels were lower in all groups compared with the control group. The total testosterone level was significantly lower in the sertraline group compared with the control group [40.87 (22.37-46.8 vs. 15.87 (13.53-19.88, p < 0.01]. There were no significant differences between the groups with respect to the MDA and LH levels (p = 0.090 and p = 0.092. Conclusion: These data suggest that SSRIs have a negative effect on testicular tissues. This negative impact is markedly greater in the paroxetine group. To determine the exact mechanism of action of these drugs on testicular tissue, well

  6. Do pharmacological and behavioral interventions differentially affect treatment outcome for children with social phobia?

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    Scharfstein, Lindsay A; Beidel, Deborah C; Finnell, Laura Rendon; Distler, Aaron; Carter, Nathan T

    2011-09-01

    In a randomized trial for children with social phobia (SP), Social Effectiveness Therapy for Children (SET-C; a treatment consisting of exposure and social skills training) and fluoxetine were more effective than pill placebo in reducing social distress and behavioral avoidance, but only SET-C demonstrated significantly improved overall social skill and social competence. In the current study, the authors examined the specific social skills enhanced by SET-C using a recently developed coding schema. At posttreatment, children treated with SET-C displayed a more effective ability to manage the conversational topic (pragmatic social behaviors) and more appropriate motor movement, facial orientation, and posture (paralinguistic social behaviors) than children treated with fluoxetine or placebo. In contrast, children treated with fluoxetine displayed no more pragmatic or paralinguistic skill than children given a pill placebo. There were no group differences on ratings of voice volume and vocal inflection (speech and prosodic social behaviors). Furthermore, only children treated with SET-C improved from pre- to posttreatment on all three skill variables. Findings suggest that pharmacological interventions that only target reduction in anxious arousal may not have an impact on social skill deficits and may not be adequate to optimally treat SP. The relationship of social skill to social avoidance and the importance of social skills training to enhance social competence in the treatment of childhood SP are discussed.

  7. Carbodithioic acid esters of fluoxetine, a novel class of dual-function spermicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiran Kumar, S T V S; Kumar, Lalit; Sharma, Vishnu L; Jain, Ashish; Jain, Rajeev K; Maikhuri, Jagdamba P; Kumar, Manish; Shukla, Praveen K; Gupta, Gopal

    2008-10-01

    Carbodithioic acid esters of fluoxetine have been prepared by replacing the methylamino function in aminopropane chain with carbodithioic acid ester group and by adding various S-2-hydroxypropyl ester of dialkyl carbodithioic acid at 3-methylamino group. Some of these compounds showed spermicidal, antifungal and anti-Trichomonas activities. The study revealed that incorporation of carbodithioic acid residue directly into fluoxetine structure leads to compounds with better antifungal and anti-Trichomonas activities, and N-methyl-[3-phenyl-3-(4-trifluoromethyl-phenoxy)-propyl]carbodithioic acid S-(2-pyrrolidino-ethyl) ester (14) has shown better profile than both fluoxetine and nonoxynol-9. Further lead optimization may yield a potent dual-function spermicide.

  8. Malnutrition during brain growth spurt alters the effect of fluoxetine on aggressive behavior in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto-Medeiros, J M; Feitoza, E G; Magalhaes, K; Cabral-Filho, J E; Manhaes-De-Castro, F M; De-Castro, C M; Manhaes-De-Castro, R

    2004-02-01

    Malnutrition effect during the suckling period on aggressive behavior was investigated in adult rats treated and not treated with fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. Sixty-four Wistar male rats were allocated in two groups, according to their mothers' diet during lactation. The well-nourished group was fed by mothers receiving a 23% protein diet; the malnourished one by mothers receiving a 8% protein diet. Following weaning, all rats received the 23% protein diet. On the 90th day after birth, each nutritional group was divided into two subgroups, one receiving a single daily injection of fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) and the other of a saline solution (0.9% NaCl) for 14 days. Treatment with Fluoxetine reduced aggressive response in well-nourished but not in malnourished rats. These findings suggest that the serotoninergic system was affected by malnutrition during the critical period of brain development, and persisted even after a long period of nutritional recovery.

  9. Combination therapy of atypical odontalgia with fluoxetine and clonazepam: Report of an effective prescription

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    Hamed Mortazavi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Atypical odontalgia (AO is a subgroup of persistent idiopathic facial pain. We introduced a combination therapy of fluoxetine and clonazepam to treat AO. Case Report: A 30-year-old female with the chief complaint of severe pain (#8 based on Visual Analogue Scale( VAS in the site of extracted tooth #3 since 2 months ago was referred to the Department of Oral Medicine. The pain was of sharp quality continuing all day long and radiated to cervical muscles, forehead, and mandible of the ipsilateral side and contra lateral structures. The patient was treated with fluoxetine 20 mg/d and clonazepam 0.5 mg/d. The pain intensity was reported almost #0 when the patient was re evaluated 1 month after the first visit. An 8-month follow up revealed no sign of pain and discomfort on the affected site. Discussion: Combination therapy with clonazepam and fluoxetine has a positive effect in the treatment of AO.

  10. Raynaud's phenomenon and digital ischaemia--pharmacologic approach and alternative treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnemann, Birgit; Erbe, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The primary goal of therapy is to reduce the frequency and intensity of Raynaud's attacks and to minimize the related morbidity rather than to cure the underlying condition. Treatment strategies depend on whether Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) is primary or secondary. All patients should be instructed about general measures to maintain body warmth and to avoid triggers of RP attacks. Pharmacologic intervention can be useful for patients with severe and frequent RP episodes that impair the patient's quality of life. Calcium channel blockers are currently the most prescribed and studied medications for this purpose. There has been limited evidence for the efficacy of alpha-1-adrenergic receptor antagonists, angiotensin receptor blockers, topical nitrates or fluoxetine to treat RP. The intravenously administered prostacyclin analogue iloprost can reduce the frequency and severity of RP attacks and is considered a second-line therapy in patients with markedly impaired quality of life, critical digital ischaemia and skin ulcers who are at risk for substantial tissue loss and amputation. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors (e.g., sildenafil) can also improve RP symptoms and ulcer healing whereas endothelin-1 receptor antagonists (e.g., bosentan) are mainly considered treatment options in secondary prevention for patients with digital skin ulcers related to systemic sclerosis. However, their use in clinical practice has been limited by their high cost. Antiplatelet therapy with low-dose aspirin is recommended for all patients who suffer from secondary RP due to ischaemia caused by structural vessel damage. Anticoagulant therapy can be considered during the acute phase of digital ischaemia in patients with suspected vascular occlusive disease attributed to the occurrence of new thromboses. In patients with critical digital ischaemia, consideration should be given to hospitalisation, optimisation of medical treatment in accordance with the underlying disease and evaluation for a

  11. Effects of chronic fluoxetine treatment on neurogenesis and tryptophan hydroxylase expression in adolescent and adult rats.

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    Anne Klomp

    Full Text Available The antidepressant drug fluoxetine (Prozac has been increasingly prescribed to children and adolescents with depressive disorders despite a lack of thorough understanding of its therapeutic effects in the paediatric population and of its putative neurodevelopmental effects. Within the framework of PRIOMEDCHILD ERA-NET, we investigated; a effects of chronic fluoxetine treatment on adult hippocampal neurogenesis, a structural readout relevant for antidepressant action and hippocampal development; b effects on tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH expression, a measure of serotonin synthesis; c whether treatment effects during adolescence differed from treatment at an adult age, and d whether they were subregion-specific. Stereological quantification of the number of proliferating (Ki-67+ cells and of the number of young migratory neurons (doublecortin+, revealed a significant age-by-treatment interaction effect, indicating that fluoxetine affects both proliferation and neurogenesis in adolescent-treated rats differently than it does in adult-treated rats. In terms of subregional differences, fluoxetine enhanced proliferation mainly in the dorsal parts of the hippocampus, and neurogenesis in both the suprapyramidal and infrapyramidal blades of the dentate gyrus in adolescent-treated rats, while no such differences were seen in adult-treated rats. Fluoxetine exerted similar age-by-treatment interaction effects on TPH cells mainly in the ventral portion of the dorsal raphe nucleus. We conclude that fluoxetine exerts divergent effects on structural plasticity and serotonin synthesis in adolescent versus adult-treated rats. These preliminary data indicate a differential sensitivity of the adolescent brain to this drug and thus warrant further research into their behavioural and translational aspects. Together with recent related findings, they further call for caution in prescribing these drugs to the adolescent population.

  12. Thirty-five Day Fluoxetine Treatment Limits Sensory-Motor Deficit and Biochemical Disorders in a Rat Model of Decompression Sickness

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    Caroline Cosnard

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available According to the OECD statistical base for 2014, anti-depressants will, on average, be distributed at a rate of 62 daily doses per 1,000 inhabitants for the 25 countries surveyed (Health at a glance: Europe 2014; OECD Health Statistics; World Health Organization and OECD Health Statistics, 2014. Divers must be concerned. On another hand, divers are potentially exposed to decompression sickness including coagulation inflammation and ischemia, which can result in neurological lesions or even death. The purpose of this study is to assess whether chronic treatment with anti-depressants may represent a contraindication to the practice of an at-risk activity, such as, scuba diving, or even presents a benefit by attenuating the severity of the symptoms. We study for the first time the effect of a 35-day fluoxetine treatment (20 mg/kg on the occurrence of decompression sickness in laboratory rats (n = 79. Following exposure to the hazardous protocol, there is a significant correlation between the type of treatment and the clinical status of the rats in favor of a better clinical prognosis for the rats treated with fluoxetine with a significantly higher number of No DCS status and a lower number of Severe DCS status in the Flux, compared to Controls. The treatment modifies the rat performances both significantly and favorably during the physical and behavioral tests, just like their biological and biochemical constants. After decompression, rats under treatment display lower sensory-motor deficit and lowers biochemical disorders. From a biological point of view, we conclude fluoxetine should not be seen as a contraindication for diving on the basis of anticipated increased physiological risk.

  13. Tratamento farmacológico do transtorno bipolar: as evidências de ensaios clínicos randomizados Pharmacological treatment of bipolar disorder: evidence from randomized clinical trials

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    Flávio Kapczinski

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo é uma síntese das evidências provenientes de ensaios clínicos randomizados sobre o tratamento do transtorno bipolar. A metodologia para a busca do material disponível é descrita, e os resultados são apresentados. Com o melhor nível de evidência disponível, ou seja, revisões sistemáticas de mais de um ensaio clínico randomizado ou pelo menos um ensaio clínico randomizado, temos as seguintes recomendações: 1 a mania aguda pode ser tratada com Lítio, Valproato, Carbamazepina, e antipsicóticos; 2 a depressão bipolar pode ser tratada com antidepressivos (com risco aumentado de virada para mania, com lamotrigina e a associação fluoxetina/olanzapina e 3 a manutenção do transtorno bipolar pode ser realizada com o lítio, valproato, carbamazepina, olanzapina e lamotrigina (quando o objetivo for a profilaxia da depressão bipolar. A não existência de ensaios clínicos publicados não significa que determinadas intervenções não sejam úteis.The present article is a synthesis of the published clinical trials about the treatment of Bipolar disorder (BD. The methodology used to search the literature is described and results are presented. Using the best available evidence (systematic reviews of clinical trials or at lest one randomized clinical trial the following is recommended: 1 acute mania can be treated with lithium, carbamazepine, valrpoate and antipsychotics; 2 acute depression can be treated with lamotrigine, olanzapine/fluoxetine combination and with antidepressants (with an increased risk of switch into mania; 3 maintenance can be performed using lithium, valproate, olanzapine and lamotrigine (when the aim is prophylaxis of bipolar depression. The absence of published results about certain interventions does not mean that such interventions are not useful.

  14. Olanzapine and fluoxetine combination therapy for treatment-resistant depression: review of efficacy, safety, and study design issues

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    William V Bobo

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available William V Bobo, Richard C SheltonDepartment of Psychiatry, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Treatment-resistant depression (TRD is a common occurrence in clinical practice. Up to 30% of patients with major depression do not respond to conventional antidepressant treatment, while a significantly greater number of patients experience only partial symptom reduction. Numerous strategies may be applied by the practicing clinician to overcome limitations in the effectiveness of antidepressant monotherapy, including combining drug treatment with evidence-supported psychotherapies, combining antidepressants (combination pharmacotherapy, and combining antidepressants with other non-antidepressant psychotropic medications (augmentation treatment. One such augmentation strategy, the combination of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine (FLX, with the atypical antipsychotic drug, olanzapine (OLZ, is supported by the results of four randomized, double-blind, acute phase studies of patients who had responded inadequately to antidepressant monotherapy. In each study, the FLX/OLZ combination caused rapid reduction in Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating scale scores, with two of the four studies showing significantly greater improvement than antidepressant monotherapy at study endpoint. Effects of the FLX/OLZ combination were strongest in cases where failure to respond to two antidepressants prior to randomization was established during the current depressive episode. The FLX/OLZ combination was well-tolerated; however, body weight gain and increases in prolactin were greater than that of the antidepressant monotherapy groups, and were comparable to that of OLZ monotherapy. While effective during acute-phase treatment, questions remain regarding the long-term efficacy and safety of FLX/OLZ relative to antidepressant monotherapy and other combination strategies. Efforts aimed at determining the placement of

  15. Effects of sertraline and fluoxetine on p-glycoprotein at barrier sites: in vivo and in vitro approaches.

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    Amita Kapoor

    Full Text Available Retention of substances from systemic circulation in the brain and testes are limited due to high levels of P-glycoprotein (P-gp in the luminal membranes of brain and testes capillary endothelial cells. From a clinical perspective, P-gp rapidly extrudes lipophilic therapeutic agents, which then fail to reach efficacious levels. Recent studies have demonstrated that acute administration of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI can affect P-gp function, in vitro and in vivo. However, little is known concerning the time-course of these effects or the effects of different SSRI in vivo.The P-gp substrate, tritiated digoxin ([(3H] digoxin, was co-administered with fluoxetine or sertraline to determine if either compound increased drug accumulation within the brains and testes of mice due to inhibition of P-gp activity. We undertook parallel studies in endothelial cells derived from brain microvessels to determine the dose-response and time-course of effects.In vitro, sertraline resulted in rapid and potent inhibition of P-gp function in brain endothelial cells, as determined by cellular calcein accumulation. In vivo, a biphasic effect was demonstrated. Brain accumulation of [(3H] digoxin was increased 5 minutes after treatment with sertraline, but by 60 minutes after sertraline treatment, brain accumulation of digoxin was reduced compared to control. By 240 minutes after sertraline treatment brain digoxin accumulation was elevated compared to control. A similar pattern of results was obtained in the testes. There was no significant effect of fluoxetine on P-gp function, in vitro or in vivo.Acute sertraline administration can modulate P-gp activity in the blood-brain barrier and blood-testes barrier. This clearly has implications for the ability of therapeutic agents that are P-gp substrates, to enter the brain when co-administered with SSRI.

  16. Efficacy and safety of a novel pharmacological stress test agent-higenamine in radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging: phase Ⅱ clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Yanrong; Li Fang; Wang Qian; Li Dianfu; Long Mingqing; Liu Yimin; Li Bilu

    2014-01-01

    of diastolic blood pressure. Either HG or Ad induced significantly increased HR during administration and 5 min after administration. The clinical laboratory profile (hematology,serum chemistry, and urinalysis) was either normal or with no significant change. A total of 176 side effects (e.g, dyspnea, short breath, palpitation, dizziness,headache) were found related to HG (69.2%, 83/120) and Ad (77.5%, 93/120) administration (χ 2 =2.1307, P>0.05), which were mostly mild and transient. Conclusion: HG is a safe and effective pharmacological stress test agent as compared to adenosine for the detection of CAD with SPECT perfusion imaging. (authors)

  17. Individualized homeopathic treatment and fluoxetine for moderate to severe depression in peri- and postmenopausal women (HOMDEP-MENOP study: a randomized, double-dummy, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Del Carmen Macías-Cortés

    Full Text Available Perimenopausal period refers to the interval when women's menstrual cycles become irregular and is characterized by an increased risk of depression. Use of homeopathy to treat depression is widespread but there is a lack of clinical trials about its efficacy in depression in peri- and postmenopausal women. The aim of this study was to assess efficacy and safety of individualized homeopathic treatment versus placebo and fluoxetine versus placebo in peri- and postmenopausal women with moderate to severe depression.A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, double-dummy, superiority, three-arm trial with a 6 week follow-up study was conducted. The study was performed in a public research hospital in Mexico City in the outpatient service of homeopathy. One hundred thirty-three peri- and postmenopausal women diagnosed with major depression according to DSM-IV (moderate to severe intensity were included. The outcomes were: change in the mean total score among groups on the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, Beck Depression Inventory and Greene Scale, after 6 weeks of treatment, response and remission rates, and safety. Efficacy data were analyzed in the intention-to-treat population (ANOVA with Bonferroni post-hoc test.After a 6-week treatment, homeopathic group was more effective than placebo by 5 points in Hamilton Scale. Response rate was 54.5% and remission rate, 15.9%. There was a significant difference among groups in response rate definition only, but not in remission rate. Fluoxetine-placebo difference was 3.2 points. No differences were observed among groups in the Beck Depression Inventory. Homeopathic group was superior to placebo in Greene Climacteric Scale (8.6 points. Fluoxetine was not different from placebo in Greene Climacteric Scale.Homeopathy and fluoxetine are effective and safe antidepressants for climacteric women. Homeopathy and fluoxetine were significantly different from placebo in response definition only

  18. Fluoxetine during development reverses the effects of prenatal stress on depressive-like behavior and hippocampal neurogenesis in adolescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ine Rayen

    Full Text Available Depression during pregnancy and the postpartum period is a growing health problem, which affects up to 20% of women. Currently, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRIs medications are commonly used for treatment of maternal depression. Unfortunately, there is very little research on the long-term effect of maternal depression and perinatal SSRI exposure on offspring development. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the role of exposure to fluoxetine during development on affective-like behaviors and hippocampal neurogenesis in adolescent offspring in a rodent model of maternal depression. To do this, gestationally stressed and non-stressed Sprague-Dawley rat dams were treated with either fluoxetine (5 mg/kg/day or vehicle beginning on postnatal day 1 (P1. Adolescent male and female offspring were divided into 4 groups: 1 prenatal stress+fluoxetine exposure, 2 prenatal stress+vehicle, 3 fluoxetine exposure alone, and 4 vehicle alone. Adolescent offspring were assessed for anxiety-like behavior using the Open Field Test and depressive-like behavior using the Forced Swim Test. Brains were analyzed for endogenous markers of hippocampal neurogenesis via immunohistochemistry. Results demonstrate that maternal fluoxetine exposure reverses the reduction in immobility evident in prenatally stressed adolescent offspring. In addition, maternal fluoxetine exposure reverses the decrease in hippocampal cell proliferation and neurogenesis in maternally stressed adolescent offspring. This research provides important evidence on the long-term effect of fluoxetine exposure during development in a model of maternal adversity.

