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Sample records for fluoroquinolone-resistant escherichia coli

  1. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis of fluoroquinolone resistance in clinical isolates of Escherichia coli.

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    Yamane, Takashi; Enokida, Hideki; Hayami, Hiroshi; Kawahara, Motoshi; Nakagawa, Masayuki

    2012-04-01

    Coincident with their worldwide use, resistance to fluoroquinolones in Escherichia coli has increased. To identify the gene expression profiles underlying fluoroquinolone resistance, we carried out genome-wide transcriptome analysis of fluoroquinolone-sensitive E. coli. Four fluoroquinolone-sensitive E. coli and five fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli clinical isolates were subjected to complementary deoxyribonucleic acid microarray analysis. Some upregulated genes' expression was verified by real-time polymerase chain reaction using 104 E. coli clinical isolates, and minimum inhibitory concentration tests were carried out by using their transformants. A total of 40 genes were significantly upregulated in fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli isolates (P fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli. One of the phage shock protein operons, pspC, was significantly upregulated in 50 fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli isolates (P fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli. Deoxyribonucleic acid adenine methyltransferase (dam), which represses type I fimbriae genes, was significantly upregulated in the clinical fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli isolates (P = 0.007). We established pspC- and dam-expressing E. coli transformants from fluoroquinolone-sensitive E. coli, and the minimum inhibitory concentration tests showed that the transformants acquired fluoroquinolone resistance, suggesting that upregulation of these genes contributes to acquiring fluoroquinolone resistance. Upregulation of psp operones and dam underlying pilus operons downregulation might be associated with fluoroquinolone resistance in E. coli. © 2011 The Japanese Urological Association.

  2. Dose-related selection of fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli.

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    Olofsson, Sara K; Marcusson, Linda L; Strömbäck, Ann; Hughes, Diarmaid; Cars, Otto

    2007-10-01

    To investigate the effects of clinically used doses of norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin and moxifloxacin on survival and selection in Escherichia coli populations containing fluoroquinolone-resistant subpopulations and to measure the value of the pharmacodynamic index AUC/mutant prevention concentration (MPC) that prevents the growth of pre-existing resistant mutants. Mixed cultures of susceptible wild-type and isogenic single (gyrA S83L) or double (gyrA S83L, Delta marR) fluoroquinolone-resistant mutants were exposed to fluoroquinolones for 24 h in an in vitro kinetic model. Antibiotic concentrations modelled pharmacokinetics attained with clinical doses. All tested doses eradicated the susceptible wild-type strain. Norfloxacin 200 mg administered twice daily selected for both single and double mutants. Ciprofloxacin 250 mg administered twice daily eradicated the single mutant, but not the double mutant. For that, 750 mg administered twice daily was required. Moxifloxacin 400 mg once daily eliminated the single mutant, but did not completely remove the double mutant. The MPC of ciprofloxacin was determined and based on those dose simulations that eradicated mutant subpopulations, an AUC/MPC(wild-type) of 35 prevented selection of the single mutant, whereas an AUC/MPC(single mutant) of 14 (equivalent to an AUC/MPC(wild-type) of 105) prevented selection of the double mutant. All tested clinical dosing regimens were effective in eradicating susceptible bacteria, but ciprofloxacin 750 mg twice daily was the only dose that prevented the selection of single- and double-resistant E. coli mutants. Thus, among approved fluoroquinolone dosing regimens, some are significantly more effective than others in exceeding the mutant selection window and preventing the enrichment of resistant mutants.

  3. Colonization with Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli among Nursing Home Residents and Its Relationship to Fluoroquinolone Resistance

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    Maslow, Joel N.; Lautenbach, Ebbing; Glaze, Thomas; Bilker, Warren; Johnson, James R.

    2004-01-01

    In a cross-sectional fecal prevalence survey involving 49 residents of a Veterans Affairs nursing home, 59% of subjects were colonized with extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC), 22% were colonized with adhesin-positive E. coli, and 51% were colonized with fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli. Among 80 unique isolates, adhesins correlated negatively and aerobactin correlated positively with fluoroquinolone resistance. PMID:15328142

  4. Correlation between levofloxacin consumption and the incidence of nosocomial infections due to fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli.

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    Wu, Hui-Hsiu; Liu, Hsin-Yi; Lin, Yi-Chun; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Lee, Yuarn-Jang

    2016-06-01

    The relationship between fluoroquinolone resistance in Escherichia coli isolates causing nosocomial infection and hospital antibiotic consumption were investigated. Restriction of levofloxacin use was implemented to control the incidence of fluoroquinolone-resistant E coli in the hospital. The study was conducted from January 2004 to December 2010. Antimicrobial agent consumption was obtained from the pharmacy computer system and presented as the defined daily doses per 1000 patient-days every 6 months. The incidence of fluoroquinolone-resistant E coli isolates causing nosocomial infections was obtained from the Department of Infection Control every 6 months. An antimicrobial stewardship program, restricting levofloxacain use, was implemented in July 2007. The incidence of fluoroquinolone-resistant E coli causing nosocomial infections was significantly correlated with fluoroquinolone usage (p = 0.005), but not with the use of third- or fourth-generation cephalosporins, piperacillin-tazobactam, or carbapenems. Parenteral (p = 0.002), oral (p = 0.018), and total levofloxacin (p = 0.001) use were significantly correlated with the extent of fluoroquinolone resistance. With a reduction of levofloxacin use, a decrease of the incidence of fluoroquinolone resistance in E coli isolates was observed. There is a significant correlation between levofloxacin use and the incidence of nosocomial fluoroquinolone-resistant E coli isolates. The incidence of fluoroquinolone-resistant E coli could be reduced by limiting levofloxacin consumption. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Efficient recovery of fluoroquinolone-susceptible and fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli strains from frozen samples.

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    Lautenbach, Ebbing; Santana, Evelyn; Lee, Abby; Tolomeo, Pam; Black, Nicole; Babson, Andrew; Perencevich, Eli N; Harris, Anthony D; Smith, Catherine A; Maslow, Joel

    2008-04-01

    We assessed the rate of recovery of fluoroquinolone-resistant and fluoroquinolone-susceptible Escherichia coli isolates from culture of frozen perirectal swab samples compared with the results for culture of the same specimen before freezing. Recovery rates for these 2 classes of E. coli were 91% and 83%, respectively. The majority of distinct strains recovered from the initial sample were also recovered from the frozen sample. The strains that were not recovered were typically present only in low numbers in the initial sample. These findings emphasize the utility of frozen surveillance samples.

  6. Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Escherichia coli Infections After Transrectal Biopsy of the Prostate in the Veterans Affairs Healthcare System

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    Saade, Elie A.; Suwantarat, Nuntra; Zabarsky, Trina F.; Wilson, Brigid; Donskey, Curtis J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent reports suggest that infections due to fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli) are an increasingly common complication of transrectal biopsy of the prostate (TBP) in the United States. A better understanding of the magnitude and scope of these infections is needed to guide prevention efforts. Our objective is to determine whether the incidence of infections due to fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli after TBP has increased nationwide in the Veterans Affairs Health Care System and to identify risk factors for infection. Methods We performed a retrospective, observational cohort study and a nested case-control study within the US Deparment of Veterans Affairs Healthcare System. The primary outcomes were the incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI) and bacteremia with E. coli and with fluoroquinolone- resistant E. coli strains within 30 days after TBP. Secondary endpoints focused on the correlation between fluoroquinolone-resistance in all urinary E. coli isolates and post-TBP infection and risk factors for infection due to fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli infection. Results 245 618 patients undergoing 302 168 TBP procedures from 2000 through 2013 were included in the cohort study, and 59 469 patients undergoing TBP from 2011 through 2013 were included in the nested case-control study. Between 2000 and 2013, there was a 5-fold increase in the incidence of E. coli UTI (0.18%–0.93%) and a 4-fold increase in the incidence of E. coli bacteremia (0.04%–0.18%) after TBP that was attributable to an increase in the incidence of fluoroquinolone- resistant E. coli UTI (0.03%–0.75%) and bacteremia (0.01%–0.14%). The increasing incidence of fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli infections after TBP occurred in parallel with increasing rates of fluoroquinolone-resistance in all urinary E. coli isolates. By multivariable logistic regression analysis, independent risk factors for fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli UTI after TBP included diabetes

  7. Rapid evolution of fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli in Nigeria is temporally associated with fluoroquinolone use

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    2011-01-01

    Background Antibiotic resistance has necessitated fluoroquinolone use but little is known about the selective forces and resistance trajectory in malaria-endemic settings, where selection from the antimalarial chloroquine for fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria has been proposed. Methods Antimicrobial resistance was studied in fecal Escherichia coli isolates in a Nigerian community. Quinolone-resistance determining regions of gyrA and parC were sequenced in nalidixic acid resistant strains and horizontally-transmitted quinolone-resistance genes were sought by PCR. Antimicrobial prescription practices were compared with antimicrobial resistance rates over a period spanning three decades. Results Before 2005, quinolone resistance was limited to low-level nalixidic acid resistance in fewer than 4% of E. coli isolates. In 2005, the proportion of isolates demonstrating low-level quinolone resistance due to elevated efflux increased and high-level quinolone resistance and resistance to the fluoroquinolones appeared. Fluoroquinolone resistance was attributable to single nucleotide polymorphisms in quinolone target genes gyrA and/or parC. By 2009, 35 (34.5%) of isolates were quinolone non-susceptible with nine carrying gyrA and parC SNPs and six bearing identical qnrS1 alleles. The antimalarial chloroquine was heavily used throughout the entire period but E. coli with quinolone-specific resistance mechanisms were only detected in the final half decade, immediately following the introduction of the fluoroquinolone antibacterial ciprofloxacin. Conclusions Fluoroquinolones, and not chloroquine, appear to be the selective force for fluoroquinolone-resistant fecal E. coli in this setting. Rapid evolution to resistance following fluoroquinolone introduction points the need to implement resistant containment strategies when new antibacterials are introduced into resource-poor settings with high infectious disease burdens. PMID:22060770

  8. Overexpression of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi recA gene confers fluoroquinolone resistance in Escherichia coli DH5α.

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    Yassien, M A M; Elfaky, M A

    2015-11-01

    A spontaneous fluoroquinolone-resistant mutant (STM1) was isolated from its parent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) clinical isolate. Unlike its parent isolate, this mutant has selective resistance to fluoroquinolones without any change in its sensitivity to various other antibiotics. DNA gyrase assays revealed that the fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype of the STM1 mutant did not result from alteration of the fluoroquinolone sensitivity of the DNA gyrase isolated from it. To study the mechanism of fluoroquinolone resistance, a genomic library from the STM1 mutant was constructed in Escherichia coli DH5α and two recombinant plasmids were obtained. Only one of these plasmids (STM1-A) conferred the selective fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype to E. coli DH5α. The chromosomal insert from STM1-A, digested with EcoRI and HindIII restriction endonucleases, produced two DNA fragments and these were cloned separately into pUC19 thereby generating two new plasmids, STM1-A1 and STM1-A2. Only STM1-A1 conferred the selective fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype to E. coli DH5α. Sequence and subcloning analyses of STM1-A1 showed the presence of an intact RecA open reading frame. Unlike that of the wild-type E. coli DH5α, protein analysis of a crude STM1-A1 extract showed overexpression of a 40 kDa protein. Western blotting confirmed the 40 kDa protein band to be RecA. When a RecA PCR product was cloned into pGEM-T and introduced into E. coli DH5α, the STM1-A11 subclone retained fluoroquinolone resistance. These results suggest that overexpression of RecA causes selective fluoroquinolone resistance in E. coli DH5α.

  9. Overexpression of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi recA gene confers fluoroquinolone resistance in Escherichia coli DH5α

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    M.A.M. Yassien

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A spontaneous fluoroquinolone-resistant mutant (STM1 was isolated from its parent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi clinical isolate. Unlike its parent isolate, this mutant has selective resistance to fluoroquinolones without any change in its sensitivity to various other antibiotics. DNA gyrase assays revealed that the fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype of the STM1 mutant did not result from alteration of the fluoroquinolone sensitivity of the DNA gyrase isolated from it. To study the mechanism of fluoroquinolone resistance, a genomic library from the STM1 mutant was constructed in Escherichia coli DH5α and two recombinant plasmids were obtained. Only one of these plasmids (STM1-A conferred the selective fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype to E. coli DH5α. The chromosomal insert from STM1-A, digested with EcoRI and HindIII restriction endonucleases, produced two DNA fragments and these were cloned separately into pUC19 thereby generating two new plasmids, STM1-A1 and STM1-A2. Only STM1-A1 conferred the selective fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype to E. coli DH5α. Sequence and subcloning analyses of STM1-A1 showed the presence of an intact RecA open reading frame. Unlike that of the wild-type E. coli DH5α, protein analysis of a crude STM1-A1 extract showed overexpression of a 40 kDa protein. Western blotting confirmed the 40 kDa protein band to be RecA. When a RecA PCR product was cloned into pGEM-T and introduced into E. coli DH5α, the STM1-A11 subclone retained fluoroquinolone resistance. These results suggest that overexpression of RecA causes selective fluoroquinolone resistance in E. coli DH5α.

  10. Relationships among Ciprofloxacin, Gatifloxacin, Levofloxacin, and Norfloxacin MICs for Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Escherichia coli Clinical Isolates▿

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    Becnel Boyd, Lauren; Maynard, Merry J.; Morgan-Linnell, Sonia K.; Horton, Lori Banks; Sucgang, Richard; Hamill, Richard J.; Jimenez, Javier Rojo; Versalovic, James; Steffen, David; Zechiedrich, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones are some of the most prescribed antibiotics in the United States. Previously, we and others showed that the fluoroquinolones exhibit a class effect with regard to the CLSI-established breakpoints for resistance, such that decreased susceptibility (i.e., an increased MIC) to one fluoroquinolone means a simultaneously decreased susceptibility to all. For defined strains, however, clear differences exist in the pharmacodynamic properties of each fluoroquinolone and the extent to which resistance-associated genotypes affect the MICs of each fluoroquinolone. In a pilot study of 920 clinical Escherichia coli isolates, we uncovered tremendous variation in norfloxacin MICs. The MICs for all of the fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates exceeded the resistance breakpoint, reaching 1,000 μg/ml. Approximately 25% of the isolates (n = 214), representing the full range of resistant norfloxacin MICs, were selected for the simultaneous determinations of ciprofloxacin, gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, and norfloxacin MICs. We found that (i) great MIC variation existed for all four fluoroquinolones, (ii) the ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin MICs of >90% of the fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates were higher than the resistance breakpoints, (iii) ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin MICs were distributed into two distinct groups, (iv) the MICs of two drug pairs (ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin by Kendall's Tau-b test and gatifloxacin and levofloxacin by paired t test) were similar with statistical significance but were different from each other, and (v) ∼2% of isolates had unprecedented fluoroquinolone MIC relationships. Thus, although the fluoroquinolones can be considered equivalent with regard to clinical susceptibility or resistance, fluoroquinolone MICs differ dramatically for fluoroquinolone-resistant clinical isolates, likely because of differences in drug structure. PMID:18838594

  11. Prevalence and Fluoroquinolone Resistance Pattern in Escherichia coli Isolates of Urinary Tract Infection (UTI Patients

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    Tippireddypalli Gururaju,

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Urinary tract infections (UTIs are among the most common infectious diseases all over the world. Recent studies reported an increased antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli, primary causative agent of UTI. The resistance has emerged even to more potent antimicrobial agents like fluoroquinolones. Objectives: The present study was undertaken to evaluate the prevalence and resistance pattern of E.coli causing UTIs in patients admitted to a tertiary care hospital in South India, with reference to fluoroquinolones. Material and Methods: A total of 278 selected urine samples of urinary tract infections were processed for E.coli culture using standard methods. For these urinary E. coli isolates, susceptibility to various antibiotics including fluoroquinolones was checked by Kirby Bauer disk diffusion method according CLSI criteria. Final resistance to fluoroquinolones isolates was analyzed. Results: Out of the 278 selected UTI clinical isolates 148 (54% showed ciprofloxacin sensitive and 130 (46% clinical isolates are ciprofloxacin resistant. Of the 130 ciprofloxacin resistant urinary isolates of E. coli subjected to susceptibility test for increased generation of fluoroquinolone drugs, the pattern of resistance noticed as levofloxacin (2nd generation 79%, gatifloxacin (3rd generation 77% and moxifloxacin (4th generation 75%, respectively. The fluoroquinolone resistance in UTI clinical isolates was decreasing with increasing generations of fluoroquinolone. Quinolone drug resistance in clinical isolates was increasing with age and hospitalized patients. Conclusion: Study showed an increased fluoroquinolone resistance among uropathogenic E. coli isolates of UTI. These increased antibiotic resistance trends in UTI patients indicated that it is imperative to rationalize the use of antimicrobials and to use them conservatively.

  12. Sequential Acquisition of Virulence and Fluoroquinolone Resistance Has Shaped the Evolution of Escherichia coli ST131.

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    Ben Zakour, Nouri L; Alsheikh-Hussain, Areej S; Ashcroft, Melinda M; Khanh Nhu, Nguyen Thi; Roberts, Leah W; Stanton-Cook, Mitchell; Schembri, Mark A; Beatson, Scott A

    2016-04-26

    Escherichia coli ST131 is the most frequently isolated fluoroquinolone-resistant (FQR) E. coli clone worldwide and a major cause of urinary tract and bloodstream infections. Although originally identified through its association with the CTX-M-15 extended-spectrum β-lactamase resistance gene, global genomic epidemiology studies have failed to resolve the geographical and temporal origin of the ST131 ancestor. Here, we developed a framework for the reanalysis of publically available genomes from different countries and used this data set to reconstruct the evolutionary steps that led to the emergence of FQR ST131. Using Bayesian estimation, we show that point mutations in chromosomal genes that confer FQR coincide with the first clinical use of fluoroquinolone in 1986 and illustrate the impact of this pivotal event on the rapid population expansion of ST131 worldwide from an apparent origin in North America. Furthermore, we identify virulence factor acquisition events that predate the development of FQR, suggesting that the gain of virulence-associated genes followed by the tandem development of antibiotic resistance primed the successful global dissemination of ST131. Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131) is a recently emerged and globally disseminated multidrug-resistant clone frequently associated with human urinary tract and bloodstream infections. In this study, we have used two large publically available genomic data sets to define a number of critical steps in the evolution of this important pathogen. We show that resistance to fluoroquinolones, a class of broad-spectrum antibiotic used extensively in human medicine and veterinary practice, developed in ST131 soon after the introduction of these antibiotics in the United States, most likely in North America. We also mapped the acquisition of several fitness and virulence determinants by ST131 and demonstrate these events occurred prior to the development of fluoroquinolone resistance. Thus, ST131 has

  13. Rapid and sensitive detection of fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli from urine samples using a genotyping DNA microarray.

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    Yu, Xiaolei; Susa, Milorad; Weile, Jan; Knabbe, Cornelius; Schmid, Rolf D; Bachmann, Till T

    2007-10-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are among the most common bacterial infections in humans, with Escherichia coli being the major cause of infection. Fluoroquinolone resistance of uropathogenic E. coli has increased significantly over the last decade. In this study a microarray-based assay was developed and applied, which provides a rapid, sensitive and specific detection of fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli in urine. The capture probes were designed against previously identified and described hotspots for quinolone resistance (codons 83 and 87 of gyrA). The key goals of this development were to reduce assay time while increasing the sensitivity and specificity as compared with a pilot version of a gyrA genotyping DNA microarray. The performance of the assay was demonstrated with pure cultures of 30 E. coli isolates as well as with urine samples spiked with 6 E. coli isolates. The microarray results were confirmed by standard DNA sequencing and were in full agreement with the phenotypic antimicrobial susceptibility testing using standard methods. The DNA microarray test displayed an assay time of 3.5h, a sensitivity of 100CFU/ml, and the ability to detect fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli in the presence of a 10-fold excess of fluoroquinolone-susceptible E. coli cells. As a consequence, we believe that this microarray-based determination of antibiotics resistance has a true potential for the application in clinical routine laboratories in the future.

  14. Fluoroquinolone-resistance mechanisms and phylogenetic background of clinical Escherichia coli strains isolated in south-east Poland.

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    Korona-Glowniak, Izabela; Skrzypek, Kinga; Siwiec, Radosław; Wrobel, Andrzej; Malm, Anna

    2016-07-01

    Fluorochinolones are a class of broad-spectrum antimicrobials in the treatment of several infections, including those caused by Escherichia coli. Due to the increasing resistance of bacteria to antimicrobials, an understanding of fluoroquinolone resistance is important for infection control. The aim of this study was to determine susceptibility of clinical E. coli strains to fluoroquinolones and characterize their mechanisms of quinolone resistance. Totally, 79 non-duplicate clinical E. coli isolates included in this study were mainly from skin lesion -36 (45.6%) isolates; 54 (68.4%) isolates were assigned to phylogenetic B2 group. Resistance to ciprofloxacin was found in 20 isolates. In the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) region of gyrA and parC, 4 types of point mutations were detected. Mutations in parC gene were found in all strains with gyrA mutations. Predominance of double mutation in codon 83 and 87 of gyrA (90%) and in codon 80 of parC (90%) was found. Moreover, plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMRQ) determinants (qnrA or qnrB and/or aac(6')-Ib-cr) were present in 5 (25%) out of 20 fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates. Resistance to fluoroquinolones in all of the tested clinical E. coli isolates correlated with point mutations in both gyrA and parC. The majority of fluoroquinolone-resistant strains belonged to D and B2 phylogenetic groups.

  15. Intensity and Mechanisms of Fluoroquinolone Resistance within the H30 and H30Rx Subclones of Escherichia coli Sequence Type 131 Compared with Other Fluoroquinolone-Resistant E. coli.

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    Johnson, James R; Johnston, Brian; Kuskowski, Michael A; Sokurenko, Evgeni V; Tchesnokova, Veronika

    2015-08-01

    The recent expansion of the H30 subclone of Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131) and its CTX-M-15-associated H30Rx subset remains unexplained. Although ST131 H30 typically exhibits fluoroquinolone resistance, so do multiple other E. coli lineages that have not expanded similarly. To determine whether H30 isolates have more intense fluoroquinolone resistance than other fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli isolates and to identify possible mechanisms, we determined the MICs for four fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, and norfloxacin) among 89 well-characterized, genetically diverse fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli isolates (48 non-H30 and 41 H30 [23 H30Rx and 18 H30 non-Rx]). We compared the MICs with the H30 and H30Rx status, the presence/number of nonsynonymous mutations in gyrA, parC, and parE, the presence of aac(6')-1b-cr (an aminoglycoside/fluoroquinolone agent-modifying enzyme), and the efflux pump activity (measured as organic solvent tolerance [OST]). Among 1,518 recent E. coli clinical isolates, ST131 H30 predominated clonally, both overall and among the fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates. Among the 89 study isolates, compared with non-H30 isolates, H30 isolates exhibited categorically higher MICs for all four fluoroquinolone agents, higher absolute ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin MICs, more nonsynonymous mutations in gyrA, parC, and parE (specifically gyrA D87N, parC E84V, and parE I529L), and a numerically higher prevalence of (H30Rx-associated) aac(6')-1b-cr but lower OST scores. All putative resistance mechanisms were significantly associated with the MICs [for aac(6')-1b-cr: ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin only]. parC D87N corresponded with ST131 H30 and parE I529L with ST131 generally. Thus, more intense fluoroquinolone resistance may provide ST131 H30, especially H30Rx [if aac(6')-1b-cr positive], with subtle fitness advantages over other fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli strains. This urges both parsimonious fluoroquinolone

  16. Multiple Antimicrobial Resistance and Novel Point Mutation in Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Escherichia coli Isolates from Mangalore, India.

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    Kogaluru Shivakumaraswamy, Santhosh; Vijaya Kumar, Deekshit; Moleyuru Nagarajappa, Venugopal; Karunasagar, Iddya; Karunasagar, Indrani

    2017-04-26

    Fluoroquinolone resistance in bacteria is usually associated with mutations in the topoisomerase regions. We report a novel point mutation in fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli strains. E. coli isolated from the environment in and around Mangalore, India, were examined for their antimicrobial resistance profile to 12 antibiotics and for the antibiotic resistance genes by polymerase chain reaction. Of the 67 E. coli isolated, 24 (35.8%) were sensitive to all antibiotics and 43 (64.2%) showed resistance to at least one of the 12 antibiotics used in the study. One isolate (EC10) was resistant to nine of the 12 antibiotics used. Resistance to nalidixic acid was the most common (34.32%), followed by nitrofurantoin (26.86%), tetracycline (22.38%), ampicillin (20.89%), cotrimoxazole (13.43%), ciprofloxacin (11.94%), gentamicin (10.44%), piperacillin/tazobactam (7.46%), chloramphenicol (7.46%), and cefotaxime (4.47%). Least resistance was observed for meropenem (1.49%) and none of the isolates showed resistance to imipenem. All the isolates harbored resistance genes corresponding to their antimicrobial resistance. Few quinolone-resistant isolates carried single point mutation (ser83Leu) and some had double point mutation (Ser83Leu and Asp87Asn) in gyrA. A third novel point mutation was also observed at position 50 with the change in the amino acid from tyrosine to cysteine (Tyr50Cys) in gyrA region. The study throws light on a novel point mutation in fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates. While the study helps to understand the risk and occurrence of antibiotic resistance among gram-negative bacteria from the environment, the alarming rate of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a cause of concern in addressing infections.

  17. Estimation of transmission parameters of a fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli strain between pigs in experimental conditions

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    Andraud Mathieu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Antimicrobial resistance is of primary importance regarding public and animal health issues. Persistence and spread of resistant strains within a population contribute to the maintenance of a reservoir and lead to treatment failure. An experimental trial was carried out to study the horizontal transmission of a fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli strain from inoculated to naïve pigs. All naïve contact pigs had positive counts of fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli after only two days of contact. Moreover, re-infections of inoculated pigs caused by newly contaminated animals were suspected. A maximum likelihood method, based on a susceptible-infectious-susceptible (SIS model, was used to determine the transmission parameters. Two transmission levels were identified depending on the quantity of bacteria shed by infected individuals: (i low-shedders with bacterial counts of resistant E. coli in the faeces between 5*103 and 106 CFU/g (βL = 0.41 [0.27; 0.62], (ii high shedders with bacterial counts above 106 CFU/g (βH = 0.98 [0.59; 1.62]. Hence, transmission between animals could be pivotal in explaining the persistence of resistant bacteria within pig herds.

  18. Fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli carriage in long-term care facility.

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    Maslow, Joel N; Lee, Betsy; Lautenbach, Ebbing

    2005-06-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional study to determine the prevalence of, and risk factors for, colonization with fluoroquinolone (FQ)-resistant Escherichia coli in residents in a long-term care facility. FQ-resistant E. coli were identified from rectal swabs for 25 (51%) of 49 participants at study entry. On multivariable analyses, prior FQ use was the only independent risk factor for FQ-resistant E. coli carriage and was consistent for FQ exposures in the previous 3, 6, 9, or 12 months. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of FQ-resistant E. coli identified clonal spread of 1 strain among 16 residents. Loss (6 residents) or acquisition (7 residents) of FQ-resistant E. coli was documented and was associated with de novo colonization with genetically distinct strains. Unlike the case in the hospital setting, FQ-resistant E. coli carriage in long-term care facilities is associated with clonal spread.

  19. Increased fluoroquinolone resistance with time in Escherichia coli from >17,000 patients at a large county hospital as a function of culture site, age, sex, and location

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    Boyd, Lauren Becnel; Atmar, Robert L; Randall, Graham L; Hamill, Richard J; Steffen, David; Zechiedrich, Lynn

    2008-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli infections are common and often treated with fluoroquinolones. Fluoroquinolone resistance is of worldwide importance and is monitored by national and international surveillance networks. In this study, we analyzed the effects of time, culture site, and patient age, sex, and location on fluoroquinolone resistance in E. coli clinical isolates. Methods To understand how patient factors and time influenced fluoroquinolone resistance and to determine how well data from surveillance networks predict trends at Ben Taub General Hospital in Houston, TX, we used Perl to parse and MySQL to house data from antibiograms (n ≅ 21,000) for E. coli isolated between 1999 to 2004 using Chi Square, Bonferroni, and Multiple Linear Regression methods. Results Fluoroquinolone resistance (i) increased with time; (ii) exceeded national averages by 2- to 4-fold; (iii) was higher in males than females, largely because of urinary isolates from male outpatients; (iv) increased with patient age; (v) was 3% in pediatric patients; (vi) was higher in hospitalized patients than outpatients; (vii) was higher in sputum samples, particularly from inpatients, than all other culture sites, including blood and urine, regardless of patient location; and (viii) was lowest in genital isolates than all other culture sites. Additionally, the data suggest that, with regard to susceptibility or resistance by the Dade Behring MicroScan system, a single fluoroquinolone suffices as a "surrogate marker" for all of the fluoroquinolone tested. Conclusion Large surveillance programs often did not predict E. coli fluoroquinolone resistance trends at a large, urban hospital with a largely indigent, ethnically diverse patient population or its affiliated community clinics. PMID:18197977

  20. Increased fluoroquinolone resistance with time in Escherichia coli from >17,000 patients at a large county hospital as a function of culture site, age, sex, and location

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamill Richard J

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli infections are common and often treated with fluoroquinolones. Fluoroquinolone resistance is of worldwide importance and is monitored by national and international surveillance networks. In this study, we analyzed the effects of time, culture site, and patient age, sex, and location on fluoroquinolone resistance in E. coli clinical isolates. Methods To understand how patient factors and time influenced fluoroquinolone resistance and to determine how well data from surveillance networks predict trends at Ben Taub General Hospital in Houston, TX, we used Perl to parse and MySQL to house data from antibiograms (n ≅ 21,000 for E. coli isolated between 1999 to 2004 using Chi Square, Bonferroni, and Multiple Linear Regression methods. Results Fluoroquinolone resistance (i increased with time; (ii exceeded national averages by 2- to 4-fold; (iii was higher in males than females, largely because of urinary isolates from male outpatients; (iv increased with patient age; (v was 3% in pediatric patients; (vi was higher in hospitalized patients than outpatients; (vii was higher in sputum samples, particularly from inpatients, than all other culture sites, including blood and urine, regardless of patient location; and (viii was lowest in genital isolates than all other culture sites. Additionally, the data suggest that, with regard to susceptibility or resistance by the Dade Behring MicroScan system, a single fluoroquinolone suffices as a "surrogate marker" for all of the fluoroquinolone tested. Conclusion Large surveillance programs often did not predict E. coli fluoroquinolone resistance trends at a large, urban hospital with a largely indigent, ethnically diverse patient population or its affiliated community clinics.

  1. Accumulation of ciprofloxacin and lomefloxacinin fluoroquinolone-resistant strains of Escherichia coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏培元; 冯萍; 钟利; 吕晓菊; 雷秉钧

    2002-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the role of outer membrane protein (Omp) F-deficiency and active efflux in the accumulation of hydrophilic fluoroquinolones ciprofloxacin (CPLX) and lomefloxacin (LMLX) in resistant E. coli strains. Methods Fluoroquinolone accumulation in bacteria and the effect of active efflux were measured by a fluorescence method. The outer membrane proteins of the bacteria were analysed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). E. coli strains in this study included control strains JF701 and JF703 that are OmpC- or OmpF-deficient mutants of E. coli K-12, respectively, and the fluoroquinolone susceptible strain the fluoroquinolone susceptible strain of Escherichia coli (Ecs) and its in vitroselected resistant strains R2 and R256, and the clinical resistant isolates R5 and R6. Results The steady-state accumulation concentration of each drug in Ecs appeared to be the same as in JF701, while in the OmpF- deficient strain JF703, it was 1/5 CPLX or 1/2 LMLX lower than that in JF701, but JF703 was still susceptible to fluoroquinolones. On the other hand, compared with susceptible strains, a 2- to 10-fold decrease in the accumulation of each drug was found in the resistant strains except R2, in which the accumulation was slightly higher than in JF703. After the addition of 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), accumulation of each drug increased, especially in resistant strains, indicating that the function of the active efflux (pump) system in these bacteria had been enhanced dramatically. Furthermore, both OmpF and OmpC in Ecs, OmpF-deficiency in R2 and R256 and OmpC-deficiency in R5 and R6 were observed.Conclusion The decreased accumulation of hydrophilic fluoroquinolones in E. coli involved OmpF-deficiency and active efflux (pump), and the latter may be an important factor.

  2. Epidemiology and characteristics of Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131) from long-term care facility residents colonized intestinally with fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jennifer H; Garrigan, Charles; Johnston, Brian; Nachamkin, Irving; Clabots, Connie; Bilker, Warren B; Santana, Evelyn; Tolomeo, Pam; Maslow, Joel; Myers, Janice; Carson, Lesley; Lautenbach, Ebbing; Johnson, James R

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate molecular and epidemiologic factors associated with Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131) among long-term care facility (LTCF) residents who acquired gastrointestinal tract colonization with fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli (FQREC). Colonizing isolates from 37 residents who newly developed FQREC colonization at three LTCFs from 2006 to 2008 were evaluated. Twenty-nine (78%) of 37 total FQREC colonizing isolates were ST131. Most ST131 isolates had a distinctive combination of gyrA and parC replacement mutations. The ST131 and non-ST131 isolates differed significantly for the prevalence of many individual virulence factors but not for the proportion that qualified molecularly as extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) or aggregate virulence factor scores. E. coli ST131 was highly prevalent among LTCF residents with FQREC colonization. Future studies should determine the risk factors for infection among ST131-colonized residents, and assess the potential for increased transmissibility of ST131 in the long-term care setting.

  3. Virulence determinants, phylogenetic groups and fluoroquinolone resistance in Escherichia coli isolated from cystitis and pyelonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferjani, S; Saidani, M; Ennigrou, S; Hsairi, M; Ben Redjeb, S

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the relation between virulence genotype, phylogenetic group and susceptibility to fluoroquinolones and the urinary tract infection type including pyelonephritis and cystitis due to Escherichia coli. Between 2006 and 2007, 129 non-duplicate E. coli isolates from pyelonephritis (n=56) and cystitis (n=73) were prospectively collected. The antibiotic susceptibility was done by disk diffusion method. The phylogenetic groups, A, B1, B2 and D and 18 virulence genes were determined by multiplex PCR. Statistical analysis was done with the Pearson χ2 test, Mann-Whitney U-test, Kruskal-Wallis test and stepwise multivariable logistic regression analysis, P values below 0.05 were considered statistically significant. For the pyelonephritis group, sex ratio was 0.3, the median age for women was 30 years and for men it was 54 years. For the cystitis group, sex ratio was 0.4, the median age for women was 41.5 years and for men it was 67.8 years. Significant statistical correlations were found between pyelonephritis isolates and susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (P=4 10(-5)), papG allele II (P=2 10(-6)), hlyA (P=10(-03)), iroN (P=0.04), iha (P=0.03) and ompT (P=0.03) virulence genes, high virulence score (P=0.008) and B2 phylogenetic group (P=0.03). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, papG II as predictor of pyelonephritis, no correlation could be established for the cystitis group. Our findings argue for a direct link between pyelonephritis, virulence factors, susceptibility to fluroquinolones and B2 phylogenetic group among uropthogenic E. coli. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Sequence Type 131 Subgroups O25b and O16 Among Extraintestinal Escherichia coli Isolates from Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefzy, Enas Mamdouh; Hassuna, Noha Anwar

    2017-03-01

    The multidrug-resistant sequence type 131 (ST131) Escherichia coli is a spreading epidemiological burden particularly among isolates resistant to fluoroquinolones. We aimed to evaluate the commonality of ST131-O25b and ST131-O16 among fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli isolates causing community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs) at Fayoum University Hospital, in Egypt. Ninety-two fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli isolates were subjected to multiplex PCR for detection of ST131 of either O25b or O16 subgroups. Positive isolates were then assessed for antimicrobial susceptibility and virulence genotyping. Out of 92 fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli isolates, 56 (60.9%) isolates were O25b/O16 subgroups of ST131, including 44 (78.6%) ST131-O25b and 12 (21.4%) ST131-O16 subgroups. All the O25b/O16 ST131 isolates were sensitive to meropenem, where ST131-O25b isolates were significantly more resistant to extended spectrum cephalosporins compared to S131-O16 strains. All the O25b/O16 ST131 isolates harbored three or more of the virulence factors associated with extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli status. ST131-O16 showed a significantly higher virulence score than ST131-O25b isolates. Our results bring to highlight the emergence of O25b/O16 ST131 isolates between community acquired UTIs among Egyptian patients. This is the first report for the presence of O16 isolates in Egypt, showing a lower predominance than the O25b subgroup. The high prevalence of O25b/O16 ST131 isolates requires strict stewardship on antimicrobial use, notably fluoroquinolones, to control the endemicity of such emerging multidrug-resistant clone in the community.

  5. Unexpected distribution of the fluoroquinolone-resistance gene qnrB in Escherichia coli isolates from different human and poultry origins in Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas-Freire, Paulina I; Trueba, Gabriel; Proaño-Bolaños, Carolina; Levy, Karen; Zhang, Lixin; Marrs, Carl F; Cevallos, William; Eisenberg, Joseph N S

    2015-06-01

    Fluoroquinolone resistance can be conferred through chromosomal mutations or by the acquisition of plasmids carrying genes such as the quinolone resistance gene (qnr). In this study, 3,309 strains of commensal Escherichia coli were isolated in Ecuador from: (i) humans and chickens in a rural northern coastal area (n = 2368, 71.5%) and (ii) chickens from an industrial poultry operation (n = 827, 25%). In addition, 114 fluoroquinolone-resistant strains from patients with urinary tract infections who were treated at three urban hospitals in Quito, Ecuador were analyzed. All of the isolates were subjected to antibiotic susceptibility screening. Fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates (FRIs) were then screened for the presence of qnrB genes. A significantly higher phenotypic resistance to fluoroquinolones was determined in E. coli strains from chickens in both the rural area (22%) and the industrial operation (10%) than in strains isolated from humans in the rural communities (3%). However, the rates of qnrB genes in E. coli isolates from healthy humans in the rural communities (11 of 35 isolates, 31%) was higher than in chickens from either the industrial operations (3 of 81 isolates, 6%) or the rural communities (7 of 251 isolates, 2.8%). The occurrence of qnrB genes in human FRIs obtained from urban hospitals was low (1 of 114 isolates, 0.9%). These results suggested that the qnrB gene is more widely distributed in rural settings, where antibiotic usage is low, than in urban hospitals and industrial poultry operations. The role of qnrB in clinical resistance to fluoroquinolones is thus far unknown.

  6. Genetic profiles of fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli isolates obtained from patients with cystitis: phylogeny, virulence factors, PAIusp subtypes, and mutation patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Akira; Muratani, Tetsuro; Yasuda, Mitsuru; Takahashi, Satoshi; Monden, Koichi; Ishikawa, Kiyohito; Kiyota, Hiroshi; Arakawa, Soichi; Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Shima, Hiroki; Kurazono, Hisao; Yamamoto, Shingo

    2009-03-01

    The low virulence of quinolone- and fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli strains is known, although the reasons for this remain unclear. We surveyed the mutation patterns of quinolone resistance determining regions (QRDRs), phylogenetic distribution, prevalence of 18 urovirulence genes, and PAIusp subtypes in 89 fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli (FQREC) isolates obtained from patients with cystitis and compared them with those of their fluoroquinolone-susceptible counterparts (FQSEC). Phylogenetic group B2 was significantly less prevalent in FQREC than in FQSEC (49% versus 78%; P=0.0138), but it still dominated, followed by phylogroup D (35%), in FQREC. When the prevalences of virulence factor (VF) genes were compared between FQREC and FQSEC, sfa/foc, cnf1, hly, kpsMT, ompT, ibeA, usp, and iroN showed significantly lower prevalences in FQREC than in FQSEC (1.1% versus 24% [Presistance, e.g., mutations in QRDRs, might be a specific event in limited strains, such as those that possess PAIusp subtype 2a in phylogroup B2.

  7. ESBL Genotypes in Fluoroquinolone-Resistant and Fluoroquinolone-Susceptible ESBL-Producing Escherichia coli Urinary Isolates in Manitoba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe RS Lagacé-Wiens

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL-producing Escherichia coli are increasingly common in nosocomial and community settings. Furthermore, fluoroquinolone (FQ and even multidrug resistance (MDR appear to be associated with certain ESBL genotypes. The purpose of the present study was to determine which ESBL genotypes are associated with FQ and MDR in E coli urinary isolates in Manitoba.

  8. Prevalence and characteristics of extended-spectrum β-lactamase and plasmid-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance genes in Escherichia coli isolated from chickens in Anhui province, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Li

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize the prevalence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL genes and plasmid-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance (PMQR determinants in 202 Escherichia coli isolates from chickens in Anhui Province, China, and to determine whether ESBL and PMQR genes co-localized in the isolates. Antimicrobial susceptibility for 12 antimicrobials was determined by broth microdilution. Polymerase chain reactions (PCRs, DNA sequencing, and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE were employed to characterize the molecular basis for β-lactam and fluoroquinolone resistance. High rates of antimicrobial resistance were observed, 147 out of the 202 (72.8% isolates were resistant to at least 6 antimicrobial agents and 28 (13.9% of the isolates were resistant to at least 10 antimicrobials. The prevalence of blaCTX-M, blaTEM-1 and blaTEM-206 genes was 19.8%, 24.3% and 11.9%, respectively. Seventy-five out of the 202 (37.1% isolates possessed a plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinant in the form of qnrS (n = 21; this determinant occurred occasionally in combination with aac(6'-1b-cr (n = 65. Coexistence of ESBL and/or PMQR genes was identified in 31 of the isolates. Two E. coli isolates carried blaTEM-1, blaCTX-M and qnrS, while two others carried blaCTX-M, qnrS and aac(6'-1b-cr. In addition, blaTEM-1, qnrS and aac(6'-1b-cr were co-located in two other E. coli isolates. PFGE analysis showed that these isolates were not clonally related and were genetically diverse. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to describe detection of TEM-206-producing E. coli in farmed chickens, and the presence of blaTEM-206, qnrS and aac(6'-1b-cr in one of the isolates.

  9. Clinical impact of fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli in the fecal flora of hematological patients with neutropenia and levofloxacin prophylaxis.

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    Yong Chong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fluoroquinolone prophylaxis in patients with neutropenia and hematological malignancies is said to be effective on febrile netropenia (FN-related infection and mortality; however, the emergence of antibiotic resistance has become a concern. Ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin prophylaxis are most commonly recommended. A significant increase in the rate of quinolone-resistant Escherichia coli in fecal flora has been reported following ciprofloxacin prophylaxis. The acquisition of quinolone-resistant E. coli after levofloxacin use has not been evaluated. METHODS: We prospectively examined the incidence of quinolone-resistant E. coli isolates recovered from stool cultures before and after levofloxacin prophylaxis in patients with neutropenia from August 2011 to May 2013. Some patients received chemotherapy multiple times. RESULTS: In this trial, 68 patients were registered. Levofloxacin-resistant E. coli isolates were detected from 11 and 13 of all patients before and after the prophylaxis, respectively. However, this was not statistically significant (P = 0.65. Multiple prophylaxis for sequential chemotherapy did not induce additional quinolone resistance among E. coli isolates. Interestingly, quinolone-resistant E. coli, most of which were extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL producers, were already detected in approximately 20% of all patients before the initiation of prophylaxis. FN-related bacteremia developed in 2 patients, accompanied by a good prognosis. CONCLUSIONS: Levofloxacin prophylaxis for neutropenia did not result in a significant acquisition of quinolone-resistant E. coli. However, we detected previous colonization of quinolone-resistant E. coli before prophylaxis, which possibly reflects the spread of ESBL. The epidemic spread of resistant E. coli as a local factor may influence strategies toward the use of quinolone prophylaxis.

  10. Tigecycline Nonsusceptibility Occurs Exclusively in Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Escherichia coli Clinical Isolates, Including the Major Multidrug-Resistant Lineages O25b:H4-ST131-H30R and O1-ST648.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Toyotaka; Suzuki, Yuuki; Shiraishi, Tsukasa; Honda, Hiroyuki; Shinagawa, Masaaki; Yamamoto, Soh; Ogasawara, Noriko; Takahashi, Hiroki; Takahashi, Satoshi; Tamura, Yutaka; Yokota, Shin-Ichi

    2017-02-01

    Tigecycline (TGC) is a last-line drug for multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae We investigated the mechanism(s) underlying TGC nonsusceptibility (TGC resistant/intermediate) in Escherichia coli clinical isolates. The MIC of TGC was determined for 277 fluoroquinolone-susceptible isolates (ciprofloxacin [CIP] MIC, resistant isolates (CIP MIC, >2 mg/liter). The MIC50 and MIC90 for TGC in fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates were 2-fold higher than those in fluoroquinolone-susceptible isolates (MIC50, 0.5 mg/liter versus 0.25 mg/liter; MIC90, 1 mg/liter versus 0.5 mg/liter, respectively). Two fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates (O25b:H4-ST131-H30R and O125:H37-ST48) were TGC resistant (MICs of 4 and 16 mg/liter, respectively), and four other isolates of O25b:H4-ST131-H30R and an isolate of O1-ST648 showed an intermediate interpretation (MIC, 2 mg/liter). No TGC-resistant/intermediate strains were found among the fluoroquinolone-susceptible isolates. The TGC-resistant/intermediate isolates expressed higher levels of acrA and acrB and had lower intracellular TGC concentrations than susceptible isolates, and they possessed mutations in acrR and/or marR The MICs of acrAB-deficient mutants were markedly lower (0.25 mg/liter) than those of the parental strain. After continuous stepwise exposure to CIP in vitro, six of eight TGC-susceptible isolates had reduced TGC susceptibility. Two of them acquired TGC resistance (TGC MIC, 4 mg/liter) and exhibited expression of acrA and acrB and mutations in acrR and/or marR In conclusion, a population of fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli isolates, including major extraintestinal pathogenic lineages O25b:H4-ST131-H30R and O1-ST648, showed reduced susceptibility to TGC due to overexpression of the efflux pump AcrAB-TolC, leading to decreased intracellular concentrations of the antibiotics that may be associated with the development of fluoroquinolone resistance.

  11. Fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli in intestinal flora of patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy--should we reassess our practices for antibiotic prophylaxis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steensels, D; Slabbaert, K; De Wever, L; Vermeersch, P; Van Poppel, H; Verhaegen, J

    2012-06-01

    Although the estimate of the incidence of sepsis following transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy (TRUSPB) is low, fluoroquinolone-resistant infections after prostate biopsy are being increasingly noted. This study was aimed at determining the prevalence of faecal carriage of fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli strains before TRUSPB and at evaluating potential predisposing risk factors. The incidence of sepsis after prostate biopsy was determined, and our routine practice for antibiotic prophylaxis for TRUSPB was evaluated. A prospective study was conducted in 342 consecutive patients undergoing prostate biopsy between December 2009 and July 2010. Before TRUSPB, a rectal swab was cultured. The correlation between the presence of fluoroquinolone-resistant strains and plausible risk factors was investigated by the use of a questionnaire. Of the 236 patients included, 22.0% (52/236) harboured ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli strains. The use of fluoroquinolones in the 6 months before biopsy was associated with an increased risk of faecal carriage of fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli strains (p fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli strains was an important risk factor for infectious complications after TRUSPB (p fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli strains (22.0%) before TRUSPB. The use of fluoroquinolones in the previous 6 months before biopsy is a risk factor for faecal carriage of fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli strains and for infectious complications after TRUSPB. Hence, the universal administration of fluoroquinolones should be reconsidered. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2011 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  12. Association of fluoroquinolone resistance, virulence genes, and IncF plasmids with extended-spectrum-β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131) and ST405 clonal groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Yasufumi; Yamamoto, Masaki; Nagao, Miki; Ito, Yutaka; Takakura, Shunji; Ichiyama, Satoshi

    2013-10-01

    The global increase of extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli is associated with the specific clonal group sequence type 131 (ST131). In order to understand the successful spread of ESBL-producing E. coli clonal groups, we characterized fluoroquinolone resistance determinants, virulence genotypes, and plasmid replicons of ST131 and another global clonal group, ST405. We investigated 41 ST131-O25b, 26 ST131-O16, 41 ST405, and 41 other ST (OST) ESBL-producing isolates, which were collected at seven acute care hospitals in Japan. The detection of ESBL types, fluoroquinolone resistance-associated mutations (including quinolone resistance-determining regions [QRDRs]), virulence genotypes, plasmid replicon types, and IncF replicon sequence types was performed using PCR and sequencing. blaCTX-M, specifically blaCTX-M-14, was the most common ESBL gene type among the four groups. Ciprofloxacin resistance was found in 90% of ST131-O25b, 19% of ST131-O16, 100% of ST405, and 54% of OST isolates. Multidrug resistance was more common in the ST405 group than in the ST131-O25 group (56% versus 32%; P = 0.045). All ST131-O25b isolates except one had four characteristic mutations in QRDRs, but most of the isolates from the other three groups had three mutations in common. The ST131-O25b and ST405 groups had larger numbers of virulence genes than the OST group. All of the ST131-O25b and ST405 isolates and most of the ST131-O16 and OST isolates carried IncF replicons. The most prevalent IncF replicon sequence types differed between the four clonal groups. Both the ST131-O25b and ST405 clonal groups had a fluoroquinolone resistance mechanism in QRDRs, multidrug resistance, high virulence, and IncF plasmids, suggesting the potential for further global expansion and a need for measures against these clonal groups.

  13. Fluoroquinolone resistance mechanisms in urinary tract pathogenic Escherichia coli isolated during rapidly increasing fluoroquinolone consumption in a low-use country

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Nina; Nielsen, Lene; Jakobsen, Lotte

    2011-01-01

    (6')-Ib-cr gene was detected on plasmids from five isolates showing ciprofloxacin MICs >512 mg/L. No overall clonal relationship among isolates was found according to PFGE. Target modification is the dominating fluoroquinolone resistance mechanism often found in combination with efflux and sometimes...

  14. Occurrence of the Plasmid-Mediated Fluoroquinolone Resistance qepA1 Gene in Two Clonal Clinical Isolates of CTX-M-15-Producing Escherichia coli from Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanat, Betitera; Dali Yahia, Radia; Yazi, Leila; Machuca, Jesús; Díaz-De-Alba, Paula; Touati, Abdelaziz; Pascual, Álvaro; Rodríguez-Martínez, José-Manuel

    2016-10-13

    QepA is a plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinant of low prevalence described worldwide, mainly in Enterobacteriaceae. This study describes, for the first time in Algeria, two clonally related, QepA-producing Escherichia coli clinical isolates positive for CTX-M-15. The clonal spread of these multidrug-resistant isolates is a major public health concern.

  15. Risk Factors for the Development of Gastrointestinal Colonization With Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Escherichia coli in Residents of Long-Term Care Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jennifer H.; Maslow, Joel; Han, Xiaoyan; Xie, Sharon X.; Tolomeo, Pam; Santana, Evelyn; Carson, Lesley; Lautenbach, Ebbing

    2014-01-01

    Background. The objective of this study was to assess risk factors for the development of fluoroquinolone (FQ)–resistant Escherichia coli gastrointestinal tract colonization in long-term care facility (LTCF) residents. Methods. A prospective cohort study was conducted from 2006 to 2008 at 3 LTCFs. Residents initially colonized with FQ-susceptible E. coli were followed by means of serial fecal sampling for new FQ-resistant E. coli colonization for up to 12 months or until discharge or death. A Cox proportional hazards regression model was developed to identify risk factors for new FQ-resistant E. coli colonization, with antibiotic and device exposures modeled as time-varying covariates. Results. Fifty-seven (47.5%) of 120 residents became newly colonized with FQ-resistant E. coli, with a median time to colonization of 57 days. Fecal incontinence (hazard ratio [HR], 1.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04–3.06; P = .04) was significantly associated with FQ-resistant E. coli acquisition. Receipt of amoxicillin-clavulanate (HR, 6.48; 95% CI, 1.43–29.4; P = .02) and the presence of a urinary catheter (HR, 3.81; 95% CI, 1.06–13.8; P = .04) during LTCF stay increased the risk of new FQ-resistant E. coli colonization. Conclusions. Acquisition of FQ-resistant E. coli was common, with nearly half of LTCF residents developing new FQ-resistant E. coli colonization. Further studies are needed on interventions to limit the emergence of FQ-resistant E. coli in LTCFs. PMID:23986544

  16. Comparison of clinical categories for Escherichia coli harboring specific qnr and chromosomal-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance determinants according to CLSI and EUCAST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machuca, Jesús; Briales, Alejandra; Díaz-de-Alba, Paula; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Rodríguez-Martínez, José-Manuel; Pascual, Álvaro

    2016-03-01

    EUCAST breakpoints are more restrictive than those defined by CLSI. This study highlights the discrepancies between CLSI and EUCAST in a well characterized isogenic Escherichia coli collection and their correlations with specific quinolone resistance mechanisms. The greatest number of discrepancies was observed in strains containing 2-4 resistance mechanisms (MIC values on the borderline of clinical resistance). Bearing in mind that quinolones are concentration dependent antimicrobial agents, small changes in MIC may have relevant consequences for treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  17. High prevalence and variability of CTX-M-15-producing and fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli observed in stray dogs in rural Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrechtova, Katerina; Kubelova, Michaela; Mazancova, Jana; Dolejska, Monika; Literak, Ivan; Cizek, Alois

    2014-08-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) represents a serious problem globally, but it is especially pronounced in the tropics, where pressure of infectious diseases is high. We examined resistance in Escherichia coli colonizing gastrointestinal tracts of 17 dogs which have never received antimicrobial treatment, living in central rural Angola. Emphasis was placed on extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL) and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR). Resistance-carrying plasmids were characterized in size, group of incompatibility and ability to conjugate. Isolates were compared by their pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiles. Detailed description of 19 E. coli isolates with either ESBL or PMQR genes carried on multiresistant plasmids of different groups of incompatibility indicates that dogs, despite never being treated by antibiotics, are important reservoirs and transmitters of AMR in the study area.

  18. Circulation of clonal populations of fluoroquinolone-resistant CTX-M-15-producing Escherichia coli ST410 in humans and animals in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falgenhauer, Linda; Imirzalioglu, Can; Ghosh, Hiren; Gwozdzinski, Konrad; Schmiedel, Judith; Gentil, Katrin; Bauerfeind, Rolf; Kämpfer, Peter; Seifert, Harald; Michael, Geovana Brenner; Schwarz, Stefan; Pfeifer, Yvonne; Werner, Guido; Pietsch, Michael; Roesler, Uwe; Guerra, Beatriz; Fischer, Jennie; Sharp, Hannah; Käsbohrer, Annemarie; Goesmann, Alexander; Hille, Katja; Kreienbrock, Lothar; Chakraborty, Trinad

    2016-06-01

    Multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli encoding CTX-M-type extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) are isolated in increasing numbers from humans, companion animals and livestock, raising concern regarding the exchange and spread of isolates in these populations. In this study, whole-genome sequencing of CTX-M-15-producing E. coli isolates recently sampled from humans, companion animals, livestock and farm environments was performed. In total, 26 different sequence types (STs) were detected, of which ST410 was the most frequent and was the only ST present in all populations studied. Five clades (designated A-E) were detected within the ST410 isolates. In particular, isolates of clade B were present in all four populations and had core genomes that differed by less than 70 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Isolates of clades B and C were also clonally marked, exhibiting identical chromosomal insertions of blaCTX-M-15 at distinct loci. These data provide strong evidence for the clonal dissemination of specific clades of CTX-M-15-producing E. coli ST410 in human and animal populations.

  19. Fluoroquinolone resistance in Campylobacter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluoroquinolone-resistant Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli are common in animals because of the use of fluoroquinolones as therapeutic agents in animal husbandry, particularly in chickens and other poultry. Campylobacter is a commensal in poultry, and therefore, poultry and poultry products are the...

  20. 养殖动物及人分离大肠埃希菌染色体和质粒介导氟喹诺酮耐药机制的研究%Chromosome-and plasmid-mediated fluoroquinolones-resistance in Escherichia coli strains isolated from food animals and healthy people around farm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李景云; 崔生辉; 王云鹏; 胡昌勤; 金少鸿; 马越

    2008-01-01

    目的 探讨从养殖动物及周围人群分离的大肠埃希菌染色体和质粒介导氟喹诺酮耐药机制. 方法 纸片扩散法和肉汤稀释法检测氟喹诺酮抗菌药物及其他抗生素的耐药性表型.PCR扩增DNA解旋酶(gyrA和gyrB)和拓扑异构酶IV(parC和parE)基因的喹诺酮耐药决定区、导致喹诺酮类抗生素耐药质粒的部分基因(qnr)以及氨基糖苷类抗生素乙酰转移酶Ib亚型cr变异体编码基因[aac(6')-I b-or],PCR产物进行直接测序.接合试验确定aac(6')-I b-cr酶的可转移性以及在氟喹诺酮耐药中的作用. 结果 鸡来源的大肠埃希菌对常用抗生素的耐药率明显高于猪和周围人群来源菌株.在PCR检测的64株大肠埃希菌中,环丙沙星MIC值大于1μg/ml以上的53株均存在gyrA和/或/parC基因上出现两个位点突变和氨基酸替代,环丙沙星的MIC>16μg/ml的菌株parE基因也发生了点突变及相应氨基酸替代.未发现gyrB亚单位有氨基酸替代.鸡来源28株菌和猪来源9株菌中分别有7株(25.O%)和1株(11.1%)携带有aac(6')-I b-cr基因;aac(6')-I b-cr基因可使环丙沙星、诺氟沙星乙酰化而降低药物抗菌活性. 结论 gyrA、parC和parE碱基突变导致氨基酸置换的数量与菌株对氟喹诺酮类耐药水平呈正相关,携带aac(6')-I b-cr基因的质粒在细菌氟喹诺酮耐药上也具有一定作用.%Objective To study on chromosome-and plasmid-mediated fluoroquinolones-resistant in Escherichia coli isolated from fecal samples of chicken,swine and people around the farm.Methods Anti-microbial susceptibility testing was carried out by disk diffusion testing and bmth microdilution testing.gyrA,gyrB,parC,pareE,qnr and aac(6')-I b-cr were examined by PCR,and the products were sequenced.Ex-presion of aac(6')-I b-cr by conjunction was tested too.Results The resistance to antimicmbial agents was much higher in strains isolated from chicken than that from swine and human.Among the E coli strains

  1. The incidence of fluoroquinolone resistant infections after prostate biopsy--are fluoroquinolones still effective prophylaxis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliciano, Joseph; Teper, Ervin; Ferrandino, Michael; Macchia, Richard J; Blank, William; Grunberger, Ivan; Colon, Ivan

    2008-03-01

    Fluoroquinolones have been shown to decrease infective complications after prostate biopsy. However, fluoroquinolone resistance is emerging. We quantified contemporary rates of infective complications and the incidence of fluoroquinolone resistant infections after prostate biopsy under fluoroquinolone prophylaxis. We retrospectively evaluated the records of 1,273 patients who underwent prostate biopsy at New York Harbor Veterans Affairs Hospital from January 2004 to December 2006. Patients received levofloxacin or gatifloxacin. Using the Veterans Affairs computerized patient record system we reviewed all patient visits within 1 month after prostate biopsy. Visits were queried for infective symptoms. Positive cultures were evaluated for resistance patterns. The annual and overall incidence of infective complications and fluoroquinolone resistant infections was calculated. Of 1,273 patients 31 (2.4%) presented with infective symptoms after biopsy. The overall incidence of fluoroquinolone resistant infections was 1.2% (15 cases). When stratified by year, there were statistically significant increases in the incidence of infective complications and fluoroquinolone resistance from 2004 to 2006. Of the positive cultures those from 89% of patients yielded Escherichia coli and 90% were fluoroquinolone resistant. Fluoroquinolone resistant E. coli were also resistant to gentamicin in 22% of cases, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole in 44%, piperacillin in 72% and ampicillin in 94%. However, 100% sensitivity was demonstrated for amikacin, ceftazidime and ceftriaxone. Fluoroquinolones are still effective as antibiotic prophylaxis for prostate biopsies but there is an increase in infective complications and fluoroquinolone resistance. When patients present with post-prostate biopsy infective symptoms, almost 50% are associated with fluoroquinolone resistant pathogens. Empirical treatment with ceftriaxone, ceftazidime or amikacin should be initiated until culture specific therapy can

  2. Escherichia Coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodsell, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Diverse biological data may be used to create illustrations of molecules in their cellular context. I describe the scientific results that support a recent textbook illustration of an "Escherichia coli cell". The image magnifies a portion of the bacterium at one million times, showing the location and form of individual macromolecules. Results…

  3. The Magnitude of the Association between Fluoroquinolone Use and Quinolone-Resistant Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae May Be Lower than Previously Reported

    OpenAIRE

    Bolon, Maureen K.; Wright, Sharon B.; Gold, Howard S.; Carmeli, Yehuda

    2004-01-01

    Case-control analyses of resistant versus susceptible isolates have implicated fluoroquinolone exposure as a strong risk factor for fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates of Enterobacteriaceae. We suspect that such methodology may overestimate this association. A total of 84 cases with fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates and 578 cases with fluoroquinolone-susceptible isolates of Escherichia coli or Klebsiella pneumoniae were compared with 608 hospitalized controls in parallel multivariable analyse...