  19. Treatment of trichotillomania with behavioral therapy or fluoxetine: a randomized, waiting-list controlled study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minnen, A. van; Hoogduin, C.A.L.; Keijsers, G.P.J.; Hellenbrand, I.C.J.; Hendriks, G.J.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both behavioral therapy (BT) and serotonin reuptake inhibitors have been reported effective in the treatment of trichotillomania. This study examines the efficacy of BT and fluoxetine hydrochloride compared with a waiting-list (WL) control group. METHODS: Forty-three patients with

  20. Effects of Gingko biloba Extract on Tissue Distribution of Fluoxetine and Venlafaxine in Rats

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    Saad Abdulrahman Hussain

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: There are many concerns about the interactions of herbal products with conventional drugs, which are mostly used as multiple drug treatment approach. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of long-term use of Ginkgo biloba extract (GK on the absorption and tissue distribution of fluoxetine and venlafaxine. Materials and Methods: Forty-six Wistar rats are utilized and allocated into eight groups; 2 groups administered the vehicle and saved as control; 4 groups are treated with 100 and 200 mg/kg of GK extract for 30 days; 2 groups are treated with 40mg/kg verapamil for 10 days. The liver, kidney and brain distribution of fluoxetine and venlafaxine were evaluated after single oral doses using HPLC method. Results: 200 mg/kg GK increases fluoxetine concentrations in all studied organs, while GK 100mg/kg increases venlafaxine levels in kidney tissue and not affected in the other two organs. Conclusion: Thirty days treatment with GK (100 mg/kg increases kidney availability of venlafaxine, while 200 mg GK dose increases fluoxetine availability in the liver, kidney and brain tissues after single oral doses. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2015; 4(3.000: 234-238

  1. Effects of long-term fluoxetine treatment on adrenergic plasticity in rat vas deferens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Fontes Souza

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic antidepressant administration increases neurotrophin levels in the central and peripheral nervous system, leading to an increase of neuronal sprouting, reestablishment of neural networks and neurotransmitter levels. Injured peripheral nerves regenerate at very slow rates. However, the recovery of the hypogastric nerve in rodents after injury is significantly improved with neurotrophin administration. Accordingly, our goal was to determine whether treatment with the antidepressant fluoxetine affects catecholamine levels and neuronal function, after surgical denervation of the rat vas deferens. Noradrenaline levels in the denervated vas deferens were higher in fluoxetine-treated animals than in the vehicle-treated group, as measured by high performance liquid chromatography. In functional studies of smooth muscle contraction, the responses induced by phenylephrine or ATP, as well as pre-synaptic α2-adrenoceptor reactivity, were not modified by chronic treatment with the antidepressant. However, the contraction mediated by neuronal release of noradrenaline induced by tyramine was increased on days 7 and 21 after denervation in rats treated with fluoxetine. These data indicate that fluoxetine can improve functional recovery after rat vas deferens denervation.

  2. Fluoxetine Exerts Age-Dependent Effects on Behavior and Amygdala Neuroplasticity in the Rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homberg, J.R.; Olivier, J.D.A.; Blom, T.; Arentsen, T.; Brunschot, C. van; Schipper, P.; Korte-Bouws, G.A.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Reneman, L.

    2011-01-01

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) Prozac® (fluoxetine) is the only registered antidepressant to treat depression in children and adolescents. Yet, while the safety of SSRIs has been well established in adults, serotonin exerts neurotrophic actions in the developing brain and thereby

  3. Fluoxetine Exerts Age-Dependent Effects on Behavior and Amygdala Neuroplasticity in the Rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homberg, J.R.; Olivier, J.D.A.; Blom, T.; Arentsen, T.; van Brunschot, C.; Schipper, P.; Korte-Bouws, G.; van Luijtelaar, G.; Reneman, L.

    2011-01-01

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) Prozac (R) (fluoxetine) is the only registered antidepressant to treat depression in children and adolescents. Yet, while the safety of SSRIs has been well established in adults, serotonin exerts neurotrophic actions in the developing brain and

  4. Fluoxetine exerts age-dependent effects on behavior and amygdala neuroplasticity in the rat.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homberg, J.R.; Olivier, J.D.A.; Blom, T.; Arentsen, T.; Brunschot, C. van; Schipper, P.; Korte-Bouws, G.A.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Reneman, L.

    2011-01-01

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) Prozac(R) (fluoxetine) is the only registered antidepressant to treat depression in children and adolescents. Yet, while the safety of SSRIs has been well established in adults, serotonin exerts neurotrophic actions in the developing brain and

  5. Daily high doses of fluoxetine for weight loss and improvement in lifestyle before bariatric surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolfing, JG; Wolffenbuttel, BHR; Oei, HI; ten Hoor-Aukerna, NM; Schweitzer, DH

    Background: The number of gastric restrictive bariatric operations is increasing each year, but about one-fifth of patients will become disappointed due to unsatisfactory weight reduction or annoying complications. We questioned whether weight reduction by taking high doses of fluoxetine improves

  6. Fluoxetine increases cerebral white matter NAA/Cr ratio in patients with multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mostert, JP; Sijens, PE; Oudkerk, M; De Keyser, J

    2006-01-01

    Axonal degeneration in multiple sclerosis (MS) may be caused by mitochondrial dysfunction and is associated with decreased levels of N-acetylaspartate (NAA) as measured with H-1-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Fluoxetine stimulates astrocytic glycogenolysis, which serves as an energy source

  7. Fluoxetine protection in decompression sickness in mice is enhanced by blocking TREK-1 potassium channel with the spadin antidepressant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas eVallée

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In mice, disseminated coagulation, inflammation and ischemia induce neurological damages that can lead to the death. These symptoms result from circulating bubbles generated by a pathogenic decompression. An acute fluoxetine treatment or the presence of the TREK-1 potassium channel increased the survival rate when mice are subjected to an experimental dive/decompression protocol. This is a paradox because fluoxetine is a blocker of TREK-1 channels. First, we studied the effects of an acute dose of fluoxetine (50mg/kg in wild-type (WT and TREK-1 deficient mice (Knockout homozygous KO and heterozygous HET. Then, we combined the same fluoxetine treatment with a five-day treatment by spadin, in order to specifically block TREK-1 activity (KO-like mice. KO and KO-like mice could be regarded as antidepressed models.167 mice (45 WTcont 46 WTflux 30 HETflux and 46 KOflux constituting the flux-pool and 113 supplementary mice (27 KO-like 24 WTflux2 24 KO-likeflux 21 WTcont2 17 WTno dive constituting the spad-pool were included in this study. Only 7% of KO-TREK-1 treated with fluoxetine (KOflux and 4% of mice treated with both spadin and fluoxetine (KO-likeflux died from decompression sickness (DCS symptoms. These values are much lower than those of WT control (62% or KO-like mice (41%. After the decompression protocol, mice showed a significant consumption of their circulating platelets and leukocytes.Spadin antidepressed mice were more likely to declare DCS. Nevertheless, which had both blocked TREK-1 channel and were treated with fluoxetine were better protected against DCS. We conclude that the protective effect of such an acute dose of fluoxetine is enhanced when TREK-1 is inhibited. We confirmed that antidepressed models may have worse DCS outcomes, but a concomitant fluoxetine treatment not only decreases DCS severity but increases the survival rate.

  8. Modulation of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-induced hypothermia by fluoxetine in the rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Daniel T; Taylor, David A

    1998-01-01

    It has been suggested that the dose of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) that induces hypothermia in the rat increases the release of brain 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). In light of this, we investigated the hypothermia produced by Δ9-THC, and the effect the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine has on this response.A significant dose-dependent decrease in body temperature occurred after i.v. administration of 0.5 to 5 mg kg−1 Δ9-THC; maximum decreases being 0.8±0.2°C to 2.9±0.3°C. This hypothermic response was attenuated by the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist SR 141716.Fluoxetine (10 mg kg−1 i.p.) alone caused a decrease in body temperature of 0.6±0.1°C (n=32, P<0.05) after 40 min. However, pretreatment with fluoxetine (10 mg kg−1 i.p.) 40 min before Δ9-THC significantly reduced the Δ9-THC-induced hypothermia (n=7–8, P<0.05). Contrary to this antagonist-like effect, fluoxetine administered 40 min after Δ9-THC significantly potentiated the Δ9-THC-induced hypothermia, producing a maximum decrease of 3.2±0.3°C.It is suggested that the effect of fluoxetine on the Δ9-THC-induced hypothermic response is dependent on the time of its administration relative to that of Δ9-THC. Pretreatment with fluoxetine increases extracellular 5-HT due to reuptake inhibition. Increased extracellular 5-HT can activate autoreceptors which may decrease serotonergic activity, thereby reducing the Δ9-THC-induced hypothermia. Conversely, when fluoxetine is adminstered after Δ9-THC, the reuptake block is thought to potentiate the already activated serotonegic system, hence potentiating the Δ9-THC-induced hypothermia. PMID:9723953

  9. Differential Peripheral Proteomic Biosignature of Fluoxetine Response in a Mouse Model of Anxiety/Depression

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    Indira Mendez-David

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The incorporation of peripheral biomarkers in the treatment of major depressive disorders (MDD could improve the efficiency of treatments and increase remission rate. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs represent an attractive biological substrate allowing the identification of a drug response signature. Using a proteomic approach with high-resolution mass spectrometry, the present study aimed to identify a biosignature of antidepressant response (fluoxetine, a Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor in PBMCs in a mouse model of anxiety/depression. Following determination of an emotionality score, using complementary behavioral analysis of anxiety/depression across three different tests (Elevated Plus Maze, Novelty Suppressed Feeding, Splash Test, we showed that a 4-week corticosterone treatment (35 μg/ml, CORT model in C57BL/6NTac male mice induced an anxiety/depressive-like behavior. Then, chronic fluoxetine treatment (18 mg/kg/day for 28 days in the drinking water reduced corticosterone-induced increase in emotional behavior. However, among 46 fluoxetine-treated mice, only 30 of them presented a 50% decrease in emotionality score, defining fluoxetine responders (CORT/Flx-R. To determine a peripheral biological signature of fluoxetine response, proteomic analysis was performed from PBMCs isolated from the “most” affected corticosterone/vehicle (CORT/V, corticosterone/fluoxetine responders and non-responders (CORT/Flx-NR animals. In comparison to CORT/V, a total of 263 proteins were differently expressed after fluoxetine exposure. Expression profile of these proteins showed a strong similarity between CORT/Flx-R and CORT/Flx-NR (R = 0.827, p < 1e-7. Direct comparison of CORT/Flx-R and CORT/Flx-NR groups revealed 100 differently expressed proteins, representing a combination of markers associated either with the maintenance of animals in a refractory state, or associated with behavioral improvement. Finally, 19 proteins showed a

  10. Ecotoxicological assessments show sucralose and fluoxetine affect the aquatic plant, Lemna minor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amy-Sagers, Cherisse; Reinhardt, Keith; Larson, Danelle M.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Sucralose increased leaf area and photosynthetic capacity of Lemna minor. • Sucralose increased δ 13 C of Lemna, indicating substantial uptake and assimilation. • 100 μg/L-fluoxetine decreased Lemna minor growth and asexual reproduction. - Abstract: Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCP) are prevalent in aquatic systems, yet the fate and impacts on aquatic plants needs quantification for many compounds. We measured and detected sucralose (an artificial sweetener), fluoxetine (an antidepressant), and other PPCP in the Portneuf River in Idaho, USA, where Lemna minor (an aquatic plant in the environment and used in ecotoxicology studies) naturally occurs. Sucralose was hypothesized to negatively affect photosynthesis and growth of L. minor because sucralose is a chlorinated molecule that may be toxic or unusable for plant metabolism. A priori hypotheses were not created for fluoxetine due to lack of previous studies examining its impacts on plants. We conducted laboratory ecotoxicological assessments for a large range of concentrations of sucralose and fluoxetine on L. minor physiology and photosynthetic function. Frond green leaf area, root length, growth rate, photosynthetic capacity, and plant carbon isotopic composition (discrimination relative to a standard; δ 13 C) were measured among treatments ranging from 0 to 15000 nmol/L-sucralose and 0–323 nmol/L-fluoxetine. Contrary to our predictions, sucralose significantly increased green leaf area, photosynthetic capacity, and δ 13 C of L. minor at environmentally relevant concentrations. The increase of δ 13 C from sucralose amendments and an isotope-mixing model indicated substantial sucralose uptake and assimilation within the plant. Unlike humans who cannot break down and utilize sucralose, we documented that L. minor—a mixotrophic plant—can use sucralose as a sugar substitute to increase its green leaf area and photosynthetic capacity. Fluoxetine significantly decreased L

  11. Ecotoxicological assessments show sucralose and fluoxetine affect the aquatic plant, Lemna minor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amy-Sagers, Cherisse; Reinhardt, Keith; Larson, Danelle M., E-mail: danellelarson77@gmail.com

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Sucralose increased leaf area and photosynthetic capacity of Lemna minor. • Sucralose increased δ {sup 13}C of Lemna, indicating substantial uptake and assimilation. • 100 μg/L-fluoxetine decreased Lemna minor growth and asexual reproduction. - Abstract: Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCP) are prevalent in aquatic systems, yet the fate and impacts on aquatic plants needs quantification for many compounds. We measured and detected sucralose (an artificial sweetener), fluoxetine (an antidepressant), and other PPCP in the Portneuf River in Idaho, USA, where Lemna minor (an aquatic plant in the environment and used in ecotoxicology studies) naturally occurs. Sucralose was hypothesized to negatively affect photosynthesis and growth of L. minor because sucralose is a chlorinated molecule that may be toxic or unusable for plant metabolism. A priori hypotheses were not created for fluoxetine due to lack of previous studies examining its impacts on plants. We conducted laboratory ecotoxicological assessments for a large range of concentrations of sucralose and fluoxetine on L. minor physiology and photosynthetic function. Frond green leaf area, root length, growth rate, photosynthetic capacity, and plant carbon isotopic composition (discrimination relative to a standard; δ{sup 13}C) were measured among treatments ranging from 0 to 15000 nmol/L-sucralose and 0–323 nmol/L-fluoxetine. Contrary to our predictions, sucralose significantly increased green leaf area, photosynthetic capacity, and δ {sup 13}C of L. minor at environmentally relevant concentrations. The increase of δ {sup 13}C from sucralose amendments and an isotope-mixing model indicated substantial sucralose uptake and assimilation within the plant. Unlike humans who cannot break down and utilize sucralose, we documented that L. minor—a mixotrophic plant—can use sucralose as a sugar substitute to increase its green leaf area and photosynthetic capacity. Fluoxetine

  12. [The effect of fluoxetine and tianeptine on emotional and eating disorders in postmenopausal women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jałocha, Waldemar; Walecka-Kapica, Ewa; Tomaszewska-Warda, Karolina; Chojnacki, Jan; Klupińska, Grazyna

    2014-07-01

    In postmenopausal period, there occur a variety of psychosomatic symptoms in a female organism, which include deterioration of mood, anxiety, fear, sleep disorders, excessive irritability, impaired concentration and memory, overt depression with psychomotor retardation, decreased interest and life activity, decreased or increased appetite. Fluoxetine -selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) is used in the treatment of obesity and depression. Tianeptine--selective serotonin reuptake enhancer (SSRE) is used in the treatment of depressive episodes. Metabolic effects of prolonged tianeptine use are not well known. The aim of the study was the evaluation of the effect of long-term use of fluoxetine and tianeptine on emotional state and eating disorders in postmenopausal women. The study was conducted in two groups of 30 postmenopausal women each, aged 52-66 years. The patients took fluoxetine for 6 months at a dose of 1 x 20 mg in the morning (group I) or tianeptine at a dose of 3 x 12.5 mg/daily (group II). Follow-up visits were conducted at 2, 4, 8, 12, 16 and 20 weeks. At week 24, extended tests were performed, including the assessment of the level of anxiety (Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale-HARS) and depression (Beck Depression Inventory-BDI), the body mass index (BMI) and the waist/ hip ratio (WHR), which were compared with the corresponding results prior to the treatment with fluoxetine and tianeptine. After 6 months, in the group receiving fluoxetine, the reduction of the level of anxiety was obtained from 22.92 +/- 4.08 points to 12.36 +/- 2.43 points (p 0.05) nor in the waist/ hip ratio--respectively 0.886 +/- 0.03 and 0.879 +/- 0.03 (p > 0.05). After 6 months, in the group receiving tianeptine, the reduction of the level of anxiety was achieved from 22.00 +/- 3.35 points to 15.20 +/- 3.42 points (p 0.05), even though slightly reduced waist/ hip ratio--from 0.877 +/- 0.03 to 0.863 +/- 0.03 (p < 0.05) was observed. Fluoxetine was more effective than

  13. Pharmacological approach to acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Ulrich-Christian; Semb, Synne; Nojgaard, Camilla

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present review is to summarize the current knowledge regarding pharmacological prevention and treatment of acute pancreatitis (AP) based on experimental animal models and clinical trials. Somatostatin (SS) and octreotide inhibit the exocrine production of pancreatic enzymes and may...... be useful as prophylaxis against post endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis (PEP). The protease inhibitor gabexate mesilate (GM) is used routinely as treatment to AP in some countries, but randomized clinical trials and a meta-analysis do not support this practice. Nitroglycerin (NGL...

  14. Effects of serotonin and fluoxetine on blood glucose regulation in two decapod species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos E.A.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the best known crustacean hormones is the crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH. However, the mechanisms involved in hormone release in these animals are poorly understood, and thus constitute the central objective of the present study. Different groups of crustaceans belonging to diverse taxa (Chasmagnathus granulata, a grapsid crab and Orconectes limosus, an astacid were injected with serotonin, fluoxetine, or a mixture of both, and glycemic values (C. granulata and O. limosus and CHH levels (O. limosus were determined after 2 h in either submerged animals or animals exposed to atmospheric air. Both serotonin and fluoxetine caused significant hyperglycemia (P<0.05 after injection into the blood sinus of the two species, an effect enhanced after exposure to atmospheric air. In C. granulata blood glucose increased from 6.1 to 43.3 and 11.4 mg/100 ml in submerged animals and from 5.7 to 55.2 and 22.5 mg/100 ml in air-exposed animals after treatment with serotonin and fluoxetine, respectively. In O. limosus the increases were from 1.2 to 59.7 and 135.2 mg/100 ml in submerged animals and from 2.5 to 200.3 and 193.6 mg/100 ml in air-exposed animals after treatment with serotonin and fluoxetine, respectively. Serotonin and fluoxetine also caused a significant increase in the circulating levels of CHH in O. limosus, from 11.9 to 43 and 45.7 fmol/ml in submerged animals and from 13.2 to 32.6 and 45.7 fmol/ml in air-exposed animals, respectively, thus confirming their action as neuroregulators in these invertebrates.

  15. Technetium-99m DTPA inhalation scintigraphy in patients treated with fluoxetine and maprotiline: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaya, G.C.; Durak, H.; Oezdogan, Oe.; Sayit, E.; Degirmenci, B.; Derebek, E. [Dokuz Eyluel Univ., Izmir (Turkey). School of Medicine; Yemez, B.; Turhal, Ue. [Dept. of Psychiatry, Dokuz Eylul Univ. School of Medicine, Izmir (Turkey)

    2000-09-01

    Drug-metabolising enzymatic activities have been detected in tracheobronchiolar, bronchiolar and alveolar regions in the lungs. Induction of phospholipidosis by amine drugs such as clorphentermine has also been shown. This study aimed to investigate the effect of fluoxetine and maprotiline, which contain amine groups in their structure, on pulmonary epithelial membrane permeability. Twenty-seven patients (mean age 36{+-}12 years) with various psychiatric problems, of whom 17 were treated with fluoxetine and 10 with maprotiline, were included in this study. Technetium-99m diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid (DTPA) aerosol inhalation scintigraphy was performed before and after 4-6 weeks of therapy. Following the inhalation of 1480 MBq {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA for 3 min, lung images in a 64 x 64 matrix were obtained every minute for 30 min. Regions of interest were drawn around the periphery of the lungs and on the major airways. Clearance half-times (T{sub 1/2}) were calculated by placing a mono-exponential fit on the curves. Penetration index (PI) was calculated on the first-minute image. There was no difference between the clearance rates of {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA before and after therapy for either the fluoxetine or the maprotiline group. After therapy, a significant decrease in PI was found in patients treated with fluoxetine (PI values before and after therapy: 0.53{+-}0.03 and 0.49{+-}0.05 respectively, P{<=}0.05). This finding might have been due to the induction of increased synaptic serotonin (5-HT) by fluoxetine, which acts by inhibiting the re-uptake of 5-HT on presynaptic membranes. Bronchoconstriction of small and medium airways may be caused by direct and indirect effects of 5-HT on smooth muscle contraction. (orig.)

  16. Pharmacological management of dermatomyositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griger, Zoltán; Nagy-Vincze, Melinda; Dankó, Katalin

    2017-10-01

    Dermatomyositis is a rare heterogeneous systemic autoimmune disease with multiple organ involvement which can result in significant disability and mortality. Despite the lack of placebo-controlled trials, glucocorticoids are considered to be the mainstay of initial management. Treatment strategies are mainly based on uncontrolled studies, evidence based guidelines for treatments do not exist. Areas covered: This review provides an overview of the currently available pharmacological treatments in the field of dermatomyositis including conventional immunosuppressants, biologics and topical agents. The role of antibodies in different treatment responses of dermatomyositis related clinicoserological syndromes is also discussed. A PubMed search was performed in order to find relevant literature for this review. Expert commentary: Early recognition and intervention is essential to ameliorate disease outcome. Determination of antibodies provide a useful key in diagnosis, clinical manifestations, malignancy, prognosis, and treatment response and may lead to wider acceptance of personalized medicine. Corticosteroids with adjunctive steroid-sparing immunosuppressive therapies are recommended to treat disease activity, prevent mortality, and reduce long-term disability. Combinations of second-line therapies or newer third-line therapies are used in severe, refractory, or corticosteroid-dependent diseases. Further research is required to assess the role of new therapies.

  17. Biological and Pharmacological properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Biological and Pharmacological properties. NOEA inhibits Ceramidase. Anandamide inhibits gap junction conductance and reduces sperm fertilizing capacity. Endogenous ligands for Cannabinoid receptors (anandamide and NPEA). Antibacterial and antiviral ...

  18. Population PK modelling and simulation based on fluoxetine and norfluoxetine concentrations in milk: a milk concentration-based prediction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanoshima, Reo; Bournissen, Facundo Garcia; Tanigawara, Yusuke; Kristensen, Judith H; Taddio, Anna; Ilett, Kenneth F; Begg, Evan J; Wallach, Izhar; Ito, Shinya

    2014-10-01

    Population pharmacokinetic (pop PK) modelling can be used for PK assessment of drugs in breast milk. However, complex mechanistic modelling of a parent and an active metabolite using both blood and milk samples is challenging. We aimed to develop a simple predictive pop PK model for milk concentration-time profiles of a parent and a metabolite, using data on fluoxetine (FX) and its active metabolite, norfluoxetine (NFX), in milk. Using a previously published data set of drug concentrations in milk from 25 women treated with FX, a pop PK model predictive of milk concentration-time profiles of FX and NFX was developed. Simulation was performed with the model to generate FX and NFX concentration-time profiles in milk of 1000 mothers. This milk concentration-based pop PK model was compared with the previously validated plasma/milk concentration-based pop PK model of FX. Milk FX and NFX concentration-time profiles were described reasonably well by a one compartment model with a FX-to-NFX conversion coefficient. Median values of the simulated relative infant dose on a weight basis (sRID: weight-adjusted daily doses of FX and NFX through breastmilk to the infant, expressed as a fraction of therapeutic FX daily dose per body weight) were 0.028 for FX and 0.029 for NFX. The FX sRID estimates were consistent with those of the plasma/milk-based pop PK model. A predictive pop PK model based on only milk concentrations can be developed for simultaneous estimation of milk concentration-time profiles of a parent (FX) and an active metabolite (NFX). © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  19. Pharmacologic therapy for acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambhampati, Swetha; Park, Walter; Habtezion, Aida

    2014-01-01

    While conservative management such as fluid, bowel rest, and antibiotics is the mainstay of current acute pancreatitis management, there is a lot of promise in pharmacologic therapies that target various aspects of the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. Extensive review of preclinical studies, which include assessment of therapies such as anti-secretory agents, protease inhibitors, anti-inflammatory agents, and anti-oxidants are discussed. Many of these studies have shown therapeutic benefit and improved survival in experimental models. Based on available preclinical studies, we discuss potential novel targeted pharmacologic approaches that may offer promise in the treatment of acute pancreatitis. To date a variety of clinical studies have assessed the translational potential of animal model effective experimental therapies and have shown either failure or mixed results in human studies. Despite these discouraging clinical studies, there is a great clinical need and there exist several preclinical effective therapies that await investigation in patients. Better understanding of acute pancreatitis pathophysiology and lessons learned from past clinical studies are likely to offer a great foundation upon which to expand future therapies in acute pancreatitis. PMID:25493000

  20. Olive oil and leaf extract prevent fluoxetine-induced hepatotoxicity by attenuating oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgebaly, Hassan A; Mosa, Nermeen M; Allach, Mariam; El-Massry, Khaled F; El-Ghorab, Ahmed H; Al Hroob, Amir M; Mahmoud, Ayman M

    2018-02-01

    Olive oil and leaf extract have several health benefits; however, their beneficial effect against fluoxetine-induced liver injury has not been investigated. The present study aimed to scrutinize the impact of fluoxetine on the liver of rats and to evaluate the protective effects of olive oil and leaf extract. Rats received fluoxetine orally at dose of 10 mg/kg body weight for 7 consecutive days. The fluoxetine-induced rats were concurrently treated with olive oil or leaf extract. At the end of the experiment, blood and liver samples were collected for analysis. Fluoxetine administration significantly increased circulating ALT, AST, ALP and the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β levels in rats. Histological analysis showed several alterations, such as inflammatory cells infiltration, hepatocyte vacuolation and dilated sinusoids in the liver of fluoxetine-induced rats. Concurrent supplementation of olive oil and olive leaf extract significantly reduced circulating liver function marker enzymes and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and prevented fluoxetine-induced histological alterations. Both olive oil and leaf extract significantly decreased liver lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide, and ameliorated liver glutathione, superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. In addition, olive oil and leaf extract prevented fluoxetine-induced apoptosis in the liver of rats as evidenced by decreased expression of Bax and caspase-3, and up-regulated expression of Bcl-2. In conclusion, olive oil and leaf extract protect against fluoxetine-induced liver injury in rats through attenuation of oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Postnatal development of rats exposed to fluoxetine or venlafaxine during the third week of pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    da-Silva V.A.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to compare the toxic effects of fluoxetine (F (8 and 16 mg/kg and venlafaxine (V (40 and 80 mg/kg administered during the third week of pregnancy on early development of rats. Both antidepressants were administered by gavage on pregnancy days 15 to 20 to groups of 10 to 12 animals each. Duration of gestation, food and water consumption, number of live pups and birth weight were recorded. Litters were culled to six pups at birth (day 1 and followed for growth until weaning (day 25. On day 60, a male and a female from each litter were injected with the 5-HT1 agonist, 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (6 mg/kg, ip and the serotonergic syndrome was graded. Fluoxetine but not venlafaxine reduced the duration of pregnancy when compared to the control (C group (F = 21.1 days and C = 21.6 days, mean, P<0.02; maximum = 22 days and minimum = 21 days in both groups. The highest doses of both fluoxetine, 16 mg/kg (F16, and venlafaxine, 80 mg/kg (V80, reduced the food intake of pregnant rats, resulting in different rates of body weight gain during treatment (from pregnancy day 15 to day 20: F16 = 29.0 g, V80 = 28.7 g vs C = 39.5 g (median. Birth weight was influenced by treatment and sex (P<0.05; two-way ANOVA. Both doses of fluoxetine or venlafaxine reduced the body weight of litters; however, the body weight of litters from treated dams was equal to the weight of control litters by the time of weaning. At weaning there was no significant difference in weight between sexes. There was no difference among groups in number of live pups at birth, stillbirths, mortality during the lactation period or in the manifestation of serotonergic syndrome in adult rats. The occurrence of low birth weight among pups born to dams which did not show reduced food ingestion or reduction of body weight gain during treatment with lower doses of fluoxetine or venlafaxine suggests that these drugs may have a deleterious effect on prenatal

  2. 1H NMR-Based Metabolic Profiling Reveals the Effects of Fluoxetine on Lipid and Amino Acid Metabolism in Astrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunjie Bai

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI, is a prescribed and effective antidepressant and generally used for the treatment of depression. Previous studies have revealed that the antidepressant mechanism of fluoxetine was related to astrocytes. However, the therapeutic mechanism underlying its mode of action in astrocytes remains largely unclear. In this study, primary astrocytes were exposed to 10 µM fluoxetine; 24 h post-treatment, a high-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR-based metabolomic approach coupled with multivariate statistical analysis was used to characterize the metabolic variations of intracellular metabolites. The orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA score plots of the spectra demonstrated that the fluoxetine-treated astrocytes were significantly distinguished from the untreated controls. In total, 17 differential metabolites were identified to discriminate the two groups. These key metabolites were mainly involved in lipids, lipid metabolism-related molecules and amino acids. This is the first study to indicate that fluoxetine may exert antidepressant action by regulating the astrocyte’s lipid and amino acid metabolism. These findings should aid our understanding of the biological mechanisms underlying fluoxetine therapy.

  3. Bioconcentration of the antidepressant fluoxetine and its effects on the physiological and biochemical status in Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jiannan; Zou, Hua; Liu, Qingqing; Zhang, Shanshan; Mamitiana Razanajatovo, Roger

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bioconcentration potential of fluoxetine and its biological effects in Daphnia magna. After 48h of waterborne exposure, the bioconcentration of fluoxetine in D. magna was determined to be 460.61 and 174.41Lkg -1 for nominal exposure concentrations of 0.5 and 5µgL -1 , respectively. Moreover, various biological endpoints, including physiological responses (filtration and ingestion rates), enzymatic biomarkers related to neurotoxicity [acetylcholinesterase (AChE)] and antioxidant defense [superoxide dismutase (SOD)], and an oxidative stress damage marker [malondialdehyde (MDA)], were assessed. Fluoxetine exposure increased the filtration rate of daphnia, while the ingestion rate was not obviously modified. AChE activity was significantly inhibited, highlighting the neurotoxicity of fluoxetine on D. magna. However, with some alterations in the SOD activity and MDA content, no obvious oxidative damage was observed in D. magna exposed to fluoxetine at the tested concentrations. These results indicate that fluoxetine can be accumulated and consequently induce physiological and biochemical perturbations in D. magna. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Pharmacological characterization of the first in class clinical candidate PF‐05190457: a selective ghrelin receptor competitive antagonist with inverse agonism that increases vagal afferent firing and glucose‐dependent insulin secretion ex vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, J; Chuddy, J; Stock, I A; Loria, P M; Straub, S V; Vage, C; Cameron, K O; Bhattacharya, S K; Lapham, K; McClure, K F; Zhang, Y

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Ghrelin increases growth hormone secretion, gastric acid secretion, gastric motility and hunger but decreases glucose‐dependent insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity in humans. Antagonizing the ghrelin receptor has potential as a therapeutic approach in the treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Therefore, the aim was to pharmacologically characterize the novel small‐molecule antagonist PF‐05190457 and assess translational pharmacology ex vivo. Experimental Approach Radioligand binding in filter and scintillation proximity assay formats were used to evaluate affinity, and europium‐labelled GTP to assess functional activity. Rat vagal afferent firing and calcium imaging in dispersed islets were used as native tissues underlying food intake and insulin secretion respectively. Key Results PF‐05190457 was a potent and selective inverse agonist on constitutively active ghrelin receptors and acted as a competitive antagonist of ghrelin action, with a human K d of 3 nM requiring 4 h to achieve equilibrium. Potency of PF‐05190457 was similar across different species. PF‐05190457 increased intracellular calcium within dispersed islets and increased vagal afferent firing in a concentration‐dependent manner with similar potency but was threefold less potent as compared with the in vitro K i in recombinant overexpressing cells. The effect of PF‐05190457 on rodent islets was comparable with glibenclamide, but glucose‐dependent and additive with the insulin secretagogue glucagon‐like peptide‐1. Conclusions and Implications Together, these data provide the pharmacological in vitro and ex vivo characterization of the first ghrelin receptor inverse agonist, which has advanced into clinical trials to evaluate the therapeutic potential of blocking ghrelin receptors in obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:26784385

  5. Evaluation of the binding of the radiolabeled antidepressant drug, {sup 18}F-fluoxetine in the rodent brain: an in vitro and in vivo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, Jogeshwar E-mail: jogeshwar_mukherjee@ketthealth.com; Das, Malay K.; Yang Zhiying; Lew, Robert

    1998-10-01

    We have developed {sup 18}F-fluoxetine as a radiotracer analog of the antidepressant drug fluoxetine (Prozac). In vitro saturation experiments of {sup 18}F-fluoxetine were carried out on rat midbrain tissue and citalopram was used for measuring nonspecific binding. A saturation curve for the binding of {sup 18}F-fluoxetine was not obtained. Even when fluoxetine (10 {mu}M) was used for measurements of nonspecific binding, a saturation curve was difficult to obtain. Other compounds, such as deprenyl, clorgyline, amphetamine, and reserpine were also not able to reduce the binding of {sup 18}F-fluoxetine. Ex vivo autoradiographic experiments with {sup 18}F-fluoxetine did not reveal any specific uptake in various brain regions. In vivo administration of {sup 18}F-fluoxetine in rats showed similar uptake in all the brain regions with little regional selectivity. A subcellular analysis of rat brain tissue after intravenous (IV) administration of {sup 18}F-fluoxetine indicated significant amounts of binding in mitochondria and synaptosomes. In summary, in vitro experiments with {sup 18}F-fluoxetine indicate little specific binding. Binding to the serotonin transporter was not identifiable. High nonspecific binding of the tracer resulting from its subcellular nature in the brain masks the ability to detect binding to the serotonin uptake sites in vivo. These findings indicate that a large portion of the binding of {sup 18}F-fluoxetine in rat brains is subcellular and clears slowly out of the cells. Other sites, such as monoamine oxidase, may also play a significant role in the action of fluoxetine.