  4. Fluoroquinolone resistant rectal colonization predicts risk of infectious complications after transrectal prostate biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liss, Michael A; Taylor, Stephen A; Batura, Deepak; Steensels, Deborah; Chayakulkeeree, Methee; Soenens, Charlotte; Rao, G Gopal; Dash, Atreya; Park, Samuel; Patel, Nishant; Woo, Jason; McDonald, Michelle; Nseyo, Unwanaobong; Banapour, Pooya; Unterberg, Stephen; Ahlering, Thomas E; Van Poppel, Hendrik; Sakamoto, Kyoko; Fierer, Joshua; Black, Peter C

    2014-12-01

    Infection after transrectal prostate biopsy has become an increasing concern due to fluoroquinolone resistant bacteria. We determined whether colonization identified by rectal culture can identify men at high risk for post-transrectal prostate biopsy infection. Six institutions provided retrospective data through a standardized, web based data entry form on patients undergoing transrectal prostate biopsy who had rectal culture performed. The primary outcome was any post-transrectal prostate biopsy infection and the secondary outcome was hospital admission 30 days after transrectal prostate biopsy. We used chi-square and logistic regression statistical analysis. A total of 2,673 men underwent rectal culture before transrectal prostate biopsy from January 1, 2007 to September 12, 2013. The prevalence of fluoroquinolone resistance was 20.5% (549 of 2,673). Fluoroquinolone resistant positive rectal cultures were associated with post-biopsy infection (6.6% vs 1.6%, p Fluoroquinolone resistant positive rectal culture increased the risk of infection (OR 3.98, 95% CI 2.37-6.71, p fluoroquinolone prophylaxis, the infection and hospitalization proportion increased to 8.2% (28 of 343) and 6.1% (21 of 343), with OR 4.77 (95% CI 2.50-9.10, p fluoroquinolone resistant bacteria isolates were Escherichia coli (83.7%). Limitations include the retrospective study design, nonstandardized culture and interpretation of resistance methods. Colonization of fluoroquinolone resistant organisms in the rectum identifies men at high risk for infection and subsequent hospitalization from prostate biopsy, especially in those with fluoroquinolone prophylaxis only. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Fluoroquinolone-resistant enteric bacteria in sub-Saharan Africa: Clones, Implications and Research needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Anne Chattaway

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fluoroquinolones came into widespread use in African countries in the early 2000s, after patents for the first generation of these drugs expired. By that time, quinolone antibacterial agents had been used intensively worldwide and resistant lineages of many bacterial species had evolved. We sought to understand which Gram negative enteric pandemic lineages have been reported from Africa, as well as the nature and transmission of any indigenous resistant clones. A systematic review of articles indexed in the Medline and AJOL literature databases was conducted. We report on the findings of 43 eligible studies documenting local or pandemic fluoroquinolone-resistant enteric clones in sub-Sahara African countries. Most reports are of invasive non-typhoidal Salmonella and Escherichia coli lineages and there have been three reports of cholera outbreaks caused by fluoroquinolone-resistant Vibrio cholerae O1. Fluoroquinolone-resistant clones have also been reported from commensals and animal isolates but there are few data for non-Enterobacteriaceae and almost none for difficult-to-culture Campylobacter spp. Fluoroquinolone-resistant lineages identified in African countries were universally resistant to multiple other classes of antibacterial agents. Although as many as 972 non-duplicate articles refer to fluoroquinolone resistance in enteric bacteria from Africa, most do not report on subtypes and therefore information on the epidemiology of fluoroquinolone-resistant clones is available from only a handful of countries in the subcontinent. When resistance is reported, resistance mechanisms and lineage information is rarely investigated. Insufficient attention has been given to molecular and sequence-based methods necessary for identifying and tracking resistant clones in Africa and more research is needed in this area.

  6. Clinical and Microbiological Features and Factors Associated with Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Men with Community-Acquired Acute Bacterial Prostatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min Gu; Cho, Min Chul; Cho, Sung Yong; Lee, Jeong Woo

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the clinical and microbiological features in the patients with community-acquired acute bacterial prostatitis (CA-ABP), as well as factors that affect fluoroquinolone resistance. A retrospective analysis was performed of 209 patients hospitalized for antibiotic treatment of CA-ABP. We investigated patient age, body mass index, underlying diseases, recurrence, prostate-related factors and results of urine culture examination and antibiotic sensitivity tests. Seventeen patients (8.1%) had fluoroquinolone-resistant bacterial colonies. When we divided the subjects into groups according to the fluoroquinolone resistance, the group with resistant bacteria was significantly older, had larger prostates and had greater residual urine volumes. Bacteria were identified in 127 of 209 patients (60.8%), and the most commonly cultured included Escherichia coli (43.5%). The sensitivity of the cultured bacteria to fluoroquinolones was high compared to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and gentamicin, but similar to cefotaxime. The bacteria were more sensitive to amikacin and imipenem than to fluoroquinolone. The multivariate analysis revealed that prostate volume ≥40 ml (p = 0.024) and residual urine volume >100 ml (p = 0.004) were independent predictive factors for fluoroquinolone resistance. Fluoroquinolone monotherapy might be an effective treatment in CA-ABP. However, combination antibiotic therapy is recommended in cases with prostate volume ≥40 ml or residual urine volume >100 ml, because fluoroquinolone resistance can occur. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Application of Fluoroquinolone Resistance Score in Management of Complicated Urinary Tract Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ansal; Justo, Julie Ann; Bookstaver, P Brandon; Kohn, Joseph; Albrecht, Helmut; Al-Hasan, Majdi N

    2017-02-13

    The fluoroquinolone resistance score (FQRS) predicts the probability of fluoroquinolone resistance with good discrimination. The score has been derived in patients with gram-negative bloodstream infections based on fluoroquinolone use within the past 6 months among other clinical and healthcare exposure criteria. This study aims to examine the utility of the FQRS in complicated urinary tract infections (cUTI) and determine whether extension of prior fluoroquinolone use to 12 months improves model discrimination. Adults with cUTI at Palmetto Health in central South Carolina, USA from April 1, 2015 through July 31, 2015 were prospectively identified. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the association between prior fluoroquinolone use and resistance. Among 238 patients, 54 (23%) had cUTI due to fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria. Overall, the median age was 66 years, 151 (63%) were women and 137 (58%) had cUTI due to Escherichia coli Prior exposure to fluoroquinolones within 3 months (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 23.4, 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 8.2-76.8, p<0.001) and within 3-12 months (aOR 13.2, 95% CI: 3.1-68.4, p<0.001) was independently associated with fluoroquinolone resistance as compared to no prior use. Area under receiver operating characteristic curve for the FQRS increased from 0.73 to 0.80 when prior fluoroquinolone use was extended from 6 to 12 months. FQRS ≥2 and ≥3 had negative predictive values of 91% and 90%, respectively. The modified FQRS stratifies patients with cUTI based on predicted probability of fluoroquinolone resistance with very good discrimination. Application of the modified FQRS may improve antimicrobial utilization in patients with acute pyelonephritis.

  8. Activity of ceftazidime-avibactam against fluoroquinolone-resistant Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitart, C; Marco, F; Keating, T A; Nichols, W W; Vila, J

    2015-01-01

    Ceftazidime-avibactam and comparator antibiotics were tested by the broth microdilution method against 200 Enterobacteriaceae and 25 Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains resistant to fluoroquinolones (including strains with the extended-spectrum β-lactamase [ESBL] phenotype and ceftazidime-resistant strains) collected from our institution. The MICs and mechanisms of resistance to fluoroquinolone were also studied. Ninety-nine percent of fluoroquinolone-resistant Enterobacteriaceae strains were inhibited at a ceftazidime-avibactam MIC of ≤4 mg/liter (using the susceptible CLSI breakpoint for ceftazidime alone as a reference). Ceftazidime-avibactam was very active against ESBL Escherichia coli (MIC90 of 0.25 mg/liter), ESBL Klebsiella pneumoniae (MIC90 of 0.5 mg/liter), ceftazidime-resistant AmpC-producing species (MIC90 of 1 mg/liter), non-ESBL E. coli (MIC90 of ≤0.125 mg/liter), non-ESBL K. pneumoniae (MIC90 of 0.25 mg/liter), and ceftazidime-nonresistant AmpC-producing species (MIC90 of ≤0.5 mg/liter). Ninety-six percent of fluoroquinolone-resistant P. aeruginosa strains were inhibited at a ceftazidime-avibactam MIC of ≤8 mg/liter (using the susceptible CLSI breakpoint for ceftazidime alone as a reference), with a MIC90 of 8 mg/liter. Additionally, fluoroquinolone-resistant mutants from each species tested were obtained in vitro from two strains, one susceptible to ceftazidime and the other a β-lactamase producer with a high MIC against ceftazidime but susceptible to ceftazidime-avibactam. Thereby, the impact of fluoroquinolone resistance on the activity of ceftazidime-avibactam could be assessed. The MIC90 values of ceftazidime-avibactam for the fluoroquinolone-resistant mutant strains of Enterobacteriaceae and P. aeruginosa were ≤4 mg/liter and ≤8 mg/liter, respectively. We conclude that the presence of fluoroquinolone resistance does not affect Enterobacteriaceae and P. aeruginosa susceptibility to ceftazidime-avibactam; that is, there is no cross

  9. Post-prostate biopsy infection with Escherichia coli ST131 leading to epididymo-orchitis and meningitis caused by Gram-negative bacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assimacopoulos, Aris; Johnston, Brian; Clabots, Connie; Johnson, James R

    2012-12-01

    A 57-year-old man who had recently undergone a transrectal prostate biopsy for a rising prostate-specific antigen level developed postbiopsy necrotizing epididymo-orchitis (requiring orchiectomy) and then Gram-negative meningitis, despite fluoroquinolone administration for periprocedural prophylaxis and subsequent therapy. The causative organism proved to be a fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli strain from sequence type ST131.

  10. Rapid evolution of fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli in Nigeria is temporally associated with fluoroquinolone use

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lamikanra, Adebayo; Crowe, Jennifer L; Lijek, Rebeccah S; Odetoyin, Babatunde W; Wain, John; Aboderin, A Oladipo; Okeke, Iruka N

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance has necessitated fluoroquinolone use but little is known about the selective forces and resistance trajectory in malaria-endemic settings, where selection from the antimalarial...

  11. Taxonomy Icon Data: Escherichia coli [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli Escherichia coli Escherichia_coli_L.png Escherichia_coli_NL.png Escherich...ia_coli_S.png Escherichia_coli_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Escherichia+co...li&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Escherichia+coli&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxono...my_icon/icon.cgi?i=Escherichia+coli&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Escherichia+coli&t=NS ...

  12. PATHOGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escherichia coli is a bacterial species which inhabits the gastrointestinal tract of man and warm-blooded animals. Because of the ubiquity of this bacterium in the intestinal flora, it serves as an important indicator organism of fecal contamination. E. coli, aside from serving a...

  13. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Tânia A T; Elias, Waldir P; Scaletsky, Isabel C A; Guth, Beatriz E C; Rodrigues, Juliana F; Piazza, Roxane M F; Ferreira, Luís C S; Martinez, Marina B

    2016-12-01

    Most Escherichia coli strains live harmlessly in the intestines and rarely cause disease in healthy individuals. Nonetheless, a number of pathogenic strains can cause diarrhea or extraintestinal diseases both in healthy and immunocompromised individuals. Diarrheal illnesses are a severe public health problem and a major cause of morbidity and mortality in infants and young children, especially in developing countries. E. coli strains that cause diarrhea have evolved by acquiring, through horizontal gene transfer, a particular set of characteristics that have successfully persisted in the host. According to the group of virulence determinants acquired, specific combinations were formed determining the currently known E. coli pathotypes, which are collectively known as diarrheagenic E. coli. In this review, we have gathered information on current definitions, serotypes, lineages, virulence mechanisms, epidemiology, and diagnosis of the major diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes.

  14. Zoonotic Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasteson Yngvild

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli is a normal inhabitant of the gastrointestinal tract of all warm-blooded animals, but variants of this species is also among the important etiological agents of enteritis and several extraintestinal diseases. The E. coli strains that cause diarrhoeal illness are categorised into pathogenicity groups based on virulence properties, mechanisms of pathogenicity, clinical symptoms and serology. The five main categories include enterotoxinogenic E. coli (ETEC, enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC, enteroaggregative E. coli (EAggEC, enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC and Shiga (Vero toxin-producing E. coli (STEC/VTEC. From a zoonotic point of view, STEC is the only E. coli pathogenicity group of major interest, as the shiga toxin-producing strains are able to cause severe disease in humans when being transmitted through the food chain from their animal reservoirs. The focus of this manuscript is therefore on STEC; pathogenicity factors, disease, the reservoirs and on-farm ecology, transmission into the food chain, growth and survival in food and in the environment, and the shiga toxin-encoding bacteriophages.

  15. PART I. ESCHERICHIA COLI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaa Mahdi Oraibi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The presence of Escherichia coli in the air of facilities involved in management and composting of post-slaughter poultry wastes in selected plants of West Western Pomerania region was studied. Measurements were made on four dates in a variety of weather conditions during the year. The study was conducted at 5 objects that differ in the type of waste and the degree of preparation for composting. These were: chemical treatment and preliminary processing plant, liquid wastes reservoir, platform for preparation of materials for composting, storage of biological sediments, and composting facility. Measurement of bacteria count was carried out in accordance with the applicable procedures on selective chromogenic TBX medium. The assays revealed the presence of E. coli at all test objects, but not always on all measurement dates. It has been shown that the presence of E. coli was from 20 to 3047 CFU∙m-3 of air, although the largest quantities were most frequently detected in the air of the building for post-slaughter waste pre-treatment in chemical treatment plant.

  16. Temporal Changes in Resistance Mechanisms in Colonizing Escherichia coli Isolates with Reduced Susceptibility to Fluoroquinolones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jennifer H.; Nachamkin, Irving; Tolomeo, Pam; Mao, Xiangqun; Bilker, Warren B.; Lautenbach, Ebbing

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the temporal variability of fluoroquinolone resistance mechanisms among Escherichia coli colonizing the gastrointestinal tract of hospitalized patients. Patients with new fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli (FQREC) colonization were followed with serial fecal sampling until discharge or death. Genetic mechanism(s) of resistance for all FQREC isolates were characterized, including mutations in gyrA and parC and efflux pump overexpression. Of 451 subjects, 73 (16.2%) became newly colonized with FQREC. There was significant variability in regard to temporal changes in resistance mechanisms and levofloxacin MICs among isolates from individual patients. Compared to patients with transient colonization, patients with persistent colonization were more likely to have a urinary catheter (P=0.04), diarrhea (P=0.04), and a longer duration of hospitalization (22 and 9.0 mean days, respectively; P=0.01) prior to sampling. Our data demonstrate the significant variability of resistance mechanisms in colonizing E. coli isolates among hospitalized patients. PMID:23719087

  17. Escherichia coli Sequence Type 131 H30 Is the Main Driver of Emerging Extended-Spectrum-β-Lactamase-Producing E. coli at a Tertiary Care Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, James R; Johnston, Brian; Thuras, Paul; Launer, Bryn; Sokurenko, Evgeni V; Miller, Loren G

    2016-01-01

    The H30 strain of Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131-H30) is a recently emerged, globally disseminated lineage associated with fluoroquinolone resistance and, via its H30Rx subclone, the CTX-M-15 extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL). Here, we studied the clonal background and resistance characteristics of 109 consecutive recent E. coli clinical isolates (2015) and 41 historical ESBL-producing E. coli blood isolates (2004 to 2011) from a public tertiary care center in California with a rising prevalence of ESBL-producing E. coli isolates. Among the 2015 isolates, ST131, which was represented mainly by ST131-H30, was the most common clonal lineage (23% overall). ST131-H30 accounted for 47% (8/17) of ESBL-producing, 47% (14/30) of fluoroquinolone-resistant, and 33% (11/33) of multidrug-resistant isolates. ST131-H30 also accounted for 53% (8/14) of dually fluoroquinolone-resistant, ESBL-producing isolates, with the remaining 47% comprised of diverse clonal groups that contributed a single isolate each. ST131-H30Rx, with CTX-M-15, was the major ESBL producer (6/8) among ST131-H30 isolates. ST131-H30 and H30Rx also dominated (46% and 37%, respectively) among the historical ESBL-producing isolates (2004 to 2011), without significant temporal shifts in relative prevalence. Thus, this medical center's recently emerging ESBL-producing E. coli strains, although multiclonal, are dominated by ST131-H30 and H30Rx, which are the only clonally expanded fluoroquinolone-resistant, ESBL-producing lineages. Measures to rapidly and effectively detect, treat, and control these highly successful lineages are needed. IMPORTANCE The ever-rising prevalence of resistance to first-line antibiotics among clinical Escherichia coli isolates leads to worse clinical outcomes and higher health care costs, thereby creating a need to discover its basis so that effective interventions can be developed. We found that the H30 subset within E. coli sequence type 131 (ST131-H30) is

  18. Impact of preoperative screening for rectal colonization with fluoroquinolone-resistant enteric bacteria on the incidence of sepsis following transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farrell JJ

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available John J Farrell,1,2 Jennifer L Hicks,3 Stephanie E Wallace,2 Allen D Seftel4,5 1Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Illinois College of Medicine, 2Department of Laboratory Medicine, Division of Clinical Microbiology & Serology, OSF/Saint Francis Medical Center, 3Department of Urology, OSF /Saint Francis Medical Center, Peoria, IL, 4Department of Urology, Cooper University Hospital, 5Department of Surgery, Cooper University School of Medicine, Camden, NJ, USA Abstract: With the universal adoption of antibiotic prophylaxis prior to prostate biopsy, the current risk of post-biopsy infection (including sepsis is <2%. Preoperative prophylactic antibiotic regimens can vary, and although fluoroquinolones have emerged as the standard of care, there is no universally agreed upon preoperative antibiotic regimen. Recently, an increase in the proportion of postoperative infections caused by fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli (as well as other Enterobacteriaceae has led to the exploration of simple, practical, and cost-effective methods to minimize this postoperative infection risk. We performed a prospective, nonrandomized, controlled study of preoperative rectal cultures to screen for rectal colonization with fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria using ciprofloxacin-supplemented MacConkey agar culture media. To evaluate the feasibility and practicality of this test, one provider used the results of rectal swab cultures collected during the preoperative outpatient evaluation to adjust each patient’s preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis when fluoroquinolone-resistant enteric bacteria were detected, whereas two other providers continued usual preoperative care and empiric antimicrobial prophylaxis. Rectal colonization with fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria was detected in 19/152 (12.5% of patients. In our intention-to-treat analysis (N=268, the rate of post-biopsy sepsis was 3.6% lower in the group that was screened

  19. Escherichia coli Uropathogenesis In Vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas E; Khandige, Surabhi; Madelung, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains are capable of invading bladder epithelial cells (BECs) on the bladder luminal surface. Based primarily on studies in mouse models, invasion is proposed to trigger an intracellular uropathogenic cascade involving intracellular bacterial proliferation...

  20. Isolation and Characterization of Escherichia coli Sequence Type 131 and Other Antimicrobial-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacilli from Clinical Stool Samples from Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Muhanad; Clabots, Connie; Porter, Stephen B; Thuras, Paul; Johnson, James R

    2016-08-01

    Emerging multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacilli (GNB), including Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131) and its resistance-associated H30 subclone, constitute an ever-growing public health threat. Their reservoirs and transmission pathways are incompletely defined. To assess diarrheal stools as a potential reservoir for ST131-H30 and other MDR GNB, we cultured 100 clinical stool samples from a Veterans Affairs Medical Center clinical laboratory (October to December 2011) for fluoroquinolone- and extended-spectrum cephalosporin (ESC)-resistant E. coli and other GNB, plus total E. coli We then characterized selected resistant and susceptible E. coli isolates by clonal group, phylogenetic group, virulence genotype, and pulsotype and screened all isolates for antimicrobial resistance. Overall, 79 of 100 stool samples yielded GNB (52 E. coli; 48 other GNB). Fifteen samples yielded fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli (10 were ST131, of which 9 were H30), 6 yielded ESC-resistant E. coli (2 were ST131, both non-H30), and 31 yielded susceptible E. coli (1 was ST131, non-H30), for 13 total ST131-positive samples. Fourteen non-E. coli GNB were ESC resistant, and three were fluoroquinolone resistant. Regardless of species, almost half (46%) of the fluoroquinolone-resistant and/or ESC-resistant non-E. coli GNB were resistant to at least three drug classes. Fecal ST131 isolates closely resembled reference clinical ST131 isolates according to virulence genotypes and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiles. Thus, a substantial minority (30%) of veterans with diarrhea who undergo stool testing excrete antibiotic-resistant GNB, including E. coli ST131. Consequently, diarrhea may pose transmission risks for more than just diarrheal pathogens and may help disseminate clinically relevant ST131 strains and other MDR GNB within hospitals and the community. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay for detection of gyrA mutations associated with fluoroquinolone resistance in Campylobacter coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Rodrigo; Mateo, Estibaliz; Girbau, Cecilia; Churruca, Estibaliz; Martinez, Irati; Fernández-Astorga, Aurora

    2004-12-01

    A fragment of the gyrA gene was sequenced from 34 isolates of Campylobacter coli, including 23 isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin. All ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates examined by DNA sequencing carried a point mutation at position Thr-86 on the gyrA gene product, involving the replacement of Thr-86 by Ile. A combined PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique using RsaI was developed to detect this mutation.

  2. Asymptomatic bacteriuria Escherichia coli strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancock, Viktoria; Nielsen, E.M.; Klemm, Per

    2006-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) affect millions of people each year. Escherichia coli is the most common organism associated with asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) in humans. Persons affected by ABU may carry a particular E. coli strain for extended periods of time without any symptoms. In contrast...

  3. Asymptomatic bacteriuria Escherichia coli strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancock, Viktoria; Nielsen, E.M.; Klemm, Per

    2006-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) affect millions of people each year. Escherichia coli is the most common organism associated with asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) in humans. Persons affected by ABU may carry a particular E. coli strain for extended periods of time without any symptoms. In contrast...

  4. Escherichia coli Sequence Type 131 H30 Is the Main Driver of Emerging Extended-Spectrum-β-Lactamase-Producing E. coli at a Tertiary Care Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Brian; Thuras, Paul; Launer, Bryn; Sokurenko, Evgeni V.; Miller, Loren G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The H30 strain of Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131-H30) is a recently emerged, globally disseminated lineage associated with fluoroquinolone resistance and, via its H30Rx subclone, the CTX-M-15 extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL). Here, we studied the clonal background and resistance characteristics of 109 consecutive recent E. coli clinical isolates (2015) and 41 historical ESBL-producing E. coli blood isolates (2004 to 2011) from a public tertiary care center in California with a rising prevalence of ESBL-producing E. coli isolates. Among the 2015 isolates, ST131, which was represented mainly by ST131-H30, was the most common clonal lineage (23% overall). ST131-H30 accounted for 47% (8/17) of ESBL-producing, 47% (14/30) of fluoroquinolone-resistant, and 33% (11/33) of multidrug-resistant isolates. ST131-H30 also accounted for 53% (8/14) of dually fluoroquinolone-resistant, ESBL-producing isolates, with the remaining 47% comprised of diverse clonal groups that contributed a single isolate each. ST131-H30Rx, with CTX-M-15, was the major ESBL producer (6/8) among ST131-H30 isolates. ST131-H30 and H30Rx also dominated (46% and 37%, respectively) among the historical ESBL-producing isolates (2004 to 2011), without significant temporal shifts in relative prevalence. Thus, this medical center’s recently emerging ESBL-producing E. coli strains, although multiclonal, are dominated by ST131-H30 and H30Rx, which are the only clonally expanded fluoroquinolone-resistant, ESBL-producing lineages. Measures to rapidly and effectively detect, treat, and control these highly successful lineages are needed. IMPORTANCE The ever-rising prevalence of resistance to first-line antibiotics among clinical Escherichia coli isolates leads to worse clinical outcomes and higher health care costs, thereby creating a need to discover its basis so that effective interventions can be developed. We found that the H30 subset within E. coli sequence type 131 (ST131-H30

  5. Mechanisms of fluoroquinolone resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yujiao, Zhang; Xiaojing, Li; Kaixia, Mi

    2016-10-20

    Tuberculosis, caused by the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is one of the world's deadliest bacterial infectious disease. It is still a global-health threat, particularly because of the drug-resistant forms. Fluoroquinolones, with target of gyrase, are among the drugs used to treat tuberculosis. However, their widespread use has led to bacterial resistance. The molecular mechanisms of fluoroquinolone resistance in mycobacterium tuberculosis have been reported, such as DNA gyrase mutations, drug efflux pumps system, bacterial cell wall thickness and pentapeptide proteins (MfpA) mediated regulation of gyrase. Mutations in gyrase conferring quinolone resistance play important roles and have been extensively studied. Recent studies have shown that the regulation of DNA gyrase affects mycobacterial drug resistance, but the mechanisms, especially by post-translational modification and regulatory proteins, are poorly understood. In this review, we summarize the fluoroquinolone drug development, and the molecular genetics of fluoroquinolone resistance in mycobacteria. Comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms of fluoroquinolone resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis will open a new view on understanding drug resistance in mycobacteria and lead to novel strategies to develop new accurate diagnosis methods.

  6. Role of homologous recombination in adaptive diversification of extraintestinal Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sandip; Linardopoulou, Elena V; Billig, Mariya; Tchesnokova, Veronika; Price, Lance B; Johnson, James R; Chattopadhyay, Sujay; Sokurenko, Evgeni V

    2013-01-01

    The contribution of homologous exchange (recombination) of core genes in the adaptive evolution of bacterial pathogens is not well understood. To investigate this, we analyzed fully assembled genomes of two Escherichia coli strains from sequence type 131 (ST131), a clonal group that is both the leading cause of extraintestinal E. coli infections and the main source of fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli. Although the sequences of each of the seven multilocus sequence typing genes were identical in the two ST131 isolates, the strains diverged from one another by homologous recombination that affected at least 9% of core genes. This was on a par with the contribution to genomic diversity of horizontal gene transfer and point gene mutation. The genomic positions of recombinant and mobile genetic regions were partially linked, suggesting their concurrent occurrence. One of the genes affected by homologous recombination was fimH, which encodes mannose-specific type 1 fimbrial adhesin, resulting in functionally distinct copies of the gene in ST131 strains. One strain, a uropathogenic isolate, had a pathoadaptive variant of fimH that was acquired by homologous replacement into the commensal strain background. Close examination of FimH structure and function in additional ST131 isolates revealed that recombination led to acquisition of several functionally distinct variants that, upon homologous exchange, were targeted by a variety of pathoadaptive mutations under strong positive selection. Different recombinant fimH strains also showed a strong clonal association with ST131 isolates that had distinct fluoroquinolone resistance profiles. Thus, homologous recombination of core genes plays a significant role in adaptive diversification of bacterial pathogens, especially at the level of clonally related groups of isolates.

  7. Impact of antibiotic use during hospitalization on the development of gastrointestinal colonization with Escherichia coli with reduced fluoroquinolone susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jennifer H; Bilker, Warren B; Nachamkin, Irving; Tolomeo, Pam; Mao, Xiangqun; Fishman, Neil O; Lautenbach, Ebbing

    2013-10-01

    Infections due to fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli (FQREC) are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Fluoroquinolone resistance likely arises at the level of gastrointestinal colonization. The objective of this study was to identify risk factors for the development of FQREC gastrointestinal tract colonization in hospitalized patients, including the impact of antibiotics prescribed during hospitalization. A prospective cohort study was conducted from 2002 to 2004 within a university health system. Hospitalized patients initially colonized with fluoroquinolone-susceptible E. coli were followed up with serial fecal sampling for new FQREC colonization or until hospital discharge or death. A Cox proportional hazards regression model was developed to identify risk factors for new FQREC colonization, with antibiotic exposure modeled as time-varying covariates. Of 395 subjects, 73 (18.5%) became newly colonized with FQREC. Length of stay before sampling (hazard ratio [HR], 1.02 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.1-1.03]; P = .003) and malignancy (HR, 0.37 [95% CI, 0.21-0.67]; P = .001) were significantly associated with the development of FQREC colonization. In addition, receipt of a first-generation cephalosporin (HR, 1.19 [95% CI, 1.10-1.29]; P antibiotic use in implementing strategies to reduce the development of new FQREC colonization. Future studies are needed to identify risk factors for infection in hospitalized patients newly colonized with FQREC.

  8. The anticancer drug tirapazamine has antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Zarna; Mahbuba, Raya; Turcotte, Bernard

    2013-10-01

    Rapidly increasing bacterial resistance to existing therapies creates an urgent need for the development of new antibacterials. Tirapazamine (TPZ, 3-amino-1,2,4-benzotriazine 1,4 dioxide) is a prodrug undergoing clinical trials for various types of cancers. In this study, we showed that TPZ has antibacterial activity, particularly at low oxygen levels. With Escherichia coli, TPZ was bactericidal under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Escherichia coli mutants deficient in homologous recombination were hypersusceptible to TPZ, suggesting that drug toxicity may be due to DNA damage. Moreover, E. coli strains deleted for genes encoding putative reductases were resistant to TPZ, implying that these enzymes are responsible for conversion of the prodrug to a toxic compound. Fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli strains were as susceptible to TPZ as a wild-type strain. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains were also susceptible to TPZ (MIC = 0.5 μg mL(-1) ), as were pathogenic strains of Clostridium difficile (MIC = 7.5 ng mL(-1) ). TPZ may merit additional study as a broad-spectrum antibacterial, particularly for anaerobes. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Fluoroquinolone Resistance among Clonal Complex 1 Group B Streptococcus Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alefiya Neemuchwala

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluoroquinolone resistance in group B Streptococcus is increasingly being reported worldwide. Here, we correlated fluoroquinolone resistance with mutations in gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes, identified by mining whole-genome sequencing (WGS data of 190 clonal complex 1 group B Streptococcus strains recovered from patients with invasive diseases in North America. We report a high prevalence of fluoroquinolone resistance (12% among GBS strains in our collection. Our approach is the first step towards accurate prediction of fluoroquinolone resistance from WGS data in this opportunistic pathogen.

  10. Shiga Toxin Producing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Allen; Youngster, Ilan; McAdam, Alexander J

    2015-06-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is among the common causes of foodborne gastroenteritis. STEC is defined by the production of specific toxins, but within this pathotype there is a diverse group of organisms. This diversity has important consequences for understanding the pathogenesis of the organism, as well as for selecting the optimum strategy for diagnostic testing in the clinical laboratory. This review includes discussions of the mechanisms of pathogenesis, the range of manifestations of infection, and the several different methods of laboratory detection of Shiga toxin-producing E coli.

  11. Comparative Analysis of Quinolone Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli from Chinese Children and Adults

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    Ying Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to compare quinolone resistance and gyrA mutations in clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli from Chinese adults who used quinolone in the preceding month and children without any known history of quinolone administration. The antimicrobial susceptibilities of 61 isolates from children and 79 isolates from adults were determined. The mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions in gyrA gene were detected by PCR and DNA sequencing. Fluoroquinolone resistance and types of gyrA mutations in isolates from children and adults were compared and statistically analyzed. No significant differences were detected in the resistance rates of ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin between children and adults among isolates of the two species (all P>0.05. The double mutation Ser83→Leu + Asp87→Asn in the ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates occurred in 73.7% isolates from the children and 67.9% from the adults, respectively (P=0.5444. Children with no known history of quinolone administration were found to carry fluoroquinolone-resistant Enterobacteriaceae isolates. The occurrence of ciprofloxacin resistance and the major types of gyrA mutations in the isolates from the children were similar to those from adults. The results indicate that precautions should be taken on environmental issues resulting from widespread transmission of quinolone resistance.

  12. Comparative analysis of quinolone resistance in clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli from Chinese children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Ogutu, James O; Gu, Jiarui; Ding, Fengshu; You, Yuhong; Huo, Yan; Zhao, Hong; Li, Wenjing; Zhang, Zhiwei; Zhang, Wenli; Chen, Xiaobei; Fu, Yingmei; Zhang, Fengmin

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare quinolone resistance and gyrA mutations in clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli from Chinese adults who used quinolone in the preceding month and children without any known history of quinolone administration. The antimicrobial susceptibilities of 61 isolates from children and 79 isolates from adults were determined. The mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions in gyrA gene were detected by PCR and DNA sequencing. Fluoroquinolone resistance and types of gyrA mutations in isolates from children and adults were compared and statistically analyzed. No significant differences were detected in the resistance rates of ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin between children and adults among isolates of the two species (all P > 0.05). The double mutation Ser83→Leu + Asp87→Asn in the ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates occurred in 73.7% isolates from the children and 67.9% from the adults, respectively (P = 0.5444). Children with no known history of quinolone administration were found to carry fluoroquinolone-resistant Enterobacteriaceae isolates. The occurrence of ciprofloxacin resistance and the major types of gyrA mutations in the isolates from the children were similar to those from adults. The results indicate that precautions should be taken on environmental issues resulting from widespread transmission of quinolone resistance.

  13. Detection and coexistence of six categories of resistance genes in Escherichia coli strains from chickens in Anhui Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterise the prevalence of class 1 integrons and gene cassettes, tetracycline-resistance genes, phenicol-resistance genes, 16S rRNA methylase genes, extended-spectrum β-lactamase genes and plasmid-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance determinants in 184 Escherichia coli isolates from chickens in Anhui Province, China. Susceptibility to 15 antimicrobials was determined using broth micro-dilution. Polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing were used to characterise the molecular basis of the antibiotic resistance. High rates of antimicrobial resistance were observed; 131 out of the 184 (72.3% isolates were resistant to at least six antimicrobial agents. The prevalences of class 1 integrons, tetracycline-resistance genes, phenicol-resistance genes, 16S rRNA methylase genes, extended-spectrum β-lactamase genes and plasmid-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance determinants were 49.5, 17.4, 15.8, 0.5, 57.6 and 46.2%, respectively. In 82 isolates, 48 different kinds of coexistence of the different genes were identified. Statistical (χ2 analysis showed that the resistance to amoxicillin, doxycycline, florfenicol, ofloxacin and gentamicin had significant differences (P<0.01 or 0.01

  14. Variation in resistance traits, phylogenetic backgrounds, and virulence genotypes among Escherichia coli clinical isolates from adjacent hospital campuses serving distinct patient populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drawz, Sarah M; Porter, Stephen; Kuskowski, Michael A; Johnston, Brian; Clabots, Connie; Kline, Susan; Ferrieri, Patricia; Johnson, James R

    2015-09-01

    Escherichia coli sequence type 13 (ST131), an emergent cause of multidrug-resistant extraintestinal infections, has important phylogenetic subsets, notably the H30 and H30Rx subclones, with distinctive resistance profiles and, possibly, clinical associations. To clarify the local prevalence of these ST131 subclones and their associations with antimicrobial resistance, ecological source, and virulence traits, we extensively characterized 233 consecutive E. coli clinical isolates (July and August 2013) from the University of Minnesota Medical Center-Fairview Infectious Diseases and Diagnostic Laboratory, Minneapolis, MN, which serves three adjacent facilities (a children's hospital and low- and high-acuity adult facilities). ST131 accounted for 26% of the study isolates (more than any other clonal group), was distributed similarly by facility, and was closely associated with ciprofloxacin resistance and extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) production. The H30 and H30Rx subclones accounted for most ST131 isolates and for the association of ST131 with fluoroquinolone resistance and ESBL production. Unlike ST131 per se, these subclones were distributed differentially by hospital, being most prevalent at the high-acuity adult facility and were absent from the children's hospital. The virulence gene profiles of ST131 and its subclones were distinctive and more extensive than those of other fluoroquinolone-resistant or ESBL-producing isolates. Within ST131, bla CTX-M-15 was confined to H30Rx isolates and other bla CTX-M variants to non-Rx H30 isolates. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis documented a predominance of globally distributed pulsotypes and no local outbreak pattern. These findings help clarify the epidemiology, ecology, and bacterial correlates of the H30 and H30Rx ST131 subclones by documenting a high overall prevalence but significant segregation by facility, strong associations with fluoroquinolone resistance and specific ESBL variants, and distinctive

  15. Prevalence of multi-drug resistant uropathogenic Escherichia coli in Potohar region of Pakistan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ihsan Ali; Zara Rafaque; Safia Ahmed; Sajid Malik; Javid Iqbal Dasti

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To scrutinize patterns of multi-drug-resistant uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains and particularly of fluoroquinolone-resistance this is an alternative choice for the treatment of urinary tract infections. Methods: Bacterial samples (n = 250) were collected from out-patients from August 2012 to August 2014 Islamabad. Antibiotic susceptibility profiling and determination of mini-mum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum bactericidal concentrations were performed according to the guidelines of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI, 2012). Genes, qnrA, qnrB and qnrS were identified by DNA amplification and sequencing. Results: The highest percentage of UPEC isolates were resistant to co-trimoxazole (82%) followed by cephalothin (80%), 2nd Gen, 3rd Gen and 4th Gen cephalosporins, respectively. Resistance against gentamicin, amikacin remained 29% and 4%. For other drugs including nitrofurantoin, tetracycline, carbapenem and beta-lactam inhibitors remained below 10%. Altogether, 59% of the isolates were resistant to at least three antibiotics including one fluoroquinolone. Overall, MICs for ciprofloxacin remained (MIC≥256 mg/mL) and for levofloxacin (MIC≥16 mg/mL and 32 mg/mL). No significant differences were observed regarding MIC values of extended spectrum b-lactamase (ESBL) and non-ESBL producers. For qnrS and qnrB positive isolates MICs remained above 32 mg/mL. Prevalence of UPEC was significantly higher among females and 40% of the isolates were ESBL producers. Conclusions: Higher percentages of ESBL producing UPEC were associated with uri-nary tract infections. Moreover, the majority of these isolates were multi-drug resistant and fluoroquinolone-resistant.

  16. Prevalence of multi-drug resistant uropathogenic Escherichia coli in Potohar region of Pakistan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ihsan Ali; Zara Rafaque; Safia Ahmed; Sajid Malik; Javid Iqbal Dasti

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To scrutinize patterns of multi-drug-resistant uropathogenic Escherichia coli(UPEC) strains and particularly of fluoroquinolone-resistance this is an alternative choice for the treatment of urinary tract infections.Methods:Bacterial samples(n = 250) were collected from out-patients from August 2012 to August 2014 Islamabad.Antibiotic susceptibility profiling and determination of minimum inhibitory concentrations(MICs) and minimum bactericidal concentrations were performed according to the guidelines of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute(CLSI,2012).Genes,qnrA,qnrB and qnrS were identified by DNA amplification and sequencing.Results:The highest percentage of UPEC isolates were resistant to co-trimoxazole(82%) followed by cephalothin(80%),2nd Gen,3rd Gen and 4th Gen cephalosporins,respectively.Resistance against gentamicin,amikacin remained 29% and 4%.For other drugs including nitrofurantoin,tetracycline,carbapenem and beta-lactam inhibitors remained below 10%.Altogether,59% of the isolates were resistant to at least three antibiotics including one fluoroquinolone.Overall,MICs for ciprofloxacin remained(MIC≥256 μg/mL) and for levofloxacin(MIC≥16 μg/mL and 32 μg/mL).No significant differences were observed regarding MIC values of extended spectrumβ-lactamase(ESBL) and non-ESBL producers.For qnrS and qnrB positive isolates MICs remained above 32 μg/mL.Prevalence of UPEC was significantly higher among females and 40% of the isolates were ESBL producers.Conclusions:Higher percentages of ESBL producing UPEC were associated with urinary tract infections.Moreover,the majority of these isolates were multi-drug resistant and fluoroquinolone-resistant.

  17. Global Fluoroquinolone Resistance Epidemiology and Implictions for Clinical Use

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    Axel Dalhoff

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper on the fluoroquinolone resistance epidemiology stratifies the data according to the different prescription patterns by either primary or tertiary caregivers and by indication. Global surveillance studies demonstrate that fluoroquinolone resistance rates increased in the past years in almost all bacterial species except S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae, causing community-acquired respiratory tract infections. However, 10 to 30% of these isolates harbored first-step mutations conferring low level fluoroquinolone resistance. Fluoroquinolone resistance increased in Enterobacteriaceae causing community acquired or healthcare associated urinary tract infections and intraabdominal infections, exceeding 50% in some parts of the world, particularly in Asia. One to two-thirds of Enterobacteriaceae producing extended spectrum -lactamases were fluoroquinolone resistant too. Furthermore, fluoroquinolones select for methicillin resistance in Staphylococci. Neisseria gonorrhoeae acquired fluoroquinolone resistance rapidly; actual resistance rates are highly variable and can be as high as almost 100%, particularly in Asia, whereas resistance rates in Europe and North America range from 30% in established sexual networks. In general, the continued increase in fluoroquinolone resistance affects patient management and necessitates changes in some guidelines, for example, treatment of urinary tract, intra-abdominal, skin and skin structure infections, and traveller’s diarrhea, or even precludes the use in indications like sexually transmitted diseases and enteric fever.

  18. Global Fluoroquinolone Resistance Epidemiology and Implictions for Clinical Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalhoff, Axel

    2012-01-01

    This paper on the fluoroquinolone resistance epidemiology stratifies the data according to the different prescription patterns by either primary or tertiary caregivers and by indication. Global surveillance studies demonstrate that fluoroquinolone resistance rates increased in the past years in almost all bacterial species except S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae, causing community-acquired respiratory tract infections. However, 10 to 30% of these isolates harbored first-step mutations conferring low level fluoroquinolone resistance. Fluoroquinolone resistance increased in Enterobacteriaceae causing community acquired or healthcare associated urinary tract infections and intraabdominal infections, exceeding 50% in some parts of the world, particularly in Asia. One to two-thirds of Enterobacteriaceae producing extended spectrum β-lactamases were fluoroquinolone resistant too. Furthermore, fluoroquinolones select for methicillin resistance in Staphylococci. Neisseria gonorrhoeae acquired fluoroquinolone resistance rapidly; actual resistance rates are highly variable and can be as high as almost 100%, particularly in Asia, whereas resistance rates in Europe and North America range from 30% in established sexual networks. In general, the continued increase in fluoroquinolone resistance affects patient management and necessitates changes in some guidelines, for example, treatment of urinary tract, intra-abdominal, skin and skin structure infections, and traveller's diarrhea, or even precludes the use in indications like sexually transmitted diseases and enteric fever. PMID:23097666

  19. Robust growth of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Robert, Lydia; Pelletier, James; Dang, Wei Lien; Taddei, Francois; Wright, Andrew; Jun, Suckjoon

    2010-06-22

    The quantitative study of the cell growth has led to many fundamental insights in our understanding of a wide range of subjects, from the cell cycle to senescence. Of particular importance is the growth rate, whose constancy represents a physiological steady state of an organism. Recent studies, however, suggest that the rate of elongation during exponential growth of bacterial cells decreases cumulatively with replicative age for both asymmetrically and symmetrically dividing organisms, implying that a "steady-state" population consists of individual cells that are never in a steady state of growth. To resolve this seeming paradoxical observation, we studied the long-term growth and division patterns of Escherichia coli cells by employing a microfluidic device designed to follow steady-state growth and division of a large number of cells at a defined reproductive age. Our analysis of approximately 10(5) individual cells reveals a remarkable stability of growth whereby the mother cell inherits the same pole for hundreds of generations. We further show that death of E. coli is not purely stochastic but is the result of accumulating damages. We conclude that E. coli, unlike all other aging model systems studied to date, has a robust mechanism of growth that is decoupled from cell death.

  20. Antibiotic selection of Escherichia coli sequence type 131 in a mouse intestinal colonization model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boetius Hertz, Frederik; Løbner-Olesen, Anders; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2014-10-01

    The ability of different antibiotics to select for extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli remains a topic of discussion. In a mouse intestinal colonization model, we evaluated the selective abilities of nine common antimicrobials (cefotaxime, cefuroxime, dicloxacillin, clindamycin, penicillin, ampicillin, meropenem, ciprofloxacin, and amdinocillin) against a CTX-M-15-producing E. coli sequence type 131 (ST131) isolate with a fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype. Mice (8 per group) were orogastrically administered 0.25 ml saline with 10(8) CFU/ml E. coli ST131. On that same day, antibiotic treatment was initiated and given subcutaneously once a day for three consecutive days. CFU of E. coli ST131, Bacteroides, and Gram-positive aerobic bacteria in fecal samples were studied, with intervals, until day 8. Bacteroides was used as an indicator organism for impact on the Gram-negative anaerobic population. For three antibiotics, prolonged colonization was investigated with additional fecal CFU counts determined on days 10 and 14 (cefotaxime, dicloxacillin, and clindamycin). Three antibiotics (cefotaxime, dicloxacillin, and clindamycin) promoted overgrowth of E. coli ST131 (P organisms. Only clindamycin treatment resulted in prolonged colonization. The remaining six antibiotics, including ciprofloxacin, did not promote overgrowth of E. coli ST131 (P > 0.95), nor did they suppress Bacteroides or Gram-positive organisms. The results showed that antimicrobials both with and without an impact on Gram-negative anaerobes can select for ESBL-producing E. coli, indicating that not only Gram-negative anaerobes have a role in upholding colonization resistance. Other, so-far-unknown bacterial populations must be of importance for preventing colonization by incoming E. coli.

  1. Antibiotic selection of Escherichia coli sequence type 131 in a mouse intestinal colonization model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Frederik Boetius; Løbner-Olesen, Anders; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2014-01-01

    , clindamycin, penicillin, ampicillin, meropenem, ciprofloxacin, and amdinocillin) against a CTX-M-15-producing E. coli sequence type 131 (ST131) isolate with a fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype. Mice (8 per group) were orogastrically administered 0.25 ml saline with 10(8) CFU/ml E. coli ST131. On that same...

  2. Prevalence and risk factor analysis of resistant Escherichia coli urinary tract infections in the emergency department.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey AM

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Escherichia coli (E. coli is a frequent uropathogen in urinary tract infections (UTI. Widespread resistance to sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (SMX-TMP and increasing resistance to fluoroquinolones amongst these isolates has been recognized. There are limited data demonstrating risk factors for resistance to both SMX-TMP and fluoroquinolones.Objectives: This study was conducted to assess for the prevalence of community resistance amongst E. coli isolates to SMX-TMP and levofloxacin in ambulatory patients discharged from the emergency department (ED.Methods: Adults presenting for evaluation and discharged from the ED with a diagnosis of an E. coli UTI were retrospectively reviewed. Utilizing demographic and clinical data the prevalence of E. coli resistance and risk factors associated with SMX-TMP- and fluoroquinolone-resistant infection were determined. Results: Among the 222 patients, the mean rates of E. coli susceptibility to levofloxacin and SMX-TMP were 82.4% and 72.5%, respectively. Significant risk factors for resistance to SMX-TMP included prior antibiotic use (p=0.04 and prior diagnosis of UTI (p= 0.01. Significant risk factors for resistance to levofloxacin included: male gender, age, presence of hypertension, diabetes, chronic respiratory disease, nursing home resident, previous antibiotic use, previous diagnosis of UTI, existence of renal or genitourinary abnormalities, and prior surgical procedures (p <0.05 for all comparisons. The number of hospital days prior to initial ED evaluation (p<0.001 was determined to be a predictive factor in hospital and ED readmission. Conclusions: These results suggest that conventional approaches to monitoring for patterns of susceptibility may be inadequate. It is imperative that practitioners develop novel approaches to identifying patients with risk factors for resistance. Identification of risk factors from this evaluation should prompt providers to scrutinize the use of these agents in

  3. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic integration and modeling of enrofloxacin in swine for Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianyi eWang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was tooptimize the dose regimens of enrofloxacin to reduce the development of fluoroquinolone resistance in Escherichia coli (E.coli using pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD modeling approach. The single dose (2.5 mg/kg body weight of enrofloxacin was administered intramuscularly (IM to the healthy pigs. Using cannulation, the pharmacokinetic properties, including peak concentration (Cmax, time to reach Cmax (Tmax and area under the curve (AUC, were determined in plasma and ileum content. The Cmax, Tmax, and AUC in the plasma were 1.09 ± 0.11 μg/mL, 1.27 ± 0.35 h and 12.70 ± 2.72 µg•h/mL, respectively. While in ileum content, the Cmax, Tmax and AUC were 7.07 ± 0.26 μg/mL, 5.54 ± 0.42 h and 136.18 ± 12.50 µg•h/mL, respectively. Based on the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC data of 918 E.coli isolates, an E.coli O101/K99 strain (enrofloxacin MIC = 0.25 μg/mL was selected for pharmacodynamic studies. The in vitro minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC, mutant prevention concentration (MPC and ex vivo time-killing curves for enrofloxacin in ileum content were established against the selected E.coli O101/K99 strain. Integrating the in vivo pharmacokinetic data and ex vivo pharmacodynamic data, a sigmoid Emax (Hill equation was established to provide values for ileum content of AUC24h/MIC producing, bactericidal activity (52.65 h and virtual eradication of bacteria (78.06 h. A dosage regimen of 1.96 mg/kg every 12 h for 3 days should be sufficient in the treatment of E.coli.

  4. Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Integration and Modeling of Enrofloxacin in Swine for Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianyi; Hao, Haihong; Huang, Lingli; Liu, Zhenli; Chen, Dongmei; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to optimize the dose regimens of enrofloxacin to reduce the development of fluoroquinolone resistance in Escherichia coli (E.coli) using pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling approach. The single dose (2.5 mg/kg body weight) of enrofloxacin was administered intramuscularly (IM) to the healthy pigs. Using cannulation, the pharmacokinetic properties, including peak concentration (C max), time to reach C max (T max), and area under the curve (AUC), were determined in plasma and ileum content. The C max, T max, and AUC in the plasma were 1.09 ± 0.11 μg/mL, 1.27 ± 0.35 h, and 12.70 ± 2.72 μg·h/mL, respectively. While in ileum content, the C max, T max, and AUC were 7.07 ± 0.26 μg/mL, 5.54 ± 0.42 h, and 136.18 ± 12.50 μg·h/mL, respectively. Based on the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) data of 918 E. coli isolates, an E. coli O101/K99 strain (enrofloxacin MIC = 0.25 μg/mL) was selected for pharmacodynamic studies. The in vitro minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC), mutant prevention concentration (MPC), and ex vivo time-killing curves for enrofloxacin in ileum content were established against the selected E. coli O101/K99 strain. Integrating the in vivo pharmacokinetic data and ex vivo pharmacodynamic data, a sigmoid E max (Hill) equation was established to provide values for ileum content of AUC24h/MIC producing, bactericidal activity (52.65 h), and virtual eradication of bacteria (78.06 h). A dosage regimen of 1.96 mg/kg every 12 h for 3 days should be sufficient in the treatment of E. coli.

  5. Escherichia coli transcriptional regulatory network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustino Martinez-Antonio

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli is the most well-know bacterial model about the function of its molecular components. In this review are presented several structural and functional aspects of their transcriptional regulatory network constituted by transcription factors and target genes. The network discussed here represent to 1531 genes and 3421 regulatory interactions. This network shows a power-law distribution with a few global regulators and most of genes poorly connected. 176 of genes in the network correspond to transcription factors, which form a sub-network of seven hierarchical layers where global regulators tend to be set in superior layers while local regulators are located in the lower ones. There is a small set of proteins know as nucleoid-associated proteins, which are in a high cellular concentrations and reshape the nucleoid structure to influence the running of global transcriptional programs, to this mode of regulation is named analog regulation. Specific signal effectors assist the activity of most of transcription factors in E. coli. These effectors switch and tune the activity of transcription factors. To this type of regulation, depending of environmental signals is named the digital-precise-regulation. The integration of regulatory programs have place in the promoter region of transcription units where it is common to observe co-regulation among global and local TFs as well as of TFs sensing exogenous and endogenous conditions. The mechanistic logic to understand the harmonious operation of regulatory programs in the network should consider the globalism of TFs, their signal perceived, coregulation, genome position, and cellular concentration. Finally, duplicated TFs and their horizontal transfer influence the evolvability of members of the network. The most duplicated and transferred TFs are located in the network periphery.

  6. Structure of Escherichia coli tryptophanase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Shao Yang; Yip, Patrick; Howell, P Lynne

    2006-07-01

    Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) dependent tryptophanase has been isolated from Escherichia coli and its crystal structure has been determined. The structure shares the same fold with and has similar quaternary structure to Proteus vulgaris tryptophanase and tyrosine-phenol lyase, but is found in a closed conformation when compared with these two enzymes. The tryptophanase structure, solved in its apo form, does not have covalent PLP bound in the active site, but two sulfate ions. The sulfate ions occupy the phosphoryl-binding site of PLP and the binding site of the alpha-carboxyl of the natural substrate tryptophan. One of the sulfate ions makes extensive interactions with both the transferase and PLP-binding domains of the protein and appears to be responsible for holding the enzyme in its closed conformation. Based on the sulfate density and the structure of the P. vulgaris enzyme, PLP and the substrate tryptophan were modeled into the active site. The resulting model is consistent with the roles of Arg419 in orienting the substrate to PLP and acidifying the alpha-proton of the substrate for beta-elimination, Lys269 in the formation and decomposition of the PLP quinonoid intermediate, Arg230 in orienting the substrate-PLP intermediates in the optimal conformation for catalysis, and His463 and Tyr74 in determining substrate specificity and suggests that the closed conformation observed in the structure could be induced by substrate binding and that significant conformational changes occur during catalysis. A catalytic mechanism for tryptophanase is proposed. Since E. coli tryptophanase has resisted forming diffraction-quality crystals for many years, the molecular surface of tryptophanase has been analyzed in various crystal forms and it was rationalized that strong crystal contacts occur on the flat surface of the protein and that the size of crystal contact surface seems to correlate with the diffraction quality of the crystal.

  7. Structure of Escherichia Coli Tryptophanase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ku,S.; Yip, P.; Howell, P.

    2006-01-01

    Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) dependent tryptophanase has been isolated from Escherichia coli and its crystal structure has been determined. The structure shares the same fold with and has similar quaternary structure to Proteus vulgaris tryptophanase and tyrosine-phenol lyase, but is found in a closed conformation when compared with these two enzymes. The tryptophanase structure, solved in its apo form, does not have covalent PLP bound in the active site, but two sulfate ions. The sulfate ions occupy the phosphoryl-binding site of PLP and the binding site of the {alpha}-carboxyl of the natural substrate tryptophan. One of the sulfate ions makes extensive interactions with both the transferase and PLP-binding domains of the protein and appears to be responsible for holding the enzyme in its closed conformation. Based on the sulfate density and the structure of the P. vulgaris enzyme, PLP and the substrate tryptophan were modeled into the active site. The resulting model is consistent with the roles of Arg419 in orienting the substrate to PLP and acidifying the {alpha}-proton of the substrate for {beta}-elimination, Lys269 in the formation and decomposition of the PLP quinonoid intermediate, Arg230 in orienting the substrate-PLP intermediates in the optimal conformation for catalysis, and His463 and Tyr74 in determining substrate specificity and suggests that the closed conformation observed in the structure could be induced by substrate binding and that significant conformational changes occur during catalysis. A catalytic mechanism for tryptophanase is proposed. Since E. coli tryptophanase has resisted forming diffraction-quality crystals for many years, the molecular surface of tryptophanase has been analyzed in various crystal forms and it was rationalized that strong crystal contacts occur on the flat surface of the protein and that the size of crystal contact surface seems to correlate with the diffraction quality of the crystal.

  8. Rising fluoroquinolone resistance in Campylobacter isolated from feedlot cattle in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yizhi; Sahin, Orhan; Pavlovic, Nada; LeJeune, Jeff; Carlson, James; Wu, Zuowei; Dai, Lei; Zhang, Qijing

    2017-03-29

    Antibiotic resistance, particularly to fluoroquinolones and macrolides, in the major foodborne pathogen Campylobacter is considered a serious threat to public health. Although ruminant animals serve as a significant reservoir for Campylobacter, limited information is available on antibiotic-resistant Campylobacter of bovine origin. Here, we analyzed the antimicrobial susceptibilities of 320 C. jejuni and 115 C. coli isolates obtained from feedlot cattle farms in multiple states in the U.S. The results indicate that fluoroquinolone resistance reached to 35.4% in C. jejuni and 74.4% in C. coli, which are significantly higher than those previously reported in the U.S. While all fluoroquinolone resistant (FQ(R)) C. coli isolates examined in this study harbored the single Thr-86-Ile mutation in GyrA, FQ(R) C. jejuni isolates had other mutations in GyrA in addition to the Thr-86-Ile change. Notably, most of the analyzed FQ(R) C. coli isolates had similar PFGE (pulsed field gel electrophoresis) patterns and the same MLST (multilocus sequence typing) sequence type (ST-1068) regardless of their geographic sources and time of isolation, while the analyzed C. jejuni isolates were genetically diverse, suggesting that clonal expansion is involved in dissemination of FQ(R) C. coli but not C. jejuni. These findings reveal the rising prevalence of FQ(R) Campylobacter in the U.S. and provide novel information on the epidemiology of antibiotic-resistant Campylobacter in the ruminant reservoir.

  9. Genes under positive selection in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lise; Bollback, J.P.; Dimmic, Matt

    2007-01-01

    We used a comparative genomics approach to identify genes that are under positive selection in six strains of Escherichia coli and Shigella flexneri, including five strains that are human pathogens. We find that positive selection targets a wide range of different functions in the E. coli genome...

  10. Fosfomycin Resistance in Escherichia coli, Pennsylvania, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrowais, Hind; McElheny, Christi L; Spychala, Caressa N; Sastry, Sangeeta; Guo, Qinglan; Butt, Adeel A; Doi, Yohei

    2015-11-01

    Fosfomycin resistance in Escherichia coli is rare in the United States. An extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing E. coli clinical strain identified in Pennsylvania, USA, showed high-level fosfomycin resistance caused by the fosA3 gene. The IncFII plasmid carrying this gene had a structure similar to those found in China, where fosfomycin resistance is commonly described.

  11. Fimbrial adhesins from extraintestinal Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Hancock, Viktoria; Schembri, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) represent an important subclass of E. coli that cause a wide spectrum of diseases in human and animal hosts. Fimbriae are key virulence factors of ExPEC strains. These long surface located rod-shaped organelles mediate receptor-specific attachment...

  12. Infectious endocarditis caused by Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Trine Kiilerich; Arpi, Magnus; Fritz-Hansen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Although Escherichia coli is among the most common causes of Gram-negative bacteraemia, infectious endocarditis (IE) due to this pathogen is rare. A 67-y-old male without a previous medical history presented with a new mitral regurgitation murmur and persisting E. coli bacteraemia in spite of broad...

  13. Genes under positive selection in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lise; Bollback, J.P.; Dimmic, Matt

    2007-01-01

    We used a comparative genomics approach to identify genes that are under positive selection in six strains of Escherichia coli and Shigella flexneri, including five strains that are human pathogens. We find that positive selection targets a wide range of different functions in the E. coli genome...

  14. Prevalence of Escherichia coli O157

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdissa, Rosa; Haile, Woynshet; Fite, Akafete Teklu; Beyi, Ashenafi Feyisa; Agga, Getahun E.; Edao, Bedaso Mammo; Tadesse, Fanos; Korsa, Mesula Geloye; Beyene, Takele; Beyene, Tariku Jibat; Zutter, De Lieven; Cox, Eric; Goddeeris, Bruno Maria

    2017-01-01

    Background: There is paucity of information regarding the epidemiology of Escherichia coli O157: H7 in developing countries. In this study, we investigated the occurrence of E. coli O157: H7 associated with beef cattle at processing plants and at retail shops in Ethiopia. Methods: Various samples

  15. Escherichia coli survival in waters: Temperature dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important in evaluating microbial contamination and making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature, a dependency that is routinely expressed using an analogue of the Q10 mo...

  16. Strategies for Protein Overproduction in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, John E.

    1984-01-01

    Examines heterologous expression in Escherichia coli and the role of regulatory sequences which control gene expression at transcription resulting in abundant production of messenger RNA and regulatory sequences in mRNA which promote efficient translation. Also examines the role of E. coli cells in stabilizing mRNA and protein that is…

  17. ANALISIS CEMARAN BAKTERI Escherichia coli ANALISIS CEMARAN BAKTERI Escherichia coli ANALISIS CEMARAN BAKTERI Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    ANGGREINI, RAHAYU

    2015-01-01

    2015 RAHAYU ANGGREINI coli Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk melakukan identifikasi cemaran bakteri E. coli O157:H7 pada daging sapi di kota Makassar. Sampel pada penelitian ini sebanyak 72 sampel Kata Kunci : Daging sapi, pasar tradisional, E. coli, E. coli O157:H7, kontaminasi bakteri, identifikasi E. coli O157:H7.

  18. ANALISIS CEMARAN BAKTERI Escherichia coli ANALISIS CEMARAN BAKTERI Escherichia coli ANALISIS CEMARAN BAKTERI Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    ANGGREINI, RAHAYU

    2015-01-01

    2015 RAHAYU ANGGREINI coli Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk melakukan identifikasi cemaran bakteri E. coli O157:H7 pada daging sapi di kota Makassar. Sampel pada penelitian ini sebanyak 72 sampel Kata Kunci : Daging sapi, pasar tradisional, E. coli, E. coli O157:H7, kontaminasi bakteri, identifikasi E. coli O157:H7.

  19. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255... coli serological reagents. (a) Identification. Escherichia coli serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify Escherichia coli from...

  20. The incidence and risk factors of resistant E. coli infections after prostate biopsy under fluoroquinolone prophylaxis: a single-centre experience with 2215 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandemir, Özlem; Bozlu, Murat; Efesoy, Ozan; Güntekin, Onur; Tek, Mesut; Akbay, Erdem

    2016-08-01

    We evaluated the incidence and risk factors of resistant Escherichia coli infections after the prostate biopsy under flouroquinolone prophylaxis. From January 2003 to December 2012, we retrospectively evaluated the records of 2215 patients. The risk factors were described for infective complications and resistant E. coli in positive cultures was calculated. Of 2215 patients, 153 had positive urine cultures, such as 129 (84·3%) E. coli, 8 (5·2%) Enterococcus spp., 6 (3·9%) Enterobacter spp., 5 (3·2%) Pseudomonas spp., 3 (1·9%) MRCNS, and 2 (1·3%) Klebsiella spp. Of the positive urine cultures which yielded E. coli, 99 (76·7%) were evaluated for fluoroquinolone resistance. Of those, 83 (83·8%) were fluoroquinolone-resistant and composed of 51 (61·4%) extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-positive. Fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli ratios were 73·4 and 95·9% before 2008 and after 2008, respectively (P = 0·002). The most sensitive antibiotics for fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli strains were imipenem (100%), amikacin (84%) and cefoperazone (83%). The use of quinolones in the last 6 months and a history of hospitalization in the last 30 days were found to be significant risk factors. We found that resistant E. coli strains might be a common microorganism in patients with this kind of complication. The risk factors for development of infection with these resistant strains were history of the use of fluoroquinolones and hospitalization.