  6. Evaluation of the binding of the radiolabeled antidepressant drug, 18F-fluoxetine in the rodent brain: an in vitro and in vivo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, Jogeshwar; Das, Malay K.; Yang Zhiying; Lew, Robert

    1998-01-01

    We have developed 18 F-fluoxetine as a radiotracer analog of the antidepressant drug fluoxetine (Prozac). In vitro saturation experiments of 18 F-fluoxetine were carried out on rat midbrain tissue and citalopram was used for measuring nonspecific binding. A saturation curve for the binding of 18 F-fluoxetine was not obtained. Even when fluoxetine (10 μM) was used for measurements of nonspecific binding, a saturation curve was difficult to obtain. Other compounds, such as deprenyl, clorgyline, amphetamine, and reserpine were also not able to reduce the binding of 18 F-fluoxetine. Ex vivo autoradiographic experiments with 18 F-fluoxetine did not reveal any specific uptake in various brain regions. In vivo administration of 18 F-fluoxetine in rats showed similar uptake in all the brain regions with little regional selectivity. A subcellular analysis of rat brain tissue after intravenous (IV) administration of 18 F-fluoxetine indicated significant amounts of binding in mitochondria and synaptosomes. In summary, in vitro experiments with 18 F-fluoxetine indicate little specific binding. Binding to the serotonin transporter was not identifiable. High nonspecific binding of the tracer resulting from its subcellular nature in the brain masks the ability to detect binding to the serotonin uptake sites in vivo. These findings indicate that a large portion of the binding of 18 F-fluoxetine in rat brains is subcellular and clears slowly out of the cells. Other sites, such as monoamine oxidase, may also play a significant role in the action of fluoxetine

  7. [Pharmacological treatment of dyslexia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artigas-Pallarés, J

    Pharmacological approaches aimed at improving dyslexia are almost inexistent. To analyse, based on the current theories of dyslexia, the possibility of applying some pharmacological measure. The different theories on dyslexia are discussed. The multiple deficit model is then outlined, in opposition to the classical single dysfunction model. The model described provides a coherent explanation for several conceptual dilemmas that arise from the analysis of the comorbidity of dyslexia. The few pharmacological interventions that have been proposed to date are also analysed; with the exception of stimulants, however, they are not supported by any solid theoretical base about dyslexia. Lastly, we use the multiple deficit model as an aid to analyse the current data referring to the effect of stimulants on nuclear mechanisms in dyslexia. It is suggested that it would be wise to monitor the response in reading skills in children with dyslexia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) who are being treated with stimulants. We also recommend taking into consideration the comorbidity between dyslexia and ADHD as an argument in favour of pharmacological intervention in patients with apparently mild symptoms of ADHD. In any case, today, pharmacological intervention cannot be expected to go beyond its having a complementary and synergic effect on traditional methods of treatment.

  8. Modeling of the temporal patterns of fluoxetine prescriptions and suicide rates in the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S Milane

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available To study the potential association of antidepressant use and suicide at a population level, we analyzed the associations between suicide rates and dispensing of the prototypic SSRI antidepressant fluoxetine in the United States during the period 1960-2002.Sources of data included Centers of Disease Control and US Census Bureau age-adjusted suicide rates since 1960 and numbers of fluoxetine sales in the US, since its introduction in 1988. We conducted statistical analysis of age-adjusted population data and prescription numbers. Suicide rates fluctuated between 12.2 and 13.7 per 100,000 for the entire population from the early 1960s until 1988. Since then, suicide rates have gradually declined, with the lowest value of 10.4 per 100,000 in 2000. This steady decline is significantly associated with increased numbers of fluoxetine prescriptions dispensed from 2,469,000 in 1988 to 33,320,000 in 2002 (r(s = -0.92; p < 0.001. Mathematical modeling of what suicide rates would have been during the 1988-2002 period based on pre-1988 data indicates that since the introduction of fluoxetine in 1988 through 2002 there has been a cumulative decrease in expected suicide mortality of 33,600 individuals (posterior median, 95% Bayesian credible interval 22,400-45,000.The introduction of SSRIs in 1988 has been temporally associated with a substantial reduction in the number of suicides. This effect may have been more apparent in the female population, whom we postulate might have particularly benefited from SSRI treatment. While these types of data cannot lead to conclusions on causality, we suggest here that in the context of untreated depression being the major cause of suicide, antidepressant treatment could have had a contributory role in the reduction of suicide rates in the period 1988-2002.

  9. 5-HT2A receptors are involved in cognitive but not antidepressant effects of fluoxetine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañé, Anna; Kargieman, Lucila; Celada, Pau; Bortolozzi, Analía; Artigas, Francesc

    2015-08-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) plays a crucial role in cognitive and affective functions. It contains a rich serotonergic (serotonin, 5-HT) innervation and a high density of 5-HT receptors. Endogenous 5-HT exerts robust actions on the activity of pyramidal neurons in medial PFC (mPFC) via excitatory 5-HT2A and inhibitory 5-HT1A receptors, suggesting the involvement of 5-HT neurotransmission in cortical functions. However, the underlying mechanisms must be elucidated. Here we examine the role of 5-HT2A receptors in the processing of emotional and cognitive signals evoked by increasing the 5-HT tone after acute blockade of the 5-HT transporter. Fluoxetine (5-20mg/kg i.p.) dose-dependently reduced the immobility time in the tail-suspension test in wild-type (WT) and 5-HT2Aknockout (KO2A) mice, with non-significant differences between genotypes. Fluoxetine (10mg/kg i.p.) significantly impaired mice performance in the novel object recognition test 24h post-administration in WT, but not in KO2A mice. The comparable effect of fluoxetine on extracellular 5-HT in the mPFC of both genotypes suggests that presynaptic differences are not accountable. In contrast, single unit recordings of mPFC putative pyramidal neurons showed that fluoxetine (1.8-7.2mg/kg i.v.) significantly increased neuronal discharge in KO2A but not in WT mice. This effect is possibly mediated by an altered excitatory/inhibitory balance in the PFC in KO2A mice. Overall, the present results suggest that 5-HT2A receptors play a detrimental role in long-term memory deficits mediated by an excess 5-HT in PFC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  10. Combination therapy of atypical odontalgia with fluoxetine and clonazepam: Report of an effective prescription

    OpenAIRE

    Hamed Mortazavi; Maryam Baharvand; Amin Khodadoustan; Zahra Mansouri

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Atypical odontalgia (AO) is a subgroup of persistent idiopathic facial pain. We introduced a combination therapy of fluoxetine and clonazepam to treat AO. Case Report: A 30-year-old female with the chief complaint of severe pain (#8 based on Visual Analogue Scale( VAS)) in the site of extracted tooth #3 since 2 months ago was referred to the Department of Oral Medicine. The pain was of sharp quality continuing all day long and radiated to cervical muscles, forehead, and mandible...

  11. Complexation of fluoxetine hydrochloride with beta-cyclodextrin. A proton magnetic resonance study in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Syed Mashhood; Asmat, Fahmeena; Maheshwari, Arti; Koketsu, Mamoru

    2005-05-01

    A proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic study in D2O of mixtures of fluoxetine hydrochloride (guest) with beta-cyclodextrin (host) revealed the existence of two different equilibria for 1:1 inclusion complexes in which -CF3 substituted ring of the guest is more tightly held by the host cavity. The structures of the two complexes have been proposed which are supported by 2DROESY spectral data. The dissociation constant was also determined.

  12. Mitochondrial biogenesis: pharmacological approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Organelle biogenesis is concomitant to organelle inheritance during cell division. It is necessary that organelles double their size and divide to give rise to two identical daughter cells. Mitochondrial biogenesis occurs by growth and division of pre-existing organelles and is temporally coordinated with cell cycle events [1]. However, mitochondrial biogenesis is not only produced in association with cell division. It can be produced in response to an oxidative stimulus, to an increase in the energy requirements of the cells, to exercise training, to electrical stimulation, to hormones, during development, in certain mitochondrial diseases, etc. [2]. Mitochondrial biogenesis is therefore defined as the process via which cells increase their individual mitochondrial mass [3]. Recent discoveries have raised attention to mitochondrial biogenesis as a potential target to treat diseases which up to date do not have an efficient cure. Mitochondria, as the major ROS producer and the major antioxidant producer exert a crucial role within the cell mediating processes such as apoptosis, detoxification, Ca2+ buffering, etc. This pivotal role makes mitochondria a potential target to treat a great variety of diseases. Mitochondrial biogenesis can be pharmacologically manipulated. This issue tries to cover a number of approaches to treat several diseases through triggering mitochondrial biogenesis. It contains recent discoveries in this novel field, focusing on advanced mitochondrial therapies to chronic and degenerative diseases, mitochondrial diseases, lifespan extension, mitohormesis, intracellular signaling, new pharmacological targets and natural therapies. It contributes to the field by covering and gathering the scarcely reported pharmacological approaches in the novel and promising field of mitochondrial biogenesis. There are several diseases that have a mitochondrial origin such as chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) and the Kearns- Sayre syndrome (KSS

  13. Does selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine affects mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Rey, Maria; Bebianno, Maria João

    2013-01-01

    Fluoxetine (FLX) the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) in Prozac ® is a widely prescribed psychoactive drug which ubiquitous occurrence in the aquatic environment is associated to a poor removal rate in waste-water treatment plant (WWTP) systems. This API acts as a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) frequently reported to cause disrupting effects in non-target species. The objective of this study includes a multibiomarker response evaluation on mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis during two weeks exposure to 75 ng L −1 FLX assessing antioxidant enzymes activities – superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST); lipid peroxidation (LPO), acetylcholinesterase (AChE) neurotoxic response and endocrine disruption through alkali-labile phosphates (ALP) indirect measurement of vitellogenin-like proteins. Results show transient tissue-specific enzymatic responses and damage affecting mostly mussel gills. However, the clear ALP levels inhibition throughout time in both sex-differentiated gonads gives evidence to FLX reinforced action as an endocrine disruptor rather than an oxidative or neurotoxic inducer. - Highlights: ► Short-time exposure of Mytilus galloprovincialis to antidepressant fluoxetine. ► Tissue-specific transient antioxidant enzymes activities alteration. ► Lipid peroxidation (LPO) induction in exposed-tissues. ► Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity upregulation in exposed gills. ► ALP levels downregulation in exposed sex-differentiated mussels. - Exposure to 75 ng L −1 antidepressant fluoxetine (FLX) induces tissue-specific multibiomarker responses alteration in mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis.

  14. Effects of fluoxetine and melatonin on mood, sleep quality and body mass index in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnacki, C; Walecka-Kapica, E; Klupinska, G; Pawlowicz, M; Blonska, A; Chojnacki, J

    2015-10-01

    Frequent mood and sleep disorders and increased appetite leading to obesity are observed in postmenopausal women. Due to the limitations of hormone replacement therapy the researchers look for other treatment regimes. The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of fluoxetine and melatonin in the treatment of these disorders. The study included 64 overweight postmenopausal women, aged 54 - 65 years, with increased appetite. They were randomly assigned in 2 groups. In group I (n = 30) fluoxetine (20 mg in the morning) and placebo (in the evening) were administered for 24 weeks. Group II (n = 34) received fluoxetine (20 mg in the morning) and melatonin (5 mg in the evening) in the same period of time. Hamilton anxiety rating scale (HARS), Beck depression scale (BDI), the insomnia severity index (ISI) and body mass index (BMI) were used to assess the health status and the treatment efficacy. After 24 weeks, comparable and statistically significant reduction in the level of anxiety and depression was obtained in both groups. In group I, the ISI decreased from 14.9 ± 2.5 points to 10.9 ± 1.9 points (P melatonin was useful option to treat mood, sleep and appetite disorders in postmenopausal women.

  15. Pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions to influence adipose tissue function

    OpenAIRE

    Westerink, Jan; Visseren, Frank LJ

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Obesity is associated with metabolic derangements such as insulin resistance, inflammation and hypercoagulobility which can all be understood as consequences of adipose tissue dysfunction. The potential role for adipose tissue derived cytokines and adipokines in the development of vascular disease and diabetes may produce a clinical need to influence adipose tissue function. Various pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions affect plasma cytokine and adipokine levels. The...

  16. Pharmacological cognitive enhancement in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colaneri, Natalie; Sheldon, Mark; Adesman, Andrew

    2018-03-13

    Given the pervasiveness of psychotropic medication in the youth population and an increasingly competitive culture regarding educational performance, children, teenagers, and/or their parents may increasingly seek psychotropic substances in an effort to enhance a student's cognitive abilities and/or academic performance. Physicians must become aware of this very important and clinically relevant issue and work to ensure that medications remain in the hands of patients seeking wellness and not enhancement. The current article highlights findings on the pervasiveness of stimulant misuse and diversion in youth, the motivations and effects of stimulant use, health and legal consequences associated with use, and physician perceptions and preventive practices. Ethical concerns regarding pharmacological cognitive enhancement in pediatrics are also outlined - including coercion for nonusers, inequities in access, and threats to an individual's sense of self with regard to authenticity and autonomy. Pharmacological cognitive enhancement in pediatrics will become a larger, clinically relevant issue in the coming years. Physicians who care for children and adolescents must become more aware of this issue. Given the myriad health, legal, and ethical concerns, clinicians should discourage use of pharmaceuticals for enhancement purposes in the pediatric population.

  17. Parotid salivary parameters in bulimic patients – a controlled clinical trial.

    OpenAIRE

    Elżbieta Paszyńska; Agnieszka Słopień; Monika Węglarz; Roger W.A. Linden

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to determine whether patients with purging-type bulimia and/or non-bulimic patients, treated with serotonin reuptake inhibitor SI-5-HT (fluoxetine), have dental erosion and changes in selected buffer components of parotid saliva (bicarbonates, phosphates, urea), compared with the healthy population. Methods A controlled clinical trial was designed for three, age-matched, female groups of 94 patients: 1) bulimic patients treated with fluoxetin...

  18. Interstitial lung disease induced by fluoxetine: Systematic review of literature and analysis of Vigiaccess, Eudravigilance and a national pharmacovigilance database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deidda, Arianna; Pisanu, Claudia; Micheletto, Laura; Bocchetta, Alberto; Del Zompo, Maria; Stochino, Maria Erminia

    2017-06-01

    We investigated a pulmonary adverse drug reaction possibly induced by fluoxetine, the Interstitial Lung Disease, by performing a systematic review of published case reports on this subject, a review of the World Health Organization VigiAccess database, of the European EudraVigilance database and of a national Pharmacovigilance database (Italian Pharmacovigilance Network). The research found a total of seven cases linking fluoxetine to Interstitial Lung Disease in the literature. 36 cases of interstitial lung disease related to fluoxetine were retrieved from the VigiAccess database (updated to July 2016), and 36 reports were found in EudraVigilance database (updated to June 2016). In the Italian Pharmacovigilance database (updated to August 2016), we found only one case of Interstitial Lung Disease, codified as "pulmonary disease". Our investigation shows that fluoxetine might be considered as a possible cause of Interstitial Lung Disease. In particular, although here we do not discuss the assessment of benefits and harms of fluoxetine, since this antidepressant is widely used, our review suggests that fluoxetine-induced Interstitial Lung Disease should be considered in patients with dyspnea, associated or not with dry cough, who are treated with this drug. An early withdrawn of fluoxetine could be useful to obtain a complete remission of this adverse drug reaction and special attention should be particularly devoted to long-term therapy, and to female and elderly patients. Although the spontaneous reporting system is affected by important limitations, drug post- marketing surveillance represents an important tool to evaluate the real world effectiveness and safety of drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. How Does In Vivo Biliary Elimination of Drugs Change with Age? Evidence from In Vitro and Clinical Data Using a Systems Pharmacology Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Trevor N; Jamei, Masoud; Rowland-Yeo, Karen

    2016-07-01

    Information on the developmental changes in biliary excretion (BE) of drugs is sparse. The aims of this study were to collate literature data on the pharmacokinetics of biliary excretion of drugs used in pediatrics and to apply a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to predict their systemic clearance (CL) with a view to elucidating age-related changes in biliary excretion. Drug parameters for azithromycin, ceftriaxone, and digoxin administered intravenously and buprenorphine (intravenous and sublingual) were collated from the literature and used in the Simcyp Simulator to predict adult CL values, which were then validated against observed data. The change in CL with age was simulated in the pediatric model and compared with observed data; where necessary, the ontogeny function associated with BE was applied to recover the age-related CL. For azithromycin a fraction of adult BE activity of 15% was necessary to predict the CL in neonates (26 weeks gestational age) and 100% activity was apparent by 7 months. For ceftriaxone and digoxin full BE activity appeared to be present at term birth; for digoxin, an adult BE activity of 10% was needed to predict the CL in premature neonates (30 weeks gestational age). The CL of buprenorphine with age was described by the ontogeny of the major elimination pathways (CYP3A4 and UGT1A1) with no ontogeny assumed for the biliary component. Thus, the ontogeny of BE for all four drugs appears to be rapid and they attain adult levels at birth or within the first few months of postnatal age. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  20. Chronic fluoxetine administration enhances synaptic plasticity and increases functional dynamics in hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, Dina; Castrén, Eero; Taira, Tomi

    2017-11-01

    Recent studies demonstrate that chronic administration of the widely used antidepressant fluoxetine (FLX) promotes neurogenesis, synaptogenesis and synaptic plasticity in the adult hippocampus, cortex and amygdala. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects and how are they related to the clinical antidepressant efficacy are still poorly understood. We show here that chronic FLX administration decreases hippocampus-associated neophobia in naïve mice. In parallel, electrophysiological recordings in hippocampal CA3-CA1 circuitry revealed that the FLX treatment resulted in increased short- and long-term plasticity likely attributed to changes in presynaptic function. These changes were accompanied by enhancement in the expression of proteins related to vesicular trafficking and release, namely synaptophysin, synaptotagmin 1, MUNC 18 and syntaxin 1. Thus, chronic FLX administration is associated with enhanced synaptic dynamics atypical of mature CA1 synapses, elevated hippocampal plasticity, improved hippocampus-dependent behavior as well as altered expression of synaptic proteins regulating neurotransmitter trafficking and release. The results support the idea that antidepressants can promote neuronal plasticity and show that they can increase the functional dynamic range and information processing in synaptic circuitries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in major depressive disorder : state-trait issues, clinical features and pharmacological treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molendijk, M. L.; Bus, B. A. A.; Spinhoven, Ph; Penninx, B. W. J. H.; Kenis, G.; Prickaerts, J.; Voshaar, R. C. Oude; Elzinga, B. M.

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence supports 'the neurotrophin hypothesis of depression' in its prediction that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is involved in depression. However, some key questions remain unanswered, including whether abnormalities in BDNF persist beyond the clinical state of depression,

  2. Serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in major depressive disorder: state-trait issues, clinical features and pharmacological treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molendijk, M.L.; Bus, B.A.A.; Spinhoven, P.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Kenis, G.; Prickaerts, J.; Voshaar, R.C.O.; Elzinga, B.M.

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence supports 'the neurotrophin hypothesis of depression' in its prediction that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is involved in depression. However, some key questions remain unanswered, including whether abnormalities in BDNF persist beyond the clinical state of depression,

  3. Fluoxetina: indícios de uso inadequado Fluoxetine: indication of inadequate use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisaldo A. Carlini

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Investigar o uso da fluoxetina na cidade de Santo André, SP, por meio de coleta e análise das receitas especiais (RE prescritas por médicos e arquivadas nas farmácias e drogarias daquela cidade. MÉTODOS: Foram coletadas as receitas especiais retidas durante os meses de agosto do ano de 2005 a julho de 2006, em 13 farmácias de manipulação e em 27 drogarias em diferentes regiões de Santo André. Cada receita especial foi analisada em relação à presença de fluoxetina, em associação ou não a outros princípios ativos, e o sexo do(a paciente foi anotado. RESULTADOS: Foram analisadas 39.782 RE - 16.124 coletadas das farmácias magistrais e 23.658 das drogarias. Desses totais, 10.919 prescrições continham fluoxetina - 9.259 provenientes das farmácias magistrais (84,8% e apenas 1.660 (15,2% das drogarias. As prescrições de fluoxetina eram predominantemente destinadas a mulheres (79,8%. Na imensa maioria das RE, a fluoxetina foi prescrita em associação com um grande número de outras substâncias ativas, inclusive anfetaminas anoréticas, chegando a mais de dez outras em quase a metade das prescrições. Esse tipo de prescrição múltipla, principalmente para mulheres, é comparado com as prescrições de fórmulas magistrais para emagrecer, muito utilizadas no Brasil. CONCLUSÃO: Os dados obtidos sugerem que a utilização de fluoxetina teria um fim estético (perda de peso, e não um fim terapêutico (tratamento de depressão. Discute-se a relação risco-benefício desse possível uso, que poderia ser classificado de inadequado dado as conhecidas reações adversas da fluoxetina e a sua interferência no sistema citocromo P450.OBJECTIVE: Investigate the use of fluoxetine in Santo André city, SP, by collecting and analyzing special prescriptions (SP issued by physicians and filed in compounding pharmacies and drugstores of that city. METHODS: Special prescriptions were collected during August 2005 to July 2006 in 13

  4. Developmental paediatric anaesthetic pharmacology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tom Giedsing

    2015-01-01

    Safe and effective drug therapy in neonates, infants and children require detailed knowledge about the ontogeny of drug disposition and action as well how these interact with genetics and co-morbidity of children. Recent advances in developmental pharmacology in children follow the increased...

  5. PHARMACOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF SECURIDACA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methanolic Extract of the root-bark of Securidaca longipedunculata was tested for pharmacological activity on isolated vascular and extra-vascular smooth muscle preparations. The root barks extract (50-800mg/ml) inhibited and/or abolished, in a concentration-dependent manner, the myogenic, spontaneous contractions ...

  6. Pharmacological management of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, Amanda; Apovian, Caroline M

    2017-04-28

    Current management of obesity includes three main arms: behavioral modification, pharmacologic therapy, and bariatric surgery. Decades prior, the only pharmacological agents available to treat obesity were approved only for short-term use (≤ 12 weeks) by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). However, in the last several years, the FDA has approved several medications for longer term treatment of obesity. This highlights the important progression that we, as a society, better appreciate now the chronicity and complexity of obesity as a disease. Also, availability of more medication options gives healthcare providers more possibilities to consider in the management of obesity. Medications for obesity can be simply categorized as FDA approved short-term use (diethylproprion, phendimetrazine, benzphetamine, and phentermine) and long-term use (orlistat, phentermine/topiramate ER, lorcaserin, naltrexone/bupropion ER and liraglutide). Additionally, type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is commonly seen in patients with obesity and necessitates consideration of pharmacological options that do not hinder patients' weight loss. Finally, weight-centric prescribing is also an important component to pharmacological management of obesity. It warrants that healthcare providers thoroughly review their patients' medication lists to determine if any of these agents could be contributing to weight gain.

  7. [Pharmacological therapy of obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagotto, Uberto; Vanuzzo, Diego; Vicennati, Valentina; Pasquali, Renato

    2008-04-01

    Obesity is reaching epidemic proportions worldwide and it is correlated with various comorbidities, among which the most relevant are diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension, and cardiovascular diseases. Obesity management is a modern challenge because of the rapid evolution of unfavorable lifestyles and unfortunately there are no effective treatments applicable to the large majority of obese/overweight people. The current medical attitude is to treat the complications of obesity (e.g. dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases). However, the potential of treating obesity is enormous, bearing in mind that a volitional weight loss of 10 kg is associated with important risk factor improvement: blood pressure -10 mmHg, total cholesterol -10%, LDL cholesterol -15%, triglycerides -30%, fasting glucose -50%, HDL cholesterol +8%. Drug treatment for obesity is an evolving branch of pharmacology, burdened by severe side effects and consequences of the early drugs, withdrawn from the market, and challenged by the lack of long-term data on the effect of medications on obesity-related morbidity and mortality, first of all cardiovascular diseases. In Europe three antiobesity drugs are currently licensed: sibutramine, orlistat, and rimonabant; important trials with clinical endpoints are ongoing for sibutramine and rimonabant. While waiting for their results, it is convenient to evaluate these drugs for their effects on body weight and cardiometabolic risk factors. Sibutramine is a centrally acting serotonin/noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor that mainly increases satiety. At the level of brown adipose tissue, sibutramine can also facilitate energy expenditure by increasing thermogenesis. The long-term studies (five) documented a mean differential weight reduction of 4.45 kg for sibutramine vs placebo. Considering the principal studies, attrition rate was 43%. This drug not only reduces body weight and waist circumference, but it decreases triglycerides and

  8. Effects of amitriptyline and fluoxetine on synaptic plasticity in the dentate gyrus of hippocampal formation in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghasem Zarei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several studies have been shown that antidepressant drugs have contradictory effects on cognitive processes. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of amitriptyline and fluoxetine on synaptic plasticity in the dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampal formation in rat. Materials and Methods: Experimental groups were the control, the fluoxetine, and amitriptyline. The rats were treated for 21 days and then, paired pulse facilitation/inhibition (PPF/I and long-term potentiation (LTP in perforant path-DG synapses were assessed (by 400 Hz tetanization. Field excitatory post-synaptic potential (fEPSP slope and population spike (PS amplitude were measured. Results: The results of PPF/I showed that PS amplitude ratios were increased in 10-70 ms inter-stimulus intervals in the amitriptyline group compared to the control group. In the fluoxetine group, EPSP slope ratios were decreased in intervals 30, 40, and 50 ms inter-stimulus intervals compared to the control group. The PS-LTP was significantly lower in the fluoxetine and the amitriptyline groups with respect to the control group. Conclusion: The results showed that fluoxetine and amitriptyline affect synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus and these effects is probably due to the impact on the number of active neurons.

  9. Antidepressant-like effects of the xanthine oxidase enzyme inhibitor allopurinol in rats. A comparison with fluoxetine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürbüz Özgür, Börte; Aksu, Hatice; Birincioğlu, Mustafa; Dost, Turhan

    2015-11-01

    Allopurinol is a xanthine oxidase enzyme inhibitor that is widely used for the treatment of hyperuricemia and gout. The activity of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase, which metabolizes tryptophan (TRP), is decreased by xanthine oxidase inhibitors, causing TRP levels in the body to be increased. Increases in TRP levels in the brain might have antidepressant effects. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the antidepressant effects of allopurinol compared to those of fluoxetine, which is a proven antidepressant. Thirty-two Wistar albino male rats were divided into four groups (control, 10mg/kg fluoxetine, 50mg/kg allopurinol, 50mg/kg allopurinol+10 mg/kg fluoxetine; n=8 per group), and forced swimming tests were performed before and after 14days of drug administration. Serotonin, 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid and uric acid levels were measured in blood samples after the final treatment. When allopurinol and fluoxetine were administered separately, a decrease in the duration of immobility and an increased duration of swimming were observed in the forced swimming test. The results showed similar antidepressant efficacies between allopurinol and fluoxetine. However, we found no statistically significant difference in the antidepressant effect of the combined therapy versus single drug therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Fluoxetine-induced inhibition of synaptosomal ( sup 3 H)5-HT release: Possible Ca sup 2+ -channel inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stauderman, K.A. (Marion Merrell Dow Research Inst., Cincinnati, OH (United States)); Gandhi, V.C.; Jones, D.J. (Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Fluoxetine, a selective 5-Ht uptake inhibitor, inhibited 15 mM K{sup +}-induced ({sup 3}H)5-HT release from rat spinal cord and cortical synaptosomes at concentrations > 0.5 uM. This effect reflected a property shared by another selective 5-HT uptake inhibitor paroxetine but not by less selective uptake inhibitors such as amitriptyline, desipramine, imipramine or nortriptyline. Inhibition of release by fluoxetine was inversely related to both the concentration of K{sup +} used to depolarize the synaptosomes and the concentration of external Ca{sup 2+}. Experiments aimed at determining a mechanism of action revealed that fluoxetine did not inhibit voltage-independent release of ({sup 3}H)5-HT release induced by the Ca{sup 2+}-ionophore A 23187 or Ca{sup 2+}-independent release induced by fenfluramine. Moreover the 5-HT autoreceptor antagonist methiothepin did not reverse the inhibitory actions of fluoxetine on K{sup +}-induced release. Further studies examined the effects of fluoxetine on voltage-dependent Ca{sup 2+} channels and Ca{sup 2+} entry.

  11. Beneficial effect of fluoxetine treatment aganist psychological stress is mediated by increasing BDNF expression in selected brain areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gongying; Jing, Ping; Liu, Zhidong; Li, Zhiruo; Ma, Hongxia; Tu, Wenzhen; Zhang, Wei; Zhuo, Chuanjun

    2017-09-19

    SSRI antidepressant fluoxetine is widely used to treat psychological stress related disorders, however the underlying working mechanisms is not fully understood, as SSRIs can rapidly increase the extracellular serotonin levels but it normally takes weeks to reveal their therapeutic effect in the stress-related psychological disorders. Our previous study demonstrated that purely psychological stress without any physic stimuli induces a biphasic change in the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which immediately decrease and then gradually increase after the stress; and that the latter BDNF increase in response to the psychological stress involves the activation of serotonin system. To investigate the role of BDNF in the fluoxetine treatment for stress-related psychological disorders, we examined the mRNA and protein levels of BDNF in the brain of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, which were pretreated with fluoxetine at 10 mg/kg or vehicle solution for 14 days, over 24 hour after an acute psychological stress exposure. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry were performed to detect the expression of BDNF at different time points in various brain regions after the psychological stress. We found that fluoxetine treatment completely blocked the BDNF decrease induced by the psychological stress, and also enhanced the gradual increase in the expression of BDNF in most of the brain regions except VTA after the psychological stress. The results suggest that the enhancement in BDNF levels induced by chronic fluoxetine treatment mediates the therapeutic effect against psychological stress.

  12. Effects of fluoxetine on protein expression of potassium ion channels in the brain of chronic mild stress rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunlin Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the expression of major potassium channel subtypes in the brain of chronical mild stress (CMS rats and reveal the effects of fluoxetine on the expression of these channels. Rats were exposed to a variety of unpredictable stress for three weeks and induced anhedonia, lower sucrose preference, locomotor activity and lower body weight. The protein expressions were determined by Western blot. CMS significantly increased the expression of Kv2.1 channel in frontal cortex but not in hippocampus, and the expression level was normalized after fluoxetine treatment. The expression of TREK-1 channel was also obviously increased in frontal cortex in CMS rats. Fluoxetine treatment might prevent this increase. However, the expression of Kv3.1 and Kv4.2 channels was considerably decreased in hippocampus after CMS, and was not affected by fluoxetine. These results suggest that different subtypes of potassium channels are associated with the pathophysiology of depression and that the therapeutical effects of fluoxetine may relate to Kv2.1 and TREK-1 potassium channels.

  13. Pharmacological actions and therapeutic uses of cannabis and cannabinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, R N; Chambers, W A; Pertwee, R G

    2001-11-01

    This review highlights the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, pharmacological actions, therapeutic uses and adverse effects of cannabinoids. The effect of cannabinoids on anaesthesia is mentioned briefly. Important advances have taken place in cannabinoid research over the last few years and have led to the discovery of novel ligands. The possible clinical applications of these ligands and the direction of future research are discussed.

  14. Pharmacological treatments in pathological gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Jon E; Odlaug, Brian L; Schreiber, Liana R N

    2014-02-01

    Pathological gambling (PG) is a relatively common and often disabling psychiatric condition characterized by intrusive urges to engage in deleterious gambling behaviour. Although common and financially devastating to individuals and families, there currently exist no formally approved pharmacotherapeutic interventions for this disorder. This review seeks to examine the history of medication treatments for PG. A systematic review of the 18 double-blind, placebo-controlled pharmacotherapy studies conducted for the treatment of pathological gambling was conducted. Study outcome and the mean dose of medication administered was documented in an effort to determine a preferred medication choice in this population. A variety of medication classes have been examined in the treatment of PG with varying results. Antidepressants, atypical antipsychotics and mood stabilizers have demonstrated mixed results in controlled clinical trials. Although limited information is available, opioid antagonists and glutamatergic agents have demonstrated efficacious outcomes, especially for individuals with PG suffering from intense urges to engage in the behaviour. Given that several studies have demonstrated their efficacy in treating the symptoms associated with PG, opioid antagonists should be considered the first line treatment for PG at this time. Most published studies, however, have employed relatively small sample sizes, are of limited duration and involve possibly non-representative clinical groups (e.g. those without co-occurring psychiatric disorders). Response measures have varied across studies. Heterogeneity of PG treatment samples may also complicate identification of effective treatments. Identification of factors related to treatment response will help inform future studies and advance treatment strategies for PG. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  15. Fluoxetine, a selective inhibitor of serotonin uptake, potentiates morphine analgesia without altering its discriminative stimulus properties or affinity for opioid receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hynes, M.D.; Lochner, M.A.; Bemis, K.G.; Hymson, D.L.

    1985-06-17

    The analgesic effect of morphine in the rat tail jerk assay was enhanced by the serotonin uptake inhibitor, fluoxetine. Tail jerk latency was not affected by fluoxetine alone. Morphine's affinity for opioid receptors labeled in vitro with /sup 3/H-naloxone or /sup 3/H-D-Ala/sup 2/-D-Leu/sup 5/-enkephalin was not altered by fluoxetine, which has no affinity for these sites at concentrations as high as 1000 nM. In rats trained to discriminate morphine from saline, fluoxetine at doses of 5 or 10 mg/kg were recognized as saline. Increasing the fluoxetine dose to 20 mg/kg did not result in generalization to either saline or morphine. The dose response curve for morphine generalization was not significantly altered by fluoxetine doses of 5 or 10 mg/kg. Those rats treated with the combination of morphine and 20 mg/kg of fluoxetine did not exhibit saline or morphine appropriate responding. Fluoxetine potentiates the analgesic properties of morphine without enhancing its affinity for opioid receptors or its discriminative stimulus properties. 30 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  16. Pharmacological treatment of obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Mancini, Marcio C.; Halpern, Alfredo

    2006-01-01

    This review offers an overview of physiological agents, current therapeutics, as well as medications, which have been extensively used and those agents not currently available or non-classically considered anti-obesity drugs. As obesity - particularly that of central distribution - represents an important triggering factor for insulin resistance, its pharmacological treatment is relevant in the context of metabolic syndrome control. The authors present an extensive review on the criteria for ...

  17. Bi-phasic regulation of glycogen content in astrocytes via Cav-1/PTEN/PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β pathway by fluoxetine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Qiufang; Song, Dan; Gu, Li; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Peng, Liang

    2017-04-01

    Here, we present the data indicating that chronic treatment with fluoxetine regulates Cav-1/PTEN/PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β signalling pathway and glycogen content in primary cultures of astrocytes with bi-phasic concentration dependence. At lower concentrations, fluoxetine downregulates gene expression of Cav-1, decreases membrane content of PTEN, increases activity of PI3K/AKT, and elevates GSK-3β phosphorylation thus suppressing its activity. At higher concentrations, fluoxetine acts in an inverse fashion. As expected, fluoxetine at lower concentrations increased while at higher concentrations decreased glycogen content in astrocytes. Our findings indicate that bi-phasic regulation of glycogen content via Cav-1/PTEN/PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β pathway by fluoxetine may be responsible for both therapeutic and side effects of the drug.

  18. Antidepressant effects of Kai-Xin-San in fluoxetine-resistant depression rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X.Z. Dong

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the antidepressant effect and the mechanism of action of Kai-Xin-San (KXS in fluoxetine-resistant depressive (FRD rats. Two hundred male Wistar rats weighing 200±10 g were exposed to chronic and unpredictable mild stresses (CUMS for 4 weeks and given fluoxetine treatment simultaneously. The rats that did not show significant improvement in behavioral indexes were chosen as the FRD model rats. These rats were randomly divided into four groups: FRD model control; oral fluoxetine and aspirin; oral KXS at a dose of 338 mg·kg–1·day–1; and oral KXS at a dose of 676 mg·kg–1·day–1. Rats continued to be exposed to CUMS and underwent treatment once a day for 3 weeks, then cytokine (COX-2, IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TGF-β, and TNF-α levels in the hippocampus and serum, and organ coefficients were measured. Both doses of KXS improved the crossing and rearing frequencies, sucrose-preference index, and body weight in FRD rats. KXS at a dose of 338 mg·kg–1·day–1reduced COX-2, IL-2, IL-6, TNF-α levels, increased IL-10 level in the hippocampus, and reduced IL-2 and TNF-α levels in serum. KXS at a dose of 676 mg·kg–1·day–1reduced TNF-α level in the hippocampus, reduced IL-2 and TNF-α levels in serum, and increased IFN-γ and IL-10 levels in the hippocampus and serum. There were no significant differences in organ-coefficients of the spleen among and between groups. The results suggested that oral administration of KXS in FRD rats was effective in improving behavior disorders by influencing various inflammatory pathways.