  1. In vitro activity of WQ-3810, a novel fluoroquinolone, against multidrug-resistant and fluoroquinolone-resistant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazamori, Daichi; Aoi, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Kaori; Ueshima, Taichi; Amano, Hirotaka; Itoh, Kenji; Kuramoto, Yasuhiro; Yazaki, Akira

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the in vitro antibacterial activity of WQ-3810, a new fluoroquinolone, against clinically relevant pathogens such as Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli and Streptococcus pneumoniae, including multidrug-resistant (MDR) and fluoroquinolone-resistant (FQR) isolates, compared with those of ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin and gemifloxacin. WQ-3810 demonstrated the most potent activity against the antimicrobial-resistant pathogens tested. Against A. baumannii, including MDR isolates, the potency of WQ-3810 [minimum inhibitory concentration for 90% of the organisms (MIC(90))=1 mg/L] was more than eight-fold higher than that of ciprofloxacin (64 mg/L) and levofloxacin (8 mg/L). Against E. coli and S. pneumoniae, including FQR isolates, WQ-3810 (MIC(90)=4 mg/L and 0.06 mg/L, respectively) was also more active than ciprofloxacin (64 mg/L and 2 mg/L) and levofloxacin (32 mg/L and 2 mg/L). Furthermore, WQ-3810 was the most potent among the fluoroquinolones tested against meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae, including FQR isolates. In particular, WQ-3810 demonstrated highly potent activity against FQR isolates of A. baumannii, E. coli and S. pneumoniae with amino acid mutation(s) in the quinolone resistance-determining region of DNA gyrase and/or topoisomerase IV, which are the target enzymes of fluoroquinolones. An enzyme inhibition study performed using FQR E. coli DNA gyrase suggested that the potent antibacterial activity of WQ-3810 against drug-resistant isolates partly results from the strong inhibition of the target enzymes. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that WQ-3810 exhibits extremely potent antibacterial activity over the existing fluoroquinolones, particularly against MDR and FQR pathogens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  2. Presence of multi-drug resistant pathogenic Escherichia coli in the San Pedro River located in the State of Aguascalientes, Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flor Yazmin Ramirez Castillo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Contamination of surface waters in developing countries is a great concern. Treated and untreated wastewaters have been discharged into rivers and streams, leading to possible waterborne infection outbreaks and may represent a significant dissemination mechanism of antibiotic resistance genes. In this study, the water quality of San Pedro River, the main river and pluvial collector of the Aguascalientes State, Mexico was assessed. Thirty sample locations were tested throughout the River. The main physicochemical parameters of water were evaluated. Results showed high levels of fecal pollution as well as inorganic and organic matter abundant enough to support the heterotrophic growth of microorganisms. These results indicate poor water quality in samples from different locations. One hundred and fifty Escherichia coli were collected and screened by PCR for several virulence genes. Isolates were classified as either pathogenic (n = 91 or commensal (n = 59. The disc diffusion method was used to determine antimicrobial susceptibility to 13 antibiotics. Fifty-two percent of the isolates were resistant to at least one antimicrobial agent and 30.6% were multi-resistant. Eighteen E. coli strains were quinolone resistant of which 16 were multi-resistant. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes were detected in 12 isolates. Mutations at the Ser-83→Leu and/or Asp-87→Asn in the gyrA gene were detected as well as mutations at the Ser-80→Ile in parC. An E. coli microarray (Maxivirulence V 3.1 was used to characterize the virulence and antimicrobial resistance genes profiles of the fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates. Antimicrobial resistance genes such as blaTEM, sulI, sulII, dhfrIX, aph3 (strA and tet (B as well as integrons were found in fluoroquinolone resistance E. coli strains. The presence of potential pathogenic E. coli and antibiotic resistance in San Pedro River such as fluoroquinolone resistant E. coli could pose a potential threat to human

  3. Sequence type 131 fimH30 and fimH41 subclones amongst Escherichia coli isolates in Australia and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Benjamin A; Ingram, Paul R; Runnegar, Naomi; Pitman, Matthew C; Freeman, Joshua T; Athan, Eugene; Havers, Sally; Sidjabat, Hanna E; Gunning, Earlleen; De Almeida, Mary; Styles, Kaylene; Paterson, David L

    2015-04-01

    The clonal composition of Escherichia coli causing extra-intestinal infections includes ST131 and other common uropathogenic clones. Drivers for the spread of these clones and risks for their acquisition have been difficult to define. In this study, molecular epidemiology was combined with clinical data from 182 patients enrolled in a case-control study of community-onset expanded-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant E. coli (ESC-R-EC) in Australia and New Zealand. Genetic analysis included antimicrobial resistance mechanisms, clonality by DiversiLab (rep-PCR) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and subtyping of ST131 by identification of polymorphisms in the fimH gene. The clonal composition of expanded-spectrum cephalosporin-susceptible E. coli and ESC-R-EC isolates differed, with six MLST clusters amongst susceptible isolates (median 7 isolates/cluster) and three clusters amongst resistant isolates, including 40 (45%) ST131 isolates. Population estimates indicate that ST131 comprises 8% of all E. coli within our population; the fluoroquinolone-susceptible H41 subclone comprised 4.5% and the H30 subclone comprised 3.5%. The H30 subclone comprised 39% of all ESC-R-EC and 41% of all fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli within our population. Patients with ST131 were also more likely than those with non-ST131 isolates to present with an upper than lower urinary tract infection (RR=1.8, 95% CI 1.01-3.1). ST131 and the H30 subclone were predominant amongst ESC-R-EC but were infrequent amongst susceptible isolates where the H41 subclone was more prevalent. Within our population, the proportional contribution of ST131 to fluoroquinolone resistance is comparable with that of other regions. In contrast, the overall burden of ST131 is low by global standards.

  4. Antimicrobial resistance in commensal Escherichia coli isolated from animals at slaughter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasyl, Dariusz; Hoszowski, Andrzej; Zając, Magdalena; Szulowski, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring of antimicrobial resistance in commensal Escherichia coli (N = 3430) isolated from slaughtered broilers, laying hens, turkeys, swine, and cattle in Poland has been run between 2009 and 2012. Based on minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) microbiological resistance to each of 14 tested antimicrobials was found reaching the highest values for tetracycline (43.3%), ampicillin (42.3%), and ciprofloxacin (39.0%) whereas the lowest for colistin (0.9%), cephalosporins (3.6 ÷ 3.8%), and florfenicol (3.8%). The highest prevalence of resistance was noted in broiler and turkey isolates, whereas it was rare in cattle. That finding along with resistance patterns specific to isolation source might reflect antimicrobial consumption, usage preferences or management practices in specific animals. Regression analysis has identified changes in prevalence of microbiological resistance and shifts of MIC values. Critically important fluoroquinolone resistance was worrisome in poultry isolates, but did not change over the study period. The difference (4.7%) between resistance to ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid indicated the scale of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance. Cephalosporin resistance were found in less than 3.8% of the isolates but an increasing trends were observed in poultry and MIC shift in the ones from cattle. Gentamycin resistance was also increasing in E. coli of turkey and cattle origin although prevalence of streptomycin resistance in laying hens decreased considerably. Simultaneously, decreasing MIC for phenicols observed in cattle and layers isolates as well as tetracycline values in E. coli from laying hens prove that antimicrobial resistance is multivariable phenomenon not only directly related to antimicrobial usage. Further studies should elucidate the scope of commensal E. coli as reservoirs of resistance genes, their spread and possible threats for human and animal health. PMID:23935596

  5. Native valve Escherichia coli endocarditis following urosepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangarajan, D; Ramakrishnan, S; Patro, K C; Devaraj, S; Krishnamurthy, V; Kothari, Y; Satyaki, N

    2013-05-01

    Gram-negative organisms are a rare cause of infective endocarditis. Escherichia coli, the most common cause of urinary tract infection and gram-negative septicemia involves endocardium rarely. In this case report, we describe infection of native mitral valve by E. coli following septicemia of urinary tract origin in a diabetic male; subsequently, he required prosthetic tissue valve replacement indicated by persistent sepsis and congestive cardiac failure.

  6. 77 FR 9888 - Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ... Food Safety and Inspection Service Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli in Certain Raw Beef Products... manufacturing trimmings for six non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serogroups (O26, O45..., non-intact product, that are contaminated with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O26,...

  7. Zoonotic Potential and Antibiotic Resistance of Escherichia coli in Neonatal Calves in Uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umpiérrez, Ana; Bado, Inés; Oliver, Martín; Acquistapace, Sofía; Etcheverría, Analía; Lía Padola, Nora; Vignoli, Rafael; Zunino, Pablo

    2017-09-12

    Escherichia coli is one of the main etiological agents of neonatal calf diarrhea (NCD). The objective of this study was to assess the presence of virulence genes, genetic diversity, and antibiotic resistance mechanisms in E. coli associated with NCD in Uruguay. PCR was used to assess the presence of intimin, Shiga-like toxin, and stable and labile enterotoxin genes. Resistance to fluoroquinolones and oxyimino-cephalosporins was estimated on Müller-Hinton agar plates. Further antibiotic disc-diffusion tests were performed to assess bacterial multi-resistance. The presence of PMQR, ESBL, MCR-1, and integron genes was evaluated. Isolates were typed using ERIC-PCR, and 20 were selected for MLST, adhesion to Hep-2 cells, in vitro biofilm formation, and eukaryotic cytotoxicity. The prevalence of ETEC genes was lower than 3% in each case (estA and elt). Six isolates were EPEC (eae+) and 2 were EHEC/STEC (eae+/stx1+). The results of a diversity analysis showed high genetic heterogenicity among isolates. Additionally, different sequence types, including ST10, ST21, and ST69, were assigned to selected isolates. Thirty-six percent (96/264) of the isolates were fluoroquinolone-resistant, with 61/96 (63.5%) being multidrug-resistant. Additionally, 6 were oxyimino-cephalosporin-resistant. The qnrB, qnrS1, and blaCTX-M-14 genes were detected, whereas no isolates carried the mcr-1 gene. Isolates had the ability to adhere to Hep-2 cells and form biofilms. Only 1 isolate expressed toxins in vitro. E. coli from NCD cases in Uruguay are very diverse, potentially virulent, and may interact with eukaryotic cells. Zoonotic potential, together with resistance traits and the presence of horizontal transfer mechanisms, may play a significant role in infections caused by these microorganisms.

  8. Control of Ribosome Synthesis in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molin, Søren; Meyenburg, K. von; Måløe, O.

    1977-01-01

    The rate of ribosome synthesis and accumulation in Escherichia coli during the transition after an energy source shift-down was analyzed. The shift was imposed on cultures of stringent and relaxed strains growing in glucose minimal medium by the addition of the glucose analogue {alpha}-methylgluc...

  9. Synergistic effects in mixed Escherichia coli biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reisner, A.; Holler, B.M.; Molin, Søren

    2006-01-01

    the pathways governing development of more complex heterogeneous communities. In this study, we established a laboratory model where biofilm-stimulating effects due to interactions between genetically diverse strains of Escherichia coli were monitored. Synergistic induction of biofilm formation resulting from...

  10. Escherichia Coli--Key to Modern Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregegere, Francois

    1982-01-01

    Mid-nineteenth century work by Mendel on plant hybrids and by Pasteur on fermentation gave birth by way of bacterial genetics to modern-day molecular biology. The bacterium Escherichia Coli has occupied a key position in genetic studies leading from early gene identification with DNA to current genetic engineering using recombinant DNA technology.…

  11. Progressive segregation of the Escherichia coli chromosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Jørck; Youngren, Brenda; Hansen, Flemming G.

    2006-01-01

    We have followed the fate of 14 different loci around the Escherichia coli chromosome in living cells at slow growth rate using a highly efficient labelling system and automated measurements. Loci are segregated as they are replicated, but with a marked delay. Most markers segregate in a smooth...

  12. Leaner and meaner genomes in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussery, David

    2006-01-01

    A 'better' Escherichia coli K-12 genome has recently been engineered in which about 15% of the genome has been removed by planned deletions. Comparison with related bacterial genomes that have undergone a natural reduction in size suggests that there is plenty of scope for yet more deletions....

  13. Compaction of isolated Escherichia coli nucleoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegner, Anna S.; Wintraecken, Kathelijne; Spurio, Roberto; Woldringh, Conrad L.; Vries, de Renko; Odijk, Theo

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli nucleoids were compacted by the inert polymer polyethylene glycol (PEG) in the presence of the H-NS protein. The protein by itself appears to have little impact on the size of the nucleoids as determined by fluorescent microscopy. However, it has a significant impact on the nucle

  14. Fluoroquinolone resistance in atypical pneumococci and oral streptococci: evidence of horizontal gene transfer of fluoroquinolone resistance determinants from Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Margaret; Chau, Shirley S L; Chi, Fang; Tang, Julian; Chan, Paul K

    2007-08-01

    Atypical strains, presumed to be pneumococcus, with ciprofloxacin MICs of > or =4.0 microg/ml and unique sequence variations within the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of the gyrase and topoisomerase genes in comparison with the Streptococcus pneumoniae R6 strain, were examined. These strains were reidentified using phenotypic methods, including detection of optochin susceptibility, bile solubility, and agglutination by serotype-specific antisera, and genotypic methods, including detection of pneumolysin and autolysin genes by PCR, 16S rRNA sequencing, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The analysis based on concatenated sequences of the six MLST loci distinguished the "atypical" strains from pneumococci, and these strains clustered closely with S. mitis. However, all these strains and five of nine strains from the viridans streptococcal group possessed one to three gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes whose QRDR sequences clustered with those of S. pneumoniae, providing evidence of horizontal transfer of the QRDRs of the gyrase and topoisomerase genes from pneumococci into viridans streptococci. These genes also conferred fluoroquinolone resistance to viridans streptococci. In addition, the fluoroquinolone resistance determinants of 32 well-characterized Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus oralis strains from bacteremic patients were also compared. These strains have unique amino acid substitutions in GyrA and ParC that were distinguishable from those in fluoroquinolone-resistant pneumococci and the "atypical" isolates. Both recombinational events and de novo mutations play an important role in the development of fluoroquinolone resistance.

  15. Escherichia coli in Europe: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerino Allocati

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli remains one of the most frequent causes of several common bacterial infections in humans and animals. E. coli is the prominent cause of enteritis, urinary tract infection, septicaemia and other clinical infections, such as neonatal meningitis. E. coli is also prominently associated with diarrhoea in pet and farm animals. The therapeutic treatment of E. coli infections is threatened by the emergence of antimicrobial resistance. The prevalence of multidrug-resistant E. coli strains is increasing worldwide principally due to the spread of mobile genetic elements, such as plasmids. The rise of multidrug-resistant strains of E. coli also occurs in Europe. Therefore, the spread of resistance in E. coli is an increasing public health concern in European countries. This paper summarizes the current status of E. coli strains clinically relevant in European countries. Furthermore, therapeutic interventions and strategies to prevent and control infections are presented and discussed. The article also provides an overview of the current knowledge concerning promising alternative therapies against E. coli diseases.

  16. Ciprofloxacin-resistant Escherichia coli in Central Greece: mechanisms of resistance and molecular identification

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    Mavroidi Angeliki

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluoroquinolone resistant E. coli isolates, that are also resistant to other classes of antibiotics, is a significant challenge to antibiotic treatment and infection control policies. In Central Greece a significant increase of ciprofloxacin-resistant Escherichia coli has occurred during 2011, indicating the need for further analysis. Methods A total of 106 ciprofloxacin-resistant out of 505 E. coli isolates consecutively collected during an eight months period in a tertiary Greek hospital of Central Greece were studied. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and mechanisms of resistance to quinolones were assessed, whereas selected isolates were further characterized by multilocus sequence typing and β-lactamase content. Results Sequence analysis of the quinolone-resistance determining region of the gyrA and parC genes has revealed that 63% of the ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli harbored a distinct amino acid substitution pattern (GyrA:S83L + D87N; ParC:S80I + E84V, while 34% and 3% carried the patterns GyrA:S83L + D87N; ParC:S80I and GyrA:S83L + D87N; ParC:S80I + E84G respectively. The aac (6’-1b-cr plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinant was also detected; none of the isolates was found to carry the qnrA, qnrB and qnrS. Genotyping of a subset of 35 selected ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli by multilocus sequence typing has revealed the presence of nine sequence types; ST131 and ST410 were the most prevalent and were exclusively correlated with hospital and health care associated infections, while strains belonging to STs 393, 361 and 162 were associated with community acquired infections. The GyrA:S83L + D87N; ParC:S80I + E84V substitution pattern was found exclusively among ST131 ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase-positive ST131 ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates produced CTX-M-type enzymes; eight the CTX-M-15 and one the CTX-M-3 variant. CTX-M-1 like and KPC-2 enzymes were detected

  17. Pathogenomics of uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Agarwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Subset of faecal E. coli that can enter, colonize urinary tract and cause infection are known as uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC. UPEC strains act as opportunistic intracellular pathogens taking advantage of host susceptibility using a diverse array of virulence factors. Presence of specific virulence associated genes on genomic/pathogenicity islands and involvement of horizontal gene transfer appears to account for evolution and diversity of UPEC. Recent success in large-scale genome sequencing and comparative genomics has helped in unravelling UPEC pathogenomics. Here we review recent findings regarding virulence characteristics of UPEC and mechanisms involved in pathogenesis of urinary tract infection.

  18. [Resistant phenotypes of Escherichia coli strains responsible for urinary tract infection in the laboratory of the University Hospital Joseph Raseta Befelatanana, Antananarivo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakotovao-Ravahatra, Zafindrasoa Domoina; Randriatsarafara, Fidiniaina Mamy; Rasoanandrasana, Saïda; Raverohanta, Léa; Rakotovao, Andriamiadana Luc

    2017-01-01

    Urinary tract infection caused by Escherichia coli frequently occurs in the hospital environment. This study aims to describe resistant phenotypes of Escherichia coli strains to monitor their occurrence. We conducted a descriptive retrospective study of 102 Escherchia coli strains responsible for urinary tract infection in the laboratory of the University Hospital Joseph Raseta Befelatanana, Antananarivo from January 2014 to October 2016. Beta-lactam antibiotic resistance screening identified high-level penicillinases 50% (n=51), Escherichia coli producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) 22.5% (n=23), high-level cephalosporinases 14.7% (n=15), penicillinases low level 5.9% (n=6), wild type strains 5.9% (n=6) and a strain ofEscherichia coli emerging strain high-level resistance. Aminoglycosides resistance was identified in 58 (56.9%) wild type phenotype, 29 (28.4%) strains sensitive to amikacin and 15 (14.7%) resistant to all aminoglycosides. Fluoroquinolones resistance was identified in 52 (51%) wild type strains, 9 (8.8%) strains sensitive to ciprofloxacin and 41 (40.2%) resistant to all fluoroquinolones. Women (25, 7%) (p= 0.25, NS), patients more than 60 years (38.7%) (p=0.02), patients hospitalized in the Department of Nephrology (53.8%) (p=0.04), with urinary disorder and kidney disease (29, 7%) (p= 0.2, NS) were the most affected by E-ESBL. Based on high multidrug resistance in Escherichia coli strains guidelines for the empirical treatment of urinary tract infections need to be revised.

  19. Antimalarial therapy selection for quinolone resistance among Escherichia coli in the absence of quinolone exposure, in tropical South America.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross J Davidson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is thought to develop only in the presence of antibiotic pressure. Here we show evidence to suggest that fluoroquinolone resistance in Escherichia coli has developed in the absence of fluoroquinolone use. METHODS: Over 4 years, outreach clinic attendees in one moderately remote and five very remote villages in rural Guyana were surveyed for the presence of rectal carriage of ciprofloxacin-resistant gram-negative bacilli (GNB. Drinking water was tested for the presence of resistant GNB by culture, and the presence of antibacterial agents and chloroquine by HPLC. The development of ciprofloxacin resistance in E. coli was examined after serial exposure to chloroquine. Patient and laboratory isolates of E. coli resistant to ciprofloxacin were assessed by PCR-sequencing for quinolone-resistance-determining-region (QRDR mutations. RESULTS: In the very remote villages, 4.8% of patients carried ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli with QRDR mutations despite no local availability of quinolones. However, there had been extensive local use of chloroquine, with higher prevalence of resistance seen in the villages shortly after a Plasmodium vivax epidemic (p<0.01. Antibacterial agents were not found in the drinking water, but chloroquine was demonstrated to be present. Chloroquine was found to inhibit the growth of E. coli in vitro. Replica plating demonstrated that 2-step QRDR mutations could be induced in E. coli in response to chloroquine. CONCLUSIONS: In these remote communities, the heavy use of chloroquine to treat malaria likely selected for ciprofloxacin resistance in E. coli. This may be an important public health problem in malarious areas.

  20. Infektionen mit darmpathogenen Escherichia coli.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedrich, Alexander; Stein, Jürgen; Dignass, Axel

    2001-01-01

    E. coli ist ein wesentlicher Bestandteil der physiologischen Darmflora des Menschen. Die üblicherweise im Darm vorkommenden Kolibakterien sind apathogen und für den Menschen eher nützlich (Sonnenborn u. Greinwald 1990). Allerdings kennen wir bei dieser Bakterienspezies auch ein breites Spektrum von

  1. Survival of Escherichia coli in stormwater biofilters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasena, G I; Deletic, A; McCarthy, D T

    2014-04-01

    Biofilters are widely adopted in Australia for stormwater treatment, but the reported removal of common faecal indicators (such as Escherichia coli (E. coli)) varies from net removal to net leaching. Currently, the underlying mechanisms that govern the faecal microbial removal in the biofilters are poorly understood. Therefore, it is important to study retention and subsequent survival of faecal microorganisms in the biofilters under different biofilter designs and operational characteristics. The current study investigates how E. coli survival is influenced by temperature, moisture content, sunlight exposure and presence of other microorganisms in filter media and top surface sediment. Soil samples were taken from two different biofilters to investigate E. coli survival under controlled laboratory conditions. Results revealed that the presence of other microorganisms and temperature are vital stressors which govern the survival of E. coli captured either in the top surface sediment or filter media, while sunlight exposure and moisture content are important for the survival of E. coli captured in the top surface sediment compared to that of the filter media. Moreover, increased survival was found in the filter media compared to the top sediment, and sand filter media was found be more hostile than loamy sand filter media towards E. coli survival. Results also suggest that the contribution from the tested environmental stressors on E. coli survival in biofilters will be greatly affected by the seasonality and may vary from one site to another.

  2. Hydrogen production by recombinant Escherichia coli strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Toshinari; Sanchez‐Torres, Viviana; Wood, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The production of hydrogen via microbial biotechnology is an active field of research. Given its ease of manipulation, the best‐studied bacterium Escherichia coli has become a workhorse for enhanced hydrogen production through metabolic engineering, heterologous gene expression, adaptive evolution, and protein engineering. Herein, the utility of E. coli strains to produce hydrogen, via native hydrogenases or heterologous ones, is reviewed. In addition, potential strategies for increasing hydrogen production are outlined and whole‐cell systems and cell‐free systems are compared. PMID:21895995

  3. The evolution of the Escherichia coli phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Roy R; Henderson, Ian R

    2012-03-01

    Escherichia coli is familiar to biologists as a classical model system, ubiquitous in molecular biology laboratories around the world. Outside of the laboratory, E. coli strains exist as an almost universal component of the lower-gut flora of humans and animals. Although usually a commensal, E. coli has an alter ego as a pathogen, and is associated with diarrhoeal disease and extra-intestinal infections. The study of E. coli diversity predates the availability of molecular data, with strains initially distinguished by serotyping and metabolic profiling, and genomic diversity illustrated by DNA hybridisation. The quantitative study of E. coli diversity began with the application of multi-locus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE), and has progressed with the accumulation of nucleotide sequence data, from single genes through multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) to whole genome sequencing. Phylogenetic methods have shed light on the processes of genomic evolution in this extraordinarily diverse species, and revealed the origins of pathogenic E. coli strains, including members of the phylogenetically indistinguishable "genus"Shigella. In May and June 2011, an outbreak of haemorrhagic uraemic syndrome in Germany was linked to a strain of enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) O104:H4. Application of high-throughput sequencing technologies allowed the genome and origins of the outbreak strain to be characterised in real time as the outbreak was in progress.

  4. Identification and Prevalence of Escherichia coli and Escherichia coli O157: H7 in Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ancuta Mihaela Rotar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to investigate the incidence of Escherichia coli in animal and non-animal foods, and mainly the incidence of the serotype O157: H7 producing verotoxin. The presence of common Escherichia coli and Escherichia coli O157: H7 in various foods (of animal and non animal origin was performed in Transylvania area. We analyzed a total of one hundred forty-one samples of minced meat, one hundred twenty-six samples of meat , twenty six samples of meat products, five samples of alcoholic beverages, three samples of seafood, one hundred samples of cheese from pasteurized milk, seventeen samples of butter, four samples of vegetables and one sample of milk powder, using the standard cultural method and Vidas Eco method for E. coli O157: H7 strains. E. coli was identified in 50 samples of minced meat, 55 samples of meat prepared, 4 samples of meat products, 2 samples of alcoholic beverages, 25 samples of cheese from pasteurized milk, 6 samples of butter and 1 sample of vegetables. In this study were not been identified any foods contaminated with the E. coli O157: H7 serotype. The results of this reasearch have demostrated that E. coli wich represents a hygienic indicator of recent food contamination, can be destroyed with heat treatment and hygienic handling of foods. Our country over the years has been among the few countries where the incidence of the E. coli O157: H7 serotype has been minimal.

  5. Automatic tracking of Escherichia coli bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jun; Khan, Shahid; Shah, Mubarak

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic method for estimating the trajectories of Escherichia coli bacteria from in vivo phase-contrast microscopy videos. To address the low-contrast boundaries in cellular images, an adaptive kernel-based technique is applied to detect cells in sequence of frames. Then a novel matching gain measure is introduced to cope with the challenges such as dramatic changes of cells' appearance and serious overlapping and occlusion. For multiple cell tracking, an optimal matching strategy is proposed to improve the handling of cell collision and broken trajectories. The results of successful tracking of Escherichia coli from various phase-contrast sequences are reported and compared with manually-determined trajectories, as well as those obtained from existing tracking methods. The stability of the algorithm with different parameter values is also analyzed and discussed.

  6. Risk factors for fluoroquinolone resistance in ocular cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junsung; Choi, Sangkyung

    2015-02-01

    To identify the risk factors associated with fluoroquinolone resistance in patients undergoing cataract surgery. A total of 1,125 patients (1,125 eyes) who underwent cataract surgery at Veterans Health Service Medical Center from May 2011 to July 2012 were enrolled in this study. Conjunctival cultures were obtained from the patients on the day of surgery before instillation of any ophthalmic solutions. The medical records of patients with positive coagulase negative staphylococcus (CNS) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) cultures were reviewed to determine factors associated with fluoroquinolone resistance. Of 734 CNS and S. aureus cultures, 175 (23.8%) were resistant to ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, gatifloxacin, or moxifloxacin. Use of fluoroquinolone within 3 months and within 1 year before surgery, topical antibiotic use other than fluoroquinolone, systemic antibiotic use, recent hospitalization, ocular surgery, intravitreal injection and use of eyedrops containing benzalkonium chloride were significantly more frequent in resistant isolates than in susceptible isolates. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, ocular surgery (odds ratio [OR], 8.457), recent hospitalization (OR, 6.646) and use of fluoroquinolone within 3 months before surgery (OR, 4.918) were significant predictors of fluoroquinolone resistance, along with intravitreal injection (OR, 2.976), systemic antibiotic use (OR, 2.665), use of eyedrops containing benzalkonium chloride (OR, 2.323), use of fluoroquinolone within 1 year before surgery (OR, 1.943) and topical antibiotic use other than fluoroquinolone (OR, 1.673). Recent topical fluoroquinolone use, hospitalization and ocular surgery were significantly associated with fluoroquinolone resistance in CNS and S. aureus isolates from ocular culture.

  7. Remarkable increase in fluoroquinolone-resistant Mycoplasma genitalium in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Mina; Ito, Shin; Yasuda, Mitsuru; Tsuchiya, Tomohiro; Hatazaki, Kyoko; Takanashi, Masaki; Ezaki, Takayuki; Deguchi, Takashi

    2014-09-01

    We determined the prevalence of macrolide and fluoroquinolone resistance-associated mutations in Mycoplasma genitalium DNA specimens from men with non-gonococcal urethritis (NGU) and analysed their effects on antibiotic treatments of M. genitalium infections. In this retrospective study, we examined antibiotic resistance-associated mutations in the 23S rRNA, gyrA and parC genes of M. genitalium and the association of the mutations with microbiological outcomes of antibiotic treatments in men with M. genitalium-positive NGU. No macrolide resistance-associated mutations in the 23S rRNA gene were observed in 27 M. genitalium DNA specimens in 2011 and in 24 in 2012. However, 5 of 17 in 2013 had 23S rRNA mutations. Three of 15 in 2011, 6 of 19 in 2012 and 8 of 17 in 2013 had fluoroquinolone resistance-associated alterations in ParC. Three in 2013 had both the antibiotic resistance-associated alterations coincidentally. In two men with M. genitalium harbouring 23S rRNA mutations, the mycoplasma persisted after treatment with a regimen of 2 g of extended-release azithromycin (AZM-SR) once daily for 1 day. All nine men with mycoplasma harbouring ParC alterations were microbiologically cured with a regimen of 100 mg of sitafloxacin twice daily for 7 days. Macrolide- or fluoroquinolone-resistant M. genitalium appears to be increasing, and the increase in fluoroquinolone-resistant mycoplasmas is especially remarkable in Japan. Mycoplasmas harbouring 23S rRNA mutations would be resistant to the AZM-SR regimen, but those harbouring ParC alterations would still be susceptible to the sitafloxacin regimen. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Escherichia coli necrotizing fasciitis in Hirschsprung's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manal A. Alsaif

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare post-operative complication of Hirschsprung's disease. Very recently the only previous case of necrotizing fasciitis following a Soave procedure was reported with the etiologic agent being Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here we are reporting the second case of necrotizing fasciitis following a Soave procedure caused by an extended spectrum beta lactamase harboring strain of Escherichia coli which is a rare pathogen in type II necrotizing fasciitis.

  9. Homology requirements for recombination in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Watt, V M; Ingles, C J; Urdea, M S; Rutter, W J

    1985-01-01

    The DNA sequence homology required for recombination in Escherichia coli has been determined by measuring the recombination frequency between insulin DNA in a miniplasmid pi VX and a homologous sequence in a bacteriophage lambda vector. A minimum of approximately equal to 20 base pairs in a completely homologous segment is required for significant recombination. There is an exponential increase in the frequency of recombination when the length of homologous DNA is increased from 20 base pairs...

  10. Characterization of ESBL- and AmpC-Producing and Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae Isolated from Mouflons (Ovis orientalis musimon in Austria and Germany.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Loncaric

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of β-lactamase producing or fluoroquinolone-resistant members of the family Enterobacteriaceae in European mouflons (Ovis orientalis musimon. The mouflon samples originated from nasal and perineal swabs and/or organ samples in cases of a suspected infection. Only one of the 32 mouflons was tested positive for the presence of Enterobacteriaceae that displayed either an ESBL/AmpC phenotype or were resistant to ciprofloxacin. The positively tested swab originated from a sample of the jejunal mucosa of a four-year old female mouflon. Two different colony morphotypes were identified as Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. These isolates were phenotypically and genotypically characterized in detail by a polyphasic approach. Both isolates were multi-drug resistant. The E. coli isolate belonged to the phylogenetic group B1 and sequence type (ST 744 and harboured the β-lactamase genes blaCTX-M-15 and blaOXA-1. The K. pneumoniae, identified as ST11, harboured the β-lactamase genes blaSHV-11, blaOXA-1, and blaDHA-1 as well as the plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR gene qnrB55. The present study demonstrates that wild animals can acquire human-derived resistance determinants and such findings may indicate environmental pollution with resistance determinants from other sources.

  11. Multiplex PCR Assay for Identification of Human Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Toma, Claudia; Lu, Yan; Higa, Naomi; Nakasone, Noboru; Isabel CHINEN; Baschkier, Ariela; Rivas, Marta; Iwanaga, Masaaki

    2003-01-01

    A multiplex PCR assay for the identification of human diarrheagenic Escherichia coli was developed. The targets selected for each category were eae for enteropathogenic E. coli, stx for Shiga toxin-producing E. coli, elt and est for enterotoxigenic E. coli, ipaH for enteroinvasive E. coli, and aggR for enteroaggregative E. coli. This assay allowed the categorization of a diarrheagenic E. coli strain in a single reaction tube.

  12. Multiplex PCR Assay for Identification of Human Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    A multiplex PCR assay for the identification of human diarrheagenic Escherichia coli was developed. The targets selected for each category were eae for enteropathogenic E. coli, stx for Shiga toxin-producing E. coli, elt and est for enterotoxigenic E. coli, ipaH for enteroinvasive E. coli, and aggR for enteroaggregative E. coli. This assay allowed the categorization of a diarrheagenic E. coli strain in a single reaction tube.

  13. Siderophore production by uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vagrali Manjula

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infection (UTI is one of the most frequently encountered problems in ambulatory medicine. The present study was designed to determine siderophore production as the urovirulence factor of Escherichia coli isolated from the patients of UTI. A total of 160 strains of E. coli isolated from urine of patients with clinically diagnosed UTI were included in the study and 50 fecal isolates of E. coli, siderophore production was seen in 156 (97.5%. In 50 fecal isolates, siderophore production was seen in 2 (4%. Siderophore production has been shown to be more frequent in E. coli from patients with UTI, than in fecal isolates. The results suggest that siderophore production positive strains can be considered as UPEC. Thus, although a great deal has been learned regarding E. coli virulence mechanisms in UTI, much remains to be learned and the practical application of our growing understanding of E. coli virulence factors to the prevention and treatment of UTI has to be continued.

  14. Differentiation between Shigella, enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC) and noninvasive Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Beld, M J C; Reubsaet, F A G

    2012-06-01

    Shigella causes bacillary dysentery and is classified into four species based on their antigen characteristics. This classification does not reflect genetic relatedness; in fact, Shigella species are so related to Escherichia coli , they should be classified as one distinctive species in the genus Escherichia. The differentiation of Shigella and E. coli is even more complicated with the description of enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC). EIEC are strains that possess some of the biochemical characteristics of E. coli and have the ability to cause dysentery using the same method of invasion as Shigella does. Sequencing of multiple housekeeping genes indicates that EIEC is more related to Shigella than to non-invasive E. coli. Shigella and EIEC evolved from the same ancestor and form a single pathovar within E. coli. Shigella and EIEC could be separated from other E. coli by a PCR targeting the ipaH-gene; this is a multicopy gene exclusively found in all Shigella and EIEC. It is possible to differentiate Shigella and all E. coli, including EIEC, by using multiple tests, including ipaH-gene PCR, physiological and biochemical typing and serological typing. Based on literature study, a key is designed for daily use in diagnostic laboratories to identify Shigella and all E. coli.

  15. Cellular chain formation in Escherichia coli biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Klemm, Per

    2009-01-01

    In this study we report on a novel structural phenotype in Escherichia coli biofilms: cellular chain formation. Biofilm chaining in E. coli K-12 was found to occur primarily by clonal expansion, but was not due to filamentous growth. Rather, chain formation was the result of intercellular......; type I fimbriae expression significantly reduced cellular chain formation, presumably by steric hindrance. Cellular chain formation did not appear to be specific to E coli K-12. Although many urinary tract infection (UTI) isolates were found to form rather homogeneous, flat biofilms, three isolates......, including the prototypic asymptomatic bacteriuria strain, 83972, formed highly elaborate cellular chains during biofilm growth in human urine. Combined, these results illustrate the diversity of biofilm architectures that can be observed even within a single microbial species....

  16. Interaction between Escherichia coli and lunar fines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, K. R.

    1983-01-01

    A sample of mature lunar fines (10084.151) was solubilized to a high degree (about 17 percent) by the chelating agent salicylic acid (0.01. M). The neutralized (pH adjusted to 7.0) leachate was found to inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli (ATCC 259922) in a minimial mineral salts glucose medium; however, the inhibition was somewhat less than that caused by neutralized salicylic acid alone. The presence of lunar fines in the minimal medium was highly stimulatory to growth of E. coli following an early inhibitory response. The bacterium survived less well in the lunar leachate than in distilled water, no doubt because of the salicylate. It was concluded that the sample of lunar soil tested has nutritional value to E. coli and that certain products of fermentation helped to solubilize the lunar soil.

  17. Intramammary challenge with Escherichia coli following immunization with a curli-producing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todhunter, D A; Smith, K L; Hogan, J S; Nelson, L

    1991-03-01

    Holstein and Jersey cattle were immunized with a curli-producing strain of Escherichia coli (pCRL65/A012) or a noncurli-producing strain (pUC18/HB101) to determine differences in resistance to establishment of experimental intramammary infection. Cows (n = 6 per group) were immunized at 14 d prior to drying off, 7 d of involution, and at calving with 3 x 10(10) E. coli in Freund's Incomplete Adjuvant. At 30 d of lactation, one mammary quarter of each cow was infused with a wild strain of E. coli (727). Escherichia coli 727 was isolated from a naturally occurring intramammary infection and produced curli. All challenged quarters became infected, and all cows developed acute clinical mastitis. Geometric mean duration of intramammary infections was 6 d for both immunization groups. All infections were spontaneously eliminated within 10 d. No differences occurred between immunization groups in blood selenium and glutathione peroxidase activity, plasma selenium, number of E. coli 727 isolated from secretion after challenge, rectal temperature and SCC response, clinical status of mammary quarters, or DMI. Reduction in milk production after challenge was greater for cows immunized with E. coli pCRL65/A012. Immunization of dairy cattle with a curli-producing strain of E. coli did not protect against experimental intramammary challenge during lactation.

  18. Ethanol production by Escherichia coli KO11; Producao de etanol por Escherichia coli KO11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Katia Gianni de Carvalho [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas. Lab. de Microbiologia de Alimentos]. E-mail: gianni@usp.br; Takahashi, Caroline Maki; Alterthum, Flavio [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biomedicas. Dept. de Microbiologia

    2002-08-01

    This paper discusses the potential use of Escherichia coli KO11 in production of ethanol, based on observation that this organism can efficiently metabolize sugar complex moistures obtained from the acid hydrolysis of lignocellulose materials such as sugar-cane bagasse, corncob, corn husk, Pinus sp and oak wood.

  19. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli: foe or innocent bystander?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, J; Torres, A G

    2015-08-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) remain one the most important pathogens infecting children and they are one of the main causes of persistent diarrhoea worldwide. Historically, typical EPEC (tEPEC), defined as those isolates with the attaching and effacement (A/E) genotype (eae(+)), which possess bfpA(+) and lack the stx(-) genes are found strongly associated with diarrhoeal cases. However, occurrence of atypical EPEC (aEPEC; eae(+)bfpA(-)stx(-)) in diarrhoeal and asymptomatic hosts has made investigators question the role of these pathogens in human disease. Current epidemiological data are helping to answer the question of whether EPEC is mainly a foe or an innocent bystander during infection.

  20. Escherichia coli fliAZY operon.

    OpenAIRE

    Mytelka, D S; Chamberlin, M J

    1996-01-01

    We have cloned the Escherichia coli fliAZY operon, which contains the fliA gene (the alternative sigma factor sigma F) and two novel genes, fliZ and fliY. Transcriptional mapping of this operon shows two start sites, one of which is preceded by a canonical E sigma F-dependent consensus and is dependent on sigma F for expression in vivo and in vitro. We have overexpressed and purified sigma F and demonstrated that it can direct core polymerase to E sigma F-dependent promoters. FliZ and FliY ar...

  1. Global gene expression in Escherichia coli biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schembri, Mark; Kjærgaard, K.; Klemm, Per

    2003-01-01

    in expression have no current defined function. These genes, as well as those induced by stresses relevant to biofilm growth such as oxygen and nutrient limitation, may be important factors that trigger enhanced resistance mechanisms of sessile communities to antibiotics and hydrodynamic shear forces.......It is now apparent that microorganisms undergo significant changes during the transition from planktonic to biofilm growth. These changes result in phenotypic adaptations that allow the formation of highly organized and structured sessile communities, which possess enhanced resistance...... to antimicrobial treatments and host immune defence responses. Escherichia coli has been used as a model organism to study the mechanisms of growth within adhered communities. In this study, we use DNA microarray technology to examine the global gene expression profile of E. coli during sessile growth compared...

  2. Genes under positive selection in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lise; Bollback, Jonathan P; Dimmic, Matt

    2007-01-01

    We used a comparative genomics approach to identify genes that are under positive selection in six strains of Escherichia coli and Shigella flexneri, including five strains that are human pathogens. We find that positive selection targets a wide range of different functions in the E. coli genome......, including cell surface proteins such as beta barrel porins, presumably because of the involvement of these genes in evolutionary arms races with other bacteria, phages, and/or the host immune system. Structural mapping of positively selected sites on trans-membrane beta barrel porins reveals...... that the residues under positive selection occur almost exclusively in the extracellular region of the proteins that are enriched with sites known to be targets of phages, colicins, or the host immune system. More surprisingly, we also find a number of other categories of genes that show very strong evidence...

  3. Production of recombinant avidin in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airenne, K J; Sarkkinen, P; Punnonen, E L; Kulomaa, M S

    1994-06-24

    A recombinant avidin (re-Avd), containing amino acids (aa) 1-123 of the native chicken egg-white Avd, was produced in Escherichia coli. When cells were grown at 37 degrees C production was over 1 microgram/ml, due to altering the codon preference of the first ten codons. The re-Avd was recovered as a soluble protein from cells grown at 25 or 30 degrees C, whereas at 37 degrees C it was mostly insoluble in inclusion bodies. Our results indicated that, despite the potentially harmful biotin-binding activity of Avd, it is possible to produce biologically active Avd in E. coli which then can easily be purified by affinity chromatography on a biotin column in a single step.

  4. Escherichia coli growth under modeled reduced gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Paul W.; Meyer, Michelle L.; Leff, Laura G.

    2004-01-01

    Bacteria exhibit varying responses to modeled reduced gravity that can be simulated by clino-rotation. When Escherichia coli was subjected to different rotation speeds during clino-rotation, significant differences between modeled reduced gravity and normal gravity controls were observed only at higher speeds (30-50 rpm). There was no apparent affect of removing samples on the results obtained. When E. coli was grown in minimal medium (at 40 rpm), cell size was not affected by modeled reduced gravity and there were few differences in cell numbers. However, in higher nutrient conditions (i.e., dilute nutrient broth), total cell numbers were higher and cells were smaller under reduced gravity compared to normal gravity controls. Overall, the responses to modeled reduced gravity varied with nutrient conditions; larger surface to volume ratios may help compensate for the zone of nutrient depletion around the cells under modeled reduced gravity.

  5. Nationwide surveillance of bacterial pathogens from patients with acute uncomplicated cystitis conducted by the Japanese surveillance committee during 2009 and 2010: antimicrobial susceptibility of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus saprophyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayami, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Kiyohito; Yasuda, Mitsuru; Yamamoto, Shingo; Uehara, Shinya; Hamasuna, Ryoichi; Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Minamitani, Shinichi; Watanabe, Akira; Iwamoto, Aikichi; Totsuka, Kyoichi; Kadota, Junichi; Sunakawa, Keisuke; Sato, Junko; Hanaki, Hideaki; Tsukamoto, Taiji; Kiyota, Hiroshi; Egawa, Shin; Tanaka, Kazushi; Arakawa, Soichi; Fujisawa, Masato; Kumon, Hiromi; Kobayashi, Kanao; Matsubara, Akio; Naito, Seiji; Tatsugami, Katsunori; Yamaguchi, Takamasa; Ito, Shin; Kanokogi, Mototsugu; Narita, Harunori; Kawano, Hiromi; Hosobe, Takahide; Takayama, Kazuo; Sumii, Toru; Fujii, Akira; Sato, Takashi; Yamauchi, Takamine; Izumitani, Masanobu; Chokyu, Hirofumi; Ihara, Hideari; Akiyama, Kikuo; Yoshioka, Masaru; Uno, Satoshi; Monden, Koichi; Kano, Motonori; Kaji, Shinichi; Kawai, Shuichi; Ito, Kenji; Inatomi, Hisato; Nishimura, Hirofumi; Ikuyama, Toshihiro; Nishi, Shohei; Takahashi, Koichi; Kawano, Yukihiro; Ishihara, Satoshi; Tsuneyoshi, Kengo; Matsushita, Shinji; Yamane, Takashi; Hirose, Takaoki; Fujihiro, Shigeru; Endo, Katsuhisa; Oka, Yasuhiko; Takeyama, Koh; Kimura, Takahiro; Uemura, Tetsuji

    2013-06-01

    The Japanese surveillance committee conducted the first nationwide surveillance of antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of uropathogens responsible for female acute uncomplicated cystitis at 43 hospitals throughout Japan from April 2009 to November 2010. In this study, the causative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus saprophyticus) and their susceptibility to various antimicrobial agents were investigated by isolation and culturing of bacteria from urine samples. In total, 387 strains were isolated from 461 patients, including E. coli (n = 301, 77.8 %), S. saprophyticus (n = 20, 5.2 %), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 13, 3.4 %), and Enterococcus faecalis (n = 11, 2.8 %). S. saprophyticus was significantly more common in premenopausal women (P = 0.00095). The minimum inhibitory concentrations of 19 antibacterial agents used for these strains were determined according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute manual. At least 87 % of E. coli isolates showed susceptibility to fluoroquinolones and cephalosporins, and 100 % of S. saprophyticus isolates showed susceptibility to fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides. The proportions of fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli strains and extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing E. coli strains were 13.3 % and 4.7 %, respectively. It is important to confirm the susceptibility of causative bacteria for optimal antimicrobial therapy, and empiric antimicrobial agents should be selected by considering patient characteristics and other factors. However, the number of isolates of fluoroquinolone-resistant or ESBL-producing strains in gram-negative bacilli may be increasing in patients with urinary tract infections (UTIs) in Japan. Therefore, these data present important information for the proper treatment of UTIs and will serve as a useful reference for future surveillance studies.

  6. Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, P S; Griffin, P M

    1998-10-10

    Escherichia coli O157 was first identified as a human pathogen in 1982. One of several Shiga toxin-producing serotypes known to cause human illness, the organism probably evolved through horizontal acquisition of genes for Shiga toxins and other virulence factors. E. coli O157 is found regularly in the faeces of healthy cattle, and is transmitted to humans through contaminated food, water, and direct contact with infected people or animals. Human infection is associated with a wide range of clinical illness, including asymptomatic shedding, non-bloody diarrhoea, haemorrhagic colitis, haemolytic uraemic syndrome, and death. Since laboratory practices vary, physicians need to know whether laboratories in their area routinely test for E. coli O157 in stool specimens. Treatment with antimicrobial agents remains controversial: some studies suggest that treatment may precipitate haemolytic uraemic syndrome, and other studies suggest no effect or even a protective effect. Physicians can help to prevent E. coli O157 infections by counselling patients about the hazards of consuming undercooked ground meat or unpasteurised milk products and juices, and about the importance of handwashing to prevent the spread of diarrhoeal illness, and by informing public-health authorities when they see unusual numbers of cases of bloody diarrhoea or haemolytic uraemic syndrome.

  7. Engineering Escherichia coli for methanol conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Jonas E N; Meyer, Fabian; Litsanov, Boris; Kiefer, Patrick; Potthoff, Eva; Heux, Stéphanie; Quax, Wim J; Wendisch, Volker F; Brautaset, Trygve; Portais, Jean-Charles; Vorholt, Julia A

    2015-03-01

    Methylotrophic bacteria utilize methanol and other reduced one-carbon compounds as their sole source of carbon and energy. For this purpose, these bacteria evolved a number of specialized enzymes and pathways. Here, we used a synthetic biology approach to select and introduce a set of "methylotrophy genes" into Escherichia coli based on in silico considerations and flux balance analysis to enable methanol dissimilation and assimilation. We determined that the most promising approach allowing the utilization of methanol was the implementation of NAD-dependent methanol dehydrogenase and the establishment of the ribulose monophosphate cycle by expressing the genes for hexulose-6-phosphate synthase (Hps) and 6-phospho-3-hexuloisomerase (Phi). To test for the best-performing enzymes in the heterologous host, a number of enzyme candidates from different donor organisms were selected and systematically analyzed for their in vitro and in vivo activities in E. coli. Among these, Mdh2, Hps and Phi originating from Bacillus methanolicus were found to be the most effective. Labeling experiments using (13)C methanol with E. coli producing these enzymes showed up to 40% incorporation of methanol into central metabolites. The presence of the endogenous glutathione-dependent formaldehyde oxidation pathway of E. coli did not adversely affect the methanol conversion rate. Taken together, the results of this study represent a major advancement towards establishing synthetic methylotrophs by gene transfer.

  8. Escherichia coli as a bioreporter in ecotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbens, Johan; Dardenne, Freddy; Devriese, Lisa; De Coen, Wim; Blust, Ronny

    2010-11-01

    Ecotoxicological assessment relies to a large extent on the information gathered with surrogate species and the extrapolation of test results across species and different levels of biological organisation. Bacteria have long been used as a bioreporter for genotoxic testing and general toxicity. Today, it is clear that bacteria have the potential for screening of other toxicological endpoints. Escherichia coli has been studied for years; in-depth knowledge of its biochemistry and genetics makes it the most proficient prokaryote for the development of new toxicological assays. Several assays have been designed with E. coli as a bioreporter, and the recent trend to develop novel, better advanced reporters makes bioreporter development one of the most dynamic in ecotoxicology. Based on in-depth knowledge of E. coli, new assays are being developed or existing ones redesigned, thanks to the availability of new reporter genes and new or improved substrates. The technological evolution towards easier and more sensitive detection of different gene products is another important aspect. Often, this requires the redesign of the bacterium to make it compatible with the novel measuring tests. Recent advances in surface chemistry and nanoelectronics open the perspective for advanced reporter based on novel measuring platforms and with an online potential. In this article, we will discuss the use of E. coli-based bioreporters in ecotoxicological applications as well as some innovative sensors awaited for the future.

  9. Cotrimoxazole treats fluoroquinolone-resistant Salmonella typhi H58 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Manan; Pandit, Sarbagya; Baker, Stephen; Basnyat, Buddha

    2016-10-26

    A woman aged 20 years presented with fever and no localising signs. She was treated with cotrimoxazole and the subsequent blood culture was positive for Salmonella typhi (S. typhi), which was resistant to fluoroquinolones but susceptible to cotrimoxazole. Genotyping identified an FQ-R subclade of H58 S. typhi Fever clearance time was 4 days after starting the antibiotics, and no relapses were noted on 2 months of follow-up. This inexpensive, well-known and easily available antimicrobial could be suitably redeployed for fluoroquinolone-resistant enteric fever in South Asia.

  10. SOS response and its regulation on the fluoroquinolone resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ting-Ting; Kang, Hai-Quan; Ma, Ping; Li, Peng-Peng; Huang, Lin-Yan; Gu, Bing

    2015-12-01

    Bacteria can survive fluoroquinolone antibiotics (FQs) treatment by becoming resistant through a genetic change-mutation or gene acquisition. The SOS response is widespread among bacteria and exhibits considerable variation in its composition and regulation, which is repressed by LexA protein and derepressed by RecA protein. Here, we take a comprehensive review of the SOS gene network and its regulation on the fluoroquinolone resistance. As a unique survival mechanism, SOS may be an important factor influencing the outcome of antibiotic therapy in vivo.

  11. Chromatin architecture and gene expression in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willenbrock, Hanni; Ussery, David

    2004-01-01

    Two recent genome-scale analyses underscore the importance of DNA topology and chromatin structure in regulating transcription in Escherichia coli.......Two recent genome-scale analyses underscore the importance of DNA topology and chromatin structure in regulating transcription in Escherichia coli....

  12. Escherichia coli O157 infections and unpasteurised milk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allerberger, F; Wagner, M; Schweiger, P; Rammer, H P; Resch, A; Dierich, M P; Friedrich, A W; Karch, H

    2001-01-01

    We report on two children with Escherichia coli O157 infection, one of whom developed haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS). Both had drunk raw cows or goats milk in the week before their illness. Molecular subtyping identified a sorbitol fermenting Escherichia coli O157:H isolate from a dairy cow. This

  13. Escherichia coli O157 infections and unpasteurised milk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allerberger, F; Wagner, M; Schweiger, P; Rammer, H P; Resch, A; Dierich, M P; Friedrich, A W; Karch, H

    2001-01-01

    We report on two children with Escherichia coli O157 infection, one of whom developed haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS). Both had drunk raw cows or goats milk in the week before their illness. Molecular subtyping identified a sorbitol fermenting Escherichia coli O157:H isolate from a dairy cow. This

  14. Production of glycoprotein vaccines in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihssen Julian

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conjugate vaccines in which polysaccharide antigens are covalently linked to carrier proteins belong to the most effective and safest vaccines against bacterial pathogens. State-of-the art production of conjugate vaccines using chemical methods is a laborious, multi-step process. In vivo enzymatic coupling using the general glycosylation pathway of Campylobacter jejuni in recombinant Escherichia coli has been suggested as a simpler method for producing conjugate vaccines. In this study we describe the in vivo biosynthesis of two novel conjugate vaccine candidates against Shigella dysenteriae type 1, an important bacterial pathogen causing severe gastro-intestinal disease states mainly in developing countries. Results Two different periplasmic carrier proteins, AcrA from C. jejuni and a toxoid form of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin were glycosylated with Shigella O antigens in E. coli. Starting from shake flask cultivation in standard complex medium a lab-scale fed-batch process was developed for glycoconjugate production. It was found that efficiency of glycosylation but not carrier protein expression was highly susceptible to the physiological state at induction. After induction glycoconjugates generally appeared later than unglycosylated carrier protein, suggesting that glycosylation was the rate-limiting step for synthesis of conjugate vaccines in E. coli. Glycoconjugate synthesis, in particular expression of oligosaccharyltransferase PglB, strongly inhibited growth of E. coli cells after induction, making it necessary to separate biomass growth and recombinant protein expression phases. With a simple pulse and linear feed strategy and the use of semi-defined glycerol medium, volumetric glycoconjugate yield was increased 30 to 50-fold. Conclusions The presented data demonstrate that glycosylated proteins can be produced in recombinant E. coli at a larger scale. The described methodologies constitute an important step

  15. Prevalence of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli in suckling rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) in suckling rabbit causes collibacillosis, which is characterized by sever yellow diarrhea, poor growth and high mortalities. This study was undertaken to investigate the prevalence of diarrheagenic E. coli in suckling rabbits in Egypt. Additionally, expression of some virulence-associated genes in the isolated E. coli serotypes were examined using the polymerase chain reaction. Finally, antibiogram of the identified E. coli serotypes was also investig...

  16. Methane production from kitchen waste using Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayalakshmi, S; Joseph, Kurian; Sukumaran, V

    2007-04-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain isolated from biogas plant sludge was examined for its ability to enhance biogas from kitchen waste during solid phase anaerobic digestion. The laboratory experiments were conducted for total solid concentrations of 20% and 22%. Kitchen waste was characterized for physico-chemical parameters and laboratory experiments were conducted with and without E. coli strain. It was found that the reactor with E. coli produced 17% more biogas than the reactors that are operated without E. coli strain.

  17. Molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolones resistance in Mycoplasma hominis clinical isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Dong-Ya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolones resistance in Mycoplasma hominis (MH clinical strains isolated from urogenital specimens. 15 MH clinical isolates with different phenotypes of resistance to fluoroquinolones antibiotics were screened for mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs of DNA gyrase (gyrA and gyrB and topoisomerase IV (parC and parE in comparison with the reference strain PG21, which is susceptible to fluoroquinolones antibiotics. 15 MH isolates with three kinds of quinolone resistance phenotypes were obtained. Thirteen out of these quinolone-resistant isolates were found to carry nucleotide substitutions in either gyrA or parC. There were no alterations in gyrB and no mutations were found in the isolates with a phenotype of resistance to Ofloxacin (OFX, intermediate resistant to Levofloxacin (LVX and Sparfloxacin (SFX, and those susceptible to all three tested antibiotics. The molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolone resistance in clinical isolates of MH was reported in this study. The single amino acid mutation in ParC of MH may relate to the resistance to OFX and LVX and the high-level resistance to fluoroquinolones for MH is likely associated with mutations in both DNA gyrase and the ParC subunit of topoisomerase IV.

  18. Molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolones resistance in Mycoplasma hominis clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Dong-Ya; Sun, Chang-Jian; Yu, Jing-Bo; Ma, Jun; Xue, Wen-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolones resistance in Mycoplasma hominis (MH) clinical strains isolated from urogenital specimens. 15 MH clinical isolates with different phenotypes of resistance to fluoroquinolones antibiotics were screened for mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of DNA gyrase (gyrA and gyrB) and topoisomerase IV (parC and parE) in comparison with the reference strain PG21, which is susceptible to fluoroquinolones antibiotics. 15 MH isolates with three kinds of quinolone resistance phenotypes were obtained. Thirteen out of these quinolone-resistant isolates were found to carry nucleotide substitutions in either gyrA or parC. There were no alterations in gyrB and no mutations were found in the isolates with a phenotype of resistance to Ofloxacin (OFX), intermediate resistant to Levofloxacin (LVX) and Sparfloxacin (SFX), and those susceptible to all three tested antibiotics. The molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolone resistance in clinical isolates of MH was reported in this study. The single amino acid mutation in ParC of MH may relate to the resistance to OFX and LVX and the high-level resistance to fluoroquinolones for MH is likely associated with mutations in both DNA gyrase and the ParC subunit of topoisomerase IV.

  19. Fluoroquinolone resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae from a university hospital, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srifuengfung, Somporn; Tribuddharat, Chanwit; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Comerungsee, Sopita

    2010-11-01

    The most frequent markers of fluoroquinolone resistance in S. pneumoniae are chromosomal mutations in the quinolone-resistance-determining regions of DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV encoding for the gyrA, gyrB and parC, parE genes. In 2008, 6.5% of the Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates in a Bangkok university hospital were resistant to ofloxacin. Using PCR and DNA sequencing, we identified mutations in both the gyrA and parC genes of four ofloxacin- and ciprofloxacin-resistant S. pneumoniae isolates (minimum inhibitory concentrations > 32 microg/ml). Mutations were found in the gyrA gene at positions Ser81Phe, Glu85Gly, Glu85Lys and in the parC gene at position Ser79Tyr. Three isolates had mutations in both genes. Two of the isolates were serotype 6B and two were serotypes not contained in currently licensed pneumococcal vaccines. This is the first report of the mechanisms of fluoroquinolone resistance in S. pneumoniae in Thailand.

  20. Long term effects of Escherichia coli mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Shlomo E; Heller, Elimelech D; Leitner, Gabriel

    2014-07-01

    Escherichia coli is one of the most frequently diagnosed causes of bovine mastitis, and is typically associated with acute, clinical mastitis. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the long term effects of intramammary infections by E. coli on milk yield and quality, especially milk coagulation. Twenty-four Israeli Holstein cows diagnosed with clinical mastitis due to intramammary infection by E. coli were used in this study. Mean lactation number, days in milk (DIM) and daily milk yield (DMY) at the time of infection was 3.3 ± 1.3, 131.7 days ± 78.6 and 45.7 L ± 8.4, respectively. DMY, milk constituents, somatic cells count (SCC), differential leukocytes count and coagulation parameters were subsequently assessed. Two patterns of inflammation were identified: 'short inflammation', characterized by 15% decrease in DMY and >30 days to reach a new maximum DMY (n = 19). The estimated mean loss of marketable milk during the study was 200 L/cow for 'short inflammation' cases, and 1,500 L/cow for 'long inflammation' ones. Significant differences between 'short' and 'long inflammation' effects were found in almost all parameters studied. Long-term detrimental effects on milk quality were found regardless of clinical or bacteriological cure of affected glands.

  1. Cyclomodulins in urosepsis strains of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Damien; Delmas, Julien; Cady, Anne; Robin, Frédéric; Sivignon, Adeline; Oswald, Eric; Bonnet, Richard

    2010-06-01

    Determinants of urosepsis in Escherichia coli remain incompletely defined. Cyclomodulins (CMs) are a growing functional family of toxins that hijack the eukaryotic cell cycle. Four cyclomodulin types are actually known in E. coli: cytotoxic necrotizing factors (CNFs), cycle-inhibiting factor (Cif), cytolethal distending toxins (CDTs), and the pks-encoded toxin. In the present study, the distribution of CM-encoding genes and the functionality of these toxins were investigated in 197 E. coli strains isolated from patients with community-acquired urosepsis (n = 146) and from uninfected subjects (n = 51). This distribution was analyzed in relation to the phylogenetic background, clinical origin, and antibiotic resistance of the strains. It emerged from this study that strains harboring the pks island and the cnf1 gene (i) were strongly associated with the B2 phylogroup (P, urosepsis origin (P, urosepsis groups, suggesting that the pks island is more important for the colonization process and the cnf1 gene for virulence. pks- or cnf1-harboring strains were significantly associated with susceptibility to antibiotics (amoxicillin, cotrimoxazole, and quinolones [P, <0.001 to 0.043]). Otherwise, only 6% and 1% of all strains harbored the cdtB and cif genes, respectively, with no particular distribution by phylogenetic background, antimicrobial susceptibility, or clinical origin.

  2. Mutant-prevention concentration and mechanism of resistance in clinical isolates and enrofloxacin/marbofloxacin-selected mutants of Escherichia coli of canine origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebru, Elias; Choi, Myung-Jin; Lee, Seung-Jin; Damte, Dereje; Park, Seung Chun

    2011-10-01

    The antibacterial activity and selection of resistant bacteria, along with mechanisms of fluoroquinolone resistance, were investigated by integrating the static [MIC or mutant-prevention concentration (MPC)] and in vitro dynamic model approaches using Escherichia coli isolates from diseased dogs. Using the dynamic models, selected E. coli strains and enrofloxacin and marbofloxacin at a range of simulated area under concentration-time curve over a 24 h interval (AUC(24 h))/MIC ratios were investigated. Our results indicated increasing losses in susceptibility of E. coli upon continuous exposure to enrofloxacin and marbofloxacin in vitro. This effect was transferable to other fluoroquinolones, as well as to structurally unrelated drugs. Our results also confirmed an AUC(24 h)/MIC (AUC(24 h)/MPC)-dependent antibacterial activity and selection of resistant E. coli mutants, in which maximum losses in fluoroquinolone susceptibility occurred at simulated AUC(24 h)/MIC ratios of 40-60. AUC(24 h)/MPC ratios of 39 (enrofloxacin) and 32 (marbofloxacin) were considered protective against the selection of resistant mutants of E. coli. Integrating our MIC and MPC data with published pharmacokinetic information in dogs revealed a better effect of the conventional dosing regimen of marbofloxacin than that of enrofloxacin in restricting the selection of resistant mutants of E. coli. Target mutations, especially at codon 83 (serine to leucine) of gyrA, and overexpression of efflux pumps contributed to resistance development in both clinically resistant and in vitro-selected mutants of E. coli. We also report here a previously undescribed mutation at codon 116 of parC in two laboratory-derived resistant mutants of E. coli. Additional studies would determine the exact role of this mutation in fluoroquinolone susceptibility, as well as establish the importance of our findings in the clinical setting.

  3. Transport of Escherichia coli in saturated porous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foppen, J.W.A.

    2007-01-01

    Over de manier waarop de bacterie en tevens meest bekende fecale indicator soort Escherichia coli getransporteerd wordt in grondwater is relatief weinig bekend. In deze studie wordt de verwijdering van E. coli uit grondwater ten gevolge van E. coli - sediment interacties bestudeerd en modelmatig

  4. Transport of Escherichia coli in saturated porous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foppen, J.W.A.

    2007-01-01

    Over de manier waarop de bacterie en tevens meest bekende fecale indicator soort Escherichia coli getransporteerd wordt in grondwater is relatief weinig bekend. In deze studie wordt de verwijdering van E. coli uit grondwater ten gevolge van E. coli - sediment interacties bestudeerd en modelmatig ge

  5. WGS accurately predicts antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objectives: To determine the effectiveness of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) in identifying resistance genotypes of multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli) and whether these correlate with observed phenotypes. Methods: Seventy-six E. coli strains were isolated from farm cattle and measured f...

  6. Transport of Escherichia coli in saturated porous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foppen, J.W.A.

    2007-01-01

    Over de manier waarop de bacterie en tevens meest bekende fecale indicator soort Escherichia coli getransporteerd wordt in grondwater is relatief weinig bekend. In deze studie wordt de verwijdering van E. coli uit grondwater ten gevolge van E. coli - sediment interacties bestudeerd en modelmatig ge

  7. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli Markers and Phenotypes among Fecal E. coli Isolates Collected from Nicaraguan Infants ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Reyes, Daniel; Vilchez, Samuel; Paniagua, Margarita; Colque-Navarro, Patricia; Weintraub, Andrej; Möllby, Roland; Kühn, Inger

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed the prevalence of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) markers and common phenotypes in 2,164 E. coli isolates from 282 DEC-positive samples. Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) and enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) were very diverse and were not correlated with diarrhea. Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) estA and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) belonged to a few phenotypes and were significantly correlated with diarrhea.

  8. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli Markers and Phenotypes among Fecal E. coli Isolates Collected from Nicaraguan Infants ▿

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed the prevalence of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) markers and common phenotypes in 2,164 E. coli isolates from 282 DEC-positive samples. Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) and enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) were very diverse and were not correlated with diarrhea. Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) estA and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) belonged to a few phenotypes and were significantly correlated with diarrhea.

  9. Initiation of Replication in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimodt-Møller, Jakob

    The circular chromosome of Escherichia coli is replicated by two replisomes assembled at the unique origin and moving in the opposite direction until they meet in the less well defined terminus. The key protein in initiation of replication, DnaA, facilitates the unwinding of double-stranded DNA...... to single-stranded DNA in oriC. Although DnaA is able to bind both ADP and ATP, DnaA is only active in initiation when bound to ATP. Although initiation of replication, and the regulation of this, is thoroughly investigated it is still not fully understood. The overall aim of the thesis was to investigate...... the regulation of initiation, the effect on the cell when regulation fails, and if regulation was interlinked to chromosomal organization. This thesis uncovers that there exists a subtle balance between chromosome replication and reactive oxygen species (ROS) inflicted DNA damage. Thus, failure in regulation...

  10. The eclipse period of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Freiesleben, Ulrik; Krekling, Martin A.; Hansen, Flemming G.

    2000-01-01

    The minimal time between successive initiations on the same origin (the eclipse) in Escherichia coli was determined to be approximately 25-30 min. An inverse relationship was found between the length of the eclipse and the amount of Dam methyltransferase in the cell, indicating that the eclipse...... corresponds to the period of origin hemimethylation. The SeqA protein was absolutely required for the eclipse, and DnaA titration studies suggested that the SeqA protein prevented the binding of multiple DnaA molecules on oriC (initial complex formation). No correlation between the amount of SeqA and eclipse...... length was revealed, but increased SeqA levels affected chromosome partitioning and/or cell division. This was corroborated further by an aberrant nucleoid distribution in SeqA-deficient cells. We suggest that the SeqA protein's role in maintaining the eclipse is tied to a function in chromosome...

  11. Escherichia coli in chronic inflammatory bowel diseases: An update on adherent invasive Escherichia coli pathogenicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Margarita; Martinez-Medina; Librado; Jesus; Garcia-Gil

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli(E. coli), and particularly the adherent invasive E. coli(AIEC) pathotype, has been increasingly implicated in the ethiopathogenesis of Crohn’s disease(CD). E. coli strains with similar pathogenic features to AIEC have been associated with other intestinal disorders such as ulcerative colitis, colorectal cancer, and coeliac disease, but AIEC prevalence in these diseases remains largely unexplored. Since AIEC was described one decade ago, substantial progress has been made in deciphering its mechanisms of pathogenicity. However, the molecular bases that characterize the phenotypic properties of this pathotype are still not well resolved. A review of studies focused on E. coli populations in inflammatory bowel disease(IBD) is presented here and we discuss about the putative role of this species on each IBD subtype. Given the relevance of AIEC in CD pathogenesis, we present the latest research findings concerning AIEC host-microbe interactions and pathogenicity. We also review the existing data regarding the prevalence and abundance of AIEC in CD and its association with other intestinal diseases from humans and animals, in order to discuss the AIEC disease- and hostspecificity. Finally, we highlight the fact that dietarycomponents frequently found in industrialized countries may enhance AIEC colonization in the gut, which merits further investigation and the implementation of preventative measures.

  12. Escherichia coli biofilms: Accepting the therapeutic challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trupti Bajpai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Urinary tract infections (UTI′s are a major public health concern globally. Recurrent UTI′s that are predominantly caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli′s forms biofilm that is an intracellular, structured bacterial community, enclosed in a self-produced matrix, adherent to an inert, or living surface. Biofilm physiology is characterized by increased tolerance to stress, antibiotics, and immunological defenses, which is at the origin of their resilience in most medical and industrial settings. Materials and Methods: The present prospective study was carried out from December 2013 to May 2014 in the Department of Microbiology of a Teaching Tertiary Care hospital located in central India. A total of 100 consecutive, nonrepetitive E. coli isolates were subjected to biofilm formation study by Christensen′s tube adherence method. All the isolates were also subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method in accordance with the Clinical Laboratory Standard Institute 2013 guidelines. Results and Discussion: Out of the 100 E. coli isolates studied, 62 (62% were positive for biofilm formation. High percentage of resistance was detected in isolates among the male inpatient group. Overall drug resistance was found to be very high among both biofilm as well as nonbiofilm forming isolates indicating excessive drug resistance among both community and hospital organisms. Conclusion: A greater understanding of the nature of biofilm organisms in chronic UTI′s would help in the development of novel and more effective treatments for these problematic diseases.

  13. Expanding ester biosynthesis in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Gabriel M; Tashiro, Yohei; Atsumi, Shota

    2014-04-01

    To expand the capabilities of whole-cell biocatalysis, we have engineered Escherichia coli to produce various esters. The alcohol O-acyltransferase (ATF) class of enzyme uses acyl-CoA units for ester formation. The release of free CoA upon esterification with an alcohol provides the free energy to facilitate ester formation. The diversity of CoA molecules found in nature in combination with various alcohol biosynthetic pathways allows for the biosynthesis of a multitude of esters. Small to medium volatile esters have extensive applications in the flavor, fragrance, cosmetic, solvent, paint and coating industries. The present work enables the production of these compounds by designing several ester pathways in E. coli. The engineered pathways generated acetate esters of ethyl, propyl, isobutyl, 2-methyl-1-butyl, 3-methyl-1-butyl and 2-phenylethyl alcohols. In particular, we achieved high-level production of isobutyl acetate from glucose (17.2 g l(-1)). This strategy was expanded to realize pathways for tetradecyl acetate and several isobutyrate esters.

  14. The crystal structure Escherichia coli Spy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Eunju; Kim, Dong Young; Gross, Carol A; Gross, John D; Kim, Kyeong Kyu

    2010-11-01

    Escherichia coli spheroplast protein y (EcSpy) is a small periplasmic protein that is homologous with CpxP, an inhibitor of the extracytoplasmic stress response. Stress conditions such as spheroplast formation induce the expression of Spy via the Cpx or the Bae two-component systems in E. coli, though the function of Spy is unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of EcSpy, which reveals a long kinked hairpin-like structure of four α-helices that form an antiparallel dimer. The dimer contains a curved oval shape with a highly positively charged concave surface that may function as a ligand binding site. Sequence analysis reveals that Spy is highly conserved over the Enterobacteriaceae family. Notably, three conserved regions that contain identical residues and two LTxxQ motifs are placed at the horizontal end of the dimer structure, stabilizing the overall fold. CpxP also contains the conserved sequence motifs and has a predicted secondary structure similar to Spy, suggesting that Spy and CpxP likely share the same fold.

  15. Independence of replisomes in Escherichia coli chromosomalreplication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breier, Adam M.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Cozzarelli, Nicholas R.

    2005-03-13

    In Escherichia coli DNA replication is carried out by the coordinated action of the proteins within a replisome. After replication initiation, the two bidirectionally oriented replisomes from a single origin are colocalized into higher-order structures termed replication factories. The factory model postulated that the two replisomes are also functionally coupled. We tested this hypothesis by using DNA combing and whole-genome microarrays. Nascent DNA surrounding oriC in single, combed chromosomes showed instead that one replisome, usually the leftward one, was significantly ahead of the other 70% of the time. We next used microarrays to follow replication throughout the genome by measuring DNA copy number. We found in multiple E. coli strains that the replisomes are independent, with the leftward replisome ahead of the rightward one. The size of the bias was strain-specific, varying from 50 to 130 kb in the array results. When we artificially blocked one replisome, the other continued unabated, again demonstrating independence. We suggest an improved version of the factory model that retains the advantages of threading DNA through colocalized replisomes at about equal rates, but allows the cell flexibility to overcome obstacles encountered during elongation.

  16. Biosynthesis of ethylene glycol in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huaiwei; Ramos, Kristine Rose M; Valdehuesa, Kris Niño G; Nisola, Grace M; Lee, Won-Keun; Chung, Wook-Jin

    2013-04-01

    Ethylene glycol (EG) is an important platform chemical with steadily expanding global demand. Its commercial production is currently limited to fossil resources; no biosynthesis route has been delineated. Herein, a biosynthesis route for EG production from D-xylose is reported. This route consists of four steps: D-xylose → D-xylonate → 2-dehydro-3-deoxy-D-pentonate → glycoaldehyde → EG. Respective enzymes, D-xylose dehydrogenase, D-xylonate dehydratase, 2-dehydro-3-deoxy-D-pentonate aldolase, and glycoaldehyde reductase, were assembled. The route was implemented in a metabolically engineered Escherichia coli, in which the D-xylose → D-xylulose reaction was prevented by disrupting the D-xylose isomerase gene. The most efficient construct produced 11.7 g L(-1) of EG from 40.0 g L(-1) of D-xylose. Glycolate is a carbon-competing by-product during EG production in E. coli; blockage of glycoaldehyde → glycolate reaction was also performed by disrupting the gene encoding aldehyde dehydrogenase, but from this approach, EG productivity was not improved but rather led to D-xylonate accumulation. To channel more carbon flux towards EG than the glycolate pathway, further systematic metabolic engineering and fermentation optimization studies are still required to improve EG productivity.

  17. The extracellular RNA complement of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Anubrata; Upadhyaya, Bimal Babu; Fritz, Joëlle V; Heintz-Buschart, Anna; Desai, Mahesh S; Yusuf, Dilmurat; Huang, David; Baumuratov, Aidos; Wang, Kai; Galas, David; Wilmes, Paul

    2015-01-21

    The secretion of biomolecules into the extracellular milieu is a common and well-conserved phenomenon in biology. In bacteria, secreted biomolecules are not only involved in intra-species communication but they also play roles in inter-kingdom exchanges and pathogenicity. To date, released products, such as small molecules, DNA, peptides, and proteins, have been well studied in bacteria. However, the bacterial extracellular RNA complement has so far not been comprehensively characterized. Here, we have analyzed, using a combination of physical characterization and high-throughput sequencing, the extracellular RNA complement of both outer membrane vesicle (OMV)-associated and OMV-free RNA of the enteric Gram-negative model bacterium Escherichia coli K-12 substrain MG1655 and have compared it to its intracellular RNA complement. Our results demonstrate that a large part of the extracellular RNA complement is in the size range between 15 and 40 nucleotides and is derived from specific intracellular RNAs. Furthermore, RNA is associated with OMVs and the relative abundances of RNA biotypes in the intracellular, OMV and OMV-free fractions are distinct. Apart from rRNA fragments, a significant portion of the extracellular RNA complement is composed of specific cleavage products of functionally important structural noncoding RNAs, including tRNAs, 4.5S RNA, 6S RNA, and tmRNA. In addition, the extracellular RNA pool includes RNA biotypes from cryptic prophages, intergenic, and coding regions, of which some are so far uncharacterised, for example, transcripts mapping to the fimA-fimL and ves-spy intergenic regions. Our study provides the first detailed characterization of the extracellular RNA complement of the enteric model bacterium E. coli. Analogous to findings in eukaryotes, our results suggest the selective export of specific RNA biotypes by E. coli, which in turn indicates a potential role for extracellular bacterial RNAs in intercellular communication. © 2015 The

  18. Escherichia coli Pathotypes Occupy Distinct Niches in the Mouse Intestine

    OpenAIRE

    Jessica P Meador; Caldwell, Matthew E.; Cohen, Paul S.; Conway, Tyrrell

    2014-01-01

    Since the first step of the infection process is colonization of the host, it is important to understand how Escherichia coli pathogens successfully colonize the intestine. We previously showed that enterohemorrhagic O157:H7 strain E. coli EDL933 colonizes a niche in the streptomycin-treated mouse intestine that is distinct from that of human commensal strains, which explains how E. coli EDL933 overcomes colonization resistance imparted by some, but not all, commensal E. coli strains. Here we...

  19. General considerations regarding the infections with the Escherichia coli pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Necşulescu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli is the species of the genus Escherichia with the greatest epidemiological impact. Escherichia coli infections are found mainly in places with poor hygiene; the infants with ages between 1 and 3 years old are included in the category with the highest risk. It is a "fecal-oral" transmission mechanism as a result of consumption of contaminated food or water, or by "dirty hands". The foods most commonly implicated in the transmission of the infection are unpasteurized milk and milk products, beef, especially the one insufficiently cooked, unpasteurized fruit juice, lettuce and insufficiently washed vegetables. The disease has been reported worldwide, being described numerous episodes of infection with Escherichia coli that caused multiple illnesses and deaths. Escherichia coli has three types of antigens: antigen "O" (somatic, antigen "H" (flagella and antigen "K" (capsular. Clinical manifestations are present in the form of non-specific diarrhea, a dysentery form of enteritis, choleriform enteritis, hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS. The Escherichia coli infection diagnosis is made by identifying the etiologic agent and/or by highlighting the VTI toxin in the feces. The treatment consists in precautionary antibiotherapy, hydrodynamics and electrolyte rebalancing, blood transfusions and dialysis, if in the case of renal failure. The prevention of infections with Escherichia coli is achieved by personal hygiene, food hygiene and work hygiene.

  20. Tackling Drug Resistant Infection Outbreaks of Global Pandemic Escherichia coli ST131 Using Evolutionary and Epidemiological Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Tim

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput molecular screening is required to investigate the origin and diffusion of antimicrobial resistance in pathogen outbreaks. The most frequent cause of human infection is Escherichia coli, which is dominated by sequence type 131 (ST131)—a set of rapidly radiating pandemic clones. The highly infectious clades of ST131 originated firstly by a mutation enhancing conjugation and adhesion. Secondly, single-nucleotide polymorphisms occurred enabling fluoroquinolone-resistance, which is near-fixed in all ST131. Thirdly, broader resistance through beta-lactamases has been gained and lost frequently, symptomatic of conflicting environmental selective effects. This flexible approach to gene exchange is worrying and supports the proposition that ST131 will develop an even wider range of plasmid and chromosomal elements promoting antimicrobial resistance. To stop ST131, deep genome sequencing is required to understand the origin, evolution and spread of antimicrobial resistance genes. Phylogenetic methods that decipher past events can predict future patterns of virulence and transmission based on genetic signatures of adaptation and gene exchange. Both the effect of partial antimicrobial exposure and cell dormancy caused by variation in gene expression may accelerate the development of resistance. High-throughput sequencing can decode measurable evolution of cell populations within patients associated with systems-wide changes in gene expression during treatments. A multi-faceted approach can enhance assessment of antimicrobial resistance in E. coli ST131 by examining transmission dynamics between hosts to achieve a goal of pre-empting resistance before it emerges by optimising antimicrobial treatment protocols. PMID:27682088

  1. Dynamics of Escherichia coli Chromosome Segregation during Multifork Replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Jørck; Youngren, Brenda; Hansen, Flemming G.

    2007-01-01

    Slowly growing Escherichia coli cells have a simple cell cycle, with replication and progressive segregation of the chromosome completed before cell division. In rapidly growing cells, initiation of replication occurs before the previous replication rounds are complete. At cell division...

  2. The incidence and antibiotics susceptibility of Escherichia coli O157 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-02-22

    Feb 22, 2010 ... The incidence of Escherichia coli 0157: H7 was assessed in meat samples from .... of this product resulting from contamination with STEC, a zoonotic .... Adak GK, Longs SM, O'Briens SJ (2002) Trends in indigenous forborne.

  3. mcr-1 identified in Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nicolle Lima Barbieri; Daniel W Nielsen; Yvonne Wannemuehler; Tia Cavender; Ashraf Hussein; Shi-gan Yan; Lisa K Nolan; Catherine M Logue

    2017-01-01

    .... Here, we examined a collection (n = 980) of Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) isolated from poultry with colibacillosis from the US and internationally for the presence of mcr-1 and mcr-2, genes known to encode colistin resistance...

  4. Overexpression of vsr in Escherichia coli is mutagenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiron, K M; Viau, S; Koutroumanis, M; Cupples, C G

    1996-01-01

    Overexpression of vsr in Escherichia coli stimulates transition and frameshift mutations. The pattern of mutations suggests that mutagenesis is due to saturation or inactivation of dam-directed mismatch repair. PMID:8763960

  5. Norfloxacin resistance in a clinical isolate of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Aoyama, H; Sato, K; Kato, T.; Hirai, K; Mitsuhashi, S.

    1987-01-01

    Analysis of DNA gyrase supercoiling and of norfloxacin uptake in Escherichia coli GN14176, a moderately norfloxacin-resistant clinical isolate, indicated that resistance was associated with both an altered drug target and a reduction in drug uptake.

  6. Shigella strains are not clones of Escherichia coli but sister species in the genus Escherichia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Guanghong; Xu, Zhao; Hao, Bailin

    2013-02-01

    Shigella species and Escherichia coli are closely related organisms. Early phenotyping experiments and several recent molecular studies put Shigella within the species E. coli. However, the whole-genome-based, alignment-free and parameter-free CVTree approach shows convincingly that four established Shigella species, Shigella boydii, Shigella sonnei, Shigella felxneri and Shigella dysenteriae, are distinct from E. coli strains, and form sister species to E. coli within the genus Escherichia. In view of the overall success and high resolution power of the CVTree approach, this result should be taken seriously. We hope that the present report may promote further in-depth study of the Shigella-E. coli relationship.

  7. Prevalence and characteristics of Escherichia coli sequence type 131 and its H30 and H30Rx subclones: a multicenter study from Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Young; Park, Yeon-Joon; Johnson, James R; Yu, Jin Kyung; Kim, Yong-Kyun; Kim, Yeong Sic

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the prevalence and characteristics of Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131) and its subclones among 268 E. coli isolates. The isolates were collected from 21 Korean hospitals without use of selection criteria and were screened for ST131 status by PCR. ST131 isolates were characterized for extended-spectrum β-lactamase variants, fluoroquinolone resistance genes, plasmid addiction systems, and replicon types. The collection's 57 identified ST131 isolates (21% of 268) were distributed disproportionately by clonal subset, as follows: 21 (37%) H30Rx, 27 (47%) H30 non-Rx, and 8 (14%) non-H30. Most (93%) ST131 isolates were ciprofloxacin resistant, and all H30 isolates had the same 5 nonsynonymous mutations in gyrA, parC, and parE. Twenty (95%) of H30Rx isolates harbored CTX-M-15, whereas only 14 (52%) of H30 non-Rx isolates harbored CTX-M-14 or CTX-M-27. Most (97%) ST131 isolates harbored IncF plasmids, but vagCD was confined exclusively to H30Rx. Our findings suggest that the distinctive characteristics of H30Rx isolates could have contributed to this subclone's recent epidemiologic success.

  8. ENERGY REQUIREMENT FOR THYMINELESS DEATH IN CELLS OF ESCHERICHIA COLI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FREIFELDER, D; MAALOE, O

    1964-10-01

    Freifelder, David (University of California, Berkeley), and Ole Maaløe. Energy requirement for thymineless death in cells of Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 88:987-990. 1964.-Thymineless death in thymine-requiring Escherichia coli is arrested immediately and reversibly by nitrogenation if the bacterial population is growing in a medium containing a carbon source that can only be metabolized aerobically. The mechanism of death, therefore, involves a metabolic process.

  9. Presence of multi-drug resistant pathogenic Escherichia coli in the San Pedro River located in the State of Aguascalientes, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez Castillo, Flor Y; Avelar González, Francisco J; Garneau, Philippe; Márquez Díaz, Francisco; Guerrero Barrera, Alma L; Harel, Josée

    2013-01-01

    Contamination of surface waters in developing countries is a great concern. Treated and untreated wastewaters have been discharged into rivers and streams, leading to possible waterborne infection outbreaks and may represent a significant dissemination mechanism of antibiotic resistance genes. In this study, the water quality of San Pedro River, the main river and pluvial collector of the Aguascalientes State, Mexico was assessed. Thirty sample locations were tested throughout the River. The main physicochemical parameters of water were evaluated. Results showed high levels of fecal pollution as well as inorganic and organic matter abundant enough to support the heterotrophic growth of microorganisms. These results indicate poor water quality in samples from different locations. One hundred and fifty Escherichia coli were collected and screened by PCR for several virulence genes. Isolates were classified as either pathogenic (n = 91) or commensal (n = 59). The disc diffusion method was used to determine antimicrobial susceptibility to 13 antibiotics. Fifty-two percent of the isolates were resistant to at least one antimicrobial agent and 30.6% were multi-resistant. Eighteen E. coli strains were quinolone resistant of which 16 were multi-resistant. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes were detected in 12 isolates. Mutations at the Ser-83→Leu and/or Asp-87→Asn in the gyrA gene were detected as well as mutations at the Ser-80→Ile in parC. An E. coli microarray (Maxivirulence V 3.1) was used to characterize the virulence and antimicrobial resistance genes profiles of the fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates. Antimicrobial resistance genes such as bla TEM, sulI, sulII, dhfrIX, aph3 (strA), and tet (B) as well as integrons were found in fluoroquinolone (FQ) resistance E. coli strains. The presence of potential pathogenic E. coli and antibiotic resistance in San Pedro River such as FQ resistant E. coli could pose a potential threat to human and animal

  10. Nanotextile membranes for bacteria Escherichia coli capturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Lev

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes an experimental study dealing with the possibility of nanotextile materials usa­ge for microbiologically contaminated water filtration. The aim of the study is to verify filtration ability of different nanotextile materials and evaluate the possibilities of practical usage. Good detention ability of these materials in the air filtration is the presumption for nanotextile to be used for bacteria filtration from a liquid. High nanotextile porosity with the nanotextile pores dimensions smaller than a bacteria size predicates the possibility of a successful usage of these materials. For the experiment were used materials made from electrospinning nanofibres under the label PA612, PUR1, PUR2 s PUR3 on the supporting unwoven textiles (viscose and PP. As a model simulation of the microbial contamination, bacteria Escherichia coli was chosen. Contaminated water was filtered during the overpressure activity of 105Pa on the input side of the filter from the mentioned material. After three-day incubation on the nutrient medium, cultures found in the samples before and after filtration were compared. In the filtrated water, bacteria E. coli were indicated, which did not verify the theoretical presumptions about an absolut bacteria detention. However, used materials caught at least 94% of bacteria in case of material PUR1 and up to 99,996% in case of material PUR2. These results predict the possibility of producing effective nanotextile filters for microbiologically contaminated water filtration.Recommendation: For the production of materials with better filtrating qualities, experiments need to be done, enabling better understanding of the bacteria detention mechanisms on the nanotextile material, and parameters of the used materials that influence the filtrating abilities need to be verified.

  11. Annual Surveillance Summary: Escherichia coli (E. coli) Infections in the Military Health System (MHS), 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-30

    Annual Surveillance Summary: Escherichia coli (E. coli) Infections in the Military Health System (MHS...and prevalence among all beneficiaries seeking care within the Military Health System (MHS). This report describes demographics, clinical...linked to assess descriptive and clinical factors related to E. coli. Health Level 7 (HL7)-formatted Composite Health Care System (CHCS) microbiology data

  12. Completion of DNA replication in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendel, Brian M; Courcelle, Charmain T; Courcelle, Justin

    2014-11-18

    The mechanism by which cells recognize and complete replicated regions at their precise doubling point must be remarkably efficient, occurring thousands of times per cell division along the chromosomes of humans. However, this process remains poorly understood. Here we show that, in Escherichia coli, the completion of replication involves an enzymatic system that effectively counts pairs and limits cellular replication to its doubling point by allowing converging replication forks to transiently continue through the doubling point before the excess, over-replicated regions are incised, resected, and joined. Completion requires RecBCD and involves several proteins associated with repairing double-strand breaks including, ExoI, SbcDC, and RecG. However, unlike double-strand break repair, completion occurs independently of homologous recombination and RecA. In some bacterial viruses, the completion mechanism is specifically targeted for inactivation to allow over-replication to occur during lytic replication. The results suggest that a primary cause of genomic instabilities in many double-strand-break-repair mutants arises from an impaired ability to complete replication, independent from DNA damage.

  13. (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli isolated from cl

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli isolated from clinical ... Methods: A total of 127 E. coli were collected from clinical samples in Kerman hospitals. The antibiotic ..... in Mexico and 26.1 % in Turkey [23,24]. These.

  14. Efficient expression of the yeast metallothionein gene in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berka, T.; Shatzman, A.; Zimmerman, J.; Strickler, J.; Rosenberg, M.

    1988-01-01

    The yeast metallothionein gene CUP1 was cloned into a bacterial expression system to achieve efficient, controlled expression of the stable, unprocessed protein product. The Escherichia coli-synthesized yeast metallothionein bound copper, cadmium, zinc, indicating that the protein was functional. Furthermore, E. coli cells expressing CUP1 acquired a new, inducible ability to selectively sequester heavy metal ions from the growth medium.

  15. Antimicrobial activity of peptidomimetics against multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahnsen, Rasmus D; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Franzyk, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    -lactamase-producing Escherichia coli was assessed by testing an array comprising different types of cationic peptidomimetics obtained by a general monomer-based solid-phase synthesis protocol. Most of the peptidomimetics possessed high to moderate activity toward multidrug-resistant E. coli as opposed to the corresponding...

  16. Characterization of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli on veal hides and carcasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) are Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli (STEC) associated with the most severe forms of foodborne illnesses. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS) has identified a higher percentage of non-O157 EHEC compared to E....

  17. Escherichia coli Eyelid Abscess in a Patient with Alcoholic Cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Stratton

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli (E. coli is a rare cause of ocular infections and has not yet been reported as a cause of an ocular abscess. We describe the case of a 47-year-old woman with a history of alcoholic cirrhosis who presented with painful left lower eyelid swelling that did not improve with oral antibiotics. The abscess was drained and cultures were positive for E. coli. Patients with cirrhosis are at increased risk for developing E. coli bacterial infections, but to our knowledge this is the first case of an E. coli eyelid abscess reported in the literature.

  18. {sup 99m}Technetium labelled Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diniz, S.O.F.; Cardoso, V.N. [Radioisotope Laboratory, Faculty of Pharmacy/UFMG, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Resende, B.M.; Nunan, E.A. [Biological Control Laboratory, Faculty of Pharmacy/UFMG, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Simal, C.J.R. [Laboratory Nuclear Medicine, Faculty of Medicine/UFMG, Belo Horizonte (Brazil)

    1999-07-01

    Samples of a culture of unlabeled Escherichia coli were incubated with different concentrations of stannous chloride for various time periods. {sup 99m}Tc (26.0 MBq) was added to each preparation and the results showed a labelling yield of 98% for E. coli. Since the bacterial viability of {sup 99m}Tc-E. coli and E. coli did not show any statistical differences, these results demonstrate that labelling of E. coli with {sup 99m}Tc does not modify the bacterial viability, and the radiolabelled bacteria may be a good model to study bacterial translocation.

  19. Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Haemophilus parasuis Isolates Exhibit More Putative Virulence Factors than Their Susceptible Counterparts

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qiang; Liu, Jiantao; Yan, Shuxian; Yang, Yujie; Zhang, Anding; Jin, Meilin

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of 23 putative virulence factors among fluoroquinolone-susceptible and -resistant Haemophilus parasuis isolates was analyzed. Putative hemolysin precursor, fimbrial assembly chaperone, and type I site-specific restriction modification system R subunit genes were more prevalent among fluoroquinolone-resistant H. parasuis isolates than among fluoroquinolone-susceptible H. parasuis isolates. Fluoroquinolone resistance may be associated with an increase in the presence of some viru...

  20. Molecular Evolutionary Relationships of Enteroinvasive Escherichia coli and Shigella spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Lan, Ruiting; Alles, M. Chehani; Donohoe, Kathy; Marina B Martinez; Reeves, Peter R.

    2004-01-01

    Enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC), a distinctive pathogenic form of E. coli causing dysentery, is similar in many properties to bacteria placed in the four species of Shigella. Shigella has been separated as a genus but in fact comprises several clones of E. coli. The evolutionary relationships of 32 EIEC strains of 12 serotypes have been determined by sequencing of four housekeeping genes and two plasmid genes which were used previously to determine the relationships of Shigella strains...

  1. Fluoroquinolone resistance mechanisms of Shigella flexneri isolated in Bangladesh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishrat J Azmi

    Full Text Available To investigate the prevalence and mechanisms of fluoroquinolone resistance in Shigella species isolated in Bangladesh and to compare with similar strains isolated in China.A total of 3789 Shigella isolates collected from Clinical Microbiology Laboratory of icddr,b, during 2004-2010 were analyzed for antibiotic susceptibility. Analysis of plasmids, plasmid-mediated quinolone-resistance genes, PFGE, and sequencing of genes of the quinolone-resistance-determining regions (QRDR were conducted in representative strains isolated in Bangladesh and compared with strains isolated in Zhengding, China. In addition, the role of efflux-pump was studied by using the efflux-pump inhibitor carbonyl cyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP.Resistance to ciprofloxacin in Shigella species increased from 0% in 2004 to 44% in 2010 and S. flexneri was the predominant species. Of Shigella spp, ciprofloxacin resistant (CipR strains were mostly found among S. flexneri (8.3%, followed by S. sonnei (1.5%. Within S. flexneri (n = 2181, 14.5% were resistance to ciprofloxacin of which serotype 2a was predominant (96%. MIC of ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, and ofloxacin were 6-32 mg/L, 8-32 mg/L, and 8-24 mg/L, respectively in S. flexneri 2a isolates. Sequencing of QRDR genes of resistant isolates showed double mutations in gyrA gene (Ser83Leu, Asp87Asn/Gly and single mutation in parC gene (Ser80Ile. A difference in amino acid substitution at position 87 was found between strains isolated in Bangladesh (Asp87Asn and China (Asp87Gly except for one. A novel mutation at position 211 (His→Tyr in gyrA gene was detected only in the Bangladeshi strains. Susceptibility to ciprofloxacin was increased by the presence of CCCP indicating the involvement of energy dependent active efflux pumps. A single PFGE type was found in isolates from Bangladesh and China suggesting their genetic relatedness.Emergence of fluoroquinolone resistance in Shigella undermines a major challenge in current

  2. Fluoroquinolone Resistance Mechanisms of Shigella flexneri Isolated in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, Ishrat J.; Khajanchi, Bijay K.; Akter, Fatema; Hasan, Trisheeta N.; Shahnaij, Mohammad; Akter, Mahmuda; Banik, Atanu; Sultana, Halima; Hossain, Mohammad A.; Ahmed, Mohammad K.; Faruque, Shah M.; Talukder, Kaisar A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence and mechanisms of fluoroquinolone resistance in Shigella species isolated in Bangladesh and to compare with similar strains isolated in China. Methods A total of 3789 Shigella isolates collected from Clinical Microbiology Laboratory of icddr,b, during 2004–2010 were analyzed for antibiotic susceptibility. Analysis of plasmids, plasmid-mediated quinolone-resistance genes, PFGE, and sequencing of genes of the quinolone-resistance-determining regions (QRDR) were conducted in representative strains isolated in Bangladesh and compared with strains isolated in Zhengding, China. In addition, the role of efflux-pump was studied by using the efflux-pump inhibitor carbonyl cyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP). Results Resistance to ciprofloxacin in Shigella species increased from 0% in 2004 to 44% in 2010 and S. flexneri was the predominant species. Of Shigella spp, ciprofloxacin resistant (CipR) strains were mostly found among S. flexneri (8.3%), followed by S. sonnei (1.5%). Within S. flexneri (n = 2181), 14.5% were resistance to ciprofloxacin of which serotype 2a was predominant (96%). MIC of ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, and ofloxacin were 6–32 mg/L, 8–32 mg/L, and 8–24 mg/L, respectively in S. flexneri 2a isolates. Sequencing of QRDR genes of resistant isolates showed double mutations in gyrA gene (Ser83Leu, Asp87Asn/Gly) and single mutation in parC gene (Ser80Ile). A difference in amino acid substitution at position 87 was found between strains isolated in Bangladesh (Asp87Asn) and China (Asp87Gly) except for one. A novel mutation at position 211 (His→Tyr) in gyrA gene was detected only in the Bangladeshi strains. Susceptibility to ciprofloxacin was increased by the presence of CCCP indicating the involvement of energy dependent active efflux pumps. A single PFGE type was found in isolates from Bangladesh and China suggesting their genetic relatedness. Conclusions Emergence of fluoroquinolone resistance in Shigella

  3. Findings of Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp. in homemade cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tambur Zoran

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available During the period from February until March 2004, 108 samples of soft cheese originating from markets of Pancevo, Subotica and Belgrade were examined. Microbiological analyses of the cheese samples to the presence of Escherichia coli was performed using methods described in the Regulations on methods for performing microbiological analyses and super analyses of consumer articles, while the presence of bacteria Enteroccocus spp. was performed on the dexter agar. From 108 samples of soft cheese from the territories of Pancevo, Belgrade and Subotica were isolated: Enterococcus spp. from 96% and Escherichia coli from 69%, cheese samples. Verocytotoxic E.coli was not isolated from any of the taken cheese samples.

  4. Fluoroquinolone resistance in the rectal carriage of men in an active surveillance cohort: longitudinal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jason E; Landis, Patricia; Trock, Bruce J; Patel, Hiten D; Ball, Mark W; Auwaerter, Paul G; Schaeffer, Edward; Carter, H Ballentine

    2015-02-01

    Rectal swabs can identify men with fluoroquinolone resistant bacteria and decrease the infection rate after transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy by targeted antimicrobial prophylaxis. We evaluated the rate of fluoroquinolone resistance in an active surveillance cohort with attention to factors associated with resistance and changes in resistance with time. We evaluated 416 men with prostate cancer on active surveillance who underwent rectal swabs to assess the rate of fluoroquinolone resistance compared to that in men undergoing diagnostic transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy. The chi-square test and Student t-test were used to compare categorical and continuous variables, respectively. Poisson regression analysis was used for multivariate analysis. On the initial swab fluoroquinolone resistance was found in 95 of 416 men (22.8%) on active surveillance compared to 54 of 221 (24.4%) in the diagnostic biopsy cohort (p = 0.675). Diabetes was found in 4.0% of the fluoroquinolone sensitive group vs 14.7% of the resistant group (p fluoroquinolone. Resistance is significantly associated with diabetes but the number of prior biopsies is not. Men with fluoroquinolone resistant flora tend to remain resistant with time. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The complete genome sequence of Escherichia coli EC958: a high quality reference sequence for the globally disseminated multidrug resistant E. coli O25b:H4-ST131 clone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian M Forde

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli ST131 is now recognised as a leading contributor to urinary tract and bloodstream infections in both community and clinical settings. Here we present the complete, annotated genome of E. coli EC958, which was isolated from the urine of a patient presenting with a urinary tract infection in the Northwest region of England and represents the most well characterised ST131 strain. Sequencing was carried out using the Pacific Biosciences platform, which provided sufficient depth and read-length to produce a complete genome without the need for other technologies. The discovery of spurious contigs within the assembly that correspond to site-specific inversions in the tail fibre regions of prophages demonstrates the potential for this technology to reveal dynamic evolutionary mechanisms. E. coli EC958 belongs to the major subgroup of ST131 strains that produce the CTX-M-15 extended spectrum β-lactamase, are fluoroquinolone resistant and encode the fimH30 type 1 fimbrial adhesin. This subgroup includes the Indian strain NA114 and the North American strain JJ1886. A comparison of the genomes of EC958, JJ1886 and NA114 revealed that differences in the arrangement of genomic islands, prophages and other repetitive elements in the NA114 genome are not biologically relevant and are due to misassembly. The availability of a high quality uropathogenic E. coli ST131 genome provides a reference for understanding this multidrug resistant pathogen and will facilitate novel functional, comparative and clinical studies of the E. coli ST131 clonal lineage.

  6. Antibiotic Resistance, Virulence, and Genetic Background of Community-Acquired Uropathogenic Escherichia coli from Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahiaoui, Merzouk; Robin, Frédéric; Bakour, Rabah; Hamidi, Moufida; Bonnet, Richard; Messai, Yamina

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate antibiotic resistance mechanisms, virulence traits, and genetic background of 150 nonrepetitive community-acquired uropathogenic Escherichia coli (CA-UPEC) from Algeria. A rate of 46.7% of isolates was multidrug resistant. bla genes detected were blaTEM (96.8% of amoxicillin-resistant isolates), blaCTX-M-15 (4%), overexpressed blaAmpC (4%), blaSHV-2a, blaTEM-4, blaTEM-31, and blaTEM-35 (0.7%). All tetracycline-resistant isolates (51.3%) had tetA and/or tetB genes. Sulfonamides and trimethoprim resistance genes were sul2 (60.8%), sul1 (45.9%), sul3 (6.7%), dfrA14 (25.4%), dfrA1 (18.2%), dfrA12 (16.3%), and dfrA25 (5.4%). High-level fluoroquinolone resistance (22.7%) was mediated by mutations in gyrA (S83L-D87N) and parC (S80I-E84G/V or S80I) genes. qnrB5, qnrS1, and aac(6')-Ib-cr were rare (5.3%). Class 1 and/or class 2 integrons were detected (40.7%). Isolates belonged to phylogroups B2+D (50%), A+B1 (36%), and F+C+Clade I (13%). Most of D (72.2%) and 38.6% of B2 isolates were multidrug resistant; they belong to 14 different sequence types, including international successful ST131, ST73, and ST69, reported for the first time in the community in Algeria and new ST4494 and ST4529 described in this study. Besides multidrug resistance, B2 and D isolates possessed virulence factors of colonization, invasion, and long-term persistence. The study highlighted multidrug-resistant CA-UPEC with high virulence traits and an epidemic genetic background.

  7. Colonization of Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in chickens and humans in southern Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trung, Nguyen Vinh; Nhung, Hoang Ngoc; Carrique-Mas, Juan J; Mai, Ho Huynh; Tuyen, Ha Thanh; Campbell, James; Nhung, Nguyen Thi; Van Minh, Pham; Wagenaar, Jaap A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/126613354; Mai, Nguyen Thi Nhu; Hieu, Thai Quoc; Schultsz, Constance; Hoa, Ngo Thi

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Enteroaggregative (EAEC) and Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are a major cause of diarrhea worldwide. E. coli carrying both virulence factors characteristic for EAEC and STEC and producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamase caused severe and protracted disease during an

  8. Colonization of Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in chickens and humans in southern Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trung, Nguyen Vinh; Nhung, Hoang Ngoc; Carrique-Mas, Juan J.; Mai, Ho Huynh; Tuyen, Ha Thanh; Campbell, James; Nhung, Nguyen Thi; Minh, Van Pham; Wagenaar, Jaap A.; Mai, Nguyen Thi Nhu; Hieu, Thai Quoc; Schultsz, Constance; Hoa, Ngo Thi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Enteroaggregative (EAEC) and Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are a major cause of diarrhea worldwide. E. coli carrying both virulence factors characteristic for EAEC and STEC and producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamase caused severe and protracted disease during an

  9. Colonization of Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in chickens and humans in southern Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trung, Nguyen Vinh; Nhung, Hoang Ngoc; Carrique-Mas, Juan J.; Mai, Ho Huynh; Tuyen, Ha Thanh; Campbell, James; Nhung, Nguyen Thi; Minh, Van Pham; Wagenaar, Jaap A.; Mai, Nguyen Thi Nhu; Hieu, Thai Quoc; Schultsz, Constance; Hoa, Ngo Thi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Enteroaggregative (EAEC) and Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are a major cause of diarrhea worldwide. E. coli carrying both virulence factors characteristic for EAEC and STEC and producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamase caused severe and protracted disease during an ou

  10. Free RNA polymerase in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Michael; Dennis, Patrick P; Ehrenberg, Mans; Bremer, Hans

    2015-12-01

    The frequencies of transcription initiation of regulated and constitutive genes depend on the concentration of free RNA polymerase holoenzyme [Rf] near their promoters. Although RNA polymerase is largely confined to the nucleoid, it is difficult to determine absolute concentrations of [Rf] at particular locations within the nucleoid structure. However, relative concentrations of free RNA polymerase at different growth rates, [Rf]rel, can be estimated from the activities of constitutive promoters. Previous studies indicated that the rrnB P2 promoter is constitutive and that [Rf]rel in the vicinity of rrnB P2 increases with increasing growth rate. Recently it has become possible to directly visualize Rf in growing Escherichia coli cells. Here we examine some of the important issues relating to gene expression based on these new observations. We conclude that: (i) At a growth rate of 2 doublings/h, there are about 1000 free and 2350 non-specifically DNA-bound RNA polymerase molecules per average cell (12 and 28%, respectively, of 8400 total) which are in rapid equilibrium. (ii) The reversibility of the non-specific binding generates more than 1000 free RNA polymerase molecules every second in the immediate vicinity of the DNA. Of these, most rebind non-specifically to the DNA within a few ms; the frequency of non-specific binding is at least two orders of magnitude greater than specific binding and transcript initiation. (iii) At a given amount of RNA polymerase per cell, [Rf] and the density of non-specifically DNA-bound RNA polymerase molecules along the DNA both vary reciprocally with the amount of DNA in the cell. (iv) At 2 doublings/h an E. coli cell contains, on the average, about 1 non-specifically bound RNA polymerase per 9 kbp of DNA and 1 free RNA polymerase per 20 kbp of DNA. However some DNA regions (i.e. near active rRNA operons) may have significantly higher than average [Rf].

  11. Characterization of recombinant fluoroquinolone-resistant pneumococcus-like isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsalobre, Luz; Ortega, Montserrat; de la Campa, Adela G

    2013-01-01

    Fourteen fluoroquinolone-resistant streptococcal isolates with recombinant DNA topoisomerase genes, preliminarily identified as pneumococci, were further characterized using phenotypic and genotypic approaches. Phenotypic tests classified them as atypical pneumococci. Phylogenetic relationships were analyzed by using the sequences of seven housekeeping alleles from these isolates and from isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus oralis, and Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae. Four isolates grouped with S. pneumoniae, seven grouped with S. pseudopneumoniae, and three grouped with S. mitis. These results generally agreed with those obtained with an optochin susceptibility test and with the organization of the atp operon chromosomal region, encoding the F(o)F(1) H(+)-ATPase (the target of optochin). All seven isolates grouping with S. pseudopneumoniae share the same spr1368-atpC-atpA gene order; all four grouping with S. pneumoniae share the spr1368-IS1239-atpC-atpA order, and two out of the three grouping with S. mitis share the spr1284-atpC-atpA order. In addition, evidence for recombination within the seven housekeeping alleles of the S. pseudopneumoniae population was provided by several methods: the index of association (0.4598, P < 0.001), the pairwise homoplasy index, and the split-decomposition method. This study confirms the existence of pneumococci among the alpha-hemolytic streptococci with DNA topoisomerase genes showing a mosaic structure and reveals a close relationship between atypical pneumococci and S. pseudopneumoniae.

  12. The versatile strategies of Escherichia coli pathotypes: a mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. P. Sousa

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The widespread species Escherichia coli includes a broad variety of different types, ranging from highly pathogenic strains to avirulent isolates. Few microorganisms are as versatile as E. coli. Pathogenic strains remain a leading cause of severe and persistent infant diarrhea in developing countries. They may be limited to colonization of a mucosal surface or can disseminate throughout the body and have been implicated in urinary tract infection, sepsis/meningitis and gastrointestinal infection. The human gastrointestinal tract is susceptible to diarrheagenic E. coli infections. Escherichia coli have effectively managed to subvert the host cytoskeleton for their own purposes causing substantial diarrheal disease, a major public health problem worldwide. This review deals with the different strategies regarding E. coli as a pathogen and the virulence traits of its pathotypes highlighting the species as a commensal, opportunistic and specialized pathogen.

  13. Environmental Escherichia coli: Ecology and public health implications - A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jeonghwan; Hur, Hor-Gil; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara; Yan, Tao; Ishii, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli is classified as a rod-shaped, Gram-negative bacterium in the family Enterobacteriaceae. The bacterium mainly inhabits the lower intestinal tract of warm-blooded animals, including humans, and is often discharged into the environment through feces or wastewater effluent. The presence of E. coli in environmental waters has long been considered as an indicator of recent fecal pollution. However, numerous recent studies have reported that some specific strains of E. coli can survive for long periods of time, and potentially reproduce, in extra-intestinal environments. This indicates that E. coli can be integrated into indigenous microbial communities in the environment. This naturalization phenomenon calls into question the reliability of E. coli as a fecal indicator bacterium (FIB). Recently, many studies reported that E. coli populations in the environment are affected by ambient environmental conditions affecting their long-term survival. Large-scale studies of population genetics provide the diversity and complexity of E. coli strains in various environments, affected by multiple environmental factors. This review examines the current knowledge on the ecology of E. coli strains in various environments in regards to its role as a FIB and as a naturalized member of indigenous microbial communities. Special emphasis is given on the growth of pathogenic E. coli in the environment, and the population genetics of environmental members of the genus Escherichia. The impact of environmental E. coli on water quality and public health is also discussed.

  14. Rapid Sterilization of Escherichia coli by Solution Plasma Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, Nina; Ishizaki, Takahiro; Baroch, Pavel; Saito, Nagahiro

    2012-12-01

    Solution plasma (SP), which is a discharge in the liquid phase, has the potential for rapid sterilization of water without chemical agents. The discharge showed a strong sterilization performance against Escherichia coli bacteria. The decimal value (D value) of the reduction time for E. coli by this system with an electrode distance of 1.0 mm was estimated to be approximately 1.0 min. Our discharge system in the liquid phase caused no physical damage to the E. coli and only a small increase in the temperature of the aqueous solution. The UV light generated by the discharge was an important factor in the sterilization of E. coli.

  15. Detection of Escherichia coli in wastewater based on enzyme immunoassay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XI Haiyan; CAI Qiang; HE Miao; SHI Hanchang

    2007-01-01

    This research describes a fast detection method on the basis of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)for Escherichia coli in drainage of wastewater treatment plants.Optimized conditions such as the reaction format(sandwich or direct),the concentrations of diluted horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-E.coli conjugate,and anti-HPR antibody and pretreatment of E.coli were studied.Those results showed that the linear range of detection for E.coli was 10 cfu/mL-6×104 cfu/mL.Compared with conventional methods,it is a convenient and sensitive detection method with low cost.

  16. Fluorogenic assay for rapid detection of Escherichia coli in food.

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    An assay procedure to screen for Escherichia coli in foods by using 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-glucuronide (MUG) incorporated into lauryl tryptose (LST) broth was evaluated. The beta-glucuronidase produced by E. coli cleaves the MUG substrate to yield a fluorescent end product. E. coli-negative samples can be identified by lack of fluorescence in LST-MUG within 24 h. MUG was not inhibitory to coliforms and E. coli. Over 1,400 food and dairy samples were tested to compare the standard three-t...

  17. Organic or antibiotic-free labeling does not impact the recovery of enteric pathogens and antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli from fresh retail chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollenkopf, Dixie F; Cenera, Johana K; Bryant, Erin M; King, Christy A; Kashoma, Isaac; Kumar, Anand; Funk, Julie A; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Wittum, Thomas E

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the implied health benefits of retail chicken breast labeled as "organic" or "antibiotic-free" when compared to conventional products based on frequency of contamination by Salmonella spp., Campylobacter spp., and coliform bacteria resistant to fluoroquinolones, extended-spectrum cephalosporins, or carbapenems. We purchased 231 prepackaged chicken breasts from 99 grocery stores representing 17 retail chains in Ohio, Michigan, and Pennsylvania from June to September 2012. Ninety-six (41.5%) packages were labeled "antibiotic free" and 40 (17.3%) were labeled "organic," with the remaining 95 (41.1%) making neither label claim. Salmonella were recovered from 56 (24.2%) packages, and the recovery rate was not different between product types. Five percent of packages contained Salmonella carrying the extended-spectrum cephalosporin resistance gene bla(CMY-2), representing 21.4% of Salmonella isolates. Campylobacter spp. were recovered from 10.8% of packages, with observed recovery rates similar for the three product types. Using selective media, we recovered Escherichia coli harboring bla(CMY-2) from over half (53.7%) of packages, with similar recovery rates for all product types. In addition, we recovered E. coli carrying bla(CTX-M) from 6.9% of packages, and E. coli with QRDR mutations from 8.2% of packages. Fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli recovered using selective media were more common (porganic (0) and antibiotic-free (2.1%) packages. Our results indicate that, regardless of product type, fresh retail chicken breast is commonly contaminated with enteric pathogens associated with foodborne illness and commensal bacteria harboring genes conferring resistance to critically important antimicrobial drugs.

  18. Chromosomal features of Escherichia coli serotype O2:K2, an avian pathogenic E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Steffen L; Kudirkiene, Egle; Li, Lili

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli causing infection outside the gastrointestinal system are referred to as extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli. Avian pathogenic E. coli is a subgroup of extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli and infections due to avian pathogenic E. coli have major impact on poultry production economy...... and welfare worldwide. An almost defining characteristic of avian pathogenic E. coli is the carriage of plasmids, which may encode virulence factors and antibiotic resistance determinates. For the same reason, plasmids of avian pathogenic E. coli have been intensively studied. However, genes encoded...... by the chromosome may also be important for disease manifestation and antimicrobial resistance. For the E. coli strain APEC_O2 the plasmids have been sequenced and analyzed in several studies, and E. coli APEC_O2 may therefore serve as a reference strain in future studies. Here we describe the chromosomal features...

  19. Fluoroquinolone resistance during 2000–2005 : An observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheehan Paul

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Moxifloxacin is a respiratory fluoroquinolone with a community acquired pneumonia indication. Unlike other fluoroquinolones used in our healthcare system, moxifloxacin's urinary excretion is low and thus we hypothesized that increased use of moxifloxacin is associated with an increase in fluoroquinolone resistance amongst gram negative uropathogens. Methods All antibiograms for Gram negative bacteria were obtained for 2000 to 2005. The defined daily dose (DDD for each fluoroquinolone was computed according to World Health Organization criteria. To account for fluctuation in patient volume, DDD/1000 bed days was computed for each year of study. Association between DDD/1000 bed days for each fluoroquinolone and the susceptibility of Gram negative bacteria to ciprofloxacin was assessed using Pearson's Correlation Coefficient, r. Results During the study period, there were 48,261 antibiograms, 347,931 DDD of fluoroquinolones, and 1,943,338 bed days. Use of fluoroquinolones among inpatients decreased from 237.2 DDD/1000 bed days in 2000 to 115.2 DDD/1000 bed days in 2005. With the exception of Enterobacter aerogenes, moxifloxacin use was negatively correlated with sensitivity among all 13 Gram negative species evaluated (r = -0.07 to -0.97. When the sensitivities of all Gram negative organisms were aggregated, all fluoroquinolones except moxifloxacin were associated with increased sensitivity (r = 0.486 to 1.000 while moxifloxacin was associated with decreased sensitivity (r = -0.464. Conclusion Moxifloxacin, while indicated for empiric treatment of community acquired pneumonia, may have important negative influence on local antibiotic sensitivities amongst Gram negative organisms. This effect was not shared by other commonly used members of the fluoroquinolone class.

  20. The asymptomatic bacteriuria Escherichia coli strain 83972 outcompetes uropathogenic E. coli strains in human urine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancock, Viktoria; Ulett, G.C.; Schembri, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the most common organism associated with asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU). In contrast to uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC), which causes symptomatic urinary tract infections (UTI), very little is known about the mechanisms by which these strains colonize the human urinary tract...

  1. Recurrent Hemolytic and Uremic Syndrome Induced by Escherichia Coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commereuc, Morgane; Weill, Francois-Xavier; Loukiadis, Estelle; Gouali, Malika; Gleizal, Audrey; Kormann, Raphaël; Ridel, Christophe; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Rondeau, Eric; Hertig, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A widespread belief is that typical hemolytic and uremic syndrome (HUS) does not recur. We report the case of a patient infected twice with raw milk taken from his own cow and containing a Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli O174:H21 that induced recurrent HUS causing severe renal and cerebral disorders. A genomic comparison of the human and bovine Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli O174:H21 isolates revealed that they were identical. Typical HUS may recur. Since milk from this animal was occasionally distributed locally, thereby posing a serious threat for the whole village, this particular cow was destroyed. PMID:26735524

  2. Obscured phylogeny and possible recombinational dormancy in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawyer Stanley A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli is one of the best studied organisms in all of biology, but its phylogenetic structure has been difficult to resolve with current data and analytical techniques. We analyzed single nucleotide polymorphisms in chromosomes of representative strains to reconstruct the topology of its emergence. Results The phylogeny of E. coli varies according to the segment of chromosome analyzed. Recombination between extant E. coli groups is largely limited to only three intergroup pairings. Conclusions Segment-dependent phylogenies most likely are legacies of a complex recombination history. However, E. coli are now in an epoch in which they no longer broadly share DNA. Using the definition of species as organisms that freely exchange genetic material, this recombinational dormancy could reflect either the end of E. coli as a species, or herald the coalescence of E. coli groups into new species.

  3. Arginine Catabolism and the Arginine Succinyltransferase Pathway in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Barbara L.; Kiupakis, Alexandros K.; Reitzer, Lawrence J.

    1998-01-01

    Arginine catabolism produces ammonia without transferring nitrogen to another compound, yet the only known pathway of arginine catabolism in Escherichia coli (through arginine decarboxylase) does not produce ammonia. Our aims were to find the ammonia-producing pathway of arginine catabolism in E. coli and to examine its function. We showed that the only previously described pathway of arginine catabolism, which does not produce ammonia, accounted for only 3% of the arginine consumed. A search...

  4. Probability of recovering pathogenic Escherichia coli from foods.

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, W E; Ferreira, J. L; Payne, W L; Jones, V.M.

    1985-01-01

    The probability of recovering pathogenic Escherichia coli from food by the Bacteriological Analytical Manual method was determined by the effects of several factors: the number of strains per food, the ability of pathogenic strains to survive enrichment, and the frequency of plasmid loss during enrichment. Biochemical patterns indicated the presence of about six E. coli strains per food sample. About half of the strains isolated from humans did not survive enrichment. Among those which grew, ...

  5. Engineered biosynthesis of bacterial aromatic polyketides in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Wenjun; Li, Yanran; Tang, Yi

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial aromatic polyketides are important therapeutic compounds including front line antibiotics and anticancer drugs. It is one of the last remaining major classes of natural products of which the biosynthesis has not been reconstituted in the genetically superior host Escherichia coli. Here, we demonstrate the engineered biosynthesis of bacterial aromatic polyketides in E. coli by using a dissected and reassembled fungal polyketide synthase (PKS). The minimal PKS of the megasynthase PKS4...

  6. Osmoprotection of Escherichia coli by ectoine: uptake and accumulation characteristics.

    OpenAIRE

    Jebbar, M; Talibart, R; Gloux, K; Bernard, T.; BLANCO, C.

    1992-01-01

    Ectoine (1,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2-methyl-4-pyrimidinecarboxylic acid) is a cyclic amino acid, identified as a compatible solute in moderately halophilic bacteria. Exogenously provided ectoine was found to stimulate growth of Escherichia coli in media of inhibitory osmotic strength. The stimulation was independent of any specific solute, electrolyte or nonelectrolyte. It is accumulated in E. coli cells proportionally to the osmotic strength of the medium, and it is not metabolized. Its osmoprotect...

  7. Key role of Mfd in the development of fluoroquinolone resistance in Campylobacter jejuni.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Han

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni is a major food-borne pathogen and a common causative agent of human enterocolitis. Fluoroquinolones are a key class of antibiotics prescribed for clinical treatment of enteric infections including campylobacteriosis, but fluoroquinolone-resistant Campylobacter readily emerges under the antibiotic selection pressure. To understand the mechanisms involved in the development of fluoroquinolone-resistant Campylobacter, we compared the gene expression profiles of C. jejuni in the presence and absence of ciprofloxacin using DNA microarray. Our analysis revealed that multiple genes showed significant changes in expression in the presence of a suprainhibitory concentration of ciprofloxacin. Most importantly, ciprofloxacin induced the expression of mfd, which encodes a transcription-repair coupling factor involved in strand-specific DNA repair. Mutation of the mfd gene resulted in an approximately 100-fold reduction in the rate of spontaneous mutation to ciprofloxacin resistance, while overexpression of mfd elevated the mutation frequency. In addition, loss of mfd in C. jejuni significantly reduced the development of fluoroquinolone-resistant Campylobacter in culture media or chickens treated with fluoroquinolones. These findings indicate that Mfd is important for the development of fluoroquinolone resistance in Campylobacter, reveal a previously unrecognized function of Mfd in promoting mutation frequencies, and identify a potential molecular target for reducing the emergence of fluoroquinolone-resistant Campylobacter.

  8. Detection of virulence factors of Uropathoigenic Escherichia coli isolates from infertile women high vaginal swabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Safarpourdehkourdi

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: The high vaginal Escherichia coli harbored certain virulence genes of uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains. The urinary tract infections should be treated well to diminish its upstream transfer into vagina. Some more investigation should be perform for identifying the epidemiological aspects of uropathogenic Escherichia coli in high vaginal part of infertile women.

  9. 76 FR 72331 - Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli in Certain Raw Beef Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-23

    ... Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli in Certain Raw Beef Products AGENCY: Food Safety and Inspection Service... methods for controlling non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in raw, intact and non-intact beef... Escherichia coli in raw, intact and non-intact beef products and product components on or before December...

  10. [The clinical characteristics analysis of Escherichia coli bloodstream infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M; Huang, J A; Chen, Y B

    2016-05-17

    To explore the clinical features of Escherichia coli bloodstream infection. The clinical data of underlying diseases, antimicrobial susceptibility, temperature at blood sampling, results of routine blood tests, venous catheterization, therapy and prognosis of Escherichia coli bloodstream infection in the First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University from January 2007 to December 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. The pathogens were routinely isolated and identified. Susceptibilities against antimicrobial agents were determined by Kirby-Bauer methods. All patients had at least one underlying disease. Most of the basic diseases were hematological malignancies, malignant solid tumors, pneumonia and so on. Body temperature was normal in 40 patients (6.4%), fever in 587 patients (93.5%) and low temperature in 1 patient. There were 252 patients with leukopenia (40.1%), 237 patients with granulocytopenia (37.7%) and 216 patients with agranulocytosis. The resistance rate to imipenem was 3.3%, which was the lowest among the total antimicrobial susceptibilities of 628 Escherichia Coli. The extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing strains accounted for 53.8% among the total patients. The resistance rates of ESBLs-producing-Escherichia coli for the Sulfamethoxazole, Ampicillin, Gentamicin, Cefazolin, Cefuroxime, Cefotaxime, Ceftriaxone, Cefepime, Ceftazidime, Cefoperazone, Piperacillin and Ciprofloxacin were 80.2%, 100.0%, 62.4%, 99.1%, 99.1%, 98.8%, 98.2%, 48.5%, 50.6%, 95.0%, 98.2%, 79.6%, respectively, which were higher than that of non-ESBLs-producing-Escherichia coli (67.9%, 79.7%, 47.6%, 50.0%, 47.2%, 41.0%, 40.3%, 27.2%, 24.1%, 40.0%, 56.2%, 58.3%, respectively), the differences were significant statistically (χ(2)=12.33, 75.90, 13.92, 209.00, 224.94, 259.25, 256.59, 27.79, 46.19, 222.85, 165.08, 33.59, all PEscherichia coli bloodstream infection. The antimicrobial resistance rate of ESBLs-producing-Escherichia coli is higher than that of none-ESBLs-producing-Escherichia

  11. Cervical celullitis in broiler chickens for Escherichia coli/ Celulite cervical em frangos de corte causada por Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivens Gomes Guimarães

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper was report the isolation of Escherichia coli in broiler chickens with cellulitis in the cervical region. It was carried through the isolation of E. coli of the lesion of cellulitis from broilers and carried through histopathological examination of skin that had characterized the lesion. Focal ulcerations of epidermis, fibrin in dermis and difuse infiltrated by lymphocytes and heterophils on subcutaneous tissues.Neste trabalho, relata-se o isolamento de Escherichia coli em frangos de corte apresentando lesão de celulite na região cervical. Foi realizado o isolamento de E. coli da lesão de celulite e realizado exames histopatológicos que caracterizaram a lesão. Na epiderme foram verificadas lesões ulcerativas, presença de fibrina na derme e infiltração difusa de linfócitos e heterófilos no tecido subcutâneo.

  12. YeeO from Escherichia coli exports flavins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAnulty, Michael J; Wood, Thomas K

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) proteins help maintain cellular homeostasis by secreting metabolic wastes. Flavins may occur as cellular waste products, with their production and secretion providing potential benefit for industrial applications related to biofuel cells. Here we find that MATE protein YeeO from Escherichia coli exports both flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Significant amounts of flavins were trapped intracellularly when YeeO was produced indicating transport limits secretion of flavins. Wild-type E. coli secreted 3 flavins (riboflavin, FMN, and FAD), so E. coli likely produces additional flavin transporters.

  13. Escherichia coli O26 IN RAW BUFFALO MILK: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rella

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli O26 is considered to be one of the most important food-borne pathogen. In this study, 120 buffalo milk samples collected in Lazio and in Apulia regions were tested for the presence of E. coli O26. One buffalo milk sample (0,8% tested positive for E. coli O26; the isolate was positive at the verocytotoxicity test and it showed resistance properties to different antimicrobial classes. These preliminary results highlight the need to monitor the foods of animal origin used for production and eaten by a wide range of persons, respect VTEC organism.

  14. antimicrobial susceptibility and plasmids from escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2001-10-10

    Oct 10, 2001 ... transmission to humans of E. coli containing antibiotic resistance plasmids ... resistant micro-organisms, which may in turn transfer resistance to .... cells were washed with sterile normal saline to remove leached. Я-lactamase ...

  15. ANTIMICIROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY PATTERNS OF Escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    aetiological agents of diarrhoea diseases of humans in developing ... Pathogenic organisms have developed a number of elaborate .... reported that E.coli isolated from animals haboured plasmids .... coil 0157:H7 as a model of entry of a new.

  16. Synergistic effects in mixed Escherichia coli biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reisner, A.; Holler, B.M.; Molin, Søren

    2006-01-01

    the strongest effects was most often linked to conjugative transmission of natural plasmids carried by the E. coli isolates (70%). Thus, the capacity of an isolate to promote the biofilm through cocultivation was (i) transferable to the K-12 strain, (ii) was linked with the acquisition of conjugation genes...... promotion in this system is not dependent on the laboratory strain and that the described model system could provide relevant insights on mechanisms of biofilm development in natural E. coli populations....

  17. Antibiotic treatment of verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC) infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Morten; Scheutz, Flemming; Villumsen, Steen;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: A consensus has existed on not to treat verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC)-infected individuals with antibiotics because of possible subsequent increased risk of developing haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS). The aim of this systematic review is to clarify the risk...

  18. Escherichia coli mutants with a temperature-sensitive alcohol dehydrogenase.

    OpenAIRE

    Lorowitz, W; Clark, D.