  19. Chronic Fluoxetine Induces the Enlargement of Perforant Path-Granule Cell Synapses in the Mouse Dentate Gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitahara, Yosuke; Ohta, Keisuke; Hasuo, Hiroshi; Shuto, Takahide; Kuroiwa, Mahomi; Sotogaku, Naoki; Togo, Akinobu; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro; Nishi, Akinori

    2016-01-01

    A selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor is the most commonly prescribed antidepressant for the treatment of major depression. However, the mechanisms underlying the actions of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are not fully understood. In the dentate gyrus, chronic fluoxetine treatment induces increased excitability of mature granule cells (GCs) as well as neurogenesis. The major input to the dentate gyrus is the perforant path axons (boutons) from the entorhinal cortex (layer II). Through voltage-sensitive dye imaging, we found that the excitatory neurotransmission of the perforant path synapse onto the GCs in the middle molecular layer of the mouse dentate gyrus (perforant path-GC synapse) is enhanced after chronic fluoxetine treatment (15 mg/kg/day, 14 days). Therefore, we further examined whether chronic fluoxetine treatment affects the morphology of the perforant path-GC synapse, using FIB/SEM (focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy). A three-dimensional reconstruction of dendritic spines revealed the appearance of extremely large-sized spines after chronic fluoxetine treatment. The large-sized spines had a postsynaptic density with a large volume. However, chronic fluoxetine treatment did not affect spine density. The presynaptic boutons that were in contact with the large-sized spines were large in volume, and the volumes of the mitochondria and synaptic vesicles inside the boutons were correlated with the size of the boutons. Thus, the large-sized perforant path-GC synapse induced by chronic fluoxetine treatment contains synaptic components that correlate with the synapse size and that may be involved in enhanced glutamatergic neurotransmission.

  20. Acute Exposure to Fluoxetine Alters Aggressive Behavior of Zebrafish and Expression of Genes Involved in Serotonergic System Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michail Pavlidis

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Zebrafish, Danio rerio, is an emerging model organism in stress and neurobehavioral studies. In nature, the species forms shoals, yet when kept in pairs it exhibits an agonistic and anxiety-like behavior that leads to the establishment of dominant-subordinate relationships. Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, is used as an anxiolytic tool to alter aggressive behavior in several vertebrates and as an antidepressant drug in humans. Pairs of male zebrafish were held overnight to develop dominant—subordinate behavior, either treated or non-treated for 2 h with fluoxetine (5 mg L−1, and allowed to interact once more for 1 h. Behavior was recorded both prior and after fluoxetine administration. At the end of the experiment, trunk and brain samples were also taken for cortisol determination and mRNA expression studies, respectively. Fluoxetine treatment significantly affected zebrafish behavior and the expression levels of several genes, by decreasing offensive aggression in dominants and by eliminating freezing in the subordinates. There was no statistically significant difference in whole-trunk cortisol concentrations between dominant and subordinate fish, while fluoxetine treatment resulted in higher (P = 0.004 cortisol concentrations in both groups. There were statistically significant differences between dominant and subordinate fish in brain mRNA expression levels of genes involved in stress axis (gr, mr, neural activity (bdnf, c-fos, and the serotonergic system (htr2b, slc6a4b. The significant decrease in the offensive and defensive aggression following fluoxetine treatment was concomitant with a reversed pattern in c-fos expression levels. Overall, an acute administration of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor alters aggressive behavior in male zebrafish in association with changes in the neuroendocrine mediators of coping styles.

  1. Fluoxetine reverses the memory impairment and reduction in proliferation and survival of hippocampal cells caused by methotrexate chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Laura; ElBeltagy, Maha; Umka, Jariya; Markwick, Rachel; Startin, Carla; Bennett, Geoffrey; Wigmore, Peter

    2011-05-01

    Adjuvant cancer chemotherapy can cause long-lasting, cognitive deficits. It is postulated that these impairments are due to these drugs targeting neural precursors within the adult hippocampus, the loss of which has been associated with memory impairment. The present study investigates the effects of the chemotherapy, methotrexate (MTX) on spatial working memory and the proliferation and survival of the neural precursors involved in hippocampal neurogenesis, and the possible neuroprotective properties of the antidepressant fluoxetine. Male Lister hooded rats were administered MTX (75 mg/kg, two i.v. doses a week apart) followed by leucovorin rescue (i.p. 18 h after MTX at 6 mg/kg and at 26, 42 and 50 h at 3 mg/kg) and/or fluoxetine (10 mg/kg/day in drinking water for 40 days). Memory was tested using the novel location recognition (NLR) test. Using markers, cell proliferation (Ki67) and survival (bromodeoxyuridine/BrdU), in the dentate gyrus were quantified. MTX-treated rats showed a cognitive deficit in the NLR task compared with the vehicle and fluoxetine-treated groups. Cognitive ability was restored in the group receiving both MTX and fluoxetine. MTX reduced both the number of proliferating cells in the SGZ and their survival. This was prevented by the co-administration of fluoxetine, which alone increased cell numbers. These results demonstrate that MTX induces an impairment in spatial working memory and has a negative long-term effect on hippocampal neurogenesis, which is counteracted by the co-administration of fluoxetine. If translatable to patients, this finding has the potential to prevent the chemotherapy-induced cognitive deficits experienced by many cancer survivors.

  2. Determination of fluoxetine and norfluoxetine in plasma by gas chromatography with electron-capture detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, J.F.; Bopp, R.J.; Carmichael, R.H.; Farid, K.Z.; Lemberger, L.

    1982-10-01

    This gas-chromatographic method for assay of fluoxetine and norfluoxetine in human plasma involves extraction of the drugs and use of a /sup 63/Ni electron-capture detector. The linear range of detection is 25 to 800 micrograms/L for each drug. Overall precision (CV) in the concentration range of 10 to 100 micrograms/L for both drugs was approximately 10%. Accuracy (relative error) in the same concentration range was approximately +10%. None of the commonly prescribed antidepressants or tranquilizers that we tested interfere with the assay.

  3. Pharmacological challenges in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anne Estrup; Brokjaer, Anne; Fischer, Iben Wendelboe Deleuran

    2014-01-01

    . Together these factors can result in malabsorption and may also affect the efficacy of pharmacological intervention. The lifestyle of chronic pancreatitis patients may also contribute to gastrointestinal changes. Many patients limit their food intake because of the pain caused by eating and in some cases...... are often prescribed as pain treatment. Opioids have intrinsic effects on gastrointestinal motility and hence can modify the absorption of other drugs taken at the same time. Furthermore, the increased fluid absorption caused by opioids will decrease water available for drug dissolution and may hereby...... affect absorption of the drug. As stated above many factors can influence drug absorption and metabolism in patients with chronic pancreatitis. The factors may not have clinical relevance, but may explain inter-individual variations in responses to a given drug, in patients with chronic pancreatitis....

  4. Fluoxetine up-regulates expression of cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein and inhibits LPS-induced apoptosis in hippocampus-derived neural stem cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiou, S.-H.; Chen, S.-J.; Peng, C-H.; Chang, Y.-L.; Ku, H.-H.; Hsu, W.-M.; Ho, Larry L.-T.; Lee, C.-H.

    2006-01-01

    Fluoxetine is a widely used antidepressant compound which inhibits the reuptake of serotonin in the central nervous system. Recent studies have shown that fluoxetine can promote neurogenesis and improve the survival rate of neurons. However, whether fluoxetine modulates the proliferation or neuroprotection effects of neural stem cells (NSCs) needs to be elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that 20 μM fluoxetine can increase the cell proliferation of NSCs derived from the hippocampus of adult rats by MTT test. The up-regulated expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and the cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP) in fluoxetine-treated NSCs was detected by real-time RT-PCR. Our results further showed that fluoxetine protects the lipopolysaccharide-induced apoptosis in NSCs, in part, by activating the expression of c-FLIP. Moreover, c-FLIP induction by fluoxetine requires the activation of the c-FLIP promoter region spanning nucleotides -414 to -133, including CREB and SP1 sites. This effect appeared to involve the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-dependent pathway. Furthermore, fluoxetine treatment significantly inhibited the induction of proinflammatory factor IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α in the culture medium of LPS-treated NSCs (p < 0.01). The results of high performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrochemical detection further confirmed that fluoxentine increased the functional production of serotonin in NSCs. Together, these data demonstrate the specific activation of c-FLIP by fluoxetine and indicate the novel role of fluoxetine for neuroprotection in the treatment of depression

  5. Pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions to influence adipose tissue function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Visseren Frank LJ

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Obesity is associated with metabolic derangements such as insulin resistance, inflammation and hypercoagulobility which can all be understood as consequences of adipose tissue dysfunction. The potential role for adipose tissue derived cytokines and adipokines in the development of vascular disease and diabetes may produce a clinical need to influence adipose tissue function. Various pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions affect plasma cytokine and adipokine levels. The effects of these interventions depend on weight loss per se, changes in fat distribution without weight loss and/or direct effects on adipose tissue inflammation. Weight loss, as a result of diet, pharmacology and surgery, positively influences plasma adipokines and systemic inflammation. Several classes of drugs influence systemic inflammation directly through their anti-inflammatory actions. PPAR-γ agonism positively influences adipose tissue inflammation in several classes of intervention such as the thiazolidinediones and perhaps salicylates, CB1-antagonists and angiotensin II receptor blockers. Furthermore, within drug classes there are differential effects of individual pharmacologic agents on adipose tissue function. It can be concluded that several commonly used pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions have unintended influences on adipose tissue function. Improving adipose tissue function may contribute to reducing the risk of vascular diseases and the development of type 2 diabetes.

  6. Integrated quantitative pharmacology for treatment optimization in oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hasselt, J.G.C. van

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes the development and application of quantitative pharmacological models in oncology for treatment optimization and for the design and analysis of clinical trials with respect to pharmacokinetics, toxicity, efficacy and cost-effectiveness. A recurring theme throughout this

  7. Pharmacological treatment of depression in women with breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftegård Andersen, Lærke; Voigt Hansen, Melissa; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    that escitalopram and the norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, reboxetine, significantly improved depression and QOL compared with baseline values. In conclusion, depression is a clinical problem in patients with breast cancer. Pharmacological treatment with antidepressants may improve depression and QOL. However...

  8. Phyto - chemistry and pharmacology of shankapushpi - four varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulakh, G S; Narayanan, S; Mahadevan, G

    1988-01-01

    Pharmacognosy, Pharmacology, Clinical studies and photochemistry of the four plants, viz., Convolvulus pluricaulis, Evolvulus alsinoides, Canscora decussate and Clitoria ternatea commonly used as the drug Shankapushphi have been reviewed here.

  9. PHYTO – CHEMISTRY AND PHARMACOLOGY OF SHANKAPUSHPI – FOUR VARIETIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulakh, Gian Singh; Narayanan, Sharada; Mahadevan, Geeta

    1988-01-01

    Pharmacognosy, Pharmacology, Clinical studies and photochemistry of the four plants, viz., Convolvulus pluricaulis, Evolvulus alsinoides, Canscora decussate and Clitoria ternatea commonly used as the drug Shankapushphi have been reviewed here. PMID:22557606

  10. PHYTO – CHEMISTRY AND PHARMACOLOGY OF SHANKAPUSHPI – FOUR VARIETIES

    OpenAIRE

    Aulakh, Gian Singh; Narayanan, Sharada; Mahadevan, Geeta

    1988-01-01

    Pharmacognosy, Pharmacology, Clinical studies and photochemistry of the four plants, viz., Convolvulus pluricaulis, Evolvulus alsinoides, Canscora decussate and Clitoria ternatea commonly used as the drug Shankapushphi have been reviewed here.

  11. Globalization of quantitative pharmacology: first international symposium of quantitative pharmacology in drug development and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Jeffrey S; Shi, Jun; Xie, Hai-Tang; Huang, Xiao-Hui; Fossler, Michael J; Sun, Rui-Yuan

    2008-07-01

    The First International Symposium on Quantitative Pharmacology in Drug Development and Regulatory Sciences was held this past October in Nanjing, China, marking the first time scientists from around the globe gathered to discuss topics related to quantitative pharmacology in the Far East. With the recent trend toward global drug development and clinical trials in nontraditional countries, China has been regarded by many as the next frontier for the pharmaceutical industry. Quantitative pharmacology embraces all phases of pharmaceutical research and development, providing a mechanism to bridge decision making from one phase of development to the next, and it facilitates multidisciplinary partnerships through the assembly of both data and models that describe complex biological, biopharmaceutic, and clinical settings. Efforts in China are at an early stage, but it is clear that Chinese scientists embrace the discipline and are keen to promote this methodology in the registration of new drugs in China. While challenges exist, they represent an exciting area of future collaboration.

  12. Pharmacological Profile of Quinoxalinone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef Ramli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Quinoxalinone and its derivatives are used in organic synthesis for building natural and designed synthetic compounds and they have been frequently utilized as suitable skeletons for the design of biologically active compound. This review covers updated information on the most active quinoxalinone derivatives that have been reported to show considerable pharmacological actions such as antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, antiviral, antitumor, and antitubercular activity. It can act as an important tool for chemists to develop newer quinoxalinone derivatives that may prove to be better agents in terms of efficacy and safety.

  13. Is there any evidence to support the use of anti-depressants in painful rheumatological conditions? Systematic review of pharmacological and clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrot, S; Javier, R-M; Marty, M; Le Jeunne, C; Laroche, F

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this study was to review the evidence supporting the use of anti-depressants in painful rheumatological conditions. A systematic review of papers published between 1966 and 2007, in five European languages, on anti-depressants in rheumatological conditions was performed. Papers were scored using Jadad method and analgesic ES was calculated. We selected 78 clinical studies and 12 meta-analyses, from 140 papers. The strongest evidence of an analgesic effect of anti-depressants has been obtained for fibromyalgia. A weak analgesic effect is observed for chronic low back pain, with an efficacy level close to that of analgesics. In RA and AS, there is no analgesic effect of anti-depressants, but these drugs may help to manage fatigue and sleep disorders. There is no clear evidence of an analgesic effect inOA, but studies have poor methodological quality. Analgesic effects of anti-depressants are independent of their anti-depressant effects. Tricyclic anti-depressants (TCAs), even at low doses, have analgesic effects equivalent to those of serotonin and noradrenalin reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), but are less well tolerated. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have modest analgesic effects, but higher doses are required to achieve analgesia. Anti-depressant drugs, particularly TCAs and SNRIs, have analgesic effects in chronic rheumatic painful states in which analgesics and NSAIDs are not very efficient, such as fibromyalgia and chronic low back pain. In inflammatory rheumatic diseases, anti-depressants may be useful for managing fatigue and sleep disorders. Further studies are required to compare anti-depressants with other analgesics in the management of chronic painful rheumatological conditions.

  14. Effect of desipramine and fluoxetine on energy metabolism of cerebral mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Roberto Federico; Ferrari, Federica; Gorini, Antonella; Brunello, Nicoletta; Tascedda, Fabio

    2016-08-25

    Brain bioenergetic abnormalities in mood disorders were detected by neuroimaging in vivo studies in humans. Because of the increasing importance of mitochondrial pathogenetic hypothesis of Depression, in this study the effects of sub-chronic treatment (21days) with desipramine (15mg/kg) and fluoxetine (10mg/kg) were evaluated on brain energy metabolism. On mitochondria in vivo located in neuronal soma (somatic) and on mitochondria of synapses (synaptic), the catalytic activities of regulatory enzymes of mitochondrial energy-yielding metabolic pathways were assayed. Antidepressants in vivo treatment modified the activities of selected enzymes of different mitochondria, leading to metabolic modifications in the energy metabolism of brain cortex: (a) the enhancement of cytochrome oxidase activity on somatic mitochondria; (b) the decrease of malate, succinate dehydrogenase and glutamate-pyruvate transaminase activities of synaptic mitochondria; (c) the selective effect of fluoxetine on enzymes related to glutamate metabolism. These results overcome the conflicting data so far obtained with antidepressants on brain energy metabolism, because the enzymatic analyses were made on mitochondria with diversified neuronal in vivo localization, i.e. on somatic and synaptic. This research is the first investigation on the pharmacodynamics of antidepressants studied at subcellular level, in the perspective of (i) assessing the role of energy metabolism of cerebral mitochondria in animal models of mood disorders, and (ii) highlighting new therapeutical strategies for antidepressants targeting brain bioenergetics. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Morphological analysis of the enamel organ in rats treated with fluoxetine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Morais Silva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Previous studies have evaluated the presence of serotonin in the dental epithelia and mesenchyme during odontogenesis, suggesting its participation in tooth development. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Here, we used fluoxetine, a selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor, at a dose of 10 mg/kg, administered for 20 days during pregnancy in 12 Wistar rats to examine the influence of this drug on the development of the enamel organ of the upper first molars of rat fetuses at 17 days of intra-uterine life (i.u.l., and at one, five and ten days postpartum. The pregnant rats were anesthetized with xylazine at 10 mg/kg and ketamine at 25 mg/kg. The fetuses were removed and beheaded; their jaws were removed, and the upper jaws were exposed. The tissues were fixed in Bouin's fixative, decalcified in 5% nitric acid for 4 - 12 h, conventionally processed for microscopy, and embedded in paraffin. Serial sections of approximately 5 mm were obtained and stained with hematoxylin and eosin, as well as periodic acid-Schiff. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Morphological analysis showed no structural changes in the experimental group compared to the controls, suggesting that, at the dose used, fluoxetine does not interfere with serotonin-mediated development of the enamel organ or the process of amelogenesis.