    1982-01-01

    Mutants of Escherichia coli resistant to allyl alcohol were selected. Such mutants were found to lack alcohol dehydrogenase. In addition, mutants with temperature-sensitive alcohol dehydrogenase activity were obtained. These mutations, designated adhE, are all located at the previously described adh regulatory locus. Most adhE mutants were also defective in acetaldehyde dehydrogenase activity.

  19. New types of Escherichia coli recombination-deficient mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freifelder, D

    1976-11-01

    A set of Escherichia coli mutants deficient in intramolecular recombination and different from those previously found is described. All have temperature-sensitive lethal mutations. The mutants have been characterized with respect to the following properties: the Pap phenotype, deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis, sensitivity to ultraviolet light, ability to support the growth of phage lambda, filament formation, and mutation frequency.

  20. Escherichia coli and virus isolated from ''sticky kits''

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, M.; Scheutz, F.; Strandbygaard, Bertel

    1996-01-01

    A total of 121 Escherichia coli strains isolated from 3-week-old mink kits were serotyped and examined for virulence factors. 56 strains were isolated from healthy kits while 65 were from ''sticky kits''. Among these, 34 different serotypes were detected. No difference in serotypes or the presenc...

  1. armA and aminoglycoside resistance in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Zorn, Bruno; Teshager, Tirushet; Casas, María; Porrero, María C; Moreno, Miguel A; Courvalin, Patrice; Domínguez, Lucas

    2005-06-01

    We report armA in an Escherichia coli pig isolate from Spain. The resistance gene was borne by self-transferable IncN plasmid pMUR050. Molecular analysis of the plasmid and of the armA locus confirmed the spread of this resistance determinant.

  2. armA and Aminoglycoside Resistance in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    González-Zorn, Bruno; Teshager, Tirushet; Casas, María; Porrero, María C.; Moreno, Miguel A.; Courvalin, Patrice; Domínguez, Lucas

    2005-01-01

    We report armA in an Escherichia coli pig isolate from Spain. The resistance gene was borne by self-transferable IncN plasmid pMUR050. Molecular analysis of the plasmid and of the armA locus confirmed the spread of this resistance determinant.

  3. Combating enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) infections: the way forward

    OpenAIRE

    Michael S Donnenberg; Finlay, B. Brett

    2013-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) strains continue to cause severe and sometimes fatal infantile diarrhea, particularly in Africa. Increased efforts at diagnosis, defining the clinical spectrum of disease, understanding pathogenic mechanisms, and delineating immune responses are desperately needed to develop new strategies to combat EPEC.

  4. Characterization of Escherichia coli nucleoids released by osmotic shock.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegner, A.S.; Alexeeva, S.; Odijk, T.; Woldringh, C.L.

    2012-01-01

    Nucleoids were isolated by osmotic shock from Escherichia coli spheroplasts at relatively low salt concentrations and in the absence of detergents. Sucrose-protected cells, made osmotically sensitive by growth in the presence of ampicillin or by digestion with low lysozyme concentrations (50-5 μg/ml

  5. Characterization of Escherichia coli nucleoids released by osmotic shock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegner, S.; Alexeeva, S.V.; Odijk, T.; Woldringh, C.L.

    2012-01-01

    Nucleoids were isolated by osmotic shock from Escherichia coli spheroplasts at relatively low salt concentrations and in the absence of detergents. Sucrose-protected cells, made osmotically sensitive by growth in the presence of ampicillin or by digestion with low lysozyme concentrations (50–5 µg/ml

  6. Immunologic Control of Diarrheal Disease Due to Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Classical Enteropathogenic (Serotyped) Escherichia coli Strains of Proven Pathogenicity. Infect. Immun. 38:798-801, 1982. 8. Levine, M.M. Vacunas Contra...Microbiol., 18:808-815, 1983. 8 15. Levine, M.M., Lanata, C. Progresos en Vacunas Contra Diarrea Bacteriana. Adelantos Microbiol. Enferm. Inf., 2:67-117

  7. Sequencing of Escherichia coli that cause persistent and transient Mastitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genomes of two strains of Escherichia coli that cause bovine mastitis were sequenced. These strains are known to be associated with persistent and transient mastitis: strain ECA-B causes a transient infection, and ECC-M leads to a persistent infection....

  8. Comparative Genomics of Escherichia coli Strains Causing Urinary Tract Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria; Schembri, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    The virulence determinants of uropathogenic Escherichia coli have been studied extensively over the years, but relatively little is known about what differentiates isolates causing various types of urinary tract infections. In this study, we compared the genomic profiles of 45 strains from a range...

  9. Inactivation of Escherichia coli by titanium dioxide photocatalytic oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titanium dioxide in the anatase crystalline form was used as a photocatalyst to generate hydroxyl radicals in a flowthrough water reactor. Experiments were performed on pure cultures of Escherichia coli in dechlorinated tap water and a surface water sample to evaluate the disinfe...

  10. Chromosomal replication incompatibility in Dam methyltransferase deficient Escherichia coli cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freiesleben, Ulrik Von

    1996-01-01

    Dam methyltransferase deficient Escherichia coli cells containing minichromosomes were constructed. Free plasmid DNA could not be detected in these cells and the minichromosomes were found to be integrated in multiple copies in the origin of replication (oriC) region of the host chromosome...

  11. FimH-mediated autoaggregation of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schembri, Mark; Christiansen, G.; Klemm, Per

    2001-01-01

    Autoaggregation is a phenomenon thought to contribute to colonization of mammalian hosts by pathogenic bacteria. Type 1 fimbriae are surface organelles of Escherichia coli that mediate D-mannose-sensitive binding to various host surfaces. This binding is conferred by the minor fimbrial component...

  12. DNA supercoiling depends on the phosphorylation potential in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Workum, M.; van Dooren, S.J.M; Oldenburg, N

    1996-01-01

    ATP/ADP ratios were varied in different ways and the degree of negative supercoiling was determined in Escherichia coli. Independent of whether the ATP/ADP ratio was reduced by a shift to anaerobic conditions, by addition of protonophore (dinitrophenol) or by potassium cyanide addition, DNA...

  13. Novel Aggregative Adherence Fimbria Variant of Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jønsson, Rie; Struve, Carsten; Boisen, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) organisms belong to a diarrheagenic pathotype known to cause diarrhea and can be characterized by distinct aggregative adherence (AA) in a stacked-brick pattern to cultured epithelial cells. In this study, we investigated 118 EAEC strains isolated from...

  14. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) antisense effects in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Good, L; Nielsen, P E

    1999-01-01

    Antisense peptide nucleic acid (PNA) can be used to control cell growth, gene expression and growth phenotypes in the bacteria Escherichia coli. PNAs targeted to the RNA components of the ribosome can inhibit translation and cell growth, and PNAs targeted to mRNA can limit gene expression with gene...

  15. Suppressors of DnaAATP imposed overinitiation in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Riber, Leise; Cohen, Malene

    2011-01-01

    Chromosome replication in Escherichia coli is limited by the supply of DnaA associated with ATP. Cells deficient in RIDA (Regulatory Inactivation of DnaA) due to a deletion of the hda gene accumulate suppressor mutations (hsm) to counteract the overinitiation caused by an elevated DnaAATP level...

  16. Differential expression of the Escherichia coli autoaggregation factor antigen 43

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schembri, Mark; Hjerrild, Louise; Gjermansen, Morten

    2003-01-01

    Antigen 43 (Ag43) is a self-recognizing surface adhesin found in most Escherichia coli strains. Due to its excellent cell-to-cell aggregation characteristics, Ag43 expression confers clumping and fluffing of cells and promotes biofilm formation. Ag43 expression is repressed by the cellular redox...

  17. Molecular characterization of the Escherichia coli asymptomatic bacteriuria strain 83972

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Hancock, Viktoria; Ulett, G.C.

    2006-01-01

    Escherichia coli 83972 is a clinical asymptomatia bacteriuric isolate that is able to colonize the human urinary bladder without inducing an immune response. Here we demonstrate that one of the mechanisms by which this strain has become attenuated is through the mutation of its genes encoding type...

  18. Binding of divalent magnesium by Escherichia coli phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willemoës, Martin; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism of binding of the substrates Mg x ATP and ribose 5-phosphate as well as Mg2+ to the enzyme 5-phospho-D-ribosyl (alpha-1-diphosphate synthetase from Escherichia coli has been analyzed. By use of the competive inhibitors of ATP and ribose 5-phosphate binding, alpha,beta-methylene ATP ...

  19. A rapid differentiation method for enteroinvasive Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aribam, Swarmistha Devi; Hirota, Jiro; Kusumoto, Masahiro; Harada, Tomoyuki; Shiraiwa, Kazumasa; Ogawa, Yohsuke; Shimoji, Yoshihiro; Eguchi, Masahiro

    2014-03-01

    Enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC) comprise 21 major serotypes defined by the presence of O and H antigens, and diagnosis depends on determining its invasive potential. Using HEp-2 cells infected with an EIEC strain, we developed a simple growth-dependent assay that differentiated EIEC strain from non-invasive strains 6 h after infection.

  20. Kwantitatief gevoeligheidsonderzoek met intra- en extramurale isolaten van Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Neeling AJ; de Jong J; Overbeek BP; de Bruin RW; Dessens-Kroon M; van Klingeren B

    1990-01-01

    Three Dutch laboratories for medical microbiology collected a total number of 1432 strains of Escherichia coli. Of these 995 were obtained from routine samples taken in clinic and policlinic, 290 had been sent spontaneously by general practitioners for microbiological examination and 147 had been i

  1. Molecular characterization of the Escherichia coli asymptomatic bacteriuria strain 83972

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Hancock, Viktoria; Ulett, G.C.

    2006-01-01

    Escherichia coli 83972 is a clinical asymptomatia bacteriuric isolate that is able to colonize the human urinary bladder without inducing an immune response. Here we demonstrate that one of the mechanisms by which this strain has become attenuated is through the mutation of its genes encoding typ...

  2. Fragility of the permeability barrier of Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haest, C.W.M.; Gier, J. de; Es, G.A. van; Verkleij, A.J.; Deenen, L.L.M. van

    1972-01-01

    An unsaturated fatty acid requiring auxotroph of Escherichia coli was grown with addition of various unsaturated fatty acids. The permeability of the cells for erythritol appeared to be strongly dependent on the fatty acid incorporated in the membrane lipid. Below certain temperatures, depending on

  3. Stringent control of FLP recombinase in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, Steven D; Palani, Nagendra P; Libourel, Igor G L

    2017-02-01

    Site specific recombinases are invaluable tools in molecular biology, and are emerging as powerful recorders of cellular events in synthetic biology. We have developed a stringently controlled FLP recombinase system in Escherichia coli using an arabinose inducible promoter combined with a weak ribosome binding site.

  4. Escherichia coli and other Enterobacteriaceae: Food poisoning and health effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    The family Enterobactericeae consists of rod-shaped, Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, non-spore forming bacteria and also includes the food-borne pathogens, Cronobacter spp., Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Shigella spp., and Yersinia spp. Illness caused by these pathogens is acquired...

  5. Escherichia coli as other Enterobacteriaceae: food poisoning and health effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many Escherichia coli strains are harmless, and they are an important commensal in the intestinal microflora; however, pathogenic strains also exist. The pathogenic strains can be divided into diarrhea-inducing strains and strains that reside in the intestines but only cause disease in bodily sites...

  6. Plasmid cloning vehicle for Haemophilus influenzae and Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, D.; Clayton, N.L.; Setlow, J.K.

    1982-09-01

    A new plasmid cloning vehicle (pDM2) was used to introduce a library of Haemophilus influenzae chromosomal fragments into H. influenzae. Transformants of the higly recombination-defective rec-1 mutant were more likely to contain exclusively recombinant plasmids after exposure to ligated DNA mixtures than was the wild type. pDM2 could replicate in Escherichia coli K-12.

  7. Norfloxacin resistance in a clinical isolate of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, H; Sato, K; Kato, T; Hirai, K; Mitsuhashi, S

    1987-01-01

    Analysis of DNA gyrase supercoiling and of norfloxacin uptake in Escherichia coli GN14176, a moderately norfloxacin-resistant clinical isolate, indicated that resistance was associated with both an altered drug target and a reduction in drug uptake. Images PMID:2829712

  8. Kwantitatief gevoeligheidsonderzoek met intra- en extramurale isolaten van Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Neeling AJ; de Jong J; Overbeek BP; de Bruin RW; Dessens-Kroon M; van Klingeren B

    1990-01-01

    Three Dutch laboratories for medical microbiology collected a total number of 1432 strains of Escherichia coli. Of these 995 were obtained from routine samples taken in clinic and policlinic, 290 had been sent spontaneously by general practitioners for microbiological examination and 147 had been

  9. Fluoroquinolone resistance: relation between drug use and evolution of resistance in some Units of the “San Bassiano” hospital from 2007 to 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Mascotto

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available There is substantial evidence that the overuse of antibiotics is a major cause for the emergence in antimicrobial resistance. This study analyzes the evolution of antimicrobial resistance to ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin from 2007 to 2008 in some Units of the “San Bassiano” hospital and compares this evolution among the consumption of the same antibiotics. The study involved the collection of all first isolates in blood, urine and transtracheal samples between 2007 and 2008; three microorganisms were chosen: Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Microorganisms investigations concerned Geriatrics, Medicine, Surgery and Intensive Care Unit (ICU with 48, 48, 44 and 10 beds respectively. Identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using the Phoenix automated system (Becton Dickinson. If the ciprofloxacin susceptibility was (S and levofloxacin susceptibility was (I/R antimicrobial susceptibility was confirmed by the E-Test method (bioMérieux on Muller Hilton agar and cell density of 0.5 MacFarland. Control strains were E. Coli ATCC 25922, P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and S. aureus ATCC 29213. The antibiotics consumed in the hospital between January 2007 and December 2008 were transformed into Defined Daily Dose (DDD, which corresponds to the quantity of antibiotics consumed by a patient in 24 h. Ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin demonstrated a similar pattern of increasing resistance in some units between 2007 and 2008. Fluoroquinolone resistance increase for E. coli, varies from 10% in Geriatrics to 15% in ICU, for S. aureus varies from 15% in Medicine Unit to 5% in ICU. P. aeruginosa maintained the same percentage of resistance from 2007 to 2008, but there was a significantly increase of strains with intermediate sensitivity (I up to 30%. The consumption of Ciprofloxacin didn’t increase in any of the units and in some case decreased. The consumption of levofloxacin increased in every units

  10. IDENTIFICATION OF UROVIRULENT MARKERS IN UROPATHOGE NIC ESCHERICHIA COLI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmaja

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted in the Department o f Microbiology, Konaseema Institute of Medical Sciences, Amalapuram, East Goda vari District from August 2011 to January 2012. Fifty Escherichia coli (E.coli strains isola ted from urine samples of different clinical entities and 25 feacal isolates were studied for th e detection of virulence markers of E.coli. There are 27 uropathogenic E.coli (UPEC isolates fr om 50 E.coli & 5 UPEC from 25 controls. Among isolates tested the most common virulent mark er is haemolysin 21 (42%, followed by Mannose resistant haemagglutination 16 (32%, cell surface hydrophobicity 13 (26%. In this, there are 14 cases with only one virulence marker, 8 with 2 marker combinations and 15 cases with combination of 3 markers.

  11. EcoCyc: Encyclopedia of Escherichia coli genes and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, P D; Riley, M; Paley, S M; Pellegrini-Toole, A; Krummenacker, M

    1998-01-01

    The encyclopedia of Escherichia coli genes and metabolism (EcoCyc) is a database that combines information about the genome and the intermediary metabolism of E.coli. The database describes 3030 genes of E.coli , 695 enzymes encoded by a subset of these genes, 595 metabolic reactions that occur in E.coli, and the organization of these reactions into 123 metabolic pathways. The EcoCyc graphical user interface allows scientists to query and explore the EcoCyc database using visualization tools such as genomic-map browsers and automatic layouts of metabolic pathways. EcoCyc can be thought of as an electronic review article because of its copious references to the primary literature, and as a (qualitative) computational model of E.coli metabolism. EcoCyc is available at URL http://ecocyc.PangeaSystems.com/ecocyc/

  12. Phylogenetic Group Determination of Escherichia coli Isolated from Animals Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Morcatti Coura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the occurrence and distribution of phylogenetic groups of 391 strains of Escherichia coli isolated from poultry, cattle, and water buffalo. The frequency of the phylogroups was A = 19%, B1 = 57%, B2 = 2.3%, C = 4.6%, D = 2.8%, E = 11%, and F = 3.3%. Phylogroups A (P<0.001 and F (P=0.018 were associated with E. coli strains isolated from poultry, phylogroups B1 (P<0.001 and E (P=0.002 were associated with E. coli isolated from cattle, and phylogroups B2 (P=0.003 and D (P=0.017 were associated with E. coli isolated from water buffalo. This report demonstrated that some phylogroups are associated with the host analyzed and the results provide knowledge of the phylogenetic composition of E. coli from domestic animals.

  13. Bug on the back: vertebral osteomyelitis secondary to fluoroquinolone resistant Salmonella typhi in an immunocompetent patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Pragya; Mohan, Sachin; Roy, Satyajeet

    2015-11-27

    Although Salmonella osteomyelitis is commonly seen in immunocompromised patients, it may occasionally affect an immunocompetent host. Symptoms are usually non-specific, such as fever, abdominal or back pain; hence it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with a history of travel to endemic regions. Fluoroquinolone resistance is rising and non-responsive patients should be treated with ampicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and ceftriaxone. We present a case of acute T8-T11 osteomyelitis with cord compression caused by a fluoroquinolone resistant strain of Salmonella typhi.

  14. Fluoroquinolone prophylaxis against febrile neutropenia in areas with high fluoroquinolone resistance--an Asian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Esther Shu-Ting; Liew, Yixin; Koh, Liang Piu; Hsu, Li Yang

    2010-09-01

    Febrile neutropenia remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients receiving chemotherapy. Major prophylactic strategies include granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and antibiotics, the most widely used of which are fluoroquinolones. While fluoroquinolone prophylaxis has been shown to be effective in areas where fluoroquinolone resistance is low, this same efficacy has not been proven in areas where resistance is high, such as in Asia. Given the increase in antimicrobial resistance with the use of prophylaxis, the risks and benefits of this strategy need to be carefully considered. This review presents the evidence for and against fluoroquinolone prophylaxis in areas of high fluoroquinolone resistance.

  15. Evolution of the iss gene in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Timothy J; Wannemuehler, Yvonne M; Nolan, Lisa K

    2008-04-01

    The increased serum survival gene iss has long been recognized for its role in extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) virulence. iss has been identified as a distinguishing trait of avian ExPEC but not of human ExPEC. This gene has been localized to large virulence plasmids and shares strong similarities with the bor gene from bacteriophage lambda. Here, we demonstrate that three alleles of iss occur among E. coli isolates that appear to have evolved from a common lambda bor precursor. In addition to the occurrence of iss on the ColV/BM virulence plasmids, at least two iss alleles occur within the E. coli chromosome. One of these alleles (designated type 3) was found to occur in the genomes of all currently sequenced ExPEC strains on a similar prophage element that also harbors the Sit iron and manganese transport system. When the prevalence of the three iss types was examined among 487 E. coli isolates, the iss type 3 gene was found to occur at a high frequency among ExPEC isolates, irrespective of the host source. The plasmid-borne iss allele (designated type 1) was highly prevalent among avian pathogenic E. coli and neonatal meningitis-associated E. coli isolates but not among uropathogenic E. coli isolates. This study demonstrates the evolution of iss in E. coli and provides an additional tool for discriminating among E. coli pathotypes through the differentiation of the three iss allele types and bor.

  16. Adhesive threads of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antão Esther-Maria

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The ability to adhere to host surfaces is by far the most vital step in the successful colonization by microbial pathogens. Colonization begins with the attachment of the bacterium to receptors expressed by cells forming the lining of the mucosa. Long hair like extracellular appendages called fimbriae, produced by most Gram-negative pathogens, mediate specific attachment to the epithelial cell surface. Associated with the fimbriae is a protein called an adhesin, which directs high-affinity binding to specific cell surface components. In the last couple of years, an enormous amount of research has been undertaken that deals with understanding how bacterial pathogens adhere to host cells. E. coli in all probability is one of the best studied free-living organisms. A group of E. coli called Extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC including both human and animal pathogens like Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC, Newborn meningitic E. coli (NMEC and Avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC, have been found to harbour many fimbriae including Type 1 fimbriae, P fimbriae, curli fibres, S fimbriae, F1C fimbriae, Dr fimbriae, afimbrial adhesins, temperature-sensitive haemagglutinin and many novel adhesin gene clusters that have not yet been characterized. Each of these adhesins is unique due to the recognition of an adhesin-specific receptor, though as a group these adhesins share common genomic organization. A newly identified putative adhesin temporarily termed ExPEC Adhesin I, encoded by gene yqi, has been recently found to play a significant role in the pathogenesis of APEC infection, thus making it an interesting candidate for future research. The aim of this review is to describe the role of ExPEC adhesins during extraintestinal infections known till date, and to suggest the idea of investigating their potential role in the colonization of the host gut which is said to be a reservoir for ExPEC.

  17. Deuterium incorporation into Escherichia-coli proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lederer, H.; May, R. P.; Kjems, Jørgen

    1986-01-01

    Neutron small-angle scattering studies of single protein subunits in a protein-DNA complex require the adjustment of the neutron scattering-length densities of protein and DNA, which is attainable by specific deuteration of the protein. The neutron scattering densities of unlabelled DNA and DNA...... of the degree of deuteration and match point of any E. coli protein from the D2O content of the growth medium, taking the 2H incorporation into RNA polymerase amino acids to be representative for all amino acids in E. coli proteins. The small-angle scattering results, on which the calculation of the degree...

  18. Deuterium incorporation into Escherichia-coli proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lederer, H.; May, R. P.; Kjems, Jørgen;

    1986-01-01

    Neutron small-angle scattering studies of single protein subunits in a protein-DNA complex require the adjustment of the neutron scattering-length densities of protein and DNA, which is attainable by specific deuteration of the protein. The neutron scattering densities of unlabelled DNA and DNA...... of the degree of deuteration and match point of any E. coli protein from the D2O content of the growth medium, taking the 2H incorporation into RNA polymerase amino acids to be representative for all amino acids in E. coli proteins. The small-angle scattering results, on which the calculation of the degree...

  19. Antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli bacteria, including strains with genes encoding the extended-spectrum beta-lactamase and QnrS, in waterbirds on the Baltic Sea Coast of Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Literak, Ivan; Dolejska, Monika; Janoszowska, Dagmar; Hrusakova, Jolana; Meissner, Wlodzimierz; Rzyska, Hanna; Bzoma, Szymon; Cizek, Alois

    2010-12-01

    Individual cloacal swabs of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) and of herring gulls (Larus argentatus), as well as samples of waterbird feces obtained in 2008 and 2009, were cultivated for Escherichia coli. Isolates of E. coli were tested for susceptibilities to 12 antimicrobial agents by the disk diffusion method. Moreover, the samples were subcultivated on MacConkey agar (MCA) containing cefotaxime (2 mg liter(-1)) to detect E. coli with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) and subsequently on MCA supplemented with ciprofloxacin (0.05 mg liter(-1)) and MCA with nalidixic acid (20 mg liter(-1)) to isolate fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli. PCR was used to detect specific antibiotic resistance genes. We found 9 E. coli isolates producing ESBL with bla genes: bla(CTX-M-1) (6 isolates), bla(CTX-M-9) plus bla(TEM-1b) (1 isolate), bla(CTX-M-15) plus bla(OXA-1) (1 isolate), and bla(SHV-12) (1 isolate). In the isolate with bla(CTX-M-15), the gene aac(6)-Ib-cr was also detected. The bla genes were harbored by transferable plasmids of the IncN and IncI1 groups. Nine quinolone-resistant E. coli isolates with qnrS genes were found and characterized. The gene qnrS was associated with a Tn3-like transposon on the IncX1 plasmid together with bla(TEM-1) in two isolates. The gene qnrS was also harbored by conjugative plasmids of the IncN and IncX2 groups. Even if populations of wild birds are not directly influenced by antibiotic practice, we have demonstrated that antibiotic-resistant E. coli strains, including strains with various ESBL and qnrS genes, are found in the feces of wild birds on the coast of the Baltic Sea in Poland.

  20. Infectious endocarditis caused by Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Trine Kiilerich; Arpi, Magnus; Fritz-Hansen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    -spectrum intravenous antibiotics. Transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography revealed a severe mitral endocarditis. E. coli DNA was identified from the mitral valve and the vegetation, and no other pathogen was found. The case was further complicated by spondylodiscitis and bilateral endophthalmitis. Extra...

  1. Genomic Comparative Study of Bovine Mastitis Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempf, Florent; Slugocki, Cindy; Blum, Shlomo E.; Leitner, Gabriel; Germon, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli, one of the main causative agents of bovine mastitis, is responsible for significant losses on dairy farms. In order to better understand the pathogenicity of E. coli mastitis, an accurate characterization of E. coli strains isolated from mastitis cases is required. By using phylogenetic analyses and whole genome comparison of 5 currently available mastitis E. coli genome sequences, we searched for genotypic traits specific for mastitis isolates. Our data confirm that there is a bias in the distribution of mastitis isolates in the different phylogenetic groups of the E. coli species, with the majority of strains belonging to phylogenetic groups A and B1. An interesting feature is that clustering of strains based on their accessory genome is very similar to that obtained using the core genome. This finding illustrates the fact that phenotypic properties of strains from different phylogroups are likely to be different. As a consequence, it is possible that different strategies could be used by mastitis isolates of different phylogroups to trigger mastitis. Our results indicate that mastitis E. coli isolates analyzed in this study carry very few of the virulence genes described in other pathogenic E. coli strains. A more detailed analysis of the presence/absence of genes involved in LPS synthesis, iron acquisition and type 6 secretion systems did not uncover specific properties of mastitis isolates. Altogether, these results indicate that mastitis E. coli isolates are rather characterized by a lack of bona fide currently described virulence genes. PMID:26809117

  2. Genomic Comparative Study of Bovine Mastitis Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempf, Florent; Slugocki, Cindy; Blum, Shlomo E; Leitner, Gabriel; Germon, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli, one of the main causative agents of bovine mastitis, is responsible for significant losses on dairy farms. In order to better understand the pathogenicity of E. coli mastitis, an accurate characterization of E. coli strains isolated from mastitis cases is required. By using phylogenetic analyses and whole genome comparison of 5 currently available mastitis E. coli genome sequences, we searched for genotypic traits specific for mastitis isolates. Our data confirm that there is a bias in the distribution of mastitis isolates in the different phylogenetic groups of the E. coli species, with the majority of strains belonging to phylogenetic groups A and B1. An interesting feature is that clustering of strains based on their accessory genome is very similar to that obtained using the core genome. This finding illustrates the fact that phenotypic properties of strains from different phylogroups are likely to be different. As a consequence, it is possible that different strategies could be used by mastitis isolates of different phylogroups to trigger mastitis. Our results indicate that mastitis E. coli isolates analyzed in this study carry very few of the virulence genes described in other pathogenic E. coli strains. A more detailed analysis of the presence/absence of genes involved in LPS synthesis, iron acquisition and type 6 secretion systems did not uncover specific properties of mastitis isolates. Altogether, these results indicate that mastitis E. coli isolates are rather characterized by a lack of bona fide currently described virulence genes.

  3. Chromosomal features of Escherichia coli serotype O2:K2, an avian pathogenic E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Steffen L; Kudirkiene, Egle; Li, Lili; Christensen, Jens P; Olsen, John E; Nolan, Lisa; Olsen, Rikke H

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli causing infection outside the gastrointestinal system are referred to as extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli. Avian pathogenic E. coli is a subgroup of extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli and infections due to avian pathogenic E. coli have major impact on poultry production economy and welfare worldwide. An almost defining characteristic of avian pathogenic E. coli is the carriage of plasmids, which may encode virulence factors and antibiotic resistance determinates. For the same reason, plasmids of avian pathogenic E. coli have been intensively studied. However, genes encoded by the chromosome may also be important for disease manifestation and antimicrobial resistance. For the E. coli strain APEC_O2 the plasmids have been sequenced and analyzed in several studies, and E. coli APEC_O2 may therefore serve as a reference strain in future studies. Here we describe the chromosomal features of E. coli APEC_O2. E. coli APEC_O2 is a sequence type ST135, has a chromosome of 4,908,820 bp (plasmid removed), comprising 4672 protein-coding genes, 110 RNA genes, and 156 pseudogenes, with an average G + C content of 50.69%. We identified 82 insertion sequences as well as 4672 protein coding sequences, 12 predicated genomic islands, three prophage-related sequences, and two clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats regions on the chromosome, suggesting the possible occurrence of horizontal gene transfer in this strain. The wildtype strain of E. coli APEC_O2 is resistant towards multiple antimicrobials, however, no (complete) antibiotic resistance genes were present on the chromosome, but a number of genes associated with extra-intestinal disease were identified. Together, the information provided here on E. coli APEC_O2 will assist in future studies of avian pathogenic E. coli strains, in particular regarding strain of E. coli APEC_O2, and aid in the general understanding of the pathogenesis of avian pathogenic E. coli.

  4. Alterations induced in Escherichia Coli cells by gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kappke, J.; Schelin, H.R.; Paschuk, S.A.; Denyak, V.; Silva, E.R. da [Federal University of Technology of Parana (CPGEI/UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)]. E-mails: jaquekap@yahoo.com.br; schelin@cpgei.cefetpr.br; sergei@utfpr.edu.br; Jesus, E.F.O. de; Lopes, R.T. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear]. E-mails: ricardo@lin.ufrj.br; edgar@lin.ufrj.br; Carlin, N.; Toledo, E.S. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica]. E-mail: nelson.carlin@dfn.if.usp.br

    2007-07-01

    Modifications occurred in Escherichia coli cells exposed to gamma radiation ({sup 60}Co source) were investigated. The irradiations were done at the LIN-COPPE laboratory of the UFRJ and the analysis at the Biology Department of the UTFPR. The E. coli cells were irradiated with 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180, 210, 240, 300, 480, 600 e 750 Gy doses. The samples were analyzed with Gram-stain, biochemical tests in EPM, MIO and Lysine Broth, Simmons Cytrate Medium and Rhamnose Broth, antibiogram and isolation of auxotrophic mutants. It was observed that for the received doses the E. coli did not show morphological alterations in the tests. Some E. Coli cells showed to be able to deaminade the L-tryptophan or they changed their sensibility for amoxillin and cephaloonine after the irradiation. The existence of aauxotrophic mutants after irradiation was also verified. (author)

  5. Is Escherichia coli urinary tract infection a zoonosis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, L.; Garneau, P.; Bruant, G.

    2012-01-01

    and kidney cultures. Further, isolates with the same gene profile also yielded similar bacterial counts in urine, bladder and kidneys. This study showed a clonal link between E. coli from meat and humans, providing solid evidence that UTI is zoonosis. The close relationship between community-dwelling human......Recently, it has been suggested that the Escherichia coli causing urinary tract infection (UTI) may come from meat and animals. The purpose was to investigate if a clonal link existed between E. coli from animals, meat and UTI patients. Twenty-two geographically and temporally matched B2 E. coli...... from UTI patients, community-dwelling humans, broiler chicken meat, pork, and broiler chicken, previously identified to exhibit eight virulence genotypes by microarraydetection of approximately 300 genes, were investigated for clonal relatedness by PFGE. Nine isolates were selected and tested...

  6. Occurrence of pathogenic and faecal Escherichia coli in layer hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Tagliabue

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 117 Escherichia coli from colibacillosis affected (APEC and clinically healthy birds (AFEC were serotyped and tested for the presence of virulence genes: iss, tsh, cva. A total of 54.5% E. Coli were typeable and 15 different serogroups were identified. The most common serogroups among APEC strains were O78, O2 and O128, whereas O139 was predominant in faecal strains from healthy birds. Iss, tsh e cva were more frequently detected among the septicaemic E. coli strains. The association of virulence genes was observed. Particularly, the pathotype iss-tsh-cva was present in 46.5% of APEC strains. Referring to serogroups, E. coli O78 and O2 originating from colibacillosis affected birds were always isstsh- cva positive but did not share virulence genes when they came from healthy birds.

  7. EcoCyc: Enyclopedia of Escherichia coli Genes and Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, P D; Riley, M; Paley, S M; Pellegrini-Toole, A; Krummenacker, M

    1997-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of Genes and Metabolism (EcoCyc) is a database that combines information about the genome and the intermediary metabolism of Escherichia coli. It describes 2970 genes of E.coli, 547 enzymes encoded by these genes, 702 metabolic reactions that occur in E.coli and the organization of these reactions into 107 metabolic pathways. The EcoCyc graphical user interface allows scientists to query and explore the EcoCyc database using visualization tools such as genomic-map browsers and automatic layouts of metabolic pathways. EcoCyc spans the space from sequence to function to allow scientists to investigate an unusually broad range of questions. EcoCyc can be thought of as both an electronic review article because of its copious references to the primary literature, and as an in silicio model of E.coli metabolism that can be probed and analyzed through computational means.

  8. Escherichia coli control in a surface flow treatment wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacIntyre, M E; Warner, B G; Slawson, R M

    2006-06-01

    A field experiment showed that numbers of Escherichia coli declined significantly when floating Lemna spp. plants were removed to create open water areas in a typical newly constructed surface flow treatment wetland in southern Ontario. It is suggested that E. coli declined immediately after Lemna removal because the Lemna was shading the water column from penetration by natural UV radiation, it was providing favourable attachment sites for the E. coli, and it was not allowing effective free exchange of oxygen from surface winds to the water column to maintain high enough dissolved oxygen supplies for predator zooplankton populations. Operators of wetland systems must have the specialized skills required to recognize the cause and the appropriate maintenance requirements to maintain efficient operation of such unconventional systems should E. coli numbers increase during the course of operation.

  9. Engineered synthetic pathway for isopropanol production in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanai, T; Atsumi, S; Liao, J C

    2007-12-01

    A synthetic pathway was engineered in Escherichia coli to produce isopropanol by expressing various combinations of genes from Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824, E. coli K-12 MG1655, Clostridium beijerinckii NRRL B593, and Thermoanaerobacter brockii HTD4. The strain with the combination of C. acetobutylicum thl (acetyl-coenzyme A [CoA] acetyltransferase), E. coli atoAD (acetoacetyl-CoA transferase), C. acetobutylicum adc (acetoacetate decarboxylase), and C. beijerinckii adh (secondary alcohol dehydrogenase) achieved the highest titer. This strain produced 81.6 mM isopropanol in shake flasks with a yield of 43.5% (mol/mol) in the production phase. To our knowledge, this work is the first to produce isopropanol in E. coli, and the titer exceeded that from the native producers.

  10. Biosynthesis of Two Flavones, Apigenin and Genkwanin, in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyejin; Kim, Bong Gyu; Kim, Mihyang; Ahn, Joong-Hoon

    2015-09-01

    The flavonoid apigenin and its O-methyl derivative, genkwanin, have various biological activities and can be sourced from some vegetables and fruits. Microorganisms are an alternative for the synthesis of flavonoids. Here, to synthesize genkwanin from tyrosine, we first synthesized apigenin from p-coumaric acid using four genes (4CL, CHS, CHI, and FNS) in Escherichia coli. After optimization of different combinations of constructs, the yield of apigenin was increased from 13 mg/l to 30 mg/l. By introducing two additional genes (TAL and POMT7) into an apigenin-producing E. coli strain, we were able to synthesize 7-O-methyl apigenin (genkwanin) from tyrosine. In addition, the tyrosine content in E. coli was modulated by overexpressing aroG and tyrA. The engineered E. coli strain synthesized approximately 41 mg/l genkwanin.

  11. Yeast DNA sequences initiating gene expression in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, Astrid; Tran, Thi Tuyen; Jacob, Daniela; Mayer, Martin; Freytag, Barbara; Appel, Bernd

    2004-01-01

    DNA transfer between pro- and eukaryotes occurs either during natural horizontal gene transfer or as a result of the employment of gene technology. We analysed the capacity of DNA sequences from a eukaryotic donor organism (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) to serve as promoter region in a prokaryotic recipient (Escherichia coli) by creating fusions between promoterless luxAB genes from Vibrio harveyi and random DNA sequences from S. cerevisiae and measuring the luminescence of transformed E. coli. Fifty-four out of 100 randomly analysed S. cerevisiae DNA sequences caused considerable gene expression in E. coli. Determination of transcription start sites within six selected yeast sequences in E. coli confirmed the existence of bacterial -10 and -35 consensus sequences at appropriate distances upstream from transcription initiation sites. Our results demonstrate that the probability of transcription of transferred eukaryotic DNA in bacteria is extremely high and does not require the insertion of the transferred DNA behind a promoter of the recipient genome.

  12. Food-borne origins of Escherichia coli causing extraintestinal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manges, Amee R; Johnson, James R

    2012-09-01

    Most human extraintestinal Escherichia coli infections, including those involving antimicrobial resistant strains, are caused by the members of a limited number of distinctive E. coli lineages, termed extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC), that have a special ability to cause disease at extraintestinal sites when they exit their usual reservoir in the host's intestinal tract. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that many of the ExPEC strains encountered in humans with urinary tract infection, sepsis, and other extraintestinal infections, especially the most extensively antimicrobial-resistant strains, may have a food animal source, and may be transmitted to humans via the food supply. This review summarizes the evidence that food-borne organisms are a significant cause of extraintestinal E. coli infections in humans.

  13. Effect of Genetic Database Comprehensiveness on Fractional Proteomics of Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    EFFECT OF GENETIC DATABASE COMPREHENSIVENESS ON FRACTIONAL PROTEOMICS OF ESCHERICHIA COLI O157:H7 ECBC-TR-1154...Database Comprehensiveness on Fractional Proteomics of Escherichia coli O157:H7 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...are characterizing the extracellular, fimbriae, and whole cell proteins produced by the pathogenic Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli (E. coli

  14. Viabilidad de Escherichia coli en presencia De diferentes contaminantes

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Rivera T,; Edith Chávez B.; Gisela Rendón A.; Silvia Giono C

    2006-01-01

    La contaminación en ríos condiciona la presencia de microorganismos adaptados al ecosistema entre ellos a pató-genos de importancia en salud pública. Objetivo: Determinar la viabilidad de Escherichia coli en presencia de nitrato de plata, carbonato de amonio, fenol y formaldehído. Materiales y métodos: Se tomaron muestras de agua del río Alseseca, que luego se sembró en medios de cultivo selectivos para enterobacterias, seleccionándose las colonias del género Escherichia, las cuales fueron se...

  15. Low rate of fluoroquinolone resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from northern Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Boogaard, Jossy; Semvua, Hadija H; van Ingen, Jakko; Mwaigwisya, Solomon; van der Laan, Tridia; van Soolingen, Dick; Kibiki, Gibson S; Boeree, Martin J; Aarnoutse, Rob E

    2011-08-01

    Fluoroquinolones are used in second-line treatment of tuberculosis (TB) and have a potential role in shortening TB treatment duration. The wide use of fluoroquinolones in the treatment of other infections, including respiratory tract infections in patients with (undiagnosed) active TB, could result in fluoroquinolone-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We determined the rate of fluoroquinolone resistance in M. tuberculosis isolates obtained from Tanzanian patients and linked this to previous fluoroquinolone exposure and mycobacterial resistance to rifampicin and isoniazid. A total of 291 M. tuberculosis isolates were obtained between April 2009 and June 2010 from patients with smear-positive pulmonary TB and tested for susceptibility to ciprofloxacin, moxifloxacin, rifampicin and isoniazid. Information on previous fluoroquinolone use was obtained by interviewing patients and checking their medical files. Only 2 (0.7%) of the 291 M. tuberculosis isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin; 1 of which was intermediately resistant to moxifloxacin as well. These two isolates were susceptible to rifampicin and isoniazid. Twenty-two (8%) of the 291 patients had a history of fluoroquinolone use (median: 7 days; interquartile range: 5-10 days). The patients from whom the fluoroquinolone-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates were obtained had no known history of previous fluoroquinolone use. Our findings indicate that the rate of fluoroquinolone-resistant M. tuberculosis in Tanzanian patients with TB is low and not related to previous, brief episodes of exposure to fluoroquinolones. The findings favour future application of fluoroquinolones in TB treatment regimens of shorter duration.

  16. Circular dimers of lambda DNA in infected, nonlysogenic Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freifelder, D.; Baran, N.; Folkmanis, A.; Freifelder, D.L.R.

    1977-09-01

    Covalently closed circular dimerss of phage lambda DNA have been found in Escherichia coli infected with lambda. These dimers can be formed by either the lambda Red or Int systems, by a nonrecombinational replicative mechanism requiring the activity of the lambda O and P genes or by joining of the cohesive ends. Dimers mediated by the E. coli Rec system have not been observed. Those formed by the Int system often result from recombination between different DNA molecules; however, the Red-mediated dimer may be a result of replicative extension of a single DNA molecule. Trimers have also been observed but studied only briefly.

  17. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Serotypes and Endemic Diarrhea in Infants

    OpenAIRE

    M. Regina F. Toledo; Alvariza, M. do Carmo B.; Murahovschi, Jayme; Sonia R.T.S. RAMOS; Trabulsi, Luiz R.

    1983-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli serotypes were searched for in feces of 550 children with endemic diarrhea and in 129 controls, in São Paulo, in 1978 and 1979; serotypes O111ab:H−, O111ab:H2, and O119:H6 were significantly associated with diarrhea in children 0 to 5 months old and were the most frequent agents of diarrhea in this age group as compared with enterotoxigenic and enteroinvasive E. coli, Salmonella sp., Shigella sp., and Yersinia enterocolitica. It is concluded that various ente...

  18. Sedimentation and gravitational instability of Escherichia coli Suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douarche, Carine; Salin, Dominique; Collaboration between Laboratory FAST; LPS Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    The successive run and tumble of Escherichia coli bacteria provides an active matter suspension of rod-like particles with a large swimming diffusion. As opposed to inactive elongated particles, this diffusion prevents clustering and instability in the gravity field. We measure the time dependent E . coli concentration profile during their sedimentation. After some hours, due to the dioxygen consumption, a motile / non-motile front forms leading to a Rayleigh-Taylor type gravitational instability. Analyzing both sedimentation and instability in the framework of active particle suspensions, we can measure the relevant bacteria hydrodynamic characteristics such as its single particle sedimentation velocity and its hindrance volume.

  19. [Drug resistance of Escherichia coli strains isolated from poultry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giurov, B; Korudzhiĭski, N; Bineva, I

    1981-01-01

    Studied was the sensitivity of a total of 143 strains of Escherichia coli, isolated from young birds and broilers died from coli septicaemia, to antibiotics and chemotherapeutics. The following descending order was established: gentamycin, carbenicillin, ampicillin, furazolidon, borgal, kanamycin, strep tomycin, chloramphenicol, neomycin sulphathiazole, and tetracycline. Markers of resistance were established with all strains with regard to the therapeutic agents in current and prospective use in industrial poultry farming. It is stated that a preliminary antibiogram is indispensable in order to obtain dependable results in the treatment of animals affected with colibacteriosis. An alternative is to apply directly those drugs to which the strains have shown highest sensitivity.

  20. Inducible repair of oxidative DNA damage in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demple, B; Halbrook, J

    Hydrogen peroxide is lethal to many cell types, including the bacterium Escherichia coli. Peroxides yield transient radical species that can damage DNA and cause mutations. Such partially reduced oxygen species are occasionally released during cellular respiration and are generated by lethal and mutagenic ionizing radiation. Because cells live in an environment where the threat of oxidative DNA damage is continual, cellular mechanisms may have evolved to avoid and repair this damage. Enzymes are known which evidently perform these functions. We report here that resistance to hydrogen peroxide toxicity can be induced in E. coli, that this novel induction is specific and occurs, in part, at the level of DNA repair.

  1. Antibacterial behavior of diamond nanoparticles against Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beranova, Jana; Seydlova, Gabriela [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Cukrovarnicka 10, 16200 Prague (Czech Republic); Department of Genetics and Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Vinicna 5, 12844 Prague (Czech Republic); Kozak, Halyna; Potocky, Stepan; Kromka, Alexander [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Cukrovarnicka 10, 16200 Prague (Czech Republic); Konopasek, Ivo [Department of Genetics and Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Vinicna 5, 12844 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2012-12-15

    In this study, we investigated the potential antibacterial properties of nanocrystalline diamond. In particular, we tested the effect of diamond nanoparticles (DNPs) on growth of the model gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli on solid, nutrient-rich growth medium. We found that the presence of DNPs on agar plates significantly reduced the colony forming ability of E. coli. The antibacterial effect occurred in a concentration dependent manner and was conditional on the specific ratio of DNPs to the number of bacterial cells. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. ESCHERICHIA COLI: AN IMPORTANT PATHOGEN IN PATIENTS WITH HEMATOLOGIC MALIGNANCIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Olson

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli (E. coli is a pathogen of great concern in immunosuppressed patients.  While antimicrobial prophylactic therapy has become the standard, the emergence of resistant pathogens has some questioning its use.  This study describes our experience with E.coli as a pathogen in neutropenic patients with a hematologic malignancy, and addresses future directions of treatment for this patient population. Methods A retrospective chart review of 245 E.coli bacteremia patients at Moffitt Cancer Center from 05/18/02 – 05/15/12 was conducted. Patients were identified via microbiology laboratory computerized records. Results The included patients experienced clinically significant E.coli bacteremia resulting in a median hospital stay of 14.7 days.  Several patients developed severe sepsis requiring the use of pressor and ventilator therapy. Conclusions E.coli is a major pathogen in these patient populations resulting in extended hospital stays and specialized treatment to overcome their E.coli bacteremia. The data supports the use of fluoroquinolone prophylactic therapy, however, earlier detection and treatment of neutropenic infection is needed.

  3. Gentamicin resistance among Escherichia coli strains isolated in neonatal sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasvold, J; Bradford, L; Nelson, C; Harrison, C; Attar, M; Stillwell, T

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality among term and preterm infants. Ampicillin and gentamicin are standard empiric therapy for early onset sepsis. Four cases of neonatal sepsis secondary to Escherichia coli (E. coli) found to be gentamicin resistant occurred within a five week period in one neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). To determine whether these cases could be tied to a single vector of transmission, and to more broadly evaluate the incidence of gentamicin resistant strains of E. coli in the neonatal population at our institution compared to other centers, we reviewed the charts of the four neonates (Infants A through D) and their mothers. The E. coli isolates were sent for Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) to evaluate for genetic similarity between strains. We also reviewed all positive E. coli cultures from one NICU over a two year period. Infants A and B had genetically indistinguishable strains which matched that of urine and placental cultures of Infant B's mother. Infant C had a genetically distinct organism. Infant D, the identical twin of Infant C, did not have typing performed. Review of all cultures positive for E. coli at our institution showed a 12.9 percent incidence of gentamicin-resistance. A review of other studies showed that rates of resistance vary considerably by institution. We conclude that gentamicin-resistant E. coli is a relatively uncommon cause of neonatal sepsis, but should remain a consideration in patients who deteriorate despite initiation of empiric antibiotics.

  4. EFFECT OF VISIBLE RANGE ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATIONS ON ESCHERICHIA COLI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeemi, Samina T Yousuf; Shaukat, Saleem Farooq; Azeemi, Khawaja Shamsuddin; Khan, Idrees; Mahmood, Khalid; Naz, Farah

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the agent responsible for a range of clinical diseases. With emerging antimicrobial resistance, other treatment options including solar/photo-therapy are becoming increasingly common. Visible Range Radiation Therapy/Colour Therapy is an emerging technique in the field of energy/vibrational medicine that uses visible spectrum of Electromagnetic Radiations to cure different diseases. In this study, our goal was to understand the effect of Visible Range Electromagnetic Radiations on E. coli (in vitro) and therefore find out the most appropriate visible range radiation for the treatment of diseases caused by E. coli. A total of 6 non-repetitive E. coli isolates were obtained from urine samples obtained from hospitalized patients with UTI. Single colony of E. coli was inoculated in 3 ml of Lysogeny Broth (LB) and 40 μl of this E. coli suspension was poured into each of the plastic tubes which were then irradiated with six different wavelengths in the visible region (Table. 1) after 18 hours with one acting as a control. The Optical Densities of these irradiated samples were then measured. Furthermore, scanning electron microscopy (TEFCAN ZEGA3) was carried out. The analysis of the microscopic and SEM images of irradiated E. coli samples with six different visible range radiations is representative of The fact that E. coli responded differently to every applied radiation in the visible region and the most profound inhibitory effects were that of 538nm Visible Range Radiation (Green) which proved to be bactericidal and 590nm Visible Range Radiation (yellow) which was bacteriostatic. The enhanced growth of E. coli with varying degrees was clearly observed in 610nm (orange), 644nm (red), 464nm (Purple) and 453nm (blue). It can be concluded that 538nm (Green) and 590nm (Yellow) can effectively be used for treating E. coli borne diseases.

  5. Stimulation of Escherichia coli F-18Col- Type-1 fimbriae synthesis by leuX

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Newman, Joseph V.; Burghoff, Robert L.; Pallesen, Lars

    1994-01-01

    Escherichia coli F-18, a normal human fecal isolate, is an excellent colonizer of the streptomycin-treated mouse large intestine. E. coli F-18Col-, a derivative of E. coli F-18 which no longer makes the E. coli F-18 colicin, colonizes the large intestine as well as E. coli F-18 when fed to mice a...

  6. Comparison of 61 Sequenced Escherichia coli Genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukjancenko, Oksana; Wassenaar, T. M.; Ussery, David

    2010-01-01

    MLST was performed, many of the various strains appear jumbled and less well resolved. The predicted pan-genome comprises 15,741 gene families, and only 993 (6%) of the families are represented in every genome, comprising the core genome. The variable or 'accessory' genes thus make up more than 90......% of the pan-genome and about 80% of a typical genome; some of these variable genes tend to be co-localized on genomic islands. The diversity within the species E. coli, and the overlap in gene content between this and related species, suggests a continuum rather than sharp species borders in this group...

  7. Topical fluoroquinolone use as a risk factor for in vitro fluoroquinolone resistance in ocular cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fintelmann, Robert E; Hoskins, Eliza N; Lietman, Thomas M; Keenan, Jeremy D; Gaynor, Bruce D; Cevallos, Vicky; Acharya, Nisha R

    2011-04-01

    To determine whether recent use of topical fluoroquinolones is a risk factor for in vitro fluoroquinolone resistance in Staphylococcus aureus ocular isolates. Disk diffusion susceptibility testing for ciprofloxacin, moxifloxacin, and gatifloxacin was performed for all ocular isolates of S aureus at the Francis I. Proctor Foundation microbiology laboratory from January 1, 2005, to December 31, 2008. The medical records of patients with positive S aureus cultures were reviewed to determine topical or systemic fluoroquinolone use within the 3 months prior to culture. The Fisher exact test was used to compare the proportion of patients who used topical fluoroquinolones in the past 3 months among fluoroquinolone-sensitive and -resistant cases. Logistic regression was used to determine risk factors for fluoroquinolone resistance. Of 200 S aureus cultures, 41 were resistant to ciprofloxacin, moxifloxacin, and gatifloxacin (20.5%). Fluoroquinolone-resistant S aureus isolates were from older patients (mean [SD] age, 65.5 [25.0] years) compared with fluoroquinolone-susceptible isolates (mean [SD] patient age, 52.1 [22.1] years) (P = .003). Use of fluoroquinolones within the 3 months before testing was more frequent in resistant isolates (29%) than in susceptible isolates (11%) (P = .005), as was recent hospitalization (22% of resistant isolates, 0% of susceptible isolates) (P fluoroquinolone use within 3 months was a significant predictor of fluoroquinolone resistance (P = .046), along with age, systemic immunosuppression, and topical fluoroquinolone use between 3 and 6 months before testing. Recent topical fluoroquinolone use is significantly associated with fluoroquinolone resistance in S aureus isolates from ocular cultures.

  8. Biogenesis of inner membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luirink, Joen; Yu, Zhong; Wagner, Samuel; de Gier, Jan-Willem

    2012-06-01

    The inner membrane proteome of the model organism Escherichia coli is composed of inner membrane proteins, lipoproteins and peripherally attached soluble proteins. Our knowledge of the biogenesis of inner membrane proteins is rapidly increasing. This is in particular true for the early steps of biogenesis - protein targeting to and insertion into the membrane. However, our knowledge of inner membrane protein folding and quality control is still fragmentary. Furthering our knowledge in these areas will bring us closer to understand the biogenesis of individual inner membrane proteins in the context of the biogenesis of the inner membrane proteome of Escherichia coli as a whole. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biogenesis/Assembly of Respiratory Enzyme Complexes.

  9. Tranformasi Fragmen Dna Kromosom Xanthomonas Campestris ke dalam Escherichia Coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wibowo Mangunwardoyo

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Research on DNA transformation of Xanthomonas campestris into Escherichia coli DH5αα using plasmid vector Escherichia coli (pUC19. was carried out. DNA chromosome was isolated using CTAB method, alkali lysis method was used to isolate DNA plasmid. Both of DNA plasmid and chromosome were digested using restriction enzyme EcoRI. Competent cell was prepared with CaCl2 and heat shock method for transformation procedure. The result revealed transformation obtain 5 white colonies, with transformation frequency was 1,22 x 10-8 colony/competent cell. Electrophoresis analysis showed the DNA fragment (insert in range 0.5 – 7,5 kb. Further research should be carried out to prepare the genomic library to obtain better result of transformant.

  10. Mechanobiology of Antimicrobial Resistant Escherichia coli and Listeria innocua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajkarimi, Mehrdad; Harrison, Scott H; Hung, Albert M; Graves, Joseph L

    2016-01-01

    A majority of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections in the United States are associated with biofilms. Nanoscale biophysical measures are increasingly revealing that adhesive and viscoelastic properties of bacteria play essential roles across multiple stages of biofilm development. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) applied to strains with variation in antimicrobial resistance enables new opportunities for investigating the function of adhesive forces (stickiness) in biofilm formation. AFM force spectroscopy analysis of a field strain of Listeria innocua and the strain Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 revealed differing adhesive forces between antimicrobial resistant and nonresistant strains. Significant increases in stickiness were found at the nanonewton level for strains of Listeria innocua and Escherichia coli in association with benzalkonium chloride and silver nanoparticle resistance respectively. This advancement in the usage of AFM provides for a fast and reliable avenue for analyzing antimicrobial resistant cells and the molecular dynamics of biofilm formation as a protective mechanism.

  11. Specific mistranslation in hisT mutants of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, J

    1982-01-01

    Certain strains of Escherichia coli mistranslate at very high frequencies when starved for asparagine or histidine. This mistranslation is the result of misreading events on the ribosome. The introduction of a hisT mutation into such a strain decreases the frequency of mistranslation during histidine starvation but not during asparagine starvation. The most likely explanation is that the replacement of the pseudouridine residue in the anticodon loop of glutamine specific transfer ribonucleic acid by uridine in hisT mutants leads to an increase in fidelity of transfer ribonucleic acid function. The hisT gene in Escherichia coli has also been more accurately mapped, giving the gene order purF-hisT-aroC-fadL-dsdA.

  12. Detection of fluoroquinolone resistance by mutation in gyrA gene of Campylobacter spp. isolates from broiler and laying (Gallus gallus domesticus hens,from Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz da Silva Frasao

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Poultry are considered to be the main reservoir of Campylobacter spp. bacteria, an important pathogen for humans. Many studies have reported a rapid selection of fluoroquinolone-resistant strains following the widespread use of these antimicrobials in poultry production and human medicine. The main mechanism of fluoroquinolone resistance in Campylobacter is a mutation in the Quinolone Resistance Determinant Region (QRDR in the gyrA gene, which codes for the subunit of the enzyme DNA gyrase, the target for fluoroquinolone. The aim of this study was to investigate the mutation in QRDR in the gyrA gene of Campylobacter strains previously isolated from broiler carcasses and feces of laying hens. Thirty-eight strains of C. jejuni and 19 C. coli strains (n=57, previously characterized as resistant to ciprofloxacin and enrofloxacin by the disk diffusion method and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC, were selected. For detection of the mutation, a fragment of 454pb QRDR in the gyrA gene was used for direct sequencing. All strains presented the QRDR mutation in the gyrA gene at codon 86 (Thr-86-Ile, which confers resistance to fluoroquinolones. Other known silent mutations were observed. This genotypic characterization of fluoroquinolone resistance in Campylobacter strains has confirmed the prior phenotypic detection of the resistance. The Thr-86-Ile mutation was observed in all samples confirming that this is the predominant mutation in enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin resistant strains of C. jejuni and C. coli.

  13. Extended spectrum beta-lactamases in Escherichia coli from municipal wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Čornejová

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective. Over the past decades, awareness of the environmental load of resistant organisms has increased. The presented paper focuses on antibiotic resistance and detection of resistance genes in environmental [i]E. coli[/i] and on the evaluation of biofilm formation in ESBLs (extended spectrum beta-lactamase producing [i]E. coli[/i] isolated from an urban wastewater treatment plant. Materials and method. Wastewater samples and artificially added polystyrene pellets were used as the source for [i]E. col[/i]i isolation. Minimal inhibitory concentrations of 19 antibiotics were determined according to CLSI (2013. Biofilm formation was investigated by crystal violet or resazurin methods. CTX-M, carbapenemases, [i]qnrS[/i], mobile elements and virulence factors were determined by PCR. Clonal relatedness of strains was detected by principal component analysis by a Maldi biotyper. Results. ESBL phenotype was detected in 26% of environmental strains. CTX-M, CMY-2 and [i]qnrS[/i] genes of antibiotic resistance were detected. IMP gene together with integron 1 in one ertapenem resistant [i]E. coli[/i] was also recorded. There was no evident correlation between antibiotic resistance, virulence and biofilm production. Conclusions. The results showed that the wastewater is a source of ESBLs, carbapenemases and plasmid fluoroquinolone resistance. Strains with biofilm production, antibiotic resistance of CTX-M group, CMY-2, [i]qnrS[/i] genes and virulence factors present a potential environmental health risk.

  14. Shear alters motility of Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molaei, Mehdi; Jalali, Maryam; Sheng, Jian

    2013-11-01

    Understanding of locomotion of microorganisms in shear flows drew a wide range of interests in microbial related topics such as biological process including pathogenic infection and biophysical interactions like biofilm formation on engineering surfaces. We employed microfluidics and digital holography microscopy to study motility of E. coli in shear flows. We controlled the shear flow in three different shear rates: 0.28 s-1, 2.8 s-1, and 28 s-1 in a straight channel with the depth of 200 μm. Magnified holograms, recorded at 15 fps with a CCD camera over more than 20 minutes, are analyzed to obtain 3D swimming trajectories and subsequently used to extract shear responses of E.coli. Thousands of 3-D bacterial trajectories are tracked. The change of bacteria swimming characteristics including swimming velocity, reorientation, and dispersion coefficient are computed directly for individual trajectory and ensemble averaged over thousands of realizations. The results show that shear suppresses the bacterial dispersions in bulk but promote dispersions near the surface contrary to those in quiescent flow condition. Ongoing analyses are focusing to quantify effect of shear rates on tumbling frequency and reorientation of cell body, and its implication in locating the hydrodynamic mechanisms for shear enhanced angular scattering. NIH, NSF, GoMRI.

  15. Pathogenic Escherichia coli and food handlers in luxury hotels in Nairobi, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyango, Abel O; Kenya, Eucharia U; Mbithi, John J N; Ng'ayo, Musa O

    2009-11-01

    The epidemiology and virulence properties of pathogenic Escherichia coli among food handlers in tourist destination hotels in Kenya are largely uncharacterized. This cross-sectional study among consenting 885 food handlers working in nine luxurious tourist hotels in Nairobi, Kenya determined the epidemiology, virulence properties, antibiotics susceptibility profiles and conjugation abilities of pathogenic Escherichia coli. Pathogenic Escherichia coli was detected among 39 (4.4%) subjects, including 1.8% enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) harboring aggR genes, 1.2% enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) expressing both LT and STp toxins, 1.1% enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and 0.2% Shiga-like Escherichia coli (EHEC) both harboring eaeA and stx2 genes respectively. All the pathotypes had increased surface hydrophobicity. Using multivariate analyses, food handlers with loose stools were more likely to be infected with pathogenic Escherichia coli. Majority 53.8% of the pathotypes were resistant to tetracycline with 40.2% being multi-drug resistant. About 85.7% pathotypes trans-conjugated with Escherichia coli K12 F(-) NA(r) LA. The carriage of multi-drug resistant, toxin expressing pathogenic Escherichia coli by this population is of public health concern because exposure to low doses can result in infection. Screening food handlers and implementing public awareness programs is recommended as an intervention to control transmission of enteric pathogens.

  16. Plasmolysis during the division cycle of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Olijhoek, A J; Eden, C G; Trueba, F J; Pas, E; Nanninga, N

    1982-01-01

    Cells of Escherichia coli were plasmolyzed with sucrose. They were classified according to length by way of electron micrographs taken from samples prepared by agar filtration. The percentage of plasmolyzed cells increased about two- and threefold between mean cell sizes of newborn and separating cells. However, dividing cells were less frequently plasmolyzed than nondividing cells of the same length class. Analysis of cell halves (prospective daughters) in dividing cells showed that they beh...

  17. Role for the female in bacterial conjugation in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freifelder, D

    1967-08-01

    Hfr and F' Lac male strains of Escherichia coli were mated with purine-requiring females which had been starved for purine. These females formed mating pairs with the males. However, a mating in the absence of purine markedly reduced the yield of recombinants. Transfer of F' Lac or of lambda prophage also occurred infrequently. It was concluded that deoxyribonucleic acid transfer from male to female requires some, as yet unknown, function of the female.

  18. Maturation of the Escherichia coli divisome occurs in two steps.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarsman, M.E.G.; Piette, A.; Fraipont, C.; Vinkenvleugel, T.M.F.; Nguyen-Distèche, M.; den Blaauwen, T.

    2005-01-01

    Cell division proteins FtsZ (FtsA, ZipA, ZapA), FtsE/X, FtsK, FtsQ, FtsL/B, FtsW, PBP3, FtsN and AmiC localize at mid cell in Escherichia coli in an interdependent order as listed. To investigate whether this reflects a time dependent maturation of the divisome, the average cell age at which FtsZ,

  19. Complementation analysis of eleven tryptophanase mutations in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, M K; Yudkin, M D

    1979-10-01

    Nine independent mutants deficient in tryptophanase activity were isolated. Each mutation was transferred to a specialized transducing phage that carries the tryptophanase region of the Escherichia coli chromosome. The nine phages thus produced, and a tenth carrying a previously characterized tryptophanase mutation, were used to lysogenize a bacterial strain harbouring a mutation in the tryptophanase structural gene and also a suppressor of polarity. In no case was complementation observed; we conclude that there is no closely linked positive regulatory gene for tryptophanase.