  16. Effects of fluoxetine on the reproduction of two prosobranch mollusks: Potamopyrgus antipodarum and Valvata piscinalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gust, M. [Laboratoire d' ecotoxicologie, Cemagref, 3b quai Chauveau, CP 220, 69336 Lyon Cedex 09 (France)], E-mail: marion.gust@cemagref.fr; Buronfosse, T. [Laboratoire d' endocrinologie, Ecole Nationale Veterinaire de Lyon, avenue Bourgelat, 69280 Marcy l' Etoile (France)], E-mail: thierry.buronfosse@inserm.fr; Giamberini, L. [Laboratoire des interactions Ecotoxicologie, Biodiversite, Ecosystemes, CNRS UMR 7146, campus Bridoux, 57000 Metz (France)], E-mail: giamb@sciences.univ-metz.fr; Ramil, M. [Federal Institute of Hydrology (BFG), D-56068 Koblenz, Am Mainzer Tor 1 (Germany)], E-mail: mramil@usc.es; Mons, R. [Laboratoire d' ecotoxicologie, Cemagref, 3b quai Chauveau, CP 220, 69336 Lyon Cedex 09 (France)], E-mail: raphael.mons@cemagref.fr; Garric, J. [Laboratoire d' ecotoxicologie, Cemagref, 3b quai Chauveau, CP 220, 69336 Lyon Cedex 09 (France)], E-mail: jeanne.garric@cemagref.fr

    2009-02-15

    Fluoxetine is a widely used antidepressant, frequently found in aquatic ecosystems. We investigated its effects on two freshwater prosobranch gastropods: Valvata piscinalis (European valve snail) and Potamopyrgus antipodarum (New Zealand mudsnail), which have different reproductive modes. The fecundity of V. piscinalis (cumulate number of eggs at day 42) was not affected with an NOEC of 100 {mu}g/L nominal concentration (69 {mu}g/L measured concentration). The mudsnail P. antipodarum responded in a biphasic dose-effect curve at low concentrations. The cumulate number of neonates at day 42 had an LOEC of 100 {mu}g/L (69 {mu}g/L) and an NOEC of 33.3 {mu}g/L (13 {mu}g/L), whereas the embryos in the brood pouch at day 42 only showed an LOEC of 3.7 {mu}g/L (1 {mu}g/L). We also observed histological effects in P. antipodarum (gonadal thickness). Among the sexual steroids we measured only testosterone which varied, independent of reproduction. Moreover the use of two closely related species highlights the interspecific variability. - Fluoxetine has significant effects on the reproduction and development of some freshwater snails.

  17. Microautoradiography of [{sup 123}I]ADAM in mice treated with fluoxetine and serotonin reuptake inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, X.-X.; Chen, J.-C.; Liu, R.-S.; Wey, S.-P.; Lee, J.-S.; Chen, C.-C.; Fu, Y.-K.; Ting, Gann; Hwang, J.-J. E-mail: jjhwang@ym.edu.tw

    2004-07-01

    A radiopharmaceutical, {sup 123}I-labeled 2-((2-((dimethylamino)methyl)phenyl)thio)-5-iodophenylamine ([{sup 123}I]ADAM), has been developed recently for evaluation of how serotonin transporters (SERT) function in the brain. However, the detailed biodistribution and specific binding in certain brain areas are not well investigated. In this study, both phosphor plate imaging and microautoradiography were applied to explore the binding characteristics of [{sup 123}I]ADAM in SERT neurons. The effect of two psychotropics and one narcotic on the binding of [{sup 123}I]ADAM to SERT was also studied. Fluoxetine and desipramine, both are psychotropics and specific SERT ligands and decreased the affinity of [{sup 123}I]ADAM, while p-chloroamphetamine (PCA), a narcotic, destroyed most of serotonergic neurons, as well as reducing the concentration of serotonin and the number of SERT in the brain as shown by the biodistribution of [{sup 123}I]ADAM. Significant and selective accumulation of [{sup 123}I]ADAM in the areas from midbrain to brain stem in normal mice with maximum target-to-background ratio was found at 90 minutes postinjection. A rapid clearance of [{sup 131}I]ADAM at 120 minutes postinjection was found in the CA1, CA3 and ThN brain areas. In addition, the inhibition effect on binding ability of [{sup 123}I]ADAM to SERT by the psychotropics and the narcotic was found to have the order of: PCA > fluoxetine > desipramine.

  18. Radiosynthesis of [F-18]fluoxetine as a potential radiotracer for serotonin reuptake sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, M.K.; Mukherjee, Jogeshwar (Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Radiology)

    1993-05-01

    Synthesis of 4-nitro-[alpha]-bromo-[alpha],[alpha]-difluorotoluene was accomplished in two steps starting from 4-nitrobenzaldehyde, with a 30% overall yield. Radiolabeling of 4-nitro-[alpha]-bromo-[alpha], [alpha]-difluorotoluene with no-carrier-added [[sup 18]F]fluoride provided 4-nitro-[alpha],[alpha]-difluoro-[alpha]-[[sup 18]F] fluorotoluene in 2-4% yields with a specific activity of 2590 GBq/mmol (70 Ci/mmol). The effect of the reaction temperature on the radiochemical yield and specific activity of the radiolabeling reaction was studied. Radiochemical yields increased, whereas specific activity decreased, with increasing temperature. Radiosynthesis of [[sup 18]F] fluoxetine involved coupling of 4-nitro-[alpha],[alpha]-difluoro-[alpha]-[[sup 18]F]fluorotoluene with the sodium alkoxide of (S)-3-(methylamino)-1-phenyl-1-propanol. The overall yield of HPLC purified [[sup 18]F]fluoxetine was 1-2% (decay-corrected; total radiosynthesis time, 150-180 min). The specific activity of the product was 1480 GBq/mmol (40 Ci/mmol). (Author).

  19. PET study of the distribution of [{sup 11}C]fluoxetine in a monkey brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiue, C.-Y.; Shiue, Grace G.; Cornish, Kurtis G.; O' Rourke, Maria F

    1995-07-01

    No-carrier-added [{sup 11}C]fluoxetine (2) was synthesized by methylation of norfluoxetine (1) with [{sup 11}C]H{sub 3}I in 20% radiochemical yield in a synthesis time of 40 min from EOB with a specific activity of 0.48 Ci/{mu}M (EOB). In vivo study in mouse indicated that the uptake of 2 in mouse tissues was high and the radioactivity remained constant throughout the study. The uptake of 2 in mouse brain was 4%/g. PET study in a Rhesus monkey also showed that the uptakes of 2 in different brain regions were similar and the retention of radioactivity in these regions remained constant throughout the study (80 min). Analysis of arterial plasma by HPLC showed that only 20% of radioactivity in the plasma remained as 2 at 30 min post-injection. These results suggest that the uptake of fluoxetine in monkey brain is probably not receptor mediated. Rather, blood flow, lipophilicity or other transport mechanisms may play a role in its uptake.

  20. Simultaneous determination of olanzapine and fluoxetine hydrochloride in capsules by spectrophotometry, TLC-spectrodensitometry and HPLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantawy, Mahmoud A; Hassan, Nagiba Y; Elragehy, Nariman A; Abdelkawy, Mohamed

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes sensitive, accurate and precise spectrophotometric, TLC-spectrodensitometric and high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) methods for simultaneous determination of olanzapine and fluoxetine HCl. Two spectrophotometric methods were developed, namely; first derivative (D (1)) and derivative ratio (DD (1)) methods. The TLC method employed aluminum TLC plates precoated with silica gel GF254 as the stationary phase and methanol:toluene:ammonia (7:3:0.1, by volume) as the mobile phase, where the chromatogram was scanned at 235 nm. The developed HPLC method used a reversed phase C18 column with isocratic elution. The mobile phase composed of phosphate buffer pH 4.0:acetonitrile:triethylamine (53:47:0.03, by volume) at flow rate of 1.0 mL min(-1). Quantitation was achieved with UV detection at 235 nm. The methods were validated according to the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) guidelines. The selectivity of the proposed methods was tested using laboratory-prepared mixtures. The developed methods were successfully applied for the determination of olanzapine and fluoxetine HCl in bulk powder and combined capsule dosage form.

  1. Epigenetics and pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanska, Barbara; MacEwan, David J

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of gene regulation have shown there to be much more regulation of the genome than first thought, through epigenetic mechanisms. These epigenetic mechanisms are systems that have evolved to either switch off gene activity altogether, or fine-tune any existing genetic activation. Such systems are present in all genes and include chromatin modifications and remodelling, DNA methylation (such as CpG island methylation rates) and histone covalent modifications (e.g. acetylation, methylation), RNA interference by short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). These systems regulate genomic activity ‘beyond’ simple transcriptional factor inducer or repressor function of genes to generate mRNA. Epigenetic regulation of gene activity has been shown to be important in maintaining normal phenotypic activity of cells, as well as having a role in development and diseases such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's. Newer classes of drugs regulate epigenetic mechanisms to counteract disease states in humans. The reports in this issue describe some advances in epigenetic understanding that relate to human disease, and our ability to control these mechanisms by pharmacological means. Increasingly the importance of epigenetics is being uncovered – it is pharmacology that will have to keep pace. PMID:25966315

  2. A randomized, placebo-controlled double-blinded comparative clinical study of five over-the-counter non-pharmacological topical analgesics for myofascial pain: single session findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avrahami Daniel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To investigate the effects of topical agents for the treatment of Myofascial Pain Syndrome (MPS and Myofascial Trigger Point (MTRP. Methods Subjects with an identifiable trigger point in the trapezius muscle, age 18-80 were recruited for a single-session randomized, placebo-blinded clinical study. Baseline measurements of trapezius muscle pressure pain threshold (PPT: by pressure algometer along with right and left cervical lateral flexion (rangiometer were obtained by a blinded examiner. An assessor blinded to the outcomes assessments applied one of 6 topical formulations which had been placed in identical plastic containers. Five of these topicals were proposed active formulations; the control group was given a non-active formulation (PLA. Five minutes after the application of the formula the outcome measures were re-tested. Data were analyzed with a 5-way ANOVA and Holms-adjusted t-tests with an alpha level of 0.05. Results 120 subjects were entered into the study (63 females; ages 16-82; 20 subjects randomly allocated into each group. The pre- and post-treatment results for pressure threshold did show significant intra-group increases for the Ben-Gay Ultra Strength Muscle Pain Ointment (BG, the Professional Therapy MuscleCare Roll-on (PTMC roll-on and Motion Medicine Cream (MM with an increased threshold of 0.5 kg/cm2 (+/-0.15, 0.72 kg/cm2 (+/-0.17 and 0.47 Kg/cm2 (+/-0.19 respectively. With respect to the inter-group comparisons, PTMC roll-on showed significant increases in pressure threshold compared with Placebo (PLA (p = 0.002 and Icy Hot Extra Strength Cream (IH (p = 0.006. In addition, BG demonstrated significant increases in pressure threshold compared with PLA (p = 0.0003. Conclusions With regards to pressure threshold, PTMC roll-on, BG and MM showed significant increases in pain threshold tolerance after a short-term application on a trigger points located in the trapezius muscle. PTMC roll-on and BG were both

  3. Pharmacologic treatment of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velosa, J F; Riddle, M A

    2000-01-01

    This article reviews the pharmacologic treatment of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents. These disorders are quite common and can be considered a "silent epidemic" because they are more often reported by the children and adolescents than by their parents. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), benzodiazepines, buspirone, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have been used to treat anxiety disorders in children and adolescents with varying degrees of success. Considering safety and efficacy, the SSRIs appear to be the first-line treatment for anxiety disorders in youth, but more studies are needed to confirm preliminary results. Tricyclic antidepressants and benzodiazepines may be considered when the child has not responded to SSRIs or when adverse effects have exceeded benefits. Although nonpharmacologic approaches for the treatment of anxiety in children and adolescents are beyond the scope of this article, their importance is to be underscored and they should be considered as part of the treatment plan. Over the next decade, research data will be generated regarding the treatment of anxiety disorders in youth. Ongoing research studies include the use of fluoxetine (B. Birmaher, personal communication, 1999) and fluvoxamine (J. Walkup, personal communication, 1999) for the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder, separation anxiety disorder, or social phobia; and buspirone for generalized anxiety disorder in children. Despite these efforts, there is a need for more studies to examine the safety and efficacy of different pharmacologic treatments, as well as longitudinal studies to monitor for long-term tolerability and side effects. Pharmacokinetic studies for children and adolescents will provide information on the metabolism and absorption of these medications and delineate the developmental differences between children and adolescents when compared to adults. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, studies that compare medication

  4. Single fluoxetine treatment before but not after stress prevents stress-induced hippocampal long-term depression and spatial memory retrieval impairment in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Huili; Dai, Chunfang; Dong, Zhifang

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of evidence has shown that chronic treatment with fluoxetine, a widely prescribed medication for treatment of depression, can affect synaptic plasticity in the adult central nervous system. However, it is not well understood whether acute fluoxetine influences synaptic plasticity, especially on hippocampal CA1 long-term depression (LTD), and if so, whether it subsequently impacts hippocampal-dependent spatial memory. Here, we reported that LTD facilitated by elevated-platform stress in hippocampal slices was completely prevented by fluoxetine administration (10 mg/kg, i.p.) 30 min before stress. The LTD was not, however, significantly inhibited by fluoxetine administration immediately after stress. Similarly, fluoxetine incubation (10 μM) during electrophysiological recordings also displayed no influence on the stress-facilitated LTD. In addition, behavioral results showed that a single fluoxetine treatment 30 min before but not after acute stress fully reversed the impairment of spatial memory retrieval in the Morris water maze paradigm. Taken together, these results suggest that acute fluoxetine treatment only before, but not after stress, can prevent hippocampal CA1 LTD and spatial memory retrieval impairment caused by behavioral stress in adult animals. PMID:26218751

  5. A novel chiral GC/MS method for the analysis of fluoxetine and norfluoxetine enantiomers in biological fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Mifsud

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: A novel robust chiral gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric (GC/MS method for the separation and measurement of fluoxetine and norfluoxetine enantiomers in urine and plasma was developed. Materials and Methods: The drug was extracted from the samples by a liquid-liquid technique, using chloroform, and the enantiomers were separated and measured on a chiral gas chromatographic column (HYDRODEX β-6TBDM®, 0.25 μm × 0.25 mm × 50 m. GC/MS instrumentation was used for the acquisition of data in the electron impact selective-ion monitoring mode. Results: The ions chosen were of a mass-to-charge ratio (m/z exactly equal to 44 units, in order to measure fluoxetine enantiomers, 134 units in order to measure norfluoxetine enantiomers, and 58 units in order to measure diphenhydramine, the internal standard. The method was found to be linear and reproducible in the 50-500 ng/mL concentration range for both urine samples and plasma samples and for both fluoxetine and norfluoxetine, with correlation coefficients ranging between 0.994 and 0.997. Conclusions: This methodology has an enormous potential for application in pharmacokinetic studies of the enantiomers of fluoxetine

  6. Long-term consequences of chronic fluoxetine exposure on the expression of myelination-related genes in the rat hippocampus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroeze, Y.L.; Peeters, D.G.A.; Boulle, F.; Hove, D.L. van den; Bokhoven, H. van; Zhou, Huiqing; Homberg, J.R.

    2015-01-01

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine is widely prescribed for the treatment of symptoms related to a variety of psychiatric disorders. After chronic SSRI treatment, some symptoms remediate on the long term, but the underlying mechanisms are not yet well understood. Here we

  7. The expression of HoxB5 and SPC in neonatal rat lung after exposure to fluoxetine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghizadeh, Razieh; Taghipour, Zahra; Karimi, Akbar; Shamsizadeh, Ali; Taghavi, Mohammad Mohsen; Shariati, Mahdi; Shabanizadeh, Ahmad; Jafari Naveh, Hamid Reza; Bidaki, Reza; Aminzadeh, Fariba

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 10% of pregnant women suffer from pregnancy-associated depression. Fluoxetine, as a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, is being employed as a therapy for depressive disorders. The present study aimed to determine the effects of fluoxetine on neonatal lung development. Thirty pregnant Wistar rats (weighing 200-250 g) were treated daily with 7 mg/kg fluoxetine from gestation day 0 to gestation day 21, via gavage. The control group received a similar volume of distilled water only. Following delivery, the newborns and their lungs were immediately weighed in both of the groups. The right lung was fixed for histological assessments while the left lung was used for evaluation of the expression of SPC and HoxB5 by the real-time polymerase chain reaction method. Results have indicated that even though the body weight and the number of neonatal rats in both groups were the same, the lung weight of neonates exposed to fluoxetine was significantly different compared to the control group ( P effects of antidepressant drugs during pregnancy is deserved.

  8. Fluoxetine for the Treatment of Childhood Anxiety Disorders: Open-Label, Long-Term Extension to a Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Duncan B.; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David; Monk, Kelly; Kalas, Catherine; Ehmann, Mary; Bridge, Jeffrey; Wood, D. Scott; Muthen, Bengt; Brent, David

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy of fluoxetine for the long-term treatment of children and adolescents with anxiety disorders, including generalized anxiety disorder, separation anxiety disorder, and/or social phobia. Method: Children and adolescents (7-17 years old) with anxiety disorders were studied in open treatment for 1 year after they…

  9. Effects of fluoxetine on disease activity in relapsing multiple sclerosis : a double-blind, placebo-controlled, exploratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mostert, J. P.; Admiraal-Behloul, F.; Hoogduin, J. M.; Luyendijk, J.; Heersema, D. J.; van Buchem, M. A.; De Keyser, J.