  20. DNA microarray analysis of fim mutations in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schembri, Mark; Ussery, David; Workman, Christopher

    2002-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion is often mediated by complex polymeric surface structures referred to as fimbriae. Type I fimbriae of Escherichia coli represent the archetypical and best characterised fimbrial system. These adhesive organelles mediate binding to D-mannose and are directly associated with viru...... the number of fimbriae expressed on the cell surface. The use of high-resolution oligonucleotide arrays for defining points of transcription initiation and termination is also demonstrated....

  1. Characterization of Aspergillus oryzae aspartyl aminopeptidase expressed in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Jun; Tanaka, Hisaki; Akagawa, Takumi; Mogi, Yoshinobu; Yamazaki, Tatsuo

    2007-10-01

    To characterize aspartyl aminopeptidase from Aspergillus oryzae, the recombinant enzyme was expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme cleaves N-terminal acidic amino acids. About 30% activity was retained in 20% NaCl. Digestion of defatted soybean by the enzyme resulted in an increase in the glutamic acid content, suggesting that the enzyme is potentially responsible for the release of glutamic acid in soy sauce mash.

  2. Escherichia coli and virus isolated from ''sticky kits''

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, M.; Scheutz, F.; Strandbygaard, Bertel

    1996-01-01

    A total of 121 Escherichia coli strains isolated from 3-week-old mink kits were serotyped and examined for virulence factors. 56 strains were isolated from healthy kits while 65 were from ''sticky kits''. Among these, 34 different serotypes were detected. No difference in serotypes or the presenc...... of virulence factors could be detected between healthy and diseased kits. By electron microscopy of faecal samples corona-, rota-, and calicivirus were demonstrated among healthy as well as diseased kits....

  3. Two Tales of Prokaryotic Genomic Diversity: Escherichia coli and Halophiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lejla Pašić

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Prokaryotes are generally characterized by vast genomic diversity that has been shaped by mutations, horizontal gene transfer, bacteriocins and phage predation. Enormous genetic diversity has developed as a result of stresses imposed in harsh environments and the ability of microorganisms to adapt. Two examples of prokaryotic diversity are presented: on intraspecies level, exemplified by Escherichia coli, and the diversity of the hypersaline environment, with the discussion of food-related health issues and biotechnological potential.

  4. Current perspectivesin pathogenesis and antimicrobial resistance of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Haishen; Hong, Xiaoping; Li, Xuefen

    2015-08-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is an emerging pathogen that causes acute and persistent diarrhea in children and adults. While the pathogenic mechanisms of EAEC intestinal colonization have been uncovered (including bacterial adhesion, enterotoxin and cytotoxin secretion, and stimulation of mucosal inflammation), those of severe extraintestinal infections remain largely unknown. The recent emergence of multidrug resistant EAEC represents an alarming public health threat and clinical challenge, and research on the molecular mechanisms of resistance is urgently needed.

  5. Effect of cobalt on Escherichia coli metabolism and metalloporphyrin formation

    OpenAIRE

    Majtan, Tomas; Frerman, Frank E.; Kraus, Jan P.

    2010-01-01

    Toxicity in Escherichia coli resulting from high concentrations of cobalt has been explained by competition of cobalt with iron in various metabolic processes including Fe–S cluster assembly, sulfur assimilation, production of free radicals and reduction of free thiol pool. Here we present another aspect of increased cobalt concentrations in the culture medium resulting in the production of cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPPIX), which was incorporated into heme proteins including membrane-bound c...

  6. Maturation of the Escherichia coli divisome occurs in two steps.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarsman, M.E.G.; Piette, A.; Fraipont, C.; Vinkenvleugel, T.M.F.; Nguyen-Distèche, M.; den Blaauwen, T.

    2005-01-01

    Cell division proteins FtsZ (FtsA, ZipA, ZapA), FtsE/X, FtsK, FtsQ, FtsL/B, FtsW, PBP3, FtsN and AmiC localize at mid cell in Escherichia coli in an interdependent order as listed. To investigate whether this reflects a time dependent maturation of the divisome, the average cell age at which FtsZ, F

  7. Multiple defects in Escherichia coli mutants lacking HU protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Huisman, O; Faelen, M; Girard, D; Jaffé, A; Toussaint, A; Rouvière-Yaniv, J

    1989-01-01

    The HU protein isolated from Escherichia coli, composed of two partially homologous subunits, alpha and beta, shares some of the properties of eucaryotic histones and is a major constituent of the bacterial nucleoid. We report here the construction of double mutants totally lacking both subunits of HU protein. These mutants exhibited poor growth and a perturbation of cell division, resulting in the formation of anucleate cells. In the absence of HU, phage Mu was unable to grow, to lysogenize,...

  8. PROFILE OF RESISTANCE OF Escherichia coli ISOLATED FROM CANINE PYOMETRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Santana Oliveira

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The endothelial pyometra is a disease that affects more frequently reproductively active adult females. Characterized by inflammation and accumulation of exudate in the uterine cavity, generally associated with bacterial infections. The present study aimed to evaluate the resistance profile of Escherichia coli isolates from 42 female dogs diagnosed with pyometra, seen at the Department of Small Animal Surgery, Hospital of Veterinary Medicine, Federal University of Bahia. To perform the bacteriological analysis, a sample of the contents of the uterus was obtained immediately after surgery of ovariosalpingohisterectomy therapy (OSH and sent to the laboratory. Microbiological analysis showed a predominance of the bacterium Escherichia coli in 40.5% (15/37. Strains of Escherichia coli isolates showed higher rates of resistance to antimicrobial erythromycin (93.3 %, azithromycin (80 %, ampicillin, amoxicillin, and cephalothin (40% each. This study reinforces the need to perform the microbiological examination for epidemiological purposes and the correct therapeutic application, thereby avoiding the indiscriminate use of antimicrobials and the potential emergence of multidrug-resistant  strains. Keywords: bacteria; multiresistant;  uterus.

  9. Vaginal Escherichia coli share common virulence factor profiles, serotypes and phylogeny with other extraintestinal E. coli

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Obata-Yasuoka, Mana; Ba-Thein, William; Tsukamoto, Teizo; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Hideo

    2002-01-01

    ...: William Ba-Thein. Tel: +81 298 53 3354. Fax: +81 298 53 3354. e-mail: bathein{at}md.tsukuba.ac.jp Characteristics of Escherichia coli residing in the vagina and their role in extraintestinal infections are largely unknown...

  10. The asymptomatic bacteriuria Escherichia coli strain 83972 outcompetes uropathogenic E. coli strains in human urine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancock, Viktoria; Ulett, G.C.; Schembri, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the most common organism associated with asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU). In contrast to uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC), which causes symptomatic urinary tract infections (UTI), very little is known about the mechanisms by which these strains colonize the human urinary tract....... The prototype ABU E. coli strain 83972 was originally isolated from a girl who had carried it asymptomatically for 3 years. Deliberate colonization of UTI-susceptible individuals with E. coli 83972 has been used successfully as an alternative approach for the treatment of patients who are refractory...... to conventional therapy. Colonization with strain 83972 appears to prevent infection with UPEC strains in such patients despite the fact that this strain is unable to express the primary adhesins involved in UTI, viz. P and type 1 fimbriae. Here we investigated the growth characteristics of E. coli 83972 in human...

  11. Impact of low-level fluoroquinolone resistance genes qnrA1, qnrB19 and qnrS1 on ciprofloxacin treatment of isogenic Escherichia coli strains in a murine urinary tract infection model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Lotte; Cattoir, Vincent; Jensen, Klaus S

    2012-01-01

    To study the impact of qnrA1, qnrB19 and qnrS1 on the ciprofloxacin treatment of urinary tract infection (UTI).......To study the impact of qnrA1, qnrB19 and qnrS1 on the ciprofloxacin treatment of urinary tract infection (UTI)....

  12. Presence of qnr gene in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae resistant to ciprofloxacin isolated from pediatric patients in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Chuanqing

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quinolone resistance in Enterobacteriaceae results mainly from mutations in type II DNA topoisomerase genes and/or changes in the expression of outer membrane and efflux pumps. Several recent studies have indicated that plasmid-mediated resistance mechanisms also play a significant role in fluoroquinolone resistance, and its prevalence is increasing worldwide. In China, the presence of the qnr gene in the clinical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae has been reported, but this transmissible quinolone resistance gene has not been detected in strains isolated singly from pediatric patients. Because quinolones associated with a variety of adverse side effects on children, they are not authorized for pediatric use. This study therefore aimed to investigate the presence of the qnr gene in clinical isolates of E. coli and K. pneumoniae from pediatric patients in China. Methods A total 213 of non-repetitive clinical isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin from E. coli and K. pneumoniae were collected from hospitalized patients at five children's hospital in Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou, and Chongqing. The isolates were screened for the plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes of qnrA, qnrB, and qnrS by PCR. Transferability was examined by conjugation with the sodium azide-resistant E. coli J53. All qnr-positive were analyzed for clonality by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC-PCR. Results The study found that 19 ciprofloxacin-resistant clinical isolates of E. coli and K. pneumoniae were positive for the qnr gene, and most of the qnr positive strains were ESBL producers. Conjugation experiments showed that quinolone resitance could be transferred to recipients. Apart from this, different DNA banding patterns were obtained by ERIC-PCR from positive strains, which means that most of them were not clonally related. Conclusion This report on transferable fluoroquinolone resistance due to the qnr gene among E. coli and K

  13. Prevalence of Escherichia coli in apple cider manufactured in Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingman, D W

    1999-06-01

    Cider samples obtained from 11 cider mills operating in Connecticut during the 1997 to 1998 production season were tested for the presence of Escherichia coli. Cider production began in mid August and continued through March, with peak production in September and October. Of 314 cider samples tested, 11 (4%) were found to contain E. coli. Of the 11 mills, 6 (55%) tested positive for E. coli in the cider at least once during the production year. E. coli was first observed in cider samples produced in mid to late October and was not detected in samples made after January. A trend was observed for cider to decrease in acidity and increase in Brix (soluble sugars) throughout the production season. No correlation between pH and soluble sugars of cider and the presence of E. coli was detected. Eight mills used both dropped apples and tree-picked apples, whereas three mills used tree-picked apples only. The use of dropped apples in cider production began 5 weeks before the first detection of E. coli in cider. E. coli was isolated from cider samples produced using dropped apples and from samples produced using only tree-picked apples. No direct correlation between the use of dropped apples or tree-picked apples and the presence of E. coli in the cider was observed. An association between the time of apple harvest and the appearance of E. coli in cider was noted. For mills providing adequate records, all contaminated cider was produced from apples harvested between mid October and mid November.

  14. Dynamics of chromosome segregation in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Jørck

    2007-01-01

    in the cell by labeling specific parts of it. Later the dynamics of chromosome segregation was included. Investigating chromosome organization by labeling of specific loci was already a widely used technique when I started on this thesis, but the data acquisition and treatment was slow and generally poorly......, and it is obvious that structured cellular actions are required to unpack it, as required for its replication, and refold the two daughter chromosomes separately without getting them entangled in the process each generation. The intention of the study was initially to find out how the chromosome is organized....... Adding the results of the thesis together with known data results in the following description of the chromosome dynamics of slowly growing E.coli cells: The chromosome of slow growing cells is organized with the origin at the cell center when it is newborn. It has one chromosomal arm on one side...

  15. Measuring Escherichia coli Gene Expression during Human Urinary Tract Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2016-01-01

    Extraintestinal Escherichia coli (E. coli) evolved by acquisition of pathogenicity islands, phage, plasmids, and DNA segments by horizontal gene transfer. Strains are heterogeneous but virulent uropathogenic isolates more often have specific fimbriae, toxins, and iron receptors than commensal strains. One may ask whether it is the virulence factors alone that are required to establish infection. While these virulence factors clearly contribute strongly to pathogenesis, bacteria must survive by metabolizing nutrients available to them. By constructing mutants in all major metabolic pathways and co-challenging mice transurethrally with each mutant and the wild type strain, we identified which major metabolic pathways are required to infect the urinary tract. We must also ask what else is E. coli doing in vivo? To answer this question, we examined the transcriptome of E. coli CFT073 in the murine model of urinary tract infection (UTI) as well as for E. coli strains collected and analyzed directly from the urine of patients attending either a urology clinic or a university health clinic for symptoms of UTI. Using microarrays and RNA-seq, we measured in vivo gene expression for these uropathogenic E. coli strains, identifying genes upregulated during murine and human UTI. Our findings allow us to propose a new definition of bacterial virulence. PMID:26784237

  16. Fluorogenic assay for rapid detection of Escherichia coli in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moberg, L J

    1985-12-01

    An assay procedure to screen for Escherichia coli in foods by using 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-glucuronide (MUG) incorporated into lauryl tryptose (LST) broth was evaluated. The beta-glucuronidase produced by E. coli cleaves the MUG substrate to yield a fluorescent end product. E. coli-negative samples can be identified by lack of fluorescence in LST-MUG within 24 h. MUG was not inhibitory to coliforms and E. coli. Over 1,400 food and dairy samples were tested to compare the standard three-tube most-probable-number procedure with the MUG-containing or non-MUG-containing LST procedure. LST-MUG testing detected a greater number of E. coli, with a lower false-positive rate (1.4%) and in a shorter time, than did the standard procedure. All false-positive results in the LST-MUG testing were attributable to beta-glucuronidase-producing staphylococci. No false-negative result was encountered. Use of MUG in LST broth obviates the EC broth step, allowing a 2.5-day procedure to a completed E. coli test versus the present 4- to 6-day standard most-probable-number method.

  17. Examination of uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains conferring large plasmids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUHARTONO

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Suhartono (2010 Examination of uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains conferring large plasmids. Biodiversitas 11: 59-64. Of major uropathogens, Escherichia coli has been widely known as a main pathogen of UTIs globally and has considerable medical and financial consequences. A strain of UPEC, namely E. coli ST131, confers a large plasmid encoding cephalosporinases (class C β-lactamase or AmpC that may be disseminated through horizontal transfer among bacterial populations. Therefore, it is worth examining such large plasmids by isolating, purifying, and digesting the plasmid with restriction enzymes. The examination of the large plasmids was conducted by isolating plasmid DNA visualized by agarose gel electrophoresis as well as by PFGE. The relationship of plasmids among isolates was carried out by HpaI restriction enzyme digestion. Of 36 isolates of E. coli ST 131, eight isolates possessed large plasmids, namely isolates 3, 9, 10, 12, 17, 18, 26 and 30 with the largest molecular size confirmed by agarose gel electrophoresis and PFGE was ~42kb and ~118kb respectively. Restriction enzyme analysis revealed that isolates 9, 10, 12, 17 and 18 have the common restriction patterns and those isolates might be closely related.

  18. Production of isopropanol by metabolically engineered Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jojima, Toru; Inui, Masayuki; Yukawa, Hideaki

    2008-01-01

    A genetically engineered strain of Escherichia coli JM109 harboring the isopropanol-producing pathway consisting of five genes encoding four enzymes, thiolase, coenzyme A (CoA) transferase, acetoacetate decarboxylase from Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824, and primary-secondary alcohol dehydrogenase from C. beijerinckii NRRL B593, produced up to 227 mM of isopropanol from glucose under aerobic fed-batch culture conditions. Acetate production by the engineered strain was approximately one sixth that produced by a control E. coli strain bearing an expression vector without the clostridial genes. These results demonstrate a functional isopropanol-producing pathway in E. coli and consequently carbon flux from acetyl-CoA directed to isopropanol instead of acetate. This is the first report on isopropanol production by genetically engineered microorganism under aerobic culture conditions.

  19. Protein abundance profiling of the Escherichia coli cytosol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ishihama, Y.; Schmidt, T.; Rappsilber, J.

    2008-01-01

    PAI approach which takes into account the number of sequenced peptides per protein. The values of abundance are within a broad range and accurately reflect independently measured copy numbers per cell. As expected, the most abundant proteins were those involved in protein synthesis, most notably ribosomal...... sample. Using a combination of LC-MS/MS approaches with protein and peptide fractionation steps we identified 1103 proteins from the cytosolic fraction of the Escherichia coli strain MC4100. A measure of abundance is presented for each of the identified proteins, based on the recently developed em...... protein and mRNA abundance in E. coli cells. Conclusion: Abundance measurements for more than 1000 E. coli proteins presented in this work represent the most complete study of protein abundance in a bacterial cell so far. We show significant associations between the abundance of a protein and its...

  20. The Escherichia coli transcriptome linked to growth fitness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bei-Wen Ying

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A series of Escherichia coli strains with varied genomic sequences were subjected to high-density microarray analyses to elucidate the fitness-correlated transcriptomes. Fitness, which is commonly evaluated by the growth rate during the exponential phase, is not only determined by the genome but is also linked to growth conditions, e.g., temperature. We previously reported genetic and environmental contributions to E. coli transcriptomes and evolutionary transcriptome changes in thermal adaptation. Here, we describe experimental details on how to prepare microarray samples that truly represent the growth fitness of the E. coli cells. A step-by-step record of sample preparation procedures that correspond to growing cells and transcriptome data sets that are deposited at the GEO database (GSE33212, GSE52770, GSE61739 are also provided for reference.

  1. Pulsed ultra-violet inactivation spectrum of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T; Macgregor, S J; Anderson, J G; Woolsey, G A

    2005-08-01

    Inactivation of Escherichia coli is examined using ultra-violet (UV) radiation from a pulsed xenon flashlamp. The light from the discharge has a broadband emission spectrum extending from the UV to the infrared region with a rich UV content. The flashlamp provides high-energy UV output using a small number of short-duration pulses (30 micros). The flashlamp is used with a monochromator to investigate the wavelength sensitivity of E. coli to inactivation by the pulsed UV light. Using 8 nm wide pulses of UV radiation, the most efficient inactivation is found to occur at around 270 nm and no inactivation is observed above 300 nm. A pyroelectric detector allows the energy dose to be determined at each wavelength, and a peak value for E. coli population reduction of 0.43 log per mJ/cm(2) is measured at 270 nm. The results are compared with the published data available for continuous UV light sources.

  2. Escherichia coli portador de betalactamasas de espectro extendido: resistencia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª C. Miranda García

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: Escherichia coli es el microorganismo que con más frecuencia se encuentra implicado en infecciones nosocomiales y comunitarias, patógeno responsable en la etiología de infecciones de vías respiratorias altas, infecciones del tracto urinario, heridas quirúrgicas, sangre o gastroenteritis. En los últimos años ha experimentado importantes cambios encontrándose un aumento de infecciones por cepas de éstos microorganismos productores de betalactamasas de espectro extendido. Objetivos: Se decide hacer este estudio retrospectivo de las muestras procesadas en el Laboratorio de Microbiología del Hospital Básico de la Defensa San Carlos (San Fernando, para conocer la frecuencia y el patrón de sensibilidad en nuestra población por gérmenes productores de betalactamasas de espectro extendido en este caso por Escherichia coli, dada la importancia de las infecciones causadas por esta bacteria y la repercusión que tiene por todo el mundo los mecanismos de resistencia. Material y Método: Se recogieron los datos de resultados obtenidos en las muestras procesadas en el Laboratorio de Microbiología durante 36 meses (Enero 2009 a Diciembre 2011, en las que se hubieran identificado cepas de Escherichia coli y de éstas las productoras de betalactamasas de espectro extendido. Resultados: Se aislaron 34 cepas de Escherichia coli productoras de betalactamasas de espectro extendido lo que supone una tasa del 5,10%. Se encontró una frecuencia mayor en el año 2010 (6,9% que en el 2009 (2,61%, pero similar al 2011 (5,98%. Conclusión: La frecuencia de cepas Escherichia coli con betalactamasas de espectro extendido encontrada es similar a la de otros estudios realizados en España, pero la tasa de resistencia de algunos antimicrobianos como Amoxicilina/clavulánico, Cotrimoxazol y Fluorquinolonas en nuestra población es elevada.

  3. Evaluation of quinolones for use in detection of determinants of acquired quinolone resistance, including the new transmissible resistance mechanisms qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, and aac(6')Ib-cr, in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica and determinations of wild-type distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaco, L M; Aarestrup, F M

    2009-09-01

    Fluoroquinolone resistance in members of the Enterobacteriaceae family is mostly due to mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions of the topoisomerase genes. However, transferable genes encoding quinolone resistance have recently been described. The current methods for susceptibility testing are not adapted to the detection of new resistance determinants, which confer low levels of resistance. The aim of this study was to compare the ability of the screening of the different quinolones by disk diffusion assays and MIC determinations to detect fluoroquinolone resistance. Sixty-nine Escherichia coli strains and 62 Salmonella strains, including strains fully susceptible to quinolones, nalidixic acid-resistant strains, strains with resistance to fluoroquinolones (resistant to nalidixic acid), and strains showing low-level resistance to fluoroquinolones conferred by transferable quinolone resistance genes, including qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, and aac(6')Ib-cr, were selected. Disk diffusion assays and MIC determinations by the agar dilution method were performed, according to CLSI standards, with nalidixic acid, flumequine, oxolinic acid, ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, marbofloxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, and levofloxacin. The MIC of levofloxacin was determined by an Etest. The results showed a trimodal distribution of the MICs for both E. coli and Salmonella. The MIC distributions for the isolates varied with the compounds tested. Screening for nalidixic acid resistance by MIC testing or disk diffusion assay was not efficient for the detection of some of the isolates carrying qnr and aac(6')Ib-cr. Transferable resistance genes would best be detected by testing for the MIC of ciprofloxacin or norfloxacin, as testing for the MICs of the other compounds would fail to detect isolates carrying aac(6')Ib-cr because the enzyme produced is able to reduce the activities of these two compounds only due to their chemical structures. In conclusion, screening with nalidixic

  4. Constitutive SoxS expression in a fluoroquinolone-resistant strain with a truncated SoxR protein and identification of a new member of the marA-soxS-rob regulon, mdtG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fàbrega, Anna; Martin, Robert G; Rosner, Judah L; Tavio, M Mar; Vila, Jordi

    2010-03-01

    Elevated levels of fluoroquinolone resistance are frequently found among Escherichia coli clinical isolates. This study investigated the antibiotic resistance mechanisms of strain NorE5, derived in vitro by exposing an E. coli clinical isolate, PS5, to two selection steps with increasing concentrations of norfloxacin. In addition to the amino acid substitution in GyrA (S83L) present in PS5, NorE5 has an amino acid change in ParC (S80R). Furthermore, we now find by Western blotting that NorE5 has a multidrug resistance phenotype resulting from the overexpression of the antibiotic resistance efflux pump AcrAB-TolC. Microarray and gene fusion analyses revealed significantly increased expression in NorE5 of soxS, a transcriptional activator of acrAB and tolC. The high soxS activity is attributable to a frameshift mutation that truncates SoxR, rendering it a constitutive transcriptional activator of soxS. Furthermore, microarray and reverse transcription-PCR analyses showed that mdtG (yceE), encoding a putative efflux pump, is overexpressed in the resistant strain. SoxS, MarA, and Rob activated an mdtG::lacZ fusion, and SoxS was shown to bind to the mdtG promoter, showing that mdtG is a member of the marA-soxS-rob regulon. The mdtG marbox sequence is in the backward or class I orientation within the promoter, and its disruption resulted in a loss of inducibility by MarA, SoxS, and Rob. Thus, chromosomal mutations in parC and soxR are responsible for the increased antibiotic resistance of NorE5.

  5. Protective effects of indigenous Escherichia coli against a pathogenic E. coli challenge strain in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahjen, W; Cuisiniere, T; Zentek, J

    2017-10-03

    To investigate the inhibitory effect of indigenous enterobacteria on pathogenic Escherichia coli, a challenge trial with postweaning pigs was conducted. A pathogenic E. coli strain was administered to all animals and their health was closely monitored thereafter. Faecal samples were taken from three healthy and three diarrhoeic animals. Samples were cultivated on MacConkey agar and isolates were subcultured. A soft agar overlay assay was used to determine the inhibitory activity of the isolates. A total of 1,173 enterobacterial isolates were screened for their ability to inhibit the E. coli challenge strain. Colony forming units of enterobacteria on MacConkey agar were not different between healthy and diarrhoeic animals in the original samples. Furthermore, numbers of isolates per animal were also not significantly different between healthy (482 isolates) and diarrhoeic animals (691 isolates). A total of 43 isolates (3.7%) with inhibitory activity against the pathogenic E. coli challenge strain were detected. All inhibitory isolates were identified as E. coli via MALDI-TOF. The isolates belonged to the phylotypes A, C and E. Many isolates (67.4%) were commensal E. coli without relevant porcine pathogenic factors, but toxin- and fimbrial genes (stx2e, fae, estIb, elt1a, fas, fan) were detected in 14 inhibitory isolates. Healthy animals showed significantly (P=0.003) more inhibitory isolates (36 of 482 isolates; 7.5%) than diseased animals (7 of 691 isolates; 1.0%). There were no significant correlations regarding phylotype or pathogenic factors between healthy and diseased animals. This study has shown that a small proportion of indigenous E. coli is able to inhibit in vitro growth of a pathogenic E. coli strain in pigs. Furthermore, healthy animals possess significantly more inhibitory E. coli strains than diarrhoeic animals. The inhibition of pathogenic E. coli by specific indigenous E. coli strains may be an underlying principle for the containment of pathogenic

  6. Analysis of molecular epidemiologic characteristics of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli colonizing feces in hospital patients and community dwellers in a Japanese city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Akihiro; Komatsu, Masaru; Noguchi, Nobuyoshi; Ohno, Yuki; Hashimoto, Eriko; Matsutani, Hiroko; Abe, Noriyuki; Fukuda, Saori; Kohno, Hisashi; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Matsuo, Shuji; Kawano, Seiji

    2016-02-01

    Infectious diseases caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli are prevalent because of nosocomial infection. In addition, colonization of ESBL-producing E. coli in the intestinal tract of community dwellers due to the contamination of meat or environmental water is assumed to be one of the sources, but the causes have not been clarified. To analyze these factors, we investigated the difference in clonal groups using a combination of phylogenetic groups and multilocus sequence typing of ESBL-producing E. coli, which were obtained from the feces of an inpatient group in our hospital and a community-dwelling group living in a Japanese city. The carriage rate of ESBL-producing E. coli in the inpatient group was 12.5% (32/257), similar to that of 8.5% (42/496) in the community dwellers (P = 0.082). Of the ESBL clonal groups detected from the community dwellers, 52% (22/42) were clonal groups, including D-ST1485, D-ST70, D-ST2847, B2-ST550, B2-ST3510, A-ST93, A-ST580, A-ST716 and B1-ST2787, that have not been detected from human pathogens, meat, companion animals and environmental water, whereas all clonal groups detected from the inpatients were those that had already been reported. The rate of fluoroquinolone-resistant ESBL clonal groups colonizing the intestinal tract of the inpatient group rose as the number of hospital days increased. These results indicated that different factors were related to colonization of ESBL-producing E. coli in the feces of the inpatient group and the community-dwelling group.

  7. Evaluation of Five Jet Fuels in the Salmonella-Escherichia coli / Microsome Plate Incorporation Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    AFRL-RH-WP-TR-2010-0138 Evaluation of Five Jet Fuels in the Salmonella-Escherichia coli / Microsome Plate Incorporation Assay Edward S...31 Jul 2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Evaluation of Five Jet Fuels in the Salmonella-Escherichia coli / Microsome Plate Incorporation Assay 5a...the Salmonella typhimurium-Escherichia coli/ microsome plate incorporation assay. The assay was performed using the plate incorporation procedure

  8. High rates of intestinal colonisation with fluoroquinolone-resistant ESBL-harbouring Enterobacteriaceae in hospitalised patients with antibiotic-associated diarrhoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervoort, J; Gazin, M; Kazma, M; Kotlovsky, T; Lammens, C; Carmeli, Y; Goossens, H; Malhotra-Kumar, S

    2014-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to investigate the intestinal carriage of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-harbouring Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-EN) and associated fluoroquinolone resistance (FQ-R) in 120 hospitalised patients with antibiotic-associated diarrhoea, and to investigate a correlation between Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection and intestinal colonisation with ESBL-EN in these patients. Stool samples were screened for C. difficile infection by toxin A/B enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and for the presence of enterobacterial isolates producing β-lactamases by plating on β-lactamase screening (BLSE) agar. Recovered isolates were confirmed pheno- and genotypically for the presence of ESBL genes (bla CTX-M, bla TEM, bla SHV) by the double-disc synergy test and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) sequencing, and tested for the presence of topoisomerase mutations (gyrA, parC) and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) determinants [qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, qepA, aac(6')-Ib-cr] by PCR sequencing. ESBL-EN were detected in 44/120 (37 %) stool samples. C. difficile-infected patients showed a significantly higher frequency of intestinal colonisation with ESBL-EN compared to C. difficile non-infected patients (62 % vs. 31 %, p = 0.008). Of the 73 ESBL-EN recovered, 46 (63 %) showed high-level FQ-R [ciprofloxacin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ≥32 mg/L]. The largest group consisted of 21 bla CTX-M-15-harbouring Enterobacteriaceae (ciprofloxacin MIC ≥64 mg/L) with multiple topoisomerase mutations in gyrA and parC, in combination with co-carriage of aac(6')-Ib-cr. Most of them were Escherichia coli isolates belonging to sequence types ST131 and ST410. We found remarkably high rates of intestinal colonisation with high-level FQ-R ESBL-EN in hospitalised patients with antibiotic-associated diarrhoea, especially among C. difficile-infected patients. These data underscore the need for stringent infection control to contain this potentially

  9. Attachment of Escherichia coli and enterococci to particles in runoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soupir, Michelle L; Mostaghimi, Saied; Dillaha, Theo

    2010-01-01

    Association of Escherichia coli and enterococci with particulates present in runoff from erodible soils has important implications for modeling the fate and transport of bacteria from agricultural sources and in the selection of management practices to reduce bacterial movement to surface waters. Three soils with different textures were collected from the Ap horizon (silty loam, silty clay loam, and loamy fine sand), placed in portable box plots, treated with standard cowpats, and placed under a rainfall simulator. Rainfall was applied to the plots until saturation-excess flow occurred for 30 min, and samples were collected 10, 20, and 30 min after initiation of the runoff event. The attachment of E. coli and enterococci to particles present in runoff was determined by a screen filtration and centrifugation procedure. Percentage of E. coli and enterococci attached to particulates in runoff ranged from 28 to 49%, with few statistically significant differences in attachment among the three soils. Similar partitioning release patterns were observed between E. coli and enterococci from the silty loam (r = 0.57) and silty clay loam soils (r = 0.60). At least 60% of all attached E. coli and enterococci were associated particles within an 8- to 62-microm particle size category. The results indicate that the majority of fecal bacteria attach to and are transported with manure colloids in sediment-laden flow regardless of the soil texture.

  10. Multiple antimicrobial resistance among Avian Escherichia coli strains in Albania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Camarda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, 101 Escherichia (E. coli isolates from broilers, laying hens and turkeys which had died from colibacillosis, collected from 37 intensive and rural farms in Albania, were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility toward 12 different molecules. The highest levels of resistance were observed for Erythromycin (E (100% Amoxicillin (AMX (99.1%, Tetracycline (TE 30 (96.07%, Streptomycin (STR (93.07% and Neomycin (N30 (85.15%. Considerable resistance was also detected for fluoroquinolones. Moreover, 73.33% of E. coli resistant to at least one fluoroquinolone were also resistant to the two other fluoroquinolones checked. No evident differences were found between the E. coli from intensive and from rural farms. Multiple antibiotic resistance was expressed by all the E. coli tested. 23.63% and 17.39% of E. coli isolated from intensive and rural farms, respectively, were resistant towards all the drugs tested. These data would seem to indicate incorrect use of antibiotics on poultry farms in Albania.

  11. Escherichia coli exports cyclic AMP via TolC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantke, Klaus; Winkler, Karin; Schultz, Joachim E

    2011-03-01

    In Escherichia coli more than 180 genes are regulated by the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP receptor protein (CRP) complex. However, more than 90% of cAMP that is made by intracellular adenylyl cyclases is found in the culture medium. How is cAMP exported from E. coli? In a tolC mutant, 0.03 mM IPTG (isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside) was sufficient to induce β-galactosidase compared to 0.1 mM IPTG in the parent strain. In a cya mutant unable to produce cAMP about 1 mM extracellular cAMP was required to induce β-galactosidase, whereas in a cya tolC mutant 0.1 mM cAMP was sufficient. When cAMP in E. coli cya was generated intracellularly by a recombinant, weakly active adenylyl cyclase from Corynebacterium glutamicum, the critical level of cAMP necessary for induction of maltose degradation was only achieved in a tolC mutant and not in the parent strain. Deletion of a putative cAMP phosphodiesterase of E. coli, CpdA, resulted in a slightly similar, yet more diffuse phenotype. The data demonstrate that export of cAMP via TolC is a most efficient way of E. coli to lower high concentrations of cAMP in the cell and maintain its sensitivity in changing metabolic environments.

  12. Phylogenetic analysis of Escherichia coli strains isolated from human samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdollah Derakhshandeh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli (E. coli is a normal inhabitant of the gastrointestinal tract of vertebrates, including humans. Phylogenetic analysis has shown that E. coli is composed of four main phylogenetic groups (A, B1, B2 and D. Group A and B1 are generally associated with commensals, whereas group B2 is associated with extra-intestinal pathotypes. Most enteropathogenic isolates, however, are assigned to group D. In the present study, a total of 102 E. coli strains, isolated from human samples, were used. Phylogenetic grouping was done based on the Clermont triplex PCR method using primers targeted at three genetic markers, chuA, yjaA and TspE4.C2. Group A contained the majority of the collected isolates (69 isolates, 67.64%, followed by group B2 (18 isolates, 17.64% and D (15 isolates, 14.7% and no strains were found to belong to group B1. The distribution of phylogenetic groups in our study suggests that although the majority of strains were commensals, the prevalence of enteropathogenic and extra-intestinal pathotypes was noteworthy. Therefore, the role of E. coli in human infections including diarrhea, urinary tract infections and meningitis should be considered.

  13. Role of peripheral pooling in porcine Escherichia coli sepsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teule, G.J.; von Lingen, A.; Verwey von Vught, M.A.; Kester, A.D.; Mackaay, R.C.; Bezemer, P.D.; Heidenal, G.A.; Thijs, L.G.

    1984-01-01

    In anesthesized pigs the effects of E. coli (2 X 10(8)/kg) on hemodynamics and red cell distribution were studied. After injection of 99m-Tc red cells (15 mCi), regional radioactivity was followed during 3 hours. Gated bloodpool studies were performed to measure end-diastolic volumes (EDV). Escherichia coli E. coli was infused in 14 pigs, while 7 animals served as controls. E. coli resulted in an early increase in pulmonary arterial pressure. Systemic arterial pressure decreased gradually, while cardiac output did not change significantly. The gated studies revealed that especially left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV) declined, to 50% of the basal value. Regional radioactivity did not change over lungs, liver and abdomen. Splenic activity declined markedly. Over the hindlimb a significant increase (29 +/- 8%) was observed. It is concluded that E. coli infusion in pigs induces a hemodynamic pattern similar to human sepsis. The decrease in LVEDV is probably related to peripheral pooling and a change in right ventricle (RV) performance.

  14. The genetic basis of Escherichia coli pathoadaptation to macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Migla Miskinyte

    Full Text Available Antagonistic interactions are likely important driving forces of the evolutionary process underlying bacterial genome complexity and diversity. We hypothesized that the ability of evolved bacteria to escape specific components of host innate immunity, such as phagocytosis and killing by macrophages (MΦ, is a critical trait relevant in the acquisition of bacterial virulence. Here, we used a combination of experimental evolution, phenotypic characterization, genome sequencing and mathematical modeling to address how fast, and through how many adaptive steps, a commensal Escherichia coli (E. coli acquire this virulence trait. We show that when maintained in vitro under the selective pressure of host MΦ commensal E. coli can evolve, in less than 500 generations, virulent clones that escape phagocytosis and MΦ killing in vitro, while increasing their pathogenicity in vivo, as assessed in mice. This pathoadaptive process is driven by a mechanism involving the insertion of a single transposable element into the promoter region of the E. coli yrfF gene. Moreover, transposition of the IS186 element into the promoter of Lon gene, encoding an ATP-dependent serine protease, is likely to accelerate this pathoadaptive process. Competition between clones carrying distinct beneficial mutations dominates the dynamics of the pathoadaptive process, as suggested from a mathematical model, which reproduces the observed experimental dynamics of E. coli evolution towards virulence. In conclusion, we reveal a molecular mechanism explaining how a specific component of host innate immunity can modulate microbial evolution towards pathogenicity.

  15. Unusual "flesh-eating" strains of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaked, Hila; Samra, Zmira; Paul, Michal; Madar-Shapiro, Liora; Cohen, Jonathan; Pitlik, Silvio; Bishara, Jihad

    2012-12-01

    Monomicrobial necrotizing fasciitis (type II) is typically caused by group A streptococcus alone or in combination with Staphylococcus aureus. Escherichia coli has been isolated from polymicrobial or Fournier's gangrene but has rarely been reported in monomicrobial necrotizing fasciitis. We describe the clinical characteristics and outcomes of seven cases of monomicrobial E. coli necrotizing fasciitis and/or severe soft tissue infection diagnosed at a single institution during an 18-month period. Four isolates from three patients and two isolates from two patients with type I polymicrobial severe soft tissue infection (controls) were assayed by the randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis for fingerprinting and PCR amplification of primers in order to detect cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1 and 2 (cnf1 and cnf2) genes. All patients had some type of immune suppression. The limb was the most commonly involved organ. In all cases, E. coli was isolated as a monomicrobial pathogen from blood, fascia, or both. All patients died during hospitalization, three within the first 48 h. The RAPD amplification assay showed a high degree of genetic diversity among the "flesh-eating" strains and controls. The cnf1 toxin gene was identified in two out of three cases, but not in the controls. cnf2 was not detected in any of the patients. E. coli may be responsible for life-threatening necrotizing fasciitis. Further research is needed to reveal relevant risk factors, reservoirs, and modes of transmission of cnf1 E. coli.

  16. Escherichia coli ST131, an Intriguing Clonal Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Xavier; Madec, Jean-Yves

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In 2008, a previously unknown Escherichia coli clonal group, sequence type 131 (ST131), was identified on three continents. Today, ST131 is the predominant E. coli lineage among extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) isolates worldwide. Retrospective studies have suggested that it may originally have risen to prominence as early as 2003. Unlike other classical group B2 ExPEC isolates, ST131 isolates are commonly reported to produce extended-spectrum β-lactamases, such as CTX-M-15, and almost all are resistant to fluoroquinolones. Moreover, ST131 E. coli isolates are considered to be truly pathogenic, due to the spectrum of infections they cause in both community and hospital settings and the large number of virulence-associated genes they contain. ST131 isolates therefore seem to contradict the widely held view that high levels of antimicrobial resistance are necessarily associated with a fitness cost leading to a decrease in pathogenesis. Six years after the first description of E. coli ST131, this review outlines the principal traits of ST131 clonal group isolates, based on the growing body of published data, and highlights what is currently known and what we need to find out to provide public health authorities with better information to help combat ST131. PMID:24982321

  17. Nonthermal atmospheric argon plasma jet effects on Escherichia coli biomacromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinzadeh Colagar, Abasalt; Memariani, Hamed; Sohbatzadeh, Farshad; Valinataj Omran, Azadeh

    2013-12-01

    Nonthermal atmospheric plasma jet, a promising technology based on ionized gas at low temperatures, can be applied for disinfection of contaminated surfaces. In this study, Escherichia coli cells and their macromolecules were exposed to the nonthermal atmospheric argon plasma jet for different time durations. Total protein, genomic DNA, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels of E. coli were assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining; agarose gel electrophoresis; and measurement of absorbance at 534 nm, respectively. After exposure, the spectroscopic results of liquid samples indicated that the survival reduction of E. coli can reach to 100 % in an exposure time of 600 s. Moreover, inactivation zones of E. coli, DNA degradation, and MDA levels were significantly increased. Additionally, banding patterns of total protein were changed and amino acid concentrations increased following ninhydrin test. The experimental results suggest that the nonthermal plasma could serve as an effective instrument for both sterilizing E. coli and degrading macromolecules from the surface of the objects being sterilized.

  18. Paper-based ELISA to rapidly detect Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Cheng-Min; Chang, Chia-Ling; Hsu, Min-Yen; Lin, Jyun-Yu; Kuan, Chen-Meng; Wang, Hsi-Kai; Huang, Chun-Te; Chung, Mu-Chi; Huang, Kui-Chou; Hsu, Cheng-En; Wang, Chun-Yuan; Shen, Ying-Cheng; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2015-12-01

    Escherichia coli is a generic indicator of fecal contamination, and certain serotypes cause food- and water-borne illness such as O157:H7. In the clinic, detection of bacteriuria, which is often due to E. coli, is critical before certain surgical procedures or in cases of nosocomial infection to prevent further adverse events such as postoperative infection or sepsis. In low- and middle-income countries, where insufficient equipment and facilities preclude modern methods of detection, a simple, low-cost diagnostic device to detect E. coli in water and in the clinic will have significant impact. We have developed a simple paper-based colorimetric platform to detect E. coli contamination in 5h. On this platform, the mean color intensity for samples with 10(5)cells/mL is 0.118±0.002 (n=4), and 0.0145±0.003 (Ppaper-based ELISA is an innovative point-of-care diagnostic tool to rapidly detect E. coli, and possibly other pathogens when customized as appropriate, especially in areas that lack advanced clinical equipment.

  19. Pulsed-Plasma Disinfection of Water Containing Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Kohki; MacGregor, Scott J.; Anderson, John G.; Woolsey, Gerry A.; Fouracre, R. Anthony

    2007-03-01

    The disinfection of water containing the microorganism, Escherichia coli (E. coli) by exposure to a pulsed-discharge plasma generated above the water using a multineedle electrode (plasma-exposure treatment), and by sparging the off-gas of the pulsed plasma into the water (off-gas-sparging treatment), is performed in the ambient gases of air, oxygen, and nitrogen. For the off-gas-sparging treatment, bactericidal action is observed only when oxygen is used as the ambient gas, and ozone is found to generate the bactericidal action. For the plasma-exposure treatment, the density of E. coli bacteria decreases exponentially with plasma-exposure time for all the ambient gases. It may be concluded that the main contributors to E. coli inactivation are particle species produced by the pulsed plasma. For the ambient gases of air and nitrogen, the influence of acidification of the water in the system, as a result of pulsed-plasma exposure, may also contribute to the decay of E. coli density.

  20. Escherichia coli mediated urinary tract infections: are there distinct uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) pathotypes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrs, Carl F; Zhang, Lixin; Foxman, Betsy

    2005-11-15

    A variety of virulence genes are associated with Escherichia coli mediated urinary tract infections. Particular sets of virulence factors shared by bacterial strains directing them through a particular pathogenesis process are called a "pathotype." Comparison of co-occurrence of potential urinary tract infection (UTI) virulence genes among different E. coli isolates from fecal and UTI collections provides evidence for multiple pathotypes of uropathogenic E. coli, but current understanding of critical genetic differences defining the pathotypes is limited. Discovery of additional E. coli genes involved in uropathogenesis and determination of their distribution and co-occurrences will further define UPEC pathotypes and allow for a more detailed analysis of how these pathotypes might differ in how they cause disease.

  1. The pangenome structure of Escherichia coli: comparative genomic analysis of E. coli commensal and pathogenic isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasko, David A; Rosovitz, M J; Myers, Garry S A; Mongodin, Emmanuel F; Fricke, W Florian; Gajer, Pawel; Crabtree, Jonathan; Sebaihia, Mohammed; Thomson, Nicholas R; Chaudhuri, Roy; Henderson, Ian R; Sperandio, Vanessa; Ravel, Jacques

    2008-10-01

    Whole-genome sequencing has been skewed toward bacterial pathogens as a consequence of the prioritization of medical and veterinary diseases. However, it is becoming clear that in order to accurately measure genetic variation within and between pathogenic groups, multiple isolates, as well as commensal species, must be sequenced. This study examined the pangenomic content of Escherichia coli. Six distinct E. coli pathovars can be distinguished using molecular or phenotypic markers, but only two of the six pathovars have been subjected to any genome sequencing previously. Thus, this report provides a seminal description of the genomic contents and unique features of three unsequenced pathovars, enterotoxigenic E. coli, enteropathogenic E. coli, and enteroaggregative E. coli. We also determined the first genome sequence of a human commensal E. coli isolate, E. coli HS, which will undoubtedly provide a new baseline from which workers can examine the evolution of pathogenic E. coli. Comparison of 17 E. coli genomes, 8 of which are new, resulted in identification of approximately 2,200 genes conserved in all isolates. We were also able to identify genes that were isolate and pathovar specific. Fewer pathovar-specific genes were identified than anticipated, suggesting that each isolate may have independently developed virulence capabilities. Pangenome calculations indicate that E. coli genomic diversity represents an open pangenome model containing a reservoir of more than 13,000 genes, many of which may be uncharacterized but important virulence factors. This comparative study of the species E. coli, while descriptive, should provide the basis for future functional work on this important group of pathogens.

  2. Viabilidad de Escherichia coli en presencia de diferentes contaminantes

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    Antonio Rivera T

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available La contaminación en ríos condiciona la presencia de microorganismos adaptados al ecosistema entre ellos a patógenos de importancia en salud pública. Objetivo: Determinar la viabilidad de Escherichia coli en presencia de nitrato de plata, carbonato de amonio, fenol y formaldehído. Materiales y métodos: Se tomaron muestras de agua del río Alseseca, que luego se sembró en medios de cultivo selectivos para enterobacterias, seleccionándose las colonias del género Escherichia, las cuales fueron sembradas en el medio de orientación CHROMagar ECC. Las muestras de E. coli se evaluaron en presencia de nitrato de plata, carbonato de amonio, fenol y formaldehído. Resultados: El grupo experimental presentó viabilidad en presencia de los cuatro compuestos, el grupo control positivo presentó nula viabilidad, la comparación entre los grupos mostró diferencia significativa (p< 0,05. Conclusión: Los aislamientos de E. coli mostraron viabilidad, implicando riesgos para el ecosistemas y la salud, ya que el río Alseseca atraviesa por el municipio de Puebla donde existen núcleos poblacionales importantes.

  3. Overexpression and export of Vibrio anguillarum metalloprotease in Escherichia coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Fengli; Chi Zhenming; Chen Jixiang; Wu Longfei; Liang Likun

    2007-01-01

    Vibrio anguillarum metalloprotease, an extracellular zinc metalloprotease involved in the virulence mechanism of Vibrio anguillarum, is synthesized from the empA gene as a 611-residue precursor and naturally secreted via Sec secretion pathway in Vibrio anguillarum. In this study, heterologous expression of the empA gene encoding metallopmtease and export of the recombinant metalloprotease in Escherichia coliwere examined. The empA gene was subcloned into pBAD24 with arabinose promoter and sequenced. The sequence encoded a polypeptide(611 amino acids)consisting of four domains: a signal peptide, an Nterminal propeptide, a mature region and a C-terminal propeptide. The empA gene inserted in plasmid pBAD24 was overexpressed in TOP10 strain of E. Coli after arabinose induction. The 36kDa polypeptide of the recombinant metalloprotease as the mature protease was further confirmed by SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting. It was found that recombinant metalloprotease with the EmpA activity and antigenicity wasexported into the periplasm of Escherichia coli cells via Sec translocation pathway, whereas it was secreted into extracellular environments in V. Anguillarum. The results imply that the expression, export and processing mechanism of the protein in E. Coli are similar to those in V. Anguillarum.

  4. Persistence of Escherichia coli in batch and continuous vermicomposting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hénault-Ethier, Louise; Martin, Vincent J J; Gélinas, Yves

    2016-10-01

    Vermicomposting is a biooxidation process in which epigeicearthworms act in synergy with microbial populations to degrade organic matter. Vermicomposting does not go through a thermophilic stage as required by North American legislations for pathogen eradication. We examined the survival of a Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) labeled Escherichia coli MG1655 as a model for the survival of pathogenic bacteria in both small-scale batch and medium-scale continuously-operated systems to discern the influence of the earthworm Eisenia fetida, nutrient content and the indigenous vermicompost microbial community on pathogen abundance. In batch systems, the microbial community had the greatest influence on the rapid decline of E. coli populations, and the effect of earthworms was only visible in microbially-impoverishedvermicomposts. No significant earthworm density-dependent relationship was observed on E. coli survival under continuous operation. E. coli numbers decreased below the US EPA compost sanitation guidelines of 10(3)Colony Forming Units (CFU)/g (dry weight) within 18-21days for both the small-scale batch and medium-scale continuous systems, but it took up to 51days without earthworms and with an impoverished microbial community to reach the legal limit. Nutrient replenishment (i.e. organic carbon) provided by continuous feed input did not appear to extend E. coli survival. In fact, longer survival of E. coli was noticed in treatments where less total and labile sugars were available, suggesting that sugars may support potentially antagonist bacteria in the vermicompost. Total N, pH and humidity did not appear to affect E. coli survival. Several opportunistic human pathogens may be found in vermicompost, and their populations are likely kept in check by antagonists.

  5. Reduction of verotoxigenic Escherichia coli in production of fermented sausages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holck, Askild L; Axelsson, Lars; Rode, Tone Mari; Høy, Martin; Måge, Ingrid; Alvseike, Ole; L'abée-Lund, Trine M; Omer, Mohamed K; Granum, Per Einar; Heir, Even

    2011-11-01

    After a number of foodborne outbreaks of verotoxigenic Escherichia coli involving fermented sausages, some countries have imposed regulations on sausage production. For example, the US Food Safety and Inspection Service requires a 5 log(10) reduction of E. coli in fermented products. Such regulations have led to a number of studies on the inactivation of E. coli in fermented sausages by changing processing and post-processing conditions. Several factors influence the survival of E. coli such as pre-treatment of the meat, amount of NaCl, nitrite and lactic acid, water activity, pH, choice of starter cultures and addition of antimicrobial compounds. Also process variables like fermentation temperature and storage time play important roles. Though a large variety of different production processes of sausages exist, generally the reduction of E. coli caused by production is in the range 1-2 log(10). In many cases this may not be enough to ensure microbial food safety. By optimising ingredients and process parameters it is possible to increase E. coli reduction to some extent, but in some cases still other post process treatments may be required. Such treatments may be storage at ambient temperatures, specific heat treatments, high pressure processing or irradiation. HACCP analyses have identified the quality of the raw materials, low temperature in the batter when preparing the sausages and a rapid pH drop during fermentation as critical control points in sausage production. This review summarises the literature on the reduction verotoxigenic E. coli in production of fermented sausages.

  6. Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Salmonella and the Utility of Pefloxacin Disk Diffusion [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ferric C

    2015-11-01

    Fluoroquinolone resistance is a serious and increasingly common problem in Salmonella. Two companion studies in this issue of the Journal of Clinical Microbiology (E. Deak, R. Skov, J. A. Hindler, and R. M. Humphries, J Clin Microbiol 53:3405-3410, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JCM.01393-15; R. Skov, E. Matuschek, M. Sjölund-Karlsson, J. Åhman, A. Petersen, M. Stegger, M. Torpdahl, and G. Kahlmeter, J Clin Microbiol 53:3411-3417, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JCM.01287-15) provide data to support the use of pefloxacin disk diffusion as a convenient and inexpensive surrogate laboratory method to detect fluoroquinolone resistance in Salmonella when the direct measurement of fluoroquinolone MICs is not feasible [corrected]. Recently updated CLSI and EUCAST susceptibility breakpoints will help to optimize clinical outcomes and reduce the likelihood of emergent resistance.

  7. Genome Sequence of the Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Bacteriophage UFV-AREG1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalha, Laís Silva; Albino, Luiz Augusto A.; Boggione, Delaine Meireles Gouveia; Gontijo, Marco Tulio Pardini; Bazzolli, Denise M. Soares; Mendonca, Regina C. Santos

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the genome sequence of the Escherichia coli bacteriophage UFV-AREG1. This phage was isolated from cowshed wastewater and showed specificity for enterohemorrhagic E. coli O157:H7 (ATCC 43895), E. coli 0111 (CDC O11ab) and E. coli (ATCC 23229). PMID:27738021

  8. Multiplex PCR for Diagnosis of Enteric Infections Associated with Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Roberto; Vidal, Maricel; Lagos, Rossana; Levine, Myron; Prado, Valeria

    2004-01-01

    A multiplex PCR for detection of three categories of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli was developed. With this method, enterohemorrhagic E. coli, enteropathogenic E. coli, and enterotoxigenic E. coli were identified in fecal samples from patients with hemorrhagic colitis, watery diarrhea, or hemolytic-uremic syndrome and from food-borne outbreaks. PMID:15071051

  9. Diarrhea, Urosepsis and Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Caused by the Same Heteropathogenic Escherichia coli Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, C Wim; Bouts, Antonia H M; Rossen, John W A; Van der Kuip, Martijn; Van Heerde, Marc; Bökenkamp, Arend

    2016-09-01

    We describe an 8-month-old girl with diarrhea, urosepsis and hemolytic uremic syndrome caused by Escherichia coli. Typing of cultured E. coli strains from urine and blood revealed the presence of virulence factors from multiple pathotypes of E. coli. This case exemplifies the genome plasticity of E. coli and the resulting heteropathogenic strains.

  10. Prevalence of plasmid-mediated multidrug resistance determinants in fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria isolated from sewage and surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osińska, Adriana; Harnisz, Monika; Korzeniewska, Ewa

    2016-06-01

    Fluoroquinolones (FQs) are fully synthetic broad-spectrum antibacterial agents that are becoming increasingly popular in the treatment of clinical and veterinary infections. Being excreted during treatment, mostly as active compounds, their biological action is not limited to the therapeutic site, but it is moved further as resistance selection pressure into the environment. Water environment is an ideal medium for the aggregation and dissemination of antibiotics, antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB), and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), which can pose a serious threat to human health. Because of this, the aim of this study was to determine the number of fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria (FQRB) and their share in total heterotrophic plate counts (HPC) in treated wastewater (TWW), and upstream and downstream river water (URW, DRW) samples where TWW is discharged. The spread of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) determinants and the presence/absence of resistance genes to other most popular antibiotic groups (against tetracyclines and beta-lactams) in selected 116 multiresistant isolates were investigated. The share of FQRB in total HPC in all samples was rather small and ranged from 0.7 % in URW samples to 7.5 % in TWW. Bacteria from Escherichia (25.0 %), Acinetobacter (25.0 %), and Aeromonas (6.9 %) genera were predominant in the FQRB group. Fluoroquinolone resistance was mostly caused by the presence of the gene aac(6')-1b-cr (91.4 %). More rarely reported was the occurrence of qnrS, qnrD, as well as oqxA, but qnrA, qnrB, qepA, and oqxB were extremely rarely or never noted in FQRB. The most prevalent bacterial genes connected with beta-lactams' resistance in FQRB were bla TEM, bla OXA, and bla CTX-M. The bla SHV was less common in the community of FQRB. The occurrence of bla genes was reported in almost 29.3 % of FQRB. The most abundant tet genes in FQRB were tet(A), tet(L), tet(K), and tet(S). The prevalence of tet genes was observed in 41.4

  11. Introduction and establishment of fluoroquinolone-resistant Shigella sonnei into Bhutan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung The, Hao; Rabaa, Maia A.; Thanh, Duy Pham; Ruekit, Sirigade; Wangchuk, Sonam; Dorji, Tshering; Tshering, Kinzang Pem; Nguyen, To Nguyen Thi; Vinh, Phat Voong; Thanh, Tuyen Ha; Minh, Chau Nguyen Ngoc; Turner, Paul; Sar, Poda; Thwaites, Guy; Holt, Kathryn E.; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Bodhidatta, Ladaporn; Jeffries Mason, Carl; Baker, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Shigella sonnei is a major contributor to the global burden of diarrhoeal disease, generally associated with dysenteric diarrhoea in developed countries but also emerging in developing countries. The reason for the recent success of S. sonnei is unknown, but is likely catalysed by its ability to acquire resistance against multiple antimicrobials. Between 2011 and 2013, S. sonnei exhibiting resistance to fluoroquinolones, the first-line treatment recommended for shigellosis, emerged in Bhutan. Aiming to reconstruct the introduction and establishment of fluoroquinolone-resistant S. sonnei populations in Bhutan, we performed whole-genome sequencing on 71 S. sonnei samples isolated in Bhutan between 2011 and 2013.We found that these strains represented an expansion of a clade within the previously described lineage III, found specifically in Central Asia. Temporal phylogenetic reconstruction demonstrated that all of the sequenced Bhutanese S. sonnei diverged from a single ancestor that was introduced into Bhutan around 2006. Our data additionally predicted that fluoroquinolone resistance, conferred by mutations in gyrA and parC, arose prior to the introduction of the founder strain into Bhutan. Once established in Bhutan, these S. sonnei had access to a broad gene pool, as indicated by the acquisition of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-encoding plasmids and genes encoding type IV pili. The data presented here outline a model for the introduction and maintenance of fluoroquinolone-resistant S. sonnei in a new setting. Given the current circulation of fluoroquinolone-resistant S. sonnei in Asia, we speculate that this pattern of introduction is being recapitulated across the region and beyond.

  12. A putative, novel coli surface antigen 8B (CS8B) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njoroge, Samuel M; Boinett, Christine J; Madé, Laure F; Ouko, Tom T; Fèvre, Eric M; Thomson, Nicholas R; Kariuki, Samuel

    2015-10-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains harbor multiple fimbriae and pili to mediate host colonization, including the type IVb pilus, colonization factor antigen III (CFA/III). Not all colonization factors are well characterized or known in toxin positive ETEC isolates, which may have an impact identifying ETEC isolates based on molecular screening of these biomarkers. We describe a novel coli surface antigen (CS) 8 subtype B (CS8B), a family of CFA/III pilus, in a toxin producing ETEC isolate from a Kenyan collection. In highlighting the existence of this putative CS, we provide the sequence and specific primers, which can be used alongside other ETEC primers previously described.

  13. Effect of bile on growth, peritoneal absorption, and blood clearance of Escherichia coli in E coli peritonitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, R.; Schalen, C.; Tranberg, K.G. (Department of Surgery, Lund University, Lund (Sweden))

    1991-06-01

    The effect of intraperitoneal bile on growth, peritoneal absorption, and clearance of Escherichia coli was determined in E coli peritonitis in the rat. In E coli peritonitis, intraperitoneal bacterial counts gradually decreased, whereas they increased (after 2 hours) with subsequent development of bacteremia in E coli plus bile peritonitis. After an intraperitoneal injection of labeled bacteria, blood radioactivity was only initially lower in E coli plus bile peritonitis compared with E coli peritonitis. Clearance from blood was lower in E coli plus bile peritonitis than in E coli peritonitis. Organ localization was similar in E coli peritonitis and E coli plus bile peritonitis with decreased splenic, increased pulmonary, and unchanged hepatic uptakes compared with controls. Impaired peritoneal absorption of bacteria, together with impaired local host defense, is likely to enhance the noxious effect of bile in E coli peritonitis.

  14. Posttranslational Modifications of Ribosomal Proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterchuk, M V; Sergiev, P V; Dontsova, O A

    2011-04-01

    А number of ribosomal proteins inEscherichia coliundergo posttranslational modifications. Six ribosomal proteins are methylated (S11, L3, L11, L7/L12, L16, and L33), three proteins are acetylated (S5, S18, and L7), and protein S12 is methylthiolated. Extra amino acid residues are added to protein S6. С-terminal amino acid residues are partially removed from protein L31. The functional significance of these modifications has remained unclear. These modifications are not vital to the cells, and it is likely that they have regulatory functions. This paper reviews all the known posttranslational modifications of ribosomal proteins inEscherichia coli. Certain enzymes responsible for the modifications and mechanisms of enzymatic reactions are also discussed.

  15. Gyrase Mutations Are Associated with Variable Levels of Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Maha R; Jacobson, Karen R; Franke, Molly F; Kaur, Devinder; Sloutsky, Alex; Mitnick, Carole D; Murray, Megan

    2016-03-01

    Molecular diagnostics that rapidly and accurately predict resistance to fluoroquinolone drugs and especially later-generation agents promise to improve treatment outcomes for patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and prevent the spread of disease. Mutations in the gyr genes are known to confer most fluoroquinolone resistance, but knowledge about the effects of gyr mutations on susceptibility to early- versus later-generation fluoroquinolones and about the role of mutation-mutation interactions is limited. Here, we sequenced the full gyrA and gyrB open reading frames in 240 multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis strains and quantified their ofloxacin and moxifloxacin MIC by testing growth at six concentrations for each drug. We constructed a multivariate regression model to assess both the individual mutation effects and interactions on the drug MICs. We found that gyrB mutations contribute to fluoroquinolone resistance both individually and through interactions with gyrA mutations. These effects were statistically significant. In these clinical isolates, several gyrA and gyrB mutations conferred different levels of resistance to ofloxacin and moxifloxacin. Consideration of gyr mutation combinations during the interpretation of molecular test results may improve the accuracy of predicting the fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype. Further, the differential effects of gyr mutations on the activity of early- and later-generation fluoroquinolones requires further investigation and could inform the selection of a fluoroquinolone for treatment. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. CRISPR adaptation in Escherichia coli subtypeI-E system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiro, Ruth; Goren, Moran G; Yosef, Ido; Qimron, Udi

    2013-12-01

    The CRISPRs (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) and their associated Cas (CRISPR-associated) proteins are a prokaryotic adaptive defence system against foreign nucleic acids. The CRISPR array comprises short repeats flanking short segments, called 'spacers', which are derived from foreign nucleic acids. The process of spacer insertion into the CRISPR array is termed 'adaptation'. Adaptation allows the system to rapidly evolve against emerging threats. In the present article, we review the most recent studies on the adaptation process, and focus primarily on the subtype I-E CRISPR-Cas system of Escherichia coli.

  17. Composition of cardiolipin molecular species in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Yokota, K; Kanamoto, R.; Kito, M

    1980-01-01

    The composition of the molecular species of acidic phospholipids in Escherichia coli B during the late exponential growth phase at 37 degrees C was determined. Two phosphatidyl groups of cardiolipin, the 3-(3-sn-phosphatidyl) and 1-(3-sn-phosphatidyl) moieties of cardiolipin, were isolated by limited hydrolysis with phospholipase C. No significant difference in the composition of the molecular species was found between the 3-(3-sn-phosphatidyl) and 1-(3-sn-phosphatidyl) moieties. On the other...

  18. Pengujian Bakteri Escherichia Coli Pada Air Sumur Di Medan Johor

    OpenAIRE

    Mahardhika, Diah

    2013-01-01

    Water is an essential material in life. Water is a means to improve public health. The spread of water borne diseases can be. Water pollution can be caused due to the entry of human and animal waste, but it can also be caused directly or through a leak or where ground soil cracks. This test aims to determine the number most likely Most Probable Number (MPN) Escherichia coli bacteria that contaminate well water located in Medan Johor still meet water quality requirements or not. The samplin...

  19. Modulation of allele leakiness and adaptive mutability in Escherichia coli

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Jayaraman

    2000-08-01

    It is shown that partial phenotypic suppression of two ochre mutations (argE3 and lacZU118) and an amber mutation (in argE) by sublethal concentrations of streptomycin in an rpsL+ (streptomycin-sensitive) derivative of the Escherichia coli strain AB1157 greatly enhances their adaptive mutability under selection. Streptomycin also increases adaptive mutability brought about by the ppm mutation described earlier. Inactivation of recA affects neither phenotypic suppression by streptomycin nor replication-associated mutagenesis but abolishes adaptive mutagenesis. These results indicate a causal relationship between allele leakiness and adaptive mutability.