    Background: Suppressing the antigen-presenting capacity of glial cells could represent a novel way of reducing inflammatory activity in multiple sclerosis (MS). Aims: To evaluate the effects of fluoxetine on new lesion formation in patients with relapsing MS. Methods: In a double-blind,

  10. Synthesis of /sup 14/C- and /sup 3/H-labeled fluoxetine, a selective serotonin uptake inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, D.W.; Krushinski, J.H.; Wong, D.T.; Kau, D.

    1987-11-01

    Fluoxetine (N-methyl-..gamma..-(4-(trifluoromethyl)phenoxy) benzenepropanamine) is a potent, highly selective serotonin uptake inhibitor that is useful in treating a variety of major psychiatric derangements. We have synthesized this compound in /sup 14/C- and /sup 3/H-labeled forms. The tritium label was introduced in the final step by catalytic dehalogenation of the brominated fluoxetine precursor. Reaction conditions could be controlled such that catalytic hydrogenolysis of the labile C-O benzylic bond was minimized. Following HPLC purification, (/sup 3/H)-fluoxetine was obtained in a state of high radiochemical purity (98%) and specific activity (20.4 Ci/mmol). The /sup 14/C-label was introduced in the final step via a nucleophilic aromatic substitution reaction between the sodium salt of ..cap alpha..-(2-(methylamino)ethyl)benzenemethanol and uniformly ring-labeled p-chlorobenzotrifluoride. Following purification by flash chromatography, (/sup 14/C)-fluoxetine was obtained in 98.3% radiochemical purity with a specific activity of 5.52 mCi/mmol.

  11. Fluoxetine Monotherapy in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Comorbid Non-Bipolar Mood Disorders in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Humberto; Butterbaugh, Grant J.; Purnell, William; Layman, Ann K.

    2007-01-01

    Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are at increased risk for developing comorbid non-bipolar mood disorders. Fluoxetine monotherapy is an established treatment for pediatric mood disorders; however its efficacy in ADHD and comorbid mood disorder is unknown. Therefore, we evaluated 30 children who met DSM-IV criteria for…

  12. Neurogenomic evidence for a shared mechanism of the antidepressant effects of exercise and chronic fluoxetine in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Jen Huang

    Full Text Available Several different interventions improve depressed mood, including medication and environmental factors such as regular physical exercise. The molecular pathways underlying these effects are still not fully understood. In this study, we sought to identify shared mechanisms underlying antidepressant interventions. We studied three groups of mice: mice treated with a widely used antidepressant drug--fluoxetine, mice engaged in voluntary exercise, and mice living in an enriched environment. The hippocampi of treated mice were investigated at the molecular and cellular levels. Mice treated with fluoxetine and mice who exercised daily showed, not only similar antidepressant behavior, but also similar changes in gene expression and hippocampal neurons. These changes were not observed in mice with environmental enrichment. An increase in neurogenesis and dendritic spine density was observed following four weeks of fluoxetine treatment and voluntary exercise. A weighted gene co-expression network analysis revealed four different modules of co-expressed genes that were correlated with the antidepressant effect. This network analysis enabled us to identify genes involved in the molecular pathways underlying the effects of fluoxetine and exercise. The existence of both neuronal and gene expression changes common to antidepressant drug and exercise suggests a shared mechanism underlying their effect. Further studies of these findings may be used to uncover the molecular mechanisms of depression, and to identify new avenues of therapy.

  13. [Pharmacological therapeutic intervention in mild cognitive impairment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriola Manchola, Enrique; Alaba Loinaz, Javier

    2017-06-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a syndrome encompassing affective and behavioural symptoms and various subtypes. MCI is a heterogeneous clinical entity with varied causes (degenerative, vascular, psychiatric, non-neurological disorders), and there is wide variation in symptoms and clinical course. There are multiple causes and consequently various treatments can be applied and should be combined with non-pharmacological measures. This article describes both preventive and therapeutic pharmacological interventions: control of vascular risk factors, avoidance of iatrogeny, use of nutraceuticals, CDP-choline, and Ginkgo biloba EGb 761 ® , and improvement in sense organs. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Geriatría y Gerontología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Pharmacological caspase inhibitors: research towards therapeutic perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudelova, J; Fleischmannova, J; Adamova, E; Matalova, E

    2015-08-01

    Caspases are key molecules of apoptosis and the inflammatory response. Up-regulation of the caspase cascade contributes to human pathologies such as neurodegenerative and immune disorders. Thus, blocking the excessive apoptosis by pharmacological inhibitors seems promising for therapeutic interventions in such diseases. Caspase inhibitors, both natural and artificial, have been used as research tools and have helped to define the role of the individual caspases in apoptosis and in non-apoptotic processes. Moreover, some caspase inhibitors have demonstrated their therapeutic efficiency in the reduction of cell death and inflammation in animal models of human diseases. However, no drug based on caspase inhibition has been approved on the market until now. Thus, the development of therapeutic approaches that specifically target caspases remains a great challenge and is now the focus of intense biological and clinical interest. Here, we provide a brief review of recent knowledge about pharmacological caspase inhibitors with special focus on their proposed clinical applications.

  15. Pharmacological management of cystic fibrosis related diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moheet, Amir; Moran, Antoinette

    2018-02-01

    There are limited data from randomized clinical trials to guide optimal options for pharmacological treatment of cystic fibrosis related diabetes (CFRD). Current guidelines recommend insulin as the only treatment option for CFRD. Areas covered: Current guidelines for screening, diagnosis and pharmacological agents for treatment of impaired glucose tolerance and CFRD in patients with cystic fibrosis are reviewed. Insights from clinical studies examining the role of insulin therapy in CFRD are presented. Expert commentary: CFRD is the most common extra pulmonary complication of cystic fibrosis, and is primarily related to insulin insufficiency. Insulin is the treatment of choice for CFRD. Insulin treatment is associated with improvement in glycemic control, nutritional status and lung function. Current data does not support use of oral hypoglycemic agents for treatment of CFRD.

  16. Modulation by fluoxetine of striatal dopamine release following Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol: a microdialysis study in conscious rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Daniel T; Taylor, David A

    1999-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) and possible serotoninergic involvement on the extracellular level of dopamine (DA) in the striatum using microdialysis in conscious, freely-moving rats. A dose-dependent increase in striatal DA release occurred after i.v. administration of 0.5–5 mg kg−1 Δ9-THC when compared with vehicle (n=5–8, P<0.05). Maximum increases, ranging from 42.1±5.4% to 97.4±5.9% (means±s.e.mean) of basal levels occurred 20 min after Δ9-THC. This effect was abolished by pretreatment with the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist, SR 141716 (2.5 mg kg−1 i.p.). Pretreatment with fluoxetine (10 mg kg−1 i.p.) abolished the Δ9-THC-induced DA release. Fluoxetine 10 mg kg−1 i.p. administered 40 min after Δ9-THC had no significant effect on Δ9-THC-induced DA release. However, fluoxetine perfused locally into the striatum by adding it to the microdialysis perfusion fluid (10 μM) 40 min after Δ9-THC significantly potentiated the Δ9-THC-induced DA release (n=6–8, P<0.05). These results suggest that DA release induced by Δ9-THC is modulated by serotoninergic changes induced by fluoxetine, the effect of which depends on the time of its administration relative to that of Δ9-THC. Fluoxetine induces an acute increase in extracellular 5-HT through reuptake inhibition, which can activate autoreceptors which may decrease serotoninergic neuronal activity. This may be the reason fluoxetine pretreatment abolished the Δ9-THC-induced DA release. The potentiation of Δ9-THC-induced DA release by fluoxetine perfusion added 40 min after Δ9-THC may be due to an acute increase in 5-HT produced by reuptake inhibition. PMID:10498830

  17. The expression of HoxB5 and SPC in neonatal rat lung at exposure to fluoxetine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taghizadeh R

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Razieh Taghizadeh,1 Zahra Taghipour,2 Akbar Karimi,1 Ali Shamsizadeh,3 Mohammad Mohsen Taghavi,2 Mahdi Shariati,2 Ahmad Shabanizadeh,2 Hamid Reza Jafari Naveh,2 Reza Bidaki,4 Fariba Aminzadeh51Department of Biology, Payame Noor University, Isfahan, Iran; 2Department of Anatomy, Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences, Rafsanjan, Iran; 3Department of Physiology, Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences, Rafsanjan, Iran; 4Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran; 5Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences, Rafsanjan, IranObjective: Approximately 10% of pregnant women suffer from pregnancy-associated depression. Fluoxetine, as a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, is being employed as a therapy for depressive disorders. The present study aimed to determine the effects of fluoxetine on neonatal lung development.Methods: Thirty pregnant Wistar rats (weighing 200–250 g were treated daily with 7 mg/kg fluoxetine from gestation day 0 to gestation day 21, via gavage. The control group received a similar volume of distilled water only. Following delivery, the newborns and their lungs were immediately weighed in both of the groups. The right lung was fixed for histological assessments while the left lung was used for evaluation of the expression of SPC and HoxB5 by the real-time polymerase chain reaction method.Results: Results have indicated that even though the body weight and the number of neonatal rats in both groups were the same, the lung weight of neonates exposed to fluoxetine was significantly different compared to the control group (P<0.05. Expression of both genes was increased, nonetheless, only elevation of HoxB5 was significant (P<0.05. Histological studies demonstrated that lung tissue in the fluoxetine treatment group morphologically appears to be similar to the pseudoglandular phase, whereas the control group lungs experienced more development.Conclusion: According to the upregulated expression of HoxB5 concerning

  18. Prevention of cardiovascular disease guided by total risk estimations - challenges and opportunities for practical implementation: highlights of a CardioVascular Clinical Trialists (CVCT) Workshop of the ESC Working Group on CardioVascular Pharmacology and Drug Therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zannad, Faiez

    2011-11-03

    This paper presents a summary of the potential practical and economic barriers to implementation of primary prevention of cardiovascular disease guided by total cardiovascular risk estimations in the general population. It also reviews various possible solutions to overcome these barriers. The report is based on discussion among experts in the area at a special CardioVascular Clinical Trialists workshop organized by the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Drug Therapy that took place in September 2009. It includes a review of the evidence in favour of the \\'treat-to-target\\' paradigm, as well as potential difficulties with this approach, including the multiple pathological processes present in high-risk patients that may not be adequately addressed by this strategy. The risk-guided therapy approach requires careful definitions of cardiovascular risk and consideration of clinical endpoints as well as the differences between trial and \\'real-world\\' populations. Cost-effectiveness presents another issue in scenarios of finite healthcare resources, as does the difficulty of documenting guideline uptake and effectiveness in the primary care setting, where early modification of risk factors may be more beneficial than later attempts to manage established disease. The key to guideline implementation is to improve the quality of risk assessment and demonstrate the association between risk factors, intervention, and reduced event rates. In the future, this may be made possible by means of automated data entry and various other measures. In conclusion, opportunities exist to increase guideline implementation in the primary care setting, with potential benefits for both the general population and healthcare resources.

  19. Pharmacologic management of myelofibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Michael; Highsmith, Kaitlin; Rexwinkle, Amber

    2017-12-01

    Myelofibrosis is a BCR-ABL-negative myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by abnormal hematopoiesis. Alterations to the Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription pathway result in dysregulation of gene transcription and cell proliferation. Patients with symptomatic myelofibrosis present with a variety of signs and symptoms including, but not limited to myelosuppression, marked splenomegaly, abdominal discomfort, fatigue, and blood transfusion-dependence. Traditional myelosuppressive therapies including hydroxyurea, azacitidine, and cladribine aim to reduce constitutional symptoms and control the burden of disease. Immunomodulators can potentially reverse anemia associated with myelofibrosis, but are poorly tolerated by most patients. The novel Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) inhibitor, ruxolitinib, has demonstrated marked improvements to constitutional symptoms and splenomegaly. While survival benefit has not yet been demonstrated, continued research into pharmacologic management of myelofibrosis offers the promise of altering the course of disease progression.

  20. The pharmacology of salmeterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M; Butchers, P R; Coleman, R A; Nials, A T; Strong, P; Sumner, M J; Vardey, C J; Whelan, C J

    1993-01-01

    Salmeterol was developed to provide prolonged bronchodilatation to control nocturnal symptoms and improve maintenance therapy in asthmatic patients. Salmeterol is > 10,000 times more lipophilic than salbutamol and has greater affinity for the beta 2-adrenoceptor. Membrane binding is non-competitive and dissociation is slow so that its effects last for many hours. Despite this, salmeterol does not accumulate in tissues. Its mechanism of action can be explained by binding to a specific exo-site domain of the beta 2-receptor protein to produce continuous stimulation of the active site of the receptor, which gives salmeterol a profile of pharmacological activity unlike that of other beta 2-agonists. Due to its potent and prolonged activation of beta 2-adrenoceptors in airway smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, mast cells and epithelial cells, salmeterol induces prolonged bronchodilatation, reduced vascular permeability, inhibition of inflammatory mediators, stimulation of ciliary function and modulation of ion and water transport across the bronchial mucosa.

  1. Systems Pharmacology in Small Molecular Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Wang, Yonghua; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2016-02-18

    Drug discovery is a risky, costly and time-consuming process depending on multidisciplinary methods to create safe and effective medicines. Although considerable progress has been made by high-throughput screening methods in drug design, the cost of developing contemporary approved drugs did not match that in the past decade. The major reason is the late-stage clinical failures in Phases II and III because of the complicated interactions between drug-specific, human body and environmental aspects affecting the safety and efficacy of a drug. There is a growing hope that systems-level consideration may provide a new perspective to overcome such current difficulties of drug discovery and development. The systems pharmacology method emerged as a holistic approach and has attracted more and more attention recently. The applications of systems pharmacology not only provide the pharmacodynamic evaluation and target identification of drug molecules, but also give a systems-level of understanding the interaction mechanism between drugs and complex disease. Therefore, the present review is an attempt to introduce how holistic systems pharmacology that integrated in silico ADME/T (i.e., absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity), target fishing and network pharmacology facilitates the discovery of small molecular drugs at the system level.

  2. Systems Pharmacology in Small Molecular Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhou

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Drug discovery is a risky, costly and time-consuming process depending on multidisciplinary methods to create safe and effective medicines. Although considerable progress has been made by high-throughput screening methods in drug design, the cost of developing contemporary approved drugs did not match that in the past decade. The major reason is the late-stage clinical failures in Phases II and III because of the complicated interactions between drug-specific, human body and environmental aspects affecting the safety and efficacy of a drug. There is a growing hope that systems-level consideration may provide a new perspective to overcome such current difficulties of drug discovery and development. The systems pharmacology method emerged as a holistic approach and has attracted more and more attention recently. The applications of systems pharmacology not only provide the pharmacodynamic evaluation and target identification of drug molecules, but also give a systems-level of understanding the interaction mechanism between drugs and complex disease. Therefore, the present review is an attempt to introduce how holistic systems pharmacology that integrated in silico ADME/T (i.e., absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity, target fishing and network pharmacology facilitates the discovery of small molecular drugs at the system level.

  3. The parallel evolution of immunology and pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, A A

    2010-01-01

    Immunology is the systematic evaluation of the means through which human beings protect themselves and respond to the attack of internal and external agents, and Edward Jenner (1749-1823) and Louis Pasteur (1822-1895) are considered pioneers of this field. Jenner observed the protective effect of cowpox against smallpox and inoculated the cowpox in human beings to protect them from the often lethal smallpox. Pasteur developed in his laboratory a vaccine against rabies and elaborated methods for attenuating the virulence of pathogenic microorganisms while maintaining their immunogenicity. Pharmacology is the area of medical science dealing with drugs and their uses, and it was during the nineteenth century that it assumed its status of scientific specialty, mainly in German-speaking Europe, through the establishment of pharmacological institutes and dedicated laboratories. The discovery and the synthesis of drugs and the systematic evaluation of their activity have constituted through time a scientific field in which immunology and pharmacology have met and given origin to notable progress in the history of science. The development of chemotherapy, as well as of organ and tissue transplantation, in the twentieth century has been decisively promoted by both immunology and pharmacology. In the last three decades the relationship between these two scientific branches has become increasingly closer in basic research, clinical science, medical education and also editorial scientific activity, as documented by the Journal hosting this paper.

  4. Suicidal thoughts and behavior with antidepressant treatment: reanalysis of the randomized placebo-controlled studies of fluoxetine and venlafaxine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Robert D; Brown, C Hendricks; Hur, Kwan; Davis, John; Mann, J John

    2012-06-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration issued a black box warning for antidepressants and suicidal thoughts and behavior in children and young adults. To determine the short-term safety of antidepressants by standard assessments of suicidal thoughts and behavior in youth, adult, and geriatric populations and the mediating effect of changes in depressive symptoms. All intent-to-treat person-level longitudinal data of major depressive disorder from 12 adult, 4 geriatric, and 4 youth randomized controlled trials of fluoxetine hydrochloride and 21 adult trials of venlafaxine hydrochloride. All sponsor-conducted randomized controlled trials of fluoxetine and venlafaxine. The suicide items from the Children's Depression Rating Scale-Revised and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale as well as adverse event reports of suicide attempts and suicide during active treatment were analyzed in 9185 patients (fluoxetine: 2635 adults, 960 geriatric patients, 708 youths; venlafaxine: 2421 adults with immediate-release venlafaxine and 2461 adults with extended-release venlafaxine) for a total of 53 260 person-week observations. Suicidal thoughts and behavior decreased over time for adult and geriatric patients randomized to fluoxetine or venlafaxine compared with placebo, but no differences were found for youths. In adults, reduction in suicide ideation and attempts occurred through a reduction in depressive symptoms. In all age groups, severity of depression improved with medication and was significantly related to suicide ideation or behavior. Fluoxetine and venlafaxine decreased suicidal thoughts and behavior for adult and geriatric patients. This protective effect is mediated by decreases in depressive symptoms with treatment. For youths, no significant effects of treatment on suicidal thoughts and behavior were found, although depression responded to treatment. No evidence of increased suicide risk was observed in youths receiving active medication. To our knowledge, this is the

  5. Sonochemical degradation of the pharmaceutical fluoxetine: Effect of parameters, organic and inorganic additives and combination with a biological system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serna-Galvis,