  20. Precursor for elongation factor Tu from Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    The tufA gene, one of two genes in Escherichia coli encoding elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), was cloned into a ColE1-derived plasmid downstream of the lac promoter-operator. In cells carrying this plasmid, the synthesis of EF-Tu was increased four- to fivefold upon the addition of isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (an inducer of the lac promoter). This condition led to the synthesis of a novel protein, called pTu, which comigrated with EF-Tu on a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel b...

  1. Interactions between Phage-Shock Proteins in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Hendrik; Teertstra, Wieke; Demmers, Jeroen; Boesten, Rolf; Tommassen, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Expression of the pspABCDE operon of Escherichia coli is induced upon infection by filamentous phage and by many other stress conditions, including defects in protein export. Expression of the operon requires the alternative sigma factor σ54 and the transcriptional activator PspF. In addition, PspA plays a negative regulatory role, and the integral-membrane proteins PspB and PspC play a positive one. In this study, we investigated whether the suggested protein-protein interactions implicated ...

  2. PspA can form large scaffolds in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standar, Kerstin; Mehner, Denise; Osadnik, Hendrik; Berthelmann, Felix; Hause, Gerd; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Brüser, Thomas

    2008-10-29

    The phage shock protein A (PspA) of Escherichia coli stabilizes the cytoplasmic membrane under stress conditions. Here we demonstrate that PspA can form hollow spherical or prolate spheroidal particles of about 30-40nm diameter with a scaffold-like arrangement of protein subunits at the surface. The 'PspA-scaffold' is the basic structure that is common to all particles. The PspA-scaffold may be of fundamental importance, as it could allow PspA to stabilize the integrity of membranes through numerous contact points over a large surface area.

  3. PspA can form large scaffolds in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Standar, Kerstin; Mehner, Denise; Osadnik, Hendrik; Berthelmann, Felix; Hause, Gerd; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Brüser, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The phage shock protein A (PspA) of Escherichia coli stabilizes the cytoplasmic membrane under stress conditions. Here we demonstrate that PspA can form hollow spherical or prolate spheroidal particles of about 30-40nm diameter with a scaffold-like arrangement of protein subunits at the surface. The 'PspA-scaffold' is the basic structure that is common to all particles. The PspA-scaffold may be of fundamental importance, as it could allow PspA to stabilize the integrity of membranes through n...

  4. Isolation and mapping of phosphotransferase mutants in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, W; Jewett, S; Fox, C F

    1970-11-01

    Mutants of Escherichia coli K-12 defective in enzyme I or Hpr, the two common components of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system, were isolated by a simple, direct method. The ptsI locus, the structural gene for enzyme I, and the ptsH locus, the site of mutations leading to loss of Hpr activity, are adjacent genes and could be part of a single operon. These two genes lie between the purC and supN markers in the order: strA... guaB-purC-ptsI-ptsH-supN-dsdA... his.

  5. Penicillin-binding site on the Escherichia coli cell envelope.

    OpenAIRE

    Amaral, L; Lee, Y.; Schwarz, U.; Lorian, V

    1986-01-01

    The binding of 35S-labeled penicillin to distinct penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) of the "cell envelope" obtained from the sonication of Escherichia coli was studied at different pHs ranging from 4 to 11. At low pH, PBPs 1b, 1c, 2, and 3 demonstrated the greatest amount of binding. At high pH, these PBPs bound the least amount of penicillin. PBPs 1a and 5/6 exhibited the greatest amount of binding at pH 10 and the least amount at pH 4. With the exception of PBP 5/6, the effect of pH on the...

  6. Modeling Surface Growth of Escherichia coli on Agar Plates

    OpenAIRE

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Morozumi, Satoshi

    2005-01-01

    Surface growth of Escherichia coli cells on a membrane filter placed on a nutrient agar plate under various conditions was studied with a mathematical model. The surface growth of bacterial cells showed a sigmoidal curve with time on a semilogarithmic plot. To describe it, a new logistic model that we presented earlier (H. Fujikawa et al., Food Microbiol. 21:501-509, 2004) was modified. Growth curves at various constant temperatures (10 to 34°C) were successfully described with the modified m...

  7. Modeling the pressure inactivation dynamics of Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamamoto K.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli, as a model microorganism, was treated in phosphate-buffered saline under high hydrostatic pressure between 100 and 300 MPa, and the inactivation dynamics was investigated from the viewpoint of predictive microbiology. Inactivation data were curve fitted by typical predictive models: logistic, Gompertz and Weibull functions. Weibull function described the inactivation curve the best. Two parameters of Weibull function were calculated for each holding pressure and their dependence on holding pressure was obtained by interpolation. With the interpolated parameters, inactivation curves were simulated and compared with the experimental data sets.

  8. [Hemolytic uremic syndrome caused by enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra, Cristina; Goldstein, Jorge; Silberstein, Claudia; Zotta, Elsa; Belardo, Marcela; Repetto, Horacio A

    2008-10-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, plaquetopenia and kidney damage. It is the leading cause of acute renal failure in pediatric age and the second for chronic renal failure. Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is the first etiologic agent of HUS being its main reservoir cattle and transmitted via contaminated food. At present, there is no specific treatment to reduce the progression of HUS. The study of the mechanisms by which STEC infects and Shiga toxin induces HUS can help to find new strategies to prevent this disease.

  9. Resistencia a biocidas de diferentes cepas de escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    López Aguayo, M. Carmen; Grande Burgos, M. José; Lucas López, R.; Gálvez-del-Postigo-Ruiz, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Los biocidas son herramientas de gran importancia para controlar la transmisión de microorganismos patógenos a través de la cadena alimentaria. En el presente estudio se ha determinado la resistencia a siete biocidas en una colección de nueve cepas de Escherichia coli, incluyendo cepas verotoxigénicas y cepas portadoras de resistencia a beta-lactámicos. Los biocidas más eficaces fueron triclosan, hexadecilpiridinio y cetrimida, seguido del cloruro de benzalconio. No se encon...

  10. Genome-scale genetic engineering in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jaehwan; Cho, Namjin; Jung, Daehee; Bang, Duhee

    2013-11-01

    Genome engineering has been developed to create useful strains for biological studies and industrial uses. However, a continuous challenge remained in the field: technical limitations in high-throughput screening and precise manipulation of strains. Today, technical improvements have made genome engineering more rapid and efficient. This review introduces recent advances in genome engineering technologies applied to Escherichia coli as well as multiplex automated genome engineering (MAGE), a recent technique proposed as a powerful toolkit due to its straightforward process, rapid experimental procedures, and highly efficient properties.

  11. Engineering Escherichia coli Cell Factories for n-Butanol Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hongjun; Zhao, Chunhua; Zhang, Tianrui; Lin, Zhao; Li, Yin; Zhang, Yanping

    2016-01-01

    The production of n-butanol, as a widely applied solvent and potential fuel, is attracting much attention. The fermentative production of butanol coupled with the production of acetone and ethanol by Clostridium (ABE fermentation) was once one of the oldest biotechnological processes, ranking second in scale behind ethanol fermentation. However, there remain problems with butanol production by Clostridium, especially the difficulty in genetically manipulating clostridial strains. In recent years, many efforts have been made to produce butanol using non-native strains. Until now, the most advanced effort was the engineering of the user-friendly and widely studied Escherichia coli for butanol production. This paper reviews the current progress and problems relating to butanol production by engineered E. coli in terms of prediction using mathematical models, pathway construction, novel enzyme replacement, butanol toxicity, and tolerance engineering strategies.

  12. Epidemiology and clinical manifestations of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hebbelstrup Jensen, Betina; Olsen, Katharina E P; Struve, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) represents a heterogeneous group of E. coli strains. The pathogenicity and clinical relevance of these bacteria are still controversial. In this review, we describe the clinical significance of EAEC regarding patterns of infection in humans, transmission......, reservoirs, and symptoms. Manifestations associated with EAEC infection include watery diarrhea, mucoid diarrhea, low-grade fever, nausea, tenesmus, and borborygmi. In early studies, EAEC was considered to be an opportunistic pathogen associated with diarrhea in HIV patients and in malnourished children...... in developing countries. In recent studies, associations with traveler's diarrhea, the occurrence of diarrhea cases in industrialized countries, and outbreaks of diarrhea in Europe and Asia have been reported. In the spring of 2011, a large outbreak of hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) and hemorrhagic colitis...

  13. Production and purification of active snowdrop lectin in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longstaff, M; Powell, K S; Gatehouse, J A; Raemaekers, R; Newell, C A; Hamilton, W D

    1998-02-15

    Recombinant snowdrop lectin was produced in Escherichia coli from a cDNA clone encoding mature Galanthus nivalis agglutinin. After induction with isopropylthio-beta-D-galactoside, inclusion bodies from E. coli were solubilised and the G. nivalis agglutinin purified by metal-affinity chromatography using a carboxy-terminal hexahistidine tag. The protein was refolded on the metal-affinity column prior to elution. After purification, the recombinant G. nivalis agglutinin agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes to a dilution similar to that determined for 'native' lectin purified from snowdrop, and showed similar specific binding to mannose. The toxicity of the recombinant G. nivalis agglutinin towards rice brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens) was shown to be similar to that of 'native' G. nivalis agglutinin when incorporated into an artificial diet. The recombinant G. nivalis agglutinin is thus functionally similar to 'native' snowdrop lectin.

  14. Probability of recovering pathogenic Escherichia coli from foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, W E; Ferreira, J L; Payne, W L; Jones, V M

    1985-01-01

    The probability of recovering pathogenic Escherichia coli from food by the Bacteriological Analytical Manual method was determined by the effects of several factors: the number of strains per food, the ability of pathogenic strains to survive enrichment, and the frequency of plasmid loss during enrichment. Biochemical patterns indicated the presence of about six E. coli strains per food sample. About half of the strains isolated from humans did not survive enrichment. Among those which grew, plasmid loss, as determined by gel electrophoresis and DNA colony hybridization, ranged from 20 to 95%. The combined effects of failure to survive enrichment and plasmid loss decreased the relative numbers of these strains and reduced the chance of detecting pathogens. To counteract this tendency and obtain a 90 to 95% probability off recovering a given pathogenic strain, 40 to 50 colonies per food sample should be picked during the routine testing of foods. PMID:3893320

  15. Bleomycin sensitivity in Escherichia coli is medium-dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Xu

    Full Text Available Bleomycin (BLM is a glycopeptide antibiotic and anti-tumor agent that targets primarily the furanose rings of DNA and in the presence of ferrous ions produces oxidative damage and DNA strand breaks. Escherichia coli cells growing in broth medium and exposed to low concentrations of BLM contain double-strand breaks and require homologous recombination to survive. To a lesser extent, the cells also require the abasic (AP endonucleases associated with base excision repair, presumably to repair oxidative damage. As expected, there is strong induction of the SOS system in treated cells. In contrast, E. coli cells growing in glucose or glycerol minimal medium are resistant to the lethal action of BLM and do not require either homologous recombination functions or AP-endonucleases for survival. DNA ligase activity, however, is needed for cells growing in minimal medium to resist the lethal effects of BLM. There is weak SOS induction in such treated cells.

  16. Rotational tumbling of Escherichia coli aggregates under shear

    CERN Document Server

    Portela, R; Almeida, P L; Sobral, R G; Franco, J M; Leal, C R

    2016-01-01

    Growing living cultures of Escherichia coli bacteria were investigated using real-time in situ rheology and rheo-imaging measurements. In the early stages of growth (lag phase), and when subjected to a constant stationary shear, the viscosity slowly increases with the cell's population. As the bacteria reach the exponential phase of growth, the viscosity increases rapidly, with sudden and temporary abrupt decreases and recoveries. At a certain stage, corresponding grossly to the late phase of growth, when the population stabilises, the viscosity also keeps its maximum constant value, with drops and recoveries, for a long period of time. This complex rheological behaviour, which was observed to be shear strain dependent, is a consequence of two coupled effects: the cell density continuous increase and its changing interacting properties. Particular attention was given to the late phase of growth of E. coli populations under shear. Rheo-imaging measurements revealed, near the static plate, a rotational motion o...

  17. Biosensing Vibrio cholerae with Genetically Engineered Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holowko, Maciej B; Wang, Huijuan; Jayaraman, Premkumar; Poh, Chueh Loo

    2016-11-18

    Cholera is a potentially mortal, infectious disease caused by Vibrio cholerae bacterium. Current treatment methods of cholera still have limitations. Beneficial microbes that could sense and kill the V. cholerae could offer potential alternative to preventing and treating cholera. However, such V. cholerae targeting microbe is still not available. This microbe requires a sensing system to be able to detect the presence of V. cholera bacterium. To this end, we designed and created a synthetic genetic sensing system using nonpathogenic Escherichia coli as the host. To achieve the system, we have moved proteins used by V. cholerae for quorum sensing into E. coli. These sensor proteins have been further layered with a genetic inverter based on CRISPRi technology. Our design process was aided by computer models simulating in vivo behavior of the system. Our sensor shows high sensitivity to presence of V. cholerae supernatant with tight control of expression of output GFP protein.

  18. Substrate specificity engineering of Escherichia coli derived fructosamine 6-kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Katsuhiro; Mikami-Sakaguchi, Akane; Kameya, Miho; Miyamoto, Yusuke; Ferri, Stefano; Tsugawa, Wakako; Sode, Koji

    2013-02-01

    A three-dimensional structural model of Escherichia coli fructosamine 6-kinase (FN6K), an enzyme that phosphorylates fructosamines at C6 and catalyzes the production of the fructosamine 6-phosphate stable intermediate, was generated using the crystal structure of 2-keto-3-deoxygluconate kinase isolated from Thermus thermophilus as template. The putative active site region was then investigated by site-directed mutagenesis to reveal several amino acid residues that likely play important roles in the enzyme reaction. Met220 was identified as a residue that plays a role in substrate recognition when compared to Bacillus subtilis derived FN6K, which shows different substrate specificity from the E. coli FN6K. Among the various Met220-substituted mutant enzymes, Met220Leu, which corresponded to the B. subtilis residue, resulted in an increased activity of fructosyl-valine and decreased activity of fructosyl-lysine, thus increasing the specificity for fructosyl-valine by 40-fold.

  19. In Vivo study of naturally deformed Escherichia coli bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavaddod, Sharareh; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein

    2016-06-01

    A combination of light-microscopy and image processing has been applied to study naturally deformed Escherichia coli under in vivo condition and at the order of sub-pixel high-resolution accuracy. To classify deflagellated non-dividing E. coli cells to the rod-shape and bent-shape, a geometrical approach has been applied. From the analysis of the geometrical data which were obtained of image processing, we estimated the required effective energy for shaping a rod-shape to a bent-shape with the same size. We evaluated the energy of deformation in the naturally deformed bacteria with minimum cell manipulation, under in vivo condition, and with minimum influence of any external force, torque and pressure. Finally, we have also elaborated on the possible scenario to explain how naturally deformed bacteria are formed from initial to final-stage.

  20. Engineering Escherichia coli for improved ethanol production from gluconate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Amanda; Schlacta, Theresa; Warmack, Rebeccah; Kasuga, Takao; Fan, Zhiliang

    2013-10-10

    We report on engineering Escherichia coli to produce ethanol at high yield from gluconic acid (gluconate). Knocking out genes encoding for the competing pathways (l-lactate dehydrogenase and pyruvate formate lyase A) in E. coli KO11 eliminated lactate production, lowered the carbon flow toward acetate production, and improved the ethanol yield from 87.5% to 97.5% of the theoretical maximum, while the growth rate of the mutant strain was about 70% of the wild type. The corresponding genetic modifications led to a small improvement of ethanol yield from 101.5% to 106.0% on glucose. Deletion of the pyruvate dehydrogenase gene (pdh) alone improved the ethanol yield from 87.5% to 90.4% when gluconate was a substrate. The growth rate of the mutant strain was identical to that of the wild type. The corresponding genetic modification led to no improvements on ethanol yield on glucose.

  1. Metabolite essentiality elucidates robustness of Escherichia coli metabolism

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Pan-Jun; Kim, Tae Yong; Lee, Kwang Ho; Jeong, Hawoong; Lee, Sang Yup; Park, Sunwon

    2007-01-01

    Complex biological systems are very robust to genetic and environmental changes at all levels of organization. Many biological functions of Escherichia coli metabolism can be sustained against single-gene or even multiple-gene mutations by using redundant or alternative pathways. Thus, only a limited number of genes have been identified to be lethal to the cell. In this regard, the reaction-centric gene deletion study has a limitation in understanding the metabolic robustness. Here, we report the use of flux-sum, which is the summation of all incoming or outgoing fluxes around a particular metabolite under pseudo-steady state conditions, as a good conserved property for elucidating such robustness of E. coli from the metabolite point of view. The functional behavior, as well as the structural and evolutionary properties of metabolites essential to the cell survival, was investigated by means of a constraints-based flux analysis under perturbed conditions. The essential metabolites are capable of maintaining a...

  2. SILVER NANOPARTICLES-DISK DIFFUSION TEST AGAINST Escherichia coli ISOLATES

    Science.gov (United States)

    CUNHA, Francisco Afrânio; MAIA, Kamila Rocha; MALLMAN, Eduardo José Jucá; CUNHA, Maria da Conceição dos Santos Oliveira; MACIEL, Antonio Auberson Martins; de SOUZA, Ieda Pereira; MENEZES, Everardo Albuquerque; FECHINE, Pierre Basílio Almeida

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Nanotechnology can be a valuable ally in the treatment of infections. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are structures that have antimicrobial activity. The aim of this study was to produce AgNPs by green methods, characterize these structures, and assess their antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli associated with the antibiotic ciprofloxacin. AgNPs were characterized by spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. Antimicrobial activity was evaluated by the disk diffusion method against 10 strains of E. coli. The synthesized AgNPs showed a spherical shape and a size of 85.07 ± 12.86 nm (mean ± SD). AgNPs increased the activity of ciprofloxacin by 40% and may represent a new therapeutic option for the treatment of bacterial infections. PMID:27680178

  3. The action of beta-galactosidase (Escherichia coli) on allolactose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, R E; Wallenfels, K; Kurz, G

    1975-09-01

    The parameters involved in the action of beta-galactosidase (EC 3.2.1.23) (Escherichia coli) on allolactose, the natural inducer of lac operon in E. coli, were studied. At low allolactose concentrations only galactose and glucose were formed, while at high allolactose concentrations transgalactolytic oligosaccharides were also produced. Detectable amounts of lactose were not formed. The V and Km values (49.6 U/mg and 0.00120 M, respectively) indicated that allolactose is as good if not a better substrate of beta-galactosidase as lactose. The pH optimum with allolactose (7.8-7.9) as well as its activation by K+ (as compared to activation by Na+) were similar to the case with lactose as substrate. The alpha-anomer of allolactose was hydrolyzed about two times as rapidly as was the beta-anomer.

  4. Mutational analysis of UMP kinase from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucurenci, N; Serina, L; Zaharia, C; Landais, S; Danchin, A; Bârzu, O

    1998-02-01

    UMP kinase from Escherichia coli is one of the four regulatory enzymes involved in the de novo biosynthetic pathway of pyrimidine nucleotides. This homohexamer, with no counterpart in eukarya, might serve as a target for new antibacterial drugs. Although the bacterial enzyme does not show sequence similarity with any other known nucleoside monophosphate kinase, two segments between amino acids 35 to 78 and 145 to 194 exhibit 28% identity with phosphoglycerate kinase and 30% identity with aspartokinase, respectively. Based on these similarities, a number of residues of E. coli UMP kinase were selected for site-directed mutagenesis experiments. Biochemical, kinetic, and spectroscopic analysis of the modified proteins identified residues essential for catalysis (Asp146), binding of UMP (Asp174), and interaction with the allosteric effectors, GTP and UTP (Arg62 and Asp77).

  5. Escherichia coli bacteraemia in patients with and without haematological malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, B; Kolmos, H J; Orskov, F

    1998-01-01

    We compared serotypes, virulence factors and susceptibility to antibiotics of Escherichia coli strains isolated from 282 patients with bacteraemia. Thirty-five of these were neutropenic patients with haematological malignancy and 247 were patients with a normal or raised total white blood cell...... in the two groups of strains. The haematological patients more often than the non-haematological patients had an unknown focus of infection, recurrent bacteraemia, shorter intervals between recurrences and recurrences caused by identical strains. Despite a well-defined focus, six of eight non......-haematological patients had recurrences with a strain different from the strain isolated in a previous episode. A possible connection between shorter intervals and recurrence with identical strains is discussed. We suggest that strains from recurrent E. coli bacteraemia are sent to a reference laboratory for serotyping...

  6. PRODUCTION OF RECOMBINANT PROTEIN CRM197 IN ESCHERICHIA COLI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Dukhovlinov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The CRM197 is a non-toxic mutant of diphtheria toxin having a single amino acid substitution of a glycine for a glutamic acid in position 52. Being naturally nontoxic, CRM197 is a promising adjuvant and ideal carrier protein for conjugate vaccines. Typically, production of diphtheria toxin and some of the non-toxic proteins are carried out by Corynebacterium diphtheriae. Production of recombinant protein CRM197 in Escherichia coli is advantageous. It is simple, cheap and permits production of the target protein in a short time using a non-pathogenic microorganism. In this study patented high-yield-producing E. coli strain was used. As a part of the study the following steps were taken: protocol adjustment for induction of crm197 gene, production and purification of recombinant CRM197 by ion-exchange, hydrophobic and gel-filtration chromatography. The purity of the final preparation reached 97%.

  7. Assessment of Escherichia coli isolates for In vitro biofilm production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.I. Dadawala

    Full Text Available A total of 14 Escherichia coli isolates were assessed for their ability to produce biofilm in-vitro by slime production on Congo red agar medium (CRA and microtitre plate assay. Out of 14 isolates tested, 12 were slime producing on CRA as indicated by black colonies. The isolates of E.coli varied in their ability to produce biofilm on the surface of microtitre plate ranging from 0.101 to 0.543 ODm. Out of 14 isolates tested, 10 were positive for biofilm production employing criterion of blank corrected ODs9s > 0.1. Two of slime negative isolated were also negative for biofilm production where as the two slime positive isolates were found to be negative for biofilm production. [Veterinary World 2010; 3(8.000: 364-366

  8. Purification of recombinant ovalbumin from inclusion bodies of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Vaibhav; Singh, Anupam; Panda, Amulya K

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant ovalbumin expressed in bacterial host is essentially free from post-translational modifications and can be useful in understanding the structure-function relationship of the protein. In this study, ovalbumin was expressed in Escherichia coli in the form of inclusion bodies. Ovalbumin inclusion bodies were solubilized using urea and refolded by decreasing the urea concentration by dilution. Refolded protein was purified by anion exchange chromatography. Overall recovery of purified recombinant ovalbumin from inclusion bodies was about 30% with 98% purity. Purified recombinant ovalbumin was characterized by mass spectrometry, circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy. Recombinant ovalbumin was shown to be resistant to trypsin using protease resistance assay. This indicated proper refolding of ovalbumin from inclusion bodies of E. coli. This method provides a simple way of producing ovalbumin free of post-translational modifications.

  9. Immunogenic Domains and Secondary Structure of Escherichia coli Recombinant Secreted Protein Escherichia coli-Secreted Protein B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxane Maria Fontes Piazza

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Several pathogenic bacteria are able to induce the attaching and effacing (A/E lesion. The A/E lesion is caused by effector proteins, such as Escherichia coli-secreted protein B (EspB, responsible together with Escherichia coli-secreted protein D for forming a pore structure on the host cell, which allows the translocation of effector proteins. Different variants of this protein can be found in E. coli strains, and during natural infection or when this protein is injected, this leads to variant-specific production of antibodies, which may not be able to recognize other variants of this bacterial protein. Herein, we describe the production of a hybrid recombinant EspB toxin that comprises all known variants of this protein. This recombinant protein could be useful as an antigen for the production of antibodies with broad-range detection of EspB-bearing bacteria, or as an antigen that could be used in vaccine formulation to generate antibodies against different EspB variants, thereby increasing immunization potential. In addition, the recombinant protein allowed us to analyze its secondary structure, to propose the immunogenic regions of EspB variants, and also to characterize anti-EspB antibodies. Our results suggest that this hybrid protein or a protein composed of the conserved immunogenic regions could be used for a variety of clinical applications.

  10. Immunogenic Domains and Secondary Structure of Escherichia coli Recombinant Secreted Protein Escherichia coli-Secreted Protein B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Bruna Alves; Rocha, Letícia Barboza; Carvalho, Eneas; Piazza, Roxane Maria Fontes; Luz, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Several pathogenic bacteria are able to induce the attaching and effacing (A/E) lesion. The A/E lesion is caused by effector proteins, such as Escherichia coli-secreted protein B (EspB), responsible together with Escherichia coli-secreted protein D for forming a pore structure on the host cell, which allows the translocation of effector proteins. Different variants of this protein can be found in E. coli strains, and during natural infection or when this protein is injected, this leads to variant-specific production of antibodies, which may not be able to recognize other variants of this bacterial protein. Herein, we describe the production of a hybrid recombinant EspB toxin that comprises all known variants of this protein. This recombinant protein could be useful as an antigen for the production of antibodies with broad-range detection of EspB-bearing bacteria, or as an antigen that could be used in vaccine formulation to generate antibodies against different EspB variants, thereby increasing immunization potential. In addition, the recombinant protein allowed us to analyze its secondary structure, to propose the immunogenic regions of EspB variants, and also to characterize anti-EspB antibodies. Our results suggest that this hybrid protein or a protein composed of the conserved immunogenic regions could be used for a variety of clinical applications.

  11. Longitudinal characterization of Escherichia coli in healthy captive nonhuman primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan B Clayton

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal (GI tracts of nonhuman primates are well known to harbor Escherichia coli, a known commensal of humans and animals. While E. coli is a normal inhabitant of the mammalian gut, it also exists in a number of pathogenic forms or pathotypes, including those with predisposition for the GI tract, as well the urogenital tract. Diarrhea in captive nonhuman primates (NHPs has long been a problem in both zoo settings and research colonies, including the Como Zoo. It is an animal welfare concern, as well as a public health concern. E. coli has not been extensively studied in correlation with diarrhea in captive primates; therefore, a study was performed during the summer of 2009 in collaboration with a zoo in Saint Paul, MN, which was experiencing an increased incidence and severity of diarrhea among their NHP collection. Fresh fecal samples were collected weekly from each member of the primate collection, between June and August of 2009, and E. coli were isolated. A total of 33 individuals were included in the study, representing eight species. E. coli isolates were examined for their genetic relatedness, phylogenetic relationships, plasmid replicon types, virulence gene profiles, and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles. A number of isolates were identified containing virulence genes commonly found in several different E. coli pathotypes, and there was evidence of clonal transmission of isolates between animals and over time. Overall, the manifestation of chronic diarrhea in the Como Zoo primate collection is a complex problem whose solution will require regular screening for microbial agents and consideration of environmental causes. This study provides some insight towards the sharing of enteric bacteria between such animals.

  12. Streptokinase: cloning, expression, and excretion by Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malke, H; Ferretti, J J

    1984-06-01

    Genomic DNA from Streptococcus equisimilis strain H46A was cloned in Escherichia coli by using the bacteriophage lambda replacement vector L47 and an in vitro packaging system. A casein/plasminogen overlay technique was used to screen the phage bank for recombinants carrying the streptokinase gene ( skc ). The gene was present with a frequency of 1 in 836 recombinants, and 10 independent clones containing skc were isolated and physically characterized. One recombinant clone was used to subclone skc in E. coli plasmid vectors. Plasmid pMF2 [10.4 kilobases (kb)] consisting of pACYC184 with a 6.4-kb H46A DNA fragment in the EcoRI site and pMF5 (6.9 kb) carrying a 2.5-kb fragment in the Pst I site of pBR322 were among the recombinant plasmids determining streptokinase production in three different E. coli host strains. Expression of skc was independent of its orientation in either vector, indicating that its own promoter was present and functional in E. coli. However, expression in pBR322 was more efficient in one orientation than in the other, suggesting that one or both of the bla gene promoters contributed to skc expression. Several lines of evidence, including proof obtained by the immunodiffusion technique, established the identity of E. coli streptokinase. Testing cell-free culture supernatant fluids, osmotic shock fluids, and sonicates of osmotically shocked cells for streptokinase activity revealed the substance to be present in all three principal locations, indicating that E. coli cells were capable of releasing substantial amounts of streptokinase into the culture medium.

  13. Pathogenic Escherichia coli in rural household container waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagals, P; Barnard, T G; Mokoena, M M; Ashbolt, N; Roser, D J

    2013-01-01

    Plastic containers in the range of 5-20 L are widely used - especially in rural African settings - to collect, transport and store water for domestic use, including drinking, bathing and hygiene. The pathogen content of the waters in these containers has not been adequately characterized as yet. This paper presents the primary findings of a synoptic survey of drinking water quality samples from these containers and involved collection of bacterial indicator and pathogenicity gene data. In total, 571 samples of a variety of waters were taken in rural communities in South Africa and the Escherichia coli numbers measured. Of the E. coli positive samples, 46% (n = 148) were screened for the presence of E. coli pathogen gene markers. Though synoptic, the survey provided many insights into the issues that drove the study. Container use markedly degraded water quality as judged by indicator counts, even where improved water supply services were in place. Household container use also appeared to promote regrowth or contamination of containers with pathogenic E. coli strains. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis also showed that the diversity of potential pathogenic E. coli carrying virulence genes was great. All seven genes screened for (Ial, Stx1, Stx2, EaeA, Eagg, ST, LT) were found in the waters, alone or as mixtures (number of different combinations = 31) including those characteristic of the more dangerous invasive and haemorrhagic E. coli strains. Given the central role of containers in the management of water supply to rural communities, it is clear the microbiology of these waters requires much further characterization.

  14. A structural view of the dissociation of Escherichia coli tryptophanase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Keren; Qasim, Nasrin; Gdaelvsky, Garik; Kogan, Anna; Goldgur, Yehuda; Parola, Abraham H; Lotan, Ofra; Almog, Orna

    2015-12-01

    Tryptophanase (Trpase) is a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent homotetrameric enzyme which catalyzes the degradation of L-tryptophan. Trpase is also known for its cold lability, which is a reversible loss of activity at low temperature (2°C) that is associated with the dissociation of the tetramer. Escherichia coli Trpase dissociates into dimers, while Proteus vulgaris Trpase dissociates into monomers. As such, this enzyme is an appropriate model to study the protein-protein interactions and quaternary structure of proteins. The aim of the present study was to understand the differences in the mode of dissociation between the E. coli and P. vulgaris Trpases. In particular, the effect of mutations along the molecular axes of homotetrameric Trpase on its dissociation was studied. To answer this question, two groups of mutants of the E. coli enzyme were created to resemble the amino-acid sequence of P. vulgaris Trpase. In one group, residues 15 and 59 that are located along the molecular axis R (also termed the noncatalytic axis) were mutated. The second group included a mutation at position 298, located along the molecular axis Q (also termed the catalytic axis). Replacing amino-acid residues along the R axis resulted in dissociation of the tetramers into monomers, similar to the P. vulgaris Trpase, while replacing amino-acid residues along the Q axis resulted in dissociation into dimers only. The crystal structure of the V59M mutant of E. coli Trpase was also determined in its apo form and was found to be similar to that of the wild type. This study suggests that in E. coli Trpase hydrophobic interactions along the R axis hold the two monomers together more strongly, preventing the dissociation of the dimers into monomers. Mutation of position 298 along the Q axis to a charged residue resulted in tetramers that are less susceptible to dissociation. Thus, the results indicate that dissociation of E. coli Trpase into dimers occurs along the molecular Q axis.

  15. Deactivation of Escherichia coli by the plasma needle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sladek, R E J; Stoffels, E [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2005-06-07

    In this paper we present a parameter study on deactivation of Escherichia coli (E. coli) by means of a non-thermal plasma (plasma needle). The plasma needle is a small-sized (1 mm) atmospheric glow sustained by radio-frequency excitation. This plasma will be used to disinfect heat-sensitive objects; one of the intended applications is in vivo deactivation of dental bacteria: destruction of plaque and treatment of caries. We use E. coli films plated on agar dishes as a model system to optimize the conditions for bacterial destruction. Plasma power, treatment time and needle-to-sample distance are varied. Plasma treatment of E. coli films results in formation of a bacteria-free void with a size up to 12 mm. 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} colony forming units are already destroyed after 10 s of treatment. Prolongation of treatment time and usage of high powers do not significantly improve the destruction efficiency: short exposure at low plasma power is sufficient. Furthermore, we study the effects of temperature increase on the survival of E. coli and compare it with thermal effects of the plasma. The population of E. coli heated in a warm water bath starts to decrease at temperatures above 40 deg. C. Sample temperature during plasma treatment has been monitored. The temperature can reach up to 60 deg. C at high plasma powers and short needle-to-sample distances. However, thermal effects cannot account for bacterial destruction at low power conditions. For safe and efficient in vivo disinfection, the sample temperature should be kept low. Thus, plasma power and treatment time should not exceed 150 mW and 60 s, respectively.

  16. Accumulation and efflux of polychlorinated biphenyls in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Shen; Fang, Jun; Turner, Kendrick B; Daunert, Sylvia; Wei, Yinan

    2012-06-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are environmental pollutants that have been associated with numerous adverse health effects in human and animals. Hydroxylated PCBs (HPCBs) are the product of the oxidative metabolism of PCBs. The presence of hydroxyl groups in HPCBs makes these compounds more hydrophilic than the parent PCBs. One of the best approaches to break down and remove these contaminants is bioremediation; an environmentally friendly process that uses microorganisms to degrade hazardous chemicals into non-toxic ones. In this study, we investigated the cellular accumulation and toxicity of selected PCBs and HPCBs in Gram-negative bacteria, using Escherichia coli as a model organism. We found that none of the five PCBs tested were toxic to E. coli, presumably due to their limited bioavailability. Nevertheless, different HPCBs tested showed different levels of toxicity. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the primary multidrug efflux system in E. coli, AcrAB-TolC, facilitated the efflux of HPCBs out of the cell. Since AcrAB-TolC is constitutively expressed in E. coli and is conserved in all sequenced Gram-negative bacterial genomes, our results suggest that the efflux activities of multidrug resistant pumps may affect the accumulation and degradation of PCBs in Gram-negative bacteria.

  17. Modification of Artificial Oliogosaccharides in Recombinant Escherichia coli Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohisa Kato

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial oligosaccharides were modified using recombinant Escherichia coli cells that overexpress sialidase. Based on the principle of the saccharide primer method by using bacterial cells overexpressing enzymes related to oligosaccharide modification. Problem statement: It is very hard to obtain oligosaccharides, because they have complex and diverse structures with different linkage patterns and monosaccharide components. Approach: It has been known that various oligosaccharides can be synthesized in mammalian cells from saccharide primers. We attempted to modify oligosaccharides by using bacterial cells overexpressing enzymes related to oligosaccharide modification instead of mammalian cells. Results: The glycosphingolipid-like derivative GM3 was absorbed by the cell and desialylated by the expressed sialidase and the desialylated product was then secreted into the medium. The GM3-type oligosaccharides were not detected from the cell fraction of recombinant E. coli cells that overexpress sialidase differently from recombinant E. coli carrying only vector DNA (pET-19b. Conclusion/Recommendations: E. coli as well as mammalian cells may be used as a biocatalyst for oligosaccharide modification and production of artificial functional oligosaccharides.

  18. Curli fimbria: an Escherichia coli adhesin associated with human cystitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melina Aparecida Cordeiro

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Escherichia coli is the major causative agent of human cystitis. In this study, a preliminary molecular analysis carried out by PCR (polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that 100% of 31 E. coli strains isolated from patients with recurrent UTIs (urinary tract infections showed the presence of the curli fimbria gene (csgA. Curli fimbria is known to be associated with bacterial biofilm formation but not with the adhesion of human cystitis-associated E. coli. Therefore, this work aimed to study how curli fimbria is associated with uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC as an adhesion factor. For this purpose, the csgA gene was deleted from strain UPEC-4, which carries three adhesion factor genes (csgA, fimH and ompA. The wild-type UPEC-4 strain and its mutant (ΔcsgA were analyzed for their adhesion ability over HTB-9 (human bladder carcinoma, Vero (kidney cells of African green monkey and HUVEC (human umbilical vein cells in the presence of α-D-mannose. All the wild-type UPEC strains tested (100% were able to adhere to all three cell types, while the UPEC-4 ΔcsgA mutant lost its adherence to HTB-9 but continued to adhere to the HUVEC and Vero cells. The results suggest that curli fimbria has an important role in the adhesion processes associated with human UPEC-induced cystitis.

  19. Insights into the biology of Escherichia coli through structural proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matte, Allan; Jia, Zongchao; Sunita, S; Sivaraman, J; Cygler, Miroslaw

    2007-09-01

    Escherichia coli has historically been an important organism for understanding a multitude of biological processes, and represents a model system as we attempt to simulate the workings of living cells. Many E. coli strains are also important human and animal pathogens for which new therapeutic strategies are required. For both reasons, a more complete and comprehensive understanding of the protein structure complement of E. coli is needed at the genome level. Here, we provide examples of insights into the mechanism and function of bacterial proteins that we have gained through the Bacterial Structural Genomics Initiative (BSGI), focused on medium-throughput structure determination of proteins from E. coli. We describe the structural characterization of several enzymes from the histidine biosynthetic pathway, the structures of three pseudouridine synthases, enzymes that synthesize one of the most abundant modified bases in RNA, as well as the combined use of protein structure and focused functional analysis to decipher functions for hypothetical proteins. Together, these results illustrate the power of structural genomics to contribute to a deeper biological understanding of bacterial processes.

  20. Redefining the requisite lipopolysaccharide structure in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Timothy C; Aggarwal, Parag; Mamat, Uwe; Lindner, Buko; Woodard, Ronald W

    2006-02-17

    Gram-negative bacteria possess an asymmetric lipid bilayer surrounding the cell wall, the outer membrane (OM). The OM inner leaflet is primarily composed of various glycerophospholipids, whereas the outer leaflet predominantly contains the unique amphiphilic macromolecule, lipopolysaccharide (LPS or endotoxin). The majority of all gram-negative bacteria elaborate LPS containing at least one 2-keto 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonate (Kdo) molecule. The minimal LPS structure required for growth of Escherichia coli has long been recognized as two Kdo residues attached to lipid A, inextricably linking viability to toxicity. Here we report the construction and characterization of the nonconditional E. coli K-12 suppressor strain KPM22 that lacks Kdo and is viable despite predominantly elaborating the endotoxically inactive LPS precursor lipid IV(A). Our results challenge the established E. coli Kdo2-lipid A dogma, indicating that the previously observed and well-documented dependence of cell viability on the synthesis of Kdo stems from a lethal pleiotropy precipitated after the depletion of the carbohydrate, rather than an inherent need for the Kdo molecule itself as an indispensable structural component of the OM LPS layer. Inclusion of the inner membrane LPS transporter MsbA on a multicopy plasmid partially suppresses the lethal deltaKdo phenotype directly in the auxotrophic parent strain, suggesting increased rates of nonglycosylated lipid A transport can, in part, compensate for Kdo depletion. The unprecedented nature of a lipid IV(A) OM redefines the requisite LPS structure for viability in E. coli.

  1. Curli fimbria: an Escherichia coli adhesin associated with human cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, Melina Aparecida; Werle, Catierine Hirsch; Milanez, Guilherme Paier; Yano, Tomomasa

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the major causative agent of human cystitis. In this study, a preliminary molecular analysis carried out by PCR (polymerase chain reaction) demonstrated that 100% of 31 E. coli strains isolated from patients with recurrent UTIs (urinary tract infections) showed the presence of the curli fimbria gene (csgA). Curli fimbria is known to be associated with bacterial biofilm formation but not with the adhesion of human cystitis-associated E. coli. Therefore, this work aimed to study how curli fimbria is associated with uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) as an adhesion factor. For this purpose, the csgA gene was deleted from strain UPEC-4, which carries three adhesion factor genes (csgA, fimH and ompA). The wild-type UPEC-4 strain and its mutant (ΔcsgA) were analyzed for their adhesion ability over HTB-9 (human bladder carcinoma), Vero (kidney cells of African green monkey) and HUVEC (human umbilical vein) cells in the presence of α-d-mannose. All the wild-type UPEC strains tested (100%) were able to adhere to all three cell types, while the UPEC-4 ΔcsgA mutant lost its adherence to HTB-9 but continued to adhere to the HUVEC and Vero cells. The results suggest that curli fimbria has an important role in the adhesion processes associated with human UPEC-induced cystitis.

  2. Magnetically-Actuated Escherichia coli System for Micro Lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauback, S.; Brown, E.; Pérez-Guzman, L.; Peace, C.; Pierce, C.; Lower, B. H.; Lower, S. K.; Sooryakumar, R.

    2015-03-01

    Technologies that control matter at the nano- and micro-scale are crucial for developing new engineered materials and devices. While the more traditional approaches for such manipulations often depend on lithographic fabrication, they can be expanded upon by taking advantage of the biological systems within a living cell which also operate on the nano- and micro- scale. In this study, a system is being developed to functionalize a targeted location on the surface of a chip with the protein AmCyan from transformed Escherichia coli cells. Using established methods in molecular biology where a plasmid with the amcyan gene sequence is inserted into the cell, E. coli are engineered to express the AmCyan protein on their outer surface. In order to transport the cells to the targeted location, the transformed E. coli are labeled with superparamagnetic micro-beads which exert directed forces on the cells in an external field. Preliminary results of the protein expression on E. coli, the transport of the cell through weak magnetic fields to targeted locations and the potential to transfer protein from the cell to the chip surface will be presented.

  3. Combinatorial biosynthesis of flavones and flavonols in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahisa, Ikuo; Funa, Nobutaka; Ohnishi, Yasuo; Martens, Stefan; Moriguchi, Takaya; Horinouchi, Sueharu

    2006-06-01

    (2S)-Flavanones (naringenin and pinocembrin) are key intermediates in the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway in plants. Recombinant Escherichia coli cells containing four genes for a phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, cinnamate/coumarate:CoA ligase, chalcone synthase, and chalcone isomerase, in addition to the acetyl-CoA carboxylase, have been established for efficient production of (2S)-naringenin from tyrosine and (2S)-pinocembrin from phenylalanine. Further introduction of the flavone synthase I gene from Petroselinum crispum under the control of the T7 promoter and the synthetic ribosome-binding sequence in pACYCDuet-1 caused the E. coli cells to produce flavones: apigenin (13 mg/l) from tyrosine and chrysin (9.4 mg/l) from phenylalanine. Introduction into the E. coli cells of the flavanone 3beta-hydroxylase and flavonol synthase genes from the plant Citrus species led to production of flavonols: kaempferol (15.1 mg/l) from tyrosine and galangin (1.1 mg/l) from phenylalanine. The combinatorial biosynthesis of the flavones and flavonols in E. coli is promising for the construction of a library of various flavonoid compounds and un-natural flavonoids in bacteria.

  4. Genomic analysis of extra-intestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli urosepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, A; Alhashash, F; Collins, M; Alqasim, A; Paszckiewicz, K; Weston, V; Diggle, M

    2013-08-01

    Urosepsis is a bacteraemia infection caused by an organism previously causing an infection in the urinary tract of a patient, a diagnosis which has been classically confirmed by culture of the same species of bacteria from both blood and urine samples. Given the new insights afforded by sequencing technologies into the complicated population structures of infectious agents affecting humans, we sought to investigate urosepsis by comparing the genome sequences of blood and urine isolates of Escherichia coli from five patients with urosepsis. The results confirm the classical urosepsis hypothesis in four of the five cases, but also show the complex nature of extra-intestinal E. coli infection in the fifth case, where three distinct strains caused two distinct infections. Additionally, we show there is little to no variation in the bacterial genome as it progressed from urine to blood, and also present a minimal set of virulence genes required for bacteraemia in E. coli based on gene association. These suggest that most E. coli have the genetic propensity to cause bacteraemia.

  5. [Investigation of pathogenic Escherichia coli strains in patients with diarrhea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydın Tutak, Gülten; Tuğrul, Hamdi Murat

    2015-01-01

    The role of certain serogroups and serotypes of Escherichia coli in the etiology of gastroenteritis is increasingly appreciated. It is important to detect the virulence factors of diarrheagenic E.coli strains that differentiate them from nonpathogenic members of normal intestinal flora for the diagnosis and treatment. The aims of this study were to determine the serotypes of E.coli isolates that cause gastroenteritis and to investigate the presence of virulence genes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A total of 202 watery, bloody or mucoid stool samples sent to microbiology laboratory collected from patients with diarrhea who were admitted to outpatient clinics of Trakya University Health Research and Application Hospital between February to October 2009, were included in the study. A total of 254 predominantly grown E.coli strains have been isolated and identified with conventional methods from the cultures of those 202 samples. All strains were tested by slide agglutination (SA) that includes 6 units of O serogroups polyvalent antisera of enteropathogenic E.coli (EPEC), enterotoxigenic E.coli (ETEC) and enteroinvasive E.coli (EIEC). The samples which yielded positive results with SA test and the same number of negative samples selected with mapping method as controls were studied for the presence of virulence genes belonging EPEC, ETEC and EIEC by conventional PCR. In the study, 14.3% (29/202) of the samples were serogrouped with SA, of them 13 (6.4%) were identified as EPEC, 11 (5.4%) as EIEC and five (2.4%) as ETEC. Only five isolates belonging to EPEC serogroup could be defined by monovalent antiserum and they were all in O1 serogroup. Out of 29 pathogenic E.coli serotyped, 3 (10.3%) of them harbored the virulence genes of diarrheagenic strains. One sample which was positive for eaeA gene of EPEC, did not harbor bfpA and stx genes and was defined as atypical EPEC. Out of other two samples, one was positive for estA gene of ETEC and the other one for ial gene

  6. Prevalence of Antibiotic Resistance in Escherichia coli Isolated from Poultry Meat Supply in Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Safarpordehkordi

    2014-08-01

    Conclusions: Despite the high contamination rate of chicken meat with Escherichia coli, majority of isolates had high resistance to common antibiotics. Complete cooking of meat and avoid indiscriminate prescribing of antibiotics, preventing the occurrence of food poisoning due to resistant Escherichia coli.

  7. Atypical Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Secretes Plasmid Encoded Toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita C. Ruiz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasmid encoded toxin (Pet is a serine protease originally described in enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC prototype strain 042 whose entire characterization was essentially obtained from studies performed with the purified toxin. Here we show that Pet is not exclusive to EAEC. Atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (aEPEC strains, isolated from diarrhea cases, express Pet and its detection in supernatants of infected HEp-2 cells coincides with the appearance of cell damage, which, in turn, were similar to those described with purified Pet. Pet secretion and the cytotoxic effects are time and culture medium dependent. In presence of DMEM supplemented with tryptone cell rounding and detachment were observed after just 5 h of incubation with the bacteria. In the absence of tryptone, the cytotoxic effects were detected only after 24 h of infection. We also show that, in addition to the prototype EAEC, other pet+ EAEC strains, also isolated from diarrhea cases, induce cellular damage in the same degree as the aEPEC. The cytotoxic effects of EAEC and aEPEC strains were significantly reduced in the presence of a serine protease inhibitor or anti-Pet IgG serum. Our results show a common aspect between the aEPEC and EAEC and provide the first evidence pointing to a role of Pet in aEPEC pathogenesis.

  8. Localization of the Tat translocon components in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelmann, Felix; Brüser, Thomas

    2004-07-02

    The Tat system has the ability to translocate folded proteins across the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. In Escherichia coli, three functionally different translocon components have been identified, namely TatA, TatB, and TatC. These proteins were fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and their localization was determined by confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy. TatA-GFP was distributed in the membrane, often with higher abundance at the poles. TatB-GFP was found in distinct spots at the poles of the cells. The fluorescence of TatC-GFP was very low and required a constitutive expression system to become higher than background, but then appearing polar. All three constructs complemented the chain-formation phenotype of corresponding mutant strains, indicating the functionality of the fusion proteins. TatB-GFP and TatC-GFP also complemented TMAO respiration deficiency and TatA-GFP the SDS-sensitivity of the mutant strains. The localization of the translocon-GFP fusions coincides with the fluorescence pattern of GFP fusions to Tat substrate signal sequences. We suggest that the active translocon complexes are mainly present at polar positions in Escherichia coli.

  9. Kinetics of Schiff base on Escherichia coli by microcalorimetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许名飞; 李新海; 万洪文; 刘义

    2003-01-01

    The influence of four kinds of Schiff bases on a strain of Escherichia coli was studied by microcalorimetry. Differences in their capabilities of suppressing the metabolism of this bacterium were observed. The results show that the extent and duration of the inhibitory effect on the metabolism as judged from the multiplication rate constant, k, varies with different Schiff bases.The multiplication rate constant k, of Escherichia coli (in log phase) in the presence of Mo-salicylioaldehyde-thiadizole, Mo-piperonaldehyde-thiosemicarbazone and Mo-3-methoxy-salicylicaldehyde-thiadizole decreases with the increase of concentrations of compounds c, and the relationships between k and c, maximum heat production rate Pm and c, peak time of growth curves tp and c are of linearity. For Mo-6-nitro-pieronalde-thiosemicarbazone, the multiplication rate constant is constant irrespective of variation in concentration. The sequence of antibiotic activity of Schiff base is: Mo-salicylioaldehyde-thiadizole>Mo-3-methoxy-salicylicaldehyde-thiadizole>Mo-piperonaldehyde-thiosemicarbazone> 6-nitro-pieronalde-thiosemicarbazone.

  10. Brote causado por Escherichia coli en Chalco, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cortés-Ortiz Iliana Alejandra

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Identificar el agente causal del brote de diarrea asociado con el desbordamiento del canal de aguas negras en Chalco. Material y métodos. Estudio retrospectivo y transversal, efectuado en el Instituto de Diagnóstico y Referencia Epidemiológicos (InDRE, de la Secretaría de Salud, con 1 550 hisopos rectales para el aislamiento e identificación bioquímica de V. cholerae y enterobacterias, obtenidos de la población del Valle de Chalco, que presentó diarrea y vómito durante el desastre natural acontecido el 31 de mayo de 2000. El análisis de los resultados se efectuó por la diferencia entre las proporciones de dos poblaciones (prueba de Ji cuadrada. Las cepas de E. coli se hibridaron por "colony blot" para los grupos ETEC, EIEC, EPEC y EHEC. Resultados. El 0.45% correspondió a Salmonella: S. agona, S. infantis, S. enteritidis, S. muenchen, S. typhimurium; 0.06% a Shigella flexneri 3a, y 76.6% a E. coli: 62.2% a ETEC (44.6 % con LT, 11.2% con ST, y 44.1% con ambas sondas, 0.84% a EIEC (sonda ial, 0.84% a EPEC (sonda bundle-forming pilus BFP, 0.08% a E. coli enterohemorrágica no-O157:H7 (sonda pCVD419, y 36.02% no hibridó. No se encontró asociación entre E. coli patógena con la edad y género. Conclusiones. Escherichia coli podría ser responsable del brote de diarrea. Es importante conocer el agente etiológico del brote para encaminar las estrategias en el estudio y control sanitario del mismo.

  11. A Novel Putrescine Exporter SapBCDF of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Yuta; Nakamura, Atsuo; Matsumoto, Mitsuharu; Kanbe, Ayaka; Sakanaka, Mikiyasu; Higashi, Kyohei; Igarashi, Kazuei; Katayama, Takane; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Kurihara, Shin

    2016-12-16

    Recent research has suggested that polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, and spermine) in the intestinal tract impact the health of animals either negatively or positively. The concentration of polyamines in the intestinal tract results from the balance of uptake and export of the intestinal bacteria. However, the mechanism of polyamine export from bacterial cells to the intestinal lumen is still unclear. In Escherichia coli, PotE was previously identified as a transporter responsible for putrescine excretion in an acidic growth environment. We observed putrescine concentration in the culture supernatant was increased from 0 to 50 μm during growth of E. coli under neutral conditions. Screening for the unidentified putrescine exporter was performed using a gene knock-out collection of E. coli, and deletion of sapBCDF significantly decreased putrescine levels in the culture supernatant. Complementation of the deletion mutant with the sapBCDF genes restored putrescine levels in the culture supernatant. Additionally, the ΔsapBCDF strain did not facilitate uptake of putrescine from the culture supernatant. Quantification of stable isotope-labeled putrescine derived from stable isotope-labeled arginine supplemented in the medium revealed that SapBCDF exported putrescine from E. coli cells to the culture supernatant. It was previously reported that SapABCDF of Salmonella enterica sv. typhimurium and Haemophilus influenzae conferred resistance toantimicrobial peptides; however, the E. coli ΔsapBCDF strain did not affect resistance to antimicrobial peptide LL-37. These results strongly suggest that the natural function of the SapBCDF proteins is the export of putrescine.

  12. Discovery of Escherichia coli CRISPR sequences in an undergraduate laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Militello, Kevin T; Lazatin, Justine C

    2017-05-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) represent a novel type of adaptive immune system found in eubacteria and archaebacteria. CRISPRs have recently generated a lot of attention due to their unique ability to catalog foreign nucleic acids, their ability to destroy foreign nucleic acids in a mechanism that shares some similarity to RNA interference, and the ability to utilize reconstituted CRISPR systems for genome editing in numerous organisms. In order to introduce CRISPR biology into an undergraduate upper-level laboratory, a five-week set of exercises was designed to allow students to examine the CRISPR status of uncharacterized Escherichia coli strains and to allow the discovery of new repeats and spacers. Students started the project by isolating genomic DNA from E. coli and amplifying the iap CRISPR locus using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The PCR products were analyzed by Sanger DNA sequencing, and the sequences were examined for the presence of CRISPR repeat sequences. The regions between the repeats, the spacers, were extracted and analyzed with BLASTN searches. Overall, CRISPR loci were sequenced from several previously uncharacterized E. coli strains and one E. coli K-12 strain. Sanger DNA sequencing resulted in the discovery of 36 spacer sequences and their corresponding surrounding repeat sequences. Five of the spacers were homologous to foreign (non-E. coli) DNA. Assessment of the laboratory indicates that improvements were made in the ability of students to answer questions relating to the structure and function of CRISPRs. Future directions of the laboratory are presented and discussed. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(3):262-269, 2017. © 2016 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  13. Evaluation of the efficacy of an autogenous Escherichia coli vaccine in broiler breeders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Lili; Thøfner, Ida; Christensen, Jens Peter

    2017-01-01

    In poultry production Escherichia coli autogenous vaccines are often used. However, the efficacy of autogenous E. coli vaccinations has not been evaluated experimentally in chickens after start of lay. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the protective effect of an autogenous E. coli...... infection, significant protection of an autogenous E. coli vaccine against neither a homologous nor a heterologous E. coli challenge could not be documented....

  14. Immobilizing live Escherichia coli for AFM studies of surface dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lonergan, N.E.; Britt, L.D.; Sullivan, C.J., E-mail: sullivcj@evms.edu

    2014-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a probe-based technique that permits high resolution imaging of live bacterial cells. However, stably immobilizing cells to withstand the probe-based lateral forces remains an obstacle in AFM mediated studies, especially those of live, rod shaped bacteria in nutrient media. Consequently, AFM has been under-utilized in the research of bacterial surface dynamics. The aim of the current study was to immobilize a less adherent Escherichia coli strain in a method that both facilitates AFM imaging in nutrient broth and preserves overall cell viability. Immobilization reagents and buffers were systematically evaluated and the cell membrane integrity was monitored in all sample preparations. As expected, the biocompatible gelatin coated surfaces facilitated stable cell attachment in lower ionic strength buffers, yet poorly immobilized cells in higher ionic strength buffers. In comparison, poly-L-lysine surfaces bound cells in both low and high ionic strength buffers. The benefit of the poly-L-lysine binding capacity was offset by the compromised membrane integrity exhibited by cells on poly-L-lysine surfaces. However, the addition of divalent cations and glucose to the immobilization buffer was found to mitigate this unfavorable effect. Ultimately, immobilization of E. coli cells on poly-L-lysine surfaces in a lower ionic strength buffer supplemented with Mg{sup 2+} and Ca{sup 2+} was determined to provide optimal cell attachment without compromising the overall cell viability. Cells immobilized in this method were stably imaged in media through multiple division cycles. Furthermore, permeability assays indicated that E. coli cells recover from the hypoosmotic stress caused by immobilization in low ionic strength buffers. Taken together, this data suggests that stable immobilization of viable cells on poly-L-lysine surfaces can be accomplished in lower ionic strength buffers that are supplemented with divalent cations for membrane

  15. Escherichia coli Meningitis after Rotavirus Gastroenteritis in an Infant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermezoglu, Oznur; Ocal Topcu, Didem; Karbuz, Adem; Hacihamdioglu, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    Although rotavirus gastroenteritis is quite common in the pediatric population, secondary bacterial sepsis following rotavirus infection is a rare clinical entity. Gram-negative bacilli are the fifth most common cause of meningitis in infants but this infection rarely occurs after gastroenteritis. Here, we report a 2.5-month-old infant who developed Escherichia coli (E. coli) meningitis after acute rotavirus gastroenteritis. The 2.5-month-old male infant with fever, vomiting, and watery diarrhea that started 1 day earlier was admitted to the hospital. Rotavirus antigen in stool sample was positive. He was hospitalized, and fever was measured at 39.5°C on the second day. Lumbar puncture was done for suspicion of meningitis, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) findings suggested meningitis. Intravenous vancomycin and cefotaxime were started empirically. Since E. coli reproduction was seen in blood culture and CSF culture, treatment was continued with cefotaxime. The patient was discharged with minimal midlevel hydrocephalus findings in cranial ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging following 21 days of antibiotics treatment. Septicemia development following rotavirus gastroenteritis is an extremely rare clinical condition. It is vital to start prompt antibiotic treatment as soon as the diagnosis of secondary bacterial infection is made because of high mortality and morbidity rates.

  16. Identification of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli strains from avian organic fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puño-Sarmiento, Juan; Gazal, Luis Eduardo; Medeiros, Leonardo P; Nishio, Erick K; Kobayashi, Renata K T; Nakazato, Gerson

    2014-08-28

    The Brazilian poultry industry generates large amounts of organic waste, such as chicken litter, which is often used in agriculture. Among the bacteria present in organic fertilizer are members of the Enterobacteriaceae family. The objective of this study was to detect the presence of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) strains in avian organic fertilizer, and assess the potential damage they can cause in humans due to antimicrobial resistance. The presence of DEC pathotypes and phylogenetic groups were detected by multiplex-PCR. Phenotypic assays, such as tests for adhesion, cytotoxicity activity, biofilm formation and especially antimicrobial susceptibility, were performed. Fifteen DEC strains from 64 E. coli were isolated. Among these, four strains were classified as enteropathogenic (EPEC; 6.2%), three strains as Shiga toxin-producing (STEC; 4.7%), 10 strains as enteroaggregative (EAEC; 12.5%), but two of these harbored the eaeA gene too. The low number of isolated strains was most likely due to the composting process, which reduces the number of microorganisms. These strains were able to adhere to HEp-2 and HeLa cells and produce Shiga-toxins and biofilms; in addition, some of the strains showed antimicrobial resistance, which indicates a risk of the transfer of resistance genes to human E. coli. These results showed that DEC strains isolated from avian organic fertilizers can cause human infections.

  17. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli for the production of xylonate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujin Cao

    Full Text Available Xylonate is a valuable chemical for versatile applications. Although the chemical synthesis route and microbial conversion pathway were established decades ago, no commercial production of xylonate has been obtained so far. In this study, the industrially important microorganism Escherichia coli was engineered to produce xylonate from xylose. Through the coexpression of a xylose dehydrogenase (xdh and a xylonolactonase (xylC from Caulobacter crescentus, the recombinant strain could convert 1 g/L xylose to 0.84 g/L xylonate and 0.10 g/L xylonolactone after being induced for 12 h. Furthermore, the competitive pathway for xylose catabolism in E. coli was blocked by disrupting two genes (xylA and xylB encoding xylose isomerase and xylulose kinase. Under fed-batch conditions, the finally engineered strain produced up to 27.3 g/L xylonate and 1.7 g/L xylonolactone from 30 g/L xylose, about 88% of the theoretical yield. These results suggest that the engineered E. coli strain has a promising perspective for large-scale production of xylonate.

  18. Improving alkane synthesis in Escherichia coli via metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xuejiao; Yu, Haiying; Zhu, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Concerns about energy security and global petroleum supply have made the production of renewable biofuels an industrial imperative. The ideal biofuels are n-alkanes in that they are chemically and structurally identical to the fossil fuels and can "drop in" to the transportation infrastructure. In this work, an Escherichia coli strain that produces n-alkanes was constructed by heterologous expression of acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase (AAR) and aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (ADO) from Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942. The accumulation of alkanes ranged from 3.1 to 24.0 mg/L using different expressing strategies. Deletion of yqhD, an inherent aldehyde reductase in E. coli, or overexpression of fadR, an activator for fatty acid biosynthesis, exhibited a nearly twofold increase in alkane titers, respectively. Combining yqhD deletion and fadR overexpression resulted in a production titer of 255.6 mg/L in E. coli, and heptadecene was the most abundant product.

  19. Escherichia coli lipoprotein binds human plasminogen via an intramolecular domain

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    Tammy eGonzalez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli lipoprotein (Lpp is a major cellular component that exists in two distinct states, bound-form and free-form. Bound-form Lpp is known to interact with the periplasmic bacterial cell wall, while free-form Lpp is localized to the bacterial cell surface. A function for surface-exposed Lpp has yet to be determined. We hypothesized that the presence of C-terminal lysines in the surface-exposed region of Lpp would facilitate binding to the host zymogen plasminogen, a protease commandeered by a number of clinically important bacteria. Recombinant Lpp was synthesized and the binding of Lpp to plasminogen, the effect of various inhibitors on this binding, and the effects of various mutations of Lpp on Lpp-plasminogen interactions were examined. Additionally, the ability of Lpp-bound plasminogen to be converted to active plasmin was analyzed. We determined that Lpp binds plasminogen via an atypical domain located near the center of mature Lpp that may not be exposed on the surface of intact E. coli according to the current localization model. Finally, we found that plasminogen bound by Lpp can be converted to active plasmin. While the consequences of Lpp binding plasminogen are unclear, these results prompt further investigation of the ability of surface exposed Lpp to interact with host molecules such as extracellular matrix components and complement regulators, and the role of these interactions in infections caused by E. coli and other bacteria.

  20. Recombinant expression of Streptococcus pneumoniae capsular polysaccharides in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Emily J; Yates, Laura E; Terra, Vanessa S; Cuccui, Jon; Wren, Brendan W

    2016-04-01

    Currently, Streptococcus pneumoniae is responsible for over 14 million cases of pneumonia worldwide annually, and over 1 million deaths, the majority of them children. The major determinant for pathogenesis is a polysaccharide capsule that is variable and is used to distinguish strains based on their serotype. The capsule forms the basis of the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) that contains purified capsular polysaccharide from 23 serotypes, and the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13), containing 13 common serotypes conjugated to CRM197 (mutant diphtheria toxin). Purified capsule from S. pneumoniae is required for pneumococcal conjugate vaccine production, and costs can be prohibitively high, limiting accessibility of the vaccine in low-income countries. In this study, we demonstrate the recombinant expression of the capsule-encoding locus from four different serotypes of S. pneumoniae within Escherichia coli. Furthermore, we attempt to identify the minimum set of genes necessary to reliably and efficiently express these capsules heterologously. These E. coli strains could be used to produce a supply of S. pneumoniae serotype-specific capsules without the need to culture pathogenic bacteria. Additionally, these strains could be applied to synthetic glycobiological applications: recombinant vaccine production using E. coli outer membrane vesicles or coupling to proteins using protein glycan coupling technology.

  1. Characterization of pyruvate uptake in Escherichia coli K-12.

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    Jens Kreth

    Full Text Available The monocarboxylate pyruvate is an important metabolite and can serve as sole carbon source for Escherichia coli. Although specific pyruvate transporters have been identified in two bacterial species, pyruvate transport is not well understood in E. coli. In the present study, pyruvate transport was investigated under different growth conditions. The transport of pyruvate shows specific activities depending on the growth substrate used as sole carbon source, suggesting the existence of at least two systems for pyruvate uptake: i one inducible system and probably highly specific for pyruvate and ii one system active under non-induced conditions. Using the toxic pyruvate analog 3-fluoropyruvate, a mutant was isolated unable to grow on and transport pyruvate. Further investigation revealed that a revertant selected for growth on pyruvate regained the inducible pyruvate transport activity. Characterization of pyruvate excretion showed that the pyruvate transport negative mutant accumulated pyruvate in the growth medium suggesting an additional transport system for pyruvate excretion. The here presented data give valuable insight into the pyruvate metabolism and transport of E. coli suggesting the presence of at least two uptake systems and one excretion system to balance the intracellular level of pyruvate.

  2. Thermal impulse response and the temperature preference of Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, William

    2010-03-01

    From a broad perspective, exposure to environmental temperature changes is a universal condition of living organisms. Escherichia coli is a powerful model system to study how a biochemical network measures and processes thermal information to produce adaptive changes in behavior. E. coli performs thermotaxis, directing its movements to a preferred temperature in spatial thermal gradients. How does the system perform thermotaxis? Where biologically is this analog value of thermal preference stored? Previous studies using populations of cells have shown that E.coli accumulate in spatial thermal gradients, but these experiments did not cleanly separate thermal responses from chemotactic responses. Here we have isolated the thermal behavior by studying the thermal impulse response of single, tethered cells. The motor output of cells was measured in response to small, impulsive increases in temperature, delivered by an infrared laser, over a range of ambient temperature (23 to 43 degrees C). The thermal impulse response at temperatures 31 degrees C, some cells show an inverted response, switching from warm- to cold-seeking behavior. The fraction of inverted responses increases nonlinearly with temperature, switching steeply at the preferred temperature of 37 degrees C.

  3. Global functional atlas of Escherichia coli encompassing previously uncharacterized proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pingzhao Hu

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available One-third of the 4,225 protein-coding genes of Escherichia coli K-12 remain functionally unannotated (orphans. Many map to distant clades such as Archaea, suggesting involvement in basic prokaryotic traits, whereas others appear restricted to E. coli, including pathogenic strains. To elucidate the orphans' biological roles, we performed an extensive proteomic survey using affinity-tagged E. coli strains and generated comprehensive genomic context inferences to derive a high-confidence compendium for virtually the entire proteome consisting of 5,993 putative physical interactions and 74,776 putative functional associations, most of which are novel. Clustering of the respective probabilistic networks revealed putative orphan membership in discrete multiprotein complexes and functional modules together with annotated gene products, whereas a machine-learning strategy based on network integration implicated the orphans in specific biological processes. We provide additional experimental evidence supporting orphan participation in protein synthesis, amino acid metabolism, biofilm formation, motility, and assembly of the bacterial cell envelope. This resource provides a "systems-wide" functional blueprint of a model microbe, with insights into the biological and evolutionary significance of previously uncharacterized proteins.

  4. Identification of Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli Strains from Avian Organic Fertilizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Puño-Sarmiento

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian poultry industry generates large amounts of organic waste, such as chicken litter, which is often used in agriculture. Among the bacteria present in organic fertilizer are members of the Enterobacteriaceae family. The objective of this study was to detect the presence of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC strains in avian organic fertilizer, and assess the potential damage they can cause in humans due to antimicrobial resistance. The presence of DEC pathotypes and phylogenetic groups were detected by multiplex-PCR. Phenotypic assays, such as tests for adhesion, cytotoxicity activity, biofilm formation and especially antimicrobial susceptibility, were performed. Fifteen DEC strains from 64 E. coli were isolated. Among these, four strains were classified as enteropathogenic (EPEC; 6.2%, three strains as Shiga toxin-producing (STEC; 4.7%, 10 strains as enteroaggregative (EAEC; 12.5%, but two of these harbored the eaeA gene too. The low number of isolated strains was most likely due to the composting process, which reduces the number of microorganisms. These strains were able to adhere to HEp-2 and HeLa cells and produce Shiga-toxins and biofilms; in addition, some of the strains showed antimicrobial resistance, which indicates a risk of the transfer of resistance genes to human E. coli. These results showed that DEC strains isolated from avian organic fertilizers can cause human infections.

  5. Escherichia coli bacteria detection by using graphene-based biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Elnaz; Buntat, Zolkafle; Afroozeh, Abdolkarim; Zeinalinezhad, Alireza; Nikoukar, Ali

    2015-10-01

    Graphene is an allotrope of carbon with two-dimensional (2D) monolayer honeycombs. A larger detection area and higher sensitivity can be provided by graphene-based nanosenor because of its 2D structure. In addition, owing to its special characteristics, including electrical, optical and physical properties, graphene is known as a more suitable candidate compared to other materials used in the sensor application. A novel model employing a field-effect transistor structure using graphene is proposed and the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of graphene are employed to model the sensing mechanism. This biosensor can detect Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria, providing high levels of sensitivity. It is observed that the graphene device experiences a drastic increase in conductance when exposed to E. coli bacteria at 0-10(5) cfu/ml concentration. The simple, fast response and high sensitivity of this nanoelectronic biosensor make it a suitable device in screening and functional studies of antibacterial drugs and an ideal high-throughput platform which can detect any pathogenic bacteria. Artificial neural network and support vector regression algorithms have also been used to provide other models for the I-V characteristic. A satisfactory agreement has been presented by comparison between the proposed models with the experimental data.

  6. Rotational tumbling of Escherichia coli aggregates under shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portela, R.; Patrício, P.; Almeida, P. L.; Sobral, R. G.; Franco, J. M.; Leal, C. R.

    2016-12-01

    Growing living cultures of Escherichia coli bacteria are investigated using real-time in situ rheology and rheoimaging measurements. In the early stages of growth (lag phase) and when subjected to a constant stationary shear, the viscosity slowly increases with the cell's population. As the bacteria reach the exponential phase of growth, the viscosity increases rapidly, with sudden and temporary abrupt decreases and recoveries. At a certain stage, corresponding grossly to the late phase of growth, when the population stabilizes, the viscosity also keeps its maximum constant value, with drops and recoveries, for a long period of time. This complex rheological behavior, which is observed to be shear strain dependent, is a consequence of two coupled effects: the cell density continuous increase and its changing interacting properties. Particular attention is given to the late phase of growth of E. coli populations under shear. Rheoimaging measurements reveal, near the static plate, a rotational motion of E. coli aggregates, collectively tumbling and flowing in the shear direction. This behavior is interpreted in the light of a simple theoretical approach based on simple rigid body mechanics.

  7. Adenosine diphosphate sugar pyrophosphatase prevents glycogen biosynthesis in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Bruna, Beatriz; Baroja-Fernández, Edurne; Muñoz, Francisco José; Bastarrica-Berasategui, Ainara; Zandueta-Criado, Aitor; Rodríguez-López, Milagros; Lasa, Iñigo; Akazawa, Takashi; Pozueta-Romero, Javier

    2001-01-01

    An adenosine diphosphate sugar pyrophosphatase (ASPPase, EC 3.6.1.21) has been characterized by using Escherichia coli. This enzyme, whose activities in the cell are inversely correlated with the intracellular glycogen content and the glucose concentration in the culture medium, hydrolyzes ADP-glucose, the precursor molecule of glycogen biosynthesis. ASPPase was purified to apparent homogeneity (over 3,000-fold), and sequence analyses revealed that it is a member of the ubiquitously distributed group of nucleotide pyrophosphatases designated as “nudix” hydrolases. Insertional mutagenesis experiments leading to the inactivation of the ASPPase encoding gene, aspP, produced cells with marginally low enzymatic activities and higher glycogen content than wild-type bacteria. aspP was cloned into an expression vector and introduced into E. coli. Transformed cells were shown to contain a dramatically reduced amount of glycogen, as compared with the untransformed bacteria. No pleiotropic changes in the bacterial growth occurred in both the aspP-overexpressing and aspP-deficient strains. The overall results pinpoint the reaction catalyzed by ASPPase as a potential step of regulating glycogen biosynthesis in E. coli. PMID:11416161

  8. Escherichia coli Meningitis after Rotavirus Gastroenteritis in an Infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamze Ozgurhan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although rotavirus gastroenteritis is quite common in the pediatric population, secondary bacterial sepsis following rotavirus infection is a rare clinical entity. Gram-negative bacilli are the fifth most common cause of meningitis in infants but this infection rarely occurs after gastroenteritis. Here, we report a 2.5-month-old infant who developed Escherichia coli (E. coli meningitis after acute rotavirus gastroenteritis. The 2.5-month-old male infant with fever, vomiting, and watery diarrhea that started 1 day earlier was admitted to the hospital. Rotavirus antigen in stool sample was positive. He was hospitalized, and fever was measured at 39.5°C on the second day. Lumbar puncture was done for suspicion of meningitis, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF findings suggested meningitis. Intravenous vancomycin and cefotaxime were started empirically. Since E. coli reproduction was seen in blood culture and CSF culture, treatment was continued with cefotaxime. The patient was discharged with minimal midlevel hydrocephalus findings in cranial ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging following 21 days of antibiotics treatment. Septicemia development following rotavirus gastroenteritis is an extremely rare clinical condition. It is vital to start prompt antibiotic treatment as soon as the diagnosis of secondary bacterial infection is made because of high mortality and morbidity rates.

  9. Escherichia coli Chromosomal Loci Segregate from Midcell with Universal Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cass, Julie A; Kuwada, Nathan J; Traxler, Beth; Wiggins, Paul A

    2016-06-21

    The structure of the Escherichia coli chromosome is inherently dynamic over the duration of the cell cycle. Genetic loci undergo both stochastic motion around their initial positions and directed motion to opposite poles of the rod-shaped cell during segregation. We developed a quantitative method to characterize cell-cycle dynamics of the E. coli chromosome to probe the chromosomal steady-state mobility and segregation process. By tracking fluorescently labeled chromosomal loci in thousands of cells throughout the entire cell cycle, our method allows for the statistical analysis of locus position and motion, the step-size distribution for movement during segregation, and the locus drift velocity. The robust statistics of our detailed analysis of the wild-type E. coli nucleoid allow us to observe loci moving toward midcell before segregation occurs, consistent with a replication factory model. Then, as segregation initiates, we perform a detailed characterization of the average segregation velocity of loci. Contrary to origin-centric models of segregation, which predict distinct dynamics for oriC-proximal versus oriC-distal loci, we find that the dynamics of loci were universal and independent of genetic position.

  10. Quinolone-resistant Escherichia coli in Poultry Farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hricová, Kristýna; Röderová, Magdaléna; Pudová, Vendula; Hanulík, Vojtěch; Halová, Dana; Julínková, Pavla; Dolejská, Monika; Papoušek, Ivo; Bardoň, Jan

    2017-06-01

    Increasing bacterial resistance to quinolone antibiotics is apparent in both humans and animals. For humans, a potential source of resistant bacteria may be animals or their products entering the human food chain, for example poultry. Between July 2013 and September 2014, samples were collected and analyzed in the Moravian regions of the Czech Republic to isolate the bacterium Escherichia coli. As a result, 212 E. coli isolates were obtained comprising 126 environmental isolates from poultry houses and 86 isolates from cloacal swabs from market-weight turkeys. Subsequently, the E. coli isolates were tested for susceptibility to selected antibiotics. Resistance of the poultry isolates to quinolones ranged from 53% to 73%. Additionally, the presence of plasmid-mediated resistance genes was studied. The genes were confirmed in 58% of the tested strains. The data on resistance of isolates from poultry were compared with results of resistance tests in human isolates obtained in the same regions. The high levels of resistance determined by both phenotyping and genotyping methods and reported in the present study confirm the fact that the use of fluoroquinolones in poultry should be closely monitored. Copyright© by the National Institute of Public Health, Prague 2017.

  11. Colibri: a functional data base for the Escherichia coli genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Médigue, C; Viari, A; Hénaut, A; Danchin, A

    1993-09-01

    Several data libraries have been created to organize all the data obtained worldwide about the Escherichia coli genome. Because the known data now amount to more than 40% of the whole genome sequence, it has become necessary to organize the data in such a way that appropriate procedures can associate knowledge produced by experiments about each gene to its position on the chromosome and its relation to other relevant genes, for example. In addition, global properties of genes, affected by the introduction of new entries, should be present as appropriate description fields. A data base, implemented on Macintosh by using the data base management system 4th Dimension, is described. It is constructed around a core constituted by known contigs of E. coli sequences and links data collected in general libraries (unmodified) to data associated with evolving knowledge (with modifiable fields). Biologically significant results obtained through the coupling of appropriate procedures (learning or statistical data analysis) are presented. The data base is available through a 4th Dimension runtime and through FTP on Internet. It has been regularly updated and will be systematically linked to other E. coli data bases (M. Kroger, R. Wahl, G. Schachtel, and P. Rice, Nucleic Acids Res. 20(Suppl.):2119-2144, 1992; K. E. Rudd, W. Miller, C. Werner, J. Ostell, C. Tolstoshev, and S. G. Satterfield, Nucleic Acids Res. 19:637-647, 1991) in the near future.

  12. Characterization of the YdeO regulon in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Yamanaka

    Full Text Available Enterobacteria are able to survive under stressful conditions within animals, such as acidic conditions in the stomach, bile salts during transfer to the intestine and anaerobic conditions within the intestine. The glutamate-dependent (GAD system plays a major role in acid resistance in Escherichia coli, and expression of the GAD system is controlled by the regulatory cascade consisting of EvgAS > YdeO > GadE. To understand the YdeO regulon in vivo, we used ChIP-chip to interrogate the E. coli genome for candidate YdeO binding sites. All of the seven operons identified by ChIP-chip as being potentially regulated by YdeO were confirmed as being under the direct control of YdeO using RT-qPCR, EMSA, DNaseI-footprinting and reporter assays. Within this YdeO regulon, we identified four stress-response transcription factors, DctR, NhaR, GadE, and GadW and enzymes for anaerobic respiration. Both GadE and GadW are involved in regulation of the GAD system and NhaR is an activator for the sodium/proton antiporter gene. In conjunction with co-transcribed Slp, DctR is involved in protection against metabolic endoproducts under acidic conditions. Taken all together, we suggest that YdeO is a key regulator of E. coli survival in both acidic and anaerobic conditions.

  13. Characterization of the YdeO regulon in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Yuki; Oshima, Taku; Ishihama, Akira; Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Enterobacteria are able to survive under stressful conditions within animals, such as acidic conditions in the stomach, bile salts during transfer to the intestine and anaerobic conditions within the intestine. The glutamate-dependent (GAD) system plays a major role in acid resistance in Escherichia coli, and expression of the GAD system is controlled by the regulatory cascade consisting of EvgAS > YdeO > GadE. To understand the YdeO regulon in vivo, we used ChIP-chip to interrogate the E. coli genome for candidate YdeO binding sites. All of the seven operons identified by ChIP-chip as being potentially regulated by YdeO were confirmed as being under the direct control of YdeO using RT-qPCR, EMSA, DNaseI-footprinting and reporter assays. Within this YdeO regulon, we identified four stress-response transcription factors, DctR, NhaR, GadE, and GadW and enzymes for anaerobic respiration. Both GadE and GadW are involved in regulation of the GAD system and NhaR is an activator for the sodium/proton antiporter gene. In conjunction with co-transcribed Slp, DctR is involved in protection against metabolic endoproducts under acidic conditions. Taken all together, we suggest that YdeO is a key regulator of E. coli survival in both acidic and anaerobic conditions.

  14. Multiple Antimicrobial Resistance of Escherichia coli Isolated from Chickens in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Reza Talebiyan; Mehdi Kheradmand; Faham Khamesipour; Mohammad Rabiee-Faradonbeh

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial agents are used extremely in order to reduce the great losses caused by Escherichia coli infections in poultry industry. In this study, 318 pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) strains isolated from commercial broiler flocks with coli-septicemia were examined for antimicrobials of both veterinary and human significance by disc diffusion method. Multiple resistances to antimicrobial agents were observed in all the isolates. Resistance to the antibiotics was as follows: Tylosin (88....

  15. Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli are associated with intestinal inflammation in patients with ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirsepasi-Lauridsen, Hengameh C; Halkjaer, Sofie Ingdam; Mortensen, Esben Munk;

    2016-01-01

    E. coli of the phylogenetic group B2 harbouring Extra intestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) genes are frequently seen as colonizers of the intestine in patients with active ulcerative colitis (UC). In this study, we describe the influence of E. coli Nissle (EcN) B2 as add-on treatment to...... scores in comparison to patients colonized with E. coli A and D (p treatment of UC patients with E. coli Nissle (B2) does not promote clinical remission and active UC patients colonized with E. coli B2 have an increased intestinal inflammation.......E. coli of the phylogenetic group B2 harbouring Extra intestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) genes are frequently seen as colonizers of the intestine in patients with active ulcerative colitis (UC). In this study, we describe the influence of E. coli Nissle (EcN) B2 as add-on treatment...

  16. Risk factors for extended-spectrum b-lactamases-producing Escherichia coli urinary tract infections in a tertiary hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Dolores Alcántar-Curiel

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the risks factors for urinary tract infections (UTIs caused by Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamases (ESBLs-producing E. coli and the molecular characterization of ESBLs. Materials and methods. A case-control study was performed to identify risk factors in consecutively recruited patients with UTIs caused by ESBLs or non-ESBLs-producing E. coli in a tertiary hospital in Mexico. Results. ESBLs-producing E. coli were isolated from 22/70 (31% patients with E. coli UTIs over a three month period. All isolates were resistant to cephalosporins and quinolones but susceptible to carbapenems, amikacin and nitrofurantoin. Prior antibiotic treatment with more than two antibiotic families (OR=6.86; 95%CI 1.06-157.70; p=0.028, recurrent symptomatic UTIs (OR=5.60; 95%CI 1.88-17.87; p=0.001 and previous hospitalization (OR=5.06; 95%CI 1.64-17.69;p=0.002 were significant risk factors. Sixteen isolates harbored the beta-lactamase (blaCTX-M-15 gene and five the blaTEM-1 gene. Conclusions. One of every three patients presented UTIs with ESBLs-producing beta-lactams and fluoroquinolone resistant E. coli. Risk factors and resistance patterns must be taken into account for developing antibiotic use policies in these settings

  17. Risk factors for extended-spectrum β-lactamases-producing Escherichia coli urinary tract infections in a tertiary hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántar-Curiel, María Dolores; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia Mercedes; Varona-Bobadilla, Héctor Javier; Gayosso-Vázquez, Catalina; Jarillo-Quijada, Ma Dolores; Frías-Mendivil, Mauricio; Sanjuan-Padrón, Lucio; Santos-Preciado, José Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    To assess the risks factors for urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamases (ESBLs)-producing E. coli and the molecular characterization of ESBLs. A case-control study was performed to identify risk factors in consecutively recruited patients with UTIs caused by ESBLs or non-ESBLs-producing E. coli in a tertiary hospital in Mexico. ESBLs-producing E. coli were isolated from 22/70 (31%) patients with E. coli UTIs over a three month period. All isolates were resistant to cephalosporins and quinolones but susceptible to carbapenems, amikacin and nitrofurantoin. Prior antibiotic treatment with more than two antibiotic families (OR=6.86; 95%CI 1.06-157.70; p=0.028), recurrent symptomatic UTIs (OR=5.60; 95%CI 1.88-17.87; p=0.001) and previous hospitalization (OR=5.06; 95%CI 1.64-17.69; p=0.002) were significant risk factors. Sixteen isolates harbored the beta-lactamase (bla)CTX-M-15 gene and five the blaTEM-1 gene. One of every three patients presented UTIs with ESBLs-producing beta-lactams and fluoroquinolone resistant E. coli. Risk factors and resistance patterns must be taken into account for developing antibiotic use policies in these settings.

  18. Starved Escherichia coli preserve reducing power under nitric oxide stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gowers, Glen-Oliver F. [Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States); Robinson, Jonathan L. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States); Brynildsen, Mark P., E-mail: mbrynild@princeton.edu [Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States); Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) detoxification enzymes, such as NO dioxygenase (NOD) and NO reductase (NOR), are important to the virulence of numerous bacteria. Pathogens use these defense systems to ward off immune-generated NO, and they do so in environments that contain additional stressors, such as reactive oxygen species, nutrient deprivation, and acid stress. NOD and NOR both use reducing equivalents to metabolically deactivate NO, which suggests that nutrient deprivation could negatively impact their functionality. To explore the relationship between NO detoxification and nutrient deprivation, we examined the ability of Escherichia coli to detoxify NO under different levels of carbon source availability in aerobic cultures. We observed failure of NO detoxification under both carbon source limitation and starvation, and those failures could have arisen from inabilities to synthesize Hmp (NOD of E. coli) and/or supply it with sufficient NADH (preferred electron donor). We found that when limited quantities of carbon source were provided, NO detoxification failed due to insufficient NADH, whereas starvation prevented Hmp synthesis, which enabled cells to maintain their NADH levels. This maintenance of NADH levels under starvation was confirmed to be dependent on the absence of Hmp. Intriguingly, these data show that under NO stress, carbon-starved E. coli are better positioned with regard to reducing power to cope with other stresses than cells that had consumed an exhaustible amount of carbon. -- Highlights: •Carbon source availability is critical to aerobic E. coli NO detoxification. •Carbon source starvation, under NO stress, preserves intracellular NADH levels. •Preservation of NADH depends on starvation-dependent inhibition of Hmp induction.

  19. Kinetic modelling of central carbon metabolism in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peskov, Kirill; Mogilevskaya, Ekaterina; Demin, Oleg

    2012-09-01

    In the present study, we developed a detailed kinetic model of Escherichia coli central carbon metabolism. The main model assumptions were based on the results of metabolic and regulatory reconstruction of the system and thorough model verification with experimental data. The development and verification of the model included several stages, which allowed us to take into account both in vitro and in vivo experimental data and avoid the ambiguity that frequently occurs in detailed models of biochemical pathways. The choice of the level of detail for the mathematical description of enzymatic reaction rates and the evaluation of parameter values were based on available published data. Validation of the complete model of the metabolic pathway describing specific physiological states was based on fluxomics and metabolomics data. In particular, we developed a model that describes aerobic growth of E. coli in continuous culture with a limiting concentration of glucose. Such modification of the model was used to integrate experimental metabolomics data obtained in steady-state conditions for wild-type E. coli and genetically modified strains, e.g. knockout of the pyruvate kinase gene (pykA). Following analysis of the model behaviour, and comparison of the coincidence between predicted and experimental data, it was possible to investigate the functional and regulatory properties of E. coli central carbon metabolism. For example, a novel metabolic regulatory mechanism for 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase inhibition by phosphoenolpyruvate was hypothesized, and the flux ratios between the reactions catalysed by enzyme isoforms were predicted. The mathematical model described here has been submitted to the JWS Online Cellular Systems Modelling Database and can be accessed at http://jjj.biochem.sun.ac.za/database/peskov/index.html © 2012 The Authors Journal compilation © 2012 FEBS.

  20. An end-joining repair mechanism in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chayot, Romain; Montagne, Benjamin; Mazel, Didier; Ricchetti, Miria

    2010-01-01

    Bridging broken DNA ends via nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) contributes to the evolution and stability of eukaryote genomes. Although some bacteria possess a simplified NHEJ mechanism, the human commensal Escherichia coli is thought to rely exclusively on homology-directed mechanisms to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We show here that laboratory and pathogenic E. coli strains possess a distinct end-joining activity that repairs DSBs and generates genome rearrangements. This mechanism, named alternative end-joining (A-EJ), does not rely on the key NHEJ proteins Ku and Ligase-D which are absent in E. coli. Differently from classical NHEJ, A-EJ is characterized by extensive end-resection largely due to RecBCD, by overwhelming usage of microhomology and extremely rare DNA synthesis. We also show that A-EJ is dependent on the essential Ligase-A and independent on Ligase-B. Importantly, mutagenic repair requires a functional Ligase-A. Although generally mutagenic, accurate A-EJ also occurs and is frequent in some pathogenic bacteria. Furthermore, we show the acquisition of an antibiotic-resistance gene via A-EJ, refuting the notion that bacteria gain exogenous sequences only by recombination-dependent mechanisms. This finding demonstrates that E. coli can integrate unrelated, nonhomologous exogenous sequences by end-joining and it provides an alternative strategy for horizontal gene transfer in the bacterial genome. Thus, A-EJ contributes to bacterial genome evolution and adaptation to environmental challenges. Interestingly, the key features of A-EJ also appear in A-NHEJ, an alternative end-joining mechanism implicated in chromosomal translocations associated with human malignancies, and we propose that this mutagenic repair might have originated in bacteria. PMID:20133858

  1. Engineering an Escherichia coli platform to synthesize designer biodiesels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierzbicki, Michael; Niraula, Narayan; Yarrabothula, Akshitha; Layton, Donovan S; Trinh, Cong T

    2016-04-20

    Biodiesels, fatty acid esters (FAEs), can be synthesized by condensation of fatty acid acyl CoAs and alcohols via a wax ester synthase in living cells. Biodiesels have advantageous characteristics over petrodiesels such as biodegradability, a higher flash point, and less emission. Controlling fatty acid and alcohol moieties are critical to produce designer biodiesels with desirable physiochemical properties (e.g., high cetane number, low kinematic viscosity, high oxidative stability, and low cloud point). Here, we developed a flexible framework to engineer Escherichia coli cell factories to synthesize designer biodiesels directly from fermentable sugars. In this framework, we designed each FAE pathway as a biodiesel exchangeable production module consisting of acyl CoA, alcohol, and wax ester synthase submodules. By inserting the FAE modules in an engineered E. coli modular chassis cell, we generated E. coli cell factories to produce targeted biodiesels (e.g., fatty acid ethyl (FAEE) and isobutyl (FAIbE) esters) with tunable and controllable short-chain alcohol moieties. The engineered E. coli chassis carrying the FAIbE production module produced 54mg/L FAIbEs with high specificity, accounting for>90% of the total synthesized FAEs and ∼4.7 fold increase in FAIbE production compared to the wildtype. Fed-batch cultures further improved FAIbE production up to 165mg/L. By mixing ethanol and isobutanol submodules, we demonstrated controllable production of mixed FAEEs and FAIbEs. We envision the developed framework offers a flexible, alternative route to engineer designer biodiesels with tunable and controllable properties using biomass-derived fermentable sugars. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The location of the restriction locus for λ·K in Escherichia coli B

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, W.P.M.; Haan, P.G. de

    1965-01-01

    Analysis of recombinants from E. coli K 12 Hfr × E. coli B F− crosses showed that one locus on the chromosome of Escherichia coli, controlling restriction and probably also the modification of phage λ, is located between the leading point of the Hfr H chromosome and the locus for threonine synthesis

  3. Construction and shuttling of novel bifunctional vectors for Streptomyces spp. and Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Neesen, K; Volckaert, G.

    1989-01-01

    Shuttle vectors for gene transfer between Streptomyces spp. and Escherichia coli have been constructed by fusion of an artificial multicopy E. coli replicon and DNA fragments of pIJ702. Stable transfer to Streptomyces lividans was obtained. Marked differences in transformation efficiency were observed when plasmid DNA isolated from E. coli GM119 was used instead of that from strain HB101.

  4. Mechanisms of antibiotic resistance to enrofloxacin in uropathogenic Escherichia coli in dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) urinary tract infections (UTIs) are becoming a serious problem both for pets and humans (zoonosis) due to the close contact and to the increasing resistance to antibiotics. Canine E. coli represents a good experimental model useful to study this pathology. Moreover, as des...

  5. Risk factors for ESBL-producing Escherichia coli on pig farms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dohmen, Wietske; Dorado-García, Alejandro; Bonten, Marc J.M.; Wagenaar, Jaap A.; Mevius, Dik; Heederik, Dick J.J.

    2017-01-01

    The presence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli (ESBL-E. coli) in food animals is a public health concern. This study aimed to determine prevalence of ESBL-E. coli on pig farms and to assess the effect of reducing veterinary antimicrobial use (AMU) and farm management

  6. DIARRHEA, UROSEPSIS AND HEMOLYTIC UREMIC SYNDROME CAUSED BY THE SAME HETEROPATHOGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI STRAIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ang, C. Wim; Bouts, Antonia H. M.; Rossen, John W. A.; Van der Kuip, Martijn; Van Heerde, Marc; Bokenkamp, Arend

    2016-01-01

    We describe an 8-month-old girl with diarrhea, urosepsis and hemolytic uremic syndrome caused by Escherichia coli. Typing of cultured E. coli strains from urine and blood revealed the presence of virulence factors from multiple pathotypes of E. coli. This case exemplifies the genome plasticity of E.

  7. Proteomic differences between Escherichia coli strains that cause transient versus persistent intramammary infections [abstract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escherichia coli is a leading cause of bacterial mastitis in dairy cattle. Typically this infection is transient in nature and lasts 2-3 days. However, in a minority of cases, E. coli can cause a persistent intramammary infection. The mechanisms that enable certain strains of E. coli to cause a p...

  8. Detection of Escherichia Coli O157:H7 in Fecal Samples in Meat Goats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Ray; Madden, Uford; Brooks-Walter, Alexis

    2004-01-01

    Studies have reported the isolation of Escherichia coli (E. coli)O157:H7 from pork, lamb and poultry products, and from other animals including deer, horses, dogs, birds and humans. There is limited or no information on the presence of the organism in goats. The objectives of this study were to determine if E. coli O157:H7 was naturally occurring…

  9. A rare presentation of ischemic pseudomembranous colitis due to Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Jessica B; Risbano, Michael; Groshong, Steve D; Frankel, Stephen K

    2007-07-15

    Escherichia coli Ol57:H7 infection ranges from mild diarrheal illness to severe hemorrhagic colitis but may rarely be complicated by pseudomembranous colitis and/or necrosis. Herein, we report a sporadic case of ischemic E. coli Ol57:H7 pseudomembranous colitis in an adult that occurred during a national outbreak of E. coli Ol57:H7 in the United States.

  10. Complete genome sequences of Escherichia coli strains 1303 and ECC-1470 isolated from bovine mastitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leimbach, Andreas; Poehlein, Anja; Witten, Anika; Scheutz, Flemming; Schukken, Ynte; Daniel, Rolf; Dobrindt, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the leading causative agent of acute bovine mastitis. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of E. coli O70:H32 strain 1303, isolated from an acute case of bovine mastitis, and E. coli Ont:Hnt strain ECC-1470, isolated from a persistent infection.

  11. Characterization of pathogenic Escherichia coli isolated from humans in Austria : phenotypes, toxin gene types and epidemiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, M; Allerberger, F; Manafi, M; Lindner, G; Friedrich, A W; Sonntag, A-K; Foissy, H

    2004-01-01

    One hundred and ten clinical Escherichia coli isolates of serovar O157 (n = 102) and O26 (n = 8) were characterized for the presence of putative virulence genes by PCR. All but one of these isolates contained the eae gene. The EHEC-hly gene could be detected in all E. coli O157 and in 50% of E. coli

  12. Attaching and effacing Escherichia coli isolates from Danish children: clinical significance and microbiological characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, C; Ethelberg, S; Olesen, B

    2007-01-01

    This study describes the prevalence, clinical manifestations and microbiological characteristics of attaching and effacing Escherichia coli isolates, i.e., enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) belonging to the classical EPEC serotypes, non-EPEC attaching and effacing E. coli (A/EEC) and verocytotoxin...

  13. Characterization of pathogenic Escherichia coli isolated from humans in Austria : phenotypes, toxin gene types and epidemiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, M; Allerberger, F; Manafi, M; Lindner, G; Friedrich, A W; Sonntag, A-K; Foissy, H

    2004-01-01

    One hundred and ten clinical Escherichia coli isolates of serovar O157 (n = 102) and O26 (n = 8) were characterized for the presence of putative virulence genes by PCR. All but one of these isolates contained the eae gene. The EHEC-hly gene could be detected in all E. coli O157 and in 50% of E. coli

  14. The comprehensive updated regulatory network of Escherichia coli K-12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karp Peter D

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli is the model organism for which our knowledge of its regulatory network is the most extensive. Over the last few years, our project has been collecting and curating the literature concerning E. coli transcription initiation and operons, providing in both the RegulonDB and EcoCyc databases the largest electronically encoded network available. A paper published recently by Ma et al. (2004 showed several differences in the versions of the network present in these two databases. Discrepancies have been corrected, annotations from this and other groups (Shen-Orr et al., 2002 have been added, making the RegulonDB and EcoCyc databases the largest comprehensive and constantly curated regulatory network of E. coli K-12. Results Several groups have been using these curated data as part of their bioinformatics and systems biology projects, in combination with external data obtained from other sources, thus enlarging the dataset initially obtained from either RegulonDB or EcoCyc of the E. coli K12 regulatory network. We kindly obtained from the groups of Uri Alon and Hong-Wu Ma the interactions they have added to enrich their public versions of the E. coli regulatory network. These were used to search for original references and curate them with the same standards we use regularly, adding in several cases the original references (instead of reviews or missing references, as well as adding the corresponding experimental evidence codes. We also corrected all discrepancies in the two databases available as explained below. Conclusion One hundred and fifty new interactions have been added to our databases as a result of this specific curation effort, in addition to those added as a result of our continuous curation work. RegulonDB gene names are now based on those of EcoCyc to avoid confusion due to gene names and synonyms, and the public releases of RegulonDB and EcoCyc are henceforth synchronized to avoid confusion due to

  15. Isobutyraldehyde production from Escherichia coli by removing aldehyde reductase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodriguez Gabriel M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing global demand and reliance on petroleum-derived chemicals will necessitate alternative sources for chemical feedstocks. Currently, 99% of chemical feedstocks are derived from petroleum and natural gas. Renewable methods for producing important chemical feedstocks largely remain unaddressed. Synthetic biology enables the renewable production of various chemicals from microorganisms by constructing unique metabolic pathways. Here, we engineer Escherichia coli for the production of isobutyraldehyde, which can be readily converted to various hydrocarbons currently derived from petroleum such as isobutyric acid, acetal, oxime and imine using existing chemical catalysis. Isobutyraldehyde can be readily stripped from cultures during production, which reduces toxic effects of isobutyraldehyde. Results We adopted the isobutanol pathway previously constructed in E. coli, neglecting the last step in the pathway where isobutyraldehyde is converted to isobutanol. However, this strain still overwhelmingly produced isobutanol (1.5 g/L/OD600 (isobutanol vs 0.14 g/L/OD600 (isobutyraldehyde. Next, we deleted yqhD which encodes a broad-substrate range aldehyde reductase known to be active toward isobutyraldehyde. This strain produced isobutanol and isobutyraldehyde at a near 1:1 ratio, indicating further native isobutyraldehyde reductase (IBR activity in E. coli. To further eliminate isobutanol formation, we set out to identify and remove the remaining IBRs from the E. coli genome. We identified 7 annotated genes coding for IBRs that could be active toward isobutyraldehyde: adhP, eutG, yiaY, yjgB, betA, fucO, eutE. Individual deletions of the genes yielded only marginal improvements. Therefore, we sequentially deleted all seven of the genes and assessed production. The combined deletions greatly increased isobutyraldehyde production (1.5 g/L/OD600 and decreased isobutanol production (0.4 g/L/OD600. By assessing production by

  16. SILAC-based comparative analysis of pathogenic Escherichia coli secretomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boysen, Anders; Borch, Jonas; Krogh, Thøger Jensen; Hjernø, Karin; Møller-Jensen, Jakob

    2015-09-01

    Comparative studies of pathogenic bacteria and their non-pathogenic counterparts has led to the discovery of important virulence factors thereby generating insight into mechanisms of pathogenesis. Protein-based antigens for vaccine development are primarily selected among unique virulence-related factors produced by the pathogen of interest. However, recent work indicates that proteins that are not unique to the pathogen but instead selectively expressed compared to its non-pathogenic counterpart could also be vaccine candidates or targets for drug development. Modern methods in quantitative proteome analysis have the potential to discover both classes of proteins and hence form an important tool for discovering therapeutic targets. Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) and Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) are pathogenic variants of E. coli which cause intestinal disease in humans. AIEC is associated with Crohn's disease (CD), a chronic inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract whereas ETEC is the major cause of human diarrhea which affects hundreds of millions annually. In spite of the disease burden associated with these pathogens, effective vaccines conferring long-term protection are still needed. In order to identify proteins with therapeutic potential, we have used mass spectrometry-based Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino acids in Cell culture (SILAC) quantitative proteomics method which allows us to compare the proteomes of pathogenic strains to commensal E. coli. In this study, we grew the pathogenic strains ETEC H10407, AIEC LF82 and the non-pathogenic reference strain E. coli K-12 MG1655 in parallel and used SILAC to compare protein levels in OMVs and culture supernatant. We have identified well-known virulence factors from both AIEC and ETEC, thus validating our experimental approach. In addition we find proteins that are not unique to the pathogenic strains but expressed at levels different from the commensal strain, including the

  17. Alpha-hemolysin from Escherichia coli uses endogenous amplification through P2X receptor activation to induce hemolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skals, Marianne; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Leipziger, Jens;

    2009-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the dominant facultative bacterium in the normal intestinal flora. E. coli is, however, also responsible for the majority of serious extraintestinal infections. There are distinct serotypical differences between facultative and invasive E. coli strains. Invasive strains...

  18. Resistance patterns, prevalence, and predictors of fluoroquinolones resistance in multidrug resistant tuberculosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Nafees; Javaid, Arshad; Sulaiman, Syed Azhar Syed; Ming, Long Chiau; Ahmad, Izaz; Khan, Amer Hayat

    2016-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones are the backbone of multidrug resistant tuberculosis treatment regimens. Despite the high burden of multidrug resistant tuberculosis in the country, little is known about drug resistance patterns, prevalence, and predictors of fluoroquinolones resistance among multidrug resistant tuberculosis patients from Pakistan. To evaluate drug resistance patterns, prevalence, and predictors of fluoroquinolones resistance in multidrug resistant tuberculosis patients. This was a cross-sectional study conducted at a programmatic management unit of drug resistant tuberculosis, Lady Reading Hospital Peshawar, Pakistan. Two hundred and forty-three newly diagnosed multidrug resistant tuberculosis patients consecutively enrolled for treatment at study site from January 1, 2012 to July 28, 2013 were included in the study. A standardized data collection form was used to collect patients' socio-demographic, microbiological, and clinical data. SPSS 16 was used for data analysis. High degree of drug resistance (median 5 drugs, range 2-8) was observed. High proportion of patients was resistant to all five first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs (62.6%), and more than half were resistant to second line drugs (55.1%). The majority of the patients were ofloxacin resistant (52.7%). Upon multivariate analysis previous tuberculosis treatment at private (OR=1.953, p=0.034) and public private mix (OR=2.824, p=0.046) sectors were predictors of ofloxacin resistance. The high degree of drug resistance observed, particularly to fluoroquinolones, is alarming. We recommend the adoption of more restrictive policies to control non-prescription sale of fluoroquinolones, its rational use by physicians, and training doctors in both private and public-private mix sectors to prevent further increase in fluoroquinolones resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Resistance patterns, prevalence, and predictors of fluoroquinolones resistance in multidrug resistant tuberculosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafees Ahmad

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluoroquinolones are the backbone of multidrug resistant tuberculosis treatment regimens. Despite the high burden of multidrug resistant tuberculosis in the country, little is known about drug resistance patterns, prevalence, and predictors of fluoroquinolones resistance among multidrug resistant tuberculosis patients from Pakistan. Objective To evaluate drug resistance patterns, prevalence, and predictors of fluoroquinolones resistance in multidrug resistant tuberculosis patients. Methods This was a cross-sectional study conducted at a programmatic management unit of drug resistant tuberculosis, Lady Reading Hospital Peshawar, Pakistan. Two hundred and forty-three newly diagnosed multidrug resistant tuberculosis patients consecutively enrolled for treatment at study site from January 1, 2012 to July 28, 2013 were included in the study. A standardized data collection form was used to collect patients’ socio-demographic, microbiological, and clinical data. SPSS 16 was used for data analysis. Results High degree of drug resistance (median 5 drugs, range 2–8 was observed. High proportion of patients was resistant to all five first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs (62.6%, and more than half were resistant to second line drugs (55.1%. The majority of the patients were ofloxacin resistant (52.7%. Upon multivariate analysis previous tuberculosis treatment at private (OR = 1.953, p = 0.034 and public private mix (OR = 2.824, p = 0.046 sectors were predictors of ofloxacin resistance. Conclusion The high degree of drug resistance observed, particularly to fluoroquinolones, is alarming. We recommend the adoption of more restrictive policies to control non-prescription sale of fluoroquinolones, its rational use by physicians, and training doctors in both private and public–private mix sectors to prevent further increase in fluoroquinolones resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains.

  20. Molecular characterization of fluoroquinolone resistance in nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig, Carmen; Tirado-Vélez, José Manuel; Calatayud, Laura; Tubau, Fe; Garmendia, Junkal; Ardanuy, Carmen; Marti, Sara; de la Campa, Adela G; Liñares, Josefina

    2015-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a common cause of respiratory infections in adults, who are frequently treated with fluoroquinolones. The aims of this study were to characterize the genotypes of fluoroquinolone-resistant NTHi isolates and their mechanisms of resistance. Among 7,267 H. influenzae isolates collected from adult patients from 2000 to 2013, 28 (0.39%) were ciprofloxacin resistant according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) criteria. In addition, a nalidixic acid screening during 2010 to 2013 detected five (0.23%) isolates that were ciprofloxacin susceptible but nalidixic acid resistant. Sequencing of their quinolone resistance-determining regions and genotyping by pulse-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing of the 25 ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates available and all 5 nalidixic acid-resistant isolates were performed. In the NTHi isolates studied, two mutations producing changes in two GyrA residues (Ser84, Asp88) and/or two ParC residues (Ser84, Glu88) were associated with increased fluoroquinolone MICs. Strains with one or two mutations (n = 15) had ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin MICs of 0.12 to 2 μg/ml, while those with three or more mutations (n = 15) had MICs of 4 to 16 μg/ml. Long persistence of fluoroquinolone-resistant strains was observed in three chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. High genetic diversity was observed among fluoroquinolone-resistant NTHi isolates. Although fluoroquinolones are commonly used to treat respiratory infections, the proportion of resistant NTHi isolates remains low. The nalidixic acid disk test is useful for detecting the first changes in GyrA or in GyrA plus ParC among fluoroquinolone-susceptible strains that are at a potential risk for the development of resistance under selective pressure by fluoroquinolone treatment. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Correlation between virulence genotype and fluoroquinolone resistance in carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hye Hyun; Kwon, Kye Chul; Kim, Semi; Koo, Sun Hoe

    2014-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a clinically important pathogen that causes opportunistic infections and nosocomial outbreaks. Recently, the type III secretion system (TTSS) has been shown to play an important role in the virulence of P. aeruginosa. ExoU, in particular, has the greatest impact on disease severity. We examined the relationship among the TTSS effector genotype (exoS and exoU), fluoroquinolone resistance, and target site mutations in 66 carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa strains. Sixty-six carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa strains were collected from patients in a university hospital in Daejeon, Korea, from January 2008 to May 2012. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin) were determined by using the agar dilution method. We used PCR and sequencing to determine the TTSS effector genotype and quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of the respective target genes gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE. A higher proportion of exoU+ strains were fluoroquinolone-resistant than exoS+ strains (93.2%, 41/44 vs. 45.0%, 9/20; P≤0.0001). Additionally, exoU+ strains were more likely to carry combined mutations than exoS+ strains (97.6%, 40/41 vs. 70%, 7/10; P=0.021), and MIC increased as the number of active mutations increased. The recent overuse of fluoroquinolone has led to both increased resistance and enhanced virulence of carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa. These data indicate a specific relationship among exoU genotype, fluoroquinolone resistance, and resistance-conferring mutations.

  2. Characterization of fluoroquinolone resistance and qnr diversity in Enterobacteriaceae from municipal biosolids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ella eKaplan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Municipal biosolids produced during activated sludge treatment applied in waste water treatment plants, are significant reservoirs of antibiotic resistance, since they assemble both natural and fecal microbiota, as well as residual concentrations of antibiotic compounds. This raises major concerns regarding the environmental and epidemiological consequences of using them as fertilizers for crops. The second generation fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin is probably the most abundant antibiotic compound detected in municipal biosolids due to its widespread use and sorption properties. Although fluoroquinolone resistance was originally thought to result from mutations in bacterial gyrase and topoisomerase IV genes, it is becoming apparent that it is also attributed to plasmid-associated resistance factors, which may propagate environmental antibiotic resistance. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of the activated sludge process on fluoroquinolone resistance. The scope of resistances and mobile genetic mechanisms associated with fluoroquinolone resistance were evaluated by screening large collections of ciprofloxacin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae strains from sludge (n=112 and from raw sewage (n=89. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants (qnrA, B and S were readily detected in isolates from both environments, the most dominant being qnrS. Interestingly, all qnr variants were significantly more abundant in sludge isolates than in the isolates from raw sewage. Almost all of ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates were resistant to multiple antibiotic compounds. The sludge isolates were on the whole resistant to a broader range of antibiotic compounds than the raw sewage isolates; however this difference was not statistically significant. Collectively, this study indicates that the activated sludge selects for multiresistant bacterial strains, and that mobile quinolone-resistance elements may have a selective advantage in the activated

  3. Plasmolysis during the division cycle of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olijhoek, A J; Van Eden, C G; Trueba, F J; Pas, E; Nanninga, N

    1982-10-01

    Cells of Escherichia coli were plasmolyzed with sucrose. They were classified according to length by way of electron micrographs taken from samples prepared by agar filtration. The percentage of plasmolyzed cells increased about two- and threefold between mean cell sizes of newborn and separating cells. However, dividing cells were less frequently plasmolyzed than nondividing cells of the same length class. Analysis of cell halves (prospective daughters) in dividing cells showed that they behaved as independent cellular units with respect to plasmolysis. The results indicate that compressibility of the protoplast (given a certain plasmolysis space) is inversely related to cell size. That a dividing cell does not react as one osmotic compartment to osmotic stress may suggest that cell size-dependent strength of the cell membrane-cell wall association, rather than variation in turgor, plays a role during the cell division cycle.

  4. SOS response induces persistence to fluoroquinolones in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Dörr

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria can survive antibiotic treatment without acquiring heritable antibiotic resistance. We investigated persistence to the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin in Escherichia coli. Our data show that a majority of persisters to ciprofloxacin were formed upon exposure to the antibiotic, in a manner dependent on the SOS gene network. These findings reveal an active and inducible mechanism of persister formation mediated by the SOS response, challenging the prevailing view that persisters are pre-existing and formed purely by stochastic means. SOS-induced persistence is a novel mechanism by which cells can counteract DNA damage and promote survival to fluoroquinolones. This unique survival mechanism may be an important factor influencing the outcome of antibiotic therapy in vivo.

  5. Structure of the Cyclomodulin Cif from Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yun; Jubelin, Gregory; Taieb, Frédéric; Nougayrède, Jean-Philippe; Oswald, Eric; Stebbins, C. Erec

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens have evolved a sophisticated arsenal of virulence factors to modulate host cell biology. Enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EPEC and EHEC) use a type III protein secretion system (T3SS) to inject microbial proteins into host cells. The T3SS effector cycle inhibiting factor (Cif) produced by EPEC and EHEC is able to block host eukaryotic cell-cycle progression. We present here a crystal structure of Cif, revealing it to be a divergent member of the superfamily of enzymes including cysteine proteases and acetyltransferases that share a common catalytic triad. Mutation of these conserved active site residues abolishes the ability of Cif to block cell-cycle progression. Finally, we demonstrate that irreversible cysteine protease inhibitors do not abolish the Cif cytopathic effect, suggesting that another enzymatic activity may underlie the biological activity of this virulence factor. PMID:18845161

  6. Structure of the Cyclomodulin Cif from Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Y.; Jubelin, G; Taieb, F; Nougayrède, J; Oswald, E; Stebbins, C

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens have evolved a sophisticated arsenal of virulence factors to modulate host cell biology. Enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EPEC and EHEC) use a type III protein secretion system (T3SS) to inject microbial proteins into host cells. The T3SS effector cycle inhibiting factor (Cif) produced by EPEC and EHEC is able to block host eukaryotic cell-cycle progression. We present here a crystal structure of Cif, revealing it to be a divergent member of the superfamily of enzymes including cysteine proteases and acetyltransferases that share a common catalytic triad. Mutation of these conserved active site residues abolishes the ability of Cif to block cell-cycle progression. Finally, we demonstrate that irreversible cysteine protease inhibitors do not abolish the Cif cytopathic effect, suggesting that another enzymatic activity may underlie the biological activity of this virulence factor.

  7. Glutathione production by recombinant Escherichia coli expressing bifunctional glutathione synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dezheng; Wang, Cheng; Wu, Hui; Li, Zhimin; Ye, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is an important bioactive substance applied widely in pharmaceutical and food industries. Due to the strong product inhibition in the GSH biosynthetic pathway, high levels of intracellular content, yield and productivity of GSH are difficult to achieve. Recently, a novel bifunctional GSH synthetase was identified to be less sensitive to GSH. A recombinant Escherichia coli strain expressing gshF encoding the bifunctional glutathione synthetase of Streptococcus thermophilus was constructed for GSH production. In this study, efficient GSH production using this engineered strain was investigated. The cultivation process was optimized by controlling dissolved oxygen (DO), amino acid addition and glucose feeding. 36.8 mM (11.3 g/L) GSH were formed at a productivity of 2.06 mM/h when the amino acid precursors (75 mM each) were added and glucose was supplied as the sole carbon and energy source.

  8. Dynamics of Escherichia coli chromosome segregation during multifork replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Henrik J; Youngren, Brenda; Hansen, Flemming G; Austin, Stuart

    2007-12-01

    Slowly growing Escherichia coli cells have a simple cell cycle, with replication and progressive segregation of the chromosome completed before cell division. In rapidly growing cells, initiation of replication occurs before the previous replication rounds are complete. At cell division, the chromosomes contain multiple replication forks and must be segregated while this complex pattern of replication is still ongoing. Here, we show that replication and segregation continue in step, starting at the origin and progressing to the replication terminus. Thus, early-replicated markers on the multiple-branched chromosomes continue to separate soon after replication to form separate protonucleoids, even though they are not segregated into different daughter cells until later generations. The segregation pattern follows the pattern of chromosome replication and does not follow the cell division cycle. No extensive cohesion of sister DNA regions was seen at any growth rate. We conclude that segregation is driven by the progression of the replication forks.

  9. Dynamics of Escherichia coli Chromosome Segregation during Multifork Replication▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Henrik J.; Youngren, Brenda; Hansen, Flemming G.; Austin, Stuart

    2007-01-01

    Slowly growing Escherichia coli cells have a simple cell cycle, with replication and progressive segregation of the chromosome completed before cell division. In rapidly growing cells, initiation of replication occurs before the previous replication rounds are complete. At cell division, the chromosomes contain multiple replication forks and must be segregated while this complex pattern of replication is still ongoing. Here, we show that replication and segregation continue in step, starting at the origin and progressing to the replication terminus. Thus, early-replicated markers on the multiple-branched chromosomes continue to separate soon after replication to form separate protonucleoids, even though they are not segregated into different daughter cells until later generations. The segregation pattern follows the pattern of chromosome replication and does not follow the cell division cycle. No extensive cohesion of sister DNA regions was seen at any growth rate. We conclude that segregation is driven by the progression of the replication forks. PMID:17905986

  10. Combinatorial method for overexpression of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leviatan, Shani; Sawada, Keisuke; Moriyama, Yoshinori; Nelson, Nathan

    2010-07-30

    Membrane proteins constitute 20-30% of all proteins encoded by the genome of various organisms. Large amounts of purified proteins are required for activity and crystallization attempts. Thus, there is an unmet need for a heterologous membrane protein overexpression system for purification, crystallization, and activity determination. We developed a combinatorial method for overexpressing and purifying membrane proteins using Escherichia coli. This method utilizes short hydrophilic bacterial proteins, YaiN and YbeL, fused to the ends of the membrane proteins to serve as facilitating factors for expression and purification. Fourteen prokaryotic and mammalian membrane proteins were expressed using this system. Moderate to high expression was obtained for most proteins, and detergent solubilization combined with a short purification process produced stable, monodispersed membrane proteins. Five of the mammalian membrane proteins, overexpressed using our system, were reconstituted into liposomes and exhibited transport activity comparable with the native transporters.

  11. Combinatorial Method for Overexpression of Membrane Proteins in Escherichia coli*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leviatan, Shani; Sawada, Keisuke; Moriyama, Yoshinori; Nelson, Nathan

    2010-01-01

    Membrane proteins constitute 20–30% of all proteins encoded by the genome of various organisms. Large amounts of purified proteins are required for activity and crystallization attempts. Thus, there is an unmet need for a heterologous membrane protein overexpression system for purification, crystallization, and activity determination. We developed a combinatorial method for overexpressing and purifying membrane proteins using Escherichia coli. This method utilizes short hydrophilic bacterial proteins, YaiN and YbeL, fused to the ends of the membrane proteins to serve as facilitating factors for expression and purification. Fourteen prokaryotic and mammalian membrane proteins were expressed using this system. Moderate to high expression was obtained for most proteins, and detergent solubilization combined with a short purification process produced stable, monodispersed membrane proteins. Five of the mammalian membrane proteins, overexpressed using our system, were reconstituted into liposomes and exhibited transport activity comparable with the native transporters. PMID:20525689

  12. Structure of the cyclomodulin Cif from pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yun; Jubelin, Gregory; Taieb, Frédéric; Nougayrède, Jean-Philippe; Oswald, Eric; Stebbins, C Erec

    2008-12-12

    Bacterial pathogens have evolved a sophisticated arsenal of virulence factors to modulate host cell biology. Enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EPEC and EHEC) use a type III protein secretion system (T3SS) to inject microbial proteins into host cells. The T3SS effector cycle inhibiting factor (Cif) produced by EPEC and EHEC is able to block host eukaryotic cell-cycle progression. We present here a crystal structure of Cif, revealing it to be a divergent member of the superfamily of enzymes including cysteine proteases and acetyltransferases that share a common catalytic triad. Mutation of these conserved active site residues abolishes the ability of Cif to block cell-cycle progression. Finally, we demonstrate that irreversible cysteine protease inhibitors do not abolish the Cif cytopathic effect, suggesting that another enzymatic activity may underlie the biological activity of this virulence factor.

  13. Combined ozone and ultraviolet inactivation of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magbanua, Benjamin S; Savant, Gaurav; Truax, Dennis D

    2006-01-01

    The kinetics of Escherichia coli inactivation using ozone and ultraviolet (UV) radiation, separately and simultaneously, was evaluated at 25 degrees C in buffered (pH 6.0, 7.0 and 8.0), demand-free media. While ozone was found to be a stronger disinfectant than UV radiation, using both simultaneously was more effective than using them individually. Inactivation kinetics was pseudo first-order for the three treatment processes, while the disinfection rate was a linear function of the disinfectant dose. The synergism observed in microbial inactivation when the disinfectant processes were combined was illustrated by estimates of kinetic model parameters. This synergy was attributed to the generation of hydroxyl radicals via ozone photolysis. Subsequently, dosage calculations, as based on disinfectant level and exposure time, indicated that the simultaneous use of UV and ozone could substantially reduce their individual doses.

  14. Protein abundance profiling of the Escherichia coli cytosol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ishihama, Y.; Schmidt, T.; Rappsilber, J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Knowledge about the abundance of molecular components is an important prerequisite for building quantitative predictive models of cellular behavior. Proteins are central components of these models, since they carry out most of the fundamental processes in the cell. Thus far, protein...... sample. Using a combination of LC-MS/MS approaches with protein and peptide fractionation steps we identified 1103 proteins from the cytosolic fraction of the Escherichia coli strain MC4100. A measure of abundance is presented for each of the identified proteins, based on the recently developed em......PAI approach which takes into account the number of sequenced peptides per protein. The values of abundance are within a broad range and accurately reflect independently measured copy numbers per cell. As expected, the most abundant proteins were those involved in protein synthesis, most notably ribosomal...

  15. Collective motion in an active suspension of Escherichia coli bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gachelin, J.; Rousselet, A.; Lindner, A.; Clement, E.

    2014-02-01

    We investigate experimentally the emergence of collective motion in the bulk of an active suspension of Escherichia coli bacteria. When increasing the concentration from a dilute to a semi-dilute regime, we observe a continuous crossover from a dynamical cluster regime to a regime of ‘bio-turbulence’ convection patterns. We measure a length scale characterizing the collective motion as a function of the bacteria concentration. For bacteria fully supplied with oxygen, the increase of the correlation length is almost linear with concentration and at the largest concentrations tested, the correlation length could be as large as 24 bacterial body sizes (or 7-8 when including the flagella bundle). In contrast, under conditions of oxygen shortage the correlation length saturates at a value of around 7 body lengths.

  16. Escherichia coli activity characterization using a laser dynamic speckle technique

    CERN Document Server

    Ramírez-Miquet, Evelio E; Contreras-Alarcón, Orestes R

    2012-01-01

    The results of applying a laser dynamic speckle technique to characterize bacterial activity are presented. The speckle activity was detected in two-compartment Petri dishes. One compartment was inoculated and the other one was left as a control blank. The speckled images were processed by the recently reported temporal difference method. Three inoculums of 0.3, 0.5, and 0.7 McFarland units of cell concentration were tested; each inoculum was tested twice for a total of six experiments. The dependences on time of the mean activity, the standard deviation of activity and other descriptors of the speckle pattern evolution were calculated for both the inoculated compartment and the blank. In conclusion the proposed dynamic speckle technique allows characterizing the activity of Escherichia coli bacteria in solid medium.

  17. The folding characteristics of tryptophanase from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizobata, T; Kawata, Y

    1995-02-01

    The unfolding and refolding characteristics of Escherichia coli tryptophanase (tryptophan indole-lyase) [EC 4.1.99.1] in guanidine hydrochloride were studied. Tryptophanase unfolded by first dissociating its coenzyme, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, from the active site. This dissociation caused a significant destabilization of structure, and global unfolding of the protein followed. During this global unfolding step, an intermediate was formed which had a strong tendency to aggregate irreversibly, as detected by light scattering experiments. Tryptophanase was unable to refold quantitatively after unfolding in 4 M guanidine hydrochloride. The low refolding yield was due to non-specific aggregation which occurs during refolding. Various conditions which limited this aggregation were probed, and it was found that by initiating the refolding reaction at low temperature, the aggregation of tryptophanase folding intermediates during the reaction could be avoided to a certain extent, and the refolding yield improved.

  18. Structure and mechanism of the lactose permease of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Jeff; Smirnova, Irina; Kasho, Vladimir; Verner, Gillian; Kaback, H Ronald; Iwata, So

    2003-08-01

    Membrane transport proteins that transduce free energy stored in electrochemical ion gradients into a concentration gradient are a major class of membrane proteins. We report the crystal structure at 3.5 angstroms of the Escherichia coli lactose permease, an intensively studied member of the major facilitator superfamily of transporters. The molecule is composed of N- and C-terminal domains, each with six transmembrane helices, symmetrically positioned within the permease. A large internal hydrophilic cavity open to the cytoplasmic side represents the inward-facing conformation of the transporter. The structure with a bound lactose homolog, beta-D-galactopyranosyl-1-thio-beta-D-galactopyranoside, reveals the sugar-binding site in the cavity, and residues that play major roles in substrate recognition and proton translocation are identified. We propose a possible mechanism for lactose/proton symport (co-transport) consistent with both the structure and a large body of experimental data.

  19. Programming a Pavlovian-like conditioning circuit in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haoqian; Lin, Min; Shi, Handuo; Ji, Weiyue; Huang, Longwen; Zhang, Xiaomeng; Shen, Shan; Gao, Rencheng; Wu, Shuke; Tian, Chengzhe; Yang, Zhenglin; Zhang, Guosheng; He, Siheng; Wang, Hao; Saw, Tiffany; Chen, Yiwei; Ouyang, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic genetic circuits are programmed in living cells to perform predetermined cellular functions. However, designing higher-order genetic circuits for sophisticated cellular activities remains a substantial challenge. Here we program a genetic circuit that executes Pavlovian-like conditioning, an archetypical sequential-logic function, in Escherichia coli. The circuit design is first specified by the subfunctions that are necessary for the single simultaneous conditioning, and is further genetically implemented using four function modules. During this process, quantitative analysis is applied to the optimization of the modules and fine-tuning of the interconnections. Analogous to classical Pavlovian conditioning, the resultant circuit enables the cells to respond to a certain stimulus only after a conditioning process. We show that, although the conditioning is digital in single cells, a dynamically progressive conditioning process emerges at the population level. This circuit, together with its rational design strategy, is a key step towards the implementation of more sophisticated cellular computing.

  20. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Epigenetically Manipulate Host Cell Death Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengguo; Wang, Ming; Eisel, Florian; Tchatalbachev, Svetlin; Chakraborty, Trinad; Meinhardt, Andreas; Bhushan, Sudhanshu

    2016-04-01

    Urinary tract infections caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) pathovars belong to the most frequent infections in human. It is well established that UPEC can subvert innate immune responses, but the role of UPEC in interfering with host cell death pathways is not known. Here, we show that UPEC abrogates activation of the host cell prosurvival protein kinase B signaling pathway, which results in the activation of mammalian forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factors. Although FOXOs were localized in the nucleus and showed increased DNA-binding activity, no change in the expression levels of FOXO target genes were observed. UPEC can suppress BIM expression induced by LY249002, which results in attenuation of caspase 3 activation and blockage of apoptosis. Mechanistically, BIM expression appears to be epigenetically silenced by a decrease in histone 4 acetylation at the BIM promoter site. Taken together, these results suggest that UPEC can epigenetically silence BIM expression, a molecular switch that prevents apoptosis.